Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
=~ Lhe [Tribune a

SNACK WRAP Pm lowin’ it

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

=-USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009

Some fishy
business

HIGH 92F
LOW 81F

” MOSTLY SUNNY
WITH T-STORM





Volume: 105 No.201




x,

Tuan we

|

in Nassau
SEE PAGE TWELVE



FNM
chairman

dubbed
a failure

ELEMENTS within the
Free National Movement
claim that their chairman
Johnley Ferguson is not per-
forming up to the standard
expected of him and have
gone as far as calling his last
two years in office a “dismal
failure.”

Yesterday, a high ranking

official of the FNM, who
spoke on condition of
anonymity, said she fully
expects for people to chal-
lenge Mr Ferguson for his
post at the party’s convention,
which is to take place in Octo-
ber.

“This position is simply too
important for anyone to be
pussy-footing around with.
Johnley has been the chair-
man since the elections. I

can’t remember the exact
date, but that isn’t important
right now.

Mi Passengers jump for lives from windows vo

enator
B® Out-of-control bus stops feet from harbour | ‘may have
Wi Two taken to hospital with leg injuries



conflicting
interests’

MINISTER of Environ-
ment Dr Earl Deveaux has
suggested that Opposition
Senator Jerome Fitzgerald
may have conflicting interests
in his opposition to Govern-
ment's planned move of the
country's container port to
Arawak Cay due to the sena-
tor's old plans to build a
reverse osmosis (RO) water
plant at the site.

But Mr Fitzgerald called
these arguments invalid. He
said it was public knowledge
that the then PLP govern-
ment vetoed the idea of the
RO plant at Arawak Cay,
instead choosing the Perpall
Tract site in 2006.

SEE page seven

Govt criticised
over financial
services cuthacks

THE Bahamas Financial
Services Union (BFSU) stat-
ed yesterday that government
is failing to inform the public
of the number of cutbacks
that are being experienced in
their sector.

In a statement issued to the
media, the BFSU said that
employers at banks, trust
companies, insurance compa-
nies, and law firms were mov-
ing ahead with restructuring
exercises that have led to

ROUTE OF OUT-OF-CONTROL BUS




Photo: Alison Lowe/Tribune staff
BUS DRAMA: The aftermath of the jit-
ney terror ride which ended just feet
short of Nassau Harbour, next to Senor
Frogs. Police are waiting to speak to

the driver. (8) reeds Arden wen





Weowces Modgare idk






By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

PASSENGERS fearing for
their lives leapt from the win-
dows of an out-of-control jit-
ney that was heading for the
waters of Nassau Harbour
during morning traffic yester-
day.

Police were waiting to
speak with the driver of the
packed bus — licensc plate

PAS aaa UNS Em CT

NP 398 — yesterday after-
noon after he was reported to
have left the scene as the vehi-
cle came to a halt just feet
from the harbour’s edge next
to Senor Frogs.

Two young men, who
police have not identified,

SEE page two




Feedanck 5



NASSAU AND BAHAMI/

ISLANDS) LEADING NEWSPAPER



downsizing or “right-sizing”
on a scheduled time frame so
that there is little resemblance
to the large redundancies
found in the hotel sector.

This tactic, the union said, is
designed to hoodwink the
public into “not noticing” the
large number of layoffs that
these companies would be
performing.

SEE page seven



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009



LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



JITNEY RIDE OF TERROR

Passengers jump for their lives

From the beginning of the corner, I

thought the bus driver was fighting, but
then they say the brakes gave way on the
bus.”



Alison Lowe/Tribune staff

THE MALE RESTROOMS where it can be seen that the bus crashed into the steps, destroying them com-
pletely.

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FROM page one

were taken to hospital with
leg injuries sustained as a
result of the incident.

“T could see they were in
pain,” said bystander Larry
McDonald, who runs a stall
where he makes and sells
wood carvings right next to
where the bus stopped.

While police have yet to
confirm the information,
shaken passengers claimed
the Number 21 bus, which
services downtown, Wulff
Road and Collins Avenue,
lost its brakes on Government
Hill sometime before 8am.

The Clarkes Bus Service jit-
ney then careened down
Cumberland Street on to Bay
Street, before veering off on
to the narrow street that leads
to Woodes Rodgers Walk and
Nassau Harbour, creating
panic for passengers who
feared they were about to be
thrown into the water.

As a result, passengers
hurled themselves out of the
bus windows on to the
ground, Mr McDonald told
The Tribune.

“The bus almost wiped out
a woman’s car on the way
down,” added the vendor.

When The Tribune reached
Woodes Rodgers Walk at
around 9.15am the bus, which
had significant damage to
both sides just above the
headlights, scrapes down the
side, and its right hand front
wheel blown — was still wait-
ing to be moved from the
scene.

Thankful

Nearby officers said they
were thankful that the poten-
tially deadly incident took
place early in the morning as
otherwise the resulting casu-
alties would likely have been
greater.

Many Straw Market ven-
dors said they were not yet at
their stalls when the incident
occurred, but some outside
the market told of having to
jump out of the path of the
oncoming vehicle.

Others who were inside the
market reported hearing a
loud “scraping sound” as the
jitney crashed into the steps
outside the male restrooms,
destroying them completely,
before coming to a halt half
way around the north west
corner of the market.

By the time it stopped, Mr
McDonald said he saw at least
“eight or nine” passengers
strewn on the ground.

Most passengers were not
seriously injured and were
able to dust themselves off
and continue to their destina-
tions.

“From the beginning of the
corner, I thought the bus dri-
ver was fighting, but then they
say the brakes gave way on
the bus.

“(The bus) knocked on the
side of the building and peo-
ple started jumping out all
around here. They thought
they were going to be dead.

“One big fat woman she fall
down there (pointing to the
sidewalk in front of Senor
Frogs).

“T know she hurt, but she
get up because she had to go
to work.

“The driver get out and he
break off running that way,”
said Mr McDonald, pointing
east on Woodes Rodgers
Walk.

The jitney was removed
from the area before 10am
and according to a police
source, will now be taken for
testing in an effort to confirm
the cause of the accident.

The Tribune attempted to
reach the owner of the
Clarke’s bus franchise, how-
ever, it had no phone listing,
and calls to the Road Traffic

Latest drama
puts heat on

Government

People question what is being
done to control public transport

\ N / HILE the cause of the latest jitney dra-

ma is as yet unconfirmed, the down-
town incident caused concerned citizens to ques-
tion what government is doing to bring the pub-
lic transportation system under control after
years of near misses and tragic endings.

For too long, jitneys have been operated in a
way that often endangers public safety and turns off
potential passengers, said a member of the public
who contacted The Tribune last night. (See story
page 1).

The Tribune’s archives reveals a lengthy history
of incidents and complaints involving jitneys,
including the death of Faith Mackey, a six-year-old
girl struck by a jitney on Carmichael Road in 2006,
a hit and run involving a cyclist, claims of racism
and refusals to pick up disabled passengers.

It also shows how years of statements, dating
back to 2005, indicating the need and support for
reform of the public trans-
portation system —- in
August 2007, former min-
ister of works Earl
Deveaux described riding
on a jitney as a “horrifying
experience” for some —
have not yet culminated in
any apparent progress in
this regard.

As early as 2006, drivers
and bus franchise owners
expressed their support for
a government plan to
implement a “unified” bus
system that would bring all bus operators under one
entity, in which private owners and the govern-
ment would have a stake.

Modelled

The plan — to be modelled on other bus systems
in the region and the world — was ultimately
intended to improve the safety and reliability of bus
services, lessening the recklessness that has given
the industry a bad name, in this way encouraging
more people onto buses and lessening traffic con-
gestion. Governor General Arthur Hanna, in his
speech from the throne in 2006, declared that the
PLP Government would bring legislation to par-
liament to enact the plan.

However, despite proclamations throughout 2006
and 2007 that it was in the process of being “fine
tuned”, nothing happened.

Former works and transport minister Earl
Deveaux was a proponent of the view that a “Uni-
fied Bus System” would have little impact on the
service provided if other core issues were not
addressed, such as route rationalisation and the
professionalism of drivers.

In June 2008, Mr Deveaux, in conjunction with
the Road Traffic Department, the United Trans-
portation Company and the Public Transport Asso-
ciation, committed to a “100-day challenge” for
buses to improve their services — becoming more
courteous, reducing speed, cleaning up their vehi-
cles and stopping at designated sites.

Mr Deveaux said the challenge would have
“measurable” goals and results would be published
publicly. However, this did not happen.

In the meantime, Lucaya MP Neko Grant took
over aS minister with responsibility for transport
and the question of what is being done to reform
the public transportation system has not had any
further public commentary.

EARL DEVEAUX



Department, including con-
troller Philip Turner, seeking
contact details were not
returned.

Despite confirming that he
knew who operates the
Clarkes franchise, President
of the Public Transport Asso-
ciation Reuben Rahming,
declined to provide the name
of the franchise holder when
called.

He said that when he
returns from a trip off the

island on Sunday he should
get a “full report” on the mat-
ter.
eee

HAVE you had a danger-
ous ride on a jitney? Does the
whole operation need to be
brought under control? Per-
haps you think it should be
left to run as it is? If you have
any comments, write to Ali-
son Lowe at alowe@tribune-
media.net or telephone her on
322-1986.

Two Bahamians charged over guns seizure — Jamaican press

TWO Bahamians were
charged in connection with the
seizure of illegal guns found
aboard a boat in Jamaica last
week, according to the
Jamaican press.

The men, Desmond Hep-
burn, 29 and Glenroy Russell,

ee ee Bose
Oa A LL a
FAO Es

Py ba Cy
322-2157

37, both of Nassau were also
expected to be charged in a
Jamaican magistrate's court
yesterday for violating that
country’s immigration laws.

According to the Jamaica
Gleaner, the two men - who
were charged with breaching
the country's Firearm Act on
Wednesday - were taken into
custody last Saturday near the
St Ann/Trelawny border.

The men allegedly had two
illegal firearms in their pos-
session.

The Gleaner also reported

that last Saturday officers
from the Trans-national
Crimes and Narcotics Divi-
sion and the Jamaica Defence
Force Coast Guard carried
out a special operation off the
Rio Bueno coast.

During this exercise, they
intercepted a go-fast boat with
two guns on board - an intra-
tech submachine gun and an
M14 rifle with ammunition -
which were seized, reports
state. A third person suspect-
ed to be on the boat is report-
edly still sought by police.



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009, PAGE 3



Oil spill cleanup expected to begin tomorrow

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

REMOVAL of the 85ft
barge and excavators which
sank in the Exuma Land
and Sea Park should com-
mence tomorrow and be
completed within five days.

The Government has
allowed for a huge salvage
crane and barge towed by a
tug to travel from the Unit-
ed States straight to the site
off Cistern Cay and arrive
tonight or tomorrow morn-
ing at the latest.

Men arraigned
On possession
of marijuana

TWO MEN charged in
connection with the recent
seizure of $128,000 worth
of marijuana were
arraigned in Magistrates
Court yesterday.

Lameko Simmons, 23, of
Sea View Drive, and a 48-
year-old Bentley Simmons,
of Pinedale Grand
Bahama, appeared before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel
in Court 8, Bank Lane,
yesterday accused of pos-
sessing marijuana with the
intent to supply to another.
Court dockets claim the
accused were found in pos-
session of the drugs on
Wednesday, July 22.

Both men pleaded not
guilty to the marijuana
possession charge. Police
reportedly seized 128 and
half pounds of marijuana
while executing a search
warrant at an apartment
on Sea View Drive. The
drugs are estimated to
have a street value of
$128,500. Both men were
remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison and are
expected back in court on
July 28 for a bail hearing.

21-year-old man in
court for unlawful
intercourse

A 21-year-old man
accused of having unlawful
intercourse with a girl of 14
was arraigned in Magis-
trates Court Thursday.

Giovanni Brown
appeared before Magistrate
Ancella Williams in Court
6, Parliament Street. It is
alleged that sometime in
February 2009, the accused
had intercourse with the
girl.

Brown elected for a sum-
mary trial and pleaded not
guilty to the charge. He was
granted bail in the sum of
$9,500. The case has been
adjourned to August 28.

Operation expected to be
completed in five days

Customs officials will
meet the vessel at the site to
prevent any delay of the
urgent clean up.

Bahamas National Trust
(BNT) executive director
Eric Carey praised the Gov-
ernment for moving swiftly
to facilitate entry of the ves-
sel.

He said: “The crane has
the capacity to lift the barge

as well as lift the excavator
and the tractor underwater,
and the government has
fast-tracked approvals to
get it here.

“They are also allowing
for the vessel to go straight
to the site without the
requirement of checking in
with Customs in Bimini.

“And we are hoping it
will arrive (this) evening or

(tomorrow) morning; hope-
fully the complete salvage
should be finished in no
more than five days.”

The barge carrying two
excavators and a front-end
loader sank to the sea floor
in the shipping channel near
Cistern Cay, Exuma, at
around 3am on Wednesday,
July 15.

A crew of around four
people were rescued by
passing boats.

Up to 1,000 gallons of
diesel leaked from the ves-
sel, but favourable wind
conditions meant the



EAT Cookies, Not Turtles cookies will raise funds for the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group.

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

EDIBLE delights will raise
money for the Bahamas Sea
Turtle Conservation Group
at a delectable event in Palm-
dale this weekend.

Creative cake and cookie
bakery ‘Something’s Differ-
ent’ in Alexander Street, off
Rosetta Street, is hosting a
cookie decorating competi-
tion and selling turtle-themed
cookies on Saturday, August
1.

The event marks the day
the slaughter of sea turtles in
the Bahamas is expected to
be banned after 15 years of
lobbying by the Bahamas Sea
Turtle Conservation Group
(BSTCG) and environmen-
tally conscious Bahamians.

Sweet-toothed adults and
children are invited to enter a
raffle to win a three-dimen-
sional turtle cake, try turtle-
themed cupcakes and colour
in their own turtle cookies
with edible markers, and a
prize will go to the artist who
makes the best cookie.

And milk and coffee will
be served to help hungry cus-
tomers wash down the sweet
treats.

‘Something’s Different’
business owner Samantha
Moree, a mosaic artist, will

also lead the baking team in
creating an edible mosaic
made of over 200 cookie
pieces.

The mosaic, ‘Eat Cookies,
Not Turtles’, will be displayed
at Doongalik Art Gallery in
Marina Village, Paradise
Island, at a ‘Save the Turtles’
exhibition featuring a num-
ber of sea turtle related art-
works by over 20 Bahamian
artists.

Mrs Moree and her hus-
band and business partner Ian
Moree will also paint an ‘Eat
Cookies, Not Turtles’ mural
on the second storey of the
bakery building to mark the
event

Mrs Moree said: “Really
this is all about raising funds
and raising awareness, and
doing our part as an environ-
mentally sensitive company
to make people more aware
of the issue.

“We don’t know yet
whether the government will
pass the legislation before the
turtle hunting season opens
on August 1, but the more we
jump up and down about it
will help remind them and
give them a kick in the pants.”

A contribution of $1 per
cookie sold will be given to
the BSTCG to assist the cause
of preserving sea turtles.

Cookies also will be sold at
participating vendors includ-

ing the Doongalik Art
Gallery, and benefit the edu-
cation efforts of the Bahamas
Sea Turtle Conservation
Group.

The Doongalik art exhibi-
tion opening will take place
from 6pm to 9pm on Friday
August 7.

‘Eat Cookies, Not Turtles’
will be held from 10am to
3pm on Saturday, August 1.

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impact was minimal.

The diesel dissipated into
the ocean away from the
nearby Cistern Cay beach
and most of the oil has
evaporated, Mr Carey said.

Fortunately the barge,
two excavators, and front-
end loader, sank to the
seabed away from major
coral reefs and around 40
yards from the nearest coral
heads, the BNT executive
director added.

But as the barge sits
around four feet above the
surface at low tide, and the
excavators around four feet

below, the wreck poses a
major hazard for boats
passing through the area.
Barge owner Michael
Oakes will cover the cost of
the cleanup and the BNT is
investing a significant num-
ber of staff and other
resources to provide sup-
port for the project, Mr

Carey said.
The Port Department
and Royal Bahamas

Defence Force are also
assisting the operation
organised by Minister of the
Environment Earl
Deveaux.

‘Eat Cookies,
Not Turtles’

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays





THE UGLY TRUTH



THE ORPHAN



HARRY POTTER & HALF BLOOD



LLOVE YOU BETH COOPER



PUBLIC ENEMIES



IGE AGE: DAWN OF THE DINOSAURS



THE PROPOSAL



TRANSFORMER: REVENGE



MY SISTER’S KEEPER



TAKING PELHAM 123





6:10 8:25 | 10:025)



THE UGLY TRUTH

6:15 8:35 10:35



THE ORPHAN

6:00 8:20 10:40



HARRY POTTER & HALF

7:10 N/A 10:10



PUBLIC ENEMIES

7Hio NA 10:10



ICE AGE

6:00 8:30 N/A



TRANSFORMERS

N/A N/A 10:00





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Attorneys hold special
sitting for Burton Hall

PROMINENT and senior
members of the Bahamas’
legal fraternity gathered at the
Court of Appeal yesterday for
a special sitting to mark the
departure of Chief Justice Sir
Burton Hall.

Sir Burton who has been
nominated to become a per-
manent judge of the Interna-
tional Criminal Tribunal for
the former Yugoslavia is
expected to demit the office
of Chief Justice of the
Bahamas on August 7.

The ICTY, which was estab-
lished in 1993, is the first war
crimes court created by the
United Nations and the first
international war crimes tri-
bunal since the Nuremberg
and Tokyo tribunals, set up
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crimes that were perpetrated
during the Balkan conflicts of
the 1990s.

Court of Appeal President
Dame Joan Sawyer, Attorney
General Michael Barnett, Bar
Association president Ruth
Bowe-Darville, former presi-
dent Wayne Munroe and
attorney Damian Gomez who
described Sir Burton as a “trail
blazer”, all expressed their
thanks and gratitude to Sir
Burton for his years of service.

Sir Burton also expressed
his thanks to those in atten-

dance at the special sitting stat-
ing that he has enjoyed a high
level of co-operation and ser-
vice from judges on the bench
and expressed thanks to the
Bar for its co-operation and
courtesy shown to him during
his tenure as Chief Justice.

Sir Burton, 61, was appoint-
ed as Chief justice of the
Supreme Court on September
4, 2001.

He was appointed as a jus-
tice of the Supreme Court on
February 1, 1991, and was also
appointed as a justice of

appeal on April 1, 1997.

Sir Burton, 61, was awarded
a knighthood by Queen Eliza-
beth in 2001. He was called to
The Bahamas Bar in 1978 and
also served in the office of the
Attorney General and as solic-
itor general.

It is still unclear who will
replace Sir Burton as Chief
Justice. The chief justice is
appointed by the Governor
General on the recommenda-
tion of the Prime Minister
after consultation with the
leader of the opposition.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master




LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-





Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas

Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE

















www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama— more emphasis on restraint

WASHINGTON (AP) — At a critical
moment in his presidency, Barack Obama
finds increasing need to talk about taming
federal deficits as he struggles with a dour
economy.

It's not just that Republicans are keeping
up a relentless and punishing attack on his
health care overhaul and other spending pri-
orities. It's also that Americans are losing

Sonecon, an economic-consulting firm.
Obama is factual in saying he inherited a
trillion-dollar-plus deficit from predecessor
George W. Bush, "but he made it worse,"
Shapiro said. The deficit in the current bud-
get year is now estimated to come in at more
than $1.8 trillion, pushed higher by the stim-
ulus spending, bailouts and increasing war

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I write this letter to bring
awareness to The Bahamas
and Bahamian people. I was
a private school teacher for
15 years and was employed
at two different institutions
during this period.

I am not being biased but
simply honest. I worked at a
private school for 10 years as
a high school teacher.

The ratio of foreign teach-
ers to Bahamians was 85:15, I
would sit in the staff room
with disgust, listening to the
foreign teachers talk poorly
about the Bahamian students
and their parents.

One teacher from Guyana
even mentioned to me, “how



Concerned
about foreign
teachers

the students and when the
students informed their par-
ents they all (foreigners)
would gather together and tell
the parents a bunch of lies
about that particular student.

Ministry of Education

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net

dents come to school so that
she gets paid and sends
monies to her family back
home (Guyana).”

I left that institution to
work in another private
school that is closer to my
home in the west.

The ratio of foreign teach-
ers to this school was much
higher than the previous
school (90:10).

I could not believe it! The
foreign teachers spoke even
worse about the students and

beware when you give private
schools stipends please inves-
tigate the administrators, staff,
and persons working at the
Department of Immigration
because I am certain that
some of these “Christian
Schools” do not have, 300 stu-
dents to receive this grant and
employ unqualified and illegal
foreign teachers.

An advocate for good
teachers (Happy Birthday
Bahamas).

confidence in Obama's ability to lead an eco- Shapiro said he believes White House














































nomic recovery. Increasingly, they are wor- officials are taking the Republican attacks she does not care who failsor parents than the previous TEACHER
ried about their jobs and the impact of the very seriously. "They're also concerned about do not understand what is — school. What’s more, the for- Nassau,
nation's mushrooming debt on future gen- long-term deficits and the impact they could being taught, once the stu- eign teachers spoke down to July, 2009.

erations.

An Associated Press-GfK Poll shows pub-
lic confidence has reversed on whether the
president's $787 billion stimulus package,
passed by Congress in February, will ulti-
mately work to improve the economy.

In January, 58 per cent were confident it
would. Now, it's the opposite, with 58 per
cent saying they doubt the stimulus will bring
any significant improvement.

Forty-seven per cent still think it's too
early to pass final judgment on whether the
plan is working. But of those who say they
are decided, three times as many say the
stimulus has harmed the economy than those
who say it has helped.

Other polls have shown similar slippage
on Obama's economic stewardship, although
his overall approval rating remains solid —
55 per cent in the AP-Gfk poll conducted stimulus package. Nearly half, 49 per cent,
July 16-20. Still, that's down nine points from now say Obama is trying to change things too
April. quickly, up from 32 per cent in April. And 80

In contrast to the increasing public gloom, per cent are worried that increasing federal
many economists see fledgling signs of an debt will harm the future of their children
economic recovery and expect the recession and grandchildren.
to end late this year. But economists also The national debt — the total of accu-
know that, historically, job losses nearly mulated annual deficits — is currently $11.6
always continue long after a recession has trillion. Democratic pollster Mark Mellman
officially ended. said "there's no question that, over time, the

The darkening mood comes as Obama chief executive pays a price if things aren't
tries to rally public support for overhauling going well in the economy." While Obama's
America's health care system, his top leg- overall approval rating is still strong, "the
islative priority, but one expected to cost fact that it's declined makes it a little harder
about $1 trillion over 10 years. His mission is for him to wield the same kind of threat over
to convince the public and Congress that his Congress as he might have some months
health care plan will benefit Americans as ago,” Mellman said.
well as strengthen the economy in the long Some economists warn that this reces-
run. It's been a hard sell. sion is so deep, it may take much longer than

Fiscally conservative Democrats are scep- in the past for a rebound even after some
tical. And Republicans have seized on the economic growth resumes.
change in public sentiment to pound Obama Job losses have now wiped out all the job
for failing to create or save the jobs he gains since the last recession in 2001, the
promised while greatly overburdening the first time that has happened since the 1930s.
federal budget. South Carolina Republican Heidi Shierholz, an economist at the Eco-
Sen. Jim DeMint has predicted the health nomic Policy Centre, a labour-funded think
care legislation could be Obama's "Waterloo tank, noted that the jobless rate continued to
moment" and could break his presidency — rise for 19 months after the 2001 recession
a remark Obama now cites as the kind of was declared over.
partisan politics-as-usual in Washington he is "If the unemployment rate is still increas-

have on the economy and on the ability to act
two, three years down the road — which of
course is moving up to the re-election sea-
son," he said.

Obama clearly has been putting more
emphasis on the importance of getting spend-
ing under control even as he tries to prod a
recovery.

"We have to do what businesses and fam-
ilies do. We've got to cut out the things we
don't need to pay for the things we do,"
Obama said at a town-hall style meeting
Thursday in Shaker Heights, Ohio, a sub-
urb of Cleveland. The meeting followed a
prime-time news conference the night before
in which Obama sought to rally public sup-
port for his health plan.

The AP-Gfk poll showed that 61 per cent
of those surveyed oppose any additional

Why are Bahamian institutions being
targeted by people from the Caribbean?

EDITOR, The Tribune. be able to dictate immigrations laws? These
people would be coming in increased num-
Thank you for allowing me the opportu- bers, to take up positions of what will now
nity to address these few points. Recently, be businesses owned by their nationals.
there seemed to be a trend developing Monies as we have been seen exited the
among certain Caribbean countries seeking Bahamas, as an example the Clico situation
ownership of key Bahamian banks, insur- without prior knowledge of the government
ance companies, hotels, and other interests, or its agencies, will continue, these tactics are
unencumbered, I might add. a direct off shoot to our national security.
When one considers the levels of their How can the government(s) allow other
ambitions and the reality of what has already countries with their personal country’s objec-
changed hands, leaves a reasonably thinking tives make the kinds of footholds and
person with one question: Why? Could receive the kinds of advantages likely to
there be a blueprint somewhere in a_ dictate commerce/policies in the Bahamas?
Caribbean business office, highlighting the These people should not have the right
various key firms in the Bahamas that they to go after institutions in the Bahamas, no
need to target in order to achieve their matter what damage is done as a result. Any
objectives, whatever that might be? Bahamian who sides, agrees and assists a
Another thing, how will Bahamians ben- foreigner to either cause his own people
efit? If this be the case, I hope that the hardship, or to be disadvantaged or by com-
objectives are not to suck the life blood out — mon design, causes the laws of the land to be
of our people and have them denigrated to broken, that person or persons, is a traitor.
levels similar to Central American coun- God gave the Bahamas to Bahamians,
tries. The Bahamas has a population of | Jamaica to Jamaicans, Trinidad to Trinida-
around 400,000 people. We are asmall pre- _—_dians, etc. Incidentally, the Bahamas is not
dominantly blessed black nation. The — seeking to establish institutions in any of
Bahamas can ill-afford to surrender our the Caribbean countries mentioned.
cherished way of life to countries that have We have increased what God has given us,
populations well in the millions. but other Caribbean countries may not have
Why aren’t they targeting American insti- increased what God has given them.
tutions? German institutions? Venezuelan I believe that they are trying to take away
institutions? Haitian institutions? Cuban what our forefathers, grandparents, and par-
institutions? Russian institutions? ents have worked so hard for, but that dev-
What we have in the Bahamas is only _ ilisa liar.
enough for our people, after all 5,000 young Please hear me, the Bahamas does not
Bahamian graduates will be joining the job) ~=want what you have, nor can you have what
force this summer. We are a much smaller God has given the Bahamas to sustain its

seeking to end. ing, people are not going to feel good," Shier- nation than Jamaica, Barbados and Trinidad. —_ people.
"T think the Republican attack on the One need not look very far to figure out
deficit is succeeding because it's real," said what is happening here. FRANK GILBERT
Rob Shapiro, a former economic adviser to (This article was written by Tom Raum, If they are allowed to own the major com- Retired Policeman
President Bill Clinton, and chairman of an Associated Press writer). panies or institutions in the Commonwealth Nassau,
of The Bahamas, then by extension will they July, 2009.

Tackling Bay Street traffic pollution

EDITOR, The Tribune.

© (()) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit one website aft weew. cole da
TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian for the following posi-
tions for the 2009 - 2010 School Year.

Dean of St nt

T have read both your editorials on the revamping of Bay Street.
You are correct in saying the merchants must do their part in the
painting and the upkeep of their buildings. Not only do I agree that
something must be done about the traffic pollution, but I also
feel that the removal of the jitneys off Bay Street is essential.

I know the Nassau Downtown Partnership is doing a fine job, but
it needs immediate decisions from Government to move along. I
don’t understand why it takes so long to decide on meter parking
on Bay Street. We all know this would greatly improve the down-
town shopping situation by making it more easily accessible to both
local shoppers and tourists alike. We always hear, “Oh I don’t go
downtown because I can’t park,” and as a former merchant, I
know this is true. In every city, there is meter parking, so what is
the hold up? Let’s bite the bullet and get those meters on Bay
Street from Victoria Avenue to Navy Lion Road.

Chapter One Bookstore
will be closed from
July 27, 2009 to August 1, 2009,
for year-end inventory.

lt will reopen for business on
August 4, 2009,
Applicants must:

We apologize

A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing to : : :
for any inconvenience caused,

subscribe to the statement of Faith of Temple Christian

NICHOLAS KLONARIS
School. Mike’s
Shoe Store
: i : : Nassau,
B. Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or Higher from tC oe es Westeyan Church July 7, 2009.
a recognized College or University. : 3 ;
Pe ade eed Lack of pride in the environment
C. Possess excellent organization, Inter-personal Horth American EDITOR. The Tribune

communicative skills. At this time of year scores of Bahamians are showing their

national pride by wearing their national colours, flying the aqua-
marine, gold and black and participating in native events designed
to foster a sense of unity. Sadly, however, there are too many
misguided individuals, Bahamians or otherwise who have no pride
in themselves or their environment. Case in point, on June 28, 2009
at around 6pm while driving through the Westridge area the driver
of a blue van threw a bottle out of his vehicle.

What was most disturbing about this was the individual did this
in plain sight as a vehicle was directly behind him and also the bot-
tle was thrown on the perimeter of an owner occupied property.
This tells me that this person could not care less who saw him and
that this type of behaviour was normal for him.

It is high time that we get serious in this country about bringing
these ‘dirty minded’ people before the courts and prosecuting
them to the fullest extent of the law. There also needs to be an envi-
ronmental hot line where individuals can report this type of behav-
iour to the necessary authorities. Otherwise the concept of the
Bahamas being “green, clean and pristine” would continue to be
an unattainable dream..

Ce ee eee ee Pe

D. Be able to assist with all aspect of the Administration. Worship Time: 1] a.m.

E. Be able to discipline, counsel students. Prayer Time: 10:1 5a.m

F. Have high morals standards.

Church School during Worship Service

Application must be picked up at the High School Office
on Shirley Street 23rd July, 2009 and be returned with
the following: a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph, church affiliation, pastor’s name and three
references to:

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.. Hoa SS5651
Telephone number: 324-2538
‘Telefax number: S24-23587

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas "TOW?
Deadline for application is July 30th, 2009

DAILY OBSERVER
Nassau,
July 8, 2009.



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009, PAGE 5



Turks and Caicos govt cracks down on spending

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

ALL political appointees in the
Turks and Caicos are set to lose
their jobs following a crack down
on spending.

Premier Galmo Williams made
the announcement yesterday as he
revealed that Government revenue
has dropped from an average of
approximately $18 million per
month last year to approximately
some $9 million per month this

year. Mr Williams said the deci-
sion, taken on the advice of the
Ministry of Finance “to better
enable the Government to work
within the constraints of its ever
shrinking revenue intake”, would
take effect as of September 30.
“Given the slowing in the econ-
omy, I have wrestled with this
decision long and hard, and regret
having to take this position, espe-
cially as we are aware that this
move could have a seriously neg-
ative impact on the many persons

Bahamas seeks Colombian
support on UN initiatives

THE Bahamas has asked
Colombia for support in a num-
ber of United Nations initiatives,
as both countries seck to strength-
en diplomatic relations.

Governor-General, His Excel-
lency Arthur Hanna, made the
appeal as His Excellency Ventura
Emilio Diaz-Mejia presented his
Letters of Credence as Ambas-
sador of the Republic of Colom-
bia, at Government House, July
23

The Bahamas wants Colombia
to support its candidacies to the
UN Economic and Social Coun-
cil; the Council of the Interna-
tional Maritime Organization, Cat-
egory C; and Presidency of the
Thirty-Fifth General Conference
of the United Nations Education-
al, Scientific and Cultural Organi-
sation.

“The Bahamas values the cor-
dial relations between our two
countries and looks forward to the
deepening and the diversification
of our relationship,” Governor
General Hanna said.

He acknowledged that The
Bahamas and Colombia "share a
wide base of linkages founded on
common interests" and the diplo-
matic relations that followed "has
consolidated the continued com-

mon understanding."

“The Bahamas, as has the rest of
the word, but particularly the
Caribbean nations, has taken keen
note of your country’s proactive
engagement in the well-being of
the governments and peoples that
comprise the Association of
Caribbean States, as a result of
the reform initiatives Colombia is
actively seeking to implement in
that body,” the said Mr Hanna.

He told the Ambassador that
bilaterally, these initiatives could
bring to fruition his personal
pledge to increase the relations of
both countries in overcoming ille-
gal drug trafficking and crime.

Replied the Ambassador:
“Colombia and the Common-
wealth of The Bahamas have
maintained, with mutual respect,
excellent relations in all areas, and
that is why I personally wish they
can be increased.

“Colombia will make every pos-
sible effort to give to your gov-
ernment the required support in
vital areas as it has occurred in the
past. I am convinced that in the
future these will be broadened.

“Be sure that loyalty, respect,
and sincerity will remain princi-
ples and essential values of our
cordial relations.

who have opted to give up other-
wise lucrative opportunities to
contribute to the growth and
development of our country over
the recent years,” said Mr
Williams.

“Coupled with the other mea-
sures that we have put in place
and others yet to be implemented,
this course of action will assure us
of the opportunity to turn around
our economy in the quickest pos-
sible time, while lessening the
impact that the current worldwide

Kristaan Ingraham/BIS Photo

recession will otherwise have on
our wider community.”

“Rest assured, however, that we
are doing all that we are able, to
ensure that as many of the effected
individuals as possible, are placed
in other job opportunities before
the termination notice expires on
September 30,” he added.

Turks and Caicos is facing hav-
ing direct rule imposed on it by
Britain following a Commission
of Inquiry into corruption there.

British Governor of the TCI,

Gordon Weatherall, announced
the suspension of certain sections
of the country’s constitution —
allowing Britain to take greater
control over the reins of power —
earlier this month.

However, he claims he is waiting
for the outcome of a court case
challenging the order that brings
the British direct rule into force
before moving ahead with full
direct rule, a move that was rec-
ommended by the report from the
Commission of Inquiry.



HIS Excellency Emilio Diaz-Mejia, Ambassador of the Republic of Colombia, paid a courtesy call on Minister of Foreign
Affairs, Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symontte, July 22. Pictured from left are Andrew McKinney, Chief of Protocol; Car-
los Gonzalez, Director, Colombian Government of Trade Bureau, Caribbean Office in Miami, Florida; Ambassador Diaz-
Mejia; Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs the Hon Brent Symonette; Dr Patricia Rodgers, Permanent
Secretary; Joshua Sears, Director General, Ministry of Foreign Affairs; and Janeen McCartney, undersecretary, Ministry of

Foreign Affairs.

Derek Smith/BIS Photo



GOVERNOR-
General, His

} Excellency
Arthur Hanna
(right) and His
Excellency
Emilio Diaz-
Mejia, Ambas-
sador of the
Republic of
Colombia, share
a light moment
during a lunch at
Gray Cliff
Restaurant.

"T vex at all these lil chirren
I see on the side of the road
from the early morning until
the middle of the night selling
phone cards! These children
should be allowed to live their
lives - they should be playing,
enrolled in some summer
camp to learn something to
better their self-esteem or at
least be in the library reading
- instead of in the hot sun all
day hustling a few dollars for
their parents. And these kids
always look like someone ran
over their puppy with their
faces all made up like some-
one forced them there.

"T don't know if this breaks
any laws but it certainly
breaks my heart. Police should
be able to lock these kids’ par-
ents up for something because
it ain't right,"

Concerned Citizen,

Nassau.

"I vex that my cable was off
for over a month even though
my account was current so of
course when the bill came
around I didn't pay it. After a
while I got fed up so when I
went to Cable Bahamas they
said they couldn't check the
problem until I paid my
measly balance. So I did that -
three days ago - but tell me
why I can only get basic cable
and not the premium channels
I paid for? After days of me
pestering them and them
"resetting my signal” they
promised me someone will
come out next week.

"What I want to know is,
am I going to get any money
back for these channels I ain’
getting?”

Avid TV Watcher,

Nassau.

"T vex that there are still
some people out there who
subscribe to the archaic school
of thought which leads them to
oppose the proposed outlaw-
ing of marital rape. I mean the
things I've been hearing and
reading about that since the
amendment was introduced in
the House of Assembly this
week astound me.

"As a woman, and a person,
with full rights and control of
my body I am disgusted that
some people think my gender
has no right to refuse the
advances of a man I just hap-
pen to be married to. Does this
thinking also lead them to
believe that a husband can
physically abuse me, dominate
me and not take my opinions
into account? It's narrow-mind-
ed views like that which are
responsible for so many things
that are wrong in our society,"

minister of environment could
say at the end of a letter that
he shedding light on the
Arawak Cay and harbour
dredging project when he ain't
the man we really want to hear
from. The only person he now
shedding light on is that PLP
senator. He need to come to
talk to us, the Bahamian peo-
ple, instead of sending letters
and get his leader to shed
some lights on these damn
projects I paying for!"

Jason Harris,

Kemp Road.

"IT vex at all these people
who chapping, shooting, and
killing their family over a lil’
piece of land. I know of plenty
cases, when someone died,

people in their family is just go
crazy trying to get their hands
on alil’ piece of something and
basically trying to take what
ain’ theirs. But the court sys-
tem is a mess so no wonder
some people have to take the
matter into their own hands,"
Concerned Citizen,
Nassau.

"Tis done vex to da point I
ga’ start to use foreign lan-
guages because of all a' dem
people in we Christian nation
who ‘slick’ our country, people
and prime minister by deceiv-
ing them to get ‘cheap’ Crown
Land for a different purpose
than which they state and then
selling it for ‘obscene profits’.

"We send the small lil’ crim-

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

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inal to jail for committing
fraud or stealing a couple of
dollars to feed his family and
say its 'zero tolerance’ but we
is usually two-faced and hyp-
ocrites when it comes to deal-
ing with the big ones. Noth-
ing happens to big ones who
normally ga’ get off cause they
done know people an' we tha
innocent ga’ suffer for dem,"
Trust me now, Nassau.

“T was so vex at the pass-
port office I wrote a poem:

The Passport Office: A
Unique Form of Torture,

People say Da Gubment
Dem aint doing what they
oughta.

Queue’s movement barely

e Get Ready For

2

Glass Bottom Water Buckets
Fishing Lines & Hooks
Fishing Accessories

Mesh Diving Bags

Summer Special!

perceptible to human eye,

As with all interminable
waiting experiences: A baby
cries.

The undefined time punc-
tuated by querulous outbursts

“Sit down and wait”: a moth-
er curses.

Seems names are called -
but never yours,

‘T have to go to work now’,
a father implores.

When will the queues ever
end?

One to get the application,
to make the application, and
then -

At the end of it all, who
knows when it will come?

Fly buzzes, infant’s shriek
peaks - give me a sign!

When is it that I can leave

* except on
red tagged
and net items

this line?

Passport office - the great
equaliser -

Man, woman, child, black,
white, every type - they all
come to die here.

- Alison of the East.

e Are you vex? Send your com-
plaints to whyyouvex@tribune-
media.net or fax them to 328-
2398.

eddie
as es
PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 822-2157



Vita

July 24th - August Ist, 2009

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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Justice tells new magistrates



(BIS photo: Patrick Hanna)
FIVE JUSTICES OF THE PEACE were sworn in as Magistrates to serve in
the Community Court by Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, July 3. Pictured
from left are Charles Sweeting, Japheth Deleveaux, Vylma Thompson-Curl-
ing, Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, Attorney General and Minister of Legal
Affairs Senator Michael Barnett, Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez, Alvan Rolle
and Charles Hunt.

CHIEF Justice Sir Burton Hall challenged newly-appointed
magistrates to apply the law “as it is” to matters coming before
them.

He was speaking during a ceremony for Justices of the Peace
who were sworn in as magistrates, July 3, at the Supreme
Court.

The five JPs who took their oaths to sit in the Community
Court are Japheth Edison Deleveaux, Charles Mahlon Hunt,
Alvan Kenneth Rolle, Charles Andrew Sweeting and Vylma
Bloneva Thompson-Curling.

The Chief Justice warned them that at times they will face
“usually ill-informed” often “unfair” criticism.

“That is an inevitable incident of holding public office in
the ‘information age’,” he said.

Views

He advised them to make their views known to the Chief Jus-
tice with regard to “how the law can be made more efficient or
effective in achieving the social ends it was intended to serve.”

“Make your views known to the Chief Justice who would con-
vey them to the Attorney General where appropriate with a
view to engaging the legislative machinery to reform and revise
the laws,” said Sir Burton.

He warned them that there are still administrative “wrinkles”
to be ironed out and these "incidental irritants" could prove
frustrating from time to time but should not deflect them from
their principal duties as judicial officers.

In congratulating the magistrates, he said he hoped the Com-
munity Court would become a “new thrust in making judicial
services more widely available to the community.”

He thanked the government agencies for their assistance
especially the management team of the Office of the Judiciary.

The Attorney General and Minister of Legal Affairs Senator
Michael Barnett also addressed the brief ceremony.

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

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* Communi Outreach; 1130 am, = 6 Sennce; 7:0 p.m,

Service Te) pum
* Sister = Moohing: 1000 a.m. Gnd Tewreday of each month)















“ao THE BAHAYLAS, TURKS AND CAICOS i,
ISLANDS CONFERENCE =.
' OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE \' a, }
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS F's :
=. « L'EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA
=r" CARAIBE ET LES AMERIQUES NASSAU! Tee wet
CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
10% Montrose Avenue
Pat), Hod RE 16379, Nassai, Rabamat: Telephone: 125-f4i2;
Fao: 328-274: methedisteonferencedman.com

REPOSITIONING FOR MIRACLES WITH FRESH EXPRESSIONS
ENERGIZING THE CONFERENCE NCW
(Nurture Outreach Witness Worship)
IMMENSE VARIETY - IMMENSE CREATIVITY - IMMENSE HOPE
“Celebrating 223 years of continueus Methodist witness for
Christ in The Rohamas*

EIGHTH LORD'S DAY AFTER PESTEOQOST, JULY 26, 2009.

COLLECT: Generous Ciod, You give ud gifls and make them prow:
though owr faith is small as mustard seed, make it prow to Your glory
and the flourishing of Your Kingdom; through Jesus Christ our Lord

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (talcote Ril Baar)

7AM) am Lay Preacher, Bro. Arthur Chase,
Vite President of Conference

[iem, Lay Preacher, Sis, Katie Carter

RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108 Mantros: Ave. orar Walll Ri}

7AM) am. Ihshop Dr. Raymond Ei. Nelly

(Celebration of the Holy Eucharet

Bishop De, Raymond R. Nelly (Bible Snudy)

Rishop De, Raymond R, Nelly

Conducted by te Rhodes Memorial Cherch School

(Oe am,
Rt

640 pm.

CORE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Res Sinoet, Far Ail)
Iam Rewer Dr, Keene A Huggins, Persident Emer

PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Pinan)
11: am. Lay Preacher, Bro. Athur Chase

HERITAGE OF se LOWE METHODIST CHURCH

(28 Crastord 2,

7200 am. "aan Lennard (i. Roberts, Jr,
(Celebration of the Holy Eucharsst)

$M am Lay Preacher, Bro. Arthur Chase

METHODMST CHURCH CH THE COTM! SHEPHERD (rire Trail Baty

a0 am Reverend Emily A. Demerste’/Lay Preacher, Sis, Elaine Stuart
(Celebration of the Holy Eucharist)

MONASTERY PARK FELLOWSHIP
Next Service: Lond’s Day, August 30, 2006 at 3:15 pum

CROM-DES-MISSIOWS ALDERSIG ATE (Quackoo Street)
Children’s Chuh, apes 1-18 years, repens om Frick, 11, 2009 at $30 p.m.

METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo 81) -Thrilt Shop and other Ministries

JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLAGE (28 Crawford St., Oakes Field)
Reception to Girede 7

MID WEEK SERVICES:
Midweek Rocharistic Servier - Rhodes Memorial Methodist Church -
August §, 2008) t:3) am-7:15 a.m. (Breakfast Served)

Wilassilay,

RADIO PROGRAMS

‘Ween’ - On the Lord's Day, 285 | at 9 pam. “Gireal Hymne of irepiration® - On
he Lord's Day, Radio 210 a1 3:30 pon; ‘Family Vibes’ 25 1, Tuesday, 70 pim.;
"To God be the tlory” 25 1, Tuesday, 7:48 Be mm,

CONFERENCE CHIL DREN'S 51! MMIT, Thursday, July 234Lond's Dey, Juty
26, 2H.

CIRCUIT OPENING OF THE CHURCH YEAR SERVICE:

IS CELEBRATION OF YOUTH — Wesley Methodist Church, 10 a.m,
Lard's Day, Sepiemier Do, D4,

Apply the law ‘as it is’, Chief 1 § |

odder proposes action plans for

socially responsible universities

THERE was no mistaking the urgency
that academics conveyed recently during a
round table at the UNESCO World Con-
ference on Higher Education in Paris,
France, about the social responsibility of
institutions of higher learning.

Addressing the round table, College of
the Bahamas President Janyne Hodder said
that post secondary institutions must main-
tain consistent connections with society
rather than operate in a vacuum. Among
the concrete proposals for change she pro-
posed were new rankings, increased inter-
national exchanges and networks, and com-
petitive awards for socially responsible uni-
versities.

“Universities differ greatly in history,
context, mission and size. Yet, they share a
set of common beliefs and practices that
allow them to create bridges to better world
understanding, respect and development,”
Ms Hodder said. But she maintained that
these bridges can be made stronger yet.

The COB president explained that devel-
oping a new ranking would involve crafting
indicators of that responsibility — perhaps in
the areas of learning, research and service —
and reporting on them. Much like the



He] strategic plans for COB,
| Ms Hodder proposed
| innovations in under-
graduate and graduate
programme develop-
ment, multidisciplinary
degrees focused on areas
of national importance,
service learning pro-
grammes and international experiences for
students. Ideally, she suggested, research
would be measured against Millennium
Development Goals (MDGs) or local and
national goals and would be assessed based
on participation in various networks, direct
impact on communities and various
research programmes focused on national
issues. In other critically important areas,
socially responsible universities would main-
tain student engagement initiatives tied to
MDGs, problem-based research and inter-
vention programmes, as well as community
awareness initiatives tied to sustainable
development.

“It is good to remember that universities
are already agents of social responsibility
but can do more,” Ms Hodder said during
the round table.

aN ATO)

“Universities are not ivory towers or the
only experts or the handmaidens of other
agencies but must remain in interactive dia-
logue with society.”

The interactive session in which the COB
president participated was designed to
explore the areas where institutions of high-
er learning could capitalise on their role as
social developers, especially within the con-
text of sustainable development, peace, the
MDGs and the global financial crisis.

At the World Conference on Higher
Education, over 1,000 participants from
approximately 150 countries examined the
role of post secondary institutions in
addressing major global challenges, pro-
viding a platform for key stakeholders to
make a renewed commitment to the devel-
opment of higher education and agree on
action-oriented recommendations to meet
the growing and multiple demands of soci-
ety.

The conference ended on July 8 with an
appeal for governments to increase their
investment in higher education as a major
force in building an inclusive and diverse
knowledge society and to advance research,
innovation and creativity.

Budding chefs receive mentoring in summer programme

EXPOSING the country’s
youth to career opportunities
in the culinary and hospitality
areas, talented local chefs, who
are graduates of the College of
the Bahamas, last week began
mentoring budding chefs in
New Providence as part of the
Lil’ Chefs summer programme.

The programme also
includes week-long training ses-
sions in Exuma and Grand
Bahama. The Lil’ Chefs pro-
gramme has been running for
three years and has grown from
initially 15 students learning
only culinary arts to approxi-
mately 50 students being
trained in culinary, pastry and
cold food delights. In the
kitchen at the Choices Restau-
rant at the Culinary and Hos-
pitality Management Institute
(CHMI), teachers and students
all share a common love for the
culinary arts.

At one work station, young
Whitney Barnes watches intent-
ly as Chef Keisha Bonimy gives
instructions about how to pre-
pare an exotic chicken dish,
while another group of young-



TWO young participants of the Lil’
Chefs summer training programme
learn the art of making decilicous
cakes and pastries.

sters learn the art of making a
decadent chocolate cake and
other pastries from scratch.
“Tm from Florida and I
come to the Bahamas for the
summer and my aunt told me
about this programme and I
thought it would be a great
experience to learn how to
cook and go back home and tell
people about it,” said Whitney.
But she quickly points out
that her interest in the kitchen

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

‘Sunday Schoot ifam
| Preaching
| Radio Bible Hour:

| Sunday Gpm - «NS 2

| Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

FUNDAMENTAL |
Mam & 7:30pm EVANMGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Wile

| "Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
| Pastor: H. Mills * Phone: 393-0663 = Box MeSae2 ]

is purely for practical purposes,
rather than a career aspiration.
“T hope to get a little bit more
skill level in the kitchen out of
this experience in order to take
back home,” she said.

This year, students enrolled
in New Providence have the
added benefit of etiquette train-
ing from well-known image
management consultant Stacia
Williams. “We’re starting some
new things and moving into
some new directions because
of the kinds of responses that
we have gotten from students
and parents over the last two
years,” said director of industry
training and Assistant Professor
at CHMI Valderine Hamilton.

One of the young partici-
pants, Anae Bain said she was
excited to learn about the Lil’
Chefs training programme,
especially because she aspires
to become a chef. But she
admits that she must first con-
quer her trepidation of han-
dling raw food.

“Tm not the best in the
kitchen but I can do little stuff.
I don’t like touching raw food,

but I do want to be a chef
because I think it’s cool,” she
said. “T hope to learn more and
help my mom in the kitchen
and then do it myself. ’'m learn-
ing culinary and pastry, and
pastry is awesome because I
can learn how to make all kinds
of cakes from scratch.”

Under the CHMI, COB
offers two Baccalaureate
degree programmes — one in
tourism management and the
other in hospitality manage-
ment. There is also an Associ-
ate of Arts degree in Culinary
Arts and a three-year chef’s
programme. In addition the
industry training department
offers short certificate courses
in specific culinary areas.
Speaking to the importance of
the Lil’s Chefs summer train-
ing programme, executive vice-
president of Academic Affairs
Dr Rhonda Chipman-Johnson
said: “You might be exposed
to careers in the culinary and
hospitality area. There are
careers in the tourism industry
that many of you might wish to
look at.”

GMM A NACL a

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4
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an
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—
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OPPORTUNITIES FOR
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AMERICAN TV star Tyler Perry paid a courtesy call on Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham at the Office of the Prime Minister on Wednesday. The
top-rated actor/producer is in The Bahamas for two weeks filming the
sequel to his blockbuster film “Why did | get married?” The film has
scenes shot on Eleuthera and Exuma and features more than two dozen
Bahamian actors and crew. Pictured from left are Prime Minister Ingra-
ham, Mr Perry, and Bishop Neil Ellis.

Grant's Town Wesler Methodist Church
(Batioe Hil Ad 6 Chapel Street] AO Goe CB-13906
The Holy Ghost Praver-Line number is 326-7427

(weww.giwesley-org)
7:00 am. Rev. Dr. Colin Archer/Bro, Ermest Miller
11:00 a.m, Sis. Nathalie ThompsonYouth
7:00 p.m, Bro. Franklyn Bethel’Sis. Marilyn Tinker

i ee a me me em ca Toe

yp LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

B..
Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place: i
The Madeira

Shopping Center

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
ephone number 325-5712
Warr lynnk@ batelnet.bs



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



HOTELIER SAYS US STAR’S FILM HAS LED TO BUSINESS BOOM

Tyler Perry's ‘$1m boost for Eleuthera economy’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AN ESTIMATED $1 million has
been invested into Eleuthera's
economy thanks to the filming of
superstar Tyler Perry's upcoming
production, one hotelier suggested
yesterday.

The American director, produc-
er and actor is on location in Gov-
ernor'’s Harbour shooting the
sequel to his 2007 hit “Why Did I
Get Married”.

David Barlyn, owner of the
Pineapple Fields Hotel where a
number of the cast and crew are



“Just about every hotel and private home
within a five-mile radius of the location has

been booked.”



staying, likened the business from
the film to "Christmas in July".

"They have put at least, in the
course of three weeks to a month,
no less than a $1million on this
island. Basically it's equal to Christ-
mas in July. We are doing the levels
of business that we would normal-
ly have in December and New
Year," he told The Tribune.

"Just about every hotel and pri-

vate home within a five-mile radius
of the location has been booked,"
said Mr Barlyn, adding that the
trickle-down effect to local taxi dri-
vers, restaurants and other sur-
rounding businesses has been
tremendous.

While he did not want to reveal
how much of a financial benefit his
property received from the film, he
said all 32 units of his condo-hotel

style resort were booked out for
the last few weeks to accommodate
some of the film's cast and crew.

He said it was much-needed busi-
ness considering the flagging
tourism industry. "It's been a tough
year. We've been very fortunate
that we've been holding our own.
We've also gotten a good amount
of international press about Tip-
py's and the hotel but I can say,
like everybody in the hospitality
world, it's been rough".

The production spent a few days
shooting in Exuma, and is expected
to wrap up about two weeks of
filming in Eleuthera in the next five
days or so.



Dd e ahd

FROM PAGE ONE

FNM chairman under fire

FROM page one

“His role is to keep the party relevant in
the country. He is to organise constituency
associations and to keep the message of the
FNM in the country interesting and timely
and attract new members to the party. In oth-
er words, his mission should be to help foster
party unity.

“However, since he has been in the chair, he
has caused disunity in several constituencies.
He has abandoned some of the basic policies
that would level the playing field in con-
stituency election of officers,” she said.

The source added that the party’s policy is
that before a constituency election can be con-
ducted all members should have attended at
least three consecutive meetings. However she
said, Mr Ferguson has “conveniently” waived
this policy in three constituencies — Bamboo

Town, South Beach and Golden Isles.

“Since then, all of these constituencies have
been less than functional and even disjointed
to put it mildly. In fact infighting is the order of
the day in these constituencies. He has allowed
the Women’s Association elections to happen
while abandoning this same policy, which has
split the association down the middle.

“His attention is scattered between his activ-
ities in South Eleuthera and his position.
Therefore the chairmanship is not getting the
kind of attention it deserves. While Mr Fer-
guson was a good educator, he certainly is not
capable of galvanizing support for the FNM.
We need a ‘hands-on’ aggressive, politically
astute chairman that can reach out and touch
people,” she said.

Attempts to reach Mr Ferguson for com-
ment on this matter were unsuccessful up to
press time last night.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

MA

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue
Accounting,

The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and the
Family Islands and the reconciliation of all revenue accounts other than miscellanequs
receivables,

PLP Senator ‘may have
conflicting interests’

FROM page one

"The facts are clear with
regard to my involvement
with the Arawak Cay con-
tainer port proposal. There is
no conflict of interest as I
have no interest, direct or
indirect, and my commitment
to save Saunders Beach
remains focused and deter-
mined,” Mr Fitzgerald said.

Documents released by the
Ministry of Environment this
week show that Mr Fitzger-
ald, as chairman of BK Water,
and his partner Mark Fin-
layson placed a bid to build
the plant that was then pro-
posed to be constructed at
Arawak Cay.

The plant was to provide
water to Kerzner Interna-
tional, Paradise Island, and
Baha Mar project, once it was
finished and BK Water had
estimated it could supply 6
million gallons of imperial
water a day.

A letter dated October 15,
2005, shows that in BK
Water's bid, the company
offered the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation 12.5 per
cent of its shares to the utility
company, at no charge, if its
bid was successful.

The company, with the oth-
er firms that qualified to bid
on the Blue Hills RO, were
invited by the Water and
Sewage Corporation (WSC)
to bid on the Arawak Cay
plant in April, 2005.

A legal opinion, prepared
by Veronique Evans, said that
BK Water was not a qualified

bidder and advised WSC to
reject its proposal.

"The senator, who wishes
to preserve the Bahamas for
future generations, and a
would-be tenant, was a par-
ticipant in a failed arrange-
ment to impose his company
on the supply of reverse
osmosis water to Kerzner.

"The president of BK
Water is the same Senator
who now claims that Arawak
Cay should not be the site of
the container port. . .Yet we
must suffer talk about accom-
modating special interests?"
said Mr Deveaux's statement.

In late 2006, the then PLP
government decided to place
the water plant at Perpall
Tract so as not to interfere
with plans to revitalise the
Nassau harbour front.

In recent months the sena-
tor has accused Dr Deveaux
of handling the port reloca-
tion, and the dredging of Nas-
sau Harbour and the exten-
sion of Arawak Cay — which
are separate but integrated
projects — under a shroud of
secrecy.

Responding to the
firestorm of criticism levelled
at him, Dr Deveaux called Mr
Fitzgerald's claims that his
ministry and the government
have been silent on the con-
troversial port relocation as
an “outrageous misrepresen-
tation" of the facts calculat-
ed to spread "public alarm."

"We need to light up the
darkness by exposing the
interest of those who seek to
spread this panic and insidi-

Government criticised over
financial services cutbacks

ous crusade about the small
man being left out. . .We
have, in our country, a more
insidious chronic disease. It is
a political disease of tribalism
masked in the form of pro-
tecting the small man," said
Dr Deveaux.

Mr Fitzgerald is head of the
newly formed Committee to
Protect and Preserve the
Bahamas for Future Genera-
tions; an organisation that has
aggressively opposed govern-
ment’s plans for the Arawak
Cay port relocation.

The group has said it is
looking at legal ways to halt
the government's actions until
"all the facts are laid on the
table."

"(Dr Deveaux) and the
government are obviously rat-
tled by the calls of Bahami-
ans to be transparent and
accountable to the Bahamian
people on the container port
at Arawak Cay. Clutching at
straws and attacking me does
not address the numerous
concerns the Bahamians have
with regard to the relocation
of the container port," said
Mr Fitzgerald.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in New Providence and

the Family Islands.

Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers.

Prepares the sales budget.

Prepares the Revenue Accounting Department Budget.
Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Receivable Reconciliation.
Oversees the training of all Customer Services stalf in the new billing software.

Prepares monthly Board reports,

Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenue reports.

Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of Statistics.
Provides statistical billing information for Family Island managers.
Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in the

Family Islands,

Attends yearly community meetings a5 well as ad hoc meetings required during

acquisition of new locations,

Develops and implements rules, guidelines and procedures for the efficient

operation of the department.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Accounts or equivalent

A minimum of 8+ years of experience in accounting practice and theory.
Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualifications

Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas.

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing.

Sound reasoning and good judgment skills
Ability to interpret financial reports.
Good time management skills.

Project management skills



ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money 20 Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

MONDAY, 20 JULY 2009

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Fornn to:
The Manager-Homan Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill. & Tucker, P.O, Box N-7509, Nassau, Bahamas on or before:
July 31, 2009,

ee

C2ee Pca Aw TT AX OT

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.86| CHG 0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -141.50 | YTD % -8.26

FINDEX: CLOSE 786.23 | YTD -5.83% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Security
Abaco Markets

10.00 Bahamas Property Fund
6.94 Bank of Bahamas

0.63 Benchmark

3.15 Bahamas Waste

2.14 Fidelity Bank

10.18 Cable Bahamas

2.74 Colina Holdings

5.50 Commonwealth Bank ($1)
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs
1.32 Doctor's Hospital

6.60 Famguard

10.00 Finco

10.35 — FirstCaribbean Bank

4.95 Focol (S$)

1.00 Focol Class B Preference

0.30 Freeport Concrete

5.50 ICD Utilities

10.40 9 J. S. Johnson

10.00 Premier Real Estate

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade

Previous Close Today's Close Change
739 739 0.00
11.00 11.00 0.00
6.94 6.94 0.00
0.63 0.63 0.00
3.15 3.15 0.00
2.37 2.37 0.00
11.39 11.39 0.00
274 274 0.00
5.64 5.64 0.00
2.98 3.00 0.02
1.82 1.82 0.00
6.60 6.60 0.00
10.90 10.90 0.00
10.38 10.38 0.00
5.03 5.03 0.00
1.00 1.00 0.00
0.30 0.30 0.00
5.50 5.50 0.00
10.40 10.40 0.00

10.00 10.00 0.00

Daily Vol.

EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.127 10.9
0.992 11.1
0.244 28.4
-0.877 N/M
0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.1
0.249 11.0
0.419 13.5
0.111 27.0
0.240 7.6
0.420 158.7
0.322 33.9
0.794 13.1
0.332 15.2
0.000 N/M
0.035 86
0.407 13.5
0.952 10.9
0.180 55.6

on a Percentage Pricing bases)

FROM page one

“Undue pressure is being put on many employees in the

5S2wk-Hi

S2wk-Low

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBE17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.

Interest

T%

Prime + 1.75%

T%

Prime + 1.75%

Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

finance sector to meet unrealistic goals and work to cover
duties where others have exited the organization — all under
the guise of adjusting to the economic situation.

“We can affirm that plans are well underway in many of
the financial institutions for redundancies via early retire-
ments, natural attrition and terminations for any breach regard-
less of level or error. The BFSU does not support wrongdoing
but wants employers to be considerate of the pressure being
placed on employees in the sector who are going to work each
day uncertain when or if that day is the last day at their com-

pany,” the statement read.

The union added that the Minister of Labour, Dion Foulkes
was quite right in his most recent statements on the layoffs at
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, where he claimed that he is not

aware of any further redundancies.

5S2wk-Low

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

1.3231
2.8952
1.4031
3.1031
12.3289

93.1992

1.0000

9.0775

1.0000

1.0000

1.0585 1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Lew - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

FEund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.8952 -1.52 -3.18
1.4777 3.07 5.31
3.1031 -8.35
12.9801 2.87 5.79
101.6693 1.10 1.67
93.1992 -3.33 -6.76
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Div $
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
10-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

-13.82

“This may be because the reduction of employees remains
below the radar due to the concealed downsizing policies of
these local employers, and thus neither the Minister nor the
public is aware of its magnitude.”

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vel. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS § - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Steck Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525



THE TRIBUNE

. : a
b

PAGE 9



25,

ts

2009



Martinborough
Bahamas National
Sunfish Champion!

See page 10

‘Golden Girl’ Debbie wins 200 again!

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ebbie Ferguson-

McKenzie picked up

her second-straight

victory in the wom-

en’s 200 metres
before she helped the women’s 4 x
100 relay team to a second place yes-
terday at the Aviva London Grand
Prix.

Four days after turning in the
world’s leading time at the 25th
Vardinoyannia International Track
and Field Meeting in Rethymno,
Greece, Ferguson-McKenzie came
back in Great Britain and clocked
23.11 seconds for another victory.

The time was no where near the
fastest time of 22.32 this year that
also recorded as a meet record, but it
was good enough to keep her well
ahead of her nearest rival, American
Marshevet Hooker, who ran 23.30.

Ferguson-McKenzie’s victory has
her in second place in the World
Athletics Tour standings with 39
points after four meets behind LaV-

erne Jones-Ferette, who is out front
with 42 points over five meets.

Jones-Ferette of the Virgin Islands
was fourth yesterday in 23.39. Third
place went to Great Britain’s Emily
Freeman in 23.34.

In the relay, Ferguson-McKenzie
teamed up with veteran Chandra
Sturrup, Timicka Clarke and Chris-
tine Amertil to run 43.35 for a sec-
ond place finish behind the United
States (42.39).

They improved on the previous
season’s best of 43.64 that was done
by Sakeitha Henfield, Sturrup,
Amertil and Ferguson-McKenzie at
the Penn Relays on April 25.

On both occasions, the teams went
under the 43.90 qualifying time for

the L[AAF World Championships in
Athletics in Berlin, Germany,
August 15-23.

Yesterday, the Bahamas matched
the times produced by Brazil and
Mexico, while only the United
States, Great Britain, Germany and
Trinidad & Tobago have ran faster.

Amertil, in her individual appear-
ance, was fifth in the first of two
women’s 400 races in 52.20. She end-
ed up in that same position with the
two races combined.

Winning the heat and taking the
top spot was Nicola Sanders of Great
Britain in 51.45, followed by three
Americans - Shana Cox (51.56),
Monica Hargrove (51.66) and
DeeDee Trotter (52.08).



Women’s 4 x 100 relay team places second
‘Superman’ Sands settles for fourth in triple jump
Shamar Sands sixth in 110m hurdles

Christine Amertil fifth in 400

Amertil is now tied with Russian
Yulia Gushchina for 12th place in
the World Athletics Tour with 27
points. American Sanya Richards,
who skipped London, is leading the
pack with 90 points.

On the men’s side, Olympic
bronze medallist Leevan “Super-
man” Sands had to settle for fourth
place in the men’s triple jump with a
leap of 17.13 metres.

Winning the event was American
Brandon Roulhac with 17.33. Cuban
Arnie David Girat was second with
17.18 and Great Britain’s Phillips
Idowu was third with 17.16.

With his performance, Sands
dropped to third with 40 points on
the World Athletics Tour. He was

Mercy rule!

passed by Idowu, who has 46. Girat
is leading with 50.

And Shamar Sands missed out on
the opportunity to advance to the
final of the men’s 110m hurdles.

In the first of two heats, Sands
clocked 13.81 for sixth place. The
heat was won by Eric Mitchum in
13.61 as he nipped Cuban world
record holder Dayron Robles
(13.62).

Robles, however, came back in
the final and turned the tables by
winning in 13.29. Mitchum was fifth.
Ryan Braithwaite of Barbados, who
won the title at the BAAA Nationals
in June, was second in 13.31 and
Great Britain’s Andrew Turner third
in 13.66.

Sands, who was 10th overall in the
two races combined, dropped into
a two-way tie for 10th place with
Bralthwaite with 38 points in the
World Athletics Tour.

Today, Sturrup will be the last of
the Bahamian contingent to com-
pete in an individual event when she
runs in heat two of the women’s 100
that will feature American Allyson
Felix.

Stingrays stop Commodores 11-2 in five innings

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MANAGER Godfrey
“Gully” Burnside has his
Price Waterhouse Stingrays
clicking in the men’s division
of the New Providence Soft-
ball Association.

Thursday night at the Bail-
lou Hills Sporting Complex,
Burnside watched as his
Stingrays ran circles around
the Defence Force Com-
modores, stopping them 11-2
in five mnings via the mercy
tule.

With the win Price Water-
house took sole possession
of second place at 8-2, just a
half game ahead of front run-
ning Heavy Equipment
Dorsey Park Boyz and a half
game ahead of defending
champions Commando Secu-
rity Truckers, who are 7-2.

With the loss - their third
straight - the Defence Force
dropped all the way to fifth
place at 5-6, just a half game
ahead of sixth place Young
Breed.

In the opener, Young
Breed knocked off the
Thompson Heavy Equip-
ment Outlaws 9-4 to improve
their record to 4-5. The Out-
laws fell to 3-8 in seventh
place.

Burnside, who is hoping
that his youthful looking
Stingrays can finally get over
the hump and not only get
into the championship but



SOFTBALL

win it all this year, said the
key to their success has been
their off-season training and
the acquisition of two veteran
players.

“We had a very good and
productive spring training
and the team is playing very
well right now as a result of
it,” Burnside said. “We still
have some little things that
we have to work through and
some injuries that shook up
our infield a little.

“But with the addition of
(pitcher) Leroy (Thompson)
and (first baseman) Ivan
(Francis), their experience
has really caused the players
to play a lot better. I really
like the way we are gelling
right now.”

If they can stay injury-free,
Burnside said his Stingrays
are really making an impact
in the league when it counts
the most in the post-season.

Leroy Thompson, who has
reunited with Burnside after
playing with the Truckers up
to last year, fired a three-hit-
ter, striking out four in secur-
ing another win on the
mound.

He gave up the only two
runs to the Commodores on
a two-run home run from
Bryon McClain in the top of
the third as he drove home
Martin Culmer from first on
an error.

NPSA TEAM STANDINGS

Here’s a look at the NPSA’s team standings going into

Saturday’s double header:

TEAMS WwW

Ladies’ Division
Pineapple Air Wild..
P CP Lady Sharks
Sigma Brackettes
Mystical Queens
Boomer G Swingers

RR UN UIO

Men’s Division
Dorsey Park Boyz

P W Stingrays

C Security Truckers
Robin Hood Hitmen
D F Commodores
Young Breed

THE Outlaws
Mighty Mits

Morgan Buccaneers

Nw Ww RMU ~1 OO OO

Tonight’s schedule

Ec Pet. GB

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ODMWDWDUNDAANNE
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7pm — Proper Care Pool vs Mystical Queens (L)
8:30pm — Dorsey Park Boyz vs Thompdon Heavy

Equipment (M)

But after taking a 3-2 lead
in the second, the Stingrays
marched 11 batters to the
plate as they batted around
the clock, scoring eight times
on five hits.

Alec Rolle, who led off the
inning with a walk, highlight-
ed the rally with a three-run
homer.

Godfrey Burnside Jr had
a perfect 3-for-3 night at the
plate, driving in a run and
scoring three times, Luton
Delancy was 2-for-3 with two
runs scored and Greg Jones
was 2-for-2 with a RBI, scor-
ing a run, while Ghandi
Williams scored twice.

In total, the Stingrays
banged out 10 hits off losing
pitcher Cory Brown, who had
just one strike out.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Young Breed 9,
Thompson Heavy
Equipment 4:

The more experienced
Outlaws seemed poised to
win this battle against their
younger foes, but they almost
ended up getting stopped.

Coming back from a 3-1
deficit in the second inning,
Young Breed slowly pecked
away until the sixth when
they needed at least five runs
to force the Outlaws to walk
off the field.

Instead, New Young felt
short with just four, allowing
the game to play to the end
when they prevailed.

Theodore Sweeting Jr
went 3-for-4 with three RBIs,
while Ken Wood was 2-for-4
with two RBIs, scoring a run
and D’Andre Rigby 2-for-4
with a run scored.

Young Breed, who pro-
duced 15 hits off loser
Roscoe Thompson, got a 2-
for-3 production from Ange-
lo Butler and Thomas Davis
with Butler scoring twice and
Thomas driving in a run and
scoring another.

“First of all, I want to
thank God for the victory
because it pushes us up in the
standings,” said Ken Wood,
who anchored their defense
at short. “I think we’re play-
ing great and once we stay
together, we should make the
playoffs.”

Wood said one of the key
ingredients is their ace pitch-
er Eugene Pratt, who came
through down the stretch and
held the Outlaws scoreless
for four innings as they
racked up their runs.

Pratt ended up giving up
seven hits with four strike
outs for the win.



Defence Force Commodores’ Brad Smith...

A PRICE WATERHOUSE STINGRAYS center fielder Godfrey Burnside Jr is tagged out at third base by

See more photos on page 10



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Federation
encourages
athletes to
“stay clean
and use
their natural
abilities’

T HE
president of
t h e
Bahamas
Softball
Federation,
in light of
the govern-
ment’s anti-
doping bill,
said the BSF |
encourages
athletes to
“stay clean
and use
their natural abilities.”

In a statement to Tribune
Sports yesterday, Burkett
Dorsett said the federation
“wholeheartedly” supports
the bill.

“We encourage our athletes
to stay away from the perfor-
mance enhancing drugs, stay
clean and use their natural
abilities. I don’t think we need
to enhance that with any ille-
gal drugs,” he said.

Dorsett said the Interna-
tional Softball Federation
(ISF) is against the use of per-
formance enhancing drugs.

“And we (the Bahamas
Softball Federation) are laud-
ed by the international body
for our clean bill of health, so
to speak, as it relates to dop-
ing in softball.”

Like all of the other sports,
he said Bahamian players are
tested for the use of perfor-
mance enhancing drugs when
they compete on the interna-
tional scene and not one ath-
lete has tested positive.

Dorsett said the federation
continues to support their ath-
letes, encouraging them to be
vigilant in what they take.

“Tf they must take some-
thing, go and see a doctor, or
get a list of the banned sub-
stances,” he said.

Over the years, Dorsett said
Bahamian athletes have com-
peted against their foreign
counterparts who years later
were stripped of their medals
after testing positive for per-
formance enhancing drugs.

“We would have liked to
see the authorities come here
and present our athletes with
medals when they are given
to them because of athletes
cheating,” Dorsett said.

“The events are normally
held on the world stage for
all to see, so they should let
everybody in the world see
that the Bahamas are the win-
ners and they didn’t use drugs
to get there.”

Thousands
expected to
attend ‘oldest
regatta in the
Bahamas’

THOUSANDS of Bahami-
ans are expected to flock to
Rolleville, Exuma, to attend
the 62nd annual
regatta/homecoming — the
oldest in the Bahamas.

According to commodore
Jeffrey McKenzie, the C class
race commences on Saturday,
August 1, beginning with the
Parliament Boys Race and a
$2,000 cash prize for the win-
ner.

On Sunday, August 2, the
Elijah McKenzie Memorial
Cup Race is scheduled to be
held and the winner will
receive a $1,000 cash prize.

On Monday, August 3, The
Ocean Race from Barraterre
will be held and the winner
will receive a $500 cash prize
followed by the two series
races with a $1,000 cash prize.

The returning champ
Touch Me Not will try to
defend her crown.

Crowd favourites Bul Reg
and Fugitive along with other
boats from Barraterre are
expected to participate in this
year’s regatta.

There will also be on shore
activities which include the
greasy pole contest, may pole
plaiting contest and other
activities.

According to McKenzie,
these are the best C class
boats in the country and the
regatta offers more prize
money than any other regatta.



D Martinborough is Bahamas
National Sunfish Champion!

@ By DIANE PHILLIPS

Special to The Tribune

WITH barely enough wind
to ripple the waters in Mon-
tagu Bay, three-time Sunfish
world champion Donnie
Martinborough used experi-
ence to find the highs, dodge
the lulls and beat a field of 35
to sail away with the
Bahamas National Sunfish
Championship title.

It was the 10th time Mart-
inborough won out of the 11
times the national champi-
onship has been held. But
this time was different.

“This is the first time that
four of the top 15 sailors
were juniors and the first
time a junior has come in sec-
ond,” said Martinborough.
Christopher Sands, a student
at St. Andrews , took second
place. “Chris deserves so
much credit. He sailed such a
smart regatta.”

Smart, in this sense, meant
not peeling off to take
chances that could pay off or
just as easily backfire in light
and fickle winds, but sailing
conservatively to end the
series with two second place
finishes, two fifths and one
10th, for a total of 24 points
in the low-point series. Sands
finished just two points
below (ahead of) veteran
sailor Jimmie Lowe, who
came in third with 26 points
in the five-race series.

In fourth place was real
estate guru George Dami-
anos who finished with 27
points. In fifth was S S Scan-
dinavian Gold Cup winner
and underwater cinematog-
rapher Gavin McKinney,
who would have given Mart-

_



THREE TIME World Championship winner Donnie Martinborough
won the Sunfish Nationals recently held at Montagu Bay, beating a

field of 35 contenders...

inborough a solid run for the
title if it had not been for a
single bad race. McKinney
was the only sailor in the
field of 35 beside Martinbor-
ough to win two races, but a
23rd place finish in the first
race hurt his overall score.

In most series, sailors are
able to toss out their worst
race, but because only five
of the six scheduled races
were run for lack of wind,
every race counted.

“The fact that there were
no throw-outs made a huge
difference in the final results
for a number of sailors in the
competition,” said Martin-
borough, whose own worst
finish was a 5th. “But it also
made young Chris Sands’
final results, in fact, all the
juniors’, that much more
impressive.”

In addition to the surprise

Photos by Robert Dunkley

of youth finishing close to or
beating experienced world
class sailors like Lowe, McK-
inney and Damianos, all of
whom sail different classes
of boats and at one time or
another have held enviable
international titles, what
made this series stand out
was its lead-up to the Sun-
fish World Championship set
for October in Nassau.
“The Worlds are huge --
boats and sailors from
around the world,” said Mar-
tinborough. “Hence the great
turn-out for the Nationals
this year, the largest turnout
that I can ever remember,
since the host team can enter
as many as 15 boats.” The
possibility of not having any
qualifiers for the World
Championship hung in the
air on the first day of the
regatta when there was so lit-







= —

SEVENTY eight-year-old Pedro Wassitsch (left) was the oldest
competitor completing the five race series...

tle wind it would have taken
a hefty whistler to disturb a
leaf. “We had only three
days to sail and complete this
regatta,” said Martinbor-
ough, who also holds a world
record in Bermuda Race
Week wins in the Sunfish,
the spunky little 14-foot boat
with a single sail. “On Sat-
urday, the first day, it didn’t
look like we were going to
get in any races.” They final-
ly sailed one. “That meant
on Sunday, we had to jam in
four races, back-to-back.
Conditions were very tough
because the wind was still
light and variable, all over
the place.” So we were to be
able to get in a series after
five, a series after five, a sit-
uation that often occurs
because of weather condi-
tions.

Martinborough’s win in

Montagu Bay earned him the
Perry Cooke Memorial
National Trophy in honour
of the late sailor who brought
home The Bahamas’ first
Olympic Gold along with Sir
Durward Knowles in the Star
Class in 1954.

The Sunfish National
Championship was hosted
and sponsored by the Nas-
sau Yacht Club while the
Royal Nassau Sailing Club’s
Commodore Francisco de
Cardenas ran the races. De
Cardenas’ son, Fernando,
finished 8th, just behind
Peter Bruce Wassitsch, who
finished in 7th, nearly 20
places ahead of his father,
Pedro Wassitsch, at 78, the
oldest competitor in the
regatta. The elder Wassitsch
sailed all five races, finishing
with 115 points and a broad
smile.

Stingrays ston Commodores 11-2



STINGRAYS’ Jameko Sands keeps an eye on the ball...

5 ad by ae me Be

Am VE

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



PRICE WATERHOUSE Stingrays’ pitcher Leroy Thompson lets it go...

Darts: Third place for Sands Bullets



THE SANDS BULLETS dart team, captained by Curtis
Malone, presented the fourth place trophy to Sands
beer representative Kelly Sands...



Malone and Graham Thornly.



ae
Nod |

THE SANDS BULLETS dart team, sponsored by Sands Beer, finished the 2008-9 Nassau Darts Association open
season in fourth place out of 29 teams and came in third in the championship division. Shown (I-r) are Neil Behagg,
Mike Russell, James Newly, Brodie Townly, Kelly Sands of Sands Beer, Captain Curtis Malone, lan Anderson, Pete



THE TRIBUNE



THE WEATHER REPORT



5-Day FORECAST

PS

z7

i

TAMPA
High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 77° F/25°C
@ fi

‘

KEY WEST
High: 90° F/32°C
Low: 82° F/28° C

ORLANDO |
_ High:92° F/33°C .
Low: 74° F/23°C





Mostly sunny with a

thunderstorm.

ig h: 92°
CEC aac

112° F









@ WEST PALM BEACH
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 78° F/26° C

FT. LAUDERDALE

High: 89° F/32°C

Low: 80° F/27°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

= AMI



High: 92° F/33°C
Low: 79° F/26° C


















SATURDAY, JULY 24 2009, PAGE 11

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

Hus ie



> TF (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

ea Ce | Ae





















High

F/C

Albuquerque 95/35
Anchorage 66/18
Atlanta 92/33
Atlantic City 84/28
Baltimore 90/32
Boston 82/27
Buffalo 82/27
Charleston, SC 94/34
Chicago 80/26
Cleveland 82/27
Dallas 100/37
Denver 82/27
Detroit 78/25
Honolulu 90/32
Houston 97/36

Today

Low

F/C
69/20
55/12
71/21
71/21
70/21
68/20
66/18
74/23
61/16
64/17
78/25
59/15
62/16
78/25
76/24

WwW

pc
sh
pc
s
$
pc
t
pc
t
t
pc
Cc
t
$

pe

High

F/C
92/33
69/20
88/31
88/31
88/31
85/29
77/25
93/33
82/27
80/26
97/36
88/31
80/26
89/31
95/35

Sunday

Low

F/C
69/20
56/13
70/21
70/21
70/21
70/21
64/17
73/22
62/16
62/16
76/24
60/15
64/17
77/25
76/24

Ww

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando

High
F/C
86/30
94/34
90/32
103/39
96/35
86/30
92/33
94/34
92/33
78/25
94/34
90/32
86/30
98/36

Today

Low

F/C
63/17
72/22
66/18
81/27
72/22
66/18
70/21
73/22
79/26
62/16
67/19
75/23
74/23
72/22

Ww











Today Sunday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
as on ~ inn = av High = Low W High Low W WASSAU ‘Today. Eat7-14Knots 2-3Feet 10-20Miles 84°F |
on oy o|1 |2 3|4|5|6 : 8|9|10 Fic _ FIC Fc FIC Sunday: Eat 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet___6-10 Miles 84° F
wil a | = Acapulco 93/33 77/25 pe 91/32 79/26 pe FREEPORT Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 84°F
— HY Low — | wooerare | HicH |v. HIGH Amsterdam 68/20 55/12 sh 72/22 57/13 pe Sunday: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 84° F
Ankara, Turkey 90/32 54/12 s 90/32 57/13 Ss ABACO ‘Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 85° F
Mainly cloudy and Partly sunny with a Partly sunny, breezy Partly sunny, a Some sun with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 102/38 79/26 s 97/36 77/25 s Sunday: Eat 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 85° F
very warm. thunderstorm. and pleasant. t-storm possible. couple of t-storms. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 53/11 40/4 s 55/12 42/5 s
High: 90° High: 90° High: 91° High: 89° Bangkok 89/31 77/25 +r 90/32 77/25 r :
Low: 81° Low: 80° Low: 80° Low: 80° Low:30°_| [ite wreee ET moe oie srs eros lkealieaberdiab ail daa
ug digh_HeGen Kae Beijing 90/32 72/22 pe 88/31 71/21 s
- —l = — —_="_—* - —— 4 —— Beirut 91/32 79/26 s 81/27 78/25 s Seattlaye
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines : effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1itiam. 3.4 4:53 a.m. -0.3 Belgrade 88/31 59/15 s 89/27 57/13 s
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 11:32pm. 29 5:19pm. -0.1 Berlin 68/20 52/11 sh 72/22 57/13 po
12:04pm. 31 5:40am. -0.2 Bermuda 84/28 77/25 pe 84/28 77/25 s
Sunday 6-15 00
ee 15pm. 0. Bogota 68/20 41/5 s 67/19 41/5 s
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Monday 7222 am. 27 628am. Od Brussels 72/22 52/11 pc 77/25 57/13 pc
ABACO Temperature 12:57pm. 3.0 7:12pm. 02 Budapest 81/27 54/12 pe 84/28 57/13 s
5 Lh. gq° ° FUNGI es cscs cicetes Dace aueeatatereaanct tacoma 90° F/32° C : : Buenos Aires 5442 39/3 c 54412 43/6 s
ee Low 79° F/26° ¢ Testy Tam od Cairo 100/37 77/25 s 101/38 78/25 s
a ow: 81° F/27 Normal high ..... gsr rgi¢c ts 97/36 87/30 t 97/36 87/30 t
ot Normal low 75° F/24° C Calgary 83/28 46/7 t 71/21 52/11 pe
i Lest Veal S MOI senate 92° F/33° C SU TUM UCT). Cancun 91/32 77/25 t 90/32 76/24 pe
a Last year's lOW oe eee 76° F/24° C " " Caracas 81/27 71/21 pe 80/26 71/21 t
i. . iv Precipitation Pei teens a am. ee Casablanca 90/32 75/23 s 96/35 77/25 s
‘alll , As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... 0.42" unsel....... 00 p.m. Moonset... . 1Uro4 p.m. Copenhagen 67/19 53/11 sh 69/20 57/13 c
FREEPORT Fre Year to date 20, First Full Last New Dublin 66/18 54/12 sh 64/17 54/12 4
High: 90° F/32° C Normal year to date oo... ceccecceseeceneee 23.42" . a= Frankfurt 73/22 54/12 pec 79/26 57/13 pc
Low: 79° F/26° C Ae Geneva 76/24 51/10 pe 82/27 55/12 s
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PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



Lion



Department of Marine Resources holds a
demonstration on how to cookand cleanthe Lionfish



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
and TIM CLARKE

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

URIOUS fish lovers learned

how to clean and cook lion-

fish at a demonstration held
by the Department of Marine
Resources at Potter's Cay yesterday.

Fisheries officers from the department’s
conservation unit explained how although
the non-native invasive fish have poisonous
spines, they are safe to eat and rather deli-
cious!

The Pacific Ocean fish are thriving in
Bahamian waters at the peril of all native
fish as they eat juvenile species of all kinds,
and have very few predators.

The department has launched a National
Lionfish Response Plan to combat the inva-
sion of lionfish which simply involves eating
them!

Assistant Fisheries Officer from the con-
servation unit of the Department of Marine
Resources Lakeshia Anderson said: “Lion-
fish eat almost anything they fit in their
mouths, shrimp, crabs, juvenile fish like
Nassau Groupers, and an array of other
fish.

“We analysed the contents of the stomach
of one lionfish and found 50 small pilchards.

“They can impact our commercial fishing
industry and because their numbers have



STEP TWO: Remove the two short, ven-
omous, pelvic spines near the head on the under-
side of the fish.



increased so much around the archipelago,
the best way to control them is to eat them.

“So let’s just start eating lionfish. They
are not poisonous and they’re very edible
and very tasty.

“You can fillet it or cook it whole. I think
it tastes similar to hogfish, but others have
said it tastes like snapper or grouper.”

Assistant Port Controller at Potter’s Cay
dock, Nassau, Craig Curtis, 39, told The
Tribune how he rates lionfish so highly he
plans to serve it at his 40th birthday party in
September.

He said: “I consider it a bit exotic and
it’s a real delicacy.

“To me the texture is relative to the snap-
per fish and it’s more tasty than the grouper.
I really enjoy it, and I understand the ratio-
nale behind the whole lionfish project
because the species is now increasing at
such a fast rate it’s important for people to
know how we can now turn the tables on
them, and start eating them, and start to
decrease their population.”

Lionfish have venomous spines in three
areas and it is important to handle them
carefully when preparing them to eat. As
you clean the fish, hold the head down to
avoid touching the spines, and wear heavy
gloves to protect your hands from fleshy
tentacles on the head.

Should you get stabbed by a venomous
Spine apply heat to the wound for 15 to 20
minutes to prevent the venom from spread-
ing and seek medical attention as soon as
possible.



STEP THREE: Remove the three short, ven-
omous, anal spines near the tail on the underside
of the fish.

STEP ONE: Begin by removing the row of 13 long, venomous dorsal spines which run along the
back of the fish with a sharp knife, or a pair of kitchen shears may make removal of the spines easier.
Cut into the flesh on each side of the row of spines along the length of the fish, moving from the head
towards the tail.

When you have made a ‘V’ shaped incision on either side, loosen the spines and then pry them off STEP FOUR: Now all three areas of ven-
completely. omous spines have been removed, the fish is
Once removed, the spines are no longer venomous, and you can save them and use them as tooth- completely safe to handle.

picks when serving the cooked fish. Cut off the fan-like pectoral fins on either side of
the fish with your knife or kitchen shears.



STEP FIVE: Remove the tail.

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking a suitably qualified individual to fill the position:

Head, Output Management

The main responsibilities of the position holder include:

Manage a small team

Manage electronic file documents
Process enhancements

Perform quality control checks
Management reporting

Qualifications:

« Atleast 2 years of management experience
Strong organizational skills
Ability to multi-task
Attention to detail and quality client service
Self motivated
Proficiency in MS Office Applications
Knowledge of IBM Content Manager a plus



STEP SIX: Remove the head. Lionfish STEP SEVEN: Fillet the fish as usual, or
heads have a rough texture and are not very scrape off the thin and easily-removed scales
meaty, so they are not recommended as some- __ to cook it whole.

thing good to eat.

Please send your resume, on or before Friday July 24th to:
hrbahamas@ubs.com

It starts with you.



STEP EIGHT: Season the fish with salt STEP NINE: Squeeze some lime juice on

and pepper, dip in egg, and then flour, and the fish and dip in hot pepper sauce. Enjoy!
deep-fry until golden brown.





Full Text

PAGE 1

By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net PASSENGERS fearing for their lives leapt from the win dows of an out-of-control jit-ney that was heading for the waters of Nassau Harbour during morning traffic yesterday. Police were waiting to speak with the driver of the packed bus licensc plate NP 398 yesterday afternoon after he was reported to have left the scene as the vehi cle came to a halt just feet from the harbour’s edge next to Senor Frogs. Two young men, who police have not identified, N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.201SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER MOSTLY SUNNY WITH T-STORM HIGH 92F LOW 81F I N S I D E SEE PAGETWELVE S P O R T S Some fishy business inNassau SEEFRONT PAGEOFSPORTS Debbie’s TRIUMPH Passengers jump for lives from windows T wo taken to hospital with leg injuries Out-of-contr ol bus stops f eet from harbour The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com Photo: Alison Lowe/Tribune staff BUSDRAMA: The aftermath of the jitney terror ride which ended just feet short of Nassau Harbour, next to Senor Frogs. Police are waiting to speak to the driver. Jitney ride of terror ELEMENTS within the Free National Movement claim that their chairman Johnley Ferguson is not perf orming up to the standard e xpected of him and have gone as far as calling his last two years in office a “dismal failure.” Yesterday, a high ranking official of the FNM, whos poke on condition of a nonymity, said she fully expects for people to challenge Mr Ferguson for his post at the party’s convention, which is to take place in October. “This position is simply too i mportant for anyone to be pussy-footing around with. Johnley has been the chair man since the elections. I can’t remember the exact date, but that isn’t important right now. FNM chairman dubbed a failure MINISTER of Environ m ent Dr Earl Deveaux has s uggested that Opposition Senator Jerome Fitzgerald may have conflicting interests in his opposition to Government's planned move of the country's container port to Arawak Cay due to the senator's old plans to build a reverse osmosis (RO plant at the site. But Mr Fitzgerald called these arguments invalid. He said it was public knowledge that the then PLP government vetoed the idea of the RO plant at Arawak Cay, instead choosing the Perpall Tract site in 2006. PLP Senator ‘may have conflicting interests’ THE Bahamas Financial Services Union (BFSU ed yesterday that government is failing to inform the public of the number of cutbacks that are being experienced in their sector. In a statement issued to the media, the BFSU said that employers at banks, trust companies, insurance companies, and law firms were moving ahead with restructuring exercises that have led to downsizing or “right-sizing” on a scheduled time frame so that there is little resemblance to the large redundancies found in the hotel sector. This tactic, the union said, is designed to hoodwink the public into “not noticing” the large number of layoffs that these companies would be performing. Govt criticised over financial services cutbacks SEE page seven SEE page seven SEE page seven R R OUTE OUTE OF OUT OF OUT -OF -OF -CONTR -CONTR OL OL BUS BUS PAGE 2: Transport fears SEE page two

PAGE 2

TWO Bahamians were charged in connection with the seizure of illegal guns found aboard a boat in Jamaica last week, according to the Jamaican press. The men, Desmond Hepburn, 29 and Glenroy Russell, 37, both of Nassau were also expected to be charged in a Jamaican magistrate's court yesterday for violating that country's immigration laws. According to the Jamaica Gleaner, the two men who were charged with breaching the country's Firearm Act on Wednesday were taken into custody last Saturday near the St Ann/Trelawny border. The men allegedly had two illegal firearms in their pos session. The Gleaner also reported that last Saturday officers from the Trans-national Crimes and Narcotics Divi sion and the Jamaica Defence Force Coast Guard carried out a special operation off the Rio Bueno coast. During this exercise, they intercepted a go-fast boat with two guns on board an intratech submachine gun and an M14 rifle with ammunition which were seized, reports state. A third person suspect ed to be on the boat is reportedly still sought by police. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Two Bahamians charged over guns seizure – Jamaican press were taken to hospital with leg injuries sustained as a result of the incident. “I could see they were in pain,” said bystander Larry McDonald, who runs a stall where he makes and sells wood carvings right next to where the bus stopped. While police have yet to confirm the information, shaken passengers claimed the Number 21 bus, which services downtown, Wulff Road and Collins Avenue, lost its brakes on Government Hill sometime before 8am. The Clarkes Bus Service jitney then careened down Cumberland Street on to Bay Street, before veering off on to the narrow street that leads to Woodes Rodgers Walk and Nassau Harbour, creating panic for passengers who feared they were about to be thrown into the water. As a result, passengers hurled themselves out of the bus windows on to the ground, Mr McDonald told The Tribune . “The bus almost wiped out a woman’s car on the way down,” added the vendor. When The Tribune reached Woodes Rodgers Walk at around 9.15am the bus, which had significant damage to both sides just above the headlights, scrapes down the side, and its right hand front wheel blown was still wait ing to be moved from the scene. Thankful Nearby officers said they were thankful that the poten tially deadly incident took place early in the morning as otherwise the resulting casualties would likely have been greater. Many Straw Market vendors said they were not yet at their stalls when the incident occurred, but some outside the market told of having to jump out of the path of the oncoming vehicle. Others who were inside the market reported hearing a loud “scraping sound” as the jitney crashed into the steps outside the male restrooms, destroying them completely, before coming to a halt halfw ay around the north west corner of the market. By the time it stopped, Mr McDonald said he saw at least “eight or nine” passengers strewn on the ground. M ost passengers were not s eriously injured and were able to dust themselves off and continue to their destinations. “From the beginning of the corner, I thought the bus driver was fighting, but then they say the brakes gave way on the bus. “(The bus side of the building and peo ple started jumping out all around here. They thought they were going to be dead. “One big fat woman she fall down there (pointing to the sidewalk in front of Senor Frogs). “I know she hurt, but she get up because she had to go to work. “The driver get out and he break off running that way,” said Mr McDonald, pointing east on Woodes Rodgers Walk. The jitney was removed from the area before 10am and according to a police source, will now be taken for testing in an effort to confirm the cause of the accident. The Tribune attempted to reach the owner of the Clarke’s bus franchise, how ever, it had no phone listing, and calls to the Road Traffic Department, including controller Philip Turner, seeking contact details were not returned. Despite confirming that he knew who operates the Clarkes franchise, President of the Public Transport Association Reuben Rahming, declined to provide the name of the franchise holder when called. He said that when he returns from a trip off the island on Sunday he should get a “full report” on the mat ter. HAVE you had a dangerous ride on a jitney? Does the whole operation need to be brought under control? Perhaps you think it should be left to run as it is? If you have any comments, write to Ali son Lowe at alowe@tribunemedia.net or telephone her on 322-1986. J J I I T T N N E E Y Y R R I I D D E E O O F F T T E E R R R R O O R R THE MALE RESTROOMS where it can be seen that the bus crashed into the steps, destroying them completely. Passengers jump for their lives Latest drama puts heat on Government A l i s o n L o w e / T r i b u n e s t a f f FROM page one W HILE the cause of the latest jitney drama is as yet unconfirmed, the downt own incident caused concerned citizens to question what government is doing to bring the publ ic transportation system under control after years of near misses and tragic endings. For too long, jitneys have been operated in a w ay that often endangers public safety and turns off potential passengers, said a member of the public who contacted The Tribune last night. (See story page 1). The Tribune’s archives reveals a lengthy history o f incidents and complaints involving jitneys, including the death of Faith Mackey, a six-year-old girl struck by a jitney on Carmichael Road in 2006,a hit and run involving a cyclist, claims of racism and refusals to pick up disabled passengers. I t also shows how years of statements, dating back to 2005, indicating the need and support for r eform of the public transportation system – in August 2007, former min i ster of works Earl Deveaux described riding o n a jitney as a “horrifying experience” for some have not yet culminated ina ny apparent progress in this regard. As early as 2006, drivers and bus franchise owners expressed their support for a government plan to implement a “unified” bus system that would bring all bus operators under one entity, in which private owners and the government would have a stake. Modelled T he plan to be modelled on other bus systems in the region and the world was ultimately intended to improve the safety and reliability of buss ervices, lessening the recklessness that has given the industry a bad name, in this way encouraging more people onto buses and lessening traffic con gestion. Governor General Arthur Hanna, in his speech from the throne in 2006, declared that theP LP Government would bring legislation to parliament to enact the plan. However, despite proclamations throughout 2006 and 2007 that it was in the process of being “fine tuned”, nothing happened. Former works and transport minister Earl Deveaux was a proponent of the view that a “Unified Bus System” would have little impact on the service provided if other core issues were not addressed, such as route rationalisation and the professionalism of drivers. In June 2008, Mr Deveaux, in conjunction with the Road Traffic Department, the United Transportation Company and the Public Transport Association, committed to a -day challenge” for buses to improve their services becoming more courteous, reducing speed, cleaning up their vehicles and stopping at designated sites. Mr Deveaux said the challenge would have “measurable” goals and results would be published publicly. However, this did not happen. In the meantime, Lucaya MP Neko Grant took over as minister with responsibility for transport and the question of what is being done to reform the public transportation system has not had any further public commentary. People question what is being done to control public transport E ARL DEVEAUX From the beginning of the corner, I t hought the bus driver was fighting, but then they say the brakes gave way on the bus.”

PAGE 3

By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net E DIBLE delights will raise money for the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group a t a delectable event in Palmdale this weekend. Creative cake and cookie b akery ‘Something’s Differe nt’ in Alexander Street, off Rosetta Street, is hosting a cookie decorating competi t ion and selling turtle-themed cookies on Saturday, August 1. T he event marks the day the slaughter of sea turtles in the Bahamas is expected to be banned after 15 years of lobbying by the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group (BSTCG tally conscious Bahamians. Sweet-toothed adults and children are invited to enter ar affle to win a three-dimensional turtle cake, try turtlethemed cupcakes and colouri n their own turtle cookies with edible markers, and a prize will go to the artist who makes the best cookie. And milk and coffee will be served to help hungry customers wash down the sweet treats. ‘Something’s Different’ business owner Samantha Moree, a mosaic artist, will also lead the baking team in creating an edible mosaic m ade of over 200 cookie pieces. The mosaic, ‘Eat Cookies, Not Turtles’, will be displayeda t Doongalik Art Gallery in Marina Village, Paradise Island, at a ‘Save the Turtles’ e xhibition featuring a num ber of sea turtle related artworks by over 20 Bahamiana rtists. M rs Moree and her hus band and business partner Ian Moree will also paint an ‘EatC ookies, Not Turtles’ mural on the second storey of the bakery building to mark thee vent Mrs Moree said: “Really this is all about raising funds and raising awareness, andd oing our part as an environmentally sensitive company to make people more awareo f the issue. “We don’t know yet whether the government will pass the legislation before thet urtle hunting season opens on August 1, but the more we jump up and down about it will help remind them and give them a kick in the pants.” A contribution of $1 per cookie sold will be given to the BSTCG to assist the cause of preserving sea turtles. Cookies also will be sold at participating vendors includ ing the Doongalik Art Gallery, and benefit the educ ation efforts of the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group. The Doongalik art exhibi t ion opening will take place from 6pm to 9pm on Friday August 7. Eat Cookies, Not Turtles’ will be held from 10am to 3pm on Saturday, August 1. PROMINENT and senior members of the Bahamas’ legal fraternity gathered at the Court of Appeal yesterday fora special sitting to mark the departure of Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall. Sir Burton who has been nominated to become a permanent judge of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia is expected to demit the officeof Chief Justice of the Bahamas on August 7. The ICTY, which was estab lished in 1993, is the first war crimes court created by the United Nations and the first international war crimes tri bunal since the Nuremberg and Tokyo tribunals, set up specifically to address the war crimes that were perpetrated during the Balkan conflicts ofthe 1990s. Court of Appeal President Dame Joan Sawyer, Attorney General Michael Barnett, Bar Association president Ruth Bowe-Darville, former presi dent Wayne Munroe and attorney Damian Gomez who described Sir Burton as a “trail blazer”, all expressed their thanks and gratitude to Sir Burton for his years of service. Sir Burton also expressed his thanks to those in atten dance at the special sitting stating that he has enjoyed a high level of co-operation and ser vice from judges on the bench and expressed thanks to the Bar for its co-operation and courtesy shown to him during his tenure as Chief Justice. Sir Burton, 61, was appointed as Chief justice of the Supreme Court on September 4, 2001. He was appointed as a jus tice of the Supreme Court on February 1, 1991, and was also appointed as a justice of appeal on April 1, 1997. Sir Burton, 61, was awarded a knighthood by Queen Eliza beth in 2001. He was called to The Bahamas Bar in 1978 and also served in the office of the Attorney General and as solicitor general. It is still unclear who will replace Sir Burton as Chief Justice. The chief justice is appointed by the Governor General on the recommenda tion of the Prime Minister after consultation with the leader of the opposition. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009, PAGE 3 INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News...........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,12 Editorial/Letters........................................P4 Comics......................................................P8 Sports..................................................P9,10 Weather.....................................................P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES USA TODA Y WEEKENDER 8 P AGES B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net REMOVAL of the 85ft barge and excavators which sank in the Exuma Land and Sea Park should com-m ence tomorrow and be completed within five days. The Government has allowed for a huge salvage crane and barge towed by a tug to travel from the Unit-ed States straight to the site o ff Cistern Cay and arrive t onight or tomorrow morni ng at the latest. Customs officials will meet the vessel at the site to prevent any delay of the urgent clean up. Bahamas National Trust (BNT Eric Carey praised the Government for moving swiftly to facilitate entry of the vessel. He said: “The crane has the capacity to lift the barge as well as lift the excavator and the tractor underwater, and the government has fast-tracked approvals to get it here. “They are also allowing for the vessel to go straight to the site without the requirement of checking in with Customs in Bimini. “And we are hoping it will arrive (this (tomorrow fully the complete salvage should be finished in no m ore than five days.” T he barge carrying two e xcavators and a front-end loader sank to the sea floor in the shipping channel near Cistern Cay, Exuma, at around 3am on Wednesday, July 15. A crew of around four people were rescued by passing boats. Up to 1,000 gallons of diesel leaked from the vessel, but favourable wind conditions meant the impact was minimal. The diesel dissipated into the ocean away from the n earby Cistern Cay beach a nd most of the oil has e vaporated, Mr Carey said. Fortunately the barge, two excavators, and frontend loader, sank to the seabed away from major coral reefs and around 40y ards from the nearest coral heads, the BNT executive director added. But as the barge sits around four feet above the surface at low tide, and the excavators around four feet below, the wreck poses a major hazard for boats passing through the area. B arge owner Michael O akes will cover the cost of t he cleanup and the BNT is investing a significant number of staff and other resources to provide support for the project, Mr Carey said. T he Port Department and Royal Bahamas Defence Force are also assisting the operation organised by Minister of the Environment Earl Deveaux. Oil spill cleanup expected to begin tomorrow A 21-year-old man accused of having unlawfuli ntercourse with a girl of 14 was arraigned in Magis trates Court Thursday. G iovanni Brown appeared before Magistrate Ancella Williams in Court 6, Parliament Street. It is a lleged that sometime in February 2009, the accused had intercourse with the girl. Brown elected for a summary trial and pleaded not guilty to the charge. He was granted bail in the sum of $9,500. The case has been adjourned to August 28. T WO MEN charged in connection with the recents eizure of $128,000 worth o f marijuana were a rraigned in Magistrates Court yesterday. Lameko Simmons, 23, of S ea View Drive, and a 48year-old Bentley Simmons, of Pinedale Grand B ahama, appeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane, yesterday accused of possessing marijuana with the i ntent to supply to another. Court dockets claim the a ccused were found in possession of the drugs on Wednesday, July 22. Both men pleaded not g uilty to the marijuana possession charge. Police reportedly seized 128 and half pounds of marijuana while executing a search warrant at an apartmento n Sea View Drive. The d rugs are estimated to have a street value of $128,500. Both men werer emanded to Her M ajesty’s Prison and are expected back in court on July 28 for a bail hearing. Men arraigned on possession of marijuana 21-year -old man in court for unlawful inter course court BRIEFS Operation expected to be completed in five days Attorneys hold special sitting for Burton Hall ‘Eat Cookies, Not Turtles’ EAT Cookies, Not Turtles cookies will raise funds for the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group. INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, r ead Insight on Mondays

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. I write this letter to bring awareness to The Bahamas and Bahamian people. I was a private school teacher for 15 years and was employed at two different institutions during this period. I am not being biased but simply honest. I worked at a private school for 10 years asa high school teacher. The ratio of foreign teachers to Bahamians was 85:15, I would sit in the staff room with disgust, listening to the foreign teachers talk poorly about the Bahamian students and their parents. One teacher from Guyana even mentioned to me, “hows he does not care who fails or do not understand what is b eing taught, once the students come to school so that she gets paid and sends monies to her family back home (Guyana I left that institution to work in another private school that is closer to my home in the west. The ratio of foreign teachers to this school was much higher than the previous s chool (90:10 I could not believe it! The f oreign teachers spoke even worse about the students and parents than the previous school. What’s more, the foreign teachers spoke down to the students and when the students informed their parents they all (foreigners would gather together and tell the parents a bunch of lies about that particular student. Ministry of Education beware when you give private schools stipends please investigate the administrators, staff, and persons working at the Department of Immigration because I am certain that some of these “Christian Schools” do not have, 300 students to receive this grant and employ unqualified and illegal foreign teachers. An advocate for good teachers (Happy Birthday Bahamas). T EACHER Nassau, J uly, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON (AP moment in his presidency, Barack Obama finds increasing need to talk about taming federal deficits as he struggles with a dour e conomy. I t's not just that Republicans are keeping up a relentless and punishing attack on his h ealth care overhaul and other spending pri orities. It's also that Americans are losing c onfidence in Obama's ability to lead an economic recovery. Increasingly, they are wor ried about their jobs and the impact of the nation's mushrooming debt on future generations. A n Associated Press-GfK Poll shows public confidence has reversed on whether thep resident's $787 billion stimulus package, passed by Congress in February, will ultim ately work to improve the economy. In January, 58 per cent were confident it would. Now, it's the opposite, with 58 per cent saying they doubt the stimulus will bring any significant improvement. F orty-seven per cent still think it's too early to pass final judgment on whether the p lan is working. But of those who say they are decided, three times as many say the stimulus has harmed the economy than those who say it has helped. Other polls have shown similar slippage o n Obama's economic stewardship, although his overall approval rating remains solid 5 5 per cent in the AP-Gfk poll conducted July 16-20. Still, that's down nine points from A pril. In contrast to the increasing public gloom, many economists see fledgling signs of an economic recovery and expect the recession to end late this year. But economists also k now that, historically, job losses nearly always continue long after a recession has o fficially ended. The darkening mood comes as Obama t ries to rally public support for overhauling America's health care system, his top legislative priority, but one expected to cost about $1 trillion over 10 years. His mission is to convince the public and Congress that his health care plan will benefit Americans as well as strengthen the economy in the long run. It's been a hard sell. Fiscally conservative Democrats are scept ical. And Republicans have seized on the change in public sentiment to pound Obama for failing to create or save the jobs he promised while greatly overburdening the federal budget. South Carolina Republican Sen. Jim DeMint has predicted the health care legislation could be Obama's "Waterloom oment" and could break his presidency a remark Obama now cites as the kind of p artisan politics-as-usual in Washington he is seeking to end. " I think the Republican attack on the deficit is succeeding because it's real," said Rob Shapiro, a former economic adviser to President Bill Clinton, and chairman of Sonecon, an economic-consulting firm. Obama is factual in saying he inherited a trillion-dollar-plus deficit from predecessor George W. Bush, "but he made it worse," S hapiro said. The deficit in the current budg et year is now estimated to come in at more than $1.8 trillion, pushed higher by the stim-u lus spending, bailouts and increasing war costs. S hapiro said he believes White House officials are taking the Republican attacks very seriously. "They're also concerned about long-term deficits and the impact they could have on the economy and on the ability to actt wo, three years down the road which of course is moving up to the re-election sea-s on," he said. Obama clearly has been putting more e mphasis on the importance of getting spending under control even as he tries to prod a recovery. "We have to do what businesses and families do. We've got to cut out the things we d on't need to pay for the things we do," Obama said at a town-hall style meeting T hursday in Shaker Heights, Ohio, a sub urb of Cleveland. The meeting followed a prime-time news conference the night before in which Obama sought to rally public support for his health plan. T he AP-Gfk poll showed that 61 per cent of those surveyed oppose any additional s timulus package. Nearly half, 49 per cent, now say Obama is trying to change things too q uickly, up from 32 per cent in April. And 80 per cent are worried that increasing federal debt will harm the future of their children and grandchildren. The national debt the total of accu m ulated annual deficits is currently $11.6 trillion. Democratic pollster Mark Mellman s aid "there's no question that, over time, the chief executive pays a price if things aren't g oing well in the economy." While Obama's overall approval rating is still strong, "the fact that it's declined makes it a little harder for him to wield the same kind of threat over Congress as he might have some months ago," Mellman said. Some economists warn that this recession is so deep, it may take much longer than in the past for a rebound even after some e conomic growth resumes. Job losses have now wiped out all the job gains since the last recession in 2001, the first time that has happened since the 1930s. Heidi Shierholz, an economist at the Economic Policy Centre, a labour-funded think tank, noted that the jobless rate continued tor ise for 19 months after the 2001 recession was declared over. " If the unemployment rate is still increasing, people are not going to feel good," Shierh olz said. ( This article was written by Tom Raum, an Associated Press writer). Concerned about foreign teachers LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net EDITOR, The Tribune. Thank you for allowing me the opportunity to address these few points. Recently,t here seemed to be a trend developing among certain Caribbean countries seeking ownership of key Bahamian banks, insur-a nce companies, hotels, and other interests, unencumbered, I might add. When one considers the levels of their ambitions and the reality of what has already changed hands, leaves a reasonably thinkingp erson with one question: Why? Could there be a blueprint somewhere in a Caribbean business office, highlighting thev arious key firms in the Bahamas that they need to target in order to achieve their o bjectives, whatever that might be? Another thing, how will Bahamians benefit? If this be the case, I hope that theo bjectives are not to suck the life blood out of our people and have them denigrated to levels similar to Central American coun tries. The Bahamas has a population of around 400,000 people. We are a small pre-d ominantly blessed black nation. The Bahamas can ill-afford to surrender our cherished way of life to countries that have populations well in the millions. Why aren’t they targeting American insti t utions? German institutions? Venezuelan institutions? Haitian institutions? Cubani nstitutions? Russian institutions? What we have in the Bahamas is only enough for our people, after all 5,000 young Bahamian graduates will be joining the job force this summer. We are a much smaller nation than Jamaica, Barbados and Trinidad. One need not look very far to figure out what is happening here. If they are allowed to own the major companies or institutions in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, then by extension will they be able to dictate immigrations laws? These p eople would be coming in increased numbers, to take up positions of what will now be businesses owned by their nationals.M onies as we have been seen exited the Bahamas, as an example the Clico situation without prior knowledge of the governmento r its agencies, will continue, these tactics are a direct off shoot to our national security. How can the government(s countries with their personal country’s objec tives make the kinds of footholds and r eceive the kinds of advantages likely to dictate commerce/policies in the Bahamas? These people should not have the right t o go after institutions in the Bahamas, no matter what damage is done as a result. Any B ahamian who sides, agrees and assists a foreigner to either cause his own people hardship, or to be disadvantaged or by com m on design, causes the laws of the land to be broken, that person or persons, is a traitor. God gave the Bahamas to Bahamians, Jamaica to Jamaicans, Trinidad to Trinida dians, etc. Incidentally, the Bahamas is not s eeking to establish institutions in any of the Caribbean countries mentioned. We have increased what God has given us, but other Caribbean countries may not have increased what God has given them. I believe that they are trying to take away what our forefathers, grandparents, and par-e nts have worked so hard for, but that dev il is a liar. Please hear me, the Bahamas does not want what you have, nor can you have what God has given the Bahamas to sustain its people. FRANK GILBERT Retired Policeman Nassau, July, 2009. Why are Bahamian institutions being targeted by people from the Caribbean? EDITOR, The Tribune. I have read both your editorials on the revamping of Bay Street. You are correct in saying the merchants must do their part in the painting and the upkeep of their buildings. Not only do I agree that something must be done about the traffic pollution, but I also feel that the removal of the jitneys off Bay Street is essential. I know the Nassau Downtown Partnership is doing a fine job, but it needs immediate decisions from Government to move along. I don’t understand why it takes so long to decide on meter parking on Bay Street. We all know this would greatly improve the downtown shopping situation by making it more easily accessible to both local shoppers and tourists alike. We always hear, “Oh I don’t go downtown because I can’t park,” and as a former merchant, I know this is true. In every city, there is meter parking, so what is the hold up? Let’s bite the bullet and get those meters on Bay Street from Victoria Avenue to Navy Lion Road. NICHOLAS KLONARIS Mike’s Shoe Store Nassau, July 7, 2009. Tackling Bay Street traffic pollution EDITOR, The Tribune. At this time of year scores of Bahamians are showing their national pride by wearing their national colours, flying the aqua marine, gold and black and participating in native events designed to foster a sense of unity. Sadly, however, there are too many misguided individuals, Bahamians or otherwise who have no pride in themselves or their environment. Case in point, on June 28, 2009 at around 6pm while driving through the Westridge area the driver of a blue van threw a bottle out of his vehicle. What was most disturbing about this was the individual did this in plain sight as a vehicle was directly behind him and also the bottle was thrown on the perimeter of an owner occupied property. This tells me that this person could not care less who saw him and that this type of behaviour was normal for him. It is high time that we get serious in this country about bringing these ‘dirty minded’ people before the courts and prosecuting them to the fullest extent of the law. There also needs to be an envi ronmental hot line where individuals can report this type of behaviour to the necessary authorities. Otherwise the concept of the Bahamas being “green, clean and pristine” would continue to be an unattainable dream.. DAILY OBSERVER Nassau, July 8, 2009. Lac k of pr ide in the environment Obama more emphasis on restraint

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"I vex at all these lil chirren I see on the side of the road f rom the early morning until the middle of the night selling phone cards! These children should be allowed to live their lives they should be playing, enrolled in some summercamp to learn something to b etter their self-esteem or at least be in the library reading instead of in the hot sun all d ay hustling a few dollars for their parents. And these kids always look like someone rano ver their puppy with their f aces all made up like some one forced them there. "I don't know if this breaks a ny laws but it certainly breaks my heart. Police should be able to lock these kids' par-e nts up for something because it ain't right," Concerned Citizen, Nassau. "I vex that my cable was off for over a month even though my account was current so of course when the bill came around I didn't pay it. After a while I got fed up so when Iwent to Cable Bahamas they said they couldn't check the problem until I paid my measly balance. So I did that three days ago but tell me why I can only get basic cable and not the premium channelsI paid for? After days of me pestering them and them "resetting my signal" they promised me someone will come out next week. "What I want to know is, am I going to get any money back for these channels I ain' getting?" Avid TV Watcher, Nassau. "I vex that there are still some people out there who subscribe to the archaic school of thought which leads them to oppose the proposed outlaw ing of marital rape. I mean the things I've been hearing and reading about that since the amendment was introduced in the House of Assembly this week astound me. "As a woman, and a person, with full rights and control of my body I am disgusted that some people think my gender has no right to refuse theadvances of a man I just hap pen to be married to. Does this thinking also lead them to believe that a husband can physically abuse me, dominate me and not take my opinions into account? It's narrow-mind ed views like that which are responsible for so many thingsthat are wrong in our society," Michelle T., Nassau. "I vex because that damn minister of environment could say at the end of a letter that h e shedding light on the Arawak Cay and harbour dredging project when he ain't the man we really want to hear from. The only person he now shedding light on is that PLP senator. He need to come to t alk to us, the Bahamian peo ple, instead of sending letters and get his leader to sheds ome lights on these damn projects I paying for!" Jason Harris, Kemp Road. "I vex at all these people who chapping, shooting, and k illing their family over a lil' piece of land. I know of plenty cases, when someone died, people in their family is just go crazy trying to get their hands o n a lil' piece of something and basically trying to take what ain' theirs. But the court system is a mess so no wonder some people have to take the matter into their own hands," Concerned Citizen, Nassau. "I is done vex to da point I g a' start to use foreign languages because of all a' dem people in we Christian nationw ho 'slick' our country, people and prime minister by deceiving them to get 'cheap' Crown Land for a different purpose t han which they state and then selling it for 'obscene profits'. "We send the small lil' criminal to jail for committing fraud or stealing a couple of d ollars to feed his family and say its 'zero tolerance' but we is usually two-faced and hypocrites when it comes to dealing with the big ones. Noth ing happens to big ones who normally ga' get off cause they d one know people an' we tha innocent ga' suffer for dem," Trust me now, Nassau. “I was so vex at the pass port office I wrote a poem: The Passport Office: A U nique Form of Torture, People say Da Gubment Dem aint doing what theyo ughta. Queue’s movement barely perceptible to human eye, As with all interminable w aiting experiences: A baby cries. The undefined time punctuated by querulous outbursts ‘Sit down and wait’: a moth er curses. Seems names are called b ut never yours, ‘I have to go to work now’, a father implores. W hen will the queues ever end? One to get the application, t o make the application, and t hen At the end of it all, who knows when it will come? F ly buzzes, infant’s shriek peaks give me a sign! When is it that I can leave this line? Passport office the great e qualiser Man, woman, child, black, white, every type they all come to die here. Alison of the East. Are you vex? Send your comp laints to whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net or fax them to 3282398. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009, PAGE 5 WHY YOU VEX? B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter ALL political appointees in the T urks and Caicos are set to lose their jobs following a crack down on spending. Premier Galmo Williams made the announcement yesterday as he revealed that Government revenue has dropped from an average of a pproximately $18 million per m onth last year to approximately s ome $9 million per month this year. Mr Williams said the decision, taken on the advice of the Ministry of Finance “to better e nable the Government to work w ithin the constraints of its ever s hrinking revenue intake”, would take effect as of September 30. “Given the slowing in the economy, I have wrestled with this decision long and hard, and regret having to take this position, espe-c ially as we are aware that this move could have a seriously negative impact on the many persons who have opted to give up otherwise lucrative opportunities to contribute to the growth and d evelopment of our country over t he recent years,” said Mr W illiams. “Coupled with the other measures that we have put in place and others yet to be implemented, this course of action will assure us of the opportunity to turn aroundo ur economy in the quickest possible time, while lessening the impact that the current worldwide recession will otherwise have on our wider community.” “Rest assured, however, that we a re doing all that we are able, to e nsure that as many of the effected i ndividuals as possible, are placed in other job opportunities before the termination notice expires on September 30,” he added. Turks and Caicos is facing having direct rule imposed on it byB ritain following a Commission of Inquiry into corruption there. British Governor of the TCI, Gordon Weatherall, announced the suspension of certain sections of the country’s constitution a llowing Britain to take greater c ontrol over the reins of power e arlier this month. However, he claims he is waiting for the outcome of a court case challenging the order that brings the British direct rule into force before moving ahead with fulld irect rule, a move that was recommended by the report from the Commission of Inquiry. Turks and Caicos govt cracks down on spending THE Bahamas has asked Colombia for support in a num-b er of United Nations initiatives, as both countries seek to strengthen diplomatic relations. Governor-General, His Excell ency Arthur Hanna, made the appeal as His Excellency Ventura Emilio Diaz-Mejia presented hisL etters of Credence as Ambassador of the Republic of Colomb ia, at Government House, July 23. The Bahamas wants Colombia t o support its candidacies to the UN Economic and Social Counc il; the Council of the International Maritime Organization, Category C; and Presidency of the T hirty-Fifth General Conference of the United Nations Educationa l, Scientific and Cultural Organisation. “The Bahamas values the cord ial relations between our two countries and looks forward to the d eepening and the diversification of our relationship,” Governor G eneral Hanna said. He acknowledged that The Bahamas and Colombia "share a wide base of linkages founded on common interests" and the diplo m atic relations that followed "has c onsolidated the continued com mon understanding." “The Bahamas, as has the rest of t he word, but particularly the Caribbean nations, has taken keen note of your country’s proactive engagement in the well-being of t he governments and peoples that comprise the Association of Caribbean States, as a result oft he reform initiatives Colombia is actively seeking to implement in t hat body,” the said Mr Hanna. He told the Ambassador that bilaterally, these initiatives could b ring to fruition his personal pledge to increase the relations of b oth countries in overcoming illegal drug trafficking and crime. Replied the Ambassador: Colombia and the Commonwealth of The Bahamas have m aintained, with mutual respect, excellent relations in all areas, and that is why I personally wish theyc an be increased. “Colombia will make every poss ible effort to give to your government the required support in v ital areas as it has occurred in the past. I am convinced that in the future these will be broadened. “Be sure that loyalty, respect, and sincerity will remain princi p les and essential values of our c ordial relations. Bahamas seeks Colombian support on UN initiatives D e r e k S m i t h / B I S P h o t o K r i s t a a n I n g r a h a m / B I S P h o t o HIS Excellency Emilio Diaz-Mejia, Ambassador of the Republic of Colombia, paid a courtesy call on Minister of Foreign A ffairs, Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symontte, July 22. Pictured from left are Andrew McKinney, Chief of Protocol; Car l os Gonzalez, Director, Colombian Government of Trade Bureau, Caribbean Office in Miami, Florida; Ambassador DiazMejia; Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs the Hon Brent Symonette; Dr Patricia Rodgers, Permanent S ecretary; Joshua Sears, Director General, Ministry of Foreign Affairs; and Janeen McCartney, undersecretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs. GOVERNOR G eneral, His E xcellency Arthur Hanna ( right) and His Excellency Emilio DiazMejia, Ambass ador of the R epublic of Colombia, share a light moment during a lunch at Gray Cliff Restaurant.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THERE was no mistaking the urgency that academics conveyed recently during a round table at the UNESCO World Con-f erence on Higher Education in Paris, France, about the social responsibility of institutions of higher learning. Addressing the round table, College of t he Bahamas President Janyne Hodder said that post secondary institutions must maintain consistent connections with society rather than operate in a vacuum. Among the concrete proposals for change she pro-p osed were new rankings, increased international exchanges and networks, and competitive awards for socially responsible universities. Universities differ greatly in history, context, mission and size. Yet, they share a set of common beliefs and practices that allow them to create bridges to better world understanding, respect and development,”M s Hodder said. But she maintained that these bridges can be made stronger yet. The COB president explained that developing a new ranking would involve crafting i ndicators of that responsibility – perhaps in the areas of learning, research and service – and reporting on them. Much like the strategic plans for COB, Ms Hodder proposed innovations in under-g raduate and graduate programme development, multidisciplinary degrees focused on areas o f national importance, service learning programmes and international experiences for students. Ideally, she suggested, research would be measured against MillenniumD evelopment Goals (MDGs national goals and would be assessed based on participation in various networks, direct impact on communities and various r esearch programmes focused on national issues. In other critically important areas, socially responsible universities would maintain student engagement initiatives tied to MDGs, problem-based research and inter-v ention programmes, as well as community awareness initiatives tied to sustainable development. “It is good to remember that universities a re already agents of social responsibility but can do more,” Ms Hodder said during the round table. “Universities are not ivory towers or the only experts or the handmaidens of other agencies but must remain in interactive dia-l ogue with society.” The interactive session in which the COB president participated was designed to explore the areas where institutions of highe r learning could capitalise on their role as social developers, especially within the context of sustainable development, peace, the MDGs and the global financial crisis. At the World Conference on Higher E ducation, over 1,000 participants from approximately 150 countries examined the role of post secondary institutions in addressing major global challenges, prov iding a platform for key stakeholders to make a renewed commitment to the development of higher education and agree on action-oriented recommendations to meet the growing and multiple demands of soci-e ty. The conference ended on July 8 with an appeal for governments to increase their investment in higher education as a major f orce in building an inclusive and diverse knowledge society and to advance research, innovation and creativity. Hodder proposes action plans for socially responsible universities CHIEF Justice Sir Burton Hall challenged newly-appointed magistrates to apply the law “as it is” to matters coming before them. He was speaking during a ceremony for Justices of the Peace who were sworn in as magistrates, July 3, at the Supreme Court. The five JPs who took their oaths to sit in the Community Court are Japheth Edison Deleveaux, Charles Mahlon Hunt, Alvan Kenneth Rolle, Charles Andrew Sweeting and Vylma Bloneva Thompson-Curling. The Chief Justice warned them that at times they will face “usually ill-informed” often “unfair” criticism. “That is an inevitable incident of holding public office in the ‘information age’,” he said. Views He advised them to make their views known to the Chief Justice with regard to “how the law can be made more efficient or effective in achieving the social ends it was intended to serve.” “Make your views known to the Chief Justice who would convey them to the Attorney General where appropriate with a view to engaging the legislative machinery to reform and revise the laws,” said Sir Burton. H e warned them that there are still administrative “wrinkles” t o be ironed out and these "incidental irritants" could prove f rustrating from time to time but should not deflect them from their principal duties as judicial officers. In congratulating the magistrates, he said he hoped the Community Court would become a “new thrust in making judicial services more widely available to the community.” He thanked the government agencies for their assistance especially the management team of the Office of the Judiciary. The Attorney General and Minister of Legal Affairs Senator Michael Barnett also addressed the brief ceremony. A pply the law ‘as it is’, Chief Justice tells new magistrates AMERICAN TV star Tyler Perry paid a courtesy call on Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham at the Office of the Prime Minister on Wednesday. The top-rated actor/producer is in The Bahamas for two weeks filming the sequel to his blockbuster film “Why did I get married?” The film has scenes shot on Eleuthera and Exuma and features more than two dozen Bahamian actors and crew. Pictured from left are Prime Minister Ingraham, Mr Perry, and Bishop Neil Ellis. J ANYNE HODDER (BIS photo: Patrick Hanna FIVE JUSTICES OF THE PEACE were sworn in as Magistrates to serve in t he Community Court by Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, July 3. Pictured from left are Charles Sweeting, Japheth Deleveaux, Vylma Thompson-Curling, Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, Attorney General and Minister of Legal Affairs Senator Michael Barnett, Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez, Alvan Rolle a nd Charles Hunt. A ct or T y ler P er r y calls on PM P e t e r R a m s a y / B I S P h o t o EXPOSING the country’s youth to career opportunities i n the culinary and hospitality areas, talented local chefs, who a re graduates of the College of the Bahamas, last week beganm entoring budding chefs in New Providence as part of the L il’ Chefs summer programme. The programme also includes week-long training sess ions in Exuma and Grand Bahama. The Lil’ Chefs pro g ramme has been running for three years and has grown fromi nitially 15 students learning only culinary arts to approxim ately 50 students being trained in culinary, pastry and cold food delights. In the k itchen at the Choices Restau rant at the Culinary and Hos-p itality Management Institute (CHMI a ll share a common love for the culinary arts. At one work station, young Whitney Barnes watches intent ly as Chef Keisha Bonimy gives i nstructions about how to prepare an exotic chicken dish,w hile another group of youngsters learn the art of making a decadent chocolate cake and o ther pastries from scratch. “I’m from Florida and I c ome to the Bahamas for the summer and my aunt told me a bout this programme and I thought it would be a great experience to learn how to cook and go back home and tell people about it,” said Whitney. But she quickly points out that her interest in the kitchen is purely for practical purposes, rather than a career aspiration. I hope to get a little bit more skill level in the kitchen out of t his experience in order to take back home,” she said. T his year, students enrolled in New Providence have the a dded benefit of etiquette training from well-known image management consultant Stacia W illiams. “We’re starting some new things and moving into s ome new directions because of the kinds of responses thatw e have gotten from students and parents over the last two y ears,” said director of industry training and Assistant Professor at CHMI Valderine Hamilton. O ne of the young partici pants, Anae Bain said she wase xcited to learn about the Lil’ Chefs training programme, e specially because she aspires to become a chef. But she admits that she must first conquer her trepidation of han dling raw food. I’m not the best in the kitchen but I can do little stuff.I don’t like touching raw food, but I do want to be a chef because I think it’s cool,” she s aid. “I hope to learn more and help my mom in the kitchen a nd then do it myself. I’m learning culinary and pastry, andp astry is awesome because I can learn how to make all kinds o f cakes from scratch.” Under the CHMI, COB offers two Baccalaureate d egree programmes – one in tourism management and the o ther in hospitality management. There is also an Associ-a te of Arts degree in Culinary Arts and a three-year chef’s p rogramme. In addition the industry training department offers short certificate courses i n specific culinary areas. Speaking to the importance oft he Lil’s Chefs summer training programme, executive vicep resident of Academic Affairs Dr Rhonda Chipman-Johnson said: “You might be exposed to careers in the culinary and hospitality area. There are c areers in the tourism industry that many of you might wish tol ook at.” Budding chefs receive mentoring in summer programme TWO young participants of the Lil’ Chefs summer training programmel earn the art of making decilicous c akes and pastries.

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"The facts are clear with regard to my involvement with the Arawak Cay container port proposal. There isno conflict of interest as I have no interest, direct or indirect, and my commitmentto save Saunders Beach remains focused and determined," Mr Fitzgerald said. Documents released by the Ministry of Environment this week show that Mr Fitzgerald, as chairman of BK Water,and his partner Mark Fin layson placed a bid to build the plant that was then pro posed to be constructed at Arawak Cay. The plant was to provide water to Kerzner International, Paradise Island, and Baha Mar project, once it was finished and BK Water had estimated it could supply 6 million gallons of imperial water a day. A letter dated October 15, 2005, shows that in BK Water's bid, the company offered the Water and Sew-erage Corporation 12.5 per cent of its shares to the utility company, at no charge, if its bid was successful. The company, with the other firms that qualified to bid on the Blue Hills RO, were invited by the Water and Sewage Corporation (WSC to bid on the Arawak Cay plant in April, 2005. A legal opinion, prepared by Veronique Evans, said that BK Water was not a qualified bidder and advised WSC to reject its proposal. "The senator, who wishes to preserve the Bahamas for future generations, and a would-be tenant, was a participant in a failed arrangement to impose his company on the supply of reverse osmosis water to Kerzner. "The president of BK Water is the same Senator who now claims that Arawak Cay should not be the site of the container port. . .Yet we must suffer talk about accommodating special interests?" said Mr Deveaux's statement. In late 2006, the then PLP government decided to place the water plant at Perpall Tract so as not to interfere with plans to revitalise the Nassau harbour front. In recent months the sena tor has accused Dr Deveaux of handling the port relocation, and the dredging of Nassau Harbour and the extension of Arawak Cay – which are separate but integrated projects under a shroud of secrecy. Responding to the firestorm of criticism levelled at him, Dr Deveaux called Mr Fitzgerald's claims that his ministry and the government have been silent on the controversial port relocation as an "outrageous misrepresentation" of the facts calculat ed to spread "public alarm." "We need to light up the darkness by exposing the interest of those who seek to spread this panic and insidious crusade about the small man being left out. . .We have, in our country, a more insidious chronic disease. It isa political disease of tribalism masked in the form of protecting the small man," said Dr Deveaux. Mr Fitzgerald is head of the newly formed Committee to Protect and Preserve the Bahamas for Future Generations; an organisation that has aggressively opposed government’s plans for the Arawak Cay port relocation. The group has said it is looking at legal ways to halt the government's actions until "all the facts are laid on the table." "(Dr Deveaux government are obviously rattled by the calls of Bahami ans to be transparent and accountable to the Bahamian people on the container port at Arawak Cay. Clutching at straws and attacking me does not address the numerous concerns the Bahamians have with regard to the relocation of the container port," said Mr Fitzgerald. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009, PAGE 7 FROM PAGEONE “His role is to keep the party relevant in the country. He is to organise constituency associations and to keep the message of the FNM in the country interesting and timely and attract new members to the party. In other words, his mission should be to help foster party unity. “However, since he has been in the chair, he has caused disunity in several constituencies. He has abandoned some of the basic policies that would level the playing field in constituency election of officers,” she said. The source added that the party’s policy is that before a constituency election can be conducted all members should have attended at least three consecutive meetings. However she said, Mr Ferguson has “conveniently” waived this policy in three constituencies Bamboo Town, South Beach and Golden Isles. “Since then, all of these constituencies have been less than functional and even disjointed to put it mildly. In fact infighting is the order of the day in these constituencies. He has allowed the Women’s Association elections to happen while abandoning this same policy, which has split the association down the middle. “His attention is scattered between his activities in South Eleuthera and his position. Therefore the chairmanship is not getting the kind of attention it deserves. While Mr Ferguson was a good educator, he certainly is not capable of galvanizing support for the FNM. We need a ‘hands-on’ aggressive, politically astute chairman that can reach out and touch people,” she said. Attempts to reach Mr Ferguson for comment on this matter were unsuccessful up to press time last night. F ROM page one FNM chairman under fire PLP Senator ‘may have conflicting interests’ FROM page one “Undue pressure is being put on many employees in the finance sector to meet unrealistic goals and work to cover duties where others have exited the organization all under the guise of adjusting to the economic situation. “We can affirm that plans are well underway in many of the financial institutions for redundancies via early retire ments, natural attrition and terminations for any breach regardless of level or error. The BFSU does not support wrongdoing but wants employers to be considerate of the pressure being placed on employees in the sector who are going to work each day uncertain when or if that day is the last day at their company,” the statement read. The union added that the Minister of Labour, Dion Foulkes was quite right in his most recent statements on the layoffs at Ansbacher (Bahamas aware of any further redundancies. “This may be because the reduction of employees remains below the radar due to the concealed downsizing policies of these local employers, and thus neither the Minister nor the public is aware of its magnitude.” FROM page one Government criticised over financial ser vices cutbacks B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net AN ESTIMATED $1million has b een invested into Eleuthera's economy thanks to the filming of superstar Tyler Perry's upcoming p roduction, one hotelier suggested yesterday. The American director, produce r and actor is on location in Governor's Harbour shooting the sequel to his 2007 hit “Why Did I G et Married”. D avid Barlyn, owner of the Pineapple Fields Hotel where a n umber of the cast and crew are staying, likened the business from the film to "Christmas in July". "They have put at least, in the course of three weeks to a month, n o less than a $1million on this island. Basically it's equal to Christmas in July. We are doing the levelso f business that we would normall y have in December and New Y ear," he told T he Tribune . "Just about every hotel and private home within a five-mile radius of the location has been booked," said Mr Barlyn, adding that the trickle-down effect to local taxi driv ers, restaurants and other surrounding businesses has been tremendous. W hile he did not want to reveal h ow much of a financial benefit his p roperty received from the film, he said all 32 units of his condo-hotel style resort were booked out for the last few weeks to accommodate some of the film's cast and crew. He said it was much-needed busin ess considering the flagging tourism industry. "It's been a tough year. We've been very fortunate that we've been holding our own. We've also gotten a good amount of international press about Tippy's and the hotel but I can say, like everybody in the hospitality world, it's been rough". The production spent a few days shooting in Exuma, and is expected t o wrap up about two weeks of filming in Eleuthera in the next five d ays or so. T YLER PERRY Tyler Perry’s ‘$1m boost for Eleuthera economy’ H O TELIERSAYS US S TAR S FILMHASLEDTOBUSINESSBOOM “Just about every hotel and private home within a five-mile radius of the location has been booked.”

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n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net MANAGER Godfrey “Gully” Burnside has his Price Waterhouse Stingrays clicking in the men’s division of the New Providence Soft ball Association. T hursday night at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex, Burnside watched as his Stingrays ran circles around the Defence Force Com modores, stopping them 11-2 in five innings via the mercy rule. With the win Price Waterhouse took sole possessionof second place at 8-2, just a half game ahead of front running Heavy Equipment Dorsey Park Boyz and a half game ahead of defending champions Commando Secu-rity Truckers, who are 7-2. With the loss their third straight the Defence Force dropped all the way to fifth place at 5-6, just a half game ahead of sixth place Young Breed. In the opener, Young Breed knocked off the Thompson Heavy Equipment Outlaws 9-4 to improve their record to 4-5. The Out-laws fell to 3-8 in seventh place. Burnside, who is hoping that his youthful looking Stingrays can finally get overthe hump and not only get into the championship but w in it all this year, said the key to their success has been their off-season training and the acquisition of two veteranp layers. “We had a very good and productive spring training and the team is playing very well right now as a result of it,” Burnside said. “We still h ave some little things that we have to work through and s ome injuries that shook up our infield a little. “But with the addition of (pitcherThompson and (first baseman (Francis has really caused the players to play a lot better. I really like the way we are gelling right now.” If they can stay injury-free, Burnside said his Stingrays are really making an impact in the league when it counts the most in the post-season. Leroy Thompson, who has reunited with Burnside after playing with the Truckers up to last year, fired a three-hitter, striking out four in securing another win on the mound. He gave up the only two runs to the Commodores ona two-run home run from Bryon McClain in the top of the third as he drove home Martin Culmer from first on an error. But after taking a 3-2 lead in the second, the Stingraysm arched 11 batters to the plate as they batted around the clock, scoring eight times on five hits. Alec Rolle, who led off the inning with a walk, highlighted the rally with a three-run homer. Godfrey Burnside Jr had a perfect 3-for-3 night at the p late, driving in a run and scoring three times, Luton Delancy was 2-for-3 with two runs scored and Greg Jones was 2-for-2 with a RBI, scoring a run, while Ghandi Williams scored twice. In total, the Stingrays banged out 10 hits off losing pitcher Cory Brown, who had just one strike out. Y Y o o u u n n g g B B r r e e e e d d 9 9 , , T T h h o o m m p p s s o o n n H H e e a a v v y y E E q q u u i i p p m m e e n n t t 4 4 : : The more experienced Outlaws seemed poised to win this battle against their younger foes, but they almost ended up getting stopped. Coming back from a 3-1 deficit in the second inning, Young Breed slowly pecked away until the sixth when they needed at least five runs to force the Outlaws to walk off the field. Instead, New Young felt short with just four, allowing the game to play to the end when they prevailed. Theodore Sweeting Jr went 3-for-4 with three RBIs, while Ken Wood was 2-for-4 with two RBIs, scoring a run and D’Andre Rigby 2-for-4 with a run scored. Young Breed, who pro duced 15 hits off loser Roscoe Thompson, got a 2for-3 production from Ange lo Butler and Thomas Davis with Butler scoring twice and Thomas driving in a run and scoring another. “First of all, I want to thank God for the victory because it pushes us up in the standings,” said Ken Wood, who anchored their defense at short. “I think we’re playing great and once we stay together, we should make the playoffs.” Wood said one of the key ingredients is their ace pitch er Eugene Pratt, who came through down the stretch and held the Outlaws scoreless for four innings as they racked up their runs. Pratt ended up giving up seven hits with four strike outs for the win. C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 9 P AGE 10 BSF president on anti-doping bill... Martinborough Bahamas National Sunfish Champion! See page 10 n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net D ebbie FergusonMcKenzie picked up her second-straight v ictory in the wome n’s 200 metres b efore she helped the women’s 4 x 100 relay team to a second place yesterday at the Aviva London Grand Prix. Four days after turning in the world’s leading time at the 25th Vardinoyannia International Track and Field Meeting in Rethymno, Greece, Ferguson-McKenzie came back in Great Britain and clocked 23.11 seconds for another victory. The time was no where near the fastest time of 22.32 this year that also recorded as a meet record, but it was good enough to keep her well ahead of her nearest rival, American Marshevet Hooker, who ran 23.30. Ferguson-McKenzie’s victory has her in second place in the World Athletics Tour standings with 39 points after four meets behind LaVerne Jones-Ferette, who is out front with 42 points over five meets. Jones-Ferette of the Virgin Islands was fourth yesterday in 23.39. Third place went to Great Britain’s Emily Freeman in 23.34. In the relay, Ferguson-McKenzie teamed up with veteran Chandra Sturrup, Timicka Clarke and Christine Amertil to run 43.35 for a sec ond place finish behind the United States (42.39 They improved on the previous season’s best of 43.64 that was done by Sakeitha Henfield, Sturrup, Amertil and Ferguson-McKenzie at the Penn Relays on April 25. On both occasions, the teams went under the 43.90 qualifying time for the IAAF World Championships in Athletics in Berlin, Germany, August 15-23. Yesterday, the Bahamas matched the times produced by Brazil and Mexico, while only the United States, Great Britain, Germany and Trinidad & Tobago have ran faster. Amertil, in her individual appearance, was fifth in the first of two women’s 400 races in 52.20. She ended up in that same position with the two races combined. Winning the heat and taking the top spot was Nicola Sanders of Great Britain in 51.45, followed by three Americans Shana Cox (51.56 Monica Hargrove (51.66 DeeDee Trotter (52.08 Amertil is now tied with Russian Yulia Gushchina for 12th place in the World Athletics Tour with 27 points. American Sanya Richards, who skipped London, is leading the pack with 90 points. On the men’s side, Olympic bronze medallist Leevan “Superman” Sands had to settle for fourth place in the men’s triple jump with a leap of 17.13 metres. Winning the event was American Brandon Roulhac with 17.33. Cuban Arnie David Girat was second with 17.18 and Great Britain’s Phillips Idowu was third with 17.16. With his performance, Sands dropped to third with 40 points on the World Athletics Tour. He was passed by Idowu, who has 46. Girat is leading with 50. And Shamar Sands missed out on the opportunity to advance to the final of the men’s 110m hurdles. In the first of two heats, Sands clocked 13.81 for sixth place. The heat was won by Eric Mitchum in 13.61 as he nipped Cuban world record holder Dayron Robles (13.62 Robles, however, came back in the final and turned the tables by winning in 13.29. Mitchum was fifth. Ryan Braithwaite of Barbados, who w on the title at the BAAA Nationals i n June, was second in 13.31 and G reat Britain’s Andrew Turner third in 13.66. Sands, who was 10th overall in the two races combined, dropped into a two-way tie for 10th place with BraIthwaite with 38 points in the World Athletics Tour. Today, Sturrup will be the last of the Bahamian contingent to compete in an individual event when she runs in heat two of the women’s 100 that will feature American Allyson Felix. ‘Golden Girl’ Debbie wins 200 again! Women’s 4 x 100 relay team places second ‘Superman’ Sands settles for fourth in triple jump Shamar Sands sixth in 110m hurdles Christine Amertil fifth in 400 Here’s a look at the NPSA’s team standings going into Saturday’s double header: TEAMS W LPct.GB L L a a d d i i e e s s D D i i v v i i s s i i o o n n Pineapple Air Wild..9 0 1,000P C P Lady Sharks 5 3 .629 31/2 Sigma Brackettes 5 4 .555 4 Mystical Queens 1 6 .142 7 Boomer G Swingers 1 8 .111 8 M M e e n n s s D D i i v v i i s s i i o o n n Dorsey Park Boyz 8 1 .808 P W Stingrays 8 2 .800 1/2 C Security Truckers 7 2 .777 1 Robin Hood Hitmen 5 4 .555 3 D F Commodores 5 6 .454 4 Young Breed 4 5 .444 4 T H E Outlaws 3 8 .272 6 Mighty Mits 3 8 .272 6 Morgan Buccaneers 2 9 .181 7 T T o o n n i i g g h h t t s s s s c c h h e e d d u u l l e e 7pm – Proper Care Pool vs Mystical Queens (L 8:30pm – Dorsey Park Boyz vs Thompdon Heavy Equipment (M Stingrays stop Commodores 11-2 in five innings Mer cy rule! S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L NPSA TEAM STANDINGS F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f A PRICE WATERHOUSE STINGRAYS center fielder Godfrey Burnside Jr is tagged out at third base by Defence Force Commodores’ Brad Smith... See more photos on page 10

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS THE president of the Bahamas Softball Federation,in light of the government’s antidoping bill, said the BSF encourages athletes to stay clean and use their natural abilities.” I n a statement to T ribune S ports y esterday, Burkett D orsett said the federation “wholeheartedly” supports the bill. “We encourage our athletes to stay away from the performance enhancing drugs, stay clean and use their natural abilities. I don’t think we need to enhance that with any illegal drugs,” he said. Dorsett said the International Softball Federation (ISF formance enhancing drugs. “And we (the Bahamas Softball Federation) are lauded by the international body for our clean bill of health, so to speak, as it relates to dop ing in softball.” Like all of the other sports, he said Bahamian players are tested for the use of performance enhancing drugs when they compete on the interna tional scene and not one athlete has tested positive. Dorsett said the federation continues to support their ath letes, encouraging them to be vigilant in what they take. “If they must take something, go and see a doctor, or get a list of the banned sub stances,” he said. Over the years, Dorsett said Bahamian athletes have com peted against their foreign counterparts who years later were stripped of their medals after testing positive for performance enhancing drugs. “We would have liked to see the authorities come here and present our athletes with medals when they are givento them because of athletes cheating,” Dorsett said. “The events are normally held on the world stage for all to see, so they should let everybody in the world seet hat the Bahamas are the win ners and they didn’t use drugs to get there.” Federation encourages athletes to ‘stay clean and use their natural abilities’ Thousands e xpected to attend ‘oldest regatta in the Bahamas’ THOUSANDS of Bahamians are expected to flock to Rolleville, Exuma, to attend the 62nd annual regatta/homecoming – the oldest in the Bahamas. According to commodore Jeffrey McKenzie, the C class race commences on Saturday, August 1, beginning with the Parliament Boys Race and a $2,000 cash prize for the win ner. On Sunday, August 2, the Elijah McKenzie Memorial Cup Race is scheduled to be held and the winner will receive a $1,000 cash prize. On Monday, August 3, The Ocean Race from Barraterre will be held and the winner will receive a $500 cash prize followed by the two series races with a $1,000 cash prize. The returning champ Touch Me Not will try to defend her crown. Crowd favourites Bul Reg and Fugitive along with other boats from Barraterre are expected to participate in this year’s regatta. There will also be on shore activities which include the greasy pole contest, may pole plaiting contest and other activities. According to McKenzie, these are the best C class boats in the country and the regatta offers more prize money than any other regatta. Dorsett Darts: Thir d place for Sands Bullets THE SANDS BULLETS dart team, captained by Curtis Malone, presented the fourth place trophy to Sands beer representative Kelly Sands... THE SANDS BULLETS dart team, sponsored by Sands Beer, finished the 2008-9 Nassau Darts Association open season in fourth place out of 29 teams and came in third in the championship division. Shown (l-r Mike Russell, James Newly, Brodie Townly, Kelly Sands of Sands Beer, Captain Curtis Malone, Ian Anderson, Pete Malone and Graham Thornly. n By DIANE PHILLIPS Special to The Tribune WITH barely enough wind to ripple the waters in Montagu Bay, three-time Sunfish world champion Donnie Martinborough used experience to find the highs, dodge the lulls and beat a field of 35 to sail away with the Bahamas National Sunfish Championship title. It was the 10th time Martinborough won out of the 11 times the national championship has been held. But this time was different. “This is the first time that four of the top 15 sailors were juniors and the first time a junior has come in second,” said Martinborough. Christopher Sands, a student at St. Andrews , took second place. “Chris deserves so much credit. He sailed such a s mart regatta.” S mart, in this sense, meant n ot peeling off to take chances that could pay off or just as easily backfire in light and fickle winds, but sailing conservatively to end the series with two second place finishes, two fifths and one 10th, for a total of 24 points in the low-point series. Sands finished just two points below (ahead of sailor Jimmie Lowe, who came in third with 26 points in the five-race series. In fourth place was real estate guru George Damianos who finished with 27 points. In fifth was S S Scan dinavian Gold Cup winner and underwater cinematog rapher Gavin McKinney, who would have given Martinborough a solid run for the title if it had not been for a single bad race. McKinney was the only sailor in the field of 35 beside Martinborough to win two races, but a 23rd place finish in the first race hurt his overall score. In most series, sailors are able to toss out their worst race, but because only five of the six scheduled races were run for lack of wind, every race counted. “The fact that there were no throw-outs made a huge difference in the final results for a number of sailors in the competition,” said Martinborough, whose own worst finish was a 5th. “But it also made young Chris Sands’ final results, in fact, all the juniors’, that much more impressive.” In addition to the surprise of youth finishing close to or beating experienced world class sailors like Lowe, McKinney and Damianos, all of whom sail different classes of boats and at one time or another have held enviable international titles, what made this series stand out was its lead-up to the Sunfish World Championship set for October in Nassau. “The Worlds are huge -boats and sailors from around the world,” said Martinborough. “Hence the great turn-out for the Nationals this year, the largest turnout that I can ever remember, since the host team can enter as many as 15 boats.” The possibility of not having any qualifiers for the World Championship hung in the air on the first day of the regatta when there was so lit tle wind it would have taken a hefty whistler to disturb a leaf. “We had only three days to sail and complete this regatta,” said Martinborough, who also holds a world r ecord in Bermuda Race W eek wins in the Sunfish, t he spunky little 14-foot boat with a single sail. “On Saturday, the first day, it didn’t look like we were going to get in any races.” They finally sailed one. “That meant on Sunday, we had to jam in four races, back-to-back. Conditions were very tough because the wind was still light and variable, all over the place.” So we were to be able to get in a series after five, a series after five, a sit uation that often occurs because of weather condi tions. Martinborough’s win in Montagu Bay earned him the Perry Cooke Memorial National Trophy in honour of the late sailor who brought home The Bahamas’ first Olympic Gold along with Sir D urward Knowles in the Star C lass in 1954. T he Sunfish National Championship was hosted and sponsored by the Nassau Yacht Club while the Royal Nassau Sailing Club’s Commodore Francisco de Cardenas ran the races. De Cardenas’ son, Fernando, finished 8th, just behind Peter Bruce Wassitsch, who finished in 7th, nearly 20 places ahead of his father, Pedro Wassitsch, at 78, the oldest competitor in the regatta. The elder Wassitsch sailed all five races, finishing with 115 points and a broad smile. D Martinborough is Bahamas National Sunfish Champion! THREE TIME World Championship winner Donnie Martinborough won the Sunfish Nationals recently held at Montagu Bay, beating a f ield of 35 contenders... Photos by Robert Dunkley SEVENTY eight-year-oldPedro Wassitsch (left competitor completing the five race series... Stingrays stop Commodores 11-2 COMMODORES’ pitcher Cory Brown in action... DEFENCE FORCE Commodores’ third baseman Brad Smith in action... PRICE WATERHOUSE Stingrays’ pitcher Leroy Thompson lets it go... STINGRAYS’ Jameko Sands keeps an eye on the ball... F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 74F/23C Low: 77F/25C Low: 78F/26C Low: 80F/27C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 82F/28C Low: 81 F/27 C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 92F/33C High: 92F/33C High: 90 F/32 C High: 89 F/32 C High: 92F/33C High: 90 F/32C High: 92F/33C Low: 81F/27C High: 91F/33C Low: 81 F/27 C High: 90F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 78F/26C High: 90 F/32 Low: 77F/25C High: 87F/31C Low: 78 F/26C High: 90F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 94F/34C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 92F/33C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 90F/32C Low: 77F/25C High: 94 F/34 C Low: 78F/26C High: 92F/33C High: 90 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, JULY 24 2009, PAGE 11 THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Mostly sunny with a thunderstorm. Mainly cloudy and very warm. Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Partly sunny, breezy and pleasant. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 92 Low: 81 High: 90 High: 90 High: 91 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Some sun with a couple of t-storms. High: 89 Low: 80 Low: 80 Low: 80 AccuWeather RealFeel 112F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 92F 111-84F 97-85F 98-89F 98-89F Low: 80 TODAYTONIGHTSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................90F/32C Low ....................................................78F/26C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 92 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 76 F/24C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.42" Year to date ................................................20.27" Normal year to date ....................................23.42" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Jul. 28 Aug. 5Aug. 13Aug. 20 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:34 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:58 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 10:18 a.m. Moonset . . . . 10:34 p.m. Today Sunday Monday Tuesday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 11:11 a.m.3.14:53 a.m.-0.3 11:32 p.m.2.95:19 p.m.-0.1 12:04 p.m.3.15:40 a.m.-0.2 -----6:15 p.m.0.0 12:22 a.m.2.76:28 a.m.-0.1 12:57 p.m.3.07:12 p.m.0.2 1:14 a.m.2.57:17 a.m.0.1 1:52 p.m.2.98:11 p.m.0.4 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco93/3377/25pc91/3279/26pc Amsterdam68/2055/12sh72/2257/13pc Ankara, Turkey90/3254/12s90/3257/13s Athens102/3879/26s97/3677/25s Auckland53/1140/4s55/1242/5s Bangkok89/3177/25r90/3277/25r Barbados86/3076/24sh86/3077/25s Barcelona84/2865/18s77/2567/19s Beijing90/3272/22pc88/3171/21s Beirut91/3279/26s81/2778/25s Belgrade88/3159/15s82/2757/13s Berlin68/2052/11sh72/2257/13pc Bermuda84/2877/25pc84/2877/25s Bogota68/2041/5s67/1941/5s Brussels72/2252/11pc77/2557/13pc Budapest81/2754/12pc84/2857/13s Buenos Aires54/1239/3c54/1243/6s Cairo100/3777/25s101/3878/25s Calcutta97/3687/30t97/3687/30t Calgary83/2846/7t71/2152/11pc Cancun91/3277/25t90/3276/24pc Caracas81/2771/21pc80/2671/21t Casablanca90/3275/23s96/3577/25s Copenhagen67/1953/11sh69/2057/13c Dublin66/1854/12sh64/1754/12r Frankfurt73/2254/12pc79/2657/13pc Geneva 76/24 51/10 pc 82/2755/12s Halifax 66/18 59/15 c 73/22 59/15 pc Havana 91/32 76/24 t 93/33 73/22 t Helsinki 72/22 52/11pc70/2155/12pc Hong Kong 90/32 82/27 t 90/32 82/27t Islamabad 104/40 84/28 s 108/42 85/29 s Istanbul98/3680/26s84/2871/21pc Jerusalem 86/30 62/16s86/3063/17s Johannesburg 53/1135/1s55/1238/3s Kingston 90/3278/25s89/3179/26sh Lima73/2259/15s73/2259/15pc London73/2255/12pc75/2355/12pc Madrid97/3663/17s100/3764/17s Manila88/3179/26t86/3078/25r Mexico City77/2555/12t76/2452/11t Monterrey104/4075/23s104/4075/23s Montreal79/2666/18c77/2566/18t Moscow75/2361/16t73/2259/15sh Munich70/2148/8pc76/2449/9pc Nairobi78/2553/11sh79/2653/11pc New Delhi 99/3781/27pc100/3783/28t Oslo66/1854/12sh72/2256/13sh Paris77/2557/13s81/2761/16s Prague 73/22 53/11 sh 74/23 55/12 s Rio de Janeiro70/2168/20r83/2868/20pc Riyadh111/4386/30s105/4079/26s Rome 88/31 64/17 s 90/32 65/18 s St. Thomas88/3179/26sh90/3279/26sh San Juan61/1634/1s65/1831/0s San Salvador 88/31 70/21 t 89/31 74/23 t Santiago 61/1639/3pc66/1845/7pc Santo Domingo90/3274/23s85/2974/23sh Sao Paulo 62/16 58/14 r 71/21 56/13r Seoul84/2866/18pc85/2966/18sh Stockholm 68/20 54/12 sh 72/22 54/12 pc Sydney 64/17 48/8 s62/1641/5sh Taipei94/3483/28t90/3278/25r T okyo 86/30 75/23 sh 85/29 74/23 pc T oronto 75/2363/17t75/2359/15t Trinidad70/2157/13c78/2563/17pc V ancouver 80/26 64/17 pc 82/2765/18pc Vienna 75/2355/12sh77/2560/15s W arsaw 72/22 52/11 sh 68/20 52/11 c Winnipeg 77/25 58/14 pc 79/2658/14pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySunday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles84F Sunday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles84F Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles84F Sunday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles84F Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles85F Sunday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles85F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque95/3569/20pc92/3369/20t Anchorage66/1855/12sh69/2056/13sh Atlanta92/3371/21pc88/3170/21t Atlantic City84/2871/21s88/3170/21pc Baltimore90/3270/21s88/3170/21t Boston82/2768/20pc85/2970/21t Buffalo82/2766/18t77/2564/17t Charleston, SC94/3474/23pc93/3373/22pc Chicago80/2661/16t82/2762/16pc Cleveland82/2764/17t80/2662/16t Dallas100/3778/25pc97/3676/24pc Denver82/2759/15c88/3160/15t Detroit78/2562/16t80/2664/17t Honolulu90/3278/25s89/3177/25pc Houston97/3676/24pc95/3576/24pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySunday TodaySundayTodaySunday Indianapolis86/3063/17t82/2765/18s Jacksonville94/3472/22t92/3372/22pc Kansas City90/3266/18s86/3067/19s Las Vegas103/3981/27pc107/4186/30s Little Rock96/3572/22s95/3570/21pc Los Angeles86/3066/18pc88/3166/18pc Louisville92/3370/21t87/3067/19t Memphis94/3473/22pc94/3472/22t Miami92/3379/26t92/3378/25t Minneapolis78/2562/16pc83/2866/18s Nashville94/3467/19pc88/3169/20t New Orleans90/3275/23t92/3376/24t New York86/3074/23pc86/3074/23t Oklahoma City98/3672/22pc94/3471/21pc Orlando92/3374/23t93/3375/23t Philadelphia89/3172/22pc88/3172/22t Phoenix 105/40 88/31 t 109/4288/31s Pittsburgh84/2864/17t80/2662/16t Portland, OR 89/3164/17s91/3265/18s Raleigh-Durham 96/35 70/21 pc 94/34 70/21 pc St. Louis90/3269/20t88/3169/20s Salt Lake City 93/33 69/20 t 94/3467/19pc San Antonio 99/37 75/23 pc 98/36 74/23 pc San Diego78/2569/20s78/2567/19pc San Francisco 71/21 55/12 pc 73/2256/13pc Seattle85/2960/15s85/2961/16s T allahassee 92/3370/21t92/3371/21pc T ampa 92/33 77/25 t 90/32 77/25t Tucson99/3781/27t103/3981/27s W ashington, DC 90/32 74/23s89/3171/21t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 11

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE B y MEGAN REYNOLDS and TIM CLARKE m reynolds@tribunemedia.net C U RIOUS fish lovers learned h ow to clean and cook lionfish at a demonstration held b y the Department of Marine R esources at Potter’s Cay yesterday. Fisheries officers from the department’s c onservation unit explained how although t he non-native invasive fish have poisonous spines, they are safe to eat and rather delicious! The Pacific Ocean fish are thriving in B ahamian waters at the peril of all native fish as they eat juvenile species of all kinds, and have very few predators. The department has launched a National L ionfish Response Plan to combat the invas ion of lionfish which simply involves eating them! Assistant Fisheries Officer from the cons ervation unit of the Department of Marine Resources Lakeshia Anderson said: “Lionf ish eat almost anything they fit in their mouths, shrimp, crabs, juvenile fish likeN assau Groupers, and an array of other fish. “We analysed the contents of the stomach of one lionfish and found 50 small pilchards. They can impact our commercial fishing industry and because their numbers have increased so much around the archipelago, the best way to control them is to eat them. “So let’s just start eating lionfish. They are not poisonous and they’re very edible and very tasty. You can fillet it or cook it whole. I think it tastes similar to hogfish, but others have said it tastes like snapper or grouper.” Assistant Port Controller at Potter’s Cay dock, Nassau, Craig Curtis, 39, told The T ribune h ow he rates lionfish so highly he plans to serve it at his 40th birthday party in September. He said: “I consider it a bit exotic and i t’s a real delicacy. “To me the texture is relative to the snapp er fish and it’s more tasty than the grouper. I really enjoy it, and I understand the ration ale behind the whole lionfish project because the species is now increasing at such a fast rate it’s important for people to know how we can now turn the tables on them, and start eating them, and start to decrease their population.” Lionfish have venomous spines in three areas and it is important to handle them carefully when preparing them to eat. As y ou clean the fish, hold the head down to a void touching the spines, and wear heavy gloves to protect your hands from fleshy t entacles on the head. Should you get stabbed by a venomous s pine apply heat to the wound for 15 to 20 minutes to prevent the venom from spreading and seek medical attention as soon asp ossible. Lion taming Department of Marine Resources holds a demonstration on how to cookand cleanthe Lionfish STEP ONE: B egin by removing the row of 13 long, venomous dorsal spines which run along the back of the fish with a sharp knife, or a pair of kitchen shears may make removal of the spines easier. Cut into the flesh on each side of the row of spines along the length of the fish, moving from the headt owards the tail. When you have made a ‘V’ shaped incision on either side, loosen the spines and then pry them off completely.O nce removed, the spines are no longer venomous, and you can save them and use them as toothpicks when serving the cooked fish. STEP TWO: Remove the two short, venomous, pelvic spines near the head on the underside of the fish. STEP THREE: Remove the three short, venomous, anal spines near the tail on the underside of the fish. STEP FOUR: Now all three areas of ven omous spines have been removed, the fish is c ompletely safe to handle. Cut off the fan-like pectoral fins on either side of the fish with your knife or kitchen shears. STEP FIVE: Remove the tail. STEP SIX: Remove the head. Lionfish heads have a rough texture and are not very meaty, so they are not recommended as something good to eat. STEP SEVEN: Fillet the fish as usual, or scrape off the thin and easily-removed scales to cook it whole. STEP EIGHT: Season the fish with salt and pepper, dip in egg, and then flour, and deep-fry until golden brown. STEP NINE: Squeeze some lime juice on the fish and dip in hot pepper sauce. Enjoy! Photos by T im Clarke /T ribune staff




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=~ Lhe [Tribune a

SNACK WRAP Pm lowin’ it

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

=-USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009

Some fishy
business

HIGH 92F
LOW 81F

” MOSTLY SUNNY
WITH T-STORM





Volume: 105 No.201




x,

Tuan we

|

in Nassau
SEE PAGE TWELVE



FNM
chairman

dubbed
a failure

ELEMENTS within the
Free National Movement
claim that their chairman
Johnley Ferguson is not per-
forming up to the standard
expected of him and have
gone as far as calling his last
two years in office a “dismal
failure.”

Yesterday, a high ranking

official of the FNM, who
spoke on condition of
anonymity, said she fully
expects for people to chal-
lenge Mr Ferguson for his
post at the party’s convention,
which is to take place in Octo-
ber.

“This position is simply too
important for anyone to be
pussy-footing around with.
Johnley has been the chair-
man since the elections. I

can’t remember the exact
date, but that isn’t important
right now.

Mi Passengers jump for lives from windows vo

enator
B® Out-of-control bus stops feet from harbour | ‘may have
Wi Two taken to hospital with leg injuries



conflicting
interests’

MINISTER of Environ-
ment Dr Earl Deveaux has
suggested that Opposition
Senator Jerome Fitzgerald
may have conflicting interests
in his opposition to Govern-
ment's planned move of the
country's container port to
Arawak Cay due to the sena-
tor's old plans to build a
reverse osmosis (RO) water
plant at the site.

But Mr Fitzgerald called
these arguments invalid. He
said it was public knowledge
that the then PLP govern-
ment vetoed the idea of the
RO plant at Arawak Cay,
instead choosing the Perpall
Tract site in 2006.

SEE page seven

Govt criticised
over financial
services cuthacks

THE Bahamas Financial
Services Union (BFSU) stat-
ed yesterday that government
is failing to inform the public
of the number of cutbacks
that are being experienced in
their sector.

In a statement issued to the
media, the BFSU said that
employers at banks, trust
companies, insurance compa-
nies, and law firms were mov-
ing ahead with restructuring
exercises that have led to

ROUTE OF OUT-OF-CONTROL BUS




Photo: Alison Lowe/Tribune staff
BUS DRAMA: The aftermath of the jit-
ney terror ride which ended just feet
short of Nassau Harbour, next to Senor
Frogs. Police are waiting to speak to

the driver. (8) reeds Arden wen





Weowces Modgare idk






By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

PASSENGERS fearing for
their lives leapt from the win-
dows of an out-of-control jit-
ney that was heading for the
waters of Nassau Harbour
during morning traffic yester-
day.

Police were waiting to
speak with the driver of the
packed bus — licensc plate

PAS aaa UNS Em CT

NP 398 — yesterday after-
noon after he was reported to
have left the scene as the vehi-
cle came to a halt just feet
from the harbour’s edge next
to Senor Frogs.

Two young men, who
police have not identified,

SEE page two




Feedanck 5



NASSAU AND BAHAMI/

ISLANDS) LEADING NEWSPAPER



downsizing or “right-sizing”
on a scheduled time frame so
that there is little resemblance
to the large redundancies
found in the hotel sector.

This tactic, the union said, is
designed to hoodwink the
public into “not noticing” the
large number of layoffs that
these companies would be
performing.

SEE page seven
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009



LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



JITNEY RIDE OF TERROR

Passengers jump for their lives

From the beginning of the corner, I

thought the bus driver was fighting, but
then they say the brakes gave way on the
bus.”



Alison Lowe/Tribune staff

THE MALE RESTROOMS where it can be seen that the bus crashed into the steps, destroying them com-
pletely.

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FROM page one

were taken to hospital with
leg injuries sustained as a
result of the incident.

“T could see they were in
pain,” said bystander Larry
McDonald, who runs a stall
where he makes and sells
wood carvings right next to
where the bus stopped.

While police have yet to
confirm the information,
shaken passengers claimed
the Number 21 bus, which
services downtown, Wulff
Road and Collins Avenue,
lost its brakes on Government
Hill sometime before 8am.

The Clarkes Bus Service jit-
ney then careened down
Cumberland Street on to Bay
Street, before veering off on
to the narrow street that leads
to Woodes Rodgers Walk and
Nassau Harbour, creating
panic for passengers who
feared they were about to be
thrown into the water.

As a result, passengers
hurled themselves out of the
bus windows on to the
ground, Mr McDonald told
The Tribune.

“The bus almost wiped out
a woman’s car on the way
down,” added the vendor.

When The Tribune reached
Woodes Rodgers Walk at
around 9.15am the bus, which
had significant damage to
both sides just above the
headlights, scrapes down the
side, and its right hand front
wheel blown — was still wait-
ing to be moved from the
scene.

Thankful

Nearby officers said they
were thankful that the poten-
tially deadly incident took
place early in the morning as
otherwise the resulting casu-
alties would likely have been
greater.

Many Straw Market ven-
dors said they were not yet at
their stalls when the incident
occurred, but some outside
the market told of having to
jump out of the path of the
oncoming vehicle.

Others who were inside the
market reported hearing a
loud “scraping sound” as the
jitney crashed into the steps
outside the male restrooms,
destroying them completely,
before coming to a halt half
way around the north west
corner of the market.

By the time it stopped, Mr
McDonald said he saw at least
“eight or nine” passengers
strewn on the ground.

Most passengers were not
seriously injured and were
able to dust themselves off
and continue to their destina-
tions.

“From the beginning of the
corner, I thought the bus dri-
ver was fighting, but then they
say the brakes gave way on
the bus.

“(The bus) knocked on the
side of the building and peo-
ple started jumping out all
around here. They thought
they were going to be dead.

“One big fat woman she fall
down there (pointing to the
sidewalk in front of Senor
Frogs).

“T know she hurt, but she
get up because she had to go
to work.

“The driver get out and he
break off running that way,”
said Mr McDonald, pointing
east on Woodes Rodgers
Walk.

The jitney was removed
from the area before 10am
and according to a police
source, will now be taken for
testing in an effort to confirm
the cause of the accident.

The Tribune attempted to
reach the owner of the
Clarke’s bus franchise, how-
ever, it had no phone listing,
and calls to the Road Traffic

Latest drama
puts heat on

Government

People question what is being
done to control public transport

\ N / HILE the cause of the latest jitney dra-

ma is as yet unconfirmed, the down-
town incident caused concerned citizens to ques-
tion what government is doing to bring the pub-
lic transportation system under control after
years of near misses and tragic endings.

For too long, jitneys have been operated in a
way that often endangers public safety and turns off
potential passengers, said a member of the public
who contacted The Tribune last night. (See story
page 1).

The Tribune’s archives reveals a lengthy history
of incidents and complaints involving jitneys,
including the death of Faith Mackey, a six-year-old
girl struck by a jitney on Carmichael Road in 2006,
a hit and run involving a cyclist, claims of racism
and refusals to pick up disabled passengers.

It also shows how years of statements, dating
back to 2005, indicating the need and support for
reform of the public trans-
portation system —- in
August 2007, former min-
ister of works Earl
Deveaux described riding
on a jitney as a “horrifying
experience” for some —
have not yet culminated in
any apparent progress in
this regard.

As early as 2006, drivers
and bus franchise owners
expressed their support for
a government plan to
implement a “unified” bus
system that would bring all bus operators under one
entity, in which private owners and the govern-
ment would have a stake.

Modelled

The plan — to be modelled on other bus systems
in the region and the world — was ultimately
intended to improve the safety and reliability of bus
services, lessening the recklessness that has given
the industry a bad name, in this way encouraging
more people onto buses and lessening traffic con-
gestion. Governor General Arthur Hanna, in his
speech from the throne in 2006, declared that the
PLP Government would bring legislation to par-
liament to enact the plan.

However, despite proclamations throughout 2006
and 2007 that it was in the process of being “fine
tuned”, nothing happened.

Former works and transport minister Earl
Deveaux was a proponent of the view that a “Uni-
fied Bus System” would have little impact on the
service provided if other core issues were not
addressed, such as route rationalisation and the
professionalism of drivers.

In June 2008, Mr Deveaux, in conjunction with
the Road Traffic Department, the United Trans-
portation Company and the Public Transport Asso-
ciation, committed to a “100-day challenge” for
buses to improve their services — becoming more
courteous, reducing speed, cleaning up their vehi-
cles and stopping at designated sites.

Mr Deveaux said the challenge would have
“measurable” goals and results would be published
publicly. However, this did not happen.

In the meantime, Lucaya MP Neko Grant took
over aS minister with responsibility for transport
and the question of what is being done to reform
the public transportation system has not had any
further public commentary.

EARL DEVEAUX



Department, including con-
troller Philip Turner, seeking
contact details were not
returned.

Despite confirming that he
knew who operates the
Clarkes franchise, President
of the Public Transport Asso-
ciation Reuben Rahming,
declined to provide the name
of the franchise holder when
called.

He said that when he
returns from a trip off the

island on Sunday he should
get a “full report” on the mat-
ter.
eee

HAVE you had a danger-
ous ride on a jitney? Does the
whole operation need to be
brought under control? Per-
haps you think it should be
left to run as it is? If you have
any comments, write to Ali-
son Lowe at alowe@tribune-
media.net or telephone her on
322-1986.

Two Bahamians charged over guns seizure — Jamaican press

TWO Bahamians were
charged in connection with the
seizure of illegal guns found
aboard a boat in Jamaica last
week, according to the
Jamaican press.

The men, Desmond Hep-
burn, 29 and Glenroy Russell,

ee ee Bose
Oa A LL a
FAO Es

Py ba Cy
322-2157

37, both of Nassau were also
expected to be charged in a
Jamaican magistrate's court
yesterday for violating that
country’s immigration laws.

According to the Jamaica
Gleaner, the two men - who
were charged with breaching
the country's Firearm Act on
Wednesday - were taken into
custody last Saturday near the
St Ann/Trelawny border.

The men allegedly had two
illegal firearms in their pos-
session.

The Gleaner also reported

that last Saturday officers
from the Trans-national
Crimes and Narcotics Divi-
sion and the Jamaica Defence
Force Coast Guard carried
out a special operation off the
Rio Bueno coast.

During this exercise, they
intercepted a go-fast boat with
two guns on board - an intra-
tech submachine gun and an
M14 rifle with ammunition -
which were seized, reports
state. A third person suspect-
ed to be on the boat is report-
edly still sought by police.
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009, PAGE 3



Oil spill cleanup expected to begin tomorrow

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

REMOVAL of the 85ft
barge and excavators which
sank in the Exuma Land
and Sea Park should com-
mence tomorrow and be
completed within five days.

The Government has
allowed for a huge salvage
crane and barge towed by a
tug to travel from the Unit-
ed States straight to the site
off Cistern Cay and arrive
tonight or tomorrow morn-
ing at the latest.

Men arraigned
On possession
of marijuana

TWO MEN charged in
connection with the recent
seizure of $128,000 worth
of marijuana were
arraigned in Magistrates
Court yesterday.

Lameko Simmons, 23, of
Sea View Drive, and a 48-
year-old Bentley Simmons,
of Pinedale Grand
Bahama, appeared before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel
in Court 8, Bank Lane,
yesterday accused of pos-
sessing marijuana with the
intent to supply to another.
Court dockets claim the
accused were found in pos-
session of the drugs on
Wednesday, July 22.

Both men pleaded not
guilty to the marijuana
possession charge. Police
reportedly seized 128 and
half pounds of marijuana
while executing a search
warrant at an apartment
on Sea View Drive. The
drugs are estimated to
have a street value of
$128,500. Both men were
remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison and are
expected back in court on
July 28 for a bail hearing.

21-year-old man in
court for unlawful
intercourse

A 21-year-old man
accused of having unlawful
intercourse with a girl of 14
was arraigned in Magis-
trates Court Thursday.

Giovanni Brown
appeared before Magistrate
Ancella Williams in Court
6, Parliament Street. It is
alleged that sometime in
February 2009, the accused
had intercourse with the
girl.

Brown elected for a sum-
mary trial and pleaded not
guilty to the charge. He was
granted bail in the sum of
$9,500. The case has been
adjourned to August 28.

Operation expected to be
completed in five days

Customs officials will
meet the vessel at the site to
prevent any delay of the
urgent clean up.

Bahamas National Trust
(BNT) executive director
Eric Carey praised the Gov-
ernment for moving swiftly
to facilitate entry of the ves-
sel.

He said: “The crane has
the capacity to lift the barge

as well as lift the excavator
and the tractor underwater,
and the government has
fast-tracked approvals to
get it here.

“They are also allowing
for the vessel to go straight
to the site without the
requirement of checking in
with Customs in Bimini.

“And we are hoping it
will arrive (this) evening or

(tomorrow) morning; hope-
fully the complete salvage
should be finished in no
more than five days.”

The barge carrying two
excavators and a front-end
loader sank to the sea floor
in the shipping channel near
Cistern Cay, Exuma, at
around 3am on Wednesday,
July 15.

A crew of around four
people were rescued by
passing boats.

Up to 1,000 gallons of
diesel leaked from the ves-
sel, but favourable wind
conditions meant the



EAT Cookies, Not Turtles cookies will raise funds for the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group.

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

EDIBLE delights will raise
money for the Bahamas Sea
Turtle Conservation Group
at a delectable event in Palm-
dale this weekend.

Creative cake and cookie
bakery ‘Something’s Differ-
ent’ in Alexander Street, off
Rosetta Street, is hosting a
cookie decorating competi-
tion and selling turtle-themed
cookies on Saturday, August
1.

The event marks the day
the slaughter of sea turtles in
the Bahamas is expected to
be banned after 15 years of
lobbying by the Bahamas Sea
Turtle Conservation Group
(BSTCG) and environmen-
tally conscious Bahamians.

Sweet-toothed adults and
children are invited to enter a
raffle to win a three-dimen-
sional turtle cake, try turtle-
themed cupcakes and colour
in their own turtle cookies
with edible markers, and a
prize will go to the artist who
makes the best cookie.

And milk and coffee will
be served to help hungry cus-
tomers wash down the sweet
treats.

‘Something’s Different’
business owner Samantha
Moree, a mosaic artist, will

also lead the baking team in
creating an edible mosaic
made of over 200 cookie
pieces.

The mosaic, ‘Eat Cookies,
Not Turtles’, will be displayed
at Doongalik Art Gallery in
Marina Village, Paradise
Island, at a ‘Save the Turtles’
exhibition featuring a num-
ber of sea turtle related art-
works by over 20 Bahamian
artists.

Mrs Moree and her hus-
band and business partner Ian
Moree will also paint an ‘Eat
Cookies, Not Turtles’ mural
on the second storey of the
bakery building to mark the
event

Mrs Moree said: “Really
this is all about raising funds
and raising awareness, and
doing our part as an environ-
mentally sensitive company
to make people more aware
of the issue.

“We don’t know yet
whether the government will
pass the legislation before the
turtle hunting season opens
on August 1, but the more we
jump up and down about it
will help remind them and
give them a kick in the pants.”

A contribution of $1 per
cookie sold will be given to
the BSTCG to assist the cause
of preserving sea turtles.

Cookies also will be sold at
participating vendors includ-

ing the Doongalik Art
Gallery, and benefit the edu-
cation efforts of the Bahamas
Sea Turtle Conservation
Group.

The Doongalik art exhibi-
tion opening will take place
from 6pm to 9pm on Friday
August 7.

‘Eat Cookies, Not Turtles’
will be held from 10am to
3pm on Saturday, August 1.

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impact was minimal.

The diesel dissipated into
the ocean away from the
nearby Cistern Cay beach
and most of the oil has
evaporated, Mr Carey said.

Fortunately the barge,
two excavators, and front-
end loader, sank to the
seabed away from major
coral reefs and around 40
yards from the nearest coral
heads, the BNT executive
director added.

But as the barge sits
around four feet above the
surface at low tide, and the
excavators around four feet

below, the wreck poses a
major hazard for boats
passing through the area.
Barge owner Michael
Oakes will cover the cost of
the cleanup and the BNT is
investing a significant num-
ber of staff and other
resources to provide sup-
port for the project, Mr

Carey said.
The Port Department
and Royal Bahamas

Defence Force are also
assisting the operation
organised by Minister of the
Environment Earl
Deveaux.

‘Eat Cookies,
Not Turtles’

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays





THE UGLY TRUTH



THE ORPHAN



HARRY POTTER & HALF BLOOD



LLOVE YOU BETH COOPER



PUBLIC ENEMIES



IGE AGE: DAWN OF THE DINOSAURS



THE PROPOSAL



TRANSFORMER: REVENGE



MY SISTER’S KEEPER



TAKING PELHAM 123





6:10 8:25 | 10:025)



THE UGLY TRUTH

6:15 8:35 10:35



THE ORPHAN

6:00 8:20 10:40



HARRY POTTER & HALF

7:10 N/A 10:10



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Attorneys hold special
sitting for Burton Hall

PROMINENT and senior
members of the Bahamas’
legal fraternity gathered at the
Court of Appeal yesterday for
a special sitting to mark the
departure of Chief Justice Sir
Burton Hall.

Sir Burton who has been
nominated to become a per-
manent judge of the Interna-
tional Criminal Tribunal for
the former Yugoslavia is
expected to demit the office
of Chief Justice of the
Bahamas on August 7.

The ICTY, which was estab-
lished in 1993, is the first war
crimes court created by the
United Nations and the first
international war crimes tri-
bunal since the Nuremberg
and Tokyo tribunals, set up
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during the Balkan conflicts of
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Court of Appeal President
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General Michael Barnett, Bar
Association president Ruth
Bowe-Darville, former presi-
dent Wayne Munroe and
attorney Damian Gomez who
described Sir Burton as a “trail
blazer”, all expressed their
thanks and gratitude to Sir
Burton for his years of service.

Sir Burton also expressed
his thanks to those in atten-

dance at the special sitting stat-
ing that he has enjoyed a high
level of co-operation and ser-
vice from judges on the bench
and expressed thanks to the
Bar for its co-operation and
courtesy shown to him during
his tenure as Chief Justice.

Sir Burton, 61, was appoint-
ed as Chief justice of the
Supreme Court on September
4, 2001.

He was appointed as a jus-
tice of the Supreme Court on
February 1, 1991, and was also
appointed as a justice of

appeal on April 1, 1997.

Sir Burton, 61, was awarded
a knighthood by Queen Eliza-
beth in 2001. He was called to
The Bahamas Bar in 1978 and
also served in the office of the
Attorney General and as solic-
itor general.

It is still unclear who will
replace Sir Burton as Chief
Justice. The chief justice is
appointed by the Governor
General on the recommenda-
tion of the Prime Minister
after consultation with the
leader of the opposition.

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master




LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-





Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas

Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE

















www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama— more emphasis on restraint

WASHINGTON (AP) — At a critical
moment in his presidency, Barack Obama
finds increasing need to talk about taming
federal deficits as he struggles with a dour
economy.

It's not just that Republicans are keeping
up a relentless and punishing attack on his
health care overhaul and other spending pri-
orities. It's also that Americans are losing

Sonecon, an economic-consulting firm.
Obama is factual in saying he inherited a
trillion-dollar-plus deficit from predecessor
George W. Bush, "but he made it worse,"
Shapiro said. The deficit in the current bud-
get year is now estimated to come in at more
than $1.8 trillion, pushed higher by the stim-
ulus spending, bailouts and increasing war

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I write this letter to bring
awareness to The Bahamas
and Bahamian people. I was
a private school teacher for
15 years and was employed
at two different institutions
during this period.

I am not being biased but
simply honest. I worked at a
private school for 10 years as
a high school teacher.

The ratio of foreign teach-
ers to Bahamians was 85:15, I
would sit in the staff room
with disgust, listening to the
foreign teachers talk poorly
about the Bahamian students
and their parents.

One teacher from Guyana
even mentioned to me, “how



Concerned
about foreign
teachers

the students and when the
students informed their par-
ents they all (foreigners)
would gather together and tell
the parents a bunch of lies
about that particular student.

Ministry of Education

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net

dents come to school so that
she gets paid and sends
monies to her family back
home (Guyana).”

I left that institution to
work in another private
school that is closer to my
home in the west.

The ratio of foreign teach-
ers to this school was much
higher than the previous
school (90:10).

I could not believe it! The
foreign teachers spoke even
worse about the students and

beware when you give private
schools stipends please inves-
tigate the administrators, staff,
and persons working at the
Department of Immigration
because I am certain that
some of these “Christian
Schools” do not have, 300 stu-
dents to receive this grant and
employ unqualified and illegal
foreign teachers.

An advocate for good
teachers (Happy Birthday
Bahamas).

confidence in Obama's ability to lead an eco- Shapiro said he believes White House














































nomic recovery. Increasingly, they are wor- officials are taking the Republican attacks she does not care who failsor parents than the previous TEACHER
ried about their jobs and the impact of the very seriously. "They're also concerned about do not understand what is — school. What’s more, the for- Nassau,
nation's mushrooming debt on future gen- long-term deficits and the impact they could being taught, once the stu- eign teachers spoke down to July, 2009.

erations.

An Associated Press-GfK Poll shows pub-
lic confidence has reversed on whether the
president's $787 billion stimulus package,
passed by Congress in February, will ulti-
mately work to improve the economy.

In January, 58 per cent were confident it
would. Now, it's the opposite, with 58 per
cent saying they doubt the stimulus will bring
any significant improvement.

Forty-seven per cent still think it's too
early to pass final judgment on whether the
plan is working. But of those who say they
are decided, three times as many say the
stimulus has harmed the economy than those
who say it has helped.

Other polls have shown similar slippage
on Obama's economic stewardship, although
his overall approval rating remains solid —
55 per cent in the AP-Gfk poll conducted stimulus package. Nearly half, 49 per cent,
July 16-20. Still, that's down nine points from now say Obama is trying to change things too
April. quickly, up from 32 per cent in April. And 80

In contrast to the increasing public gloom, per cent are worried that increasing federal
many economists see fledgling signs of an debt will harm the future of their children
economic recovery and expect the recession and grandchildren.
to end late this year. But economists also The national debt — the total of accu-
know that, historically, job losses nearly mulated annual deficits — is currently $11.6
always continue long after a recession has trillion. Democratic pollster Mark Mellman
officially ended. said "there's no question that, over time, the

The darkening mood comes as Obama chief executive pays a price if things aren't
tries to rally public support for overhauling going well in the economy." While Obama's
America's health care system, his top leg- overall approval rating is still strong, "the
islative priority, but one expected to cost fact that it's declined makes it a little harder
about $1 trillion over 10 years. His mission is for him to wield the same kind of threat over
to convince the public and Congress that his Congress as he might have some months
health care plan will benefit Americans as ago,” Mellman said.
well as strengthen the economy in the long Some economists warn that this reces-
run. It's been a hard sell. sion is so deep, it may take much longer than

Fiscally conservative Democrats are scep- in the past for a rebound even after some
tical. And Republicans have seized on the economic growth resumes.
change in public sentiment to pound Obama Job losses have now wiped out all the job
for failing to create or save the jobs he gains since the last recession in 2001, the
promised while greatly overburdening the first time that has happened since the 1930s.
federal budget. South Carolina Republican Heidi Shierholz, an economist at the Eco-
Sen. Jim DeMint has predicted the health nomic Policy Centre, a labour-funded think
care legislation could be Obama's "Waterloo tank, noted that the jobless rate continued to
moment" and could break his presidency — rise for 19 months after the 2001 recession
a remark Obama now cites as the kind of was declared over.
partisan politics-as-usual in Washington he is "If the unemployment rate is still increas-

have on the economy and on the ability to act
two, three years down the road — which of
course is moving up to the re-election sea-
son," he said.

Obama clearly has been putting more
emphasis on the importance of getting spend-
ing under control even as he tries to prod a
recovery.

"We have to do what businesses and fam-
ilies do. We've got to cut out the things we
don't need to pay for the things we do,"
Obama said at a town-hall style meeting
Thursday in Shaker Heights, Ohio, a sub-
urb of Cleveland. The meeting followed a
prime-time news conference the night before
in which Obama sought to rally public sup-
port for his health plan.

The AP-Gfk poll showed that 61 per cent
of those surveyed oppose any additional

Why are Bahamian institutions being
targeted by people from the Caribbean?

EDITOR, The Tribune. be able to dictate immigrations laws? These
people would be coming in increased num-
Thank you for allowing me the opportu- bers, to take up positions of what will now
nity to address these few points. Recently, be businesses owned by their nationals.
there seemed to be a trend developing Monies as we have been seen exited the
among certain Caribbean countries seeking Bahamas, as an example the Clico situation
ownership of key Bahamian banks, insur- without prior knowledge of the government
ance companies, hotels, and other interests, or its agencies, will continue, these tactics are
unencumbered, I might add. a direct off shoot to our national security.
When one considers the levels of their How can the government(s) allow other
ambitions and the reality of what has already countries with their personal country’s objec-
changed hands, leaves a reasonably thinking tives make the kinds of footholds and
person with one question: Why? Could receive the kinds of advantages likely to
there be a blueprint somewhere in a_ dictate commerce/policies in the Bahamas?
Caribbean business office, highlighting the These people should not have the right
various key firms in the Bahamas that they to go after institutions in the Bahamas, no
need to target in order to achieve their matter what damage is done as a result. Any
objectives, whatever that might be? Bahamian who sides, agrees and assists a
Another thing, how will Bahamians ben- foreigner to either cause his own people
efit? If this be the case, I hope that the hardship, or to be disadvantaged or by com-
objectives are not to suck the life blood out — mon design, causes the laws of the land to be
of our people and have them denigrated to broken, that person or persons, is a traitor.
levels similar to Central American coun- God gave the Bahamas to Bahamians,
tries. The Bahamas has a population of | Jamaica to Jamaicans, Trinidad to Trinida-
around 400,000 people. We are asmall pre- _—_dians, etc. Incidentally, the Bahamas is not
dominantly blessed black nation. The — seeking to establish institutions in any of
Bahamas can ill-afford to surrender our the Caribbean countries mentioned.
cherished way of life to countries that have We have increased what God has given us,
populations well in the millions. but other Caribbean countries may not have
Why aren’t they targeting American insti- increased what God has given them.
tutions? German institutions? Venezuelan I believe that they are trying to take away
institutions? Haitian institutions? Cuban what our forefathers, grandparents, and par-
institutions? Russian institutions? ents have worked so hard for, but that dev-
What we have in the Bahamas is only _ ilisa liar.
enough for our people, after all 5,000 young Please hear me, the Bahamas does not
Bahamian graduates will be joining the job) ~=want what you have, nor can you have what
force this summer. We are a much smaller God has given the Bahamas to sustain its

seeking to end. ing, people are not going to feel good," Shier- nation than Jamaica, Barbados and Trinidad. —_ people.
"T think the Republican attack on the One need not look very far to figure out
deficit is succeeding because it's real," said what is happening here. FRANK GILBERT
Rob Shapiro, a former economic adviser to (This article was written by Tom Raum, If they are allowed to own the major com- Retired Policeman
President Bill Clinton, and chairman of an Associated Press writer). panies or institutions in the Commonwealth Nassau,
of The Bahamas, then by extension will they July, 2009.

Tackling Bay Street traffic pollution

EDITOR, The Tribune.

© (()) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit one website aft weew. cole da
TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian for the following posi-
tions for the 2009 - 2010 School Year.

Dean of St nt

T have read both your editorials on the revamping of Bay Street.
You are correct in saying the merchants must do their part in the
painting and the upkeep of their buildings. Not only do I agree that
something must be done about the traffic pollution, but I also
feel that the removal of the jitneys off Bay Street is essential.

I know the Nassau Downtown Partnership is doing a fine job, but
it needs immediate decisions from Government to move along. I
don’t understand why it takes so long to decide on meter parking
on Bay Street. We all know this would greatly improve the down-
town shopping situation by making it more easily accessible to both
local shoppers and tourists alike. We always hear, “Oh I don’t go
downtown because I can’t park,” and as a former merchant, I
know this is true. In every city, there is meter parking, so what is
the hold up? Let’s bite the bullet and get those meters on Bay
Street from Victoria Avenue to Navy Lion Road.

Chapter One Bookstore
will be closed from
July 27, 2009 to August 1, 2009,
for year-end inventory.

lt will reopen for business on
August 4, 2009,
Applicants must:

We apologize

A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing to : : :
for any inconvenience caused,

subscribe to the statement of Faith of Temple Christian

NICHOLAS KLONARIS
School. Mike’s
Shoe Store
: i : : Nassau,
B. Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or Higher from tC oe es Westeyan Church July 7, 2009.
a recognized College or University. : 3 ;
Pe ade eed Lack of pride in the environment
C. Possess excellent organization, Inter-personal Horth American EDITOR. The Tribune

communicative skills. At this time of year scores of Bahamians are showing their

national pride by wearing their national colours, flying the aqua-
marine, gold and black and participating in native events designed
to foster a sense of unity. Sadly, however, there are too many
misguided individuals, Bahamians or otherwise who have no pride
in themselves or their environment. Case in point, on June 28, 2009
at around 6pm while driving through the Westridge area the driver
of a blue van threw a bottle out of his vehicle.

What was most disturbing about this was the individual did this
in plain sight as a vehicle was directly behind him and also the bot-
tle was thrown on the perimeter of an owner occupied property.
This tells me that this person could not care less who saw him and
that this type of behaviour was normal for him.

It is high time that we get serious in this country about bringing
these ‘dirty minded’ people before the courts and prosecuting
them to the fullest extent of the law. There also needs to be an envi-
ronmental hot line where individuals can report this type of behav-
iour to the necessary authorities. Otherwise the concept of the
Bahamas being “green, clean and pristine” would continue to be
an unattainable dream..

Ce ee eee ee Pe

D. Be able to assist with all aspect of the Administration. Worship Time: 1] a.m.

E. Be able to discipline, counsel students. Prayer Time: 10:1 5a.m

F. Have high morals standards.

Church School during Worship Service

Application must be picked up at the High School Office
on Shirley Street 23rd July, 2009 and be returned with
the following: a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph, church affiliation, pastor’s name and three
references to:

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.. Hoa SS5651
Telephone number: 324-2538
‘Telefax number: S24-23587

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas "TOW?
Deadline for application is July 30th, 2009

DAILY OBSERVER
Nassau,
July 8, 2009.
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009, PAGE 5



Turks and Caicos govt cracks down on spending

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

ALL political appointees in the
Turks and Caicos are set to lose
their jobs following a crack down
on spending.

Premier Galmo Williams made
the announcement yesterday as he
revealed that Government revenue
has dropped from an average of
approximately $18 million per
month last year to approximately
some $9 million per month this

year. Mr Williams said the deci-
sion, taken on the advice of the
Ministry of Finance “to better
enable the Government to work
within the constraints of its ever
shrinking revenue intake”, would
take effect as of September 30.
“Given the slowing in the econ-
omy, I have wrestled with this
decision long and hard, and regret
having to take this position, espe-
cially as we are aware that this
move could have a seriously neg-
ative impact on the many persons

Bahamas seeks Colombian
support on UN initiatives

THE Bahamas has asked
Colombia for support in a num-
ber of United Nations initiatives,
as both countries seck to strength-
en diplomatic relations.

Governor-General, His Excel-
lency Arthur Hanna, made the
appeal as His Excellency Ventura
Emilio Diaz-Mejia presented his
Letters of Credence as Ambas-
sador of the Republic of Colom-
bia, at Government House, July
23

The Bahamas wants Colombia
to support its candidacies to the
UN Economic and Social Coun-
cil; the Council of the Interna-
tional Maritime Organization, Cat-
egory C; and Presidency of the
Thirty-Fifth General Conference
of the United Nations Education-
al, Scientific and Cultural Organi-
sation.

“The Bahamas values the cor-
dial relations between our two
countries and looks forward to the
deepening and the diversification
of our relationship,” Governor
General Hanna said.

He acknowledged that The
Bahamas and Colombia "share a
wide base of linkages founded on
common interests" and the diplo-
matic relations that followed "has
consolidated the continued com-

mon understanding."

“The Bahamas, as has the rest of
the word, but particularly the
Caribbean nations, has taken keen
note of your country’s proactive
engagement in the well-being of
the governments and peoples that
comprise the Association of
Caribbean States, as a result of
the reform initiatives Colombia is
actively seeking to implement in
that body,” the said Mr Hanna.

He told the Ambassador that
bilaterally, these initiatives could
bring to fruition his personal
pledge to increase the relations of
both countries in overcoming ille-
gal drug trafficking and crime.

Replied the Ambassador:
“Colombia and the Common-
wealth of The Bahamas have
maintained, with mutual respect,
excellent relations in all areas, and
that is why I personally wish they
can be increased.

“Colombia will make every pos-
sible effort to give to your gov-
ernment the required support in
vital areas as it has occurred in the
past. I am convinced that in the
future these will be broadened.

“Be sure that loyalty, respect,
and sincerity will remain princi-
ples and essential values of our
cordial relations.

who have opted to give up other-
wise lucrative opportunities to
contribute to the growth and
development of our country over
the recent years,” said Mr
Williams.

“Coupled with the other mea-
sures that we have put in place
and others yet to be implemented,
this course of action will assure us
of the opportunity to turn around
our economy in the quickest pos-
sible time, while lessening the
impact that the current worldwide

Kristaan Ingraham/BIS Photo

recession will otherwise have on
our wider community.”

“Rest assured, however, that we
are doing all that we are able, to
ensure that as many of the effected
individuals as possible, are placed
in other job opportunities before
the termination notice expires on
September 30,” he added.

Turks and Caicos is facing hav-
ing direct rule imposed on it by
Britain following a Commission
of Inquiry into corruption there.

British Governor of the TCI,

Gordon Weatherall, announced
the suspension of certain sections
of the country’s constitution —
allowing Britain to take greater
control over the reins of power —
earlier this month.

However, he claims he is waiting
for the outcome of a court case
challenging the order that brings
the British direct rule into force
before moving ahead with full
direct rule, a move that was rec-
ommended by the report from the
Commission of Inquiry.



HIS Excellency Emilio Diaz-Mejia, Ambassador of the Republic of Colombia, paid a courtesy call on Minister of Foreign
Affairs, Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symontte, July 22. Pictured from left are Andrew McKinney, Chief of Protocol; Car-
los Gonzalez, Director, Colombian Government of Trade Bureau, Caribbean Office in Miami, Florida; Ambassador Diaz-
Mejia; Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs the Hon Brent Symonette; Dr Patricia Rodgers, Permanent
Secretary; Joshua Sears, Director General, Ministry of Foreign Affairs; and Janeen McCartney, undersecretary, Ministry of

Foreign Affairs.

Derek Smith/BIS Photo



GOVERNOR-
General, His

} Excellency
Arthur Hanna
(right) and His
Excellency
Emilio Diaz-
Mejia, Ambas-
sador of the
Republic of
Colombia, share
a light moment
during a lunch at
Gray Cliff
Restaurant.

"T vex at all these lil chirren
I see on the side of the road
from the early morning until
the middle of the night selling
phone cards! These children
should be allowed to live their
lives - they should be playing,
enrolled in some summer
camp to learn something to
better their self-esteem or at
least be in the library reading
- instead of in the hot sun all
day hustling a few dollars for
their parents. And these kids
always look like someone ran
over their puppy with their
faces all made up like some-
one forced them there.

"T don't know if this breaks
any laws but it certainly
breaks my heart. Police should
be able to lock these kids’ par-
ents up for something because
it ain't right,"

Concerned Citizen,

Nassau.

"I vex that my cable was off
for over a month even though
my account was current so of
course when the bill came
around I didn't pay it. After a
while I got fed up so when I
went to Cable Bahamas they
said they couldn't check the
problem until I paid my
measly balance. So I did that -
three days ago - but tell me
why I can only get basic cable
and not the premium channels
I paid for? After days of me
pestering them and them
"resetting my signal” they
promised me someone will
come out next week.

"What I want to know is,
am I going to get any money
back for these channels I ain’
getting?”

Avid TV Watcher,

Nassau.

"T vex that there are still
some people out there who
subscribe to the archaic school
of thought which leads them to
oppose the proposed outlaw-
ing of marital rape. I mean the
things I've been hearing and
reading about that since the
amendment was introduced in
the House of Assembly this
week astound me.

"As a woman, and a person,
with full rights and control of
my body I am disgusted that
some people think my gender
has no right to refuse the
advances of a man I just hap-
pen to be married to. Does this
thinking also lead them to
believe that a husband can
physically abuse me, dominate
me and not take my opinions
into account? It's narrow-mind-
ed views like that which are
responsible for so many things
that are wrong in our society,"

minister of environment could
say at the end of a letter that
he shedding light on the
Arawak Cay and harbour
dredging project when he ain't
the man we really want to hear
from. The only person he now
shedding light on is that PLP
senator. He need to come to
talk to us, the Bahamian peo-
ple, instead of sending letters
and get his leader to shed
some lights on these damn
projects I paying for!"

Jason Harris,

Kemp Road.

"IT vex at all these people
who chapping, shooting, and
killing their family over a lil’
piece of land. I know of plenty
cases, when someone died,

people in their family is just go
crazy trying to get their hands
on alil’ piece of something and
basically trying to take what
ain’ theirs. But the court sys-
tem is a mess so no wonder
some people have to take the
matter into their own hands,"
Concerned Citizen,
Nassau.

"Tis done vex to da point I
ga’ start to use foreign lan-
guages because of all a' dem
people in we Christian nation
who ‘slick’ our country, people
and prime minister by deceiv-
ing them to get ‘cheap’ Crown
Land for a different purpose
than which they state and then
selling it for ‘obscene profits’.

"We send the small lil’ crim-

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

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inal to jail for committing
fraud or stealing a couple of
dollars to feed his family and
say its 'zero tolerance’ but we
is usually two-faced and hyp-
ocrites when it comes to deal-
ing with the big ones. Noth-
ing happens to big ones who
normally ga’ get off cause they
done know people an' we tha
innocent ga’ suffer for dem,"
Trust me now, Nassau.

“T was so vex at the pass-
port office I wrote a poem:

The Passport Office: A
Unique Form of Torture,

People say Da Gubment
Dem aint doing what they
oughta.

Queue’s movement barely

e Get Ready For

2

Glass Bottom Water Buckets
Fishing Lines & Hooks
Fishing Accessories

Mesh Diving Bags

Summer Special!

perceptible to human eye,

As with all interminable
waiting experiences: A baby
cries.

The undefined time punc-
tuated by querulous outbursts

“Sit down and wait”: a moth-
er curses.

Seems names are called -
but never yours,

‘T have to go to work now’,
a father implores.

When will the queues ever
end?

One to get the application,
to make the application, and
then -

At the end of it all, who
knows when it will come?

Fly buzzes, infant’s shriek
peaks - give me a sign!

When is it that I can leave

* except on
red tagged
and net items

this line?

Passport office - the great
equaliser -

Man, woman, child, black,
white, every type - they all
come to die here.

- Alison of the East.

e Are you vex? Send your com-
plaints to whyyouvex@tribune-
media.net or fax them to 328-
2398.

eddie
as es
PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 822-2157



Vita

July 24th - August Ist, 2009

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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Justice tells new magistrates



(BIS photo: Patrick Hanna)
FIVE JUSTICES OF THE PEACE were sworn in as Magistrates to serve in
the Community Court by Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, July 3. Pictured
from left are Charles Sweeting, Japheth Deleveaux, Vylma Thompson-Curl-
ing, Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, Attorney General and Minister of Legal
Affairs Senator Michael Barnett, Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez, Alvan Rolle
and Charles Hunt.

CHIEF Justice Sir Burton Hall challenged newly-appointed
magistrates to apply the law “as it is” to matters coming before
them.

He was speaking during a ceremony for Justices of the Peace
who were sworn in as magistrates, July 3, at the Supreme
Court.

The five JPs who took their oaths to sit in the Community
Court are Japheth Edison Deleveaux, Charles Mahlon Hunt,
Alvan Kenneth Rolle, Charles Andrew Sweeting and Vylma
Bloneva Thompson-Curling.

The Chief Justice warned them that at times they will face
“usually ill-informed” often “unfair” criticism.

“That is an inevitable incident of holding public office in
the ‘information age’,” he said.

Views

He advised them to make their views known to the Chief Jus-
tice with regard to “how the law can be made more efficient or
effective in achieving the social ends it was intended to serve.”

“Make your views known to the Chief Justice who would con-
vey them to the Attorney General where appropriate with a
view to engaging the legislative machinery to reform and revise
the laws,” said Sir Burton.

He warned them that there are still administrative “wrinkles”
to be ironed out and these "incidental irritants" could prove
frustrating from time to time but should not deflect them from
their principal duties as judicial officers.

In congratulating the magistrates, he said he hoped the Com-
munity Court would become a “new thrust in making judicial
services more widely available to the community.”

He thanked the government agencies for their assistance
especially the management team of the Office of the Judiciary.

The Attorney General and Minister of Legal Affairs Senator
Michael Barnett also addressed the brief ceremony.

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS * Tak 325-2924

1130 AML Speaker

PASTOR PATRICK RUTHERFORD
Theme: * Enniching Marriage And Family Lifeâ„¢
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* Communi Outreach; 1130 am, = 6 Sennce; 7:0 p.m,

Service Te) pum
* Sister = Moohing: 1000 a.m. Gnd Tewreday of each month)















“ao THE BAHAYLAS, TURKS AND CAICOS i,
ISLANDS CONFERENCE =.
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CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
10% Montrose Avenue
Pat), Hod RE 16379, Nassai, Rabamat: Telephone: 125-f4i2;
Fao: 328-274: methedisteonferencedman.com

REPOSITIONING FOR MIRACLES WITH FRESH EXPRESSIONS
ENERGIZING THE CONFERENCE NCW
(Nurture Outreach Witness Worship)
IMMENSE VARIETY - IMMENSE CREATIVITY - IMMENSE HOPE
“Celebrating 223 years of continueus Methodist witness for
Christ in The Rohamas*

EIGHTH LORD'S DAY AFTER PESTEOQOST, JULY 26, 2009.

COLLECT: Generous Ciod, You give ud gifls and make them prow:
though owr faith is small as mustard seed, make it prow to Your glory
and the flourishing of Your Kingdom; through Jesus Christ our Lord

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (talcote Ril Baar)

7AM) am Lay Preacher, Bro. Arthur Chase,
Vite President of Conference

[iem, Lay Preacher, Sis, Katie Carter

RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108 Mantros: Ave. orar Walll Ri}

7AM) am. Ihshop Dr. Raymond Ei. Nelly

(Celebration of the Holy Eucharet

Bishop De, Raymond R. Nelly (Bible Snudy)

Rishop De, Raymond R, Nelly

Conducted by te Rhodes Memorial Cherch School

(Oe am,
Rt

640 pm.

CORE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Res Sinoet, Far Ail)
Iam Rewer Dr, Keene A Huggins, Persident Emer

PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Pinan)
11: am. Lay Preacher, Bro. Athur Chase

HERITAGE OF se LOWE METHODIST CHURCH

(28 Crastord 2,

7200 am. "aan Lennard (i. Roberts, Jr,
(Celebration of the Holy Eucharsst)

$M am Lay Preacher, Bro. Arthur Chase

METHODMST CHURCH CH THE COTM! SHEPHERD (rire Trail Baty

a0 am Reverend Emily A. Demerste’/Lay Preacher, Sis, Elaine Stuart
(Celebration of the Holy Eucharist)

MONASTERY PARK FELLOWSHIP
Next Service: Lond’s Day, August 30, 2006 at 3:15 pum

CROM-DES-MISSIOWS ALDERSIG ATE (Quackoo Street)
Children’s Chuh, apes 1-18 years, repens om Frick, 11, 2009 at $30 p.m.

METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo 81) -Thrilt Shop and other Ministries

JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLAGE (28 Crawford St., Oakes Field)
Reception to Girede 7

MID WEEK SERVICES:
Midweek Rocharistic Servier - Rhodes Memorial Methodist Church -
August §, 2008) t:3) am-7:15 a.m. (Breakfast Served)

Wilassilay,

RADIO PROGRAMS

‘Ween’ - On the Lord's Day, 285 | at 9 pam. “Gireal Hymne of irepiration® - On
he Lord's Day, Radio 210 a1 3:30 pon; ‘Family Vibes’ 25 1, Tuesday, 70 pim.;
"To God be the tlory” 25 1, Tuesday, 7:48 Be mm,

CONFERENCE CHIL DREN'S 51! MMIT, Thursday, July 234Lond's Dey, Juty
26, 2H.

CIRCUIT OPENING OF THE CHURCH YEAR SERVICE:

IS CELEBRATION OF YOUTH — Wesley Methodist Church, 10 a.m,
Lard's Day, Sepiemier Do, D4,

Apply the law ‘as it is’, Chief 1 § |

odder proposes action plans for

socially responsible universities

THERE was no mistaking the urgency
that academics conveyed recently during a
round table at the UNESCO World Con-
ference on Higher Education in Paris,
France, about the social responsibility of
institutions of higher learning.

Addressing the round table, College of
the Bahamas President Janyne Hodder said
that post secondary institutions must main-
tain consistent connections with society
rather than operate in a vacuum. Among
the concrete proposals for change she pro-
posed were new rankings, increased inter-
national exchanges and networks, and com-
petitive awards for socially responsible uni-
versities.

“Universities differ greatly in history,
context, mission and size. Yet, they share a
set of common beliefs and practices that
allow them to create bridges to better world
understanding, respect and development,”
Ms Hodder said. But she maintained that
these bridges can be made stronger yet.

The COB president explained that devel-
oping a new ranking would involve crafting
indicators of that responsibility — perhaps in
the areas of learning, research and service —
and reporting on them. Much like the



He] strategic plans for COB,
| Ms Hodder proposed
| innovations in under-
graduate and graduate
programme develop-
ment, multidisciplinary
degrees focused on areas
of national importance,
service learning pro-
grammes and international experiences for
students. Ideally, she suggested, research
would be measured against Millennium
Development Goals (MDGs) or local and
national goals and would be assessed based
on participation in various networks, direct
impact on communities and various
research programmes focused on national
issues. In other critically important areas,
socially responsible universities would main-
tain student engagement initiatives tied to
MDGs, problem-based research and inter-
vention programmes, as well as community
awareness initiatives tied to sustainable
development.

“It is good to remember that universities
are already agents of social responsibility
but can do more,” Ms Hodder said during
the round table.

aN ATO)

“Universities are not ivory towers or the
only experts or the handmaidens of other
agencies but must remain in interactive dia-
logue with society.”

The interactive session in which the COB
president participated was designed to
explore the areas where institutions of high-
er learning could capitalise on their role as
social developers, especially within the con-
text of sustainable development, peace, the
MDGs and the global financial crisis.

At the World Conference on Higher
Education, over 1,000 participants from
approximately 150 countries examined the
role of post secondary institutions in
addressing major global challenges, pro-
viding a platform for key stakeholders to
make a renewed commitment to the devel-
opment of higher education and agree on
action-oriented recommendations to meet
the growing and multiple demands of soci-
ety.

The conference ended on July 8 with an
appeal for governments to increase their
investment in higher education as a major
force in building an inclusive and diverse
knowledge society and to advance research,
innovation and creativity.

Budding chefs receive mentoring in summer programme

EXPOSING the country’s
youth to career opportunities
in the culinary and hospitality
areas, talented local chefs, who
are graduates of the College of
the Bahamas, last week began
mentoring budding chefs in
New Providence as part of the
Lil’ Chefs summer programme.

The programme also
includes week-long training ses-
sions in Exuma and Grand
Bahama. The Lil’ Chefs pro-
gramme has been running for
three years and has grown from
initially 15 students learning
only culinary arts to approxi-
mately 50 students being
trained in culinary, pastry and
cold food delights. In the
kitchen at the Choices Restau-
rant at the Culinary and Hos-
pitality Management Institute
(CHMI), teachers and students
all share a common love for the
culinary arts.

At one work station, young
Whitney Barnes watches intent-
ly as Chef Keisha Bonimy gives
instructions about how to pre-
pare an exotic chicken dish,
while another group of young-



TWO young participants of the Lil’
Chefs summer training programme
learn the art of making decilicous
cakes and pastries.

sters learn the art of making a
decadent chocolate cake and
other pastries from scratch.
“Tm from Florida and I
come to the Bahamas for the
summer and my aunt told me
about this programme and I
thought it would be a great
experience to learn how to
cook and go back home and tell
people about it,” said Whitney.
But she quickly points out
that her interest in the kitchen

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

‘Sunday Schoot ifam
| Preaching
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| Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

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| "Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
| Pastor: H. Mills * Phone: 393-0663 = Box MeSae2 ]

is purely for practical purposes,
rather than a career aspiration.
“T hope to get a little bit more
skill level in the kitchen out of
this experience in order to take
back home,” she said.

This year, students enrolled
in New Providence have the
added benefit of etiquette train-
ing from well-known image
management consultant Stacia
Williams. “We’re starting some
new things and moving into
some new directions because
of the kinds of responses that
we have gotten from students
and parents over the last two
years,” said director of industry
training and Assistant Professor
at CHMI Valderine Hamilton.

One of the young partici-
pants, Anae Bain said she was
excited to learn about the Lil’
Chefs training programme,
especially because she aspires
to become a chef. But she
admits that she must first con-
quer her trepidation of han-
dling raw food.

“Tm not the best in the
kitchen but I can do little stuff.
I don’t like touching raw food,

but I do want to be a chef
because I think it’s cool,” she
said. “T hope to learn more and
help my mom in the kitchen
and then do it myself. ’'m learn-
ing culinary and pastry, and
pastry is awesome because I
can learn how to make all kinds
of cakes from scratch.”

Under the CHMI, COB
offers two Baccalaureate
degree programmes — one in
tourism management and the
other in hospitality manage-
ment. There is also an Associ-
ate of Arts degree in Culinary
Arts and a three-year chef’s
programme. In addition the
industry training department
offers short certificate courses
in specific culinary areas.
Speaking to the importance of
the Lil’s Chefs summer train-
ing programme, executive vice-
president of Academic Affairs
Dr Rhonda Chipman-Johnson
said: “You might be exposed
to careers in the culinary and
hospitality area. There are
careers in the tourism industry
that many of you might wish to
look at.”

GMM A NACL a

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AMERICAN TV star Tyler Perry paid a courtesy call on Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham at the Office of the Prime Minister on Wednesday. The
top-rated actor/producer is in The Bahamas for two weeks filming the
sequel to his blockbuster film “Why did | get married?” The film has
scenes shot on Eleuthera and Exuma and features more than two dozen
Bahamian actors and crew. Pictured from left are Prime Minister Ingra-
ham, Mr Perry, and Bishop Neil Ellis.

Grant's Town Wesler Methodist Church
(Batioe Hil Ad 6 Chapel Street] AO Goe CB-13906
The Holy Ghost Praver-Line number is 326-7427

(weww.giwesley-org)
7:00 am. Rev. Dr. Colin Archer/Bro, Ermest Miller
11:00 a.m, Sis. Nathalie ThompsonYouth
7:00 p.m, Bro. Franklyn Bethel’Sis. Marilyn Tinker

i ee a me me em ca Toe

yp LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

B..
Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place: i
The Madeira

Shopping Center

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
ephone number 325-5712
Warr lynnk@ batelnet.bs
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



HOTELIER SAYS US STAR’S FILM HAS LED TO BUSINESS BOOM

Tyler Perry's ‘$1m boost for Eleuthera economy’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AN ESTIMATED $1 million has
been invested into Eleuthera's
economy thanks to the filming of
superstar Tyler Perry's upcoming
production, one hotelier suggested
yesterday.

The American director, produc-
er and actor is on location in Gov-
ernor'’s Harbour shooting the
sequel to his 2007 hit “Why Did I
Get Married”.

David Barlyn, owner of the
Pineapple Fields Hotel where a
number of the cast and crew are



“Just about every hotel and private home
within a five-mile radius of the location has

been booked.”



staying, likened the business from
the film to "Christmas in July".

"They have put at least, in the
course of three weeks to a month,
no less than a $1million on this
island. Basically it's equal to Christ-
mas in July. We are doing the levels
of business that we would normal-
ly have in December and New
Year," he told The Tribune.

"Just about every hotel and pri-

vate home within a five-mile radius
of the location has been booked,"
said Mr Barlyn, adding that the
trickle-down effect to local taxi dri-
vers, restaurants and other sur-
rounding businesses has been
tremendous.

While he did not want to reveal
how much of a financial benefit his
property received from the film, he
said all 32 units of his condo-hotel

style resort were booked out for
the last few weeks to accommodate
some of the film's cast and crew.

He said it was much-needed busi-
ness considering the flagging
tourism industry. "It's been a tough
year. We've been very fortunate
that we've been holding our own.
We've also gotten a good amount
of international press about Tip-
py's and the hotel but I can say,
like everybody in the hospitality
world, it's been rough".

The production spent a few days
shooting in Exuma, and is expected
to wrap up about two weeks of
filming in Eleuthera in the next five
days or so.



Dd e ahd

FROM PAGE ONE

FNM chairman under fire

FROM page one

“His role is to keep the party relevant in
the country. He is to organise constituency
associations and to keep the message of the
FNM in the country interesting and timely
and attract new members to the party. In oth-
er words, his mission should be to help foster
party unity.

“However, since he has been in the chair, he
has caused disunity in several constituencies.
He has abandoned some of the basic policies
that would level the playing field in con-
stituency election of officers,” she said.

The source added that the party’s policy is
that before a constituency election can be con-
ducted all members should have attended at
least three consecutive meetings. However she
said, Mr Ferguson has “conveniently” waived
this policy in three constituencies — Bamboo

Town, South Beach and Golden Isles.

“Since then, all of these constituencies have
been less than functional and even disjointed
to put it mildly. In fact infighting is the order of
the day in these constituencies. He has allowed
the Women’s Association elections to happen
while abandoning this same policy, which has
split the association down the middle.

“His attention is scattered between his activ-
ities in South Eleuthera and his position.
Therefore the chairmanship is not getting the
kind of attention it deserves. While Mr Fer-
guson was a good educator, he certainly is not
capable of galvanizing support for the FNM.
We need a ‘hands-on’ aggressive, politically
astute chairman that can reach out and touch
people,” she said.

Attempts to reach Mr Ferguson for com-
ment on this matter were unsuccessful up to
press time last night.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

MA

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue
Accounting,

The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and the
Family Islands and the reconciliation of all revenue accounts other than miscellanequs
receivables,

PLP Senator ‘may have
conflicting interests’

FROM page one

"The facts are clear with
regard to my involvement
with the Arawak Cay con-
tainer port proposal. There is
no conflict of interest as I
have no interest, direct or
indirect, and my commitment
to save Saunders Beach
remains focused and deter-
mined,” Mr Fitzgerald said.

Documents released by the
Ministry of Environment this
week show that Mr Fitzger-
ald, as chairman of BK Water,
and his partner Mark Fin-
layson placed a bid to build
the plant that was then pro-
posed to be constructed at
Arawak Cay.

The plant was to provide
water to Kerzner Interna-
tional, Paradise Island, and
Baha Mar project, once it was
finished and BK Water had
estimated it could supply 6
million gallons of imperial
water a day.

A letter dated October 15,
2005, shows that in BK
Water's bid, the company
offered the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation 12.5 per
cent of its shares to the utility
company, at no charge, if its
bid was successful.

The company, with the oth-
er firms that qualified to bid
on the Blue Hills RO, were
invited by the Water and
Sewage Corporation (WSC)
to bid on the Arawak Cay
plant in April, 2005.

A legal opinion, prepared
by Veronique Evans, said that
BK Water was not a qualified

bidder and advised WSC to
reject its proposal.

"The senator, who wishes
to preserve the Bahamas for
future generations, and a
would-be tenant, was a par-
ticipant in a failed arrange-
ment to impose his company
on the supply of reverse
osmosis water to Kerzner.

"The president of BK
Water is the same Senator
who now claims that Arawak
Cay should not be the site of
the container port. . .Yet we
must suffer talk about accom-
modating special interests?"
said Mr Deveaux's statement.

In late 2006, the then PLP
government decided to place
the water plant at Perpall
Tract so as not to interfere
with plans to revitalise the
Nassau harbour front.

In recent months the sena-
tor has accused Dr Deveaux
of handling the port reloca-
tion, and the dredging of Nas-
sau Harbour and the exten-
sion of Arawak Cay — which
are separate but integrated
projects — under a shroud of
secrecy.

Responding to the
firestorm of criticism levelled
at him, Dr Deveaux called Mr
Fitzgerald's claims that his
ministry and the government
have been silent on the con-
troversial port relocation as
an “outrageous misrepresen-
tation" of the facts calculat-
ed to spread "public alarm."

"We need to light up the
darkness by exposing the
interest of those who seek to
spread this panic and insidi-

Government criticised over
financial services cutbacks

ous crusade about the small
man being left out. . .We
have, in our country, a more
insidious chronic disease. It is
a political disease of tribalism
masked in the form of pro-
tecting the small man," said
Dr Deveaux.

Mr Fitzgerald is head of the
newly formed Committee to
Protect and Preserve the
Bahamas for Future Genera-
tions; an organisation that has
aggressively opposed govern-
ment’s plans for the Arawak
Cay port relocation.

The group has said it is
looking at legal ways to halt
the government's actions until
"all the facts are laid on the
table."

"(Dr Deveaux) and the
government are obviously rat-
tled by the calls of Bahami-
ans to be transparent and
accountable to the Bahamian
people on the container port
at Arawak Cay. Clutching at
straws and attacking me does
not address the numerous
concerns the Bahamians have
with regard to the relocation
of the container port," said
Mr Fitzgerald.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in New Providence and

the Family Islands.

Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers.

Prepares the sales budget.

Prepares the Revenue Accounting Department Budget.
Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Receivable Reconciliation.
Oversees the training of all Customer Services stalf in the new billing software.

Prepares monthly Board reports,

Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenue reports.

Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of Statistics.
Provides statistical billing information for Family Island managers.
Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in the

Family Islands,

Attends yearly community meetings a5 well as ad hoc meetings required during

acquisition of new locations,

Develops and implements rules, guidelines and procedures for the efficient

operation of the department.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Accounts or equivalent

A minimum of 8+ years of experience in accounting practice and theory.
Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualifications

Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas.

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing.

Sound reasoning and good judgment skills
Ability to interpret financial reports.
Good time management skills.

Project management skills



ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money 20 Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

MONDAY, 20 JULY 2009

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Fornn to:
The Manager-Homan Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill. & Tucker, P.O, Box N-7509, Nassau, Bahamas on or before:
July 31, 2009,

ee

C2ee Pca Aw TT AX OT

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.86| CHG 0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -141.50 | YTD % -8.26

FINDEX: CLOSE 786.23 | YTD -5.83% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Security
Abaco Markets

10.00 Bahamas Property Fund
6.94 Bank of Bahamas

0.63 Benchmark

3.15 Bahamas Waste

2.14 Fidelity Bank

10.18 Cable Bahamas

2.74 Colina Holdings

5.50 Commonwealth Bank ($1)
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs
1.32 Doctor's Hospital

6.60 Famguard

10.00 Finco

10.35 — FirstCaribbean Bank

4.95 Focol (S$)

1.00 Focol Class B Preference

0.30 Freeport Concrete

5.50 ICD Utilities

10.40 9 J. S. Johnson

10.00 Premier Real Estate

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade

Previous Close Today's Close Change
739 739 0.00
11.00 11.00 0.00
6.94 6.94 0.00
0.63 0.63 0.00
3.15 3.15 0.00
2.37 2.37 0.00
11.39 11.39 0.00
274 274 0.00
5.64 5.64 0.00
2.98 3.00 0.02
1.82 1.82 0.00
6.60 6.60 0.00
10.90 10.90 0.00
10.38 10.38 0.00
5.03 5.03 0.00
1.00 1.00 0.00
0.30 0.30 0.00
5.50 5.50 0.00
10.40 10.40 0.00

10.00 10.00 0.00

Daily Vol.

EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.127 10.9
0.992 11.1
0.244 28.4
-0.877 N/M
0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.1
0.249 11.0
0.419 13.5
0.111 27.0
0.240 7.6
0.420 158.7
0.322 33.9
0.794 13.1
0.332 15.2
0.000 N/M
0.035 86
0.407 13.5
0.952 10.9
0.180 55.6

on a Percentage Pricing bases)

FROM page one

“Undue pressure is being put on many employees in the

5S2wk-Hi

S2wk-Low

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBE17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.

Interest

T%

Prime + 1.75%

T%

Prime + 1.75%

Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

finance sector to meet unrealistic goals and work to cover
duties where others have exited the organization — all under
the guise of adjusting to the economic situation.

“We can affirm that plans are well underway in many of
the financial institutions for redundancies via early retire-
ments, natural attrition and terminations for any breach regard-
less of level or error. The BFSU does not support wrongdoing
but wants employers to be considerate of the pressure being
placed on employees in the sector who are going to work each
day uncertain when or if that day is the last day at their com-

pany,” the statement read.

The union added that the Minister of Labour, Dion Foulkes
was quite right in his most recent statements on the layoffs at
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, where he claimed that he is not

aware of any further redundancies.

5S2wk-Low

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

1.3231
2.8952
1.4031
3.1031
12.3289

93.1992

1.0000

9.0775

1.0000

1.0000

1.0585 1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Lew - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

FEund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.8952 -1.52 -3.18
1.4777 3.07 5.31
3.1031 -8.35
12.9801 2.87 5.79
101.6693 1.10 1.67
93.1992 -3.33 -6.76
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Div $
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
10-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

-13.82

“This may be because the reduction of employees remains
below the radar due to the concealed downsizing policies of
these local employers, and thus neither the Minister nor the
public is aware of its magnitude.”

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vel. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS § - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Steck Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525
THE TRIBUNE

. : a
b

PAGE 9



25,

ts

2009



Martinborough
Bahamas National
Sunfish Champion!

See page 10

‘Golden Girl’ Debbie wins 200 again!

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ebbie Ferguson-

McKenzie picked up

her second-straight

victory in the wom-

en’s 200 metres
before she helped the women’s 4 x
100 relay team to a second place yes-
terday at the Aviva London Grand
Prix.

Four days after turning in the
world’s leading time at the 25th
Vardinoyannia International Track
and Field Meeting in Rethymno,
Greece, Ferguson-McKenzie came
back in Great Britain and clocked
23.11 seconds for another victory.

The time was no where near the
fastest time of 22.32 this year that
also recorded as a meet record, but it
was good enough to keep her well
ahead of her nearest rival, American
Marshevet Hooker, who ran 23.30.

Ferguson-McKenzie’s victory has
her in second place in the World
Athletics Tour standings with 39
points after four meets behind LaV-

erne Jones-Ferette, who is out front
with 42 points over five meets.

Jones-Ferette of the Virgin Islands
was fourth yesterday in 23.39. Third
place went to Great Britain’s Emily
Freeman in 23.34.

In the relay, Ferguson-McKenzie
teamed up with veteran Chandra
Sturrup, Timicka Clarke and Chris-
tine Amertil to run 43.35 for a sec-
ond place finish behind the United
States (42.39).

They improved on the previous
season’s best of 43.64 that was done
by Sakeitha Henfield, Sturrup,
Amertil and Ferguson-McKenzie at
the Penn Relays on April 25.

On both occasions, the teams went
under the 43.90 qualifying time for

the L[AAF World Championships in
Athletics in Berlin, Germany,
August 15-23.

Yesterday, the Bahamas matched
the times produced by Brazil and
Mexico, while only the United
States, Great Britain, Germany and
Trinidad & Tobago have ran faster.

Amertil, in her individual appear-
ance, was fifth in the first of two
women’s 400 races in 52.20. She end-
ed up in that same position with the
two races combined.

Winning the heat and taking the
top spot was Nicola Sanders of Great
Britain in 51.45, followed by three
Americans - Shana Cox (51.56),
Monica Hargrove (51.66) and
DeeDee Trotter (52.08).



Women’s 4 x 100 relay team places second
‘Superman’ Sands settles for fourth in triple jump
Shamar Sands sixth in 110m hurdles

Christine Amertil fifth in 400

Amertil is now tied with Russian
Yulia Gushchina for 12th place in
the World Athletics Tour with 27
points. American Sanya Richards,
who skipped London, is leading the
pack with 90 points.

On the men’s side, Olympic
bronze medallist Leevan “Super-
man” Sands had to settle for fourth
place in the men’s triple jump with a
leap of 17.13 metres.

Winning the event was American
Brandon Roulhac with 17.33. Cuban
Arnie David Girat was second with
17.18 and Great Britain’s Phillips
Idowu was third with 17.16.

With his performance, Sands
dropped to third with 40 points on
the World Athletics Tour. He was

Mercy rule!

passed by Idowu, who has 46. Girat
is leading with 50.

And Shamar Sands missed out on
the opportunity to advance to the
final of the men’s 110m hurdles.

In the first of two heats, Sands
clocked 13.81 for sixth place. The
heat was won by Eric Mitchum in
13.61 as he nipped Cuban world
record holder Dayron Robles
(13.62).

Robles, however, came back in
the final and turned the tables by
winning in 13.29. Mitchum was fifth.
Ryan Braithwaite of Barbados, who
won the title at the BAAA Nationals
in June, was second in 13.31 and
Great Britain’s Andrew Turner third
in 13.66.

Sands, who was 10th overall in the
two races combined, dropped into
a two-way tie for 10th place with
Bralthwaite with 38 points in the
World Athletics Tour.

Today, Sturrup will be the last of
the Bahamian contingent to com-
pete in an individual event when she
runs in heat two of the women’s 100
that will feature American Allyson
Felix.

Stingrays stop Commodores 11-2 in five innings

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MANAGER Godfrey
“Gully” Burnside has his
Price Waterhouse Stingrays
clicking in the men’s division
of the New Providence Soft-
ball Association.

Thursday night at the Bail-
lou Hills Sporting Complex,
Burnside watched as his
Stingrays ran circles around
the Defence Force Com-
modores, stopping them 11-2
in five mnings via the mercy
tule.

With the win Price Water-
house took sole possession
of second place at 8-2, just a
half game ahead of front run-
ning Heavy Equipment
Dorsey Park Boyz and a half
game ahead of defending
champions Commando Secu-
rity Truckers, who are 7-2.

With the loss - their third
straight - the Defence Force
dropped all the way to fifth
place at 5-6, just a half game
ahead of sixth place Young
Breed.

In the opener, Young
Breed knocked off the
Thompson Heavy Equip-
ment Outlaws 9-4 to improve
their record to 4-5. The Out-
laws fell to 3-8 in seventh
place.

Burnside, who is hoping
that his youthful looking
Stingrays can finally get over
the hump and not only get
into the championship but



SOFTBALL

win it all this year, said the
key to their success has been
their off-season training and
the acquisition of two veteran
players.

“We had a very good and
productive spring training
and the team is playing very
well right now as a result of
it,” Burnside said. “We still
have some little things that
we have to work through and
some injuries that shook up
our infield a little.

“But with the addition of
(pitcher) Leroy (Thompson)
and (first baseman) Ivan
(Francis), their experience
has really caused the players
to play a lot better. I really
like the way we are gelling
right now.”

If they can stay injury-free,
Burnside said his Stingrays
are really making an impact
in the league when it counts
the most in the post-season.

Leroy Thompson, who has
reunited with Burnside after
playing with the Truckers up
to last year, fired a three-hit-
ter, striking out four in secur-
ing another win on the
mound.

He gave up the only two
runs to the Commodores on
a two-run home run from
Bryon McClain in the top of
the third as he drove home
Martin Culmer from first on
an error.

NPSA TEAM STANDINGS

Here’s a look at the NPSA’s team standings going into

Saturday’s double header:

TEAMS WwW

Ladies’ Division
Pineapple Air Wild..
P CP Lady Sharks
Sigma Brackettes
Mystical Queens
Boomer G Swingers

RR UN UIO

Men’s Division
Dorsey Park Boyz

P W Stingrays

C Security Truckers
Robin Hood Hitmen
D F Commodores
Young Breed

THE Outlaws
Mighty Mits

Morgan Buccaneers

Nw Ww RMU ~1 OO OO

Tonight’s schedule

Ec Pet. GB

1,000—-
629 31/2
555 4
142 i
11 8

AnNBRWS

808
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454
444
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IE:
181

~
NB

ODMWDWDUNDAANNE
SNA RWERE !

7pm — Proper Care Pool vs Mystical Queens (L)
8:30pm — Dorsey Park Boyz vs Thompdon Heavy

Equipment (M)

But after taking a 3-2 lead
in the second, the Stingrays
marched 11 batters to the
plate as they batted around
the clock, scoring eight times
on five hits.

Alec Rolle, who led off the
inning with a walk, highlight-
ed the rally with a three-run
homer.

Godfrey Burnside Jr had
a perfect 3-for-3 night at the
plate, driving in a run and
scoring three times, Luton
Delancy was 2-for-3 with two
runs scored and Greg Jones
was 2-for-2 with a RBI, scor-
ing a run, while Ghandi
Williams scored twice.

In total, the Stingrays
banged out 10 hits off losing
pitcher Cory Brown, who had
just one strike out.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Young Breed 9,
Thompson Heavy
Equipment 4:

The more experienced
Outlaws seemed poised to
win this battle against their
younger foes, but they almost
ended up getting stopped.

Coming back from a 3-1
deficit in the second inning,
Young Breed slowly pecked
away until the sixth when
they needed at least five runs
to force the Outlaws to walk
off the field.

Instead, New Young felt
short with just four, allowing
the game to play to the end
when they prevailed.

Theodore Sweeting Jr
went 3-for-4 with three RBIs,
while Ken Wood was 2-for-4
with two RBIs, scoring a run
and D’Andre Rigby 2-for-4
with a run scored.

Young Breed, who pro-
duced 15 hits off loser
Roscoe Thompson, got a 2-
for-3 production from Ange-
lo Butler and Thomas Davis
with Butler scoring twice and
Thomas driving in a run and
scoring another.

“First of all, I want to
thank God for the victory
because it pushes us up in the
standings,” said Ken Wood,
who anchored their defense
at short. “I think we’re play-
ing great and once we stay
together, we should make the
playoffs.”

Wood said one of the key
ingredients is their ace pitch-
er Eugene Pratt, who came
through down the stretch and
held the Outlaws scoreless
for four innings as they
racked up their runs.

Pratt ended up giving up
seven hits with four strike
outs for the win.



Defence Force Commodores’ Brad Smith...

A PRICE WATERHOUSE STINGRAYS center fielder Godfrey Burnside Jr is tagged out at third base by

See more photos on page 10
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Federation
encourages
athletes to
“stay clean
and use
their natural
abilities’

T HE
president of
t h e
Bahamas
Softball
Federation,
in light of
the govern-
ment’s anti-
doping bill,
said the BSF |
encourages
athletes to
“stay clean
and use
their natural abilities.”

In a statement to Tribune
Sports yesterday, Burkett
Dorsett said the federation
“wholeheartedly” supports
the bill.

“We encourage our athletes
to stay away from the perfor-
mance enhancing drugs, stay
clean and use their natural
abilities. I don’t think we need
to enhance that with any ille-
gal drugs,” he said.

Dorsett said the Interna-
tional Softball Federation
(ISF) is against the use of per-
formance enhancing drugs.

“And we (the Bahamas
Softball Federation) are laud-
ed by the international body
for our clean bill of health, so
to speak, as it relates to dop-
ing in softball.”

Like all of the other sports,
he said Bahamian players are
tested for the use of perfor-
mance enhancing drugs when
they compete on the interna-
tional scene and not one ath-
lete has tested positive.

Dorsett said the federation
continues to support their ath-
letes, encouraging them to be
vigilant in what they take.

“Tf they must take some-
thing, go and see a doctor, or
get a list of the banned sub-
stances,” he said.

Over the years, Dorsett said
Bahamian athletes have com-
peted against their foreign
counterparts who years later
were stripped of their medals
after testing positive for per-
formance enhancing drugs.

“We would have liked to
see the authorities come here
and present our athletes with
medals when they are given
to them because of athletes
cheating,” Dorsett said.

“The events are normally
held on the world stage for
all to see, so they should let
everybody in the world see
that the Bahamas are the win-
ners and they didn’t use drugs
to get there.”

Thousands
expected to
attend ‘oldest
regatta in the
Bahamas’

THOUSANDS of Bahami-
ans are expected to flock to
Rolleville, Exuma, to attend
the 62nd annual
regatta/homecoming — the
oldest in the Bahamas.

According to commodore
Jeffrey McKenzie, the C class
race commences on Saturday,
August 1, beginning with the
Parliament Boys Race and a
$2,000 cash prize for the win-
ner.

On Sunday, August 2, the
Elijah McKenzie Memorial
Cup Race is scheduled to be
held and the winner will
receive a $1,000 cash prize.

On Monday, August 3, The
Ocean Race from Barraterre
will be held and the winner
will receive a $500 cash prize
followed by the two series
races with a $1,000 cash prize.

The returning champ
Touch Me Not will try to
defend her crown.

Crowd favourites Bul Reg
and Fugitive along with other
boats from Barraterre are
expected to participate in this
year’s regatta.

There will also be on shore
activities which include the
greasy pole contest, may pole
plaiting contest and other
activities.

According to McKenzie,
these are the best C class
boats in the country and the
regatta offers more prize
money than any other regatta.



D Martinborough is Bahamas
National Sunfish Champion!

@ By DIANE PHILLIPS

Special to The Tribune

WITH barely enough wind
to ripple the waters in Mon-
tagu Bay, three-time Sunfish
world champion Donnie
Martinborough used experi-
ence to find the highs, dodge
the lulls and beat a field of 35
to sail away with the
Bahamas National Sunfish
Championship title.

It was the 10th time Mart-
inborough won out of the 11
times the national champi-
onship has been held. But
this time was different.

“This is the first time that
four of the top 15 sailors
were juniors and the first
time a junior has come in sec-
ond,” said Martinborough.
Christopher Sands, a student
at St. Andrews , took second
place. “Chris deserves so
much credit. He sailed such a
smart regatta.”

Smart, in this sense, meant
not peeling off to take
chances that could pay off or
just as easily backfire in light
and fickle winds, but sailing
conservatively to end the
series with two second place
finishes, two fifths and one
10th, for a total of 24 points
in the low-point series. Sands
finished just two points
below (ahead of) veteran
sailor Jimmie Lowe, who
came in third with 26 points
in the five-race series.

In fourth place was real
estate guru George Dami-
anos who finished with 27
points. In fifth was S S Scan-
dinavian Gold Cup winner
and underwater cinematog-
rapher Gavin McKinney,
who would have given Mart-

_



THREE TIME World Championship winner Donnie Martinborough
won the Sunfish Nationals recently held at Montagu Bay, beating a

field of 35 contenders...

inborough a solid run for the
title if it had not been for a
single bad race. McKinney
was the only sailor in the
field of 35 beside Martinbor-
ough to win two races, but a
23rd place finish in the first
race hurt his overall score.

In most series, sailors are
able to toss out their worst
race, but because only five
of the six scheduled races
were run for lack of wind,
every race counted.

“The fact that there were
no throw-outs made a huge
difference in the final results
for a number of sailors in the
competition,” said Martin-
borough, whose own worst
finish was a 5th. “But it also
made young Chris Sands’
final results, in fact, all the
juniors’, that much more
impressive.”

In addition to the surprise

Photos by Robert Dunkley

of youth finishing close to or
beating experienced world
class sailors like Lowe, McK-
inney and Damianos, all of
whom sail different classes
of boats and at one time or
another have held enviable
international titles, what
made this series stand out
was its lead-up to the Sun-
fish World Championship set
for October in Nassau.
“The Worlds are huge --
boats and sailors from
around the world,” said Mar-
tinborough. “Hence the great
turn-out for the Nationals
this year, the largest turnout
that I can ever remember,
since the host team can enter
as many as 15 boats.” The
possibility of not having any
qualifiers for the World
Championship hung in the
air on the first day of the
regatta when there was so lit-







= —

SEVENTY eight-year-old Pedro Wassitsch (left) was the oldest
competitor completing the five race series...

tle wind it would have taken
a hefty whistler to disturb a
leaf. “We had only three
days to sail and complete this
regatta,” said Martinbor-
ough, who also holds a world
record in Bermuda Race
Week wins in the Sunfish,
the spunky little 14-foot boat
with a single sail. “On Sat-
urday, the first day, it didn’t
look like we were going to
get in any races.” They final-
ly sailed one. “That meant
on Sunday, we had to jam in
four races, back-to-back.
Conditions were very tough
because the wind was still
light and variable, all over
the place.” So we were to be
able to get in a series after
five, a series after five, a sit-
uation that often occurs
because of weather condi-
tions.

Martinborough’s win in

Montagu Bay earned him the
Perry Cooke Memorial
National Trophy in honour
of the late sailor who brought
home The Bahamas’ first
Olympic Gold along with Sir
Durward Knowles in the Star
Class in 1954.

The Sunfish National
Championship was hosted
and sponsored by the Nas-
sau Yacht Club while the
Royal Nassau Sailing Club’s
Commodore Francisco de
Cardenas ran the races. De
Cardenas’ son, Fernando,
finished 8th, just behind
Peter Bruce Wassitsch, who
finished in 7th, nearly 20
places ahead of his father,
Pedro Wassitsch, at 78, the
oldest competitor in the
regatta. The elder Wassitsch
sailed all five races, finishing
with 115 points and a broad
smile.

Stingrays ston Commodores 11-2



STINGRAYS’ Jameko Sands keeps an eye on the ball...

5 ad by ae me Be

Am VE

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



PRICE WATERHOUSE Stingrays’ pitcher Leroy Thompson lets it go...

Darts: Third place for Sands Bullets



THE SANDS BULLETS dart team, captained by Curtis
Malone, presented the fourth place trophy to Sands
beer representative Kelly Sands...



Malone and Graham Thornly.



ae
Nod |

THE SANDS BULLETS dart team, sponsored by Sands Beer, finished the 2008-9 Nassau Darts Association open
season in fourth place out of 29 teams and came in third in the championship division. Shown (I-r) are Neil Behagg,
Mike Russell, James Newly, Brodie Townly, Kelly Sands of Sands Beer, Captain Curtis Malone, lan Anderson, Pete
THE TRIBUNE



THE WEATHER REPORT



5-Day FORECAST

PS

z7

i

TAMPA
High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 77° F/25°C
@ fi

‘

KEY WEST
High: 90° F/32°C
Low: 82° F/28° C

ORLANDO |
_ High:92° F/33°C .
Low: 74° F/23°C





Mostly sunny with a

thunderstorm.

ig h: 92°
CEC aac

112° F









@ WEST PALM BEACH
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 78° F/26° C

FT. LAUDERDALE

High: 89° F/32°C

Low: 80° F/27°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

= AMI



High: 92° F/33°C
Low: 79° F/26° C


















SATURDAY, JULY 24 2009, PAGE 11

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

Hus ie



> TF (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

ea Ce | Ae





















High

F/C

Albuquerque 95/35
Anchorage 66/18
Atlanta 92/33
Atlantic City 84/28
Baltimore 90/32
Boston 82/27
Buffalo 82/27
Charleston, SC 94/34
Chicago 80/26
Cleveland 82/27
Dallas 100/37
Denver 82/27
Detroit 78/25
Honolulu 90/32
Houston 97/36

Today

Low

F/C
69/20
55/12
71/21
71/21
70/21
68/20
66/18
74/23
61/16
64/17
78/25
59/15
62/16
78/25
76/24

WwW

pc
sh
pc
s
$
pc
t
pc
t
t
pc
Cc
t
$

pe

High

F/C
92/33
69/20
88/31
88/31
88/31
85/29
77/25
93/33
82/27
80/26
97/36
88/31
80/26
89/31
95/35

Sunday

Low

F/C
69/20
56/13
70/21
70/21
70/21
70/21
64/17
73/22
62/16
62/16
76/24
60/15
64/17
77/25
76/24

Ww

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando

High
F/C
86/30
94/34
90/32
103/39
96/35
86/30
92/33
94/34
92/33
78/25
94/34
90/32
86/30
98/36

Today

Low

F/C
63/17
72/22
66/18
81/27
72/22
66/18
70/21
73/22
79/26
62/16
67/19
75/23
74/23
72/22

Ww











Today Sunday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
as on ~ inn = av High = Low W High Low W WASSAU ‘Today. Eat7-14Knots 2-3Feet 10-20Miles 84°F |
on oy o|1 |2 3|4|5|6 : 8|9|10 Fic _ FIC Fc FIC Sunday: Eat 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet___6-10 Miles 84° F
wil a | = Acapulco 93/33 77/25 pe 91/32 79/26 pe FREEPORT Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 84°F
— HY Low — | wooerare | HicH |v. HIGH Amsterdam 68/20 55/12 sh 72/22 57/13 pe Sunday: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 84° F
Ankara, Turkey 90/32 54/12 s 90/32 57/13 Ss ABACO ‘Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 85° F
Mainly cloudy and Partly sunny with a Partly sunny, breezy Partly sunny, a Some sun with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 102/38 79/26 s 97/36 77/25 s Sunday: Eat 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 85° F
very warm. thunderstorm. and pleasant. t-storm possible. couple of t-storms. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 53/11 40/4 s 55/12 42/5 s
High: 90° High: 90° High: 91° High: 89° Bangkok 89/31 77/25 +r 90/32 77/25 r :
Low: 81° Low: 80° Low: 80° Low: 80° Low:30°_| [ite wreee ET moe oie srs eros lkealieaberdiab ail daa
ug digh_HeGen Kae Beijing 90/32 72/22 pe 88/31 71/21 s
- —l = — —_="_—* - —— 4 —— Beirut 91/32 79/26 s 81/27 78/25 s Seattlaye
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines : effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1itiam. 3.4 4:53 a.m. -0.3 Belgrade 88/31 59/15 s 89/27 57/13 s
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 11:32pm. 29 5:19pm. -0.1 Berlin 68/20 52/11 sh 72/22 57/13 po
12:04pm. 31 5:40am. -0.2 Bermuda 84/28 77/25 pe 84/28 77/25 s
Sunday 6-15 00
ee 15pm. 0. Bogota 68/20 41/5 s 67/19 41/5 s
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Monday 7222 am. 27 628am. Od Brussels 72/22 52/11 pc 77/25 57/13 pc
ABACO Temperature 12:57pm. 3.0 7:12pm. 02 Budapest 81/27 54/12 pe 84/28 57/13 s
5 Lh. gq° ° FUNGI es cscs cicetes Dace aueeatatereaanct tacoma 90° F/32° C : : Buenos Aires 5442 39/3 c 54412 43/6 s
ee Low 79° F/26° ¢ Testy Tam od Cairo 100/37 77/25 s 101/38 78/25 s
a ow: 81° F/27 Normal high ..... gsr rgi¢c ts 97/36 87/30 t 97/36 87/30 t
ot Normal low 75° F/24° C Calgary 83/28 46/7 t 71/21 52/11 pe
i Lest Veal S MOI senate 92° F/33° C SU TUM UCT). Cancun 91/32 77/25 t 90/32 76/24 pe
a Last year's lOW oe eee 76° F/24° C " " Caracas 81/27 71/21 pe 80/26 71/21 t
i. . iv Precipitation Pei teens a am. ee Casablanca 90/32 75/23 s 96/35 77/25 s
‘alll , As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... 0.42" unsel....... 00 p.m. Moonset... . 1Uro4 p.m. Copenhagen 67/19 53/11 sh 69/20 57/13 c
FREEPORT Fre Year to date 20, First Full Last New Dublin 66/18 54/12 sh 64/17 54/12 4
High: 90° F/32° C Normal year to date oo... ceccecceseeceneee 23.42" . a= Frankfurt 73/22 54/12 pec 79/26 57/13 pc
Low: 79° F/26° C Ae Geneva 76/24 51/10 pe 82/27 55/12 s
AccuWeather.com i Halifax 66/18 59/15 c 73/22 59/15 pe Sa cael
Forecasts and graphics provided by a is Havana 91/32 76/24 t 93/33 73/22 t store 92/79
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 : Helsinki 72/22 52/11 pe 70/21 55/12 pc oo :
ELEUTHERA a ae el Hong Kong 90/32 82/27 t 90/32 82/27 t ee im Suc
NASSAU High: 90° F/32° C Islamabad 104/40 84/28 s 108/42 85/29 s BES Shown are noon positions of weather systems and W.
High: 92° F/33°C Low: 81°F/27°C Istanbul 98/36 80/26 s 84/28 71/21 po IS ico peta, Tong te tenes ey ody ‘ie,
— Low: 81°F/27°C Jerusalem 86/30 62/16 s 86/30 63/17 s ce orecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Megumi
a me shamesg SUA ete 522825 UF so IBN 10620 40 Roos 7a 66S
alll ; @ a CATISLAND Kingston 90/32 78/25 s 89/31 79/26 sh
A. } J 7 7 Lima 73/22 59/15 s 73/22 59/15 pc
ay High: 87° F/31°C London 73/22 55/12 pc 75/23 55/12 pc
Low: 77° F/25°C Madrid 97/36 63/17 s 100/37 64/17 s
low ion ai om! ‘ao ex MM UTULTU@PNN el NUL VAN Ge
: » a Mexico City 77/25 55/12 t 76/24 52/11 t | : .
a ail a Monterrey 104/40 75/23 s 104/40 75/23 s
Ny GREAT EXUMA \ om SAN SALVADOR Montreal 79/26 66/18 c 77/25 66/18 t
~ High: 90° F/32° C High: 90° F/32°C Moscow 75/23 61/16 t 73/22 59/15 sh
Low: 78° F/26°C ee Munich 70/21 48/8 pe 76/24 49/9 pc
ANDROS Low: 78° F/26° C Nairobi 78/25 53/11 sh 79/26 53/11 pc
High: 92° F/33° C en New Delhi 99/37 81/27 pc 100/37 83/28 t Yo yu 9 Be B low
Low: 78° F/26° C {. , . a “ Oslo 66/18 54/12 sh 72/22 56/13 sh nN n
-., , om Paris 77/25 B7/13 s 81/27 61/16 s A A H
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iah: 92° ° Riyadh 111/43 86/30 s 105/40 79/26 s
te a sais Gill? s «8082. 5/18 s Or you can rest easy knowing
sunday Today saa MAYAGUANA St.Thomas 88/81 79/26 sh 80/82._79/26 sh that yo pane excellent insurance
i i i “90° F/32° an Juan $ $ .
7 oe” ee ih Lowe 75°24" Terai ee ee ase co e no matter which
82/27 65/18 s Philadelphia 89/31 72/22 pc 88/31 72/22 t Santiago 61/16 39/3. pe 66/18 45/7 pe Way he wind blows.
92/33 72/22 pce Phoenix 105/40 99/31 t 109/42 99/31 5 CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo 90/32 74/23 s 85/29 74/23 sh
: ° ~G Sao Paulo 62/16 58/14 + 71/21 56/13 +
86/30 67/19 s Pittsburgh 84/28 64/17 t 80/26 62/16 t RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:94°F/34°c a
107/41 86/80 s Portland, OR 89/31 64/17 s 91/92 658s GGEDISLAND joy:77°F/25°c Seoul 84/28 66/18 pc 85/29 66/18 sh Nobody does it better.
oe High: 93° F/34° C Stockholm 68/20 54/12 sh 72/22 54/12 pc
95/35 70/21 pc Raleigh-Durham 96/385 70/21 pc 94/34 70/21 pc “74° 0 i.
: Low: 74° F/23°C Sydney 6417 48/8 s 62/16 41/5 sh
88/31 66/18 pc St. Louis 90/32 69/20 t 88/31 69/20 s aA Taipei 94/34 83/28 t 90/32 78/25 +
87/30 67/19 t Salt Lake City 93/33 69/20 t 94/34 67/19 pc GREAT INAGUA AY. Tokyo 96/30 75/23 sh 85/29 74/23 pc :
94/34 72/22 t San Antonio 99/37 75/23 pe 98/86 74/23 pc Pannier 6 |
: High: 94° F/34°C Toronto 75/23 63/17 t 75/23 59/15 t
92/33 78/25 t San Diego 78/25 69/20 s 78/25 67/19 pc Low: 77° F/25°C Trinidad 70/21 57/13 c 78/25 63/17 pc
83/28 66/18 s Sanfrancisco 71/21 55/12 pc 73/22 56/13 pc : carne 30/26 64/17 pc 82/7 65/18 pc (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
a “ ve EEE TSI ama | Ka entes, B
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pe Heed! 7 Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
93/33 75/23 t Washington, DG 90/32 74/23 s 89/31 71/21 t storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

92/33

74/23


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



Lion



Department of Marine Resources holds a
demonstration on how to cookand cleanthe Lionfish



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
and TIM CLARKE

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

URIOUS fish lovers learned

how to clean and cook lion-

fish at a demonstration held
by the Department of Marine
Resources at Potter's Cay yesterday.

Fisheries officers from the department’s
conservation unit explained how although
the non-native invasive fish have poisonous
spines, they are safe to eat and rather deli-
cious!

The Pacific Ocean fish are thriving in
Bahamian waters at the peril of all native
fish as they eat juvenile species of all kinds,
and have very few predators.

The department has launched a National
Lionfish Response Plan to combat the inva-
sion of lionfish which simply involves eating
them!

Assistant Fisheries Officer from the con-
servation unit of the Department of Marine
Resources Lakeshia Anderson said: “Lion-
fish eat almost anything they fit in their
mouths, shrimp, crabs, juvenile fish like
Nassau Groupers, and an array of other
fish.

“We analysed the contents of the stomach
of one lionfish and found 50 small pilchards.

“They can impact our commercial fishing
industry and because their numbers have



STEP TWO: Remove the two short, ven-
omous, pelvic spines near the head on the under-
side of the fish.



increased so much around the archipelago,
the best way to control them is to eat them.

“So let’s just start eating lionfish. They
are not poisonous and they’re very edible
and very tasty.

“You can fillet it or cook it whole. I think
it tastes similar to hogfish, but others have
said it tastes like snapper or grouper.”

Assistant Port Controller at Potter’s Cay
dock, Nassau, Craig Curtis, 39, told The
Tribune how he rates lionfish so highly he
plans to serve it at his 40th birthday party in
September.

He said: “I consider it a bit exotic and
it’s a real delicacy.

“To me the texture is relative to the snap-
per fish and it’s more tasty than the grouper.
I really enjoy it, and I understand the ratio-
nale behind the whole lionfish project
because the species is now increasing at
such a fast rate it’s important for people to
know how we can now turn the tables on
them, and start eating them, and start to
decrease their population.”

Lionfish have venomous spines in three
areas and it is important to handle them
carefully when preparing them to eat. As
you clean the fish, hold the head down to
avoid touching the spines, and wear heavy
gloves to protect your hands from fleshy
tentacles on the head.

Should you get stabbed by a venomous
Spine apply heat to the wound for 15 to 20
minutes to prevent the venom from spread-
ing and seek medical attention as soon as
possible.



STEP THREE: Remove the three short, ven-
omous, anal spines near the tail on the underside
of the fish.

STEP ONE: Begin by removing the row of 13 long, venomous dorsal spines which run along the
back of the fish with a sharp knife, or a pair of kitchen shears may make removal of the spines easier.
Cut into the flesh on each side of the row of spines along the length of the fish, moving from the head
towards the tail.

When you have made a ‘V’ shaped incision on either side, loosen the spines and then pry them off STEP FOUR: Now all three areas of ven-
completely. omous spines have been removed, the fish is
Once removed, the spines are no longer venomous, and you can save them and use them as tooth- completely safe to handle.

picks when serving the cooked fish. Cut off the fan-like pectoral fins on either side of
the fish with your knife or kitchen shears.



STEP FIVE: Remove the tail.

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking a suitably qualified individual to fill the position:

Head, Output Management

The main responsibilities of the position holder include:

Manage a small team

Manage electronic file documents
Process enhancements

Perform quality control checks
Management reporting

Qualifications:

« Atleast 2 years of management experience
Strong organizational skills
Ability to multi-task
Attention to detail and quality client service
Self motivated
Proficiency in MS Office Applications
Knowledge of IBM Content Manager a plus



STEP SIX: Remove the head. Lionfish STEP SEVEN: Fillet the fish as usual, or
heads have a rough texture and are not very scrape off the thin and easily-removed scales
meaty, so they are not recommended as some- __ to cook it whole.

thing good to eat.

Please send your resume, on or before Friday July 24th to:
hrbahamas@ubs.com

It starts with you.



STEP EIGHT: Season the fish with salt STEP NINE: Squeeze some lime juice on

and pepper, dip in egg, and then flour, and the fish and dip in hot pepper sauce. Enjoy!
deep-fry until golden brown.