Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
The Tribu

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

{T\

Pim blowin’ it

HIGH 87F
LOW 79F

© SUN WITH
“ee T-STORM

Volume: 105 No.199



~ atiakie at

The Paint Depot
Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875







PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Was

aR
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE














ay



CLASSIFIEDS TRADER CL R CLASSIFIEDS TRADER

Man dies after
Gunmen attack

Pair armed
with handguns
fire at group

Tyler Perry
‘could give

major boost
to tourism’

New movie
is being shot | sense



By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tribunemedia.net
e
in Eleuthera AMERICAN superstar
Tyler Perry could hold the
key to boosting tourism to
the Bahamas, it was
claimed yesterday.

The Ministry of
Tourism is counting on the
widespread exposure from
his new movie - which is
currently being shot on
location in Eleuthera - to
attracting more of the

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A MAN has died and
another was injured when two
men armed with handguns
fired randomly at a group of
men standing in the street.

The gunmen pulled into
Milton Street, off East Street,
in a dark coloured vehicle at
around 12.40 yesterday morn-
ing. Two men, armed with
handguns, got out of the car.

They fired shots into a
group of about six men, hit-
ting Marvin Sears, 36, in the

stomach and another man in
the elbow.

Mr Sears was rushed to
hospital and later died of his
injuries.

The injured man is said to
be in stable condition and
may have been released from
hospital yesterday, according
to police.

Superintendent in charge
of the Criminal Detective
Unit Elsworth Moss said:
“We don’t yet know the
motive behind the shooting
and we have not yet got all of

SEE page nine

African-American and
Christian market the
superstar filmmaker has
cornered.

And the hope is it could
lure visitors who have
scaled back on travel plans
because of the global eco-
nomic crisis.

The production is also
expected to inject signifi-
cant revenue into the local
market with every hotel in
the settlement booked out
to accommodate cast and
crew according to Mr Per-

But ministry officials
were unable to peg a dol-

lar amount on the esti-
mated cash injection as
production is ongoing.



Bishop Hall criticises
‘mentally tired’ MPs

BISHOP Simeon Hall, former president of the Bahamas

ISHOP Simeon Ha Change to
Christian Council, criticised more than half of the Members of
Parliament for being “mentally tired” and lacking the fire nec-

essary to propel the country to the “next level.” rap € law to

Bishop Hall, therefore, called on both the PLP and the
FNM’s chairmen to ensure that all persons offering for politi- protect wives
cal leadership at the next general election have the “personal

MINISTER OF TOURISM Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace (right) presents Tyler Perry with a box of

SEE page 10

Christie: PM
may not let
parliamentary
committee

do its job

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

cigars from Graycliff yesterday. ¢ SEE STORY RIGHT



Govt owns just 55% of
























usable land in Bahamas

By PAUL
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter

With the
Bahamas’ popula-
tion marked at
350,000, this
pturnquest@ amounts to approx-

. tribunemedia.net , imately 10 acres per

A CLAUSE in the law that ies. person.
prohibits a person from being ONLY 55 per However, with
charged with the rape of their cent of usable land 938,709 in private
spouse is set to be removed | in the entire hands, 910,341 list-
under a proposed amendment Bahamas is still ed as undevelopable
er eae | owned by Govern- “wet land” and

Ue tabling the amend- ment. 237,583 alread
ment for first reading in the All other acreage hltsas lghe AE leased, onl 4
House of Assembly yester- in the country is etther vest- 1,362,205 acres are available.
day, Minister of State for | ed in private ownership or is The former Exuma MP
Social Development Loretta classified as “wet” Crown George Smith, who also is
Butler-Turner noted that the — | Land. a practising realtor with HG
prohibition was outdated, as And, according to infor- _ Christie said that while land
many countries had long mation tabled by Prime continues to change hands,
updated their laws and made Minister Hubert Ingraham, Government ought to come
marital Tape a crime. there is a little more than up with approaches where

"Even in England, whose 3.5 million acres of both Crown land can be used by
common law is the basis of “dry” and “wet” land avail- ‘

SEE page nine

SEE page nine able in the entire country.

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

SEE page nine

THE Prime Minister’s exten-
sive presentation of informa-
tion to parliament on the ques-
tion of Crown lands and his
commitment to personally
“investigate” the issue “raises
the suspicion” that he may not
let the parliamentary commit-
tee do its job, claims PLP leader
Perry Christie.

The Opposition leader pro-
posed in the House of Assem-
bly that the Prime Minister may
be set to prorogue parliament

SEE page 10

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Crown land: ‘Conflict of interest’ rule may have been ignored

PUBLIC officers are required to
declare any potential for a conflict of
interest to the Department of Public
Service, but the available evidence sug-
gests that this principle may have not
been observed in the granting or leas-
ing of Crown land to civil servants in
the past, Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said in the House of Assembly
yesterday.

The prime minister said public offi-
cers may not seek to influence deci-
sions of another person in order to
promote or seek to promote their or
another person’s private interests or
that of their relatives and friends.

“In any event, and for the avoid-
ance of any and all doubt, where the
potential for a conflict of interest
exists, public officers are expected,
indeed required, to declare such poten-
tial to the Department of Public Ser-



vice,” he
said.
“The
available
evidence
does not
support the
view that
these prin-
ciples were
necessarily
observed in
the grant
or lease of
Crown land to civil servants,” he said.
While the application forms for
Crown land do request information
on “occupation”, the form does not
require applicants to specify whether
they are engaged in the public service
or by any publicly-owned corporation,
company or agency, nor are applicants

HUBERT INGRAHAM

required to reveal their relationship, if
any, to a public officer — a matter that
is to be changed, Mr Ingraham said.

Seventy-three current and former
public servants are listed as having
received Crown land grants between
the years of 1997 to 2009, documents
tabled in the House reveal.

List

This master list tabled by Prime
Minister Ingraham yesterday reveals
that staff from the Department of
Lands and Surveys; Her Majesty’s
Prison; the Attorney General’s Office;
the Royal Bahamas Police Force; the
Port Department; Road Traffic; the
Department of Education; Civil Avia-
tion; Customs; the Department of
Agriculture; Environmental Health;

Foreign Affairs, and the Prime Min-
ister’s Office all applied and received
their requested acreage on various
islands throughout the country. In his
earlier contribution, Mr Ingraham said
that during his previous term in office
he had put in place policy guidelines
for the consideration of applications
and for granting of publicly-held land
to employees of the Bahamas govern-
ment or their relatives.

While the prime minister admitted
that the terms and conditions for pub-
lic officers accessing Crown land are
basically the same as those applicable
to members of the general public, the
potential for conflicts of interest and
preferential consideration is obvious-
ly much greater for government
employees.

“Hence, the consideration of appli-
cation by public officers and members

of their families should be subject to
far greater scrutiny than that of appli-
cations from the general public,” Mr
Ingraham said.

“Tt is expected and required that
public officers will not make or par-
ticipate in a decision relating to the
exercise of an official power, duty or
function. It is expected and required
that no public officer will use infor-
mation that is not available to the gen-
eral public and is obtained in his or
her position as a public servant to pro-
mote or seek to promote his or her or
another person’s private interests or
that of the public officer’s relatives
and friends’ private interests,” he said.

Sunilarly, he added, public officers,
in exercising official power, duty or
function, are not supposed to give pref-
erential treatment to any person or
organisation or their representatives.

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What's your view on Crown land?



I feel as if Crown land

should be used for any
project that is going to help
the Bahamas and Bahamians
as a whole, whether it’s by the
government or by private citi-
zens, whether it’s granted to
family members or members
of parliament or whoever. I
don’t think it makes a differ-
ence once you can prove that
there is no favouritism on why
the land was granted.

And once it is going to be
used for something that is
beneficial for Bahamians and
not for sole profit — only in
those cases it is wrong, and
that’s taking advantage.”

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THE distribution of Crown land has been a much
discussed topic in recent weeks, so The Tribune hit
the streets to hear what the public thinks about the
hot button issue. Average Bahamians were asked if

Crown land should only be used by the government for the
good of the public, or if it should be sold to private individu-
als and investors.

I feel as if it (Crown land)

should be used for the
betterment of the Bahamian peo-
ple, especially for the betterment
of the Bahamian people (in the
area of) agriculture and for plen-
ty other reasons, because for-
eigners come here and take
advantage of us sometimes by
buying a lot of land and saving it
to make a profit, and lots of times they die and the land stays
right there with nobody knowing who owns it, and it stays that
way for years. I’ve seen it happen over and over until the gov-
ernment takes it over, and all the while the land could have been
used for the betterment of the Bahamian people.

“That’s why I think Crown land should be used for the better-
ment of the Bahamian people, but we have to do it in propor-
tion because we have kids coming up and they want to use some
too, so we also have preserve some for our kids.”

¢ I don’t think you should
sell Crown land to pri-

vate investors who are expatri-
ates or Bahamians to do what
they want to do with it, it
should be specific what they
want to do with it and it has to
be for the development of the
country, period. You can’t just
think of yourself or a small
group of people, you have to
think about the country
because it is small, and we
allow too many people to grab
too much of the Crown land.
When those who have good
ideas come around there
wouldn’t be any land for them to invest (in). Crown land should
be utilised properly and government should be in control of it,
but it must be transparent so the people could have a say in the
distribution of Crown land, because after all it is the people’s
country and I think it’s no more than fair that people should
have a say.”







G6

My assertion is that the

population is growing
rapidly and there is a shortage
of land all over, and with the
growth the government is
going to have to dip into the
Crown land, that’s the only
thing available right now, all
the rest of the land is privately
owned. A lot of people who
want to buy land can’t find it
and some people can’t afford
land so the government has to
make laws so that poor people
can have a part of it, I don’t
have a problem with that. The
foreigners nor Bahamians
should be able to buy Crown
land and not use it, they
should be doing something
with it.”

I think that the govern-

ment should only be
allowed to deal with Crown
land, and if there are investors
that strike a good deal then
government should have a big
committee with a lot of watch-
dogs around to see what is
going on because there is a lot
of selling of the land for next
to nothing and you have these
foreign investors making ten
times the amount, this is a
barber shop conversation but
no one is talking about it.”

Wes
is

tsFinger

Catt





THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 3



Oln brief COURT: DORNEIL FERGUSON MURDER TRIAL

Grieving widow recalls
shooting death of husband

Non-managerial
employees to
have chance to
vote for union



Dion Foulkes

YEARS of uncertainty
could come to an end on
Thursday, August 13, when
non-managerial Sandals
Resort employees will be able
to vote for the union they
want to represent them.

Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes yesterday announced
that he will take a representa-
tional count by secret ballot to
determine which union — the
Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU) or the Bahamas
Hotel Maintenance and
Allied Workers Union
(BHMAWU) — the 450
employees wish to have as
their bargaining agent.

The move comes “in com-
pliance with an order made by
Justice K Neville Adderley on
July 16, 2009,” noted Mr
Foulkes. Justice Adderley had
ruled that a poll must be con-
ducted on or before August
14. The BHCAWU and the
BHMAWU have been bat-
tling since 2006 over which
one should be able to repre-
sent Sandal’s line staff.

At present all of the 12
executive members of the
BHMAWU, including presi-
dent Lynden Taylor, no
longer work at Sandals. They
were let go last year by the
resort, which cited the effects
of the global recession for the
lay-offs. Trade Union Con-
gress President Obie Fergu-
son, who also acts as legal
adviser to the BHMAWU,
has called for them to be rein-
stated. The poll is due to take
place at the Gaming Board
Office on West Bay Street,
between the hours of 9am and
Spm.

Tourist ‘stable’
after being hit
hy speed boat

THE American tourist who
was hit by a speed boat on
Tuesday while snorkelling
near the Sandals Resort is
said to be in stable condition
at Doctors Hospital.

According to a police
source, the woman is a resi-
dent of Northern Kansas and
a guest at the Sandals Resort
on Cable Beach.

Meanwhile, police are
investigating who was at fault
in the accident and trying to
determine whether or not the
woman was swimming in an
off-limits area. A jet ski oper-
ator who witnessed the inci-
dent claimed that the tourist
was hit by the propellor of a
vessel believed to be operated
by Sandals. According some
bystanders, the woman’s arm
was "nearly severed" and she
had a "huge gash" on her leg.

The tourist was reportedly
conscious and calm as she was
taken to hospital for treat-
ment. Yesterday, officers at
the Cable Beach police sta-
tion, who are handling the
investigation into the acci-
dent, declined to release any
details on the matter.

Officials at the resort also
declined to discuss the inci-
dent. "We're not commenting
on that at all," said Sandals'
public relations officer Stacey
Mackey yesterday.

Police have not released the
tourist's identity.

Boat cruise on
Laty Savannah

The St. George Branch of
The ACM will be having a
boat cruise Friday July 24th
on board the Lady Savan-
nah, boarding time is 7 p.m,
sailing at 8 pm from The
Prince George Wharf. The
proceeds will assist with its
outreach ministry for the
church and the wider com-
munity.

For ticket information
contact Rosow Davies on
325-8997.

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By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

JURORS in the Dorneil
Ferguson murder trial heard
emotional testimony yesterday
from the victim’s widow who
recalled the shooting that led
to her husband’s death.

Dudley Duran Moree, 23, is
accused of the murder of his
co-worker, mortician Dorneil
Ferguson, 38, and the attempt-
ed murder of Ferguson’s wife,
‘Yuzann.

Struggling at times to hold
back tears, Mrs Ferguson testi-
fied that she went to sleep with
her husband and seven-month-
old daughter around midnight
on June 26, 2008.

She told the court that as
she lay in the middle of the bed,
baby Dorneisha lay close to the
wall and her husband lay
behind her. She said she and
her husband were wakened by
the sound of gunshots and sat
up. Mrs Ferguson recalled feel-
ing a pain in her left arm and
leg. She testified that as gun-
shots were being fired from the
outside her husband pushed her
closer to the wall and rolled on
top of her, asking her if she was
all right. Mrs Ferguson recalled
how her husband lifted the
baby by her leg and shook her
to see if she was all right. She
said after the gunfire had
stopped, she called the police
and while on the phone her
husband told her to tell them
Dudley Moree had shot them.

Mrs Ferguson said when the

police came they had to kick in
their bedroom door and she
urged them to check on their
other children in the apartment.
She said her husband at that
time kept telling police that
Moree had shot them and gave
them Moree’s address.

Statement

Under cross-examination by
Moree’s attorney, Murrio
Ducille, Mrs Ferguson told the
court she gave a statement to
police two days after the inci-
dent. She also told the court
her husband also worked at a
nightclub as a security guard.
She said she met Moree at her
husband’s work at Butler’s
Funeral Home and the accused
visited their home on many
occasions. Forensic patholo-
gist Dr Govinda Raju testified
yesterday that Ferguson died
as a result of a collection of
blood in his chest cavity due to
gunshot wounds. He said that
Ferguson had seven entry
wounds and three exit wounds.

He said an external exami-
nation showed that Ferguson
had received a gunshot entry
wound to his lower right palm
which exited through the back
of his palm. He also had a gun-
shot wound to the left outer
thigh, left mid-upper back and
buttocks region and an entry
wound in the left buttocks
region.

Detective Corporal Jamal
Evans said that around 2.40 am
on June 26, 2008, while on duty

at the Eastern Detective Unit,
he received information regard-
ing a complaint in the Family
Street area and proceeded to
the scene with three other offi-
cers. He told the court he
spoke to Sgt Alexander Pierre
who led him into a bedroom.
There, he said, he saw a man
lying on his stomach with
wounds to his lower back, a
woman with a gunshot wound
to the left leg and an infant
child lying between them.

Evans said the man, who he
identified as Dorneil Ferguson,
told him: “Duran Moree shot
me.”

He said that minutes later
EMS personnel came and took
Ferguson and his wife, Yuzann,
from the apartment. He also
told the court that at Spm that
day he and other officers while
armed with a search warrant
went to Moree’s home at Faith
Gardens and arrested him.

He said a search of Moree’s
residence proved negative for
any evidence.

Corporal Evans said that
while taking Moree to the
Carmichael Road Police Sta-
tion he noticed that the accused
had an injury to his right hand.
Under cross-examination he
told the court that the accused
claimed he had injured his fin-
ger in a motorcycle accident.
Mr Ducille also suggested that
Ferguson had never identified
Moree as the shooter and that
Evans had made it up. Evans
denied the suggestion.

The trial continues today.

Sports anti-doping move applauded



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AN Olympic gold medallist and
the president of the Bahamas
Olympic Association yesterday called
the introduction of legislation to out-
law doping in sports a “great step
forward” for Bahamian athletes.

Parliamentarians yesterday debat-
ed a Bill for an Act to Provide for the
Implementation of Measures to Dis-
courage the Use of Drugs and Dop-
ing Methods in Sports and for Relat-
ed Purposes.

Noting that Bahamian athletes have been
among those who have been cheated most by
the use of illegal performance enhancing sub-
stances by competing athletes, Minister of Sports
Desmond Bannister suggested it is right that the
country now formally joins the fight against dop-
ing. The new Bill provides the legal framework
for the Bahamas to fulfil commitments it made
when it signed onto the World Anti Doping Code
in 2003, to which 192 countries are signatories.

This code calls for the implementation of effec-
tive programmes to prevent, deter, detect and
legally punish individuals for using or providing
performance enhancing drugs which are banned
under the code. The new Bill not only deals with
anti-doping violations by Bahamian athletes and
international athletes, but also includes sanctions
for people such as coaches or officials who may
try to influence or mislead an athlete into taking
a banned substance.

Mr Bannister said: “We are seeking to ensure
that cheaters never again take glory away from
the honest competitors on the world stage in the
sporting arena.”

President of the Bahamas Olympic Association
Wellington Miller, who was in parliament to hear
Mr Bannister’s speech on the Bill, described the
legislation as a “great step forward.”

“One of the disappointing things for me when
I travelled to international conferences was that
these people always ask me ‘why y’all don’t have
your doping bill in place?’ Now it’s here and I'll

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be proud when I go away,” he
said.

Pauline Davis-Thompson, a
100, 200 and 400 metre sprinter
who is soon to receive the gold
medal for her performance in the
2000 Olympic Games after Amer-
ican athlete Marion Jones was
found to have tested positive for a
banned substance, said the legis-
lation is “a wonderful thing.”

“We should be at the forefront
of the fight against doping. (By
passing the law) we’ll be protect-
ing our reputation on the inter-
national scene,” she said.

The sprinter, who was also in parliament yes-
terday, recalled the intense pressure she resisted
from one of her coaches when she was younger to
try certain things which would “make her run
faster” and her bittersweet experience of finding
out she is to get her Olympic gold medal eight
years after she should have.

“Not being able to hear my national anthem
was what stood out the most to me, not being
able to see your flag raise. The feeling that you
get at that moment just gives you such joy,” she
said. Under the Bill, four new institutions will be
created: A National Anti-Doping Commission, an
Anti-Doping Therapeutic Use Exemption Com-
mittee, a Disciplinary Panel and an Appeals Tri-
bunal. Mr Bannister emphasised that education
is critical in the fight against doping in sports.

“Young people need to know what is on the
prohibited list because it is not whether the ath-
lete intended to dope that counts in sports, it is
what is found in your body,” he said.

The minister noted that some over-the-counter
pharmaceuticals such as a Vicks Inhaler as well as
certain “traditional medicines” used in the
Bahamas have or may soon be designated as
products that contain banned substances.

“Full effectiveness of the Bill will require the
combined support of the athletic community,
including coaches, athletes and parents; they
must all work hand in hand with our education as
well as the legal and medical community,” he
said.

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

PM’s exposé upsets Christie

WE GOT a good chuckle from Opposi-
tion Leader Perry Christie’s protest yester-
day that by the time Prime Minister Ingra-
ham had completed his extensive exposé in
the House of Assembly on the abuse of
Crown land, nothing would be left for the
appointed House committee to investigate.

When this report came up on our com-
puter last night — it is on this morning’s
front page — its contents brought back ear-
ly memories of the union movement in this
country. The incident it recalled took place
sometime in the fifties when the late Martin
Pounder, a labour adviser, arrived from Eng-
land to assist local unions. One day one of
our staff approached Sir Etienne, then pub-
lisher of this newspaper. He wanted to start
a union in The Tribune plant. Sir Etienne
gave him the green light and then forgot
about it.

Some months later the staff member went
to see Sir Etienne in his office. He was great-
ly agitated. At the time we had an English
foreman, who was forward thinking, and
wanted to modernise conditions in the plant
and improve standards of employment for
our employees. Sir Etienne also gave him the
green light and backed his innovations
enthusiastically, as did the staff.

This apparently was a monumental prob-
lem for our budding unionist. He protested
all the improvements being made.

“But, Mr Etienne,” he argued, “if Mr
Richards keeps doing all this for the staff,
there will be nothing left for me to agitate for
when I start my union.”

He was brusquely sent back to his job
on the “stone.” That ended all talk of unions
in The Tribune. We went to the office daily,
the staff was told, to put out a newspaper,
not to talk foolishness. And if there was any-
thing they didn’t like they knew their way to
Sir Etienne’s office — his was an open door
policy for his staff. The staff had a good
laugh.

The scenario in the House yesterday
between Mr Christie and Mr Ingraham
seemed to be history repeating itself — only
in a new venue and in different circum-
stances, but with the same mental attitude.

Information was leaked to The Tribune
that all was not right in the Lands and Sur-
veys department.

The Tribune investigated the allegations
and published its findings. The Opposition,
as did the public, agitated for more infor-
mation. The Tribune kept digging and pub-
lishing. However, behind the scenes Prime

Minister Ingraham was quietly doing his
own investigation. Obviously he was in a
position to unearth a treasure trove of infor-
mation. He was now ready to publish. The
House was adjourned to Monday — under
Opposition protest — to hear his Commu-
nication. On Monday he made his Commu-
nication about the Crown land problem. He
laid the supporting documents on the table
of the House to be seen by all.

The public can’t get into a committee
room to hear what documents are presented
to committee members or what matters are
discussed.

Nor, when it is time for the committee to
report, will it know what important infor-
mation has been suppressed. This way noth-
ing can be swept under the carpet. Mr Ingra-
ham has made it all available.

Mr Christie is suspicious of Mr Ingra-
ham’s extensive presentation of the infor-
mation.

He suspects that the Prime Minister might
not let the parliamentary committee do its
job; that he might prorogue parliament, end-
ing the current legislative session, which
would mean the death of all legislative com-
mittees. — including the committee to inves-
tigate Crown land.

Like Sir Etienne told his thwarted union-
ist, Prime Minister Ingraham told the Oppo-
sition leader that he was talking “baseless
nonsense”, seeking to distract from the con-
tent of his criticisms of the former PLP
administration in relation to Crown lands.
Mr Ingraham denied any intention to pro-
rogue parliament. He said he just wanted
to “ensure” that the committee reported on
the matters it was appointed to investigate.

However, according to Mr Christie, Mr
Ingraham has made a considerable effort to
get the information out and “win political
points, which really could have been the
work of the committee” — it could also have
been suppressed by the committee.

We recall the 2002 election when Mr
Christie and his colleagues accused the FNM
of giving away Bahamian land to foreign-
ers — it was their main plank for getting rid
of the FNM government.

Mr Christie’s government was elected,
then proceeded to give away even more of
the Bahamian people’s land in the name of
important “anchor projects.”

These documents will tell the full story on
both sides of the Crown land argument. The
public can make up its own mind. It needs no
committee to tell it what to think.



What is
soing on
at NIB?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please tell me what’s going
on at NIB? I am a business
person in the eastern area of
New Providence. I take my
payment to the Fox Hill office
every month as I am instruct-
ed to do by the Inspector.

The Fox Hill office is con-
venient for me when I cannot
make it, I send one of my
workers.

The people in this office are
very helpful, polite and most
of all the Inspectors know
how to handle old people with
respect.

Last week I was told that
very soon I would have to go
down to the Blue Hill Road
office because the Inspectors

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



I think this is so inconsid-
erate and so inconvenient for
me as a customer.

I thought the whole idea of
NIB was to make things bet-
ter for people that means I
have to drive through all that
traffic to make my payment
to me, this makes no business
sense.

Mr Prime Minister, I know
that you don’t know about
this, sir, I thought the reason
for having the people in the
work place was to make
things better and convenient

for the employers. I know you
are a considerate man and I’m
begging you to please do
something about this for me
and the other business peo-
ple up here in the Fox Hill
area.

Sir, when anybody gets sick
we go right to the Fox Hill
Clinic.

This should be the same
thing with NIB.

Mr Prime Minister, we
going backwards or forward?
Please, sir, put a stop to this, if
not my payment will be
behind all the time.

A BUSINESS PERSON
IN FOX HILL
Nassau,

will be going down there.

June 27, 2009.

The world's armaments culture outdated

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Your editorial “America’s Gun Culture
Outdated” is very apt and timely, and
deserves greater prominence, but needs to
be subtitled “The World’s Armaments Cul-
ture Outdated.”

The UN International Action Network
on Small Arms ([ANSA) has worked on
this problem for many years, and publishes
a wealth of information on the topic.

The tragic fact is that the arms industry
makes tremendous profits (in fact, the arms
industry is regarded as the major industry in
our world), and money and morality always
appear to be in conflict!

Some years ago, Amnesty International,
IANSA and Oxfam stated in a Press release:
“From 1998 — 2001, USA, UK & France
earned more income from arms sales to
developing countries than they gave in aid.

The arms industry is unlike any other. It
operates without regulation.

It suffers from widespread corruption and
bribes. And it makes its profits on the back
of machines designed to kill and maim
human beings.”

The Report concludes: “So who profits
most from this murderous trade? The five

Permanent Members of the UN Security
Council — USA, UK, France, Russia and
China. Together they are responsible for 88
per cent of reported arms exports.”

The US Congressional Research Service
records the 2001 top military exporters:

USA $9.7 billion.; UK $4 billion; USSR
3.6 billion; France $1 billion; China 500 mil-
lion; Israel 200 million. And since that date,
sales figures have increased.

Nobel Peace Prize winner and former
USA President Jimmy Carter observed:
“We cannot have it both ways. We cannot
be both the world’s leading champion of
peace and the world’s leading supplier of
arms.”

In the interests of world peace and pros-
perity, universal co-operation and action
are needed to end the arms race, both
nationally and internationally.

As Nobel Prize winner and former UN
Secretary General Dag Hammarskjold
observed:

“In our age, the road to holiness neces-
sarily passes through the world of action.”

CITIZEN OF THE WORLD
Nassau,
July 15, 2009.

Still waiting for my merchandise

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Further to the article con-
cerning the difficulty in
clearing Customs as related
by one importer, I have
been waiting since July 7 to
receive my merchandise
which I ordered from the
US.

It was delivered on July 6,

2009 to the Miami address
of a local courier and was
shipped to Nassau since July
7th. Surely the new Customs
import forms cannot be that
difficult to complete.

No one can advise me
when I can receive my pack-
age.

This is terrible as I do not
know what has happened to

my merchandise. It is better
for me to travel and bring
my purchases with me. Can
anyone help?

Even Bahamasair had a
better record than this.

FRUSTRATED
CUSTOMER
Nassau,

July 19, 2009.

Educated by a politician? What a thought

EDITOR, The Tribune.

First Baptist Church











Tae PT Cae EL a
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Re: Campaign to ‘educate’ on adverse affects of Arawak
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Young Haitian — Woman accused of defrauding hank
Bahamains set
to meet Minister

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

YOUNG Haitian Bahamians
were scheduled to meet with Labour
Minister Dion Foulkes last night to
discuss topics ranging from national
identity to job opportunities and
the problem of crime in the com-
munity. j

Yesterday’s talk constituted the
opening of the United Association
of Haitians in the Bahamas Youth
Conclave that lasts for five days.

Professionals from the banking industry,
education, business owners, president of the
Haitian Bahamian Society of the Bahamas
Jetta Baptiste, and others, will share their
experiences of living and working in the
Bahamas.

The role models will also explore the issue
of Haitian Bahamian identity.

United Association of Haitians in the
Bahamas secretary Julie Smith said: “All of
them are facing an identity problem, which I
guess no one will be able to solve.

“Tt’s just that some of them go to school,

Tropical wave to bring storms an showers

THUNDERSTORMS,
high winds and scattered
showers will continue today as
a tropical wave moves over the
Bahamas affecting weather
conditions across the islands.

As the tropical wave
moved over the central and
northern Bahamas yesterday
it merged with a surface
trough off the southeast coast
of Florida.

Meteorologists say there is
less than a 30 per cent chance
of the weather system devel-
oping into a tropical or sub-



Dion Foulkes

and are not into school, and they
don’t go to church, so there are
things that they should know they
are not learning elsewhere.

“Tt’s really for them to let them
know what’s happening in the com-
munity and the good from the bad,
and what they shouldn’t be involved

in.”
| A police inspector will also talk to
the boys and girls aged 14 to 18 about
crime in the community and offer
advice.

Mrs Smith added: “We have a lot
of crime in Nassau and sometimes
those crimes are committed by children of
Haitian descent so we want to let them know
what time it is.

“We want them to see the difference of the
negative from the positive so they can know
how to make good choices when they finish
school, and what they should look forward to
doing, so they will know how to excel them-
selves.”

Daytime sessions will be held at Victory
Chapel on Minnie Street, off Wulff Road, and
evening talks take place at the Calvary Baptist
Chapel.

cia THIS NOAA

satellite image

| taken Wednes-
day, July 22,
2009 at 01:15

) PM EDT shows
dense clouds

) next to the
Bahamas. (AP)

i A 24-YEAR-OLD woman accused of
i defrauding a local bank of just over $8,000
? was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yes-
i terday.
i Lakindes Brown appeared before Mag-
i? istrate Guillemina Archer in Court 10, Nas-
? sau Street, charged with two counts of steal-
i ing by reason of employment and 13 counts
? of fraud by false pretences.

It is alleged that Brown, who was










employed at the Fidelity Bank Bahamas
Limited on Frederick Street, between April
and May of this year, obtained $8,200 from
the bank by means of fraud and also stole
two Fidelity Gold Visa credit cards valued
at $5 each.

Brown pleaded not guilty to the charges
and was granted $13,000 bail.

The case was adjourned to November
17.

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tropical cyclone over the next
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As the small upper level
trough interacts with the weak
tropical wave there will be
clouds and thunderstorms
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Gusty winds associated
with thunderstorms will be
around 10 to 15 knots.

A senior meteorologist at
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tem will be east of the Bahama
islands and move north into
the Atlantic.

He added: “It’s quite right
now, there’s nothing of signif-
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at this time.”

The weather system is
expected to move northward
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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Letisha Henderson



E

a

ROAD SAFETY coordinator Michael Hudson fields a question from children enrolled in the
road safety summer camp sponsored by the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture.

SUT MONI w ote
all about road safety

By KATHRYN CAMPBELL
Bahamas Information Services

MORE than 100 students were taught
about road safety during a special session of
the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture’s
summer programme this week.

Road Traffic Controller Philip Turner
with representatives of the Road Traffic
Department, including Michael Hudson,
road safety coordinator, advised the stu-
dents at the Faith Temple Ministries camp
site on proper use of pedestrian crossings,
seat belts, and sidewalks, and how to get on
and get off buses.

“Too many people lose their lives on the
road in the Bahamas," said Mr Turner.
"And sometimes people older than you are
not responsible drivers.

"So watch out for them because they
may cause harm to you and to others. It is
very important to pay attention as you walk
or drive on the road.”

Mr Turner told the children to encourage
their parents and guardians not to use cell
phones or apply cosmetics while driving.

“Tell them to pay attention to the road,”

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ROAD Traffic Controller Philip Turner speaks
to children in the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture’s summer camp programme on
the importance of road safety.

he said. "When you are driving focus on
the road only."

The ministry’s four-week programme is
being held in conjunction with Faith Tem-
ple Ministries.

A developer is

‘J showin

g interest in

‘dead’ subdivision

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Sir Jack
Hayward said that a devel-
oper has expressed strong
interest in developing the
Dover Sound Subdivision,
which has remained largely
undeveloped for 40 years.

Sir Jack, a principal own-
er of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority, said the
new bridge to be built at
Grand Bahama Highway
will revitalise development
at Dover Sound.

Bridge

“We have interest in
Dover Sound, which has
been dead for a long time;
we have some one inter-
ested in Dover Sound and
one of his conditions is he
must have a bridge con-
necting Grand Bahama
Highway,” he said.

According to Sir Jack,
the developer is interested
in building a marina and
restaurant, and “doing
what Dover Sound has not
had for 40 years.”

Graham Torode, presi-
dent of the Grand Bahama
Development Company,
could not be reached for
comment concerning plans

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for the development at
Dover Sound.

The Grand Bahama Port
Authority is expected to
begin construction on a
30ft high, four-lane con-
crete bridge in the next
three months.

Sir Jack said the Port
Authority also plans to
construct a farmer’s mar-
Ket in Freeport, where res-
idents can purchase fresh
fruits, vegetables and fish.

Originally, there were
plans to build a fish mar-
ket, but many local fisher-
men were opposed to the
proposed location at the
Fishing Hole Road on
Queens Highway.

The Port Authority has
now decided on a new
downtown location for the
market at West Atlantic
Drive, near the roundabout
at the Home Centre.

“JT think we should call it
a farmer’s market, and we
should encourage all farm-
ers of the whole Bahamas
to send their produce
there, and not just have a
fish market, I think that
has been the mistake,” said
Sir Jack.

He noted that fruits and
produce from Eleuthera,
Andros, Abaco, Long
Island, Exuma, and other
Family Islands should be
available in Freeport.

“We should have fruits

and vegetables and other
products from the rest of
the Bahamas. It is ridicu-
lous that we cannot get
pineapples from Eleuthera.
We need to be able to
access all the many prod-
ucts of the other islands in
the Bahamas,” he said.

Hannes Babak, chairman
of the Port Authority, said
BAIC has agreed to assist
in bringing Bahamian
grown produce _ to
Freeport.

Products

“We really want it to be
a farmer’s market where
you are able to have fresh
products but also processed
products like the little
restaurants at Arawak Cay.
We are talking to Mr Edi-
son Key at BAIC who has
promised to help us bring
the products here to
Freeport,” he said.

Mr Babak said that they
have received positive
feedback on the new loca-
tion from many of the local
fish vendors in Freeport.

“Most of the fishermen
wanted it downtown
instead of at Fishing Hole
Road, and a lot of people
don’t want to drive all the
way down there, so we
donated the land in down-
town for that project,” he
said.

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

Bahamian’s turtle research to be
published in major science journal



BAHAMIAN envi-
-| ronmental scientist
| Stefan Moss (fore-
front) collects blood
»* | from a freshwater
>») turtle on the
Tennessee River.
Moss’ groundbreak-
ing findings will be
published in
Chemosphere, a
leading scientific

ed with renowned sea turtle
scientist Dr Jennifer Keller
who allowed him access to
the facilities for weeks at a

By Arthia Nixon
TENNESSEE - A young

Bahamian scientist’s ground-
breaking study on freshwater
turtles has earned him the
opportunity to be featured
in one of the world’s lead-
ing international journals.
Stefan Moss, who spent two
years collecting samples and
data from the reptiles he
encountered in the Ten-
nessee River will now have
the findings of his research
documented in Chemos-
phere.

Chemosphere is a well-
known international journal
focused on disseminating
information related to all
aspects of environmental sci-
ence, especially important
new discoveries or further
developments in investiga-
tions related to the environ-
ment and human health.

Hard work has certainly
paid off for Mr Moss who
was born in Grand Bahama
but raised in the capital city
of Nassau by his parents Kei-
th and Sylvia Moss-Green-
wade. He double majored in
Chemistry and Biology.

The studies he completed
in Tennessee, Mr Moss now
plans to duplicate on endan-
gered freshwater turtles in
his native Bahamas, particu-
larly on the islands of
Inagua, Cat Island and
Eleuthera.

“It didn’t start off as me
with aspirations of getting
published in a respected
journal like Chemosphere,”
admits Mr Moss.

“As an environmental sci-
entist I was more focused on
figuring out what chemicals
were in the river and their
effects on the environment,
and possibly human health.
Instead, it seems I uncovered
- and documented - a lot of
valuable information in the
field of herpetology, which
is the study of reptiles and
amphibians.”

“The project, which was
funded by a conservation
grant from the Tennessee

a



BAHAMIAN ENVIRONMENTAL scientist Stefan Moss (pictured)
plans to duplicate the research that earned him recognition in
science journal, Chemosphere on the freshwater turtles in his
native Bahamas.

Aquarium Research Insti-
tute (TNARI) focused on
the freshwater turtles in the
river because they are long
lived organisms and are
therefore able to provide a
large quantity of data over
a longer period of time,”
added Mr Moss.

“Sure enough, after two
years of collecting body mea-
surements and blood sam-
ples, there was so much new



information on them that my
professor Dr Thomas Wil-
son challenged me to pub-
lish it. Unbelievably, after
four years of work, it’s going
to be published.”

Mr Moss’ work led him to
the National Institute of Sci-
ence and Technology
(NIST) in Charleston, North
Carolina, where he worked
in the Hollings Marine Lab-
oratory. He also collaborat-

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time, which he took full journal.

advantage of, sometimes
working as much as 20 hours
a day.

“Being recognised for this
work is the highlight of my
scientific career thus far,”
said Mr Moss.

“It’s now a new contribu-
tion to science in an area
that’s been studied before
but not in this particular way.
I feel that Bahamians need
to become more environ-
mentally conscious and con-
tinue their efforts of encour-
aging students to take up sci-
ence careers. I am confident
that if we get creative and
think beyond the norm, we
can offer exciting opportu-
nities to our own scientists
and those visiting our nation.
There is still a whole lot we
don’t know about our coun-
try in terms of science and I
hope to come back home
and help contribute to erad-
icating the brain drain we so
frequently hear about. We
must come together, and
pool our talents into making
the Bahamas a model coun-
try as it relates to science.”

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009



By ERIC ROSE
Bahamas Information
Services

CAT Island’s rake n’
scrape band The Turning
Point Turners wowed visi-
tors of the week-long Henley
Festival in England.

The Turners joined fire
dancer Devia Wilson and
visual artist P Elton Moxey
to give audiences a taste of
Bahamian culture.

“We were heating up the
cold town with the fire
dancer and the hot sounds
of rake ’n scrape,” said
Bahamian cultural affairs
representative and project
manager Angelique McKay.

“It feels great to be here,
to have been able to accom-
plish this particular feat in
the midst of this economic
downturn. “The Henley Fes-
tival (from July 8 to 12) has
also. experienced the
squeeze. Tough decisions
had to be made to cut acts
from some of the countries
that they were looking for-
ward to, but the Bahamas
was able to remain on the

Ceramic

LOCAL NEWS

Rake-N-Scrape



MEMBERS of the Turning Point Turners rake n’ scrape group
are pictured as they performed at the Henley Festival in England.

lineup of artists for the
event,” she said.

Mr McKay said it was a
feeling of “elation to be able
to showcase yet another
array of our cultural expres-
sions to the European audi-
ence and hopefully entice
them to visit the land where
all these great cultural
expressions take place.”

The relationship between
the Bahamas and the Henley
Festival was formed from
the successful Junkanoo Live
project last year.

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They showcased their art
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venues.

But the Henley Festival
was a chance to interact with
a new audience and hope-
fully give them a deeper
appreciation for Bahamian
culture.

wows eens

the Henley Festival,” said
fire dancer Devia Wilson.
“The crowd was amazed by
the fact that I was putting
the fire on my body.”

Ms Wilson also per-
formed last year on the Isle
of Wight as part of another
project that brought
junkanoo and other aspects
of Bahamian culture to
Europe for the first time
through workshops and per-
formances at schools and
with various festival organ-
isers.

Charles King, Turners’
accordion player and leader,
said he was “really amazed”
at the response they received
being a small group coming
out of the Bahamas.

“People actually followed
us to some of the other
spaces we were performing
at the festival to listen to our
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THE TRIBUNE



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FIRE DANCER and junkanoo performer Devia Wilson
showcased her talent at the Henley Festival in England.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 9



Change to
rape law to
protect wives

FROM page one

Bahamian law, the prohibi-
tion against marital rape was
eliminated in 1991," she
said.

The present law defines
rape as an act of any per-
son not under 14 years of
age having sexual inter-
course with another per-
son who is not his spouse
without the consent of
that other person; without
consent that has been
extorted by threats or fear
of bodily harm; with con-
sent obtained by imper-
sonating the spouse of
that other person; or with
consent obtained by false
and fraudulent represen-
tations as to the nature
and quality of the act.

The proposed amend-
ment would omit the
words "who is not his
spouse" therefore making
it a crime for anyone to
have sexual intercourse
with another person with-
out that person's consent
— whether or not the per-
sons involved are married
to each other — Ms But-
ler-Turner explained.

The proposed move
also comes after calls from
the international commu-
nity, she told Parliament.

The United Nations
General Assembly's Dec-
laration on the Elimina-
tion of Violence Against
Women considers marital
rape a human violation
while the UN's Human
Rights Council recom-
mended the Bahamas'
clause on marital rape be
removed, said Ms Butler-
Turner.

One religious leader
weighed in on the pro-
posed change yesterday,
calling it a positive step
forward that could pro-
vide some recourse for
marital rape victims.

"That's a step for-
ward— because some
spouses are taking advan-

tage — and generally it's
the man taking advantage
of what they believe is still
their legal right — and I
think it advances those
who might be wronged in
any way,” said Bishop
Hall, senior pastor of New
Covenant Baptist Church,
when contacted for com-
ment on the amendment.

He also stressed that
married couples should
look to counseling to
repair their union before
the situation spirals into
a violent one that needs
the intervention of police.

"People have to learn
that ‘no’ means ‘no’ and
the bottom line is some-
thing has gone wrong in
the marriage when a hus-
band is going to force
himself on his wife. Peo-
ple need to revert to their
pastor, priest or rabbi
whoever put them togeth-
er before the marriage
crumbles to that point,”
he said yesterday.

The proposed amend-
ment will also increase the
maximum period of time
that legal proceedings can
commence after a sexual
offence is committed from
six months to two years.

Ms Butler-Turner said
many sexual offences, the
current window of time is
too short as many cases of
sexual crimes — particu-
larly those dealing with
minors — are reported to
police much later than the
time they were commit-
ted.

According to the minis-
ter, the law will not be
amended before her
department has time to
get the country's input on
the changes through sev-
eral public forums.

"It is hoped that after
these public discussions,
this Parliament will con-
sider the enactment of this
Bill," she said.

LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

Bahamians to empower
them.

“The agricultural land
should be managed so that it
is used by serious agricultur-
ists, by those in the business
now and those who want to
get into the business. Wher-
ever the land is owned by the
Government, because it is
the people’s resource, we
have to find a way where it is
fairly — unlike how we have
seen it exposed — managed.”

Mr Smith added that obvi-
ously some of this land has
to be set aside for public use
such as national parks, etc,
but cautioned that there is
sufficient land in the
Bahamas for every Bahami-
an to use to empower them-
selves.

“But we have obviously in
most recent years permitted
the management of our
greatest resource, outside of
our people, to be managed
by the most incompetent
people. And that can’t be fair
to the Bahamian people,” he
said.

goo Of land

At the time that the graph
tabled by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham was made,
Government’s dry land hold-
ings stood at 1,362,205 acres.

It is unknown at this time
what the current figure would
reflect, but it is expected that
with the formation of the
Lands Committee in the
House of Assembly yester-
day that more up-to-date
information will be made
available to the public in the
weeks and months to come.

According to the table, the
total land mass of the
Bahamas stands at 3.4 mil-
lion acres, with 938,709 of
that being private property.
This total figure is again sub-
tracted by 910,341 acres of
wet Crown land (swamps and
marshes) and the 237,583
that is already leased.

It is with this scarceness of
property in mind that Mr
Ingraham recently informed
the House of Assembly that
Government will take a
stronger approach to elimi-

nate the illegal occupation or
“squatting” on Crown land.

It is widely acknowledged
that historic, informal occu-
pation of Crown or Govern-
ment land for residential and
commercial purposes has
occurred throughout the
Bahamas for generations,
particularly in the Family
Islands, he said.

Crown land made available
for the development of a
dwelling home by Bahamian
citizens is granted in fee sim-
ple unless a lease purchase
arrangement is sought by the
applicant, Mr Ingraham
explained.

“This policy was adopted
as the Government recog-
nised that banks and other
financial institutions were
unwilling to approve home
construction mortgages to
individuals who only held
lease purchase agreements
for Crown Land.

“Following the adoption of
this policy, hundreds of indi-
viduals were able to acquire
Crown land at concessionary
rates and subsequently to
qualify for mortgage loans

Man dies after gunmen attack

FROM page one

the information we need from the injured

man.”

They have not yet received a description of
the vehicle or the armed men.
The shooting death marks the 44th murder

of the year.

It follows a drive-by shooting in the East
Street area at around 10pm Monday night,
when a 30-year-old man was shot at least four
times in the body on Lifebuoy Street. He is
reportedly in critical, but stable condition.

Police are also investigating the stabbing of
a man from Stapledon Gardens who was
knifed several times while a group of men

were having at a party in Goodman’s Bay,
West Bay Street.
The man was stabbed three times in the

the murder.

back and once in the neck, Supt Moss said.
He did not provide details of the weapon.
The man was taken to hospital in a private
vehicle and is in serious, but stable condition.
Supt Moss said: “Someone has come for-
ward to give us information, but we have been
unable to speak to him as yet.”
Police are appealing for information from
the public in respect to both the stabbing and

Anyone with any information, which could
assist investigations, should call the Criminal
Detective Unit on 502-9991 or call Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477).

FROM page one

native capacity” to offer
“inspiration leadership” to the
next generation of Bahami-
ans.

“With the general elections
a mere two years away, I note
that some political aspirants
have begun posturing. This is
good and in my opinion
healthy for our democratic
way of life.

“T also opine that many
elected politicians presently
serving, on both sides of the

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Bishop Hall

House, seem lost and lack the
vision necessary to birth inno-
vative and creative ideas to
lead as the nation grapples
with multitudinous chal-
lenges,” Bishop Hall said.
Indeed, Bishop Hall added
that it would be a disservice to
the country if many of our
current politicians would offer
themselves for re-election.
“Some of them are petty
and too small for the big

Break away from the ordinary
and discover how to experience

shoes they are in. One is hard-
pressed to find more than five
constituencies that can be
used as model communities
for the rest of the nation.

“Thousands of Bahamians
will never reach the prover-
bial Promised Land if we con-
tinue to think and work the
way we do. It should be clear
that creativity, innovation and
a broadening of leadership
are all necessary to lift our
country out of the quagmire
in which it finds itself today,”
he said.

life to the fullest. The Isuzu

from banks and other lending
institutions,” he said.

Where occupants in the
Family Islands establish that
they have been on the land
for a minimum of 10 years
prior to 1992, land was typi-
cally granted at the conces-
sionary fee of two cents per
square foot, said the Prime
Minister.

In New Providence, accel-
erated efforts were made
after 1992 to regularise the
occupation of Crown and/or
Government owned land in
Carmichael Village, Mr
Ingraham said.

As a result, 36 Crown
grants were issued to indi-
viduals, their estates, and to
institutions.

As a general rule, Crown
land occupied and developed
without proper authorization
for less than 10 years prior
to this Government’s re-elec-
tion in 1992 were not consid-
ered eligible to be regular-
ized at concessional rates, he
said.

“However, where occupa-
tion existed for more than
five years prior to 1992, and
where development had tak-
en place either by construc-
tion of a residence or of a
business enterprise, land has
generally been approved by
my Government at conces-
sionary rates ranging from
four to seven cents per
square foot,” Mr Ingraham
said.

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    PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE





    FROM page one

    "They're not finished shoot-
    ing yet and so we don't know
    that number," said Tourism
    Minister Vincent Vanderpool-
    Wallace on the sidelines of a
    press conference at the Gray-
    cliff restaurant to announce the
    production yesterday.

    The movie - a sequel to Mr

    Tyler Perry

    vacation to reaffirm why they
    got married. The film will high-
    light the tranquil life and pic-
    turesque beauty of the Family
    Islands away from the hustle
    and bustle of Nassau.

    "As people see the movie,
    more are going to want to come

    LOCAL NEWS

    resume production.

    "I think it's going to spike
    tourism a little bit so hopefully
    we'll see lots more people com-
    ing down, especially African-
    American people coming down
    to have a good time."

    Mr Perry, who reportedly
    purchased a private island in
    Exuma, said he may use the
    Bahamas as a location for

    (to the Bahamas) and it'll have
    a huge global impact,” said Mr
    Perry said yesterday before jet-
    setting back to Eleuthera to

    NOTICE

    Johnson, Maura, Roberts,
    Thompson, Nottage, Pinder,
    Wallace-Whitfield, Claridge,

    Twynam, Bowles, Young,
    Deveaux, Moree, Lightbourn,
    Symonette, Gibson, Bethel

    THE
    STERN
    EMETER

    Perry's 2007 hit “Why Did I
    Get Married” - follows three
    married couples who go on

    Many of us have loved ones buried there.
    The cemetery has now been CLEANED UP and

    it is our turn to take care of the individual areas.

    Please join us there on Saturday, July 25,

    2009 from 8am with tools, plants, small
    shrubs, gloves and drinking water.

    They die only when we who are left, forget them.

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    future films and hopes more
    film-makers will follow suit.

    Before a brief session with
    the local media, Mr Perry paid
    a courtesy call to the Prime
    Minister and other Members of
    Parliament at the House of
    Assembly.

    Afterwards, Opposition
    Leader Perry Christie said the
    meeting was held to thank Mr
    Perry for his "significant"
    investment in the Bahamas.

    "He is very impressed with
    the beauty of Eleuthera and its
    people and I suspect we are
    going to have the benefits of
    that, whenever the film is
    made," said Mr Christie.

    The film's crew spent about a
    week shooting in the Exumas
    with filming expected to wrap
    on Eleuthera within the next
    five or six days.

    The original members of the
    first film's star-studded cast -
    including Janet Jackson, Malik



    piesa

    Yoba and Jill Scott - all return
    for the sequel which is slated
    for an April, 2010 release.

    According Director-Gener-
    al of Tourism Vernice Walkine,
    production on the film was
    delayed for a few days after the
    death of Ms Jackson's brother
    Michael Jackson on June, 25.

    Around two dozen locals are
    employed with the project, min-
    istry officials said.



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    Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified

    professional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer.

    This is an

    executive position and the successful applicant should possess the following:

    Qualifications & Experience

    Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university
    Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance
    Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a

    law degree

    Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations

    for improvements to a compliance culture

    Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of

    duties

    Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and

    best practices

    Confidentiality

    Excellent oral and written communication skills
    Duties & Responsibilities:

    Design and implement a risk framework.

    Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps

    taken to foster good compliance.

    Implement and maintain a compliance monitoring programme. This will
    serve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures.

    Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws,
    regulations and policies applicable to the institution.

    Provide management with guidance in the development, implementation
    and maintenance of policies, procedures and practices to cover

    regulated activities.
    Create programmes that educate, train and

    encourage directors,

    managers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and

    regulations.

    Serve as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators.

    The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with

    FROM page one

    ? — ending the current legisla-
    ? tive session and allowing all
    ? legislation and committees
    i appointed during it, including
    i the most recently appointed
    ? committee to investigate mat-
    i ters connected to the disposi-
    i tion of Crown lands — to
    i “die” with it.

    “This extensive provision of

    ? information to the House of
    i Assembly and the country (by
    ? Mr Ingraham) could be seen to
    ? be arming the committee in
    ? advance with all of the infor-
    ? mation it needs. It could also
    i be seen as some kind of justifi-
    ? cation if the committee dies for
    i the Prime Minister to be able to
    i say ‘Well you have all of the
    ? information and you can draw
    i? whatever conclusions you wish’,

    “Today you saw him say he’s

    i going to investigate and report
    i which is within the terms of the
    ? committee. There’s been a con-
    i siderable effort to get out the
    ? information and win political
    ? points, which really could have
    : been the work of the commit-
    i tee,” said Mr Christie.

    However, Prime Minister

    i Hubert Ingraham accused Mr
    ? Christie of talking “baseless
    ? nonsense” and seeking to dis-
    ? tract from the content of his
    i criticisms of the former PLP
    ? administration in relation to
    ? Crown lands.

    He said he has “no such

    i intention” of preroguing par-
    : liament and wants to “ensure”
    i that the committee reports on
    ? the matter it has been appoint-
    i ed to look into. “That was just
    ? (Christie’s) reaction to some-
    i thing to which he has no
    i response,” stated Mr Ingraham.

    During an address to the

    : House yesterday Mr Ingraham
    i presented his rebuttal of claims
    ? made by Mr Christie on the
    i issue of the granting of Crown
    i lands on Monday.

    He claimed the PLP has his-

    i torically sought to “have it both
    ? ways” in its position on Crown
    ? lands by both suggesting that
    ? the FNM has a record of facili-
    i tating land sales to foreigners
    i; to an extent that puts at risk the
    :? ability of future generations of
    i Bahamians to own lands, and
    i in the meantime doing many
    : things during their tenure to
    ? assist foreigners in buying large
    ? amounts of Crown land in the
    i interests of “economic growth.”

    He said that while “as much

    ? as half” of land sales to for-
    i eigners in the Bahamas during
    ? the FNM’s tenure was between
    : foreigners and not from the
    : Government or a Bahamian to

    Christie
    a foreigner, “reports made by
    (the PLP) to his House claimed
    that their administration had
    approved the sale of more land
    to international persons in less
    than a single term than was sold
    in two terms under my admin-
    istration.”

    Mr Ingraham claimed Mr
    Christie cannot be considered
    “completely blameless” in rela-
    tion to the abuse of Crown land
    granted to then Director of
    Lands and Surveys, Tex Turn-
    quest’s relatives, despite con-
    demning this abuse.

    Several parcels of the unde-
    veloped beachfront land grant-
    ed to relatives of Mr Turn-
    quest’s relatives for nominal
    fees in the region of $2,000 was
    “flipped” under the PLP gov-
    ernment in 2005 and 2006 for
    close to half a million several
    years after Mr Ingraham signed
    off on the grants for the pur-
    pose of vacation or retirement
    homes several years earlier.

    Mr Ingraham charged that
    Mr Christie’s government did
    not do the “due diligence” nec-
    essary when it registered the re-
    sale of the undeveloped Forbes
    Hill, Exuma properties and
    could have objected.

    “T do not find the Leader of
    the Opposition blameless in
    registering the resale of these
    properties in 2005 and 2006. I
    do not find them blameless.
    This matter is not yet complet-
    ed, Mr Speaker. Inquiries are
    and continue to be made by
    myself and others and in due
    course a report will be made to
    parliament,” said the Prime
    Minister.

    It was at this point Mr
    Christie interjected, stating that
    based on these comments and
    the information the Prime Min-
    ister brought to parliament he
    now “questioned whether this
    committee (to inquire into all
    matters concerning the dispo-
    sition of Crown land) will ever
    be given life to report.”

    “T am now very curious as to
    whether or not there will be
    prerogation during this time
    and that committee will die,”
    said Mr Christie.

    Speaker of the House Alvin
    Smith yesterday announced
    that the lands committee will
    be headed by Fox Hill MP Fred
    Mitchell and consist of Cat
    Island Rum Cay and San Sal-
    vador MP Philip Davis,
    Kennedy MP Kenyatta Gibson,
    Bamboo Town MP Branville
    McCartney and Golden Isles
    MP Charles Maynard.

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    experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a cover
    letter and resume to the following e-mail address no later than 27 July 2009 :

    1 if el east a

    E-mail: careers@c olinaimperial.com
    RE: Risk and Compliance Officer

    Absolutely no phone calls will be accepted





    THE TRIBUNE



    THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 11

    The Bahamas national bird:

    one of our star attractions
    the EGO-fF MYA,

    LONG before the science of
    ecology was born, adventurers
    were reporting on the natural
    wonders of the Bahamas.

    And one of our star attrac-
    tions was the flamingo — our
    national bird. In fact, one early
    European visitor recorded
    hunting and catching a great
    number of "Swanees" during a
    stopover on his way to Virginia
    in 1587.

    These scarlet-coloured wad-
    ing birds (which resembled
    swans to European explorers)
    are one of six species scattered
    around the globe. The West
    Indian flamingo nests in large
    colonies on coastal mudflats
    and saltpans, principally in the
    Bahamas, Mexico, and Bonaire,
    but also on one island in the
    Galapagos.

    In the 1700s, Englishman
    Mark Catesby produced the
    first illustrations of the West
    Indian flamingo for his famous
    Natural History of Carolina,
    Florida and the Bahama
    Islands, which was commnis-
    sioned by Sir Isaac Newton to
    document the plants and ani-
    mals of the New World.

    In 1890, an American natu-
    ralist named John Northrop
    observed flamingo rookeries on
    the west side of Andros, and
    noted that "a large number of
    young birds are yearly
    destroyed by the people for
    food. We ate the bodies of
    those we obtained and found
    the flavour most delicious."

    Frank Chapman, a pioneer-
    ing ornithologist from the
    American Museum of Natural
    history, found thousands of
    nesting flamingos in South
    Andros during a field trip in
    1904.

    His reports helped prod the
    government to pass the Wild
    Birds Protection Act the fol-
    lowing year.

    "Neither they, nor any other
    Bahaman bird was protected
    by law,” Chapman wrote, "and
    I take no small pleasure in say-
    ing that when this matter was
    brought to the attention of the
    proper authorities, an adequate
    bill was prepared and passed at
    the next session of the colonial
    legislature."

    In the 1930s an amateur nat-
    uralist and adventurer named
    Gilbert Klingel spent time on
    Inagua and later published a
    book about his observations
    (UInagua - a very lonely and
    nearly forgotten island). In one
    memorable passage he
    describes stumbling across a
    flock of flamingos:

    "A roar of sound suddenly
    burst across the water and a
    thousand pairs of scarlet wings
    beat the air at once, throbbing,
    and the flock went screaming
    into the sky. It was the most
    breathtaking sight I had ever
    witnessed...Higher and higher
    they mounted, wheeled, and in
    a colourful deluge poured over
    the horizon."

    During the first half of the
    20th century flamingos were
    pushed into ever more remote
    areas as human development
    expanded: "The Inagua colony
    is the most magnificent of all,”
    Klingel reported. "Here the
    flamingos will make their last
    stand...and it will be only a short
    time before one of the world's
    most sublime sights will have
    disappeared from the Earth.”

    But there's a surprising twist
    to this story. Frank Chapman
    (who led the 1904 expedition)
    was a mentor to Robert Porter
    Allen, an Audubon Society
    expert who scoured the
    Caribbean searching for flamin-
    gos in the early 1950s. In his
    classic book, On the Trail of
    Vanishing Birds, Allen found
    that the colonies on Andros
    had already disappeared.

    He determined that the
    largest surviving group of West
    Indian flamingos inhabited the
    isolated back-waters of Lake
    Rosa on Inagua. During one of
    his visits, with local guide Sam
    Nixon, Allen came across a
    large flock of flamingos
    engaged in their ritualistic
    courtship dance:

    "We could see a solid band
    of red. It shimmered and undu-
    lated in the heat exactly as if it
    were a long sheet of
    flame... They moved this way
    and that, without obvious pur-
    pose, like a hysterical and lead-
    erless mob. Tightly packed as
    they were, and with every indi-
    vidual jostling his neighbour
    and all of them jumping about
    like madmen, the outlines of
    the flock ebbed and flowed, as
    if it were molten, red-hot
    lava...the din was frightful.”

    Allen and the Audubon
    Society decided to make a

    Mexturcl History Infarrrcstic

    in fran the Bahvarrns Mertic



    wal Trust

    ’ Roi

    2 arte tn? a
    Bie, ea NC eet
    Mjshy Se east. Phe nas

    ip en Bip kore

    ry ary at Lake ren in ere National Park.

    stand at Inagua, where they
    believed they could "hold off
    the eventual extinction of this
    species no matter what hap-
    pened elsewhere."

    A group of influential back-
    ers was recruited in Nassau to
    form a Society for the Protec-
    tion of the Flamingo, with
    Arthur Vernay as its leader.

    Vernay was an English
    antiques dealer who had made
    his fortune in New York. An
    amateur zoologist, he went on
    collecting expeditions around
    the world for the American
    Museum of Natural History.
    And on retirement, he moved
    to Nassau. Before Vernay died
    in 1960, Inagua had become the
    epitome of conservation chic in
    the Bahamas.

    "So far as Inagua is con-
    cerned, the Society for the Pro-
    tection of the Flamingo, with
    Arthur Vernay at the helm and
    with the goodwill and assistance
    of the Erickson family at Math-
    ew Town, has provided com-
    plete warden protection," Allen
    wrote. Audubon helped finance
    this operation.

    In 1956 the Society under-
    took an expedition to Inagua
    to survey the flamingo colony.
    One of Vernay's associates
    invited James Bond creator Ian
    Fleming along for the ride. And
    in the Bond novel, Dr No,
    (written that same year) the fic-
    tional island of Crab Cay,
    where the novel's evil genius
    lived, is a mirror image of Great
    Inagua.

    "His island's topography, its
    sights and sounds, and the two
    wardens with their primitive lit-
    tle camp in the interior smack
    strongly of Audubon's real-life
    project on Great Inagua."
    according to an article in the
    Audubon Magazine years later.
    In fact, Fleming even took the
    name “James Bond” from an
    ornithologist who wrote a field
    guide on Birds of the West
    indies.

    Then in 1958 events acceler-
    ated. A Columbia University
    grad student named Carleton
    Ray teamed up with the presti-
    gious international explorer Iha
    Tolstoy (a grandson of the great
    19th century Russian writer
    Count Tolstoy) to mount a new
    Bahamian expedition — this
    time to the Exuma Cays.

    Robert Porter Allen and
    other big-name conservation-
    ists were part of the team and
    their report led to the creation
    of the world’s first land and sea
    park in Exuma, as well as to
    the formation of The Bahamas
    National Trust itself.

    In the early 1960s, this cadre
    of conservationists turned their
    attention to Inagua. According
    to Dr Ray, now in his 80s but
    still working as a research pro-
    fessor at the University of Vir-
    ginia:

    "After the passage of the
    BNT Act in 1959 and during
    the formal leasing process of
    the Exuma park, which was
    finalized in 1963, some of us
    were thinking about keeping
    up the momentum of protect-
    ed-area conservation.

    "The flamingos were already
    protected to a degree through
    the Society, but we negotiated
    with government for a second
    park, and it agreed. The Inagua
    National Park was set aside in
    1965. This series of events could
    not happen in today's complex
    world."

    Today the consensus is that,
    in many parts of the world,
    flamingos are at risk due to loss
    of feeding and breeding sites.
    As it becomes more difficult
    for them to breed successfully,
    populations are destined to
    decline, experts say.

    The number of breeding
    sites in the Caribbean has fallen
    from possibly 35 to around five



    today, and the largest colony
    — numbering some 60,000
    birds — is found in the Inagua
    National Park — which remains
    a true conservation success sto-
    ry.

    Flamingos are among the
    world’s longest-lived birds —



    A FLAMINGO guards her chick on a nest alin in the Inagua

    National Park.

    there is a 1998 record of a
    female breeding successfully at
    the age of 53. And The
    Bahamas National Trust still
    operates a field station at Lake
    Rosa (named after Arthur Ver-
    nay) while Inagua continues as

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    eWritten by Larry Smith,
    Media Enterprises Ltd, for the
    Bahamas National Trust. For
    more information call 393-1317
    or visit www.bnt.bs



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    TRIBUNE SPORTS

    THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 13



    INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

    Baliamas introduces
    Anti-doping Sports Bill
    FROM page 15

    doping organizations outside
    The Bahamas, in relation to
    any athlete; encouraging and
    facilitating the negotiation by
    any sporting organisation and
    anti-doping organisation of
    any agreement permitting
    their members to be tested by
    authorised doping control
    teams from other countries;
    and cooperating with the test-
    ing and education initiatives
    of WADA and other anti-
    doping organizations.

    Bannister made special
    mention of the impact the
    Anti-Doping Therapeutic Use
    Exemption Committee can
    have on the education of ath-
    letes, parents and coaches, and
    the inadvertent use of banned
    substances which has plagued
    Bahamian athletes in the past.

    “This Committee will be
    responsible for Implement-
    ing and monitoring education
    and preventing programs
    along with the right sand
    responsibilities of our athletes.
    This will be critical for young
    people in our country and crit-
    ical for them to know what is
    on the prohibited list of
    banned substances,” he said.
    “As we know it is not whether
    the athlete intended to use the
    substance for performance
    enhance drugs but whether it
    is found in the body. It is a
    very serious issue that can
    effect young people. Bahami-
    ans have long used the benefit
    of cerrasee, strong bark, love
    vine, along like things with
    vicks inhalers and vapour rubs
    however some of these tradi-
    tional medicines may find
    their way on the list of banned
    substances and we need to be
    aware of that.”

    Bannister noted the numer-
    ous benefits Bahamian ath-
    letes have reaped on the inter-
    national stage because of strict
    enforcement of Anti-Doping
    policies and the subsequent
    disqualification of offenders.

    “At the 2000 Olympic
    Games in Sydney, Australia,
    the Bahamian Men 4x400
    relay team finished fourth on
    the track. However in later
    years four of the United States
    team members were suspend-
    ed for the use of performance
    enhancing drugs. Last year
    our men got their Olympic
    bronze medal. At the same
    2000 Olympic games, Pauline
    Davis Thompson finished sec-
    ond behind Marion Jones in
    the 200m. Jones was later
    revealed to be taking perfor-
    mance enhancing drugs. At
    the 2001 World Champi-
    onships, Debbie Ferguson-
    McKenzie finished behind
    Marion Jones. After Ms
    Jones’ disqualification, Deb-
    bie was just recently awarded
    her gold medal. At the same
    World Championships in
    2001, our Men’s relay team
    finished in second place
    behind the United States and
    now eight years later, Avard
    Moncur, Tim Munnings, Troy
    McIntosh, Chris Brown and
    Carl Oliver, finally have a
    world gold medal. Chandra
    Sturrup was only recently
    awarded her bronze medal for
    her performance in the 100m
    at the 2001 World Champi-
    onships as the end result of
    the disqualifications of both
    Marion Jones and Kelli White.
    Our Men’s relay team is now
    to be recognised as bronze
    medallists from the 2003
    World Championships as a
    result of the disqualification
    of the United States team,”
    he said. “Our recent experi-
    ences have shown exactly why
    it is in the interest of the
    Bahamas to adopt an efficient
    anti-doping regime. I know of
    no country in the world that
    has been impacted as much as
    the Bahamas has by other
    countries that have been taint-
    ed through the doping

    2

    The Tribune wants to
    hear from people who are
    making news in their
    neighbourhoods. Perhaps
    you are raising funds for a
    good cause, campaigning
    for improvements in the
    area or have won an
    award.

    If so, call us on 322-1986
    and share your story.















































































































    THOMAS LURZ of Germany reacts after winning the 10-kilo-

    meter open water race in the sea off Rome’s ancient port of

    Ostia, at FINA Swimming World Championships yesterday...
    (AP Photo: Michael Sohn)

    Lurz wins
    10k open
    water race

    By ANDREW DAMPF
    AP Sports Writer

    LONG-TIME coach Keith Parker holds up a book that highlights the performance of legendary sprinter
    Thomas Augustus Robinson at the 1956 British Empire and Commonwealth Games. At left is commit-
    tee member Linda Thompson and at right is committee chairman Alpheus ‘Hawk’ Finlayson.

    Cable Bahamas first platinum sponsor
    of “Tribute to a Legend’ luncheon
    FROM page 15

    silver medallist in the men’s 100m in Tokyo,
    Japan, where Robinson was a finalist.

    During the luncheon, Finlayson said they
    intend to show the actual race from Wales as
    well as highlight a number of the outstanding
    achievements by Robinson dating back to the
    1995 Pan American Games in Mexico where
    he was a finalist in both the 100 and 200 to the
    1966 Commonwealth Games in Kingston,
    Jamaica, where he won a silver medal in the
    100.

    Parker represented Britain in the long jump
    in Wales in 1958 around the same time that he
    had applied for a job in the Bahamas.

    "I heard about Tommy and went to the
    Games Village and introduced myself to him,"
    Parker recalled. "We struck up a great rela-
    tionship. He told me that the Bahamas loves
    track and field and I came here in July or
    August of 1958."

    Producing a book that outlined many of
    the achievements of Robinson in Wales, Park-
    er said every newspaper had tons of articles on
    Robinson.

    "He was amazing and he remains pretty
    much the same today," Parker pointed out.
    "He's friendly, casual, quiet and he cares a
    lot about the athletes. Never shout at any-
    body, always whispers a kind word of encour-
    agement and has been a contributor to many.
    He's just a great man. This is a very suitable
    honour for him."

    Persons still interested in securing tickets for
    the luncheon can contact any committee mem-
    ber or obtain them from the Colony Resort on
    St Alban’s Drive or Prescription Parlour Phar-
    macy on East Street south.

    ROME (AP) — Thomas Lurz
    won the men’s 10-kilometer
    open water race at the world
    championships Wednesday,
    where officials will have to |
    decide who gets the bronze
    medal after American Francis
    Crippen swam off course.

    Lurz, who also won the 5K
    race Tuesday, covered the sea
    course off Rome’s ancient port
    of Ostia in 1 hour, 52 minutes,
    6.9 seconds.

    “T had the same tactic as the
    5K and it worked really well for
    me,” Lurz said, adding that a big dinner helped him recoy-
    er from his victory the day before. “First I had pasta,
    then I had a Big Mac and a cheeseburger at McDonald’s.
    Unfortunately, there was no German food available.”

    Andrew Gemmell of the United States finished sec-
    ond and Crippen touched third.

    The Italian team protested that Crippen swam on the
    wrong side of a buoy heading into the finish, prompting
    him to duck under a rope to get back in line. The Italians
    are hoping that local favorite Valerio Cleri could move up
    from fourth if Crippen is disqualified.

    Swimming governing body FINA accepted Italy’s
    protest and the United States appealed the decision. The
    FINA Bureau will rule on the case Thursday morning.

    U.S. coach Catherine Vogt pointed out that open water
    rules do not require athletes to swim between the ropes.

    “There’s nothing written in the rules saying you have to
    finish through the lane lines,” Vogt said. “It’s merely for
    guidance. And actually he had no advantage of doing
    what he did. It was actually a disadvantage to him. I think
    clearly he could have been first or second and he was
    third, and I think he deserves it.”

    However, FINA said that athletes were told before the
    race to finish between the ropes.

    Regardless of whether Crippen keeps his medal, Vogt
    was pleased by the American performances.

    “They both swam great races. I’m really proud of the
    adjustments they made from yesterday. It’s a tough turn-
    around,” Vogt said, referring to Gemmell’s fifth place
    and Crippen’s seventh in the 5K. “It’s their first world
    championships.”

    Gemmell lives in Wilmington, Del., and Crippen is
    from nearby Philadelphia, yet they do not train together.

    “It’s a 30 minute drive up I-95 (to Philadelphia) but I
    train at home with my dad,” Gemmell said. “We don’t
    really train in open water. We train in the pool. We’ve
    found that pool swimming is actually very similar to open
    water swimming.”

    the Queen Elizabeth Sports Center named
    after him in 1981.

    Finlayson, accompanied by committee
    members Harrison Petty, Sherwin Stuart, Lin-
    da Thompson, Sandra Smith and coach Keith
    Parker, said they are really appreciative of
    the contribution by Cable Bahamas for the
    luncheon that is scheduled to start at 2pm.

    "We thank Cable Bahamas for their kind
    gesture,” Robinson stressed. "The response to
    this event has been great from both the cor-
    porate and individual level. We anticipate
    that Bahamians from every walk of life will
    join Tommy's contemporaries in a well
    deserved tribute to our Bahamian national
    hero.

    "We have a number of partners who have
    come aboard by making an additional con-
    tribution and continue to encourage others
    to go above and beyond in paying tribute to an
    individual who has done so much for sports in
    the Bahamas."

    The luncheon was originally scheduled as a
    part of the 50th anniversary of Robinson's
    victory in the men’s 220 yards at the British
    Empire and Commonwealth Games in
    Cardiff, Wales, on July 24, 1958. But due to
    the death of one of Robinson's family mem-
    bers and his own illness last year, they had to
    postpone the celebrations to this year.

    Among the special guests expected to
    attend the event are Robinson's University
    of Michigan team-mate Hilton Nicholsen and
    Enrique Figuerola, the 1964 Olympic Games

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    PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

    TRIBUNE SPORTS



    SPORTS

    Bryant ‘optimistic’ Odom
    will re-sign with Lakers

    By ALEX KENNEDY
    Associated Press Writer

    SINGAPORE (AP) — Los
    Angeles Lakers star Kobe
    Bryant is optimistic the NBA
    champions will re-sign key
    free agent Lamar Odom.

    "I'm optimistic that he'll be
    back," Bryant said Wednes-
    day at a news conference in
    Singapore as part of a six-
    country Asian tour. "He
    makes us a much, much
    stronger team."

    Negotiations broke down
    last week and the Lakers
    retracted a contract offer to
    Odom. The Miami Heat are
    also wooing the 6-foot-10 for-
    ward.

    Odom played a key role off
    the bench in the Lakers’
    championship run, averaging
    12.3 points and 9.1 rebounds
    during the playoffs.

    Bryant said forward Ron
    Artest, who signed as a free
    agent with the Lakers earlier
    this month, will help bolster
    the team's chances to repeat
    as champions.

    "T think Ron's going to be a
    great addition to us," Bryant
    said. "It's about how well we
    play together. No matter how
    much talent you have, it's
    about how you put those
    pieces of the puzzle togeth-
    er.”

    Bryant downplayed specu-
    lation that Lakers coach Phil
    Jackson may take some
    games off next season because
    of health problems.

    "Who said he's coaching
    less?" Bryant said. "Phil likes
    messing with you guys. He'll
    be there all the time, unless
    he has a doctor's appointment
    to get to."

    Bryant also said he was
    more likely to agree to play
    for Team USA at the World



    KOBE BRYANT (AP)

    Championships in 2010 and
    the 2012 London Olympics
    now that Duke coach Mike
    Krzyzewski has committed to
    lead the team.

    Bryant and Krzyzewski
    won the gold medal at the
    Beijing Olympics last year.

    "I'm very excited to see
    that he signed on," Bryant
    said. "It influences all the guys
    just because we've been
    through that experience
    before and it becomes like a
    family."

    "It definitely influences
    me."

    Bryant, an 11-time All-Star,
    said a possible showdown
    against LeBron James, for-
    mer Lakers teammate
    Shaquille O'Neal and the
    Cleveland Cavaliers in next
    season's finals would be
    "crazy."

    "Just the hoopla that sur-
    rounds it and all the stories
    that would come out of it,"
    Bryant said. "If that match up
    is to happen, we have to take
    it one day at a time, we can't
    get caught up in it being a giv-
    en that we're going to be in
    the finals."

    "We have to take care of
    our business, but that being
    said, it would be a heck of a
    show."

    Robinson and Gibson should
    ‘be knighted’ by the Queen

    STUBBS

    THIS weekend is
    a special one for
    our sporting icon
    Thomas Augustus
    Robinson and leg-
    endary skipper
    King Eric Gibson.
    Both, in their own
    rights, have been
    hailed as legends in
    track and field and
    sailing respectively,
    yet neither of them
    have earned the
    international recog-



    44

    am
    ‘Gt

    =
    a e





    a.

    nition that has been OPINION

    bestowed upon so
    many other
    Bahamians on the
    Queen’s honours list.

    Here is Robinson, whose
    résumé looks like a best sell-
    er novel about a sprinter who
    traveled the world and
    almost single-handedly rep-
    resented the Bahamas at the
    highest level in the sport of
    track and field.

    The Friends of Thomas
    Augustus Robinson commit-
    tee is scheduled to hold a
    luncheon 2pm Sunday at
    Sandals Royal Bahamian
    Resort & Spa in a tribute
    that is fitting for a king. On
    July 24, 1958, Robinson was
    sitting on top of the world
    when he won the men's 200
    yards at the British Empire
    and Commonwealth Games
    in Cardiff, Wales.

    That was the pinnacle of
    his achievement, but over a
    span of a decade from 1955-
    1966, Robinson excelled in
    both the 100 and 200 yards
    and metres as well as extend-
    ing it to the 300 where he set
    a world indoor record in
    Saskatoon, Canada, in 1964.






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    Robinson, who took a shot
    at running for Parliament
    and eventually was honoured
    with his name being placed
    on the track and field stadi-
    um at the Queen Elizabeth
    Sports Centre in 1981,
    deserves any and all of the
    accolades that will be
    bestowed upon him.

    He's a humble individual
    who, like coach Keith Parker
    points out, has a big broad
    smile and has contributed
    significantly to the develop-
    ment of a number of local
    track and field athletes
    behind the scenes.

    As he recovers from
    surgery, the committee could
    not have selected a better
    time to honour Robinson,
    who will also have an edu-
    cational fund established in
    his name. The latter is a true
    testament to the first
    Bahamian to attend college
    on an athletic scholarship.

    It maybe long overdue, but
    considering that the achieve-
    ments of Robinson are well
    documented, no one can
    take away from his achieve-
    ments. And like everybody
    would suggest, now would
    also be a good time for him
    to be knighted as Sir Thomas
    Augustus Robinson by the
    Queen.




    a



    KING ERIC GIBSON

    After all, he had one of the
    most glaring performances
    turned in at the British
    Empire and Commonwealth
    Games in Cardiff, one of the
    countries still under the
    British rule, headed by the
    Queen. So let us honour him
    in that manner now when he
    would really appreciate it,
    just as much as he will on
    Sunday.

    While Robinson will get
    some more of his flowers this
    weekend, the focus will be
    placed on King Eric Gibson



    sy

    next weekend during the
    Acklins Regatta.

    Gibson, coined King
    because of his tremendous
    performance on the sailing
    beat, has enjoyed one of the
    longest tenures of any local
    skipper. He has been sailing
    in regattas for more than 30
    years and will finally be
    going home to have the 2009
    regatta held in his honour.

    Some may say that Gibson
    may have caused more havoc
    in the sport than anybody
    else. But he has done more
    for the promotion and the
    smooth sailing of regattas
    throughout the Bahamas
    than any one individual per-
    son.

    So his contribution has
    balanced itself out.

    Like Robinson, I person-
    ally feel that what Gibson
    has done for the sport of sail-
    ing has not been recognised
    and he too should be given a
    knighthood for his achieve-
    ment, although it's not as
    documented as Robinson.

    But one cannot talk about
    sailing and not mention the
    name King Eric Gibson. It's
    time that these icons are hon-
    oured just like others who
    have received the accolades
    for less than national accom-
    plishments.

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    THE TRIBUNE

    A



    THURSDAY, JULY 23,



    2009



    a See 4
    wa

    Lurz wins
    10k open

    water race...
    See page 15

    A

    Bahamas introduces Anti-doping Sports Bill

    By RENALDO DORSETT
    Sports Reporter
    rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

    AS ONE of nearly 200 countries to
    sign on to the World Anti Doping
    Code and adhere to the programme
    as adopted by the International
    Olympic Committee, the Bahamas
    has moved toward compliance by
    adopting legislation to enforce the
    code, said Minister of Youth Sports
    and Culture, Desmond Bannister.

    In his contribution to the Anti-
    Doping Sports Bill, Bannister,
    announced that the Bill would intro-
    duce a number of initiatives to place
    the Bahamas on par with the remain-
    der of the world in regards to its anti-
    doping policy, most notably the
    establishment of a National Anti-




















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    Country signs on to
    World Anti Doping Code

    Doping Commission, Anti-Doping
    Therapeutic Use Exemption Com-
    mittee and a Disciplinary Panel.

    “My Ministry will seek to estab-
    lish a National Sports Medicine Com-
    mission that will have a number of
    important functions, the most impor-
    tant of which will be the enforce-
    ment of the World Anti Doping
    Code upon local and visiting athletes
    and teams,” he said.

    “The Bahamas was one of 192
    countries to sign this declaration to
    date. Its principal objective is the

    implementation of anti-doping pro-
    grammes in order to prevent, deter,
    detect and punish individuals using or
    providing performance enhancing
    substances. We have a global instru-
    ment to organise regulation and to
    provide the establishment and exe-
    cution of anti doping policies, rules
    and regulations for the benefits of
    sports organisations and ensure fair-
    play to athletes worldwide. Individual
    countries have three commitments
    under the code, the first is accep-
    tance, the second is implementation

    7

    By BRENT STUBBS
    Senior Sports Reporter
    bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

    CABLE Bahamas is the

    always looking at ways to give
    back to the community,” said
    Gomez, who attended the
    conference with Richard
    Adderley, director of human

    icon in the country, Gomez
    said they couldn't help but
    support Robinson, who had
    the track and field stadium at

    and the third is enforcement.”

    The Minister outlined the various
    responsibilities of the Commission
    and its subsequent panels which will
    become vital in the country’s com-
    pliance with the Lausanne Act and
    the Anti-Doping Code.

    “The National Anti-Doping Com-
    mission will consist of nine members
    who will be appointed by the Minis-
    ter. This commission will have the
    duty of propagating anti doping rules,
    implement policies and programs
    with regard to doping in sports and
    wherever necessary be responsible
    for implementing the world anti dop-
    ing code,” Bannister said.

    Other duties of the Commission
    as recorded in the Bill will include
    the establishment of a “register for
    the Registered Testing Pool of
    national-level and international-lev-

    ="

    el Bahamian athletes who are citi-
    zens or residents of The Bahamas
    and notifying such athletes and rele-
    vant national sporting organisations
    of entries made in the register, it will
    also

    lead to the notification of “test
    results to athletes and, as the case
    may be, governments of countries
    other than The Bahamas, anti-doping
    organisations of other countries, or
    other signatories to the Code in
    accordance with bilateral or multi-
    lateral agreements entered into by
    The Bahamas with such govern-
    ments, organizations or signatories.”

    Other duties of the Commission
    include “entering into reciprocal test-
    ing agreements with national anti-

    SEE page 13

    CABLE Bahamas’
    vice president of
    engineering John
    Gomez makes a
    cheque presentation
    to Alpheus ‘Hawk’
    Finlayson for the
    luncheon on Sun-
    day for Thomas
    Augustus Robinson.
    From left are Harri-
    son Petty, Sherwin
    Stuart, Linda
    Thompson, Gomez,
    Finlayson, Sandra
    Smith, Richard
    Adderley and coach
    Keith Parker.

    area oR Tere Me iteon

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    first platinum sponsor of the ;
    As a sporting legend and

    “Tribute to a Legend” lun-
    cheon in honour of track and
    field icon Thomas Augustus
    Robinson - set for Sunday at
    Sandals Royal Bahamian
    Resort & Spa.

    John Gomez, vice president
    of engineering at Cable
    Bahamas, yesterday made a
    cheque presentation to
    Alpheus “Hawk” Finlayson,
    chairman of the Friends of
    Thomas Augustus Robinson
    committee.

    Cable Bahamas joins a
    number of companies who
    have pledged their financial
    support for the luncheon,
    which is being held in part to
    help cover the medical
    expenses of an ailing Robin-
    son and establish an educa-
    tional fund in honour of the
    first Bahamian to head off to
    school on an athletic scholar-
    ship.

    "At Cable Bahamas, we
    always believe in giving back
    and with the Cable for Cares
    organisation, which has been
    in existence since the incep-
    tion of the company, we are

    SEE page 13

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    Bahamas First:
    $11.9m swing
    Shows ability
    to absorb loss

    * General insurance
    carrier’s Board still
    considering BISX listing,
    but not top priority

    * Predicting likely gross
    premium drop of 5%
    year-over-year for 2009

    * Set to make decision on
    acquiring remaining 70%
    stake in General Brokers
    & Agents by year-end

    By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    BAHAMAS First’s president
    yesterday said the negative
    $11.9 million swing the compa-
    ny sustained on the value of its
    equity investments in 2008
    showed it “can actually sustain
    a significant loss” and remain
    profitable, giving shareholders
    confidence it can weather a
    major hurricane and the expect-
    ed “close to 5 per cent” drop
    in gross premiums this year.

    Patrick Ward, who is also the
    general insurance carrier’s chief
    executive, said that despite the
    unrealised losses on its invest-
    ment portfolio, largely due to
    the slump in value of its Com-
    monwealth Bank holdings from
    $18 million to $14.9 million, its
    equities holdings had per-
    formed better than if they had
    been more widely invested
    across BISX-listed stocks.

    “We actually did better than
    if we had been more broadly
    invested on BISX,” Mr Ward
    told Tribune Business. “It’s just
    another vindication for holding
    on to that [Commonwealth
    Bank] investment.”

    Bahamas First owns 2.133
    million Commonwealth Bank
    shares, although their value had
    dropped to $7 per share at year-
    end 2008, compared to $8.37
    per share the year before,
    hence the swing to a $2.922 mil-
    lion loss on the unrealised value
    of its investments.

    However, Mr Ward said the
    fact that Bahamas First had
    managed to generate net profits
    of $3.464 million for 2008,
    despite such a dramatic swing,
    should give shareholders, poli-
    cyholders and the industry con-
    fidence it could withstand an
    avalanche of insurance claims
    resulting from a major hurri-
    cane and remain profitable.

    Explaining that the impact
    of the $11.9 million equities val-
    uation swing was similar to that
    expected from a major hurri-
    cane, Mr Ward said of the 2008
    financial performance: “We can
    actually sustain a significant loss
    on the profit and loss side, with-
    out necessarily having a com-
    plete wash in any one year.

    “The impact of the Com-
    monwealth Bank move is actu-
    ally what we would expect to
    see in any significant loss year.”

    SEE page 10B

    SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

    $30m investment in Town Centre

    By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    ew Providence

    Development

    Company is look-

    ing at a $30 million
    total investment to construct its
    planned new Town Centre for
    the western part of the island,
    its chief executive explaining
    that the facility was needed to
    spark the firm’s “regional
    development plans” and
    replace a Lyford Cay Shopping
    Centre that was “clearly on its
    last legs”.

    T. Rhys Duggan, who is also
    New Providence Development
    Company’s president, told Tri-
    bune Business that the Town
    Centre development - located
    opposite the entrance to the
    Charlotteville project - would
    feature some 32,000 square feet
    of retail space, and another
    32,000 square feet of office con-
    do space.

    In addition to the planned
    64,000 square foot mixed-use
    Town Centre space, Mr Dug-
    gan said the company’s plans
    also called for “six or seven”
    businesses to be located along
    Windsor Field Road, including
    the likes of a gas station, bank
    and fast food restaurant. He
    pointed to a current dearth of
    such facilities in western New
    Providence.

    Mr Duggan said New Provi-
    dence Development Company
    was now “going full speed
    ahead” to obtain all the neces-

    $100k spend
    takes Cost
    Right online

    By CHESTER ROBARDS
    Business Reporter
    crobards@tribunemedia.net

    ABACO MARKETS is
    moving its Cost Right retail for-
    mat online with the launch of
    CostRite.com through an
    almost $100,000 investment set
    to roll out in the third quarter
    of its current financial year, its
    chief executive revealed yes-
    terday.

    Gavin Watchorn, who is also
    Abaco Markets’ president, said

    SEE page 4B

    $3.5-4m spend
    for AML Foods’
    latest format

    By CHESTER ROBARDS
    Business Reporter
    crobards@tribunemedia. net

    ABACO MARKETS, which
    has been renamed as AML
    Foods Ltd, reduced its bank
    debt by $1.2 million near the
    end of its fiscal 2010 second
    quarter, while sales had shown
    significant growth over the first

    SEE page 9B

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    T. RHYS DUGGAN

    sary final planning approvals
    and other permits needed from
    the Government.

    The proposed Town Centre
    had already received its
    ‘approval in principle’ from
    planning bodies such as the
    Town Planning Committee, and
    Mr Duggan said the Traffic
    Impact Study had also been
    approved by the Government.

    With Abaco Markets’ new
    premium food store format,
    Solomon’s Fresh Food Market,
    secured as the Town Centre’s
    anchor tenant, Mr Duggan said
    New Providence Development
    Company would “ramp up”
    efforts to secure all outstand-
    ing government permits and
    approvals.

    “We already have our engi-
    neering designs done in-house



    * Proposed project to feature 64,000 square feet of space
    split evenly between retail and offices, with ‘six to seven
    pads’ to include bank, gas station and fast food restaurant

    * Project to replace 40 year-old Lyford Cay

    Shopping Centre that ‘is on its last legs’

    * But waste water franchise for western New
    Providence is key component that is missing

    * 20 homes still being developed at Old Fort Bay, but
    light industrial park on hold until ‘market improves’

    schematically, so it will not take
    long to translate them into con-
    struction” and other required
    documents, Mr Duggan added.

    While unable to give a pre-
    cise construction start date due
    to the outstanding approvals,
    the New Providence Develop-
    ment Company chief executive
    added: “As quickly as things
    can get approved, we’ll start
    construction.

    “The target for us and Abaco
    Markets, which is very impor-
    tant for both of us, is to have
    the fresh food market open by
    Spring 2011, which we think is
    very doable.”

    Although unable to give
    details on how many jobs the
    Town Centre project would cre-
    ate, both during the construc-
    tion and post-opening phase,

    Mr Duggan said: “For us, it’s a
    key component of our regional
    development plans.”

    And, referring to the com-
    pany’s existing Lyford Cay
    Shopping Centre, he added: “TI
    think the centre we have now is
    clearly on its last legs, being 40
    years-old, and it’s time to
    upgrade facilities here both for
    the existing population and the
    new population moving to west-
    ern New Providence.

    “We're seeing a lot of inter-
    est among both office busi-
    nesses and retailers, realising
    there’s a well-established mar-
    ket here already, and as a result
    they want to have a presence
    out here.”

    Mr Duggan added that New
    Providence Development Com-
    pany had 25 tenants at the

    Designers must ‘come up to mark’ to
    maximise Miss Universe exposure

    By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    THE head of the host plan-
    ning committee for next mon-
    th’s Miss Universe Pageant yes-
    terday said it was critical that all
    Bahamian designers “come up
    to the mark” on product quali-
    ty and design if this nation is
    to develop a sustainable fashion
    industry, with the Government
    needing to encourage the sec-
    tor’s development due to its
    foreign currency earning poten-
    tial.

    Owen Bethel, head of Nas-
    sau-based financial services
    provider the Montaque Group,

    * Pageant and fashion show organiser urges government
    to encourage development of Bahamian fashion
    industry as foreign exchange earner

    * Miss Universe publicity can be ‘catalyst’
    for sector and fashion show growth

    * Islands of the World hoping to attract more than 500
    visitors this year, with maximum of 20-25 designers

    who is also acting as the
    Pageant’s co-ordinator, told
    Tribune Business that all
    Bahamian fashion designers
    needed to match the quality of
    their peers who had been
    selected to outfit the 86 Miss

    Universe contestants during the
    Fashion Show.

    The three Bahamian design-
    ers chosen for this task, after
    an open call, are Rachel Turn-

    SEE page 8B

    existing Lyford Cay Shopping
    Centre, and hoped to take “a
    lot of them” with it when the
    new Town Centre opened. The
    company had received interest
    from a similar number of
    prospective new tenants inter-
    ested in taking space in the new
    development.

    “That centre [Lyford Cay]
    will close once the new one is
    open, and we will continue to
    evaluate our development
    options on that site,” he added.

    New Providence Develop-
    ment Company had “a good
    number of potential tenants”
    lined up for the Town Centre,
    and Mr Duggan said securing
    contracts and agreements with
    them would be easier now that

    SEE page 4B

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    PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE





    INSIGHT

    For the stories

    behind the

    news, read
    Insight on
    Mondays



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    ONE of the essential ser-
    vices required by any business
    is a good legal relationship
    with a competent attorney or
    law firm, whether for litiga-
    tion, commercial or transac-
    tion purposes.

    As with other service
    providers, it is important that
    a business considers certain
    factors in selecting attorneys,
    preparing for attorney-client
    meetings/consultations, and
    maintaining and managing the
    legal relationship and overall
    conduct of any legal matters.

    Key Considerations

    When retaining an attorney
    or law firm for a legal matter,
    a business should consider the
    following key elements:

    * The attorney/law firm’s
    expertise in the area of law
    featuring the anticipated/spe-
    cific business need or legal
    matter (s) to be addressed.
    Some legal matters require
    both litigation and transac-

    UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Lid. is seeking a suitably qualified individual to fill the position:

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    Please send your resume, on or before Friday July 24th to:

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    It starts with you.

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    tion competencies, and an
    overall commercial awareness
    and understanding of the
    business’s most optimal legal
    strategy and intended legal
    outcome, given the nature,
    complexity and cost-benefit
    analysis of the matter.

    * Potential conflicts of
    interest or representation of
    any potential alliance part-
    ners and/or competitors

    * The adequacy of the
    attorney/law firm’s profes-
    sional indemnity insurance for
    potential liability, given the
    legal matter for which the
    attorney/law firm will be
    engaged.

    * The experience, compe-
    tence, case management,
    leadership, communication
    and legal and business skills of
    the attorney/law firm, given
    the nature and complexity of
    the legal matter.

    * The integrity and trust-
    worthiness of the attorney/law
    firm and his/her understand-
    ing and commitment to the
    confidentiality, attorney-client
    privilege, and roles and legal
    responsibilities of the parties
    upon engagement.

    * The cllarity and compre-
    hensiveness of the engage-
    ment letter, retainer agree-
    ment, or the terms and condi-
    tions of the attorney/law fir-
    m’s engagement in and con-
    duct of the legal matter.

    * The attorney/law firm’s
    hourly rate, estimated fees,
    retainer, payment arrange-
    ments, and fee structure and
    billing scheme for work to be
    done by junior attorneys
    and/or paralegals.

    * Any past work, cases or
    legal matters performed by
    the attorney/law firm in the
    area of law relating to the spe-
    cific matter to be litigated or
    handled by the attorney/law
    firm.

    * The reputation and
    respectability of the attor-
    ney/law firm locally and inter-
    nationally.

    * Whether any complaints
    have been made or discipli-
    nary actions taken against the
    attorney/law firm by the
    Bahamas Bar Association.

    Documentation

    Before meeting the attor-
    ney/law firm for the initial
    consultation on the legal mat-
    ter to be addressed, a busi-
    ness person should organise
    and bring a copy of all the
    legal and business documents

    Colina General.
    ape Insurance Agency

    and correspondence which
    may be relevant to the issue.
    Depending upon the specific
    business or legal need, these
    documents may include, but
    not be limited to, the follow-
    ing items:

    * The business plan, organ-
    isational chart, company man-
    uals, policies and procedures,
    compliance reports, annual
    reports, financial statements

    * Corporate documents,
    including the original or
    copies of the Certificate of
    Incorporation, Memorandum
    and Articles of Association,
    resolutions, minutes, Regis-
    ters of Directors and Officers,
    Register of Members, Certifi-
    cates of Incumbency, Powers
    of Attorney, Shareholder
    Agreements

    * Letters, e-mail messages
    and other correspondences

    * Contractual, vendor,
    employment or other business
    agreements

    * Court documents, includ-
    ing Writs of Summons, State-
    ments of Claim, Judgments

    Information gathering and
    understanding the legal
    process

    In your initial meeting with
    the attorney/law firm, some
    of the following questions
    should be asked:

    * How many similar trans-
    actions or legal matters has
    the lawyer handled in com-
    parison to the legal matter to
    be addressed?

    * What has been the out-
    come/success rate of past legal
    matters?

    * How much of the attor-
    ney/law firm’s work is done
    in the particular area of law of
    the legal matter to be
    engaged?

    * What is the process, pro-
    cedure and paperwork
    involved in the particular legal
    matter to be dealt with? Will
    the attorney/law firm also
    effectively and responsively
    communicate this information
    to the client in a clear, coher-
    ent and comprehensive man-
    ner?

    * What is the education and
    information-gathering process
    between the attorney/law firm
    and client? Will there be any
    legal coaching and overall
    legal strategy in the conduct
    of the matter?

    * Are there any potential
    conflicts of interest relating
    to the attorney’s proposed
    engagement in the matter?

    * What personal and cor-

    with your attorney

    porate documentation is
    needed beforehand in order
    to engage the attorney/law
    firm?

    * How long will the matter
    take to conclude?

    * What will be the mode
    and frequency of communi-
    cation between the attor-
    ney/law firm and the client in
    the conduct of the matter?

    . How many
    attorneys/paralegals will be
    working on the matter? How
    will the client be charged —
    hourly rate, flat fee, or retain-
    er? How will the work of
    junior attorneys, paralegals,
    staff members be reflected in
    the billing? What are the esti-
    mated disbursements and
    expenses involved?

    * What will be the nature
    and ambit of their legal ser-
    vice, advice and assistance on
    engagement, and throughout
    the conduct of the matter?

    * What are the alternative
    solutions, legal strategies, and
    possible consequences of each
    option to be proposed or pur-
    sued by the attorney/law
    firm?

    * What is the potential out-
    come of the case? Are these
    aligned with the expectations
    of both the attorney/law firm
    and client?

    All attorney-client rela-
    tionships should be built,
    maintained and managed on
    integrity, trust, mutual under-
    standing, open and honest
    communication, professional-
    ism and interdependence.

    These objectives can only
    be achieved with a clear
    understanding of the role,
    risks and responsibilities of
    both attorney and client, and
    an appreciation and respect
    for the professional services
    to be rendered and rewards
    to be gained.

    © 2009. Tyrone L. E.
    Fitzgerald. All rights reserved.

    NB: The information con-
    tained in this article does not
    constitute nor is it a substi-
    tute for legal advice. Persons
    reading this article and/or col-
    umn, generally, are encour-
    aged to seek the relevant legal
    advice and assistance regard-
    ing issues that may affect
    them and may relate to the
    information presented.

    Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is
    an attorney with Fitzgerald &
    Fitzgerald. Should you have
    any comments regarding this
    article, you may contact Mr
    Fitzgerald at Suite 212,
    Lagoon Court Building, Olde
    Towne Mall at Sandyport,
    West Bay Street, PO Box CB-
    11173, Nassau, Bahamas or
    at tyrone@tlefitzgerald-
    group.com.

    Share your news

    The Tribune wants to hear

    from people who are
    making news in their
    neighbourhoods. Perhaps

    you are raising funds for a

    good cause, campaigning
    for improvements in the
    area or have won an
    award.

    If so, call us on 322-1986
    and share your story.

    To our valued customers,

    Please be advised that all of our Colina General offices
    in Nassau will be closed
    on

    Friday July 24 2009

    To allow staff to attend the company’s
    Annual Staff Fun Day.

    We will resume normal business on

    Monday July 27" 2009

    mangos

    Transfer Solutions Providers Limited is a Bahamian software
    company specializing in micro-payments, with an aggressive
    implementation time-table. In order to meet these goals we
    require the services of a Chief Technical Officer immediately.

    Chief Technical Officer
    Minimum requirements:

    ¢ University degree in Science/Engineering
    e 10+ years experience in:

    Major systems design

    Programming (C, C++, .net)

    Large scale database design

    Large scale networking and associated protocols
    ¢ Experience in card-based financial systems
    ¢ Experience working for Government level institutions
    ¢ Experience working in an international environment

    We apologize for any inconvenience caused.

    All interested parties please submit CV by e-mail to harvey.morris@ts
    pbahamas.com or by fax to 394-6763. No telephone calls accepted.

    Management





    THE TRIBUNE

    THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 3B



    Fund administrator
    confirms 11 lay-offs

    By CHESTER ROBARDS
    Business Reporter
    crobards@tribunemedia.net

    BUTTERFIELD Fulcrum
    (Bahamas) yesterday confirmed
    that it is making 11 staff mem-
    bers redundant over a period
    of six months, and indicated
    that this newspaper’s Wednes-
    day story was correct by sug-
    gesting its operations in this
    nation were due to shut down.

    Sources close to the company
    told Tribune Business on Tues-
    day that as many as 15 individ-
    uals might have been let go, as
    the fund administrator sought
    to close its Bahamas -ased oper-
    ation and transfer the business
    book to Butterfield Fulcrum’s
    offices in Bermuda and the
    Cayman Islands.

    Butterfield Fulcrum’s head
    office, in a statement released
    yesterday, confirmed: “As a
    result of difficult market con-
    ditions, we have decided to
    downsize our office in the
    Bahamas, resulting in 11 staff

    redundancies which will take
    effect over a six-month period.
    “We have made relocation
    offers to several members of
    staff affected by the redundan-
    cies. We have undertaken care-
    ful advance planning to ensure
    a transparent and seamless
    transition for all our Bahamas-
    domiciled clients, while allow-
    ing for substantial notice for
    affected employees to find oth-
    er employment opportunities.”
    One financial industry source
    said of the Bahamas office:
    “The fund business has dried
    up for them, probably, and they
    are relocating to where they
    have scale, which would be
    Cayman or Bermuda.”
    Keeping mum on further
    details of the lay-offs and
    potential move, current man-
    aging director Sandra Gilbert
    told Tribune Business she could
    not say more but that “a press
    release would be issued by the
    afternoon”.
    The investment funds sector
    of the global financial services

    industry has borne the brunt of
    the credit crunch and econom-
    ic recession, with many funds
    suffering huge redemption
    requests from investors des-
    perate to pull their money out
    and find safer havens for it.

    These redemption requests
    have been enough to put some
    funds out of business, while oth-
    er fund managers/promotors
    have either suspended redemp-
    tions or decided to wind-up
    their existing funds. All this
    would negatively impact a fund
    administrator such as Butter-
    field Fulcrum, reducing its busi-
    ness. It is thought that the fund
    administrator would have
    wrapped up its business in the
    Bahamas by September.

    A statement was prepared by
    Butterfield Bank (Bahamas),
    designed to distinguish itself as
    a separate entity unaffected by
    the lay-offs.

    Butterfield Fulcrum is an
    affiliate of Butterfield Bank
    (Bahamas) though with an
    autonomous management team

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    and board of directors.

    Butterfield Fulcrum’s
    Bahamas business has gone
    through two ownership changes
    in five years. Originally known
    as Deerfield Fund Services, it
    was acquired by Butterfield
    Bank in January 2004 and
    renamed Butterfield Fund Ser-
    vices (Bahamas).

    Then, in July 2008, Butter-
    field decided to merge all its
    funds services operations -
    including those in the Bahamas
    - with Fulcrum, retaining a 40
    per cent stake in the merged
    Butterfield Fulcrum.

    When Butterfield acquired
    Deerfield, it had 12 staff and
    assets under administration of
    $1.8 billion. The latter figure

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    had grown to $2.9 billion by
    year-end 2004, and its size at
    the time of the Fulcrum deal
    can be gauged by the fact that,
    at year-end 2007, Butterfield’s
    assets under administration in
    the Bahamas (when it still
    owned both the funds business
    and the bank), were $5.447 bil-
    lion.

    At year-end 2008, when the
    funds business had been
    merged into Butterfield Ful-
    crum, assets under administra-
    tion in the Bahamas totalled
    just $2.349 billion. This implied
    that Butterfield Fulcrum’s
    Bahamas operations had almost
    $3.1 billion in assets under
    administration by year-end
    2008.

    Correction

    IN the Page 3 Tribune
    Business story on
    Wednesday, July 22, 2009,
    headlined ‘Bank’s in-
    house move to boost e-
    commerce’, Bahamas Vir-
    tual Mall’s website was
    wrongly stated as
    bvn.com.

    The correct web address
    is www.shopbvm.com. The
    Tribune appologises for
    any inconveniences this
    has caused.

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    BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
    VACANCY NOTICE

    An employment opportunity exists for an innovative,
    persuasive leader with a passion for success, a desire to
    succeed and the ability to initiate progress.

    Skill Requirements
    MANAGER, REVENUE ACCOUNTING ,
    CUSTOMER SERVICES DIVISION Excellent oral and written communication skills
    OO Excellent motivation & coaching skills

    Ability to execute priority based workload
    Possess excellent planning, organizational and
    implementation skills

    Ability to operate and familiarity with POS
    systems

    Proficient in Microsoft Office applications
    Possess strong foundation of accounting

    practices and procedures

    Strong multitasking ability

    Strong leadership & managerial skills

    Strong internet skills i.e. Emailing, group
    messaging and research

    Ability to exert initiative

    Recording, summarizing, analyzing, verifying and
    reporting of results of financial transactions

    A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue
    Accounting.

    The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and the
    Family Islands and the reconciliation of all revenue accounts other than miscellaneous
    receivables.

    Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

    + Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in New Providence and
    the Famuly Islands.

    Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers.
    Prepares the sales budget.

    Prepares the Reverwe A ccoOunting Department Budget

    Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Receivable Reconciliation,
    Oversees the training of all Customer Services staff in the new billing software.
    Prepares monthly Board reports

    Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenwe reports.

    Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of Statistics.
    Provides statistical billing information for Family Island managers.

    Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in the
    Family Islands,

    Attends yearly community meetings as well as ad hoc meetings required during
    acquisition of new locations

    Develops and implements rules, guidelines and procedures for the efficient
    operation of the department.

    *- ¢ ¢ be b&b te te +t + of

    Minimum Experience Requirements

    Tertiary level — with degree in related field;
    Collections executive with at least 4 years
    experience in collections or related field ;

    At least three years experience in supervisory
    post;

    Strong knowledge and application of MS
    Microsoft Suite

    Job requirements include:

    Atminimum of a Bachelors degree in Accounts or equivalent

    A minimum of 8+ years of experience in accounting practice and theory.
    Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualifications

    Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas.

    Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing.

    Sound reasoning and good judement skills.

    Ability to interpret financial reports.

    Good time management skills,

    Project management skills,

    st t¢ + + + ££ & &@

    APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:
    Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: : :
    The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity srcollectionsofficer@yahoo.com
    Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509, Nassau, Bahamas on or before:

    duly 31, 2009,





    PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE



    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that JOSUE MERICE of

    STAPLEDON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SB-50202, NASSAU,
    BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
    Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
    as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
    knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
    not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
    of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23" day of
    July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
    Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

    NOTICE

    NEW TELEPHONE
    NUMBER

    To our valued Members, please be advised that


























































    Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative
    Credit Union Limited, has up graded its
    telephone service to better assist our members
    as follows:

    242-502-9200
    242-502-9219
    242-502-9222

    All Departments:
    Loans Department:
    Member Services Department:

    Please note that we can still be reached at our
    old telephone numbers:

    242-323-4488

    242-323-4492

    242-323-4495
    242-323-4411-4

    REQUEST FOR

    $30m investment
    in [own Centre

    FROM page 1B

    Abaco Markets had been
    unveiled as the anchor tenant.

    “We've been waiting to
    finalise the anchor tenant, and
    the rest of the development was
    contingent on that,” he
    explained. “With this deal
    behind us, we’re going full
    speed ahead.

    “With Albany going out
    here, and this going out here
    now, they just complement one
    another very well. It seems the
    west part of the island has the
    momentum now.”

    And enough momentum to
    attract those businesses who
    already have an established
    presence in eastern and western
    New Providence. Mr Duggan,
    though, explained that he was
    unable to give a figure for how
    many tenants would ultimately
    be accommodated in the new
    Town Centre, due to the fact
    that the company wanted to
    have “flexibility” to configure

    space to whatever a tenant’s
    requirements were.

    However, Mr Duggan said a
    key ingredient not yet in place
    was a water supply franchise
    for western New Providence,
    something its New Providence
    Water Development Company
    affiliate is still negotiating with
    the Ministry of the Environ-
    ment and Water & Sewerage
    Corporation.

    The firms are looking to tie
    down a long-term, formal
    arrangement for their supply of
    water to developments such as
    Old Fort Bay, Lyford Cay and
    Albany, but this is likely to run
    into opposition from some who
    will argue that it would deprive
    Water & Sewerage of a cus-
    tomer base and revenue stream.
    New Providence Water Devel-
    opment Company has been
    supplying water for 50 years.

    “That’s probably our most
    important component of this
    whole deal,” Mr Duggan told
    Tribune Business. “Growth

    $100k spend takes Cost Right online

    FROM page 1B

    the company was also in talks
    with the Domino's Pizza master
    franchisor in a bid to bring

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    Abaco Markets owns the
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    Bahamas.

    According to Mr Watchorn,
    the new CostRite.com site will
    give Family Island customers
    the option of having their
    orders delivered to the dock for
    direct shipping.

    He said Cost Rite will
    employ a dedicated department
    for processing and shipping
    orders.

    "We're gong to include the
    schedule of all the mail boats,
    so whichever island you're on
    you can select which mail boat
    services your island, which day
    it sails and pick which day you
    want to put it on," said Mr
    Watchorn.

    The website will be designed
    to be as robust as possible, he
    added, with comprehensive
    details on each item including
    the label, ingredient and nutri-
    tional information of food
    products, and all specifications
    for electronic equipment.

    "It will be just like you're in
    the store with the item," said
    Mr Watchorn. He said item
    specials will be available on
    CostRite.com that will not be
    available in the Town Centre
    Mall anchor store.

    Mr Watchorn said the
    $100,000 invested in construct-
    ing the site included design per-
    sonnel and all other resources
    needed to develop Abaco Mar-
    ket's e-commerce business.

    He expressed confidence that
    the company's development of
    an e-commerce model for Aba-
    co Markets was important for
    Family Island customers.

    When CostRite.com goes
    live, online shoppers will be
    able to purchase items over the
    Internet using a major credit
    card, or deposit money directly
    to Abaco Markets bank
    account. Purchasers can then
    choose to pick up their items
    or have them delivered.

    Mr Watchorn said neither
    Solomon's SuperCenter nor the
    proposed high-end Fresh Food
    Market, expected to open in
    western New Providence in
    spring 2011, will have an online
    presence.

    Abaco Markets is currently
    beta testing the site in prepa-
    ration for its launch.

    We are currently seeking a bright, anergetic, honest and confidant individual to join our Finm as a:

    Messenger

    Candidates will be required to provide messenger and other services on a daily basis. The ideal candidate should

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    Experience in handling cash

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    Uncomproamising personal and business ethics

    We offer a competitive compensation and an attractive benefits package. Assurance is given that every applicant

    will be treated in the strictest of confidanca

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    can’t happen out west without
    that being resolved, and I don’t
    have that yet. We need to have
    that resolved to move forward.

    “We supply everyone west
    of the airport, and are looking
    at upgrading technology and
    providing world class potable
    water. Water and waste water
    disposal, along with electricity,
    are the three most important
    components, and without those
    in place development is impos-
    sible.”

    Meanwhile, Mr Duggan said
    New Providence Development
    Company had delayed putting
    in the planned infrastructure
    for its 75-acre light industrial
    park, located just south of the
    airport, until “the market picks
    up”. Grading for the site had
    been completed.

    As for Old Fort Bay, Mr
    Duggan added: “We’re doing
    well. We still have 20 homes
    under development, and new
    homes are starting every
    month, which is encouraging

    given the way the economy is.”

    New Providence Develop-
    ment Company is the largest
    private land owner on New
    Providence with more than
    2,300 acres. It has developed
    Old Fort Bay and the Old Fort
    Club, and owns the New Prov-
    idence Water Development
    Company.

    It is also an affiliate of the
    Tavistock Group, the Albany
    developer. Both it and Tavis-
    tock Group are owned by Joe
    Lewis, the Lyford Cay-based
    billionaire. Mr Lewis’s business
    partner, Terry White, is an
    investor in both Albany and
    New Providence Development
    Company.

    For the stories
    behind the news,

    read Insight on
    Mondays



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    THE TRIBUNE



    Delta posts 2Q loss, while
    AirTran reports profit

    By HARRY R WEBER
    AP Airlines Writer

    ATLANTA (AP) — Delta
    Air Lines Inc. and AirTran
    Airways posted contrasting
    financial results, but had a
    similar message Wednesday
    about the state of the airline
    industry: A near-term revenue
    recovery is unlikely.

    It remains to be seen
    whether that will mean fewer
    jobs for airline employees and
    higher fees and fares for pas-
    sengers.

    Discount carrier AirTran
    has been able to find ways to
    stay in the black. Its parent

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    posted a $78.4 million profit
    for the April-June quarter,
    while Delta, the world’s
    biggest airline operator, con-
    tinues to rack up the red ink,
    as it recorded a $257 million
    loss for the quarter.

    The news followed hefty
    second-quarter losses reported
    by Continental Airlines Inc.
    and American Airlines par-
    ent AMR Corp., while United
    Airlines parent UAL Corp.
    posted a small profit. Discount
    carrier Southwest Airlines Co.
    also had a profit. US Airways
    Group Inc., JetBlue Airways
    Corp. and Alaska Air Group
    Inc. were to report their
    results on Thursday.

    There has been concern
    that one or two major carri-
    ers might not make it past ear-
    ly next year if the economy
    doesn’t improve or weakens
    further. Investors have been
    paying close attention to air-
    lines’ cash positions.

    Delta had $5.4 billion in
    unrestricted cash as of June
    30, though it expects that to
    fall to $5 billion by the end of
    September. AirTran, a much
    smaller carrier with fewer
    financial obligations, ended
    the second quarter with $389.4

    LEGAL NOTICE

    NOTICE

    INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
    (No.45 of 2000)

    In Voluntary Liquidation

    Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
    the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
    WOODLANDS HOLDINGS LTD. is in dissolution. Salwa
    Bahey El-Din Mounib El-Sayed is the Liquidator and can
    be contacted at Zahran Plaza, 3rd Floor, 7th Circle, P.O. Box
    140825, Amman 11814, Jordan. All persons having claims
    against the above-named company are required to send their
    names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
    Liquidator before the 20th day of August, 2009.

    —
    . et

    yin ed:

    Sales Fsbey ELDin Mirenib El Sped

    L quidates

    LEGAL NOTICE

    NOTICE

    INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
    (No.45 of 2000)

    In Voluntary Liquidation

    Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
    the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
    WOODLANDS MARKETING LTD. is in dissolution.
    Salwa Bahey El-Din Mounib El-Sayed is the Liquidator and
    can be contacted at Zahran Plaza, 3rd Floor, 7th Circle, P.O.
    Box 140825, Amman 11814, Jordan. All persons having claims
    against the above-named company are required to send their
    names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
    Liquidator before the 20th day of August, 2009.

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    million in unrestricted cash.

    “We may face some tough
    choices,” Delta CEO Richard
    Anderson said during a con-
    ference call with analysts and
    reporters.

    He didn’t offer specifics, but
    Anderson said the carrier’s
    responsibility is to “continue
    to maximize the revenue
    across our business.” Chief
    Financial Officer Hank Hal-
    ter told workers in a memo
    that given the current envi-
    ronment the airline can’t guar-
    antee there won’t be involun-
    tary furloughs of frontline
    employees.

    Delta executives said they
    don’t expect any meaningful
    recovery for the remainder of
    the year, and they also don’t
    expect to be profitable for
    2009.

    The Atlanta-based compa-
    ny has already cut 11 per cent
    of its workforce over the last
    year, on a combined basis
    including Northwest Airlines,
    executives said. Delta has
    offered voluntary programs in
    the previous rounds of cuts.

    Although AirTran’s parent,
    Orlando, Fla.-based AirTran
    Holdings Inc., reported a prof-
    it, revenue fell almost 13 per
    cent. AirTran hasn’t been
    immune to the industry’s
    woes, as more travelers fly less
    and take fewer business trips
    amid the weak economy.

    “The consumer is pinched,
    and now the consumer is look-
    ing for deals,” AirTran CEO
    Bob Fornaro told The Asso-
    ciated Press.

    AirTran, like other carriers,
    has cut capacity, sold and
    deferred aircraft and unwound
    fuel hedges. However, its
    capacity reductions have been
    smaller than at other carriers,
    and it has been adding service
    in some areas, including Mil-
    waukee. It also has installed
    Wi-Fi connectivity on all of
    its planes.

    Delta shares fell 12 cents,
    or two per cent, to $5.94 in
    afternoon trading, while Air-
    ‘Tran shares rose 85 cents, or
    14.8 per cent, to $6.60.

    Airlines, despite some suc-
    cess increasing fares recently,
    have had to significantly dis-
    count seats at times and offer
    deals for business travelers to
    lure passengers during the
    summer, which is usually a
    busy time for carriers. Add-
    on fees also have been a key
    revenue source for the air-
    lines.

    As the industry heads into
    its slow period in the fall,
    some airlines may be forced
    to make deeper cuts or gener-
    ate new sources of revenue.
    Delta already plans to cut
    international capacity by 15
    per cent starting in Septem-
    ber.

    Delta’s loss for the second
    quarter was equivalent to 31
    cents a share, compared to a
    loss of $1.04 billion, or $2.64 a
    share, a year earlier when
    Delta recorded a big non-cash
    charge related to the decline
    in the carrier’s market value.

    Excluding merger-related
    expenses, Delta would have
    lost $199 million, or 24 cents a
    share, in the latest quarter.
    The airline said it would have
    posted a profit of $191 million
    if it were to also exclude $390
    million in fuel hedge losses.

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    Re: MELLOR HOLDIN

    This NOTICE is issued by the Securities Commission of The Bahamas (“the
    Commission”) pursuant to Section 4(2) of the Securities Industry Act, 1999
    (“the Act”).

    It has been brought to the attention of the Commission that the above named
    company may be carrying out activities that are registrable under the Act.

    The general public is HEREBY ADVISED that neither Mellor Holdings Ltd.,
    its agents nor its consultants are registrants of the Securities Commission nor
    have they made application for registration with the Commission. Therefore,
    any conduct of registrable securities business by this company, its agents or
    consultants in or from this jurisdiction is a violation of the Act. Further, if this
    company in any way holds itself out as fully compliant and bona fide persons
    operating in the securities industry from this jurisdiction, it has committed an
    offence and is liable for criminal prosecution and/or regulatory sanctions under
    the relevant laws of The Bahamas.

    Background

    Mellor Holdings Ltd. appears to be a company engaged in providing investment
    services to the public. The company operates a website at
    www.mellorholdings.com., The website claims that the company is located in

    The Bahamas at:

    P.O. Box CB - 14076

    14 South Buckner Square
    Old Towne, Sandyport
    New Providence, Bahamas.

    The Commission advises that there is no company named Mellor Holdings
    Ltd. operating from that address. Further, the company is holding itself out as
    duly incorporated in this jurisdiction. The Commission advises that while there
    is evidence of an entity named Mellor Holdings Limited incorporated in this
    jurisdiction, this entity has been struck from the Register of Companies since
    January Ist, 1993. Further, the Commission advises that the Bahamian Certificate
    of Incorporation displayed on the Mellor website appears to be fraudulent.

    Anyone desirous of conducting securities business with Mellor Holdings
    Ltd. its agents, or its consultants, should be cognizant that they are doing
    so with an unregulated entity and individuals. You are therefore strongly
    urged to conduct full and proper due diligence and exercise the utmost
    caution before engaging in transactions with the above named company,
    its agents or its consultants.

    Anyone who is already involved in transactions with the above named company,
    its agents or its consultants and is concerned about these transactions should
    contact Ms. Mechelle Martinborough, Secretary & Legal Counsel at the
    Securitics Commission of The Bahamas at telephone number 356-6291/2 or
    in writing to P.O. Box N-8347, Nassau, The Bahamas or via ¢-mail:
    info @sch.gov.bs.



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    THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 7B

    Bahamas firm wins $40k grant from IDB

    A BAHAMIAN compa-
    ny/entrepreneur is among the
    10 award winners selected
    from 580 submissions by
    Caribbean firms to receive a
    $40,000 investment grant
    from the Inter-American
    Development Bank’s (IDB)
    Multilateral Investment Fund
    (MIF).

    Organisers confirmed in a
    statement that country-level
    winners have been selected
    for the 2009 Pioneers of Pros-
    perity Caribbean Awards
    Competition.

    A ceremony to honour
    their achievement is sched-
    uled to be held today.

    Ten winners and five hon-
    ourable mentions were select-
    ed from across the
    Caribbean. These firms
    emerged from a pool of 580
    small to medium-sized firms
    (SMEs) that applied to the
    programme.

    Winners at the country lev-
    el will receive a $40,000 grant

    from the MIF to invest in
    training and technical infra-
    structure for their company,
    and are automatically entered
    into the regional competition
    for a chance to win an addi-
    tional $60,000 and the presti-
    gious title of Pioneer of Pros-
    perity Caribbean.

    Honourable mentions will
    receive a similar grant of
    $10,000.

    Winning firms will also be
    connected to a global net-
    work of technical expertise,
    potential investors, and other
    cutting-edge entrepreneurs.

    All 10 winners will travel
    to Jamaica to compete for
    three regional prizes.

    Bruce Golding, Prime Min-
    ister of Jamaica, will host the
    final awards ceremony on
    September 11, 2009.

    The Pioneers of Prosperi-
    ty Awards Programme is an
    initiative made-up of region-
    al competitions spanning the
    Caribbean, Africa and Cen-

    0 cal

    tral America.

    Seven countries participat-
    ed in the inaugural Caribbean
    competition: Bahamas, Bar-
    bados, Belize, Guyana, Haiti,
    Jamaica, Trinidad and Toba-
    go.

    The programme seeks to
    inspire a new generation of
    entrepreneurs in emerging
    economies by identifying,
    rewarding and promoting
    outstanding small to medium-
    size businesses, who will serve
    as role models to their peers.

    The programme is spon-
    sored by the Multilateral
    Investment Fund of the Inter-
    American Development
    Bank, the John Templeton
    Foundation, and the Social
    Equity Venture Fund
    (S.E.VEN Fund).

    The Pioneers of Prosperity
    programme was conceived
    and initiated by Michael Fair-
    banks, a recognised thought
    leader in the area of enter-
    prise solutions to poverty.

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    PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE





    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

    IN THE SUPREME COURT



















    IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
    comprising the Eastern portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21)
    containing 26,120 square feet and originally granted to Crispin
    Benjamin and being Crown Grant A4-63 situate Two thousand feet
    east of Gladstone Road in the Gladstone Road Crown Allotments in
    the Western District of the Island of New Providence

    2008

    CLE/QuI/No.001 64

    IN THE MATTER OF THE Quieting Title Act, 1959






























    IN THE MATTER OF THE Petition of
    JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS



    AND

    NOTICE

    ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising the Eastern
    portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21} containing 26,120 square
    eet and originally granted to Crispin Benjamin and being Crown
    Grant A4-63 situate Two thousand feet east of Gladstone Road in
    he Gladstone Road Crown Allotments in the Western District of the
    sland of New Providence which said piece parcel or lot of land
    is bounded NORTHWARDLY by Lot Number Twenty-Two (22}
    originally granted to Francis A. Garraway and running thereon Five
    hundred and Seventy-Seven and Eighty-Five hundredths (577.85)
    eet EASTWARDLY by Lot Number Twenty-Six (26) originally
    granted to Rhonda Louis Wallace Wildgoose and running thereon
    Six hundred and Thirty-Four and Sixty hundredths (634.60) feet

    FROM page 1B

    quest-Garcia of Rachel's Bou-
    tique, Basheva Eve of La Mai-
    son de Besh, and Sabrina Fran-
    cis of SE'B Fashions.

    They will use Androsia and
    Bahama Hand Prints for their
    creations, which will be worn
    by the Miss Universe contes-
    tants at the fashion show,
    scheduled for Wednesday,
    August 12, at the Sheraton Nas-
    sau Beach Resort.

    Acknowledging that the
    immense international media
    interest surrounding the Miss
    Universe event would provide a
    further stepping stone for the
    fledgling Bahamian fashion
    design industry to showcase its
    talents to buyers and merchan-
    disers around the world, Mr
    Bethel told Tribune Business
    yesterday: “It will certainly
    bring to light that, yes, there is
    a local industry here.

    “Tt is critical that we are able

    he Petition of JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS of Cambridge
    Drive, South Beach in the Southern District of the Island of New
    Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
    Bahamas, in respect of:-

    SOUTHWARDLY by a Thirty (30) feet wide Road Reservation
    known as and called “Rocky Pine Road" separating it from Lot






    Number Twenty (20) originally granted to Herbert Cleveland
    Walkine and running thereon Five hundred and Seventy-Seven

    and Eighty-Five hundredths (577.85) feet and SOUTHWARDLY
    by the Western Portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21) originally






    granted to Crispin Benjamin and running thereon Six hundred and
    Thirty-Four and Sixty hundredths (634.60) feet; which said piece

    parcel or lot of land has such position shape marks and dimensions
    as are more particularly described and delineated on the diagram
    or plan attached hereto and thereon coloured GREEN








    JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS, claims to be the beneficial

    owner in fee simple in possession of the parcel of land hereinbefore
    described and such ownership arise by virtue of possession of the



    said land.

    Copies of the filed plan may be inspected during normal office

    hours at:-

    The Registry of the Supreme Court, Anasbacher House, East Street.
    Nassau, Bahamas;

    The Chambers of Richard L. Boodle & Co., 3% Floor, Columbus

    House, East & Shirley Streets, Nassau, Bahamas

    Notice is hereby given to any person(s} wishing to make a claim
    shall do so by filing an Adverse Claim in the Supreme Court and

    serving such Statement on the Petitioners or his Attorneys by the
    30" day after the last day on which on which this Notice appears

    in the daily papers. Failure by any person to file and serve a

    statement of such claim on or before the said date will operate as
    a bar to such claim.

    RICHARD L. BOODLE & CO.

    52wk-Low
    1.28

    6.94
    0.63
    3.15
    2.14

    2.74
    5.50
    1.27
    1.32
    6.60
    10.00
    10.35
    4.95
    1.00
    0.30
    5.50
    10.40

    0.00 10.00

    52wk-Hi
    000.00
    000.00
    000.00
    000.00

    52wk-Low
    1000.00
    1000.00
    1000.00
    1000.00

    52wk-Hi 52wk-Low

    14.25

    6.00

    0.20



    29.00
    0.40

    52wk-Low
    1.3231
    2.8952
    1.4031
    3.1031
    12.3289
    100.0000
    93.1992
    1.0000

    Richard LL, Boodle & Co.

    Counsels ¢ Attorneys-At-Law
    Chambers,
    3" Floor, Columbus House
    East & Shirley Street

    Attorneys for the Petitioner

    ROYAL @FIDELITY

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    Consolidated Water BDRs
    Doctor's Hospital
    Famguard
    Finco
    FirstCaribbean Bank
    Focol ($)
    Focol Class B Preference
    Freeport Concrete
    ICD Utilities
    J. S. Johnson
    Premier Real Estate

    BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

    Security
    Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
    Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
    Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
    Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

    Symbol
    Bahamas Supermarkets
    Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
    RND Holdings

    ABDAB
    RND Holdings

    Fund Name
    CFAL Bond Fund
    CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
    CFAL Money Market Fund
    Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
    Fidelity Prime Income Fund
    CFAL Global Bond Fund
    CFAL Global Equity Fund
    CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

    to showcase we have a diversi-
    ty of talent and designers here
    in the fashion industry. It is crit-
    ical that other designers, other
    than those selected, come up
    to the mark and make every
    effort to market their designs.
    The more that we have putting
    out and producing quality prod-
    ucts for purchase, the better will
    be for the industry.”

    Urging Bahamian fashion
    designers to exploit the invest-
    ment incentives available to
    them under existing legislation,
    Mr Bethel added: “As a for-
    eign exchange earner, it’s [the
    fashion industry] certainly
    something the Government
    should encourage and ensure
    there’s adequate incentives to
    encourage Bahamian designers
    to develop their works and
    develop some manufacturing
    capabilities.”

    Mr Bethel acknowledged
    that because of this nation’s rel-
    atively high operating and

    NOTICE

    ALL ENTRANCES
    to the grounds of
    ST. FRANCIS XAVIER
    CATHEDRAL
    WILL BE CLOSED

    To retain ownership rights
    between the hours of
    6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

    MONDAY,
    AUGUST 3rd, 2009.

    E &

    CFAL

    BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

    MONDAY, 20 JULY 2009
    BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.86] CHG 0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -141.50 | YTD % -8.26
    FINDEX: CLOSE 786.23 | YTD -5.83% | 2008 -12.31%

    WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

    Previous Close

    1.39

    6.94
    0.63
    3.15
    2.37

    2.74
    5.64
    2.98
    1.82
    6.60
    10.90
    10.38
    5.03
    1.00
    0.30
    5.50
    10.40
    10.00

    Symbol
    FBB17
    FBB22
    FBB13
    FBB15

    Today's Close
    1.39

    Change
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.02
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00

    Daily Vol.

    6.94
    0.63
    3.15
    2.37

    2.74
    5.64
    3.00
    1.82
    6.60
    10.90
    10.38
    5.03
    1.00
    0.30
    5.50
    10.40
    10.00

    Last Sale
    100.00
    100.00
    100.00
    100.00

    Change Daily Vol.
    0.00

    0.00

    Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

    Bid $
    7.92
    4.00
    0.35

    Ask $
    8.42
    6.25
    0.40

    Last Price
    14.60
    6.00
    0.35

    Weekly Vol.

    Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

    30.13
    0.45

    31.59
    0.55

    29.00
    0.55

    BISX Listed Mutual Funds

    NAV
    1.3860
    2.8952
    1.4777
    3.1031

    12.9801
    101.6693
    93.1992
    1.0000

    YTD%
    2.40
    -1.52
    3.07
    -8.35
    2.87
    1.10
    -3.33
    0.00

    Last 12 Months
    4.75
    -3.18
    5:31
    -13.82
    5.79
    1.67
    -6.76
    0.00

    Div $

    EPS $

    0.00 7%
    Prime + 1.75%
    0.00 7%
    Prime + 1.75%

    EPS $

    COLON TAL

    Div $
    0.127
    0.992
    0.244

    -0.877

    0.078
    0.055
    1.406
    0.249
    0.419
    0.111
    0.240
    0.420
    0.322
    0.794
    0.332
    0.000
    0.035
    0.407
    0.952
    0.180

    Interest Maturity

    9 October 2017
    9 October 2022
    30 May 2013

    29 May 2015



    Div $
    0.300
    0.480
    0.000

    PIE

    N/M

    N/M
    256.6

    Yield

    0.000
    0.000

    9.03
    261.90
    Yield % NAV Date
    30-Jun-09
    30-Jun-09
    10-Jul-09
    30-Jun-09
    31-May-09
    30-Jun-09
    31-Mar-09
    31-Dec-07

    labour costs, Bahamian design-
    ers would likely have to be
    “realistic and look outside the
    Bahamas for manufacturing”
    of their garments, if they were
    to be competitive on price with
    international rivals.

    The Montaque Group presi-
    dent and chief executive is cur-
    rently organising the second
    annual Islands of the World
    fashion week, to be held from
    November 4-8, 2009, at the
    Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort.

    Mr Bethel told Tribune Busi-
    ness that he was hoping the
    Miss Universe Pageant, and the
    international exposure and
    media interest it generated,
    would “be a catalyst” for
    Islands of the World and other
    events, “setting the stage” for
    them and further development
    of the industry in the Bahamas.

    “We're hoping that the pub-
    licity we gain from Miss Uni-
    verse will certainly increase the
    numbers we had last year,” he
    added of Islands of the World.
    “We’re certainly looking at well
    above 500 travelling in for it
    this year.

    “We are very much ahead in
    the planning stage, and have
    received a significant response
    from designers.” Five Bahami-
    an designers have applied to be
    showcased at Islands of the
    World to date, with another
    three seeking to enter the ‘next
    generation’ category. There
    were no Bahamians in that last
    year.

    Mr Bethel told Tribune Busi-
    ness that he wanted to limit
    Islands of the World to a max-
    imum of between 20-25 design-
    ers this year, “to make sure the
    quality and standard is much
    higher”. Some 30 applications
    in total - Bahamian and foreign
    - have been received so far.

    Proving that Islands of the
    World had worked as an expo-
    sure platform, Mr Bethel said
    he had received reports that
    three designers who exhibited
    at last year’s inaugural event
    had received “significant con-
    tracts” - one with Top Shop in
    the UK, and the others with

    Designers must ‘come up to mark’ to maximise Miss Universe exposure

    specialist boutiques.

    As for Miss Universe, Mr
    Bethel said that “on a broader
    scale” it provided an opportu-
    nity to market the Bahamas in a
    “different light than our sun,
    sand and sea,” as it showcased a
    different product from that
    which normally received expo-
    sure.

    Ticket sales for the Pageant,
    now in their second week, had
    started slowly, Mr Bethel said,
    but were picking up in line with
    increased publicity. “Atlantis is
    reporting that they’re getting a
    very good response to ticket
    sales from online channels,” he
    added.

    “We anticipate that as it
    draws closer to the end of the
    month, and pay day comes, we
    will see Bahamians coming in
    and buying tickets to be part of
    the event.”

    Also featured at the Miss
    Universe Pageant’s Fashion
    Show will be Bahamian design-
    er Brynda Knowles, who will
    design the evening's outfits for
    the reigning Miss Universe,
    Dayana Mendoza.

    Ms Mendoza will share the
    stage as co-host of the event
    with Charles Sealey.

    The newly-crowned Miss
    Universe will receive an outfit
    created by Bahamian designer
    Jeff St. John, of the House of
    St. John, which she will wear
    at her press briefing on the
    morning after her crowning.
    She will also receive a specially-
    crafted bag from Harl Taylor
    BAG.

    Mr Bethel said: “Not only is
    this significant as the first time
    that the Bahamas is hosting the
    Miss Universe Pageant, but also
    because the fashion show will
    feature another aspect of the
    islands’ creativity and culture
    as displayed in fashion.

    “This will certainly have the
    potential of catapulting the
    local fashion industry into the
    international spotlight. It is
    important for other designers
    and novices to take advantage
    of this and continue to build on
    the opportunity.”

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

    IN THE SUPREME COURT

    Probate Side

    IN THE ESTATE OF RUPERT A.R. CULMER,
    late of No. 3 Imperial Park,

    in the Eastern District of New

    Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

    NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any
    claim or demand against the above Estate are required to
    send the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned
    on or before the 20th August, 2009 after which date the
    Executrix will proceed to distribute the assets having
    regard only to the claims of which she shall then have had

    notice.

    AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all persons
    indebted to the said Estate are requested to make full
    settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

    JOSEPH C. LEDEE
    Chambers
    Suite No. 6, Grosvenor Close
    Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas
    Attorney for the Executrix

    (July 9, 16, 23)

    Temple Christian High School
    Shirley Street

    Invites applications from qualified Christian for the following posi-
    tions for the 2009 - 2010 School Year.

    Dean of Students

    Applicants must:

    A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing to
    subscribe to the statement of Faith of Temple Christian

    School.

    B. Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or Higher from
    a recognized College or University.

    C. Possess excellent organization, Inter-personal

    communicative skills.

    D. Be able to assist with all aspect of the Administration.

    E. Be able to discipline, counsel students.

    F. Have high morals standards.

    Application must be picked up at the High School Office
    on Shirley Street 23rd July, 2009 and be returned with
    the following: a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
    photograph, church affiliation, pastor’s name and three
    references to:

    9.0775
    1.0000
    1.0000
    1.0000

    9.2765
    1.0622
    1.0243 -0.84
    1.0585 2.04
    MARKET TERMS

    YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

    Bid § - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

    Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

    Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

    Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

    EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.

    NAV - Net Asset Value.

    NIM - Not Meaningful

    FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

    2.00
    2.56

    -2.98
    6.22
    2.43
    5.85

    30-Jun-09
    30-Jun-09
    30-Jun-09
    30-Jun-09

    Fidelity International Investment Fund
    FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
    FG Financial Growth Fund

    FG Financial Diversified Fund

    BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
    352wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.
    52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
    Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
    Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
    Change - Change in closing price from day to day
    Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
    DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
    P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
    (S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
    (31) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
    TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

    Mr. Neil Hamilton
    The Principal
    Temple Christian High School
    P.O. Box N-1566
    Nassau, Bahamas
    Deadline for application is July 30th, 2009





    THE TRIBUNE



    po BUSINESS
    $3.5-4m spend for AML

    Foods’ latest format

    FROM page 1B

    five months with an 11 per cent
    increase last month.

    Gavin Watchorn, the com-
    pany’s president and chief exec-
    utive, unveiled the details on
    the company’s financial perfor-
    mance as it gears up for an
    almost $4 million investment
    project in western New Provi-
    dence with its new format,
    Solomon’s Fresh Food Market,
    set to be the anchor tenant in a
    new Town Centre project.

    Speaking at Abaco Markets’
    Annual General Meeting, Mr
    Watchorn revealed the compa-
    ny's investment in the high-
    end store had been pegged at
    between $3.5-$4 million invest-
    ment.

    Despite the state of the glob-
    al economy and the teetering
    financial sector, Mr Watchorn
    suggested that now was as good
    a time as any for the new pro-
    ject.

    This suggests management
    remains confident in the con-
    tinued recovery of the BISX-
    listed company, which expects
    the 2010 second quarter results
    to look much like the first quar-
    ter’s. It expects to pay the
    $600,000 debt remaining with
    the Royal Bank of Canada.

    "IT am very pleased with the
    progress so far this year,” said
    Mr Watchorn.

    Abaco Markets has been
    working towards reversing its
    net overdraft position of recent
    years to end the 2010 first quar-
    ter with a 127,000 net cash posi-
    tion. The overdraft facility
    reduction saw interest costs
    drop by 25 per cent, while the
    company paid down a further
    $500,000 of the debt owed to
    Royal Bank.

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

    IN THE SUPREME QOURT

    Some $400,000 of that debt
    repayment came from the pro-
    ceeds raised by selling the
    equipment and inventory from
    the former Cost-Right Abaco
    store, with the actual property
    leased to Price Right partners,
    Rupert Roberts and Chad
    Sawyer.

    "We're going to focus on
    continued work into improving
    liquidity so we can get back to
    different things," said Mr
    Watchorn.

    The company will also invest
    $418,000 to acquire 15,000
    square feet of property adja-
    cent to the Solomon's Super-
    Centre Freeport location. The
    newly acquired land will ini-
    tially be used for parking with a
    long-term view for store expan-
    sion.

    The company formalised sig-
    nificant changes to its Board on
    Tuesday night, with Craig
    Symonette and Frank Crothers
    stepping down as chairman and
    vice-chairman respectively after
    20 years of service. Former
    Bahamas Chamber of Com-
    merce president, Dionisio
    D’ Aguilar, was voted in as
    chairman and Robert ‘Sandy’
    Sands as vice-chairman. Mr
    Watchhorn was formally
    named chief executive.

    With the turnaround of Aba-
    co Markets financials came the
    need to renivent the company,
    leading to shareholders giving
    their consent to the name
    change to AML Foods.

    The company has been
    proactive in training manage-
    ment for its new store locations,
    lamenting the difficulty of find-
    ing local management talent.

    "So far we have three inter-
    nal candidates," said Mr
    Watchorn.

    2007

    COMMON LAW AND BOUITY DIVISION

    BETWEEN

    CLEAGEN M1033

    BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

    Piainift

    AND
    STEPHEN FRITAGERALD FARROW

    De fenclant

    ADVERTISEMENT OF SERVICE OF SUMMONS

    ANDI! EOF A

    IRNED HEARIN

    TAKE NOTICE that it has been ordered by Ms. Marilyn Meeres,
    Deputy Registrar of the Supreme Court on the Suh day of March,
    A_D., 2009 that service of the Summons and the Notice of Adjourned
    Heanng in the said action be effected on you by this advertisement,

    Dated this 25th day of June, A.D., 2009,

    GIBSON, RIGHY & Ca.
    CHAMBERS
    Ki-Malex House
    Dowdeswell Street
    Nassau, The Bahamas

    Attomeys for the Plaintiff

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

    IN THE SUPREME OOURT

    2007

    COMMON LAW AND BOUITY DIVISION

    BETWEEN

    CLEGEN 1033

    BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

    AND
    STEPHEN FRITAGERALD FARROW

    Plaimentt

    Defendant

    SUMMONS

    LET ALL PARTIES concerned attend before Deputy Registrar
    Meeres of the een Court, Supreme Court Building, Bank Lane,

    Nassau. The Ba

    hamas on Monday the 11th day of August, A.D..

    2008 at 12:45 o"DSclock in the afternoon for the hearing of an
    applieabon on the part of the Plant for an Oriler tor leave to enter

    Judgment in Default of Appearance pursuant to Order 73 of the
    Rules of the Supreme Court for the amount claimed in the Statement

    of Claim with imberest,

    as therein claimed and costs.

    TARE NOTICE that a party intending te oppose this application

    of lo apply for a stay of execution should send to the

    ainuill's

    party or its Attorneys to reach them mot leas than three (3) days
    before the date abowe mentioned a copy of any Adtidavit intended

    to be used.

    Dated this 20th day of June, A.D. 2008,

    REGISTRAR

    To: Stephen Freeper Fanowsor his Counsel

    Seabreeze Lane
    Meeecau, Tha: Fealiaeticrs

    The Defendane

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

    IN THE SUPREME COURT

    Ciihsom Righy a Co.
    Chambers

    Fai-Msiles, Hicaisa:
    Devwedeswell Street
    Nassau. The Bahamas

    Anonmeys For the Plamailt

    aT

    COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION

    BETWEEN

    CLEAGENM1O33

    BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

    Plain!

    AND
    STEPHEN FRITAGERALD PARROW

    Defendant

    SOTICE OF ADJOURNED HEARING.

    TAKE NOTICE that the Sammons filed on the 25th day of June,
    AD. 2008 and set dean to be heard on Monday the 11th day af
    August, A.D., 2008 at 1245 oDSclock in the aftemoon will now
    be heard before Deputy Registrar Meeres of the Supreme Court,
    Amshkacher Building, Bank Lane, Nassau, The Bahamas on Thursday
    the Sth day of July, A.D, 2009 ot 12:00 o"DSclock in the afternoon.

    Dated this 20th day of March, A.D., 2009,
    REGISTRAR

    This notice was taken out by Messrs. Gibson, Rigby & Co.
    Chambers, Ki-Malex House, Dowdeswell Street, Nassau, The
    Bahamas, Attorneys for the Plaimul?,

    (Ty. 6 9)



    RBC
    FINCO



    THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 9B

    June 2009

    Contact Numbers 393-2004

    PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

    HOUSES

    Lot #4, Jacaranda Subdivision, 6.P
    2 Rekoors, 7 Radhroeonis

    Property Size: 11224 sg

    Butiding Size: | 19 sn fi

    Apprnsad Valor: $7710.00

    Travel south from the round-about, where West Bay Strect
    ara] JFK Drive, (eres of Aicport and aoth of Lyfied Cay) to
    the fing ead on the el; the enirasse dwaraada Sebvbaision,
    Take a left at the T-junction, then the first right onto Jacaranda
    court. The subject property is the last an fhe mgai peered
    White rift Hae,

    Parcel of Land Boner Stroet Foo: Hill, §.P
    Siagle Funaily Reader:

    (3) Bedroom, (1) Bathroom

    Property Stee) on. ft

    Buihding Size: 1,014.59 ft

    Appraised Value: 911500000

    Fron Fire Hill Riteal tem onto Romer Sina }Chunch CW Gi
    Prophecy and Foo Hill Community Ceawre juneion) navel
    east east on Romer Sirect inthe third commer on the night
    trv south to the Givarth borer oe the [ef whack tat adead
    ef The subject Bo aplin level residence padmied blue and
    trimmed white ai a tiled entrance patio

    Lote 300s, Ser Lisden Pindliag Eotaies, iP
    Single Family Residenoo

    1 Rekoom, 2 uthreaen

    Pri Siac 3/000 ag.

    Building Size: 1.15) soft

    Appensed Valor: $164,000,00

    From: Chorks Saunders Higheay emer Sir Lynden Pindling
    Estates and travel south on Lenty Marguerite Pindling Aeeee

    to he second acer on the eaves Sireet) carve] ca on
    Lanren street to the second corner on lefi (Peor Tree Avene,
    Travel nari on Pear Tree Avenue te the subiect, fie fiflrenth
    prayer cen Che: eal, The sare is lie green terre] abhi,

    Lote}, Done Joteson Estas
    Single Fusily Reader
    Sedrooms, 2 Bohesors
    Property Stee: §,065 aq.fi
    Bouildinng Sive: | 684 sg fl
    Appraised Vilue: $100 245,00

    From (iadkione: Road teree] exe along Rocky Ping Rice fier
    appecad mately 1,444 [eet and tern left on Dame Darts
    dere then 2nd lett and the sobject property is the died from
    come,

    Lote 33754 Sir Lynden Pindling Estates, 4.P
    Single Family Reackre:

    3 Beakoors, T Rathrosns

    Property Stee: 4,300 sq.ft

    Building Size: | 150 og

    Appraaad Vile: 5161000.00

    From East Street 4 Eamon Goukeeard {sonih beach Police
    Stvion) awe) cat on Hara bi Rorakevard oy the neta-ahel
    continue traveling eastward on CW Saunders Highway take
    the second right, Lady Margucritie Findling Avenue, tea
    tale ee fired Left, Lauren Street anal the: subject property i
    the aateeath bet oa the night

    Liow¥d], Fesukil: Sutil vidire, MP,
    aiagle Family Residence

    1 fhecoors, 2 Hathrooms
    Proqutty Sime 6109 Ao 7
    Building Size: 1.247 3
    Apprased Value: 191, m0

    From Fos Hall Read aad Bernard Read gavel weal on
    Berard Atoad, tales the first heft Foo: Drive then the third right
    Sparrow Lane and the subject praperty i dhe bast on the beh

    TTB Pratts Clone Subdiwiaion, NP
    Sige Fer Resdinas
    ~ Redinenta, 2 - Aalirocens

    Sine tie
    be ing Size: 1.20
    Appraned Value: $150,500
    From Carmichael and Golden [sles Roads travel south to the
    Ub [iret comer on the comer on the kell anal the abe jot
    peaperty bi the ah om che right, Mae om obite

    Lig#2] Madeoln Rica) East
    Single Furaily Rewdence

    2 Redoora, 2 Bathrooms
    Proqurty Sine: 6/000 ag.
    Building Size: Hiv sg tt
    Acppransed value: $129 2000 00

    From Faw Sire Sauth - rive a dina Mad oolit Rial
    nd tum nigat on Wander Terrace to the dest road on the
    left contivae fer about 200 6 and the subject property is on
    the left

    Lotd- (CH West of Hine Hal Heigl:

    Property Sine: 43560 sa ft

    Apprmsad Valo: $25, 000,00

    Prom Blue Hill Road ond Indepeadenc Highoay west along
    Torque Williams Dering Higheay aad fm lef on Preston:
    Avveree [Farnaly Creazdian oa comer, cintitae dee Premakct’s
    Avenue into “Pride Estate and cum right on the first cul-de-
    — the sebject peoperty ts directly ahead throug 3 track
    rie

    Lott], Lower Bogee: Biouthers
    Veer! lind

    my Sine: 10TH sg. ft
    Append Valor: $46,000.00
    Trevel westward om Skyline ind Menhawund Bay Smet
    the subject is the firs vacami land afier Save Mare Drug
    Stare on ie gh bed side,

    Lote F2) West Winds Subdivision, WP
    Vac! Land

    Single Family Residence

    Lide?d, Fairview Sublivaion

    4 Becbooms, 2 Bathroaris

    Property Stee: 6,530) sqft

    Baaikding Sine: O28 wy fl

    Appraised Valoe:$ |i 0001 00

    From Cannictec! Road & Angus Steet, tere! sour on
    Astin Sees, tern right at dhe TJ, 3 Wincor Riel,
    then take the second left into Fair View Heights, Skaureen
    Avene, te fins right, Sharon Coert, and

    subject praperty ts Ge fiest on the lefl,

    Lot 8 Taran bhegits Subdivisem, NP
    Single Fansily Rewdence
    2» Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
    Property Sine: oe
    Bau ikthana Sine: DAT ay. fl
    Appraised Value: 938 42180K)

    Foot Prince: Clerics Drive tree ork along Tyrone Avene
    and the aubject property ies che 2th on the rhuhe after the fret
    comer on the right

    Liat 104% Pinewood Crandon
    Single Funily Readence

    3 ~ Berkusers - 7 Bathrooms
    Property Sime en af
    Bouikchineg: Size: 1525 aa ft
    Apprimied! Valo: $063,700 00

    Prone Pigeon Plum Avenue « torpel wert along Walnut Sect;
    crossover Hey Geranfam Avenee and the sebject peoperty
    is the Ind property en Ge lel,

    Lott], Bik) phase, Faith Gardens

    Single Farsily Redden:

    4 Berbooms, ? Baihroarns

    Property Sine 6/000 59 .ft

    Buihding Sins: 225) 29 M1

    Appraised Value: e304 878.00

    Freon the: traffic Liga of Fath Avera: & Cow Peo Aiea, raved
    ateth aloag Faith Aneaue te che entrance wm Faith Gardens
    tom left and comtiqge to the lad: “T° junction, tum rigid and
    thir subject property inthe [leh on the right

    Single Forily Residence
    Late, Tripical Gardens

    2 Bekeorms, | Bahroors
    Property sine: 7437 9f
    Barihting Size: I, 108 ag. fi
    Apprameed Valoe:$144 ARILO0

    Trevel wert on West Flay Street to the first mad on the bef
    afer posting Trreclers Rest Resarast, Windane Deteg, avd
    south tothe secaad road on the right, Hollyhock

    inveling wesi, the subject porperty is smeeed on the second
    comme oe dhe lef called Parey ime

    Lott, Golden Cater Estates?
    Single Farsilp Rewdkrws:

    (3| Bedroceres, (2) Hathrowens
    Property Sine: 6/00 59 -ft
    Basikhinng Sine: | 68) sa M1
    Appraised Value: $207 00H)

    Travel wet on Carmichac! Fiosd from Hor Hell Read tam

    onto the hind left Gelden Sua Deve the corner after

    ae ae Anglican Church and betore Carmichael Primary
    travel seth om San Dorrvae te thee first, travel weet pase

    the second corner om the rigitl and) the subjest fim property

    on the right The subject is painted white trimmed white.

    Lot loll Fean Sixes, KE Conger Subdivision, MP
    Single Family Residence

    § Hauboorma, 2 Rathroores

    Property Sine 6,161 oy.

    Bauiiding size: 1158 3a ft

    Apprased Value: $2000 H)

    From Ponce Charles Drive, tom into Jean Steet ee! nor
    on Jean Street to ALE. Cooper subdivision continac directly
    inter. E. Cooper Susdivine and the abject is the ninth
    property on the let House be whine trimmed areca.

    Lite? 0] Go lkdes Qeues 22, Sulbelvtaies, AP
    Single Furaily Reddence
    @ [becboorns, 2 Bathrooms
    Property Sins 6/000 sq. fi
    Butidinya Size: 13M 39, f1
    Apprased Value: $058 SMH)

    From Canmiched Read & Antigua Suet (Ciedden Coc,
    Agsem bie Church) tere! on Antigua Street and

    the subject property is. the sicta lot on the right past de first
    corres ot the right.

    Lots, Frelia Subcirvasion, 6.7
    PW CANTLAND OT Fareily Resdkrex:

    Pp VACANTLAND

    bine 14,320
    Appraised Valoe: S27. rae0
    Travel weil on west Bay Steect and tern ints Wee Witak;
    pass Scourity pate and continoe to ‘T junction. Tur lett and
    coring around bend to neat bend cures and the subject
    property about 3,000 tot from beral on left

    Lote 153 West Winds Sabcirvaion, §.P

    Vaca! Land

    Property Sine: 375 59-f

    Apprased Valoe: $075 000)

    Front the: mmersccion of Wel Bay Sreet and Fomander Road
    (Gambier V'lage} travel weet dong West Hay Street and tum
    Deft ca thee Vat tempera! prevvee] ricad/takos Dred bell aafier pink
    security gate thes left again amd the subject propery |s the
    7th on the lef, on ihe curve (bend

    Lit S00, Wee ot Margeld Riowal South of Hanae Road
    Vacant Land
    Property Sine 16,107 ae. fl





    Bedrooms, } Bathrooms
    Property Sine: 5/000 sq. f
    Buiiding Size: 1.20 sg ft
    Appraised Value: $152 00000

    Front Faith Aree aad Fore Tri] eto Faith Avene,
    follow he curee arcand in the rigat (approcc imately fiola
    rile cast of Faith Avera: tobe the firs eff into Frelia
    Sabahivickon, hen the: fire right anal the suhpext propery is
    the lest Loes om the right

    Litt 124 Bel-Air Estates, AP,
    Binge Fesaily Residence

    } Bakoorms, ——
    Property Sine 6000 &
    Building Size: 43
    Appraised Valuer: 15 sah

    From: Comchae Read and Fath Aweaue iavel east on
    Cannichsel Road take the first mai bruana Way then the
    fivarth right, Harbour Chose, andl the debpoet property ia the
    third on the bef

    Lai@)s, BIRAR, Nowe Eat Mirth, MP,

    Siggle Fardily Reddence

    1 fledrooma, ! Bathrooms

    Proqurty Sie: BSES aq.

    Building Size: 2349 29 It

    Apprased Value: £31215.

    Tria eel ot Print Cheles Drie turn leh inn open
    But North; mare! mori to the first comer on the 1

    the subject i fie secang property on the lett on ‘atnoat
    Corner, The gabycet is ponte green inal trirerecal greet,
    houses! 16

    Lit aiaued gorthernade of Vice Se & Laser Ril,
    Ivanhoe Subdivision, MF

    4 Bechoorns, } Bathrooras - Singh Family Residence
    Property Size: 17,651 53, fl
    Buiiding Size: $26 39 ft
    leuael Value: S406 895.

    From: Mackey Street and Wordaor Road (by Wendy's
    Resturant} travel easton Windsor Goad taloe the secod lett to
    Victor Alocsd,, Gen the first night whech te Larscester Aron, the
    subject property bi the first on the lett on the commer.

    Lite lay, Tayren Heights Sebveion
    Richends Deas

    Single Funily Residence

    § Rakeom, 3 Bedroom

    Pr Sine: £000 agi

    Buiiding ingle. 2.418 aut

    Appraised Valec $717 000,00

    Trowel East on Ponce harks. dove to the comer ae o6 Super
    Value ‘Winton fur. right and dhe subject is the second house
    on the Jef. The subjpent @ painted line green aad bere
    white

    Lil hile appricoradety 70 Nl westward of Florida Coat

    Single Farnily Reddence:

    4 [etkoora, ! Bathrooms

    Property Sine 6/000 sq.7i

    Building Size: 1730 59. ft

    Appraised Value: $22 700000

    Trawel east on Haltoer Avenue on fhe fist mght (Along Coan}
    from Florida Court take the first right onto a ii wide mead

    Disereation and the sebjecdt ia the saad house on the lef

    white tinned grey.

    Lote $4 35 Se Lynden Finding Estries
    Smale hy mi Reudkeics:

    4 Bedroom, ? Huchroom

    Property Sto: 5,479 sq.ft

    Fusiiding siz: Wa a

    Appraised value 34 420.00

    Frere dhe nurdbahee! at Pinewieel ch. tel et on Chel.
    W Saunders Haghwey cate Lady Margueric Pindling Avenue,
    trvel south on i Mdargwerric Pindlin:

    Aer ont Launin Street, terre! cast of Lacnen Sieset and
    the subject property i the trenty-ciaht (26) property on the
    left. (painted lime green and trimmed white

    Lore], Victoria Grandens, -P.
    Single fanily Residence

    7 Baloo, pir

    Pr Siac: 6/000 sq
    Bunding Sine: 16 50 og ft
    Appresed Vale: $11 Ea

    Prom JF. Kennedy Dove travel south along Gladstone Re
    and take the first entrance on lef (former Obadstione Fare),
    OonIME Bones the er asd condita to the 'T junctioe;
    tem left, then another left ond the subject property is the dh
    on the right

    Appraised Valee: 140) 00000

    Lott 145 South Seas Subeivisins

    Vacum Land

    Property Sine: 7067 sq.ft

    Apprasal Vale Sh 000

    Poon Carmichael Road tneel south akoae Miller Road (Bacardi
    Road} and turn bef into Southern Secs Diarver pass rough
    socunity gait aad tam right al Ind Comer ( Eacteoedd Direc}
    continu to the T lunction and the sabject property is the Sed
    on the night from the T Junction

    Lote 5 Golden Grates Eouies ¢ 2 NP

    Varn Land
    Papperty Site. 3,736 ag-f
    Appraised Value 55200000

    Trav pe on Cammrecteael Pal (room Biles EVD Pad to thee int
    Fomachwny on he left reared) Ciaadeloape Rl Travel oo the end
    od Ceadeloupe Boad, the bot is om the Merthwest camer.

    APARTMENTS/CONDOMINIUMS

    Lote) Gamble Heights
    Triplex Apartment
    1-1 Bed, | Bath, {27 Bakeries, | Balhroons

    PB Sine 7,750 3g.fi

    Bauikding Size: 2.3459 ft

    Apprneed Vales: 3118, 000.00

    From Aloe Hall Road & Faith United Way, tare! easton
    Faith Uniied Wary and the subject property on Uh right
    hand side, 2000 feet cnet of Fach Leied Cierch and oppose
    abeary equipmerm depot

    Unies, Hillesest Tower Comdomniniam, Mp.
    Cosdominm

    ? Kekoom, 2 Bathe

    Unit Sine: 1,010 sa
    Appraised Value: S60)000000

    Treva stuth on Calin Averee to Third Tetrace term weed on
    third temace and the subject is contained sothin the second
    building on the ght which ta condominium complex. The
    subject copies. The subpart conples is paitied line green
    ond inemed whine.

    Lol? sus in Mae Suivi
    Dupies: Downline Aparment
    Each with 2 Bedroom, | Eurhesom
    Property Sine: §,541 ag. fl
    y Size: | 2 2g ft
    Apprnsed Value: £20097
    Front Fah Aweroc ive weet along Conv Pen Areal aad om
    Fight on the 2nd comer, conmanue along the road reservation
    to the 44 property on the efi

    Lote, Seawell Mdlanor Subdivicion, KP

    Duplex Apartmeti

    = Lait with T Belton, | Rathaeis
    Size 6410 59.

    Balinese |

    Apprnged Valet: $197,557.00

    Prom Carmichael Ad. revel sorth along Gladsiose Bioad and |

    fem-on ie sotond comer on he ight Gieinuy eT jenctim
    eh) com Left, cake: Def tale atber lef and the eabject peperry
    is the 5th on the lett.

    Lote], Billo] |, Millers Heights Subchvision, §.F
    Daples Apariaical
    le? Bedroom, | Buchoom
    | -) Bedrooms. 2 12 Batroones

    Sise: 7.500 ay. fi
    Bailing Size:| 444g 3
    Apprased Valeo: (4 /000,08
    From Cumiched Read wnvelling weet, tum bef oma Exst
    Avenue, tree! sovth on East Avenue to the first comer on
    the right tearee] noret thenage ty Ube: firs) cose on the lef
    (Margaret ApS ee) continue on Marafret Ave pause Tis
    Infersection and the subject tx the fifth property on the right
    Painted mest Gomened peach

    Lote | Kiso] ‘itinds Subdivision, MF

    2 Storey @ Ales Agartnenl

    All ons ore | Bede, | Bacheeon

    Property Sine: 10084 ao fi

    Barikking. Size: 5.237 ag fl

    Appraised Value: S479 7M

    From the intersection of Fox Hill Road and Joe Farringion
    Aid travel seath on Fire il Ril, tabs the Gre corner on the
    Tight and the subject is the second property on the left

    Lit Gaal Windsor Place Sadiber Aicad

    Duples sy

    2 a) Bedovcrs, (|) Bato

    Propesty Sine: 600mg 1

    Building Size: | 79) sg [1

    Appraised Valoe: $1 GH

    Travel Eat on Soldier Rhoad 00 the igiemection aear Sugar
    Kid Beane Food Store turn right and travel to the end of this
    Sreet, across the intersection ai the carve tem cast and ibe
    abject i dhe First property on the bell, wrtaich isa dhiplen. The
    dupes is cecendly painted bee and immed white with
    enclosed fencing.

    Lot Rocky pine Road

    Dples: Apartment

    Each Unit I Beiiroorms, | Rahrooe
    oy Sine 4475 oq ft

    Bari kcing Sie: |7 14 eg. ft

    Appraised Value: £218 000000

    From Canrechad] Road -travel perth along Gbehione Aicad
    io Rocky Fine Rood tare right and contieue: to the third comer,
    tom night end cominue for aboot AIK feet and the subject
    property sen the right ienslounl with a chain ink Geel

    Lote Portion of James Howe Grant bt

    Deples aparinent

    Each with 2 bedinoors, | bation
    property Sime: 45) oy ft

    Bartling Sire: 1315 sql

    Appraised Vidar: $147 4300

    Freon the traffic light at the intersection of Cow hen and Alec
    Fill Rowaks, irievel sivath aboerg, Wee Hall Road andl tern right
    on the first road: the subject property is the comer lot on the
    Jeli.

    Property situated 330 feet south Adelaide & Cord Harhoer
    Dreples: Apartment

    | -4 Hedineaiad, 2 Hatiiven, | - | Roden, | Hawi
    Property Siac 3691 sq.ft

    Buiiding Size: 2000 sy fi

    Appresal Video $295,400

    Travel along Carmichael Road io the roundabout continuc
    weet anio Ade berks Roca term lef at the furth commer which
    WL OeWwly paved enmano: road; continue sooth on this rood
    and the suaject t: fe seventh house on the lett spt bevel
    dle Dimers whi

    Lote 10 & 1) Blot a5 Nassan WGlage Subdivision
    Meli Farsily Reader
    Deples,
    Uni | = 2 Bedrooms | Bathroom
    — =) Beers 7 Aathreeetrs
    Sine: 3000 sqft
    Buin, Size: 204 soft
    Appraisal Valec $236,715.00

    Prom Soldier Road travel south along Taylor Street (entrance
    into Kay Villeee|; cominus across Akecasdna Boulevard
    fal torn left oni Lawton Avenue, thes rah on Jackson
    Smeect and the subject property is ebowi 225 feet on the left.
    Crees iran white

    We providing financing to qualified buyers

    CONTACT INFORMATION

    RBC Royal Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO Loans Collection Centre



    istered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada

    â„¢The Lion & Globe symbol

    and AGG are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada

    RBC
    FNCO



    PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009












































    MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
    DEPARTMENT OF
    ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

    INVITATION FOR TENDERS

    The Government of the Bahamas is inviting tenders
    for the supply of servicing, maintenance and repair
    of tractor equipment, Solid Waste site off Tonique
    Williams-Darling Hwy. (Harold Rd).

    Interested parties may obtain further information
    including eligibility to participate and may collect the
    bidding document upon payment of a non refundable
    fee of fifty dollars ($50.00) as of July 22nd 2009
    from:

    The Department of Environmental Health Services
    Farrington Road

    Nassau, Bahamas

    P. O. Box SS-19048

    Telephone No. (242) 322-8037, Facsimile No. (242)
    322-8073 between the hours of 9:00 A.M. and 5:00
    P.M. Monday to Friday.

    The method of payment will be certified cheque or
    cash. Tenders are to be submitted in triplicate (3) in
    sealed envelope (s) addressed to:

    The Tenders Board

    c/o The Financial Secretary

    Ministry of Finance Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Centre
    P. O. Box N-3017

    Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas

    No later than August 3rd, 2009.

    Tenders will be open at 10:00 A.M. on August 4th
    2009 at the office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of
    Finance.

    THE TRIBUNE

    SINE
    Bahamas First: $11.9m swing

    shows ability to absorb loss

    FROM page 1B

    Meanwhile, Mr Ward con-
    firmed that Bahamas First
    Holdings’ Board of Directors
    was still considering whether
    the company should list its ordi-
    nary shares on the Bahamas
    International Securities
    Exchange (BISX).

    Based on a show of hands, a
    majority of shareholders had
    indicated at Bahamas First’s
    last annual general meeting
    (AGM), for the 2007 financial
    year, that they would like to
    see the company progress to a
    BISX listing. It was felt this
    would boost liquidity in the
    stock, given that Bahamas First
    meets the definition of a public
    company as its stock is widely
    held, yet it is not listed on any
    exchange.

    However, Mr Ward said that
    while the Board continued to
    assess the matter, no timeframe
    for any BISX listing had been
    set at the AGM, which had
    been more “a show of intent”.

    And he added that Bahamas
    First’s main priority had been
    to prepare itself for the rigours
    of the new Domestic Insurance
    Act, which came into effect on
    July 2, 2009, and will be fully
    enforced a year from that date.

    As such, a BISX listing was
    not top of the priority agenda,
    but Mr Ward explained: “We
    continue to discuss it as a
    Board. Not firm decision has
    been made yet, but there was a

    clear indication from the share-
    holder base that this is the
    direction they want to go in.

    “But they want the Board to
    consider all the issues first.
    There was no timeframe estab-
    lished at the AGM. It was real-
    ly a show of intent as opposed
    to a specific timeframe man-
    date.”

    Given the economic down-
    turn and increased difficulty
    many Bahamians are having in
    meeting insurance premium
    payments, Bahamas First’s
    expectations of a decrease in
    gross written premium for 2009
    are in line with the industry
    average, which has forecast a
    drop of between 5-10 per cent.

    Mr Ward said “10 per cent
    is probably larger than you will
    see in our case”, adding: “At
    this early stage, I would sug-
    gest we will be closer to 5 per
    cent than 10 per cent.

    “T think everyone is going to
    show a drop in retentions as a
    result of some persons actively
    deciding not to insure. The
    expectation this year is that per-
    sons will not have the money
    to pay for coverage. Like every
    business, we’re going to see a
    fall-off in new business and
    retentions because the funds to
    pay premiums are not there.”

    The Bahamas First president
    added that one saving factor,
    in cases where assets such as
    real estate and cars were the
    security/collateral for loans, was
    that often the lending institu-
    tions, such as banks, stepped in

    NOTICE

    INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
    No, 45 of 2000

    HAMERSLEY CONSULTING GMBH

    to pay the insurance premiums
    if their clients were unable to
    afford to do so.

    However, he added that now
    “banks are being more selec-
    tive about which clients they do
    that with”.

    Bahamas First has also “sta-
    bilised the operations” at Gen-
    eral Brokers & Agents (GBA),
    an insurance brokerage and
    agency business it took man-
    agement control of in January
    this year, having acquired a 30
    per cent stake in it last year.

    Mr Ward implied that
    Bahamas First would decide by
    year-end whether to purchase
    the remaining 70 per cent stake
    and take complete control at
    GBA, telling Tribune Business:
    “Apart from having to stabilise
    the operations we’ve done
    nothing at this stage, but the
    likelihood is that by year-end
    we will make a strategic deci-
    sion as to what is in our best
    interests there.”

    He added that the stabilisa-
    tion effort had involved “simple
    management disciplines and
    controls”, with GBA having a
    fair net asset value of $899,967
    based on its unaudited finan-
    cials.

    GBA’s total net assets were
    pegged at $1.121 million, with
    $4.853 million in total assets off-
    set by $3.733 million in total
    liabilities. The net asset valua-
    tion was then written down by
    $220,800.

    GBA has substantial receiv-
    ables and payables on its bal-
    ance sheet, with the former
    (money owed to it) written

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

    down from $3.694 million to
    $2.223 million, a $1.471 million
    adjustment. The business also
    owes $3.559 million in accounts
    payables.

    Bahamas First’s 2008 annual
    report also showed that the
    company paid $4.993 million of
    the $5.014 million to acquire
    Carib Insurance Agency as
    goodwill, the net assets standing
    at just $21,032.

    Mr Ward said the consolida-
    tion of Bahamas First’s 100 per
    cent-owned agencies, Carib,
    Moseley Burnside and NUA,
    into one was “going extremely
    smoothly so far. We haven’t
    seen any adverse impact on
    business retention levels.

    “We've seen an increase in
    walk-in customers, based on
    anecdotal evidence, and there’s
    certainly been an increased lev-
    el of traffic at the Harbour Bay
    location.” The three agencies
    are being combined under the
    NUA name.

    “Our core business is oper-
    ating on quite a good level, and
    as the economy recovers we
    expect to see some uptick from
    that. If there’s no catastrophic
    event, we'll be in good shape,”
    Mr Ward added.

    “In terms of the capital base,
    Bahamas First probably has
    more capital in absolute dollar
    terms than any of our competi-
    tors, and in terms of capital to
    net written premium, we figure
    very strongly as either the num-
    ber one or number two. We
    want to leverage that capital
    base to produce more profits
    for the bottom line.”

    2008

    IN THE SUPREME COURT

    COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION

    CLE/IGENIN0443

    The government reserves the right to reject any or all
    Tenders .

    PORT DEPARTMENT

    GOVERNMENT NOTICE
    INVITATION FOR TENDERS

    ADDENDUM

    The Government of The Bahamas is inviting
    tenders for the following Contracted Service for
    the Port Department, Ministry of The
    Environment.

    ¢ The Cleaning of Potters Cay Dock

    Interested parties may obtain further information,
    and may collect the bidding document as of 20th
    July, 2009 from:

    The Port Department
    Prince George Dock
    Nassau, The Bahamas
    Telephone Number: (242) 356-5639

    Between the hours of 9:00a.m. and 5:00p.m.
    Monday through Friday.

    Tenders are to be submitted in Triplicate (3) in
    a sealed envelope(s) Marked "Tender For
    Cleaning of Potters Cay Dock" addressed to:

    The Chairman
    Tenders Board
    Ministry of Finance
    Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Building
    Cable Beach
    P. O. Box N-3017
    Nassau, The Bahamas

    No later thaN 5:00p.m. on the July 27th, 2009.

    Tenders will be opened at 10am on th 28th July,
    2009 at the Office of the Tenders Board, Ministry
    of Finance.

    THE GOVERNMENT RESERVES THE
    RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL
    TENDERS.

    Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
    137 of The Intemational Business Companies Act No.
    45 of 2000, HAMERSLEY CONSULTING GMBH is
    in dissolution. The date of commencement of
    dissolution was the 21st day of July, 2009. Dillon
    Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
    HAMERSLEY CONSULTING GMBH.

    Dillan Dean
    LIQUIDATOR

    a
    1

    GOVERNMENT NOTICE
    MINISTRY OF LABOUR AND
    SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
    DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR

    NOTICE

    Pursuant to Section 21 of the Industrial
    Relation Act Chapter 321 Statute Law of the
    Commonwealth of the Bahamas it is hereby
    ordered that election of officers in the Airport,
    Airline and Allied Workers Union shall take
    place on Tuesday 18th August, 2009 from 9a.m.
    to 5 p.m. at the Bahamas Communications and
    Public Officers Union Hall, Farrington Road.
    The Department of Labour offices in Grand
    Bahama, and all other Family Islands where
    there are Labour Offices namely; Andros,
    Abaco, Bimini, Exuma, and Eleuthera. Where
    there is no Labour Office, voting will take place
    at the Administrator's Office on the Family
    Islands.

    Only members of the Union who are financial as
    of Tuesday 4th August, 2009, shall be eligible to
    vote.

    Signed
    Harcourt V. Brown
    Registrar of trade Union
    The Commonwealth of The Bahamas



    BETWEEN

    BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
    Plaintiff
    AND
    JACQUELINE JOHNSON
    Defendant

    ADVERTISEMENT OF SERVICE OF
    WRIT OF SUMMONS

    TAKE NOTICE that an action has been commenced
    against you in the Supreme Court, Common Law
    and Equity Division, Action No. CLE/GEN/00443
    of 2008 in which the Plaintiff, BANK OF THE
    BAHAMAS LIMITED, has issued a Writof Summons
    out of the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on the
    20th March, 2008 claiming against you the sum of
    $17,476.70 arising from your default of the loan
    granted by the Plaintiff to you on or about the 11th
    August, 2002 in the principal amount of $7,500.00
    and interest at the rate of 15% per annum.

    AND THAT it has been ordered by
    Ms. Marilyn Meeres, Deputy Registrar of the
    Supreme Court on the 17th March, 2009 that
    service of the Writ of Summons in the said
    action on you be effected by this advertisement,

    AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that
    you must within fourteen (14) days from the
    publication of this advertisement inclusive of the
    day of such publication, acknowledge service
    of the said Writ of Summons by completing a
    prescribed form of Acknowledgement of Service
    which may be obtained on requested from the
    Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
    otherwise Judgment may be entered against you.

    Dated this 17th day of March, A.D., 2009

    GIBSON, RIGBY & Co,
    CHAMBERS
    Ki-Malex House
    Dowdeswell Street
    Nassau, The Bahamas

    Attorneys for the Plaintiff





    THE TRIBUNE

    THE WEATHER REPO

    5-Day FORECAST



    ORLANDO

    High: 93° F/34°C Partly sunny with a Partly cloudy. Partly sunny. Mostly sunny with a



















    - bie" thunderstorm. shower possible. t-storm possible. and sunshine, greater the need for eye and skin protection.
    Low: 73° F/23°C ° si ° °
    @ High: 90 High: 92 High: 90 High: 90
    c tat High: 90° Low: 78° Low: 78° Low: 77° Low: 76° Low: 76° see ED
    _TAMPA Le 4 a UE
    High: 91° F/33° C , - 103° F [eer | FL 102-88 F 109°-84° F 107°-81° F 101°-78° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft.
    Low: 77° F/25°C ry r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 9:27 a.m. 30 3:18am. -0.3
    aa @ ’ 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 9:52pm. 3.3 3:29pm. -0.3
    aa a 10:42pm. 31 4:24pm. -0.2
    , ee r Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday Ti11am. 31 453am. 03
    i _ a ABACO Temperature 11:32pm. 29 5:19pm. -0.1
    f 2 Py, High: 91° F/33°C QIN. see seeders eseceee as Coe 93" F/34" C Sunday T204pm. 31 540am. 02
    bs “al anal N eso és LOW eeeeeeeeeeeeee 79° F/26°C OU 6:15pm. 0.0
    a a Low: 81°F/27°C Normal high... eee rstec
    - ; ee Normal low 75° F/24° C
    , Sm @ WEST PALMBEACH a Last year's high... or Fssc | ONT UII
    4 ll High: 90° F/32° C — Last year's lOW oes 80° F/26° C ae re aa can
    ’ Low: 76° F/24° C i ~~ Precipitation = ———————C™s—S—S—S—— Sunrise... 33 am. Moonrise. .... 10 a.m.
    . ‘ a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....cccccscssssesssssssseeen 0.37" Sunset....... 7:59 p.m. Moonset... .. 9:19 p.m.
    alll ; FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT | Year to date 19. First Full Last New
    High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date .......c.ccsecsccsessseeeseeseeee 23.00" : oe =
    Low: 78° F/26°C _— Low: 78° F/26° C ie
    a AccuWeather.com es
    y @ a a Forecasts and graphics provided by oH 5
    , MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 28 = Aug.5 Aug.13 Aug. 20
    7; High: 90° F/32° C EL ELT HERA
    i Low: 79° F/26°C NASSAU eco Fon C
    High: 90° F/32° C oe:
    =a Low: 78° F/26° C
    5 i. @ ere
    KEY WEST a “oe CATISLAND
    High: 90° F/32" C High: 86° F/30° C
    Low: 81° F/27°C — Low: 78° F/26°C
    . oy GREAT EXUMA ot SAN SALVADOR
    all High: 90° F/32° C 5 he 70 E940
    Low: 82°F/28° C feces
    . : Low: 79° F/26° C
    Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | 5 f
    highs and tonights's lows. High: 92° F/33° C —— .
    Low: 80° F/27° C i. . et
    ee r ra
    LONGISLAND
    Low: 79° F/26° C
    Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday MAYAGUANA
    High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W yr" High: 90° F/32° C
    F/C FIC FC FIC FC —F/C FC FIC FC FC Fic FC Low: 76° F/24°C
    Albuquerque 90/32 69/20 t 95/35 69/20 pc Indianapolis 82/27 60/15 t 82/27 67/19 pc Philadelphia 81/27 68/20 t 84/28 68/20 t
    Anchorage 65/18 54/12 ¢ 66/18 55/12 c Jacksonville 94/34 70/21 t 91/382 71/21 t Phoenix 109/42 39/31 t 109/42 39/31 t CROOKED SLAND/ ACKLINS
    Atlanta 88/31 66/18 pc 90/32 67/19 pc Kansas City 88/31 67/19 s 89/31 69/20 pe _Pittsburgh 78/25 60/15 t 80/26 62/16 pc RAGGEDISLAND — igh:91°F/s3°¢
    Atlantic City 79/26 66/18 + 80/26 67/19 t Las Vegas 110/43 84/28 s 109/42 88/31 s Portland, OR 81/27 50/15 s 85/29 59/15 pec High: 88° F/31° C Low: 80° F/27°C
    Baltimore 82/27 66/18 t 84/28 66/18 t Little Rock 90/32 67/19 pc 92/83 71/21 pc Raleigh-Durham 88/31 68/20 t 90/32 68/20 pc Low: 77°F/25°C eo.
    Boston 74/23 60/15 t 71/21 61/46 t Los Angeles 86/30 66/18 pc 88/31 66/18 pc St. Louis 84/28 67/19 s 88/31 71/21 pc .
    Buffalo 74/23 62/16 t 75/23 61/16 pc Louisville 84/28 64/117 pce 84/28 68/20 s Salt Lake City 100/37 70/21 s 98/36 69/20 pc GREAT INAGUA = etn
    Charleston, SC 90/32 73/22 t 90/32 74/23 t Memphis 88/31 70/21 pe 91/82 73/22 pc San Antonio 94/34 72/22 t 94/34 75/23 pc High: 93° F/34° C
    Chicago 82/27 61/16 pc 85/29 64/17 t Miami 90/32 79/26 t 91/32 80/26 t San Diego 76/24 69/20 pce 78/25 69/20 pc Low. 79° F26°C
    Cleveland 76/24 60/15 t 80/26 64/17 pc Minneapolis 82/27 66/18 pc 80/26 61/16 t San Francisco 69/20 56/13 pc 69/20 55/12 pc y
    Dallas 95/35 70/21 pce 97/386 76/24 pc Nashville 86/30 61/16 pc 89/81 67/19 pc Seattle 78/25 57/13 pe 79/26 57/13 pc
    Denver 92/33 62/16 pc 96/385 58/14 pc New Orleans 89/31 74/23 t 90/32 74/23 t Tallahassee 94/34 72/22 t 91/32 71/21 t
    Detroit 75/23 60/15 t 82/27 64/17 t New York 79/26 67/19 r 81/27 70/21 t Tampa 91/32 77/25 t 91/32 78/25 t
    Honolulu 89/31 75/23 c 89/31 76/24 s Oklahoma City 92/83 65/18 s 97/36 72/22 s Tucson 99/37 80/26 t 101/38 79/26 t
    Houston 96/35 74/23 t 95/35 76/24 pc Orlando 93/33 73/22 t 94/34 75/23 t Washington, DC 84/28 69/20 t 85/29 69/20 t

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    Acapulco
    Amsterdam
    Ankara, Turkey
    Athens
    Auckland
    Bangkok
    Barbados
    Barcelona
    Beijing
    Beirut
    Belgrade
    Berlin
    Bermuda
    Bogota
    Brussels
    Budapest
    Buenos Aires
    Cairo
    Calcutta
    Calgary
    Cancun
    Caracas
    Casablanca
    Copenhagen
    Dublin
    Frankfurt
    Geneva
    Halifax
    Havana
    Helsinki
    Hong Kong
    Islamabad
    Istanbul
    Jerusalem
    Johannesburg
    Kingston
    Lima
    London
    Madrid
    Manila
    Mexico City
    Monterrey
    Montreal
    Moscow
    Munich
    Nairobi
    New Delhi
    Oslo

    Paris
    Prague

    Rio de Janeiro
    Riyadh
    Rome

    St. Thomas
    San Juan
    San Salvador
    Santiago
    Santo Domingo
    Sao Paulo
    Seoul
    Stockholm
    Sydney
    Taipei

    Tokyo
    Toronto
    Trinidad
    Vancouver
    Vienna
    Warsaw
    Winnipeg

    High
    F/C
    93/33
    72/22
    84/28
    93/33
    61/16
    89/31
    86/30
    89/31
    92/33
    81/27
    97/36
    79/26
    85/29
    66/18
    72/22
    91/32
    45/7
    103/39
    96/35
    78/25
    90/32
    82/27
    85/29
    74/23
    66/18
    79/26
    85/29
    65/18
    88/31
    73/22
    89/31
    100/37
    89/31
    88/31
    54/12
    90/32
    70/21
    71/21
    86/30
    85/29
    81/27
    104/40
    75/23
    72/22
    88/31
    77/25
    97/36
    64/17
    75/23
    90/32
    81/27
    104/40
    92/33
    91/32
    48/8
    88/31
    54/12
    91/32
    68/20
    79/26
    73/22
    64/17
    93/33
    77/25
    72/22
    75/23
    75/23
    95/35
    88/31
    79/26

    Ti

    Today

    Low
    F/C
    79/26
    59/15
    50/10
    75/23
    43/8
    78/25
    76/24
    72/22
    72/22
    77/25
    74/23
    59/15
    77/25
    46/7
    57/13





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    68/20 s

    30/-1
    76/24
    85/29
    52/11
    75/23
    73/22
    68/20
    62/16

    54/12 4

    63/17
    62/16
    57/13
    72/22
    59/15
    81/27
    81/27
    74/23
    64/17
    27/-2
    77/25
    57/13
    55/12
    59/15
    78/25
    54/12

    oO

    cy

    75/23 s

    64/17
    55/12
    58/14

    57/13 ¢

    81/27
    52/11
    57/13
    59/15
    69/20
    81/27
    68/20
    81/27
    17/-8
    70/21

    32/0
    73/22
    54/12
    64/17
    55/12

    43/6
    80/26
    72/22
    64/17
    50/10
    60/15
    74/23
    70/21
    60/15

    pc
    s
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    High
    F/C
    91/32
    68/20
    82/27
    97/36
    55/12
    90/32
    86/30
    84/28
    87/30
    81/27
    103/39
    74/23
    85/29
    67/19
    75/23
    97/36
    50/10
    101/38
    98/36
    73/22
    91/32
    80/26
    85/29
    68/20
    64/17
    73/22
    80/26
    63/17
    90/32
    68/20
    91/32
    103/39
    94/34
    86/30
    48/8
    90/32
    71/21
    70/21
    90/32
    84/28
    79/26
    104/40
    79/26
    77/25
    78/25
    78/25
    99/37
    70/21
    70/21
    82/27
    74/23
    104/40
    92/33
    89/31
    54/12
    89/31
    59/15
    86/30
    60/15
    81/27
    70/21
    61/16
    95/35
    77/25
    75/23
    54/12
    76/24
    90/32
    80/26
    70/21

    Friday

    Low
    F/C
    78/25
    57/13
    52/11
    75/23
    39/3
    78/25
    77/25
    71/21
    72/22
    77/25
    72/22
    54/12
    77/25
    44/6
    Soril2
    68/20
    36/2
    75/23
    81/27
    53/11
    75/23
    71/21
    69/20
    56/13
    52/11
    59/15
    60/15
    59/15
    5/28
    59/15
    82/27
    83/28
    77/25
    62/16
    29/-1
    80/26
    59/15
    54/12
    63/17
    77/25
    57/13
    75/23
    64/17
    61/16
    59/15
    54/12
    81/27
    54/12
    54/12
    58/14
    68/20
    81/27
    70/21
    80/26
    25/-3
    74/23
    36/2
    74/23
    53/11
    63/17
    54/12
    39/3
    82/27
    73/22
    61/16
    48/8
    61/16
    62/16
    56/13
    57/13

    INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

    (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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    storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace



    THURSDAY, JULY 23k, 2009, PAGE 11B



    MARINE FORECAST



    WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
    NASSAU Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 86° F
    Friday: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 86° F
    FREEPORT Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 85° F
    Friday: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 85° F
    ABACO Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 85° F
    Friday: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 85° F



    82/66) 9)"

    Chicago)





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    Showers





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    Cs PMtms: Shown are noon positions of weather systems and ae

    Bk. Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm i—fitafi.

    [v_=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Magen
    0s | -0s GR] 105 206 BHR] 40s (50R) ons 70s 608 GORANI





    a bony

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    PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE



    aaa S55
    Government urged: ‘Repeal’ airline fee rise

    By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    THE head of a leading
    Bahamian private airline yes-
    terday questioned how the
    Government planned to put in
    the management infrastructure
    to collect the increased Civil
    Aviation Department (CAD)
    fees, and urged the administra-
    tion to “repeal” the 2005 regu-



    lations permitting the raised
    charges.

    Captain Randy Butler, chief
    executive of Sky Bahamas, told
    Tribune Business that the
    Bahamian private airlines had
    met with Tyrone Sawyer and
    David Johnson, the Ministry of
    Tourism’s head of airlift and
    deputy director-general respec-
    tively, and CAD officials on the
    issue, and said they had been

    NOTICE

    PANJANG UMUR LIMITED







    NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:





    (a) PANJANG UMUR LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
    under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
    Business Companies Act 2000.








    (b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
    the 14 July 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
    submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

    (c) The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh
    of 1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

    Dated this 15" day of July A. D. 2009.



    Ms. Celene Koh
    Liquidator

    A World of

    Choices

    asked to submit a counter-pro-
    posal to the proposed fee
    increases.

    Captain Butler, though, said
    it would be impossible for the
    Bahamian private airlines to
    submit a counter-proposal in
    the two-week timeframe they
    had been given, and with the
    fee increases set to take effect
    from September 10, 2009,
    because the Government had
    not given them financial details
    on how much money it expect-
    ed to raise, and what the funds
    would be used for.

    Arguing that the Govern-
    ment should “really repeal” the
    proposed fee increases, since it
    was already collecting fees,
    Captain Butler questioned
    whether it had given any
    thought as to how it would col-
    lect landing fees at airports in
    remote Family Islands. And,
    indeed, whether it could afford
    to implement the system to do
    so.

    “Can you imagine collecting

    all the landing fees in Mayagua-
    na, Acklins and Crooked
    Island?” Captain Butler asked.
    “How will they know the planes
    landed?”

    He also questioned whether
    the Government would put in
    baggage and passenger x-ray
    screening facilities at Family
    Islands airports, given that the
    fee increases also included a
    per passenger security fee. If it
    did not put in the screening
    facilities, then why should pri-
    vate airlines be made to pay
    this fee.

    Tribune Business previously
    revealed how private Bahamian
    airlines and charter operators
    fear “draconian” increases of
    as much as 10,000 per cent in
    their fee structure could “kill”
    the industry.

    Under the CAD’s proposed
    “across the board” fee increas-
    es, the operator of a five-seater
    aircraft flying 50 hours per
    month could expect to see a
    $13,000 per annum fee rise.

    UES 0 TT
    RMR BRC
    just call 902-2371 today!

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    GET THERE. TOGETHER.

    This newspaper was told that
    the fee increases include a
    tripling or 200 per cent rise in
    landing fees at Family Island
    airports, the rates jumping from
    a current $18.56 per landing to
    $56 per landing for a 19-seat
    aircraft.

    Other fee increases divulged
    to Tribune Business are as fol-
    lows:

    ¢ Monitoring charge: From
    a current $0 to $1,000, a 1,000
    per cent increase

    ¢ Fleet charge: For a five
    seater Aztec aircraft, this will
    go from $0 to $7,000 — a 7,000
    per cent increase. For a Beech
    19 seater aircraft, the fee will
    rise from $0 to $10,000, a 10,000
    per cent increase

    ¢ Charge to lease a foreign
    aircraft: Current: $0. Proposed:



    $4,000, a 4,000 per cent increase

    ¢ Charter permit renewal:
    Current: $500 per annum. Pro-
    posed: $1,200, a 240 per cent
    increase

    ¢ Renewal of scheduled per-
    mits: Current: $500 per annum.
    Proposed: $1,200, a 240 per cent
    increase. Both large foreign air-
    lines and Bahamian operators,
    including small charter compa-
    nies, will pay the same rate

    ¢ Pilot licences: From $0 to
    $250 for a six-month Air Trans-
    port US licence. From $0 to
    $200 for a one-year US com-
    mercial pilots licence.

    ¢ Fuel suppliers to Bahamian
    airlines in the Family Islands
    will have to pay a tax equiva-
    lent to $0.07 per gallon to the
    Civil Aviation Department, on
    top of existing government tax-
    es

    NOTICE
    CRANIUM INVESTMENTS LIMITED

    NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:




    (a) CRANIUM INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in voluntary
    dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
    International Business Companies Act 2000.

    (b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
    the 14" July 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
    submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

    (c) The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh
    of 1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

    Dated this 15" day of July A. D. 2009



    Ms. Celene Koh
    Liquidator

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    STANGEE MOUNTAIN
    INVESTMENTS LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 21st day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
    Argosa Corp. Inc., PR O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    ABBERTON VISTAS LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 21st day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
    Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    WORDSWORTH LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 21st day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
    Argosa Corp. Inc., PR O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)





    The Tribune oo "”""”
    OBIMUARIES
    RELIGION

    \ ~< The Tribune

    —‘\ > ae
    » \8
    707.9

    SS Four choice for ine family





    UREN
    July 23, 2009

    PG 26 The Tribune



    RELIGIOUS

    NEWS,

    STORIES
    AND i
    CU Orn Ao

    EVENTS



    The Tribune






    - a

    RELIGION



    Thursday, July 23, 2009 ® PG 27

    /

    From left to right; Saulene Smith, committee member, Val Gardiner, Committee Member, Minalee Hanchell, Executive Founder and coordinator of Miss Gospel Bahamas, Tamalia
    Hanchell, Committee member, Tanya McFall, Miss Gospel Bahamas 2009/2010, Ethlyn Hanchell, chaperone for Miss Gospel Bahamas and committee member, and Moika Rolle, Miss
    Gospel Bahamas 2005/2006. On Tuesday, executives from the Miss Gospel Bahamas Committee along with its reigning queen Tanya McFall held a press conference to announce the

    August 2 competition date.

    Miss Gospe! Bahamas 2009

    By LLOYD ALLEN
    Tribune Features Reporter
    lallen@tribunemedia.net

    IN less than two weeks one
    of six contestants of this
    year’s Miss Gospel Bahamas
    Pageant will walk away with
    the coveted title of Miss
    Gospel Bahamas
    2009/2010.

    The event which is set to take place
    on August 2, at the Wyndham’s
    Rainforest Theater will feature several
    special guest performances by Synergy
    Soldiers for Christ, Mericha Walker,
    and Overcomers Mime Ministry.

    Now in its fourteenth season, pageant
    founder and coordinator Minalee
    Hanchell said during a press conference
    on Tuesday that for the lucky winner,
    the year long reign is expected to be
    filled with appearances, presentations,
    and front line outreach.

    “First of all she will be expected to be
    an ambassador for Christ, an ambassa-

    dor for our nation, she will be engaged
    in a vast number of weekly activities
    including her involvement in youth
    groups, school presentations, and apart
    from this her platform too will help
    keep her busy.”

    This was most certainly true for
    2005/2006 Miss Gospel Bahamas Moika
    Rolle, who said during her reign she
    was exposed to many projects and
    opportunities that not only introduced
    her to some of the biggest names in
    gospel music, but allowed her to share
    some of her ideas for youth empower-
    ment on an international stage.

    She explained: “With a college schol-
    arship offered as one of my prizes, I had
    opportunities to minister and speak at
    numerous conferences while in the
    United States, with one of them being
    The United Negro College Fund
    National Annual Conference.

    “Persons such as TD Jakes, and the
    then Governor of Texas Rick Perry
    were present at that event, and had it
    not been for this pageant I may have
    never made those contacts.”

    Additionally, Ms Rolle said she had
    the chance to visit the US senate in

    Washington DC, and was able to meet
    dozens of young people who like her
    are committed to youth development
    and leadership.

    Ms Rolle said when comparing Miss
    Gospel Bahamas to other pageants in
    the country, the one thing that sets it
    apart is the emphasis that’s placed on
    spiritual development.

    “In this pageant you meet a lot of
    spiritual leaders and women who pour
    into you, a lot of prayer and fasting is
    put into this pageant, a lot of time in
    terms of how you speak in public, how
    you answer questions is used to make
    you that much better, it’s more than just
    an outer transformation, it’s also an
    inner transformation.”

    Tanya McFall, the 2008/2009 queen
    said although her year as queen has
    been filled with many accomplishments,
    there is still more work to be done.

    With the platform “Empowering
    young women for a global revolution,”
    Ms McFall said her focus was naturally
    transformed to impacting all youth
    because of the need for change within
    the group and explained that she
    helped jump-start the Save The

    Children Programme at Great
    Commission Ministries.

    Now pursuing a bachelor of arts
    degree in English and Teaching, and
    being a youth activist involved in sever-
    al community groups, Ms McFall said
    the pageant has been paramount in
    assisting her to accomplish many of her
    goals, while proving that it is still cool to
    be hip and Christian.

    Ms McFall said she is simply excited
    and wishes all the contestants good luck
    and looks forward to assisting the new

    queen.
    Minister Kevin Harris of Joy
    101.9FM and Terez Davis aka

    Dynamite Daisy are slated to be mas-
    ters of ceremony who are both expect-
    ed to lighten-up the stage as these six
    young women compete for the title.
    Tickets for the event can be pur-
    chased at Great Commission Ministries
    on Wulff Road between Market Street
    and Baillou Hill Road, or Quality
    Fabrics on Mount Royal Avenue.
    Sponsors for the event include
    Wong’s Rubber Stamp and printing,
    PGF Realty, Galilee College, and
    Bahamas Orthodontic Centre.



    PG 28 ® Thursday, July 23, 2009

    (SY MEDITATION

    RELIGION

    Be a plumb-line

    “The Lord said, “See | am setting a
    plumb-line in the midst of my people”
    (Amos 7:8)

    A plumb-line is an instrument that
    measures the uprightness of a wall, for
    example.

    The weight at the end of the line cre-
    ates a straight line that reliably reveals
    the angles which may be correct or
    may need to be corrected. When a
    moral and spiritual plumb-line is used
    to measure individual or collective
    integrity, the presence of sin is easily
    detected.

    Our Lord Jesus Christ modeled in
    his life and taught with his words, the
    expectations that God has for us all,
    but especially for Christians who
    should be open to the leading of the
    Holy Spirit. Our daily prayers need to
    include the desire for knowledge and
    understanding of what we ought to do
    and to have the grace and power so to
    do (The Book of Common Prayer

    The Ditch

    Matthew 15:14,

    Let them alone: they be blind leaders. And
    if the blind lead the blind, both shall fall
    into the ditch.

    I'VE already asked the question
    where are we going as a nation? Could it
    be that we're heading in the ditch as a
    result of blind leadership? Are we so
    politically and religiously crazy, we're
    willing to accept whatever comes down
    the pipe?

    Watch this!

    There was a time in the Bahamas
    when it truly was an honour to call our
    members of parliament honourable; not
    saying that our forefathers didn't have
    their share of personal challenges and
    issues, but when it came to honourably
    standing up for and defending the small
    man; the forefathers effectively played
    their part.

    Here is one of our greatest problem
    with today's political pool. Over the past
    fifteen years the powers have failed mis-
    erably in properly honouring the
    nation's forefathers, and educating the
    younger generations as to who they
    were and the significant roles they've
    played in the shaping of the Bahamas
    today.

    Think on this question: Can we select
    at random a few 6th grade students and
    ask them about some of our forefathers
    like; Sir Cecil, Alvin Brennen, Sinclair
    Outten, etc? No, it would not be fair to
    these students; because this part of our
    nation's history and equipping the gen-

    gz ~Â¥
    ~~. © REV. ANGELA

    + PALACIOUS

    -

    Proper 10—Year B).

    In the whole 23rd chapter Matthew,
    Jesus challenged the teachers of the
    law with scathing comments about
    their hypocrisy and neglect of justice,
    mercy and faithfulness (v.23). Soon
    afterwards, he turned his attention to
    Jerusalem lamenting over the destruc-
    tion that would occur some years
    hence.

    I am sure that the Lord weeps over
    what is happening to us. From the dec-
    imation of the Arawaks and other
    Indian and island people, through the
    days of slavery and slave trading, to the
    present, there have been occasions for




    PASTOR _
    ALLEN

    eration of tomorrow with this knowl-
    edge is of no importance to the educat-
    ed, foolish leaders we have today. But I
    can assure you that

    if ever asked; these same children at
    any given moment can provide you with
    detailed information about the latest
    international music or movie celebrity;
    and I dare to say that many of them
    don't even know our own Bahamian
    recording artists.

    So, as it relates to the nation's social
    and cultural development; we have clas-
    sic cases of the blind leading the blind.

    It is quite evident that the leadership
    of which the Bahamas is in need of; in
    order to fulfill her God ordained assign-
    ment is not in today's pool. But by no
    means should we cease to keep our
    politicians lifted up in payer. Despite the
    fact that many of them don't know, that
    they don't know what's going on and
    what to do about it, yet they're parading
    around as if they are the best thing to
    the country since slice bread.

    YES, we've got ministers and minis-
    ters of states acting as if they are God,
    and as if the people owes them some-
    thing. Here's what I find so amazing;
    before the last general election it was
    the PLP ministers that acted and operat-
    ed in this manner.

    Now, one would have thought that the
    FNM would have learned from the PLP
    arrogance; but needless to say, these

    the heart of God to be severely grieved
    by our inhumanity. Whenever the
    innocent are made to suffer, there is
    heavenly outrage.

    We each need to consider ourselves
    a personal plumb-line allowing God to
    use us to promote a national standard
    of accountability. When we fall or
    stumble let us ask for forgiveness and
    extend it to others in appropriate ways,
    when they err.

    Psalm 37: 5-6 reminds us:

    Trust in the Lord and do good, angel
    dwell in the land and enjoy safe pasture.
    Delight yourself in the Lord

    and he will give you the desires of your
    heart.

    Commit your way to the Lord,

    trust in him and he will do this:

    He will make your righteousness shine
    like the dawn,

    the justice of your cause like the noonday
    sun.”

    clowns have taken arrogance to another
    level. But I sternly admonished you
    politicians (FNM & PLP) to study the
    rise and fall of King Nebuchadnezzar of
    Babylon.

    As an authoritative voice of Father
    Yahweh, I'm at liberty to speak on and
    about national issues that your weak,
    compromising religious leaders of the
    Bahamas are not able to. In order not to
    affect their politician's tithe and govern-
    ment hand-outs these religious weak-
    lings have got to stay within their four
    walls and remain silent while the nation
    goes to HELL on roller skates. And if
    by chance any of these religious-whatev-
    er do speak, it's always from a re-active
    position rather than a pro-active posi-
    tion.

    It is most disheartening to see the
    condition / state of the Bahamas (spiri-
    tually), being a small nation with some
    three hundred, thousand plus people
    and over four thousand churches. The
    only logical question one can ask is this:
    “What has happened to the church?”

    The answer to that question is as such:

    The church has become such a
    watered down, powerless / dead reli-
    gious organisation in the spirit realm;
    whereby every man / leader has set out
    to fulfill their own dreams and desires at
    the expense of the people in Jesus’
    name.

    What do you think the Bahamas
    would be like if the church was operat-
    ing as the ordained organism of
    Yeshuwa Messiah, rather than religious
    organisations?

    The church, the organism of Yeshuwa
    is a consistently alive organ / body that's
    constantly growing and producing after
    its own kind. Whereas the organised
    religious church is consistently seeking

    The Tribune

    “Ve each need

    to consider ourselves
    a personal plumb4ine
    allowing God to use
    Us fo promote a
    national standard
    of accountability.
    When we fall or
    stumble let us ask for
    forgiveness and
    extend it to others in
    appropriate ways,
    when they err.”

    to be revived; through their annual
    money making revivals, conferences,
    workshop, seminars, etc.

    Here's the mandate and representa-
    tion of Yeshuwa's organism - church:
    Mark.16: 17. And these signs shall fol-
    low them that believe; In my name shall
    they cast out devils; they shall speak
    with new tongues;

    : 18. They shall take up serpents; and
    if they drink any deadly thing, it shall
    not hurt them; they shall lay hands on
    the sick, and they shall recover.

    Here's the mandate and representa-
    tion / signs of the organised religious
    church: The pulpit pimps, the bishops,
    apostles, doctors, prophets, etc; are liv-
    ing on the hill top / green pastures
    whiles the congregation lives in the val-
    ley / dry land. This is certainly not the
    will of God, but rather it's a well laid out
    plan and motive of the religious leaders.

    Meanwhile the enemy is wreaking
    havoc throughout this country, for he
    (the enemy) knows that these religious
    leaders are void of Yahweh's (dunamis,
    doo'-nam-is) to lay hands on the sick
    and see them recover; much less to cast
    out devils . Therefore many within the
    religious church are dying from all kinds
    of sickness and diseases causing linger-
    ing questions to exist as to whether God
    heals or not?

    The time has come when the question
    must be asked “Am I being blindly led
    into the ditch?”

    * Questions or comments contact us via E-
    mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or Phone
    #1-242-441-2021 or 225-3850

    Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
    Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l



    The Tribune

    RELIGION

    Thursday, July 23, 2009 ® PG 29

    Gaz:

    Only the |

    "So we say with confidence, 'The
    Lord is my helper; | will not be afraid.
    What can man do to me?â„¢

    Hebrews 13:6 (N.I.V)

    I've never thought of the word,
    alone, in a negative way, now, lonely, is
    a different story.

    The definition of the word alone,
    according to the Oxford dictionary is,
    ‘having no one else present; on one’s
    own.'

    However, we are never alone, God is
    always present. In fact, God is always
    one step ahead of us. He is
    omnipresent, present everywhere at
    the same time. We don't have to fight
    each other for His attention or be envi-
    ous of another's relationship with Him.
    God is here, very present and very
    ready for us to seek Him first, so that in
    return we can experience the awesome
    blessings He has for us.

    Being alone and being lonely are two
    separate states. The latter is a result of
    neglecting the discovery of who a per-



    TONI |
    STYLES

    son is. When a person is lonely, it can
    be in any number of environments. In
    a house with many occupants, in an
    apartment by themselves, working at a
    large company, or living in a foreign
    country-with no company. All of these
    environments are different, yet all are
    the same. The same in the sense that
    they are imperfect. In order to live a
    satisfying life, we ought to stop
    depending on persons, places, and
    things to bring us acceptance, fulfill-
    ment, and happiness. True love comes
    from knowing God and His love for us
    and from knowing ourselves.
    Happiness, begins with our decision to
    be happy.



    Bahamas hosts 8th

    Annual Caribbean
    Baptist Youth Festival

    By ALEX MISSICK
    Tribune Features Reporter
    amissick@tribunemedia.net

    EVERY three years youth from across the Caribbean come together to discuss



    and find solutions to the issues affecting the youth of the world. This year for the }
    first time, the Bahamas has been chose to host the 8th Annual Caribbean Baptist i
    Fellowship Youth Festival from July 22-25 under the theme “Stomp Pun De ;

    Enemy.”

    Reverend Clinton Minnis, Vice President of the Caribbean Baptist Fellowship

    Youth Department, said the organisation is excited to host the festival.

    “Our number is going to exceed 500 in delegate count. We were looking for
    more delegates but this recession has been challenging for many nations. We have :

    ten family islands represented along with 13 nations,” Mr Minnis said.

    Director of the Youth Department for the Baptist World Alliance, Reverend
    Emmett Dunn, congratulated the Bahamian government for opening it’s doors to

    the Christian faith.

    “Together we can create partnerships to reach young people so that they can
    become better citizens not only for the country, but world citizens,” Mr Dunn }

    said.

    there are some myths to be dispelled.

    “When I see groups like yours, bringing hundreds of young people together for
    dynamic goals to determine the future and direction in relation to young people }
    is very special. To be able to have this kind of festival in the Bahamas is very spe- :

    cial,” Mr Bannister said.

    Youth leaders and those attending the festival will be treated to a number of
    events and get to hear speakers that include among others: Pastor Dave Burrows, }

    Pastor Sterling McPhee and Pastor Carlos Reid.

    Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture, Desmond Bannister, said although many
    people do not appreciate the productive young people throughout the world, }

    onely

    The other day, I was flipping through
    an magazine from a couple years back,
    and came across an interview Oprah
    did with Mariane Pearl, the widow of
    slain American journalist, Daniel
    Pearl. She was pregnant at the time of
    his horrific execution at the hands of
    Islamic militants.

    In the interview, Oprah asks Mrs
    Pearl, about the moment the tragedy
    became a reality.

    Her response, "That night I remem-
    ber saying, ‘I'm pregnant and I'm
    alone.’ " In understandable grief, for a
    moment she felt very alone, however,
    she added, "It was very clear that I was
    going to either die or live-nothing in
    between.” "And if I was going to live,
    then I was going to take the challenge
    to be happy."

    Facing one of the darkest situations
    anyone can imagine, we can still
    choose, to be happy. That supernatural
    strength comes from faith, for believ-
    ers, it is a faith in God, and an assur-
    ance that He will never hand us more

    a "Tad me A} il {





    than we can bear. Loneliness is a state
    of mind, a profound depression and
    disservice to the spirit. Indeed it is as
    believers, an insult to the Father God
    we know loves and desires us.
    Furthermore, I personally feel that an
    allowance for loneliness and self pity, is
    extremely selfish.

    Upon realising the fact that we are
    not alone, we ought to look after each
    other as an example of the way in
    which our Saviour Jesus Christ lived
    and loved while on this earth. There
    are always persons who need a shoul-
    der to lean on, and this gives us a won-
    derful opportunity to recharge spiritu-
    ally with one another. In closing, may
    God's presence in your life, always be
    more than enough.

    ¢ Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian
    writer and poet, currently residing in
    Nassau, Bahamas.

    Comments related to the article can be
    sent to fearless247@gmail.com.

    2 religion today

    if f s This July 7, 2009

    photo shows pastor
    Joseph Fuiten, of
    Cedar Park Church
    in Bothell, Wash.,
    looking at Middle
    Eastern artifacts
    that he has collect-
    ed, dating to before
    the time of Christ.
    Many of the early
    leaders of the con-
    servative evangeli-
    cal movement have
    stepped back due to
    health or age,
    because they feel
    burned at being
    called haters or
    because they're
    tired of political
    divisiveness, saying
    it gets in the way of
    saving souls.

    Ken Lambert/AP Photo



    PG 30 © Thursday, July 23, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune

    Calvary Deliverance celebrates
    27 years of Bahamian ministry

    UNDER the theme Pursue,
    Overtake and Recover All , senior
    pastor, Bishop Vernal G Clarke and
    his wife Elder Beverly M Clarke, and
    members of the Calvary Deliverance
    Church (CDC), will celebrate 27
    years of committed service to God
    and the Bahamian community during
    the church’s annual convention slated
    for July 26-31 2009. The event which
    will be held at the church on East
    Street South, is expected to draw del-
    egates from across The Bahamas, the
    Turks and Caicos Islands and the
    United States. Governor General
    AD Hanna is also expected to attend.

    Among this years list of local and
    international speakers will be hosts,
    Bishop VG and Elder BM Clarke;
    Bishop Phalmon Ferguson of United
    Faith Ministries; Pastor Deanza
    Cunningham of Christ Community
    Church; Pastor Thomas Maxwell of
    Tabernacle of Hope Church; Prophet
    Brian Carn of Jacksonville, Florida;
    Evangelist Demetrius Stewart of
    Nashville, Tennessee; and Bishop
    Gregory Davis of Wilmington,
    Delaware.

    There will also be a series of lec-
    tures on relevant social issues such as
    financial independence; public trans-
    portation system; combating the
    scourge of HIV/AIDS; combating the
    fear of crime; and healthy lifestyles.

    Presenters include Glenn
    Ferguson, Reuben Rahming, Keith
    Kemp, Ann Rolle and Assistant
    Commissioner of Police, Hulan
    Hanna.

    Musical artists include the CDC
    mass choir and praise team,
    Reverend Denczil Rolle and the
    Church of God

    Incorporated Mass Choir; Christ
    Community Church Choir;
    Tabernacle of Hope Church Choir
    and others.

    The theme for the conference is
    taken from a familiar Biblical story of
    triumph in the face of despair as seen
    in the book of 1st Samuel, chapter 30
    verse 8. The families and prized pos-
    sessions of David and his trusted war-
    riors had been unceremoniously
    taken captive by the enemy whilst he
    and the men were away.
    Discouraged, weary, disillusioned
    and with no where else to turn, David
    inquired of the Lord whether or not
    to go after the enemy. God emphati-
    cally instructed that David should
    pursue, overtake and recover all that
    the enemy had stolen from them.



    ih
    Andrew Brown



    Brian Carn ' Dr. Ann Rolle



    The Tribune

    RELIGION

    Thursday, July 23, 2009 ® PG 31

    Part 37



    Methodists in Abaco 2

    THE MOVE TO DUNDAS TOWN

    IN 1941, the population of Old
    Place, devastated by hurricane, was
    moved to Dundas Town, where a new
    settlement was established. In 1942,
    the wooden chapel was dismantled and
    transported by boat from Old Place to
    Dundas Town, where it was used until
    a new chapel was built in 1969-70.

    The building of a new chapel at
    Dundas Town in 1970 was accompa-
    nied by the closure of the Marsh
    Harbour chapel. This proved to be a
    most controversial decision, spear-
    headed by the Reverend George
    Hopkins. In March, 1969, Hopkins
    reports:

    "The decision of the Synod to
    uphold the findings of the standing
    committee, to replace our present old
    and out-dated churches at Marsh
    Harbour and Dundas Town with a
    brand new church to be known as "The
    Sea View Methodist Church’, is all in
    step with modern trends and wise stew-
    ardship, both of the ministry and
    finance. The actual siting of the new
    church was hotly debated and now we
    know the considered judgment of the

    All is not

    It is always an honor to be apart of
    what God is doing in this end time.
    Last weekend was one of the most
    meaningful weekends I have ever
    experienced.

    I was apart of a team of young peo-
    ple on a mission to get the gospel out
    to the people in Palmetto Point
    Eleuthera. It was amazing to see
    teenagers not afraid to present Jesus
    Christ to people. Bishop Paul S$
    Morton has a song that says, " Lord
    whatever you doing in this season
    please don't do it without me."

    Every born again believer should
    want to be a part of the movement for

    INSIGHT

    For the stories

    behind the news,
    read Insight
    on Mondays






    ,
    }

    } JIM
    x LAWLOR
    ~—

    Church -- our wisdom is to use this
    golden opportunity of proving the
    worth of our Methodism.

    Before long we shall be saying, ‘Why
    did not this happen years ago?'"

    The Reverend Hopkins’ positive
    outlook was never shared by the mem-
    bership of the Marsh Harbour society.
    In 1969, the circuit report indicated
    that they were preparing to build a new
    chapel on a more attractive site. Their
    pride was stung, in that they were
    being compelled to join a new church,
    established in a new community.
    Several refused to join, and some did
    so with reluctance. The new chapel was
    dedicated in August 9, 1970.

    In December, 1971, Pastor Bert
    Batham writes, with a note of disap-
    pointment and concern, of the growing
    financial and spiritual concerns of the

    lost

    ALLISON
    | MILLER



    souls. That was why Jesus bled and
    died to save man from his sins. We
    (the church) have moved away from
    soul winning, but now more than ever
    it is imperative that we get back to
    that.

    People are dying everyday, that isn't
    the bad part, people dying. The Bible
    tells us that, ‘it is appointed once for
    man to die.’ The bad part is they are
    dying without Christ -just on their way
    to hell.

    Well this weekend the thirty young
    people that went to Palmetto Point,
    Eleuthera gave the people of that set-
    tlement hope. It was truly a blessing to
    witness and be apart of that. An eld-
    erly lady told one of the groups, that
    she had been praying to God to for
    help and He answered her prayers.
    When we went to another settlement
    a lady said to one of the youths, "it is
    hard being a Christian, what made
    you all come to that determination to
    be saved?" The answer given was sim-
    ply amazing. That young lady who is

    circuit. Of the decision regarding the
    closure of the Marsh Harbour Chapel,
    he writes, "Alas, the two societies of
    Marsh Harbour and Dundas Town
    never really fused." By this time there
    is a church hall at Dundas Town, called
    the community centre, and the name of
    the church has been changed from
    ‘Seaview’ to Saint Andrews.

    NEW CHAPEL
    FOR HOPE TOWN

    In 1971 the new Hope Town chapel,
    later named St James, was under con-
    struction. The old chapel, condemned
    by the Ministry of Works, was demol-
    ished by a work team from the US. The
    structure was so strong, dynamite had
    to be used before it crumbled. The new
    chapel was dedicated on June 25, 1972.

    In September, 1972, the Reverend
    Colin Archer became the first minister
    of Abaconian descent to serve in the
    Abaco circuit. The son of Mr and Mrs
    AB Archer, Reverend Archer served
    in the circuit for two years. It is regret-
    table that we have to record that the
    new St James Chapel was destroyed by
    fire on Sunday afternoon August 28,

    only 16 said, " When you see your
    friends dying everyday the best thing

    me away.

    realise what is going on in our society

    days are evil and devil is busy. Every
    happened and is happening. As we

    not ready for a change to happen in
    their lives. And that's ok, because

    change to occur. Agreed or not we
    we are untouchable, that time is on

    our side, we know everything and the

    tells that NOW is the accepted time
    and today if you hear His voice hard-

    regretted decision.

    rebellious. There are a lot of them
    control their lives. They still need
    ers, parents and guardians all come in.

    They could have been anywhere

    nevertheless, they are trying and we
    applaud them for their efforts. To
    God be the glory.

    1986. All of the church records were
    lost. The strong bands of believers in
    Hope Town along with their relatives
    and friends in Nassau are determined
    that another church will be built and
    have begun to vigorously raise funds
    by means of social functions and cook-
    outs.

    NEW BEGINNINGS IN
    MARSH HARBOUR

    In 1985, a new society of 14 members
    was formed in Marsh Harbour. The
    first service, conducted by the
    Reverend Charles Carey, was held at
    the home of Agatha Archer on
    September 1, 1985. The decision to
    open a new society resulted from the
    unexpected and phenomenal growth of
    Marsh Harbour. Peter Campbell, a
    leader from the old Marsh Harbour
    Society, was appointed the first Society
    Steward in the new society, and circuit
    lay pastor. Most of the other members
    are also former members of the old
    society or their descendants

    e (Next time: Part 38 — Native Baptists
    in the Bahamas)

    ] TRIBUNE TIP OF THE DAY

    is to get saved,” That statement blew

    'Where does

    If this young lady at her age can } h | 9
    then what excuse do the rest of us have? yo ur hea rt ay 7
    What is going on you may ask? The :

    IN a time when financial survival

    : : : i requires many of us to put in extra
    negative thing you can think of has } hours at work, forgo time spent with
    PE ? family, friends, or to attend church, it’s
    ministered there were some people } pot hard to understand why people
    i often struggle with understanding and
    ? discovering their true calling.

    only you know when you are ready for ;

    Yes it is important to ensure that

    ? your family has what it needs to sur-

    gamble with our lives in thinking that i vive, however this doesn’t mean that

    ? you should ignore all the things you’ve

    : : : been created to accomplish.
    list goes on. These are the lies that :

    devil tell us that we fall for. The Bible i ability to accomplish something great,

    : whether that is to inspire the masses to

    ? recognise God for who he is, encour-

    en not your hearts. But we aren’t ; age a child to see the good in life

    ready to give up our wants for God's : through a community programme, or

    will. My prayer is that that isn't a whether it’s just to help a friend get

    : . ? through a rough time.
    I said all of that to say this- that not ;

    all of our young people are living to be : Bahamas Faith Ministries said the rich-

    ? est place in the world is the graveyard,

    who have considered God and let Him ? because so many die before they

    nee accomplish all the things they could.
    some guidance and this is where lead- :

    Every individual possess a special

    Recently Pastor Myles Munroe from

    To avoid that fate, begin thinking

    beyond your needs, extend yourself to

    ; ? others, become more than just your
    but in Eleuthera last weekend, but :

    they were there. They are not perfect,

    job.
    Yes it is important to work for the

    i things you need, but it’s equally impor-
    ? tant to help others, and in essence
    ? you'll be helping yourself and God.





    PG 32 © Thursday, July 23, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune
    —. Td" oo... _ #9 inne Eee id
    Scenes

    — .
    from

    ~
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    The Tribu

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    THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

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    IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE














    ay



    CLASSIFIEDS TRADER CL R CLASSIFIEDS TRADER

    Man dies after
    Gunmen attack

    Pair armed
    with handguns
    fire at group

    Tyler Perry
    ‘could give

    major boost
    to tourism’

    New movie
    is being shot | sense



    By TANEKA
    THOMPSON
    Tribune Staff Reporter

    tribunemedia.net
    e
    in Eleuthera AMERICAN superstar
    Tyler Perry could hold the
    key to boosting tourism to
    the Bahamas, it was
    claimed yesterday.

    The Ministry of
    Tourism is counting on the
    widespread exposure from
    his new movie - which is
    currently being shot on
    location in Eleuthera - to
    attracting more of the

    Felipé Major/Tribune staff

    By MEGAN REYNOLDS
    Tribune Staff Reporter
    mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

    A MAN has died and
    another was injured when two
    men armed with handguns
    fired randomly at a group of
    men standing in the street.

    The gunmen pulled into
    Milton Street, off East Street,
    in a dark coloured vehicle at
    around 12.40 yesterday morn-
    ing. Two men, armed with
    handguns, got out of the car.

    They fired shots into a
    group of about six men, hit-
    ting Marvin Sears, 36, in the

    stomach and another man in
    the elbow.

    Mr Sears was rushed to
    hospital and later died of his
    injuries.

    The injured man is said to
    be in stable condition and
    may have been released from
    hospital yesterday, according
    to police.

    Superintendent in charge
    of the Criminal Detective
    Unit Elsworth Moss said:
    “We don’t yet know the
    motive behind the shooting
    and we have not yet got all of

    SEE page nine

    African-American and
    Christian market the
    superstar filmmaker has
    cornered.

    And the hope is it could
    lure visitors who have
    scaled back on travel plans
    because of the global eco-
    nomic crisis.

    The production is also
    expected to inject signifi-
    cant revenue into the local
    market with every hotel in
    the settlement booked out
    to accommodate cast and
    crew according to Mr Per-

    But ministry officials
    were unable to peg a dol-

    lar amount on the esti-
    mated cash injection as
    production is ongoing.



    Bishop Hall criticises
    ‘mentally tired’ MPs

    BISHOP Simeon Hall, former president of the Bahamas

    ISHOP Simeon Ha Change to
    Christian Council, criticised more than half of the Members of
    Parliament for being “mentally tired” and lacking the fire nec-

    essary to propel the country to the “next level.” rap € law to

    Bishop Hall, therefore, called on both the PLP and the
    FNM’s chairmen to ensure that all persons offering for politi- protect wives
    cal leadership at the next general election have the “personal

    MINISTER OF TOURISM Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace (right) presents Tyler Perry with a box of

    SEE page 10

    Christie: PM
    may not let
    parliamentary
    committee

    do its job

    By ALISON LOWE
    Tribune Staff Reporter
    alowe@tribunemedia.net

    cigars from Graycliff yesterday. ¢ SEE STORY RIGHT



    Govt owns just 55% of
























    usable land in Bahamas

    By PAUL
    TURNQUEST
    Tribune Staff
    Reporter

    With the
    Bahamas’ popula-
    tion marked at
    350,000, this
    pturnquest@ amounts to approx-

    . tribunemedia.net , imately 10 acres per

    A CLAUSE in the law that ies. person.
    prohibits a person from being ONLY 55 per However, with
    charged with the rape of their cent of usable land 938,709 in private
    spouse is set to be removed | in the entire hands, 910,341 list-
    under a proposed amendment Bahamas is still ed as undevelopable
    er eae | owned by Govern- “wet land” and

    Ue tabling the amend- ment. 237,583 alread
    ment for first reading in the All other acreage hltsas lghe AE leased, onl 4
    House of Assembly yester- in the country is etther vest- 1,362,205 acres are available.
    day, Minister of State for | ed in private ownership or is The former Exuma MP
    Social Development Loretta classified as “wet” Crown George Smith, who also is
    Butler-Turner noted that the — | Land. a practising realtor with HG
    prohibition was outdated, as And, according to infor- _ Christie said that while land
    many countries had long mation tabled by Prime continues to change hands,
    updated their laws and made Minister Hubert Ingraham, Government ought to come
    marital Tape a crime. there is a little more than up with approaches where

    "Even in England, whose 3.5 million acres of both Crown land can be used by
    common law is the basis of “dry” and “wet” land avail- ‘

    SEE page nine

    SEE page nine able in the entire country.

    By TANEKA THOMPSON
    Tribune Staff Reporter
    tthompson@tribunemedia.net

    SEE page nine

    THE Prime Minister’s exten-
    sive presentation of informa-
    tion to parliament on the ques-
    tion of Crown lands and his
    commitment to personally
    “investigate” the issue “raises
    the suspicion” that he may not
    let the parliamentary commit-
    tee do its job, claims PLP leader
    Perry Christie.

    The Opposition leader pro-
    posed in the House of Assem-
    bly that the Prime Minister may
    be set to prorogue parliament

    SEE page 10

    DOUBLE
    STACKER

    spiritull Yeuly tse
    Kiet telesge et angi 0d Se laycy satcell Chit iE slapd tae leds

    Plaid Skirts Starting @

    Plain Skirts Starting @

    Jumpers Starting @
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    & Blouses Starting
    Monogram Shirts/blouses





    NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER
    PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE



    LOCAL NEWS



    Crown land: ‘Conflict of interest’ rule may have been ignored

    PUBLIC officers are required to
    declare any potential for a conflict of
    interest to the Department of Public
    Service, but the available evidence sug-
    gests that this principle may have not
    been observed in the granting or leas-
    ing of Crown land to civil servants in
    the past, Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
    ham said in the House of Assembly
    yesterday.

    The prime minister said public offi-
    cers may not seek to influence deci-
    sions of another person in order to
    promote or seek to promote their or
    another person’s private interests or
    that of their relatives and friends.

    “In any event, and for the avoid-
    ance of any and all doubt, where the
    potential for a conflict of interest
    exists, public officers are expected,
    indeed required, to declare such poten-
    tial to the Department of Public Ser-



    vice,” he
    said.
    “The
    available
    evidence
    does not
    support the
    view that
    these prin-
    ciples were
    necessarily
    observed in
    the grant
    or lease of
    Crown land to civil servants,” he said.
    While the application forms for
    Crown land do request information
    on “occupation”, the form does not
    require applicants to specify whether
    they are engaged in the public service
    or by any publicly-owned corporation,
    company or agency, nor are applicants

    HUBERT INGRAHAM

    required to reveal their relationship, if
    any, to a public officer — a matter that
    is to be changed, Mr Ingraham said.

    Seventy-three current and former
    public servants are listed as having
    received Crown land grants between
    the years of 1997 to 2009, documents
    tabled in the House reveal.

    List

    This master list tabled by Prime
    Minister Ingraham yesterday reveals
    that staff from the Department of
    Lands and Surveys; Her Majesty’s
    Prison; the Attorney General’s Office;
    the Royal Bahamas Police Force; the
    Port Department; Road Traffic; the
    Department of Education; Civil Avia-
    tion; Customs; the Department of
    Agriculture; Environmental Health;

    Foreign Affairs, and the Prime Min-
    ister’s Office all applied and received
    their requested acreage on various
    islands throughout the country. In his
    earlier contribution, Mr Ingraham said
    that during his previous term in office
    he had put in place policy guidelines
    for the consideration of applications
    and for granting of publicly-held land
    to employees of the Bahamas govern-
    ment or their relatives.

    While the prime minister admitted
    that the terms and conditions for pub-
    lic officers accessing Crown land are
    basically the same as those applicable
    to members of the general public, the
    potential for conflicts of interest and
    preferential consideration is obvious-
    ly much greater for government
    employees.

    “Hence, the consideration of appli-
    cation by public officers and members

    of their families should be subject to
    far greater scrutiny than that of appli-
    cations from the general public,” Mr
    Ingraham said.

    “Tt is expected and required that
    public officers will not make or par-
    ticipate in a decision relating to the
    exercise of an official power, duty or
    function. It is expected and required
    that no public officer will use infor-
    mation that is not available to the gen-
    eral public and is obtained in his or
    her position as a public servant to pro-
    mote or seek to promote his or her or
    another person’s private interests or
    that of the public officer’s relatives
    and friends’ private interests,” he said.

    Sunilarly, he added, public officers,
    in exercising official power, duty or
    function, are not supposed to give pref-
    erential treatment to any person or
    organisation or their representatives.

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    What's your view on Crown land?



    I feel as if Crown land

    should be used for any
    project that is going to help
    the Bahamas and Bahamians
    as a whole, whether it’s by the
    government or by private citi-
    zens, whether it’s granted to
    family members or members
    of parliament or whoever. I
    don’t think it makes a differ-
    ence once you can prove that
    there is no favouritism on why
    the land was granted.

    And once it is going to be
    used for something that is
    beneficial for Bahamians and
    not for sole profit — only in
    those cases it is wrong, and
    that’s taking advantage.”

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    THE distribution of Crown land has been a much
    discussed topic in recent weeks, so The Tribune hit
    the streets to hear what the public thinks about the
    hot button issue. Average Bahamians were asked if

    Crown land should only be used by the government for the
    good of the public, or if it should be sold to private individu-
    als and investors.

    I feel as if it (Crown land)

    should be used for the
    betterment of the Bahamian peo-
    ple, especially for the betterment
    of the Bahamian people (in the
    area of) agriculture and for plen-
    ty other reasons, because for-
    eigners come here and take
    advantage of us sometimes by
    buying a lot of land and saving it
    to make a profit, and lots of times they die and the land stays
    right there with nobody knowing who owns it, and it stays that
    way for years. I’ve seen it happen over and over until the gov-
    ernment takes it over, and all the while the land could have been
    used for the betterment of the Bahamian people.

    “That’s why I think Crown land should be used for the better-
    ment of the Bahamian people, but we have to do it in propor-
    tion because we have kids coming up and they want to use some
    too, so we also have preserve some for our kids.”

    ¢ I don’t think you should
    sell Crown land to pri-

    vate investors who are expatri-
    ates or Bahamians to do what
    they want to do with it, it
    should be specific what they
    want to do with it and it has to
    be for the development of the
    country, period. You can’t just
    think of yourself or a small
    group of people, you have to
    think about the country
    because it is small, and we
    allow too many people to grab
    too much of the Crown land.
    When those who have good
    ideas come around there
    wouldn’t be any land for them to invest (in). Crown land should
    be utilised properly and government should be in control of it,
    but it must be transparent so the people could have a say in the
    distribution of Crown land, because after all it is the people’s
    country and I think it’s no more than fair that people should
    have a say.”







    G6

    My assertion is that the

    population is growing
    rapidly and there is a shortage
    of land all over, and with the
    growth the government is
    going to have to dip into the
    Crown land, that’s the only
    thing available right now, all
    the rest of the land is privately
    owned. A lot of people who
    want to buy land can’t find it
    and some people can’t afford
    land so the government has to
    make laws so that poor people
    can have a part of it, I don’t
    have a problem with that. The
    foreigners nor Bahamians
    should be able to buy Crown
    land and not use it, they
    should be doing something
    with it.”

    I think that the govern-

    ment should only be
    allowed to deal with Crown
    land, and if there are investors
    that strike a good deal then
    government should have a big
    committee with a lot of watch-
    dogs around to see what is
    going on because there is a lot
    of selling of the land for next
    to nothing and you have these
    foreign investors making ten
    times the amount, this is a
    barber shop conversation but
    no one is talking about it.”

    Wes
    is

    tsFinger

    Catt


    THE TRIBUNE



    LOCAL NEWS

    THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 3



    Oln brief COURT: DORNEIL FERGUSON MURDER TRIAL

    Grieving widow recalls
    shooting death of husband

    Non-managerial
    employees to
    have chance to
    vote for union



    Dion Foulkes

    YEARS of uncertainty
    could come to an end on
    Thursday, August 13, when
    non-managerial Sandals
    Resort employees will be able
    to vote for the union they
    want to represent them.

    Labour Minister Dion
    Foulkes yesterday announced
    that he will take a representa-
    tional count by secret ballot to
    determine which union — the
    Bahamas Hotel Catering and
    Allied Workers Union
    (BHCAWU) or the Bahamas
    Hotel Maintenance and
    Allied Workers Union
    (BHMAWU) — the 450
    employees wish to have as
    their bargaining agent.

    The move comes “in com-
    pliance with an order made by
    Justice K Neville Adderley on
    July 16, 2009,” noted Mr
    Foulkes. Justice Adderley had
    ruled that a poll must be con-
    ducted on or before August
    14. The BHCAWU and the
    BHMAWU have been bat-
    tling since 2006 over which
    one should be able to repre-
    sent Sandal’s line staff.

    At present all of the 12
    executive members of the
    BHMAWU, including presi-
    dent Lynden Taylor, no
    longer work at Sandals. They
    were let go last year by the
    resort, which cited the effects
    of the global recession for the
    lay-offs. Trade Union Con-
    gress President Obie Fergu-
    son, who also acts as legal
    adviser to the BHMAWU,
    has called for them to be rein-
    stated. The poll is due to take
    place at the Gaming Board
    Office on West Bay Street,
    between the hours of 9am and
    Spm.

    Tourist ‘stable’
    after being hit
    hy speed boat

    THE American tourist who
    was hit by a speed boat on
    Tuesday while snorkelling
    near the Sandals Resort is
    said to be in stable condition
    at Doctors Hospital.

    According to a police
    source, the woman is a resi-
    dent of Northern Kansas and
    a guest at the Sandals Resort
    on Cable Beach.

    Meanwhile, police are
    investigating who was at fault
    in the accident and trying to
    determine whether or not the
    woman was swimming in an
    off-limits area. A jet ski oper-
    ator who witnessed the inci-
    dent claimed that the tourist
    was hit by the propellor of a
    vessel believed to be operated
    by Sandals. According some
    bystanders, the woman’s arm
    was "nearly severed" and she
    had a "huge gash" on her leg.

    The tourist was reportedly
    conscious and calm as she was
    taken to hospital for treat-
    ment. Yesterday, officers at
    the Cable Beach police sta-
    tion, who are handling the
    investigation into the acci-
    dent, declined to release any
    details on the matter.

    Officials at the resort also
    declined to discuss the inci-
    dent. "We're not commenting
    on that at all," said Sandals'
    public relations officer Stacey
    Mackey yesterday.

    Police have not released the
    tourist's identity.

    Boat cruise on
    Laty Savannah

    The St. George Branch of
    The ACM will be having a
    boat cruise Friday July 24th
    on board the Lady Savan-
    nah, boarding time is 7 p.m,
    sailing at 8 pm from The
    Prince George Wharf. The
    proceeds will assist with its
    outreach ministry for the
    church and the wider com-
    munity.

    For ticket information
    contact Rosow Davies on
    325-8997.

    FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
    Oa La
    ba XA

    ee le
    322-2157



    By NATARIO McKENZIE
    Tribune Staff Reporter
    nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

    JURORS in the Dorneil
    Ferguson murder trial heard
    emotional testimony yesterday
    from the victim’s widow who
    recalled the shooting that led
    to her husband’s death.

    Dudley Duran Moree, 23, is
    accused of the murder of his
    co-worker, mortician Dorneil
    Ferguson, 38, and the attempt-
    ed murder of Ferguson’s wife,
    ‘Yuzann.

    Struggling at times to hold
    back tears, Mrs Ferguson testi-
    fied that she went to sleep with
    her husband and seven-month-
    old daughter around midnight
    on June 26, 2008.

    She told the court that as
    she lay in the middle of the bed,
    baby Dorneisha lay close to the
    wall and her husband lay
    behind her. She said she and
    her husband were wakened by
    the sound of gunshots and sat
    up. Mrs Ferguson recalled feel-
    ing a pain in her left arm and
    leg. She testified that as gun-
    shots were being fired from the
    outside her husband pushed her
    closer to the wall and rolled on
    top of her, asking her if she was
    all right. Mrs Ferguson recalled
    how her husband lifted the
    baby by her leg and shook her
    to see if she was all right. She
    said after the gunfire had
    stopped, she called the police
    and while on the phone her
    husband told her to tell them
    Dudley Moree had shot them.

    Mrs Ferguson said when the

    police came they had to kick in
    their bedroom door and she
    urged them to check on their
    other children in the apartment.
    She said her husband at that
    time kept telling police that
    Moree had shot them and gave
    them Moree’s address.

    Statement

    Under cross-examination by
    Moree’s attorney, Murrio
    Ducille, Mrs Ferguson told the
    court she gave a statement to
    police two days after the inci-
    dent. She also told the court
    her husband also worked at a
    nightclub as a security guard.
    She said she met Moree at her
    husband’s work at Butler’s
    Funeral Home and the accused
    visited their home on many
    occasions. Forensic patholo-
    gist Dr Govinda Raju testified
    yesterday that Ferguson died
    as a result of a collection of
    blood in his chest cavity due to
    gunshot wounds. He said that
    Ferguson had seven entry
    wounds and three exit wounds.

    He said an external exami-
    nation showed that Ferguson
    had received a gunshot entry
    wound to his lower right palm
    which exited through the back
    of his palm. He also had a gun-
    shot wound to the left outer
    thigh, left mid-upper back and
    buttocks region and an entry
    wound in the left buttocks
    region.

    Detective Corporal Jamal
    Evans said that around 2.40 am
    on June 26, 2008, while on duty

    at the Eastern Detective Unit,
    he received information regard-
    ing a complaint in the Family
    Street area and proceeded to
    the scene with three other offi-
    cers. He told the court he
    spoke to Sgt Alexander Pierre
    who led him into a bedroom.
    There, he said, he saw a man
    lying on his stomach with
    wounds to his lower back, a
    woman with a gunshot wound
    to the left leg and an infant
    child lying between them.

    Evans said the man, who he
    identified as Dorneil Ferguson,
    told him: “Duran Moree shot
    me.”

    He said that minutes later
    EMS personnel came and took
    Ferguson and his wife, Yuzann,
    from the apartment. He also
    told the court that at Spm that
    day he and other officers while
    armed with a search warrant
    went to Moree’s home at Faith
    Gardens and arrested him.

    He said a search of Moree’s
    residence proved negative for
    any evidence.

    Corporal Evans said that
    while taking Moree to the
    Carmichael Road Police Sta-
    tion he noticed that the accused
    had an injury to his right hand.
    Under cross-examination he
    told the court that the accused
    claimed he had injured his fin-
    ger in a motorcycle accident.
    Mr Ducille also suggested that
    Ferguson had never identified
    Moree as the shooter and that
    Evans had made it up. Evans
    denied the suggestion.

    The trial continues today.

    Sports anti-doping move applauded



    By ALISON LOWE
    Tribune Staff Reporter
    alowe@tribunemedia.net

    AN Olympic gold medallist and
    the president of the Bahamas
    Olympic Association yesterday called
    the introduction of legislation to out-
    law doping in sports a “great step
    forward” for Bahamian athletes.

    Parliamentarians yesterday debat-
    ed a Bill for an Act to Provide for the
    Implementation of Measures to Dis-
    courage the Use of Drugs and Dop-
    ing Methods in Sports and for Relat-
    ed Purposes.

    Noting that Bahamian athletes have been
    among those who have been cheated most by
    the use of illegal performance enhancing sub-
    stances by competing athletes, Minister of Sports
    Desmond Bannister suggested it is right that the
    country now formally joins the fight against dop-
    ing. The new Bill provides the legal framework
    for the Bahamas to fulfil commitments it made
    when it signed onto the World Anti Doping Code
    in 2003, to which 192 countries are signatories.

    This code calls for the implementation of effec-
    tive programmes to prevent, deter, detect and
    legally punish individuals for using or providing
    performance enhancing drugs which are banned
    under the code. The new Bill not only deals with
    anti-doping violations by Bahamian athletes and
    international athletes, but also includes sanctions
    for people such as coaches or officials who may
    try to influence or mislead an athlete into taking
    a banned substance.

    Mr Bannister said: “We are seeking to ensure
    that cheaters never again take glory away from
    the honest competitors on the world stage in the
    sporting arena.”

    President of the Bahamas Olympic Association
    Wellington Miller, who was in parliament to hear
    Mr Bannister’s speech on the Bill, described the
    legislation as a “great step forward.”

    “One of the disappointing things for me when
    I travelled to international conferences was that
    these people always ask me ‘why y’all don’t have
    your doping bill in place?’ Now it’s here and I'll

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    be proud when I go away,” he
    said.

    Pauline Davis-Thompson, a
    100, 200 and 400 metre sprinter
    who is soon to receive the gold
    medal for her performance in the
    2000 Olympic Games after Amer-
    ican athlete Marion Jones was
    found to have tested positive for a
    banned substance, said the legis-
    lation is “a wonderful thing.”

    “We should be at the forefront
    of the fight against doping. (By
    passing the law) we’ll be protect-
    ing our reputation on the inter-
    national scene,” she said.

    The sprinter, who was also in parliament yes-
    terday, recalled the intense pressure she resisted
    from one of her coaches when she was younger to
    try certain things which would “make her run
    faster” and her bittersweet experience of finding
    out she is to get her Olympic gold medal eight
    years after she should have.

    “Not being able to hear my national anthem
    was what stood out the most to me, not being
    able to see your flag raise. The feeling that you
    get at that moment just gives you such joy,” she
    said. Under the Bill, four new institutions will be
    created: A National Anti-Doping Commission, an
    Anti-Doping Therapeutic Use Exemption Com-
    mittee, a Disciplinary Panel and an Appeals Tri-
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    “Young people need to know what is on the
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    The minister noted that some over-the-counter
    pharmaceuticals such as a Vicks Inhaler as well as
    certain “traditional medicines” used in the
    Bahamas have or may soon be designated as
    products that contain banned substances.

    “Full effectiveness of the Bill will require the
    combined support of the athletic community,
    including coaches, athletes and parents; they
    must all work hand in hand with our education as
    well as the legal and medical community,” he
    said.

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    380-FLIX


    PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

    EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

    THE TRIBUNE





    The Tribune Limited

    NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
    Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

    LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

    SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

    (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

    Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
    Contributing Editor 1972-1991

    EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

    Publisher/Editor 1972-

    Published Daily Monday to Saturday

    Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
    Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

    TELEPHONES
    Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
    Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
    Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
    Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

    WEBSITE
    www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

    PM’s exposé upsets Christie

    WE GOT a good chuckle from Opposi-
    tion Leader Perry Christie’s protest yester-
    day that by the time Prime Minister Ingra-
    ham had completed his extensive exposé in
    the House of Assembly on the abuse of
    Crown land, nothing would be left for the
    appointed House committee to investigate.

    When this report came up on our com-
    puter last night — it is on this morning’s
    front page — its contents brought back ear-
    ly memories of the union movement in this
    country. The incident it recalled took place
    sometime in the fifties when the late Martin
    Pounder, a labour adviser, arrived from Eng-
    land to assist local unions. One day one of
    our staff approached Sir Etienne, then pub-
    lisher of this newspaper. He wanted to start
    a union in The Tribune plant. Sir Etienne
    gave him the green light and then forgot
    about it.

    Some months later the staff member went
    to see Sir Etienne in his office. He was great-
    ly agitated. At the time we had an English
    foreman, who was forward thinking, and
    wanted to modernise conditions in the plant
    and improve standards of employment for
    our employees. Sir Etienne also gave him the
    green light and backed his innovations
    enthusiastically, as did the staff.

    This apparently was a monumental prob-
    lem for our budding unionist. He protested
    all the improvements being made.

    “But, Mr Etienne,” he argued, “if Mr
    Richards keeps doing all this for the staff,
    there will be nothing left for me to agitate for
    when I start my union.”

    He was brusquely sent back to his job
    on the “stone.” That ended all talk of unions
    in The Tribune. We went to the office daily,
    the staff was told, to put out a newspaper,
    not to talk foolishness. And if there was any-
    thing they didn’t like they knew their way to
    Sir Etienne’s office — his was an open door
    policy for his staff. The staff had a good
    laugh.

    The scenario in the House yesterday
    between Mr Christie and Mr Ingraham
    seemed to be history repeating itself — only
    in a new venue and in different circum-
    stances, but with the same mental attitude.

    Information was leaked to The Tribune
    that all was not right in the Lands and Sur-
    veys department.

    The Tribune investigated the allegations
    and published its findings. The Opposition,
    as did the public, agitated for more infor-
    mation. The Tribune kept digging and pub-
    lishing. However, behind the scenes Prime

    Minister Ingraham was quietly doing his
    own investigation. Obviously he was in a
    position to unearth a treasure trove of infor-
    mation. He was now ready to publish. The
    House was adjourned to Monday — under
    Opposition protest — to hear his Commu-
    nication. On Monday he made his Commu-
    nication about the Crown land problem. He
    laid the supporting documents on the table
    of the House to be seen by all.

    The public can’t get into a committee
    room to hear what documents are presented
    to committee members or what matters are
    discussed.

    Nor, when it is time for the committee to
    report, will it know what important infor-
    mation has been suppressed. This way noth-
    ing can be swept under the carpet. Mr Ingra-
    ham has made it all available.

    Mr Christie is suspicious of Mr Ingra-
    ham’s extensive presentation of the infor-
    mation.

    He suspects that the Prime Minister might
    not let the parliamentary committee do its
    job; that he might prorogue parliament, end-
    ing the current legislative session, which
    would mean the death of all legislative com-
    mittees. — including the committee to inves-
    tigate Crown land.

    Like Sir Etienne told his thwarted union-
    ist, Prime Minister Ingraham told the Oppo-
    sition leader that he was talking “baseless
    nonsense”, seeking to distract from the con-
    tent of his criticisms of the former PLP
    administration in relation to Crown lands.
    Mr Ingraham denied any intention to pro-
    rogue parliament. He said he just wanted
    to “ensure” that the committee reported on
    the matters it was appointed to investigate.

    However, according to Mr Christie, Mr
    Ingraham has made a considerable effort to
    get the information out and “win political
    points, which really could have been the
    work of the committee” — it could also have
    been suppressed by the committee.

    We recall the 2002 election when Mr
    Christie and his colleagues accused the FNM
    of giving away Bahamian land to foreign-
    ers — it was their main plank for getting rid
    of the FNM government.

    Mr Christie’s government was elected,
    then proceeded to give away even more of
    the Bahamian people’s land in the name of
    important “anchor projects.”

    These documents will tell the full story on
    both sides of the Crown land argument. The
    public can make up its own mind. It needs no
    committee to tell it what to think.



    What is
    soing on
    at NIB?

    EDITOR, The Tribune.

    Please tell me what’s going
    on at NIB? I am a business
    person in the eastern area of
    New Providence. I take my
    payment to the Fox Hill office
    every month as I am instruct-
    ed to do by the Inspector.

    The Fox Hill office is con-
    venient for me when I cannot
    make it, I send one of my
    workers.

    The people in this office are
    very helpful, polite and most
    of all the Inspectors know
    how to handle old people with
    respect.

    Last week I was told that
    very soon I would have to go
    down to the Blue Hill Road
    office because the Inspectors

    LETTERS

    letters@triounemedia.net



    I think this is so inconsid-
    erate and so inconvenient for
    me as a customer.

    I thought the whole idea of
    NIB was to make things bet-
    ter for people that means I
    have to drive through all that
    traffic to make my payment
    to me, this makes no business
    sense.

    Mr Prime Minister, I know
    that you don’t know about
    this, sir, I thought the reason
    for having the people in the
    work place was to make
    things better and convenient

    for the employers. I know you
    are a considerate man and I’m
    begging you to please do
    something about this for me
    and the other business peo-
    ple up here in the Fox Hill
    area.

    Sir, when anybody gets sick
    we go right to the Fox Hill
    Clinic.

    This should be the same
    thing with NIB.

    Mr Prime Minister, we
    going backwards or forward?
    Please, sir, put a stop to this, if
    not my payment will be
    behind all the time.

    A BUSINESS PERSON
    IN FOX HILL
    Nassau,

    will be going down there.

    June 27, 2009.

    The world's armaments culture outdated

    EDITOR, The Tribune.

    Your editorial “America’s Gun Culture
    Outdated” is very apt and timely, and
    deserves greater prominence, but needs to
    be subtitled “The World’s Armaments Cul-
    ture Outdated.”

    The UN International Action Network
    on Small Arms ([ANSA) has worked on
    this problem for many years, and publishes
    a wealth of information on the topic.

    The tragic fact is that the arms industry
    makes tremendous profits (in fact, the arms
    industry is regarded as the major industry in
    our world), and money and morality always
    appear to be in conflict!

    Some years ago, Amnesty International,
    IANSA and Oxfam stated in a Press release:
    “From 1998 — 2001, USA, UK & France
    earned more income from arms sales to
    developing countries than they gave in aid.

    The arms industry is unlike any other. It
    operates without regulation.

    It suffers from widespread corruption and
    bribes. And it makes its profits on the back
    of machines designed to kill and maim
    human beings.”

    The Report concludes: “So who profits
    most from this murderous trade? The five

    Permanent Members of the UN Security
    Council — USA, UK, France, Russia and
    China. Together they are responsible for 88
    per cent of reported arms exports.”

    The US Congressional Research Service
    records the 2001 top military exporters:

    USA $9.7 billion.; UK $4 billion; USSR
    3.6 billion; France $1 billion; China 500 mil-
    lion; Israel 200 million. And since that date,
    sales figures have increased.

    Nobel Peace Prize winner and former
    USA President Jimmy Carter observed:
    “We cannot have it both ways. We cannot
    be both the world’s leading champion of
    peace and the world’s leading supplier of
    arms.”

    In the interests of world peace and pros-
    perity, universal co-operation and action
    are needed to end the arms race, both
    nationally and internationally.

    As Nobel Prize winner and former UN
    Secretary General Dag Hammarskjold
    observed:

    “In our age, the road to holiness neces-
    sarily passes through the world of action.”

    CITIZEN OF THE WORLD
    Nassau,
    July 15, 2009.

    Still waiting for my merchandise

    EDITOR, The Tribune.

    Further to the article con-
    cerning the difficulty in
    clearing Customs as related
    by one importer, I have
    been waiting since July 7 to
    receive my merchandise
    which I ordered from the
    US.

    It was delivered on July 6,

    2009 to the Miami address
    of a local courier and was
    shipped to Nassau since July
    7th. Surely the new Customs
    import forms cannot be that
    difficult to complete.

    No one can advise me
    when I can receive my pack-
    age.

    This is terrible as I do not
    know what has happened to

    my merchandise. It is better
    for me to travel and bring
    my purchases with me. Can
    anyone help?

    Even Bahamasair had a
    better record than this.

    FRUSTRATED
    CUSTOMER
    Nassau,

    July 19, 2009.

    Educated by a politician? What a thought

    EDITOR, The Tribune.

    First Baptist Church











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    Re: Campaign to ‘educate’ on adverse affects of Arawak
    Cay extension. Tribune, July 13, 2009.

    I appreciate being informed, but the thought of being
    “educated” by a politician (even though well-meaning)

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    THE TRIBUNE

    THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 5



    LOCAL NEWS



    Young Haitian — Woman accused of defrauding hank
    Bahamains set
    to meet Minister

    By MEGAN REYNOLDS
    Tribune Staff Reporter
    mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

    YOUNG Haitian Bahamians
    were scheduled to meet with Labour
    Minister Dion Foulkes last night to
    discuss topics ranging from national
    identity to job opportunities and
    the problem of crime in the com-
    munity. j

    Yesterday’s talk constituted the
    opening of the United Association
    of Haitians in the Bahamas Youth
    Conclave that lasts for five days.

    Professionals from the banking industry,
    education, business owners, president of the
    Haitian Bahamian Society of the Bahamas
    Jetta Baptiste, and others, will share their
    experiences of living and working in the
    Bahamas.

    The role models will also explore the issue
    of Haitian Bahamian identity.

    United Association of Haitians in the
    Bahamas secretary Julie Smith said: “All of
    them are facing an identity problem, which I
    guess no one will be able to solve.

    “Tt’s just that some of them go to school,

    Tropical wave to bring storms an showers

    THUNDERSTORMS,
    high winds and scattered
    showers will continue today as
    a tropical wave moves over the
    Bahamas affecting weather
    conditions across the islands.

    As the tropical wave
    moved over the central and
    northern Bahamas yesterday
    it merged with a surface
    trough off the southeast coast
    of Florida.

    Meteorologists say there is
    less than a 30 per cent chance
    of the weather system devel-
    oping into a tropical or sub-



    Dion Foulkes

    and are not into school, and they
    don’t go to church, so there are
    things that they should know they
    are not learning elsewhere.

    “Tt’s really for them to let them
    know what’s happening in the com-
    munity and the good from the bad,
    and what they shouldn’t be involved

    in.”
    | A police inspector will also talk to
    the boys and girls aged 14 to 18 about
    crime in the community and offer
    advice.

    Mrs Smith added: “We have a lot
    of crime in Nassau and sometimes
    those crimes are committed by children of
    Haitian descent so we want to let them know
    what time it is.

    “We want them to see the difference of the
    negative from the positive so they can know
    how to make good choices when they finish
    school, and what they should look forward to
    doing, so they will know how to excel them-
    selves.”

    Daytime sessions will be held at Victory
    Chapel on Minnie Street, off Wulff Road, and
    evening talks take place at the Calvary Baptist
    Chapel.

    cia THIS NOAA

    satellite image

    | taken Wednes-
    day, July 22,
    2009 at 01:15

    ) PM EDT shows
    dense clouds

    ) next to the
    Bahamas. (AP)

    i A 24-YEAR-OLD woman accused of
    i defrauding a local bank of just over $8,000
    ? was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yes-
    i terday.
    i Lakindes Brown appeared before Mag-
    i? istrate Guillemina Archer in Court 10, Nas-
    ? sau Street, charged with two counts of steal-
    i ing by reason of employment and 13 counts
    ? of fraud by false pretences.

    It is alleged that Brown, who was










    employed at the Fidelity Bank Bahamas
    Limited on Frederick Street, between April
    and May of this year, obtained $8,200 from
    the bank by means of fraud and also stole
    two Fidelity Gold Visa credit cards valued
    at $5 each.

    Brown pleaded not guilty to the charges
    and was granted $13,000 bail.

    The case was adjourned to November
    17.

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    two days.

    As the small upper level
    trough interacts with the weak
    tropical wave there will be
    clouds and thunderstorms
    across the islands.

    Gusty winds associated
    with thunderstorms will be
    around 10 to 15 knots.

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    tem will be east of the Bahama
    islands and move north into
    the Atlantic.

    He added: “It’s quite right
    now, there’s nothing of signif-
    icant development, and no
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    at this time.”

    The weather system is
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    PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE



    LOCAL NEWS

    Letisha Henderson



    E

    a

    ROAD SAFETY coordinator Michael Hudson fields a question from children enrolled in the
    road safety summer camp sponsored by the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture.

    SUT MONI w ote
    all about road safety

    By KATHRYN CAMPBELL
    Bahamas Information Services

    MORE than 100 students were taught
    about road safety during a special session of
    the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture’s
    summer programme this week.

    Road Traffic Controller Philip Turner
    with representatives of the Road Traffic
    Department, including Michael Hudson,
    road safety coordinator, advised the stu-
    dents at the Faith Temple Ministries camp
    site on proper use of pedestrian crossings,
    seat belts, and sidewalks, and how to get on
    and get off buses.

    “Too many people lose their lives on the
    road in the Bahamas," said Mr Turner.
    "And sometimes people older than you are
    not responsible drivers.

    "So watch out for them because they
    may cause harm to you and to others. It is
    very important to pay attention as you walk
    or drive on the road.”

    Mr Turner told the children to encourage
    their parents and guardians not to use cell
    phones or apply cosmetics while driving.

    “Tell them to pay attention to the road,”

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    ROAD Traffic Controller Philip Turner speaks
    to children in the Ministry of Youth, Sports
    and Culture’s summer camp programme on
    the importance of road safety.

    he said. "When you are driving focus on
    the road only."

    The ministry’s four-week programme is
    being held in conjunction with Faith Tem-
    ple Ministries.

    A developer is

    ‘J showin

    g interest in

    ‘dead’ subdivision

    By DENISE MAYCOCK
    Tribune Freeport
    Reporter

    dmaycock@
    tribunemedia.net

    FREEPORT - Sir Jack
    Hayward said that a devel-
    oper has expressed strong
    interest in developing the
    Dover Sound Subdivision,
    which has remained largely
    undeveloped for 40 years.

    Sir Jack, a principal own-
    er of the Grand Bahama
    Port Authority, said the
    new bridge to be built at
    Grand Bahama Highway
    will revitalise development
    at Dover Sound.

    Bridge

    “We have interest in
    Dover Sound, which has
    been dead for a long time;
    we have some one inter-
    ested in Dover Sound and
    one of his conditions is he
    must have a bridge con-
    necting Grand Bahama
    Highway,” he said.

    According to Sir Jack,
    the developer is interested
    in building a marina and
    restaurant, and “doing
    what Dover Sound has not
    had for 40 years.”

    Graham Torode, presi-
    dent of the Grand Bahama
    Development Company,
    could not be reached for
    comment concerning plans

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    for the development at
    Dover Sound.

    The Grand Bahama Port
    Authority is expected to
    begin construction on a
    30ft high, four-lane con-
    crete bridge in the next
    three months.

    Sir Jack said the Port
    Authority also plans to
    construct a farmer’s mar-
    Ket in Freeport, where res-
    idents can purchase fresh
    fruits, vegetables and fish.

    Originally, there were
    plans to build a fish mar-
    ket, but many local fisher-
    men were opposed to the
    proposed location at the
    Fishing Hole Road on
    Queens Highway.

    The Port Authority has
    now decided on a new
    downtown location for the
    market at West Atlantic
    Drive, near the roundabout
    at the Home Centre.

    “JT think we should call it
    a farmer’s market, and we
    should encourage all farm-
    ers of the whole Bahamas
    to send their produce
    there, and not just have a
    fish market, I think that
    has been the mistake,” said
    Sir Jack.

    He noted that fruits and
    produce from Eleuthera,
    Andros, Abaco, Long
    Island, Exuma, and other
    Family Islands should be
    available in Freeport.

    “We should have fruits

    and vegetables and other
    products from the rest of
    the Bahamas. It is ridicu-
    lous that we cannot get
    pineapples from Eleuthera.
    We need to be able to
    access all the many prod-
    ucts of the other islands in
    the Bahamas,” he said.

    Hannes Babak, chairman
    of the Port Authority, said
    BAIC has agreed to assist
    in bringing Bahamian
    grown produce _ to
    Freeport.

    Products

    “We really want it to be
    a farmer’s market where
    you are able to have fresh
    products but also processed
    products like the little
    restaurants at Arawak Cay.
    We are talking to Mr Edi-
    son Key at BAIC who has
    promised to help us bring
    the products here to
    Freeport,” he said.

    Mr Babak said that they
    have received positive
    feedback on the new loca-
    tion from many of the local
    fish vendors in Freeport.

    “Most of the fishermen
    wanted it downtown
    instead of at Fishing Hole
    Road, and a lot of people
    don’t want to drive all the
    way down there, so we
    donated the land in down-
    town for that project,” he
    said.

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    THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 7

    LOCAL NEWS

    Bahamian’s turtle research to be
    published in major science journal



    BAHAMIAN envi-
    -| ronmental scientist
    | Stefan Moss (fore-
    front) collects blood
    »* | from a freshwater
    >») turtle on the
    Tennessee River.
    Moss’ groundbreak-
    ing findings will be
    published in
    Chemosphere, a
    leading scientific

    ed with renowned sea turtle
    scientist Dr Jennifer Keller
    who allowed him access to
    the facilities for weeks at a

    By Arthia Nixon
    TENNESSEE - A young

    Bahamian scientist’s ground-
    breaking study on freshwater
    turtles has earned him the
    opportunity to be featured
    in one of the world’s lead-
    ing international journals.
    Stefan Moss, who spent two
    years collecting samples and
    data from the reptiles he
    encountered in the Ten-
    nessee River will now have
    the findings of his research
    documented in Chemos-
    phere.

    Chemosphere is a well-
    known international journal
    focused on disseminating
    information related to all
    aspects of environmental sci-
    ence, especially important
    new discoveries or further
    developments in investiga-
    tions related to the environ-
    ment and human health.

    Hard work has certainly
    paid off for Mr Moss who
    was born in Grand Bahama
    but raised in the capital city
    of Nassau by his parents Kei-
    th and Sylvia Moss-Green-
    wade. He double majored in
    Chemistry and Biology.

    The studies he completed
    in Tennessee, Mr Moss now
    plans to duplicate on endan-
    gered freshwater turtles in
    his native Bahamas, particu-
    larly on the islands of
    Inagua, Cat Island and
    Eleuthera.

    “It didn’t start off as me
    with aspirations of getting
    published in a respected
    journal like Chemosphere,”
    admits Mr Moss.

    “As an environmental sci-
    entist I was more focused on
    figuring out what chemicals
    were in the river and their
    effects on the environment,
    and possibly human health.
    Instead, it seems I uncovered
    - and documented - a lot of
    valuable information in the
    field of herpetology, which
    is the study of reptiles and
    amphibians.”

    “The project, which was
    funded by a conservation
    grant from the Tennessee

    a



    BAHAMIAN ENVIRONMENTAL scientist Stefan Moss (pictured)
    plans to duplicate the research that earned him recognition in
    science journal, Chemosphere on the freshwater turtles in his
    native Bahamas.

    Aquarium Research Insti-
    tute (TNARI) focused on
    the freshwater turtles in the
    river because they are long
    lived organisms and are
    therefore able to provide a
    large quantity of data over
    a longer period of time,”
    added Mr Moss.

    “Sure enough, after two
    years of collecting body mea-
    surements and blood sam-
    ples, there was so much new



    information on them that my
    professor Dr Thomas Wil-
    son challenged me to pub-
    lish it. Unbelievably, after
    four years of work, it’s going
    to be published.”

    Mr Moss’ work led him to
    the National Institute of Sci-
    ence and Technology
    (NIST) in Charleston, North
    Carolina, where he worked
    in the Hollings Marine Lab-
    oratory. He also collaborat-

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    time, which he took full journal.

    advantage of, sometimes
    working as much as 20 hours
    a day.

    “Being recognised for this
    work is the highlight of my
    scientific career thus far,”
    said Mr Moss.

    “It’s now a new contribu-
    tion to science in an area
    that’s been studied before
    but not in this particular way.
    I feel that Bahamians need
    to become more environ-
    mentally conscious and con-
    tinue their efforts of encour-
    aging students to take up sci-
    ence careers. I am confident
    that if we get creative and
    think beyond the norm, we
    can offer exciting opportu-
    nities to our own scientists
    and those visiting our nation.
    There is still a whole lot we
    don’t know about our coun-
    try in terms of science and I
    hope to come back home
    and help contribute to erad-
    icating the brain drain we so
    frequently hear about. We
    must come together, and
    pool our talents into making
    the Bahamas a model coun-
    try as it relates to science.”

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    PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009



    By ERIC ROSE
    Bahamas Information
    Services

    CAT Island’s rake n’
    scrape band The Turning
    Point Turners wowed visi-
    tors of the week-long Henley
    Festival in England.

    The Turners joined fire
    dancer Devia Wilson and
    visual artist P Elton Moxey
    to give audiences a taste of
    Bahamian culture.

    “We were heating up the
    cold town with the fire
    dancer and the hot sounds
    of rake ’n scrape,” said
    Bahamian cultural affairs
    representative and project
    manager Angelique McKay.

    “It feels great to be here,
    to have been able to accom-
    plish this particular feat in
    the midst of this economic
    downturn. “The Henley Fes-
    tival (from July 8 to 12) has
    also. experienced the
    squeeze. Tough decisions
    had to be made to cut acts
    from some of the countries
    that they were looking for-
    ward to, but the Bahamas
    was able to remain on the

    Ceramic

    LOCAL NEWS

    Rake-N-Scrape



    MEMBERS of the Turning Point Turners rake n’ scrape group
    are pictured as they performed at the Henley Festival in England.

    lineup of artists for the
    event,” she said.

    Mr McKay said it was a
    feeling of “elation to be able
    to showcase yet another
    array of our cultural expres-
    sions to the European audi-
    ence and hopefully entice
    them to visit the land where
    all these great cultural
    expressions take place.”

    The relationship between
    the Bahamas and the Henley
    Festival was formed from
    the successful Junkanoo Live
    project last year.

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    But the Henley Festival
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    appreciation for Bahamian
    culture.

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    fire dancer Devia Wilson.
    “The crowd was amazed by
    the fact that I was putting
    the fire on my body.”

    Ms Wilson also per-
    formed last year on the Isle
    of Wight as part of another
    project that brought
    junkanoo and other aspects
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    Europe for the first time
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    performances, when we had
    completed our set, we were
    asked to play more.

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    by the festival patrons.”

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    THE TRIBUNE



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    THE TRIBUNE

    THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 9



    Change to
    rape law to
    protect wives

    FROM page one

    Bahamian law, the prohibi-
    tion against marital rape was
    eliminated in 1991," she
    said.

    The present law defines
    rape as an act of any per-
    son not under 14 years of
    age having sexual inter-
    course with another per-
    son who is not his spouse
    without the consent of
    that other person; without
    consent that has been
    extorted by threats or fear
    of bodily harm; with con-
    sent obtained by imper-
    sonating the spouse of
    that other person; or with
    consent obtained by false
    and fraudulent represen-
    tations as to the nature
    and quality of the act.

    The proposed amend-
    ment would omit the
    words "who is not his
    spouse" therefore making
    it a crime for anyone to
    have sexual intercourse
    with another person with-
    out that person's consent
    — whether or not the per-
    sons involved are married
    to each other — Ms But-
    ler-Turner explained.

    The proposed move
    also comes after calls from
    the international commu-
    nity, she told Parliament.

    The United Nations
    General Assembly's Dec-
    laration on the Elimina-
    tion of Violence Against
    Women considers marital
    rape a human violation
    while the UN's Human
    Rights Council recom-
    mended the Bahamas'
    clause on marital rape be
    removed, said Ms Butler-
    Turner.

    One religious leader
    weighed in on the pro-
    posed change yesterday,
    calling it a positive step
    forward that could pro-
    vide some recourse for
    marital rape victims.

    "That's a step for-
    ward— because some
    spouses are taking advan-

    tage — and generally it's
    the man taking advantage
    of what they believe is still
    their legal right — and I
    think it advances those
    who might be wronged in
    any way,” said Bishop
    Hall, senior pastor of New
    Covenant Baptist Church,
    when contacted for com-
    ment on the amendment.

    He also stressed that
    married couples should
    look to counseling to
    repair their union before
    the situation spirals into
    a violent one that needs
    the intervention of police.

    "People have to learn
    that ‘no’ means ‘no’ and
    the bottom line is some-
    thing has gone wrong in
    the marriage when a hus-
    band is going to force
    himself on his wife. Peo-
    ple need to revert to their
    pastor, priest or rabbi
    whoever put them togeth-
    er before the marriage
    crumbles to that point,”
    he said yesterday.

    The proposed amend-
    ment will also increase the
    maximum period of time
    that legal proceedings can
    commence after a sexual
    offence is committed from
    six months to two years.

    Ms Butler-Turner said
    many sexual offences, the
    current window of time is
    too short as many cases of
    sexual crimes — particu-
    larly those dealing with
    minors — are reported to
    police much later than the
    time they were commit-
    ted.

    According to the minis-
    ter, the law will not be
    amended before her
    department has time to
    get the country's input on
    the changes through sev-
    eral public forums.

    "It is hoped that after
    these public discussions,
    this Parliament will con-
    sider the enactment of this
    Bill," she said.

    LOCAL NEWS

    FROM page one

    Bahamians to empower
    them.

    “The agricultural land
    should be managed so that it
    is used by serious agricultur-
    ists, by those in the business
    now and those who want to
    get into the business. Wher-
    ever the land is owned by the
    Government, because it is
    the people’s resource, we
    have to find a way where it is
    fairly — unlike how we have
    seen it exposed — managed.”

    Mr Smith added that obvi-
    ously some of this land has
    to be set aside for public use
    such as national parks, etc,
    but cautioned that there is
    sufficient land in the
    Bahamas for every Bahami-
    an to use to empower them-
    selves.

    “But we have obviously in
    most recent years permitted
    the management of our
    greatest resource, outside of
    our people, to be managed
    by the most incompetent
    people. And that can’t be fair
    to the Bahamian people,” he
    said.

    goo Of land

    At the time that the graph
    tabled by Prime Minister
    Hubert Ingraham was made,
    Government’s dry land hold-
    ings stood at 1,362,205 acres.

    It is unknown at this time
    what the current figure would
    reflect, but it is expected that
    with the formation of the
    Lands Committee in the
    House of Assembly yester-
    day that more up-to-date
    information will be made
    available to the public in the
    weeks and months to come.

    According to the table, the
    total land mass of the
    Bahamas stands at 3.4 mil-
    lion acres, with 938,709 of
    that being private property.
    This total figure is again sub-
    tracted by 910,341 acres of
    wet Crown land (swamps and
    marshes) and the 237,583
    that is already leased.

    It is with this scarceness of
    property in mind that Mr
    Ingraham recently informed
    the House of Assembly that
    Government will take a
    stronger approach to elimi-

    nate the illegal occupation or
    “squatting” on Crown land.

    It is widely acknowledged
    that historic, informal occu-
    pation of Crown or Govern-
    ment land for residential and
    commercial purposes has
    occurred throughout the
    Bahamas for generations,
    particularly in the Family
    Islands, he said.

    Crown land made available
    for the development of a
    dwelling home by Bahamian
    citizens is granted in fee sim-
    ple unless a lease purchase
    arrangement is sought by the
    applicant, Mr Ingraham
    explained.

    “This policy was adopted
    as the Government recog-
    nised that banks and other
    financial institutions were
    unwilling to approve home
    construction mortgages to
    individuals who only held
    lease purchase agreements
    for Crown Land.

    “Following the adoption of
    this policy, hundreds of indi-
    viduals were able to acquire
    Crown land at concessionary
    rates and subsequently to
    qualify for mortgage loans

    Man dies after gunmen attack

    FROM page one

    the information we need from the injured

    man.”

    They have not yet received a description of
    the vehicle or the armed men.
    The shooting death marks the 44th murder

    of the year.

    It follows a drive-by shooting in the East
    Street area at around 10pm Monday night,
    when a 30-year-old man was shot at least four
    times in the body on Lifebuoy Street. He is
    reportedly in critical, but stable condition.

    Police are also investigating the stabbing of
    a man from Stapledon Gardens who was
    knifed several times while a group of men

    were having at a party in Goodman’s Bay,
    West Bay Street.
    The man was stabbed three times in the

    the murder.

    back and once in the neck, Supt Moss said.
    He did not provide details of the weapon.
    The man was taken to hospital in a private
    vehicle and is in serious, but stable condition.
    Supt Moss said: “Someone has come for-
    ward to give us information, but we have been
    unable to speak to him as yet.”
    Police are appealing for information from
    the public in respect to both the stabbing and

    Anyone with any information, which could
    assist investigations, should call the Criminal
    Detective Unit on 502-9991 or call Crime Stop-
    pers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477).

    FROM page one

    native capacity” to offer
    “inspiration leadership” to the
    next generation of Bahami-
    ans.

    “With the general elections
    a mere two years away, I note
    that some political aspirants
    have begun posturing. This is
    good and in my opinion
    healthy for our democratic
    way of life.

    “T also opine that many
    elected politicians presently
    serving, on both sides of the

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    House, seem lost and lack the
    vision necessary to birth inno-
    vative and creative ideas to
    lead as the nation grapples
    with multitudinous chal-
    lenges,” Bishop Hall said.
    Indeed, Bishop Hall added
    that it would be a disservice to
    the country if many of our
    current politicians would offer
    themselves for re-election.
    “Some of them are petty
    and too small for the big

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    and discover how to experience

    shoes they are in. One is hard-
    pressed to find more than five
    constituencies that can be
    used as model communities
    for the rest of the nation.

    “Thousands of Bahamians
    will never reach the prover-
    bial Promised Land if we con-
    tinue to think and work the
    way we do. It should be clear
    that creativity, innovation and
    a broadening of leadership
    are all necessary to lift our
    country out of the quagmire
    in which it finds itself today,”
    he said.

    life to the fullest. The Isuzu

    from banks and other lending
    institutions,” he said.

    Where occupants in the
    Family Islands establish that
    they have been on the land
    for a minimum of 10 years
    prior to 1992, land was typi-
    cally granted at the conces-
    sionary fee of two cents per
    square foot, said the Prime
    Minister.

    In New Providence, accel-
    erated efforts were made
    after 1992 to regularise the
    occupation of Crown and/or
    Government owned land in
    Carmichael Village, Mr
    Ingraham said.

    As a result, 36 Crown
    grants were issued to indi-
    viduals, their estates, and to
    institutions.

    As a general rule, Crown
    land occupied and developed
    without proper authorization
    for less than 10 years prior
    to this Government’s re-elec-
    tion in 1992 were not consid-
    ered eligible to be regular-
    ized at concessional rates, he
    said.

    “However, where occupa-
    tion existed for more than
    five years prior to 1992, and
    where development had tak-
    en place either by construc-
    tion of a residence or of a
    business enterprise, land has
    generally been approved by
    my Government at conces-
    sionary rates ranging from
    four to seven cents per
    square foot,” Mr Ingraham
    said.

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    PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE





    FROM page one

    "They're not finished shoot-
    ing yet and so we don't know
    that number," said Tourism
    Minister Vincent Vanderpool-
    Wallace on the sidelines of a
    press conference at the Gray-
    cliff restaurant to announce the
    production yesterday.

    The movie - a sequel to Mr

    Tyler Perry

    vacation to reaffirm why they
    got married. The film will high-
    light the tranquil life and pic-
    turesque beauty of the Family
    Islands away from the hustle
    and bustle of Nassau.

    "As people see the movie,
    more are going to want to come

    LOCAL NEWS

    resume production.

    "I think it's going to spike
    tourism a little bit so hopefully
    we'll see lots more people com-
    ing down, especially African-
    American people coming down
    to have a good time."

    Mr Perry, who reportedly
    purchased a private island in
    Exuma, said he may use the
    Bahamas as a location for

    (to the Bahamas) and it'll have
    a huge global impact,” said Mr
    Perry said yesterday before jet-
    setting back to Eleuthera to

    NOTICE

    Johnson, Maura, Roberts,
    Thompson, Nottage, Pinder,
    Wallace-Whitfield, Claridge,

    Twynam, Bowles, Young,
    Deveaux, Moree, Lightbourn,
    Symonette, Gibson, Bethel

    THE
    STERN
    EMETER

    Perry's 2007 hit “Why Did I
    Get Married” - follows three
    married couples who go on

    Many of us have loved ones buried there.
    The cemetery has now been CLEANED UP and

    it is our turn to take care of the individual areas.

    Please join us there on Saturday, July 25,

    2009 from 8am with tools, plants, small
    shrubs, gloves and drinking water.

    They die only when we who are left, forget them.

    Moree, Fox, Sands, Bowe,
    Cancino, Fisher, Grant, Taylor,
    Price, Cleare, Perpall, Watson,
    Deal, Smith, Fountain, Styles,
    Francis, Huyler, Coleby, Scriven,
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    future films and hopes more
    film-makers will follow suit.

    Before a brief session with
    the local media, Mr Perry paid
    a courtesy call to the Prime
    Minister and other Members of
    Parliament at the House of
    Assembly.

    Afterwards, Opposition
    Leader Perry Christie said the
    meeting was held to thank Mr
    Perry for his "significant"
    investment in the Bahamas.

    "He is very impressed with
    the beauty of Eleuthera and its
    people and I suspect we are
    going to have the benefits of
    that, whenever the film is
    made," said Mr Christie.

    The film's crew spent about a
    week shooting in the Exumas
    with filming expected to wrap
    on Eleuthera within the next
    five or six days.

    The original members of the
    first film's star-studded cast -
    including Janet Jackson, Malik



    piesa

    Yoba and Jill Scott - all return
    for the sequel which is slated
    for an April, 2010 release.

    According Director-Gener-
    al of Tourism Vernice Walkine,
    production on the film was
    delayed for a few days after the
    death of Ms Jackson's brother
    Michael Jackson on June, 25.

    Around two dozen locals are
    employed with the project, min-
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    Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified

    professional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer.

    This is an

    executive position and the successful applicant should possess the following:

    Qualifications & Experience

    Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university
    Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance
    Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a

    law degree

    Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations

    for improvements to a compliance culture

    Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of

    duties

    Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and

    best practices

    Confidentiality

    Excellent oral and written communication skills
    Duties & Responsibilities:

    Design and implement a risk framework.

    Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps

    taken to foster good compliance.

    Implement and maintain a compliance monitoring programme. This will
    serve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures.

    Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws,
    regulations and policies applicable to the institution.

    Provide management with guidance in the development, implementation
    and maintenance of policies, procedures and practices to cover

    regulated activities.
    Create programmes that educate, train and

    encourage directors,

    managers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and

    regulations.

    Serve as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators.

    The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with

    FROM page one

    ? — ending the current legisla-
    ? tive session and allowing all
    ? legislation and committees
    i appointed during it, including
    i the most recently appointed
    ? committee to investigate mat-
    i ters connected to the disposi-
    i tion of Crown lands — to
    i “die” with it.

    “This extensive provision of

    ? information to the House of
    i Assembly and the country (by
    ? Mr Ingraham) could be seen to
    ? be arming the committee in
    ? advance with all of the infor-
    ? mation it needs. It could also
    i be seen as some kind of justifi-
    ? cation if the committee dies for
    i the Prime Minister to be able to
    i say ‘Well you have all of the
    ? information and you can draw
    i? whatever conclusions you wish’,

    “Today you saw him say he’s

    i going to investigate and report
    i which is within the terms of the
    ? committee. There’s been a con-
    i siderable effort to get out the
    ? information and win political
    ? points, which really could have
    : been the work of the commit-
    i tee,” said Mr Christie.

    However, Prime Minister

    i Hubert Ingraham accused Mr
    ? Christie of talking “baseless
    ? nonsense” and seeking to dis-
    ? tract from the content of his
    i criticisms of the former PLP
    ? administration in relation to
    ? Crown lands.

    He said he has “no such

    i intention” of preroguing par-
    : liament and wants to “ensure”
    i that the committee reports on
    ? the matter it has been appoint-
    i ed to look into. “That was just
    ? (Christie’s) reaction to some-
    i thing to which he has no
    i response,” stated Mr Ingraham.

    During an address to the

    : House yesterday Mr Ingraham
    i presented his rebuttal of claims
    ? made by Mr Christie on the
    i issue of the granting of Crown
    i lands on Monday.

    He claimed the PLP has his-

    i torically sought to “have it both
    ? ways” in its position on Crown
    ? lands by both suggesting that
    ? the FNM has a record of facili-
    i tating land sales to foreigners
    i; to an extent that puts at risk the
    :? ability of future generations of
    i Bahamians to own lands, and
    i in the meantime doing many
    : things during their tenure to
    ? assist foreigners in buying large
    ? amounts of Crown land in the
    i interests of “economic growth.”

    He said that while “as much

    ? as half” of land sales to for-
    i eigners in the Bahamas during
    ? the FNM’s tenure was between
    : foreigners and not from the
    : Government or a Bahamian to

    Christie
    a foreigner, “reports made by
    (the PLP) to his House claimed
    that their administration had
    approved the sale of more land
    to international persons in less
    than a single term than was sold
    in two terms under my admin-
    istration.”

    Mr Ingraham claimed Mr
    Christie cannot be considered
    “completely blameless” in rela-
    tion to the abuse of Crown land
    granted to then Director of
    Lands and Surveys, Tex Turn-
    quest’s relatives, despite con-
    demning this abuse.

    Several parcels of the unde-
    veloped beachfront land grant-
    ed to relatives of Mr Turn-
    quest’s relatives for nominal
    fees in the region of $2,000 was
    “flipped” under the PLP gov-
    ernment in 2005 and 2006 for
    close to half a million several
    years after Mr Ingraham signed
    off on the grants for the pur-
    pose of vacation or retirement
    homes several years earlier.

    Mr Ingraham charged that
    Mr Christie’s government did
    not do the “due diligence” nec-
    essary when it registered the re-
    sale of the undeveloped Forbes
    Hill, Exuma properties and
    could have objected.

    “T do not find the Leader of
    the Opposition blameless in
    registering the resale of these
    properties in 2005 and 2006. I
    do not find them blameless.
    This matter is not yet complet-
    ed, Mr Speaker. Inquiries are
    and continue to be made by
    myself and others and in due
    course a report will be made to
    parliament,” said the Prime
    Minister.

    It was at this point Mr
    Christie interjected, stating that
    based on these comments and
    the information the Prime Min-
    ister brought to parliament he
    now “questioned whether this
    committee (to inquire into all
    matters concerning the dispo-
    sition of Crown land) will ever
    be given life to report.”

    “T am now very curious as to
    whether or not there will be
    prerogation during this time
    and that committee will die,”
    said Mr Christie.

    Speaker of the House Alvin
    Smith yesterday announced
    that the lands committee will
    be headed by Fox Hill MP Fred
    Mitchell and consist of Cat
    Island Rum Cay and San Sal-
    vador MP Philip Davis,
    Kennedy MP Kenyatta Gibson,
    Bamboo Town MP Branville
    McCartney and Golden Isles
    MP Charles Maynard.

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    THE TRIBUNE



    THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 11

    The Bahamas national bird:

    one of our star attractions
    the EGO-fF MYA,

    LONG before the science of
    ecology was born, adventurers
    were reporting on the natural
    wonders of the Bahamas.

    And one of our star attrac-
    tions was the flamingo — our
    national bird. In fact, one early
    European visitor recorded
    hunting and catching a great
    number of "Swanees" during a
    stopover on his way to Virginia
    in 1587.

    These scarlet-coloured wad-
    ing birds (which resembled
    swans to European explorers)
    are one of six species scattered
    around the globe. The West
    Indian flamingo nests in large
    colonies on coastal mudflats
    and saltpans, principally in the
    Bahamas, Mexico, and Bonaire,
    but also on one island in the
    Galapagos.

    In the 1700s, Englishman
    Mark Catesby produced the
    first illustrations of the West
    Indian flamingo for his famous
    Natural History of Carolina,
    Florida and the Bahama
    Islands, which was commnis-
    sioned by Sir Isaac Newton to
    document the plants and ani-
    mals of the New World.

    In 1890, an American natu-
    ralist named John Northrop
    observed flamingo rookeries on
    the west side of Andros, and
    noted that "a large number of
    young birds are yearly
    destroyed by the people for
    food. We ate the bodies of
    those we obtained and found
    the flavour most delicious."

    Frank Chapman, a pioneer-
    ing ornithologist from the
    American Museum of Natural
    history, found thousands of
    nesting flamingos in South
    Andros during a field trip in
    1904.

    His reports helped prod the
    government to pass the Wild
    Birds Protection Act the fol-
    lowing year.

    "Neither they, nor any other
    Bahaman bird was protected
    by law,” Chapman wrote, "and
    I take no small pleasure in say-
    ing that when this matter was
    brought to the attention of the
    proper authorities, an adequate
    bill was prepared and passed at
    the next session of the colonial
    legislature."

    In the 1930s an amateur nat-
    uralist and adventurer named
    Gilbert Klingel spent time on
    Inagua and later published a
    book about his observations
    (UInagua - a very lonely and
    nearly forgotten island). In one
    memorable passage he
    describes stumbling across a
    flock of flamingos:

    "A roar of sound suddenly
    burst across the water and a
    thousand pairs of scarlet wings
    beat the air at once, throbbing,
    and the flock went screaming
    into the sky. It was the most
    breathtaking sight I had ever
    witnessed...Higher and higher
    they mounted, wheeled, and in
    a colourful deluge poured over
    the horizon."

    During the first half of the
    20th century flamingos were
    pushed into ever more remote
    areas as human development
    expanded: "The Inagua colony
    is the most magnificent of all,”
    Klingel reported. "Here the
    flamingos will make their last
    stand...and it will be only a short
    time before one of the world's
    most sublime sights will have
    disappeared from the Earth.”

    But there's a surprising twist
    to this story. Frank Chapman
    (who led the 1904 expedition)
    was a mentor to Robert Porter
    Allen, an Audubon Society
    expert who scoured the
    Caribbean searching for flamin-
    gos in the early 1950s. In his
    classic book, On the Trail of
    Vanishing Birds, Allen found
    that the colonies on Andros
    had already disappeared.

    He determined that the
    largest surviving group of West
    Indian flamingos inhabited the
    isolated back-waters of Lake
    Rosa on Inagua. During one of
    his visits, with local guide Sam
    Nixon, Allen came across a
    large flock of flamingos
    engaged in their ritualistic
    courtship dance:

    "We could see a solid band
    of red. It shimmered and undu-
    lated in the heat exactly as if it
    were a long sheet of
    flame... They moved this way
    and that, without obvious pur-
    pose, like a hysterical and lead-
    erless mob. Tightly packed as
    they were, and with every indi-
    vidual jostling his neighbour
    and all of them jumping about
    like madmen, the outlines of
    the flock ebbed and flowed, as
    if it were molten, red-hot
    lava...the din was frightful.”

    Allen and the Audubon
    Society decided to make a

    Mexturcl History Infarrrcstic

    in fran the Bahvarrns Mertic



    wal Trust

    ’ Roi

    2 arte tn? a
    Bie, ea NC eet
    Mjshy Se east. Phe nas

    ip en Bip kore

    ry ary at Lake ren in ere National Park.

    stand at Inagua, where they
    believed they could "hold off
    the eventual extinction of this
    species no matter what hap-
    pened elsewhere."

    A group of influential back-
    ers was recruited in Nassau to
    form a Society for the Protec-
    tion of the Flamingo, with
    Arthur Vernay as its leader.

    Vernay was an English
    antiques dealer who had made
    his fortune in New York. An
    amateur zoologist, he went on
    collecting expeditions around
    the world for the American
    Museum of Natural History.
    And on retirement, he moved
    to Nassau. Before Vernay died
    in 1960, Inagua had become the
    epitome of conservation chic in
    the Bahamas.

    "So far as Inagua is con-
    cerned, the Society for the Pro-
    tection of the Flamingo, with
    Arthur Vernay at the helm and
    with the goodwill and assistance
    of the Erickson family at Math-
    ew Town, has provided com-
    plete warden protection," Allen
    wrote. Audubon helped finance
    this operation.

    In 1956 the Society under-
    took an expedition to Inagua
    to survey the flamingo colony.
    One of Vernay's associates
    invited James Bond creator Ian
    Fleming along for the ride. And
    in the Bond novel, Dr No,
    (written that same year) the fic-
    tional island of Crab Cay,
    where the novel's evil genius
    lived, is a mirror image of Great
    Inagua.

    "His island's topography, its
    sights and sounds, and the two
    wardens with their primitive lit-
    tle camp in the interior smack
    strongly of Audubon's real-life
    project on Great Inagua."
    according to an article in the
    Audubon Magazine years later.
    In fact, Fleming even took the
    name “James Bond” from an
    ornithologist who wrote a field
    guide on Birds of the West
    indies.

    Then in 1958 events acceler-
    ated. A Columbia University
    grad student named Carleton
    Ray teamed up with the presti-
    gious international explorer Iha
    Tolstoy (a grandson of the great
    19th century Russian writer
    Count Tolstoy) to mount a new
    Bahamian expedition — this
    time to the Exuma Cays.

    Robert Porter Allen and
    other big-name conservation-
    ists were part of the team and
    their report led to the creation
    of the world’s first land and sea
    park in Exuma, as well as to
    the formation of The Bahamas
    National Trust itself.

    In the early 1960s, this cadre
    of conservationists turned their
    attention to Inagua. According
    to Dr Ray, now in his 80s but
    still working as a research pro-
    fessor at the University of Vir-
    ginia:

    "After the passage of the
    BNT Act in 1959 and during
    the formal leasing process of
    the Exuma park, which was
    finalized in 1963, some of us
    were thinking about keeping
    up the momentum of protect-
    ed-area conservation.

    "The flamingos were already
    protected to a degree through
    the Society, but we negotiated
    with government for a second
    park, and it agreed. The Inagua
    National Park was set aside in
    1965. This series of events could
    not happen in today's complex
    world."

    Today the consensus is that,
    in many parts of the world,
    flamingos are at risk due to loss
    of feeding and breeding sites.
    As it becomes more difficult
    for them to breed successfully,
    populations are destined to
    decline, experts say.

    The number of breeding
    sites in the Caribbean has fallen
    from possibly 35 to around five



    today, and the largest colony
    — numbering some 60,000
    birds — is found in the Inagua
    National Park — which remains
    a true conservation success sto-
    ry.

    Flamingos are among the
    world’s longest-lived birds —



    A FLAMINGO guards her chick on a nest alin in the Inagua

    National Park.

    there is a 1998 record of a
    female breeding successfully at
    the age of 53. And The
    Bahamas National Trust still
    operates a field station at Lake
    Rosa (named after Arthur Ver-
    nay) while Inagua continues as

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    a magnet for both conserva-
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    eWritten by Larry Smith,
    Media Enterprises Ltd, for the
    Bahamas National Trust. For
    more information call 393-1317
    or visit www.bnt.bs



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    TRIBUNE SPORTS

    THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 13



    INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

    Baliamas introduces
    Anti-doping Sports Bill
    FROM page 15

    doping organizations outside
    The Bahamas, in relation to
    any athlete; encouraging and
    facilitating the negotiation by
    any sporting organisation and
    anti-doping organisation of
    any agreement permitting
    their members to be tested by
    authorised doping control
    teams from other countries;
    and cooperating with the test-
    ing and education initiatives
    of WADA and other anti-
    doping organizations.

    Bannister made special
    mention of the impact the
    Anti-Doping Therapeutic Use
    Exemption Committee can
    have on the education of ath-
    letes, parents and coaches, and
    the inadvertent use of banned
    substances which has plagued
    Bahamian athletes in the past.

    “This Committee will be
    responsible for Implement-
    ing and monitoring education
    and preventing programs
    along with the right sand
    responsibilities of our athletes.
    This will be critical for young
    people in our country and crit-
    ical for them to know what is
    on the prohibited list of
    banned substances,” he said.
    “As we know it is not whether
    the athlete intended to use the
    substance for performance
    enhance drugs but whether it
    is found in the body. It is a
    very serious issue that can
    effect young people. Bahami-
    ans have long used the benefit
    of cerrasee, strong bark, love
    vine, along like things with
    vicks inhalers and vapour rubs
    however some of these tradi-
    tional medicines may find
    their way on the list of banned
    substances and we need to be
    aware of that.”

    Bannister noted the numer-
    ous benefits Bahamian ath-
    letes have reaped on the inter-
    national stage because of strict
    enforcement of Anti-Doping
    policies and the subsequent
    disqualification of offenders.

    “At the 2000 Olympic
    Games in Sydney, Australia,
    the Bahamian Men 4x400
    relay team finished fourth on
    the track. However in later
    years four of the United States
    team members were suspend-
    ed for the use of performance
    enhancing drugs. Last year
    our men got their Olympic
    bronze medal. At the same
    2000 Olympic games, Pauline
    Davis Thompson finished sec-
    ond behind Marion Jones in
    the 200m. Jones was later
    revealed to be taking perfor-
    mance enhancing drugs. At
    the 2001 World Champi-
    onships, Debbie Ferguson-
    McKenzie finished behind
    Marion Jones. After Ms
    Jones’ disqualification, Deb-
    bie was just recently awarded
    her gold medal. At the same
    World Championships in
    2001, our Men’s relay team
    finished in second place
    behind the United States and
    now eight years later, Avard
    Moncur, Tim Munnings, Troy
    McIntosh, Chris Brown and
    Carl Oliver, finally have a
    world gold medal. Chandra
    Sturrup was only recently
    awarded her bronze medal for
    her performance in the 100m
    at the 2001 World Champi-
    onships as the end result of
    the disqualifications of both
    Marion Jones and Kelli White.
    Our Men’s relay team is now
    to be recognised as bronze
    medallists from the 2003
    World Championships as a
    result of the disqualification
    of the United States team,”
    he said. “Our recent experi-
    ences have shown exactly why
    it is in the interest of the
    Bahamas to adopt an efficient
    anti-doping regime. I know of
    no country in the world that
    has been impacted as much as
    the Bahamas has by other
    countries that have been taint-
    ed through the doping

    2

    The Tribune wants to
    hear from people who are
    making news in their
    neighbourhoods. Perhaps
    you are raising funds for a
    good cause, campaigning
    for improvements in the
    area or have won an
    award.

    If so, call us on 322-1986
    and share your story.















































































































    THOMAS LURZ of Germany reacts after winning the 10-kilo-

    meter open water race in the sea off Rome’s ancient port of

    Ostia, at FINA Swimming World Championships yesterday...
    (AP Photo: Michael Sohn)

    Lurz wins
    10k open
    water race

    By ANDREW DAMPF
    AP Sports Writer

    LONG-TIME coach Keith Parker holds up a book that highlights the performance of legendary sprinter
    Thomas Augustus Robinson at the 1956 British Empire and Commonwealth Games. At left is commit-
    tee member Linda Thompson and at right is committee chairman Alpheus ‘Hawk’ Finlayson.

    Cable Bahamas first platinum sponsor
    of “Tribute to a Legend’ luncheon
    FROM page 15

    silver medallist in the men’s 100m in Tokyo,
    Japan, where Robinson was a finalist.

    During the luncheon, Finlayson said they
    intend to show the actual race from Wales as
    well as highlight a number of the outstanding
    achievements by Robinson dating back to the
    1995 Pan American Games in Mexico where
    he was a finalist in both the 100 and 200 to the
    1966 Commonwealth Games in Kingston,
    Jamaica, where he won a silver medal in the
    100.

    Parker represented Britain in the long jump
    in Wales in 1958 around the same time that he
    had applied for a job in the Bahamas.

    "I heard about Tommy and went to the
    Games Village and introduced myself to him,"
    Parker recalled. "We struck up a great rela-
    tionship. He told me that the Bahamas loves
    track and field and I came here in July or
    August of 1958."

    Producing a book that outlined many of
    the achievements of Robinson in Wales, Park-
    er said every newspaper had tons of articles on
    Robinson.

    "He was amazing and he remains pretty
    much the same today," Parker pointed out.
    "He's friendly, casual, quiet and he cares a
    lot about the athletes. Never shout at any-
    body, always whispers a kind word of encour-
    agement and has been a contributor to many.
    He's just a great man. This is a very suitable
    honour for him."

    Persons still interested in securing tickets for
    the luncheon can contact any committee mem-
    ber or obtain them from the Colony Resort on
    St Alban’s Drive or Prescription Parlour Phar-
    macy on East Street south.

    ROME (AP) — Thomas Lurz
    won the men’s 10-kilometer
    open water race at the world
    championships Wednesday,
    where officials will have to |
    decide who gets the bronze
    medal after American Francis
    Crippen swam off course.

    Lurz, who also won the 5K
    race Tuesday, covered the sea
    course off Rome’s ancient port
    of Ostia in 1 hour, 52 minutes,
    6.9 seconds.

    “T had the same tactic as the
    5K and it worked really well for
    me,” Lurz said, adding that a big dinner helped him recoy-
    er from his victory the day before. “First I had pasta,
    then I had a Big Mac and a cheeseburger at McDonald’s.
    Unfortunately, there was no German food available.”

    Andrew Gemmell of the United States finished sec-
    ond and Crippen touched third.

    The Italian team protested that Crippen swam on the
    wrong side of a buoy heading into the finish, prompting
    him to duck under a rope to get back in line. The Italians
    are hoping that local favorite Valerio Cleri could move up
    from fourth if Crippen is disqualified.

    Swimming governing body FINA accepted Italy’s
    protest and the United States appealed the decision. The
    FINA Bureau will rule on the case Thursday morning.

    U.S. coach Catherine Vogt pointed out that open water
    rules do not require athletes to swim between the ropes.

    “There’s nothing written in the rules saying you have to
    finish through the lane lines,” Vogt said. “It’s merely for
    guidance. And actually he had no advantage of doing
    what he did. It was actually a disadvantage to him. I think
    clearly he could have been first or second and he was
    third, and I think he deserves it.”

    However, FINA said that athletes were told before the
    race to finish between the ropes.

    Regardless of whether Crippen keeps his medal, Vogt
    was pleased by the American performances.

    “They both swam great races. I’m really proud of the
    adjustments they made from yesterday. It’s a tough turn-
    around,” Vogt said, referring to Gemmell’s fifth place
    and Crippen’s seventh in the 5K. “It’s their first world
    championships.”

    Gemmell lives in Wilmington, Del., and Crippen is
    from nearby Philadelphia, yet they do not train together.

    “It’s a 30 minute drive up I-95 (to Philadelphia) but I
    train at home with my dad,” Gemmell said. “We don’t
    really train in open water. We train in the pool. We’ve
    found that pool swimming is actually very similar to open
    water swimming.”

    the Queen Elizabeth Sports Center named
    after him in 1981.

    Finlayson, accompanied by committee
    members Harrison Petty, Sherwin Stuart, Lin-
    da Thompson, Sandra Smith and coach Keith
    Parker, said they are really appreciative of
    the contribution by Cable Bahamas for the
    luncheon that is scheduled to start at 2pm.

    "We thank Cable Bahamas for their kind
    gesture,” Robinson stressed. "The response to
    this event has been great from both the cor-
    porate and individual level. We anticipate
    that Bahamians from every walk of life will
    join Tommy's contemporaries in a well
    deserved tribute to our Bahamian national
    hero.

    "We have a number of partners who have
    come aboard by making an additional con-
    tribution and continue to encourage others
    to go above and beyond in paying tribute to an
    individual who has done so much for sports in
    the Bahamas."

    The luncheon was originally scheduled as a
    part of the 50th anniversary of Robinson's
    victory in the men’s 220 yards at the British
    Empire and Commonwealth Games in
    Cardiff, Wales, on July 24, 1958. But due to
    the death of one of Robinson's family mem-
    bers and his own illness last year, they had to
    postpone the celebrations to this year.

    Among the special guests expected to
    attend the event are Robinson's University
    of Michigan team-mate Hilton Nicholsen and
    Enrique Figuerola, the 1964 Olympic Games

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    TRIBUNE SPORTS



    SPORTS

    Bryant ‘optimistic’ Odom
    will re-sign with Lakers

    By ALEX KENNEDY
    Associated Press Writer

    SINGAPORE (AP) — Los
    Angeles Lakers star Kobe
    Bryant is optimistic the NBA
    champions will re-sign key
    free agent Lamar Odom.

    "I'm optimistic that he'll be
    back," Bryant said Wednes-
    day at a news conference in
    Singapore as part of a six-
    country Asian tour. "He
    makes us a much, much
    stronger team."

    Negotiations broke down
    last week and the Lakers
    retracted a contract offer to
    Odom. The Miami Heat are
    also wooing the 6-foot-10 for-
    ward.

    Odom played a key role off
    the bench in the Lakers’
    championship run, averaging
    12.3 points and 9.1 rebounds
    during the playoffs.

    Bryant said forward Ron
    Artest, who signed as a free
    agent with the Lakers earlier
    this month, will help bolster
    the team's chances to repeat
    as champions.

    "T think Ron's going to be a
    great addition to us," Bryant
    said. "It's about how well we
    play together. No matter how
    much talent you have, it's
    about how you put those
    pieces of the puzzle togeth-
    er.”

    Bryant downplayed specu-
    lation that Lakers coach Phil
    Jackson may take some
    games off next season because
    of health problems.

    "Who said he's coaching
    less?" Bryant said. "Phil likes
    messing with you guys. He'll
    be there all the time, unless
    he has a doctor's appointment
    to get to."

    Bryant also said he was
    more likely to agree to play
    for Team USA at the World



    KOBE BRYANT (AP)

    Championships in 2010 and
    the 2012 London Olympics
    now that Duke coach Mike
    Krzyzewski has committed to
    lead the team.

    Bryant and Krzyzewski
    won the gold medal at the
    Beijing Olympics last year.

    "I'm very excited to see
    that he signed on," Bryant
    said. "It influences all the guys
    just because we've been
    through that experience
    before and it becomes like a
    family."

    "It definitely influences
    me."

    Bryant, an 11-time All-Star,
    said a possible showdown
    against LeBron James, for-
    mer Lakers teammate
    Shaquille O'Neal and the
    Cleveland Cavaliers in next
    season's finals would be
    "crazy."

    "Just the hoopla that sur-
    rounds it and all the stories
    that would come out of it,"
    Bryant said. "If that match up
    is to happen, we have to take
    it one day at a time, we can't
    get caught up in it being a giv-
    en that we're going to be in
    the finals."

    "We have to take care of
    our business, but that being
    said, it would be a heck of a
    show."

    Robinson and Gibson should
    ‘be knighted’ by the Queen

    STUBBS

    THIS weekend is
    a special one for
    our sporting icon
    Thomas Augustus
    Robinson and leg-
    endary skipper
    King Eric Gibson.
    Both, in their own
    rights, have been
    hailed as legends in
    track and field and
    sailing respectively,
    yet neither of them
    have earned the
    international recog-



    44

    am
    ‘Gt

    =
    a e





    a.

    nition that has been OPINION

    bestowed upon so
    many other
    Bahamians on the
    Queen’s honours list.

    Here is Robinson, whose
    résumé looks like a best sell-
    er novel about a sprinter who
    traveled the world and
    almost single-handedly rep-
    resented the Bahamas at the
    highest level in the sport of
    track and field.

    The Friends of Thomas
    Augustus Robinson commit-
    tee is scheduled to hold a
    luncheon 2pm Sunday at
    Sandals Royal Bahamian
    Resort & Spa in a tribute
    that is fitting for a king. On
    July 24, 1958, Robinson was
    sitting on top of the world
    when he won the men's 200
    yards at the British Empire
    and Commonwealth Games
    in Cardiff, Wales.

    That was the pinnacle of
    his achievement, but over a
    span of a decade from 1955-
    1966, Robinson excelled in
    both the 100 and 200 yards
    and metres as well as extend-
    ing it to the 300 where he set
    a world indoor record in
    Saskatoon, Canada, in 1964.






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    Robinson, who took a shot
    at running for Parliament
    and eventually was honoured
    with his name being placed
    on the track and field stadi-
    um at the Queen Elizabeth
    Sports Centre in 1981,
    deserves any and all of the
    accolades that will be
    bestowed upon him.

    He's a humble individual
    who, like coach Keith Parker
    points out, has a big broad
    smile and has contributed
    significantly to the develop-
    ment of a number of local
    track and field athletes
    behind the scenes.

    As he recovers from
    surgery, the committee could
    not have selected a better
    time to honour Robinson,
    who will also have an edu-
    cational fund established in
    his name. The latter is a true
    testament to the first
    Bahamian to attend college
    on an athletic scholarship.

    It maybe long overdue, but
    considering that the achieve-
    ments of Robinson are well
    documented, no one can
    take away from his achieve-
    ments. And like everybody
    would suggest, now would
    also be a good time for him
    to be knighted as Sir Thomas
    Augustus Robinson by the
    Queen.




    a



    KING ERIC GIBSON

    After all, he had one of the
    most glaring performances
    turned in at the British
    Empire and Commonwealth
    Games in Cardiff, one of the
    countries still under the
    British rule, headed by the
    Queen. So let us honour him
    in that manner now when he
    would really appreciate it,
    just as much as he will on
    Sunday.

    While Robinson will get
    some more of his flowers this
    weekend, the focus will be
    placed on King Eric Gibson



    sy

    next weekend during the
    Acklins Regatta.

    Gibson, coined King
    because of his tremendous
    performance on the sailing
    beat, has enjoyed one of the
    longest tenures of any local
    skipper. He has been sailing
    in regattas for more than 30
    years and will finally be
    going home to have the 2009
    regatta held in his honour.

    Some may say that Gibson
    may have caused more havoc
    in the sport than anybody
    else. But he has done more
    for the promotion and the
    smooth sailing of regattas
    throughout the Bahamas
    than any one individual per-
    son.

    So his contribution has
    balanced itself out.

    Like Robinson, I person-
    ally feel that what Gibson
    has done for the sport of sail-
    ing has not been recognised
    and he too should be given a
    knighthood for his achieve-
    ment, although it's not as
    documented as Robinson.

    But one cannot talk about
    sailing and not mention the
    name King Eric Gibson. It's
    time that these icons are hon-
    oured just like others who
    have received the accolades
    for less than national accom-
    plishments.

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    THE TRIBUNE

    A



    THURSDAY, JULY 23,



    2009



    a See 4
    wa

    Lurz wins
    10k open

    water race...
    See page 15

    A

    Bahamas introduces Anti-doping Sports Bill

    By RENALDO DORSETT
    Sports Reporter
    rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

    AS ONE of nearly 200 countries to
    sign on to the World Anti Doping
    Code and adhere to the programme
    as adopted by the International
    Olympic Committee, the Bahamas
    has moved toward compliance by
    adopting legislation to enforce the
    code, said Minister of Youth Sports
    and Culture, Desmond Bannister.

    In his contribution to the Anti-
    Doping Sports Bill, Bannister,
    announced that the Bill would intro-
    duce a number of initiatives to place
    the Bahamas on par with the remain-
    der of the world in regards to its anti-
    doping policy, most notably the
    establishment of a National Anti-




















    |

    PCa ME Ce tee platinum sponsor of

    Country signs on to
    World Anti Doping Code

    Doping Commission, Anti-Doping
    Therapeutic Use Exemption Com-
    mittee and a Disciplinary Panel.

    “My Ministry will seek to estab-
    lish a National Sports Medicine Com-
    mission that will have a number of
    important functions, the most impor-
    tant of which will be the enforce-
    ment of the World Anti Doping
    Code upon local and visiting athletes
    and teams,” he said.

    “The Bahamas was one of 192
    countries to sign this declaration to
    date. Its principal objective is the

    implementation of anti-doping pro-
    grammes in order to prevent, deter,
    detect and punish individuals using or
    providing performance enhancing
    substances. We have a global instru-
    ment to organise regulation and to
    provide the establishment and exe-
    cution of anti doping policies, rules
    and regulations for the benefits of
    sports organisations and ensure fair-
    play to athletes worldwide. Individual
    countries have three commitments
    under the code, the first is accep-
    tance, the second is implementation

    7

    By BRENT STUBBS
    Senior Sports Reporter
    bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

    CABLE Bahamas is the

    always looking at ways to give
    back to the community,” said
    Gomez, who attended the
    conference with Richard
    Adderley, director of human

    icon in the country, Gomez
    said they couldn't help but
    support Robinson, who had
    the track and field stadium at

    and the third is enforcement.”

    The Minister outlined the various
    responsibilities of the Commission
    and its subsequent panels which will
    become vital in the country’s com-
    pliance with the Lausanne Act and
    the Anti-Doping Code.

    “The National Anti-Doping Com-
    mission will consist of nine members
    who will be appointed by the Minis-
    ter. This commission will have the
    duty of propagating anti doping rules,
    implement policies and programs
    with regard to doping in sports and
    wherever necessary be responsible
    for implementing the world anti dop-
    ing code,” Bannister said.

    Other duties of the Commission
    as recorded in the Bill will include
    the establishment of a “register for
    the Registered Testing Pool of
    national-level and international-lev-

    ="

    el Bahamian athletes who are citi-
    zens or residents of The Bahamas
    and notifying such athletes and rele-
    vant national sporting organisations
    of entries made in the register, it will
    also

    lead to the notification of “test
    results to athletes and, as the case
    may be, governments of countries
    other than The Bahamas, anti-doping
    organisations of other countries, or
    other signatories to the Code in
    accordance with bilateral or multi-
    lateral agreements entered into by
    The Bahamas with such govern-
    ments, organizations or signatories.”

    Other duties of the Commission
    include “entering into reciprocal test-
    ing agreements with national anti-

    SEE page 13

    CABLE Bahamas’
    vice president of
    engineering John
    Gomez makes a
    cheque presentation
    to Alpheus ‘Hawk’
    Finlayson for the
    luncheon on Sun-
    day for Thomas
    Augustus Robinson.
    From left are Harri-
    son Petty, Sherwin
    Stuart, Linda
    Thompson, Gomez,
    Finlayson, Sandra
    Smith, Richard
    Adderley and coach
    Keith Parker.

    area oR Tere Me iteon

    resources.

    first platinum sponsor of the ;
    As a sporting legend and

    “Tribute to a Legend” lun-
    cheon in honour of track and
    field icon Thomas Augustus
    Robinson - set for Sunday at
    Sandals Royal Bahamian
    Resort & Spa.

    John Gomez, vice president
    of engineering at Cable
    Bahamas, yesterday made a
    cheque presentation to
    Alpheus “Hawk” Finlayson,
    chairman of the Friends of
    Thomas Augustus Robinson
    committee.

    Cable Bahamas joins a
    number of companies who
    have pledged their financial
    support for the luncheon,
    which is being held in part to
    help cover the medical
    expenses of an ailing Robin-
    son and establish an educa-
    tional fund in honour of the
    first Bahamian to head off to
    school on an athletic scholar-
    ship.

    "At Cable Bahamas, we
    always believe in giving back
    and with the Cable for Cares
    organisation, which has been
    in existence since the incep-
    tion of the company, we are

    SEE page 13

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    Bahamas First:
    $11.9m swing
    Shows ability
    to absorb loss

    * General insurance
    carrier’s Board still
    considering BISX listing,
    but not top priority

    * Predicting likely gross
    premium drop of 5%
    year-over-year for 2009

    * Set to make decision on
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    stake in General Brokers
    & Agents by year-end

    By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    BAHAMAS First’s president
    yesterday said the negative
    $11.9 million swing the compa-
    ny sustained on the value of its
    equity investments in 2008
    showed it “can actually sustain
    a significant loss” and remain
    profitable, giving shareholders
    confidence it can weather a
    major hurricane and the expect-
    ed “close to 5 per cent” drop
    in gross premiums this year.

    Patrick Ward, who is also the
    general insurance carrier’s chief
    executive, said that despite the
    unrealised losses on its invest-
    ment portfolio, largely due to
    the slump in value of its Com-
    monwealth Bank holdings from
    $18 million to $14.9 million, its
    equities holdings had per-
    formed better than if they had
    been more widely invested
    across BISX-listed stocks.

    “We actually did better than
    if we had been more broadly
    invested on BISX,” Mr Ward
    told Tribune Business. “It’s just
    another vindication for holding
    on to that [Commonwealth
    Bank] investment.”

    Bahamas First owns 2.133
    million Commonwealth Bank
    shares, although their value had
    dropped to $7 per share at year-
    end 2008, compared to $8.37
    per share the year before,
    hence the swing to a $2.922 mil-
    lion loss on the unrealised value
    of its investments.

    However, Mr Ward said the
    fact that Bahamas First had
    managed to generate net profits
    of $3.464 million for 2008,
    despite such a dramatic swing,
    should give shareholders, poli-
    cyholders and the industry con-
    fidence it could withstand an
    avalanche of insurance claims
    resulting from a major hurri-
    cane and remain profitable.

    Explaining that the impact
    of the $11.9 million equities val-
    uation swing was similar to that
    expected from a major hurri-
    cane, Mr Ward said of the 2008
    financial performance: “We can
    actually sustain a significant loss
    on the profit and loss side, with-
    out necessarily having a com-
    plete wash in any one year.

    “The impact of the Com-
    monwealth Bank move is actu-
    ally what we would expect to
    see in any significant loss year.”

    SEE page 10B

    SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

    $30m investment in Town Centre

    By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    ew Providence

    Development

    Company is look-

    ing at a $30 million
    total investment to construct its
    planned new Town Centre for
    the western part of the island,
    its chief executive explaining
    that the facility was needed to
    spark the firm’s “regional
    development plans” and
    replace a Lyford Cay Shopping
    Centre that was “clearly on its
    last legs”.

    T. Rhys Duggan, who is also
    New Providence Development
    Company’s president, told Tri-
    bune Business that the Town
    Centre development - located
    opposite the entrance to the
    Charlotteville project - would
    feature some 32,000 square feet
    of retail space, and another
    32,000 square feet of office con-
    do space.

    In addition to the planned
    64,000 square foot mixed-use
    Town Centre space, Mr Dug-
    gan said the company’s plans
    also called for “six or seven”
    businesses to be located along
    Windsor Field Road, including
    the likes of a gas station, bank
    and fast food restaurant. He
    pointed to a current dearth of
    such facilities in western New
    Providence.

    Mr Duggan said New Provi-
    dence Development Company
    was now “going full speed
    ahead” to obtain all the neces-

    $100k spend
    takes Cost
    Right online

    By CHESTER ROBARDS
    Business Reporter
    crobards@tribunemedia.net

    ABACO MARKETS is
    moving its Cost Right retail for-
    mat online with the launch of
    CostRite.com through an
    almost $100,000 investment set
    to roll out in the third quarter
    of its current financial year, its
    chief executive revealed yes-
    terday.

    Gavin Watchorn, who is also
    Abaco Markets’ president, said

    SEE page 4B

    $3.5-4m spend
    for AML Foods’
    latest format

    By CHESTER ROBARDS
    Business Reporter
    crobards@tribunemedia. net

    ABACO MARKETS, which
    has been renamed as AML
    Foods Ltd, reduced its bank
    debt by $1.2 million near the
    end of its fiscal 2010 second
    quarter, while sales had shown
    significant growth over the first

    SEE page 9B

    Sealed Bid Property

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    T. RHYS DUGGAN

    sary final planning approvals
    and other permits needed from
    the Government.

    The proposed Town Centre
    had already received its
    ‘approval in principle’ from
    planning bodies such as the
    Town Planning Committee, and
    Mr Duggan said the Traffic
    Impact Study had also been
    approved by the Government.

    With Abaco Markets’ new
    premium food store format,
    Solomon’s Fresh Food Market,
    secured as the Town Centre’s
    anchor tenant, Mr Duggan said
    New Providence Development
    Company would “ramp up”
    efforts to secure all outstand-
    ing government permits and
    approvals.

    “We already have our engi-
    neering designs done in-house



    * Proposed project to feature 64,000 square feet of space
    split evenly between retail and offices, with ‘six to seven
    pads’ to include bank, gas station and fast food restaurant

    * Project to replace 40 year-old Lyford Cay

    Shopping Centre that ‘is on its last legs’

    * But waste water franchise for western New
    Providence is key component that is missing

    * 20 homes still being developed at Old Fort Bay, but
    light industrial park on hold until ‘market improves’

    schematically, so it will not take
    long to translate them into con-
    struction” and other required
    documents, Mr Duggan added.

    While unable to give a pre-
    cise construction start date due
    to the outstanding approvals,
    the New Providence Develop-
    ment Company chief executive
    added: “As quickly as things
    can get approved, we’ll start
    construction.

    “The target for us and Abaco
    Markets, which is very impor-
    tant for both of us, is to have
    the fresh food market open by
    Spring 2011, which we think is
    very doable.”

    Although unable to give
    details on how many jobs the
    Town Centre project would cre-
    ate, both during the construc-
    tion and post-opening phase,

    Mr Duggan said: “For us, it’s a
    key component of our regional
    development plans.”

    And, referring to the com-
    pany’s existing Lyford Cay
    Shopping Centre, he added: “TI
    think the centre we have now is
    clearly on its last legs, being 40
    years-old, and it’s time to
    upgrade facilities here both for
    the existing population and the
    new population moving to west-
    ern New Providence.

    “We're seeing a lot of inter-
    est among both office busi-
    nesses and retailers, realising
    there’s a well-established mar-
    ket here already, and as a result
    they want to have a presence
    out here.”

    Mr Duggan added that New
    Providence Development Com-
    pany had 25 tenants at the

    Designers must ‘come up to mark’ to
    maximise Miss Universe exposure

    By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    THE head of the host plan-
    ning committee for next mon-
    th’s Miss Universe Pageant yes-
    terday said it was critical that all
    Bahamian designers “come up
    to the mark” on product quali-
    ty and design if this nation is
    to develop a sustainable fashion
    industry, with the Government
    needing to encourage the sec-
    tor’s development due to its
    foreign currency earning poten-
    tial.

    Owen Bethel, head of Nas-
    sau-based financial services
    provider the Montaque Group,

    * Pageant and fashion show organiser urges government
    to encourage development of Bahamian fashion
    industry as foreign exchange earner

    * Miss Universe publicity can be ‘catalyst’
    for sector and fashion show growth

    * Islands of the World hoping to attract more than 500
    visitors this year, with maximum of 20-25 designers

    who is also acting as the
    Pageant’s co-ordinator, told
    Tribune Business that all
    Bahamian fashion designers
    needed to match the quality of
    their peers who had been
    selected to outfit the 86 Miss

    Universe contestants during the
    Fashion Show.

    The three Bahamian design-
    ers chosen for this task, after
    an open call, are Rachel Turn-

    SEE page 8B

    existing Lyford Cay Shopping
    Centre, and hoped to take “a
    lot of them” with it when the
    new Town Centre opened. The
    company had received interest
    from a similar number of
    prospective new tenants inter-
    ested in taking space in the new
    development.

    “That centre [Lyford Cay]
    will close once the new one is
    open, and we will continue to
    evaluate our development
    options on that site,” he added.

    New Providence Develop-
    ment Company had “a good
    number of potential tenants”
    lined up for the Town Centre,
    and Mr Duggan said securing
    contracts and agreements with
    them would be easier now that

    SEE page 4B

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    PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE





    INSIGHT

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    As with other service
    providers, it is important that
    a business considers certain
    factors in selecting attorneys,
    preparing for attorney-client
    meetings/consultations, and
    maintaining and managing the
    legal relationship and overall
    conduct of any legal matters.

    Key Considerations

    When retaining an attorney
    or law firm for a legal matter,
    a business should consider the
    following key elements:

    * The attorney/law firm’s
    expertise in the area of law
    featuring the anticipated/spe-
    cific business need or legal
    matter (s) to be addressed.
    Some legal matters require
    both litigation and transac-

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    tion competencies, and an
    overall commercial awareness
    and understanding of the
    business’s most optimal legal
    strategy and intended legal
    outcome, given the nature,
    complexity and cost-benefit
    analysis of the matter.

    * Potential conflicts of
    interest or representation of
    any potential alliance part-
    ners and/or competitors

    * The adequacy of the
    attorney/law firm’s profes-
    sional indemnity insurance for
    potential liability, given the
    legal matter for which the
    attorney/law firm will be
    engaged.

    * The experience, compe-
    tence, case management,
    leadership, communication
    and legal and business skills of
    the attorney/law firm, given
    the nature and complexity of
    the legal matter.

    * The integrity and trust-
    worthiness of the attorney/law
    firm and his/her understand-
    ing and commitment to the
    confidentiality, attorney-client
    privilege, and roles and legal
    responsibilities of the parties
    upon engagement.

    * The cllarity and compre-
    hensiveness of the engage-
    ment letter, retainer agree-
    ment, or the terms and condi-
    tions of the attorney/law fir-
    m’s engagement in and con-
    duct of the legal matter.

    * The attorney/law firm’s
    hourly rate, estimated fees,
    retainer, payment arrange-
    ments, and fee structure and
    billing scheme for work to be
    done by junior attorneys
    and/or paralegals.

    * Any past work, cases or
    legal matters performed by
    the attorney/law firm in the
    area of law relating to the spe-
    cific matter to be litigated or
    handled by the attorney/law
    firm.

    * The reputation and
    respectability of the attor-
    ney/law firm locally and inter-
    nationally.

    * Whether any complaints
    have been made or discipli-
    nary actions taken against the
    attorney/law firm by the
    Bahamas Bar Association.

    Documentation

    Before meeting the attor-
    ney/law firm for the initial
    consultation on the legal mat-
    ter to be addressed, a busi-
    ness person should organise
    and bring a copy of all the
    legal and business documents

    Colina General.
    ape Insurance Agency

    and correspondence which
    may be relevant to the issue.
    Depending upon the specific
    business or legal need, these
    documents may include, but
    not be limited to, the follow-
    ing items:

    * The business plan, organ-
    isational chart, company man-
    uals, policies and procedures,
    compliance reports, annual
    reports, financial statements

    * Corporate documents,
    including the original or
    copies of the Certificate of
    Incorporation, Memorandum
    and Articles of Association,
    resolutions, minutes, Regis-
    ters of Directors and Officers,
    Register of Members, Certifi-
    cates of Incumbency, Powers
    of Attorney, Shareholder
    Agreements

    * Letters, e-mail messages
    and other correspondences

    * Contractual, vendor,
    employment or other business
    agreements

    * Court documents, includ-
    ing Writs of Summons, State-
    ments of Claim, Judgments

    Information gathering and
    understanding the legal
    process

    In your initial meeting with
    the attorney/law firm, some
    of the following questions
    should be asked:

    * How many similar trans-
    actions or legal matters has
    the lawyer handled in com-
    parison to the legal matter to
    be addressed?

    * What has been the out-
    come/success rate of past legal
    matters?

    * How much of the attor-
    ney/law firm’s work is done
    in the particular area of law of
    the legal matter to be
    engaged?

    * What is the process, pro-
    cedure and paperwork
    involved in the particular legal
    matter to be dealt with? Will
    the attorney/law firm also
    effectively and responsively
    communicate this information
    to the client in a clear, coher-
    ent and comprehensive man-
    ner?

    * What is the education and
    information-gathering process
    between the attorney/law firm
    and client? Will there be any
    legal coaching and overall
    legal strategy in the conduct
    of the matter?

    * Are there any potential
    conflicts of interest relating
    to the attorney’s proposed
    engagement in the matter?

    * What personal and cor-

    with your attorney

    porate documentation is
    needed beforehand in order
    to engage the attorney/law
    firm?

    * How long will the matter
    take to conclude?

    * What will be the mode
    and frequency of communi-
    cation between the attor-
    ney/law firm and the client in
    the conduct of the matter?

    . How many
    attorneys/paralegals will be
    working on the matter? How
    will the client be charged —
    hourly rate, flat fee, or retain-
    er? How will the work of
    junior attorneys, paralegals,
    staff members be reflected in
    the billing? What are the esti-
    mated disbursements and
    expenses involved?

    * What will be the nature
    and ambit of their legal ser-
    vice, advice and assistance on
    engagement, and throughout
    the conduct of the matter?

    * What are the alternative
    solutions, legal strategies, and
    possible consequences of each
    option to be proposed or pur-
    sued by the attorney/law
    firm?

    * What is the potential out-
    come of the case? Are these
    aligned with the expectations
    of both the attorney/law firm
    and client?

    All attorney-client rela-
    tionships should be built,
    maintained and managed on
    integrity, trust, mutual under-
    standing, open and honest
    communication, professional-
    ism and interdependence.

    These objectives can only
    be achieved with a clear
    understanding of the role,
    risks and responsibilities of
    both attorney and client, and
    an appreciation and respect
    for the professional services
    to be rendered and rewards
    to be gained.

    © 2009. Tyrone L. E.
    Fitzgerald. All rights reserved.

    NB: The information con-
    tained in this article does not
    constitute nor is it a substi-
    tute for legal advice. Persons
    reading this article and/or col-
    umn, generally, are encour-
    aged to seek the relevant legal
    advice and assistance regard-
    ing issues that may affect
    them and may relate to the
    information presented.

    Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is
    an attorney with Fitzgerald &
    Fitzgerald. Should you have
    any comments regarding this
    article, you may contact Mr
    Fitzgerald at Suite 212,
    Lagoon Court Building, Olde
    Towne Mall at Sandyport,
    West Bay Street, PO Box CB-
    11173, Nassau, Bahamas or
    at tyrone@tlefitzgerald-
    group.com.

    Share your news

    The Tribune wants to hear

    from people who are
    making news in their
    neighbourhoods. Perhaps

    you are raising funds for a

    good cause, campaigning
    for improvements in the
    area or have won an
    award.

    If so, call us on 322-1986
    and share your story.

    To our valued customers,

    Please be advised that all of our Colina General offices
    in Nassau will be closed
    on

    Friday July 24 2009

    To allow staff to attend the company’s
    Annual Staff Fun Day.

    We will resume normal business on

    Monday July 27" 2009

    mangos

    Transfer Solutions Providers Limited is a Bahamian software
    company specializing in micro-payments, with an aggressive
    implementation time-table. In order to meet these goals we
    require the services of a Chief Technical Officer immediately.

    Chief Technical Officer
    Minimum requirements:

    ¢ University degree in Science/Engineering
    e 10+ years experience in:

    Major systems design

    Programming (C, C++, .net)

    Large scale database design

    Large scale networking and associated protocols
    ¢ Experience in card-based financial systems
    ¢ Experience working for Government level institutions
    ¢ Experience working in an international environment

    We apologize for any inconvenience caused.

    All interested parties please submit CV by e-mail to harvey.morris@ts
    pbahamas.com or by fax to 394-6763. No telephone calls accepted.

    Management


    THE TRIBUNE

    THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 3B



    Fund administrator
    confirms 11 lay-offs

    By CHESTER ROBARDS
    Business Reporter
    crobards@tribunemedia.net

    BUTTERFIELD Fulcrum
    (Bahamas) yesterday confirmed
    that it is making 11 staff mem-
    bers redundant over a period
    of six months, and indicated
    that this newspaper’s Wednes-
    day story was correct by sug-
    gesting its operations in this
    nation were due to shut down.

    Sources close to the company
    told Tribune Business on Tues-
    day that as many as 15 individ-
    uals might have been let go, as
    the fund administrator sought
    to close its Bahamas -ased oper-
    ation and transfer the business
    book to Butterfield Fulcrum’s
    offices in Bermuda and the
    Cayman Islands.

    Butterfield Fulcrum’s head
    office, in a statement released
    yesterday, confirmed: “As a
    result of difficult market con-
    ditions, we have decided to
    downsize our office in the
    Bahamas, resulting in 11 staff

    redundancies which will take
    effect over a six-month period.
    “We have made relocation
    offers to several members of
    staff affected by the redundan-
    cies. We have undertaken care-
    ful advance planning to ensure
    a transparent and seamless
    transition for all our Bahamas-
    domiciled clients, while allow-
    ing for substantial notice for
    affected employees to find oth-
    er employment opportunities.”
    One financial industry source
    said of the Bahamas office:
    “The fund business has dried
    up for them, probably, and they
    are relocating to where they
    have scale, which would be
    Cayman or Bermuda.”
    Keeping mum on further
    details of the lay-offs and
    potential move, current man-
    aging director Sandra Gilbert
    told Tribune Business she could
    not say more but that “a press
    release would be issued by the
    afternoon”.
    The investment funds sector
    of the global financial services

    industry has borne the brunt of
    the credit crunch and econom-
    ic recession, with many funds
    suffering huge redemption
    requests from investors des-
    perate to pull their money out
    and find safer havens for it.

    These redemption requests
    have been enough to put some
    funds out of business, while oth-
    er fund managers/promotors
    have either suspended redemp-
    tions or decided to wind-up
    their existing funds. All this
    would negatively impact a fund
    administrator such as Butter-
    field Fulcrum, reducing its busi-
    ness. It is thought that the fund
    administrator would have
    wrapped up its business in the
    Bahamas by September.

    A statement was prepared by
    Butterfield Bank (Bahamas),
    designed to distinguish itself as
    a separate entity unaffected by
    the lay-offs.

    Butterfield Fulcrum is an
    affiliate of Butterfield Bank
    (Bahamas) though with an
    autonomous management team

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    and board of directors.

    Butterfield Fulcrum’s
    Bahamas business has gone
    through two ownership changes
    in five years. Originally known
    as Deerfield Fund Services, it
    was acquired by Butterfield
    Bank in January 2004 and
    renamed Butterfield Fund Ser-
    vices (Bahamas).

    Then, in July 2008, Butter-
    field decided to merge all its
    funds services operations -
    including those in the Bahamas
    - with Fulcrum, retaining a 40
    per cent stake in the merged
    Butterfield Fulcrum.

    When Butterfield acquired
    Deerfield, it had 12 staff and
    assets under administration of
    $1.8 billion. The latter figure

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    had grown to $2.9 billion by
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    the time of the Fulcrum deal
    can be gauged by the fact that,
    at year-end 2007, Butterfield’s
    assets under administration in
    the Bahamas (when it still
    owned both the funds business
    and the bank), were $5.447 bil-
    lion.

    At year-end 2008, when the
    funds business had been
    merged into Butterfield Ful-
    crum, assets under administra-
    tion in the Bahamas totalled
    just $2.349 billion. This implied
    that Butterfield Fulcrum’s
    Bahamas operations had almost
    $3.1 billion in assets under
    administration by year-end
    2008.

    Correction

    IN the Page 3 Tribune
    Business story on
    Wednesday, July 22, 2009,
    headlined ‘Bank’s in-
    house move to boost e-
    commerce’, Bahamas Vir-
    tual Mall’s website was
    wrongly stated as
    bvn.com.

    The correct web address
    is www.shopbvm.com. The
    Tribune appologises for
    any inconveniences this
    has caused.

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    Stay 7 nights
    get the 1 night FREE

    Complimantiry balhne amenities including:
    soap, shampoo, conditioner, lothon

    Packages a5 low a5 $135.00 per nigit

    BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
    VACANCY NOTICE

    An employment opportunity exists for an innovative,
    persuasive leader with a passion for success, a desire to
    succeed and the ability to initiate progress.

    Skill Requirements
    MANAGER, REVENUE ACCOUNTING ,
    CUSTOMER SERVICES DIVISION Excellent oral and written communication skills
    OO Excellent motivation & coaching skills

    Ability to execute priority based workload
    Possess excellent planning, organizational and
    implementation skills

    Ability to operate and familiarity with POS
    systems

    Proficient in Microsoft Office applications
    Possess strong foundation of accounting

    practices and procedures

    Strong multitasking ability

    Strong leadership & managerial skills

    Strong internet skills i.e. Emailing, group
    messaging and research

    Ability to exert initiative

    Recording, summarizing, analyzing, verifying and
    reporting of results of financial transactions

    A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue
    Accounting.

    The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and the
    Family Islands and the reconciliation of all revenue accounts other than miscellaneous
    receivables.

    Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

    + Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in New Providence and
    the Famuly Islands.

    Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers.
    Prepares the sales budget.

    Prepares the Reverwe A ccoOunting Department Budget

    Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Receivable Reconciliation,
    Oversees the training of all Customer Services staff in the new billing software.
    Prepares monthly Board reports

    Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenwe reports.

    Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of Statistics.
    Provides statistical billing information for Family Island managers.

    Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in the
    Family Islands,

    Attends yearly community meetings as well as ad hoc meetings required during
    acquisition of new locations

    Develops and implements rules, guidelines and procedures for the efficient
    operation of the department.

    *- ¢ ¢ be b&b te te +t + of

    Minimum Experience Requirements

    Tertiary level — with degree in related field;
    Collections executive with at least 4 years
    experience in collections or related field ;

    At least three years experience in supervisory
    post;

    Strong knowledge and application of MS
    Microsoft Suite

    Job requirements include:

    Atminimum of a Bachelors degree in Accounts or equivalent

    A minimum of 8+ years of experience in accounting practice and theory.
    Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualifications

    Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas.

    Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing.

    Sound reasoning and good judement skills.

    Ability to interpret financial reports.

    Good time management skills,

    Project management skills,

    st t¢ + + + ££ & &@

    APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:
    Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: : :
    The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity srcollectionsofficer@yahoo.com
    Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509, Nassau, Bahamas on or before:

    duly 31, 2009,


    PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE



    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that JOSUE MERICE of

    STAPLEDON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SB-50202, NASSAU,
    BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
    Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
    as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
    knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
    not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
    of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23" day of
    July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
    Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

    NOTICE

    NEW TELEPHONE
    NUMBER

    To our valued Members, please be advised that


























































    Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative
    Credit Union Limited, has up graded its
    telephone service to better assist our members
    as follows:

    242-502-9200
    242-502-9219
    242-502-9222

    All Departments:
    Loans Department:
    Member Services Department:

    Please note that we can still be reached at our
    old telephone numbers:

    242-323-4488

    242-323-4492

    242-323-4495
    242-323-4411-4

    REQUEST FOR

    $30m investment
    in [own Centre

    FROM page 1B

    Abaco Markets had been
    unveiled as the anchor tenant.

    “We've been waiting to
    finalise the anchor tenant, and
    the rest of the development was
    contingent on that,” he
    explained. “With this deal
    behind us, we’re going full
    speed ahead.

    “With Albany going out
    here, and this going out here
    now, they just complement one
    another very well. It seems the
    west part of the island has the
    momentum now.”

    And enough momentum to
    attract those businesses who
    already have an established
    presence in eastern and western
    New Providence. Mr Duggan,
    though, explained that he was
    unable to give a figure for how
    many tenants would ultimately
    be accommodated in the new
    Town Centre, due to the fact
    that the company wanted to
    have “flexibility” to configure

    space to whatever a tenant’s
    requirements were.

    However, Mr Duggan said a
    key ingredient not yet in place
    was a water supply franchise
    for western New Providence,
    something its New Providence
    Water Development Company
    affiliate is still negotiating with
    the Ministry of the Environ-
    ment and Water & Sewerage
    Corporation.

    The firms are looking to tie
    down a long-term, formal
    arrangement for their supply of
    water to developments such as
    Old Fort Bay, Lyford Cay and
    Albany, but this is likely to run
    into opposition from some who
    will argue that it would deprive
    Water & Sewerage of a cus-
    tomer base and revenue stream.
    New Providence Water Devel-
    opment Company has been
    supplying water for 50 years.

    “That’s probably our most
    important component of this
    whole deal,” Mr Duggan told
    Tribune Business. “Growth

    $100k spend takes Cost Right online

    FROM page 1B

    the company was also in talks
    with the Domino's Pizza master
    franchisor in a bid to bring

    FINANCING

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    Prequalification will include, based on the tender packapes, the following critena:

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    A global leader in audit, tax and advisory services

    online order purchasing to the
    Caribbean and the Bahamas.
    Abaco Markets owns the
    Domino's Pizza franchise in the
    Bahamas.

    According to Mr Watchorn,
    the new CostRite.com site will
    give Family Island customers
    the option of having their
    orders delivered to the dock for
    direct shipping.

    He said Cost Rite will
    employ a dedicated department
    for processing and shipping
    orders.

    "We're gong to include the
    schedule of all the mail boats,
    so whichever island you're on
    you can select which mail boat
    services your island, which day
    it sails and pick which day you
    want to put it on," said Mr
    Watchorn.

    The website will be designed
    to be as robust as possible, he
    added, with comprehensive
    details on each item including
    the label, ingredient and nutri-
    tional information of food
    products, and all specifications
    for electronic equipment.

    "It will be just like you're in
    the store with the item," said
    Mr Watchorn. He said item
    specials will be available on
    CostRite.com that will not be
    available in the Town Centre
    Mall anchor store.

    Mr Watchorn said the
    $100,000 invested in construct-
    ing the site included design per-
    sonnel and all other resources
    needed to develop Abaco Mar-
    ket's e-commerce business.

    He expressed confidence that
    the company's development of
    an e-commerce model for Aba-
    co Markets was important for
    Family Island customers.

    When CostRite.com goes
    live, online shoppers will be
    able to purchase items over the
    Internet using a major credit
    card, or deposit money directly
    to Abaco Markets bank
    account. Purchasers can then
    choose to pick up their items
    or have them delivered.

    Mr Watchorn said neither
    Solomon's SuperCenter nor the
    proposed high-end Fresh Food
    Market, expected to open in
    western New Providence in
    spring 2011, will have an online
    presence.

    Abaco Markets is currently
    beta testing the site in prepa-
    ration for its launch.

    We are currently seeking a bright, anergetic, honest and confidant individual to join our Finm as a:

    Messenger

    Candidates will be required to provide messenger and other services on a daily basis. The ideal candidate should

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    2tod years working experience
    A valid driver's licanse

    Excellent interpersonal and customer service skills

    Excellant communication skills
    Experience in handling cash

    The ability to work independently and under pressure to meet strict deadlines

    Uncomproamising personal and business ethics

    We offer a competitive compensation and an attractive benefits package. Assurance is given that every applicant

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    can’t happen out west without
    that being resolved, and I don’t
    have that yet. We need to have
    that resolved to move forward.

    “We supply everyone west
    of the airport, and are looking
    at upgrading technology and
    providing world class potable
    water. Water and waste water
    disposal, along with electricity,
    are the three most important
    components, and without those
    in place development is impos-
    sible.”

    Meanwhile, Mr Duggan said
    New Providence Development
    Company had delayed putting
    in the planned infrastructure
    for its 75-acre light industrial
    park, located just south of the
    airport, until “the market picks
    up”. Grading for the site had
    been completed.

    As for Old Fort Bay, Mr
    Duggan added: “We’re doing
    well. We still have 20 homes
    under development, and new
    homes are starting every
    month, which is encouraging

    given the way the economy is.”

    New Providence Develop-
    ment Company is the largest
    private land owner on New
    Providence with more than
    2,300 acres. It has developed
    Old Fort Bay and the Old Fort
    Club, and owns the New Prov-
    idence Water Development
    Company.

    It is also an affiliate of the
    Tavistock Group, the Albany
    developer. Both it and Tavis-
    tock Group are owned by Joe
    Lewis, the Lyford Cay-based
    billionaire. Mr Lewis’s business
    partner, Terry White, is an
    investor in both Albany and
    New Providence Development
    Company.

    For the stories
    behind the news,

    read Insight on
    Mondays



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    THE TRIBUNE



    Delta posts 2Q loss, while
    AirTran reports profit

    By HARRY R WEBER
    AP Airlines Writer

    ATLANTA (AP) — Delta
    Air Lines Inc. and AirTran
    Airways posted contrasting
    financial results, but had a
    similar message Wednesday
    about the state of the airline
    industry: A near-term revenue
    recovery is unlikely.

    It remains to be seen
    whether that will mean fewer
    jobs for airline employees and
    higher fees and fares for pas-
    sengers.

    Discount carrier AirTran
    has been able to find ways to
    stay in the black. Its parent

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    posted a $78.4 million profit
    for the April-June quarter,
    while Delta, the world’s
    biggest airline operator, con-
    tinues to rack up the red ink,
    as it recorded a $257 million
    loss for the quarter.

    The news followed hefty
    second-quarter losses reported
    by Continental Airlines Inc.
    and American Airlines par-
    ent AMR Corp., while United
    Airlines parent UAL Corp.
    posted a small profit. Discount
    carrier Southwest Airlines Co.
    also had a profit. US Airways
    Group Inc., JetBlue Airways
    Corp. and Alaska Air Group
    Inc. were to report their
    results on Thursday.

    There has been concern
    that one or two major carri-
    ers might not make it past ear-
    ly next year if the economy
    doesn’t improve or weakens
    further. Investors have been
    paying close attention to air-
    lines’ cash positions.

    Delta had $5.4 billion in
    unrestricted cash as of June
    30, though it expects that to
    fall to $5 billion by the end of
    September. AirTran, a much
    smaller carrier with fewer
    financial obligations, ended
    the second quarter with $389.4

    LEGAL NOTICE

    NOTICE

    INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
    (No.45 of 2000)

    In Voluntary Liquidation

    Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
    the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
    WOODLANDS HOLDINGS LTD. is in dissolution. Salwa
    Bahey El-Din Mounib El-Sayed is the Liquidator and can
    be contacted at Zahran Plaza, 3rd Floor, 7th Circle, P.O. Box
    140825, Amman 11814, Jordan. All persons having claims
    against the above-named company are required to send their
    names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
    Liquidator before the 20th day of August, 2009.

    —
    . et

    yin ed:

    Sales Fsbey ELDin Mirenib El Sped

    L quidates

    LEGAL NOTICE

    NOTICE

    INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
    (No.45 of 2000)

    In Voluntary Liquidation

    Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
    the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
    WOODLANDS MARKETING LTD. is in dissolution.
    Salwa Bahey El-Din Mounib El-Sayed is the Liquidator and
    can be contacted at Zahran Plaza, 3rd Floor, 7th Circle, P.O.
    Box 140825, Amman 11814, Jordan. All persons having claims
    against the above-named company are required to send their
    names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
    Liquidator before the 20th day of August, 2009.

    rs
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    million in unrestricted cash.

    “We may face some tough
    choices,” Delta CEO Richard
    Anderson said during a con-
    ference call with analysts and
    reporters.

    He didn’t offer specifics, but
    Anderson said the carrier’s
    responsibility is to “continue
    to maximize the revenue
    across our business.” Chief
    Financial Officer Hank Hal-
    ter told workers in a memo
    that given the current envi-
    ronment the airline can’t guar-
    antee there won’t be involun-
    tary furloughs of frontline
    employees.

    Delta executives said they
    don’t expect any meaningful
    recovery for the remainder of
    the year, and they also don’t
    expect to be profitable for
    2009.

    The Atlanta-based compa-
    ny has already cut 11 per cent
    of its workforce over the last
    year, on a combined basis
    including Northwest Airlines,
    executives said. Delta has
    offered voluntary programs in
    the previous rounds of cuts.

    Although AirTran’s parent,
    Orlando, Fla.-based AirTran
    Holdings Inc., reported a prof-
    it, revenue fell almost 13 per
    cent. AirTran hasn’t been
    immune to the industry’s
    woes, as more travelers fly less
    and take fewer business trips
    amid the weak economy.

    “The consumer is pinched,
    and now the consumer is look-
    ing for deals,” AirTran CEO
    Bob Fornaro told The Asso-
    ciated Press.

    AirTran, like other carriers,
    has cut capacity, sold and
    deferred aircraft and unwound
    fuel hedges. However, its
    capacity reductions have been
    smaller than at other carriers,
    and it has been adding service
    in some areas, including Mil-
    waukee. It also has installed
    Wi-Fi connectivity on all of
    its planes.

    Delta shares fell 12 cents,
    or two per cent, to $5.94 in
    afternoon trading, while Air-
    ‘Tran shares rose 85 cents, or
    14.8 per cent, to $6.60.

    Airlines, despite some suc-
    cess increasing fares recently,
    have had to significantly dis-
    count seats at times and offer
    deals for business travelers to
    lure passengers during the
    summer, which is usually a
    busy time for carriers. Add-
    on fees also have been a key
    revenue source for the air-
    lines.

    As the industry heads into
    its slow period in the fall,
    some airlines may be forced
    to make deeper cuts or gener-
    ate new sources of revenue.
    Delta already plans to cut
    international capacity by 15
    per cent starting in Septem-
    ber.

    Delta’s loss for the second
    quarter was equivalent to 31
    cents a share, compared to a
    loss of $1.04 billion, or $2.64 a
    share, a year earlier when
    Delta recorded a big non-cash
    charge related to the decline
    in the carrier’s market value.

    Excluding merger-related
    expenses, Delta would have
    lost $199 million, or 24 cents a
    share, in the latest quarter.
    The airline said it would have
    posted a profit of $191 million
    if it were to also exclude $390
    million in fuel hedge losses.

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    THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 5B

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    SECURITIES COMMISSION
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    PUBLIC NOTICE

    23â„¢ July 2009

    » LTD

    No. 4 of 2009

    Re: MELLOR HOLDIN

    This NOTICE is issued by the Securities Commission of The Bahamas (“the
    Commission”) pursuant to Section 4(2) of the Securities Industry Act, 1999
    (“the Act”).

    It has been brought to the attention of the Commission that the above named
    company may be carrying out activities that are registrable under the Act.

    The general public is HEREBY ADVISED that neither Mellor Holdings Ltd.,
    its agents nor its consultants are registrants of the Securities Commission nor
    have they made application for registration with the Commission. Therefore,
    any conduct of registrable securities business by this company, its agents or
    consultants in or from this jurisdiction is a violation of the Act. Further, if this
    company in any way holds itself out as fully compliant and bona fide persons
    operating in the securities industry from this jurisdiction, it has committed an
    offence and is liable for criminal prosecution and/or regulatory sanctions under
    the relevant laws of The Bahamas.

    Background

    Mellor Holdings Ltd. appears to be a company engaged in providing investment
    services to the public. The company operates a website at
    www.mellorholdings.com., The website claims that the company is located in

    The Bahamas at:

    P.O. Box CB - 14076

    14 South Buckner Square
    Old Towne, Sandyport
    New Providence, Bahamas.

    The Commission advises that there is no company named Mellor Holdings
    Ltd. operating from that address. Further, the company is holding itself out as
    duly incorporated in this jurisdiction. The Commission advises that while there
    is evidence of an entity named Mellor Holdings Limited incorporated in this
    jurisdiction, this entity has been struck from the Register of Companies since
    January Ist, 1993. Further, the Commission advises that the Bahamian Certificate
    of Incorporation displayed on the Mellor website appears to be fraudulent.

    Anyone desirous of conducting securities business with Mellor Holdings
    Ltd. its agents, or its consultants, should be cognizant that they are doing
    so with an unregulated entity and individuals. You are therefore strongly
    urged to conduct full and proper due diligence and exercise the utmost
    caution before engaging in transactions with the above named company,
    its agents or its consultants.

    Anyone who is already involved in transactions with the above named company,
    its agents or its consultants and is concerned about these transactions should
    contact Ms. Mechelle Martinborough, Secretary & Legal Counsel at the
    Securitics Commission of The Bahamas at telephone number 356-6291/2 or
    in writing to P.O. Box N-8347, Nassau, The Bahamas or via ¢-mail:
    info @sch.gov.bs.



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    THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 7B

    Bahamas firm wins $40k grant from IDB

    A BAHAMIAN compa-
    ny/entrepreneur is among the
    10 award winners selected
    from 580 submissions by
    Caribbean firms to receive a
    $40,000 investment grant
    from the Inter-American
    Development Bank’s (IDB)
    Multilateral Investment Fund
    (MIF).

    Organisers confirmed in a
    statement that country-level
    winners have been selected
    for the 2009 Pioneers of Pros-
    perity Caribbean Awards
    Competition.

    A ceremony to honour
    their achievement is sched-
    uled to be held today.

    Ten winners and five hon-
    ourable mentions were select-
    ed from across the
    Caribbean. These firms
    emerged from a pool of 580
    small to medium-sized firms
    (SMEs) that applied to the
    programme.

    Winners at the country lev-
    el will receive a $40,000 grant

    from the MIF to invest in
    training and technical infra-
    structure for their company,
    and are automatically entered
    into the regional competition
    for a chance to win an addi-
    tional $60,000 and the presti-
    gious title of Pioneer of Pros-
    perity Caribbean.

    Honourable mentions will
    receive a similar grant of
    $10,000.

    Winning firms will also be
    connected to a global net-
    work of technical expertise,
    potential investors, and other
    cutting-edge entrepreneurs.

    All 10 winners will travel
    to Jamaica to compete for
    three regional prizes.

    Bruce Golding, Prime Min-
    ister of Jamaica, will host the
    final awards ceremony on
    September 11, 2009.

    The Pioneers of Prosperi-
    ty Awards Programme is an
    initiative made-up of region-
    al competitions spanning the
    Caribbean, Africa and Cen-

    0 cal

    tral America.

    Seven countries participat-
    ed in the inaugural Caribbean
    competition: Bahamas, Bar-
    bados, Belize, Guyana, Haiti,
    Jamaica, Trinidad and Toba-
    go.

    The programme seeks to
    inspire a new generation of
    entrepreneurs in emerging
    economies by identifying,
    rewarding and promoting
    outstanding small to medium-
    size businesses, who will serve
    as role models to their peers.

    The programme is spon-
    sored by the Multilateral
    Investment Fund of the Inter-
    American Development
    Bank, the John Templeton
    Foundation, and the Social
    Equity Venture Fund
    (S.E.VEN Fund).

    The Pioneers of Prosperity
    programme was conceived
    and initiated by Michael Fair-
    banks, a recognised thought
    leader in the area of enter-
    prise solutions to poverty.

    VACANCY

    General Counsel

    A vacancy exists at The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited and Port Group

    Limited for the position of General Counsel.

    d and suitably qualified individuals to fill this

    resp

    of The Grand Bahama

    lity of the overall direction and management o
    Port Authority, Limited and Port Group Limited, and:

    Applicants are inv

    ed from
    on, with the primary

    the Legal Department

    d head strategic and tactical legal initiatives for the Group o f

    COrmborate F

    matters requiring legal suppeart

    Obtain and ow

    k of outside counsel

    Provide senior management with effective legal opinians on company

    and implementation

    Boron all major business transactio

    contracts

    Play a key role in managing risk and helping to make

    and in négohating critical

    ound business decisions

    Develop and implement all legal and corporate governance policies

    etary and participate in meetings of the Board of

    KNOWLEDGE AND QUALIFICATIONS

    Judicial degree along with international expert

    15 or more years «

    Combined in-he

    Strong transactional and general business and commercial law experience,
    néluding drafting and me

    Significant intellectual pre

    Experience in both public and global companies

    Results-oriented, with skills to influence change and drive compliance

    Strang presentation and r

    judgment, and outsta

    ohation skills

    4 Ls ireess

    instinets and

    communication skills

    Creative and flexible problem-solving skills

    Ability and interpe

    al skills to relate with internal and external custar
    including government, business professionals, the community, corporate
    executives and managers, and contribute to strategic planning.

    USSR ee ORR a Pen eRe Ee |e
    SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS TO GENERALCOUNSEL@GBPA.COM
    ee ee ee

    P, 0. BOX F-42666

    DOC Pere mee) LE


    PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE





    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

    IN THE SUPREME COURT



















    IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
    comprising the Eastern portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21)
    containing 26,120 square feet and originally granted to Crispin
    Benjamin and being Crown Grant A4-63 situate Two thousand feet
    east of Gladstone Road in the Gladstone Road Crown Allotments in
    the Western District of the Island of New Providence

    2008

    CLE/QuI/No.001 64

    IN THE MATTER OF THE Quieting Title Act, 1959






























    IN THE MATTER OF THE Petition of
    JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS



    AND

    NOTICE

    ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising the Eastern
    portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21} containing 26,120 square
    eet and originally granted to Crispin Benjamin and being Crown
    Grant A4-63 situate Two thousand feet east of Gladstone Road in
    he Gladstone Road Crown Allotments in the Western District of the
    sland of New Providence which said piece parcel or lot of land
    is bounded NORTHWARDLY by Lot Number Twenty-Two (22}
    originally granted to Francis A. Garraway and running thereon Five
    hundred and Seventy-Seven and Eighty-Five hundredths (577.85)
    eet EASTWARDLY by Lot Number Twenty-Six (26) originally
    granted to Rhonda Louis Wallace Wildgoose and running thereon
    Six hundred and Thirty-Four and Sixty hundredths (634.60) feet

    FROM page 1B

    quest-Garcia of Rachel's Bou-
    tique, Basheva Eve of La Mai-
    son de Besh, and Sabrina Fran-
    cis of SE'B Fashions.

    They will use Androsia and
    Bahama Hand Prints for their
    creations, which will be worn
    by the Miss Universe contes-
    tants at the fashion show,
    scheduled for Wednesday,
    August 12, at the Sheraton Nas-
    sau Beach Resort.

    Acknowledging that the
    immense international media
    interest surrounding the Miss
    Universe event would provide a
    further stepping stone for the
    fledgling Bahamian fashion
    design industry to showcase its
    talents to buyers and merchan-
    disers around the world, Mr
    Bethel told Tribune Business
    yesterday: “It will certainly
    bring to light that, yes, there is
    a local industry here.

    “Tt is critical that we are able

    he Petition of JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS of Cambridge
    Drive, South Beach in the Southern District of the Island of New
    Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
    Bahamas, in respect of:-

    SOUTHWARDLY by a Thirty (30) feet wide Road Reservation
    known as and called “Rocky Pine Road" separating it from Lot






    Number Twenty (20) originally granted to Herbert Cleveland
    Walkine and running thereon Five hundred and Seventy-Seven

    and Eighty-Five hundredths (577.85) feet and SOUTHWARDLY
    by the Western Portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21) originally






    granted to Crispin Benjamin and running thereon Six hundred and
    Thirty-Four and Sixty hundredths (634.60) feet; which said piece

    parcel or lot of land has such position shape marks and dimensions
    as are more particularly described and delineated on the diagram
    or plan attached hereto and thereon coloured GREEN








    JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS, claims to be the beneficial

    owner in fee simple in possession of the parcel of land hereinbefore
    described and such ownership arise by virtue of possession of the



    said land.

    Copies of the filed plan may be inspected during normal office

    hours at:-

    The Registry of the Supreme Court, Anasbacher House, East Street.
    Nassau, Bahamas;

    The Chambers of Richard L. Boodle & Co., 3% Floor, Columbus

    House, East & Shirley Streets, Nassau, Bahamas

    Notice is hereby given to any person(s} wishing to make a claim
    shall do so by filing an Adverse Claim in the Supreme Court and

    serving such Statement on the Petitioners or his Attorneys by the
    30" day after the last day on which on which this Notice appears

    in the daily papers. Failure by any person to file and serve a

    statement of such claim on or before the said date will operate as
    a bar to such claim.

    RICHARD L. BOODLE & CO.

    52wk-Low
    1.28

    6.94
    0.63
    3.15
    2.14

    2.74
    5.50
    1.27
    1.32
    6.60
    10.00
    10.35
    4.95
    1.00
    0.30
    5.50
    10.40

    0.00 10.00

    52wk-Hi
    000.00
    000.00
    000.00
    000.00

    52wk-Low
    1000.00
    1000.00
    1000.00
    1000.00

    52wk-Hi 52wk-Low

    14.25

    6.00

    0.20



    29.00
    0.40

    52wk-Low
    1.3231
    2.8952
    1.4031
    3.1031
    12.3289
    100.0000
    93.1992
    1.0000

    Richard LL, Boodle & Co.

    Counsels ¢ Attorneys-At-Law
    Chambers,
    3" Floor, Columbus House
    East & Shirley Street

    Attorneys for the Petitioner

    ROYAL @FIDELITY

    Maney at Work

    Security
    Abaco Markets
    Bahamas Property Fund
    Bank of Bahamas
    Benchmark
    Bahamas Waste
    Fidelity Bank
    Cable Bahamas
    Colina Holdings
    Commonwealth Bank ($1)
    Consolidated Water BDRs
    Doctor's Hospital
    Famguard
    Finco
    FirstCaribbean Bank
    Focol ($)
    Focol Class B Preference
    Freeport Concrete
    ICD Utilities
    J. S. Johnson
    Premier Real Estate

    BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

    Security
    Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
    Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
    Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
    Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

    Symbol
    Bahamas Supermarkets
    Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
    RND Holdings

    ABDAB
    RND Holdings

    Fund Name
    CFAL Bond Fund
    CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
    CFAL Money Market Fund
    Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
    Fidelity Prime Income Fund
    CFAL Global Bond Fund
    CFAL Global Equity Fund
    CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

    to showcase we have a diversi-
    ty of talent and designers here
    in the fashion industry. It is crit-
    ical that other designers, other
    than those selected, come up
    to the mark and make every
    effort to market their designs.
    The more that we have putting
    out and producing quality prod-
    ucts for purchase, the better will
    be for the industry.”

    Urging Bahamian fashion
    designers to exploit the invest-
    ment incentives available to
    them under existing legislation,
    Mr Bethel added: “As a for-
    eign exchange earner, it’s [the
    fashion industry] certainly
    something the Government
    should encourage and ensure
    there’s adequate incentives to
    encourage Bahamian designers
    to develop their works and
    develop some manufacturing
    capabilities.”

    Mr Bethel acknowledged
    that because of this nation’s rel-
    atively high operating and

    NOTICE

    ALL ENTRANCES
    to the grounds of
    ST. FRANCIS XAVIER
    CATHEDRAL
    WILL BE CLOSED

    To retain ownership rights
    between the hours of
    6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

    MONDAY,
    AUGUST 3rd, 2009.

    E &

    CFAL

    BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

    MONDAY, 20 JULY 2009
    BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.86] CHG 0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -141.50 | YTD % -8.26
    FINDEX: CLOSE 786.23 | YTD -5.83% | 2008 -12.31%

    WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

    Previous Close

    1.39

    6.94
    0.63
    3.15
    2.37

    2.74
    5.64
    2.98
    1.82
    6.60
    10.90
    10.38
    5.03
    1.00
    0.30
    5.50
    10.40
    10.00

    Symbol
    FBB17
    FBB22
    FBB13
    FBB15

    Today's Close
    1.39

    Change
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.02
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00

    Daily Vol.

    6.94
    0.63
    3.15
    2.37

    2.74
    5.64
    3.00
    1.82
    6.60
    10.90
    10.38
    5.03
    1.00
    0.30
    5.50
    10.40
    10.00

    Last Sale
    100.00
    100.00
    100.00
    100.00

    Change Daily Vol.
    0.00

    0.00

    Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

    Bid $
    7.92
    4.00
    0.35

    Ask $
    8.42
    6.25
    0.40

    Last Price
    14.60
    6.00
    0.35

    Weekly Vol.

    Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

    30.13
    0.45

    31.59
    0.55

    29.00
    0.55

    BISX Listed Mutual Funds

    NAV
    1.3860
    2.8952
    1.4777
    3.1031

    12.9801
    101.6693
    93.1992
    1.0000

    YTD%
    2.40
    -1.52
    3.07
    -8.35
    2.87
    1.10
    -3.33
    0.00

    Last 12 Months
    4.75
    -3.18
    5:31
    -13.82
    5.79
    1.67
    -6.76
    0.00

    Div $

    EPS $

    0.00 7%
    Prime + 1.75%
    0.00 7%
    Prime + 1.75%

    EPS $

    COLON TAL

    Div $
    0.127
    0.992
    0.244

    -0.877

    0.078
    0.055
    1.406
    0.249
    0.419
    0.111
    0.240
    0.420
    0.322
    0.794
    0.332
    0.000
    0.035
    0.407
    0.952
    0.180

    Interest Maturity

    9 October 2017
    9 October 2022
    30 May 2013

    29 May 2015



    Div $
    0.300
    0.480
    0.000

    PIE

    N/M

    N/M
    256.6

    Yield

    0.000
    0.000

    9.03
    261.90
    Yield % NAV Date
    30-Jun-09
    30-Jun-09
    10-Jul-09
    30-Jun-09
    31-May-09
    30-Jun-09
    31-Mar-09
    31-Dec-07

    labour costs, Bahamian design-
    ers would likely have to be
    “realistic and look outside the
    Bahamas for manufacturing”
    of their garments, if they were
    to be competitive on price with
    international rivals.

    The Montaque Group presi-
    dent and chief executive is cur-
    rently organising the second
    annual Islands of the World
    fashion week, to be held from
    November 4-8, 2009, at the
    Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort.

    Mr Bethel told Tribune Busi-
    ness that he was hoping the
    Miss Universe Pageant, and the
    international exposure and
    media interest it generated,
    would “be a catalyst” for
    Islands of the World and other
    events, “setting the stage” for
    them and further development
    of the industry in the Bahamas.

    “We're hoping that the pub-
    licity we gain from Miss Uni-
    verse will certainly increase the
    numbers we had last year,” he
    added of Islands of the World.
    “We’re certainly looking at well
    above 500 travelling in for it
    this year.

    “We are very much ahead in
    the planning stage, and have
    received a significant response
    from designers.” Five Bahami-
    an designers have applied to be
    showcased at Islands of the
    World to date, with another
    three seeking to enter the ‘next
    generation’ category. There
    were no Bahamians in that last
    year.

    Mr Bethel told Tribune Busi-
    ness that he wanted to limit
    Islands of the World to a max-
    imum of between 20-25 design-
    ers this year, “to make sure the
    quality and standard is much
    higher”. Some 30 applications
    in total - Bahamian and foreign
    - have been received so far.

    Proving that Islands of the
    World had worked as an expo-
    sure platform, Mr Bethel said
    he had received reports that
    three designers who exhibited
    at last year’s inaugural event
    had received “significant con-
    tracts” - one with Top Shop in
    the UK, and the others with

    Designers must ‘come up to mark’ to maximise Miss Universe exposure

    specialist boutiques.

    As for Miss Universe, Mr
    Bethel said that “on a broader
    scale” it provided an opportu-
    nity to market the Bahamas in a
    “different light than our sun,
    sand and sea,” as it showcased a
    different product from that
    which normally received expo-
    sure.

    Ticket sales for the Pageant,
    now in their second week, had
    started slowly, Mr Bethel said,
    but were picking up in line with
    increased publicity. “Atlantis is
    reporting that they’re getting a
    very good response to ticket
    sales from online channels,” he
    added.

    “We anticipate that as it
    draws closer to the end of the
    month, and pay day comes, we
    will see Bahamians coming in
    and buying tickets to be part of
    the event.”

    Also featured at the Miss
    Universe Pageant’s Fashion
    Show will be Bahamian design-
    er Brynda Knowles, who will
    design the evening's outfits for
    the reigning Miss Universe,
    Dayana Mendoza.

    Ms Mendoza will share the
    stage as co-host of the event
    with Charles Sealey.

    The newly-crowned Miss
    Universe will receive an outfit
    created by Bahamian designer
    Jeff St. John, of the House of
    St. John, which she will wear
    at her press briefing on the
    morning after her crowning.
    She will also receive a specially-
    crafted bag from Harl Taylor
    BAG.

    Mr Bethel said: “Not only is
    this significant as the first time
    that the Bahamas is hosting the
    Miss Universe Pageant, but also
    because the fashion show will
    feature another aspect of the
    islands’ creativity and culture
    as displayed in fashion.

    “This will certainly have the
    potential of catapulting the
    local fashion industry into the
    international spotlight. It is
    important for other designers
    and novices to take advantage
    of this and continue to build on
    the opportunity.”

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

    IN THE SUPREME COURT

    Probate Side

    IN THE ESTATE OF RUPERT A.R. CULMER,
    late of No. 3 Imperial Park,

    in the Eastern District of New

    Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

    NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any
    claim or demand against the above Estate are required to
    send the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned
    on or before the 20th August, 2009 after which date the
    Executrix will proceed to distribute the assets having
    regard only to the claims of which she shall then have had

    notice.

    AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all persons
    indebted to the said Estate are requested to make full
    settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

    JOSEPH C. LEDEE
    Chambers
    Suite No. 6, Grosvenor Close
    Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas
    Attorney for the Executrix

    (July 9, 16, 23)

    Temple Christian High School
    Shirley Street

    Invites applications from qualified Christian for the following posi-
    tions for the 2009 - 2010 School Year.

    Dean of Students

    Applicants must:

    A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing to
    subscribe to the statement of Faith of Temple Christian

    School.

    B. Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or Higher from
    a recognized College or University.

    C. Possess excellent organization, Inter-personal

    communicative skills.

    D. Be able to assist with all aspect of the Administration.

    E. Be able to discipline, counsel students.

    F. Have high morals standards.

    Application must be picked up at the High School Office
    on Shirley Street 23rd July, 2009 and be returned with
    the following: a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
    photograph, church affiliation, pastor’s name and three
    references to:

    9.0775
    1.0000
    1.0000
    1.0000

    9.2765
    1.0622
    1.0243 -0.84
    1.0585 2.04
    MARKET TERMS

    YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

    Bid § - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

    Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

    Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

    Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

    EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.

    NAV - Net Asset Value.

    NIM - Not Meaningful

    FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

    2.00
    2.56

    -2.98
    6.22
    2.43
    5.85

    30-Jun-09
    30-Jun-09
    30-Jun-09
    30-Jun-09

    Fidelity International Investment Fund
    FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
    FG Financial Growth Fund

    FG Financial Diversified Fund

    BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
    352wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.
    52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
    Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
    Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
    Change - Change in closing price from day to day
    Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
    DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
    P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
    (S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
    (31) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
    TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

    Mr. Neil Hamilton
    The Principal
    Temple Christian High School
    P.O. Box N-1566
    Nassau, Bahamas
    Deadline for application is July 30th, 2009


    THE TRIBUNE



    po BUSINESS
    $3.5-4m spend for AML

    Foods’ latest format

    FROM page 1B

    five months with an 11 per cent
    increase last month.

    Gavin Watchorn, the com-
    pany’s president and chief exec-
    utive, unveiled the details on
    the company’s financial perfor-
    mance as it gears up for an
    almost $4 million investment
    project in western New Provi-
    dence with its new format,
    Solomon’s Fresh Food Market,
    set to be the anchor tenant in a
    new Town Centre project.

    Speaking at Abaco Markets’
    Annual General Meeting, Mr
    Watchorn revealed the compa-
    ny's investment in the high-
    end store had been pegged at
    between $3.5-$4 million invest-
    ment.

    Despite the state of the glob-
    al economy and the teetering
    financial sector, Mr Watchorn
    suggested that now was as good
    a time as any for the new pro-
    ject.

    This suggests management
    remains confident in the con-
    tinued recovery of the BISX-
    listed company, which expects
    the 2010 second quarter results
    to look much like the first quar-
    ter’s. It expects to pay the
    $600,000 debt remaining with
    the Royal Bank of Canada.

    "IT am very pleased with the
    progress so far this year,” said
    Mr Watchorn.

    Abaco Markets has been
    working towards reversing its
    net overdraft position of recent
    years to end the 2010 first quar-
    ter with a 127,000 net cash posi-
    tion. The overdraft facility
    reduction saw interest costs
    drop by 25 per cent, while the
    company paid down a further
    $500,000 of the debt owed to
    Royal Bank.

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

    IN THE SUPREME QOURT

    Some $400,000 of that debt
    repayment came from the pro-
    ceeds raised by selling the
    equipment and inventory from
    the former Cost-Right Abaco
    store, with the actual property
    leased to Price Right partners,
    Rupert Roberts and Chad
    Sawyer.

    "We're going to focus on
    continued work into improving
    liquidity so we can get back to
    different things," said Mr
    Watchorn.

    The company will also invest
    $418,000 to acquire 15,000
    square feet of property adja-
    cent to the Solomon's Super-
    Centre Freeport location. The
    newly acquired land will ini-
    tially be used for parking with a
    long-term view for store expan-
    sion.

    The company formalised sig-
    nificant changes to its Board on
    Tuesday night, with Craig
    Symonette and Frank Crothers
    stepping down as chairman and
    vice-chairman respectively after
    20 years of service. Former
    Bahamas Chamber of Com-
    merce president, Dionisio
    D’ Aguilar, was voted in as
    chairman and Robert ‘Sandy’
    Sands as vice-chairman. Mr
    Watchhorn was formally
    named chief executive.

    With the turnaround of Aba-
    co Markets financials came the
    need to renivent the company,
    leading to shareholders giving
    their consent to the name
    change to AML Foods.

    The company has been
    proactive in training manage-
    ment for its new store locations,
    lamenting the difficulty of find-
    ing local management talent.

    "So far we have three inter-
    nal candidates," said Mr
    Watchorn.

    2007

    COMMON LAW AND BOUITY DIVISION

    BETWEEN

    CLEAGEN M1033

    BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

    Piainift

    AND
    STEPHEN FRITAGERALD FARROW

    De fenclant

    ADVERTISEMENT OF SERVICE OF SUMMONS

    ANDI! EOF A

    IRNED HEARIN

    TAKE NOTICE that it has been ordered by Ms. Marilyn Meeres,
    Deputy Registrar of the Supreme Court on the Suh day of March,
    A_D., 2009 that service of the Summons and the Notice of Adjourned
    Heanng in the said action be effected on you by this advertisement,

    Dated this 25th day of June, A.D., 2009,

    GIBSON, RIGHY & Ca.
    CHAMBERS
    Ki-Malex House
    Dowdeswell Street
    Nassau, The Bahamas

    Attomeys for the Plaintiff

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

    IN THE SUPREME OOURT

    2007

    COMMON LAW AND BOUITY DIVISION

    BETWEEN

    CLEGEN 1033

    BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

    AND
    STEPHEN FRITAGERALD FARROW

    Plaimentt

    Defendant

    SUMMONS

    LET ALL PARTIES concerned attend before Deputy Registrar
    Meeres of the een Court, Supreme Court Building, Bank Lane,

    Nassau. The Ba

    hamas on Monday the 11th day of August, A.D..

    2008 at 12:45 o"DSclock in the afternoon for the hearing of an
    applieabon on the part of the Plant for an Oriler tor leave to enter

    Judgment in Default of Appearance pursuant to Order 73 of the
    Rules of the Supreme Court for the amount claimed in the Statement

    of Claim with imberest,

    as therein claimed and costs.

    TARE NOTICE that a party intending te oppose this application

    of lo apply for a stay of execution should send to the

    ainuill's

    party or its Attorneys to reach them mot leas than three (3) days
    before the date abowe mentioned a copy of any Adtidavit intended

    to be used.

    Dated this 20th day of June, A.D. 2008,

    REGISTRAR

    To: Stephen Freeper Fanowsor his Counsel

    Seabreeze Lane
    Meeecau, Tha: Fealiaeticrs

    The Defendane

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

    IN THE SUPREME COURT

    Ciihsom Righy a Co.
    Chambers

    Fai-Msiles, Hicaisa:
    Devwedeswell Street
    Nassau. The Bahamas

    Anonmeys For the Plamailt

    aT

    COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION

    BETWEEN

    CLEAGENM1O33

    BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

    Plain!

    AND
    STEPHEN FRITAGERALD PARROW

    Defendant

    SOTICE OF ADJOURNED HEARING.

    TAKE NOTICE that the Sammons filed on the 25th day of June,
    AD. 2008 and set dean to be heard on Monday the 11th day af
    August, A.D., 2008 at 1245 oDSclock in the aftemoon will now
    be heard before Deputy Registrar Meeres of the Supreme Court,
    Amshkacher Building, Bank Lane, Nassau, The Bahamas on Thursday
    the Sth day of July, A.D, 2009 ot 12:00 o"DSclock in the afternoon.

    Dated this 20th day of March, A.D., 2009,
    REGISTRAR

    This notice was taken out by Messrs. Gibson, Rigby & Co.
    Chambers, Ki-Malex House, Dowdeswell Street, Nassau, The
    Bahamas, Attorneys for the Plaimul?,

    (Ty. 6 9)



    RBC
    FINCO



    THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 9B

    June 2009

    Contact Numbers 393-2004

    PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

    HOUSES

    Lot #4, Jacaranda Subdivision, 6.P
    2 Rekoors, 7 Radhroeonis

    Property Size: 11224 sg

    Butiding Size: | 19 sn fi

    Apprnsad Valor: $7710.00

    Travel south from the round-about, where West Bay Strect
    ara] JFK Drive, (eres of Aicport and aoth of Lyfied Cay) to
    the fing ead on the el; the enirasse dwaraada Sebvbaision,
    Take a left at the T-junction, then the first right onto Jacaranda
    court. The subject property is the last an fhe mgai peered
    White rift Hae,

    Parcel of Land Boner Stroet Foo: Hill, §.P
    Siagle Funaily Reader:

    (3) Bedroom, (1) Bathroom

    Property Stee) on. ft

    Buihding Size: 1,014.59 ft

    Appraised Value: 911500000

    Fron Fire Hill Riteal tem onto Romer Sina }Chunch CW Gi
    Prophecy and Foo Hill Community Ceawre juneion) navel
    east east on Romer Sirect inthe third commer on the night
    trv south to the Givarth borer oe the [ef whack tat adead
    ef The subject Bo aplin level residence padmied blue and
    trimmed white ai a tiled entrance patio

    Lote 300s, Ser Lisden Pindliag Eotaies, iP
    Single Family Residenoo

    1 Rekoom, 2 uthreaen

    Pri Siac 3/000 ag.

    Building Size: 1.15) soft

    Appensed Valor: $164,000,00

    From: Chorks Saunders Higheay emer Sir Lynden Pindling
    Estates and travel south on Lenty Marguerite Pindling Aeeee

    to he second acer on the eaves Sireet) carve] ca on
    Lanren street to the second corner on lefi (Peor Tree Avene,
    Travel nari on Pear Tree Avenue te the subiect, fie fiflrenth
    prayer cen Che: eal, The sare is lie green terre] abhi,

    Lote}, Done Joteson Estas
    Single Fusily Reader
    Sedrooms, 2 Bohesors
    Property Stee: §,065 aq.fi
    Bouildinng Sive: | 684 sg fl
    Appraised Vilue: $100 245,00

    From (iadkione: Road teree] exe along Rocky Ping Rice fier
    appecad mately 1,444 [eet and tern left on Dame Darts
    dere then 2nd lett and the sobject property is the died from
    come,

    Lote 33754 Sir Lynden Pindling Estates, 4.P
    Single Family Reackre:

    3 Beakoors, T Rathrosns

    Property Stee: 4,300 sq.ft

    Building Size: | 150 og

    Appraaad Vile: 5161000.00

    From East Street 4 Eamon Goukeeard {sonih beach Police
    Stvion) awe) cat on Hara bi Rorakevard oy the neta-ahel
    continue traveling eastward on CW Saunders Highway take
    the second right, Lady Margucritie Findling Avenue, tea
    tale ee fired Left, Lauren Street anal the: subject property i
    the aateeath bet oa the night

    Liow¥d], Fesukil: Sutil vidire, MP,
    aiagle Family Residence

    1 fhecoors, 2 Hathrooms
    Proqutty Sime 6109 Ao 7
    Building Size: 1.247 3
    Apprased Value: 191, m0

    From Fos Hall Read aad Bernard Read gavel weal on
    Berard Atoad, tales the first heft Foo: Drive then the third right
    Sparrow Lane and the subject praperty i dhe bast on the beh

    TTB Pratts Clone Subdiwiaion, NP
    Sige Fer Resdinas
    ~ Redinenta, 2 - Aalirocens

    Sine tie
    be ing Size: 1.20
    Appraned Value: $150,500
    From Carmichael and Golden [sles Roads travel south to the
    Ub [iret comer on the comer on the kell anal the abe jot
    peaperty bi the ah om che right, Mae om obite

    Lig#2] Madeoln Rica) East
    Single Furaily Rewdence

    2 Redoora, 2 Bathrooms
    Proqurty Sine: 6/000 ag.
    Building Size: Hiv sg tt
    Acppransed value: $129 2000 00

    From Faw Sire Sauth - rive a dina Mad oolit Rial
    nd tum nigat on Wander Terrace to the dest road on the
    left contivae fer about 200 6 and the subject property is on
    the left

    Lotd- (CH West of Hine Hal Heigl:

    Property Sine: 43560 sa ft

    Apprmsad Valo: $25, 000,00

    Prom Blue Hill Road ond Indepeadenc Highoay west along
    Torque Williams Dering Higheay aad fm lef on Preston:
    Avveree [Farnaly Creazdian oa comer, cintitae dee Premakct’s
    Avenue into “Pride Estate and cum right on the first cul-de-
    — the sebject peoperty ts directly ahead throug 3 track
    rie

    Lott], Lower Bogee: Biouthers
    Veer! lind

    my Sine: 10TH sg. ft
    Append Valor: $46,000.00
    Trevel westward om Skyline ind Menhawund Bay Smet
    the subject is the firs vacami land afier Save Mare Drug
    Stare on ie gh bed side,

    Lote F2) West Winds Subdivision, WP
    Vac! Land

    Single Family Residence

    Lide?d, Fairview Sublivaion

    4 Becbooms, 2 Bathroaris

    Property Stee: 6,530) sqft

    Baaikding Sine: O28 wy fl

    Appraised Valoe:$ |i 0001 00

    From Cannictec! Road & Angus Steet, tere! sour on
    Astin Sees, tern right at dhe TJ, 3 Wincor Riel,
    then take the second left into Fair View Heights, Skaureen
    Avene, te fins right, Sharon Coert, and

    subject praperty ts Ge fiest on the lefl,

    Lot 8 Taran bhegits Subdivisem, NP
    Single Fansily Rewdence
    2» Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
    Property Sine: oe
    Bau ikthana Sine: DAT ay. fl
    Appraised Value: 938 42180K)

    Foot Prince: Clerics Drive tree ork along Tyrone Avene
    and the aubject property ies che 2th on the rhuhe after the fret
    comer on the right

    Liat 104% Pinewood Crandon
    Single Funily Readence

    3 ~ Berkusers - 7 Bathrooms
    Property Sime en af
    Bouikchineg: Size: 1525 aa ft
    Apprimied! Valo: $063,700 00

    Prone Pigeon Plum Avenue « torpel wert along Walnut Sect;
    crossover Hey Geranfam Avenee and the sebject peoperty
    is the Ind property en Ge lel,

    Lott], Bik) phase, Faith Gardens

    Single Farsily Redden:

    4 Berbooms, ? Baihroarns

    Property Sine 6/000 59 .ft

    Buihding Sins: 225) 29 M1

    Appraised Value: e304 878.00

    Freon the: traffic Liga of Fath Avera: & Cow Peo Aiea, raved
    ateth aloag Faith Aneaue te che entrance wm Faith Gardens
    tom left and comtiqge to the lad: “T° junction, tum rigid and
    thir subject property inthe [leh on the right

    Single Forily Residence
    Late, Tripical Gardens

    2 Bekeorms, | Bahroors
    Property sine: 7437 9f
    Barihting Size: I, 108 ag. fi
    Apprameed Valoe:$144 ARILO0

    Trevel wert on West Flay Street to the first mad on the bef
    afer posting Trreclers Rest Resarast, Windane Deteg, avd
    south tothe secaad road on the right, Hollyhock

    inveling wesi, the subject porperty is smeeed on the second
    comme oe dhe lef called Parey ime

    Lott, Golden Cater Estates?
    Single Farsilp Rewdkrws:

    (3| Bedroceres, (2) Hathrowens
    Property Sine: 6/00 59 -ft
    Basikhinng Sine: | 68) sa M1
    Appraised Value: $207 00H)

    Travel wet on Carmichac! Fiosd from Hor Hell Read tam

    onto the hind left Gelden Sua Deve the corner after

    ae ae Anglican Church and betore Carmichael Primary
    travel seth om San Dorrvae te thee first, travel weet pase

    the second corner om the rigitl and) the subjest fim property

    on the right The subject is painted white trimmed white.

    Lot loll Fean Sixes, KE Conger Subdivision, MP
    Single Family Residence

    § Hauboorma, 2 Rathroores

    Property Sine 6,161 oy.

    Bauiiding size: 1158 3a ft

    Apprased Value: $2000 H)

    From Ponce Charles Drive, tom into Jean Steet ee! nor
    on Jean Street to ALE. Cooper subdivision continac directly
    inter. E. Cooper Susdivine and the abject is the ninth
    property on the let House be whine trimmed areca.

    Lite? 0] Go lkdes Qeues 22, Sulbelvtaies, AP
    Single Furaily Reddence
    @ [becboorns, 2 Bathrooms
    Property Sins 6/000 sq. fi
    Butidinya Size: 13M 39, f1
    Apprased Value: $058 SMH)

    From Canmiched Read & Antigua Suet (Ciedden Coc,
    Agsem bie Church) tere! on Antigua Street and

    the subject property is. the sicta lot on the right past de first
    corres ot the right.

    Lots, Frelia Subcirvasion, 6.7
    PW CANTLAND OT Fareily Resdkrex:

    Pp VACANTLAND

    bine 14,320
    Appraised Valoe: S27. rae0
    Travel weil on west Bay Steect and tern ints Wee Witak;
    pass Scourity pate and continoe to ‘T junction. Tur lett and
    coring around bend to neat bend cures and the subject
    property about 3,000 tot from beral on left

    Lote 153 West Winds Sabcirvaion, §.P

    Vaca! Land

    Property Sine: 375 59-f

    Apprased Valoe: $075 000)

    Front the: mmersccion of Wel Bay Sreet and Fomander Road
    (Gambier V'lage} travel weet dong West Hay Street and tum
    Deft ca thee Vat tempera! prevvee] ricad/takos Dred bell aafier pink
    security gate thes left again amd the subject propery |s the
    7th on the lef, on ihe curve (bend

    Lit S00, Wee ot Margeld Riowal South of Hanae Road
    Vacant Land
    Property Sine 16,107 ae. fl





    Bedrooms, } Bathrooms
    Property Sine: 5/000 sq. f
    Buiiding Size: 1.20 sg ft
    Appraised Value: $152 00000

    Front Faith Aree aad Fore Tri] eto Faith Avene,
    follow he curee arcand in the rigat (approcc imately fiola
    rile cast of Faith Avera: tobe the firs eff into Frelia
    Sabahivickon, hen the: fire right anal the suhpext propery is
    the lest Loes om the right

    Litt 124 Bel-Air Estates, AP,
    Binge Fesaily Residence

    } Bakoorms, ——
    Property Sine 6000 &
    Building Size: 43
    Appraised Valuer: 15 sah

    From: Comchae Read and Fath Aweaue iavel east on
    Cannichsel Road take the first mai bruana Way then the
    fivarth right, Harbour Chose, andl the debpoet property ia the
    third on the bef

    Lai@)s, BIRAR, Nowe Eat Mirth, MP,

    Siggle Fardily Reddence

    1 fledrooma, ! Bathrooms

    Proqurty Sie: BSES aq.

    Building Size: 2349 29 It

    Apprased Value: £31215.

    Tria eel ot Print Cheles Drie turn leh inn open
    But North; mare! mori to the first comer on the 1

    the subject i fie secang property on the lett on ‘atnoat
    Corner, The gabycet is ponte green inal trirerecal greet,
    houses! 16

    Lit aiaued gorthernade of Vice Se & Laser Ril,
    Ivanhoe Subdivision, MF

    4 Bechoorns, } Bathrooras - Singh Family Residence
    Property Size: 17,651 53, fl
    Buiiding Size: $26 39 ft
    leuael Value: S406 895.

    From: Mackey Street and Wordaor Road (by Wendy's
    Resturant} travel easton Windsor Goad taloe the secod lett to
    Victor Alocsd,, Gen the first night whech te Larscester Aron, the
    subject property bi the first on the lett on the commer.

    Lite lay, Tayren Heights Sebveion
    Richends Deas

    Single Funily Residence

    § Rakeom, 3 Bedroom

    Pr Sine: £000 agi

    Buiiding ingle. 2.418 aut

    Appraised Valec $717 000,00

    Trowel East on Ponce harks. dove to the comer ae o6 Super
    Value ‘Winton fur. right and dhe subject is the second house
    on the Jef. The subjpent @ painted line green aad bere
    white

    Lil hile appricoradety 70 Nl westward of Florida Coat

    Single Farnily Reddence:

    4 [etkoora, ! Bathrooms

    Property Sine 6/000 sq.7i

    Building Size: 1730 59. ft

    Appraised Value: $22 700000

    Trawel east on Haltoer Avenue on fhe fist mght (Along Coan}
    from Florida Court take the first right onto a ii wide mead

    Disereation and the sebjecdt ia the saad house on the lef

    white tinned grey.

    Lote $4 35 Se Lynden Finding Estries
    Smale hy mi Reudkeics:

    4 Bedroom, ? Huchroom

    Property Sto: 5,479 sq.ft

    Fusiiding siz: Wa a

    Appraised value 34 420.00

    Frere dhe nurdbahee! at Pinewieel ch. tel et on Chel.
    W Saunders Haghwey cate Lady Margueric Pindling Avenue,
    trvel south on i Mdargwerric Pindlin:

    Aer ont Launin Street, terre! cast of Lacnen Sieset and
    the subject property i the trenty-ciaht (26) property on the
    left. (painted lime green and trimmed white

    Lore], Victoria Grandens, -P.
    Single fanily Residence

    7 Baloo, pir

    Pr Siac: 6/000 sq
    Bunding Sine: 16 50 og ft
    Appresed Vale: $11 Ea

    Prom JF. Kennedy Dove travel south along Gladstone Re
    and take the first entrance on lef (former Obadstione Fare),
    OonIME Bones the er asd condita to the 'T junctioe;
    tem left, then another left ond the subject property is the dh
    on the right

    Appraised Valee: 140) 00000

    Lott 145 South Seas Subeivisins

    Vacum Land

    Property Sine: 7067 sq.ft

    Apprasal Vale Sh 000

    Poon Carmichael Road tneel south akoae Miller Road (Bacardi
    Road} and turn bef into Southern Secs Diarver pass rough
    socunity gait aad tam right al Ind Comer ( Eacteoedd Direc}
    continu to the T lunction and the sabject property is the Sed
    on the night from the T Junction

    Lote 5 Golden Grates Eouies ¢ 2 NP

    Varn Land
    Papperty Site. 3,736 ag-f
    Appraised Value 55200000

    Trav pe on Cammrecteael Pal (room Biles EVD Pad to thee int
    Fomachwny on he left reared) Ciaadeloape Rl Travel oo the end
    od Ceadeloupe Boad, the bot is om the Merthwest camer.

    APARTMENTS/CONDOMINIUMS

    Lote) Gamble Heights
    Triplex Apartment
    1-1 Bed, | Bath, {27 Bakeries, | Balhroons

    PB Sine 7,750 3g.fi

    Bauikding Size: 2.3459 ft

    Apprneed Vales: 3118, 000.00

    From Aloe Hall Road & Faith United Way, tare! easton
    Faith Uniied Wary and the subject property on Uh right
    hand side, 2000 feet cnet of Fach Leied Cierch and oppose
    abeary equipmerm depot

    Unies, Hillesest Tower Comdomniniam, Mp.
    Cosdominm

    ? Kekoom, 2 Bathe

    Unit Sine: 1,010 sa
    Appraised Value: S60)000000

    Treva stuth on Calin Averee to Third Tetrace term weed on
    third temace and the subject is contained sothin the second
    building on the ght which ta condominium complex. The
    subject copies. The subpart conples is paitied line green
    ond inemed whine.

    Lol? sus in Mae Suivi
    Dupies: Downline Aparment
    Each with 2 Bedroom, | Eurhesom
    Property Sine: §,541 ag. fl
    y Size: | 2 2g ft
    Apprnsed Value: £20097
    Front Fah Aweroc ive weet along Conv Pen Areal aad om
    Fight on the 2nd comer, conmanue along the road reservation
    to the 44 property on the efi

    Lote, Seawell Mdlanor Subdivicion, KP

    Duplex Apartmeti

    = Lait with T Belton, | Rathaeis
    Size 6410 59.

    Balinese |

    Apprnged Valet: $197,557.00

    Prom Carmichael Ad. revel sorth along Gladsiose Bioad and |

    fem-on ie sotond comer on he ight Gieinuy eT jenctim
    eh) com Left, cake: Def tale atber lef and the eabject peperry
    is the 5th on the lett.

    Lote], Billo] |, Millers Heights Subchvision, §.F
    Daples Apariaical
    le? Bedroom, | Buchoom
    | -) Bedrooms. 2 12 Batroones

    Sise: 7.500 ay. fi
    Bailing Size:| 444g 3
    Apprased Valeo: (4 /000,08
    From Cumiched Read wnvelling weet, tum bef oma Exst
    Avenue, tree! sovth on East Avenue to the first comer on
    the right tearee] noret thenage ty Ube: firs) cose on the lef
    (Margaret ApS ee) continue on Marafret Ave pause Tis
    Infersection and the subject tx the fifth property on the right
    Painted mest Gomened peach

    Lote | Kiso] ‘itinds Subdivision, MF

    2 Storey @ Ales Agartnenl

    All ons ore | Bede, | Bacheeon

    Property Sine: 10084 ao fi

    Barikking. Size: 5.237 ag fl

    Appraised Value: S479 7M

    From the intersection of Fox Hill Road and Joe Farringion
    Aid travel seath on Fire il Ril, tabs the Gre corner on the
    Tight and the subject is the second property on the left

    Lit Gaal Windsor Place Sadiber Aicad

    Duples sy

    2 a) Bedovcrs, (|) Bato

    Propesty Sine: 600mg 1

    Building Size: | 79) sg [1

    Appraised Valoe: $1 GH

    Travel Eat on Soldier Rhoad 00 the igiemection aear Sugar
    Kid Beane Food Store turn right and travel to the end of this
    Sreet, across the intersection ai the carve tem cast and ibe
    abject i dhe First property on the bell, wrtaich isa dhiplen. The
    dupes is cecendly painted bee and immed white with
    enclosed fencing.

    Lot Rocky pine Road

    Dples: Apartment

    Each Unit I Beiiroorms, | Rahrooe
    oy Sine 4475 oq ft

    Bari kcing Sie: |7 14 eg. ft

    Appraised Value: £218 000000

    From Canrechad] Road -travel perth along Gbehione Aicad
    io Rocky Fine Rood tare right and contieue: to the third comer,
    tom night end cominue for aboot AIK feet and the subject
    property sen the right ienslounl with a chain ink Geel

    Lote Portion of James Howe Grant bt

    Deples aparinent

    Each with 2 bedinoors, | bation
    property Sime: 45) oy ft

    Bartling Sire: 1315 sql

    Appraised Vidar: $147 4300

    Freon the traffic light at the intersection of Cow hen and Alec
    Fill Rowaks, irievel sivath aboerg, Wee Hall Road andl tern right
    on the first road: the subject property is the comer lot on the
    Jeli.

    Property situated 330 feet south Adelaide & Cord Harhoer
    Dreples: Apartment

    | -4 Hedineaiad, 2 Hatiiven, | - | Roden, | Hawi
    Property Siac 3691 sq.ft

    Buiiding Size: 2000 sy fi

    Appresal Video $295,400

    Travel along Carmichael Road io the roundabout continuc
    weet anio Ade berks Roca term lef at the furth commer which
    WL OeWwly paved enmano: road; continue sooth on this rood
    and the suaject t: fe seventh house on the lett spt bevel
    dle Dimers whi

    Lote 10 & 1) Blot a5 Nassan WGlage Subdivision
    Meli Farsily Reader
    Deples,
    Uni | = 2 Bedrooms | Bathroom
    — =) Beers 7 Aathreeetrs
    Sine: 3000 sqft
    Buin, Size: 204 soft
    Appraisal Valec $236,715.00

    Prom Soldier Road travel south along Taylor Street (entrance
    into Kay Villeee|; cominus across Akecasdna Boulevard
    fal torn left oni Lawton Avenue, thes rah on Jackson
    Smeect and the subject property is ebowi 225 feet on the left.
    Crees iran white

    We providing financing to qualified buyers

    CONTACT INFORMATION

    RBC Royal Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO Loans Collection Centre



    istered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada

    â„¢The Lion & Globe symbol

    and AGG are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada

    RBC
    FNCO
    PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009












































    MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
    DEPARTMENT OF
    ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

    INVITATION FOR TENDERS

    The Government of the Bahamas is inviting tenders
    for the supply of servicing, maintenance and repair
    of tractor equipment, Solid Waste site off Tonique
    Williams-Darling Hwy. (Harold Rd).

    Interested parties may obtain further information
    including eligibility to participate and may collect the
    bidding document upon payment of a non refundable
    fee of fifty dollars ($50.00) as of July 22nd 2009
    from:

    The Department of Environmental Health Services
    Farrington Road

    Nassau, Bahamas

    P. O. Box SS-19048

    Telephone No. (242) 322-8037, Facsimile No. (242)
    322-8073 between the hours of 9:00 A.M. and 5:00
    P.M. Monday to Friday.

    The method of payment will be certified cheque or
    cash. Tenders are to be submitted in triplicate (3) in
    sealed envelope (s) addressed to:

    The Tenders Board

    c/o The Financial Secretary

    Ministry of Finance Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Centre
    P. O. Box N-3017

    Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas

    No later than August 3rd, 2009.

    Tenders will be open at 10:00 A.M. on August 4th
    2009 at the office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of
    Finance.

    THE TRIBUNE

    SINE
    Bahamas First: $11.9m swing

    shows ability to absorb loss

    FROM page 1B

    Meanwhile, Mr Ward con-
    firmed that Bahamas First
    Holdings’ Board of Directors
    was still considering whether
    the company should list its ordi-
    nary shares on the Bahamas
    International Securities
    Exchange (BISX).

    Based on a show of hands, a
    majority of shareholders had
    indicated at Bahamas First’s
    last annual general meeting
    (AGM), for the 2007 financial
    year, that they would like to
    see the company progress to a
    BISX listing. It was felt this
    would boost liquidity in the
    stock, given that Bahamas First
    meets the definition of a public
    company as its stock is widely
    held, yet it is not listed on any
    exchange.

    However, Mr Ward said that
    while the Board continued to
    assess the matter, no timeframe
    for any BISX listing had been
    set at the AGM, which had
    been more “a show of intent”.

    And he added that Bahamas
    First’s main priority had been
    to prepare itself for the rigours
    of the new Domestic Insurance
    Act, which came into effect on
    July 2, 2009, and will be fully
    enforced a year from that date.

    As such, a BISX listing was
    not top of the priority agenda,
    but Mr Ward explained: “We
    continue to discuss it as a
    Board. Not firm decision has
    been made yet, but there was a

    clear indication from the share-
    holder base that this is the
    direction they want to go in.

    “But they want the Board to
    consider all the issues first.
    There was no timeframe estab-
    lished at the AGM. It was real-
    ly a show of intent as opposed
    to a specific timeframe man-
    date.”

    Given the economic down-
    turn and increased difficulty
    many Bahamians are having in
    meeting insurance premium
    payments, Bahamas First’s
    expectations of a decrease in
    gross written premium for 2009
    are in line with the industry
    average, which has forecast a
    drop of between 5-10 per cent.

    Mr Ward said “10 per cent
    is probably larger than you will
    see in our case”, adding: “At
    this early stage, I would sug-
    gest we will be closer to 5 per
    cent than 10 per cent.

    “T think everyone is going to
    show a drop in retentions as a
    result of some persons actively
    deciding not to insure. The
    expectation this year is that per-
    sons will not have the money
    to pay for coverage. Like every
    business, we’re going to see a
    fall-off in new business and
    retentions because the funds to
    pay premiums are not there.”

    The Bahamas First president
    added that one saving factor,
    in cases where assets such as
    real estate and cars were the
    security/collateral for loans, was
    that often the lending institu-
    tions, such as banks, stepped in

    NOTICE

    INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
    No, 45 of 2000

    HAMERSLEY CONSULTING GMBH

    to pay the insurance premiums
    if their clients were unable to
    afford to do so.

    However, he added that now
    “banks are being more selec-
    tive about which clients they do
    that with”.

    Bahamas First has also “sta-
    bilised the operations” at Gen-
    eral Brokers & Agents (GBA),
    an insurance brokerage and
    agency business it took man-
    agement control of in January
    this year, having acquired a 30
    per cent stake in it last year.

    Mr Ward implied that
    Bahamas First would decide by
    year-end whether to purchase
    the remaining 70 per cent stake
    and take complete control at
    GBA, telling Tribune Business:
    “Apart from having to stabilise
    the operations we’ve done
    nothing at this stage, but the
    likelihood is that by year-end
    we will make a strategic deci-
    sion as to what is in our best
    interests there.”

    He added that the stabilisa-
    tion effort had involved “simple
    management disciplines and
    controls”, with GBA having a
    fair net asset value of $899,967
    based on its unaudited finan-
    cials.

    GBA’s total net assets were
    pegged at $1.121 million, with
    $4.853 million in total assets off-
    set by $3.733 million in total
    liabilities. The net asset valua-
    tion was then written down by
    $220,800.

    GBA has substantial receiv-
    ables and payables on its bal-
    ance sheet, with the former
    (money owed to it) written

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

    down from $3.694 million to
    $2.223 million, a $1.471 million
    adjustment. The business also
    owes $3.559 million in accounts
    payables.

    Bahamas First’s 2008 annual
    report also showed that the
    company paid $4.993 million of
    the $5.014 million to acquire
    Carib Insurance Agency as
    goodwill, the net assets standing
    at just $21,032.

    Mr Ward said the consolida-
    tion of Bahamas First’s 100 per
    cent-owned agencies, Carib,
    Moseley Burnside and NUA,
    into one was “going extremely
    smoothly so far. We haven’t
    seen any adverse impact on
    business retention levels.

    “We've seen an increase in
    walk-in customers, based on
    anecdotal evidence, and there’s
    certainly been an increased lev-
    el of traffic at the Harbour Bay
    location.” The three agencies
    are being combined under the
    NUA name.

    “Our core business is oper-
    ating on quite a good level, and
    as the economy recovers we
    expect to see some uptick from
    that. If there’s no catastrophic
    event, we'll be in good shape,”
    Mr Ward added.

    “In terms of the capital base,
    Bahamas First probably has
    more capital in absolute dollar
    terms than any of our competi-
    tors, and in terms of capital to
    net written premium, we figure
    very strongly as either the num-
    ber one or number two. We
    want to leverage that capital
    base to produce more profits
    for the bottom line.”

    2008

    IN THE SUPREME COURT

    COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION

    CLE/IGENIN0443

    The government reserves the right to reject any or all
    Tenders .

    PORT DEPARTMENT

    GOVERNMENT NOTICE
    INVITATION FOR TENDERS

    ADDENDUM

    The Government of The Bahamas is inviting
    tenders for the following Contracted Service for
    the Port Department, Ministry of The
    Environment.

    ¢ The Cleaning of Potters Cay Dock

    Interested parties may obtain further information,
    and may collect the bidding document as of 20th
    July, 2009 from:

    The Port Department
    Prince George Dock
    Nassau, The Bahamas
    Telephone Number: (242) 356-5639

    Between the hours of 9:00a.m. and 5:00p.m.
    Monday through Friday.

    Tenders are to be submitted in Triplicate (3) in
    a sealed envelope(s) Marked "Tender For
    Cleaning of Potters Cay Dock" addressed to:

    The Chairman
    Tenders Board
    Ministry of Finance
    Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Building
    Cable Beach
    P. O. Box N-3017
    Nassau, The Bahamas

    No later thaN 5:00p.m. on the July 27th, 2009.

    Tenders will be opened at 10am on th 28th July,
    2009 at the Office of the Tenders Board, Ministry
    of Finance.

    THE GOVERNMENT RESERVES THE
    RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL
    TENDERS.

    Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
    137 of The Intemational Business Companies Act No.
    45 of 2000, HAMERSLEY CONSULTING GMBH is
    in dissolution. The date of commencement of
    dissolution was the 21st day of July, 2009. Dillon
    Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
    HAMERSLEY CONSULTING GMBH.

    Dillan Dean
    LIQUIDATOR

    a
    1

    GOVERNMENT NOTICE
    MINISTRY OF LABOUR AND
    SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
    DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR

    NOTICE

    Pursuant to Section 21 of the Industrial
    Relation Act Chapter 321 Statute Law of the
    Commonwealth of the Bahamas it is hereby
    ordered that election of officers in the Airport,
    Airline and Allied Workers Union shall take
    place on Tuesday 18th August, 2009 from 9a.m.
    to 5 p.m. at the Bahamas Communications and
    Public Officers Union Hall, Farrington Road.
    The Department of Labour offices in Grand
    Bahama, and all other Family Islands where
    there are Labour Offices namely; Andros,
    Abaco, Bimini, Exuma, and Eleuthera. Where
    there is no Labour Office, voting will take place
    at the Administrator's Office on the Family
    Islands.

    Only members of the Union who are financial as
    of Tuesday 4th August, 2009, shall be eligible to
    vote.

    Signed
    Harcourt V. Brown
    Registrar of trade Union
    The Commonwealth of The Bahamas



    BETWEEN

    BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
    Plaintiff
    AND
    JACQUELINE JOHNSON
    Defendant

    ADVERTISEMENT OF SERVICE OF
    WRIT OF SUMMONS

    TAKE NOTICE that an action has been commenced
    against you in the Supreme Court, Common Law
    and Equity Division, Action No. CLE/GEN/00443
    of 2008 in which the Plaintiff, BANK OF THE
    BAHAMAS LIMITED, has issued a Writof Summons
    out of the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on the
    20th March, 2008 claiming against you the sum of
    $17,476.70 arising from your default of the loan
    granted by the Plaintiff to you on or about the 11th
    August, 2002 in the principal amount of $7,500.00
    and interest at the rate of 15% per annum.

    AND THAT it has been ordered by
    Ms. Marilyn Meeres, Deputy Registrar of the
    Supreme Court on the 17th March, 2009 that
    service of the Writ of Summons in the said
    action on you be effected by this advertisement,

    AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that
    you must within fourteen (14) days from the
    publication of this advertisement inclusive of the
    day of such publication, acknowledge service
    of the said Writ of Summons by completing a
    prescribed form of Acknowledgement of Service
    which may be obtained on requested from the
    Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
    otherwise Judgment may be entered against you.

    Dated this 17th day of March, A.D., 2009

    GIBSON, RIGBY & Co,
    CHAMBERS
    Ki-Malex House
    Dowdeswell Street
    Nassau, The Bahamas

    Attorneys for the Plaintiff


    THE TRIBUNE

    THE WEATHER REPO

    5-Day FORECAST



    ORLANDO

    High: 93° F/34°C Partly sunny with a Partly cloudy. Partly sunny. Mostly sunny with a



















    - bie" thunderstorm. shower possible. t-storm possible. and sunshine, greater the need for eye and skin protection.
    Low: 73° F/23°C ° si ° °
    @ High: 90 High: 92 High: 90 High: 90
    c tat High: 90° Low: 78° Low: 78° Low: 77° Low: 76° Low: 76° see ED
    _TAMPA Le 4 a UE
    High: 91° F/33° C , - 103° F [eer | FL 102-88 F 109°-84° F 107°-81° F 101°-78° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft.
    Low: 77° F/25°C ry r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 9:27 a.m. 30 3:18am. -0.3
    aa @ ’ 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 9:52pm. 3.3 3:29pm. -0.3
    aa a 10:42pm. 31 4:24pm. -0.2
    , ee r Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday Ti11am. 31 453am. 03
    i _ a ABACO Temperature 11:32pm. 29 5:19pm. -0.1
    f 2 Py, High: 91° F/33°C QIN. see seeders eseceee as Coe 93" F/34" C Sunday T204pm. 31 540am. 02
    bs “al anal N eso és LOW eeeeeeeeeeeeee 79° F/26°C OU 6:15pm. 0.0
    a a Low: 81°F/27°C Normal high... eee rstec
    - ; ee Normal low 75° F/24° C
    , Sm @ WEST PALMBEACH a Last year's high... or Fssc | ONT UII
    4 ll High: 90° F/32° C — Last year's lOW oes 80° F/26° C ae re aa can
    ’ Low: 76° F/24° C i ~~ Precipitation = ———————C™s—S—S—S—— Sunrise... 33 am. Moonrise. .... 10 a.m.
    . ‘ a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....cccccscssssesssssssseeen 0.37" Sunset....... 7:59 p.m. Moonset... .. 9:19 p.m.
    alll ; FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT | Year to date 19. First Full Last New
    High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date .......c.ccsecsccsessseeeseeseeee 23.00" : oe =
    Low: 78° F/26°C _— Low: 78° F/26° C ie
    a AccuWeather.com es
    y @ a a Forecasts and graphics provided by oH 5
    , MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 28 = Aug.5 Aug.13 Aug. 20
    7; High: 90° F/32° C EL ELT HERA
    i Low: 79° F/26°C NASSAU eco Fon C
    High: 90° F/32° C oe:
    =a Low: 78° F/26° C
    5 i. @ ere
    KEY WEST a “oe CATISLAND
    High: 90° F/32" C High: 86° F/30° C
    Low: 81° F/27°C — Low: 78° F/26°C
    . oy GREAT EXUMA ot SAN SALVADOR
    all High: 90° F/32° C 5 he 70 E940
    Low: 82°F/28° C feces
    . : Low: 79° F/26° C
    Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | 5 f
    highs and tonights's lows. High: 92° F/33° C —— .
    Low: 80° F/27° C i. . et
    ee r ra
    LONGISLAND
    Low: 79° F/26° C
    Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday MAYAGUANA
    High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W yr" High: 90° F/32° C
    F/C FIC FC FIC FC —F/C FC FIC FC FC Fic FC Low: 76° F/24°C
    Albuquerque 90/32 69/20 t 95/35 69/20 pc Indianapolis 82/27 60/15 t 82/27 67/19 pc Philadelphia 81/27 68/20 t 84/28 68/20 t
    Anchorage 65/18 54/12 ¢ 66/18 55/12 c Jacksonville 94/34 70/21 t 91/382 71/21 t Phoenix 109/42 39/31 t 109/42 39/31 t CROOKED SLAND/ ACKLINS
    Atlanta 88/31 66/18 pc 90/32 67/19 pc Kansas City 88/31 67/19 s 89/31 69/20 pe _Pittsburgh 78/25 60/15 t 80/26 62/16 pc RAGGEDISLAND — igh:91°F/s3°¢
    Atlantic City 79/26 66/18 + 80/26 67/19 t Las Vegas 110/43 84/28 s 109/42 88/31 s Portland, OR 81/27 50/15 s 85/29 59/15 pec High: 88° F/31° C Low: 80° F/27°C
    Baltimore 82/27 66/18 t 84/28 66/18 t Little Rock 90/32 67/19 pc 92/83 71/21 pc Raleigh-Durham 88/31 68/20 t 90/32 68/20 pc Low: 77°F/25°C eo.
    Boston 74/23 60/15 t 71/21 61/46 t Los Angeles 86/30 66/18 pc 88/31 66/18 pc St. Louis 84/28 67/19 s 88/31 71/21 pc .
    Buffalo 74/23 62/16 t 75/23 61/16 pc Louisville 84/28 64/117 pce 84/28 68/20 s Salt Lake City 100/37 70/21 s 98/36 69/20 pc GREAT INAGUA = etn
    Charleston, SC 90/32 73/22 t 90/32 74/23 t Memphis 88/31 70/21 pe 91/82 73/22 pc San Antonio 94/34 72/22 t 94/34 75/23 pc High: 93° F/34° C
    Chicago 82/27 61/16 pc 85/29 64/17 t Miami 90/32 79/26 t 91/32 80/26 t San Diego 76/24 69/20 pce 78/25 69/20 pc Low. 79° F26°C
    Cleveland 76/24 60/15 t 80/26 64/17 pc Minneapolis 82/27 66/18 pc 80/26 61/16 t San Francisco 69/20 56/13 pc 69/20 55/12 pc y
    Dallas 95/35 70/21 pce 97/386 76/24 pc Nashville 86/30 61/16 pc 89/81 67/19 pc Seattle 78/25 57/13 pe 79/26 57/13 pc
    Denver 92/33 62/16 pc 96/385 58/14 pc New Orleans 89/31 74/23 t 90/32 74/23 t Tallahassee 94/34 72/22 t 91/32 71/21 t
    Detroit 75/23 60/15 t 82/27 64/17 t New York 79/26 67/19 r 81/27 70/21 t Tampa 91/32 77/25 t 91/32 78/25 t
    Honolulu 89/31 75/23 c 89/31 76/24 s Oklahoma City 92/83 65/18 s 97/36 72/22 s Tucson 99/37 80/26 t 101/38 79/26 t
    Houston 96/35 74/23 t 95/35 76/24 pc Orlando 93/33 73/22 t 94/34 75/23 t Washington, DC 84/28 69/20 t 85/29 69/20 t

    Clouds and sun, a

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    HIGH |



    \. HIGH

    The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the






    Acapulco
    Amsterdam
    Ankara, Turkey
    Athens
    Auckland
    Bangkok
    Barbados
    Barcelona
    Beijing
    Beirut
    Belgrade
    Berlin
    Bermuda
    Bogota
    Brussels
    Budapest
    Buenos Aires
    Cairo
    Calcutta
    Calgary
    Cancun
    Caracas
    Casablanca
    Copenhagen
    Dublin
    Frankfurt
    Geneva
    Halifax
    Havana
    Helsinki
    Hong Kong
    Islamabad
    Istanbul
    Jerusalem
    Johannesburg
    Kingston
    Lima
    London
    Madrid
    Manila
    Mexico City
    Monterrey
    Montreal
    Moscow
    Munich
    Nairobi
    New Delhi
    Oslo

    Paris
    Prague

    Rio de Janeiro
    Riyadh
    Rome

    St. Thomas
    San Juan
    San Salvador
    Santiago
    Santo Domingo
    Sao Paulo
    Seoul
    Stockholm
    Sydney
    Taipei

    Tokyo
    Toronto
    Trinidad
    Vancouver
    Vienna
    Warsaw
    Winnipeg

    High
    F/C
    93/33
    72/22
    84/28
    93/33
    61/16
    89/31
    86/30
    89/31
    92/33
    81/27
    97/36
    79/26
    85/29
    66/18
    72/22
    91/32
    45/7
    103/39
    96/35
    78/25
    90/32
    82/27
    85/29
    74/23
    66/18
    79/26
    85/29
    65/18
    88/31
    73/22
    89/31
    100/37
    89/31
    88/31
    54/12
    90/32
    70/21
    71/21
    86/30
    85/29
    81/27
    104/40
    75/23
    72/22
    88/31
    77/25
    97/36
    64/17
    75/23
    90/32
    81/27
    104/40
    92/33
    91/32
    48/8
    88/31
    54/12
    91/32
    68/20
    79/26
    73/22
    64/17
    93/33
    77/25
    72/22
    75/23
    75/23
    95/35
    88/31
    79/26

    Ti

    Today

    Low
    F/C
    79/26
    59/15
    50/10
    75/23
    43/8
    78/25
    76/24
    72/22
    72/22
    77/25
    74/23
    59/15
    77/25
    46/7
    57/13





    WwW

    $
    sh

    os ec) oe ee ec Oe

    a *
    =>

    68/20 s

    30/-1
    76/24
    85/29
    52/11
    75/23
    73/22
    68/20
    62/16

    54/12 4

    63/17
    62/16
    57/13
    72/22
    59/15
    81/27
    81/27
    74/23
    64/17
    27/-2
    77/25
    57/13
    55/12
    59/15
    78/25
    54/12

    oO

    cy

    75/23 s

    64/17
    55/12
    58/14

    57/13 ¢

    81/27
    52/11
    57/13
    59/15
    69/20
    81/27
    68/20
    81/27
    17/-8
    70/21

    32/0
    73/22
    54/12
    64/17
    55/12

    43/6
    80/26
    72/22
    64/17
    50/10
    60/15
    74/23
    70/21
    60/15

    pc
    s
    sh
    t

    High
    F/C
    91/32
    68/20
    82/27
    97/36
    55/12
    90/32
    86/30
    84/28
    87/30
    81/27
    103/39
    74/23
    85/29
    67/19
    75/23
    97/36
    50/10
    101/38
    98/36
    73/22
    91/32
    80/26
    85/29
    68/20
    64/17
    73/22
    80/26
    63/17
    90/32
    68/20
    91/32
    103/39
    94/34
    86/30
    48/8
    90/32
    71/21
    70/21
    90/32
    84/28
    79/26
    104/40
    79/26
    77/25
    78/25
    78/25
    99/37
    70/21
    70/21
    82/27
    74/23
    104/40
    92/33
    89/31
    54/12
    89/31
    59/15
    86/30
    60/15
    81/27
    70/21
    61/16
    95/35
    77/25
    75/23
    54/12
    76/24
    90/32
    80/26
    70/21

    Friday

    Low
    F/C
    78/25
    57/13
    52/11
    75/23
    39/3
    78/25
    77/25
    71/21
    72/22
    77/25
    72/22
    54/12
    77/25
    44/6
    Soril2
    68/20
    36/2
    75/23
    81/27
    53/11
    75/23
    71/21
    69/20
    56/13
    52/11
    59/15
    60/15
    59/15
    5/28
    59/15
    82/27
    83/28
    77/25
    62/16
    29/-1
    80/26
    59/15
    54/12
    63/17
    77/25
    57/13
    75/23
    64/17
    61/16
    59/15
    54/12
    81/27
    54/12
    54/12
    58/14
    68/20
    81/27
    70/21
    80/26
    25/-3
    74/23
    36/2
    74/23
    53/11
    63/17
    54/12
    39/3
    82/27
    73/22
    61/16
    48/8
    61/16
    62/16
    56/13
    57/13

    INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

    (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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    Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
    storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace



    THURSDAY, JULY 23k, 2009, PAGE 11B



    MARINE FORECAST



    WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
    NASSAU Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 86° F
    Friday: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 86° F
    FREEPORT Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 85° F
    Friday: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 85° F
    ABACO Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 85° F
    Friday: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 85° F



    82/66) 9)"

    Chicago)





    Miami

    Showers





    T-storms mn

    Rain Fronts
    Cs PMtms: Shown are noon positions of weather systems and ae

    Bk. Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm i—fitafi.

    [v_=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Magen
    0s | -0s GR] 105 206 BHR] 40s (50R) ons 70s 608 GORANI





    a bony

    ‘You an Be Blown
    Away yA Hurric sane

    Or you.can rest easy knowing
    that youwhave excellent insurance
    coverage no matter which
    way the wind blows.

    Nobody does it better.

    (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

    ' ore Exuma
    thet



    Paes Tel (242) 336-2904
    PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE



    aaa S55
    Government urged: ‘Repeal’ airline fee rise

    By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    THE head of a leading
    Bahamian private airline yes-
    terday questioned how the
    Government planned to put in
    the management infrastructure
    to collect the increased Civil
    Aviation Department (CAD)
    fees, and urged the administra-
    tion to “repeal” the 2005 regu-



    lations permitting the raised
    charges.

    Captain Randy Butler, chief
    executive of Sky Bahamas, told
    Tribune Business that the
    Bahamian private airlines had
    met with Tyrone Sawyer and
    David Johnson, the Ministry of
    Tourism’s head of airlift and
    deputy director-general respec-
    tively, and CAD officials on the
    issue, and said they had been

    NOTICE

    PANJANG UMUR LIMITED







    NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:





    (a) PANJANG UMUR LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
    under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
    Business Companies Act 2000.








    (b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
    the 14 July 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
    submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

    (c) The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh
    of 1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

    Dated this 15" day of July A. D. 2009.



    Ms. Celene Koh
    Liquidator

    A World of

    Choices

    asked to submit a counter-pro-
    posal to the proposed fee
    increases.

    Captain Butler, though, said
    it would be impossible for the
    Bahamian private airlines to
    submit a counter-proposal in
    the two-week timeframe they
    had been given, and with the
    fee increases set to take effect
    from September 10, 2009,
    because the Government had
    not given them financial details
    on how much money it expect-
    ed to raise, and what the funds
    would be used for.

    Arguing that the Govern-
    ment should “really repeal” the
    proposed fee increases, since it
    was already collecting fees,
    Captain Butler questioned
    whether it had given any
    thought as to how it would col-
    lect landing fees at airports in
    remote Family Islands. And,
    indeed, whether it could afford
    to implement the system to do
    so.

    “Can you imagine collecting

    all the landing fees in Mayagua-
    na, Acklins and Crooked
    Island?” Captain Butler asked.
    “How will they know the planes
    landed?”

    He also questioned whether
    the Government would put in
    baggage and passenger x-ray
    screening facilities at Family
    Islands airports, given that the
    fee increases also included a
    per passenger security fee. If it
    did not put in the screening
    facilities, then why should pri-
    vate airlines be made to pay
    this fee.

    Tribune Business previously
    revealed how private Bahamian
    airlines and charter operators
    fear “draconian” increases of
    as much as 10,000 per cent in
    their fee structure could “kill”
    the industry.

    Under the CAD’s proposed
    “across the board” fee increas-
    es, the operator of a five-seater
    aircraft flying 50 hours per
    month could expect to see a
    $13,000 per annum fee rise.

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    GET THERE. TOGETHER.

    This newspaper was told that
    the fee increases include a
    tripling or 200 per cent rise in
    landing fees at Family Island
    airports, the rates jumping from
    a current $18.56 per landing to
    $56 per landing for a 19-seat
    aircraft.

    Other fee increases divulged
    to Tribune Business are as fol-
    lows:

    ¢ Monitoring charge: From
    a current $0 to $1,000, a 1,000
    per cent increase

    ¢ Fleet charge: For a five
    seater Aztec aircraft, this will
    go from $0 to $7,000 — a 7,000
    per cent increase. For a Beech
    19 seater aircraft, the fee will
    rise from $0 to $10,000, a 10,000
    per cent increase

    ¢ Charge to lease a foreign
    aircraft: Current: $0. Proposed:



    $4,000, a 4,000 per cent increase

    ¢ Charter permit renewal:
    Current: $500 per annum. Pro-
    posed: $1,200, a 240 per cent
    increase

    ¢ Renewal of scheduled per-
    mits: Current: $500 per annum.
    Proposed: $1,200, a 240 per cent
    increase. Both large foreign air-
    lines and Bahamian operators,
    including small charter compa-
    nies, will pay the same rate

    ¢ Pilot licences: From $0 to
    $250 for a six-month Air Trans-
    port US licence. From $0 to
    $200 for a one-year US com-
    mercial pilots licence.

    ¢ Fuel suppliers to Bahamian
    airlines in the Family Islands
    will have to pay a tax equiva-
    lent to $0.07 per gallon to the
    Civil Aviation Department, on
    top of existing government tax-
    es

    NOTICE
    CRANIUM INVESTMENTS LIMITED

    NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:




    (a) CRANIUM INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in voluntary
    dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
    International Business Companies Act 2000.

    (b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
    the 14" July 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
    submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

    (c) The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh
    of 1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

    Dated this 15" day of July A. D. 2009



    Ms. Celene Koh
    Liquidator

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    STANGEE MOUNTAIN
    INVESTMENTS LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 21st day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
    Argosa Corp. Inc., PR O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    ABBERTON VISTAS LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 21st day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
    Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    WORDSWORTH LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 21st day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
    Argosa Corp. Inc., PR O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)


    The Tribune oo "”""”
    OBIMUARIES
    RELIGION

    \ ~< The Tribune

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    » \8
    707.9

    SS Four choice for ine family


    UREN
    July 23, 2009

    PG 26 The Tribune



    RELIGIOUS

    NEWS,

    STORIES
    AND i
    CU Orn Ao

    EVENTS
    The Tribune






    - a

    RELIGION



    Thursday, July 23, 2009 ® PG 27

    /

    From left to right; Saulene Smith, committee member, Val Gardiner, Committee Member, Minalee Hanchell, Executive Founder and coordinator of Miss Gospel Bahamas, Tamalia
    Hanchell, Committee member, Tanya McFall, Miss Gospel Bahamas 2009/2010, Ethlyn Hanchell, chaperone for Miss Gospel Bahamas and committee member, and Moika Rolle, Miss
    Gospel Bahamas 2005/2006. On Tuesday, executives from the Miss Gospel Bahamas Committee along with its reigning queen Tanya McFall held a press conference to announce the

    August 2 competition date.

    Miss Gospe! Bahamas 2009

    By LLOYD ALLEN
    Tribune Features Reporter
    lallen@tribunemedia.net

    IN less than two weeks one
    of six contestants of this
    year’s Miss Gospel Bahamas
    Pageant will walk away with
    the coveted title of Miss
    Gospel Bahamas
    2009/2010.

    The event which is set to take place
    on August 2, at the Wyndham’s
    Rainforest Theater will feature several
    special guest performances by Synergy
    Soldiers for Christ, Mericha Walker,
    and Overcomers Mime Ministry.

    Now in its fourteenth season, pageant
    founder and coordinator Minalee
    Hanchell said during a press conference
    on Tuesday that for the lucky winner,
    the year long reign is expected to be
    filled with appearances, presentations,
    and front line outreach.

    “First of all she will be expected to be
    an ambassador for Christ, an ambassa-

    dor for our nation, she will be engaged
    in a vast number of weekly activities
    including her involvement in youth
    groups, school presentations, and apart
    from this her platform too will help
    keep her busy.”

    This was most certainly true for
    2005/2006 Miss Gospel Bahamas Moika
    Rolle, who said during her reign she
    was exposed to many projects and
    opportunities that not only introduced
    her to some of the biggest names in
    gospel music, but allowed her to share
    some of her ideas for youth empower-
    ment on an international stage.

    She explained: “With a college schol-
    arship offered as one of my prizes, I had
    opportunities to minister and speak at
    numerous conferences while in the
    United States, with one of them being
    The United Negro College Fund
    National Annual Conference.

    “Persons such as TD Jakes, and the
    then Governor of Texas Rick Perry
    were present at that event, and had it
    not been for this pageant I may have
    never made those contacts.”

    Additionally, Ms Rolle said she had
    the chance to visit the US senate in

    Washington DC, and was able to meet
    dozens of young people who like her
    are committed to youth development
    and leadership.

    Ms Rolle said when comparing Miss
    Gospel Bahamas to other pageants in
    the country, the one thing that sets it
    apart is the emphasis that’s placed on
    spiritual development.

    “In this pageant you meet a lot of
    spiritual leaders and women who pour
    into you, a lot of prayer and fasting is
    put into this pageant, a lot of time in
    terms of how you speak in public, how
    you answer questions is used to make
    you that much better, it’s more than just
    an outer transformation, it’s also an
    inner transformation.”

    Tanya McFall, the 2008/2009 queen
    said although her year as queen has
    been filled with many accomplishments,
    there is still more work to be done.

    With the platform “Empowering
    young women for a global revolution,”
    Ms McFall said her focus was naturally
    transformed to impacting all youth
    because of the need for change within
    the group and explained that she
    helped jump-start the Save The

    Children Programme at Great
    Commission Ministries.

    Now pursuing a bachelor of arts
    degree in English and Teaching, and
    being a youth activist involved in sever-
    al community groups, Ms McFall said
    the pageant has been paramount in
    assisting her to accomplish many of her
    goals, while proving that it is still cool to
    be hip and Christian.

    Ms McFall said she is simply excited
    and wishes all the contestants good luck
    and looks forward to assisting the new

    queen.
    Minister Kevin Harris of Joy
    101.9FM and Terez Davis aka

    Dynamite Daisy are slated to be mas-
    ters of ceremony who are both expect-
    ed to lighten-up the stage as these six
    young women compete for the title.
    Tickets for the event can be pur-
    chased at Great Commission Ministries
    on Wulff Road between Market Street
    and Baillou Hill Road, or Quality
    Fabrics on Mount Royal Avenue.
    Sponsors for the event include
    Wong’s Rubber Stamp and printing,
    PGF Realty, Galilee College, and
    Bahamas Orthodontic Centre.
    PG 28 ® Thursday, July 23, 2009

    (SY MEDITATION

    RELIGION

    Be a plumb-line

    “The Lord said, “See | am setting a
    plumb-line in the midst of my people”
    (Amos 7:8)

    A plumb-line is an instrument that
    measures the uprightness of a wall, for
    example.

    The weight at the end of the line cre-
    ates a straight line that reliably reveals
    the angles which may be correct or
    may need to be corrected. When a
    moral and spiritual plumb-line is used
    to measure individual or collective
    integrity, the presence of sin is easily
    detected.

    Our Lord Jesus Christ modeled in
    his life and taught with his words, the
    expectations that God has for us all,
    but especially for Christians who
    should be open to the leading of the
    Holy Spirit. Our daily prayers need to
    include the desire for knowledge and
    understanding of what we ought to do
    and to have the grace and power so to
    do (The Book of Common Prayer

    The Ditch

    Matthew 15:14,

    Let them alone: they be blind leaders. And
    if the blind lead the blind, both shall fall
    into the ditch.

    I'VE already asked the question
    where are we going as a nation? Could it
    be that we're heading in the ditch as a
    result of blind leadership? Are we so
    politically and religiously crazy, we're
    willing to accept whatever comes down
    the pipe?

    Watch this!

    There was a time in the Bahamas
    when it truly was an honour to call our
    members of parliament honourable; not
    saying that our forefathers didn't have
    their share of personal challenges and
    issues, but when it came to honourably
    standing up for and defending the small
    man; the forefathers effectively played
    their part.

    Here is one of our greatest problem
    with today's political pool. Over the past
    fifteen years the powers have failed mis-
    erably in properly honouring the
    nation's forefathers, and educating the
    younger generations as to who they
    were and the significant roles they've
    played in the shaping of the Bahamas
    today.

    Think on this question: Can we select
    at random a few 6th grade students and
    ask them about some of our forefathers
    like; Sir Cecil, Alvin Brennen, Sinclair
    Outten, etc? No, it would not be fair to
    these students; because this part of our
    nation's history and equipping the gen-

    gz ~Â¥
    ~~. © REV. ANGELA

    + PALACIOUS

    -

    Proper 10—Year B).

    In the whole 23rd chapter Matthew,
    Jesus challenged the teachers of the
    law with scathing comments about
    their hypocrisy and neglect of justice,
    mercy and faithfulness (v.23). Soon
    afterwards, he turned his attention to
    Jerusalem lamenting over the destruc-
    tion that would occur some years
    hence.

    I am sure that the Lord weeps over
    what is happening to us. From the dec-
    imation of the Arawaks and other
    Indian and island people, through the
    days of slavery and slave trading, to the
    present, there have been occasions for




    PASTOR _
    ALLEN

    eration of tomorrow with this knowl-
    edge is of no importance to the educat-
    ed, foolish leaders we have today. But I
    can assure you that

    if ever asked; these same children at
    any given moment can provide you with
    detailed information about the latest
    international music or movie celebrity;
    and I dare to say that many of them
    don't even know our own Bahamian
    recording artists.

    So, as it relates to the nation's social
    and cultural development; we have clas-
    sic cases of the blind leading the blind.

    It is quite evident that the leadership
    of which the Bahamas is in need of; in
    order to fulfill her God ordained assign-
    ment is not in today's pool. But by no
    means should we cease to keep our
    politicians lifted up in payer. Despite the
    fact that many of them don't know, that
    they don't know what's going on and
    what to do about it, yet they're parading
    around as if they are the best thing to
    the country since slice bread.

    YES, we've got ministers and minis-
    ters of states acting as if they are God,
    and as if the people owes them some-
    thing. Here's what I find so amazing;
    before the last general election it was
    the PLP ministers that acted and operat-
    ed in this manner.

    Now, one would have thought that the
    FNM would have learned from the PLP
    arrogance; but needless to say, these

    the heart of God to be severely grieved
    by our inhumanity. Whenever the
    innocent are made to suffer, there is
    heavenly outrage.

    We each need to consider ourselves
    a personal plumb-line allowing God to
    use us to promote a national standard
    of accountability. When we fall or
    stumble let us ask for forgiveness and
    extend it to others in appropriate ways,
    when they err.

    Psalm 37: 5-6 reminds us:

    Trust in the Lord and do good, angel
    dwell in the land and enjoy safe pasture.
    Delight yourself in the Lord

    and he will give you the desires of your
    heart.

    Commit your way to the Lord,

    trust in him and he will do this:

    He will make your righteousness shine
    like the dawn,

    the justice of your cause like the noonday
    sun.”

    clowns have taken arrogance to another
    level. But I sternly admonished you
    politicians (FNM & PLP) to study the
    rise and fall of King Nebuchadnezzar of
    Babylon.

    As an authoritative voice of Father
    Yahweh, I'm at liberty to speak on and
    about national issues that your weak,
    compromising religious leaders of the
    Bahamas are not able to. In order not to
    affect their politician's tithe and govern-
    ment hand-outs these religious weak-
    lings have got to stay within their four
    walls and remain silent while the nation
    goes to HELL on roller skates. And if
    by chance any of these religious-whatev-
    er do speak, it's always from a re-active
    position rather than a pro-active posi-
    tion.

    It is most disheartening to see the
    condition / state of the Bahamas (spiri-
    tually), being a small nation with some
    three hundred, thousand plus people
    and over four thousand churches. The
    only logical question one can ask is this:
    “What has happened to the church?”

    The answer to that question is as such:

    The church has become such a
    watered down, powerless / dead reli-
    gious organisation in the spirit realm;
    whereby every man / leader has set out
    to fulfill their own dreams and desires at
    the expense of the people in Jesus’
    name.

    What do you think the Bahamas
    would be like if the church was operat-
    ing as the ordained organism of
    Yeshuwa Messiah, rather than religious
    organisations?

    The church, the organism of Yeshuwa
    is a consistently alive organ / body that's
    constantly growing and producing after
    its own kind. Whereas the organised
    religious church is consistently seeking

    The Tribune

    “Ve each need

    to consider ourselves
    a personal plumb4ine
    allowing God to use
    Us fo promote a
    national standard
    of accountability.
    When we fall or
    stumble let us ask for
    forgiveness and
    extend it to others in
    appropriate ways,
    when they err.”

    to be revived; through their annual
    money making revivals, conferences,
    workshop, seminars, etc.

    Here's the mandate and representa-
    tion of Yeshuwa's organism - church:
    Mark.16: 17. And these signs shall fol-
    low them that believe; In my name shall
    they cast out devils; they shall speak
    with new tongues;

    : 18. They shall take up serpents; and
    if they drink any deadly thing, it shall
    not hurt them; they shall lay hands on
    the sick, and they shall recover.

    Here's the mandate and representa-
    tion / signs of the organised religious
    church: The pulpit pimps, the bishops,
    apostles, doctors, prophets, etc; are liv-
    ing on the hill top / green pastures
    whiles the congregation lives in the val-
    ley / dry land. This is certainly not the
    will of God, but rather it's a well laid out
    plan and motive of the religious leaders.

    Meanwhile the enemy is wreaking
    havoc throughout this country, for he
    (the enemy) knows that these religious
    leaders are void of Yahweh's (dunamis,
    doo'-nam-is) to lay hands on the sick
    and see them recover; much less to cast
    out devils . Therefore many within the
    religious church are dying from all kinds
    of sickness and diseases causing linger-
    ing questions to exist as to whether God
    heals or not?

    The time has come when the question
    must be asked “Am I being blindly led
    into the ditch?”

    * Questions or comments contact us via E-
    mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or Phone
    #1-242-441-2021 or 225-3850

    Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
    Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l
    The Tribune

    RELIGION

    Thursday, July 23, 2009 ® PG 29

    Gaz:

    Only the |

    "So we say with confidence, 'The
    Lord is my helper; | will not be afraid.
    What can man do to me?â„¢

    Hebrews 13:6 (N.I.V)

    I've never thought of the word,
    alone, in a negative way, now, lonely, is
    a different story.

    The definition of the word alone,
    according to the Oxford dictionary is,
    ‘having no one else present; on one’s
    own.'

    However, we are never alone, God is
    always present. In fact, God is always
    one step ahead of us. He is
    omnipresent, present everywhere at
    the same time. We don't have to fight
    each other for His attention or be envi-
    ous of another's relationship with Him.
    God is here, very present and very
    ready for us to seek Him first, so that in
    return we can experience the awesome
    blessings He has for us.

    Being alone and being lonely are two
    separate states. The latter is a result of
    neglecting the discovery of who a per-



    TONI |
    STYLES

    son is. When a person is lonely, it can
    be in any number of environments. In
    a house with many occupants, in an
    apartment by themselves, working at a
    large company, or living in a foreign
    country-with no company. All of these
    environments are different, yet all are
    the same. The same in the sense that
    they are imperfect. In order to live a
    satisfying life, we ought to stop
    depending on persons, places, and
    things to bring us acceptance, fulfill-
    ment, and happiness. True love comes
    from knowing God and His love for us
    and from knowing ourselves.
    Happiness, begins with our decision to
    be happy.



    Bahamas hosts 8th

    Annual Caribbean
    Baptist Youth Festival

    By ALEX MISSICK
    Tribune Features Reporter
    amissick@tribunemedia.net

    EVERY three years youth from across the Caribbean come together to discuss



    and find solutions to the issues affecting the youth of the world. This year for the }
    first time, the Bahamas has been chose to host the 8th Annual Caribbean Baptist i
    Fellowship Youth Festival from July 22-25 under the theme “Stomp Pun De ;

    Enemy.”

    Reverend Clinton Minnis, Vice President of the Caribbean Baptist Fellowship

    Youth Department, said the organisation is excited to host the festival.

    “Our number is going to exceed 500 in delegate count. We were looking for
    more delegates but this recession has been challenging for many nations. We have :

    ten family islands represented along with 13 nations,” Mr Minnis said.

    Director of the Youth Department for the Baptist World Alliance, Reverend
    Emmett Dunn, congratulated the Bahamian government for opening it’s doors to

    the Christian faith.

    “Together we can create partnerships to reach young people so that they can
    become better citizens not only for the country, but world citizens,” Mr Dunn }

    said.

    there are some myths to be dispelled.

    “When I see groups like yours, bringing hundreds of young people together for
    dynamic goals to determine the future and direction in relation to young people }
    is very special. To be able to have this kind of festival in the Bahamas is very spe- :

    cial,” Mr Bannister said.

    Youth leaders and those attending the festival will be treated to a number of
    events and get to hear speakers that include among others: Pastor Dave Burrows, }

    Pastor Sterling McPhee and Pastor Carlos Reid.

    Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture, Desmond Bannister, said although many
    people do not appreciate the productive young people throughout the world, }

    onely

    The other day, I was flipping through
    an magazine from a couple years back,
    and came across an interview Oprah
    did with Mariane Pearl, the widow of
    slain American journalist, Daniel
    Pearl. She was pregnant at the time of
    his horrific execution at the hands of
    Islamic militants.

    In the interview, Oprah asks Mrs
    Pearl, about the moment the tragedy
    became a reality.

    Her response, "That night I remem-
    ber saying, ‘I'm pregnant and I'm
    alone.’ " In understandable grief, for a
    moment she felt very alone, however,
    she added, "It was very clear that I was
    going to either die or live-nothing in
    between.” "And if I was going to live,
    then I was going to take the challenge
    to be happy."

    Facing one of the darkest situations
    anyone can imagine, we can still
    choose, to be happy. That supernatural
    strength comes from faith, for believ-
    ers, it is a faith in God, and an assur-
    ance that He will never hand us more

    a "Tad me A} il {





    than we can bear. Loneliness is a state
    of mind, a profound depression and
    disservice to the spirit. Indeed it is as
    believers, an insult to the Father God
    we know loves and desires us.
    Furthermore, I personally feel that an
    allowance for loneliness and self pity, is
    extremely selfish.

    Upon realising the fact that we are
    not alone, we ought to look after each
    other as an example of the way in
    which our Saviour Jesus Christ lived
    and loved while on this earth. There
    are always persons who need a shoul-
    der to lean on, and this gives us a won-
    derful opportunity to recharge spiritu-
    ally with one another. In closing, may
    God's presence in your life, always be
    more than enough.

    ¢ Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian
    writer and poet, currently residing in
    Nassau, Bahamas.

    Comments related to the article can be
    sent to fearless247@gmail.com.

    2 religion today

    if f s This July 7, 2009

    photo shows pastor
    Joseph Fuiten, of
    Cedar Park Church
    in Bothell, Wash.,
    looking at Middle
    Eastern artifacts
    that he has collect-
    ed, dating to before
    the time of Christ.
    Many of the early
    leaders of the con-
    servative evangeli-
    cal movement have
    stepped back due to
    health or age,
    because they feel
    burned at being
    called haters or
    because they're
    tired of political
    divisiveness, saying
    it gets in the way of
    saving souls.

    Ken Lambert/AP Photo
    PG 30 © Thursday, July 23, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune

    Calvary Deliverance celebrates
    27 years of Bahamian ministry

    UNDER the theme Pursue,
    Overtake and Recover All , senior
    pastor, Bishop Vernal G Clarke and
    his wife Elder Beverly M Clarke, and
    members of the Calvary Deliverance
    Church (CDC), will celebrate 27
    years of committed service to God
    and the Bahamian community during
    the church’s annual convention slated
    for July 26-31 2009. The event which
    will be held at the church on East
    Street South, is expected to draw del-
    egates from across The Bahamas, the
    Turks and Caicos Islands and the
    United States. Governor General
    AD Hanna is also expected to attend.

    Among this years list of local and
    international speakers will be hosts,
    Bishop VG and Elder BM Clarke;
    Bishop Phalmon Ferguson of United
    Faith Ministries; Pastor Deanza
    Cunningham of Christ Community
    Church; Pastor Thomas Maxwell of
    Tabernacle of Hope Church; Prophet
    Brian Carn of Jacksonville, Florida;
    Evangelist Demetrius Stewart of
    Nashville, Tennessee; and Bishop
    Gregory Davis of Wilmington,
    Delaware.

    There will also be a series of lec-
    tures on relevant social issues such as
    financial independence; public trans-
    portation system; combating the
    scourge of HIV/AIDS; combating the
    fear of crime; and healthy lifestyles.

    Presenters include Glenn
    Ferguson, Reuben Rahming, Keith
    Kemp, Ann Rolle and Assistant
    Commissioner of Police, Hulan
    Hanna.

    Musical artists include the CDC
    mass choir and praise team,
    Reverend Denczil Rolle and the
    Church of God

    Incorporated Mass Choir; Christ
    Community Church Choir;
    Tabernacle of Hope Church Choir
    and others.

    The theme for the conference is
    taken from a familiar Biblical story of
    triumph in the face of despair as seen
    in the book of 1st Samuel, chapter 30
    verse 8. The families and prized pos-
    sessions of David and his trusted war-
    riors had been unceremoniously
    taken captive by the enemy whilst he
    and the men were away.
    Discouraged, weary, disillusioned
    and with no where else to turn, David
    inquired of the Lord whether or not
    to go after the enemy. God emphati-
    cally instructed that David should
    pursue, overtake and recover all that
    the enemy had stolen from them.



    ih
    Andrew Brown



    Brian Carn ' Dr. Ann Rolle
    The Tribune

    RELIGION

    Thursday, July 23, 2009 ® PG 31

    Part 37



    Methodists in Abaco 2

    THE MOVE TO DUNDAS TOWN

    IN 1941, the population of Old
    Place, devastated by hurricane, was
    moved to Dundas Town, where a new
    settlement was established. In 1942,
    the wooden chapel was dismantled and
    transported by boat from Old Place to
    Dundas Town, where it was used until
    a new chapel was built in 1969-70.

    The building of a new chapel at
    Dundas Town in 1970 was accompa-
    nied by the closure of the Marsh
    Harbour chapel. This proved to be a
    most controversial decision, spear-
    headed by the Reverend George
    Hopkins. In March, 1969, Hopkins
    reports:

    "The decision of the Synod to
    uphold the findings of the standing
    committee, to replace our present old
    and out-dated churches at Marsh
    Harbour and Dundas Town with a
    brand new church to be known as "The
    Sea View Methodist Church’, is all in
    step with modern trends and wise stew-
    ardship, both of the ministry and
    finance. The actual siting of the new
    church was hotly debated and now we
    know the considered judgment of the

    All is not

    It is always an honor to be apart of
    what God is doing in this end time.
    Last weekend was one of the most
    meaningful weekends I have ever
    experienced.

    I was apart of a team of young peo-
    ple on a mission to get the gospel out
    to the people in Palmetto Point
    Eleuthera. It was amazing to see
    teenagers not afraid to present Jesus
    Christ to people. Bishop Paul S$
    Morton has a song that says, " Lord
    whatever you doing in this season
    please don't do it without me."

    Every born again believer should
    want to be a part of the movement for

    INSIGHT

    For the stories

    behind the news,
    read Insight
    on Mondays






    ,
    }

    } JIM
    x LAWLOR
    ~—

    Church -- our wisdom is to use this
    golden opportunity of proving the
    worth of our Methodism.

    Before long we shall be saying, ‘Why
    did not this happen years ago?'"

    The Reverend Hopkins’ positive
    outlook was never shared by the mem-
    bership of the Marsh Harbour society.
    In 1969, the circuit report indicated
    that they were preparing to build a new
    chapel on a more attractive site. Their
    pride was stung, in that they were
    being compelled to join a new church,
    established in a new community.
    Several refused to join, and some did
    so with reluctance. The new chapel was
    dedicated in August 9, 1970.

    In December, 1971, Pastor Bert
    Batham writes, with a note of disap-
    pointment and concern, of the growing
    financial and spiritual concerns of the

    lost

    ALLISON
    | MILLER



    souls. That was why Jesus bled and
    died to save man from his sins. We
    (the church) have moved away from
    soul winning, but now more than ever
    it is imperative that we get back to
    that.

    People are dying everyday, that isn't
    the bad part, people dying. The Bible
    tells us that, ‘it is appointed once for
    man to die.’ The bad part is they are
    dying without Christ -just on their way
    to hell.

    Well this weekend the thirty young
    people that went to Palmetto Point,
    Eleuthera gave the people of that set-
    tlement hope. It was truly a blessing to
    witness and be apart of that. An eld-
    erly lady told one of the groups, that
    she had been praying to God to for
    help and He answered her prayers.
    When we went to another settlement
    a lady said to one of the youths, "it is
    hard being a Christian, what made
    you all come to that determination to
    be saved?" The answer given was sim-
    ply amazing. That young lady who is

    circuit. Of the decision regarding the
    closure of the Marsh Harbour Chapel,
    he writes, "Alas, the two societies of
    Marsh Harbour and Dundas Town
    never really fused." By this time there
    is a church hall at Dundas Town, called
    the community centre, and the name of
    the church has been changed from
    ‘Seaview’ to Saint Andrews.

    NEW CHAPEL
    FOR HOPE TOWN

    In 1971 the new Hope Town chapel,
    later named St James, was under con-
    struction. The old chapel, condemned
    by the Ministry of Works, was demol-
    ished by a work team from the US. The
    structure was so strong, dynamite had
    to be used before it crumbled. The new
    chapel was dedicated on June 25, 1972.

    In September, 1972, the Reverend
    Colin Archer became the first minister
    of Abaconian descent to serve in the
    Abaco circuit. The son of Mr and Mrs
    AB Archer, Reverend Archer served
    in the circuit for two years. It is regret-
    table that we have to record that the
    new St James Chapel was destroyed by
    fire on Sunday afternoon August 28,

    only 16 said, " When you see your
    friends dying everyday the best thing

    me away.

    realise what is going on in our society

    days are evil and devil is busy. Every
    happened and is happening. As we

    not ready for a change to happen in
    their lives. And that's ok, because

    change to occur. Agreed or not we
    we are untouchable, that time is on

    our side, we know everything and the

    tells that NOW is the accepted time
    and today if you hear His voice hard-

    regretted decision.

    rebellious. There are a lot of them
    control their lives. They still need
    ers, parents and guardians all come in.

    They could have been anywhere

    nevertheless, they are trying and we
    applaud them for their efforts. To
    God be the glory.

    1986. All of the church records were
    lost. The strong bands of believers in
    Hope Town along with their relatives
    and friends in Nassau are determined
    that another church will be built and
    have begun to vigorously raise funds
    by means of social functions and cook-
    outs.

    NEW BEGINNINGS IN
    MARSH HARBOUR

    In 1985, a new society of 14 members
    was formed in Marsh Harbour. The
    first service, conducted by the
    Reverend Charles Carey, was held at
    the home of Agatha Archer on
    September 1, 1985. The decision to
    open a new society resulted from the
    unexpected and phenomenal growth of
    Marsh Harbour. Peter Campbell, a
    leader from the old Marsh Harbour
    Society, was appointed the first Society
    Steward in the new society, and circuit
    lay pastor. Most of the other members
    are also former members of the old
    society or their descendants

    e (Next time: Part 38 — Native Baptists
    in the Bahamas)

    ] TRIBUNE TIP OF THE DAY

    is to get saved,” That statement blew

    'Where does

    If this young lady at her age can } h | 9
    then what excuse do the rest of us have? yo ur hea rt ay 7
    What is going on you may ask? The :

    IN a time when financial survival

    : : : i requires many of us to put in extra
    negative thing you can think of has } hours at work, forgo time spent with
    PE ? family, friends, or to attend church, it’s
    ministered there were some people } pot hard to understand why people
    i often struggle with understanding and
    ? discovering their true calling.

    only you know when you are ready for ;

    Yes it is important to ensure that

    ? your family has what it needs to sur-

    gamble with our lives in thinking that i vive, however this doesn’t mean that

    ? you should ignore all the things you’ve

    : : : been created to accomplish.
    list goes on. These are the lies that :

    devil tell us that we fall for. The Bible i ability to accomplish something great,

    : whether that is to inspire the masses to

    ? recognise God for who he is, encour-

    en not your hearts. But we aren’t ; age a child to see the good in life

    ready to give up our wants for God's : through a community programme, or

    will. My prayer is that that isn't a whether it’s just to help a friend get

    : . ? through a rough time.
    I said all of that to say this- that not ;

    all of our young people are living to be : Bahamas Faith Ministries said the rich-

    ? est place in the world is the graveyard,

    who have considered God and let Him ? because so many die before they

    nee accomplish all the things they could.
    some guidance and this is where lead- :

    Every individual possess a special

    Recently Pastor Myles Munroe from

    To avoid that fate, begin thinking

    beyond your needs, extend yourself to

    ; ? others, become more than just your
    but in Eleuthera last weekend, but :

    they were there. They are not perfect,

    job.
    Yes it is important to work for the

    i things you need, but it’s equally impor-
    ? tant to help others, and in essence
    ? you'll be helping yourself and God.


    PG 32 © Thursday, July 23, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune
    —. Td" oo... _ #9 inne Eee id
    Scenes

    — .
    from

    ~
    -

    ma
    =








    PAGE 1

    N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.199THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNWITH T-STORM HIGH 87F LOW 79F B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A MAN has died and another was injured when twom en armed with handguns fired randomly at a group of men standing in the street. T he gunmen pulled into Milton Street, off East Street, in a dark coloured vehicle at around 12.40 yesterday morn-i ng. Two men, armed with handguns, got out of the car. They fired shots into a g roup of about six men, hitting Marvin Sears, 36, in the s tomach and another man in the elbow. Mr Sears was rushed to h ospital and later died of his injuries. The injured man is said to b e in stable condition and may have been released from hospital yesterday, accordingt o police. Superintendent in charge of the Criminal Detective Unit Elsworth Moss said: We don’t yet know the motive behind the shooting and we have not yet got all of The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com Man dies after gunmen attack I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER I N S I D E OBITUARIES and RELIGION I NTODAY’STRIBUNE JOBSAND HELPWANTED L L O O A A D D S S O O F F CARS! CARS! CARS! Pair armed with handgunsf ire at group By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net AMERICAN superstar Tyler Perry could hold the k ey to boosting tourism to the Bahamas, it was claimed yesterday. The Ministry of Tourism is counting on the widespread exposure from his new movie which is currently being shot on location in Eleuthera to a ttracting more of the African-American and Christian market the superstar filmmaker has cornered. And the hope is it could lure visitors who have scaled back on travel plans because of the global eco n omic crisis. The production is also expected to inject signifi cant revenue into the local market with every hotel in the settlement booked out to accommodate cast and crew according to Mr Perry. B ut ministry officials were unable to peg a dol l ar amount on the esti mated cash injection as production is ongoing. Tyler Perry ‘could give major boost to tourism’ MINISTER OF TOURISM Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace (right cigars from Graycliff yesterday. SEESTORYRIGHT New movie is being shot in Eleuthera GIFT F OR A SUPERSTAR Felip Major /Tribune staff SEE page 10 By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A CLAUSE in the law that prohibits a person from being charged with the rape of their spouse is set to be removed under a proposed amendment to the Sexual Offences Act. While tabling the amend ment for first reading in the House of Assembly yesterday, Minister of State for Social Development Loretta Butler-Turner noted that the prohibition was outdated, as many countries had long updated their laws and made marital rape a crime. "Even in England, whose common law is the basis of Change to rape law to protect wives SEE page nine By PAUL TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net ONLY 55 per cent of usable land intheentire Bahamas is still owned by Government. All other acreage in the country is either vested in private ownership or is classified as “wet” Crown Land. And, according to information tabled by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, there is a little more than 3.5 million acres of both “dry” and “wet” land avail able in the entire country. Withthe Bahamas’ population marked at 350,000,this amounts to approx imately 10 acres per person. However, with 938,709 in private hands, 910,341 listed as undevelopable “wet land” and 237,583 already leased, only 1,362,205 acres are available. The former Exuma MP George Smith, who also is a practising realtor with HG Christie said that while land continues to change hands, Government ought to come up with approaches where Crown land can be used by Govt owns just 55% of usable land in Bahamas SEE page nine Hubert Ingraham By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE Prime Minister’s exten sive presentation of information to parliament on the question of Crown lands and his commitment to personally “investigate” the issue “raises the suspicion” that he may not let the parliamentary commit tee do its job, claims PLP leader Perry Christie. The Opposition leader proposed in the House of Assem bly that the Prime Minister may be set to prorogue parliament Christie:PM may not let parliamentary committee do its job SEE page 10 SEE page nine BISHOP Simeon Hall, former president of the Bahamas Christian Council, criticised more than half of the Members of Parliament for being “mentally tired” and lacking the fire necessary to propel the country to the “next level.” Bishop Hall, therefore, called on both the PLP and the FNM’s chairmen to ensure that all persons offering for politi cal leadership at the next general election have the “personal Bishop Hall criticises ‘mentally tired’ MPs SEE page nine

    PAGE 2

    C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE W W h h a a t t s s y y o o u u r r v v i i e e w w o o n n C C r r o o w w n n l l a a n n d d ? ? PUBLIC officers are required to d eclare any potential for a conflict of interest to the Department of Public Service, but the available evidence sug-g ests that this principle may have not been observed in the granting or leasing of Crown land to civil servants in t he past, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said in the House of Assembly yesterday. The prime minister said public officers may not seek to influence decisions of another person in order to promote or seek to promote their or another person’s private interests ort hat of their relatives and friends. “In any event, and for the avoidance of any and all doubt, where the potential for a conflict of interest exists, public officers are expected, indeed required, to declare such potential to the Department of Public Service,” he s aid. The available evidence does nots upport the view that these principles were n ecessarily o bserved in the grant or lease of Crown land to civil servants,” he said. W hile the application forms for Crown land do request information on “occupation”, the form does not require applicants to specify whether t hey are engaged in the public service o r by any publicly-owned corporation, company or agency, nor are applicants required to reveal their relationship, if any, to a public officer a matter that is to be changed, Mr Ingraham said. Seventy-three current and former public servants are listed as havingr eceived Crown land grants between t he years of 1997 to 2009, documents tabled in the House reveal. List T his master list tabled by Prime M inister Ingraham yesterday reveals t hat staff from the Department of Lands and Surveys; Her Majesty’s Prison; the Attorney General’s Office; the Royal Bahamas Police Force; the Port Department; Road Traffic; the Department of Education; Civil Avia-t ion; Customs; the Department of Agriculture; Environmental Health; Foreign Affairs, and the Prime Mini ster’s Office all applied and received their requested acreage on various islands throughout the country. In hise arlier contribution, Mr Ingraham said that during his previous term in office he had put in place policy guidelines f or the consideration of applications and for granting of publicly-held land to employees of the Bahamas government or their relatives. While the prime minister admitted that the terms and conditions for public officers accessing Crown land are basically the same as those applicablet o members of the general public, the potential for conflicts of interest and preferential consideration is obviously much greater for government employees. “Hence, the consideration of application by public officers and members of their families should be subject to f ar greater scrutiny than that of applications from the general public,” Mr Ingraham said. It is expected and required that public officers will not make or participate in a decision relating to the e xercise of an official power, duty or function. It is expected and required that no public officer will use information that is not available to the general public and is obtained in his or her position as a public servant to promote or seek to promote his or her or another person’s private interests ort hat of the public officer’s relatives and friends’ private interests,” he said. Similarly, he added, public officers, in exercising official power, duty or function, are not supposed to give preferential treatment to any person or organisation or their representatives. Crown land: ‘Conflict of interest’ rule may have been ignored HUBERT INGRAHAM T HE distribution of Crown land has been a much discussed topic in recent weeks, so The Tribune hit the streets to hear what the public thinks about theh ot button issue. Average Bahamians were asked if Crown land should only be used by the government for the good of the public, or if it should be sold to private individu-a ls and investors. I feel as if Crown land should be used for any project that is going to help the Bahamas and Bahamiansa s a whole, whether it’s by the government or by private citi-z ens, whether it’s granted to family members or members o f parliament or whoever. I don’t think it makes a differe nce once you can prove that there is no favouritism on why the land was granted. And once it is going to be used for something that is b eneficial for Bahamians and not for sole profit only in t hose cases it is wrong, and that’s taking advantage.” Eamon Adderley Mark Haven My assertion is that the p opulation is growing rapidly and there is a shortage of land all over, and with the growth the government is going to have to dip into theC rown land, that’s the only thing available right now, allt he rest of the land is privately owned. A lot of people who want to buy land can’t find it and some people can’t afford land so the government has to m ake laws so that poor people can have a part of it, I don’t h ave a problem with that. The foreigners nor Bahamians s hould be able to buy Crown land and not use it, they should be doing something with it.” I feel as if it (Crown land should be used for the betterment of the Bahamian peop le, especially for the betterment of the Bahamian people (in the a rea of) agriculture and for plen ty other reasons, because for eigners come here and take advantage of us sometimes by buying a lot of land and saving it t o make a profit, and lots of times they die and the land stays right there with nobody knowing who owns it, and it stays that w ay for years. I’ve seen it happen over and over until the gov ernment takes it over, and all the while the land could have been u sed for the betterment of the Bahamian people. “That’s why I think Crown land should be used for the betterment of the Bahamian people, but we have to do it in proportion because we have kids coming up and they want to use some too, so we also have preserve some for our kids.” David Kemp T ALK S TREET I don’t think you should s ell Crown land to private investors who are expatria tes or Bahamians to do what they want to do with it, it s hould be specific what they want to do with it and it has to be for the development of the country, period. You can’t just think of yourself or a small group of people, you have to think about the countryb ecause it is small, and we allow too many people to grab too much of the Crown land. When those who have goodi deas come around there wouldn’t be any land for them to invest (in b e utilised properly and government should be in control of it, but it must be transparent so the people could have a say in the distribution of Crown land, because after all it is the people’s country and I think it’s no more than fair that people should have a say.” Edward Ferguson I think that the govern ment should only be allowed to deal with Crown land, and if there are investors that strike a good deal theng overnment should have a big committee with a lot of watchd ogs around to see what is going on because there is a lot o f selling of the land for next to nothing and you have these f oreign investors making ten times the amount, this is a barber shop conversation but no one is talking about it.” Allan P Wallace

    PAGE 3

    C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 3 Y EARS of uncertainty could come to an end on Thursday, August 13, when non-managerial Sandals R esort employees will be able t o vote for the union they want to represent them. Labour Minister Dion Foulkes yesterday announcedt hat he will take a representational count by secret ballot to determine which union the B ahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union ( BHCAWU) or the Bahamas Hotel Maintenance and Allied Workers Union (BHMAWU employees wish to have ast heir bargaining agent. The move comes “in comp liance with an order made by Justice K Neville Adderley on J uly 16, 2009,” noted Mr Foulkes. Justice Adderley had ruled that a poll must be conducted on or before August 14. The BHCAWU and theB HMAWU have been battling since 2006 over which o ne should be able to represent Sandal’s line staff. A t present all of the 12 executive members of the BHMAWU, including president Lynden Taylor, no longer work at Sandals. They w ere let go last year by the resort, which cited the effects o f the global recession for the lay-offs. Trade Union Con g ress President Obie Ferguson, who also acts as legal a dviser to the BHMAWU, has called for them to be reinstated. The poll is due to take place at the Gaming Board Office on West Bay Street, b etween the hours of 9am and 5pm. N on-managerial employees to have chance tov ote for union THE American tourist who was hit by a speed boat on T uesday while snorkelling near the Sandals Resort is s aid to be in stable condition at Doctors Hospital. According to a police source, the woman is a resident of Northern Kansas and a guest at the Sandals Resort on Cable Beach. M eanwhile, police are investigating who was at fault i n the accident and trying to determine whether or not the woman was swimming in an off-limits area. A jet ski oper ator who witnessed the incident claimed that the tourist was hit by the propellor of a vessel believed to be operated by Sandals. According some bystanders, the woman’s arm was "nearly severed" and she had a "huge gash" on her leg. The tourist was reportedly conscious and calm as she was taken to hospital for treatment. Yesterday, officers at the Cable Beach police sta-tion, who are handling the investigation into the accident, declined to release any details on the matter. Officials at the resort also declined to discuss the incident. "We're not commenting on that at all," said Sandals' public relations officer Stacey Mackey yesterday. Police have not released the tourist's identity. Tourist ‘stable’ after being hit by speed boat By NATARIO McKENZIE T ribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net J URORS in the Dorneil Ferguson murder trial heard emotional testimony yesterdayf rom the victim’s widow who recalled the shooting that led to her husband’s death. Dudley Duran Moree, 23, is accused of the murder of his c o-worker, mortician Dorneil Ferguson, 38, and the attempted murder of Ferguson’s wife, Y uzann. Struggling at times to hold back tears, Mrs Ferguson testi-f ied that she went to sleep with her husband and seven-montho ld daughter around midnight on June 26, 2008. She told the court that as s he lay in the middle of the bed, baby Dorneisha lay close to the wall and her husband lay b ehind her. She said she and her husband were wakened by the sound of gunshots and sat u p. Mrs Ferguson recalled feel ing a pain in her left arm and leg. She testified that as gun-s hots were being fired from the outside her husband pushed her closer to the wall and rolled on top of her, asking her if she was all right. Mrs Ferguson recalled how her husband lifted the baby by her leg and shook her t o see if she was all right. She said after the gunfire had stopped, she called the police and while on the phone her h usband told her to tell them Dudley Moree had shot them. Mrs Ferguson said when the p olice came they had to kick in their bedroom door and she urged them to check on their other children in the apartment. S he said her husband at that time kept telling police that Moree had shot them and gave them Moree’s address. Statement Under cross-examination by M oree’s attorney, Murrio Ducille, Mrs Ferguson told the court she gave a statement to police two days after the incident. She also told the court h er husband also worked at a nightclub as a security guard. She said she met Moree at her husband’s work at Butler’s F uneral Home and the accused visited their home on many occasions. Forensic pathologist Dr Govinda Raju testified y esterday that Ferguson died a s a result of a collection of b lood in his chest cavity due to gunshot wounds. He said that F erguson had seven entry wounds and three exit wounds. H e said an external examination showed that Ferguson had received a gunshot entry wound to his lower right palm which exited through the back o f his palm. He also had a gun shot wound to the left outer thigh, left mid-upper back and buttocks region and an entry wound in the left buttocks region. Detective Corporal Jamal E vans said that around 2.40 am on June 26, 2008, while on duty a t the Eastern Detective Unit, he received information regarding a complaint in the Family Street area and proceeded to t he scene with three other officers. He told the court he spoke to Sgt Alexander Pierre who led him into a bedroom. There, he said, he saw a man lying on his stomach with wounds to his lower back, a woman with a gunshot wound to the left leg and an infant child lying between them. Evans said the man, who he identified as Dorneil Ferguson, told him: “Duran Moree shot me.” He said that minutes later EMS personnel came and took Ferguson and his wife, Yuzann, from the apartment. He also told the court that at 5pm that day he and other officers while armed with a search warrant went to Moree’s home at Faith Gardens and arrested him. H e said a search of Moree’s r esidence proved negative for a ny evidence. C orporal Evans said that w hile taking Moree to the Carmichael Road Police Stat ion he noticed that the accused h ad an injury to his right hand. U nder cross-examination he t old the court that the accused c laimed he had injured his finger in a motorcycle accident. M r Ducille also suggested that F erguson had never identified M oree as the shooter and that Evans had made it up. Evans d enied the suggestion. The trial continues today. Grieving widow recalls shooting death of husband B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net AN Olympic gold medallist and t he president of the Bahamas Olympic Association yesterday calledt he introduction of legislation to outlaw doping in sports a “great step f orward” for Bahamian athletes. Parliamentarians yesterday debated a Bill for an Act to Provide for the Implementation of Measures to Dis courage the Use of Drugs and Dop i ng Methods in Sports and for Related Purposes. N oting that Bahamian athletes have been among those who have been cheated most by t he use of illegal performance enhancing substances by competing athletes, Minister of Sports Desmond Bannister suggested it is right that the country now formally joins the fight against dop ing. The new Bill provides the legal frameworkf or the Bahamas to fulfil commitments it made when it signed onto the World Anti Doping Code i n 2003, to which 192 countries are signatories. This code calls for the implementation of effective programmes to prevent, deter, detect and legally punish individuals for using or providing performance enhancing drugs which are banned under the code. The new Bill not only deals with anti-doping violations by Bahamian athletes and international athletes, but also includes sanctions for people such as coaches or officials who mayt ry to influence or mislead an athlete into taking a banned substance. M r Bannister said: “We are seeking to ensure that cheaters never again take glory away from the honest competitors on the world stage in the sporting arena.” President of the Bahamas Olympic Association Wellington Miller, who was in parliament to hear Mr Bannister’s speech on the Bill, described the legislation as a “great step forward.” “One of the disappointing things for me when I travelled to international conferences was that these people always ask me ‘why y’all don’t have your doping bill in place?’ Now it’s here and I’ll b e proud when I go away,” he said. Pauline Davis-Thompson, a 100, 200 and 400 metre sprinter who is soon to receive the gold m edal for her performance in the 2000 Olympic Games after Amer-i can athlete Marion Jones was found to have tested positive for a b anned substance, said the legis lation is “a wonderful thing.” “We should be at the forefront of the fight against doping. (By passing the law) we’ll be protect i ng our reputation on the international scene,” she said. T he sprinter, who was also in parliament yes terday, recalled the intense pressure she resisted f rom one of her coaches when she was younger to try certain things which would “make her run faster” and her bittersweet experience of finding out she is to get her Olympic gold medal eight years after she should have. Not being able to hear my national anthem was what stood out the most to me, not being a ble to see your flag raise. The feeling that you get at that moment just gives you such joy,” she s aid. Under the Bill, four new institutions will be created: A National Anti-Doping Commission, an A nti-Doping Therapeutic Use Exemption Com mittee, a Disciplinary Panel and an Appeals Trib unal. Mr Bannister emphasised that education is critical in the fight against doping in sports. Young people need to know what is on the prohibited list because it is not whether the athlete intended to dope that counts in sports, it is what is found in your body,” he said. The minister noted that some over-the-counter pharmaceuticals such as a Vicks Inhaler as well as certain “traditional medicines” used in the Bahamas have or may soon be designated as products that contain banned substances. “Full effectiveness of the Bill will require the combined support of the athletic community, including coaches, athletes and parents; they must all work hand in hand with our education as well as the legal and medical community,” he said. Sports anti-doping move applauded COURT: DORNEIL FERGUSON MURDER TRIAL In brief The St. George Branch of The ACM will be having a boat cruise Friday July 24th on board the Lady Savan nah, boarding time is 7 p.m, sailing at 8 pm from The Prince George Wharf. The proceeds will assist with its outreach ministry for the church and the wider com munity. For ticket information contact Rosow Davies on 325-8997. Boat cr uise on Lady Savannah Dion Foulkes D ESMOND BANNISTER

    PAGE 4

    EDITOR, The Tribune. Please tell me what’s going on at NIB? I am a business person in the eastern area of New Providence. I take my payment to the Fox Hill office every month as I am instructed to do by the Inspector. The Fox Hill office is convenient for me when I cannot make it, I send one of my workers. The people in this office are very helpful, polite and most of all the Inspectors know how to handle old people with respect. Last week I was told that very soon I would have to go down to the Blue Hill Road office because the Inspectors will be going down there. I think this is so inconside rate and so inconvenient for me as a customer. I thought the whole idea of NIB was to make things better for people that means I have to drive through all that traffic to make my payment to me, this makes no business sense. Mr Prime Minister, I know that you don’t know about this, sir, I thought the reason for having the people in the work place was to make things better and convenient for the employers. I know you are a considerate man and I’m begging you to please do something about this for me and the other business people up here in the Fox Hill area. Sir, when anybody gets sick we go right to the Fox Hill Clinic. This should be the same thing with NIB. Mr Prime Minister, we going backwards or forward? Please, sir, put a stop to this, ifn ot my payment will be behind all the time. A BUSINESS PERSON IN FOX HILL Nassau, June 27, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WE GOT a good chuckle from Opposit ion Leader Perry Christie’s protest yesterday that by the time Prime Minister Ingraham had completed his extensive expos in the House of Assembly on the abuse ofC rown land, nothing would be left for the appointed House committee to investigate. When this report came up on our computer last night it is on this morning’s front page its contents brought back early memories of the union movement in this country. The incident it recalled took place sometime in the fifties when the late Martin Pounder, a labour adviser, arrived from England to assist local unions. One day one of our staff approached Sir Etienne, then pub lisher of this newspaper. He wanted to start a union in The Tribune plant. Sir Etienne gave him the green light and then forgot about it. Some months later the staff member went to see Sir Etienne in his office. He was great ly agitated. At the time we had an English foreman, who was forward thinking, and wanted to modernise conditions in the plant and improve standards of employment for o ur employees. Sir Etienne also gave him the green light and backed his innovations enthusiastically, as did the staff. This apparently was a monumental probl em for our budding unionist. He protested all the improvements being made. “But, Mr Etienne,” he argued, “if Mr R ichards keeps doing all this for the staff, t here will be nothing left for me to agitate for when I start my union.” He was brusquely sent back to his job o n the “stone.” That ended all talk of unions i n The Tribune. We went to the office daily, the staff was told, to put out a newspaper, not to talk foolishness. And if there was any thing they didn’t like they knew their way to S ir Etienne’s office his was an open door policy for his staff. The staff had a good laugh. The scenario in the House yesterday b etween Mr Christie and Mr Ingraham seemed to be history repeating itself only in a new venue and in different circumstances, but with the same mental attitude. I nformation was leaked to The Tribune that all was not right in the Lands and Surveys department. The Tribune investigated the allegations and published its findings. The Opposition, as did the public, agitated for more infor mation. The Tribune kept digging and publishing. However, behind the scenes Prime Minister Ingraham was quietly doing his o wn investigation. Obviously he was in a position to unearth a treasure trove of information. He was now ready to publish. The House was adjourned to Monday underO pposition protest to hear his Communication. On Monday he made his Communication about the Crown land problem. He laid the supporting documents on the table of the House to be seen by all. The public can’t get into a committee room to hear what documents are presented to committee members or what matters are discussed. Nor, when it is time for the committee to report, will it know what important infor mation has been suppressed. This way nothing can be swept under the carpet. Mr Ingra ham has made it all available. Mr Christie is suspicious of Mr Ingra ham’s extensive presentation of the information. He suspects that the Prime Minister might not let the parliamentary committee do its job; that he might prorogue parliament, ending the current legislative session, which w ould mean the death of all legislative committees. including the committee to investigate Crown land. Like Sir Etienne told his thwarted unioni st, Prime Minister Ingraham told the Oppo sition leader that he was talking “baseless nonsense”, seeking to distract from the con t ent of his criticisms of the former PLP a dministration in relation to Crown lands. Mr Ingraham denied any intention to prorogue parliament. He said he just wanted t o “ensure” that the committee reported on t he matters it was appointed to investigate. However, according to Mr Christie, Mr Ingraham has made a considerable effort to get the information out and “win political p oints, which really could have been the work of the committee” it could also have been suppressed by the committee. We recall the 2002 election when Mr C hristie and his colleagues accused the FNM of giving away Bahamian land to foreigners it was their main plank for getting rid of the FNM government. M r Christie’s government was elected, then proceeded to give away even more of the Bahamian people’s land in the name of important “anchor projects.” These documents will tell the full story on both sides of the Crown land argument. The public can make up its own mind. It needs no committee to tell it what to think. What is going on at NIB? LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net EDITOR, The Tribune. Y our editorial “America’s Gun Culture Outdated” is very apt and timely, andd eserves greater prominence, but needs to b e subtitled “The World’s Armaments Culture Outdated.” The UN International Action Network on Small Arms (IANSA this problem for many years, and publishesa wealth of information on the topic. The tragic fact is that the arms industry makes tremendous profits (in fact, the arms i ndustry is regarded as the major industry in our world), and money and morality always appear to be in conflict! Some years ago, Amnesty International, IANSA and Oxfam stated in a Press release: “From 1998 – 2001, USA, UK & Francee arned more income from arms sales to developing countries than they gave in aid. The arms industry is unlike any other. It operates without regulation. It suffers from widespread corruption and bribes. And it makes its profits on the backo f machines designed to kill and maim human beings.” T he Report concludes: “So who profits most from this murderous trade? The five Permanent Members of the UN Security C ouncil – USA, UK, France, Russia and C hina. Together they are responsible for 88 per cent of reported arms exports.” T he US Congressional Research Service r ecords the 2001 top military exporters: USA $9.7 billion.; UK $4 billion; USSR 3.6 billion; France $1 billion; China 500 million; Israel 200 million. And since that date, sales figures have increased. N obel Peace Prize winner and former USA President Jimmy Carter observed: “We cannot have it both ways. We cannot b e both the world’s leading champion of peace and the world’s leading supplier of arms.” In the interests of world peace and prosperity, universal co-operation and action are needed to end the arms race, bothn ationally and internationally. As Nobel Prize winner and former UN Secretary General Dag Hammarskjold observed: “In our age, the road to holiness necessarily passes through the world of action.” CITIZEN OF THE WORLD N assau, July 15, 2009. The world’s armaments culture outdated EDITOR, The Tribune. Re: Campaign to ‘educate’ on adverse affects of Arawak Cay extension. Tribune, July 13, 2009. I appreciate being informed, but the thought of being “educated” by a politician (even though well-meaning always gives me the heebie-jeebies. KEN W KNOWLES, MD Nassau, July 13, 2009. Educated by a politician? What a thought PM’s expos upsets Christie E DITOR, The Tribune. Further to the article concerning the difficulty in clearing Customs as related by one importer, I have been waiting since July 7 to receive my merchandise which I ordered from the US. It was delivered on July 6, 2 009 to the Miami address of a local courier and was shipped to Nassau since July 7th. Surely the new Customs import forms cannot be that difficult to complete. No one can advise me when I can receive my package. This is terrible as I do not know what has happened to m y merchandise. It is better for me to travel and bring my purchases with me. Can anyone help? Even Bahamasair had a better record than this. FRUSTRATED CUSTOMER Nassau, July 19, 2009. Still waiting for my merchandise

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    T HUNDERSTORMS, h igh winds and scattered s howers will continue today as a tropical wave moves over the Bahamas affecting weather c onditions across the islands. As the tropical wave moved over the central andn orthern Bahamas yesterday it merged with a surface trough off the southeast coast of Florida. Meteorologists say there is l ess than a 30 per cent chance of the weather system develo ping into a tropical or sub tropical cyclone over the next two days. As the small upper level t rough interacts with the weak tropical wave there will be clouds and thunderstorms across the islands. G usty winds associated with thunderstorms will be a round 10 to 15 knots. A senior meteorologist at the Lynden Pindling Interna tional airport said the highest a ctivity brought on by the system will be east of the Bahama islands and move north into t he Atlantic. He added: “It’s quite right now, there’s nothing of signif i cant development, and no news is good news, especially at this time.” The weather system is e xpected to move northward or northeastward at around 20 mph and is expected to affect t he islands today and tomorrow. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 A 24-YEAR-OLDwoman accused of defrauding a local bank of just over $8,000 was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yest erday. L akindes Brown appeared before Magi strate Guillemina Archer in Court 10, Nassau Street, charged with two counts of stealing by reason of employment and 13 counts of fraud by false pretences. It is alleged that Brown, who was employed at the Fidelity Bank Bahamas Limited on Frederick Street, between April and May of this year, obtained $8,200 from t he bank by means of fraud and also stole t wo Fidelity Gold Visa credit cards valued a t $5 each. Brown pleaded not guilty to the charges and was granted $13,000 bail. The case was adjourned to November 17. Woman accused of defrauding bank By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net YOUNG Haitian Bahamians were scheduled to meet with Labour Minister Dion Foulkes last night to discuss topics ranging from national identity to job opportunities and t he problem of crime in the comm unity. Yesterday’s talk constituted the opening of the United Association of Haitians in the Bahamas Youth Conclave that lasts for five days. P rofessionals from the banking industry, e ducation, business owners, president of the H aitian Bahamian Society of the Bahamas J etta Baptiste, and others, will share their experiences of living and working in the Bahamas. T he role models will also explore the issue of Haitian Bahamian identity. United Association of Haitians in the B ahamas secretary Julie Smith said: “All of t hem are facing an identity problem, which I guess no one will be able to solve. “It’s just that some of them go to school, and are not into school, and they don’t go to church, so there aret hings that they should know they a re not learning elsewhere. “It’s really for them to let them know what’s happening in the community and the good from the bad, and what they shouldn’t be involved i n.” A police inspector will also talk to t he boys and girls aged 14 to 18 about crime in the community and offer advice. Mrs Smith added: “We have a lot of crime in Nassau and sometimes t hose crimes are committed by children of H aitian descent so we want to let them know what time it is. We want them to see the difference of the negative from the positive so they can know how to make good choices when they finishs chool, and what they should look forward to doing, so they will know how to excel themselves.” D aytime sessions will be held at Victory C hapel on Minnie Street, off Wulff Road, and evening talks take place at the Calvary Baptist Chapel. Young Haitian Bahamains set to meet Minister Tropical wave to bring storms and showers T HIS NOAA s atellite image t aken Wednesd ay, July 22, 2009 at 01:15 PM EDT shows dense clouds next to theB ahamas. (AP Dion Foulkes

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    C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@ tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Sir Jack Hayward said that a devel-o per has expressed strong interest in developing theD over Sound Subdivision, w hich has remained largely undeveloped for 40 years. Sir Jack, a principal owner of the Grand Bahama Port Authority, said the new bridge to be built at Grand Bahama Highway w ill revitalise development a t Dover Sound. Bridge “We have interest in Dover Sound, which has b een dead for a long time; we have some one intere sted in Dover Sound and one of his conditions is he must have a bridge conn ecting Grand Bahama Highway,” he said. A ccording to Sir Jack, the developer is interested in building a marina andr estaurant, and “doing what Dover Sound has not h ad for 40 years.” Graham Torode, presid ent of the Grand Bahama Development Company,c ould not be reached for comment concerning plans for the development at D over Sound. T he Grand Bahama Port A uthority is expected to begin construction on a 30ft high, four-lane concrete bridge in the next three months. S ir Jack said the Port Authority also plans to c onstruct a farmer’s mark et in Freeport, where resi dents can purchase fresh fruits, vegetables and fish. O riginally, there were p lans to build a fish market, but many local fishermen were opposed to the proposed location at the Fishing Hole Road on Queens Highway. The Port Authority has n ow decided on a new d owntown location for the m arket at West Atlantic D rive, near the roundabout a t the Home Centre. I think we should call it a farmer’s market, and we should encourage all farmers of the whole Bahamas to send their produce there, and not just have a fish market, I think that h as been the mistake,” said Sir Jack. He noted that fruits and p roduce from Eleuthera, Andros, Abaco, Long I sland, Exuma, and other Family Islands should be available in Freeport. We should have fruits and vegetables and other p roducts from the rest of t he Bahamas. It is ridicul ous that we cannot get pineapples from Eleuthera. We need to be able to access all the many products of the other islands in t he Bahamas,” he said. Hannes Babak, chairman o f the Port Authority, said B AIC has agreed to assist i n bringing Bahamian grown produce toF reeport. Products We really want it to be a farmer’s market where y ou are able to have fresh products but also processed products like the little r estaurants at Arawak Cay. We are talking to Mr Edis on Key at BAIC who has promised to help us bring the products here to F reeport,” he said. Mr Babak said that they h ave received positive feedback on the new location from many of the localf ish vendors in Freeport. “Most of the fishermen w anted it downtown instead of at Fishing Hole R oad, and a lot of people don’t want to drive all the way down there, so we d onated the land in downtown for that project,” hes aid. A developer is showing interest in ‘dead’ subdivision By KATHRYN CAMPBELL Bahamas Information Services MORE than 100 students were taught a bout road safety during a special session of the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture’s summer programme this week. Road Traffic Controller Philip Turner w ith representatives of the Road Traffic D epartment, including Michael Hudson, road safety coordinator, advised the stu dents at the Faith Temple Ministries camp s ite on proper use of pedestrian crossings, seat belts, and sidewalks, and how to get onand get off buses. Too many people lose their lives on the r oad in the Bahamas," said Mr Turner. " And sometimes people older than you are not responsible drivers. " So watch out for them because they may cause harm to you and to others. It is very important to pay attention as you walko r drive on the road.” M r Turner told the children to encourage their parents and guardians not to use cell phones or apply cosmetics while driving. Tell them to pay attention to the road," h e said. "When you are driving focus on the road only." The ministry’s four-week programme is b eing held in conjunction with Faith Tem ple Ministries. Summer campers learn all about road safety ROAD SAFETY coordinator Michael Hudson fields a question from children enrolled in the road safety summer camp sponsored by the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture. Letisha Henderson R OAD T raffic Controller Philip Turner speaks to children in the Ministry of Youth, Sportsa nd Culture’s summer camp programme on t he importance of road safety.

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    By Arthia Nixon TENNESSEE – A young B ahamian scientist’s groundbreaking study on freshwater turtles has earned him the opportunity to be featured in one of the world’s leading international journals. S tefan Moss, who spent two y ears collecting samples and d ata from the reptiles he encountered in the Tennessee River will now have the findings of his research documented in Chemosphere . C hemosphere i s a wellknown international journal focused on disseminatingi nformation related to all aspects of environmental science, especially importantnew discoveries or further d evelopments in investigations related to the environ ment and human health. H ard work has certainly p aid off for Mr Moss who w as born in Grand Bahama but raised in the capital cityo f Nassau by his parents Kei t h and Sylvia Moss-Greenwade. He double majored in Chemistry and Biology. The studies he completed in Tennessee, Mr Moss now plans to duplicate on endangered freshwater turtles in h is native Bahamas, particul arly on the islands of Inagua, Cat Island and E leuthera. It didn’t start off as me w ith aspirations of getting published in a respected journal like Chemosphere admits Mr Moss. “As an environmental scientist I was more focused on figuring out what chemicalsw ere in the river and their effects on the environment, and possibly human health. Instead, it seems I uncoveredand documented a lot of valuable information in the field of herpetology, which is the study of reptiles anda mphibians.” “The project, which was funded by a conservationg rant from the Tennessee A quarium Research Insti t ute (TNARI the freshwater turtles in the river because they are longl ived organisms and are therefore able to provide a large quantity of data overa longer period of time,” added Mr Moss. “Sure enough, after two years of collecting body meas urements and blood samp les, there was so much new i nformation on them that my p rofessor Dr Thomas Wilson challenged me to publish it. Unbelievably, afterf our years of work, it’s going to be published.” Mr Moss’ work led him to the National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST Carolina, where he worked i n the Hollings Marine Labo ratory. He also collaborated with renowned sea turtle scientist Dr Jennifer Keller who allowed him access to t he facilities for weeks at a time, which he took full advantage of, sometimes working as much as 20 hours a day. “Being recognised for this w ork is the highlight of my s cientific career thus far,” s aid Mr Moss. “It’s now a new contribution to science in an area that’s been studied before but not in this particular way. I feel that Bahamians need t o become more environmentally conscious and continue their efforts of encour-a ging students to take up science careers. I am confident that if we get creative and think beyond the norm, we c an offer exciting opportunities to our own scientists and those visiting our nation. T here is still a whole lot we d on’t know about our coun t ry in terms of science and I hope to come back homea nd help contribute to erad i cating the brain drain we so frequently hear about. We must come together, and pool our talents into making the Bahamas a model country as it relates to science.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 7 Bahamian’s turtle research to be published in major science journal B AHAMIAN ENVIRONMENTAL s cientist Stefan Moss (pictured plans to duplicate the research that earned him recognition in s cience journal, Chemosphere on the freshwater turtles in his native Bahamas. BAHAMIAN environmental scientist Stefan Moss (forefront) collects blood from a freshwater turtle on the Tennessee River. Moss’ groundbreaking findings will be published in Chemosphere, a leading scientific journal.

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    C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ByERIC ROSE Bahamas Information Services C AT Island’s rake n’ s crape band The Turning P oint Turners wowed visitors of the week-long Henley Festival in England. The Turners joined fire dancer Devia Wilson and visual artist P Elton Moxeyt o give audiences a taste of Bahamian culture. “We were heating up the c old town with the fire dancer and the hot sounds of rake ’n scrape,” said Bahamian cultural affairs r epresentative and project manager Angelique McKay. “It feels great to be here, t o have been able to accomp lish this particular feat in t he midst of this economic d ownturn. “The Henley Fest ival (from July 8 to 12 a lso experienced the squeeze. Tough decisions had to be made to cut acts from some of the countries that they were looking forward to, but the Bahamas was able to remain on the lineup of artists for the e vent,” she said. M r McKay said it was a feeling of “elation to be able t o showcase yet another a rray of our cultural expres s ions to the European audience and hopefully entice them to visit the land where a ll these great cultural e xpressions take place.” T he relationship between the Bahamas and the Henley Festival was formed fromt he successful Junkanoo Live project last year. That initiative took about 3 0 junkanoo performers and a rtists from various groups on a three-week tour of Engl and. T hey showcased their art f orm at several festivals and venues. But the Henley Festival w as a chance to interact with a new audience and hope f ully give them a deeper appreciation for Bahamian culture. " It was a wonderful experience being the first time in the Henley Festival,” said fire dancer Devia Wilson. “The crowd was amazed by the fact that I was putting the fire on my body.” Ms Wilson also performed last year on the Isle of Wight as part of another project that brought j unkanoo and other aspects o f Bahamian culture to E urope for the first time t hrough workshops and perf ormances at schools and with various festival organi sers. C harles King, Turners’ a ccordion player and leader, said he was “really amazed”a t the response they received b eing a small group coming o ut of the Bahamas. “People actually followed u s to some of the other spaces we were performing at the festival to listen to our music,” Mr King said. “Several times during our p erformances, when we had c ompleted our set, we were asked to play more. So this gives you an idea o f how much we were loved b y the festival patrons.” Rake-N-Scrape wows Europeans FIRE DANCER and junkanoo performer Devia Wilson s howcased her talent at the Henley Festival in England. M EMBERS o f the Turning Point Turners rake n’ scrape group are pictured as they performed at the Henley Festival in England.

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    Bahamians to empower them. “The agricultural land should be managed so that it is used by serious agriculturists, by those in the businessn ow and those who want to g et into the business. Wherever the land is owned by the Government, because it is the people’s resource, we have to find a way where it is fairly unlike how we haves een it exposed managed.” M r Smith added that obviously some of this land has to be set aside for public use such as national parks, etc, but cautioned that there iss ufficient land in the B ahamas for every Bahamia n to use to empower themselves. “But we have obviously in most recent years permitted the management of ourg reatest resource, outside of our people, to be managed by the most incompetent people. And that can’t be fair to the Bahamian people,” he said. At the time that the graph tabled by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham was made, Government’s dry land holdings stood at 1,362,205 acres. It is unknown at this time w hat the current figure would reflect, but it is expected that with the formation of the Lands Committee in the House of Assembly yesterday that more up-to-datei nformation will be made a vailable to the public in the weeks and months to come. According to the table, the total land mass of the Bahamas stands at 3.4 million acres, with 938,709 oft hat being private property. This total figure is again subtracted by 910,341 acres of wet Crown land (swamps and marshes) and the 237,583 that is already leased. It is with this scarceness of p roperty in mind that Mr Ingraham recently informed the House of Assembly that Government will take as tronger approach to eliminate the illegal occupation or “squatting” on Crown land. It is widely acknowledged t hat historic, informal occup ation of Crown or Governm ent land for residential and commercial purposes has occurred throughout the Bahamas for generations, particularly in the FamilyI slands, he said. C rown land made available for the development of a dwelling home by Bahamian citizens is granted in fee simple unless a lease purchase arrangement is sought by the applicant, Mr Ingrahame xplained. “This policy was adopted as the Government recognised that banks and other financial institutions were unwilling to approve home construction mortgages toi ndividuals who only held lease purchase agreements for Crown Land. “Following the adoption of this policy, hundreds of individuals were able to acquire C rown land at concessionary rates and subsequently to q ualify for mortgage loans from banks and other lending institutions,” he said. Where occupants in the F amily Islands establish that t hey have been on the land f or a minimum of 10 years prior to 1992, land was typically granted at the concessionary fee of two cents per square foot, said the PrimeM inister. I n New Providence, accelerated efforts were made after 1992 to regularise the occupation of Crown and/or Government owned land in Carmichael Village, Mr Ingraham said. A s a result, 36 Crown grants were issued to individuals, their estates, and to institutions. As a general rule, Crown land occupied and developed without proper authorizationf or less than 10 years prior to this Government’s re-election in 1992 were not considered eligible to be regularized at concessional rates, he said. However, where occupation existed for more than f ive years prior to 1992, and w here development had taken place either by construct ion of a residence or of a business enterprise, land has generally been approved by m y Government at concessionary rates ranging fromf our to seven cents per s quare foot,” Mr Ingraham s aid. 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Robinson Road393-5964 $20 $25 $40Offer last July 23rd 31st the information we need from the injured man.” They have not yet received a description of the vehicle or the armed men. T he shooting death marks the 44th murder o f the year. It follows a drive-by shooting in the East Street area at around 10pm Monday night,w hen a 30-year-old man was shot at least four times in the body on Lifebuoy Street. He isr eportedly in critical, but stable condition. P olice are also investigating the stabbing of a man from Stapledon Gardens who was knifed several times while a group of men w ere having at a party in Goodman’s Bay, West Bay Street. The man was stabbed three times in the b ack and once in the neck, Supt Moss said. He did not provide details of the weapon. T he man was taken to hospital in a private v ehicle and is in serious, but stable condition. S upt Moss said: “Someone has come forw ard to give us information, but we have been unable to speak to him as yet.” P olice are appealing for information from the public in respect to both the stabbing and the murder. A nyone with any information, which could a ssist investigations, should call the Criminal D etective Unit on 502-9991 or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 n ative capacity” to offer “inspiration leadership” to the next generation of Bahami-a ns. “With the general elections a mere two years away, I note t hat some political aspirants have begun posturing. This is good and in my opinion healthy for our democratic w ay of life. “I also opine that many elected politicians presentlys erving, on both sides of the House, seem lost and lack the vision necessary to birth inno v ative and creative ideas to lead as the nation grapples w ith multitudinous chall enges,” Bishop Hall said. Indeed, Bishop Hall added that it would be a disservice tot he country if many of our current politicians would offer themselves for re-election. “Some of them are petty a nd too small for the big s hoes they are in. One is hardp ressed to find more than five constituencies that can be used as model communitiesf or the rest of the nation. “Thousands of Bahamians will never reach the prover bial Promised Land if we con t inue to think and work the way we do. It should be clear that creativity, innovation and a broadening of leadership are all necessary to lift our country out of the quagmirei n which it finds itself today,” h e said. Bahamian law, the prohibition against marital rape was eliminated in 1991," she said. The present law defines r ape as an act of any person not under 14 years of age having sexual intercourse with another person who is not his spouse without the consent of that other person; without consent that has been e xtorted by threats or fear of bodily harm; with consent obtained by impersonating the spouse of that other person; or withc onsent obtained by false a nd fraudulent representations as to the nature and quality of the act. The proposed amendment would omit thew ords "who is not his spouse" therefore making i t a crime for anyone to h ave sexual intercourse with another person witho ut that person's consent whether or not the pers ons involved are married t o each other Ms Butler-Turner explained. T he proposed move also comes after calls from the international commun ity, she told Parliament. T he United Nations G eneral Assembly's Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women considers marital rape a human violationw hile the UN's Human Rights Council recommended the Bahamas' clause on marital rape be removed, said Ms ButlerTurner. O ne religious leader weighed in on the proposed change yesterday, calling it a positive stepf orward that could pro vide some recourse for marital rape victims. " That's a step forward because some spouses are taking advan tage and generally it's the man taking advantage of what they believe is still their legal right and I think it advances those w ho might be wronged in any way," said Bishop Hall, senior pastor of New Covenant Baptist Church, when contacted for comment on the amendment. He also stressed that married couples should l ook to counseling to repair their union before the situation spirals intoa violent one that needs the intervention of police. " People have to learn t hat ‘no’ means ‘no’ and the bottom line is something has gone wrong in the marriage when a husband is going to forceh imself on his wife. People need to revert to their p astor, priest or rabbi w hoever put them together before the marriage c rumbles to that point," h e said yesterday. T he proposed amendm ent will also increase the maximum period of time t hat legal proceedings can commence after a sexual offence is committed froms ix months to two years. M s Butler-Turner said m any sexual offences, the current window of time is too short as many cases of sexual crimes particularly those dealing withm inors are reported to police much later than the time they were committed. According to the minis ter, the law will not be a mended before her department has time to get the country's input on the changes through sev-e ral public forums. "It is hoped that after these public discussions, t his Parliament will consider the enactment of this Bill," she said. Change to rape law to protect wives F ROM page one FROM page one 55% of land Bishop Hall FROM page one FROM page one Man dies after gunmen attack

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    "They're not finished shooting yet and so we don't know that number," said Tourism Minister Vincent VanderpoolWallace on the sidelines of a press conference at the Graycliff restaurant to announce the production yesterday. The movie a sequel to Mr Perry's 2007 hit “Why Did I Get Married” follows three married couples who go on vacation to reaffirm why they got married. The film will highlight the tranquil life and picturesque beauty of the Family Islands away from the hustle and bustle of Nassau. "As people see the movie, more are going to want to come (to the Bahamasa huge global impact," said Mr Perry said yesterday before jetsetting back to Eleuthera to resume production. "I think it's going to spike tourism a little bit so hopefully we'll see lots more people coming down, especially AfricanAmerican people coming down to have a good time." Mr Perry, who reportedly purchased a private island in Exuma, said he may use the Bahamas as a location for future films and hopes more film-makers will follow suit. Before a brief session with the local media, Mr Perry paid a courtesy call to the Prime Minister and other Members of Parliament at the House of Assembly. Afterwards, Opposition Leader Perry Christie said the meeting was held to thank Mr Perry for his "significant" investment in the Bahamas. "He is very impressed with the beauty of Eleuthera and its people and I suspect we are going to have the benefits of that, whenever the film is made," said Mr Christie. The film's crew spent about a week shooting in the Exumas with filming expected to wrap on Eleuthera within the next five or six days. The original members of the first film's star-studded cast including Janet Jackson, Malik Yoba and Jill Scott all return for the sequel which is slated for an April, 2010 release. According Director-General of Tourism Vernice Walkine, production on the film was d elayed for a few days after the death of Ms Jackson's brother Michael Jackson on June, 25. Around two dozen locals are employed with the project, ministry officials said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE CAREER OPPORTUNITY Risk & Compliance OfficerColina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified professional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer. This isan executive position and the successful applicant should possess the following: Qualifications & Experience xBachelor’s degree from an accredited college or universityxMinimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliancexGraduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a law degreexProven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations for improvements to a compliance culture xHighest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of duties xKnowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and best practices xConfidentiality xExcellent oral and written communication skills Duties & Responsibilities: xDesign and implement a risk framework.xDevelop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps taken to foster good compliance.xImplement and maintaina compliance monitoring programme. This will serve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures.xProvide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws, regulations and policies applicable to the institution. xProvide management with guidance in the development, implementation and maintenance of policies, proceduresand practices tocover regulated activities.xCreate programmes thateducate, train and encourage directors, managers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and regulations.xServe as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators. The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a cover letter and resume to the following e-mail address no later than 27 July 2009: E-mail: careers@colinaimperial.com RE: Risk and Compliance Officer Absolutely no phone callswill be accepted ending the current legislative session and allowing all legislation and committees appointed during it, including the most recently appointed committee to investigate matters connected to the disposition of Crown lands to “die” with it. “This extensive provision of information to the House of Assembly and the country (by Mr Ingraham) could be seen to be arming the committee in advance with all of the information it needs. It could also be seen as some kind of justification if the committee dies for the Prime Minister to be able to say ‘Well you have all of the information and you can draw whatever conclusions you wish’. “Today you saw him say he’s going to investigate and report which is within the terms of the committee. There’s been a considerable effort to get out the information and win political points, which really could have been the work of the committee,” said Mr Christie. However, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham accused Mr Christie of talking “baseless nonsense” and seeking to distract from the content of his criticisms of the former PLP administration in relation to Crown lands. He said he has “no such intention” of preroguing par liament and wants to “ensure” that the committee reports on the matter it has been appointed to look into. “That was just (Christie’s thing to which he has no response,” stated Mr Ingraham. During an address to the House yesterday Mr Ingraham presented his rebuttal of claims made by Mr Christie on the issue of the granting of Crown lands on Monday. He claimed the PLP has historically sought to “have it both ways” in its position on Crown lands by both suggesting that the FNM has a record of facili tating land sales to foreigners to an extent that puts at risk the ability of future generations of Bahamians to own lands, and in the meantime doing many things during their tenure to assist foreigners in buying largea mounts of Crown land in the interests of “economic growth.” He said that while “as much as half” of land sales to for eigners in the Bahamas during the FNM’s tenure was between foreigners and not from the Government or a Bahamian to a foreigner, “reports made by (the PLP that their administration had approved the sale of more land to international persons in less than a single term than was sold in two terms under my administration.” Mr Ingraham claimed Mr Christie cannot be considered “completely blameless” in relation to the abuse of Crown land granted to then Director of Lands and Surveys, Tex Turnquest’s relatives, despite condemning this abuse. Several parcels of the undeveloped beachfront land granted to relatives of Mr Turnquest’s relatives for nominal fees in the region of $2,000 was “flipped” under the PLP government in 2005 and 2006 for close to half a million several years after Mr Ingraham signed off on the grants for the purpose of vacation or retirement homes several years earlier. Mr Ingraham charged that Mr Christie’s government did not do the “due diligence” necessary when it registered the resale of the undeveloped Forbes Hill, Exuma properties and could have objected. “I do not find the Leader of the Opposition blameless in registering the resale of these properties in 2005 and 2006. I do not find them blameless. This matter is not yet completed, Mr Speaker. Inquiries are and continue to be made by myself and others and in due course a report will be made to parliament,” said the Prime Minister. It was at this point Mr Christie interjected, stating that based on these comments and the information the Prime Minister brought to parliament he now “questioned whether this committee (to inquire into all matters concerning the disposition of Crown land) will ever be given life to report.” “I am now very curious as to whether or not there will be prerogation during this time and that committee will die,” said Mr Christie. Speaker of the House Alvin S mith yesterday announced that the lands committee will be headed by Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell and consist of Cat Island Rum Cay and San Sal vador MP Philip Davis, Kennedy MP Kenyatta Gibson, Bamboo Town MP Branville McCartney and Golden IslesM P Charles Maynard. FROM page one Christie FROM page one Tyler Perry TYLER PERRY

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    LONG before the science of ecology was born, adventurers were reporting on the natural wonders of the Bahamas. And one of our star attract ions was the flamingo our national bird. In fact, one early European visitor recorded hunting and catching a great number of "Swanees" during as topover on his way to Virginia i n 1587. T hese scarlet-coloured wading birds (which resembled swans to European explorers) are one of six species scattered around the globe. The West Indian flamingo nests in large colonies on coastal mudflatsa nd saltpans, principally in the Bahamas, Mexico, and Bonaire,b ut also on one island in the G alapagos. I n the 1700s, Englishman M ark Catesby produced the first illustrations of the West I ndian flamingo for his famous Natural History of Carolina, F lorida and the Bahama I slands, w hich was commiss ioned by Sir Isaac Newton to document the plants and animals of the New World. I n 1890, an American naturalist named John Northrop observed flamingo rookeries ont he west side of Andros, and noted that "a large number of young birds are yearly destroyed by the people for food. We ate the bodies of t hose we obtained and found the flavour most delicious." F rank Chapman, a pioneering ornithologist from the American Museum of Natural history, found thousands of n esting flamingos in South Andros during a field trip in 1904. His reports helped prod the government to pass the Wild Birds Protection Act the fol-l owing year. " Neither they, nor any other Bahaman bird was protected by law," Chapman wrote, "andI take no small pleasure in sayi ng that when this matter was brought to the attention of the proper authorities, an adequate bill was prepared and passed at the next session of the colonial legislature." I n the 1930s an amateur naturalist and adventurer named Gilbert Klingel spent time on Inagua and later published a b ook about his observations ( Inagua a very lonely and nearly forgotten island ). In one memorable passage he describes stumbling across a flock of flamingos: "A roar of sound suddenly b urst across the water and a thousand pairs of scarlet wings beat the air at once, throbbing, and the flock went screaming into the sky. It was the most breathtaking sight I had ever witnessed...Higher and higher they mounted, wheeled, and ina colourful deluge poured over the horizon." During the first half of the 20th century flamingos were pushed into ever more remote areas as human development expanded: "The Inagua colony is the most magnificent of all," Klingel reported. "Here the flamingos will make their last stand...and it will be only a short time before one of the world's most sublime sights will have disappeared from the Earth." But there's a surprising twist to this story. Frank Chapman (who led the 1904 expedition was a mentor to Robert Porter Allen, an Audubon Society expert who scoured the Caribbean searching for flamin-gos in the early 1950s. In his classic book, On the Trail of Vanishing Birds, Allen found that the colonies on Androshad already disappeared. He determined that the largest surviving group of West Indian flamingos inhabited the isolated back-waters of Lake Rosa on Inagua. During one of his visits, with local guide Sam Nixon, Allen came across a large flock of flamingos engaged in their ritualistic courtship dance: "We could see a solid band of red. It shimmered and undu lated in the heat exactly as if it were a long sheet of flame...They moved this way and that, without obvious pur-pose, like a hysterical and leaderless mob. Tightly packed as they were, and with every indi vidual jostling his neighbour and all of them jumping about like madmen, the outlines of the flock ebbed and flowed, as if it were molten, red-hot lava...the din was frightful." Allen and the Audubon Society decided to make a stand at Inagua, where they believed they could "hold off the eventual extinction of this species no matter what happ ened elsewhere." A group of influential backers was recruited in Nassau to form a Society for the Protec-t ion of the Flamingo, with Arthur Vernay as its leader. Vernay was an English a ntiques dealer who had made h is fortune in New York. An amateur zoologist, he went on collecting expeditions around t he world for the American Museum of Natural History. And on retirement, he movedt o Nassau. Before Vernay died i n 1960, Inagua had become the epitome of conservation chic in the Bahamas. " So far as Inagua is con cerned, the Society for the Pro tection of the Flamingo, with A rthur Vernay at the helm and with the goodwill and assistance of the Erickson family at Math ew Town, has provided com p lete warden protection," Allen wrote. Audubon helped finance this operation. I n 1956 the Society under took an expedition to Inagua to survey the flamingo colony.O ne of Vernay's associates i nvited James Bond creator Ian Fleming along for the ride. And in the Bond novel, Dr No, ( written that same year) the fictional island of Crab Cay, where the novel's evil geniusl ived, is a mirror image of Great Inagua. "His island's topography, its s ights and sounds, and the two wardens with their primitive little camp in the interior smack strongly of Audubon's real-lifep roject on Great Inagua." according to an article in the A udubon Magazine years later. I n fact, Fleming even took the name “James Bond” from an ornithologist who wrote a field guide on Birds of the West indie s. Then in 1958 events accelerated. A Columbia University grad student named Carleton Ray teamed up with the presti gious international explorer Ilia Tolstoy (a grandson of the great 19th century Russian writer Count Tolstoy) to mount a new Bahamian expedition this time to the Exuma Cays. Robert Porter Allen and other big-name conservationists were part of the team and their report led to the creation of the world's first land and sea park in Exuma, as well as to the formation of The Bahamas National Trust itself. In the early 1960s, this cadre of conservationists turned their attention to Inagua. According to Dr Ray, now in his 80s but still working as a research pro fessor at the University of Virginia: "After the passage of the BNT Act in 1959 and during the formal leasing process of the Exuma park, which was finalized in 1963, some of us were thinking about keeping up the momentum of protect ed-area conservation. "The flamingos were already protected to a degree through the Society, but we negotiated with government for a second park, and it agreed. The Inagua National Park was set aside in 1965. This series of events could not happen in today's complex world." Today the consensus is that, in many parts of the world, flamingos are at risk due to loss of feeding and breeding sites. As it becomes more difficult for them to breed successfully, populations are destined to decline, experts say. The number of breeding sites in the Caribbean has fallen from possibly 35 to around five today, and the largest colony numbering some 60,000 birds is found in the Inagua National Park which remains a true conservation success stor y. Flamingos are among the world’s longest-lived birds t here is a 1998 record of a female breeding successfully at t he age of 53. And The B ahamas National Trust still operates a field station at Lake R osa (named after Arthur Vernay) while Inagua continues as a magnet for both conservationists and ecotourists. Written by Larry Smith, M edia Enterprises Ltd, for the Bahamas National Trust. For m ore information call 393-1317 or visit www.bnt.bs C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 11 Island SpecialUnlimited Mileage, CDW, Fees, Taxes & Free UpgradeM idsizeinFloridaaslowasU S$45Daily/US$180Weekly w henusingtheupgradecoupon.F ullsizeinFloridaaslowasUS$49Daily/ US$205 Weekly w hen using the upgrade coupon.F orreservations,aswellasterms&conditions pleasecontactDestinationsat(786245-0520orat 1-800-468-3334.BesuretouseratecodeRC1 and couponcodeAU2253VLS whenmakingthe reservation.Upgradeisonlyvalidoncompactand midsizecarsonrentalsoftwoormoredays. RatesincludeunlimitedmileageCDW, local/state/airporttaxesandfees.Rates,terms& c onditionsaresubjecttochangewithoutnotice. OffervalidthroughSeptember30th2009.alamo.com The Bahamas national bird: one of our star attractions CAMP VERNAY at Lake Rosa in Inagua National Park. A FLAMINGO guards her chick on a nest mound in the Inagua National Park.

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    By ANDREW DAMPF AP Sports Writer ROME (AP w on the men’s 10-kilometer open water race at the world championships Wednesday, where officials will have to decide who gets the bronze medal after American Francis C rippen swam off course. L urz, who also won the 5K race Tuesday, covered the sea course off Rome’s ancient porto f Ostia in 1 hour, 52 minutes, 6.9 seconds. “I had the same tactic as the 5 K and it worked really well for m e,” Lurz said, adding that a big dinner helped him recover from his victory the day before. “First I had pasta, then I had a Big Mac and a cheeseburger at McDonald’s. U nfortunately, there was no German food available.” Andrew Gemmell of the United States finished second and Crippen touched third. T he Italian team protested that Crippen swam on the w rong side of a buoy heading into the finish, prompting him to duck under a rope to get back in line. The Italians a re hoping that local favorite Valerio Cleri could move up f rom fourth if Crippen is disqualified. Swimming governing body FINA accepted Italy’s protest and the United States appealed the decision. TheF INA Bureau will rule on the case Thursday morning. U.S. coach Catherine Vogt pointed out that open water rules do not require athletes to swim between the ropes. “There’s nothing written in the rules saying you have to f inish through the lane lines,” Vogt said. “It’s merely for guidance. And actually he had no advantage of doing what he did. It was actually a disadvantage to him. I think c learly he could have been first or second and he was third, and I think he deserves it.” However, FINA said that athletes were told before the r ace to finish between the ropes. R egardless of whether Crippen keeps his medal, Vogt was pleased by the American performances. “They both swam great races. I’m really proud of the a djustments they made from yesterday. It’s a tough turnaround,” Vogt said, referring to Gemmell’s fifth place and Crippen’s seventh in the 5K. “It’s their first world c hampionships.” Gemmell lives in Wilmington, Del., and Crippen is from nearby Philadelphia, yet they do not train together. It’s a 30 minute drive up I-95 (to Philadelphia train at home with my dad,” Gemmell said. “We don’t really train in open water. We train in the pool. We’ve found that pool swimming is actually very similar to openw ater swimming.” C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 13 T HOMAS LURZ o f Germany reacts after winning the 10-kilometer open water race in the sea off Rome’s ancient port of Ostia, at FINA Swimming World Championships yesterday... ( AP Photo: Michael Sohn) Lurz wins 10k open water race T HOMAS LURZ (AP d oping organizations outside The Bahamas, in relation to any athlete; encouraging and facilitating the negotiation by any sporting organisation and anti-doping organisation ofa ny agreement permitting t heir members to be tested by authorised doping control teams from other countries; and cooperating with the testing and education initiatives of WADA and other anti-d oping organizations. B annister made special mention of the impact the Anti-Doping Therapeutic Use Exemption Committee can have on the education of athletes, parents and coaches, andt he inadvertent use of banned substances which has plagued Bahamian athletes in the past. “This Committee will be responsible for Implementing and monitoring education a nd preventing programs along with the right sand r esponsibilities of our athletes. T his will be critical for young p eople in our country and criti cal for them to know what is on the prohibited list of banned substances,” he said. “As we know it is not whether t he athlete intended to use the s ubstance for performance enhance drugs but whether it is found in the body. It is av ery serious issue that can effect young people. Bahamians have long used the benefit o f cerrasee, strong bark, love v ine, along like things with v icks inhalers and vapour rubs however some of these tradit ional medicines may find their way on the list of banned substances and we need to bea ware of that.” B annister noted the numero us benefits Bahamian athletes have reaped on the international stage because of strict enforcement of Anti-Doping policies and the subsequent d isqualification of offenders. “At the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia, t he Bahamian Men 4x400 relay team finished fourth on the track. However in later y ears four of the United States team members were suspended for the use of performance enhancing drugs. Last yearo ur men got their Olympic bronze medal. At the same2000 Olympic games, Pauline D avis Thompson finished sec ond behind Marion Jones in the 200m. Jones was later revealed to be taking perfor m ance enhancing drugs. At the 2001 World Championships, Debbie Ferguson-M cKenzie finished behind Marion Jones. After Ms Jones’ disqualification, Debbie was just recently awarded h er gold medal. At the same World Championships in 2001, our Men’s relay teamf inished in second place behind the United States and now eight years later, Avard Moncur, Tim Munnings, Troy McIntosh, Chris Brown and Carl Oliver, finally have a world gold medal. Chandra Sturrup was only recently awarded her bronze medal for her performance in the 100m at the 2001 World Championships as the end result ofthe disqualifications of both Marion Jones and Kelli White. Our Men’s relay team is now to be recognised as bronze medallists from the 2003 World Championships as a result of the disqualification of the United States team,” he said. “Our recent experiences have shown exactly why it is in the interest of the Bahamas to adopt an efficient anti-doping regime. I know ofno country in the world that has been impacted as much as the Bahamas has by other countries that have been taint-ed through the doping process.” Bahamas introduces Anti-doping Sports Bill F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 5 5 the Queen Elizabeth Sports Center named after him in 1981. Finlayson, accompanied by committee members Harrison Petty, Sherwin Stuart, Lind a Thompson, Sandra Smith and coach Keith Parker, said they are really appreciative of t he contribution by Cable Bahamas for the l uncheon that is scheduled to start at 2pm. "We thank Cable Bahamas for their kind gesture," Robinson stressed. "The response to this event has been great from both the corp orate and individual level. We anticipate t hat Bahamians from every walk of life will join Tommy's contemporaries in a well d eserved tribute to our Bahamian national hero. " We have a number of partners who have come aboard by making an additional con-t ribution and continue to encourage others t o go above and beyond in paying tribute to an individual who has done so much for sports in the Bahamas." The luncheon was originally scheduled as a part of the 50th anniversary of Robinson's v ictory in the men's 220 yards at the British Empire and Commonwealth Games in C ardiff, Wales, on July 24, 1958. But due to t he death of one of Robinson's family mem bers and his own illness last year, they had to postpone the celebrations to this year. A mong the special guests expected to a ttend the event are Robinson's University of Michigan team-mate Hilton Nicholsen and Enrique Figuerola, the 1964 Olympic Games s ilver medallist in the men's 100m in Tokyo, Japan, where Robinson was a finalist. D uring the luncheon, Finlayson said they intend to show the actual race from Wales as well as highlight a number of the outstandinga chievements by Robinson dating back to the 1995 Pan American Games in Mexico where he was a finalist in both the 100 and 200 to the 1966 Commonwealth Games in Kingston, Jamaica, where he won a silver medal in the 100. Parker represented Britain in the long jump i n Wales in 1958 around the same time that he had applied for a job in the Bahamas. "I heard about Tommy and went to the Games Village and introduced myself to him," Parker recalled. "We struck up a great relat ionship. He told me that the Bahamas loves t rack and field and I came here in July or A ugust of 1958." Producing a book that outlined many of the achievements of Robinson in Wales, Park-e r said every newspaper had tons of articles on Robinson. " He was amazing and he remains pretty much the same today," Parker pointed out. " He's friendly, casual, quiet and he cares a lot about the athletes. Never shout at anybody, always whispers a kind word of encoura gement and has been a contributor to many. He's just a great man. This is a very suitable honour for him." P ersons still interested in securing tickets for t he luncheon can contact any committee mem ber or obtain them from the Colony Resort on St Alban's Drive or Prescription Parlour Phar-m acy on East Street south. Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y . F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 5 5 LONG-TIME coach Keith Parker holds up a book that highlights the performance of legendary sprinter Thomas Augustus Robinson at the 1956 British Empire and Commonwealth Games. At left is committee member Linda Thompson and at right is committee chairman Alpheus ‘Hawk’ Finlayson. Cable Bahamas first platinum sponsor of ‘Tribute to a Legend’ luncheon

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    THIS weekend is a special one for o ur sporting icon T homas Augustus R obinson and legendary skipper King Eric Gibson. Both, in their own rights, have been hailed as legends in track and field and sailing respectively, yet neither of them have earned the international recognition that has been bestowed upon so m any other Bahamians on the Queen’s honours list. Here is Robinson, whose rsum looks like a best seller novel about a sprinter who traveled the world and almost single-handedly represented the Bahamas at the highest level in the sport of track and field. The Friends of Thomas Augustus Robinson committee is scheduled to hold a luncheon 2pm Sunday at Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa in a tribute that is fitting for a king. On J uly 24, 1958, Robinson was s itting on top of the world w hen he won the men's 200 yards at the British Empire and Commonwealth Games in Cardiff, Wales. That was the pinnacle of his achievement, but over a span of a decade from 19551966, Robinson excelled in both the 100 and 200 yards and metres as well as extend ing it to the 300 where he set a world indoor record in Saskatoon, Canada, in 1964. Robinson, who took a shot at running for Parliament and eventually was honoured with his name being placed on the track and field stadi um at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre in 1981, deserves any and all of the accolades that will be bestowed upon him. He's a humble individual who, like coach Keith Parker p oints out, has a big broad s mile and has contributed s ignificantly to the development of a number of local track and field athletes behind the scenes. As he recovers from surgery, the committee could not have selected a better time to honour Robinson, who will also have an educational fund established in his name. The latter is a true testament to the first Bahamian to attend college on an athletic scholarship. It maybe long overdue, but considering that the achieve ments of Robinson are well documented, no one can take away from his achieve ments. And like everybody would suggest, now would also be a good time for him to be knighted as Sir Thomas Augustus Robinson by the Queen. After all, he had one of the most glaring performances turned in at the British Empire and Commonwealth Games in Cardiff, one of the countries still under the British rule, headed by the Queen. So let us honour him in that manner now when he would really appreciate it, just as much as he will on Sunday. While Robinson will get some more of his flowers this weekend, the focus will be placed on King Eric Gibson next weekend during the Acklins Regatta. Gibson, coined King because of his tremendous performance on the sailing beat, has enjoyed one of the longest tenures of any local skipper. He has been sailing in regattas for more than 30 years and will finally be going home to have the 2009 regatta held in his honour. S ome may say that Gibson m ay have caused more havoc i n the sport than anybody else. But he has done more for the promotion and the smooth sailing of regattas throughout the Bahamas than any one individual person. So his contribution has balanced itself out. Like Robinson, I person ally feel that what Gibson has done for the sport of sailing has not been recognised and he too should be given a knighthood for his achievement, although it's not as documented as Robinson. But one cannot talk about sailing and not mention the name King Eric Gibson. It's time that these icons are honoured just like others who have received the accolades for less than national accomplishments. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS For the Second Year Atlantis, Paradise Island will host the 2009 Miss Teen USA Pageant showcasing the beauty and grace ofthe most talented teenagers across the United States. WELCOME RECEPTION Tuesday, July 28th, 7:00pm 9:00pm, Atlantis, Paradise Island Opening cocktail party where guests can mingle with contestants and supporters. Ticket price includes food with carving station, appetizers, desserts, and other gourmet samplings from Atlantis restaurants. Cash bar available. Welcome Reception Tickets: Adults: $35, Kids under 12: $15 (Price inclusive of gratuity).PRESENTATION SHOW Thursday, July 30th, 8: 00pm, Atlantis, Paradise Island Watch all fifty one contestants compete in the Swimsuit and Evening Gown competitions to secure their spot in the Final Show. Presentation Show Tickets: General: $30, Reserved: $40 FINAL SHOW Friday, July 31st, 8:00pm, Atlantis, Paradise Island Witness the crowning of the new Miss Teen USA 2009! Final Show Tickets: General: $50, Reserved: $75Call Atlantis Box Office for ticket information at 363-66012009 MISS TEEN USA PAGEANT By ALEX KENNEDY Associated Press Writer SINGAPORE (AP Angeles Lakers star Kobe Bryant is optimistic the NBA champions will re-sign key free agent Lamar Odom. "I'm optimistic that he'll be back," Bryant said Wednesday at a news conference in Singapore as part of a sixcountry Asian tour. "He makes us a much, much stronger team." Negotiations broke down last week and the Lakers retracted a contract offer to Odom. The Miami Heat are also wooing the 6-foot-10 forward. Odom played a key role off the bench in the Lakers' championship run, averaging 12.3 points and 9.1 rebounds during the playoffs. Bryant said forward Ron Artest, who signed as a free agent with the Lakers earlier this month, will help bolster t he team's chances to repeat a s champions. " I think Ron's going to be a great addition to us," Bryant said. "It's about how well we play together. No matter how much talent you have, it's about how you put those pieces of the puzzle together." Bryant downplayed speculation that Lakers coach Phil Jackson may take some games off next season because of health problems. " Who said he's coaching l ess?" Bryant said. "Phil likes messing with you guys. He'll be there all the time, unless he has a doctor's appointment to get to." Bryant also said he was more likely to agree to play for Team USA at the World Championships in 2010 and the 2012 London Olympics now that Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski has committed to lead the team. Bryant and Krzyzewski won the gold medal at the Beijing Olympics last year. "I'm very excited to see that he signed on," Bryant said. "It influences all the guys just because we've been through that experience before and it becomes like a family." "It definitely influences me." Bryant, an 11-time All-Star, said a possible showdown against LeBron James, former Lakers teammate Shaquille O'Neal and the Cleveland Cavaliers in next season's finals would be "crazy." "Just the hoopla that surrounds it and all the stories that would come out of it," Bryant said. "If that match up is to happen, we have to take it one day at a time, we can't get caught up in it being a given that we're going to be in the finals." "We have to take care of our business, but that being said, it would be a heck of a show." Bryant ‘optimistic’ Odom will re-sign with Lakers KOBE BRYANT (AP KING ERIC GIBSON THOMAS AUGUSTUS ROBINSON one the premier Bahamian athletes of the 20th century Robinson and Gibson should ‘be knighted’ by the Queen O PINION S TUBBS

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    By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net CABLE Bahamas is the first platinum sponsor of the “Tribute to a Legend” lun-c heon in honour of track and field icon Thomas Augustus Robinson set for Sunday atS andals Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa. John Gomez, vice president of engineering at CableB ahamas, yesterday made a cheque presentation to Alpheus “Hawk” Finlayson, chairman of the Friends of Thomas Augustus Robinson committee. Cable Bahamas joins a number of companies who have pledged their financial support for the luncheon, which is being held in part tohelp cover the medical expenses of an ailing Robinson and establish an educational fund in honour of the first Bahamian to head off to school on an athletic scholarship. "At Cable Bahamas, we always believe in giving back and with the Cable for Cares organisation, which has been in existence since the incep tion of the company, we are always looking at ways to give b ack to the community," said Gomez, who attended the conference with Richard A dderley, director of human resources. As a sporting legend and icon in the country, Gomez s aid they couldn't help but support Robinson, who had the track and field stadium at C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 PAGE 13 International sports news Lurz wins 1 0k open water race... S ee page 13 By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net AS ONEof nearly 200 countries to sign on to the World Anti Doping Code and adhere to the programmea s adopted by the International O lympic Committee, the Bahamas h as moved toward compliance by adopting legislation to enforce the c ode, said Minister of Youth Sports and Culture, Desmond Bannister. I n his contribution to the AntiDoping Sports Bill, Bannister, announced that the Bill would introduce a number of initiatives to place the Bahamas on par with the remainder of the world in regards to its antid oping policy, most notably the e stablishment of a National AntiDoping Commission, Anti-Doping Therapeutic Use Exemption Committee and a Disciplinary Panel. “My Ministry will seek to establ ish a National Sports Medicine Commission that will have a number of important functions, the most impor-t ant of which will be the enforce ment of the World Anti Doping Code upon local and visiting athletesa nd teams,” he said. “The Bahamas was one of 192 c ountries to sign this declaration to date. Its principal objective is the implementation of anti-doping programmes in order to prevent, deter, detect and punish individuals using or providing performance enhancing s ubstances. We have a global instrument to organise regulation and to provide the establishment and exe-c ution of anti doping policies, rules and regulations for the benefits of sports organisations and ensure fair-p lay to athletes worldwide. Individual countries have three commitments u nder the code, the first is acceptance, the second is implementation and the third is enforcement.” The Minister outlined the various responsibilities of the Commission and its subsequent panels which will b ecome vital in the country’s compliance with the Lausanne Act and t he Anti-Doping Code. “The National Anti-Doping Commission will consist of nine members who will be appointed by the Minister. This commission will have the duty of propagating anti doping rules, i mplement policies and programs w ith regard to doping in sports and w herever necessary be responsible f or implementing the world anti doping code,” Bannister said. O ther duties of the Commission as recorded in the Bill will include the establishment of a “register fort he Registered Testing Pool of national-level and international-level Bahamian athletes who are citizens or residents of The Bahamas and notifying such athletes and relevant national sporting organisations o f entries made in the register, it will also l ead to the notification of “test results to athletes and, as the case may be, governments of countries other than The Bahamas, anti-doping organisations of other countries, or other signatories to the Code in a ccordance with bilateral or multil ateral agreements entered into by T he Bahamas with such governm ents, organizations or signatories.” Other duties of the Commission i nclude “entering into reciprocal test ing agreements with national antiBahamas introduces Anti-doping Sports Bill Country signs on to World Anti Doping Code Cable Bahamas first platinum sponsor of ‘T ribute to a Legend’ luncheon CABLE Bahamas’ vice president of engineering JohnG omez makes a cheque presentation to Alpheus ‘Hawk’F inlayson for the luncheon on Sunday for Thomas A ugustus Robinson. F rom left are Harrison Petty, Sherwin Stuart, LindaT hompson, Gomez, Finlayson, Sandra Smith, Richard Adderley and coach K eith Parker. S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 3 3 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 3 3

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    $100k spend takes Cost Right online C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.21 $3.90 $4.10 %' r&%(! !&+&*&%#"% +++ ntrn ft !)"*+&$ #!"#%(,#-+!+&,#-ft+!''&"%+$%+&%#-,#-ft+!&%&)& "*%&+, ,*++! .#&+."%+)"&).,##-..'+"&.+!. f f f r ! & # ! ( t # ! ! b % ! # ! $ ! ' n # ! $ * General insurance carrier’s Board still considering BISX listing, but not top priority * Predicting likely gross premium drop of 5% year-over-year for 2009 * Set to make decision on acquiring remaining 70% stake in General Brokers& Agents by year-end By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor BAHAMAS First’s president yesterday said the negative $11.9 million swing the compa-n y sustained on the value of its equity investments in 2008s howed it “can actually sustain a significant loss” and remain p rofitable, giving shareholders confidence it can weather a m ajor hurricane and the expected “close to 5 per cent” drop in gross premiums this year. Patrick Ward, who is also the general insurance carrier’s chief e xecutive, said that despite the unrealised losses on its invest m ent portfolio, largely due to the slump in value of its Com m onwealth Bank holdings from $18 million to $14.9 million, its equities holdings had performed better than if they had been more widely invested a cross BISX-listed stocks. “We actually did better than i f we had been more broadly invested on BISX,” Mr Ward t old Tribune Business. “It’s just another vindication for holding on to that [Commonwealth Bank] investment.” Bahamas First owns 2.133 m illion Commonwealth Bank shares, although their value had d ropped to $7 per share at yearend 2008, compared to $8.37 p er share the year before, hence the swing to a $2.922 mil lion loss on the unrealised value o f its investments. However, Mr Ward said the f act that Bahamas First had managed to generate net profits o f $3.464 million for 2008, despite such a dramatic swing, s hould give shareholders, poli cyholders and the industry conf idence it could withstand an avalanche of insurance claims resulting from a major hurricane and remain profitable. Explaining that the impact of the $11.9 million equities valuation swing was similar to that expected from a major hurricane, Mr Ward said of the 2008 financial performance: “We can actually sustain a significant loss on the profit and loss side, without necessarily having a com plete wash in any one year. “The impact of the Commonwealth Bank move is actu ally what we would expect to see in any significant loss year.” Bahamas First: $11.9m swing shows ability to absorb loss S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 B B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE head of the host plan n ing committee for next month’s Miss Universe Pageant yest erday said it was critical that all Bahamian designers “come up t o the mark” on product quali ty and design if this nation is to develop a sustainable fashion industry, with the Government needing to encourage the sec t or’s development due to its foreign currency earning poten t ial. Owen Bethel, head of Nas sau-based financial services provider the Montaque Group, who is also acting as the Pageant’s co-ordinator, told Tribune Business that all B ahamian fashion designers needed to match the quality of t heir peers who had been selected to outfit the 86 Miss Universe contestants during the Fashion Show. The three Bahamian designe rs chosen for this task, after an open call, are Rachel Turn Designers must ‘come up to mark’ to maximise Miss Universe exposure * Pageant and fashion show organiser urges government to encourage development of Bahamian fashion industry as foreign exchange earner * Miss Universe publicity can be ‘catalyst’ for sector and fashion show growth * Islands of the W orld hoping to attract more than 500 visitors this year, with maximum of 20-25 designers S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor N ew Providence Development Company is look-i ng at a $30 million total investment to construct its planned new Town Centre for the western part of the island, i ts chief executive explaining t hat the facility was needed to spark the firm’s “regional development plans” and replace a Lyford Cay ShoppingC entre that was “clearly on its last legs”. T. Rhys Duggan, who is also New Providence Development Company’s president, told Tribune Business that the TownC entre development located opposite the entrance to theC harlotteville project would feature some 32,000 square feet o f retail space, and another 32,000 square feet of office condo space. In addition to the planned 64,000 square foot mixed-useT own Centre space, Mr Duggan said the company’s plansa lso called for “six or seven” businesses to be located along W indsor Field Road, including the likes of a gas station, bank a nd fast food restaurant. He pointed to a current dearth of such facilities in western New Providence. Mr Duggan said New Provid ence Development Company was now “going full speeda head” to obtain all the necess ary final planning approvals and other permits needed fromt he Government. The proposed Town Centre h ad already received its ‘approval in principle’ from planning bodies such as the Town Planning Committee, and Mr Duggan said the TrafficI mpact Study had also been approved by the Government. W ith Abaco Markets’ new premium food store format, S olomon’s Fresh Food Market, secured as the Town Centre’s anchor tenant, Mr Duggan said N ew Providence Development Company would “ramp up” e fforts to secure all outstanding government permits and a pprovals. “We already have our engi neering designs done in-house schematically, so it will not take long to translate them into con-s truction” and other required documents, Mr Duggan added. W hile unable to give a precise construction start date due t o the outstanding approvals, the New Providence Development Company chief executive added: “As quickly as things can get approved, we’ll startc onstruction. “The target for us and Abaco M arkets, which is very important for both of us, is to have t he fresh food market open by Spring 2011, which we think is v ery doable.” Although unable to give details on how many jobs the Town Centre project would cre ate, both during the construc t ion and post-opening phase, Mr Duggan said: “For us, it’s a key component of our regionald evelopment plans.” And, referring to the comp any’s existing Lyford Cay Shopping Centre, he added: “I t hink the centre we have now is clearly on its last legs, being 40 years-old, and it’s time to upgrade facilities here both for the existing population and then ew population moving to western New Providence. We’re seeing a lot of interest among both office busin esses and retailers, realising there’s a well-established mark et here already, and as a result they want to have a presence out here.” Mr Duggan added that New Providence Development Com p any had 25 tenants at the existing Lyford Cay Shopping Centre, and hoped to take “al ot of them” with it when the new Town Centre opened. Thec ompany had received interest from a similar number of p rospective new tenants interested in taking space in the new development. “That centre [Lyford Cay] will close once the new one iso pen, and we will continue to evaluate our developmento ptions on that site,” he added. New Providence Developm ent Company had “a good number of potential tenants” l ined up for the Town Centre, and Mr Duggan said securing contracts and agreements with them would be easier now that $30m investment in Town Centre * Proposed project to feature 64,000 square feet of space s plit evenly between retail and offices, with ‘six to seven p ads’ to include bank, gas station and fast food restaurant * Project to replace 40 year-old Lyford Cay Shopping Centre that ‘is on its last legs’ * But waste water franchise for western New Providence is key component that is missing * 20 homes still being developed at Old Fort Bay, but light industrial park on hold until ‘market improves’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net A BACO MARKETS is moving its Cost Right retail form at online with the launch of CostRite.com through an almost $100,000 investment set to roll out in the third quarter of its current financial year, its c hief executive revealed yesterday. G avin Watchorn, who is also Abaco Markets’ president, said T. RHYS DUGGAN By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net ABACO MARKETS, which has been renamed as AML Foods Ltd, reduced its bank debt by $1.2 million near the end of its fiscal 2010 second quarter, while sales had shown significant growth over the first $3.5-4m spend for AML Foods’ latest format S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B

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    ONE of the essential services required by any business is a good legal relationship with a competent attorney or law firm, whether for litigation, commercial or transaction purposes. As with other service providers, it is important that a business considers certain factors in selecting attorneys, preparing for attorney-client meetings/consultations, and maintaining and managing the legal relationship and overall conduct of any legal matters. K K e e y y C C o o n n s s i i d d e e r r a a t t i i o o n n s s When retaining an attorney or law firm for a legal matter, a business should consider the following key elements: * The attorney/law firm’s expertise in the area of law featuring the anticipated/specific business need or legal m atter (s S ome legal matters require b oth litigation and transaction competencies, and an overall commercial awareness and understanding of the business’s most optimal legal strategy and intended legal outcome, given the nature, complexity and cost-benefit analysis of the matter. * Potential conflicts of interest or representation of any potential alliance partners and/or competitors * The adequacy of the attorney/law firm’s professional indemnity insurance for potential liability, given the legal matter for which the attorney/law firm will be engaged. * The experience, competence, case management, leadership, communication and legal and business skills of the attorney/law firm, given the nature and complexity of the legal matter. * The integrity and trustworthiness of the attorney/law firm and his/her understand ing and commitment to the confidentiality, attorney-client privilege, and roles and legalr esponsibilities of the parties u pon engagement. * The cllarity and comprehensiveness of the engage ment letter, retainer agree ment, or the terms and conditions of the attorney/law fir-m ’s engagement in and conduct of the legal matter. * The attorney/law firm’s hourly rate, estimated fees, retainer, payment arrange ments, and fee structure and billing scheme for work to be done by junior attorneys and/or paralegals. * Any past work, cases or legal matters performed by the attorney/law firm in the area of law relating to the spe cific matter to be litigated or handled by the attorney/law firm. * The reputation and respectability of the attorney/law firm locally and internationally. * Whether any complaints have been made or disciplinary actions taken against the attorney/law firm by the Bahamas Bar Association. D D o o c c u u m m e e n n t t a a t t i i o o n n Before meeting the attorney/law firm for the initial consultation on the legal matter to be addressed, a business person should organise and bring a copy of all the legal and business documents and correspondence which may be relevant to the issue. Depending upon the specific business or legal need, these documents may include, but not be limited to, the following items: * The business plan, organisational chart, company manuals, policies and procedures, compliance reports, annual reports, financial statements * Corporate documents, including the original or copies of the Certificate of Incorporation, Memorandum and Articles of Association, resolutions, minutes, Registers of Directors and Officers, Register of Members, Certificates of Incumbency, Powers of Attorney, Shareholder Agreements * Letters, e-mail messages a nd other correspondences * Contractual, vendor, employment or other business agreements * Court documents, including Writs of Summons, Statements of Claim, Judgments I I n n f f o o r r m m a a t t i i o o n n g g a a t t h h e e r r i i n n g g a a n n d d u u n n d d e e r r s s t t a a n n d d i i n n g g t t h h e e l l e e g g a a l l p p r r o o c c e e s s s s In your initial meeting with the attorney/law firm, some of the following questions should be asked: * How many similar trans actions or legal matters has the lawyer handled in comparison to the legal matter to be addressed? * What has been the outcome/success rate of past legal matters? * How much of the attorney/law firm’s work is done in the particular area of law of the legal matter to be engaged? * What is the process, procedure and paperwork involved in the particular legal matter to be dealt with? Will the attorney/law firm also effectively and responsively communicate this information to the client in a clear, coher ent and comprehensive man ner? * What is the education and information-gathering process between the attorney/law firm and client? Will there be any legal coaching and overall legal strategy in the conduct of the matter? * Are there any potential conflicts of interest relating to the attorney’s proposed engagement in the matter? * What personal and corporate documentation is needed beforehand in order to engage the attorney/law firm? * How long will the matter take to conclude? * What will be the mode and frequency of communication between the attorney/law firm and the client in the conduct of the matter? * How many attorneys/paralegals will be working on the matter? How will the client be charged – hourly rate, flat fee, or retainer? How will the work of junior attorneys, paralegals, staff members be reflected in the billing? What are the estimated disbursements and expenses involved? * What will be the nature a nd ambit of their legal serv ice, advice and assistance on e ngagement, and throughout the conduct of the matter? * What are the alternative solutions, legal strategies, and possible consequences of each option to be proposed or pursued by the attorney/law firm? * What is the potential outcome of the case? Are these aligned with the expectations of both the attorney/law firm and client? All attorney-client rela tionships should be built, maintained and managed on integrity, trust, mutual understanding, open and honest communication, professional ism and interdependence. These objectives can only be achieved with a clear understanding of the role, risks and responsibilities of both attorney and client, and an appreciation and respect for the professional services to be rendered and rewards to be gained. 2 2 0 0 0 0 9 9 . . T T y y r r o o n n e e L L . . E E . . F F i i t t z z g g e e r r a a l l d d . . A A l l l l r r i i g g h h t t s s r r e e s s e e r r v v e e d d . . N N B B : : T T h h e e i i n n f f o o r r m m a a t t i i o o n n c c o o n n t t a a i i n n e e d d i i n n t t h h i i s s a a r r t t i i c c l l e e d d o o e e s s n n o o t t c c o o n n s s t t i i t t u u t t e e n n o o r r i i s s i i t t a a s s u u b b s s t t i i t t u u t t e e f f o o r r l l e e g g a a l l a a d d v v i i c c e e . . P P e e r r s s o o n n s s r r e e a a d d i i n n g g t t h h i i s s a a r r t t i i c c l l e e a a n n d d / / o o r r c c o o l l u u m m n n , , g g e e n n e e r r a a l l l l y y , , a a r r e e e e n n c c o o u u r r a a g g e e d d t t o o s s e e e e k k t t h h e e r r e e l l e e v v a a n n t t l l e e g g a a l l a a d d v v i i c c e e a a n n d d a a s s s s i i s s t t a a n n c c e e r r e e g g a a r r d d i i n n g g i i s s s s u u e e s s t t h h a a t t m m a a y y a a f f f f e e c c t t t t h h e e m m a a n n d d m m a a y y r r e e l l a a t t e e t t o o t t h h e e i i n n f f o o r r m m a a t t i i o o n n p p r r e e s s e e n n t t e e d d . . T T y y r r o o n n e e L L . . E E . . F F i i t t z z g g e e r r a a l l d d i i s s a a n n a a t t t t o o r r n n e e y y w w i i t t h h F F i i t t z z g g e e r r a a l l d d & & F F i i t t z z g g e e r r a a l l d d . . S S h h o o u u l l d d y y o o u u h h a a v v e e a a n n y y c c o o m m m m e e n n t t s s r r e e g g a a r r d d i i n n g g t t h h i i s s a a r r t t i i c c l l e e , , y y o o u u m m a a y y c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M r r F F i i t t z z g g e e r r a a l l d d a a t t S S u u i i t t e e 2 2 1 1 2 2 , , L L a a g g o o o o n n C C o o u u r r t t B B u u i i l l d d i i n n g g , , O O l l d d e e T T o o w w n n e e M M a a l l l l a a t t S S a a n n d d y y p p o o r r t t , , W W e e s s t t B B a a y y S S t t r r e e e e t t , , P P O O B B o o x x C C B B 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 7 3 3 , , N N a a s s s s a a u u , , B B a a h h a a m m a a s s o o r r a a t t t t y y r r o o n n e e @ @ t t l l e e f f i i t t z z g g e e r r a a l l d d g g r r o o u u p p . . c c o o m m . . C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE KDUYH\PRUULV#WV SEDKDPDVFRP INSIGHT F or the stories behind the n ews, read I nsight o n Mondays Legal Ease by Tyrone Fitzgerald On the same page with your attorney Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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    Correction B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net B UTTERFIELD Fulcrum (Bahamas that it is making 11 staff members redundant over a period o f six months, and indicated t hat this newspaper’s Wednesday story was correct by suggesting its operations in this nation were due to shut down. S ources close to the company told Tribune Business on Tuesday that as many as 15 individuals might have been let go, as t he fund administrator sought t o close its Bahamas -ased operation and transfer the business book to Butterfield Fulcrum’s offices in Bermuda and theC ayman Islands. Butterfield Fulcrum’s head office, in a statement released yesterday, confirmed: “As a result of difficult market conditions, we have decided tod ownsize our office in the Bahamas, resulting in 11 staff redundancies which will take effect over a six-month period. We have made relocation offers to several members of staff affected by the redundancies. We have undertaken caref ul advance planning to ensure a transparent and seamless transition for all our Bahamasdomiciled clients, while allowing for substantial notice fora ffected employees to find other employment opportunities.” One financial industry source said of the Bahamas office: The fund business has dried up for them, probably, and they are relocating to where they have scale, which would be Cayman or Bermuda.” K eeping mum on further details of the lay-offs and potential move, current managing director Sandra Gilbert t old Tribune Business she could n ot say more but that “a press r elease would be issued by the a fternoon”. T he investment funds sector of the global financial services industry has borne the brunt of the credit crunch and econom-i c recession, with many funds suffering huge redemption requests from investors desperate to pull their money out a nd find safer havens for it. These redemption requests have been enough to put some funds out of business, while other fund managers/promotorsh ave either suspended redemptions or decided to wind-up their existing funds. All this would negatively impact a fund a dministrator such as Butterfield Fulcrum, reducing its business. It is thought that the fund administrator would have wrapped up its business in theB ahamas by September. A statement was prepared by Butterfield Bank (Bahamas designed to distinguish itself as a separate entity unaffected by t he lay-offs. B utterfield Fulcrum is an a ffiliate of Butterfield Bank ( Bahamas) though with an autonomous management team and board of directors. Butterfield Fulcrum’s B ahamas business has gone through two ownership changes in five years. Originally known as Deerfield Fund Services, it w as acquired by Butterfield Bank in January 2004 and renamed Butterfield Fund Services (Bahamas Then, in July 2008, Butterf ield decided to merge all its funds services operations including those in the Bahamaswith Fulcrum, retaining a 40 p er cent stake in the merged Butterfield Fulcrum. When Butterfield acquired Deerfield, it had 12 staff and assets under administration of$ 1.8 billion. The latter figure had grown to $2.9 billion by year-end 2004, and its size att he time of the Fulcrum deal can be gauged by the fact that, at year-end 2007, Butterfield’s assets under administration in t he Bahamas (when it still owned both the funds business and the bank), were $5.447 billion. At year-end 2008, when the f unds business had been merged into Butterfield Fulcrum, assets under administration in the Bahamas totalled j ust $2.349 billion. This implied that Butterfield Fulcrum’s Bahamas operations had almost $3.1 billion in assets under administration by year-end2 008. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 3B Employment Opportunity Senior Collections Officer An employment opportunity exists for an innovative, persuasive leader with a passion for success, a desire to succeed and the ability to initiate progress. Skill Requirements Excellent oral and written communication skills Excellent motivation & coaching skills Ability to execute priority based workload Possess excellent planning, organizational and implementation skills Ability to operate and familiarity with POS systemsProficient in Microsoft Office applications Possess strong foundation of accounting practices and procedures Strong multitasking abilityStrong leadership & managerial skills Strong internet skills i.e. Emailing, group messaging and research Ability to exert initiativeRecording, summarizing, a nalyzing, verifying and reporting of results of financial transactions Minimum Experience Requirements Tertiary level with degree in related field; Collections executive with at least 4 years experience in collections or related field ; At least three years experience in supervisory post; Strong knowledge and application of MS Microsoft Suite APPLY VIA EMAIL TO: srcollectionsofficer@yahoo.com bnr fbnn %((%(!( &!) bn r !%, &'!$( ***!,&,# tttt !%,, Fund administrator confirms 11 lay-offs IN the Page 3 Tribune Business story on Wednesday, July 22, 2009, headlined ‘Bank’s inhouse move to boost ecommerce’, Bahamas Virtual Mall’s website was wrongly stated as bvn.com. The correct web address is www.shopbvm.com. The Tribune appologises for any inconveniences this has caused.

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    t he company was also in talks w ith the Domino's Pizza master franchisor in a bid to bring online order purchasing to the C aribbean and the Bahamas. Abaco Markets owns the D omino's Pizza franchise in the Bahamas. According to Mr Watchorn, the new CostRite.com site will give Family Island customerst he option of having their orders delivered to the dock for d irect shipping. He said Cost Rite will employ a dedicated department for processing and shipping orders. " We're gong to include the schedule of all the mail boats,s o whichever island you're on you can select which mail boat s ervices your island, which day it sails and pick which day you want to put it on," said Mr Watchorn. The website will be designed t o be as robust as possible, he added, with comprehensive d etails on each item including the label, ingredient and nutri t ional information of food products, and all specifications for electronic equipment. "It will be just like you're in the store with the item," said M r Watchorn. He said item specials will be available on C ostRite.com that will not be available in the Town Centre M all anchor store. Mr Watchorn said the $100,000 invested in constructing the site included design per sonnel and all other resources needed to develop Abaco Market's e-commerce business. H e expressed confidence that the company's development of an e-commerce model for Aba co Markets was important for F amily Island customers. When CostRite.com goes l ive, online shoppers will be able to purchase items over the Internet using a major credit card, or deposit money directly to Abaco Markets bank account. Purchasers can then choose to pick up their items or have them delivered. Mr Watchorn said neither Solomon's SuperCenter nor the proposed high-end Fresh Food Market, expected to open in western New Providence in spring 2011, will have an online presence. Abaco Markets is currently beta testing the site in preparation for its launch. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW -268(0(5,&(RI 67$3/('21*$5'(163%2;1$66$8 %$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU 1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ DVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKR NQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOG QRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQW RIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH U G GD\RI -XO\ WRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG &LWL]HQVKLS 127,&( Abaco Markets had been u nveiled as the anchor tenant. “We’ve been waiting to finalise the anchor tenant, and the rest of the development was c ontingent on that,” he explained. “With this deal behind us, we’re going full speed ahead. “With Albany going out h ere, and this going out here now, they just complement one another very well. It seems the west part of the island has the m omentum now.” And enough momentum to attract those businesses who already have an established presence in eastern and westernN ew Providence. Mr Duggan, though, explained that he was unable to give a figure for how many tenants would ultimately be accommodated in the new T own Centre, due to the fact that the company wanted to h ave “flexibility” to configure space to whatever a tenant’s requirements were. However, Mr Duggan said a k ey ingredient not yet in place was a water supply franchise for western New Providence, something its New Providence Water Development Companya ffiliate is still negotiating with the Ministry of the Environment and Water & Sewerage Corporation. T he firms are looking to tie down a long-term, formal arrangement for their supply of water to developments such as Old Fort Bay, Lyford Cay andA lbany, but this is likely to run into opposition from some who will argue that it would deprive Water & Sewerage of a cust omer base and revenue stream. New Providence Water Development Company has been supplying water for 50 years. That’s probably our most important component of this w hole deal,” Mr Duggan told Tribune Business. “Growth can’t happen out west without that being resolved, and I don’t have that yet. We need to have t hat resolved to move forward. “We supply everyone west of the airport, and are looking at upgrading technology and providing world class potablew ater. Water and waste water disposal, along with electricity, are the three most important components, and without those i n place development is impossible.” Meanwhile, Mr Duggan said New Providence Development Company had delayed puttingi n the planned infrastructure for its 75-acre light industrial park, located just south of the airport, until “the market picks u p”. Grading for the site had been completed. As for Old Fort Bay, Mr Duggan added: “We’re doing w ell. We still have 20 homes under development, and new h omes are starting every month, which is encouraging given the way the economy is.” New Providence Development Company is the largest p rivate land owner on New Providence with more than 2,300 acres. It has developed Old Fort Bay and the Old Fort Club, and owns the New Prov-i dence Water Development Company. It is also an affiliate of the Tavistock Group, the Albany d eveloper. Both it and Tavistock Group are owned by Joe Lewis, the Lyford Cay-based billionaire. Mr Lewis’s business partner, Terry White, is ani nvestor in both Albany and New Providence Development Company. $30m investment in Town Centre $100k spend takes Cost Right online F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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    By HARRY R WEBER A P Airlines Writer ATLANTA (AP Air Lines Inc. and AirTran Airways posted contrasting financial results, but had a similar message Wednesday about the state of the airline industry: A near-term revenue r ecovery is unlikely. It remains to be seen whether that will mean fewer jobs for airline employees and higher fees and fares for passengers. Discount carrier AirTran has been able to find ways to stay in the black. Its parent p osted a $78.4 million profit f or the April-June quarter, w hile Delta, the world’s biggest airline operator, continues to rack up the red ink, as it recorded a $257 million loss for the quarter. The news followed hefty second-quarter losses reported b y Continental Airlines Inc. a nd American Airlines pare nt AMR Corp., while United Airlines parent UAL Corp. posted a small profit. Discount carrier Southwest Airlines Co. also had a profit. US Airways Group Inc., JetBlue Airways Corp. and Alaska Air Group Inc. were to report their r esults on Thursday. T here has been concern that one or two major carriers might not make it past early next year if the economy doesn’t improve or weakens further. Investors have been paying close attention to airl ines’ cash positions. D elta had $5.4 billion in unrestricted cash as of June 30, though it expects that to fall to $5 billion by the end of September. AirTran, a muchs maller carrier with fewer financial obligations, ended the second quarter with $389.4 m illion in unrestricted cash. We may face some tough c hoices,” Delta CEO Richard Anderson said during a conference call with analysts and reporters. He didn’t offer specifics, but Anderson said the carrier’s responsibility is to “continue t o maximize the revenue a cross our business.” Chief F inancial Officer Hank Halter told workers in a memo that given the current environment the airline can’t guarantee there won’t be involuntary furloughs of frontline employees. Delta executives said they d on’t expect any meaningful r ecovery for the remainder of the year, and they also don’t expect to be profitable for 2009. The Atlanta-based company has already cut 11 per cent of its workforce over the last y ear, on a combined basis i ncluding Northwest Airlines, executives said. Delta has offered voluntary programs in the previous rounds of cuts. Although AirTran’s parent, O rlando, Fla.-based AirTran Holdings Inc., reported a profit, revenue fell almost 13 per c ent. AirTran hasn’t been i mmune to the industry’s woes, as more travelers fly less and take fewer business trips amid the weak economy. The consumer is pinched, a nd now the consumer is looking for deals,” AirTran CEO Bob Fornaro told The Assoc iated Press. A irTran, like other carriers, h as cut capacity, sold and deferred aircraft and unwound fuel hedges. However, itsc apacity reductions have been smaller than at other carriers, and it has been adding service in some areas, including Mil w aukee. It also has installed W i-Fi connectivity on all of i ts planes. Delta shares fell 12 cents, or two per cent, to $5.94 in afternoon trading, while Air T ran shares rose 85 cents, or 14.8 per cent, to $6.60. Airlines, despite some suc cess increasing fares recently, have had to significantly disc ount seats at times and offer deals for business travelers to lure passengers during the summer, which is usually a b usy time for carriers. Addon fees also have been a key revenue source for the airlines. As the industry heads into i ts slow period in the fall, some airlines may be forced to make deeper cuts or gener ate new sources of revenue.D elta already plans to cut i nternational capacity by 15 per cent starting in Septem ber. D elta’s loss for the second quarter was equivalent to 31 cents a share, compared to a loss of $1.04 billion, or $2.64 a share, a year earlier when Delta recorded a big non-cash charge related to the decline in the carrier’s market value. Excluding merger-related expenses, Delta would have lost $199 million, or 24 cents a share, in the latest quarter. The airline said it would have posted a profit of $191 million if it were to also exclude $390 million in fuel hedge losses. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 5B LifeChoicesATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD. Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue,P.O.Box SS-5915,Nassau Tel.356-5433A member of Colonial Group International:Insurance,Health,Pensions,LifeIf you could secure $300,000 family protection for the price of a daily coffee,with no medical required,would you do it? Would you invest in $300,000 family financial security,if it included a free and confidential financial review with a professional adviser? Were hoping the answer is yes,because you could have this cover,for a little less caffeine,from just $9 per week*.You’ll certainly sleep a little easier! *rates vary,applies to male age 30CALL 356-LIFEor visit www.cgigroup.bmFor the price of a coffee,you can take care of something priceless.$300,000 life cover for the price of a coffee per day! Colonial Group International is rated A-(Excellentby AM Best. Delta posts 2Q loss, while AirTran reports profit

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    C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 7B A BAHAMIAN company/entrepreneur is among the1 0 award winners selected f rom 580 submissions by Caribbean firms to receive a $40,000 investment grant from the Inter-American Development Bank’s (IDB Multilateral Investment Fund( MIF). O rganisers confirmed in a statement that country-level winners have been selected for the 2009 Pioneers of Prosperity Caribbean Awards Competition. A ceremony to honour t heir achievement is scheduled to be held today. Ten winners and five honourable mentions were selected from across the Caribbean. These firms e merged from a pool of 580 s mall to medium-sized firms (SMEs programme. Winners at the country leve l will receive a $40,000 grant from the MIF to invest in training and technical infra-s tructure for their company, a nd are automatically entered into the regional competition for a chance to win an additional $60,000 and the prestigious title of Pioneer of Prosperity Caribbean. H onourable mentions will r eceive a similar grant of $10,000. Winning firms will also be connected to a global network of technical expertise, potential investors, and other c utting-edge entrepreneurs. A ll 10 winners will travel to Jamaica to compete for three regional prizes. Bruce Golding, Prime Minister of Jamaica, will host the final awards ceremony on S eptember 11, 2009. T he Pioneers of Prosperity Awards Programme is an initiative made-up of regional competitions spanning theC aribbean, Africa and Central America. Seven countries participate d in the inaugural Caribbean c ompetition: Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago. The programme seeks to inspire a new generation ofe ntrepreneurs in emerging e conomies by identifying, rewarding and promoting outstanding small to mediumsize businesses, who will serve as role models to their peers. The programme is spons ored by the Multilateral I nvestment Fund of the InterAmerican Development Bank, the John Templeton Foundation, and the Social Equity Venture Fund (S.E.VEN Fund T he Pioneers of Prosperity p rogramme was conceived and initiated by Michael Fairbanks, a recognised thought leader in the area of enter-p rise solutions to poverty. Bahamas firm wins $40k grant from IDB

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    quest-Garcia of Rachel's Bout ique, Basheva Eve of La Maison de Besh, and Sabrina Francis of SE'B Fashions. They will use Androsia and Bahama Hand Prints for theirc reations, which will be worn by the Miss Universe contestants at the fashion show, scheduled for Wednesday, A ugust 12, at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort. Acknowledging that the immense international media interest surrounding the MissU niverse event would provide a further stepping stone for the fledgling Bahamian fashion design industry to showcase its t alents to buyers and merchandisers around the world, Mr Bethel told Tribune Business yesterday: “It will certainly bring to light that, yes, there isa local industry here. “It is critical that we are able to showcase we have a diversity of talent and designers here in the fashion industry. It is criti cal that other designers, other than those selected, come up to the mark and make every effort to market their designs. The more that we have puttingo ut and producing quality products for purchase, the better will be for the industry.” Urging Bahamian fashion d esigners to exploit the investment incentives available to them under existing legislation, Mr Bethel added: “As a foreign exchange earner, it’s [thef ashion industry] certainly something the Government should encourage and ensure there’s adequate incentives to e ncourage Bahamian designers to develop their works and develop some manufacturing capabilities.” Mr Bethel acknowledged t hat because of this nation’s relatively high operating and labour costs, Bahamian designers would likely have to be “realistic and look outside the B ahamas for manufacturing” of their garments, if they were to be competitive on price with international rivals. The Montaque Group presid ent and chief executive is currently organising the second annual Islands of the World fashion week, to be held from N ovember 4-8, 2009, at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort. Mr Bethel told Tribune Business that he was hoping the Miss Universe Pageant, and thei nternational exposure and media interest it generated, would “be a catalyst” for Islands of the World and other e vents, “setting the stage” for them and further development of the industry in the Bahamas. “We’re hoping that the publicity we gain from Miss Uni-v erse will certainly increase the numbers we had last year,” he added of Islands of the World. “We’re certainly looking at well a bove 500 travelling in for it this year. “We are very much ahead in the planning stage, and have received a significant responsef rom designers.” Five Bahamian designers have applied to be showcased at Islands of theW orld to date, with another three seeking to enter the ‘nextg eneration’ category. There w ere no Bahamians in that last y ear. M r Bethel told Tribune Business that he wanted to limit I slands of the World to a maximum of between 20-25 design e rs this year, “to make sure the quality and standard is muchh igher”. Some 30 applications in total Bahamian and foreign have been received so far. Proving that Islands of the World had worked as an exposure platform, Mr Bethel said he had received reports thatt hree designers who exhibited at last year’s inaugural event h ad received “significant con tracts” one with Top Shop in the UK, and the others with specialist boutiques. As for Miss Universe, Mr Bethel said that “on a broader s cale” it provided an opportunity to market the Bahamas in a “different light than our sun, sand and sea,” as it showcased a different product from thatw hich normally received exposure. Ticket sales for the Pageant, now in their second week, had s tarted slowly, Mr Bethel said, but were picking up in line with increased publicity. “Atlantis is reporting that they’re getting a very good response to tickets ales from online channels,” he added. “We anticipate that as it draws closer to the end of the m onth, and pay day comes, we will see Bahamians coming in and buying tickets to be part of the event.” Also featured at the Miss U niverse Pageant’s Fashion Show will be Bahamian designer Brynda Knowles, who will design the evening's outfits for t he reigning Miss Universe, Dayana Mendoza. Ms Mendoza will share the stage as co-host of the event with Charles Sealey. T he newly-crowned Miss Universe will receive an outfit created by Bahamian designerJ eff St. John, of the House of St. John, which she will weara t her press briefing on the m orning after her crowning. S he will also receive a speciallyc rafted bag from Harl Taylor BAG. M r Bethel said: “Not only is this significant as the first time t hat the Bahamas is hosting the Miss Universe Pageant, but alsob ecause the fashion show will feature another aspect of the i slands' creativity and culture as displayed in fashion. “This will certainly have the potential of catapulting the local fashion industry into thei nternational spotlight. It is important for other designers a nd novices to take advantage of this and continue to build on the opportunity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tKLUOH\WUHHWVDVVDX%DKDPDV 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWRDQ\SHUVRQVfZLVKLQJWRPDNHFODLP VKDOOGRVROLQJDQ$GYHUVH&ODLPLQWKH6XSUHPH&RXUWDQG VHUYLQJVXFK6WDWHPHQWRQWKH3HWLWLRQHUVRUKLV$WWRUQH\VWKH WKG DIWHUWKHODVWGD\RQZKLFKRQZKLFKWKLV1RWLFHDSSHDUV LQWKHGDLO\SDSHUV)DLOXUHDQ\SHUVRQWRDQGVHUYH VWDWHPHQWRIVXFKFODLPRQRUEHIRUHWKHVDLGGDWHZLOORSHUDWHDV D EDUWRVXFKFODLP 5 LFKDUG/%RRGOHt&R 5,&+$5'/%22'/(t&2 &RXQVHOVt$WWRUQH\V$W/DZ &KDPEHUV UG )ORRU&ROXPEXV+RXVH (DVWtKLUOH\WUHHW $WWRUQH\VIRUWKHHWLWLRQHU Designers must ‘come up to mark’ to maximise Miss Universe exposure F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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    C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009, PAGE 9B $3.5-4m spend for AML Foods’ latest format five months with an 11 per cent increase last month. Gavin Watchorn, the comp any’s president and chief executive, unveiled the details on the company’s financial performance as it gears up for an a lmost $4 million investment project in western New Providence with its new format, Solomon’s Fresh Food Market, set to be the anchor tenant in an ew Town Centre project. Speaking at Abaco Markets’ Annual General Meeting, Mr Watchorn revealed the compan y's investment in the highend store had been pegged at between $3.5-$4 million investment. Despite the state of the globa l economy and the teetering financial sector, Mr Watchorn suggested that now was as gooda time as any for the new proj ect. This suggests management remains confident in the continued recovery of the BISXlisted company, which expectst he 2010 second quarter results to look much like the first quarter’s. It expects to pay the$ 600,000 debt remaining with the Royal Bank of Canada. " I am very pleased with the p rogress so far this year," said M r Watchorn. A baco Markets has been working towards reversing its n et overdraft position of recent years to end the 2010 first quar t er with a 127,000 net cash position. The overdraft facility r eduction saw interest costs drop by 25 per cent, while the c ompany paid down a further $500,000 of the debt owed to Royal Bank. Some $400,000 of that debt r epayment came from the proceeds raised by selling the equipment and inventory from the former Cost-Right Abaco s tore, with the actual property leased to Price Right partners, Rupert Roberts and Chad Sawyer. "We're going to focus on c ontinued work into improving liquidity so we can get back to different things," said Mr Watchorn. T he company will also invest $418,000 to acquire 15,000 square feet of property adjacent to the Solomon's SuperCentre Freeport location.Then ewly acquired land will initially be used for parking with a long-term view for store expansion. T he company formalised significant changes to its Board on Tuesday night, with Craig Symonette and Frank Crothers stepping down as chairman andv ice-chairman respectively after 20 years of service. Former Bahamas Chamber of Commerce president, Dionisio D ’Aguilar, was voted in as chairman and Robert ‘Sandy’ S ands as vice-chairman. Mr W atchhorn was formally n amed chief executive. With the turnaround of Abac o Markets financials came the need to renivent the company, l eading to shareholders giving their consent to the namec hange to AML Foods. The company has been p roactive in training management for its new store locations, lamenting the difficulty of finding local management talent. "So far we have three inter n al candidates," said Mr Watchorn. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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    M eanwhile, Mr Ward confirmed that Bahamas First Holdings’ Board of Directors was still considering whether the company should list its ordi-n ary shares on the Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX Based on a show of hands, a m ajority of shareholders had indicated at Bahamas First’s last annual general meeting (AGM year, that they would like tos ee the company progress to a BISX listing. It was felt this would boost liquidity in the stock, given that Bahamas First m eets the definition of a public company as its stock is widely held, yet it is not listed on any exchange. However, Mr Ward said that while the Board continued to assess the matter, no timeframe for any BISX listing had been s et at the AGM, which had been more “a show of intent”. A nd he added that Bahamas First’s main priority had been to prepare itself for the rigours of the new Domestic Insurance Act, which came into effect onJ uly 2, 2009, and will be fully enforced a year from that date. A s such, a BISX listing was not top of the priority agenda, b ut Mr Ward explained: “We continue to discuss it as a Board. Not firm decision has been made yet, but there was a clear indication from the shareholder base that this is the direction they want to go in. But they want the Board to consider all the issues first. There was no timeframe established at the AGM. It was really a show of intent as opposedt o a specific timeframe mandate.” Given the economic downturn and increased difficulty m any Bahamians are having in meeting insurance premium payments, Bahamas First’s expectations of a decrease in gross written premium for 2009a re in line with the industry average, which has forecast a drop of between 5-10 per cent. Mr Ward said per cent i s probably larger than you will see in our case”, adding: “At this early stage, I would suggest we will be closer to 5 per cent than 10 per cent. I think everyone is going to show a drop in retentions as a result of some persons activelyd eciding not to insure. The expectation this year is that per-s ons will not have the money to pay for coverage. Like every b usiness, we’re going to see a f all-off in new business and retentions because the funds to p ay premiums are not there.” The Bahamas First president a dded that one saving factor, in cases where assets such asr eal estate and cars were the security/collateral for loans, was t hat often the lending institutions, such as banks, stepped in to pay the insurance premiums if their clients were unable to afford to do so. H owever, he added that now “banks are being more selective about which clients they do that with”. Bahamas First has also “stab ilised the operations” at General Brokers & Agents (GBA an insurance brokerage and agency business it took mana gement control of in January this year, having acquired a 30 per cent stake in it last year. Mr Ward implied that Bahamas First would decide byy ear-end whether to purchase the remaining 70 per cent stake and take complete control at GBA, telling Tribune Business: Apart from having to stabilise the operations we’ve done nothing at this stage, but the likelihood is that by year-end we will make a strategic deci-s ion as to what is in our best interests there.” He added that the stabilisa t ion effort had involved “simple management disciplines andc ontrols”, with GBA having a fair net asset value of $899,967 b ased on its unaudited financ ials. GBA’s total net assets were p egged at $1.121 million, with $4.853 million in total assets off s et by $3.733 million in total liabilities. The net asset valua-t ion was then written down by $220,800. G BA has substantial receivables and payables on its balance sheet, with the former (money owed to it down from $3.694 million to $2.223 million, a $1.471 million adjustment. The business also o wes $3.559 million in accounts payables. Bahamas First’s 2008 annual report also showed that the company paid $4.993 million oft he $5.014 million to acquire Carib Insurance Agency as goodwill, the net assets standing at just $21,032. M r Ward said the consolidation of Bahamas First’s 100 per cent-owned agencies, Carib, Moseley Burnside and NUA, into one was “going extremelys moothly so far. We haven’t seen any adverse impact on business retention levels. “We’ve seen an increase in w alk-in customers, based on anecdotal evidence, and there’s certainly been an increased level of traffic at the Harbour Bay location.” The three agenciesa re being combined under the NUA name. “Our core business is oper a ting on quite a good level, and as the economy recovers wee xpect to see some uptick from that. If there’s no catastrophic e vent, we’ll be in good shape,” M r Ward added. “In terms of the capital base, B ahamas First probably has more capital in absolute dollar t erms than any of our competitors, and in terms of capital ton et written premium, we figure very strongly as either the numb er one or number two. We want to leverage that capital base to produce more profits for the bottom line.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Bahamas First: $11.9m swing shows ability to absorb loss F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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    ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 73F/23C Low: 77F/25C Low: 76F/24C Low: 78F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 81F/27C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 93F/34C High: 91F/33C High: 90 F/32 C High: 90 F/32 C High: 90F/32C High: 90 F/32C High: 90F/32C Low: 81F/27C High: 91F/33C Low: 82 F/28 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 77F/25C High: 88 F/31 C Low: 82F/28C High: 90 F/32 Low: 78F/26C High: 86F/30C Low: 79 F/26C High: 87F/31C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 91F/33C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 89F/32C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 90F/32C Low: 79F/26C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 80F/27C High: 92F/33C High: 88 F/31 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 23 RD , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Partly cloudy.Partly sunny.Mostly sunny with a shower possible. Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 78 High: 90 High: 92 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Breezy with clouds and sunshine. High: 90 Low: 78 Low: 77 Low: 76 AccuWeather RealFeel 103F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 88F 102-88F 109-84F 107-81F 101-78F Low: 76 TODAYTONIGHTFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................93F/34C Low ....................................................79F/26C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 80 F/26C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.37" Year to date ................................................19.19" Normal year to date ....................................23.00" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Jul. 28 Aug. 5Aug. 13Aug. 20 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:33 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:59 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 8:10 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 9:19 p.m. Today Friday Saturday Sunday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 9:27 a.m.3.03:18 a.m.-0.3 9:52 p.m.3.33:29 p.m.-0.3 10:19 a.m.3.14:05 a.m.-0.3 10:42 p.m.3.14:24 p.m.-0.2 11:11 a.m.3.14:53 a.m.-0.3 11:32 p.m.2.95:19 p.m.-0.1 12:04 p.m.3.15:40 a.m.-0.2 -----6:15 p.m.0.0 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco93/3379/26s91/3278/25pc Amsterdam72/2259/15sh68/2057/13r Ankara, Turkey84/2850/10s82/2752/11s Athens93/3375/23s97/3675/23s Auckland61/1648/8r55/1239/3pc Bangkok89/3178/25r90/3278/25sh Barbados86/3076/24t86/3077/25sh Barcelona89/3172/22s84/2871/21s Beijing92/3372/22s87/3072/22t Beirut81/2777/25s81/2777/25s Belgrade97/3674/23s103/3972/22s Berlin79/2659/15r74/2354/12sh Bermuda85/2977/25s85/2977/25t Bogota66/1846/7sh67/1944/6sh Brussels72/2257/13r75/2355/12sh Budapest91/3268/20s97/3668/20s Buenos Aires45/730/-1pc50/1036/2s Cairo103/3976/24s101/3875/23s Calcutta96/3585/29s98/3681/27r Calgary78/2552/11s73/2253/11s Cancun90/3275/23pc91/3275/23c Caracas82/2773/22t80/2671/21t Casablanca85/2968/20s85/2969/20s Copenhagen74/2362/16sh68/2056/13r Dublin66/1854/12r64/1752/11sh Frankfurt79/2663/17t73/2259/15pc Geneva 85/29 62/16 t 80/2660/15pc Halifax 65/18 57/13 pc 63/17 59/15 r Havana 88/31 72/22 t 90/32 75/23 t Helsinki 73/22 59/15pc68/2059/15r Hong Kong 89/31 81/27 r 91/32 82/27sh Islamabad 100/37 81/27 t 103/39 83/28 t Istanbul89/3174/23s94/3477/25s Jerusalem 88/31 64/17s86/3062/16s Johannesburg 54/1227/-2s48/829/-1c Kingston 90/3277/25t90/3280/26sh Lima70/2157/13s71/2159/15pc London71/2155/12sh70/2154/12r Madrid86/3059/15pc90/3263/17s Manila85/2978/25r84/2877/25r Mexico City81/2754/12t79/2657/13pc Monterrey104/4075/23s104/4075/23s Montreal75/2364/17pc79/2664/17t Moscow72/2255/12t77/2561/16pc Munich88/3158/14sh78/2559/15sh Nairobi77/2557/13c78/2554/12c New Delhi 97/3681/27t99/3781/27s Oslo64/1752/11sh70/2154/12pc Paris75/2357/13r70/2154/12sh Prague 90/32 59/15 pc 82/27 58/14 pc Rio de Janeiro81/2769/20pc74/2368/20r Riyadh104/4081/27s104/4081/27s Rome 92/33 68/20 s 92/33 70/21 s St. Thomas91/3281/27pc89/3180/26s San Juan48/817/-8pc54/1225/-3s San Salvador 88/31 70/21 t 89/31 74/23 t Santiago 54/1232/0s59/1536/2s Santo Domingo91/3273/22pc86/3074/23sh Sao Paulo 68/20 54/12 r 60/15 53/11r Seoul79/2664/17pc81/2763/17pc Stockholm 73/22 55/12 sh 70/21 54/12 r Sydney 64/17 43/6 s61/1639/3pc Taipei93/3380/26pc95/3582/27pc T okyo 77/25 72/22 r 77/25 73/22 r T oronto 72/2264/17t75/2361/16pc Trinidad75/2350/10t54/1248/8r V ancouver 75/23 60/15 pc 76/2461/16pc Vienna 95/3574/23s90/3262/16t W arsaw 88/31 70/21 sh 80/26 56/13 pc Winnipeg 79/26 60/15 t 70/2157/13pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles86F Friday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles86F Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles85F Friday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles85F Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles85F Friday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles85F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque90/3269/20t95/3569/20pc Anchorage65/1854/12c66/1855/12c Atlanta88/3166/18pc90/3267/19pc Atlantic City79/2666/18r80/2667/19t Baltimore82/2766/18t84/2866/18t Boston74/2360/15t71/2161/16t Buffalo74/2362/16t75/2361/16pc Charleston, SC90/3273/22t90/3274/23t Chicago82/2761/16pc85/2964/17t Cleveland76/2460/15t80/2664/17pc Dallas95/3570/21pc97/3676/24pc Denver92/3362/16pc96/3558/14pc Detroit75/2360/15t82/2764/17t Honolulu89/3175/23c89/3176/24s Houston96/3574/23t95/3576/24pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday TodayFridayTodayFriday Indianapolis82/2760/15t82/2767/19pc Jacksonville94/3470/21t91/3271/21t Kansas City88/3167/19s89/3169/20pc Las Vegas110/4384/28s109/4288/31s Little Rock90/3267/19pc92/3371/21pc Los Angeles86/3066/18pc88/3166/18pc Louisville84/2864/17pc84/2868/20s Memphis88/3170/21pc91/3273/22pc Miami90/3279/26t91/3280/26t Minneapolis82/2766/18pc80/2661/16t Nashville86/3061/16pc89/3167/19pc New Orleans89/3174/23t90/3274/23t New York79/2667/19r81/2770/21t Oklahoma City92/3365/18s97/3672/22s Orlando93/3373/22t94/3475/23t Philadelphia81/2768/20t84/2868/20t Phoenix 109/42 89/31 t 109/4289/31t Pittsburgh78/2560/15t80/2662/16pc Portland, OR 81/2759/15s85/2959/15pc Raleigh-Durham 88/31 68/20 t 90/32 68/20 pc St. Louis84/2867/19s88/3171/21pc Salt Lake City 100/37 70/21 s 98/3669/20pc San Antonio 94/34 72/22 t 94/34 75/23 pc San Diego76/2469/20pc78/2569/20pc San Francisco 69/20 56/13 pc 69/2055/12pc Seattle78/2557/13pc79/2657/13pc T allahassee 94/3472/22t91/3271/21t T ampa 91/32 77/25 t 91/32 78/25t Tucson99/3780/26t101/3879/26t W ashington, DC 84/28 69/20t85/2969/20t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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    By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE head of a leading Bahamian private airline yesterday questioned how the G overnment planned to put in t he management infrastructure to collect the increased Civil Aviation Department (CAD fees, and urged the administra-t ion to “repeal” the 2005 regul ations permitting the raised charges. Captain Randy Butler, chief executive of Sky Bahamas, told T ribune Business that the Bahamian private airlines had met with Tyrone Sawyer and David Johnson, the Ministry of Tourism’s head of airlift andd eputy director-general respectively, and CAD officials on the issue, and said they had been a sked to submit a counter-proposal to the proposed fee increases. Captain Butler, though, said i t would be impossible for the Bahamian private airlines to submit a counter-proposal in the two-week timeframe they had been given, and with thef ee increases set to take effect from September 10, 2009, because the Government had not given them financial details o n how much money it expected to raise, and what the funds would be used for. Arguing that the Government should “really repeal” thep roposed fee increases, since it was already collecting fees, Captain Butler questioned whether it had given any t hought as to how it would collect landing fees at airports in remote Family Islands. And, indeed, whether it could afford to implement the system to dos o. “Can you imagine collecting a ll the landing fees in Mayaguana, Acklins and Crooked Island?” Captain Butler asked. “How will they know the planes l anded?” He also questioned whether the Government would put in baggage and passenger x-ray screening facilities at FamilyI slands airports, given that the fee increases also included a per passenger security fee. If it did not put in the screening f acilities, then why should private airlines be made to pay this fee. Tribune Business previously revealed how private Bahamiana irlines and charter operators fear “draconian” increases of as much as 10,000 per cent in their fee structure could “kill” t he industry. Under the CAD’s proposed “across the board” fee increases, the operator of a five-seater aircraft flying 50 hours perm onth could expect to see a $13,000 per annum fee rise. T his newspaper was told that the fee increases include a tripling or 200 per cent rise in landing fees at Family Island a irports, the rates jumping from a current $18.56 per landing to $56 per landing for a 19-seat aircraft. O ther fee increases divulged to Tribune Business are as follows: Monitoring charge: From a current $0 to $1,000, a 1,000 per cent increase Fleet charge: For a five seater Aztec aircraft, this will go from $0 to $7,000 – a 7,000p er cent increase. For a Beech 19 seater aircraft, the fee will rise from $0 to $10,000, a 10,000 per cent increase Charge to lease a foreign aircraft: Current: $0. Proposed: $ 4,000, a 4,000 per cent increase Charter permit renewal: Current: $500 per annum. Proposed: $1,200, a 240 per cent i ncrease Renewal of scheduled permits: Current: $500 per annum. Proposed: $1,200, a 240 per cent increase. Both large foreign air-l ines and Bahamian operators, including small charter companies, will pay the same rate Pilot licences: From $0 to $ 250 for a six-month Air Transport US licence. From $0 to $200 for a one-year US commercial pilots licence. Fuel suppliers to Bahamian a irlines in the Family Islands will have to pay a tax equivalent to $0.07 per gallon to the Civil Aviation Department, on t op of existing government taxes C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV Government urged: ‘Repeal’ airline fee rise To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today!

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    The Tribune The T ribune M y V o i c e , M y N e w s p a p e r ! Thursday, July 23rd, 2009

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    RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND CHURCH EVENTS PG 26The Tribune THURSDAY July 23, 2009

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    The Tribune Thursday, July 23, 2009 P G 27 RELIGION By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net IN less than two weeks one of six contestants of this year’s Miss Gospel Bahamas Pageant will walk away with the coveted title of Miss Gospel Bahamas 2009/2010. The event which is set to take place on August 2, at the W yndham’ s Rainfor est Theater will featur e several special guest performances by Synergy Soldiers for Christ, Mericha W alker , and Overcomers Mime Ministry. Now in its fourteenth season, pageant founder and coordinator Minalee Hanchell said during a press conference on Tuesday that for the lucky winner, the year long r eign is expected to be filled with appearances, pr esentations, and front line outreach. “First of all she will be expected to be an ambassador for Christ, an ambassador for our nation, she will be engaged in a vast number of weekly activities including her involvement in youth groups, school presentations, and apart fr om this her platfor m too will help keep her busy This was most certainly true for 2005/2006 Miss Gospel Bahamas Moika Rolle, who said during her reign she was exposed to many projects and oppor tunities that not only intr oduced her to some of the biggest names in gospel music, but allowed her to share some of her ideas for youth empower ment on an inter national stage. She explained: “With a college scholarship offered as one of my prizes, I had opportunities to minister and speak at numerous conferences while in the United States, with one of them being The United Negro College Fund National Annual Conference. “Persons such as TD Jakes, and the then Gover nor of T exas Rick Per ry were present at that event, and had it not been for this pageant I may have never made those contacts.” Additionally, Ms Rolle said she had the chance to visit the US senate in Washington DC, and was able to meet dozens of young people who like her ar e committed to youth development and leadership. Ms Rolle said when comparing Miss Gospel Bahamas to other pageants in the country, the one thing that sets it apart is the emphasis that’s placed on spiritual development. “In this pageant you meet a lot of spiritual leaders and women who pour into you, a lot of prayer and fasting is put into this pageant, a lot of time in ter ms of how you speak in public, how you answer questions is used to make you that much better, it’s more than just an outer transformation, it’s also an inner transformation.” Tanya McFall, the 2008/2009 queen said although her year as queen has been filled with many accomplishments, there is still more work to be done. W ith the platfor m “Empowering young women for a global r evolution,” Ms McFall said her focus was naturally transformed to impacting all youth because of the need for change within the group and explained that she helped jump-star t the Save The Children Programme at Great Commission Ministries. Now pursuing a bachelor of ar ts degree in English and Teaching, and being a youth activist involved in sever al community groups, Ms McFall said the pageant has been paramount in assisting her to accomplish many of her goals, while proving that it is still cool to be hip and Christian. Ms McFall said she is simply excited and wishes all the contestants good luck and looks forward to assisting the new queen. Minister Kevin Har ris of Joy 101.9FM and Terez Davis aka Dynamite Daisy are slated to be masters of ceremony who are both expected to lighten-up the stage as these six young women compete for the title. Tickets for the event can be purchased at Great Commission Ministrieson W ulf f Road between Market Str eet and Baillou Hill Road, or Quality Fabrics on Mount Royal Avenue. Sponsors for the event include Wong’s Rubber Stamp and printing, PGF Realty, Galilee College, and Bahamas Or thodontic Centr e. F F rom left to right; Saulene Smith, committee member, Val Gardiner, Committee Member, Minalee Hanchell, Executive Founder and coordinator of Miss Gospel Bahamas, Tamalia Hanchell, Committee member, Tanya McFall, Miss Gospel Bahamas 2009/2010, Ethlyn Hanchell, chaperone for Miss Gospel Bahamas and committee member, and Moika Rolle, Miss Gospel Bahamas 2005/2006. On Tuesday, executives from the Miss Gospel Bahamas Committee along with its reigning queen Tanya McFall held a press conference to announce the August 2 competition date. Miss Gospel Bahamas 2009

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    MEDITATION “The Lord said, “See I am setting a plumb-line in the midst of my people” (Amos 7:8 A plumb-line is an instrument that measures the uprightness of a wall, for example. The weight at the end of the line creates a straight line that reliably reveals the angles which may be correct or may need to be corrected. When a moral and spiritual plumb-line is used to measure individual or collective integrity, the presence of sin is easily detected. Our Lord Jesus Christ modeled in his life and taught with his words, the expectations that God has for us all, but especially for Christians who should be open to the leading of the Holy Spirit. Our daily prayers need to include the desire for knowledge and understanding of what we ought to do and to have the grace and power so to do (The Book of Common Prayer Proper 10Year B). In the whole 23rd chapter Matthew, Jesus challenged the teachers of the law with scathing comments about their hypocrisy and neglect of justice, mercy and faithfulness (v.23).Soon after wards, he turned his attention to Jerusalem lamenting over the destruction that would occur some years hence. I am sure that the Lord weeps over what is happening to us. From the decimation of the Arawaks and other Indian and island people, through the days of slavery and slave trading, to the present, there have been occasions for the heart of God to be severely grieved by our inhumanity. Whenever the innocent are made to suffer, there is heavenly outrage. We each need to consider ourselves a personal plumb-line allowing God to use us to promote a national standard of accountability. When we fall or stumble let us ask for forgiveness and extend it to others in appropriate ways, when they err. Psalm 37: 5-6 reminds us: Trust in the Lord and do good, angel dwell in the land and enjoy safe pasture. Delight yourself in the Lord and he will give you the desires of your heart. Commit your way to the Lord, trust in him and he will do this: He will make your righteousness shine like the dawn, the justice of your cause like the noonday sun.” Be a plumb-line REV.ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS We each need to consider ourselves a personal plumb-line allowing God to use us to promote a national standard of accountability. When we fall or stumble let us ask for forgiveness and extend it to others in appropriate ways, when they err. Matthew 15:14. Let them alone: they be blind leaders. And if the blind lead the blind, both shall fall into the ditch. I'VE already asked the question where are we going as a nation? Could it be that we're heading in the ditch as a r esult of blind leadership? Ar e we so politically and r eligiously crazy , we're willing to accept whatever comes down the pipe? W atch this! There was a time in the Bahamas when it truly was an honour to call our members of parliament honourable; not saying that our for efathers didn't have their shar e of personal challenges and issues, but when it came to honourably standing up for and defending the small man; the for efathers ef fectively played their part. Here is one of our greatest problem with today's political pool. Over the past fifteen years the powers have failed miserably in pr operly honouring the nation's forefathers, and educating the younger generations as to who they were and the significant roles they've played in the shaping of the Bahamas today . Think on this question: Can we select at random a few 6th grade students and ask them about some of our forefathers like; Sir Cecil, Alvin Br ennen, Sinclair Outten, etc? No, it would not be fair to these students; because this part of our nation's histor y and equipping the gen eration of tomorrow with this knowledge is of no impor tance to the educat ed, foolish leaders we have today. But I can assure you that if ever asked; these same children at any given moment can provide you with detailed information about the latest inter national music or movie celebrity; and I dare to say that many of them don't even know our own Bahamianr ecording artists. So, as it relates to the nation's social and cultural development; we have classic cases of the blind leading the blind. It is quite evident that the leadership of which the Bahamas is in need of; in order to fulfill her God ordained assignment is not in today's pool. But by no means should we cease to keep our politicians lifted up in payer. Despite the fact that many of them don't know, that they don't know what's going on and what to do about it, yet they'r e parading ar ound as if they ar e the best thing to the country since slice bread. YES, we've got ministers and ministers of states acting as if they are God, and as if the people owes them something. Her e's what I find so amazing; before the last general election it was the PLP ministers that acted and operated in this manner . Now, one would have thought that the FNM would have learned from the PLP arrogance; but needless to say, these clowns have taken arrogance to another level. But I ster nly admonished you politicians (FNM & PLP rise and fall of King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon. As an authoritative voice of Father Yahweh, I'm at liberty to speak on and about national issues that your weak, compromising religious leaders of the Bahamas are not able to. In order not to af fect their politician's tithe and gover n ment hand-outs these r eligious weaklings have got to stay within their four walls and r emain silent while the nation goes to HELL on roller skates. And if by chance any of these religious-whatever do speak, it's always from a re-active position rather than a pro-active position. It is most dishear tening to see the condition / state of the Bahamas (spiritually), being a small nation with some three hundred, thousand plus people and over four thousand churches. The only logical question one can ask is this: “What has happened to the church?” The answer to that question is as such: The chur ch has become such a watered down, powerless / dead religious organisation in the spirit realm; wher eby every man / leader has set out to fulfill their own dr eams and desir es at the expense of the people in Jesus' name. What do you think the Bahamas would be like if the chur ch was operat ing as the ordained organism of Yeshuwa Messiah, rather than religious or ganisations? The chur ch, the or ganism of Y eshuwa is a consistently alive or gan / body that's constantly growing and producing after its own kind. Whereas the organised religious church is consistently seeking to be revived; through their annual money making r evivals, confer ences, workshop, seminars, etc. Her e's the mandate and representation of Yeshuwa's organism church: Mark.16: 17. And these signs shall follow them that believe; In my name shall they cast out devils; they shall speak with new tongues; : 18. They shall take up serpents; and if they drink any deadly thing, it shall not hur t them; they shall lay hands on the sick, and they shall recover. Her e's the mandate and r epr esentation / signs of the organised religious church: The pulpit pimps, the bishops, apostles, doctors, prophets, etc; are living on the hill top / green pastures whiles the congr egation lives in the val ley / dr y land. This is certainly not the will of God, but rather it's a well laid out plan and motive of the religious leaders. Meanwhile the enemy is wreaking havoc throughout this country, for he (the enemy eligious leaders are void of Yahweh's (dunamis, doo'-nam-is) to lay hands on the sick and see them r ecover; much less to cast out devils . Therefore many within the religious church are dying from all kinds of sickness and diseases causing linger ing questions to exist as to whether God heals or not? The time has come when the question must be asked “Am I being blindly led into the ditch?” Questions or comments contact us via Email:pastormallen@yahoo.com or Phone #1-242-441-2021 or 225-3850 Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l The Ditch PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN The Tribune P G 28 Thursday, July 23, 2009 RELIGION

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    FEARLESS The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, July 23, 2009 P G29 "So we say with confidence, 'The Lord is my helper; I will not be afraid. What can man do to me?'" Hebrews 13:6 (N.I.V) I've never thought of the word, alone, in a negative way, now, lonely, isa different story. The definition of the word alone, according to the Oxford dictionary is, 'having no one else present; on one's own.' However , we are never alone, God is always present. In fact, God is always one step ahead of us. He is omnipresent, present everywhere at the same time. We don't have to fight each other for His attention or be envious of another's relationship with Him. God is here, very present and very ready for us to seek Him first, so that inr eturn we can experience the awesome blessings He has for us. Being alone and being lonely are two separate states. The latter is a result of neglecting the discover y of who a per son is. When a person is lonely, it can be in any number of environments. Ina house with many occupants, in an apartment by themselves, working at a large company, or living in a foreign country-with no company. All of these environments are different, yet all are the same. The same in the sense that they are imperfect. In order to live a satisfying life, we ought to stop depending on persons, places, and things to bring us acceptance, fulfillment, and happiness. T rue love comes from knowing God and His love for us and from knowing ourselves. Happiness, begins with our decision to be happy. The other day, I was flipping through an magazine from a couple years back, and came across an interview Oprah did with Mariane Pearl, the widow of slain American journalist, Daniel Pearl. She was pregnant at the time of his horrific execution at the hands of Islamic militants. In the interview, Oprah asks Mrs Pearl, about the moment the tragedy became a reality. Her response, "That night I remember saying, 'I'm pr egnant and I'm alone.' " In understandable grief, for a moment she felt very alone, however, she added, "It was very clear that I was going to either die or live-nothing in between." "And if I was going to live, then I was going to take the challenge to be happy." Facing one of the darkest situations anyone can imagine, we can still choose, to be happy. That supernatural strength comes from faith, for believers, it is a faith in God, and an assurance that He will never hand us mor e than we can bear. Loneliness is a state of mind, a profound depression and disservice to the spirit. Indeed it is as believers, an insult to the Father God we know loves and desires us. Furthermore, I personally feel that an allowance for loneliness and self pity, is extremely selfish. Upon realising the fact that we are not alone, we ought to look after each other as an example of the way in which our Saviour Jesus Christ lived and loved while on this ear th. There are always persons who need a shoulder to lean on, and this gives us a wonderful opportunity to recharge spiritually with one another. In closing, may God's presence in your life, always be more than enough. Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian writer and poet, currently residing in Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to the article can be sent to fearless247@gmail.com. Only the lonely TONI STYLES By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net EVERY three years youth from across the Caribbean come together to discuss and find solutions to the issues affecting the youth of the world. This year for the first time, the Bahamas has been chose to host the 8th Annual Caribbean Baptist Fellowship Y outh Festival from July 22-25 under the theme “Stomp Pun De Enemy Reverend Clinton Minnis, Vice President of the Caribbean Baptist Fellowship Y outh Depar tment, said the or ganisation is excited to host the festival. “Our number is going to exceed 500 in delegate count. W e wer e looking for mor e delegates but this recession has been challenging for many nations. We have ten family islands represented along with 13 nations,” Mr Minnis said. Director of the Youth Department for the Baptist World Alliance, Reverend Emmett Dunn, congratulated the Bahamian gover nment for opening it’ s doors to the Christian faith. ogether we can create partnerships to reach young people so that they can become better citizens not only for the countr y , but world citizens,” Mr Dunn said. Minister of Y outh, Sports and Culture, Desmond Bannister, said although many people do not appr eciate the pr oductive young people thr oughout the world, there are some myths to be dispelled. “When I see groups like yours, bringing hundreds of young people together for dynamic goals to deter mine the futur e and direction in relation to young people is very special. To be able to have this kind of festival in the Bahamas is very special,” Mr Bannister said. Y outh leaders and those attending the festival will be tr eated to a number of events and get to hear speakers that include among others: Pastor Dave Bur r ows, Pastor Sterling McPhee and Pastor Carlos Reid. Bahamas hosts 8t h Annual Caribbean Baptist Youth Festival religion today This July 7, 2009 photo shows pastor Joseph Fuiten, of Cedar Park Church in Bothell, Wash., looking at Middle Eastern artifacts that he has collected, dating to before the time of Christ. Many of the early leaders of the conservative evangelical movement have stepped back due to health or age, because they feel burned at being called haters or because they're tired of political divisiveness, saying it gets in the way of saving souls. K e n L a m b e r t / A P P h o t o

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    The Tribune P G 30 Thursday, July 23, 2009 RELIGION UNDER the theme Pursue, O vertake and Recover All , senior pastor, Bishop Vernal G Clarke and his wife Elder Beverly M Clarke, and members of the Calvary Deliverance Chur ch (CDC y ears of committed service to God and the Bahamian community during the church’s annual convention slated for July 26-31 2009. The event which will be held at the church on East Street South, is expected to draw delegates from across The Bahamas, the Turks and Caicos Islands and the United States. Governor General AD Hanna is also expected to attend. Among this years list of local and international speakers will be hosts, Bishop VG and Elder BM Clarke; Bishop Phalmon Ferguson of United Faith Ministries; Pastor Deanza Cunningham of Christ Community Chur ch; Pastor Thomas Maxwell of T aber nacle of Hope Chur ch; Pr ophet Brian Carn of Jacksonville, Florida; Evangelist Demetrius Stewar t of Nashville, Tennessee; and Bishop Gr egory Davis of Wilmington, Delawar e. There will also be a series of lectures on relevant social issues such as financial independence; public transportation system; combating the scourge of HIV/AIDS; combating the fear of crime; and healthy lifestyles. Presenters include Glenn Ferguson, Reuben Rahming, Keith Kemp, Ann Rolle and Assistant Commissioner of Police, Hulan Hanna. Musical artists include the CDC mass choir and praise team, Reverend Denczil Rolle and the Church of God Incorporated Mass Choir; Christ Community Church Choir; Tabernacle of Hope Church Choir and others. The theme for the conference is taken from a familiar Biblical story of triumph in the face of despair as seenin the book of 1st Samuel, chapter 30 verse 8. The families and prized possessions of David and his trusted warriors had been uncer emoniously taken captive by the enemy whilst he and the men wer e away . Discouraged, wear y , disillusioned and with no wher e else to tur n, David inquir ed of the Lor d whether or not to go after the enemy . God emphati cally instr ucted that David should pursue, over take and r ecover all that the enemy had stolen fr om them. Calvary Deliverance celebrates 27 years of Bahamian ministry Bishop and Elder Clar k e Andr e w Br o wn Dr. Ann Rolle Brian Carn

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    THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS The Tribune Thursday, July 23, 2009 P G 31 RELIGION T T H H E E M M O O V V E E T T O O D D U U N N D D A A S S T T O O W W N N IN1941, the population of Old Place, devastated by hurricane, was moved to Dundas Town, where a new settlement was established. In 1942, the wooden chapel was dismantled and transported by boat from Old Place to Dundas Town, where it was used until a new chapel was built in 1969-70. The building of a new chapel at Dundas Town in 1970 was accompanied by the closure of the Marsh Harbour chapel. This proved to be a most controversial decision, spearheaded by the Reverend George Hopkins. In March, 1969, Hopkins reports: "The decision of the Synod to uphold the findings of the standing committee, to replace our present old and out-dated churches at Marsh Harbour and Dundas Town with a brand new church to be known as 'The Sea View Methodist Church', is all in step with modern trends and wise stewardship, both of the ministry and finance. The actual siting of the new chur ch was hotly debated and now we know the considered judgment of the Church -our wisdom is to use this golden opportunity of proving the worth of our Methodism. Before long we shall be saying, 'Why did not this happen years ago?'" The Reverend Hopkins' positive outlook was never shared by the membership of the Marsh Harbour society. In 1969, the circuit report indicated that they were preparing to build a new chapel on a more attractive site. Their pride was stung, in that they were being compelled to join a new church, established in a new community. Several refused to join, and some did so with reluctance. The new chapel was dedicated in August 9, 1970. In December , 1971, Pastor Ber t Batham writes, with a note of disappointment and concern, of the growing financial and spiritual concer ns of the circuit. Of the decision regarding the closure of the Marsh Harbour Chapel, he writes, "Alas, the two societies of Marsh Harbour and Dundas Town never really fused." By this time there is a church hall at Dundas Town, called the community centre, and the name of the church has been changed from 'Seaview' to Saint Andrews. N N E E W W C C H H A A P P E E L L F F O O R R H H O O P P E E T T O O W W N N In 1971 the new Hope Town chapel, later named St James, was under construction. The old chapel, condemned by the Ministry of Works, was demolished by a work team from the US. The structure was so strong, dynamite had to be used before it crumbled. The new chapel was dedicated on June 25, 1972. In September, 1972, the Reverend Colin Archer became the first minister of Abaconian descent to serve in the Abaco circuit. The son of Mr and Mrs AB Archer, Reverend Archer served in the circuit for two years. It is regrettable that we have to record that the new St James Chapel was destr oyed by fire on Sunday afternoon August 28, 1986. All of the church records were lost. The strong bands of believers in Hope Town along with their relatives and friends in Nassau are determined that another church will be built and have begun to vigorously raise funds by means of social functions and cookouts. N N E E W W B B E E G G I I N N N N I I N N G G S S I I N N M M A A R R S S H H H H A A R R B B O O U U R R In 1985, a new society of 14 members was formed in Marsh Harbour. The first service, conducted by the Reverend Charles Carey, was held at the home of Agatha Archer on September 1, 1985. The decision to open a new society resulted from the unexpected and phenomenal growth of Marsh Harbour. Peter Campbell, a leader from the old Marsh Harbour Society, was appointed the first Society Steward in the new society, and circuit lay pastor. Most of the other members are also former members of the old society or their descendants (Next time: Par t 38 – Native Baptists in the Bahamas) Methodists in Abaco 2 JIM LAWLOR P P a a r r t t 3 3 7 7 It is always an honor to be apar t of what God is doing in this end time. Last weekend was one of the most meaningful weekends I have ever experienced. I was apart of a team of young people on a mission to get the gospel out to the people in Palmetto Point Eleuthera. It was amazing to see teenagers not afraid to pr esent Jesus Christ to people. Bishop Paul S Morton has a song that says, " Lord whatever you doing in this season please don't do it without me." Every born again believer should want to be a par t of the movement for souls. That was why Jesus bled and died to save man from his sins. We (the church soul winning, but now more than ever it is imperative that we get back to that. People are dying everyday, that isn't the bad part, people dying. The Bible tells us that, 'it is appointed once for man to die.' The bad par t is they ar e dying without Christ -just on their way to hell. Well this weekend the thirty young people that went to Palmetto Point, Eleuthera gave the people of that set tlement hope. It was truly a blessing to witness and be apart of that. An elderly lady told one of the gr oups, that she had been praying to God to for help and He answered her prayers. When we went to another settlement a lady said to one of the youths, "it is hard being a Christian, what made you all come to that deter mination to be saved?" The answer given was simply amazing. That young lady who is only 16 said, " When you see your friends dying ever yday the best thing is to get saved," That statement blew me away. If this young lady at her age can realise what is going on in our society then what excuse do the r est of us have? What is going on you may ask? The days are evil and devil is busy. Every negative thing you can think of has happened and is happening. As we ministered there were some people not r eady for a change to happen in their lives. And that's ok, because only you know when you are ready for change to occur . Agr eed or not we gamble with our lives in thinking that we are untouchable, that time is on our side, we know everything and the list goes on. These are the lies that devil tell us that we fall for. The Bible tells that NOW is the accepted time and today if you hear His voice harden not your hearts. But we aren’tr eady to give up our wants for God's will. My prayer is that that isn't a regretted decision. I said all of that to say thisthat not all of our young people are living to be rebellious. There are a lot of them who have consider ed God and let Him control their lives. They still need some guidance and this is where leaders, par ents and guar dians all come in. They could have been anywher e but in Eleuthera last weekend, but they were there. They are not perfect, nevertheless, they are trying and we applaud them for their efforts. To God be the glor y. All is not lost ALLISON MILLER IN a time when financial sur vival r equires many of us to put in extra hours at work, forgo time spent with family, friends, or to attend church, it’s not hard to understand why people often struggle with understanding and discovering their true calling. Yes it is important to ensure that your family has what it needs to survive, however this doesn’ t mean that you should ignor e all the things you’ve been created to accomplish. Every individual possess a special ability to accomplish something great, whether that is to inspire the masses to recognise God for who he is, encourage a child to see the good in life through a community programme, or whether it’ s just to help a friend get through a rough time. Recently Pastor Myles Munroe from Bahamas Faith Ministries said the rich est place in the world is the graveyard, because so many die befor e they accomplish all the things they could. To avoid that fate, begin thinking beyond your needs, extend yourself to others, become mor e than just your job. Y es it is impor tant to work for the things you need, but it’ s equally impor tant to help others, and in essence you’ll be helping yourself and God. Where does your heart lay? TRIBUNE TIP OF THE DA Y I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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    Thrill Grill The Tribune P G 32 Thursday, July 23, 2009 RELIGION Scenes from of the