Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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The Tribune

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009



Threat to lie’ of
ton potice cel

Security heightened [NESTE INI,

after commissionet’s
car ‘tampered with’

POLICE are inves- [FF
tigating whether an |,

attempt could have |) ==

been made on the life |!
of Police Commission- |
er Reginald Ferguson
after officers discov-
ered that his private
vehicle had been tam-
pered with.
According to sources, Mr
Ferguson discovered that most
of the lug nuts on his car’s
front left tyre had “miracu-
lously” disappeared while on

ROTEL rete



the grounds of police
headquarters in East
Street.

Reportedly only two
nuts were loosely
screwed on to two of
the five bolts on the
tyre.

This act, allegedly
done in an effort to
cause the Commissioner to
crash his vehicle, has been tak-
en seriously by acting Assis-

SEE page eight

Businessman dies one week
after being shot hy robbers

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Businessman Leslie Maycock lost his battle
for life and died on Thursday in hospital one week after he was
shot by armed robbers outside his business.

Maycock, 50, was detained in critical, but stable condition in
the Intensive Care Unit at Rand Memorial Hospital after being

shot on July 15.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle said his death now pushes the
homicide count to six for the year on Grand Bahama.
Maycock, a former police officer, was closing his store in the

SEE page eight



| | HECTOR AND ROSETTA
| SMITH, the parents of



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Brenton Smith, look at
their son’s photograph
during the memorial held
yesterday in Stapledon
Gardens.

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net




























THERE was an out-
pouring of love and a
call for justice for 18-
year-old Brenton Smith
last night in Stapledon
Gardens as scores of
young people and fami-
ly members gathered
last night to remember
the life of the ambitious
young man killed by a
stray bullet in a police
shoot out.

The “Candlelight Vig-
il” organised by Bren-
ton’s friends drew a
large crowd of people
who took the opportu-
nity to express what a
kind, funny, humble and
driven person their fall-
en friend was, and their
sorrow for the loss he

SEE page seven





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PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

aa
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Hung jury

in Dorneil

Ferguson
murder trial

Failure to

reach decisive
verdicts on three
separate charges









Bahamian arrested with son of

former Miami Dolphins owner

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

AN Abaco restaurant own-
er has been arrested in Flori-
da with the son of former
Miami Dolphins owner H
Wayne Huizenga after the
pair were suspected of trying
to burgle a woman’s home.
However, it is believed that
Huizenga, under the influence
of alcohol, mistook the house
for his own and had tried to
enter.

In a bizarre scenario,
Bahamian Patrick Stewart, 44,
the owner of Cracker P’s Bar
and Grill, was arrested on
Monday by Fort Lauderdale
police after his friend Robert
Ray Huizenga allegedly
docked his boat at the wrong
house and tried to get inside.

Yesterday Huizenga plead-
ed not guilty to boating under
the influence of alcohol.
Police say Stewart is expected
to face charges of trespassing,



ROBERT Ray Huizenga (left)
and Bahamian Patrick Stewart.

possession of a controlled
substance, and possession of
cannabis under 20 grams.

Stewart, whose popular
restaurant sits on a 7.5 acre
beachfront property in Lub-
ber’s Quarters, Abaco, has yet
to be arraigned.

According to a police
report, the fiasco unfolded
when officers got an 11.15pm
phone call from a woman liv-
ing at Lido Drive, Fort Laud-
erdale.

She said two men were at
the rear door of her residence
“jiggling at the door, attempt-

SEE page seven

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By NATARIO
McKENZIE

Tribune Staff
Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

THE DORNEIL Fer-
guson murder trial end-
ed with a hung jury yes-
terday after jurors failed
to reach decisive ver-
dicts on three separate
charges.

Dudley Duran
Moree, 23, Mr Fergu-
son’s co-worker, is
charged with his murder
as well as the attempted
murder of the morti-
cian’s wife, Yuzann.

Moree is also charged
with possession of a
firearm with the intent
to endanger the life of
the couple’s daughter
Dorneisha, who was
seven months at the
time of the shooting
incident.

The couple were shot
as they slept in the bed-
room of their Family
Street apartment off
Soldier Road on the
morning of June 26,
2008.

Moree has main-
tained his innocence.

After three hours of
deliberation, the jury of

SEE page eight

Homeowners
claim they are
‘kept in dark’
over highway
construction

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ANGRY homeowners in
the Vista Marina subdivision
claim Government is contin-
uing to leave them in the dark
about the construction of the
multi-million dollar highway
being built around and within
the borders of their land.

They said they are dis-
tressed about possible flood-
ing, property devaluation,
noise and traffic pollution
they feel will stem from the

SEE page eight





PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Approved Crown land applicants |

‘will get papers by end of year’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Prime Minister has
promised to take action to
ensure that all people whose
Crown land applications
have been approved will
“get their papers to which
they are entitled” by the end
of the year.

Speaking in the House of
Assembly, Hubert Ingra-
ham said he is “disheart-
ened” by the number of
applications that have
received approvals but have
not yet been executed
“notwithstanding that the
requisite fee has been paid,
in too many cases, years and
years ago.”

“I was astounded to see
the number of people in
Acklins who have not yet




















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Congratulations to this year's winners in the

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received their grants even
though I approved their
grants years ago.

“T will dispatch surveyors
to Acklins in short order to
finalise the process so that
before the end of the year
we Shall issue these people
of Acklins and Mayaguana,
in Bogue, Eleuthera and
Grand Bahama and Abaco
and elsewhere in the
Bahamas their papers to
which they are entitled.”

He made this commit-
ment as he noted that there
are also 9,000 outstanding
applications for Crown land
which have not even yet
gone through the earliest
stages of review by the Min-

istry of Lands — that which
results in a “recommenda-
tion” being made by the
Director of Lands and Sur-
veys and the under-secre-
tary in the Ministry of Lands
as to whether the request
should get the go-ahead.

Mr Ingraham recently
presented data in parlia-
ment that shows that just
under 1.4 million acres of
available Crown land still
exists in the country, which
is made up of 3.4 million
acres.

This amounts to approxi-
mately 10 acres per person,
or 55 per cent of usable land
in the entire country, the
rest being privately held or
classified as wetlands.

MPs, speaking last week
during the debate on a res-
olution to create a select
committee on Crown land,
suggested that how such
land is distributed, to whom,
after what length of time
and in what quantities, has
traditionally been seen to
be arbitrary or on the basis
of “kisses going by favours.”

It has been proposed by
some that a written policy
on how Crown land is dis-
tributed should be made
available and the considera-
tion process should be finite
— rather than taking over
a decade in some cases.

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Michael Toogood

Yesterday Mr Mitchell }
issued a Statement saying :
that he and Philip Davis, the :
other PLP MP appointed to :
the land committee, “want }
to get to work with dis- }
patch” in carrying out its }

responsibilities.

“We intend to engageina }
serious effort to carry out }
the will of the House. We }
look forward to working :
with our colleagues from the }
FNM in a similarly serious }

effort.

Surveys.”

Mr Mitchell added that as
the committee does its work
the trail of evidence will be }
followed wherever it leads ;
“and let the chips fall where

they may.”

This Lands Committee :
was formed following arti- }
cles in The Tribune reveal- :
ing claims of nepotism and }
corruption in the Depart- :
ment of Lands and Sur- }

veys.

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“With hard work and :
determination, the country :
should know the full story }
in this matter in short order, :
including testing the integri- ;
ty of claims made in the }
House by the Prime Minis- :
ter and others about the :
abuse of Crown land by for- ;
mer staff members at the }
Department of Lands and }



* SEE PAGE THREE |



Bahamians have their
say on harbour dredging
move the container port to

THE harbour at Arawak

Cay is in the process of STREET

being dredged to go along

with Government’s plan to

Arawak Cay. The Tribune

hit the streets to find out what the average Bahamian thinks
about the matter:

STEPHEN LOGAN

I think it will be better for the Bahamas
because they are dredging the harbour to
bring in the cruise ships, more cruise ships,
more people, more money so that’s why I
am for it. I don’t think the environmental
risk will be a big problem. I think the peo-
ple who are doing it will be experienced
enough to take care of all the environ-
mental risk and problems that will come

up, I think they should be able to handle |
the problems.



GINO THORTON
Tam not for it. For instance, If you take
‘| this area out here where the ships are now
(pointing toward Nassau Harbour) for a
point in time people had the authority to
go where they want to go. Since the Gov-
ernment took over they can’t do that any-
more. Everything is private security and it
will be the same way down there (Arawak
Cay). The freedom we have now we won’t
have it anymore, that’s why ’'m not for
it. 5






CLAUDETTE LUNDY





Iam against the dredging of the harbor =
at Arawak Cay. They should take it down |}
to Clifton Pier.

MARGARET
BULLARD

If the Government
wants to do it, then that
| is what’s gonna happen, but I don’t believe
| it will affect the Bahamian people that
much except with the beaches. When hol-
idays come around people like to go to
the beach and there is hardly enough
beaches out there now.




MORRIS HENERY






Well personally I wished they would
have moved all of the cargo shipping from |=
downtown or the immediate downtown |" 4% -
area, but the powers-that-be say that’s | s
where they want to put it. 4

My only opinion is that they should take |
it (the harbour) away from town and the |
immediate area of town so that they can
get rid of some of the congestion. I’m not saying that only the
lorries are causing the congestion there are a number of cars
causing it also.

But if that’s where they want to put it ’m waiting to see
what sort of traffic relief we are going to get by putting it
there (Arawak Cay) or what extra problems there will be.
There are two big cruise ships coming on board and we
would like to get that business as an addition to what we
have now. It will be good for tourism and local businesses.

Kenyatta Gibson is
named as Mortgage
Corporation chairman

FORMER PLP MP for
Kennedy Kenyatta Gibson
has been named by Govern-
ment to act as the new chair-
man of the Mortgage Cor-
poration.

Crossing the floor of the
House of Assembly to join
the FNM on January 21 of

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this year, Mr Gibson has
also most recently been
named to the Lands Review
committee, which was for-
mally appointed by Parlia-
ment on Wednesday.

The Tribune understands
that the formal documenta-
tion from the Governor
General has yet to be deliv-
ered to the MP.

The Mortgage Corpora-
tion has been in the press
recently because it forclosed
on a number of Bahamians
who were hard-hit by the
slumping economy.





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



MPs welcome
investigation into
land disposition

FOX Hill MP Fred
Mitchell, along with Cat
Island, Rum Cay, and San
Salvador MP Philip Davis,
issued a statement yester-
day welcoming the appoint-
ment of the committee to
investigate the disposition
of all publicly held lands in
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

The statement read: “My
colleague and I from the
Opposition side want to get
to work with dispatch and
forthwith. We intend to
engage in a serious effort to
carry out the will of the
House. We look forward to
working with our colleagues
from the FNM in a similarly
serious effort.

“With hard work and
determination, the country
should know the full story
in this matter in short order
including testing the integri-
ty of claims made in the
House by the Prime Minis-
ter and others about the
abuse of crown land by for-
mer staff members at the
Department of Lands and
Surveys.”

Mr Mitchell added that as
the committee does it’s work
the trail of evidence will be
followed wherever it leads
“and let the chips fall where
they may”.

Man expected
in court over
alleged firearm
possession

A MAN allegedly found
in possession of a firearm
and 10 rounds of ammuni-
tion is expected to be
arraigned in Magistrates
Court today.

he was arrested at
around 4.30pm on
Wednesday when police
officers from the Fox Hill
division and the mobile
division found a 9mm pis-
tol and 10 bullets for the
gun while on patrol in
Grant Street, Fox Hill.

BDM leader makes allegations over politicians, crown land

POLITICIANS in recent
times have been utilizing the
practice of placing crown land
grants in the names of their
maids, house-keepers, garden-
ers, wives, and friends as a
means to avoid being implicat-
ed in any land-looting scandals,
Bahamas Democratic Move-
ment leader Cassius Stuart
claimed yesterday.

Calling these actions “dis-
turbing and distressful”, Mr
Stuart said the Bahamas’ polit-
ical leaders have used their
“political operatives and
cronies” from the 1950s to pre-
sent to essentially syphon off
this most important and pre-
cious commodity.

He said: “The Bahamas may
not have natural resources such
as oil or gold but what we do
have is the commodity of land.
This precious commodity is
supposed to be held in trust for
the Bahamian people by our
elected leaders. However, the
recent revelations indicated
that many of our leaders,
whom we have trusted to pro-
tect our natural resources for
future generations of Bahami-
ans, have looted land for their
personal use.

“These men and women,
who were supposed to be the
guardians of our natural trea-
sures, became nothing but
political pirates who raided the
country of land for themselves
and their children.

“It is also heartbreaking to
know that the men and women
who claim to care so much
about the Bahamian people
and have trumpeted the cause
of equality and land equity and
even went as far as including
in our Constitution, a preamble
which states that the Bahamian
people are ‘the successors and
inheritors of these families of
islands’, are nothing but mod-
ern day pirates who care only
about their own well being.”

Noting that the average
Bahamian often times is turned
away by the government or
outright rejected for any crown
land application, Mr Stuart said
that this often would only hap-
pen because they don’t have a
“famous political name”.

“It is unacceptable that the
average Bahamian cannot get
50 x 100 piece of property as
crown grant to build a sensible
home and our politicians over
the years, have received hun-
dreds of acres to build their
luxurious mansions. In some
cases, they even turn around
and sell what they have
received for hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars, when they
themselves paid little or noth-
ing for it.

Anger over passport
processing delays

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

DELAYS in processing and producing
passports is vexing Bahamians whose tray-
el plans are being thwarted by the hold up.

Long waiting lines to put in applications
are followed by incorrect collection dates
driving Bahamians back to the Passport
Office in Thompson Boulevard, Nassau,
several times before their passports are actu-
ally ready for collection.

Once there, citizens are forced to wait at
least half an hour before being told their
passports are not ready, only to return again
the following week to be disappointed once
again, a passport collector fumed.

She applied for her passport in May and
was told to return on June 25 to collect it,
but when she called she was told the pass-
port would not be ready for another week.

A week later, the 24-year-old went
through the same process again, and it was
not until six weeks after the original collec-
tion date that she was able to finally collect
the document.

Men wanted for questioning in
connection with armed robbery

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama Police are
searching for two male residents of Eight
Mile Rock who are wanted for questioning

in connection with armed robbery.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle said police
have released wanted posters of Ezrin Green
Jr, alias “Snake” of Queens Highway, Han-
na Hill, and Jermaine Moss, alias “JB”, of

Jackson Corner, Hanna Hill.

He said the men are considered armed

and extremely dangerous.

Green, 24, is described as being of dark
complexion and having dark brown eyes.
He is 5ft 7 inches tall, of thin build and

weighs about 145 pounds.

Moss, 25, is of dark complexion with black
eyes. He is 5ft 11 inches tall, of muscular

She said: “I had waited three
and a half hours to put in the
application, and when I finally
went to pick up the passport I was
there for around an hour and 45
minutes before they gave it to me.

“T was waiting outside in the
hot sun for around half and hour
and when I got in there was a
room full of people and everyone
was so angry.

“When I finally got to the win-
dow I was told it was ready and to
sit down, then it took over an hour
for them to find my passport in
the building.”

As the woman waited for staff to find
her passport, she said another applicant told
her it was the seventh time she had returned
to the office to collect her passport after
being told it was ready, and each time she
was forced to wait in the queue before she
was then told it was not.

“Several people were told their passports
were not ready yet, when they had been
told it would be,” she said.

Ezrin Green

3125 or call 911.

Brent Symonette



Jermaine Moss



build and weighs around 180 pounds.
Anyone with any information concern-
ing these two men is asked to contact the
police in Grand Bahama at 352-1919, 351-
9111, 351-9991, 352-8351, 352-9076, and 350-

“T don’t see why they don’t
just extend the deadline to be
more realistic.

“Some people had arranged
to travel because they had been
told it was going to be ready,
and then it was not. It doesn’t
seem fair.”

Minister of Foreign Affairs
and Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette said while
‘i there have been some improve-
ments at the passport office,
there is still work to be done.

He said: “It takes around
eight weeks for a passport to be processed at
the moment which is totally unacceptable
and we are working on that. We are doing
all that is humanly possible to try to assist.”

The Minister explained how College of
the Bahamas students have been brought in
to assist with data entry and additional staff
from the ministry have been assigned to
the office to help process the backlog.

An additional window is being added in
the collection office, and the problem of

PAINT -

] of our sacred trea-

inheritance in this country. The pa ee

“Just recently, the Ij
director of land and |®
survey was caught up
in a shameful scandal
in which he was abus-
ing his authority, by
granting crown land
in Exuma to his fam-
ily members for little
or nothing.

“These family
members in turn
resold the same land
for hundreds of thou-
sand of dollars.

“This practice is
unethical and unac-
ceptable and these men and
women, who have engaged in
such despicable practices,
should hold their heads down
in shame, because they were
the chosen by the people of the
Bahamas to be the guardians



sure, land.”

In recent times, in
the practice of land-
looting Mr Stuart
said, some leaders
have shifted to plac-
ing crown grants in
the names of house-
keepers, gardeners,
wives, friends and
family members, to
avoid be implicated

SSIS tra called in such a scan-

dal as this.

However, Mr Stu-
art said that the time has come
for Bahamians to put an end
to the pillaging of crown land
by these “political pirates”.

“The time is now for the
Bahamian people to take back
what is rightfully theirs, their

evidence is clear, the UBP,
FNM and PLP all have been
in a conspiracy to steal land
from the Bahamian people, for
themselves.

“These people are nothing
but thieves and robbers and
should never be address as
honorable. The BDM con-
demns these men and their
wicked practices.

“Last election, the BDM
made a promise that we would
make crown land available to
the average Bahamian who
wants to build a home, build
their businesses and build a life
and when elected 2012, we will
ensure that you, the average
Bahamian, receives a piece of
the Bahamas, so that you can
enrich your lives and have a
stake in your country,” he said.



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people lining up outside the building to put
in their applications as highlighted in The
Tribune last summer, has been eased by
the additional staff.

Mr Symonette said part of the current
problem is the high volume of people want-
ing to travel in the summer and putting in
applications after their passports have
expired, along with and influx of college
students who need to travel to school in
September, and others who need to have
their passports are fast-tracked for medical
reasons. He added: “There is no forward
planning and that has added to the frustra-
tion. “People should look at their passports
and see when they are due for renewal and
put their applications in early.”

“YOUR VIEW’

To have your say on this or any other
issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver
your letter to The Tribune on Shirley
Street, P.O. Box N-3207



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380-FLIX



PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master






































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Overcoming water shortages

DESPITE this year’s record breaking rain-
fall there are residents in various areas of
New Providence who still complain of water
shortages.

Recently residents in the east complained
of low to non-existent water pressure. They
said they were on the verge of despair
because they have had to suffer these short-
ages for more than three years.

“We have been forgotten, this must be
the most hateful place in Nassau to live,”
said a man whose wife suffers from a kidney
disease. “Our ancestors must have buried
dead people in this ground that’s why we’re
so cursed.” He was referring to an area
behind Seagrapes plaza.

What with major water leaks, complica-
tions with the reverse osmosis plant at Bail-
lou Hills when a computer malfunctioned
and technicians had to be flown in from the
Caymans to restore supplies, many Bahami-
ans know the inconvenience of having to go
without water.

Bahamians will have to think of including
a water tank in future construction. Bermu-
da, which has no rainy season, rivers or fresh
water lakes, depends entirely on the weath-
er for its water supply.

Therefore, by law all private homes and
apartment complexes must have their own
water tanks to store whatever rainfall the
island gets. The size of these tanks is man-
dated by local building and planning regu-
lations. Homes can store about 14,000 gal-
lons per bedroom independently of any oth-
er building. However, this does put up the
cost of building.

According to a report on Bermuda “the
most common source of water for home and
apartment buildings — are often found
under bedrooms, living rooms or patios but
are not allowed under bathrooms or
kitchens. Bermuda relies on the combination
of rainwater falling on roofs and piped to
more than 21,000 water tanks and ground-
water extracted from underground lenses for
more than 90 per cent of its entire water
supply. Rainwater by itself is nowhere near
sufficient, at a volume of 1.4 million gallons
overall yearly, to supply all of Bermuda's
demands in one of the highest populations
anywhere in the world per square mile.

“Some commercial and domestic proper-
ties have wells to supplement the rainwater
supply. There are over 3,000 such wells. All
must be licensed by the Health Department
of the Bermuda Government. They can be
used only for flushing and washing purposes.

It is illegal to drink water from these pri-
vate wells because of the potential for cont-
amination from many sources, including
nitrates from cesspits. Routine periodic tests
are made to ensure standards are maintained
to protect public health.”

Bahamians should consider water catch-
ments of some sort if only to water their
gardens in the dry season so as not to be
such a drain on government’s water supply.

One of the Water Corporation’s greatest
challenges is the loss of water either through
leaks, or theft or metering inaccuracies.

During the Budget debate in the House of
Assembly recently Phenton Neymour, State
Minister of the Environment, said the cor-
poration estimates that it loses five million
imperial gallons a day. If one million of this
water had been sold, at the end of a year it
would have brought a $5 million return to
the Treasury.

Although to include water tanks beneath
a building would increase the initial cost of
its construction, Bahamians should study
their water bills and decide whether there
would be a saving on the long stretch if gov-
ernment water could be reduced or elimi-
nated.

Instead of having tanks that would be
standbys in case the government supply
failed, the water tanks could become the
main supplier with government’s water held
as standby in case tanks run low during the

dry season.
eeoee

Who has the better team?

IN a recent interview Opposition leader
Perry Christie said that Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham is burdened down with a
team of new people, lacking in experience.
This would seem to be a good team to have,
because at least they can learn from a sea-
soned political leader. It is at least a better
team than the one that brought Mr Christie’s
administration down in 2007.

Even Mr Christie had to admit after his
loss at the polls that he took too much for
granted and failed to assess the impact his
party’s scandals would have on its election.
Mr Christie was characterised as a weak
leader, unable to discipline his party and
parliamentarians.

With that assessment, by some of his own
members, it seems that Mr Ingraham has
more chance with his team than Mr Christie
with his.

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Youll wonder how you ever got along without it.

Culture — our
orand hope
for the

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The desolate soul of a
nation lay trodden amongst
the squalor of Nassau city
in throes of a slow and
painful decline. In this
unstately quagmire of
affairs, a people desperately
try to make sense of what is
now a deplorable, disgrace-
ful embarrassment.

How have we allowed our
godly attributes to be dis-
paraged by our desire to live
outside ourselves; so convo-
luted has our path become
that destiny is confused, we
have tied her feet with the
corruption of our hands.

It is time for the Bahamas
to find implicit impetus
through the interpretation
of its rich and diverse cul-
ture, thus translating to one
beautiful language of love
for all within our borders.

Culture speaks to the
heart; it demands justice for
the disenfranchised; brokers
peace for those under tyran-
ny; creates a legacy for state-
less generations; nurtures
freedom for the ‘Diaspora’
and heals the broken and
abused.

One ponders, as cycles of
time usher in governments

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



intended to be gifts, howev-
er, too often they become
burdensome liabilities on
the scale of history. Also of
note, the footprints of a gen-
uine Christian ship seem to
be disappearing in our soci-
ety, trampled by the obfus-
cation of religion.

As with TS Eliot’s “The
Wasteland”, we are wells
drawn dry; a land in drought
of vision; depleted of natur-
al spiritual resources; souls
scarred by addiction to van-
ities; now that the mirror of
reality is not clouded by eco-
nomic prosperity, we see
exactly who we are.

We as a people must
desire learning; invite coun-
sel, thirst for truth and abhor
the “deadly sin” of greed
that has eroded foundations
of the four pillars of this
society.

Culture is hope, though
fragile it endures beyond all
other spirit vestments; it
must be culture to bring
restoration to a discomposed
people; and to be princely
funded as such. Mark my

ture

word, all else will miserably
fail.

Sadly, we see a rejuvenat-
ed, toxic illiteracy fueling the
“gang” sub-culture and its
music, seething in undercur-
rents of juvenile angst on
our school grounds and
streets; but in midst of this
madness, we are delighted
with a resurging climate of
culture breathing beauty
into season after vibrant sea-
son of literary, theatre,
dance, art and music pro-
duction. Kudos.

We must now ask our-
selves the questions: “Are
the triumphs of this coun-
try’s change and progress,
now resigned to pyrrhic vic-
tories?” and “Who do we
celebrate, if not ourselves?”

It will serve wisdom well,
if this letter is taken into
context, of the preceding
four.

Be assured, culture is the
glorious expression of a peo-
ple, a compass for the pre-
sent age, the archives of the
past and our grand hope for
the future. More will be
revealed

GREGORY NEELY
Nassau,
July 21, 2009.

The Bahamas still have men with integrity

EDITOR, The Tribune.

To see Mr Symonette, Deputy Prime Min-
ister, a family friend, a true and kind Bahami-
an. Also Mr Hanna, Governor General, a man
for all seasons. While sitting in my TV room a
sense of pride came over me while watching
the Independence Celebration on television
from Clifford Park, July 9, 2009.

Also to see my neighbour, island and home-
town boy, but most of all friend and brother on
that podium. Tears of joy came to my eyes to
see from whence we came. I am speaking of
Commodore Clifford Scavella.

There are some folks out there who are fan-
ning a campaign to destroy him. He is not into

I asked the Lord what I should tell him. I
remember driving down the section of Blue

Hill Road and Independence Highway near
Esso Service station. The Holy Spirit said these
words ,to me: “Tell him his success depends on
who he puts first.” I added a few words to
that, I said always put God first.

God put him there and as long as he put

God first, he will be just all right. Anytime

either.

you are doing a good job some folks will not
like you. Remember, Jesus was not liked by all

Keep up the good works and continue to

make us proud to be Bahamian and show the

integrity.

politics, nor is he representing any political

party. Please give him a chance to carry out
government and his mandate.
T recall after he was installed as commodore,

Nassau,
July 2009.

world that the Bahamas still have men with

CLADWELL FARRINGTON

Government should condone a National Lottery

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This letter is in reference
to the article highlighting Mr
Sidney Strachan’s comments
about gambling laws being
changed in the Bahamas.

In my humble opinion I
don’ think anything has to
be changed in the gambling

RU

laws! If government would
be wise and condone a
National Lottery where any-
one could purchase a ticket
and the monies could be
used in so many ways in
building the necessary
schools, more well staffed
clinics throughout the
islands, and better qualified

esta JBINS

Harbur Bay Plaza.322-3170 Cable Cottage,
less 5% for credit cards, all sales final

teachers. This scheme has
been quite successful in oth-
er countries therefore I
strongly feel that it should
be started here.

HELEN ASTARITA
Nassau,
July 19, 2009.



THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009, PAGE 5

Christian

cumini Full-scale airport emergency

empowerment

smi response exercise successful
rand Bahama |

By DENISEMAYCOCK {| THE Grand Bahama Air-










Tribune Freeport ? port Company (GBAC) suc-
Reporter : cessfully conducted a full-
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net } scale airport emergency
? response exercise.
FREEPORT — The ; Operation Mike Alpha
Bahamas Christian Coun- } was designed to test the
cil will host a one-day } emergency preparedness of
National Empowerment } first-response agencies, gov-
Summit on Grand i: ernment departments and
Bahama to inspire i private sector entities.
Bahamians during these The exercise simulated
hard economic times. : the crash of a Marlin Air- : ee
Rev Patrick Paul, presi- | ways SAAB 340 aircraft nn -
dent of the aan | : arriving from Nassau carry- GBAC’S FIREFIGHTERS
Christian Council, said i ing 10 passengers, three demonstrate rescuing passen-
the summit will take i crew members, and 2,000 gers from the downed aircraft.
place on September 1 at : pounds of fuel. ie 3 es ha a ru tard Pata 5 a
Our Lucaya Resort. i “Each airport must have J a Srehst - e a baited eras ai =. ty Ae
“We chose Grand ; an emergency plan, and the iad See ee kr ee beac a
Bahama because it is i Seeiegee this drill . to = ee ee et a iy EXTERMINATORS
known to be the industri- : es is emergency plan, : = —_ a a == ae , x) 4 :
al capital of the Bahamas } an anaes re eae of Fy See = . , FOR PEST PROBLEM
and we wanttodowhat } ran ahama Airport & . = — 7 _
we can to stimulate the : Company. GBAC FIREFIGHTERS fight a fire that resulted from the simulated crash. PHONE: a ra TY /
Grand Bahama econo- : “The exercise is conduct-
my,” he said. ? ed at least once every two “Grand Bahama Health Inspector Henry Rolle said:
Rev Paul said speakers } years in accordance with Services and the Royal “We had our agencies from Fully furnished and equipped apartments
will include Dr Myles i requirements set by the Bahamas Police were also the Criminal Investigation by the day week or manth in
Munroe, Bishop Neil i International Civil Aviation able to test portions of their Department, Scenes of f "
Ellis, Dr Simeon Hall, i Organization (ICAO). emergency response plans, Crime, and the Grand ‘ *
Rev Hayward Cooper : The goals of the exercise coordinate their plans with Bahama Fire Department
and Grand Bahama Port ; Were to: our own, and join usin col- all participate, and it was a
Authority president lan | Synchronize the actions _ lectively correcting any defi- good coordination. The lair
Rolle. : of all response agencies. ciencies that existed.” exercise was fruitful and our : es
He noted that the : 1 Safely rescue all persons Sharon Williams, Grand overall response time was a Summer Specials: $85 per night ? beds
objective of the summit is {| imvolved in the mishap. Bahama Health Services — success.” Sunrise - Ft, Laudegcal
to inspire, motivate and 1 Prevent other emergency administrator, was also The exercise also included
encourage the people of i situations from arising. pleased with the overall suc- the observation and criti- 954.570.4 1Ab
the Bahamas, and partic- : | Set up appropriate site cess of her agency’s cism of volunteers from a .
ularly in Grand Bahama, { controls and command _ response to the drill. variety of organizations and
to maximise this time and ; authority. She said: “We had aninci- industrial companies.
to seek new opportuni- i 1 Control the movement dent where, in real time, an As he thanked these vol-
ties. i of persons to and from the ambulance broke down, but —unteers for their participa-
“We believe that in i scene and ensure the estab- we were immediately able tion, Mr Carey noted that,
relation to the downturn { lishment and maintenance to commandeer another aside from ensuring that the BEAUTY GUARD
in the world’s economy i of effective communications. replacement resource. airport’s obligations under
the church plays an : Mr Carey said: “The drill We’re thinking it went well the ICAO annex are met,
important role inencour- { simulated an aircraft crash from the response site and all of the participants share
aging the public atlarge ; 2,000ft from the threshold we will be working on the a professional interest as
to retool and look at oth- :{ of Runway 24 prior toland- communications aspect of first responders in improvy-
er ways toempower our- : ing. In the process, we suc- the exercise, providing bet- ing their emergency pre-
selves and network : cessfully tested our initial ter channels for all persons.” _ paredness.
together,” said Rev Paul. ? response, our incident com- Commenting on the suc- He said the exercise was : . .
“We want to use this : mand, and our EOC (Emer- cessful response of the Roy- particularly rewarding to all Serving The Bahamian C. ommunity
time for what the scrip- ? gency Operations Centre). al Bahamas Police Force, parties.

Since 1978

ture teaches it to be for.
God allows a downturn

Gnadicwccep — ONUPCH Without Borders to host conference
and retool ourselves.” :
Rev Paul believes that By LLOYD ALLEN

d Tribune Features Reporter
(he cieuineh tn: Hie modern lallen@tribunemedia.net
Bahamas must play its cP oooo———eom""m"—n-0:,"'1 $8
role in the spiritual, social : THE Church Without Borders

and economic develop- International Ministries is playing host
ment of the country. to a two-day conference designed to

e SAFE

spirit and thus was unable to speak in
tongues.

However God’s will proved greater e COOL
than his, and after gaining spiritual
advice from Bishop Rodney Roberts

during his primary years as a Christian, eDOUBLE
he was then able to connect with the

“The church is called to ? encourage religious followers to dis- spirit reaching a new level in his spiri- ACTION
be Intercessors and to ? cover God’s plan for their lives. tuality. DE ADBOLT
seek to bridge the gap : Pastor Mark Knowles from Holy Eventually he moved on to worship
and assist our people in =} ~— Ghost and Fire Deliverance Centre is at Solomon’s Porce Outreach Min- LOCK
practical ways to be all : the guest speaker for the event which istries, where he was commissioned as
they can be in our nation- } — started on Thursday. | a pastor, and that was where he
al development. : Rev Knowles said although he has realised that he was called to operate e WHITE OR
“We must seek to do ? been a Christian for more than 20 his own ministry and this was where his BRONZE

what we canto stimulate } years, his road to Christ and his pur- present ministry was born.



our country,” he said. ? pose was anything but easy. PASTOR MARK KNOWLES Mr Knowles said throughout the
Rev Paul said they are A native of Stanyard Creek, years there have been many challenges
expecting about 20to 40} Andros, he explained his childhood was filled |= which have forced him to keep the faith, and in ALSO FOR
persons from New Provi- ? with many disappointments camingintheformof doing so he has reaped the rewards of God’s plan.
dence alone. as well-ae-a verbal and physical rejection, but also because Now that he has started his own family, and WINDOWS

he was considered the black sheep of his family. _ established his own ministry, Mr Knowles said the
Because of these difficult beginnings, Mr time has come to nudge others to discover their

Islands to attend the sum- ioe ‘dh lie deli in Chri

ai ia Ereepent: owles said he eventually became a delinquent — purpose in Christ.

Th ios th ‘lb and ended missing numerous school days, he With this conference being one of many plat-
e topics E at will be : abusing drugs, and generally had a negative out- forms embraced by Mr Knowles to share the DO N S I Al N I Oo N
addressed are: Industry in $ — jook on life. promise of Christ, he said if only one person is

group from the Family



Grand Bahama; the role j However all of that soon changed where at the —_ inspired his mission would have been achieved.

| the oe i age of 15, he had an encounter with God that The conference which began yesterday under (PROTECTION) LTD.

the need for Bahamians =} ~~ would change his life forever. the theme, ‘Setting The Captives Free,’ will fea-

to take ownership inthe As he made the decision to accept God’s will ture a presentation from Mr Knowles and others HILLSIDE PLAZA - THOMPSON BLVD.
Bahamas, and the role of : for his life, Mr Knowles said he still faced one _ at the church located Edmira Plaza, Soldier Road PHONE: 322-8160 OR 322-8219
the church in interces- ? challenge, he was unable to connect with the holy — North starting at 7pm.

sion. :

The daytime sessions
begin at 8.30am and con-
tinue until 4pm, and
evening sessions are from
6.30pm to 9.30pm.

The summit is open to
the public. Persons who
are interested in starting
a business or those who
are already in business,
church leaders and minis-
ters are also invited to
register.





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The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a ee eee
Stronger rent and eviction laws needed

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

IN THIS country, the strong
societies that were founded by
African slaves and were antho-
logical/archaeological gems have
now deteriorated into squalid
pigsties.

In New Providence, Bahami-
ans and immigrants pay hefty
rents to reside in Over-the-Hill
shanties and dilapidated build-
ings throughout the island,
apparently without any rent con-
trol as landlords rent dwellings
at any rate they fancy.

The Rent Control Act is out-
dated and needs to be com-
pletely overhauled and amend-
ed. Although there is supposed
to be a Rent Control Board,
comprised of ordinary citizens
and chaired by a magistrate, this
board is practically toothless
since the Act only covers prop-
erties worth up to $75,000. This
is dimwitted and needs urgent
updating, since hardly any apart-
ment, condo or house is worth
less than $75,000 these days—
even in some parts of the ghetto!

Let me also clearly state that

YOUNG MAN’S VIEW

A DRI AN

any amendments to the Act
must not be lopsided in favour
of would-be tenants, as there
are some who are just filthy and
destroy rental accommodations,
thereby leaving many landlords
with unnecessary debt. There
must be a sense of reason and
responsibility on both sides.

Rent control places a price
ceiling on rental units, promotes
fair play and limits the price a
landlord can charge a tenant,
outlining the services a landlord
must provide and giving tenants
the right, if a landlord fails to
uphold his/her responsibilities
as it relates to maintenance, to
temporarily withhold rent or
demand a lower rent.

The Bahamas must adopt
more comprehensive rent and
eviction control laws, especially
as most Bahamians rent accom-
modations. Enforcement of rent
control and dispatching inspec-
tors to investigate unscrupulous

GIBSON



landlords suspected of acting in
contravention to the Act, will
reduce instances of profiteering
through unfair rental rates or
unreasonable rent hikes and
mandate that landlords repair
hidden defects and carry out
adequate maintenance of rented
properties. Implementing
tougher rent control laws will
also ensure the diversity of
neighbourhoods and prevent
landlords from imposing rent
increases that force persons out
of an area.

In New York city, a Maxi-
mum Base Rent system (MBR)
establishes the maximum allow-
able rent for a place, sets guide-
lines that cover the cost of main-
tenance and building improve-
ments, allows for landlords to
make slight increases (up to a
maximum of 7.5 per cent) every
two years until the MBR is
reached, and is calculated
depending upon the water and

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sewerage charges, real estate
taxes, operating and mainte-
nance expenses, loss allowances,
and upon vacancy and return of
capital value.

Frankly, effective rent con-
trol should also address lease
renewals, evictions and senior
citizens. These amendments
would ensure that tenants are
not unfairly evicted because an
unscrupulous landlord wants to
raise the rent and that the elder-
ly aren’t saddled with rent
increases in their old age.

Some time ago, The Tribune
ran a story about a 74-year-old
Coconut Grove resident whose
landlord raised the rent for a
small wooden house to the point
where it exceeded his meager
pension. Senior citizen Maxwell
Williams was living in substan-
dard conditions—a clapboard
structure, no electricity or run-
ning water, and an outdoor toi-
let—for $250 per month.

Mr Williams, who previously
was only requested to pay at the
most $50 a month for the dilap-
idated shack, had his rent adjust-
ed when his elderly landlord
died and her granddaughter
inherited the property. He
claimed that although his new
landlord made no renovations
or upgrades to the building, she
raised the rent from $50 to $250
per month—even higher than
his sole income of $230 per
month (old age pension).

In addition to still having to
use an outdoor toilet in the
bushes behind the house, Mr
Williams’ termite infested
roof—held up by two pieces of
wood—leaked and the walls
were rotting through.

Every other day in New
Providence, I see unkempt
apartments and unsightly build-
ings with broken windows, many
of which appear to have not
been painted in years. In some
instances, particularly the ghet-
tos of Nassau, people seem to
live a peasant-like existence. In
these rundown sections of soci-
ety, landlords are constantly
exploiting desolate tenants who
dejectedly live in sagging, grub-
by clapboard shacks with “pee
buckets” in one corner. Con-
trasted to the suburbs, some of
the places being rented are only
comparable to a broken-down
garden house. These inner-city
areas are obscured by over-
grown weeds, prickle patches
and bushes, littered with
garbage, wooden shipping crates
and old, rusted appliances that

are strewn about adjoining
yards!

In some parts of the “sub-
urbs” of Carmichael, Cowpen
Road and off Village Road, sim-
ilar living conditions are
observed. I have even seen lean-
ing, rickety wooden houses on
Shirley Street, which are com-
plete eyesores and probably
rented in excess of their real val-
ue.

Thave heard stories about the
grimy walls, blocked toilets and
the “dutty” mattresses that
come with some rented accom-
modations. Any tenable place
should be approved by the Min-
istry of Works and the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health,
and must have an occupancy
certificate! Yet, there are many
Bahamians and immigrants liv-
ing like “slum dogs.” Quite hon-
estly, the film Slum Dog Mil-
lionaire could have been easily
shot in New Providence!

According to section 20 of the
Rent Control Act:

“Where, upon a determina-
tion of the value of a dwelling-
house or of the furniture, the
Boards finds that, in all the cir-
cumstances, the value declared
by the landlord is unfair and
unreasonable, it shall order the
landlord to repay to the tenant
the difference between the rent
as a percentage of the deter-
mined value and the rent as a
percentage of the declared value
for the period of tenancy not
exceeding one year immediate-
ly preceding the date of deter-
mination, and may institute pro-
ceedings against the landlord for
the offence of making an unfair
and unreasonable declaration.”

The aforementioned rarely
happens! The Rent Control
Board obviously has a lot of
work to do and frankly, if the
Consumer Affairs division of
government sends out inspec-
tors, they would easily find hun-
dreds of cases where tenants are
being charged unreasonable
rates.

Since the government’s real
property tax exemption is
$250,000 for first time home-
owners, $250,000 to $300,000
should also be the applicable
price ceiling for homes falling
under the Rent Control Act, not
the measly $75,000 that the Act
currently covers. According to
the Act, the rent lawfully
chargeable should not exceed
15 per cent, per annum, of the
value of the property, or 20 per
cent per annum of furnished res-

idences.

While tenants are subject to
rights of enjoyment—meaning
they cannot be simply kicked
out without a court order—land-
lords must also be protected
from tenants who destroy their
property and consistently, and
sometimes intentionally, fail to
pay rent. Revamping the Land-
lords and Tenants Act as well
as the Rent Control Act would
only be effective if it leaves both
the landlords and tenants in a
win-win situation.

CROWN LAND AND
THE CHURCH

This week, it was reported
that the Golden Gates Assem-
bly church initially applied for
and received crown land for the
purpose of building an old folks
home. Wouldn’t that have been
such a noble idea? However,
once the land was granted, the
church’s principals turned
around and decided to build a
subdivision—named after the
pastor (Ros Davis Estates)—
where houses were built on the
land and sold for hundreds of
thousands of dollars.

Since this occurred under the
former administration, was this
another case of preferential
treatment? Was it a politically
expedient move on the part of
former Prime Minister Perry
Christie when he signed off on
the variation to the original
crown land grant issued to the
church? Indeed, while this move
did create home ownership, I
have no doubt that it also filled
the coffers of those behind the
construction, who were granted
crown land for little-to-nothing
and apparently made so much
more.

Throughout the Bahamas,
many church leaders are shal-
low in the word of God, as they
would have spent too much time
in pursuit of fame, money and
erecting gargantuan, religious
edifices to tend to the needs of
the people and lead them to
Christ. Any reverence for God
has long left some churchmen,
who shamelessly use seminars,
tapes, CDs, books, conferences
and other money-making
schemes—under the guise of
Christianity—to enrich them-
selves. Yes, there are one or two
pastors who use monies gener-
ated from their book sales and
motivational speaking tours to

SEE page seven

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HOLDINGS LTD.

DIVIDEND PAYMENT

FOCOL is pleased to announce a

dividend payment of

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ordinary shareholders of record

as of July 31, 2009

payable August 11

2009.

“Fuelling Growth For People”





THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009, PAGE 7



FROM page one

represents to society.

Meanwhile, some said they
also came to the memorial to
show their support for some-
one being held accountable
for his death.

Wearing green — the St
Augustine’s College gradu-
ate’s favourite colour — over
a hundred of Brenton’s
friends and family watched a
slideshow of photographs of
Brenton, and paid their trib-
utes over a microphone. His
mother, Rosetta Smith said
the gathering “made her feel
good in her heart.”

“He was only here for 18
years, but he impacted so
many people,” she said.

Brenton, who lived in
Seabreeze Estates, was shot
on July 9 at around 8pm as
police chased two suspected
armed robbers in the area of
Kemp Road.

While his family are
adamant that he died from a
shot fired by police, the police
say it is too early to deter-
mine who was responsible for
the teenager’s death. A bal-
listics report, which could dis-
cern this, is said to have been
completed, but its results
have not been released.

Speaking to The Tribune
as they prepared to partici-
pate in the memorial last
night, friends remembered
someone who always had a
problem with violence.

Monique Hanna, a neigh-
bour whose daughter grew up
with Brenton, said the
teenager was “someone who
was trying to live right in soci-
ety.”

“He was in high school, he
was in college, and he was
getting on with his life like a
normal person.

“To get mixed up in some-
thing like this — an accident is
an accident — but it’s just
hurtful. I have two sons and
I'd hate to know they could
just walk out on the street to
play basketball or hang out
and something could kick up
in this so-called Christian
nation the Bahamas is and
someone could call me and

REMEMBERING
BRENTON SMITH

say “Your son is shot, he’s
lying in the road dead’. It’s
very hurtful.”

Thompson, 18, who knew
Brenton since Grade seven,
said he “couldn’t believe it”
when he heard Brenton had
been killed.

“He’s always been like a
big brother to me. I just came
to show my support — we all
love him, everyone loves
him,” he told The Tribune.

Another former classmate
of Brenton’s, 19-year-old
Candice Lockhart, remem-
bered Brenton as someone
who would “always get you
laughing.”

“He was a good presence
to be around. I am thankful I
had a chance to meet him and
I’m sure everyone else feels
the same way,” she added.

Lesley Sealey, 20, said that
Brenton was “a brilliant life
which we lost.”

“JT just wish that we could
have seen him grow, it’s so
unfortunate. I just hope no
one forgets that this is still
unsolved.”

His doting and emotional
grandmother, Shirley Smith,
remembered Brenton as an
emotionally expressive boy
who was always trying to help
other people.

While his family knew he
was “special” it was not until
his death that they fully
understood how much so, she
said.

Janet Styles, a grand-aunt
of Brenton’s, who travelled
from Fort Lauderdale for the
memorial, and his funeral,
which takes place on Satur-
day, said the 18-year-old was
“a kind-spirited young man
(with) such great plans and
aspirations.”

A website www.brenton-
hectorsmith.com has been set
up for people to pay tribute
to the teenager.

His funeral will be held
tomorrow at St Anselm’s
church in Fox Hill at 2pm.

Bahamian arrested with son of
former Miami Dolphins owner

FROM page one

ing to open it.”

When officers reached the house, they found and detained
Stewart on the property. Huizenga was discovered operating a
2005 Jupiter Marine boat in a canal next to the house.

Police requested that Huizenga throw them a rope so they
could secure the boat to a nearby dock, but despite several
attempts, he could not manage the feat.

Eventually they were able to dock the boat and Huizenga,
whose breath smelled strongly of alcohol and whose speech was
slurred, explained to officers that he was at his house.

“He was not,” said the Fort Lauderdale Police Departmen-

t’s report.

Huizenga was taken into custody for boating under the influ-
ence. He also faces charges of violation of probation for felony
drink-driving, violation of probation for failure to submit to a
sobriety test and refusal to submit to a blood/urine test. He

denies all charges.

The 47-year-old was already banned from drinking as a con-
dition of his probation on a previous DUI charge in which a 71-
year-old pedestrian was seriously injured.

His father, Wayne, was owner of the Miami Dolphins foot-
ball team for 15 years until he sold all but a five per cent stake

in January of this year.

This is the younger Huizenga’s fourth arrest on DUI charges,
and officials said, if convicted, he could be sent to prison for five

years.

Rent and

eviction
FROM page six

fund their churches, but they are
vastly outnumbered by the reli-
gious charlatans.

It is high-time that the gov-
ernment requires churches to
submit independently-produced
audits, which could go a long
way in preserving the church’s
integrity and possibly change
the perception of many Bahami-
ans who now see the church as
big businesses led by misers
rather than ministers.

PAUL RITCHIE

There is a suspicion among
Bahamians that some realtors
are crooks, intent helping
unscrupulous lawyers to quiet
land titles or swindle elderly cit-
izens of their birthright. Paul
Ritchie stands above the fray as
the consummate professional
and an experienced realtor of
more than 30 years. Last week, I
would have requested Mr
Ritchie’s appraisal services, and
not only was I pleased with his
timeliness and professionalism,
but his rate was very reasonable,
especially when contrasted to
an absurd rate I had heard was
being charged by another real
estate firm. A fellow Long
Islander, Mr Ritchie’s success is
largely due to his quality of ser-
vice, which is nearly unseen in
today’s Bahamas.

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009

NOTICE

Johnson, Maura, Roberts,
Thompson, Nottage, Pinder,
Wallace-Whitfield, Claridge,

Twynam, Bowles, Young,
Deveaux, Moree, Lightbourn,
Symonette, Gibson, Bethel

THE
STERN
EMETER

any of us have loved ones buried there.
the en has now been CLEANED UD and |
it is our turn to take care of the individual areas. |

Please join us there on Saturday, July 25,
2009 from 8am with tools, a small
shrubs, gloves and drinking water.

They die only when we who are left, forget them.

Moree, Fox, Sands, Bowe,
Cancino, Fisher, Grant, Taylor,
Price, Cleare, Perpall, Watson,
Deal, Smith, Fountain, Styles,
Francis, Huyler, Coleby, Scriven,
Pyfrom and many , many more!

COMMONWEALTH BANK

Employment Opportuni

Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed to delivering superior quality service, to
training and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in
the community.

Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for
Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco.

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE;

¢ Assisting the Branch Manager in managing the sales activities of
the Branch to enhance profitability.

Effectively leading, supporting and coaching personnel! to

achieve corporate objectives.

Effectively managing a portfolio of consumer, mortgage and

commercial loans.

Adjudicating credit lines within delegated authority.

Managing the Branch’s collection activities and the protection of

collateral.

Following-up with client and support functions to ensure timely

completion of product requests and transactions and resolution of

inquiries and issues.

Ensuring Credit risk ratings and credit scoring practices are

adhered to at all times to minimize the risk of loan losses.

Ensuring specific objectives are developed through an

appropriate strategic plan to grow the Branch’s loan and deposit

portfolios and other offerings.

Adding value to the customers’ portfolio of financial services

by actively promoting, marketing, building and cross selling all

deposit / investment and consumer credit business. Ensuring

self and direct reports consistently provide highly courteous

customer service in an informed and thorough manner. Assisting

the Manager in attaining the targets incorporated in the Branch’s

financial plan.



QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE:
Bachelor’s degree or higher in Business Administration, Banking
& Finance or a related discipline from an accredited University.
Minimum of eight years commercial banking experience with a
mitimum of 3 years supervisory / managerial experience.
Experience in managing a diverse loan portfolio and assessing
loan quality.
Detailed knowledge of Retail / Commercial / Mortgage lending

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





ene nee Homeowners claim ne are ‘kepti in dark’

highway construction. They
also claim Government has
failed to engage in an open
dialogue with them while it
goes ahead with the construc-
tion.

They are also calling for
barriers to be placed between
the proposed highway and
their homes.

Single mother Telvern
Dean claimed the area’s infra-
structure to control flooding
from a filled-in swamp was
being paved over by workers.

"What infrastructure is
there going to be to control
the flooding? When we
bought the property we
realised it was reclaimed land,
we built our foundation to a
certain level to alleviate the
flooding, but what's going to
happen now?" Ms Dean
asked at press conference out-
side their homes near Saun-
ders Beach.

Lawyer Michelle Campbell
said she feels like a second-
class citizen in her own coun-
try because of the lack of clear
information from Govern-
ment about the project. She
claimed she only became
aware of the roadwork a few
months ago when she noticed
workers in her backyard.

She also argued that a pub-
lic meeting held a few months
ago was an exercise for offi-
cials to disseminate informa-
tion and not to hear the voic-

WORK TAKING place near Vista Marina.

es of the people of Vista
Marina.

"The information they are
able to give you is very piece-
meal. It’s not enough to con-
nect the dots as to what's hap-
pening. The Government is
the servant of the people, not
the master, but why are we
treated like we don't need to
know about these things?
Why are people just going
ahead without even consult-
ing us?

"T just feel very saddened
and I feel like this place is
going to be wrecked,” said Ms
Campbell, as two tractors
roved about the area.

The residents are also wor-
ried about the negative scenic
and possible environmental
affects the proposed exten-
sion of Arawak Cay — to

‘Threat to life’ of top police chief

FROM page one

tant Commissioner of Crime Raymond Gibson who report-
edly launched a full scale investigation into the car tampering.

While the results did not ascertain conclusively how the
bolts came to be off the car, it did however expose some seri-
ous weaknesses in security at the compound, even drawing
into question whether other officers could be blamed.

The Tribune also understands that security has been
increased in and around police headquarters after this dis-

covery.

It is not the first time Mr Ferguson might have been the tar-

get of a would-be assassin.

According to information available to The Tribune, a
notable drug dealer currently serving time in the United
States was discovered to have sensitive documentation. It
included times and places, along with the photographs of
Mr Ferguson and other senior officers, as the targets of hitmen
intent on stopping their investigations.

However, as a stern and upright law enforcement official,
Mr Ferguson has reportedly said he cannot be intimidated by
such tactics, nor would he allow himself be distracted from
doing his duty by such petty antics.



facilitate the relocation of the
downtown container ports —
will have on Saunders Beach.

Both women said they have
been frustrated in their
attempts to get their hands
on the relevant environmen-
tal impact assessments (ETA)
so they can get a better
understanding of the devel-
opment.

According to information
several residents compiled on
the roadwork earlier this
year, it appears that corridor
18 will be the main access
route from John F Kennedy
Drive to the new container
port set to be established on a
new man-made island off the
shore of Saunders Beach.

Under the current plan, the
72-acre island would be
accessed by a corridor or



bridge which would begin at
the proposed new round-
about on Saunders Beach.
The island would also be con-
nected to Arawak Cay by
another causeway on its east-
ern end.

Attempts to reach Minis-
ter of Works Neko Grant for
comment were unsuccessful
up to press time.

Also present at the press
conference was Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald, who heads
the Committee to Protect and
Preserve the Bahamas for
Future Generations.

He said his organisation
will continue to agitate Gov-
ernment to lay all the facts
on the table regarding the
extension of Arawak Cay and
the cost of the container port
relocation.

Businessman dies

FROM page one

Hawksbill area around 10.45pm last Wednesday when two
armed masked men shot and robbed him of his pouch, which
contained an undetermined amount of cash.

After being shot, Maycock attempted to drive himself to
the hospital, but lost control of his vehicle and overturned
near the Four Way Co-op Plaza on West Atlantic Drive and

Pioneers Way.

When police arrived at the scene, they discovered Maycock
inside the vehicle suffering from a gunshot injury to his left side.

He was removed from the vehicle and taken in an ambulance
by EMS personnel to the Rand Memorial Hospital.

Several fellow officers were saddened by the death of their
former colleague, who was described as a very quiet and com-

petent officer.

Maycock served as an officer in the Special Intelligence
Branch (SIB) for many years. He also served as a member of
the security for the Prime Minister.

Maycock leaves behind a wife and children.

Anyone with information that could assist police
with their investigations is asked to call 911 or 350-3092 or

350-3097.

BACK-TO-SCHOOL
WIN 1 of 4

HP lz

et eae
inkjet printer and goin

style this September



SE

Hung jury
FROM page one

six men and six women
returned divided 6-6 on all
three charges. A unanimous
decision is required for a con-
viction on a murder charge
and a two-thirds majority on
the other two charges.

Senior Justice Anita Allen
ordered a retrial and remand-
ed Moree to Her Majesty’s
Prison.

Outside the courtroom
Moree’s attorney Murrio
Ducille said: “My view is that
some of the jurors again, were
listening to the case and oth-
ers were listening to some-
thing else because the evi-
dence is such that the wit-
nesses for the prosecution
have again been thoroughly
discredited and the only ver-
dict that they could have pos-
sibly reached was one of not
guilty.”

Neil Brathwaite and
Yoland Rolle prosecuted the
case.

The prosecution alleged it
was Moree who shot Mr Fer-
guson and his wife through
their bedroom window.

Two police officers testi-
fied that Mr Ferguson had







Etat tamer Dh by yell tdi

MEU Came
Cikcte the two items on your sore recaip(s) (dated betwoen July 1
eae met pri e ete ana eee tre Mrs Ferguson said that
and drop ino entry boxes in participating stares or at The dAlbenas : alee ihe shooting, wale she

Ageney In Palmdale, = was on the phone to the
si - police, her husband told her

to inform them that Moree
had shot them.

Cassandra Evans, another
prosecution witness, told the
court on Tuesday that she
observed an altercation
between the two men during
which Mr Ferguson beat up
Moree, while Moree simply
stood there.

She testified that Moree
threatened to shoot Mr Fer-
guson. She also recalled a con-
= frontation at Butler’s Funeral
Home where the men
worked, during which Mr Fer-
guson pushed Moree in his
head.

Moree also told police of
another assault by Mr Fergu-
son two days before the
shooting incident. Moree,
however, denied the incident
drove him to kill Mr Fergu-
son. He claims he was
nowhere near their home that
night.

told them Moree, his co-work-

practices and credit anal ysis to ensure portfolio quality. : ie
er, had shot him and his wife.

Substantial work experience in loans and risk management with
a full understanding of financial statements and the ability to
anal yze the information.

Excellent leadership and coaching skills

Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills
Excellent organizational and time management skills

Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications.

REMUNERATION PACKAGE:

Commonwealth Bank is a Great place to work! We offer an
exciting work environment with the opportumty for growth and
development. We also offer a competitive compensation package,
reflecting the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications,
including a performance based incentive plan, health, vision,
dental and life insurances and a pension plan

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before

ly 24, 2009 to:
cae ; Caen

COMPUTERS LATED

aE Th The dAlbenas Agency Ltd.

Human Resources Department MACHER. STPIEET. PALMICARLE » TELEPHOME: 22-Malt

Re: Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco
P.O. Box SS-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Telefax: (242) 393-8073
E-mail address: hr@combankltd.com

Faadiogg 9 Bode decir, Sree Looper, Pech Plater Cpe Pade ered Cos Pope are peed beech A Bright Start

mop ee eee ee ee ee ee He He eH

BACK-TO-SCHOOL

©2009 CreativeRelations.net

Name:
Address: Tel:
What is the name of the Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes character?
T_NY the T_ G_R

“Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their
interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those
under consideration will be contacted.”











Questions
over Ginn

refinance

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

Ginn will still employ
close to 400 persons in
Grand Bahama’s West
End even after its Old
Bahama Bay resort releas-
es 85 staff by Monday,
although sources yesterday
expressed concern that a
major refinancing deal for
its project may have stalled
or fallen through.

Tribune Business
revealed back in February
2009 that a “major financ-
ing” deal for the $4.9 bil-
lion Ginn sur mer project
was being backed by a
wealthy Arab prince,
believed to be from Dubai,
although the funds were
due to originate from Swiss
and Italian sources.

However, contacts famil-
iar with the situation yes-
terday expressed concern
that Bobby Ginn, principal
of Ginn Clubs & Resorts
and Ginn Development
Company, was now in the
process of seeking alterna-
tive financing for the West
End development, indicat-
ing that the Dubai-based
deal may not be happen-
ing.
It is understood that, had
this financing come
through, it would have pro-
vided Mr Ginn with the
funding to buy-out his orig-
inal financing partner for
Ginn sur mer, the US-
based real estate private
equity group, Lubert
Adler.

And Mr Ginn, who is
now focused solely on the
Ginn sur mer project, plus
another development in
Colorado, would have had
enough financing left over
to start vertical construc-
tion at West End.

Ryan Julison, Ginn’s
vice-president of communi-
cations, yesterday told this
newspaper that he had “no
information” on the
Dubai-backed financing,
and whether it had stalled
or fallen through.

“Bobby Ginn’s doing a
lot of things across the
company that I’m not privy
to,” he added.

Ginn’s need for new
financing became painfully
obvious last year, after the
company and Lubert Adler
were forced to reach an
agreement with a Credit
Suisse-led consortium over

SEE page 4B



THE TRIBUNE ®

USINCSS

E Rol DAY

UPN ee

2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Lease delay increases ‘Crystal ball’
Studio repairs $500k would have

Mi Chairman of Grand Bahama-based Film Studios
questions whether government serious about
agreeing new Heads of Agreement and lease for

project

MW Says ‘unwilling’ to commit funds to repairs and
maintenance until impasse resolved
WH ‘No plans’ to sell facility ‘at the moment’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The cost to repair the closed Bahamas
Film Studios development has increased by
$500,000 as a result of delays in concluding
a new lease agreement with the Govern-
ment, its chairman yesterday questioning
whether the Ingraham administration was
serious about completing a new Heads of
Agreement for the project.

Nashville-based investment banker Ross
Fuller, in a series of e-mailed responses to
Tribune Business’s questions, said he was
unwilling to invest further funds in mainte-
nance and repairs to the Film Studios’ water
tank and other facilities until an agreement
with the Government was concluded.

He told Tribune Business: “I negotiated a
deal with the Prime Minister early in July
2008 for 120 acres of land, which included
the tank and buildings that we had reno-

Travel supplier
closure’s blow
for Out Islands

vated. There has been no change in this that
Tam aware of.

“The Government apparently does not
believe this is important enough to push
through the new Heads of Agreement and
lease, although they tell me on a bi-weekly
basis that it will be completed ‘soon’.” It
was last understood that the agreements
were being scrutinised by the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office.

The Bahamas Film Studios site is effec-
tively closed, with just a skeleton security
staff understood to be on-site. The devel-
opment is effectively in limbo, a far cry from
the days when its water tank was used for
the filming of all water-based scenes for the
Pirates of the Caribbean II and III sequels.

It is now a virtual certainty that the
Bahamas Film Studios will not play host to

SEE page 5B

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Airlift into two key Fami-
ly Islands via private air-
lines/charter companies was
dealt a major blow yester-
day, after a Florida-based
teravel agency specialising
in the sector announced it
was closing down due to the
global recession.

Daytona Beach-based
Island Pass told customers
via e-mail yesterday that it
was closing down, and
warned that tickets already
purchased for future flights
would not be honoured.

It specialised in booking
tickets on charter airlines
and private operators for
flights to Abaco and
Eleuthera, providing clients
for companies such as
Cherokee Aviation, Peter
Russell Flight Services,
White Crown Aviation and
Banyan Air.

Cat Island family in partial
win on 450-acre dispute

â„¢

|: Other side included
MacTaggart family,
=| and DPM Brent

1) Symonette’s wife





-
BRENT SYMONETTE

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Cat Island family has won a partial victory at the Court
of Appeal in a land dispute involving Deputy Prime Minis-
ter Brent Symonette’s wife, the appeal justices part-revers-
ing a previous Supreme Court decision by finding they were
the legal owners of a 15-acre tract of real estate on the
island.

Yet although the Court of Appeal found in favour of
Anthony and Cyril Armbrister, representatives of the
Frances Armbrister estate, in their appeal over the 15-acre
tract known as the Village Estate, it rejected their appeal
over the much larger 430-acre Freeman Hall parcel.

The judgment, written by Appeal Justice Emanuel Osade-
bay, recorded how the dispute had arisen out of a Certificate
of Title granted under the Quieting Titles Act, following a
petition brought by members of the MacTaggart and Light-
bourn families. Almost 1,000 acres of land on Cat Island was

SEE page 6B

In an e-mail sent to Island
Pass clients yesterday, its
president, Kevin Ream, said:
“It is with regret that I
announce IslandPass is sus-
pending service. We opened
during an unprecedented
and unpredictable economy,
and our business has been
very difficult to plan since

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



halted firm’s
expansion

* Nassau Motor Company would not
gone ahead with more than $700k
growth had it known of upcoming
recession

* Firm ‘i/3 to 1/2 way through’
second phase, with five hydraulic
lifts/service bays operational for
three months

* But firm to put phase four on hold
‘for now’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A leading new car dealer yesterday said it might not
have gone ahead with its more than-$700,000 four-
stage expansion “if we had our crystal ball” and pre-
dicted the recession, yet it is hoping the investment
will leave it well-positioned to exploit economic recov-
ery despite having to put the final phase “on hold”.

Rick Lowe, Nassau Motor Company’s (NMC) oper-
ations manager, told Tribune Business the second
stage of the company’s expansion - the construction of
its new client reception building in the service area,
and eventual demolition of the existing facility - was
“maybe one-third to one-half of the way finished”.

However, he added: “Quite honestly, had we had
our crystal ball, we would probably not have done this,
but once we signed the contract we had the commit-
ment of our owners to see it through.

“When the economic turnaround takes place, hope-
fully we’ll be in a better position for the future.

“It’s certainly not a good time to be in any business,
but hopefully things will start to turn around in the
next quarter or next six months, and we will have
done the right thing.”

There were likely to be another four to five weeks

SEE page 5B



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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear from people
who are making news in their

funds for a good cause, campaigning for a
improvements in the area or have won an OH
award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share DN
your story.

neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising Va] m)



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The main responaibilities of the position halder include:

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Process enhancements

Perfonm quality control checks
Management reporting

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Please send your resume, on or before Friday Juby 24th to:

irbahamastiubs com

It starts with you.



By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BANKING sector liquidity remains strong
at $439 million as of July 2, with a $713 mil-
lion fund reserve as at Wednesday, a gov-
ernment minister said, as both he and the
Central Bank governor lauded the “funda-
mentals of our domestic banking system”.
This was despite the negative impact the
recession, and loan defaults, were having
on and credit asset quality.

Wendy Craigg, the Central Bank gover-
nor, speaking at the opening of Scotiabank's
Caves Village location, said Bahamas-based
commercial banks remain available to
finance credit expansion to qualified bor-
rowers.

"The banks’ capital position is healthy
and reinforces the operational strength of
the institutions," she said.

Mrs Craigg said the Central Bank remains
vigilant in monitoring the banking sector to
ensure that "growth continues in an orderly
manner”.

She said the Central Bank continues to
require that commercial banks strengthen
their risk management portfolios and main-
tain adequate provisions for loan losses.

"As we know, countries around the world
are trying to repair their economies from
the fall out due to the global and economic
crisis,” said Mrs Craigg.

"In the Bahamas we continue to grapple
with the negative trends in tourism and for-
eign investment that we know are adverse-
ly affecting the livelihood of a sizable num-
ber of houscholds.”

The Bahamian banking sector itself has
experienced the effects first hand in terms of
the slowdown in opportunities for growth in
the short-term, and the difficulties that are
being faced by many borrowers in keeping
up with their loan servicing obligations.

Also Speaking at the Scotiabank open-
ing, minister of state for finance, Zhivargo
Liang, echoed Mrs Craigg’s assessment of
the economy and financial sector.

"Our network of banks is showing tremen-
dous resilience in the face of our current
economic storm,” he said.

According to Mr Laing, despite the dete-
rioration in bank loan portfolios, the

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Ride away either way from Esso.

One Kia Sportage and Six Sym Jet Scooters to be won.



Bank liquidity still
strong with $439m

Th Me TULLE

Bahamian financial system has not been
compromised.

He said the Government continues to do
what it can to stabilize the economy, with the
$500 million invested in capital works pro-
jects and secured financing of $265 million
for the Lynden Pindling International Air-
port expansion project.

"We in the Government continue to do all
we can to nurture the economy in this down-
turn,” said Mr Liang

"We continue to promote and facilitate
investment applications, which though
reduced in terms of quality, still continue
to come in."

Mrs Craigg revealed that commercial
banks themselves expended almost $350
million in capital spending, salaries, related
payments and other outlays, including
administrative costs, in 2008.

"It is our hope that these efforts, com-
bined with the rebound of the US economy
sooner rather than later, will enable us to
endure unquestionably the worst economic
fallout since the great depression," said Mr
Laing.

Drive into participating Esso stations for the chance to win a brand
new 2009 Kia Sportage on August 7, 2009.

Your entry also qualifies you for weekly draws starting June 26th for
a Sym Jet Scooter.

For every $25 spent on fuel or $10 spent in the C-store you will get
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009, PAGE 3B



‘Pioneering’ company reinvests 3%
of revenue in developing workers

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

An engineering firm,
CARIBBEAN Civil Group
(CCG), has been chosen as
the Bahamian winner of
Pioneers of Prosperity's
(PoP) entrepreneurial
award, receiving a $40,000
grant and the chance to
compete with other
Caribbean companies for up
to $60,000 more, it was
revealed yesterday.

Coordinator for the pro-
gramme, Abby Noble, said
CCG was chosen from
among 110 other Bahamian
businesses, including several
other engineering firms, in
a highly competitive contest.
She added that CCG was
chosen primarily because of
its reinvesting in its employ-
ees through training.

"We look for things like
role model potential, how
they can inspire the next
generation of entrepreneurs,
how they are investing in the
workers and creating a high-
er level of human capital,
how they're investing in the
community through men-
toring other young business
leaders or doing something

that's good for the environ-
ment," she said.

Principal of CCG, Ray
McKenzie, said the compe-
tition involved a rigorous
process, but he expressed his
elation at having been cho-
sen as this year’s country
winner for the Bahamas.

"We are quite honored
and humbled quite frankly.
It was an exhausting process,
so we're quite pleased to be
representing the Bahamas
going forward," he said.

Ceremony

Mr McKenzie will join
nine other country winners
from throughout’ the
Caribbean in Jamaica on
September 11 for the region-
al award ceremony.

CCG is a transporta-
tion/traffic and civil engi-
neering consulting firm
which has done work with
Baha Mar, Kerzner Interna-
tional and the Ministry of
Public Works, and has com-
pleted projects in the Turks
and Caicos and Guyana.

" Our core expertise is
public works, major infra-
structural works and major
development on the private
side in terms of engineering

and construction aspects of
those developments,” said
Mr McKenzie.

He said his company’s
most important resource is
human capital, in which 3
per cent of total revenue is
reinvested through constant
training.

"We firmly recognise that
our number one resource is
our people, and we are ina
knowledge based profession,
so we invest heavily in our
people,” Mr McKenzie said.

"We do the lion’s share of
training offshore, but we
would like to see that
change such that there is
credible training engineers
can get onshore. We invest
heavily in that."

CCG also visits 10 schools
per year to speak to students
about the engineering field
and steer those adept at
maths and science towards
civil engineering.

"We won't be here forev-
er,” said Mr McKenzie.

His company, with five
employees, competes in a
global market, but especial-
ly against foreign firms who
enter the Bahamas on the
heel of big developers.

"We would like to see
local firms get a greater per-

TC CUT Ta Sy TE

A BANK EXAMINER in the Central Bank of the Bahamas bank supervision department, Kathrina Rodgers,
has passed the Series 7 exam in Florida after training with the Nassau-based Nastac Group. She is shown
here with the Nastac Group’s Laquel Hall

FOR RENT

Available August Ist, 2009
PROSPECT RIDGE CONDOMINIUM.

centage of the local project,"
he said. "As developers
come in, they tend to bring
their team who they've had
relationships with, firms
from previous projects, and
that's always a challenge."

Mr McKenzie said finding
the capital to begin his busi-
ness was difficult, but after
having his plan scrutinised
by a scholarly body at the
College of the Bahamas, he
was able to secure a loan
with a Bahamian bank.

"Business was challenged
from the beginning,” he
said.

Now, Mr McKenzie said
he would like to see the reg-
ulators of the engineering
sector step up to the plate
and help it grow.

He said opportunities aris-
ing from the Economic Part-
nership Agreement (EPA)
with the European Union
will help the sector to get on
its feet and think globally.

"We (CCG) stay on the
cutting edge because we
compete globally,” said Mr
McKenzie.

The PoP is a global
awards program that "seeks
to inspire a new generation
of entrepreneurs in emerg-
ing economies", and with

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sponsorship from the Inter-
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uplift and promote small
and medium-sized business

in this region. According to
a PoP release: "Unlike oth-
er award programs PoP does
not end with the distribution
of the award. Rather, the
award is just the beginning."

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in that accordance with Section 138

(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of

2000), Crossworld Consulting Ltd. is in dissoulution. Alvaro

Barria is the Liquidator and can be contacted at GlobalBank
Tower, 23rd Floor, 50th Street, Panama City, Republic of
Panama. All persons having claims against the above-named

company are required to send their names, addresses and par-

ticulatars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the

21st day of August 2009.

LYFORD CAY
E.P. TAYLOR DR.

Cottage Lot With Private Beach

FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at

US:$1.5 million

= *- Mario A. Carey,
President & CEO

Mario Carey Realty

v CRS, CIPS, CLHMS
a Tel: 242-677-8255 | Fax: 242-677-8255

www.mariocareyrealt



Director / Chief Executive
The Bahamas Maritime Authority

PM ate em PURO AT DMND Ra sreme me MOTeD LOCO T Loam) ere COLES
patio/deck gated, pool, oceanview includes water and gas.

Phone: 357-9274 or 325-4465

REQUEST FOR
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LPIA Expansion Project Stage |
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Massau Airport
Dervaioprnent Core peat

Ledcor is seeking contractors to assist in completion of Stage | of the LPIA Expansion
Project (WS Departures Terminal). All contractors, particularly Bahamian contractors, are
encouraged to participate in this significant national proyect. Scopes to be tendered to
complete the fit out of the new terminal include:

+ Doors & Hardware + Mechanical

«Interior Glazing == # Electrical

+ Drywall

+ Flooring

¢ Masonry
# Millwork
+ Specialties

# Paint

Prequalification will include, based on the tender packapes, the following cntena:
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Experience
References
Bahamian ownership / content

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London

The Bahamas Maritime Authority administers The Bahamas’ ship
registry, the third largest registry in the world. It is responsible for
servicing and policing ils registered vessels, promoting The Bahamas
registry to the international shipping community, and for collecting
and accounting for all ship registration and other applicable fees.
The Authority also advises the Government of The Bahamas on all
aspects of international shipping.

The Authority is a statutory Government-owned corporation,
supervised by a Board whose Members are appointed by the
Government, and which reports to the responsible Minister.

Day-to-day management of the Authority rests with its Director, who
is its chief executive. He or she oversees all of the Authority's
dealings with shipowners, with the IMO, and with classification
societies, independent inspectors and the legal and financial
communities. The Authority's main office is presently in London,
where the Director has been based, but it also has offices in Nassau
and New York, with other locations forthcoming.

Candidates must be able to demonstrate a successful track record in
a senior position working in or with the shipping industry. They
should have leadership qualities, experience in directing and
developing personnel, and success in team-building. They should
also have experience in financial management. They should be
holders of a university degree and/or a class | ship's officer certificate.
An appropriate salary will be offered to the preferred candidate.

Applicants are invited to write, enclosing a copy of their C/V, and
with the details of their current salary to: Mr. Peter John Goulandris,
Deputy Chairman, The Bahamas Maritime Authority, Consulate
General of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, 231 East 46th
Street, New York, '.Y. LOO17, USA.

Closing date for receipt of applications is August 31st, 2009. All
applications will be acknowledged.





PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Amazon 2Q profit falls with Toys R Us settlement | Questions

SAN FRANCISCO

Amazon.com Inc. said Thurs-
day that its second-quarter
earnings fell while sales rose,
as the leading online retailer
recorded a $51 million payment
to settle a long-standing dispute
with former partner Toys R Us,
according to Associated Press.

The revenue increase was not
enough to placate analysts, who
were expecting even more than
Amazon delivered. Shares of

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Seattle-based Amazon fell
nearly 7 percent in extended
trading after the results were
released. Sanford C. Bernstein
analyst Jeffrey Lindsay said the
company's report was general-
ly good, but its stock — which
hit a 52-week high of $94.40
during regular trading — was
priced for a blowout quarter.
"That's why you got such a
negative reaction after hours,"
he said. Amazon earned $142
million, or 32 cents per share, in
the April-June quarter, 10 per-
cent lower than the profit of

$158 million, or 37 cents per
share, a year ago. Analysts
polled by Thomson Reuters
expected a penny less per share.

Sales climbed nearly 15 per-
cent to $4.65 billion, slightly
below analyst estimates of $4.69
billion.

Amazon's sales were helped
last year by a $53 million non-
cash gain from the sale of Euro-
pean DVD rental assets.Sales
of items such as books, CDs
and DVDs inched up 1 percent
to $2.44 billion in the second
quarter, while electronics and

other general merchandise sales
soared 35 percent to $2.07 bil-
lion.

The company's North Amer-
ican sales rose 13 percent, while
international sales increased 16
percent.

During a conference call with
reporters, Chief Financial Offi-
cer Tom Szkutak said the com-
pany saw declines in some
North American media cate-
gories, including video games
and video game consoles.

He noted that in the year
before, three of the four hottest

games were released during the
second quarter, including Nin-
tendo Co.'s popular "Wii Fit."
This year's gaming decline was
balanced out by increased book
sales, he said.

Szkutak said that third-party
sellers, who offer their goods
to consumers through Amazon,
made up 30 percent of total unit
sales — an increase from the
previous year.

Amazon's net shipping cost,
which is a closely watched met-
ric, rose to $147 million from
$128 million last year.

Travel supplier closure’s blow for Out Islands

FROM page 1B

our inception.

“We have been operating
and selling tickets in good
faith, but a lack of consis-
tent business will prevent us
from making it through

Crease e@elelas

these tumultuous times. As
of today, my partner and I
decided to end operations.

“Effective immediately,
no further flights will be
conducted. All tickets pur-
chased in advance will be
lost. I'm sorry for any incon-

A vacancy exists at The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited and Port Group

Limited for the position of General Counsel.

Applicants are invited from

interested and suitably qualified individuals ta fill this position, with the primary
responsibility of the overall direction and management of the Legal Department
of The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited and Port Group Limited, and:

~

® Manage and bead strategic and tactical legal initiatives for the Group of

Com panbes

Structure and manage the company's internal legal function and statt

Lead various projects Including litigation management: direction of leases,
deeds of release, and conveyances; privacy and employment matters,
corporate governance, domestic and international compliance and other
matters requiring legal support

Obtain and oversee the work of outside counsel

Provide senior management with effective legal opinians on corparny
Strategies and implementation

Serve as advisor on all major business transactions and in negotiating critical

contracts

Play a key role in managing risk and helping to make sound business decisions

Develop and implement all legal and corporate governance policies

Serve as Company Secretary and participate in meetings of the Board of

Directors

Advise and counsel corporate departments on general and specialized legal
matters including complex international and commercial business transactions

Provide legal representation on International and local projects at preliminary
stage of negotiations and throughout development

Provide legal counsel and advice regarding various corporate business tramsac-
tions to ensure compliance with Bahamian Law and company policies and

procedures.

KNOWLEDGE AND QUALIFICATIONS

Judicial degree along with lintemational expertise

15 or more years of commercial transactional legal background, along with
combined in-hause and law firm legal experience

Strong transactional and general business and commercial law experience,
including drafting and negotiating commercial contracts and licenses

Significant intellectual property experience

Experience in both public and global companies

Results-oriented, with skills to influence change and drive compliance

Strang presentation and negotiation skills, solid business instinets and
judgment, and outstanding written and verbal communication skills

Creative and flexible problem-solving skills

Ability and interpersonal skills to relate with Internal and external customers,
including government, business professionals, the community, corporate
executives and managers, and contribute to strategic planning.

SUS ee ke RRS PRS MRS ere a
SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS TO GENERALCOUNSEL@GBPA.COM
De ee ee el

P, 0. BOX F-42666

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHANIA ISLAND

venience this has caused
you, but I appreciate all your
support over the last several
months.”

Among the alternative
airlines suggested were
Bimini Air and Continental
Airlines.

The loss of Island Pass will
deal something of a blow to
airlift and tourism on Abaco
and Eleuthera, especially
given that those islands rely
heavily on visitors brought
in by private airlines and
charter operators.

Law Firm is seeking skilled professional litigation legal

little supervision

little supervision

« Excellent memory
* Ability to multi-task

« Energetic

+ Self-motivated

« Pleasant personality
« Despises mediocrity

HELP WANTED

secretary. The following are needed:

+ Proficiency in Microsoft Word

« Experience in drafting legal letters with little supervision
« Experience in drafting legal documents with

* Ability to confidently speak with clients
« Ability to take instructions and carry same out with

« Excellent organizational skills

« Works beyond the standard 9 to 5 when necessary

clo The Tribune ¢ P.O. Box N-3207¢ D/A #81242

NOTICE

Voluntary Dissolution

Pursuant to Section 138 (4) (a), (b) and (c) of the
International Business Companies Act, 2000 notice is

given that:-

(a) SPONGE INVESTMENTS INC. is in voluntary

dissolution.

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution is
the 15th day of July, A.D. 2009.

(c) The name of the Liquidator is Anthony A.M. Moree
of Dupuch & Turnquest & Co., 308 East Bay Street,
P.O. Box N-8181, Nassau, Bahamas

Liquidator

Legal Notice
NOTICE

HRK Investments Ltd.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 138(4) of the International

Business

Companies Act. 2000, HRK Investments Ltd. is in
dissolution as of July 20, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

St. Anne’s School, Fox Hill, invites
applicants for its 2009/10 Nursey Class

¢ Children must be three years or older on before 31
July 2009

¢ Application Forms may be collected from the
school’s office from 9:00 - 3:00 daily

* For additional information please contact the office

at 324-1203, 324-1226





over Ginn
refinance

FROM page 1B

a $675 million loan default.

The agreement created a
joint venture that would
see the consortium develop
Ginn sur mer in conjunc-
tion with Ginn. The $675
million loan facility held a
mortgage over half Ginn’s
more than 2,000-acre prop-
erty at West End, largely
the land allocated for lot
and real estate develop-
ment - some 1,400 lot sites.

The core casino and
resort development, cover-
ing some 500 acres on the
north side of Ginn sure
mer, were not covered by
the mortgage.

Without the new financ-
ing, there are concerns that
Ginn sur mer could be a
maze of roads and infra-
structure and no buildings.
Ginn is understood to have
drawn down on a major
portion of the $200 million
it placed in escrow to
finance infrastructure and
golf course construction,
and is likely to complete
this phase by the 2010 first
quarter.

Equipment

One source told Tribune
Business that there was
some “$20-$30 million
worth of heavy equip-
ment” still on site at Ginn
sur mer, and added: “The
first 18-hole Arnold
Palmer golf course is in
and seeded, and being
catered for with 400,000 to
500,000 gallons of water
per day.

“The water system anda
million-and-a-half gallon
tank are in, the canals are
mostly in, and the entrance
to the ocean is done.”

Meanwhile, Tribune
Business was told by
sources that Old Bahama
Bay, which was suffering
occupancy rates as low as
10 per cent, was losing a
net $5 million per year,
hence the decision to dras-
tically reduce staff.

Ginn acquired Old
Bahama Bay in December
2006, with the intention of
using it primarily as an
accommodation base for
investors and potential
purchasers of real estate at
Ginn sur mer. However,
following the credit crunch
and economic recession,
the pool of real estate buy-
ers has all but dried up,
leaving Old Bahama Bay
without its planned cus-
tomer base.

However, Tribune Busi-
ness understands that
rumours that Old Bahama
Bay will close and/or be
sold are not correct, as the
marina and hotel will stay
open and be operated by a
skeleton staff.

Ginn was also said to
have been searching for a
brand/operating partner
for the property.

This newspaper was told
that the 85 lay-offs would
take Ginn’s total staff com-
plement in West End - at
the resort and develop-
ment company - from 428
to 344, However, Dion
Foulkes, minister of
labour, indicated that Ginn
was Set to hire another 35
construction workers at the
Development Company,
taking employee numbers
to around 380.

DJ CeNn eens

INSIGHT

are) am ta(-M-j (ela (=1)
behind the news,
beetle Meee 414
on Mondays





THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

left before the new service recep-
tion building was completed, Mr
Lowe, as construction workers
were currently “putting up the
panels, with the roof next weck”.

Work on the service reception
building had begun three weeks
ago, Mr Lowe added, and once
erected there was then the issue
of installing electricity supply and
moving all the furniture from the
old office in.

“Hopefully, it will be nicer for

Lease delay increases
Studio repairs $500k

the customers. There will be a nice
overhang, so customers will not
get wet in the rain.”

Expansion

The first phase of Nassau Motor
Company’s expansion, the con-
struction of five new service bays
with hydraulic lifts at its head-
quarters, sandwiched between
Shirley and Deveaux Streets, had
been completed earlier this year.

Mr Lowe said yesterday these
facilities had been open for three

months, and had increased Nas-
sau Motor Company’s service bays
to 20 in number, which were now
“mostly occupied”.

“They’re working out quite
well,” he added of the five new
service bays. “With the new lifts,
everyone’s quite efficient. It makes
life easier.” Where they came in
really handy, he said, was in
“speeding up” jobs such as tyre
changes and work on the under-
side of any vehicle, as it removed
the need to use jacks.

Nassau Motor Company had
also put in another hydraulic lift

FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009, PAGE 5B

‘Crystal ball’ would have halted firm’s expansion

recently, Mr Lowe said, taking the
number of lifts it possessed to 12 -
nine major, and three smaller ones.
Once the new service reception
area is completed, Nassau Motor
Company will move on to phase
three, which involves converting
the old service reception area into
two more work bays. The fourth
and final phase, though, which is
designed to create a new service
and lunch area, has been stayed.
“Phase four we’ve put on hold,
but we could not get out of phases
one and two because we’d made a
contractual commitment.

“Once we committed to phase
one, we had to do phase two,” Mr
Lowe explained.

“Phase three we’re going to do,
as it’s a matter of turning the old
reception office into two work
bays. That we can do ourselves, as
we can pull the building down our-
selves. Phase four, we’ve put that
on hold for right now.” Mr Lowe
said service and parts “remain a
significant part of our business”,
especially at a time when new car
sales are down industry-wide
between 40-50 per cent as a result
of the global recession.

Kingsway Academy High
School Teaching positions
For September, 2009



Kingsway Academy High School invites

FROM page 1B

Pirates of the Caribbean IV,
with the uncertainty sur-
rounding its fate not only
depriving Grand Bahama -
and the wider Bahamas - of
economic activity and pub-
licity opportunities, but also
acting as a potential deter-
rent to film and TV crews
using this nation as a pro-
duction setting.

Mr Fuller told Tribune
Business yesterday: “We are

“We are no
longer trying
to attract new
productions
because of the
uncertainty
surrounding
our rights to

on the lease,” he said.

Mr Fuller had previously
agreed to sell the Bahamas
Film Studios to Bahamas
FilmInvest International, a
group headed by Nassau-
based banker Owen Bethel,
president and chief execu-
tive of the Montaque
Group, in a transaction
widely believed to be val-
ued at around $14 million.

The deal was an ‘off, on’
process, the two sides walk-
ing away once only to agree
new terms. However, the

trying to ‘wait out’ Mr Fuller
in the hope that he will
decide to exit the Bahamas
Film Studios investment and
sell it to another buyer.
But in the meantime, the
longer the saga drags on, the
greater the negative impact
it risks having on the
Bahamas’ attractiveness as
a destination for film and
TV production filming, nev-
er mind the benefits from
one-off events such as the
Tyler Perry-inspired movie
currently being shot in north

no longer trying to attract

the property.”

Eleuthera.

new productions because of
the uncertainty surrounding
our rights to the property.

“Furthermore, we are
unwilling to commit further
funds for maintenance and
repair until these matters are
resolved. The necessary
repairs have increased by an
estimated $500,000 as a
direct result of these delays.”

On the possibility that
other film and TV produc-
tion crews might still be
interested in filming at the
Bahamas Film Studios, he
added: “There can be no
interest until and unless the
Government acts very
soon.”

Mr Fuller said he had
received no communications
from the Government about
its intentions for the
Bahamas Film Studios,
“which would indicate to me
that they have no interest in



Ross Fuller

what happens.

“A lone exception to this
is the Ministry of Tourism,
who have tried to influence
the powers that be to move
this along, citing the loss of
revenue to Grand Bahama.”

Dropped

Mr Fuller indicated to Tri-
bune Business that, for the
moment, he had dropped
plans to sell the Bahamas
Film Studios and had pulled
it off the market, and was
instead focusing on con-
cluding the new lease and
Heads of Agreement with
the Government.

“I do not have any plans
at the moment other than
trying to settle the situation

ENTER T0 WIN!

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3. AILOMUT Official Entry Form and Attach Original

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Palmdale, 322-1441

Grocery Store Receipt.

4, DEPOOT Entry Form in Ballot Boxes Located at
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Palmdale and Parity takery om Market and
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transaction finally came
unstuck last year, Mr Bethel
telling Tribune Business that
the sales agreement was
essentially null and void as
Mr Fuller was unable to
deliver on what he had
promised, namely a 3,500-
acre site, after the Govern-
ment decided to reduce the
project’s scale to 120 acres.
Mr Fuller, though, accused
Mr Bethel’s side or breach
of contract, and initiated
arbitration proceedings
through the International
Chambers of Commerce.
These proceedings, though,
were later dropped and
there appears to be no
immediate intention of
reviving them, Mr Fuller
telling Tribune Business he
did “not have any plans at
the moment” on this score.

Although the Govern-
ment’s intentions are
unclear, it could be that it is

—_/ : L_.
‘PURITY
BAKERY |

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302-3000



BUSINESS
SOLUTIONS

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Needs, and Answers

To All Your Business
Questions

B2BahamasBiz.com
Or 323-2533/4


















qualified applicants for the following teaching
positions for September, 2009.

candidates MUST be

qualified, born again Christian with a valid
Teacher's Certificate and minimum if a

Bachelor's Degree. He or She must also
be willing to participate in Extra Curricular

activities, etc.

Application forms can be collected from

Human Resources section at the Business
Office on Bernard Road. Telephone 242-
324-6269 / 324-6887.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS

al
br
sy

FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, 2009.

Bahamas Agricultural & Industrial Corporation

Presents
Its

NEW PROVIDENCE II

SHELL CRAFT TRAINING PROGRAM

+‘

Date: July 27-August7, 2009 Time:
Venue: Bahamas Academy High School

Application Form

6:00 - 10:00 p.m,

Location: Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas

P. 0. Box:

Email:

Fax:

Employment Status: 0 Employed © Government o Private

O Unemployed

Sunder 15 o 16-25 o 26-40 041-60 061-70 O71 and over

O Self-employed

ADMINISTRATIVE FEE: $100 | EXCLUDING MATERIALS)

Contact:

Le-Var Miller or Sharae Collie

Tel: 322-3740-3



HANDICRAFT DEVELOPMENT/MARKETING DEPARTMENTS - BAIC

Fax: 322-2123/328-6542



PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009

THe TRIBUNE





Cat Island family in partial
win on 450-acre dispute

FROM page 1B

involved, namely the 554.8-
acre Village Estate tract,
and the 484.6 Freeman Hall
tract.

The original petitioners
were Marion Lightbourn
and Sheila MacTaggart, but
the latter had been replaced
via an April 9, 1991,
Supreme Court order with
Neil MacTaggart, Robin
MacTaggart-Symonette and
Jolanta Maria Graham. Mrs
MacTaggart-Symoncette is
Mr Symonette’s wife, but he
has no connection whatso-
ever to the case.

The MacTaggart side, the
judgment said, claimed own-
ership through both docu-
mentary and possessory title,
the latter of which they
alleged to have acquired
under the Real Property
Limitation Act 1874.

Petition

They also alleged that
“they and their predecessors
in title have been in full, free
and undisturbed possession
of two tracts of land by
farming thereon continu-
ously for more than 20
years” before the Quieting



“They claim to
be entitled to
one-half interest
in Freeman Hall
by virtue of
documentary
title, and to 15
acres in the
Village Estate.”



Titles Act petition.

The Armbristers, broth-
ers who were Frances Arm-
brister’s children, argued in
return that they had contin-
uous documentary title to
the Freeman Hall Estate,
through inheritance, since
1873. They also claimed
ownership of 15 acres on the
Village Estate, again via
documented title from the
original Crown Land grant.

Tracing the title roots, the
Court of Appeal judgment
said it was not disputed that
William Edward Armbris-
ter in 1895 owned the Vil-
lage Estate, plus 430 acres
or 50 per cent of the Free-
man Hall tract.

Then, on May 27 of that



year, William Armbrister
conveyed the Village Estate
to the Bahamas (Inagua)
Sisal Plantation Company,
apart from 15 out of 100
acres he had acquired under
an 1871 Crown grant. This
was “reserved for himself”,
while the 430 acres he
owned in Freeman Hall
were also conveyed to the
company.

Eventually, the Bahamas
(Inagua) Sisal Plantation
Company was struck off the
Register of Companies in
1911 “after several years of
inactivity and thereby
ceased to exist”.

The MacTaggart side’s
title, the Court of Appeal
recorded, was alleged to
have its roots in the posses-
sory title of Walter Brown-
rigg, a former manager of
the company. He was
alleged to have taken pos-
session of the land parcels
in dispute around 1906, after
not being paid his due wages
when the Bahamas (Inagua)
Sisal Plantation Company
ceased operating.

Eventually, Mr Brownrig-
2’s heirs sold all the Free-
man Hall and Village Estate
lands to Herbert Arnold
McKinney, the MacTaggart
side’s predecessors in title.
He died on January 10,

estate interests to his daugh-
ters, Marion Lightbourn and
Sheila MacTaggart, the orig-
inal petitioners.

However, the Armbristers
countered by alleging that
all the land claimed by the
MacTaggart side was owned
by their forefather, William.

“They claim that one of
them, Anthony Armbrister,
still lives on part of the land
in the area of The Bight,”
the Court of Appeal found.
“They claim to be entitled
to one-half interest in Free-
man Hall by virtue of docu-
mentary title, and to 15 acres
in the Village Estate.

“They claim that upon the
company going out of busi-
ness and struck out, the one-
half interest in Freeman
Hall (430 acres) granted to
the company reverted to
William..... their predeces-
sor in title or to his estate.”

Then-Supreme Court Jus-
tice Jeanne Thompson
found in favour of the Mac-
Taggart side, but the Arm-
bristers appealed, alleging
that she had wrongly found
them to be claiming adverse
possession of the 15-acre
Village Estate tract, when
in fact they had documents
to prove their title.

The MacTaggart side,
though, denied that the

tary title to the 15 acres.
However, the Court of
Appeal said conveyancing
records showed William
Armbrister had carved out
15 acres from the original
Crown Land grant, only
conveying 85 acres to the
Bahamas (Inagua) Sisal
Plantation Company.

Therefore, the court
found that the Armbristers’
root of title had its genesis in
that 1895 conveyance, and
the 1871 Crown Land grant,
giving them documentary
title. The MacTaggart side’s
claim, though, was posses-
sory as Charles Brownrigg
was ‘squatting’ on the land
to claim wages due to him.

Given that the Bahamas
(Inagua) Sisal Plantation
Company’s lands did not
include the 15-acre parcel in
question, and that the Arm-
bristers’ documentary title
preceded all the documents
possessed by the MacTag-
gart side, the Court of
Appeal found: “It seems to
me that the trial judge fell
into error when she ruled
that the appellants did not
establish any documentary
title to the disputed 15-acre
parcel of land, and that [the
MacTaggart side] have
established a documentary
title.”

duced evidence to show
their claim to the 15 acres
was not recent, having
engaged attorney Living-
stone B. Johnson to protect
their interests back in 1966.
Ultimately, the Court of
Appeal found that they
should be awarded a Cer-
tificate of Title to those 15
acres.

Yet the Court of Appeal
found for the MacTaggart
side on the Freeman Hall
claim, finding that the
Bahamas (Inagua) Sisal
Plantation Company did not
own any real estate when it
was struck off in 1911. Asa
result, there was nothing
that could have reverted to
William Armbrister.

And the court also con-
cluded that the Armbristers
had not established docu-
mentary title good enough
to defeat the MacTaggart
side’s claim.

They and their predeces-
sors had been in continuous
and exclusive possession for
some 70 years, using it for
corn and peas farming.

Patrick Toothe and
Travette Pyfrom represent-
ed the Armbristers; Richard
Lightbourn and Tim Eneas,
of McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, the MacTaggart

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW AND BOUITY DIVISION

2007

(CLEAGEN D033
BETWEEN
BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
STEPHEN FRITAGERALD FARROW

Defenclant

ADVERTISEMENT OF SERVICE OF SUMMONS
ASD SOTICE OF ADJOURNED HEARING

TAKE NOTICE that it has been ordered by Ms. Marilyn Meeres,
Deputy Registrar cf the Supreme Court on the Suh day of March,
AD, 2009 that service of the Summons and the Notice of Adjourned
Hearne in the said action he effected on you by this advertisement

Dated this 25th day of June, A.D., 2009,

GIBSON, RIGRY & Co.
CHAMBERS
RieMalex House
Dowdeswell Street
Nassau, The Bahimes

Attorneys for the Plaintiff

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME OORT
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION

an

CLEGER/0)033
BETWEEN
BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Plamertt
AND
STEPHEN FRITAGERALD FARROW
Delendarit

SUMMONS

LET ALL PARTIES concerned attend before Deputy Registrar
Meeres of the SMIp Tes Tue Coun, Supreme Conart Building, Bank Line,
Nassau, The Bahamas on Monday the 11th day of Auguar, A.D,
2008 at 12:43 o"DSclock in the afternoon for the hearing of an
application on the part of the Plaintiff for an Crier for leave to enter

Judement in Default of Appearance pursuant to Order 73 of the
Rules of the Supreme Court for the amount claimed in the Statement
of Claim with interest, as therein claimed and costs,

TAKE NOTICE that a party intending to oppose this application
or lo apply fora stay of execution should send to the Plaintll’s
party or its Attorneys to reach them not less than three (3) days
before the dite abowe mentioned a copy ot any Affidavit intended
io be used.

Dated this 20th day of June, A.D, 20008,
REGISTRAR
‘To: Stephen Freeper Farrowior his Counsel Giheom Righy d& Cn.
Seabroceae Lane Chamoers
Neeccau, Tha: Feahaercs Ki-tdakes Hicaise
Devedeswell Street

The Ded emda Passau The Bateimas

Automeyvs For the Plaimaiff

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS AMT
Is THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW AND BOUITY DIVISION
CLEAGEM AT OS4
BETWEEN
BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Plaintull
AND
STEPHEN FRITACGERALD FARROW
Defendant

NOTICE OF ADJOURNED HEARING

TARE MOTICE that the Summons filed on the 25th day of June,
A.D. S008 and set down bo be heard on Monday the 11th day af
August, AD., 2008 at 12:45 oDSclock in the afternoon will now
be heard before Deputy Registrar Meetes of the Supreme Court,
Anshacher Guikling, Hank Lane, Nassau, The Bahamas on Thursday
ihe 30h day of July, A.D., 2009 at 12:00 0"DSclock in the afiemoon.

Dated this 20th day of March, ADL, 2009,
REGISTRAR

This notice was taken out by Messrs. Gibson, Rigby & Co..
Chambers, Ki-Malex House, Dowdeswell Street, Nassau, The
Bahamas, Attorneys bor the Plaimull,

(Jy. 6, 9)

1981, leaving all his real

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that We, GEORGE PHILIP ANTONIO
ROBINSON JR and CHANTEL ANISE MARY JOHNSON

both of the Western District of the Island of New providence intend to change the

name of our daughter from GEORGIANNA PHILLISHA ANTONIA
JOHNSON to GEORGIANNA PHILLISHA ANTONIA

robinson. If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KENSON JEAN JACQUES
of CARMICHEAL RD., P.O. BOX CR-55404, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24" day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHRIS PHILIP TILME
of SOUTH BEACH, P.O. BOX CR-55404, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24" day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Armbristers had documen-

The Armbristers also pro- side.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA LISSAINT ELIONOR
EWING of WASHINGTON’ STREET, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24" day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YVROSE ARISCA of
CARMICHAEL ROAD, P.O. BOX N-9456, NASSAU
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 17" day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JENO ALEXI of HOMES
STEAD STREET, P.O. BOX N-7060, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24" day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

ROYAL @FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 20 JULY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.86| CHG 0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -141.50 | YTD % -8.26
FINDEX: CLOSE 786.23 | YTD -5.83% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Security
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.39
10.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00
6.94 Bank of Bahamas 6.94
0.63 Benchmark 0.63
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37
10.18 Cable Bahamas 11.39
2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74
5.50 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.64
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.98
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 1.82
6.60 Famguard 6.60
10.00 Finco 10.90
10.35 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.38
4.95 Focol ($) 5.03
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.50
10.40 J. S. Johnson 10.40
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00

Previous Close _Today‘s Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.39

11.00 0.00
6.94 0.00
0.63 0.00
3.15 0.00
2.37 0.00

11.39 0.00

2.74 0.00

0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240

5.64 0.00
3.00 0.02
1.82 0.00
6.60 0.00
10.90 0.00
10.38 0.00
5.03 0.00
1.00 0.00
0.30 0.00
5.50 0.00
10.40 0.00
10.00 0.00

0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBE17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Change Daily Vol. Interest
700.00 0.00 7%
100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
100.00 0.00 7%
100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

5S2wk-Low

Symbol

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $

Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

1.3231
2.8952
1.4031
3.1031
12.3289

93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
last 52 weeks

CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

0.35

Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol.
8.42 14.60
6.25 6.00

0.40 0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

30.13
0.45

31.59 29.00
0.55 0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV

1.3860
2.8952
1.4777
3.1031
12.9801
101.6693
93.1992
1.0000
9.2765
1.0622
1.0243
1.0585

YTD% Last 12 Months
2.40 4.75

-1.52 -3.18

3.07 5.31

-8.35 -13.82
2.87 5.79

Div $

1.10 1.67
-3.33. -6.76
0.00 0.00
2.00 -2.98
2.56 6.22
-0.84 2.43
2.04 5.85

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $

ighted price for daily velume

ted price for daily velume

ivi
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date #/8/2007

(S31) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

- Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Net Asset Value

N/M - Net Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

EPS $

Div $ P/E

30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
10-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

pri
EPS § - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV -



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST



FRIDAY, JULY 24 2009, PAGE 8B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

“oO



Fi (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

CL a 0



















y =x. Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
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@ High: 92 High: 90 High: 90 High: 89 Barbados 86/30 77/25 sh 36/30 76/245 MAT) Van | BAe Se
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ie CU nn Saturday thilam. 31 43am. 03 Bermuda 84/28 77/25 pe 84/28 77/25 pc
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Anchorage 66/18 55/12 sh 67/19 55/12 sh Jacksonville 91/32 71/21 t 93/83 72/22 t Phoenix 106/41 89/31 t 108/42 88/31 t HBA Me , aaa Maul as en pe oe ae 7
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Atlantic City 81/27 67/19 t 86/30 70/21 pc Las Vegas 105/40 81/27 t 106/41 87/30 pc Portland, OR 85/29 62/16 s 89/31 64/17 5 oberon Low: 79° F/26°C ear aaa ae Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 84/28 66/18 t 90/32 70/21 pc Little Rock 96/35 71/21 po 94/34 68/20 s Raleigh-Durham 90/32 66/18 pc 93/33 70/21 pe Low:76°F/24°C a oo can AeA pe err 7
Boston 71/21 64417 + 78/25 68/20 c LosAngeles 86/30 64/17 pc 86/30 66/18 pc St. Louis 88/31 71/21 po 89/31 66/18 t . a ae SSaEAORE Re Sa ESTOTE Fe
Buffalo 76/24 6116 t 80/26 66/18 t Louisville 86/30 68/20 s 88/31 68/20 t Salt Lake City 94/34 69/20 t 95/35 69/20 t GREAT INAGUA Tava er. at eT
Charleston, SC 93/33 72/22 t 95/35 74/23 pc Memphis 94/34 73/22 pce 94/34 73/22 pc San Antonio 100/37 75/23 pce 99/87 75/23 pc High: 97° F/36° C aa 74/23 59/15 pe 75/23 63/17 t
Chicago 82/27 66/18 t 78/25 61/16 t Miami 93/33 80/26 t 92/33 79/26 t San Diego 78/25 69/20 pc 78/25 68/20 s bet Le va mm | ol ee
Cleveland 78/25 61/16 pc 82/27 6A/17 t Minneapolis 80/26 61/46 t 77/25 6246 pc Sanfrancisco 67/19 55/12 pc 72/22 55/12 pe Low: 77° F/25° C aa a wae . aes aa fe er LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 96/35 76/24 pc 100/37 76/24 pc Nashville 88/31 69/20 pc 91/32 67/19 pc Seattle 79/26 57/13 s 84/28 60/15 s Vienne 83/08 6/17 sh 73/99 BB/I2 sh Abaco Eleuthera Evuma
Denver 94/34 60/15 pc 88/31 59/15 pc NewOrleans 92/33 74/23 t 90/32 75/23 t Tallahassee 91/32 71/21 t 94/32 70/21 t Te 81/27 57/19. sh 73/22 52/11 t FS “57-04 Fe <7-2860 F, een
Detroit 82/27 62/16 pc 79/26 62/16 t New York 81/27 71/21 t 83/28 74/23 po Tampa 91/32 78/25 pe 92/33 7/25 t Winnipeg 70/01 59/15 ¢ 7/22 58/14 pe (eA) (22) 2+ a)
Honolulu 89/31 76/24 pc 90/32 78/25 c OklahomaCity 96/35 72/22 s 97/36 69/20 pc Tucson 101/38 79/26 t 102/38 81/27 t :
Houston 97/36 76/24 pc 97/36 76/24 pc Orlando 94/34 73/22 t 93/33 74/23 t Washington, DC 86/30 69/20 t 90/32 74/23 pc Te eh ee ee



















Full Text
TRY OUR
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Volume: 105 No.200

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The Tribune

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009



Threat to lie’ of
ton potice cel

Security heightened [NESTE INI,

after commissionet’s
car ‘tampered with’

POLICE are inves- [FF
tigating whether an |,

attempt could have |) ==

been made on the life |!
of Police Commission- |
er Reginald Ferguson
after officers discov-
ered that his private
vehicle had been tam-
pered with.
According to sources, Mr
Ferguson discovered that most
of the lug nuts on his car’s
front left tyre had “miracu-
lously” disappeared while on

ROTEL rete



the grounds of police
headquarters in East
Street.

Reportedly only two
nuts were loosely
screwed on to two of
the five bolts on the
tyre.

This act, allegedly
done in an effort to
cause the Commissioner to
crash his vehicle, has been tak-
en seriously by acting Assis-

SEE page eight

Businessman dies one week
after being shot hy robbers

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Businessman Leslie Maycock lost his battle
for life and died on Thursday in hospital one week after he was
shot by armed robbers outside his business.

Maycock, 50, was detained in critical, but stable condition in
the Intensive Care Unit at Rand Memorial Hospital after being

shot on July 15.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle said his death now pushes the
homicide count to six for the year on Grand Bahama.
Maycock, a former police officer, was closing his store in the

SEE page eight



| | HECTOR AND ROSETTA
| SMITH, the parents of



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Brenton Smith, look at
their son’s photograph
during the memorial held
yesterday in Stapledon
Gardens.

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net




























THERE was an out-
pouring of love and a
call for justice for 18-
year-old Brenton Smith
last night in Stapledon
Gardens as scores of
young people and fami-
ly members gathered
last night to remember
the life of the ambitious
young man killed by a
stray bullet in a police
shoot out.

The “Candlelight Vig-
il” organised by Bren-
ton’s friends drew a
large crowd of people
who took the opportu-
nity to express what a
kind, funny, humble and
driven person their fall-
en friend was, and their
sorrow for the loss he

SEE page seven





crams Cold

Coffee Fix

oo

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

aa
SCTE Ta TT



Hung jury

in Dorneil

Ferguson
murder trial

Failure to

reach decisive
verdicts on three
separate charges









Bahamian arrested with son of

former Miami Dolphins owner

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

AN Abaco restaurant own-
er has been arrested in Flori-
da with the son of former
Miami Dolphins owner H
Wayne Huizenga after the
pair were suspected of trying
to burgle a woman’s home.
However, it is believed that
Huizenga, under the influence
of alcohol, mistook the house
for his own and had tried to
enter.

In a bizarre scenario,
Bahamian Patrick Stewart, 44,
the owner of Cracker P’s Bar
and Grill, was arrested on
Monday by Fort Lauderdale
police after his friend Robert
Ray Huizenga allegedly
docked his boat at the wrong
house and tried to get inside.

Yesterday Huizenga plead-
ed not guilty to boating under
the influence of alcohol.
Police say Stewart is expected
to face charges of trespassing,



ROBERT Ray Huizenga (left)
and Bahamian Patrick Stewart.

possession of a controlled
substance, and possession of
cannabis under 20 grams.

Stewart, whose popular
restaurant sits on a 7.5 acre
beachfront property in Lub-
ber’s Quarters, Abaco, has yet
to be arraigned.

According to a police
report, the fiasco unfolded
when officers got an 11.15pm
phone call from a woman liv-
ing at Lido Drive, Fort Laud-
erdale.

She said two men were at
the rear door of her residence
“jiggling at the door, attempt-

SEE page seven

ieee
SIZZLER
BLOCK SPECIAL

) COME INAND CHECK OUT OUR {

__ SPECIALS ON BLOCKS FOR _



NASSAU AND

BAHAMA ISTPANDS LEADING NEWSP4

PER



By NATARIO
McKENZIE

Tribune Staff
Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

THE DORNEIL Fer-
guson murder trial end-
ed with a hung jury yes-
terday after jurors failed
to reach decisive ver-
dicts on three separate
charges.

Dudley Duran
Moree, 23, Mr Fergu-
son’s co-worker, is
charged with his murder
as well as the attempted
murder of the morti-
cian’s wife, Yuzann.

Moree is also charged
with possession of a
firearm with the intent
to endanger the life of
the couple’s daughter
Dorneisha, who was
seven months at the
time of the shooting
incident.

The couple were shot
as they slept in the bed-
room of their Family
Street apartment off
Soldier Road on the
morning of June 26,
2008.

Moree has main-
tained his innocence.

After three hours of
deliberation, the jury of

SEE page eight

Homeowners
claim they are
‘kept in dark’
over highway
construction

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ANGRY homeowners in
the Vista Marina subdivision
claim Government is contin-
uing to leave them in the dark
about the construction of the
multi-million dollar highway
being built around and within
the borders of their land.

They said they are dis-
tressed about possible flood-
ing, property devaluation,
noise and traffic pollution
they feel will stem from the

SEE page eight


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Approved Crown land applicants |

‘will get papers by end of year’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Prime Minister has
promised to take action to
ensure that all people whose
Crown land applications
have been approved will
“get their papers to which
they are entitled” by the end
of the year.

Speaking in the House of
Assembly, Hubert Ingra-
ham said he is “disheart-
ened” by the number of
applications that have
received approvals but have
not yet been executed
“notwithstanding that the
requisite fee has been paid,
in too many cases, years and
years ago.”

“I was astounded to see
the number of people in
Acklins who have not yet




















PUM cae chy

Bernard Bd : Maeker Sts Thompson Bed

Family uardlas
calendar photo eantest winrs

Congratulations to this year's winners in the

UL am Nee UEUN



received their grants even
though I approved their
grants years ago.

“T will dispatch surveyors
to Acklins in short order to
finalise the process so that
before the end of the year
we Shall issue these people
of Acklins and Mayaguana,
in Bogue, Eleuthera and
Grand Bahama and Abaco
and elsewhere in the
Bahamas their papers to
which they are entitled.”

He made this commit-
ment as he noted that there
are also 9,000 outstanding
applications for Crown land
which have not even yet
gone through the earliest
stages of review by the Min-

istry of Lands — that which
results in a “recommenda-
tion” being made by the
Director of Lands and Sur-
veys and the under-secre-
tary in the Ministry of Lands
as to whether the request
should get the go-ahead.

Mr Ingraham recently
presented data in parlia-
ment that shows that just
under 1.4 million acres of
available Crown land still
exists in the country, which
is made up of 3.4 million
acres.

This amounts to approxi-
mately 10 acres per person,
or 55 per cent of usable land
in the entire country, the
rest being privately held or
classified as wetlands.

MPs, speaking last week
during the debate on a res-
olution to create a select
committee on Crown land,
suggested that how such
land is distributed, to whom,
after what length of time
and in what quantities, has
traditionally been seen to
be arbitrary or on the basis
of “kisses going by favours.”

It has been proposed by
some that a written policy
on how Crown land is dis-
tributed should be made
available and the considera-
tion process should be finite
— rather than taking over
a decade in some cases.

Winner

Tim Aylen (2)
Paul Harding

Tim Higgs
Linda Huber

Erick Darling

Anthony Hepburn

Family Guardian Annual Calendar Photo Contest

The 14 winning photographs will appear in the Company's
2010 Calendar “A Celebration of Nature,” which also
commemorates the 45th Anniversary of Family Guardian.

Family Guardian thanks all participants who submitted
photos in the annual photo contest.

Julie Lightbourn
Rachel Lightbourne
Melissa Maura (2)
Roston McGregor (2)
Michael Toogood

Yesterday Mr Mitchell }
issued a Statement saying :
that he and Philip Davis, the :
other PLP MP appointed to :
the land committee, “want }
to get to work with dis- }
patch” in carrying out its }

responsibilities.

“We intend to engageina }
serious effort to carry out }
the will of the House. We }
look forward to working :
with our colleagues from the }
FNM in a similarly serious }

effort.

Surveys.”

Mr Mitchell added that as
the committee does its work
the trail of evidence will be }
followed wherever it leads ;
“and let the chips fall where

they may.”

This Lands Committee :
was formed following arti- }
cles in The Tribune reveal- :
ing claims of nepotism and }
corruption in the Depart- :
ment of Lands and Sur- }

veys.

Financial Strength Rating

AS Breeton

Residence

Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Abaco
Nassau
Eleuthera
Nassau
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Nassau

A SUBSIDIARY OF

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Photo by Michael Toogood
Family Guardian's 2010 Calendar

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“With hard work and :
determination, the country :
should know the full story }
in this matter in short order, :
including testing the integri- ;
ty of claims made in the }
House by the Prime Minis- :
ter and others about the :
abuse of Crown land by for- ;
mer staff members at the }
Department of Lands and }



* SEE PAGE THREE |



Bahamians have their
say on harbour dredging
move the container port to

THE harbour at Arawak

Cay is in the process of STREET

being dredged to go along

with Government’s plan to

Arawak Cay. The Tribune

hit the streets to find out what the average Bahamian thinks
about the matter:

STEPHEN LOGAN

I think it will be better for the Bahamas
because they are dredging the harbour to
bring in the cruise ships, more cruise ships,
more people, more money so that’s why I
am for it. I don’t think the environmental
risk will be a big problem. I think the peo-
ple who are doing it will be experienced
enough to take care of all the environ-
mental risk and problems that will come

up, I think they should be able to handle |
the problems.



GINO THORTON
Tam not for it. For instance, If you take
‘| this area out here where the ships are now
(pointing toward Nassau Harbour) for a
point in time people had the authority to
go where they want to go. Since the Gov-
ernment took over they can’t do that any-
more. Everything is private security and it
will be the same way down there (Arawak
Cay). The freedom we have now we won’t
have it anymore, that’s why ’'m not for
it. 5






CLAUDETTE LUNDY





Iam against the dredging of the harbor =
at Arawak Cay. They should take it down |}
to Clifton Pier.

MARGARET
BULLARD

If the Government
wants to do it, then that
| is what’s gonna happen, but I don’t believe
| it will affect the Bahamian people that
much except with the beaches. When hol-
idays come around people like to go to
the beach and there is hardly enough
beaches out there now.




MORRIS HENERY






Well personally I wished they would
have moved all of the cargo shipping from |=
downtown or the immediate downtown |" 4% -
area, but the powers-that-be say that’s | s
where they want to put it. 4

My only opinion is that they should take |
it (the harbour) away from town and the |
immediate area of town so that they can
get rid of some of the congestion. I’m not saying that only the
lorries are causing the congestion there are a number of cars
causing it also.

But if that’s where they want to put it ’m waiting to see
what sort of traffic relief we are going to get by putting it
there (Arawak Cay) or what extra problems there will be.
There are two big cruise ships coming on board and we
would like to get that business as an addition to what we
have now. It will be good for tourism and local businesses.

Kenyatta Gibson is
named as Mortgage
Corporation chairman

FORMER PLP MP for
Kennedy Kenyatta Gibson
has been named by Govern-
ment to act as the new chair-
man of the Mortgage Cor-
poration.

Crossing the floor of the
House of Assembly to join
the FNM on January 21 of

EE Be Boles
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

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this year, Mr Gibson has
also most recently been
named to the Lands Review
committee, which was for-
mally appointed by Parlia-
ment on Wednesday.

The Tribune understands
that the formal documenta-
tion from the Governor
General has yet to be deliv-
ered to the MP.

The Mortgage Corpora-
tion has been in the press
recently because it forclosed
on a number of Bahamians
who were hard-hit by the
slumping economy.


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



MPs welcome
investigation into
land disposition

FOX Hill MP Fred
Mitchell, along with Cat
Island, Rum Cay, and San
Salvador MP Philip Davis,
issued a statement yester-
day welcoming the appoint-
ment of the committee to
investigate the disposition
of all publicly held lands in
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

The statement read: “My
colleague and I from the
Opposition side want to get
to work with dispatch and
forthwith. We intend to
engage in a serious effort to
carry out the will of the
House. We look forward to
working with our colleagues
from the FNM in a similarly
serious effort.

“With hard work and
determination, the country
should know the full story
in this matter in short order
including testing the integri-
ty of claims made in the
House by the Prime Minis-
ter and others about the
abuse of crown land by for-
mer staff members at the
Department of Lands and
Surveys.”

Mr Mitchell added that as
the committee does it’s work
the trail of evidence will be
followed wherever it leads
“and let the chips fall where
they may”.

Man expected
in court over
alleged firearm
possession

A MAN allegedly found
in possession of a firearm
and 10 rounds of ammuni-
tion is expected to be
arraigned in Magistrates
Court today.

he was arrested at
around 4.30pm on
Wednesday when police
officers from the Fox Hill
division and the mobile
division found a 9mm pis-
tol and 10 bullets for the
gun while on patrol in
Grant Street, Fox Hill.

BDM leader makes allegations over politicians, crown land

POLITICIANS in recent
times have been utilizing the
practice of placing crown land
grants in the names of their
maids, house-keepers, garden-
ers, wives, and friends as a
means to avoid being implicat-
ed in any land-looting scandals,
Bahamas Democratic Move-
ment leader Cassius Stuart
claimed yesterday.

Calling these actions “dis-
turbing and distressful”, Mr
Stuart said the Bahamas’ polit-
ical leaders have used their
“political operatives and
cronies” from the 1950s to pre-
sent to essentially syphon off
this most important and pre-
cious commodity.

He said: “The Bahamas may
not have natural resources such
as oil or gold but what we do
have is the commodity of land.
This precious commodity is
supposed to be held in trust for
the Bahamian people by our
elected leaders. However, the
recent revelations indicated
that many of our leaders,
whom we have trusted to pro-
tect our natural resources for
future generations of Bahami-
ans, have looted land for their
personal use.

“These men and women,
who were supposed to be the
guardians of our natural trea-
sures, became nothing but
political pirates who raided the
country of land for themselves
and their children.

“It is also heartbreaking to
know that the men and women
who claim to care so much
about the Bahamian people
and have trumpeted the cause
of equality and land equity and
even went as far as including
in our Constitution, a preamble
which states that the Bahamian
people are ‘the successors and
inheritors of these families of
islands’, are nothing but mod-
ern day pirates who care only
about their own well being.”

Noting that the average
Bahamian often times is turned
away by the government or
outright rejected for any crown
land application, Mr Stuart said
that this often would only hap-
pen because they don’t have a
“famous political name”.

“It is unacceptable that the
average Bahamian cannot get
50 x 100 piece of property as
crown grant to build a sensible
home and our politicians over
the years, have received hun-
dreds of acres to build their
luxurious mansions. In some
cases, they even turn around
and sell what they have
received for hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars, when they
themselves paid little or noth-
ing for it.

Anger over passport
processing delays

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

DELAYS in processing and producing
passports is vexing Bahamians whose tray-
el plans are being thwarted by the hold up.

Long waiting lines to put in applications
are followed by incorrect collection dates
driving Bahamians back to the Passport
Office in Thompson Boulevard, Nassau,
several times before their passports are actu-
ally ready for collection.

Once there, citizens are forced to wait at
least half an hour before being told their
passports are not ready, only to return again
the following week to be disappointed once
again, a passport collector fumed.

She applied for her passport in May and
was told to return on June 25 to collect it,
but when she called she was told the pass-
port would not be ready for another week.

A week later, the 24-year-old went
through the same process again, and it was
not until six weeks after the original collec-
tion date that she was able to finally collect
the document.

Men wanted for questioning in
connection with armed robbery

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama Police are
searching for two male residents of Eight
Mile Rock who are wanted for questioning

in connection with armed robbery.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle said police
have released wanted posters of Ezrin Green
Jr, alias “Snake” of Queens Highway, Han-
na Hill, and Jermaine Moss, alias “JB”, of

Jackson Corner, Hanna Hill.

He said the men are considered armed

and extremely dangerous.

Green, 24, is described as being of dark
complexion and having dark brown eyes.
He is 5ft 7 inches tall, of thin build and

weighs about 145 pounds.

Moss, 25, is of dark complexion with black
eyes. He is 5ft 11 inches tall, of muscular

She said: “I had waited three
and a half hours to put in the
application, and when I finally
went to pick up the passport I was
there for around an hour and 45
minutes before they gave it to me.

“T was waiting outside in the
hot sun for around half and hour
and when I got in there was a
room full of people and everyone
was so angry.

“When I finally got to the win-
dow I was told it was ready and to
sit down, then it took over an hour
for them to find my passport in
the building.”

As the woman waited for staff to find
her passport, she said another applicant told
her it was the seventh time she had returned
to the office to collect her passport after
being told it was ready, and each time she
was forced to wait in the queue before she
was then told it was not.

“Several people were told their passports
were not ready yet, when they had been
told it would be,” she said.

Ezrin Green

3125 or call 911.

Brent Symonette



Jermaine Moss



build and weighs around 180 pounds.
Anyone with any information concern-
ing these two men is asked to contact the
police in Grand Bahama at 352-1919, 351-
9111, 351-9991, 352-8351, 352-9076, and 350-

“T don’t see why they don’t
just extend the deadline to be
more realistic.

“Some people had arranged
to travel because they had been
told it was going to be ready,
and then it was not. It doesn’t
seem fair.”

Minister of Foreign Affairs
and Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette said while
‘i there have been some improve-
ments at the passport office,
there is still work to be done.

He said: “It takes around
eight weeks for a passport to be processed at
the moment which is totally unacceptable
and we are working on that. We are doing
all that is humanly possible to try to assist.”

The Minister explained how College of
the Bahamas students have been brought in
to assist with data entry and additional staff
from the ministry have been assigned to
the office to help process the backlog.

An additional window is being added in
the collection office, and the problem of

PAINT -

] of our sacred trea-

inheritance in this country. The pa ee

“Just recently, the Ij
director of land and |®
survey was caught up
in a shameful scandal
in which he was abus-
ing his authority, by
granting crown land
in Exuma to his fam-
ily members for little
or nothing.

“These family
members in turn
resold the same land
for hundreds of thou-
sand of dollars.

“This practice is
unethical and unac-
ceptable and these men and
women, who have engaged in
such despicable practices,
should hold their heads down
in shame, because they were
the chosen by the people of the
Bahamas to be the guardians



sure, land.”

In recent times, in
the practice of land-
looting Mr Stuart
said, some leaders
have shifted to plac-
ing crown grants in
the names of house-
keepers, gardeners,
wives, friends and
family members, to
avoid be implicated

SSIS tra called in such a scan-

dal as this.

However, Mr Stu-
art said that the time has come
for Bahamians to put an end
to the pillaging of crown land
by these “political pirates”.

“The time is now for the
Bahamian people to take back
what is rightfully theirs, their

evidence is clear, the UBP,
FNM and PLP all have been
in a conspiracy to steal land
from the Bahamian people, for
themselves.

“These people are nothing
but thieves and robbers and
should never be address as
honorable. The BDM con-
demns these men and their
wicked practices.

“Last election, the BDM
made a promise that we would
make crown land available to
the average Bahamian who
wants to build a home, build
their businesses and build a life
and when elected 2012, we will
ensure that you, the average
Bahamian, receives a piece of
the Bahamas, so that you can
enrich your lives and have a
stake in your country,” he said.



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people lining up outside the building to put
in their applications as highlighted in The
Tribune last summer, has been eased by
the additional staff.

Mr Symonette said part of the current
problem is the high volume of people want-
ing to travel in the summer and putting in
applications after their passports have
expired, along with and influx of college
students who need to travel to school in
September, and others who need to have
their passports are fast-tracked for medical
reasons. He added: “There is no forward
planning and that has added to the frustra-
tion. “People should look at their passports
and see when they are due for renewal and
put their applications in early.”

“YOUR VIEW’

To have your say on this or any other
issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver
your letter to The Tribune on Shirley
Street, P.O. Box N-3207



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380-FLIX
PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master






































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Overcoming water shortages

DESPITE this year’s record breaking rain-
fall there are residents in various areas of
New Providence who still complain of water
shortages.

Recently residents in the east complained
of low to non-existent water pressure. They
said they were on the verge of despair
because they have had to suffer these short-
ages for more than three years.

“We have been forgotten, this must be
the most hateful place in Nassau to live,”
said a man whose wife suffers from a kidney
disease. “Our ancestors must have buried
dead people in this ground that’s why we’re
so cursed.” He was referring to an area
behind Seagrapes plaza.

What with major water leaks, complica-
tions with the reverse osmosis plant at Bail-
lou Hills when a computer malfunctioned
and technicians had to be flown in from the
Caymans to restore supplies, many Bahami-
ans know the inconvenience of having to go
without water.

Bahamians will have to think of including
a water tank in future construction. Bermu-
da, which has no rainy season, rivers or fresh
water lakes, depends entirely on the weath-
er for its water supply.

Therefore, by law all private homes and
apartment complexes must have their own
water tanks to store whatever rainfall the
island gets. The size of these tanks is man-
dated by local building and planning regu-
lations. Homes can store about 14,000 gal-
lons per bedroom independently of any oth-
er building. However, this does put up the
cost of building.

According to a report on Bermuda “the
most common source of water for home and
apartment buildings — are often found
under bedrooms, living rooms or patios but
are not allowed under bathrooms or
kitchens. Bermuda relies on the combination
of rainwater falling on roofs and piped to
more than 21,000 water tanks and ground-
water extracted from underground lenses for
more than 90 per cent of its entire water
supply. Rainwater by itself is nowhere near
sufficient, at a volume of 1.4 million gallons
overall yearly, to supply all of Bermuda's
demands in one of the highest populations
anywhere in the world per square mile.

“Some commercial and domestic proper-
ties have wells to supplement the rainwater
supply. There are over 3,000 such wells. All
must be licensed by the Health Department
of the Bermuda Government. They can be
used only for flushing and washing purposes.

It is illegal to drink water from these pri-
vate wells because of the potential for cont-
amination from many sources, including
nitrates from cesspits. Routine periodic tests
are made to ensure standards are maintained
to protect public health.”

Bahamians should consider water catch-
ments of some sort if only to water their
gardens in the dry season so as not to be
such a drain on government’s water supply.

One of the Water Corporation’s greatest
challenges is the loss of water either through
leaks, or theft or metering inaccuracies.

During the Budget debate in the House of
Assembly recently Phenton Neymour, State
Minister of the Environment, said the cor-
poration estimates that it loses five million
imperial gallons a day. If one million of this
water had been sold, at the end of a year it
would have brought a $5 million return to
the Treasury.

Although to include water tanks beneath
a building would increase the initial cost of
its construction, Bahamians should study
their water bills and decide whether there
would be a saving on the long stretch if gov-
ernment water could be reduced or elimi-
nated.

Instead of having tanks that would be
standbys in case the government supply
failed, the water tanks could become the
main supplier with government’s water held
as standby in case tanks run low during the

dry season.
eeoee

Who has the better team?

IN a recent interview Opposition leader
Perry Christie said that Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham is burdened down with a
team of new people, lacking in experience.
This would seem to be a good team to have,
because at least they can learn from a sea-
soned political leader. It is at least a better
team than the one that brought Mr Christie’s
administration down in 2007.

Even Mr Christie had to admit after his
loss at the polls that he took too much for
granted and failed to assess the impact his
party’s scandals would have on its election.
Mr Christie was characterised as a weak
leader, unable to discipline his party and
parliamentarians.

With that assessment, by some of his own
members, it seems that Mr Ingraham has
more chance with his team than Mr Christie
with his.

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Youll wonder how you ever got along without it.

Culture — our
orand hope
for the

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The desolate soul of a
nation lay trodden amongst
the squalor of Nassau city
in throes of a slow and
painful decline. In this
unstately quagmire of
affairs, a people desperately
try to make sense of what is
now a deplorable, disgrace-
ful embarrassment.

How have we allowed our
godly attributes to be dis-
paraged by our desire to live
outside ourselves; so convo-
luted has our path become
that destiny is confused, we
have tied her feet with the
corruption of our hands.

It is time for the Bahamas
to find implicit impetus
through the interpretation
of its rich and diverse cul-
ture, thus translating to one
beautiful language of love
for all within our borders.

Culture speaks to the
heart; it demands justice for
the disenfranchised; brokers
peace for those under tyran-
ny; creates a legacy for state-
less generations; nurtures
freedom for the ‘Diaspora’
and heals the broken and
abused.

One ponders, as cycles of
time usher in governments

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



intended to be gifts, howev-
er, too often they become
burdensome liabilities on
the scale of history. Also of
note, the footprints of a gen-
uine Christian ship seem to
be disappearing in our soci-
ety, trampled by the obfus-
cation of religion.

As with TS Eliot’s “The
Wasteland”, we are wells
drawn dry; a land in drought
of vision; depleted of natur-
al spiritual resources; souls
scarred by addiction to van-
ities; now that the mirror of
reality is not clouded by eco-
nomic prosperity, we see
exactly who we are.

We as a people must
desire learning; invite coun-
sel, thirst for truth and abhor
the “deadly sin” of greed
that has eroded foundations
of the four pillars of this
society.

Culture is hope, though
fragile it endures beyond all
other spirit vestments; it
must be culture to bring
restoration to a discomposed
people; and to be princely
funded as such. Mark my

ture

word, all else will miserably
fail.

Sadly, we see a rejuvenat-
ed, toxic illiteracy fueling the
“gang” sub-culture and its
music, seething in undercur-
rents of juvenile angst on
our school grounds and
streets; but in midst of this
madness, we are delighted
with a resurging climate of
culture breathing beauty
into season after vibrant sea-
son of literary, theatre,
dance, art and music pro-
duction. Kudos.

We must now ask our-
selves the questions: “Are
the triumphs of this coun-
try’s change and progress,
now resigned to pyrrhic vic-
tories?” and “Who do we
celebrate, if not ourselves?”

It will serve wisdom well,
if this letter is taken into
context, of the preceding
four.

Be assured, culture is the
glorious expression of a peo-
ple, a compass for the pre-
sent age, the archives of the
past and our grand hope for
the future. More will be
revealed

GREGORY NEELY
Nassau,
July 21, 2009.

The Bahamas still have men with integrity

EDITOR, The Tribune.

To see Mr Symonette, Deputy Prime Min-
ister, a family friend, a true and kind Bahami-
an. Also Mr Hanna, Governor General, a man
for all seasons. While sitting in my TV room a
sense of pride came over me while watching
the Independence Celebration on television
from Clifford Park, July 9, 2009.

Also to see my neighbour, island and home-
town boy, but most of all friend and brother on
that podium. Tears of joy came to my eyes to
see from whence we came. I am speaking of
Commodore Clifford Scavella.

There are some folks out there who are fan-
ning a campaign to destroy him. He is not into

I asked the Lord what I should tell him. I
remember driving down the section of Blue

Hill Road and Independence Highway near
Esso Service station. The Holy Spirit said these
words ,to me: “Tell him his success depends on
who he puts first.” I added a few words to
that, I said always put God first.

God put him there and as long as he put

God first, he will be just all right. Anytime

either.

you are doing a good job some folks will not
like you. Remember, Jesus was not liked by all

Keep up the good works and continue to

make us proud to be Bahamian and show the

integrity.

politics, nor is he representing any political

party. Please give him a chance to carry out
government and his mandate.
T recall after he was installed as commodore,

Nassau,
July 2009.

world that the Bahamas still have men with

CLADWELL FARRINGTON

Government should condone a National Lottery

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This letter is in reference
to the article highlighting Mr
Sidney Strachan’s comments
about gambling laws being
changed in the Bahamas.

In my humble opinion I
don’ think anything has to
be changed in the gambling

RU

laws! If government would
be wise and condone a
National Lottery where any-
one could purchase a ticket
and the monies could be
used in so many ways in
building the necessary
schools, more well staffed
clinics throughout the
islands, and better qualified

esta JBINS

Harbur Bay Plaza.322-3170 Cable Cottage,
less 5% for credit cards, all sales final

teachers. This scheme has
been quite successful in oth-
er countries therefore I
strongly feel that it should
be started here.

HELEN ASTARITA
Nassau,
July 19, 2009.
THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009, PAGE 5

Christian

cumini Full-scale airport emergency

empowerment

smi response exercise successful
rand Bahama |

By DENISEMAYCOCK {| THE Grand Bahama Air-










Tribune Freeport ? port Company (GBAC) suc-
Reporter : cessfully conducted a full-
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net } scale airport emergency
? response exercise.
FREEPORT — The ; Operation Mike Alpha
Bahamas Christian Coun- } was designed to test the
cil will host a one-day } emergency preparedness of
National Empowerment } first-response agencies, gov-
Summit on Grand i: ernment departments and
Bahama to inspire i private sector entities.
Bahamians during these The exercise simulated
hard economic times. : the crash of a Marlin Air- : ee
Rev Patrick Paul, presi- | ways SAAB 340 aircraft nn -
dent of the aan | : arriving from Nassau carry- GBAC’S FIREFIGHTERS
Christian Council, said i ing 10 passengers, three demonstrate rescuing passen-
the summit will take i crew members, and 2,000 gers from the downed aircraft.
place on September 1 at : pounds of fuel. ie 3 es ha a ru tard Pata 5 a
Our Lucaya Resort. i “Each airport must have J a Srehst - e a baited eras ai =. ty Ae
“We chose Grand ; an emergency plan, and the iad See ee kr ee beac a
Bahama because it is i Seeiegee this drill . to = ee ee et a iy EXTERMINATORS
known to be the industri- : es is emergency plan, : = —_ a a == ae , x) 4 :
al capital of the Bahamas } an anaes re eae of Fy See = . , FOR PEST PROBLEM
and we wanttodowhat } ran ahama Airport & . = — 7 _
we can to stimulate the : Company. GBAC FIREFIGHTERS fight a fire that resulted from the simulated crash. PHONE: a ra TY /
Grand Bahama econo- : “The exercise is conduct-
my,” he said. ? ed at least once every two “Grand Bahama Health Inspector Henry Rolle said:
Rev Paul said speakers } years in accordance with Services and the Royal “We had our agencies from Fully furnished and equipped apartments
will include Dr Myles i requirements set by the Bahamas Police were also the Criminal Investigation by the day week or manth in
Munroe, Bishop Neil i International Civil Aviation able to test portions of their Department, Scenes of f "
Ellis, Dr Simeon Hall, i Organization (ICAO). emergency response plans, Crime, and the Grand ‘ *
Rev Hayward Cooper : The goals of the exercise coordinate their plans with Bahama Fire Department
and Grand Bahama Port ; Were to: our own, and join usin col- all participate, and it was a
Authority president lan | Synchronize the actions _ lectively correcting any defi- good coordination. The lair
Rolle. : of all response agencies. ciencies that existed.” exercise was fruitful and our : es
He noted that the : 1 Safely rescue all persons Sharon Williams, Grand overall response time was a Summer Specials: $85 per night ? beds
objective of the summit is {| imvolved in the mishap. Bahama Health Services — success.” Sunrise - Ft, Laudegcal
to inspire, motivate and 1 Prevent other emergency administrator, was also The exercise also included
encourage the people of i situations from arising. pleased with the overall suc- the observation and criti- 954.570.4 1Ab
the Bahamas, and partic- : | Set up appropriate site cess of her agency’s cism of volunteers from a .
ularly in Grand Bahama, { controls and command _ response to the drill. variety of organizations and
to maximise this time and ; authority. She said: “We had aninci- industrial companies.
to seek new opportuni- i 1 Control the movement dent where, in real time, an As he thanked these vol-
ties. i of persons to and from the ambulance broke down, but —unteers for their participa-
“We believe that in i scene and ensure the estab- we were immediately able tion, Mr Carey noted that,
relation to the downturn { lishment and maintenance to commandeer another aside from ensuring that the BEAUTY GUARD
in the world’s economy i of effective communications. replacement resource. airport’s obligations under
the church plays an : Mr Carey said: “The drill We’re thinking it went well the ICAO annex are met,
important role inencour- { simulated an aircraft crash from the response site and all of the participants share
aging the public atlarge ; 2,000ft from the threshold we will be working on the a professional interest as
to retool and look at oth- :{ of Runway 24 prior toland- communications aspect of first responders in improvy-
er ways toempower our- : ing. In the process, we suc- the exercise, providing bet- ing their emergency pre-
selves and network : cessfully tested our initial ter channels for all persons.” _ paredness.
together,” said Rev Paul. ? response, our incident com- Commenting on the suc- He said the exercise was : . .
“We want to use this : mand, and our EOC (Emer- cessful response of the Roy- particularly rewarding to all Serving The Bahamian C. ommunity
time for what the scrip- ? gency Operations Centre). al Bahamas Police Force, parties.

Since 1978

ture teaches it to be for.
God allows a downturn

Gnadicwccep — ONUPCH Without Borders to host conference
and retool ourselves.” :
Rev Paul believes that By LLOYD ALLEN

d Tribune Features Reporter
(he cieuineh tn: Hie modern lallen@tribunemedia.net
Bahamas must play its cP oooo———eom""m"—n-0:,"'1 $8
role in the spiritual, social : THE Church Without Borders

and economic develop- International Ministries is playing host
ment of the country. to a two-day conference designed to

e SAFE

spirit and thus was unable to speak in
tongues.

However God’s will proved greater e COOL
than his, and after gaining spiritual
advice from Bishop Rodney Roberts

during his primary years as a Christian, eDOUBLE
he was then able to connect with the

“The church is called to ? encourage religious followers to dis- spirit reaching a new level in his spiri- ACTION
be Intercessors and to ? cover God’s plan for their lives. tuality. DE ADBOLT
seek to bridge the gap : Pastor Mark Knowles from Holy Eventually he moved on to worship
and assist our people in =} ~— Ghost and Fire Deliverance Centre is at Solomon’s Porce Outreach Min- LOCK
practical ways to be all : the guest speaker for the event which istries, where he was commissioned as
they can be in our nation- } — started on Thursday. | a pastor, and that was where he
al development. : Rev Knowles said although he has realised that he was called to operate e WHITE OR
“We must seek to do ? been a Christian for more than 20 his own ministry and this was where his BRONZE

what we canto stimulate } years, his road to Christ and his pur- present ministry was born.



our country,” he said. ? pose was anything but easy. PASTOR MARK KNOWLES Mr Knowles said throughout the
Rev Paul said they are A native of Stanyard Creek, years there have been many challenges
expecting about 20to 40} Andros, he explained his childhood was filled |= which have forced him to keep the faith, and in ALSO FOR
persons from New Provi- ? with many disappointments camingintheformof doing so he has reaped the rewards of God’s plan.
dence alone. as well-ae-a verbal and physical rejection, but also because Now that he has started his own family, and WINDOWS

he was considered the black sheep of his family. _ established his own ministry, Mr Knowles said the
Because of these difficult beginnings, Mr time has come to nudge others to discover their

Islands to attend the sum- ioe ‘dh lie deli in Chri

ai ia Ereepent: owles said he eventually became a delinquent — purpose in Christ.

Th ios th ‘lb and ended missing numerous school days, he With this conference being one of many plat-
e topics E at will be : abusing drugs, and generally had a negative out- forms embraced by Mr Knowles to share the DO N S I Al N I Oo N
addressed are: Industry in $ — jook on life. promise of Christ, he said if only one person is

group from the Family



Grand Bahama; the role j However all of that soon changed where at the —_ inspired his mission would have been achieved.

| the oe i age of 15, he had an encounter with God that The conference which began yesterday under (PROTECTION) LTD.

the need for Bahamians =} ~~ would change his life forever. the theme, ‘Setting The Captives Free,’ will fea-

to take ownership inthe As he made the decision to accept God’s will ture a presentation from Mr Knowles and others HILLSIDE PLAZA - THOMPSON BLVD.
Bahamas, and the role of : for his life, Mr Knowles said he still faced one _ at the church located Edmira Plaza, Soldier Road PHONE: 322-8160 OR 322-8219
the church in interces- ? challenge, he was unable to connect with the holy — North starting at 7pm.

sion. :

The daytime sessions
begin at 8.30am and con-
tinue until 4pm, and
evening sessions are from
6.30pm to 9.30pm.

The summit is open to
the public. Persons who
are interested in starting
a business or those who
are already in business,
church leaders and minis-
ters are also invited to
register.





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The Tribune wants to hear
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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a ee eee
Stronger rent and eviction laws needed

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

IN THIS country, the strong
societies that were founded by
African slaves and were antho-
logical/archaeological gems have
now deteriorated into squalid
pigsties.

In New Providence, Bahami-
ans and immigrants pay hefty
rents to reside in Over-the-Hill
shanties and dilapidated build-
ings throughout the island,
apparently without any rent con-
trol as landlords rent dwellings
at any rate they fancy.

The Rent Control Act is out-
dated and needs to be com-
pletely overhauled and amend-
ed. Although there is supposed
to be a Rent Control Board,
comprised of ordinary citizens
and chaired by a magistrate, this
board is practically toothless
since the Act only covers prop-
erties worth up to $75,000. This
is dimwitted and needs urgent
updating, since hardly any apart-
ment, condo or house is worth
less than $75,000 these days—
even in some parts of the ghetto!

Let me also clearly state that

YOUNG MAN’S VIEW

A DRI AN

any amendments to the Act
must not be lopsided in favour
of would-be tenants, as there
are some who are just filthy and
destroy rental accommodations,
thereby leaving many landlords
with unnecessary debt. There
must be a sense of reason and
responsibility on both sides.

Rent control places a price
ceiling on rental units, promotes
fair play and limits the price a
landlord can charge a tenant,
outlining the services a landlord
must provide and giving tenants
the right, if a landlord fails to
uphold his/her responsibilities
as it relates to maintenance, to
temporarily withhold rent or
demand a lower rent.

The Bahamas must adopt
more comprehensive rent and
eviction control laws, especially
as most Bahamians rent accom-
modations. Enforcement of rent
control and dispatching inspec-
tors to investigate unscrupulous

GIBSON



landlords suspected of acting in
contravention to the Act, will
reduce instances of profiteering
through unfair rental rates or
unreasonable rent hikes and
mandate that landlords repair
hidden defects and carry out
adequate maintenance of rented
properties. Implementing
tougher rent control laws will
also ensure the diversity of
neighbourhoods and prevent
landlords from imposing rent
increases that force persons out
of an area.

In New York city, a Maxi-
mum Base Rent system (MBR)
establishes the maximum allow-
able rent for a place, sets guide-
lines that cover the cost of main-
tenance and building improve-
ments, allows for landlords to
make slight increases (up to a
maximum of 7.5 per cent) every
two years until the MBR is
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sewerage charges, real estate
taxes, operating and mainte-
nance expenses, loss allowances,
and upon vacancy and return of
capital value.

Frankly, effective rent con-
trol should also address lease
renewals, evictions and senior
citizens. These amendments
would ensure that tenants are
not unfairly evicted because an
unscrupulous landlord wants to
raise the rent and that the elder-
ly aren’t saddled with rent
increases in their old age.

Some time ago, The Tribune
ran a story about a 74-year-old
Coconut Grove resident whose
landlord raised the rent for a
small wooden house to the point
where it exceeded his meager
pension. Senior citizen Maxwell
Williams was living in substan-
dard conditions—a clapboard
structure, no electricity or run-
ning water, and an outdoor toi-
let—for $250 per month.

Mr Williams, who previously
was only requested to pay at the
most $50 a month for the dilap-
idated shack, had his rent adjust-
ed when his elderly landlord
died and her granddaughter
inherited the property. He
claimed that although his new
landlord made no renovations
or upgrades to the building, she
raised the rent from $50 to $250
per month—even higher than
his sole income of $230 per
month (old age pension).

In addition to still having to
use an outdoor toilet in the
bushes behind the house, Mr
Williams’ termite infested
roof—held up by two pieces of
wood—leaked and the walls
were rotting through.

Every other day in New
Providence, I see unkempt
apartments and unsightly build-
ings with broken windows, many
of which appear to have not
been painted in years. In some
instances, particularly the ghet-
tos of Nassau, people seem to
live a peasant-like existence. In
these rundown sections of soci-
ety, landlords are constantly
exploiting desolate tenants who
dejectedly live in sagging, grub-
by clapboard shacks with “pee
buckets” in one corner. Con-
trasted to the suburbs, some of
the places being rented are only
comparable to a broken-down
garden house. These inner-city
areas are obscured by over-
grown weeds, prickle patches
and bushes, littered with
garbage, wooden shipping crates
and old, rusted appliances that

are strewn about adjoining
yards!

In some parts of the “sub-
urbs” of Carmichael, Cowpen
Road and off Village Road, sim-
ilar living conditions are
observed. I have even seen lean-
ing, rickety wooden houses on
Shirley Street, which are com-
plete eyesores and probably
rented in excess of their real val-
ue.

Thave heard stories about the
grimy walls, blocked toilets and
the “dutty” mattresses that
come with some rented accom-
modations. Any tenable place
should be approved by the Min-
istry of Works and the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health,
and must have an occupancy
certificate! Yet, there are many
Bahamians and immigrants liv-
ing like “slum dogs.” Quite hon-
estly, the film Slum Dog Mil-
lionaire could have been easily
shot in New Providence!

According to section 20 of the
Rent Control Act:

“Where, upon a determina-
tion of the value of a dwelling-
house or of the furniture, the
Boards finds that, in all the cir-
cumstances, the value declared
by the landlord is unfair and
unreasonable, it shall order the
landlord to repay to the tenant
the difference between the rent
as a percentage of the deter-
mined value and the rent as a
percentage of the declared value
for the period of tenancy not
exceeding one year immediate-
ly preceding the date of deter-
mination, and may institute pro-
ceedings against the landlord for
the offence of making an unfair
and unreasonable declaration.”

The aforementioned rarely
happens! The Rent Control
Board obviously has a lot of
work to do and frankly, if the
Consumer Affairs division of
government sends out inspec-
tors, they would easily find hun-
dreds of cases where tenants are
being charged unreasonable
rates.

Since the government’s real
property tax exemption is
$250,000 for first time home-
owners, $250,000 to $300,000
should also be the applicable
price ceiling for homes falling
under the Rent Control Act, not
the measly $75,000 that the Act
currently covers. According to
the Act, the rent lawfully
chargeable should not exceed
15 per cent, per annum, of the
value of the property, or 20 per
cent per annum of furnished res-

idences.

While tenants are subject to
rights of enjoyment—meaning
they cannot be simply kicked
out without a court order—land-
lords must also be protected
from tenants who destroy their
property and consistently, and
sometimes intentionally, fail to
pay rent. Revamping the Land-
lords and Tenants Act as well
as the Rent Control Act would
only be effective if it leaves both
the landlords and tenants in a
win-win situation.

CROWN LAND AND
THE CHURCH

This week, it was reported
that the Golden Gates Assem-
bly church initially applied for
and received crown land for the
purpose of building an old folks
home. Wouldn’t that have been
such a noble idea? However,
once the land was granted, the
church’s principals turned
around and decided to build a
subdivision—named after the
pastor (Ros Davis Estates)—
where houses were built on the
land and sold for hundreds of
thousands of dollars.

Since this occurred under the
former administration, was this
another case of preferential
treatment? Was it a politically
expedient move on the part of
former Prime Minister Perry
Christie when he signed off on
the variation to the original
crown land grant issued to the
church? Indeed, while this move
did create home ownership, I
have no doubt that it also filled
the coffers of those behind the
construction, who were granted
crown land for little-to-nothing
and apparently made so much
more.

Throughout the Bahamas,
many church leaders are shal-
low in the word of God, as they
would have spent too much time
in pursuit of fame, money and
erecting gargantuan, religious
edifices to tend to the needs of
the people and lead them to
Christ. Any reverence for God
has long left some churchmen,
who shamelessly use seminars,
tapes, CDs, books, conferences
and other money-making
schemes—under the guise of
Christianity—to enrich them-
selves. Yes, there are one or two
pastors who use monies gener-
ated from their book sales and
motivational speaking tours to

SEE page seven

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009, PAGE 7



FROM page one

represents to society.

Meanwhile, some said they
also came to the memorial to
show their support for some-
one being held accountable
for his death.

Wearing green — the St
Augustine’s College gradu-
ate’s favourite colour — over
a hundred of Brenton’s
friends and family watched a
slideshow of photographs of
Brenton, and paid their trib-
utes over a microphone. His
mother, Rosetta Smith said
the gathering “made her feel
good in her heart.”

“He was only here for 18
years, but he impacted so
many people,” she said.

Brenton, who lived in
Seabreeze Estates, was shot
on July 9 at around 8pm as
police chased two suspected
armed robbers in the area of
Kemp Road.

While his family are
adamant that he died from a
shot fired by police, the police
say it is too early to deter-
mine who was responsible for
the teenager’s death. A bal-
listics report, which could dis-
cern this, is said to have been
completed, but its results
have not been released.

Speaking to The Tribune
as they prepared to partici-
pate in the memorial last
night, friends remembered
someone who always had a
problem with violence.

Monique Hanna, a neigh-
bour whose daughter grew up
with Brenton, said the
teenager was “someone who
was trying to live right in soci-
ety.”

“He was in high school, he
was in college, and he was
getting on with his life like a
normal person.

“To get mixed up in some-
thing like this — an accident is
an accident — but it’s just
hurtful. I have two sons and
I'd hate to know they could
just walk out on the street to
play basketball or hang out
and something could kick up
in this so-called Christian
nation the Bahamas is and
someone could call me and

REMEMBERING
BRENTON SMITH

say “Your son is shot, he’s
lying in the road dead’. It’s
very hurtful.”

Thompson, 18, who knew
Brenton since Grade seven,
said he “couldn’t believe it”
when he heard Brenton had
been killed.

“He’s always been like a
big brother to me. I just came
to show my support — we all
love him, everyone loves
him,” he told The Tribune.

Another former classmate
of Brenton’s, 19-year-old
Candice Lockhart, remem-
bered Brenton as someone
who would “always get you
laughing.”

“He was a good presence
to be around. I am thankful I
had a chance to meet him and
I’m sure everyone else feels
the same way,” she added.

Lesley Sealey, 20, said that
Brenton was “a brilliant life
which we lost.”

“JT just wish that we could
have seen him grow, it’s so
unfortunate. I just hope no
one forgets that this is still
unsolved.”

His doting and emotional
grandmother, Shirley Smith,
remembered Brenton as an
emotionally expressive boy
who was always trying to help
other people.

While his family knew he
was “special” it was not until
his death that they fully
understood how much so, she
said.

Janet Styles, a grand-aunt
of Brenton’s, who travelled
from Fort Lauderdale for the
memorial, and his funeral,
which takes place on Satur-
day, said the 18-year-old was
“a kind-spirited young man
(with) such great plans and
aspirations.”

A website www.brenton-
hectorsmith.com has been set
up for people to pay tribute
to the teenager.

His funeral will be held
tomorrow at St Anselm’s
church in Fox Hill at 2pm.

Bahamian arrested with son of
former Miami Dolphins owner

FROM page one

ing to open it.”

When officers reached the house, they found and detained
Stewart on the property. Huizenga was discovered operating a
2005 Jupiter Marine boat in a canal next to the house.

Police requested that Huizenga throw them a rope so they
could secure the boat to a nearby dock, but despite several
attempts, he could not manage the feat.

Eventually they were able to dock the boat and Huizenga,
whose breath smelled strongly of alcohol and whose speech was
slurred, explained to officers that he was at his house.

“He was not,” said the Fort Lauderdale Police Departmen-

t’s report.

Huizenga was taken into custody for boating under the influ-
ence. He also faces charges of violation of probation for felony
drink-driving, violation of probation for failure to submit to a
sobriety test and refusal to submit to a blood/urine test. He

denies all charges.

The 47-year-old was already banned from drinking as a con-
dition of his probation on a previous DUI charge in which a 71-
year-old pedestrian was seriously injured.

His father, Wayne, was owner of the Miami Dolphins foot-
ball team for 15 years until he sold all but a five per cent stake

in January of this year.

This is the younger Huizenga’s fourth arrest on DUI charges,
and officials said, if convicted, he could be sent to prison for five

years.

Rent and

eviction
FROM page six

fund their churches, but they are
vastly outnumbered by the reli-
gious charlatans.

It is high-time that the gov-
ernment requires churches to
submit independently-produced
audits, which could go a long
way in preserving the church’s
integrity and possibly change
the perception of many Bahami-
ans who now see the church as
big businesses led by misers
rather than ministers.

PAUL RITCHIE

There is a suspicion among
Bahamians that some realtors
are crooks, intent helping
unscrupulous lawyers to quiet
land titles or swindle elderly cit-
izens of their birthright. Paul
Ritchie stands above the fray as
the consummate professional
and an experienced realtor of
more than 30 years. Last week, I
would have requested Mr
Ritchie’s appraisal services, and
not only was I pleased with his
timeliness and professionalism,
but his rate was very reasonable,
especially when contrasted to
an absurd rate I had heard was
being charged by another real
estate firm. A fellow Long
Islander, Mr Ritchie’s success is
largely due to his quality of ser-
vice, which is nearly unseen in
today’s Bahamas.

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NOTICE

Johnson, Maura, Roberts,
Thompson, Nottage, Pinder,
Wallace-Whitfield, Claridge,

Twynam, Bowles, Young,
Deveaux, Moree, Lightbourn,
Symonette, Gibson, Bethel

THE
STERN
EMETER

any of us have loved ones buried there.
the en has now been CLEANED UD and |
it is our turn to take care of the individual areas. |

Please join us there on Saturday, July 25,
2009 from 8am with tools, a small
shrubs, gloves and drinking water.

They die only when we who are left, forget them.

Moree, Fox, Sands, Bowe,
Cancino, Fisher, Grant, Taylor,
Price, Cleare, Perpall, Watson,
Deal, Smith, Fountain, Styles,
Francis, Huyler, Coleby, Scriven,
Pyfrom and many , many more!

COMMONWEALTH BANK

Employment Opportuni

Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed to delivering superior quality service, to
training and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in
the community.

Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for
Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco.

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE;

¢ Assisting the Branch Manager in managing the sales activities of
the Branch to enhance profitability.

Effectively leading, supporting and coaching personnel! to

achieve corporate objectives.

Effectively managing a portfolio of consumer, mortgage and

commercial loans.

Adjudicating credit lines within delegated authority.

Managing the Branch’s collection activities and the protection of

collateral.

Following-up with client and support functions to ensure timely

completion of product requests and transactions and resolution of

inquiries and issues.

Ensuring Credit risk ratings and credit scoring practices are

adhered to at all times to minimize the risk of loan losses.

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by actively promoting, marketing, building and cross selling all

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Minimum of eight years commercial banking experience with a
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loan quality.
Detailed knowledge of Retail / Commercial / Mortgage lending

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





ene nee Homeowners claim ne are ‘kepti in dark’

highway construction. They
also claim Government has
failed to engage in an open
dialogue with them while it
goes ahead with the construc-
tion.

They are also calling for
barriers to be placed between
the proposed highway and
their homes.

Single mother Telvern
Dean claimed the area’s infra-
structure to control flooding
from a filled-in swamp was
being paved over by workers.

"What infrastructure is
there going to be to control
the flooding? When we
bought the property we
realised it was reclaimed land,
we built our foundation to a
certain level to alleviate the
flooding, but what's going to
happen now?" Ms Dean
asked at press conference out-
side their homes near Saun-
ders Beach.

Lawyer Michelle Campbell
said she feels like a second-
class citizen in her own coun-
try because of the lack of clear
information from Govern-
ment about the project. She
claimed she only became
aware of the roadwork a few
months ago when she noticed
workers in her backyard.

She also argued that a pub-
lic meeting held a few months
ago was an exercise for offi-
cials to disseminate informa-
tion and not to hear the voic-

WORK TAKING place near Vista Marina.

es of the people of Vista
Marina.

"The information they are
able to give you is very piece-
meal. It’s not enough to con-
nect the dots as to what's hap-
pening. The Government is
the servant of the people, not
the master, but why are we
treated like we don't need to
know about these things?
Why are people just going
ahead without even consult-
ing us?

"T just feel very saddened
and I feel like this place is
going to be wrecked,” said Ms
Campbell, as two tractors
roved about the area.

The residents are also wor-
ried about the negative scenic
and possible environmental
affects the proposed exten-
sion of Arawak Cay — to

‘Threat to life’ of top police chief

FROM page one

tant Commissioner of Crime Raymond Gibson who report-
edly launched a full scale investigation into the car tampering.

While the results did not ascertain conclusively how the
bolts came to be off the car, it did however expose some seri-
ous weaknesses in security at the compound, even drawing
into question whether other officers could be blamed.

The Tribune also understands that security has been
increased in and around police headquarters after this dis-

covery.

It is not the first time Mr Ferguson might have been the tar-

get of a would-be assassin.

According to information available to The Tribune, a
notable drug dealer currently serving time in the United
States was discovered to have sensitive documentation. It
included times and places, along with the photographs of
Mr Ferguson and other senior officers, as the targets of hitmen
intent on stopping their investigations.

However, as a stern and upright law enforcement official,
Mr Ferguson has reportedly said he cannot be intimidated by
such tactics, nor would he allow himself be distracted from
doing his duty by such petty antics.



facilitate the relocation of the
downtown container ports —
will have on Saunders Beach.

Both women said they have
been frustrated in their
attempts to get their hands
on the relevant environmen-
tal impact assessments (ETA)
so they can get a better
understanding of the devel-
opment.

According to information
several residents compiled on
the roadwork earlier this
year, it appears that corridor
18 will be the main access
route from John F Kennedy
Drive to the new container
port set to be established on a
new man-made island off the
shore of Saunders Beach.

Under the current plan, the
72-acre island would be
accessed by a corridor or



bridge which would begin at
the proposed new round-
about on Saunders Beach.
The island would also be con-
nected to Arawak Cay by
another causeway on its east-
ern end.

Attempts to reach Minis-
ter of Works Neko Grant for
comment were unsuccessful
up to press time.

Also present at the press
conference was Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald, who heads
the Committee to Protect and
Preserve the Bahamas for
Future Generations.

He said his organisation
will continue to agitate Gov-
ernment to lay all the facts
on the table regarding the
extension of Arawak Cay and
the cost of the container port
relocation.

Businessman dies

FROM page one

Hawksbill area around 10.45pm last Wednesday when two
armed masked men shot and robbed him of his pouch, which
contained an undetermined amount of cash.

After being shot, Maycock attempted to drive himself to
the hospital, but lost control of his vehicle and overturned
near the Four Way Co-op Plaza on West Atlantic Drive and

Pioneers Way.

When police arrived at the scene, they discovered Maycock
inside the vehicle suffering from a gunshot injury to his left side.

He was removed from the vehicle and taken in an ambulance
by EMS personnel to the Rand Memorial Hospital.

Several fellow officers were saddened by the death of their
former colleague, who was described as a very quiet and com-

petent officer.

Maycock served as an officer in the Special Intelligence
Branch (SIB) for many years. He also served as a member of
the security for the Prime Minister.

Maycock leaves behind a wife and children.

Anyone with information that could assist police
with their investigations is asked to call 911 or 350-3092 or

350-3097.

BACK-TO-SCHOOL
WIN 1 of 4

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Hung jury
FROM page one

six men and six women
returned divided 6-6 on all
three charges. A unanimous
decision is required for a con-
viction on a murder charge
and a two-thirds majority on
the other two charges.

Senior Justice Anita Allen
ordered a retrial and remand-
ed Moree to Her Majesty’s
Prison.

Outside the courtroom
Moree’s attorney Murrio
Ducille said: “My view is that
some of the jurors again, were
listening to the case and oth-
ers were listening to some-
thing else because the evi-
dence is such that the wit-
nesses for the prosecution
have again been thoroughly
discredited and the only ver-
dict that they could have pos-
sibly reached was one of not
guilty.”

Neil Brathwaite and
Yoland Rolle prosecuted the
case.

The prosecution alleged it
was Moree who shot Mr Fer-
guson and his wife through
their bedroom window.

Two police officers testi-
fied that Mr Ferguson had







Etat tamer Dh by yell tdi

MEU Came
Cikcte the two items on your sore recaip(s) (dated betwoen July 1
eae met pri e ete ana eee tre Mrs Ferguson said that
and drop ino entry boxes in participating stares or at The dAlbenas : alee ihe shooting, wale she

Ageney In Palmdale, = was on the phone to the
si - police, her husband told her

to inform them that Moree
had shot them.

Cassandra Evans, another
prosecution witness, told the
court on Tuesday that she
observed an altercation
between the two men during
which Mr Ferguson beat up
Moree, while Moree simply
stood there.

She testified that Moree
threatened to shoot Mr Fer-
guson. She also recalled a con-
= frontation at Butler’s Funeral
Home where the men
worked, during which Mr Fer-
guson pushed Moree in his
head.

Moree also told police of
another assault by Mr Fergu-
son two days before the
shooting incident. Moree,
however, denied the incident
drove him to kill Mr Fergu-
son. He claims he was
nowhere near their home that
night.

told them Moree, his co-work-

practices and credit anal ysis to ensure portfolio quality. : ie
er, had shot him and his wife.

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Questions
over Ginn

refinance

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

Ginn will still employ
close to 400 persons in
Grand Bahama’s West
End even after its Old
Bahama Bay resort releas-
es 85 staff by Monday,
although sources yesterday
expressed concern that a
major refinancing deal for
its project may have stalled
or fallen through.

Tribune Business
revealed back in February
2009 that a “major financ-
ing” deal for the $4.9 bil-
lion Ginn sur mer project
was being backed by a
wealthy Arab prince,
believed to be from Dubai,
although the funds were
due to originate from Swiss
and Italian sources.

However, contacts famil-
iar with the situation yes-
terday expressed concern
that Bobby Ginn, principal
of Ginn Clubs & Resorts
and Ginn Development
Company, was now in the
process of seeking alterna-
tive financing for the West
End development, indicat-
ing that the Dubai-based
deal may not be happen-
ing.
It is understood that, had
this financing come
through, it would have pro-
vided Mr Ginn with the
funding to buy-out his orig-
inal financing partner for
Ginn sur mer, the US-
based real estate private
equity group, Lubert
Adler.

And Mr Ginn, who is
now focused solely on the
Ginn sur mer project, plus
another development in
Colorado, would have had
enough financing left over
to start vertical construc-
tion at West End.

Ryan Julison, Ginn’s
vice-president of communi-
cations, yesterday told this
newspaper that he had “no
information” on the
Dubai-backed financing,
and whether it had stalled
or fallen through.

“Bobby Ginn’s doing a
lot of things across the
company that I’m not privy
to,” he added.

Ginn’s need for new
financing became painfully
obvious last year, after the
company and Lubert Adler
were forced to reach an
agreement with a Credit
Suisse-led consortium over

SEE page 4B



THE TRIBUNE ®

USINCSS

E Rol DAY

UPN ee

2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Lease delay increases ‘Crystal ball’
Studio repairs $500k would have

Mi Chairman of Grand Bahama-based Film Studios
questions whether government serious about
agreeing new Heads of Agreement and lease for

project

MW Says ‘unwilling’ to commit funds to repairs and
maintenance until impasse resolved
WH ‘No plans’ to sell facility ‘at the moment’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The cost to repair the closed Bahamas
Film Studios development has increased by
$500,000 as a result of delays in concluding
a new lease agreement with the Govern-
ment, its chairman yesterday questioning
whether the Ingraham administration was
serious about completing a new Heads of
Agreement for the project.

Nashville-based investment banker Ross
Fuller, in a series of e-mailed responses to
Tribune Business’s questions, said he was
unwilling to invest further funds in mainte-
nance and repairs to the Film Studios’ water
tank and other facilities until an agreement
with the Government was concluded.

He told Tribune Business: “I negotiated a
deal with the Prime Minister early in July
2008 for 120 acres of land, which included
the tank and buildings that we had reno-

Travel supplier
closure’s blow
for Out Islands

vated. There has been no change in this that
Tam aware of.

“The Government apparently does not
believe this is important enough to push
through the new Heads of Agreement and
lease, although they tell me on a bi-weekly
basis that it will be completed ‘soon’.” It
was last understood that the agreements
were being scrutinised by the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office.

The Bahamas Film Studios site is effec-
tively closed, with just a skeleton security
staff understood to be on-site. The devel-
opment is effectively in limbo, a far cry from
the days when its water tank was used for
the filming of all water-based scenes for the
Pirates of the Caribbean II and III sequels.

It is now a virtual certainty that the
Bahamas Film Studios will not play host to

SEE page 5B

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Airlift into two key Fami-
ly Islands via private air-
lines/charter companies was
dealt a major blow yester-
day, after a Florida-based
teravel agency specialising
in the sector announced it
was closing down due to the
global recession.

Daytona Beach-based
Island Pass told customers
via e-mail yesterday that it
was closing down, and
warned that tickets already
purchased for future flights
would not be honoured.

It specialised in booking
tickets on charter airlines
and private operators for
flights to Abaco and
Eleuthera, providing clients
for companies such as
Cherokee Aviation, Peter
Russell Flight Services,
White Crown Aviation and
Banyan Air.

Cat Island family in partial
win on 450-acre dispute

â„¢

|: Other side included
MacTaggart family,
=| and DPM Brent

1) Symonette’s wife





-
BRENT SYMONETTE

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Cat Island family has won a partial victory at the Court
of Appeal in a land dispute involving Deputy Prime Minis-
ter Brent Symonette’s wife, the appeal justices part-revers-
ing a previous Supreme Court decision by finding they were
the legal owners of a 15-acre tract of real estate on the
island.

Yet although the Court of Appeal found in favour of
Anthony and Cyril Armbrister, representatives of the
Frances Armbrister estate, in their appeal over the 15-acre
tract known as the Village Estate, it rejected their appeal
over the much larger 430-acre Freeman Hall parcel.

The judgment, written by Appeal Justice Emanuel Osade-
bay, recorded how the dispute had arisen out of a Certificate
of Title granted under the Quieting Titles Act, following a
petition brought by members of the MacTaggart and Light-
bourn families. Almost 1,000 acres of land on Cat Island was

SEE page 6B

In an e-mail sent to Island
Pass clients yesterday, its
president, Kevin Ream, said:
“It is with regret that I
announce IslandPass is sus-
pending service. We opened
during an unprecedented
and unpredictable economy,
and our business has been
very difficult to plan since

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



halted firm’s
expansion

* Nassau Motor Company would not
gone ahead with more than $700k
growth had it known of upcoming
recession

* Firm ‘i/3 to 1/2 way through’
second phase, with five hydraulic
lifts/service bays operational for
three months

* But firm to put phase four on hold
‘for now’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A leading new car dealer yesterday said it might not
have gone ahead with its more than-$700,000 four-
stage expansion “if we had our crystal ball” and pre-
dicted the recession, yet it is hoping the investment
will leave it well-positioned to exploit economic recov-
ery despite having to put the final phase “on hold”.

Rick Lowe, Nassau Motor Company’s (NMC) oper-
ations manager, told Tribune Business the second
stage of the company’s expansion - the construction of
its new client reception building in the service area,
and eventual demolition of the existing facility - was
“maybe one-third to one-half of the way finished”.

However, he added: “Quite honestly, had we had
our crystal ball, we would probably not have done this,
but once we signed the contract we had the commit-
ment of our owners to see it through.

“When the economic turnaround takes place, hope-
fully we’ll be in a better position for the future.

“It’s certainly not a good time to be in any business,
but hopefully things will start to turn around in the
next quarter or next six months, and we will have
done the right thing.”

There were likely to be another four to five weeks

SEE page 5B



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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear from people
who are making news in their

funds for a good cause, campaigning for a
improvements in the area or have won an OH
award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share DN
your story.

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It starts with you.



By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BANKING sector liquidity remains strong
at $439 million as of July 2, with a $713 mil-
lion fund reserve as at Wednesday, a gov-
ernment minister said, as both he and the
Central Bank governor lauded the “funda-
mentals of our domestic banking system”.
This was despite the negative impact the
recession, and loan defaults, were having
on and credit asset quality.

Wendy Craigg, the Central Bank gover-
nor, speaking at the opening of Scotiabank's
Caves Village location, said Bahamas-based
commercial banks remain available to
finance credit expansion to qualified bor-
rowers.

"The banks’ capital position is healthy
and reinforces the operational strength of
the institutions," she said.

Mrs Craigg said the Central Bank remains
vigilant in monitoring the banking sector to
ensure that "growth continues in an orderly
manner”.

She said the Central Bank continues to
require that commercial banks strengthen
their risk management portfolios and main-
tain adequate provisions for loan losses.

"As we know, countries around the world
are trying to repair their economies from
the fall out due to the global and economic
crisis,” said Mrs Craigg.

"In the Bahamas we continue to grapple
with the negative trends in tourism and for-
eign investment that we know are adverse-
ly affecting the livelihood of a sizable num-
ber of houscholds.”

The Bahamian banking sector itself has
experienced the effects first hand in terms of
the slowdown in opportunities for growth in
the short-term, and the difficulties that are
being faced by many borrowers in keeping
up with their loan servicing obligations.

Also Speaking at the Scotiabank open-
ing, minister of state for finance, Zhivargo
Liang, echoed Mrs Craigg’s assessment of
the economy and financial sector.

"Our network of banks is showing tremen-
dous resilience in the face of our current
economic storm,” he said.

According to Mr Laing, despite the dete-
rioration in bank loan portfolios, the

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Bank liquidity still
strong with $439m

Th Me TULLE

Bahamian financial system has not been
compromised.

He said the Government continues to do
what it can to stabilize the economy, with the
$500 million invested in capital works pro-
jects and secured financing of $265 million
for the Lynden Pindling International Air-
port expansion project.

"We in the Government continue to do all
we can to nurture the economy in this down-
turn,” said Mr Liang

"We continue to promote and facilitate
investment applications, which though
reduced in terms of quality, still continue
to come in."

Mrs Craigg revealed that commercial
banks themselves expended almost $350
million in capital spending, salaries, related
payments and other outlays, including
administrative costs, in 2008.

"It is our hope that these efforts, com-
bined with the rebound of the US economy
sooner rather than later, will enable us to
endure unquestionably the worst economic
fallout since the great depression," said Mr
Laing.

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Your entry also qualifies you for weekly draws starting June 26th for
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For every $25 spent on fuel or $10 spent in the C-store you will get
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009, PAGE 3B



‘Pioneering’ company reinvests 3%
of revenue in developing workers

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

An engineering firm,
CARIBBEAN Civil Group
(CCG), has been chosen as
the Bahamian winner of
Pioneers of Prosperity's
(PoP) entrepreneurial
award, receiving a $40,000
grant and the chance to
compete with other
Caribbean companies for up
to $60,000 more, it was
revealed yesterday.

Coordinator for the pro-
gramme, Abby Noble, said
CCG was chosen from
among 110 other Bahamian
businesses, including several
other engineering firms, in
a highly competitive contest.
She added that CCG was
chosen primarily because of
its reinvesting in its employ-
ees through training.

"We look for things like
role model potential, how
they can inspire the next
generation of entrepreneurs,
how they are investing in the
workers and creating a high-
er level of human capital,
how they're investing in the
community through men-
toring other young business
leaders or doing something

that's good for the environ-
ment," she said.

Principal of CCG, Ray
McKenzie, said the compe-
tition involved a rigorous
process, but he expressed his
elation at having been cho-
sen as this year’s country
winner for the Bahamas.

"We are quite honored
and humbled quite frankly.
It was an exhausting process,
so we're quite pleased to be
representing the Bahamas
going forward," he said.

Ceremony

Mr McKenzie will join
nine other country winners
from throughout’ the
Caribbean in Jamaica on
September 11 for the region-
al award ceremony.

CCG is a transporta-
tion/traffic and civil engi-
neering consulting firm
which has done work with
Baha Mar, Kerzner Interna-
tional and the Ministry of
Public Works, and has com-
pleted projects in the Turks
and Caicos and Guyana.

" Our core expertise is
public works, major infra-
structural works and major
development on the private
side in terms of engineering

and construction aspects of
those developments,” said
Mr McKenzie.

He said his company’s
most important resource is
human capital, in which 3
per cent of total revenue is
reinvested through constant
training.

"We firmly recognise that
our number one resource is
our people, and we are ina
knowledge based profession,
so we invest heavily in our
people,” Mr McKenzie said.

"We do the lion’s share of
training offshore, but we
would like to see that
change such that there is
credible training engineers
can get onshore. We invest
heavily in that."

CCG also visits 10 schools
per year to speak to students
about the engineering field
and steer those adept at
maths and science towards
civil engineering.

"We won't be here forev-
er,” said Mr McKenzie.

His company, with five
employees, competes in a
global market, but especial-
ly against foreign firms who
enter the Bahamas on the
heel of big developers.

"We would like to see
local firms get a greater per-

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A BANK EXAMINER in the Central Bank of the Bahamas bank supervision department, Kathrina Rodgers,
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centage of the local project,"
he said. "As developers
come in, they tend to bring
their team who they've had
relationships with, firms
from previous projects, and
that's always a challenge."

Mr McKenzie said finding
the capital to begin his busi-
ness was difficult, but after
having his plan scrutinised
by a scholarly body at the
College of the Bahamas, he
was able to secure a loan
with a Bahamian bank.

"Business was challenged
from the beginning,” he
said.

Now, Mr McKenzie said
he would like to see the reg-
ulators of the engineering
sector step up to the plate
and help it grow.

He said opportunities aris-
ing from the Economic Part-
nership Agreement (EPA)
with the European Union
will help the sector to get on
its feet and think globally.

"We (CCG) stay on the
cutting edge because we
compete globally,” said Mr
McKenzie.

The PoP is a global
awards program that "seeks
to inspire a new generation
of entrepreneurs in emerg-
ing economies", and with

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in this region. According to
a PoP release: "Unlike oth-
er award programs PoP does
not end with the distribution
of the award. Rather, the
award is just the beginning."

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in that accordance with Section 138

(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of

2000), Crossworld Consulting Ltd. is in dissoulution. Alvaro

Barria is the Liquidator and can be contacted at GlobalBank
Tower, 23rd Floor, 50th Street, Panama City, Republic of
Panama. All persons having claims against the above-named

company are required to send their names, addresses and par-

ticulatars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the

21st day of August 2009.

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Director / Chief Executive
The Bahamas Maritime Authority

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The Bahamas Maritime Authority administers The Bahamas’ ship
registry, the third largest registry in the world. It is responsible for
servicing and policing ils registered vessels, promoting The Bahamas
registry to the international shipping community, and for collecting
and accounting for all ship registration and other applicable fees.
The Authority also advises the Government of The Bahamas on all
aspects of international shipping.

The Authority is a statutory Government-owned corporation,
supervised by a Board whose Members are appointed by the
Government, and which reports to the responsible Minister.

Day-to-day management of the Authority rests with its Director, who
is its chief executive. He or she oversees all of the Authority's
dealings with shipowners, with the IMO, and with classification
societies, independent inspectors and the legal and financial
communities. The Authority's main office is presently in London,
where the Director has been based, but it also has offices in Nassau
and New York, with other locations forthcoming.

Candidates must be able to demonstrate a successful track record in
a senior position working in or with the shipping industry. They
should have leadership qualities, experience in directing and
developing personnel, and success in team-building. They should
also have experience in financial management. They should be
holders of a university degree and/or a class | ship's officer certificate.
An appropriate salary will be offered to the preferred candidate.

Applicants are invited to write, enclosing a copy of their C/V, and
with the details of their current salary to: Mr. Peter John Goulandris,
Deputy Chairman, The Bahamas Maritime Authority, Consulate
General of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, 231 East 46th
Street, New York, '.Y. LOO17, USA.

Closing date for receipt of applications is August 31st, 2009. All
applications will be acknowledged.


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Amazon 2Q profit falls with Toys R Us settlement | Questions

SAN FRANCISCO

Amazon.com Inc. said Thurs-
day that its second-quarter
earnings fell while sales rose,
as the leading online retailer
recorded a $51 million payment
to settle a long-standing dispute
with former partner Toys R Us,
according to Associated Press.

The revenue increase was not
enough to placate analysts, who
were expecting even more than
Amazon delivered. Shares of

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Seattle-based Amazon fell
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trading after the results were
released. Sanford C. Bernstein
analyst Jeffrey Lindsay said the
company's report was general-
ly good, but its stock — which
hit a 52-week high of $94.40
during regular trading — was
priced for a blowout quarter.
"That's why you got such a
negative reaction after hours,"
he said. Amazon earned $142
million, or 32 cents per share, in
the April-June quarter, 10 per-
cent lower than the profit of

$158 million, or 37 cents per
share, a year ago. Analysts
polled by Thomson Reuters
expected a penny less per share.

Sales climbed nearly 15 per-
cent to $4.65 billion, slightly
below analyst estimates of $4.69
billion.

Amazon's sales were helped
last year by a $53 million non-
cash gain from the sale of Euro-
pean DVD rental assets.Sales
of items such as books, CDs
and DVDs inched up 1 percent
to $2.44 billion in the second
quarter, while electronics and

other general merchandise sales
soared 35 percent to $2.07 bil-
lion.

The company's North Amer-
ican sales rose 13 percent, while
international sales increased 16
percent.

During a conference call with
reporters, Chief Financial Offi-
cer Tom Szkutak said the com-
pany saw declines in some
North American media cate-
gories, including video games
and video game consoles.

He noted that in the year
before, three of the four hottest

games were released during the
second quarter, including Nin-
tendo Co.'s popular "Wii Fit."
This year's gaming decline was
balanced out by increased book
sales, he said.

Szkutak said that third-party
sellers, who offer their goods
to consumers through Amazon,
made up 30 percent of total unit
sales — an increase from the
previous year.

Amazon's net shipping cost,
which is a closely watched met-
ric, rose to $147 million from
$128 million last year.

Travel supplier closure’s blow for Out Islands

FROM page 1B

our inception.

“We have been operating
and selling tickets in good
faith, but a lack of consis-
tent business will prevent us
from making it through

Crease e@elelas

these tumultuous times. As
of today, my partner and I
decided to end operations.

“Effective immediately,
no further flights will be
conducted. All tickets pur-
chased in advance will be
lost. I'm sorry for any incon-

A vacancy exists at The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited and Port Group

Limited for the position of General Counsel.

Applicants are invited from

interested and suitably qualified individuals ta fill this position, with the primary
responsibility of the overall direction and management of the Legal Department
of The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited and Port Group Limited, and:

~

® Manage and bead strategic and tactical legal initiatives for the Group of

Com panbes

Structure and manage the company's internal legal function and statt

Lead various projects Including litigation management: direction of leases,
deeds of release, and conveyances; privacy and employment matters,
corporate governance, domestic and international compliance and other
matters requiring legal support

Obtain and oversee the work of outside counsel

Provide senior management with effective legal opinians on corparny
Strategies and implementation

Serve as advisor on all major business transactions and in negotiating critical

contracts

Play a key role in managing risk and helping to make sound business decisions

Develop and implement all legal and corporate governance policies

Serve as Company Secretary and participate in meetings of the Board of

Directors

Advise and counsel corporate departments on general and specialized legal
matters including complex international and commercial business transactions

Provide legal representation on International and local projects at preliminary
stage of negotiations and throughout development

Provide legal counsel and advice regarding various corporate business tramsac-
tions to ensure compliance with Bahamian Law and company policies and

procedures.

KNOWLEDGE AND QUALIFICATIONS

Judicial degree along with lintemational expertise

15 or more years of commercial transactional legal background, along with
combined in-hause and law firm legal experience

Strong transactional and general business and commercial law experience,
including drafting and negotiating commercial contracts and licenses

Significant intellectual property experience

Experience in both public and global companies

Results-oriented, with skills to influence change and drive compliance

Strang presentation and negotiation skills, solid business instinets and
judgment, and outstanding written and verbal communication skills

Creative and flexible problem-solving skills

Ability and interpersonal skills to relate with Internal and external customers,
including government, business professionals, the community, corporate
executives and managers, and contribute to strategic planning.

SUS ee ke RRS PRS MRS ere a
SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS TO GENERALCOUNSEL@GBPA.COM
De ee ee el

P, 0. BOX F-42666

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHANIA ISLAND

venience this has caused
you, but I appreciate all your
support over the last several
months.”

Among the alternative
airlines suggested were
Bimini Air and Continental
Airlines.

The loss of Island Pass will
deal something of a blow to
airlift and tourism on Abaco
and Eleuthera, especially
given that those islands rely
heavily on visitors brought
in by private airlines and
charter operators.

Law Firm is seeking skilled professional litigation legal

little supervision

little supervision

« Excellent memory
* Ability to multi-task

« Energetic

+ Self-motivated

« Pleasant personality
« Despises mediocrity

HELP WANTED

secretary. The following are needed:

+ Proficiency in Microsoft Word

« Experience in drafting legal letters with little supervision
« Experience in drafting legal documents with

* Ability to confidently speak with clients
« Ability to take instructions and carry same out with

« Excellent organizational skills

« Works beyond the standard 9 to 5 when necessary

clo The Tribune ¢ P.O. Box N-3207¢ D/A #81242

NOTICE

Voluntary Dissolution

Pursuant to Section 138 (4) (a), (b) and (c) of the
International Business Companies Act, 2000 notice is

given that:-

(a) SPONGE INVESTMENTS INC. is in voluntary

dissolution.

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution is
the 15th day of July, A.D. 2009.

(c) The name of the Liquidator is Anthony A.M. Moree
of Dupuch & Turnquest & Co., 308 East Bay Street,
P.O. Box N-8181, Nassau, Bahamas

Liquidator

Legal Notice
NOTICE

HRK Investments Ltd.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 138(4) of the International

Business

Companies Act. 2000, HRK Investments Ltd. is in
dissolution as of July 20, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

St. Anne’s School, Fox Hill, invites
applicants for its 2009/10 Nursey Class

¢ Children must be three years or older on before 31
July 2009

¢ Application Forms may be collected from the
school’s office from 9:00 - 3:00 daily

* For additional information please contact the office

at 324-1203, 324-1226





over Ginn
refinance

FROM page 1B

a $675 million loan default.

The agreement created a
joint venture that would
see the consortium develop
Ginn sur mer in conjunc-
tion with Ginn. The $675
million loan facility held a
mortgage over half Ginn’s
more than 2,000-acre prop-
erty at West End, largely
the land allocated for lot
and real estate develop-
ment - some 1,400 lot sites.

The core casino and
resort development, cover-
ing some 500 acres on the
north side of Ginn sure
mer, were not covered by
the mortgage.

Without the new financ-
ing, there are concerns that
Ginn sur mer could be a
maze of roads and infra-
structure and no buildings.
Ginn is understood to have
drawn down on a major
portion of the $200 million
it placed in escrow to
finance infrastructure and
golf course construction,
and is likely to complete
this phase by the 2010 first
quarter.

Equipment

One source told Tribune
Business that there was
some “$20-$30 million
worth of heavy equip-
ment” still on site at Ginn
sur mer, and added: “The
first 18-hole Arnold
Palmer golf course is in
and seeded, and being
catered for with 400,000 to
500,000 gallons of water
per day.

“The water system anda
million-and-a-half gallon
tank are in, the canals are
mostly in, and the entrance
to the ocean is done.”

Meanwhile, Tribune
Business was told by
sources that Old Bahama
Bay, which was suffering
occupancy rates as low as
10 per cent, was losing a
net $5 million per year,
hence the decision to dras-
tically reduce staff.

Ginn acquired Old
Bahama Bay in December
2006, with the intention of
using it primarily as an
accommodation base for
investors and potential
purchasers of real estate at
Ginn sur mer. However,
following the credit crunch
and economic recession,
the pool of real estate buy-
ers has all but dried up,
leaving Old Bahama Bay
without its planned cus-
tomer base.

However, Tribune Busi-
ness understands that
rumours that Old Bahama
Bay will close and/or be
sold are not correct, as the
marina and hotel will stay
open and be operated by a
skeleton staff.

Ginn was also said to
have been searching for a
brand/operating partner
for the property.

This newspaper was told
that the 85 lay-offs would
take Ginn’s total staff com-
plement in West End - at
the resort and develop-
ment company - from 428
to 344, However, Dion
Foulkes, minister of
labour, indicated that Ginn
was Set to hire another 35
construction workers at the
Development Company,
taking employee numbers
to around 380.

DJ CeNn eens

INSIGHT

are) am ta(-M-j (ela (=1)
behind the news,
beetle Meee 414
on Mondays


THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

left before the new service recep-
tion building was completed, Mr
Lowe, as construction workers
were currently “putting up the
panels, with the roof next weck”.

Work on the service reception
building had begun three weeks
ago, Mr Lowe added, and once
erected there was then the issue
of installing electricity supply and
moving all the furniture from the
old office in.

“Hopefully, it will be nicer for

Lease delay increases
Studio repairs $500k

the customers. There will be a nice
overhang, so customers will not
get wet in the rain.”

Expansion

The first phase of Nassau Motor
Company’s expansion, the con-
struction of five new service bays
with hydraulic lifts at its head-
quarters, sandwiched between
Shirley and Deveaux Streets, had
been completed earlier this year.

Mr Lowe said yesterday these
facilities had been open for three

months, and had increased Nas-
sau Motor Company’s service bays
to 20 in number, which were now
“mostly occupied”.

“They’re working out quite
well,” he added of the five new
service bays. “With the new lifts,
everyone’s quite efficient. It makes
life easier.” Where they came in
really handy, he said, was in
“speeding up” jobs such as tyre
changes and work on the under-
side of any vehicle, as it removed
the need to use jacks.

Nassau Motor Company had
also put in another hydraulic lift

FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009, PAGE 5B

‘Crystal ball’ would have halted firm’s expansion

recently, Mr Lowe said, taking the
number of lifts it possessed to 12 -
nine major, and three smaller ones.
Once the new service reception
area is completed, Nassau Motor
Company will move on to phase
three, which involves converting
the old service reception area into
two more work bays. The fourth
and final phase, though, which is
designed to create a new service
and lunch area, has been stayed.
“Phase four we’ve put on hold,
but we could not get out of phases
one and two because we’d made a
contractual commitment.

“Once we committed to phase
one, we had to do phase two,” Mr
Lowe explained.

“Phase three we’re going to do,
as it’s a matter of turning the old
reception office into two work
bays. That we can do ourselves, as
we can pull the building down our-
selves. Phase four, we’ve put that
on hold for right now.” Mr Lowe
said service and parts “remain a
significant part of our business”,
especially at a time when new car
sales are down industry-wide
between 40-50 per cent as a result
of the global recession.

Kingsway Academy High
School Teaching positions
For September, 2009



Kingsway Academy High School invites

FROM page 1B

Pirates of the Caribbean IV,
with the uncertainty sur-
rounding its fate not only
depriving Grand Bahama -
and the wider Bahamas - of
economic activity and pub-
licity opportunities, but also
acting as a potential deter-
rent to film and TV crews
using this nation as a pro-
duction setting.

Mr Fuller told Tribune
Business yesterday: “We are

“We are no
longer trying
to attract new
productions
because of the
uncertainty
surrounding
our rights to

on the lease,” he said.

Mr Fuller had previously
agreed to sell the Bahamas
Film Studios to Bahamas
FilmInvest International, a
group headed by Nassau-
based banker Owen Bethel,
president and chief execu-
tive of the Montaque
Group, in a transaction
widely believed to be val-
ued at around $14 million.

The deal was an ‘off, on’
process, the two sides walk-
ing away once only to agree
new terms. However, the

trying to ‘wait out’ Mr Fuller
in the hope that he will
decide to exit the Bahamas
Film Studios investment and
sell it to another buyer.
But in the meantime, the
longer the saga drags on, the
greater the negative impact
it risks having on the
Bahamas’ attractiveness as
a destination for film and
TV production filming, nev-
er mind the benefits from
one-off events such as the
Tyler Perry-inspired movie
currently being shot in north

no longer trying to attract

the property.”

Eleuthera.

new productions because of
the uncertainty surrounding
our rights to the property.

“Furthermore, we are
unwilling to commit further
funds for maintenance and
repair until these matters are
resolved. The necessary
repairs have increased by an
estimated $500,000 as a
direct result of these delays.”

On the possibility that
other film and TV produc-
tion crews might still be
interested in filming at the
Bahamas Film Studios, he
added: “There can be no
interest until and unless the
Government acts very
soon.”

Mr Fuller said he had
received no communications
from the Government about
its intentions for the
Bahamas Film Studios,
“which would indicate to me
that they have no interest in



Ross Fuller

what happens.

“A lone exception to this
is the Ministry of Tourism,
who have tried to influence
the powers that be to move
this along, citing the loss of
revenue to Grand Bahama.”

Dropped

Mr Fuller indicated to Tri-
bune Business that, for the
moment, he had dropped
plans to sell the Bahamas
Film Studios and had pulled
it off the market, and was
instead focusing on con-
cluding the new lease and
Heads of Agreement with
the Government.

“I do not have any plans
at the moment other than
trying to settle the situation

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transaction finally came
unstuck last year, Mr Bethel
telling Tribune Business that
the sales agreement was
essentially null and void as
Mr Fuller was unable to
deliver on what he had
promised, namely a 3,500-
acre site, after the Govern-
ment decided to reduce the
project’s scale to 120 acres.
Mr Fuller, though, accused
Mr Bethel’s side or breach
of contract, and initiated
arbitration proceedings
through the International
Chambers of Commerce.
These proceedings, though,
were later dropped and
there appears to be no
immediate intention of
reviving them, Mr Fuller
telling Tribune Business he
did “not have any plans at
the moment” on this score.

Although the Govern-
ment’s intentions are
unclear, it could be that it is

—_/ : L_.
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BAKERY |

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BUSINESS
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qualified applicants for the following teaching
positions for September, 2009.

candidates MUST be

qualified, born again Christian with a valid
Teacher's Certificate and minimum if a

Bachelor's Degree. He or She must also
be willing to participate in Extra Curricular

activities, etc.

Application forms can be collected from

Human Resources section at the Business
Office on Bernard Road. Telephone 242-
324-6269 / 324-6887.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS

al
br
sy

FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, 2009.

Bahamas Agricultural & Industrial Corporation

Presents
Its

NEW PROVIDENCE II

SHELL CRAFT TRAINING PROGRAM

+‘

Date: July 27-August7, 2009 Time:
Venue: Bahamas Academy High School

Application Form

6:00 - 10:00 p.m,

Location: Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas

P. 0. Box:

Email:

Fax:

Employment Status: 0 Employed © Government o Private

O Unemployed

Sunder 15 o 16-25 o 26-40 041-60 061-70 O71 and over

O Self-employed

ADMINISTRATIVE FEE: $100 | EXCLUDING MATERIALS)

Contact:

Le-Var Miller or Sharae Collie

Tel: 322-3740-3



HANDICRAFT DEVELOPMENT/MARKETING DEPARTMENTS - BAIC

Fax: 322-2123/328-6542
PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009

THe TRIBUNE





Cat Island family in partial
win on 450-acre dispute

FROM page 1B

involved, namely the 554.8-
acre Village Estate tract,
and the 484.6 Freeman Hall
tract.

The original petitioners
were Marion Lightbourn
and Sheila MacTaggart, but
the latter had been replaced
via an April 9, 1991,
Supreme Court order with
Neil MacTaggart, Robin
MacTaggart-Symonette and
Jolanta Maria Graham. Mrs
MacTaggart-Symoncette is
Mr Symonette’s wife, but he
has no connection whatso-
ever to the case.

The MacTaggart side, the
judgment said, claimed own-
ership through both docu-
mentary and possessory title,
the latter of which they
alleged to have acquired
under the Real Property
Limitation Act 1874.

Petition

They also alleged that
“they and their predecessors
in title have been in full, free
and undisturbed possession
of two tracts of land by
farming thereon continu-
ously for more than 20
years” before the Quieting



“They claim to
be entitled to
one-half interest
in Freeman Hall
by virtue of
documentary
title, and to 15
acres in the
Village Estate.”



Titles Act petition.

The Armbristers, broth-
ers who were Frances Arm-
brister’s children, argued in
return that they had contin-
uous documentary title to
the Freeman Hall Estate,
through inheritance, since
1873. They also claimed
ownership of 15 acres on the
Village Estate, again via
documented title from the
original Crown Land grant.

Tracing the title roots, the
Court of Appeal judgment
said it was not disputed that
William Edward Armbris-
ter in 1895 owned the Vil-
lage Estate, plus 430 acres
or 50 per cent of the Free-
man Hall tract.

Then, on May 27 of that



year, William Armbrister
conveyed the Village Estate
to the Bahamas (Inagua)
Sisal Plantation Company,
apart from 15 out of 100
acres he had acquired under
an 1871 Crown grant. This
was “reserved for himself”,
while the 430 acres he
owned in Freeman Hall
were also conveyed to the
company.

Eventually, the Bahamas
(Inagua) Sisal Plantation
Company was struck off the
Register of Companies in
1911 “after several years of
inactivity and thereby
ceased to exist”.

The MacTaggart side’s
title, the Court of Appeal
recorded, was alleged to
have its roots in the posses-
sory title of Walter Brown-
rigg, a former manager of
the company. He was
alleged to have taken pos-
session of the land parcels
in dispute around 1906, after
not being paid his due wages
when the Bahamas (Inagua)
Sisal Plantation Company
ceased operating.

Eventually, Mr Brownrig-
2’s heirs sold all the Free-
man Hall and Village Estate
lands to Herbert Arnold
McKinney, the MacTaggart
side’s predecessors in title.
He died on January 10,

estate interests to his daugh-
ters, Marion Lightbourn and
Sheila MacTaggart, the orig-
inal petitioners.

However, the Armbristers
countered by alleging that
all the land claimed by the
MacTaggart side was owned
by their forefather, William.

“They claim that one of
them, Anthony Armbrister,
still lives on part of the land
in the area of The Bight,”
the Court of Appeal found.
“They claim to be entitled
to one-half interest in Free-
man Hall by virtue of docu-
mentary title, and to 15 acres
in the Village Estate.

“They claim that upon the
company going out of busi-
ness and struck out, the one-
half interest in Freeman
Hall (430 acres) granted to
the company reverted to
William..... their predeces-
sor in title or to his estate.”

Then-Supreme Court Jus-
tice Jeanne Thompson
found in favour of the Mac-
Taggart side, but the Arm-
bristers appealed, alleging
that she had wrongly found
them to be claiming adverse
possession of the 15-acre
Village Estate tract, when
in fact they had documents
to prove their title.

The MacTaggart side,
though, denied that the

tary title to the 15 acres.
However, the Court of
Appeal said conveyancing
records showed William
Armbrister had carved out
15 acres from the original
Crown Land grant, only
conveying 85 acres to the
Bahamas (Inagua) Sisal
Plantation Company.

Therefore, the court
found that the Armbristers’
root of title had its genesis in
that 1895 conveyance, and
the 1871 Crown Land grant,
giving them documentary
title. The MacTaggart side’s
claim, though, was posses-
sory as Charles Brownrigg
was ‘squatting’ on the land
to claim wages due to him.

Given that the Bahamas
(Inagua) Sisal Plantation
Company’s lands did not
include the 15-acre parcel in
question, and that the Arm-
bristers’ documentary title
preceded all the documents
possessed by the MacTag-
gart side, the Court of
Appeal found: “It seems to
me that the trial judge fell
into error when she ruled
that the appellants did not
establish any documentary
title to the disputed 15-acre
parcel of land, and that [the
MacTaggart side] have
established a documentary
title.”

duced evidence to show
their claim to the 15 acres
was not recent, having
engaged attorney Living-
stone B. Johnson to protect
their interests back in 1966.
Ultimately, the Court of
Appeal found that they
should be awarded a Cer-
tificate of Title to those 15
acres.

Yet the Court of Appeal
found for the MacTaggart
side on the Freeman Hall
claim, finding that the
Bahamas (Inagua) Sisal
Plantation Company did not
own any real estate when it
was struck off in 1911. Asa
result, there was nothing
that could have reverted to
William Armbrister.

And the court also con-
cluded that the Armbristers
had not established docu-
mentary title good enough
to defeat the MacTaggart
side’s claim.

They and their predeces-
sors had been in continuous
and exclusive possession for
some 70 years, using it for
corn and peas farming.

Patrick Toothe and
Travette Pyfrom represent-
ed the Armbristers; Richard
Lightbourn and Tim Eneas,
of McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, the MacTaggart

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW AND BOUITY DIVISION

2007

(CLEAGEN D033
BETWEEN
BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
STEPHEN FRITAGERALD FARROW

Defenclant

ADVERTISEMENT OF SERVICE OF SUMMONS
ASD SOTICE OF ADJOURNED HEARING

TAKE NOTICE that it has been ordered by Ms. Marilyn Meeres,
Deputy Registrar cf the Supreme Court on the Suh day of March,
AD, 2009 that service of the Summons and the Notice of Adjourned
Hearne in the said action he effected on you by this advertisement

Dated this 25th day of June, A.D., 2009,

GIBSON, RIGRY & Co.
CHAMBERS
RieMalex House
Dowdeswell Street
Nassau, The Bahimes

Attorneys for the Plaintiff

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME OORT
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION

an

CLEGER/0)033
BETWEEN
BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Plamertt
AND
STEPHEN FRITAGERALD FARROW
Delendarit

SUMMONS

LET ALL PARTIES concerned attend before Deputy Registrar
Meeres of the SMIp Tes Tue Coun, Supreme Conart Building, Bank Line,
Nassau, The Bahamas on Monday the 11th day of Auguar, A.D,
2008 at 12:43 o"DSclock in the afternoon for the hearing of an
application on the part of the Plaintiff for an Crier for leave to enter

Judement in Default of Appearance pursuant to Order 73 of the
Rules of the Supreme Court for the amount claimed in the Statement
of Claim with interest, as therein claimed and costs,

TAKE NOTICE that a party intending to oppose this application
or lo apply fora stay of execution should send to the Plaintll’s
party or its Attorneys to reach them not less than three (3) days
before the dite abowe mentioned a copy ot any Affidavit intended
io be used.

Dated this 20th day of June, A.D, 20008,
REGISTRAR
‘To: Stephen Freeper Farrowior his Counsel Giheom Righy d& Cn.
Seabroceae Lane Chamoers
Neeccau, Tha: Feahaercs Ki-tdakes Hicaise
Devedeswell Street

The Ded emda Passau The Bateimas

Automeyvs For the Plaimaiff

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS AMT
Is THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW AND BOUITY DIVISION
CLEAGEM AT OS4
BETWEEN
BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Plaintull
AND
STEPHEN FRITACGERALD FARROW
Defendant

NOTICE OF ADJOURNED HEARING

TARE MOTICE that the Summons filed on the 25th day of June,
A.D. S008 and set down bo be heard on Monday the 11th day af
August, AD., 2008 at 12:45 oDSclock in the afternoon will now
be heard before Deputy Registrar Meetes of the Supreme Court,
Anshacher Guikling, Hank Lane, Nassau, The Bahamas on Thursday
ihe 30h day of July, A.D., 2009 at 12:00 0"DSclock in the afiemoon.

Dated this 20th day of March, ADL, 2009,
REGISTRAR

This notice was taken out by Messrs. Gibson, Rigby & Co..
Chambers, Ki-Malex House, Dowdeswell Street, Nassau, The
Bahamas, Attorneys bor the Plaimull,

(Jy. 6, 9)

1981, leaving all his real

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that We, GEORGE PHILIP ANTONIO
ROBINSON JR and CHANTEL ANISE MARY JOHNSON

both of the Western District of the Island of New providence intend to change the

name of our daughter from GEORGIANNA PHILLISHA ANTONIA
JOHNSON to GEORGIANNA PHILLISHA ANTONIA

robinson. If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KENSON JEAN JACQUES
of CARMICHEAL RD., P.O. BOX CR-55404, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24" day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHRIS PHILIP TILME
of SOUTH BEACH, P.O. BOX CR-55404, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24" day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Armbristers had documen-

The Armbristers also pro- side.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA LISSAINT ELIONOR
EWING of WASHINGTON’ STREET, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24" day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YVROSE ARISCA of
CARMICHAEL ROAD, P.O. BOX N-9456, NASSAU
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 17" day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JENO ALEXI of HOMES
STEAD STREET, P.O. BOX N-7060, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24" day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

ROYAL @FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 20 JULY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.86| CHG 0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -141.50 | YTD % -8.26
FINDEX: CLOSE 786.23 | YTD -5.83% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Security
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.39
10.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00
6.94 Bank of Bahamas 6.94
0.63 Benchmark 0.63
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37
10.18 Cable Bahamas 11.39
2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74
5.50 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.64
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.98
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 1.82
6.60 Famguard 6.60
10.00 Finco 10.90
10.35 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.38
4.95 Focol ($) 5.03
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.50
10.40 J. S. Johnson 10.40
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00

Previous Close _Today‘s Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.39

11.00 0.00
6.94 0.00
0.63 0.00
3.15 0.00
2.37 0.00

11.39 0.00

2.74 0.00

0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240

5.64 0.00
3.00 0.02
1.82 0.00
6.60 0.00
10.90 0.00
10.38 0.00
5.03 0.00
1.00 0.00
0.30 0.00
5.50 0.00
10.40 0.00
10.00 0.00

0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBE17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Change Daily Vol. Interest
700.00 0.00 7%
100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
100.00 0.00 7%
100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

5S2wk-Low

Symbol

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $

Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

1.3231
2.8952
1.4031
3.1031
12.3289

93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
last 52 weeks

CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

0.35

Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol.
8.42 14.60
6.25 6.00

0.40 0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

30.13
0.45

31.59 29.00
0.55 0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV

1.3860
2.8952
1.4777
3.1031
12.9801
101.6693
93.1992
1.0000
9.2765
1.0622
1.0243
1.0585

YTD% Last 12 Months
2.40 4.75

-1.52 -3.18

3.07 5.31

-8.35 -13.82
2.87 5.79

Div $

1.10 1.67
-3.33. -6.76
0.00 0.00
2.00 -2.98
2.56 6.22
-0.84 2.43
2.04 5.85

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $

ighted price for daily velume

ted price for daily velume

ivi
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date #/8/2007

(S31) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

- Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Net Asset Value

N/M - Net Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

EPS $

Div $ P/E

30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
10-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

pri
EPS § - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV -



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST



FRIDAY, JULY 24 2009, PAGE 8B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

“oO



Fi (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

CL a 0



















y =x. Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
i } ry . . Se a ee i Ww ee ee W WASSAU Today. Eat7-14Knots | 2-3Feet 10-20Miles 84°F | a ae ie aan as oe
‘ Pr ‘ NS an all ONS =~ —_ =i oi |2 3|4|5|¢ | |s|o|ioh Acapulco 91/32 77/25 pe 88/31 77/25 pc FREEPORT Tatay eat Aa Kote 3 Feat 40-20 Miles 84° F
ae fy — k mm ORLANDO : Ankara, Turkey 86/30 54/12 s 86/30 55/12 s ABACO ‘Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 85° F
High: 94° F/34°C Sun and some Patchy clouds. Mostly sunny with a Sunshine with a Breezy and pleasant Mostly cloudy, a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 95/35 77/25 s 99/37 79/26 s Saturday: Eat 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 85° F
yf Low: 73°F/23°C clouds. thunderstorm. t-storm possible. with some sun. t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 55/12 42/5 sh 53/11 40/4 +
13" é é 5 é Bangkok 90/32 78/25 t 89/31 79/26 +
@ High: 92 High: 90 High: 90 High: 89 Barbados 86/30 77/25 sh 36/30 76/245 MAT) Van | BAe Se
c iar High: 92° Low: 81° Low: 81° Low: 80° Low: 80° Low: 80° se Ne ey had
TAMPA | fy ae pects eae Re oi ee 552 OTS
High: 91° F/33°C t i 105°-93° F 107°-87° F 101°-83° F 96°-87° F High _HtL(ft.) Low —_Ht.(ft. ar ee a. - eT Tos
Low: 78° F/26°C ak 7 The exclusive ees Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 10:19am. 31 4:05am. -03 Belgrade 100/37 72/22 5 38/31 59/15 s
i Q - - elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:42pm. 3.1 4:24pm. -0.2 Berlin 72/22 57/13 sh 68/20 52/11 sh
ie CU nn Saturday thilam. 31 43am. 03 Bermuda 84/28 77/25 pe 84/28 77/25 pc
_ 11:32pm. 2.9 5:19pm. -0.1 Bogota 67/19 44/6 sh 66/18 41/5 pe -
Sa Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sunilay T204pm. 31 540am. 02 Brussels 70/21 54/12 sh 73/22 52/11 pe Se neat
ABACO Temperature wee 6:15 p.m. 0.0 Budapest 94/34 66/18 s 83/28 57/13 ¢
ith: 9° ° IGM sess sasadvsssesstccedsonaesecsiediianed tacecdaees 90° F/32° C : : : Buenos Aires 50/10 37/2 s 54/12 37/2 pe
U Dp” Neale High: 93° F/34°C LOW 79° F/26° ¢ © Monday eee tam og Cairo 101/38 75/23 s 100/37 77/25 s I
¢ - Low:81°F/27°C Normal high... es rsic ee COE 95/35 83/28 + 94/34 85/29 t Den
Normal low 75° F/24° C Calgary 78/25 53/11 s 77/25 55/12 t
is F,.: @ WEST PALMBEACH CT 92° F/83° ¢ Sun AND Moon engin 90/32 75/23 t 92/33 77/25 pc
High: 91° F/33°C ‘i Last year's lOW oe eee 75° F/24° C " " Caracas 80/26 71/21 pc 81/27 71/21 pc
Low: 77° F/25° C Precipitation, Pai seen 7 a.m. Lala oe am. Casablanca 85/29 69/20 s 90/32 75/23 s
As of 2 p.m. yesterday 0... c.cccceeceeeeeee 0.66" unsel....... ov p.m. Moonset..... “99 P.M. Copenhagen 67/9 56/13 Fr 69/20 53/11 sh
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date 19. First Full Last New Dublin 6417 52/11 r 66/18 54/12 pe
iy ue one Qa High: 92° F/33° C Normal year to date o.....eescccsssseeessseees 23.24" i ss . Frankfurt 75/23 55/12 sh 72/22 50/10 pc
ow: 80° F/27°C Low: 79° F/26° C 1 Geneva 74/23 54/12 sh 75/23 49/9 pc
<4 AccuWeather.com dE Halifax 63/17 57/13 1 70/21 57/13 c ee safari
= @ — Forecasts and graphics provided by a oy Havana 88/31 72/22 t 91/32 76/24 t Tstorme 93/80
igh: 93° F/34° ELEUTHERA Hong Kon 91/32 82/27 sh 90/32 82/27 sh Fronts
“allie High: 93° F/34° C : m g Kong *__*| Flurries Cold
Low: 80° F/27°C NASSAU High: 94° F/34° C Islamabad 103/39 83/28 t 102/38 84/28 s Be) Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and rece
"li. : High: 92° F/33°C Low: 80° F/27°C Istanbul 90/32 77/25 s 98/36 80/26 s sel precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. ;
Low: 81°F/27°C Tanisalen 86/30 62/16 s 86/30 626 s ce Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Megami
a ; Johannesburg 48/8 29/-1 s 51/10 32/0 s ; . “50s 60s 70s 8(s /S0s /i00sl/i10e)
KEY WEST 7s @ CATISLAND Kingston 88/31 75/23 t 90/32 78/25 s 10s| -05 [05/105 205 [Btsl] 40s
High: 90° F/32°C i —_— wT TOLAN Lima 71/21 59/15 s 73/22 59/15 s
Low: 81°F/27°C High: 89° F/32° C London 70/21 54/12 73/22 54/12 pc
: Low: 77° F/25°C Madrid 90/32 59/15 s 97/36 63/17 s
es Manila 86/30 77/25 + 84/28 78/25 sh i? 8 k ke Ley.’ N i: » i" J RAN e iz
_— + Mexico City 79/26 55/12 t 76/24 57/13 t
x. GaREXUA Monterrey 104/40 75/23 s 104/40 75/23 s
a SAN SALVADOR Montreal 66/18 61/16 c 72/22 63/17 t
High: 91° F/33° C ae 3 Moscow 77/25 61/16 pc 79/26 59/15 sh
i Low:79° F/26° C eee Munich 76/24 50/10 sh 70/21 48/8 t
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's iinet hs , NaC eae ae sh ae aoe sh Yo u an B Bl wn
highs and tonights's lows. a : ew Delhi pe pe O
: P—] Low: 79° F/26° C i Oslo 72/22 59/15 sh 70/21 50/10 pc \ FY
, Paris 73/22 55/12 sh 77/25 57/3 s A “
LONGISLAND Prague 78/25 55/12 pc 73/22 53/11 sh way ul rlcane
| Rio de Janeiro 70/21 65/18 + 72/22 68/20
a ert Rome ‘od 7ozi s G18 Br S Or you can en easy knowing
Low: 78° F/26°C ome 8 s
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday eee S wane ay ae pe ae nie 8 that yo have excelle nt aie”
High Low W High = Low WwW High Low W High = Low WwW High Low W High = Low WwW igh: 93° : an Juan “25 “<5 i ‘
FC FIC FIC FIC FC FIC FIC FIC Fic FIC FIC F/G et Low: 76° F/24° C San Salvador 90/32 70/21 pe 87/30 74/23 t coverace no matter Wille
Albuquerque 94/34 69/20 pc 95/35 69/20 pc Indianapolis 84/28 67/19 po 82/27 63/17 t Philadelphia 86/30 68/20 t 88/31 72/22 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santiago 59/15 36/2 s 63/17 39/3 s Way tne wind blows.
Anchorage 66/18 55/12 sh 67/19 55/12 sh Jacksonville 91/32 71/21 t 93/83 72/22 t Phoenix 106/41 89/31 t 108/42 88/31 t HBA Me , aaa Maul as en pe oe ae 7
Atlanta 92/33 6719 po 88/31 71/21 pc Kansas City 94/34 69/20 pc 89/31 64/17 s Pittsburgh 78/25 6015 po 82/27 64/17 t RAGGEDISLAND — igh:94°F/s4" a0 Paulo r r ay _
Atlantic City 81/27 67/19 t 86/30 70/21 pc Las Vegas 105/40 81/27 t 106/41 87/30 pc Portland, OR 85/29 62/16 s 89/31 64/17 5 oberon Low: 79° F/26°C ear aaa ae Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 84/28 66/18 t 90/32 70/21 pc Little Rock 96/35 71/21 po 94/34 68/20 s Raleigh-Durham 90/32 66/18 pc 93/33 70/21 pe Low:76°F/24°C a oo can AeA pe err 7
Boston 71/21 64417 + 78/25 68/20 c LosAngeles 86/30 64/17 pc 86/30 66/18 pc St. Louis 88/31 71/21 po 89/31 66/18 t . a ae SSaEAORE Re Sa ESTOTE Fe
Buffalo 76/24 6116 t 80/26 66/18 t Louisville 86/30 68/20 s 88/31 68/20 t Salt Lake City 94/34 69/20 t 95/35 69/20 t GREAT INAGUA Tava er. at eT
Charleston, SC 93/33 72/22 t 95/35 74/23 pc Memphis 94/34 73/22 pce 94/34 73/22 pc San Antonio 100/37 75/23 pce 99/87 75/23 pc High: 97° F/36° C aa 74/23 59/15 pe 75/23 63/17 t
Chicago 82/27 66/18 t 78/25 61/16 t Miami 93/33 80/26 t 92/33 79/26 t San Diego 78/25 69/20 pc 78/25 68/20 s bet Le va mm | ol ee
Cleveland 78/25 61/16 pc 82/27 6A/17 t Minneapolis 80/26 61/46 t 77/25 6246 pc Sanfrancisco 67/19 55/12 pc 72/22 55/12 pe Low: 77° F/25° C aa a wae . aes aa fe er LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 96/35 76/24 pc 100/37 76/24 pc Nashville 88/31 69/20 pc 91/32 67/19 pc Seattle 79/26 57/13 s 84/28 60/15 s Vienne 83/08 6/17 sh 73/99 BB/I2 sh Abaco Eleuthera Evuma
Denver 94/34 60/15 pc 88/31 59/15 pc NewOrleans 92/33 74/23 t 90/32 75/23 t Tallahassee 91/32 71/21 t 94/32 70/21 t Te 81/27 57/19. sh 73/22 52/11 t FS “57-04 Fe <7-2860 F, een
Detroit 82/27 62/16 pc 79/26 62/16 t New York 81/27 71/21 t 83/28 74/23 po Tampa 91/32 78/25 pe 92/33 7/25 t Winnipeg 70/01 59/15 ¢ 7/22 58/14 pe (eA) (22) 2+ a)
Honolulu 89/31 76/24 pc 90/32 78/25 c OklahomaCity 96/35 72/22 s 97/36 69/20 pc Tucson 101/38 79/26 t 102/38 81/27 t :
Houston 97/36 76/24 pc 97/36 76/24 pc Orlando 94/34 73/22 t 93/33 74/23 t Washington, DC 86/30 69/20 t 90/32 74/23 pc Te eh ee ee



















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PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.200FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNAND CLOUDS HIGH 92F LOW 81F SEEBUSINESSFRONT S P O R T S Lease delay increases studio repairs $500k SEEPAGEELEVEN Tonique set to start coaching POLICE are inves tigating whether an attempt could have been made on the life of Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson after officers discovered that his private vehicle had been tam pered with. Accordingto sources, Mr Ferguson discovered that most of the lug nuts on his car’s front left tyre had “miraculously” disappeared while on the grounds of police headquarters in East Street. Reportedly only two nuts were loosely screwed on to two of the five bolts on the tyre. This act, allegedly done in an effort to cause the Commissioner to crash his vehicle, has been taken seriously by acting Assis The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com ‘Threat to life’ of top police chief Security heightened after commissioner’ s car ‘tampered with’ B U S I N E S S B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r A i r l i f t i n t o t w o k e y F a m i l y I s l a n d s v i a p r i v a t e a i r l i n e s / c h a r t e r c o m p a n i e s w a s d e a l t a m a j o r b l o w y e s t e r d a y , a f t e r a F l o r i d a b a s e d t e r a v e l a g e n c y s p e c i a l i s i n g i n t h e s e c t o r a n n o u n c e d i t w a s c l o s i n g d o w n d u e t o t h e g l o b a l r e c e s s i o n . D a y t o n a B e a c h b a s e d I s l a n d P a s s t o l d c u s t o m e r s v i a e m a i l y e s t e r d a y t h a t i t w a s c l o s i n g d o w n , a n d w a r n e d t h a t t i c k e t s a l r e a d y p u r c h a s e d f o r f u t u r e f l i g h t s w o u l d n o t b e h o n o u r e d . I t s p e c i a l i s e d i n b o o k i n g t i c k e t s o n c h a r t e r a i r l i n e s a n d p r i v a t e o p e r a t o r s f o r f l i g h t s t o A b a c o a n d E l e u t h e r a , p r o v i d i n g c l i e n t s f o r c o m p a n i e s s u c h a s C h e r o k e e A v i a t i o n , P e t e r R u s s e l l F l i g h t S e r v i c e s , W h i t e C r o w n A v i a t i o n a n d B a n y a n A i r . I n a n e m a i l s e n t t o I s l a n d P a s s c l i e n t s y e s t e r d a y , i t s p r e s i d e n t , K e v i n R e a m , s a i d : I t i s w i t h r e g r e t t h a t I a n n o u n c e I s l a n d P a s s i s s u s p e n d i n g s e r v i c e . W e o p e n e d d u r i n g a n u n p r e c e d e n t e d a n d u n p r e d i c t a b l e e c o n o m y , a n d o u r b u s i n e s s h a s b e e n v e r y d i f f i c u l t t o p l a n s i n c e C r y s t a l b a l l w o u l d h a v e h a l t e d f i r m s e x p a n s i o n C M Y K C M Y K S E C T I O N B b u s i n e s s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t F R I D A Y , J U L Y 2 4 , 2 0 0 9 T H E T R I B U N E $ 4 .6 8$ 4 .5 1$ 4 .6 9T h e i n f o r m a t i o n c o n t a i n e d i s f r o m a t h i r d p a r t y a n d T h e T r i b u n e c a n n o t b e h e l d r e s p o n s i b l e f o r e r r o r s a n d / o r o m i s s i o n f r o m t h e d a i l y r e p o r t . $ 4 . 2 1 $ 3 . 9 0 $ 4 . 1 0 B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r A C a t I s l a n d f a m i l y h a s w o n a p a r t i a l v i c t o r y a t t h e C o u r t o f A p p e a l i n a l a n d d i s p u t e i n v o l v i n g D e p u t y P r i m e M i n i s t e r B r e n t S y m o n e t t e s w i f e , t h e a p p e a l j u s t i c e s p a r t r e v e r s i n g a p r e v i o u s S u p r e m e C o u r t d e c i s i o n b y f i n d i n g t h e y w e r e t h e l e g a l o w n e r s o f a 1 5 a c r e t r a c t o f r e a l e s t a t e o n t h e i s l a n d . Y e t a l t h o u g h t h e C o u r t o f A p p e a l f o u n d i n f a v o u r o f A n t h o n y a n d C y r i l A r m b r i s t e r , r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s o f t h e F r a n c e s A r m b r i s t e r e s t a t e , i n t h e i r a p p e a l o v e r t h e 1 5 a c r e t r a c t k n o w n a s t h e V i l l a g e E s t a t e , i t r e j e c t e d t h e i r a p p e a l o v e r t h e m u c h l a r g e r 4 3 0 a c r e F r e e m a n H a l l p a r c e l . T h e j u d g m e n t , w r i t t e n b y A p p e a l J u s t i c e E m a n u e l O s a d e b a y , r e c o r d e d h o w t h e d i s p u t e h a d a r i s e n o u t o f a C e r t i f i c a t e o f T i t l e g r a n t e d u n d e r t h e Q u i e t i n g T i t l e s A c t , f o l l o w i n g a p e t i t i o n b r o u g h t b y m e m b e r s o f t h e M a c T a g g a r t a n d L i g h t b o u r n f a m i l i e s . A l m o s t 1 , 0 0 0 a c r e s o f l a n d o n C a t I s l a n d w a sC a t I s l a n d f a m i l y i n p a r t i a l w i n o n 4 5 0 a c r e d i s p u t eO t h e r s i d e i n c l u d e d M a c T a g g a r t f a m i l y , a n d D P M B r e n t S y m o n e t t e s w i f e S E E p a g e 6 BB R E N T S Y M O N E T T E B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e c o s t t o r e p a i r t h e c l o s e d B a h a m a s F i l m S t u d i o s d e v e l o p m e n t h a s i n c r e a s e d b y $ 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 a s a r e s u l t o f d e l a y s i n c o n c l u d i n g a n e w l e a s e a g r e e m e n t w i t h t h e G o v e r n m e n t , i t s c h a i r m a n y e s t e r d a y q u e s t i o n i n g w h e t h e r t h e I n g r a h a m a d m i n i s t r a t i o n w a s s e r i o u s a b o u t c o m p l e t i n g a n e w H e a d s o f A g r e e m e n t f o r t h e p r o j e c t . N a s h v i l l e b a s e d i n v e s t m e n t b a n k e r R o s s F u l l e r , i n a s e r i e s o f e m a i l e d r e s p o n s e s t o T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s s q u e s t i o n s , s a i d h e w a s u n w i l l i n g t o i n v e s t f u r t h e r f u n d s i n m a i n t e n a n c e a n d r e p a i r s t o t h e F i l m S t u d i o s w a t e r t a n k a n d o t h e r f a c i l i t i e s u n t i l a n a g r e e m e n t w i t h t h e G o v e r n m e n t w a s c o n c l u d e d . H e t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s : I n e g o t i a t e d a d e a l w i t h t h e P r i m e M i n i s t e r e a r l y i n J u l y 2 0 0 8 f o r 1 2 0 a c r e s o f l a n d , w h i c h i n c l u d e d t h e t a n k a n d b u i l d i n g s t h a t w e h a d r e n o v a t e d . T h e r e h a s b e e n n o c h a n g e i n t h i s t h a t I a m a w a r e o f . T h e G o v e r n m e n t a p p a r e n t l y d o e s n o t b e l i e v e t h i s i s i m p o r t a n t e n o u g h t o p u s h t h r o u g h t h e n e w H e a d s o f A g r e e m e n t a n d l e a s e , a l t h o u g h t h e y t e l l m e o n a b i w e e k l y b a s i s t h a t i t w i l l b e c o m p l e t e d s o o n . I t w a s l a s t u n d e r s t o o d t h a t t h e a g r e e m e n t s w e r e b e i n g s c r u t i n i s e d b y t h e A t t o r n e y G e n e r a l s O f f i c e . T h e B a h a m a s F i l m S t u d i o s s i t e i s e f f e c t i v e l y c l o s e d , w i t h j u s t a s k e l e t o n s e c u r i t y s t a f f u n d e r s t o o d t o b e o n s i t e . T h e d e v e l o p m e n t i s e f f e c t i v e l y i n l i m b o , a f a r c r y f r o m t h e d a y s w h e n i t s w a t e r t a n k w a s u s e d f o r t h e f i l m i n g o f a l l w a t e r b a s e d s c e n e s f o r t h e P i r a t e s o f t h e C a r i b b e a n I I a n d I I I s e q u e l s . I t i s n o w a v i r t u a l c e r t a i n t y t h a t t h e B a h a m a s F i l m S t u d i o s w i l l n o t p l a y h o s t t o L e a s e d e l a y i n c r e a s e s S t u d i o r e p a i r s $ 5 0 0 k C h a i r m a n o f G r a n d B a h a m a b a s e d F i l m S t u d i o s q u e s t i o n s w h e t h e r g o v e r n m e n t s e r i o u s a b o u t a g r e e i n g n e w H e a d s o f A g r e e m e n t a n d l e a s e f o r p r o j e c t S a y s u n w i l l i n g t o c o m m i t f u n d s t o r e p a i r s a n d m a i n t e n a n c e u n t i l i m p a s s e r e s o l v e d N o p l a n s t o s e l l f a c i l i t y a t t h e m o m e n t S E E p a g e 5 B B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r A l e a d i n g n e w c a r d e a l e r y e s t e r d a y s a i d i t m i g h t n o t h a v e g o n e a h e a d w i t h i t s m o r e t h a n $ 7 0 0 , 0 0 0 f o u r s t a g e e x p a n s i o n i f w e h a d o u r c r y s t a l b a l l a n d p r e d i c t e d t h e r e c e s s i o n , y e t i t i s h o p i n g t h e i n v e s t m e n t w i l l l e a v e i t w e l l p o s i t i o n e d t o e x p l o i t e c o n o m i c r e c o v e r y d e s p i t e h a v i n g t o p u t t h e f i n a l p h a s e o n h o l d . R i c k L o w e , N a s s a u M o t o r C o m p a n y s ( N M C ) o p e r a t i o n s m a n a g e r , t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h e s e c o n d s t a g e o f t h e c o m p a n y s e x p a n s i o n t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f i t s n e w c l i e n t r e c e p t i o n b u i l d i n g i n t h e s e r v i c e a r e a , a n d e v e n t u a l d e m o l i t i o n o f t h e e x i s t i n g f a c i l i t y w a s m a y b e o n e t h i r d t o o n e h a l f o f t h e w a y f i n i s h e d . H o w e v e r , h e a d d e d : Q u i t e h o n e s t l y , h a d w e h a d o u r c r y s t a l b a l l , w e w o u l d p r o b a b l y n o t h a v e d o n e t h i s , b u t o n c e w e s i g n e d t h e c o n t r a c t w e h a d t h e c o m m i t m e n t o f o u r o w n e r s t o s e e i t t h r o u g h . W h e n t h e e c o n o m i c t u r n a r o u n d t a k e s p l a c e , h o p e f u l l y w e l l b e i n a b e t t e r p o s i t i o n f o r t h e f u t u r e . I t s c e r t a i n l y n o t a g o o d t i m e t o b e i n a n y b u s i n e s s , b u t h o p e f u l l y t h i n g s w i l l s t a r t t o t u r n a r o u n d i n t h e n e x t q u a r t e r o r n e x t s i x m o n t h s , a n d w e w i l l h a v e d o n e t h e r i g h t t h i n g . T h e r e w e r e l i k e l y t o b e a n o t h e r f o u r t o f i v e w e e k s * N a s s a u M o t o r C o m p a n y w o u l d n o t g o n e a h e a d w i t h m o r e t h a n $ 7 0 0 k g r o w t h h a d i t k n o w n o f u p c o m i n g r e c e s s i o n * F i r m i / 3 t o 1 / 2 w a y t h r o u g h s e c o n d p h a s e , w i t h f i v e h y d r a u l i c l i f t s / s e r v i c e b a y s o p e r a t i o n a l f o r t h r e e m o n t h s * B u t f i r m t o p u t p h a s e f o u r o n h o l d f o r n o w S E E p a g e 5 B B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r G i n n w i l l s t i l l e m p l o y c l o s e t o 4 0 0 p e r s o n s i n G r a n d B a h a m a s W e s t E n d e v e n a f t e r i t s O l d B a h a m a B a y r e s o r t r e l e a s e s 8 5 s t a f f b y M o n d a y , a l t h o u g h s o u r c e s y e s t e r d a y e x p r e s s e d c o n c e r n t h a t a m a j o r r e f i n a n c i n g d e a l f o r i t s p r o j e c t m a y h a v e s t a l l e d o r f a l l e n t h r o u g h . T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s r e v e a l e d b a c k i n F e b r u a r y 2 0 0 9 t h a t a m a j o r f i n a n c i n g d e a l f o r t h e $ 4 . 9 b i l l i o n G i n n s u r m e r p r o j e c t w a s b e i n g b a c k e d b y a w e a l t h y A r a b p r i n c e , b e l i e v e d t o b e f r o m D u b a i , a l t h o u g h t h e f u n d s w e r e d u e t o o r i g i n a t e f r o m S w i s s a n d I t a l i a n s o u r c e s . H o w e v e r , c o n t a c t s f a m i l i a r w i t h t h e s i t u a t i o n y e s t e r d a y e x p r e s s e d c o n c e r n t h a t B o b b y G i n n , p r i n c i p a l o f G i n n C l u b s & R e s o r t s a n d G i n n D e v e l o p m e n t C o m p a n y , w a s n o w i n t h e p r o c e s s o f s e e k i n g a l t e r n a t i v e f i n a n c i n g f o r t h e W e s t E n d d e v e l o p m e n t , i n d i c a t i n g t h a t t h e D u b a i b a s e d d e a l m a y n o t b e h a p p e n i n g . I t i s u n d e r s t o o d t h a t , h a d t h i s f i n a n c i n g c o m e t h r o u g h , i t w o u l d h a v e p r o v i d e d M r G i n n w i t h t h e f u n d i n g t o b u y o u t h i s o r i g i n a l f i n a n c i n g p a r t n e r f o r G i n n s u r m e r , t h e U S b a s e d r e a l e s t a t e p r i v a t e e q u i t y g r o u p , L u b e r t A d l e r . A n d M r G i n n , w h o i s n o w f o c u s e d s o l e l y o n t h e G i n n s u r m e r p r o j e c t , p l u s a n o t h e r d e v e l o p m e n t i n C o l o r a d o , w o u l d h a v e h a d e n o u g h f i n a n c i n g l e f t o v e r t o s t a r t v e r t i c a l c o n s t r u c t i o n a t W e s t E n d . R y a n J u l i s o n , G i n n s v i c e p r e s i d e n t o f c o m m u n i c a t i o n s , y e s t e r d a y t o l d t h i s n e w s p a p e r t h a t h e h a d n o i n f o r m a t i o n o n t h e D u b a i b a c k e d f i n a n c i n g , a n d w h e t h e r i t h a d s t a l l e d o r f a l l e n t h r o u g h . B o b b y G i n n s d o i n g a l o t o f t h i n g s a c r o s s t h e c o m p a n y t h a t I m n o t p r i v y t o , h e a d d e d . G i n n s n e e d f o r n e w f i n a n c i n g b e c a m e p a i n f u l l y o b v i o u s l a s t y e a r , a f t e r t h e c o m p a n y a n d L u b e r t A d l e r w e r e f o r c e d t o r e a c h a n a g r e e m e n t w i t h a C r e d i t S u i s s e l e d c o n s o r t i u m o v e r Q u e s t i o n s o v e r G i n n r e f i n a n c eS E E p a g e 4 B T r a v e l s u p p l i e r c l o s u r e s b l o w f o r O u t I s l a n d sS E E p a g e 4 B BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Hung jury in Dorneil Ferguson murder trial B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net THE DORNEIL Fer guson murder trial ende d with a hung jury yes terday after jurors failed t o reach decisive verdicts on three separate charges. D udleyDuran Moree, 23, Mr Fergu son’s co-worker, is charged with his murder as well as the attemptedm urder of the morti cian’s wife, Yuzann. Moree is also charged with possession of a firearm with the intentt o endanger the life of the couple’s daughter Dorneisha, who was seven months at the time of the shootingi ncident. The couple were shot as they slept in the bedroom of their Family Street apartment off Soldier Road on the morning of June 26, 2008. Moree has main tained his innocence. After three hours of deliberation, the jury of Failure to reach decisive verdicts on three separate charges SEE page eight SEE page eight By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Businessman Leslie Maycock lost his battle for life and died on Thursday in hospital one week after he was shot by armed robbers outside his business. Maycock, 50, was detained in critical, but stable condition in the Intensive Care Unit at Rand Memorial Hospital after being shot on July 15. Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle said his death now pushes the homicide count to six for the year on Grand Bahama. Maycock, a former police officer, was closing his store in the Businessman dies one week after being shot by robbers By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THERE was an outpouring of love and a call for justice for 18year-old Brenton Smith last night in Stapledon Gardens as scores of young people and family members gathered last night to remember the life of the ambitious young man killed by a stray bullet in a police shoot out. The “Candlelight Vigil” organised by Brenton’s friends drew a large crowd of people who took the opportunity to express what a kind, funny, humble and driven person their fallen friend was, and their sorrow for the loss he REMEMBERING BRENTONSMITH HECTOR AND ROSETTA SMITH , the parents of Brenton Smith, look at their son’s photograph during the memorial held yesterday in Stapledon Gardens. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page eight SEE page seven R eginald Ferguson By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net AN Abaco restaurant own er has been arrested in Florida with the son of former Miami Dolphins owner H Wayne Huizenga after the pair were suspected of trying to burgle a woman’s home. However, it is believed that Huizenga, under the influence of alcohol, mistook the house for his own and had tried to enter. In a bizarre scenario, Bahamian Patrick Stewart, 44, the owner of Cracker P’s Bar and Grill, was arrested on Monday by Fort Lauderdale police after his friend Robert Ray Huizenga allegedly docked his boat at the wrong house and tried to get inside. Yesterday Huizenga pleaded not guilty to boating under the influence of alcohol. Police say Stewart is expected to face charges of trespassing, possession of a controlled substance, and possession of cannabis under 20 grams. Stewart, whose popular restaurant sits on a 7.5 acre beachfront property in Lub ber’s Quarters, Abaco, has yet to be arraigned. According to a police report, the fiasco unfolded when officers got an 11.15pm phone call from a woman liv ing at Lido Drive, Fort Lauderdale. She said two men were at the rear door of her residence “jiggling at the door, attempt Bahamian arrested with son of former Miami Dolphins owner SEE page seven ROBERT Ray Huizenga (left and Bahamian Patrick Stewart. By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net ANGRY homeowners in the Vista Marina subdivision claim Government is continuing to leave them in the dark about the construction of the multi-million dollar highway being built around and within the borders of their land. They said they are distressed about possible flooding, property devaluation, noise and traffic pollution they feel will stem from the Homeowners claim they are ‘kept in dark’ over highway construction SEE page eight

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T HE harbour at Arawak C ay is in the process of b eing dredged to go along with Government’s plan to move the container port to Arawak Cay. The Tribune hit the streets to find out what the average Bahamian thinks about the matter: STEPHEN LOGAN I think it will be better for the Bahamas because they are dredging the harbour to bring in the cruise ships, more cruise ships, more people, more money so that’s why I a m for it. I don’t think the environmental r isk will be a big problem. I think the peop le who are doing it will be experienced e nough to take care of all the environmental risk and problems that will come up, I think they should be able to handle t he problems. G INO THORTON I am not for it. For instance, If you take t his area out here where the ships are now ( pointing toward Nassau Harbour) for a point in time people had the authority to g o where they want to go. Since the Government took over they can’t do that anymore. Everything is private security and it w ill be the same way down there (Arawak Cay). The freedom we have now we won’t h ave it anymore, that’s why I’m not for it. C LAUDETTE LUNDY I am against the dredging of the harbor at Arawak Cay. They should take it down t o Clifton Pier. MARGARET B ULLARD If the Government wants to do it, then that is what’s gonna happen, but I don’t believe it will affect the Bahamian people thatm uch except with the beaches. When holidays come around people like to go to t he beach and there is hardly enough beaches out there now. MORRIS HENERY Well personally I wished they would h ave moved all of the cargo shipping from d owntown or the immediate downtown area, but the powers-that-be say that’sw here they want to put it. M y only opinion is that they should take it (the harbour immediate area of town so that they can get rid of some of the congestion. I’m not saying that only thel orries are causing the congestion there are a number of cars causing it also. But if that’s where they want to put it I’m waiting to see what sort of traffic relief we are going to get by putting it there (Arawak Cay There are two big cruise ships coming on board and we would like to get that business as an addition to what we have now. It will be good for tourism and local businesses. FORMER PLP MP for Kennedy Kenyatta Gibson has been named by Govern ment to act as the new chairman of the Mortgage Corporation. Crossing the floor of the House of Assembly to join the FNM on January 21 of this year, Mr Gibson has also most recently been named to the Lands Review committee, which was formally appointed by Parliament on Wednesday. The Tribune understands that the formal documentation from the Governor General has yet to be delivered to the MP. The Mortgage Corpora tion has been in the press recently because it forclosed on a number of Bahamians who were hard-hit by the slumping economy. By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net T HE Prime Minister has p romised to take action to ensure that all people whose Crown land applicationshave been approved will “get their papers to which they are entitled” by the endof the year. S peaking in the House of Assembly, Hubert Ingraham said he is “disheartened” by the number of applications that have received approvals but have not yet been executed “notwithstanding that the requisite fee has been paid, i n too many cases, years and y ears ago.” I was astounded to see t he number of people in A cklins who have not yet received their grants even though I approved their g rants years ago. I will dispatch surveyors to Acklins in short order to f inalise the process so that b efore the end of the year w e shall issue these people of Acklins and Mayaguana, in Bogue, Eleuthera andG rand Bahama and Abaco and elsewhere in the Bahamas their papers to which they are entitled.” H e made this commitment as he noted that there are also 9,000 outstanding a pplications for Crown land w hich have not even yet g one through the earliest stages of review by the Mini stry of Lands that which results in a “recommendation” being made by the Director of Lands and Surveys and the under-secret ary in the Ministry of Lands a s to whether the request s hould get the go-ahead. Mr Ingraham recently presented data in parliament that shows that just under 1.4 million acres of available Crown land still exists in the country, which i s made up of 3.4 million a cres. This amounts to approximately 10 acres per person, or 55 per cent of usable land in the entire country, the r est being privately held or c lassified as wetlands. MPs, speaking last week d uring the debate on a reso lution to create a select c ommittee on Crown land, suggested that how suchl and is distributed, to whom, a fter what length of time and in what quantities, has traditionally been seen to be arbitrary or on the basis of “kisses going by favours.” It has been proposed by some that a written policy o n how Crown land is dist ributed should be made a vailable and the considerat ion process should be finite rather than taking over a decade in some cases. Y esterday Mr Mitchell issued a statement saying that he and Philip Davis, the other PLP MP appointed to the land committee, “want t o get to work with disp atch” in carrying out its r esponsibilities. “We intend to engage in a serious effort to carry out the will of the House. We look forward to working with our colleagues from the FNM in a similarly serious e ffort. With hard work and determination, the country should know the full story in this matter in short order, including testing the integrit y of claims made in the H ouse by the Prime Minister and others about the a buse of Crown land by form er staff members at the D epartment of Lands and Surveys.” M r Mitchell added that as t he committee does its work the trail of evidence will be followed wherever it leads “and let the chips fall where they may.” This Lands Committee was formed following artic les in T he Tribune r eveali ng claims of nepotism and c orruption in the Departm ent of Lands and Surv eys. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com A SUBSIDIARY OF A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating WinnerResidenceTim Aylen (2NassauErick DarlingNassauPaul HardingNassauAnthony HepburnNassauTim HiggsAbacoLinda HuberNassauJulie LightbournEleutheraRachel LightbourneNassauMelissa Maura (2NassauRoston McGregor (2ExumaMichael ToogoodNassaufamily guardian’scalendarphotocontestwinners Congratulationstothisyear’swinnersinthe Family Guardian Annual Calendar Photo ContestThe 14 winning photographs will appear in the Company’s 2010 Calendar “A Celebration of Nature,” whichalso commemorates the 45th Anniversary of Family Guardian. Family Guardian thanks all participants who submitted photos in the annual photo contest. Photo by Michael Toogood Family Guardian’s 2010 Calendar Approved Crown land applicants ‘will get papers by end of year’ Kenyatta Gibson is named as Mortgage Corporation chairman T ALK STREET Bahamians have their say on harbour dredging Hubert Ingraham SEEPAGETHREE

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POLITICIANS in recent times have been utilizing the practice of placing crown land grants in the names of their m aids, house-keepers, gardeners, wives, and friends as a m eans to avoid being implicated in any land-looting scandals, B ahamas Democratic Movement leader Cassius Stuart claimed yesterday. Calling these actions “disturbing and distressful”, MrS tuart said the Bahamas’ polit ical leaders have used their “political operatives and cronies” from the 1950s to present to essentially syphon offt his most important and precious commodity. H e said: “The Bahamas may not have natural resources such as oil or gold but what we do have is the commodity of land. This precious commodity is supposed to be held in trust for the Bahamian people by our elected leaders. However, the recent revelations indicated that many of our leaders, whom we have trusted to protect our natural resources for future generations of Bahamians, have looted land for their personal use. “These men and women, who were supposed to be the guardians of our natural treasures, became nothing but political pirates who raided the country of land for themselves and their children. “It is also heartbreaking to know that the men and women who claim to care so much about the Bahamian people and have trumpeted the cause of equality and land equity and even went as far as including in our Constitution, a preamble which states that the Bahamian people are ‘the successors and inheritors of these families of islands’, are nothing but mod-ern day pirates who care only about their own well being.” Noting that the average Bahamian often times is turned away by the government or outright rejected for any crown land application, Mr Stuart said that this often would only hap pen because they don’t have a “famous political name”. “It is unacceptable that the average Bahamian cannot get50 x 100 piece of property as crown grant to build a sensible home and our politicians over the years, have received hundreds of acres to build their luxurious mansions. In some cases, they even turn around and sell what they have received for hundreds of thousands of dollars, when they themselves paid little or noth ing for it. “Just recently, the director of land and survey was caught up in a shameful scandal i n which he was abusing his authority, by g ranting crown land in Exuma to his fam i ly members for little or nothing. “These family members in turn resold the same landf or hundreds of thou sand of dollars. “This practice is unethical and unacceptable and these men andw omen, who have engaged in such despicable practices, s hould hold their heads down in shame, because they were the chosen by the people of the Bahamas to be the guardians of our sacred trea sure, land.” In recent times, in the practice of landl ooting Mr Stuart said, some leaders h ave shifted to placing crown grants in t he names of housekeepers, gardeners, wives, friends and family members, to avoid be implicated o r having their name called in such a scandal as this. However, Mr Stuart said that the time has comef or Bahamians to put an end to the pillaging of crown land b y these “political pirates”. “The time is now for the Bahamian people to take back what is rightfully theirs, their inheritance in this country. The evidence is clear, the UBP, FNM and PLP all have been in a conspiracy to steal land f rom the Bahamian people, for themselves. These people are nothing but thieves and robbers and s hould never be address as honorable. The BDM con demns these men and their wicked practices. “Last election, the BDM m ade a promise that we would make crown land available to the average Bahamian who wants to build a home, build their businesses and build a lifea nd when elected 2012, we will ensure that you, the average B ahamian, receives a piece of the Bahamas, so that you can enrich your lives and have a stake in your country,” he said. By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net DELAYS in processing and producing passports is vexing Bahamians whose travel plans are being thwarted by the hold up. Long waiting lines to put in applications are followed by incorrect collection dates driving Bahamians back to the Passport O ffice in Thompson Boulevard, Nassau, several times before their passports are actually ready for collection. Once there, citizens are forced to wait at least half an hour before being told their passports are not ready, only to return again the following week to be disappointed once again, a passport collector fumed. She applied for her passport in May and w as told to return on June 25 to collect it, but when she called she was told the passport would not be ready for another week. A week later, the 24-year-old went through the same process again, and it was not until six weeks after the original collection date that she was able to finally collect the document. She said: “I had waited three and a half hours to put in the application, and when I finallyw ent to pick up the passport I was there for around an hour and 45 minutes before they gave it to me. “I was waiting outside in the hot sun for around half and hour a nd when I got in there was a room full of people and everyone was so angry. “When I finally got to the wind ow I was told it was ready and to sit down, then it took over an hour for them to find my passport in the building.” As the woman waited for staff to find h er passport, she said another applicant told her it was the seventh time she had returned to the office to collect her passport after being told it was ready, and each time shew as forced to wait in the queue before she was then told it was not. “Several people were told their passports were not ready yet, when they had been told it would be,” she said. “I don’t see why they don’t just extend the deadline to be more realistic. Some people had arranged to travel because they had been told it was going to be ready, and then it was not. It doesn’t seem fair.” M inister of Foreign Affairs and Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette said while there have been some improve-m ents at the passport office, there is still work to be done. He said: “It takes around eight weeks for a passport to be processed at the moment which is totally unacceptable a nd we are working on that. We are doing all that is humanly possible to try to assist.” The Minister explained how College of the Bahamas students have been brought int o assist with data entry and additional staff from the ministry have been assigned to the office to help process the backlog. An additional window is being added in the collection office, and the problem of people lining up outside the building to put in their applications as highlighted in The Tribune last summer, has been eased by t he additional staff. Mr Symonette said part of the current problem is the high volume of people wanting to travel in the summer and putting in applications after their passports have e xpired, along with and influx of college students who need to travel to school in September, and others who need to have their passports are fast-tracked for medicalr easons. He added: “There is no forward planning and that has added to the frustration. “People should look at their passports and see when they are due for renewal and put their applications in early.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009, PAGE 3 Anger over passport processing delays B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Grand Bahama Police are s earching for two male residents of Eight Mile Rock who are wanted for questioning i n connection with armed robbery. Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle said police have released wanted posters of Ezrin Green J r, alias “Snake” of Queens Highway, Han na Hill, and Jermaine Moss, alias “JB”, of Jackson Corner, Hanna Hill. He said the men are considered armed and extremely dangerous. G reen, 24, is described as being of dark complexion and having dark brown eyes. He is 5ft 7 inches tall, of thin build andw eighs about 145 pounds. Moss, 25, is of dark complexion with black e yes. He is 5ft 11 inches tall, of muscular Men wanted for questioning in connection with armed robbery BDM leader makes allegations over politicians, crown land F OX Hill MP Fred Mitchell, along with Cat Island, Rum Cay, and San Salvador MP Philip Davis, i ssued a statement yesterday welcoming the appointment of the committee to investigate the disposition o f all publicly held lands in t he Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The statement read: “My colleague and I from the O pposition side want to get to work with dispatch and forthwith. We intend to engage in a serious effort to c arry out the will of the H ouse. We look forward to working with our colleagues from the FNM in a similarly serious effort. With hard work and determination, the country should know the full story in this matter in short order i ncluding testing the integrit y of claims made in the House by the Prime Minister and others about the abuse of crown land by form er staff members at the Department of Lands and Surveys.” M r Mitchell added that as the committee does it’s work the trail of evidence will be followed wherever it leads and let the chips fall where t hey may”. M Ps welcome investigation into land disposition Man expected in court over alleged firearm possession A MAN allegedly found in possession of a firearm and 10 rounds of ammunition is expected to be arraigned in Magistrates Court today. he was arrested at around4.30pmon Wednesday when police officers from the Fox Hill division and the mobile division found a 9mm pistol and 10 bullets for the gun while on patrol in Grant Street, Fox Hill. Brent Symonette CASSIUS STUART To have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at: l etters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207 Ezrin Green Jermaine Moss build and weighs around 180 pounds. Anyone with any information concerni ng these two men is asked to contact the police in Grand Bahama at 352-1919, 3519 111, 351-9991, 352-8351, 352-9076, and 3503125 or call 911.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. T he desolate soul of a nation lay trodden amongst the squalor of Nassau city in throes of a slow and painful decline. In this u nstately quagmire of affairs, a people desperately try to make sense of what isn ow a deplorable, disgraceful embarrassment. How have we allowed our g odly attributes to be disparaged by our desire to live outside ourselves; so convol uted has our path become that destiny is confused, we have tied her feet with thec orruption of our hands. It is time for the Bahamas to find implicit impetus through the interpretation of its rich and diverse culture, thus translating to one beautiful language of love for all within our borders. C ulture speaks to the heart; it demands justice for the disenfranchised; brokers p eace for those under tyranny; creates a legacy for state-l ess generations; nurtures f reedom for the ‘Diaspora’ and heals the broken and abused. One ponders, as cycles of time usher in governments intended to be gifts, however, too often they become b urdensome liabilities on t he scale of history. Also of n ote, the footprints of a genuine Christian ship seem to b e disappearing in our society, trampled by the obfus-c ation of religion. As with TS Eliot’s “The W asteland”, we are wells drawn dry; a land in droughto f vision; depleted of natural spiritual resources; souls s carred by addiction to vanities; now that the mirror of r eality is not clouded by economic prosperity, we see exactly who we are. We as a people must d esire learning; invite counsel, thirst for truth and abhor the “deadly sin” of greed that has eroded foundations of the four pillars of this society. Culture is hope, though f ragile it endures beyond all o ther spirit vestments; it m ust be culture to bring r estoration to a discomposed p eople; and to be princely funded as such. Mark my word, all else will miserably fail. S adly, we see a rejuvenated, toxic illiteracy fueling the “gang” sub-culture and its music, seething in undercurrents of juvenile angst on o ur school grounds and streets; but in midst of this madness, we are delightedw ith a resurging climate of culture breathing beauty into season after vibrant sea-s on of literary, theatre, dance, art and music production. Kudos. W e must now ask ourselves the questions: “Are the triumphs of this coun-t ry’s change and progress, now resigned to pyrrhic victories?” and “Who do we celebrate, if not ourselves?” It will serve wisdom well, if this letter is taken into context, of the preceding four. B e assured, culture is the glorious expression of a people, a compass for the pre s ent age, the archives of the past and our grand hope fort he future. More will be r evealed GREGORY NEELY Nassau, July 21, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm D ESPITE this year’s record breaking rainf all there are residents in various areas of New Providence who still complain of water shortages. Recently residents in the east complained of low to non-existent water pressure. They said they were on the verge of despair because they have had to suffer these short ages for more than three years. “We have been forgotten, this must be the most hateful place in Nassau to live,” said a man whose wife suffers from a kidney disease. “Our ancestors must have buried dead people in this ground that’s why we’re so cursed.” He was referring to an area behind Seagrapes plaza. What with major water leaks, complications with the reverse osmosis plant at Baillou Hills when a computer malfunctioned and technicians had to be flown in from the Caymans to restore supplies, many Bahamians know the inconvenience of having to go without water. B ahamians will have to think of including a water tank in future construction. Bermud a, which has no rainy season, rivers or fresh w ater lakes, depends entirely on the weather for its water supply. T herefore, by law all private homes and apartment complexes must have their own water tanks to store whatever rainfall the island gets. The size of these tanks is man d ated by local building and planning regulations. Homes can store about 14,000 gal l ons per bedroom independently of any other building. However, this does put up thec ost of building. A ccording to a report on Bermuda “the most common source of water for home and apartment buildings are often found under bedrooms, living rooms or patios but are not allowed under bathrooms or kitchens. Bermuda relies on the combination of rainwater falling on roofs and piped to more than 21,000 water tanks and groundwater extracted from underground lensesfor more than 90 per cent of its entire water supply. Rainwater by itself is nowhere near sufficient, at a volume of 1.4 million gallons overall yearly, to supply all of Bermuda's demands in one of the highest populations anywhere in the world per square mile. “Some commercial and domestic proper ties have wells to supplement the rainwater supply. There are over 3,000 such wells. All must be licensed by the Health Department of the Bermuda Government. They can be used only for flushing and washing purposes. I t is illegal to drink water from these private wells because of the potential for conta mination from many sources, including nitrates from cesspits. Routine periodic tests a re made to ensure standards are maintained t o protect public health.” Bahamians should consider water catchm ents of some sort if only to water their g ardens in the dry season so as not to be such a drain on government’s water supply. O ne of the Water Corporation’s greatest challenges is the loss of water either throughl eaks, or theft or metering inaccuracies. D uring the Budget debate in the House of Assembly recently Phenton Neymour, StateM inister of the Environment, said the corp oration estimates that it loses five million imperial gallons a day. If one million of thisw ater had been sold, at the end of a year it w ould have brought a $5 million return to t he Treasury. A lthough to include water tanks beneath a building would increase the initial cost of i ts construction, Bahamians should study their water bills and decide whether therew ould be a saving on the long stretch if gove rnment water could be reduced or eliminated. Instead of having tanks that would be s tandbys in case the government supply failed, the water tanks could become them ain supplier with government’s water held a s standby in case tanks run low during the dry season. Who has the better team? IN a recent interview Opposition leader Perry Christie said that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham is burdened down with a team of new people, lacking in experience. This would seem to be a good team to have, because at least they can learn from a seasoned political leader. It is at least a better team than the one that brought Mr Christie’s administration down in 2007. Even Mr Christie had to admit after his loss at the polls that he took too much for granted and failed to assess the impact his party’s scandals would have on its election. Mr Christie was characterised as a weak leader, unable to discipline his party and parliamentarians. With that assessment, by some of his own members, it seems that Mr Ingraham has more chance with his team than Mr Christie with his. Culture – our grand hope for the future LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Overcoming water shortages WCVH6800 DCVH680E * StunningPRACTICAL 322-2188/9 You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. $2575.00 EDITOR, The Tribune. To see Mr Symonette, Deputy Prime Minister, a family friend, a true and kind Bahami an. Also Mr Hanna, Governor General, a man for all seasons. While sitting in my TV room a sense of pride came over me while watching the Independence Celebration on television from Clifford Park, July 9, 2009. Also to see my neighbour, island and home town boy, but most of all friend and brother on that podium. Tears of joy came to my eyes to see from whence we came. I am speaking of Commodore Clifford Scavella. There are some folks out there who are fanning a campaign to destroy him. He is not into politics, nor is he representing any political party. Please give him a chance to carry out government and his mandate. I recall after he was installed as commodore, I asked the Lord what I should tell him. I r emember driving down the section of Blue Hill Road and Independence Highway near Esso Service station. The Holy Spirit said these words ,to me: “Tell him his success depends on who he puts first.” I added a few words to that, I said always put God first. God put him there and as long as he put God first, he will be just all right. Anytime you are doing a good job some folks will not like you. Remember, Jesus was not liked by all either. Keep up the good works and continue to make us proud to be Bahamian and show the world that the Bahamas still have men with integrity. CLADWELL FARRINGTON Nassau, July 2009. The Bahamas still have men with integrity EDITOR, The Tribune. This letter is in reference to the article highlighting Mr Sidney Strachan’s comments about gambling laws being changed in the Bahamas. In my humble opinion I don’ think anything has to be changed in the gambling laws! If government would be wise and condone a National Lottery where anyone could purchase a ticket and the monies could be used in so many ways in building the necessary schools, more well staffed clinics throughout the islands, and better qualified teachers. This scheme has been quite successful in other countries therefore I strongly feel that it should be started here. HELEN ASTARITA Nassau, July 19, 2009. Government should condone a National Lottery

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THE Grand Bahama Airp ort Company (GBAC c essfully conducted a fullscale airport emergency response exercise. Operation Mike Alpha was designed to test the emergency preparedness of f irst-response agencies, gove rnment departments and private sector entities. The exercise simulated the crash of a Marlin Airways SAAB 340 aircrafta rriving from Nassau carryi ng 10 passengers, three c rew members, and 2,000 pounds of fuel. “Each airport must have an emergency plan, and thei dea behind this drill is to test this emergency plan,” said Phil Carey, Director of Grand Bahama Airport Company. The exercise is conducte d at least once every two y ears in accordance with requirements set by the International Civil AviationO rganization (ICAO The goals of the exercise w ere to: l Synchronize the actions o f all response agencies. l Safely rescue all persons involved in the mishap. l Prevent other emergency situations from arising. l Set up appropriate site c ontrols and command a uthority. l Control the movement of persons to and from the scene and ensure the establishment and maintenance of effective communications. M r Carey said: “The drill simulated an aircraft crash 2,000ft from the threshold of Runway 24 prior to land i ng. In the process, we suc cessfully tested our initial response, our incident com m and, and our EOC (Emer gency Operations Centre). Grand Bahama Health Services and the Royal Bahamas Police were also able to test portions of their emergency response plans, coordinate their plans with o ur own, and join us in coll ectively correcting any deficiencies that existed.” Sharon Williams, Grand B ahama Health Services administrator, was also pleased with the overall succ ess of her agency’s r esponse to the drill. S he said: “We had an incident where, in real time, an a mbulance broke down, but we were immediately able to commandeer anotherr eplacement resource. We’re thinking it went well from the response site andw e will be working on the communications aspect of the exercise, providing bet ter channels for all persons.” C ommenting on the suc cessful response of the Roy al Bahamas Police Force, I nspector Henry Rolle said: “We had our agencies from the Criminal Investigation Department, Scenes of Crime, and the Grand Bahama Fire Department a ll participate, and it was a g ood coordination. The exercise was fruitful and our overall response time was as uccess.” The exercise also included the observation and critic ism of volunteers from a v ariety of organizations and i ndustrial companies. As he thanked these volu nteers for their participa tion, Mr Carey noted that, aside from ensuring that thea irport’s obligations under the ICAO annex are met, all of the participants sharea professional interest as first responders in improving their emergency pre paredness. H e said the exercise was particularly rewarding to all parties. C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009, PAGE 5 Full-scale airport emergency response exercise successful By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORTThe Bahamas Christian Council will host a one-day N ational Empowerment Summit on Grand Bahama to inspire Bahamians during these hard economic times. Rev Patrick Paul, president of the Bahamas C hristian Council, said the summit will take place on September 1 at Our Lucaya Resort. WechoseGrand B ahama because it is k nown to be the industria l capital of the Bahamas and we want to do what we can to stimulate the Grand Bahama economy,” he said. R ev Paul said speakers will include Dr Myles Munroe, Bishop Neil Ellis, Dr Simeon Hall, Rev Hayward Cooper and Grand Bahama Port A uthority president Ian R olle. He noted that the objective of the summit ist o inspire, motivate and encourage the people of the Bahamas, and particu larly in Grand Bahama, t o maximise this time and t o seek new opportunities. We believe that in relation to the downturn in the world’s economy t he church plays an important role in encour aging the public at large t o retool and look at oth er ways to empower ourselves and network together,” said Rev Paul. We want to use this time for what the scripture teaches it to be for. G od allows a downturn for us to have introspection and for us to regroupa nd retool ourselves.” R ev Paul believes that the church in the modern Bahamas must play itsr ole in the spiritual, social and economic develop ment of the country. “The church is called to b e intercessors and to seek to bridge the gap and assist our people inp ractical ways to be all they can be in our nation al development. We must seek to do what we can to stimulateour country,” he said. Rev Paul said they are e xpecting about 20 to 40 persons from New Providence alone, as well as a group from the Family Islands to attend the summit in Freeport. The topics that will be addressed are: Industry in Grand Bahama; the role of the church in industry; the need for Bahamians to take ownership in the Bahamas, and the role of the church in intercession. The daytime sessions begin at 8.30am and con tinue until 4pm, and evening sessions are from 6.30pm to 9.30pm. The summit is open to the public. Persons whoare interested in starting a business or those who are already in business, church leaders and minis ters are also invited to register. Christian Council to host empowerment summit in Grand Bahama By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net THE Church Without Borders International Ministries is playing host to a two-day conference designed to encourage religious followers to discover God’s plan for their lives. Pastor Mark Knowles from Holy Ghost and Fire Deliverance Centre is the guest speaker for the event which started on Thursday. Rev Knowles said although he has been a Christian for more than 20 years, his road to Christ and his pur pose was anything but easy. A native of Stanyard Creek, Andros, he explained his childhood was filled with many disappointments caming in the form of verbal and physical rejection, but also because he was considered the black sheep of his family. Because of these difficult beginnings, Mr Knowles said he eventually became a delinquent and ended missing numerous school days, he abusing drugs, and generally had a negative out look on life. However all of that soon changed where at the age of 15, he had an encounter with God that would change his life forever. As he made the decision to accept God’s will for his life, Mr Knowles said he still faced one challenge, he was unable to connect with the holy spirit and thus was unable to speak in tongues. However God’s will proved greater than his, and after gaining spiritual advice from Bishop Rodney Roberts during his primary years as a Christian, he was then able to connect with the spirit reaching a new level in his spirituality. Eventually he moved on to worship at Solomon’s Porce Outreach Min istries, where he was commissioned asa pastor, and that was where he realised that he was called to operate his own ministry and this was where his present ministry was born. Mr Knowles said throughout the years there have been many challenges which have forced him to keep the faith, and in doing so he has reaped the rewards of God’s plan. Now that he has started his own family, and established his own ministry, Mr Knowles said the time has come to nudge others to discover their purpose in Christ. With this conference being one of many plat forms embraced by Mr Knowles to share the promise of Christ, he said if only one person is inspired his mission would have been achieved. The conference which began yesterday under the theme, ‘Setting The Captives Free,’ will feature a presentation from Mr Knowles and others at the church located Edmira Plaza, Soldier Road North starting at 7pm. Chur ch Without Borders to host conference GBAC FIREFIGHTERS fight a fire that resulted from the simulated crash. GBAC’S FIREFIGHTERS demonstrate rescuing passeng ers from the downed aircraft. Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. PASTOR MARKKNOWLES

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By ADRIAN GIBSON ajbahama@hotmail.com IN THIS country, the strong societies that were founded by African slaves and were anthological/archaeological gems have now deteriorated into squalid pigsties. In New Providence, Bahamians and immigrants pay hefty rents to reside in Over-the-Hill shanties and dilapidated buildings throughout the island, apparently without any rent control as landlords rent dwellings at any rate they fancy. The Rent Control Act is outdated and needs to be completely overhauled and amended. Although there is supposed to be a Rent Control Board, comprised of ordinary citizens and chaired by a magistrate, this board is practically toothless since the Act only covers properties worth up to $75,000. This is dimwitted and needs urgent updating, since hardly any apartment, condo or house is worth less than $75,000 these days even in some parts of the ghetto! Let me also clearly state that any amendments to the Act must not be lopsided in favour of would-be tenants, as there are some who are just filthy and destroy rental accommodations, thereby leaving many landlords with unnecessary debt. There must be a sense of reason and responsibility on both sides. Rent control places a price ceiling on rental units, promotes fair play and limits the price a landlord can charge a tenant, outlining the services a landlord must provide and giving tenants the right, if a landlord fails to uphold his/her responsibilities as it relates to maintenance, to temporarily withhold rent or demand a lower rent. The Bahamas must adopt more comprehensive rent and eviction control laws, especially as most Bahamians rent accommodations. Enforcement of rent control and dispatching inspectors to investigate unscrupulous landlords suspected of acting in contravention to the Act, will reduce instances of profiteering through unfair rental rates or unreasonable rent hikes and mandate that landlords repair hidden defects and carry out adequate maintenance of rented properties. Implementing tougher rent control laws will also ensure the diversity of neighbourhoods and prevent landlords from imposing rent increases that force persons out of an area. In New York city, a Maximum Base Rent system (MBR establishes the maximum allowable rent for a place, sets guidelines that cover the cost of maintenance and building improvements, allows for landlords to make slight increases (up to a maximum of 7.5 per cent) every two years until the MBR is reached, and is calculated depending upon the water and sewerage charges, real estate taxes, operating and maintenance expenses, loss allowances, and upon vacancy and return of capital value. Frankly, effective rent control should also address lease renewals, evictions and senior citizens. These amendments would ensure that tenants are not unfairly evicted because an unscrupulous landlord wants to raise the rent and that the elderly aren’t saddled with rent increases in their old age. Some time ago, The Tribune ran a story about a 74-year-old Coconut Grove resident whose landlord raised the rent for a small wooden house to the point where it exceeded his meager pension. Senior citizen Maxwell Williams was living in substandard conditionsa clapboard structure, no electricity or running water, and an outdoor toiletfor $250 per month. Mr Williams, who previously was only requested to pay at the most $50 a month for the dilapidated shack, had his rent adjusted when his elderly landlord died and her granddaughter inherited the property. He claimed that although his new landlord made no renovations or upgrades to the building, she raised the rent from $50 to $250 per montheven higher than his sole income of $230 per month (old age pension In addition to still having to u se an outdoor toilet in the bushes behind the house, Mr Williams’ termite infested roofheld up by two pieces of woodleaked and the walls were rotting through. Every other day in New Providence, I see unkempt apartments and unsightly buildi ngs with broken windows, many of which appear to have not been painted in years. In some instances, particularly the ghettos of Nassau, people seem to live a peasant-like existence. In these rundown sections of society, landlords are constantly exploiting desolate tenants whod ejectedly live in sagging, grub by clapboard shacks with “pee buckets” in one corner. Contrasted to the suburbs, some of the places being rented are only comparable to a broken-down garden house. These inner-city areas are obscured by over grown weeds, prickle patchesa nd bushes, littered with garbage, wooden shipping crates and old, rusted appliances that are strewn about adjoining yards! In some parts of the “suburbs” of Carmichael, Cowpen Road and off Village Road, similar living conditions are observed. I have even seen leaning, rickety wooden houses on Shirley Street, which are complete eyesores and probably rented in excess of their real value. I have heard stories about the grimy walls, blocked toilets and the “dutty” mattresses that come with some rented accommodations. Any tenable place should be approved by the Ministry of Works and the Department of Environmental Health, and must have an occupancy certificate! Yet, there are many Bahamians and immigrants living like “slum dogs.” Quite honestly, the film Slum Dog Millionaire could have been easily shot in New Providence! According to section 20 of the Rent Control Act: “Where, upon a determination of the value of a dwellinghouse or of the furniture, the Boards finds that, in all the circumstances, the value declared by the landlord is unfair and unreasonable, it shall order the landlord to repay to the tenant the difference between the rent as a percentage of the determined value and the rent as a percentage of the declared value for the period of tenancy not e xceeding one year immediately preceding the date of determination, and may institute proceedings against the landlord for the offence of making an unfair and unreasonable declaration.” The aforementioned rarely happens! The Rent Control Board obviously has a lot of w ork to do and frankly, if the Consumer Affairs division of government sends out inspectors, they would easily find hundreds of cases where tenants are being charged unreasonable rates. Since the government’s real property tax exemption is$ 250,000 for first time home owners, $250,000 to $300,000 should also be the applicable price ceiling for homes falling under the Rent Control Act, not the measly $75,000 that the Act currently covers. According to the Act, the rent lawfully chargeable should not exceed1 5 per cent, per annum, of the value of the property, or 20 per cent per annum of furnished residences. While tenants are subject to rights of enjoymentmeaning they cannot be simply kicked out without a court orderlandlords must also be protected from tenants who destroy their property and consistently, and sometimes intentionally, fail to pay rent. Revamping the Landlords and Tenants Act as well as the Rent Control Act would only be effective if it leaves both the landlords and tenants in a win-win situation. CROWN LAND AND THE CHURCH This week, it was reported that the Golden Gates Assembly church initially applied for and received crown land for the purpose of building an old folks home. Wouldn’t that have been such a noble idea? However, once the land was granted, the church’s principals turned around and decided to build a subdivisionnamed after the pastor (Ros Davis Estates where houses were built on the land and sold for hundreds of thousands of dollars. Since this occurred under the former administration, was this another case of preferential treatment? Was it a politically expedient move on the part of former Prime Minister Perry Christie when he signed off on the variation to the original c rown land grant issued to the church? Indeed, while this move did create home ownership,I have no doubt that it also filled the coffers of those behind the construction, who were granted crown land for little-to-nothing and apparently made so much more. T hroughout the Bahamas, many church leaders are shallow in the word of God, as they would have spent too much time in pursuit of fame, money and erecting gargantuan, religious edifices to tend to the needs of the people and lead them to Christ. Any reverence for Godh as long left some churchmen, who shamelessly use seminars, tapes, CDs, books, conferences and other money-making schemesunder the guise of Christianityto enrich them selves. Yes, there are one or two pastors who use monies gener ated from their book sales andm otivational speaking tours to C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Stronger rent and eviction laws needed Y OUNG M AN S V IEW A DRIANGIBSON SEE page seven

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009, PAGE 7 A Festival of Time TreasureSATURDAY, JULY 25THComplimentary Jewellery Cleaning John Bull, 284 Bay St . (Restrictions apply: 2 jewellery items per person.12 noon 2pm David Yurman, Bay StreetComplimentary Watch Battery Replacement 12 noon 2pm John Bull, 284 Bay St.(Restrictions apply: 1 watch per person must be a John Bull featured brand.) *John Bull reserves the right to refuse any jewellery or watches based on condition.& July 25th -august 1st 284 bay street (242 crystal court at atlantis harbour bay mall at marathonmarina village palmdale abaco freeportharbour islandbvlgari cartier david yurman Complimentary Refreshments by Starbucks In-store Giveaways * Complimentary one-hour parking at The Bahamas Financial Centre for festival attendees. ENTERTOWIN his & her movado timepieces valued at $1,200.00 grand drawing saturday, august 1st RECEIVE FABULOUS SAVINGS ON SELECTWATCH & JEWELLERY PURCHASES“Stylist Event” 11am 1pm Pandora Boutique (John Bull, 284 Bay Street Bring in your personal Pandora collection & learn how to “Create Your Own Look.” . fund their churches, but they are vastly outnumbered by the reli gious charlatans. It is high-time that the government requires churches to submit independently-produced audits, which could go a long way in preserving the church’s integrity and possibly change the perception of many Bahami ans who now see the church as big businesses led by misers rather than ministers. PAUL RITCHIE There is a suspicion among Bahamians that some realtors are crooks, intent helping unscrupulous lawyers to quiet land titles or swindle elderly citizens of their birthright. Paul Ritchie stands above the fray as the consummate professional and an experienced realtor of more than 30 years. Last week, I would have requested Mr Ritchie’s appraisal services, and not only was I pleased with his timeliness and professionalism, but his rate was very reasonable, especially when contrasted to an absurd rate I had heard was being charged by another real estate firm. A fellow Long Islander, Mr Ritchie’s success is largely due to his quality of service, which is nearly unseen in today’s Bahamas. Rent and eviction FROM page six represents to society. Meanwhile, some said they a lso came to the memorial to show their support for some-o ne being held accountable for his death. Wearing green the St Augustine’s College graduate’s favourite colour overa hundred of Brenton’s friends and family watched as lideshow of photographs of Brenton, and paid their tributes over a microphone. His mother, Rosetta Smith said the gathering “made her feelg ood in her heart.” He was only here for 18 years, but he impacted so many people,” she said. Brenton, who lived in Seabreeze Estates, was shot on July 9 at around 8pm as p olice chased two suspected a rmed robbers in the area of Kemp Road. While his family are adamant that he died from a shot fired by police, the polices ay it is too early to determ ine who was responsible for the teenager’s death. A ball istics report, which could discern this, is said to have been completed, but its resultsh ave not been released. Speaking to The Tribune as they prepared to participate in the memorial last n ight, friends remembered someone who always had a problem with violence. M onique Hanna, a neighbour whose daughter grew up with Brenton, said the teenager was “someone who was trying to live right in society.” “He was in high school, he w as in college, and he was getting on with his life like a normal person. To get mixed up in something like this – an accident is an accident – but it’s just h urtful. I have two sons and I ’d hate to know they could just walk out on the street to play basketball or hang outa nd something could kick up in this so-called Christian nation the Bahamas is and someone could call me and say ‘Your son is shot, he’s lying in the road dead’. It’s very hurtful.” Thompson, 18, who knew Brenton since Grade seven, said he “couldn’t believe it”w hen he heard Brenton had been killed. He’s always been like a big brother to me. I just came to show my support we all love him, everyone loves him,” he told The Tribune. A nother former classmate of Brenton’s, 19-year-old Candice Lockhart, remembered Brenton as someone who would “always get you laughing.” “He was a good presence t o be around. I am thankful I had a chance to meet him and I’m sure everyone else feels the same way,” she added. Lesley Sealey, 20, said that Brenton was “a brilliant life w hich we lost.” I just wish that we could have seen him grow, it’s so u nfortunate. I just hope no one forgets that this is still u nsolved.” H is doting and emotional grandmother, Shirley Smith, r emembered Brenton as an e motionally expressive boy who was always trying to help other people. While his family knew he w as “special” it was not until h is death that they fully u nderstood how much so, she s aid. Janet Styles, a grand-aunt o f Brenton’s, who travelled f rom Fort Lauderdale for the m emorial, and his funeral, w hich takes place on Saturday, said the 18-year-old was a kind-spirited young man (with aspirations.” A website www.brentonhectorsmith.com has been set u p for people to pay tribute t o the teenager. His funeral will be held tomorrow at St Anselm’s church in Fox Hill at 2pm. ing to open it.” When officers reached the house, they found and detained S tewart on the property. Huizenga was discovered operating a 2005 Jupiter Marine boat in a canal next to the house. Police requested that Huizenga throw them a rope so they c ould secure the boat to a nearby dock, but despite several attempts, he could not manage the feat. E ventually they were able to dock the boat and Huizenga, whose breath smelled strongly of alcohol and whose speech was slurred, explained to officers that he was at his house. “He was not,” said the Fort Lauderdale Police Departmen t’s report. Huizenga was taken into custody for boating under the influ ence. He also faces charges of violation of probation for felony drink-driving, violation of probation for failure to submit to a sobriety test and refusal to submit to a blood/urine test. He denies all charges. The 47-year-old was already banned from drinking as a condition of his probation on a previous DUI charge in which a 71year-old pedestrian was seriously injured. His father, Wayne, was owner of the Miami Dolphins foot ball team for 15 years until he sold all but a five per cent stake in January of this year. This is the younger Huizenga’s fourth arrest on DUI charges, and officials said, if convicted, he could be sent to prison for five years. FROM page one Bahamian ar r ested with son of former Miami Dolphins owner FROM page one REMEMBERING BRENTONSMITH

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Employment Opportunity Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t C ommonwealthBankisthepremierBahamianBankwith brancheslocatedinNewProvidence,AbacoandGrandBahama. Wearecommittedtodeliveringsuperiorqualityservice,to traininganddevelopingouremployees,tocreatingvalueforour shareholdersandtopromotingeconomicgrowthandstabilityin thecommunity. Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco. CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE: AssistingtheBranchManagerinmanagingthesalesactivitiesof theBranchtoenhanceprofitability.Effectivelyleading,supportingandcoachingpersonnelto achievecorporateobjectives.Effectivelymanagingaportfolioofconsumer,mortgageand commercialloans.Adjudicatingcreditlineswithindelegatedauthority.ManagingtheBranch’scollectionactivitiesandtheprotectionof collateral.Following-upwithclientandsupportfunctionstoensuretimely completionofproductrequestsandtransactionsandresolutionof inquiriesandissues.EnsuringCreditriskratingsandcreditscoringpracticesare adheredtoatalltimestominimizetheriskofloanlosses.Ensuringspecificobjectivesaredevelopedthroughan appropriatestrategicplantogrowtheBranch’sloananddeposit portfoliosandotherofferings.Addingvaluetothecustomers’portfoliooffinancialservices byactivelypromoting,marketing,buildingandcrosssellingall deposit/investmentandconsumercreditbusiness.Ensuring selfanddirectreportsconsistentlyprovidehighlycourteous customerserviceinaninformedandthoroughmanner.Assisting theManagerinattainingthetargetsincorporatedintheBranch’s financialplan.QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE: Bachelor’sdegreeorhigherinBusinessAdministration,Banking &FinanceorarelateddisciplinefromanaccreditedUniversity.Minimumofeightyearscommercialbankingexperiencewitha minimumof3yearssupervisory/managerialexperience.Experienceinmanagingadiverseloanportfolioandassessing loanquality.DetailedknowledgeofRetail/Commercial/Mortgagelending practicesandcreditanalysistoensureportfolioquality.Substantialworkexperienceinloansandriskmanagementwith afullunderstandingoffinancialstatementsandtheabilityto analyzetheinformation.Excellentleadershipandcoachingskills.Excellentcommunication,analyticalandreasoningskills.Excellentorganizationalandtimemanagementskills.ProficientintheuseoftheMicrosoftrangeofapplications.REMUNERATION PACKAGE: CommonwealthBankisaGreatplacetowork!Weofferan excitingworkenvironmentwiththeopportunityforgrowthand development.Wealsoofferacompetitivecompensationpackage, reflectingthesuccessfulapplicant’sexperienceandqualifications, includingaperformancebasedincentiveplan,health,vision, dentalandlifeinsurancesandapensionplan. Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before July 24, 2009to: Human Resources Department Re: Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco P.O. Box SS-6263 Nassau, Bahamas Telefax: (242393-8073 E-mail address:hr@combankltd.com Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those under consideration will be contacted.” six men and six women returned divided 6-6 on all three charges. A unanimous d ecision is required for a conviction on a murder charge and a two-thirds majority on t he other two charges. S enior Justice Anita Allen o rdered a retrial and remand ed Moree to Her Majesty’s Prison. Outside the courtroom Moree’s attorney Murrio Ducille said: “My view is that some of the jurors again, were listening to the case and oth ers were listening to something else because the evidence is such that the witnesses for the prosecution have again been thoroughly discredited and the only ver dict that they could have possibly reached was one of not guilty.” Neil Brathwaite and Yoland Rolle prosecuted the case. The prosecution alleged it was Moree who shot Mr Ferguson and his wife through their bedroom window. Two police officers testified that Mr Ferguson had told them Moree, his co-worker, had shot him and his wife. Mrs Ferguson said that after the shooting, while she was on the phone to the police, her husband told her to inform them that Moree had shot them. Cassandra Evans, another prosecution witness, told the court on Tuesday that she observed an altercation between the two men during which Mr Ferguson beat up Moree, while Moree simply stood there. She testified that Moree threatened to shoot Mr Ferguson. She also recalled a confrontation at Butler’s Funeral Home where the men worked, during which Mr Ferguson pushed Moree in his head. Moree also told police of another assault by Mr Ferguson two days before the shooting incident. Moree, however, denied the incident drove him to kill Mr Fergu son. He claims he was nowhere near their home that night. highway construction. They also claim Government has failed to engage in an open dialogue with them while it goes ahead with the construction. T hey are also calling for b arriers to be placed between the proposed highway and their homes. Single mother Telvern Dean claimed the area’s infrastructure to control floodingf rom a filled-in swamp was b eing paved over by workers. "What infrastructure is there going to be to control the flooding? When we bought the property wer ealised it was reclaimed land, w e built our foundation to a c ertain level to alleviate the flooding, but what's going to happen now?" Ms Dean asked at press conference outside their homes near Saun-d ers Beach. Lawyer Michelle Campbell said she feels like a secondclass citizen in her own country because of the lack of clear information from Govern-m ent about the project. She claimed she only became aware of the roadwork a fewm onths ago when she noticed w orkers in her backyard. She also argued that a public meeting held a few months ago was an exercise for officials to disseminate information and not to hear the voice s of the people of Vista M arina. " The information they are able to give you is very piecemeal. It's not enough to connect the dots as to what's happening. The Government ist he servant of the people, not t he master, but why are we treated like we don't need to know about these things? Why are people just going ahead without even consult-i ng us? "I just feel very saddened and I feel like this place is g oing to be wrecked," said Ms C ampbell, as two tractors roved about the area. The residents are also worried about the negative scenic and possible environmental affects the proposed exten s ion of Arawak Cay to f acilitate the relocation of the d owntown container ports w ill have on Saunders Beach. Both women said they have been frustrated in their attempts to get their hands on the relevant environmen-t al impact assessments (EIA s o they can get a better understanding of the development. According to information several residents compiled ont he roadwork earlier this year, it appears that corridor 18 will be the main access r oute from John F Kennedy D rive to the new container port set to be established on a new man-made island off the shore of Saunders Beach. Under the current plan, the 72-acre island would bea ccessed by a corridor or b ridge which would begin at t he proposed new rounda bout on Saunders Beach. The island would also be connected to Arawak Cay by another causeway on its eastern end. A ttempts to reach Minist er of Works Neko Grant for comment were unsuccessful up to press time. Also present at the press conference was SenatorJ erome Fitzgerald, who heads the Committee to Protect and Preserve the Bahamas for F uture Generations. H e said his organisation will continue to agitate Government to lay all the facts on the table regarding the extension of Arawak Cay and the cost of the container portr elocation. tant Commissioner of Crime Raymond Gibson who reporte dly launched a full scale investigation into the car tampering. While the results did not ascertain conclusively how the b olts came to be off the car, it did however expose some serious weaknesses in security at the compound, even drawing into question whether other officers could be blamed. The Tribune also understands that security has been increased in and around police headquarters after this disc overy. It is not the first time Mr Ferguson might have been the targ et of a would-be assassin. According to information available to The Tribune, a notable drug dealer currently serving time in the UnitedS tates was discovered to have sensitive documentation. It included times and places, along with the photographs of Mr Ferguson and other senior officers, as the targets of hitmen intent on stopping their investigations. H owever, as a stern and upright law enforcement official, Mr Ferguson has reportedly said he cannot be intimidated by such tactics, nor would he allow himself be distracted from doing his duty by such petty antics. H awksbill area around 10.45pm last Wednesday when two armed masked men shot and robbed him of his pouch, which contained an undetermined amount of cash. A fter being shot, Maycock attempted to drive himself to t he hospital, but lost control of his vehicle and overturned near the Four Way Co-op Plaza on West Atlantic Drive and Pioneers Way. W hen police arrived at the scene, they discovered Maycock inside the vehicle suffering from a gunshot injury to his left side. He was removed from the vehicle and taken in an ambulance by EMS personnel to the Rand Memorial Hospital. S everal fellow officers were saddened by the death of their former colleague, who was described as a very quiet and competent officer. M aycock served as an officer in the Special Intelligence Branch (SIB the security for the Prime Minister. M aycock leaves behind a wife and children. Anyone with information that could assist police with their investigations is asked to call 911 or 350-3092 or 350-3097. Hung jury FROM page one ‘Thr eat to life’ of top police chief FROM page one Businessman dies FROM page one FROM page one Homeowners claim they are ‘kept in dark’ WORKTAKING place near Vista Marina.

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A irlift into two key Family Islands via private air lines/charter companies was d ealt a major blow yesterday, after a Florida-based teravel agency specialising in the sector announced it was closing down due to the global recession. Daytona Beach-based Island Pass told customers via e-mail yesterday that it was closing down, and warned that tickets already purchased for future flights would not be honoured. It specialised in booking tickets on charter airlines and private operators for flights to Abaco and Eleuthera, providing clients for companies such as Cherokee Aviation, Peter Russell Flight Services, White Crown Aviation and Banyan Air. In an e-mail sent to Island Pass clients yesterday, its president, Kevin Ream, said: It is with regret that I announce IslandPass is suspending service. We opened during an unprecedented and unpredictable economy,a nd our business has been very difficult to plan since ‘Crystal ball’ would have halted firm’s expansion C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a t hird party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for e rrors and/or omission from the daily report. $4.21 $3.90 $4.10 MUTUAL FUND investment expert investment advice multiple fund options potentially higher returnsall of the aboveFAMILY GUARDIAN CORPORATE CENTRE: AT THE JUNCTION OF VILLAGE ROAD, SHIRLEY STREET & EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.comcall us today at 396-4076 A SUBSIDIARY OF By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A Cat Island family has won a partial victory at the Court of Appeal in a land dispute involving Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette’s wife, the appeal justices part-revers ing a previous Supreme Court decision by finding they were the legal owners of a 15-acre tract of real estate on the island. Yet although the Court of Appeal found in favour of Anthony and Cyril Armbrister, representatives of the Frances Armbrister estate, in their appeal over the 15-acre tract known as the Village Estate, it rejected their appeal over the much larger 430-acre Freeman Hall parcel. The judgment, written by Appeal Justice Emanuel Osade bay, recorded how the dispute had arisen out of a Certificate of Title granted under the Quieting Titles Act, following a petition brought by members of the MacTaggart and Light bourn families. Almost 1,000 acres of land on Cat Island was Cat Island family in partial win on 450-acre dispute Other side included MacTaggart family, and DPM Brent Symonette’ s wife SEE page 6B BRENT SYMONETTE By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor The cost to repair the closed Bahamas F ilm Studios development has increased by $500,000 as a result of delays in concluding a new lease agreement with the Government, its chairman yesterday questioning whether the Ingraham administration wass erious about completing a new Heads of Agreement for the project. Nashville-based investment banker Ross Fuller, in a series of e-mailed responses to Tribune Business’s questions, said he wasu nwilling to invest further funds in maintenance and repairs to the Film Studios’ water t ank and other facilities until an agreement with the Government was concluded. He told Tribune Business : “I negotiated a d eal with the Prime Minister early in July 2008 for 120 acres of land, which included t he tank and buildings that we had renov ated. There has been no change in this that I am aware of. “The Government apparently does not b elieve this is important enough to push through the new Heads of Agreement and l ease, although they tell me on a bi-weekly basis that it will be completed ‘soon’.” It was last understood that the agreementsw ere being scrutinised by the Attorney General’s Office. T he Bahamas Film Studios site is effectively closed, with just a skeleton security staff understood to be on-site. The devel o pment is effectively in limbo, a far cry from the days when its water tank was used for the filming of all water-based scenes for the Pirates of the Caribbean II and III sequels. It is now a virtual certainty that the B ahamas Film Studios will not play host to Lease delay increases Studio repairs $500k Chairman of Grand Bahama-based Film Studios questions whether government serious about agreeing new Heads of Agreement and lease forp roject Says ‘unwilling’ to commit funds to repairs and maintenance until impasse resolved ‘No plans’ to sell facility ‘at the moment’ SEE page 5B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A leading new car dealer yesterday said it might not have gone ahead with its more than-$700,000 fourstage expansion “if we had our crystal ball” and pre d icted the recession, yet it is hoping the investment will leave it well-positioned to exploit economic recov ery despite having to put the final phase “on hold”. R ick Lowe, Nassau Motor Company’s (NMC ations manager, told Tribune Business the second s tage of the company’s expansion the construction of its new client reception building in the service area, and eventual demolition of the existing facility was maybe one-third to one-half of the way finished”. However, he added: “Quite honestly, had we had our crystal ball, we would probably not have done this, but once we signed the contract we had the commit ment of our owners to see it through. When the economic turnaround takes place, hopefully we’ll be in a better position for the future. “It’s certainly not a good time to be in any business, but hopefully things will start to turn around in the next quarter or next six months, and we will haved one the right thing.” There were likely to be another four to five weeks * Nassau Motor Company would not gone ahead with more than $700k growth had it known of upcoming recession * Firm ‘i/3 to 1/2 way through’ second phase, with five hydraulic lifts/service bays operational for three months * But firm to put phase four on hold ‘for now’ SEE page 5B By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor G inn will still employ close to 400 persons in Grand Bahama’s WestE nd even after its Old Bahama Bay resort release s 85 staff by Monday, although sources yesterday expressed concern that am ajor refinancing deal for its project may have stalled o r fallen through. Tribune Business revealed back in February 2 009 that a “major financing” deal for the $4.9 billion Ginn sur mer project was being backed by a wealthy Arab prince,b elieved to be from Dubai, although the funds were due to originate from Swissa nd Italian sources. However, contacts famili ar with the situation yes terday expressed concern t hat Bobby Ginn, principal of Ginn Clubs & Resorts and Ginn DevelopmentC ompany, was now in the process of seeking alterna t ive financing for the West End development, indicating that the Dubai-basedd eal may not be happening. It is understood that, had this financing come through, it would have pro-v ided Mr Ginn with the funding to buy-out his original financing partner for Ginn sur mer, the USbased real estate privatee quity group, Lubert Adler. And Mr Ginn, who is n ow focused solely on the Ginn sur mer project, plus a nother development in Colorado, would have had enough financing left overt o start vertical construc tion at West End. Ryan Julison, Ginn’s v ice-president of communications, yesterday told this newspaper that he had “no information” on the Dubai-backed financing, and whether it had stalled or fallen through. “Bobby Ginn’s doing a lot of things across the company that I’m not privy to,” he added. Ginn’s need for new financing became painfully obvious last year, after the company and Lubert Adler were forced to reach an agreement with a Credit Suisse-led consortium over Questions over Ginn refinance SEE page 4B T ravel supplier closure’s blow for Out Islands SEE page 4B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net B ANKING sector liquidity remains strong at $439 million as of July 2, with a $713 million fund reserve as at Wednesday, a government minister said, as both he and the Central Bank governor lauded the "funda-m entals of our domestic banking system”. This was despite the negative impact the recession, and loan defaults, were having on and credit asset quality. Wendy Craigg, the Central Bank governor, speaking at the opening of Scotiabank'sC aves Village location, said Bahamas-based commercial banks remain available to finance credit expansion to qualified bor-r owers. "The banks’ capital position is healthy a nd reinforces the operational strength of the institutions," she said. Mrs Craigg said the Central Bank remains v igilant in monitoring the banking sector to ensure that "growth continues in an orderly m anner”. She said the Central Bank continues to require that commercial banks strengthent heir risk management portfolios and maintain adequate provisions for loan losses. " As we know, countries around the world are trying to repair their economies from the fall out due to the global and economicc risis," said Mrs Craigg. "In the Bahamas we continue to grapple with the negative trends in tourism and foreign investment that we know are adversely affecting the livelihood of a sizable num-b er of households.” The Bahamian banking sector itself has experienced the effects first hand in terms oft he slowdown in opportunities for growth in the short-term, and the difficulties that are b eing faced by many borrowers in keeping up with their loan servicing obligations. Also Speaking at the Scotiabank openi ng, minister of state for finance, Zhivargo Liang, echoed Mrs Craigg’s assessment of t he economy and financial sector. "Our network of banks is showing tremendous resilience in the face of our currente conomic storm," he said. According to Mr Laing, despite the deterioration in bank loan portfolios, the B ahamian financial system has not been compromised. H e said the Government continues to do what it can to stabilize the economy, with the $500 million invested in capital works pro-j ects and secured financing of $265 million for the Lynden Pindling International Airport expansion project. " We in the Government continue to do all we can to nurture the economy in this downt urn," said Mr Liang "We continue to promote and facilitate investment applications, which though r educed in terms of quality, still continue to come in." Mrs Craigg revealed that commercial b anks themselves expended almost $350 million in capital spending, salaries, related payments and other outlays, including administrative costs, in 2008. "It is our hope that these efforts, comb ined with the rebound of the US economy sooner rather than later, will enable us to endure unquestionably the worst economic fallout since the great depression," said Mr Laing. Bank liquidity still strong with $439m WENDY CRAIGG Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people w ho are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and sharey our story.

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By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net An engineering firm, CARIBBEAN Civil Group (CCGt he Bahamian winner of Pioneers of Prosperity's (PoP award, receiving a $40,000 grant and the chance to compete with otherC aribbean companies for up to $60,000 more, it was revealed yesterday. C oordinator for the programme, Abby Noble, said C CG was chosen from among 110 other Bahamian businesses, including severalo ther engineering firms, in a highly competitive contest. S he added that CCG was chosen primarily because of its reinvesting in its employ-e es through training. "We look for things like r ole model potential, how they can inspire the next generation of entrepreneurs,h ow they are investing in the workers and creating a higher level of human capital, h ow they're investing in the community through ment oring other young business leaders or doing something that's good for the environment," she said. Principal of CCG, Ray M cKenzie, said the competition involved a rigorous process, but he expressed his elation at having been chosen as this year’s countryw inner for the Bahamas. "We are quite honored and humbled quite frankly. It was an exhausting process,s o we're quite pleased to be representing the Bahamas g oing forward," he said. Ceremony M r McKenzie will join nine other country winners from throughout theC aribbean in Jamaica on September 11 for the regiona l award ceremony. CCG is a transporta tion/traffic and civil engineering consulting firmw hich has done work with Baha Mar, Kerzner International and the Ministry of Public Works, and has completed projects in the Turksa nd Caicos and Guyana. " Our core expertise is public works, major infra-s tructural works and major development on the private s ide in terms of engineering and construction aspects of those developments," said Mr McKenzie. H e said his company’s most important resource is human capital, in which 3 per cent of total revenue is reinvested through constantt raining. "We firmly recognise that our number one resource is our people, and we are in ak nowledge based profession, so we invest heavily in our p eople," Mr McKenzie said. "We do the lion’s share of training offshore, but wew ould like to see that change such that there is c redible training engineers c an get onshore. We invest heavily in that." CCG also visits 10 schools per year to speak to students about the engineering fielda nd steer those adept at maths and science towards c ivil engineering. "We won't be here forever," said Mr McKenzie. H is company, with five employees, competes in a g lobal market, but especially against foreign firms who enter the Bahamas on theh eel of big developers. "We would like to see local firms get a greater percentage of the local project," he said."As developers come in, they tend to bringt heir team who they've had relationships with, firms from previous projects, and that's always a challenge." Mr McKenzie said finding t he capital to begin his business was difficult, but after having his plan scrutinised by a scholarly body at theC ollege of the Bahamas, he was able to secure a loan w ith a Bahamian bank. "Business was challenged from the beginning," hes aid. Now, Mr McKenzie said h e would like to see the regu lators of the engineering sector step up to the plate and help it grow. He said opportunities arising from the Economic Part-n ership Agreement (EPA with the European Union w ill help the sector to get on its feet and think globally. "We (CCG c utting edge because we compete globally," said Mr M cKenzie. The PoP is a global awards program that "seekst o inspire a new generation of entrepreneurs in emerging economies", and with sponsorship from the InterAmerican Development Bank (IDBp leton Foundation, aims to uplift and promote small and medium-sized business in this region. According to a PoP release: "Unlike other award programs PoP doesn ot end with the distribution of the award. Rather, the award is just the beginning." C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009, PAGE 3B br fbnn%((%(!( &!) bn r !%, '!$( ***!,&,# tttt !%,, ‘Pioneering’ company reinvests 3% of revenue in developing workers A BANK EXAMINER in the Central Bank of the Bahamas bank supervision department, Kathrina Rodgers, has passed the Series 7 exam in Florida after training with the Nassau-based Nastac Group. She is shown here with the Nastac Group’s Laquel Hall Bank examiner passes Series 7

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S AN FRANCISCO Amazon.com Inc. said Thursday that its second-quartere arnings fell while sales rose, as the leading online retailer recorded a $51 million payment to settle a long-standing dispute with former partner Toys R Us, a ccording to Associated Press . The revenue increase was not enough to placate analysts, who were expecting even more than A mazon delivered. Shares of Seattle-based Amazon fell nearly 7 percent in extended t rading after the results were released. Sanford C. Bernstein analyst Jeffrey Lindsay said the company's report was generally good, but its stock which h it a 52-week high of $94.40 during regular trading was priced for a blowout quarter. "That's why you got such a n egative reaction after hours," he said. Amazon earned $142 million, or 32 cents per share, in the April-June quarter, 10 perc ent lower than the profit of $158 million, or 37 cents per share, a year ago. Analysts p olled by Thomson Reuters expected a penny less per share. Sales climbed nearly 15 percent to $4.65 billion, slightly below analyst estimates of $4.69 b illion. Amazon's sales were helped last year by a $53 million noncash gain from the sale of Europ ean DVD rental assets.Sales of items such as books, CDs and DVDs inched up 1 percent to $2.44 billion in the second q uarter, while electronics and other general merchandise sales soared 35 percent to $2.07 bill ion. The company's North American sales rose 13 percent, while international sales increased 16 percent. D uring a conference call with reporters, Chief Financial Officer Tom Szkutak said the company saw declines in some N orth American media categories, including video games and video game consoles. He noted that in the year b efore, three of the four hottest games were released during the second quarter, including Nint endo Co.'s popular "Wii Fit." This year's gaming decline was balanced out by increased book sales, he said. Szkutak said that third-party s ellers, who offer their goods to consumers through Amazon, made up 30 percent of total unit sales an increase from the p revious year. Amazon's net shipping cost, which is a closely watched metric, rose to $147 million from $ 128 million last year. our inception. “We have been operating and selling tickets in goodf aith, but a lack of consist ent business will prevent us from making it through these tumultuous times. As of today, my partner and Id ecided to end operations. “Effective immediately, no further flights will be c onducted. All tickets purchased in advance will be lost. I'm sorry for any inconvenience this has caused you, but I appreciate all yours upport over the last several months.” Among the alternative a irlines suggested were Bimini Air and Continental Airlines. The loss of Island Pass will deal something of a blow toa irlift and tourism on Abaco and Eleuthera, especially given that those islands rely h eavily on visitors brought in by private airlines and charter operators. C M Y K C M Y K LOCALANDINTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE +5.,QYHVWPHQWV/WG ,Q9ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQ 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK 6HFWLRQRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV &RPSDQLHV +5.,QYHVWPHQWV LVLQ GLVVROXWLRQDVRI ,QWHUQDWLRQDO/LTXLGDWRU6HUYLFHVVLWXDWHGDW 5HJHQW6WUHHW3%R[%HOL]H&LW\%HOL]HLV WKH/LTXLGDWRU a $675 million loan default. T he agreement created a j oint venture that would see the consortium develop Ginn sur mer in conjunction with Ginn. The $675 million loan facility held am ortgage over half Ginn’s more than 2,000-acre property at West End, largelyt he land allocated for lot and real estate development some 1,400 lot sites. T he core casino and resort development, covering some 500 acres on then orth side of Ginn sure mer, were not covered by t he mortgage. Without the new financing, there are concerns thatG inn sur mer could be a maze of roads and infras tructure and no buildings. Ginn is understood to have drawn down on a majorp ortion of the $200 million it placed in escrow to f inance infrastructure and golf course construction, and is likely to completet his phase by the 2010 first quarter. Equipment O ne source told T ribune Business that there was some “$20-$30 millionw orth of heavy equipment” still on site at Ginn s ur mer, and added: “The first 18-hole Arnold Palmer golf course is ina nd seeded, and being catered for with 400,000 to 5 00,000 gallons of water per day. “The water system and a m illion-and-a-half gallon tank are in, the canals are mostly in, and the entrance to the ocean is done.” Meanwhile, Tribune B usiness w as told by sources that Old Bahama Bay, which was suffering occupancy rates as low as 10 per cent, was losing an et $5 million per year, hence the decision to drastically reduce staff. Ginn acquired Old Bahama Bay in December2 006, with the intention of using it primarily as an accommodation base fori nvestors and potential purchasers of real estate at Ginn sur mer. However, following the credit crunch and economic recession, the pool of real estate buyers has all but dried up, leaving Old Bahama Bay without its planned customer base. However, Tribune Business understands that rumours that Old Bahama Bay will close and/or be sold are not correct, as the marina and hotel will stay open and be operated by a skeleton staff. Ginn was also said to have been searching for a brand/operating partner for the property. This newspaper was told that the 85 lay-offs would take Ginn’s total staff complement in West End at the resort and development company from 428 to 344. However, Dion Foulkes, minister of labour, indicated that Ginn was set to hire another 35 construction workers at the Development Company, taking employee numbers to around 380. Questions over Ginn refinance F ROM page 1B Dion Foulkes I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s Travel supplier closure’s blow for Out Islands FROM page 1B Amazon 2Q profit falls with Toys R Us settlement

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Pirates of the Caribbean IV, with the uncertainty sur r ounding its fate not only depriving Grand Bahama and the wider Bahamas of economic activity and publicity opportunities, but alsoa cting as a potential deterrent to film and TV crews using this nation as a pro d uction setting. Mr Fuller told Tribune B usiness y esterday: “We are no longer trying to attract new productions because oft he uncertainty surrounding our rights to the property. Furthermore, we are unwilling to commit further funds for maintenance andr epair until these matters are resolved. The necessary repairs have increased by an estimated $500,000 as a direct result of these delays.” O n the possibility that other film and TV production crews might still be interested in filming at the Bahamas Film Studios, hea dded: “There can be no interest until and unless the Government acts verys oon.” Mr Fuller said he had r eceived no communications from the Government about its intentions for theB ahamas Film Studios, “which would indicate to me that they have no interest in what happens. A lone exception to this is the Ministry of Tourism, w ho have tried to influence the powers that be to move this along, citing the loss ofr evenue to Grand Bahama.” Dropped Mr Fuller indicated to Tri b une Business t hat, for the moment, he had dropped plans to sell the Bahamas Film Studios and had pulled it off the market, and wasi nstead focusing on con cluding the new lease and Heads of Agreement witht he Government. “I do not have any plans a t the moment other than trying to settle the situation o n the lease,” he said. Mr Fuller had previously agreed to sell the BahamasF ilm Studios to Bahamas FilmInvest International, a g roup headed by Nassaubased banker Owen Bethel, president and chief execu-t ive of the Montaque Group, in a transaction widely believed to be val-u ed at around $14 million. The deal was an ‘off, on’ p rocess, the two sides walking away once only to agree new terms. However, thet ransaction finally came unstuck last year, Mr Bethel t elling Tribune Business that the sales agreement was e ssentially null and void as Mr Fuller was unable to deliver on what he hadp romised, namely a 3,500acre site, after the Governm ent decided to reduce the project’s scale to 120 acres. Mr Fuller, though, accusedM r Bethel’s side or breach of contract, and initiated arbitration proceedings through the International Chambers of Commerce. These proceedings, though, were later dropped and there appears to be noi mmediate intention of reviving them, Mr Fuller telling Tribune Business he d id “not have any plans at the moment” on this score. Although the Govern ment’s intentions are unclear, it could be that it is t rying to ‘wait out’ Mr Fuller in the hope that he will decide to exit the BahamasF ilm Studios investment and sell it to another buyer. B ut in the meantime, the longer the saga drags on, the greater the negative impacti t risks having on the Bahamas’ attractiveness as a destination for film and T V production filming, never mind the benefits from o ne-off events such as the Tyler Perry-inspired movie currently being shot in northE leuthera. l eft before the new service reception building was completed, Mr Lowe, as construction workers were currently “putting up the panels, with the roof next week”. Work on the service reception b uilding had begun three weeks a go, Mr Lowe added, and once erected there was then the issue of installing electricity supply and moving all the furniture from theold office in. Hopefully, it will be nicer for the customers. There will be a nice overhang, so customers will not get wet in the rain.” Expansion The first phase of Nassau Motor Company’s expansion, the construction of five new service bays w ith hydraulic lifts at its headquarters, sandwiched between Shirley and Deveaux Streets, had been completed earlier this year. Mr Lowe said yesterday these f acilities had been open for three months, and had increased Nassau Motor Company’s service bays to 20 in number, which were now mostly occupied”. They’re working out quite well,” he added of the five new service bays. “With the new lifts, everyone’s quite efficient. It makes life easier.” Where they came inr eally handy, he said, was in “speeding up” jobs such as tyre changes and work on the underside of any vehicle, as it removed the need to use jacks. N assau Motor Company had also put in another hydraulic lift recently, Mr Lowe said, taking the number of lifts it possessed to 12 nine major, and three smaller ones. O nce the new service reception a rea is completed, Nassau Motor Company will move on to phase three, which involves converting the old service reception area into two more work bays. The fourtha nd final phase, though, which is designed to create a new service and lunch area, has been stayed. “Phase four we’ve put on hold, but we could not get out of phaseso ne and two because we’d made a contractual commitment. “Once we committed to phase one, we had to do phase two,” Mr Lowe explained. Phase three we’re going to do, a s it’s a matter of turning the old reception office into two work bays. That we can do ourselves, as we can pull the building down ourselves. Phase four, we’ve put thato n hold for right now.” Mr Lowe said service and parts “remain a significant part of our business”, especially at a time when new car sales are down industry-wideb etween 40-50 per cent as a result of the global recession. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009, PAGE 5B ‘Crystal ball’ would have halted firm’s expansion F ROM page 1B Lease delay increases Studio repairs $500k FROM page 1B e are no longer trying to attract new productions because of the uncertainty surrounding our rights to the property.” Ross Fuller

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i nvolved, namely the 554.8acre Village Estate tract, and the 484.6 Freeman Hall tract. The original petitioners w ere Marion Lightbourn and Sheila MacTaggart, but the latter had been replacedvia an April 9, 1991, S upreme Court order with Neil MacTaggart, Robin MacTaggart-Symonette andJ olanta Maria Graham. Mrs MacTaggart-Symonette is M r Symonette’s wife, but he has no connection whatsoever to the case. T he MacTaggart side, the judgment said, claimed owne rship through both documentary and possessory title, the latter of which theya lleged to have acquired under the Real Property Limitation Act 1874. Petition T hey also alleged that “they and their predecessors in title have been in full, free a nd undisturbed possession of two tracts of land by f arming thereon continuously for more than 20 years” before the Quieting T itles Act petition. The Armbristers, brothers who were Frances Armb rister’s children, argued in return that they had continuous documentary title to the Freeman Hall Estate, through inheritance, since 1873. They also claimed ownership of 15 acres on the Village Estate, again via d ocumented title from the original Crown Land grant. Tracing the title roots, the C ourt of Appeal judgment said it was not disputed that William Edward Armbrister in 1895 owned the Village Estate, plus 430 acres or 50 per cent of the Freeman Hall tract. Then, on May 27 of that year, William Armbrister c onveyed the Village Estate to the Bahamas (Inagua Sisal Plantation Company, apart from 15 out of 100 acres he had acquired undera n 1871 Crown grant. This was “reserved for himself”, while the 430 acres he owned in Freeman Hall were also conveyed to thec ompany. Eventually, the Bahamas ( Inagua) Sisal Plantation Company was struck off theR egister of Companies in 1 911 “after several years of inactivity and thereby ceased to exist”. The MacTaggart side’s title, the Court of Appeal recorded, was alleged to h ave its roots in the possessory title of Walter Brown rigg, a former manager of t he company. He was a lleged to have taken pos session of the land parcels in dispute around 1906, after not being paid his due wages when the Bahamas (Inagua Sisal Plantation Company c eased operating. Eventually, Mr Brownrigg’s heirs sold all the Freeman Hall and Village Estate lands to Herbert Arnold M cKinney, the MacTaggart s ide’s predecessors in title. He died on January 10, 1981, leaving all his real estate interests to his daught ers, Marion Lightbourn and Sheila MacTaggart, the original petitioners. However, the Armbristers countered by alleging thata ll the land claimed by the MacTaggart side was owned by their forefather, William. “They claim that one of them, Anthony Armbrister,s till lives on part of the land in the area of The Bight,” t he Court of Appeal found. “They claim to be entitledt o one-half interest in Freem an Hall by virtue of documentary title, and to 15 acres in the Village Estate. “They claim that upon the company going out of business and struck out, the oneh alf interest in Freeman Hall (430 acres the company reverted to W illiam..... their predecess or in title or to his estate.” Then-Supreme Court Justice Jeanne Thompson found in favour of the MacTaggart side, but the Armbristers appealed, alleging t hat she had wrongly found them to be claiming adverse possession of the 15-acre Village Estate tract, when in fact they had documents t o prove their title. T he MacTaggart side, though, denied that the Armbristers had documentary title to the 15 acres. H owever, the Court of Appeal said conveyancing records showed William Armbrister had carved out 15 acres from the originalC rown Land grant, only conveying 85 acres to the Bahamas (Inagua Plantation Company. Therefore, the court f ound that the Armbristers’ root of title had its genesis in t hat 1895 conveyance, and the 1871 Crown Land grant,g iving them documentary t itle. The MacTaggart side’s claim, though, was possessory as Charles Brownrigg was ‘squatting’ on the land to claim wages due to him. Given that the Bahamas ( Inagua) Sisal Plantation Company’s lands did not include the 15-acre parcel in q uestion, and that the Armb risters’ documentary title preceded all the documents possessed by the MacTaggart side, the Court of Appeal found: “It seems to me that the trial judge fell i nto error when she ruled that the appellants did not establish any documentary title to the disputed 15-acre parcel of land, and that [the M acTaggart side] have e stablished a documentary title.” The Armbristers also produced evidence to show t heir claim to the 15 acres was not recent, having engaged attorney Livings tone B. Johnson to protect their interests back in 1966. Ultimately, the Court of A ppeal found that they should be awarded a Certificate of Title to those 15 acres. Y et the Court of Appeal found for the MacTaggart side on the Freeman Hallc laim, finding that the B ahamas (Inagua Plantation Company did not own any real estate when it was struck off in 1911. As a result, there was nothing t hat could have reverted to William Armbrister. And the court also concluded that the Armbristersh ad not established docum entary title good enough to defeat the MacTaggarts ide’s claim. They and their predecess ors had been in continuous a nd exclusive possession for some 70 years, using it for corn and peas farming. Patrick Toothe and Travette Pyfrom represente d the Armbristers; Richard Lightbourn and Tim Eneas, of McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes, the MacTaggart side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at Island family in partial win on 450-acre dispute F ROM page 1B “They claim to be entitled too ne-half interest in Freeman Hall by virtue of documentary title, and to 15 a cres in the Village Estate.”

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 73F/23C Low: 78F/26C Low: 77F/25C Low: 80F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 81F/27C Low: 81 F/27 C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 94F/34C High: 91F/33C High: 91 F/33 C High: 90 F/32 C High: 93F/34C High: 90 F/32C High: 92F/33C Low: 81F/27C High: 93F/34C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 94F/34C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 76F/24C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 79F/26C High: 91 F/33 Low: 77F/25C High: 89F/32C Low: 78 F/26C High: 91F/33C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 94F/34C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 92F/33C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 93F/34C Low: 77F/25C High: 97 F/36 C Low: 79F/26C High: 94F/34C High: 92 F/33 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 24 2009, PAGE 8B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Sun and some clouds. Patchy clouds.Mostly sunny with a thunderstorm. Sunshine with a t-storm possible. Breezy and pleasant with some sun. High: 92 Low: 81 High: 92 High: 90 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Mostly cloudy, a t-storm possible. High: 89 Low: 81 Low: 80 Low: 80 AccuWeather RealFeel 120F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 90F 105-93F 107-87F 101-83F 96-87F Low: 80 TODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................90F/32C Low ....................................................79F/26C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 92 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 75 F/24C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.66" Year to date ................................................19.85" Normal year to date ....................................23.21" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Jul. 28 Aug. 5Aug. 13Aug. 20 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:34 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:59 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 9:16 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 9:58 p.m. Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 10:19 a.m.3.14:05 a.m.-0.3 10:42 p.m.3.14:24 p.m.-0.2 11:11 a.m.3.14:53 a.m.-0.3 11:32 p.m.2.95:19 p.m.-0.1 12:04 p.m.3.15:40 a.m.-0.2 -----6:15 p.m.0.0 12:22 a.m.2.76:28 a.m.-0.1 12:57 p.m.3.07:12 p.m.0.2 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco91/3277/25pc88/3177/25pc Amsterdam68/2057/13r66/1854/12sh Ankara, Turkey86/3054/12s86/3055/12s Athens95/3577/25s99/3779/26s Auckland55/1242/5sh53/1140/4r Bangkok90/3278/25t89/3179/26r Barbados86/3077/25sh86/3076/24s Barcelona86/3067/19s77/2568/20s Beijing88/3172/22pc93/3370/21s Beirut91/3275/23s81/2777/25s Belgrade100/3772/22s88/3159/15s Berlin72/2257/13sh68/2052/11sh Bermuda84/2877/25pc84/2877/25pc Bogota67/1944/6sh66/1841/5pc Brussels70/2154/12sh73/2252/11pc Budapest94/3466/18s83/2857/13c Buenos Aires50/1037/2s54/1237/2pc Cairo101/3875/23s100/3777/25s Calcutta95/3583/28r94/3485/29t Calgary78/2553/11s77/2555/12t Cancun90/3275/23t92/3377/25pc Caracas80/2671/21pc81/2771/21pc Casablanca85/2969/20s90/3275/23s Copenhagen67/1956/13r69/2053/11sh Dublin64/1752/11r66/1854/12pc Frankfurt75/2355/12sh72/2250/10pc Geneva 74/23 54/12 sh 75/2349/9pc Halifax 63/17 57/13 r 70/21 57/13 c Havana 88/31 72/22 t 91/32 76/24 t Helsinki 72/22 59/15sh70/2155/12r Hong Kong 91/32 82/27 sh 90/32 82/27sh Islamabad 103/39 83/28 t 102/38 84/28 s Istanbul90/3277/25s98/3680/26s Jerusalem 86/30 62/16s86/3062/16s Johannesburg 48/829/-1s51/1032/0s Kingston 88/3175/23t90/3278/25s Lima71/2159/15s73/2259/15s London70/2154/12r73/2254/12pc Madrid90/3259/15s97/3663/17s Manila86/3077/25r84/2878/25sh Mexico City79/2655/12t76/2457/13t Monterrey104/4075/23s104/4075/23s Montreal66/1861/16c72/2263/17t Moscow77/2561/16pc79/2659/15sh Munich76/2450/10sh70/2148/8t Nairobi78/2554/12sh78/2553/11sh New Delhi 95/3577/25pc99/3779/26pc Oslo72/2259/15sh70/2150/10pc Paris73/2255/12sh77/2557/13s Prague 78/25 55/12 pc 73/22 53/11 sh Rio de Janeiro70/2165/18r72/2268/20r Riyadh108/4286/30s105/4081/27pc Rome 92/33 70/21 s 91/32 63/17 s St. Thomas89/3180/26pc88/3179/26s San Juan55/1227/-2s64/1727/-2s San Salvador 90/32 70/21 pc 87/30 74/23 t Santiago 59/1536/2s63/1739/3s Santo Domingo91/3275/23pc86/3074/23sh Sao Paulo 57/13 53/11 r 62/16 58/14r Seoul81/2766/18s82/2770/21sh Stockholm 73/22 57/13 pc 70/21 52/11 sh Sydney 63/17 46/7 pc64/1748/8pc Taipei93/3379/26sh90/3279/26t T okyo 82/27 73/22 t 84/28 75/23 sh T oronto 74/2359/15pc75/2363/17t Trinidad56/1350/10r70/2158/14pc V ancouver 76/24 61/16 pc 77/2564/17s Vienna 83/2864/17sh73/2255/12sh W arsaw 81/27 57/13 sh 73/22 52/11 t Winnipeg 70/21 59/15 c 72/2258/14pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles84F Saturday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles84F Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles84F Saturday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles84F Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles85F Saturday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles85F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque94/3469/20pc95/3569/20pc Anchorage66/1855/12sh67/1955/12sh Atlanta92/3367/19pc88/3171/21pc Atlantic City81/2767/19t86/3070/21pc Baltimore84/2866/18t90/3270/21pc Boston71/2164/17r78/2568/20c Buffalo76/2461/16t80/2666/18t Charleston, SC93/3372/22t95/3574/23pc Chicago82/2766/18t78/2561/16t Cleveland78/2561/16pc82/2764/17t Dallas96/3576/24pc100/3776/24pc Denver94/3460/15pc88/3159/15pc Detroit82/2762/16pc79/2662/16t Honolulu89/3176/24pc90/3278/25c Houston97/3676/24pc97/3676/24pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday TodaySaturdayTodaySaturday Indianapolis84/2867/19pc82/2763/17t Jacksonville91/3271/21t93/3372/22t Kansas City94/3469/20pc89/3164/17s Las Vegas105/4081/27t106/4187/30pc Little Rock96/3571/21pc94/3468/20s Los Angeles86/3064/17pc86/3066/18pc Louisville86/3068/20s88/3168/20t Memphis94/3473/22pc94/3473/22pc Miami93/3380/26t92/3379/26t Minneapolis80/2661/16t77/2562/16pc Nashville88/3169/20pc91/3267/19pc New Orleans92/3374/23t90/3275/23t New York81/2771/21t83/2874/23pc Oklahoma City96/3572/22s97/3669/20pc Orlando94/3473/22t93/3374/23t Philadelphia86/3068/20t88/3172/22pc Phoenix 106/41 89/31 t 108/4288/31t Pittsburgh78/2560/15pc82/2764/17t Portland, OR 85/2962/16s89/3164/17s Raleigh-Durham 90/32 66/18 pc 93/33 70/21 pc St. Louis88/3171/21pc89/3166/18t Salt Lake City 94/34 69/20 t 95/3569/20t San Antonio 100/37 75/23 pc 99/37 75/23 pc San Diego78/2569/20pc78/2568/20s San Francisco 67/19 55/12 pc 72/2255/12pc Seattle79/2657/13s84/2860/15s T allahassee 91/3271/21t91/3270/21t T ampa 91/32 78/25 pc 92/33 77/25t Tucson101/3879/26t102/3881/27t W ashington, DC 86/30 69/20t90/3274/23pc UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com