Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
{T)

Pim blowin’ it

91F
70F

FSTORM IN

HIGH
LOW

“oe SPORTS

Volume: 105 No.205







HESS a r

Marital rape:






BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009



R CLASSIFIEDS TRADER

A nation divided

Heated debate over
law change issue

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

CONTROVERSY over the
proposed outlaw of marital
rape has divided the communi-
ty as men argue against the
removal of their safeguards in
order to give more protection
to women.

Heated discussion over the
issue continued on Wendell
Jones’ Love 97FM talk show
yesterday as Minister of Labour
and Social Development Loret-
ta Butler-Turner, Crisis Centre
director Sandra Dean-Patter-
son, and Pastor Barrington
Brennen responded to callers’
queries about the proposed leg-
islation.

Mrs Butler-Turner tabled a
bill to amend the Sexual
Offences Act in Parliament last
week to reform current legis-
lation and uphold the rights of
the individual set out in United
Nations conventions by mak-
ing rape within marriage ille-

al.

: But religious leaders and
those who believe marriage
allows for a wife’s physical ‘sub-
mission’ to her husband have
shown difficulty in understand-
ing the reality of rape in the
context of the marriage.

Pastor Cedric Moss of King-
dom Life Church has said
forced intercourse within a non-

estranged marriage should be
considered some other punish-
able crime other than rape
between strangers.

And a male caller said: “The
law that the minister is trying to
push to the table goes against
the vows of marriage.”

Another asked: “If a hus-
band makes a wife mad and she
says she won’t give him sex for
a week and he takes it can you
report it as rape?”

When this was confirmed, he
said: “Well if that’s correct this
must be the height of stupidity,
and all those persons involved
in it should be put in that cate-
gory as well!”

The panel strived to explain
how rape is a violent act regard-
less of the perpetrator, and cit-
ed examples of married women
who have been subjected to
horrific sexual abuse by their
husbands.

Mrs Butler-Turner said a
woman called to thank her for
putting the bill forward because
rape was a part of her daily
married life.

The minister explained: “She
said, ‘every night I would come
home from work and my hus-
band would rip my clothing off
and he would violate me, beat
me up, and have sex with me.’
Obviously that was his way of
using her as an object, as

SEE page three

*

DOUBLE
STACKER

st retzull tfaybaney a tegee |
fateliteliepcparicil) Flagg tyayel Seegiill ey de tes



es
=
I
s
oa)
fab)
=
=
2
re
=
5)
a
S
=
‘o
=5
o
ira

applications
for national

programme

23-YEAR-OLD Police Constable Elvin Sanjay McClain is
shown leaving Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

A POLICE Constable accused of extortion was arraigned
in Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Constable Elvin Sanjay McClain, 23, of Garden Hills,
appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court
1, Bank Lane yesterday on the extortion charge.

It is alleged that McClain on Thursday, May 21, extorted
$1,100 from Stephanie Glinton knowing that he was not law-
fully authorised to do so. McClain, who was represented by
lawyer Romona Farquharson, pleaded not guilty to the
extortion charge.

Sgt Sean Thurston, the prosecutor, did not object to

SEE page 10



Seaboard
marines hold
anti-smuggling
exercises

SEABOARD Marines
conducted three joint anti-
smuggling exercises at its

Over 1,000

training

AS OF 5pm Tuesday

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

OBITUARIES

and RELIGION
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE








The Tribune =

=USA TODAY.

~.. Available at

The Paint Depot
Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875










per
REL uss

The Tribune launches
Passport to Paradise
Miss Universe edition

Felipé Major

president and managing
director of Kerzner
Bahamas Limited, receives
the latest Passport to Par-
adise Miss Universe edition
from The Tribune’s Jenny
Pinder, managing editor of
the magazine.

THE TRIBUNE has
launched the fourth edi-
tion of its Passport to Paradise magazine — Miss Universe
Edition — once more distributing it room-to-room at
Atlantis and nearby marinas, The Hilton, various hotels
on Cable Beach such as Sandals and the Sheraton and
high-end boutique hotels in the Out Islands.

This latest edition features interviews with Miss Uni-
verse 2008 Dayana Mendoza (Venezuela), Miss USA
Kristen Dalton as well as the Bahamas’ very own Kiara
Sherman and other Bahamian beauty queens.

There are also articles focusing on dining out in the
Bahamas, going green, beauty tips and the local upswing
in the real estate market.

Passport to Paradise magazine managing editor Jenny
Pinder says of the latest issue: “The Miss Universe edition
was a lot of hard work and fun. It was obvious we need-
ed to dedicate an entire issue to this prestigious once-in-
a-lifetime event.

“The opportunity to showcase the Bahamas to all the
world had advertisers jumping at the chance to be a part
of it.”

Assault charges withdrawn against
former MP and former union executive

ASSAULT charges were
withdrawn yesterday against
attorney and former MP
Keod Smith and former
Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union exec-
utive Basil McKenzie.

The charges stemmed from
an incident at Workers House
in May. Smith, 45, who is the
legal representative for the
BHCAWU executive coun-



=O) RS SEE page nine

some 1,100 applications had
been collected from Urban
Renewal Centres and the
Department of Labour
offices in New Providence
and Grand Bahama for the
National Training and
Empowerment Programme,
Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes said yesterday.

The programme was con-
ceived by government to

SEE page eight

loading dock compound on
West Bay Street yesterday.

Utilising a modified con-
tainer, which was outfitted
with a list of hidden com-
partments, security experts
showed personnel how to
conduct a seven-point
inspection of the unit
before it can be sealed and
shipped off to another des-
tination.

SEE page nine

Chamber of Commerce president
unofficially backs local lottery

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Chamber of Com-
merce’s President Khaalis
Rolle has unofficially come
out in support of legalizing a
local lottery, charging that the

Plaid Skirts Starting @

Plain Skirts Starting @

Jumpers Starting @
Whlte & Assorted Colours Shirts

& Blouses Starting
Monogram Shirts/blouses



NASSAU AND BAHAMAVISEANDS:

LEADING NEWSPAPER

debate surrounding this issue
needs to be raised above the
emotional “nonsensical” lev-
el.

Stressing that the entire
membership of the Chamber
has yet to be canvassed on the

SEE page 10





PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Church, community leaders speak on marital rape law

Community and church leaders weigh
in on the proposed amendment to the
Sexual Offences Act which would
make marital rape illegal.

Janet Bostwick, first
woman elected as a Member
of Parliament in the Bahamas
and former Cabinet Minister

“T think it’s most definitely
long overdue. I can under-
stand the concern from cer-
tain bodies, particularly with





regard to the expression of
concern by certain pastors.
“Perhaps if they had sat in
my chair in which I sat for a
number of years as a female
lawyer and heard the horren-
dous stories of forced rape of
spouses; men forcing their
wives to do unnatural sexual

Colina General







Insurance Agency

WE ARE MOVING

To Our Valued Clients:








We wish to advise that Colina General
Insurance Agency will be relocating to







12 Village Road North

EFFECTIVE 4 AUGUST 2009.







You will

be able to make premium

payments at any of these Colina General






locations:

Oakes Field in the Nassau Guardian





Bldg;

Colinalmperial at Rosetta Street;
Bahama Life & Property located in the
Henry F. Storr Building on Mackey







Street;

And at our new location at 12 Village






Road North.

Our telephone number, 325-3809,
will remain the same.






MORE LOCATIONS
TO SERVE YOU BETTER!















acts and intercourse; forcing
them in circumstances where
the husband is inebriated, and
forcing them after informing
them that they have come
from being with some other
person, and demanding their
right.

“There’s a need for this act,
and certainly it’s meant to
cover instances where wives
may say ‘no’ when they don’t
mean it, but even a wife has
the right to say ‘no’.

“T believe that the thinking
goes back to the wives being
considered property, and I
don’t believe that was ever
intended by God.

“We are to treat each other
with respect and dignity and
concern, and I believe that if
some more full consideration
was given to (the amend-
ment), it will gain support.

“T think they are opposing
it because they are looking at
it as husband and wife being
one, and their bodies belong-
ing to each other, and a wife
in particular, belonging to her
husband.

“And it really has been
used to justify abuse so I’m
very pleased that the law is at
last being brought in.

“T believe it will grow to
where we respect each other
and treat each other as having
our own individual rights, and
that includes the right to say
‘no’.

“T have been so aware of
the concept and given legal
advice to women who have
suffered the greatest abuse
and sexual abuse, more hor-
rendous than pastors would
like to believe, of husbands
exercising their right.

“T cannot say that it’s pro-
lific, but I think it’s definitely
not as infrequent as one

Casual Wear

PU ase h3

ON Meee pela

The sign of great things to come!

Alacta Plus Advanced formulation is the only milk food

for growing children enriched with 34 nutrients,
such as iron, iodine and zinc, as well as DHA, ARA,
and Sialic Acid, which are integral building

blocks for the brain.

They'll go meh further in life

iy ad

SHERWIN
WILLIAMS.

Meadinhn
Awericdomals

With ColorSnapâ„¢, you can discover how coordinating
colors and bringing ideas to life is easier than you ever
imagined, Find a color you love, snap the photo and
receive the matching Sherwin-Williams paint color and

coordinating palette. And it's all FREE!

Vieit waew.sherwin.com for mone information.

would hope or expect. I total-
ly support this act.”

Bishop Simeon Hall, New
Covenant Baptist Church



“Tam always a bit reserved
when government makes any-
thing to do with family
because I think it’s most times
outside of the sphere of gov-
ernment’s jurisdiction, and at
the same time government
has the duty and right to pro-
tect its citizens.

“But I am questioning it
because so many times things
come before parliament with-
out there being any statistics.
I want to know if they have
had any statistics to say we
have 50, 100 or 20 women
who have been ravished by
their husbands - what is hap-
pening there? Is there some
parliamentarian with some
bitterness against his father?
I’m a little suspicious.

“When it comes to family
laws I want to protect our
women, I think they have not
been as protected as they
ought to be, but at the same
time we have to be careful
when walking down this road.
Even as I think about it, we
don’t need a whole lot of
women to be raped by their
husbands to protect them, we
should protect our women
anyway, so I would like to
have the widest discussion on
this.

“T don’t think parliamen-
tarians should do this kind of

eee
Us
ee UE
PHONE: 322-2157

thing. Rape is a heinous thing,
any kind of rape, and I want
there to be stronger laws on
marital counselling. If you
have to force yourself on
someone then that takes the
enjoyment out of it. I want
every woman in the Bahamas
to feel protected whether she
is single or married, but at the
same time we must be careful
because we have some devi-
ous women around the place.
So I think the widest discus-
sion should be held on this
and we should hear both
sides.

“T think I am more for it
than not, but I want us to be
careful that we are not open-
ing Pandora’s box, certainly
for women who ought not to
get back at a man and abuse
this law. It will be interesting
to see if anyone comes for-
ward with a case of this if it is
enforced.

“T think some more discus-
sion (is needed) and some-
times we need greater scien-
tific basis for these things.
And I would like to know
what is the motivation for this
(amendment).”

Dr David Allen, leading
psychiatrist

“T just feel that it’s part of
our development. Obviously
one has to make sure they
have a court system that
judges fairly, but I don’t see
how we can turn the clock
back - women have a sense of
their boundaries.

“The argument is for
women to always submit, but
men also have to be willing to
sacrifice themselves for their
partners.

“Part of the development
process is where people have
boundaries, within marriage
or outside of marriage. It is
the same thing for a teacher
and student, there are bound-
aries.

“We have to recognise that
boundary formation is devel-
oping around the world so if
you don’t recognise that and
you fly your airplane in this
hurricane you will crash.

“Women have rights, teach-
ers have rights, students have
rights, so how do you block
this kind of development and
still show love and respect for
each other?

“T don’t think we can stop
the development of people
having boundaries and this
developmental process.”

Ou FRAME

WINDOWS
JONESER RESISTANT

10 Years Tried and Proven

Call for your FREE quote or
Come visit our factory located on 74 Mount Royal Avenue, Nassau

TEL:

1-242-325-6633

FAX: 1-242-325-6638



ete UU ed

Preferred Customer Card

Want exclusive savings and simple

ee mise mms lis | ie

Pee Du PAM le]
and SAVE, Plus take acvantage of the FREE
eal eee ate Opeth g alm

eT ee sme eee

(Met tans and quarts excluded,)

Clever Duncombe,
Duo emg ite
organisation ‘Bahamian
Fathers for Children
aA Io Ce



“T believe if they are
looking at it from a health
perspective then I believe
women should be protect-
ed and anyone in general
should be protected. But I
think they are presenting
it in the wrong way.

“T don’t know if Sandra
Dean Patterson has been
overwhelmed with this
type of thing or if this is a
rampage against all men in
this country.

“The Child Protection
Act was passed in 2006 and
has yet to be enforced.
And when you look at the
cases from then until now
it’s horrendous. There
were over 700 reported
cases of child abuse in New
Providence alone in 2008,
and that doesn’t even
include the Family Islands.

“The government should
have a chart and a serious
priority list. Why is the
government moving ahead
and ignoring the fact that
children need to be pro-
tected?

“They are the most vul-
nerable of our entire soci-
ety and yet we don’t have
a Family and Child Pro-
tection Act and that is
where all this legislation
should stem from. To date
we are one of the few
countries left on the planet
that hasn’t taken any posi-
tive steps to protect chil-
dren.

“People are angry
because of the way they
are selling it (the amend-
ment), like it’s men versus
women, or women versus
men, but it shouldn’t be
like that - all legislation
should be gender neutral.
What about the homosex-
ual faction who are being
taken advantage of or sex-
ually abused?

“Marital rape can be a
reality when you look at
some of the cases. I have
known men who have tak-
en advantage of their
wives, who are living a rau-
cous and promiscuous life
and the wife may withdraw
from that for their own
protection.

“T think some stiff penal-
ties should be enforced
and be very clear and def-
inite for persons who
would use this legislation.
Rape is difficult to prove,
and even harder to prove
in a marital relationship,
so I don’t understand
where they are going.

“It’s going to be very dif-
ficult to prove, so I don’t
see the point.

“And in terms of this
legislation, I have some
reservations.

“T think these women,
these wives, who are being
raped should be protected,
but not the way that
they’re going about it, with
men against women and
women against men.

“We have much more to
say in respect to this,
because I question the sin-
cerity in this piece of leg-
islation at this point in
time when we don’t have
protection of children.

“It’s going to be very
interesting to see how they
present their position
when parliament recon-
venes on this Act because
there are many things on
this legislation that need
to be addressed.”



Visit Your Neighborhood are nnn Paint Store Today! © Prince Charles Drive: 324-5476 © Cable Beach (oid city Market Building) 327 -OO02



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

6 9 4

Don't classify forced (va Sections Jat Yout Hom

sex in non-estranged |o yack1
marriage as rape’

0 In brief

Man fined
$9,000 for
marijuana
possession

A MAN was fined
$5,000 yesterday after
being convicted on a mari-
juana possession charge.

Henry Smith, 28, was
charged with possession of
marijuana with intent to
supply. Smith was report-
edly found in possession of
30 pounds of marijuana
while at Congo Town in
South Andros on July 8,
2004.

Seized

The drugs, which were
reportedly in a suit bag,
were seized at the Congo
Town Airport.

Smith was convicted on
the drug charge following
the end of a trial yesterday.
He will have to serve a
year in jail if he fails to pay
the fine.

Smith was also bound
over to keep the peace.

He was represented by
lawyer Ian Cargill.

Marital rape:
A nation divided

FROM page one

opposed to a woman who
is his partner.”

Dr Dean-Patterson added:
“It’s important for us to
speak to the fact that sexual
violence is not acceptable
whether the person is a
stranger to you, a relative, a
girlfriend or boyfriend, or
husband or wife; you are
naming behaviour that is
unacceptable and wrong.”

The Crisis Centre psychol-
ogist spoke of women who
have been infected with
HIV because their promis-
cuous husbands refused to
wear a condom and forced
them to have sex.

And Mr Brennen said he
knows women who must
take medication for the rest
of their lives to treat sexual-
ly transmitted diseases
passed on by husbands who
forced them to have sexual
intercourse.

He said: “Wives are being
raped multiple times, some-
times every time they have
sex, and sometimes every
month.

“T have met many women
who have been raped by
their husbands, I meet them
every week. If I shared their
stories you would cry.”

Concern

But male callers contin-
ued to express concern over
the amendment as it could
allow women to abuse the
law and falsely accuse their
husbands of rape.

Mrs Butler-Turner said:
“People would rather back
down from saying they have
been raped because of the
way it’s perceived as
opposed to moving forward
with it. They will go and get
counselling, they will do
everything, but very few will
go to court.”

The law would ensure
protection for women and at
the same time ensure those
who abuse it would be
liable, the panel confirmed.

Fathers rights activist
Clever Duncombe said: “IT
think these women, these
wives, who are being raped
should be protected, but not
the way that they’re going
about it.

“People are angry because
of the way they are selling it
(the amendment), like it’s
men versus women, or
women versus men, but it
shouldn’t be like that — all
legislation should be gender
neutral.”

ee les
OR WL
NAMI

Tropical Exterminators
a AL



Punish it as
some other
crime, says
pastor

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FORCED sexual intercourse
within a non-estranged mar-
riage should not be classified
as rape as it is defined under
current law, but rather be pun-
ishable as some other crime,
Pastor Cedric Moss said yes-
terday.

The Kingdom Life Church
pastor has vowed to protect
women while remaining stead-
fast in his opposition to pro-
posed legislation that would
outlaw marital rape.

In a statement released yes-
terday, Mr Moss said he sup-
ports the passage of laws to
protect women from being
forced into any kind of sexual
activity against their will, be it
by their husband or a stranger.

Amendment

But he argued that the
amendment to the Sexual
Offences Act introduced last
week in parliament needs to be
given more thought and adjust-
ed as in its current state “it will
cause untold harm and may-
hem in marriages and families
in our country.”

He said he is concerned
about the way the amendment
would repeal current law that
states a husband can only be



Influential group

Sexual Offences Act

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net sex i

AN INELUENTIAL wom- in
en’s organisation has hit out at
opponents of plans to reform



Cedric Moss caused a storm of
controversy by telling Monday's
bune how ape we Sex- ny



charged with raping his wife if
the marriage is in termination
or separation, and the Attor-
ney General consents to the
charge.

The pastor said the results of
such a repeal would “provide
for the possibility of rape alle-
gations to be made and rape
charges to be brought in all
marriages, not just those in ter-
mination or separation.”

“Tt will provide for immedi-
ate rape charges to be brought
against all husbands whose
wives accuse them of rape with-
out the prior consent of the
Attorney General. To my mind,
it is important this protection
continues under the proposed
amendment in cases of non-
estranged marriages.”

He argued that wives who
are separated or in divorce pro-
ceedings need more protection
against unwanted sexual acts
from their husbands than
women who are in non-

Women hit out at
rape law pastor

condemns remarks on

Mrs Paul said a wife should
have the right to say “no”

HEADLINE NEWS: Wednesday's Tribune.









estranged marriages, but the
proposed amendment offers
them no special protection, he
said.

“With regard to unwanted
sexual acts being forced upon
wives in marriages that are not
in termination or separation,
while I believe such acts are
wrong and should be made ille-
gal, and punishable by amend-
ed legislation, I do not agree
with the proposed amendment
that seeks to call such unwant-
ed sexual acts rape.

“In that regard, I believe that
the definition of rape as it is
defined now under section
three of the current law should
not be changed, and therefore
any forced sexual acts on wives
by husbands in non-estranged
marriages should be punishable
as some other crime, perhaps
indecent assault, and not treat-
ed as if it were rape by a
stranger.”

Call for independent police complaints hotly

“MINISTER of National
Security Tommy Turnquest
must immediately take steps to
establish an independent body
to review complaints against
the police, PLP Chairman
Glenys Hanna-Martin demand-
ed yesterday.

Ms Hanna-Martin, who is
also MP for Englerston, said
that the statutory instruments
are provided for in the Police
Act which was passed in par-
liament several months ago, but
the body has yet to be brought
into force.

“This is a critical provision in
the legislation designed to
ensure transparency in the
exercise of police powers, bol-
ster the integrity of the Force
and engender public confi-
dence.

“The Royal Bahamas Police
Force is being grossly disad-
vantaged by the government’s
failure to bring the relevant
provisions into effect as there is
a real risk that public confi-
dence might be eroded in an
institution critical to our nation-
al well-being,” Ms Hanna-Mar-

Tommy mes

tin said in a press statement.

She pointed out that in the
last several months there have
been a number of deaths
involving the police, including
the shooting death of a minor.

“Most recently a 18-year-old
lost his life in circumstances
which have captured our
national attention and which
has left incredible grief in its
wake.”

The PLP chairman said that
Minister Turnquest must now
see that creating a modernised





Glenys Hanna-Martin

professional police force with
a mechanism to facilitate trans-
parency in the scrutiny of com-
plaints and concerns of the pub-
lic, will benefit the police while
at the same time bolstering
public confidence in the coop-
erative enterprise of eradicating
crime in our country.

The establishment of an
independent body to review
police complaints is now a mat-
ter of urgent priority and one
which the Bahamian people
require, she said.

Madeira St. ONLY Juty 13 - AUG 1

= STOCK

b Vebrkss

O/, OFF

* 20% OFF NEW OUTDOOR
FABRICS FROM BRAZIL

“EXCEPT NET ITEMS, VINYL, PLASTIC

5

Lamps, Mirrors,
\ Candleholders,
Vases etc.

ae Le Pain

aL

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Ra.[242] 322-3080 * Fax:[242] 322-5251

TS Crim ce

Sh!
Large Selection

Upholstery &
Drapery Fabrics



a



Nassau’s Premier Store

For 1s MSN DENS

Bayparl Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
email:info@colesofnassau.com

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THE Moat THOh0H RESTORATION & (CLeEAxTHO Eves, o@ THR ve 6 Ree!
AAS" s Oey PROrSoMAL, Coen Soon Cano & Ure sey Care §sTrs.

* Carpe. Uphokiey, Sone aad Matte Cheating &
Hesterahon Spectakst

® Prochon Cleaning Syaens romawes Deepa Hoeey
Soil, Haciena, Creu, Woiermurks aad Staines from
Carpeting & Punnivaire, revoring ua oo like mew
tia fraction of repbcemernt cral
Carpet, Sofa's, Lovescats, Chitra, Dining Chars, Cars.
Bows, Girowt. Tiles, Marble & Stone

* Perian Wool & Sik Caner Cleasing Specials

* Marble Polshing, Resndion & Care

* Word Ploor Beatenation

Authorized Stone Tech Profeisiosa! Connecti

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS

PHONE: 323-3083 or 323-1594
OWRY WE CAS 00 IT BAGS

* ama Geral idole

UU LOCAL ae CW PP

PROCES SVS TEM con)

Saati kate)

uewsnrieme ew [6 [245 [wn [is [ae [|
were we] |W [own [ran [a
TWECOULECTOR | 0s [05 [WH_| eso [0 [1000 |

eros [an] | wh [wa [ae J
frHEuoa TUT ct | 95 MM | ets | 0 |S |
racorn |» |3as [wn [on [ean [|
un por co0 [uo [wa wH_[ wt [|
aeons | [us| wa |r | wt
E16 uF EDWORNRS | a0|sas |] WH [| [a
Tienes [|u| WH | gos at [|
uso ce» [on [nn [0 [wn [ran [|

USE SOUR E: CaAD To Ase TRE TS AT Sb a GALE a Pe Ms: ta
AEN MTHEATIC ——weW! 115 | 305 | WA | et | a0 | 1ea0
THE COLLECTOR c | 495 | das | Ni | G05 | B40 | 1040

rome a [90 | 80.| WA | | 25 12s
a I
rion 6 [90 | 95 | WA | 60 20] 100
umeromeh 1 [80 [WR aso 1-[ Wh | YO
ef td

380-FLIX





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Tough decision on health for Obama

WASHINGTON — After months of talk,
decision time is nearing for President Barack
Obama on health care.

Bipartisan Senate negotiators are weak-
ening some of his top priorities, leaving the
president with a difficult choice: He can give
ground, and implore disappointed liberals
to go along with him. Or he can try to ram
through a Democratic bill with his wishes
intact, infuriating Republicans.

His eventual decision could be a pivotal
moment in his presidency. Remaking health
care is Obama's top domestic priority. He
wants to expand coverage, contain costs,
make insurance more competitive and
change the way doctors and hospitals are
compensated. Liberals, noting that Democ-
rats control the House, Senate and White
House, see no need for serious compromis-
es. Some moderates and independents, how-
ever, say a one-party solution would under-
mine public confidence in the plan and poi-
son the atmosphere in Congress for the rest
of Obama's term.

For now, the president continues to hold
his cards close, giving lawmakers more time
to seek a compromise that could attract some
Republican votes. But many Democrats are
impatient, ready for Obama to insist that
Republicans either endorse the main ele-
ments of his proposal or step aside as a
Democrats-only bill is enacted.

"He's going to have to choose pretty
soon,” Sen. Lindsey Graham, a South Car-
olina Republican, said Tuesday.

If Obama decides to run roughshod over
the Republicans, Graham said, "he'll ruin
his administration” by destroying his image
as a political healer under a big tent.

But many Democrats want Obama to
stand firm on his campaign proposals.

"Because we want three Republicans to
come along on this, we betray what the
American people want?" said Sen. Sherrod
Brown, D-Ohio. "I don't think so."

The outlines of Obama's approaching
choice are taking shape. Bipartisan nego-
tiators on the Senate Finance Committee
— the panel making the biggest effort to
gain support from both parties — are start-
ing to show details of their thinking. In sev-
eral crucial respects, they fall well short of
Obama's health care proposals.

For instance, Obama's campaign called
for large employers either to provide their

SHirst Baptist Church
289 Market St. South * P.O. Box N-7984 « Nassau, Bahamas

es

“Everyone must face God

workers with health insurance or pay into a
national fund to subsidize insurance for low-
income people. The Senate Finance plan
would require "a much more modest" con-
tribution from employers than would Oba-
ma's "pay or play” scenario, said Sen. Kent
Conrad, D-N.D., one of the key negotia-
tors. Obama also proposed to help pay for
health care by trimming tax deductions tak-
en by high-income earners. Lawmakers
rejected the idea months ago, and the Senate
Finance plan offers no alternative means of
extracting new revenue from wealthy people.

Most troubling to many liberal Democ-
rats, the Senate Finance plan does not call
for a robust government-run option for buy-
ing health insurance. It calls for an insur-
ance cooperative, but liberals such as Sen.
Bernard Sanders, a Vermont Independent,
say that's unacceptable.

"I think we have the votes to pass a strong
bill," he said, which would include a public
option for health insurance that is compa-
rable to Medicare in its reach and cost con-
trols.

If Republicans don't agree, Sanders said,
then Senate Democrats can use a strong-
arm tactic called "reconciliation" to pass
major elements of Obama's plan without
any GOP votes.

Asked if he would like Obama to speak
out more forcefully for his campaign pro-
posals, Sanders answered: "Yeah."

White House adviser David Axelrod said
it's too early for Obama to fully endorse the
Senate Finance Committee's bipartisan
approach or the liberals’ call to stand firm.

"This is the legislative process," Axelrod
said Tuesday. "The important thing is to
keep the process moving forward."

"There's no doubt that what we'll have at
the end of the day will not fully satisfy any
major player in this process,” he said. The
most important goal, he said, is to improve
the nation's health care system.

"Everyone is going to have to give a little
to get there,” Axelrod said.

But in a political system dominated by
Democrats, some liberals say a down-the-
middle approach will give conservatives and
Republicans more influence than they have

(This article was written by Charles
Babington, Associated Press Writer — c.2009.



THE TRIBUNE



Impressed by the
professionalism of
PMH doctors, nurses

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I would be grateful if you
would allow me to convey
thanks via your “Letters” col-
umn to a large number of per-
sons, and at the same time
make a positive comment
about our public health sys-
tem.

Some weeks ago my wife
had to be admitted into the
Princess Margaret Hospital as
a result of an allergic reaction
to a medication she has used
for many years. The doctors
felt she should be monitored
during the change to a new
medication. We were greatly
impressed by the profession-
alism of the doctors (espe-
cially Dr. Orlander) and the
nurses. Each and every per-
son involved in her care,
including those who kept the
room sanitized, was pleasant
and courteous while carrying
out his or her duties. They
all brightened her stay. Sadly,
in our modern world far too
many persons feel that once

LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



they “do their job”, “the man-
ner of their bearing” doesn’t
matter. The staff at PMH,
however, personified what
our national anthem
expressed and one felt it had
become a part of their nature
to care for others. The “man-
ner of their bearing” was
exemplary.

Simultaneous with this
experience, one of my broth-
ers had spent many weeks in
PMH, first in one of the male
medical wards and then in
The Eye Wing. He recently
passed away while in the Eye
Wing — the result of a battle
against cancer that spanned
many years. The professional
care of the doctors and nurses
had extended his life for some
six years after the initial
surgery, and with God’s help,
had not only given him extra

years, but years of quality liv-
ing. Through the terminal
months of his life, the doctors
(especially Dr. Chin) and the
nurses displayed total profes-
sionalism and a sense of car-
ing. Through his last 48 hours,
the nurses stood by us, and at
his passing, one would have
thought they were part of the
family.

There continues to be a
need for a new hospital build-
ing — and for many more
beds — but I take this oppor-
tunity of commending the
doctors, the nurses and the
ancillary staff. I thank them
for experiences that have
heightened my pride in being
Bahamian and knowing that
we have a medical system of
which we can be proud — in
spite of the challenges caused
by limited facilities, and lim-
ited funding.

CHARLES A.
SWEETING,
Nassau,

July 23, 2009.

Ministry of Works on JFK will
show you road plans, madam

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Watching the ZNS Evening News last Thurs-
day, July 23, 2009, I was somewhat perturbed by
the young lady in the shocking pink suit, com-
plaining about not being able to get any infor-
mation on the new road being cut through from
Thompson Boulevard/John F. Kennedy Drive
to West Bay Street — Corridor 18, I believe.
She claimed she has been trying to find these

details for a considerable time.

Madam, on July 20, 2009, I called into the
Lands and Surveys office on East Bay Street,
asking for just such information, the lady who

So I called into them and was shown the dia-
grammatic plan and an aerial photograph and

at rest.

was able to ask some questions, putting my mind

When I asked if I could have a copy, I was
told to call back last Friday, of course I forgot to
do that but have spoken with the department
today and I can collect tomorrow July 28. This is
something I had meant to do for a while, as I do
live in the Vista Marina Subdivision, but some-

thing else always took precedence, until last

served me was most apologetic but admitted that

they did not have the plans I was looking for.
However, she was able to tell me I could get
them directly from the Ministry of Public Works.

Can we really risk
Waiting 10 years?

EDITOR, the Tribune.

Re:10-Year Plan for
Education
The Tribune, July 8, 2009

We may do well to remem-
ber that Parkinson’s Law
from 1957 is still very much
alive and well: “Work
expands to fill the time avail-
able for its completion”. Can
we really risk waiting 10 years
for the MOE to develop and
implement a “national plan
for education in the
Bahamas”?

KEN W KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,
July 16, 2009.

DON STAINTON |

Nassau,

July 27, 2009.

week. So, madam, if you are truly interested,
visit the Ministry of Works on JFK, they will
happily show you the plans.

A RESIDENT

Bahamas can’t afford a slip-up

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Out of curiosity I went on
the “Miss Universe” web-
site — if at this stage of the
schedule run-up this is all
the ‘official’ website has for
the Atlantis contest then the
Bahamas are certainly get-
ting the rough end of the
stick.

Can’t find out who will be
attending as contestants —
no schedule — no list of
events but of course they are
trying to sell tickets like you

can’t believe. If tourism is
officially in this they had
better clean up the act that
the Trump organisation is
putting on as this is shabby
to say the least.

The Bahamas can’t afford
a slip up on this one!

Only a month to go and
this is what you can’t find
out!

MASHA WILSON
Nassau,
July 12, 2009.

=su0ry

PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-6160

Free Estimates

ALL ALUMINUM PATIO ROOF OR
SCREENED ROOM

as Saviour or Judge.”
SUNDAY SERVICES
fam, #:00am, 11:18am

PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS JP 0.0.
Marr Officer, Gourmallor, iercaasor
et S-8452 «909-5798
Fax: 32-0 Hi390-001

TEL

MAKING WAY FOR
NEW STOCK
50% OFF ALL

SHOES & BAGS

Store Hours:
Monday - Friday 9:30 am - 5:30 pm
BYE
Saturday 9:30 am - 6:00 pm

ROBEY CO MN nas
(Old House of Music Building) next to

StI GRD ei ey |

Thank You For Shopping With Us!

eel.
GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTR

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre ~"* =
a Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448

‘ALL ALUMINUM CAR PORT
__ Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1976





THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



Bahamian charged in US in
connection with drug deal

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A BAHAMIAN man has
been charged in Florida in con-
nection with a drug deal and a
shooting incident.

Courtney Kirk Alexander
Davis, 23, of Freeport, was
charged in West Palm Beach last
week with aggravated battery
with a deadly weapon, armed

robbery and carrying a con-
cealed firearm.

Davis and another man, Kar-
ruan Parker, 26, were arrested
for their alleged involvement in
a drug deal on May 4, the West
Palm Beach Post reported.

According to the Palm Beach
County Sheriff's report, the vic-
tim, Kiplyn Box, met three men
for an alleged marijuana sale on
the evening of May 4 in an
industrial park at 7153 70th Dri-

ve North, near the South Florida
Fairgrounds.

It is alleged that Box met with
Parker, Davis and a third man to
sell them some drugs. Davis
allegedly pulled out a silver
handgun and began firing at him.

As the three men ran outside
with the drugs to their car, shots
were fired at them. Davis was
shot in the face.

Police arrested Davis on May
7, three days after he was shot.

May 11. He was formally
charged with attempted felony
murder, armed robbery and vio-

Parker, 26, was arrested on __ lation of probation.
Davis and Parker are being
held without bail at the Palm

Beach County Jail. een aaey. VTS



APS
RIMES

JUST WEST OF CITY MARKET, TONIQUE DARLING HIGHWAY

ee eee ee ie St

‘Pillar of the community’
Julian Alleyne remembered

THE late Julian Alleyne, a retired
Tribune and former bank employ-
ee, was yesterday remembered by
his family and friends as a “pillar of
his community.”

Mr Alleyne, who died at the age of
81 of a heart attack in Doctors Hos-
pital earlier this week, was consid-
ered a father figure by many in the
neighbourhood of Millers Clove.

He began his career at the
Bahamas Electric Company, where
he worked in the monetary exchange
department, he then transferred to
the Central Bank and also worked
part-time as a paper delivery man
for the Tribune for over 30 years.
Among the many jobs he held during
his lifetime, he also served as driver to former
Minister of Finance Carlton Francis.

His daughter, Sandra Sears, yesterday told
The Tribune that her father was an imposing
figure in his community, a strict disciplinarian
who was respected and loved.

“All of the kids in the neighborhood would
say ‘there goes Mr Alleyne’ when they saw
him. My father was the type of gentleman
that believed no matter, whether you had a
father or not, that he would step in and be that
father figure,” another daughter, Sheila, said.

Dress to impress in your
hat, shoes, accessories or

aCe Pee dis



A lifelong Anglican, he first
attended St Bernards Church and
then St Agnes.

In his community, Mr Alleyne
impacted the lives of many people.

“My dad was always happy serving
other people,” his daughter Sheila
said. “He didn’t show much emo-
tion, but knew deep down how he
felt. My dad made an impact on this
island by just being the person who
he was.”

Mr Alleyne’s former colleagues at
The Tribune all remember him as a
nice man with a big pipe in his
mouth. “He was a character,” said
Robert Carron, company president.

“He was always a pipe-smoking
Barbadian guy, always had a joke, always
laughing, he always had a story about some-
thing and he was always complaining that the
paper didn’t go out on time, he was always
complaining the paper made him late for din-
ner. He was in charge when he came in.”

Mr Alleyne is survived by his five children,
Stacy, Sandra, Sharon, Stanley, and Sheila,
as well as by numerous grandchildren and
nieces and nephews.

Funeral arrangements have yet to be
announced.

5 TRUCKUM

that special dress from

ORALEE’S FASHIONS

Mackey Street « Telephone: 393-0744
ee ge ML mmr lta



UO Te Ta

FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS

PHONE: 327-6464
re

BE PREPARED THIS HURRICANE SEASON






HURRICANE SEASON IS HERE!

Dh

SD vac rotor for the
hi Dou hes) ee Aan or
dry. Indoors ar outdoors.

Ae o

exten, § 5/9

Ierauinian
bakers aad
fiberglass bitiders:
eth enteral

48! :

14/3 2 100-FI.
Extension Cord

) dep, Sivan ba
aS diy Feary, Eat Wrecked Co



NASSAU: 677.2100

www.cbsbahamas.com






~~ Get prepared...

———
Bahama Shatter oo &

===
Make your home
look good. and

protactad!

Roll Down Shutter

With the flip of a Switch
Ingiant hurricane protection



Fire Escape 24-In. Poly Leaf
Ladder Rake

2 Showy, a fant tiny SS res, Pebpropgionn bead bs
ina inti Pally OSES pupae gine ciaciahedl in
wa rbd, pety--o

eras i ome piece. 4-f weed
caren he rahe

7 = SKU




72 Voll 1M-in,
Cardlers
Sernwidiiar
Adah eb Te
hare. Al Bi aed

120 Volt 7-14-In,

reular Saw
1 arg. 24 HP, 4 a
WAL boty a ove ie

me Pei bee {8 oath corsics Shade ord
nest pode) ad hints wach, (TI)
ab HN)

. with
CBS
BAHAMAS

BAHAMAS

COMMONWEALTH BUILDING SUPPLIES



S HHH! Don’t Tell Anyone,

Our

"O” down

Pel MMM:
for

Government
Workers

Celery elds}
Batelco Employees

(OSE TM OCT eee) 8)

Of Pre-Owned Cars

aa
=f)
* Honda Accord
"Honda Civic
‘Honda Odyssey
* Nissan Cefiro
* Nissan Sunny
* Toyota Camry
* Toyota Corolla
* Toyota 8-Seater Vans

eR Gee
Ford ee errs)

FAX: (242) 361-1136

Visit our Website: www.autohl.com

“IN-HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE”

Rosetta St.

Colors:
Fuschia
Blue
Red
Yellow
Black
Orange
Silver
White
Gold
Bronze
Green

Ph: 325-3336





PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamasair refutes the police's ‘no report filed hy Bahamasair allegation PLP Senator calls

for open debate
on Arawak Cay

Challenge to Minister of Environment

BAHAMASAIR chiefs last
night hit out at claims that the
airline never filed a report with
the police on a credit card fraud
which conned the company out
of $400,000.

Managing Director Henry
Woods expressed his disap-
pointment with the Nassau
Guardian for failing to “get the
facts” from executive manage-
ment, all of whom he said were
in place on Monday July 27,
2009, contrary to what the arti-
cle suggested.

He said: “This process start-
ed more than 18 months ago,
and from that time to now, at
each step of the way, they have

kept the police informed and
have seen some recovery of
funds and cancellation of tick-
ets through these efforts.
“While we acknowledge that
some of the victims in this case
have not been very cooperative
in coming forward, in cases
where they have cooperated
with us, we have provided the
police with all of the informa-
tion and have had excellent
results.”

Mr Woods added that in
June 2009, executive manage-
ment at the airline made a
request for a meeting with the
officer in charge of Commer-
cial Crime to give Bahamasair

« ANDRE},
SCHOOL °

SA

an update on the cases reported
to them.

“We “Bahamasair” were
informed that the officer was
going on vacation and would
not be back until July 2, 2009.
He would meet with Bahama-
sair upon his return.

Surprise

“Imagine our surprise” said
Mr Woods, “when we learned
that during his absence a press
conference was held by Inspec-
tor Sandra Miller regarding
credit card fraud at Bahama-
sair. “During this press release,

Inspector Miller said Bahama-
sair was involved in a Nigerian
Scam and was out some
$400,000. Bahamasair had pre-
viously provided this figure to
the Officer In charge of Com-
mercial Crimes. While we were
not shocked that the amount
was revealed, we were shocked
that the police seemed to know
who the perpetrators of the
crime was, but was not forth-
coming with this information
to Bahamasair.

“After this press conference
we once again requested a
meeting with the Commercial
Crime Unit and after much
waiting and complaining we
were finally able to meet with
three officers of that unit on
Friday July 24. During this
meeting we also updated the
officers on matters that would
have transpired since we last
spoke with them at the begin-
ning of June. As a result of this
meeting held just Friday past,
we find it difficult to understand
this statement made by Super-
intendent Ellsworth Moss of
the Central Detective Unit.”

Mr Woods said he takes this
time to thank the police for
their assistance, but said it is
regrettable that such statements
would be made by such a senior
officer, particularly after they
would have met only three days

PLP SENATOR Jerome
Fitzgerald yesterday chal-
lenged Minister of Environ-
ment Dr Earl Deveaux to an
open debate on the govern-
ment’s reasons for the relo-
cation of the container port
and the extension of Arawak
Cay.

Claiming the minister is
“avoiding” the myriad of
issues relating to the venture,
Senator Fitzgerald said that
Dr Deveaux is now attempt-
ing to muddy the waters by
talking about an EIA study
prepared on the dredging of
Nassau Harbour.

“Our questions related to
the ETA on the extension of
Arawak Cay. Why has the
government ignored the 2005
Environmental Impact
Assessment which ranked

EARL DEVEAUX



port? Why have they failed
to release the October 2007
Ecorys report which stated
that the southwest port was
the best location, a report
received by Dr Deveaux and

Arawak Cay as the sixth least
favourable location out of sev-
en for the relocation of the

ate ae Nea f

UE UE aes cL ae
Maintenance Workers / Helpers

Te eee ee ene

School Nurse - one year temporary position
StAndrew’s School, the International School of The Bahamas,
requires a School Nurse for the 2009 - 2010 school year.
All applications must include a written letter of application, full
details of degrees, nursing qualifications and experience as
well as the names of two relevant referees.

the Deputy Prime Minister
the Minister of Foreign
Affairs, Mr Brent Symon-
ette,” Mr Fitzgerald said in a
press statement.

With so many questions
and “so little answers”, Mr
Fitzgerald said that he has
attempted on many occasions
to invite the government to
be “open and transparent” on
the extension of Arawak Cay
and the relocation of the port.

“Three months ago on
April 30, 2009, I gave notice
of a resolution in the Senate
to debate the extension to
Arawak Cay and the port
relocation, and to date noth-
ing, not even an acknowledg-
ment by the government.

“T therefore challenge Dr
Earl Deveaux and the gov-
ernment to an open debate at
any venue, at any time, where
he and the government are
prepared to answer the ques-
tions raised by myself and
many Bahamians and come
clean in an open and trans-
parent manner,” he said.

e SEE PAGE SEVEN

ago and agreed a position on
this matter.

All applications must be received at the
school by 3:00pm on Friday, 7" August and
should be addressed to Mrs Sharon E Wilson,
The Principal. Applications received after that date will
not be considered. (Please note that access to the school
for deliveries is through the Nassau East North entrance
during the summer months)

RSME eel ee Oe De

Be Re AE REPO RSet RD TNT eh

inforostad persons should AV in an application at our Head Office
on Harold Road ov at the Alport Store

(Oomestic Departures Section),
Mo phone calls plpase,

"Plazes ote that fhe os ie aniry level pasion

Deadline is Friday, August Tth, 2009

FOCOL HOLDING

CHAIRMAN'S REPORT









FOCOL HOLDINGS LID
— - 7 7 CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
For The Quarter Ended April 30, 2009 [2 $000)
oe April 30, 2000 April 30, 2005
The Directors of FOCOL Holdings Limited
4 fs ‘ 1
[FOCOL) are pleased to present results ee = aaa 4 __ 1458
for the quarter énded Agril 30, 200%, Met Sharehoakierns” equity a7.13a
Income available te common
Tatal liailities & shorehalders’ equity 5 114.184 § 134,338

shareholders for the nine monihs ended
Ajoril 30, 2009 wos $8.950.205 compared

to $9,330,152 last year, CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME



(B $000)
oe . . Proanihs ended FF rmanihs ended
FOECOL has been oble fo maintain an ; April 30, 2008
consistent eamings in a very difficult oo ae
> Sole & revenues 5 710.451 5 gor Are
anvironment proving the redlience and
. Pn . 2 (Cost of sales | 78d peeB ee
sustainability of our business. Despite - | 7 ins :
the high cost of fuel and other goods Income Tram aperations 17,424 41,200
and services. We expect to report qa Markeling, administrative and general 19.394) (la200)
Depreciation { 1494) | LaF]
. ; Fingnmce cost | S20) i 1 232]
successful year. We hove strengthened Olher income 7H a
Our balance sheet ourng the year Our
cash position is strong and we hove Met Income Or F2 1,082
, , Preference share divigdenck ( 142) | 752)
been able to conteal receivables in a
cificult time. We hove also been able . : - —
/ Nel income ovalable to common shorehalders 5 8,950 5 9430
to reduce long term debt by more than
000 I sinc © start of th 500 _ . - ;
$4,000,000 since the start of the fiscal Basic: earnings per share 5 O28 5 02
year
I rie pagcey F. muri rel
Our Directors, management and staff Dividends per share bs 0.07 5 00a

remain committed to seeking every
qvenve to contribute ta the growth of
FOCOL.

Copies of a full set of the unaudited financial statements can be obtained fram Stephen Adderley



adder yefocaloom), al the Freeg-art Gl Company locoted on Queens Highway, Freeport

nie i
off RP Ro Grand Bahama, Monday through Friday from #30 AM TO S900 PR.
# a

Sir Albert J. Miller
Chairman & President





THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 7



Minister defends plans

to move container

THE opposition to Arawak
Cay as the location for the new
container port, said Environ-
ment Minister Dr Earl
Deveaux, is based on a set of
“peculiar interests that will be
derailed” if the port is moved
to Arawak instead of Clifton.

He said the number of
Bahamians who will benefit
both at the Fish Fry and from
the port relocation to Arawak
is significant.

“The economic transforma-
tion in the change of owner-
ship of shipping is equally sig-
nificant,” he said, as is the
opportunity to renovate and
revitalize downtown Nassau.

Senator Jerome Fitzgerald,
who has led the PLP charge
against the relocation of the
container port to Arawak Cay
instead of Clifton as planned
under the PLP administration,
has challenged Dr Deveaux to
an open debate on govern-
ment’s reasons for the reloca-
tion. (See story page 6). He
has called the move “secre-
tive” and “criminal,” and
claims it only serves special
interest groups. On July 16,
Mr Fitzgerald said he was
investigating legal options that
would possibly halt govern-
ment’s extension of Arawak
Cay until there is full tans-
parency and accountability.

“When the issues first sur-
faced about the Nassau Har-
bour dredging, I wondered
about the motives,” said Dr
Deveaux. “The EIA for the
harbour and its scheduled start
was a matter which had been
in the public domain for some
time. At no time was the issue
of Saunders Beach raised as a
concern in respect of the har-
bour dredging. The only con-
cern raised regarding Corri-
dor 18 of the New Providence
Road Improvement Project
and the likely noise impact on
Vista Marina was raised
months ago by Dr Madeline
Sawyer. Yet persons say they
have heard nothing and knew
nothing. The plans for the Cor-
ridor were announced in a

famaung AIT
Spacial Price
$55.00

Earl Deveaux: Opposition to change
of location ‘based on peculiar
interests that will be derailed’

public ceremony with the
Police band playing,” said Mr
Deveaux.

In a letter to the Editor on
page 4 of today’s Tribune a
Vista Marina resident said that
for anyone who is interested
a copy of the new road being
cut through from Thompson
Boulevard/John F Kennedy
drive to West Bay Street —
Corridor 18 — is available at
the Ministry of Works.

Mr Deveaux said that while
one cannot minimize the effect
of the Corridor's proposed
location on a particular indi-
vidual or home; the clear pub-
lic good with respect to the
road improvement, enhanced
beach access, parking and traf-
fic flow is evident for all impar-
tial observers to see. It was
and remains irresponsible to
raise unwarranted public
alarm about the destruction of
Saunders Beach, when the
whole intent is to restore the
dune, rehabilitate the site and
enhance public access.”

“The next alarm,” said the
Environmental Minister, “was
Arawak Cay port relocation.
Again this was the basis of
ongoing discussions between
the government and various
shipping operators for a num-
ber of years.

“The Arawak Cay Port
relocation was discussed a
number of times and publicly
announced by the Prime Min-
ister. [spoke extensively about
it while at Ministry of Public
Works and subsequently at the
Ministry of The Environ-
ment,” said Mr Deveaux..

“T could not help but con-
clude a political slant having
regard to Mr Fitzgerald's inter-
est. The harbour dredging and

New Providence road
improvement projects is Min-
istry of Public Works projects.
The EIA for both have always
been available. It is custom-
ary for BEST to publish all
EIAS for projects on its web-
site.

“Regarding the release of
documents. I did so to demon-
strate a level of hypocrisy and
way of thinking. When some-
thing is proposed by the FNM
it is often objected to by the
PLP on the basis of catering
to ‘special interest’. The land
acquisition alleged and com-
pleted around the South West
Port subsequent to the PLP
Government announcing its
intent to locate a port there is
the best barometer of ‘special
interest.’ A check of the land
holdings and the time of the
acquisitions will reveal some
peculiar inclinations. The
mindset of ‘entitlement’ and
‘my time’ best illustrates the
true underlying reasons for the
public political posturing
under the guise of the envi-
ronment.”

Mr Deveaux referred to the
health concerns at the airport,
raised by former tourism min-
ister Obie Wilchcombe, and
published in The Nassau
Guardian on Monday.

“The baseline study was
done in 2007 by the Nassau
Airport Development Com-
pany (NAD) to compile the
scope of remediation required
to improve the airport,” said
Mr Deveaux. “The issues were
there for many years. The
required EIA is under review.
The concerns, couched in a
series of questions, could have
been directed to BEST,
DEHS or myself, however,

yf- I.

Cellular & ae

Simmer

LG Cookie
Special Price
$279.00

MADNESS
SALE

Motorola ViI90
Special Price
$55.00

AY)

Unlocking & Reparing

All Cell EONS

BlackBerry
Spacial Price
$275.00
(All colors)

atest software 3. 0 Pa $50. 00

@o°

Motorola C139

Special Price GD
ek — a

feCoconut Grove Plaza-Coconut Grove

,

Nokia 1200
Special Price
$50.00

on the completion of has 10 day course with the People to People Programme,
Washington School af World Siecdies at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore
Marland. Dante's Credit Completion Report in the Leadership Summit Course noted that

Dante completed all assignments, incheding apportioned research; developed the wea for
the project handout and; was a supporting member of his team which won the academic

contest against 3 other good teams. Dante enters the | lih grade at Queen's College in

September and received awards in Music and Spanish in Grade 10, Keep inupl

From purenis: Dante and Cheryl Baceard
GCramiparcnts: Lacita and Patricia Bazard and Stella Major

brothers, Agents, Uneles ancl Consus.

port

EARL DEVEAUX



they are published on Mon-
day in glaring headlines,
intended to spread alarm. It is
simply not responsible.

“Having regard to the many
times the various projects have
been in the public domain,”
said Mr Deveaux, “Iam ata
loss to understand where we
have acted secretly with
respect to Harbour dredging,
road improvement or even the
proposed port relocation.

“T released the ‘four year
old’ information to demon-
strate a very current way of
thinking; the desire of a group
of politically connected
Bahamians to control a vital
piece of real estate. The oppo-
sition to Arawak Cay is based
on a set of peculiar interests
which will be derailed if the
Port goes there.”

“IT do not minimize the con-
cern of people living in Vista
Marina or Rock Crusher or
any where along the corridors
and we may have erred in con-
tinuing to dialogue with them,
but not out of a desire to be
secretive.

“The Town Meetings are
scheduled to give interested
members of the public updates
on the projects being under-
taken.

“They should have been
held long ago.”

El-squire

Men's Wear

hy
as

MEN'S WEAR ONLY,

Boys Clothing Sizes 10-18

Mall at Marathon 304-7470
Harbour Bay 394-7470

OPEN CAST AUDITIONS
FOR DREAMER’ A Bahamian,
feon TV Series Drama
Auguseist, 2009 @ St. Johns College”
1:00 pm to 3:30 pm

MALE 30's to 40's

Could be Balding (Not A Must)
Dark Skinned

Averaga Haight & Weight

MALE, Early to Mid-Tean
Average Height to Tall
Brown Stcin of Light Brown S&in

MALE, Mid Teen
Tall MALE, 2 TO 5 Years
Dark Brown Skin Brown of Light Brown Skin

FEMALE, 20's Ip 20's
Dark Skinned
Average Weight

FEMALE, Early to Mid Teens
Brown or Light Brown Siin
Average Weight

YOU COULD BE A STAR!!! GO FOR ITI!!!
For More Infomation Call 428-1287 or email:
bahamasdreamer gmail.com



NOTICE

Early diagnosis and treatment

of cancer is critical.

lf you or your loved ones have questions about
this disease, there are answers.

The Cancer Centre Bahamas at Centreville Medical
Pavilion will be hosting individual cancer clinics with
two of the world's most renowned specialists on
Monday, August 3rd. The clinics are open to the public.

The Hon. Prof. Dr. Arthur Porter
PC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FAAMA

Dr. Porter serves as Managing Director of The Cancer
Centre and Director of Radiation Oncology. He is also

the current Director General

and CEO of McGill

University Health Centre and author of more than 300
articles on cancer research.

Dr. Karol Sikora

MA, MBBCh, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM

Dr. Sikora is the Director of Medical Oncology at The
Cancer Centre. He also serves as the Dean of Britain's
first independent Medical School at the University of
Buckingham and is the author of the most widely-used
cancer textbook in graduate medical school in the
United Kingdom.

The Cancer Centre Bahamas is one of only two
medical facilities outside the U.S. certified by the
American College of Radiation Oncology (ACRO)
and the only non-U.S. facility in the Western
Hemisphere to qualify for ACRO certification.

For more information,
Centreville Medical Pavilion

please contact: 502-9610.
e 72 Collins Avenue





PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

Clanks

BACK*TO*SCHOOL

Over 1,000
applications
for national
training
programme

FROM page one

help train displaced workers.

It is envisioned that at the
end of this programme indi-
viduals will have acquired
new skills in those vocational
areas that are most often
requested by employers
through the Department of
Labour thereby making them
more marketable, eager and
ready to embrace the job mar-
Ket.

Nearly $250,000 has been
allocated for the programme
in the budget of the Depart-
ment of Labour.

The programme will offer
training opportunities for one
thousand persons utilizing the
College of The Bahamas and
The Bahamas Technical and

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





The private sector has been extremely supportive of this initiative and has committed some coun-
terpart funding towards the implementation of the programme.

Sub-committees comprised of individuals in the private and public sectors have been established
in both New Providence and Grand Bahama and charged with the responsibility of developing cri-
teria for the selection of persons to be enrolled in the programme and advising the committee as
to the courses to be conducted at the two institutions.

The members of the subcommittee are as follows:

NEW PROVIDENCE

Mr Khaalis Rolle - Chairman, president,
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce

Dr Pandora Johnson - College of the
Bahamas

Alphaeus R. Forbes - Ministry of Labour
and Social Development

Iva Dahl - The Bahamas Technical Voca-
tional Institute

John Pinder - National Congress of Trade
Unions

Marisa Smith - Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration/ Bahamas Employers Confederation

Dorothy Godet - Department of Labour

Charles Hunt - Consultant, Ministry of
Labour and Social Development

Representative - Trade Union Congress

Representative - Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil.

Other members of the New Providence
committee:

Allan Strachan - Undersecretary

Brian Nutt - BECON

Thomas Bastian - TUC

John Pinder - NCTUB

Rev Patrick Paul - Christian Council
Rev Victor Cooper - Christian Council

The programme is geared craft.

GRAND BAHAMA

Tryone Gibson - Deputy Director of
Labour, chairman.

Greg Moss - Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce

Leslie Lightbourne - Grand Bahama Pow-
erline Staff Union

Malvese Capron - Freeport Harbour Con-
tainer Port.

Mervin Wright - Grand Bahama Port

Authority Workers Union (TUC)

Johns Curtiss - Bahamas Public Service
Union (NCTUB)

Bishop Sobig Kemp - President, Grand
Bahama Christian Council

Elliott Thompson - Bahamas Hotel Cater-
ing and Allied Workers Union

Tirzh Carey - Urban Renewal Programme
Jennifer Ellis - Urban Renewal Programme
Dr Coralee Kelly - College of the Bahamas

Cheryl Marshall-Campbell - The Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Institute

Fred Delancey - Consultant

Geneva Rutherford - Grand Bahama Port
Authority

Agnes McIntosh - Penthouse Investments



Confederation, Trade
Unions, the Bahamas Cham-

Vocational Institute (BTVI)
as learning centres.

BU ES RRR LTS fell 3
CLOSING SALE

Rivet Rite Shelving, Gondolas,
Glass Shelves, 2 & 4 Arm Display

towards training unem-
ployed persons in a range of
areas such as masonry, basic
carpentry skills, landscaping,
heavy equipment operating,
housekeeping, accounting,
diesel mechanics, nail tech-
niques, computer applica-
tions and straw and shell

A steering committee was
established on June 8, 2009,
comprising representatives
from the Ministry of Labour
and Social Development, the
College of the Bahamas, the
Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BTVD,
the Bahamas Employers

ber of Commerce and the
Bahamas Christian Council.

The course structure will
be designed as an “intro to
course” which will provide
participants with basic and
functional exposure to per-
form in an entry level capac-

ity subsequent to the suc-
cessful completion of the
programme.

Courses will be standard
offerings at COB and BTVI.

Non-traditional courses a
likely scenario to enhance
long term viability. An
example of this is marine

Racks, Gridwall, Slatwall, Slotted
Standards, and Hardware,
Smee Coes male cM (oS
Coverall’s $5.00, White S/S &
SES ch noose Dee
Blank ID Cards, 16” Stand Fans,
School Shoes, Men's Jeans size
ETO SEM (SRM Ice oi(ciice
4pk. $6.00 & more Chevy Van
$1,200.00 Location: Maderia
Shopping Center Behind Mystical
CN Tam miele Renae (Ulam ES
ee ESC CROIE CIS

FOR SALE BY OWNER
cal rh Wi
4 ai navigation course.

oe
L a. Courses will be relevant

= to market needs.
wt a ae To reduce probability of

Four(4) - Unit Plaza over saturation in a particu-
East Shirley Street lar skill set Courses will

. place strong emphasis on
Zoned for Retail Shop/Office Use developing and enhancing

soft skills. This will be inher-
ent in the course structure
and will be reinforced with
specific sessions conducted
by the Bahamas Hotel Asso-
clation.

Get Your Clarks On!

These styles available at:
The Shoe Village, Madeira Shopping Plaza - 328-0703
The Shoe Village, Marathon Mall - 393-6113
The Shoe Village, RND Plaza Freeport - 351-3274
The Clarks Store, Marathon Mall - 393-4155

The ONLY Authorized Retailer Of Genuine Clarks
Shoes For The ENTIRE FAMILY!

Hours 11am - 5pm
Thur. 23rd, July
11. am - 5pm Wed. 29th

Pec Sale Opt. |: Entire Complex - $479K net, on.o

Sale Opt. 2: Three-Unit Ownership = $594K net
Serious Inquires Only
Fh. (242) 477-3772(days)

Contaact: 326-8215 or 465-8648
bjohnson@adamandeve.bs



Ee
a Liebet»
Me edi,

ColinalImperial.

No WORK ZONE” “Wo WoRR ZONE” Way

A TRIBUTE TO
GARTH THOMPSON

Garth Thompson died at his home unexpectedly on July

? at the age of 69. He was general manager at Quality
Auto Sales for 20 years until his retirement for health
reasons in February, 2008.

medical emergencies
don't study economics



... they don't know the word “recession” either.

That's why you need to maintain your insurance coverage
with Colinalmperial even when the economy is weak -to
make sure hard times don't get harder just because you
fall ill or fall down on your luck.

Stay confident. Stay connected.

Beginning in the early 1970s, his long automotive career
: also included stints at KC New Car Sales, Bahamas
confidence for life Automobile, Nassau Motor Company and Avis.

Garth had trained as an architect in his youth and led
planning and development of the Auto Mall on Shirley
Street, which houses state-of-the-art parts, service and
sales facilities for both Quality Auto and Executive
Motors.

www.colinaimperial.com

According to Jeff Albury, Quality Auto's owner, Garth
was a disciplinarian and multi-tasker who could organise
complex operations with efficiency and integrity.

"He made a tremendous personal contribution to the
development of Quality Auto Sales and the Auto Mall
over the years,” Albury said.

The management and staff
of Quality Auto Sales and Executive Motors extend their deepest synnpathy
to Garth's wife, [rene avd fis children, Joni, Minarda and Travis.

FIRST AID





THE TRIBUNE





anti-smugegling exercises

FROM page one

While a demonstration of
this process was conducted
for the benefit of this news-
paper, security officials have
asked that the exact proce-
dure not be released.

With the genesis of this
exercise is normally to
counter any attempts at
smuggling drugs, security
experts revealed that these
“modified containers” have
been known to be used by
terrorists to ship weapons,
even humans from one coun-
try to the next.

Therefore, in an effort to
ensure that their facility does

not become a victim of this
nefarious trade, Operation
Manager Thomas Gibson
said they have required all
docking personnel to take
part in the programme.

“All containers that come
in are checked when they
arrive. They are sealed and
the seal number is recorded.
So when it is time to load the
ship, we pull the container,
check the seal, along with the
police, and re-seal it again.

“But what I’m saying is
even overnight if someone
just came on the terminal to
do anything we would
know,” he said.

As a partner in the inter-

LOCAL NEWS

Seaboard marines hold

national C-TPAT pro-
gramme the security officer
conducting the training
explained that Seaboard
Marine works in partnership
with local authorities to
ensure that their containers
are not used for any other
purpose than that for which it
was originally intended.
According to the US
Department of Homeland
Security, C-TPAT is a volun-
tary government to business
initiative to build coopera-
tive relationships that
strengthen and improve over-
all international supply
chains and US border securi-

ty.

“C-TPAT recognizes that
US Customs and Border Pro-
tection (CBP) can provide
the highest level of cargo
security only through close
cooperation with the ultimate
owners of the international
supply chain such as
importers, carriers, consol-
idators, licensed customs bro-
kers, and manufacturers.

“Through this initiative,
CBP is asking businesses to
ensure the integrity of their
security practices and com-
municate and verify the secu-
rity guidelines of their busi-
ness partners within the sup-
ply chain,” the statement
said.

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 9

c

Employment Opportuni

Experienced Tellers

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed to delivering superior quality service, to
training and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in
the community.

Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for
Experienced Tellers.

Assault
charges

FROM page one

QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE:
Matured (minimum age 23 years)

Minimum of two (2) years Teller experience

Excellent cash management skills

Excellent customer service skills

Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills
Excellent organzational and time management skills
Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications
Minimum five (5) BGCSE with C grades or above, including
Mathematics and English

TOWN HALL MEETING

There have been so many questions, and we have
received so few answers.

cil, was charged with assault-
ing McKenzie, former
BHCAWU treasurer on May
11. McKenzie was also
charged with assaulting Smith
and causing damage to his
prescription eyeglasses valued
at $685.

Both men appeared in
Court 5, Bank Lane yester-
day morning and withdrew
the charges. They were both
discharged. Smith was report-
edly hit in the face as he
served a court notice to mem-
bers of the BHCAWU exec-
utive council at Worker’s
House on Harrold Road. The
orders prohibited any mem-
ber of the council from pre-
venting any other executive
member from attending a full
meeting of the council for
election nominations.

The court order came after
the union executive split over
which day to hold nomina-
tions for council elections.

Join The Committee to Protect and Preserve The Bahamas
for Future Generations at a Town Hal! Meeting to discuss the
relocation of the container port to Arawak Cay and the harmful

REMUNERATION PACKAGE;

Commonwealth Bank 1s a Great place to work! We offer an
exciting work environment with the opportunity for growth and
development. We also offer a competitive compensation package,
reflecting the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications,
including a performance based incentive plan, health, vision,
dental and life insurances and a pension plan.

impact it will have on the surrounding environment, our

communities and us, the Bahamian people.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before

Venue: The British Colonial Hilton heer ae

Date: Thursday, July 30, 2009
5 : a ee Human Resources Department
Time: 7:00pm - 9:30pm ierpelles
P.O. Box SS-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Telefax: (242) 393-8073
E-mail address: hr@ combankltd.com

©2009 CreativeRelations.net

Join other worried citizens, including Senator Jerome Fitzgerald
and express your concerns.

“Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their
interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those
under consideration will be contacted.”

Moderated by Wendell Jones.



ployment Opportunities =

wf fs en Tey: l
—y

oF Su
Ss

Roles in Finance and Operations Departments Marine Project Controls Specialist

Dee to the changed business environment, growth in basiness operations as well as significant level of
Ivestinen i the Conkpany several Opportunies exast for seasoned hiacial and operons
professionals.

Department Assistant / Cash Applications

Reporting to the Manager of Business Controls smd Analysis, you would be responsible for providing
the Company's Finance Department with the clerical and administrative support necessary to complete
all of its clesagnated tasks. Tn addition, you will be responsible for the tanely processune of payments
from customers. In an ever-changing environment, you will need to be flexible and have the ability to
embrace frequent changes. You must have strong commonication skills, be self-motivated and able to
werk independently. You mst have au Associate's Degree, preferably in Basiness Adminstration, with
expentence working with JD Edwards, proficient in Wlicroseft Office (Excel, Word and Power Point) is
aplus, You must be able to uveract well with multiple levels ot management ane operntional statt

Cash Management / Credit Coordinator

Reporting to the Chief Financial Officer, you wonkl be responsible for the optimization of cash flow for
Vopak Terminal Bahamas by maintaining accurate cash flow projections, executing cash transactions and
collecting mney owed to the Company expedimousy. In aiever-chinging environment, you Will need
to be flexible and have the abiliry to embrace frequent changes. You must have strong analytical aud
conunuMication skills, you mast be self-motivated and able to work independently. You must have a
degree in Accounting from an accredited four (4) year wuversity or college and 5 years professsonal
(Acconting) business experience. Additionally, you must have experience working with ID Edwards
of Hyperion and mst be proficient in Microsoft Office (Excel, Word and Power Point), Prior experience
working ina Cash Management position is a plas. You must be able to interact well with multiple levels

of management and operational staff,

Fixed Asset Accountant / Auditor

Reporting to the Financial Analyst / Fined Asset Coondinator, you will be required to contribute to the
praection of the Company's assets by documenting axl analyzing the financial information related to
fived assets and controls procedures. [nan ever-changing environment, you will eed to be flexible and
have the alulity to work onder pressure, multi task and meet deadlines, ‘You must have strong analvtical
and comumimication skills, be self-motivated aid able to work independently. You must have a degree
in Accounting from an aecredited four (4) vear university or college and 3 years of professional (Accounting)
bnsiiess expenence, You wall be reqnired te averact well with mulnple levels of management sil
operational staff. You must have experience working with JD Edwards and be proficient in Microsoft
Ottee (Excel, Word and Power Pout) Expenerce working with fined assets A plies

Financial Reporting Coordinator

Reportar to the Manager of Biaaess Controls d& Analysis, vou will be rexyluined te Convriliite te the
protection of the Company's profitability aod nek reduction by documenting and analyzing the financial
statements, controls and financial compliance functions. ‘You will be required to further ensure the timely
ald accurate complehon of internal aud external andits, budgetuig and forecasting reports. Ln an
ever-changing enviroment, you will need to be flexible and have the ability to work wouder pressure,
noth task and meet deadlines. You must have strong analytical and commoucation skills, be self-motvated
ald able to work independently. “You must have a degree in Accounting from an accredited four (49 year
university of college and 5 years professional (Accounting) business experience. You mvust lave experience
working with JD Edwards or Hypenon and be proficient in Microsoft Office (Excel, Word and Power
Point. You must be able to interact well with ouultiple levels of management and operational staff

As directed by the Project Manager, you will be required to perform critical path analysis to forecast
potential issues that coukd impact deliverables or project contractual commitments amd performs
“ whataf” evalnations af different approaches. You must have previo manne construction projects
comtels experience inexcess of 5 years. The candidate must have a mininvun of a BS Degree im
a relevant engineenng field, You must be able to determine margins in companson to original
developmental budgets for projects, tack and neonitor costs. ‘You must be able to produce project
gains and loss schedules tor Manageovent review, You most be able to control determed revenue
aed Goal AGCCOUMNNS, track pryect reverie Awd Cres On a coumpete bases, You ost awe the abuary
to analyze all standard cost variances and allocate costs as directed by the Project Manager.

Senior Offshore Inspector

‘You mast have 15 vears offshore Marine Comstriction expencoce and minimum of an AAS in
Engineeting, You will be responsible for coordinating, inspecting and monitoring an offshore marine
inspection group, famuliar with API, AWS and related regulatory bodies. You will be responsible
for the entire inspection team and communicate to the Project Manager on all related activities, and
Wal be respeesi te bo assiire all COMME Ns ancl ppanys are mnitnctirel py accordance wath the
comract specifications. You will coordinate the activities of all the concemed parties, and will
interface With the proctirement department, pipe manufachirer, fitings and equipment mamifacnirers,
IS pectonk Techie cars, Hap coaters anil Irae peter.

Senior Project Engineer

Yor must have Bachelor of Science Degree at an accredited University m Mechanical Engineering
with a minimum of 5 years job expenence relating to fabrication and offshore constriction
ianagemnent. You will be accomntable for coordination and monitoring offshore construction You
will also be responsible for submitting request for proposals for offshore aml onshore constraction
amd offshore installation, therefore must be familar with commen technical proposals to determine
the best candidate for the job scope. The proposals and work the senior project engineer mst be
familiar with shall be but wot limited to construction of offshore platforms Le. jacket and deck, the
removal of offshore platforms, debns removal, pipeline removal, pipeline pupe and coatings, laying
offshore pipelines, installation of jacket and deck, and fabrication and installation of various. facility
equipment. You will be interfacing with the procurement departinent, pipe manofacturer, fittings
al ecpnpabenie mAWuAChiers, inspectors, HIpe coaler ail Crans porters, avn design engineers.

eter Meet te ee ea ee lle ee
Bahama Or by emall to: vopakapps@gfs-bahamas.com

Applicants are to bo aware that any inquiry made by tolaphone or office visit to
ee ae ee mT ee MP
insligible for process. Applicants will be notified by written letter on the status of
etme el

The deadline for application is Friday,August 14th, 2009





HAL:

PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

LOCAL NEWS





ASSOCIATION



AUGUST MONDAY

HOLIDAY HOURS
Monday, August 3, 2009

CLOSED

Normal banking hours resume
Tuesday, August 4, 2009
9:30am - 3:00pm

CLEARING BANKS
ASSOCIATION MEMBERS

Bank of The Bahamas
International Limited
CitiBank, N.A. Bahamas
Commonwealth Bank Limited
Fidelity Bank Bahamas Limited
FirstCaribbean International Bank
RBC Royal Bank of Canada
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited





THE TRIBUNE



Chamber of Commerce
president unofficially
backs local lottery

FROM page one

issue, Mr Rolle said his
stance remains an unofficial
position “at this time.”

While the legalization of a
local lottery may have only
been discussed at the execu-
tive level to get some “tacit
support”, Mr Rolle said the
Chamber is prepared to doa
full study to determine what
the “benefits and downside
risks may be” prior to tak-
ing a full formal position on
it.

“We have to debate this
on the merits and make deci-
sions on what the scientific
research says. But we cannot
neglect the emotional side of
the argument. It has to be a
very balanced approach,” he
said.

With “numbers” having an
estimated transaction value
pegged at $600 million a year
in the Bahamas, Mr Rolle

said that if the government
only took 15 per cent of this
amount in taxes, these sums
could go toward healthcare,
educational, physical infra-
structural development.

“There are so many
aspects of our infrastructure
that is still underdeveloped
and still requires a lot of
investment and that money
can go toward that. I am very
big on education and IJ think
we have missed the boat on
how we design, finance, and
how we invest in education.
And this is a golden oppor-
tunity if we head in that
direction to improve the
quality of education.

“One can make an argu-
ment that people will be irre-
sponsible if gambling is legal-
ized. But my argument is,
yes, some may be irresponsi-
ble, and that is the emotion-
al response, but if you use
money to invest in education

Police Constable

FROM page one

McClain being granted bail but asked that the court set reporting
conditions. Ms Farquharson told the court that McClain has been
a police officer since the age of 19, is not a flight risk, has no pre-
vious convictions and has no matters pending before the courts.

McClain was granted bail in the sum of $4,000 with one surety.
The case has been adjourned to August 6 and transferred to Court
6, Parliament Street. McClain was ordered to report to the East
Street South Police Station every Saturday before 6pm.

Don't wait until after you have been victimized

Get-your-FREE-alarm today

Professional woe



people on the benefits of
being a responsible citizen
then certainly they will make
better decisions,” he said.
Mr Rolle added that gov-
ernment at this time has little
options open to it to gain
additional revenue. With this
scheme, he said, it would not
require government to con-
tinue to have to borrow
money, which would then
begin to compromise the
country’s fiscal structure.
“Or we can look at creat-
ing new revenue streams.
And I am in favour of cre-
ating new revenue streams
which I feel there are some
positive benefits if you look
at the lottery aspect. Unfor-
tunately, and I hate to use
the term ‘fanatics’, but that is
the term that has to be used
because the fanatics are not
giving the discussion a fair
chance. They are not trying
to balance the discussion.
“Everyone who gambles is
not irresponsible. And for-
tunately 100 per cent of the
people who will gamble will
not spend their rent money,
their food money, and
neglect their family. The
reality is there is a distribu-
tion of people/behaviour and
you have to determine what
percentage of that distribu-
tion those people represent.
“The biggest scourge we
ever had in this country was
drugs. Everybody didn’t deal
it, everybody didn’t consume
it. Everybody didn’t partici-
pate it in. So the argument
has to be well balanced and
it has to be rational. I am
tired of these irrational
debates we continue to have
in this country. That is why
we can’t progress. We allow
one segment to hijack the
process with an irrational
argument and because they
scream the loudest nothing
else is heard and then we
don’t move the debate any
further and that has to
change,” he said.

BitenntoBiGSavingsatiour,

Bacluto School

an _|

Thursday, Friday & Saturday
URE GBT a

The? Sweeting's

Vi

Shoes For All Walks Of Life

Madeira Shopping Plaza 328-0703
Marathon Mall 393-6113
RND Plaza, Freeport 351-3274

All Major
Credit Cards
Accepted.
Sorry No
Debit Cards.

» Colanks

Marathon Mall 393-6113

“The ONLY authorized retailer of Genuine Clarks Shoes for the ENTIRE FAMILY!”





THE TRIBUNE PAGE 12

OF



t



THURSDAY, JULY 30,

2009

PAGES 13 & 14¢ International sports news

Athletes take spotlight

urge you
athletes to
stay drug free

REIGNING Common-
wealth boxing champion
Jermaine “Choo Choo”
Mackey, a tough-kid-
turned-super-hero, has
thrown his weight behind a
proposed anti-doping bill
designed to keep athletes
performing in the
Bahamas drug-free or
force them to face the con-
sequences.

“Drug use in sports is
dishonest and I applaud
the government’s efforts
to bring it out in the open
and create laws to deal
with it because it is a grow-
ing problem that comes
back to haunt the athlete
as well as the country
where they are perform-
ing,” said Mackey, the
super middle weight
champ who holds the 52-
nation title.

Performance-enhancing
drugs can ruin an athlete’s
future, said the fighter,
offering to throw his sup-
port into the ring to help
drum up support for the
bill introduced in the
House of Assembly last
week by Minister of State for Sports Desmond Bannister.

“Athletes sometimes think it (drugs) gives them the upper
hand but it really gives the other athlete the upper hand,” said
Mackey. “After all their hard work, they get caught or even if
they don’t, it hurts them, and then they are robbed of their full
potential.”

Mackey — who faces a challenge to his title this October
when Charles Adumu of Ghana meets him at the Kendal
Isaacs National Gymnasium in front of a crowd expected to be
in the thousands — said he is discouraged by what he believes is
an increasing reliance on performance-enhancing drugs and
doesn’t want that trend to mushroom in the Bahamas.

“Participation in sports builds character and healthy citi-
zens,” said Mackey, who grew up in a rough, tough Kemp
Road neighbourhood and now stands as its leading role mod-
el.

“For a country the size of our Bahamas to have produced so
many outstanding athletes is amazing and many of those ath-
letes have helped produce a wealth of outstanding citizens of
extraordinary character. We have to protect that so I am fully
behind the government making tough laws and enforcing them
to keep the world of athletes apart from the world of drugs. And
I tell all my friends and people I know in sports, I urge you ath-
letes to stay drug free.”

)

Commonwealth
boxing champion

backs proposed
anti-doping bill





JERMAINE MACKEY

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:d22-1722 « Fax: 326-7452

3 ENTAA, EXTRA

Large Shipment
of
Used Gars

COME CHECK
US OUT

wa" Shipments Arrived

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Invurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

ET Se



noni more Io cunt Them hmow le cloee | For wih Wnow be cCigpe cha firms elle Court iy

= Dec

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ollowing another

impressive showing

at the latest meet on

the IAAF World

Athletics Tour,
Bahamian athletes continue to
rise in the Tour’s standings with
many of them listed near the top
in their respective events.

At the Herculis Super Grand
Prix in Monaco, Debbie Fergu-
son McKenzie and Chandra
Sturrup continued their stellar
seasons in preparation for next
month’s World Athletics.

Ferguson-Mckenzie ran to a
second place finish in the 100m
in a time of 10.97s behind 2008
Olympic gold medallist in the
event, Shelly-Ann Fraser of
Jamaica, who won in 10.91s.

Sturrup finished fourth in
11.13s just behind reigning
Olympic 200m champion Veron-
ica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica
who was third in 11.03s.

Also competing at the meet,
quarter-miler Andrae Williams
finished eighth in the 400m in
47.98s.

Americans LaShawn Merrit
and David Neville finished in
the top two positions in 44.73s
and 45.26s respectively.

Ferguson-McKenzie earned
16 tour points for her perfor-
mance while Sturrup added 12
to her total.

Sturrup, now ranked second
in the 100m, has garnered 72
points behind Kerron Stewart
of Jamaica who leads the field with 100 points.

Sturrup finished second in consecutive meets this month,
posting times at Paris Saint-Denis and London in times of
11.15s and 11.09s.

She posted a season's best time of 10.99s July 10 in
Roma, Italy, in a third place finish.

Ferguson-McKenzie is ranked seventh in the event with
a total of 55 points with her latest posting of 10.97s, the sixth
fastest time of any 100m sprinter this year, which pro-
pelled her six spots in the rankings.

Carmelita Jeter of the United States is ranked third with
68 points, while Fraser (64 points) and country woman
Sheri-Ann Brooks (56 points) round out the top five.

Ferguson-McKenzie has dominated the 200m on tour
with three first place finishes and a third in her fourth
event. After four meets, she remains in second place with
39 points, just three points behind leading 200m runner
LaVerne Jones-Ferrette with 42 points.

The US Virgin Islander began her season with three
consecutive first place finishes, followed by a pair of second

now andunderstand,imagnaton poms.ui ta Al! wie maint ye? dscaver!



Â¥
i ah 7
| ws ! ‘S201 10
1 wo |
” Register at:

bilgi wweimagine.vertexping. com
Are you looking for an extraordinary experience this
summer, norsaathapheditionn
agers

August 4" - Auguet 212009
8.30) AM - 5:30 PM
Buys and Girls Agos 5- 13
8!" Torrace (EAGT) off Collins Ave.

2
2
=
z
2
=



(Prepretors Aisa & Steve Sobeh)

Yeoom Ga uBio aM The 0) quod ueytubOur pul cen gut mou

£ aw SUNS SAA YD CHS BS Sou Spy Oy [SE So Lye QU oo Sy cP pou 7

GOLDEN GIRL Chandra Sturrup finished fourth in the
100m at the Herculis Super Grand Prix in Monaco...





Bobcats, Hornets
complete Okafor-
Chandler deal...

See page 14

place finishes.

Ferguson-McKenzie ran her
world leading time of 22.32s July
20 in Greece, just two weeks pri-
or to posting her season's best
time in the 100m.

Bianca Knight of the United
States is ranked third with 35
points, Shericka Williams of
Jamaica is fourth with 32 points
and Cydonie Mothersill of the
Cayman Islands rounds out the
top five with 24 points.

In the men's 400m, Chris
Brown tops the leader board
with a sizeable 12 point advan-
tage over his nearest competi-
tor.

Brown posted consecutive
first place finishes this month in
Berlin and Roma at Golden
League events, each good for 20
tour points apiece.

The national 400m record
holder has finished no worst
than third on a tour event with a
season's best time of 44.81s two
weeks ago in Roma.

Gary Kikaya of the Congo is
ranked second with 53 points,
while Renny Quow of Trinidad
and Tobago is third with 50
points.

Other members of the
Bahamas' silver medal winning
Olympic 1600m relay team have
also reached top 25 rankings.

Michael Mathieu is in a three
way tie for a 21st place with 14
points, Williams is ranked 24th
with 13 points, while Andretti
Bain is ranked 40th.

Leevan Sands, with a fourth
place finish last weekend in Lon-
don, moved up to third in the

(AP Photo)

triple jump rankings.

After a two-month layoff, Sands returned to form this
month with a season’s best jump of 17.13m.

Arnie Girat of Cuba maintains the top position with 50
points including two first place finishes and two second
place finishes.

Phillips Idowu is ranked second with 45 points and three
first place finishes.

Shamar Sands maintains a 10th place ranking in the 110
meter hurdles with 38 points. His latest contest was a third
place finish June 17 in Ostrava, good enough for seven tour
points.

His highest point total was a 12 point outing in a fourth
place finish at Berlin and a season’s best time came May 30
in New York when he finished second in 13.32s.

Daryn Robles leads the field with 90 points, followed by
Dexter Faulk (80 points) and Antwon Hicks (72 points).

Donald Thomas, after three competitions, is ranked
10th in the high jump, while Christine Amertil is 12th in the
400m.

Swimmers

continue to

break local
records

BAHAMIAN swimmers,
making their mark at the
world championships in Italy,
continue to produce faster
times and set new local
records.

At the 13th FINA World
Championships in Roma,
Team Bahamas continues to
shine.

On day two of the meet,
Alicia Lightbourne swam a
personal best time in the
100m breaststroke and a new
Bahamas record in 1:12.60.
She broke the old record time
of 1:14.36 which she held since
the RBC Bahamas National
Swimming Championships.

On day three, the team
took a much needed rest after
two busy, hot days in temper-
atures which reached as high
as 39 degrees Celsius. But
they were back in the pool on
day four.

Olympians Alana Dillette
and Vereance Burrows both
swam Bahamian records in
the morning prelims. Dillette
broke her own record of 30.50
in the 50m backstroke with a
time of 29.83 and Burrows
broke veteran Jeremy
Knowles old record in the 100
free in a time of 50.88.

Bahamians hit the pool
again today, Friday and Sat-



ALICIA LIGHTBOURNE

urday with individual swims
in the 100 free, 50 breast, 50
fly, 50 free and the 4 x 100
female medley.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 13



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Phelps sets world record in 200 fly

a

MICHAEL PHELPS races to win

TC RICCRIRe

Butterfly at the FINA Swimming

} World Championships in Rome

Aes cT OC ae

WT Ap

Pen cite ac

: Bahamas Chamber
Pee tare
OUTSTANDING BUSINESS
OF THE YEAR AWARD 2009

Easy & Affordable

Teale) UeR area

Ma



aay Payee
UEC CIE:

Fm ihe
or ais
an

=

{
‘
-
:
oe
-
a
p

ee

aT} a

_

S
@
[=
ic)
=
J
=

By PAUL NEWBERRY
AP National Writer

ROME (AP) — Now that’s
more like it. Michael Phelps
bounced back from a stunning
loss with something more famil-
iar — another world record
Wednesday.

One night after he was sound-
ly beaten by Germany’s Paul
Biedermann, Phelps set a world
record in the 200-meter butterfly
with a time of 1 minute, 51.51
seconds — more than a half-sec-
ond ahead of his previous mark,
1:52.03.

Phelps whipped around quick-
ly to see his time and held up his
right index finger when the
“WR” was posted. And just like
Beijing, he has taken down
another of Mark Spitz’s stan-
dards, this time with the 34th
world record of his career — one
more than Spitz had during his
brilliant run in the pool.

“T wanted to step on it in the
first 100 to get out there in the
clean water, and that’s pretty
much what happened,” Phelps
said. “It was a lot more pain last
night than tonight.”

There couldn’t have been a
more appropriate place for
Phelps to add another record to
his resume. Shortly after he
climbed from the pool, Italy’s
Federica Pellegrini sent the
home crowd into a frenzy when
she set the 20th world mark of
the four-day-old meet in the 200
freestyle.

Before the night was done,
South Africa’s Cameron van der
Burgh broke the mark he set in
the semifinals to win the 50
breaststroke and China’s Zhang
Lin took down Grant Hackett’s
four-year-old 800 free by more
than six seconds, with Tunisia’s
Ous Mellouli also going under
the old mark but only getting sil-
ver. Both are non-Olympic
events.

Earlier, Germany’s Daniela
Samulski and Russia’s Anasta-
sia Zueva got things rolling by
setting records in consecutive
semifinal heats of the 50 back-
stroke, another event not on the
Olympic program. And let’s not
forget American Mary Descenza,
who took more than three sec-
onds off her personal best to
swim the fastest women’s 200
butterfly ever — in the prelimi-
naries, no less.

For those who’ve lost count,
that’s 22 records in Rome, hard-
ly living up to it label as the Eter-
nal City. Nothing is sacred in
these high-tech bodysuits, which
have already helped surpass the
15 records set at the last worlds
in Melbourne two years ago,
with four days still to go.

Phelps couldn’t wait to get on
the podium to collect his first
individual title at the Foro Itali-
co. While his name was being
announced in English and Ital-
ian, he stood impatiently with
his right foot already on the

stand.

Finally, he hopped up to the
highest rung, thrust both arms
in the air with a defiant look that
melted into a crooked smile. He
was back on top.

The scene was much different
than a night earlier, when Bie-
dermann blew away Phelps in
the 200 free, winning by more
than a full body length and
snatching away one of the Amer-
ican’s five individual world
records.

The loss — Phelps’ first in an
individual race at the Olympics
or world championships since
2005 — was followed by coach
Bob Bowman’s angry tirade
against the sport’s governing
body, which allowed
polyurethane suits to be used at
these championships.

FINA plans to ban all body-
suits sometime early in 2010, but
Bowman said Phelps might take
his goggles and go home until
the rule goes into effect, believ-
ing Biedermann’s Arena suit
gave him a huge edge over
Phelps’ once-revolutionary
Speedo LZR Racer because it’s
more buoyant.

Phelps stuck with Speedo for
the fly, though he did change out
of a model that stretches up to
his shoulders, going with one that
stretched only from waist to
ankles.

“It didn’t feel right in
warmup,” Phelps said. “I
changed out of it and put this
on. This is what I’ve always worn
in this race.”

“He actually warmed up with
the full body and he just said it
felt too tight and he took it off,”
Bowman said. “Then I noticed
he hadn’t shaved his chest, but
I’m like, Just don’t worry about
it.’”’

No worries, indeed. No one
was even close.

“T said to Bob beforehand,
*T’m going to go for the 150 and
whatever happens, happens. ’m
going to try to hang on the last
50,”’ Phelps said. “I was able to.”

Bowman knew Phelps had it
when he made the last turn
ahead of everyone else, no mat-
ter how hard he went out.

“He swam a really fast first
150 and he paid for it a little on
the last lap,” the coach said. “I’m
sure he’ll be tired, but I knew
nobody was getting by him.
That’s how he is.”

Actually, Bowman was confi-
dent from the moment he saw
Phelps at lunch. Instead of fret-
ting over the loss to Biedermann,
he had that look the coach likes
to see — and there weren’t any
concerns about someone having
a technological edge.

“T just felt like he was really
relaxed tonight,” Bowman said.
“T saw him at lunchtime and he
was in really good spirits. You
can always tell when something
like this is kind of going to hap-
pen. He was definitely there
tonight.”

Mme eee
ere CRN Este

www.furnitureplus.com





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Bobcats, Hornets complete
Okafor-Chandler deal

By MIKE CRANSTON
AP Sports Writer

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP)
— The New Orleans Hornets
finally found a taker for
Tyson Chandler. It took a
deal with tinkering Charlotte
coach Larry Brown, who was
willing to jettison the Bob-
cats’ first draft pick.

Emeka Okafor was sent to
the Hornets on Tuesday for
Chandler, another former No.
2 overall pick. The trade
involving 26-year-old centers
brought financial relief to
both teams and confidence
they'll each thrive with a new
man in the middle.

The Hornets have been try-
ing to unload the 7-foot-1
Chandler for several months.
A trade last season to Okla-
homa City was rescinded after
Chandler failed a physical
amid concerns aver a linger-
ing toe injury.

"I'm very, very excited and
thrilled about this new oppor-
tunity,” Chandler said in a
conference call.

Brown was willing to gam-
ble on the injury-prone, ath-
letic big man who can also
play power forward and is
three inches taller than
Okafor.

"We're getting a young kid
who is long and athletic and
can play multiple positions
and fills a need that we obvi-
ously have,” Brown said.

The Hornets were intrigued
by Okafor's superior
rebounding and durability.
New Orleans gets a reliable
big man with a longer con-
tract as it tries to recover from
last season's first-round play-
off exit.

"Emeka is one of the pre-
mier centers in the NBA with
All-Star caliber scoring and
rebounding averages through-
out his career,” Hornets gen-
eral manager Jeff Bower said.
"His potential to improve is
endless once you put him on



EMEKA OKAFOR (50) works the ball against Cleveland Cavaliers’ J J
Hickson (21) during the first quarter of a game in Cleveland...

(AP Photo: Mark Dunean)

Drive It!, Drag It!,
Pull it!, Push it!

EVEN IF IT DOESN’T MOVE
WE WILL TRADE IT IN.

BEST PRICES
EVER SALE!

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED

F289 Wall Read
PO. Bow Nt
b (2A2) 39ed4a? £042) 9938798

ON THE SPOT FINANCING WITH
COMMONWEALTH BANK

Thompson Blvd. « Oakes Field
t. 242.326.6377" f. 242.326.6315
é. sanpin@coralwave.com

INSURANCE AVAILABLE WITH
ADVANTAGE INSURANCE
BRORERS & AGENTS LTD.





TYSON CHANDLER (6) applauds in the second half of a first-round
playoff game against the Denver Nuggets in New Orleans...

the court running with Chris
Paul."

Chandler had the best sea-
son of his career (2007-08)
playing with Paul. The pair
comprised a constant alley-
oop threat when Chandler
was healthy, and the two were
close off the court.

"I'm losing a great friend, a
brother. T.C. is my man. ...
I'm going to miss him,” said
Paul, who was attending a
basketball camp in New
Orleans.

"It's going to take some
time to see how this works
out," Paul continued. "I want
Emeka to come in here and
be the best player he’s ever
been. From today on out,
that's my teammate. ... Hope-
fully we can eventually have
the same relationship that me
and Tyson had.”

The deal is the fourth trade
Charlotte has made since
managing partner Michael
Jordan hired Brown before
last season. Brown, in his

(AP Photo: Bill Haber)

record ninth NBA head
coaching job, has continued
his history of numerous trades
to mold the team into his ver-
satile, defensive-minded lik-
ing.

Now it includes sending the
centerpiece of Charlotte's
new franchise to the city’s old
team.

Two years after the Hor-
nets bolted Charlotte, the
expansion Bobcats took
Okafor with the No. 2 pick in
the 2004 draft — after Orlan-
do grabbed Dwight Howard.

Okafor had injury problems
early in his career, but played
all 82 games in each of the
last two seasons. He averaged
13.2 points and 10.1 rebounds
in another solid, but unspec-
tacular season under Brown,
who later questioned his bas-
ketball fire.

"T wanted him to have a
passion and work on his
game," Brown said Tuesday.
"T think he made unbeliev-
able progress in that regard.



a) Tamir einem tea CGI e Te

Tel: 502 2356

for ad rates

VU aM OUT

When we had an exit meet-
ing this past season he told
me he was going to do that,
he was going to work on his
game. ... This was a basket-
ball decision. It had nothing to
do with Emeka."

But Chandler, the No. 2
pick in the 2001 draft after
declaring for the NBA out of
high school, faces injury ques-
tions.

Chandler averaged 8.8
points and 8.7 rebounds in
only 45 games last season. He
then underwent procedures
on his left ankle and toe in
May after being ineffective in
the first-round series loss to
Denver.

Chandler will be in Char-
lotte for a physical later this
week and is confident he is
healed.

"For the first time in the
last couple of years, I have
had really good movement in
my toe,” Chandler said. "Now
Tam just trying to gain confi-
dence on my ankle again."

For the Hornets, it imme-
diately lowers their payroll
and could reduce luxury tax
payments. Okafor will make
$10.5 million next season and
Chandler $11.8 million. The
Hornets entered the week
with a payroll of about $78
million, triggering a dollar-
for-dollar tax on the amount
over the NBA's luxury tax
threshold of $69.9 million.

However, the Hornets also
take on the last five years of
an escalating, six-year, $72
million contract.

"We have a long-term
option for us now at the cen-
ter position and one we feel
we can grow with,” Bower
said. "We looked at that as
an asset, the fact that Emeka
is under contract. ... It shows
we are interested in improv-
ing and we are interested in
competing in the Western
Conference and we are willing
to pay the price."

The Bobcats, meanwhile,
unloaded a longer contract.
Chandler would make $12.7
million in a player option in
2010-11, the final season of
his deal.

Bobcats owner Bob John-
son, who is looking to sell the
team after losing millions of
dollars, has ordered manage-
ment not to reach the luxury
tax threshold. Shedding
Okafor's contract will help
achieve that goal.

Brown, meanwhile, is con-
vinced Chandler will improve
Charlotte's frontcourt.

"Emeka is a great kid, but
we all felt that with the way
Tyson plays, with his quick-
ness and his ability to handle
the ball and his length, that
was something that was very
important to us,” Brown said.
"That was the overriding fac-
tor."

e¢ AP Sports Writer Brett
Martel in New Orleans con-
tributed to this report





PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



MISSUNIVERSEPAGEANT2009 f&

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

¢ AUGUST 1-3

Arrivals and Registration, Official Photography

¢ AUGUST 5

Location Filming, Visit to the Ardastra
Gardens

Tour of Port Charlotte

Tour of Clifton Heritage Site and Sacred
Space,

Visit Arawak Cay (Fish Fry)

° AUGUST 6

Visit the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas

Courtesy Call on the Governor General

Tea Party at Government House

¢ AUGUST 7
Downtown Casual Shopping and Photo-ops

Display of Bahamian Arts and Crafts in
Rawson Square

Welcome Dinner

¢ AUGUST 8

Stay at the Bimini Bay Resort in Exuma

Tour of Moriah Harbour Cay and Elizabeth
Harbour, Stocking Island

Visit to Fountain of Youth and Shark Lab














HOME AWAT
FROM HOME

Safe and Comfortable



MANY of the events will take place at Atlantis 0 on
Paradise Island.

¢ AUGUST 9

Tour of Garden of the Groves in Grand
Bahama and Photo-ops

Visit the Port Lucaya Marketplace

Swimsuit Presentation at 5pm on the great
lawn at Our Lucaya Resort (Best Figure
Award) All seats: $50

¢ AUGUST 10

Motorcade through New Providence starting
at lpm leaving Arawak Cay

National Costume Competition at the

Rainforest Theatre, Wyndham Hotel,

starting at 7pm

VIP $175, General $125, Balcony $100

Short Term Apartment

RENTALS

Cheaper than a Hotel
week 2weeks | month

BARLAM AS
HOME AWAY FROM HOME

call: 3 28-2325

eriak hahinds horiwafronhors iigrielcom

¢ AUGUST 11
Tour of Harbour Island by Golf Cart
Leisure activities at Coral Sands Beach

House, Green Turtle Cay, Abaco

¢ AUGUST 12

Junkanoo Summer Festival
(in the afternoon)

Miss Universe 2009 Fashion Show with local
designers starting at 7pm at the Sheraton
Nassau Beach Hotel

VIP $125, General $75

Junkanoo Rush-Out along the Cable Beach
Strip starting at 9.30pm

¢ AUGUST 13

Delegates’ National Gift Charity Auction at
7.30pm at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Hotel

General $150, Corporate Tables $2,000,
Banner Tables $3,000

¢ AUGUST 14- 15
Rehearsals

Location Filming

° AUGUST 16

Miss Universe 2009 Presentation Show
in the Imperial Ballroom of Atlantis,
Paradise Island

VIP $250 (including buffet dinner), Sections
3-7: $175; 8-10: $125; 11-13: $100; 14-20: $100



¢ AUGUST 17 - 18

Preliminary Interviews with the
Panel of Judges

Rehearsals

¢ AUGUST 19 - 22

Rehearsals

National Director Meeting

¢ AUGUST 23

Viewing Party at 7pm on Royal Deck,
Royal Palace, Atlantis

All the food and drinks you can handle while
viewing the finals on multiple giant screens

All Access: $185

Final Show/Telecast from 9pm to 11pm
Imperial Ballroom, Atlantis

VIP $1,000

(including entrance to coronation ball)
Sections 3-7: $750; 8-11: $400; 11-13: $250;
14-20: $175

Coronation Ball starting at 11pm
Royal Court, Royal Towers, Atlantis
All Access: $145

¢ AUGUST 24

Departures

(More events will be added as
the schedule is finalised)

Astronauts inspect space shuttle ahead of landing

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

SPACE shuttle Endeavour’s
astronauts uncovered no notice-
able flaws in the thermal shield-
ing of their ship Wednesday fol-
lowing an in-depth inspection
with lasers and cameras,
according to Associated Press.

Flight director Tony Ceccac-
ci said a preliminary look at the
images beamed down found

was on track for Friday’s
planned landing. But he cau-
tioned that 20 hours usually are
needed to analyze all the data.
The survey of the wings and
nose, which took almost all
morning, is standard before a
shuttle returns to Earth.
Endeavour’s successful space
station construction mission is
due to end Friday morning.
NASA wants to make sure
the most vulnerable parts of

Endeavour’s heat shield were
not pierced by micrometeorites
or space junk during the past
two weeks in orbit.

The astronauts used a laser-
tipped boom to check for dam-
age.

It’s the same tool used to
check for launch damage early
in the flight; nothing serious
was detected back then despite
an unusual loss of insulating
foam from the fuel tank.

nothing amiss, and everything



Savings so BIG
we couldn't hold
them in the store!,

a
SUFDICS Biisva,
Of (tems Wvidst

saVINGsS 7 Pihe ttt 2b

188 Wulff Road
Tel: 323-3973 or 325-3976
Open Mon-Fri 7:00am-4:00pm ¢ Saturday 7:00am-3:00pm
Web: www.buildersmallbahamas.com
Email: info@buildersmallbahamas.com

© POG? Ceealive Edge



THE TRIBUNE







KENWOOD KERR



No ‘recovery’
in BISK stocks
until 2010 Q2

Market suffering from
investor confidence time
lag, plus absence of liquidity
and institutional investors to
show ‘true value’ of equities

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
business@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamian stock mar-
ket is unlikely to experience
“any real substantial recovery”
until possibly the 2010 second
quarter, a leading investment
advisor told Tribune Business
yesterday, due to its continued
liquidity problems and ‘time

SEE page 5B

Bahamas ‘fortunate’
to avoid mass lay-offs
in financial industry

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
business@tribunemedia. net

THE Bahamas has “been
fortunate so far” to have avoid-
ed mass lay-offs in its interna-
tional financial services indus-
try, the Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board’s (BFSB) chairman
saying yesterday that the sec-
tor had done well to “hold our

isin

TH UR SD Aly



WoW lai eac0.



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Resort project
set to be sold

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
business@tribunemedia.net

he receiver for a $250 million

Bahamas-based resort project

has begun moves to find a buy-

er for the development through
selecting a real estate agent to market it,
Tribune Business can reveal, as a former
financial backer attempts to enforce a
$24.228 million judgment against the pro-
ject’s principals.

Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, the Baker Tilly
Gomez partner and accountant, who is act-
ing as receiver for the Berry Islands-based
Chub Cay development, after its principals
allegedly defaulted on the repayment of a
$45 million loan to Scotiabank (Bahamas),
is understood to be close to selecting a
Bahamian real estate agent to market the
project to potential buyers/investors.

Among those agents in the mix are said
by sources to be the likes of H. G. Christie
and Damianos Sothebys International, with
Mr Gomez thought to be leaning in favour
of choosing the latter.

He is attempting to sell Chub Cay in a
bid to recover at least some of the funds its
principals owe to Scotiabank (Bahamas),
although finding a purchaser could prove
difficult in an economic environment over-
shadowed by recession and the aftermath of
the global liquidity/credit crunch.

* Receiver for $250m Chub Cay project set to appoint realtor to market
development to buyers, and recover Scotiabank (Bahamas) $45m loan
* Other financing partner seeking to enforce
$24m judgment against project principals
* MP says project’s failure has left area’s economy ‘struggling to survive’

Meanwhile, BA Chub Cay, a vehicle of
private equity firm, Cerberus Capital Man-
agement, which also provided a $16 mil-
lion loan to Chub Cay, is attempting to
enforce a $24 million judgment it obtained
in New York against the project’s three
principals in the south Florida courts.

According to court documents obtained
by Tribune Business, Cerberus is attempt-
ing to enforce the $24.228 million judg-
ment against Walter McCrory and Bob
Moss, plus the estate of the late Kaye Pear-
son. The judgment gives Cerberus the $16
million original principal on the loan, plus
$3.212 million via interest at 18.5 per cent,
levied between May 10, 2007 and June 1,
2008. A further $4.696 million in penalty
interest for the period June 2, 2008, to June
10, 2009, has also been assessed.

Meanwhile, the MP for the Berry Islands
yesterday told Tribune Business that Chub
Cay’s failure and slide into receivership
had brought his constituency’s economy to
a virtual “standstill”, with many “struggling

business@tribunemedia.net

* BFSB chair says sector
done ‘well to hold our
position’ after stock
market meltdown’s
impact on client base

* Unaware of any ‘wave’ of
redundancies to come,
as tepid stock market

A LEADING international bank saw its
Bahamas operations suffer a 71.4 per cent drop in
2009 second quarter net income to $200,000, it
was revealed yesterday, a decline that partly
reflected the sale of its fund administration busi-
ness last year.

The sale of Butterfield Fund Services
(Bahamas) during the 2008 third quarter meant
that any year-over-year comparatives for Bank of
Butterfield’s Bahamian operations were some-
what skewed, with total revenues for the three

to survive”.

Arguing that it was very much “the soon-

er the better” for a sale to be concluded,
Vincent Peet, the former minister of finan-
cial services and investments in the Christie
government, said: “The bank [Scotiabank
Bahamas] is still in possession. Right now,
things appear to be at a standstill and I
have no information as to where they are
with any additional investor. The concern is
certainly very high in regard to that pro-
ject.”
Mr Peet added that a number of staff
had been terminated at Chub Cay as a
result of the receivership, and the number
of employees left was “so small”.

He added: “It is causing my constituency,
the whole area, to become even more
depressed, not knowing what is happen-
ing. Most of the employees came from
North Andros, and with the employee num-
bers dropping the whole area has been neg-
atively impacted. We are struggling to sur-
vive.”

Bahamas bank sees 71.4 per
cent net income decline

By NEIL HARTNELL

. a
Dae Gace en canes But drop and comparatives impacted

by Butterfield’s sale of fund business

* Total assets at Bahamas private bank
rise 12.3% to $174m, with assets under
administration also ahead at $2.4bn

from $700,000 to $200,000 year-over-year. How-
ever, Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) saw its total
assets increase by 12.3 per cent in the six months
since 2008 year-end, rising from $154 million at
December 31 to $174 million at end-June - a $19
million increase.



Money Safe.
Money Fast.

MoneyGram.

international Money Traneer

Bank of The Bahamas

[HBT ERABAT IOAN AT

Online at
BankBahamatOniine.com

Rum Cay
developer
talking to
potential
investors

* Head of $700m project
says discussions with ‘a
few’ interested parties
proceeding at ‘measured
pace’ to avoid
undercapitalisation

* Adds that outlook one of
‘very cautious optimism’
in belief economy
starting to turn

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
business@tribunemedia.net

THE developer behind the
$700 million Rum Cay Resort
Marina project yesterday said
he was in talks with “a few”
groups who had expressed
interest in investing in the pro-
ject, and said the outlook was
one of “very cautious opti-
mism” given signs the global
economy was starting to turn
around.

SEE page 8B

The information cic is from a

party and The Tribune can not be |
responsible for errors and,
from the daily report,

Butterfield attributed the total assets increase

SEE page 9B

position” given the global stock
market downturn’s impact on

SEE page 7B

months to June 30, 2009, down by 37.6 per cent at
$2 million.
Net income for the 2009 second quarter fell

recovery ‘means so
much more to Bahamas’



Shipping volumes showing increase

ARE YOU PREPARED FOR THIS
UPCOMING HURRICANE SEASON?

APPLY FOR A

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Bahamas-based shipper set to
implement Saturday receiving

SEABOARD Marine is starting to see an increase in container
shipping volumes, its inside sales coordinator said yesterday, as the
company prepares to implement Saturday receiving at its Miami
location from August onwards as a result of increased demand from
Bahamian businesses.

Oralee Deveaux said that on average Seaboard is shipping full
containers from Miami to Nassau, and the implementation of the
Saturday Less Container Loads (LCL) initiative will serve to fur-

ther increase their shipment volumes.
“We’re looking forward to an increase in that area,” she said. i I [ | Wr
Seaboard’s operations manag- on @ | WU
, Th Gibson, echoed th A

er, Thomas Gibson, echoed the SBE page 8B ty , 4 / i i A ve Boat

PROTECTION LOAN

——

TODAY!
EINANGING UP TO 7 YEARS:

ha UL eat

HURRICANE SHUTTERS
HURRICANE SUPPLIES
GENERATORS
INSURANCE PROTECTION

|° Bank of The Bahamas

WINTERNATION A L
Revolutionizing The Way You Bank!

New Providence * Grand Bahama * Andros * Inagua * Exama
San Salvador » Cat Island »* Coral Gables, FL

Head Office Nassau: (242) 397-3000
www. Bank Bahamas Chnline.com





PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

TRANSFORMATION MINISTRIES
INTERNATIONAL

PPCSAEE: -





























aut IL ot I et publ

VENUE: B-C.P.O.U HALL
FARRINGTON RD.

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

7.30PM NIGHTLY

GUEST SPEAKER

PASTOR | .
(EMPOWERMENT WORSHIP CENTER
LEXINGTON, KY)

MINISTRY OF
WORKS & TRANSPORT

The general public is invited to attend a

TOWN MEETING

Thursday, 30 July, 2009
starting at 69m

Bahamas Tourism Training Center Lecture Theatre
[COB School of Hospitality]

To discuss the proposed design
for the Big Pond Project. This |

is your opportunity to

provide your input and
comment on the

proposed design.

Please be there.
For futher information contact

302-9538

Your presence and feedback is important.

— aa —

THE TRIBUNE



BANK of the Bahamas International’s managing director, Paul McWeeney, is pictured with the

Euromoney Award for Excellence.

BANK of the Bahamas
International has been named
the ‘Best Bank’ in the country
for the third time by
Euromoney magazine, which
granted the award just as the
Bahamian institution recog-
nised its 20th anniversary.

“For Bank of the Bahamas
to stand for the third time
shoulder-to-shoulder with
some of the leading financial
institutions in the world is an
outstanding honour, and we
are proud to have won and to
bring such recognition to the
Bahamas,” said managing
director Paul McWeeney,
who flew to London for the
July 11 award ceremony.

“For a young bank like
Bank of the Bahamas to have
been awarded the
Euromoney Award for Excel-
lence three out of the last four

(Photo by Wellington Chea for DP&A)

Bank gains leading
award for third time

years speaks not only to our
growth, but to the innovation
the Bank of the Bahamas
team has demonstrated and
the array of quality products
and services earning interna-
tional approval.”

In announcing the award,
Euromoney applauded Bank
of the Bahamas’ ability to
stave off the recessionary tide
that has hammered the indus-
try.

“An economic slowdown
globally has had little impact
on Bank of the Bahamas,” the
leading financial industry pub-
lication said.

“At its mid-year results at
end of December, the bank
reported it had attracted 5,000
new accounts, opened a
branch in Cat Island and
grown its private banking
division, showing its strength

domestically and in Florida,
where it recently opened an
office.”

Held annually since 1992,
the Euromoney awards are
based on performance, quali-
ty service, innovation and
momentum.

“We thank Euromoney for
honouring us again and
pledge to continue to do all
we can to deserve that recog-
nition,” said Mr McWeeney,
who heads a bank that in two
decades has grown from $90
million in total assets to near-
ly $800 million.

Bank of the Bahamas first
won the Euromoney award in
2006, a year after being the
first Bahamian bank to win
the sought-after Bracken
Award from The Banker
magazine, a division of the
Financial Times Group.

EXCELLENT CAREER
OPPORTUNITY

QUALITY CONTROL
TECHNICIAN NEEDED

Do you want a rewarding fulfilling career witha
growing dynamic Company?

We are accepting resumes for a much needed
QC (Quality Control) Technician

Person must have Hazard and Critical Control
Point training and awareness of occupational
safety and Health Procedures.

QC/QA experience required and FDA experience

is a plus.

Person must have experience in Lab testing,

Microbial

Microsoft Excel,

Filtration,

Spectrophotometer

use,

Word and Outlook.

Person are required to have their own personal
vehicle and Pay and benefits are based on
experience and degree.

Apply immediately

Resume are to be E-mailed to
rbalfour@ nautilush2o0.com



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 3B



eS
MTT a I aay

Films can inject up to $15m Rr

into nation’s economy

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Films and TV productions
shot in the Bahamas can inject
up to $15 million in extra
spending into this nation’s
economy in addition to employ-
ing Bahamians, the Bahamas
Film Commission’s senior man-
ager told Tribune Business,
while Bahamian films have also
been finding their footing in the
local market.

Angela Archer said the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation
consistently scouts film shows in
order to market the Bahamas
as a film-friendly country.

"The Film Commission has
a good working relationship
with government entities to
ensure things are done quick-
ly,” she said.

Ms Archer said movie
shoots, photo shoots and pro-
duction of commercials in the
Bahamas is a large part of the
Ministry's marketing strategy.

And that strategy appears to
have been having some success.
Film star and movie producer,
Tyler Perry, who is shooting a
film in Eleuthera, is said to
have brought almost $1 million
into that island’s economy.

While films such as Casino
Royale brought in an estimated
$7-$8 million, with just a small
part of the movie shot in Nas-
sau, Pirates of the Caribbean
brought in almost $15 million
and used several locations
throughout the Bahamas.

Shot

Unfortunately, Ms Archer
said, these types of films are
shot in the Bahamas only about
every two to three years.

She said the film shoots in
the Bahamas are typically down
during the summer months
because of the chance of hurri-
canes. "At this time most peo-
ple shy away from the tropics to
shoot," said Ms Archer.

However, she said the

Bahamas attracts feature films
because of its proximity and the
wide range of locations avail-
able.

Ms Archer added that the
Bahamian film industry has
been expanding with more
"Bahamans using opportunities
to make their own films”.

And Bahamians have been
seen assisting large movie hous-
es who come to the Bahamas
with things such as production
and coordination. "They have
been involved as extras, make-
up artists and stunt people,” Ms
Archer said.

According to her, the
Bahamian film industry is grow-
ing rapidly, with one or two
individuals investing in equip-
ment large studios may need to
shoot their films. She said that
instead of shipping equipment,
movie houses can rent what
they need from one Bahamian
company in particular.

"More and more people have
been here and hired him," said
Ms Archer.

Bahamas tourism set for 2010 revival

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

THE WORLD Travel and
Tourism Council (WTTC)
expects the Bahamas’ Travel
and Tourism Consumption to
grow by 8 per cent in 2010, and
by a further 3 per cent in 2011,
while predicting a 4 per cent
increase in sector employment
in 2010 and a marginal 2 per
cent increase in 2011.

The WTTC has been a
resource for world tourism and
travel data, and closely follows
the actions of global govern-
ments and their policies, as well
as Central Banks and their
financial data.

According to its forecasting
tool, Bahamian government
spending on the tourism indus-
try is expected to increase by 3
per cent in 2010 and 2 per cent
in 2011, while capital invest-
ment - which experienced a
major 8 per cent decline year-
on-year - is predicted to grow
only by about one tenth of a

percentage point in 2010,
before showing growth of about
6 per cent the following year.

Travel and tourism demand,
which took a hit globally as a
result of the economic down-
turn, declined in the Bahamas
from year-end 2008 by 8 per
cent, with the WI'TC expect-
ing an almost similar increase in
2010 and 3 per cent growth in
2011.

The WTTC recorded a 12
per cent decline in this coun-
try’s tourism gross domestic
product (GDP) between 2008
and 2009, but projects a sharp
spike in GDP of 11 per cent in
2010. This denotes the predic-
tion of a swift recovery for the
Bahamas following the bot-
toming out of the global reces-
sion, with marginal growth of
2 per cent year-on-year being
felt by 2011. Unemployment is
expected to shrink by 7 per cent
in 2010 and remain relatively
flat into 2011.

The WTTC has also predict-
ed that Asia, namely China and
Japan, will be the industry lead-

ers in tourist arrivals to the
Caribbean by 2020.

China is poised to become
an almost $90 billion leader in
outbound tourist flows within
the next ten years, still one
place below the US.

“It’s amazing how this coun-
try (China), when you open it
up, how people are going to go
overseas. Here on the chart we
said that in 2020 there will be
100 million Chinese going over-
seas — maybe more,” said
WTTC president Jean-Claude
Baumgarten recently.

The other eight biggest trav-
el and tourist economies are
projected to be Japan, Great
Britain, France, Spain, Ger-
many, Russia, Italy and Mexico.

With regard to those statis-
tics, the Bahamas government
and Ministry of Tourism have
cornered at least three of the
top five emerging travel and
tourism economies, with
increased airlift to Great
Britain, direct flights into
France and its proximity to the
US.

The Bahamas Government
Ministry of National Security

Notice

Request for Proposal (RFP)

for

Electronic Monitoring (EM) Solution

The Government of The Bahamas is seeking proposals from Vendors/
Implementers to provide an Electronic Monitoring (EM) Solution, as a
purpose of monitoring and tracking offenders.

Interested Vendors/Implementers should collect a copy of the RFP,
inclusive of the technical requirements, from the Ministry of National
Security, 3rd Floor Churchill Building Rawson Square, Nassau, The

Bahamas.

Proposals should be delivered on or before Friday, 25 September 2009 by
3pm in a sealed envelope addressed to:

Chairman
Tender’s Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre

West Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

Labeled: RFP-Her Majesty’s Prisons Electronic Monitoring Solution

All submissions will be opened at 10:00am on Thursday, 1 October 2009
at the Tender’s Board meeting, 3rd floor Conference Room, Ministry of

Finance, Cable Beach.

The Government reserves the right to reject any or all tenders
































































LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
“Eattage Lat With Private Beach
FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

Web Listing # 8377

Mario Carey Realty
2t's abaut yaw... Let's talk.

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013

info@mariocareyrealty.com
www.mariocareyrea com

REQUEST FOR
ote.
i PREQUALIFICATION
NAD :

LPIA Expansion Project Stage |
US Departures Terminal

Nassau Airport
Deresioprre Cor pry

Ledcor is seeking contractors to assist in completion of Stage | of the LPIA Expansion
Preyect (LS Departures Testnircal) All cantractors, particularly Bahamian contractors, are
encouraged to participate in this significant national proyect. Scopes to be tendered to
complete the fit out of the new terminal include:

+ Doors & Hardware + Mechonical

# Interior Glazing = # Electrical

+ Drywall

+ Flooring

# Masonry
# Millwork

+ Speciaities
# Paine
Prequalification will include, based on the tender packages, the following cntena:
Ability to bond, provide letter of credit or demonstrate finance! capacity
Experience
References
Bahamian ownership / content

Frequatificnton packages wel! fe avadiaie dor got yp ar ithe lester Conmteenon Rakamas Loneied' ore aifice ar
ipncien Floating Javernationay Arport Minoior fata Road by phone at APSF SEL? or by email regowst ar
infoC230@ledcor.com. dnerested contracterr mart abtair a prequalifcation package by Aupuot 7 ANN

Church of God Ministries
“The Mega Worship Centre”

July 30th — August 2nd

4th PASTORAL &
28th CHURCH'S ANNIVERSARY

Theme: “No Limit”
Scripture Text: Ephesians 3:20-21

Friday, July 31st-7:30 pm
Speaker; Pastor Tameko Collie,
Bethany Assembly Church

€
:

Sunday, August 2nd-11:00 am
Speaker:
Pastor Eric D. Clarke, M.A., J.P.
President of The Cayman laland
Conference of Seventh-Day Adventist

Ww"

Host Pastor:
Rev. Sherelle Saunders

Thursday, July 30th-7:30 pm
Speaker: Pastor Shameka Morley
Anointed to Reign Ministries

Wa Oe Ce Oe Oe Oe Oe Oe eC Oe Oe Oe

r

Saturday, Auguat ist-7:00 am
“FUN, RUN, WALK, SWIM" &
All Day Family Fun Day
(In Memory of the late
Bishop Austin E. Saunders)

a io 8)

Fox Hill Road & Davis Street
Telephone: 242-324-0339



PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Y ahi d-: R, areal
Anti-Aging Spa
Full Service Spa & Salon



Highly mouvated, self-starting professionals who possess |
the requisite skills, work ethics, a desire for an opportunity
to grow in your chosen career, and to contribute to and |
benefit from a long and mutually-beneficial working
relationship.

Send details of your qualifications by email to:
(info@ baharetreat.com),
or drop off to Raha-Retreat Spa & Salon
East Bay Street
Attention: Mrs. McKenzie

Please include contact information and the most
convenient time to reach you.



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/873
Equity Side

IN THE MATTER of All that parcel of land
containing 5 Acres situate Northwestwardly of
The Settlement of Cherokee Sound, Abaco.

AND
IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Charles Earl Bethel

NOTICE

The Petition of Charles Earl Bethel formerly of
Cherokee Sound, Abaco one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and now a resident
of the State of New York one of the United States of
America in respect:-

ALL THAT parcel of land comprising Five (5) Acres
situate Northwestwardly of the Settlement of Cherokee
Sound in the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and which said parcel
of land is bounded on the NORTHEAST and NORTH
by vacant Crown Land and running thereon One
thousand Six hundred and Seventy-eight and Seventy-
one hundredths () feet on the EAST by vacant Crown
Land and running thereon One hundred and Thirty-
two (132) feet more or less on the SOUTH and
SOUTHWEST by the Sea and running thereon One
thousand Eight hundred and Thirteen (1,813) feet more
or less and on the NORTHWEST by Grant B-87 and
running thereon One hundred and Thirty-two (132)
feet more or less and which said piece parcel or lot of
land has such position shape marks boundaries and
dimensions as are shown on the diagram or plan filed
in this matter being Plan No.1879 AB and is delineated
on that part of the plan which is coloured PINK.

Charles Earl Bethel claims to be the owner in fee
simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme
Court in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have his
title to the said land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours in the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the said
City of Nassau;

(b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, Mareva House, 4 George Street in the
City of Nassau, Attorneys for the Petitioner;
and

(c) The office of the Administrator at Sandy Point,
Abaco.

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower
or a right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim
not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the
14th day of September, 2009 file in the Supreme Court
and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
statement of his claim in the prescribed form, verified
by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any
such person to file and serve a statement of his claim
on or before the said 14th day of September, 2009 will
operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for the Petitioner
Mareva House
George Street
Nassau, Bahamas



To advertise, call 502-2371

Chamber executives ‘retreat’ to g0 forward

THE newly-elected officers and direc-
tors of the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce participated in a retreat at the
Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort to dis-
cuss the organisation’s objectives for the
current administrative year.

Headed by executive director, Philip
Simon, and president Khaalis Rolle, the
group discussed the opportunities and
challenges in the current economic envi-
ronment.

The retreat was facilitated by Wil

Pineauchief executive of the Cayman
Islands Chamber of Commerce, who
shared insights on programmes and
strategies successfully implemented in
his market.

¢ Pictured are (front L-R) Chester
Cooper, second vice-president; Marvia
Thomas, Chamber associate; Wil Pineau,
chief executive, Cayman Islands Cham-
ber of Commerce; Khaalis Rolle, presi-
dent; Gershan Major, first vice-president;



Darron Cash, treasurer; Yvette Sands,
secretary; Antoinette Butler, Chamber
associate; Dionisio D’ Aguilar, former
president; Robert Myers, director.

(Back L-R) Hank Ferguson, director -
SMESU trade unit; Odley Aritis, direc-
tor; Philip Simon, executive director; Tim
Covington, director; Aaron Brice, direc-
tor; Merritt Storr, director; Dr Jonathan
Rodgers, director; Pedro Roberts, direc-
tor.

(Photo by Leah Davis)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MELANIE TUCKER of
ORCHARD TERRACE, P.O. Box 8843, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 30‘ day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

This is to inform the public that Martin-Essex
Solomon has retired from the Firm of Higgs
& Kelly. Godfrey Kenneth Kelly, C.M.G. and
Ronald James Cole will continue to carry on a
law partnership practicing under the firm name
“Higgs & Kelly” at Chambers situate at 384 Bay
Street, P.O. Box N-4818, Nassau, Bahamas,
telephone 322-7511. Mr. Solomon is no longer a
partner of the Firm but continues in the capacity
of a consultant to the firm.

—

yz Heath For Life

SSITION OPENING]

ae
==

WN isoy(ey- 1
TECHNOLOGIST

QUALIFICATIONS:

* Baccalaureate degree in Medical Technology

* 2 years experience

¢ ASCP. NCA or AMT Certification

¢ Excellent written and oral communication
skills

POSITION SUMMARY:
The successful candidate will be required to:

* Cross-train through all areas of the lab -
Chemistry, Hematology, Blood Bank and
Microbiology;

* Perform phlebotomy and specimen
processing and any other duties assigned.

Please submit resume via email: nwatkins@doctorshosp.com
or hand-deliver to Doctors Hospital, Human Resources Department
ONLY QUALIFIED APPLICANTS WILL BE CONTACTED.

Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JUDE EDOMWONYL of
COCKBURN TOWN, SAN SALVADOR, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 30 day of July, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSUE MERICE of
STAPLEDON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SB-50202, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23 day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

CAMBRIDGE CAPITAL INVESTMENT LTD.

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) CAMBRIDGE CAPITAL INVESTMENT LTD. is in
voluntary dissolution under the provisions of Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(o) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 04" June 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Andrew Ramage
of 38/40 Victoria Street, Douglas, Isle of Man.

Dated this 30" day of July A. D. 2009



Andrew Ramage
Liquidator

CT LL
BRAND MANAGER

Come join our team a leading Wholesale/Distributor serving
perishables/food products throughout The Bahamas for 25
years

Requirements

¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills
Excellent motivation & Coaching skills
Possess excellent planning, organizational and
implementation skills
Strong multitasking ability
Strong leadership & managerial skills
Ability to exert initiative
Recording, summarizing and verifying results of sales
and movement of product
Strong internet skills, emailing, group messaging and
research
Proficient in Microsoft Office and Quick Books
Applications
Available to travel to Family Islands when required
Transportation

Experience requirements
¢ Three years experience in supervisory/management
position
¢ BA or equivalent degree
Please fax all resumes to 394-0282 or call 677-6731

Salary & Benefits based on experience





THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 5B



No ‘recovery’ in BISX stocks until 2010 Q2

FROM page 1B

lags’ between the recovery in
investor confidence here and
elsewhere.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive, said
the relative absence of liquidity
in the Bahamian securities mar-
ket meant that investors were
“not getting the true value” for
stocks listed on the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX).

In addition, the institutional
investors and professional mon-
ey managers, such as pension
funds and insurance companies,
were not trading equities on a
regular basis - something that
not only contributed to BISX’s
domestic market liquidity
issues, but also failed to indi-
cate the true value of listed
stocks and what they were real-
ly worth.

BISX earlier this week
released statistics showing that
its listed stocks had yet to expe-
rience the fledgling recovery
being experienced by other
global markets and indices, with
its All-Share Index down some
7.8 per cent for the first six
months of 2009.

In contrast, other global
stock market indices were up.
The MSCI Emerging Market
Index was ahead by 34.3 per
cent as at June 30, 2009, com-
pared to its year-end 2008 close.
Similarly, the Standard &

Poor’s (S&P) 500 Index was up
1.8 per cent, while the FTSE
100 Index was only down 4.2
per cent.

“You can point directly to
the fact that we are lagging in
terms of investor and consumer
confidence,” Mr Kerr told Tri-
bune Business yesterday, when
asked why BISX and the rest
of the world appeared to be
headed in opposite directions.

Pointing out that the BISX
All-Share Index had performed
better than many global indices
over the medium-term, being
down only 13.78 per cent when
compared to the 30-40 per cent
value slippages experienced by
others last year, Mr Kerr said of
the Bahamian equities market:
“There’s a lag in there.

“BISX may take some time
in catching up, assuming all
things remain equal and the
recovery in global markets con-
tinues at the same pace.”

Asked when Bahamian equi-
ties markets were likely to
recover and regain their
upward momentum, Mr Kerr
replied: “I'd just be guessing,
but I suspect we will not see
that in any real, substantial way
until the second quarter of next
year, maybe.”

Share prices for almost all
BISX-listed stocks have been
under pressure for some time,
due to the sustained build-up
in sell orders as mostly smaller,
retail investors seek to exit their

investment and generate liquid
cash to meet current obliga-
tions. These ‘sell’ orders, num-
bering more than 200, vastly
outnumber the minuscule num-
ber of ‘buy’ orders, producing
the downward pressure on
stock prices.

This was more pronounced
in stocks that were more liq-
uid, Mr Kerr said, as retail
investors in these cases were
actually able to find buyers and
cash out. “Across the board,
liquidity has always been the
issue,” he added.

As for institutional investors,
while they were expected to
hold equities as long-term
investments, many had gravi-
tated to fixed income instru-
ments - such as bonds and pref-
erence shares, plus bank
deposits - and away from stocks
given the perceived market
volatility.

Arguing that professional
money managers perhaps need-
ed to educate clients better on
the need to hold on to their
equity investments long-term,
and not drop them at the first
sign of volatility, Mr Kerr said:
“In this liquidity perfect envi-
ronment, they should be com-
ing in and picking up stocks at a
good value.”

But, with “smart money not
getting in and out” of the
Bahamian equities market and
stimulating trading, there was
nothing to “demonstrate the

ADVANCED FAMILY MEDICINE CENTER ; —

true value” of many BISX-list-
ed stocks. As a result, investors
were not getting the “true value
of securities”.

However, Mr Kerr acknowl-
edged that institutional
investors in the Bahamian mar-
ket were faced with “the diffi-
culty of re-entering the mar-
ket” at an appropriate price if
they traded out of their hold-
ings in a particular stock.

NOTICE is hereby given that WISLER JOSEPH of
CARMICHAEL ROAD, P.O. BOX CR-54802, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 30" day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Please be advised that the Nassau office of

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS
will be CLOSED on

Friday, 31 July 2009

to allow staff to enjoy their

#149 Shirley Se am

Tal: 326-1111 * Fax 326-1112
Healthy Kids

Back to School
Summer Campaign

Take advantage of the summer break

CT
We regret any inconvenience this
may cause.

F eae ae ie IME

MIEISPA

a

Normal working hours will
resume on
Tuesday, 4 August 2009.

This summer before echool starts, annual physicals
are one of the most important things on your “To Do List",

Annual Physical for the Kids & You!
Family Medicine & Skin Care Clinic Mon - Sat 9 - 6

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS PUBLIC
SERVICES UNION

N

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue
Accounting,

URGENT
NOTICE

The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and the
Family Islands and the reconciliation of all reverie accounts other than miseellanequs
receivables,

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

' Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in New Providence and
the Family Islands.

Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers.
Prepares the sales budget.

Prepares the Revenue Accounting Department Budget.

Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Recetvable Recomeciliation.
Oversees the training of all Customer Services statf in the new billing software.
Prepares monthly Board reports.

Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenue reports.

Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of Statistics.
Provides statistical billing information for Family Island managers.

Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in the
Family Islands,

Attends yearly community meetings as well as ad hoc meetings required during
acquisition of new locations,

Develops and implements rules, guidelines and procedures for the efficient
operation of the department,

The Bahamas Public Services Union (BPSU)
Contributory Medical Plan will cause to come into
effect new medical premium rates effective 1st, July
2009.

= * = * = * + & £ *

The new premium rates are due to the escalating
cost of healthcare services and treatment for all our
members.

Job requirements include:

‘ A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Accounts or equivalent

‘ A minimum of 8+ years of expenence in accounting practioe and theory.
‘ Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualifications

‘ Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas.

‘ Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing,

.

.

.

.

All members of the Contributory Medical Plan are
urged to contact the Medical Plan Office at the
George Lafleur Building on Wulff Road immediately
with regards to the increase of medical premiums.

Sound reasoning and good judgment skills
Ability te interpret financial reports.
Good time management skills.

Project management skills

For more information please visit our website at:
http/Wwww.bpsubahamas.com

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box W-7509, Nassau, Bahamas on or before:
July 31, 2009,





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 7B

Bahamas ‘fortunate’
to avoid mass lay-offs
in financial industry

FROM page 1B

its client base.

Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, the
Baker Tilly Gomez partner and
accountant, told Tribune Busi-
ness that he was “not aware”
of any significant redundancies
to come in a sector whose high
net worth individual clients had
seen their wealth holdings hit
hard by the collapse of global
equities markets in 2008.

Speaking in the wake of at
least 40 lay-offs in the Bahami-
an international financial ser-
vices industry, including 24 at
Ansbacher (Bahamas) and five
at CIBC Trust Company
(Bahamas), plus Butterfield
Fulcrum (Bahamas) decision to
downsize by releasing 11 staff
over a six-month period, Mr
Gomez said that while institu-
tion-specific factors were at
play, these developments also
indicated that the sector was
being impacted by global
trends.

“Considering the times in the
financial markets and what’s
been happening to high net
worth individuals, this does not
come as a total surprise,” Mr
Gomez told Tribune Business
of financial sector lay-offs.

“The Bahamas has been for-
tunate so far that there’s not
been mass lay-offs, and that
there’s only been a scattering
to date, although that’s no com-
fort to those affected.

“From a general perspective,
certainly we are saddened by
any lay-offs in the sector, finan-
cial services being the second
pillar of our economy. One has
to be moved by the fact per-
sons in the sector are being
affected.”

However, striking a more
upbeat note, Mr Gomez said
he was unaware of any major
redundancies being planned in
the international financial ser-
vices sector - the industry that
contains a large number of

high-salaried jobs.

“We can’t be surprised that
this is happening, but I don’t
see any sign that there is a wave
to come,” Mr Gomez added.
“We have very much held our
position, and held it signifi-
cantly. ’m not aware of any sig-
nificant redundancies and lay-
offs to come.”

Referring to the Ansbacher
(Bahamas) situation, Mr
Gomez said that while he felt
“sorry for those persons
involved in the process”, any
major merger - such as the Sen-
tinel/Ansbacher tie-up - was
bound to result in a “significant
duplication” of staff posts and
activities. This made some
redundancies almost inevitable.

Addition

In addition, the BFSB chair-
man said major global institu-
tions were rationalising their
geographic footprint, and “are
moving out of certain jurisdic-
tions for commercial and busi-
ness reasons”. An example of
this was Qatar National Bank’s
(QNB) decision to exit the
Bahamas by selling Ansbacher
(Bahamas) to A. F. Holdings.

A major factor impacting the
Bahamian financial services
industry, with its emphasis on
private banking and wealth
management, is that fee income
is linked heavily to the level of
assets under administration. If
these assets decline in value, as
almost all have due to the late
2008 stock market collapse, rev-
enues and income for
Bahamas-based financial insti-
tutions is reduced, forcing some
to bring staffing levels in line
with business activities.

Similar trends were impact-
ing the Bahamian investment
fund administration business,
Mr Gomez said, influencing
both the Butterfield Fulcrum
downsizing and Ernst &
Young’s decision earlier this
year to lay-off several accoun-
tants. The latter move reflected

a decline in investment fund
auditing work.

The BFSB chairman said
that prior to the New Year, “we
anticipated that come the
month of January the fund
industry would be challenged
as a result of the downturn in
global markets.”

Investors were switching out
of equities investments and
looking for safer havens, such
as fixed income instruments
and bank deposits, resulting in
a wave of investment fund
redemptions.

Many funds were unable to
meet these requests, either sus-
pending redemptions or plac-
ing themselves into liquidation.
Other investment funds were
also wound-up by their man-
agers/promoters, all of which
impacted Bahamas-based fund
administrators.

“It takes some time, but the
result of that impacts jobs in
the Bahamas,” Mr Gomez told
Tribune Business. “As funds
wind down, there is less busi-
ness for fund administrators, so
that impacts the level of staffing
they have.

“T’m not surprised in the gen-
eral sense that there’s reduced
capacity in the fund adminis-
tration business. Fee income is
determined by the level of
activity, and when net asset val-
ues (NAV) are reduced, there’s
a direct impact on fee income
for fund administrators and
managers.

“When there’s no upside, it
does not bode well for advis-
ers and administrators, so there
is less income at all levels. The
less income you make, the less
staff you need. That is where
we’re headed in that business,
and I hope that is all we see [in
terms of redundancies’.”

With global stock markets
showing tepid ‘green shoots’ of
recovery from 2008 lows, Mr
Gomez said he hoped the trend
would continue because “it
means so much more for us in
the Bahamas”.

Director / Chief Executive
The Bahamas Maritime Authority
London

The Bahamas Maritime Authority administers The Bahamas’ ship
registry, the third largest registry in the world. It is responsible for
servicing and policing ils registered vessels, promoting The Bahamas
registry to the international shipping community, and for collecting
and accounting for all ship registration and other applicable fees.
The Authority also advises the Government of The Bahamas on all
aspects of international shipping.

The Authority is a statutory Government-owned corporation,
supervised by a Board whose Members are appointed by the
Government, and which reports to the responsible Minister.

Day-to-day management of the Authority rests with its Director, who
is its chief executive. He or she oversees all of the Au wity's
dealings with shipowners, with the IMO, and with cla: tion

wicties, independent inspectors and the legal and financial
communities. The Authority's main office is presently in London,
where the Director has been based, but it also has offices in Nassau
and New York, with other locations forthcoming.

Candidates must be able to demonstrate a successful track record in
a senior position working in or with the shipping industry. They
should have leadership _ qualities, experience in directing and
developing personnel, and success in team-building. They should
also have experience in financial management. They should be
holders of a university degree and/or a class | ship's officer certificate.

An appropriate salary will be offered to the preferred candidate.

Applicants are invited to write, enclosing a copy of their C/V, and
with the details of their current salary to: Mr. Peter John C-oulandris,
Deputy Chairman, The Bahamas Maritime Authority, Consulate
General of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, 231 East 46th
Street, New York, '.Â¥. LO017, USA.

Closing date for receipt of applications is August 31st, 2009. All
applications will be acknowledged.





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS & TRANSPORT
CONSTRUCTION OF NEW MARKET,
DOWNTOWN NASSAU

PRE-QUALIFICATION OF CONTRACTORS

The Government of Commonwealth of The
Bahamas through the Ministry of Public Works
and Transport is inviting qualified General
Contractors to participate in a Pre-Qualification for
the Tender for the construction of a new Market to
be built on a restricted site in Downtown Nassau.

The structure will be approximately 38,724 sq. ft.
with associated external works and services.
Contractors will be

The General required to

provide a detailed indication of their competence.
both technically and financially, to carry out the
intended scope of work within a reasonable time.

Interested parties may collect the pre-qualification
documents as of Thursday, 2 July, 2009, between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. from:

The Office of the Director of Public Works

Ministry of Public Works and Transport

John F. Kennedy Drive

Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 322-4830

Fax: (242) 302-9770
The completed _ pre-qualification document
should be deposited in the Tender Box at
the Ministry of Finance, 3rd Floor, Cecil
Wallace-Whitfield Building. West Bay Street, P.O.
Box, N-3017, Nassau. The Bahamas not later
than 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, 4 August, 2009.

The Government of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas has the right to reject any or all
pre-qualification contractors. .

Signed

Colin Higgs
Permanent Secretary



Rum Cay developer talking to potential investors

FROM page 1B

John Mittens, chairman of
Montana Holdings, the project
developer, said in a statement
released in response to Tribune
Business’s inquiries that talks
with potential investor groups
were proceeding at “a mea-
sured pace”, given that confi-
dence was still fragile and the
need to ensure any deal would
enable the Rum Cay Resort
Marina project to proceed.

He told Tribune Business:
“We are experiencing the
toughest economy in recent his-
tory with regard to financing of
real estate development, not
just in the Bahamas but world-
wide, and particularly in North
America.

“I do believe that the econo-
my is just beginning to turn
around, but investors remain
very cautious. There have been,
in recent months and weeks, a
number of potential investment
groups who have expressed sig-
nificant interest in the Montana
Holdings project at Rum Cay,
and we are presently engaged
in discussions with a few.

Mr Mittens added: “These
negotiations are progressing at
a measured pace, since what we
will not do is consider any
investor interest that would
undercapitalise the develop-
ment, because that is a recipe
for disaster. Overall, I think the

Shipping

showing

FROM page 1B

container volume increases the
company is experiencing, saying
that shipping in the Bahamas
is starting to pick up again.
One of the larger shipping
lines in the Bahamas, Seaboard
reported earlier this year that
they had not been negatively

view is one of very cautious
optimism.”

The Montana Holdings
chairman was responding to
Tribune Business’s inquiries,
after this newspaper learned
that the developer was in talks
with potential investors inter-
ested in the Rum Cay project.

One source familiar with the
situation had told Tribune Busi-
ness that Montana Holdings
was, in particular, holding
“promising talks” with an
unnamed British investor who
was said to be keen in investing
in Bahamas-based resort pro-
jects generally.

Although Tribune Business
has been unable to learn of the
potential investor’s name, it is
understood he has been putting
out feelers to other Bahamas-
based projects in need of
financing.

One source described the
potential investor as “UK-
based and a strong supporter
of the Bahamas, who believes
the Family Islands hold great
potential for touristic and resi-
dential development”.

While the global credit
crunch and financial crisis, and
subsequent recession, held up
the Rum Cay Resort Marina
project and almost brought it
to a standstill due to the virtual
impossibility of finding new
debt financing lines, Montana
Holdings has been far from
idle.

It has continued operating

volumes
increase

affected by the downturn.

Ms Deveuax said in March
that Seaboard had seen no
decline in revenue since the
onset of the global economic
downturn.

And she added that the com-
pany had restructured its rates
in order to compensate for
changes in the economy, and
to remain competitive.

Meanwhile, the shipping
company has invested in its
security with a one-day train-
ing programme held yesterday
at its facilities on East Bay
Street.

The director of security from
the Miami-based operation of
Seaboard Marine, who wished
to remain anonymous for secu-
rity reasons, came down to train
local Seaboard staff and law
enforcement on the seven-point
detection method for twenty-
foot equipment units (TEUs).
This detection method ensures
agents and law enforcement ful-
ly scrutinise containers leaving
the Bahamas for drugs, guns
and stowaways.

According to the director,
the training is an international
initiative, which has gone to 15
ports already.

Notwithstanding the training
programme and the company’s
earlier claims of financial sta-
bility, he said Seaboard had
been negatively affected by the
economic downturn.

Some Bahamian based-ship-
ping companies reported a 10
per cent decline in container
throughput volume in the first
three months of 2009. The Port
Manager at one container ship-
ping line said there had been a
major decline in high-end
imports.

However, Ms Deveaux said
Seaboard had seen a tremen-
dous increase in grocery ship-
ments from Miami.

Questions loom as to what
will happen to properties

and fixing up the Sumner Point
Marina on Rum Cay, which it
acquired from American
investor Bobby Little, with the
island used as the site for
Southern Boating magazine’s
April 2009 photo shoot. That
is understood to have helped
drive boating traffic to the Sum-
ner Point Marina this season.

Montana Holdings’ Rum
Cay project is little different
from the many other mixed-use
resort investment projects that
were either slowed to a crawl or
brought to a standstill by the
credit crunch, and their subse-
quent inability to access new
lines of debt financing.

These projects were also fur-
ther impacted by the inability of
potential real estate buyers to
obtain financing, plus the dry-
ing up of investor and con-
sumer confidence.

However, Mr Mittens has
been as good as his word, hav-
ing remained living with his
family in Nassau and refusing to
walk away from the Rum Cay

Resort Marina project, just as
he said in a September 29, 2008,
interview with Tribune Busi-
ness.

At the time, Mr Mittens said
he had invested $32 million to
date into the Rum Cay project,
and at the time had been paying
staff wagess and other project
costs from his own personal
expenses.

He told Tribune Business
then: “I’m not going anywhere.
I don’t have anything but the
Rum Cay development. I sold
all my UK assets to come here.
I’m stuck here, gladly putting
my nose to the grind stone. I’ve
invested millions in this coun-
try, and brought my family
here. I’m not a remote devel-
oper. I’m here on a daily basis,
working with my staff.

“We have not given up. I just
don’t like giving up. All you
can do is keep the faith, keep
working. It always changes, but
I can’t forsee when. This is the
worst economic situation since
the Great Depression.”

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2009/CLE/gen/qui/850

IN THE SUPREME COURT

Common Law & Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF all that piece parcel or lot of land
comprising 719.77 acres situate on the Eastern side of the
Queenis Highway in the Settlement of Taits in the Island of
Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the

Bahamas.

AND

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Veronica C. Miller (nee Major)

NOTICE

The Petition of VERONICA C. MILLER (nee Major) of
Taits, Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth

of The Bahamas in respect of:-

“ALL that piece parcel or lot of land situate on the Eastern
Side of the Queen’s Highway in the Settlement of Taits,
Long Island comprising 719.77 acres and which said
parcel of land is bounded on the NORTHWEST by a
loose stone wall separating it from other portions of the
original Grant to the Earl of Dunmore said to be the
property of Samuel Carroll and Nathan Major and running
thereon Eight thousand One hundred and Eight (8,108)
feet more or less on the NORTHEAST by the Atlantic
Ocean and running thereon in several courses Five
thousand and Seventy-one (5,071) feet more or less on
the SOUTHEAST by a loose stone wall separating it
from land originally granted to James Rose now said to
be the property of Timothy Darville and Emest Dean and
running thereon Nine thousand Eight hundred and Thirty-
two (9,832) feet more or less on the SOUTHWEST by
land said to be the property of Emily Major and running
thereon Five hundred and Ninety-three and Forty-four
hundredths (593.44) feet on the NORTHWEST by land
said to be the property of Theresa Major and running
thereon Three hundred and Thirty-seven and Forty-nine
(337.49) feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property of
the said Theresa Major and running thereon Four hundred
and Seventy-eight and Twenty-two hundredths (478.22)
feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property of Melvin
Major and running thereon One thousand Five hundred
and Three and Ninety-two hundredths (1,503.92) feet
and by a Twenty (20) foot road reservation leading to the
Queen’s Highway, on the NORTHWEST by the property
of William Mortimer and running thereon Three hundred
and Thirty-five and Eighty-seven hundredths (335.87)
feet and on the SOUTHWEST by the property of the
said William Mortimer and running thereon Eight hundred
and Thirty-five and Eighty-one hundredths feet (835.81)
and which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position
shape marks boundaries and dimensions as are shown on
the plan filed herein and recorded in the Department of
Lands and Surveys and Plan “296 LI” and thereon
outlined in Pink.

VERONICA C. MILLER (nee Major) claims to be the
owner in fee simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme
Court in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section
3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have her title to the
said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
fereyelopmieat Mier ihe con: determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
tainer facility is moved. Mr Gib- by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said

son said he has no idea when Act.
that move will take place.

belonging to the shipping com-
panies once the new Arawak
Cay container port is complete.

Seaboard Marine's property
is owned by the Symonette
family, and nothing has been
forthcoming on plans for its

Tel: 502 2356)

for ad rates



A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours in the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the said City
of Nassau;

(b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes,
Mareva House, 4 George Street in the City of Nassau,
Attorneys for the Petitioner; and

(c) The office of the Administrator at Clarence Town,
Long Island.

ae _ MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORTG&

Coc
NOTICE
CORRIDOR 18

SAUNDERS BEACH AREA
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower or a
right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the 14th day of September,
2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed
form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of
any such person to file and serve a statement of his claim
on or before the said 14th day of September, 2009 will
operate as a bar to such claim.

In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems
JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES 5&.A has been
contracted for the Completion of the New Providence Road Improvement
Project — International Package. Road construction will be commencing on
Corridor 18 (Saunders Beach),which may require diversions on:

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009

Poinsettia Avenue through Marine Drive and exits at Bougainvillea Avenue.

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Mareva House
George Street
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner

There will be delays along this vicinity due to the one-way traffic flow system.
Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further information will be
provided in the local media



Tel 742-2 7-Rad ) P4F-1s 7-36 10 Err: peochshemasScarte inne oon. er



THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas bank sees 71.4 per
cent net income decline

FROM page 1B

to growth in its customer
deposits. Client assets under
administration also increased
marginally in the six months
since the 2008 year-end,
increasing by 4.3 per cent to
$2.4 billion from $2.3 billion.

And, unlike several Butter-
field operations in other coun-
tries, Butterfield Bank
(Bahamas) needed to make no
loan loss provisions during the
2009 second quarter.

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas),
the private banking unit, is the
Bermuda-headquartered bank’s
remaining wholly-owned
Bahamian operation, the funds
administration business having
been spun-off into Butterfield
Fulcrum (Bahamas). Butter-
field Bank still holds a 40 per
cent stake in Butterfield Ful-
crum.

Tribune Business reported

earlier this month that Butter-
field Fulcrum was downsizing
its Bahamian operations by
making 11 staff redundant over
a six-month period, and trans-
ferring the impacted unit’s busi-
ness to its other offices. It
implied that the Bahamian
operation was likely to close its
doors.

Butterfield Fulcrum’s
Bahamas business has gone
through two ownership changes
in five years. Originally known
as Deerfield Fund Services, it
was acquired by Butterfield
Bank in January 2004 and
renamed Butterfield Fund Ser-
vices (Bahamas).

Then, in July 2008, Butter-
field decided to merge all its
funds services operations -
including those in the Bahamas
- with Fulcrum.

When Butterfield acquired
Deerfield, it had 12 staff and
assets under administration of

©

TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian for the following posi-
tions for the 2009 - 2010 School Year.

Dean of Student

Applicants must:

A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing to
subscribe to the statement of Faith of Temple Christian

School.

B. Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or Higher from
a recognized College or University.

C. Possess excellent organization, Inter-personal

communicative skills.

D. Be able to assist with all aspect of the Administration.

$1.8 billion. The latter figure
had grown to $2.9 billion by
year-end 2004, and its size at
the time of the Fulcrum deal
can be gauged by the fact that,
at year-end 2007, Butterfield’s
assets under administration in
the Bahamas (when it still
owned both the funds business
and the bank), were $5.447 bil-
lion.

Ta

Ug

At year-end 2008, when the
funds business had been
merged into Butterfield Ful-
crum, assets under administra-
tion in the Bahamas totalled
just $2.349 billion. This implied
that Butterfield Fulcrum’s
Bahamas operations had almost
$3.1 billion in assets under
administration by year-end
2008.

=

Kingsway Academy High
School Teaching positions
For September, 2009

Kingsway Academy High School invites
qualified applicants for the following teaching
positions for September, 2009.

- Chemistry
* Music

* Spanish

* French

The successful

candidates

MUST be

qualified, born again Christian with a valid

Teacher's Certificate and minimum

if a

Bachelor's Degree. He or She must also
be willing to participate in Extra Curricular

activities, etc.

Application forms can be collected from
Human Resources section at the Business
Office on Bernard Road. Telephone 242-

324-6269 / 324-6887.

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 9B





























Duncan Town Airport Rehabilitation

Tender publication No.: FIA/5/15/1 (GOB) EUROPEAID/
128849/M/WKSIBS (EU)

The Government of The Bahamas intends to award
a works contract for the rehabilitation of Duncan
Town Airport on Ragged Island. The works contract
consists in the partial rehabilitation and the provision
of periodic maintenance (pavement patching and
sealing) of the existing runway and apron. The runway
is about 3 850 feet long. New shoulders and swales
on each side of the runway will also be constructed.

The works are co-financed by the Government of The
Bahamas and the 9th European Development Fund.

The period of performance to complete the works is eight
(8) months.

The tender dossier Is available for inspection and
purchase at the following address:

Department of Public Works of the Ministry of Works and
Transport,

John F. Kennedy Drive,

1st, Floor East Wing

Nassau (N.P.), The Bahamas

Tel.: +242-322-4830

Fax.: +242-326-7344

Sealed Tender submissions are to be deposited in the
Tender Box located at:

Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

3rd Floor Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Tender submissions will be received DO later than
4:00 pm, Monday, 14th of September 2009. Any tender
received after this deadline will not be considered.

Tenderers are invited to attend the Tender opening at
10:00am., Tuesday, I5th of September 2009 at the
Tenders Board.

Possible additional information or clarifications/
questions shall be published on the EuropeAid website:
http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/work/funding/index_en.htm
(Select Contracts link) and will be communicated in
writing to all tenderers.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS
FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, 2009.

E. Be able to discipline, counsel students. Colin Higgs

Permanent Secretary

F. Have high morals standards. Ministry of Public Works and Transport

Application must be picked up at the High School Office
on Shirley Street 23rd July, 2009 and be returned with
the following: a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph, church affiliation, pastor’s name and three
references to:

GH-691

MINISTRY OF THE

GH-852

MINISTRY OF THE

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is July 30th, 2009

NOTICE

ALL ENTRANCES

to the grounds of
ST. FRANCIS XAVIER
CATHEDRAL
WILL BE CLOSED

To retain ownership rights
between the hours of
6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

MONDAY,
AUGUST 3rd, 2009.

To advertise in The Tribune,
just call 502-2371 today!

ENVIRONMENT

Bahamas Maritime Authority

Director Stepped Down
Nassau, London, New York - July 17, 2009

The Bahamas Maritime Authority announces that Mr.
Kenneth D. McLean stepped down as the Authority's
Director effective July 17, 2009, Mr. McLean joined
the Authonty in 2005 following a distinguished career
in the maritime sector. He has served a successful
term as Director.

Mr. Peter John Goulandris, the Authority's Deputy
Chairman, said, "We are justifiably proud of the status
of The Bahamas international ship registry as the
"Registry of Choice’ for many of the world’s finest
shipowning groups. Ken McLean has shared our vision
of quality and of service. He has been an ambassador
for the flag and has served his term as The Bahamas
Maritime Authority's Director with distinction. Both
[ personally and The Bahamas Maritime Authority
wish him well."

Mr. Kenneth D, McLean said, "I am pleased to have
completed a successful term as The Bahamas Maritime
Authority's Director, and to have been of support in
extending both the quality and the scope of the
Authority's service. The Bahamas Flag represents
excellence in the increasingly complex field of
international ship registry. I am certain that the
Bahamas Registry, with quality and service as its
guiding philosophy, will continue to build on its pre-
eminent standing in the international maritime
community."

The Authority wall designate Mr. McLean's successor
in due course. In the interim, the Authority’s senor
management team will oversee the Authority's day-
to-day affairs, reporting directly to the Authority's
Chairman, Mr, lan Fair and Deputy Chairman, Mr,
Peter John Goulandns. The Authority is grateful as
well for the continued advice and support of His
Excellency Paul Farquharson, OPM, The Baharnas’
Permanent Representative at IMQ and High
Commissioner,

The Bahamas Maritime Authority oversees The
Bahamas’ intemational ship registry, the third largest
in the world, The Bahamas Registry, supported by
many of the world's finest shipowning groups,
represents the highest quality in maritime
administration, oversight and service.

ENVIRONMENT

Lf

Director / Chief Executive

The Bahamas Maritime Authority
London

The Bahamas Maritime Authority administers The
Bahamas’ ship registry, the third largest registry in the
world. It is responsible for servicing and policing its
registered vessels, promoting The Bahamas registry to
the international shipping community, and for collecting
and accounting for all ship registration and other
applicable fees. The Authority also advises the
Government of The Bahamas on all aspects of
intermational shipping

The Authority is a statutory Government-owned
corporation, supervised by a Board whose Members
are appointed by the Government, and which reports
to the responsible Minister,

Day-to-day management of the Authority rests with
its Director, who is its chief executive. He or she
oversees all of the Authority's dealings with shipowners,
with the IMO, and with classification societies,
independent inspectors and the legal and financial
communities, The Authority's main office is presently
in London, where the Director has been based, but it
also has offices in Nassau and New York, with other
locations forthcoming.

Candidates must be able to demonstrate a successful
track record in a senior position working in or with the
shipping industry. They should have leadership
qualities, experience in directing and developing
personnel, and suacess in team-building. They should
also have experience in financial management, They
should be holders of a university degree and/or a class
| ship's officer certificate. An appropriate salary will
be offered to the preferred candidate.

Applicants are invited to write, enclosing a copy of
their C’Y, and with the details of their current salary
to: Mr, Peter John Goulandris, Deputy Chairman,
The Bahamas Maritime Authority, Consulate
General of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
231 East 46th Street, New York, N.Â¥. 10017, USA,

Closing date for receipt of applications is August 31st,
2009. All applications will be acknowledged.





THE TRIBUNE



THE WEATHER REPO



5-Day FORECAST































TT Sa NG











fil

SN A a i

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST



















Today Friday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
ert _ High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 84° F
' » Pa i o|1|2 3|4|5 617 s|olioh FC FIC FC FIC Friday: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 84° F
co te f : all J ty Acapulco 93/33 79/26 s 92/33 78/25 t FREEPORT Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 84° F
ail — ee LOW =| MODERATE | HIGH J V.HIGH Amsterdam 66/18 54/12 sh 68/20 55/12 pc Friday: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 84° F
‘ mek ORLANDO XN Ankara, Turkey 82/27 52/11 s 81/27 52/11 ¢ = ABACO Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 85° F
High:94°F34°C = Afternoon Clear to partly cloudy Partly sunny, a Partly sunny, a Clouds and sun, a Clouds and sun, a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 91/32 75/23 s 93/33 75/23 s Friday: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 85° F
rr Low: 76°F/24°C / thunderstorm in and breezy. t-storm; breezy. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 56/13 47/8 pc 58/14 51/10 c
sare all Ml spots. ° © ° ° Bangkok 88/31 77/25 sh 89/31 77/25 sh rl
\ @ et apes Pawan et | re Me oe i: oe be i 7 Barbados 86/30 77/25 sh mee TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
TAMPA ag : IDES FOR NASSAU Barcelona 80/26 68/20 s 79/26 65/18 s
a i , ETE Terai i
High: 91° F/33° C : 04°-86° F 94°-80° F High _Ht(ft.) Low Ht) Peng eee Sica
Low: 76° F/24°C ry r, The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 3:07 a.m. 2.2 9:05am. 03 oe ao oe —. a s
ae @ “ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 350p.m. 2.7 10:12pm. 05 aan e 79/26 57/13 7m 75/93 56/13 7s
7 CLL Friday 400am. 21 10:02am. 04 Bermuda 82/27 76/24 s 81/27 75/23 pe
mh 4:49pm. 27 11:09p.m. 0.5 Bogota 66/18 43/6 sh 64/17 44/6
Sa Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 504dam. 21 1058am. 04 Brussels 70/21 52/11 pc 72/22 55/12 pc
ABACO Temperature 5:43pm. 2.7 0 Budapest 94/34 64/17 s 91/32 64/17 pe
ih: Q9° ° IGM: sess sacudvssenselacetsonaesecsiediiansd tecechane 91° F/33° C : : Buenos Aires 5412 41/4 s 54/12 45/7 pe
, pT Nal eee Low ga° F/ag° ¢ Sunday Bae tistam od Cairo 98/36 76/24 s 99/37 76/24 s
ai Cy ow: 78° F/: Normal high. ... asrrgieC ee 93/33 87/30 r 96/35 87/30 +
. of Normal low 75° F/24° C Calgary 76/24 50/10 pc 66/18 48/8 pc
4 of F,.: @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's DIQH oo. eeceseseeesseesseeesseeeeeees 93° F/34° C SUN Ay Ty yt Cancun 91/32 79/26 pc 92/33 78/25 sh
' —a High: 93° F/34° C ae Last year's low sires seeyt eye aces, 79° F/26° C ; Caracas 82/27 71/21 t 81/27 71/21 t
— Low: 79° F/26° C ¢ a Precipitation _ aie a ans Ly a a Casablanca 89/31 75/23 s 88/31 68/20 s
—_ yr al As of 2 p.m. yesterday .......ccceececcseteseecenees 0.00" = suliset....... 90 p.m. Moonset... .. “VO a.m. Copenhagen 70/21 51/10 sh 71/21 55/12 pe
ie. FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT me Year to date . 20. Last New First Dublin 64/17 50/10 sh 63/17 52/11 +
High: 91°F/33°C @ High: 91° F/33° C Normal year to date .o.......ccsecsessessseeseeeeeee 24.47" ‘ Frankfurt 75/23 50/10 pc 73/22 52/11 po
Low: 81°F/27°C a Low: 77° F/25°C i Geneva 76/24 53/11 pc 80/26 59/15 pc
SG AccuWeather.com ae Halifax 6719 61/16 t 77/25 61/16 s Showers Miami
; @ a mt Forecasts and aianhice provided by Havana 91/32 73/22 s 90/32 74/23 s T-storms aun
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Pe 13 Aug.20 = Aug. 27 Helsinki 75/23 57/13 pc 66/18 54/12 1 Rain Fronts
: High: 91° F/33°C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 90/32 81/27 t 90/32 81/27 t Le, 4 Flurries beastie ances Cold
~ i . i = o eo own are noon positions of wealtner systems ani
i Low: 81°F/27°C NASSAU Sesran'c Islamabad 104/40 82/27 s 104/40 82/27 t Be] Snow precipitation. Tempers bands are highs for the day. Warm fteniiteniin
High: 91° F/33°C ow: oe cam a 8 ae om sh [y_%] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Magu
~ One ° erusaiem s S
i at — a Johannesburg cate 446s soi 288 sf] -105| Os (NGBT 10s 205) HRN] aos 5ORH) cos 70s |e Se AaNTTET
KEY WEST -, fn CATISLAND Kingston 90/32 78/25 s 90/32 78/25 1
High: 91° F/83°C << a Lima 72/22 60/15 s 72/22 58/14 s
Low: 83° F/28°C High: 89° F/32°C London 68/20 54/12 sh 72/22 55/12 pe
eet © id om we; as as’ TBRTOe NaN UWAN Gs
. Manila 85/29 77/25 r 86/30 78/25 1 : =
aa > Mexico City 81/27 55/12 t 76/24 56/13 t
ail a Monterrey 104/40 75/23 s 104/40 77/25 s
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 79/26 64/17 pc 75/23 64/17 t
High: 88° F/31° C Hi h:91°F/33°C Moscow 81/27 61/16 pc 79/26 59/15 pe e
ANDROS Low: 78° F/26° C Low: 75°F/24°C Munich 78/25 54/12 pc 73/22 54/12 c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's High: 93° F/34°C ‘ Noe pee ae Pe oe oo fe Yy wn
highs and tonights's lows. : ——— ,. ew Delhi ou an O
: : Low: 76° F/24°C ie : in . Oslo 64/17 54/12 6 70/21 54/12 1
alll ) , om Paris 73/22 52/11 pc 77/25 57/13 pe A A Ir
a) Prague 85/29 54/12 s 77/25 52/11 pe Way uU : 1Cane
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 73/22 65/18 c 70/21 65/18 +
US. Cres oe ‘Mae oud s ‘SOD. Bae s Fae can rest easy knowing
Low: 75° F/24°C Rome 91/32 69/20 s 90/32 66/18 s
a “me a aa aa ae MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 90/32 81/27 t ~—~=«I82. 79/28 sh that you have excellent insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ade High: 91° F/33° C a aa im oe oe oe coveravre no matter which
FIC FIC FIC FIC FC FIC FIC FIC FC F/C FIC = F/C Low: 73° F/23° C ane Saad 0) h : d bl
Albuquerque 89/31 67/19 pc 92/33 68/20 s Indianapolis 84/28 62/16 t 81/27 GING s Philadelphia 90/32 74/23 t 88/31 72/22 1 CROOKED ISLAND ACKLINS Santiago 66/18 41/5 pc 55/12 37/2 ¢ Way e€ Win OWS,
Anchorage «74/21 «58/14 pe 74/21 «54/12 po Jacksonville «92/33 74/23 t «92/83 74/23 «+t ~—Phoenix 108/42 85/29 s 108/42 86/30 s i sun aa aul va nt rm eta one 7
Atlanta 84/28 70/21 t 82/27 70/21 t Kansas City 78/25 57/13 pc 85/29 63/17 s Pittsburgh 80/26 66/18 po 82/27 60/15 t RAGGEDISLAND — Uiist:93°F/34" a0 Paulo s s :
Atlantic City 88/31 72/22 t 99/31 69/20 t Las Vegas 106/41 80/26 s 106/41 84/28 s Portland,OR 101/38 64/17 s 92/33 63/17 s cae Low: 76° F/24°C aan ae wie pe aan ae Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 90/32 70/21 t 90/32 70/21 ¢ Little Rock 83/28 69/20 t 82/27 69/20 t Raleigh-Durham 92/33 73/22 t 91/32 71/21 t Low:73°F/23°C = % sen — Reg” Bh Ne ores
Boston 86/30 69/20 pc 86/30 71/21 t LosAngeles 80/26 66/18 pc 82/27 6417 pc St. Louis 82/27 6216 t 86/30 66/18 s . a ae See - eT OREEE mi
Buffalo 78/25 65/18 po 74/23 6015 t Louisville 86/30 68/20 t 84/28 64417 pc SaltLakeCity 87/30 6518 s 92/33 66/18 s GREATINAGUA wr Tala Gae ee am ot ee
Charleston, SC 90/32 75/23 t 92/33 76/24 t Memphis 85/29 71/21 t 83/28 70/21 t San Antonio 101/38 79/26 s 101/38 78/25 s High: 93° F/34°C aaa 75/59 SO Be 75/23 S73. pe INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Chicago 78/25 58/14 t 78/25 61M6 s Miami 91/32 81/27 t 91/32 79/26 San Diego 74/23 67/19 po 75/23 68/20 pc Low. 75°F24°C Trinidad 8/97 63/17 pc e790 64/17 5 ,
Cleveland 82/27 65/18 po 76/24 58/14 t Minneapolis 70/21 5743 t 80/26 63/17 pc Sanfrancisco 67/19 56/13 pc 67/19 56/13 pc ; TERESI 96/30 65/18 5 SiS 7aNESTNE (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 87/30 68/20 t 84/28 75/23 t Nashville 85/29 71/21 t 84/28 6518 t Seattle 96/35 60/15 s 87/30 61/16 s Gianna 86/20 66/18 s 83/28 66/18. pc en hace Exuma
Denver 71/21 53/11 t 88/31 5341 pc NewOrleans 92/33 78/25 t 92/33 78/25 t Tallahassee «91/32 73/22 t -92/33 73/22 t alc
i Warsaw 82/27 61/16 pc 75/23 55/12 pc A 350-3500 fl: graf Te: 999.0069 Ff Tel: 5-204
Le A GUA? 77S | OME TUDE Ee C2 COE pe O28E POA CaO Ae Mines ee i re i i
onolulu s s anoma Ul pe ucson s s -
Houston 97/36 79/26 t 97/36 78/25 t Orlando 94/34 76/24 t 93/33 75/23 t Washington, DC 92/33 75/23 t 90/32 71/21 t ah ee





The Tribune "””"”
OBIMUARIES
RELIGION

\ ~< The Tribune

—‘\ ee
» \0
707.9

SS hour chaice for ine family:



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

In Loving Memory

Mr Leslie Nolan Smith

February 13, 1933 - July 30, 2008

‘Poem
I thought of you today
but that is nothing new
I thought about you yesterday and
days before that too.

I think of you in silence.

I often speak your name.
Now all I have are memories
and your picture in a frame.

Your memory is my keepsake,
with which I will never part.
(sod has you in his keeping,

I have you in my heart.

Cherished Memories By Loving wile:
Leonie Smith, brother, sisters, in-laws,
nieces, nephews and a host of family
and friends



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

ers ——
In Loving Memory of |





Mr. Doug ouglas Cudsie McKenzie

27th August 1940 July 2008
If tears could build a stairway,
and memories were a lane,
we would walk right to heaven,
to bring you home again.

No farewell words were spoken,
no time to say good-bye,
you were gone before we knew it,
and only God knows why.
Our hearts still aches in sadness,
and secret tears still flow,
what it means to loose you,
no one will never know.

28 FF

Sadly missed by your loving wife:
Eugenia McKenzie; daughters: Therez and
Francine McKenzie and Royanne
McKenzic-Williams of Atlanta;
grandchildren: Symone and Brandon
McKenzie and “Zaire Williams of Atlanta;
nephew Ricardo Johnson; and a host of
other relatives and friends.

Gone but not forgotten

“) aT 2 PPP OTIS ETS A

Fa





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

GARTH
MINARD
THOMPSON,
69

of Nassau, The Bahamas,

who died on Monday, 27th

July, 2009, will be held at :

St. Matthew’s Anglican Church, Shirley and
Church Streets, Nassau, today, Thursday 30th
July, 2009 at 3:00 pm.

Reverend Father James Moultrie and The
Venerable James Palacious will officiate and
interment will follow in the Western Cemetery,
Nassau Street, Nassau.

Mr. Thompson is survived by his wife Irene;
daughters, Joni Marchant and Minarda Powell; son
Travis; sons-in-law, Ron Marchant and Stuart Powell:
daughter-in-law, Nashtelka; grand-children, Carter
and Amber Powell and Trent Thompson; sisters,
Sheila Harrison and Barbara Albury and brother,
Trevor Thompson; brothers-in-law, Lawrence
Harrison and Tyrone Albury and sister-in-law,
Dorothea Thompson; numerous nieces and nephews
and other family members.

He will be fondly remembered by the management
and staff of Quality Auto Sales and Executive
Motors and many friends too numerous to mention.

In lieu of flowers, the family request that donations
be made to the Cancer Society of The Bahamas,
P.O. Box 3.8. 6539, Nassau in memory of Garth
M. Thompson.

Arrangements by Kemp’s Funeral Home Limited.

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 3

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

PETER S
O'BRIEN

will be held on Saturday, | st
August, 2009 at 10:00a.m. at
graveside, Western Cemetery,
Nassau Street. 4

Reverend Charles A. Sweeting |
will officiate.

Peter Allan O'Brien, 56, aka "Captain Pete" or "Peter
Pan", passed away 21st May, 2009 in Munroe, North
Carolina, after suffering a heart attack. Peter was
predeceased by his parents, Mr. & Mrs. Gordon O'Brien
who founded the Stapledon School for Peter and others
like him. Peter was also predeceased by his brothers,
Andrew and Patrick O'Brien and is survived by his sisters,
Helen Garcia and Mary Ann Jones; brothers, Michael and
Jimmy O'Brien; brothers-in-law, Victor Jones and Jose
Garcia; sister-in-law, Roslyn O'Brien; many loving nieces,
nephews and friends who, as children, grew up under his
watchful eye as he shared his toys with them.

These past 17 years Peter lived in Munroe, North Carolina
at the Karen Lane Group Home but spent Christmases
and summer holidays with family in Nassau or with his
sister Helen or brothers Pat and Jimmy Stateside, "Captain
Pete" would not visit Nassau without an adventure to Ft.
Charlotte and the Pirate Museum.

After his mother and brother Pat passed away, Sue Payne
of Indian Trail, North Carolina became his guardian in
North Carolina, Sue loved, cared for and looked after
Peter's needs when his family could not be there. Karen
Lane became Peter's second "home" and the staff, his
"family" there.

Our "Peter Pan" can surely fly now.
In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Stapledon

school, P.O. Box N. 3913, Nassau or Special Olympics,
P.O. Box 3.8. 19036, Nassau in memory of Peter O'Brien.



Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.



PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Yager funeral Home && Crematorium

Queen’s Highway
P.O, Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 « Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

i a

DELLAREASE
RACHEAL
COOPER VIL,
37

Coral Reef Estates,

on Saturday, August

Public Cemetery.

husband: Benedite Vil; two daughters: Sha-

Kintae Rolle and Laquay Vil; one grandson: |
Dexter Fowler Jr.; two stepchildren: Bee | Pinder and a host of other relatives and

eulah ;
Cooper, Mary Bastian, Dorlene Cooper and |
Starlene Ramsey; one brother: Harcourt |
Kingsley Cooper; father-in-law Hartley _ at Yager Funeral Home and Crematorium
Levarity; mother-in-law: Colmada Levarity; ! on Queens Highway on Friday from 12:00
grandmother-in-law: Pauline Forbes; 10) noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church on

oo Mother Laura Roberts, Brenda Laing, | Saturday from 11:30 a.m. until service time.
Louise Pinder, Virginia Cooper, Eugene |

Hield, Iva Cooper, Natalie Laing, Hazel /

and Bennicka Vil: four sisters:

' Baillou, Elsaida and Maudie Cooper; five
: uncles: William and Alfred Cooper, Masatio
' Baillou, JP Rev. Freddie Laing and Andy
! Hield; 10 brothers-in-law: Keith Bastian,
' Paul Ramsey, Stanley Missick, Hartley,

: Hastwell and Donny Levarity, Kevin
a resident of #66:

Missick, John Williams, Sidney Forbes and

| Lindsey Parker; six sisters-in-law: Shenell
Freeport will be held |

Parker, Sherell Forbes, Dorothy Williams,

: Ist} Vanessa Levarity, Princess Williams and
1, 2009 at 1:00 p.m. at Emmanuel Baptist |
Church, High Rock, Grand Bahama. ' nieces-in-law, 10 nephews-in-law, 10 grand
Officiating will be Pastor Henry Cooper and :

interment will follow in the High Rock 7 Cynthia and Berthamae Forbes, Lucy,

| Gladys and Ninea Jones; six uncles-in-law:

: Frank, Donald, Arnold and Van Forbes,
Left to cherish her memories are her:

Valerie Cooper; 15 nieces, 16 nephews, 11

nieces, 18 grand nephews, 5 aunts-in-law:

Hilton Jones and Brandford Harvey; one

' godson Ashton; one godmother: Alfreda

Roberts; one godfather: Rev. Lawrence
friends.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects

ee ee





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009,

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

GLEN WENDELL
GILLGOD
HOLMES, 67

of #13 Marlin Drive, Highland Park,
will beheld on Friday, July 31st, 10-200
am., at Holy Spint Anglican Church,
Howard Street, Chippingham. Rev'd
Fr. Harry Ward will officiate.
Interment will follow in the Western
Cemetery, Nassau Street.

He is survived by his wife, Cynthia if

W. Holmes; children, Claudelle Rolle-
Holmes and Cornell Rolle, Jules and Juliet Holmes, Carlene Delancy,
Rafael Holmes and Yvette Holmes. Kimberley, Annischka Holmes-
Moncur; siblings, Alonzo Holmes, Doranell King and Deborah Gaitor;
grandchildren, Joelle Holmes, Duran Holmes, Diamond Rolle, KK and
Mally, Geremy Mullings and Erin Delancy, Coryne Holmes-Rolle, Anwar,
Sharonda, Travis, Ron, Glennard, Jerrard, Raven and Rihanna Holmes,
Iman Joseph and Ayrton Moncur; great grandchildren, Geremy Jr. and
Genesys Mullings, Makiko Holmes, Nishand and Yukari Joseph; son-in-
law, Eric Delancy and John Moncur, daughter-in-law, Darchelle and
Renee Holmes; brothers-in-law, Hansel King, George Burrows, Kendal
Taylor and Patrick Kelly: sisters-in-law, Mildred Holmes, Mable Femander,
Rose Burrows, Mavis Burrows and Almonica McBain, nieces, Antoinette
King, Makella Cartwright and Thea Gaitor; nephews, Dwayne and Antoine
King, Darius Turnquest and Cedric Gaitor Jr, Ricardo Holmes, and Rev.
Michael Holmes; adopted children, Emile Ledee and family, Dominic
Deveaux and family, Theophilis and Antoinette Glinton and family, Jason,
Jordash and Joshua Clarke of New Jersey, Ann, Lionel, Bernard Jr, and
Chanel Cole of Florida, Ursula Larrimore, Kirizza and Kaivyah Knowles,
Vanessa A. Clarke of New York and William Davis; numerous relatives
and friends, Dorothy and Oswald Lightbourme, Margaret Bostwick, Mavis
Holmes-Hanek, Deloris Nottage, Beryl Murray, Millet Dorsette, Sheila
Rolle, Vernae Elcott, Judy and Richard Dawkins, Casscine Kinnear,
William and Paula Butler, Junior and Doralee Bain, Randolph Minnis
and family, Jean Cole of Florida, Bruce Elliott and family, Monsignor
Preston Moss, Hon, Hubert Minnis, Florence Clark of New Jersey, Dean
Patrick Adderley and Astrid Adderley, Omar Smith and family, Gavin
Johnson and family, Miranda Adderley, Isaac and Rosalita Davis of
Andros, Antoine Sealy, Mercia Strachan, Tom and Paula Darcy, Shirley
and Henry Saunders and family, Audrey Fountain, Kareem Hanna, Fr.
Harry Ward and Mrs Ward, Fr. Samuel Sturrup and Mrs Sturrup, the
Chippingham and Highland Park communities, and the church of the
Holy Spirit family: special friends, Sir Arlington Butler and Lady Sheila

Florida, Jacqueline Bain, Ruth Donaldson, David and Valerie Culmer
and family of Grand Bahama, Gracian Sands, and Dominic C. A. Culmer
and other family and friends too numerous to mention.

| Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
: Nassau Street on Thursday from 10°00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Friday
i at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

NIKITA NICOLO
OMAR CURRY,
34

of 440 Marathon Road Estates, will be
held on Saturday, August Ist, 10:00
am at Rhodes Memorial Methodist
Church, Montrose Avenue. Bishop Dr.
Raymond R. Neilly and Rev. Emily
Bementte will officiate. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Memorial
Gardens, Soldier Road.

| Nikita will be sadly missed and remembered by his devoted mother,
| Mary: ten aunts, Edwina Smith, Eudene Thompson, Fay Major, Zorene
: Curry, Angela Bullard, Sheila, Rosie and Terrice Curry, Agatha Ferguson,
! Betty Moss: seven uncles, William, Charlie, Colon, Calvert, Pedro and
| John Curry, George Bullard: four grandaunts, Marion Curry, Berline
: Curry, Gwendolyn Clarke, Mable King; one grand uncle, Paul Curry;
| numerous cousins including, Spence, Dwayne, Shelly, Craig, Steven,
| Sherry, Geoffrey, André Tony, Marcus, Marie, Ashtra, Clover, Kenneth,
: Amanada, Carlos, Hendrick, Drexel, Emory, Kenley, Patrick, Patricia,
' Hendrick Jr, Adrian, Zorene, Alexandria, Montez, Jodie, Jonek,

Christopher, Nicole, Vasht, Colby, Colon Jr, Colleen Agatha, Mikhail,

: Mikhala, Miquel, John Jr., Johnavan, Johnté; Nikita had some very special
| friends who were very supportive and remained with him until his passing,
| fiends include, Ceryl Jones, Allen Adderley, Mark Miller, Scarlette Stuart,
: Michael Rigg, Desiree Moxey, Sykvia Forbes, Kedmin Munnings, John
i Fox, Mario Sherman, Percy Wallace, Charmaine Minnis, Charmaine
| Duncombe, Detra Bethel, Deshon, Ron Hightower, Grant Merryman,
Jason, David Molzahm from Toronto, Canada; godparents, Dr, Brendamaec
| Cleare, Joycelyn Smith, Charles Curry; numerous relatives and friends
| including, Betty Clarke, Alexander Thompson, Betty Bethel and family.
: Evelyn Babbs and family, Pat Bootle, Heather Armbrister and family,
| Sheena Pratt and family, Basil and Agnes Charlow, Mr and Mrs William
| Jones, Mr and Mrs Ivan Cleare and family, Janet Shirley, Shani Marks,
: Charmaine Burrows, Cynthia Curtis and family, Reneé and Felipé Major
; and family, Ricardo Moncur and family, Wendy Smith and family, Mr.

Steven Sawyer, Jackie Hepburn, Joyce Moncur and family, Movena

; Clarke and family, Shannondon McKenzie and family, Dale Grant, Mr
; and Mirs. Ruben Stuart and Janet Peterson.

Butler; Ozzie and Edy Fowler of Florida, Carl and Menera Butler of |

: Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
; Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday
| at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.



PAGE 5



PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

.\ Vaughn O. Jones

MEMORIAL CENTER

“Honoring the memories of loved ones”
IMDEPEMDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

EVANGELINE
ALFREDA ‘Vangy’
HALL, 51

of Pinewood Gardens will be
held on Saturday August I,
2009 at 10:30 a.m. at St.
Thomas More Parish, Madeira
Street, Palmdale. Officiating
will be Fr. Alfred Culmer,
assisted by other Ministers of
the Gospel. Interment will follow in Old Trail Cemetery,
Abundant Life Road.

Precious memories will forever linger in the hearts of
her Husband: Frederick W. Hall, Mother: Sylvia Collie;
Father: Drexwell Rolle Sr.; Son: Michael F. Hall;
Daughter: Mickelle Hall; Grandchildren: Dekaj Derek
Pratt, Anthony, Nia and Haley Hall; Brothers: Franklyn
and Drexwell Rolle Jr.; Sisters: Gail Martin, Karen
Cooper, Vindora and Lashea Rolle, Wendy Mckinnon;
Mother In Law: Ann Hall; Father in Law: Frederick
Hall; Sisters in Law: Alice Rolle, Tanya Knowles,
Charlene Coakley, Magnola, Dedrie, Nathalie and
Delerease Hall; Brothers in Law: Stephen, Christopher,
Elvin, Paul, and Peter Hall, Alfred Coakley, Dwayne
Knowles; Uncles: Bertram Rahming, Peter and
Washington Dames, Aunts: Alicia Rahming, Yvonne
Dames, Jenny Evans, Roslyn Dames; Over 30 Nieces
and Nephews; Cousins includng: Tanya White, Dwayne,
Anthone, Stacy, Rochelle Dames; Sylvana, Alicia, Gina,
Gino, Karen, Bertram Jr. Rahming, Valencia Rolle;
Numerous Other Relatives and Close Friends including:
Barbara, Bernadette, Patrice, Tera, Cindy, Dereck Pratt,
The Montel Heights Family, Garden Hills Family, Wilson
Track Family, Yellow Elder and Pinewood Family.

Viewing will be held in the “Legacy Suite’ of Vaughn
©. Jones Memorial Center, Wulff Road and Primrose
Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m, and at the
church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to service time.

Wulff Road and Primrose Street,
Telephone: 456,9800/ 1 © 24 Hour Emergen
ephone: * ur Eme
434-9220 /380-8077 -

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 * Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

WELLINGTON
PAUL-CLARKE,
43

of Rock Crusher Road yl be held
on Saturday August 1°", 200° at
11:00 a.m. Church: St Joseph
Church, Boyd Roa Officiating:
Fr. Martin Gomes, $5.CC.
Interment: Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen & Spikenard Roads,

He is survived by his Fiancé

Dianne: seven (7) sisters: Renay

Clarke, Jenniemae Higgins,
Christine Lundy, Carol Rolle, Janet Hanna, Eunice Young & Ashley
Duncombe: nine (9) brothers: Leonard & Terrance Lundy, Wayde
Higgins, Joshua Eden, Alfred Paul, Shaquille, George & Stephen Clarke
& Marco Stubbs; twenty-two (22) nieces: Bettymae Major, Rochelle
Smith, Niokia & Sylvia Hudson, Sharelle Higgins, Indianna Strachan,
Lakeira Duncombe, Wequel, Rochelle, Joshanique, Anvber & Joshelle
Eden, Kaylisa & Karissa Hanna, Tessa Adderley, Shantell Rolle,
Shermaine Brown, Kasha & Shamelra Wolmane, Juliette, Natasha &
Ashanti Grant; fourtecn (14) nephews: Marco Major, Rendall & Kelsey
Hanna, Jason Strachan, Edward Wallace, Donavan Higgins, Joshua,
Christin, Justin, Gevonte Eden, Michacl Roker, Fabian & Renaldo Rolle
& Tomas Adderley; thirteen (13) grandnieces: Katic & Krystal Lewis,
Shavonne Clarke, Chadwick Wilson, Nikeytra & Nikenya Knowles,
Tatyana Smith, Mercedes, Brittany & Nakia Strachan, Shandise &
Gabriel Major & Cranique: eight (8) grandnephews: Alexander Smith,
Tyral Hepburn, Johnny $, Jerome Davies, Clarence Wilson, Jakad,
Lamont & Wade; three (3) sisters-in-law: Barbara Laing, Donalee
Higgins & Tambra Price; brother-in-law: Dennis Young; grandmother:
Beatrice Clarke; eight (8) aunts: Shirleymac King, Lillian Rolle, Audrey
Dean, Patsy Stuart, Betty Bamett, Margaret Major, Myrtle Boyd of New
Jersey & Marietta Miller; three (3) uncles: Godfrey Stuart & Granville
& Allan Clarke; cousins: Beatrice Smith, Sharlene, Sherry & Shantel
Rolle, Paulette & Sharmaine Bailey, Lillian Munroe, Shekira Whyms,
Raquel, Parnela, Ronette, Pauline, Dwina, Felicia & Keisha, Desiree,
Christopher, Tangemica, Patrice, Lisa, Thelma, Monique Newman,
Shameka, Nicola, Charles, Basil, Anthony Newman, Theophilus, Patricia,
Wanda, Kay, Tyrone, Matthew, Sarah, Kimberley, Leslie & Andrew
Stuart, Katrina, Burrows, Stephen & Andrew Burrows, Lisa Dames of
Abaco, Ronald & Spurgeon Dames, Delina Ferguson, Patsy Sturrup,
Theresa & Tavares, Capea & Ashton, Tameka Clarke, Anya & Melwem
Sturrup, Alvando Scott, Roosevelt, Renaldo, Lavana & Rasheed Minus,
Shawn, Shawnell & Jontae Clarke, Clinton Rolle, Dessalee & Lucy,
Esthenmae Wrcht, Annamae Sands, Sharlene Sanderson, Anthony &
Monica Wong, Green Clarke, Clarissa Johnson, Cheryl Hanna, Deon
Whoiht, Louise Bain & Sonia Non of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Ana
Gilbert, Durant & Annette Minus, Wendy North & Dr. Nelson & Perry
Clarke, Glen & Norman Rolle, Jessler, Lloyd, Loett Lightbourne,
Verlene Clarke & the Smith Family,

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF AGES
FUNERAL CHAPEL ON WULFF ROAD & PINEDALE ON
FRIDAY FROM 10 A.M. TO 6 P.M AND ON SATURDAY AT
THE CHURCH FROM 10:00 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.







THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 7

me COR IK Dee ere
7 GateWauy (hemorialruneral Chapel Wy
Harewood Sinclair Higgs L.F.D. |
President/Managing Director
(404) S45 Vea path P ated

alle « lad: a J) db!
iusis =i ji}!

fal, Wu

4:4 ilutir |

mal
4 iairita: el Tue e

erving The Entire Bahamas, Turks 6 Cacios Island

afi) Fece.o Nene vou) Mirus) 6) rusts
WHighertServicelisithemkeyptopescetiences

ee a a) Se SERVICE FOR

Prison Officer
DESERAY
STUART, 26

a resident of Mount Pleasant Village
will be held on Friday, 31st July,
2009 at 11:00 a.m. at Church Of
God Chippingham, Eden Street;
Officiating will be Bishop C. Dennis
Lafrenier; assisted by: Other
Ministers and interment will follow
in Lakeview Memorial & Mausoleum, J. F. Kennedy Drive.
Services entrusted to Gateway Memorial Funeral Chapel, Mount
Royal Avenue and Kenwood Strect.

The memories of Deseray Deandrea Stuart, ‘Desi’, will linger on
in the hearts of many, including her parents: Donna and Desmond
Stuart; daughter: Rogrea Grant; her fiancé: Perry Saunders Jr.;
grandparents; Gwendolyn Evans, Louis and Janice Stuart; four
(4) sisters: Italia Gordon, Chalese Tate, Crystal Adderley and
Sadia Stuart; three (3) brothers: Jamison Rolle, Kendal Cooper
and Desmond Stuart Jr.; two (2) sisters-in-law: Lavaughn Rolle
and Jathorn Cooper; three (3) brothers-in-law: Marvin Gordon
Sr.. Steven Sr. and Clinton Sr.; numerous aunts and uncles
including; Mebra Evans, Norma Johnson, Montrac Drammeh,
Paula Emmanuel, Paula Rolle, Marion Rolle, Shirlene Murphy,
Iva White, Vernita Rolle, Iris Rolle, Melony Poitier, Inspector
Alma Rolle, Inez Nesbitt, Gloria Symonette, Jessie Burnside,
Mary and Judy Stuart, George, Donald, Leonard, Samuel, Pasqual,
Jerod, Leon and Glen Rolle, Howard, Rudolph, Ettiene, Jerry,
Bernie and Hubert Stuart, Lenward Clarke, and Molifer Drammeh;
grandaunts including: Catherine Johnson, Mozena Sands,
Altheamae Lewis, Runez Major and Early Winters; granduncle:
Euticus Rolle; numerous cousins including: Lorraine, Lateisha
and John Farrington, Carlos Evans, Corporal Brian Roach, Lenroy,
Allen, Tammara, Joshua, Kino, George, Lateria, Telford, Ebony,
Natale, Donnella, Donald Jr., John, Lencice, Kelly, Gweneth,
Monette, Johnae, John John, Brian Jr., Cierra Lavette, Terrance,
Veronique, Carletha, Ceola, Miriam, Loretta, Shenique, Dino,
Sammy Jr., Chelsea, Christopher, Lavonda, Mikatlo, Tiffaney,
Elsworth, Ashley and other relatives and friends including Myrtle

and Michael Thompson, Angela Gray, Willamae Johnson, Michael,
Bertha and Roy Johnson, Melva Gibson, Rose, Judy, Paula and
Allen Newbold, Beroline Wells, Joystina Conliffe, Lloyd
Sands, Janet and Nathanel Lewis, Patricia Brown, Perry Sr. and
family, Yvonne Russell and family, Washington Smith and family,

Eloise and Mavis Cooper and the Stuart Clan of Bimini and Grand
Bahama, Superintendent Elliston Rahming, and the Staff of her
Majestyis Prison, A Recruit Squad 2006 in particular her best
friend Marlene Rolle, Bishop John N. Humes and family, Bishop
C. Dennis Lafernia and The Church of God Greater Chippingham
family, Invaders for Christ Church family (Freeport), Dr. H. A.
Simmons and familyThe Doctors and Nurses of Intensive Care
Unit, P. ML H., The Exuma Royal Bahamas Police Force Reservists,
The Staff of The Department of Labor, The Management
and Staff at the College of The Bahamas School of Nursing
Grosvenor Campus, The Black Village Community, The Mount
Pleasant Village Community, The Hawksbill and High Rock
Community, Grand Bahama, Ragged Island and Watkins Street
Community, Staniel Cay Community, Candice Mackey, Keilia
Adderley, Elder Ervin and Dr, Curleen Femander, Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Saunders, Rosetta Minnis and family, Odetta Brown and
family, Wanda Williams, Rodger Grant and many others too
numerous to mention.

DAE’*QWON SAUNDERS

He survived by his father: Perry Pedrito Saunders Jr.; sister:
Rogrea Grant; grandparents: Donna and Desmond Saunders,
Yvonne Russell and Perry Saunders Sr.; greatgrandparents:
Louis and Janet Stuart, Gwendolyn Evans, Louise Strachan and
Mr, and Mrs. R. Saunders; uncles: Tavane and Travis Russell,
Jamison Rolle and Chavez Saunders; aunts: Alexis Adderley of
Port St. Lucy, Florida and Italia Gordon; grand-uncles: Robert
and Ronald Saunders; great-aunts: Kathy Saunders, Ann Bowles,
Agatha King, Judy Edwards, Helen Jones, Pandora Roach, Rose
Campbell and Melvina Woodara of Miami, Florida; numerous
cousins including: Prison Officer T. Hall, Keisha, Tisco Diondco,
Ashla, Brian, Lorenzo, and other relatives, too numerous to
mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on
Thursday, July 30th, 2009 from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on
Friday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.





PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 30,

2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

and Crematouium Limited

SO nt Cocmansarn Lind!

IIA Eas! Coral Roos, Freeport, S.B., Bahamas

Telephone: (243) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005

Picisiieeiorcwicd Seidler ocacle Nassau, MUP, Boho,
P.O. Box CB-12072

Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 + Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL oH SILOS Be FOR

DOROTHY MORINA
SAUNDERS, 77

of Fritz Lane of East Street will be | Wiewing will be held in the Irenic Suite at Restview Mortuary
11:00 Voice of Deliveranc ? and Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday
WM am. at Voice OF Deliverance | from 10:00am to 6:00pm and at the church on Saturday from

WY, | 9:30 service time.
Malcolm Allotment East. Officiating : uae Ra OO Lee

will be Pastor Edlin Scott, assisted by

held on Saturday, August Ist, 2009,

Disciple Center, Deliverance Way,

i Gibson, Sandy, Lisa, Picky, Ida, Joyann, Sam, Marie, Doramae,
i | Docotty, Menera, Mrs. Belle, and others too numerous to
} mention along with the Fritz Lane family and the Community
i Nursing Home.

Pastor Carl Fred Curry and other ; |

ministers of the gospel and Interment |
Road, :

will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier

She was predeceased by her husband: Mr. Locksley Saunders
her son: Patrick Saunders and daughter; Paulette Brooks. Left :
to cherish precious memories of this gem are her three sons: :

lan, Kendrick and Cecil Saunders; brothers: Israel ‘Buster’

Wallace, Chief Apostle Leon Wallace, Errol and Allden Wallace; |
sisters: Shirley Sands of Eleuthera, Bahamas, Iona Wallace, :
Vedora Hall, and Inez McKenzie of Nassau, Bahamas; two }
adopted sons: Hamlin Newbold and Leviticus Ferguson; step |

children: Sharon, Kathleen, Diane and Ermestine; twenty one : Bs —Te . .
nieces: Donnamae, Rochelle, Meriam, Janet, Nicola, Mrs. Laran | Hes survived by his daughters: Kathleen Huyler Cooke, Debrah
Wallace-Williams of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Gia, Christana, | Huyler, Sande Huyler, son: Evereite Huyter; grand children:
Aramanth, Candia, Michelle, Inspector Eleian Sands, Tersha, :

De De, Ivilin, Marie, Golden, Shameka, Garnell and Sherell : . , : :
St oe ye ee ee a oe | Jason, Oral, Elton, Carvel, Joshua, Kevia, Anfernee, Ovante,

i Kenvia, Leon, Carlisa, Deon, Latrell, Vernon, Calia, Dajah,

Grand sons: Corey, Shevar, Lil Kenny, William, K-C, Cody : Ashanti, Aston, Calvin Jr., son-in-law: Leroy Cooke; brothers-
Chara, Rashad, Patrick, Jermaine, Giovanie and Dwayne; Great | P lor; st Banni F Ohio. Florida: 5 ;
Grandchildren: Willasha and Empress; Two aunts: Grace and | ° goul Florida, Dewitt Bannister of Ohio, Florida, sisters-in-
Eulamae Hepburn; Grand son-in-law: Devin Moss; mother-in- : oe : a
law: Winifred Grant: brother-in-law: Earlin Sands: Sisters-in- j and friends including: Kenneth Huyler, Dr. Philip Huyler,
Sees. ag hela rane gil ayaa eres | Godfrey B. Huyler, Adrain Huyler, Lisa Russell, Ludell Whylly,
; Ethimae Bain of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Alice Taylor, Joel
Achara, Sebastian Wallace, Roland and Chris Sands, Kavon | Knowles, Shelia Hepburn, Rosa Zonicle, Shirley and Cleomi

W i . ar .B.D.F. ine § ;
and Israel Wallace, McKell, and R.B.D.F., Marine Seaman | Watson, Nurse Daphne Ferguson, Nurse Tiffany Turnquest of
Stacey, Shantvia, Shantell and Ratesha grand nephews: Jamaal, | the Pierce Ward at Sandilands Hospital and the Doctor and
ae. Manty, Christopher, Kyle, Alfred, peas and Shamar. | Nurses at the Sandilands Hospital, Rev. Dr. Carl J. Rahming.
Cousins: Ruby Cambridge, Vera Davis, Norma Lillian, Zona, :

Violet, Williamae, Rodville, Pearline, lona, Howard, Arabella, : Viewing will be held in the Celestial Suite at Restview Mortuary

: Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00am to 6:00pm
Other relatives and friends including: The Honourable Kenyatta and at the church on Saturday from 9:30m to service time.

Wallace (of Eleuthera) and Franchena Sands; Grand daughter:
Kendra, Sisley, Lashawn, Sharicka, Venteria, Nicola and Alexsin;

law: Minister Leona, Mrs. Melvern and Mrs. Bernice Wallace,
and Calara Gibson of Nassau; nephews: David, Granville,

Michael Hall, Hackey, James and Gary grand nieces Sharell,

Stanley, Allen, Louise, Ruby and Nelle, Joana, Stanley, Patrick.

MR. ALFRED JUNIOR
HUYLER, 82

held on Saturday August Ist 2009 at
11:00am at St. Paul’s Baptist Church
Bernard Road Fox Hill. Officiating
will be Pastor J. Carl Rahming, assisted
by other ministers of gospel and
cremation will follow.

Derek Darville, Sharmaine Cartwright, Kevin Ferguson, Deon
Moss, Alvin, Calvin, Selina , Jennifer, Wenshe; 2) grandchildren:

in-law: Evangelist Jefferey Bannister, Deacon James Bannister

law: Esther smith, Doreen Davis; and a host of other relatives

Ferguson, Winnifred Bannister, Bishop Ross Davis, Pastor Lee





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

FREEPORT
Li eee ee
PG. Box F-
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (42) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « See

LAUREN MARY
MILLER, 59

of Wulff Road will be held on Saturday,
August Ist, 2009 at 1:00pm at Holy |

Cross Anglican Church, Highbury Park,

off Soldier Roads. Officiating will be ;

Ny Father Norman Lightbourne, assisted by |
u\ Sj other ministers of the gospel and :
\ Interment will follow in Woodlawn

Gardens Soldier Road.

Left to cherish her memories are her sons: Swede Ford, Lamont ;
Ken Thompson, and Neil Miller; daughter: Kayla i
| Matthew Town, Inagua.
grandchildren: Ashlyn Johnson, Tenile and Treasure Miller; brothers: ;
Dr. Ralph Reckley of Baltimore, Maryland, Brain, Carl, Glen, Dennis, :
and Tyrone Miller; sisters: Shelia and Valderine Miller, Jennie j
Hinsey, Betty Russell, and Judy Thompson of Freeport; aunts: Audrey |
? law: Yvette and Ingrid Gibson; Brothers: Lynden and Delano Gibson:
? Brothers-in-law: Wayne R. Taylor, Troy Knowles, and Kellman
i Burrows; Nieces: Shanell, Deneca, Shabreka, Kellisa, Tinkia, Nikita,
Linda and Tony Thomas (Freeport), Parrish, Gary, Sandra, Michelle |

Knowles,
Thompson; adopted daughters: Lorraine and Evelve Knowles;

Forbes and Alice Smith; nephews and nieces: Andrew and Claudine
Deveaux, Tamarah Miller, Christie, Misty and Raymond Bain,
Lynette Johnson, Garvin and Carlitta Miller, Ray and Ricky Reckley,

and Glendina Miller (Miami Fl) Sandra Strapp (West Palm Beach),

and Tiffany Thompson, Nirvana Armbrister, Geno and Shala Bullard,
Giselle Smith, Ashlee Rolle, Cora Bowe, Jillian Brown, Ian, Quetel,

and Tyronda Miller; fifty-nine grand nephews and nieces, one brother-

Carmeta Miller specialpersonal friends: Hilda Woodside, Ruby Fox,
Georgina Gibson, Ena Gibson, Cleo
Family; other family and fiend including: Valerie Taylor, Ruby Fox,

Eleanor, Vincent, Norman Stubbs, Deloris, Marla Strachan, Eleanor
Brennen, Bernadette Stubbs, Francis Woodside, Patsy McPhee, Angie
McPhee, Earmest Scavella, Rod, Prince Hart, Scully, The Bain, Green,

Il, especially Nurse Bowe, Loraine and Kenneth Clarke, Tomasina,

Linda Riley, Jennifer, Sideny, Robert, Wendy and Derek Smith,
Raymond, Richard, Hugh, Cassandra and Blundell Laramore, Willard,

Paulette, and Freddie Miller, Bishop Neville Hart, Dwayne Johnson,
The Bastian Family, Valentine (Valley) The Old Club Med Family,
Junior and Teteshia Wright, and Marsha Bullard.

Viewing will be held in the Perpetual Suite at Restview Mortuary

Jr., Kellman Jr.,
Sharon and Keisha Hinsey, Rickey, Lisa, Quentin, Linda, Nicholas i

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009,

Telephone: (242) 394-8043 J (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 + Fox: (242) 340-8034

: Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00am to 6:00pm and
; on Saturday at the Church from 12:00noon to service time.

LANFORD
LAWRENCE HANNA,
4

of Gilbert Street, Kennedy Subdivision
and formerly of Inagua, will be held on
August Ist, 2009 at Zion Baptist Church,
Matthew Town, Inagua at 10:30 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. Godfrey Bain,
assisted by Rev. T.G. Morrison. Intenment
will follow at the Public Cemetery,

He is survived by his Grandfather: Luther Roker; Father: Rodney
Hanna; Step-father: Harrison Saunders; Sisters: Ulacea Taylor,
Delores Bain, Shareece Knowles and Shenequa Burrows; Sisters-in-

Leanne, Aliyah, Ricara and Shantavia; Nephews: Darrols Jr., Troy
Wayne Jr., Lynden Jr., Tromaze, Trokaeco, Jonathan
and Ricardo; Grandnephew: Tre*Quan Taylor; Aunts: Idell Charlton,

| Vanessa Allen and Pinas, Valerie, Celestine and Antoinette; Uncles:
? Luther Jr., Leroy Sr., Ronald and Donavin Roker and Robert Cox;
and Bridgette Miller, Robert, Sherice, Shanika, Kershena, Machaika : Cousins: Jacqulin, Yvonne, Monica, Leroy Jr., Coyotito, Kachanna,
| ? Judy, Norma, Andrew, Carl, Livingston, Brenda, Maxine, Cecil,
in-law: Whitney Russell; Three sisters-in-law: Carolyn, Jackie, and |

Ricardo, Janet, Lynette, Linda, Lavern, Lorie, Junior, Linette, Rochelle,

et ? Ronald Jr., Rolando, Rovard, Laresha, Leanardo, Lealondo, Daphne,
Williams, Leon Knowles and :

Javon, Janell, Derek, Donavin Jr., Dontei and Donette; A host of

A | other relatives and friends including: The Palacious family, Smith
Barbara Dorsett, Sylvia Laramore-Crawford, Rose and Roger Parad, |

family, Beckford family, Fargharson family, Fawkes family, Sardé

? Joseph, Clyvone Seymour, Ricardo Beneby, John McKinney,
? Dominique Seymour, Nadine, Bernard Charlton, Nevis Collie, Louise

Taylor & family, Rosalie Moss & family, Shirley Johnson & family,
Wells, Tynes, Johnson, Laramore, Walkine and Carey Families, The :
Role Avenue and Apple Street Families, The Staff of Female Medical :
i Baptist Church of Inagua, Rev, T.G. Mornson, Rev, Ulne Smith &
Madge Bowleg, Iclyn Fowler, Leon Knowles, Kenneth Thompson, |

Nicole Symonette & family, Suzette Wilson & family, Paulette Bain
& family, Duwayne Hepburn & family, Rev. Godfrey Bin & Zion

#10n Baptist Church of East and Shirley St., Nassau, Bahamas, Dr.

i Tyrone Bartlette, Pro's Wireless Staff, Staff of Top Class Security,
i the entire community of Matthew Town, Inagua and the family of
Carolyn and Albert Roberts, Irene Fernander, Eva King, Diane, |

Kennedy Subdivision, Nassau.

: Viewing will be held in Serenity Suite at Restview Mortuary and
: Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Thursday from

10:00am to 5:00pm and at the church in Matthew Town, Inagua on
Friday until service time.



PAGE 9



PAGE 10,

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Resteiae Memorial Mortuary
and Cromatoriiam Limiled

, 68., Bohomes
12

P. a
Telephones: a ‘BV3-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 240-8043 « Fox: (242) 373-3005

: (242) 394-6043
Pager: (242) 340-8043 + Fax: (243) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

MR. CARL RUDOLPH
STEWART, 91

of Malcolm Road and formerly of the Blult,

Eleuthera, will be held on Saturday, August
Ist, 2009 at 10:00am at All Saints Anglican }

Church Joann’s Heights, Officiating will

be father Sebastian Campbell, assisted by |
Father Norman Lightbourne and interment :
will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier |

Rowcls.

Cherished memories are held by his children: Lorraine Mullin
Jr., Mark and Randy Stewart, Dawn Kemp, Latetia Delancey a

Kenyon, Krista,
Lavar Stewart, Schnora and Dawnette Kemp, Jason and Jamel Satchel,
Carla Anderson-Hollis, Aniska, Amber, Drumeco, Marvin, Letika,
Lorenzo and Travon Delancey, Caroline Watkins and Misty Roker. Great-

Stewart, Devonte Munnings and Keydon Pratt, John Jermaine Ingraham,

Duval and Ivoree Tinker, Daughters In-laws: Euliemac, Eleanor and | ee ae niga ce es
Helen Stewart, Valderine Stewart-Cooper. Sons In-laws: Frank Mullings | J°hnathan and Rocklyn Booile; sisters: Minalee Bodie and Keva McKinney
and Albert Kemp, Grand Daughter In-law: Ronette Stubbs-Stewart. Grand :
Sons In-laws: Keith Nathan Higgins Sr., Larondo Pratt and Jason Hollis. |

Sisters In-laws: Rosalie Stewart and Rowena Hudson Nieces and Nephews: | - : ‘a 5 : xt ae
Vivian Neely, Margaret and Paulette Saunders, Jean Newry, Alva Stewart- Charles Bodie, Basil McKinney and Michael Levarity, aunt: Armeania

Coakley, Carolyn and Tyrone Miller, Carlos and (Mac) McIntosh,
Catherine Gibson, Edna and Rex Neely, Raymond and Bertha Hudson,

Locksley and Julian Brown, Idell Thompson, Dave and Donald Hudson,

Daphne Miller, Paulette Sands, and Darnell Bruce, Maple Strachan Deliah |

Simnith, Beverely Percentie and Beth Stewart. Cousins: Stanley, Inell,

Kenneth, Ralph and Nora Reckley, Hewitt and Ruth Stewart, Theo and

Cynthia Stewart, Fredricka Brown, Gwen McDigen, Winitred Munnings,
Gwendalyn Hepburn, Sandra Joyce, Timothy Jr., Vincent and Hynes

Dorsette, Alvine Scavella, Eureka Youndblood. Other relatives and |
friends: Sherry Neely, Ephriam and Sylvia Jones, Texton and Mary Laing, |
Rose Barry-Neely, Mildred Neely, Wendy Wallace, Beatrice Saunders, |

Dolly Dorsette, Raphaleta Neely. Hugh Dorsette, Sandra Mackey, Dionne © re scintosh Family, The Morris Family, Linda Mills and Family, The

| Taxi Family and the entire communities of Green turtle Cay ,

Stubbs, Ruth Deal, Myrtis and Ella Beneby, Pastor Bishop Rudolph V.
Bowe and Veronica Bowe, Dorith Grant, Isula Henfield and Mae

Bluff, Eleuthera. May his soul rest in peace.

i, Carl |
Elaine |
Sands. Grand-children: Shequetta Mullings-Higeins, Kaye Stewart-Pratt, |
Karla, LaToya, Valentino, Markara, Sasha, Selina, and ;

Viewing will be held in the Perpetual Suite at Restview Mortuary and

| Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00am
: to 6:00pm and at the church on Saturday from #:30 am ‘to service time.

MR. WILBERT ‘Bill’
BOOTLE, 57

of Murphy Town, Abaco will be held on
Sunday August 2nd 2009 at 1:00pm at Marsh
Harbour Seventh-Day Adventist Church,
Marsh Harbour, Abaco. Officiating will be
Pastor Desmond Sturrup and other ministers
of the gospel and Interment will follow in
the Public Cemetery Murphy Town, Abaca.

Left to cherish his memories are his sons:
: Nathan Bootle Sr. and Marvin Bootle;
} daughters: Emily Davis, Lawanda, Latoya, Loretta and Lasonia Bootle
} adopted daughter Latisha Douglas; grand children: Nathan Jr., Timothy

grand children: Tabitha and Keith Nathan Higgins Jr,, Ladon and Khalia : Jr, Tashawn, Lyden Jr., Lynario, Tammy, Faith, Gaysha, Tianna, Makaya,

Lyntario; son-in-law: Timothy Davis Sr.; Daugthers-in-law: Sophia
Bootle, and Tamika Bootle brothers: Rodney, Hilly, Emitte, Lester,

sisters-in-law: Ernestine, Mildred, Natasha, Racquel, Raquel, and Sandy
Bootle, Marguerite Levarity, Monica Adderley, Wiolet Smith, Judy Curry
and Brenda Cooper; brothers-in-law: Sgt.1529 Hubert Smith , Joe Curry,

Smith uncle: Rupert Bootle; nieces and nephews: Don and Jonna Bootle,
Samantha and Quincy Jones, Shavez, Richia, Rodney Jr.. Lavargo, Hilly

Kenneth, Randall, Wayde and Dwight Stewart, Lilamac Adams and | Jr., Nasasha, Emmanique, Azarial, Shaquille, Durrell, Johnathan Jr.,

Sherry Cox, Clarice Bain, Halson Neely, Vanria Kemp, Sharon Sturrup, :

Elaine and Lincoln Forbes, Claudette, Lorna, Asbert, Tony, Terry, | Thomas, Trevor, Michael, Anthony Jr

Decarlo, Rocklyn Jr., Alexis, Deneze, Don Jr., Jonmyah, Kelia, Basia,
Kendra, Katalyn, Basil Jr., Brian, Kirk, Willis, Dennis, Ron, Cindy,
Julie and Al, Jermaine and
Monique, Jasmine, Jigeria, Misty, Phylicia and Ashley; god children:
Barry Swain; other family and friends including: Mr. Edison Key South
Abaco M.P., Thomas Davis, Michac] Dawkins, Joseph Davis, Glen
McDonald, Joe Knowles, Rodrick Strachan, Hershal Davis, Cay Mills,

: Taino Clarke, TJ Jones, Jamaal, Jamal McDonald, Carnetta Boodle,

Melvease Davis, Mother Ida Swain, Edith Clarke, Shelia Simms, William
Swain, Edna Swain, Ada Deaveaux, Cleavland Dawkins, John Simms,
Iva Duncombe, Dawkins Family, Agathe Simms and Family, Davis
Family, Swain family, Reckley Family, Curry and McDonald Families,

Murphy

: mg! 1 gs oc chi ¢ | own Abaco and Dundas Town Abaco, The North Bahamas Conference,
tana Tievertucsiand he =edke Chanckaraadeer Menis Fellowship. | the Marsh Harbour Seventh-Day Adventist Church Family, Chad Sawyer
Family, Pauline Bastain, Patricia Moxey, Edith, Susan Lona Red and | #0d the family at Price is Right, The Soul Saving Ministries Church

Frank Stewart, Justina Neely, Donna Johnson and Linda Ash, Dr. Dorsette ;
of the Accident and Emergency Department at the Princess Margaret } ,,.0 - 4) 1 1). a es = Te

si ae wok Tinmetie "Klmalarsacn Sas wear eat i Viewing will be held in the Halcyon Suite at Restview Memorial Mortuary
Hogpital, Miogs, Stuart, Dorsetie, Neely anc the entire community of The } and Crematorium, Robinson and Soldier Roads on Thursday from 12:00
| noon te 5:00 pm and at the church in Marsh Harbour, Abaco on Friday
: until service time on Sunday.

Family and the Eugene Dawkins and Family.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009,

\ Kostuiow Memoud Mortuary
and Cremalouum Limdled

FREEPORT
114 Bost Coral Rood, Free , @.B., Bohomas
P.O. Boo F 12
Telephone: (242) 373- 5 ere (242) are. 1471
Poogper: (242) 340-2043 * Fox: (242) 373-3005

Hl
Robinson ond Soldier Roods, Nassau, N.P., Bohomes
P.O. Box CB-12072
ee eee ee anad CBee OE) tab +H
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 340

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

GRACE ELOISE
ROLLE, 75

Saturday, August 1, 2009 at 9:30 a.m.

at Holy Name Catholic Church, Bailey :
Town, Bimini. Officiating will be Father :
Simeon Roberts, assisted by Deacon | Smuth, Brown, Pinder and Richardson families, Holy Name Church
John Sears. Interment will follow in the -

Catholic Cemetery, Bailey Town,
Bimini.

Cherished memories will forever linger within the hearts of her:

three sons: Bishop Chester Rolle, Kipling and Rodrick Rolle; §
five daughters: Caretha Stingly, Daisy Rolle, Rosetta Brennen, |
Loretta Rahming and Janice Saunders; 29 grandchildren; Lavante’, :
Crystal, T’ Vaughn, Wanessa, Donavaughn, Kaylequa, Jasman, :

Nicoya, Chesternique, Cemiko, Jarvin, Kito, Robert Jr., Geo,

Roshawnda, Lloydria, Tevin, Kenisha, Omar Corletha, Keva,
Shawndrick, :
14 great- —

Julyesia, Julius Jr., Leotha, Asheran, Shawn Jr.,
Jaquan and Valarie McQueen and Julius Rolle;
grandchildren; Cravante, Cravaughn, Shekinah, Joshua, Shiann,

Najee’, Chazz, Lenaj, Kalesia, Reaniah, Braniah, Justin, Jaden :
and Jayla; sisters: Agnes McPhee, Eulah Francis, Lorna Taylor |
and Cindy Francis; stepsister: Garnel Louis; numerous nieces -
and nephews including: Caren and Andrea Saunders, Maureen, :

Nichola, Aretha, William and Ron Marshall, Alease Garland,

Olive Johnson, Georgeann, Renee Roberts, Zinabeth Sands, Melissa — . .
Ferguson, Antionette Knowles, Timothy McPhee, Damell Frazier, © O"'ve, Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Dashan and Sytira Taylor, Sarah Pinder, Patricia Bain, Linda |
Woodside, and Brendalee Bonamy: numerous grand and great |
grand nieces and nephews; four sons-in-law: Tyrone Stingly, :
Stephen Brennen, Julius Rahming and Shawn Saunders; two :

daughters-in-law: Pastor Letty and Natasha Rolle; godson: Rex

Grant and a host of other relatives and friends including: Nyoka :
Hanna and family, Dorothy Smith and family, Rev. Rupert Rolle :

and family, Carolyn Newbold, Floyd and Mag Smith, Frank Hinzey

and family, Carl and Madeline Levarity, Shirley Ritchie, Phyllis :

Alexander, Julie Dean, Katie Toote, Annis Robins, Brenda Hanna, : : : 7 :
CE eg GH Wecuaie ‘Gadi Gad Acatnees | Glenda and a host of other relatives and friends including: Donald

Emma Rolle, Marinette Sands, Francis, Basil and Antoinette,

Percell and Philamina, Esther, Lincoln and Angela, Lamour, David :
and Laurice, Judith and Mitra Rolle, Delores Saunders, Dr. Carlis :
and Autrey Russell, Rev. Teachlet and Bercu Pierre, Vincent and j
Theressa, Charlice Ellis, Tammy Elliot, Jerome Stuart, Donalee -
Stuart, Renee Johnson, Cousin Cotton, Rosalie Hanna, Clyde and :
Rozelda Flowers, Pricilla Bain and family, Benjamin Francis and | Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday
family, Idamae David and family, Corey Pricthard and family, |

| Robert Saunders Sr. and family, Janet Cox, Anna Romer and
: family, Dolly Brennen-Stuart, Birdie Pinder, Dec. John Sears,
: Gerry Brown, Cheryl Saunders, Gervase Lewis, Fabian & Linda
| Stuart, Administrator Sherrick and Phillipia Ellis, Nel Sweeting,
: Genevive Dean and family, Alpheus Rolle and family, Shelly
of Bailey Town, Bimini will be held on :
: and family, Willamac Sawyer and family, Francis Rolle and family,

McPhee and family, Terricita Rolle and family, Bernice Stuart

Stephanie and Julie Dotten and family, the Rolle, Rollins, Francis,
Edgecombe, Ellis, Sherman, Chea, Adams, Johnson, Brennen,

Family and the entire community of Bimini,

> Viewing will be held at Holy Name Catholic Church, Bailey
| Town, Bimini on Friday from 3:00 p.m. until service time at the
_ church on Saturday.

TENALIA DESINOR
DAREUS, 70

of #104 Bahama Anns, Freeport, Grand
Bahama will be held on Saturday,
August 1, 2009 at 2:00 p.m. at St.
Vincent de Paul Catholic Church,
Hunter’s, Grand Bahama. Officiating
will be Father Remy David. Interment
will follow in the Grand Bahama
Memorial Park Section #2, Frobisher

Left to cherish her precious memories are her husband: Oderiner
Daniel Dareus; children: Pastor Brian Dareus, Minister David
Dareus, Kensie, Rosney, Lynden (Dabert), Enise and Julie D.
Saintil;: grandchildren: Geraldine, Jhanlyn, Marcus, Mare IJr.,
Maquita, Abigail, Daniel, Beyoncé, Brechanté, Wendy, Cindy,
Soraya, Gaylene, Megan, Joanne, Lavincky and Anthon; nieces:
Edith, Enise, Tinana, Bielka and Roselene; nephew: Albert:
daughters-in-law: Monett, Lynne and Jasmine; son-in-law:
Johnny, Jean and Pastor Mare Saintil; godchildren: Linda and

and family, Verti and family, Johnson and Medilia Milfort,
Richmond and family.

Viewing will be held in the ‘Celestial Suite’ of Restview Memorial
Mortuary and Crematorium Limited, #11-A East Coral Road,
from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
and on Saturday at the Church from 12:30 p.m. until service time.



PAGE 11



PAGE 12,

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

114A Bost Co ele pas .8., Bohormos.

ra ; , G.B., |

PO. Box Faesl2
Telaphonae: (242) 373-1115 / Gada) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-6043 + Fox: (242) 373-3005

Hl
Robinson ond Soldier Roods, Nassau, N.P., Bohomeas
P.O. Box CB- 12072
Talaphone: (242) 394-8043 | (242) 394-8047
Pager (242) 340-8043 » Fox: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

LESLIE THOMAS
MAYCOCK, 50

Roache. Interment will follow in the Grand Bahama Memorial

Park Section #2, Frobisher Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama, :

: family, Latoya Lewis, Tiffany Cartwright, Stephon Forbes, The
Left to carry on his legacy and cherish the memories of a man that |
did his part to change the world are his wife: Beverley Maycock; :
daughter: Anjelica Maycock; sons: Ryan and Ashton Maycock =
and D’Angelo Carey; brothers: Derek, Brian H. and Sgt. 234 |
Brian Maycock; sisters: R. Diane Maycock-Williams, M. Carmeta, :
M. Beverley and Paige Maycock; nieces: Andrea, Miah and =
Sheniqua Maycock, Lauryn Symonette, Bridgette Farrington, |
Kimberley Laing, Shence Jackson, Erica, Shantol, Antonia, Ashley, :
Latera, Aneka, Melissa, Bianca Riley; nephews: Jarret =

Major, Andrew Jr., Maverick, Sean, Solomon and Brian Maycock,

Genero Forbes, Renaldo, Edvardo, Neko, Eron, Giovanni, Godfrey, :
Joseph, Stephen Jr., and Dion Riley, Christian Levarity, Clayton :
Jr, Corey, Chavez Young, Reginald Farrington; aunts: Leona |
Hall, Alma Belhomme, Alicia Rahming and Tizel Rahming, Ruth :
Miller, and Dolly Foster; uncles: Bertram and Vincent Rahming; :
grandaunts: Lucine iDelii Wilmott, Veronica and Yvonne |
Rahming, Eulahmae Edgecombe, Madge, Doris and Velma Cargill; :
granduncles: Bernard Rahming, Amold (TB) and Alton Cargill, :
Wilbert Edgecombe; brothers-in-law: Anthony, Eric, Godfrey,

Glen, Stephen, Joseph Riley, Clayton Young Sr., John Williams; :
sisters-in-law: Loretta and Ophelia Maycock, Marinetta Young, :
Cynthia Riley-Sargent, Patricia Riley-Bain, Loretta Riley, Ida, |
Angela and Nezzlene Riley; cousins: Giselle, Antia, Anita, Silvana, :
Alicia, Gina, Tedra, Ansela, Bridgette, Tanya, Kayla and Karen :
Rahming, Bonnie and Jeda Knowles, Cristal Belhomme, Heda |
Rich, Roshae Gibson, Valencia Rolle, Gretchen Ferguson, Theresa ;
Hall, Troy Knowles, Terrance Hall, Jevon, Vincent Jr., Gino, :
Bertram Jr., Yale, Robert, Shawn, Denero, Arl and Miguel Miguel, |
and Winston Rolle; godchildren: Carlton Cleare Jr., Trancka :
Thompson, Randall Cooper Jr., Justin Knowles, Vincent Rahming :
Ir.; cell group family: Randall and Maryann Cooper, Winston |
and Dahlia Pinnock, Derek and Rehana Sing, Don and Sherone :

Singh, Rhonda Plakans, Walter and Anishka Parker, Tracey Mills,

: Chris and Garnell Pelecanos, Orlando Hanna, Barbarajean Barton,
? Axton and VWernessa Morris, Kendall and Krista Williamson, Don
| and Cenethra Laing, Pastor Wilbur & Barbara Outten, Samuel
: Johnson, Robert Adams, Brady Johnson, Allen Hyppolite, Patrick
of #5 Braemar Drive, South Bahamia, =
Freeport, Grand Bahama will be held on ©

| Saturday, August 1, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. :

) at Freeport Bible Church, West Atlantic :
| Drive and John Tinker Street, Freeport, |

| Grand Bahama. Officiating will be Pastor :
Wilbur Outten assisted by Pastor Karol :

Rolle, Maxime Saintelus and a host of other relatives and friends
including: Donna Maycock, Roosevelt Major, Sonia Knowles,
Monique Millar, Michael Foster, Norma Wallace and family,
Cynthia Poitier, Theo and Hilda Farquharson, Derek and Angie
Farquharson, Theresa Wright, Theresa W ilmott-Burrows, Mr. and
Mrs. Brudinell Kelly, Floyd and Don Wilmott, Apostle Wellimgton
and Beryl Wallace, Ms. Angela Sands, Shirley Mae Astwood,
Emerick Seymour, Mark Seymour, David Thompson, Mr. and
Mrs. Major and family of Yamacraw, Ian and Sidney Cargill and

members of Freeport Bible Church, Joeretta and the Roberts
family, Mr. and Mrs. Welbourne Bootle and family, The Rahming
and Cargill families, the Lundy, Coakley, Hanna, Minnis,
Thompson, and Wallace families of Calabash Bay Andros, The
Royal Bahamas Police Force including the SIB Division, The
RBPF Choir, and Debate Team, The Jack Hayward PTA Board,
The entire Community of Hawksbill, The Doctors, Nurses and
Staff of the Rand Memorial Hospital, and a host of other relatives
and friends too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held in the ‘Serenity Suite’ of Restview Memorial
Mortuary & Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport,
Grand Bahama on Fnday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the
church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.

DEATH ANNOUNCEMENT

MR. WILSON
ALBERT, 29

of Hawksbill, Grand Bahama died at the
Rand Memorial Hospital, Freeport,
Grand Bahama on Tuesday, July 28,
2009.

Funeral arrangements will be
announced at a later date.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

FREEPORT
11.4 Ens Coral Road, Freeport, G.8., Batons Robingon 2nd Solder Roads. Meena, WP, Elahorine.
BO, Boo F-Azaiz BO, Bow C10?
Telapteare: (242) STR1115 | (STA TBO J 43) eB
Pager: (242) 380-643 © Foor (242) 373-3006 Paper: (242) 340-304) + Fas: (242) 340-2004

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

WILSON PRESTON
BURROWS, 49

of #1 Corndle Apt., Freeport,
Grand Bahama and formerly of
Abraham's Bay, Mayaguana will
be held on Saturday, August |,
2009 at 11:00 a.m. at New Canaan
Zion Baptist Church, Balao Road,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Officiating will The Right Rev'd
Bishop Washington Williams
assisted by Evangelist Esmia
Lockhart. Cremation will follow.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Carolyn Burrows;
mother: Matilda Burrows; daughters: Latoya Burrows Woodside
and Lakeisha Burrows; son: Preston Burrows; adopted sons:
Quinton and Carlton Symonette; granddaughters: Azaleah
Woodside, Deandrea, Kenya, Keva and Kendra Bethel, Kieshan,
Tajah and Quintia Symonette; sisters: Ceva Sweeting, Erma
and Luciter Burrows, Genieva Williamson and Audrey Charlton;
brothers: Albert Charlton, Hubert Burrows and Edmund
Burrows; nieces: Verdell Chariton, Debra Johnson, Susan Hanna,
Charlene Williamson, Michelle Sweeting, Judy Marshall, Lateria
and Monique Sweeting, Deidre and Demece Williamson,
Samantha Burrows, Shanique Moss, Vita and Wet Pyfrom,
Marisha Charlton, Eureka Charlton, Tiffany and Letecia Burrows,
Clara Bell, Sharice, Michaella and Alfreda Lightbourne and
Shanice Burrows; nephews: Godfrey, Kelsin and Levon
Williamson, Otis Johnson, Dorin and Alworth Rolle, Maurice
Sweeting, Dennis Williamson, Kazzi, Edmund Jr., Eduardo,
Kristen, Dion and Marcus Burrows, Alfred, Aaron and Romel
Lightbourne and Arlington; aunts: Nora McIntosh, Gladys
Murphy, Idell Burrows and Mary Smith; uncles: John Burrows
and Eustace McIntosh; mother-in-law: Mary Small; son-in-
law: Ronald Woodside Jr. and Kevin Bethel; sisters-in-law:
Natasha Burrows, Ins Charlton, Marilyn Burrows, Enna Taylor,
Melanie Swaby, Cynthia Lightbourne, Nelly Darville and Manion
Sweeting: brothers-in-laws: Godfrey Saunders, Simeon
Sweeting, Alfred Lightbourne, Freddy Taylor, Eklin Williamson
and Anthony Swaby a fest of other relatives and friends
including: Dewitt McPhee, Queenie Gibson, Della Taylor,
Channaine Hall-Rolle, Froggie, Brother Merv, Winkey, Tyrone,
Wesley Williams, Lakeishan Rolle, Winn Dixie management
and staff, Airport and Manor, House Taxi- Drivers, G. B. Taxi
Union, Freeport Taxi, Berth Perry and the PLP Party.

Persons wishing to sign the book of condolences my do so in
the ‘Irenic Suite’ of Restview Memorial Mortuary and
Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand
Bahama on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m, and at the church
on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 13

Ui mya

PRISCILLA
MUSGROVE
MURPHY

will be held at Five Porches Of
Deliverance Centre Apostolic
Tabneracle Church, Market Street
& Poinciana Avenue, New
Providence, The Bahamas
Saturday, Ist August, 2009 at
11:00 a.m. Officiating will be
Apostle J Rodney Roberts, assisted by Other Ministers of
the Gospel.

She is survived by her beloved children: Minister Idell
McKinney of Palm Coast Florida, Fredericka Rolle, and
Herbert Seabrooks of Los Angeles California. Daughter
Althea Louise Newbold predeceased her on Tuesday, March
31, 2009, Grandchildren: Charmaine and Frank Sweeting;
Deborah Thompson; Lindsay Thompson; David Thompson,
Michaelia and Michael Johnson; Neya and Dwight Sands,
Jermaine Newbold, Kristan and Nadia Newbold,
Sheremethius Lashan Newbold, Ratassja Rolle, Monique,
Inthia, Eric, Herbert Jr., Ashley, Whitney, Shanta, Lindsei,
J.C and Quincy. Great-Grand Children: Marcian Thompson,
Leon Johnson, Kyle Hepburn, Kemuel Forbes, Kiwana
Bubb, Kadeem Williams, Kadesha Williams, Clayton
Williams Jr., William Knowles, Theo and Malik Sands,
Jermaine Newbold Jr., Adrian, Nicole, Lawrence and Adian;
Great-Great Grandchildren: Marcian Thompson Jr., Jahnai
Johnson, Kam’Ren Bubb, and McKayle Hepbum; Nephews:
Rev Godfrey Ellis, Graylin Moncur; and Ricardo Moncur,
Lamont Tumer, Tyrone McKenzie; Nieces: Francina Forbes,
Wendy Smith, Hedda Armbrister, Patricia Reckley, Yvonne
McKenzie and Anita McKenzie, Marva Cooper, Eleanor
Wilson, Francis Stuart, Beatrice Munroe; Numerous other
relatives from the Hermitage including: Ellis, Bodie,
Musgrove, Sturrup, Barr, Dorsette, Sears, Clarke, Saunders,
Davis, Smith, and McPhee families. Other relatives and
friends including: Donald Knowles Jr.; Donald and Ancel
Knowles and family of Chippingham; Carl Rolle; Pastor
C B Moss and members of Mt Olivet Baptist Church, Rev
Elmomd King and members of New Hope Missionary
Baptist Church, Overseer Rudolph Cooper and members
of Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church, Rev Joseph
Thompson and members of Bread of Life Baptist Church,
Pastor Sidney Hardy and members of Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church, St Augustine’s, Florida; David Siegel Day
Care Centre of Palm Coast, Florida; nurses and staff of the
Hospice of Volusia in Flagler County. Thanks also to the
management and staff of Kelly's, Home Centre Marathon.



Cremation by Neptune Society, Florida.



PAGE 14,

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KRurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020¢ Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 « 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

Na ed Ol

NATHALIE JANET |
‘Aunt Netta’
FLOWERS, 100

of Rokers Point, Exuma will :

be held on Saturday at 2:00 :

P.M. at St. Andrew’s Anglican :

Church, George Town Exuma. :

Officiating will be Father :

Mario Conliffe assisted by :

Canon Harry Bain and Rev. :

Willish Johnson. Interment in St. Margaret's Cemetery, :
Harts Exuma.

nephews, great great great-grand nieces and nephews;
other relatives and friends include: Sheila Mackey and
family, Minerva Bowe and family, Eddison Brice and family,

Reverend Oswald Nixon and family, Visna Bowe-Mackay
: and family, Jane Curry and family, Sidney Curry, Junior &
: Rhona Davis and family, Magnolia Rolle and Family, Kerlene

Nixon-Brown and family, Emma Rodriguez and family,

(| Merlene Smith and family, Valerie Paul and family, Reverend

Gerald Pennerman, Forestor Rolle and family, Elbert Rolle
and family, Judy Rolle and family, Harrington Rolle and
family, Christine Rolle, Father Mario Conliffe and family,

: Father Harry Bain and family, Father Keith Cartwright and

family, Father Steven Davies and family, Reverend Willish

: Johnson and family, Reverend Charles Saunders and family,
: Reverend Adam Brown and family, Reverend Cedric Smith

: and family, Reverend Ivan Clarke and family, Bishop

Left to Cherish her fond memories are: daughter: :
Priscillamac Flowers; grandson: Audrin Pennerman; :
adopted sons: Whitney Brice, Reverend Oswald Nixon and :
Warren Brice; one sister-in-law: Aurelia Brice; adopted
grandchildren: Telanna, Tanya, Whitney Jr., Tatum, Tenae, :
Talmun and Branado Brice, Alexis Collins, Idena, Inspector :
Oswald Brian, John and Wayne Nixon, Tanya Sanchez La :
Chapel and Dr. Latonia Moncur; nieces and nephews :
include: Eulease Smith, Gwendolyn Smith Brice, Matilda :
& Cleveland Stuart, Curlene Carter, Archie Edgecombe of :
Canada, Beverly, Michael, Sharon and Leroy Brice, Brenda :
and Laverne McKenzie, Warren, Charles and Judy Brice, :
Benjamin and Cypnanne Brice, Whitney and Karen Brice, :
Annamae , Elijah and Sherry Brice, Sharlamae and Philip :
Stubbs, Alfred, Kenneth and Eloise Brice, Helen and :
Roosevelt Thompson, Patrice Brice, Veronica and :
Livingstone Lloyd, Vanria and Cleophas Gibson, Rufus and :
Nene Curry, Vincent and Joycelyn Curry, Geraldine and :
Sherman Stevens, Essiemae and Basil Mcintosh, Michael :
and Janice Curry, Frankie, Paul and Melanie, Kenneth, :
Carolyn, Michael, Leroy, Yorick and Alanna Brice, Sharon :
Hinds, Nellie Ferguson, Lawrence and Hanna Brice, Prince :
Rahming, Arie McPhee, Elder Sarah Lee Rolle, Gloria Rolle, :
Reverend Hilbert and Deaconess Victoria Flowers, Charles :
Flowers, Joycelyn Morris, Theresa Laroda and Christie :
Flowers; numerous adopted great-grand children great- :
grand nieces and nephews; great great-grand nieces and :

Hartman Rolle and family, Halsey Hanna and family, Nesbitt
Ferguson and family, Bishop Rudolph Bowe and family,
Cedric Curry and family, Kenneth Nixon and family, James
Williams and family, Leon Flowers and family, Annie Lloyd
and family, Marjorie Nixon and family, Gladstone Rolle
and family, Nola Curry and family, Nigel Bowe and family,
Sabrina and Paulette Armbrister, Judy Ducatel and family,
Vandelyn Major and family, Kenneth Bowe and family,
Joan Bowe and family, Valcena Brown and family, Wakeley

| Clarke and family, Andrew Clarke and family, Audrey Clarke

and family, Roland Clarke and family, Ruth Clarke-Archer
and family, Naomi Rolle and family, Oveta Strachan and
family, Zelma Nixon and family, Sylvanaus Thompson and
family, Solomon Roach and family, Absalom Roach and
family, Isadora Adderley and family, John Rolle and family,
Adeline Rolle and family, Hazel Sears and family, Rolle
family, Flowers family, Clarke family, Smith family, Lloyd
family, Taylor family, Nixon family, Bowe family, Roach
family, Anthony Moss, MP and family, the entire Exuma
communities especially Roker’s Point, Harts, Steventon and
Farmers Hill.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Ramsey
Exuma on Friday from 12:00 Noon until 6:00 P.M. and at
the church in George Town on Saturday from 1:00 P.M.
until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 15

Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020¢ Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 * 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

LAST RITES FOR

CAROLYN
LAVERN ‘Caya’
CAMPBELL, 48

Gardens.

She is survived by her parents: Basil & Prescola Campbell; 3

her son: Heath "Peabo" Campbell; Adopted sons: Basil Jr., :
Valdez Evans, Valentino Burrows, Montel, Mateo, Montez :
Campbell, and Ramon Rolle; Adopted Daughters: Marlene :
Newton, Donell, Holly Knowles, and Richa Campbell; :
Brothers: Rev. Garneth Campbell, Locksley, Wellington and :
Sisters: Margaret Campbell, Melony :
Colebrooke, Jessica, Betty Campbell, Shantel Dames and :
Petrona Campbell, Adopted Sisters: Paula Josey, Luann :
Russell, Cassandra Fowler and Normanick Davis; Nephews: :
Leslie Farquharson, Taryll Moore, Garneth Jr., Wellington :
Jr., Samuel Jr., Johnathan, Geno Jr., Ashton, Basil II, :
Bernard, Stephan, Valdre and Marvin Jr.; Nieces: Garnell, :
Gabrielle, Wellicia, Lakeshia, Aleshia, Kadeshia, Tamara, :
Ragine, Kazia, Aniyah, Ashanti, Sandra Burrows, Lavarnique, :
Lyndonia and Lavonya, Camia, Tassia;. Brothers-in-law: :
Samuel Colebrooke Sr. and Randolph Dames; Sisters-in- :
law: Josephine, Ellen, Barbarann, Beauthine and Shandy :
Campbell; Uncles: Ivan Campbell, Prince and Randolph :
Mackey, Epharaim Lafleur, Linkwood and Bernard Evans; :
Aunts: Branhilda Russell, Francis Smith, Zerlean and Jackie :
Campbell, Gloria Evans, Alice Lafleur, 7ilpha Mackey and :
Julia Hanna; Granduncle: Elias Rolle; Grandaunts: Francetta :
Johnson, Sunkin, Sylvia and Merlene Mackey; Cousins: :
Edward, Mike, Vanola, Majorie, Georgina, Brendalee, Pam, :
Lauralee, Kingsley, Denny, Edmund, Braidman, Trevor, 7

Oscar Campbell;

Marco, Thesrine, Asalee, Ashley, Norman, Charlie, Basil,
Steven, Nell, Mary, Gary, Vangie, Lisa, Quentin, Yolanda, :

Valderine, Yvonne, Bernard Jr., Wendell, Dale, Kenny,



: Kimberley, Ruby, Darnelle, John, Earl, Irene, Rochelle,
Nicole, Bradley, Randy, Lester, Rodney, Ednal, Kenrick,

: Travis, Teddy, Princeton, Jeffery, Cindy, Nikia, Prescola,
; Carmille, Hope, and Shikera; Godchildren: Joyann, Santino,

Richardette, Vasti, Resha, and Anissa; Host of other relatives

: and friends including: Ashley Marshall, Ricardo Rolle,
of Lowe Sound, Andros will :
be held on Saturday at 11:00 :
A.M. at The Cathedral of Olive, :
Morgan’s Bluff Drive Andros. :
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. :
Philip Campbell assisted by :
Other Ministers. Interment in :
the City of Olive Memorial :

Mitchell Bullard, Vanera Barr, Clyde Edgecombe, Alva
Brown, Rev, Ifill Russell & Family, Irene Harris, Peggy
Newton, Rev Claretta Campbell & Family, Becky Johnson
& Family, Sarah Evans & Family, Dec. Beluah Lafleur &
Family, “elda Campbell & Family, #ilpha Campbell-Marshall
& Family, Elvia Bowleg & Family, Helena Clarke & Family,
Austin Campbell & Family, Ethel Sherman, Dianna Beneby
& Family, Dolly King & Family, Rex and Shandrice Rolle,
Doramae Clarke, Merrill Rolle & Family, Tonique Martin,
Lynette Oliver, Lynden & Amanda Johnson, Margaret
Burrows, Linda Adderley, Maude Smith, Magnetta Knowles,
Icealene Thompson, Lillian Young, Carolyn Knowles, Stacey
and Dianna Hanna, Yolanda Hilton, Kenny Robinson, Dr
Dario Curry, Darren & Linda Evans, Monica, Pandora
Roberts, Rose Roberts & Family, Barbara Munnings, Nurse
Kenria Johnson, Nurse Brenda Wilson, Nastascia Knowles,
Raindell Barr & Family, Floyd Rolle, John Woodside, Sharon
Mitchell and Family, Akeem Russell, The Staff of Nicholls
Town Community Clinic, Estella Hunter, Nakera Evans,
Brian Cleare and Family, The Staff of Western Air, Prince
Oliver and Family, Rev. Philip Campbell and Family, Rev.
Henson Miller and Family, Rev. Rudy Bowleg and Family,
Kevin Bootle and Family, Cleomi Strachan, Calvin Griffin,
Perris Russell, Patricia Woodside, Errol Moss and Family,
Emest Oliver and Family, Evelyn Barr, Basil Bowleg and
Family, Dr. Kay Bain and The Staff of Bahamas Dental
Center, Cherylee Johnson, The Cathedral Of Olive Family,
The Community of North Andros and a host of other family
and friends too numerous to mention.

It is not the intention of the family to have left out anyone,
but if we did we apologize as we try to remember everyone
during our time of bereavement.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary,
Robinson Road and Fifth Street on Thursday from 12:00
Noon until 6:00 P.M. and at the church in Morgan's Bluff
on Friday from 3:00 P.M. until service time on Saturday.



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Demeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

mS eae

Julian H. Alleyne, 81

a resident of Miller's Close
( Market Street), died at
his residence on
Wednesday 29 July, 2009.
He is survived by his
children: Sandra Sears,
Sharon Alleyne, Stanley
Alleyne, Sheila
Richardson & Stacy
Arthur; 13 grand children
& 3 great grand children.

Anthony Alvin Ferguson, 56

a resident of Culmer's

Alley off Kemp Road, died

at Potters Cay, on 27 July,

2009. He is survived by

his wife, Madlyn

Ferguson; 2 sons: Anthony

Jr. & Eric Ferguson; 4

stepsons: Daron, Jamal,

Ryan & Roston; 1

daughter: Roslyn;

brothers: Charley, Terry,

Mark of Conniticut & Kevin; sisters: Debbie,
Delores & Mahalia.

Dorothy Louise Woodside, 60

a resident of Stanyard
Creek, Andros & formerly
of West End Grand
Bahama, died at PMH on
21 July, 2009. She is
survived by her mother:
Roslie Dean of Stanyard
Creek, Andros; son:
Joseph Woodside Jr.; 1
sister: Leonie Hall of
Freeport, G.B.

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 17

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL

#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street
PO. Box N-3572
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 326-5773

eat SERVICE FOR

PRINCE ANDREW
"George"
BRICE, 14

of #11 Talbot Street West will be held
on Saturday, August O1et, 2009, at 10:00
a fin. at Southland Cathedral Church of
f God, Soldier Road. Officiating will be
Bishop Dr. Teuton Stubbs. Interment
follows in Woodlawn Gardens
Cemetery, Soldier Road.

P Left to cherish his loving memories are:
his mothers: [ka Carey and Althemeze Carey; father: Prince Brice;
stepfather: Derrick Dawkins; brothers: Javano Carey, Andree’ Brice and
Wislet St. Brave; sisters: Grancka, Andrea and Aaliyah Brice; grandparents:
Bemard and Dhann Newbold, Rodney and Curlene Strachan; Aunts and
uncles: Monique, Cedric, Derick and Desiree Carey, Stanford Burrows,
Romeo, Kingston, Milton and Margaret Newbold, Samuel and Rosemary
Cambridge, Abraham and Patrice Johnson, Freddie Mac Bethel, Winifred
Ferguson, Margaret, Elvis, Cecil and Stephen Brice, Linda Lamb, Edgar
and Nathalie Bonaby, Elliot Smith, Charles and Madlyn Campbell, Margaret,
Louise and Irenese Stuart, Florinda Smith, Annamae Ferguson, Winnie,
Marina Beckford, Anthony and Phillip Cambridge, Shuniqua and Stacia
Evans, Sandm Rolle, Aretha Higgs, Lucy Metelus, Joe Mott, Reuben and
Mae Stuart, Melanie, Shannane, Shakera, Erskine and Manion Johnson,
Treco and Odysea Strachan, Troy and Shan Carter; cousins including:
Alexander, Derinardo, Savahana, Jayda, Jayden, Kevette, Keisha, Ashanti,
Avanti, Demetrius, Dedrick, Eric, Kadeisha, Ashley, Aaliah, Derineka,
Mitzi, Mckeisha, Melnishka, Monte, Damien, Diane, Nicee, Mario, Sedricka,
Alvin, Kenton, Renderia, Danario, Treco Jr, Anterto, Anpenire, Shatayala,
Troianna, Troiann, Cameron, Shavette, Shakera, Vjay, Vance, Vernay,
Rishawn, Aumia, Lisa and C.K. Smuth; Godparents: Eroline Hanna, Monique
Rolle, June Stubbs, Charmane Wright, Dave Righy amd D-Boy; other
relatives and friends including: Fonswitt and Elva Stubbs, Alice Stuart,
William McDonald, Holbroke Stuart, Coral Johnson, Ellen Newbold, Ellen
Farrington, Rose, William and Eula Newbold, Alfred and William Poitier,
Desiree Higgins, Michael Pinder, Eric and Shirley Carey, MP, Frank and
Sharlyn Smith, Jeweness Wood, Carol Cunry, Tyrone and Larissa Johnsen,
Alicia Johnson, Barry, Georgette, Maniettita Deveaux and family, "Aunty"
Ceomie and family, Lia Munroe, Drameko and Chickita Archer, Sunshine
Holdings Staff, Erskine and Patricia Bain, Class of 09 D.W, Davis, Dominic
and Helen Deveaux, Norman Forbes, Kennedy Pinder, Perry and Esther
Newton, Pastor Teuton and Helena Stubbs and the Southland Church of
God family, Rhyna Barry, Antonio and Marcus Roberts, Edrica, Delroy,
Neil Flowers, Ricardo, Rohan and Wringhy Adderley, Bernard, Edward,
Reco, Jqustin, Dillen, Marley, Natin, Olden and Javon Cartwright, Ross,
Tracy, Carolyn, The Carew, Talbot and Kenilworth Streets families, the
entire Newbold and Stuart families and other relatives and friends too
numerous to mention. A very special thank you toe; The staff of Princess
Margaret Hospital especially Dr. Adrian Sawyer, Amanda Stubbs and
Daphne Evans.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Newbold Brothers
Chapel, Palmetto Avenue and Acklins Street off Market and East Streets,
on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.om., Saturday at the church from 9:00
am... Wntil service time.





PAGE 18,

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Butler’s Huneral Aomes & Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Funeral Announcement

Vernon Wentworth Culmer
affectionately called “N AN”, 64

Â¥ ry
* ® ,

Church, Abundant Life

Road on Saturday, }
August 1, 2009 at 11:00 |

Kennedy Drive.

Vernell, Patricia, Adina, Edwina, Ingrid & Jacqueline

Culmer, Ethlyn Stuart, and Russell Franks; aunt, Flossiemae |
Bowleg-Curling; grandchildren, Brandon, Brittany, | Allen & the Abundant Life family, including The Chapel
Janerio, Justin, Javaughn, Candice, Remus, Jr., Mataya, |
Marissa, Mariah, Marvin, Jr., Shantae and Dresyn Culmer; }
Shavoughn Jr., Anthonea and Trivoughn Sturrup, and ;
Ehrin Antoine; father-in-law, Louis Taylor ; numerous
sisters-in-law including: Sylvia Culmer, Bernice |
Fernander, Janet Cartwright, Vernita Rolle, Merlene Taylor, |
Joycelyn Ferguson, Beverley, Rachel and Mary Culmer, }
and many others; brother-in-law, Sidney Rolle; |
daughters-in-law, Jeannie, Anthea, Maresha, and Kertissa |
Culmer; son-in-law, Evince Antoine; numerous nieces :
& nephews including, Trevor, Winston Jr. (Reds), Dennis, |
Trained Clinical Nurse Denise Culmer, Desiree, Tamika, }
Lynell, Sarah, Quentin, Michelle, Allison, Terry, Marissa, |

formerly of Mangrove
Cay, Andros, died on
} July 21, 2009, will be }
: and Shacara; numerous cousins including, George
? Thompson (New York), Rev. Dr. Mary Nairn, Jennimae

: Prescola, Stanley, Gayle, Kirk, Donavon, Brent, Stefon,
i Alarick, Kranz, Kyjia, Jevone, Taurian, Sherrise, Netica,
: Craig, Jarad, Javase, Judyann, Vaughan, Chandra, Jessica,
: Trivano, Kevin, Dwayne, Patrice, Petral, Patrick and

Pheromone; numerous grand-nieces & grand-nephews
including, Shaquille, Ashley, Kriston, Quianie, Lauren,
Chrystal, Alexis, Sierra, Hesley, Carlin, Giovanni, Shauntae

Minus, James Clarke, Hubert Pratt, Roberta Greene-Harris,
Paula Bain-Munnings, Bridgette Bain, Godfrey Bain,

: Dianne Bain-Thurston, Bishop Samuel Greene, Corean
| Cox, Kirklyn Barr, Patsy Miller, Pandora Miller, Lillymae
interment will follow in |
the Lakeview Memorial :
Cemetery, John F. :

Miller, James Clarke, Jr., Hubert Pratt, Manny Bowleg,
Cecil Bowleg II, Goldstone Bain and Beverley Munnings;
and a host of other relatives and friends including,

' Marissa Culmer & Family, Christopher Bain & Family,
| Mr. and Mrs. Collin Johnson & Family, Teddy Simmons

Dearest memories will |
live on in their hearts of, his wife, Evalyn Culmer; 5 sons, |
Remus, Sr., Jason, Marvin & Dustin Culmer, and |
Shavoughn Sturrup; 1 daughter, Staff Nurse Sherrell :
Sturrup-Antoine; numerous brothers and sisters
(children of the late R.H. Culmer), especially, Elder :
Winston Culmer, Sr., Dr. Kirtland Culmer, Dr. Leslie :
Culmer, Lowell, Sanford, R. H., Jr., Addison, Kendal, |
George, Vincent, Stuart, Eardley, Llewelyn, Ann, Jan, Ivy, }
: Family, Austin Burrows & Family, Mr. Alfred Stewart &

& Family, Bryan Whymns & Family, Elder Olga Culmer
& Family, Birdina Taylor & Family, Jeff Swaby & Family,
Ashton, William and Sean Miller & Family, Sean Turnquest
& Family, Sean Longley & Family, Kenric Major (AKA
Captin Blood) & Family, Barron & Elvis Strapp, Esther
Francis, Joy Culmer & Family, Bishop Samuel Johnson
& Family, Pastor Raymond and Barbara Duncombe &
Family, Anthony Johnson & Family, Pastor and Mrs.
Winton Roberts & Family, Marilyn Sturrup-Brown &

Family, Patricia Sears & Family, Pastor and Mrs. Edward

Singers and The Men's Choir; Samuel Bain, Benjamin
Bain & Family, Brian Baker & Family, Anthony Baker,
Mr. & Mrs. Theophilus Storr & Family, Leo Rodgers &
Family, Kevin Tinker & Family, Amos Rolle & Family,
Glenda Hepburn & Family, Don, Eugene, Patterson and
Raymond Smith & Family, The Entire Mangrove Cay
Community, The Avocado Street Family, and others too
numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butler’s Funeral
Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on
Friday from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. and on Saturday from 10
a.m. until service time at the church.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009,

: FEL USC POS

FUNERAL DIRECTORS

“Rendering the finest in caring and compassionate service
regardless of financial condition.”

7th Terrace, Collins Avenue * (242) 356-2187 ©
P.O. Box GT-2679 * Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MAKIA "Chaka"
WHYMNS-
JOHNSON, 29

Rev.

' law; Rashanda Cox, Jasmine Wells, Antionette,
' Shaketra, Janeen, Shawanda and Alexandria
| Johnson, and Asharan Adderley. (5) Brothers-in-
: law; Deangelo Johnson, Anton, Dion Anwar and
: Andrew Johnson. Aunts; Virginia Harris, Yvonne
: : : ' Gardiner and Rosemary Ferguson. Uncles;
of Soldier Road, will be : Roderic. Por: Perry, Stenk A Eid ase
B held on Saturday, August {| Roderick, Partick, Perry, Stephen, an war
Ist, 2009 at 10am at The !
New Mount Zion Baptist |
Church, Blue Hill Road |
South, Officiating will be ;
Andrew Stuart, |
assisted by other ministers. Interment will be made |
in Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road. :
' Mario Bowe, Sheffrey Rolle, Michael Roach,
Precious and loving memories will forever be in :
the hearts of her Husband; Andrew Johnson Jr., :
Children; Shamara Thurston, Franklyn Whymns, |
Andewnique and Andrell Johnson. Mother; Leanna |
Whymns; Grandmothers; Wealthea Whymns and |
Carmetta Rolle. Mother-in-Law: Jessiemae Wells. :
Father-in-Law; Andrew Jonson Sr., Sisters; Aretha |
Ferguson and Franlee Whymns. Brothers; Robert :
and James Smith, Nieces; Sharita Rahming, Ryesha |
Ferguson, Frandesha Whymns, Robinique and :
Rabanisha Smith, Shanderia Cox, De'ante Johnson, :
Franisa, Nicolette and Destiny; Grand niece;
Valtinique Simmons. Nephews; Randy Mackey, :
Geno Ferguson and Treyvar Taylor, Michael :
Johnson, Kingsley Hanna, Courtney Anderson, |

Anton Dion and Anwar Johnson, (9) Sisters-in- | #
: time.

Whymns, Robert, Franklyn and James Ferguson.
Godchild; Lorenzo Mcoy Jr., and a host of other
relatives and friends including; Gelina Wells,
Remelda Walker, Lennox Wells, Chanel Nottage,
Judy Roache-Davis, Philincia, Deidre, Shantor and
Dennis Harris, Malinda Cartwright, Allison
Strachan, Stephen, Quitell and Delricka Whymns,

Cephas Bowe and family, The Smith, Johnson,
Wells, Hanna, McDonald, Woodside, Bowe,
Wallace, Brice, Miller, Ferguson and Rolle family.
Hubert Taylor, Tasha, Jackie, Elaine and Tasha
Nottage, Kendrell Smith, Alicia Rahming, Nardo
Major, Valentino Simmons, Mama Carey and
family, Mario and Terry Bowe, Michael McDonald,
Geovannia White The Claridge Road and Bowe
Alley family, R.M. Bailey class of 97 and the
management and staff of Ultimate Door and
window and many others too numerous to mention.

The body will repose in the Blessed Redeemer Chapel
at Ferguson's Funeral Directors, 7th Terrace Collins
Avenue on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and
at the church on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. until service



PAGE 19



PAGE 20, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

Publish your

CARD OF THANKS
or

IN LOVING MEMORY

in The Tribune’s
NEW

OBITUARY
SECTION

Every Thursday

Call us today

502-2352
or 502-2354



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

EAST SUN qg RISE MORTUARY
37S

“A New Commitment To Service’

GRAVESIDE SERVICE FOR

SUZETTE
RECKLEY, 33

of Elizabeth Estates will
be held on Friday at 10
a.m. at Lakeview
Memorial Gardens, |p
J.EK Drive. Officiating |
will be Rev. Howard T.
Smith.

Born: Sept. 30, 1975 — Died: July 26, 2009.

She is survived by her mother: Ada Reckley:
her step-father: Harold Major; 3 sisters: Valerie
Harding, Venilda Dean and Nicola Reckley; 1
adopted sister: Monique Hanna; 3 brothers: Van
Miller, Dwayne Reckley and Ian Miller; 2 aunts:
Vernita and Margaret Reckey; 6 uncles: Roland,
Mervin, Nelson, Vernal, Haziel and Algey
Reckley; 2 brothers-in-law: Melpert Dean and
Leslie Harding; | sister-in-law: Walda Miller;
numerous nieces, nephews and cousins and a
host of other relatives and friends.

There will be no public viewing.

Funeral Arrangements are being handled by East
Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta Street, Palmdale.

EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service”

#27 Rosetta Street, PO.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale,
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957
24 hrs. Emergency Service
er ee Te wes) oe] ac





The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, July 30, 2009® PG 21





PG 22 ® Thursday, July 30, 2009

RELIGION



By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

MANY times in our daily
lives we may ask ourselves
“why does God let bad
things happen to good peo-
ple?” In his wisdom, God's
love is never failing allowing
him to not only provide us
with his love, protection and
guidance, but also to give us
our own free will.

1 Peter 5:7 states “Cast all your
anxiety on him because he cares
for you.”

Golden Gates World Outreach
Ministries International, Trent
Davis, said God guiding us is really
like being in tune with a satellite
dish.

“A satellite station is above the
earth and once you have the



GOD’S love is
never failing
allowing him to
not only provide ;
us with his love,
protection and
guidance, but
also to give

us Our Own |
ste |



receiver down here on earth, you
get a signal. The satellite is higher
than you and can see the entire
picture, but your receiver must be
on. You can have that receiver
inside but once it is not on you
won't pick up the signal,” Mr Davis
said.

Mr Davis said God's guidance
can also be found in the “still small
voice” of the Holy Spirit.

“His directives may be as simple
as when you have a ‘something
told me to turn my windows down
today’ moment. It might be a
nudging to not call a certain per-
son, or to go to a specific place ata
given time. Success with God
always means choosing to do things
God's way, not our own way,” Mr
Davis said.

Mr Davis said the way we can
activate that satellite receiver is
through our relationship with God.

“Through praise and worship
that tweaks the signal when we
lift our hands to God;
when we

open our selves up to his presence
and when we give him glory. When
the person that is on earth opens
up their receiver and they make
sure their antennas are up, they get
a clear signal from the satellite.
When we open up our spirits to
God and spend time tuning and
tracking that signal, we get clear
instructions as to how to move,”
Mr Davis said.

Mr Davis also makes reference
to God’s guidance from the recent
film “Taken.”

“The premise of Taken is where
this young lady goes on a trip
against her father’s wishes and the
last thing he gives her is a cell
phone telling her to keep in con-
tact. She is then talking to him
when the kidnappers come and as
he is talking to her the most key
important line he says is ‘in ten
seconds they are going to take you.

However, when they do,
describe as



The Tribune

much as you can as the phone is
going to be open.’ She was able to
be calm because she heard his
voice just before all this was going
on and she got clear guidance and
instructions. She knew that her
father knew what was going on
because she had the receiver and
the connection going on and in the
end she came out with the victory.
That is how we are with God-there
are some things we can’t avoid but
His voice and His guidance
through the process will give us the
victory,” Mr Davis said.

Mr Davis said God can handle
the heavy weights that wear us
down in life and love us uncondi-
tionally.

“As the world continues going
on, there are things that we still
can’t avoid, but our constant con-
tact with our God allows us to see
some things before, allows us to
walk around some things and the
things we can not walk around,
God takes through those
things.”





The Tribune

©

RELIGION

Married for Life

WE are facing many challenges in our
society, and being happily married is one
such area. How can we remain married
for life? How can we find some level of
happiness together?

One way to do this, I have been told
by a lady married for fifty-six years, is
for both persons to really want to be
married and to intend work at it. There
needs to be an intentional effort being
made to help each other to find joy in
the relationship.

This requires a degree of maturity
that cares about the well-being of the
other, a level of love that puts the other
first, and a consistent desire to please
the Lord through the ministry of mar-
riage. What an ideal! How do we meet
such a high standard?

First of all, we need to accept that
God has called us to a life-time journey
with this other person. If you have a
traveling companion who will share
everything with you, it makes sense to
try to create as congenial an atmosphere
as possible. The time frame dictates the
approach.

Once we keep this in mind, then the
next consideration is the wisdom
required to work things out together.
The more humble we are the better, The
more dependent on God for insight we
are, seeking the mind of Christ together,
the quicker we will discern the will of
God.

If we truly admire our spouse as an
intelligent person, gifted in certain
areas, and capable of contributing much
to the relationship, then it is easier to



trust opinions which differ from our own
as having some validity. Respect given
and appreciated, then returned, in an
ongoing reciprocal arrangement, boosts
the level of self-esteem for both persons.

Put another way, we sit together as
equals, both made in the image and like-
ness of God, and we share our thoughts
and feelings, prayerfully searching for
the best possible solution. Because we
both wish to bless and be blessed we
control our egos and explore all options.
There is no need for a power struggle
because God is the power to which we
both seek to sincerely submit.

A life-time is a long time to be unhap-
py. It can make the promise to be
together “Til death us do part’ feel like a
life sentence to be served on death row.
Regular appeals may prolong the execu-
tion for many years but one day it will
have to happen.

Why not search your own heart,
examine your own conscience, and con-
fess your own sins to Almighty God con-
cerning your present situation. Ask God
to heal you and help you. If you both do
this, you allow God to fill you with
peace, joy and love for now through
eternity.

r
° |
ll ee el
an et 1 Hea oe

Everywhere The Buyers Are!

L



Thursday, July 30, 2009 ® PG 23

FRET NOT THYSELF: DO NOT
WORRY!

Text: Psalm 37:1-10; Matthew 6:24-34:

Psalm 37 raises the question, “Why do the wicked
prosper, and the Righteous suffer? Then offers Godly
Instructions to persons who are suffering adversity;
they are counselled to never envy the apparently
prosperous, wicked people; because their prosperity
is shallow, and only lasts a short time. The confidence
of the Righteous should reside in God, and they
must live to bring Glory to His Name; in this ordinary
way; they are assured happiness in this life, and in
‘The Life to Come.’

Pastor Ben Bailey
The Prophetic Voice
P. O. Box N-9518
Nassau, Bahamas
Tpv.inc@coralwave.com

Paraphrased, the Psalmist provided the following
encouragements: Do not fret, allow the mind to be entirely calm and
composed; do not worry, fuss, trouble, bother, upset yourself, harass, pester
— or vex-up yourself, do not feel hurt, or sad because of what is happening
to you; do not hassle yourself - or get on your own nerves; do not irritate
— wind-up yourself, or rub yourself the wrong way, annoy — or drive yourself
mad; do not become aggravated — or wound-up; do not disturb — or scare
your own self with foolish thoughts; do not exacerbate - make things worse,
or ‘fan the flames of passion’ because of evildoers, nor be envious of the
workers of iniquity. They shall soon be cut down like the grass, and vanish
as the green herb.

Trust in the Lord, and do good; dwell in the land, and feed on His faithfulness,
knowing that God will provide the necessaries of life for you. The Psalmist
believes that if we seek our happiness in God; ‘His Way of Life’ will regulate
our desires for a delicate life of ease and pleasure, causing us to ask for
things we now consider proper for God to supply.

Delight yourself also in the Lord, ‘Don’t Worry: Be Happy,’ expecting
everything that makes you happy to come from Him; knowing that every
good and perfect gift comes from God; and He shall give you the desires,
needs, requirements, requests, or wishes of your heart. Commit your way
to the Lord, Trust also in Him, and He shall bring it to pass. He shall bring
forth your righteousness as the light, and your justice as the noonday.

Rest in the Lord! Learn to be silent to the Lord; Learn to leave the whole
predicament with him, without being anxious about the result, and wait
patiently for Him. Do not fret because of those, who prosper in their way,
or because of the man who brings wicked plans to pass. Cease from anger,
and forsake fury and rage: Do not fret: because it only causes you harm.

Mathew addresses the question of man’s appetite for material things; which
increases our anxiety levels whenever we are unable to acquire them, and
provides a simple solution. First, he addresses the topic of choosing a
master, who can empower our spiritual nature to exercise self-control over
passions and desires of our human nature: “No man can serve two masters:
for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the
one, and despise the other” [We surrender to what we love supremely].

Next, He addresses the inability of human intellect to positively alter the
natural products of creation: “Therefore | say to you, take no thought for
your life, what you shall eat, or what you shall drink; nor yet for your body,
what you shall put on. Is not the life more than meat, and the body than
raiment? Behold the fowls of the air: for they sow not, neither do they reap,
nor gather into barns; yet your Heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not
much better than they? Which of you by taking thought can add one cubit
to his physique?

Why take you thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they
grow; they toil not, neither do they spin: and yet | say to you, that even
Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. Wherefore, if God
so clothe the grass of the field, which to day is, and to morrow is cast into
the oven, shall He not much more clothe you, O you of little faith? Therefore
take no thought, saying, what shall we eat? or, what shall we drink? or,
Wherewithal shall we be clothed?

Your Heavenly Father knows that you have need of all these things. But seek
you first the Kingdom of God, and His Righteousness; and all these things
shall be added to you. Take therefore no thought for the morrow: for the
morrow shall take thought for the things of itself. Sufficient unto the day is
the evil contained within it.”

Human appetite is incapable of altering situations it creates; however, spiritual
alteration of human appetite can avoid difficult situations!





PG 24 ® Thursday, July 30, 2009

RELIGION

Take back our streets

It is a proven fact that everything
rises and falls upon leadership!

It is blatantly evident that one of the
greatest problems of the Bahamas
today; is that of effective leadership.
This fact is conclusive straight across
the board; the lack of effective leader-
ship in the home, in the church and in
the government. With the Bahamas
being a small group of islands and
Nassau being only twenty miles long
and seven miles wide (21/7) how is it
that lawlessness is allowed to have such
free course on so small of an island?

Being a Bahamian who has lived and
traveled throughout the USA and
returning back home, it's disheartening
to hear the silly excuses; that ninety
nine per cent of Bahamians sincerely
gives for the lawlessness in the land
today. Worst of all I've heard supposed
to be leaders (politicians, police offi-
cers, civic and religious leaders) giving
weak excuses for their inability / failure
to enforce the law.

Again, it’s obvious that these leaders
only mentally ascend to scriptures such
as “Prov.18:21: Death and life are in the
power of the tongue: and they that love
it shall eat the fruit thereof. And Mark
11:23 : He shall have whatsoever he
saith.

Here's a quick note to persons such
as the minister of National Security, the
attorney general and the commissioner
of police. The parents and family mem-
bers who would have lost their loved
ones through some form of criminal
act; care not to hear you leaders give
dumb excuses and try to cover your
incompetence to enforce the law.

Any leader or person who sits in the
office of authority and ascribes to such
notions as: “What we experiencing is as
a result of that which is taking place in
America” is not fit to lead or occupy an
office of authority.

What the Bahamas is experiencing is
leadership with no testosterone to



PASTOR

effectively deal with its problems. As
soon as true leadership arises, the
Bahamas will boldly move forward,
upward and onward together, then the
slogan It's Better in the Bahamas
would be true.

Overall Bahamians are law abiding
people but where there is no law
enforcement; but just like every other
nationality; what we're allowed to get
away with, we would.

Here's my case and point:

As crazy and as lawless as
Bahamians may appear to be when
they're at home in the Bahamas when
traveling to the USA, immediately this
(suppose to be) lawlessness, raw born
Bahamian becomes a law abiding visi-
tor.

Let's observe the lawless Bahamian
visiting the USA for a few days? If they
intend to drive on the streets of
America, watch how quickly they
adhere to the seat belt law.

As much as this Bahamian would
drink alcohol beverages while driving
on the streets of the Bahamas; how is it
that they won't do the same on the
streets of America?

For the Bahamian visiting America;
obeying the laws of that land is by no
means a problem to him or her. This
individual or these individuals are fully
aware that there are swift conse-
quences for every lawless action taken.

Now on the other hand; the minute
these temporary law abiding
Bahamians leave America and their
feet hits the Bahamas soil; instanta-
neously they revert to their lawless
ways. Why is this? Listen, it's not that

Job well done!

I AM taking a different route
today. This article gives props to
The Royal Bahamas Police Force
for running a much needed and
extremely helpful Summer Camp.

The summer months approached
and the reality of school closing for
more than 8 weeks left many par-
ents wondering how to entertain
their children. I heard on the radio
that The Royal Bahamas Police
Force was having a summer camp
and the following morning regis-
tered my neice.

I don't know how this is going to

r



ALLISON
MILLER

sound but Pll say it anyway, when I
went with much anticipation to
pick her up and saw that they were
giving the children a hot lunch I
knew instantly that this was the
right place for my niece to be for
the next several weeks. I think the

there are no laws here in the Bahamas.
What we've got is a two fold dynamic at
work here: 1) There is no respect or
reverence for our laws, and 2) There is
very little enforcement of our laws, and
where there is enforcement; there lacks
swift judgment and meaningful conse-
quences.

It is said that “It's the little fox that
spoils the vine” This proverb also fits or
is the root cause for the deterioration
of law and order in the Bahamas.

The simple neglect of enforcing our
traffic laws has given birth to many
other serious crimes in the land. Here's
a little foot note for these sleeping /
blind leaders that oversee law enforce-
ment in the Bahamas: The Oklahoma
City bomber Timothy Mcveigh was
arrested for a simple traffic matter.
Had it not been for that police officer
enforcing the traffic laws; this danger-
ous criminal might have gotten away.

I deemed it a shame and the lack of
vision for the government to have to
borrow millions of dollars for road
repairs. The strict enforcement of the
traffic laws, along with an expeditious-
ly working court system; and stiffer
penalties and fines would generate
more than enough finances to repair
and maintain roads and highways
throughout the Bahamas.

The simple enforcement of traffic
laws would overwhelmingly fund the
Bahamas treasury. I would invite the
commissioner of police and the comp-
troller of road traffic to ride incognito
the public bus / jitney for a month; and
the would have a greater appreciation
for the spirit of this article with refer-
ence to the level of traffic lawlessness
on the streets.

The terror and fear of riding the
Jitneys

At some point the commissioner of
police and the comptroller of road traf-
fic must put their heads together and
come up with a zero tolerance task
force; to take back the street from the

officers out did themselves. Not
only were the children served hot
lunch every day, they were also
given a snack at break and all field
trips were free.

The only thing parents had to pay
for was the T-shirt given to each
child at registeration. I don't think
you can beat that at all.

I think we are all aware that sum-
mer time is the most popular time
for children to be idle.

However, the RBPF sought to do
something about that this summer
by hosting a summer camp for four
weeks.

I applaud their efforts and
accomplishments in helping par-
ents for a few hours out of the day.
It is good to see problems, that

The Tribune

road demons) jitney drivers.

Mr Commissioner / Mr Comptroller,
here are a few point or concerns that
I'm sure you must have heard of on
more than one occasion.

Bus drivers are allowed to play loud,
filthy music as they recklessly transport
paying passengers to their destination.

Passengers have to tolerate this
abuse of this nasty music; out of fear of
being beaten down and assaulted on
these buses by the drivers and their rid-
ing partners, if they complain about the
music.

There is also disrespect for other
motorist by bus drivers as they're
allowed to stop in the middle of the
street to off load an receive passengers.

Might I suggest, Mr Commissioner
and Mr Comptroller; that the selected
officers of this task force be made
aware that if it is proven that they've
compromised the integrity of the task
force by whatever means; they would
be immediately dealt with at the
strictest measure of the law.

This is but a mustard seed observa-
tion of the lawlessness that is being
allowed to have free course on our
street. I do blame the various drivers
for their lawless actions, but most of all
T highly hold / blame the commissioner
of police, the comptroller of road traf-
fic and the constipated, weak court sys-
tem for failing to effectively enforce the
laws.

IS THERE ANYBODY IN
AUTHORITY; within the above men-
tioned departments / offices who are
not afraid to enforce the laws and Take
Back Our Streets? Stop Talking and
Take Action.

¢ For questions or comments contact us
via E-mail: pastormallen@yahoo.com or
Phone 1-242-441-2021 or 225-3850

Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l.

means efforts can be made to solve
them. It is even better when we see
problems and have solutions to
those problems. I know we are liv-
ing in different times from the 80's
and early 90's and many of us don't
believe this any more but it truly
"takes a village to raise a child.” I
thought they were in good hands
being in the police hands. This
department sought to make life
easier for people and I hope that
they are given the thanks that they
deserve.

My sister and I would like to
extend our thanks to the commis-
sioner of police and his force espe-
cially Central Division for a job
well done. It was very much appre-
ciated, thank you.



The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, July 30, 2009 ® PG 25

Regarding darts

"TO some who were confident of their
own righteousness and looked down on
everybody else, Jesus told this parable:
"Two men went up to the temple to pray,
one a Pharisee and the other a tax col-
lector. The Pharisee stood up and prayed
about himself: 'God I thank you that I
am not like other men- robbers, evildo-
ers, adulterers- or even like this tax col-
lector. I fast twice a week and give a
tenth of all I get.’

"But the tax collector stood at a dis-
tance. He would not even look up to
heaven, but beat his breast and said,
‘God, have mercy on me, a sinner.’ "I tell
you that this man, rather than the other,
went home justified before God. For
everyone who exalts himself will be
humbled, and he who humbles himself
will be exalted.”

Luke 18:9-14 (N.I.V)

It's amazing how imperfect I've found
Tam. It’s not that I ever thought I was per-
fect, or anything even close, but I also did-
n't think I was extraordinarily imperfect
either. Yet it was a Saturday I will never
forget. My ten year old nephew asked me
to play a game of darts and although I
never had a stellar history in darts, I
thought- twenty-four year- old me,
against, ten -year- old him, how miserable
could one game possibly be? I accepted
the challenge. In fact, I thought it would
be a great opportunity for me to teach



him something; being fourteen years his
senior and all. So what could I teach him
I pondered- maybe, how to be a good
sport whether you win, or more impor-
tantly lose? At this point I'm sure you've
already fast tracked to the conclusion-
well, don't burn out your sneakers just
yet.

Two minutes into the game, I've finally
landed a dart on the board- the wall is
relieved- my nephew is on cloud nine,
blissfully content that regardless of my
improved play I don't stand a chance. As
I shift from one unpleasant emotion to
another equally unpleasant emotion, I try
to remain as physically pleasant as possi-
ble-with this ten year old kid, who seems
to be growing rather quickly in front of
my very eyes. As he explains the scoring
to me again, I panic and think, "This can-
not be happening!’ "You mean I'm unable
to avoid some level of mathematical com-
petence?!’ My nephew who considers me
to be the coolest thing since Nintendo
Wii, is about to find out I have a flaw- a
distressing defect, discovered and quickly
concealed- well somewhat, in grade five.

While he wrote the scores, I would count
and recount my points as quickly as I
could manage; so to not be discovered to
be a fraud, a con artist who swindled her
way to high rank in the LA.C.A.E-

International Association of Cool
Aunts Everywhere.

However, when he looked at my land
and again at the point I had given him-
the cat was out of the bag so to speak.
My Mathematics A-grade nephew fre-
quently and quietly replaced the 18- for
double 8, with a 16- and in those very
moments I realised, there’s something
hugely disturbing about the often peace-
ful quiet, that emerges when one has
been exposed- it's almost as if laughter,
finger pointing or arrest would be more
comforting. While the vicious cycle of
recounts picked up speed, he would
occasionally chuckle and shake his head.
The darts wanted to teach me some-
thing.

Ultimately I won- one game out of
five. Alright, alright, I did get into the
game somewhat self righteous, con-
vinced that my age compared to his was
all I needed to ensure a win. Convinced,
he could never teach me anything. But
he did. It was- that there are some things
he's better at and that's okay.
Regardless of a persons age, race or
gender, we can all find wisdom and
understanding in each other.

Yet am J alone in my struggle with the



Bethel Baptist Church
celebration 219 years

HISTORIC Bethel Baptist Church will cele-
brate its 219th anniversary on Sunday August 2 in
one combined service at 10 am under the theme
“In Pursuit of Greatness” taken from Genesis
12:1-4, Joshua 17:14-18 and Matthew 20:20-24.
The special guest speaker will be Rev Dr Victor
Cooper, Pastor of New Bethany Baptist Church.

Two hundred and nineteen years ago, a run
away American slave of the Carolina shores
named Prince Williams, guided by the hand of
providence, landed on the shores of Nassau and
in 1790 organised and erected Bethel's Meeting
House from which the name Meeting Street was
derived. The church has the oldest continuous
Baptist congregation in the Bahamas and possibly
in the Caribbean.

The church’s forefathers under the leadership
of the Holy Spirit have laid a solid foundation
upon which to build and expand. Persons like
Rev Robert Johnson who ordered the church's
first pipe organ; Rev Dr HR Brown who was a
social activist, a great orator, and a man con-
cerned about others and was also responsible for

the “Serving the Whole Man” ministry; Rev
Wellington Johnson who under his short tenure
introduced many administrative changes and
finally, the current minister Timothy Stewart all
played pivotal roles in the church’s development.
The church has undergone extensive renovations,
administrative offices were built, properties
acquired, full-time associate ministers were
employed, an administrative team was employed
and numerous ministries established.

The church will commit to receiving all that
God has promised for his people to become, and
recommit to doing what God has called His
Church to do. In the future, members will focus
on the challenges that confront the family, the
community, and the country as a whole. These
objectives would be met through the pastoral
care ministry, the preaching of the gospel, the
teaching ministry of the church, evangelism, the
youth and children's ministry of the church, and
the necessary expansion of the church's facilities
to effectively meet the spiritual demands of the
times.

occasional self righteous attitude or is
this a vice

that looms over us all- particularly
believers as we strive to be witnesses of
God's truth in the world? Well what I do
know is, this is without a doubt one of
the reasons why we must at all times be
of a sober mind; humbling ourselves,
accepting that we don't have all the
answers, we can't solve all problems-
but we do, have all the truth, written in
the Bible. There is no ranking system
based on perfection, that places believ-
ers above any other human being. Is one
who is skilled at maths, more valuable
than one who is skilled at communica-
tions?

Absolutely not. We all need to have a
healthy dose of each discipline, and we
all need to realise we have individual
gifts- essential to our individual pur-
pose, and destiny. That being said- I'll
always be ready for another game of
darts; an invitation to share-or one to
simply listen.

In closing, may you always welcome
every light hearted opportunity no mat-
ter how small it seems.

¢ Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian
writer and poet, currently residing in
Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to
the article can be sent to

fearless247@gmail.com.



UO Ea



The Tribune

TRIBUNE TIP
OF THE DAY

PG 26 ® Thursday, July 30, 2009 RELIGION

(SQ) THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS







es)

Native Baptists of the Bahamas — cca

By far the largest number of the negro
Creoles belong to the Baptist persua-
sion.

This species of dissent has peculiar
attractions for them, involving, as it
does, a very democratic form of self-
government, the substitution of class
councils, and adjudications for the pro-
cedure of the established courts of law,
together with a system of mutual espi-
onage and censorship, which at the
same time gratifies their curiosity and
flatters their self-conceit. I by no means
deny that, in their time, the Baptist
preachers have done good to their
flocks ; but I consider that the present
effect of their preaching and of their
church organisation is to impart a tone
of republican self-assertion to their con-
gregations, to foster a hypocritical habit
of quoting the Sacred Scriptures on all
occasions, and to postpone the more
serious duties of the moral law to chapel
- going observance of the Sabbath, and
similar ceremonial _ formalities....
(Governor Bayley, 1864)

At this time the Baptists of the
Bahamas consisted of ex slaves and lib-
erated Africans belonging to either the
Baptist Missionary Society of London
or an equally large widespread network
of Native Baptists - just as their lan-
guage overlaid African grammar with
English syntax both groups employed
Christian imagery with underlying
powerful West African religious sym-
bols. Hence, the immersion in water
and reverence to John the Baptist
became a key meeting point in the two
belief systems.

The Native Baptists had their origins
in the Bahamas from the coming of the
Loyalists in the 1780s with Brother
Amos, Frank Spence, Prince Williams
and Sharper Morris. In 1801, the
Society of Anabaptists was formed by
Prince Williams and other free
Negroes. After a brief flirtation with
the Baptist Missionary Society of
London, Prince Williams split away
and built the St John's Particular
Church of the Native Baptist Society in
1835 but the Society itself was probably
in existence since 1825. Prince Williams
and James Burns evangelised the Out
Islands up to William's death in 1840.

Thomas 'Pappy' Romer

Thomas Rumer was born in Grand
Bahama in 1798 and was a slave of
John Pinder until Emancipation. “The
work of soul saving was Mr Romer's
chief delight” (St John's Society
Record Book) - he traveled to the
islands to existing churches and added
new ones, ordaining elders in all.
Although illiterate, Pappy was
described as a worthy, pious man and a
strong disciplinarian - a giant in rebuk-
ing sin and weeping with those that
wept. He visited the homes of the aged

/ JIM
> LAWLOR
7

and sick - often bent over a cooking pot
preparing sustenance for the helpless.

In New Providence, Rumer started
St Peter's in Gambier (1856), St
James', St Peter's and St Mark's. He
also purchased or obtained grants of
land for churches in Long Cay,
Crooked Island, Port Nelson, Rum Cay
(1853), Salt Pond, Long Island (1854),
Matthew Town, Inagua (1855) and
Calabash Bay, Andros (1868).

Thomas 'Pappy’ Romer died on 29th
March 1883 with his dying testimony:
“My work on earth is finished.

Come, thou Great Conqueror, come!
Thou didst bear those five bloody
wounds for me.

I shall soon be satisfied.”

A large procession of all classes and
denominations followed his remains to
the south of St John's Church, where
he was buried. “He was eminently
revered and beloved by the congrega-
tion and many affiliated
Christians...... He was of a kindly, gen-
erous disposition, of simple humble
manners. His life was of consistent
godliness, unostentatious devotion and
earnest zeal”. (Obituary Nassau
Guardian 31st March 1883).

James W Roberts

David C Lightbourne succeeded
Pappy Romer in the pastorate of
Native Baptists but died just over two
years later.

The Church called Methodist lay
reader, James W Roberts born at the
Bogue, Eleuthera as Pastor. In 1891,
‘Pa’ Roberts led the construction of a
new building, 100ft by 30 ft, which is
still in use today. At the cornerstone
laying ceremony Rev Robert Dunlop
(Presbyterian) reported that: “St
John's had 480 members and over 300
children in Sunday School and 48
churches with 4,550 members and
3,000 children in Sunday School. This
church has been a great power for the
good...it has maintained a true and
pure faith.....its neighbours sometimes
think its services are too rousing when
they awake us at three or four o'clock
in the morning”. He likened Pa
Roberts as ‘likeminded' and a ‘worthy
successor’ to old Mr Rumer of simple
manners, earnest life and commanding
influence.

Divisions

Just before he died in 1915, Pa
Roberts asked Rev Daniel Wilshire to
ordain choirmaster Alfred Carrington

Symonette of Snug Corner, Acklins
(born 1875). This was not acceptable
to everyone and as a result the St
James' Native Baptist Association was
formed with Symonette as the
Superintendent.

Rev Gilbert H Thompson, a well
educated Bahamian preaching in New
York became Pastor of the St John's
Society but after four years left taking
away many members and started the
Metropolitan Baptist Church. Rev
Samuel McKinney took over and trav-
elled widely from island to island bap-
tising converts and ordaining minis-
ters. By 1924 there were 46 affiliated
chapels and 5,260 members.

Just before McKinney retired,
Timothy Edward Wesley Donaldson
returned from the USA to assist him.
Donaldson (born in Cat Island 1880),
who had taught in the Government
Schools became Superintendent of the
churches in the Out Islands and R H
Higgs, a Bahamian Pastor in Florida
was brought in to be Pastor of St
John's.

After many churches were damaged
in the 1926 hurricane, the rebuilding of
St John's proved to be very expensive -
at this point a disagreement split the
church again over the payment of a
salary asked for by R H Higgs. Higgs
took away about 300 members, who
worshipped on the Southern
Recreation Grounds and gradually
organised St Paul's Baptist Church
which was later built on Bias Street.

An agreement between Rev T E W
Donaldson and Rev A C Carrington to
amalgamate the whole Baptist Society
together again resulted in Symonette
taking on as superintendent of the
Society and Pastor of St John's with
Donaldson as _ assistant pastor.
Symonette proved to be a good organ-
iser as he brought the Society together
again and added The Annex Baptist
Church and Mt Carmel Baptist Church.
He became the first president of the
Bahamian Baptist Missionary and
Educational Convention. He was
unfortunately drowned off Fresh Creek
Andros and his body is buried there.

Rev T E W Donaldson took over
until his death in 1963. After
Donaldson there was a period of
unrest until Rev Michael Carrington
Symonette (born 1938 in Nassau) was
elected in 1965. Under this Symonette,
Mt Zion, Golden Gates and St John's
Freeport Native Baptist Churches
were added to the Society.

So the Native Baptist Church creat-
ed by those ‘negro creoles' has grown
and prospered into one of the most
influential institutions in the modern
Bahamas.

(Next time: Part 39 - The last years of the
Baptist Missionary Society of London)

A VERSE A DAY KEEPS THE
ENEMY AT BAY. Many
Christians understand the need
for a healthy dose of daily inspi-
ration, especially when it comes
to having a defence against the
troubles that always seem to
arise when we are at our weak-
est.

The word of God is not just
the bread for our daily walk, it is
the essence of what keeps the
saved covered under God’s pro-
tection.

At any time troubles arise with
no clear reason why, however
we have the choice to either
poke our heads in the sand and
pray the situation disappears, or
trust in the Word knowing “This
too shall pass.”

To survive in an ever increas-
ing secular world, Christian or
not, reading the word daily is
simply the best option.

The Bible says to trust in the
word and lean not your own
understanding.

So the next time you're facing
a black cloud, or an obstacle,
instead of fighting a loosing bat-
tle, pick up the Bible and let it
help you through.

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you
are raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in
the area or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and share
your story.





The Tribune

RELIGION

Sickness

By BISHOP VG CLARKE
Calvary Deliverance Church

THE HUMAN body, as everybody
knows, is a remarkable organism com-
prising of billions of cells, numerous
chemicals, hundreds of muscles, miles of
blood vessels and a variety of organs.
The human body can grow, heal itself,
fight disease, adapt to temperature
changes, react to environmental stimu-
lation, and survive numerous physical
abuses. But the body does not go on
forever, at least in this world.
Sometimes it is injured beyond repair. It
can break down if it is not cared for and
eventually wears out.

When we are healthy, we often take
our body for granted. Colds and period-
ic bouts with the flu are annoying but
usually only temporary interruptions to
the activities of life.

Sickness is an issue which runs
throughout the pages of scripture. The
illnesses of Miriam, Naaman,
Nebuchadnezzar, David's newborn
child, Job, and various others are

TODAY IN RELIGION

described with charity in both the old
and new testaments. When Jesus came
to earth in person his concern for the
sick was so important that almost one-
fifth of the gospels are devoted to the
topic of healing. The disciples were
expected to carry on this healing min-
istry and the book of Acts records how
the early church cared for those with
physical illnesses.

The biblical emphasis on sickness
points to at least three conclusions
which can be helpful for the believer:-

1. Sickness is a part of life. Few peo-
ple, if any go through life without
experiencing at least periodic illness.
It seems likely that sickness entered
the human race as a result of the fall,
and since that time people have known
what it is like to be unhealthy. The
Bible makes no attempt to diagnose,
categorise or systematically list the
symptoms in passing, it refers directly
or indirectly to alcoholism, blindness,
deafness, muteness, infirmity, insanity,
speech impediment and a number of

other illnesses.

2. Care, compassion and healing are
important for believers. By his word
and actions, Jesus taught that sickness,
while common, also is undesirable. He
spent much of his time healing the sick.
He encouraged others to do likewise,
and he emphasised the importance of
compassionate caring for those who
were needy and unhealthy. Even to
give someone a drink of water was con-
sidered praiseworthy and Jesus indi-
cated that helping a sick person was
the same as ministering to himself.
Believers are instructed to pray for the
sick and to help in practical ways for
those who are not well.

3. Sickness raises some difficult and
crucial questions about suffering. Some
of you may ask the question “If God is
in control why is He allowing many bad
things to happen to us.” You must
remember that things happen because
of the choices we make. The school
shooting in Colorado some years ago is



Thursday, July 30, 2009 ® PG 27

a prime example of the choices we make
as human beings. When God is left out
of our decision making we leave our-
selves open to be controlled by the devil.

It is probable that our minds will
never fully comprehend the reasons for
suffering, but the Bible teaches that suf-
fering keeps us humble, refines our
faith, conform us to His image, teaches
us about God and produces patience,
maturity, perseverance and character.
Suffering also teaches us to become
more compassionate and caring.

Learning to walk with God - through
prayer, fasting, meditation, Bible study
and worship - can prepare us for the cri-
sis of life. The scriptures never teach
that believers are exempted from illness
or that suffering will be easy for
Christians; neither are we taught that we
should bear problems alone. When we
are in the habit of “bearing one anoth-
er's burdens,” and casting our burdens
on God in prayer, then we are better
prepared for facing illness and death
when they come.

BULGARIAN
Orthodox priests
_ hold the miracu-
lous icon of the
Virgin Mary dur-
ing an orthodox
procession in the
town of Varna
east of the
Bulgarian capital
Sofia, Sunday,
July, 26, 2009.
Every year some
thousands of
believers take part
in this procession
as they try to
touch or kiss the
miraculous icon
before a praying
for good health.

Petar Petrov/AP Photo



PG 28 ® Thursday, July 30, 2009

SHENIQUE GRAY

DE’WAYNIA JOSEY

VALENCIA MOSS

RELIGION

,
RUSHAN COOPER

SHANNON EVANS

The Tribune



JAMELL DAWKINS

The contestants of the Miss
Gospel Bahamas Competition

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE excitement is now
brewing and within just three
days one of six contestant
for this year’s Miss Gospel
Bahamas will walk away

with the title of queen.

The event which is set to take place
on August 2, at the Wyndham’s
Rainforest Theater will feature several
special guest performances by Synergy
Soldiers for Christ, Mericha Walker,
and Overcomers Mime Ministry.

Going through months of vigorous
training, appearances, retreats, and
pageant preparations, the young
women have gone through a transfor-
mation that has escorted them from
girls to women, but only one can be
queen.

Kahlil Gibran once said: “Beauty is
not in the face, beauty is a light in the
heart,”and for these young beauties
the challenge is to convince the judges
that they have what it takes.

According to the organisiers of
Miss Gospel Bahamas: “From the
start, the Miss Gospel Bahamas
Pageant has encouraged its partici-
pants to transform their spiritual lives
in ways that truly reflect Jesus Christ.

Organised by Great Commission
Ministries International, the pageant
also promotes assistance to the nation’s
impoverished and homeless.”

SHENIQUE GRAY

MISS AMETHYST

25 years old and is a member of
Annex Baptist Church. She serves as
president of her church’s youth min-
istry, church secretary, member of the
choir, and lieutenant of her church’s
Girls Brigade. Shenique is employed
as a senior accountant at Deloitte &
‘Touche, and is a Certified Public
Accountant (CPA). Her hobbies
include swimming, tennis, and travel-
ling. Shenique aspires to become a
multi-faceted entrepreneur, as she
plans to creatively develop her own
travel agency, business consultancy
firm, and financial advisement firm.

DE’WAYNIA JOSEY

MISS CALVARY DELIVERANCE CHURCH

is an 18 year old student at the
College of the Bahamas. She serves in
various church and civic organisations
including Calvary Deliverance
Church’s Dance Ministry, Crusaders
Brass Brand, and Total Praise Dance
Troupe. She is also a volunteer of
Sister Circle, a charity organisation
assisting the less fortunate.
De’Waynia’s hobbies include dancing
and performing in musicals. Having a

passion for mental wellness, she hopes
to one day achieve a doctorate degree
in Clinical Psychology.

VALENCIA MOSS

MISS CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY GAMBIER
is a 25 year old teacher. She has
trained in various governmental min-
istries, including the Ministry of
Youth, Sports, and Culture, Foreign
Affairs, and presently as a Spanish
teacher enlisted through the Ministry
of Education. Valencia also ministers
in the Praise and Worship and Dance
Ministries of her church. She aspires
to become an International Relations
Officer in the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs. Her hobbies include singing,
dancing, and experiencing different
cultures.

RUSHAN COOPER

MISS ALL OUT ENTERTAINMENT

is 19 years old and is a member of
Emmanuel Missionary Baptist
Church. She serves as Vice President
of her church’s Dance Ministry, Youth
Ministry Secretary, a member of the
Youth Choir and Youth Praise team.
Rushan is currently enrolled at the
College of the Bahamas where she
hopes to obtain certification and train-
ing to become a primary school
teacher. Her hobbies include dancing,
singing, reading, traveling, and pho-
tography.

SHANNON EVANS

MISS ZION BAPTIST CHURCH EAST & SHIRLEY
STREETS

is a 20 year old student at the College
of the Bahamas. She is committed to
sharing the importance of educational
advancement, which is evidenced by
her involvement in the Education
Awareness Society, her church’s Youth
Ministry, and Children’s Church. She
is also a director of Shachah Worship
and dance ministries. Shannon’s hob-
bies include reading, writing, and
communications, all of which she
hopes to help in her dream of becom-
ing a Primary Educator.

JAMELL DAWKINS

MISS BAHAMAS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP CENTRE
has an ambition to encourage others
in pursuing Jesus Christ. Although her
life’s journey has only spanned 20
years, Jamell is already certain that
she has been called to Dance
Ministry. She serves in the Dance and
Drama Ministries of her church, in
addition to practicing dance as a pas-
time. She is a volunteer of Miss Teen
Bahamas World Pageant. Jamell is
also a member of Bahamas Christian
Fellowship Centre’s Youth Praise
team and Chairperson of the Youth
Board. Her hobbies include reading,
writing, and she has an interest in
Spanish.



Full Text
{T)

Pim blowin’ it

91F
70F

FSTORM IN

HIGH
LOW

“oe SPORTS

Volume: 105 No.205







HESS a r

Marital rape:






BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009



R CLASSIFIEDS TRADER

A nation divided

Heated debate over
law change issue

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

CONTROVERSY over the
proposed outlaw of marital
rape has divided the communi-
ty as men argue against the
removal of their safeguards in
order to give more protection
to women.

Heated discussion over the
issue continued on Wendell
Jones’ Love 97FM talk show
yesterday as Minister of Labour
and Social Development Loret-
ta Butler-Turner, Crisis Centre
director Sandra Dean-Patter-
son, and Pastor Barrington
Brennen responded to callers’
queries about the proposed leg-
islation.

Mrs Butler-Turner tabled a
bill to amend the Sexual
Offences Act in Parliament last
week to reform current legis-
lation and uphold the rights of
the individual set out in United
Nations conventions by mak-
ing rape within marriage ille-

al.

: But religious leaders and
those who believe marriage
allows for a wife’s physical ‘sub-
mission’ to her husband have
shown difficulty in understand-
ing the reality of rape in the
context of the marriage.

Pastor Cedric Moss of King-
dom Life Church has said
forced intercourse within a non-

estranged marriage should be
considered some other punish-
able crime other than rape
between strangers.

And a male caller said: “The
law that the minister is trying to
push to the table goes against
the vows of marriage.”

Another asked: “If a hus-
band makes a wife mad and she
says she won’t give him sex for
a week and he takes it can you
report it as rape?”

When this was confirmed, he
said: “Well if that’s correct this
must be the height of stupidity,
and all those persons involved
in it should be put in that cate-
gory as well!”

The panel strived to explain
how rape is a violent act regard-
less of the perpetrator, and cit-
ed examples of married women
who have been subjected to
horrific sexual abuse by their
husbands.

Mrs Butler-Turner said a
woman called to thank her for
putting the bill forward because
rape was a part of her daily
married life.

The minister explained: “She
said, ‘every night I would come
home from work and my hus-
band would rip my clothing off
and he would violate me, beat
me up, and have sex with me.’
Obviously that was his way of
using her as an object, as

SEE page three

*

DOUBLE
STACKER

st retzull tfaybaney a tegee |
fateliteliepcparicil) Flagg tyayel Seegiill ey de tes



es
=
I
s
oa)
fab)
=
=
2
re
=
5)
a
S
=
‘o
=5
o
ira

applications
for national

programme

23-YEAR-OLD Police Constable Elvin Sanjay McClain is
shown leaving Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

A POLICE Constable accused of extortion was arraigned
in Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Constable Elvin Sanjay McClain, 23, of Garden Hills,
appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court
1, Bank Lane yesterday on the extortion charge.

It is alleged that McClain on Thursday, May 21, extorted
$1,100 from Stephanie Glinton knowing that he was not law-
fully authorised to do so. McClain, who was represented by
lawyer Romona Farquharson, pleaded not guilty to the
extortion charge.

Sgt Sean Thurston, the prosecutor, did not object to

SEE page 10



Seaboard
marines hold
anti-smuggling
exercises

SEABOARD Marines
conducted three joint anti-
smuggling exercises at its

Over 1,000

training

AS OF 5pm Tuesday

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

OBITUARIES

and RELIGION
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE








The Tribune =

=USA TODAY.

~.. Available at

The Paint Depot
Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875










per
REL uss

The Tribune launches
Passport to Paradise
Miss Universe edition

Felipé Major

president and managing
director of Kerzner
Bahamas Limited, receives
the latest Passport to Par-
adise Miss Universe edition
from The Tribune’s Jenny
Pinder, managing editor of
the magazine.

THE TRIBUNE has
launched the fourth edi-
tion of its Passport to Paradise magazine — Miss Universe
Edition — once more distributing it room-to-room at
Atlantis and nearby marinas, The Hilton, various hotels
on Cable Beach such as Sandals and the Sheraton and
high-end boutique hotels in the Out Islands.

This latest edition features interviews with Miss Uni-
verse 2008 Dayana Mendoza (Venezuela), Miss USA
Kristen Dalton as well as the Bahamas’ very own Kiara
Sherman and other Bahamian beauty queens.

There are also articles focusing on dining out in the
Bahamas, going green, beauty tips and the local upswing
in the real estate market.

Passport to Paradise magazine managing editor Jenny
Pinder says of the latest issue: “The Miss Universe edition
was a lot of hard work and fun. It was obvious we need-
ed to dedicate an entire issue to this prestigious once-in-
a-lifetime event.

“The opportunity to showcase the Bahamas to all the
world had advertisers jumping at the chance to be a part
of it.”

Assault charges withdrawn against
former MP and former union executive

ASSAULT charges were
withdrawn yesterday against
attorney and former MP
Keod Smith and former
Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union exec-
utive Basil McKenzie.

The charges stemmed from
an incident at Workers House
in May. Smith, 45, who is the
legal representative for the
BHCAWU executive coun-



=O) RS SEE page nine

some 1,100 applications had
been collected from Urban
Renewal Centres and the
Department of Labour
offices in New Providence
and Grand Bahama for the
National Training and
Empowerment Programme,
Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes said yesterday.

The programme was con-
ceived by government to

SEE page eight

loading dock compound on
West Bay Street yesterday.

Utilising a modified con-
tainer, which was outfitted
with a list of hidden com-
partments, security experts
showed personnel how to
conduct a seven-point
inspection of the unit
before it can be sealed and
shipped off to another des-
tination.

SEE page nine

Chamber of Commerce president
unofficially backs local lottery

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Chamber of Com-
merce’s President Khaalis
Rolle has unofficially come
out in support of legalizing a
local lottery, charging that the

Plaid Skirts Starting @

Plain Skirts Starting @

Jumpers Starting @
Whlte & Assorted Colours Shirts

& Blouses Starting
Monogram Shirts/blouses



NASSAU AND BAHAMAVISEANDS:

LEADING NEWSPAPER

debate surrounding this issue
needs to be raised above the
emotional “nonsensical” lev-
el.

Stressing that the entire
membership of the Chamber
has yet to be canvassed on the

SEE page 10


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Church, community leaders speak on marital rape law

Community and church leaders weigh
in on the proposed amendment to the
Sexual Offences Act which would
make marital rape illegal.

Janet Bostwick, first
woman elected as a Member
of Parliament in the Bahamas
and former Cabinet Minister

“T think it’s most definitely
long overdue. I can under-
stand the concern from cer-
tain bodies, particularly with





regard to the expression of
concern by certain pastors.
“Perhaps if they had sat in
my chair in which I sat for a
number of years as a female
lawyer and heard the horren-
dous stories of forced rape of
spouses; men forcing their
wives to do unnatural sexual

Colina General







Insurance Agency

WE ARE MOVING

To Our Valued Clients:








We wish to advise that Colina General
Insurance Agency will be relocating to







12 Village Road North

EFFECTIVE 4 AUGUST 2009.







You will

be able to make premium

payments at any of these Colina General






locations:

Oakes Field in the Nassau Guardian





Bldg;

Colinalmperial at Rosetta Street;
Bahama Life & Property located in the
Henry F. Storr Building on Mackey







Street;

And at our new location at 12 Village






Road North.

Our telephone number, 325-3809,
will remain the same.






MORE LOCATIONS
TO SERVE YOU BETTER!















acts and intercourse; forcing
them in circumstances where
the husband is inebriated, and
forcing them after informing
them that they have come
from being with some other
person, and demanding their
right.

“There’s a need for this act,
and certainly it’s meant to
cover instances where wives
may say ‘no’ when they don’t
mean it, but even a wife has
the right to say ‘no’.

“T believe that the thinking
goes back to the wives being
considered property, and I
don’t believe that was ever
intended by God.

“We are to treat each other
with respect and dignity and
concern, and I believe that if
some more full consideration
was given to (the amend-
ment), it will gain support.

“T think they are opposing
it because they are looking at
it as husband and wife being
one, and their bodies belong-
ing to each other, and a wife
in particular, belonging to her
husband.

“And it really has been
used to justify abuse so I’m
very pleased that the law is at
last being brought in.

“T believe it will grow to
where we respect each other
and treat each other as having
our own individual rights, and
that includes the right to say
‘no’.

“T have been so aware of
the concept and given legal
advice to women who have
suffered the greatest abuse
and sexual abuse, more hor-
rendous than pastors would
like to believe, of husbands
exercising their right.

“T cannot say that it’s pro-
lific, but I think it’s definitely
not as infrequent as one

Casual Wear

PU ase h3

ON Meee pela

The sign of great things to come!

Alacta Plus Advanced formulation is the only milk food

for growing children enriched with 34 nutrients,
such as iron, iodine and zinc, as well as DHA, ARA,
and Sialic Acid, which are integral building

blocks for the brain.

They'll go meh further in life

iy ad

SHERWIN
WILLIAMS.

Meadinhn
Awericdomals

With ColorSnapâ„¢, you can discover how coordinating
colors and bringing ideas to life is easier than you ever
imagined, Find a color you love, snap the photo and
receive the matching Sherwin-Williams paint color and

coordinating palette. And it's all FREE!

Vieit waew.sherwin.com for mone information.

would hope or expect. I total-
ly support this act.”

Bishop Simeon Hall, New
Covenant Baptist Church



“Tam always a bit reserved
when government makes any-
thing to do with family
because I think it’s most times
outside of the sphere of gov-
ernment’s jurisdiction, and at
the same time government
has the duty and right to pro-
tect its citizens.

“But I am questioning it
because so many times things
come before parliament with-
out there being any statistics.
I want to know if they have
had any statistics to say we
have 50, 100 or 20 women
who have been ravished by
their husbands - what is hap-
pening there? Is there some
parliamentarian with some
bitterness against his father?
I’m a little suspicious.

“When it comes to family
laws I want to protect our
women, I think they have not
been as protected as they
ought to be, but at the same
time we have to be careful
when walking down this road.
Even as I think about it, we
don’t need a whole lot of
women to be raped by their
husbands to protect them, we
should protect our women
anyway, so I would like to
have the widest discussion on
this.

“T don’t think parliamen-
tarians should do this kind of

eee
Us
ee UE
PHONE: 322-2157

thing. Rape is a heinous thing,
any kind of rape, and I want
there to be stronger laws on
marital counselling. If you
have to force yourself on
someone then that takes the
enjoyment out of it. I want
every woman in the Bahamas
to feel protected whether she
is single or married, but at the
same time we must be careful
because we have some devi-
ous women around the place.
So I think the widest discus-
sion should be held on this
and we should hear both
sides.

“T think I am more for it
than not, but I want us to be
careful that we are not open-
ing Pandora’s box, certainly
for women who ought not to
get back at a man and abuse
this law. It will be interesting
to see if anyone comes for-
ward with a case of this if it is
enforced.

“T think some more discus-
sion (is needed) and some-
times we need greater scien-
tific basis for these things.
And I would like to know
what is the motivation for this
(amendment).”

Dr David Allen, leading
psychiatrist

“T just feel that it’s part of
our development. Obviously
one has to make sure they
have a court system that
judges fairly, but I don’t see
how we can turn the clock
back - women have a sense of
their boundaries.

“The argument is for
women to always submit, but
men also have to be willing to
sacrifice themselves for their
partners.

“Part of the development
process is where people have
boundaries, within marriage
or outside of marriage. It is
the same thing for a teacher
and student, there are bound-
aries.

“We have to recognise that
boundary formation is devel-
oping around the world so if
you don’t recognise that and
you fly your airplane in this
hurricane you will crash.

“Women have rights, teach-
ers have rights, students have
rights, so how do you block
this kind of development and
still show love and respect for
each other?

“T don’t think we can stop
the development of people
having boundaries and this
developmental process.”

Ou FRAME

WINDOWS
JONESER RESISTANT

10 Years Tried and Proven

Call for your FREE quote or
Come visit our factory located on 74 Mount Royal Avenue, Nassau

TEL:

1-242-325-6633

FAX: 1-242-325-6638



ete UU ed

Preferred Customer Card

Want exclusive savings and simple

ee mise mms lis | ie

Pee Du PAM le]
and SAVE, Plus take acvantage of the FREE
eal eee ate Opeth g alm

eT ee sme eee

(Met tans and quarts excluded,)

Clever Duncombe,
Duo emg ite
organisation ‘Bahamian
Fathers for Children
aA Io Ce



“T believe if they are
looking at it from a health
perspective then I believe
women should be protect-
ed and anyone in general
should be protected. But I
think they are presenting
it in the wrong way.

“T don’t know if Sandra
Dean Patterson has been
overwhelmed with this
type of thing or if this is a
rampage against all men in
this country.

“The Child Protection
Act was passed in 2006 and
has yet to be enforced.
And when you look at the
cases from then until now
it’s horrendous. There
were over 700 reported
cases of child abuse in New
Providence alone in 2008,
and that doesn’t even
include the Family Islands.

“The government should
have a chart and a serious
priority list. Why is the
government moving ahead
and ignoring the fact that
children need to be pro-
tected?

“They are the most vul-
nerable of our entire soci-
ety and yet we don’t have
a Family and Child Pro-
tection Act and that is
where all this legislation
should stem from. To date
we are one of the few
countries left on the planet
that hasn’t taken any posi-
tive steps to protect chil-
dren.

“People are angry
because of the way they
are selling it (the amend-
ment), like it’s men versus
women, or women versus
men, but it shouldn’t be
like that - all legislation
should be gender neutral.
What about the homosex-
ual faction who are being
taken advantage of or sex-
ually abused?

“Marital rape can be a
reality when you look at
some of the cases. I have
known men who have tak-
en advantage of their
wives, who are living a rau-
cous and promiscuous life
and the wife may withdraw
from that for their own
protection.

“T think some stiff penal-
ties should be enforced
and be very clear and def-
inite for persons who
would use this legislation.
Rape is difficult to prove,
and even harder to prove
in a marital relationship,
so I don’t understand
where they are going.

“It’s going to be very dif-
ficult to prove, so I don’t
see the point.

“And in terms of this
legislation, I have some
reservations.

“T think these women,
these wives, who are being
raped should be protected,
but not the way that
they’re going about it, with
men against women and
women against men.

“We have much more to
say in respect to this,
because I question the sin-
cerity in this piece of leg-
islation at this point in
time when we don’t have
protection of children.

“It’s going to be very
interesting to see how they
present their position
when parliament recon-
venes on this Act because
there are many things on
this legislation that need
to be addressed.”



Visit Your Neighborhood are nnn Paint Store Today! © Prince Charles Drive: 324-5476 © Cable Beach (oid city Market Building) 327 -OO02
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

6 9 4

Don't classify forced (va Sections Jat Yout Hom

sex in non-estranged |o yack1
marriage as rape’

0 In brief

Man fined
$9,000 for
marijuana
possession

A MAN was fined
$5,000 yesterday after
being convicted on a mari-
juana possession charge.

Henry Smith, 28, was
charged with possession of
marijuana with intent to
supply. Smith was report-
edly found in possession of
30 pounds of marijuana
while at Congo Town in
South Andros on July 8,
2004.

Seized

The drugs, which were
reportedly in a suit bag,
were seized at the Congo
Town Airport.

Smith was convicted on
the drug charge following
the end of a trial yesterday.
He will have to serve a
year in jail if he fails to pay
the fine.

Smith was also bound
over to keep the peace.

He was represented by
lawyer Ian Cargill.

Marital rape:
A nation divided

FROM page one

opposed to a woman who
is his partner.”

Dr Dean-Patterson added:
“It’s important for us to
speak to the fact that sexual
violence is not acceptable
whether the person is a
stranger to you, a relative, a
girlfriend or boyfriend, or
husband or wife; you are
naming behaviour that is
unacceptable and wrong.”

The Crisis Centre psychol-
ogist spoke of women who
have been infected with
HIV because their promis-
cuous husbands refused to
wear a condom and forced
them to have sex.

And Mr Brennen said he
knows women who must
take medication for the rest
of their lives to treat sexual-
ly transmitted diseases
passed on by husbands who
forced them to have sexual
intercourse.

He said: “Wives are being
raped multiple times, some-
times every time they have
sex, and sometimes every
month.

“T have met many women
who have been raped by
their husbands, I meet them
every week. If I shared their
stories you would cry.”

Concern

But male callers contin-
ued to express concern over
the amendment as it could
allow women to abuse the
law and falsely accuse their
husbands of rape.

Mrs Butler-Turner said:
“People would rather back
down from saying they have
been raped because of the
way it’s perceived as
opposed to moving forward
with it. They will go and get
counselling, they will do
everything, but very few will
go to court.”

The law would ensure
protection for women and at
the same time ensure those
who abuse it would be
liable, the panel confirmed.

Fathers rights activist
Clever Duncombe said: “IT
think these women, these
wives, who are being raped
should be protected, but not
the way that they’re going
about it.

“People are angry because
of the way they are selling it
(the amendment), like it’s
men versus women, or
women versus men, but it
shouldn’t be like that — all
legislation should be gender
neutral.”

ee les
OR WL
NAMI

Tropical Exterminators
a AL



Punish it as
some other
crime, says
pastor

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FORCED sexual intercourse
within a non-estranged mar-
riage should not be classified
as rape as it is defined under
current law, but rather be pun-
ishable as some other crime,
Pastor Cedric Moss said yes-
terday.

The Kingdom Life Church
pastor has vowed to protect
women while remaining stead-
fast in his opposition to pro-
posed legislation that would
outlaw marital rape.

In a statement released yes-
terday, Mr Moss said he sup-
ports the passage of laws to
protect women from being
forced into any kind of sexual
activity against their will, be it
by their husband or a stranger.

Amendment

But he argued that the
amendment to the Sexual
Offences Act introduced last
week in parliament needs to be
given more thought and adjust-
ed as in its current state “it will
cause untold harm and may-
hem in marriages and families
in our country.”

He said he is concerned
about the way the amendment
would repeal current law that
states a husband can only be



Influential group

Sexual Offences Act

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net sex i

AN INELUENTIAL wom- in
en’s organisation has hit out at
opponents of plans to reform



Cedric Moss caused a storm of
controversy by telling Monday's
bune how ape we Sex- ny



charged with raping his wife if
the marriage is in termination
or separation, and the Attor-
ney General consents to the
charge.

The pastor said the results of
such a repeal would “provide
for the possibility of rape alle-
gations to be made and rape
charges to be brought in all
marriages, not just those in ter-
mination or separation.”

“Tt will provide for immedi-
ate rape charges to be brought
against all husbands whose
wives accuse them of rape with-
out the prior consent of the
Attorney General. To my mind,
it is important this protection
continues under the proposed
amendment in cases of non-
estranged marriages.”

He argued that wives who
are separated or in divorce pro-
ceedings need more protection
against unwanted sexual acts
from their husbands than
women who are in non-

Women hit out at
rape law pastor

condemns remarks on

Mrs Paul said a wife should
have the right to say “no”

HEADLINE NEWS: Wednesday's Tribune.









estranged marriages, but the
proposed amendment offers
them no special protection, he
said.

“With regard to unwanted
sexual acts being forced upon
wives in marriages that are not
in termination or separation,
while I believe such acts are
wrong and should be made ille-
gal, and punishable by amend-
ed legislation, I do not agree
with the proposed amendment
that seeks to call such unwant-
ed sexual acts rape.

“In that regard, I believe that
the definition of rape as it is
defined now under section
three of the current law should
not be changed, and therefore
any forced sexual acts on wives
by husbands in non-estranged
marriages should be punishable
as some other crime, perhaps
indecent assault, and not treat-
ed as if it were rape by a
stranger.”

Call for independent police complaints hotly

“MINISTER of National
Security Tommy Turnquest
must immediately take steps to
establish an independent body
to review complaints against
the police, PLP Chairman
Glenys Hanna-Martin demand-
ed yesterday.

Ms Hanna-Martin, who is
also MP for Englerston, said
that the statutory instruments
are provided for in the Police
Act which was passed in par-
liament several months ago, but
the body has yet to be brought
into force.

“This is a critical provision in
the legislation designed to
ensure transparency in the
exercise of police powers, bol-
ster the integrity of the Force
and engender public confi-
dence.

“The Royal Bahamas Police
Force is being grossly disad-
vantaged by the government’s
failure to bring the relevant
provisions into effect as there is
a real risk that public confi-
dence might be eroded in an
institution critical to our nation-
al well-being,” Ms Hanna-Mar-

Tommy mes

tin said in a press statement.

She pointed out that in the
last several months there have
been a number of deaths
involving the police, including
the shooting death of a minor.

“Most recently a 18-year-old
lost his life in circumstances
which have captured our
national attention and which
has left incredible grief in its
wake.”

The PLP chairman said that
Minister Turnquest must now
see that creating a modernised





Glenys Hanna-Martin

professional police force with
a mechanism to facilitate trans-
parency in the scrutiny of com-
plaints and concerns of the pub-
lic, will benefit the police while
at the same time bolstering
public confidence in the coop-
erative enterprise of eradicating
crime in our country.

The establishment of an
independent body to review
police complaints is now a mat-
ter of urgent priority and one
which the Bahamian people
require, she said.

Madeira St. ONLY Juty 13 - AUG 1

= STOCK

b Vebrkss

O/, OFF

* 20% OFF NEW OUTDOOR
FABRICS FROM BRAZIL

“EXCEPT NET ITEMS, VINYL, PLASTIC

5

Lamps, Mirrors,
\ Candleholders,
Vases etc.

ae Le Pain

aL

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Ra.[242] 322-3080 * Fax:[242] 322-5251

TS Crim ce

Sh!
Large Selection

Upholstery &
Drapery Fabrics



a



Nassau’s Premier Store

For 1s MSN DENS

Bayparl Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
email:info@colesofnassau.com

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THE Moat THOh0H RESTORATION & (CLeEAxTHO Eves, o@ THR ve 6 Ree!
AAS" s Oey PROrSoMAL, Coen Soon Cano & Ure sey Care §sTrs.

* Carpe. Uphokiey, Sone aad Matte Cheating &
Hesterahon Spectakst

® Prochon Cleaning Syaens romawes Deepa Hoeey
Soil, Haciena, Creu, Woiermurks aad Staines from
Carpeting & Punnivaire, revoring ua oo like mew
tia fraction of repbcemernt cral
Carpet, Sofa's, Lovescats, Chitra, Dining Chars, Cars.
Bows, Girowt. Tiles, Marble & Stone

* Perian Wool & Sik Caner Cleasing Specials

* Marble Polshing, Resndion & Care

* Word Ploor Beatenation

Authorized Stone Tech Profeisiosa! Connecti

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS

PHONE: 323-3083 or 323-1594
OWRY WE CAS 00 IT BAGS

* ama Geral idole

UU LOCAL ae CW PP

PROCES SVS TEM con)

Saati kate)

uewsnrieme ew [6 [245 [wn [is [ae [|
were we] |W [own [ran [a
TWECOULECTOR | 0s [05 [WH_| eso [0 [1000 |

eros [an] | wh [wa [ae J
frHEuoa TUT ct | 95 MM | ets | 0 |S |
racorn |» |3as [wn [on [ean [|
un por co0 [uo [wa wH_[ wt [|
aeons | [us| wa |r | wt
E16 uF EDWORNRS | a0|sas |] WH [| [a
Tienes [|u| WH | gos at [|
uso ce» [on [nn [0 [wn [ran [|

USE SOUR E: CaAD To Ase TRE TS AT Sb a GALE a Pe Ms: ta
AEN MTHEATIC ——weW! 115 | 305 | WA | et | a0 | 1ea0
THE COLLECTOR c | 495 | das | Ni | G05 | B40 | 1040

rome a [90 | 80.| WA | | 25 12s
a I
rion 6 [90 | 95 | WA | 60 20] 100
umeromeh 1 [80 [WR aso 1-[ Wh | YO
ef td

380-FLIX


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Tough decision on health for Obama

WASHINGTON — After months of talk,
decision time is nearing for President Barack
Obama on health care.

Bipartisan Senate negotiators are weak-
ening some of his top priorities, leaving the
president with a difficult choice: He can give
ground, and implore disappointed liberals
to go along with him. Or he can try to ram
through a Democratic bill with his wishes
intact, infuriating Republicans.

His eventual decision could be a pivotal
moment in his presidency. Remaking health
care is Obama's top domestic priority. He
wants to expand coverage, contain costs,
make insurance more competitive and
change the way doctors and hospitals are
compensated. Liberals, noting that Democ-
rats control the House, Senate and White
House, see no need for serious compromis-
es. Some moderates and independents, how-
ever, say a one-party solution would under-
mine public confidence in the plan and poi-
son the atmosphere in Congress for the rest
of Obama's term.

For now, the president continues to hold
his cards close, giving lawmakers more time
to seek a compromise that could attract some
Republican votes. But many Democrats are
impatient, ready for Obama to insist that
Republicans either endorse the main ele-
ments of his proposal or step aside as a
Democrats-only bill is enacted.

"He's going to have to choose pretty
soon,” Sen. Lindsey Graham, a South Car-
olina Republican, said Tuesday.

If Obama decides to run roughshod over
the Republicans, Graham said, "he'll ruin
his administration” by destroying his image
as a political healer under a big tent.

But many Democrats want Obama to
stand firm on his campaign proposals.

"Because we want three Republicans to
come along on this, we betray what the
American people want?" said Sen. Sherrod
Brown, D-Ohio. "I don't think so."

The outlines of Obama's approaching
choice are taking shape. Bipartisan nego-
tiators on the Senate Finance Committee
— the panel making the biggest effort to
gain support from both parties — are start-
ing to show details of their thinking. In sev-
eral crucial respects, they fall well short of
Obama's health care proposals.

For instance, Obama's campaign called
for large employers either to provide their

SHirst Baptist Church
289 Market St. South * P.O. Box N-7984 « Nassau, Bahamas

es

“Everyone must face God

workers with health insurance or pay into a
national fund to subsidize insurance for low-
income people. The Senate Finance plan
would require "a much more modest" con-
tribution from employers than would Oba-
ma's "pay or play” scenario, said Sen. Kent
Conrad, D-N.D., one of the key negotia-
tors. Obama also proposed to help pay for
health care by trimming tax deductions tak-
en by high-income earners. Lawmakers
rejected the idea months ago, and the Senate
Finance plan offers no alternative means of
extracting new revenue from wealthy people.

Most troubling to many liberal Democ-
rats, the Senate Finance plan does not call
for a robust government-run option for buy-
ing health insurance. It calls for an insur-
ance cooperative, but liberals such as Sen.
Bernard Sanders, a Vermont Independent,
say that's unacceptable.

"I think we have the votes to pass a strong
bill," he said, which would include a public
option for health insurance that is compa-
rable to Medicare in its reach and cost con-
trols.

If Republicans don't agree, Sanders said,
then Senate Democrats can use a strong-
arm tactic called "reconciliation" to pass
major elements of Obama's plan without
any GOP votes.

Asked if he would like Obama to speak
out more forcefully for his campaign pro-
posals, Sanders answered: "Yeah."

White House adviser David Axelrod said
it's too early for Obama to fully endorse the
Senate Finance Committee's bipartisan
approach or the liberals’ call to stand firm.

"This is the legislative process," Axelrod
said Tuesday. "The important thing is to
keep the process moving forward."

"There's no doubt that what we'll have at
the end of the day will not fully satisfy any
major player in this process,” he said. The
most important goal, he said, is to improve
the nation's health care system.

"Everyone is going to have to give a little
to get there,” Axelrod said.

But in a political system dominated by
Democrats, some liberals say a down-the-
middle approach will give conservatives and
Republicans more influence than they have

(This article was written by Charles
Babington, Associated Press Writer — c.2009.



THE TRIBUNE



Impressed by the
professionalism of
PMH doctors, nurses

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I would be grateful if you
would allow me to convey
thanks via your “Letters” col-
umn to a large number of per-
sons, and at the same time
make a positive comment
about our public health sys-
tem.

Some weeks ago my wife
had to be admitted into the
Princess Margaret Hospital as
a result of an allergic reaction
to a medication she has used
for many years. The doctors
felt she should be monitored
during the change to a new
medication. We were greatly
impressed by the profession-
alism of the doctors (espe-
cially Dr. Orlander) and the
nurses. Each and every per-
son involved in her care,
including those who kept the
room sanitized, was pleasant
and courteous while carrying
out his or her duties. They
all brightened her stay. Sadly,
in our modern world far too
many persons feel that once

LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



they “do their job”, “the man-
ner of their bearing” doesn’t
matter. The staff at PMH,
however, personified what
our national anthem
expressed and one felt it had
become a part of their nature
to care for others. The “man-
ner of their bearing” was
exemplary.

Simultaneous with this
experience, one of my broth-
ers had spent many weeks in
PMH, first in one of the male
medical wards and then in
The Eye Wing. He recently
passed away while in the Eye
Wing — the result of a battle
against cancer that spanned
many years. The professional
care of the doctors and nurses
had extended his life for some
six years after the initial
surgery, and with God’s help,
had not only given him extra

years, but years of quality liv-
ing. Through the terminal
months of his life, the doctors
(especially Dr. Chin) and the
nurses displayed total profes-
sionalism and a sense of car-
ing. Through his last 48 hours,
the nurses stood by us, and at
his passing, one would have
thought they were part of the
family.

There continues to be a
need for a new hospital build-
ing — and for many more
beds — but I take this oppor-
tunity of commending the
doctors, the nurses and the
ancillary staff. I thank them
for experiences that have
heightened my pride in being
Bahamian and knowing that
we have a medical system of
which we can be proud — in
spite of the challenges caused
by limited facilities, and lim-
ited funding.

CHARLES A.
SWEETING,
Nassau,

July 23, 2009.

Ministry of Works on JFK will
show you road plans, madam

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Watching the ZNS Evening News last Thurs-
day, July 23, 2009, I was somewhat perturbed by
the young lady in the shocking pink suit, com-
plaining about not being able to get any infor-
mation on the new road being cut through from
Thompson Boulevard/John F. Kennedy Drive
to West Bay Street — Corridor 18, I believe.
She claimed she has been trying to find these

details for a considerable time.

Madam, on July 20, 2009, I called into the
Lands and Surveys office on East Bay Street,
asking for just such information, the lady who

So I called into them and was shown the dia-
grammatic plan and an aerial photograph and

at rest.

was able to ask some questions, putting my mind

When I asked if I could have a copy, I was
told to call back last Friday, of course I forgot to
do that but have spoken with the department
today and I can collect tomorrow July 28. This is
something I had meant to do for a while, as I do
live in the Vista Marina Subdivision, but some-

thing else always took precedence, until last

served me was most apologetic but admitted that

they did not have the plans I was looking for.
However, she was able to tell me I could get
them directly from the Ministry of Public Works.

Can we really risk
Waiting 10 years?

EDITOR, the Tribune.

Re:10-Year Plan for
Education
The Tribune, July 8, 2009

We may do well to remem-
ber that Parkinson’s Law
from 1957 is still very much
alive and well: “Work
expands to fill the time avail-
able for its completion”. Can
we really risk waiting 10 years
for the MOE to develop and
implement a “national plan
for education in the
Bahamas”?

KEN W KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,
July 16, 2009.

DON STAINTON |

Nassau,

July 27, 2009.

week. So, madam, if you are truly interested,
visit the Ministry of Works on JFK, they will
happily show you the plans.

A RESIDENT

Bahamas can’t afford a slip-up

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Out of curiosity I went on
the “Miss Universe” web-
site — if at this stage of the
schedule run-up this is all
the ‘official’ website has for
the Atlantis contest then the
Bahamas are certainly get-
ting the rough end of the
stick.

Can’t find out who will be
attending as contestants —
no schedule — no list of
events but of course they are
trying to sell tickets like you

can’t believe. If tourism is
officially in this they had
better clean up the act that
the Trump organisation is
putting on as this is shabby
to say the least.

The Bahamas can’t afford
a slip up on this one!

Only a month to go and
this is what you can’t find
out!

MASHA WILSON
Nassau,
July 12, 2009.

=su0ry

PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-6160

Free Estimates

ALL ALUMINUM PATIO ROOF OR
SCREENED ROOM

as Saviour or Judge.”
SUNDAY SERVICES
fam, #:00am, 11:18am

PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS JP 0.0.
Marr Officer, Gourmallor, iercaasor
et S-8452 «909-5798
Fax: 32-0 Hi390-001

TEL

MAKING WAY FOR
NEW STOCK
50% OFF ALL

SHOES & BAGS

Store Hours:
Monday - Friday 9:30 am - 5:30 pm
BYE
Saturday 9:30 am - 6:00 pm

ROBEY CO MN nas
(Old House of Music Building) next to

StI GRD ei ey |

Thank You For Shopping With Us!

eel.
GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTR

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre ~"* =
a Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448

‘ALL ALUMINUM CAR PORT
__ Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1976


THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



Bahamian charged in US in
connection with drug deal

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A BAHAMIAN man has
been charged in Florida in con-
nection with a drug deal and a
shooting incident.

Courtney Kirk Alexander
Davis, 23, of Freeport, was
charged in West Palm Beach last
week with aggravated battery
with a deadly weapon, armed

robbery and carrying a con-
cealed firearm.

Davis and another man, Kar-
ruan Parker, 26, were arrested
for their alleged involvement in
a drug deal on May 4, the West
Palm Beach Post reported.

According to the Palm Beach
County Sheriff's report, the vic-
tim, Kiplyn Box, met three men
for an alleged marijuana sale on
the evening of May 4 in an
industrial park at 7153 70th Dri-

ve North, near the South Florida
Fairgrounds.

It is alleged that Box met with
Parker, Davis and a third man to
sell them some drugs. Davis
allegedly pulled out a silver
handgun and began firing at him.

As the three men ran outside
with the drugs to their car, shots
were fired at them. Davis was
shot in the face.

Police arrested Davis on May
7, three days after he was shot.

May 11. He was formally
charged with attempted felony
murder, armed robbery and vio-

Parker, 26, was arrested on __ lation of probation.
Davis and Parker are being
held without bail at the Palm

Beach County Jail. een aaey. VTS



APS
RIMES

JUST WEST OF CITY MARKET, TONIQUE DARLING HIGHWAY

ee eee ee ie St

‘Pillar of the community’
Julian Alleyne remembered

THE late Julian Alleyne, a retired
Tribune and former bank employ-
ee, was yesterday remembered by
his family and friends as a “pillar of
his community.”

Mr Alleyne, who died at the age of
81 of a heart attack in Doctors Hos-
pital earlier this week, was consid-
ered a father figure by many in the
neighbourhood of Millers Clove.

He began his career at the
Bahamas Electric Company, where
he worked in the monetary exchange
department, he then transferred to
the Central Bank and also worked
part-time as a paper delivery man
for the Tribune for over 30 years.
Among the many jobs he held during
his lifetime, he also served as driver to former
Minister of Finance Carlton Francis.

His daughter, Sandra Sears, yesterday told
The Tribune that her father was an imposing
figure in his community, a strict disciplinarian
who was respected and loved.

“All of the kids in the neighborhood would
say ‘there goes Mr Alleyne’ when they saw
him. My father was the type of gentleman
that believed no matter, whether you had a
father or not, that he would step in and be that
father figure,” another daughter, Sheila, said.

Dress to impress in your
hat, shoes, accessories or

aCe Pee dis



A lifelong Anglican, he first
attended St Bernards Church and
then St Agnes.

In his community, Mr Alleyne
impacted the lives of many people.

“My dad was always happy serving
other people,” his daughter Sheila
said. “He didn’t show much emo-
tion, but knew deep down how he
felt. My dad made an impact on this
island by just being the person who
he was.”

Mr Alleyne’s former colleagues at
The Tribune all remember him as a
nice man with a big pipe in his
mouth. “He was a character,” said
Robert Carron, company president.

“He was always a pipe-smoking
Barbadian guy, always had a joke, always
laughing, he always had a story about some-
thing and he was always complaining that the
paper didn’t go out on time, he was always
complaining the paper made him late for din-
ner. He was in charge when he came in.”

Mr Alleyne is survived by his five children,
Stacy, Sandra, Sharon, Stanley, and Sheila,
as well as by numerous grandchildren and
nieces and nephews.

Funeral arrangements have yet to be
announced.

5 TRUCKUM

that special dress from

ORALEE’S FASHIONS

Mackey Street « Telephone: 393-0744
ee ge ML mmr lta



UO Te Ta

FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS

PHONE: 327-6464
re

BE PREPARED THIS HURRICANE SEASON






HURRICANE SEASON IS HERE!

Dh

SD vac rotor for the
hi Dou hes) ee Aan or
dry. Indoors ar outdoors.

Ae o

exten, § 5/9

Ierauinian
bakers aad
fiberglass bitiders:
eth enteral

48! :

14/3 2 100-FI.
Extension Cord

) dep, Sivan ba
aS diy Feary, Eat Wrecked Co



NASSAU: 677.2100

www.cbsbahamas.com






~~ Get prepared...

———
Bahama Shatter oo &

===
Make your home
look good. and

protactad!

Roll Down Shutter

With the flip of a Switch
Ingiant hurricane protection



Fire Escape 24-In. Poly Leaf
Ladder Rake

2 Showy, a fant tiny SS res, Pebpropgionn bead bs
ina inti Pally OSES pupae gine ciaciahedl in
wa rbd, pety--o

eras i ome piece. 4-f weed
caren he rahe

7 = SKU




72 Voll 1M-in,
Cardlers
Sernwidiiar
Adah eb Te
hare. Al Bi aed

120 Volt 7-14-In,

reular Saw
1 arg. 24 HP, 4 a
WAL boty a ove ie

me Pei bee {8 oath corsics Shade ord
nest pode) ad hints wach, (TI)
ab HN)

. with
CBS
BAHAMAS

BAHAMAS

COMMONWEALTH BUILDING SUPPLIES



S HHH! Don’t Tell Anyone,

Our

"O” down

Pel MMM:
for

Government
Workers

Celery elds}
Batelco Employees

(OSE TM OCT eee) 8)

Of Pre-Owned Cars

aa
=f)
* Honda Accord
"Honda Civic
‘Honda Odyssey
* Nissan Cefiro
* Nissan Sunny
* Toyota Camry
* Toyota Corolla
* Toyota 8-Seater Vans

eR Gee
Ford ee errs)

FAX: (242) 361-1136

Visit our Website: www.autohl.com

“IN-HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE”

Rosetta St.

Colors:
Fuschia
Blue
Red
Yellow
Black
Orange
Silver
White
Gold
Bronze
Green

Ph: 325-3336


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamasair refutes the police's ‘no report filed hy Bahamasair allegation PLP Senator calls

for open debate
on Arawak Cay

Challenge to Minister of Environment

BAHAMASAIR chiefs last
night hit out at claims that the
airline never filed a report with
the police on a credit card fraud
which conned the company out
of $400,000.

Managing Director Henry
Woods expressed his disap-
pointment with the Nassau
Guardian for failing to “get the
facts” from executive manage-
ment, all of whom he said were
in place on Monday July 27,
2009, contrary to what the arti-
cle suggested.

He said: “This process start-
ed more than 18 months ago,
and from that time to now, at
each step of the way, they have

kept the police informed and
have seen some recovery of
funds and cancellation of tick-
ets through these efforts.
“While we acknowledge that
some of the victims in this case
have not been very cooperative
in coming forward, in cases
where they have cooperated
with us, we have provided the
police with all of the informa-
tion and have had excellent
results.”

Mr Woods added that in
June 2009, executive manage-
ment at the airline made a
request for a meeting with the
officer in charge of Commer-
cial Crime to give Bahamasair

« ANDRE},
SCHOOL °

SA

an update on the cases reported
to them.

“We “Bahamasair” were
informed that the officer was
going on vacation and would
not be back until July 2, 2009.
He would meet with Bahama-
sair upon his return.

Surprise

“Imagine our surprise” said
Mr Woods, “when we learned
that during his absence a press
conference was held by Inspec-
tor Sandra Miller regarding
credit card fraud at Bahama-
sair. “During this press release,

Inspector Miller said Bahama-
sair was involved in a Nigerian
Scam and was out some
$400,000. Bahamasair had pre-
viously provided this figure to
the Officer In charge of Com-
mercial Crimes. While we were
not shocked that the amount
was revealed, we were shocked
that the police seemed to know
who the perpetrators of the
crime was, but was not forth-
coming with this information
to Bahamasair.

“After this press conference
we once again requested a
meeting with the Commercial
Crime Unit and after much
waiting and complaining we
were finally able to meet with
three officers of that unit on
Friday July 24. During this
meeting we also updated the
officers on matters that would
have transpired since we last
spoke with them at the begin-
ning of June. As a result of this
meeting held just Friday past,
we find it difficult to understand
this statement made by Super-
intendent Ellsworth Moss of
the Central Detective Unit.”

Mr Woods said he takes this
time to thank the police for
their assistance, but said it is
regrettable that such statements
would be made by such a senior
officer, particularly after they
would have met only three days

PLP SENATOR Jerome
Fitzgerald yesterday chal-
lenged Minister of Environ-
ment Dr Earl Deveaux to an
open debate on the govern-
ment’s reasons for the relo-
cation of the container port
and the extension of Arawak
Cay.

Claiming the minister is
“avoiding” the myriad of
issues relating to the venture,
Senator Fitzgerald said that
Dr Deveaux is now attempt-
ing to muddy the waters by
talking about an EIA study
prepared on the dredging of
Nassau Harbour.

“Our questions related to
the ETA on the extension of
Arawak Cay. Why has the
government ignored the 2005
Environmental Impact
Assessment which ranked

EARL DEVEAUX



port? Why have they failed
to release the October 2007
Ecorys report which stated
that the southwest port was
the best location, a report
received by Dr Deveaux and

Arawak Cay as the sixth least
favourable location out of sev-
en for the relocation of the

ate ae Nea f

UE UE aes cL ae
Maintenance Workers / Helpers

Te eee ee ene

School Nurse - one year temporary position
StAndrew’s School, the International School of The Bahamas,
requires a School Nurse for the 2009 - 2010 school year.
All applications must include a written letter of application, full
details of degrees, nursing qualifications and experience as
well as the names of two relevant referees.

the Deputy Prime Minister
the Minister of Foreign
Affairs, Mr Brent Symon-
ette,” Mr Fitzgerald said in a
press statement.

With so many questions
and “so little answers”, Mr
Fitzgerald said that he has
attempted on many occasions
to invite the government to
be “open and transparent” on
the extension of Arawak Cay
and the relocation of the port.

“Three months ago on
April 30, 2009, I gave notice
of a resolution in the Senate
to debate the extension to
Arawak Cay and the port
relocation, and to date noth-
ing, not even an acknowledg-
ment by the government.

“T therefore challenge Dr
Earl Deveaux and the gov-
ernment to an open debate at
any venue, at any time, where
he and the government are
prepared to answer the ques-
tions raised by myself and
many Bahamians and come
clean in an open and trans-
parent manner,” he said.

e SEE PAGE SEVEN

ago and agreed a position on
this matter.

All applications must be received at the
school by 3:00pm on Friday, 7" August and
should be addressed to Mrs Sharon E Wilson,
The Principal. Applications received after that date will
not be considered. (Please note that access to the school
for deliveries is through the Nassau East North entrance
during the summer months)

RSME eel ee Oe De

Be Re AE REPO RSet RD TNT eh

inforostad persons should AV in an application at our Head Office
on Harold Road ov at the Alport Store

(Oomestic Departures Section),
Mo phone calls plpase,

"Plazes ote that fhe os ie aniry level pasion

Deadline is Friday, August Tth, 2009

FOCOL HOLDING

CHAIRMAN'S REPORT









FOCOL HOLDINGS LID
— - 7 7 CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
For The Quarter Ended April 30, 2009 [2 $000)
oe April 30, 2000 April 30, 2005
The Directors of FOCOL Holdings Limited
4 fs ‘ 1
[FOCOL) are pleased to present results ee = aaa 4 __ 1458
for the quarter énded Agril 30, 200%, Met Sharehoakierns” equity a7.13a
Income available te common
Tatal liailities & shorehalders’ equity 5 114.184 § 134,338

shareholders for the nine monihs ended
Ajoril 30, 2009 wos $8.950.205 compared

to $9,330,152 last year, CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME



(B $000)
oe . . Proanihs ended FF rmanihs ended
FOECOL has been oble fo maintain an ; April 30, 2008
consistent eamings in a very difficult oo ae
> Sole & revenues 5 710.451 5 gor Are
anvironment proving the redlience and
. Pn . 2 (Cost of sales | 78d peeB ee
sustainability of our business. Despite - | 7 ins :
the high cost of fuel and other goods Income Tram aperations 17,424 41,200
and services. We expect to report qa Markeling, administrative and general 19.394) (la200)
Depreciation { 1494) | LaF]
. ; Fingnmce cost | S20) i 1 232]
successful year. We hove strengthened Olher income 7H a
Our balance sheet ourng the year Our
cash position is strong and we hove Met Income Or F2 1,082
, , Preference share divigdenck ( 142) | 752)
been able to conteal receivables in a
cificult time. We hove also been able . : - —
/ Nel income ovalable to common shorehalders 5 8,950 5 9430
to reduce long term debt by more than
000 I sinc © start of th 500 _ . - ;
$4,000,000 since the start of the fiscal Basic: earnings per share 5 O28 5 02
year
I rie pagcey F. muri rel
Our Directors, management and staff Dividends per share bs 0.07 5 00a

remain committed to seeking every
qvenve to contribute ta the growth of
FOCOL.

Copies of a full set of the unaudited financial statements can be obtained fram Stephen Adderley



adder yefocaloom), al the Freeg-art Gl Company locoted on Queens Highway, Freeport

nie i
off RP Ro Grand Bahama, Monday through Friday from #30 AM TO S900 PR.
# a

Sir Albert J. Miller
Chairman & President


THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 7



Minister defends plans

to move container

THE opposition to Arawak
Cay as the location for the new
container port, said Environ-
ment Minister Dr Earl
Deveaux, is based on a set of
“peculiar interests that will be
derailed” if the port is moved
to Arawak instead of Clifton.

He said the number of
Bahamians who will benefit
both at the Fish Fry and from
the port relocation to Arawak
is significant.

“The economic transforma-
tion in the change of owner-
ship of shipping is equally sig-
nificant,” he said, as is the
opportunity to renovate and
revitalize downtown Nassau.

Senator Jerome Fitzgerald,
who has led the PLP charge
against the relocation of the
container port to Arawak Cay
instead of Clifton as planned
under the PLP administration,
has challenged Dr Deveaux to
an open debate on govern-
ment’s reasons for the reloca-
tion. (See story page 6). He
has called the move “secre-
tive” and “criminal,” and
claims it only serves special
interest groups. On July 16,
Mr Fitzgerald said he was
investigating legal options that
would possibly halt govern-
ment’s extension of Arawak
Cay until there is full tans-
parency and accountability.

“When the issues first sur-
faced about the Nassau Har-
bour dredging, I wondered
about the motives,” said Dr
Deveaux. “The EIA for the
harbour and its scheduled start
was a matter which had been
in the public domain for some
time. At no time was the issue
of Saunders Beach raised as a
concern in respect of the har-
bour dredging. The only con-
cern raised regarding Corri-
dor 18 of the New Providence
Road Improvement Project
and the likely noise impact on
Vista Marina was raised
months ago by Dr Madeline
Sawyer. Yet persons say they
have heard nothing and knew
nothing. The plans for the Cor-
ridor were announced in a

famaung AIT
Spacial Price
$55.00

Earl Deveaux: Opposition to change
of location ‘based on peculiar
interests that will be derailed’

public ceremony with the
Police band playing,” said Mr
Deveaux.

In a letter to the Editor on
page 4 of today’s Tribune a
Vista Marina resident said that
for anyone who is interested
a copy of the new road being
cut through from Thompson
Boulevard/John F Kennedy
drive to West Bay Street —
Corridor 18 — is available at
the Ministry of Works.

Mr Deveaux said that while
one cannot minimize the effect
of the Corridor's proposed
location on a particular indi-
vidual or home; the clear pub-
lic good with respect to the
road improvement, enhanced
beach access, parking and traf-
fic flow is evident for all impar-
tial observers to see. It was
and remains irresponsible to
raise unwarranted public
alarm about the destruction of
Saunders Beach, when the
whole intent is to restore the
dune, rehabilitate the site and
enhance public access.”

“The next alarm,” said the
Environmental Minister, “was
Arawak Cay port relocation.
Again this was the basis of
ongoing discussions between
the government and various
shipping operators for a num-
ber of years.

“The Arawak Cay Port
relocation was discussed a
number of times and publicly
announced by the Prime Min-
ister. [spoke extensively about
it while at Ministry of Public
Works and subsequently at the
Ministry of The Environ-
ment,” said Mr Deveaux..

“T could not help but con-
clude a political slant having
regard to Mr Fitzgerald's inter-
est. The harbour dredging and

New Providence road
improvement projects is Min-
istry of Public Works projects.
The EIA for both have always
been available. It is custom-
ary for BEST to publish all
EIAS for projects on its web-
site.

“Regarding the release of
documents. I did so to demon-
strate a level of hypocrisy and
way of thinking. When some-
thing is proposed by the FNM
it is often objected to by the
PLP on the basis of catering
to ‘special interest’. The land
acquisition alleged and com-
pleted around the South West
Port subsequent to the PLP
Government announcing its
intent to locate a port there is
the best barometer of ‘special
interest.’ A check of the land
holdings and the time of the
acquisitions will reveal some
peculiar inclinations. The
mindset of ‘entitlement’ and
‘my time’ best illustrates the
true underlying reasons for the
public political posturing
under the guise of the envi-
ronment.”

Mr Deveaux referred to the
health concerns at the airport,
raised by former tourism min-
ister Obie Wilchcombe, and
published in The Nassau
Guardian on Monday.

“The baseline study was
done in 2007 by the Nassau
Airport Development Com-
pany (NAD) to compile the
scope of remediation required
to improve the airport,” said
Mr Deveaux. “The issues were
there for many years. The
required EIA is under review.
The concerns, couched in a
series of questions, could have
been directed to BEST,
DEHS or myself, however,

yf- I.

Cellular & ae

Simmer

LG Cookie
Special Price
$279.00

MADNESS
SALE

Motorola ViI90
Special Price
$55.00

AY)

Unlocking & Reparing

All Cell EONS

BlackBerry
Spacial Price
$275.00
(All colors)

atest software 3. 0 Pa $50. 00

@o°

Motorola C139

Special Price GD
ek — a

feCoconut Grove Plaza-Coconut Grove

,

Nokia 1200
Special Price
$50.00

on the completion of has 10 day course with the People to People Programme,
Washington School af World Siecdies at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore
Marland. Dante's Credit Completion Report in the Leadership Summit Course noted that

Dante completed all assignments, incheding apportioned research; developed the wea for
the project handout and; was a supporting member of his team which won the academic

contest against 3 other good teams. Dante enters the | lih grade at Queen's College in

September and received awards in Music and Spanish in Grade 10, Keep inupl

From purenis: Dante and Cheryl Baceard
GCramiparcnts: Lacita and Patricia Bazard and Stella Major

brothers, Agents, Uneles ancl Consus.

port

EARL DEVEAUX



they are published on Mon-
day in glaring headlines,
intended to spread alarm. It is
simply not responsible.

“Having regard to the many
times the various projects have
been in the public domain,”
said Mr Deveaux, “Iam ata
loss to understand where we
have acted secretly with
respect to Harbour dredging,
road improvement or even the
proposed port relocation.

“T released the ‘four year
old’ information to demon-
strate a very current way of
thinking; the desire of a group
of politically connected
Bahamians to control a vital
piece of real estate. The oppo-
sition to Arawak Cay is based
on a set of peculiar interests
which will be derailed if the
Port goes there.”

“IT do not minimize the con-
cern of people living in Vista
Marina or Rock Crusher or
any where along the corridors
and we may have erred in con-
tinuing to dialogue with them,
but not out of a desire to be
secretive.

“The Town Meetings are
scheduled to give interested
members of the public updates
on the projects being under-
taken.

“They should have been
held long ago.”

El-squire

Men's Wear

hy
as

MEN'S WEAR ONLY,

Boys Clothing Sizes 10-18

Mall at Marathon 304-7470
Harbour Bay 394-7470

OPEN CAST AUDITIONS
FOR DREAMER’ A Bahamian,
feon TV Series Drama
Auguseist, 2009 @ St. Johns College”
1:00 pm to 3:30 pm

MALE 30's to 40's

Could be Balding (Not A Must)
Dark Skinned

Averaga Haight & Weight

MALE, Early to Mid-Tean
Average Height to Tall
Brown Stcin of Light Brown S&in

MALE, Mid Teen
Tall MALE, 2 TO 5 Years
Dark Brown Skin Brown of Light Brown Skin

FEMALE, 20's Ip 20's
Dark Skinned
Average Weight

FEMALE, Early to Mid Teens
Brown or Light Brown Siin
Average Weight

YOU COULD BE A STAR!!! GO FOR ITI!!!
For More Infomation Call 428-1287 or email:
bahamasdreamer gmail.com



NOTICE

Early diagnosis and treatment

of cancer is critical.

lf you or your loved ones have questions about
this disease, there are answers.

The Cancer Centre Bahamas at Centreville Medical
Pavilion will be hosting individual cancer clinics with
two of the world's most renowned specialists on
Monday, August 3rd. The clinics are open to the public.

The Hon. Prof. Dr. Arthur Porter
PC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FAAMA

Dr. Porter serves as Managing Director of The Cancer
Centre and Director of Radiation Oncology. He is also

the current Director General

and CEO of McGill

University Health Centre and author of more than 300
articles on cancer research.

Dr. Karol Sikora

MA, MBBCh, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM

Dr. Sikora is the Director of Medical Oncology at The
Cancer Centre. He also serves as the Dean of Britain's
first independent Medical School at the University of
Buckingham and is the author of the most widely-used
cancer textbook in graduate medical school in the
United Kingdom.

The Cancer Centre Bahamas is one of only two
medical facilities outside the U.S. certified by the
American College of Radiation Oncology (ACRO)
and the only non-U.S. facility in the Western
Hemisphere to qualify for ACRO certification.

For more information,
Centreville Medical Pavilion

please contact: 502-9610.
e 72 Collins Avenue


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

Clanks

BACK*TO*SCHOOL

Over 1,000
applications
for national
training
programme

FROM page one

help train displaced workers.

It is envisioned that at the
end of this programme indi-
viduals will have acquired
new skills in those vocational
areas that are most often
requested by employers
through the Department of
Labour thereby making them
more marketable, eager and
ready to embrace the job mar-
Ket.

Nearly $250,000 has been
allocated for the programme
in the budget of the Depart-
ment of Labour.

The programme will offer
training opportunities for one
thousand persons utilizing the
College of The Bahamas and
The Bahamas Technical and

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





The private sector has been extremely supportive of this initiative and has committed some coun-
terpart funding towards the implementation of the programme.

Sub-committees comprised of individuals in the private and public sectors have been established
in both New Providence and Grand Bahama and charged with the responsibility of developing cri-
teria for the selection of persons to be enrolled in the programme and advising the committee as
to the courses to be conducted at the two institutions.

The members of the subcommittee are as follows:

NEW PROVIDENCE

Mr Khaalis Rolle - Chairman, president,
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce

Dr Pandora Johnson - College of the
Bahamas

Alphaeus R. Forbes - Ministry of Labour
and Social Development

Iva Dahl - The Bahamas Technical Voca-
tional Institute

John Pinder - National Congress of Trade
Unions

Marisa Smith - Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration/ Bahamas Employers Confederation

Dorothy Godet - Department of Labour

Charles Hunt - Consultant, Ministry of
Labour and Social Development

Representative - Trade Union Congress

Representative - Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil.

Other members of the New Providence
committee:

Allan Strachan - Undersecretary

Brian Nutt - BECON

Thomas Bastian - TUC

John Pinder - NCTUB

Rev Patrick Paul - Christian Council
Rev Victor Cooper - Christian Council

The programme is geared craft.

GRAND BAHAMA

Tryone Gibson - Deputy Director of
Labour, chairman.

Greg Moss - Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce

Leslie Lightbourne - Grand Bahama Pow-
erline Staff Union

Malvese Capron - Freeport Harbour Con-
tainer Port.

Mervin Wright - Grand Bahama Port

Authority Workers Union (TUC)

Johns Curtiss - Bahamas Public Service
Union (NCTUB)

Bishop Sobig Kemp - President, Grand
Bahama Christian Council

Elliott Thompson - Bahamas Hotel Cater-
ing and Allied Workers Union

Tirzh Carey - Urban Renewal Programme
Jennifer Ellis - Urban Renewal Programme
Dr Coralee Kelly - College of the Bahamas

Cheryl Marshall-Campbell - The Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Institute

Fred Delancey - Consultant

Geneva Rutherford - Grand Bahama Port
Authority

Agnes McIntosh - Penthouse Investments



Confederation, Trade
Unions, the Bahamas Cham-

Vocational Institute (BTVI)
as learning centres.

BU ES RRR LTS fell 3
CLOSING SALE

Rivet Rite Shelving, Gondolas,
Glass Shelves, 2 & 4 Arm Display

towards training unem-
ployed persons in a range of
areas such as masonry, basic
carpentry skills, landscaping,
heavy equipment operating,
housekeeping, accounting,
diesel mechanics, nail tech-
niques, computer applica-
tions and straw and shell

A steering committee was
established on June 8, 2009,
comprising representatives
from the Ministry of Labour
and Social Development, the
College of the Bahamas, the
Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BTVD,
the Bahamas Employers

ber of Commerce and the
Bahamas Christian Council.

The course structure will
be designed as an “intro to
course” which will provide
participants with basic and
functional exposure to per-
form in an entry level capac-

ity subsequent to the suc-
cessful completion of the
programme.

Courses will be standard
offerings at COB and BTVI.

Non-traditional courses a
likely scenario to enhance
long term viability. An
example of this is marine

Racks, Gridwall, Slatwall, Slotted
Standards, and Hardware,
Smee Coes male cM (oS
Coverall’s $5.00, White S/S &
SES ch noose Dee
Blank ID Cards, 16” Stand Fans,
School Shoes, Men's Jeans size
ETO SEM (SRM Ice oi(ciice
4pk. $6.00 & more Chevy Van
$1,200.00 Location: Maderia
Shopping Center Behind Mystical
CN Tam miele Renae (Ulam ES
ee ESC CROIE CIS

FOR SALE BY OWNER
cal rh Wi
4 ai navigation course.

oe
L a. Courses will be relevant

= to market needs.
wt a ae To reduce probability of

Four(4) - Unit Plaza over saturation in a particu-
East Shirley Street lar skill set Courses will

. place strong emphasis on
Zoned for Retail Shop/Office Use developing and enhancing

soft skills. This will be inher-
ent in the course structure
and will be reinforced with
specific sessions conducted
by the Bahamas Hotel Asso-
clation.

Get Your Clarks On!

These styles available at:
The Shoe Village, Madeira Shopping Plaza - 328-0703
The Shoe Village, Marathon Mall - 393-6113
The Shoe Village, RND Plaza Freeport - 351-3274
The Clarks Store, Marathon Mall - 393-4155

The ONLY Authorized Retailer Of Genuine Clarks
Shoes For The ENTIRE FAMILY!

Hours 11am - 5pm
Thur. 23rd, July
11. am - 5pm Wed. 29th

Pec Sale Opt. |: Entire Complex - $479K net, on.o

Sale Opt. 2: Three-Unit Ownership = $594K net
Serious Inquires Only
Fh. (242) 477-3772(days)

Contaact: 326-8215 or 465-8648
bjohnson@adamandeve.bs



Ee
a Liebet»
Me edi,

ColinalImperial.

No WORK ZONE” “Wo WoRR ZONE” Way

A TRIBUTE TO
GARTH THOMPSON

Garth Thompson died at his home unexpectedly on July

? at the age of 69. He was general manager at Quality
Auto Sales for 20 years until his retirement for health
reasons in February, 2008.

medical emergencies
don't study economics



... they don't know the word “recession” either.

That's why you need to maintain your insurance coverage
with Colinalmperial even when the economy is weak -to
make sure hard times don't get harder just because you
fall ill or fall down on your luck.

Stay confident. Stay connected.

Beginning in the early 1970s, his long automotive career
: also included stints at KC New Car Sales, Bahamas
confidence for life Automobile, Nassau Motor Company and Avis.

Garth had trained as an architect in his youth and led
planning and development of the Auto Mall on Shirley
Street, which houses state-of-the-art parts, service and
sales facilities for both Quality Auto and Executive
Motors.

www.colinaimperial.com

According to Jeff Albury, Quality Auto's owner, Garth
was a disciplinarian and multi-tasker who could organise
complex operations with efficiency and integrity.

"He made a tremendous personal contribution to the
development of Quality Auto Sales and the Auto Mall
over the years,” Albury said.

The management and staff
of Quality Auto Sales and Executive Motors extend their deepest synnpathy
to Garth's wife, [rene avd fis children, Joni, Minarda and Travis.

FIRST AID


THE TRIBUNE





anti-smugegling exercises

FROM page one

While a demonstration of
this process was conducted
for the benefit of this news-
paper, security officials have
asked that the exact proce-
dure not be released.

With the genesis of this
exercise is normally to
counter any attempts at
smuggling drugs, security
experts revealed that these
“modified containers” have
been known to be used by
terrorists to ship weapons,
even humans from one coun-
try to the next.

Therefore, in an effort to
ensure that their facility does

not become a victim of this
nefarious trade, Operation
Manager Thomas Gibson
said they have required all
docking personnel to take
part in the programme.

“All containers that come
in are checked when they
arrive. They are sealed and
the seal number is recorded.
So when it is time to load the
ship, we pull the container,
check the seal, along with the
police, and re-seal it again.

“But what I’m saying is
even overnight if someone
just came on the terminal to
do anything we would
know,” he said.

As a partner in the inter-

LOCAL NEWS

Seaboard marines hold

national C-TPAT pro-
gramme the security officer
conducting the training
explained that Seaboard
Marine works in partnership
with local authorities to
ensure that their containers
are not used for any other
purpose than that for which it
was originally intended.
According to the US
Department of Homeland
Security, C-TPAT is a volun-
tary government to business
initiative to build coopera-
tive relationships that
strengthen and improve over-
all international supply
chains and US border securi-

ty.

“C-TPAT recognizes that
US Customs and Border Pro-
tection (CBP) can provide
the highest level of cargo
security only through close
cooperation with the ultimate
owners of the international
supply chain such as
importers, carriers, consol-
idators, licensed customs bro-
kers, and manufacturers.

“Through this initiative,
CBP is asking businesses to
ensure the integrity of their
security practices and com-
municate and verify the secu-
rity guidelines of their busi-
ness partners within the sup-
ply chain,” the statement
said.

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 9

c

Employment Opportuni

Experienced Tellers

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed to delivering superior quality service, to
training and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in
the community.

Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for
Experienced Tellers.

Assault
charges

FROM page one

QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE:
Matured (minimum age 23 years)

Minimum of two (2) years Teller experience

Excellent cash management skills

Excellent customer service skills

Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills
Excellent organzational and time management skills
Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications
Minimum five (5) BGCSE with C grades or above, including
Mathematics and English

TOWN HALL MEETING

There have been so many questions, and we have
received so few answers.

cil, was charged with assault-
ing McKenzie, former
BHCAWU treasurer on May
11. McKenzie was also
charged with assaulting Smith
and causing damage to his
prescription eyeglasses valued
at $685.

Both men appeared in
Court 5, Bank Lane yester-
day morning and withdrew
the charges. They were both
discharged. Smith was report-
edly hit in the face as he
served a court notice to mem-
bers of the BHCAWU exec-
utive council at Worker’s
House on Harrold Road. The
orders prohibited any mem-
ber of the council from pre-
venting any other executive
member from attending a full
meeting of the council for
election nominations.

The court order came after
the union executive split over
which day to hold nomina-
tions for council elections.

Join The Committee to Protect and Preserve The Bahamas
for Future Generations at a Town Hal! Meeting to discuss the
relocation of the container port to Arawak Cay and the harmful

REMUNERATION PACKAGE;

Commonwealth Bank 1s a Great place to work! We offer an
exciting work environment with the opportunity for growth and
development. We also offer a competitive compensation package,
reflecting the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications,
including a performance based incentive plan, health, vision,
dental and life insurances and a pension plan.

impact it will have on the surrounding environment, our

communities and us, the Bahamian people.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before

Venue: The British Colonial Hilton heer ae

Date: Thursday, July 30, 2009
5 : a ee Human Resources Department
Time: 7:00pm - 9:30pm ierpelles
P.O. Box SS-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Telefax: (242) 393-8073
E-mail address: hr@ combankltd.com

©2009 CreativeRelations.net

Join other worried citizens, including Senator Jerome Fitzgerald
and express your concerns.

“Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their
interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those
under consideration will be contacted.”

Moderated by Wendell Jones.



ployment Opportunities =

wf fs en Tey: l
—y

oF Su
Ss

Roles in Finance and Operations Departments Marine Project Controls Specialist

Dee to the changed business environment, growth in basiness operations as well as significant level of
Ivestinen i the Conkpany several Opportunies exast for seasoned hiacial and operons
professionals.

Department Assistant / Cash Applications

Reporting to the Manager of Business Controls smd Analysis, you would be responsible for providing
the Company's Finance Department with the clerical and administrative support necessary to complete
all of its clesagnated tasks. Tn addition, you will be responsible for the tanely processune of payments
from customers. In an ever-changing environment, you will need to be flexible and have the ability to
embrace frequent changes. You must have strong commonication skills, be self-motivated and able to
werk independently. You mst have au Associate's Degree, preferably in Basiness Adminstration, with
expentence working with JD Edwards, proficient in Wlicroseft Office (Excel, Word and Power Point) is
aplus, You must be able to uveract well with multiple levels ot management ane operntional statt

Cash Management / Credit Coordinator

Reporting to the Chief Financial Officer, you wonkl be responsible for the optimization of cash flow for
Vopak Terminal Bahamas by maintaining accurate cash flow projections, executing cash transactions and
collecting mney owed to the Company expedimousy. In aiever-chinging environment, you Will need
to be flexible and have the abiliry to embrace frequent changes. You must have strong analytical aud
conunuMication skills, you mast be self-motivated and able to work independently. You must have a
degree in Accounting from an accredited four (4) year wuversity or college and 5 years professsonal
(Acconting) business experience. Additionally, you must have experience working with ID Edwards
of Hyperion and mst be proficient in Microsoft Office (Excel, Word and Power Point), Prior experience
working ina Cash Management position is a plas. You must be able to interact well with multiple levels

of management and operational staff,

Fixed Asset Accountant / Auditor

Reporting to the Financial Analyst / Fined Asset Coondinator, you will be required to contribute to the
praection of the Company's assets by documenting axl analyzing the financial information related to
fived assets and controls procedures. [nan ever-changing environment, you will eed to be flexible and
have the alulity to work onder pressure, multi task and meet deadlines, ‘You must have strong analvtical
and comumimication skills, be self-motivated aid able to work independently. You must have a degree
in Accounting from an aecredited four (4) vear university or college and 3 years of professional (Accounting)
bnsiiess expenence, You wall be reqnired te averact well with mulnple levels of management sil
operational staff. You must have experience working with JD Edwards and be proficient in Microsoft
Ottee (Excel, Word and Power Pout) Expenerce working with fined assets A plies

Financial Reporting Coordinator

Reportar to the Manager of Biaaess Controls d& Analysis, vou will be rexyluined te Convriliite te the
protection of the Company's profitability aod nek reduction by documenting and analyzing the financial
statements, controls and financial compliance functions. ‘You will be required to further ensure the timely
ald accurate complehon of internal aud external andits, budgetuig and forecasting reports. Ln an
ever-changing enviroment, you will need to be flexible and have the ability to work wouder pressure,
noth task and meet deadlines. You must have strong analytical and commoucation skills, be self-motvated
ald able to work independently. “You must have a degree in Accounting from an accredited four (49 year
university of college and 5 years professional (Accounting) business experience. You mvust lave experience
working with JD Edwards or Hypenon and be proficient in Microsoft Office (Excel, Word and Power
Point. You must be able to interact well with ouultiple levels of management and operational staff

As directed by the Project Manager, you will be required to perform critical path analysis to forecast
potential issues that coukd impact deliverables or project contractual commitments amd performs
“ whataf” evalnations af different approaches. You must have previo manne construction projects
comtels experience inexcess of 5 years. The candidate must have a mininvun of a BS Degree im
a relevant engineenng field, You must be able to determine margins in companson to original
developmental budgets for projects, tack and neonitor costs. ‘You must be able to produce project
gains and loss schedules tor Manageovent review, You most be able to control determed revenue
aed Goal AGCCOUMNNS, track pryect reverie Awd Cres On a coumpete bases, You ost awe the abuary
to analyze all standard cost variances and allocate costs as directed by the Project Manager.

Senior Offshore Inspector

‘You mast have 15 vears offshore Marine Comstriction expencoce and minimum of an AAS in
Engineeting, You will be responsible for coordinating, inspecting and monitoring an offshore marine
inspection group, famuliar with API, AWS and related regulatory bodies. You will be responsible
for the entire inspection team and communicate to the Project Manager on all related activities, and
Wal be respeesi te bo assiire all COMME Ns ancl ppanys are mnitnctirel py accordance wath the
comract specifications. You will coordinate the activities of all the concemed parties, and will
interface With the proctirement department, pipe manufachirer, fitings and equipment mamifacnirers,
IS pectonk Techie cars, Hap coaters anil Irae peter.

Senior Project Engineer

Yor must have Bachelor of Science Degree at an accredited University m Mechanical Engineering
with a minimum of 5 years job expenence relating to fabrication and offshore constriction
ianagemnent. You will be accomntable for coordination and monitoring offshore construction You
will also be responsible for submitting request for proposals for offshore aml onshore constraction
amd offshore installation, therefore must be familar with commen technical proposals to determine
the best candidate for the job scope. The proposals and work the senior project engineer mst be
familiar with shall be but wot limited to construction of offshore platforms Le. jacket and deck, the
removal of offshore platforms, debns removal, pipeline removal, pipeline pupe and coatings, laying
offshore pipelines, installation of jacket and deck, and fabrication and installation of various. facility
equipment. You will be interfacing with the procurement departinent, pipe manofacturer, fittings
al ecpnpabenie mAWuAChiers, inspectors, HIpe coaler ail Crans porters, avn design engineers.

eter Meet te ee ea ee lle ee
Bahama Or by emall to: vopakapps@gfs-bahamas.com

Applicants are to bo aware that any inquiry made by tolaphone or office visit to
ee ae ee mT ee MP
insligible for process. Applicants will be notified by written letter on the status of
etme el

The deadline for application is Friday,August 14th, 2009


HAL:

PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

LOCAL NEWS





ASSOCIATION



AUGUST MONDAY

HOLIDAY HOURS
Monday, August 3, 2009

CLOSED

Normal banking hours resume
Tuesday, August 4, 2009
9:30am - 3:00pm

CLEARING BANKS
ASSOCIATION MEMBERS

Bank of The Bahamas
International Limited
CitiBank, N.A. Bahamas
Commonwealth Bank Limited
Fidelity Bank Bahamas Limited
FirstCaribbean International Bank
RBC Royal Bank of Canada
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited





THE TRIBUNE



Chamber of Commerce
president unofficially
backs local lottery

FROM page one

issue, Mr Rolle said his
stance remains an unofficial
position “at this time.”

While the legalization of a
local lottery may have only
been discussed at the execu-
tive level to get some “tacit
support”, Mr Rolle said the
Chamber is prepared to doa
full study to determine what
the “benefits and downside
risks may be” prior to tak-
ing a full formal position on
it.

“We have to debate this
on the merits and make deci-
sions on what the scientific
research says. But we cannot
neglect the emotional side of
the argument. It has to be a
very balanced approach,” he
said.

With “numbers” having an
estimated transaction value
pegged at $600 million a year
in the Bahamas, Mr Rolle

said that if the government
only took 15 per cent of this
amount in taxes, these sums
could go toward healthcare,
educational, physical infra-
structural development.

“There are so many
aspects of our infrastructure
that is still underdeveloped
and still requires a lot of
investment and that money
can go toward that. I am very
big on education and IJ think
we have missed the boat on
how we design, finance, and
how we invest in education.
And this is a golden oppor-
tunity if we head in that
direction to improve the
quality of education.

“One can make an argu-
ment that people will be irre-
sponsible if gambling is legal-
ized. But my argument is,
yes, some may be irresponsi-
ble, and that is the emotion-
al response, but if you use
money to invest in education

Police Constable

FROM page one

McClain being granted bail but asked that the court set reporting
conditions. Ms Farquharson told the court that McClain has been
a police officer since the age of 19, is not a flight risk, has no pre-
vious convictions and has no matters pending before the courts.

McClain was granted bail in the sum of $4,000 with one surety.
The case has been adjourned to August 6 and transferred to Court
6, Parliament Street. McClain was ordered to report to the East
Street South Police Station every Saturday before 6pm.

Don't wait until after you have been victimized

Get-your-FREE-alarm today

Professional woe



people on the benefits of
being a responsible citizen
then certainly they will make
better decisions,” he said.
Mr Rolle added that gov-
ernment at this time has little
options open to it to gain
additional revenue. With this
scheme, he said, it would not
require government to con-
tinue to have to borrow
money, which would then
begin to compromise the
country’s fiscal structure.
“Or we can look at creat-
ing new revenue streams.
And I am in favour of cre-
ating new revenue streams
which I feel there are some
positive benefits if you look
at the lottery aspect. Unfor-
tunately, and I hate to use
the term ‘fanatics’, but that is
the term that has to be used
because the fanatics are not
giving the discussion a fair
chance. They are not trying
to balance the discussion.
“Everyone who gambles is
not irresponsible. And for-
tunately 100 per cent of the
people who will gamble will
not spend their rent money,
their food money, and
neglect their family. The
reality is there is a distribu-
tion of people/behaviour and
you have to determine what
percentage of that distribu-
tion those people represent.
“The biggest scourge we
ever had in this country was
drugs. Everybody didn’t deal
it, everybody didn’t consume
it. Everybody didn’t partici-
pate it in. So the argument
has to be well balanced and
it has to be rational. I am
tired of these irrational
debates we continue to have
in this country. That is why
we can’t progress. We allow
one segment to hijack the
process with an irrational
argument and because they
scream the loudest nothing
else is heard and then we
don’t move the debate any
further and that has to
change,” he said.

BitenntoBiGSavingsatiour,

Bacluto School

an _|

Thursday, Friday & Saturday
URE GBT a

The? Sweeting's

Vi

Shoes For All Walks Of Life

Madeira Shopping Plaza 328-0703
Marathon Mall 393-6113
RND Plaza, Freeport 351-3274

All Major
Credit Cards
Accepted.
Sorry No
Debit Cards.

» Colanks

Marathon Mall 393-6113

“The ONLY authorized retailer of Genuine Clarks Shoes for the ENTIRE FAMILY!”


THE TRIBUNE PAGE 12

OF



t



THURSDAY, JULY 30,

2009

PAGES 13 & 14¢ International sports news

Athletes take spotlight

urge you
athletes to
stay drug free

REIGNING Common-
wealth boxing champion
Jermaine “Choo Choo”
Mackey, a tough-kid-
turned-super-hero, has
thrown his weight behind a
proposed anti-doping bill
designed to keep athletes
performing in the
Bahamas drug-free or
force them to face the con-
sequences.

“Drug use in sports is
dishonest and I applaud
the government’s efforts
to bring it out in the open
and create laws to deal
with it because it is a grow-
ing problem that comes
back to haunt the athlete
as well as the country
where they are perform-
ing,” said Mackey, the
super middle weight
champ who holds the 52-
nation title.

Performance-enhancing
drugs can ruin an athlete’s
future, said the fighter,
offering to throw his sup-
port into the ring to help
drum up support for the
bill introduced in the
House of Assembly last
week by Minister of State for Sports Desmond Bannister.

“Athletes sometimes think it (drugs) gives them the upper
hand but it really gives the other athlete the upper hand,” said
Mackey. “After all their hard work, they get caught or even if
they don’t, it hurts them, and then they are robbed of their full
potential.”

Mackey — who faces a challenge to his title this October
when Charles Adumu of Ghana meets him at the Kendal
Isaacs National Gymnasium in front of a crowd expected to be
in the thousands — said he is discouraged by what he believes is
an increasing reliance on performance-enhancing drugs and
doesn’t want that trend to mushroom in the Bahamas.

“Participation in sports builds character and healthy citi-
zens,” said Mackey, who grew up in a rough, tough Kemp
Road neighbourhood and now stands as its leading role mod-
el.

“For a country the size of our Bahamas to have produced so
many outstanding athletes is amazing and many of those ath-
letes have helped produce a wealth of outstanding citizens of
extraordinary character. We have to protect that so I am fully
behind the government making tough laws and enforcing them
to keep the world of athletes apart from the world of drugs. And
I tell all my friends and people I know in sports, I urge you ath-
letes to stay drug free.”

)

Commonwealth
boxing champion

backs proposed
anti-doping bill





JERMAINE MACKEY

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:d22-1722 « Fax: 326-7452

3 ENTAA, EXTRA

Large Shipment
of
Used Gars

COME CHECK
US OUT

wa" Shipments Arrived

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Invurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

ET Se



noni more Io cunt Them hmow le cloee | For wih Wnow be cCigpe cha firms elle Court iy

= Dec

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ollowing another

impressive showing

at the latest meet on

the IAAF World

Athletics Tour,
Bahamian athletes continue to
rise in the Tour’s standings with
many of them listed near the top
in their respective events.

At the Herculis Super Grand
Prix in Monaco, Debbie Fergu-
son McKenzie and Chandra
Sturrup continued their stellar
seasons in preparation for next
month’s World Athletics.

Ferguson-Mckenzie ran to a
second place finish in the 100m
in a time of 10.97s behind 2008
Olympic gold medallist in the
event, Shelly-Ann Fraser of
Jamaica, who won in 10.91s.

Sturrup finished fourth in
11.13s just behind reigning
Olympic 200m champion Veron-
ica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica
who was third in 11.03s.

Also competing at the meet,
quarter-miler Andrae Williams
finished eighth in the 400m in
47.98s.

Americans LaShawn Merrit
and David Neville finished in
the top two positions in 44.73s
and 45.26s respectively.

Ferguson-McKenzie earned
16 tour points for her perfor-
mance while Sturrup added 12
to her total.

Sturrup, now ranked second
in the 100m, has garnered 72
points behind Kerron Stewart
of Jamaica who leads the field with 100 points.

Sturrup finished second in consecutive meets this month,
posting times at Paris Saint-Denis and London in times of
11.15s and 11.09s.

She posted a season's best time of 10.99s July 10 in
Roma, Italy, in a third place finish.

Ferguson-McKenzie is ranked seventh in the event with
a total of 55 points with her latest posting of 10.97s, the sixth
fastest time of any 100m sprinter this year, which pro-
pelled her six spots in the rankings.

Carmelita Jeter of the United States is ranked third with
68 points, while Fraser (64 points) and country woman
Sheri-Ann Brooks (56 points) round out the top five.

Ferguson-McKenzie has dominated the 200m on tour
with three first place finishes and a third in her fourth
event. After four meets, she remains in second place with
39 points, just three points behind leading 200m runner
LaVerne Jones-Ferrette with 42 points.

The US Virgin Islander began her season with three
consecutive first place finishes, followed by a pair of second

now andunderstand,imagnaton poms.ui ta Al! wie maint ye? dscaver!



Â¥
i ah 7
| ws ! ‘S201 10
1 wo |
” Register at:

bilgi wweimagine.vertexping. com
Are you looking for an extraordinary experience this
summer, norsaathapheditionn
agers

August 4" - Auguet 212009
8.30) AM - 5:30 PM
Buys and Girls Agos 5- 13
8!" Torrace (EAGT) off Collins Ave.

2
2
=
z
2
=



(Prepretors Aisa & Steve Sobeh)

Yeoom Ga uBio aM The 0) quod ueytubOur pul cen gut mou

£ aw SUNS SAA YD CHS BS Sou Spy Oy [SE So Lye QU oo Sy cP pou 7

GOLDEN GIRL Chandra Sturrup finished fourth in the
100m at the Herculis Super Grand Prix in Monaco...





Bobcats, Hornets
complete Okafor-
Chandler deal...

See page 14

place finishes.

Ferguson-McKenzie ran her
world leading time of 22.32s July
20 in Greece, just two weeks pri-
or to posting her season's best
time in the 100m.

Bianca Knight of the United
States is ranked third with 35
points, Shericka Williams of
Jamaica is fourth with 32 points
and Cydonie Mothersill of the
Cayman Islands rounds out the
top five with 24 points.

In the men's 400m, Chris
Brown tops the leader board
with a sizeable 12 point advan-
tage over his nearest competi-
tor.

Brown posted consecutive
first place finishes this month in
Berlin and Roma at Golden
League events, each good for 20
tour points apiece.

The national 400m record
holder has finished no worst
than third on a tour event with a
season's best time of 44.81s two
weeks ago in Roma.

Gary Kikaya of the Congo is
ranked second with 53 points,
while Renny Quow of Trinidad
and Tobago is third with 50
points.

Other members of the
Bahamas' silver medal winning
Olympic 1600m relay team have
also reached top 25 rankings.

Michael Mathieu is in a three
way tie for a 21st place with 14
points, Williams is ranked 24th
with 13 points, while Andretti
Bain is ranked 40th.

Leevan Sands, with a fourth
place finish last weekend in Lon-
don, moved up to third in the

(AP Photo)

triple jump rankings.

After a two-month layoff, Sands returned to form this
month with a season’s best jump of 17.13m.

Arnie Girat of Cuba maintains the top position with 50
points including two first place finishes and two second
place finishes.

Phillips Idowu is ranked second with 45 points and three
first place finishes.

Shamar Sands maintains a 10th place ranking in the 110
meter hurdles with 38 points. His latest contest was a third
place finish June 17 in Ostrava, good enough for seven tour
points.

His highest point total was a 12 point outing in a fourth
place finish at Berlin and a season’s best time came May 30
in New York when he finished second in 13.32s.

Daryn Robles leads the field with 90 points, followed by
Dexter Faulk (80 points) and Antwon Hicks (72 points).

Donald Thomas, after three competitions, is ranked
10th in the high jump, while Christine Amertil is 12th in the
400m.

Swimmers

continue to

break local
records

BAHAMIAN swimmers,
making their mark at the
world championships in Italy,
continue to produce faster
times and set new local
records.

At the 13th FINA World
Championships in Roma,
Team Bahamas continues to
shine.

On day two of the meet,
Alicia Lightbourne swam a
personal best time in the
100m breaststroke and a new
Bahamas record in 1:12.60.
She broke the old record time
of 1:14.36 which she held since
the RBC Bahamas National
Swimming Championships.

On day three, the team
took a much needed rest after
two busy, hot days in temper-
atures which reached as high
as 39 degrees Celsius. But
they were back in the pool on
day four.

Olympians Alana Dillette
and Vereance Burrows both
swam Bahamian records in
the morning prelims. Dillette
broke her own record of 30.50
in the 50m backstroke with a
time of 29.83 and Burrows
broke veteran Jeremy
Knowles old record in the 100
free in a time of 50.88.

Bahamians hit the pool
again today, Friday and Sat-



ALICIA LIGHTBOURNE

urday with individual swims
in the 100 free, 50 breast, 50
fly, 50 free and the 4 x 100
female medley.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 13



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Phelps sets world record in 200 fly

a

MICHAEL PHELPS races to win

TC RICCRIRe

Butterfly at the FINA Swimming

} World Championships in Rome

Aes cT OC ae

WT Ap

Pen cite ac

: Bahamas Chamber
Pee tare
OUTSTANDING BUSINESS
OF THE YEAR AWARD 2009

Easy & Affordable

Teale) UeR area

Ma



aay Payee
UEC CIE:

Fm ihe
or ais
an

=

{
‘
-
:
oe
-
a
p

ee

aT} a

_

S
@
[=
ic)
=
J
=

By PAUL NEWBERRY
AP National Writer

ROME (AP) — Now that’s
more like it. Michael Phelps
bounced back from a stunning
loss with something more famil-
iar — another world record
Wednesday.

One night after he was sound-
ly beaten by Germany’s Paul
Biedermann, Phelps set a world
record in the 200-meter butterfly
with a time of 1 minute, 51.51
seconds — more than a half-sec-
ond ahead of his previous mark,
1:52.03.

Phelps whipped around quick-
ly to see his time and held up his
right index finger when the
“WR” was posted. And just like
Beijing, he has taken down
another of Mark Spitz’s stan-
dards, this time with the 34th
world record of his career — one
more than Spitz had during his
brilliant run in the pool.

“T wanted to step on it in the
first 100 to get out there in the
clean water, and that’s pretty
much what happened,” Phelps
said. “It was a lot more pain last
night than tonight.”

There couldn’t have been a
more appropriate place for
Phelps to add another record to
his resume. Shortly after he
climbed from the pool, Italy’s
Federica Pellegrini sent the
home crowd into a frenzy when
she set the 20th world mark of
the four-day-old meet in the 200
freestyle.

Before the night was done,
South Africa’s Cameron van der
Burgh broke the mark he set in
the semifinals to win the 50
breaststroke and China’s Zhang
Lin took down Grant Hackett’s
four-year-old 800 free by more
than six seconds, with Tunisia’s
Ous Mellouli also going under
the old mark but only getting sil-
ver. Both are non-Olympic
events.

Earlier, Germany’s Daniela
Samulski and Russia’s Anasta-
sia Zueva got things rolling by
setting records in consecutive
semifinal heats of the 50 back-
stroke, another event not on the
Olympic program. And let’s not
forget American Mary Descenza,
who took more than three sec-
onds off her personal best to
swim the fastest women’s 200
butterfly ever — in the prelimi-
naries, no less.

For those who’ve lost count,
that’s 22 records in Rome, hard-
ly living up to it label as the Eter-
nal City. Nothing is sacred in
these high-tech bodysuits, which
have already helped surpass the
15 records set at the last worlds
in Melbourne two years ago,
with four days still to go.

Phelps couldn’t wait to get on
the podium to collect his first
individual title at the Foro Itali-
co. While his name was being
announced in English and Ital-
ian, he stood impatiently with
his right foot already on the

stand.

Finally, he hopped up to the
highest rung, thrust both arms
in the air with a defiant look that
melted into a crooked smile. He
was back on top.

The scene was much different
than a night earlier, when Bie-
dermann blew away Phelps in
the 200 free, winning by more
than a full body length and
snatching away one of the Amer-
ican’s five individual world
records.

The loss — Phelps’ first in an
individual race at the Olympics
or world championships since
2005 — was followed by coach
Bob Bowman’s angry tirade
against the sport’s governing
body, which allowed
polyurethane suits to be used at
these championships.

FINA plans to ban all body-
suits sometime early in 2010, but
Bowman said Phelps might take
his goggles and go home until
the rule goes into effect, believ-
ing Biedermann’s Arena suit
gave him a huge edge over
Phelps’ once-revolutionary
Speedo LZR Racer because it’s
more buoyant.

Phelps stuck with Speedo for
the fly, though he did change out
of a model that stretches up to
his shoulders, going with one that
stretched only from waist to
ankles.

“It didn’t feel right in
warmup,” Phelps said. “I
changed out of it and put this
on. This is what I’ve always worn
in this race.”

“He actually warmed up with
the full body and he just said it
felt too tight and he took it off,”
Bowman said. “Then I noticed
he hadn’t shaved his chest, but
I’m like, Just don’t worry about
it.’”’

No worries, indeed. No one
was even close.

“T said to Bob beforehand,
*T’m going to go for the 150 and
whatever happens, happens. ’m
going to try to hang on the last
50,”’ Phelps said. “I was able to.”

Bowman knew Phelps had it
when he made the last turn
ahead of everyone else, no mat-
ter how hard he went out.

“He swam a really fast first
150 and he paid for it a little on
the last lap,” the coach said. “I’m
sure he’ll be tired, but I knew
nobody was getting by him.
That’s how he is.”

Actually, Bowman was confi-
dent from the moment he saw
Phelps at lunch. Instead of fret-
ting over the loss to Biedermann,
he had that look the coach likes
to see — and there weren’t any
concerns about someone having
a technological edge.

“T just felt like he was really
relaxed tonight,” Bowman said.
“T saw him at lunchtime and he
was in really good spirits. You
can always tell when something
like this is kind of going to hap-
pen. He was definitely there
tonight.”

Mme eee
ere CRN Este

www.furnitureplus.com


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Bobcats, Hornets complete
Okafor-Chandler deal

By MIKE CRANSTON
AP Sports Writer

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP)
— The New Orleans Hornets
finally found a taker for
Tyson Chandler. It took a
deal with tinkering Charlotte
coach Larry Brown, who was
willing to jettison the Bob-
cats’ first draft pick.

Emeka Okafor was sent to
the Hornets on Tuesday for
Chandler, another former No.
2 overall pick. The trade
involving 26-year-old centers
brought financial relief to
both teams and confidence
they'll each thrive with a new
man in the middle.

The Hornets have been try-
ing to unload the 7-foot-1
Chandler for several months.
A trade last season to Okla-
homa City was rescinded after
Chandler failed a physical
amid concerns aver a linger-
ing toe injury.

"I'm very, very excited and
thrilled about this new oppor-
tunity,” Chandler said in a
conference call.

Brown was willing to gam-
ble on the injury-prone, ath-
letic big man who can also
play power forward and is
three inches taller than
Okafor.

"We're getting a young kid
who is long and athletic and
can play multiple positions
and fills a need that we obvi-
ously have,” Brown said.

The Hornets were intrigued
by Okafor's superior
rebounding and durability.
New Orleans gets a reliable
big man with a longer con-
tract as it tries to recover from
last season's first-round play-
off exit.

"Emeka is one of the pre-
mier centers in the NBA with
All-Star caliber scoring and
rebounding averages through-
out his career,” Hornets gen-
eral manager Jeff Bower said.
"His potential to improve is
endless once you put him on



EMEKA OKAFOR (50) works the ball against Cleveland Cavaliers’ J J
Hickson (21) during the first quarter of a game in Cleveland...

(AP Photo: Mark Dunean)

Drive It!, Drag It!,
Pull it!, Push it!

EVEN IF IT DOESN’T MOVE
WE WILL TRADE IT IN.

BEST PRICES
EVER SALE!

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED

F289 Wall Read
PO. Bow Nt
b (2A2) 39ed4a? £042) 9938798

ON THE SPOT FINANCING WITH
COMMONWEALTH BANK

Thompson Blvd. « Oakes Field
t. 242.326.6377" f. 242.326.6315
é. sanpin@coralwave.com

INSURANCE AVAILABLE WITH
ADVANTAGE INSURANCE
BRORERS & AGENTS LTD.





TYSON CHANDLER (6) applauds in the second half of a first-round
playoff game against the Denver Nuggets in New Orleans...

the court running with Chris
Paul."

Chandler had the best sea-
son of his career (2007-08)
playing with Paul. The pair
comprised a constant alley-
oop threat when Chandler
was healthy, and the two were
close off the court.

"I'm losing a great friend, a
brother. T.C. is my man. ...
I'm going to miss him,” said
Paul, who was attending a
basketball camp in New
Orleans.

"It's going to take some
time to see how this works
out," Paul continued. "I want
Emeka to come in here and
be the best player he’s ever
been. From today on out,
that's my teammate. ... Hope-
fully we can eventually have
the same relationship that me
and Tyson had.”

The deal is the fourth trade
Charlotte has made since
managing partner Michael
Jordan hired Brown before
last season. Brown, in his

(AP Photo: Bill Haber)

record ninth NBA head
coaching job, has continued
his history of numerous trades
to mold the team into his ver-
satile, defensive-minded lik-
ing.

Now it includes sending the
centerpiece of Charlotte's
new franchise to the city’s old
team.

Two years after the Hor-
nets bolted Charlotte, the
expansion Bobcats took
Okafor with the No. 2 pick in
the 2004 draft — after Orlan-
do grabbed Dwight Howard.

Okafor had injury problems
early in his career, but played
all 82 games in each of the
last two seasons. He averaged
13.2 points and 10.1 rebounds
in another solid, but unspec-
tacular season under Brown,
who later questioned his bas-
ketball fire.

"T wanted him to have a
passion and work on his
game," Brown said Tuesday.
"T think he made unbeliev-
able progress in that regard.



a) Tamir einem tea CGI e Te

Tel: 502 2356

for ad rates

VU aM OUT

When we had an exit meet-
ing this past season he told
me he was going to do that,
he was going to work on his
game. ... This was a basket-
ball decision. It had nothing to
do with Emeka."

But Chandler, the No. 2
pick in the 2001 draft after
declaring for the NBA out of
high school, faces injury ques-
tions.

Chandler averaged 8.8
points and 8.7 rebounds in
only 45 games last season. He
then underwent procedures
on his left ankle and toe in
May after being ineffective in
the first-round series loss to
Denver.

Chandler will be in Char-
lotte for a physical later this
week and is confident he is
healed.

"For the first time in the
last couple of years, I have
had really good movement in
my toe,” Chandler said. "Now
Tam just trying to gain confi-
dence on my ankle again."

For the Hornets, it imme-
diately lowers their payroll
and could reduce luxury tax
payments. Okafor will make
$10.5 million next season and
Chandler $11.8 million. The
Hornets entered the week
with a payroll of about $78
million, triggering a dollar-
for-dollar tax on the amount
over the NBA's luxury tax
threshold of $69.9 million.

However, the Hornets also
take on the last five years of
an escalating, six-year, $72
million contract.

"We have a long-term
option for us now at the cen-
ter position and one we feel
we can grow with,” Bower
said. "We looked at that as
an asset, the fact that Emeka
is under contract. ... It shows
we are interested in improv-
ing and we are interested in
competing in the Western
Conference and we are willing
to pay the price."

The Bobcats, meanwhile,
unloaded a longer contract.
Chandler would make $12.7
million in a player option in
2010-11, the final season of
his deal.

Bobcats owner Bob John-
son, who is looking to sell the
team after losing millions of
dollars, has ordered manage-
ment not to reach the luxury
tax threshold. Shedding
Okafor's contract will help
achieve that goal.

Brown, meanwhile, is con-
vinced Chandler will improve
Charlotte's frontcourt.

"Emeka is a great kid, but
we all felt that with the way
Tyson plays, with his quick-
ness and his ability to handle
the ball and his length, that
was something that was very
important to us,” Brown said.
"That was the overriding fac-
tor."

e¢ AP Sports Writer Brett
Martel in New Orleans con-
tributed to this report


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



MISSUNIVERSEPAGEANT2009 f&

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

¢ AUGUST 1-3

Arrivals and Registration, Official Photography

¢ AUGUST 5

Location Filming, Visit to the Ardastra
Gardens

Tour of Port Charlotte

Tour of Clifton Heritage Site and Sacred
Space,

Visit Arawak Cay (Fish Fry)

° AUGUST 6

Visit the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas

Courtesy Call on the Governor General

Tea Party at Government House

¢ AUGUST 7
Downtown Casual Shopping and Photo-ops

Display of Bahamian Arts and Crafts in
Rawson Square

Welcome Dinner

¢ AUGUST 8

Stay at the Bimini Bay Resort in Exuma

Tour of Moriah Harbour Cay and Elizabeth
Harbour, Stocking Island

Visit to Fountain of Youth and Shark Lab














HOME AWAT
FROM HOME

Safe and Comfortable



MANY of the events will take place at Atlantis 0 on
Paradise Island.

¢ AUGUST 9

Tour of Garden of the Groves in Grand
Bahama and Photo-ops

Visit the Port Lucaya Marketplace

Swimsuit Presentation at 5pm on the great
lawn at Our Lucaya Resort (Best Figure
Award) All seats: $50

¢ AUGUST 10

Motorcade through New Providence starting
at lpm leaving Arawak Cay

National Costume Competition at the

Rainforest Theatre, Wyndham Hotel,

starting at 7pm

VIP $175, General $125, Balcony $100

Short Term Apartment

RENTALS

Cheaper than a Hotel
week 2weeks | month

BARLAM AS
HOME AWAY FROM HOME

call: 3 28-2325

eriak hahinds horiwafronhors iigrielcom

¢ AUGUST 11
Tour of Harbour Island by Golf Cart
Leisure activities at Coral Sands Beach

House, Green Turtle Cay, Abaco

¢ AUGUST 12

Junkanoo Summer Festival
(in the afternoon)

Miss Universe 2009 Fashion Show with local
designers starting at 7pm at the Sheraton
Nassau Beach Hotel

VIP $125, General $75

Junkanoo Rush-Out along the Cable Beach
Strip starting at 9.30pm

¢ AUGUST 13

Delegates’ National Gift Charity Auction at
7.30pm at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Hotel

General $150, Corporate Tables $2,000,
Banner Tables $3,000

¢ AUGUST 14- 15
Rehearsals

Location Filming

° AUGUST 16

Miss Universe 2009 Presentation Show
in the Imperial Ballroom of Atlantis,
Paradise Island

VIP $250 (including buffet dinner), Sections
3-7: $175; 8-10: $125; 11-13: $100; 14-20: $100



¢ AUGUST 17 - 18

Preliminary Interviews with the
Panel of Judges

Rehearsals

¢ AUGUST 19 - 22

Rehearsals

National Director Meeting

¢ AUGUST 23

Viewing Party at 7pm on Royal Deck,
Royal Palace, Atlantis

All the food and drinks you can handle while
viewing the finals on multiple giant screens

All Access: $185

Final Show/Telecast from 9pm to 11pm
Imperial Ballroom, Atlantis

VIP $1,000

(including entrance to coronation ball)
Sections 3-7: $750; 8-11: $400; 11-13: $250;
14-20: $175

Coronation Ball starting at 11pm
Royal Court, Royal Towers, Atlantis
All Access: $145

¢ AUGUST 24

Departures

(More events will be added as
the schedule is finalised)

Astronauts inspect space shuttle ahead of landing

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

SPACE shuttle Endeavour’s
astronauts uncovered no notice-
able flaws in the thermal shield-
ing of their ship Wednesday fol-
lowing an in-depth inspection
with lasers and cameras,
according to Associated Press.

Flight director Tony Ceccac-
ci said a preliminary look at the
images beamed down found

was on track for Friday’s
planned landing. But he cau-
tioned that 20 hours usually are
needed to analyze all the data.
The survey of the wings and
nose, which took almost all
morning, is standard before a
shuttle returns to Earth.
Endeavour’s successful space
station construction mission is
due to end Friday morning.
NASA wants to make sure
the most vulnerable parts of

Endeavour’s heat shield were
not pierced by micrometeorites
or space junk during the past
two weeks in orbit.

The astronauts used a laser-
tipped boom to check for dam-
age.

It’s the same tool used to
check for launch damage early
in the flight; nothing serious
was detected back then despite
an unusual loss of insulating
foam from the fuel tank.

nothing amiss, and everything



Savings so BIG
we couldn't hold
them in the store!,

a
SUFDICS Biisva,
Of (tems Wvidst

saVINGsS 7 Pihe ttt 2b

188 Wulff Road
Tel: 323-3973 or 325-3976
Open Mon-Fri 7:00am-4:00pm ¢ Saturday 7:00am-3:00pm
Web: www.buildersmallbahamas.com
Email: info@buildersmallbahamas.com

© POG? Ceealive Edge
THE TRIBUNE







KENWOOD KERR



No ‘recovery’
in BISK stocks
until 2010 Q2

Market suffering from
investor confidence time
lag, plus absence of liquidity
and institutional investors to
show ‘true value’ of equities

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
business@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamian stock mar-
ket is unlikely to experience
“any real substantial recovery”
until possibly the 2010 second
quarter, a leading investment
advisor told Tribune Business
yesterday, due to its continued
liquidity problems and ‘time

SEE page 5B

Bahamas ‘fortunate’
to avoid mass lay-offs
in financial industry

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
business@tribunemedia. net

THE Bahamas has “been
fortunate so far” to have avoid-
ed mass lay-offs in its interna-
tional financial services indus-
try, the Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board’s (BFSB) chairman
saying yesterday that the sec-
tor had done well to “hold our

isin

TH UR SD Aly



WoW lai eac0.



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Resort project
set to be sold

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
business@tribunemedia.net

he receiver for a $250 million

Bahamas-based resort project

has begun moves to find a buy-

er for the development through
selecting a real estate agent to market it,
Tribune Business can reveal, as a former
financial backer attempts to enforce a
$24.228 million judgment against the pro-
ject’s principals.

Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, the Baker Tilly
Gomez partner and accountant, who is act-
ing as receiver for the Berry Islands-based
Chub Cay development, after its principals
allegedly defaulted on the repayment of a
$45 million loan to Scotiabank (Bahamas),
is understood to be close to selecting a
Bahamian real estate agent to market the
project to potential buyers/investors.

Among those agents in the mix are said
by sources to be the likes of H. G. Christie
and Damianos Sothebys International, with
Mr Gomez thought to be leaning in favour
of choosing the latter.

He is attempting to sell Chub Cay in a
bid to recover at least some of the funds its
principals owe to Scotiabank (Bahamas),
although finding a purchaser could prove
difficult in an economic environment over-
shadowed by recession and the aftermath of
the global liquidity/credit crunch.

* Receiver for $250m Chub Cay project set to appoint realtor to market
development to buyers, and recover Scotiabank (Bahamas) $45m loan
* Other financing partner seeking to enforce
$24m judgment against project principals
* MP says project’s failure has left area’s economy ‘struggling to survive’

Meanwhile, BA Chub Cay, a vehicle of
private equity firm, Cerberus Capital Man-
agement, which also provided a $16 mil-
lion loan to Chub Cay, is attempting to
enforce a $24 million judgment it obtained
in New York against the project’s three
principals in the south Florida courts.

According to court documents obtained
by Tribune Business, Cerberus is attempt-
ing to enforce the $24.228 million judg-
ment against Walter McCrory and Bob
Moss, plus the estate of the late Kaye Pear-
son. The judgment gives Cerberus the $16
million original principal on the loan, plus
$3.212 million via interest at 18.5 per cent,
levied between May 10, 2007 and June 1,
2008. A further $4.696 million in penalty
interest for the period June 2, 2008, to June
10, 2009, has also been assessed.

Meanwhile, the MP for the Berry Islands
yesterday told Tribune Business that Chub
Cay’s failure and slide into receivership
had brought his constituency’s economy to
a virtual “standstill”, with many “struggling

business@tribunemedia.net

* BFSB chair says sector
done ‘well to hold our
position’ after stock
market meltdown’s
impact on client base

* Unaware of any ‘wave’ of
redundancies to come,
as tepid stock market

A LEADING international bank saw its
Bahamas operations suffer a 71.4 per cent drop in
2009 second quarter net income to $200,000, it
was revealed yesterday, a decline that partly
reflected the sale of its fund administration busi-
ness last year.

The sale of Butterfield Fund Services
(Bahamas) during the 2008 third quarter meant
that any year-over-year comparatives for Bank of
Butterfield’s Bahamian operations were some-
what skewed, with total revenues for the three

to survive”.

Arguing that it was very much “the soon-

er the better” for a sale to be concluded,
Vincent Peet, the former minister of finan-
cial services and investments in the Christie
government, said: “The bank [Scotiabank
Bahamas] is still in possession. Right now,
things appear to be at a standstill and I
have no information as to where they are
with any additional investor. The concern is
certainly very high in regard to that pro-
ject.”
Mr Peet added that a number of staff
had been terminated at Chub Cay as a
result of the receivership, and the number
of employees left was “so small”.

He added: “It is causing my constituency,
the whole area, to become even more
depressed, not knowing what is happen-
ing. Most of the employees came from
North Andros, and with the employee num-
bers dropping the whole area has been neg-
atively impacted. We are struggling to sur-
vive.”

Bahamas bank sees 71.4 per
cent net income decline

By NEIL HARTNELL

. a
Dae Gace en canes But drop and comparatives impacted

by Butterfield’s sale of fund business

* Total assets at Bahamas private bank
rise 12.3% to $174m, with assets under
administration also ahead at $2.4bn

from $700,000 to $200,000 year-over-year. How-
ever, Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) saw its total
assets increase by 12.3 per cent in the six months
since 2008 year-end, rising from $154 million at
December 31 to $174 million at end-June - a $19
million increase.



Money Safe.
Money Fast.

MoneyGram.

international Money Traneer

Bank of The Bahamas

[HBT ERABAT IOAN AT

Online at
BankBahamatOniine.com

Rum Cay
developer
talking to
potential
investors

* Head of $700m project
says discussions with ‘a
few’ interested parties
proceeding at ‘measured
pace’ to avoid
undercapitalisation

* Adds that outlook one of
‘very cautious optimism’
in belief economy
starting to turn

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
business@tribunemedia.net

THE developer behind the
$700 million Rum Cay Resort
Marina project yesterday said
he was in talks with “a few”
groups who had expressed
interest in investing in the pro-
ject, and said the outlook was
one of “very cautious opti-
mism” given signs the global
economy was starting to turn
around.

SEE page 8B

The information cic is from a

party and The Tribune can not be |
responsible for errors and,
from the daily report,

Butterfield attributed the total assets increase

SEE page 9B

position” given the global stock
market downturn’s impact on

SEE page 7B

months to June 30, 2009, down by 37.6 per cent at
$2 million.
Net income for the 2009 second quarter fell

recovery ‘means so
much more to Bahamas’



Shipping volumes showing increase

ARE YOU PREPARED FOR THIS
UPCOMING HURRICANE SEASON?

APPLY FOR A

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Bahamas-based shipper set to
implement Saturday receiving

SEABOARD Marine is starting to see an increase in container
shipping volumes, its inside sales coordinator said yesterday, as the
company prepares to implement Saturday receiving at its Miami
location from August onwards as a result of increased demand from
Bahamian businesses.

Oralee Deveaux said that on average Seaboard is shipping full
containers from Miami to Nassau, and the implementation of the
Saturday Less Container Loads (LCL) initiative will serve to fur-

ther increase their shipment volumes.
“We’re looking forward to an increase in that area,” she said. i I [ | Wr
Seaboard’s operations manag- on @ | WU
, Th Gibson, echoed th A

er, Thomas Gibson, echoed the SBE page 8B ty , 4 / i i A ve Boat

PROTECTION LOAN

——

TODAY!
EINANGING UP TO 7 YEARS:

ha UL eat

HURRICANE SHUTTERS
HURRICANE SUPPLIES
GENERATORS
INSURANCE PROTECTION

|° Bank of The Bahamas

WINTERNATION A L
Revolutionizing The Way You Bank!

New Providence * Grand Bahama * Andros * Inagua * Exama
San Salvador » Cat Island »* Coral Gables, FL

Head Office Nassau: (242) 397-3000
www. Bank Bahamas Chnline.com


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

TRANSFORMATION MINISTRIES
INTERNATIONAL

PPCSAEE: -





























aut IL ot I et publ

VENUE: B-C.P.O.U HALL
FARRINGTON RD.

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

7.30PM NIGHTLY

GUEST SPEAKER

PASTOR | .
(EMPOWERMENT WORSHIP CENTER
LEXINGTON, KY)

MINISTRY OF
WORKS & TRANSPORT

The general public is invited to attend a

TOWN MEETING

Thursday, 30 July, 2009
starting at 69m

Bahamas Tourism Training Center Lecture Theatre
[COB School of Hospitality]

To discuss the proposed design
for the Big Pond Project. This |

is your opportunity to

provide your input and
comment on the

proposed design.

Please be there.
For futher information contact

302-9538

Your presence and feedback is important.

— aa —

THE TRIBUNE



BANK of the Bahamas International’s managing director, Paul McWeeney, is pictured with the

Euromoney Award for Excellence.

BANK of the Bahamas
International has been named
the ‘Best Bank’ in the country
for the third time by
Euromoney magazine, which
granted the award just as the
Bahamian institution recog-
nised its 20th anniversary.

“For Bank of the Bahamas
to stand for the third time
shoulder-to-shoulder with
some of the leading financial
institutions in the world is an
outstanding honour, and we
are proud to have won and to
bring such recognition to the
Bahamas,” said managing
director Paul McWeeney,
who flew to London for the
July 11 award ceremony.

“For a young bank like
Bank of the Bahamas to have
been awarded the
Euromoney Award for Excel-
lence three out of the last four

(Photo by Wellington Chea for DP&A)

Bank gains leading
award for third time

years speaks not only to our
growth, but to the innovation
the Bank of the Bahamas
team has demonstrated and
the array of quality products
and services earning interna-
tional approval.”

In announcing the award,
Euromoney applauded Bank
of the Bahamas’ ability to
stave off the recessionary tide
that has hammered the indus-
try.

“An economic slowdown
globally has had little impact
on Bank of the Bahamas,” the
leading financial industry pub-
lication said.

“At its mid-year results at
end of December, the bank
reported it had attracted 5,000
new accounts, opened a
branch in Cat Island and
grown its private banking
division, showing its strength

domestically and in Florida,
where it recently opened an
office.”

Held annually since 1992,
the Euromoney awards are
based on performance, quali-
ty service, innovation and
momentum.

“We thank Euromoney for
honouring us again and
pledge to continue to do all
we can to deserve that recog-
nition,” said Mr McWeeney,
who heads a bank that in two
decades has grown from $90
million in total assets to near-
ly $800 million.

Bank of the Bahamas first
won the Euromoney award in
2006, a year after being the
first Bahamian bank to win
the sought-after Bracken
Award from The Banker
magazine, a division of the
Financial Times Group.

EXCELLENT CAREER
OPPORTUNITY

QUALITY CONTROL
TECHNICIAN NEEDED

Do you want a rewarding fulfilling career witha
growing dynamic Company?

We are accepting resumes for a much needed
QC (Quality Control) Technician

Person must have Hazard and Critical Control
Point training and awareness of occupational
safety and Health Procedures.

QC/QA experience required and FDA experience

is a plus.

Person must have experience in Lab testing,

Microbial

Microsoft Excel,

Filtration,

Spectrophotometer

use,

Word and Outlook.

Person are required to have their own personal
vehicle and Pay and benefits are based on
experience and degree.

Apply immediately

Resume are to be E-mailed to
rbalfour@ nautilush2o0.com
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 3B



eS
MTT a I aay

Films can inject up to $15m Rr

into nation’s economy

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Films and TV productions
shot in the Bahamas can inject
up to $15 million in extra
spending into this nation’s
economy in addition to employ-
ing Bahamians, the Bahamas
Film Commission’s senior man-
ager told Tribune Business,
while Bahamian films have also
been finding their footing in the
local market.

Angela Archer said the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation
consistently scouts film shows in
order to market the Bahamas
as a film-friendly country.

"The Film Commission has
a good working relationship
with government entities to
ensure things are done quick-
ly,” she said.

Ms Archer said movie
shoots, photo shoots and pro-
duction of commercials in the
Bahamas is a large part of the
Ministry's marketing strategy.

And that strategy appears to
have been having some success.
Film star and movie producer,
Tyler Perry, who is shooting a
film in Eleuthera, is said to
have brought almost $1 million
into that island’s economy.

While films such as Casino
Royale brought in an estimated
$7-$8 million, with just a small
part of the movie shot in Nas-
sau, Pirates of the Caribbean
brought in almost $15 million
and used several locations
throughout the Bahamas.

Shot

Unfortunately, Ms Archer
said, these types of films are
shot in the Bahamas only about
every two to three years.

She said the film shoots in
the Bahamas are typically down
during the summer months
because of the chance of hurri-
canes. "At this time most peo-
ple shy away from the tropics to
shoot," said Ms Archer.

However, she said the

Bahamas attracts feature films
because of its proximity and the
wide range of locations avail-
able.

Ms Archer added that the
Bahamian film industry has
been expanding with more
"Bahamans using opportunities
to make their own films”.

And Bahamians have been
seen assisting large movie hous-
es who come to the Bahamas
with things such as production
and coordination. "They have
been involved as extras, make-
up artists and stunt people,” Ms
Archer said.

According to her, the
Bahamian film industry is grow-
ing rapidly, with one or two
individuals investing in equip-
ment large studios may need to
shoot their films. She said that
instead of shipping equipment,
movie houses can rent what
they need from one Bahamian
company in particular.

"More and more people have
been here and hired him," said
Ms Archer.

Bahamas tourism set for 2010 revival

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

THE WORLD Travel and
Tourism Council (WTTC)
expects the Bahamas’ Travel
and Tourism Consumption to
grow by 8 per cent in 2010, and
by a further 3 per cent in 2011,
while predicting a 4 per cent
increase in sector employment
in 2010 and a marginal 2 per
cent increase in 2011.

The WTTC has been a
resource for world tourism and
travel data, and closely follows
the actions of global govern-
ments and their policies, as well
as Central Banks and their
financial data.

According to its forecasting
tool, Bahamian government
spending on the tourism indus-
try is expected to increase by 3
per cent in 2010 and 2 per cent
in 2011, while capital invest-
ment - which experienced a
major 8 per cent decline year-
on-year - is predicted to grow
only by about one tenth of a

percentage point in 2010,
before showing growth of about
6 per cent the following year.

Travel and tourism demand,
which took a hit globally as a
result of the economic down-
turn, declined in the Bahamas
from year-end 2008 by 8 per
cent, with the WI'TC expect-
ing an almost similar increase in
2010 and 3 per cent growth in
2011.

The WTTC recorded a 12
per cent decline in this coun-
try’s tourism gross domestic
product (GDP) between 2008
and 2009, but projects a sharp
spike in GDP of 11 per cent in
2010. This denotes the predic-
tion of a swift recovery for the
Bahamas following the bot-
toming out of the global reces-
sion, with marginal growth of
2 per cent year-on-year being
felt by 2011. Unemployment is
expected to shrink by 7 per cent
in 2010 and remain relatively
flat into 2011.

The WTTC has also predict-
ed that Asia, namely China and
Japan, will be the industry lead-

ers in tourist arrivals to the
Caribbean by 2020.

China is poised to become
an almost $90 billion leader in
outbound tourist flows within
the next ten years, still one
place below the US.

“It’s amazing how this coun-
try (China), when you open it
up, how people are going to go
overseas. Here on the chart we
said that in 2020 there will be
100 million Chinese going over-
seas — maybe more,” said
WTTC president Jean-Claude
Baumgarten recently.

The other eight biggest trav-
el and tourist economies are
projected to be Japan, Great
Britain, France, Spain, Ger-
many, Russia, Italy and Mexico.

With regard to those statis-
tics, the Bahamas government
and Ministry of Tourism have
cornered at least three of the
top five emerging travel and
tourism economies, with
increased airlift to Great
Britain, direct flights into
France and its proximity to the
US.

The Bahamas Government
Ministry of National Security

Notice

Request for Proposal (RFP)

for

Electronic Monitoring (EM) Solution

The Government of The Bahamas is seeking proposals from Vendors/
Implementers to provide an Electronic Monitoring (EM) Solution, as a
purpose of monitoring and tracking offenders.

Interested Vendors/Implementers should collect a copy of the RFP,
inclusive of the technical requirements, from the Ministry of National
Security, 3rd Floor Churchill Building Rawson Square, Nassau, The

Bahamas.

Proposals should be delivered on or before Friday, 25 September 2009 by
3pm in a sealed envelope addressed to:

Chairman
Tender’s Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre

West Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

Labeled: RFP-Her Majesty’s Prisons Electronic Monitoring Solution

All submissions will be opened at 10:00am on Thursday, 1 October 2009
at the Tender’s Board meeting, 3rd floor Conference Room, Ministry of

Finance, Cable Beach.

The Government reserves the right to reject any or all tenders
































































LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
“Eattage Lat With Private Beach
FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

Web Listing # 8377

Mario Carey Realty
2t's abaut yaw... Let's talk.

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013

info@mariocareyrealty.com
www.mariocareyrea com

REQUEST FOR
ote.
i PREQUALIFICATION
NAD :

LPIA Expansion Project Stage |
US Departures Terminal

Nassau Airport
Deresioprre Cor pry

Ledcor is seeking contractors to assist in completion of Stage | of the LPIA Expansion
Preyect (LS Departures Testnircal) All cantractors, particularly Bahamian contractors, are
encouraged to participate in this significant national proyect. Scopes to be tendered to
complete the fit out of the new terminal include:

+ Doors & Hardware + Mechonical

# Interior Glazing = # Electrical

+ Drywall

+ Flooring

# Masonry
# Millwork

+ Speciaities
# Paine
Prequalification will include, based on the tender packages, the following cntena:
Ability to bond, provide letter of credit or demonstrate finance! capacity
Experience
References
Bahamian ownership / content

Frequatificnton packages wel! fe avadiaie dor got yp ar ithe lester Conmteenon Rakamas Loneied' ore aifice ar
ipncien Floating Javernationay Arport Minoior fata Road by phone at APSF SEL? or by email regowst ar
infoC230@ledcor.com. dnerested contracterr mart abtair a prequalifcation package by Aupuot 7 ANN

Church of God Ministries
“The Mega Worship Centre”

July 30th — August 2nd

4th PASTORAL &
28th CHURCH'S ANNIVERSARY

Theme: “No Limit”
Scripture Text: Ephesians 3:20-21

Friday, July 31st-7:30 pm
Speaker; Pastor Tameko Collie,
Bethany Assembly Church

€
:

Sunday, August 2nd-11:00 am
Speaker:
Pastor Eric D. Clarke, M.A., J.P.
President of The Cayman laland
Conference of Seventh-Day Adventist

Ww"

Host Pastor:
Rev. Sherelle Saunders

Thursday, July 30th-7:30 pm
Speaker: Pastor Shameka Morley
Anointed to Reign Ministries

Wa Oe Ce Oe Oe Oe Oe Oe eC Oe Oe Oe

r

Saturday, Auguat ist-7:00 am
“FUN, RUN, WALK, SWIM" &
All Day Family Fun Day
(In Memory of the late
Bishop Austin E. Saunders)

a io 8)

Fox Hill Road & Davis Street
Telephone: 242-324-0339
PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Y ahi d-: R, areal
Anti-Aging Spa
Full Service Spa & Salon



Highly mouvated, self-starting professionals who possess |
the requisite skills, work ethics, a desire for an opportunity
to grow in your chosen career, and to contribute to and |
benefit from a long and mutually-beneficial working
relationship.

Send details of your qualifications by email to:
(info@ baharetreat.com),
or drop off to Raha-Retreat Spa & Salon
East Bay Street
Attention: Mrs. McKenzie

Please include contact information and the most
convenient time to reach you.



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/873
Equity Side

IN THE MATTER of All that parcel of land
containing 5 Acres situate Northwestwardly of
The Settlement of Cherokee Sound, Abaco.

AND
IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Charles Earl Bethel

NOTICE

The Petition of Charles Earl Bethel formerly of
Cherokee Sound, Abaco one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and now a resident
of the State of New York one of the United States of
America in respect:-

ALL THAT parcel of land comprising Five (5) Acres
situate Northwestwardly of the Settlement of Cherokee
Sound in the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and which said parcel
of land is bounded on the NORTHEAST and NORTH
by vacant Crown Land and running thereon One
thousand Six hundred and Seventy-eight and Seventy-
one hundredths () feet on the EAST by vacant Crown
Land and running thereon One hundred and Thirty-
two (132) feet more or less on the SOUTH and
SOUTHWEST by the Sea and running thereon One
thousand Eight hundred and Thirteen (1,813) feet more
or less and on the NORTHWEST by Grant B-87 and
running thereon One hundred and Thirty-two (132)
feet more or less and which said piece parcel or lot of
land has such position shape marks boundaries and
dimensions as are shown on the diagram or plan filed
in this matter being Plan No.1879 AB and is delineated
on that part of the plan which is coloured PINK.

Charles Earl Bethel claims to be the owner in fee
simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme
Court in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have his
title to the said land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours in the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the said
City of Nassau;

(b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, Mareva House, 4 George Street in the
City of Nassau, Attorneys for the Petitioner;
and

(c) The office of the Administrator at Sandy Point,
Abaco.

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower
or a right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim
not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the
14th day of September, 2009 file in the Supreme Court
and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
statement of his claim in the prescribed form, verified
by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any
such person to file and serve a statement of his claim
on or before the said 14th day of September, 2009 will
operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for the Petitioner
Mareva House
George Street
Nassau, Bahamas



To advertise, call 502-2371

Chamber executives ‘retreat’ to g0 forward

THE newly-elected officers and direc-
tors of the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce participated in a retreat at the
Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort to dis-
cuss the organisation’s objectives for the
current administrative year.

Headed by executive director, Philip
Simon, and president Khaalis Rolle, the
group discussed the opportunities and
challenges in the current economic envi-
ronment.

The retreat was facilitated by Wil

Pineauchief executive of the Cayman
Islands Chamber of Commerce, who
shared insights on programmes and
strategies successfully implemented in
his market.

¢ Pictured are (front L-R) Chester
Cooper, second vice-president; Marvia
Thomas, Chamber associate; Wil Pineau,
chief executive, Cayman Islands Cham-
ber of Commerce; Khaalis Rolle, presi-
dent; Gershan Major, first vice-president;



Darron Cash, treasurer; Yvette Sands,
secretary; Antoinette Butler, Chamber
associate; Dionisio D’ Aguilar, former
president; Robert Myers, director.

(Back L-R) Hank Ferguson, director -
SMESU trade unit; Odley Aritis, direc-
tor; Philip Simon, executive director; Tim
Covington, director; Aaron Brice, direc-
tor; Merritt Storr, director; Dr Jonathan
Rodgers, director; Pedro Roberts, direc-
tor.

(Photo by Leah Davis)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MELANIE TUCKER of
ORCHARD TERRACE, P.O. Box 8843, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 30‘ day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

This is to inform the public that Martin-Essex
Solomon has retired from the Firm of Higgs
& Kelly. Godfrey Kenneth Kelly, C.M.G. and
Ronald James Cole will continue to carry on a
law partnership practicing under the firm name
“Higgs & Kelly” at Chambers situate at 384 Bay
Street, P.O. Box N-4818, Nassau, Bahamas,
telephone 322-7511. Mr. Solomon is no longer a
partner of the Firm but continues in the capacity
of a consultant to the firm.

—

yz Heath For Life

SSITION OPENING]

ae
==

WN isoy(ey- 1
TECHNOLOGIST

QUALIFICATIONS:

* Baccalaureate degree in Medical Technology

* 2 years experience

¢ ASCP. NCA or AMT Certification

¢ Excellent written and oral communication
skills

POSITION SUMMARY:
The successful candidate will be required to:

* Cross-train through all areas of the lab -
Chemistry, Hematology, Blood Bank and
Microbiology;

* Perform phlebotomy and specimen
processing and any other duties assigned.

Please submit resume via email: nwatkins@doctorshosp.com
or hand-deliver to Doctors Hospital, Human Resources Department
ONLY QUALIFIED APPLICANTS WILL BE CONTACTED.

Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JUDE EDOMWONYL of
COCKBURN TOWN, SAN SALVADOR, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 30 day of July, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSUE MERICE of
STAPLEDON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SB-50202, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23 day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

CAMBRIDGE CAPITAL INVESTMENT LTD.

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) CAMBRIDGE CAPITAL INVESTMENT LTD. is in
voluntary dissolution under the provisions of Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(o) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 04" June 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Andrew Ramage
of 38/40 Victoria Street, Douglas, Isle of Man.

Dated this 30" day of July A. D. 2009



Andrew Ramage
Liquidator

CT LL
BRAND MANAGER

Come join our team a leading Wholesale/Distributor serving
perishables/food products throughout The Bahamas for 25
years

Requirements

¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills
Excellent motivation & Coaching skills
Possess excellent planning, organizational and
implementation skills
Strong multitasking ability
Strong leadership & managerial skills
Ability to exert initiative
Recording, summarizing and verifying results of sales
and movement of product
Strong internet skills, emailing, group messaging and
research
Proficient in Microsoft Office and Quick Books
Applications
Available to travel to Family Islands when required
Transportation

Experience requirements
¢ Three years experience in supervisory/management
position
¢ BA or equivalent degree
Please fax all resumes to 394-0282 or call 677-6731

Salary & Benefits based on experience


THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 5B



No ‘recovery’ in BISX stocks until 2010 Q2

FROM page 1B

lags’ between the recovery in
investor confidence here and
elsewhere.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive, said
the relative absence of liquidity
in the Bahamian securities mar-
ket meant that investors were
“not getting the true value” for
stocks listed on the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX).

In addition, the institutional
investors and professional mon-
ey managers, such as pension
funds and insurance companies,
were not trading equities on a
regular basis - something that
not only contributed to BISX’s
domestic market liquidity
issues, but also failed to indi-
cate the true value of listed
stocks and what they were real-
ly worth.

BISX earlier this week
released statistics showing that
its listed stocks had yet to expe-
rience the fledgling recovery
being experienced by other
global markets and indices, with
its All-Share Index down some
7.8 per cent for the first six
months of 2009.

In contrast, other global
stock market indices were up.
The MSCI Emerging Market
Index was ahead by 34.3 per
cent as at June 30, 2009, com-
pared to its year-end 2008 close.
Similarly, the Standard &

Poor’s (S&P) 500 Index was up
1.8 per cent, while the FTSE
100 Index was only down 4.2
per cent.

“You can point directly to
the fact that we are lagging in
terms of investor and consumer
confidence,” Mr Kerr told Tri-
bune Business yesterday, when
asked why BISX and the rest
of the world appeared to be
headed in opposite directions.

Pointing out that the BISX
All-Share Index had performed
better than many global indices
over the medium-term, being
down only 13.78 per cent when
compared to the 30-40 per cent
value slippages experienced by
others last year, Mr Kerr said of
the Bahamian equities market:
“There’s a lag in there.

“BISX may take some time
in catching up, assuming all
things remain equal and the
recovery in global markets con-
tinues at the same pace.”

Asked when Bahamian equi-
ties markets were likely to
recover and regain their
upward momentum, Mr Kerr
replied: “I'd just be guessing,
but I suspect we will not see
that in any real, substantial way
until the second quarter of next
year, maybe.”

Share prices for almost all
BISX-listed stocks have been
under pressure for some time,
due to the sustained build-up
in sell orders as mostly smaller,
retail investors seek to exit their

investment and generate liquid
cash to meet current obliga-
tions. These ‘sell’ orders, num-
bering more than 200, vastly
outnumber the minuscule num-
ber of ‘buy’ orders, producing
the downward pressure on
stock prices.

This was more pronounced
in stocks that were more liq-
uid, Mr Kerr said, as retail
investors in these cases were
actually able to find buyers and
cash out. “Across the board,
liquidity has always been the
issue,” he added.

As for institutional investors,
while they were expected to
hold equities as long-term
investments, many had gravi-
tated to fixed income instru-
ments - such as bonds and pref-
erence shares, plus bank
deposits - and away from stocks
given the perceived market
volatility.

Arguing that professional
money managers perhaps need-
ed to educate clients better on
the need to hold on to their
equity investments long-term,
and not drop them at the first
sign of volatility, Mr Kerr said:
“In this liquidity perfect envi-
ronment, they should be com-
ing in and picking up stocks at a
good value.”

But, with “smart money not
getting in and out” of the
Bahamian equities market and
stimulating trading, there was
nothing to “demonstrate the

ADVANCED FAMILY MEDICINE CENTER ; —

true value” of many BISX-list-
ed stocks. As a result, investors
were not getting the “true value
of securities”.

However, Mr Kerr acknowl-
edged that institutional
investors in the Bahamian mar-
ket were faced with “the diffi-
culty of re-entering the mar-
ket” at an appropriate price if
they traded out of their hold-
ings in a particular stock.

NOTICE is hereby given that WISLER JOSEPH of
CARMICHAEL ROAD, P.O. BOX CR-54802, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 30" day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Please be advised that the Nassau office of

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS
will be CLOSED on

Friday, 31 July 2009

to allow staff to enjoy their

#149 Shirley Se am

Tal: 326-1111 * Fax 326-1112
Healthy Kids

Back to School
Summer Campaign

Take advantage of the summer break

CT
We regret any inconvenience this
may cause.

F eae ae ie IME

MIEISPA

a

Normal working hours will
resume on
Tuesday, 4 August 2009.

This summer before echool starts, annual physicals
are one of the most important things on your “To Do List",

Annual Physical for the Kids & You!
Family Medicine & Skin Care Clinic Mon - Sat 9 - 6

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS PUBLIC
SERVICES UNION

N

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue
Accounting,

URGENT
NOTICE

The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and the
Family Islands and the reconciliation of all reverie accounts other than miseellanequs
receivables,

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

' Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in New Providence and
the Family Islands.

Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers.
Prepares the sales budget.

Prepares the Revenue Accounting Department Budget.

Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Recetvable Recomeciliation.
Oversees the training of all Customer Services statf in the new billing software.
Prepares monthly Board reports.

Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenue reports.

Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of Statistics.
Provides statistical billing information for Family Island managers.

Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in the
Family Islands,

Attends yearly community meetings as well as ad hoc meetings required during
acquisition of new locations,

Develops and implements rules, guidelines and procedures for the efficient
operation of the department,

The Bahamas Public Services Union (BPSU)
Contributory Medical Plan will cause to come into
effect new medical premium rates effective 1st, July
2009.

= * = * = * + & £ *

The new premium rates are due to the escalating
cost of healthcare services and treatment for all our
members.

Job requirements include:

‘ A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Accounts or equivalent

‘ A minimum of 8+ years of expenence in accounting practioe and theory.
‘ Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualifications

‘ Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas.

‘ Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing,

.

.

.

.

All members of the Contributory Medical Plan are
urged to contact the Medical Plan Office at the
George Lafleur Building on Wulff Road immediately
with regards to the increase of medical premiums.

Sound reasoning and good judgment skills
Ability te interpret financial reports.
Good time management skills.

Project management skills

For more information please visit our website at:
http/Wwww.bpsubahamas.com

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box W-7509, Nassau, Bahamas on or before:
July 31, 2009,


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 7B

Bahamas ‘fortunate’
to avoid mass lay-offs
in financial industry

FROM page 1B

its client base.

Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, the
Baker Tilly Gomez partner and
accountant, told Tribune Busi-
ness that he was “not aware”
of any significant redundancies
to come in a sector whose high
net worth individual clients had
seen their wealth holdings hit
hard by the collapse of global
equities markets in 2008.

Speaking in the wake of at
least 40 lay-offs in the Bahami-
an international financial ser-
vices industry, including 24 at
Ansbacher (Bahamas) and five
at CIBC Trust Company
(Bahamas), plus Butterfield
Fulcrum (Bahamas) decision to
downsize by releasing 11 staff
over a six-month period, Mr
Gomez said that while institu-
tion-specific factors were at
play, these developments also
indicated that the sector was
being impacted by global
trends.

“Considering the times in the
financial markets and what’s
been happening to high net
worth individuals, this does not
come as a total surprise,” Mr
Gomez told Tribune Business
of financial sector lay-offs.

“The Bahamas has been for-
tunate so far that there’s not
been mass lay-offs, and that
there’s only been a scattering
to date, although that’s no com-
fort to those affected.

“From a general perspective,
certainly we are saddened by
any lay-offs in the sector, finan-
cial services being the second
pillar of our economy. One has
to be moved by the fact per-
sons in the sector are being
affected.”

However, striking a more
upbeat note, Mr Gomez said
he was unaware of any major
redundancies being planned in
the international financial ser-
vices sector - the industry that
contains a large number of

high-salaried jobs.

“We can’t be surprised that
this is happening, but I don’t
see any sign that there is a wave
to come,” Mr Gomez added.
“We have very much held our
position, and held it signifi-
cantly. ’m not aware of any sig-
nificant redundancies and lay-
offs to come.”

Referring to the Ansbacher
(Bahamas) situation, Mr
Gomez said that while he felt
“sorry for those persons
involved in the process”, any
major merger - such as the Sen-
tinel/Ansbacher tie-up - was
bound to result in a “significant
duplication” of staff posts and
activities. This made some
redundancies almost inevitable.

Addition

In addition, the BFSB chair-
man said major global institu-
tions were rationalising their
geographic footprint, and “are
moving out of certain jurisdic-
tions for commercial and busi-
ness reasons”. An example of
this was Qatar National Bank’s
(QNB) decision to exit the
Bahamas by selling Ansbacher
(Bahamas) to A. F. Holdings.

A major factor impacting the
Bahamian financial services
industry, with its emphasis on
private banking and wealth
management, is that fee income
is linked heavily to the level of
assets under administration. If
these assets decline in value, as
almost all have due to the late
2008 stock market collapse, rev-
enues and income for
Bahamas-based financial insti-
tutions is reduced, forcing some
to bring staffing levels in line
with business activities.

Similar trends were impact-
ing the Bahamian investment
fund administration business,
Mr Gomez said, influencing
both the Butterfield Fulcrum
downsizing and Ernst &
Young’s decision earlier this
year to lay-off several accoun-
tants. The latter move reflected

a decline in investment fund
auditing work.

The BFSB chairman said
that prior to the New Year, “we
anticipated that come the
month of January the fund
industry would be challenged
as a result of the downturn in
global markets.”

Investors were switching out
of equities investments and
looking for safer havens, such
as fixed income instruments
and bank deposits, resulting in
a wave of investment fund
redemptions.

Many funds were unable to
meet these requests, either sus-
pending redemptions or plac-
ing themselves into liquidation.
Other investment funds were
also wound-up by their man-
agers/promoters, all of which
impacted Bahamas-based fund
administrators.

“It takes some time, but the
result of that impacts jobs in
the Bahamas,” Mr Gomez told
Tribune Business. “As funds
wind down, there is less busi-
ness for fund administrators, so
that impacts the level of staffing
they have.

“T’m not surprised in the gen-
eral sense that there’s reduced
capacity in the fund adminis-
tration business. Fee income is
determined by the level of
activity, and when net asset val-
ues (NAV) are reduced, there’s
a direct impact on fee income
for fund administrators and
managers.

“When there’s no upside, it
does not bode well for advis-
ers and administrators, so there
is less income at all levels. The
less income you make, the less
staff you need. That is where
we’re headed in that business,
and I hope that is all we see [in
terms of redundancies’.”

With global stock markets
showing tepid ‘green shoots’ of
recovery from 2008 lows, Mr
Gomez said he hoped the trend
would continue because “it
means so much more for us in
the Bahamas”.

Director / Chief Executive
The Bahamas Maritime Authority
London

The Bahamas Maritime Authority administers The Bahamas’ ship
registry, the third largest registry in the world. It is responsible for
servicing and policing ils registered vessels, promoting The Bahamas
registry to the international shipping community, and for collecting
and accounting for all ship registration and other applicable fees.
The Authority also advises the Government of The Bahamas on all
aspects of international shipping.

The Authority is a statutory Government-owned corporation,
supervised by a Board whose Members are appointed by the
Government, and which reports to the responsible Minister.

Day-to-day management of the Authority rests with its Director, who
is its chief executive. He or she oversees all of the Au wity's
dealings with shipowners, with the IMO, and with cla: tion

wicties, independent inspectors and the legal and financial
communities. The Authority's main office is presently in London,
where the Director has been based, but it also has offices in Nassau
and New York, with other locations forthcoming.

Candidates must be able to demonstrate a successful track record in
a senior position working in or with the shipping industry. They
should have leadership _ qualities, experience in directing and
developing personnel, and success in team-building. They should
also have experience in financial management. They should be
holders of a university degree and/or a class | ship's officer certificate.

An appropriate salary will be offered to the preferred candidate.

Applicants are invited to write, enclosing a copy of their C/V, and
with the details of their current salary to: Mr. Peter John C-oulandris,
Deputy Chairman, The Bahamas Maritime Authority, Consulate
General of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, 231 East 46th
Street, New York, '.Â¥. LO017, USA.

Closing date for receipt of applications is August 31st, 2009. All
applications will be acknowledged.


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS & TRANSPORT
CONSTRUCTION OF NEW MARKET,
DOWNTOWN NASSAU

PRE-QUALIFICATION OF CONTRACTORS

The Government of Commonwealth of The
Bahamas through the Ministry of Public Works
and Transport is inviting qualified General
Contractors to participate in a Pre-Qualification for
the Tender for the construction of a new Market to
be built on a restricted site in Downtown Nassau.

The structure will be approximately 38,724 sq. ft.
with associated external works and services.
Contractors will be

The General required to

provide a detailed indication of their competence.
both technically and financially, to carry out the
intended scope of work within a reasonable time.

Interested parties may collect the pre-qualification
documents as of Thursday, 2 July, 2009, between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. from:

The Office of the Director of Public Works

Ministry of Public Works and Transport

John F. Kennedy Drive

Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 322-4830

Fax: (242) 302-9770
The completed _ pre-qualification document
should be deposited in the Tender Box at
the Ministry of Finance, 3rd Floor, Cecil
Wallace-Whitfield Building. West Bay Street, P.O.
Box, N-3017, Nassau. The Bahamas not later
than 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, 4 August, 2009.

The Government of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas has the right to reject any or all
pre-qualification contractors. .

Signed

Colin Higgs
Permanent Secretary



Rum Cay developer talking to potential investors

FROM page 1B

John Mittens, chairman of
Montana Holdings, the project
developer, said in a statement
released in response to Tribune
Business’s inquiries that talks
with potential investor groups
were proceeding at “a mea-
sured pace”, given that confi-
dence was still fragile and the
need to ensure any deal would
enable the Rum Cay Resort
Marina project to proceed.

He told Tribune Business:
“We are experiencing the
toughest economy in recent his-
tory with regard to financing of
real estate development, not
just in the Bahamas but world-
wide, and particularly in North
America.

“I do believe that the econo-
my is just beginning to turn
around, but investors remain
very cautious. There have been,
in recent months and weeks, a
number of potential investment
groups who have expressed sig-
nificant interest in the Montana
Holdings project at Rum Cay,
and we are presently engaged
in discussions with a few.

Mr Mittens added: “These
negotiations are progressing at
a measured pace, since what we
will not do is consider any
investor interest that would
undercapitalise the develop-
ment, because that is a recipe
for disaster. Overall, I think the

Shipping

showing

FROM page 1B

container volume increases the
company is experiencing, saying
that shipping in the Bahamas
is starting to pick up again.
One of the larger shipping
lines in the Bahamas, Seaboard
reported earlier this year that
they had not been negatively

view is one of very cautious
optimism.”

The Montana Holdings
chairman was responding to
Tribune Business’s inquiries,
after this newspaper learned
that the developer was in talks
with potential investors inter-
ested in the Rum Cay project.

One source familiar with the
situation had told Tribune Busi-
ness that Montana Holdings
was, in particular, holding
“promising talks” with an
unnamed British investor who
was said to be keen in investing
in Bahamas-based resort pro-
jects generally.

Although Tribune Business
has been unable to learn of the
potential investor’s name, it is
understood he has been putting
out feelers to other Bahamas-
based projects in need of
financing.

One source described the
potential investor as “UK-
based and a strong supporter
of the Bahamas, who believes
the Family Islands hold great
potential for touristic and resi-
dential development”.

While the global credit
crunch and financial crisis, and
subsequent recession, held up
the Rum Cay Resort Marina
project and almost brought it
to a standstill due to the virtual
impossibility of finding new
debt financing lines, Montana
Holdings has been far from
idle.

It has continued operating

volumes
increase

affected by the downturn.

Ms Deveuax said in March
that Seaboard had seen no
decline in revenue since the
onset of the global economic
downturn.

And she added that the com-
pany had restructured its rates
in order to compensate for
changes in the economy, and
to remain competitive.

Meanwhile, the shipping
company has invested in its
security with a one-day train-
ing programme held yesterday
at its facilities on East Bay
Street.

The director of security from
the Miami-based operation of
Seaboard Marine, who wished
to remain anonymous for secu-
rity reasons, came down to train
local Seaboard staff and law
enforcement on the seven-point
detection method for twenty-
foot equipment units (TEUs).
This detection method ensures
agents and law enforcement ful-
ly scrutinise containers leaving
the Bahamas for drugs, guns
and stowaways.

According to the director,
the training is an international
initiative, which has gone to 15
ports already.

Notwithstanding the training
programme and the company’s
earlier claims of financial sta-
bility, he said Seaboard had
been negatively affected by the
economic downturn.

Some Bahamian based-ship-
ping companies reported a 10
per cent decline in container
throughput volume in the first
three months of 2009. The Port
Manager at one container ship-
ping line said there had been a
major decline in high-end
imports.

However, Ms Deveaux said
Seaboard had seen a tremen-
dous increase in grocery ship-
ments from Miami.

Questions loom as to what
will happen to properties

and fixing up the Sumner Point
Marina on Rum Cay, which it
acquired from American
investor Bobby Little, with the
island used as the site for
Southern Boating magazine’s
April 2009 photo shoot. That
is understood to have helped
drive boating traffic to the Sum-
ner Point Marina this season.

Montana Holdings’ Rum
Cay project is little different
from the many other mixed-use
resort investment projects that
were either slowed to a crawl or
brought to a standstill by the
credit crunch, and their subse-
quent inability to access new
lines of debt financing.

These projects were also fur-
ther impacted by the inability of
potential real estate buyers to
obtain financing, plus the dry-
ing up of investor and con-
sumer confidence.

However, Mr Mittens has
been as good as his word, hav-
ing remained living with his
family in Nassau and refusing to
walk away from the Rum Cay

Resort Marina project, just as
he said in a September 29, 2008,
interview with Tribune Busi-
ness.

At the time, Mr Mittens said
he had invested $32 million to
date into the Rum Cay project,
and at the time had been paying
staff wagess and other project
costs from his own personal
expenses.

He told Tribune Business
then: “I’m not going anywhere.
I don’t have anything but the
Rum Cay development. I sold
all my UK assets to come here.
I’m stuck here, gladly putting
my nose to the grind stone. I’ve
invested millions in this coun-
try, and brought my family
here. I’m not a remote devel-
oper. I’m here on a daily basis,
working with my staff.

“We have not given up. I just
don’t like giving up. All you
can do is keep the faith, keep
working. It always changes, but
I can’t forsee when. This is the
worst economic situation since
the Great Depression.”

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2009/CLE/gen/qui/850

IN THE SUPREME COURT

Common Law & Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF all that piece parcel or lot of land
comprising 719.77 acres situate on the Eastern side of the
Queenis Highway in the Settlement of Taits in the Island of
Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the

Bahamas.

AND

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Veronica C. Miller (nee Major)

NOTICE

The Petition of VERONICA C. MILLER (nee Major) of
Taits, Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth

of The Bahamas in respect of:-

“ALL that piece parcel or lot of land situate on the Eastern
Side of the Queen’s Highway in the Settlement of Taits,
Long Island comprising 719.77 acres and which said
parcel of land is bounded on the NORTHWEST by a
loose stone wall separating it from other portions of the
original Grant to the Earl of Dunmore said to be the
property of Samuel Carroll and Nathan Major and running
thereon Eight thousand One hundred and Eight (8,108)
feet more or less on the NORTHEAST by the Atlantic
Ocean and running thereon in several courses Five
thousand and Seventy-one (5,071) feet more or less on
the SOUTHEAST by a loose stone wall separating it
from land originally granted to James Rose now said to
be the property of Timothy Darville and Emest Dean and
running thereon Nine thousand Eight hundred and Thirty-
two (9,832) feet more or less on the SOUTHWEST by
land said to be the property of Emily Major and running
thereon Five hundred and Ninety-three and Forty-four
hundredths (593.44) feet on the NORTHWEST by land
said to be the property of Theresa Major and running
thereon Three hundred and Thirty-seven and Forty-nine
(337.49) feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property of
the said Theresa Major and running thereon Four hundred
and Seventy-eight and Twenty-two hundredths (478.22)
feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property of Melvin
Major and running thereon One thousand Five hundred
and Three and Ninety-two hundredths (1,503.92) feet
and by a Twenty (20) foot road reservation leading to the
Queen’s Highway, on the NORTHWEST by the property
of William Mortimer and running thereon Three hundred
and Thirty-five and Eighty-seven hundredths (335.87)
feet and on the SOUTHWEST by the property of the
said William Mortimer and running thereon Eight hundred
and Thirty-five and Eighty-one hundredths feet (835.81)
and which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position
shape marks boundaries and dimensions as are shown on
the plan filed herein and recorded in the Department of
Lands and Surveys and Plan “296 LI” and thereon
outlined in Pink.

VERONICA C. MILLER (nee Major) claims to be the
owner in fee simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme
Court in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section
3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have her title to the
said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
fereyelopmieat Mier ihe con: determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
tainer facility is moved. Mr Gib- by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said

son said he has no idea when Act.
that move will take place.

belonging to the shipping com-
panies once the new Arawak
Cay container port is complete.

Seaboard Marine's property
is owned by the Symonette
family, and nothing has been
forthcoming on plans for its

Tel: 502 2356)

for ad rates



A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours in the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the said City
of Nassau;

(b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes,
Mareva House, 4 George Street in the City of Nassau,
Attorneys for the Petitioner; and

(c) The office of the Administrator at Clarence Town,
Long Island.

ae _ MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORTG&

Coc
NOTICE
CORRIDOR 18

SAUNDERS BEACH AREA
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower or a
right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the 14th day of September,
2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed
form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of
any such person to file and serve a statement of his claim
on or before the said 14th day of September, 2009 will
operate as a bar to such claim.

In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems
JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES 5&.A has been
contracted for the Completion of the New Providence Road Improvement
Project — International Package. Road construction will be commencing on
Corridor 18 (Saunders Beach),which may require diversions on:

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009

Poinsettia Avenue through Marine Drive and exits at Bougainvillea Avenue.

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Mareva House
George Street
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner

There will be delays along this vicinity due to the one-way traffic flow system.
Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further information will be
provided in the local media



Tel 742-2 7-Rad ) P4F-1s 7-36 10 Err: peochshemasScarte inne oon. er
THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas bank sees 71.4 per
cent net income decline

FROM page 1B

to growth in its customer
deposits. Client assets under
administration also increased
marginally in the six months
since the 2008 year-end,
increasing by 4.3 per cent to
$2.4 billion from $2.3 billion.

And, unlike several Butter-
field operations in other coun-
tries, Butterfield Bank
(Bahamas) needed to make no
loan loss provisions during the
2009 second quarter.

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas),
the private banking unit, is the
Bermuda-headquartered bank’s
remaining wholly-owned
Bahamian operation, the funds
administration business having
been spun-off into Butterfield
Fulcrum (Bahamas). Butter-
field Bank still holds a 40 per
cent stake in Butterfield Ful-
crum.

Tribune Business reported

earlier this month that Butter-
field Fulcrum was downsizing
its Bahamian operations by
making 11 staff redundant over
a six-month period, and trans-
ferring the impacted unit’s busi-
ness to its other offices. It
implied that the Bahamian
operation was likely to close its
doors.

Butterfield Fulcrum’s
Bahamas business has gone
through two ownership changes
in five years. Originally known
as Deerfield Fund Services, it
was acquired by Butterfield
Bank in January 2004 and
renamed Butterfield Fund Ser-
vices (Bahamas).

Then, in July 2008, Butter-
field decided to merge all its
funds services operations -
including those in the Bahamas
- with Fulcrum.

When Butterfield acquired
Deerfield, it had 12 staff and
assets under administration of

©

TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian for the following posi-
tions for the 2009 - 2010 School Year.

Dean of Student

Applicants must:

A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing to
subscribe to the statement of Faith of Temple Christian

School.

B. Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or Higher from
a recognized College or University.

C. Possess excellent organization, Inter-personal

communicative skills.

D. Be able to assist with all aspect of the Administration.

$1.8 billion. The latter figure
had grown to $2.9 billion by
year-end 2004, and its size at
the time of the Fulcrum deal
can be gauged by the fact that,
at year-end 2007, Butterfield’s
assets under administration in
the Bahamas (when it still
owned both the funds business
and the bank), were $5.447 bil-
lion.

Ta

Ug

At year-end 2008, when the
funds business had been
merged into Butterfield Ful-
crum, assets under administra-
tion in the Bahamas totalled
just $2.349 billion. This implied
that Butterfield Fulcrum’s
Bahamas operations had almost
$3.1 billion in assets under
administration by year-end
2008.

=

Kingsway Academy High
School Teaching positions
For September, 2009

Kingsway Academy High School invites
qualified applicants for the following teaching
positions for September, 2009.

- Chemistry
* Music

* Spanish

* French

The successful

candidates

MUST be

qualified, born again Christian with a valid

Teacher's Certificate and minimum

if a

Bachelor's Degree. He or She must also
be willing to participate in Extra Curricular

activities, etc.

Application forms can be collected from
Human Resources section at the Business
Office on Bernard Road. Telephone 242-

324-6269 / 324-6887.

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 9B





























Duncan Town Airport Rehabilitation

Tender publication No.: FIA/5/15/1 (GOB) EUROPEAID/
128849/M/WKSIBS (EU)

The Government of The Bahamas intends to award
a works contract for the rehabilitation of Duncan
Town Airport on Ragged Island. The works contract
consists in the partial rehabilitation and the provision
of periodic maintenance (pavement patching and
sealing) of the existing runway and apron. The runway
is about 3 850 feet long. New shoulders and swales
on each side of the runway will also be constructed.

The works are co-financed by the Government of The
Bahamas and the 9th European Development Fund.

The period of performance to complete the works is eight
(8) months.

The tender dossier Is available for inspection and
purchase at the following address:

Department of Public Works of the Ministry of Works and
Transport,

John F. Kennedy Drive,

1st, Floor East Wing

Nassau (N.P.), The Bahamas

Tel.: +242-322-4830

Fax.: +242-326-7344

Sealed Tender submissions are to be deposited in the
Tender Box located at:

Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

3rd Floor Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Tender submissions will be received DO later than
4:00 pm, Monday, 14th of September 2009. Any tender
received after this deadline will not be considered.

Tenderers are invited to attend the Tender opening at
10:00am., Tuesday, I5th of September 2009 at the
Tenders Board.

Possible additional information or clarifications/
questions shall be published on the EuropeAid website:
http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/work/funding/index_en.htm
(Select Contracts link) and will be communicated in
writing to all tenderers.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS
FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, 2009.

E. Be able to discipline, counsel students. Colin Higgs

Permanent Secretary

F. Have high morals standards. Ministry of Public Works and Transport

Application must be picked up at the High School Office
on Shirley Street 23rd July, 2009 and be returned with
the following: a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph, church affiliation, pastor’s name and three
references to:

GH-691

MINISTRY OF THE

GH-852

MINISTRY OF THE

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is July 30th, 2009

NOTICE

ALL ENTRANCES

to the grounds of
ST. FRANCIS XAVIER
CATHEDRAL
WILL BE CLOSED

To retain ownership rights
between the hours of
6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

MONDAY,
AUGUST 3rd, 2009.

To advertise in The Tribune,
just call 502-2371 today!

ENVIRONMENT

Bahamas Maritime Authority

Director Stepped Down
Nassau, London, New York - July 17, 2009

The Bahamas Maritime Authority announces that Mr.
Kenneth D. McLean stepped down as the Authority's
Director effective July 17, 2009, Mr. McLean joined
the Authonty in 2005 following a distinguished career
in the maritime sector. He has served a successful
term as Director.

Mr. Peter John Goulandris, the Authority's Deputy
Chairman, said, "We are justifiably proud of the status
of The Bahamas international ship registry as the
"Registry of Choice’ for many of the world’s finest
shipowning groups. Ken McLean has shared our vision
of quality and of service. He has been an ambassador
for the flag and has served his term as The Bahamas
Maritime Authority's Director with distinction. Both
[ personally and The Bahamas Maritime Authority
wish him well."

Mr. Kenneth D, McLean said, "I am pleased to have
completed a successful term as The Bahamas Maritime
Authority's Director, and to have been of support in
extending both the quality and the scope of the
Authority's service. The Bahamas Flag represents
excellence in the increasingly complex field of
international ship registry. I am certain that the
Bahamas Registry, with quality and service as its
guiding philosophy, will continue to build on its pre-
eminent standing in the international maritime
community."

The Authority wall designate Mr. McLean's successor
in due course. In the interim, the Authority’s senor
management team will oversee the Authority's day-
to-day affairs, reporting directly to the Authority's
Chairman, Mr, lan Fair and Deputy Chairman, Mr,
Peter John Goulandns. The Authority is grateful as
well for the continued advice and support of His
Excellency Paul Farquharson, OPM, The Baharnas’
Permanent Representative at IMQ and High
Commissioner,

The Bahamas Maritime Authority oversees The
Bahamas’ intemational ship registry, the third largest
in the world, The Bahamas Registry, supported by
many of the world's finest shipowning groups,
represents the highest quality in maritime
administration, oversight and service.

ENVIRONMENT

Lf

Director / Chief Executive

The Bahamas Maritime Authority
London

The Bahamas Maritime Authority administers The
Bahamas’ ship registry, the third largest registry in the
world. It is responsible for servicing and policing its
registered vessels, promoting The Bahamas registry to
the international shipping community, and for collecting
and accounting for all ship registration and other
applicable fees. The Authority also advises the
Government of The Bahamas on all aspects of
intermational shipping

The Authority is a statutory Government-owned
corporation, supervised by a Board whose Members
are appointed by the Government, and which reports
to the responsible Minister,

Day-to-day management of the Authority rests with
its Director, who is its chief executive. He or she
oversees all of the Authority's dealings with shipowners,
with the IMO, and with classification societies,
independent inspectors and the legal and financial
communities, The Authority's main office is presently
in London, where the Director has been based, but it
also has offices in Nassau and New York, with other
locations forthcoming.

Candidates must be able to demonstrate a successful
track record in a senior position working in or with the
shipping industry. They should have leadership
qualities, experience in directing and developing
personnel, and suacess in team-building. They should
also have experience in financial management, They
should be holders of a university degree and/or a class
| ship's officer certificate. An appropriate salary will
be offered to the preferred candidate.

Applicants are invited to write, enclosing a copy of
their C’Y, and with the details of their current salary
to: Mr, Peter John Goulandris, Deputy Chairman,
The Bahamas Maritime Authority, Consulate
General of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
231 East 46th Street, New York, N.Â¥. 10017, USA,

Closing date for receipt of applications is August 31st,
2009. All applications will be acknowledged.


THE TRIBUNE



THE WEATHER REPO



5-Day FORECAST































TT Sa NG











fil

SN A a i

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST



















Today Friday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
ert _ High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 84° F
' » Pa i o|1|2 3|4|5 617 s|olioh FC FIC FC FIC Friday: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 84° F
co te f : all J ty Acapulco 93/33 79/26 s 92/33 78/25 t FREEPORT Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 84° F
ail — ee LOW =| MODERATE | HIGH J V.HIGH Amsterdam 66/18 54/12 sh 68/20 55/12 pc Friday: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 84° F
‘ mek ORLANDO XN Ankara, Turkey 82/27 52/11 s 81/27 52/11 ¢ = ABACO Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 85° F
High:94°F34°C = Afternoon Clear to partly cloudy Partly sunny, a Partly sunny, a Clouds and sun, a Clouds and sun, a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 91/32 75/23 s 93/33 75/23 s Friday: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 85° F
rr Low: 76°F/24°C / thunderstorm in and breezy. t-storm; breezy. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 56/13 47/8 pc 58/14 51/10 c
sare all Ml spots. ° © ° ° Bangkok 88/31 77/25 sh 89/31 77/25 sh rl
\ @ et apes Pawan et | re Me oe i: oe be i 7 Barbados 86/30 77/25 sh mee TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
TAMPA ag : IDES FOR NASSAU Barcelona 80/26 68/20 s 79/26 65/18 s
a i , ETE Terai i
High: 91° F/33° C : 04°-86° F 94°-80° F High _Ht(ft.) Low Ht) Peng eee Sica
Low: 76° F/24°C ry r, The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 3:07 a.m. 2.2 9:05am. 03 oe ao oe —. a s
ae @ “ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 350p.m. 2.7 10:12pm. 05 aan e 79/26 57/13 7m 75/93 56/13 7s
7 CLL Friday 400am. 21 10:02am. 04 Bermuda 82/27 76/24 s 81/27 75/23 pe
mh 4:49pm. 27 11:09p.m. 0.5 Bogota 66/18 43/6 sh 64/17 44/6
Sa Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 504dam. 21 1058am. 04 Brussels 70/21 52/11 pc 72/22 55/12 pc
ABACO Temperature 5:43pm. 2.7 0 Budapest 94/34 64/17 s 91/32 64/17 pe
ih: Q9° ° IGM: sess sacudvssenselacetsonaesecsiediiansd tecechane 91° F/33° C : : Buenos Aires 5412 41/4 s 54/12 45/7 pe
, pT Nal eee Low ga° F/ag° ¢ Sunday Bae tistam od Cairo 98/36 76/24 s 99/37 76/24 s
ai Cy ow: 78° F/: Normal high. ... asrrgieC ee 93/33 87/30 r 96/35 87/30 +
. of Normal low 75° F/24° C Calgary 76/24 50/10 pc 66/18 48/8 pc
4 of F,.: @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's DIQH oo. eeceseseeesseesseeesseeeeeees 93° F/34° C SUN Ay Ty yt Cancun 91/32 79/26 pc 92/33 78/25 sh
' —a High: 93° F/34° C ae Last year's low sires seeyt eye aces, 79° F/26° C ; Caracas 82/27 71/21 t 81/27 71/21 t
— Low: 79° F/26° C ¢ a Precipitation _ aie a ans Ly a a Casablanca 89/31 75/23 s 88/31 68/20 s
—_ yr al As of 2 p.m. yesterday .......ccceececcseteseecenees 0.00" = suliset....... 90 p.m. Moonset... .. “VO a.m. Copenhagen 70/21 51/10 sh 71/21 55/12 pe
ie. FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT me Year to date . 20. Last New First Dublin 64/17 50/10 sh 63/17 52/11 +
High: 91°F/33°C @ High: 91° F/33° C Normal year to date .o.......ccsecsessessseeseeeeeee 24.47" ‘ Frankfurt 75/23 50/10 pc 73/22 52/11 po
Low: 81°F/27°C a Low: 77° F/25°C i Geneva 76/24 53/11 pc 80/26 59/15 pc
SG AccuWeather.com ae Halifax 6719 61/16 t 77/25 61/16 s Showers Miami
; @ a mt Forecasts and aianhice provided by Havana 91/32 73/22 s 90/32 74/23 s T-storms aun
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Pe 13 Aug.20 = Aug. 27 Helsinki 75/23 57/13 pc 66/18 54/12 1 Rain Fronts
: High: 91° F/33°C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 90/32 81/27 t 90/32 81/27 t Le, 4 Flurries beastie ances Cold
~ i . i = o eo own are noon positions of wealtner systems ani
i Low: 81°F/27°C NASSAU Sesran'c Islamabad 104/40 82/27 s 104/40 82/27 t Be] Snow precipitation. Tempers bands are highs for the day. Warm fteniiteniin
High: 91° F/33°C ow: oe cam a 8 ae om sh [y_%] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Magu
~ One ° erusaiem s S
i at — a Johannesburg cate 446s soi 288 sf] -105| Os (NGBT 10s 205) HRN] aos 5ORH) cos 70s |e Se AaNTTET
KEY WEST -, fn CATISLAND Kingston 90/32 78/25 s 90/32 78/25 1
High: 91° F/83°C << a Lima 72/22 60/15 s 72/22 58/14 s
Low: 83° F/28°C High: 89° F/32°C London 68/20 54/12 sh 72/22 55/12 pe
eet © id om we; as as’ TBRTOe NaN UWAN Gs
. Manila 85/29 77/25 r 86/30 78/25 1 : =
aa > Mexico City 81/27 55/12 t 76/24 56/13 t
ail a Monterrey 104/40 75/23 s 104/40 77/25 s
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 79/26 64/17 pc 75/23 64/17 t
High: 88° F/31° C Hi h:91°F/33°C Moscow 81/27 61/16 pc 79/26 59/15 pe e
ANDROS Low: 78° F/26° C Low: 75°F/24°C Munich 78/25 54/12 pc 73/22 54/12 c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's High: 93° F/34°C ‘ Noe pee ae Pe oe oo fe Yy wn
highs and tonights's lows. : ——— ,. ew Delhi ou an O
: : Low: 76° F/24°C ie : in . Oslo 64/17 54/12 6 70/21 54/12 1
alll ) , om Paris 73/22 52/11 pc 77/25 57/13 pe A A Ir
a) Prague 85/29 54/12 s 77/25 52/11 pe Way uU : 1Cane
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 73/22 65/18 c 70/21 65/18 +
US. Cres oe ‘Mae oud s ‘SOD. Bae s Fae can rest easy knowing
Low: 75° F/24°C Rome 91/32 69/20 s 90/32 66/18 s
a “me a aa aa ae MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 90/32 81/27 t ~—~=«I82. 79/28 sh that you have excellent insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ade High: 91° F/33° C a aa im oe oe oe coveravre no matter which
FIC FIC FIC FIC FC FIC FIC FIC FC F/C FIC = F/C Low: 73° F/23° C ane Saad 0) h : d bl
Albuquerque 89/31 67/19 pc 92/33 68/20 s Indianapolis 84/28 62/16 t 81/27 GING s Philadelphia 90/32 74/23 t 88/31 72/22 1 CROOKED ISLAND ACKLINS Santiago 66/18 41/5 pc 55/12 37/2 ¢ Way e€ Win OWS,
Anchorage «74/21 «58/14 pe 74/21 «54/12 po Jacksonville «92/33 74/23 t «92/83 74/23 «+t ~—Phoenix 108/42 85/29 s 108/42 86/30 s i sun aa aul va nt rm eta one 7
Atlanta 84/28 70/21 t 82/27 70/21 t Kansas City 78/25 57/13 pc 85/29 63/17 s Pittsburgh 80/26 66/18 po 82/27 60/15 t RAGGEDISLAND — Uiist:93°F/34" a0 Paulo s s :
Atlantic City 88/31 72/22 t 99/31 69/20 t Las Vegas 106/41 80/26 s 106/41 84/28 s Portland,OR 101/38 64/17 s 92/33 63/17 s cae Low: 76° F/24°C aan ae wie pe aan ae Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 90/32 70/21 t 90/32 70/21 ¢ Little Rock 83/28 69/20 t 82/27 69/20 t Raleigh-Durham 92/33 73/22 t 91/32 71/21 t Low:73°F/23°C = % sen — Reg” Bh Ne ores
Boston 86/30 69/20 pc 86/30 71/21 t LosAngeles 80/26 66/18 pc 82/27 6417 pc St. Louis 82/27 6216 t 86/30 66/18 s . a ae See - eT OREEE mi
Buffalo 78/25 65/18 po 74/23 6015 t Louisville 86/30 68/20 t 84/28 64417 pc SaltLakeCity 87/30 6518 s 92/33 66/18 s GREATINAGUA wr Tala Gae ee am ot ee
Charleston, SC 90/32 75/23 t 92/33 76/24 t Memphis 85/29 71/21 t 83/28 70/21 t San Antonio 101/38 79/26 s 101/38 78/25 s High: 93° F/34°C aaa 75/59 SO Be 75/23 S73. pe INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Chicago 78/25 58/14 t 78/25 61M6 s Miami 91/32 81/27 t 91/32 79/26 San Diego 74/23 67/19 po 75/23 68/20 pc Low. 75°F24°C Trinidad 8/97 63/17 pc e790 64/17 5 ,
Cleveland 82/27 65/18 po 76/24 58/14 t Minneapolis 70/21 5743 t 80/26 63/17 pc Sanfrancisco 67/19 56/13 pc 67/19 56/13 pc ; TERESI 96/30 65/18 5 SiS 7aNESTNE (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 87/30 68/20 t 84/28 75/23 t Nashville 85/29 71/21 t 84/28 6518 t Seattle 96/35 60/15 s 87/30 61/16 s Gianna 86/20 66/18 s 83/28 66/18. pc en hace Exuma
Denver 71/21 53/11 t 88/31 5341 pc NewOrleans 92/33 78/25 t 92/33 78/25 t Tallahassee «91/32 73/22 t -92/33 73/22 t alc
i Warsaw 82/27 61/16 pc 75/23 55/12 pc A 350-3500 fl: graf Te: 999.0069 Ff Tel: 5-204
Le A GUA? 77S | OME TUDE Ee C2 COE pe O28E POA CaO Ae Mines ee i re i i
onolulu s s anoma Ul pe ucson s s -
Houston 97/36 79/26 t 97/36 78/25 t Orlando 94/34 76/24 t 93/33 75/23 t Washington, DC 92/33 75/23 t 90/32 71/21 t ah ee


The Tribune "””"”
OBIMUARIES
RELIGION

\ ~< The Tribune

—‘\ ee
» \0
707.9

SS hour chaice for ine family:
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

In Loving Memory

Mr Leslie Nolan Smith

February 13, 1933 - July 30, 2008

‘Poem
I thought of you today
but that is nothing new
I thought about you yesterday and
days before that too.

I think of you in silence.

I often speak your name.
Now all I have are memories
and your picture in a frame.

Your memory is my keepsake,
with which I will never part.
(sod has you in his keeping,

I have you in my heart.

Cherished Memories By Loving wile:
Leonie Smith, brother, sisters, in-laws,
nieces, nephews and a host of family
and friends



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

ers ——
In Loving Memory of |





Mr. Doug ouglas Cudsie McKenzie

27th August 1940 July 2008
If tears could build a stairway,
and memories were a lane,
we would walk right to heaven,
to bring you home again.

No farewell words were spoken,
no time to say good-bye,
you were gone before we knew it,
and only God knows why.
Our hearts still aches in sadness,
and secret tears still flow,
what it means to loose you,
no one will never know.

28 FF

Sadly missed by your loving wife:
Eugenia McKenzie; daughters: Therez and
Francine McKenzie and Royanne
McKenzic-Williams of Atlanta;
grandchildren: Symone and Brandon
McKenzie and “Zaire Williams of Atlanta;
nephew Ricardo Johnson; and a host of
other relatives and friends.

Gone but not forgotten

“) aT 2 PPP OTIS ETS A

Fa


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

GARTH
MINARD
THOMPSON,
69

of Nassau, The Bahamas,

who died on Monday, 27th

July, 2009, will be held at :

St. Matthew’s Anglican Church, Shirley and
Church Streets, Nassau, today, Thursday 30th
July, 2009 at 3:00 pm.

Reverend Father James Moultrie and The
Venerable James Palacious will officiate and
interment will follow in the Western Cemetery,
Nassau Street, Nassau.

Mr. Thompson is survived by his wife Irene;
daughters, Joni Marchant and Minarda Powell; son
Travis; sons-in-law, Ron Marchant and Stuart Powell:
daughter-in-law, Nashtelka; grand-children, Carter
and Amber Powell and Trent Thompson; sisters,
Sheila Harrison and Barbara Albury and brother,
Trevor Thompson; brothers-in-law, Lawrence
Harrison and Tyrone Albury and sister-in-law,
Dorothea Thompson; numerous nieces and nephews
and other family members.

He will be fondly remembered by the management
and staff of Quality Auto Sales and Executive
Motors and many friends too numerous to mention.

In lieu of flowers, the family request that donations
be made to the Cancer Society of The Bahamas,
P.O. Box 3.8. 6539, Nassau in memory of Garth
M. Thompson.

Arrangements by Kemp’s Funeral Home Limited.

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 3

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

PETER S
O'BRIEN

will be held on Saturday, | st
August, 2009 at 10:00a.m. at
graveside, Western Cemetery,
Nassau Street. 4

Reverend Charles A. Sweeting |
will officiate.

Peter Allan O'Brien, 56, aka "Captain Pete" or "Peter
Pan", passed away 21st May, 2009 in Munroe, North
Carolina, after suffering a heart attack. Peter was
predeceased by his parents, Mr. & Mrs. Gordon O'Brien
who founded the Stapledon School for Peter and others
like him. Peter was also predeceased by his brothers,
Andrew and Patrick O'Brien and is survived by his sisters,
Helen Garcia and Mary Ann Jones; brothers, Michael and
Jimmy O'Brien; brothers-in-law, Victor Jones and Jose
Garcia; sister-in-law, Roslyn O'Brien; many loving nieces,
nephews and friends who, as children, grew up under his
watchful eye as he shared his toys with them.

These past 17 years Peter lived in Munroe, North Carolina
at the Karen Lane Group Home but spent Christmases
and summer holidays with family in Nassau or with his
sister Helen or brothers Pat and Jimmy Stateside, "Captain
Pete" would not visit Nassau without an adventure to Ft.
Charlotte and the Pirate Museum.

After his mother and brother Pat passed away, Sue Payne
of Indian Trail, North Carolina became his guardian in
North Carolina, Sue loved, cared for and looked after
Peter's needs when his family could not be there. Karen
Lane became Peter's second "home" and the staff, his
"family" there.

Our "Peter Pan" can surely fly now.
In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Stapledon

school, P.O. Box N. 3913, Nassau or Special Olympics,
P.O. Box 3.8. 19036, Nassau in memory of Peter O'Brien.



Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.
PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Yager funeral Home && Crematorium

Queen’s Highway
P.O, Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 « Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

i a

DELLAREASE
RACHEAL
COOPER VIL,
37

Coral Reef Estates,

on Saturday, August

Public Cemetery.

husband: Benedite Vil; two daughters: Sha-

Kintae Rolle and Laquay Vil; one grandson: |
Dexter Fowler Jr.; two stepchildren: Bee | Pinder and a host of other relatives and

eulah ;
Cooper, Mary Bastian, Dorlene Cooper and |
Starlene Ramsey; one brother: Harcourt |
Kingsley Cooper; father-in-law Hartley _ at Yager Funeral Home and Crematorium
Levarity; mother-in-law: Colmada Levarity; ! on Queens Highway on Friday from 12:00
grandmother-in-law: Pauline Forbes; 10) noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church on

oo Mother Laura Roberts, Brenda Laing, | Saturday from 11:30 a.m. until service time.
Louise Pinder, Virginia Cooper, Eugene |

Hield, Iva Cooper, Natalie Laing, Hazel /

and Bennicka Vil: four sisters:

' Baillou, Elsaida and Maudie Cooper; five
: uncles: William and Alfred Cooper, Masatio
' Baillou, JP Rev. Freddie Laing and Andy
! Hield; 10 brothers-in-law: Keith Bastian,
' Paul Ramsey, Stanley Missick, Hartley,

: Hastwell and Donny Levarity, Kevin
a resident of #66:

Missick, John Williams, Sidney Forbes and

| Lindsey Parker; six sisters-in-law: Shenell
Freeport will be held |

Parker, Sherell Forbes, Dorothy Williams,

: Ist} Vanessa Levarity, Princess Williams and
1, 2009 at 1:00 p.m. at Emmanuel Baptist |
Church, High Rock, Grand Bahama. ' nieces-in-law, 10 nephews-in-law, 10 grand
Officiating will be Pastor Henry Cooper and :

interment will follow in the High Rock 7 Cynthia and Berthamae Forbes, Lucy,

| Gladys and Ninea Jones; six uncles-in-law:

: Frank, Donald, Arnold and Van Forbes,
Left to cherish her memories are her:

Valerie Cooper; 15 nieces, 16 nephews, 11

nieces, 18 grand nephews, 5 aunts-in-law:

Hilton Jones and Brandford Harvey; one

' godson Ashton; one godmother: Alfreda

Roberts; one godfather: Rev. Lawrence
friends.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects

ee ee


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009,

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

GLEN WENDELL
GILLGOD
HOLMES, 67

of #13 Marlin Drive, Highland Park,
will beheld on Friday, July 31st, 10-200
am., at Holy Spint Anglican Church,
Howard Street, Chippingham. Rev'd
Fr. Harry Ward will officiate.
Interment will follow in the Western
Cemetery, Nassau Street.

He is survived by his wife, Cynthia if

W. Holmes; children, Claudelle Rolle-
Holmes and Cornell Rolle, Jules and Juliet Holmes, Carlene Delancy,
Rafael Holmes and Yvette Holmes. Kimberley, Annischka Holmes-
Moncur; siblings, Alonzo Holmes, Doranell King and Deborah Gaitor;
grandchildren, Joelle Holmes, Duran Holmes, Diamond Rolle, KK and
Mally, Geremy Mullings and Erin Delancy, Coryne Holmes-Rolle, Anwar,
Sharonda, Travis, Ron, Glennard, Jerrard, Raven and Rihanna Holmes,
Iman Joseph and Ayrton Moncur; great grandchildren, Geremy Jr. and
Genesys Mullings, Makiko Holmes, Nishand and Yukari Joseph; son-in-
law, Eric Delancy and John Moncur, daughter-in-law, Darchelle and
Renee Holmes; brothers-in-law, Hansel King, George Burrows, Kendal
Taylor and Patrick Kelly: sisters-in-law, Mildred Holmes, Mable Femander,
Rose Burrows, Mavis Burrows and Almonica McBain, nieces, Antoinette
King, Makella Cartwright and Thea Gaitor; nephews, Dwayne and Antoine
King, Darius Turnquest and Cedric Gaitor Jr, Ricardo Holmes, and Rev.
Michael Holmes; adopted children, Emile Ledee and family, Dominic
Deveaux and family, Theophilis and Antoinette Glinton and family, Jason,
Jordash and Joshua Clarke of New Jersey, Ann, Lionel, Bernard Jr, and
Chanel Cole of Florida, Ursula Larrimore, Kirizza and Kaivyah Knowles,
Vanessa A. Clarke of New York and William Davis; numerous relatives
and friends, Dorothy and Oswald Lightbourme, Margaret Bostwick, Mavis
Holmes-Hanek, Deloris Nottage, Beryl Murray, Millet Dorsette, Sheila
Rolle, Vernae Elcott, Judy and Richard Dawkins, Casscine Kinnear,
William and Paula Butler, Junior and Doralee Bain, Randolph Minnis
and family, Jean Cole of Florida, Bruce Elliott and family, Monsignor
Preston Moss, Hon, Hubert Minnis, Florence Clark of New Jersey, Dean
Patrick Adderley and Astrid Adderley, Omar Smith and family, Gavin
Johnson and family, Miranda Adderley, Isaac and Rosalita Davis of
Andros, Antoine Sealy, Mercia Strachan, Tom and Paula Darcy, Shirley
and Henry Saunders and family, Audrey Fountain, Kareem Hanna, Fr.
Harry Ward and Mrs Ward, Fr. Samuel Sturrup and Mrs Sturrup, the
Chippingham and Highland Park communities, and the church of the
Holy Spirit family: special friends, Sir Arlington Butler and Lady Sheila

Florida, Jacqueline Bain, Ruth Donaldson, David and Valerie Culmer
and family of Grand Bahama, Gracian Sands, and Dominic C. A. Culmer
and other family and friends too numerous to mention.

| Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
: Nassau Street on Thursday from 10°00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Friday
i at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

NIKITA NICOLO
OMAR CURRY,
34

of 440 Marathon Road Estates, will be
held on Saturday, August Ist, 10:00
am at Rhodes Memorial Methodist
Church, Montrose Avenue. Bishop Dr.
Raymond R. Neilly and Rev. Emily
Bementte will officiate. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Memorial
Gardens, Soldier Road.

| Nikita will be sadly missed and remembered by his devoted mother,
| Mary: ten aunts, Edwina Smith, Eudene Thompson, Fay Major, Zorene
: Curry, Angela Bullard, Sheila, Rosie and Terrice Curry, Agatha Ferguson,
! Betty Moss: seven uncles, William, Charlie, Colon, Calvert, Pedro and
| John Curry, George Bullard: four grandaunts, Marion Curry, Berline
: Curry, Gwendolyn Clarke, Mable King; one grand uncle, Paul Curry;
| numerous cousins including, Spence, Dwayne, Shelly, Craig, Steven,
| Sherry, Geoffrey, André Tony, Marcus, Marie, Ashtra, Clover, Kenneth,
: Amanada, Carlos, Hendrick, Drexel, Emory, Kenley, Patrick, Patricia,
' Hendrick Jr, Adrian, Zorene, Alexandria, Montez, Jodie, Jonek,

Christopher, Nicole, Vasht, Colby, Colon Jr, Colleen Agatha, Mikhail,

: Mikhala, Miquel, John Jr., Johnavan, Johnté; Nikita had some very special
| friends who were very supportive and remained with him until his passing,
| fiends include, Ceryl Jones, Allen Adderley, Mark Miller, Scarlette Stuart,
: Michael Rigg, Desiree Moxey, Sykvia Forbes, Kedmin Munnings, John
i Fox, Mario Sherman, Percy Wallace, Charmaine Minnis, Charmaine
| Duncombe, Detra Bethel, Deshon, Ron Hightower, Grant Merryman,
Jason, David Molzahm from Toronto, Canada; godparents, Dr, Brendamaec
| Cleare, Joycelyn Smith, Charles Curry; numerous relatives and friends
| including, Betty Clarke, Alexander Thompson, Betty Bethel and family.
: Evelyn Babbs and family, Pat Bootle, Heather Armbrister and family,
| Sheena Pratt and family, Basil and Agnes Charlow, Mr and Mrs William
| Jones, Mr and Mrs Ivan Cleare and family, Janet Shirley, Shani Marks,
: Charmaine Burrows, Cynthia Curtis and family, Reneé and Felipé Major
; and family, Ricardo Moncur and family, Wendy Smith and family, Mr.

Steven Sawyer, Jackie Hepburn, Joyce Moncur and family, Movena

; Clarke and family, Shannondon McKenzie and family, Dale Grant, Mr
; and Mirs. Ruben Stuart and Janet Peterson.

Butler; Ozzie and Edy Fowler of Florida, Carl and Menera Butler of |

: Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
; Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday
| at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.



PAGE 5
PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

.\ Vaughn O. Jones

MEMORIAL CENTER

“Honoring the memories of loved ones”
IMDEPEMDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

EVANGELINE
ALFREDA ‘Vangy’
HALL, 51

of Pinewood Gardens will be
held on Saturday August I,
2009 at 10:30 a.m. at St.
Thomas More Parish, Madeira
Street, Palmdale. Officiating
will be Fr. Alfred Culmer,
assisted by other Ministers of
the Gospel. Interment will follow in Old Trail Cemetery,
Abundant Life Road.

Precious memories will forever linger in the hearts of
her Husband: Frederick W. Hall, Mother: Sylvia Collie;
Father: Drexwell Rolle Sr.; Son: Michael F. Hall;
Daughter: Mickelle Hall; Grandchildren: Dekaj Derek
Pratt, Anthony, Nia and Haley Hall; Brothers: Franklyn
and Drexwell Rolle Jr.; Sisters: Gail Martin, Karen
Cooper, Vindora and Lashea Rolle, Wendy Mckinnon;
Mother In Law: Ann Hall; Father in Law: Frederick
Hall; Sisters in Law: Alice Rolle, Tanya Knowles,
Charlene Coakley, Magnola, Dedrie, Nathalie and
Delerease Hall; Brothers in Law: Stephen, Christopher,
Elvin, Paul, and Peter Hall, Alfred Coakley, Dwayne
Knowles; Uncles: Bertram Rahming, Peter and
Washington Dames, Aunts: Alicia Rahming, Yvonne
Dames, Jenny Evans, Roslyn Dames; Over 30 Nieces
and Nephews; Cousins includng: Tanya White, Dwayne,
Anthone, Stacy, Rochelle Dames; Sylvana, Alicia, Gina,
Gino, Karen, Bertram Jr. Rahming, Valencia Rolle;
Numerous Other Relatives and Close Friends including:
Barbara, Bernadette, Patrice, Tera, Cindy, Dereck Pratt,
The Montel Heights Family, Garden Hills Family, Wilson
Track Family, Yellow Elder and Pinewood Family.

Viewing will be held in the “Legacy Suite’ of Vaughn
©. Jones Memorial Center, Wulff Road and Primrose
Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m, and at the
church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to service time.

Wulff Road and Primrose Street,
Telephone: 456,9800/ 1 © 24 Hour Emergen
ephone: * ur Eme
434-9220 /380-8077 -

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 * Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

WELLINGTON
PAUL-CLARKE,
43

of Rock Crusher Road yl be held
on Saturday August 1°", 200° at
11:00 a.m. Church: St Joseph
Church, Boyd Roa Officiating:
Fr. Martin Gomes, $5.CC.
Interment: Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen & Spikenard Roads,

He is survived by his Fiancé

Dianne: seven (7) sisters: Renay

Clarke, Jenniemae Higgins,
Christine Lundy, Carol Rolle, Janet Hanna, Eunice Young & Ashley
Duncombe: nine (9) brothers: Leonard & Terrance Lundy, Wayde
Higgins, Joshua Eden, Alfred Paul, Shaquille, George & Stephen Clarke
& Marco Stubbs; twenty-two (22) nieces: Bettymae Major, Rochelle
Smith, Niokia & Sylvia Hudson, Sharelle Higgins, Indianna Strachan,
Lakeira Duncombe, Wequel, Rochelle, Joshanique, Anvber & Joshelle
Eden, Kaylisa & Karissa Hanna, Tessa Adderley, Shantell Rolle,
Shermaine Brown, Kasha & Shamelra Wolmane, Juliette, Natasha &
Ashanti Grant; fourtecn (14) nephews: Marco Major, Rendall & Kelsey
Hanna, Jason Strachan, Edward Wallace, Donavan Higgins, Joshua,
Christin, Justin, Gevonte Eden, Michacl Roker, Fabian & Renaldo Rolle
& Tomas Adderley; thirteen (13) grandnieces: Katic & Krystal Lewis,
Shavonne Clarke, Chadwick Wilson, Nikeytra & Nikenya Knowles,
Tatyana Smith, Mercedes, Brittany & Nakia Strachan, Shandise &
Gabriel Major & Cranique: eight (8) grandnephews: Alexander Smith,
Tyral Hepburn, Johnny $, Jerome Davies, Clarence Wilson, Jakad,
Lamont & Wade; three (3) sisters-in-law: Barbara Laing, Donalee
Higgins & Tambra Price; brother-in-law: Dennis Young; grandmother:
Beatrice Clarke; eight (8) aunts: Shirleymac King, Lillian Rolle, Audrey
Dean, Patsy Stuart, Betty Bamett, Margaret Major, Myrtle Boyd of New
Jersey & Marietta Miller; three (3) uncles: Godfrey Stuart & Granville
& Allan Clarke; cousins: Beatrice Smith, Sharlene, Sherry & Shantel
Rolle, Paulette & Sharmaine Bailey, Lillian Munroe, Shekira Whyms,
Raquel, Parnela, Ronette, Pauline, Dwina, Felicia & Keisha, Desiree,
Christopher, Tangemica, Patrice, Lisa, Thelma, Monique Newman,
Shameka, Nicola, Charles, Basil, Anthony Newman, Theophilus, Patricia,
Wanda, Kay, Tyrone, Matthew, Sarah, Kimberley, Leslie & Andrew
Stuart, Katrina, Burrows, Stephen & Andrew Burrows, Lisa Dames of
Abaco, Ronald & Spurgeon Dames, Delina Ferguson, Patsy Sturrup,
Theresa & Tavares, Capea & Ashton, Tameka Clarke, Anya & Melwem
Sturrup, Alvando Scott, Roosevelt, Renaldo, Lavana & Rasheed Minus,
Shawn, Shawnell & Jontae Clarke, Clinton Rolle, Dessalee & Lucy,
Esthenmae Wrcht, Annamae Sands, Sharlene Sanderson, Anthony &
Monica Wong, Green Clarke, Clarissa Johnson, Cheryl Hanna, Deon
Whoiht, Louise Bain & Sonia Non of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Ana
Gilbert, Durant & Annette Minus, Wendy North & Dr. Nelson & Perry
Clarke, Glen & Norman Rolle, Jessler, Lloyd, Loett Lightbourne,
Verlene Clarke & the Smith Family,

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF AGES
FUNERAL CHAPEL ON WULFF ROAD & PINEDALE ON
FRIDAY FROM 10 A.M. TO 6 P.M AND ON SATURDAY AT
THE CHURCH FROM 10:00 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.




THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 7

me COR IK Dee ere
7 GateWauy (hemorialruneral Chapel Wy
Harewood Sinclair Higgs L.F.D. |
President/Managing Director
(404) S45 Vea path P ated

alle « lad: a J) db!
iusis =i ji}!

fal, Wu

4:4 ilutir |

mal
4 iairita: el Tue e

erving The Entire Bahamas, Turks 6 Cacios Island

afi) Fece.o Nene vou) Mirus) 6) rusts
WHighertServicelisithemkeyptopescetiences

ee a a) Se SERVICE FOR

Prison Officer
DESERAY
STUART, 26

a resident of Mount Pleasant Village
will be held on Friday, 31st July,
2009 at 11:00 a.m. at Church Of
God Chippingham, Eden Street;
Officiating will be Bishop C. Dennis
Lafrenier; assisted by: Other
Ministers and interment will follow
in Lakeview Memorial & Mausoleum, J. F. Kennedy Drive.
Services entrusted to Gateway Memorial Funeral Chapel, Mount
Royal Avenue and Kenwood Strect.

The memories of Deseray Deandrea Stuart, ‘Desi’, will linger on
in the hearts of many, including her parents: Donna and Desmond
Stuart; daughter: Rogrea Grant; her fiancé: Perry Saunders Jr.;
grandparents; Gwendolyn Evans, Louis and Janice Stuart; four
(4) sisters: Italia Gordon, Chalese Tate, Crystal Adderley and
Sadia Stuart; three (3) brothers: Jamison Rolle, Kendal Cooper
and Desmond Stuart Jr.; two (2) sisters-in-law: Lavaughn Rolle
and Jathorn Cooper; three (3) brothers-in-law: Marvin Gordon
Sr.. Steven Sr. and Clinton Sr.; numerous aunts and uncles
including; Mebra Evans, Norma Johnson, Montrac Drammeh,
Paula Emmanuel, Paula Rolle, Marion Rolle, Shirlene Murphy,
Iva White, Vernita Rolle, Iris Rolle, Melony Poitier, Inspector
Alma Rolle, Inez Nesbitt, Gloria Symonette, Jessie Burnside,
Mary and Judy Stuart, George, Donald, Leonard, Samuel, Pasqual,
Jerod, Leon and Glen Rolle, Howard, Rudolph, Ettiene, Jerry,
Bernie and Hubert Stuart, Lenward Clarke, and Molifer Drammeh;
grandaunts including: Catherine Johnson, Mozena Sands,
Altheamae Lewis, Runez Major and Early Winters; granduncle:
Euticus Rolle; numerous cousins including: Lorraine, Lateisha
and John Farrington, Carlos Evans, Corporal Brian Roach, Lenroy,
Allen, Tammara, Joshua, Kino, George, Lateria, Telford, Ebony,
Natale, Donnella, Donald Jr., John, Lencice, Kelly, Gweneth,
Monette, Johnae, John John, Brian Jr., Cierra Lavette, Terrance,
Veronique, Carletha, Ceola, Miriam, Loretta, Shenique, Dino,
Sammy Jr., Chelsea, Christopher, Lavonda, Mikatlo, Tiffaney,
Elsworth, Ashley and other relatives and friends including Myrtle

and Michael Thompson, Angela Gray, Willamae Johnson, Michael,
Bertha and Roy Johnson, Melva Gibson, Rose, Judy, Paula and
Allen Newbold, Beroline Wells, Joystina Conliffe, Lloyd
Sands, Janet and Nathanel Lewis, Patricia Brown, Perry Sr. and
family, Yvonne Russell and family, Washington Smith and family,

Eloise and Mavis Cooper and the Stuart Clan of Bimini and Grand
Bahama, Superintendent Elliston Rahming, and the Staff of her
Majestyis Prison, A Recruit Squad 2006 in particular her best
friend Marlene Rolle, Bishop John N. Humes and family, Bishop
C. Dennis Lafernia and The Church of God Greater Chippingham
family, Invaders for Christ Church family (Freeport), Dr. H. A.
Simmons and familyThe Doctors and Nurses of Intensive Care
Unit, P. ML H., The Exuma Royal Bahamas Police Force Reservists,
The Staff of The Department of Labor, The Management
and Staff at the College of The Bahamas School of Nursing
Grosvenor Campus, The Black Village Community, The Mount
Pleasant Village Community, The Hawksbill and High Rock
Community, Grand Bahama, Ragged Island and Watkins Street
Community, Staniel Cay Community, Candice Mackey, Keilia
Adderley, Elder Ervin and Dr, Curleen Femander, Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Saunders, Rosetta Minnis and family, Odetta Brown and
family, Wanda Williams, Rodger Grant and many others too
numerous to mention.

DAE’*QWON SAUNDERS

He survived by his father: Perry Pedrito Saunders Jr.; sister:
Rogrea Grant; grandparents: Donna and Desmond Saunders,
Yvonne Russell and Perry Saunders Sr.; greatgrandparents:
Louis and Janet Stuart, Gwendolyn Evans, Louise Strachan and
Mr, and Mrs. R. Saunders; uncles: Tavane and Travis Russell,
Jamison Rolle and Chavez Saunders; aunts: Alexis Adderley of
Port St. Lucy, Florida and Italia Gordon; grand-uncles: Robert
and Ronald Saunders; great-aunts: Kathy Saunders, Ann Bowles,
Agatha King, Judy Edwards, Helen Jones, Pandora Roach, Rose
Campbell and Melvina Woodara of Miami, Florida; numerous
cousins including: Prison Officer T. Hall, Keisha, Tisco Diondco,
Ashla, Brian, Lorenzo, and other relatives, too numerous to
mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on
Thursday, July 30th, 2009 from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on
Friday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 30,

2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

and Crematouium Limited

SO nt Cocmansarn Lind!

IIA Eas! Coral Roos, Freeport, S.B., Bahamas

Telephone: (243) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005

Picisiieeiorcwicd Seidler ocacle Nassau, MUP, Boho,
P.O. Box CB-12072

Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 + Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL oH SILOS Be FOR

DOROTHY MORINA
SAUNDERS, 77

of Fritz Lane of East Street will be | Wiewing will be held in the Irenic Suite at Restview Mortuary
11:00 Voice of Deliveranc ? and Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday
WM am. at Voice OF Deliverance | from 10:00am to 6:00pm and at the church on Saturday from

WY, | 9:30 service time.
Malcolm Allotment East. Officiating : uae Ra OO Lee

will be Pastor Edlin Scott, assisted by

held on Saturday, August Ist, 2009,

Disciple Center, Deliverance Way,

i Gibson, Sandy, Lisa, Picky, Ida, Joyann, Sam, Marie, Doramae,
i | Docotty, Menera, Mrs. Belle, and others too numerous to
} mention along with the Fritz Lane family and the Community
i Nursing Home.

Pastor Carl Fred Curry and other ; |

ministers of the gospel and Interment |
Road, :

will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier

She was predeceased by her husband: Mr. Locksley Saunders
her son: Patrick Saunders and daughter; Paulette Brooks. Left :
to cherish precious memories of this gem are her three sons: :

lan, Kendrick and Cecil Saunders; brothers: Israel ‘Buster’

Wallace, Chief Apostle Leon Wallace, Errol and Allden Wallace; |
sisters: Shirley Sands of Eleuthera, Bahamas, Iona Wallace, :
Vedora Hall, and Inez McKenzie of Nassau, Bahamas; two }
adopted sons: Hamlin Newbold and Leviticus Ferguson; step |

children: Sharon, Kathleen, Diane and Ermestine; twenty one : Bs —Te . .
nieces: Donnamae, Rochelle, Meriam, Janet, Nicola, Mrs. Laran | Hes survived by his daughters: Kathleen Huyler Cooke, Debrah
Wallace-Williams of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Gia, Christana, | Huyler, Sande Huyler, son: Evereite Huyter; grand children:
Aramanth, Candia, Michelle, Inspector Eleian Sands, Tersha, :

De De, Ivilin, Marie, Golden, Shameka, Garnell and Sherell : . , : :
St oe ye ee ee a oe | Jason, Oral, Elton, Carvel, Joshua, Kevia, Anfernee, Ovante,

i Kenvia, Leon, Carlisa, Deon, Latrell, Vernon, Calia, Dajah,

Grand sons: Corey, Shevar, Lil Kenny, William, K-C, Cody : Ashanti, Aston, Calvin Jr., son-in-law: Leroy Cooke; brothers-
Chara, Rashad, Patrick, Jermaine, Giovanie and Dwayne; Great | P lor; st Banni F Ohio. Florida: 5 ;
Grandchildren: Willasha and Empress; Two aunts: Grace and | ° goul Florida, Dewitt Bannister of Ohio, Florida, sisters-in-
Eulamae Hepburn; Grand son-in-law: Devin Moss; mother-in- : oe : a
law: Winifred Grant: brother-in-law: Earlin Sands: Sisters-in- j and friends including: Kenneth Huyler, Dr. Philip Huyler,
Sees. ag hela rane gil ayaa eres | Godfrey B. Huyler, Adrain Huyler, Lisa Russell, Ludell Whylly,
; Ethimae Bain of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Alice Taylor, Joel
Achara, Sebastian Wallace, Roland and Chris Sands, Kavon | Knowles, Shelia Hepburn, Rosa Zonicle, Shirley and Cleomi

W i . ar .B.D.F. ine § ;
and Israel Wallace, McKell, and R.B.D.F., Marine Seaman | Watson, Nurse Daphne Ferguson, Nurse Tiffany Turnquest of
Stacey, Shantvia, Shantell and Ratesha grand nephews: Jamaal, | the Pierce Ward at Sandilands Hospital and the Doctor and
ae. Manty, Christopher, Kyle, Alfred, peas and Shamar. | Nurses at the Sandilands Hospital, Rev. Dr. Carl J. Rahming.
Cousins: Ruby Cambridge, Vera Davis, Norma Lillian, Zona, :

Violet, Williamae, Rodville, Pearline, lona, Howard, Arabella, : Viewing will be held in the Celestial Suite at Restview Mortuary

: Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00am to 6:00pm
Other relatives and friends including: The Honourable Kenyatta and at the church on Saturday from 9:30m to service time.

Wallace (of Eleuthera) and Franchena Sands; Grand daughter:
Kendra, Sisley, Lashawn, Sharicka, Venteria, Nicola and Alexsin;

law: Minister Leona, Mrs. Melvern and Mrs. Bernice Wallace,
and Calara Gibson of Nassau; nephews: David, Granville,

Michael Hall, Hackey, James and Gary grand nieces Sharell,

Stanley, Allen, Louise, Ruby and Nelle, Joana, Stanley, Patrick.

MR. ALFRED JUNIOR
HUYLER, 82

held on Saturday August Ist 2009 at
11:00am at St. Paul’s Baptist Church
Bernard Road Fox Hill. Officiating
will be Pastor J. Carl Rahming, assisted
by other ministers of gospel and
cremation will follow.

Derek Darville, Sharmaine Cartwright, Kevin Ferguson, Deon
Moss, Alvin, Calvin, Selina , Jennifer, Wenshe; 2) grandchildren:

in-law: Evangelist Jefferey Bannister, Deacon James Bannister

law: Esther smith, Doreen Davis; and a host of other relatives

Ferguson, Winnifred Bannister, Bishop Ross Davis, Pastor Lee


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

FREEPORT
Li eee ee
PG. Box F-
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (42) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « See

LAUREN MARY
MILLER, 59

of Wulff Road will be held on Saturday,
August Ist, 2009 at 1:00pm at Holy |

Cross Anglican Church, Highbury Park,

off Soldier Roads. Officiating will be ;

Ny Father Norman Lightbourne, assisted by |
u\ Sj other ministers of the gospel and :
\ Interment will follow in Woodlawn

Gardens Soldier Road.

Left to cherish her memories are her sons: Swede Ford, Lamont ;
Ken Thompson, and Neil Miller; daughter: Kayla i
| Matthew Town, Inagua.
grandchildren: Ashlyn Johnson, Tenile and Treasure Miller; brothers: ;
Dr. Ralph Reckley of Baltimore, Maryland, Brain, Carl, Glen, Dennis, :
and Tyrone Miller; sisters: Shelia and Valderine Miller, Jennie j
Hinsey, Betty Russell, and Judy Thompson of Freeport; aunts: Audrey |
? law: Yvette and Ingrid Gibson; Brothers: Lynden and Delano Gibson:
? Brothers-in-law: Wayne R. Taylor, Troy Knowles, and Kellman
i Burrows; Nieces: Shanell, Deneca, Shabreka, Kellisa, Tinkia, Nikita,
Linda and Tony Thomas (Freeport), Parrish, Gary, Sandra, Michelle |

Knowles,
Thompson; adopted daughters: Lorraine and Evelve Knowles;

Forbes and Alice Smith; nephews and nieces: Andrew and Claudine
Deveaux, Tamarah Miller, Christie, Misty and Raymond Bain,
Lynette Johnson, Garvin and Carlitta Miller, Ray and Ricky Reckley,

and Glendina Miller (Miami Fl) Sandra Strapp (West Palm Beach),

and Tiffany Thompson, Nirvana Armbrister, Geno and Shala Bullard,
Giselle Smith, Ashlee Rolle, Cora Bowe, Jillian Brown, Ian, Quetel,

and Tyronda Miller; fifty-nine grand nephews and nieces, one brother-

Carmeta Miller specialpersonal friends: Hilda Woodside, Ruby Fox,
Georgina Gibson, Ena Gibson, Cleo
Family; other family and fiend including: Valerie Taylor, Ruby Fox,

Eleanor, Vincent, Norman Stubbs, Deloris, Marla Strachan, Eleanor
Brennen, Bernadette Stubbs, Francis Woodside, Patsy McPhee, Angie
McPhee, Earmest Scavella, Rod, Prince Hart, Scully, The Bain, Green,

Il, especially Nurse Bowe, Loraine and Kenneth Clarke, Tomasina,

Linda Riley, Jennifer, Sideny, Robert, Wendy and Derek Smith,
Raymond, Richard, Hugh, Cassandra and Blundell Laramore, Willard,

Paulette, and Freddie Miller, Bishop Neville Hart, Dwayne Johnson,
The Bastian Family, Valentine (Valley) The Old Club Med Family,
Junior and Teteshia Wright, and Marsha Bullard.

Viewing will be held in the Perpetual Suite at Restview Mortuary

Jr., Kellman Jr.,
Sharon and Keisha Hinsey, Rickey, Lisa, Quentin, Linda, Nicholas i

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009,

Telephone: (242) 394-8043 J (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 + Fox: (242) 340-8034

: Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00am to 6:00pm and
; on Saturday at the Church from 12:00noon to service time.

LANFORD
LAWRENCE HANNA,
4

of Gilbert Street, Kennedy Subdivision
and formerly of Inagua, will be held on
August Ist, 2009 at Zion Baptist Church,
Matthew Town, Inagua at 10:30 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. Godfrey Bain,
assisted by Rev. T.G. Morrison. Intenment
will follow at the Public Cemetery,

He is survived by his Grandfather: Luther Roker; Father: Rodney
Hanna; Step-father: Harrison Saunders; Sisters: Ulacea Taylor,
Delores Bain, Shareece Knowles and Shenequa Burrows; Sisters-in-

Leanne, Aliyah, Ricara and Shantavia; Nephews: Darrols Jr., Troy
Wayne Jr., Lynden Jr., Tromaze, Trokaeco, Jonathan
and Ricardo; Grandnephew: Tre*Quan Taylor; Aunts: Idell Charlton,

| Vanessa Allen and Pinas, Valerie, Celestine and Antoinette; Uncles:
? Luther Jr., Leroy Sr., Ronald and Donavin Roker and Robert Cox;
and Bridgette Miller, Robert, Sherice, Shanika, Kershena, Machaika : Cousins: Jacqulin, Yvonne, Monica, Leroy Jr., Coyotito, Kachanna,
| ? Judy, Norma, Andrew, Carl, Livingston, Brenda, Maxine, Cecil,
in-law: Whitney Russell; Three sisters-in-law: Carolyn, Jackie, and |

Ricardo, Janet, Lynette, Linda, Lavern, Lorie, Junior, Linette, Rochelle,

et ? Ronald Jr., Rolando, Rovard, Laresha, Leanardo, Lealondo, Daphne,
Williams, Leon Knowles and :

Javon, Janell, Derek, Donavin Jr., Dontei and Donette; A host of

A | other relatives and friends including: The Palacious family, Smith
Barbara Dorsett, Sylvia Laramore-Crawford, Rose and Roger Parad, |

family, Beckford family, Fargharson family, Fawkes family, Sardé

? Joseph, Clyvone Seymour, Ricardo Beneby, John McKinney,
? Dominique Seymour, Nadine, Bernard Charlton, Nevis Collie, Louise

Taylor & family, Rosalie Moss & family, Shirley Johnson & family,
Wells, Tynes, Johnson, Laramore, Walkine and Carey Families, The :
Role Avenue and Apple Street Families, The Staff of Female Medical :
i Baptist Church of Inagua, Rev, T.G. Mornson, Rev, Ulne Smith &
Madge Bowleg, Iclyn Fowler, Leon Knowles, Kenneth Thompson, |

Nicole Symonette & family, Suzette Wilson & family, Paulette Bain
& family, Duwayne Hepburn & family, Rev. Godfrey Bin & Zion

#10n Baptist Church of East and Shirley St., Nassau, Bahamas, Dr.

i Tyrone Bartlette, Pro's Wireless Staff, Staff of Top Class Security,
i the entire community of Matthew Town, Inagua and the family of
Carolyn and Albert Roberts, Irene Fernander, Eva King, Diane, |

Kennedy Subdivision, Nassau.

: Viewing will be held in Serenity Suite at Restview Mortuary and
: Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Thursday from

10:00am to 5:00pm and at the church in Matthew Town, Inagua on
Friday until service time.



PAGE 9
PAGE 10,

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Resteiae Memorial Mortuary
and Cromatoriiam Limiled

, 68., Bohomes
12

P. a
Telephones: a ‘BV3-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 240-8043 « Fox: (242) 373-3005

: (242) 394-6043
Pager: (242) 340-8043 + Fax: (243) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

MR. CARL RUDOLPH
STEWART, 91

of Malcolm Road and formerly of the Blult,

Eleuthera, will be held on Saturday, August
Ist, 2009 at 10:00am at All Saints Anglican }

Church Joann’s Heights, Officiating will

be father Sebastian Campbell, assisted by |
Father Norman Lightbourne and interment :
will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier |

Rowcls.

Cherished memories are held by his children: Lorraine Mullin
Jr., Mark and Randy Stewart, Dawn Kemp, Latetia Delancey a

Kenyon, Krista,
Lavar Stewart, Schnora and Dawnette Kemp, Jason and Jamel Satchel,
Carla Anderson-Hollis, Aniska, Amber, Drumeco, Marvin, Letika,
Lorenzo and Travon Delancey, Caroline Watkins and Misty Roker. Great-

Stewart, Devonte Munnings and Keydon Pratt, John Jermaine Ingraham,

Duval and Ivoree Tinker, Daughters In-laws: Euliemac, Eleanor and | ee ae niga ce es
Helen Stewart, Valderine Stewart-Cooper. Sons In-laws: Frank Mullings | J°hnathan and Rocklyn Booile; sisters: Minalee Bodie and Keva McKinney
and Albert Kemp, Grand Daughter In-law: Ronette Stubbs-Stewart. Grand :
Sons In-laws: Keith Nathan Higgins Sr., Larondo Pratt and Jason Hollis. |

Sisters In-laws: Rosalie Stewart and Rowena Hudson Nieces and Nephews: | - : ‘a 5 : xt ae
Vivian Neely, Margaret and Paulette Saunders, Jean Newry, Alva Stewart- Charles Bodie, Basil McKinney and Michael Levarity, aunt: Armeania

Coakley, Carolyn and Tyrone Miller, Carlos and (Mac) McIntosh,
Catherine Gibson, Edna and Rex Neely, Raymond and Bertha Hudson,

Locksley and Julian Brown, Idell Thompson, Dave and Donald Hudson,

Daphne Miller, Paulette Sands, and Darnell Bruce, Maple Strachan Deliah |

Simnith, Beverely Percentie and Beth Stewart. Cousins: Stanley, Inell,

Kenneth, Ralph and Nora Reckley, Hewitt and Ruth Stewart, Theo and

Cynthia Stewart, Fredricka Brown, Gwen McDigen, Winitred Munnings,
Gwendalyn Hepburn, Sandra Joyce, Timothy Jr., Vincent and Hynes

Dorsette, Alvine Scavella, Eureka Youndblood. Other relatives and |
friends: Sherry Neely, Ephriam and Sylvia Jones, Texton and Mary Laing, |
Rose Barry-Neely, Mildred Neely, Wendy Wallace, Beatrice Saunders, |

Dolly Dorsette, Raphaleta Neely. Hugh Dorsette, Sandra Mackey, Dionne © re scintosh Family, The Morris Family, Linda Mills and Family, The

| Taxi Family and the entire communities of Green turtle Cay ,

Stubbs, Ruth Deal, Myrtis and Ella Beneby, Pastor Bishop Rudolph V.
Bowe and Veronica Bowe, Dorith Grant, Isula Henfield and Mae

Bluff, Eleuthera. May his soul rest in peace.

i, Carl |
Elaine |
Sands. Grand-children: Shequetta Mullings-Higeins, Kaye Stewart-Pratt, |
Karla, LaToya, Valentino, Markara, Sasha, Selina, and ;

Viewing will be held in the Perpetual Suite at Restview Mortuary and

| Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00am
: to 6:00pm and at the church on Saturday from #:30 am ‘to service time.

MR. WILBERT ‘Bill’
BOOTLE, 57

of Murphy Town, Abaco will be held on
Sunday August 2nd 2009 at 1:00pm at Marsh
Harbour Seventh-Day Adventist Church,
Marsh Harbour, Abaco. Officiating will be
Pastor Desmond Sturrup and other ministers
of the gospel and Interment will follow in
the Public Cemetery Murphy Town, Abaca.

Left to cherish his memories are his sons:
: Nathan Bootle Sr. and Marvin Bootle;
} daughters: Emily Davis, Lawanda, Latoya, Loretta and Lasonia Bootle
} adopted daughter Latisha Douglas; grand children: Nathan Jr., Timothy

grand children: Tabitha and Keith Nathan Higgins Jr,, Ladon and Khalia : Jr, Tashawn, Lyden Jr., Lynario, Tammy, Faith, Gaysha, Tianna, Makaya,

Lyntario; son-in-law: Timothy Davis Sr.; Daugthers-in-law: Sophia
Bootle, and Tamika Bootle brothers: Rodney, Hilly, Emitte, Lester,

sisters-in-law: Ernestine, Mildred, Natasha, Racquel, Raquel, and Sandy
Bootle, Marguerite Levarity, Monica Adderley, Wiolet Smith, Judy Curry
and Brenda Cooper; brothers-in-law: Sgt.1529 Hubert Smith , Joe Curry,

Smith uncle: Rupert Bootle; nieces and nephews: Don and Jonna Bootle,
Samantha and Quincy Jones, Shavez, Richia, Rodney Jr.. Lavargo, Hilly

Kenneth, Randall, Wayde and Dwight Stewart, Lilamac Adams and | Jr., Nasasha, Emmanique, Azarial, Shaquille, Durrell, Johnathan Jr.,

Sherry Cox, Clarice Bain, Halson Neely, Vanria Kemp, Sharon Sturrup, :

Elaine and Lincoln Forbes, Claudette, Lorna, Asbert, Tony, Terry, | Thomas, Trevor, Michael, Anthony Jr

Decarlo, Rocklyn Jr., Alexis, Deneze, Don Jr., Jonmyah, Kelia, Basia,
Kendra, Katalyn, Basil Jr., Brian, Kirk, Willis, Dennis, Ron, Cindy,
Julie and Al, Jermaine and
Monique, Jasmine, Jigeria, Misty, Phylicia and Ashley; god children:
Barry Swain; other family and friends including: Mr. Edison Key South
Abaco M.P., Thomas Davis, Michac] Dawkins, Joseph Davis, Glen
McDonald, Joe Knowles, Rodrick Strachan, Hershal Davis, Cay Mills,

: Taino Clarke, TJ Jones, Jamaal, Jamal McDonald, Carnetta Boodle,

Melvease Davis, Mother Ida Swain, Edith Clarke, Shelia Simms, William
Swain, Edna Swain, Ada Deaveaux, Cleavland Dawkins, John Simms,
Iva Duncombe, Dawkins Family, Agathe Simms and Family, Davis
Family, Swain family, Reckley Family, Curry and McDonald Families,

Murphy

: mg! 1 gs oc chi ¢ | own Abaco and Dundas Town Abaco, The North Bahamas Conference,
tana Tievertucsiand he =edke Chanckaraadeer Menis Fellowship. | the Marsh Harbour Seventh-Day Adventist Church Family, Chad Sawyer
Family, Pauline Bastain, Patricia Moxey, Edith, Susan Lona Red and | #0d the family at Price is Right, The Soul Saving Ministries Church

Frank Stewart, Justina Neely, Donna Johnson and Linda Ash, Dr. Dorsette ;
of the Accident and Emergency Department at the Princess Margaret } ,,.0 - 4) 1 1). a es = Te

si ae wok Tinmetie "Klmalarsacn Sas wear eat i Viewing will be held in the Halcyon Suite at Restview Memorial Mortuary
Hogpital, Miogs, Stuart, Dorsetie, Neely anc the entire community of The } and Crematorium, Robinson and Soldier Roads on Thursday from 12:00
| noon te 5:00 pm and at the church in Marsh Harbour, Abaco on Friday
: until service time on Sunday.

Family and the Eugene Dawkins and Family.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009,

\ Kostuiow Memoud Mortuary
and Cremalouum Limdled

FREEPORT
114 Bost Coral Rood, Free , @.B., Bohomas
P.O. Boo F 12
Telephone: (242) 373- 5 ere (242) are. 1471
Poogper: (242) 340-2043 * Fox: (242) 373-3005

Hl
Robinson ond Soldier Roods, Nassau, N.P., Bohomes
P.O. Box CB-12072
ee eee ee anad CBee OE) tab +H
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 340

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

GRACE ELOISE
ROLLE, 75

Saturday, August 1, 2009 at 9:30 a.m.

at Holy Name Catholic Church, Bailey :
Town, Bimini. Officiating will be Father :
Simeon Roberts, assisted by Deacon | Smuth, Brown, Pinder and Richardson families, Holy Name Church
John Sears. Interment will follow in the -

Catholic Cemetery, Bailey Town,
Bimini.

Cherished memories will forever linger within the hearts of her:

three sons: Bishop Chester Rolle, Kipling and Rodrick Rolle; §
five daughters: Caretha Stingly, Daisy Rolle, Rosetta Brennen, |
Loretta Rahming and Janice Saunders; 29 grandchildren; Lavante’, :
Crystal, T’ Vaughn, Wanessa, Donavaughn, Kaylequa, Jasman, :

Nicoya, Chesternique, Cemiko, Jarvin, Kito, Robert Jr., Geo,

Roshawnda, Lloydria, Tevin, Kenisha, Omar Corletha, Keva,
Shawndrick, :
14 great- —

Julyesia, Julius Jr., Leotha, Asheran, Shawn Jr.,
Jaquan and Valarie McQueen and Julius Rolle;
grandchildren; Cravante, Cravaughn, Shekinah, Joshua, Shiann,

Najee’, Chazz, Lenaj, Kalesia, Reaniah, Braniah, Justin, Jaden :
and Jayla; sisters: Agnes McPhee, Eulah Francis, Lorna Taylor |
and Cindy Francis; stepsister: Garnel Louis; numerous nieces -
and nephews including: Caren and Andrea Saunders, Maureen, :

Nichola, Aretha, William and Ron Marshall, Alease Garland,

Olive Johnson, Georgeann, Renee Roberts, Zinabeth Sands, Melissa — . .
Ferguson, Antionette Knowles, Timothy McPhee, Damell Frazier, © O"'ve, Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Dashan and Sytira Taylor, Sarah Pinder, Patricia Bain, Linda |
Woodside, and Brendalee Bonamy: numerous grand and great |
grand nieces and nephews; four sons-in-law: Tyrone Stingly, :
Stephen Brennen, Julius Rahming and Shawn Saunders; two :

daughters-in-law: Pastor Letty and Natasha Rolle; godson: Rex

Grant and a host of other relatives and friends including: Nyoka :
Hanna and family, Dorothy Smith and family, Rev. Rupert Rolle :

and family, Carolyn Newbold, Floyd and Mag Smith, Frank Hinzey

and family, Carl and Madeline Levarity, Shirley Ritchie, Phyllis :

Alexander, Julie Dean, Katie Toote, Annis Robins, Brenda Hanna, : : : 7 :
CE eg GH Wecuaie ‘Gadi Gad Acatnees | Glenda and a host of other relatives and friends including: Donald

Emma Rolle, Marinette Sands, Francis, Basil and Antoinette,

Percell and Philamina, Esther, Lincoln and Angela, Lamour, David :
and Laurice, Judith and Mitra Rolle, Delores Saunders, Dr. Carlis :
and Autrey Russell, Rev. Teachlet and Bercu Pierre, Vincent and j
Theressa, Charlice Ellis, Tammy Elliot, Jerome Stuart, Donalee -
Stuart, Renee Johnson, Cousin Cotton, Rosalie Hanna, Clyde and :
Rozelda Flowers, Pricilla Bain and family, Benjamin Francis and | Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday
family, Idamae David and family, Corey Pricthard and family, |

| Robert Saunders Sr. and family, Janet Cox, Anna Romer and
: family, Dolly Brennen-Stuart, Birdie Pinder, Dec. John Sears,
: Gerry Brown, Cheryl Saunders, Gervase Lewis, Fabian & Linda
| Stuart, Administrator Sherrick and Phillipia Ellis, Nel Sweeting,
: Genevive Dean and family, Alpheus Rolle and family, Shelly
of Bailey Town, Bimini will be held on :
: and family, Willamac Sawyer and family, Francis Rolle and family,

McPhee and family, Terricita Rolle and family, Bernice Stuart

Stephanie and Julie Dotten and family, the Rolle, Rollins, Francis,
Edgecombe, Ellis, Sherman, Chea, Adams, Johnson, Brennen,

Family and the entire community of Bimini,

> Viewing will be held at Holy Name Catholic Church, Bailey
| Town, Bimini on Friday from 3:00 p.m. until service time at the
_ church on Saturday.

TENALIA DESINOR
DAREUS, 70

of #104 Bahama Anns, Freeport, Grand
Bahama will be held on Saturday,
August 1, 2009 at 2:00 p.m. at St.
Vincent de Paul Catholic Church,
Hunter’s, Grand Bahama. Officiating
will be Father Remy David. Interment
will follow in the Grand Bahama
Memorial Park Section #2, Frobisher

Left to cherish her precious memories are her husband: Oderiner
Daniel Dareus; children: Pastor Brian Dareus, Minister David
Dareus, Kensie, Rosney, Lynden (Dabert), Enise and Julie D.
Saintil;: grandchildren: Geraldine, Jhanlyn, Marcus, Mare IJr.,
Maquita, Abigail, Daniel, Beyoncé, Brechanté, Wendy, Cindy,
Soraya, Gaylene, Megan, Joanne, Lavincky and Anthon; nieces:
Edith, Enise, Tinana, Bielka and Roselene; nephew: Albert:
daughters-in-law: Monett, Lynne and Jasmine; son-in-law:
Johnny, Jean and Pastor Mare Saintil; godchildren: Linda and

and family, Verti and family, Johnson and Medilia Milfort,
Richmond and family.

Viewing will be held in the ‘Celestial Suite’ of Restview Memorial
Mortuary and Crematorium Limited, #11-A East Coral Road,
from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
and on Saturday at the Church from 12:30 p.m. until service time.



PAGE 11
PAGE 12,

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

114A Bost Co ele pas .8., Bohormos.

ra ; , G.B., |

PO. Box Faesl2
Telaphonae: (242) 373-1115 / Gada) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-6043 + Fox: (242) 373-3005

Hl
Robinson ond Soldier Roods, Nassau, N.P., Bohomeas
P.O. Box CB- 12072
Talaphone: (242) 394-8043 | (242) 394-8047
Pager (242) 340-8043 » Fox: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

LESLIE THOMAS
MAYCOCK, 50

Roache. Interment will follow in the Grand Bahama Memorial

Park Section #2, Frobisher Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama, :

: family, Latoya Lewis, Tiffany Cartwright, Stephon Forbes, The
Left to carry on his legacy and cherish the memories of a man that |
did his part to change the world are his wife: Beverley Maycock; :
daughter: Anjelica Maycock; sons: Ryan and Ashton Maycock =
and D’Angelo Carey; brothers: Derek, Brian H. and Sgt. 234 |
Brian Maycock; sisters: R. Diane Maycock-Williams, M. Carmeta, :
M. Beverley and Paige Maycock; nieces: Andrea, Miah and =
Sheniqua Maycock, Lauryn Symonette, Bridgette Farrington, |
Kimberley Laing, Shence Jackson, Erica, Shantol, Antonia, Ashley, :
Latera, Aneka, Melissa, Bianca Riley; nephews: Jarret =

Major, Andrew Jr., Maverick, Sean, Solomon and Brian Maycock,

Genero Forbes, Renaldo, Edvardo, Neko, Eron, Giovanni, Godfrey, :
Joseph, Stephen Jr., and Dion Riley, Christian Levarity, Clayton :
Jr, Corey, Chavez Young, Reginald Farrington; aunts: Leona |
Hall, Alma Belhomme, Alicia Rahming and Tizel Rahming, Ruth :
Miller, and Dolly Foster; uncles: Bertram and Vincent Rahming; :
grandaunts: Lucine iDelii Wilmott, Veronica and Yvonne |
Rahming, Eulahmae Edgecombe, Madge, Doris and Velma Cargill; :
granduncles: Bernard Rahming, Amold (TB) and Alton Cargill, :
Wilbert Edgecombe; brothers-in-law: Anthony, Eric, Godfrey,

Glen, Stephen, Joseph Riley, Clayton Young Sr., John Williams; :
sisters-in-law: Loretta and Ophelia Maycock, Marinetta Young, :
Cynthia Riley-Sargent, Patricia Riley-Bain, Loretta Riley, Ida, |
Angela and Nezzlene Riley; cousins: Giselle, Antia, Anita, Silvana, :
Alicia, Gina, Tedra, Ansela, Bridgette, Tanya, Kayla and Karen :
Rahming, Bonnie and Jeda Knowles, Cristal Belhomme, Heda |
Rich, Roshae Gibson, Valencia Rolle, Gretchen Ferguson, Theresa ;
Hall, Troy Knowles, Terrance Hall, Jevon, Vincent Jr., Gino, :
Bertram Jr., Yale, Robert, Shawn, Denero, Arl and Miguel Miguel, |
and Winston Rolle; godchildren: Carlton Cleare Jr., Trancka :
Thompson, Randall Cooper Jr., Justin Knowles, Vincent Rahming :
Ir.; cell group family: Randall and Maryann Cooper, Winston |
and Dahlia Pinnock, Derek and Rehana Sing, Don and Sherone :

Singh, Rhonda Plakans, Walter and Anishka Parker, Tracey Mills,

: Chris and Garnell Pelecanos, Orlando Hanna, Barbarajean Barton,
? Axton and VWernessa Morris, Kendall and Krista Williamson, Don
| and Cenethra Laing, Pastor Wilbur & Barbara Outten, Samuel
: Johnson, Robert Adams, Brady Johnson, Allen Hyppolite, Patrick
of #5 Braemar Drive, South Bahamia, =
Freeport, Grand Bahama will be held on ©

| Saturday, August 1, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. :

) at Freeport Bible Church, West Atlantic :
| Drive and John Tinker Street, Freeport, |

| Grand Bahama. Officiating will be Pastor :
Wilbur Outten assisted by Pastor Karol :

Rolle, Maxime Saintelus and a host of other relatives and friends
including: Donna Maycock, Roosevelt Major, Sonia Knowles,
Monique Millar, Michael Foster, Norma Wallace and family,
Cynthia Poitier, Theo and Hilda Farquharson, Derek and Angie
Farquharson, Theresa Wright, Theresa W ilmott-Burrows, Mr. and
Mrs. Brudinell Kelly, Floyd and Don Wilmott, Apostle Wellimgton
and Beryl Wallace, Ms. Angela Sands, Shirley Mae Astwood,
Emerick Seymour, Mark Seymour, David Thompson, Mr. and
Mrs. Major and family of Yamacraw, Ian and Sidney Cargill and

members of Freeport Bible Church, Joeretta and the Roberts
family, Mr. and Mrs. Welbourne Bootle and family, The Rahming
and Cargill families, the Lundy, Coakley, Hanna, Minnis,
Thompson, and Wallace families of Calabash Bay Andros, The
Royal Bahamas Police Force including the SIB Division, The
RBPF Choir, and Debate Team, The Jack Hayward PTA Board,
The entire Community of Hawksbill, The Doctors, Nurses and
Staff of the Rand Memorial Hospital, and a host of other relatives
and friends too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held in the ‘Serenity Suite’ of Restview Memorial
Mortuary & Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport,
Grand Bahama on Fnday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the
church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.

DEATH ANNOUNCEMENT

MR. WILSON
ALBERT, 29

of Hawksbill, Grand Bahama died at the
Rand Memorial Hospital, Freeport,
Grand Bahama on Tuesday, July 28,
2009.

Funeral arrangements will be
announced at a later date.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

FREEPORT
11.4 Ens Coral Road, Freeport, G.8., Batons Robingon 2nd Solder Roads. Meena, WP, Elahorine.
BO, Boo F-Azaiz BO, Bow C10?
Telapteare: (242) STR1115 | (STA TBO J 43) eB
Pager: (242) 380-643 © Foor (242) 373-3006 Paper: (242) 340-304) + Fas: (242) 340-2004

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

WILSON PRESTON
BURROWS, 49

of #1 Corndle Apt., Freeport,
Grand Bahama and formerly of
Abraham's Bay, Mayaguana will
be held on Saturday, August |,
2009 at 11:00 a.m. at New Canaan
Zion Baptist Church, Balao Road,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Officiating will The Right Rev'd
Bishop Washington Williams
assisted by Evangelist Esmia
Lockhart. Cremation will follow.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Carolyn Burrows;
mother: Matilda Burrows; daughters: Latoya Burrows Woodside
and Lakeisha Burrows; son: Preston Burrows; adopted sons:
Quinton and Carlton Symonette; granddaughters: Azaleah
Woodside, Deandrea, Kenya, Keva and Kendra Bethel, Kieshan,
Tajah and Quintia Symonette; sisters: Ceva Sweeting, Erma
and Luciter Burrows, Genieva Williamson and Audrey Charlton;
brothers: Albert Charlton, Hubert Burrows and Edmund
Burrows; nieces: Verdell Chariton, Debra Johnson, Susan Hanna,
Charlene Williamson, Michelle Sweeting, Judy Marshall, Lateria
and Monique Sweeting, Deidre and Demece Williamson,
Samantha Burrows, Shanique Moss, Vita and Wet Pyfrom,
Marisha Charlton, Eureka Charlton, Tiffany and Letecia Burrows,
Clara Bell, Sharice, Michaella and Alfreda Lightbourne and
Shanice Burrows; nephews: Godfrey, Kelsin and Levon
Williamson, Otis Johnson, Dorin and Alworth Rolle, Maurice
Sweeting, Dennis Williamson, Kazzi, Edmund Jr., Eduardo,
Kristen, Dion and Marcus Burrows, Alfred, Aaron and Romel
Lightbourne and Arlington; aunts: Nora McIntosh, Gladys
Murphy, Idell Burrows and Mary Smith; uncles: John Burrows
and Eustace McIntosh; mother-in-law: Mary Small; son-in-
law: Ronald Woodside Jr. and Kevin Bethel; sisters-in-law:
Natasha Burrows, Ins Charlton, Marilyn Burrows, Enna Taylor,
Melanie Swaby, Cynthia Lightbourne, Nelly Darville and Manion
Sweeting: brothers-in-laws: Godfrey Saunders, Simeon
Sweeting, Alfred Lightbourne, Freddy Taylor, Eklin Williamson
and Anthony Swaby a fest of other relatives and friends
including: Dewitt McPhee, Queenie Gibson, Della Taylor,
Channaine Hall-Rolle, Froggie, Brother Merv, Winkey, Tyrone,
Wesley Williams, Lakeishan Rolle, Winn Dixie management
and staff, Airport and Manor, House Taxi- Drivers, G. B. Taxi
Union, Freeport Taxi, Berth Perry and the PLP Party.

Persons wishing to sign the book of condolences my do so in
the ‘Irenic Suite’ of Restview Memorial Mortuary and
Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand
Bahama on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m, and at the church
on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 13

Ui mya

PRISCILLA
MUSGROVE
MURPHY

will be held at Five Porches Of
Deliverance Centre Apostolic
Tabneracle Church, Market Street
& Poinciana Avenue, New
Providence, The Bahamas
Saturday, Ist August, 2009 at
11:00 a.m. Officiating will be
Apostle J Rodney Roberts, assisted by Other Ministers of
the Gospel.

She is survived by her beloved children: Minister Idell
McKinney of Palm Coast Florida, Fredericka Rolle, and
Herbert Seabrooks of Los Angeles California. Daughter
Althea Louise Newbold predeceased her on Tuesday, March
31, 2009, Grandchildren: Charmaine and Frank Sweeting;
Deborah Thompson; Lindsay Thompson; David Thompson,
Michaelia and Michael Johnson; Neya and Dwight Sands,
Jermaine Newbold, Kristan and Nadia Newbold,
Sheremethius Lashan Newbold, Ratassja Rolle, Monique,
Inthia, Eric, Herbert Jr., Ashley, Whitney, Shanta, Lindsei,
J.C and Quincy. Great-Grand Children: Marcian Thompson,
Leon Johnson, Kyle Hepburn, Kemuel Forbes, Kiwana
Bubb, Kadeem Williams, Kadesha Williams, Clayton
Williams Jr., William Knowles, Theo and Malik Sands,
Jermaine Newbold Jr., Adrian, Nicole, Lawrence and Adian;
Great-Great Grandchildren: Marcian Thompson Jr., Jahnai
Johnson, Kam’Ren Bubb, and McKayle Hepbum; Nephews:
Rev Godfrey Ellis, Graylin Moncur; and Ricardo Moncur,
Lamont Tumer, Tyrone McKenzie; Nieces: Francina Forbes,
Wendy Smith, Hedda Armbrister, Patricia Reckley, Yvonne
McKenzie and Anita McKenzie, Marva Cooper, Eleanor
Wilson, Francis Stuart, Beatrice Munroe; Numerous other
relatives from the Hermitage including: Ellis, Bodie,
Musgrove, Sturrup, Barr, Dorsette, Sears, Clarke, Saunders,
Davis, Smith, and McPhee families. Other relatives and
friends including: Donald Knowles Jr.; Donald and Ancel
Knowles and family of Chippingham; Carl Rolle; Pastor
C B Moss and members of Mt Olivet Baptist Church, Rev
Elmomd King and members of New Hope Missionary
Baptist Church, Overseer Rudolph Cooper and members
of Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church, Rev Joseph
Thompson and members of Bread of Life Baptist Church,
Pastor Sidney Hardy and members of Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church, St Augustine’s, Florida; David Siegel Day
Care Centre of Palm Coast, Florida; nurses and staff of the
Hospice of Volusia in Flagler County. Thanks also to the
management and staff of Kelly's, Home Centre Marathon.



Cremation by Neptune Society, Florida.
PAGE 14,

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KRurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020¢ Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 « 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

Na ed Ol

NATHALIE JANET |
‘Aunt Netta’
FLOWERS, 100

of Rokers Point, Exuma will :

be held on Saturday at 2:00 :

P.M. at St. Andrew’s Anglican :

Church, George Town Exuma. :

Officiating will be Father :

Mario Conliffe assisted by :

Canon Harry Bain and Rev. :

Willish Johnson. Interment in St. Margaret's Cemetery, :
Harts Exuma.

nephews, great great great-grand nieces and nephews;
other relatives and friends include: Sheila Mackey and
family, Minerva Bowe and family, Eddison Brice and family,

Reverend Oswald Nixon and family, Visna Bowe-Mackay
: and family, Jane Curry and family, Sidney Curry, Junior &
: Rhona Davis and family, Magnolia Rolle and Family, Kerlene

Nixon-Brown and family, Emma Rodriguez and family,

(| Merlene Smith and family, Valerie Paul and family, Reverend

Gerald Pennerman, Forestor Rolle and family, Elbert Rolle
and family, Judy Rolle and family, Harrington Rolle and
family, Christine Rolle, Father Mario Conliffe and family,

: Father Harry Bain and family, Father Keith Cartwright and

family, Father Steven Davies and family, Reverend Willish

: Johnson and family, Reverend Charles Saunders and family,
: Reverend Adam Brown and family, Reverend Cedric Smith

: and family, Reverend Ivan Clarke and family, Bishop

Left to Cherish her fond memories are: daughter: :
Priscillamac Flowers; grandson: Audrin Pennerman; :
adopted sons: Whitney Brice, Reverend Oswald Nixon and :
Warren Brice; one sister-in-law: Aurelia Brice; adopted
grandchildren: Telanna, Tanya, Whitney Jr., Tatum, Tenae, :
Talmun and Branado Brice, Alexis Collins, Idena, Inspector :
Oswald Brian, John and Wayne Nixon, Tanya Sanchez La :
Chapel and Dr. Latonia Moncur; nieces and nephews :
include: Eulease Smith, Gwendolyn Smith Brice, Matilda :
& Cleveland Stuart, Curlene Carter, Archie Edgecombe of :
Canada, Beverly, Michael, Sharon and Leroy Brice, Brenda :
and Laverne McKenzie, Warren, Charles and Judy Brice, :
Benjamin and Cypnanne Brice, Whitney and Karen Brice, :
Annamae , Elijah and Sherry Brice, Sharlamae and Philip :
Stubbs, Alfred, Kenneth and Eloise Brice, Helen and :
Roosevelt Thompson, Patrice Brice, Veronica and :
Livingstone Lloyd, Vanria and Cleophas Gibson, Rufus and :
Nene Curry, Vincent and Joycelyn Curry, Geraldine and :
Sherman Stevens, Essiemae and Basil Mcintosh, Michael :
and Janice Curry, Frankie, Paul and Melanie, Kenneth, :
Carolyn, Michael, Leroy, Yorick and Alanna Brice, Sharon :
Hinds, Nellie Ferguson, Lawrence and Hanna Brice, Prince :
Rahming, Arie McPhee, Elder Sarah Lee Rolle, Gloria Rolle, :
Reverend Hilbert and Deaconess Victoria Flowers, Charles :
Flowers, Joycelyn Morris, Theresa Laroda and Christie :
Flowers; numerous adopted great-grand children great- :
grand nieces and nephews; great great-grand nieces and :

Hartman Rolle and family, Halsey Hanna and family, Nesbitt
Ferguson and family, Bishop Rudolph Bowe and family,
Cedric Curry and family, Kenneth Nixon and family, James
Williams and family, Leon Flowers and family, Annie Lloyd
and family, Marjorie Nixon and family, Gladstone Rolle
and family, Nola Curry and family, Nigel Bowe and family,
Sabrina and Paulette Armbrister, Judy Ducatel and family,
Vandelyn Major and family, Kenneth Bowe and family,
Joan Bowe and family, Valcena Brown and family, Wakeley

| Clarke and family, Andrew Clarke and family, Audrey Clarke

and family, Roland Clarke and family, Ruth Clarke-Archer
and family, Naomi Rolle and family, Oveta Strachan and
family, Zelma Nixon and family, Sylvanaus Thompson and
family, Solomon Roach and family, Absalom Roach and
family, Isadora Adderley and family, John Rolle and family,
Adeline Rolle and family, Hazel Sears and family, Rolle
family, Flowers family, Clarke family, Smith family, Lloyd
family, Taylor family, Nixon family, Bowe family, Roach
family, Anthony Moss, MP and family, the entire Exuma
communities especially Roker’s Point, Harts, Steventon and
Farmers Hill.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Ramsey
Exuma on Friday from 12:00 Noon until 6:00 P.M. and at
the church in George Town on Saturday from 1:00 P.M.
until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 15

Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020¢ Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 * 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

LAST RITES FOR

CAROLYN
LAVERN ‘Caya’
CAMPBELL, 48

Gardens.

She is survived by her parents: Basil & Prescola Campbell; 3

her son: Heath "Peabo" Campbell; Adopted sons: Basil Jr., :
Valdez Evans, Valentino Burrows, Montel, Mateo, Montez :
Campbell, and Ramon Rolle; Adopted Daughters: Marlene :
Newton, Donell, Holly Knowles, and Richa Campbell; :
Brothers: Rev. Garneth Campbell, Locksley, Wellington and :
Sisters: Margaret Campbell, Melony :
Colebrooke, Jessica, Betty Campbell, Shantel Dames and :
Petrona Campbell, Adopted Sisters: Paula Josey, Luann :
Russell, Cassandra Fowler and Normanick Davis; Nephews: :
Leslie Farquharson, Taryll Moore, Garneth Jr., Wellington :
Jr., Samuel Jr., Johnathan, Geno Jr., Ashton, Basil II, :
Bernard, Stephan, Valdre and Marvin Jr.; Nieces: Garnell, :
Gabrielle, Wellicia, Lakeshia, Aleshia, Kadeshia, Tamara, :
Ragine, Kazia, Aniyah, Ashanti, Sandra Burrows, Lavarnique, :
Lyndonia and Lavonya, Camia, Tassia;. Brothers-in-law: :
Samuel Colebrooke Sr. and Randolph Dames; Sisters-in- :
law: Josephine, Ellen, Barbarann, Beauthine and Shandy :
Campbell; Uncles: Ivan Campbell, Prince and Randolph :
Mackey, Epharaim Lafleur, Linkwood and Bernard Evans; :
Aunts: Branhilda Russell, Francis Smith, Zerlean and Jackie :
Campbell, Gloria Evans, Alice Lafleur, 7ilpha Mackey and :
Julia Hanna; Granduncle: Elias Rolle; Grandaunts: Francetta :
Johnson, Sunkin, Sylvia and Merlene Mackey; Cousins: :
Edward, Mike, Vanola, Majorie, Georgina, Brendalee, Pam, :
Lauralee, Kingsley, Denny, Edmund, Braidman, Trevor, 7

Oscar Campbell;

Marco, Thesrine, Asalee, Ashley, Norman, Charlie, Basil,
Steven, Nell, Mary, Gary, Vangie, Lisa, Quentin, Yolanda, :

Valderine, Yvonne, Bernard Jr., Wendell, Dale, Kenny,



: Kimberley, Ruby, Darnelle, John, Earl, Irene, Rochelle,
Nicole, Bradley, Randy, Lester, Rodney, Ednal, Kenrick,

: Travis, Teddy, Princeton, Jeffery, Cindy, Nikia, Prescola,
; Carmille, Hope, and Shikera; Godchildren: Joyann, Santino,

Richardette, Vasti, Resha, and Anissa; Host of other relatives

: and friends including: Ashley Marshall, Ricardo Rolle,
of Lowe Sound, Andros will :
be held on Saturday at 11:00 :
A.M. at The Cathedral of Olive, :
Morgan’s Bluff Drive Andros. :
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. :
Philip Campbell assisted by :
Other Ministers. Interment in :
the City of Olive Memorial :

Mitchell Bullard, Vanera Barr, Clyde Edgecombe, Alva
Brown, Rev, Ifill Russell & Family, Irene Harris, Peggy
Newton, Rev Claretta Campbell & Family, Becky Johnson
& Family, Sarah Evans & Family, Dec. Beluah Lafleur &
Family, “elda Campbell & Family, #ilpha Campbell-Marshall
& Family, Elvia Bowleg & Family, Helena Clarke & Family,
Austin Campbell & Family, Ethel Sherman, Dianna Beneby
& Family, Dolly King & Family, Rex and Shandrice Rolle,
Doramae Clarke, Merrill Rolle & Family, Tonique Martin,
Lynette Oliver, Lynden & Amanda Johnson, Margaret
Burrows, Linda Adderley, Maude Smith, Magnetta Knowles,
Icealene Thompson, Lillian Young, Carolyn Knowles, Stacey
and Dianna Hanna, Yolanda Hilton, Kenny Robinson, Dr
Dario Curry, Darren & Linda Evans, Monica, Pandora
Roberts, Rose Roberts & Family, Barbara Munnings, Nurse
Kenria Johnson, Nurse Brenda Wilson, Nastascia Knowles,
Raindell Barr & Family, Floyd Rolle, John Woodside, Sharon
Mitchell and Family, Akeem Russell, The Staff of Nicholls
Town Community Clinic, Estella Hunter, Nakera Evans,
Brian Cleare and Family, The Staff of Western Air, Prince
Oliver and Family, Rev. Philip Campbell and Family, Rev.
Henson Miller and Family, Rev. Rudy Bowleg and Family,
Kevin Bootle and Family, Cleomi Strachan, Calvin Griffin,
Perris Russell, Patricia Woodside, Errol Moss and Family,
Emest Oliver and Family, Evelyn Barr, Basil Bowleg and
Family, Dr. Kay Bain and The Staff of Bahamas Dental
Center, Cherylee Johnson, The Cathedral Of Olive Family,
The Community of North Andros and a host of other family
and friends too numerous to mention.

It is not the intention of the family to have left out anyone,
but if we did we apologize as we try to remember everyone
during our time of bereavement.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary,
Robinson Road and Fifth Street on Thursday from 12:00
Noon until 6:00 P.M. and at the church in Morgan's Bluff
on Friday from 3:00 P.M. until service time on Saturday.
THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Demeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

mS eae

Julian H. Alleyne, 81

a resident of Miller's Close
( Market Street), died at
his residence on
Wednesday 29 July, 2009.
He is survived by his
children: Sandra Sears,
Sharon Alleyne, Stanley
Alleyne, Sheila
Richardson & Stacy
Arthur; 13 grand children
& 3 great grand children.

Anthony Alvin Ferguson, 56

a resident of Culmer's

Alley off Kemp Road, died

at Potters Cay, on 27 July,

2009. He is survived by

his wife, Madlyn

Ferguson; 2 sons: Anthony

Jr. & Eric Ferguson; 4

stepsons: Daron, Jamal,

Ryan & Roston; 1

daughter: Roslyn;

brothers: Charley, Terry,

Mark of Conniticut & Kevin; sisters: Debbie,
Delores & Mahalia.

Dorothy Louise Woodside, 60

a resident of Stanyard
Creek, Andros & formerly
of West End Grand
Bahama, died at PMH on
21 July, 2009. She is
survived by her mother:
Roslie Dean of Stanyard
Creek, Andros; son:
Joseph Woodside Jr.; 1
sister: Leonie Hall of
Freeport, G.B.

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 17

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL

#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street
PO. Box N-3572
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 326-5773

eat SERVICE FOR

PRINCE ANDREW
"George"
BRICE, 14

of #11 Talbot Street West will be held
on Saturday, August O1et, 2009, at 10:00
a fin. at Southland Cathedral Church of
f God, Soldier Road. Officiating will be
Bishop Dr. Teuton Stubbs. Interment
follows in Woodlawn Gardens
Cemetery, Soldier Road.

P Left to cherish his loving memories are:
his mothers: [ka Carey and Althemeze Carey; father: Prince Brice;
stepfather: Derrick Dawkins; brothers: Javano Carey, Andree’ Brice and
Wislet St. Brave; sisters: Grancka, Andrea and Aaliyah Brice; grandparents:
Bemard and Dhann Newbold, Rodney and Curlene Strachan; Aunts and
uncles: Monique, Cedric, Derick and Desiree Carey, Stanford Burrows,
Romeo, Kingston, Milton and Margaret Newbold, Samuel and Rosemary
Cambridge, Abraham and Patrice Johnson, Freddie Mac Bethel, Winifred
Ferguson, Margaret, Elvis, Cecil and Stephen Brice, Linda Lamb, Edgar
and Nathalie Bonaby, Elliot Smith, Charles and Madlyn Campbell, Margaret,
Louise and Irenese Stuart, Florinda Smith, Annamae Ferguson, Winnie,
Marina Beckford, Anthony and Phillip Cambridge, Shuniqua and Stacia
Evans, Sandm Rolle, Aretha Higgs, Lucy Metelus, Joe Mott, Reuben and
Mae Stuart, Melanie, Shannane, Shakera, Erskine and Manion Johnson,
Treco and Odysea Strachan, Troy and Shan Carter; cousins including:
Alexander, Derinardo, Savahana, Jayda, Jayden, Kevette, Keisha, Ashanti,
Avanti, Demetrius, Dedrick, Eric, Kadeisha, Ashley, Aaliah, Derineka,
Mitzi, Mckeisha, Melnishka, Monte, Damien, Diane, Nicee, Mario, Sedricka,
Alvin, Kenton, Renderia, Danario, Treco Jr, Anterto, Anpenire, Shatayala,
Troianna, Troiann, Cameron, Shavette, Shakera, Vjay, Vance, Vernay,
Rishawn, Aumia, Lisa and C.K. Smuth; Godparents: Eroline Hanna, Monique
Rolle, June Stubbs, Charmane Wright, Dave Righy amd D-Boy; other
relatives and friends including: Fonswitt and Elva Stubbs, Alice Stuart,
William McDonald, Holbroke Stuart, Coral Johnson, Ellen Newbold, Ellen
Farrington, Rose, William and Eula Newbold, Alfred and William Poitier,
Desiree Higgins, Michael Pinder, Eric and Shirley Carey, MP, Frank and
Sharlyn Smith, Jeweness Wood, Carol Cunry, Tyrone and Larissa Johnsen,
Alicia Johnson, Barry, Georgette, Maniettita Deveaux and family, "Aunty"
Ceomie and family, Lia Munroe, Drameko and Chickita Archer, Sunshine
Holdings Staff, Erskine and Patricia Bain, Class of 09 D.W, Davis, Dominic
and Helen Deveaux, Norman Forbes, Kennedy Pinder, Perry and Esther
Newton, Pastor Teuton and Helena Stubbs and the Southland Church of
God family, Rhyna Barry, Antonio and Marcus Roberts, Edrica, Delroy,
Neil Flowers, Ricardo, Rohan and Wringhy Adderley, Bernard, Edward,
Reco, Jqustin, Dillen, Marley, Natin, Olden and Javon Cartwright, Ross,
Tracy, Carolyn, The Carew, Talbot and Kenilworth Streets families, the
entire Newbold and Stuart families and other relatives and friends too
numerous to mention. A very special thank you toe; The staff of Princess
Margaret Hospital especially Dr. Adrian Sawyer, Amanda Stubbs and
Daphne Evans.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Newbold Brothers
Chapel, Palmetto Avenue and Acklins Street off Market and East Streets,
on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.om., Saturday at the church from 9:00
am... Wntil service time.


PAGE 18,

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Butler’s Huneral Aomes & Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Funeral Announcement

Vernon Wentworth Culmer
affectionately called “N AN”, 64

Â¥ ry
* ® ,

Church, Abundant Life

Road on Saturday, }
August 1, 2009 at 11:00 |

Kennedy Drive.

Vernell, Patricia, Adina, Edwina, Ingrid & Jacqueline

Culmer, Ethlyn Stuart, and Russell Franks; aunt, Flossiemae |
Bowleg-Curling; grandchildren, Brandon, Brittany, | Allen & the Abundant Life family, including The Chapel
Janerio, Justin, Javaughn, Candice, Remus, Jr., Mataya, |
Marissa, Mariah, Marvin, Jr., Shantae and Dresyn Culmer; }
Shavoughn Jr., Anthonea and Trivoughn Sturrup, and ;
Ehrin Antoine; father-in-law, Louis Taylor ; numerous
sisters-in-law including: Sylvia Culmer, Bernice |
Fernander, Janet Cartwright, Vernita Rolle, Merlene Taylor, |
Joycelyn Ferguson, Beverley, Rachel and Mary Culmer, }
and many others; brother-in-law, Sidney Rolle; |
daughters-in-law, Jeannie, Anthea, Maresha, and Kertissa |
Culmer; son-in-law, Evince Antoine; numerous nieces :
& nephews including, Trevor, Winston Jr. (Reds), Dennis, |
Trained Clinical Nurse Denise Culmer, Desiree, Tamika, }
Lynell, Sarah, Quentin, Michelle, Allison, Terry, Marissa, |

formerly of Mangrove
Cay, Andros, died on
} July 21, 2009, will be }
: and Shacara; numerous cousins including, George
? Thompson (New York), Rev. Dr. Mary Nairn, Jennimae

: Prescola, Stanley, Gayle, Kirk, Donavon, Brent, Stefon,
i Alarick, Kranz, Kyjia, Jevone, Taurian, Sherrise, Netica,
: Craig, Jarad, Javase, Judyann, Vaughan, Chandra, Jessica,
: Trivano, Kevin, Dwayne, Patrice, Petral, Patrick and

Pheromone; numerous grand-nieces & grand-nephews
including, Shaquille, Ashley, Kriston, Quianie, Lauren,
Chrystal, Alexis, Sierra, Hesley, Carlin, Giovanni, Shauntae

Minus, James Clarke, Hubert Pratt, Roberta Greene-Harris,
Paula Bain-Munnings, Bridgette Bain, Godfrey Bain,

: Dianne Bain-Thurston, Bishop Samuel Greene, Corean
| Cox, Kirklyn Barr, Patsy Miller, Pandora Miller, Lillymae
interment will follow in |
the Lakeview Memorial :
Cemetery, John F. :

Miller, James Clarke, Jr., Hubert Pratt, Manny Bowleg,
Cecil Bowleg II, Goldstone Bain and Beverley Munnings;
and a host of other relatives and friends including,

' Marissa Culmer & Family, Christopher Bain & Family,
| Mr. and Mrs. Collin Johnson & Family, Teddy Simmons

Dearest memories will |
live on in their hearts of, his wife, Evalyn Culmer; 5 sons, |
Remus, Sr., Jason, Marvin & Dustin Culmer, and |
Shavoughn Sturrup; 1 daughter, Staff Nurse Sherrell :
Sturrup-Antoine; numerous brothers and sisters
(children of the late R.H. Culmer), especially, Elder :
Winston Culmer, Sr., Dr. Kirtland Culmer, Dr. Leslie :
Culmer, Lowell, Sanford, R. H., Jr., Addison, Kendal, |
George, Vincent, Stuart, Eardley, Llewelyn, Ann, Jan, Ivy, }
: Family, Austin Burrows & Family, Mr. Alfred Stewart &

& Family, Bryan Whymns & Family, Elder Olga Culmer
& Family, Birdina Taylor & Family, Jeff Swaby & Family,
Ashton, William and Sean Miller & Family, Sean Turnquest
& Family, Sean Longley & Family, Kenric Major (AKA
Captin Blood) & Family, Barron & Elvis Strapp, Esther
Francis, Joy Culmer & Family, Bishop Samuel Johnson
& Family, Pastor Raymond and Barbara Duncombe &
Family, Anthony Johnson & Family, Pastor and Mrs.
Winton Roberts & Family, Marilyn Sturrup-Brown &

Family, Patricia Sears & Family, Pastor and Mrs. Edward

Singers and The Men's Choir; Samuel Bain, Benjamin
Bain & Family, Brian Baker & Family, Anthony Baker,
Mr. & Mrs. Theophilus Storr & Family, Leo Rodgers &
Family, Kevin Tinker & Family, Amos Rolle & Family,
Glenda Hepburn & Family, Don, Eugene, Patterson and
Raymond Smith & Family, The Entire Mangrove Cay
Community, The Avocado Street Family, and others too
numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butler’s Funeral
Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on
Friday from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. and on Saturday from 10
a.m. until service time at the church.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009,

: FEL USC POS

FUNERAL DIRECTORS

“Rendering the finest in caring and compassionate service
regardless of financial condition.”

7th Terrace, Collins Avenue * (242) 356-2187 ©
P.O. Box GT-2679 * Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MAKIA "Chaka"
WHYMNS-
JOHNSON, 29

Rev.

' law; Rashanda Cox, Jasmine Wells, Antionette,
' Shaketra, Janeen, Shawanda and Alexandria
| Johnson, and Asharan Adderley. (5) Brothers-in-
: law; Deangelo Johnson, Anton, Dion Anwar and
: Andrew Johnson. Aunts; Virginia Harris, Yvonne
: : : ' Gardiner and Rosemary Ferguson. Uncles;
of Soldier Road, will be : Roderic. Por: Perry, Stenk A Eid ase
B held on Saturday, August {| Roderick, Partick, Perry, Stephen, an war
Ist, 2009 at 10am at The !
New Mount Zion Baptist |
Church, Blue Hill Road |
South, Officiating will be ;
Andrew Stuart, |
assisted by other ministers. Interment will be made |
in Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road. :
' Mario Bowe, Sheffrey Rolle, Michael Roach,
Precious and loving memories will forever be in :
the hearts of her Husband; Andrew Johnson Jr., :
Children; Shamara Thurston, Franklyn Whymns, |
Andewnique and Andrell Johnson. Mother; Leanna |
Whymns; Grandmothers; Wealthea Whymns and |
Carmetta Rolle. Mother-in-Law: Jessiemae Wells. :
Father-in-Law; Andrew Jonson Sr., Sisters; Aretha |
Ferguson and Franlee Whymns. Brothers; Robert :
and James Smith, Nieces; Sharita Rahming, Ryesha |
Ferguson, Frandesha Whymns, Robinique and :
Rabanisha Smith, Shanderia Cox, De'ante Johnson, :
Franisa, Nicolette and Destiny; Grand niece;
Valtinique Simmons. Nephews; Randy Mackey, :
Geno Ferguson and Treyvar Taylor, Michael :
Johnson, Kingsley Hanna, Courtney Anderson, |

Anton Dion and Anwar Johnson, (9) Sisters-in- | #
: time.

Whymns, Robert, Franklyn and James Ferguson.
Godchild; Lorenzo Mcoy Jr., and a host of other
relatives and friends including; Gelina Wells,
Remelda Walker, Lennox Wells, Chanel Nottage,
Judy Roache-Davis, Philincia, Deidre, Shantor and
Dennis Harris, Malinda Cartwright, Allison
Strachan, Stephen, Quitell and Delricka Whymns,

Cephas Bowe and family, The Smith, Johnson,
Wells, Hanna, McDonald, Woodside, Bowe,
Wallace, Brice, Miller, Ferguson and Rolle family.
Hubert Taylor, Tasha, Jackie, Elaine and Tasha
Nottage, Kendrell Smith, Alicia Rahming, Nardo
Major, Valentino Simmons, Mama Carey and
family, Mario and Terry Bowe, Michael McDonald,
Geovannia White The Claridge Road and Bowe
Alley family, R.M. Bailey class of 97 and the
management and staff of Ultimate Door and
window and many others too numerous to mention.

The body will repose in the Blessed Redeemer Chapel
at Ferguson's Funeral Directors, 7th Terrace Collins
Avenue on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and
at the church on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. until service



PAGE 19
PAGE 20, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009

Publish your

CARD OF THANKS
or

IN LOVING MEMORY

in The Tribune’s
NEW

OBITUARY
SECTION

Every Thursday

Call us today

502-2352
or 502-2354



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

EAST SUN qg RISE MORTUARY
37S

“A New Commitment To Service’

GRAVESIDE SERVICE FOR

SUZETTE
RECKLEY, 33

of Elizabeth Estates will
be held on Friday at 10
a.m. at Lakeview
Memorial Gardens, |p
J.EK Drive. Officiating |
will be Rev. Howard T.
Smith.

Born: Sept. 30, 1975 — Died: July 26, 2009.

She is survived by her mother: Ada Reckley:
her step-father: Harold Major; 3 sisters: Valerie
Harding, Venilda Dean and Nicola Reckley; 1
adopted sister: Monique Hanna; 3 brothers: Van
Miller, Dwayne Reckley and Ian Miller; 2 aunts:
Vernita and Margaret Reckey; 6 uncles: Roland,
Mervin, Nelson, Vernal, Haziel and Algey
Reckley; 2 brothers-in-law: Melpert Dean and
Leslie Harding; | sister-in-law: Walda Miller;
numerous nieces, nephews and cousins and a
host of other relatives and friends.

There will be no public viewing.

Funeral Arrangements are being handled by East
Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta Street, Palmdale.

EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service”

#27 Rosetta Street, PO.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale,
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957
24 hrs. Emergency Service
er ee Te wes) oe] ac


The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, July 30, 2009® PG 21


PG 22 ® Thursday, July 30, 2009

RELIGION



By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

MANY times in our daily
lives we may ask ourselves
“why does God let bad
things happen to good peo-
ple?” In his wisdom, God's
love is never failing allowing
him to not only provide us
with his love, protection and
guidance, but also to give us
our own free will.

1 Peter 5:7 states “Cast all your
anxiety on him because he cares
for you.”

Golden Gates World Outreach
Ministries International, Trent
Davis, said God guiding us is really
like being in tune with a satellite
dish.

“A satellite station is above the
earth and once you have the



GOD’S love is
never failing
allowing him to
not only provide ;
us with his love,
protection and
guidance, but
also to give

us Our Own |
ste |



receiver down here on earth, you
get a signal. The satellite is higher
than you and can see the entire
picture, but your receiver must be
on. You can have that receiver
inside but once it is not on you
won't pick up the signal,” Mr Davis
said.

Mr Davis said God's guidance
can also be found in the “still small
voice” of the Holy Spirit.

“His directives may be as simple
as when you have a ‘something
told me to turn my windows down
today’ moment. It might be a
nudging to not call a certain per-
son, or to go to a specific place ata
given time. Success with God
always means choosing to do things
God's way, not our own way,” Mr
Davis said.

Mr Davis said the way we can
activate that satellite receiver is
through our relationship with God.

“Through praise and worship
that tweaks the signal when we
lift our hands to God;
when we

open our selves up to his presence
and when we give him glory. When
the person that is on earth opens
up their receiver and they make
sure their antennas are up, they get
a clear signal from the satellite.
When we open up our spirits to
God and spend time tuning and
tracking that signal, we get clear
instructions as to how to move,”
Mr Davis said.

Mr Davis also makes reference
to God’s guidance from the recent
film “Taken.”

“The premise of Taken is where
this young lady goes on a trip
against her father’s wishes and the
last thing he gives her is a cell
phone telling her to keep in con-
tact. She is then talking to him
when the kidnappers come and as
he is talking to her the most key
important line he says is ‘in ten
seconds they are going to take you.

However, when they do,
describe as



The Tribune

much as you can as the phone is
going to be open.’ She was able to
be calm because she heard his
voice just before all this was going
on and she got clear guidance and
instructions. She knew that her
father knew what was going on
because she had the receiver and
the connection going on and in the
end she came out with the victory.
That is how we are with God-there
are some things we can’t avoid but
His voice and His guidance
through the process will give us the
victory,” Mr Davis said.

Mr Davis said God can handle
the heavy weights that wear us
down in life and love us uncondi-
tionally.

“As the world continues going
on, there are things that we still
can’t avoid, but our constant con-
tact with our God allows us to see
some things before, allows us to
walk around some things and the
things we can not walk around,
God takes through those
things.”


The Tribune

©

RELIGION

Married for Life

WE are facing many challenges in our
society, and being happily married is one
such area. How can we remain married
for life? How can we find some level of
happiness together?

One way to do this, I have been told
by a lady married for fifty-six years, is
for both persons to really want to be
married and to intend work at it. There
needs to be an intentional effort being
made to help each other to find joy in
the relationship.

This requires a degree of maturity
that cares about the well-being of the
other, a level of love that puts the other
first, and a consistent desire to please
the Lord through the ministry of mar-
riage. What an ideal! How do we meet
such a high standard?

First of all, we need to accept that
God has called us to a life-time journey
with this other person. If you have a
traveling companion who will share
everything with you, it makes sense to
try to create as congenial an atmosphere
as possible. The time frame dictates the
approach.

Once we keep this in mind, then the
next consideration is the wisdom
required to work things out together.
The more humble we are the better, The
more dependent on God for insight we
are, seeking the mind of Christ together,
the quicker we will discern the will of
God.

If we truly admire our spouse as an
intelligent person, gifted in certain
areas, and capable of contributing much
to the relationship, then it is easier to



trust opinions which differ from our own
as having some validity. Respect given
and appreciated, then returned, in an
ongoing reciprocal arrangement, boosts
the level of self-esteem for both persons.

Put another way, we sit together as
equals, both made in the image and like-
ness of God, and we share our thoughts
and feelings, prayerfully searching for
the best possible solution. Because we
both wish to bless and be blessed we
control our egos and explore all options.
There is no need for a power struggle
because God is the power to which we
both seek to sincerely submit.

A life-time is a long time to be unhap-
py. It can make the promise to be
together “Til death us do part’ feel like a
life sentence to be served on death row.
Regular appeals may prolong the execu-
tion for many years but one day it will
have to happen.

Why not search your own heart,
examine your own conscience, and con-
fess your own sins to Almighty God con-
cerning your present situation. Ask God
to heal you and help you. If you both do
this, you allow God to fill you with
peace, joy and love for now through
eternity.

r
° |
ll ee el
an et 1 Hea oe

Everywhere The Buyers Are!

L



Thursday, July 30, 2009 ® PG 23

FRET NOT THYSELF: DO NOT
WORRY!

Text: Psalm 37:1-10; Matthew 6:24-34:

Psalm 37 raises the question, “Why do the wicked
prosper, and the Righteous suffer? Then offers Godly
Instructions to persons who are suffering adversity;
they are counselled to never envy the apparently
prosperous, wicked people; because their prosperity
is shallow, and only lasts a short time. The confidence
of the Righteous should reside in God, and they
must live to bring Glory to His Name; in this ordinary
way; they are assured happiness in this life, and in
‘The Life to Come.’

Pastor Ben Bailey
The Prophetic Voice
P. O. Box N-9518
Nassau, Bahamas
Tpv.inc@coralwave.com

Paraphrased, the Psalmist provided the following
encouragements: Do not fret, allow the mind to be entirely calm and
composed; do not worry, fuss, trouble, bother, upset yourself, harass, pester
— or vex-up yourself, do not feel hurt, or sad because of what is happening
to you; do not hassle yourself - or get on your own nerves; do not irritate
— wind-up yourself, or rub yourself the wrong way, annoy — or drive yourself
mad; do not become aggravated — or wound-up; do not disturb — or scare
your own self with foolish thoughts; do not exacerbate - make things worse,
or ‘fan the flames of passion’ because of evildoers, nor be envious of the
workers of iniquity. They shall soon be cut down like the grass, and vanish
as the green herb.

Trust in the Lord, and do good; dwell in the land, and feed on His faithfulness,
knowing that God will provide the necessaries of life for you. The Psalmist
believes that if we seek our happiness in God; ‘His Way of Life’ will regulate
our desires for a delicate life of ease and pleasure, causing us to ask for
things we now consider proper for God to supply.

Delight yourself also in the Lord, ‘Don’t Worry: Be Happy,’ expecting
everything that makes you happy to come from Him; knowing that every
good and perfect gift comes from God; and He shall give you the desires,
needs, requirements, requests, or wishes of your heart. Commit your way
to the Lord, Trust also in Him, and He shall bring it to pass. He shall bring
forth your righteousness as the light, and your justice as the noonday.

Rest in the Lord! Learn to be silent to the Lord; Learn to leave the whole
predicament with him, without being anxious about the result, and wait
patiently for Him. Do not fret because of those, who prosper in their way,
or because of the man who brings wicked plans to pass. Cease from anger,
and forsake fury and rage: Do not fret: because it only causes you harm.

Mathew addresses the question of man’s appetite for material things; which
increases our anxiety levels whenever we are unable to acquire them, and
provides a simple solution. First, he addresses the topic of choosing a
master, who can empower our spiritual nature to exercise self-control over
passions and desires of our human nature: “No man can serve two masters:
for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the
one, and despise the other” [We surrender to what we love supremely].

Next, He addresses the inability of human intellect to positively alter the
natural products of creation: “Therefore | say to you, take no thought for
your life, what you shall eat, or what you shall drink; nor yet for your body,
what you shall put on. Is not the life more than meat, and the body than
raiment? Behold the fowls of the air: for they sow not, neither do they reap,
nor gather into barns; yet your Heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not
much better than they? Which of you by taking thought can add one cubit
to his physique?

Why take you thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they
grow; they toil not, neither do they spin: and yet | say to you, that even
Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. Wherefore, if God
so clothe the grass of the field, which to day is, and to morrow is cast into
the oven, shall He not much more clothe you, O you of little faith? Therefore
take no thought, saying, what shall we eat? or, what shall we drink? or,
Wherewithal shall we be clothed?

Your Heavenly Father knows that you have need of all these things. But seek
you first the Kingdom of God, and His Righteousness; and all these things
shall be added to you. Take therefore no thought for the morrow: for the
morrow shall take thought for the things of itself. Sufficient unto the day is
the evil contained within it.”

Human appetite is incapable of altering situations it creates; however, spiritual
alteration of human appetite can avoid difficult situations!


PG 24 ® Thursday, July 30, 2009

RELIGION

Take back our streets

It is a proven fact that everything
rises and falls upon leadership!

It is blatantly evident that one of the
greatest problems of the Bahamas
today; is that of effective leadership.
This fact is conclusive straight across
the board; the lack of effective leader-
ship in the home, in the church and in
the government. With the Bahamas
being a small group of islands and
Nassau being only twenty miles long
and seven miles wide (21/7) how is it
that lawlessness is allowed to have such
free course on so small of an island?

Being a Bahamian who has lived and
traveled throughout the USA and
returning back home, it's disheartening
to hear the silly excuses; that ninety
nine per cent of Bahamians sincerely
gives for the lawlessness in the land
today. Worst of all I've heard supposed
to be leaders (politicians, police offi-
cers, civic and religious leaders) giving
weak excuses for their inability / failure
to enforce the law.

Again, it’s obvious that these leaders
only mentally ascend to scriptures such
as “Prov.18:21: Death and life are in the
power of the tongue: and they that love
it shall eat the fruit thereof. And Mark
11:23 : He shall have whatsoever he
saith.

Here's a quick note to persons such
as the minister of National Security, the
attorney general and the commissioner
of police. The parents and family mem-
bers who would have lost their loved
ones through some form of criminal
act; care not to hear you leaders give
dumb excuses and try to cover your
incompetence to enforce the law.

Any leader or person who sits in the
office of authority and ascribes to such
notions as: “What we experiencing is as
a result of that which is taking place in
America” is not fit to lead or occupy an
office of authority.

What the Bahamas is experiencing is
leadership with no testosterone to



PASTOR

effectively deal with its problems. As
soon as true leadership arises, the
Bahamas will boldly move forward,
upward and onward together, then the
slogan It's Better in the Bahamas
would be true.

Overall Bahamians are law abiding
people but where there is no law
enforcement; but just like every other
nationality; what we're allowed to get
away with, we would.

Here's my case and point:

As crazy and as lawless as
Bahamians may appear to be when
they're at home in the Bahamas when
traveling to the USA, immediately this
(suppose to be) lawlessness, raw born
Bahamian becomes a law abiding visi-
tor.

Let's observe the lawless Bahamian
visiting the USA for a few days? If they
intend to drive on the streets of
America, watch how quickly they
adhere to the seat belt law.

As much as this Bahamian would
drink alcohol beverages while driving
on the streets of the Bahamas; how is it
that they won't do the same on the
streets of America?

For the Bahamian visiting America;
obeying the laws of that land is by no
means a problem to him or her. This
individual or these individuals are fully
aware that there are swift conse-
quences for every lawless action taken.

Now on the other hand; the minute
these temporary law abiding
Bahamians leave America and their
feet hits the Bahamas soil; instanta-
neously they revert to their lawless
ways. Why is this? Listen, it's not that

Job well done!

I AM taking a different route
today. This article gives props to
The Royal Bahamas Police Force
for running a much needed and
extremely helpful Summer Camp.

The summer months approached
and the reality of school closing for
more than 8 weeks left many par-
ents wondering how to entertain
their children. I heard on the radio
that The Royal Bahamas Police
Force was having a summer camp
and the following morning regis-
tered my neice.

I don't know how this is going to

r



ALLISON
MILLER

sound but Pll say it anyway, when I
went with much anticipation to
pick her up and saw that they were
giving the children a hot lunch I
knew instantly that this was the
right place for my niece to be for
the next several weeks. I think the

there are no laws here in the Bahamas.
What we've got is a two fold dynamic at
work here: 1) There is no respect or
reverence for our laws, and 2) There is
very little enforcement of our laws, and
where there is enforcement; there lacks
swift judgment and meaningful conse-
quences.

It is said that “It's the little fox that
spoils the vine” This proverb also fits or
is the root cause for the deterioration
of law and order in the Bahamas.

The simple neglect of enforcing our
traffic laws has given birth to many
other serious crimes in the land. Here's
a little foot note for these sleeping /
blind leaders that oversee law enforce-
ment in the Bahamas: The Oklahoma
City bomber Timothy Mcveigh was
arrested for a simple traffic matter.
Had it not been for that police officer
enforcing the traffic laws; this danger-
ous criminal might have gotten away.

I deemed it a shame and the lack of
vision for the government to have to
borrow millions of dollars for road
repairs. The strict enforcement of the
traffic laws, along with an expeditious-
ly working court system; and stiffer
penalties and fines would generate
more than enough finances to repair
and maintain roads and highways
throughout the Bahamas.

The simple enforcement of traffic
laws would overwhelmingly fund the
Bahamas treasury. I would invite the
commissioner of police and the comp-
troller of road traffic to ride incognito
the public bus / jitney for a month; and
the would have a greater appreciation
for the spirit of this article with refer-
ence to the level of traffic lawlessness
on the streets.

The terror and fear of riding the
Jitneys

At some point the commissioner of
police and the comptroller of road traf-
fic must put their heads together and
come up with a zero tolerance task
force; to take back the street from the

officers out did themselves. Not
only were the children served hot
lunch every day, they were also
given a snack at break and all field
trips were free.

The only thing parents had to pay
for was the T-shirt given to each
child at registeration. I don't think
you can beat that at all.

I think we are all aware that sum-
mer time is the most popular time
for children to be idle.

However, the RBPF sought to do
something about that this summer
by hosting a summer camp for four
weeks.

I applaud their efforts and
accomplishments in helping par-
ents for a few hours out of the day.
It is good to see problems, that

The Tribune

road demons) jitney drivers.

Mr Commissioner / Mr Comptroller,
here are a few point or concerns that
I'm sure you must have heard of on
more than one occasion.

Bus drivers are allowed to play loud,
filthy music as they recklessly transport
paying passengers to their destination.

Passengers have to tolerate this
abuse of this nasty music; out of fear of
being beaten down and assaulted on
these buses by the drivers and their rid-
ing partners, if they complain about the
music.

There is also disrespect for other
motorist by bus drivers as they're
allowed to stop in the middle of the
street to off load an receive passengers.

Might I suggest, Mr Commissioner
and Mr Comptroller; that the selected
officers of this task force be made
aware that if it is proven that they've
compromised the integrity of the task
force by whatever means; they would
be immediately dealt with at the
strictest measure of the law.

This is but a mustard seed observa-
tion of the lawlessness that is being
allowed to have free course on our
street. I do blame the various drivers
for their lawless actions, but most of all
T highly hold / blame the commissioner
of police, the comptroller of road traf-
fic and the constipated, weak court sys-
tem for failing to effectively enforce the
laws.

IS THERE ANYBODY IN
AUTHORITY; within the above men-
tioned departments / offices who are
not afraid to enforce the laws and Take
Back Our Streets? Stop Talking and
Take Action.

¢ For questions or comments contact us
via E-mail: pastormallen@yahoo.com or
Phone 1-242-441-2021 or 225-3850

Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l.

means efforts can be made to solve
them. It is even better when we see
problems and have solutions to
those problems. I know we are liv-
ing in different times from the 80's
and early 90's and many of us don't
believe this any more but it truly
"takes a village to raise a child.” I
thought they were in good hands
being in the police hands. This
department sought to make life
easier for people and I hope that
they are given the thanks that they
deserve.

My sister and I would like to
extend our thanks to the commis-
sioner of police and his force espe-
cially Central Division for a job
well done. It was very much appre-
ciated, thank you.
The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, July 30, 2009 ® PG 25

Regarding darts

"TO some who were confident of their
own righteousness and looked down on
everybody else, Jesus told this parable:
"Two men went up to the temple to pray,
one a Pharisee and the other a tax col-
lector. The Pharisee stood up and prayed
about himself: 'God I thank you that I
am not like other men- robbers, evildo-
ers, adulterers- or even like this tax col-
lector. I fast twice a week and give a
tenth of all I get.’

"But the tax collector stood at a dis-
tance. He would not even look up to
heaven, but beat his breast and said,
‘God, have mercy on me, a sinner.’ "I tell
you that this man, rather than the other,
went home justified before God. For
everyone who exalts himself will be
humbled, and he who humbles himself
will be exalted.”

Luke 18:9-14 (N.I.V)

It's amazing how imperfect I've found
Tam. It’s not that I ever thought I was per-
fect, or anything even close, but I also did-
n't think I was extraordinarily imperfect
either. Yet it was a Saturday I will never
forget. My ten year old nephew asked me
to play a game of darts and although I
never had a stellar history in darts, I
thought- twenty-four year- old me,
against, ten -year- old him, how miserable
could one game possibly be? I accepted
the challenge. In fact, I thought it would
be a great opportunity for me to teach



him something; being fourteen years his
senior and all. So what could I teach him
I pondered- maybe, how to be a good
sport whether you win, or more impor-
tantly lose? At this point I'm sure you've
already fast tracked to the conclusion-
well, don't burn out your sneakers just
yet.

Two minutes into the game, I've finally
landed a dart on the board- the wall is
relieved- my nephew is on cloud nine,
blissfully content that regardless of my
improved play I don't stand a chance. As
I shift from one unpleasant emotion to
another equally unpleasant emotion, I try
to remain as physically pleasant as possi-
ble-with this ten year old kid, who seems
to be growing rather quickly in front of
my very eyes. As he explains the scoring
to me again, I panic and think, "This can-
not be happening!’ "You mean I'm unable
to avoid some level of mathematical com-
petence?!’ My nephew who considers me
to be the coolest thing since Nintendo
Wii, is about to find out I have a flaw- a
distressing defect, discovered and quickly
concealed- well somewhat, in grade five.

While he wrote the scores, I would count
and recount my points as quickly as I
could manage; so to not be discovered to
be a fraud, a con artist who swindled her
way to high rank in the LA.C.A.E-

International Association of Cool
Aunts Everywhere.

However, when he looked at my land
and again at the point I had given him-
the cat was out of the bag so to speak.
My Mathematics A-grade nephew fre-
quently and quietly replaced the 18- for
double 8, with a 16- and in those very
moments I realised, there’s something
hugely disturbing about the often peace-
ful quiet, that emerges when one has
been exposed- it's almost as if laughter,
finger pointing or arrest would be more
comforting. While the vicious cycle of
recounts picked up speed, he would
occasionally chuckle and shake his head.
The darts wanted to teach me some-
thing.

Ultimately I won- one game out of
five. Alright, alright, I did get into the
game somewhat self righteous, con-
vinced that my age compared to his was
all I needed to ensure a win. Convinced,
he could never teach me anything. But
he did. It was- that there are some things
he's better at and that's okay.
Regardless of a persons age, race or
gender, we can all find wisdom and
understanding in each other.

Yet am J alone in my struggle with the



Bethel Baptist Church
celebration 219 years

HISTORIC Bethel Baptist Church will cele-
brate its 219th anniversary on Sunday August 2 in
one combined service at 10 am under the theme
“In Pursuit of Greatness” taken from Genesis
12:1-4, Joshua 17:14-18 and Matthew 20:20-24.
The special guest speaker will be Rev Dr Victor
Cooper, Pastor of New Bethany Baptist Church.

Two hundred and nineteen years ago, a run
away American slave of the Carolina shores
named Prince Williams, guided by the hand of
providence, landed on the shores of Nassau and
in 1790 organised and erected Bethel's Meeting
House from which the name Meeting Street was
derived. The church has the oldest continuous
Baptist congregation in the Bahamas and possibly
in the Caribbean.

The church’s forefathers under the leadership
of the Holy Spirit have laid a solid foundation
upon which to build and expand. Persons like
Rev Robert Johnson who ordered the church's
first pipe organ; Rev Dr HR Brown who was a
social activist, a great orator, and a man con-
cerned about others and was also responsible for

the “Serving the Whole Man” ministry; Rev
Wellington Johnson who under his short tenure
introduced many administrative changes and
finally, the current minister Timothy Stewart all
played pivotal roles in the church’s development.
The church has undergone extensive renovations,
administrative offices were built, properties
acquired, full-time associate ministers were
employed, an administrative team was employed
and numerous ministries established.

The church will commit to receiving all that
God has promised for his people to become, and
recommit to doing what God has called His
Church to do. In the future, members will focus
on the challenges that confront the family, the
community, and the country as a whole. These
objectives would be met through the pastoral
care ministry, the preaching of the gospel, the
teaching ministry of the church, evangelism, the
youth and children's ministry of the church, and
the necessary expansion of the church's facilities
to effectively meet the spiritual demands of the
times.

occasional self righteous attitude or is
this a vice

that looms over us all- particularly
believers as we strive to be witnesses of
God's truth in the world? Well what I do
know is, this is without a doubt one of
the reasons why we must at all times be
of a sober mind; humbling ourselves,
accepting that we don't have all the
answers, we can't solve all problems-
but we do, have all the truth, written in
the Bible. There is no ranking system
based on perfection, that places believ-
ers above any other human being. Is one
who is skilled at maths, more valuable
than one who is skilled at communica-
tions?

Absolutely not. We all need to have a
healthy dose of each discipline, and we
all need to realise we have individual
gifts- essential to our individual pur-
pose, and destiny. That being said- I'll
always be ready for another game of
darts; an invitation to share-or one to
simply listen.

In closing, may you always welcome
every light hearted opportunity no mat-
ter how small it seems.

¢ Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian
writer and poet, currently residing in
Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to
the article can be sent to

fearless247@gmail.com.



UO Ea
The Tribune

TRIBUNE TIP
OF THE DAY

PG 26 ® Thursday, July 30, 2009 RELIGION

(SQ) THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS







es)

Native Baptists of the Bahamas — cca

By far the largest number of the negro
Creoles belong to the Baptist persua-
sion.

This species of dissent has peculiar
attractions for them, involving, as it
does, a very democratic form of self-
government, the substitution of class
councils, and adjudications for the pro-
cedure of the established courts of law,
together with a system of mutual espi-
onage and censorship, which at the
same time gratifies their curiosity and
flatters their self-conceit. I by no means
deny that, in their time, the Baptist
preachers have done good to their
flocks ; but I consider that the present
effect of their preaching and of their
church organisation is to impart a tone
of republican self-assertion to their con-
gregations, to foster a hypocritical habit
of quoting the Sacred Scriptures on all
occasions, and to postpone the more
serious duties of the moral law to chapel
- going observance of the Sabbath, and
similar ceremonial _ formalities....
(Governor Bayley, 1864)

At this time the Baptists of the
Bahamas consisted of ex slaves and lib-
erated Africans belonging to either the
Baptist Missionary Society of London
or an equally large widespread network
of Native Baptists - just as their lan-
guage overlaid African grammar with
English syntax both groups employed
Christian imagery with underlying
powerful West African religious sym-
bols. Hence, the immersion in water
and reverence to John the Baptist
became a key meeting point in the two
belief systems.

The Native Baptists had their origins
in the Bahamas from the coming of the
Loyalists in the 1780s with Brother
Amos, Frank Spence, Prince Williams
and Sharper Morris. In 1801, the
Society of Anabaptists was formed by
Prince Williams and other free
Negroes. After a brief flirtation with
the Baptist Missionary Society of
London, Prince Williams split away
and built the St John's Particular
Church of the Native Baptist Society in
1835 but the Society itself was probably
in existence since 1825. Prince Williams
and James Burns evangelised the Out
Islands up to William's death in 1840.

Thomas 'Pappy' Romer

Thomas Rumer was born in Grand
Bahama in 1798 and was a slave of
John Pinder until Emancipation. “The
work of soul saving was Mr Romer's
chief delight” (St John's Society
Record Book) - he traveled to the
islands to existing churches and added
new ones, ordaining elders in all.
Although illiterate, Pappy was
described as a worthy, pious man and a
strong disciplinarian - a giant in rebuk-
ing sin and weeping with those that
wept. He visited the homes of the aged

/ JIM
> LAWLOR
7

and sick - often bent over a cooking pot
preparing sustenance for the helpless.

In New Providence, Rumer started
St Peter's in Gambier (1856), St
James', St Peter's and St Mark's. He
also purchased or obtained grants of
land for churches in Long Cay,
Crooked Island, Port Nelson, Rum Cay
(1853), Salt Pond, Long Island (1854),
Matthew Town, Inagua (1855) and
Calabash Bay, Andros (1868).

Thomas 'Pappy’ Romer died on 29th
March 1883 with his dying testimony:
“My work on earth is finished.

Come, thou Great Conqueror, come!
Thou didst bear those five bloody
wounds for me.

I shall soon be satisfied.”

A large procession of all classes and
denominations followed his remains to
the south of St John's Church, where
he was buried. “He was eminently
revered and beloved by the congrega-
tion and many affiliated
Christians...... He was of a kindly, gen-
erous disposition, of simple humble
manners. His life was of consistent
godliness, unostentatious devotion and
earnest zeal”. (Obituary Nassau
Guardian 31st March 1883).

James W Roberts

David C Lightbourne succeeded
Pappy Romer in the pastorate of
Native Baptists but died just over two
years later.

The Church called Methodist lay
reader, James W Roberts born at the
Bogue, Eleuthera as Pastor. In 1891,
‘Pa’ Roberts led the construction of a
new building, 100ft by 30 ft, which is
still in use today. At the cornerstone
laying ceremony Rev Robert Dunlop
(Presbyterian) reported that: “St
John's had 480 members and over 300
children in Sunday School and 48
churches with 4,550 members and
3,000 children in Sunday School. This
church has been a great power for the
good...it has maintained a true and
pure faith.....its neighbours sometimes
think its services are too rousing when
they awake us at three or four o'clock
in the morning”. He likened Pa
Roberts as ‘likeminded' and a ‘worthy
successor’ to old Mr Rumer of simple
manners, earnest life and commanding
influence.

Divisions

Just before he died in 1915, Pa
Roberts asked Rev Daniel Wilshire to
ordain choirmaster Alfred Carrington

Symonette of Snug Corner, Acklins
(born 1875). This was not acceptable
to everyone and as a result the St
James' Native Baptist Association was
formed with Symonette as the
Superintendent.

Rev Gilbert H Thompson, a well
educated Bahamian preaching in New
York became Pastor of the St John's
Society but after four years left taking
away many members and started the
Metropolitan Baptist Church. Rev
Samuel McKinney took over and trav-
elled widely from island to island bap-
tising converts and ordaining minis-
ters. By 1924 there were 46 affiliated
chapels and 5,260 members.

Just before McKinney retired,
Timothy Edward Wesley Donaldson
returned from the USA to assist him.
Donaldson (born in Cat Island 1880),
who had taught in the Government
Schools became Superintendent of the
churches in the Out Islands and R H
Higgs, a Bahamian Pastor in Florida
was brought in to be Pastor of St
John's.

After many churches were damaged
in the 1926 hurricane, the rebuilding of
St John's proved to be very expensive -
at this point a disagreement split the
church again over the payment of a
salary asked for by R H Higgs. Higgs
took away about 300 members, who
worshipped on the Southern
Recreation Grounds and gradually
organised St Paul's Baptist Church
which was later built on Bias Street.

An agreement between Rev T E W
Donaldson and Rev A C Carrington to
amalgamate the whole Baptist Society
together again resulted in Symonette
taking on as superintendent of the
Society and Pastor of St John's with
Donaldson as _ assistant pastor.
Symonette proved to be a good organ-
iser as he brought the Society together
again and added The Annex Baptist
Church and Mt Carmel Baptist Church.
He became the first president of the
Bahamian Baptist Missionary and
Educational Convention. He was
unfortunately drowned off Fresh Creek
Andros and his body is buried there.

Rev T E W Donaldson took over
until his death in 1963. After
Donaldson there was a period of
unrest until Rev Michael Carrington
Symonette (born 1938 in Nassau) was
elected in 1965. Under this Symonette,
Mt Zion, Golden Gates and St John's
Freeport Native Baptist Churches
were added to the Society.

So the Native Baptist Church creat-
ed by those ‘negro creoles' has grown
and prospered into one of the most
influential institutions in the modern
Bahamas.

(Next time: Part 39 - The last years of the
Baptist Missionary Society of London)

A VERSE A DAY KEEPS THE
ENEMY AT BAY. Many
Christians understand the need
for a healthy dose of daily inspi-
ration, especially when it comes
to having a defence against the
troubles that always seem to
arise when we are at our weak-
est.

The word of God is not just
the bread for our daily walk, it is
the essence of what keeps the
saved covered under God’s pro-
tection.

At any time troubles arise with
no clear reason why, however
we have the choice to either
poke our heads in the sand and
pray the situation disappears, or
trust in the Word knowing “This
too shall pass.”

To survive in an ever increas-
ing secular world, Christian or
not, reading the word daily is
simply the best option.

The Bible says to trust in the
word and lean not your own
understanding.

So the next time you're facing
a black cloud, or an obstacle,
instead of fighting a loosing bat-
tle, pick up the Bible and let it
help you through.

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you
are raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in
the area or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and share
your story.


The Tribune

RELIGION

Sickness

By BISHOP VG CLARKE
Calvary Deliverance Church

THE HUMAN body, as everybody
knows, is a remarkable organism com-
prising of billions of cells, numerous
chemicals, hundreds of muscles, miles of
blood vessels and a variety of organs.
The human body can grow, heal itself,
fight disease, adapt to temperature
changes, react to environmental stimu-
lation, and survive numerous physical
abuses. But the body does not go on
forever, at least in this world.
Sometimes it is injured beyond repair. It
can break down if it is not cared for and
eventually wears out.

When we are healthy, we often take
our body for granted. Colds and period-
ic bouts with the flu are annoying but
usually only temporary interruptions to
the activities of life.

Sickness is an issue which runs
throughout the pages of scripture. The
illnesses of Miriam, Naaman,
Nebuchadnezzar, David's newborn
child, Job, and various others are

TODAY IN RELIGION

described with charity in both the old
and new testaments. When Jesus came
to earth in person his concern for the
sick was so important that almost one-
fifth of the gospels are devoted to the
topic of healing. The disciples were
expected to carry on this healing min-
istry and the book of Acts records how
the early church cared for those with
physical illnesses.

The biblical emphasis on sickness
points to at least three conclusions
which can be helpful for the believer:-

1. Sickness is a part of life. Few peo-
ple, if any go through life without
experiencing at least periodic illness.
It seems likely that sickness entered
the human race as a result of the fall,
and since that time people have known
what it is like to be unhealthy. The
Bible makes no attempt to diagnose,
categorise or systematically list the
symptoms in passing, it refers directly
or indirectly to alcoholism, blindness,
deafness, muteness, infirmity, insanity,
speech impediment and a number of

other illnesses.

2. Care, compassion and healing are
important for believers. By his word
and actions, Jesus taught that sickness,
while common, also is undesirable. He
spent much of his time healing the sick.
He encouraged others to do likewise,
and he emphasised the importance of
compassionate caring for those who
were needy and unhealthy. Even to
give someone a drink of water was con-
sidered praiseworthy and Jesus indi-
cated that helping a sick person was
the same as ministering to himself.
Believers are instructed to pray for the
sick and to help in practical ways for
those who are not well.

3. Sickness raises some difficult and
crucial questions about suffering. Some
of you may ask the question “If God is
in control why is He allowing many bad
things to happen to us.” You must
remember that things happen because
of the choices we make. The school
shooting in Colorado some years ago is



Thursday, July 30, 2009 ® PG 27

a prime example of the choices we make
as human beings. When God is left out
of our decision making we leave our-
selves open to be controlled by the devil.

It is probable that our minds will
never fully comprehend the reasons for
suffering, but the Bible teaches that suf-
fering keeps us humble, refines our
faith, conform us to His image, teaches
us about God and produces patience,
maturity, perseverance and character.
Suffering also teaches us to become
more compassionate and caring.

Learning to walk with God - through
prayer, fasting, meditation, Bible study
and worship - can prepare us for the cri-
sis of life. The scriptures never teach
that believers are exempted from illness
or that suffering will be easy for
Christians; neither are we taught that we
should bear problems alone. When we
are in the habit of “bearing one anoth-
er's burdens,” and casting our burdens
on God in prayer, then we are better
prepared for facing illness and death
when they come.

BULGARIAN
Orthodox priests
_ hold the miracu-
lous icon of the
Virgin Mary dur-
ing an orthodox
procession in the
town of Varna
east of the
Bulgarian capital
Sofia, Sunday,
July, 26, 2009.
Every year some
thousands of
believers take part
in this procession
as they try to
touch or kiss the
miraculous icon
before a praying
for good health.

Petar Petrov/AP Photo
PG 28 ® Thursday, July 30, 2009

SHENIQUE GRAY

DE’WAYNIA JOSEY

VALENCIA MOSS

RELIGION

,
RUSHAN COOPER

SHANNON EVANS

The Tribune



JAMELL DAWKINS

The contestants of the Miss
Gospel Bahamas Competition

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE excitement is now
brewing and within just three
days one of six contestant
for this year’s Miss Gospel
Bahamas will walk away

with the title of queen.

The event which is set to take place
on August 2, at the Wyndham’s
Rainforest Theater will feature several
special guest performances by Synergy
Soldiers for Christ, Mericha Walker,
and Overcomers Mime Ministry.

Going through months of vigorous
training, appearances, retreats, and
pageant preparations, the young
women have gone through a transfor-
mation that has escorted them from
girls to women, but only one can be
queen.

Kahlil Gibran once said: “Beauty is
not in the face, beauty is a light in the
heart,”and for these young beauties
the challenge is to convince the judges
that they have what it takes.

According to the organisiers of
Miss Gospel Bahamas: “From the
start, the Miss Gospel Bahamas
Pageant has encouraged its partici-
pants to transform their spiritual lives
in ways that truly reflect Jesus Christ.

Organised by Great Commission
Ministries International, the pageant
also promotes assistance to the nation’s
impoverished and homeless.”

SHENIQUE GRAY

MISS AMETHYST

25 years old and is a member of
Annex Baptist Church. She serves as
president of her church’s youth min-
istry, church secretary, member of the
choir, and lieutenant of her church’s
Girls Brigade. Shenique is employed
as a senior accountant at Deloitte &
‘Touche, and is a Certified Public
Accountant (CPA). Her hobbies
include swimming, tennis, and travel-
ling. Shenique aspires to become a
multi-faceted entrepreneur, as she
plans to creatively develop her own
travel agency, business consultancy
firm, and financial advisement firm.

DE’WAYNIA JOSEY

MISS CALVARY DELIVERANCE CHURCH

is an 18 year old student at the
College of the Bahamas. She serves in
various church and civic organisations
including Calvary Deliverance
Church’s Dance Ministry, Crusaders
Brass Brand, and Total Praise Dance
Troupe. She is also a volunteer of
Sister Circle, a charity organisation
assisting the less fortunate.
De’Waynia’s hobbies include dancing
and performing in musicals. Having a

passion for mental wellness, she hopes
to one day achieve a doctorate degree
in Clinical Psychology.

VALENCIA MOSS

MISS CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY GAMBIER
is a 25 year old teacher. She has
trained in various governmental min-
istries, including the Ministry of
Youth, Sports, and Culture, Foreign
Affairs, and presently as a Spanish
teacher enlisted through the Ministry
of Education. Valencia also ministers
in the Praise and Worship and Dance
Ministries of her church. She aspires
to become an International Relations
Officer in the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs. Her hobbies include singing,
dancing, and experiencing different
cultures.

RUSHAN COOPER

MISS ALL OUT ENTERTAINMENT

is 19 years old and is a member of
Emmanuel Missionary Baptist
Church. She serves as Vice President
of her church’s Dance Ministry, Youth
Ministry Secretary, a member of the
Youth Choir and Youth Praise team.
Rushan is currently enrolled at the
College of the Bahamas where she
hopes to obtain certification and train-
ing to become a primary school
teacher. Her hobbies include dancing,
singing, reading, traveling, and pho-
tography.

SHANNON EVANS

MISS ZION BAPTIST CHURCH EAST & SHIRLEY
STREETS

is a 20 year old student at the College
of the Bahamas. She is committed to
sharing the importance of educational
advancement, which is evidenced by
her involvement in the Education
Awareness Society, her church’s Youth
Ministry, and Children’s Church. She
is also a director of Shachah Worship
and dance ministries. Shannon’s hob-
bies include reading, writing, and
communications, all of which she
hopes to help in her dream of becom-
ing a Primary Educator.

JAMELL DAWKINS

MISS BAHAMAS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP CENTRE
has an ambition to encourage others
in pursuing Jesus Christ. Although her
life’s journey has only spanned 20
years, Jamell is already certain that
she has been called to Dance
Ministry. She serves in the Dance and
Drama Ministries of her church, in
addition to practicing dance as a pas-
time. She is a volunteer of Miss Teen
Bahamas World Pageant. Jamell is
also a member of Bahamas Christian
Fellowship Centre’s Youth Praise
team and Chairperson of the Youth
Board. Her hobbies include reading,
writing, and she has an interest in
Spanish.



xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EIEEHZVD8_E17S09 INGEST_TIME 2012-01-26T19:11:04Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01373
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Marital rape: A nation divided C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.205THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER T-STORMIN SPORTS HIGH 91F LOW 70F By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net CONTROVERSY over the proposed outlaw of marital rape has divided the communi ty as men argue against the removal of their safeguards in order to give more protection to women. Heated discussion over the issue continued on Wendell Jones’ Love 97FM talk show yesterday as Minister of Labour and Social Development Loretta Butler-Turner, Crisis Centre director Sandra Dean-Patter son, and Pastor Barrington Brennen responded to callers’ queries about the proposed legislation. Mrs Butler-Turner tabled a bill to amend the Sexual Offences Act in Parliament last week to reform current legislation and uphold the rights of the individual set out in United Nations conventions by making rape within marriage ille gal. But religious leaders and those who believe marriage allows for a wife’s physical ‘submission’ to her husband have shown difficulty in understand ing the reality of rape in the context of the marriage. Pastor Cedric Moss of King dom Life Church has said forced intercourse within a nonestranged marriage should be considered some other punish able crime other than rape between strangers. And a male caller said: “The law that the minister is trying to push to the table goes against the vows of marriage.” Another asked: “If a hus band makes a wife mad and she says she won’t give him sex for a week and he takes it can you report it as rape?” When this was confirmed, he said: “Well if that’s correct this must be the height of stupidity, and all those persons involved i n it should be put in that category as well!” T he panel strived to explain how rape is a violent act regard less of the perpetrator, and cit ed examples of married women who have been subjected to horrific sexual abuse by their husbands. M rs Butler-Turner said a woman called to thank her for putting the bill forward because rape was a part of her daily married life. The minister explained: “She said, ‘every night I would come home from work and my husband would rip my clothing off and he would violate me, beat me up, and have sex with me.’ Obviously that was his way of using her as an object, as Heated debate over law change issue The Tribune YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER I N S I D E OBITUARIES and RELIGION INTODAY’STRIBUNE JOBSAND HELPWANTED L L O O A A D D S S O O F F CARS! CARS! CARS! The Tribune launches Passport to Paradise Miss Universe edition THE TRIBUNE has l aunched the fourth edition of its Passport to Paradise magazine Miss Universe Edition – once more distributing it room-to-room at Atlantis and nearby marinas, The Hilton, various hotels on Cable Beach such as Sandals and the Sheraton and high-end boutique hotels in the Out Islands. T his latest edition features interviews with Miss Universe 2008 Dayana Mendoza (Venezuela Kristen Dalton as well as the Bahamas’ very own KiaraS herman and other Bahamian beauty queens. There are also articles focusing on dining out in the Bahamas, going green, beauty tips and the local upswing in the real estate market. Passport to Paradise magazine managing editor Jenny Pinder says of the latest issue: “The Miss Universe edition was a lot of hard work and fun. It was obvious we needed to dedicate an entire issue to this prestigious once-ina-lifetime event. “The opportunity to showcase the Bahamas to all the world had advertisers jumping at the chance to be a part of it.” GEORGE MARKANTONIS , president and managing director of Kerzner BahamasLimited, receives the latest Passport to Par adise Miss Universe edition from The Tribune’s Jenny Pinder, managing editor of the magazine. P 2 P _ 3 8 4 1 _ L 1 R 4 . i n d d 1 7 / 2 1 / 0 9 7 : 1 7 : 1 2 P M F e l i p M a j o r SEE page three A POLICE Constable accused of extortion was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Constable Elvin Sanjay McClain, 23, of Garden Hills, appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court 1, Bank Lane yesterday on the extortion charge. It is alleged that McClain on Thursday, May 21, extorted $1,100 from Stephanie Glinton knowing that he was not lawfully authorised to do so. McClain, who was represented by lawyer Romona Farquharson, pleaded not guilty to the extortion charge. Sgt Sean Thurston, the prosecutor, did not object to POLICECONSTABLECHARGED 23-YEAR-OLD Police Constable Elvin Sanjay McClain is shown leaving Magistrate’s Court yesterday. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page 10 AS OF5pm Tuesday some 1,100 applications had been collected from Urban Renewal Centres and the Department of Labour offices in New Providence and Grand Bahama for the National Training and Empowerment Programme, Labour Minister Dion Foulkes said yesterday. The programme was conceived by government to SEABOARD Marines conducted three joint antismuggling exercises at its loading dock compound on West Bay Street yesterday. Utilising a modified con tainer, which was outfitted with a list of hidden compartments, security experts showed personnel how to conduct a seven-point inspection of the unit before it can be sealed and shipped off to another des tination. ASSAULT charges were withdrawn yesterday against attorney and former MP Keod Smith and former Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union executive Basil McKenzie. The charges stemmed from an incident at Workers House in May. Smith, 45, who is the legal representative for the BHCAWU executive counOver 1,000 applications for national training programme SEE page eight Seaboard marines hold anti-smuggling exercises SEE page nine Assault char ges withdrawn against former MP and former union executive SEE page nine KEODSMITH By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE Chamber of Com merce’s President Khaalis Rolle has unofficially come out in support of legalizing a local lottery, charging that the debate surrounding this issue needs to be raised above the emotional “nonsensical” level. Stressing that the entire membership of the Chamber has yet to be canvassed on the Chamber of Commerce president unofficially backs local lottery SEE page 10

PAGE 2

J anet Bostwick, first w oman elected as a Member of Parliament in the Bahamas and former Cabinet Minister “I think it’s most definitely l ong overdue. I can unders tand the concern from certain bodies, particularly with r egard to the expression of c oncern by certain pastors. “Perhaps if they had sat in my chair in which I sat for a number of years as a female lawyer and heard the horren-d ous stories of forced rape of s pouses; men forcing their wives to do unnatural sexual a cts and intercourse; forcing t hem in circumstances where the husband is inebriated, and forcing them after informing them that they have come from being with some other person, and demanding theirr ight. There’s a need for this act, and certainly it’s meant to cover instances where wives may say ‘no’ when they don’t mean it, but even a wife hast he right to say ‘no’. “I believe that the thinking g oes back to the wives being considered property, and I don’t believe that was ever intended by God. “We are to treat each other w ith respect and dignity and concern, and I believe that if some more full consideration was given to (the amendment), it will gain support. “I think they are opposing it because they are looking at it as husband and wife being one, and their bodies belong-i ng to each other, and a wife i n particular, belonging to her husband. “And it really has been used to justify abuse so I’m v ery pleased that the law is at last being brought in. I believe it will grow to where we respect each other and treat each other as having our own individual rights, and t hat includes the right to say no’. “I have been so aware of t he concept and given legal advice to women who have suffered the greatest abuse and sexual abuse, more horrendous than pastors would l ike to believe, of husbands exercising their right. I cannot say that it’s prol ific, but I think it’s definitely not as infrequent as one w ould hope or expect. I totall y support this act.” Bishop Simeon Hall, New Covenant Baptist Church “I am always a bit reserved when government makes any-t hing to do with family b ecause I think it’s most times outside of the sphere of government’s jurisdiction, and at the same time government h as the duty and right to protect its citizens. But I am questioning it because so many times things come before parliament without there being any statistics. I want to know if they have h ad any statistics to say we have 50, 100 or 20 women w ho have been ravished by their husbands what is happening there? Is there some parliamentarian with some bitterness against his father? I ’m a little suspicious. “When it comes to family l aws I want to protect our w omen, I think they have not been as protected as they ought to be, but at the same time we have to be careful when walking down this road. Even as I think about it, wed on’t need a whole lot of w omen to be raped by their husbands to protect them, we should protect our women anyway, so I would like to have the widest discussion on this. I don’t think parliamentarians should do this kind of t hing. Rape is a heinous thing, a ny kind of rape, and I want there to be stronger laws on marital counselling. If you have to force yourself on someone then that takes the enjoyment out of it. I wante very woman in the Bahamas t o feel protected whether she is single or married, but at the same time we must be careful because we have some devious women around the place.S o I think the widest discussion should be held on this a nd we should hear both sides. “I think I am more for it than not, but I want us to be careful that we are not open-i ng Pandora’s box, certainly for women who ought not to get back at a man and abuse this law. It will be interesting to see if anyone comes forward with a case of this if it is enforced. “I think some more discussion (is neededt imes we need greater scient ific basis for these things. And I would like to know what is the motivation for this (amendment D r David Allen, leading psychiatrist “I just feel that it’s part of o ur development. Obviously o ne has to make sure they have a court system that j udges fairly, but I don’t see how we can turn the clock back women have a sense of their boundaries. “The argument is for w omen to always submit, but men also have to be willing to s acrifice themselves for their p artners. “Part of the development process is where people have boundaries, within marriage or outside of marriage. It is the same thing for a teachera nd student, there are bounda ries. “We have to recognise that boundary formation is developing around the world so if you don’t recognise that and you fly your airplane in thish urricane you will crash. “Women have rights, teachers have rights, students have rights, so how do you blockt his kind of development and still show love and respect for each other? I don’t think we can stop the development of people having boundaries and thisd evelopmental process.” Clever Duncombe, r epresenting the organisation ‘Bahamian Fathers for Children Everywhere’ I believe if they are looking at it from a health perspective then I believe women should be protected and anyone in general should be protected. But It hink they are presenting it in the wrong way. I don’t know if Sandra Dean Patterson has been overwhelmed with this t ype of thing or if this is a r ampage against all men in t his country. The Child Protection Act was passed in 2006 and h as yet to be enforced. And when you look at the cases from then until nowi t’s horrendous. There w ere over 700 reported c ases of child abuse in New Providence alone in 2008, and that doesn’t even include the Family Islands. “The government should h ave a chart and a serious priority list. Why is the government moving ahead and ignoring the fact that children need to be protected? They are the most vulnerable of our entire society and yet we don’t have a Family and Child Pro t ection Act and that is where all this legislation should stem from. To date w e are one of the few countries left on the planet that hasn’t taken any posi t ive steps to protect child ren. “People are angry because of the way theya re selling it (the amendment), like it’s men versus women, or women versusm en, but it shouldn’t be like that all legislation should be gender neutral. What about the homosex u al faction who are being taken advantage of or sex ually abused? Marital rape can be a reality when you look at some of the cases. I have known men who have tak-e n advantage of their wives, who are living a raucous and promiscuous life and the wife may withdraw from that for their own protection. “I think some stiff penalties should be enforced and be very clear and def inite for persons who would use this legislation. Rape is difficult to prove, and even harder to prove in a marital relationship, so I don’t understand where they are going. “It’s going to be very dif ficult to prove, so I don’t see the point. “And in terms of this legislation, I have some reservations. “I think these women, these wives, who are being raped should be protected, but not the way that they’re going about it, with men against women and women against men. “We have much more to say in respect to this, because I question the sincerity in this piece of legislation at this point in time when we don’t have protection of children. “It’s going to be very interesting to see how they present their position when parliament recon venes on this Act because there are many things on this legislation that need to be addressed.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE WE ARE MOVING To Our Valued Clients:We wish to advise that Colina General Insurance Agency will be relocating to 1 2 Village Road North EFFECTIVE 4 AUGUST 2009.Y ou will be able to make premium payments at any of these Colina General locations: xO akes Field in the Nassau Guardian Bldg;xColinaImperial at Rosetta Street; xBahama Life & Property located in the H enry F. Storr Building on Mackey Street; xAnd at our new location at 12 Village Road North. Our telephone number, 325-3809, will remain the same. M ORE LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER! Church, community leaders speak on marital rape law C ommunity and church leaders weigh in on the proposed amendment to the Sexual Offences Act which would make marital rape illegal.

PAGE 3

By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net F ORCED sexual intercourse within a non-estranged marriage should not be classified as rape as it is defined underc urrent law, but rather be punishable as some other crime, Pastor Cedric Moss said yesterday. The Kingdom Life Church p astor has vowed to protect women while remaining steadfast in his opposition to proposed legislation that would outlaw marital rape. In a statement released yesterday, Mr Moss said he supp orts the passage of laws to protect women from being forced into any kind of sexual a ctivity against their will, be it by their husband or a stranger. Amendment But he argued that the amendment to the Sexual O ffences Act introduced last week in parliament needs to be given more thought and adjust e d as in its current state “it will cause untold harm and mayhem in marriages and families i n our country.” He said he is concerned about the way the amendmentw ould repeal current law that states a husband can only be charged with raping his wife if the marriage is in termination or separation, and the Attorney General consents to thec harge. The pastor said the results of s uch a repeal would “provide for the possibility of rape alleg ations to be made and rape charges to be brought in all marriages, not just those in termination or separation.” “It will provide for immediate rape charges to be brought against all husbands whose w ives accuse them of rape without the prior consent of theA ttorney General. To my mind, it is important this protection c ontinues under the proposed amendment in cases of nonestranged marriages.” He argued that wives who are separated or in divorce proc eedings need more protection against unwanted sexual actsf rom their husbands than women who are in nonestranged marriages, but the proposed amendment offers them no special protection, he said. With regard to unwanted sexual acts being forced upon wives in marriages that are not in termination or separation, while I believe such acts are w rong and should be made illegal, and punishable by amended legislation, I do not agree with the proposed amendment t hat seeks to call such unwant ed sexual acts rape. “In that regard, I believe that the definition of rape as it is defined now under section t hree of the current law should not be changed, and therefore any forced sexual acts on wives by husbands in non-estranged marriages should be punishable a s some other crime, perhaps indecent assault, and not treat ed as if it were rape by a stranger.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 3 Women hit out at rape law pastor NASSAUANDBAHAMAISLANDSLEADINGNEWSPAPER C M Y K C M Y KVolume: 105 No.204WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHERSHOWERS ANDT-STORMHIGH 91F LOW 82F F E A T U R E SSEE‘THEARTS’S P O R T SBringing art ova-da-hillSEEPAGE ELEVENJeff RogersB-ball camp By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net AN INFLUENTIAL women’s organisation has hit out at opponents of plans to reform marital rape. Kingdom Life Church pastor Cedric Moss caused a storm of controversy by telling Monday’s Tribune how amending the Sexual Offences Act would lead to the “wholesale” removal of safeguards” to protect a husband being charged with the rape of his wife. He also suggested he is unsure that when a wife does not consent to sex it can even be “defined as rape in the same way as if it was a stranger.” B ut yesterday Kingdom Women in Business (KWIB spokeswoman Charlene Paul fumed when asked to reply to those who have condemned the proposed amendment. Mrs Paul said a wife should have the right to say “no” to sex in order to protect herself from an abusive or promiscuous h usband who could infect her with sexually transmitted diseases. She also spoke out about why KWIB stands to protect the rights of the individual, whether they are married or not. Mrs Paul said: “When you get married, there are benefits and obligations proclaimed in the marriage vows. “However we know that we live in a society where there are detrimental situations a wife ori ndividual may find themselves in, because the other party has made choices which are detrimental not only to themselves, but also to the home. “So to protect the rights of the wife, the home, and I nfluential group c ondemns remarks on Sexual Offences ActThe TribuneY OURPASSPORTTOMS. U NIVERSE BAHAMASEDITIONT RY OUR B BQ CHIPOTLE S NACK WRAPwww.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGESTC ARSFORSALE, H ELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E A NUMBER of “top quality” telecommunications companies have each paid $25,000 to register for information packages on the sale of Bahamas Telecommunic ations Company (BTC With the registration deadline concluded yesterday, sources told The Tribune that there still remains “quite a bit of interest” in BTC internationally. “Things are moving very smoothly, and we are very happy at this point. Unfortunately we cannot comment on exactly who has offered bids as we are in the sale process and still collecting information,” the source said. However, as this p rocess gets underway, there still remains a concern among a segment of the population that government will not be able to get a better offer for BTC than that made by Bluewater in 2007. Bradley Roberts, the former Minister of Works and Utilities, said he highly doubts that government will get anywhere near what was originally offered for the simple fact that the world economy has taken a nose dive since then. “As far as I am aware, the Bluewater people are still interested in buying it at the same price, of which they submitted a bid in the past. “I believe there is some process they are still pursuing under the terms of the agreement,” he said. A s to whether or not another company would enter into such an agreem ent with government, n oting how the terms and conditions of their contracts could essentially be “renegotiated” if that government were booted out of office, Mr Roberts said “time will certainly tell.” “I don’t know, but I definitely have my doubts,” he said. A t this point, the former Bain and Grants Town MP said government would face some serious financial and political fall-out if it negotiated a deal with another company whose offer was l ower than the one made earlier by Bluewater.op quality’ firms show BTCinterestRegistration deadline c oncluded y esterday MAKING THEMOSTOFSUMMERW ITHJUST weeks to go till the end of the school summer vacation, these youngsters make the most of the holidays yesterday evening at Clifford Park.Fe l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f fBy MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net HORRIFYING rates of domestic violence, sexual abuse and child abuse in the Bahamas will be addressed by police and a panel of experts in a seminar tomorrow. The prolific occurrence of violence in the home has earned the country an international reputation for crimes against women and children, and B ahamas Police say it is the leading cause of emergency calls. That is why Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson and Police Training College commandant Superintendent Wayne Miller got on board when representatives from Kingdom Women in Business (KWIB panel of experts to address the issues. Dr Sandra Dean Patterson, director of the Crisis Centre and Child Protection Advocacy, Inspector Elaine Sands from the Domestic VioBy TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net OPPOSITION leader Perry Christie said he still has not been officially consulted by the prime minist er about a replacement for Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall who is expected to demit office on August 7. "No, the prime minister has not spoken to me about the chief justice's (replacement) other than to communicate to me that (Sir Burton is expected) to leave office but with respect to the new appointment I have not been cons ulted," said Mr Christie yesterday, adding that he understands the nation's chief is awaiting formal confirmation that Sir Burton is officially leaving his post. E xperts to address domestic violence, child abuse in the BahamasSEE page sevenChristie ‘not officially consulted’ by PM on Chief Justice replacementSEE page seven Perry ChristieBAHAMIANS HAVETHEIR SAYONMARITALRAPELAWPAGETWOSEE page seven t classify forced sex in non-estranged marriage as rape’ A MAN was fined $5,000 yesterday after being convicted on a mari-j uana possession charge. Henry Smith, 28, was charged with possession of marijuana with intent tos upply. Smith was reportedly found in possession of 3 0 pounds of marijuana w hile at Congo Town in South Andros on July 8, 2 004. Seized The drugs, which were r eportedly in a suit bag, were seized at the Congo Town Airport. S mith was convicted on the drug charge following t he end of a trial yesterday. He will have to serve a year in jail if he fails to payt he fine. Smith was also bound o ver to keep the peace. He was represented by lawyer Ian Cargill. Man fined $5,000 for marijuana possession In brief “MINISTER of National S ecurity Tommy Turnquest must immediately take steps to establish an independent body to review complaints against the police, PLP Chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin demanded yesterday. Ms Hanna-Martin, who is also MP for Englerston, said t hat the statutory instruments are provided for in the Police A ct which was passed in parliament several months ago, but the body has yet to be brought into force. “This is a critical provision in t he legislation designed to ensure transparency in the e xercise of police powers, bolster the integrity of the Force and engender public confi dence. “The Royal Bahamas Police Force is being grossly disad vantaged by the government’s failure to bring the relevant provisions into effect as there is a real risk that public confidence might be eroded in an institution critical to our nation al well-being,” Ms Hanna-Martin said in a press statement. She pointed out that in the last several months there have been a number of deaths involving the police, including the shooting death of a minor. “Most recently a 18-year-old lost his life in circumstances which have captured our national attention and which has left incredible grief in its wake.” The PLP chairman said that Minister Turnquest must now see that creating a modernised p rofessional police force with a mechanism to facilitate transp arency in the scrutiny of com plaints and concerns of the public, will benefit the police while at the same time bolstering public confidence in the cooperative enterprise of eradicating crime in our country. The establishment of an independent body to review police complaints is now a mat ter of urgent priority and one which the Bahamian people require, she said. Call for independent police complaints body Punish it as some other crime, says pastor Tommy Turnquest Glenys Hanna-Martin opposed to a woman who is his partner.” Dr Dean-Patterson added: “It’s important for us to speak to the fact that sexual violence is not acceptable whether the person is a stranger to you, a relative, a girlfriend or boyfriend, or husband or wife; you are naming behaviour that is unacceptable and wrong.” The Crisis Centre psychologist spoke of women who have been infected with HIV because their promiscuous husbands refused to wear a condom and forced them to have sex. And Mr Brennen said he knows women who must take medication for the rest of their lives to treat sexual ly transmitted diseases passed on by husbands who forced them to have sexual intercourse. He said: “Wives are being raped multiple times, sometimes every time they have sex, and sometimes every month. “I have met many women who have been raped by their husbands, I meet them every week. If I shared their stories you would cry.” Concer n But male callers continued to express concern over the amendment as it could allow women to abuse the law and falsely accuse their husbands of rape. Mrs Butler-Turner said: “People would rather back down from saying they have been raped because of the way it’s perceived as opposed to moving forward with it. They will go and get counselling, they will do everything, but very few will go to court.” The law would ensure protection for women and at the same time ensure those who abuse it would be liable, the panel confirmed. Fathers rights activist Clever Duncombe said: “I think these women, these wives, who are being raped should be protected, but not the way that they’re going about it. “People are angry because of the way they are selling it (the amendment men versus women, or women versus men, but it shouldn’t be like that all legislation should be gender neutral.” Marital rape: A nation divided FROM page one HEADLINE NEWS: Wednesday’s Tribune.

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. Out of curiosity I went on the “Miss Universe” web-s ite if at this stage of the schedule run-up this is all the ‘official’ website has fort he Atlantis contest then the Bahamas are certainly get ting the rough end of the stick. Can’t find out who will be a ttending as contestants no schedule no list of events but of course they are trying to sell tickets like you can’t believe. If tourism is officially in this they had better clean up the act that the Trump organisation isp utting on as this is shabby to say the least. The Bahamas can’t afford a slip up on this one! Only a month to go and this is what you can’t find out! M ASHA WILSON Nassau, July 12, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. I would be grateful if you would allow me to convey thanks via your “Letters” column to a large number of persons, and at the same time make a positive comment about our public health system. Some weeks ago my wife had to be admitted into the Princess Margaret Hospital as a result of an allergic reaction t o a medication she has used for many years. The doctors felt she should be monitored during the change to a new medication. We were greatly impressed by the professionalism of the doctors (especially Dr. Orlander) and the nurses. Each and every person involved in her care, including those who kept the room sanitized, was pleasant and courteous while carrying out his or her duties. They all brightened her stay. Sadly, in our modern world far too many persons feel that once they “do their job”, “the manner of their bearing” doesn’t matter. The staff at PMH, however, personified what our national anthem expressed and one felt it had become a part of their nature to care for others. The “manner of their bearing” was exemplary. Simultaneous with this experience, one of my brothers had spent many weeks in PMH, first in one of the male medical wards and then in The Eye Wing. He recently passed away while in the Eye Wing the result of a battle against cancer that spanned many years. The professional care of the doctors and nurses had extended his life for some s ix years after the initial s urgery, and with God’s help, h ad not only given him extra years, but years of quality living. Through the terminal months of his life, the doctors (especially Dr. Chin nurses displayed total professionalism and a sense of caring. Through his last 48 hours, the nurses stood by us, and at his passing, one would have thought they were part of the family. There continues to be a need for a new hospital building and for many more b eds but I take this opportunity of commending the doctors, the nurses and the ancillary staff. I thank them for experiences that have heightened my pride in being Bahamian and knowing that we have a medical system of which we can be proud in spite of the challenges caused by limited facilities, and limited funding. CHARLES A. SWEETING, Nassau, July 23, 2009. E DITOR, The Tribune. W atching the ZNS Evening News last Thurs day, July 23, 2009, I was somewhat perturbed by t he young lady in the shocking pink suit, com plaining about not being able to get any information on the new road being cut through from Thompson Boulevard/John F. Kennedy Drive to West Bay Street Corridor 18, I believe. She claimed she has been trying to find these details for a considerable time. M adam, on July 20, 2009, I called into the Lands and Surveys office on East Bay Street, a sking for just such information, the lady who served me was most apologetic but admitted that they did not have the plans I was looking for. However, she was able to tell me I could get them directly from the Ministry of Public Works. S o I called into them and was shown the diagrammatic plan and an aerial photograph and w as able to ask some questions, putting my mind at rest. W hen I asked if I could have a copy, I was told to call back last Friday, of course I forgot to do that but have spoken with the department today and I can collect tomorrow July 28. This is something I had meant to do for a while, as I do live in the Vista Marina Subdivision, but something else always took precedence, until lastw eek. So, madam, if you are truly interested, visit the Ministry of Works on JFK, they will h appily show you the plans. A RESIDENT Nassau, July 27, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON After months of talk, d ecision time is nearing for President Barack Obama on health care. B ipartisan Senate negotiators are weak ening some of his top priorities, leaving the p resident with a difficult choice: He can give ground, and implore disappointed liberals to go along with him. Or he can try to ram through a Democratic bill with his wishes intact, infuriating Republicans. H is eventual decision could be a pivotal moment in his presidency. Remaking health c are is Obama's top domestic priority. He wants to expand coverage, contain costs, make insurance more competitive and change the way doctors and hospitals are compensated. Liberals, noting that Democr ats control the House, Senate and White House, see no need for serious compromis e s. Some moderates and independents, however, say a one-party solution would under m ine public confidence in the plan and poi son the atmosphere in Congress for the rest of Obama's term. For now, the president continues to hold his cards close, giving lawmakers more time t o seek a compromise that could attract some Republican votes. But many Democrats are i mpatient, ready for Obama to insist that Republicans either endorse the main ele m ents of his proposal or step aside as a Democrats-only bill is enacted. "He's going to have to choose pretty soon," Sen. Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican, said Tuesday. I f Obama decides to run roughshod over the Republicans, Graham said, "he'll ruin h is administration" by destroying his image as a political healer under a big tent. B ut many Democrats want Obama to stand firm on his campaign proposals. "Because we want three Republicans to come along on this, we betray what the American people want?" said Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio. "I don't think so." The outlines of Obama's approaching c hoice are taking shape. Bipartisan nego tiators on the Senate Finance Committee the panel making the biggest effort to gain support from both parties are start-i ng to show details of their thinking. In several crucial respects, they fall well short of O bama's health care proposals. For instance, Obama's campaign called for large employers either to provide their workers with health insurance or pay into a n ational fund to subsidize insurance for lowincome people. The Senate Finance planw ould require "a much more modest" con tribution from employers than would Obam a's "pay or play" scenario, said Sen. Kent Conrad, D-N.D., one of the key negotiators. Obama also proposed to help pay for health care by trimming tax deductions taken by high-income earners. Lawmakers r ejected the idea months ago, and the Senate Finance plan offers no alternative means of e xtracting new revenue from wealthy people. Most troubling to many liberal Democrats, the Senate Finance plan does not call for a robust government-run option for buying health insurance. It calls for an insura nce cooperative, but liberals such as Sen. Bernard Sanders, a Vermont Independent,s ay that's unacceptable. "I think we have the votes to pass a strong b ill," he said, which would include a public option for health insurance that is comparable to Medicare in its reach and cost controls. If Republicans don't agree, Sanders said, t hen Senate Democrats can use a strongarm tactic called "reconciliation" to pass m ajor elements of Obama's plan without any GOP votes. A sked if he would like Obama to speak out more forcefully for his campaign pro posals, Sanders answered: "Yeah." White House adviser David Axelrod said it's too early for Obama to fully endorse the S enate Finance Committee's bipartisan approach or the liberals' call to stand firm. " This is the legislative process," Axelrod said Tuesday. "The important thing is to k eep the process moving forward." "There's no doubt that what we'll have at the end of the day will not fully satisfy any major player in this process," he said. The most important goal, he said, is to improve the nation's health care system. "Everyone is going to have to give a little t o get there," Axelrod said. But in a political system dominated by Democrats, some liberals say a down-themiddle approach will give conservatives andR epublicans more influence than they have earned. (This article was written by Charles Babington, Associated Press Writer c.2009. Impressed by the professionalism of PMH doctors, nurses LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Tough decision on health for Obama Bahamas can’ t afford a slip-up EDITOR, the Tribune. Re:10-Year Plan for E ducation The Tribune, July 8, 2009 We may do well to remem ber that Parkinson’s Law from 1957 is still very much alive and well: “Worke xpands to fill the time availa ble for its completion”. Can we really risk waiting 10 years for the MOE to develop and implement a “national plan for education in the Bahamas”? KEN W KNOWLES, MD Nassau, July 16, 2009. Ministry of Works on JFK will show you road plans, madam Can we r eally risk waiting 10 years?

PAGE 5

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 THE late Julian Alleyne, a retired Tribune and former bank employ ee, was yesterday remembered by h is family and friends as a “pillar of h is community.” M r Alleyne, who died at the age of 8 1 of a heart attack in Doctors Hospital earlier this week, was considered a father figure by many in the neighbourhood of Millers Clove. He began his career at the B ahamas Electric Company, where he worked in the monetary exchange d epartment, he then transferred to the Central Bank and also worked part-time as a paper delivery man for the Tribune for over 30 years. Among the many jobs he held during h is lifetime, he also served as driver to former Minister of Finance Carlton Francis. His daughter, Sandra Sears, yesterday told T he Tribune t hat her father was an imposing figure in his community, a strict disciplinarian who was respected and loved. All of the kids in the neighborhood would s ay ‘there goes Mr Alleyne’ when they saw h im. My father was the type of gentleman that believed no matter, whether you had a f ather or not, that he would step in and be that father figure,” another daughter, Sheila, said. A lifelong Anglican, he first attended St Bernards Church and then St Agnes. I n his community, Mr Alleyne i mpacted the lives of many people. My dad was always happy serving o ther people,” his daughter Sheila said. “He didn’t show much emotion, but knew deep down how he felt. My dad made an impact on this island by just being the person whoh e was.” Mr Alleyne’s former colleagues at T he Tribune a ll remember him as a nice man with a big pipe in his mouth. “He was a character,” said Robert Carron, company president. “He was always a pipe-smoking B arbadian guy, always had a joke, always laughing, he always had a story about some thing and he was always complaining that the p aper didn’t go out on time, he was always complaining the paper made him late for dinner. He was in charge when he came in.” M r Alleyne is survived by his five children, S tacy, Sandra, Sharon, Stanley, and Sheila, a s well as by numerous grandchildren and nieces and nephews. F uneral arrangements have yet to be announced. ‘Pillar of the community’ Julian Alleyne remembered By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net A BAHAMIAN man has been charged in Florida in connection with a drug deal and a shooting incident. Courtney Kirk Alexander Davis, 23, of Freeport, was charged in West Palm Beach last week with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, armed robbery and carrying a concealed firearm. Davis and another man, Karruan Parker, 26, were arrested for their alleged involvement in a drug deal on May 4, the West Palm Beach Post reported. According to the Palm Beach County Sheriff's report, the victim, Kiplyn Box, met three men for an alleged marijuana sale on the evening of May 4 in an industrial park at 7153 70th Drive North, near the South Florida Fairgrounds. It is alleged that Box met with Parker, Davis and a third man to sell them some drugs. Davis allegedly pulled out a silver handgun and began firing at him. As the three men ran outside with the drugs to their car, shots were fired at them. Davis was shot in the face. Police arrested Davis on May 7, three days after he was shot. Parker, 26, was arrested on May 11. He was formally charged with attempted felony murder, armed robbery and violation of probation. Davis and Parker are being held without bail at the Palm Beach County Jail. Bahamian charged in US in connection with drug deal COURTNEY DAVIS JULIAN ALLEYNE

PAGE 6

PLP SENATOR Jerome Fitzgerald yesterday chall enged Minister of Environm ent Dr Earl Deveaux to an o pen debate on the government’s reasons for the relocation of the container port and the extension of Arawak Cay. Claiming the minister is “avoiding” the myriad of issues relating to the venture, Senator Fitzgerald said that Dr Deveaux is now attempting to muddy the waters by talking about an EIA study prepared on the dredging of Nassau Harbour. “Our questions related to the EIA on the extension of Arawak Cay. Why has the government ignored the 2005E nvironmental Impact Assessment which ranked Arawak Cay as the sixth least favourable location out of seven for the relocation of the port? Why have they failed to release the October 2007 Ecorys report which stated that the southwest port was the best location, a report received by Dr Deveaux and the Deputy Prime Minister the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mr Brent Symonette,” Mr Fitzgerald said in a press statement. With so many questions and “so little answers”, Mr Fitzgerald said that he has attempted on many occasions to invite the government to be “open and transparent” on the extension of Arawak Cay and the relocation of the port. “Three months ago on April 30, 2009, I gave notice of a resolution in the Senate to debate the extension to Arawak Cay and the port relocation, and to date nothing, not even an acknowledg ment by the government. “I therefore challenge Dr Earl Deveaux and the government to an open debate at any venue, at any time, where he and the government are prepared to answer the ques tions raised by myself and many Bahamians and come clean in an open and trans parent manner,” he said. SEE PAGE SEVEN BAHAMASAIR chiefs last night hit out at claims that the a irline never filed a report with t he police on a credit card fraud which conned the company out of $400,000. Managing Director Henry W oods expressed his disappointment with the Nassau Guardian for failing to “get the facts” from executive managem ent, all of whom he said were i n place on Monday July 27, 2009, contrary to what the article suggested. He said: “This process starte d more than 18 months ago, and from that time to now, at each step of the way, they have kept the police informed and have seen some recovery of f unds and cancellation of ticke ts through these efforts. “While we acknowledge that some of the victims in this case have not been very cooperative i n coming forward, in cases where they have cooperated with us, we have provided the police with all of the informat ion and have had excellent r esults.” Mr Woods added that in June 2009, executive management at the airline made ar equest for a meeting with the officer in charge of Commercial Crime to give Bahamasair an update on the cases reported to them. We “Bahamasair” were i nformed that the officer was going on vacation and would not be back until July 2, 2009. He would meet with Bahamas air upon his return. Surprise “Imagine our surprise” said M r Woods, “when we learned t hat during his absence a press conference was held by Inspector Sandra Miller regarding credit card fraud at Bahama-s air. “During this press release, Inspector Miller said Bahamasair was involved in a Nigerian S cam and was out some $ 400,000. Bahamasair had previously provided this figure to the Officer In charge of Commercial Crimes. While we were n ot shocked that the amount was revealed, we were shocked that the police seemed to know who the perpetrators of the c rime was, but was not forthc oming with this information to Bahamasair. “After this press conference we once again requested am eeting with the Commercial Crime Unit and after much waiting and complaining we were finally able to meet with t hree officers of that unit on F riday July 24. During this meeting we also updated the officers on matters that would have transpired since we lasts poke with them at the beginning of June. As a result of this meeting held just Friday past, we find it difficult to understand t his statement made by Superintendent Ellsworth Moss of the Central Detective Unit.” Mr Woods said he takes this time to thank the police fort heir assistance, but said it is regrettable that such statements would be made by such a senior officer, particularly after they would have met only three daysa go and agreed a position on t his matter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f PLP Senator calls for open debate on Arawak Cay Bahamasair refutes the police’s ‘no report filed by Bahamasair’ allegation Challenge to Minister of Environment E ARL DEVEAUX

PAGE 7

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 7 NOTICE Early diagnosis and treatment of cancer is critical. If you or your loved ones have questions about this disease, there are answers. The Cancer Centre Bahamas at Centreville Medical Pavilion will be hosting individual cancer clinics with two of the world's most renowned specialists on Monday, August 3rd. The clinics are open to the public. The Hon. Prof. Dr. Arthur PorterPC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FAAMA Dr. Porter serves as Managing Director of The Cancer Centre and Director of Radiation Oncology. He is also the current Director General and CEO of McGill University Health Centre and author of more than 300 articles on cancer research.Dr. Karol Sikora MA, MBBCh, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM Dr. Sikora is the Director of Medical Oncology at The Cancer Centre. He also serves as the Dean of Britain's first independent Medical School at the University of Buckingham and is the author of the most widely-used cancer textbook in graduate medical school in the United Kingdom. The Cancer Centre Bahamas is one of only two medical facilities outside the U.S. certified by the American College of Radiation Oncology (ACRO and the only non-U.S. facility in the Western Hemisphere to qualify for ACRO certification. For more information, please contact: 502-9610. Centreville Medical Pavilion y y 72 Collins Avenue THE opposition to Arawak Cay as the location for the newc ontainer port, said Environm ent Minister Dr Earl Deveaux, is based on a set of “peculiar interests that will be derailed” if the port is moved to Arawak instead of Clifton. He said the number of B ahamians who will benefit both at the Fish Fry and from the port relocation to Arawak is significant. “The economic transformation in the change of ownership of shipping is equally sig-n ificant,” he said, as is the o pportunity to renovate and revitalize downtown Nassau. Senator Jerome Fitzgerald, who has led the PLP charge against the relocation of the container port to Arawak Cay instead of Clifton as planned under the PLP administration, h as challenged Dr Deveaux to an open debate on govern ment’s reasons for the relocat ion. ( S ee story page 6 ) . He has called the move “secretive” and “criminal,” andc laims it only serves special i nterest groups. On July 16, M r Fitzgerald said he was investigating legal options that w ould possibly halt govern ment’s extension of Arawak Cay until there is full tans-p arency and accountability. When the issues first surfaced about the Nassau Harbour dredging, I wondered about the motives,” said Dr Deveaux. “The EIA for the harbour and its scheduled startw as a matter which had been in the public domain for some time. At no time was the issue o f Saunders Beach raised as a c oncern in respect of the har bour dredging. The only conc ern raised regarding Corri dor 18 of the New Providence Road Improvement Project and the likely noise impact onV ista Marina was raised months ago by Dr Madeline Sawyer. Yet persons say they have heard nothing and knew nothing. The plans for the Cor ridor were announced in a public ceremony with the Police band playing,” said Mr Deveaux. In a letter to the Editor on p age 4 of today’s Tribune a V ista Marina resident said that for anyone who is interested a copy of the new road being cut through from Thompson Boulevard/John F Kennedyd rive to West Bay Street Corridor 18 is available at the Ministry of Works. M r Deveaux said that while o ne cannot minimize the effect of the Corridor's proposed location on a particular indi-v idual or home; the clear pub lic good with respect to the r oad improvement, enhanced b each access, parking and traffic flow is evident for all impart ial observers to see. It was and remains irresponsible to raise unwarranted public alarm about the destruction of Saunders Beach, when thew hole intent is to restore the dune, rehabilitate the site and enhance public access.” “The next alarm,” said the Environmental Minister, “was Arawak Cay port relocation. A gain this was the basis of o ngoing discussions between the government and various shipping operators for a num-b er of years. “The Arawak Cay Port relocation was discussed a n umber of times and publicly announced by the Prime Min ister. I spoke extensively about i t while at Ministry of Public W orks and subsequently at the Ministry of The Environ ment,” said Mr Deveaux.. I could not help but conclude a political slant having regard to Mr Fitzgerald's inter e st. The harbour dredging and New Providence road improvement projects is Ministry of Public Works projects. The EIA for both have always b een available. It is customa ry for BEST to publish all EIAS for projects on its website. “Regarding the release of documents. I did so to demon-s trate a level of hypocrisy and way of thinking. When something is proposed by the FNM i t is often objected to by the P LP on the basis of catering to ‘special interest’. The land acquisition alleged and com-p leted around the South West Port subsequent to the PLP G overnment announcing its i ntent to locate a port there is the best barometer of ‘special i nterest.’ A check of the land holdings and the time of the acquisitions will reveal some peculiar inclinations. The mindset of ‘entitlement’ and my time’ best illustrates the true underlying reasons for the public political posturing under the guise of the environment.” Mr Deveaux referred to the h ealth concerns at the airport, r aised by former tourism minister Obie Wilchcombe, and published in The Nassau G uardian o n Monday. “The baseline study was done in 2007 by the Nassau A irport Development Com pany (NAD scope of remediation requiredt o improve the airport,” said M r Deveaux. “The issues were there for many years. The required EIA is under review.T he concerns, couched in a series of questions, could have been directed to BEST,D EHS or myself, however, t hey are published on Mond ay in glaring headlines, i ntended to spread alarm. It is simply not responsible. Having regard to the many times the various projects have been in the public domain,”s aid Mr Deveaux, “I am at a loss to understand where we have acted secretly with respect to Harbour dredging, road improvement or even the proposed port relocation. “I released the ‘four year o ld’ information to demonstrate a very current way of thinking; the desire of a group of politically connected Bahamians to control a vital p iece of real estate. The oppos ition to Arawak Cay is based o n a set of peculiar interests which will be derailed if the Port goes there.” I do not minimize the concern of people living in VistaM arina or Rock Crusher or any where along the corridors a nd we may have erred in continuing to dialogue with them, but not out of a desire to be s ecretive. “The Town Meetings are scheduled to give interestedm embers of the public updates o n the projects being under taken. “They should have been h eld long ago.” Minister defends plans to move container port Earl Deveaux:Opposition to change of location ‘based on peculiar interests that will be derailed’ E ARL DEVEAUX

PAGE 8

The programme is geared towards training unemployed persons in a range of areas such as masonry, basicc arpentry skills, landscaping, heavy equipment operating, housekeeping, accounting, diesel mechanics, nail techniques, computer applications and straw and shell craft. A steering committee was established on June 8, 2009, comprising representativesf rom the Ministry of Labour and Social Development, the College of the Bahamas, the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI the Bahamas Employers Confederation, Trade Unions, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and the Bahamas Christian Council. T he course structure will be designed as an “intro to course” which will provide participants with basic and functional exposure to perform in an entry level capaci ty subsequent to the succ essful completion of the programme. Courses will be standard o fferings at COB and BTVI. Non-traditional courses a l ikely scenario to enhance l ong term viability. An e xample of this is marine navigation course. Courses will be relevant t o market needs. To reduce probability of over saturation in a particular skill set Courses will p lace strong emphasis on developing and enhancing soft skills. This will be inher-e nt in the course structure and will be reinforced with specific sessions conductedb y the Bahamas Hotel Association. help train displaced workers. It is envisioned that at the e nd of this programme indiv iduals will have acquired new skills in those vocational areas that are most often requested by employers through the Department of Labour thereby making themm ore marketable, eager and r eady to embrace the job mark et. Nearly $250,000 has been allocated for the programme in the budget of the Department of Labour. The programme will offer training opportunities for onet housand persons utilizing the C ollege of The Bahamas and The Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI as learning centres. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE N EW PROVIDENCE Mr Khaalis Rolle Chairman, president, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce Dr Pandora Johnson College of the Bahamas Alphaeus R. Forbes Ministry of Labour and Social Development Iva Dahl The Bahamas Technical Vocational Institute John Pinder National Congress of Trade Unions Marisa Smith Bahamas Electricity Corporation/ Bahamas Employers Confederation Dorothy Godet Department of Labour C harles Hunt C onsultant, Ministry of L abour and Social Development Representative Trade Union Congress Representative Bahamas Christian Council. Other members of the New Providence committee: Allan Strachan Undersecretary B rian Nutt B ECON T homas Bastian T UC J ohn Pinder N CTUB Rev Patrick Paul Christian Council R ev Victor Cooper C hristian Council G RAND BAHAMA Tryone Gibson Deputy Director of Labour, chairman. Greg Moss Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce L eslie Lightbourne G rand Bahama Powerline Staff Union Malvese Capron Freeport Harbour Container Port. M ervin Wright G rand Bahama Port Authority Workers Union (TUC Johns Curtiss Bahamas Public Service Union (NCTUB Bishop Sobig Kemp President, Grand B ahama Christian Council Elliott Thompson Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union T irzh Carey U rban Renewal Programme Jennifer Ellis Urban Renewal Programme Dr Coralee Kelly College of the Bahamas Cheryl Marshall-Campbell The Bahamas T echnical and Vocational Institute F red Delancey C onsultant Geneva Rutherford Grand Bahama Port A uthority Agnes McIntosh Penthouse Investments The private sector has been extremely supportive of this initiative and has committed some counterpart funding towards the implementation of the programme. Sub-committees comprised of individuals in the private and public sectors have been established in both New Providence and Grand Bahama and charged with the responsibility of developing criteria for the selection of persons to be enrolled in the programme and advising the committee as to the courses to be conducted at the two institutions. Over 1,000 applications for national training programme F ROM page one The members of the subcommittee are as follows:

PAGE 9

While a demonstration of this process was conducted for the benefit of this newspaper, security officials have asked that the exact proce-d ure not be released. With the genesis of this exercise is normally to counter any attempts at smuggling drugs, security experts revealed that these “modified containers” haveb een known to be used by terrorists to ship weapons, even humans from one country to the next. Therefore, in an effort to ensure that their facility does n ot become a victim of this nefarious trade, Operation Manager Thomas Gibson said they have required all docking personnel to take part in the programme. All containers that come i n are checked when they arrive. They are sealed and the seal number is recorded. So when it is time to load the ship, we pull the container, check the seal, along with the p olice, and re-seal it again. But what I’m saying is even overnight if someone just came on the terminal to do anything we would know,” he said. A s a partner in the intern ational C-TPAT programme the security officer conducting the training explained that Seaboard Marine works in partnership with local authorities to e nsure that their containers a re not used for any other purpose than that for which it was originally intended. According to the US Department of Homeland Security, C-TPAT is a volunt ary government to business i nitiative to build cooperative relationships that strengthen and improve overall international supply chains and US border securi-t y. C-TPAT recognizes that US Customs and Border Protection (CBP the highest level of cargo security only through close cooperation with the ultimate o wners of the international s upply chain such as importers, carriers, consolidators, licensed customs brokers, and manufacturers. “Through this initiative, CBP is asking businesses to e nsure the integrity of their s ecurity practices and communicate and verify the security guidelines of their business partners within the supply chain,” the statements aid. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 9 Employment Opportunity Experienced Tellers 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t C ommonwealthBankisthepremierBahamianBankwith brancheslocatedinNewProvidence,AbacoandGrandBahama. Wearecommittedtodeliveringsuperiorqualityservice,to traininganddevelopingouremployees,tocreatingvalueforour shareholdersandtopromotingeconomicgrowthandstabilityin thecommunity. Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for Experienced Tellers. QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE: Matured(minimumage23years)Minimumoftwo(2yearsTellerexperienceExcellentcashmanagementskillsExcellentcustomerserviceskillsExcellentcommunication,analyticalandreasoningskillsExcellentorganizationalandtimemanagementskillsProficientintheuseoftheMicrosoftrangeofapplicationsMinimumfive(5BGCSEwithCgradesorabove,including MathematicsandEnglishREMUNERATION PACKAGE: CommonwealthBankisaGreatplacetowork!Weofferan excitingworkenvironmentwiththeopportunityforgrowthand development.Wealsoofferacompetitivecompensationpackage, reflectingthesuccessfulapplicant’sexperienceandqualifications, includingaperformancebasedincentiveplan,health,vision, dentalandlifeinsurancesandapensionplan. Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before August 7, 2009to: Human Resources Department Re: Teller P.O. Box SS-6263 Nassau, Bahamas Telefax: (242393-8073 E-mail address:hr@combankltd.com Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those under consideration will be contacted.” c il, was charged with assault ing McKenzie, former BHCAWU treasurer on May1 1. McKenzie was also c harged with assaulting Smith and causing damage to his prescription eyeglasses valued at $685. Both men appeared in Court 5, Bank Lane yester d ay morning and withdrew the charges. They were both discharged. Smith was reportedly hit in the face as he served a court notice to memb ers of the BHCAWU executive council at Worker’s H ouse on Harrold Road. The orders prohibited any mem ber of the council from prev enting any other executive member from attending a full meeting of the council for election nominations. T he court order came after the union executive split over which day to hold nominat ions for council elections. Seaboard marines hold anti-smuggling exercises F ROM page one Assault charges FROM page one

PAGE 10

issue, Mr Rolle said his s tance remains an unofficial position “at this time.” W hile the legalization of a local lottery may have only been discussed at the executive level to get some “tacit support”, Mr Rolle said theC hamber is prepared to do a full study to determine what the “benefits and downside risks may be” prior to taking a full formal position on it. “We have to debate this on the merits and make deci-s ions on what the scientific r esearch says. But we cannot n eglect the emotional side of the argument. It has to be a very balanced approach,” he s aid. W ith “numbers” having an estimated transaction value p egged at $600 million a year in the Bahamas, Mr Rolle said that if the government only took 15 per cent of this amount in taxes, these sums could go toward healthcare, educational, physical infras tructural development. There are so many aspects of our infrastructure that is still underdeveloped and still requires a lot of investment and that money can go toward that. I am very big on education and I think w e have missed the boat on how we design, finance, and how we invest in education. And this is a golden opportunity if we head in thatd irection to improve the quality of education. “One can make an argument that people will be irresponsible if gambling is legalized. But my argument is,y es, some may be irresponsible, and that is the emotion al response, but if you use money to invest in education people on the benefits of being a responsible citizen then certainly they will make better decisions,” he said. Mr Rolle added that gove rnment at this time has little o ptions open to it to gain additional revenue. With this scheme, he said, it would not require government to continue to have to borrow money, which would then begin to compromise the c ountry’s fiscal structure. “Or we can look at creating new revenue streams. And I am in favour of creating new revenue streamsw hich I feel there are some positive benefits if you look at the lottery aspect. Unfortunately, and I hate to use the term ‘fanatics’, but that is the term that has to be usedb ecause the fanatics are not giving the discussion a fair chance. They are not trying to balance the discussion. “Everyone who gambles is not irresponsible. And fortunately 100 per cent of thep eople who will gamble will not spend their rent money, their food money, and neglect their family. The reality is there is a distribution of people/behaviour and y ou have to determine what p ercentage of that distribution those people represent. “The biggest scourge we e ver had in this country was drugs. Everybody didn’t deal it, everybody didn’t consume i t. Everybody didn’t particip ate it in. So the argument has to be well balanced and it has to be rational. I am t ired of these irrational debates we continue to have in this country. That is whyw e can’t progress. We allow o ne segment to hijack the process with an irrational argument and because theys cream the loudest nothing else is heard and then we don’t move the debate anyf urther and that has to change,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE McClain being granted bail but asked that the court set reporting conditions. Ms Farquharson told the court that McClain has been a police officer since the age of 19, is not a flight risk, has no previous convictions and has no matters pending before the courts. McClain was granted bail in the sum of $4,000 with one surety. The case has been adjourned to August 6 and transferred to Court 6, Parliament Street. McClain was ordered to report to the East Street South Police Station every Saturday before 6pm. FROM page one Police Constable Chamber of Commerce president unofficially backs local lottery F ROM page one

PAGE 11

C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 12 P AGES 13 & 14 International sports news Bobcats, Hornets complete OkaforChandler deal... See page 14 By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net F ollowing another impressive showing at the latest meet on the IAAF World Athletics Tour, Bahamian athletes continue to rise in the Tour’s standings with many of them listed near the top in their respective events. At the Herculis Super Grand Prix in Monaco, Debbie Ferguson McKenzie and Chandra Sturrup continued their stellar seasons in preparation for next month’s World Athletics. Ferguson-Mckenzie ran to a second place finish in the 100m in a time of 10.97s behind 2008 Olympic gold medallist in the event, Shelly-Ann Fraser of Jamaica, who won in 10.91s. Sturrup finished fourth in 11.13s just behind reigning Olympic 200m champion Veron ica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica who was third in 11.03s. Also competing at the meet, quarter-miler Andrae Williams finished eighth in the 400m in 47.98s. Americans LaShawn Merrit and David Neville finished in the top two positions in 44.73s and 45.26s respectively. Ferguson-McKenzie earned 16 tour points for her perfor mance while Sturrup added 12 to her total. Sturrup, now ranked second in the 100m, has garnered 72 points behind Kerron Stewart of Jamaica who leads the field with 100 points. Sturrup finished second in consecutive meets this month, posting times at Paris Saint-Denis and London in times of 11.15s and 11.09s. She posted a season's best time of 10.99s July 10 in Roma, Italy, in a third place finish. Ferguson-McKenzie is ranked seventh in the event with a total of 55 points with her latest posting of 10.97s, the sixth f astest time of any 100m sprinter this year, which pro pelled her six spots in the rankings. Carmelita Jeter of the United States is ranked third with 68 points, while Fraser (64 points Sheri-Ann Brooks (56 points Ferguson-McKenzie has dominated the 200m on tour with three first place finishes and a third in her fourthe vent. After four meets, she remains in second place with 39 points, just three points behind leading 200m runner LaVerne Jones-Ferrette with 42 points. The US Virgin Islander began her season with three consecutive first place finishes, followed by a pair of second place finishes. Ferguson-McKenzie ran her world leading time of 22.32s July 20 in Greece, just two weeks prior to posting her season's best time in the 100m. Bianca Knight of the United States is ranked third with 35 points, Shericka Williams of Jamaica is fourth with 32 points and Cydonie Mothersill of the Cayman Islands rounds out the top five with 24 points. In the men's 400m, Chris Brown tops the leader board with a sizeable 12 point advantage over his nearest competi-t or. Brown posted consecutive f irst place finishes this month in Berlin and Roma at Golden L eague events, each good for 20 tour points apiece. The national 400m record holder has finished no worst than third on a tour event with a season's best time of 44.81s two weeks ago in Roma. Gary Kikaya of the Congo is ranked second with 53 points, while Renny Quow of Trinidad and Tobago is third with 50 points. Other members of the Bahamas' silver medal winning Olympic 1600m relay team have also reached top 25 rankings. Michael Mathieu is in a three way tie for a 21st place with 14 points, Williams is ranked 24th with 13 points, while Andretti Bain is ranked 40th. Leevan Sands, with a fourth place finish last weekend in London, moved up to third in the triple jump rankings. After a two-month layoff, Sands returned to form this month with a season’s best jump of 17.13m. Arnie Girat of Cuba maintains the top position with 50 points including two first place finishes and two second place finishes. Phillips Idowu is ranked second with 45 points and three first place finishes. Shamar Sands maintains a 10th place ranking in the 110 meter hurdles with 38 points. His latest contest was a third place finish June 17 in Ostrava, good enough for seven tour points. His highest point total was a 12 point outing in a fourth place finish at Berlin and a season’s best time came May 30 in New York when he finished second in 13.32s. Daryn Robles leads the field with 90 points, followed by Dexter Faulk (80 points72 points Donald Thomas, after three competitions, is ranked 10th in the high jump, while Christine Amertil is 12th in the 400m. REIGNING Commonwealth boxing champion Jermaine “Choo Choo” Mackey, a tough-kidturned-super-hero, has thrown his weight behind a proposed anti-doping bill designed to keep athletes performing in the Bahamas drug-free or force them to face the con sequences. “Drug use in sports is dishonest and I applaud the government’s efforts to bring it out in the open and create laws to deal with it because it is a growing problem that comes back to haunt the athlete as well as the country where they are performing,” said Mackey, the super middle weight champ who holds the 52nation title. Performance-enhancing drugs can ruin an athlete’s future, said the fighter, offering to throw his sup-p ort into the ring to help d rum up support for the bill introduced in the House of Assembly last week by Minister of State for Sports Desmond Bannister. “Athletes sometimes think it (drugs hand but it really gives the other athlete the upper hand,” said Mackey. “After all their hard work, they get caught or even ift hey don’t, it hurts them, and then they are robbed of their full potential.” Mackey – who faces a challenge to his title this October when Charles Adumu of Ghana meets him at the Kendal Isaacs National Gymnasium in front of a crowd expected to be in the thousands – said he is discouraged by what he believes is an increasing reliance on performance-enhancing drugs and doesn’t want that trend to mushroom in the Bahamas. “Participation in sports builds character and healthy citi zens,” said Mackey, who grew up in a rough, tough Kemp Road neighbourhood and now stands as its leading role model. “For a country the size of our Bahamas to have produced so many outstanding athletes is amazing and many of those athletes have helped produce a wealth of outstanding citizens of extraordinary character. We have to protect that so I am fully behind the government making tough laws and enforcing them to keep the world of athletes apart from the world of drugs. And I tell all my friends and people I know in sports, I urge you ath letes to stay drug free.” ‘...I urge you athletes to stay drug free’ Commonwealth boxing champion backs proposed anti-doping bill JERMAINE MACKEY BAHAMIAN swimmers, making their mark at the world championships in Italy, continue to produce faster times and set new local records. At the 13th FINA World Championships in Roma, Team Bahamas continues to shine. On day two of the meet, Alicia Lightbourne swam a personal best time in the 100m breaststroke and a new Bahamas record in 1:12.60. She broke the old record time of 1:14.36 which she held since the RBC Bahamas National Swimming Championships. On day three, the team took a much needed rest after two busy, hot days in temperatures which reached as high as 39 degrees Celsius. But they were back in the pool on day four. Olympians Alana Dillette and Vereance Burrows both swam Bahamian records in the morning prelims. Dillette broke her own record of 30.50 in the 50m backstroke with a time of 29.83 and Burrows broke veteran Jeremy Knowles old record in the 100 free in a time of 50.88. Bahamians hit the pool again today, Friday and Sat urday with individual swims in the 100 free, 50 breast, 50 fly, 50 free and the 4 x 100 female medley. Swimmers continue to break local records ALICIA LIGHTBOURNE Athletes take spotlight GOLDEN GIRL Chandra Sturrup finished fourth in the 100m at the Herculis Super Grand Prix in Monaco... (AP Photo

PAGE 12

C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 13 By PAUL NEWBERRY AP National Writer ROME (AP more like it. Michael Phelps bounced back from a stunning loss with something more familiar another world record Wednesday. One night after he was soundly beaten by Germany’s Paul Biedermann, Phelps set a world record in the 200-meter butterfly with a time of 1 minute, 51.51 seconds more than a half-second ahead of his previous mark, 1:52.03. Phelps whipped around quickly to see his time and held up his right index finger when the “WR” was posted. And just like Beijing, he has taken down another of Mark Spitz’s standards, this time with the 34th world record of his career one more than Spitz had during his brilliant run in the pool. “I wanted to step on it in the first 100 to get out there in the clean water, and that’s pretty much what happened,” Phelps said. “It was a lot more pain last night than tonight.” T here couldn’t have been a m ore appropriate place for P helps to add another record to his resume. Shortly after he climbed from the pool, Italy’s Federica Pellegrini sent the home crowd into a frenzy when she set the 20th world mark of the four-day-old meet in the 200 freestyle. Before the night was done, South Africa’s Cameron van der Burgh broke the mark he set in the semifinals to win the 50 breaststroke and China’s Zhang Lin took down Grant Hackett’s four-year-old 800 free by more than six seconds, with Tunisia’s Ous Mellouli also going under the old mark but only getting sil ver. Both are non-Olympic events. Earlier, Germany’s Daniela Samulski and Russia’s Anastasia Zueva got things rolling by setting records in consecutive semifinal heats of the 50 backstroke, another event not on the Olympic program. And let’s not forget American Mary Descenza, who took more than three sec onds off her personal best to swim the fastest women’s 200 butterfly ever in the preliminaries, no less. For those who’ve lost count, that’s 22 records in Rome, hard ly living up to it label as the Eter nal City. Nothing is sacred in these high-tech bodysuits, which have already helped surpass the 15 records set at the last worlds in Melbourne two years ago, with four days still to go. Phelps couldn’t wait to get on the podium to collect his first individual title at the Foro Italico. While his name was being announced in English and Italian, he stood impatiently with his right foot already on the stand. Finally, he hopped up to the highest rung, thrust both arms in the air with a defiant look that melted into a crooked smile. He was back on top. The scene was much different than a night earlier, when Biedermann blew away Phelps in the 200 free, winning by more than a full body length and snatching away one of the Ameri can’s five individual world r ecords. The loss Phelps’ first in an individual race at the Olympics or world championships since 2005 was followed by coach Bob Bowman’s angry tirade against the sport’s governing body, which allowed polyurethane suits to be used at these championships. FINA plans to ban all bodysuits sometime early in 2010, but Bowman said Phelps might take his goggles and go home until the rule goes into effect, believing Biedermann’s Arena suit gave him a huge edge over Phelps’ once-revolutionary Speedo LZR Racer because it’s more buoyant. Phelps stuck with Speedo for the fly, though he did change out of a model that stretches up to his shoulders, going with one that stretched only from waist to ankles. “It didn’t feel right in warmup,” Phelps said. “I changed out of it and put this on. This is what I’ve always worn in this race.” “He actually warmed up with the full body and he just said itf elt too tight and he took it off,” Bowman said. “Then I noticed he hadn’t shaved his chest, but I’m like, ’Just don’t worry about No worries, indeed. No one was even close. I said to Bob beforehand, ’I’m going to go for the 150 and whatever happens, happens. I’m going to try to hang on the last 50,”’ Phelps said. “I was able to.” Bowman knew Phelps had it when he made the last turna head of everyone else, no matt er how hard he went out. “He swam a really fast first 150 and he paid for it a little on the last lap,” the coach said. “I’m sure he’ll be tired, but I knew nobody was getting by him. That’s how he is.” Actually, Bowman was confident from the moment he saw Phelps at lunch. Instead of fret ting over the loss to Biedermann, he had that look the coach likes to see and there weren’t any concerns about someone havinga technological edge. “I just felt like he was really relaxed tonight,” Bowman said. “I saw him at lunchtime and he was in really good spirits. You can always tell when something like this is kind of going to happen. He was definitely there tonight.” Phelps sets world record in 200 fly MICHAEL PHELPS races to win the gold medal in the 200m Butterfly at the FINA Swimming World Championships in Rome yesterday... M a r k J T e r r i l l / A P

PAGE 13

By MIKE CRANSTON AP Sports Writer CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP The New Orleans Hornets finally found a taker for Tyson Chandler. It took a deal with tinkering Charlotte coach Larry Brown, who was willing to jettison the Bobcats' first draft pick. Emeka Okafor was sent to the Hornets on Tuesday for Chandler, another former No. 2 overall pick. The trade involving 26-year-old centers brought financial relief to both teams and confidencet hey'll each thrive with a new man in the middle. The Hornets have been trying to unload the 7-foot-1 Chandler for several months. A trade last season to Oklahoma City was rescinded after Chandler failed a physical amid concerns aver a linger ing toe injury. "I'm very, very excited and thrilled about this new opportunity," Chandler said in a conference call. Brown was willing to gamble on the injury-prone, athletic big man who can also play power forward and is three inches taller than Okafor. "We're getting a young kid who is long and athletic and can play multiple positions and fills a need that we obviously have," Brown said. The Hornets were intrigued by Okafor's superior rebounding and durability. New Orleans gets a reliable big man with a longer contract as it tries to recover from last season's first-round play off exit. "Emeka is one of the premier centers in the NBA withAll-Star caliber scoring and rebounding averages throughout his career," Hornets gen eral manager Jeff Bower said. "His potential to improve is endless once you put him on the court running with Chris Paul." C handler had the best season of his career (2007-08 playing with Paul. The pair comprised a constant alleyoop threat when Chandler was healthy, and the two were close off the court. "I'm losing a great friend, a brother. T.C. is my man. ... I'm going to miss him," said Paul, who was attending a basketball camp in New Orleans. "It's going to take some time to see how this works out," Paul continued. "I want Emeka to come in here and be the best player he's ever been. From today on out, that's my teammate. ... Hopefully we can eventually have the same relationship that me and Tyson had." The deal is the fourth trade Charlotte has made since managing partner Michael Jordan hired Brown before last season. Brown, in his record ninth NBA head coaching job, has continuedh is history of numerous trades to mold the team into his versatile, defensive-minded lik ing. Now it includes sending the centerpiece of Charlotte's new franchise to the city's old team. Two years after the Hor nets bolted Charlotte, the expansion Bobcats took Okafor with the No. 2 pick in the 2004 draft after Orlan do grabbed Dwight Howard. Okafor had injury problems early in his career, but played all 82 games in each of the last two seasons. He averaged 13.2 points and 10.1 rebounds in another solid, but unspectacular season under Brown, who later questioned his basketball fire. "I wanted him to have a passion and work on his game," Brown said Tuesday. "I think he made unbelievable progress in that regard. When we had an exit meeting this past season he told me he was going to do that, he was going to work on his game. ... This was a basketball decision. It had nothing to do with Emeka." But Chandler, the No. 2 pick in the 2001 draft after declaring for the NBA out of high school, faces injury questions. Chandler averaged 8.8 points and 8.7 rebounds in only 45 games last season. He then underwent procedures on his left ankle and toe in May after being ineffective in the first-round series loss to Denver. Chandler will be in Charlotte for a physical later this week and is confident he is healed. "For the first time in the last couple of years, I have had really good movement in my toe," Chandler said. "Now I am just trying to gain confidence on my ankle again." For the Hornets, it immediately lowers their payroll and could reduce luxury tax payments. Okafor will make $10.5 million next season and Chandler $11.8 million. The Hornets entered the week with a payroll of about $78 million, triggering a dollarfor-dollar tax on the amount over the NBA's luxury tax threshold of $69.9 million. However, the Hornets also t ake on the last five years of a n escalating, six-year, $72 million contract. "We have a long-term option for us now at the center position and one we feel we can grow with," Bower said. "We looked at that asa n asset, the fact that Emeka is under contract. ... It shows we are interested in improv ing and we are interested in competing in the Western Conference and we are willing to pay the price." The Bobcats, meanwhile, unloaded a longer contract. Chandler would make $12.7 million in a player option in 2010-11, the final season of his deal. Bobcats owner Bob Johnson, who is looking to sell the team after losing millions of dollars, has ordered management not to reach the luxury tax threshold. Shedding Okafor's contract will help achieve that goal. Brown, meanwhile, is con vinced Chandler will improve Charlotte's frontcourt. "Emeka is a great kid, but we all felt that with the way Tyson plays, with his quick ness and his ability to handle the ball and his length, that was something that was very important to us," Brown said. "That was the overriding factor." AP Sports Writer Brett Martel in New Orleans contributed to this report C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Bobcats, Hornets complete Okafor-Chandler deal TYSON CHANDLER (6 playoff game against the Denver Nuggets in New Orleans... (AP Photo: Bill Haber EMEKA OKAFOR (50 H ickson (21 (AP Photo: Mark Duncan

PAGE 14

AUGUST 1 3 Arrivals and Registration, Official Photography AUGUST 5 Location Filming, Visit to the Ardastra Gardens Tour of Port CharlotteT our of Clifton Heritage Site and Sacred S pace, Visit Arawak Cay (Fish Fry AUGUST 6 Visit the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas C ourtesy Call on the Governor General Tea Party at Government House AUGUST 7 D owntown Casual Shopping and Photo-ops Display of Bahamian Arts and Crafts in Rawson Square Welcome Dinner AUGUS T 8 S tay at the Bimini Bay Resort in Exuma Tour of Moriah Harbour Cay and Elizabeth H arbour, Stocking Island Visit to Fountain of Youth and Shark Lab AUGUST 9 T our of Garden of the Groves in Grand Bahama and Photo-ops Visit the Port Lucaya Marketplace S wimsuit Presentation at 5pm on the great l awn at Our Lucaya Resort (Best Figure A ward) All seats: $50 AUGUST 10 M otorcade through New Providence starting at 1pm leaving Arawak Cay National Costume Competition at the Rainforest Theatre, Wyndham Hotel, starting at 7pm VIP $175, General $125, Balcony $100 AUGUST 11 Tour of Harbour Island by Golf Cart Leisure activities at Coral Sands Beach H ouse, Green Turtle Cay, Abaco AUGUST 12 Junkanoo Summer Festival ( in the afternoon) M iss Universe 2009 Fashion Show with local designers starting at 7pm at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Hotel VIP $125, General $75 J unkanoo Rush-Out along the Cable Beach S trip starting at 9.30pm AUGUST 13 D elegates' National Gift Charity Auction at 7.30pm at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Hotel G eneral $150, Corporate Tables $2,000, Banner Tables $3,000 AUGUST 14 15 Rehearsals Location Filming AUGUS T 16 M iss Universe 2009 Presentation Show in the Imperial Ballroom of Atlantis, Paradise Island V IP $250 (including buffet dinner 3-7: $175; 8-10: $125; 11-13: $100; 14-20: $100 AUGUST 17 18 Preliminary Interviews with the P anel of Judges Rehearsals AUGUST 19 22 R ehearsals National Director Meeting AUGUST 23 Viewing Party at 7pm on Royal Deck, Royal Palace, Atlantis All the food and drinks you can handle while v iewing the finals on multiple giant screens All Access: $185 Final Show/Telecast from 9pm to 11pm I mperial Ballroom, Atlantis VIP $1,000 (including entrance to coronation ball S ections 3-7: $750; 8-11: $400; 11-13: $250; 14-20: $175 C oronation Ball starting at 11pm Royal Court, Royal Towers, Atlantis All Access: $145 AUGUS T 24 Departures (More events will be added as the schedule is finalised) C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE MISS UNIVERSE PAGEANT 2009 SCHEDULE OFEVENTS CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. SPACE shuttle Endeavour’s astronauts uncovered no notice able flaws in the thermal shield ing of their ship Wednesday fol lowing an in-depth inspection with lasers and cameras, according to Associated Press. Flight director Tony Ceccacc i said a preliminary look at the images beamed down found nothing amiss, and everything was on track for Friday’s p lanned landing. But he cautioned that 20 hours usually are needed to analyze all the data. The survey of the wings and nose, which took almost all morning, is standard before a shuttle returns to Earth. Endeavour’s successful space station construction mission isd ue to end Friday morning. NASA wants to make sure the most vulnerable parts of Endeavour’s heat shield were n ot pierced by micrometeorites or space junk during the past two weeks in orbit. The astronauts used a lasertipped boom to check for dam age. It’s the same tool used to check for launch damage early in the flight; nothing seriousw as detected back then despite an unusual loss of insulating foam from the fuel tank. Astr onauts inspect space shuttle ahead of landing M ANY of the events will take place at Atlantis on Paradise Island.

PAGE 15

By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor b usiness@tribunemedia.net T he receiver for a $250 million Bahamas-based resort project has begun moves to find a buyer for the development through s electing a real estate agent to market it, Tribune Business can reveal, as a former financial backer attempts to enforce a $24.228 million judgment against the project’s principals. C raig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, the Baker Tilly Gomez partner and accountant, who is act-i ng as receiver for the Berry Islands-based Chub Cay development, after its principals a llegedly defaulted on the repayment of a $45 million loan to Scotiabank (Bahamas is understood to be close to selecting a Bahamian real estate agent to market the project to potential buyers/investors. A mong those agents in the mix are said by sources to be the likes of H. G. Christiea nd Damianos Sothebys International, with Mr Gomez thought to be leaning in favour o f choosing the latter. He is attempting to sell Chub Cay in a b id to recover at least some of the funds its principals owe to Scotiabank (Bahamas although finding a purchaser could prove difficult in an economic environment over shadowed by recession and the aftermath of t he global liquidity/credit crunch. Meanwhile, BA Chub Cay, a vehicle of private equity firm, Cerberus Capital Management, which also provided a $16 mil-l ion loan to Chub Cay, is attempting to enforce a $24 million judgment it obtainedi n New York against the project’s three principals in the south Florida courts. A ccording to court documents obtained by Tribune Business, Cerberus is attempting to enforce the $24.228 million judgment against Walter McCrory and Bob Moss, plus the estate of the late Kaye Pear-s on. The judgment gives Cerberus the $16 million original principal on the loan, plus$ 3.212 million via interest at 18.5 per cent, levied between May 10, 2007 and June 1, 2 008. A further $4.696 million in penalty interest for the period June 2, 2008, to June 1 0, 2009, has also been assessed. Meanwhile, the MP for the Berry Islands yesterday told Tribune Business that Chub Cay’s failure and slide into receivership had brought his constituency’s economy to a virtual “standstill”, with many “struggling to survive”. Arguing that it was very much “the sooner the better” for a sale to be concluded,V incent Peet, the former minister of financial services and investments in the Christieg overnment, said: “The bank [Scotiabank Bahamas] is still in possession. Right now, t hings appear to be at a standstill and I have no information as to where they are with any additional investor. The concern is certainly very high in regard to that project.” M r Peet added that a number of staff had been terminated at Chub Cay as ar esult of the receivership, and the number of employees left was “so small”. H e added: “It is causing my constituency, the whole area, to become even more d epressed, not knowing what is happen ing. Most of the employees came from North Andros, and with the employee numbers dropping the whole area has been neg atively impacted. We are struggling to surv ive.” By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor b usiness@tribunemedia.net T HE developer behind the $700 million Rum Cay Resort M arina project yesterday said he was in talks with “a few” g roups who had expressed interest in investing in the project, and said the outlook was one of “very cautious opti mism” given signs the global e conomy was starting to turn around. By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor business@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamian stock mark et is unlikely to experience “any real substantial recovery” u ntil possibly the 2010 second quarter, a leading investment advisor told Tribune Business yesterday, due to its continued liquidity problems and ‘time C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be h eld responsible for errors and/or o mission from the daily report. $3.96 $3.90 $4.10 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor business@tribunemedia.net A LEADING international bank saw its B ahamas operations suffer a 71.4 per cent drop in 2009 second quarter net income to $200,000, it w as revealed yesterday, a decline that partly reflected the sale of its fund administration busi ness last year. The sale of Butterfield Fund Services (Bahamas t hat any year-over-year comparatives for Bank of Butterfield’s Bahamian operations were somew hat skewed, with total revenues for the three months to June 30, 2009, down by 37.6 per cent at $2 million. Net income for the 2009 second quarter fell from $700,000 to $200,000 year-over-year. How ever, Butterfield Bank (Bahamas assets increase by 12.3 per cent in the six months since 2008 year-end, rising from $154 million at December 31 to $174 million at end-June a $19 million increase. B utterfield attributed the total assets increase Bahamas bank sees 71.4 per cent net income decline By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor business@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas has “been f ortunate so far” to have avoid ed mass lay-offs in its interna tional financial services industry, the Bahamas Financial Services Board’s (BFSB s aying yesterday that the sector had done well to “hold our p osition” given the global stock market downturn’s impact on Bahamas ‘fortunate’ to avoid mass lay-offs in financial industry * BFSB chair says sector done ‘well to hold our position’ after stock market meltdown’s impact on client base * Unaware of any ‘wave’ of redundancies to come, as tepid stock market recovery ‘means so much more to Bahamas’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 7 7 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B * But drop and comparatives impacted by Butterfield’s sale of fund business * T otal assets at Bahamas private bank rise 12.3% to $174m, with assets under administration also ahead at $2.4bn No ‘recover in BISX stocks until 2010 Q2 M arket suffering from investor confidence time lag, plus absence of liquidity a nd institutional investors to show ‘true value’ of equities K ENWOOD KERR Rum Cay developer talking to potential investors * Head of $700m project s ays discussions with ‘a f ew’ interested parties proceeding at ‘measured pace’ to avoid u ndercapitalisation * Adds that outlook one of very cautious optimism’ in belief economy s tarting to turn Resort project set to be sold * Receiver for $250m Chub Cay project set to appoint realtor to market development to buyers, and recover Scotiabank (Bahamas * Other financing partner seeking to enforce $24m judgment against project principals * MP says project’s failure has left area’s economy ‘struggling to survive’ By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net SEABOARD Marine is starting to see an increase in container shipping volumes, its inside sales coordinator said yesterday, as the company prepares to implement Saturday receiving at its Miami location from August onwards as a result of increased demand from Bahamian businesses. Oralee Deveaux said that on average Seaboard is shipping full containers from Miami to Nassau, and the implementation of the Saturday Less Container Loads (LCL ther increase their shipment volumes. “We’re looking forward to an increase in that area,” she said. Seaboard’s operations manager, Thomas Gibson, echoed the Shipping volumes showing increase Bahamas-based shipper set to implement Saturday receiving S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B

PAGE 16

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE BANK of the Bahamas International has been named the ‘Best Bank’ in the country for the third time by E uromoney m agazine, which granted the award just as the Bahamian institution recognised its 20th anniversary. “For Bank of the Bahamas to stand for the third time shoulder-to-shoulder with some of the leading financial institutions in the world is an outstanding honour, and we are proud to have won and to bring such recognition to the Bahamas,” said managing director Paul McWeeney, who flew to London for the July 11 award ceremony. “For a young bank like Bank of the Bahamas to have been awarded the Euromoney Award for Excellence three out of the last four years speaks not only to our growth, but to the innovation the Bank of the Bahamas team has demonstrated and t he array of quality products and services earning international approval.” In announcing the award, Euromoney applauded Bank of the Bahamas’ ability to stave off the recessionary tide that has hammered the industry. “An economic slowdown globally has had little impact on Bank of the Bahamas,” the leading financial industry pub lication said. “At its mid-year results at end of December, the bank reported it had attracted 5,000 new accounts, opened a branch in Cat Island and grown its private banking division, showing its strength domestically and in Florida, where it recently opened an office.” Held annually since 1992, t he Euromoney awards are based on performance, quality service, innovation and momentum. “We thank Euromoney for honouring us again and pledge to continue to do all we can to deserve that recognition,” said Mr McWeeney, who heads a bank that in two decades has grown from $90 million in total assets to near ly $800 million. Bank of the Bahamas first won the Euromoney award in 2006, a year after being the first Bahamian bank to win the sought-after Bracken Award from The Banker magazine, a division of the Financial Times Group. Bank gains leading award for third time BANK of the Bahamas International’s managing director, Paul McWeeney, is pictured with the Euromoney Award for Excellence. (Photo by Wellington Chea for DP&A

PAGE 17

By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net Films and TV productions s hot in the Bahamas can inject u p to $15 million in extra spending into this nation’s economy in addition to employing Bahamians, the BahamasF ilm Commission’s senior manager told Tribune Business, while Bahamian films have also been finding their footing in the l ocal market. A ngela Archer said the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation consistently scouts film shows in order to market the Bahamasa s a film-friendly country. "The Film Commission has a good working relationship with government entities to e nsure things are done quickl y," she said. Ms Archer said movie shoots, photo shoots and production of commercials in theB ahamas is a large part of the Ministry's marketing strategy. And that strategy appears to have been having some success. Film star and movie producer, T yler Perry, who is shooting a film in Eleuthera, is said to have brought almost $1 million into that island’s economy. While films such as Casino R oyale brought in an estimated $7-$8 million, with just a small part of the movie shot in Nassau, Pirates of the Caribbean b rought in almost $15 million and used several locations throughout the Bahamas. Shot Unfortunately, Ms Archer said, these types of films are shot in the Bahamas only about e very two to three years. She said the film shoots in the Bahamas are typically down during the summer months because of the chance of hurri-c anes. "At this time most people shy away from the tropics to shoot," said Ms Archer. However, she said the Bahamas attracts feature films because of its proximity and the wide range of locations availa ble. Ms Archer added that the Bahamian film industry has been expanding with more "Bahamans using opportunitiest o make their own films”. And Bahamians have been seen assisting large movie houses who come to the Bahamas w ith things such as production and coordination. "They have been involved as extras, makeup artists and stunt people," Ms Archer said. A ccording to her, the Bahamian film industry is growing rapidly, with one or two individuals investing in equipm ent large studios may need to shoot their films. She said that instead of shipping equipment, movie houses can rent what they need from one Bahamianc ompany in particular. "More and more people have been here and hired him," said Ms Archer. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 3B btrt tfb r f r!%* '!$() ))!*&*#tffn""bnff ! $ %#&!*&*# !%** To advertise in The Tribune , call 502-2371 By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net T HE WORLD Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC e xpects the Bahamas' Travel and Tourism Consumption to grow by 8 per cent in 2010, and by a further 3 per cent in 2011, while predicting a 4 per centi ncrease in sector employment in 2010 and a marginal 2 per c ent increase in 2011. The WTTC has been a r esource for world tourism and travel data, and closely follows t he actions of global govern ments and their policies, as well as Central Banks and their financial data. According to its forecasting t ool, Bahamian government spending on the tourism indus-t ry is expected to increase by 3 per cent in 2010 and 2 per cent i n 2011, while capital invest ment which experienced a major 8 per cent decline yearon-year is predicted to grow only by about one tenth of a percentage point in 2010, b efore showing growth of about 6 per cent the following year. Travel and tourism demand, w hich took a hit globally as a result of the economic down t urn, declined in the Bahamas from year-end 2008 by 8 perc ent, with the WTTC expect ing an almost similar increase in 2 010 and 3 per cent growth in 2011. The WTTC recorded a 12 p er cent decline in this country’s tourism gross domesticp roduct (GDP and 2009, but projects a sharp s pike in GDP of 11 per cent in 2010. This denotes the prediction of a swift recovery for the Bahamas following the bottoming out of the global recess ion, with marginal growth of 2 per cent year-on-year being f elt by 2011. Unemployment is expected to shrink by 7 per cent i n 2010 and remain relatively flat into 2011. The WTTC has also predicted that Asia, namely China and Japan, will be the industry lead ers in tourist arrivals to the C aribbean by 2020. China is poised to become an almost $90 billion leader in o utbound tourist flows within the next ten years, still one p lace below the US. “It’s amazing how this count ry (China up, how people are going to go o verseas. Here on the chart we said that in 2020 there will be 100 million Chinese going overs eas – maybe more,” said WTTC president Jean-ClaudeB aumgarten recently. The other eight biggest trav e l and tourist economies are projected to be Japan, Great Britain, France, Spain, Germany, Russia, Italy and Mexico. With regard to those statist ics, the Bahamas government and Ministry of Tourism havec ornered at least three of the top five emerging travel and t ourism economies, with increased airlift to Great Britain, direct flights into France and its proximity to the US. Bahamas tourism set for 2010 revival Films can inject up to $15m into nation’s economy

PAGE 18

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW -268(0(5,&(RI 67$3/('21*$5'(163%2;1$66$8 % $+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU 1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ DVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKR NQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOG QRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQW RIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH UG GD\RI -XO\ WRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG &LWL]HQVKLS 127,&( Please submit resume via email: nwatkins@doctorshosp.comor hand-deliver to Doctors Hospital, Human Resources DepartmentONLY QUALIFIED APPLICANTS WILL BE CONTACTED. THE newly-elected officers and directors of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce participated in a retreat at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort to discuss the organisation’s objectives for the current administrative year. Headed by executive director, Philip Simon, and president Khaalis Rolle, the group discussed the opportunities and challenges in the current economic environment. The retreat was facilitated by Wil Pineauchief executive of the Cayman Islands Chamber of Commerce, who shared insights on programmes and strategies successfully implemented in his market. Pictured are (front L-R Cooper, second vice-president; Marvia Thomas, Chamber associate; Wil Pineau, chief executive, Cayman Islands Chamber of Commerce; Khaalis Rolle, president; Gershan Major, first vice-president; Darron Cash, treasurer; Yvette Sands, secretary; Antoinette Butler, Chamber associate; Dionisio D’ Aguilar, former president; Robert Myers, director. (Back L-R SMESU trade unit; Odley Aritis, director; Philip Simon, executive director; Tim Covington, director; Aaron Brice, director; Merritt Storr, director; Dr Jonathan Rodgers, director; Pedro Roberts, director. ( ( P P h h o o t t o o b b y y L L e e a a h h D D a a v v i i s s ) ) Chamber executives ‘retreat’ to go forward To advertise, call 502-2371 1 27,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW 0 (/$1,(78&.(5RI 25&+$5'7(55$&(3%R[1$66$8 %$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU 1 DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ DVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKR NQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOG Q RWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQW RIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH W GD\RI -XO\ WRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG & LWL]HQVKLS 127,&( 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW -8'(('20:21
PAGE 19

lags’ between the recovery in investor confidence here and e lsewhere. Kenwood Kerr, Providence Advisors’ chief executive, said the relative absence of liquidityin the Bahamian securities market meant that investors were “not getting the true value” for stocks listed on the Bahamas International Securities E xchange (BISX In addition, the institutional investors and professional money managers, such as pension funds and insurance companies, were not trading equities on a regular basis something thatnot only contributed to BISX’s domestic market liquidity i ssues, but also failed to indicate the true value of listed stocks and what they were really worth. BISX earlier this week released statistics showing that its listed stocks had yet to experience the fledgling recovery being experienced by other g lobal markets and indices, with its All-Share Index down some 7.8 per cent for the first six months of 2009. In contrast, other global s tock market indices were up. The MSCI Emerging Market I ndex was ahead by 34.3 per cent as at June 30, 2009, compared to its year-end 2008 close. Similarly, the Standard & Poor’s (S&P 1.8 per cent, while the FTSE 100 Index was only down 4.2 p er cent. “You can point directly to the fact that we are lagging in terms of investor and consumer confidence,” Mr Kerr told Tri-b une Business yesterday, when asked why BISX and the rest of the world appeared to be headed in opposite directions. P ointing out that the BISX All-Share Index had performed better than many global indices over the medium-term, being down only 13.78 per cent whenc ompared to the 30-40 per cent value slippages experienced by others last year, Mr Kerr said of the Bahamian equities market: There’s a lag in there. “BISX may take some time in catching up, assuming all things remain equal and the recovery in global markets con-t inues at the same pace.” Asked when Bahamian equities markets were likely to recover and regain their u pward momentum, Mr Kerr replied: “I’d just be guessing, but I suspect we will not see that in any real, substantial way until the second quarter of nexty ear, maybe.” Share prices for almost all BISX-listed stocks have beenu nder pressure for some time, due to the sustained build-upi n sell orders as mostly smaller, retail investors seek to exit their investment and generate liquid cash to meet current obligations. These ‘sell’ orders, numb ering more than 200, vastly outnumber the minuscule number of ‘buy’ orders, producing the downward pressure on stock prices. T his was more pronounced in stocks that were more liquid, Mr Kerr said, as retail investors in these cases were a ctually able to find buyers and cash out. “Across the board, liquidity has always been the issue,” he added. As for institutional investors, w hile they were expected to hold equities as long-term investments, many had gravitated to fixed income instrum ents such as bonds and preference shares, plus bank deposits and away from stocks given the perceived market volatility. A rguing that professional money managers perhaps needed to educate clients better on the need to hold on to their e quity investments long-term, and not drop them at the first sign of volatility, Mr Kerr said: “In this liquidity perfect environment, they should be com-i ng in and picking up stocks at a good value.” But, with “smart money not g etting in and out” of the Bahamian equities market ands timulating trading, there was nothing to “demonstrate the true value” of many BISX-listed stocks. As a result, investors were not getting the “true value o f securities”. However, Mr Kerr acknowledged that institutional investors in the Bahamian market were faced with “the diffi-c ulty of re-entering the market” at an appropriate price if they traded out of their holdings in a particular stock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o ‘recovery’ in BISX stocks until 2010 Q2 F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 20

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 7B Bahamas ‘fortunate’ to avoid mass lay-offs in financial industry its client base. C raig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, the Baker Tilly Gomez partner and accountant, told Tribune Business that he was “not aware” of any significant redundanciest o come in a sector whose high net worth individual clients had seen their wealth holdings hit hard by the collapse of global e quities markets in 2008. Speaking in the wake of at least 40 lay-offs in the Bahamian international financial services industry, including 24 atA nsbacher (Bahamas at CIBC Trust Company (Bahamas Fulcrum (Bahamas d ownsize by releasing 11 staff over a six-month period, Mr Gomez said that while institution-specific factors were at p lay, these developments also indicated that the sector was b eing impacted by global trends. Considering the times in the f inancial markets and what’s been happening to high net worth individuals, this does not come as a total surprise,” Mr G omez told Tribune Business of financial sector lay-offs. The Bahamas has been for tunate so far that there’s not b een mass lay-offs, and that there’s only been a scattering to date, although that’s no comfort to those affected. “From a general perspective, c ertainly we are saddened by any lay-offs in the sector, financ ial services being the second pillar of our economy. One has t o be moved by the fact per sons in the sector are being affected.” However, striking a more upbeat note, Mr Gomez said he was unaware of any major redundancies being planned in the international financial ser vices sector the industry that c ontains a large number of high-salaried jobs. We can’t be surprised that this is happening, but I don’t see any sign that there is a wave to come,” Mr Gomez added. “We have very much held ourp osition, and held it significantly. I’m not aware of any significant redundancies and layoffs to come.” R eferring to the Ansbacher (Bahamas Gomez said that while he felt “sorry for those persons involved in the process”, anym ajor merger such as the Sentinel/Ansbacher tie-up was bound to result in a “significant duplication” of staff posts and a ctivities. This made some redundancies almost inevitable. Addition In addition, the BFSB chairm an said major global institutions were rationalising their g eographic footprint, and “are moving out of certain jurisdic-t ions for commercial and busi ness reasons”. An example of t his was Qatar National Bank’s (QNB Bahamas by selling Ansbacher (Bahamas A major factor impacting the B ahamian financial services industry, with its emphasis onp rivate banking and wealth management, is that fee income is linked heavily to the level of assets under administration. If these assets decline in value, as a lmost all have due to the late 2008 stock market collapse, rev e nues and income for Bahamas-based financial insti t utions is reduced, forcing some to bring staffing levels in line with business activities. Similar trends were impacting the Bahamian investment f und administration business, Mr Gomez said, influencingb oth the Butterfield Fulcrum downsizing and Ernst & Y oung’s decision earlier this year to lay-off several accoun tants. The latter move reflected a decline in investment fund a uditing work. The BFSB chairman said that prior to the New Year, “we anticipated that come the month of January the fundi ndustry would be challenged as a result of the downturn in global markets.” Investors were switching out o f equities investments and looking for safer havens, such as fixed income instruments and bank deposits, resulting in a wave of investment fundr edemptions. Many funds were unable to meet these requests, either suspending redemptions or placi ng themselves into liquidation. Other investment funds were also wound-up by their managers/promoters, all of which i mpacted Bahamas-based fund administrators. It takes some time, but the result of that impacts jobs in t he Bahamas,” Mr Gomez told Tribune Business. “As fundsw ind down, there is less busi ness for fund administrators, so t hat impacts the level of staffing they have. “I’m not surprised in the general sense that there’s reduced capacity in the fund adminis t ration business. Fee income is determined by the level ofa ctivity, and when net asset val ues (NAV a direct impact on fee income for fund administrators and managers. When there’s no upside, it does not bode well for advis e rs and administrators, so there is less income at all levels. The l ess income you make, the less staff you need. That is where we’re headed in that business, and I hope that is all we see [in terms of redundancies’.” W ith global stock markets showing tepid ‘green shoots’ ofr ecovery from 2008 lows, Mr Gomez said he hoped the trend w ould continue because “it means so much more for us in the Bahamas”. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 21

c ontainer volume increases the company is experiencing, sayingt hat shipping in the Bahamas is starting to pick up again. O ne of the larger shipping lines in the Bahamas, Seaboard reported earlier this year that they had not been negatively affected by the downturn. Ms Deveuax said in March t hat Seaboard had seen no decline in revenue since theo nset of the global economic downturn. A nd she added that the com pany had restructured its rates in order to compensate for changes in the economy, and to remain competitive. M eanwhile, the shipping company has invested in itss ecurity with a one-day training programme held yesterday a t its facilities on East Bay Street. The director of security from the Miami-based operation of Seaboard Marine, who wished t o remain anonymous for security reasons, came down to train l ocal Seaboard staff and law enforcement on the seven-point d etection method for twentyfoot equipment units (TEUs This detection method ensures agents and law enforcement fully scrutinise containers leaving t he Bahamas for drugs, guns and stowaways. A ccording to the director, the training is an internationali nitiative, which has gone to 15 ports already. N otwithstanding the training programme and the company’s e arlier claims of financial stability, he said Seaboard had b een negatively affected by the economic downturn. Some Bahamian based-shipping companies reported a 10 per cent decline in container throughput volume in the first three months of 2009. The Port Manager at one container shipping line said there had been a major decline in high-end imports. However, Ms Deveaux said Seaboard had seen a tremen dous increase in grocery shipments from Miami. Questions loom as to what will happen to properties belonging to the shipping companies once the new Arawak Cay container port is complete. Seaboard Marine's property is owned by the Symonette family, and nothing has been forthcoming on plans for its redevelopment after the con tainer facility is moved. Mr Gibson said he has no idea when that move will take place. John Mittens, chairman of Montana Holdings, the project d eveloper, said in a statement released in response to Tribune Business ’s inquiries that talks with potential investor groupsw ere proceeding at “a measured pace”, given that confidence was still fragile and the need to ensure any deal would enable the Rum Cay Resort M arina project to proceed. He told Tribune Business: “We are experiencing the toughest economy in recent his-t ory with regard to financing of real estate development, not just in the Bahamas but worldwide, and particularly in North America. I do believe that the economy is just beginning to turn around, but investors remain very cautious. There have been,i n recent months and weeks, a number of potential investment groups who have expressed significant interest in the Montana Holdings project at Rum Cay, a nd we are presently engaged in discussions with a few. Mr Mittens added: “These n egotiations are progressing at a measured pace, since what we w ill not do is consider any investor interest that would undercapitalise the development, because that is a recipe for disaster. Overall, I think the view is one of very cautious optimism.” T he Montana Holdings chairman was responding to Tribune Business’s inquiries, after this newspaper learned t hat the developer was in talks with potential investors interested in the Rum Cay project. One source familiar with the situation had told Tribune Busi-n ess that Montana Holdings was, in particular, holding “promising talks” with an unnamed British investor who w as said to be keen in investing in Bahamas-based resort projects generally. Although Tribune Business has been unable to learn of thep otential investor’s name, it is understood he has been putting out feelers to other Bahamasbased projects in need of f inancing. One source described the potential investor as “UKbased and a strong supporter of the Bahamas, who believest he Family Islands hold great potential for touristic and residential development”. While the global credit c runch and financial crisis, and subsequent recession, held up the Rum Cay Resort Marina p roject and almost brought it t o a standstill due to the virtual impossibility of finding new d ebt financing lines, Montana Holdings has been far from i dle. It has continued operating and fixing up the Sumner Point Marina on Rum Cay, which ita cquired from American investor Bobby Little, with the island used as the site for Southern Boating magazine’s A pril 2009 photo shoot. That is understood to have helped drive boating traffic to the Sumner Point Marina this season. Montana Holdings’ Rum C ay project is little different from the many other mixed-use resort investment projects that were either slowed to a crawl or b rought to a standstill by the credit crunch, and their subsequent inability to access new lines of debt financing. These projects were also furt her impacted by the inability of potential real estate buyers to obtain financing, plus the drying up of investor and cons umer confidence. However, Mr Mittens has been as good as his word, having remained living with his family in Nassau and refusing tow alk away from the Rum Cay Resort Marina project, just as he said in a September 29, 2008,i nterview with Tribune Business. At the time, Mr Mittens said he had invested $32 million to d ate into the Rum Cay project, and at the time had been paying staff wagess and other project costs from his own personal expenses. H e told Tribune Business then: “I’m not going anywhere.I don’t have anything but the Rum Cay development. I sold a ll my UK assets to come here. I’m stuck here, gladly putting my nose to the grind stone. I’ve invested millions in this country, and brought my familyh ere. I’m not a remote developer. I’m here on a daily basis, working with my staff. “We have not given up. I just d on’t like giving up. All you can do is keep the faith, keep working. It always changes, but I can’t forsee when. This is the worst economic situation sincet he Great Depression.” 0,1,675<)%/,&:25.6t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p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Rum Cay developer talking to potential investors Shipping volumes showing increase F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 22

t o growth in its customer deposits. Client assets under administration also increased marginally in the six months since the 2008 year-end, increasing by 4.3 per cent to $2.4 billion from $2.3 billion. And, unlike several Butterfield operations in other count ries, Butterfield Bank (Bahamas loan loss provisions during the 2009 second quarter. Butterfield Bank (Bahamas the private banking unit, is the Bermuda-headquartered bank’s remaining wholly-owned Bahamian operation, the funds a dministration business having been spun-off into Butterfield Fulcrum (Bahamas field Bank still holds a 40 per cent stake in Butterfield Fulcrum. Tribune Business reported earlier this month that Butterf ield Fulcrum was downsizing its Bahamian operations by making 11 staff redundant overa six-month period, and transf erring the impacted unit’s business to its other offices. It implied that the Bahamian operation was likely to close its doors. B utterfield Fulcrum’s Bahamas business has gone through two ownership changes in five years. Originally known a s Deerfield Fund Services, it was acquired by Butterfield Bank in January 2004 and renamed Butterfield Fund Services (Bahamas T hen, in July 2008, Butterfield decided to merge all its funds services operations including those in the Bahamas with Fulcrum. When Butterfield acquired Deerfield, it had 12 staff and assets under administration of $1.8 billion. The latter figure h ad grown to $2.9 billion by year-end 2004, and its size at the time of the Fulcrum deal can be gauged by the fact that, a t year-end 2007, Butterfield’s assets under administration in the Bahamas (when it still owned both the funds business and the bank), were $5.447 bil-l ion. At year-end 2008, when the f unds business had been merged into Butterfield Fulcrum, assets under administration in the Bahamas totalled j ust $2.349 billion. This implied that Butterfield Fulcrum’s Bahamas operations had almost $3.1 billion in assets under administration by year-end2 008. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 9B ' XQFDQRZQ$LUSRUWHKDELOLWDWLRQ7 7KH*RYHUQPHQWRI7KH%DKDPDVLQWHQGVWRDZDUG D ZRUNVFRQWUDFWIRUWKHUHKDELOLWDWLRQRI'XQFDQ 7RZQ$LUSRUWRQ5DJJHG,VODQG7KHZRUNVFRQWUDFWF RQVLVWVLQWKHSDUWLDOUHKDELOLWDWLRQDQGWKHSURYLVLRQ RISHULRGLFPDLQWHQDQFHSDYHPHQWSDWFKLQJDQG VHDOLQJf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fDQGZLOOEHFRPPXQLFDWHGLQZ ULWLQJWRDOOWHQGHUHUV &ROLQ+LJJV 3HUPDQHQWHFUHWDU\ 0LQLVWU\RIXEOLF:RUNVDQG7UDQVSRUW Bahamas bank sees 71.4 per cent net income decline F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B To advertise in The Tribune , just call 502-2371 today!

PAGE 23

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 76F/24C Low: 76F/24C Low: 79F/26C Low: 81F/27C Low: 81 F/27 C Low: 83F/28C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 94F/34C High: 91F/33C High: 93 F/34 C High: 91 F/33 C High: 91F/33C High: 91 F/33C High: 91F/33C Low: 78F/26C High: 92F/33C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 93F/34C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 73F/23C High: 91 F/33 C Low: 78F/26C High: 88 F/31 Low: 74F/23C High: 89F/32C Low: 75 F/24C High: 91F/33C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 93F/34C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 73 F/23 C High: 91F/33C Low: 75F/24C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 76F/24C High: 93F/34C High: 91 F/33 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 30 TH 2009, PAGE 12B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Afternoon thunderstorm in spots. Clear to partly cloudy and breezy. Partly sunny, a t-storm; breezy. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. High: 91 Low: 80 High: 91 High: 90 High: 89 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. High: 89 Low: 80 Low: 81 Low: 81 AccuWeather RealFeel 95F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 83F 95-86F 94-86F 94-89F 93-83F Low: 79 TODAYTONIGHTFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................84F/29C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 93 F/34C Last year's low .................................. 79 F/26C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................20.79" Normal year to date ....................................24.47" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Full Last New First Aug. 5 Aug. 13Aug. 20Aug. 27 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:37 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:56 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 3:10 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 1:06 a.m. Today Friday Saturday Sunday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 3:07 a.m.2.29:05 a.m.0.3 3:50 p.m.2.710:12 p.m.0.5 4:06 a.m.2.110:02 a.m.0.4 4:49 p.m.2.711:09 p.m.0.5 5:04 a.m.2.110:58 a.m.0.4 5:43 p.m.2.7----5:57 a.m.2.212:00 a.m.0.5 6:31 p.m.2.811:51 a.m.0.4 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco93/3379/26s92/3378/25t Amsterdam66/1854/12sh68/2055/12pc Ankara, Turkey82/2752/11s81/2752/11c Athens91/3275/23s93/3375/23s Auckland56/1347/8pc58/1451/10c Bangkok88/3177/25sh89/3177/25sh Barbados86/3077/25sh86/3077/25sh Barcelona80/2668/20s79/2665/18s Beijing90/3275/23t91/3275/23s Beirut79/2676/24s80/2676/24s Belgrade94/3468/20s96/3570/21s Berlin79/2657/13pc75/2356/13pc Bermuda82/2776/24s81/2775/23pc Bogota66/1843/6sh64/1744/6c Brussels70/2152/11pc72/2255/12pc Budapest94/3464/17s91/3264/17pc Buenos Aires54/1241/5s54/1245/7pc Cairo98/3676/24s99/3776/24s Calcutta93/3387/30r96/3587/30r Calgary76/2450/10pc66/1848/8pc Cancun91/3279/26pc92/3378/25sh Caracas82/2771/21t81/2771/21t Casablanca89/3175/23s88/3168/20s Copenhagen70/2151/10sh71/2155/12pc Dublin64/1750/10sh63/1752/11r Frankfurt75/2350/10pc73/2252/11pc Geneva 76/24 53/11 pc 80/2659/15pc Halifax 67/19 61/16 t 77/25 61/16 s Havana 91/32 73/22 s 90/32 74/23 s Helsinki 75/23 57/13pc66/1854/12r Hong Kong 90/32 81/27 t 90/32 81/27t Islamabad 104/40 82/27 s 104/40 82/27 t Istanbul86/3070/21s86/3070/21sh Jerusalem 85/29 62/16s84/2863/17s Johannesburg 62/1644/6s60/1538/3s Kingston 90/3278/25s90/3278/25r Lima72/2260/15s72/2258/14s London68/2054/12sh72/2255/12pc Madrid97/3661/16s95/3559/15s Manila85/2977/25r86/3078/25r Mexico City81/2755/12t76/2456/13t Monterrey104/4075/23s104/4077/25s Montreal79/2664/17pc75/2364/17t Moscow81/2761/16pc79/2659/15pc Munich78/2554/12pc73/2254/12c Nairobi81/2753/11pc80/2654/12pc New Delhi 91/3281/27t93/3381/27t Oslo64/1754/12r70/2154/12r Paris73/2252/11pc77/2557/13pc Prague 85/29 54/12 s 77/25 52/11 pc Rio de Janeiro73/2265/18c70/2165/18r Riyadh102/3879/26s103/3980/26s Rome 91/32 69/20 s 90/32 66/18 s St. Thomas90/3281/27t90/3279/26sh San Juan64/1732/0s63/1732/0s San Salvador 88/31 72/22 t 86/30 74/23 t Santiago 66/1841/5pc55/1237/2c Santo Domingo91/3274/23t85/2973/22sh Sao Paulo 63/17 56/13 sh 63/17 56/13sh Seoul82/2772/22pc84/2869/20sh Stockholm 72/22 54/12 pc 66/18 54/12 sh Sydney 66/18 45/7 s66/1841/5s Taipei88/3179/26pc87/3078/25pc T okyo 90/32 77/25 pc 86/30 75/23 r T oronto 75/2359/15pc75/2357/13pc Trinidad82/2763/17pc87/3064/17s V ancouver 86/30 65/18 s 81/2763/17s Vienna 86/3066/18s83/2866/18pc W arsaw 82/27 61/16 pc 75/23 55/12 pc Winnipeg 66/18 53/11 pc 71/2156/13t H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet7-10 Miles84F Friday:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet7-10 Miles84F Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet7-10 Miles84F Friday:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet7-10 Miles84F Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet7-10 Miles85F Friday:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet7-10 Miles85F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque89/3167/19pc92/3368/20s Anchorage71/2158/14pc71/2154/12pc Atlanta84/2870/21t82/2770/21t Atlantic City88/3172/22t89/3169/20t Baltimore90/3270/21t90/3270/21t Boston86/3069/20pc86/3071/21t Buffalo78/2565/18pc74/2360/15t Charleston, SC90/3275/23t92/3376/24t Chicago78/2558/14t78/2561/16s Cleveland82/2765/18pc76/2458/14t Dallas87/3068/20t84/2875/23t Denver71/2153/11t88/3153/11pc Detroit80/2661/16c78/2562/16pc Honolulu88/3176/24s90/3277/25s Houston97/3679/26t97/3678/25t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday TodayFridayTodayFriday Indianapolis84/2862/16t81/2761/16s Jacksonville92/3374/23t92/3374/23t Kansas City78/2557/13pc85/2963/17s Las Vegas106/4180/26s106/4184/28s Little Rock83/2869/20t82/2769/20t Los Angeles80/2666/18pc82/2764/17pc Louisville86/3068/20t84/2864/17pc Memphis85/2971/21t83/2870/21t Miami91/3281/27t91/3279/26t Minneapolis70/2157/13t80/2663/17pc Nashville85/2971/21t84/2865/18t New Orleans92/3378/25t92/3378/25t New York85/2974/23t88/3175/23t Oklahoma City79/2660/15t84/2866/18pc Orlando94/3476/24t93/3375/23t Philadelphia90/3274/23t88/3172/22t Phoenix 108/42 85/29 s 108/4286/30s Pittsburgh80/2666/18pc82/2760/15t Portland, OR 101/3864/17s92/3363/17s Raleigh-Durham 92/33 73/22 t 91/32 71/21 t St. Louis82/2762/16t86/3066/18s Salt Lake City 87/30 65/18 s 92/3366/18s San Antonio 101/38 79/26 s 101/38 78/25 s San Diego74/2367/19pc75/2368/20pc San Francisco 67/19 56/13 pc 67/1956/13pc Seattle96/3560/15s87/3061/16s T allahassee 91/3273/22t92/3373/22t T ampa 91/32 76/24 t 92/33 77/25t Tucson102/3876/24s103/3977/25s W ashington, DC 92/33 75/23t90/3271/21t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 24

The Tribune The T ribune M y V o i c e , M y N e w s p a p e r ! Thursday, July 30th, 2009

PAGE 25

PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 26

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 3

PAGE 27

PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 28

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 5

PAGE 29

PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 30

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 7

PAGE 31

PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 32

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 9

PAGE 33

PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 34

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 11

PAGE 35

PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 36

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 13

PAGE 37

PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 38

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 15

PAGE 39

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 17

PAGE 40

PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 41

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009, PAGE 19

PAGE 42

PAGE 20, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 43

The Tribune Thursday, July 30, 2009 P G 21 RELIGION RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND CHURCH EVENTS PG 21The Tribune THURSDAY July 30, 2009

PAGE 44

The Tribune P G 22 Thursday, July 30, 2009 RELIGION By ALEX MISSICK T r ibune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net MANY times in our daily lives we may ask ourselves “why does God let bad things happen to good people?” In his wisdom, God’s love is never failing allowing him to not only provide us with his love, protection and guidance, but also to give us our own free will. 1 Peter 5:7 states “Cast all your anxiety on him because he car es for you.” Golden Gates World Outreach Ministries Inter national, Trent Davis, said God guiding us is really like being in tune with a satellite dish. “A satellite station is above the ear th and once you have the receiver down here on earth, you get a signal. The satellite is higher than you and can see the entire picture, but your receiver must be on. You can have that receiver inside but once it is not on you won’t pick up the signal,” Mr Davis said. Mr Davis said God's guidance can also be found in the “still small voice” of the Holy Spirit. “His directives may be as simple as when you have a ‘something told me to turn my windows down today’ moment. It might be a nudging to not call a certain person, or to go to a specific place at a given time. Success with God always means choosing to do things God's way, not our own way,” Mr Davis said. Mr Davis said the way we can activate that satellite receiver is thr ough our relationship with God. “Thr ough praise and worship that tweaks the signal when we lift our hands to God; when we open our selves up to his presence and when we give him glory. When the person that is on earth opens up their receiver and they make sure their antennas are up, they get a clear signal from the satellite. When we open up our spirits to God and spend time tuning and tracking that signal, we get clear instructions as to how to move,” Mr Davis said. Mr Davis also makes reference to God’s guidance from the recent film “Taken.” “The pr emise of T aken is wher e this young lady goes on a trip against her father’s wishes and the last thing he gives her is a cell phone telling her to keep in contact. She is then talking to him when the kidnappers come and as he is talking to her the most key important line he says is ‘in ten seconds they ar e going to take you. However , when they do, describe as much as you can as the phone is going to be open.’ She was able to be calm because she heard his voice just before all this was going on and she got clear guidance and instructions. She knew that her father knew what was going on because she had the receiver and the connection going on and in the end she came out with the victory. That is how we are with God-there are some things we can’t avoid but His voice and His guidance through the process will give us the victor y,” Mr Davis said. Mr Davis said God can handle the heavy weights that wear us down in life and love us unconditionally. “As the world continues going on, there are things that we still can’t avoid, but our constant contact with our God allows us to see some things befor e, allows us to walk ar ound some things and the things we can not walk around, God takes through those things.” ? guide Who is your GOD’S love is never failing allowing him to not only provide us with his love, protection and guidance, but also to give us our own free will.

PAGE 45

MEDITATION WE are facing many challenges in our society, and being happily married is one such area. How can we remain married for life? How can we find some level of happiness together? One way to do this, I have been told by a lady married for fifty-six years, is for both persons to really want to be married and to intend work at it. There needs to be an intentional effort being made to help each other to find joy in the relationship. This requires a degree of maturity that cares about the well-being of the other, a level of love that puts the other first, and a consistent desire to please the Lord through the ministry of marriage. What an ideal! How do we meet such a high standard? First of all, we need to accept that God has called us to a life-time journey with this other person. If you have a traveling companion who will share everything with you, it makes sense to try to create as congenial an atmosphere as possible. The time frame dictates the approach. Once we keep this in mind, then the next consideration is the wisdom required to work things out together. The mor e humble we ar e the better , The mor e dependent on God for insight we are, seeking the mind of Christ together, the quicker we will discer n the will of God. If we truly admire our spouse as an intelligent person, gifted in certain areas, and capable of contributing much to the relationship, then it is easier to trust opinions which differ from our own as having some validity . Respect given and appreciated, then returned, in an ongoing reciprocal arrangement, boosts the level of self-esteem for both persons. Put another way, we sit together as equals, both made in the image and like ness of God, and we share our thoughts and feelings, prayerfully searching for the best possible solution. Because we both wish to bless and be blessed we control our egos and explore all options. There is no need for a power struggle because God is the power to which we both seek to sincerely submit. A life-time is a long time to be unhappy. It can make the promise to be together ‘Til death us do part’ feel like a life sentence to be ser ved on death r ow . Regular appeals may prolong the execution for many years but one day it will have to happen. Why not search your own heart, examine your own conscience, and con fess your own sins to Almighty God concerning your present situation. Ask God to heal you and help you. If you both do this, you allow God to fill you with peace, joy and love for now through eternity. The Tribune Thursday, July 30, 2009 PG 23 RELIGION Married for Life REV.ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS

PAGE 46

I AM taking a different route today. This article gives props to The Royal Bahamas Police Force for running a much needed and extr emely helpful Summer Camp. The summer months appr oached and the r eality of school closing for more than 8 weeks left many parents wondering how to enter tain their childr en. I hear d on the radio that The Royal Bahamas Police For ce was having a summer camp and the following mor ning r egister ed my neice. I don't know how this is going to sound but I’ll say it anyway, when I went with much anticipation to pick her up and saw that they wer e giving the children a hot lunch I knew instantly that this was the right place for my niece to be for the next several weeks. I think the officers out did themselves. Not only were the children served hot lunch every day, they were also given a snack at break and all field trips were free. The only thing parents had to pay for was the T-shirt given to each child at registeration. I don't think you can beat that at all. I think we ar e all aware that summer time is the most popular time for childr en to be idle. However, the RBPF sought to do something about that this summer by hosting a summer camp for four weeks. I applaud their ef for ts and accomplishments in helping par ents for a few hours out of the day . It is good to see pr oblems, that means efforts can be made to solve them. It is even better when we see problems and have solutions to those problems. I know we are living in different times from the 80's and early 90's and many of us don't believe this any more but it truly "takes a village to raise a child." I thought they were in good hands being in the police hands. This depar tment sought to make life easier for people and I hope that they are given the thanks that they deser ve. My sister and I would like to extend our thanks to the commis sioner of police and his for ce espe cially Central Division for a job well done. It was ver y much appr e ciated, thank you. The Tribune P G 24 Thursday, July 30, 2009 RELIGION Take back our streets It is a proven fact that everything rises and falls upon leadership! It is blatantly evident that one of the greatest problems of the Bahamas today; is that of effective leadership. This fact is conclusive straight across the board; the lack of effective leadership in the home, in the church and in the government. With the Bahamas being a small group of islands and Nassau being only twenty miles long and seven miles wide (21/7 that lawlessness is allowed to have such free course on so small of an island? Being a Bahamian who has lived and traveled throughout the USA and returning back home, it's disheartening to hear the silly excuses; that ninety nine per cent of Bahamians sincerely gives for the lawlessness in the land today. Worst of all I've heard supposed to be leaders (politicians, police officers, civic and religious leaders) giving weak excuses for their inability / failure to enforce the law. Again, it's obvious that these leaders only mentally ascend to scriptures such as “Pr ov .18:21: Death and life ar e in the power of the tongue: and they that love it shall eat the fruit thereof. And Mark 11:23 : He shall have whatsoever he saith. Her e's a quick note to persons such as the minister of National Security, the attorney general and the commissioner of police. The parents and family members who would have lost their loved ones through some form of criminal act; care not to hear you leaders give dumb excuses and try to cover your incompetence to enforce the law. Any leader or person who sits in the of fice of authority and ascribes to such notions as: “What we experiencing is as a r esult of that which is taking place in America” is not fit to lead or occupy an office of authority. What the Bahamas is experiencing is leadership with no testosterone to effectively deal with its problems. As soon as true leadership arises, the Bahamas will boldly move forward, upward and onward together, then the slogan It's Better in the Bahamas would be true. Overall Bahamians are law abiding people but where there is no law enforcement; but just like every other nationality; what we're allowed to get away with, we would. Here's my case and point: As crazy and as lawless as Bahamians may appear to be when they're at home in the Bahamas when traveling to the USA, immediately this (suppose to be Bahamian becomes a law abiding visitor. Let's observe the lawless Bahamian visiting the USA for a few days? If they intend to drive on the str eets of America, watch how quickly they adher e to the seat belt law . As much as this Bahamian would drink alcohol beverages while driving on the str eets of the Bahamas; how is it that they won't do the same on the streets of America? For the Bahamian visiting America; obeying the laws of that land is by no means a problem to him or her. This individual or these individuals ar e fully awar e that there are swift consequences for every lawless action taken. Now on the other hand; the minute these temporar y law abiding Bahamians leave America and their feet hits the Bahamas soil; instantaneously they revert to their lawless ways. Why is this? Listen, it's not that there are no laws here in the Bahamas. What we've got is a two fold dynamic at work here: 1) There is no respect or reverence for our laws, and 2) There is very little enforcement of our laws, and where there is enforcement; there lacks swift judgment and meaningful consequences. It is said that “It's the little fox that spoils the vine” This proverb also fits or is the root cause for the deterioration of law and order in the Bahamas. The simple neglect of enforcing our traffic laws has given birth to many other serious crimes in the land. Here's a little foot note for these sleeping / blind leaders that oversee law enforcement in the Bahamas: The Oklahoma City bomber Timothy Mcveigh was arrested for a simple traffic matter. Had it not been for that police officer enforcing the traffic laws; this dangerous criminal might have gotten away. I deemed it a shame and the lack of vision for the government to have to borrow millions of dollars for road repairs. The strict enforcement of the traffic laws, along with an expeditiously working cour t system; and stif fer penalties and fines would generate more than enough finances to repair and maintain r oads and highways throughout the Bahamas. The simple enfor cement of traf fic laws would overwhelmingly fund the Bahamas treasury. I would invite the commissioner of police and the comptroller of road traffic to ride incognito the public bus / jitney for a month; and the would have a greater appreciation for the spirit of this article with reference to the level of traffic lawlessness on the str eets. The ter ror and fear of riding the Jitneys At some point the commissioner of police and the comptr oller of r oad traf fic must put their heads together and come up with a zero tolerance task force; to take back the street from the road demons) jitney drivers. Mr Commissioner / Mr Comptroller, here are a few point or concerns that I'm sure you must have heard of on more than one occasion. Bus drivers are allowed to play loud, filthy music as they recklessly transport paying passengers to their destination. Passengers have to tolerate this abuse of this nasty music; out of fear of being beaten down and assaulted on these buses by the drivers and their riding partners, if they complain about the music. There is also disrespect for other motorist by bus drivers as they're allowed to stop in the middle of the street to off load an receive passengers. Might I suggest, Mr Commissioner and Mr Comptroller; that the selected officers of this task force be made aware that if it is proven that they've compromised the integrity of the task force by whatever means; they would be immediately dealt with at the strictest measure of the law. This is but a mustard seed observation of the lawlessness that is being allowed to have fr ee course on our str eet. I do blame the various drivers for their lawless actions, but most of all I highly hold / blame the commissioner of police, the comptroller of road traffic and the constipated, weak cour t sys tem for failing to effectively enforce the laws. IS THERE ANYBODY IN AUTHORITY; within the above mentioned departments / offices who are not afraid to enforce the laws and Take Back Our Streets? Stop Talking and Take Action. For questions or comments contact us via E-mail: pastormallen@yahoo.com or Phone 1-242-441-2021 or 225-3850 Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l. PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN Job w ell done! ALLISON MILLER

PAGE 47

FEARLESS "TOsome who were confident of their own righteousness and looked down on everybody else, Jesus told this parable: "Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee stood up and prayed about himself: 'God I thank you that I am not like other menrobbers, evildoers, adulterersor even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week and give a tenth of all I get.' "But the tax collector stood at a distance. He would not even look up to heaven, but beat his breast and said, 'God, have mercy on me, a sinner.' "I tell you that this man, rather than the other, went home justified before God. For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted." Luke 18:9-14 (N.I.V) It's amazing how imperfect I've found I am. It's not that I ever thought I was perfect, or anything even close, but I also didn't think I was extraordinarily imperfect either. Yet it was a Saturday I will never for get. My ten year old nephew asked me to play a game of darts and although I never had a stellar history in darts, I thoughttwenty-four yearold me, against, ten -year old him, how miserable could one game possibly be? I accepted the challenge. In fact, I thought it would be a great opportunity for me to teach him something; being four teen years his senior and all. So what could I teach him I ponderedmaybe, how to be a good sport whether you win, or more importantly lose? At this point I'm sure you've alr eady fast tracked to the conclusionwell, don't burn out your sneakers just yet. Two minutes into the game, I've finally landed a dart on the boardthe wall is relievedmy nephew is on cloud nine, blissfully content that regardless of my improved play I don't stand a chance. As I shift from one unpleasant emotion to another equally unpleasant emotion, I try to remain as physically pleasant as possible-with this ten year old kid, who seems to be gr owing rather quickly in fr ont of my very eyes. As he explains the scoring to me again, I panic and think, 'This can not be happening!' 'You mean I'm unable to avoid some level of mathematical competence?!' My nephew who considers me to be the coolest thing since Nintendo Wii, is about to find out I have a flawa distr essing defect, discover ed and quickly concealedwell somewhat, in grade five. While he wrote the scores, I would count and recount my points as quickly as I could manage; so to not be discovered to be a fraud, a con artist who swindled her way to high rank in the I.A.C.A.EInternational Association of Cool Aunts Everywhere. However, when he looked at my land and again at the point I had given himthe cat was out of the bag so to speak. My Mathematics A-grade nephew frequently and quietly replaced the 18for double 8, with a 16and in those very moments I realised, there's something hugely disturbing about the often peaceful quiet, that emerges when one has been exposedit's almost as if laughter, finger pointing or arrest would be more comforting. While the vicious cycle of recounts picked up speed, he would occasionally chuckle and shake his head. The darts wanted to teach me something. Ultimately I wonone game out of five. Alright, alright, I did get into the game somewhat self righteous, convinced that my age compared to his was all I needed to ensur e a win. Convinced, he could never teach me anything. But he did. It wasthat there are some things he's better at and that's okay. Regar dless of a persons age, race or gender , we can all find wisdom and understanding in each other. Yet am I alone in my struggle with the occasional self righteous attitude or is this a vice that looms over us allparticularly believers as we strive to be witnesses of God's truth in the world? Well what I do know is, this is without a doubt one of the reasons why we must at all times be of a sober mind; humbling ourselves, accepting that we don't have all the answers, we can't solve all problemsbut we do, have all the truth, written in the Bible. There is no ranking system based on perfection, that places believers above any other human being. Is one who is skilled at maths, more valuable than one who is skilled at communications? Absolutely not. We all need to have a healthy dose of each discipline, and we all need to realise we have individual giftsessential to our individual purpose, and destiny. That being saidI'll always be ready for another game of darts; an invitation to share-or one to simply listen. In closing, may you always welcome every light hearted opportunity no matter how small it seems. T oni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian writer and poet, currently residing in Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to the article can be sent to fearless247@gmail.com . The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, July 30, 2009 PG25 Regarding darts TONI STYLES HISTORIC Bethel Baptist Church will celebrate its 219th anniversar y on Sunday August 2 in one combined ser vice at 10 am under the theme “In Pursuit of Greatness” taken from Genesis 12:1-4, Joshua 17:14-18 and Matthew 20:20-24. The special guest speaker will be Rev Dr V ictor Cooper , Pastor of New Bethany Baptist Chur ch. T wo hundr ed and nineteen years ago, a r un away American slave of the Car olina shor es named Prince W illiams, guided by the hand of pr ovidence, landed on the shor es of Nassau and in 1790 or ganised and erected Bethel's Meeting House fr om which the name Meeting Str eet was derived. The chur ch has the oldest continuous Baptist congr egation in the Bahamas and possibly in the Caribbean. The chur ch’ s for efathers under the leadership of the Holy Spirit have laid a solid foundation upon which to build and expand. Persons like Rev Rober t Johnson who or der ed the chur ch's first pipe organ; Rev Dr HR Brown who was a social activist, a gr eat orator , and a man con cer ned about others and was also r esponsible for the “Ser ving the Whole Man” ministr y; Rev W ellington Johnson who under his shor t tenur e intr oduced many administrative changes and finally, the current minister Timothy Stewart all played pivotal r oles in the chur ch’ s development. The chur ch has under gone extensive renovations, administrative of fices wer e built, pr oper ties acquir ed, full-time associate ministers wer e employed, an administrative team was employed and numer ous ministries established. The chur ch will commit to r eceiving all that God has pr omised for his people to become, and r ecommit to doing what God has called His Chur ch to do. In the futur e, members will focus on the challenges that confr ont the family, the community , and the countr y as a whole. These objectives would be met thr ough the pastoral car e ministry, the preaching of the gospel, the teaching ministr y of the chur ch, evangelism, the youth and childr en's ministr y of the chur ch, and the necessary expansion of the church's facilities to ef fectively meet the spiritual demands of the times. Bethel Baptist Church celebration 219 years Timothy Stewart

PAGE 48

THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS The Tribune P G 26 Thursday, July 30, 2009 RELIGION By far the largest number of the negro Creoles belong to the Baptist persuasion. This species of dissent has peculiar attractions for them, involving, as it does, a very democratic form of selfgovernment, the substitution of class councils, and adjudications for the procedure of the established courts of law, together with a system of mutual espionage and censorship, which at the same time gratifies their curiosity and flatters their self-conceit. I by no means deny that, in their time, the Baptist preachers have done good to their flocks ; but I consider that the present effect of their preaching and of their church organisation is to impart a tone of republican self-assertion to their congregations, to foster a hypocritical habit of quoting the Sacred Scriptures on all occasions, and to postpone the more serious duties of the moral law to chapelgoing observance of the Sabbath, and similar ceremonial formalities. (Governor Bayley, 1864) At this time the Baptists of the Bahamas consisted of ex slaves and lib erated Africans belonging to either the Baptist Missionary Society of Londonor an equally large widespread network of Native Baptists just as their lan guage overlaid African grammar with English syntax both groups employed Christian imagery with underlying powerful West African religious symbols. Hence, the immersion in water and r everence to John the Baptist became a key meeting point in the two belief systems. The Native Baptists had their origins in the Bahamas from the coming of the Loyalists in the 1780s with Brother Amos, Frank Spence, Prince Williams and Sharper Morris. In 1801, the Society of Anabaptists was for med by Prince Williams and other free Negroes. After a brief flirtation with the Baptist Missionar y Society of London, Prince W illiams split away and built the St John's Particular Church of the Native Baptist Society in 1835 but the Society itself was probably in existence since 1825. Prince Williams and James Bur ns evangelised the Out Islands up to William's death in 1840. Thomas 'Pappy' Romer Thomas Rumer was bor n in Grand Bahama in 1798 and was a slave of John Pinder until Emancipation. “The work of soul saving was Mr Romer's chief delight” (St John's Society Recor d Book) he traveled to the islands to existing churches and added new ones, ordaining elders in all. Although illiterate, Pappy was described as a wor thy , pious man and a strong disciplinarian a giant in rebuking sin and weeping with those that wept. He visited the homes of the aged and sick often bent over a cooking pot preparing sustenance for the helpless. In New Providence, Rumer started St Peter's in Gambier (1856 James', St Peter's and St Mark's. He also purchased or obtained grants of land for churches in Long Cay, Crooked Island, Port Nelson, Rum Cay (18531854 Matthew Town, Inagua (1855 Calabash Bay, Andros (1868 Thomas 'Pappy' Romer died on 29th March 1883 with his dying testimony: “My work on earth is finished. Come, thou Great Conqueror, come! Thou didst bear those five bloody wounds for me.I shall soon be satisfied.” A large procession of all classes and denominations followed his remains to the south of St John's Chur ch, where he was buried. “He was eminentlyr ever ed and beloved by the congregation and many affiliated ChristiansHe was of a kindly , gen erous disposition, of simple humble manners. His life was of consistent godliness, unostentatious devotion and earnest zeal”. (Obituary Nassau Guar dian 31st Mar ch 1883). James W Roberts David C Lightbourne succeeded Pappy Romer in the pastorate of Native Baptists but died just over two years later . The Chur ch called Methodist lay reader, James W Roberts born at the Bogue, Eleuthera as Pastor . In 1891, 'Pa' Rober ts led the constr uction of a new building, 100ft by 30 ft, which is still in use today. At the cornerstone laying ceremony Rev Robert Dunlop (Presbyterian John's had 480 members and over 300 children in Sunday School and 48 churches with 4,550 members and 3,000 childr en in Sunday School. This chur ch has been a gr eat power for the goodit has maintained a tr ue and pure faith..its neighbours sometimes think its services are too rousing when they awake us at three or four o'clock in the mor ning”. He likened Pa Roberts as 'likeminded' and a 'worthy successor' to old Mr Rumer of simple manners, ear nest life and commanding influence. Divisions Just before he died in 1915, Pa Roberts asked Rev Daniel Wilshire to or dain choirmaster Alfred Carrington Symonette of Snug Corner, Acklins (born 1875 to everyone and as a result the St James' Native Baptist Association was formed with Symonette as the Superintendent. Rev Gilbert H Thompson, a well educated Bahamian preaching in New York became Pastor of the St John's Society but after four years left taking away many members and started the Metropolitan Baptist Church. Rev Samuel McKinney took over and travelled widely from island to island baptising converts and ordaining ministers. By 1924 there were 46 affiliated chapels and 5,260 members. Just before McKinney retired, Timothy Edward Wesley Donaldson returned from the USA to assist him. Donaldson (born in Cat Island 1880 who had taught in the Government Schools became Superintendent of the churches in the Out Islands and R H Higgs, a Bahamian Pastor in Florida was brought in to be Pastor of St John's. After many chur ches wer e damaged in the 1926 hurricane, the rebuilding of St John's proved to be very expensive at this point a disagreement split the chur ch again over the payment of a salar y asked for by R H Higgs. Higgs took away about 300 members, who worshipped on the Southern Recreation Grounds and gradually or ganised St Paul's Baptist Chur ch which was later built on Bias Str eet. An agreement between Rev T E W Donaldson and Rev A C Car rington to amalgamate the whole Baptist Society together again resulted in Symonette taking on as superintendent of the Society and Pastor of St John's with Donaldson as assistant pastor. Symonette pr oved to be a good or gan iser as he brought the Society together again and added The Annex Baptist Chur ch and Mt Car mel Baptist Chur ch. He became the first pr esident of the Bahamian Baptist Missionary and Educational Convention. He was unfortunately drowned off Fresh Creek Andros and his body is buried there. Rev T E W Donaldson took over until his death in 1963. After Donaldson there was a period of unr est until Rev Michael Car rington Symonette (bor n 1938 in Nassau) was elected in 1965. Under this Symonette, Mt Zion, Golden Gates and St John's Freeport Native Baptist Churches were added to the Society. So the Native Baptist Chur ch created by those 'negro creoles' has grown and prospered into one of the most influential institutions in the moder n Bahamas. (Next time: Part 39 The last years of the Baptist Missionary Society of London) Native Baptists of the Bahamas PART 38 JIM LAWLOR A VERSE A DAY KEEPS THE ENEMY AT BAY. ManyC hristians understand the need f or a healthy dose of daily inspiration, especially when it comes to having a defence against the troubles that always seem to arise when we are at our weakest. The word of God is not just the bread for our daily walk, it is the essence of what keeps the saved covered under God’s pro tection. At any time troubles arise with no clear reason why, however we have the choice to either poke our heads in the sand and pray the situation disappears, or trust in the Word knowing “This too shall pass.” To survive in an ever increasing secular world, Christian or not, reading the word daily is simply the best option. The Bible says to trust in the word and lean not your own understanding. So the next time you’re facing a black cloud, or an obstacle, instead of fighting a loosing battle, pick up the Bible and let it help you through. TRIBUNE TIP OF THE DAY Share your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 49

The Tribune Thursday, July 30, 2009 PG 27 RELIGION By BISHOP VG CLARKE Calvary Deliverance Church THE HUMAN body, as everybody knows, is a remarkable organism comprising of billions of cells, numerous chemicals, hundreds of muscles, miles of blood vessels and a variety of organs. The human body can grow, heal itself, fight disease, adapt to temperature changes, react to environmental stimulation, and survive numerous physical abuses. But the body does not go on forever, at least in this world. Sometimes it is injured beyond repair. It can break down if it is not cared for and eventually wears out. When we are healthy, we often take our body for granted. Colds and periodic bouts with the flu are annoying but usually only temporary interruptions to the activities of life. Sickness is an issue which runs throughout the pages of scripture. The illnesses of Miriam, Naaman, Nebuchadnezzar, David's newborn child, Job, and various others are described with charity in both the old and new testaments. When Jesus came to earth in person his concern for the sick was so important that almost onefifth of the gospels are devoted to the topic of healing. The disciples were expected to carry on this healing ministry and the book of Acts records how the early church cared for those with physical illnesses. The biblical emphasis on sickness points to at least three conclusions which can be helpful for the believer:1. Sickness is a part of life. Few people, if any go through life without experiencing at least periodic illness. It seems likely that sickness entered the human race as a result of the fall, and since that time people have known what it is like to be unhealthy. The Bible makes no attempt to diagnose, categorise or systematically list the symptoms in passing, it refers directly or indirectly to alcoholism, blindness, deafness, muteness, infirmity, insanity, speech impediment and a number of other illnesses. 2. Care, compassion and healing are important for believers. By his word and actions, Jesus taught that sickness, while common, also is undesirable. He spent much of his time healing the sick. He encouraged others to do likewise, and he emphasised the importance of compassionate caring for those who were needy and unhealthy. Even to give someone a drink of water was considered praiseworthy and Jesus indicated that helping a sick person was the same as ministering to himself. Believers are instructed to pray for the sick and to help in practical ways for those who are not well. 3. Sickness raises some difficult and crucial questions about suffering. Some of you may ask the question “If God is in control why is He allowing many bad things to happen to us.” You must remember that things happen because of the choices we make. The school shooting in Colorado some years ago is a prime example of the choices we make as human beings. When God is left out of our decision making we leave ourselves open to be controlled by the devil. It is probable that our minds will never fully comprehend the reasons for suffering, but the Bible teaches that suffering keeps us humble, refines our faith, conform us to His image, teaches us about God and produces patience, maturity, perseverance and character. Suffering also teaches us to become more compassionate and caring. Learning to walk with God through prayer, fasting, meditation, Bible study and worship can prepare us for the crisis of life. The scriptures never teach that believers are exempted from illness or that suffering will be easy for Christians; neither are we taught that we should bear problems alone. When we are in the habit of “bearing one another's burdens,” and casting our burdens on God in prayer, then we are better prepared for facing illness and death when they come. Sickness TODAY IN RELIGION BULGARIAN Orthodox priests hold the miraculous icon of the Virgin Mary during an orthodox procession in the town of Varna east of the Bulgarian capital Sofia, Sunday, July, 26, 2009. Every year some thousands of believers take part in this procession as they try to touch or kiss the miraculous icon before a praying for good health. P e t a r P e t r o v / A P P h o t o

PAGE 50

The Tribune P G 28 Thursday, July 30, 2009 RELIGION By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net THE excitement is now br e wing and within just three da ys one of six cont est ant for this year’s Miss Gospel Bahamas will walk away wit h t he title of q ueen. The event which is set to take place on August 2, at the W yndham’ s Rainforest Theater will feature several special guest performances by Synergy Soldiers for Christ, Mericha W alker, and Overcomers Mime Ministry. Going through months of vigorous training, appearances, r etr eats, and pageant pr eparations, the young women have gone through a transformation that has escor ted them fr om girls to women, but only one can be queen. Kahlil Gibran once said: “Beauty is not in the face, beauty is a light in the heart,”and for these young beauties the challenge is to convince the judges that they have what it takes. According to the organisiers of Miss Gospel Bahamas: “Fr om the star t, the Miss Gospel Bahamas Pageant has encouraged its participants to transform their spiritual lives in ways that truly reflect Jesus Christ. Organised by Great Commission Ministries Inter national, the pageant also promotes assistance to the nation’s impoverished and homeless.” SHENIQUE GRAY MISS AMETHY ST 25 years old and is a member of Annex Baptist Church. She serves as president of her church’s youth ministry, church secretary, member of the choir, and lieutenant of her church’s Girls Brigade. Shenique is employed as a senior accountant at Deloitte & Touche, and is a Certified Public Accountant (CPA).Her hobbies include swimming, tennis, and travel ling. Shenique aspir es to become a multi-faceted entrepreneur, as she plans to creatively develop her own travel agency, business consultancy firm, and financial advisement firm. DE’ WAYNIA JOSEY MISS CALVARY DELIVERANCE CHURCH is an 18 year old student at the College of the Bahamas. She serves in various church and civic organisations including Calvar y Deliverance Church’s Dance Ministry, Crusaders Brass Brand, and Total Praise DanceT r oupe. She is also a volunteer of Sister Cir cle, a charity or ganisation assisting the less for tunate. De’Waynia’s hobbies include dancing and performing in musicals.Having a passion for mental wellness, she hopes to one day achieve a doctorate degr ee in Clinical Psychology. VALENCIA MOSS MISS CHUR CH OF GOD OF PR OPHECY GAMBIER is a 25 year old teacher. She has trained in various gover nmental min istries, including the Ministry of Youth, Sports, and Culture, Foreign Affairs, and presently as a Spanish teacher enlisted through the Ministry of Education.Valencia also ministers in the Praise and W orship and Dance Ministries of her church.She aspires to become an International Relations Of ficer in the Ministr y of For eign Af fairs. Her hobbies include singing, dancing, and experiencing different cultures. RUSHAN COOPER MISS ALL OUT ENTER T AINMENT is 19 years old and is a member of Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church.She serves as Vice President of her church’s Dance Ministry, Youth Ministry Secretary, a member of theY outh Choir and Youth Praise team. Rushan is currently enrolled at the College of the Bahamas where she hopes to obtain cer tification and train ing to become a primar y school teacher .Her hobbies include dancing, singing, reading, traveling, and photography. SHANNON EVANS MISS ZION BAPTIST CHURCH EAST & SHIRLEY S TREET S is a 20 year old student at the College of the Bahamas.She is committed to sharing the importance of educational advancement, which is evidenced by her involvement in the Education Awareness Society, her church’s Youth Ministry, and Children’s Church. She is also a dir ector of Shachah Worship and dance ministries.Shannon’s hobbies include r eading, writing, and communications, all of which she hopes to help in her dream of becoming a Primary Educator. J AMELL D AWKINS MISS BAHAMAS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP CENTRE has an ambition to encourage others in pursuing Jesus Christ. Although her life’s journey has only spanned 20 years, Jamell is already certain that she has been called to Dance Ministr y . She serves in the Dance and Drama Ministries of her church, in addition to practicing dance as a pastime.She is a volunteer of Miss Teen Bahamas W orld Pageant. Jamell is also a member of Bahamas Christian Fellowship Centr s Y outh Praise team and Chairperson of the Y outh Board. Her hobbies include reading, writing, and she has an interest in Spanish. The contestants of the Miss Gospel Bahamas Competition SHENIQUE GRAY DE’WAYNIA JOSEY VALENCIA MOSS RUSHAN COOPER SHANNON EVANS JAMELL DAWKINS