Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.202



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hunger

SEE INSIGHT SECTION

m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009



28 now infected
with swine flu

Cases multiply
by almost a third
in just two weeks

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE number of swine flu
cases in the Bahamas has
rocketed to at least 28, health
chiefs have confirmed.

The number of people with
the potentially-deadly
Influenza H1IN1 has multi-
plied by nearly a third in the
two weeks since 19 cases were
confirmed on July 9.

With many families and

groups travelling abroad dur-
ing the summer months, the
Ministry of Health expects to
see the sporadic emergence
of new cases of the virus.
And the number of cases is
expected to rise as the annual
flu season approaches.
Health Minister Dr Hubert
Minnis said weekly updates
will be posted on the Ministry
of Health website every Fri-
day to keep people informed

SEE page 10

Police seeking to question
driver of out of control jitney

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net



Jithey ride =

|



PSS at



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Daughter of
murder victim
‘not arrested’
say police

Claims made
on website

and on TV
are refuted

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

~~

HECTOR AND Rosetta



By MEGAN
REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

REPORTS which say
the 16-year-old daughter
of murdered American
Anna Michelle Garrison
has been arrested in the
United States have been
refuted by The Royal
Bahamas Police Force.

Claims made by a
Bahamian website, and
repeated by Florida NBC
news Channel Five, say
Ms Garrison’s daughter,
Anna Pugh, was found in
Kennett Square, Penn-
sylvania, with her father
Chris Pugh.

Bahamas Police want
to question Anna about
Ms Garrison’s death and
have enlisted the United
States Federal Bureau of
Investigation (FBI) to
help find her.

Ms Garrison’s decom-
posing body was found
in a bushy area off Fox
Hill Road south, near the
Blue Water Cay devel-
opment, New Provi-
dence, at around 6pm on

SEE page 10

More than 60









POLICE are still looking to
question the driver of a packed
jitney that sped out of control
towards the Nassau Harbour.

Chief Superintendent Glenn
Miller, head of the Central
Police Station, yesterday said
that as far as he was aware, the
driver had not been questioned

Haitian migrants
apprehended

MORE than 60 Haitian
migrants were apprehended
in the Exumas over the week-
end near Harvey Cay, accord-

of terror

Passengers jump for lives from window: =
Out-of-control bus stops feet from harbour | ‘may ha
‘Two taken to hospital with leg injuries

Smith, the parents of Bren-
ton Smith, place flowers
on his coffin on Saturday.











i
Brenton Smith

Boys who went missing
on Andros still in hospital





TEENAGER Brenton
Smith was buried yester-
day, just two weeks after
he was accidentally killed
in a shootout between











by traffic officers. police and armed robbers. La Bahamas
SEE page 11 THE report in Saturday's Tribune, By TANEKA THOMPSON Fonuly and bide 0: According to RBDF offi-

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Tribune Staff Reporter
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THE two boys who were missing in Andros for 33 days and
feared dead are still recovering at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital, their mother Vera Clarke said yesterday.

Although the brothers are expected to make a full recovery,

SEE page 10

Teenager stabbed in fight

A TEENAGE boy was
stabbed in a fight with another
youth on the Western
Esplanade beach near Arawak
Cay, West Bay Street, last night.

The Nassau boy, aged 16, ran
to the Arawak Cay police sta-
tion bleeding after he was
stabbed.

Quiznos

Police Superintendent
Elsworth Moss said he was cut
twice on the arm.

The attacker fled as the boy
ran for help.

The incident is still under
investigation and the boy was
taken to Princess Margaret Hos-
pital for medical treatment.

|

r ea
Bit GREARE





















friends gathered at St
Anselm’s Church on Sat-
urday to grieve for the
bright 18-year-old who
was caught in the cross-
fire.

Brenton was said to be
a family-loving jokester
who had dreams of
becoming an engineer. He
had completed a marine
navigational course days
before his death and, for
the second summer in a
row, had been accepted
into a prestigious intern-
ship at the Albany devel-
opment.

A website has been set
up in his honour:
brentonhectorsmith.com

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ioT SAND WIC

cials, July has seen the largest
number of Haitain migrants
seeking refuge to the coun-
try’s shores in recent times.

The group, 66 migrants in
all, were caught just after 9am
Sunday by Defence Force
vessel HMBS P-49, which was
on routine patrol approxi-
mately 18 miles southwest of
Harvey Cay.

The officers, under the
command of Lieutenant
Omarv Saunders, spotted a
40-foot Haitian sailing sloop
and upon further investiga-
tion discovered the migrants -
46 males, 11 females and 9
children - aboard the vessel.

SEE page 11

il





PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Bradley Roberts undecided
on running for PLP chairman

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Bain and
Grants Town MP Bradley
Roberts is undecided on
whether or not he will vie
for the post of chairman of
the Progressive Liberal Par-
ty at the party’s upcoming
convention.

“T’ve been hearing that
myself (but) I have not

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made any decision with
regard to that. ’ve been
asked by many persons,
encouraged by many per-
sons but I have not given
that any consideration,” Mr
Roberts told The Tribune
yesterday when asked to
clarify speculation that he
was gunning for the post.

He added that he has not
decided whether or not he
will join the fray of possible
contenders.

Mr Roberts said he has
been asked to bid for the
post by party supporters
who feel his “no-nonsense”
style will inject energy into
the Opposition.

“T think they like my style

and the fact that they know
that I’m a no-nonsense per-
son. And I got the job done
before when I was chairman
of the party.”

Mr Roberts was the PLP’s
chairman when the party
defeated the Free National
Movement in the 2002 elec-
tion race. He also served as
public works minister under
the Christie administration.

After one term in office,
the PLP lost power to the
FNM in May, 2007. In order
to return to the country’s
helm, Mr Roberts feels the
PLP needs to revert to the
tried and tested policies
which won them the 2002
election race.

“A return to what it did
in 2002 is a good start,
become focused and intro-
duce a programme to the
Bahamian people,” he said.

When asked if he thought
he would be able to help
steer the PLP to victory in
the 2012 election, Mr
Roberts laughed and said:
“Why don’t we cross that
bridge if we ever need to get
to it.

“But I'll say this though,
there is need to bring about
a change in this country.

“We are going down the
tubes fast.

“ Lots of people are hurt-
ing all over and we’re not
getting any answers to prob-



BRADLEY ROBERTS

lems of our people - except
wait to see what (US Presi-
dent Barack) Obama will
do. That cannot be a solu-
tion to our problems.”

The PLP’s convention is
slated for October. Engler-
ston MP Glenys Hanna-
Martin is the current party
chairman.

Man charged with possession of
unlicensed firearm, ammunition

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A MAN appeared before
Deputy Chief Magistrate
Helen Jones in Court Three,
yesterday charged with pos-
session of an unlicensed
firearm and ammunition.

It is alleged that on May
15, Kendrick McQueen, 37,
while being concerned with
another, was found in pos-
session of a firearm, serial
number AK16243, without

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being the holder of a special
license.

It is also alleged that on
the same date, while being
concerned with another, he
was found in possession of
10 live rounds of .40 bullets.

McQueen pleaded not
guilty to the charges. He was
represented by K Brian
Hanna.

e A MAN has been

charged with two counts of
shop breaking and two

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counts of stealing.

Dougaye Huyler, 23, is
accused of breaking into
McGibbons Enterprises, at
Keat Street, and making off
with a red coloured air com-
pressor.

He pleaded not guilty to
the charges and selected
summary trial.

Huyler was also charged
with shop breaking and
stealing at the G & G Ship-
ping Company.

It is alleged that between

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USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

“a

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July 7 and July 8, he broke
into the company at Shelly
Street and stole one Geo
Tracker Jeep, one genera-
tor, a safe, and $700, togeth-
er valued $9,300.

He was also charged with
dishonestly receiving the
items.

Huyler pleaded not guilty
to all the charges and the
matter was adjourned to
March 9, 2010. He was
granted $5,000 bail with one
or two sureties.



EMOTIONS run high at the
funeral of Brenton Smith, the
teenager who died after he was
accidentally killed in a shootout
between police and armed
robbers.

¢ SEE PAGE ONE

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!

AT PARTICIPATING STORES





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 3



0 In brief



Fisherman
ties while
diving for

(raps

A FISHERMAN}:
drowned while diving for }
traps off the coast of Salt }

Cay, near Paradise Island,
on Friday.

The man has not yet been
identified by police, and his }

age is not known.

Superintendent Elsworth ;
Moss in charge of the Crim- }
inal Detective Unit said the }
Harbour Patrol were called }
at around 3pm on Friday }
when the man did not sur- }

face.

He had gone under to }
retreive a fish trap around }
half a mile off the coast of }
Salt Cay, northeast of Par- }

adise Island.

A team of divers from the }
and }
Bahamas Air Sea Rescue }
(BASRA) recovered the }
man’s body from the sea

Defence Force

floor.

sau for an autopsy.

Masked men
rob Grand
Bahama
Pestaurant

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

GRAND Bahama
Police are investigating
an armed robbery on
Saturday evening.

Three masked armed
men stormed into the
Dolphin restaurant and
bar, on the airport road,
around 11.12pm and
demanded cash.

Nobody was hurt and
suspects got away with
an undetermined amount
of cash and several bot-
tles of liquors. Investiga-
tions continue.

FIREARM FOUND
POLICE were called

to a disturbance and fight

at the Hawksbill Yacht
Club around 11.43pm on
Saturday evening.

On arrival at the scene,
officers discovered a .40
pistol with two maga-
zines and two live rounds
of ammunition. No arrest
was made.

POLICE APPEAL

Police are appealing to
people to come forward
with information which
could assist them with
their investigation into
the armed robbery and
murder of businessman
Leslie Maycock.

Mr Maycock, 50, was
shot and robbed of cash
at his store in the Hawks-
bill on July 15. His death
is the sixth homicide for
the year on Grand
Bahama.

ie ee
Ut

ae i tay

Mal ara) |

He was brought to Nas-

NDP: crown land controversy shows
need for Freedom of Information Act

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE controversy sur-
rounding the abuse of crown
land grants highlights the
need for the Government to
implement a Freedom of
Information Act (FOIA),
claims the National Devel-
opment Party.

“Our government will nev-
er be seen as truly transpar-
ent unless and until this act is
brought into force,” said a
press release issued by the
party.

The NDP also questioned
the ability of Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham and Oppo-
sition Leader Perry Christie
to objectively investigate
their parts in the controver-
sial granting of Crown Land.

“We do not believe that
the two men who were ulti-
mately responsible for the
disposition of crown lands
since 1992, and who today
still sit as leaders of their
respective political parties,
can truly be objective in any
investigation of themselves,”
said the NDP.

The group is also calling



THE NDP questioned the ability of Hubert Ingraham (left) and Perry
Christie to objectively investigate their parts in the controversial

granting of Crown Land.

on the Government to allow
the media and the public
unfettered access into the
records of the Department
of Lands and Surveys for an
independent inquiry into the
debacle.

“We believe that the public
would be much better served
if members of the press were
given independent responsi-
bility for conducting a thor-
ough investigation into the
records related to the granti-
ng of crown lands, while per-
mitting our political leaders

to instead focus on the more
urgent matter of economic
recovery, diversification, and
strengthening”.

“Tf there is any select com-
mittee that should be formed
at this time, it should be one
that focuses on the current
economic crisis and the
future development of the
Bahamas,” said the NDP.

A committee - headed by
Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell -
was recently formed to inves-
tigate the disposition of all
publicly held lands in the

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after The Tribune’s extensive
reporting into the issue.

The NDP also wants to
know:

The names of all persons
who have applied for Crown
Land.

The purpose for which it
was applied.

The citizenship of each

country. It is expected to
make a report on its findings
in October.

This Lands Committee
was formed following a series
of Tribune exposes which
revealed claims of nepotism
and corruption in the Depart-
ment of Lands and Surveys.

Following these reports,
the former director of Lands application.

Tex Turnquest was forced to How many applications
resign from his post after The for crown land were
Tribune published allegations approved and how many
that members of his family, were denied.

including his mother-in-law, The price paid for the land
were granted crown land lots and whether the land was
on the island of Exuma. developed or not.

These beachfront lots,
which were sold at less than
$2,500 each, were flipped a
few years later for more than
$550,000 apiece. Mr Turn-
quest denied any connection
to any of the transactions.

A litany of other crown
land “abuses” were subse-
quently detailed in Parlia-
ment by the Prime Minister,

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune
at: letters@tribunemedia.net
or deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207









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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Jury selection: bad habits forming?

THIS WEEKEND a lawyer, who spends
a great deal of time around the courts,
expressed concern on behalf of some of his
colleagues about what they think might be
developing into a problem within the jury
system.

They don’t know whether the bailiffs are
having difficulty contacting jurors, or
whether jurors are being difficult about serv-
ing, but they do not like what they think
they see.

For example, said one, when a juror has
served on a murder case, he is excused from
jury duty for a year. However, last week in
the Dudley Moree murder trial, this partic-
ular lawyer counted at least three jurors who
he believed had already served the previ-
ous week on the Troyniko McNeil murder
trial.

Motree, 23, was on trial last week accused
of the murder of fellow mortician Dornell
Ferguson, 38. The jury returned a split ver-
dict — 6-6. The case was ordered back for
retrial.

As for Troyniko McNeil, 22, the jury
found him guilty, 8-4, of murdering well-
known handbag designer, Hal Taylor,
between November 17 and 18, 2007. That
case also will have to go back to a new jury
for retrial, because a murder verdict must be
unanimous. The 8-4 verdict resulted in a
hung jury. McNeil’s case ended about 10
days ago, just a few days before the Moree
case opened.

The lawyer considered that if what he
thought he saw was correct it would be most
irregular for a juror, who should be excused
from jury duty for a year after serving on a
murder case, should be serving on two mur-
der cases within the same court session.

In the old days, said one of the lawyers,
the head bailiff was usually a retired police
officer. He knew the jurors, he knew who
had biases and should not serve, particular-
ly on certain cases. Maybe, the lawyer spec-
ulated, these new bailiffs aren’t as familiar
with the jury pool, or maybe they are having
to use their own cars to go out to find these
people, and because of the personal expense
are recycling those jurors already in the court
room. This is a possible reason that they
might be using the same people, the lawyer
said.

“But we don’t want to start a system

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where we’re encouraging professional jurors,
who believe they know more than the
lawyers on the case, make up their minds
as to what happened and how the law should
be applied, and really approach the case
with a closed mind,” said the lawyer.

However, what he found most disturbing
was what looked to him like a bailiff sig-
nalling a defence attorney.

“Everytime a juror’s name was pulled, it
looked as though a bailiff tapped the defend-
ing attorney, who promptly challenged that
juror,” said the lawyer.

Another feature he found disturbing was
how some court clerks and bailiffs mingled
freely during adjournments with the family
of the accused, defence counsel and even
prosecutors.

The lawyer wanted to draw attention to
what he perceived as bad habits developing
before the system got out of hand and broke
down.

Almost half a century ago when we start-
ed out as a court reporter there were many
discussions on how to improve the jury sys-
tem.

In those days there was jury tampering.
We recall a certain gentleman who was a
fixture around the courts. He seemed to
have no special reason for being there. He
could almost be classified as a loiterer. But,
he acquired a reputation for jury tamper-
ing. The jury sat in a room to which someone
from the outside had easy access for con-
versation, or the passing of notes, through a
low-slung window. One day to try to test
this man’s purpose for hanging around the
courts, we asked him about what a particular
jury was thinking in a case that had been
“out” for some time.

He said to give him a few minutes, and he
would report back. We saw him head for
the window.

On his return, he reported that the jury
would soon be out, one juror was giving
trouble, but they were confident it was
“swinging” for the accused.

Sure enough, they were soon out, and so
was the accused.

Over the years jury tampering has been a
major problem.

If what the lawyer has told us is true, the
matter should be immediately investigated
and corrected.



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EDITOR, THE Tribune.

The Nassau Institute
recently attended the eco-
nomic conference “Freedom
Fest” in Las Vegas — billed as
the “World’s Largest Gather-
ing of Free Minds”.

One of the topics discussed
was the toxic effects of exces-
sive inflation, currency deval-
uation and poor economy
management. As a general
rule, the higher a country’s
budget deficit, governmental
borrowings and level of mon-
ey creation the greater down-
ward pressure on that coun-
try’s currency. Conversely, a
strong currency is a reflection
of a sound and productive
economy, and increases that
country’s buying power in
world markets.

At “Freedom Fest”, the
example of Zimbabwe was

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



given to represent the
extreme and toxic effects pos-
sible with poor economic
management.

Zimbabwe ruined their cur-
rency (and economy in the
process) through reckless
spending, excessive borrow-
ing and money creation. The
Zimbabwe Central Bank has
now begun to print official,
legal tender 100 Trillion Dol-
lar Notes!

At “Freedom Fest”, Steve
Forbes (CEO, Forbes Maga-
zine) held one of these 100
Trillion Dollar Notes and
related a simple analogy and
warning regarding Zimbab-
we’s economic path: “Thirty

years ago the Zimbabwe dol-
lar was pegged to the U.S. dol-
lar. If I would have had this
100 Trillion Dollar note 30
years ago, and it was legal ten-
der, I would have been able
to buy everything in the world
and had change! Now
through the manipulation of
the printing press and money
inflation, I can’t even go into
the lobby of this hotel and buy
a pack of chewing gum.”

To The Nassau Institute,
this is an extreme, but clear,
example and a lesson to
Bahamian policy makers to
run a sound economy with
balanced budgets, low taxa-
tion, minimal intervention
and appropriate levels of
money creation.

The Nassau Institute
Nassau,
July 20, 2009

Now is time to review how
judiciary appoints judges

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank you for publishing
my thoughts in your July 9th
edition. Further, thank you
for your response to same; it
is always good to receive a
different point of view
because it promotes good
discussion on issues of pub-
lic importance.

I would like to assure you
and your readers that before
submitting any written work,
I go through a process of
research and discussion
before I formulate and pub-
lish my opinions. With
regards to my thoughts on
the resignation of Sir Bur-
ton Hall, one of the many
reference materials I used
was a book called “The Law
and Legal System of The
Commonwealth of The
Bahamas” by Dr Dexter
Johnson.

In this book, Dr Johnson
was able to accomplish what
few lawyers can — explain
the legal system without the
use of the draconian lan-
guage that is custom within
that system and keeps many
lawyers employed. Simply
put, this book can be

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version of “Bahamian law
for Dummies” and I think
it’s a must read for readers
who would like a better
sense of how the legal sys-
tem is structured. It is num-
ber one on my best seller
list!

My last submission spoke
about Sir Burton’s poor
tenure in office more so than
how he and other members
are appointed, however, as a
result of his resignation, I
think now is the best time
for us to review how the
judiciary appoints judges
and the manner in which the
head of the judiciary is
appointed.

I will not go into the nuts
and bolts of how persons are
appointed in the judiciary; I
think your last response did
an excellent job, but I will
direct your readers to the
aforementioned book by Dr
Johnson should they need
more details on this subject.

As you rightly stated, jus-
tices are “appointed” by the
Governor General. This
appointment is nothing
more than a rubber stamp
due to the fact that the Gov-
ernor General, as “head of
State”, is also an appointed
position, more so politically
appointed! It cannot be right
that a head of state that is
responsible for signing laws
into existence and “appoint-
ing” members of the gov-

ernment’s agenda is bound-
ed by the political will of an
individual, the Prime Min-
ister, who essentially has
absolute power as the real
head of state — scary!

We the people should not
settle for a politically
appointed office to look
after our welfare; this is not
a transparent system — espe-
cially when it comes to the
appointment of individuals
whose job is to interpret law
and administer justice. I
would hope that your opine
to my thoughts is in no way
confirmation and acceptance
of the current system of how
our judiciary is appointed,
because it would go against
the mantra of your institu-
tion — Being Bound to
Swear to The Dogmas of No
Master.

In closing, I look forward
to the day when we will be
allowed to elect heads of the
judiciary and the day when
judges are subjected to pub-
lic vetting before being
appointed so that we the
people can get some insight
into their thinking and have
some level of comfort with
the final decision on why
their appointments were
approve or denied.

ERIC B STRACHAN
Nassau,
July, 2009.

4 B Ba Bahamas Business

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 5





By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

EDUCATION chiefs have
spoken out against a proposal
to raise money for schools
through the introduction of a
National Lottery made in the
Ten Year Education Plan.

Contrary to various news
articles, Minister of Education
Carl Bethel maintains he nev-
er affirmed his stance on the
issue during development of
the plan by technical officers in
communication with stake-
holders over the last 13
months.

The plan lists 22 goals, each
with short-term and long-term
objectives, aimed at improv-
ing education for students of
all ages throughout the
Bahamas.

But whether or not the plan
meets its objectives will
depend on receipt of sufficient
government funding. And the
cost has not yet been ascer-
tained as the team developing
the plan has yet to perform a
cost analysis for each goal.

And the idea of starting a
national lottery, or a national
tax, to fund the plan as sug-
gested in the blueprint devised
by a team of technical officers
has been ruled out by Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham as
well as the education minister.

Mr Bethel said: “The tech-
nical officers putting the plan
together wanted to raise all
kinds of issues.

“T think discussion is fine,
but when it comes to Cabinet
it will be a policy document of
the government, and it won’t
be possible for the government
to propose any funding like
that.”

The minister maintains it is
government’s responsibility to
fund education and the cost
should not be delegated.

Rosetta

St.



“If the
Bahamian
people want
gambling they
will have to
decide that on
its own merit
and not use
education as a
horse to ride
in on.”



Carl Bethel

He mentioned plans to use a
lottery system to fund educa-
tion implemented in the Unit-
ed States, which failed in its
attempts to fund education
through a lottery.

Mr Bethel said: “As far as
this government is concerned
and from my point of view the
lottery will not be a desirable
option.

“If the Bahamian people
want gambling they will have
to decide that on its own mer-
it and not use education as a
horse to ride in on.

“The Prime Minister has
already expressed as much,
and IJ feel the same way.

“T want to remind people
that there’s consistency in all
areas of the state and that is
reflected in what the Prime
Minister said and what I said
as minister.”

Mr Bethel said he hopes the
plan will be finalised by
December and implemented
by January, however Bahamas
Union of Teachers president

LOCAL NEWS

Minister against
national lottery
money for schools



Belinda Wilson has said at
least another year of extensive
background work is needed in
order for the programme to
be successful.

e SEE YOUNG MAN’S
VIEW ON PAGE EIGHT

“YOUR VIEW?

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune
at: letters@tribunemedia.net
or deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207

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Widow of Jamaica’s first premier dies

KINGSTON, Jamaica "Lady B," as she was known, married
Alexander Bustamante in 1963, one year
after Jamaica was granted independence
from Britain.

Her husband was named a national
hero, an honor bestowed to a select few
including black civil rights leader Marcus
Garvey.

Gladys Bustamante continued to work
for the Jamaica Labor Party long after her
husband died in 1977 at age 93.

GLADYS BUSTAMANTE, the widow
of Jamaica's first prime minister and a
fierce supporter of women's and workers’
rights, has died, according to Associated
Press. She was 97.

A statement from the office of Prime
Minister Bruce Golding says Bustamante
died Saturday at the hospital after suffering
from a fever.



















































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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009



LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



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Rowland will grace the
stage along with the huge
list of international beauties
at the pageant.

Billy Bush, co-anchor of
“Access Hollywood” and
Claudia Jordan of “Celebri-
ty Apprentice” and “Deal
or No Deal,” will host the
competition live from
Atlantis, Paradise Island, on
August 23 at 9pm on NBC
and Telemundo.

International superstar
Flo Rida will perform his
hugely successful hit, “Right
Round” and “Jump” as part
of a two song medley during
the Swimsuit Competition
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with his blockbuster debut
album, “Mail on Sunday.”

Flo Rida’s single “Right
Round,” from his new
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selling digital song ever,
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Included in the show will
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featuring her single “Turn
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Venezuelan Dayana Men-
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will crown her successor at
the conclusion of the 2009
Miss Universe telecast. Dur-
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elled the globe as an advo-
cate for HIV/AIDS educa-
tion, research and legisla-
tion. The newly crowned
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By DENISE
MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

THREE men have
been charged with
armed robbery and
firearm possession.

Charles Miller, 28, of
Yorkshire Drive, Rey-
nard Fulford, 22, of
Hanna Hill, Eight Mile
Rock, and Dougaye
Huyler appeared
before Deputy Chief
Magistrate Helen
Jones.

They were charged
with armed robbery,
possession of an unli-
censed firearm while
committing an
indictable offence, and
conspiracy to commit
armed robbery.

It is alleged that on
July 19, the accused
robbed Kevin McPhee
of a leather wallet and
$300.

The men are also
charged with the armed
robbery of Nolan
McKenzie on July 20. It
is alleged they robbed
McKenzie of a maroon
coloured Oldsmobile
licensed while armed
with a handgun.

They are also
charged with causing
harm to McKenzie.

Miller, Fulford and
Huyler were also
charged with posses-
sion of unlicensed
firearm and ammuni-
tion on July 20.

It is alleged that the
men were found in pos-
session of a black Lla-
ma .45 mm pistol and
five live rounds of .45
bullets.

The men pleaded not
guilty to the charge.

In a separate matter,
Fulford was charged
with armed robbery of
Fabian Sears on July
20.

It is alleged that he
robbed Sears of three
outboard Yamaha
engines, a white 1996
Truck, a Motorola cel-
lular phone, together
valued at $35,947.30,
the property of Marine
Land and Industry.

The men were
denied bail and
remanded to Fox Hill
Prison until October 1,
2009 for preliminary

inquiry.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 7



Facing financial challenges in
the Caribbean’s smaller states
insight

By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)

AS the member countries
of the Organisation of East-
ern Caribbean States
(OECS) work toward the
establishment of an Eco-
nomic Union amongst them-
selves amid grave economic
circumstances, all of them
should even now be consid-
ering initiatives that would
cut costs while making poli-
cy making and implementa-
tion more cohesive.

Now that’s a long sen-
tence to swallow and its pre-
cise meaning may be
unclear. So, spelling out the
concept is important for clar-
ity.

Starting with the eco-
nomic circumstances of these
countries, six of them are
independent nations; the
other member is Montserrat
which remains a British
colony. The six are among
the most heavily indebted
nations, per capita, in the
world. Their ratio of debt to
gross domestic product
ranges from between 95 per
cent to 120 per cent. This
means that, after servicing
debt, they don’t have a great
deal left over to play with.
The space for policy options,
therefore, is limited if not
non-existent.

Assistance

Five of them have sought
assistance from programmes
introduced by the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund (IMF)
to help countries cope with
the consequences of the pre-
sent difficult global financial
crisis.

St Lucia, St Vincent and
the Grenadines and Domini-
ca have each signed up to
the IMF’s Exogenous
Shocks Facility, St Kitts-
Nevis has arrangements
under the IMF’s Emergency
Assistance for Natural Dis-
asters programme, and
Grenada is receiving help to
address poverty as part of
the IMF’s Poverty Reduc-
tion Strategy Papers. The
Minister of Finance of the
sixth OECS member coun-
try, Antigua and Barbuda,
has indicated that his gov-
ernment will also soon have
to approach the IMF for
help given the economic dif-
ficulties being faced.

Each of these countries
may have to go beyond the
present IMF windows from
which some are getting assis-
tance into a full IMF pro-
gramme. They have been
talking of doing so collec-
tively, and the IMF should
accommodate such an
approach. While each coun-
try will have needs that differ
in some ways, and the mea-
sures to address them would
also be different, the funda-
mental problems are not dis-
similar and an overall strat-
egy with national compo-
nents could be devised.

The IMF should also
recognise that, with the best
will in the world, the OECS
member countries, individ-
ually, lack the capacity to
negotiate terms effectively.
A joint team drawn from the
best of each of the countries,
supported by national min-
istries of finance, would
make for a more effective
negotiation and an outcome
that the IMF and the coun-
tries could stand behind.

This is just one example
of what the member coun-
tries of the OECS could do
now ahead of the creation
of their Economic Union
which becomes increasingly
imperative for each of them.

But there are other areas.
A crucial one — and one
which should be addressed
urgently — is the setting-up
two sets of joint regulators: a
joint regulator for all banks,
and a joint regulator for non-
bank financial institutions
such as insurance companies.

Recent events in the off-
shore banking sector in
Antigua and Barbuda and
St Vincent and _ the

WORLD VIEW

Grenadines, where the oper-
ations of offshore banks in
both counties have led to
allegations of Ponzi Schemes
and investors being defraud-
ed, suggest the need for
more efficient regulation by
drawing on the best talents
and experience of the entire
area to form a single, joint
regulator.

The Eastern Caribbean
Central (ECCB) already
regulates the on-shore bank-
ing sector of the Eastern
Caribbean Currency Union
countries of which the
OECS members are a part.
A strengthened ECCB could
be given the task of regulat-
ing the offshore banking sec-
tor as well. This would elim-
inate the present national
regulation that ranges in
individual countries from a
statutory body under the
control of the Minister of
Finance to regulation by the
Minister alone.

In placing the regulation
of all offshore banks in
OECS countries under the
ECCB would not only cut
national costs, it would make
for more credible and effec-
tive regulation of the off-
shore banking sector. Mul-
ti-national watchdog organi-
sations, such as the Finan-
cial Action Task Force and
the Organisation for Eco-
nomic Cooperation and



Development (OECD),
would also be more com-
fortable with a joint regional
regulator that has a longer
arms-length relationship
with institutions in individ-
ual countries. So, too, would
commercial banks interna-
tionally which provide cor-
respondent relationships for
banks in the OECS.

Initiatives

The British international
publication, The Economist,
recently reported that, in
light of the financial crisis
which occurred in the Unit-
ed States and the United
Kingdom because of weak
regulation of banks,
“Britain’s Conservative Par-
ty, likely to form the next
government, wants the Bank
of England to be in charge
not just of interest rates, but
also the two big tasks of reg-
ulation: guarding the over-
all system’s stability and the
“micro” supervision of indi-
vidual firms.” So the idea is
not out of sync with initia-
tives in other parts of the
world.

The OECS should also
consider a joint regulator for
non-bank financial institu-
tions. Effective regulation
of this sector is lacking
throughout the region. But,

SIR RONALD SANDERS



cross-border transactions
involving two Insurance
companies, CLICO and
British American, that have
hurt some investors and are
likely to cause more prob-
lems in the coming months,
also support the need for
such a joint regulator.

When the OECS was
formed in 1981, joint over-
seas representation was one
of the objectives it wished to
achieve. As it turned out, it
has only achieved it in Cana-
da where the member coun-
tries have a joint mission
and, in a tenuous way, at the
World Trade Organization
(WTO) in Geneva. Yet, indi-
vidual overseas missions
have been a high cost in the
implementation of the for-
eign policy of member states
even though, with few excep-
tions, more has been
achieved in the international
community when Caribbean
countries have acted collec-
tively than when they have
acted alone.

A strong joint mission at
the WTO and in Brussels,
where the headquarters of
the European Commission
is located, is becoming more
important every day for the
members of the OECS as
rules on trade and invest-
ment are created that direct-
ly affect the livelihood of
these countries. Individual
small countries with very
limited resources, lack the
capacity for effective repre-
sentation; they have a bet-

ter chance drawing on their
collective pool.

So, even as the small
member countries of the
OECS look toward the for-
mation of an Economic
Union, there are practical
steps that could be taken
now to cut costs and estab-
lish effective machinery to
address some of their chal-
lenges.

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The government, the
church and gambling

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

TODAY, there is a consid-
erable body of opinion sup-
porting the passage of legisla-
tion that legalises the partici-
pation of Bahamians in the var-
ious forms of gambling. Over
the years, consecutive govern-
ments have lacked the political
will to listen to the voices of
the electorate, instead choos-
ing to pander to some of the
country’s clergy and their arm
twisting for fear of losing votes.

Neither government nor the
church should interfere with the
public’s right to spend their dis-
posable income in the way that
they would wish to. How can
the church or politicians tell
grown men and women what
to do with their discretionary
income, so long as it does not
infringe upon the rights of oth-
er citizens?

It would be prudent for the
government to legalize what
has become an innate practice
for Bahamians.

In April, 1990, the Pindling

YOUNG MAN’S VIEW

ADRIAN

administration had the gravitas
to table a Bill in the House of
Assembly that called for the
establishment of a national lot-
tery board. However, by Sep-
tember 1990, after a substan-
tial public outcry from the reli-
gious sector, plans for a nation-
al lottery were shelved.

Just recently, it was suggest-
ed that a national lottery be
established to fund the govern-
ment’s 10-year plan for educa-
tion.

However, immediately fol-
lowing this announcement, a
small group of churches
expressed opposition in a state-
ment referring to it as “catering
to chance” and “undermining
the very lofty ideals and spirit
of discipline that the Ministry of
Education (MOE) is trying to
inculcate in the youth of our

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nation and, in fact, actually help
to create a cycle of the very
adverse social ad moral cor-
ruption it is trying to prevent.

“Presently, the average busi-
nessman is complaining about
the difficulty of finding people
to hire who can do basic math.
Imagine therefore what further
legislation of gambling will do
to the mindset of an emerging
work force that even now is
viewed as incompetent,
unskilled and undisciplined in
many quarters.

Following this, Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham publicly
stated that the MOE jumped
the gun on the national lottery
issue.

In an interview with me, Sid-
ney Strachan, chairman of the
Bahamas Gaming Reform com-
mittee, responded to the
church, saying:

“The church has a responsi-
bility to their parishioners and
when they step outside of that,
they risk the chance of becom-
ing political. I don’t see any
scriptural procedure that says
that gambling is illegal. If you
think about it, dice was thrown
in the Bible for religious pur-
poses. The church’s authority
on issues should be the Bible. I
don’t think the church should
take their personal dogmas and
ideologies and try to force them
on the general public.

He went on to say: “Their
argument is baseless and if the
church is talking about social
and moral obligations, saying
our people are lazy, then they
should share in the blame for
their idea of the degradation of
society. There are more
Bahamians doing positive
things than negative. I believe
strongly in the 90/10 rule. Nine-
ty per cent of the problems are
caused by 10 per cent of the
people. I don’t subscribe to the
idea that we are incompetent,
unskilled and undisciplined. If

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that is so, then the majority of
church people are the same,
and the church should be
ashamed because they would
have failed the people.”

Mr Strachan also suggested
that the church play a role in
ensuring that if Bahamians are
allowed to gamble legally “the
gaming practices are transpar-
ent, properly policed and that
guidelines and safety nets are in
place.

According to the FNM’s
2007 Manifesto (A Matter of
Trust), they would appoint a
full-time Law Reform Com-
missioner who would be
required to “undertake a
review of all laws enacted in
the Bahamas prior to 1973 to
determine whether they ought
to be repealed or amended to
reflect the needs of a 21st cen-
tury Bahamas.” The Lotteries
and Gaming Act should be one
of them.

The Lotteries and Gaming
Act chapter 387 is unaccept-
able because it allows for a
form of discrimination against
the citizens/residents of the
Bahamas, where one group of
people is prohibited from gam-
bling, while another group
(tourists) is permitted to.

A national lottery and the
taxation of gaming houses can
make up budgetary shortfalls,
create supplementary funds for
infrastructural and human
development and even fund
college scholarships and pre-
kindergarten programmes.

We have all heard of the
many police raids, arrests, con-

SS

fiscation of equipment and per-
sons hauled before the courts
because they violated the Lot-
teries and Gaming Act. Obvi-
ously, this has not been a deter-
rent to these activities and the
efforts of the police could be
focused on preventing and com-
bating serious crimes.

Frankly, the police’s activi-
ties are almost in vain since cer-
tain operators of numbers
house fund political conven-
tions, electoral campaigns, sup-
port beauty pageant contes-
tants, advertise in law enforce-
ment handbooks and other
publications, support the pet
projects and initiatives of cer-
tain politicians!

It is not the number houses
that are ripping humongous
holes into the wallets of
Bahamians, but instead it is 90
per cent of the churchmen and
so-called pastors, particularly
those on New Providence, who
are waging a holy war to empty
the pockets of their parish-
ioners/consumers. The church
can hardly be credited for pro-
viding a moral or ethical foun-
dation for this country!
Frankly, some church leaders
show little to no interest in
assisting people in their com-
munities or in converting sin-
ners and helping to save souls.

Real pastors to go to the
people, particularly since the
majority of Bahamians do not
go to those large edifices that
many crass church leaders fool-
ishly assume is representative
of the true church! Real pas-
tors go to the highways and

byways to meet the people in
their comfort zones and speak
to them at their level.

However, I’m told that
many of today's highfaluting
pastors don’t even want to be
seen mixing with these types of
people—the poor and down-
trodden. Every now and again,
I see persons preaching on
street corners—but most of
them, sometimes rightly, are
viewed as crazy.

The Bible does not specifi-
cally condemn gambling, bet-
ting or the lottery. In fact, at
no point in the Bible is the
word “gambling” used nor does
the Bible give any direct guid-
ance on whether gambling is
right or wrong!

Archaeological and histori-
cal evidence shows that dice
playing and other forms of
gambling were practised in Bib-
lical times.

In Leviticus 16:8-10, Aaron
cast lots to determine which of
the two goats would be used
for the sin offering, and which
would become the scapegoat.
Joshua 18:1-6 records that lots
were cast to determine the dis-
tribution of land between the
twelve tribes of Israel. In the
book of Nehemiah, lots were
cast to determine who would
live inside the walls of
Jerusalem and who wouldn’t.
In Jonah 1:7, the sailors cast
lots to determine the course of
action concerning Jonah. In
Acts 1:21-26, lots were cast to
replace Judas with Matthias
and after Jesus was crucified,
the Roman soldiers cast lots to
see who would get Jesus’ cloth-
ing (Matthew 27:35, Mark
15:24, Luke 23:34, John 19:24).

The Bahamas is not the Vat-
ican, so why are some churches
attempting to selfishly dictate
to, and control, the country’s
political apparatus? Instead of
singing hosannas, having hap-
py-clappy rituals and hand-
holding in the comfort of large
edifices, church leaders should
take to the streets and accept
the Bahamian people’s verdict
on gambling—whatever that

SEE page 10

PUBLIC NOTICE

Request for Proposals to
act as Registrar of the new
Utilities Appeal Tribunal

In preparation for the enactment of the new Utilities Appeal Tribu-

nal Bill, 2007, ("the Bill") the Committee for the Privatisation of The

Bahamas Telecarmunications Company Ltd. ("the Cormrmmitiee"|

is seeking proposals for the role of Registrar as defined in the Bill.

The Utilities Appeal Tribunal (“the Tribunal") will be established to

settle disputes ansing in the communications sector under the

new Communications Act, 2007 ance it comes into farce.

It is the

intention fa outsource the role of fhe Registrar of the Tribunal

(“Regstrar’] to an independent organisation.

The Committee is pleased to invile the submission of proposals to

act as Registrar fram suitably qualified organisations. Capies of
fhe request for proposal [“RFP") document may be downloaded

fram the Government's website at www.bahamas.goyv.bs or the

privatisation website at www. bteprivatisation.com.

Submissions must be made by Som, July 31, 2009 in the manner

outlined in the RFP documents. The prefered bidder will be in-

farmed no later than August 7, 200%.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 9



Bahamas real
estate today

Carmen Massoni



MOVE OF A.

LIFETIME

IF YOWRE in your
fifties, sixties or beyond,
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2009 MISS TEEN USA PAGEANT

For the Second Year Atlantis, Paradise Island will host the 2009 Miss Teen USA Pageant
showcasing the beauty and grace of the most talented teenagers across the United States.

WELCOME RECEPTION

Tuesday, July 28th, 7:00pm - 9:00pm, Atlantis, Paradise Island

Opening cocktail party where guests can mingle with contestants and supporters.
Ticket price includes food with carving station, appetizers, desserts, and other gourmet

Colombian Ambassador gives
his support to crime fight

COLOMBIAN Ambas-
sador Ventura Emilio Diaz-
Mejia pledged his support in
the Bahamas’ mission to over-
come drug trafficking and
crime during a visit to Gov-
ernment House.

Governor General Arthur
Hanna had asked the Repub-
lic of Colombia for support in
a number of United Nations
initiatives as both countries
seek to strengthen diplomatic
relations.

The Bahamas wants Colom-
bia to support its candidacies
to the United Nations’ Eco-
nomic and Social Council; the
Council of the International
Maritime Organisation, cate-
gory C; and Presidency of the
35th General Conference of
the United Nations Educa-
tional, Scientific and Cultural
Organisation.

Mr Hanna acknowledged
how both the Bahamas and
Columbia share a “wide base
of linkages founded on com-
mon interests”, and the diplo-
matic relations that have fol-
lowed “consolidated the con-
tinued common understand-
ing”.

The governor general also
told Mr Diaz-Mejia how the
initiatives could help him fulfill
his personal pledge to increase
the relations of both countries
and overcome illegal drug traf-
ficking and crime.

He said: “The Bahamas, as
has the rest of the word, but
particularly the Caribbean
nations, has taken keen note of
your country’s proactive
engagement in the well-being
of the governments and peo-
ples that comprise the Asso-
ciation of Caribbean States, as
a result of the reform initia-
tives Colombia is actively seek-
ing to implement in that body.

“The Bahamas values the
cordial relations between our
two countries and looks for-
ward to the deepening and the
diversification of our relation-
ship.”

Mr Diaz Mejia commented



samplings from Atlantis restaurants. Cash bar available.

Welcome Reception Tickets: Adults: $35, Kids under 12: $15 (Price inclusive of gratuity).

PRESENTATION SHOW

Thursday, July 30th, 8:00pm, Atlantis, Paradise Island

Watch all fifty one contestants compete in the Swimsuit and

Evening Gown competitions to secure their spot in the Final Show.

Presentation Show Tickets: General: $30, Reserved: $40

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Call Atlantis Box Office for ticket information at 363-6601

Friday, July 31st, 8:00pm, Atlantis, Paradise Island
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Final Show Tickets: General: $50, Reserved: $75

on how the two countries have
maintained excellent relations
in all areas, with mutual
respect, and how he hopes
such relations will be
increased.

The ambassador said:
“Colombia will make every
possible effort to give to your
government the required sup-
port in vital areas as it has
occurred in the past.

“Tam convinced that in the
future these will be broadened.

“Be sure that loyalty,
respect, and sincerity will
remain principles and essen-
tial values of our cordial rela-
tions.”





























Derek Smith/BIS

GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur
Hanna (left) accepts Letters of
Credence from Ventura Emilio
Diaz-Mejia, as Ambassador of
the Republic of Colombia, at
Government House, July 23.

staan Ingraham/B

7



Se) - fw
EMILIO DIAZ-MEJIA, Ambassador of the Republic of Colombia, paid a courtesy call on Minister of Foreign Affairs, Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symontte,
July 22. Pictured from left are Andrew McKinney, Chief of Protocol: Carlos Gonzalez, Director, Colombian Government of Trade Bureau, Caribbean Office in
Miami, Florida; Ambassador Diaz-Mejia; Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette; Dr Patricia Rodgers, Permanent Secretary;
Joshua Sears, Director General, Ministry of Foreign Affairs; and Janeen McCartney, undersecretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

S



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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





BACK*TO*SCHOOL

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KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

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A Funeral Service For

PETER
O'BRIEN

will be held on Saturday,
Ist August, 2009 at
10:00a.m. at graveside,
Western Cemetery, Nassau
Street.

Reverend Charles A.
Sweeting will officiate.

Peter Allan O'Brien, 56, aka "Captain Pete" or
“Peter Pan”, passed away 21st May, 2009 in Munroe,
North Carolina, after suffering a heart attack, Peter
was predeceased by his parents, Mr. & Mrs. Gordon
©'Brien who founded the Stapledon School for Peter
and others like him, Peter was also predeceased by
his brothers, Andrew and Patrick O'Brien and is
survived by his sisters, Helen Garcia and Mary Ann
Jones; brothers, Michael and Jimmy O'Brien; brothers
in-law, Victor Jones and Jose Garcia; sister-in-law,
Roslyn O'Brien; many loving nieces, nephews and
friends who, as children, grew up under his watchful
eye as be shared his toys with them.

These past 17 years Peter lived in Munroe, North
Carolina at the Karen Lane Group Home but spent
Christmases and summer holidays with family in
Nassau or with his sister Helen or brothers Pat and
Jimmy Stateside, “Captain Pete" would not visit Nassau
without an adventure to Ft. Charlotte and the Pirate
Museurn.

After his mother and brother Pat passed away, Sue
Payne of Indian Trail, North Carolina became his
guardian in North Carolina. Sue loved, cared for and
looked after Peter's needs when his family could not
be there, Karen Lane became Peter's second "home"
and the staff, his "family" there.

Our "Peter Pan" can surely fly now.

In liew of flowers donations may be made to the
Stapledon School, P.O, Box N, 3913, Nassau or Special
Olympics, P.O. Box §.8. 19036, Nassau in memory
of Peter O'Brien.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.



28 now infected
with swine flu

FROM page one

about the spread of the dis-
ease.

But without the latest fig-
ures at hand yesterday, Dr
Minnis said he is “almost cer-
tain” there are 28 or 29 infect-
ed confirmed cases in the
Bahamas today.

He said: “I am not certain
where all the cases are, but I
know some are in Nassau, and
some are in the other islands.

“We will continue to moni-
tor the situation and update
the public weekly.”

Fears over the disease were
heightened as it has claimed
the lives of hundreds as it
spread from where it is
believed to have originated in
Mexico around the world
since April this year.

The World Health Organi-
sation declared H1N1 a pan-

DR HUBERT MINNIS



demic in May, confirming
widespread human infection.

But Dr Minnis said with the
development of medication,
and no deaths yet in the
Bahamas, he hopes to dispel
irrational fears.

Daughter of murder victim
‘not arrested’ say police

FROM page one

Saturday, July 4.

Police estimate she had been dead for around two months
before her body was discovered.

Ms Garrison, 33, of West Palm Beach, Florida, had been
reported missing on February 25 by the United States
Embassy in Nassau. Diplomats said she may have been in
the company of a Bahamian man.

Police are still awaiting the results of an autopsy to find
out how she died.

In the week after her body was found, Zyndall McKinney,
22, of Isabella Boulevard, Nassau, was arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court and charged with intentionally causing Ms
Garrison’s death between Sunday, February 25, and Sat-
urday, July 4, 2009, while being concerned with another.

Anna Pugh is said to have been McKinney’s girlfriend
and to have lived with him in the Bahamas. Also known as
Madison Sweeting and Madision McKinney, Anna is
thought to have left the Bahamas for the United States
sometime after her mother’s death.

Reports over the weekend claimed she was being shel-
tered by her father and other people in the Pennsylvania
area, and is being questioned in connection with Ms Gar-
rison’s murder by officers in the Pennsylvania State Police
Department.

But the FBI told an ABC news affilate in West Palm
Beach, Florida, on Saturday that Pugh had not been arrest-
ed.

Pennsylvania Police have also yet to confirm an arrest has
been made, and Superintendent Elsworth Moss, in charge
of the Royal Bahamas Police Force Criminal Detective
Unit, said he has not been made aware of any such arrest.

Mr Moss said: “I have no knowledge of that. We have
been in touch with Pennsylvania and we are trying to work
with the Pennsylvania police, but I don’t have any infor-
mation regarding her being arrested.”

A preliminary inquiry into the murder of Ms Garrison is
scheduled to begin in Nassau on October 26.

The minister said: “It is still
a concern in that it’s flu, but
they’re testing the vaccina-
tions now, so I’m sure once
the vaccinations have been
cleared we will be able to deal
with it properly.

“We have sufficient med-
ication so that should not be a
fear, but we are keeping it to
only be used when necessary.

“We are not going to give
medication to people unless
it is absolutely necessary,
because if we give it out as a
provision the organism will
become resistant by the time
the patient develops a a seri-
ous infection.”

The Ministry of Health
advises everyone to continue
to follow influenza preventa-
tive measures to ensure pro-
tection of individuals, fami-
lies and communities.

Health officials maintain:

“These precautionary mea-
sures include covering your
nose and mouth with a tissue
when you cough or sneeze,
disposing of the tissue in the
trash after use, along with fre-
quent hand washing with soap
and water.

“Additionally, if you are
experiencing flu like symp-
toms, to decrease the poten-
tial spread, avoid contact with
others, and stay away from
group settings.”

For further information
persons may contact the fol-
lowing hotlines:

From 9am to 6pm, Mon-
day through Friday, call: (242)
502-4790 or 502-4728.

And from 6pm to 9am, or
on weekends, call: (242) 502-
7811, 502-7812 or 502-7855.

For a weekly update on
swine flu in the Bahamas log
on to: www.bahamas.gov.bs.

Boys who went missing
on Andros still in hospital

FROM page one

Ms Clarke said she does not
know when they will be
released from hospital.

The boys miraculously sur-
vived more than a month
stuck in a hole surrounded by
the dense Andros coppice sto-
ry, sustaining themselves on
wild coco-plums and rainwa-
ter, they claimed after they
were discovered.

Deangelo Clarke, nine, and
Marcell Clarke-Sylverin, six,
went missing from their
grandmother’s house in the
remote settlement of Smith’s
Hill on June 9. The boys had
left the house to hunt for
crabs around 6pm and were
never heard from again.

A police search of the area
where the boys disappeared
proved fruitless and was later
called off. More than a month
later the brothers were sight-
ed by a female relative as they
walked in the nearby settle-
ment of Kemp’s Bay.

The two appeared severely
dehydrated and malnourished
and were rushed to hospital
in Nassau.

Although there was wide-
spread jubilation over their
return, some scepticism has
emerged surrounding the
boys’ account of their ordeal.
Some have questioned how

two young boys could have
survived so long on their own
while others wonder if some-
thing more sinister was afoot.

Marcell has apparently
claimed that an old man visit-
ed the two while they were
stuck in the hole —- a man
dressed in black, with pale
hands, whose face he never
saw.

The man, who Marcell
believes was the grandfather
who died when he was an
infant, fed Marcell the food
of his dreams — pizza, water-
melon, macaroni — and when
he went to wake his brother
to join the feast, ‘Pa’ stopped
him.

He had cared for him and
washed his back, but never
hurt him, said Marcell’s
father, Marcellian Sylverin.

And Deangelo never saw
the man, it was claimed.

The boys told family that
on the day of their escape
from the hole, they noticed a
tree for the first time and
were able to shimmy up its
bark and out of the crevice.

At last report, police had
not yet interviewed the boys.

Yesterday, head of the
Central Detective Unit Super-
intendent Elsworth Moss said
officers would take a state-
ment from the pair once they
are released from hospital.

Government, church and gambling

FROM page eight

may be.

Whatever happened to those street
revivals, where pastors and their congrega-
tions would go into neighbourhoods, pitch
a tent and invite the residents to a few days
of services where Biblical teachings are rein-
forced and new souls are saved?

The church should begin to pursue a
more spiritual mission as it is missing the
opportunity to be an oasis for the people.

If the church wishes to talk about a
wastage of money, we must recognize that
people waste money on all sorts of activities.
Gambling is no more or less of a waste of
money than buying that expensive “Sun-
day outfit,” seeing a movie (in many cases),
purchasing an insignificant item such as
those alligator skin shoes I see some pastors
wearing or that church hat for $350. In many
instances, people work for the money they
gamble with.

Why wouldn’t these churchmen speak to
the loss of humility among clergymen? Why

wouldn’t they step up and address the
notion that many pastors are nothing more
than "pimps in the pulpit”? How can it be
that there is a proliferation of churches in
the Bahamas—the largest per capita in the
world—and there is little to no impact on
the moral health of the country—violent
crimes, political scandals and nationwide
immoral behaviour? When would the
church promote the idea of financial audits,
particularly since so many pastors are
immersed—from their hands to their
elbows—in the cookie jar? Why don’t they
talk dat?

Surely, the church doesn’t refuse to take
money from its members that work in the
casinos! Churchmen must realize that every
church raffle is a form of gambling!

No government or entity should be
allowed to legislate personal morality—it
would be a diminishment of our personal
freedoms. The church should know that we
live in a democracy not a theocracy, and
that means freedom of choice! Religion
and politics should always be separated. In
the Bahamas, the wall separating church

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and state seems to be non existent.

The church seems to cherry pick what
issues it’s going to object to, choosing to
crusade against selected issues just to appear
to be doing their job, when there’s a myriad
of pressing issues confronting our society.
Where is the church on matters such as
sweethearting, even in the church? There
are many issues confronting our society that
the church has overlooked, such as: pae-
dophilia; incest; the need for prison reform
and the treatment of petty criminals who are
treated like animals and thereby turned
into savages. Where is the church when
fraud is perpetrated on consumers by some
highly irresponsible church folk who sell
goods they claim can cure cancer,
HIV/AIDS and resurrect the dead?

Christianity is supposed to be a religion
about conscience, especially since souls can
only be saved through people making that
decision for themselves. Although the
church, may wish to stop persons from
doing as they wish or from pursuing their
desires by seeking social control, choices
must be individually made.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 11



Police seeking
to question
driver of out of |
control jitney
FROM page one i

“T know that police
were seeking to do so, to
question him,” Mr Miller
said yesterday, adding i
that officers were still try- ;
ing to determine the
cause of the crash.

The incident occurred
shortly after 8am on Fri-
day when the Clarkes ser- }
vice bus, which follows
the Number 21 route,
reportedly lost its breaks
on Government Hill
before careening down
Cumberland Street, on to
Bay Street.

The bus then reported-
ly sped on to the narrow
side-street leading to
Woodes Rodgers Walk
and appeared to be head-
ing towards the nearby
harbour.

Eyewitnesses told The
Tribune that passengers,
fearing for their lives,
jumped from the win-
dows of the out-of-con-
trol bus as it sped down
the hill.

Two passengers on the
bus were taken to hospi-
tal for treatment.

Their condition is not
known.

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ALITTLE infant being taken care of shortly after the arrival at the
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apprehended in the Exuma Chain shortly after 9:00am.



on Sunday afternoon.

SOME OF the Haitian migrants onboard HMBS P-49, as they arrive at the Defence Force Base

RBDF Photos/Petty Officer Jonathan Rolle :



More than 60 Haitian
migrants apprehended

FROM page one

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



A a

Australia
take heart
from win at

Australia left Northamp-
ton with a heartening vic-
tory, but concern for the
well-being of would-be
strike bowler Mitchell
Johnson. His solitary tail-
end wicket for 107 runs in
18.1 overs at Wantage
Road cast doubt over
whether he will feature at
allin the third Test.

Meanwhile, Englands
Ashes Test success at
Lord's provided the selec-
tors with the luxury of
sticking close to a winning
formula when they
announced their squad for
Edgbaston.

Tan Bell was retained
without extra batting cover
to replace the injured
Kevin Pietersen and Steve
Harmison provided the
pace-bowling contingency
plan should Andrew
Flintoff's knee fail him.

England's 13-man squad
also contains Monty Pane-
sar as an extra spin option.

AUSTRALIA’ $ Stuart Clarke | in action during the tour
match at the County Ground, Northampton, England

Saturday July 25, 2009.

David Jones/AP Photo/PA Wire



Inter Milan top rival AG Milan 2-0

By JIMMY GOLEN
AP Sports Writer
FOXBOROUGH, Mass.

Diego Milito scored twice
to lead Inter Milan to a 2-0
victory over AC Milan on
Sunday in an exhibition that
was just the third match the
bitter intracity rivals have
ever played outside Italy.

The crowd of 42,531 leaned
heavily toward AC Milan, and
they were quieted in the
fourth minute when Milito
chased the ball down to the
left of the goal and left-footed
it between the goalkeeper
Zeljko Kalac and the near
post. He gave Inter a 2-0 lead
in the 75th minute on a 2-on-
1 break with Amantino
Mancini, who drew the
defender and passed to Milito
for the shot that bounced off
and over the keeper into the
net. The clubs that share a
home in foggy San Siro had
met outside Italy only twice:
in Chiasso, Switzerland, in
1908 and at Yankee Stadium
in 1969. But they came to the
United States as part of an

exhibition tournament known
as the World Football Clas-
sic.

Inter star Zlatan Ibrahi-
movic was not with the team;
he is expected in Barcelona
on Monday for a physical that
would complete the deal that
would send striker Samuel
Eto’o and midfielder Alek-
sandr Hleb to the Italian
champions.

Milan and Chelsea sold out
the 71,000-seat home stadium
of the NFL’s Baltimore
Ravens on Friday night. But
Sunday’s match on a warm
New England afternoon was
played with the upper deck
half-closed and the lower
bowl empty at one end
because the seats were
obstructed by the enormous
stage for Tuesday night’s
AC/DC concert. (Also
obstructed was the press box,
forcing the media to be relo-
cated into luxury suites.)

Sunday’s crowd wasn’t con-
cerned about the headbang-
ing of AC/DC as much as the
head-passing of AC Milan,
though. And the home stadi-

um of NFL genius Bill
Belichick, who guided the
New England Patriots to an
18-0 record before losing the
2008 Super Bowl, proved to
be a fitting host for Inter
coach Jose Mourinho, the
self-proclaimed “Special
One” who helped Inter win a
fourth straight Italian Serie A
title before losing in the first
knockout round of the Cham-
pions League.

Although the rivalry
between the teams has been
bitter, there was little ani-
mosity for the friendly and
even a few smiles — and
gasps from the crowd — when
referee Jorge Gonzalez held
up a red card for Milan’s
Ronaldinho in the 34th
minute but quickly realized
his mistake and replaced it
with a yellow one.

Inter was rarely tested,
though Julio Cesar made a
pair of tough saves at around
the 70th minute, when it was
still 1-0, and another on
Alessandro Nesta in stoppage
time, just before the final
whistle.

Ronaldo makes low-key Madrid home debut

MADRID, Spain

Cristiano Ronaldo produced only glimpses
of his talent during his home debut for Real
Madrid in a 1-1 draw with Al Ittihad on Sun-
day, according to Associated Press.

Ronaldo was substituted by Gonzalo
Higuain in the 66th minute, immediately after
Hicham Aboucherouane equalized for the
Saudi Arabian champions in the Peace Cup.

ran

Raul Gonzalez gave Madrid the lead at Santi-
ago Bernabeu Stadium in the 55th minute.

Madrid’s new No. 9 came closest to his first
Madrid goal just before halftime, when his
shot was tipped around the post by goalkeep-
er Mabrouk Zaid after a swift exchange of
passes with Karim Benzema.

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expensive player after his $133.7 million trans-
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SWIMMING: FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS, ITALY

Team Bahamas
sets three new
national records

BAH RELAY THIRD LEG: Teisha Lightbourne in aetion swimming in

the 4 x 100 freestyle relay.

PHOTOS: Kathryn Dillete



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| BAH RELAY
EXCHANGE
LAST LEG:-
Alicia
Lightbourne
is off the
starting
block to
swim the
final leg of
the relay
after sister
Teisha
touched ina
time of
See] 58.52. Alicia
| swama
57.86 to
bring the
| Bahamas
home in
Bahamian
record time
of 3:48.34.

Team Bahamas wasted little
time in its assault on the local
record books, with three new
national records set on the
opening day of competition at
the 13th FINA World Cham-
pionships in Roma, Italy.

Arianna Vanderpool-Wal-
lace set a new Bahamian record
in the 100 butterfly today swim-
ming in 1:00.56. Overall she
placed first in her heat and 43rd
overall. Bahamas teammate
Alana Dillette who held the old
record of 1:01.50 swam in the
same heat with Vanderpool-
Wallace and finished in 1:01.51
for a sixth place finish in the
heat.

Elvis Burrows swam a very
fast 50 butterfly in 23.74 placing
first in his heat and 26th overall
and lowering his own Bahami-
an record of 24.47 that he swam
at the RBC National Champi-
onships in June 2009.

The female 4 x 100 Freestyle
relay team swam to a new
Bahamian record in a time of
3:48.34 - smashing the old
record of 3:51.89 set by the
same quartet in May 2008.

Alana Dillette lead off and
swam a personal best time of
57.11. She was followed by Ari-
anna Vanderpool-Wallace who
swam 54.85, Teisha Light-
bourne swam 3rd in 58.52 and
Alicia Lightbourne anchored
in 57.86. The relay team fin-
ished 20th overall and was the
only female Caribbean relay
team to compete. Regionally
they placed third behind the
USA and Canada.

Algernon Cargill, President
of the BSF was in the stands to
cheer the swimmers on and
stated that "the swims today
will bring attention to the sport
of swimming in the Bahamas
with Arianna Vanderpool-Wal-
lace and Elvis Burrows both
winning their heats in Bahami-
an record time and Elvis plac-
ing a very impressive 26th place
overall. The female relay team
also did very well and in break-
ing the Bahamian record by
almost three seconds the coun-
try should be very excited about
future Bahamas swimming
relay teams competing on the
international scene. These
females have already proven
themselves at both the CAC
and Pan Am Games winning
bronze medals at both meets in
the 4 x 100 medley relay. Today
in the 4 x 100 freestyle relay
they have also made an impor-
tant statement about the direc-
tion of swimming in the
Bahamas today. Equally
impressive is that these four
young Bahamian women also
study full time at the university
level and have remained com-
mitted and dedicated to
improving themselves in the
sport of swimming. All of the
swimmers are commended on
their performances today and
we can expect more records
over the duration of this meet”.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



AVIVA LONDON GRAND PRIX



Chandra Sturrup comes second

AP Photo/Simon Dawson

Bl avive|

| JETER /

a avivl

STURRP

Byte ed



CARMELITA JETER of the US, centre, Chandra Sturrup of the Bahamas, right, and Stephanie Durst of the U.S., left, compete in the women's 100 meters final during the Athletics Grand Prix at Crystal Palace in Lon-

don, Saturday, July 25, 2009.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

VETERAN sprinter Chan-
dra Sturrup capped off a pretty
good weekend for the Bahami-
an athletic contingent at the
Aviva London Grand Prix with
a second place finish in the
women's 100 metres.

After helping the women's 4
x 100 metre relay team run a
season's best for second place
on Friday, Sturrup came back
on Saturday and clocked 11.09
seconds in the straight away
race behind American Carmeli-
ta Jeter, who won the final in
10.92.

In the second of two heats of
the century, Sturrup was sec-
ond once again in 11.27, this
time to American Allyson
Felix, who won the heat in
11.26. Jeter took the first heat
in 10.92.

Felix, however, had to settle
for sixth place in 11.29. LaV-
erne Jones-Ferrette of the Vir-
gin Islands came in third in the
final in 11.21.

Sturrup, who turns 38 on
September 12, is still sitting in
second place in the World Ath-
letics Tour with 72 points from
five meets. She trail Jamaican
Kerron Stewart, who is out
front with 100.

Also on Saturday, Lavern
Eve competed in the women's
javelin, but her berst toss of
51.16 metres placed her in the
10th and final spot. Winning
the competition with a throw
of 64.64 was Germany's Steffi
Nerius, followed by Goldie Say-
ers of Great Britain (59.82) and
Australian Kimberley Mickle
(59.67).

It was the first appearance
this year on the European cir-
cuit for Eve, the 44-year-old
Central American and
Caribbean Championships'
bronze medalist as she try to
prepare for the IAAF World
Championships in Berlin, Ger-
many from August 15-23.

While Sturrup joined Deb-
bie Ferguson-McKenzie in
proving that they are right on
form to contend for a medal,
the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations also got a
chance to run the women's 4 x
100 relay team.




Veteran sprinter clocks 11.09 seconds in the

100 metres to cap good weekend for Bahamas

CARMELITA JETER of US, centre, leads the fie

Palace in London, Saturday, July 25, 2009.

The team of 28-year-old Tim-
icka Clarke, Sturrup, Christine
Amertil and Ferguson-McKen-
zie, were second in 43.35 behind
the American A team that won
in 42.39. The B team ran 43.51
for third place.

Only the United States,
Great Britain, Germany and
Trinidad & Tobago have ran
faster than the Bahamas so far
this year. The Bahamas
matched season's best by Brazil
and Russia.

With 19-year-old Sheniqua
'Q' Ferguson expected to be
ready to run in Berlin after
nursing an injury, the BAAA
is confident that the tem can
run faster and finally regain its
position as a medal contender
in the post-era of the Golden
Girls.

Before they did theior relay
duties, Ferguson-McKenzie and
Amertil both competed in their
specility events.

Having ran the fast time in
the world this year at a meet in
Rethomno on Monday, Fer-

SS

gsuson-McKenzie picked up
her second straight victory in
the 200 in 23.11, well ahead of
American Marshevet Hooker
(23.30).

Ferguson-McKenzie, 33, is
now sitting in second place on
the World Athletics Tour with
39 points. Jones-Ferette is lead-
ing the pack with 42. Ferguson-
McKenzie is also in the ranking
in the century, tied with
Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser
with 44 apeice.

Amertil ran 52.20 for fifth
place in the wpmen's 400. Nico-
la Sanders of Great Britam won
in 51.54, followed by Ameri-
cans Shana Cox (51.56), Moni-
ca Hargroove (51.66) and
DeeDee Trotter (52.08).

Amertil, who will celebrate
her 30th birthday at the cham-
pionships on August 18, is now
tied for 12th spot on the World
Athletics Tour with Yulia
Gushchina with 27. American
Sanya Richards is out front with
90.

Olympic bronze medalist



AP Photo/Sang Tan

if

Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands
turned in a fourth place finish in
the men's trile jump with a best
leap of 17.13 metres. The event
was won by Brandon Roulhac

Id to finish first in the women's 100 metres final during the Athletics





AP Photo/Sang Tan

Grand Prix at Crystal

with 17.33. Cuban Arnie David
Girat was second with 17.18
and Great Britain's Phillips
Idowu was third qith 17.16.

"I felt good about my per-

formance. I had my best meet
for the year, so that was a good
sign that Iam in good form for
the world's," said Sands, who
competed with tendinitis in his
right knee.

"T just need to strengthen my
quad muscles a little bit to get
rid of the tendinitis. But other
than that, I am really confident
right now and I will not let any-
thing stop me from going for
my goal in Berlin."

Leevan Sands, who will also
celebrate his 28th birthday at
the championships two days
before Amertil on August 16, is
in third place with 40 points.
Girat is on top of the leader-
board with 50, followed by
Idowu with 46.

And Shamar Sands clocked
13.81 for sixth place in the first
of twov heats, but that was only
good for 10th overall, eliminat-
ing him from a spot in the final.
Cuban world record holder
Dayron Robles won in 13.29
with Barbados' Ryan Brath-
waite second in 13.31, followed
by Great Britain's Andwer
Turner in 13.66.

Shamar Sands, 24, is tied for
10th place with Brathwaite,
who won the BAAA's Natinals,
with 38 each on the World Ath-
letics Tour. Dexter Faulk of the
United States is out front with
80, followed by Robles with 76.

Although he didn't compete,
30-year-old Chris ‘Fireman’
Brown controls the men's 400
with 67 points.

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CARMELITA JETER of US, left, leads the field to finish first in the women's 100 metres final during the
Athletics Grand Prix at Crystal Palace in London, Saturday, July 25, 2009.





PAGE 14, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS
SPORTS

HONOURING TOMMY ROBINSON

FROM page 15







Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
announced that the new national sta-
dium currently under construction and
expected to be completed by 2011 will
be named in Robinson’s honour.

The Committee also doled out a
$10,000 athletic scholarship to the Col-
lege of the Bahamas, named after the
legendary sprinter to highlight a series
of plaques and personal gifts.

Robinson was lauded for a ground-
breaking career that began with his
first international competition in 1955
and spanned 15 years including four
Olympic Games appearances.

Prime Minister Ingraham said
Robinson blazed a trail for genera-
tions of great Bahamian athletes to
follow which has positively raised the
profile of the Bahamas on the inter-
national stage.

“T am happy to join with the Friends
of Tommy Robinson in paying tribute
to a great Bahamian son who has been
an inspiration to Bahamians every-
where but most especially to our youth
who aspire to achieve in the field of
sports,” he said, “The modern
Bahamas has a growing ledger of
sporting greats including World Cham-
pions and Olympic medallists whose
success internationally sheds positive
light on our country and our people.”

Ingraham said for his efforts in the
early stages of the nation’s growth as a
sporting power, Robinson deserves
great accolades.

“Long ago, Tommy Robinson was
among the pioneering few who first
represented our country on the world
stage. It is him that your sportspersons
may look for inspiration as they strive
to achieve their best. Tommy was on
some occasions, the lone member of
the Bahamian track and field team,” he
said, “It is appropriate that the
Bahamas’ track and field stadium was
named in honor of this Bahamian star
and appropriate now that his friends
have chosen to
honor and pay
It is diffi- this sporting
cult to icon tribute in

. . this fashion.”
imagine the — prime Min-



‘ . i standing ister Ingraham

GOLDEN : 1 / Bahamian no j aa
| : ‘ claimed Fri-

an : | sprinters hold 4... july 24th
caliie f , today without = as “Tommy

Davis

hugs the pioneering Robinson

_ Day,” the day
Thomas efforts of Tom that marks the

Robinson. 4 hy Pr aie my Robinson.” 51st anniver-
an ; Sh at ME cary of Robin-

‘ : : ‘at son’s historic win in the 220 yard dash
TOMMY ROBINSON pictured with Prime Minister Hubert at the British Empire Games in Cardiff

Ingraham receiving a plaque. Wales in 1958.
Dozens of colleagues, well wishers

and contemporaries, ranging from

Robinson’s former roommate at the

i University of Michigan, to current stars

in athletics whom he has influenced in

the sport of track, addressed the audi-

ence to place Robinson’s achievements

and place in history into perspective.

cups Lamine Diack, President of the

International Association of Athletic
Federations, the global governing body
for track and field, said that Robin-
son’s place as a true giant in the sport
and his influence on the region can-
not be underscored.

“A sporting legend is a pioneer; one
whose influence and legacy spread
wider than the original area of com-
petition; one whose successes showed
others the way; one whose exploits
helped raise the international sport-
ing profile of a small nation,” he said,
“In short, a man such as Tommy
Robinson, who has become a truly
iconic and legendary figure amongst
the people of the Bahamas. His career
is well-documented. It is difficult to
imagine the standing Bahamian sprint-
ers hold today without the pioneering
efforts of Tommy Robinson.”

Perry Christie, Leader of the Oppo-
sition and former teammate of Robin-
son on several national teams, said
Robinson’s role not only as an athlete,
but as an ambassador for the Bahamas
may have made his greatest impact.

“A pioneer and trailblazer, he
focused the global spotlight on the tiny
little known colony of the Bahama
Islands through the power and majesty
of his athletic performance around the

HILUX DOU BLE CAB Ve da aa ? world in the 50s and 60s,” he said, “He

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ie ambassador for our country wherever

mp3/cd player alloy aS Lt he went. His charm and intelligence,

his gentlemanly bearing, and above
all, the fervor and authenticity of his
patriotism, always presented Bahami-
ans and the Bahamas in a most favor-
able light. He is indeed a legend.”
Robinson’s first international com-
petition came in 1955 at the Pan Amer-
ican Games in Mexico City. Just a year
later he became the first Bahamian to

security system side steps
air conditioning ree

H H H vs . a et ‘| compete in Track and Field at the
The Hilux is To on TN Toyota TT) for aye a iy ee ee
performance with car-quality comfort. Big, strong and stylish, country’s first medal in international

competition with a bronze in the 100m
at the West Indian Federation Games
in 1957.

His collegiate highlights at the Uni-

Fy versity of Michigan included nine indi-

H ! oa vidual Big Ten Championships in the

Tela <-to ARCOLA ROOM TCM Cola N ACen . g : if 100 yards: 220 yards, 0 yards and 300
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In 1962 Robinson won gold at 100m

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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 15

§

;
i
MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

TRIBUTE 10 A LEGEND






by RENALDO DORSETT to celebrate the life, legacy and achievements to
Sports Reporter the country’s greatest pioneer in the sporting
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net arena.

Friends of Thomas Augustus Robinson hon-

oured his extensive litany of accolades as a
embers of the local and inter- Bahamian national sporting hero at a luncheon
national track and field com- yesterday, held under the theme: “Tribute to a

munity came together with Legend.”

Bahamians of all walks of life SEE page 14

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THE TRIBUNE
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MONDAY,

2009

te) ai ets let=m ge) A

Receiver
‘totally
confident’
of no asset
auction

* Galanis plans to obtain
court injunction blocking
sale of New Hope's
Freeport-based marina
and leisure assets

* Alleges that judgment
creditor’s $1.2m claim
‘more in the region’
of $500,000

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE receiver for Freeport-
based marina owner/opera-
tor, New Hope Holdings, is
“absolutely convinced” there
will be no auction of the com-
pany’s assets as planned this
week, telling Tribune Busi-
ness that a judgment credi-
tor’s claim it was owed $1.2
million was “more in the

SEE page 4B

Water plant
contract's ‘far
reaching legal
ramifications’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Water & Sewerage
Corporation’s proposal to
negotiate a contract with a
company, headed by Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald, for a now-
abandoned reverse osmosis
plant project at Arawak Cay
had “very far-reaching legal
ramifications” because it had
not met the original bid
requirements.

A 2006 legal opinion on the

SEE page 6B

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net





CLICO liquidator
argets 75 firms

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

LICO
(Bahamas)
liquidator

a s

demanded a host of
documents related to
the business dealings
of 75 Florida-based
companies believed to
be owned and/or con-
trolled by the insol-
vent insurer’s Trinida-
dian mastermind,
Lawrence Duprey, as
he ramps up efforts to
trace and recover the company’s assets.

Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, through his
US attorney, Ronald Neiwirth, on July 14
subpoenaed via the Florida Bankruptcy
Courts another law firm, Greenberg
Traurig, in a bid to force it to hand over
a ‘treasure trove’ of documents related to
the business dealings and transactions of
the 75 entities thought to be connected to
Mr Duprey.

Documents filed in the Bankruptcy
Court for the southern district of Florida,
which have been obtained by Tribune
Business, show Mr Gomez is demand-
ing all documents detailing wire trans-
fers between the Duprey companies and

Craig Gomez



* Gomez demands documents on entities that comprise private
business empire of insolvent insurer's mastermind

* Likely wants to determine whether Bahamian investors’
assets helped finance Duprey’'s personal interests

* Also subpoenaed documents on Bahamas insurer's main asset, relating to
‘approved contractors’ and ‘advertising fund’ they allegedly had to pay into

Greenberg Traurig’s operating and
escrow accounts from the period begin-
ning January 1, 2004, onwards.

The Baker Tilly Gomez partner and
accountant is also seeking records of all
payments into the Florida-based law fir-
m’s operating and escrow accounts from
the Duprey-controlled entities, and any
payments worth more than $1,000 that
Greenberg Traurig sent from its accounts
in the opposite direction. For the latter,
the CLICO (Bahamas) liquidator is also
seeking copies of instructions, invoices
and demands for payment that may have
been sent by the Duprey companies.

Finally, Mr Gomez and his attorneys
are also demanding copies of all man-
agement, shareholder and operating
agreements that Greenberg Traurig pre-
pared for any of the companies Mr
Duprey is believed to control or benefi-
cially own. The information is scheduled
to be handed over by August 13, 2009.

Also filed with the Florida courts, and
obtained by Tribune Business, is the list
of Florida-based entities suspected to
comprise Mr Duprey’s private business
network. Several, namely Angostura
Spirits & Wine; Atlantica Manager Inc;
CL Hospitality Inc; Colonial Parker
Group Manager Inc; Colonial Commu-
nications Inc; Creative Manager Inc; Dal-
co 84 LLC; Dalco New River Manager
Inc; Dalco Infinity Holdings; LD USA
Manager Inc; LD DYL Inc; LD Merrick
Park Manager Inc; SCC Distribution
Corporation; and Wellington Preserve
Corporation, all name Lawrence Duprey
as their principal.

A number of these entities are listed as
the principal of other companies Mr
Gomez is seeking documents on, while
other targeted entities name their prin-
cipal as Sylvia Baldini. She is likely to

SEE page 9B

Bahamas to face high unemployment ‘for quite some time’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas is likely to
experience prolonged high
levels of unemployment last-
ing “two to three years”, a

* Ex-minister says prolonged high jobless levels could last ‘for two to three years’ to 2011-2012
* Warns hotel industry unlikely to re-hire all those terminated

* Urges Bahamas ‘not to be lulled to sleep’ by high foreign reserves levels

* Calls on nation to tackle structural weaknesses not related to recession



former finance minister
believes, because this nation’s
economy will endure a slow,
protracted recovery when it
comes as opposed to a sharp
rebound.

James Smith, CFAL’s
chairman, told Tribune Busi-
ness that the structure of the
Bahamian economy meant its
main factor of production was
labour, the result being that
an economic recession would

New Business Licence
‘next year for certain’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas will “next
year for certain have a new
Business Licence Act”, a gov-
ernment minister has pledged,
with the Ministry of Finance
currently reviewing proposed
amendments that might
include a change to how fees
are calculated.

* Minister says amendments
to way fee is calculated
under review

* Expects EPA services
offer to be finalised this
summer, with Trade
Commission renewed

SEE page 10B

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show itself most in the unem-
ployment figures — estimated
earlier this year to be 12 per
cent on New Providence, and
14 per cent on Grand
Bahama.

The former minister of
state added that, with the
Bahamas likely to follow the
US in experiencing a slow, ‘L-
shaped’ recovery that would
leave unemployment rates
relatively high until 2011-

2012, this nation needed to
concentrate on resolving
structural economic weak-
nesses unrelated to the reces-
sion.

And he warned that the
Bahamas must “not be lulled
to sleep” by the current rela-
tively high level of foreign
exchange reserves, pegged at
$723 million in early July
2009, because they had been
artificially inflated by the pro-

ceeds from the Government’s
foreign currency borrowings —
as opposed to ‘real’ capital
inflows from tourism and for-
eign direct investment.

Mr Smith told Tribune
Business that while tourism
and construction had been the
sectors to first feel the reces-
sion’s impact, as they relied
directly on tourism and for-

SEE page 8B

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Site's $100k
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shopBVM.com says
hosted businesses have
received orders from
Middle East, Thailand
since going online in
January this year

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A BAHAMIAN-owned e-
commerce facilitator believes
it has opened up the online
market for this nation’s busi-
nesses with an initial invest-
ment of just $100,000, its prin-
cipals telling Tribune Busi-
ness that its clients had
received product orders from
locations such as the Middle
East and Thailand.

Kent Bazard,
shopB VM.com’s chief finan-
cial officer, said that almost
anything can be sold from the
site, with just about any
Bahamian business or entre-
preneur able to open a store
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ShopBVM.com currently

SEE page 11B

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

UAT



of the 24 listed securities. Of
these, one advanced, two
declined and two remained

By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets




changed hands, representing a
significant increase of 72,967
shares compared to the pre-

Earnings Releases:

There were no financial

The Bahamian Stock Market

THE trading momentum — unchanged. vious week's trading volume __ results reported by any of the FINDEX 786.96 (-5.73%) YTD
increased last week in the of 3,100 shares. 24-listed companies during
Bahamian market, with EQUITY MARKET FOCOL Holdings (FCL) _ the week. BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
investors trading in five out A total of 76,067 shares was the sole advancer and SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
volume leader this week with Dividend Notes: AML $1.39 $- 0 -18.71%
40,786 shares trading hands, BBL $0.63 $- 0 4.55%
its share price rising by $0.13 ¢ Consolidated Water BOB $6.94 $- 0 -9.16%
to end the week at $5.16.. Company (CWCO) has BPF $11.00 $- 0 6.78%
Finance declared a dividend of $0.013 7 es i ; cr a
per share, payable on et CAB $11.39 $. 6 18.99%
10, 2009, to all ordinary share CBL $5.64 § 0 19.43%
Finance Corporation of the holders of record date July 1, : i Rg ons
CHL $2.74 $- 0 -3.18%
Bahamas (FIN) was the lead —_ 2009.
; J 5 decliner, its stock falling by ree eee A 54 ; Bete
Tri l a] i + i fc $0.10 to end the week at a ¢ FOCOL Holdings (FCL) : i oo
- see: DHS $1.82 $- 600 -28.63%
i new 52-week low of $10.800n has declared a dividend of Fang $6.60 $- 550 15.38%
Enrollment Limited a volume of 23,001 shares. $0.03 per share, payable on FRR $2.37 $- 0 0.00%
pom Far, acsosesnt ICD Utilities ICD) traded — August 11, 2009, to all ordi- FOC $0.30 $. 0 0.00%
hits ; 11,130 shares, its share price nary shareholders of record FcCL $5.16 $0.13 40,786 -0.19%
decreasing by $0.01 toendthe date July 31, 2009. FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%
- week at a new 52-week low FIN $10.80 $-0.10 23,001 -9.01%
“Understanding and Teaching Kingdom Principles" | = of $5.49. Annual General Meeting 1CD $5.49 $-0.01 11,130 -10.44%
(How te Teach the Kingdom —Series by Dr. Myles Munroe) (AGM) Notes: JSJ $10.40 $- 0 -6.31%
BOND MARKET PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%













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No notes traded in the
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COMPANY NEWS

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced that the Board of
Directors had approved a $10
million share buy back pro-
gramme that will last for 10
years.

Bahamas First Holdings
announced it will be holding
its Annual General Meeting
on Thursday, August 13, 2009,
at Spm at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel, No. 1 Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

Shareholders of record as
of July 9, 2009, will be quali-
fied to vote at the Annual
Meeting.

International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold

Weekly % Change
0.9221
1.6445
1.4217

+2.90
+0.64
+0.77



Weekly % Change

+5.81
+1.84

$68.06
$954.40



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 3B



By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Chamber of
is preparing Bahamian busi-
nesses to take advantage of
upcoming trade agreements
even though the Government
is still trying to finalise this
country's services offer for the
Economic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA).

Hank Ferguson, the Cham-
ber’s trade policy expert, told
Tribune Business that
Bahamian companies need to
be informed of the benefits
resulting from the EPA when

SCOTIABANK (Bahamas)
has opened the doors to its
new retail sales centre in the
Caves Village Shopping Plaza,
a facility the bank says is the
first of its kind to be opened in
the Bahamas.

Vice-president of retail
banking, Wayde Christie, said
Scotiabank studied its market
and found the need for a ded-
icated retail banking centre.

"We have always been look-
ing at the opportunities that
are in our market, and not so
much just in terms of opening
new branches or expanding
our service but really listening
to what the market is telling
they need and want to see,"
he said.

“Through a number of sur-

Chamber readies business for trade



it comes to trade with the
European Union and other
CARIFORUM nations, as
well future trade agreements
with Canada and this nation’s
entry into the World Trade
Organization (WTO).

Mr Ferguson said the
Chamber of Commerce will
be holding a seminar to this
end on Thursday at the British
Colonial Hilton in Nassau, and
on Friday in Grand Bahama.

The Seminar will be led by
head of the Services Trade

Unit at the

Caribbean Regional Nego-
tiating Machinery (CRNM),
Ramesh Chaitoo, and

Trade Specialist Dr Noel
Watson.

"This will be a focused sem-
inar to expose Bahamian ser-
vice providers to opportuni-
ties offered through the EPA,”
said Mr Ferguson. He said
these seminars are a continu-
ing effort by the Chamber of
Commerce and Inter-Ameri-
can Development Bank (IDB)

to highlight the perceived ben-
efits of the EPA and other
Trade Agreements.

“The Chamber wants to
ensure that its members are
fully informed,” said Mr Fer-
guson.

"We are taking holistic
approach to trade agreements,
including Canada and the
WTO."

He said the Bahamas Trade
Commission is partnering with
the Chamber on several of the
seminars.

‘Bank’ on us for your convenience

veys and feed back, it was evi-
dent that there was a strong
need for a facility that provid-
ed flexible terms and focused
service that allows people to
come in and get out really
quickly."

At the new Scotiabank
branch, all the services which
can be found at other retail
banking locations can be per-
formed, except the exchange
of cash. Automatic Teller
Machines (ATM) can be used
for deposits and withdrawals.

According to Mr Christie, a
second ATM machine will be
added to the one already at
the centre and will hold dual
currency - Bahamian and US
dollars.

The new centre also features

Saturday banking, which Sco-
tiabank (Bahamas) managing
director, Barry Malcolm, said
has been a request of the
banking public for some time.

"The need for after-hours
and weekend banking has
been voiced in many quarters,
and the Caves Village centre
states simply that we have
heard," he said.

"This centre is but the first
of many innovations and
refinements to our branch net-
work systems that we will
unveil in our Bahamas mar-
Ket over the next few years."

He said that with the open-
ing of the Caves Village
branch, Scotiabank is prepar-
ing itself to meet the rebound
that will come when the world

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Visit our website at www.cob.edu,hs

STAFF VACANCY

Suitably qualified persons are invited to apply for the following posi-

tion: ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT I.

The Administrative Assistant I will provide direct assistance to the
Dean, Faculty of Liberal & Fine Arts, including the necessary adminis-
trative support for the overall management of the office. The success-
ful candidate will be someone with strong interpersonal, communica-
lion (both oral and written) and organization skills who enjoys the chal-
lenge of engaging individuals on a one-on-one level.

Applicants should posses a Bachelor's degree or the equivalent with no
work experience and Associate Degree in relevant area with ten (10)
years work experience at the AS-1 level. For a detailed job description,
visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested candidates should submit a
detailed resume and cover letter of interest no later than Friday, August

7th, 2009,

and the Bahamas pulls out of
the current economic reces-
sion. "We hold the view that
as it does, Scotiabank

Bahamas must be best posi-
tioned to respond to the mar-












However, the Bahamas’ ini-
tial services submission was
rejected the EU and returned
for amendments to be made.

"There are still some things
to be worked out. Language
that had to be fine tuned and it
(the services offer) has to go
back to Cabinet," said Mr Fer-
guson.

It is not yet known what the
EU has proposed to the
Bahamas in its services offer
or the level of market access.
However, because of the

ket we serve," said Mr Mal-
colm. "This new Scotiabank
retail sales centre provides you
with another exciting choice
by which to meet your banking
needs.”



National Investment Policy
some sectors will still be closed
to the EU and Cariforum
nations.

"The Government has
pledged to keep the national
investment policy sound," said
Mr Ferguson.

He said that though the final
draft of the Bahamas services
offer has not been submitted,
"we won't wait for the ink to
dry to start working”.

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mi INTERNATIONAL A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life





PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS ee
Receiver ‘totally confident’ of no asset auction





FROM page 1B

region” of $500,000.

Philip Galanis, an accoun-
tant and partner in HLB
Galanis Bain, told Tribune

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Business from New York that
he and his attorneys would
this week initiate legal action
to prevent the Provost Mar-
shall selling off numerous
land parcels and several vehi-














(Psp Smears, Prostate, Biol Text)
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Doctor's Hospital

i dg

be
ss

cles owned by New Hope
Holdings, in order to settle an
alleged debt they owed to two
US marina construction spe-
cialists, Florida Marine and
Carey Marine International.

The Provost Marshall is due
to auction off some 15 parcels
of real estate, seven of which
contain buildings, and eight
other tracts of land, plus two
vehicles, via Public Auction
on Wednesday, July 29, 2009.
The auction has already been
advertised in the newspapers,
with seizure notices already
attached to the affected prop-
erties.

However, Mr Galanis told
Tribune Business: “I’ve been
in touch in the last two days
with my attorneys and per-
sons involved with this, and
I’m absolutely convinced
there will be no auction.

“We are going to take the
necessary legal action. We’re
going to court to obtain an
injunction to stay that auc-

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tion. I’m absolutely convinced
there will be no auction.”

Mr Galanis said he had
been in contact with the Com-
missioner of Police, Reginald
Ferguson, over the issue. The
Commissioner, he added, had
not been aware that New
Hope Holdings was in court-
supervised receivership when
notice was given of the inten-
tion to seize the company’s
assets and make good its debt.

Indicating that the asset
seizure and auction could not
be carried out anyway, due to
the protection offered by the
court-supervised receivership
—a process that stays all debts
and claims against a company
— Mr Galanis said Florida
Marina and Carey Marine
International had “certainly
not followed the process to
redress their grievance”.

Explaining that neither
himself nor New Hope or
Preben Olsen, the Scandina-
vian investor who is the com-
pany’s principal, had been
served with the appropriate
writ, Mr Galanis disputed the
$1.2 million being claimed by
the two Florida-based com-
panies.

“While I believe there is a
bona fide liability owed by the
company, I can’t quantify it
at this time,” he told Tribune
Business. “The numbers may
be in the region of $500,000. I
can’t justify $1.2 million. They
also have to stand behind the
other secured creditors.
They’re not a preferred cred-

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itor.”

However, sources close to
Mr Olsen and New Hope told
Tribune Business that they
blamed Mr Galanis for the sit-
uation with Florida Marine.
They argued that the Florida-
based firms had been able to
obtain a default judgment
after the receiver failed to
submit a defence to the
Supreme Court action they
initiated.

The threatened auction and
asset seizure is the latest spin-
off from the legal battle
between Mr Olsen and New
Hope’s primary financier, T.
G. Investments, which is
headed by Tom Gonzalez.
This led to New Hope being
placed into court-supervised
receivership, Mr Galanis
being charged with continu-
ing the company’s operations
and protecting and preserv-
ing assets, until their dispute is
sorted out.

Mr Gonzalez is alleging
that Mr Olsen and New Hope
defaulted on repaying loans
worth $23-$24 million. He is
alleging that he lent this sum,
secured by two promissory
notes, to Mr Olsen and New
Hope Holdings to finance the
acquisition of the Port Lucaya
Marina and associated prop-
erties, but this has not been
repaid. He is also claiming he
financed other obligations of
New Hope Holdings.

Mr Olsen’s side is alleging
that responsibility for any
loan repayment default lies
squarely with Mr Gonzalez.

A days

MWh ik

They are claiming that he
failed to live up to several
obligations, one of which was
to provide New Hope Hold-
ings with $12 million in work-
ing capital - over and above
the initial purchase price - to
fund its operations.

This, Mr Olsen is alleging,
never happened, and without
that capital New Hope end-
ed up defaulting. Essentially,
the core allegation in their
arguments rests on the claim
that any responsibility for the
loan default lies with Mr Gon-
zalez himself.

The assets under receiver-
ship are the Lucayan Marina,
private residences, pool bar,
Ferry House restaurant and
the newly-completed Grand
Bahama Yacht Club facility.
Taken out of receivership ear-
lier this year, with manage-
ment turned back to Mr
Olsen, was the Port Lucaya
Marina and adjacent land.

New Hope Holdings and
Mr Olsen acquired the 115-
slip Port Lucaya Marina in
August 2006 amid much fan-
fare, with a signing ceremo-
ny that was attended by then-
Prime Minister Perry Christie
and senior Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) exec-
utives.

Together with the Grand
Bahama Yacht Club and oth-
er associated facilities, the
Port Lucaya Marina was,
according to press releases
issued at the time, intended
to be the centerpiece of a
$500 million, 70-acre water-
front expansion undertaken
by New Hope Holdings for
the Bell Channel Bay area.

That project was slated to
include 300 yacht slips and
300 new waterfront condos,
townhouses and private resi-
dences, with New Hope Hold-
ings also intended to dredge
the Bell Channel to 13 feet in
depth to accommodate the
latest class of mega yachts.

The next court hearing in
the battle between Mr Olsen
and Mr Gonzalez is set for
September 2009.

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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



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Water plant contract’s

FROM page 1B

issue, prepared by attorney
Veronique Evans, urged the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion to “annul” the bidding
process for the Arawak Cay
plant because two other bid-
ders, Consolidated Water and
GE-Ionics, would “have cause

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORTHIG

NOTICE
CORRIDOR 18












SAUNDERS BEACH AREA

ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

for complaint” if negotiations
were commenced with Mr
Fitzgerald’s BK Water.

Ms Evans’s opinion con-
firmed details in Tribune
Business’s 2005-2006 articles
that chronicled the Arawak
Cay reverse osmosis plant
saga, with the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation having
invited three firms who had
qualified to bid on the previ-
ous Blue Hills reverse osmosis
plant to submit tenders for
this project.

That bidding process, initi-
ated in April 2005, saw the
receipt of one bid by dead-
line, but it was rejected. The
Arawak Cay plant contract
was put out to tender again,
and two bids were received —
one from Consolidated

wrote, and while it “had some
connection” to water suppli-
er/wastewater treatment
provider Veolia/Ennerserve,
this “was not established to
the satisfaction of the Water
& Sewerage Corporation”.

While neither of the bids
was officially rejected, the
legal opinion detailed how the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion felt Consolidated Water
was “not a good candidate”
for the Arawak Cay contract
since it would have a monop-
oly on reverse osmosis water
supply due to its existing Blue
Hills plant.

As a result, the Corpora-
tion planned to approach
Veolia directly and negotiate
the Arawak Cay contract.
However, Ms Evans advised




In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems
JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A has been
contracted for the Completion of the New Providence Road Improvement
Project — International Package. Road construction will be commencing on
Corridor 18 (Saunders Beach),which may require diversions on:






Poinsettia Avenue through Marine Drive and exits at Bougainvillea Avenue.

There will be delays along this vicinity due to the one-way traffic flow system.
Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further information will be
provided in the local media

Tel: 242-322-8341/242-322-2610

@ i

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE,
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES — FALL SEMESTER 2009 -

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GOURSE

| SEC. | CODE
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BEGINS

Bahamian Cusine 1 Sept. 10

COOK

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Gourmet Cooking Il Sept. 9

Cake & Pastry
Making | aE} Sept. &
Cako & Pawiry
Making Il

Bread Making B10 Sept. 10

Cake Decorating | 17 Sept 7

Cako Deporating Il

fopt. 9

Sepia |

TLOTION &

ENDS DURATION | DATS TIRE | FEES | Fim

| 600
Adon

B wees 5375.00 | Mik

|
$300.00 | Mr

| Oet, 22 | Thursday
tu
fo0pm
A -

4.00pm

_ Get. 18 6 wens | Balcony

Oct. 21 O weeks Wedresilay $045.00 | Mik

| 600
Ad0nm
G00 -
8pm

Nov, 3 8 weeks Tuesday $500.00 | PK

Mow. & 8 weeks | Thursday $328.00 | PK
| a -
Nov. & 0pm Lit

Nov.

A weeks Thursday,

Au -
00pm
6900 -
f0pm | Sar

a weeds Morday $326.00 | PK

Now. 4 B wakes | Wiener salary ne | PK

AM fees are included in the price queted above; new stedents pay a onetime applicntion fee of 40.00, (WON REFUNDABLE)

Application Deadline: August 28, 2009 at 4:00) p.m.

For titlesr inloria ls oF bo pick i ar applicaion eibiseasac GM ceT We Indusairy Training Departivet of the Culinary i Hospitality

Maratemnent Listitule, 723-581,

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42 3=f or fax TS- 1267.

Sebediwle cua! Come Adieerlanls

ROYAL B FIDELITY

Money at Work

COOL cI NT AL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

MONDAY, 20 JULY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.86] CHG 0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -141.50 | YTD % -8.26
FINDEX: CLOSE 786.23 | YTD -5.83% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Security
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S$)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

10.40
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS$ Div $ P/E Yield

13.5
10.9
55.6

10.40
10.00

10.40
10.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3231
2.8952
1.4031
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Last Sale
100.00
100.00

Symbol Interest
FBB17

FBB22

Change Daily Vol.
0.00 7%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.8952 -1.52 -3.18
1.4777 3.07 5.31
3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.9801 2.87 5.79
101.6693 1.10 1.67
93.1992 -3.33 -6.76
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.300 N/M
0.480 N/M
0.000 256.6

Weekly Vol. Yield

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90
Div $ Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
10-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Water, winner of the Blue
Hills contract, and the other
from BK Water.

BK Water had not been
invited to bid, Ms Evans

against this.

She wrote: “As it stands,

SEE next page

BAHAMAS FIRST
HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS

Bahamas First Holdings Limited hereby
notifies all its shareholders that the Board
of Directors has declared an interim
dividend of two cents (2¢) per ordinary
share to be paid 31* July 2009, to all

shareholders of record as of 27° July 2009.

©

TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian for the following posi-
tions for the 2009 - 2010 School Year.

Dean of Students

Applicants must:

A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing to
subscribe to the statement of Faith of Temple Christian
School.

B. Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or Higher from
a recognized College or University.

C. Possess excellent organization, Inter-personal
communicative skills.

D. Be able to assist with all aspect of the Administration.
E. Be able to discipline, counsel students.

F. Have high morals standards.

Application must be picked up at the High School Office
on Shirley Street 23rd July, 2009 and be returned with
the following: a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph, church affiliation, pastor’s name and three
references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is July 30th, 2009





THE TRIBUNE



‘far reaching legal ramifications’

the only true bidder is Con-
solidated Water, as it is the
only bidder who qualified
under clause 4 of the bid doc-
uments. BK was not a quali-
fied bidder, and their bid
should therefore be rejected
without any further consider-
ation.

“Tam aware of some rep-
resentations made be Veolia
that BK is an affiliate of
theirs, but none of the docu-
ments required under Clause
5 were provided with the bid.”

She added: “At the start of
the bidding process in April,
three companies were invit-
ed to bid. Now Water & Sew-
erage Corporation proposes
to negotiate directly with a
company which to the best of
its available information did
not qualify in the first place.

“The potential legal ramifi-
cations of that decision are
very far-reaching. Not only
would Consolidated Water
have cause for complaint, but
so would GE-Ionics (the third
invitee), because both would
not be given the opportunity
to renew their bids..... Should
BK prove its relationship with
Veolia, then its bid can be
accepted. The most important
aspect of this process is that it

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

is transparently fair, so that
justice can be seen to be
done.”

To annul the bidding
process, Consolidated Water’s
offer had to be rejected as
well, Ms Evans urging that “in
the interest of transparency
and to ward off any taint of
bias” they should be informed
of the reasons why, given that
they were also the Water &
Sewerage Corporation’s part-
ner via the Blue Hills plant.

The legal opinion was
among a batch of documents
released to the media by the
Government, and was seem-
ingly designed to show Mr
Fitzgerald had a ‘conflict of
interest’ in relation to his
opposition to the Arawak Cay
port plan — something that
seems a stretch, given that
Arawak Cay was abandoned
as a reverse osmosis plant
location, as show by Tribune
Business articles at the time —
in favour of Perpall Tract.

A November 1, 2005, letter
from BK Water’s registered
agent, Higgs & Johnson Cor-
porate Services, and signed
by attorney Zarina Fitzger-
ald, Mr Fitzgerald’s wife, said
65 per cent of BK Water was
to be owned by BK Holdings

and Bay West (Bahamas).

BK Holdings’ beneficial
owners were Mr Fitzgerald,
Mark Finlayson and Philip
Kemp, as detailed by Tribune
Business back in 2005, and
Bay West’s principals were
Prince Wallace and Judson
Wilmott. Tribune Business
had again identified the lat-
ter’s participation at the time.

A further 5 per cent of BK
Water’s equity was proposed
to be allocated to the Water
& Sewerage Corporation,
with the remaining 30 per
cent to be offered to Bahami-
an institutional investors.

In a proposal to the Water
& Sewerage Corporation sent
two weeks earlier, on Octo-
ber 19, 2005, Mr Fitzgerald
said that apart from an initial
5 per cent stake offered to the
Corporation at “no cost”, this
could be increased in two
phases.

A further 5 per cent stake
in BK Water would be
offered to Water & Sewerage
once BK Water/Veolia
“receives the additional vol-
ume to supply water to
Kerzner and the provision of
wastewater services to Par-
adise Island”. Then, another
2.5 per cent stake would be

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For more information or survey

Email: energysavingsconsultants @ hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121

Tuer sth s

THE BAHAMAS PUBLIC
SERVICES UNION

URGENT
NOTICE

The Bahamas Public Services Union (BPSU)
Contributory Medical Plan will cause to come into
effect new Medical Premium Rates effective 1st,

2009.

The new Premium Rates are of to the escalating
cost of healthcare services and treatment for all our

members.

All members of the Contributory Medical Plan are
urged to contact the Medical Plan Office at the
George Lafleur Building on Wulff Road immediately
with regards to the increase of Medical Premiums.

For more information please visit our website at:
http/Wwww.bpsubahamas.com



offered — taking Water &
Sewerage’s equity in BK
Water to 12.5 per cent — once
the company supplied water
and wastewater services to
Baha Mar. The Arawak Cay
plant was designed to provide
water to Atlantis Phase II
and Baha Mar.

Mr Fitzgerald also offered
to reduce BK Water’s price
for five million gallons of
water per day, excluding elec-
tricity costs, to $3.74 per gal-

LEE TEES
SOLUTIONS

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STeP AN lel msie ales

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LoTR A D745 XIE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 7B

















NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON
late of #48 Winton Highway, Easter Districl New
Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby piven that all persons having:
claims or demands against the abowenamed Estab are
requicsied tc send the same duly certitied to the undersigned
exnor befeue 4 A usrust AOE,

AND NWOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, thie assets of the late
NORMAN STAFPORD SOLOMON will be distributed
among the persons entitled thereto hav ing, re ard omy ler
the aims of which the Executor of the Estate shall then
have had Notice.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.
Attorneys bor the Execubors
Saxe House
Shirley Street & Vicbona Avenue
P.O). Box N.272
Nassau, Bahan.

Attention: & Smith

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

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Deadline For Enrolment: July 31, 2009
ee Ee MeL Cee Mc cs Ses TB
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a dynamic market. This

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contributes to the Bank's success and offers good career potential

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Job Duties:

¢ Monitor the Bank’s daily operation to ensure compliance with

relevant regulatory requirements and AML policies

¢ Implement regulatory and Group requirements on compliance
monitoring and AML

e Prepare report and statutory returns for submission to Group
Compliance and external regulators

¢ Act as the regulatory and legal liaison for and between the
Bank’s operations in The Bahamas and Hong Kong parent

company

Requirements:

¢ A University Degree in Business Administration, Law or other
relevant qualifications

¢ Minimum of six year’s experience in financial institutions,
preferably in managerial or supervisory role.

¢ Proven working experience in compliance monitoring and AML,
with good knowledge on regulations and related statutory

requirements

¢ Strong self motivation, with good communication and

interpersonal skills

Please send us a full

resume, including personal particulars,

employment history, present and expected salary and contact phone

number to:

Country Manager
P.O. Box N-3019
Nassau, Bahamas

Application Deadline: 10 August 2009

Applicants who are not contacted within one month may consider
their applications unsuccessful.

All information provided by applicants will be used strictly in
accordance with the employer's personal data policies. Applicants
may be considered for other suitable positions within the Bank and
its related companies over a one-year period, after which their personal

data will be destroyed.





PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



USNS
Bahamas to face high unemployment ‘for quite some time’

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF Robert Douglas Erskine late of 303 East
Street on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the Undersigned on or before the 10th
day of August, A.D., 2009, after which date the Executors will
proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of
which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the said
Estate of Robert Douglas Erskine are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

LEANDRA A. ESFAKIS
Attorney for the Executors
Chambers
P.O. Box $S-19269
No. 16 Market Street
Nassau, New Providence
The Bahamas

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PLEASE FAX ALL RESUMES TO) 34.0828 OR CALL 677-6731

SALARY & BENEFITS BASED OS EXPERIENCE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS — 2009
In The Supreme Court CLE/Gen/ 00439
Common Law Side

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE Of LEONARD
NATHANIEL MILLER (Presumed Deceased) Late of
Lee Street in the Subdivision of Nassau Village in the
Island of New Providence One Of The Islands Of The
Commonwealth of the Bahamas

And

IN THE MATTER For An Application For A Declaration
Of Death Pursuant To Section 93 Of The Evidence Act
- Chapter 65 Of The Laws The Bahamas

And

IN THE MATTER OF An Application of CAROL
YVONNE MILLER Nee MILLS

And

IN THE MATTER OF An Application To Declare
LEONARD NATHANIEL MILLER, Dead

NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that LEONARD NATHANIEL
MILLER of Lee Street in the Subdivision of Nassau
Village in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence who was on 7th October, A. D. 2001 a
Carpenter went missing on the 7th October, A. D. 2001.

Any person knowing the whereabouts of LEONARD
NATHANIEL MILLER are to file a Notice of
Appearance at the Supreme Court Registry at the 3rd
Floor of the Ansbacher Building on Bank Lane and East
Street in the City of Nassau or contact the firm of Wells
Legal & Corporate Services in Columbus us House, East
& Shirley Streets in the City of Nassau in the Island of
New Providence.

Dated: This 23rd day of July, A. D. 2009.

Stephanie Anne Wells
Wells Legal & Corporate Services
Columbus House
East & Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas



FROM page 1B

eign direct investment, the
effects were now spreading to
the Bahamian financial ser-
vices industry.

He warned that when the
Bahamian hotel industry
recovered it was unlikely to
re-hire all the workers laid off
between autumn 2008 and
now, due to the fact that pro-
ductivity gains from the
remaining workforce had like-
ly made many posts redun-
dant.

“T don’t think things will
return to normal,” Mr Smith
added of the hotel sector.
“They may never hire them
again, because the ones left
are being a lot more produc-
tive and a lot more efficient.
Some people in the National
Training Programme are
going to find they have to stay
in the new industries.”



That, too, will likely con-
tribute to a slower reduction
in the unemployment rate
than the Government would
want — a rate that, if anything,
is likely to be higher than the
Department of Statistics sur-
vey found earlier this year,
due to increasing lay-offs and
the difficulty in measuring the
number of underemployed
and discouraged workers.

“T think we’re going to, like
the US, continue with higher
levels of unemployment for
quite some time,” Mr Smith
said. “We could be talking
two to three years, because
the US is approaching 10 per
cent unemployment, and
some times our unemploy-
ment level is twice theirs.”

This trend, he added, was
exacerbated by the fact that
the Bahamas’ reliance on
tourism and financial services
meant its sole, and key, factor

Law Firm is seeking skilled professional litigation legal





















little supervision

little supervision

+ Excellent memory
+ Ability to multi-task

« Energetic

+ Self-motivated

* Pleasant personality
+ Despises mediocrity

eb A

secretary. The following are needed:

+ Proficiency in Microsoft Word

* Experience in drafting legal letters with little supervision
« Experience in drafting legal documents with

+ Ability to confidently speak with clients
+ Ability to take instructions and carry same out with

* Excellent organizational skills

+ Works beyond the standard 9 to 5 when necessary

clo The Tribune ¢ P.O. Box N-3207¢ D/A #81242







THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Viett oor website at weew.cob,edu. br

IMPORTANT DATES

Fall Semester 2009
New Student Orientation







Parents’ Evening
Tuesday, 18th August, 2009
6:30 p.m. — 8:00 p.m.

Orientation
Wednesday, 19th August, 2009
8:00 am. — 1:00 p.m.

Advisement & Registration
Wednesday, 19th August, 2049

1:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m,

Advisement, Registration & Bill Payment
Thursday, 20th August, 2009 and
Friday, 21st August, 2009
9:04) a.m. — 7:00 p.m.

Venue:
Front of Portia Smith Student Services
Centre,
Pomneciana Drive

Ti

can

Kingsway A

cademy High
School Teaching positions
For September, 2009

Kingsway Academy High School invites
qualified applicants for the following teaching
positions for September, 2009.

+ Chemistry
* Music

» Spanish

* French

The successful

candidates MUST be

qualified, born again Christian with a valid

Teacher's Certificate and minimum

if a

Bachelor's Degree. He or She must also
be willing to participate in Extra Curricular

activities, etc.

Application forms can be collected from
Human Resources section at the Business
Office on Bernard Road. Telephone 242-

o24-6269 | 324-6887.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS
FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, 2009.

of production was labour. As
a result, the Bahamian work-
force took the brunt of eco-
nomic recessions.

Mr Smith told Tribune
Business that a Bahamian
economic recovery continued
to depend on what happened
in the US, and the current evi-
dence from major markets,
such as housing and the finan-
cial system, suggested the
rebound — when it came — was
likely “ to be very sluggish” in
our northern neighbour.

“That means a continuing
dampening impact on con-
sumer spending, which drives
things like travel,” he warned.
“We can expect, when our
market rebounds, it will not
be ‘v-shaped’, it will be a ‘long
L’ shape.”

With consumer confidence
in the US, which supplies 85
per cent of the Bahamas’
tourists, remaining low, con-
sumer spending power and
disposable income for use on
items such as Bahamian vaca-
tions remains depressed. Con-
sumer and business spending
is likely to be subdued for
some time in the US as both
sectors deleverage and reduce
years of debt-fuelled spend-
ing, which also does not bode
well for the Bahamas.

Mr Smith said that while
Americans were still travel-
ling, they were increasingly
shopping on price for cut-
price vacations, something
which had taken them away
from the relatively high-
priced Bahamas to cheaper
Caribbean destinations such
as Cancun and the Domini-
can Republic.

These destinations, the for-
mer finance minister said,
offered the same attractions
as the Bahamas — sun, sand
and sea — but often a much
better ‘value for money’
proposition. “When we have a
rebound, we will have less
return visitors,” Mr Smith

said. “Americans are still trav-
elling, but less to the
Bahamas.”

Based on anecdotal evi-
dence, his understanding was
that the Bahamian hotel and
tourism industry had not
offered such deep discounts
to entice visitors as other des-
tinations. And the discounts
offered tended to largely
focus on reduced room rates,
which still left visitors paying
relatively high prices in areas
such as food and beverage.

Factoring all this into an
equation featuring the poten-
tial opening of Cuba to US
travellers, Mr Smith told Tri-
bune Business: “I think we’ve
got an uphill battle with some
factors not directly related to
the recession.”

The Bahamas, he added,
needed to be “much more
conscious” of the tourism and
hotel industry’s perceived
weaknesses, chiefly poor ser-
vice and the high operating
cost base. “I think as long as
we recognise where we are
and the challenges ahead, we
can probably muddle our way
through, but we’ve got to
appreciate things will not
return to normal,” Mr Smith
added.

“The upside, I believe, is
that we will deliver a more
efficient economy because the
survivors in the labour force
and small businesses shall be
leaner and much more effi-
cient.”

As for the foreign exchange
reserves, Mr Smith added:
“We might be lulled to sleep
because we see the reserves
performing well, but that’s
mostly the product of bor-
rowing, which has to be
repaid at some point or used
to finance the Government’s
capital works projects.

“We can’t be clapping too
much about that, because it’s
not the product of tourism or
foreign direct investment.”

UU Te SA 0
AMS RRL
US eT are

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY FORGIE EV ANS late of
#17 London Terrace, Eastern Districl, New Providence,

Bahamas, deceased

NOTICE is hereby piven that all persons having
claims of demands against the above-named Estate are
requested bo send the same duly certified to the undersigned

enor before h Aupust IWF,

AND NOTICE is hereby also piven that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the babe
DOROTHY PORGIE EVANS will be distributed anong the
persons entitled thereto having regard only toe the clainis cel
which the Executor of the Estate shall then have had Notice.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO,
AMorneys for the Execuiicers

Sassoon Hise
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
PC). Box N-272
Nassau, Bahernas
Attention: 5. Smith

YES YOU CAN

God got with his instrument and produced the book
“Yes You Can - A Bahamian Plan”.

The world seems to be waiting; every nation it has
touched is positively affected.

Did two leaders missed it, missed it to our

detriment!

We are still here to serve your accounting needs.

For a copy of “Yes You Can” and other services

Contact us at:- M.E. LOCKHART ACCOUNTING
Tel: 242-394-3565
Cell: 242-425-0650
P.O.Box N522

Email: elshagg @coralwave.com





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 9B



CLICO liquidator targets 75 firms

FROM page 1B

be Mr Duprey’s partner or
some other relative, given that
they share the same Florida
address of 2 Harborage Isle
Drive, Fort Lauderdale.
Regardless, Mr Gomez is also
seeking documents from
Greenberg Traurig on its
dealings with both in an indi-
vidual capacity.

Although the documents
do not divulge why Mr
Gomez is seeking this infor-
mation, it is more than likely
that he wants to examine
whether any assets belonging
to CLICO (Bahamas) and, by
extension, its Bahamian insur-
ance policyholders, annuity
depositors and other credi-
tors, may have ended up with
Mr Duprey’s private compa-
nies — and been used to
finance his private business
interests.

If this turns out to be the
case, the CLICO (Bahamas)
liquidator will more than like-
ly go after Mr Duprey and his
companies through the courts
to secure their return. This
could take months before a
successful outcome is secured,
though, as Mr Gomez will

likely have to unravel a maze
of inter-party transactions and
related party wheelings and
dealings.

There is little doubt,
though, that eyebrows will be
raised by the size of Mr
Duprey’s private business
empire, and why it was nec-
essary to have as many as 75
different companies.

Meanwhile, Mr Gomez, in
a separate subpoena, is seek-
ing documents from a Florida-
based firm, North County
Properties & Investments,
relating to its dealings with
CLICO (Bahamas) largest
asset/investment, the Welling-
ton Preserve Corporation real
estate development.

Specifically, Mr Gomez is
seeking documents on “any
arrangements that may have
existed concerning Welling-
ton Preserve Corporation’s
‘approved contractors’, and
advertising fund to which
approved contractors were to
contribute”. This information
is to be produced by August
10, 2009.

It is no surprise that Mr
Gomez is having to spend
considerable time in the US
to protect, preserve and ulti-
mately recover CLICO
(Bahamas) assets for the ulti-

mate benefit of its Bahamian
creditors. Through the
$73.638 million loan to
finance investments by its sub-
sidiary, CLICO Enterprises,
the Bahamian life and healthy
insurer has some 63 per cent
of its assets tied up in various
chunks of Florida real estate.

According to Mr Gomez,
apart from Wellington Pre-
serve these investments also
include the ‘W’ hotel proper-
ty in Fort Lauderdale and,
indeed, there are numerous
resort and real estate devel-
opment companies that he
wants to obtain documents
on.

Tribune Business revealed
last week that Mr Gomez was
in talks with two to three
potential buyers, one of
whom is believed to be a
major real estate develop-
ment company, to sell
Wellington Preserve.

Its sale, and maximising the
price paid, will be key toa
successful liquidation and how
much Bahamian creditors are
ultimately able to recover.
The closer Mr Gomez gets to
a $73 million sales price, the
better the likelihood that
secured creditors — especially
its life and health insurance
policyholders — will recover

SPEECH COMPETITION
TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK
3RD - 10TH OCTOBER, 2009

The Department of Public Service will host a Speech Competition as one of the
activities for the Tenth Annual Public Service Week. The competition is open to
Senior High School Students in the Northern, Southern and Central Bahamas.

Students interested in participating should prepare a five minute speech to be
delivered on the topic: “The Public Service - Striving for Excellence in Customer

Service.”

The deadline for the names of students participating should be referred to
the attention of Ms Rose Gibson, Chairperson, Public Service Committee,
Department of Public Service by 4th September, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 computer system will be awarded to the winners. The first
runners-up will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winner will be announced during the Tenth Annual Public Service Week
Awards Ceremony scheduled for Saturday, 10th October, 2009.

Students wishing to participate can obtain further details regarding the requirements
for entry from their Language Arts Teacher of Family Island Administrator, in

their respective district.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website aft www.cobeduby

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
& EXTENSION SERVICES

CAREER INSTITUTE PROGRAMMES 2009/2010

Are you interested in starting a new career? Would you like to become a
Massage Therapist, Event Planner or Computer Technician? The Centre for
Continuing Education and Extension Services, Career Institute offers
programmes in these creative careers and others.

Massage Therapy Essentials
Computer Systemes Tachnician

Medical Secretary

Medical Billing & Coding
Wedding & Event Planning
Cleaning Science Technician

Esthetician

UPCOMING PROGRAMMES

HEALTH & SAFETY

RECEPTION OPERATION & SERVICES
VETERINARY ASSISTANT
CUSTOMER SERVICE

DENTAL ASSISTANT

Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today!
Call (242) 325-5714/328-(093/328-1936 or visit us on Moss Road

in Oakes Field

Fess May Be Paid By Cash, Credit Cant, or Bank Certified Cheque Payable To:
The Callege of The Bahamas, Business Oifice
CEES Reserves The Right To Chonge Tuition, Fees, Course Coment, Course Schedule

And Course Mhatereals

100 per cent of their long-
term investments.

The CLICO (Bahamas) liq-
uidator had warned previous-
ly that Wellington Preserve
was “not presently considered
marketable” due to the down-
turn in the Florida real estate
market, and that it was
unlikely that the $73 million
loan to CLICO Enterprises
could be “recovered at full
value”.

While Wellington Pre-
serve’s accounts showed
investment property valued
at $127 million, the same real
estate was valued at $62 mil-
lion on an ‘as is basis’. The
development, planned to fea-
ture 80 residential lots and
















le
~
NAD

Nagsau Airport
Cerssloprrat Core peat

other amenities on a 523-acre
site, also required a $42 mil-
lion cash injection to get it
ready for sale.

Mr Duprey was the chair-
man and principal owner of
CL Financial, the Trinidadian
conglomerate that owned and
controlled CLICO
(Bahamas). As such, he
directed the latter’s Board
and dominated decision-mak-
ing at the Bahamian insurer,
running all aspects of its oper-
ations. Therefore, he has to
assume most responsibility for
its collapse into a $16 million
insolvency (at least), and the
financial stress hundreds of
Bahamians find themselves
in.

REQUEST FOR
PREQUALIFICATION

LPIA Expansion Project Stage |
US Departures Terminal

CL Financial had also given
a $57 million guarantee to
cover the latter’s loans to
high-risk investments by relat-
ed parties in Wellington Pre-
serve and other Florida-based
real estate investment pro-
jects.

In his first report to the
Bahamian Supreme Court as
the then-provisional liquida-
tor, Mr Gomez said CLICO
(Bahamas) “may have a
claim” against CL Financial
for the full value of the $57
million guarantee.

He added that he would
thus have to ensure CL Finan-
cial’s assets were not “dissi-
pated” by court proceedings
in Trinidad.

Ledcor is seeking contractors to asset in completion of Stage | of the LPIA Expansion



Praject (U5 Departures Terrninal), All contractors, particularly Bahamian contractors, are



encouraged to participate in this significant national project. Scopes to be tendered to

commlete the fit out of the new terminal include:

# Masonry
# Millwork
# Specialties
# Paint

+ Interior Glazing
+ Drywall
+ Flooring

+ Door & Hordwore «+ Mechanical
# Electrical

Prequalification will include, based on the tender packapes, the following critena:

+ Ability to bond, provide letter of credit or demonstrate financial capacity

# Experience

* References

* Bahamian ownership / content

Frequatifcnton packager wall de avataite Jor pont ap af the dakar Commenon Bahamas Limited! ote alfice ar
Lyneien Fioailing Jaternationy Arport, Mindior Fatt foad br phone at MPF SEI? op by email regen ar
infot 230 @ledcor.com. steresied contractor mort sitar 2 preqenticanor package by Aygwat 7 AY

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

MANAGER, REVENUE ACCOUNTING
CUSTOMER SERVICES DIVISION

A vacaney exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue

Accounting

The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and the
Family Islands and the reconciliation of all revenue accounts other than miscellaneous

recervables.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

. Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in New Providence and

the Family Islands.

Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers.
Prepares the sales budget.
Prepares the Revenue Accounting Department Budget.

Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Receivable Reconciliation.
Oversees the training of all Customer Services staff in the new billing software.
Prepares monthly Board reports.
Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenue reports.

Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of Statistics
Provides statistical billing information for Family Island managers
Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in the

Family Islands,

Attends yearly community meetings as well as ad hoc meetings required during
acquisition of new locations.
Develops and implements mules, guidelines and procedures for the efficient
operation of the department.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Accounts or equivalent

A minimum of §+ years of experience in accounting practice and theory.
Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualitications

Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas.

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing.

Sound reasoning and good judgment skills,
Ability to interpret financial reports,

Good time management skills,

Project management skills.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7500, Nassau, Bahamas on or before:

July 31, 2009.





PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009
New Business Licence ‘next year for certain’

FROM page 1B

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, told Tribune
Business that “the Ministry
of Finance is undertaking a
review of the Business
Licence Act” with a view to
fulfilling the 2009-2010 Bud-
get promise to create a ‘one-
stop’ service for licensing all
companies, thereby eliminat-

ing bureaucracy and costs
associated with red tape.

“We expect next year for
certain to have a new Busi-
ness Licence Act,” Mr Laing
told Tribune Business. “The
bottom line is we think it is
possible to licence business-
es in a much simpler fashion
in this country.

“The idea is to make it sim-
pler to do business in the

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF Bethany Jones Major late of Wilson Street
n the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the Undersigned on or before the 10th
day of August, A.D., 2009, after which date the Executors will
proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of
which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate of Bethany Jones Major are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

LEANDRA A. ESFAKIS
Attorney for the Executors
Chambers
P.O. Box $S-19269
No. 16 Market Street
Nassau, New Providence
The Bahamas






COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION © CLE/GEN/00443

BETWEEN

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
JACQUELINE JOHNSON
Defendant

ADVERTISEMENT OF SERVICE OF
WRIT OF SUMMONS

TAKE NOTICE that an action has been commenced
against you in the Supreme Court, Common Law
and Equity Division, Action No. CLE/GEN/00443
of 2008 in which the Plaintiff, BANK OF THE
BAHAMAS LIMITED, has issued a Writof Summons
out of the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on the
20th March, 2008 claiming against you the sum af
$17,476.70 arising from your default of the loan
granted by the Plaintiff to you on or about the 11th
August, 2002 in the principal amount of $7,500.00
and interest at the rate of 15% per annum.

AND THAT it has been ordered by
Ms. Marilyn Meeres, Deputy Registrar of the
Supreme Court on the 17th March, 2009 that
service of the Writ of Summons in the said
action on you be effected by this advertisement.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that
you must within fourteen (14) days from the
publication of this advertisement inclusive of the
day of such publication, acknowledge service
of the said Writ of Summons by completing a
prescribed form of Acknowledgement of Service
which may be obtained on requested from the
Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise Judgment may be entered against you.

Dated this 17th day of March, A.D., 2009

GIBSON, RIGBY & Co,
CHAMBERS
Ki-Malex House
Dowdeswell Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Plaintiff



Bahamas. That’s the objec-
tive. The idea is to make it
easier for people to do busi-
ness.”

The new Business Licence
Act is designed to incorpo-
rate four existing Acts into
one, with the Liquor Licences
Act, the Shop Licences Act
and the Music and Dancing
Licences Act amalgamated
with it to create a ‘one-stop
shop’ licensing process.

Mr Laing pointed to situa-
tions where businesses such
as liquor stores not only had
to obtain their Business
Licence, but were also sub-
jected to the Shop Licences
and Liquor Licences Acts,
effectively forcing them to
undergo three different pro-
cedures to meet their licens-
ing requirements.



The same situation could
also face nightclubs, restau-
rants and other entertainment
spots, and Mr Laing indicated
that reforms could also focus
on the way Business Licence
fees are calculated.

The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce and others have
long complained that the way
Business Licence fees are cal-
culated, based on a formula
involving gross profits,
penalises businesses with high
sales but low margins and
profits, such as food stores.
Conversely, it rewards com-
panies with low sales but high
margins and net profits, such
as law firms.

In his 2009-2010 Budget
communication, Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham said:
“The new Business Licence

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DEEKER STREAM LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)











Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

















Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Act will make specific provi-
sion for Liquor Licence as a
special category of Licence.
The Licensing Authority will
no longer be required.

“The new Act also impor-
tantly includes a provision for
the establishment of a Review
Board that will hear objec-
tions from the public on cer-
tain licence applications,
objections by applicants of
licence revocations or sus-
pensions and complaints
regarding matters related to
Business Licence. The
issuance of the Business
Licence will become the
responsibility of the Ministry
of Finance. This will result in
an amendment to the Local
Government Act.”

Meanwhile, Mr Laing told
Tribune Business that the
Bahamas expected to finalise
its services offer for the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) with the Euro-
pean Union (EU) “over the
summer”.

“We expect a concluding
meeting with them [the EU]
over the summer,” the min-
ister said. “I think we will
have that final meeting and
be able to conclude the ser-
vices agreement then.

““Tt’s still a matter of mode

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the

news, read
Hat y [o/s] me) a)
Mondays



THE TRIBUNE

three offerings; they'd like to
see more. That’s the rationale
of these discussions.”

Mode Three relates to the
ability of European firms to
establish a commercial pres-
ence for their operations in
the Bahamas. Tribune Busi-
ness previously reported that
the EU was seeking more lib-
eralisation from this nation,
and greater openings, for EU
firms in areas such as retail,
construction, computer sys-
tems, advisory services and
foreign/international law.

The prime reason why the
EU rejected the Bahamas’ ini-
tial services offer was that it
did not meet the minimum
liberalisation thresholds set
by Europe and CARIFO-
RUM, and it also did not
align with the criteria cur-
rently set out — and used — by
this nation in its National
Investment Policy.

The EU was also seeking
greater clarity on the invest-
ment approvals process, much
of which is in policy as
opposed to statute. The Euro-
peans would prefer this to be
in statute law, not policy,
where it could be subject to
the whim or opinion of some
ministers or officials. In short,
they want the ‘rules of the
game’ to be clear when it
comes to the Bahamas.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing said
the mandate of the Trade
Commission and other gov-
ernment Boards had been
renewed. He added that the
Trade Commission’s size had
been expanded, through the
inclusion of representatives
from the Abaco, Exuma,
Andros and Grand Bahama
Chambers of Commerce, plus
persons acting for the
Bahamas Hotel Association
and straw vendors.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BASOTHO VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DOLE HOLLOW LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
IRISH LORD MANAGEMENT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RASBORA WELLS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GOSLINGTON
INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRIDEDON VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 11B



Site’s $100k outlay takes
Bahamas firms to world

has more than 50 stores in its
virtual mall, and with the
power of the Internet and
expansion only a program
upgrade away, the site can
conceivably accommodate all
the businesses in the Bahamas
and more.

Like amazon.com, one of
the largest online shopping
sites in the world, shopB-
VM.com allows Bahamian
individuals and businesses to
set up an account with it in
order to sell their products
and services online. And,
through the keying in of a
credit card number, Bahami-
ans are able to shop from
home and have their products
delivered to them, or they can
simply pick it up themselves.

According to the site’s
operations manager and head
of information technology,
Ricardo Berris, when items
are purchased on shopB-
VM.com's secure site, a
receipt is generated for the
product to verify that the
holder is the purchaser. If the
purchased product is picked
up from its location, the ven-
dor is required to ask for
identification.

While this represents a
physical security feature, Mr
Berris said that online, Shop-
BVM.com have taken steps
to secure every page on the
site.

He explained that cus-
tomers can ensure the site is
secure by looking for the
security seal on the lower
right hand corner of the web

page, where credit or debit
card information is inputed.
He also said individuals can
tell a site is secure when http:
begins the line of

the Uniform Resource
Locator (URL).

Vaughn Burrows, shopB-
VM.com’s chief executive,
told Tribune Business that the
website was conceived of dur-
ing a brainstorming session
among former Atlantis
employees.

"Everyone had their good
ideas, but we thought that a
mall where Bahamians can
shop anywhere in the
Bahamas from the comfort of
their homes would be a good
idea,” said Mr Burrows.

Due to the Bahamas’ e-
commerce infancy, shopB-
VM.com’s investors required
their website to be far differ-
ent from existing home shop-
ping sites, and able to accom-
modate the limited capabili-
ties available. After an exten-
sive search for a suitable web
design company, they chose
the Miami-based company,
Oxidev.

"We got online and looked
for the best web designer we
could find," Mr Burrows said.
"We looked at their website,
because if you're designing
our website and yours looks
like garbage, we’re not going
with you."

As a result of the relation-
ship with Oxidev, the shopB-
VM.com's principal became
the sole independent broker
in the Bahamas for the web

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HYLANE POINTE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MANUAL VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is

Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DAVINCI PRIZE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

design company.
Website

"We didn't want to just
copy and paste amazon.com
to a Bahamian website, so we
looked at a lot of other sites
and said: ‘Why be like ama-
zon - we can be better," said
Mr Bazard.

Visitors to the site will
immediately notice themes of
the fslands and of the
Bahamas, in particular.

According to Mr Bazard,



investors wanted the site to
be authentically representa-
tive of the Bahamian islands
and leave business owners’
online stores with the same
appeal.

ShopBVM.com has been so
well received since its launch
in January 2009 that the t-
shirt company, 242 People,
has sold its product as far
away as the Middle East.

According to Mr Berris, a
Bahamian florist also received
an order from Thailand via
the shopBVM.com for flow-

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRAND PAVILION
CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)













Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
















Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





Legal Notice

NOTICE
VAL SALVAN CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PROWELL VALLEY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SEA BLACK TIGER SLOPES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ers to be sent to a recipient
in Bermuda. He said instead
of shipping the flowers from
Nassau, the company was able
to fill the order through an
affiliate florist in Bermuda.

All the principals agree that
the possibilities are endless
for those Bahamian ‘bricks
and mortar’ stores who wish
to expand but do not have the
capital.

"Move your store online,”
they say.

For a limited time, shopb-
vm.com is offering its cus-

tomers free store set up. Fol-
lowing the promotion, inter-
ested business owners will be
able to purchase Bimini, Aba-
co and Andros packages, with
set-up costs starting at $49.99.
With the Bimini package,
vendors will be able to dis-
play up to 100 products on
the site; with the Abaco pack-
age, up to 200 products; and
with the Andros package,
more than 200 products.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PICADILLICA CIRCUS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PREVONLOUP LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KILMAMENE CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JINGER ROOT
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009



AD EERTUNGER



The stories behind the news

INSIGHT

Cs



How can we Satisfy the ‘spiritual, emotional and
mental hunger’ that exists in our people?

By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

he last time I wrote a col-

umn for Insight I dis-

cussed the need of

Bahamians to be "fed."
While we received many good
responses to the article I was
encouraged to explain more about
what I was referring to when I said
there was a deep hunger in our
nation.

The greatest human need is the
need to be fed. For many of us in
the Bahamas the concept of starva-
tion, real physical hunger is an alien
reality. But no doubt if physical
food is out of reach and we face
death through starvation, there is
no limit to the depths we would sink
in order to be nourished. We would
leave our place of birth, stand on
lines longer than we would tolerate
in better days, steal, beg, do
“demeaning” work, sell our most
treasured possessions, and sell our-
selves or perhaps our loved ones in
order to survive.

Despite the fact that the horrors
of this physical starvation are
removed from most of our realities,
several questions must be posed.
Among them are: Why are we steal-
ing? Why are we selling ourselves,
our loved ones? Why are we killing
ourselves and our loved ones?

We are doing this not out of phys-

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING

oe,
i hee

ical hunger but because of the spir-
itual, emotional and mental hunger
that exists in this city, on our islands
and in our people. As I said before,
this hunger lies like a gaping maw in
our existence, howling in a hollow
voice in the midst of our prosperity.
It is this hunger that leads many
Bahamians to feel that they cannot
make it, that they are not equipped
to make it and no one else but
(excuse the colloquialism) “them
and their ma” cares if they make it.

Increasingly Bahamians are
becoming unable to take advantage
of the opportunities in their own
county because of the shortfall in
the education system. There is a
growing sector of our society that
feels pushed out of the mainstream
because of the country from which
they or their parents originated. Our
youth, for a plethora of reasons, are
becoming increasingly angry, dis-
enfranchised and violent. And it's
not only the youth, it's their par-
ents as well who are feeling discon-
nected from, or dispossessed from
the Bahamas and its promise of
prosperity.

This dispossession is not mani-
festing itself in what I like to call
the dilly tree philosophers, the won-
derful men and women in our coun-
try who've been there, done that,
seen it and can tell you better than
can any book on Bahamian history.
It's not expressing itself in many of
the middle or affluent classes who

Well-refined.
Ne

are becoming more educated, more
"economically empowered" — the
phrase some people like to use—
and it is certainly not being
expressed in those movers and shak-
ers in the tourism industry, the judi-
ciary, in the political, or financial
sector.

This phenomenon of disposses-
sion is being expressed in the heart
of this island in those people who
are largely ignored, spoken about
jokingly as the "jungaless", looked
down upon as the unwed teenager,
the sneered at construction worker
who just spent the lion’s share of
his pay cheque in Hoffer and Sons,
the unemployable high school
senior.

They are the young men who we
see being trouped out of the prison
buses on weekdays, arrested on
weekends and cycled and recycled
through Her Majesty's Prison for
the rest of their lives. They are the
young people, and some not so
young, who use their body as chattel
to be traded for chattel, favour or
affection.

Our material wealth as a nation
has brought us no closer to being
the sand-bordered utopia that we
sell to tourists on our postcards than
it was 500 years ago.

Despite our material prosperity,
Bahamians are more afraid of one
another, less patient with one anoth-
er, less tolerant and less under-
standing. Despite the nation's mate-

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rial wealth we are not being fed as a
people. All people with some influ-
ence in this society, the media, the
church, the judiciary, all branches of
government, and our elected offi-
cials have become complicit in this.

Regardless, there is no other enti-
ty in this nation, or any other nation
for that matter, that is more power-
ful than the individual. Every able-
bodied citizen and resident of this
county can change things for the
better and in fact the institutions
that were mentioned before.

We must relieve our people of
this famine. We must not remove
ourselves from the people in the
sense that average concerns are not
our concerns, We must not believe
that we are a special sect, the digni-
fied and entitled, well connected
and privileged men and women, the
playground for the pedantic or pow-
erful. We must not create a bubble
around ourselves and lull ourselves
into thinking that if all is well with
me and my world, then all is well.

There is nothing that is played
out in the wider society that cannot
reach our homes.

We must become the enactors of
social change, the builders of social
consciousness. We must continu-
ously realise that we are no better
than the people with whom we exist.
We are no more powerful than they
are, no more entitled or special. If
our neighbour is weak, then we are
weak. If they lack, then we lack. I

have said this many times because I
believe it so strongly: The Bahamas
and the Bahamian stand on the cusp
of a great social change and how
we address these issues today will
determine whether this change will
be either cataclysmic or miraculous.

Every person can assist with
addressing this sense of desperation
and work for positive change. We
can help each other learn from our
mistakes and the mistake of others,
think and express ourselves prop-
erly and have a sense of responsi-
bility for each other. We must let
our people Know that no matter
how poor, uneducated or hopeless
they feel, they are Bahamians and
they are the only ones who can
build this nation.

As in every age, we have the
responsibility to keep the common
good uppermost in our minds so
that we can make informed deci-
sions to direct our actions. Working
for a just social order requires us
to become less insular or self-con-
tained. We must also be ready to
accept the realities of our society.
The truth is often ugly, uncomfort-
able, embarrassing, and inconve-
nient and may more often than not
be catering to the status quo.

But if we are to flourish and be
equipped with what we need to pur-
sue our authentic fulfilment, then
we must be armed with knowledge
enough to know what must be done
to save ourselves.

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

Hubble image shows debris from Jupiter collision

BALTIMORE (AP) — NASA's
Hubble Space Telescope is offering a
glimpse of atmospheric debris from
an object that plunged into Jupiter in
a rare collision with the planet.

Scientists used the telescope Thurs-
day to capture what they call the
"sharpest visible-light picture” so far
of the expanding gash.

rare.

Simon-Miller estimates the diameter
of the object that hit the planet was
the size of several football fields.

The debris possibly came from a
comet or asteroid that hit Jupiter.

NASA also says the new images
prove repairs done on the Hubble in
May were successful.

An amateur stargazer in Australia
spotted the impression last Sunday.

Space
Amy Simon-Miller of NASA's
Goddard Space Flight Center in

Greenbelt, Maryland, says the mag-
nitude of the impact is believed to be

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First Name:
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Work:
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Telephone # Home:

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THE impact feature |
(dark spot) and

"backsplash" of

material from a

small object that

plunged into

Jupiter...

(AP Photo: NASA)







NASA patches
air-purifying
system on
space station

By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL,
Fla. (AP) — A space station
air purifier was working again
Sunday after it shut down at
the worst possible time, when
company was still visiting and
had swollen the on-board
crowd to a record 13.

The repair by flight con-
trollers, albeit temporary,
came as a great relief to
NASA.

Even if the carbon dioxide-
removal system had remained
broken, shuttle Endeavour
would not have had to
undock early from the inter-
national space station, said
flight director Brian Smith.
But the system needs to work
to support six station residents
over the long term, he said.

The machine for cleansing
the station atmosphere, on the
US side of the sprawling out-
post, failed Saturday when it
got too hot and tripped a cir-
cuit breaker.

Flight controllers managed
to get the unit up and running
again 8 1/2 hours later in man-
ual mode. That means extra
people are needed in Mission
Control — six each day — to
handle the approximately 50
computer commands that
need to be sent up every few
hours.

Normally, the system runs
automatically. Smith said
engineers hope to come up
with a software solution soon
to have the system back in
automatic.

An air-cleansing system on
the Russian side of the sta-
tion is working fine. In addi-
tion, the station has about
three weeks’ worth of canis-
ters for removing the carbon
dioxide exhaled by six crew
members. The astronauts
would have relied on those
canisters to prevent an early
undocking of Endeavour, if
the US carbon-dioxide
removal machine not been
coaxed back into operation.

The shuttle and its crew of
seven will depart Tuesday, as
originally planned.

Before leaving, the shuttle

astronauts have their fifth and
final spacewalk to perform.

During Monday’s space-
walk, Christopher Cassidy
and Thomas Marshburn will
rearrange some power cable
hookups, fold down a piece
of popped-up insulation on a
small, dexterous robot arm,
and install TV cameras on the
brand new porch of Japan’s
space station lab.

“We're all keenly aware
that (spacewalks) carry some
risk to them, and so we’re
going to be very, very delib-
erate and careful,” said shut-
tle commander Mark Polan-
sky. “In my book, the last one
you do is always the one that
you have to watch out for the
most.”

After experiencing elevated
carbon dioxide levels on the
past two spacewalks, astro-
naut Christopher Cassidy
promises to take it nice and
slow Monday. His first space-
walk last week had to be cut
short because of the problem.

Mission Control has urged
Cassidy to rein himself in, not
so easy for a former Navy
SEAL.

“Yes, I am taking quite a
bit of teasing about this,” Cas-
sidy said at a news conference
as his crewmates erupted in
laughter. “I have a whole lot
of confidence in the suit and
the system there. ... It’s not
like you leave them out on
the loading dock overnight or
anything.”

A spare carbon-dioxide
removal system for the space
station, meanwhile, will be
launched at the end of August
on the next shuttle flight, a
plan put in place long before
this weekend’s trouble.

NASA has wrapped up
extensive testing of the foam
insulation on the fuel tank for
that mission, and so far every-
thing looks to be in good
shape. Engineers wanted to
make sure that the insulation
was attached properly after
considerable foam was lost
during Endeavour’s July 15
launch. The tests delayed Dis-
covery’s mission by a week.

Liftoff is now targeted for
August 25 at the earliest.

hore PPT EL

Everywhere Lu Lee end Are!

| a f
iF Par = A =
f Tel: 502 23564 ~

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oC





THE TRIBUNE



Jamaica targets child
porn with new bill

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico
(AP) — Legislators in
Jamaica have tentatively
approved a bill that would
crack down on the posses-
sion, production and distri-
bution of child pornography.

The government says the
bill makes child pornography
a separate crime punishable
by up to 20 years in prison
and more than $5,000 in
fines.

People linked to child
pornography previously had

to be prosecuted under other
statues, such as carnal abuse.

The bill, approved by the
Senate on Friday, is needed
to better protect children,
according to a government
statement issued Saturday.

The House of Represen-
tatives is expected to debate
the bill next week.

Jamaica recently strength-
ened laws regarding other
sexual offenses and created
the island's first sex-offender
registry.

Programme aims to
boost food production

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Jamaica says it has thou-
sands more acres of former mining sites that can be converted
into fields under a programme aimed at boosting food pro-

duction.

Mining Minister Laurence Broderick says the plan aims to
ease poverty following a recent World Bank report that found
rural areas remain impoverished.

He says the state owns more than 5,000 hectares (12,000
acres) of land once mined for bauxite that can be converted.

He said Friday in a statement that some 3,000 hectares (7,400
acres) have already been converted and yield more than 700,000
pounds (318,000 kilograms) annually of cauliflower, pumpkin,

sweet pepper and other crops.

Jamaica is one of the world's top producers of bauxite, the

main ore in aluminum.

Widow of Jamaica’s first PM dies at 97

KINGSTON, Jamaica
(AP) — Gladys Bustamante,
the widow of Jamaica's first
prime minister and a staunch
supporter of women's and
workers’ rights, died Satur-
day. She was 97.

Bustamante died Saturday
at a hospital after suffering
from a fever, according to a
statement from the office of
current Prime Minister Bruce
Golding.

The cause of death was
unclear, although the govern-
ment said she had been con-
fined to her house for two
years.

"Lady B,” as Bustamante
was known, married Alexan-

der Bustamante in 1963, a
year after Jamaica was grant-
ed independence from
Britain.

She continued to work for
the Jamaica Labour Party
long after her husband died
in 1977.

"Lady B" also was a mem-
ber of the Bustamante Indus-
trial Trade Union and volun-
teered with non-profit groups
to help impoverished families,
the government news agency
said.

Alexander Bustamante was
named a national hero, an
honour bestowed to a select
few including black civil rights
leader Marcus Garvey.

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MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 3C

INSIGHT

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BANCO

ESPIRITO
SANTO

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KPMG & Associados - Sociedade de
Revisores

Oficiais de Contas, S. A.

Edificio Monumental

Av. Praia da Vitéria, 71 - A, 11%
1069-006 Lisbon

Portugal

Telephone: +351 210 110 000
Fax: +351 210 110 121
Internet: www.kpmg.pt

Rane

AUDITORS’ REPORT
CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(ISSUED BY THE STATUTORY AUDITOR, A CMVM REGISTERED AUDITOR)

(This report is a free translation to English from the original Portuguese version)

Introduction

1. In accordance with the applicable legislation, we present our Audit Report on the
financial information included in the Report of the Board of Directors and in the
accompanying consolidated financial statements as at and for the year ended 31
December 2008, of Banco Espirito Santo, S.A., which comprise the consolidated
balance shect as at 31 December 2008 (showing total consolidated assets of Euro
75,186,728 thousand and total equity attributable to the equity holders of the Bank of
Euro 4,499,435 thousand, including a net profit attributable to the equity holders of the
Bank of Euro 402,284 thousand), the consolidated statements of income, the consolidated
statement of changes in equity, and the consolidated statement of cash flows for the year
then ended, and the corresponding notes to the accounts.

Responsibilities

2. The Board of Directors is responsible for:

a) the preparation of the consolidated financial statements in accordance with the
International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as adopted by the European
Union, that present fairly, the consolidated financial position of the Bank, the
consolidated results of its operations, its consolidated changes in equity and its
consolidated cash flows;

b) maintaining historical financial information, prepared in accordance with generally
accepted accounting principles which is complete, true, current, clear, objective and
lawful as required by the Stock Exchange Code (“Cédigo dos Valores Mobilidrios”),

c) the adoption of adequate accounting policies and criteria;
d) maintaining an appropriate system of internal control; and

e) the communication of any relevant matter that may have influenced the activity of the
bank and its subsidiaries, their financial position or results.

3. Our responsibility is to verify the consolidated financial information included in the
above referred documents, namely as to whether it is complete, true, current, clear,
objective and lawful as required by the “Cédigo dos Valores Mobilidrios”, in order to
issue a professional and independent opinion based on our audit.

Scope

4, We conducted our audit in accordance with the Technical Standards and Guidelines
issued by the Portuguese Institute of Statutory Auditors (“Ordem dos Revisores Oficiais
de Contas”), which require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable
assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material
misstatements. Accordingly our audit included:

- verification that the financial statements of the companies included in the
consolidation have been properly audited and, in those significant cases in which they
were not, verification, on a test basis, of the information underlying the figures and its
disclosures contained therein, and an assessment of the estimates, based on the
judgements and criteria defined by the Board of Directors, used in the preparation of
the referred financial statements;

- verification of the consolidation procedures and of the application of the equity
method;

- evaluation of the appropriateness of the accounting policies used and of their
disclosure, taking into account the applicable circumstances;

- assessing the applicability of the going concern basis of accounting:

- assessment of the appropriateness of the overall presentation of the financial
statements; and

- assessment of whether the consolidated financial information is complete, true,
current, clear, objective and lawful.

Our audit also included the verification that the consolidated financial information
included in the Report of the Board of Directors is consistent with the consolidated
financial statements presented.

un

6. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

Opinion

Ts In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly in all
material respects the consolidated financial position of Banco Espirito Santo, S.A. as at
31 December 2008, the consolidated results of its operations, consolidated changes in
equity and consolidated cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with the
International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as adopted by the European Union,
and the information contained therein is complete, true, current, clear, objective and
lawful.

A copy of the Annual Report may be obtained from Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, Ansbacher House, Bank Lane, Nassau, Bahamas.





et

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST





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A] INDEX NG
















fi

MONDAY, JULY 27TH 2009, PAGE 7C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



MARINE FORECAST






















Z Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
i es — — _ we High = Low ~W High Low W NASSAU Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 84° F
: - — of PP én i 0| 1 | 2|3 \4 [5 i 8| oft Fic OFC Fic FC Tuesday: __E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 84° F
iP é — te , |) Acapulco 88/31 79/26 t 88/31 80/26 ¢ FREEPORT Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 84° F
wm en e — el a Low | MODERATE | HIGH | V.HIGH | EXT Amsterdam 70/21 56/13 + 70/21 56/13 pe Tuesday: Eat 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 84° F
k m ORLANDO A Ankara, Turkey 83/28 49/9 pe 80/26 47/8 Ss ABACO Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 85° F
High: 91° F/33°C i wg Partly sunny and Partly cloudy, a Mostly cloudy, a Some sun with a Periods of sun, a Partly sunny, a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 92/33 73/22 s 90/32 72/22 s Tuesday: _ E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 85° F
rs Cae F/24°C ae breezy. t-storm; breezy. t-storm: breezy. couple of t-storms. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 56/13 44/6 s 57/13 51/10 pc
: 5 t ‘anil . Hi h: Q1° Hi h: 941° Hi h: 91° Hi h: 89° Bangkok 91/32 79/26 t 89/31 79/26 t
1 @ 8 de ade ane IQn: 91 IM. JT Me Ie I. OF Barbados 86/30 76/24 96/30 77/25 r MMA) Vacs | Bt) GS
TAMPA ly High: 90 Low: 80 Low: 80 Low: 82 Low: 80 Low: 80 TIDES FOR Nassau Barcelona 80/26 68/20 s 80/26 67/19 s
eu i. r, CsA Ur Beijin 84/28 64/17 s 90/32 64/17 5
High: 91° F/33° C toi 104° F 96°-88° F 100°-90° F 103°-85° F 97°-88° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft. US
-7f° ° j 5 as : : a — - - —— Beirut 81/27 77/25 s 81/27 77/25 s
Low: 76° F/24°C ryt - The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Tod 12:22am. 27 6:28am. -0.1
» “ - elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. ee 12:57pm. 3.0 7:12pm. 0.2 Belgrade 85/29 62/16 pc 91/32 67/19 s
@ i sale mes pal 7 Berlin 81/27 63/17 pc 72/22 55/12 c
7 = CU ne Tuesday 4am. 25 Tivam 0. Bermuda 81/27 75/23 s 81/27 74/23 s ~ Billings
a 1, , | = 52pm. 29 8:11pm. 04 Bogota 68/20 43/6 pc 69/20 44/6 pc
) ei 7 Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Wednesday209am. 23 810am. 02 Brussels 77/25 47/8 sh 72/22 53/11 pe
| 1 ABACO Temperature 251p.m. 28 9:41pm. 05 Budapest 86/30 62/16 s 93/33 63/17 s
, | 5 * jah: 4° ° HIGH: sess sasedvssseslacettonacecsiediared leaecbanes 93° F/34° C : ; Buenos Aires 59/15 41/5 s 5713 383s
| - 1 hel F/aa G Low 73° F/26°¢ ‘Thursday Fe ee ea oe Cairo 104/40 77/25 s 102/88 77/25 s aDenver
- Cy Low: 79° F/26°C Normal high... gee rsi2¢ PEE Calcutta 93/33 82/27 t 94/34 83/28 t
od i wy Normal low 75° F/24° C Calgary 75/23 50/10 pc 68/20 50/10 t
é ofa The: @ WEST PALM BEACH a Last years NUD saccuhseiacieranesi 93° F/34° C Sun AND Moon ene 93/33 74/23 pe 90/32 75/23 pc eetateios
’ —— High: 91° F/33°C ae Last year's lOW oes 77° F/25° C " Caracas 80/26 72/22 t 82/27 71/21 t 86/66
omg Low: 77° F/25°C a Precipitation Sunrise... ... 6:35 am. Moonrise ...12:18p.m. Casablanca 89/31 70/21 s 91/32 73/22 s 85/69)
~~
¢ r. FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT ~f As of 2 p.m, yesterday v.eccccscccscsscssssssesessesee 0.00" Sunset....... 7:57 p.m. Moonset....11:46 p.m. Copenhagen 72/22 60/15 sh 71/21 54/12 c
Ai . 1 Year to date .. 20. i Dublin 64/17 50/10 sh 6317 52/1 6
—. : o£ 99° : f First Full Last New u
mm High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date .......c.ccsecscssessseseeeeseeee 23.84 : as - Frankfurt 86/30 57/13 pc 77/25 57/13 5
Low: 79° F/26°C — Low: 77° F/25°C Eo F a ie Geneva 84/28 59/15 t 79/26 55/12 pe
a. AccuWeather.com oe im ee Halifax 67/19 59/15 po 75/23 58/14 c Siow Miami
o @ q Forecasts and graphics provided by : — hy Havana 91/32 74/23 sh 90/32 74/23 sh T-storms 91/79
: : MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 28 Aug. 5 Aug.13 Aug. 20 Helsinki 72/22 55/12 pe 73/22 55/12 s Rain Eronte
- High: 91° F/33° C Hong Kong 90/32 81/27 t 90/32 81/27 t [a Flues Cold
all Low: 79° F/26°C NASSAU High: 91° F/33° C Islamabad 110/43 86/30 s 108/42 84/28 s eS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and Vs erecnis
be ; Fe 3 Low: 79° F/26°C SET 93/28 67/19 s 34/28 BEB s Be Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. arm
pt ree c . Neeicalei 88/31 64/17 s 87/30 65/18 s [v_Â¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mega
=a ow: 80° F/27°
; a — Co hams 1g gas srg 308s a5] 08 BN 1s 26GB 6s 70 6 AAT
KEY WEST a , CATISLAND Kingston 89/31 78/25 sh 90/32 78/25 sh
High: 90° F/32°C i 4 3 - Lima 73/22 60/15 s 73/22 59/15 s
Low: 80° F/27°C Bee rnaee London 71/21 51/10 + 70/21 57/13 pc
j - ¥ ow: Madrid 99/37 66/18 s 99/37 68/20 s
@ 7 , Manila 86/30 77/25 r 84/28 79/26 +r in es - ke 16 A NJ im | N S B RA N ‘é F
P ; =} Mexico City 75/23 53/11 t 74/23 55/12 t .
———-~ Monterrey 105/40 74/23 pc 110/43 75/23 s
Z > : GREAT EXUMA — SAN SALVADOR Montreal 77/25 63/17 t 82/27 68/20 pc .
all, i High: 87° F/31°C High: 88° F/31°C Moscow 74/23 54/12 + 71/21 59/15 pc ,
Low: 79° F/26° C Low: 76°F/24°C Munich 86/30 61/16 s 76/24 48/8 pc > “a
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | . Nairobi _ 78/25 53/11 ¢ 79/26 54/12 sh ! rr
highia’and tonights's lows: ve High: 91° F/33°C New Delhi 90/32 79/26 t 91/32 77/25 pe ae) u an e OW nN
: i Paris 74/23 54/12 sh 77/25 59/15 pe A a
i Prague 82/27 63/17 pc 72/22 53/11 pc f Way y I lur r cane
ee ao aes we ne De ;
High: 90° F/32° C la $ s 7
: "77° ‘0 Rome 86/30 67/19 s 88/31 68/20 s Or you can rest Casy knowing
Low: 77° F/25° C 4
Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 90/32 81/27 sh 91/32 81/27 s that yo have excellent Insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 91° F/33°C San Juan 57/13 32/0 s 64/17 33/0 s CO race no matter which
Fc FIC Fic FIC Fic F/C Fic FIC FIC FIC Fic FIC ru Low: 75° F/24°C San Salvador 89/31 74/23 s 89/31 74/23 pe th rate d bl :
Albuquerque 92/33 70/21 t 92/33 67/19 c Indianapolis 85/29 66/18 s 88/31 68/20 t Philadelphia 88/31 72/22 t 88/31 72/22 t CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS Santiago S713 37/2 s 63/17 398 s Way e win OWS.
Anchorage 68/20 57/13 r 72/22 56/13 s Jacksonville 92/33 71/21 t 92/33 74/23 t Phoenix 111/43 89/31 s 111/43 88/31 s Han ree . aaa aaa a ome 7 ice a -
Atlanta 85/29 69/20 t 88/31 71/21 t KansasCity 92/33 70/21 pc 86/30 5915 t Pittsburgh 82/27 61/16 pc 87/30 66/18 pc RAGGEDISLAND — Ulish:92°F/33° ao Paulo s ‘-
Atlantic City 88/31 72/22 t 88/31 71/21 t Las Vegas 109/42 83/28 +s 110/43 87/30 s Portland, OR 101/38 65/18 s 102/38 65/18 eno Low: 77° F/25°C cl a Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 88/31 68/20 t 88/31 70/21 t Little Rock 91/32 72/22 pc 84/28 70/21 t Raleigh-Durham 90/32 71/21 t 91/32 71/21 t Low:74°F/23°C aa _ ee ee - Ae er 7
Boston 84/28 69/20 t 87/30 71/21 pc Los Angeles 86/30 66/18 s 84/28 64/17 $s St. Louis 90/32 72/22 s 91/32 68/20 t . a. a ae 91/32 79/26 Ps 93/33 81/27 Se
Buffalo 76/24 65/18 pc 84/28 67/19 pc Louisville 88/31 68/20 pce 90/382 71/21 pc Salt Lake City 92/83 64/17 pce 88/81 63/17 s GREATINAGUA Tala 82/27 75/23 sh 93/28 78/25 4
Charleston, SC 91/32 74/23 t 89/31 74/23 t Memphis 93/33 73/22 pe 87/380 71/21 t San Antonio 98/36 76/24 pce 98/86 79/26 s High: 93° F/34° C Tara 73/22 61/16 pe 81/27 63/17 t
Chicago 85/29 68/20 pc 84/28 64/17 t Miami 91/32 79/26 t 91/32 81/27 t San Diego 77/25 67/9 pce 74/23 67/19 pc 08 3 ss :
Cleveland 81/27 64/17 pc 89/31 69/20 pc Minneapolis 96/30 63/17 t 77/25 57/13 pc SanFrancisco 73/22 56/13 pc 70/21 56/13 pc Low: 78° F/26"G mea eae ans is oe ey a (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 90/32 74/23 t eee 2 Nashville 89/31 67/19 pce 88/81 71/21 t Seattle 94/34 63/17 $s 96/35 63/17 s Vienna 84/28 68/20 pc 93/28 62/16 pc Bahar: Abaco Eleuthera Exum
Denver 90/32 55/12 t 75/23 53/11 t New Orleans 89/31 76/24 t 88/31 77/25 t Tallahassee 91/32 71/21 t 94/34 72/22 t Warsaw 72/22 59/15 pc 81/27 54/12 ¢ 5f-3500 Tat (242) 387-4004 Tek (242) 322-2882 Tek (242) 306-2004
Detroit 85/29 66/18 t 87/30 67/19 t New York 87/30 73/22 t 88/31 76/24 t Tampa 91/32 76/24 t 91/32 77/25 t Winnipeg 72/29 55/12 sh 66/18 52/11 pc
Honolulu 89/31 77/25 pc 89/31 76/24 s OklahomaCity 92/33 70/21 pc 90/32 68/20 t Tucson 105/40 82/27 s 105/40 82/27 s Weather (W): 6-6uti
: 1S: y, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
Houston 92/33 76/24 t 91/32 76/24 t Orlando 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23 t Washington, DC 88/31 73/22 t 89/31 73/22 t storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace





PAGE 8C, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Castro says Cuba must
put land to better use

By WILL WEISSERT
Associated Press Writer

HOLGUIN, Cuba (AP) — Raul Castro said
Sunday that the global economic crisis means
tougher times ahead for Cuba, but the country
has no one to blame but itself for poor farm
production that leads to frequent shortages
of fruits, vegetables and other basics.

In a speech marking Revolution Day, Cuba's
president said the island can't pin all its prob-
lems on Washington's 47-year-old trade
embargo. He implored Cubans to take better
advantage of a government programme begun
last year to turn unused state land over to pri-
vate farmers.

"The land is there, here are the Cubans," he
said, pounding the podium. "Let's see if we get
to work or not, if we produce or not, if we
keep our word."

The line did not get much of a response
from a crowd not thrilled about working under
the island's scorching tropical sun, but the 78-
year-old Castro called agricultural production
Cuba's top priority and a matter of national
security.

"It is not a question of yelling ‘Fatherland or
death! Down with imperialism! The blockade
hurts us,’" he said, referring to US sanctions
begun in 1962. "The land is there waiting for
our efforts." He made almost no other mention
of the United States.

Three years since the last time his 82-year-
old brother Fidel was seen in public, the
younger Castro showed signs he is getting
more comfortable with national addresses,
opening with a joke about how whoever
designed the stage failed to provide any shade
for the speaker or the crowd. He later har-
pooned his own Agricultural Ministry, asking
how previous Cuban generations managed to
ever grow even a single mango tree if all state
advisers do today is say there's no money for
reforestation.

Tens of thousands of supporters, most wear-
ing red T-shirts or caps, filled a grassy plaza
dotted with red and black "July 26" flags. Rev-
olution Day, the top holiday for the communist
government, commemorates the date in 1953
when the Castros led an attack on the Mon-
cada army barracks in the eastern city of San-
tiago. The attack was a disaster, but Cubans
consider it the beginning of the revolution that
culminated with dictator Fulgencio Batista's
ouster on New Year's Day 1959.

Unlike in his last two holiday speeches, Raul
Castro did not address the crowd with a sculp-

a.
Ss
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&
o
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td
—
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PRESIDENT Raul Castro yesterday delivers a speech in Holguin, northeast of Cuba. July 26, Cuba’s Day
of National Rebellion, marks a new anniversary of the attack against Moncada military complex, where a
band of rebels, led by Fidel and Raul Castro, launched the attack 56 years ago, planting the seeds for the
1959 Cuban revolution. Holguin was selected to host the main July 26, 2009, celebration.

ture or banner of his brother's face nearby.
Instead, an eight-story tall banner on a build-
ing behind the crowd featured a picture of
both Castros thrusting their arms skyward
under the words "The Vigorous and Victorious
Revolution Keeps Marching Forward."
Despite Cubans’ hopes for change after Raul
formally took over as president in February
2008, economic reforms that were supposed to
ease life on the island have been slow to come.
Meanwhile, Cuba's economy has been ham-
mered by the global economic crisis, and US

relations have not improved much under Pres-
ident Barack Obama.

Raul Castro "was working to improve things,
but with all that's happened with the economy
in the world, the effect has been minimal,"
said Silvia Hernandez, a retired commercial
analyst for a state-run firm in Holguin, where
Castro spoke. Castro has asked Cubans to be
patient as he implements "structural changes"
to a struggling economy more than 90 per cent
controlled by the state. He also has said he'd
be willing to meet with US leaders over any

issue — including the country's political pris-
oners and human rights record, though he did
not mention that Sunday.

Officials from Cuba and the US discussed
immigration this month for the first time since
2003. The Obama administration lifted restric-
tions on Cuban-Americans who want to trav-
el or send money to the island. But Washing-
ton has said it wants to see small political or
economic reforms before going further.

"The other side doesn't want to do any-
thing,” said housewife Elena Fuentes, 73, refer-
ring to the Obama administration. "We've
been like this for 50 years. That's too long.
They talk about ‘change,’ but the change we
want is for things to get better with the United
States."

In recent months, the government has
ordered lights and air conditioners turned off
at banks, stores and other government insti-
tutions and closed state-run businesses and
factories early to conserve oil — even though
Venezuela sends the island about 100,000 bar-
rels of crude a day at favourable prices.

Farming and land reform have bolstered
production of vegetables somewhat, but gov-
ernment money problems have delayed
imports of other food, causing shortages of
basic staples such as cooking oil.

Castro said that since state officials began
doling out unused state land to private farmers
and cooperatives, 82,000 applicants have
received more than 1.7 million acres — near-
ly 40 per cent of fallow state land. The pro-
gramme bets private interests can revive an
agricultural sector crippled by decades of gov-
ernment mismanagement.

He also said Sunday that government lead-
ers will meet in coming days to assess the affect
of the global crisis on Cuba's economy, " par-
ticularly the significant reduction of income
from exports.”

Oscar Espinosa Chepe, a state-trained econ-
omist who became a dissident anti-commu-
nist and was jailed in 2003, said Castro has
failed to keep his promises as president.

"He knows times have changed, but ... he
hasn't confronted the very strong inertia with-
in the government,” said Espinosa Chepe.

Cuba's free health care and subsidized food
and housing do little to soften the sting of fur-
ther belt-tightening in a country where nearly
everyone works for the state and the average
wage is less than $20 per month.

"More steps against the crisis, more adjust-
ments, aren't going to be easy,” said Reina
Delgado, a 70-year-old retiree.





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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R 28 now infected with swine flu C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.202MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY AND BREEZY HIGH 90F LOW 80F I N S I G H T SEEINSIGHTSECTION S P O R T S A deep hunger THOMASAROBINSONHONOURED CELEBRATING THE LEGACY OF A LEGEND By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE number of swine flu c ases in the Bahamas has rocketed to at least 28, health chiefs have confirmed. T he number of people with thepotentially-deadly Influenza H1N1 has multiplied by nearly a third in the t wo weeks since 19 cases were confirmed on July 9. With many families and groups travelling abroad dur ing the summer months, the M inistry of Health expects to see the sporadic emergence of new cases of the virus. A nd the number of cases is expected to rise as the annual flu season approaches. H ealth Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said weekly updates will be posted on the Ministry of Health website every Fri-d ay to keep people informed Cases multiply b y almost a thir d in just tw o w eeks The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com House Home& SEE page 10 TEENAGER Brenton Smith was buried yesterday, just two weeks after he was accidentally killed in a shootout between police and armed robbers. Family and hundreds of friends gathered at St Anselm’s Church on Sat urday to grieve for the bright 18-year-old who was caught in the crossfire. Brenton was said to be a family-loving jokester who had dreams of becoming an engineer. He had completed a marine navigational course days before his death and, for the second summer in a row, had been accepted into a prestigious intern ship at the Albany devel opment. A website has been set up inhishonour: brentonhectorsmith.com BRENT ON SMITHLAIDTOREST HECTOR AND Rosetta Smith, the parents of Bren ton Smith, place flowers on his coffin on Saturday. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Daughter of murder victim ‘not arrested’ say police B y MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net R EPORTS which say the 16-year-old daughter of murdered American Anna Michelle Garrisonh as been arrested in the United States have been refuted by The Royal B ahamas Police Force. Claims made by a Bahamian website, andr epeated by Florida NBC n ews Channel Five, say Ms Garrison’s daughter, Anna Pugh, was found in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, with her father Chris Pugh. B ahamas Police want to question Anna about Ms Garrison’s death and have enlisted the United S tates Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI help find her. Ms Garrison’s decomposing body was found in a bushy area off Fox Hill Road south, near theB lue Water Cay development, New Provi dence, at around 6pm on Brenton Smith Claims made on website and on TV are refuted SEE page 10 MORE than 60 Haitian migrants were apprehended in the Exumas over the week end near Harvey Cay, according to the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. According to RBDF offi cials, July has seen the largest number of Haitain migrants seeking refuge to the coun try’s shores in recent times. The group, 66 migrants in all, were caught just after 9am Sunday by Defence Force vessel HMBS P-49, which was on routine patrol approxi mately 18 miles southwest of Harvey Cay. The officers, under the command of Lieutenant Omarv Saunders, spotted a 40-foot Haitian sailing sloop and upon further investigation discovered the migrants 46 males, 11 females and 9 children aboard the vessel. More than 60 Haitian migrants apprehended SEE page 11 A TEENAGE boy was stabbed in a fight with another youth on the Western Esplanade beach near Arawak Cay, West Bay Street, last night. The Nassau boy, aged 16, ran to the Arawak Cay police sta tion bleeding after he was stabbed. Police Superintendent Elsworth Moss said he was cut twice on the arm. The attacker fled as the boy ran for help. The incident is still under investigation and the boy was taken to Princess Margaret Hospital for medical treatment. T eenager stabbed in fight By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE two boys who were missing in Andros for 33 days and feared dead are still recovering at the Princess Margaret Hospital, their mother Vera Clarke said yesterday. Although the brothers are expected to make a full recovery, Boys who went missing on Andros still in hospital SEE page 10 By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net POLICE are still looking to question the driver of a packed jitney that sped out of control towards the Nassau Harbour. Chief Superintendent Glenn Miller, head of the Central Police Station, yesterday said that as far as he was aware, the driver had not been questioned by traffic officers. B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net PASSENGERS fearing for t heir lives leapt from the windows of an out-of-control jitneythat was heading for the waters of Nassau Harbour during morning traffic yesterday. Police were waiting to speak with the driver of the packed bus licensc plate NP 398 yesterday afternoon after he was reported to have left the scene as the vehi cle came to a halt just feet from the harbour’s edge next to Senor Frogs. Two young men, who police have not identified,NASSAUANDBAHAMAISLANDSLEADINGNEWSPAPER C M Y K C M Y KVolume: 105 No.201SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 W EATHERMOSTLY SUNNY WITH T-STORMHIGH 92F L OW 81F I N S I D ESEE PAGETWELVES P O R T SSome fishy b usiness i nNassauS EEFRONT PAGEOFSPORTSDebbie’s TRIUMPH Passengers jump for lives from windows T wo taken to hospital with leg injuries O ut-of-control bus stops feet from harbourThe TribuneANYTIME...ANYPLACE, WERE#1 BAHAMASEDITIONTRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAPwww.tribune242.com P hoto: Alison Lowe/Tribune staff B USDRAMA: The aftermath of the jitney terror ride which ended just feet short of Nassau Harbour, next to Senor F rogs. Police are waiting to speak to t he driver. Jitney ride of terror E LEMENTS within the Free National Movement claim that their chairman Johnley Ferguson is not perf o rming up to the standard e xpected of him and have g one as far as calling his last two years in office a “dismal failure.” Y esterday, a high ranking official of the FNM, who s poke on condition of a nonymity, said she fully e xpects for people to chall enge Mr Ferguson for his post at the party’s convention, which is to take place in Octob er. “This position is simply too important for anyone to be pussy-footing around with.J ohnley has been the chairman since the elections. I can’t remember the exactd ate, but that isn’t important right now. FNM chairman dubbed a failure MINISTER of Environm ent Dr Earl Deveaux has s uggested that Opposition S enator Jerome Fitzgerald m ay have conflicting interests in his opposition to Government's planned move of the c ountry's container port to Arawak Cay due to the senator's old plans to build a reverse osmosis (ROp lant at the site. But Mr Fitzgerald called these arguments invalid. Hes aid it was public knowledge that the then PLP government vetoed the idea of the RO plant at Arawak Cay, instead choosing the Perpall Tract site in 2006. PLP Senator ‘may have conflicting interests’ THE Bahamas Financial Services Union (BFSU ed yesterday that government is failing to inform the public of the number of cutbacks that are being experienced int heir sector. In a statement issued to the media, the BFSU said thate mployers at banks, trust companies, insurance compan ies, and law firms were moving ahead with restructuring e xercises that have led to downsizing or “right-sizing” on a scheduled time frame so t hat there is little resemblance to the large redundancies found in the hotel sector. This tactic, the union said, is designed to hoodwink the public into “not noticing” the large number of layoffs that these companies would be performing. Govt criticised over financial s ervices cutbacks S EE page seven S EE page seven S EE page seven R R O UTE O UTE O F OUT O F OUT OF OF CONTR CONTR O L O L B US B USPAGE 2: Transport fearsSEE page two SEE page 11 THE report in Saturday’s Tribune. Police seeking to question driver of out of control jitney

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By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net FORMER Bain and G rants Town MP Bradley R oberts is undecided on w hether or not he will vie for the post of chairman of the Progressive Liberal Par-ty at the party’s upcoming convention. “I’ve been hearing that m yself (but made any decision with regard to that. I’ve been asked by many persons, e ncouraged by many pers ons but I have not given that any consideration,” Mr Roberts told The Tribune yesterday when asked to clarify speculation that he was gunning for the post. He added that he has not d ecided whether or not he w ill join the fray of possible contenders. Mr Roberts said he has been asked to bid for the post by party supporters w ho feel his “no-nonsense” s tyle will inject energy into the Opposition. I think they like my style and the fact that they know that I’m a no-nonsense person. And I got the job done b efore when I was chairman o f the party.” Mr Roberts was the PLP’s chairman when the party defeated the Free National Movement in the 2002 election race. He also served as public works minister under t he Christie administration. A fter one term in office, the PLP lost power to the FNM in May, 2007. In order to return to the country’s helm, Mr Roberts feels the P LP needs to revert to the t ried and tested policies which won them the 2002 e lection race. “A return to what it did in 2002 is a good start, become focused and introd uce a programme to the B ahamian people,” he said. When asked if he thought he would be able to help steer the PLP to victory in the 2012 election, Mr Roberts laughed and said: “Why don’t we cross that b ridge if we ever need to get t o it. “But I’ll say this though, there is need to bring about a change in this country. “We are going down the t ubes fast. Lots of people are hurting all over and we’re not g etting any answers to problems of our people except w ait to see what (US President Barack) Obama will d o. That cannot be a solut ion to our problems.” T he PLP’s convention is s lated for October. Englers ton MP Glenys HannaM artin is the current party chairman. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News.................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11 Editorial/Letters.........................................P4 Sports......................................P12,13,14,15 Advt .......................................................P16 BUSINESS SECTION Business...................... P1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9,10,11 Advts...................................................P5,12 INSIGHT SECTION Insight............................................P1,2,3,4,8 Advt .........................................................P5 Comics..................................................... P6 Weather.....................................................P7 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES REAL ESTATE GUIDE 24 PAGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 P AGES Bradley Roberts undecided on running for PLP chairman BRADLEYROBERTS B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net A MAN appeared before Deputy Chief Magistrate H elen Jones in Court Three, y esterday charged with pos s ession of an unlicensed firearm and ammunition. I t is alleged that on May 1 5, Kendrick McQueen, 37, while being concerned with another, was found in pos session of a firearm, serialn umber AK16243, without being the holder of a special l icense. It is also alleged that on t he same date, while being c oncerned with another, he was found in possession of 1 0 live rounds of .40 bullets. McQueen pleaded not guilty to the charges. He was represented by K Brian Hanna. A MAN has been c harged with two counts of shop breaking and two counts of stealing. D ougaye Huyler, 23, is accused of breaking into M cGibbons Enterprises, at K eat Street, and making off with a red coloured air comp ressor. He pleaded not guilty to the charges and selected summary trial. Huyler was also charged w ith shop breaking and stealing at the G & G Shipp ing Company. It is alleged that between July 7 and July 8, he broke i nto the company at Shelly Street and stole one Geo T racker Jeep, one generat or, a safe, and $700, together valued $9,300. H e was also charged with dishonestly receiving the items. Huyler pleaded not guilty to all the charges and them atter was adjourned to March 9, 2010. He was g ranted $5,000 bail with one or two sureties. Man charged with possession of unlicensed firearm, ammunition FUNERALOFBRENTONSMITH EMOTIONS run high at the funeral of Brenton Smith, the teenager who died after he was accidentally killed in a shootout between police and armed robbers. SEEPAGEONE Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y.

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By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE controversy surrounding the abuse of crown land grants highlights the need for the Government to implement a Freedom ofI nformation Act (FOIA claims the National Devel-o pment Party. “Our government will never be seen as truly transparent unless and until this act is brought into force,” said ap ress release issued by the party. The NDP also questioned the ability of Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and Opposition Leader Perry Christiet o objectively investigate their parts in the controvers ial granting of Crown Land. We do not believe that the two men who were ultimately responsible for the d isposition of crown lands s ince 1992, and who today s till sit as leaders of their respective political parties, c an truly be objective in any investigation of themselves,” said the NDP. T he group is also calling o n the Government to allow t he media and the public u nfettered access into the r ecords of the Department of Lands and Surveys for an independent inquiry into the d ebacle. “We believe that the public would be much better servedi f members of the press were given independent responsi bility for conducting a thoro ugh investigation into the records related to the granting of crown lands, while perm itting our political leaders t o instead focus on the more u rgent matter of economic r ecovery, diversification, and s trengthening”. “If there is any select committee that should be formed a t this time, it should be one that focuses on the current economic crisis and thef uture developmentofthe Bahamas,” said the NDP. A committee headed by F ox Hill MP Fred Mitchell was recently formed to investigate the disposition of all p ublicly held lands in the country. It is expected to make a report on its findingsi n October. This Lands Committee w as formed following a series of Tribune exposes which revealed claims of nepotism and corruption in the Department of Lands and Surveys. F ollowing these reports, the former director of Lands Tex Turnquest was forced to resign from his post after The Tribune published allegations that members of his family, including his mother-in-law, w ere granted crown land lots on the island of Exuma. These beachfront lots, which were sold at less than $2,500 each, were flipped a few years later for more than $ 550,000 apiece. Mr Turnq uest denied any connection to any of the transactions. A litany of other crown land “abuses” were subseq uently detailed in Parliam ent by the Prime Minister, after The Tribune’s extensive reporting into the issue. T he NDP also wants to know: T he names of all persons who have applied for Crown Land. The purpose for which it was applied. T he citizenship of each application. How many applications for crown land were approved and how many were denied. The price paid for the land a nd whether the land was developed or not. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Post Bed 3 pc Queen Post Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,950 $3,950 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,150 $4,150Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e NDP:crown land controversy shows need for Freedom of Information Act By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net GRAND Bahama P olice are investigating an armed robbery on Saturday evening. Three masked armed m en stormed into the D olphin restaurant and bar, on the airport road,a round 11.12pm and d emanded cash. Nobody was hurt and suspects got away with an undetermined amounto f cash and several bottles of liquors. Investigations continue. FIREARM FOUND POLICE were called to a disturbance and fight at the Hawksbill Yacht Club around 11.43pm on Saturday evening. On arrival at the scene, officers discovered a .40 pistol with two magazines and two live rounds of ammunition. No arrest was made. POLICE APPEAL Police are appealing to people to come forward with information which could assist them with their investigation into the armed robbery and murder of businessman Leslie Maycock. Mr Maycock, 50, was shot and robbed of cash at his store in the Hawksbill on July 15. His death is the sixth homicide for the year on Grand Bahama. Masked men rob Grand Bahama restaurant In brief THE NDP questioned the ability of Hubert Ingraham (left Christie to objectively investigate their parts in the controversial granting of Crown Land. To have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at:letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207 AFISHERMAN drowned while diving for traps off the coast of Salt Cay, near Paradise Island, on Friday. T he man has not yet been i dentified by police, and his age is not known. Superintendent Elsworth Moss in charge of the Criminal Detective Unit said the Harbour Patrol were calleda t around 3pm on Friday w hen the man did not surface. H e had gone under to retreive a fish trap around h alf a mile off the coast of S alt Cay, northeast of Par adise Island. A team of divers from the D efence Force and B ahamas Air Sea Rescue (BASRA man’s body from the sea f loor. He was brought to Nassau for an autopsy. Fisherman dies while diving for traps

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Thank you for publishing my thoughts in your July 9th edition. Further, thank you f or your response to same; it is always good to receive a different point of view because it promotes good discussion on issues of public importance. I would like to assure you a nd your readers that before submitting any written work, I go through a process of research and discussion before I formulate and publish my opinions. With regards to my thoughts on t he resignation of Sir Bur ton Hall, one of the many reference materials I used was a book called “The Law and Legal System of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas” by Dr Dexter Johnson. In this book, Dr Johnson was able to accomplish what few lawyers can – explain the legal system without the use of the draconian lan guage that is custom within that system and keeps many lawyers employed. Simply put, this book can be thought of as the Bahamian version of “Bahamian law for Dummies” and I think it’s a must read for readers who would like a betters ense of how the legal system is structured. It is number one on my best sellerl ist! My last submission spoke a bout Sir Burton’s poor t enure in office more so than how he and other members a re appointed, however, as a r esult of his resignation, I t hink now is the best time f or us to review how the judiciary appoints judges a nd the manner in which the h ead of the judiciary is appointed. I will not go into the nuts and bolts of how persons are appointed in the judiciary; I t hink your last response did an excellent job, but I will direct your readers to the aforementioned book by Dr Johnson should they need more details on this subject. As you rightly stated, justices are “appointed” by the Governor General. This appointment is nothing more than a rubber stamp due to the fact that the Governor General, as “head of state”, is also an appointed position, more so politically appointed! It cannot be right that a head of state that is responsible for signing laws into existence and “appointing” members of the government’s agenda is bound ed by the political will of an individual, the Prime Min i ster, who essentially has absolute power as the real head of state – scary! W e the people should not s ettle for a politically appointed office to looka fter our welfare; this is not a transparent system – especially when it comes to the appointment of individuals whose job is to interpret law and administer justice. I would hope that your opine to my thoughts is in no way confirmation and acceptance of the current system of how our judiciary is appointed, because it would go against the mantra of your institution Being Bound to S wear to The Dogmas of No M aster. In closing, I look forward to the day when we will be allowed to elect heads of the judiciary and the day when judges are subjected to public vetting before being appointed so that we the people can get some insight into their thinking and have some level of comfort with the final decision on why their appointments were approve or denied. ERIC B STRACHAN Nassau, July, 2009. EDITOR, THE Tribune. The Nassau Institute recently attended the economic conference “Freedom Fest” in Las Vegas – billed as the “World’s Largest Gathering of Free Minds”. One of the topics discussed was the toxic effects of excessive inflation, currency devaluation and poor economy management. As a general rule, the higher a country’s budget deficit, governmental borrowings and level of money creation the greater downward pressure on that country’s currency. Conversely, a strong currency is a reflection of a sound and productive economy, and increases that country’s buying power in world markets. At “Freedom Fest”, the example of Zimbabwe was given to represent the extreme and toxic effects possible with poor economic management. Zimbabwe ruined their currency (and economy in the p rocess) through reckless s pending, excessive borrowing and money creation. The Zimbabwe Central Bank has now begun to print official, legal tender 100 Trillion Dollar Notes! At “Freedom Fest”, Steve Forbes (CEO, Forbes Magazine) held one of these 100 Trillion Dollar Notes and related a simple analogy and warning regarding Zimbabwe’s economic path: “Thirty years ago the Zimbabwe dollar was pegged to the U.S. dollar. If I would have had this 100 Trillion Dollar note 30 years ago, and it was legal tender, I would have been able to buy everything in the world and had change! Now through the manipulation of the printing press and money inflation, I can’t even go into the lobby of this hotel and buy a pack of chewing gum.” To The Nassau Institute, this is an extreme, but clear, example and a lesson to Bahamian policy makers to run a sound economy with balanced budgets, low taxation, minimal intervention and appropriate levels of money creation. The Nassau Institute Nassau, July 20, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm T HIS WEEKEND a lawyer, who spends a great deal of time around the courts, e xpressed concern on behalf of some of his colleagues about what they think might bed eveloping into a problem within the jury system. T hey don’t know whether the bailiffs are having difficulty contacting jurors, or whether jurors are being difficult about serving, but they do not like what they think they see. F or example, said one, when a juror has served on a murder case, he is excused from j ury duty for a year. However, last week in the Dudley Moree murder trial, this particular lawyer counted at least three jurors who he believed had already served the previous week on the Troyniko McNeil murder t rial. Moree, 23, was on trial last week accused o f the murder of fellow mortician Dornell Ferguson, 38. The jury returned a split ver d ict 6-6. The case was ordered back for retrial. As for Troyniko McNeil, 22, the jury found him guilty, 8-4, of murdering wellknown handbag designer, Hal Taylor, b etween November 17 and 18, 2007. That case also will have to go back to a new jury f or retrial, because a murder verdict must be unanimous. The 8-4 verdict resulted in a h ung jury. McNeil’s case ended about 10 days ago, just a few days before the Moree case opened. The lawyer considered that if what he thought he saw was correct it would be most i rregular for a juror, who should be excused from jury duty for a year after serving on a m urder case, should be serving on two mur der cases within the same court session. I n the old days, said one of the lawyers, the head bailiff was usually a retired police officer. He knew the jurors, he knew who had biases and should not serve, particularly on certain cases. Maybe, the lawyer speculated, these new bailiffs aren’t as familiar with the jury pool, or maybe they are havingt o use their own cars to go out to find these people, and because of the personal expense are recycling those jurors already in the court room. This is a possible reason that theym ight be using the same people, the lawyer said. “But we don’t want to start a system w here we’re encouraging professional jurors, who believe they know more than the l awyers on the case, make up their minds as to what happened and how the law shouldb e applied, and really approach the case with a closed mind,” said the lawyer. H owever, what he found most disturbing was what looked to him like a bailiff signalling a defence attorney. “Everytime a juror’s name was pulled, it looked as though a bailiff tapped the defend i ng attorney, who promptly challenged that juror,” said the lawyer. A nother feature he found disturbing was how some court clerks and bailiffs mingled freely during adjournments with the family of the accused, defence counsel and even prosecutors. T he lawyer wanted to draw attention to what he perceived as bad habits developingb efore the system got out of hand and broke down. A lmost half a century ago when we start ed out as a court reporter there were many discussions on how to improve the jury system. In those days there was jury tampering. W e recall a certain gentleman who was a fixture around the courts. He seemed to h ave no special reason for being there. He could almost be classified as a loiterer. But, h e acquired a reputation for jury tampering. The jury sat in a room to which someone from the outside had easy access for conversation, or the passing of notes, through a low-slung window. One day to try to test t his man’s purpose for hanging around the courts, we asked him about what a particular j ury was thinking in a case that had been “out” for some time. H e said to give him a few minutes, and he would report back. We saw him head for the window. On his return, he reported that the jury would soon be out, one juror was giving trouble, but they were confident it was “swinging” for the accused. S ure enough, they were soon out, and so was the accused. Over the years jury tampering has been a major problem. I f what the lawyer has told us is true, the matter should be immediately investigated and corrected. A case study in inflation and monetary mischief LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Jury selection: bad habits forming? Now is time to review how judiciary appoints judges

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By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net EDUCATION chiefs have spoken out against a proposalto raise money for schools through the introduction of a National Lottery made in the T en Year Education Plan. C ontrary to various news articles, Minister of Education Carl Bethel maintains he nev-er affirmed his stance on the issue during development oft he plan by technical officers in communication with stakeholders over the last 13 m onths. T he plan lists 22 goals, each with short-term and long-term o bjectives, aimed at improvi ng education for students of all ages throughout the Bahamas. B ut whether or not the plan m eets its objectives will d epend on receipt of sufficient government funding. And the c ost has not yet been ascertained as the team developing the plan has yet to perform ac ost analysis for each goal. A nd the idea of starting a n ational lottery, or a national tax, to fund the plan as suggested in the blueprint devised by a team of technical officers has been ruled out by PrimeM inister Hubert Ingraham as well as the education minister. Mr Bethel said: “The technical officers putting the plan together wanted to raise all kinds of issues. I think discussion is fine, b ut when it comes to Cabinet it will be a policy document of the government, and it won’tb e possible for the government to propose any funding like that.” T he minister maintains it is government’s responsibility to fund education and the cost should not be delegated. He mentioned plans to use a l ottery system to fund educa tion implemented in the United States, which failed in itsa ttempts to fund education t hrough a lottery. Mr Bethel said: “As far as this government is concerned and from my point of view the lottery will not be a desirable option. If the Bahamian people want gambling they will have to decide that on its own merit and not use education as a horse to ride in on. “The Prime Minister has already expressed as much,a nd I feel the same way. “I want to remind people that there’s consistency in alla reas of the state and that is r eflected in what the Prime Minister said and what I said a s minister.” Mr Bethel said he hopes the plan will be finalised by December and implementedb y January, however Bahamas Union of Teachers president Belinda Wilson has said at least another year of extensive background work is needed in order for the programme to b e successful. SEE YOUNG MAN’S VIEW ONPAGEEIGHT Minister against national lottery money for schools C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS P HONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 I I f f t t h h e e B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n p p e e o o p p l l e e w w a a n n t t g g a a m m b b l l i i n n g g t t h h e e y y w w i i l l l l h h a a v v e e t t o o d d e e c c i i d d e e t t h h a a t t o o n n i i t t s s o o w w n n m m e e r r i i t t a a n n d d n n o o t t u u s s e e e e d d u u c c a a t t i i o o n n a a s s a a h h o o r r s s e e t t o o r r i i d d e e i i n n o o n n . . Carl Bethel To have your say on this or any o ther issue, email T he Tribune at:letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207 KINGSTON, Jamaica GLADYS BUSTAMANTE,the widow of Jamaica's first prime minister and a fierce supporter of women's and workers' rights, has died, according to Associated Press . She was 97. A statement from the office of Prime Minister Bruce Golding says Bustamante died Saturday at the hospital after suffering from a fever. "Lady B," as she was known, married Alexander Bustamante in 1963, one year after Jamaica was granted independence from Britain. Her husband was named a national hero, an honor bestowed to a select few including black civil rights leader Marcus Garvey. Gladys Bustamante continued to work for the Jamaica Labor Party long after her husband died in 1977 at age 93. Widow of Jamaica’s first premier dies

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE superstar guests for t he Miss Universe contest h ave been revealed by comp etition chiefs. F lo Rida, Heidi Montag, David Guetta and Kelly Rowland will grace the stage along with the huge list of international beauties at the pageant. Billy Bush, co-anchor of Access Hollywood” and C laudia Jordan of “Celebri ty Apprentice” and “Dealo r No Deal,” will host the c ompetition live from A tlantis, Paradise Island, on August 23 at 9pm on NBC and Telemundo. I nternational superstar Flo Rida will perform his hugely successful hit, “Right Round” and “Jump” as part of a two song medley during the Swimsuit Competition of the telecast. The rapper b urst on to the scene in 2008 w ith his blockbuster debut a lbum, “Mail on Sunday.” Flo Rida’s single “Right R ound,” from his new a lbum “R.O.O.T.S.,” became the fastest millionselling digital song ever,r eaching platinum status in j ust two weeks. Included in the show will also be a performance byr eality star Heidi Montag featuring her single “Turn Ya Head.” The song comes from Montag’s debut album, “Unleashed,” which w as released in July. Along w ith her music career, Mont ag is a cast member on the h it MTV show “The Hills.” David Guetta and Kelly Rowland will set the tone for the Evening Gown portion of the pageant. The popular duo will combine their talents as they perform t heir hit single, “When Love T akes Over.” Guetta, a world-renowned French DJ a nd producer, will release h is fourth studio album in A ugust, “One Love,” with Rowland, an accomplished R & B solo artist and for m er member of the band Destiny’s Child, providing the vocals for its lead single. “When Love Takes Over” is already number one on the UK Singles C hart and is quickly climbi ng in the US, having a lready been downloaded over 120,000 times oni Tunes. V enezuelan Dayana Mendoza, Miss Universe 2008, will crown her successor att he conclusion of the 2009 M iss Universe telecast. Dur ing her reign, she has trav elled the globe as an advoc ate for HIV/AIDS educa tion, research and legisla tion. The newly crowned Miss Universe will go on to do the same. Each contestant from m ore than 80 countries a round the world will be j udged in three categories: swimsuit, evening gown and interview as they vie for thec oveted title of Miss Universe 2009. In recent years, the pageant has been viewed before an estimatedw orldwide viewing audience of approximately 1 billion viewers. Miss Universe star guests are revealed MISS UNIVERSE BAHAMAS2009 F LO RIDA w ill grace the stage at the Miss Universe pageant. (AP By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net T HREE men have b een charged with armed robbery and firearm possession. C harles Miller, 28, of Yorkshire Drive, Reynard Fulford, 22, of Hanna Hill, Eight Mile Rock, and Dougaye Huyler appeared before Deputy Chief Magistrate Helen Jones. T hey were charged w ith armed robbery, possession of an unlicensed firearm while committing an indictable offence, and conspiracy to commit armed robbery. It is alleged that on July 19, the accused robbed Kevin McPhee of a leather wallet and $300. The men are also charged with the armed robbery of Nolan McKenzie on July 20. It is alleged they robbed McKenzie of a maroon coloured Oldsmobile licensed while armed with a handgun. They are also charged with causing harm to McKenzie. Miller, Fulford and Huyler were also charged with possession of unlicensed firearm and ammuni tion on July 20. It is alleged that the men were found in pos session of a black Llama .45 mm pistol and five live rounds of .45 bullets. The men pleaded not guilty to the charge. In a separate matter, Fulford was charged with armed robbery of Fabian Sears on July 20. It is alleged that he robbed Sears of three outboard Yamaha engines, a white 1996 Truck, a Motorola cel lular phone, together valued at $35,947.30, the property of Marine Land and Industry. The men were denied bail and remanded to Fox Hill Prison until October 1, 2009 for preliminary inquiry. Three men are charged with ar med robbery

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By SIR RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a Consultant a nd former Caribbean d iplomat) AS the member countries of the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS e stablishment of an Econ omic Union amongst thems elves amid grave economic c ircumstances, all of them s hould even now be considering initiatives that would cut costs while making poli-c y making and implementation more cohesive. Now that’s a long sen tence to swallow and its pre-c ise meaning may be unclear. So, spelling out the concept is important for clari ty. Starting with the econ omic circumstances of these countries, six of them are independent nations; the o ther member is Montserrat which remains a British c olony. The six are among the most heavily indebted nations, per capita, in the w orld. Their ratio of debt to gross domestic product r anges from between 95 per cent to 120 per cent. This means that, after servicingd ebt, they don’t have a great deal left over to play with. T he space for policy options, therefore, is limited if not non-existent. Assistance F ive of them have sought assistance from programmes introduced by the Interna tional Monetary Fund (IMF t o help countries cope with the consequences of the pre sent difficult global financial c risis. S t Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines and Domini ca have each signed up to the IMF’s ExogenousS hocks Facility, St KittsNevis has arrangements under the IMF’s Emergency Assistance for Natural Disasters programme, and Grenada is receiving help to a ddress poverty as part of t he IMF’s Poverty Reduc t ion Strategy Papers. The Minister of Finance of the sixth OECS member country, Antigua and Barbuda, has indicated that his government will also soon have to approach the IMF for help given the economic dif ficulties being faced. Each of these countries may have to go beyond the present IMF windows from which some are getting assistance into a full IMF pro gramme. They have been talking of doing so collectively, and the IMF should accommodate such an approach. While each country will have needs that differ in some ways, and the mea sures to address them would also be different, the fundamental problems are not dis similar and an overall strategy with national components could be devised. The IMF should also recognise that, with the best will in the world, the OECS member countries, individually, lack the capacity to negotiate terms effectively. A joint team drawn from the best of each of the countries, supported by national min istries of finance, would make for a more effective negotiation and an outcome that the IMF and the countries could stand behind. This is just one example of what the member countries of the OECS could do now ahead of the creation of their Economic Union which becomes increasingly imperative for each of them. But there are other areas. A crucial one – and one which should be addressed urgently is the setting-up two sets of joint regulators: a joint regulator for all banks, and a joint regulator for nonbank financial institutions such as insurance companies. Recent events in the offshore banking sector in Antigua and Barbuda andSt Vincent and the Grenadines, where the operations of offshore banks in both counties have led to a llegations of Ponzi Schemes a nd investors being defraude d, suggest the need for m ore efficient regulation by d rawing on the best talents a nd experience of the entire area to form a single, joint regulator. The Eastern Caribbean C entral (ECCB regulates the on-shore banki ng sector of the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union countries of which the OECS members are a part.A strengthened ECCB could b e given the task of regulati ng the offshore banking sect or as well. This would elimi nate the present national r egulation that ranges in i ndividual countries from a statutory body under the control of the Minister of Finance to regulation by the Minister alone. In placing the regulation of all offshore banks in O ECS countries under the ECCB would not only cut national costs, it would make f or more credible and effect ive regulation of the off shore banking sector. Multi-national watchdog organi sations, such as the Financ ial Action Task Force and the Organisation for Eco nomic Cooperation and Development (OECD would also be more comfortable with a joint regional r egulator that has a longer a rms-length relationship w ith institutions in individu al countries. So, too, would c ommercial banks internat ionally which provide correspondent relationships for banks in the OECS. Initiatives The British international publication, The Economist, r ecently reported that, in light of the financial crisis w hich occurred in the Unite d States and the United Kingdom because of weak r egulation of banks, “Britain’s Conservative Part y, likely to form the next government, wants the Bank of England to be in charge n ot just of interest rates, but also the two big tasks of regu lation: guarding the overall system’s stability and the “micro” supervision of indi-v idual firms.” So the idea is not out of sync with initiat ives in other parts of the world. The OECS should also c onsider a joint regulator for n on-bank financial institu tions. Effective regulation of this sector is lacking throughout the region. But, cross-border transactions involving two Insurance companies, CLICO and B ritish American, that have hurt some investors and are likely to cause more probl ems in the coming months, a lso support the need for s uch a joint regulator. When the OECS was f ormed in 1981, joint over s eas representation was one of the objectives it wished to achieve. As it turned out, it has only achieved it in Canada where the member countries have a joint mission and, in a tenuous way, at the W orld Trade Organization ( WTO) in Geneva. Yet, individual overseas missions h ave been a high cost in the i mplementation of the for e ign policy of member states even though, with few exceptions, more has beena chieved in the international community when Caribbean countries have acted collec t ively than when they have a cted alone. A strong joint mission at the WTO and in Brussels, where the headquarters of the European Commission is located, is becoming more important every day for the members of the OECS as r ules on trade and investm ent are created that directl y affect the livelihood of these countries. Individual small countries with very limited resources, lack the c apacity for effective repres entation; they have a bett er chance drawing on their collective pool. So, even as the small member countries of the OECS look toward the formation of an Economic Union, there are practical s teps that could be taken n ow to cut costs and establ ish effective machinery to address some of their challenges. R esponses to: r onaldsanders29@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 7 Facing financial challenges in the Caribbean’s smaller states WORLDVIEW S IRRONALD SANDERS

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By ADRIAN GIBSON ajbahama@hotmail.com TODAY, there is a considerable body of opinion supporting the passage of legislation that legalises the participation of Bahamians in the various forms of gambling. Over the years, consecutive governments have lacked the politicalwill to listen to the voices of the electorate, instead choosing to pander to some of the country’s clergy and their arm twisting for fear of losing votes. Neither government nor the church should interfere with the public’s right to spend their disposable income in the way that they would wish to. How can the church or politicians tell grown men and women what to do with their discretionary income, so long as it does not infringe upon the rights of other citizens? It would be prudent for the government to legalize what has become an innate practice for Bahamians. In April, 1990, the Pindling administration had the gravitas to table a Bill in the House of Assembly that called for the establishment of a national lottery board. However, by September 1990, after a substantial public outcry from the religious sector, plans for a national lottery were shelved. Just recently, it was suggested that a national lottery be established to fund the government’s 10-year plan for education. However, immediately following this announcement, a small group of churches expressed opposition in a statement referring to it as “catering to chance” and “undermining the very lofty ideals and spirit of discipline that the Ministry of E ducation (MOE inculcate in the youth of our nation and, in fact, actually help to create a cycle of the very adverse social ad moral corruption it is trying to prevent. “Presently, the average businessman is complaining about the difficulty of finding people to hire who can do basic math. Imagine therefore what further legislation of gambling will do to the mindset of an emerging work force that even now is viewed as incompetent, unskilled and undisciplined in many quarters. Following this, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham publicly stated that the MOE jumped the gun on the national lottery issue. In an interview with me, Sidney Strachan, chairman of the B ahamas Gaming Reform committee, responded to the church, saying: “The church has a responsibility to their parishioners and when they step outside of that, they risk the chance of becoming political. I don’t see any scriptural procedure that says that gambling is illegal. If you think about it, dice was thrown in the Bible for religious purposes. The church’s authority on issues should be the Bible. I don’t think the church should take their personal dogmas and ideologies and try to force them on the general public. He went on to say: “Their argument is baseless and if the church is talking about social and moral obligations, saying our people are lazy, then they should share in the blame for their idea of the degradation of society. There are more Bahamians doing positive things than negative. I believe strongly in the 90/10 rule. Nine ty per cent of the problems are caused by 10 per cent of the people. I don’t subscribe to the idea that we are incompetent, unskilled and undisciplined. If that is so, then the majority of church people are the same, and the church should be ashamed because they would have failed the people.” Mr Strachan also suggested that the church play a role in ensuring that if Bahamians are allowed to gamble legally “the gaming practices are transparent, properly policed and that guidelines and safety nets are in place. According to the FNM’s 2007 Manifesto (A Matter of Trust), they would appoint a full-time Law Reform Commissioner who would be required to “undertake a review of all laws enacted in the Bahamas prior to 1973 to determine whether they ought to be repealed or amended to reflect the needs of a 21st century Bahamas.” The Lotteries and Gaming Act should be one of them. The Lotteries and Gaming Act chapter 387 is unacceptable because it allows for a form of discrimination against the citizens/residents of the Bahamas, where one group of people is prohibited from gambling, while another group (tourists A national lottery and the taxation of gaming houses can make up budgetary shortfalls, create supplementary funds for infrastructural and human development and even fund college scholarships and prekindergarten programmes. We have all heard of the many police raids, arrests, confiscation of equipment and persons hauled before the courts because they violated the Lotteries and Gaming Act. Obviously, this has not been a deterrent to these activities and the efforts of the police could be focused on preventing and com bating serious crimes. Frankly, the police’s activities are almost in vain since certain operators of numbers house fund political conven tions, electoral campaigns, support beauty pageant contestants, advertise in law enforcement handbooks and other publications, support the pet projects and initiatives of certain politicians! It is not the number houses that are ripping humongous holes into the wallets of Bahamians, but instead it is 90 per cent of the churchmen and so-called pastors, particularly those on New Providence, who are waging a holy war to empty the pockets of their parishioners/consumers. The church can hardly be credited for pro viding a moral or ethical foundation for this country! Frankly, some church leaders show little to no interest in assisting people in their com munities or in converting sinners and helping to save souls. Real pastors to go to the people, particularly since the majority of Bahamians do not go to those large edifices that many crass church leaders fool ishly assume is representative of the true church! Real pastors go to the highways and byways to meet the people in their comfort zones and speak to them at their level. However, I’m told that many of today's highfaluting pastors don’t even want to be seen mixing with these types of peoplethe poor and downtrodden. Every now and again,I see persons preaching on street cornersbut most of them, sometimes rightly, are viewed as crazy. The Bible does not specifically condemn gambling, betting or the lottery. In fact, at no point in the Bible is the word “gambling” used nor does the Bible give any direct guidance on whether gambling is right or wrong! Archaeological and historical evidence shows that dice playing and other forms of gambling were practised in Biblical times. In Leviticus 16:8-10, Aaron cast lots to determine which of the two goats would be used for the sin offering, and which would become the scapegoat. Joshua 18:1-6 records that lots were cast to determine the distribution of land between the twelve tribes of Israel. In the book of Nehemiah, lots were cast to determine who would live inside the walls of Jerusalem and who wouldn’t. In Jonah 1:7, the sailors cast lots to determine the course of action concerning Jonah. In Acts 1:21-26, lots were cast to replace Judas with Matthias and after Jesus was crucified, the Roman soldiers cast lots to see who would get Jesus' clothing (Matthew 27:35 , Mark 15:24 , Luke 23:34 , John 19:24 ). The Bahamas is not the Vatican, so why are some churches attempting to selfishly dictate to, and control, the country’s political apparatus? Instead of singing hosannas, having hap py-clappy rituals and hand holding in the comfort of large edifices, church leaders should take to the streets and accept the Bahamian people’s verdict on gamblingwhatever that The government, the church and gambling Y OUNG M AN S V IEW A DRIANGIBSON SEE page 10 C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

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C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 9 The Mercedes M-Class. Beauty, brains and brawn. TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz M-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667When you think of the average SUV on the road today, you think of roadhogging, air-polluting gas guzzlers that wouldnt know the meaning of high precision and fuel efficiency if it were emblazoned on their windshields. But there is an alternative. The refined M-Class from Mercedes-Benz. Withits superior German styling utilising only high-grade materials, its robust engine power delivering exemplary turn-on-a-dime performance whilst still being frugal on fuel and its handling of pot-holed roads and 1.5 ft. flooded streets, the Mercedes-Benz M-Class is clearly the best choice in SUVs. For the Second Year Atlantis, Paradise Island will host the 2009 Miss Teen USA Pageant showcasing the beauty and grace ofthe most talented teenagers across the United States. WELCOME RECEPTION Tuesday, July 28th, 7:00pm 9:00pm, Atlantis, Paradise Island Opening cocktail party where guests can mingle with contestants and supporters. Ticket price includes food with carving station, appetizers, desserts, and other gourmet samplings from Atlantis restaurants. Cash bar available. Welcome Reception Tickets: Adults: $35, Kids under 12: $15 (Price inclusive of gratuity).PRESENTATION SHOW Thursday, July 30th, 8: 00pm, Atlantis, Paradise Island Watch all fifty one contestants compete in the Swimsuit and Evening Gown competitions to secure their spot in the Final Show. Presentation Show Tickets: General: $30, Reserved: $40 FINAL SHOW Friday, July 31st, 8:00pm, Atlantis, Paradise Island Witness the crowning of the new Miss Teen USA 2009! Final Show Tickets: General: $50, Reserved: $75Call Atlantis Box Office for ticket information at 363-66012009 MISS TEEN USA PAGEANT C OLOMBIAN Ambassador Ventura Emilio DiazMejia pledged his support in the Bahamas’ mission to overcome drug trafficking andc rime during a visit to Gove rnment House. Governor General Arthur Hanna had asked the Republic of Colombia for support ina number of United Nations initiatives as both countriess eek to strengthen diplomatic r elations. The Bahamas wants Colombia to support its candidacies to the United Nations’ Economic and Social Council; the C ouncil of the International Maritime Organisation, category C; and Presidency of the3 5th General Conference of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation. Mr Hanna acknowledged how both the Bahamas and Columbia share a “wide baseo f linkages founded on common interests”, and the diplo matic relations that have followed “consolidated the continued common understanding”. T he governor general also t old Mr Diaz-Mejia how the initiatives could help him fulfill his personal pledge to increaset he relations of both countries and overcome illegal drug traf-f icking and crime. H e said: “The Bahamas, as h as the rest of the word, but particularly the Caribbean nations, has taken keen note of y our country’s proactive engagement in the well-being of the governments and peo-p les that comprise the Assoc iation of Caribbean States, as a result of the reform initia tives Colombia is actively seek i ng to implement in that body. “The Bahamas values the cordial relations between our t wo countries and looks for ward to the deepening and the diversification of our relationship.” M r Diaz Mejia commented o n how the two countries have maintained excellent relations in all areas, with mutual respect, and how he hopes such relations will bei ncreased. T he ambassador said: “Colombia will make every possible effort to give to your government the required support in vital areas as it has occurred in the past. I am convinced that in the f uture these will be broadened. “Be sure that loyalty, respect, and sincerity will remain principles and essential values of our cordial relat ions.” Colombian Ambassador gives his support to crime fight MOVE OF A LIFETIME Bahamas real estate today Carmen Massoni IF YOU’REin your f ifties, sixties or beyond, y ou may be facing your f irst move in decades. The process may seem overwhelming, and you may be anxious about the futurea nd the big changes coming up. However, a trusted BREA real estate agentc an help with all the steps along the way, especiallyw ith selling your home q uickly in a competitive m arket. If you’ve occupied your home for ten, twenty or m ore years, you’ll want to enlist family members to get your home market-r eady, and prepare for y our move. The preparation involved in staging your h ome for showings as well as the organisation needed to get you moved with am inimum of hassle and confusion. You are in complete control, while they unclutter the house, pack and organise boxes, make the home sparkle, and arrange for moving, ship p ing, or donating belong ings as you direct. By showing your home i n the best possible light, b uyers will be able to picture their own families there. C ombined with the BREA agent’s marketing tools, this formula can pro v ide a quick and profitable sale while you settle into your new residence! EMILIO DIAZ-MEJIA , Ambassador of the Republic of Colombia, paid a courtesy call on Minister of Foreign Affairs, Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symontte, July 22. Pictured from left are Andrew McKinney, Chief of Protocol; Carlos Gonzalez, Director, Colombian Government of Trade Bureau, Caribbean Office in Miami, Florida; Ambassador Diaz-Mejia; Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette; Dr Patricia Rodgers, Permanent Secretary; Joshua Sears, Director General, Ministry of Foreign Affairs; and Janeen McCartney, undersecretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs. K r i s t a a n I n g r a h a m / B I S GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur Hanna (left Credence from Ventura Emilio Diaz-Mejia, as Ambassador oft he Republic of Colombia, at G overnment House, July 23. D e r e k S m i t h / B I S

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C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE may be. Whatever happened to those street revivals, where pastors and their congregations would go into neighbourhoods, pitch a tent and invite the residents to a few days of services where Biblical teachings are reinforced and new souls are saved? The church should begin to pursue a more spiritual mission as it is missing the opportunity to be an oasis for the people. If the church wishes to talk about a wastage of money, we must recognize that people waste money on all sorts of activities. Gambling is no more or less of a waste of money than buying that expensive “Sunday outfit,” seeing a movie (in many cases purchasing an insignificant item such as those alligator skin shoes I see some pastors wearing or that church hat for $350. In many instances, people work for the money they gamble with. Why wouldn’t these churchmen speak to the loss of humility among clergymen? Why wouldn’t they step up and address the notion that many pastors are nothing more than "pimps in the pulpit”? How can it be that there is a proliferation of churches in the Bahamasthe largest per capita in the worldand there is little to no impact on the moral health of the countryviolent crimes, political scandals and nationwide immoral behaviour? When would the church promote the idea of financial audits, particularly since so many pastors are immersedfrom their hands to their elbowsin the cookie jar? Why don’t they talk dat? Surely, the church doesn’t refuse to take money from its members that work in the casinos! Churchmen must realize that every church raffle is a form of gambling! No government or entity should be allowed to legislate personal moralityit would be a diminishment of our personal freedoms. The church should know that we live in a democracy not a theocracy, and that means freedom of choice! Religion and politics should always be separated. In the Bahamas, the wall separating church and state seems to be non existent. The church seems to cherry pick what issues it’s going to object to, choosing to crusade against selected issues just to appear to be doing their job, when there’s a myriad of pressing issues confronting our society. Where is the church on matters such as sweethearting, even in the church? There are many issues confronting our society that the church has overlooked, such as: pae dophilia; incest; the need for prison reform and the treatment of petty criminals who are treated like animals and thereby turned into savages. Where is the church when fraud is perpetrated on consumers by some highly irresponsible church folk who sell goods they claim can cure cancer, HIV/AIDS and resurrect the dead? Christianity is supposed to be a religion about conscience, especially since souls can only be saved through people making that decision for themselves. Although the church, may wish to stop persons from doing as they wish or from pursuing their desires by seeking social control, choices must be individually made. FROM page eight about the spread of the disease. But without the latest figures at hand yesterday, Dr Minnis said he is “almost certain” there are 28 or 29 infect-e d confirmed cases in the Bahamas today. He said: “I am not certain where all the cases are, but I know some are in Nassau, and some are in the other islands. “We will continue to monit or the situation and update the public weekly.” F ears over the disease were heightened as it has claimed the lives of hundreds as it s pread from where it is b elieved to have originated in M exico around the world since April this year. T he World Health Organisation declared H1N1 a pandemic in May, confirming widespread human infection. B ut Dr Minnis said with the development of medication, and no deaths yet in theB ahamas, he hopes to dispel irrational fears. T he minister said: “It is still a concern in that it’s flu, but they’re testing the vaccinations now, so I’m sure once the vaccinations have beenc leared we will be able to deal with it properly. “We have sufficient medication so that should not be a fear, but we are keeping it to only be used when necessary. “We are not going to give medication to people unlessi t is absolutely necessary, because if we give it out as a provision the organism will become resistant by the time the patient develops a a serio us infection.” T he Ministry of Health advises everyone to continue t o follow influenza preventative measures to ensure protection of individuals, famil ies and communities. Health officials maintain: These precautionary measures include covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, disposing of the tissue in thet rash after use, along with frequent hand washing with soap and water. “Additionally, if you are experiencing flu like symptoms, to decrease the potential spread, avoid contact with others, and stay away fromg roup settings.” For further information persons may contact the following hotlines: From 9am to 6pm, Mond ay through Friday, call: (242 5 02-4790 or 502-4728. And from 6pm to 9am, or o n weekends, call: (242 7811, 502-7812 or 502-7855. For a weekly update on s wine flu in the Bahamas log on to: www.bahamas.gov.bs. Ms Clarke said she does not k now when they will be r eleased from hospital. T he boys miraculously survived more than a month stuck in a hole surrounded by t he dense Andros coppice story, sustaining themselves on wild coco-plums and rainwa-t er, they claimed after they w ere discovered. Deangelo Clarke, nine, and Marcell Clarke-Sylverin, six, w ent missing from their grandmother’s house in the remote settlement of Smith’sH ill on June 9. The boys had left the house to hunt for crabs around 6pm and were never heard from again. A police search of the area where the boys disappeared proved fruitless and was later c alled off. More than a month later the brothers were sighted by a female relative as theyw alked in the nearby settle m ent of Kemp’s Bay. The two appeared severely dehydrated and malnourished and were rushed to hospital in Nassau. Although there was wides pread jubilation over their return, some scepticism has emerged surrounding theb oys’ account of their ordeal. Some have questioned how t wo young boys could have survived so long on their own while others wonder if some-t hing more sinister was afoot. Marcell has apparently claimed that an old man visited the two while they were stuck in the hole – a man dressed in black, with pale hands, whose face he nevers aw. The man, who Marcell believes was the grandfatherw ho died when he was an infant, fed Marcell the food of his dreams – pizza, water-m elon, macaroni – and when he went to wake his brother to join the feast, ‘Pa’ stopped him. H e had cared for him and washed his back, but never hurt him, said Marcell’s father, Marcellian Sylverin. And Deangelo never saw the man, it was claimed. T he boys told family that o n the day of their escape from the hole, they noticed a tree for the first time andw ere able to shimmy up its bark and out of the crevice. At last report, police had not yet interviewed the boys. Y esterday, head of the Central Detective Unit Super intendent Elsworth Moss said o fficers would take a state ment from the pair once they are released from hospital. Saturday, July 4. Police estimate she had been dead for around two months before her body was discovered. Ms Garrison, 33, of West Palm Beach, Florida, had been r eported missing on February 25 by the United States Embassy in Nassau. Diplomats said she may have been in t he company of a Bahamian man. Police are still awaiting the results of an autopsy to find out how she died. In the week after her body was found, Zyndall McKinney, 2 2, of Isabella Boulevard, Nassau, was arraigned in Magis trate’s Court and charged with intentionally causing Ms Garrison’s death between Sunday, February 25, and Saturday, July 4, 2009, while being concerned with another. A nna Pugh is said to have been McKinney’s girlfriend and to have lived with him in the Bahamas. Also known as M adison Sweeting and Madision McKinney, Anna is t hought to have left the Bahamas for the United States sometime after her mother’s death. Reports over the weekend claimed she was being shel t ered by her father and other people in the Pennsylvania a rea, and is being questioned in connection with Ms Gar rison’s murder by officers in the Pennsylvania State Police Department. But the FBI told an ABC news affilate in West Palm Beach, Florida, on Saturday that Pugh had not been arrested. P ennsylvania Police have also yet to confirm an arrest has been made, and Superintendent Elsworth Moss, in charge of the Royal Bahamas Police Force Criminal Detective Unit, said he has not been made aware of any such arrest. M r Moss said: “I have no knowledge of that. We have been in touch with Pennsylvania and we are trying to work with the Pennsylvania police, but I don’t have any information regarding her being arrested.” A preliminary inquiry into the murder of Ms Garrison is scheduled to begin in Nassau on October 26. 28 now infected with swine flu FROM page one DR HUBERT MINNIS Go v er nment, c hurch and gambling Daughter of murder victim ‘not arrested’ say police F ROM page one Boys who went missing on Andros still in hospital FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 11 I know that police were seeking to do so, to question him,” Mr Miller said yesterday, adding that officers were still trying to determine the cause of the crash. T he incident occurred shortly after 8am on Friday when the Clarkes ser-vice bus, which follows the Number 21 route,r eportedly lost its breaks on Government Hill b efore careening down Cumberland Street, on to Bay Street. The bus then reportedly sped on to the narrow s ide-street leading to Woodes Rodgers Walk a nd appeared to be heading towards the nearby harbour. E yewitnesses told T he T ribune t hat passengers, fearing for their lives, jumped from the win-d ows of the out-of-con trol bus as it sped down the hill. T wo passengers on the bus were taken to hospital for treatment. Their condition is not known. D ue to the “unsanitary and overcrowded c ondition of the vessel”, the Haitian migrants w ere removed and placed aboard the HMBS P-49, said a press release issued by the RBDF. The migrants arrived in the capital at 3.30 p m yesterday and all appeared to be in fair health, said the RBDF. T he group was handed over to Immigration o fficials, and are currently being detained at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre. Police seeking to question driver of out of control jitney F ROM page one More than 60 Haitian migrants apprehended R B D F P h o t o s / P e t t y O f f i c e r J o n a t h a n R o l l e F ROM page one A LITTLE i nfant being taken care of shortly after the arrival at the D efence Force Base on Sunday afternoon. The migrants were a pprehended in the Exuma Chain shortly after 9:00am. SOME OF the Haitian migrants onboard HMBS P-49, as they arrive at the Defence Force Base on Sunday afternoon.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCALANDINTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS MADRID, Spain Cristiano Ronaldo produced only glimpses of his talent during his home debut for Real Madrid in a 1-1 draw with Al Ittihad on Sunday, according to Associated Press . Ronaldo was substituted by Gonzalo Higuain in the 66th minute, immediately after Hicham Aboucherouane equalized for the Saudi Arabian champions in the Peace Cup. Raul Gonzalez gave Madrid the lead at Santi ago Bernabeu Stadium in the 55th minute. Madrid’s new No. 9 came closest to his first Madrid goal just before halftime, when his shot was tipped around the post by goalkeeper Mabrouk Zaid after a swift exchange of passes with Karim Benzema. The Portugal winger is the world’s most expensive player after his $133.7 million transfer from Manchester United. By JIMMY GOLEN AP Sports Writer FOXBOROUGH, Mass. Diego Milito scored twice to lead Inter Milan to a 2-0 victory over AC Milan on Sunday in an exhibition that was just the third match the bitter intracity rivals have ever played outside Italy. The crowd of 42,531 leaned heavily toward AC Milan, and they were quieted in the fourth minute when Milito chased the ball down to the left of the goal and left-footedit between the goalkeeper Zeljko Kalac and the near post. He gave Inter a 2-0 leadin the 75th minute on a 2-on1 break with Amantino Mancini, who drew the defender and passed to Milito for the shot that bounced off and over the keeper into the net. The clubs that share a home in foggy San Siro hadmet outside Italy only twice: in Chiasso, Switzerland, in 1908 and at Yankee Stadiumin 1969. But they came to the United States as part of an exhibition tournament known as the World Football Classic. Inter star Zlatan Ibrahi movic was not with the team; he is expected in Barcelona on Monday for a physical that would complete the deal that would send striker Samuel Eto’o and midfielder Aleksandr Hleb to the Italian champions. Milan and Chelsea sold out the 71,000-seat home stadium of the NFL’s Baltimore Ravens on Friday night. But Sunday’s match on a warm New England afternoon was played with the upper deck half-closed and the lower bowl empty at one end because the seats were obstructed by the enormous stage for Tuesday night’s AC/DC concert. (Also obstructed was the press box, forcing the media to be relocated into luxury suites.) Sunday’s crowd wasn’t concerned about the headbanging of AC/DC as much as the head-passing of AC Milan, though. And the home stadium of NFL genius Bill Belichick, who guided the New England Patriots to an 18-0 record before losing the 2008 Super Bowl, proved to be a fitting host for Inter coach Jose Mourinho, the self-proclaimed “Special One” who helped Inter win a fourth straight Italian Serie A title before losing in the first knockout round of the Champions League. Although the rivalry between the teams has been bitter, there was little ani mosity for the friendly and even a few smiles and gasps from the crowd when referee Jorge Gonzalez held up a red card for Milan’s Ronaldinho in the 34th minute but quickly realized his mistake and replaced it with a yellow one. Inter was rarely tested, though Julio Cesar made a pair of tough saves at around the 70th minute, when it was still 1-0, and another on Alessandro Nesta in stoppage time, just before the final whistle. Australia t ake heart from win at Northampton OVERSEASNEWS A ustralia left Northampton with a heartening victory, but concern for the well-being of would-bes trike bowler Mitchell Johnson. His solitary tailend wicket for 107 runs in 18.1 overs at Wantage R oad cast doubt over w hether he will feature at all in the third Test. Meanwhile, Englands Ashes Test success atL ord's provided the selectors with the luxury of sticking close to a winning formula when they a nnounced their squad for Edgbaston. Ian Bell was retained without extra batting cover to replace the injuredK evin Pietersen and Steve Harmison provided the pace-bowling contingency plan should Andrew F lintoff's knee fail him. England's 13-man squad a lso contains Monty Panesar as an extra spin option. AUSTRALIA'S Stuart Clarke in action during the tour match at the County Ground, Northampton, England Saturday July 25, 2009. D a v i d J o n e s / A P P h o t o / P A W i r e Inter Milan top rival ACMilan 2-0 Ronaldo makes low-key Madrid home debut Team Bahamas wasted little time in its assault on the local r ecord books, with three new national records set on the o pening day of competition at the 13th FINA World Championships in Roma, Italy. Arianna Vanderpool-Wal lace set a new Bahamian record in the 100 butterfly today swimming in 1:00.56. Overall she p laced first in her heat and 43rd overall. Bahamas teammate A lana Dillette who held the old record of 1:01.50 swam in the same heat with VanderpoolWallace and finished in 1:01.51 for a sixth place finish in the heat. Elvis Burrows swam a very f ast 50 butterfly in 23.74 placing first in his heat and 26th overall a nd lowering his own Bahamian record of 24.47 that he swam at the RBC National Champi-o nships in June 2009. The female 4 x 100 Freestyle r elay team swam to a new Bahamian record in a time of 3:48.34smashing the old record of 3:51.89 set by the same quartet in May 2008. Alana Dillette lead off and swam a personal best time of 57.11. She was followed by Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace who swam 54.85, Teisha Light bourne swam 3rd in 58.52 and Alicia Lightbourne anchored in 57.86. The relay team finished 20th overall and was the only female Caribbean relay team to compete. Regionally they placed third behind the USA and Canada. Algernon Cargill, President of the BSF was in the stands to cheer the swimmers on and stated that "the swims today will bring attention to the sport of swimming in the Bahamas with Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace and Elvis Burrows both winning their heats in Bahamian record time and Elvis placing a very impressive 26th place overall. The female relay team also did very well and in breaking the Bahamian record by almost three seconds the coun try should be very excited about future Bahamas swimming relay teams competing on the international scene. These females have already proven themselves at both the CAC and Pan Am Games winning bronze medals at both meets in the 4 x 100 medley relay. Today in the 4 x 100 freestyle relay they have also made an impor tant statement about the direc tion of swimming in the Bahamas today. Equally impressive is that these four young Bahamian women also study full time at the university level and have remained com mitted and dedicated to improving themselves in the sport of swimming. All of the swimmers are commended on their performances today and we can expect more records over the duration of this meet". BAH RELAY EXCHANGE LAST LEG: Alicia Lightbourne is off the starting block to swim the final leg of the relay after sister Teisha touched in a time of 58.52. Alicia swam a 57.86 to bring the Bahamas home in Bahamian record time of 3:48.34. BAH RELAY THIRD LEG: Teisha Lightbourne in action swimming in the 4 x 100 freestyle relay. S WIMMING: FINA WORLDCHAMPIONSHIPS, ITALY Team Bahamas sets three new national records BAH RELAY: Members of the Female 4x100m Freestyle team. PHO T OS: Kathryn Dillete

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By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net VETERAN sprinter Chand ra Sturrup capped off a pretty good weekend for the Bahamian athletic contingent at the Aviva London Grand Prix witha second place finish in the w omen's 100 metres. After helping the women's 4 x 100 metre relay team run a season's best for second place o n Friday, Sturrup came back on Saturday and clocked 11.09 seconds in the straight away race behind American Carmelita Jeter, who won the final in 1 0.92. In the second of two heats of t he century, Sturrup was second once again in 11.27, thist ime to American Allyson Felix, who won the heat in 1 1.26. Jeter took the first heat in 10.92. Felix, however, had to settle for sixth place in 11.29. LaV erne Jones-Ferrette of the Virg in Islands came in third in the final in 11.21. S turrup, who turns 38 on September 12, is still sitting in s econd place in the World Athletics Tour with 72 points from five meets. She trail Jamaican Kerron Stewart, who is out front with 100. A lso on Saturday, Lavern Eve competed in the women's javelin, but her berst toss of 51.16 metres placed her in the 10th and final spot. Winning the competition with a throw of 64.64 was Germany's Steffi Nerius, followed by Goldie Say ers of Great Britain (59.82 Australian Kimberley Mickle (59.67 It was the first appearance this year on the European cir cuit for Eve, the 44-year-old Central American and Caribbean Championships' bronze medalist as she try to prepare for the IAAF World Championships in Berlin, Ger many from August 15-23. While Sturrup joined Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie in proving that they are right on form to contend for a medal, the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations also got achance to run the women's 4 x 100 relay team. T he team of 28-year-old Timicka Clarke, Sturrup, Christine Amertil and Ferguson-McKenzie, were second in 43.35 behind the American A team that won in 42.39. The B team ran 43.51 for third place. Only the United States, Great Britain, Germany and Trinidad & Tobago have ran faster than the Bahamas so far this year. The Bahamas matched season's best by Brazil and Russia. With 19-year-old Sheniqua 'Q' Ferguson expected to be ready to run in Berlin after nursing an injury, the BAAA is confident that the tem can run faster and finally regain its position as a medal contender in the post-era of the Golden Girls. Before they did theior relay duties, Ferguson-McKenzie and Amertil both competed in their specility events. Having ran the fast time in the world this year at a meet in Rethomno on Monday, Ferg suson-McKenzie picked up her second straight victory in the 200 in 23.11, well ahead of American Marshevet Hooker (23.30 Ferguson-McKenzie, 33, is now sitting in second place on the World Athletics Tour with 39 points. Jones-Ferette is leading the pack with 42. FergusonMcKenzie is also in the ranking in the century, tied with Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser with 44 apeice. Amertil ran 52.20 for fifth place in the wpmen's 400. Nico la Sanders of Great Britain won in 51.54, followed by Americans Shana Cox (51.56 ca Hargroove (51.66 DeeDee Trotter (52.08 Amertil, who will celebrate her 30th birthday at the championships on August 18, is now tied for 12th spot on the World Athletics Tour with Yulia Gushchina with 27. American Sanya Richards is out front with 90. Olympic bronze medalist L eevan 'Superman' Sands turned in a fourth place finish in the men's trile jump with a best leap of 17.13 metres. The event was won by Brandon Roulhac w ith 17.33. Cuban Arnie David Girat was second with 17.18 and Great Britain's Phillips Idowu was third qith 17.16. "I felt good about my performance. I had my best meet f or the year, so that was a good sign that I am in good form for t he world's," said Sands, who competed with tendinitis in his r ight knee. "I just need to strengthen my quad muscles a little bit to get rid of the tendinitis. But other than that, I am really confident r ight now and I will not let anything stop me from going for m y goal in Berlin." Leevan Sands, who will also c elebrate his 28th birthday at the championships two days before Amertil on August 16, is in third place with 40 points. Girat is on top of the leaderb oard with 50, followed by Idowu with 46. A nd Shamar Sands clocked 13.81 for sixth place in the firsto f twov heats, but that was only good for 10th overall, eliminat i ng him from a spot in the final. Cuban world record holder Dayron Robles won in 13.29 with Barbados' Ryan Brathwaite second in 13.31, followed b y Great Britain's Andwer Turner in 13.66. S hamar Sands, 24, is tied for 10th place with Brathwaite, who won the BAAA's Natinals, with 38 each on the World Athletics Tour. Dexter Faulk of the United States is out front with 80, followed by Robles with 76. Although he didn't compete, 30-year-old Chris 'Fireman' Brown controls the men's 400 with 67 points. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 13 Chandra Sturrup comes second AVIVALONDONGRANDPRIX CARMELITA JETER of the US, centre, Chandra Sturrup of the Bahamas, right, and Stephanie Durst of the U.S., left, compete in the women's 100 meters final during the Athletics Grand Prix at Crystal Palace in Lon don, Saturday, July 25, 2009. AP Photo /Simon Dawson Veteran sprinter clocks 11.09 seconds in the 100 metres to cap good weekend for Bahamas CARMELITA JETER of US, left, leads the field to finish first in the women's 100 metres final during the Athletics Grand Prix at Crystal Palace in London, Saturday, July 25, 2009. A P P h o t o / S a n g T a n CARMELITA JETER of US, centre, leads the field to finish first in the women's 100 metres final during the Athletics Grand Prix at Crystal Palace in London, Saturday, July 25, 2009. A P P h o t o / S a n g T a n

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham a nnounced that the new national stadium currently under construction and expected to be completed by 2011 will be named in Robinson’s honour. T he Committee also doled out a $10,000 athletic scholarship to the College of the Bahamas, named after the legendary sprinter to highlight a series of plaques and personal gifts. Robinson was lauded for a groundbreaking career that began with his first international competition in 1955 and spanned 15 years including four O lympic Games appearances. Prime Minister Ingraham said Robinson blazed a trail for generations of great Bahamian athletes to follow which has positively raised the profile of the Bahamas on the international stage. “I am happy to join with the Friends of Tommy Robinson in paying tribute t o a great Bahamian son who has been an inspiration to Bahamians everywhere but most especially to our youth who aspire to achieve in the field of sports,” he said, “The modern Bahamas has a growing ledger of s porting greats including World Cham pions and Olympic medallists whose s uccess internationally sheds positive light on our country and our people.” I ngraham said for his efforts in the early stages of the nation’s growth as as porting power, Robinson deserves g reat accolades. “Long ago, Tommy Robinson was a mong the pioneering few who first represented our country on the world s tage. It is him that your sportspersons may look for inspiration as they strive t o achieve their best. Tommy was on some occasions, the lone member oft he Bahamian track and field team,” he said, “It is appropriate that the Bahamas’ track and field stadium wasn amed in honor of this Bahamian star and appropriate now that his friends h ave chosen to honor and pay t his sporting icon tribute in t his fashion.” Prime Min ister Ingraham also pro claimed Fri d ay, July 24th as “Tommy R obinson Day,” the day t hat marks the 51st anniver sary of Robinson’s historic win in the 220 yard dash at the British Empire Games in Cardiff W ales in 1958. Dozens of colleagues, well wishers a nd contemporaries, ranging from Robinson’s former roommate at the U niversity of Michigan, to current stars in athletics whom he has influenced in the sport of track, addressed the audi ence to place Robinson’s achievements and place in history into perspective. L amine Diack, President of the International Association of Athletic F ederations, the global governing body for track and field, said that Robin-s on’s place as a true giant in the sport and his influence on the region can not be underscored. “A sporting legend is a pioneer; one whose influence and legacy spreadw ider than the original area of competition; one whose successes showed o thers the way; one whose exploits helped raise the international sporting profile of a small nation,” he said, “In short, a man such as Tommy Robinson, who has become a truly iconic and legendary figure amongst the people of the Bahamas. His career is well-documented. It is difficult to imagine the standing Bahamian sprint ers hold today without the pioneering efforts of Tommy Robinson.” Perry Christie, Leader of the Opposition and former teammate of Robin son on several national teams, said Robinson’s role not only as an athlete, but as an ambassador for the Bahamas may have made his greatest impact. “A pioneer and trailblazer, he focused the global spotlight on the tiny little known colony of the Bahama Islands through the power and majesty of his athletic performance around the world in the 50s and 60s,” he said, “He was a superbly gifted sprinter who took on the world’s best and always did our country proud. More than just an athlete though, he was a wonderful ambassador for our country wherever he went. His charm and intelligence, his gentlemanly bearing, and above all, the fervor and authenticity of his patriotism, always presented Bahamians and the Bahamas in a most favor able light. He is indeed a legend.” Robinson’s first international competition came in 1955 at the Pan Amer ican Games in Mexico City. Just a year later he became the first Bahamian to compete in Track and Field at the Olympic Games in 1956 and won the country’s first medal in international competition with a bronze in the 100m at the West Indian Federation Games in 1957. His collegiate highlights at the Uni versity of Michigan included nine individual Big Ten Championships in the 100 yards, 220 yards, 60 yards and 300 yards between 1957-1962. In 1962 Robinson won gold at 100m the Central American and Caribbean games and a silver medal in the 100 yards at the British Empire and Commonwealth Games. He became the world indoor record holder in the 300m in 1964 and won his final international medal at the 1966 Common wealth Games in 1966 with a silver medal in the 100 yards. FAMILYMAN: Tommy Robinson sits with his grandchildren. HONOURINGTOMMYROBINSON F ROM page 15 GOLDEN GIRL Pauline Davis hugs Thomas Robinson. PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff TOMMYROBINSON pictured with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham receiving a plaque. THOMAS ROBINSON gives remarks. TOMMY ROBINSON surrounded by family. It is dif f i c ult to i magine the standing B ahamian sprinters hold today withoutt he pioneering ef f orts of Tommy Robinson.”

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C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 I NSIDE Chandra Sturrup comes second FRIENDLY RIVALRY: Tommy Robinson hugs old friend and Cuban rival Enrique Figuerola. by RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net M embers of the local and international track and field community came together with B ahamians of all walks of life to celebrate the life, legacy and achievements to t he country’s greatest pioneer in the sporting arena. Friends of Thomas Augustus Robinson honoured his extensive litany of accolades as a Bahamian national sporting hero at a luncheony esterday, held under the theme: “Tribute to a Legend.” TRIBUTETOALEGEND CELEBRATINGTOMMYROBINSON S EE page 14 F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f MOREPHOTOS ONPAGE 14

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shopBVM.com says hosted businesses have received orders from Middle East, Thailand since going online in January this year By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A BAHAMIAN-owned ecommerce facilitator believes it has opened up the online market for this nation’s businesses with an initial investment of just $100,000, its principals telling Tribune Business that its clients had received product orders from locations such as the Middle East and Thailand. Kent Bazard, shopBVM.com’s chief financial officer, said that almost anything can be sold from the site, with just about any Bahamian business or entre preneur able to open a store o n it. S hopBVM.com currently C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.96 $3.90 $4.10 f f &&& bntn b ")&'!"'#$$#%'("',#", #%f% !("','#b (+(%, $$%#+!' ,' '%,*##" + (&#% #% #' b By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor C LICO ( Bahamas) liquidator has demanded a host of documents related to the business dealings of 75 Florida-based companies believed to be owned and/or controlled by the insolvent insurer’s Trinidadian mastermind, Lawrence Duprey, as he ramps up efforts to trace and recover the company’s assets. Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, through his US attorney, Ronald Neiwirth, on July 14 subpoenaed via the Florida Bankruptcy Courts another law firm, Greenberg Traurig, in a bid to force it to hand over a ‘treasure trove’ of documents related to the business dealings and transactions of the 75 entities thought to be connected to Mr Duprey. Documents filed in the Bankruptcy Court for the southern district of Florida, which have been obtained by Tribune Business, show Mr Gomez is demand ing all documents detailing wire transfers between the Duprey companies and Greenberg Traurig’s operating and escrow accounts from the period beginning January 1, 2004, onwards. The Baker Tilly Gomez partner and accountant is also seeking records of all payments into the Florida-based law firm’s operating and escrow accounts from the Duprey-controlled entities, and any payments worth more than $1,000 that Greenberg Traurig sent from its accounts in the opposite direction. For the latter, the CLICO (Bahamas seeking copies of instructions, invoices and demands for payment that may have been sent by the Duprey companies. Finally, Mr Gomez and his attorneys are also demanding copies of all man agement, shareholder and operating agreements that Greenberg Traurig prepared for any of the companies Mr Duprey is believed to control or beneficially own. The information is scheduled to be handed over by August 13, 2009. Also filed with the Florida courts, and obtained by Tribune Business, is the list of Florida-based entities suspected to comprise Mr Duprey’s private business network. Several, namely Angostura Spirits & Wine; Atlantica Manager Inc; CL Hospitality Inc; Colonial Parker Group Manager Inc; Colonial Communications Inc; Creative Manager Inc; Dalco 84 LLC; Dalco New River Manager Inc; Dalco Infinity Holdings; LD USA Manager Inc; LD DYL Inc; LD Merrick Park Manager Inc; SCC Distribution Corporation; and Wellington Preserve Corporation, all name Lawrence Duprey as their principal. A number of these entities are listed as the principal of other companies Mr Gomez is seeking documents on, while other targeted entities name their principal as Sylvia Baldini. She is likely to CLICO liquidator targets 75 firms Site’s $100k outlay takes Bahamas firms to the world * Galanis plans to obtain court injunction blocking sale of New Hope’s Freeport-based marina a nd leisure assets * Alleges that judgment c reditor’s $1.2m claim ‘more in the region’ o f $500,000 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE receiver for Freeportbased marina owner/operator, New Hope Holdings, is “absolutely convinced” there will be no auction of the comp any’s assets as planned this w eek, telling Tribune Business that a judgment creditor’s claim it was owed $1.2 million was “more in the Receiver ‘totally confident’ of no asset auction By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas is likely to experience prolonged high levels of unemployment lasting “two to three years”, a former finance minister believes, because this nation’s economy will endure a slow, protracted recovery when it comes as opposed to a sharp rebound. James Smith, CFAL’s chairman, told Tribune Busi ness that the structure of the Bahamian economy meant its main factor of production was labour, the result being that an economic recession would show itself most in the unem ployment figures – estimated earlier this year to be 12 per cent on New Providence, and 14 per cent on Grand Bahama. The former minister of state added that, with the Bahamas likely to follow the US in experiencing a slow, ‘Lshaped’ recovery that would leave unemployment rates relatively high until 20112012, this nation needed to concentrate on resolving structural economic weaknesses unrelated to the reces sion. And he warned that the Bahamas must “not be lulled to sleep” by the current relatively high level offoreign exchange reserves, pegged at $723 million in early July 2009, because they had been artificially inflated by the pro ceeds from the Government’s foreign currency borrowings – as opposed to ‘real’ capital inflows from tourism and for eign direct investment. Mr Smith told Tribune Business that while tourism and construction had been the sectors to first feel the recession’s impact, as they relied directly on tourism and forBahamas to face high unemployment ‘for quite some time’ By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas will “next year for certain have a new Business Licence Act”, a government minister has pledged, with the Ministry of Finance currently reviewing proposed amendments that might include a change to how fees are calculated. New Business Licence ‘next year for certain’ * Ex-minister says prolonged high jobless levels could last ‘for two to three years’ to 2011-2012 * W arns hotel industry unlikely to re-hire all those terminated * Urges Bahamas ‘not to be lulled to sleep’ by high foreign reserves levels * Calls on nation to tackle structural weaknesses not related to recession S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B * Gomez demands documents on entities that comprise private business empire of insolvent insurer's mastermind * Likely wants to determine whether Bahamian investors' assets helped finance Duprey's personal interests * Also subpoenaed documents on Bahamas insurer's main asset, relating to ‘approved contractors’ and ‘advertising fund’ they allegedly had to pay into Craig Gomez * Minister says amendments to way fee is calculated under review * Expects EPA services offer to be finalised this summer, with Trade Commission renewed S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 B B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Water & Sewerage Corporation’s proposal to negotiate a contract with a company, headed by Senator Jerome Fitzgerald, for a nowabandoned reverse osmosis plant project at Arawak Cay had “very far-reaching legal ramifications” because it had not met the original bid requirements. A 2006 legal opinion on the W ater plant contract’s ‘far reaching legal ramifications’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

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By RoyalFidelity Capital Markets THE trading momentum increased last week in the Bahamian market, with investors trading in five out of the 24 listed securities. Of these, one advanced, two declined and two remained unchanged. E E Q Q U U I I T T Y Y M M A A R R K K E E T T A total of 76,067 shares changed hands, representing a significant increase of 72,967 shares compared to the previous week's trading volume of 3,100 shares. FOCOL Holdings (FCL was the sole advancer and volume leader this week with 40,786 shares trading hands, its share price rising by $0.13 to end the week at $5.16.. Finance Finance Corporation of the Bahamas (FIN decliner, its stock falling by $0.10 to end the week at a new 52-week low of $10.80 on a volume of 23,001 shares. ICD Utilities (ICD 11,130 shares, its share price decreasing by $0.01 to end the week at a new 52-week low of $5.49. B B O O N N D D M M A A R R K K E E T T No notes traded in the Bahamian market last week. C C O O M M P P A A N N Y Y N N E E W W S S FOCOL Holdings (FCL announced that the Board of Directors had approved a $10 million share buy back programme that will last for 10 years. E E a a r r n n i i n n g g s s R R e e l l e e a a s s e e s s : : There were no financial results reported by any of the 24-listed companies during the week. D D i i v v i i d d e e n n d d N N o o t t e e s s : : Consolidated Water Company (CWCO declared a dividend of $0.013 per share, payable on August 10, 2009, to all ordinary shareholders of record date July 1, 2009. FOCOL Holdings (FCL has declared a dividend of $0.03 per share, payable on August 11, 2009, to all ordinary shareholders of record date July 31, 2009. A A n n n n u u a a l l G G e e n n e e r r a a l l M M e e e e t t i i n n g g ( ( A A G G M M ) ) N N o o t t e e s s : : Bahamas First Holdings announced it will be holding its Annual General Meeting on Thursday, August 13, 2009, at 5pm at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, No. 1 Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of July 9, 2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ROYAL FIDELITY MARKETWRAP The Bahamian Stock Market F F I I N N D D E E X X 7 7 8 8 6 6 . . 9 9 6 6 ( ( 5 5 . . 7 7 3 3 % % ) ) Y Y T T D D B B I I S S X X C C L L O O S S I I N N G G C C H H A A N N G G E E V V O O L L U U M M E E Y Y T T D D P P R R I I C C E E S S Y Y M M B B O O L L P P R R I I C C E E C C H H A A N N G G E E AML$1.39 $-0-18.71% BBL$0.63 $-0-4.55% BOB$6.94 $-0-9.16% BPF$11.00 $-0-6.78%B SL$7.92 $-0-22.28% BWL$3.15 $-00.00% CAB$11.39$-0-18.82% CBL$5.64 $-0-19.43% C HL$2.74 $-0-3.18% CIB$10.38 $-0-0.67% CWCB$3.53 $0.54056.89% DHS$1.82 $-600-28.63% FAM$6.60 $-550-15.38%F BB$2.37 $-00.00% FCC$0.30 $-00.00% FCL$5.16 $0.1340,786-0.19% FCLB$1.00 $-00.00% F IN$10.80$-0.1023,001-9.01% ICD$5.49 $-0.0111,130-10.44% JSJ$10.40 $-0-6.31% PRE$10.00 $-00.00% International Markets F F O O R R E E X X R R a a t t e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C A A D D $ $ 0 .9221+2.90 G G B B P P 1.6445+0.64 E E U U R R 1 .4217+0.77 C C o o m m m m o o d d i i t t i i e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C r r u u d d e e O O i i l l $68.06 + 5.81 G G o o l l d d $ 954.40+1.84 I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l S S t t o o c c k k M M a a r r k k e e t t I I n n d d e e x x e e s s : : W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e D D J J I I A A 9,093.24 +3.99 S S & & P P 5 5 0 0 0 0 979.26+4.13 N N A A S S D D A A Q Q 1 ,965.96+4.21 N N i i k k k k e e i i 9,944.55+5.85 To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today!

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S COTIABANK (Bahamas has opened the doors to its new retail sales centre in the Caves Village Shopping Plaza, a facility the bank says is the first of its kind to be opened in the Bahamas. Vice-president of retail b anking, Wayde Christie, said Scotiabank studied its market and found the need for a dedicated retail banking centre. "We have always been looki ng at the opportunities that are in our market, and not so much just in terms of opening new branches or expanding our service but really listening to what the market is telling they need and want to see," he said. "Through a number of surv eys and feed back, it was evident that there was a strong need for a facility that provided flexible terms and focused s ervice that allows people to come in and get out really quickly." At the new Scotiabank b ranch, all the services which can be found at other retail banking locations can be performed, except the exchange of cash. Automatic TellerM achines (ATM for deposits and withdrawals. According to Mr Christie, a second ATM machine will be added to the one already at the centre and will hold dual currency Bahamian and US dollars. The new centre also features S aturday banking, which Scotiabank (Bahamas director, Barry Malcolm, said has been a request of the b anking public for some time. "The need for after-hours and weekend banking has been voiced in many quarters,a nd the Caves Village centre states simply that we have heard," he said. "This centre is but the first of many innovations andr efinements to our branch network systems that we will unveil in our Bahamas market over the next few years." He said that with the opening of the Caves Village branch, Scotiabank is preparing itself to meet the rebound that will come when the world a nd the Bahamas pulls out of the current economic recession. "We hold the view that as it does, Scotiabank B ahamas must be best positioned to respond to the mark et we serve," said Mr Malcolm. "This new Scotiabank retail sales centre provides you with another exciting choice b y which to meet your banking needs." By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net T HE Bahamas Chamber of is preparing Bahamian businesses to take advantage of upcoming trade agreements even though the Government is still trying to finalise this country's services offer for the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA Hank Ferguson, the Chamber’s trade policy expert, told Tribune Business that Bahamian companies need to be informed of the benefits resulting from the EPA when it comes to trade with the European Union and other CARIFORUM nations, as well future trade agreements with Canada and this nation’s entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO Mr Ferguson said the Chamber of Commerce will be holding a seminar to this end on Thursday at the British Colonial Hilton in Nassau, and on Friday in Grand Bahama. The Seminar will be led by head of the Services Trade Unit at the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM Ramesh Chaitoo, and Trade Specialist Dr Noel Watson. "This will be a focused seminar to expose Bahamian service providers to opportunities offered through the EPA," said Mr Ferguson. He said these seminars are a continuing effort by the Chamber of Commerce and Inter-American Development Bank (IDB to highlight the perceived benefits of the EPA and other Trade Agreements. “The Chamber wants to ensure that its members are fully informed," said Mr Ferguson. "We are taking holistic approach to trade agreements, including Canada and the WTO." He said the Bahamas Trade Commission is partnering with the Chamber on several of the seminars. However, the Bahamas' initial services submission was rejected the EU and returned for amendments to be made. "There are still some things to be worked out. Language that had to be fine tuned and it (the services offer back to Cabinet," said Mr Ferguson. It is not yet known what the EU has proposed to the Bahamas in its services offer or the level of market access. However, because of the National Investment Policy some sectors will still be closed to the EU and Cariforum nations. "The Government has p ledged to keep the national investment policy sound," said Mr Ferguson. He said that though the final draft of the Bahamas services offer has not been submitted, "we won't wait for the ink to dry to start working”. 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r egion” of $500,000. P hilip Galanis, an accountant and partner in HLB Galanis Bain, told Tribune Business from New York that he and his attorneys would this week initiate legal action to prevent the Provost Marshall selling off numerous land parcels and several vehicles owned by New Hope Holdings, in order to settle an alleged debt they owed to two US marina construction specialists, Florida Marine and Carey Marine International. The Provost Marshall is due to auction off some 15 parcels of real estate, seven of which contain buildings, and eight other tracts of land, plus two vehicles, via Public Auction on Wednesday, July 29, 2009. T he auction has already been a dvertised in the newspapers, with seizure notices already attached to the affected properties. However, Mr Galanis told Tribune Business: “I’ve been in touch in the last two days with my attorneys and persons involved with this, and I’m absolutely convinced there will be no auction. “We are going to take the necessary legal action. We’re going to court to obtain an injunction to stay that auction. I’m absolutely convinced there will be no auction.” Mr Galanis said he had been in contact with the Commissioner of Police, Reginald Ferguson, over the issue. The Commissioner, he added, had not been aware that New Hope Holdings was in courtsupervised receivership when notice was given of the intention to seize the company’s assets and make good its debt. I ndicating that the asset s eizure and auction could not be carried out anyway, due to the protection offered by the court-supervised receivership a process that stays all debts and claims against a company Mr Galanis said Florida Marina and Carey Marine International had “certainly not followed the process to redress their grievance”. Explaining that neither himself nor New Hope or Preben Olsen, the Scandinavian investor who is the company’s principal, had been served with the appropriate writ, Mr Galanis disputed the $1.2 million being claimed by the two Florida-based companies. “While I believe there is a bona fide liability owed by the company, I can’t quantify it at this time,” he told Tribune Business. “The numbers may be in the region of $500,000. I can’t justify $1.2 million. They also have to stand behind the other secured creditors. They’re not a preferred creditor.” However, sources close to Mr Olsen and New Hope told Tribune Business that they blamed Mr Galanis for the situation with Florida Marine. They argued that the Floridabased firms had been able to obtain a default judgment after the receiver failed to submit a defence to the Supreme Court action they initiated. T he threatened auction and a sset seizure is the latest spinoff from the legal battle between Mr Olsen and New Hope’s primary financier, T. G. Investments, which is headed by Tom Gonzalez. This led to New Hope being placed into court-supervised receivership, Mr Galanis being charged with continuing the company’s operations and protecting and preserving assets, until their dispute is sorted out. Mr Gonzalez is alleging that Mr Olsen and New Hope defaulted on repaying loans worth $23-$24 million. He is alleging that he lent this sum, secured by two promissory notes, to Mr Olsen and New Hope Holdings to finance the acquisition of the Port Lucaya Marina and associated properties, but this has not been repaid. He is also claiming he financed other obligations of New Hope Holdings. Mr Olsen’s side is alleging that responsibility for any loan repayment default lies squarely with Mr Gonzalez. They are claiming that he failed to live up to several obligations, one of which was to provide New Hope Holdings with $12 million in working capital – over and above the initial purchase price to fund its operations. This, Mr Olsen is alleging, never happened, and without that capital New Hope ended up defaulting. Essentially, the core allegation in their a rguments rests on the claim t hat any responsibility for the loan default lies with Mr Gonzalez himself. The assets under receivership are the Lucayan Marina, private residences, pool bar, Ferry House restaurant and the newly-completed Grand Bahama Yacht Club facility. Taken out of receivership earlier this year, with management turned back to Mr Olsen, was the Port Lucaya Marina and adjacent land. New Hope Holdings and Mr Olsen acquired the 115slip Port Lucaya Marina in August 2006 amid much fanfare, with a signing ceremony that was attended by thenPrime Minister Perry Christie and senior Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA utives. Together with the Grand Bahama Yacht Club and other associated facilities, the Port Lucaya Marina was, according to press releases issued at the time, intended to be the centerpiece of a $500 million, 70-acre waterfront expansion undertakenb y New Hope Holdings for the Bell Channel Bay area. That project was slated to include 300 yacht slips and 300 new waterfront condos, townhouses and private residences, with New Hope Hold i ngs also intended to dredge the Bell Channel to 13 feet in depth to accommodate the latest class of mega yachts. The next court hearing in the battle between Mr Olsen and Mr Gonzalez is set forS eptember 2009. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Receiver ‘totally confident’ of no asset auction I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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issue, prepared by attorney Veronique Evans, urged the Water & Sewerage Corporation to “annul” the bidding process for the Arawak Cay plant because two other bidders, Consolidated Water and GE-Ionics, would “have cause for complaint” if negotiations were commenced with Mr Fitzgerald’s BK Water. Ms Evans’s opinion confirmed details in Tribune Business’s 2005-2006 articles that chronicled the Arawak Cay reverse osmosis plant saga, with the Water & Sewerage Corporation having invited three firms who had qualified to bid on the previous Blue Hills reverse osmosis plant to submit tenders for t his project. T hat bidding process, initiated in April 2005, saw the receipt of one bid by deadline, but it was rejected. The Arawak Cay plant contract was put out to tender again, and two bids were received – one from Consolidated Water, winner of the Blue Hills contract, and the other from BK Water. BK Water had not been invited to bid, Ms Evans wrote, and while it “had some connection” to water supplier/wastewater treatment provider Veolia/Ennerserve, this “was not established to the satisfaction of the Water& Sewerage Corporation”. While neither of the bids was officially rejected, the legal opinion detailed how the Water & Sewerage Corporation felt Consolidated Water was “not a good candidate” for the Arawak Cay contract s ince it would have a monopo ly on reverse osmosis water supply due to its existing Blue Hills plant. As a result, the Corporation planned to approach Veolia directly and negotiate the Arawak Cay contract. However, Ms Evans advised against this. She wrote: “As it stands, C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs M INISTRY OFWORKS & TRANSPORT NOTICE CORRIDOR 18SAUNDERS BEACH AREA R OADWAY CONSTRUCTIONI n an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems J OSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A has been contracted for the Completion of the New Providence Road Improvement P roject – International Package. Road construction will be commencing on Corridor 18 (Saunders Beachdiversions on: Poinsettia Avenue through Marine Drive and exits at Bougainvillea Avenue. There will be delays along this vicinity due to the one-way traffic flow system. Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further information will be provided in the local media! "#$%&'&()&&(*)'+,&'&()&&(&-+.%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%/012#$%344451610178419:"##;<"=4 Water plant contract’s F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e

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the only true bidder is Consolidated Water, as it is the only bidder who qualified under clause 4 of the bid documents. BK was not a qualified bidder, and their bid should therefore be rejected without any further consideration. am aware of some representations made be Veolia that BK is an affiliate of theirs, but none of the documents required under Clause 5 were provided with the bid.” She added: “At the start of the bidding process in April, three companies were invited to bid. Now Water & Sewerage Corporation proposes to negotiate directly with a company which to the best of its available information did not qualify in the first place. “The potential legal ramifications of that decision are very far-reaching. Not only would Consolidated Water have cause for complaint, but s o would GE-Ionics (the third invitee), because both would not be given the opportunity to renew their bids.. Should BK prove its relationship with Veolia, then its bid can be accepted. The most important aspect of this process is that it is transparently fair, so that justice can be seen to be done.” To annul the bidding process, Consolidated Water’s offer had to be rejected as well, Ms Evans urging that “in the interest of transparency and to ward off any taint of bias” they should be informed of the reasons why, given that they were also the Water & Sewerage Corporation’s partner via the Blue Hills plant. The legal opinion was among a batch of documents released to the media by the Government, and was seemingly designed to show Mr Fitzgerald had a ‘conflict of interest’ in relation to his opposition to the Arawak Cay port plan – something that seems a stretch, given that Arawak Cay was abandoned as a reverse osmosis plant location, as show by Tribune Business articles at the time – in favour of Perpall Tract. A November 1, 2005, letter from BK Water’s registered agent, Higgs & Johnson Corporate Services, and signed by attorney Zarina Fitzgerald, Mr Fitzgerald’s wife, said 65 per cent of BK Water was to be owned by BK Holdings and Bay West (Bahamas BK Holdings’ beneficial owners were Mr Fitzgerald, Mark Finlayson and Philip Kemp, as detailed by Tribune Business back in 2005, and Bay West’s principals were Prince Wallace and Judson Wilmott. Tribune Business had again identified the latter’s participation at the time. A further 5 per cent of BK Water’s equity was proposed to be allocated to the Water & Sewerage Corporation, with the remaining 30 per cent to be offered to Bahamian institutional investors. In a proposal to the Water & Sewerage Corporation sent two weeks earlier, on October 19, 2005, Mr Fitzgerald said that apart from an initial 5 per cent stake offered to the Corporation at “no cost”, this could be increased in two phases. A further 5 per cent stake in BK Water would be o ffered to Water & Sewerage once BK Water/Veolia “receives the additional volume to supply water to Kerzner and the provision of wastewater services to Paradise Island”. Then, another 2.5 per cent stake would be offered – taking Water & Sewerage’s equity in BK Water to 12.5 per cent – once the company supplied water and wastewater services to Baha Mar. The Arawak Cay plant was designed to provide water to Atlantis Phase III and Baha Mar. Mr Fitzgerald also offered to reduce BK Water’s price for five million gallons of water per day, excluding electricity costs, to $3.74 per gallon. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 7B ar reaching legal ramifications’ Share your news T he T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for ag ood cause, campaigning for improvements in the a r e a or have won an a ward. If so, call us on 322-1986 a nd share your story.

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eign direct investment, the effects were now spreading to the Bahamian financial services industry. He warned that when the Bahamian hotel industry recovered it was unlikely to re-hire all the workers laid off between autumn 2008 and now, due to the fact that productivity gains from the remaining workforce had likely made many posts redundant. “I don’t think things will return to normal,” Mr Smith added of the hotel sector. “They may never hire them again, because the ones left are being a lot more productive and a lot more efficient. Some people in the National Training Programme are going to find they have to stay in the new industries.” T hat, too, will likely cont ribute to a slower reduction i n the unemployment rate than the Government would want – a rate that, if anything, is likely to be higher than the Department of Statistics survey found earlier this year, due to increasing lay-offs and the difficulty in measuring the number of underemployed and discouraged workers. “I think we’re going to, like the US, continue with higher levels of unemployment for quite some time,” Mr Smith said. “We could be talking two to three years, because the US is approaching 10 per cent unemployment, and some times our unemployment level is twice theirs.” This trend, he added, was exacerbated by the fact that the Bahamas’ reliance on tourism and financial services meant its sole, and key, factor o f production was labour. As a result, the Bahamian workf orce took the brunt of economic recessions. Mr Smith told Tribune Business that a Bahamian economic recovery continued to depend on what happened in the US, and the current evidence from major markets, such as housing and the financial system, suggested the rebound – when it came – was likely “ to be very sluggish” in our northern neighbour. “That means a continuing dampening impact on consumer spending, which drives things like travel,” he warned. “We can expect, when our market rebounds, it will not be ‘v-shaped’, it will be a ‘long L’ shape.” With consumer confidence in the US, which supplies 85 per cent of the Bahamas’ tourists, remaining low, consumer spending power and disposable income for use on items such as Bahamian vacations remains depressed. Consumer and business spending is likely to be subdued for s ome time in the US as both s ectors deleverage and reduce y ears of debt-fuelled spending, which also does not bode well for the Bahamas. Mr Smith said that while Americans were still travelling, they were increasingly shopping on price for cutprice vacations, something which had taken them away from the relatively highpriced Bahamas to cheaper Caribbean destinations such as Cancun and the Dominican Republic. These destinations, the former finance minister said, offered the same attractions as the Bahamas – sun, sand and sea – but often a much better ‘value for money’ proposition. “When we have a rebound, we will have less return visitors,” Mr Smith s aid. “Americans are still trave lling, but less to the B ahamas.” Based on anecdotal evidence, his understanding was that the Bahamian hotel and tourism industry had not offered such deep discounts to entice visitors as other destinations. And the discounts offered tended to largely focus on reduced room rates, which still left visitors paying relatively high prices in areas such as food and beverage. Factoring all this into an equation featuring the potential opening of Cuba to US travellers, Mr Smith told Tribune Business: “I think we’ve got an uphill battle with some factors not directly related to the recession.” The Bahamas, he added, needed to be “much more conscious” of the tourism and hotel industry’s perceived weaknesses, chiefly poor service and the high operating cost base. “I think as long as we recognise where we are and the challenges ahead, we can probably muddle our way t hrough, but we’ve got to a ppreciate things will not r eturn to normal,” Mr Smith added. “The upside, I believe, is that we will deliver a more efficient economy because the survivors in the labour force and small businesses shall be leaner and much more efficient.” As for the foreign exchange reserves, Mr Smith added: “We might be lulled to sleep because we see the reserves performing well, but that’s mostly the product of borrowing, which has to be repaid at some point or used to finance the Government’s capital works projects. “We can’t be clapping too much about that, because it’s not the product of tourism or foreign direct investment.” Bahamas to face high unemployment ‘for quite some time’ C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE <(6<28&$1 NOTICEIN THE ESTATE OF Robert Douglas Erskine late of 303 East Street on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or demand againstthe above Estate are required to send the same 10th day of August, A.D., 2009 , after which date the Executors will proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of which they shall then have had notice. AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the said Estate of Robert Douglas Erskine are requested to make full s ettlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned. LEANDRAA. ESFAKIS Attorney for the Executors Chambers P.O. Box SS-19269 No. 16 Market Street Nassau, New Providence The Bahamas To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 502-2371 today! F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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be Mr Duprey’s partner or some other relative, given that they share the same Florida address of 2 Harborage Isle Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Regardless, Mr Gomez is also seeking documents from Greenberg Traurig on its dealings with both in an individual capacity. Although the documents do not divulge why Mr Gomez is seeking this information, it is more than likely t hat he wants to examine w hether any assets belonging t o CLICO (Bahamas extension, its Bahamian insurance policyholders, annuity depositors and other creditors, may have ended up with Mr Duprey’s private companies – and been used to finance his private business interests. If this turns out to be the case, the CLICO (Bahamas liquidator will more than like-ly go after Mr Duprey and his companies through the courts to secure their return. This could take months before a successful outcome is secured, though, as Mr Gomez will likely have to unravel a maze of inter-party transactions and related party wheelings and dealings. There is little doubt, though, that eyebrows will be raised by the size of Mr Duprey’s private business empire, and why it was necessary to have as many as 75 different companies. Meanwhile, Mr Gomez, in a separate subpoena, is seeking documents from a Floridabased firm, North County Properties & Investments, relating to its dealings with CLICO (Bahamas asset/investment, the Wellington Preserve Corporation real estate development. Specifically, Mr Gomez is seeking documents on “any arrangements that may have existed concerning Wellington Preserve Corporation’s ‘approved contractors’, and advertising fund to which approved contractors were to contribute”. This information is to be produced by August 10, 2009. It is no surprise that Mr Gomez is having to spend considerable time in the US to protect, preserve and ultimately recover CLICO (Bahamas mate benefit of its Bahamian creditors. Through the $73.638 million loan to finance investments by its subsidiary, CLICO Enterprises, the Bahamian life and healthy insurer has some 63 per cent of its assets tied up in various chunks of Florida real estate. According to Mr Gomez, apart from Wellington Preserve these investments also include the ‘W’ hotel property in Fort Lauderdale and, indeed, there are numerous resort and real estate development companies that he wants to obtain documents on. Tribune Business revealed last week that Mr Gomez was in talks with two to three potential buyers, one of whom is believed to be a major real estate development company, to sell Wellington Preserve. Its sale, and maximising the price paid, will be key to a successful liquidation and how much Bahamian creditors are ultimately able to recover. The closer Mr Gomez gets to a $73 million sales price, the better the likelihood that secured creditors – especially its life and health insurance policyholders – will recover 100 per cent of their longterm investments. The CLICO (Bahamas uidator had warned previously that Wellington Preserve was “not presently considered marketable” due to the downturn in the Florida real estate market, and that it was unlikely that the $73 million loan to CLICO Enterprises could be “recovered at full value”. While Wellington Preserve’s accounts showed investment property valued at $127 million, the same real estate was valued at $62 million on an ‘as is basis’. The development, planned to feature 80 residential lots and other amenities on a 523-acre site, also required a $42 million cash injection to get it ready for sale. Mr Duprey was the chairman and principal owner of CL Financial, the Trinidadian conglomerate that owned and controlled CLICO (Bahamas directed the latter’s Board and dominated decision-making at the Bahamian insurer, running all aspects of its operations. Therefore, he has to assume most responsibility for its collapse into a $16 million insolvency (at least financial stress hundreds of Bahamians find themselves in. CL Financial had also given a $57 million guarantee to cover the latter’s loans to high-risk investments by related parties in Wellington Preserve and other Florida-based real estate investment projects. In his first report to the Bahamian Supreme Court as the then-provisional liquidator, Mr Gomez said CLICO (Bahamas claim” against CL Financial for the full value of the $57 million guarantee. He added that he would thus have to ensure CL Financial’s assets were not “dissipated” by court proceedings in Trinidad. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 9B CLICO liquidator targets 75 firms F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, told Tribune Business that “the Ministry of Finance is undertaking a review of the Business Licence Act” with a view to fulfilling the 2009-2010 Budget promise to create a ‘onestop’ service for licensing all companies, thereby eliminating bureaucracy and costs associated with red tape. “We expect next year for certain to have a new Business Licence Act,” Mr Laing told Tribune Business. “The bottom line is we think it is possible to licence businesses in a much simpler fashion in this country. “The idea is to make it simpler to do business in the Bahamas. That’s the objective. The idea is to make it easier for people to do business.” The new Business Licence Act is designed to incorporate four existing Acts into one, with the Liquor Licences Act, the Shop Licences Act and the Music and Dancing Licences Act amalgamated with it to create a ‘one-stop shop’ licensing process. Mr Laing pointed to situations where businesses such as liquor stores not only had to obtain their Business Licence, but were also subjected to the Shop Licences and Liquor Licences Acts, effectively forcing them to undergo three different procedures to meet their licensing requirements. The same situation could also face nightclubs, restaurants and other entertainment spots, and Mr Laing indicated that reforms could also focus on the way Business Licence fees are calculated. The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and others have long complained that the way Business Licence fees are calculated, based on a formula involving gross profits, penalises businesses with high sales but low margins and profits, such as food stores. Conversely, it rewards companies with low sales but high margins and net profits, such as law firms. In his 2009-2010 Budget communication, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said: “The new Business Licence Act will make specific provision for Liquor Licence as a special category of Licence. The Licensing Authority will no longer be required. “The new Act also importantly includes a provision for the establishment of a Review Board that will hear objections from the public on certain licence applications, objections by applicants of licence revocations or suspensions and complaints regarding matters related to Business Licence. The issuance of the Business Licence will become the responsibility of the Ministry of Finance. This will result in an amendment to the Local Government Act.” Meanwhile, Mr Laing told Tribune Business that the Bahamas expected to finalise its services offer for the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA p ean Union (EU s ummer”. We expect a concluding meeting with them [the EU] over the summer,” the min ister said. “I think we will have that final meeting and be able to conclude the ser vices agreement then. ““It’s still a matter of mode three offerings; they’d like to see more. That’s the rationale of these discussions.” Mode Three relates to the ability of European firms to establish a commercial presence for their operations in the Bahamas. Tribune Business previously reported that the EU was seeking more liberalisation from this nation, and greater openings, for EU firms in areas such as retail, construction, computer systems, advisory services and foreign/international law. The prime reason why the EU rejected the Bahamas’ initial services offer was that it did not meet the minimum liberalisation thresholds set by Europe and CARIFORUM, and it also did not align with the criteria currently set out – and used – by this nation in its National Investment Policy. The EU was also seeking g reater clarity on the investm ent approvals process, much o f which is in policy as opposed to statute. The Europeans would prefer this to be in statute law, not policy, where it could be subject to the whim or opinion of some ministers or officials. In short, they want the ‘rules of the game’ to be clear when it comes to the Bahamas. Meanwhile, Mr Laing said the mandate of the Trade Commission and other government Boards had been renewed. He added that the Trade Commission’s size had been expanded, through the inclusion of representatives from the Abaco, Exuma, Andros and Grand Bahama Chambers of Commerce, plus persons acting for the Bahamas Hotel Association and straw vendors. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE N OTICEIN THE ESTATE OF Bethany Jones Major late of Wilson Street n the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or demand againstthe above Estate are required to send the same 10th day of August, A.D., 2009 , after which date the Executors will proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of which they shall then have had notice. AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the said Estate of Bethany Jones Major are requested to make full settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned. LEANDRAA. ESFAKIS Attorney for the Executors C hambers P.O. Box SS-19269 No. 16 Market Street Nassau, New Providence The Bahamas /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q WKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $ UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $ UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV New Business Licence ‘next year for certain’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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h as more than 50 stores in its v irtual mall, and with the power of the Internet and expansion only a program upgrade away, the site can conceivably accommodate all the businesses in the Bahamas and more. Like amazon.com, one of the largest online shopping sites in the world, shopBVM.com allows Bahamian individuals and businesses to set up an account with it in o rder to sell their products and services online. And, through the keying in of a credit card number, Bahamians are able to shop from home and have their products delivered to them, or they can simply pick it up themselves. According to the site’s operations manager and head of information technology, Ricardo Berris, when items are purchased on shopBVM.com's secure site, a receipt is generated for the product to verify that the holder is the purchaser.If the purchased product is picked u p from its location, the vend or is required to ask for i dentification. While this represents a physical security feature, Mr Berris said that online, ShopBVM.com have taken steps to secure every page on the site. He explained that customers can ensure the site is secure by looking for the security seal on the lower right hand corner of the web p age, where credit or debit c ard information is inputed. He also said individuals can tell a site is secure when http: begins the line of the Uniform Resource Locator (URL Vaughn Burrows, shopBVM.com’s chief executive, told Tribune Business that the website was conceived of during a brainstorming session among former Atlantis employees. " Everyone had their good ideas, but we thought that a mall where Bahamians can shop anywhere in the Bahamas from the comfort of their homes would be a good idea," said Mr Burrows. Due to the Bahamas' ecommerce infancy, shopBVM.com’s investors required their website to be far differ ent from existing home shopping sites, and able to accommodate the limited capabilities available. After an extensive search for a suitable web design company, they chose the Miami-based company, O xidev. " We got online and looked f or the best web designer we could find," Mr Burrows said. "We looked at their website, because if you're designing our website and yours looks like garbage, we’re not going with you." As a result of the relationship with Oxidev, the shopBVM.com's principal became the sole independent broker in the Bahamas for the web d esign company. W ebsite "We didn't want to just copy and paste amazon.com to a Bahamian website, so we looked at a lot of other sites and said: ‘Why be like amazon we can be better," said Mr Bazard. Visitors to the site will immediately notice themes of the ’slands and of the B ahamas, in particular. According to Mr Bazard, i nvestors wanted the site to b e authentically representative of the Bahamian islands and leave business owners’ online stores with the same appeal. ShopBVM.com has been so well received since its launch in January 2009 that the tshirt company, 242 People, has sold its product as far away as the Middle East. According to Mr Berris, a Bahamian florist also received a n order from Thailand via the shopBVM.com for flowe rs to be sent to a recipient i n Bermuda. He said instead of shipping the flowers from Nassau, the company was able to fill the order through an affiliate florist in Bermuda. All the principals agree that the possibilities are endless for those Bahamian ‘bricks and mortar’ stores who wish to expand but do not have the capital. "Move your store online," they say. F or a limited time, shopbvm.com is offering its cust omers free store set up. Foll owing the promotion, interested business owners will be able to purchase Bimini, Abaco and Andros packages, with set-up costs starting at $49.99. With the Bimini package, vendors will be able to display up to 100 products on the site; with the Abaco package, up to 200 products; and with the Andros package, more than 200 products. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 11B /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q WKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q WKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV Site’s $100k outlay takes Bahamas firms to world

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How can we satisfy the ‘spiritual, emotional and mental hunger’ that exists in our people? By RUPERT MISSICK Jr Chief Reporter rmissick@tribunemedia.net T he last time I wrote a column for Insight I dis cussed the need of Bahamians to be "fed." While we received many good responses to the article I was encouraged to explain more about what I was referring to when I said there was a deep hunger in our nation. The greatest human need is the need to be fed. For many of us in the Bahamas the concept of starva tion, real physical hunger is an alien reality. But no doubt if physical food is out of reach and we face death through starvation, there is no limit to the depths we would sink in order to be nourished. We would leave our place of birth, stand on lines longer than we would tolerate in better days, steal, beg, do "demeaning" work, sell our most treasured possessions, and sell ourselves or perhaps our loved ones in order to survive. Despite the fact that the horrors of this physical starvation are removed from most of our realities, several questions must be posed. Among them are: Why are we steal ing? Why are we selling ourselves, our loved ones? Why are we killing ourselves and our loved ones? We are doing this not out of physical hunger but because of the spiritual, emotional and mental hunger that exists in this city, on our islands and in our people. As I said before, this hunger lies like a gaping maw in our existence, howling in a hollow voice in the midst of our prosperity. It is this hunger that leads many Bahamians to feel that they cannot make it, that they are not equipped to make it and no one else but (excuse the colloquialism and their ma” cares if they make it. Increasingly Bahamians are becoming unable to take advantage of the opportunities in their own county because of the shortfall in the education system. There is a growing sector of our society that feels pushed out of the mainstream because of the country from which they or their parents originated. Our youth, for a plethora of reasons, are becoming increasingly angry, disenfranchised and violent. And it's not only the youth, it's their par ents as well who are feeling disconnected from, or dispossessed from the Bahamas and its promise of prosperity. This dispossession is not mani festing itself in what I like to call the dilly tree philosophers, the won derful men and women in our country who've been there, done that, seen it and can tell you better than can any book on Bahamian history. It's not expressing itself in many of the middle or affluent classes who are becoming more educated, more "economically empowered" the phrase some people like to use and it is certainly not being expressed in those movers and shakers in the tourism industry, the judiciary, in the political, or financial sector. This phenomenon of disposses sion is being expressed in the heart of this island in those people who are largely ignored, spoken about jokingly as the "jungaless", looked down upon as the unwed teenager, the sneered at construction worker who just spent the lion’s share of his pay cheque in Hoffer and Sons, the unemployable high school senior. They are the young men who we see being trouped out of the prison buses on weekdays, arrested on weekends and cycled and recycled through Her Majesty's Prison for the rest of their lives. They are the young people, and some not so young, who use their body as chattel to be traded for chattel, favour or affection. Our material wealth as a nation has brought us no closer to being the sand-bordered utopia that we sell to tourists on our postcards than it was 500 years ago. Despite our material prosperity, Bahamians are more afraid of one another, less patient with one another, less tolerant and less under standing. Despite the nation's material wealth we are not being fed as a people. All people with some influ ence in this society, the media, the church, the judiciary, all branches of government, and our elected officials have become complicit in this. Regardless, there is no other entity in this nation, or any other nation for that matter, that is more power ful than the individual. Every ablebodied citizen and resident of this county can change things for the better and in fact the institutions that were mentioned before. We must relieve our people of this famine. We must not remove ourselves from the people in the sense that average concerns are not our concerns, We must not believe that we are a special sect, the dignified and entitled, well connected and privileged men and women, the playground for the pedantic or pow erful. We must not create a bubble around ourselves and lull ourselves into thinking that if all is well with me and my world, then all is well. There is nothing that is played out in the wider society that cannot reach our homes. We must become the enactors of social change, the builders of social consciousness. We must continu ously realise that we are no better than the people with whom we exist. We are no more powerful than they are, no more entitled or special. If our neighbour is weak, then we are weak. If they lack, then we lack. I have said this many times because I believe it so strongly: The Bahamas and the Bahamian stand on the cusp of a great social change and how we address these issues today will determine whether this change will be either cataclysmic or miraculous. Every person can assist with addressing this sense of desperation and work for positive change. We can help each other learn from our mistakes and the mistake of others, think and express ourselves prop erly and have a sense of responsibility for each other. We must let our people know that no matter how poor, uneducated or hopeless they feel, they are Bahamians and they are the only ones who can build this nation. As in every age, we have the responsibility to keep the common good uppermost in our minds so that we can make informed decisions to direct our actions. Working for a just social order requires us to become less insular or self-contained. We must also be ready to accept the realities of our society. The truth is often ugly, uncomfort able, embarrassing, and inconve nient and may more often than not be catering to the status quo. But if we are to flourish and be equipped with what we need to pursue our authentic fulfilment, then we must be armed with knowledge enough to know what must be done to save ourselves. INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 The stories behind the news A A A A D D D D E E E E E E E E P P P P H H H H U U U U N N N N G G G G E E E E R R R R . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Hubble image shows debris from Jupiter collision C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By MARCIA DUNN AP Aerospace Writer CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP air purifier was working again Sunday after it shut down at the worst possible time, when company was still visiting and had swollen the on-board crowd to a record 13. The repair by flight controllers, albeit temporary, came as a great relief to NASA. Even if the carbon dioxideremoval system had remained broken, shuttle Endeavour would not have had to undock early from the international space station, said flight director Brian Smith. But the system needs to work to support six station residents over the long term, he said. The machine for cleansing the station atmosphere, on the US side of the sprawling outpost, failed Saturday when it got too hot and tripped a circuit breaker. Flight controllers managed to get the unit up and running again 8 1/2 hours later in manual mode. That means extra people are needed in Mission Control six each day to handle the approximately 50 computer commands that need to be sent up every few hours. Normally, the system runs automatically. Smith said engineers hope to come up with a software solution soon to have the system back in automatic. An air-cleansing system on the Russian side of the station is working fine. In addi tion, the station has about three weeks’ worth of canisters for removing the carbon dioxide exhaled by six crew m embers. The astronauts would have relied on those canisters to prevent an early undocking of Endeavour, if the US carbon-dioxide removal machine not been coaxed back into operation. The shuttle and its crew of seven will depart Tuesday, as originally planned. Before leaving, the shuttle astronauts have their fifth and final spacewalk to perform. D uring Monday’s spacewalk, Christopher Cassidy and Thomas Marshburn will rearrange some power cable hookups, fold down a piece of popped-up insulation on a small, dexterous robot arm, and install TV cameras on the brand new porch of Japan’s space station lab. “We’re all keenly aware that (spacewalks risk to them, and so we’re g oing to be very, very delibe rate and careful,” said shutt le commander Mark Polansky. “In my book, the last one you do is always the one that you have to watch out for the most.” After experiencing elevated carbon dioxide levels on the past two spacewalks, astro naut Christopher Cassidy promises to take it nice and slow Monday. His first spacewalk last week had to be cut short because of the problem. Mission Control has urged Cassidy to rein himself in, not so easy for a former Navy SEAL. “Yes, I am taking quite a bit of teasing about this,” Cassidy said at a news conference as his crewmates erupted in laughter. “I have a whole lot of confidence in the suit and the system there. ... It’s not like you leave them out on the loading dock overnight or anything.” A spare carbon-dioxide removal system for the space station, meanwhile, will be launched at the end of August on the next shuttle flight, a plan put in place long before this weekend’s trouble. NASA has wrapped up extensive testing of the foam insulation on the fuel tank for that mission, and so far every thing looks to be in good shape. Engineers wanted to make sure that the insulation was attached properly after considerable foam was lost during Endeavour’s July 15 launch. The tests delayed Discovery’s mission by a week. Liftoff is now targeted for August 25 at the earliest. NASA patches air-purifying system on space station BALTIMORE (AP Hubble Space Telescope is offering a glimpse of atmospheric debris from an object that plunged into Jupiter in a rare collision with the planet. Scientists used the telescope Thursday to capture what they call the "sharpest visible-light picture" so far of the expanding gash. An amateur stargazer in Australia spotted the impression last Sunday. Space Amy Simon-Miller of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, says the magnitude of the impact is believed to be rare. Simon-Miller estimates the diameter of the object that hit the planet was the size of several football fields. The debris possibly came from a comet or asteroid that hitJupiter. NASA also says the new images prove repairs done on the Hubble in May were successful. THE impact feature (dark spot "backsplash" of material from a small object that plunged into Jupiter... (AP Photo: NASA

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SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP Jamaica have tentatively approved a bill that would crack down on the possession, production and distribution of child pornography. The government says the bill makes child pornography a separate crime punishable by up to 20 years in prison and more than $5,000 in fines. People linked to child pornography previously had to be prosecuted under other statues, such as carnal abuse. The bill, approved by the Senate on Friday, is needed to better protect children, according to a government statement issued Saturday. The House of Representatives is expected to debate the bill next week. Jamaica recently strengthened laws regarding other sexual offenses and created the island's first sex-offender registry. C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 3C Email: 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t It’sElectric! Acopy of the Annual Report may be obtained from Ansbacher (BahamasAnsbacher House, Bank Lane, Nassau, Bahamas. Jamaica targets child porn with new bill SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP sands more acres of former mining sites that can be converted into fields under a programme aimed at boosting food prod uction. M ining Minister Laurence Broderick says the plan aims to e ase poverty following a recent World Bank report that found rural areas remain impoverished. He says the state owns more than 5,000 hectares (12,000 acres) of land once mined for bauxite that can be converted. He said Friday in a statement that some 3,000 hectares (7,400 acres) have already been converted and yield more than 700,000 pounds (318,000 kilograms sweet pepper and other crops. Jamaica is one of the world's top producers of bauxite, the main ore in aluminum. Programme aims to boost food production KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP the widow of Jamaica's firstp rime minister and a staunch supporter of women's and workers' rights, died Satur day. She was 97. Bustamante died Saturday at a hospital after suffering from a fever, according to as tatement from the office of current Prime Minister Bruce Golding. The cause of death was unclear, although the govern ment said she had been confined to her house for two years. "Lady B," as Bustamante was known, married Alexander Bustamante in 1963, a year after Jamaica was granted independence fromB ritain. She continued to work for the Jamaica Labour Party long after her husband died in 1977. "Lady B" also was a mem ber of the Bustamante Indus t rial Trade Union and volunteered with non-profit groups to help impoverished families, the government news agency said. Alexander Bustamante was named a national hero, an honour bestowed to a select few including black civil rights leader Marcus Garvey. Widow of Jamaica’s first PM dies at 97

PAGE 29

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 75F/24C Low: 76F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 79F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 91F/33C High: 91F/33C High: 91 F/33 C High: 90 F/32 C High: 91F/33C High: 90 F/32C High: 90F/32C Low: 79F/26C High: 91F/33C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 91 F/33 C Low: 79F/26C High: 87 F/31 Low: 75F/24C High: 86F/30C Low: 76 F/24C High: 88F/31C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 92F/33C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 90F/32C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 78F/26C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 77F/25C High: 91F/33C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 27 TH 2009, PAGE 7C THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny and breezy. Partly cloudy, a t-storm; breezy. Mostly cloudy, a t-storm; breezy. Some sun with a couple of t-storms. Periods of sun, a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 80 High: 91 High: 91 High: 91 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 89 Low: 80 Low: 82 Low: 80 AccuWeather RealFeel 104F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 83F 96-88F 100-90F 103-85F 97-88F Low: 80 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................93F/34C Low ....................................................78F/26C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 93 F/34C Last year's low .................................. 77 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................20.79" Normal year to date ....................................23.84" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Jul. 28 Aug. 5Aug. 13Aug. 20 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:35 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:57 p.m. Moonrise . . . 12:18 p.m. Moonset . . . . 11:46 p.m. Today Tuesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 12:22 a.m.2.76:28 a.m.-0.1 12:57 p.m.3.07:12 p.m.0.2 1:14 a.m.2.57:17 a.m.0.1 1:52 p.m.2.98:11 p.m.0.4 2:09 a.m.2.38:10 a.m.0.2 2:51 p.m.2.89:11 p.m.0.5 3:07 a.m.2.29:05 a.m.0.3 3:50 p.m.2.710:12 p.m.0.5 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco88/3179/26t88/3180/26c Amsterdam70/2156/13r70/2156/13pc Ankara, Turkey83/2849/9pc80/2647/8s Athens92/3373/22s90/3272/22s Auckland56/1344/6s57/1351/10pc Bangkok91/3279/26t89/3179/26t Barbados86/3076/24s86/3077/25r Barcelona80/2668/20s80/2667/19s Beijing84/2864/17s90/3264/17s Beirut81/2777/25s81/2777/25s Belgrade85/2962/16pc91/3267/19s Berlin81/2763/17pc72/2255/12c Bermuda81/2775/23s81/2774/23s Bogota68/2043/6pc69/2044/6pc Brussels77/2547/8sh72/2253/11pc Budapest86/3062/16s93/3363/17s Buenos Aires59/1541/5s57/1338/3s Cairo104/4077/25s102/3877/25s Calcutta93/3382/27t94/3483/28t Calgary75/2350/10pc68/2050/10t Cancun93/3374/23pc90/3275/23pc Caracas80/2672/22t82/2771/21t Casablanca89/3170/21s91/3273/22s Copenhagen72/2260/15sh71/2154/12c Dublin64/1750/10sh63/1752/11r Frankfurt86/3057/13pc77/2557/13s Geneva 84/28 59/15 t 79/2655/12pc Halifax 67/19 59/15 pc 75/23 58/14 c Havana 91/32 74/23 sh 90/32 74/23 sh Helsinki 72/22 55/12pc73/2255/12s Hong Kong 90/32 81/27 t 90/32 81/27t Islamabad 110/43 86/30 s 108/42 84/28 s Istanbul83/2867/19s84/2866/18s Jerusalem 88/31 64/17s87/3065/18s Johannesburg 56/1339/3s57/1339/3s Kingston 89/3178/25sh90/3278/25sh Lima73/2260/15s73/2259/15s London71/2151/10r70/2157/13pc Madrid99/3766/18s99/3768/20s Manila86/3077/25r84/2879/26r Mexico City75/2353/11t74/2355/12t Monterrey105/4074/23pc110/4375/23s Montreal77/2563/17t82/2768/20pc Moscow74/2354/12r71/2159/15pc Munich86/3061/16s76/2448/8pc Nairobi78/2553/11c79/2654/12sh New Delhi 90/3279/26t91/3277/25pc Oslo66/1854/12sh72/2249/9sh Paris74/2354/12sh77/2559/15pc Prague 82/27 63/17 pc 72/22 53/11 pc Rio de Janeiro74/2367/19c81/2771/21pc Riyadh105/4080/26s104/4077/25s Rome 86/30 67/19 s 88/31 68/20 s St. Thomas90/3281/27sh91/3281/27s San Juan57/1332/0s64/1733/0s San Salvador 89/31 74/23 s 89/31 74/23 pc Santiago 57/1337/2s63/1739/3s Santo Domingo86/3074/23r87/3074/23sh Sao Paulo 66/18 56/13 sh 71/21 58/14t Seoul84/2866/18pc75/2363/17pc Stockholm 68/20 55/12 pc 66/18 55/12 sh Sydney 61/16 45/7 pc61/1645/7pc Taipei91/3279/26t93/3381/27pc T okyo 82/27 75/23 sh 83/28 78/25 t T oronto 73/2261/16pc81/2763/17t Trinidad75/2367/19pc86/3065/18pc V ancouver 82/27 65/18 s 82/2766/18s Vienna 84/2868/20pc83/2862/16pc W arsaw 72/22 59/15 pc 81/27 54/12 c Winnipeg 72/22 55/12 sh 66/1852/11pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles84F Tuesday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles84F Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles84F Tuesday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles84F Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles85F Tuesday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles85F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque92/3370/21t92/3367/19c Anchorage68/2057/13r72/2256/13s Atlanta85/2969/20t88/3171/21t Atlantic City88/3172/22t88/3171/21t Baltimore88/3168/20t88/3170/21t Boston84/2869/20t87/3071/21pc Buffalo76/2465/18pc84/2867/19pc Charleston, SC91/3274/23t89/3174/23t Chicago85/2968/20pc84/2864/17t Cleveland81/2764/17pc89/3169/20pc Dallas90/3274/23t92/3375/23t Denver90/3255/12t75/2353/11t Detroit85/2966/18t87/3067/19t Honolulu89/3177/25pc89/3176/24s Houston92/3376/24t91/3276/24t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday TodayTuesdayTodayTuesday Indianapolis85/2966/18s88/3168/20t Jacksonville92/3371/21t92/3374/23t Kansas City92/3370/21pc86/3059/15t Las Vegas109/4283/28s110/4387/30s Little Rock91/3272/22pc84/2870/21t Los Angeles86/3066/18s84/2864/17s Louisville88/3168/20pc90/3271/21pc Memphis93/3373/22pc87/3071/21t Miami91/3279/26t91/3281/27t Minneapolis86/3063/17t77/2557/13pc Nashville89/3167/19pc88/3171/21t New Orleans89/3176/24t88/3177/25t New York87/3073/22t88/3176/24t Oklahoma City92/3370/21pc90/3268/20t Orlando91/3275/23t91/3275/23t Philadelphia88/3172/22t88/3172/22t Phoenix 111/43 89/31 s 111/4388/31s Pittsburgh82/2761/16pc87/3066/18pc Portland, OR 101/3865/18s102/3865/18s Raleigh-Durham 90/32 71/21 t 91/32 71/21 t St. Louis90/3272/22s91/3268/20t Salt Lake City 92/33 64/17 pc 88/3163/17s San Antonio 98/36 76/24 pc 98/36 79/26 s San Diego77/2567/19pc74/2367/19pc San Francisco 73/22 56/13 pc 70/2156/13pc Seattle94/3463/17s96/3563/17s T allahassee 91/3271/21t94/3472/22t T ampa 91/32 76/24 t 91/32 77/25t Tucson105/4082/27s105/4082/27s W ashington, DC 88/31 73/22t89/3173/22t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 30

C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 8C, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By WILL WEISSERT Associated Press Writer HOLGUIN, Cuba (AP S unday that the global economic crisis means t ougher times ahead for Cuba, but the country has no one to blame but itself for poor farm production that leads to frequent shortages of fruits, vegetables and other basics. In a speech marking Revolution Day, Cuba's president said the island can't pin all its prob-l ems on Washington's 47-year-old trade e mbargo. He implored Cubans to take better advantage of a government programme begun last year to turn unused state land over to private farmers. " The land is there, here are the Cubans," he s aid, pounding the podium. "Let's see if we get to work or not, if we produce or not, if we keep our word." The line did not get much of a response f rom a crowd not thrilled about working under t he island's scorching tropical sun, but the 78y ear-old Castro called agricultural production C uba's top priority and a matter of national security. " It is not a question of yelling 'Fatherland or d eath! Down with imperialism! The blockade h urts us,'" he said, referring to US sanctions b egun in 1962. "The land is there waiting for our efforts." He made almost no other mention of the United States. Three years since the last time his 82-yearo ld brother Fidel was seen in public, the y ounger Castro showed signs he is getting more comfortable with national addresses, o pening with a joke about how whoever designed the stage failed to provide any shade for the speaker or the crowd. He later harpooned his own Agricultural Ministry, asking how previous Cuban generations managed to e ver grow even a single mango tree if all state advisers do today is say there's no money for reforestation. T ens of thousands of supporters, most wear ing red T-shirts or caps, filled a grassy plaza dotted with red and black "July 26" flags. Rev o lution Day, the top holiday for the communist government, commemorates the date in 1953 when the Castros led an attack on the Moncada army barracks in the eastern city of San t iago. The attack was a disaster, but Cubans consider it the beginning of the revolution that culminated with dictator Fulgencio Batista's o uster on New Year's Day 1959. Unlike in his last two holiday speeches, Raul Castro did not address the crowd with a sculpture or banner of his brother's face nearby. I nstead, an eight-story tall banner on a building behind the crowd featured a picture of both Castros thrusting their arms skyward u nder the words "The Vigorous and Victorious Revolution Keeps Marching Forward." Despite Cubans' hopes for change after Raul formally took over as president in February 2 008, economic reforms that were supposed to ease life on the island have been slow to come. Meanwhile, Cuba's economy has been hammered by the global economic crisis, and US relations have not improved much under Pres i dent Barack Obama. Raul Castro "was working to improve things, but with all that's happened with the economy i n the world, the effect has been minimal," said Silvia Hernandez, a retired commercial analyst for a state-run firm in Holguin, where Castro spoke. Castro has asked Cubans to be p atient as he implements "structural changes" to a struggling economy more than 90 per cent controlled by the state. He also has said he'd be willing to meet with US leaders over any i ssue including the country's political prisoners and human rights record, though he did not mention that Sunday. Officials from Cuba and the US discussed immigration this month for the first time since 2 003. The Obama administration lifted restrict ions on Cuban-Americans who want to trave l or send money to the island. But Washington has said it wants to see small political or economic reforms before going further. "The other side doesn't want to do anything," said housewife Elena Fuentes, 73, refer-r ing to the Obama administration. "We've b een like this for 50 years. That's too long. They talk about 'change,' but the change we want is for things to get better with the United States." In recent months, the government has o rdered lights and air conditioners turned off at banks, stores and other government institutions and closed state-run businesses and f actories early to conserve oil even though V enezuela sends the island about 100,000 barrels of crude a day at favourable prices. Farming and land reform have bolstered production of vegetables somewhat, but government money problems have delayed imports of other food, causing shortages ofb asic staples such as cooking oil. Castro said that since state officials began doling out unused state land to private farmers and cooperatives, 82,000 applicants have received more than 1.7 million acres nearly 40 per cent of fallow state land. The prog ramme bets private interests can revive an a gricultural sector crippled by decades of government mismanagement. He also said Sunday that government leade rs will meet in coming days to assess the affect of the global crisis on Cuba's economy, "particularly the significant reduction of income f rom exports." O scar Espinosa Chepe, a state-trained economist who became a dissident anti-communist and was jailed in 2003, said Castro has f ailed to keep his promises as president. "He knows times have changed, but ... he hasn't confronted the very strong inertia with-i n the government," said Espinosa Chepe. C uba's free health care and subsidized food and housing do little to soften the sting of fur t her belt-tightening in a country where nearly everyone works for the state and the average wage is less than $20 per month. "More steps against the crisis, more adjust m ents, aren't going to be easy," said Reina Delgado, a 70-year-old retiree. Castro says Cuba must put land to better use PRESIDENT Raul Castro yesterday delivers a speech in Holguin, northeast of Cuba. July 26, Cuba’s Day of National Rebellion, marks a new anniversary of the attack against Moncada military complex, where ab and of rebels, led by Fidel and Raul Castro, launched the attack 56 years ago, planting the seeds for the 1959 Cuban revolution. Holguin was selected to host the main July 26, 2009, celebration. J a v i e r G a l e a n o / A P




im lowin’ it

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LOW

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Volume: 105 No.202



90F
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SUNNY AND

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SEE INSIGHT SECTION

m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009



28 now infected
with swine flu

Cases multiply
by almost a third
in just two weeks

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE number of swine flu
cases in the Bahamas has
rocketed to at least 28, health
chiefs have confirmed.

The number of people with
the potentially-deadly
Influenza H1IN1 has multi-
plied by nearly a third in the
two weeks since 19 cases were
confirmed on July 9.

With many families and

groups travelling abroad dur-
ing the summer months, the
Ministry of Health expects to
see the sporadic emergence
of new cases of the virus.
And the number of cases is
expected to rise as the annual
flu season approaches.
Health Minister Dr Hubert
Minnis said weekly updates
will be posted on the Ministry
of Health website every Fri-
day to keep people informed

SEE page 10

Police seeking to question
driver of out of control jitney

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net



Jithey ride =

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PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Daughter of
murder victim
‘not arrested’
say police

Claims made
on website

and on TV
are refuted

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

~~

HECTOR AND Rosetta



By MEGAN
REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

REPORTS which say
the 16-year-old daughter
of murdered American
Anna Michelle Garrison
has been arrested in the
United States have been
refuted by The Royal
Bahamas Police Force.

Claims made by a
Bahamian website, and
repeated by Florida NBC
news Channel Five, say
Ms Garrison’s daughter,
Anna Pugh, was found in
Kennett Square, Penn-
sylvania, with her father
Chris Pugh.

Bahamas Police want
to question Anna about
Ms Garrison’s death and
have enlisted the United
States Federal Bureau of
Investigation (FBI) to
help find her.

Ms Garrison’s decom-
posing body was found
in a bushy area off Fox
Hill Road south, near the
Blue Water Cay devel-
opment, New Provi-
dence, at around 6pm on

SEE page 10

More than 60









POLICE are still looking to
question the driver of a packed
jitney that sped out of control
towards the Nassau Harbour.

Chief Superintendent Glenn
Miller, head of the Central
Police Station, yesterday said
that as far as he was aware, the
driver had not been questioned

Haitian migrants
apprehended

MORE than 60 Haitian
migrants were apprehended
in the Exumas over the week-
end near Harvey Cay, accord-

of terror

Passengers jump for lives from window: =
Out-of-control bus stops feet from harbour | ‘may ha
‘Two taken to hospital with leg injuries

Smith, the parents of Bren-
ton Smith, place flowers
on his coffin on Saturday.











i
Brenton Smith

Boys who went missing
on Andros still in hospital





TEENAGER Brenton
Smith was buried yester-
day, just two weeks after
he was accidentally killed
in a shootout between











by traffic officers. police and armed robbers. La Bahamas
SEE page 11 THE report in Saturday's Tribune, By TANEKA THOMPSON Fonuly and bide 0: According to RBDF offi-

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Tribune Staff Reporter
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THE two boys who were missing in Andros for 33 days and
feared dead are still recovering at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital, their mother Vera Clarke said yesterday.

Although the brothers are expected to make a full recovery,

SEE page 10

Teenager stabbed in fight

A TEENAGE boy was
stabbed in a fight with another
youth on the Western
Esplanade beach near Arawak
Cay, West Bay Street, last night.

The Nassau boy, aged 16, ran
to the Arawak Cay police sta-
tion bleeding after he was
stabbed.

Quiznos

Police Superintendent
Elsworth Moss said he was cut
twice on the arm.

The attacker fled as the boy
ran for help.

The incident is still under
investigation and the boy was
taken to Princess Margaret Hos-
pital for medical treatment.

|

r ea
Bit GREARE





















friends gathered at St
Anselm’s Church on Sat-
urday to grieve for the
bright 18-year-old who
was caught in the cross-
fire.

Brenton was said to be
a family-loving jokester
who had dreams of
becoming an engineer. He
had completed a marine
navigational course days
before his death and, for
the second summer in a
row, had been accepted
into a prestigious intern-
ship at the Albany devel-
opment.

A website has been set
up in his honour:
brentonhectorsmith.com

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NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

ioT SAND WIC

cials, July has seen the largest
number of Haitain migrants
seeking refuge to the coun-
try’s shores in recent times.

The group, 66 migrants in
all, were caught just after 9am
Sunday by Defence Force
vessel HMBS P-49, which was
on routine patrol approxi-
mately 18 miles southwest of
Harvey Cay.

The officers, under the
command of Lieutenant
Omarv Saunders, spotted a
40-foot Haitian sailing sloop
and upon further investiga-
tion discovered the migrants -
46 males, 11 females and 9
children - aboard the vessel.

SEE page 11

il


PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Bradley Roberts undecided
on running for PLP chairman

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Bain and
Grants Town MP Bradley
Roberts is undecided on
whether or not he will vie
for the post of chairman of
the Progressive Liberal Par-
ty at the party’s upcoming
convention.

“T’ve been hearing that
myself (but) I have not

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made any decision with
regard to that. ’ve been
asked by many persons,
encouraged by many per-
sons but I have not given
that any consideration,” Mr
Roberts told The Tribune
yesterday when asked to
clarify speculation that he
was gunning for the post.

He added that he has not
decided whether or not he
will join the fray of possible
contenders.

Mr Roberts said he has
been asked to bid for the
post by party supporters
who feel his “no-nonsense”
style will inject energy into
the Opposition.

“T think they like my style

and the fact that they know
that I’m a no-nonsense per-
son. And I got the job done
before when I was chairman
of the party.”

Mr Roberts was the PLP’s
chairman when the party
defeated the Free National
Movement in the 2002 elec-
tion race. He also served as
public works minister under
the Christie administration.

After one term in office,
the PLP lost power to the
FNM in May, 2007. In order
to return to the country’s
helm, Mr Roberts feels the
PLP needs to revert to the
tried and tested policies
which won them the 2002
election race.

“A return to what it did
in 2002 is a good start,
become focused and intro-
duce a programme to the
Bahamian people,” he said.

When asked if he thought
he would be able to help
steer the PLP to victory in
the 2012 election, Mr
Roberts laughed and said:
“Why don’t we cross that
bridge if we ever need to get
to it.

“But I'll say this though,
there is need to bring about
a change in this country.

“We are going down the
tubes fast.

“ Lots of people are hurt-
ing all over and we’re not
getting any answers to prob-



BRADLEY ROBERTS

lems of our people - except
wait to see what (US Presi-
dent Barack) Obama will
do. That cannot be a solu-
tion to our problems.”

The PLP’s convention is
slated for October. Engler-
ston MP Glenys Hanna-
Martin is the current party
chairman.

Man charged with possession of
unlicensed firearm, ammunition

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A MAN appeared before
Deputy Chief Magistrate
Helen Jones in Court Three,
yesterday charged with pos-
session of an unlicensed
firearm and ammunition.

It is alleged that on May
15, Kendrick McQueen, 37,
while being concerned with
another, was found in pos-
session of a firearm, serial
number AK16243, without

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being the holder of a special
license.

It is also alleged that on
the same date, while being
concerned with another, he
was found in possession of
10 live rounds of .40 bullets.

McQueen pleaded not
guilty to the charges. He was
represented by K Brian
Hanna.

e A MAN has been

charged with two counts of
shop breaking and two

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Dougaye Huyler, 23, is
accused of breaking into
McGibbons Enterprises, at
Keat Street, and making off
with a red coloured air com-
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He pleaded not guilty to
the charges and selected
summary trial.

Huyler was also charged
with shop breaking and
stealing at the G & G Ship-
ping Company.

It is alleged that between

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He was also charged with
dishonestly receiving the
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Huyler pleaded not guilty
to all the charges and the
matter was adjourned to
March 9, 2010. He was
granted $5,000 bail with one
or two sureties.



EMOTIONS run high at the
funeral of Brenton Smith, the
teenager who died after he was
accidentally killed in a shootout
between police and armed
robbers.

¢ SEE PAGE ONE

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!

AT PARTICIPATING STORES


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 3



0 In brief



Fisherman
ties while
diving for

(raps

A FISHERMAN}:
drowned while diving for }
traps off the coast of Salt }

Cay, near Paradise Island,
on Friday.

The man has not yet been
identified by police, and his }

age is not known.

Superintendent Elsworth ;
Moss in charge of the Crim- }
inal Detective Unit said the }
Harbour Patrol were called }
at around 3pm on Friday }
when the man did not sur- }

face.

He had gone under to }
retreive a fish trap around }
half a mile off the coast of }
Salt Cay, northeast of Par- }

adise Island.

A team of divers from the }
and }
Bahamas Air Sea Rescue }
(BASRA) recovered the }
man’s body from the sea

Defence Force

floor.

sau for an autopsy.

Masked men
rob Grand
Bahama
Pestaurant

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

GRAND Bahama
Police are investigating
an armed robbery on
Saturday evening.

Three masked armed
men stormed into the
Dolphin restaurant and
bar, on the airport road,
around 11.12pm and
demanded cash.

Nobody was hurt and
suspects got away with
an undetermined amount
of cash and several bot-
tles of liquors. Investiga-
tions continue.

FIREARM FOUND
POLICE were called

to a disturbance and fight

at the Hawksbill Yacht
Club around 11.43pm on
Saturday evening.

On arrival at the scene,
officers discovered a .40
pistol with two maga-
zines and two live rounds
of ammunition. No arrest
was made.

POLICE APPEAL

Police are appealing to
people to come forward
with information which
could assist them with
their investigation into
the armed robbery and
murder of businessman
Leslie Maycock.

Mr Maycock, 50, was
shot and robbed of cash
at his store in the Hawks-
bill on July 15. His death
is the sixth homicide for
the year on Grand
Bahama.

ie ee
Ut

ae i tay

Mal ara) |

He was brought to Nas-

NDP: crown land controversy shows
need for Freedom of Information Act

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE controversy sur-
rounding the abuse of crown
land grants highlights the
need for the Government to
implement a Freedom of
Information Act (FOIA),
claims the National Devel-
opment Party.

“Our government will nev-
er be seen as truly transpar-
ent unless and until this act is
brought into force,” said a
press release issued by the
party.

The NDP also questioned
the ability of Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham and Oppo-
sition Leader Perry Christie
to objectively investigate
their parts in the controver-
sial granting of Crown Land.

“We do not believe that
the two men who were ulti-
mately responsible for the
disposition of crown lands
since 1992, and who today
still sit as leaders of their
respective political parties,
can truly be objective in any
investigation of themselves,”
said the NDP.

The group is also calling



THE NDP questioned the ability of Hubert Ingraham (left) and Perry
Christie to objectively investigate their parts in the controversial

granting of Crown Land.

on the Government to allow
the media and the public
unfettered access into the
records of the Department
of Lands and Surveys for an
independent inquiry into the
debacle.

“We believe that the public
would be much better served
if members of the press were
given independent responsi-
bility for conducting a thor-
ough investigation into the
records related to the granti-
ng of crown lands, while per-
mitting our political leaders

to instead focus on the more
urgent matter of economic
recovery, diversification, and
strengthening”.

“Tf there is any select com-
mittee that should be formed
at this time, it should be one
that focuses on the current
economic crisis and the
future development of the
Bahamas,” said the NDP.

A committee - headed by
Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell -
was recently formed to inves-
tigate the disposition of all
publicly held lands in the

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after The Tribune’s extensive
reporting into the issue.

The NDP also wants to
know:

The names of all persons
who have applied for Crown
Land.

The purpose for which it
was applied.

The citizenship of each

country. It is expected to
make a report on its findings
in October.

This Lands Committee
was formed following a series
of Tribune exposes which
revealed claims of nepotism
and corruption in the Depart-
ment of Lands and Surveys.

Following these reports,
the former director of Lands application.

Tex Turnquest was forced to How many applications
resign from his post after The for crown land were
Tribune published allegations approved and how many
that members of his family, were denied.

including his mother-in-law, The price paid for the land
were granted crown land lots and whether the land was
on the island of Exuma. developed or not.

These beachfront lots,
which were sold at less than
$2,500 each, were flipped a
few years later for more than
$550,000 apiece. Mr Turn-
quest denied any connection
to any of the transactions.

A litany of other crown
land “abuses” were subse-
quently detailed in Parlia-
ment by the Prime Minister,

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune
at: letters@tribunemedia.net
or deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207









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380-FLIX


PAGE 4, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Jury selection: bad habits forming?

THIS WEEKEND a lawyer, who spends
a great deal of time around the courts,
expressed concern on behalf of some of his
colleagues about what they think might be
developing into a problem within the jury
system.

They don’t know whether the bailiffs are
having difficulty contacting jurors, or
whether jurors are being difficult about serv-
ing, but they do not like what they think
they see.

For example, said one, when a juror has
served on a murder case, he is excused from
jury duty for a year. However, last week in
the Dudley Moree murder trial, this partic-
ular lawyer counted at least three jurors who
he believed had already served the previ-
ous week on the Troyniko McNeil murder
trial.

Motree, 23, was on trial last week accused
of the murder of fellow mortician Dornell
Ferguson, 38. The jury returned a split ver-
dict — 6-6. The case was ordered back for
retrial.

As for Troyniko McNeil, 22, the jury
found him guilty, 8-4, of murdering well-
known handbag designer, Hal Taylor,
between November 17 and 18, 2007. That
case also will have to go back to a new jury
for retrial, because a murder verdict must be
unanimous. The 8-4 verdict resulted in a
hung jury. McNeil’s case ended about 10
days ago, just a few days before the Moree
case opened.

The lawyer considered that if what he
thought he saw was correct it would be most
irregular for a juror, who should be excused
from jury duty for a year after serving on a
murder case, should be serving on two mur-
der cases within the same court session.

In the old days, said one of the lawyers,
the head bailiff was usually a retired police
officer. He knew the jurors, he knew who
had biases and should not serve, particular-
ly on certain cases. Maybe, the lawyer spec-
ulated, these new bailiffs aren’t as familiar
with the jury pool, or maybe they are having
to use their own cars to go out to find these
people, and because of the personal expense
are recycling those jurors already in the court
room. This is a possible reason that they
might be using the same people, the lawyer
said.

“But we don’t want to start a system

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where we’re encouraging professional jurors,
who believe they know more than the
lawyers on the case, make up their minds
as to what happened and how the law should
be applied, and really approach the case
with a closed mind,” said the lawyer.

However, what he found most disturbing
was what looked to him like a bailiff sig-
nalling a defence attorney.

“Everytime a juror’s name was pulled, it
looked as though a bailiff tapped the defend-
ing attorney, who promptly challenged that
juror,” said the lawyer.

Another feature he found disturbing was
how some court clerks and bailiffs mingled
freely during adjournments with the family
of the accused, defence counsel and even
prosecutors.

The lawyer wanted to draw attention to
what he perceived as bad habits developing
before the system got out of hand and broke
down.

Almost half a century ago when we start-
ed out as a court reporter there were many
discussions on how to improve the jury sys-
tem.

In those days there was jury tampering.
We recall a certain gentleman who was a
fixture around the courts. He seemed to
have no special reason for being there. He
could almost be classified as a loiterer. But,
he acquired a reputation for jury tamper-
ing. The jury sat in a room to which someone
from the outside had easy access for con-
versation, or the passing of notes, through a
low-slung window. One day to try to test
this man’s purpose for hanging around the
courts, we asked him about what a particular
jury was thinking in a case that had been
“out” for some time.

He said to give him a few minutes, and he
would report back. We saw him head for
the window.

On his return, he reported that the jury
would soon be out, one juror was giving
trouble, but they were confident it was
“swinging” for the accused.

Sure enough, they were soon out, and so
was the accused.

Over the years jury tampering has been a
major problem.

If what the lawyer has told us is true, the
matter should be immediately investigated
and corrected.



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A case study
in inflation
and monetary
mischief

EDITOR, THE Tribune.

The Nassau Institute
recently attended the eco-
nomic conference “Freedom
Fest” in Las Vegas — billed as
the “World’s Largest Gather-
ing of Free Minds”.

One of the topics discussed
was the toxic effects of exces-
sive inflation, currency deval-
uation and poor economy
management. As a general
rule, the higher a country’s
budget deficit, governmental
borrowings and level of mon-
ey creation the greater down-
ward pressure on that coun-
try’s currency. Conversely, a
strong currency is a reflection
of a sound and productive
economy, and increases that
country’s buying power in
world markets.

At “Freedom Fest”, the
example of Zimbabwe was

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



given to represent the
extreme and toxic effects pos-
sible with poor economic
management.

Zimbabwe ruined their cur-
rency (and economy in the
process) through reckless
spending, excessive borrow-
ing and money creation. The
Zimbabwe Central Bank has
now begun to print official,
legal tender 100 Trillion Dol-
lar Notes!

At “Freedom Fest”, Steve
Forbes (CEO, Forbes Maga-
zine) held one of these 100
Trillion Dollar Notes and
related a simple analogy and
warning regarding Zimbab-
we’s economic path: “Thirty

years ago the Zimbabwe dol-
lar was pegged to the U.S. dol-
lar. If I would have had this
100 Trillion Dollar note 30
years ago, and it was legal ten-
der, I would have been able
to buy everything in the world
and had change! Now
through the manipulation of
the printing press and money
inflation, I can’t even go into
the lobby of this hotel and buy
a pack of chewing gum.”

To The Nassau Institute,
this is an extreme, but clear,
example and a lesson to
Bahamian policy makers to
run a sound economy with
balanced budgets, low taxa-
tion, minimal intervention
and appropriate levels of
money creation.

The Nassau Institute
Nassau,
July 20, 2009

Now is time to review how
judiciary appoints judges

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank you for publishing
my thoughts in your July 9th
edition. Further, thank you
for your response to same; it
is always good to receive a
different point of view
because it promotes good
discussion on issues of pub-
lic importance.

I would like to assure you
and your readers that before
submitting any written work,
I go through a process of
research and discussion
before I formulate and pub-
lish my opinions. With
regards to my thoughts on
the resignation of Sir Bur-
ton Hall, one of the many
reference materials I used
was a book called “The Law
and Legal System of The
Commonwealth of The
Bahamas” by Dr Dexter
Johnson.

In this book, Dr Johnson
was able to accomplish what
few lawyers can — explain
the legal system without the
use of the draconian lan-
guage that is custom within
that system and keeps many
lawyers employed. Simply
put, this book can be

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thought of as the Bahamian
version of “Bahamian law
for Dummies” and I think
it’s a must read for readers
who would like a better
sense of how the legal sys-
tem is structured. It is num-
ber one on my best seller
list!

My last submission spoke
about Sir Burton’s poor
tenure in office more so than
how he and other members
are appointed, however, as a
result of his resignation, I
think now is the best time
for us to review how the
judiciary appoints judges
and the manner in which the
head of the judiciary is
appointed.

I will not go into the nuts
and bolts of how persons are
appointed in the judiciary; I
think your last response did
an excellent job, but I will
direct your readers to the
aforementioned book by Dr
Johnson should they need
more details on this subject.

As you rightly stated, jus-
tices are “appointed” by the
Governor General. This
appointment is nothing
more than a rubber stamp
due to the fact that the Gov-
ernor General, as “head of
State”, is also an appointed
position, more so politically
appointed! It cannot be right
that a head of state that is
responsible for signing laws
into existence and “appoint-
ing” members of the gov-

ernment’s agenda is bound-
ed by the political will of an
individual, the Prime Min-
ister, who essentially has
absolute power as the real
head of state — scary!

We the people should not
settle for a politically
appointed office to look
after our welfare; this is not
a transparent system — espe-
cially when it comes to the
appointment of individuals
whose job is to interpret law
and administer justice. I
would hope that your opine
to my thoughts is in no way
confirmation and acceptance
of the current system of how
our judiciary is appointed,
because it would go against
the mantra of your institu-
tion — Being Bound to
Swear to The Dogmas of No
Master.

In closing, I look forward
to the day when we will be
allowed to elect heads of the
judiciary and the day when
judges are subjected to pub-
lic vetting before being
appointed so that we the
people can get some insight
into their thinking and have
some level of comfort with
the final decision on why
their appointments were
approve or denied.

ERIC B STRACHAN
Nassau,
July, 2009.

4 B Ba Bahamas Business

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 5





By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

EDUCATION chiefs have
spoken out against a proposal
to raise money for schools
through the introduction of a
National Lottery made in the
Ten Year Education Plan.

Contrary to various news
articles, Minister of Education
Carl Bethel maintains he nev-
er affirmed his stance on the
issue during development of
the plan by technical officers in
communication with stake-
holders over the last 13
months.

The plan lists 22 goals, each
with short-term and long-term
objectives, aimed at improv-
ing education for students of
all ages throughout the
Bahamas.

But whether or not the plan
meets its objectives will
depend on receipt of sufficient
government funding. And the
cost has not yet been ascer-
tained as the team developing
the plan has yet to perform a
cost analysis for each goal.

And the idea of starting a
national lottery, or a national
tax, to fund the plan as sug-
gested in the blueprint devised
by a team of technical officers
has been ruled out by Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham as
well as the education minister.

Mr Bethel said: “The tech-
nical officers putting the plan
together wanted to raise all
kinds of issues.

“T think discussion is fine,
but when it comes to Cabinet
it will be a policy document of
the government, and it won’t
be possible for the government
to propose any funding like
that.”

The minister maintains it is
government’s responsibility to
fund education and the cost
should not be delegated.

Rosetta

St.



“If the
Bahamian
people want
gambling they
will have to
decide that on
its own merit
and not use
education as a
horse to ride
in on.”



Carl Bethel

He mentioned plans to use a
lottery system to fund educa-
tion implemented in the Unit-
ed States, which failed in its
attempts to fund education
through a lottery.

Mr Bethel said: “As far as
this government is concerned
and from my point of view the
lottery will not be a desirable
option.

“If the Bahamian people
want gambling they will have
to decide that on its own mer-
it and not use education as a
horse to ride in on.

“The Prime Minister has
already expressed as much,
and IJ feel the same way.

“T want to remind people
that there’s consistency in all
areas of the state and that is
reflected in what the Prime
Minister said and what I said
as minister.”

Mr Bethel said he hopes the
plan will be finalised by
December and implemented
by January, however Bahamas
Union of Teachers president

LOCAL NEWS

Minister against
national lottery
money for schools



Belinda Wilson has said at
least another year of extensive
background work is needed in
order for the programme to
be successful.

e SEE YOUNG MAN’S
VIEW ON PAGE EIGHT

“YOUR VIEW?

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune
at: letters@tribunemedia.net
or deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207

STRUCKUM

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Widow of Jamaica’s first premier dies

KINGSTON, Jamaica "Lady B," as she was known, married
Alexander Bustamante in 1963, one year
after Jamaica was granted independence
from Britain.

Her husband was named a national
hero, an honor bestowed to a select few
including black civil rights leader Marcus
Garvey.

Gladys Bustamante continued to work
for the Jamaica Labor Party long after her
husband died in 1977 at age 93.

GLADYS BUSTAMANTE, the widow
of Jamaica's first prime minister and a
fierce supporter of women's and workers’
rights, has died, according to Associated
Press. She was 97.

A statement from the office of Prime
Minister Bruce Golding says Bustamante
died Saturday at the hospital after suffering
from a fever.



















































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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009



LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



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By DENISE
MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

THREE men have
been charged with
armed robbery and
firearm possession.

Charles Miller, 28, of
Yorkshire Drive, Rey-
nard Fulford, 22, of
Hanna Hill, Eight Mile
Rock, and Dougaye
Huyler appeared
before Deputy Chief
Magistrate Helen
Jones.

They were charged
with armed robbery,
possession of an unli-
censed firearm while
committing an
indictable offence, and
conspiracy to commit
armed robbery.

It is alleged that on
July 19, the accused
robbed Kevin McPhee
of a leather wallet and
$300.

The men are also
charged with the armed
robbery of Nolan
McKenzie on July 20. It
is alleged they robbed
McKenzie of a maroon
coloured Oldsmobile
licensed while armed
with a handgun.

They are also
charged with causing
harm to McKenzie.

Miller, Fulford and
Huyler were also
charged with posses-
sion of unlicensed
firearm and ammuni-
tion on July 20.

It is alleged that the
men were found in pos-
session of a black Lla-
ma .45 mm pistol and
five live rounds of .45
bullets.

The men pleaded not
guilty to the charge.

In a separate matter,
Fulford was charged
with armed robbery of
Fabian Sears on July
20.

It is alleged that he
robbed Sears of three
outboard Yamaha
engines, a white 1996
Truck, a Motorola cel-
lular phone, together
valued at $35,947.30,
the property of Marine
Land and Industry.

The men were
denied bail and
remanded to Fox Hill
Prison until October 1,
2009 for preliminary

inquiry.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 7



Facing financial challenges in
the Caribbean’s smaller states
insight

By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)

AS the member countries
of the Organisation of East-
ern Caribbean States
(OECS) work toward the
establishment of an Eco-
nomic Union amongst them-
selves amid grave economic
circumstances, all of them
should even now be consid-
ering initiatives that would
cut costs while making poli-
cy making and implementa-
tion more cohesive.

Now that’s a long sen-
tence to swallow and its pre-
cise meaning may be
unclear. So, spelling out the
concept is important for clar-
ity.

Starting with the eco-
nomic circumstances of these
countries, six of them are
independent nations; the
other member is Montserrat
which remains a British
colony. The six are among
the most heavily indebted
nations, per capita, in the
world. Their ratio of debt to
gross domestic product
ranges from between 95 per
cent to 120 per cent. This
means that, after servicing
debt, they don’t have a great
deal left over to play with.
The space for policy options,
therefore, is limited if not
non-existent.

Assistance

Five of them have sought
assistance from programmes
introduced by the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund (IMF)
to help countries cope with
the consequences of the pre-
sent difficult global financial
crisis.

St Lucia, St Vincent and
the Grenadines and Domini-
ca have each signed up to
the IMF’s Exogenous
Shocks Facility, St Kitts-
Nevis has arrangements
under the IMF’s Emergency
Assistance for Natural Dis-
asters programme, and
Grenada is receiving help to
address poverty as part of
the IMF’s Poverty Reduc-
tion Strategy Papers. The
Minister of Finance of the
sixth OECS member coun-
try, Antigua and Barbuda,
has indicated that his gov-
ernment will also soon have
to approach the IMF for
help given the economic dif-
ficulties being faced.

Each of these countries
may have to go beyond the
present IMF windows from
which some are getting assis-
tance into a full IMF pro-
gramme. They have been
talking of doing so collec-
tively, and the IMF should
accommodate such an
approach. While each coun-
try will have needs that differ
in some ways, and the mea-
sures to address them would
also be different, the funda-
mental problems are not dis-
similar and an overall strat-
egy with national compo-
nents could be devised.

The IMF should also
recognise that, with the best
will in the world, the OECS
member countries, individ-
ually, lack the capacity to
negotiate terms effectively.
A joint team drawn from the
best of each of the countries,
supported by national min-
istries of finance, would
make for a more effective
negotiation and an outcome
that the IMF and the coun-
tries could stand behind.

This is just one example
of what the member coun-
tries of the OECS could do
now ahead of the creation
of their Economic Union
which becomes increasingly
imperative for each of them.

But there are other areas.
A crucial one — and one
which should be addressed
urgently — is the setting-up
two sets of joint regulators: a
joint regulator for all banks,
and a joint regulator for non-
bank financial institutions
such as insurance companies.

Recent events in the off-
shore banking sector in
Antigua and Barbuda and
St Vincent and _ the

WORLD VIEW

Grenadines, where the oper-
ations of offshore banks in
both counties have led to
allegations of Ponzi Schemes
and investors being defraud-
ed, suggest the need for
more efficient regulation by
drawing on the best talents
and experience of the entire
area to form a single, joint
regulator.

The Eastern Caribbean
Central (ECCB) already
regulates the on-shore bank-
ing sector of the Eastern
Caribbean Currency Union
countries of which the
OECS members are a part.
A strengthened ECCB could
be given the task of regulat-
ing the offshore banking sec-
tor as well. This would elim-
inate the present national
regulation that ranges in
individual countries from a
statutory body under the
control of the Minister of
Finance to regulation by the
Minister alone.

In placing the regulation
of all offshore banks in
OECS countries under the
ECCB would not only cut
national costs, it would make
for more credible and effec-
tive regulation of the off-
shore banking sector. Mul-
ti-national watchdog organi-
sations, such as the Finan-
cial Action Task Force and
the Organisation for Eco-
nomic Cooperation and



Development (OECD),
would also be more com-
fortable with a joint regional
regulator that has a longer
arms-length relationship
with institutions in individ-
ual countries. So, too, would
commercial banks interna-
tionally which provide cor-
respondent relationships for
banks in the OECS.

Initiatives

The British international
publication, The Economist,
recently reported that, in
light of the financial crisis
which occurred in the Unit-
ed States and the United
Kingdom because of weak
regulation of banks,
“Britain’s Conservative Par-
ty, likely to form the next
government, wants the Bank
of England to be in charge
not just of interest rates, but
also the two big tasks of reg-
ulation: guarding the over-
all system’s stability and the
“micro” supervision of indi-
vidual firms.” So the idea is
not out of sync with initia-
tives in other parts of the
world.

The OECS should also
consider a joint regulator for
non-bank financial institu-
tions. Effective regulation
of this sector is lacking
throughout the region. But,

SIR RONALD SANDERS



cross-border transactions
involving two Insurance
companies, CLICO and
British American, that have
hurt some investors and are
likely to cause more prob-
lems in the coming months,
also support the need for
such a joint regulator.

When the OECS was
formed in 1981, joint over-
seas representation was one
of the objectives it wished to
achieve. As it turned out, it
has only achieved it in Cana-
da where the member coun-
tries have a joint mission
and, in a tenuous way, at the
World Trade Organization
(WTO) in Geneva. Yet, indi-
vidual overseas missions
have been a high cost in the
implementation of the for-
eign policy of member states
even though, with few excep-
tions, more has been
achieved in the international
community when Caribbean
countries have acted collec-
tively than when they have
acted alone.

A strong joint mission at
the WTO and in Brussels,
where the headquarters of
the European Commission
is located, is becoming more
important every day for the
members of the OECS as
rules on trade and invest-
ment are created that direct-
ly affect the livelihood of
these countries. Individual
small countries with very
limited resources, lack the
capacity for effective repre-
sentation; they have a bet-

ter chance drawing on their
collective pool.

So, even as the small
member countries of the
OECS look toward the for-
mation of an Economic
Union, there are practical
steps that could be taken
now to cut costs and estab-
lish effective machinery to
address some of their chal-
lenges.

Responses to:

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The government, the
church and gambling

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

TODAY, there is a consid-
erable body of opinion sup-
porting the passage of legisla-
tion that legalises the partici-
pation of Bahamians in the var-
ious forms of gambling. Over
the years, consecutive govern-
ments have lacked the political
will to listen to the voices of
the electorate, instead choos-
ing to pander to some of the
country’s clergy and their arm
twisting for fear of losing votes.

Neither government nor the
church should interfere with the
public’s right to spend their dis-
posable income in the way that
they would wish to. How can
the church or politicians tell
grown men and women what
to do with their discretionary
income, so long as it does not
infringe upon the rights of oth-
er citizens?

It would be prudent for the
government to legalize what
has become an innate practice
for Bahamians.

In April, 1990, the Pindling

YOUNG MAN’S VIEW

ADRIAN

administration had the gravitas
to table a Bill in the House of
Assembly that called for the
establishment of a national lot-
tery board. However, by Sep-
tember 1990, after a substan-
tial public outcry from the reli-
gious sector, plans for a nation-
al lottery were shelved.

Just recently, it was suggest-
ed that a national lottery be
established to fund the govern-
ment’s 10-year plan for educa-
tion.

However, immediately fol-
lowing this announcement, a
small group of churches
expressed opposition in a state-
ment referring to it as “catering
to chance” and “undermining
the very lofty ideals and spirit
of discipline that the Ministry of
Education (MOE) is trying to
inculcate in the youth of our

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nation and, in fact, actually help
to create a cycle of the very
adverse social ad moral cor-
ruption it is trying to prevent.

“Presently, the average busi-
nessman is complaining about
the difficulty of finding people
to hire who can do basic math.
Imagine therefore what further
legislation of gambling will do
to the mindset of an emerging
work force that even now is
viewed as incompetent,
unskilled and undisciplined in
many quarters.

Following this, Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham publicly
stated that the MOE jumped
the gun on the national lottery
issue.

In an interview with me, Sid-
ney Strachan, chairman of the
Bahamas Gaming Reform com-
mittee, responded to the
church, saying:

“The church has a responsi-
bility to their parishioners and
when they step outside of that,
they risk the chance of becom-
ing political. I don’t see any
scriptural procedure that says
that gambling is illegal. If you
think about it, dice was thrown
in the Bible for religious pur-
poses. The church’s authority
on issues should be the Bible. I
don’t think the church should
take their personal dogmas and
ideologies and try to force them
on the general public.

He went on to say: “Their
argument is baseless and if the
church is talking about social
and moral obligations, saying
our people are lazy, then they
should share in the blame for
their idea of the degradation of
society. There are more
Bahamians doing positive
things than negative. I believe
strongly in the 90/10 rule. Nine-
ty per cent of the problems are
caused by 10 per cent of the
people. I don’t subscribe to the
idea that we are incompetent,
unskilled and undisciplined. If

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that is so, then the majority of
church people are the same,
and the church should be
ashamed because they would
have failed the people.”

Mr Strachan also suggested
that the church play a role in
ensuring that if Bahamians are
allowed to gamble legally “the
gaming practices are transpar-
ent, properly policed and that
guidelines and safety nets are in
place.

According to the FNM’s
2007 Manifesto (A Matter of
Trust), they would appoint a
full-time Law Reform Com-
missioner who would be
required to “undertake a
review of all laws enacted in
the Bahamas prior to 1973 to
determine whether they ought
to be repealed or amended to
reflect the needs of a 21st cen-
tury Bahamas.” The Lotteries
and Gaming Act should be one
of them.

The Lotteries and Gaming
Act chapter 387 is unaccept-
able because it allows for a
form of discrimination against
the citizens/residents of the
Bahamas, where one group of
people is prohibited from gam-
bling, while another group
(tourists) is permitted to.

A national lottery and the
taxation of gaming houses can
make up budgetary shortfalls,
create supplementary funds for
infrastructural and human
development and even fund
college scholarships and pre-
kindergarten programmes.

We have all heard of the
many police raids, arrests, con-

SS

fiscation of equipment and per-
sons hauled before the courts
because they violated the Lot-
teries and Gaming Act. Obvi-
ously, this has not been a deter-
rent to these activities and the
efforts of the police could be
focused on preventing and com-
bating serious crimes.

Frankly, the police’s activi-
ties are almost in vain since cer-
tain operators of numbers
house fund political conven-
tions, electoral campaigns, sup-
port beauty pageant contes-
tants, advertise in law enforce-
ment handbooks and other
publications, support the pet
projects and initiatives of cer-
tain politicians!

It is not the number houses
that are ripping humongous
holes into the wallets of
Bahamians, but instead it is 90
per cent of the churchmen and
so-called pastors, particularly
those on New Providence, who
are waging a holy war to empty
the pockets of their parish-
ioners/consumers. The church
can hardly be credited for pro-
viding a moral or ethical foun-
dation for this country!
Frankly, some church leaders
show little to no interest in
assisting people in their com-
munities or in converting sin-
ners and helping to save souls.

Real pastors to go to the
people, particularly since the
majority of Bahamians do not
go to those large edifices that
many crass church leaders fool-
ishly assume is representative
of the true church! Real pas-
tors go to the highways and

byways to meet the people in
their comfort zones and speak
to them at their level.

However, I’m told that
many of today's highfaluting
pastors don’t even want to be
seen mixing with these types of
people—the poor and down-
trodden. Every now and again,
I see persons preaching on
street corners—but most of
them, sometimes rightly, are
viewed as crazy.

The Bible does not specifi-
cally condemn gambling, bet-
ting or the lottery. In fact, at
no point in the Bible is the
word “gambling” used nor does
the Bible give any direct guid-
ance on whether gambling is
right or wrong!

Archaeological and histori-
cal evidence shows that dice
playing and other forms of
gambling were practised in Bib-
lical times.

In Leviticus 16:8-10, Aaron
cast lots to determine which of
the two goats would be used
for the sin offering, and which
would become the scapegoat.
Joshua 18:1-6 records that lots
were cast to determine the dis-
tribution of land between the
twelve tribes of Israel. In the
book of Nehemiah, lots were
cast to determine who would
live inside the walls of
Jerusalem and who wouldn’t.
In Jonah 1:7, the sailors cast
lots to determine the course of
action concerning Jonah. In
Acts 1:21-26, lots were cast to
replace Judas with Matthias
and after Jesus was crucified,
the Roman soldiers cast lots to
see who would get Jesus’ cloth-
ing (Matthew 27:35, Mark
15:24, Luke 23:34, John 19:24).

The Bahamas is not the Vat-
ican, so why are some churches
attempting to selfishly dictate
to, and control, the country’s
political apparatus? Instead of
singing hosannas, having hap-
py-clappy rituals and hand-
holding in the comfort of large
edifices, church leaders should
take to the streets and accept
the Bahamian people’s verdict
on gambling—whatever that

SEE page 10

PUBLIC NOTICE

Request for Proposals to
act as Registrar of the new
Utilities Appeal Tribunal

In preparation for the enactment of the new Utilities Appeal Tribu-

nal Bill, 2007, ("the Bill") the Committee for the Privatisation of The

Bahamas Telecarmunications Company Ltd. ("the Cormrmmitiee"|

is seeking proposals for the role of Registrar as defined in the Bill.

The Utilities Appeal Tribunal (“the Tribunal") will be established to

settle disputes ansing in the communications sector under the

new Communications Act, 2007 ance it comes into farce.

It is the

intention fa outsource the role of fhe Registrar of the Tribunal

(“Regstrar’] to an independent organisation.

The Committee is pleased to invile the submission of proposals to

act as Registrar fram suitably qualified organisations. Capies of
fhe request for proposal [“RFP") document may be downloaded

fram the Government's website at www.bahamas.goyv.bs or the

privatisation website at www. bteprivatisation.com.

Submissions must be made by Som, July 31, 2009 in the manner

outlined in the RFP documents. The prefered bidder will be in-

farmed no later than August 7, 200%.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 9



Bahamas real
estate today

Carmen Massoni



MOVE OF A.

LIFETIME

IF YOWRE in your
fifties, sixties or beyond,
you may be facing your
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anxious about the future

and the big changes coming }

up. However, a trusted
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along the way, especially
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market.

If you’ve occupied your
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The preparation
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Combined with the
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sale while you settle into
your new residence!

2009 MISS TEEN USA PAGEANT

For the Second Year Atlantis, Paradise Island will host the 2009 Miss Teen USA Pageant
showcasing the beauty and grace of the most talented teenagers across the United States.

WELCOME RECEPTION

Tuesday, July 28th, 7:00pm - 9:00pm, Atlantis, Paradise Island

Opening cocktail party where guests can mingle with contestants and supporters.
Ticket price includes food with carving station, appetizers, desserts, and other gourmet

Colombian Ambassador gives
his support to crime fight

COLOMBIAN Ambas-
sador Ventura Emilio Diaz-
Mejia pledged his support in
the Bahamas’ mission to over-
come drug trafficking and
crime during a visit to Gov-
ernment House.

Governor General Arthur
Hanna had asked the Repub-
lic of Colombia for support in
a number of United Nations
initiatives as both countries
seek to strengthen diplomatic
relations.

The Bahamas wants Colom-
bia to support its candidacies
to the United Nations’ Eco-
nomic and Social Council; the
Council of the International
Maritime Organisation, cate-
gory C; and Presidency of the
35th General Conference of
the United Nations Educa-
tional, Scientific and Cultural
Organisation.

Mr Hanna acknowledged
how both the Bahamas and
Columbia share a “wide base
of linkages founded on com-
mon interests”, and the diplo-
matic relations that have fol-
lowed “consolidated the con-
tinued common understand-
ing”.

The governor general also
told Mr Diaz-Mejia how the
initiatives could help him fulfill
his personal pledge to increase
the relations of both countries
and overcome illegal drug traf-
ficking and crime.

He said: “The Bahamas, as
has the rest of the word, but
particularly the Caribbean
nations, has taken keen note of
your country’s proactive
engagement in the well-being
of the governments and peo-
ples that comprise the Asso-
ciation of Caribbean States, as
a result of the reform initia-
tives Colombia is actively seek-
ing to implement in that body.

“The Bahamas values the
cordial relations between our
two countries and looks for-
ward to the deepening and the
diversification of our relation-
ship.”

Mr Diaz Mejia commented



samplings from Atlantis restaurants. Cash bar available.

Welcome Reception Tickets: Adults: $35, Kids under 12: $15 (Price inclusive of gratuity).

PRESENTATION SHOW

Thursday, July 30th, 8:00pm, Atlantis, Paradise Island

Watch all fifty one contestants compete in the Swimsuit and

Evening Gown competitions to secure their spot in the Final Show.

Presentation Show Tickets: General: $30, Reserved: $40

#)

Call Atlantis Box Office for ticket information at 363-6601

Friday, July 31st, 8:00pm, Atlantis, Paradise Island
Witness the crowning of the new Miss Teen USA 2009!

Final Show Tickets: General: $50, Reserved: $75

on how the two countries have
maintained excellent relations
in all areas, with mutual
respect, and how he hopes
such relations will be
increased.

The ambassador said:
“Colombia will make every
possible effort to give to your
government the required sup-
port in vital areas as it has
occurred in the past.

“Tam convinced that in the
future these will be broadened.

“Be sure that loyalty,
respect, and sincerity will
remain principles and essen-
tial values of our cordial rela-
tions.”





























Derek Smith/BIS

GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur
Hanna (left) accepts Letters of
Credence from Ventura Emilio
Diaz-Mejia, as Ambassador of
the Republic of Colombia, at
Government House, July 23.

staan Ingraham/B

7



Se) - fw
EMILIO DIAZ-MEJIA, Ambassador of the Republic of Colombia, paid a courtesy call on Minister of Foreign Affairs, Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symontte,
July 22. Pictured from left are Andrew McKinney, Chief of Protocol: Carlos Gonzalez, Director, Colombian Government of Trade Bureau, Caribbean Office in
Miami, Florida; Ambassador Diaz-Mejia; Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette; Dr Patricia Rodgers, Permanent Secretary;
Joshua Sears, Director General, Ministry of Foreign Affairs; and Janeen McCartney, undersecretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

S



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that wouldn’t know the meaning of
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were emblazoned on their windshields.
But there is an alternative. The refined
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With its superior German styling utilising
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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





BACK*TO*SCHOOL

Get Your Clarks On!

These styles available at:
The Shoe Village, Madeira Shopping Plaza - 328-0703
The Shoe Village, Marathon Mall - 393-6113
The Shoe Village, RND Plaza Freeport - 351-3274
The Clarks Store, Marathon Mall - 393-4155

The ONLY Authorized Retailer Of Genuine Clarks
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KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Wussau, WP, The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

PETER
O'BRIEN

will be held on Saturday,
Ist August, 2009 at
10:00a.m. at graveside,
Western Cemetery, Nassau
Street.

Reverend Charles A.
Sweeting will officiate.

Peter Allan O'Brien, 56, aka "Captain Pete" or
“Peter Pan”, passed away 21st May, 2009 in Munroe,
North Carolina, after suffering a heart attack, Peter
was predeceased by his parents, Mr. & Mrs. Gordon
©'Brien who founded the Stapledon School for Peter
and others like him, Peter was also predeceased by
his brothers, Andrew and Patrick O'Brien and is
survived by his sisters, Helen Garcia and Mary Ann
Jones; brothers, Michael and Jimmy O'Brien; brothers
in-law, Victor Jones and Jose Garcia; sister-in-law,
Roslyn O'Brien; many loving nieces, nephews and
friends who, as children, grew up under his watchful
eye as be shared his toys with them.

These past 17 years Peter lived in Munroe, North
Carolina at the Karen Lane Group Home but spent
Christmases and summer holidays with family in
Nassau or with his sister Helen or brothers Pat and
Jimmy Stateside, “Captain Pete" would not visit Nassau
without an adventure to Ft. Charlotte and the Pirate
Museurn.

After his mother and brother Pat passed away, Sue
Payne of Indian Trail, North Carolina became his
guardian in North Carolina. Sue loved, cared for and
looked after Peter's needs when his family could not
be there, Karen Lane became Peter's second "home"
and the staff, his "family" there.

Our "Peter Pan" can surely fly now.

In liew of flowers donations may be made to the
Stapledon School, P.O, Box N, 3913, Nassau or Special
Olympics, P.O. Box §.8. 19036, Nassau in memory
of Peter O'Brien.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.



28 now infected
with swine flu

FROM page one

about the spread of the dis-
ease.

But without the latest fig-
ures at hand yesterday, Dr
Minnis said he is “almost cer-
tain” there are 28 or 29 infect-
ed confirmed cases in the
Bahamas today.

He said: “I am not certain
where all the cases are, but I
know some are in Nassau, and
some are in the other islands.

“We will continue to moni-
tor the situation and update
the public weekly.”

Fears over the disease were
heightened as it has claimed
the lives of hundreds as it
spread from where it is
believed to have originated in
Mexico around the world
since April this year.

The World Health Organi-
sation declared H1N1 a pan-

DR HUBERT MINNIS



demic in May, confirming
widespread human infection.

But Dr Minnis said with the
development of medication,
and no deaths yet in the
Bahamas, he hopes to dispel
irrational fears.

Daughter of murder victim
‘not arrested’ say police

FROM page one

Saturday, July 4.

Police estimate she had been dead for around two months
before her body was discovered.

Ms Garrison, 33, of West Palm Beach, Florida, had been
reported missing on February 25 by the United States
Embassy in Nassau. Diplomats said she may have been in
the company of a Bahamian man.

Police are still awaiting the results of an autopsy to find
out how she died.

In the week after her body was found, Zyndall McKinney,
22, of Isabella Boulevard, Nassau, was arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court and charged with intentionally causing Ms
Garrison’s death between Sunday, February 25, and Sat-
urday, July 4, 2009, while being concerned with another.

Anna Pugh is said to have been McKinney’s girlfriend
and to have lived with him in the Bahamas. Also known as
Madison Sweeting and Madision McKinney, Anna is
thought to have left the Bahamas for the United States
sometime after her mother’s death.

Reports over the weekend claimed she was being shel-
tered by her father and other people in the Pennsylvania
area, and is being questioned in connection with Ms Gar-
rison’s murder by officers in the Pennsylvania State Police
Department.

But the FBI told an ABC news affilate in West Palm
Beach, Florida, on Saturday that Pugh had not been arrest-
ed.

Pennsylvania Police have also yet to confirm an arrest has
been made, and Superintendent Elsworth Moss, in charge
of the Royal Bahamas Police Force Criminal Detective
Unit, said he has not been made aware of any such arrest.

Mr Moss said: “I have no knowledge of that. We have
been in touch with Pennsylvania and we are trying to work
with the Pennsylvania police, but I don’t have any infor-
mation regarding her being arrested.”

A preliminary inquiry into the murder of Ms Garrison is
scheduled to begin in Nassau on October 26.

The minister said: “It is still
a concern in that it’s flu, but
they’re testing the vaccina-
tions now, so I’m sure once
the vaccinations have been
cleared we will be able to deal
with it properly.

“We have sufficient med-
ication so that should not be a
fear, but we are keeping it to
only be used when necessary.

“We are not going to give
medication to people unless
it is absolutely necessary,
because if we give it out as a
provision the organism will
become resistant by the time
the patient develops a a seri-
ous infection.”

The Ministry of Health
advises everyone to continue
to follow influenza preventa-
tive measures to ensure pro-
tection of individuals, fami-
lies and communities.

Health officials maintain:

“These precautionary mea-
sures include covering your
nose and mouth with a tissue
when you cough or sneeze,
disposing of the tissue in the
trash after use, along with fre-
quent hand washing with soap
and water.

“Additionally, if you are
experiencing flu like symp-
toms, to decrease the poten-
tial spread, avoid contact with
others, and stay away from
group settings.”

For further information
persons may contact the fol-
lowing hotlines:

From 9am to 6pm, Mon-
day through Friday, call: (242)
502-4790 or 502-4728.

And from 6pm to 9am, or
on weekends, call: (242) 502-
7811, 502-7812 or 502-7855.

For a weekly update on
swine flu in the Bahamas log
on to: www.bahamas.gov.bs.

Boys who went missing
on Andros still in hospital

FROM page one

Ms Clarke said she does not
know when they will be
released from hospital.

The boys miraculously sur-
vived more than a month
stuck in a hole surrounded by
the dense Andros coppice sto-
ry, sustaining themselves on
wild coco-plums and rainwa-
ter, they claimed after they
were discovered.

Deangelo Clarke, nine, and
Marcell Clarke-Sylverin, six,
went missing from their
grandmother’s house in the
remote settlement of Smith’s
Hill on June 9. The boys had
left the house to hunt for
crabs around 6pm and were
never heard from again.

A police search of the area
where the boys disappeared
proved fruitless and was later
called off. More than a month
later the brothers were sight-
ed by a female relative as they
walked in the nearby settle-
ment of Kemp’s Bay.

The two appeared severely
dehydrated and malnourished
and were rushed to hospital
in Nassau.

Although there was wide-
spread jubilation over their
return, some scepticism has
emerged surrounding the
boys’ account of their ordeal.
Some have questioned how

two young boys could have
survived so long on their own
while others wonder if some-
thing more sinister was afoot.

Marcell has apparently
claimed that an old man visit-
ed the two while they were
stuck in the hole —- a man
dressed in black, with pale
hands, whose face he never
saw.

The man, who Marcell
believes was the grandfather
who died when he was an
infant, fed Marcell the food
of his dreams — pizza, water-
melon, macaroni — and when
he went to wake his brother
to join the feast, ‘Pa’ stopped
him.

He had cared for him and
washed his back, but never
hurt him, said Marcell’s
father, Marcellian Sylverin.

And Deangelo never saw
the man, it was claimed.

The boys told family that
on the day of their escape
from the hole, they noticed a
tree for the first time and
were able to shimmy up its
bark and out of the crevice.

At last report, police had
not yet interviewed the boys.

Yesterday, head of the
Central Detective Unit Super-
intendent Elsworth Moss said
officers would take a state-
ment from the pair once they
are released from hospital.

Government, church and gambling

FROM page eight

may be.

Whatever happened to those street
revivals, where pastors and their congrega-
tions would go into neighbourhoods, pitch
a tent and invite the residents to a few days
of services where Biblical teachings are rein-
forced and new souls are saved?

The church should begin to pursue a
more spiritual mission as it is missing the
opportunity to be an oasis for the people.

If the church wishes to talk about a
wastage of money, we must recognize that
people waste money on all sorts of activities.
Gambling is no more or less of a waste of
money than buying that expensive “Sun-
day outfit,” seeing a movie (in many cases),
purchasing an insignificant item such as
those alligator skin shoes I see some pastors
wearing or that church hat for $350. In many
instances, people work for the money they
gamble with.

Why wouldn’t these churchmen speak to
the loss of humility among clergymen? Why

wouldn’t they step up and address the
notion that many pastors are nothing more
than "pimps in the pulpit”? How can it be
that there is a proliferation of churches in
the Bahamas—the largest per capita in the
world—and there is little to no impact on
the moral health of the country—violent
crimes, political scandals and nationwide
immoral behaviour? When would the
church promote the idea of financial audits,
particularly since so many pastors are
immersed—from their hands to their
elbows—in the cookie jar? Why don’t they
talk dat?

Surely, the church doesn’t refuse to take
money from its members that work in the
casinos! Churchmen must realize that every
church raffle is a form of gambling!

No government or entity should be
allowed to legislate personal morality—it
would be a diminishment of our personal
freedoms. The church should know that we
live in a democracy not a theocracy, and
that means freedom of choice! Religion
and politics should always be separated. In
the Bahamas, the wall separating church

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$10.00 & Up

and state seems to be non existent.

The church seems to cherry pick what
issues it’s going to object to, choosing to
crusade against selected issues just to appear
to be doing their job, when there’s a myriad
of pressing issues confronting our society.
Where is the church on matters such as
sweethearting, even in the church? There
are many issues confronting our society that
the church has overlooked, such as: pae-
dophilia; incest; the need for prison reform
and the treatment of petty criminals who are
treated like animals and thereby turned
into savages. Where is the church when
fraud is perpetrated on consumers by some
highly irresponsible church folk who sell
goods they claim can cure cancer,
HIV/AIDS and resurrect the dead?

Christianity is supposed to be a religion
about conscience, especially since souls can
only be saved through people making that
decision for themselves. Although the
church, may wish to stop persons from
doing as they wish or from pursuing their
desires by seeking social control, choices
must be individually made.

Join the Ilunt
For Treasure!

>

Instinm thy wor

ASPECWAL MSC VE Ie YOUN VERE

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For more
Information (@

acbahamas.com


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 11



Police seeking
to question
driver of out of |
control jitney
FROM page one i

“T know that police
were seeking to do so, to
question him,” Mr Miller
said yesterday, adding i
that officers were still try- ;
ing to determine the
cause of the crash.

The incident occurred
shortly after 8am on Fri-
day when the Clarkes ser- }
vice bus, which follows
the Number 21 route,
reportedly lost its breaks
on Government Hill
before careening down
Cumberland Street, on to
Bay Street.

The bus then reported-
ly sped on to the narrow
side-street leading to
Woodes Rodgers Walk
and appeared to be head-
ing towards the nearby
harbour.

Eyewitnesses told The
Tribune that passengers,
fearing for their lives,
jumped from the win-
dows of the out-of-con-
trol bus as it sped down
the hill.

Two passengers on the
bus were taken to hospi-
tal for treatment.

Their condition is not
known.

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LOCAL NEWS



ALITTLE infant being taken care of shortly after the arrival at the
Defence Force Base on Sunday afternoon. The migrants were
apprehended in the Exuma Chain shortly after 9:00am.



on Sunday afternoon.

SOME OF the Haitian migrants onboard HMBS P-49, as they arrive at the Defence Force Base

RBDF Photos/Petty Officer Jonathan Rolle :



More than 60 Haitian
migrants apprehended

FROM page one

Due to the “unsanitary and overcrowded
condition of the vessel”, the Haitian migrants
were removed and placed aboard the HMBS
P-49, said a press release issued by the RBDF.

The migrants arrived in the capital at 3.30
pm yesterday and all appeared to be in fair
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The group was handed over to Immigration
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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



A a

Australia
take heart
from win at

Australia left Northamp-
ton with a heartening vic-
tory, but concern for the
well-being of would-be
strike bowler Mitchell
Johnson. His solitary tail-
end wicket for 107 runs in
18.1 overs at Wantage
Road cast doubt over
whether he will feature at
allin the third Test.

Meanwhile, Englands
Ashes Test success at
Lord's provided the selec-
tors with the luxury of
sticking close to a winning
formula when they
announced their squad for
Edgbaston.

Tan Bell was retained
without extra batting cover
to replace the injured
Kevin Pietersen and Steve
Harmison provided the
pace-bowling contingency
plan should Andrew
Flintoff's knee fail him.

England's 13-man squad
also contains Monty Pane-
sar as an extra spin option.

AUSTRALIA’ $ Stuart Clarke | in action during the tour
match at the County Ground, Northampton, England

Saturday July 25, 2009.

David Jones/AP Photo/PA Wire



Inter Milan top rival AG Milan 2-0

By JIMMY GOLEN
AP Sports Writer
FOXBOROUGH, Mass.

Diego Milito scored twice
to lead Inter Milan to a 2-0
victory over AC Milan on
Sunday in an exhibition that
was just the third match the
bitter intracity rivals have
ever played outside Italy.

The crowd of 42,531 leaned
heavily toward AC Milan, and
they were quieted in the
fourth minute when Milito
chased the ball down to the
left of the goal and left-footed
it between the goalkeeper
Zeljko Kalac and the near
post. He gave Inter a 2-0 lead
in the 75th minute on a 2-on-
1 break with Amantino
Mancini, who drew the
defender and passed to Milito
for the shot that bounced off
and over the keeper into the
net. The clubs that share a
home in foggy San Siro had
met outside Italy only twice:
in Chiasso, Switzerland, in
1908 and at Yankee Stadium
in 1969. But they came to the
United States as part of an

exhibition tournament known
as the World Football Clas-
sic.

Inter star Zlatan Ibrahi-
movic was not with the team;
he is expected in Barcelona
on Monday for a physical that
would complete the deal that
would send striker Samuel
Eto’o and midfielder Alek-
sandr Hleb to the Italian
champions.

Milan and Chelsea sold out
the 71,000-seat home stadium
of the NFL’s Baltimore
Ravens on Friday night. But
Sunday’s match on a warm
New England afternoon was
played with the upper deck
half-closed and the lower
bowl empty at one end
because the seats were
obstructed by the enormous
stage for Tuesday night’s
AC/DC concert. (Also
obstructed was the press box,
forcing the media to be relo-
cated into luxury suites.)

Sunday’s crowd wasn’t con-
cerned about the headbang-
ing of AC/DC as much as the
head-passing of AC Milan,
though. And the home stadi-

um of NFL genius Bill
Belichick, who guided the
New England Patriots to an
18-0 record before losing the
2008 Super Bowl, proved to
be a fitting host for Inter
coach Jose Mourinho, the
self-proclaimed “Special
One” who helped Inter win a
fourth straight Italian Serie A
title before losing in the first
knockout round of the Cham-
pions League.

Although the rivalry
between the teams has been
bitter, there was little ani-
mosity for the friendly and
even a few smiles — and
gasps from the crowd — when
referee Jorge Gonzalez held
up a red card for Milan’s
Ronaldinho in the 34th
minute but quickly realized
his mistake and replaced it
with a yellow one.

Inter was rarely tested,
though Julio Cesar made a
pair of tough saves at around
the 70th minute, when it was
still 1-0, and another on
Alessandro Nesta in stoppage
time, just before the final
whistle.

Ronaldo makes low-key Madrid home debut

MADRID, Spain

Cristiano Ronaldo produced only glimpses
of his talent during his home debut for Real
Madrid in a 1-1 draw with Al Ittihad on Sun-
day, according to Associated Press.

Ronaldo was substituted by Gonzalo
Higuain in the 66th minute, immediately after
Hicham Aboucherouane equalized for the
Saudi Arabian champions in the Peace Cup.

ran

Raul Gonzalez gave Madrid the lead at Santi-
ago Bernabeu Stadium in the 55th minute.

Madrid’s new No. 9 came closest to his first
Madrid goal just before halftime, when his
shot was tipped around the post by goalkeep-
er Mabrouk Zaid after a swift exchange of
passes with Karim Benzema.

The Portugal winger is the world’s most
expensive player after his $133.7 million trans-
fer from Manchester United.

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SWIMMING: FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS, ITALY

Team Bahamas
sets three new
national records

BAH RELAY THIRD LEG: Teisha Lightbourne in aetion swimming in

the 4 x 100 freestyle relay.

PHOTOS: Kathryn Dillete



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| BAH RELAY
EXCHANGE
LAST LEG:-
Alicia
Lightbourne
is off the
starting
block to
swim the
final leg of
the relay
after sister
Teisha
touched ina
time of
See] 58.52. Alicia
| swama
57.86 to
bring the
| Bahamas
home in
Bahamian
record time
of 3:48.34.

Team Bahamas wasted little
time in its assault on the local
record books, with three new
national records set on the
opening day of competition at
the 13th FINA World Cham-
pionships in Roma, Italy.

Arianna Vanderpool-Wal-
lace set a new Bahamian record
in the 100 butterfly today swim-
ming in 1:00.56. Overall she
placed first in her heat and 43rd
overall. Bahamas teammate
Alana Dillette who held the old
record of 1:01.50 swam in the
same heat with Vanderpool-
Wallace and finished in 1:01.51
for a sixth place finish in the
heat.

Elvis Burrows swam a very
fast 50 butterfly in 23.74 placing
first in his heat and 26th overall
and lowering his own Bahami-
an record of 24.47 that he swam
at the RBC National Champi-
onships in June 2009.

The female 4 x 100 Freestyle
relay team swam to a new
Bahamian record in a time of
3:48.34 - smashing the old
record of 3:51.89 set by the
same quartet in May 2008.

Alana Dillette lead off and
swam a personal best time of
57.11. She was followed by Ari-
anna Vanderpool-Wallace who
swam 54.85, Teisha Light-
bourne swam 3rd in 58.52 and
Alicia Lightbourne anchored
in 57.86. The relay team fin-
ished 20th overall and was the
only female Caribbean relay
team to compete. Regionally
they placed third behind the
USA and Canada.

Algernon Cargill, President
of the BSF was in the stands to
cheer the swimmers on and
stated that "the swims today
will bring attention to the sport
of swimming in the Bahamas
with Arianna Vanderpool-Wal-
lace and Elvis Burrows both
winning their heats in Bahami-
an record time and Elvis plac-
ing a very impressive 26th place
overall. The female relay team
also did very well and in break-
ing the Bahamian record by
almost three seconds the coun-
try should be very excited about
future Bahamas swimming
relay teams competing on the
international scene. These
females have already proven
themselves at both the CAC
and Pan Am Games winning
bronze medals at both meets in
the 4 x 100 medley relay. Today
in the 4 x 100 freestyle relay
they have also made an impor-
tant statement about the direc-
tion of swimming in the
Bahamas today. Equally
impressive is that these four
young Bahamian women also
study full time at the university
level and have remained com-
mitted and dedicated to
improving themselves in the
sport of swimming. All of the
swimmers are commended on
their performances today and
we can expect more records
over the duration of this meet”.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



AVIVA LONDON GRAND PRIX



Chandra Sturrup comes second

AP Photo/Simon Dawson

Bl avive|

| JETER /

a avivl

STURRP

Byte ed



CARMELITA JETER of the US, centre, Chandra Sturrup of the Bahamas, right, and Stephanie Durst of the U.S., left, compete in the women's 100 meters final during the Athletics Grand Prix at Crystal Palace in Lon-

don, Saturday, July 25, 2009.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

VETERAN sprinter Chan-
dra Sturrup capped off a pretty
good weekend for the Bahami-
an athletic contingent at the
Aviva London Grand Prix with
a second place finish in the
women's 100 metres.

After helping the women's 4
x 100 metre relay team run a
season's best for second place
on Friday, Sturrup came back
on Saturday and clocked 11.09
seconds in the straight away
race behind American Carmeli-
ta Jeter, who won the final in
10.92.

In the second of two heats of
the century, Sturrup was sec-
ond once again in 11.27, this
time to American Allyson
Felix, who won the heat in
11.26. Jeter took the first heat
in 10.92.

Felix, however, had to settle
for sixth place in 11.29. LaV-
erne Jones-Ferrette of the Vir-
gin Islands came in third in the
final in 11.21.

Sturrup, who turns 38 on
September 12, is still sitting in
second place in the World Ath-
letics Tour with 72 points from
five meets. She trail Jamaican
Kerron Stewart, who is out
front with 100.

Also on Saturday, Lavern
Eve competed in the women's
javelin, but her berst toss of
51.16 metres placed her in the
10th and final spot. Winning
the competition with a throw
of 64.64 was Germany's Steffi
Nerius, followed by Goldie Say-
ers of Great Britain (59.82) and
Australian Kimberley Mickle
(59.67).

It was the first appearance
this year on the European cir-
cuit for Eve, the 44-year-old
Central American and
Caribbean Championships'
bronze medalist as she try to
prepare for the IAAF World
Championships in Berlin, Ger-
many from August 15-23.

While Sturrup joined Deb-
bie Ferguson-McKenzie in
proving that they are right on
form to contend for a medal,
the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations also got a
chance to run the women's 4 x
100 relay team.




Veteran sprinter clocks 11.09 seconds in the

100 metres to cap good weekend for Bahamas

CARMELITA JETER of US, centre, leads the fie

Palace in London, Saturday, July 25, 2009.

The team of 28-year-old Tim-
icka Clarke, Sturrup, Christine
Amertil and Ferguson-McKen-
zie, were second in 43.35 behind
the American A team that won
in 42.39. The B team ran 43.51
for third place.

Only the United States,
Great Britain, Germany and
Trinidad & Tobago have ran
faster than the Bahamas so far
this year. The Bahamas
matched season's best by Brazil
and Russia.

With 19-year-old Sheniqua
'Q' Ferguson expected to be
ready to run in Berlin after
nursing an injury, the BAAA
is confident that the tem can
run faster and finally regain its
position as a medal contender
in the post-era of the Golden
Girls.

Before they did theior relay
duties, Ferguson-McKenzie and
Amertil both competed in their
specility events.

Having ran the fast time in
the world this year at a meet in
Rethomno on Monday, Fer-

SS

gsuson-McKenzie picked up
her second straight victory in
the 200 in 23.11, well ahead of
American Marshevet Hooker
(23.30).

Ferguson-McKenzie, 33, is
now sitting in second place on
the World Athletics Tour with
39 points. Jones-Ferette is lead-
ing the pack with 42. Ferguson-
McKenzie is also in the ranking
in the century, tied with
Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser
with 44 apeice.

Amertil ran 52.20 for fifth
place in the wpmen's 400. Nico-
la Sanders of Great Britam won
in 51.54, followed by Ameri-
cans Shana Cox (51.56), Moni-
ca Hargroove (51.66) and
DeeDee Trotter (52.08).

Amertil, who will celebrate
her 30th birthday at the cham-
pionships on August 18, is now
tied for 12th spot on the World
Athletics Tour with Yulia
Gushchina with 27. American
Sanya Richards is out front with
90.

Olympic bronze medalist



AP Photo/Sang Tan

if

Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands
turned in a fourth place finish in
the men's trile jump with a best
leap of 17.13 metres. The event
was won by Brandon Roulhac

Id to finish first in the women's 100 metres final during the Athletics





AP Photo/Sang Tan

Grand Prix at Crystal

with 17.33. Cuban Arnie David
Girat was second with 17.18
and Great Britain's Phillips
Idowu was third qith 17.16.

"I felt good about my per-

formance. I had my best meet
for the year, so that was a good
sign that Iam in good form for
the world's," said Sands, who
competed with tendinitis in his
right knee.

"T just need to strengthen my
quad muscles a little bit to get
rid of the tendinitis. But other
than that, I am really confident
right now and I will not let any-
thing stop me from going for
my goal in Berlin."

Leevan Sands, who will also
celebrate his 28th birthday at
the championships two days
before Amertil on August 16, is
in third place with 40 points.
Girat is on top of the leader-
board with 50, followed by
Idowu with 46.

And Shamar Sands clocked
13.81 for sixth place in the first
of twov heats, but that was only
good for 10th overall, eliminat-
ing him from a spot in the final.
Cuban world record holder
Dayron Robles won in 13.29
with Barbados' Ryan Brath-
waite second in 13.31, followed
by Great Britain's Andwer
Turner in 13.66.

Shamar Sands, 24, is tied for
10th place with Brathwaite,
who won the BAAA's Natinals,
with 38 each on the World Ath-
letics Tour. Dexter Faulk of the
United States is out front with
80, followed by Robles with 76.

Although he didn't compete,
30-year-old Chris ‘Fireman’
Brown controls the men's 400
with 67 points.

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CARMELITA JETER of US, left, leads the field to finish first in the women's 100 metres final during the
Athletics Grand Prix at Crystal Palace in London, Saturday, July 25, 2009.


PAGE 14, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS
SPORTS

HONOURING TOMMY ROBINSON

FROM page 15







Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
announced that the new national sta-
dium currently under construction and
expected to be completed by 2011 will
be named in Robinson’s honour.

The Committee also doled out a
$10,000 athletic scholarship to the Col-
lege of the Bahamas, named after the
legendary sprinter to highlight a series
of plaques and personal gifts.

Robinson was lauded for a ground-
breaking career that began with his
first international competition in 1955
and spanned 15 years including four
Olympic Games appearances.

Prime Minister Ingraham said
Robinson blazed a trail for genera-
tions of great Bahamian athletes to
follow which has positively raised the
profile of the Bahamas on the inter-
national stage.

“T am happy to join with the Friends
of Tommy Robinson in paying tribute
to a great Bahamian son who has been
an inspiration to Bahamians every-
where but most especially to our youth
who aspire to achieve in the field of
sports,” he said, “The modern
Bahamas has a growing ledger of
sporting greats including World Cham-
pions and Olympic medallists whose
success internationally sheds positive
light on our country and our people.”

Ingraham said for his efforts in the
early stages of the nation’s growth as a
sporting power, Robinson deserves
great accolades.

“Long ago, Tommy Robinson was
among the pioneering few who first
represented our country on the world
stage. It is him that your sportspersons
may look for inspiration as they strive
to achieve their best. Tommy was on
some occasions, the lone member of
the Bahamian track and field team,” he
said, “It is appropriate that the
Bahamas’ track and field stadium was
named in honor of this Bahamian star
and appropriate now that his friends
have chosen to
honor and pay
It is diffi- this sporting
cult to icon tribute in

. . this fashion.”
imagine the — prime Min-



‘ . i standing ister Ingraham

GOLDEN : 1 / Bahamian no j aa
| : ‘ claimed Fri-

an : | sprinters hold 4... july 24th
caliie f , today without = as “Tommy

Davis

hugs the pioneering Robinson

_ Day,” the day
Thomas efforts of Tom that marks the

Robinson. 4 hy Pr aie my Robinson.” 51st anniver-
an ; Sh at ME cary of Robin-

‘ : : ‘at son’s historic win in the 220 yard dash
TOMMY ROBINSON pictured with Prime Minister Hubert at the British Empire Games in Cardiff

Ingraham receiving a plaque. Wales in 1958.
Dozens of colleagues, well wishers

and contemporaries, ranging from

Robinson’s former roommate at the

i University of Michigan, to current stars

in athletics whom he has influenced in

the sport of track, addressed the audi-

ence to place Robinson’s achievements

and place in history into perspective.

cups Lamine Diack, President of the

International Association of Athletic
Federations, the global governing body
for track and field, said that Robin-
son’s place as a true giant in the sport
and his influence on the region can-
not be underscored.

“A sporting legend is a pioneer; one
whose influence and legacy spread
wider than the original area of com-
petition; one whose successes showed
others the way; one whose exploits
helped raise the international sport-
ing profile of a small nation,” he said,
“In short, a man such as Tommy
Robinson, who has become a truly
iconic and legendary figure amongst
the people of the Bahamas. His career
is well-documented. It is difficult to
imagine the standing Bahamian sprint-
ers hold today without the pioneering
efforts of Tommy Robinson.”

Perry Christie, Leader of the Oppo-
sition and former teammate of Robin-
son on several national teams, said
Robinson’s role not only as an athlete,
but as an ambassador for the Bahamas
may have made his greatest impact.

“A pioneer and trailblazer, he
focused the global spotlight on the tiny
little known colony of the Bahama
Islands through the power and majesty
of his athletic performance around the

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Robinson’s first international com-
petition came in 1955 at the Pan Amer-
ican Games in Mexico City. Just a year
later he became the first Bahamian to

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His collegiate highlights at the Uni-

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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 15

§

;
i
MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

TRIBUTE 10 A LEGEND






by RENALDO DORSETT to celebrate the life, legacy and achievements to
Sports Reporter the country’s greatest pioneer in the sporting
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net arena.

Friends of Thomas Augustus Robinson hon-

oured his extensive litany of accolades as a
embers of the local and inter- Bahamian national sporting hero at a luncheon
national track and field com- yesterday, held under the theme: “Tribute to a

munity came together with Legend.”

Bahamians of all walks of life SEE page 14

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THE TRIBUNE
D yu

ine

WL Ya eae



MONDAY,

2009

te) ai ets let=m ge) A

Receiver
‘totally
confident’
of no asset
auction

* Galanis plans to obtain
court injunction blocking
sale of New Hope's
Freeport-based marina
and leisure assets

* Alleges that judgment
creditor’s $1.2m claim
‘more in the region’
of $500,000

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE receiver for Freeport-
based marina owner/opera-
tor, New Hope Holdings, is
“absolutely convinced” there
will be no auction of the com-
pany’s assets as planned this
week, telling Tribune Busi-
ness that a judgment credi-
tor’s claim it was owed $1.2
million was “more in the

SEE page 4B

Water plant
contract's ‘far
reaching legal
ramifications’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Water & Sewerage
Corporation’s proposal to
negotiate a contract with a
company, headed by Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald, for a now-
abandoned reverse osmosis
plant project at Arawak Cay
had “very far-reaching legal
ramifications” because it had
not met the original bid
requirements.

A 2006 legal opinion on the

SEE page 6B

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net





CLICO liquidator
argets 75 firms

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

LICO
(Bahamas)
liquidator

a s

demanded a host of
documents related to
the business dealings
of 75 Florida-based
companies believed to
be owned and/or con-
trolled by the insol-
vent insurer’s Trinida-
dian mastermind,
Lawrence Duprey, as
he ramps up efforts to
trace and recover the company’s assets.

Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, through his
US attorney, Ronald Neiwirth, on July 14
subpoenaed via the Florida Bankruptcy
Courts another law firm, Greenberg
Traurig, in a bid to force it to hand over
a ‘treasure trove’ of documents related to
the business dealings and transactions of
the 75 entities thought to be connected to
Mr Duprey.

Documents filed in the Bankruptcy
Court for the southern district of Florida,
which have been obtained by Tribune
Business, show Mr Gomez is demand-
ing all documents detailing wire trans-
fers between the Duprey companies and

Craig Gomez



* Gomez demands documents on entities that comprise private
business empire of insolvent insurer's mastermind

* Likely wants to determine whether Bahamian investors’
assets helped finance Duprey’'s personal interests

* Also subpoenaed documents on Bahamas insurer's main asset, relating to
‘approved contractors’ and ‘advertising fund’ they allegedly had to pay into

Greenberg Traurig’s operating and
escrow accounts from the period begin-
ning January 1, 2004, onwards.

The Baker Tilly Gomez partner and
accountant is also seeking records of all
payments into the Florida-based law fir-
m’s operating and escrow accounts from
the Duprey-controlled entities, and any
payments worth more than $1,000 that
Greenberg Traurig sent from its accounts
in the opposite direction. For the latter,
the CLICO (Bahamas) liquidator is also
seeking copies of instructions, invoices
and demands for payment that may have
been sent by the Duprey companies.

Finally, Mr Gomez and his attorneys
are also demanding copies of all man-
agement, shareholder and operating
agreements that Greenberg Traurig pre-
pared for any of the companies Mr
Duprey is believed to control or benefi-
cially own. The information is scheduled
to be handed over by August 13, 2009.

Also filed with the Florida courts, and
obtained by Tribune Business, is the list
of Florida-based entities suspected to
comprise Mr Duprey’s private business
network. Several, namely Angostura
Spirits & Wine; Atlantica Manager Inc;
CL Hospitality Inc; Colonial Parker
Group Manager Inc; Colonial Commu-
nications Inc; Creative Manager Inc; Dal-
co 84 LLC; Dalco New River Manager
Inc; Dalco Infinity Holdings; LD USA
Manager Inc; LD DYL Inc; LD Merrick
Park Manager Inc; SCC Distribution
Corporation; and Wellington Preserve
Corporation, all name Lawrence Duprey
as their principal.

A number of these entities are listed as
the principal of other companies Mr
Gomez is seeking documents on, while
other targeted entities name their prin-
cipal as Sylvia Baldini. She is likely to

SEE page 9B

Bahamas to face high unemployment ‘for quite some time’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas is likely to
experience prolonged high
levels of unemployment last-
ing “two to three years”, a

* Ex-minister says prolonged high jobless levels could last ‘for two to three years’ to 2011-2012
* Warns hotel industry unlikely to re-hire all those terminated

* Urges Bahamas ‘not to be lulled to sleep’ by high foreign reserves levels

* Calls on nation to tackle structural weaknesses not related to recession



former finance minister
believes, because this nation’s
economy will endure a slow,
protracted recovery when it
comes as opposed to a sharp
rebound.

James Smith, CFAL’s
chairman, told Tribune Busi-
ness that the structure of the
Bahamian economy meant its
main factor of production was
labour, the result being that
an economic recession would

New Business Licence
‘next year for certain’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas will “next
year for certain have a new
Business Licence Act”, a gov-
ernment minister has pledged,
with the Ministry of Finance
currently reviewing proposed
amendments that might
include a change to how fees
are calculated.

* Minister says amendments
to way fee is calculated
under review

* Expects EPA services
offer to be finalised this
summer, with Trade
Commission renewed

SEE page 10B

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$1,500,000 for the private lot alone. Web Listing #8370.

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show itself most in the unem-
ployment figures — estimated
earlier this year to be 12 per
cent on New Providence, and
14 per cent on Grand
Bahama.

The former minister of
state added that, with the
Bahamas likely to follow the
US in experiencing a slow, ‘L-
shaped’ recovery that would
leave unemployment rates
relatively high until 2011-

2012, this nation needed to
concentrate on resolving
structural economic weak-
nesses unrelated to the reces-
sion.

And he warned that the
Bahamas must “not be lulled
to sleep” by the current rela-
tively high level of foreign
exchange reserves, pegged at
$723 million in early July
2009, because they had been
artificially inflated by the pro-

ceeds from the Government’s
foreign currency borrowings —
as opposed to ‘real’ capital
inflows from tourism and for-
eign direct investment.

Mr Smith told Tribune
Business that while tourism
and construction had been the
sectors to first feel the reces-
sion’s impact, as they relied
directly on tourism and for-

SEE page 8B

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shopBVM.com says
hosted businesses have
received orders from
Middle East, Thailand
since going online in
January this year

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A BAHAMIAN-owned e-
commerce facilitator believes
it has opened up the online
market for this nation’s busi-
nesses with an initial invest-
ment of just $100,000, its prin-
cipals telling Tribune Busi-
ness that its clients had
received product orders from
locations such as the Middle
East and Thailand.

Kent Bazard,
shopB VM.com’s chief finan-
cial officer, said that almost
anything can be sold from the
site, with just about any
Bahamian business or entre-
preneur able to open a store
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ShopBVM.com currently

SEE page 11B

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

UAT



of the 24 listed securities. Of
these, one advanced, two
declined and two remained

By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets




changed hands, representing a
significant increase of 72,967
shares compared to the pre-

Earnings Releases:

There were no financial

The Bahamian Stock Market

THE trading momentum — unchanged. vious week's trading volume __ results reported by any of the FINDEX 786.96 (-5.73%) YTD
increased last week in the of 3,100 shares. 24-listed companies during
Bahamian market, with EQUITY MARKET FOCOL Holdings (FCL) _ the week. BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
investors trading in five out A total of 76,067 shares was the sole advancer and SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
volume leader this week with Dividend Notes: AML $1.39 $- 0 -18.71%
40,786 shares trading hands, BBL $0.63 $- 0 4.55%
its share price rising by $0.13 ¢ Consolidated Water BOB $6.94 $- 0 -9.16%
to end the week at $5.16.. Company (CWCO) has BPF $11.00 $- 0 6.78%
Finance declared a dividend of $0.013 7 es i ; cr a
per share, payable on et CAB $11.39 $. 6 18.99%
10, 2009, to all ordinary share CBL $5.64 § 0 19.43%
Finance Corporation of the holders of record date July 1, : i Rg ons
CHL $2.74 $- 0 -3.18%
Bahamas (FIN) was the lead —_ 2009.
; J 5 decliner, its stock falling by ree eee A 54 ; Bete
Tri l a] i + i fc $0.10 to end the week at a ¢ FOCOL Holdings (FCL) : i oo
- see: DHS $1.82 $- 600 -28.63%
i new 52-week low of $10.800n has declared a dividend of Fang $6.60 $- 550 15.38%
Enrollment Limited a volume of 23,001 shares. $0.03 per share, payable on FRR $2.37 $- 0 0.00%
pom Far, acsosesnt ICD Utilities ICD) traded — August 11, 2009, to all ordi- FOC $0.30 $. 0 0.00%
hits ; 11,130 shares, its share price nary shareholders of record FcCL $5.16 $0.13 40,786 -0.19%
decreasing by $0.01 toendthe date July 31, 2009. FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%
- week at a new 52-week low FIN $10.80 $-0.10 23,001 -9.01%
“Understanding and Teaching Kingdom Principles" | = of $5.49. Annual General Meeting 1CD $5.49 $-0.01 11,130 -10.44%
(How te Teach the Kingdom —Series by Dr. Myles Munroe) (AGM) Notes: JSJ $10.40 $- 0 -6.31%
BOND MARKET PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%













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No notes traded in the
Bahamian market last week.

COMPANY NEWS

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced that the Board of
Directors had approved a $10
million share buy back pro-
gramme that will last for 10
years.

Bahamas First Holdings
announced it will be holding
its Annual General Meeting
on Thursday, August 13, 2009,
at Spm at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel, No. 1 Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

Shareholders of record as
of July 9, 2009, will be quali-
fied to vote at the Annual
Meeting.

International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold

Weekly % Change
0.9221
1.6445
1.4217

+2.90
+0.64
+0.77



Weekly % Change

+5.81
+1.84

$68.06
$954.40



International Stock Market Indexes:

DITA

S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei

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THE NASSAU FLORIST

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Weekly % Change
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979.26

1,965.96
9,944.55

+3.99
+4.13
+4.21
+5.85



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 3B



By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Chamber of
is preparing Bahamian busi-
nesses to take advantage of
upcoming trade agreements
even though the Government
is still trying to finalise this
country's services offer for the
Economic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA).

Hank Ferguson, the Cham-
ber’s trade policy expert, told
Tribune Business that
Bahamian companies need to
be informed of the benefits
resulting from the EPA when

SCOTIABANK (Bahamas)
has opened the doors to its
new retail sales centre in the
Caves Village Shopping Plaza,
a facility the bank says is the
first of its kind to be opened in
the Bahamas.

Vice-president of retail
banking, Wayde Christie, said
Scotiabank studied its market
and found the need for a ded-
icated retail banking centre.

"We have always been look-
ing at the opportunities that
are in our market, and not so
much just in terms of opening
new branches or expanding
our service but really listening
to what the market is telling
they need and want to see,"
he said.

“Through a number of sur-

Chamber readies business for trade



it comes to trade with the
European Union and other
CARIFORUM nations, as
well future trade agreements
with Canada and this nation’s
entry into the World Trade
Organization (WTO).

Mr Ferguson said the
Chamber of Commerce will
be holding a seminar to this
end on Thursday at the British
Colonial Hilton in Nassau, and
on Friday in Grand Bahama.

The Seminar will be led by
head of the Services Trade

Unit at the

Caribbean Regional Nego-
tiating Machinery (CRNM),
Ramesh Chaitoo, and

Trade Specialist Dr Noel
Watson.

"This will be a focused sem-
inar to expose Bahamian ser-
vice providers to opportuni-
ties offered through the EPA,”
said Mr Ferguson. He said
these seminars are a continu-
ing effort by the Chamber of
Commerce and Inter-Ameri-
can Development Bank (IDB)

to highlight the perceived ben-
efits of the EPA and other
Trade Agreements.

“The Chamber wants to
ensure that its members are
fully informed,” said Mr Fer-
guson.

"We are taking holistic
approach to trade agreements,
including Canada and the
WTO."

He said the Bahamas Trade
Commission is partnering with
the Chamber on several of the
seminars.

‘Bank’ on us for your convenience

veys and feed back, it was evi-
dent that there was a strong
need for a facility that provid-
ed flexible terms and focused
service that allows people to
come in and get out really
quickly."

At the new Scotiabank
branch, all the services which
can be found at other retail
banking locations can be per-
formed, except the exchange
of cash. Automatic Teller
Machines (ATM) can be used
for deposits and withdrawals.

According to Mr Christie, a
second ATM machine will be
added to the one already at
the centre and will hold dual
currency - Bahamian and US
dollars.

The new centre also features

Saturday banking, which Sco-
tiabank (Bahamas) managing
director, Barry Malcolm, said
has been a request of the
banking public for some time.

"The need for after-hours
and weekend banking has
been voiced in many quarters,
and the Caves Village centre
states simply that we have
heard," he said.

"This centre is but the first
of many innovations and
refinements to our branch net-
work systems that we will
unveil in our Bahamas mar-
Ket over the next few years."

He said that with the open-
ing of the Caves Village
branch, Scotiabank is prepar-
ing itself to meet the rebound
that will come when the world

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Visit our website at www.cob.edu,hs

STAFF VACANCY

Suitably qualified persons are invited to apply for the following posi-

tion: ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT I.

The Administrative Assistant I will provide direct assistance to the
Dean, Faculty of Liberal & Fine Arts, including the necessary adminis-
trative support for the overall management of the office. The success-
ful candidate will be someone with strong interpersonal, communica-
lion (both oral and written) and organization skills who enjoys the chal-
lenge of engaging individuals on a one-on-one level.

Applicants should posses a Bachelor's degree or the equivalent with no
work experience and Associate Degree in relevant area with ten (10)
years work experience at the AS-1 level. For a detailed job description,
visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested candidates should submit a
detailed resume and cover letter of interest no later than Friday, August

7th, 2009,

and the Bahamas pulls out of
the current economic reces-
sion. "We hold the view that
as it does, Scotiabank

Bahamas must be best posi-
tioned to respond to the mar-












However, the Bahamas’ ini-
tial services submission was
rejected the EU and returned
for amendments to be made.

"There are still some things
to be worked out. Language
that had to be fine tuned and it
(the services offer) has to go
back to Cabinet," said Mr Fer-
guson.

It is not yet known what the
EU has proposed to the
Bahamas in its services offer
or the level of market access.
However, because of the

ket we serve," said Mr Mal-
colm. "This new Scotiabank
retail sales centre provides you
with another exciting choice
by which to meet your banking
needs.”



National Investment Policy
some sectors will still be closed
to the EU and Cariforum
nations.

"The Government has
pledged to keep the national
investment policy sound," said
Mr Ferguson.

He said that though the final
draft of the Bahamas services
offer has not been submitted,
"we won't wait for the ink to
dry to start working”.

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS ee
Receiver ‘totally confident’ of no asset auction





FROM page 1B

region” of $500,000.

Philip Galanis, an accoun-
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he and his attorneys would
this week initiate legal action
to prevent the Provost Mar-
shall selling off numerous
land parcels and several vehi-














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cles owned by New Hope
Holdings, in order to settle an
alleged debt they owed to two
US marina construction spe-
cialists, Florida Marine and
Carey Marine International.

The Provost Marshall is due
to auction off some 15 parcels
of real estate, seven of which
contain buildings, and eight
other tracts of land, plus two
vehicles, via Public Auction
on Wednesday, July 29, 2009.
The auction has already been
advertised in the newspapers,
with seizure notices already
attached to the affected prop-
erties.

However, Mr Galanis told
Tribune Business: “I’ve been
in touch in the last two days
with my attorneys and per-
sons involved with this, and
I’m absolutely convinced
there will be no auction.

“We are going to take the
necessary legal action. We’re
going to court to obtain an
injunction to stay that auc-

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tion. I’m absolutely convinced
there will be no auction.”

Mr Galanis said he had
been in contact with the Com-
missioner of Police, Reginald
Ferguson, over the issue. The
Commissioner, he added, had
not been aware that New
Hope Holdings was in court-
supervised receivership when
notice was given of the inten-
tion to seize the company’s
assets and make good its debt.

Indicating that the asset
seizure and auction could not
be carried out anyway, due to
the protection offered by the
court-supervised receivership
—a process that stays all debts
and claims against a company
— Mr Galanis said Florida
Marina and Carey Marine
International had “certainly
not followed the process to
redress their grievance”.

Explaining that neither
himself nor New Hope or
Preben Olsen, the Scandina-
vian investor who is the com-
pany’s principal, had been
served with the appropriate
writ, Mr Galanis disputed the
$1.2 million being claimed by
the two Florida-based com-
panies.

“While I believe there is a
bona fide liability owed by the
company, I can’t quantify it
at this time,” he told Tribune
Business. “The numbers may
be in the region of $500,000. I
can’t justify $1.2 million. They
also have to stand behind the
other secured creditors.
They’re not a preferred cred-

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itor.”

However, sources close to
Mr Olsen and New Hope told
Tribune Business that they
blamed Mr Galanis for the sit-
uation with Florida Marine.
They argued that the Florida-
based firms had been able to
obtain a default judgment
after the receiver failed to
submit a defence to the
Supreme Court action they
initiated.

The threatened auction and
asset seizure is the latest spin-
off from the legal battle
between Mr Olsen and New
Hope’s primary financier, T.
G. Investments, which is
headed by Tom Gonzalez.
This led to New Hope being
placed into court-supervised
receivership, Mr Galanis
being charged with continu-
ing the company’s operations
and protecting and preserv-
ing assets, until their dispute is
sorted out.

Mr Gonzalez is alleging
that Mr Olsen and New Hope
defaulted on repaying loans
worth $23-$24 million. He is
alleging that he lent this sum,
secured by two promissory
notes, to Mr Olsen and New
Hope Holdings to finance the
acquisition of the Port Lucaya
Marina and associated prop-
erties, but this has not been
repaid. He is also claiming he
financed other obligations of
New Hope Holdings.

Mr Olsen’s side is alleging
that responsibility for any
loan repayment default lies
squarely with Mr Gonzalez.

A days

MWh ik

They are claiming that he
failed to live up to several
obligations, one of which was
to provide New Hope Hold-
ings with $12 million in work-
ing capital - over and above
the initial purchase price - to
fund its operations.

This, Mr Olsen is alleging,
never happened, and without
that capital New Hope end-
ed up defaulting. Essentially,
the core allegation in their
arguments rests on the claim
that any responsibility for the
loan default lies with Mr Gon-
zalez himself.

The assets under receiver-
ship are the Lucayan Marina,
private residences, pool bar,
Ferry House restaurant and
the newly-completed Grand
Bahama Yacht Club facility.
Taken out of receivership ear-
lier this year, with manage-
ment turned back to Mr
Olsen, was the Port Lucaya
Marina and adjacent land.

New Hope Holdings and
Mr Olsen acquired the 115-
slip Port Lucaya Marina in
August 2006 amid much fan-
fare, with a signing ceremo-
ny that was attended by then-
Prime Minister Perry Christie
and senior Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) exec-
utives.

Together with the Grand
Bahama Yacht Club and oth-
er associated facilities, the
Port Lucaya Marina was,
according to press releases
issued at the time, intended
to be the centerpiece of a
$500 million, 70-acre water-
front expansion undertaken
by New Hope Holdings for
the Bell Channel Bay area.

That project was slated to
include 300 yacht slips and
300 new waterfront condos,
townhouses and private resi-
dences, with New Hope Hold-
ings also intended to dredge
the Bell Channel to 13 feet in
depth to accommodate the
latest class of mega yachts.

The next court hearing in
the battle between Mr Olsen
and Mr Gonzalez is set for
September 2009.

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CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTESSION“ SERVICES

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT — FALL SEMESTER 042009

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WEDT aI aT

| SULITUEOO NAILS
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MesTiih fell

FLORAL DESIGN I
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WEALTH AME ITN

[ol MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS |

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| MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

he tele rs pi
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_[eetnipra-tnopen | Wed

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| Beep [0 wks | 5225.00

| 2i-Sep | Miwks | 540g 00

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ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tet: (24228-5714 | 242) 8 9S fe 1536 | OD ext G202 oF

emai penevietcob.edu.bs

Al fae are included with the exception of the application fee of $40,00 [ane time),


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



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Water plant contract’s

FROM page 1B

issue, prepared by attorney
Veronique Evans, urged the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion to “annul” the bidding
process for the Arawak Cay
plant because two other bid-
ders, Consolidated Water and
GE-Ionics, would “have cause

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORTHIG

NOTICE
CORRIDOR 18












SAUNDERS BEACH AREA

ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

for complaint” if negotiations
were commenced with Mr
Fitzgerald’s BK Water.

Ms Evans’s opinion con-
firmed details in Tribune
Business’s 2005-2006 articles
that chronicled the Arawak
Cay reverse osmosis plant
saga, with the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation having
invited three firms who had
qualified to bid on the previ-
ous Blue Hills reverse osmosis
plant to submit tenders for
this project.

That bidding process, initi-
ated in April 2005, saw the
receipt of one bid by dead-
line, but it was rejected. The
Arawak Cay plant contract
was put out to tender again,
and two bids were received —
one from Consolidated

wrote, and while it “had some
connection” to water suppli-
er/wastewater treatment
provider Veolia/Ennerserve,
this “was not established to
the satisfaction of the Water
& Sewerage Corporation”.

While neither of the bids
was officially rejected, the
legal opinion detailed how the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion felt Consolidated Water
was “not a good candidate”
for the Arawak Cay contract
since it would have a monop-
oly on reverse osmosis water
supply due to its existing Blue
Hills plant.

As a result, the Corpora-
tion planned to approach
Veolia directly and negotiate
the Arawak Cay contract.
However, Ms Evans advised




In an effort to relieve current traffic congestion problems
JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A has been
contracted for the Completion of the New Providence Road Improvement
Project — International Package. Road construction will be commencing on
Corridor 18 (Saunders Beach),which may require diversions on:






Poinsettia Avenue through Marine Drive and exits at Bougainvillea Avenue.

There will be delays along this vicinity due to the one-way traffic flow system.
Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further information will be
provided in the local media

Tel: 242-322-8341/242-322-2610

@ i

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE,
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES — FALL SEMESTER 2009 -

42000







GOURSE

| SEC. | CODE
) cade
606

BEGINS

Bahamian Cusine 1 Sept. 10

COOK

Gearmat Cooking | | _Sapt. 7

Gourmet Cooking Il Sept. 9

Cake & Pastry
Making | aE} Sept. &
Cako & Pawiry
Making Il

Bread Making B10 Sept. 10

Cake Decorating | 17 Sept 7

Cako Deporating Il

fopt. 9

Sepia |

TLOTION &

ENDS DURATION | DATS TIRE | FEES | Fim

| 600
Adon

B wees 5375.00 | Mik

|
$300.00 | Mr

| Oet, 22 | Thursday
tu
fo0pm
A -

4.00pm

_ Get. 18 6 wens | Balcony

Oct. 21 O weeks Wedresilay $045.00 | Mik

| 600
Ad0nm
G00 -
8pm

Nov, 3 8 weeks Tuesday $500.00 | PK

Mow. & 8 weeks | Thursday $328.00 | PK
| a -
Nov. & 0pm Lit

Nov.

A weeks Thursday,

Au -
00pm
6900 -
f0pm | Sar

a weeds Morday $326.00 | PK

Now. 4 B wakes | Wiener salary ne | PK

AM fees are included in the price queted above; new stedents pay a onetime applicntion fee of 40.00, (WON REFUNDABLE)

Application Deadline: August 28, 2009 at 4:00) p.m.

For titlesr inloria ls oF bo pick i ar applicaion eibiseasac GM ceT We Indusairy Training Departivet of the Culinary i Hospitality

Maratemnent Listitule, 723-581,

The Cli ee

of (ie Farms Peeves thie it ta eae Titi, Pas, Cannes Cater, Coonan

42 3=f or fax TS- 1267.

Sebediwle cua! Come Adieerlanls

ROYAL B FIDELITY

Money at Work

COOL cI NT AL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

MONDAY, 20 JULY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.86] CHG 0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -141.50 | YTD % -8.26
FINDEX: CLOSE 786.23 | YTD -5.83% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Security
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S$)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

10.40
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS$ Div $ P/E Yield

13.5
10.9
55.6

10.40
10.00

10.40
10.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3231
2.8952
1.4031
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Last Sale
100.00
100.00

Symbol Interest
FBB17

FBB22

Change Daily Vol.
0.00 7%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.8952 -1.52 -3.18
1.4777 3.07 5.31
3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.9801 2.87 5.79
101.6693 1.10 1.67
93.1992 -3.33 -6.76
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.300 N/M
0.480 N/M
0.000 256.6

Weekly Vol. Yield

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90
Div $ Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
10-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Water, winner of the Blue
Hills contract, and the other
from BK Water.

BK Water had not been
invited to bid, Ms Evans

against this.

She wrote: “As it stands,

SEE next page

BAHAMAS FIRST
HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS

Bahamas First Holdings Limited hereby
notifies all its shareholders that the Board
of Directors has declared an interim
dividend of two cents (2¢) per ordinary
share to be paid 31* July 2009, to all

shareholders of record as of 27° July 2009.

©

TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian for the following posi-
tions for the 2009 - 2010 School Year.

Dean of Students

Applicants must:

A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing to
subscribe to the statement of Faith of Temple Christian
School.

B. Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or Higher from
a recognized College or University.

C. Possess excellent organization, Inter-personal
communicative skills.

D. Be able to assist with all aspect of the Administration.
E. Be able to discipline, counsel students.

F. Have high morals standards.

Application must be picked up at the High School Office
on Shirley Street 23rd July, 2009 and be returned with
the following: a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph, church affiliation, pastor’s name and three
references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is July 30th, 2009


THE TRIBUNE



‘far reaching legal ramifications’

the only true bidder is Con-
solidated Water, as it is the
only bidder who qualified
under clause 4 of the bid doc-
uments. BK was not a quali-
fied bidder, and their bid
should therefore be rejected
without any further consider-
ation.

“Tam aware of some rep-
resentations made be Veolia
that BK is an affiliate of
theirs, but none of the docu-
ments required under Clause
5 were provided with the bid.”

She added: “At the start of
the bidding process in April,
three companies were invit-
ed to bid. Now Water & Sew-
erage Corporation proposes
to negotiate directly with a
company which to the best of
its available information did
not qualify in the first place.

“The potential legal ramifi-
cations of that decision are
very far-reaching. Not only
would Consolidated Water
have cause for complaint, but
so would GE-Ionics (the third
invitee), because both would
not be given the opportunity
to renew their bids..... Should
BK prove its relationship with
Veolia, then its bid can be
accepted. The most important
aspect of this process is that it

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

is transparently fair, so that
justice can be seen to be
done.”

To annul the bidding
process, Consolidated Water’s
offer had to be rejected as
well, Ms Evans urging that “in
the interest of transparency
and to ward off any taint of
bias” they should be informed
of the reasons why, given that
they were also the Water &
Sewerage Corporation’s part-
ner via the Blue Hills plant.

The legal opinion was
among a batch of documents
released to the media by the
Government, and was seem-
ingly designed to show Mr
Fitzgerald had a ‘conflict of
interest’ in relation to his
opposition to the Arawak Cay
port plan — something that
seems a stretch, given that
Arawak Cay was abandoned
as a reverse osmosis plant
location, as show by Tribune
Business articles at the time —
in favour of Perpall Tract.

A November 1, 2005, letter
from BK Water’s registered
agent, Higgs & Johnson Cor-
porate Services, and signed
by attorney Zarina Fitzger-
ald, Mr Fitzgerald’s wife, said
65 per cent of BK Water was
to be owned by BK Holdings

and Bay West (Bahamas).

BK Holdings’ beneficial
owners were Mr Fitzgerald,
Mark Finlayson and Philip
Kemp, as detailed by Tribune
Business back in 2005, and
Bay West’s principals were
Prince Wallace and Judson
Wilmott. Tribune Business
had again identified the lat-
ter’s participation at the time.

A further 5 per cent of BK
Water’s equity was proposed
to be allocated to the Water
& Sewerage Corporation,
with the remaining 30 per
cent to be offered to Bahami-
an institutional investors.

In a proposal to the Water
& Sewerage Corporation sent
two weeks earlier, on Octo-
ber 19, 2005, Mr Fitzgerald
said that apart from an initial
5 per cent stake offered to the
Corporation at “no cost”, this
could be increased in two
phases.

A further 5 per cent stake
in BK Water would be
offered to Water & Sewerage
once BK Water/Veolia
“receives the additional vol-
ume to supply water to
Kerzner and the provision of
wastewater services to Par-
adise Island”. Then, another
2.5 per cent stake would be

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THE BAHAMAS PUBLIC
SERVICES UNION

URGENT
NOTICE

The Bahamas Public Services Union (BPSU)
Contributory Medical Plan will cause to come into
effect new Medical Premium Rates effective 1st,

2009.

The new Premium Rates are of to the escalating
cost of healthcare services and treatment for all our

members.

All members of the Contributory Medical Plan are
urged to contact the Medical Plan Office at the
George Lafleur Building on Wulff Road immediately
with regards to the increase of Medical Premiums.

For more information please visit our website at:
http/Wwww.bpsubahamas.com



offered — taking Water &
Sewerage’s equity in BK
Water to 12.5 per cent — once
the company supplied water
and wastewater services to
Baha Mar. The Arawak Cay
plant was designed to provide
water to Atlantis Phase II
and Baha Mar.

Mr Fitzgerald also offered
to reduce BK Water’s price
for five million gallons of
water per day, excluding elec-
tricity costs, to $3.74 per gal-

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MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 7B

















NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON
late of #48 Winton Highway, Easter Districl New
Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby piven that all persons having:
claims or demands against the abowenamed Estab are
requicsied tc send the same duly certitied to the undersigned
exnor befeue 4 A usrust AOE,

AND NWOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, thie assets of the late
NORMAN STAFPORD SOLOMON will be distributed
among the persons entitled thereto hav ing, re ard omy ler
the aims of which the Executor of the Estate shall then
have had Notice.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.
Attorneys bor the Execubors
Saxe House
Shirley Street & Vicbona Avenue
P.O). Box N.272
Nassau, Bahan.

Attention: & Smith

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

Want To Be An

AGENT OF
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Deadline For Enrolment: July 31, 2009
ee Ee MeL Cee Mc cs Ses TB
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is an opportunity to join a winning team that

contributes to the Bank's success and offers good career potential

Compliance Officer
Job Duties:

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relevant regulatory requirements and AML policies

¢ Implement regulatory and Group requirements on compliance
monitoring and AML

e Prepare report and statutory returns for submission to Group
Compliance and external regulators

¢ Act as the regulatory and legal liaison for and between the
Bank’s operations in The Bahamas and Hong Kong parent

company

Requirements:

¢ A University Degree in Business Administration, Law or other
relevant qualifications

¢ Minimum of six year’s experience in financial institutions,
preferably in managerial or supervisory role.

¢ Proven working experience in compliance monitoring and AML,
with good knowledge on regulations and related statutory

requirements

¢ Strong self motivation, with good communication and

interpersonal skills

Please send us a full

resume, including personal particulars,

employment history, present and expected salary and contact phone

number to:

Country Manager
P.O. Box N-3019
Nassau, Bahamas

Application Deadline: 10 August 2009

Applicants who are not contacted within one month may consider
their applications unsuccessful.

All information provided by applicants will be used strictly in
accordance with the employer's personal data policies. Applicants
may be considered for other suitable positions within the Bank and
its related companies over a one-year period, after which their personal

data will be destroyed.


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



USNS
Bahamas to face high unemployment ‘for quite some time’

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF Robert Douglas Erskine late of 303 East
Street on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the Undersigned on or before the 10th
day of August, A.D., 2009, after which date the Executors will
proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of
which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the said
Estate of Robert Douglas Erskine are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

LEANDRA A. ESFAKIS
Attorney for the Executors
Chambers
P.O. Box $S-19269
No. 16 Market Street
Nassau, New Providence
The Bahamas

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PLEASE FAX ALL RESUMES TO) 34.0828 OR CALL 677-6731

SALARY & BENEFITS BASED OS EXPERIENCE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS — 2009
In The Supreme Court CLE/Gen/ 00439
Common Law Side

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE Of LEONARD
NATHANIEL MILLER (Presumed Deceased) Late of
Lee Street in the Subdivision of Nassau Village in the
Island of New Providence One Of The Islands Of The
Commonwealth of the Bahamas

And

IN THE MATTER For An Application For A Declaration
Of Death Pursuant To Section 93 Of The Evidence Act
- Chapter 65 Of The Laws The Bahamas

And

IN THE MATTER OF An Application of CAROL
YVONNE MILLER Nee MILLS

And

IN THE MATTER OF An Application To Declare
LEONARD NATHANIEL MILLER, Dead

NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that LEONARD NATHANIEL
MILLER of Lee Street in the Subdivision of Nassau
Village in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence who was on 7th October, A. D. 2001 a
Carpenter went missing on the 7th October, A. D. 2001.

Any person knowing the whereabouts of LEONARD
NATHANIEL MILLER are to file a Notice of
Appearance at the Supreme Court Registry at the 3rd
Floor of the Ansbacher Building on Bank Lane and East
Street in the City of Nassau or contact the firm of Wells
Legal & Corporate Services in Columbus us House, East
& Shirley Streets in the City of Nassau in the Island of
New Providence.

Dated: This 23rd day of July, A. D. 2009.

Stephanie Anne Wells
Wells Legal & Corporate Services
Columbus House
East & Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas



FROM page 1B

eign direct investment, the
effects were now spreading to
the Bahamian financial ser-
vices industry.

He warned that when the
Bahamian hotel industry
recovered it was unlikely to
re-hire all the workers laid off
between autumn 2008 and
now, due to the fact that pro-
ductivity gains from the
remaining workforce had like-
ly made many posts redun-
dant.

“T don’t think things will
return to normal,” Mr Smith
added of the hotel sector.
“They may never hire them
again, because the ones left
are being a lot more produc-
tive and a lot more efficient.
Some people in the National
Training Programme are
going to find they have to stay
in the new industries.”



That, too, will likely con-
tribute to a slower reduction
in the unemployment rate
than the Government would
want — a rate that, if anything,
is likely to be higher than the
Department of Statistics sur-
vey found earlier this year,
due to increasing lay-offs and
the difficulty in measuring the
number of underemployed
and discouraged workers.

“T think we’re going to, like
the US, continue with higher
levels of unemployment for
quite some time,” Mr Smith
said. “We could be talking
two to three years, because
the US is approaching 10 per
cent unemployment, and
some times our unemploy-
ment level is twice theirs.”

This trend, he added, was
exacerbated by the fact that
the Bahamas’ reliance on
tourism and financial services
meant its sole, and key, factor

Law Firm is seeking skilled professional litigation legal





















little supervision

little supervision

+ Excellent memory
+ Ability to multi-task

« Energetic

+ Self-motivated

* Pleasant personality
+ Despises mediocrity

eb A

secretary. The following are needed:

+ Proficiency in Microsoft Word

* Experience in drafting legal letters with little supervision
« Experience in drafting legal documents with

+ Ability to confidently speak with clients
+ Ability to take instructions and carry same out with

* Excellent organizational skills

+ Works beyond the standard 9 to 5 when necessary

clo The Tribune ¢ P.O. Box N-3207¢ D/A #81242







THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Viett oor website at weew.cob,edu. br

IMPORTANT DATES

Fall Semester 2009
New Student Orientation







Parents’ Evening
Tuesday, 18th August, 2009
6:30 p.m. — 8:00 p.m.

Orientation
Wednesday, 19th August, 2009
8:00 am. — 1:00 p.m.

Advisement & Registration
Wednesday, 19th August, 2049

1:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m,

Advisement, Registration & Bill Payment
Thursday, 20th August, 2009 and
Friday, 21st August, 2009
9:04) a.m. — 7:00 p.m.

Venue:
Front of Portia Smith Student Services
Centre,
Pomneciana Drive

Ti

can

Kingsway A

cademy High
School Teaching positions
For September, 2009

Kingsway Academy High School invites
qualified applicants for the following teaching
positions for September, 2009.

+ Chemistry
* Music

» Spanish

* French

The successful

candidates MUST be

qualified, born again Christian with a valid

Teacher's Certificate and minimum

if a

Bachelor's Degree. He or She must also
be willing to participate in Extra Curricular

activities, etc.

Application forms can be collected from
Human Resources section at the Business
Office on Bernard Road. Telephone 242-

o24-6269 | 324-6887.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS
FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, 2009.

of production was labour. As
a result, the Bahamian work-
force took the brunt of eco-
nomic recessions.

Mr Smith told Tribune
Business that a Bahamian
economic recovery continued
to depend on what happened
in the US, and the current evi-
dence from major markets,
such as housing and the finan-
cial system, suggested the
rebound — when it came — was
likely “ to be very sluggish” in
our northern neighbour.

“That means a continuing
dampening impact on con-
sumer spending, which drives
things like travel,” he warned.
“We can expect, when our
market rebounds, it will not
be ‘v-shaped’, it will be a ‘long
L’ shape.”

With consumer confidence
in the US, which supplies 85
per cent of the Bahamas’
tourists, remaining low, con-
sumer spending power and
disposable income for use on
items such as Bahamian vaca-
tions remains depressed. Con-
sumer and business spending
is likely to be subdued for
some time in the US as both
sectors deleverage and reduce
years of debt-fuelled spend-
ing, which also does not bode
well for the Bahamas.

Mr Smith said that while
Americans were still travel-
ling, they were increasingly
shopping on price for cut-
price vacations, something
which had taken them away
from the relatively high-
priced Bahamas to cheaper
Caribbean destinations such
as Cancun and the Domini-
can Republic.

These destinations, the for-
mer finance minister said,
offered the same attractions
as the Bahamas — sun, sand
and sea — but often a much
better ‘value for money’
proposition. “When we have a
rebound, we will have less
return visitors,” Mr Smith

said. “Americans are still trav-
elling, but less to the
Bahamas.”

Based on anecdotal evi-
dence, his understanding was
that the Bahamian hotel and
tourism industry had not
offered such deep discounts
to entice visitors as other des-
tinations. And the discounts
offered tended to largely
focus on reduced room rates,
which still left visitors paying
relatively high prices in areas
such as food and beverage.

Factoring all this into an
equation featuring the poten-
tial opening of Cuba to US
travellers, Mr Smith told Tri-
bune Business: “I think we’ve
got an uphill battle with some
factors not directly related to
the recession.”

The Bahamas, he added,
needed to be “much more
conscious” of the tourism and
hotel industry’s perceived
weaknesses, chiefly poor ser-
vice and the high operating
cost base. “I think as long as
we recognise where we are
and the challenges ahead, we
can probably muddle our way
through, but we’ve got to
appreciate things will not
return to normal,” Mr Smith
added.

“The upside, I believe, is
that we will deliver a more
efficient economy because the
survivors in the labour force
and small businesses shall be
leaner and much more effi-
cient.”

As for the foreign exchange
reserves, Mr Smith added:
“We might be lulled to sleep
because we see the reserves
performing well, but that’s
mostly the product of bor-
rowing, which has to be
repaid at some point or used
to finance the Government’s
capital works projects.

“We can’t be clapping too
much about that, because it’s
not the product of tourism or
foreign direct investment.”

UU Te SA 0
AMS RRL
US eT are

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY FORGIE EV ANS late of
#17 London Terrace, Eastern Districl, New Providence,

Bahamas, deceased

NOTICE is hereby piven that all persons having
claims of demands against the above-named Estate are
requested bo send the same duly certified to the undersigned

enor before h Aupust IWF,

AND NOTICE is hereby also piven that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the babe
DOROTHY PORGIE EVANS will be distributed anong the
persons entitled thereto having regard only toe the clainis cel
which the Executor of the Estate shall then have had Notice.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO,
AMorneys for the Execuiicers

Sassoon Hise
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
PC). Box N-272
Nassau, Bahernas
Attention: 5. Smith

YES YOU CAN

God got with his instrument and produced the book
“Yes You Can - A Bahamian Plan”.

The world seems to be waiting; every nation it has
touched is positively affected.

Did two leaders missed it, missed it to our

detriment!

We are still here to serve your accounting needs.

For a copy of “Yes You Can” and other services

Contact us at:- M.E. LOCKHART ACCOUNTING
Tel: 242-394-3565
Cell: 242-425-0650
P.O.Box N522

Email: elshagg @coralwave.com


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 9B



CLICO liquidator targets 75 firms

FROM page 1B

be Mr Duprey’s partner or
some other relative, given that
they share the same Florida
address of 2 Harborage Isle
Drive, Fort Lauderdale.
Regardless, Mr Gomez is also
seeking documents from
Greenberg Traurig on its
dealings with both in an indi-
vidual capacity.

Although the documents
do not divulge why Mr
Gomez is seeking this infor-
mation, it is more than likely
that he wants to examine
whether any assets belonging
to CLICO (Bahamas) and, by
extension, its Bahamian insur-
ance policyholders, annuity
depositors and other credi-
tors, may have ended up with
Mr Duprey’s private compa-
nies — and been used to
finance his private business
interests.

If this turns out to be the
case, the CLICO (Bahamas)
liquidator will more than like-
ly go after Mr Duprey and his
companies through the courts
to secure their return. This
could take months before a
successful outcome is secured,
though, as Mr Gomez will

likely have to unravel a maze
of inter-party transactions and
related party wheelings and
dealings.

There is little doubt,
though, that eyebrows will be
raised by the size of Mr
Duprey’s private business
empire, and why it was nec-
essary to have as many as 75
different companies.

Meanwhile, Mr Gomez, in
a separate subpoena, is seek-
ing documents from a Florida-
based firm, North County
Properties & Investments,
relating to its dealings with
CLICO (Bahamas) largest
asset/investment, the Welling-
ton Preserve Corporation real
estate development.

Specifically, Mr Gomez is
seeking documents on “any
arrangements that may have
existed concerning Welling-
ton Preserve Corporation’s
‘approved contractors’, and
advertising fund to which
approved contractors were to
contribute”. This information
is to be produced by August
10, 2009.

It is no surprise that Mr
Gomez is having to spend
considerable time in the US
to protect, preserve and ulti-
mately recover CLICO
(Bahamas) assets for the ulti-

mate benefit of its Bahamian
creditors. Through the
$73.638 million loan to
finance investments by its sub-
sidiary, CLICO Enterprises,
the Bahamian life and healthy
insurer has some 63 per cent
of its assets tied up in various
chunks of Florida real estate.

According to Mr Gomez,
apart from Wellington Pre-
serve these investments also
include the ‘W’ hotel proper-
ty in Fort Lauderdale and,
indeed, there are numerous
resort and real estate devel-
opment companies that he
wants to obtain documents
on.

Tribune Business revealed
last week that Mr Gomez was
in talks with two to three
potential buyers, one of
whom is believed to be a
major real estate develop-
ment company, to sell
Wellington Preserve.

Its sale, and maximising the
price paid, will be key toa
successful liquidation and how
much Bahamian creditors are
ultimately able to recover.
The closer Mr Gomez gets to
a $73 million sales price, the
better the likelihood that
secured creditors — especially
its life and health insurance
policyholders — will recover

SPEECH COMPETITION
TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK
3RD - 10TH OCTOBER, 2009

The Department of Public Service will host a Speech Competition as one of the
activities for the Tenth Annual Public Service Week. The competition is open to
Senior High School Students in the Northern, Southern and Central Bahamas.

Students interested in participating should prepare a five minute speech to be
delivered on the topic: “The Public Service - Striving for Excellence in Customer

Service.”

The deadline for the names of students participating should be referred to
the attention of Ms Rose Gibson, Chairperson, Public Service Committee,
Department of Public Service by 4th September, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 computer system will be awarded to the winners. The first
runners-up will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winner will be announced during the Tenth Annual Public Service Week
Awards Ceremony scheduled for Saturday, 10th October, 2009.

Students wishing to participate can obtain further details regarding the requirements
for entry from their Language Arts Teacher of Family Island Administrator, in

their respective district.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website aft www.cobeduby

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
& EXTENSION SERVICES

CAREER INSTITUTE PROGRAMMES 2009/2010

Are you interested in starting a new career? Would you like to become a
Massage Therapist, Event Planner or Computer Technician? The Centre for
Continuing Education and Extension Services, Career Institute offers
programmes in these creative careers and others.

Massage Therapy Essentials
Computer Systemes Tachnician

Medical Secretary

Medical Billing & Coding
Wedding & Event Planning
Cleaning Science Technician

Esthetician

UPCOMING PROGRAMMES

HEALTH & SAFETY

RECEPTION OPERATION & SERVICES
VETERINARY ASSISTANT
CUSTOMER SERVICE

DENTAL ASSISTANT

Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today!
Call (242) 325-5714/328-(093/328-1936 or visit us on Moss Road

in Oakes Field

Fess May Be Paid By Cash, Credit Cant, or Bank Certified Cheque Payable To:
The Callege of The Bahamas, Business Oifice
CEES Reserves The Right To Chonge Tuition, Fees, Course Coment, Course Schedule

And Course Mhatereals

100 per cent of their long-
term investments.

The CLICO (Bahamas) liq-
uidator had warned previous-
ly that Wellington Preserve
was “not presently considered
marketable” due to the down-
turn in the Florida real estate
market, and that it was
unlikely that the $73 million
loan to CLICO Enterprises
could be “recovered at full
value”.

While Wellington Pre-
serve’s accounts showed
investment property valued
at $127 million, the same real
estate was valued at $62 mil-
lion on an ‘as is basis’. The
development, planned to fea-
ture 80 residential lots and
















le
~
NAD

Nagsau Airport
Cerssloprrat Core peat

other amenities on a 523-acre
site, also required a $42 mil-
lion cash injection to get it
ready for sale.

Mr Duprey was the chair-
man and principal owner of
CL Financial, the Trinidadian
conglomerate that owned and
controlled CLICO
(Bahamas). As such, he
directed the latter’s Board
and dominated decision-mak-
ing at the Bahamian insurer,
running all aspects of its oper-
ations. Therefore, he has to
assume most responsibility for
its collapse into a $16 million
insolvency (at least), and the
financial stress hundreds of
Bahamians find themselves
in.

REQUEST FOR
PREQUALIFICATION

LPIA Expansion Project Stage |
US Departures Terminal

CL Financial had also given
a $57 million guarantee to
cover the latter’s loans to
high-risk investments by relat-
ed parties in Wellington Pre-
serve and other Florida-based
real estate investment pro-
jects.

In his first report to the
Bahamian Supreme Court as
the then-provisional liquida-
tor, Mr Gomez said CLICO
(Bahamas) “may have a
claim” against CL Financial
for the full value of the $57
million guarantee.

He added that he would
thus have to ensure CL Finan-
cial’s assets were not “dissi-
pated” by court proceedings
in Trinidad.

Ledcor is seeking contractors to asset in completion of Stage | of the LPIA Expansion



Praject (U5 Departures Terrninal), All contractors, particularly Bahamian contractors, are



encouraged to participate in this significant national project. Scopes to be tendered to

commlete the fit out of the new terminal include:

# Masonry
# Millwork
# Specialties
# Paint

+ Interior Glazing
+ Drywall
+ Flooring

+ Door & Hordwore «+ Mechanical
# Electrical

Prequalification will include, based on the tender packapes, the following critena:

+ Ability to bond, provide letter of credit or demonstrate financial capacity

# Experience

* References

* Bahamian ownership / content

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BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

MANAGER, REVENUE ACCOUNTING
CUSTOMER SERVICES DIVISION

A vacaney exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue

Accounting

The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and the
Family Islands and the reconciliation of all revenue accounts other than miscellaneous

recervables.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

. Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in New Providence and

the Family Islands.

Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers.
Prepares the sales budget.
Prepares the Revenue Accounting Department Budget.

Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Receivable Reconciliation.
Oversees the training of all Customer Services staff in the new billing software.
Prepares monthly Board reports.
Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenue reports.

Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of Statistics
Provides statistical billing information for Family Island managers
Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in the

Family Islands,

Attends yearly community meetings as well as ad hoc meetings required during
acquisition of new locations.
Develops and implements mules, guidelines and procedures for the efficient
operation of the department.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Accounts or equivalent

A minimum of §+ years of experience in accounting practice and theory.
Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualitications

Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas.

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing.

Sound reasoning and good judgment skills,
Ability to interpret financial reports,

Good time management skills,

Project management skills.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7500, Nassau, Bahamas on or before:

July 31, 2009.


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009
New Business Licence ‘next year for certain’

FROM page 1B

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, told Tribune
Business that “the Ministry
of Finance is undertaking a
review of the Business
Licence Act” with a view to
fulfilling the 2009-2010 Bud-
get promise to create a ‘one-
stop’ service for licensing all
companies, thereby eliminat-

ing bureaucracy and costs
associated with red tape.

“We expect next year for
certain to have a new Busi-
ness Licence Act,” Mr Laing
told Tribune Business. “The
bottom line is we think it is
possible to licence business-
es in a much simpler fashion
in this country.

“The idea is to make it sim-
pler to do business in the

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF Bethany Jones Major late of Wilson Street
n the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the Undersigned on or before the 10th
day of August, A.D., 2009, after which date the Executors will
proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of
which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate of Bethany Jones Major are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

LEANDRA A. ESFAKIS
Attorney for the Executors
Chambers
P.O. Box $S-19269
No. 16 Market Street
Nassau, New Providence
The Bahamas






COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION © CLE/GEN/00443

BETWEEN

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
JACQUELINE JOHNSON
Defendant

ADVERTISEMENT OF SERVICE OF
WRIT OF SUMMONS

TAKE NOTICE that an action has been commenced
against you in the Supreme Court, Common Law
and Equity Division, Action No. CLE/GEN/00443
of 2008 in which the Plaintiff, BANK OF THE
BAHAMAS LIMITED, has issued a Writof Summons
out of the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on the
20th March, 2008 claiming against you the sum af
$17,476.70 arising from your default of the loan
granted by the Plaintiff to you on or about the 11th
August, 2002 in the principal amount of $7,500.00
and interest at the rate of 15% per annum.

AND THAT it has been ordered by
Ms. Marilyn Meeres, Deputy Registrar of the
Supreme Court on the 17th March, 2009 that
service of the Writ of Summons in the said
action on you be effected by this advertisement.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that
you must within fourteen (14) days from the
publication of this advertisement inclusive of the
day of such publication, acknowledge service
of the said Writ of Summons by completing a
prescribed form of Acknowledgement of Service
which may be obtained on requested from the
Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise Judgment may be entered against you.

Dated this 17th day of March, A.D., 2009

GIBSON, RIGBY & Co,
CHAMBERS
Ki-Malex House
Dowdeswell Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Plaintiff



Bahamas. That’s the objec-
tive. The idea is to make it
easier for people to do busi-
ness.”

The new Business Licence
Act is designed to incorpo-
rate four existing Acts into
one, with the Liquor Licences
Act, the Shop Licences Act
and the Music and Dancing
Licences Act amalgamated
with it to create a ‘one-stop
shop’ licensing process.

Mr Laing pointed to situa-
tions where businesses such
as liquor stores not only had
to obtain their Business
Licence, but were also sub-
jected to the Shop Licences
and Liquor Licences Acts,
effectively forcing them to
undergo three different pro-
cedures to meet their licens-
ing requirements.



The same situation could
also face nightclubs, restau-
rants and other entertainment
spots, and Mr Laing indicated
that reforms could also focus
on the way Business Licence
fees are calculated.

The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce and others have
long complained that the way
Business Licence fees are cal-
culated, based on a formula
involving gross profits,
penalises businesses with high
sales but low margins and
profits, such as food stores.
Conversely, it rewards com-
panies with low sales but high
margins and net profits, such
as law firms.

In his 2009-2010 Budget
communication, Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham said:
“The new Business Licence

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DEEKER STREAM LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)











Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

















Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Act will make specific provi-
sion for Liquor Licence as a
special category of Licence.
The Licensing Authority will
no longer be required.

“The new Act also impor-
tantly includes a provision for
the establishment of a Review
Board that will hear objec-
tions from the public on cer-
tain licence applications,
objections by applicants of
licence revocations or sus-
pensions and complaints
regarding matters related to
Business Licence. The
issuance of the Business
Licence will become the
responsibility of the Ministry
of Finance. This will result in
an amendment to the Local
Government Act.”

Meanwhile, Mr Laing told
Tribune Business that the
Bahamas expected to finalise
its services offer for the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) with the Euro-
pean Union (EU) “over the
summer”.

“We expect a concluding
meeting with them [the EU]
over the summer,” the min-
ister said. “I think we will
have that final meeting and
be able to conclude the ser-
vices agreement then.

““Tt’s still a matter of mode

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the

news, read
Hat y [o/s] me) a)
Mondays



THE TRIBUNE

three offerings; they'd like to
see more. That’s the rationale
of these discussions.”

Mode Three relates to the
ability of European firms to
establish a commercial pres-
ence for their operations in
the Bahamas. Tribune Busi-
ness previously reported that
the EU was seeking more lib-
eralisation from this nation,
and greater openings, for EU
firms in areas such as retail,
construction, computer sys-
tems, advisory services and
foreign/international law.

The prime reason why the
EU rejected the Bahamas’ ini-
tial services offer was that it
did not meet the minimum
liberalisation thresholds set
by Europe and CARIFO-
RUM, and it also did not
align with the criteria cur-
rently set out — and used — by
this nation in its National
Investment Policy.

The EU was also seeking
greater clarity on the invest-
ment approvals process, much
of which is in policy as
opposed to statute. The Euro-
peans would prefer this to be
in statute law, not policy,
where it could be subject to
the whim or opinion of some
ministers or officials. In short,
they want the ‘rules of the
game’ to be clear when it
comes to the Bahamas.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing said
the mandate of the Trade
Commission and other gov-
ernment Boards had been
renewed. He added that the
Trade Commission’s size had
been expanded, through the
inclusion of representatives
from the Abaco, Exuma,
Andros and Grand Bahama
Chambers of Commerce, plus
persons acting for the
Bahamas Hotel Association
and straw vendors.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BASOTHO VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DOLE HOLLOW LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
IRISH LORD MANAGEMENT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RASBORA WELLS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GOSLINGTON
INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRIDEDON VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 11B



Site’s $100k outlay takes
Bahamas firms to world

has more than 50 stores in its
virtual mall, and with the
power of the Internet and
expansion only a program
upgrade away, the site can
conceivably accommodate all
the businesses in the Bahamas
and more.

Like amazon.com, one of
the largest online shopping
sites in the world, shopB-
VM.com allows Bahamian
individuals and businesses to
set up an account with it in
order to sell their products
and services online. And,
through the keying in of a
credit card number, Bahami-
ans are able to shop from
home and have their products
delivered to them, or they can
simply pick it up themselves.

According to the site’s
operations manager and head
of information technology,
Ricardo Berris, when items
are purchased on shopB-
VM.com's secure site, a
receipt is generated for the
product to verify that the
holder is the purchaser. If the
purchased product is picked
up from its location, the ven-
dor is required to ask for
identification.

While this represents a
physical security feature, Mr
Berris said that online, Shop-
BVM.com have taken steps
to secure every page on the
site.

He explained that cus-
tomers can ensure the site is
secure by looking for the
security seal on the lower
right hand corner of the web

page, where credit or debit
card information is inputed.
He also said individuals can
tell a site is secure when http:
begins the line of

the Uniform Resource
Locator (URL).

Vaughn Burrows, shopB-
VM.com’s chief executive,
told Tribune Business that the
website was conceived of dur-
ing a brainstorming session
among former Atlantis
employees.

"Everyone had their good
ideas, but we thought that a
mall where Bahamians can
shop anywhere in the
Bahamas from the comfort of
their homes would be a good
idea,” said Mr Burrows.

Due to the Bahamas’ e-
commerce infancy, shopB-
VM.com’s investors required
their website to be far differ-
ent from existing home shop-
ping sites, and able to accom-
modate the limited capabili-
ties available. After an exten-
sive search for a suitable web
design company, they chose
the Miami-based company,
Oxidev.

"We got online and looked
for the best web designer we
could find," Mr Burrows said.
"We looked at their website,
because if you're designing
our website and yours looks
like garbage, we’re not going
with you."

As a result of the relation-
ship with Oxidev, the shopB-
VM.com's principal became
the sole independent broker
in the Bahamas for the web

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HYLANE POINTE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MANUAL VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is

Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DAVINCI PRIZE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

design company.
Website

"We didn't want to just
copy and paste amazon.com
to a Bahamian website, so we
looked at a lot of other sites
and said: ‘Why be like ama-
zon - we can be better," said
Mr Bazard.

Visitors to the site will
immediately notice themes of
the fslands and of the
Bahamas, in particular.

According to Mr Bazard,



investors wanted the site to
be authentically representa-
tive of the Bahamian islands
and leave business owners’
online stores with the same
appeal.

ShopBVM.com has been so
well received since its launch
in January 2009 that the t-
shirt company, 242 People,
has sold its product as far
away as the Middle East.

According to Mr Berris, a
Bahamian florist also received
an order from Thailand via
the shopBVM.com for flow-

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRAND PAVILION
CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)













Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
















Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





Legal Notice

NOTICE
VAL SALVAN CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PROWELL VALLEY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SEA BLACK TIGER SLOPES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ers to be sent to a recipient
in Bermuda. He said instead
of shipping the flowers from
Nassau, the company was able
to fill the order through an
affiliate florist in Bermuda.

All the principals agree that
the possibilities are endless
for those Bahamian ‘bricks
and mortar’ stores who wish
to expand but do not have the
capital.

"Move your store online,”
they say.

For a limited time, shopb-
vm.com is offering its cus-

tomers free store set up. Fol-
lowing the promotion, inter-
ested business owners will be
able to purchase Bimini, Aba-
co and Andros packages, with
set-up costs starting at $49.99.
With the Bimini package,
vendors will be able to dis-
play up to 100 products on
the site; with the Abaco pack-
age, up to 200 products; and
with the Andros package,
more than 200 products.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PICADILLICA CIRCUS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PREVONLOUP LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KILMAMENE CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JINGER ROOT
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009



AD EERTUNGER



The stories behind the news

INSIGHT

Cs



How can we Satisfy the ‘spiritual, emotional and
mental hunger’ that exists in our people?

By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

he last time I wrote a col-

umn for Insight I dis-

cussed the need of

Bahamians to be "fed."
While we received many good
responses to the article I was
encouraged to explain more about
what I was referring to when I said
there was a deep hunger in our
nation.

The greatest human need is the
need to be fed. For many of us in
the Bahamas the concept of starva-
tion, real physical hunger is an alien
reality. But no doubt if physical
food is out of reach and we face
death through starvation, there is
no limit to the depths we would sink
in order to be nourished. We would
leave our place of birth, stand on
lines longer than we would tolerate
in better days, steal, beg, do
“demeaning” work, sell our most
treasured possessions, and sell our-
selves or perhaps our loved ones in
order to survive.

Despite the fact that the horrors
of this physical starvation are
removed from most of our realities,
several questions must be posed.
Among them are: Why are we steal-
ing? Why are we selling ourselves,
our loved ones? Why are we killing
ourselves and our loved ones?

We are doing this not out of phys-

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING

oe,
i hee

ical hunger but because of the spir-
itual, emotional and mental hunger
that exists in this city, on our islands
and in our people. As I said before,
this hunger lies like a gaping maw in
our existence, howling in a hollow
voice in the midst of our prosperity.
It is this hunger that leads many
Bahamians to feel that they cannot
make it, that they are not equipped
to make it and no one else but
(excuse the colloquialism) “them
and their ma” cares if they make it.

Increasingly Bahamians are
becoming unable to take advantage
of the opportunities in their own
county because of the shortfall in
the education system. There is a
growing sector of our society that
feels pushed out of the mainstream
because of the country from which
they or their parents originated. Our
youth, for a plethora of reasons, are
becoming increasingly angry, dis-
enfranchised and violent. And it's
not only the youth, it's their par-
ents as well who are feeling discon-
nected from, or dispossessed from
the Bahamas and its promise of
prosperity.

This dispossession is not mani-
festing itself in what I like to call
the dilly tree philosophers, the won-
derful men and women in our coun-
try who've been there, done that,
seen it and can tell you better than
can any book on Bahamian history.
It's not expressing itself in many of
the middle or affluent classes who

Well-refined.
Ne

are becoming more educated, more
"economically empowered" — the
phrase some people like to use—
and it is certainly not being
expressed in those movers and shak-
ers in the tourism industry, the judi-
ciary, in the political, or financial
sector.

This phenomenon of disposses-
sion is being expressed in the heart
of this island in those people who
are largely ignored, spoken about
jokingly as the "jungaless", looked
down upon as the unwed teenager,
the sneered at construction worker
who just spent the lion’s share of
his pay cheque in Hoffer and Sons,
the unemployable high school
senior.

They are the young men who we
see being trouped out of the prison
buses on weekdays, arrested on
weekends and cycled and recycled
through Her Majesty's Prison for
the rest of their lives. They are the
young people, and some not so
young, who use their body as chattel
to be traded for chattel, favour or
affection.

Our material wealth as a nation
has brought us no closer to being
the sand-bordered utopia that we
sell to tourists on our postcards than
it was 500 years ago.

Despite our material prosperity,
Bahamians are more afraid of one
another, less patient with one anoth-
er, less tolerant and less under-
standing. Despite the nation's mate-

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rial wealth we are not being fed as a
people. All people with some influ-
ence in this society, the media, the
church, the judiciary, all branches of
government, and our elected offi-
cials have become complicit in this.

Regardless, there is no other enti-
ty in this nation, or any other nation
for that matter, that is more power-
ful than the individual. Every able-
bodied citizen and resident of this
county can change things for the
better and in fact the institutions
that were mentioned before.

We must relieve our people of
this famine. We must not remove
ourselves from the people in the
sense that average concerns are not
our concerns, We must not believe
that we are a special sect, the digni-
fied and entitled, well connected
and privileged men and women, the
playground for the pedantic or pow-
erful. We must not create a bubble
around ourselves and lull ourselves
into thinking that if all is well with
me and my world, then all is well.

There is nothing that is played
out in the wider society that cannot
reach our homes.

We must become the enactors of
social change, the builders of social
consciousness. We must continu-
ously realise that we are no better
than the people with whom we exist.
We are no more powerful than they
are, no more entitled or special. If
our neighbour is weak, then we are
weak. If they lack, then we lack. I

have said this many times because I
believe it so strongly: The Bahamas
and the Bahamian stand on the cusp
of a great social change and how
we address these issues today will
determine whether this change will
be either cataclysmic or miraculous.

Every person can assist with
addressing this sense of desperation
and work for positive change. We
can help each other learn from our
mistakes and the mistake of others,
think and express ourselves prop-
erly and have a sense of responsi-
bility for each other. We must let
our people Know that no matter
how poor, uneducated or hopeless
they feel, they are Bahamians and
they are the only ones who can
build this nation.

As in every age, we have the
responsibility to keep the common
good uppermost in our minds so
that we can make informed deci-
sions to direct our actions. Working
for a just social order requires us
to become less insular or self-con-
tained. We must also be ready to
accept the realities of our society.
The truth is often ugly, uncomfort-
able, embarrassing, and inconve-
nient and may more often than not
be catering to the status quo.

But if we are to flourish and be
equipped with what we need to pur-
sue our authentic fulfilment, then
we must be armed with knowledge
enough to know what must be done
to save ourselves.

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

Hubble image shows debris from Jupiter collision

BALTIMORE (AP) — NASA's
Hubble Space Telescope is offering a
glimpse of atmospheric debris from
an object that plunged into Jupiter in
a rare collision with the planet.

Scientists used the telescope Thurs-
day to capture what they call the
"sharpest visible-light picture” so far
of the expanding gash.

rare.

Simon-Miller estimates the diameter
of the object that hit the planet was
the size of several football fields.

The debris possibly came from a
comet or asteroid that hit Jupiter.

NASA also says the new images
prove repairs done on the Hubble in
May were successful.

An amateur stargazer in Australia
spotted the impression last Sunday.

Space
Amy Simon-Miller of NASA's
Goddard Space Flight Center in

Greenbelt, Maryland, says the mag-
nitude of the impact is believed to be

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THE impact feature |
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small object that

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Jupiter...

(AP Photo: NASA)







NASA patches
air-purifying
system on
space station

By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL,
Fla. (AP) — A space station
air purifier was working again
Sunday after it shut down at
the worst possible time, when
company was still visiting and
had swollen the on-board
crowd to a record 13.

The repair by flight con-
trollers, albeit temporary,
came as a great relief to
NASA.

Even if the carbon dioxide-
removal system had remained
broken, shuttle Endeavour
would not have had to
undock early from the inter-
national space station, said
flight director Brian Smith.
But the system needs to work
to support six station residents
over the long term, he said.

The machine for cleansing
the station atmosphere, on the
US side of the sprawling out-
post, failed Saturday when it
got too hot and tripped a cir-
cuit breaker.

Flight controllers managed
to get the unit up and running
again 8 1/2 hours later in man-
ual mode. That means extra
people are needed in Mission
Control — six each day — to
handle the approximately 50
computer commands that
need to be sent up every few
hours.

Normally, the system runs
automatically. Smith said
engineers hope to come up
with a software solution soon
to have the system back in
automatic.

An air-cleansing system on
the Russian side of the sta-
tion is working fine. In addi-
tion, the station has about
three weeks’ worth of canis-
ters for removing the carbon
dioxide exhaled by six crew
members. The astronauts
would have relied on those
canisters to prevent an early
undocking of Endeavour, if
the US carbon-dioxide
removal machine not been
coaxed back into operation.

The shuttle and its crew of
seven will depart Tuesday, as
originally planned.

Before leaving, the shuttle

astronauts have their fifth and
final spacewalk to perform.

During Monday’s space-
walk, Christopher Cassidy
and Thomas Marshburn will
rearrange some power cable
hookups, fold down a piece
of popped-up insulation on a
small, dexterous robot arm,
and install TV cameras on the
brand new porch of Japan’s
space station lab.

“We're all keenly aware
that (spacewalks) carry some
risk to them, and so we’re
going to be very, very delib-
erate and careful,” said shut-
tle commander Mark Polan-
sky. “In my book, the last one
you do is always the one that
you have to watch out for the
most.”

After experiencing elevated
carbon dioxide levels on the
past two spacewalks, astro-
naut Christopher Cassidy
promises to take it nice and
slow Monday. His first space-
walk last week had to be cut
short because of the problem.

Mission Control has urged
Cassidy to rein himself in, not
so easy for a former Navy
SEAL.

“Yes, I am taking quite a
bit of teasing about this,” Cas-
sidy said at a news conference
as his crewmates erupted in
laughter. “I have a whole lot
of confidence in the suit and
the system there. ... It’s not
like you leave them out on
the loading dock overnight or
anything.”

A spare carbon-dioxide
removal system for the space
station, meanwhile, will be
launched at the end of August
on the next shuttle flight, a
plan put in place long before
this weekend’s trouble.

NASA has wrapped up
extensive testing of the foam
insulation on the fuel tank for
that mission, and so far every-
thing looks to be in good
shape. Engineers wanted to
make sure that the insulation
was attached properly after
considerable foam was lost
during Endeavour’s July 15
launch. The tests delayed Dis-
covery’s mission by a week.

Liftoff is now targeted for
August 25 at the earliest.

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THE TRIBUNE



Jamaica targets child
porn with new bill

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico
(AP) — Legislators in
Jamaica have tentatively
approved a bill that would
crack down on the posses-
sion, production and distri-
bution of child pornography.

The government says the
bill makes child pornography
a separate crime punishable
by up to 20 years in prison
and more than $5,000 in
fines.

People linked to child
pornography previously had

to be prosecuted under other
statues, such as carnal abuse.

The bill, approved by the
Senate on Friday, is needed
to better protect children,
according to a government
statement issued Saturday.

The House of Represen-
tatives is expected to debate
the bill next week.

Jamaica recently strength-
ened laws regarding other
sexual offenses and created
the island's first sex-offender
registry.

Programme aims to
boost food production

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Jamaica says it has thou-
sands more acres of former mining sites that can be converted
into fields under a programme aimed at boosting food pro-

duction.

Mining Minister Laurence Broderick says the plan aims to
ease poverty following a recent World Bank report that found
rural areas remain impoverished.

He says the state owns more than 5,000 hectares (12,000
acres) of land once mined for bauxite that can be converted.

He said Friday in a statement that some 3,000 hectares (7,400
acres) have already been converted and yield more than 700,000
pounds (318,000 kilograms) annually of cauliflower, pumpkin,

sweet pepper and other crops.

Jamaica is one of the world's top producers of bauxite, the

main ore in aluminum.

Widow of Jamaica’s first PM dies at 97

KINGSTON, Jamaica
(AP) — Gladys Bustamante,
the widow of Jamaica's first
prime minister and a staunch
supporter of women's and
workers’ rights, died Satur-
day. She was 97.

Bustamante died Saturday
at a hospital after suffering
from a fever, according to a
statement from the office of
current Prime Minister Bruce
Golding.

The cause of death was
unclear, although the govern-
ment said she had been con-
fined to her house for two
years.

"Lady B,” as Bustamante
was known, married Alexan-

der Bustamante in 1963, a
year after Jamaica was grant-
ed independence from
Britain.

She continued to work for
the Jamaica Labour Party
long after her husband died
in 1977.

"Lady B" also was a mem-
ber of the Bustamante Indus-
trial Trade Union and volun-
teered with non-profit groups
to help impoverished families,
the government news agency
said.

Alexander Bustamante was
named a national hero, an
honour bestowed to a select
few including black civil rights
leader Marcus Garvey.

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MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009, PAGE 3C

INSIGHT

SS)
BANCO

ESPIRITO
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AUDITORS’ REPORT
CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(ISSUED BY THE STATUTORY AUDITOR, A CMVM REGISTERED AUDITOR)

(This report is a free translation to English from the original Portuguese version)

Introduction

1. In accordance with the applicable legislation, we present our Audit Report on the
financial information included in the Report of the Board of Directors and in the
accompanying consolidated financial statements as at and for the year ended 31
December 2008, of Banco Espirito Santo, S.A., which comprise the consolidated
balance shect as at 31 December 2008 (showing total consolidated assets of Euro
75,186,728 thousand and total equity attributable to the equity holders of the Bank of
Euro 4,499,435 thousand, including a net profit attributable to the equity holders of the
Bank of Euro 402,284 thousand), the consolidated statements of income, the consolidated
statement of changes in equity, and the consolidated statement of cash flows for the year
then ended, and the corresponding notes to the accounts.

Responsibilities

2. The Board of Directors is responsible for:

a) the preparation of the consolidated financial statements in accordance with the
International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as adopted by the European
Union, that present fairly, the consolidated financial position of the Bank, the
consolidated results of its operations, its consolidated changes in equity and its
consolidated cash flows;

b) maintaining historical financial information, prepared in accordance with generally
accepted accounting principles which is complete, true, current, clear, objective and
lawful as required by the Stock Exchange Code (“Cédigo dos Valores Mobilidrios”),

c) the adoption of adequate accounting policies and criteria;
d) maintaining an appropriate system of internal control; and

e) the communication of any relevant matter that may have influenced the activity of the
bank and its subsidiaries, their financial position or results.

3. Our responsibility is to verify the consolidated financial information included in the
above referred documents, namely as to whether it is complete, true, current, clear,
objective and lawful as required by the “Cédigo dos Valores Mobilidrios”, in order to
issue a professional and independent opinion based on our audit.

Scope

4, We conducted our audit in accordance with the Technical Standards and Guidelines
issued by the Portuguese Institute of Statutory Auditors (“Ordem dos Revisores Oficiais
de Contas”), which require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable
assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material
misstatements. Accordingly our audit included:

- verification that the financial statements of the companies included in the
consolidation have been properly audited and, in those significant cases in which they
were not, verification, on a test basis, of the information underlying the figures and its
disclosures contained therein, and an assessment of the estimates, based on the
judgements and criteria defined by the Board of Directors, used in the preparation of
the referred financial statements;

- verification of the consolidation procedures and of the application of the equity
method;

- evaluation of the appropriateness of the accounting policies used and of their
disclosure, taking into account the applicable circumstances;

- assessing the applicability of the going concern basis of accounting:

- assessment of the appropriateness of the overall presentation of the financial
statements; and

- assessment of whether the consolidated financial information is complete, true,
current, clear, objective and lawful.

Our audit also included the verification that the consolidated financial information
included in the Report of the Board of Directors is consistent with the consolidated
financial statements presented.

un

6. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

Opinion

Ts In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly in all
material respects the consolidated financial position of Banco Espirito Santo, S.A. as at
31 December 2008, the consolidated results of its operations, consolidated changes in
equity and consolidated cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with the
International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as adopted by the European Union,
and the information contained therein is complete, true, current, clear, objective and
lawful.

A copy of the Annual Report may be obtained from Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, Ansbacher House, Bank Lane, Nassau, Bahamas.


et

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST





~.

A] INDEX NG
















fi

MONDAY, JULY 27TH 2009, PAGE 7C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



MARINE FORECAST






















Z Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
i es — — _ we High = Low ~W High Low W NASSAU Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 84° F
: - — of PP én i 0| 1 | 2|3 \4 [5 i 8| oft Fic OFC Fic FC Tuesday: __E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 84° F
iP é — te , |) Acapulco 88/31 79/26 t 88/31 80/26 ¢ FREEPORT Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 84° F
wm en e — el a Low | MODERATE | HIGH | V.HIGH | EXT Amsterdam 70/21 56/13 + 70/21 56/13 pe Tuesday: Eat 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 84° F
k m ORLANDO A Ankara, Turkey 83/28 49/9 pe 80/26 47/8 Ss ABACO Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 85° F
High: 91° F/33°C i wg Partly sunny and Partly cloudy, a Mostly cloudy, a Some sun with a Periods of sun, a Partly sunny, a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 92/33 73/22 s 90/32 72/22 s Tuesday: _ E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 85° F
rs Cae F/24°C ae breezy. t-storm; breezy. t-storm: breezy. couple of t-storms. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 56/13 44/6 s 57/13 51/10 pc
: 5 t ‘anil . Hi h: Q1° Hi h: 941° Hi h: 91° Hi h: 89° Bangkok 91/32 79/26 t 89/31 79/26 t
1 @ 8 de ade ane IQn: 91 IM. JT Me Ie I. OF Barbados 86/30 76/24 96/30 77/25 r MMA) Vacs | Bt) GS
TAMPA ly High: 90 Low: 80 Low: 80 Low: 82 Low: 80 Low: 80 TIDES FOR Nassau Barcelona 80/26 68/20 s 80/26 67/19 s
eu i. r, CsA Ur Beijin 84/28 64/17 s 90/32 64/17 5
High: 91° F/33° C toi 104° F 96°-88° F 100°-90° F 103°-85° F 97°-88° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft. US
-7f° ° j 5 as : : a — - - —— Beirut 81/27 77/25 s 81/27 77/25 s
Low: 76° F/24°C ryt - The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Tod 12:22am. 27 6:28am. -0.1
» “ - elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. ee 12:57pm. 3.0 7:12pm. 0.2 Belgrade 85/29 62/16 pc 91/32 67/19 s
@ i sale mes pal 7 Berlin 81/27 63/17 pc 72/22 55/12 c
7 = CU ne Tuesday 4am. 25 Tivam 0. Bermuda 81/27 75/23 s 81/27 74/23 s ~ Billings
a 1, , | = 52pm. 29 8:11pm. 04 Bogota 68/20 43/6 pc 69/20 44/6 pc
) ei 7 Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Wednesday209am. 23 810am. 02 Brussels 77/25 47/8 sh 72/22 53/11 pe
| 1 ABACO Temperature 251p.m. 28 9:41pm. 05 Budapest 86/30 62/16 s 93/33 63/17 s
, | 5 * jah: 4° ° HIGH: sess sasedvssseslacettonacecsiediared leaecbanes 93° F/34° C : ; Buenos Aires 59/15 41/5 s 5713 383s
| - 1 hel F/aa G Low 73° F/26°¢ ‘Thursday Fe ee ea oe Cairo 104/40 77/25 s 102/88 77/25 s aDenver
- Cy Low: 79° F/26°C Normal high... gee rsi2¢ PEE Calcutta 93/33 82/27 t 94/34 83/28 t
od i wy Normal low 75° F/24° C Calgary 75/23 50/10 pc 68/20 50/10 t
é ofa The: @ WEST PALM BEACH a Last years NUD saccuhseiacieranesi 93° F/34° C Sun AND Moon ene 93/33 74/23 pe 90/32 75/23 pc eetateios
’ —— High: 91° F/33°C ae Last year's lOW oes 77° F/25° C " Caracas 80/26 72/22 t 82/27 71/21 t 86/66
omg Low: 77° F/25°C a Precipitation Sunrise... ... 6:35 am. Moonrise ...12:18p.m. Casablanca 89/31 70/21 s 91/32 73/22 s 85/69)
~~
¢ r. FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT ~f As of 2 p.m, yesterday v.eccccscccscsscssssssesessesee 0.00" Sunset....... 7:57 p.m. Moonset....11:46 p.m. Copenhagen 72/22 60/15 sh 71/21 54/12 c
Ai . 1 Year to date .. 20. i Dublin 64/17 50/10 sh 6317 52/1 6
—. : o£ 99° : f First Full Last New u
mm High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date .......c.ccsecscssessseseeeeseeee 23.84 : as - Frankfurt 86/30 57/13 pc 77/25 57/13 5
Low: 79° F/26°C — Low: 77° F/25°C Eo F a ie Geneva 84/28 59/15 t 79/26 55/12 pe
a. AccuWeather.com oe im ee Halifax 67/19 59/15 po 75/23 58/14 c Siow Miami
o @ q Forecasts and graphics provided by : — hy Havana 91/32 74/23 sh 90/32 74/23 sh T-storms 91/79
: : MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 28 Aug. 5 Aug.13 Aug. 20 Helsinki 72/22 55/12 pe 73/22 55/12 s Rain Eronte
- High: 91° F/33° C Hong Kong 90/32 81/27 t 90/32 81/27 t [a Flues Cold
all Low: 79° F/26°C NASSAU High: 91° F/33° C Islamabad 110/43 86/30 s 108/42 84/28 s eS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and Vs erecnis
be ; Fe 3 Low: 79° F/26°C SET 93/28 67/19 s 34/28 BEB s Be Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. arm
pt ree c . Neeicalei 88/31 64/17 s 87/30 65/18 s [v_Â¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mega
=a ow: 80° F/27°
; a — Co hams 1g gas srg 308s a5] 08 BN 1s 26GB 6s 70 6 AAT
KEY WEST a , CATISLAND Kingston 89/31 78/25 sh 90/32 78/25 sh
High: 90° F/32°C i 4 3 - Lima 73/22 60/15 s 73/22 59/15 s
Low: 80° F/27°C Bee rnaee London 71/21 51/10 + 70/21 57/13 pc
j - ¥ ow: Madrid 99/37 66/18 s 99/37 68/20 s
@ 7 , Manila 86/30 77/25 r 84/28 79/26 +r in es - ke 16 A NJ im | N S B RA N ‘é F
P ; =} Mexico City 75/23 53/11 t 74/23 55/12 t .
———-~ Monterrey 105/40 74/23 pc 110/43 75/23 s
Z > : GREAT EXUMA — SAN SALVADOR Montreal 77/25 63/17 t 82/27 68/20 pc .
all, i High: 87° F/31°C High: 88° F/31°C Moscow 74/23 54/12 + 71/21 59/15 pc ,
Low: 79° F/26° C Low: 76°F/24°C Munich 86/30 61/16 s 76/24 48/8 pc > “a
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | . Nairobi _ 78/25 53/11 ¢ 79/26 54/12 sh ! rr
highia’and tonights's lows: ve High: 91° F/33°C New Delhi 90/32 79/26 t 91/32 77/25 pe ae) u an e OW nN
: i Paris 74/23 54/12 sh 77/25 59/15 pe A a
i Prague 82/27 63/17 pc 72/22 53/11 pc f Way y I lur r cane
ee ao aes we ne De ;
High: 90° F/32° C la $ s 7
: "77° ‘0 Rome 86/30 67/19 s 88/31 68/20 s Or you can rest Casy knowing
Low: 77° F/25° C 4
Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 90/32 81/27 sh 91/32 81/27 s that yo have excellent Insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 91° F/33°C San Juan 57/13 32/0 s 64/17 33/0 s CO race no matter which
Fc FIC Fic FIC Fic F/C Fic FIC FIC FIC Fic FIC ru Low: 75° F/24°C San Salvador 89/31 74/23 s 89/31 74/23 pe th rate d bl :
Albuquerque 92/33 70/21 t 92/33 67/19 c Indianapolis 85/29 66/18 s 88/31 68/20 t Philadelphia 88/31 72/22 t 88/31 72/22 t CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS Santiago S713 37/2 s 63/17 398 s Way e win OWS.
Anchorage 68/20 57/13 r 72/22 56/13 s Jacksonville 92/33 71/21 t 92/33 74/23 t Phoenix 111/43 89/31 s 111/43 88/31 s Han ree . aaa aaa a ome 7 ice a -
Atlanta 85/29 69/20 t 88/31 71/21 t KansasCity 92/33 70/21 pc 86/30 5915 t Pittsburgh 82/27 61/16 pc 87/30 66/18 pc RAGGEDISLAND — Ulish:92°F/33° ao Paulo s ‘-
Atlantic City 88/31 72/22 t 88/31 71/21 t Las Vegas 109/42 83/28 +s 110/43 87/30 s Portland, OR 101/38 65/18 s 102/38 65/18 eno Low: 77° F/25°C cl a Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 88/31 68/20 t 88/31 70/21 t Little Rock 91/32 72/22 pc 84/28 70/21 t Raleigh-Durham 90/32 71/21 t 91/32 71/21 t Low:74°F/23°C aa _ ee ee - Ae er 7
Boston 84/28 69/20 t 87/30 71/21 pc Los Angeles 86/30 66/18 s 84/28 64/17 $s St. Louis 90/32 72/22 s 91/32 68/20 t . a. a ae 91/32 79/26 Ps 93/33 81/27 Se
Buffalo 76/24 65/18 pc 84/28 67/19 pc Louisville 88/31 68/20 pce 90/382 71/21 pc Salt Lake City 92/83 64/17 pce 88/81 63/17 s GREATINAGUA Tala 82/27 75/23 sh 93/28 78/25 4
Charleston, SC 91/32 74/23 t 89/31 74/23 t Memphis 93/33 73/22 pe 87/380 71/21 t San Antonio 98/36 76/24 pce 98/86 79/26 s High: 93° F/34° C Tara 73/22 61/16 pe 81/27 63/17 t
Chicago 85/29 68/20 pc 84/28 64/17 t Miami 91/32 79/26 t 91/32 81/27 t San Diego 77/25 67/9 pce 74/23 67/19 pc 08 3 ss :
Cleveland 81/27 64/17 pc 89/31 69/20 pc Minneapolis 96/30 63/17 t 77/25 57/13 pc SanFrancisco 73/22 56/13 pc 70/21 56/13 pc Low: 78° F/26"G mea eae ans is oe ey a (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 90/32 74/23 t eee 2 Nashville 89/31 67/19 pce 88/81 71/21 t Seattle 94/34 63/17 $s 96/35 63/17 s Vienna 84/28 68/20 pc 93/28 62/16 pc Bahar: Abaco Eleuthera Exum
Denver 90/32 55/12 t 75/23 53/11 t New Orleans 89/31 76/24 t 88/31 77/25 t Tallahassee 91/32 71/21 t 94/34 72/22 t Warsaw 72/22 59/15 pc 81/27 54/12 ¢ 5f-3500 Tat (242) 387-4004 Tek (242) 322-2882 Tek (242) 306-2004
Detroit 85/29 66/18 t 87/30 67/19 t New York 87/30 73/22 t 88/31 76/24 t Tampa 91/32 76/24 t 91/32 77/25 t Winnipeg 72/29 55/12 sh 66/18 52/11 pc
Honolulu 89/31 77/25 pc 89/31 76/24 s OklahomaCity 92/33 70/21 pc 90/32 68/20 t Tucson 105/40 82/27 s 105/40 82/27 s Weather (W): 6-6uti
: 1S: y, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
Houston 92/33 76/24 t 91/32 76/24 t Orlando 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23 t Washington, DC 88/31 73/22 t 89/31 73/22 t storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace


PAGE 8C, MONDAY, JULY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Castro says Cuba must
put land to better use

By WILL WEISSERT
Associated Press Writer

HOLGUIN, Cuba (AP) — Raul Castro said
Sunday that the global economic crisis means
tougher times ahead for Cuba, but the country
has no one to blame but itself for poor farm
production that leads to frequent shortages
of fruits, vegetables and other basics.

In a speech marking Revolution Day, Cuba's
president said the island can't pin all its prob-
lems on Washington's 47-year-old trade
embargo. He implored Cubans to take better
advantage of a government programme begun
last year to turn unused state land over to pri-
vate farmers.

"The land is there, here are the Cubans," he
said, pounding the podium. "Let's see if we get
to work or not, if we produce or not, if we
keep our word."

The line did not get much of a response
from a crowd not thrilled about working under
the island's scorching tropical sun, but the 78-
year-old Castro called agricultural production
Cuba's top priority and a matter of national
security.

"It is not a question of yelling ‘Fatherland or
death! Down with imperialism! The blockade
hurts us,’" he said, referring to US sanctions
begun in 1962. "The land is there waiting for
our efforts." He made almost no other mention
of the United States.

Three years since the last time his 82-year-
old brother Fidel was seen in public, the
younger Castro showed signs he is getting
more comfortable with national addresses,
opening with a joke about how whoever
designed the stage failed to provide any shade
for the speaker or the crowd. He later har-
pooned his own Agricultural Ministry, asking
how previous Cuban generations managed to
ever grow even a single mango tree if all state
advisers do today is say there's no money for
reforestation.

Tens of thousands of supporters, most wear-
ing red T-shirts or caps, filled a grassy plaza
dotted with red and black "July 26" flags. Rev-
olution Day, the top holiday for the communist
government, commemorates the date in 1953
when the Castros led an attack on the Mon-
cada army barracks in the eastern city of San-
tiago. The attack was a disaster, but Cubans
consider it the beginning of the revolution that
culminated with dictator Fulgencio Batista's
ouster on New Year's Day 1959.

Unlike in his last two holiday speeches, Raul
Castro did not address the crowd with a sculp-

a.
Ss
o
=
os
&
o
CS
td
—
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3
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PRESIDENT Raul Castro yesterday delivers a speech in Holguin, northeast of Cuba. July 26, Cuba’s Day
of National Rebellion, marks a new anniversary of the attack against Moncada military complex, where a
band of rebels, led by Fidel and Raul Castro, launched the attack 56 years ago, planting the seeds for the
1959 Cuban revolution. Holguin was selected to host the main July 26, 2009, celebration.

ture or banner of his brother's face nearby.
Instead, an eight-story tall banner on a build-
ing behind the crowd featured a picture of
both Castros thrusting their arms skyward
under the words "The Vigorous and Victorious
Revolution Keeps Marching Forward."
Despite Cubans’ hopes for change after Raul
formally took over as president in February
2008, economic reforms that were supposed to
ease life on the island have been slow to come.
Meanwhile, Cuba's economy has been ham-
mered by the global economic crisis, and US

relations have not improved much under Pres-
ident Barack Obama.

Raul Castro "was working to improve things,
but with all that's happened with the economy
in the world, the effect has been minimal,"
said Silvia Hernandez, a retired commercial
analyst for a state-run firm in Holguin, where
Castro spoke. Castro has asked Cubans to be
patient as he implements "structural changes"
to a struggling economy more than 90 per cent
controlled by the state. He also has said he'd
be willing to meet with US leaders over any

issue — including the country's political pris-
oners and human rights record, though he did
not mention that Sunday.

Officials from Cuba and the US discussed
immigration this month for the first time since
2003. The Obama administration lifted restric-
tions on Cuban-Americans who want to trav-
el or send money to the island. But Washing-
ton has said it wants to see small political or
economic reforms before going further.

"The other side doesn't want to do any-
thing,” said housewife Elena Fuentes, 73, refer-
ring to the Obama administration. "We've
been like this for 50 years. That's too long.
They talk about ‘change,’ but the change we
want is for things to get better with the United
States."

In recent months, the government has
ordered lights and air conditioners turned off
at banks, stores and other government insti-
tutions and closed state-run businesses and
factories early to conserve oil — even though
Venezuela sends the island about 100,000 bar-
rels of crude a day at favourable prices.

Farming and land reform have bolstered
production of vegetables somewhat, but gov-
ernment money problems have delayed
imports of other food, causing shortages of
basic staples such as cooking oil.

Castro said that since state officials began
doling out unused state land to private farmers
and cooperatives, 82,000 applicants have
received more than 1.7 million acres — near-
ly 40 per cent of fallow state land. The pro-
gramme bets private interests can revive an
agricultural sector crippled by decades of gov-
ernment mismanagement.

He also said Sunday that government lead-
ers will meet in coming days to assess the affect
of the global crisis on Cuba's economy, " par-
ticularly the significant reduction of income
from exports.”

Oscar Espinosa Chepe, a state-trained econ-
omist who became a dissident anti-commu-
nist and was jailed in 2003, said Castro has
failed to keep his promises as president.

"He knows times have changed, but ... he
hasn't confronted the very strong inertia with-
in the government,” said Espinosa Chepe.

Cuba's free health care and subsidized food
and housing do little to soften the sting of fur-
ther belt-tightening in a country where nearly
everyone works for the state and the average
wage is less than $20 per month.

"More steps against the crisis, more adjust-
ments, aren't going to be easy,” said Reina
Delgado, a 70-year-old retiree.