Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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THIET
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naked body found
in West Palm Beach

By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

POLICE in Flori-
da are searching for
the killer of
Bahamian business-
man Kahil Holmes, who was
found half naked and shot
to death in the middle of a
residential street.

Mr Holmes, a 33-year-old
father-of-two, was found
dead on 22nd Street in West
Palm Beach around 8 pm
last week Tuesday.

According to reports, Mr
Holmes was found face
down, wearing only a t-shirt
and a pair of socks.

Officers responded to the
scene after receiving a
report of a man being shot,
according to a statement
from the West Palm Beach
Police Department
(WPBPD).

Yesterday, detectives
would not discuss a possible

Kahil Holmes



motive or details
relating to the case.

Police press offi-

cer Peter Robbins
would only say Mr
Holmes was shot
multiple times.

However, reports

reaching The Tri-
bune indicate the
victim was found in
a "run-down" area of town,
well known for drug-relat-
ed violence.

It is believed Mr Holmes
was stripped of his clothes
after being shot, and the
attack may have been gang
related.

The victim's half-sister,
Juliet, said her brother was
only expected to be in Flori-
da for one day as he had
promised to return to his ail-
ing father's side. She said
she did not know the pur-
pose of her brother's trip.

She added that Mr
Holmes — who owned a car
and scooter rental company
— was good natured and
knew how to bring a smile

SEE page eight

The Tribune -

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

=USA TODAY.





BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

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BAHAMAS BIGGEST jae



Passport to
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Christie allowed
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Church land
grant variation

By PAUL G

Former PM Soe
Tribune Staff Reporter

speaks on pturnquest@

tribunemedia.net

change to old
folks home
application

FORMER Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie
informed The Tribune
yesterday that he was the
one who signed off on
the variation to the orig-
inal Crown land grant
issued to the Golden
Gates Assembly church,
which created a housing
subdivision instead of the
intended old folks home
for which the application
was originally made.

Noting that the origi-
nal grant to the church
was made for an old folks
home, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham told
the House Monday that
he found the case sur-
rounding Golden Gates
Assembly very “interest-
ing.”

“Now Golden Gates is
an interesting one
because I approved for
Golden Gates to build an
old folks home. The con-
veyance was signed by
my predecessor in office.
The land was sold and a
housing subdivision is on
it, named after the rev-
erend,” Mr Ingraham
said.

The Prime Minister
then motioned to the
PLP MP for St Thomas
More, Frank Smith, who
was seated behind Mr

SEE page eight





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WORKERS PREPARE to lay pipes for the dredging of Nassau Harbour. The harbour is to be made
deeper in order to accommodate the world’s largest cruise ships.



Tourist involved in horrific | 400 collect applications for
accident with speed boat — govt funded job training

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AN AMERICAN tourist area said he rushed to help } By MEGAN interest shown on
was involved ina horror acci- the woman onto the boat, | REYNOLDS the first day of the
dent with a speed boat while and tied towels around her | Tribune Staff innovative scheme
snorkelling off the beach of | wounds to stem the bleed- } Reporter to improve job skills
a major resort yesterday. ing. : mreynolds@ in the labour mar-

According to reports, the
woman was hit by the vessel
while swimming near the
Sandals Royal Bahamian
Resort on Cable Beach with
her husband.

Eyewitnesses claimed she
was hit by the propellor of a
speed boat they believed was
operated by Sandals.

Her arm was “nearly sev-
ered” they said, and she
received a “huge gash” in her
leg.

A jetski operator in the

Y EEO W- B80 X

slashed with the propellor.

“T helped her on the boat,
secured the wound on her }

arm, and secured the wound ; 80ver
: training courses as

on her leg.”

The woman was reported-
ly conscious and calm as she }

was taken to hospital for
? Scheme was launched yes-

treatment.

Another jetski driver who

saw the accident said: “Her : t
: Foulkes said the department

SEE page eight

He added: “It nearly took
off her hand and her foot was

tribunemedia.net

JOB SEEKERS
appear enthusiastic
about applying for
government funded

more than 400 col-
lected application forms
after the National Training

terday.
Labour Minister Dion

is “very pleased” with the

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ket and the unem-
ployed’s chances of
finding work.

A total of 300 dis-
placed workers col-
lected application
forms from the
Department of
Labour on Thompson
Boulevard, Nassau, and
another 75 New Providence
residents collected forms
from Urban Renewal Cen-

SEE page 12

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





CCM URIS LCR CTL CLE
atter Sunday’s collision with squad car

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE officer who was
seriously injured when his
motorcycle collided with a
squad car during a dramat-
ic police chase on Sunday
night is in stable condition
in hospital.

Officer Nelson Rahming,
a father of two sons and a
well-known member of the
Fox Hill community, had
been pursuing a trail bike
on his motorcycle with a
police patrol car when the
vehicles crashed on Soldier
Road shortly after 7pm.

The trail bike made off
and the police motorcyclist
was rushed to hospital
unconscious.

Police in the Traffic Divi-
sion reported yesterday
that Officer Rahming, a
resident of Cockburn
Street, is now stable, but
could not confirm if he had
regained consciousness.

So far, their investigation
has not revealed any infor-
mation about what may
have caused the accident,
police said.

Tyee (Lea eLO are SI NA

CRASH FLASHBACK: The aftermath of Sunday’s collision in which a policeman was seriously injured
after a collision with a squad car during a high-speed chase. The two police vehicles were pursuing
a trail bike when they collided on Soldier Road shortly after 7pm. The police motorcyclist was tak-

en to hospital.

The three police officers
who were in the Wulff
Road Police Station squad
car at the time of the crash
also sustained injuries in

the collision and were treat-
ed in hospital.

Anyone who witnessed
the crash or may have any
information which could

assist investigations should
call the Traffic Division on
393-7714 or call Crime
Stoppers anonymously on
328-TIPS (8477).



Committee designed to probe Crown land
sale expected to be formally named today

FRED MITCHELL



By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE SELECT Committee
designed to investigate all
aspects relating to the sale and
disposition of Crown land in
the Bahamas is expected to be
formally named and commis-
sioned in the House of Assem-
bly today.

Heading the committee will
be PLP MP Fred Mitchell who
is expected to be joined by the
PLP’s MP for Cat Island and
San Salvador Philip Davis.
Three FNM MPs will join Mr
Mitchell and Mr Davis, but
their names are unknown at
this time. The committee is

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expected to review all the doc-
umentation tabled by Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham in
the House of Assembly on
Monday and make further
inquiries before it makes its for-
mal report in October of this
year. Speaking with The Tri-
bune yesterday, Mr Mitchell
said that one of the aspects the
committee will have to investi-
gate are the “missing” files that
Mr Ingraham said they are
unable to locate at this time.

During his contribution, Mr
Ingraham noted that the list he
was tabling before parliament
on all Crown grants issued
between 1950 and 2009 was in
his estimation not a complete
list.



“There is a book of Crown
grants, book number A4 which
includes (grants issued in the
years) 1960 to 1963. This book
has not been located. It has
been missing for quite some
time,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said there
should be some very “interest-
ing names” in this book.

“We have also sought to
compare that which is available
with that at the Registrar Gen-
eral’s office and at the end of
the day we may revert back to
parliament to say whether they
are missing.

“And once we have verified
they are missing we will then
consider whether or not there is
any grant that does not show
up at the Registrar General’s
office or in other information
we have, whether or not we
should cause parliament to pass
a Bill that declares any such
grant to be null and void,” he
said.

Careful

However, Mr Mitchell
warned that in this case the
prime minister must be very
careful in his approach.

“You can’t use a cannon for
something that really requires a
fly swat. You have to be careful
about the rule of law and peo-
ple’s right to property.

“Notwithstanding how poor-
ly we feel about the ethics of
it, you can’t lawfully strip peo-
ple of their rights without com-
pensation,” Mr Mitchell said.

The Fox Hill MP added that
the committee will be open to
all ideas that are in the public
domain, but stopped short of
saying if it will recommend any
criminal charges at the end of
its investigations.

As he waits to see who will
be named from the FNM to
join the committee, Mr Mitchell
said it will be interesting to see
if government is serious about
the Crown land issue.

The House of Assembly is
expected to meet this morning
at 10am.














from Terry &
Latishka

Ministry wants
education
plan finalised
by December

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MINISTRY of Education officials want their proposed
ten-year education plan to be finanalised by December and
implemented by next January, but the head of the Bahamas
Union of Teachers (BUT) thinks this timeline is unrealistic.

While noting that she thinks the plan - which is current-
ly in draft form - is an "excellent idea", BUT's president
Belinda Wilson said at least another year of extensive back-
ground work is needed for the programme to be successful.

"Based on looking at the document, I don't see it being
completed by December. If it's going to be done in a prop-
er manner, I think December is an unrealistic date. I would
think that this needs at least a full year's work, another
year's work, with the view for it to be implemented for
September 2010," Ms Wilson told The Tribune yesterday
when asked how she felt about the ministry's target date for
implementation.

"In my mind, you have to be working on this document
and the procedures (outlined) every day for the next year -
it cannot be done with just a few persons working part-
time or in set groups.”

She said educators also
needed more time to
peruse and discuss the 65-
page document - which
was presented to educa-
tion stakeholders at the
National Education Sum-
mit two weeks ago.

Yesterday, Marcellus
Taylor, director of plan-
ning and co-chair of the
educational plan commit-
tee, said the implementa-
tion timeline is based on
ministry's current sched-
ule.

Ministry officials plan
Belinda Wilson to meet again with edu-

cators when the fall semes-
ter begins to get detailed feedback on the draft and will also
hold a number of town meetings on the issue, Mr Taylor said
at a press briefing yesterday at the Ministry of Education.

The plan comprises 22 goals, each with accompanying
short-term and long-term objectives, that the ministry said
is a blueprint to transforming the country's educational sys-
tem.

Whether or not the plan meets its objectives will ulti-
mately boil down to whether it receives sufficient govern-
ment funding.

However, the committee does not know how much it will
cost to implement the programme as it needs to perform a
cost analysis for each goal, said Mr Taylor.

The idea of starting a national lottery or a national tax to
fund the plan are suggested in the blueprint but - according
to another local daily - this plan was quashed by Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham.

The committee was commissioned in April 2008 and has
spent the last 13 months compiling ideas from focus groups
and educational stakeholders.

The draft can be viewed in its entirety at www.bahamase-
ducation.com and feedback on the plan can be sent to
tenyearplan@bahamaseducation.com.



“Based on looking
at the document, I
don't see it being
completed by
December. If it's
going to be done in
a proper manner, I
think December is
an unrealistic date.”



O Magistrate’s Court

Pair charged with drive-by
shooting of 17-year-old hoy

TWO men charged with
the drive-by shooting of a
17-year-old boy were
arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Reginald Chase, 22, and
Emmanuel Rolle, 20, both
of Nassau Village, have
been charged with the mur-
der of William Farrington,
of Sir Lynden Pindling
Estates.

The teenager was killed
in a drive-by shooting on Ida
Street around 4am last
Wednesday. He was report-
edly hit in the chest and
upper arm. Two other men
were also wounded.

Chase and Rolle, who
appeared before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in
Court 1, Bank Lane, have
also been charged with caus-
ing grievous harm to Jamal
Edgecombe and Kelcio
Clarke. The men pleaded
not guilty to the charges and
were not required to enter a
plea to the murder charge.

The accused were
remanded to her Majesty’s
Prison. The case has been
adjourned to July 28 and
transferred to Court 5, Bank
Lane.

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THE TRIBUNE





Policeman:
mortician
told me his
co-worker
shot him
and wife

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A POLICE officer testi-
fied yesterday that local
mortician Dorneil Ferguson
told him that his co-worker
Dudley Moree had shot him
and his wife.

Sergeant Alexander
Pierre told the court that
around 2.40 am on Thurs-
day, June 26, he was on
patrol and ordered to go to
the Family Street area.

On arrival he was
stopped by a civilian who
pointed out an apartment
and gave him certain infor-
mation.

Sergeant Pierre said he
kicked in the front door of
the apartment and also a
bedroom door. Inside he
saw a man, a woman and a
baby in bed.

He said he noticed the
man had gunshot wounds to
his right hand and lower
back. The woman, he said,
had been shot in the left leg.

Sgt Pierre said he asked
Mr Ferguson who had shot
him. Mr Ferguson told him:
“Officer I ain feel like I gern
make it. My co-worker Dud-
ley Moree who live off Cow-
pen Road shot us, I saw him
through our bedroom win-
dow.”

Sgt Pierre told the court
how a few minutes later,
EMS personnel arrived and
took Mr Ferguson and his
wife to hospital.

Notepad

During cross-examination
by Moree’s attorney, Murrio
Ducille, Sgt Pierre said he
recorded what Mr Ferguson
had told him on a notepad
but did not know where it
was. Mr Ducille also sug-
gested Mr Ferguson had
never said those words. Sgt
Pierre denied the sugges-
tion.

Housekeeper Cassandra
Evans told the court she
knew the accused and the
deceased who worked at
Butler’s Funeral Home. She
recalled an altercation
between the two men during
which she saw Mr Ferguson
beating up Moree.

She said Moree just stood
there and took the blows.
Ms Evans also said she
heard Moree tell Mr Fergu-
son he was going to shoot
him, but Mr Ferguson
replied that he wasn’t going
to shoot anyone.

Ms Evans also recalled an
incident at the funeral home
three weeks later. She said
Moree said he was going to
kill Mr Ferguson and she
watched as Mr Ferguson
came and pushed Moree in
his head. She told the court
that a month after that inci-
dent, she learned that Mr
Ferguson had died.

Moree, 23, of Faith Gar-
dens is accused of murdering
38-year-old Ferguson.
Moree is also charged with
attempted murder and pos-
session of a firearm with the
intent to endanger the life of
another.

The trial continues today.

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 3

Drive-by shooting victim

hit at least four times

Mi 30-year-old man in critical condition

Mm Police say motive remains unclear

ME Officers ask public for information

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A 30-YEAR-OLD man was lucky to sur-
vive after being shot at least four times in a
drive-by shooting in Nassau’s inner-city.

The victim was on Lifebuoy Street, off
East Street, when he was gunned down by
the driver or passenger of a passing vehicle
at around 10pm on Monday, police said.

Police Supt Elsworth Moss, officer in-
charge of the Central Detective Unit
(CDU), said police have not received any
description of the vehicle, or its occupants,
and are appealing to the public for infor-
mation.

“The injured man is in critical, but stable
condition in the hospital’s Intensive Care
Unit.

“He was shot about four or five times
about the body.

“We don’t know what the motive for the
shooting was at this stage.

“Hopefully once he improves we can
speak to him and see if we can find the
motive,” Mr Moss said.

The violent shooting was one of two in
the capital within three hours.

Quinten Walker, 18, was engaged in an

argument with another man on Cumber-
batch Alley, off Wulff Road, at around
12.40am yesterday when shots were fired.

As they were arguing, in what police say
was simply a verbal altercation, a third man
appeared and fired several shots at the
teenager.

Grazed

A bullet grazed the side of Mr Walker’s
face and another hit the rental car he had
been driving.

Police have two men in custody for ques-
tioning in connection with the incident.

Supt Moss said: “We believe the man who
fired the shots was a friend of the person he
was arguing with.”

No arrests have yet been made in con-
nection with the Lifebuoy Street shooting.

Anyone who may have witnessed the
shooting in Lifebuoy Street, or have any
information which may assist investigations,
should call the Criminal Detective Unit
urgently on 502-9991 or call Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477).

All calls to Crime Stoppers are answered
in the United States and ensure total
anonymity.

Tourism numbers declining
— despite bid to woo visitors

BHA president
confirms the
comments of
Ingraham

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter 2
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net re wal
BAHAMAS Hotel Associ- | if iy
ation (BHA) president :

Robert Sands yesterday con- Fe) s) ta Tn

firmed that, as revealed by
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, tourism numbers con-
tinue to decline despite all
efforts to attract visitors.
While statistics are still
being compiled for the annu-
al Tourism Outlook Survey
which will be released next
week, Mr Sands said it
appears the number of
tourists visiting the islands is
declining month by month as
they have been since the glob-
al economic crisis hit last year.
Last week Mr Ingraham
told the Regional Forum at



“... arrivals are
still showing
decreases in
terms of the
occupancy rate
and revenue....”



Robert Sands



OL Mer

and revenue, so although it
appears to be slowing it has
not changed.

“There are pockets of prop-
erty doing better than some,
we have one or two of the
major hotels showing slight
improvements over last year,
but we have to look at this in
the aggregate, the experiences
of a few small properties and
one or two medium sized
hotels is not a good indica-
tion of our state of industry.”

He added: “The Bahamas
could have taken the position



A 30-YEAR-OLD-MAN was shot several times in a drive-by shoot-

ing in Lifebouy street of East street Tuesday night.

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the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank’s 50th anniversary
in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, how
occupancy levels at hotels
remain well below those
achieved last year in tourism
economies across the
Caribbean despite discounts
and other incentives to attract
visitors.

The economic downturn
has resulted in 2,200 lay-offs
in the Bahamas’ hotel sector,
which amounts to one per cent
of the country’s entire work-
force, Mr Ingraham said, as
the country was one of the first
in the region to feel the effects
of the slowing global econo-
my.

However, Mr Sands yester-
day praised efforts to revamp
the airport, cruise ship port,
and clean up the islands to
improve the tourism product
and ensure the visitors who

do come to the Bahamas
leave with a positive impres-
sion and a mind to return, as
well as the inclination to
report good things to friends
and family at home.

“Notwithstanding the cur-
rent situation is the fact that
the efforts of all those
involved in private sector
tourism and public sector
tourism are working to be
more creative in the market-
place, and to keep the name
of the Bahamas out there in
an attempt to make up for
financial losses.

“We are in the process of
trying to complete the eco-
nomic survey we do annually,
so I am not in a position to
comment on it, but the trend
remains the same, arrivals are
still showing decreases in
terms of the occupancy rate

where they see that it’s tough
and not do anything about it,
so it would continue to dete-
riorate, but we are not doing
that, we are seeing work, it
may not be manifesting itself
in terms of increased arrivals,
but people who visit here will
recommend the destination
based on their experience that
they had.”

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Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6

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Telephone: (242) 323-8240 * Fax: (242) 326-9953

P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

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Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
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Attitude to work and to foreigners

BAHAMIANS aspire to first world stan-
dards, but many are not prepared to make
the effort to achieve them. Not only do they
want the luxury without the required effort,
but they get upset if experts are brought in to
show them how to improve themselves.

“Hey, man, you trying to show us up,
eh?”

Oh, how often have we heard that stupid,
Third World lament — even in an office set-
ting.

in the early days of the PLP regime,
under the late Sir Lynden Pindling, we were
shocked one day when the Opposition UBP
offered a word of advice in the House of
Assembly. “You think just because we black
we don’t know, eh?” was Sir Lynden’s angry
retort.

The fact was that they did not know.
They needed help and direction from a
group of legislators, who, having ruled the
country for generations, had administrative
know-how in their genes. The PLP were not
ignorant of the art of government because
they were black. They were ignorant because
they had never had the opportunity to learn
about administration at any level. Suddenly
they were in a position to experiment on
the Bahamian people. But what made them
a danger to the country was their attitude.
They were too proud to accept guidance.
They were afraid of being “shown up.” As a
consequence this country took many wrong
turns. It is a miracle it has done as well as it
has despite all the road blocks put in the
way by people puffed up with false pride,
stupid arrogance, and envy.

We have qualified our statement by the
use of the word “many” because obviously
this attitude does not apply to all Bahamians
who are hard working and who fully deserve
to enjoy the fruits of their labours.

Today the Bahamas is behind in many
areas.

Facing global competition for which
Bahamians are not ready, there is much
catching up to do.

Government has brought in needed for-
eign experts many of whom, from the con-
versations we have had, have come up
against the very attitude that we are now
discussing.

Many of these projects are backed by
European financing, about which we have
heard grudging remarks by those who fear
that any improvement requiring more effort

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might change their laid-back lifestyle. How
many times have we seen a brilliant for-
eigner shake his head in frustration not
knowing how to complete a project because
he is held back by a local staff unwilling to
learn.

He knows he is wasting his time, and that
they will slip back into their old ways as
soon as he leaves.

This week we were talking to a friend
who described the feelings of some foreign
experts in some of government’s ministries.

“They are experienced foreigners,” our
friend said, “who were contracted by gov-
ernment to undertake a major project in

a particular ministry that government sees
as necessary to modernise, to make more
efficient and productive.

“Despite working on average around 12
hours a day, and on weekends, they were
dismayed to have someone bring to their
attention comments made in a Bahamian
internet chat forum where someone with
knowledge of the workings of their depart-
ment, believed to be an employee, was mak-
ing disparaging comments about them.

“They were being accused of getting paid
too much, taking jobs that Bahamians in the
ministry could have had, and of generally
being superfluous, when in fact their work
has been praised as having the potential of
being very transformative.

“Its goals are numerous and address areas
where it is well known we are in serious
need of reform.

“While this seriously disillusioned at least
one of the group, they have also been dis-
turbed by what they see as the apparent dis-
regard for their work by the various agencies
and department that its success hinges on,”
said our friend.

“One said to me that he feels almost cer-
tain that all of their efforts will be lost once
they leave. It really has not sunk in with
those who need help — whether the cause is
ineptitude, indifference or hostility against
foreigners, they didn't attempt to say.”

These consultants, used to a First World
work ethic, were shocked by how many in
their department leave work at 2.30pm to
pick up their children from school, but nev-
er return.

It certainly makes one wonder how many
of them could survive a full eight-hour work
day, not to mention the 12 hours often
required daily to build a successful nation.



Remember the
retirees — while
we are still here!

Re:Requesting Government
to Review Pensions

Of Retired Public Offi-
cers/Servants

B) Utilization of Some
Retirees Ete:

EDITOR, The Tribune.

To my knowledge, it has
been a long time since a review
of pensions was carried out, ie,
public servants and public offi-
cers. There is a policy by gov-
ernment which is appreciated
by us retirees that soon after
an increase of public ser-
vants/public officers, an addi-
tional increase reflected
retirees’ pensions, ie, a small
amount across the board.

Some time last year, there
was an increase for govern-
ment: public officers/servants
approximately received $63.00
per month. Mr John Pinder,
President of The Bahamas Pub-
lic Services Union, usually pro-
posed for retirees at least half
given to public officers be con-
sidered. Although half of this
seems small, but it would be a
help for the time being:

To date at the demise of a
pensioner the spouse/benefi-
clary is given one year of a
deceased pensioner, upon
request by application. Hope-
fully at the discretion of gov-
ernment a longer period may
be considered.

Some pensioners passed
away not long after retirement,
while others could live for a
very long period. A review of
pensions when carried out
should be commensurate at
least the nineteen sixties com-
pared to the two thousands.

The vast contrast would be
observed. Relative to the police
department: a constable’s pen-
sion is about $1,200 per month.
This analogy could refer to oth-
er government departments.
Some retirees are earning
monthly pensions less than
$1,000, including the combina-
tion of National Insurance. It
should be realised that we
retirees are living in the same
era of consistent escalation of
the cost of living.

Following are names of some
retirees:

Education: Mr Livingstone
V Taylor — the most senior
educator; Mrs Mildred Dilette
(nee King) — the most senior
female educator; Mr Filex
Deleveaux — Family Island;
Rev Dr Charles Saunders: Fam-
ily Island, former deputy per-
manent secretary. The naming
of the highway in his honour
most appropriate and merito-
rious, including other persons
mentioned can be termed as
legendary, 1 educators. Percy
Strachan, Hexon Pratt also
Island Commissioner, L B
D’Arville, Catherina
Cartwright, Maria Ferguson
(née Taylor) Principal, Loretta
Minnis (née Moncur), Delores
Mounts (née Lockhart), Sybil

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To our valued Members, please be advised that

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



Strachan (née Coakley) Prin-
cipal, Beryl Francis-Culmer
Principal, Vylma Curling, Mari-
na Walcott (née Thompson)
Principal, Paula Holder (née
Gibbs), Nathilee Hutcheson
(née Russell), Barbara Dean,
Mrs Leona Jane Fernander,
Mrs Thelma Ferguson of USA.

Messrs: Vincent Wilson,
Frank Reid, Gibson, Raul
Dean, Dr Moree Holder. The
latter six educators are also for-
mer police officers. Mr Richard
E Dean, an educator to be
remembered also as Asst Direc-
tor, Immigration, Deputy Sec-
retary, Gaming Board, Super-
intendent Boy’s Industrial
School, Mr Albert Smith, Ms
Alice Watson, Mrs Josephine
Parker, Mrs Claudette Lundy
etc.

Police Department: Rudley
(Diamond) Ferguson — Most
Senior Police Officers, retired
Charles McKinney, Frederick
Brooks. These three retirees
are the last survivors of the
famous Burma Road Riot, 1942
Sgts: Bynoe, Carl Lynch, Den-
nis John, Ezra Flowers, “Old
Abe” Stuart, Allan McPhee,
Inspector John “Stinger” Moss,
ASP Wilmore Dames, Hugh
Sandford, Lewis Hennings,
Edmund Stubbs, Ormond Brig-
gs, Charles Fernander, Avery
Ferguson (former teacher),
Addington D’Arville (former
headmaster, Roses, Long
Island), Stanley Moir, Ashton
Miller, Keith Mason, Errol Far-
quharson, Arnold Farquharson,
Kenneth Andrews, Ms Agatha
Rodgers (née Gibson), Marina
Forbes, Mrs Agnes Saunders,
Dezerina Schroeter (née
Lewis), Whitfield Major,
Salathiel “All night” Wilson,
Irrington “Fish” Dean, Alfred
Williams, Irvin Taylor, Regi-
nald Dumont, Errol Hepburn,
Ronnie Bannister, Vincent
Charlton, Haverson McKenzie,
Kilroy Coakley, Harcourt Wal-
lace, Paul Thompson, Erring-
ton Watkins, Fr Rodney Bur-
rows, Arthur Yearwood, Edwin
“Cheno” Knowles, Irrington
“Fish” Dean, Wilfred Jack,
Bertram Davis, George
“Shoes” Poitier, Leland Turner,
Lemond Seymour, Ezra Curry,
Dustan Babb, Alonzo Butler,
Dorthan Chandler, Cordell
Delancey, Larry Johnson, Ellis
Peet, Retired Secretary, Labour
Tribunal, Supentindent of
Boy’s Industrial School, New-
ton McDonald, Former Under-
secretary, Garth Johnson, Leon
Johnson, Wilton Strachan,
Fritzroy Antoine.

Road Traffic: Fred Neely,
Leroy Braithwaite, (both for-
mer police officers), Mr Charles
Clarke - Former Deputy Con-
troller.

Customs: Mrs Patsy Wring
(née Poitier), Mr Leslie “White
man” Albury, Mr Arlington
Miller, ete:

Immigration: Mr Fred Stra-
chan, Mrs Joan Clarke (nee
Hanna) Former Deputy Per-
manent Secretary, Mrs Barbara
Pierre, Former Director.

There are several retirees
who could be utilised if only
part time: eg Police Depart-
ment retirees CID experience:
Reading of crime cases, mak-
ing recommendations: etc: Mr
Paul Thompson Consultant
Ministry of National Security.

Education: There are many

English. Classrooms could be
assisted ie Literature: Shake-
speare, Merchant of Venice,
Macbeth, King Lear; Hamlet
Prince of Denmark. Reference:
Mr Livingstone V Taylor, I
recall this modest gentleman as
a Family Island Headmaster
when in 1949 I was appointed
pupil teacher. Note during that
era pupil/asst teachers could
have acted as head masters
whenever necessary. Some
were appointed head masters
from the said position. Permit
me to refer to Rev Dr Charles
W Saunders who preached at
his church some time last year.
This service related to Retired
Police Officers. He made an
analogy ie: the death of Christ
when simultaneously the tem-
ple was split: The Atonement
which made the possibility of
going to the high priest obso-
lete. As an educator he illus-
trated ie: Geometry: The equi-
lateral, triangle: The straight
perpendicular line from the
base to the apex. He explained
“No acute, obtuse, right angle:”
He reiterated the straight line
could reach God. I was stimu-
lated and impressed. He depict-
ed the talent of educators mak-
ing a pertinent point. The nam-
ing of Charles W Saunders
Highway is meritorious and
most appropriate.

There are categories of
retirees eg: The Police, Educa-
tion, Prison, Customs, etc; they
should independently form an
association so that functions,
committees, profiles, testimo-
nials etc, could be organised
other than expecting the gov-
ernment of the day to always
intervene.

There are crucial times for
the nation, therefore, retirees
as we are, have to maintain
patience and not to be per-
ceived as imprudent. In time
hopefully something would be
worked out.

Some retired public offi-
cers/civil servants who are Jus-
tices of the Peace could be
utilised as Lay Magistrates.

Especially such Justices of
the Peace with propensities, eg,
legal/court matters. This could
alleviate backlog of minor
offences and facilitate the hear-
ing of such cases.

The FNM government merits
congratulations relative to some
unemployed contributors hav-
ing been considered payment
benefits under The National
Insurance Board. It should be
noted that retirees generally
reflect a most arduous past: in
retirement many experience
physical repercussions as a con-
sequence. With regards to util-
isation of retirees, suggestions,
modifications are strongly rec-
ommended.

There was a philosopher L
Ron Hubbard, one of his ren-
ditions: knowledge experience
not imparted is atrophied,
(waste personified), unequivo-
cally I wish to point out that
the retirees hope that the pow-
ers that be would at their con-
venience, remember us while
we are still in the realm of exis-
tence and that relevant sugges-
tions mentioned may be
brought to fruition. We are
privy to the fact that the
Bahamas is experiencing eco-
nomic, financial, crisis which of
course is not insurmountable
hence, whatever is done would
be appreciated immensely.

C ADRIEL HUTCHIN-
SON

Retired Chief Inspector of
Police

converence to any home, : eas ; ; teachers retired with special- Nassau,
Sens oe tne coe aie enc Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative ties: Reading Mathematics, Tune, 2009.

service calls within 48 hours, usually on the
same day.

Credit Union Limited, has up graded its Excitement as Barack Obama

makes his footprint in history

EDITOR, The Tribune.

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first African-American person to such an extreme position
in the world.

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was a night of excitement in Chicago and The Bahamas
when he was chosen as the next President of the United
States of America.

When coming to office in January 20, 2009. The next two
years the road is a long, hard one.

Stay focused and committed to a job that your people
entrust you to do.

At this time, and place the world needs strong men of your
character. You are like a fresh wind breeze. The World
was crying out for more peace, love and waited patiently for
your arrival.

We here in The Bahamas would be watching every step
you make all your ups and downs, sorrows and joys. The
Lord raises up great men of loyalty and good character to
lead.

Make your own footprint in the sand and legend so the
World would remember Barack Obama.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 5



0 In brief



Estate agent
named Pilot

Club president

for Freeport

ESTATE agent Donna
Laing-Jones, of H G
Christie in Grand
Bahama, was recently
named president for the
Pilot Club of Freeport for
2009/2010.

When asked about her
involvement in this par-
ticular organisation, Ms
Laing-Jones replied, “I
joined our club over 17
years ago, and for me it
has been a fantastic
understanding of real ser-
vice and friendship. I
have been able to connect
with women from all
around the world with
one common desire, to
serve. As president of the
Pilot Club of Freeport,
my theme for 2009/2010
is ‘Let the journey
begin’.”

Pilot International was
founded and chartered in
1921 as an international
service organisation. The
river boat pilots of the
early 1900s are the inspi-
ration for the name.
These pilots were
admired for their ability
to steer a "true course"
through challenging con-
ditions and obstacles.

The Bahamas is home
to six Pilot Clubs with a
combined membership of
approximately 165 who
have been answering the
needs in their community
through various worth-
while service projects and
fundraisers since 1974.

H G Christie is a full-
service real estate com-
pany in the Bahamas
offering sales, rentals,
appraisals, and property
management.

Bahamians

and tourists
outraged at
cancelled flight

A GROUP of
Bahamians and tourists
were outraged on Mon-
day when a Spirit Air
flight was cancelled,
leaving them stranded
in Florida without com-
pensation to cover their
overnight accommoda-
tion.

According to an irate
passenger, the airline
announced that the
4pm flight from Fort
Lauderdale to Nassau
would be cancelled
because of weather, but
allowed a Spirit Air
flight to Freeport to
depart at the same time.

One traveller, noting
that the airline’s policy
is not to pay out for
accommodation if the
cancellation is “weath-
er-related”, said passen-
gers were sceptical that
this was the true cause
for cancelling the
flight.

“They left a couple
hundred people strand-
ed and booked them on
the next flight,” said the
traveller, who added
that he had to postpone
a morning meeting for
today in view of the
cancellation.

Attempts to reach
Spirit Air in the
Bahamas for comment
yesterday afternoon
were unsuccessful.

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Govt set to give
Disease Prescription Dru

SOME $5.4 million is
expected to be contributed by
government to start the first
phase of the Chronic Disease
Prescription Drug Plan
(CDPDP) to cover approxi-
mately 32,000 persons.

Representatives of the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) apprised government
and opposition members of
parliament on the CDPDP
during a special presentation at
the Police Conference Centre
on East Street yesterday.

Addressing the parliamen-
tarians, NIB director Alger-
non Cargill said: “It is impor-
tant to note that phase one is
not calling on any additional
contributions from the gov-
ernment or the persons who
will be covered,” he said.
“Phase one will be funded
entirely from the National
Insurance Board.”

There will be a second
reading in the House of
Assembly on September 2 of
the Bill for the CDPDP.

Once the legislation is
enacted, the prescription drug
plan, which is similar to that
of Jamaica, will be adminis-
tered in two phases beginning
with a pilot phase of NIB pen-
sioners, invalids and children
under 18 or up to 25 if in uni-
versity.

Future phases, which will
cover 48,000 persons, will
include employed and self-

employed persons, indigents,
persons in government insti-
tutions and voluntary mem-
bers.

Mr Cargill said the drug
plan will address national con-
cerns regarding the burden of
chronic diseases — which
affect one in three Bahamians
— timely access to essential

drugs, and the financial bur-
den to patients, families and
government.

“The key benefit of the
plan is quality, cost effective
drugs, associated medical plans
including syringes and test
strips,” he said. “The medical
supplies or prescription
drugs will be provided on a

ALGERNON
CARGILL, director
of the National
Insurance Board.

ick Hanna/BIS

5



monthly basis.”

The initial list of drugs cov-
ers 93 items that will be
reviewed and amended.

Mr Cargill said the plan is
intended to cover 11 chronic
diseases, including arthritis,
breast and prostate cancer,
glaucoma, hypertension, high
cholesterol, asthma and

5.4m to Chronic
g Plan

ischaemic heart disease.

“For this plan to be suc-
cessful and for us to operate as
efficiently as possible, tech-
nology is going to be a big con-
tributor to the success in terms
of ensuring that the pharma-
cies remain on board in its exe-
cution,” he said.

Public and private pharma-
cies will be contracted as
providers.

“We recognise that in some
of the Family Island pharma-
cies there is no technology and
we are making special arrange-
ments to have the prescription
drugs to be dispensed through
the various clinics,” said Mr
Cargill.

The plan will also assist in
funding health and wellness
projects.

“The other part of the plan
is the Healthy People Pro-
gramme,” he said. “The objec-
tive is to partner with the Min-
istry of Health to provide sup-
port and grant funds for well-
designed community projects
to create more awareness
about healthy lifestyles.

“Proposals will be invited
from formally established pub-
lic and community organisa-
tions to ensure that we create
an awareness about health
benefits because the more
awareness we create, the less
prescription drugs hopefully
will be required,” said Mr
Cargill.

Government lease renewal not
automatic says Prime Minister

RENEWAL of commer-
cial leases of government
land is not automatic,
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has warned.

“Renewals are based
upon evidence of satisfac-
tory compliance with ‘key
performance indicators’ as
set out in the lease agree-
ment,” he said in a com-
munication to the House of
Assembly on Monday on
the Disposition of Crown
and Government Owned
Land.

These performance indi-
cators include financial
commitment, likely public
benefits to be derived from
the development, ongoing
use, and sustainability of
the development, he said.

“The government
reserves the right to revisit
lease terms and conditions
at the time of each renew-
al,” the prime minister said.

Agreement

The conditional lease
purchase of Crown land
agreement stipulates fees,
rents, a specified time
frame and other develop-
ment conditions or mark-
ers to be met by the lessee.

“In the event that the
conditions of the lease are
not met the land reverts to
the inventory of Crown
lands,” Mr Ingraham said.

Bahamian applicants
have been approved and
issued Crown grants and
conditional purchase lease
agreements for properties
along the Carmichael,
Gladstone and Marshall
Roads corridors in New
Providence for commercial
development.

The prime minister said



Hubert Ingraham

he was pleased to have
been the instrument
through which independent
Bahamian entrepreneurs at
the Down Home Fish Fry
were approved for renew-
able Crown leases. Howev-
er, he said he is disappoint-
ed that so many lessees
are behind in their pay-
ments.

Infrastructure

“Following upon the
receipt of those leases and
the installation of public
infrastructure by the gov-
ernment,” he said, “some
of the shacks at the
entrance to Arawak Cay
were transformed into
attractive restaurants,
which are frequented by
Bahamians of all walks of
life and countless visitors
to New Providence.

“T have recently noted
my disappointment that a
large number of these
lessees are years in arrears

Deep sea explorers object
to judge recommendation

TAMPA, Fla.

DEEP-SEA explorers based in Florida have filed an
objection to a judge’s recommendation that they give 17 tons
of shipwreck treasure back to Spain, according to Associat-

ed Press.

Odyssey Marine Exploration filed its objection in Tampa

federal court on Tuesday.

The dispute concerns the 200-year-old wreck of a Spanish
galleon that carried tons of silver and other artifacts esti-
mated to be worth $500 million.

The ship is believed to be the Nuestra Senora de las Mer-

cedes y las Animas.

Odyssey says they don’t have enough evidence to confirm
that the recovered cargo is from the Mercedes. The company
argues that if it is, the Mercedes was engaged in commercial
activity when it exploded, which would nullify Spain’s sov-

ereign immunity claim.

in the payment of their
lease fees.”

The government accel-
erated the creation of new
Crown subdivisions during
its first term in office, Mr
Ingraham said.

New subdivisions were




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Abaco, Grand Bahama,
Andros and Exuma, mak-
ing land more easily and
reasonably available to
Bahamians for the con-
struction of residences, he
said.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



GB sub-division
renamed to
honour popular
Bantist peicher

By SIMON LEWIS
Bahamas Information
Service

FREEPORT -— The
government’s housing
subdivision at Hawksbill,
Grand Bahama, will carry
the name of a prominent
Baptist preacher.

This was revealed by
Housing Minister Ken-
neth Russell who con-
firmed the renaming of
the Sister Mary Patricia

Russell Estate to Welling-

ton Pinder Heights.

Mr Russell said the
government felt it more
fitting to place Sister
Mary Patricia Russell’s
name on the new junior
high school at Freeport,
since her contribution to
the nation was mainly in
education.

“This development has
opened the door for
another stalwart commu-
nity leader to be hon-
oured,” said Mr Russell.
“Dr Pinder has given
excellent service to the

Grand Bahama communi- }

ty in religious, social and
civil sectors of our soci-
ety.”

Born November 3,

1920, and a product of the

Pinder lineage of Pinder’s
Point, Grand Bahama,
Rev Dr Wellington Pin-
der succeeded his father
Rev William Pinder as

pastor of the Zion Baptist

Church in Eight Mile
Rock in 1961.

Two years later he was
challenged to establish a
church in the Pinder’s
Point community. Thus
was born the Upper Zion
Baptist Church which was
completed and a service
of dedication held on
November 7, 1965.

Rev Pinder was mar-
ried to the late Verdell
Pinder nee Smith. That
marriage produced nine
children, three of whom
became religious minis-

ters. After his wife died in

1989, Rev Pinder married
Valurine Bain the follow-
ing year.

Nowadays, Rev Pinder
is enjoying retirement.
He remains one of Grand

Bahama’s most influential }

leaders, having served as
moderator for the Zion
Churches for 30 years,
pastor of Upper Zion for
35 years, as a member of
the local board of Works
for 29 years, member of
the Independence Com-
mittee, honorary presi-
dent of the Grand
Bahama Christian Coun-
cil, and most worthy offi-
cer in the Grand United
Order of Odd-fellows
Lodge.

He is also a Justice of
the Peace and a recipient
of the Queen’s Badge of
Honour.

Bahamas to import
directly from Haiti

THE Bahamas is to import
agricultural products directly
from Haiti, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham confirmed.

He said the Bahamas
wants to grow more of its own
food but it cannot produce an
adequate amount for domes-
tic consumption and the hotel
sector.

“It will benefit the
Bahamas if crops are import-
ed from Haiti because fewer
Haitians would leave home in
search of jobs if they had
employment opportunities in
Haiti,” he said in an interview
with BIS and ZNS following
the IDB Forum in Haiti last
weekend.

Prime Minister Ingraham
also met privately with Hait-
ian President René Préval at
the National Palace, Port-au-
Prince, when they discussed
topics of mutual interests.

Trip

On his trip to Haiti, he was
accompanied by Christine
Thompson, Chief Economist,
Ministry of Finance, and
Haiti’s Ambassador to the
Bahamas Louis Harold
Joseph. They were met in
Port-au-Prince by the
Bahamas’ Ambassador to
Haiti Davy Rolle.

Mr Ingraham pointed out
that The Bahamas is selling
in its food stores Haitian
mangoes imported from Mia-
mi.

“Why can we not import
the mangoes directly from
Haiti to Nassau?” he asked.
“Would it not be cheaper to
do so?”

The same goes for vegeta-
bles grown in Haiti, he said.

“We have had complica-
tions in terms of certifying
fruits grown in Haiti, as an







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PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham bids Haitian President René
Préval goodbye before leaving the reception held for delegates
attending the 50th anniversary of the creation of the Inter-American

Development Bank, July 16.

2

example,” said the Prime
Minister. “The Americans
have found a way to deal
with it why can’t we?”

Mr. Ingraham said he
promised the Haitian Presi-
dent that by the end of the
year, crops such as mangoes
should be coming directly
from Haiti without jeopar-
dising The Bahamas’ agricul-
tural sector.

“We in The Bahamas
have a long history of impos-
ing on ourselves require-
ments and standards that are
not in our interest,” he said.

“At one time we would not
import beef from Argentina

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because of some rules that
we have.

“But the Argentines could
export beef into the United
States and we could buy the
beef from there.

“We are going to seek to
overcome that kind of thing.”

Meanwhile, the Govern-
ment is going to maximize
opportunities for Bahamians
to go into food production.

“One of the things we can
do in The Bahamas is
increase the supply of goods
and services to the tourism
sector,” he said.

“It would create numer-
ous jobs if Bahamians pro-

NANCY KELLY and Dame
Marguerite Pindling (seated),
standing are Pauline Allen
Dean, raffle chairperson;
Michelangiolo Baccelli, com-
mittee member, and newly
elected Red Cross president
Brendon Watson.



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PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham sends sarerlletione on behalf
of CARICOM nations to the Inter-American Development Bank as it cel-
ebrated the 50th anniversary of its creation, July 16, Port-au-Prince,
Haiti. Pictured are IDB President, Luis Alberto Moreno (right) and Hait-
ian President René Préval.

duced more things the
tourists use, because while
there are only 300,000 peo-
ple residing in the country,
nearly 5 million tourists pass
through The Bahamas every
year.”

Because the attraction and
demand to get to the
Bahamas “is so great,” said
the Prime Minister, migration
of Haitians there “is over-
whelming.”

Immigrants

“We have intensified our
efforts to stem the flow of
illegal immigrants into the
Bahamas,” he said.

“At the same time, we have
been seeking as best as we
can to deal with those who
are there, who are undocu-
mented.

“We have also been pro-
viding status for those who
have been in The Bahamas
for long periods of time and
who have a connection to the

Official launch of 2009
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society.”

The Government, he said,
is employing a multi-pronged
approach to handling the ille-
gal immigration problem.

“We have been able to
beef up our protection,” he
said.

“We have craft stationed
permanently at Inagua.

“We are working with the
European Union to build a
new docking facility at
Ragged Island where
Defence Force craft will be
stationed.”

The Government recent-
ly purchased two aircraft for
the Defence Force.

“The Haitian authorities
have been most co-operative
with The Bahamas in terms
of returning to Haiti
those persons who come to
our country illegally,” he said.

“At the same time we
have been very fair in dealing
with those who have been in
the country and who have
made a contribution to our
development.”





A GROUP of prominent Bahamians came together to
support the Bahamas Red Cross Society at the recent launch
of its grand raffle to raise funds for humanitarian services and

disaster relief.

Among those voicing their public support were Dame
Marguerite Pindling; Nancy Kelly of Kelly’s Home Centre;
Rupert Roberts of Super Value; Freddie Albury of Execu-
tive Motors, and Wayde Christie, senior executive at Sco-

tiabank.

The raffle’s opening day took place in front of the Scotia-

bank branch on Bay Street.

Dame Marguerite, a long-time supporter of the Red Cross,
urged people to purchase raffle tickets for a good cause.

“Funds raised from this 2009 raffle will be used for the Soci-
ety’s humanitarian services throughout the Bahamas, and dis-
aster relief. In light of this, it is very important that the Soci-
ety has sufficient funds to respond to emergencies as they

arise,” she said.

“The Red Cross is one of the major emergency relief
organisations in the Bahamas and is a member of the Nation-
al Emergency Management Agency (NEMA).

“Red Cross plays a significant role in youth development,
whether through it training in first aid, after school pro-
grammes, or teaching young people to help the needy in

their communities.”

Dame Marguerite said she is especially pleased to welcome
Mrs Kelly and Mr Roberts, “two of our most prominent
businesspersons, who have again this year taken time out of
their busy schedules to give of their personal time to assist the
Bahamas Red Cross fundraising efforts.”

“T am pleased to be joined by Mr and Mrs Freddie Albury
of Executive Motors, who I understand has given a sub-
stantial discount to Red Cross on the purchase of the 2009
Toyota Corolla which is the first prize in this year’s raffle,”

she said.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



PASSPORT

PARADISE

SHOOTS
PILOT

B AHAMIAN culture and entertain-
ment will be beamed to people
around the world with the success of the new
television magazine, Passport to Paradise. A
pilot for the television show is being taped
around the Bahamas with Producers exploring
options for international distribution.

Preparations are underway to deliver a 12 to
16 episode series to either the Network or
Cable Channel that picks up this informative
and entertaining new show. Taped segments
have included shopping on Bay Street; the fes-
tive “Junkanoo” festivities; and fine dining at
Luciano's. Future shows will feature other exot-
ic spots and dining centres with behind-the-
scenes glimpses at what makes vacation visits all
the more memorable. The show's exciting pace
is given a witty edge by an attractive host
Rachael Carr, a British model who has worked
as a double for several stars, including Brit-
ney Spears, Christina Aguilera and Kylie
Minoque.

Capturing the best elements of the Bahami-
an vacation experience, Passport to Paradise
brought in the creative team of Lou Maggio
and Rob Mason. Mason is a partner at Los
Angeles based RobCyn Entertainment Group
and Maggio an Executive Producer and partner
at Maven Films. Maggio, who has produced
three feature films and numerous segments for
the E! Entertainment show “Wild On” is no
stranger to the Bahamas.

“As Director of Photography for Venus
Swimwear for 18 years, I directed photo shoots
on some of the most beautiful beaches in the
Caribbean and Mexico,” Maggio stated, “but I
always came back to the Bahamas. With the
beautiful beaches, great history and warm lov-
ing people... it always felt like home to me.”

Alana Phillips, a London make up artist,
who is part of the team, said working on Pass-
port to Paradise was like a dream come true.
“To be able to work in such a beautiful place
alongside great people, to experience such dif-
ferent and rich culture and to be so welcomed
by everyone was just amazing,” she said.

Among the many VIPs and celebrities that
Passport to Paradise chose to interview for its

axthis



Esk? OUTLETS

show was
Vincent Van-
derpool-Wal-
lace, the
Bahamian
Minister of
Tourism

and Avia-
tion. Support-
ing the show's
theme for qual-
ity locations,
Minister Van-
derpool-
Wallace
pointed out
that the
demo-
graphics of
visitors to the

Bahamas remain high

quality guests who are interest-

ed in participating in a wide range of
activities. In response to the current economy,
the Bahamas, like other vacation destinations,
has seen a decrease in travellers from distant
places, so the country's marketing strategies
have changed to reflect the shift.

“You will find us spending a great deal more
of our time, energy, and money in places that
have non-stop flights, lower cost flights and
again places closer by,” Minister Vanderpool-
Wallace said. “Because you are finding almost
everywhere, when you look at the fall off in
business, it is from points distant from wherever
the destination is. So very clearly, we are going
to be in places like Florida, in the northeastern
United States and other non-stop places.”

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace concluded,
“Bahamas marketing will be strong as far away
as London because of the non-stop service to
the country. People are travelling for shorter
periods, so they want to get where they are
going directly, rapidly and inexpensively.”

The Passport to Paradise television show
pilot is a joint project of The Tribune and USA
Today, and is a spinoff of the Passport to Par-
adise Magazine, which is published by the Tri-
bune.

Honduras orders Venezuelan diplomats expelled

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras

Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez has been the most

gations and — holed up in the
embassy along with a consular

HONDURAS’ interim gov-
ernment ordered Venezuelan
diplomats on Tuesday to leave
the country as the interna-
tional community threatened
new sanctions on the Central
American nation if negotia-
tions fail to resolve the crisis,
according to Associated Press.

Venezuelan Embassy
charge d’affaires Ariel Vargas
said he received a letter from
the Honduran Foreign Min-
istry ordering his diplomats to
leave in 72 hours.

vociferous critic of what he
calls the “gorilla” government
that overthrew his ally Manuel
Zelaya on June 28.

The government of Roberto
Micheletti, whom congress
swore in as president after the
coup, accused Venezuela of
meddling in its affairs and of
threatening to use its armed
forces against Honduras,
according to a copy of the let-
ter obtained by The Associat-
ed Press.

Vargas dismissed the alle-

officer also affected by the
order — vowed to defy it.

“We only have relations
with the government of Presi-
dent Manuel Zelaya,” Vargas
told reporters outside the
building. He said the expul-
sion order “does not exist for
us, because the Micheletti gov-
ernment does not exist. It is a
usurper government, a coup
government, a government
that is not recognized by any-
one on an international lev-
el.”

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Earlier impacts on the
New Providence shoreline

TOUGH CALL

By LARRY SMITH

THE argument over the
Arawak Cay port, the harbour
dredging and Saunders Beach
has grown more heated lately,
so we thought we'd take a look
at earlier shoreline impacts on
New Providence to provide
some much-needed perspec-
tive on this issue.

There is something that biol-
ogists refer to as the "shifting
baseline", which describes the
way significant changes to an
ecosystem are measured
against previous standards,
which themselves differ radi-
cally from original conditions.
In this way, large declines in
ecosystems or species over long
periods of time are masked.

This is similar to what we
are experiencing today with the
coastline around Nassau. The
fact is that Nassau harbour and
adjacent shorelines have been
hugely affected by human
action for more than a century.

Perhaps the most visible
impact has been the growth of
casuarinas along the shore.
These trees are native to the
western Pacific and were intro-
duced to the Bahamas in the
1920s as fast-growing replace-
ments for the loss of native
trees to hurricanes.

"In those days no-one could
foresee the extent of the engulf-
ment of our landscape," wrote
Pericles Maillis when he was
president of the Bahamas
National Trust in the late 1990s.
"And I will fight to eradicate
this raging weed to make room
for trees that belong to, or ben-
efit, the Bahamas."

Early photographs show
that our shorelines were cov-
ered in low scrub and native
dune vegetation — such as sea
oats, sea purslane, coco plums,
railroad vine, sea grapes and
buttonwood. But the picture is
decidedly different today, with
dense thickets of casuarinas
edging almost every beach.

According to Dr David
Campbell in his book, The
Ephemeral Islands, casuarinas
are "the most pernicious plants
to have invaded the Bahamas
via the hand of man...most peo-
ple stroll under their singing
boughs oblivious to their
destructive nature...native veg-
etation is smothered by a
wasteland of casuarina stems."

Recent research has also
shown that casuarinas have a
devastating effect on beaches,
where erosion is caused by the
suppression of native vegeta-
tion beneath the trees. This
leads to sand blown onshore
not being trapped to form
dunes, so that during storms
there is nothing to stop mas-
sive sand loss.

The accompanying photo-
graph of Fort Montagu in 1910
shows a wide expanse of beach
with no trees on New Provi-
dence or Paradise Island. A
road was later built on the dune

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ARRY SMITH

and the beach has virtually dis-
appeared today, with the road
retained by a sea wall that
requires frequent and costly
repair.

The 1883 Dredging

Nassau became one of the
busiest ports in the region dur-
ing the American civil war in
the 1860s. At that time, the
Nassau Guardian compared
the harbour to its pre-war state:
"There were no quays along
the strand, and instead of ves-
sels lying, as they now do, along
the shore loaded and unloaded
by a steam crane, they were
approached only from the mid-
dle of the harbour by lighters."

Regular steamship service
began in the mid-19th century,
and was accompanied by the
construction of the island's first
hotel — the 90-room Royal
Victoria, which was then the
largest building in town. During
the late 1800s there was
steamship service from New
York, Savannah, Jacksonville
and Miami.

In 1883 an act was passed
to provide for the dredging of
the harbour, and the following
year Francisco Aranha, a civil
engineer (whose great grand-
son is retired airline pilot Paul
Aranha), was contracted to
build two barges for the pro-
ject. Aranha had come to the
Bahamas from Brazil in 1849 as
foreman of the Inagua Salt
Company, and he was a well-
known boat builder of the time.

The government ordered
steam dredging equipment
from London, and the disused
Vendue House on Bay Street
(once a slave market) was
assigned to the Board of
Pilotage as a storehouse for
"gear, machinery and coal".
But the extent of this early
dredging is unclear. In his trav-
elogue, Sketches of Summer-
land, written in 1900, George
Northcroft described the har-
bour in much the same terms as
the earlier Nassau Guardian
account:

"..many sailing vessels come
and go and occasional steamers
anchor off the bar or venture
inside if of light draught: hosts
of sponging boats, mail
schooners and others that trade
with foreign ports, and vessels
that casually visit the colony or
carry freights among the
islands, are lashed to the
wharves or lying in the stream."

The 1922 Dredging

When the Americans made
alcohol illegal from 1919 to
1933, the Bahamas enjoyed
another economic boom. And
the Development Board

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applied most of the windfall
revenues from bootlegging to
pay for public works to make
the country more attractive to
investors. These infrastructure
projects included a water and
sewerage system for the city,
expansion of the electricity grid,
and a new cruise ship port for
the harbour.

According to Mary Mose-
ley's 1926 Bahamas Handbook,
"The deepening of Nassau har-
bour, which had been under
consideration for nearly a cen-
tury and which was taken up
seriously by the House of
Assembly in 1911 and 1912,
was definitely authorised by
the harbour dredging act of
1921 and dredging operations
commenced in 1922."

This was the first time that
Nassau harbour became suit-
able for deep-draft vessels such
as passenger liners. Before,
large ships had to anchor over
the harbour bar, with their car-
goes transshipped by lighters
and passengers landed by ten-
ders. In rough weather, ships
had to anchor off Clifton, and
passengers travelled 16 miles
to Nassau on a bad road.

The 1922 act approved
deepening the harbour
entrance to a depth of 35 feet
with a 33-foot channel and
basin at a cost of 250,000
pounds. The bar and harbour
were dredged to allow entry,
turning and mooring for ves-
sels with 27-foot drafts, and a
600-foot long concrete dock
(named after Prince George)
was connected to Rawson
Square by a steel bridge. This
project was completed in 1928.

It turned out to have been a
prudent investment. When the
economy collapsed after Pro-
hibition ended in 1933, Gover-
nor Sir Bede Clifford said the
colony had to choose between
"the tourist industry and bank-
ruptcy.” And the new cruise
port was a major asset in the
development of tourism over
the next 30 years.

Spoil from the harbour
dredging was used to create
Clifford Park (named after the
governor) and pumped over
Paradise Island to create what
we now know as Lighthouse
Beach. During this period,
dredged fill was also pumped
from areas off Cable Beach for
the development of the Hobby
Horse Hall racetrack and the
Bahamas Country Club golf
course. This led to a loss of
sand from the offshore system,
which eventually degraded the
beaches in that area.

The 1966 Dredging
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have been even greater impacts
on the harbour and adjacent
shorelines. In 1966 — during
another economic boom — the
government spent $18 million
to dredge the harbour to a
depth of 36 feet with a 1500-
foot turning basin. Also includ-
ed were two breakwaters at the
harbour entrance, an artificial
island, and a new pier and ter-
minal for the cruise port. A
total of 3.5 million cubic yards
of material was excavated by
the US-based Frederick Snare
Corporation.

Most of that spoil was used
to create Arawak Cay, which
can be considered the most sig-
nificant impact in history on
the state of Nassau's coastline.
At the time, the opposition
Progressive Liberal Party com-
plained bitterly about govern-
ment secrecy over the project
and suggested that the premier,
Sir Roland Symonette, was
planning to prevent public
access to Saunders Beach,
where he owned land.

This dredging was tied to a
landmark investment project
involving the sale of large tracts
of Paradise Island by Hunting-
ton Hartford to the Mary
Carter Paint Company (which
later became Resorts Interna-
tional) for tourist development,
and included the construction
of the Paradise Island bridge
at a cost of $1.5 million.

Hartford was a winter resi-
dent who had acquired 750
acres of Hog Island (as it was
then known) for $9.5 million
in 1961. His redevelopment of
the island included dredging
part of the eastern end of the
harbour to fill a scalloped area
called Three Bays opposite
Fort Montagu. A golf course
and later an airstrip was built
on this reclaimed land, which is
now part of the residential
enclave known as Ocean
Estates.

The 1989 Dredging
The fourth harbour dredg-
ing project was conceived in
1986 and awarded to the Cana-
dian firm, Balfour Beatty, two
years later. The contract includ-
ed a feasibility study for build-

MONTAGU BEACH in 1910, looking towards Three Bays on Paradise Island, taken from Reminiscing 11,

ing anew port at Clifton, which
was rejected due to environ-
mental concerns.

The harbour entrance chan-
nel was widened to 600 feet
and dredged to a depth of 37
feet’ with a 1700' turning basin.
The cruise port was expanded
to berth 11 ships, up from the
previous eight, Woodes Rogers
Wharf was enlarged, and there
was some reclamation of the
foreshore at Malcolm's Park as
well as an extension of Potters
Cay to the east and west.

This contract also included
work on so-called mini cruise
ports at Morgan's Bluff on
Andros, Governor's Harbour
on Eleuthera and Snake Cay
on Abaco — none of which
ever saw a cruise ship. The final
cost was $52.4 million and most
of the work was finished by late
1990.

According to the then chair-
man of the Port Authority:
"Whatever disturbances that
occur during the building of
our new port we should
remember that it's for the over-
all good of the country. This
will take us well into the 21st
century.” But the opposition
Free National Movement
alleged that "something smells
in Nassau harbour" and com-
plained loudly that the project
was "shrouded in secrecy."

Environmental concerns at
the time were largely confined
to the impact the dredging
might have on the Coral World
facility at Silver Cay. This
marine park had only just been
developed in 1987 and included
an underwater observatory
topped by a 100-foot tower. A
sea wall was built between
Arawak Cay and New Provi-
dence in an effort to prevent
silt from affecting the under-
water tower.

Meanwhile, Woodes Rogers
Wharf has been extended sev-
eral times. In the 1940s it was
taken as far west as the old
Prince George Hotel. In the
1950s more seabed was
reclaimed to extend the prom-
enade to the British Colonial
Hotel. And in the 1980s it was
widened to 38 feet over its
entire length.

Christie allowed Golden Gates
Church land grant variation

FROM page one

Christie in the House of Assembly. Mr Ingraham said that Mr
Smith knew something about this deal.

In a brief interview with The Tribune yesterday, Mr Christie
stated that he met with the leaders of the church to confirm
their support on the change to the grant, noting the increasing
demand for low cost housing at the time.

“There were two applications that had affected a variation.
When the application was dealt with by (Prime Minister Ingra-
ham) there was one thing, but when I dealt with it there was a
variation that I had to sign off on the change.

“At the time I did it I knew it was a variation and I signed off
on it as a variation because at the time I was dealing with the
fact that this was going to create home ownership and that is in

fact exactly what happened.”

Mr Christie added that he effected a second variation to a
church application in respect of Bishop Simeon Hall, which he
said is expected to produce some housing development as well.

Bahamian man found
shot dead in Florida

FROM page one

to his sick father's face.
"He was always smiling,
always cheerful. He was
always making daddy
laugh. He was the last son
and we just buried our
oldest brother in Febru-
ary and this is really hard
for us right now," she told
The Tribune yesterday,
adding that the family was
dealing with the grief of
plans to take their father
off life support this week.

She added that her
brother was the kind of
person who would not
turn a blind-eye to wrong-
doing and suggested he
may have been killed
because of something he
witnessed.

"He was like most of
our family, we always
stood up for things going
on. I don't know if he saw
something going on and
stood up for someone,"
she speculated yesterday.

Investigations into the

lS ie a ek



The 2009 Dredging

In April of this year the gov-
ernment signed a $50 million
contract with the Dutch firm,
Royal Westminster Boskalis,
to dredge 1.9 million cubic
yards of material from the har-
bour.

The spoil will be used to add
some 40 acres to the western
end of Arawak Cay and extend
the eastern end of Woodes
Rogers Wharf as far as Arm-
strong Street to a width of
some 30 feet.

This promenade will include
a boardwalk, landscaping, ser-
vice road and utility corridor
and is a component of the
downtown redevelopment pro-
ject.

It will cost an additional $24
million.

"The contract will enable us
to welcome into Nassau Har-
bour the largest cruise ships,"
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said recently. "The coastal
analysis has indicated minimal
change to beaches and tidal
flow as a result of the deepen-
ing. There has also been no
indication of potential adverse
effects on the Western
Esplanade beach from dredg-
ing activities."

But once again there are
complaints about a lack of
information and fears of poten-
tial damage to nearby beaches,
especially Saunders Beach.
Coastal experts say it is unlike-
ly that the extension to Arawak
Cay will affect the area any fur-
ther as the shielding of the
beach and restriction of flow
along the shore already exist.

The problem now is to res-
urrect the beach with the sand
that is available in the coastal
system. Regardless of any past
abuse, the re-alignment of
West Bay Street inland and
replacing the casuarinas with
native plants will restore Saun-
ders Beach eventually, where-
as leaving things as they are
will certainly lead to its even-
tual total loss.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

Tourist
FROM page one

body was cold from being
in the water for so long,
but it was not a very
bloody scene.”

Jetski drivers said more
should be done to keep
tourists safe from boats
and jetskis by ensuring
they swim within the buoy
marking the safe swim-
ming zone, and boats do
not drive within the barri-
er.

There were no updates
on the woman’s condition
before The Tribune went
to press last night.

murder are continuing,
and police in West Palm
Beach are appealing for
witnesses to come for-
ward.

According to residents
in the area, the Palm
Beach County, with an
estimated population of
1.4 million people, had
about 90 murders in 2008.

By contrast, the
Bahamas, with an esti-
mated population of
330,000, had 72 murders
last year and 78 in 2007.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS

‘Peace on da Streets’ basketball
classic expected to tip off today

Bahamas
‘can’t buy
win’ at World
Baseball
Challenge

FROM page 11

of 16 and 22 with the oldest at
28, compared to the other
teams who have players 22
years and older.

“But it’s a good experience
for the guys. I just think that if
we had gotten some of the
eight players that we left
behind who played with us
when we played in Cuba, that
would have made a differ-
ence. But for some reason,
most of the senior guys could
not have traveled with us on
this trip.”

Once the team gets back,
Kemp said the federation is
definitely going to have to
find a way to get the local
players to start playing more
baseball.

“We need facilities, we
need to play more baseball
and we need to host more
tournaments,” he stressed.
“We need to get the guys who
are going to be able to play at
this level to travel and play
together in smaller tourna-
ments and more series of
games.

“Tt’s not an easy thing to
do, but we know what we
need to do. So we just have to
find a way to put our guys at
an advantage where they can
get ready to play in the next
tournament here in two
years.”

Here’s a summary of the
three games the team played
so far:

Prince George Axemen 13,

Bahamas 3:

Johnathan Groezinger went
5.1 innings, giving up seven
hits and 11 runs, five earned
in suffering the loss before
Amad Williams came in relief
giving up the final two runs
on three hits.

Right fielder Raymond
Grant was the top batter,
going 1-for-3 with two runs
scored. Left fielder Sherman
Ferguson and center fielder
Diondre Rolle both had a hit
with a RBI. First baseman
Darren Bowleg also had a
RBI.

After scoring first two runs
in the bottom of the first, the
Bahamas watched as Prince
George struck for a run in the
second, two in the third, one
in the fourth, two in the fifth
and seven in the sixth. The
Bahamas final run came in
the seventh.

Germany 20, Bahamas 3:

Darren Bowleg got the
start, but only lasted three
innings on the mound after
he was issued eight runs, sev-
en earned on five hits. He
only had one strike out before
he was relieved by Amad
Williams, who gave way to
Diondre Williams to finish up
in the fourth.

Jason Curry, playing sec-
ond base as the lead off bat-
ter, went 1-for-2 with two runs
scored and left fielder Sher-
man Ferguson was 1-for-2
with a RBI and run. Short-
stop Sharad Johnson was 1-
for-3 with a RBI.

While the Bahamas drew
first blood scoring twice in the
first and another in the third,
Germany got three in the bot-
tom, two in the second, one in
the third and 14 in the fourth
to blow the game wide open.

Team Canada 14,

Team Bahamas 0:

Three pitchers went on the
mound with M Holbert suf-
fering the loss on nine hits
with 12 runs, nine earned in
three innings before he was
relieved by David Sweeting
before Jason Curry came in
to finish up in the sixth.

The Bahamas, however,
avoided getting completely
shutout as three batters were
walked by Canada’s winning
pitcher J Rawlky, who went
five innings with seven strike
outs.

The Bahamas gave up three
runs in the first, one in both
the second and third, eight in
the fourth and another in the
sixth.

INSIGHT

For stories behind
hews, read /nsight
Mondays

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THE Nelson Cooper “Peace on da
Streets” Basketball Classic is expected
to tip off today with its 15th annual
edition at the Kendal Isaacs Gymna-
sium.

Organisers of the tournament,
scheduled to start at 6pm each day
(but at 9am on Saturday) are expect-
ing perhaps the largest turnout of
spectators and teams in its history.

Nearly 40 teams are expected to
take the floor over the course of the
four-day tournament which culminates
Saturday night with a series of cham-
pionship games and exhibitions.

According to Carlos Reid, founder
of Youth Against Violence, the teams
will be placed into brackets within
their divisions at 6pm, while play will
officially begin at 6:30pm.

Teams from Family Islands, colle-
giate players and coaches from the
United States are scheduled to com-
pete, making it one of the largest tour-

naments of all time.

Reid said the opening night will
foreshadow what fans should expect
from the tournament over the four
days.

“Wednesday night should set the
tone and start us off on a good pace
for all the exciting action that will fol-
low throughout the tournament,” he
said. “It is an exciting year for the
organisers, for the fans and for the
players themselves. We are almost
maxed out now at full capacity for the
numbers of teams.”

Reid said with the large number of
people from a cross section of society
taking part in the event, the ultimate
goal is to create a Bahamian version of
the NBA-AIll Star weekend.

“This tournament, more than the
previous years, is for the first time
bringing together people from every
different sector of society,” he said.
“Tt is bringing together politicians,
clergy, singers, both gospel and secu-
lar, reporters, basketball players,
media members, high society and peo-
ple from the inner city all coming



CARLOS REID, founder of Youth Against Violence...

together to make one common goal to
make a statement that we need peace
on the streets.”

One of several new innovations will
be the Media/Entertainers division.

The winning team in the division will
be awarded the Phil Smith/Anthony
“Fatback” Marshall floating trophy in
memory of the media icons who
recently passed.



FROM page 11

Ten Championships: 100
yards and 220 yards in 1960
and 1961, 60 yards in 1959
and 1961, and the 300 yards
in 1959, 1960, and 1961.

At the NCAA Champi-
onships Robinson was an
All American in 1960, fin-
ishing fifth in both 100 yards
and 220 yards.

That summer the
Bahamas participated for
the first time in the Central
American and Caribbean
Games in Kingston in 1962.
Robinson captured the
100m, defeating several
world record holders,
including Cuba’s Enrique
Figuerola, Jamaica’s Dennis
Johnson, and Venezuela’s
Arquimedes Herrera.
Rafael Romero and Horacio
Esteves in the process in
10.4 secs.

Later that year he won the
silver medal in the 100 yards
in the British Empire and
Commonwealth Games in
Perth, Australia.

Robinson ran the first two
rounds in Perth but with-
drew from the semi-final
because he felt he was not
prepared for it. He never
again ran this event, which
many people considered his
best, in international compe-
tition.

While in Nassau that year,
after graduation, he was a
substitute teacher at Gov-
ernment High in French and
Spanish.

In September of 1963 he
studied business for one
semester at the University of
Toronto. He returned to
Nassau and worked at Com-
monwealth Industrial Bank
for a couple months.

At an indoor meet in
Saskatoon, Canada, in Feb-
ruary of 1964, Robinson set
a new world indoor record
in the 300m.

Robinson returned to
Jamaica in the summer of
1964, winning the 100m at
the West Indian Federation
Games in 10.3secs.

At the 1964 Tokyo
Olympic Games Robinson
finished second to world
record holder Bob Hayes
from the United States in
the semi-final. He became
the first Bahamian track and
field athlete to advance to
an Olympic final.

Track and Field News, in
its October/November issue
of 1964, covered the final
and wrote: “Robinson
pulled a muscle while run-
ning fourth and was starting
to move on the leaders at
about 65 metres”. Robinson
finished eighth in 10.57 secs.

One of Robinson’s most
memorable races was at the
Commonwealth Games held
in Kingston in 1966. Earlier
that summer Canada’s Har-
ry Jerome had tied the
world record in the 100
yards of 9.1 secs in Edmon-
ton, Canada. Harry was the
1964 Tokyo 100m bronze
medallist. Jerome had also
previously tied the world
100m record of 10.0 secs.

The race was so close that
it took some 50 minutes to
declare the winner. Jerome
at 9.41 secs was awarded the
win over Robinson at 9.44
secs. Jerome even came to
congratulate Robinson after

i

the finish. 2008.
That year Robinson
worked at Texaco for about
a year from 1965, moving to
the Human Resources
department of Mary Carter
Paints, the owner of Par-

adise Island Limited and the a

forerunner of Kerzner in
late 1966, where he stayed
until 1975.

A veteran at 29, Robinson
failed to make the final in
the 100m at the Pan Ameri-
can Games in Winnipeg,
Canada, in 1967, finishing
sixth in the semi-final in 10.7
secs.

Throughout his stellar
career, Robinson had been
challenged with hamstring
injuries. In the 1968 Mexico
City Olympics, Robinson
did not finish the sixth heat
of the 100m.

Robinson did participate
in the quarter-final of the
400m relay, which included
Norris Stubbs, Kevin John-
son, and Bernard Nottage.
Their time of 39.45 secs was
anew Bahamian national
record which was not bro-
ken until 1993, 25 years lat-
er.
In the semi-final Robin-
son had another hamstring
injury which caused the
team not to finish.

Robinson’s last outing was
at the 1970 Commonwealth
Games in Edinburgh, Scot-
land. Robinson was the
team manager in Edinburgh
and also a member of the
400m relay team. Unfortu-
nately, Gerald Wisdom was
supposed to pass the baton
to Robinson. The team nev-
er finished the race as Wis-
dom was unable to catch
Robinson. This was the end
of a colourful career of the :
first Bahamian participant in
track and field in the
Olympic Games. The career
spanned 15 years and four
Olympic Games.

Don Canham was Tom-
my’s coach at the University
of Michigan.

Tommy was coached &
locally by Henry Crawford
and De’Yanza Burrows.

In 1972 Robinson entered
politics, running for the Free
National Movement in the
general elections.

He was contesting a seat
for the Culmersville Con-
stituency, which he lost to
his cousin, Arlington Butler,
who had been the president
of the Bahamas Amateur
Athletic Association from
1964 to 1968, and would be
elected as president of the
Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion in 1973, serving until

Robinson made another

a A

ATURDAY 25TH JULY FROM 9AM

Ks OFF @ 5PM

@ DA BASEMENT

‘ee



THOMAS AUGUSTUS ROBINSON was one of the premier Bahamian athletes of the 20th century...

try at political office in the
1977 general elections, this

_ NELS@N CS@PER
yi44 ON DA ST EEY

it

r

For application forms & more info call 358 6549
or 326 7269 of visil The Hope Center Thompson Blvd,
thehopecenter242@gmail.com www.thebahamas.org

FAMILY NIGHT KIC

PASTORS MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT

2NS,100 JAMZ, THE TRIBUNE & MEDIA ALLSTARS
@ JMEL ENTERPRISE

DUNK

time for the Salem Con-
stituency. He carried the
Bahamian Democratic Party
banner and was defeated by
David Knowles of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party.

Twenty-five years after he
first competed in the
Olympic Games, the track
and field stadium in Nassau
was named in his honour.

In 1985 Robinson was giv-
en the Hall of Honour
Award by the University of
Michigan.

He has five children,
Tanya and Erika, Scott,
Robbie and Jake, a brother
Kingsley Robinson and two
sisters Brenda Archer and
Ernestine Douglas. Robin-
son worships at St George's
Anglican Church in The
Valley.

ro

=

SHOOTING HOOPS INSTEAD OF GUNS

DOOR PRIZES
Courtesy of

bre:

Courtesy of
oe Eeabemas: ||
25, sete tow

Family Guardian, Scotia Bank, Basil Ingraham & Co, 1.5, Johason, Purity Bakery, Chilly Willy

SU GU WO eC ee



Ministry of Youth & Sports, LG investments Limited, KFC. Thompson Trading, The Sport Center
Fee TT ea Re et Leu iii Loa aul



PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Bahamas Cycling Federation's ‘09 National Cycling Championship



TONY Mackey Jr rode to victory
in the junior division of the Bahamas
Cycling Federation’s 2009 National
Cycling Championship on Saturday.

It was an all out sprint to the finish
line as Mackey Jr pulled off the vic-
tory amidst cheers from spectators.

Here’s a look at the official results
posted:

JUNIORS U-17

24 miles

1st - Tony Mackey 1:14:40.06

Tony Mackey Jr rides to

victory in junior division

2nd - Jay Major 1:14:40.35

3rd - Anthony Colebrook
1:14:39.19

4th - Dangelo Sturrup 1:14:39.61

Contador, Armstrong
stay 1-2 at Tour in Alps

@ By JAMEY KEATEN
Associated Press Writer

BOURG-SAINT-MAURICE,
France (AP) — Alberto Contador
rode hard to keep the Tour de
France’s yellow jersey in the Alps on
Tuesday, while teammate Lance
Armstrong produced a dazzling burst
of speed to remain in second place.

Mikel Astarloza of Spain won the
16th stage, a 99-mile route from the
Swiss town of Martigny to Bourg-
Saint-Maurice. Contador and Arm-
strong finished in the main pack
behind Astarloza and other break-
away riders.

Contador, the 2007 Tour winner
from Spain, fought off an attack led
by brothers Andy and Frank Schleck
of Luxembourg in the day’s second
big climb.

“We had expected (an attack) and
I gave my maximum. I could resist
but not without difficulty,” Contador
said. “I’m happy after this difficult
day.”

Astarloza, who rides on the Euska-
di Euskaltel team, thrust his fists in
the air and kissed his fingers as he
crossed the line in 4 hours, 14 min-
utes, 20 seconds. He was six seconds
ahead of French riders Sandy Casar
and Pierrick Fedrigo. The three-week
Tour ends Sunday in Paris.

With a little more than a mile to go
Tuesday, Astarloza escaped three
other breakaway riders with him and
held for his first Tour stage win.

“T was lucky to leave alone and fin-
ish alone,” Astarloza said. “ma
complete rider but I’m not good at
the sprint, so I have to attack from far
away. This is the biggest day of my
career.”

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Contador, Armstrong, fourth-place
Astana teammate Andreas Kloeden
and third-place Bradley Wiggins of
Britain all crossed 59 seconds after
Astarloza.

Overall, Contador leads Armstrong
by 1:37. Wiggins is third, 1:46 back,
while Kloeden is 2:17 behind and
Andy Schleck is fifth, trailing by 2:26.

With nearly 23 miles left, Andy
Schleck attacked. He was quickly
joined by Contador and a few other
riders, but not Armstrong.

The 37-year-old Texan had
dropped back by as much as 35 sec-
onds. He then showed great speed to
return to that small group of favorites,
which included Schleck, Contador
and Wiggins.

“Tjust didn’t want follow that quick
acceleration like I tried to do on Ver-
bier” — the first Alpine stage on Sun-
day, Armstrong said. “I’ve stayed
with the other group, and then I real-
ized the race was basically going away
from us.

“So, [had no choice other than try-
ing to make the cross,” Armstrong
said. “So I waited until we had a
steeper section and then I got away
with an acceleration.”

Contador was impressed.

“Tt’s easy to explain — he’s a very
great rider,” the Spaniard said. “He
was in the past, and he showed it once
again.”

Two-time runner-up Cadel Evans
of Australia, who finished 3:55 back,
was one of the big losers on the day.
He fell to 17th from 14th and now
trails Contador by 7:23.

The course ended with a 19-mile
downhill run. Downhills make it hard
for breakaway riders to outpace the
fast-moving pack.

Sth - Justin Minnis 1:17:01.43

6th - Rahiame Colebrook
1:17:01.65

7th - Michael Holowesko 1:17:02.21

8th - Bruce Hall 1:17:03.21
JUNIOR GIRLS

Lee Farmer

1st - Antinece Simmons 1:17:36.66

OPEN WOMEN
1st - Carmel Stucci 1:15:00.79

2nd - Linda Holowesko 1:24:19:67

JUNIORS II

12 miles

1st - Liam Holowesko 37:37.88
2nd - Adrian Canter 41:03.00
JUNIOR GIRLS

Ist - Abagail Minnis 53:44.98

Bas Czerwinski/AP



STAGE WINNER Mikel Astarloza of Spain (left), followed by Jurgen van den Broeck of
Belgium, climb Petit-Saint-Bernard pass during the 16th stage of the Tour de France
race over 159 kilometers (98.8 miles) with start in Martigny, Switzerland and finish in

Bourg-Saint-Maurice, Alps region, France,

Riders scaled the highest peak of
this Tour, the snowcapped Grand-
Saint-Bernard pass on the Swiss-Ital-
ian border that is 8,113 feet. Its sister,
the Petit-Saint-Bernard pass on the
Italian-French border, was the day’s
other big climb, and each was at least
13 1/2 miles.

The final descent was perilous: Jens
Voigt of Germany crashed either
from a bicycle malfunction or a bump
in the road. The Tour’s medical staff
said he severely bruised his face and
right elbow, and was flown by heli-
copter to a hospital in the French city
of Grenoble.

“He lost consciousness for a while,
but he should be OK,” CSC team
manager Bjarne Riis said. “For me,
it’s a good sign.”

yesterday...

During the stage, an Astana vehicle
was stopped and searched by customs
officials at the Swiss-French border,
the team said, adding nothing of con-
cern was found.

Pope Benedict XVI sent greetings
to Tour riders and organizers as the
pack passed close to the Alpine
retreat of Les Combes, overlooking
Mont Blanc, where the pontiff is stay-
ing.

Wednesday’s stage features what
some riders fear is the toughest
Alpine route this year — a 105-mile
ride from Bourg-Saint-Maurice to Le
Grand-Bornand marked by five
tough climbs and another downhill
finish.

¢ AP Sports Writer Samuel Petre-
quin contributed to this report

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wins senior
division

In the senior division, the
extreme temperature did not
hinder anyone registered
from racing. After an open-
ing prayer, the 23 cyclists
started out together for the
first of two gruelling 18-mile
loops.

Lee Farmer soon edged a
comfortable distance out from
the rest of the pack. During
the sixth of a six-mile loop,
the riders fell into groups in
their categories so the finish
line held lots of action, as
sprints to it gave position,
determined by hundredths of
seconds, to riders.

RESULTS

OVERALL WINNER -

Lee Farmer

Senior I

72 miles

Ist Lee Farmer 3:18:41:12

2nd Tracy Sweeting

3:23:36.95

3rd Barron Musgrove

3:23:36.97

4th Rowshan Jones

3:23:37.20

5th Kim Thompson

3:23:37.54

6th Rich Hincapie

3:23:37.91

7th Mark Holowesko

3:23:38.20

8th Scott Hirshorn

3:23:51.04

Senior IT

1st Stephen Holowesko

3:34:19.76

2nd Stefan Krauskopf

3:36:50.95

3rd Wayne Price 3:39:47.91

Senior [IT

Ist - Van Demeritte

3:36:49.84

48 miles

Senior HIT

Ist - Mackey Williams

2:27.30.96

2nd - Robert Bethel

2:27:31.04

3rd - Robert Jones

2:27:31.79

4th - Lashane Dean

2:42:17.79

Sth - Tommy Mackey

2:50:21.39

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THE TRIBUNE

sp

-_
|
|
h

PAGE 11

Or



WEDNESDAY, JULY 22,

Thomas

Robinson
set to be
honoured

@ By ALPHEUS ‘HAWK’
FINLAYSON
Special to The Tribune

THOMAS ROBINSON is
scheduled to be honoured by
acommittee, headed by
Alpheus ‘Hawk’ Finlayson,
during a luncheon at Sandals
Royal Bahamian Resort &
Spa 2pm Sunday...

BAHAMIAN national
hero Thomas Augustus
Robinson was one of the
premier Bahamian athletes
of the 20th century.

Tommy Robinson, who
attended St John’s College
in Nassau and the University
of Michigan in the United
States, was born on March
16, 1938.

Robinson graduated from
St John’s College in Nassau
in December of 1953 and
was employed at the
Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration in January, 1954. He
worked at the Customs
Department from late 1954
to September 1957.

In 1958, at the tender age
of 20, Robinson shocked the
track and field world, win-
ning the gold medal in the
220 yards and the silver
medal in the 100 yards at the
British Empire Games in
Cardiff, Wales.

Robinson’s first interna-
tional team was the 1955
Pan American Games in
Mexico City. He finished
fifth in the semi-final of the
100m and 200m.

In 1956, Robinson became
the first Bahamian to partic-
ipate in track and field in the
Olympic Games, finishing
fourth in the first round of
the 100m and 200m in Mel-
bourne, Australia.

The following year Robin-
son became the first
Bahamian to win a medal in
international competition,
when he won a bronze
medal in the 100m in the
West Indian Federation
Games in Kingston,
Jamaica. He also participat-
ed in the 400m relay team
with Oscar Francis, Tom
Grant, and Enoch Backford.

Tommy enrolled at the
University of Michigan in
the fall of 1957. It was at
Michigan that Jessie Owens
set or tied five world records
in 1935, the year before the
Berlin Olympics.

In 1958, the year of the
general strike in the
Bahamas, Robinson
equalled the new British
Empire Games and British
All Comers record of 9.5
seconds in the first race of
the first round of the 100
yards. In the final, Robinson
finished second to Jamaica’s
Keith Gardener in 9.6 secs.

In the semi-final of the
220 yards, Robinson ran 20.9
secs to win, establishing a
new games and British
Empire and Commonwealth
and national record. In the
final, running out of the out-
side lane, the boy from
Hawkins Hill won the gold
medal in 21.1 secs, defeating
Jamaica’s Keith Gardener.

In the Rome Olympics of
1960 Robinson made it to
the semi-final in both 100m
in a time of 10.69 secs the
and 200m in a time of 21.67
secs, just missing the final in
both events.

Earlier that summer
Robinson won the 100m at
the second West Indian Fed-
eration Games in Kingston,
Jamaica.

Robinson had been a
member of the St George’s
Athletic Club and upon his
return to Nassau in 1961,
joined the newly formed
Pioneers Sporting Club.

Tommy graduated from
the University of Michigan
in 1962.

While at Michigan Robin-
son won nine individual Big

SEE page 9




ts

2009






Contador,
Armstrong
stay 1-2 at

Tour...
See page 10

Bahamas ‘can’t buy win’ at
World Baseball Challenge

B By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

he Bahamas’ first appear-

ance in the World Baseball

Challenge has been more

than Bahamas Baseball
Federation (BBF) president Craig
“Salty” Kemp envisioned.

Through the first three games
played this week at the Prince George
Citizen Field in Prince George, British
Colombia, the Bahamas has remained

winless and will need a miracle to turn
things around before the tournament
wraps up on Sunday.

“We’re not fearing too well,” said
Kemp as the team was preparing to
play the United States in last night’s
feature contest. “We are still winless
and it’s only going to get tougher as we
move on.”

The Bahamas is scheduled to play
its final game during the round robin
today against Team British Colom-
bia. Currently sitting in the sixth and
final spot, the Bahamas will play the

third place team to determine who
they will go on to play in the playoff
on Saturday.

So far, the Bahamas has not had a
good showing against any of the teams
they played, losing 13-3 to Prince
George Axemen in their opener on
Saturday, then 20-3 to Germany on
Sunday before they were shutout 14-0
by Team Canada Monday.

“The first two games we hit, but we
didn’t play defense,” Kemp said. “Yes-
terday we played defense, but we did-
mt hit. We were just trying to do what-

ever it took to win a ball game. But
our pitching is not as strong as it needs
to be at this level with the pitchers
that we have.”

Not having the opportunity to play
semior baseball in the country has also
been a negative sign for the Bahamian
players at the tournament.

“Most of the kids that we have are
playing in college, but they are very
young,” said Kemp of the team that is
made up of players between the ages

SEE page 9

CARL HIELD



VALENTINO KNOWLES

boxers eager to train
with ‘Pretty Boy’ Floyd

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

VALENTINO Knowles
and Carl Hield, in prepara-
tion for their second and third
consecutive appearance
respectively at the World
Championships — set for
August — are hoping to take
advantage of the opportuni-
ty to train in the United
States.

The duo, who are back
home after training facilities
in Cuba closed for the sum-
mer break, are expected to

travel to Washington DC
where they are expected to
train with former amateur
boxer turned coach “Pretty
Boy” Floyd Seymour starting
next week.

Seymour was in town over
the weekend when he sealed
the deal for the boxers to
travel. At the same time, he
also presented Andre Sey-
mour and his Carmichael
Knockout Boxing Club with
boxing equipment from
Washington.

While Seymour said he’s
elated to be able to continue
to make a contribution to the



COACH “Pretty Boy” Floyd Seymour (left) presents boxing equipment
to coach Andre Seymour, Carmichael Knockout Boxing Club...

local programme, the boxers
are eager to make another
trip overseas.

“T’ve been living and train-
ing in Cuba with the best,”
said Hield about his trip to
continue his training. “But
I’m now looking forward to
going to the United States
and see what it’s like and
doing the same thing that I
was doing in Cuba.”

Hield, who emerged from
the junior circuit and made
his first trip to the 2005 World
Championships in Mianyang,
China, and again in Chicago
in 2007 where he lost in the
first round in both trips, said
he’s now in his prime.

“TPve already been on the
circuit for a while, so I have to
do it now,” he insisted. “I
can’t wait for another shot.
This is my shot here. I have to
shine now.”

At age 21, Hield said his
goal is to go to Italy and
unleash the dragon.

“Tcan’t say I’m going to go
there and do it,” he charged.
“T have to go out there and
do it. can’t just go there and
lose in the first round again.”

In his first trip to the cham-
pionships, Knowles also suf-
fered a first-round loss, but
he noted that he was just as
eager and hungry to go to
Italy and improve.

“The first time I was
younger,” he pointed out.
“Now this time, ’m looking
forward to a different expe-
rience because I’m more
experienced and I’m ready.”

Knowles, 20, said since the
last championships, he was
able to go to Cuba through

the assistance of the federa-
tion and that has helped him
to improve tremendously.

But he said the trip to
Washington should really
fine-tune his skills.

“T think the trip to Wash-
ington will be another step
forward,” Knowles said. “So
I’m looking forward to going
there and giving it my best in
training.”

Andre Seymour, the head
coach for the two boxers
when they travel to Italy, said
the trip to Washington should
really be beneficial for his
protégés.

“Floyd has offered us the

JR. CHEESEBURGER
Paes re

Jn. BACON
CHEESEBURGER

invitation to come to Wash-
ington and because the gym in
China is closed, we are going
to take advantage of it,” Sey-
mour said.

“They have some very good
training facilities that I know
will really help to keep them
in shape for the World Cham-
pionships. So we are really
going to utilize what they
have to offer.”

Floyd Seymour, a cousin of
Andre Seymour, said once the
boxers get there, they will
move around and train at a
number of gyms so that they
get to face as many different
opponents as possible.

6 pc CHICKEN
Nuccets Compo

ae ets
ern eek eel ce





PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

BRITISH AMERICAN’S
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LOCAL NEWS

400 people collect
applications for govt
funded job training

FROM page one

tres across the island.

In Grand Bahama, 50 job
seekers picked up applica-
tion forms at the Depart-
ment of Labour in
Freeport, and three got
them at Urban Renewal
Centres on the island.

Just one Exuma resident
collected a form from the
Local Government Admin-
istrator’s office yesterday,
while no one in Abaco has
yet shown interest in the
scheme. Figures for the
other Family Islands were
not reported by the
Department of Labour yes-
terday.

Mr Dion Foulkes said it
has been difficult to predict
demand for the scheme as
nothing like it has ever
been done in the country
before.

Training courses in voca-
tions construction, engine
repair, accounting, com-
puter applications and
landscaping will be provid-
ed to successful applicants
to help them develop more
marketable job skills
without any cost to the
trainee.

Mr Foulkes said: “There
is obviously a strong
demand for this new train-
ing programme, with 429
people taking application
forms yesterday.

“We are very pleased
with the interest shown to
date.”

Displaced workers, who
are actively seeking work
and receive the National
Insurance Benefit, have just
over a week to return com-

pleted application forms for
courses starting at College
of the Bahamas (COB) and
the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute
(BTVI) on September 7.

A total of 1,000 appli-
cants will be selected for
the courses divided into
three 10 week semesters
taking around 333 trainees
per term.

All courses are fully
funded by a $250,000 gov-
ernment grant and $70,000
investment from businesses
and trade unions for
administrative courses.

The launch of the
National Training Pro-
gramme yesterday follows
the National Insurance
Board’s Unemployment
Benefit introduced this
year to ease the financial
burdens forced upon thou-
sands of Bahamians who
lost their jobs as a result of
the global economic down-
turn.

According to the latest
figures around 12 per cent
of New Providence work-
ers lost their jobs as a result
of the recession, in addition
to 14 per cent in Grand
Bahama.

Mr Foulkes said the
National Insurance Board
has issued more than 30,000
cheques to over 9,000
unemployed Bahamians
since the first cheques were
handed out on May 4.

The Department of
Labour has also created
over 4,000 jobs through
aggressive economic stim-
ulus initiatives, Mr Foulkes
said.

And entrepreneurs have
been encouraged by the

department’s self-starters
programme which provides
grants of up to $5,000 to
help people start their own
businesses.

Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce president and
chairman of the Implemen-
tation Advisory Commit-
tee, Khaalis Rolle, said he
hopes the National Train-
ing Programme will contin-
ue in the long-term.

He said: “When we look
at some of the basic needs
of businesses to be effec-
tive and profitable you look
to your labour pool to exe-
cute the task flawlessly, and
a better qualified labour
pool allows you to execute
better business, so this pro-
gramme has tremendous
long-term value.”

Application forms can be
collected from the Depart-
ment of Labour buildings
in Nassau and Freeport,
Urban Renewal Centres
across the islands, and
Local Government Admin-
istrator’s offices in the
Family Islands.

Successful candidates
from the Family Islands will
not have to pay for the cost
of travel to cither New
Providence or Grand
Bahama to attend training
courses.

Applications must be
returned to the Depart-
ment of Labour by
Wednesday, July 29. Inter-
views will be held the fol-
lowing week, from August
4 to 7.

For more information
about the National Train-
ing Programme call the
Department of Labour at
302-2550.

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@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

oyalFidelity Mer-

chant Bank &

Trust was only

able to place 60
per cent of its second index-
linked international invest-
ment sub-fund, raising $3 mil-
lion instead of the targeted $5
million, although its president
yesterday said this represent-
eda “huge amount” given the
skittishness of Bahamian
investors towards interna-
tional markets.

Michael Anderson con-
firmed that the TIGRS Series
2 sub-fund had raised $3 mil-
lion during its offering, which

THE TRIBUNE

uSiIness

2009

WEDNESDAY,

eu) eve

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

RoyalFidelity fund
gets 60% of target

* Merchant bank’s second index-linked international
investment sub-fund raises $3m of $5m goal

* But president says ‘neither success nor failure’,
due to uncertainty over investor appetite

* Amount allocated for principal protection
rises to 80 per cent from 75 per cent

closed on June 22, 2009, and
told Tribune Business: “It’s
not a bad result, but it’s not
what we hoped for.”

He added: “We went out
for up to $5 million, and we
raised $3 million. We were
always a little unsure as to

Funds business lays-off
15 as it readies to close

m By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
and NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

A BAHAMAS-based fund
administrator has laid-off
some 15 staff over several
months in a downsizing
designed to lead to the clo-
sure of its operations by Sep-
tember 2009, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal, with that and
other recent redundancies
amounting to almost 40 job
losses in the international
financial services sector.

Butterfield Fulcrum Group
(BFG), the Montague Ster-
ling Centre-based fund
administrator, was said to
have made 15 redundancies
over the span of several
months, in preparation for the
closure of its Bahamian office
and the transfer of its busi-
ness book to BFG’s offices in
Bermuda and the Cayman
Islands.

* Butterfield Fulcrum
preparing to close
Bahamas office by
September 2009 and
switch business to
Cayman or Bermuda

* Recession and
financial crunch
hitting Bahamian
sector, as CIBC
Trust declines to
comment on lay-offs

And, in addition to the 24
Ansbacher (Bahamas) staff
terminated by A. F. Holdings
on Friday, Tribune Business
has also learnt that CIBC
Trust Company (Bahamas)
released five employees - a
clear indication that the glob-

SEE page 5B

30,000 square ft Abaco Markets
format anchors new town centre

ABACO Markets last night
confirmed its new premium
food market format had been
selected as the 30,000 square
foot anchor tenant for New
Providence Development
Company’s proposed 20-acre,
multi-million dollar new town
centre for western New Prov-
idence.

Shareholders in the BISX-
listed retail group were told
the news at last night’s annu-
al general meeting (AGM),
as securing Solomon’s Fresh
Food Market as the anchor
tenant for its mixed-use town
centre development has
paved the way for New Prov-
idence Development Compa-
ny to move the project from
the three-year planning stage
to full development. The new
Abaco Markets’ store is
expected to open in spring
2011.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



BISx-listed retail group's
new high-end premium
format to form centrepiece
at the New Providence
Development Company's
60,000 square foot,
20-acre project for
western end of island

Rhys Duggan, New Provi-
dence Development Compa-
ny’s chief executive, had told
Tribune Business last year of
the company’s plans to cre-
ate a new town centre for the
western end of the island,
effectively moving the existing
Lyford Cay Shopping Centre
- which it owns - to a more
central location closer to the
Charlotteville and Old Fort
Bay developments.

The mixed-use town cen-
tre, featuring both retail and
commercial tenants, will be
some 60,000 square feet in
size.

Solomon’s Fresh Food
Market, meanwhile, will be
targeted at the premium,
high-end of the food market,
no doubt aiming to capture
the wealthy, higher spending
consumers living in commu-
nities such as Lyford Cay, Old
Fort Bay, Charlotteville and
the Albany and Lyford Hills
projects.

Mr Duggan said in state-
ment: “This represents the
realisation of a key compo-
nent of our regional develop-
ment plan for the western end
of the island — one which is
inclusive of key conveniences,
social and activity centres,

SEE page 5B

what the appeal was in the
market.

“We've had this general
lack of interest by investors
in international markets, so
trying to get $3 million raised

people have been doing.”
And Mr Anderson said:
“For us, to be honest, whether
we got $5 million or $2 million
did not make much differ-
ence. It was difficult for us to

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com



Share price ‘does not show
FOCOL underlying value’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor Director and largest

shareholder says 10-
year, $10m stock
buy back initiative
best way to ‘create
short-term value’ for
investors and guard
against desperate
sellers

FREEPORT Oil Holdings
(FOCOL) largest shareholder
yesterday told Tribune Busi-
ness that its Board of Direc-
tors believed the current share
price “does not reflect the
underlying value of the com-
pany”, forcing it to embark on
a $10 million share repurchase
programme to boost liquidity
and “create short-term value”
for investors.

Franklyn Wilson, a FOCOL
director and chairman of Sun-
shine Holdings/Arawak Homes, said the stock buy-back pro-
gramme, which was launched on Monday and will last for 10
years, would protect the BISX-listed company’s share price
from investors prepared to sell-out at especially low prices to
meet their needs for cash in this economic recession.

“We believe it’s in the interests of all stockholders,” Mr
Wilson said of the share repurchase plan. “The market, in our
view, does not reflect the underlying value of the company, and

for international investing is a
huge amount relative to what

Sandals

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Sandals |
resort chain is the
buyer who has the
Emerald Bay resort
“under contract” and
is hoping to close the
purchase within 45
days, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal, the
minister of tourism [7
yesterday confirming [yi :
the Government’s uenelleres
priority was to get
Exuma’s ‘anchor property’ open and
operational “as quickly as possible”.

Although declining to confirm that
Sandals was the purchaser who had inked
an agreement with Emerald Bay’s
receivers, Vincent Vanderpool- Wallace
told this newspaper that there was “a
very strong interest” in the property,
implying that a recognised hotel own-
er/developer or resort chain had come
through as a potential buyer.

Multiple sources, though, confirmed
to Tribune Business that Sandals, the
Jamaica-headquartered chain owned by
Gordon ‘Butch’ Stewart and his family,
was indeed the prospective purchaser of
Emerald Bay.



ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

SEE page 3B

we believe it’s in the interests of

the stockholders to protect their

SEE page 4B

is Emerald Bay purchaser

Minister says ‘in good position of having very strong interest’ in the
resort, with government seeking its re-opening ‘as quickly as possible’

Tribune Business had revealed the
company’s “strong interest” in acquir-
ing the property, and that it was in talks
with the PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC)
receivers, last week. And this newspa-
per’s contacts again confirmed that senior
Sandals executives were spotted in Exu-
ma yesterday.

A Sandals spokeswoman yesterday
said the resort chain was unable to com-
ment on developments surrounding
Emerald Bay.

However, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said: “We’re in a good position of having
a very strong interest in the property.”

He added that the Government’s pri-
ority was to facilitate the completion of
the resort’s purchase, then get Emerald
Bay back open and operational as rapid-
ly as possible, so as to rescue Exuma’s
economy.

The island’s economy was plunged into
a tailspin when the PWC receivers and
Emerald Bay’s main creditor, the Japan-
ese insurer, Mitsui, decided to close the
resort in order to eliminate losses running
at around $5 million annually.

The put some 500 Bahamian employ-
ees, the lifeblood for many other Exuma-

Where do you want to be?

We can get you there!

BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

PU Velo)
St. Michael: 246.435.1955

ey ENA)

based businesses, out of work. While
many have remained on the island in the
hope that a purchase and re-opening of
Emerald Bay could be accomplished
quickly, they are likely to soon lose hope
and move to other islands in search of
work if no deal is forthcoming soon.

“We want to get that property open
and operational as quickly as possible,”
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said. “It is very
important for us to get this going as
quickly as possible.”

This urgency was borne out by com-
ments from the main PwC receiver for
Emerald Bay, Russell Downs, who indi-
cated to Tribune Business yesterday that
the Government was fully on board with
the buyer, and was prepared to rapidly
move through the approvals process to
secure a deal.

That, in turn, indicates that the pur-
chaser must be someone who the Gov-
ernment knows and trusts, with a proven
track record in resort development and
ownership in the Bahamas - another clue
that it is Sandals.

The resort chain, apart from the Roy-

SEE page 2B

> Pension Plans

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> Education Investment Accounts

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Cen iol 4





PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



=
Tune into client needs or face being tuned out

WHEN you get a potential
client to sit down with you,
do the following and you will
be out the door the same way
you walked in — empty hand-
ed.

Straight to the point, right?
Even while you are reading
this you may start to tune out.
So here it is.




Talk About Yourself

Everybody loves to spend
their time listening about
someone else, right?

WRONG! Remember, take
the cotton out of your ears
and insert it in your mouth.
Leave the cotton in your ears,
talk about yourself and watch
your prospect’s reaction. They

start looking at e-mails,
answering calls, looking
around on their desk, etc.
They are not interested in
you; they are interested in
what you can do for them.

Make Small Talk
Small talk is exactly that:
SMALL. Most prospective

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking a suitably qualified individual to fill the position:






Head, Output Management





The main respongibilities of the position holder include:





Manatee a small team

Manage alactronic file documents
Process enhancements

Perform quality control checks
Management reporting











Qualifications

= Atleast 2 years of management experience
Strong organizational akilis




clients don’t care about what
you did over the weekend or
anything else. Get straight to
the point; they know why you
are there and so should you.
Business. What’s in it for
them? That’s why you’re
there. If you can’t demon-
strate that in 15 seconds you
are half way out the door.

Show Off your awards

and accomplishments

Brag and boast about what
you and/or your company has
done. Yeah, they love to hear
this. Break out awards and
plaques, and show them off.
This is the perfect way to tune
out a prospect.

When you make contact
with a prospective client -
either by telephone or in a
face-to-face meeting -you
have an extremely short win-
dow of time to connect with
them. If you fail to achieve
this they will quickly tune you
out. Here are several things
you can do to lose your
prospect's attention in the
first five seconds of the con-
versation:

Give them Pamphlets

Promotional
Marketing

by Scott Farrington



and Brochures

Everyone needs more
paper and pictures to look at,
right? WRONG! We are so
saturated with information,
paper and brochures. Typi-
cally, what happens is that
most of the literature gets
filed in the oval filing draw
(meaning garbage can).

Bottom Line - Straight

to the point, right?

The more time you spend
talking about yourself, your
product, your company, the
quicker you will tune out your
prospect. The more you talk
about your prospect, their
company and focus on their
needs, their problems and
offer solutions, the more they
will tune into you and your
potential to solve their prob-
lems. You only have a few
seconds. In sports, seconds

count BIG TIME. So the
same applies when meeting
with prospects.

I kept this article short and
to the point for a reason.
Everyone’s time is valuable.
Hope you tune in next week.

All of these marketing
strategies are certain to keep
your business on top during
these challenging economic
times. Have a productive and
profitable week. Remember,
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT.”

NB: Scott Farrington is
president of SunTee
EmbroidMe, a promotional
and marketing company spe-
cialising in promotional prod-
ucts. Established over 27
years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted
Bahamian businesses in vari-
ous industries, ranging from
tourism and banking to
telecommunications, in mar-
keting themselves. Readers
can contact Mr Farrington at
SunTee EmbroidMe on East
Shirley Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
phone at 242-393-3104.

































Ability: to multitass

Attention to detal and quality cllant service
Salf motivated

Proficiency in MS Office Applications
Knowledge of IBM Content Manager a plus

Please send your resume, on or before Friday July 24th to:

nrbahamasiiuhs com

It starts with you.

item er

gee Colina.
— Holdings Bahamas

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Risk & Compliance Officer

Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified
professional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer. This is an
executive position and the successful applicant should possess the following:

Qualifications & Experience

Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university

Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance

Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a
law degree

Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations
for improvements to a compliance culture

Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of
duties

Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and
best practices

Confidentiality

Excellent oral and written communication skills

Duties & Responsibilities:

Design and implement a risk framework.

Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps
taken to foster good compliance.

Implement and maintain a compliance monitoring programme. This will
serve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures.

Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws,
regulations and policies applicable to the institution.

Provide management with guidance in the development, implementation
and maintenance of policies, procedures and practices to cover
regulated activities.

Create programmes that educate, train and encourage directors,
managers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and
regulations.

Serve as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators.

The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with
experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a cover
letter and resume to the following e-mail address no later than 27 July 2009 :

E-mail: careers@c olinaimperial.com
RE: Risk and Compliance Officer

Absolutely no phone calls will be accepted

Sandals is Emerald Bay purchaser

al Bahamian property at Cable Beach, already
has resort interests in the Exumas via its bou-
tique Royal Plantation chain, which will have
a 21-villa property on 50-acre Fowl Cay by
end-2009.

When asked whether the Government want-
ed a proven resort owner/operator for Emer-
ald Bay, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace responded
yesterday: “That, I suppose, is one of the cri-
teria for anyone to operate there.

“You’re talking about an island beyond Nas-
sau and Paradise Island. You need someone
who has great knowledge of these islands, this
part of the world.”

It seems likely that the removal of Four Sea-
sons as the brand/management partner for
Emerald Bay, and the substantial reduction
in purchase price, was enough to pave the way
for Sandals’ purchase. Having inherited $120
million in debt, Mitsui was initially looking
for at least that sum when it placed the resort
in receivership in 2007.

The last bid accepted by the receivers, which
collapsed prior to Emerald Bay’s closure, was
understood to have valued the property at $40
million.

Informed sources are now suggesting that a
purchase price of as little as $20-$30 million
might be enough to close a deal. Entry point is

key for acquisitions in the Bahamian hotel
sector, as the price largely determines return
on investment for owners, given this nation’s
high operating costs.

It is by no means certain, though, that a
rapid re-opening of Emerald Bay is on the
cards should Sandals close a purchase. Mr
Downs, the receiver, said on Tuesday any buy-
er would be faced with a choice of “doing the
resort first and bringing the builders in, or
opening up and getting trade in, and do the
building works at a later date. There is more on
the purchaser’s ‘to do’ list than ours”.

It is quite possible that construction will
come first. Four Seasons, whose contract enti-
tled it to fees equivalent to 7-8 per cent of
gross revenues - said by many to be too much
- is understood to have told the insurer that the
property required a minimum $25 million in
capital spending to bring it into line with its
five-star status. A further $7 million is needed
to reconfigure its marina, and the Greg Nor-
man Golf Course costs $300,000 per month
to maintain despite having no members.

Several sources, though, suggested these
sums were too low, and a $50-$100 million
investment will ultimately be required by any
potential purchaser to upgrade Emerald Bay
and complete its build-out.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

MANAGER, REVENUE ACCOUNTING
CUSTOMER SERVICES DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue

Accounting,

The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and the
Family Islands and the reconciliation ofall revenue accounts other than miscellaneous

receivables,

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

* Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in New Providence and

the Family Islands.

Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers.

Prepares the sales budget.

Prepares the Revenue Accounting Department Budget. .
Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Receivable Reconciliation.
Oversees the training of all Customer Services staff in the new billing software.

Prepares monthly Board reports,

Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenue reports.

Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of Statistics
Provides statistical billing information for Family Island managers,
Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in the

Family Islands.

Attends yearly community meetings as well as ad hoc meetings required during

acquisition of new locations.

Develops and implements rules, guidelines and procedures for the efficient

operation of the department.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Accounts or equivalent

A minimum of 8+ years of expenence in accounting practice and theory.
Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualifications

Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas,

Sound reasoning and good judgment skills.
Ability to interpret financial reports.

Geod time management skills.

*
2
‘a
=
. Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing,
.
J
*
*

Project management skills.

Interested persons should apply by completing and retuming an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7309, Nassau, Hahamas on or before:

July 31, 20009,



THE TRIBUNE



Bank’s in-house move
to boost e-commerce

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

E-COMMERCE could arrive full
force in the Bahamas by end-2009, Bank
of the Bahamas International’s managing
director said, with some businesses
already benefiting from the bank's intro-
duction of hardware that will expand the
online business community.

Paul McWeeney told Tribune Busi-
ness that the bank’s $2 million invest-
ment to bring all its credit card process-
ing in house will lead to the growth of
Bank of the Bahamas’ e-commerce capa-
bilities.

Mr McWeeney said the infrastructural
upgrades will include components to
allow businesses greater access to online
money transfers and direct payment
deposits form credit card payments made
online.

for the move
to a full e-
commerce
operation for
competitive
reasons, Mr
er ead
said
SWITC H
mechanism is
needed to
make deposits
for online
payments
possible. He
would not say
whether the
bank had
acquired the mechanism.

However, one business known to this
paper, Bahamas Virtual Mall
(BVM.com), uses the Bank of the
Bahamas’ online deposit system on their
site.

Paul Neeenny



Buyers can purchase a wide range of
products through BVM.com, including
clothing, car parts and baby items.

It was thought that e-commerce in the
Bahamas could not develop without the
implementation of an Automatic Clear-
ing House, which would allow for greater
communication between local commer-
cial banks.

Bank of the Bahamas International
has invested some $2 million in bringing
its card processing in-house, and Mr
McWeeney told this paper recently: “The
bank expects there to be tremendous
internal synergies that result from out-
sourcing.

“With that coming in-house we will be
able to benefit from transaction volumes
and offer more to the public. Because
we will control the whole process. We
have plans to do more in terms of e-com-
merce activity and payment card process-
es that will help us to launch e-commerce
in the not too distant future.”

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 3B

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY FORGIE EVANS late of
#17 London Terrace, Eastern District, New Providence,
Bahamas, deceased

NOTICE is hereby piven that all persons having
Claims or demands ayainsl the above-named Estate are
requested bo send the same duly certified bo the undersigned
on or before Aueust JOM,

AND NOTICE is hereby also given thal al the
expiration of the tine mentioned above, the assels of the late
DOROTHY PORGIE EVANS will be distributed arcing: the
persons entitled thereto having regard only to the claims of
which the Executor of the Estate shall then have had Notice,

GERARAM, THOMPSON & CO,
Altorneys tor the Execu bors
Sasccn Hic
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O. Box W-272
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: S Smith

Not wanting to reveal detailed plans

RoyalFidelity fund gets 60% of target

FROM page 1B

assess what the appetite was,
so I don’t see it as a success or
failure.

“The general view locally
is that the international mar-
kets are more volatile than
investors are interested in and
they are keeping cash safe in
bank deposits. They are movy-
ing away generally from the
equities side and getting into
investments in fixed income
and bank deposits.”

The global trend of
investors fleeing from equi-
ties into perceived safer
havens, such as fixed income
instruments and bank
deposits, has arrived in the
Bahamas, Mr Anderson con-
firmed, with RoyalFidelity’s
Growth & Income fund con-
tinuing to see redemption
requests, but its fixed income
investments receiving addi-
tional interest.

The RoyalFidelity presi-
dent said the merchant bank
now planned to get the
TIGRS 2 Series sub-fund list-
ed on the Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange
(BISX), and hoped that as
investor confidence and inter-
national share/asset prices
improved, there would be
opportunities for other
Bahamian investors to buy in
when their peers cashed out.

The TIGRS 2 Series sub-
fund has already purchased
its options in the four indices
to which it is linked - the
iShares Emerging Markets
Index, the S&P 500 Index, the
Dow Jones Euro STOXX



Index, and Nikkei 225 Index -
and Mr Anderson said: “We
need to see how it does over
the next five years or so.”

As with the TIGRS series 1
sub-fund, RoyalFidelity’s
inaugural index-linked sub-
fund that was also launched
under the institution’s Inter-
national Investment Fund, the
principal invested in the
Series 2 fund will also be
“protected” or guaranteed.

This time, though, 80 per
cent instead of 75 per cent of
investor capital will be used
for principal protection, Mr
Anderson explaining that this

eee cae mas

Tribune)_
rte Estate

was because the five-year
time horizon meant RoyalFi-
delity had to settle for lower
interest rates on the principal
protected sum.

This will be invested in
Bahamas-domiciled fixed
income securities, such as
bonds and certificates of
deposit.

The interest earned on
these latter investments will
ensure that Bahamian
investors recover 100 per cent
of their principal when their
Series 2 investment matures
in five years’ time - on June
30, 2014.

Pe eel) eEtD ls

Everywhere The ee Are!

dows ad rates

at

Available August Ist, 2009
PROSPECT RIDGE CONDOMINIUM.

PAA tee eR UAT et eli eee ONTUT TOTO) TnI

SH Lel ts

patio/deck gated, pool, oceanview includes water and gas.

Phone: 357-9274 or 325-4465

—r
NA

Magsau Airport
Geesiopreni Corp

REQUEST FOR
PREQUALIFICATION

LPIA Expansion Project Stage |
US Departures Terminal

Ledcor is seeking contractors to assist in completion of Stage | of the LPIA Expansion

Praject (WS Departures Terminal), All contractors, particularly Bahamian contractors, are

encouraged to participate in this significant national provect. Scopes to be tendered to

complete the fit 0

# Masonry
# Millwork
# Speciaities
+ Point

Prequalification will include, based on the tend

mut of the new terminal include:

+ Doorn & Hordwore + Mechanical
# Glectical

+ Interior Glazing
+ Drywall
+ Flooring

er packapes, the following cntena:

Ability to bond, provide letter of credit o demonstrate finanola! capacity

Experience

References

Bahamian ownership / content

Frequatifcaton packages wall de aati dor pont ap at che dagtar Comtmetin Bahamas Limvted! ote alfice ar
Lynden Floating Javermationay Arport Minoiar Fatt foad by phone at MPTP SI? a by emai regen af
infotl 30 @ledcor.com. isterested contractor mort eltait 2 preqeniicanon package by Aywar 7 AMY
















































Gastroenterology

Doctors Hospital Sessional Clinic

Do you have any of the
CO UCe ASUS Tee A ONT ELON EE EES

« Difficulty swallowing

« Heartburn

+» Dyspepsia (gas, bloating)

+ Nausea and vomiting

« Unintentional weight loss
» Diarrhea & Constipation

« Abdominal pain

« Diseases of the pancreas

« Liver disease

+ Jaundice

« Colon cancer screening

SCREENING and
CONSULTATION

« Family history of colon cancer

+ Rectal bleeding

By Appointment Only

Call: 302-4684

Date: Wednesday, July 22°09
Open: 9:00 am

ie f

Dr. hiarca Cooper
Internal Medicine
Gastroenterology

ee DOCTORS HOSPITAL

feats Pa

GENERAL MANAGER

Exclusive private members club on New Providence Island requires a suitable
candidate to fill the position of General Manager.

Main Responsibilities:

¢ Oversee all aspects of Club operations to ensure achievement of strategic
priorities as set by the Board of Directors.

* To develop and maintain operating & capital budgets.

¢ To provide leadership, supervision & direction to the Club’s management
team.

¢ To facilitate & coordinate all aspects of member relations.

¢ To oversee & ensure the upkeep of all company assets including but not
limited to buildings, grounds & equipment.

¢ To develop events & programs to enhance revenue as well as the overall
experience of club members.

Qualifications and Experience:

¢ Bachelors Degree in Hospitality Management, Business Administration or
similar studies.

¢ Prior experience in Food & Beverage Management in an international
setting.

¢ Proven management & leadership skills, with at least five years experience
in a senior management position within a 5-star organization.

¢ Excellent oral & written communications.

¢ Excellent organizational skills.

¢ Must be proficient with Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point & various
restaurant POS Systems.

Remuneration:

Salary will be based upon experience and qualifications. We offer an excellent
benefit package.

Interested persons should submit their resume by email to
careeropportunity09@ yahoo.com
on or before Thursday, July 23, 2009.



PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
































NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON
late of #48 Winton Highway, Eastern District, New
Providence, Bahamas, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Eslale are
requested to send the same duly certified bo the undersigned
onor before * August SOCK,

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
eX piraticen of the time mentioned above, the asserts of the late
NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON will be distributed
among the persons entitled thereto having regard only to
the claims of which the Execubor of the Estate shall then
have had Notice.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO,
Atborineys for the Execuitors
SSISSCer Hiren
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O7. Box M-272
Nassau, Balrnas.

Allention: 5. Seilh

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS =. 2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION CLE/GEN/00443

BETWEEN

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
JACQUELINE JOHNSON
Defendant

ADVERTISEMENT OF SERVICE OF
WRIT OF SUMMONS

TAKE NOTICE that an action has been commenced
against you in the Supreme Court, Common Law
and Equity Division, Action No. CLE/GEN/00443
of 2008 in which the Plaintiff, BANK OF THE
BAHAMAS LIMITED, has issued a Writof Summons
out of the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on the
20th March, 2008 claiming against you the sum of
$17,476.70 arising from your default of the loan
granted by the Plaintiff to you on or about the 11th
August, 2002 in the principal amount of $7,500.00
and interest at the rate of 15% per annum.

AND THAT it has been ordered by
Ms. Marilyn Meeres, Deputy Registrar of the
Supreme Court on the 1/th March, 2009 that
service of the Writ of Summons in the said
action on you be effected by this advertisement.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that
you must within fourteen (14) days from the
publication of this advertisement inclusive of the
day of such publication, acknowledge service
of the said Writ of Summons by completing a
prescribed form of Acknowledgement of Service
which may be obtained on requested from the
Attomeys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise Judgment may be entered against you.

Dated this 17th day of March, A.D., 2009

GIBSON, RIGBY & Co,
CHAMBERS
Ki-Malex House
Dowdeswell Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Plaintiff

Share price ‘does
not show FOCOL
underlying value’

FROM page 1B

value through this initiative.

“Secondly, those stock-
holders who wish to exit the
company, for whatever rea-
son - we would recommend
that they don’t, but we can
understand it in this econom-
ic climate - we would prefer
them not to sell at a price that
would be significantly under-
valued.”

Mr Wilson added that
based on FOCOL’s
“prospects, underlying trends

and the quality of the man-
agement”, the company’s
share price was undervalued
on the Bahamas Internation-
al Securities Exchange
(BISX). The stock is current-
ly trading at $5.03 per share,
its 52-week range lying
between a $5.53 high and a
$4.95 low following FOCOL’s
four-for-one stock split in
2007.

Stock repurchase pro-
grammes, where companies
buy back their own shares,
are nothing new in the

Bahamas. Cable Bahamas has
been running its own for sev-
eral years, in a bid to prop up
its share price in an illiquid
market, where retail investors
are prepared to cash out at
prices markedly below a
stock’s true value. Such pro-
grammes also create liquidity
for investors.

FOCOL plans to use the
shares it repurchases for an
employee stock ownership
programme (ESOP), or oth-
erwise cancel them.

Mr Wilson added on the

stock repurchase: “T think it’s
a sign of when you’re dealing
with a quality company, qual-
ity companies do things like
that.

“The directors have faith in
the company, and have an
interest in protecting value
for all shareholders. There are
occasions, from time to time,
when it is necessary to show
the market we have confi-
dence in it, and this is a good,
dependable company.”

He said: “We can grow by
various ways, acquiring busi-

Law Firm is seeking skilled professional litigation legal

secretary. The following are needed:

+ Proficiency in Microsoft Word

« Experience in drafting legal letters with little supervision

« Experience in drafting legal documents with
little supervision

+ Ability to confidently speak with clients

+ Ability to take instructions and carry same out with
little supervision

« Excellent organizational skills

* Excellent memory

+ Ability to multi-task

« Works beyond the standard 9 to 5 when necessary

+ Energetic

+ Self-motivated

+ Pleasant personality

* Despises mediocrity

clo The Tribune ¢ P.O. Box N-3207¢ D/A #81242

HELP WANTED

LEGAL SOTHOR

NOTICE

WASHING PEBBLES INC.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
13%(4) of the Intemational Business Companies Act, 20000,
WASHING PEBBLES INC. is in dissolution as of July
15, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 354
Regent Sirect, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liguidater.

LIQUIDATOR

mango

Transfer Solutions Providers Limited is a Bahamian software
company specializing in micro-payments, with an aggressive
implementation time-table. In order to meet these goals we
require the services of a Chief Technical Officer immediately.

Chief Technical Offi
Minimum requirements:

e University degree in Science/Engineering
e 10+ years experience in:

Major systems design

Programming (C, C++, .net}

Large scale database design

Large scale networking and associated protocols
e Experience in card-based financial systems
e Experience working for Government level institutions
e Experience working in an international environment

All interested parties please submit CV by e-mail to harvey.morris@ts
pbahamas.com or by fax to 394-6763. No telephone calls accepted.

o

St. Anne’s School, Fox Hill, invites
applicants for its 2009/10 Nursey Class

¢ Children must be three years or older on before 31
July 2009

¢ Application Forms may be collected from the
school’s office from 9:00 - 3:00 daily

* For additional information please contact the office
at 324-1203, 324-1226



nesses, paying dividends.
What we are saying is that
rather than pursue these alter-
natives, the best way we can
create value for shareholders
in the short-term is to let the
market reflect the true value
of the stock.”

Despite the “tough cli-
mate”, Mr Wilson said
FOCOL was performing well,
with management having a
“good plan and good strate-
gy” for the company that was
already being implemented.

NOTICE

NOTICE is h given that MR. OVAN PIERRE OF NASSAU
VILLAGE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration‘naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration’
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15TH day of JULY, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, R'O.Box N-7 147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the

news, read
Insight on
Mondays

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RANDOLPH SAINTIL of
#31 WOODCOCK LN, ARDENT FOREST, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
15th day of JULY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that Mr. JOHN BERNARD of
Lovely Bay, Acklins, Bahamas, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15" day of July, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

aS

TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications trom qualified Christian for the following posi-
tions for the 2009 - 2010 School Year.

Dean of St nt

Applicants must:

A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing to
subscribe to the statement of Faith of Temple Christian
School.

B. Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or Higher from
a recognized College or University.

C. Possess excellent organization, Inter-personal
communicative skills.

D. Be able to assist with all aspect of the Administration.
E. Be able to discipline, counsel students.

F. Have high morals standards.

Application must be picked up at the High School Office
on Shirley Street 23rd July, 2009 and be returned with
the following: a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph, church affiliation, pastor’s name and three
references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is July 30th, 2009



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 5B



FUNDS, from 1B

al recession and the loss of
wealth as a result of last Sep-
tember’s stock market crash
are now beginning to impact
the Bahamian financial ser-
vices industry.

On the Butterfield Fulcrum
front, one financial industry
source said of the Bahamas
office: “I think they’re clos-
ing it, and relocating the busi-
ness to Cayman or some-
where else like Bermuda.

“The fund business has
dried up for them, probably,
and they are relocating to
where they have scale, which
would be Cayman or Bermu-
da.”

This was confirmed by
sources close to Butterfield
Fulcrum’s Bahamas opera-
tions, who said the lay-offs
and downsizing were linked
to the contracting investment
funds (hedge and mutual
funds) industry.

This sector of the global
financial services industry has
also borne the brunt of the
credit crunch and economic

recession, with many funds
suffering huge redemption
requests from investors des-
perate to pull their money out
and find safer havens for it.

These redemption requests
have been enough to put
some funds out of business,
while other fund
managers/promoters have
either suspended redemptions
or decided to wind-up their
existing funds. All this would
negatively impact a fund
administrator such as Butter-
field Fulcrum, reducing its
business.

Indeed, the entire interna-
tional financial services sec-
tor has experienced a reduc-
tion in fee income, this is
linked to assets under admin-
istration/management. These
have shrunk as a result of the
stock market crash and, with
revenues declining, players in
the Bahamian financial ser-
vices industry have been left
with no choice but to align
staffing levels with business.

And, with Cayman and
Bermuda having a much
stronger presence and repu-

tation in the funds adminis-
tration business, it would be
an easy choice for Butterfield
Fulcrum’s Bermuda head
office to close operations here
and switch the business to
either of these jurisdictions.

A statement prepared by
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas),
designed to distinguish itself
as a separate entity unaffected
by the lay-offs, revealed that
it was informed by Butterfield
Fulcrum Group that "sever-
al positions within the their
company are being made
redundant”.

BFG is an affiliate of But-
terfield Bank (Bahamas),
though with an autonomous
management team and board
of directors.

"Although the loss of posi-
tions at Butterfield Fulcrum
Group in the Bahamas is
unfortunate, we believe that
Butterfield Fulcrum Group
management is acting in the
best interests of the compa-
ny, and the employees are
being treated fairly and with
respect. The employees
impacted were employees of

ABACO MARKETS, from 1B

open spaces, parks and both commercial and
residential spaces to meet both the existing
and the growing demand in the area.

“Development of the town centre with the
high-end Solomon’s Fresh Food Market will
bring a new level of shopping experience to the
rapidly growing western region of the island. In
addition to the existing population in the area,
there is also a clear move west for many look-
ing for a different quality of life defined by
an ease of living, working and shopping right
here.”

Mr Duggan added: “We are very pleased
with our partnership with Abaco Markets,
which shares our vision of offering a com-
pletely new food shopping experience not yet
available anywhere in the Bahamas.

“Our respective organisations have worked
very hard on the plans for both the town cen-
tre and for Solomon’s Fresh Food Market.
We are confident this partnership will deliver
the high quality standards we - and residents in
the area — are demanding.”

Abaco Markets pledged that Solomon’s
Fresh Food Market would feature an eco-
friendly design intended to appeal to the more
“discerning customer”, and focus on an upscale
shopping experience with high quality products
and gourmet selection.

“We are excited about this opportunity to
bring about a new standard for food shopping
in the Bahamas. Everything about the store is
focused on delivering a superior shopping
experience,” said Gavin Watchorn, Abaco
Markets president and chief executive.

“From the state-of-the-art facility, which is
being designed with new energy efficient and

‘green’ standards, and the ease of shopping
to our premium product selection, service, and
gourmet deli, customers will enjoy an entirely
new experience at Solomon’s Fresh Food Mar-
ket.”

He added: “This agreement for Solomon’s
Fresh Food Market marks a new era for our
group, which has been revived by our perfor-
mance and much improved market share over
the past two years. As a result, we have devel-
oped an exciting new model that we are con-
fident not only addresses the dynamic needs of
the area but will serve as a new standard for us
all in the food business.”

Abaco Markets’ new format will likely com-
pete directly with retailers such as Gourmet
Market at Caves Village. It is also unclear
what has happened to plans by Rupert
Roberts, Supervalue’s president, for his own
niche, high-end health food store in western
New Providence.

Meanwhile, Mr Watchorn told shareholders
at last night’s Abaco Markets AGM that the
company was in talks to open another Domi-
no’s Pizza outlet at the western town centre.

New Providence Development Company,
the largest private land owner on New Provi-
dence with more than 2,300 acres, developed
Old Fort Bay and the Old Fort Club, and owns
the New Providence Water Development
Company. It is also an affiliate of the Tavistock
Group, the Albany developer. Both it and
Tavistock Group are owned by Joe Lewis, the
Lyford Cay-based billionaire. Mr Lewis’s busi-
ness partner, Terry White, is an investor in
both Albany and New Providence Develop-
ment Company.

Important

Notice

SERVICE INTERRUPTION

Butterfield Fund Services
(Bahamas) (a subsidiary of
the Bank) prior to January
2009, at which time they
became employees of Butter-
field Fulcrum Group," But-
terfield Bank's statement said.

"The bank's operations in
the Bahamas are not affect-
ed by the actions being taken
by Butterfield Fulcrum
Group. We continue to offer
private banking, personal
trust and corporate trust ser-
vices to clients from our
offices in Montague Sterling
Centre East Bay Street."

Butterfield Fulcrum’s
Bahamas business has gone
through two ownership
changes in five years. Origi-
nally known as Deerfield
Fund Services, it was acquired
by Butterfield Bank in Janu-
ary 2004 and renamed But-
terfield Fund Services
(Bahamas).

Then, in July 2008, Butter-
field decided to merge all its
funds services operations -
including those in the
Bahamas - with Fulcrum,
retaining a 40 per cent stake
in the merged Butterfield Ful-

crum.

When Butterfield acquired
Deerfield, it had 12 staff and
assets under administration
of $1.8 billion. The latter fig-
ure had grown to $2.9 billion
by year-end 2004, and its size
at the time of the Fulcrum
deal can be gauged by the fact
that, at year-end 2007, But-
terfield’s assets under admin-
istration in the Bahamas
(when it still owned both the
funds business and the bank),
were $5.447 billion.

At year-end 2008, when the
funds business had been
merged into Butterfield Ful-
crum, assets under adminis-
tration in the Bahamas
totalled just $2.349 billion.
This implied that Butterfield
Fulcrum’s Bahamas opera-
tions had almost $3.1 billion in
assets under administration
by year-end 2008.

Its loss would deal a blow
to the Bahamas’ standing as a
domicile for investment funds
and their administration.

Heather Bellot, the unit’s
managing director when it
was under the Deerfield and
Butterfield Services

(Bahamas) brands, was said
to no longer be with the com-
pany when it was contacted
by Tribune Business yester-
day. Current managing direc-
tor, Sandra Gilbert, did not
return this newspaper’s calls
seeking comment.

Meanwhile, CIBC Trust
Company (Bahamas) was said
by sources to have let go five
employees. When questioned
about the lay-offs, deputy
general manager, Carlis
Chisholm, replied: "No com-
ment!"

Minister of Labour Dion
Foulkes said he was not
appraised of layoffs at either
Butterfield Fulcrum Group or
CIBC Trust, but said he
would look into the matters.

"T have not received any
communication from CIBC
Trust with respect to any
pending lay-offs," said Mr
Foulkes.

"The code of industrial
practice mandates that when-
ever a business establishment
plans to make any employees
redundant they must the alert
the Ministry of Labour. I am
totally unaware of this."

VACANCY

Create ma@el elas)

A vacancy exists at The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited and Port Group

Limited for the position of General Counsel.

Applicants are invited from

interested and suitably qualified individuals ta fill this position, with the primary
responsibility of the overall direction and management of the Legal Department
of The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited and Port Group Limited, and:

-

® Manage and lead strategic and tactical legal initiatives for the Group of

COM panes

Structure and manage the company’s internal legal function and statt

Lead various projects Including litigation management: direction of leases,
deeds of release, and conveyances; privacy and employment matters,
corporate governance, domestic and international compliance and other
matters requiring legal suppart

Obtain and oversee the work of outside counsel

Provide senior managernent with effective legal opinians on company
Strategies and implementation

Serve as adviser on all major business transactions and in negotiating critical

contracts

Play a key role in managing risk and helping to make sound business decisions

Develop and implement all legal and corporate governance policies

Serve as Company Secretary and participate in meetings of the Board of

Directors

From 1:00 am to 8:00 am
July 26th, 2009.

Advise and counsel corporate departments on general and specialized legal
matters including complex international and commercial business transactions

Provide legal representation on International and local projects at preliminary
stage of negotiations and throughout development

Provide legal counsel and advice regarding various corporate business tramsac-

tions to ensure compliance with Bahamian Law and company policies and
procedures.

KNOWLEDGE AND QUALIFICATIONS

Judiclal degree along with international expertise

As we continue efforts to improve our service to you, we ask
you to take note that our Electronic Banking System will be
temporarily unavailable during the time listed above while
we conduct routine maintenance.

We apologise for any inconvenience that this may cause.

15 or more years of commercial transactional legal background, along with
combined in-house and law firm legal experience

Strong transactional and general business and commercial law experience,
including drafting and negetiating commercial contracts and licenses

During this period, the following services will be unavailable:

Significant intellectual property experience

e ABM
e VISA transactions via ABM

e Internet Banking & Telephone Banking
(from 1:00 am to 11:00 am July 26th, 2009)

Experience in both public and global companies
Results-oriented, with skills to influence change and drive compliance

Strang presentation and negotiation skills, solid business instinets and
judgment, and outstanding written and verbal communication skills

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this necessary Creative and flexible problem-solving skills

maintenance. Ability and interpersonal skills to relate with Internal and external customers,

including government, business professionals, the community, corporate
executives and managers, and contribute to strategic planning.

USSR ee ee ORR Seen Ee |e
SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS TO GENERALCOUNSEL@GBPA.COM
eee eR el
P, 0. BOX F-42666
PaO PC PR elim) ed) LB

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com GET THERE. TOGETHER.





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
TASTE







The Tribune



Welcome to the

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

OR busy moms and snack lovers, cookies

have been a life saver for a quick mess

free and preparation free nibble. Laurel
Handfield, owner of The Cookie Mill located in

Freeport, Grand Bahama, has taken on the Chocolate Brownie

growing cookie craze.

According to kitchenproject.com, the first cookies were cre-
ated by accident.

“Cooks used a small amount of cake batter to test their oven
temperature before baking a large cake. These little test cakes
were called ‘koekje’, meaning ‘little cake’ in Dutch. Originally
called ‘little cakes,’ cookies are made with sweet dough or bat-
ter, baked in single-sized servings and eaten out-of-hand. Per-
fect for snacking or as dessert, cookies are consumed in 95.2
percent of US households. Americans alone consume over 2
billion cookies a year, or 300 cookies for each person annually,”
the website said.

Mrs Handfield, who is originally from Pennsylvania, said she i,
thought about entering the cookie business when she first ;
moved to the Bahamas several years ago.

“For the past few months, I ended up baking as a hobby for
family, friends and kids around the neighborhood. I had been
thinking about getting into business but was reluctant with the
state of the economy. A few Sundays back, I was in church
(Freeport Bible) and my pastor spoke on how we have to create
our own opportunities. That was my sign and I haven't looked
back since,” Mrs Handfield said.

As for the uniqueness of the name, Mrs Handfield said it _
came from her husband.

“Honestly, my husband and I had a few names in mind but all
were taken when we tried to create a website. Then my hus-
band suggested The Cookie Mill and I liked it. To me it sug-
gested that we were all cookies all the time. When we went to
create the website, the name wasn't taken so we stuck with it.
Next in line was Cookie Supreme but that sounded a little too
pretentious to me,” Mrs Handfield said.

The Cookie Mill bakes several dozen cookies a week with 4 a
their 2 for 1 special going on for the month of July which also 4
includes brownies and mini-cheesecakes.

“We have our old-fashioned chocolate chip, traditional oat-
meal raisin, chocolate chocolatey chip cookies, iced sugar cook-
ies, double stuffed chocolate brownies with a milk chocolate
drizzle, chocolate chip blonde brownie with the creamy choco-
late drizzle, and miniature cheesecakes. We also just introduced
the peanut butter delight,” Mrs Handfield said.

Although the Cookie Mill is always looking to expand the
menu, the more popular flavors are the double stuffed choco-
late brownie and the old fashioned chocolate chip cookie.

“Our specialty is definitely the chocolate chip cookie. I like to
make them flaky on the outside while making the inside chewy.
Talso found a trick on how to make them thick. I'm in the
process of creating a great recipe for a chocolate brownie cup
with nuts, which is like a brownie cupcake for those that wish to
keep the gooey chocolate off their fingers,” Mrs Handfield said.

Unfortunately, for those cookie lovers who are located on
other islands, Mrs Handfield said although she does not ship
outside of Grand Bahama, she is looking into finding ways of
getting these tasty bites to them.

“Our products are fresh, made-to-order so there are no
added preservatives. That may present an obstacle depending
upon how long it would take to get to another island. I need to
keep costs as low as possible and keep quality up and shipping
may raise the price too high,” Mrs Handfield said.

For other cookie lovers who want to get into the cookie busi-
ness, Mrs Handfield urges them to start small. , P : onl —

“Do your research and start off small scale if you are hesitant. 2 7 | ii
! a : _ Chocolate Chip Cookies —



Peanut Butter delight










Believe me, I am queen of hesitation and
business now would be crazy. What I d
concentrating on a delicious no-frills tr
for a great price. Who can say no to 24 c@
Handfield said.

She has high hopes for the future of the

“T see us concentrating on a larger scale
individual cookie lovers. My next target
ness meetings of larger companies or €
pick me up gift for their students. The possi
Mrs Handfield said.





Chocolate Chip White Brownies



THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 9B













The Tribune

GONE 100 SOON

Bahamian entertainer Frydeh passes away

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

LOCAL entertainer
Frydeh from the
Make-Um-Listen
movement shocked
many in the industry
after his death last
Monday.

The Stars competition, and in 1998, he was
part of a local choir arranged for the grand
opening of the Atlantis Royal Towers where
he had the chance to work with artists such as
Bebe Winans, Michael Jackson, Baron Cage,
Stephanie Mills, and Donnie McClurkin.

Frydeh described his music as a crossover
between diverse genres including pop, reggae,
rap, RnB, Reggaeton, and Caribbean beats.
Influenced by artists such as Kenny Latti-
more, Brian McKnight, Brandy, Mariah
Carey, and Eric Benet, Frydeh successfully
molded his own sound helping him to expe-
rience beauty in life, and music was undoubt-
edly his true passion.

In the days leading up to his death, his moth-
er explained that there was nothing on his
mind other than singing and continuing his
work with the Make-Um-Listen movement.

She said: “He was my all, he was my inspi-
ration, he was a very independent person.
The last thing he said to me was ‘Mommy, I
have something to say, you know what, I see
God. Mommy please, I don’t want to die
here, I want to die home in your hands.’ My
baby gone too soon.”

Expressing her condolences, his manager
Ms Chatti said never before has she met an
artist like Frydeh, she said his devotion to the
vision of Make-Um-Listen has been unwa-
vering from the start.

She said although he resided on the eastern
end of the island, Frydeh would do what he
had to when the time came to attend group
meetings at her home office on Gladstone
Road or to any other engagements.

“He was a true star, and I have no doubt
that he was headed for nothing but greatness,
and my heart feels as empty as that of a wid-
ow because I have lost an important member
of my team and family.”

Recently performing alongside Davey
Yarborough in the Jazz Summer Festival
event held at Mount Batton House, he is
remembered as an artist with loads of stage
presence and a big voice.

Survived by his parents and his siblings
Damar Leadon, Fredricka Minns, and Deliska
Minns, he is missed and will forever be
remembered as a true musician gone before

THE local music industry is
mourning the death of yet anoth-
er entertainer, Ryan Andrews aka
Frydeh who died at Princess Mar-
garet Hospital last Monday after
a three year battle with cancer.

According to his manager Patricia Catti, the
news came as a shock as the fallen entertainer
was due to perform at a concert on July 10 in
Cat Island.

Making several unsuccessful attempts to
contact Frydeh in the days leading up to the
event, Ms Chatti assumed that something had
come up and that Frydeh would eventually
contact her.

During an emotional interview last Friday,
Ms Catti said unfortunately that call she was
waiting on never came through, and instead
she did received a call from radio personality
Randy C who confirmed that the artist had
passed away.

Career

Frydeh who was best known for his mem-
bership in the world renowned Bahamian pop
group Bahamen (2004 to 2006), was also on
the verge of starting his solo career having
already released a list of hit songs including
the popular Joy ft Apollo Kreed (a remake of
Joy originally composed by Blackstreet in
1995), Handle It, Pil be, and others.

Born September 1, 1979, to Vincent
Andrews and Dolly Deveaux, he possesed a
special love for singing from early on.

According to his mother, he would pick up
anything he could find to use as a mic and
would belt out his favourite tune at the drop of
a dime.

This love for music lead to his future
achievements including becoming a part of
the New Born Church of God youth chior in
1994, winning the 1995 local Searching For

things 2D0



This weeks events include a synergetic art
and entertainment event, some old school :

music and a street festival Bahamian style.
. Local artist Terez Hepburn is set to

release her new single Mister Bus Driver 3

during a “night of expression,” at Tehillah
Lounge in the Reggae Café at Breezes Hotel
this Saturday at 8pm. In addition to that per-
formance, artist Kevin Rolle will showcase his

latest art exhibition. There will also be an ama-

teur poetry and spoken word segment allow-
ing audience to become involved in the event.
Tickets are $10, and can be purchased at
100 per cent Bible Bookstore, or by visiting
www.tehillanlounge.com.
» The Junkanoo Summer Festival con-
tinues on Bay Street this Saturday

when dozens of local souvenir producers and :
venders will get to showcase their crafts. The :

event will also feature live Goombay music,

live-bands, and lots of local food and fun. It’s

free for all, so come and show your support
for all things Bahamian.
« The Nettie Symonette art exhibit at
Central Bank continues until August 7,
and already it has received rave reviews. This

75-year-old artist presents 75 abstract pieces

that have been compared to the likes of
Picasso, Michael Bellon, and Barnett New-

man. The collection which was first started in
2003 in the Abacos while Mrs Symonette was

working on her memoirs, uses mirror like
illusion to tell the story of life and emotions.
The exhibition can be seen from Monday to
Friday between 9.30am and 4.30pm.

» Former Mr Caribbean/model/stylist

and local icon Kendrick Kemp is using
his celebrity status to bring the Envy Beach
Night Club back to life with his upcoming
event called Sweet Dreams. The event which
promises a heavy mix of appearances from
many in the entertainment industry, backed
by music from DJ Reds, Urban Empire, and
JDX sounds just to name a few, promises to
be an event like none other. At the cost of
$10, you can rub shoulders with the stars

while partying in a safe and comfortable envi-

ronment.
. On Friday, the National Art Gallery of
The Bahamas will be transformed into
the infamous Drum Beat Club as a host of
music veterans seek to bring the nostalgic
club back to life.
Chickie Horn, Chippie Chipman, Peanut

Taylor, and others who were part of the origi-

nal cast at the club, will play their hearts
away for guests at NAGB. Starting at 8pm,
tickets are $40 for NAGB members, and $45
for all others.

his time.



-Mr Beeds makes history | The best in Bahamian
with debut video

MOVIEMAKER to musicmaker,
Ricardo 'Mr Beeds' Forbes has made
history in the local entertainment indus-
try with his debut music video for his hit
song Achoo (Bless You). Combining
hip hop with the Bahamian folk sound
of rake 'n' scrape, Mr Beeds is the first
artist from his country to use several
types of animation throughout his entire
video.

“Having already won film awards and

i working in theatre I think a lot of people

expected me to come from a familiar
angle,” he admitted. “However, it was
great to see everyone's reaction when it
turned out I was hardly featured thanks
to the wonders of animation.”

The video was officially launched dur-
ing Youth Alive, one of the region's
major events for young people featuring
some of the biggest names in positive
music. By the end of the night, North
Americans were requesting to take
copies of the video back home with
them and by the end of the week Face-

book and YouTube comments were

pouring in.

“T feel like progress is being made,”
says Mr Beeds who released his first
album Peak State in January 2009.

“T wrote the vision, made it plain, left
in to God and he made it a reality. lam
happy with the response from people

i but I am most humbled with the love

that Bahamians have shown. People say
that if you want an honest critique you
have to ask a Bahamian and they have

i been honest and I thank them for being

so supportive. The one constant com-
ment I keep getting is that the video is so
original.”

Mr Beeds credits his friend, compos-
itor Al Rahming as the mastermind

behind the artistry. Viewers enjoy the

tion.

tempted beyond what you can bear,

can stand above it. ”

Mr Beeds, who has been busy hit-

ting up different venues on his sum- ; test. It started off as a five

mer tour of New Providence each ; Minute show and by the

weekend, is excited about the oppor- / time we were done we were

tunities which have presented them- ; ON television. We finished a
selves for the video. The video is }
expected to air on MTV Tempo this }
summer and has been submitted to }
BET and VHI1. Fans who can't wait }

may check out the video on YouTube :

or Mr Beeds' Facebook page.



BY ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features

amissick@tribunemedia.net

OVER the past few years,

“Alis an amazing artist and it was a a a of rpg
blessing that he not only poured out } ae cn hase ora .
so many styles in this but that he gave i 7“ :
all he had aie turning the video an in } tainment industry to anoth-
only six weeks,” said Mr Beeds. “We : © level by experimenting
came up with the concept together -
the whole good versus evil aspect. Peo- | Sounds. However, to get
ple who know the song often joke }
about it being the worst day ever for :
someone. I mean, the person I sing }
about proposes to a woman he finds }
out is actually married, tries to help an }
old woman who turns out to be a rob- }
ber in disguise and he's like on the }
verge of throwing in the towel. But in }
the video we get to see that there is a }
demon assigned to bring him down and }
an angel assigned to help him rise }
above it all. The thing is we need to : Patrick Major, said they
be tested sometimes and the video can } :
be perceived as an allegory of a biblical

text that talks about when you are

Bahamian music and enter-

with different genres and

those unique products and
music out to the public and
the world, artists need a
media outlet and Bahamian
Entertainment Television
(BeTv) has been one of
those outlets for the past
four years.

BeTv has existed since
November of 2006 and its
owners Ian Pinder and

have big plans for the com-
pany.
“We wanted to really do

God will provide a way out so that you what ie do and make sure
? our vision was actually

viable so it started out as a

season so everything just
happened. Everywhere we
went people were interested
and hype about it so we kept
going.

Mr Major said BeTv’s

? main goal among other
i things,
: Bahamians.

is to entertain

“Where ever we have to

? go for that entertainment is
i where we will go. We are
: looking to basically travel
i the globe. Season two may
? not take us to Japan but we
i hope in season’s three and
: four we will get there. We
? want to touch Europe, Cana-
? da, the United States, and
i the Caribbean, so we want
: to basically bring entertain-
? ment from all over the globe.
i; We have Bahamians in those

entertainment - BETV

cut out animation similar to the style }
used in South Park in the first verse of }
the song featuring a cameo by one of the }
Bahamas’ leading DJs Dion Da Butcha. } Reporter
Mr Rahming also experimented with }
sketch, 3-D and scribble animation, all of }

which ends up in perfect synchronisa- }

places so we want to give
them some shine and show
us the hot spots. We have
some guys out there who are
on top in the US and we
have a lot of big Bahamians
all over the world. A lot of
people when they think of
Bahamians they only think
about the Bahamas, but this
is a global thing,” Mr Major
said.

Due to the many genres
of entertainment present in
the Bahamas, Mr Pinder
said BeTv is not mainly
focused on music, but the
culture of Bahamians.

“Whether it be the graph-
ic artists, craftsman, musi-
cians and so forth, it is basi-
cally trying to push all arti-
sans out there as Bahami-
ans. If you go in the straw
market and see some of the
wood carvings that some of
those guys do you would be
amazed. There are a lot of
Bahamians that don’t know
about the work of other
Bahamians,” Mr Pinder
said.

“We have to make sure
we get them out there. Our
five man production team
works around the clock to
work hard and get the mate-
rial out,” Mr Major said.

Mr Pinder said BeTv is
also hoping to relaunch their
website, as MyBeTVv to pro-
vide a sense of ownership to
Bahamians instead of the
older BeTv Live. Persons
will be able to go online and
watch the shows they missed
on television.

“We have a lot of talent
here in the Bahamas and a
lot of radio stations. How-
ever, radio can only push
content so far. It might only
reach as far as South Flori-
da. Video, television and
internet can reach world-
wide and that is the avenue
we want to take Bahamians-
world wide,” Mr Pinder said.



PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



TASTE

Miss Universe Pageant Fashion Show

THE 88 contestants of the 58th Miss Uni-
verse Pageant will take to the catwalk during
the pageant’s official fashion show to be held
at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort on
Wednesday August 12 wearing the outfits of
three outstanding Bahamian designers and
locally manufactured fabrics of Androsia and

Bahama Hand Prints .

Owen Bethel, chairman of
the host planning committee
and pageant coordinator,
explained: “Not only is this
significant as the first time
that The Bahamas is hosting

the Miss Universe Pageant,
but also because the fashion
show will feature another
aspect of the islands’ creativ-
ity and culture as displayed
in fashion. This will certainly

have the potential of cata-
pulting the local fashion
industry into the internation-
al spotlight. It is important for
other designers and novices
to take advantage of this and
continue to build on the
opportunity.”

The three designers chosen
after an open call are: Rachel
Turnquest-Garcia of Rachel’s
Boutique, Basheva Eve of La
Maison de Besh, and Sabrina
Francis of SE’B Fashions.
Also contributing to the night
of elegance and splendour will
be noted Bahamian designer
Brynda Knowles, who will

design the evening’s outfits
for the reigning Miss Uni-
verse, Dayana Mendoza. Ms
Mendoza will share the stage
as co-host of the event with
Charles Sealey. The newly-
crowned Miss Universe will
receive an outfit created by
prominent Bahamian design-
er Jeff St John, of the House
of St John, which she will
wear at her press briefing on
the morning after her crown-
ing. She will also receive a
specially-crafted bag from
internationally-acclaimed
Harl Taylor BAG.

The fashion show is being

organised and produced by
Mode Iles Ltd, producers of
the award-winning Islands of
the World Fashion Week.
Tickets are available online
at www.tourismtoday.com or
at the box office at the Shera-
ton Nassau Beach Resort,
Cable Beach. Telephone #
(242) 702-5812.

Immediately following the
fashion show the contestants
will view and participate in a
junkanoo rush-out along the
Cable Beach Strip.For further
information, please contact
Ms Arianne Etuk at 242-356-
6133.



Ene Mendoza

Members of the Bahamas National Symphony Orchestra



The Bahamas National Symphony Orchestra Performed in Canada

By JENNIFER HUDSON

FOURTEEN members of the
Bahamas National Symphony
Orchestra (BNSO) traveled to Cana-
da on June 18 to spend a week as
guests of the musicians of Le Jardin
de Violons. Although the BNSO has
performed in the Family Islands, this
was its first international trip and
was the result of a Bahamian- Cana-
dian exchange programme begun last
year when sixteen members of Le
Jardin des Violons performed with
the BNSO in its annual gala concert
on Paradise Island, Nassau.

Having rehearsed separately dur-
ing the year, the Bahamian and
Canadian musicians came together
for two rehearsals after arrival in

Canada in order to adjust final
details before the performance on
June 21 in the magnificent church of
Saint Louis de France in Terrebonne,
just north of Montreal. The well
attended concert was an outstand-
ing success with the appreciative
audience rising to give the musicians
multiple standing ovations.
Michael Smith, Bahamas High
Commissioner to Canada, journeyed
from Ottowa with his wife, Suzanne,
to attend the concert. Following the
performance, Mr Smith expressed
pride in the way in which ties have
been forged between the Bahamian
and Canadian musicians bringing the
cultures of the two countries togeth-
er in such a magnificent way. He also
presented medals to each of the
Bahamian musicians on behalf of the

TRIBUNE TIP OF THE DAY

Starting your day on the right track

¢ Now that summer is here and
we're in the middle of daylight
savings time, it’s hard not to be
absolutely exhausted after a long
day at work, and even more tired
by the time morning rolls around.

Rather than trying to constant-
ly catch up with everything that’s
happening around you, attempt to

(CY MOVIE REVIEW

In this image
released by
Warner Bros.,
Daniel Radcliffe
is shown in a
scene from
"Harry Potter
and the Half-
Blood Prince."

Jaap Buitendjik/AP Photo

make three little adjustments that
could help brighten your day even
before it gets started.

1. Start planning a daily sched-
ule. Knowing what to expect
tomorrow at work is a great way
to keep your tasks organised, and
thus keeps you from feeling
stressed and over worked.

2. Take a minute to collect
yourself the moment you wake-



musicians of Le Jardin des Violins.

The programme included works
by Corelli, Vivaldi, Kreisler and Karl
Jenkins with the Bahamian contin-
gent also performing a lively rendi-
tion of the old Bahamian favourite
‘Sponger Money’ which showcased
Bahamian culture and thrilled the
audience.

The generosity of many helped
make this exchange experience very
special. Accommodations for the
Bahamian musicians were very gen-
erously provided by the families of
musicians of Le Jardin des Violons.
Cellos and a Double Bass were kind-
ly loaned by the music workshop of
Monsieur Jules Saint- Michel, long-
standing supporter of the violin
school, and a drum set was loaned by
another friend in order to eliminate

up. Some people use prayer as a
means of harnessing positive ener-
gy for their day ahead, visualising
yourself relaxed and in control
can also propel you to a more
fruitful day filled with blissful
thoughts.

3. Add some exercise to your
morning routine. It has been
proven that moderate morning
exercise helps to increase the acu-

the problem of transporting such
bulky instruments.

Special thanks are due to Mar-
tine Cardinal, Director/ Founder of
Le Jardin des Violons and Alexandre
Da Costa, Artistic Director, a
renowned violinist, who not only act-
ed as master of ceremonies but also
performed a solo from his latest CD
accompanied by the Bahamian musi-
cians. Additionally, thanks go out to
Helene Peloquin and Denis Don-
aldson of the BNSO who worked
tirelessly along with Ms Cardinal to
organise the exchange trip and a pre-
trip concert to assist in raising funds
towards defraying expenses.

Very close friendships have been
forged between the musicians of the
two countries and all are looking for-
ward to the next exchange.

ity of your brain. A brisk 10 to 20
minute walk or run in the morning
can also help to create a feeling of
accomplishment that can keep
you confident, alert, and ener-
gised all day long.

At the end of the day, you can’t
do much about having a busy day.
However you can take the time to
put it in perspective, so remember
to get your day started right.

All the flowers

FROM page 12

Mrs Mackey said she also dis-
covered, tourists are quite put
off when they discover an item
made in China or somewhere
else other than The Bahamas.

“I have made a number of
items thus far. They include
trendy table top items such as
table runners, placemats, nap-
kin rings. I also make pillow
slip covers, scarves, bow ties,
and I am getting into some oth-
er stuff,” Mrs Mackey said.

Mrs Mackey said she must
give all the credit to God and
her mentor, Dr Deryl G. Hunt.

“T lived in the US for about
16 years, and while there met
some of the most wonderful
people, who had a very positive
impact on my life. Dr Hunt was
one of them, a colleague and
advisor. I met him while study-
ing for my masters at Florida
International University. At that
time he was a professor at the
university. He taught me about
sustainable living and intro-
duced me to The Ellison Model.
The Ellison Model, which is a
way of life, has three basic
tenets, caring, sharing and lov-
ing. Further it provides a cyclical
approach to learning: teaching
while being taught. Because the
framework of the model is so
palatable, it can be used to
undergird any program. One in
particular was The Ozzie
Ritchey Endowment for
Bahamian Students developed
by Dr. Hunt. This program
helped to ease the financial bur-
den encountered by Bahamian
students during their matricula-
tion at Florida International
University. Many students
including myself were able to
tremendously benefit from the
program. As a result, this model
became my way of life,” Mrs
Mackey said.

Prices for the flowers are $7
each, hibiscus plant (her signa-
ture collection starts at $30),
baskets $50 small and $120
large. Mrs Mackey also provides
arrangements for weddings
including bridal bouquets as well
as special occasions/events.
These prices vary according to
order sizes.

“T would love to use the
Bahama Hand Print (fabric) and
eventually make my own batik
design. I was directed by Ben-
jamin Rahming at BAIC toa
young woman who is now train-
ing in batik design. That’s won-
derful for the Bahamas because
we need more persons teaching
the skills we would otherwise
have to look outward to obtain.
In essence, these things not only
aid us in becoming self sufficient
but they sustain us as a people.”

To find out more about My
Andro Batik and these authentic
creations, Mrs Mackey can be
reached at 242-445-8854.



Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince

By JASON DONALD

Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Michael Gambon,

Emma Watson, Rupert Grint

REMEMBER the days when we’d go to just
watch a stand alone film? I don’t. Now we’ve got
trilogies, franchises, reboots and sub-series - mul-
tiple films about the same characters in similar

situations.

It’s tiring at the best times, but nothing can
compare to the commitment needed to keep up
with the Harry Potter series - now in it’s sixth
movie with two more still to go.

Anyone other than fans of the books has prob-
ably forgotten how the last one ended - I’m losing
track myself - but it seems the evil Lord Volde-
mort is still tightening his grip over Harry’s magi-
cal world and there’s still a sense of impending
doom. Basically, business as usual at Hogwart’s
School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

This time though, there’s a generous sprinkling
of Twilight-style teen heartbreak, with Harry,
Hermoine and Ron all caught up in complicated
relationships. We’re also given a glimpse into

Voldemort’s past, when Harry uses a device to
explore memories showing Tom Riddle at Hog-

warts - before he turned to dark magic.

This is all nicely done and without a doubt The
Half Blood Prince is the most visually accom-

plished of the films so far. There’s a dynamite
opening set piece with ‘death eaters’ swooping
through the streets of London and director David
Yates injects some real creepiness at times. But

the film is always battling against its origins on

mood.

the printed page. Unlike a lengthy book, you
can’t really put a movie down for a couple of
hours, then get back to it when you're in the

Scenes which may have worked as little
vignettes in the novel just seem redundant here.
And the format of each film being a term at Hog-
warts is becoming tiresome, I was already glanc-
ing at my watch before Harry made his annual
Christmas trip to the Weasleys’s.

Now we’re faced with the prospect of the last
book being split into two movies - a real error of
judgment in my opinion. Hardcore Harry Potter
fans might be happy at that prospect, but I’m
already beginning to feel the magic wear off.
















tS

THE WEATHER REPORTK&

5-Day FORECAST



WEDNESDAY, JULY 22np, 2009, PAGE 11B

{INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST
Today Thursday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.








































































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, i Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Friday ‘(019am. 31 405am. 03 Brussels 72/22 57/13 sh 75/23 59/15 pc Severe (NICE) Z
j r a ABACO Temperature 10:42pm. 34 4:24pm. -0.2 Budapest 94/34 64/17 s 95/35 68/20 s @
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Welcome to Bahamian
the Cookie entertainer

Mill Frydeh passes
see page eight away

see page nine ‘7

i j Fi
The Tribune SECTION Be






WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

19

os

Orange and red Androsia floral orice lANe VAN =MAl

Red Androsia floral arrangement

Independance flowers

Multi colored Androsa floral arrangement



all.
flowers

Samara Saunders-Mackey uses her gifted hands to create gorgeous Androsia print flowers



By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

THE flora and fauna of the
Bahamas are some of the
most beautiful in the world
and Samara Saunders-
Mackey, owner of My Andro
Batik, Ltd., saw an opportu-
nity to recreate some of

those gorgeous flowers.

Mrs Mackey said she started mak-
ing table top items and home acces-
sories using vibrant Androsia fabric.

“I never intended to make flowers
but rather, the appliqués to place on
my products, which I thought would
enhance the look. The flowers were
just an experiment that turned out to
be an excellent idea, and thus began
the creation of them. I got my inspira-
tion from live flowers and because of
my love for them, I wanted to find a
way to preserve them. The fabric and
finish gives them a sort of perma-
nence,” Mrs Mackey said.

Mrs Mackey said she fell in love
with Androsia fabrics during her
childhood.

“The colours are a true representa-
tion of my personality: lively, outgo-
ing, warm and loving. I have incorpo-
rated a lot of trendy styles with the
fabric. After doing a market study of
the Bahamian and tourist popula-
tions, I discovered Bahamians more
than anything want trends and so do
tourists. Tourists prefer authentic
Bahamian products when they visit
The Bahamas,” Mrs Mackey said.

Although flowers may appear to be
rather simple in their anatomy, Mrs
IW ET coy y-b COND OLem Oy ROLCeSw Kosa MLB UNILS
consuming. However, Mrs Mackey
SY-UCC Solem bUOTel has KoluNeCeur-mUUT-LeNUIotemBOrAUE
can do all the work for her.

“First, IT would cut out a model/pat-
tern (leaf or petal), take the pattern
and draw it on the cloth. I would then
cut the pattern from the cloth and after
gluing, begin making the flower
design,” Mrs Mackey said.

SEE page 10



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THIET
NTS

naked body found
in West Palm Beach

By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

POLICE in Flori-
da are searching for
the killer of
Bahamian business-
man Kahil Holmes, who was
found half naked and shot
to death in the middle of a
residential street.

Mr Holmes, a 33-year-old
father-of-two, was found
dead on 22nd Street in West
Palm Beach around 8 pm
last week Tuesday.

According to reports, Mr
Holmes was found face
down, wearing only a t-shirt
and a pair of socks.

Officers responded to the
scene after receiving a
report of a man being shot,
according to a statement
from the West Palm Beach
Police Department
(WPBPD).

Yesterday, detectives
would not discuss a possible

Kahil Holmes



motive or details
relating to the case.

Police press offi-

cer Peter Robbins
would only say Mr
Holmes was shot
multiple times.

However, reports

reaching The Tri-
bune indicate the
victim was found in
a "run-down" area of town,
well known for drug-relat-
ed violence.

It is believed Mr Holmes
was stripped of his clothes
after being shot, and the
attack may have been gang
related.

The victim's half-sister,
Juliet, said her brother was
only expected to be in Flori-
da for one day as he had
promised to return to his ail-
ing father's side. She said
she did not know the pur-
pose of her brother's trip.

She added that Mr
Holmes — who owned a car
and scooter rental company
— was good natured and
knew how to bring a smile

SEE page eight

The Tribune -

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

=USA TODAY.





BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

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Christie allowed
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Church land
grant variation

By PAUL G

Former PM Soe
Tribune Staff Reporter

speaks on pturnquest@

tribunemedia.net

change to old
folks home
application

FORMER Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie
informed The Tribune
yesterday that he was the
one who signed off on
the variation to the orig-
inal Crown land grant
issued to the Golden
Gates Assembly church,
which created a housing
subdivision instead of the
intended old folks home
for which the application
was originally made.

Noting that the origi-
nal grant to the church
was made for an old folks
home, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham told
the House Monday that
he found the case sur-
rounding Golden Gates
Assembly very “interest-
ing.”

“Now Golden Gates is
an interesting one
because I approved for
Golden Gates to build an
old folks home. The con-
veyance was signed by
my predecessor in office.
The land was sold and a
housing subdivision is on
it, named after the rev-
erend,” Mr Ingraham
said.

The Prime Minister
then motioned to the
PLP MP for St Thomas
More, Frank Smith, who
was seated behind Mr

SEE page eight





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WORKERS PREPARE to lay pipes for the dredging of Nassau Harbour. The harbour is to be made
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dent with a speed boat while and tied towels around her | Tribune Staff innovative scheme
snorkelling off the beach of | wounds to stem the bleed- } Reporter to improve job skills
a major resort yesterday. ing. : mreynolds@ in the labour mar-

According to reports, the
woman was hit by the vessel
while swimming near the
Sandals Royal Bahamian
Resort on Cable Beach with
her husband.

Eyewitnesses claimed she
was hit by the propellor of a
speed boat they believed was
operated by Sandals.

Her arm was “nearly sev-
ered” they said, and she
received a “huge gash” in her
leg.

A jetski operator in the

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“T helped her on the boat,
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The woman was reported-
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Another jetski driver who

saw the accident said: “Her : t
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SEE page eight

He added: “It nearly took
off her hand and her foot was

tribunemedia.net

JOB SEEKERS
appear enthusiastic
about applying for
government funded

more than 400 col-
lected application forms
after the National Training

terday.
Labour Minister Dion

is “very pleased” with the

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ket and the unem-
ployed’s chances of
finding work.

A total of 300 dis-
placed workers col-
lected application
forms from the
Department of
Labour on Thompson
Boulevard, Nassau, and
another 75 New Providence
residents collected forms
from Urban Renewal Cen-

SEE page 12

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





CCM URIS LCR CTL CLE
atter Sunday’s collision with squad car

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE officer who was
seriously injured when his
motorcycle collided with a
squad car during a dramat-
ic police chase on Sunday
night is in stable condition
in hospital.

Officer Nelson Rahming,
a father of two sons and a
well-known member of the
Fox Hill community, had
been pursuing a trail bike
on his motorcycle with a
police patrol car when the
vehicles crashed on Soldier
Road shortly after 7pm.

The trail bike made off
and the police motorcyclist
was rushed to hospital
unconscious.

Police in the Traffic Divi-
sion reported yesterday
that Officer Rahming, a
resident of Cockburn
Street, is now stable, but
could not confirm if he had
regained consciousness.

So far, their investigation
has not revealed any infor-
mation about what may
have caused the accident,
police said.

Tyee (Lea eLO are SI NA

CRASH FLASHBACK: The aftermath of Sunday’s collision in which a policeman was seriously injured
after a collision with a squad car during a high-speed chase. The two police vehicles were pursuing
a trail bike when they collided on Soldier Road shortly after 7pm. The police motorcyclist was tak-

en to hospital.

The three police officers
who were in the Wulff
Road Police Station squad
car at the time of the crash
also sustained injuries in

the collision and were treat-
ed in hospital.

Anyone who witnessed
the crash or may have any
information which could

assist investigations should
call the Traffic Division on
393-7714 or call Crime
Stoppers anonymously on
328-TIPS (8477).



Committee designed to probe Crown land
sale expected to be formally named today

FRED MITCHELL



By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE SELECT Committee
designed to investigate all
aspects relating to the sale and
disposition of Crown land in
the Bahamas is expected to be
formally named and commis-
sioned in the House of Assem-
bly today.

Heading the committee will
be PLP MP Fred Mitchell who
is expected to be joined by the
PLP’s MP for Cat Island and
San Salvador Philip Davis.
Three FNM MPs will join Mr
Mitchell and Mr Davis, but
their names are unknown at
this time. The committee is

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expected to review all the doc-
umentation tabled by Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham in
the House of Assembly on
Monday and make further
inquiries before it makes its for-
mal report in October of this
year. Speaking with The Tri-
bune yesterday, Mr Mitchell
said that one of the aspects the
committee will have to investi-
gate are the “missing” files that
Mr Ingraham said they are
unable to locate at this time.

During his contribution, Mr
Ingraham noted that the list he
was tabling before parliament
on all Crown grants issued
between 1950 and 2009 was in
his estimation not a complete
list.



“There is a book of Crown
grants, book number A4 which
includes (grants issued in the
years) 1960 to 1963. This book
has not been located. It has
been missing for quite some
time,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said there
should be some very “interest-
ing names” in this book.

“We have also sought to
compare that which is available
with that at the Registrar Gen-
eral’s office and at the end of
the day we may revert back to
parliament to say whether they
are missing.

“And once we have verified
they are missing we will then
consider whether or not there is
any grant that does not show
up at the Registrar General’s
office or in other information
we have, whether or not we
should cause parliament to pass
a Bill that declares any such
grant to be null and void,” he
said.

Careful

However, Mr Mitchell
warned that in this case the
prime minister must be very
careful in his approach.

“You can’t use a cannon for
something that really requires a
fly swat. You have to be careful
about the rule of law and peo-
ple’s right to property.

“Notwithstanding how poor-
ly we feel about the ethics of
it, you can’t lawfully strip peo-
ple of their rights without com-
pensation,” Mr Mitchell said.

The Fox Hill MP added that
the committee will be open to
all ideas that are in the public
domain, but stopped short of
saying if it will recommend any
criminal charges at the end of
its investigations.

As he waits to see who will
be named from the FNM to
join the committee, Mr Mitchell
said it will be interesting to see
if government is serious about
the Crown land issue.

The House of Assembly is
expected to meet this morning
at 10am.














from Terry &
Latishka

Ministry wants
education
plan finalised
by December

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MINISTRY of Education officials want their proposed
ten-year education plan to be finanalised by December and
implemented by next January, but the head of the Bahamas
Union of Teachers (BUT) thinks this timeline is unrealistic.

While noting that she thinks the plan - which is current-
ly in draft form - is an "excellent idea", BUT's president
Belinda Wilson said at least another year of extensive back-
ground work is needed for the programme to be successful.

"Based on looking at the document, I don't see it being
completed by December. If it's going to be done in a prop-
er manner, I think December is an unrealistic date. I would
think that this needs at least a full year's work, another
year's work, with the view for it to be implemented for
September 2010," Ms Wilson told The Tribune yesterday
when asked how she felt about the ministry's target date for
implementation.

"In my mind, you have to be working on this document
and the procedures (outlined) every day for the next year -
it cannot be done with just a few persons working part-
time or in set groups.”

She said educators also
needed more time to
peruse and discuss the 65-
page document - which
was presented to educa-
tion stakeholders at the
National Education Sum-
mit two weeks ago.

Yesterday, Marcellus
Taylor, director of plan-
ning and co-chair of the
educational plan commit-
tee, said the implementa-
tion timeline is based on
ministry's current sched-
ule.

Ministry officials plan
Belinda Wilson to meet again with edu-

cators when the fall semes-
ter begins to get detailed feedback on the draft and will also
hold a number of town meetings on the issue, Mr Taylor said
at a press briefing yesterday at the Ministry of Education.

The plan comprises 22 goals, each with accompanying
short-term and long-term objectives, that the ministry said
is a blueprint to transforming the country's educational sys-
tem.

Whether or not the plan meets its objectives will ulti-
mately boil down to whether it receives sufficient govern-
ment funding.

However, the committee does not know how much it will
cost to implement the programme as it needs to perform a
cost analysis for each goal, said Mr Taylor.

The idea of starting a national lottery or a national tax to
fund the plan are suggested in the blueprint but - according
to another local daily - this plan was quashed by Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham.

The committee was commissioned in April 2008 and has
spent the last 13 months compiling ideas from focus groups
and educational stakeholders.

The draft can be viewed in its entirety at www.bahamase-
ducation.com and feedback on the plan can be sent to
tenyearplan@bahamaseducation.com.



“Based on looking
at the document, I
don't see it being
completed by
December. If it's
going to be done in
a proper manner, I
think December is
an unrealistic date.”



O Magistrate’s Court

Pair charged with drive-by
shooting of 17-year-old hoy

TWO men charged with
the drive-by shooting of a
17-year-old boy were
arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Reginald Chase, 22, and
Emmanuel Rolle, 20, both
of Nassau Village, have
been charged with the mur-
der of William Farrington,
of Sir Lynden Pindling
Estates.

The teenager was killed
in a drive-by shooting on Ida
Street around 4am last
Wednesday. He was report-
edly hit in the chest and
upper arm. Two other men
were also wounded.

Chase and Rolle, who
appeared before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in
Court 1, Bank Lane, have
also been charged with caus-
ing grievous harm to Jamal
Edgecombe and Kelcio
Clarke. The men pleaded
not guilty to the charges and
were not required to enter a
plea to the murder charge.

The accused were
remanded to her Majesty’s
Prison. The case has been
adjourned to July 28 and
transferred to Court 5, Bank
Lane.

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PHONE: 322-2157


THE TRIBUNE





Policeman:
mortician
told me his
co-worker
shot him
and wife

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A POLICE officer testi-
fied yesterday that local
mortician Dorneil Ferguson
told him that his co-worker
Dudley Moree had shot him
and his wife.

Sergeant Alexander
Pierre told the court that
around 2.40 am on Thurs-
day, June 26, he was on
patrol and ordered to go to
the Family Street area.

On arrival he was
stopped by a civilian who
pointed out an apartment
and gave him certain infor-
mation.

Sergeant Pierre said he
kicked in the front door of
the apartment and also a
bedroom door. Inside he
saw a man, a woman and a
baby in bed.

He said he noticed the
man had gunshot wounds to
his right hand and lower
back. The woman, he said,
had been shot in the left leg.

Sgt Pierre said he asked
Mr Ferguson who had shot
him. Mr Ferguson told him:
“Officer I ain feel like I gern
make it. My co-worker Dud-
ley Moree who live off Cow-
pen Road shot us, I saw him
through our bedroom win-
dow.”

Sgt Pierre told the court
how a few minutes later,
EMS personnel arrived and
took Mr Ferguson and his
wife to hospital.

Notepad

During cross-examination
by Moree’s attorney, Murrio
Ducille, Sgt Pierre said he
recorded what Mr Ferguson
had told him on a notepad
but did not know where it
was. Mr Ducille also sug-
gested Mr Ferguson had
never said those words. Sgt
Pierre denied the sugges-
tion.

Housekeeper Cassandra
Evans told the court she
knew the accused and the
deceased who worked at
Butler’s Funeral Home. She
recalled an altercation
between the two men during
which she saw Mr Ferguson
beating up Moree.

She said Moree just stood
there and took the blows.
Ms Evans also said she
heard Moree tell Mr Fergu-
son he was going to shoot
him, but Mr Ferguson
replied that he wasn’t going
to shoot anyone.

Ms Evans also recalled an
incident at the funeral home
three weeks later. She said
Moree said he was going to
kill Mr Ferguson and she
watched as Mr Ferguson
came and pushed Moree in
his head. She told the court
that a month after that inci-
dent, she learned that Mr
Ferguson had died.

Moree, 23, of Faith Gar-
dens is accused of murdering
38-year-old Ferguson.
Moree is also charged with
attempted murder and pos-
session of a firearm with the
intent to endanger the life of
another.

The trial continues today.

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 3

Drive-by shooting victim

hit at least four times

Mi 30-year-old man in critical condition

Mm Police say motive remains unclear

ME Officers ask public for information

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A 30-YEAR-OLD man was lucky to sur-
vive after being shot at least four times in a
drive-by shooting in Nassau’s inner-city.

The victim was on Lifebuoy Street, off
East Street, when he was gunned down by
the driver or passenger of a passing vehicle
at around 10pm on Monday, police said.

Police Supt Elsworth Moss, officer in-
charge of the Central Detective Unit
(CDU), said police have not received any
description of the vehicle, or its occupants,
and are appealing to the public for infor-
mation.

“The injured man is in critical, but stable
condition in the hospital’s Intensive Care
Unit.

“He was shot about four or five times
about the body.

“We don’t know what the motive for the
shooting was at this stage.

“Hopefully once he improves we can
speak to him and see if we can find the
motive,” Mr Moss said.

The violent shooting was one of two in
the capital within three hours.

Quinten Walker, 18, was engaged in an

argument with another man on Cumber-
batch Alley, off Wulff Road, at around
12.40am yesterday when shots were fired.

As they were arguing, in what police say
was simply a verbal altercation, a third man
appeared and fired several shots at the
teenager.

Grazed

A bullet grazed the side of Mr Walker’s
face and another hit the rental car he had
been driving.

Police have two men in custody for ques-
tioning in connection with the incident.

Supt Moss said: “We believe the man who
fired the shots was a friend of the person he
was arguing with.”

No arrests have yet been made in con-
nection with the Lifebuoy Street shooting.

Anyone who may have witnessed the
shooting in Lifebuoy Street, or have any
information which may assist investigations,
should call the Criminal Detective Unit
urgently on 502-9991 or call Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477).

All calls to Crime Stoppers are answered
in the United States and ensure total
anonymity.

Tourism numbers declining
— despite bid to woo visitors

BHA president
confirms the
comments of
Ingraham

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter 2
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net re wal
BAHAMAS Hotel Associ- | if iy
ation (BHA) president :

Robert Sands yesterday con- Fe) s) ta Tn

firmed that, as revealed by
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, tourism numbers con-
tinue to decline despite all
efforts to attract visitors.
While statistics are still
being compiled for the annu-
al Tourism Outlook Survey
which will be released next
week, Mr Sands said it
appears the number of
tourists visiting the islands is
declining month by month as
they have been since the glob-
al economic crisis hit last year.
Last week Mr Ingraham
told the Regional Forum at



“... arrivals are
still showing
decreases in
terms of the
occupancy rate
and revenue....”



Robert Sands



OL Mer

and revenue, so although it
appears to be slowing it has
not changed.

“There are pockets of prop-
erty doing better than some,
we have one or two of the
major hotels showing slight
improvements over last year,
but we have to look at this in
the aggregate, the experiences
of a few small properties and
one or two medium sized
hotels is not a good indica-
tion of our state of industry.”

He added: “The Bahamas
could have taken the position



A 30-YEAR-OLD-MAN was shot several times in a drive-by shoot-

ing in Lifebouy street of East street Tuesday night.

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the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank’s 50th anniversary
in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, how
occupancy levels at hotels
remain well below those
achieved last year in tourism
economies across the
Caribbean despite discounts
and other incentives to attract
visitors.

The economic downturn
has resulted in 2,200 lay-offs
in the Bahamas’ hotel sector,
which amounts to one per cent
of the country’s entire work-
force, Mr Ingraham said, as
the country was one of the first
in the region to feel the effects
of the slowing global econo-
my.

However, Mr Sands yester-
day praised efforts to revamp
the airport, cruise ship port,
and clean up the islands to
improve the tourism product
and ensure the visitors who

do come to the Bahamas
leave with a positive impres-
sion and a mind to return, as
well as the inclination to
report good things to friends
and family at home.

“Notwithstanding the cur-
rent situation is the fact that
the efforts of all those
involved in private sector
tourism and public sector
tourism are working to be
more creative in the market-
place, and to keep the name
of the Bahamas out there in
an attempt to make up for
financial losses.

“We are in the process of
trying to complete the eco-
nomic survey we do annually,
so I am not in a position to
comment on it, but the trend
remains the same, arrivals are
still showing decreases in
terms of the occupancy rate

where they see that it’s tough
and not do anything about it,
so it would continue to dete-
riorate, but we are not doing
that, we are seeing work, it
may not be manifesting itself
in terms of increased arrivals,
but people who visit here will
recommend the destination
based on their experience that
they had.”

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MEN

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Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6

Baypar! Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 * Fax: (242) 326-9953

P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Attitude to work and to foreigners

BAHAMIANS aspire to first world stan-
dards, but many are not prepared to make
the effort to achieve them. Not only do they
want the luxury without the required effort,
but they get upset if experts are brought in to
show them how to improve themselves.

“Hey, man, you trying to show us up,
eh?”

Oh, how often have we heard that stupid,
Third World lament — even in an office set-
ting.

in the early days of the PLP regime,
under the late Sir Lynden Pindling, we were
shocked one day when the Opposition UBP
offered a word of advice in the House of
Assembly. “You think just because we black
we don’t know, eh?” was Sir Lynden’s angry
retort.

The fact was that they did not know.
They needed help and direction from a
group of legislators, who, having ruled the
country for generations, had administrative
know-how in their genes. The PLP were not
ignorant of the art of government because
they were black. They were ignorant because
they had never had the opportunity to learn
about administration at any level. Suddenly
they were in a position to experiment on
the Bahamian people. But what made them
a danger to the country was their attitude.
They were too proud to accept guidance.
They were afraid of being “shown up.” As a
consequence this country took many wrong
turns. It is a miracle it has done as well as it
has despite all the road blocks put in the
way by people puffed up with false pride,
stupid arrogance, and envy.

We have qualified our statement by the
use of the word “many” because obviously
this attitude does not apply to all Bahamians
who are hard working and who fully deserve
to enjoy the fruits of their labours.

Today the Bahamas is behind in many
areas.

Facing global competition for which
Bahamians are not ready, there is much
catching up to do.

Government has brought in needed for-
eign experts many of whom, from the con-
versations we have had, have come up
against the very attitude that we are now
discussing.

Many of these projects are backed by
European financing, about which we have
heard grudging remarks by those who fear
that any improvement requiring more effort

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might change their laid-back lifestyle. How
many times have we seen a brilliant for-
eigner shake his head in frustration not
knowing how to complete a project because
he is held back by a local staff unwilling to
learn.

He knows he is wasting his time, and that
they will slip back into their old ways as
soon as he leaves.

This week we were talking to a friend
who described the feelings of some foreign
experts in some of government’s ministries.

“They are experienced foreigners,” our
friend said, “who were contracted by gov-
ernment to undertake a major project in

a particular ministry that government sees
as necessary to modernise, to make more
efficient and productive.

“Despite working on average around 12
hours a day, and on weekends, they were
dismayed to have someone bring to their
attention comments made in a Bahamian
internet chat forum where someone with
knowledge of the workings of their depart-
ment, believed to be an employee, was mak-
ing disparaging comments about them.

“They were being accused of getting paid
too much, taking jobs that Bahamians in the
ministry could have had, and of generally
being superfluous, when in fact their work
has been praised as having the potential of
being very transformative.

“Its goals are numerous and address areas
where it is well known we are in serious
need of reform.

“While this seriously disillusioned at least
one of the group, they have also been dis-
turbed by what they see as the apparent dis-
regard for their work by the various agencies
and department that its success hinges on,”
said our friend.

“One said to me that he feels almost cer-
tain that all of their efforts will be lost once
they leave. It really has not sunk in with
those who need help — whether the cause is
ineptitude, indifference or hostility against
foreigners, they didn't attempt to say.”

These consultants, used to a First World
work ethic, were shocked by how many in
their department leave work at 2.30pm to
pick up their children from school, but nev-
er return.

It certainly makes one wonder how many
of them could survive a full eight-hour work
day, not to mention the 12 hours often
required daily to build a successful nation.



Remember the
retirees — while
we are still here!

Re:Requesting Government
to Review Pensions

Of Retired Public Offi-
cers/Servants

B) Utilization of Some
Retirees Ete:

EDITOR, The Tribune.

To my knowledge, it has
been a long time since a review
of pensions was carried out, ie,
public servants and public offi-
cers. There is a policy by gov-
ernment which is appreciated
by us retirees that soon after
an increase of public ser-
vants/public officers, an addi-
tional increase reflected
retirees’ pensions, ie, a small
amount across the board.

Some time last year, there
was an increase for govern-
ment: public officers/servants
approximately received $63.00
per month. Mr John Pinder,
President of The Bahamas Pub-
lic Services Union, usually pro-
posed for retirees at least half
given to public officers be con-
sidered. Although half of this
seems small, but it would be a
help for the time being:

To date at the demise of a
pensioner the spouse/benefi-
clary is given one year of a
deceased pensioner, upon
request by application. Hope-
fully at the discretion of gov-
ernment a longer period may
be considered.

Some pensioners passed
away not long after retirement,
while others could live for a
very long period. A review of
pensions when carried out
should be commensurate at
least the nineteen sixties com-
pared to the two thousands.

The vast contrast would be
observed. Relative to the police
department: a constable’s pen-
sion is about $1,200 per month.
This analogy could refer to oth-
er government departments.
Some retirees are earning
monthly pensions less than
$1,000, including the combina-
tion of National Insurance. It
should be realised that we
retirees are living in the same
era of consistent escalation of
the cost of living.

Following are names of some
retirees:

Education: Mr Livingstone
V Taylor — the most senior
educator; Mrs Mildred Dilette
(nee King) — the most senior
female educator; Mr Filex
Deleveaux — Family Island;
Rev Dr Charles Saunders: Fam-
ily Island, former deputy per-
manent secretary. The naming
of the highway in his honour
most appropriate and merito-
rious, including other persons
mentioned can be termed as
legendary, 1 educators. Percy
Strachan, Hexon Pratt also
Island Commissioner, L B
D’Arville, Catherina
Cartwright, Maria Ferguson
(née Taylor) Principal, Loretta
Minnis (née Moncur), Delores
Mounts (née Lockhart), Sybil

NOTICE

NEW TELEPHONE
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To our valued Members, please be advised that

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



Strachan (née Coakley) Prin-
cipal, Beryl Francis-Culmer
Principal, Vylma Curling, Mari-
na Walcott (née Thompson)
Principal, Paula Holder (née
Gibbs), Nathilee Hutcheson
(née Russell), Barbara Dean,
Mrs Leona Jane Fernander,
Mrs Thelma Ferguson of USA.

Messrs: Vincent Wilson,
Frank Reid, Gibson, Raul
Dean, Dr Moree Holder. The
latter six educators are also for-
mer police officers. Mr Richard
E Dean, an educator to be
remembered also as Asst Direc-
tor, Immigration, Deputy Sec-
retary, Gaming Board, Super-
intendent Boy’s Industrial
School, Mr Albert Smith, Ms
Alice Watson, Mrs Josephine
Parker, Mrs Claudette Lundy
etc.

Police Department: Rudley
(Diamond) Ferguson — Most
Senior Police Officers, retired
Charles McKinney, Frederick
Brooks. These three retirees
are the last survivors of the
famous Burma Road Riot, 1942
Sgts: Bynoe, Carl Lynch, Den-
nis John, Ezra Flowers, “Old
Abe” Stuart, Allan McPhee,
Inspector John “Stinger” Moss,
ASP Wilmore Dames, Hugh
Sandford, Lewis Hennings,
Edmund Stubbs, Ormond Brig-
gs, Charles Fernander, Avery
Ferguson (former teacher),
Addington D’Arville (former
headmaster, Roses, Long
Island), Stanley Moir, Ashton
Miller, Keith Mason, Errol Far-
quharson, Arnold Farquharson,
Kenneth Andrews, Ms Agatha
Rodgers (née Gibson), Marina
Forbes, Mrs Agnes Saunders,
Dezerina Schroeter (née
Lewis), Whitfield Major,
Salathiel “All night” Wilson,
Irrington “Fish” Dean, Alfred
Williams, Irvin Taylor, Regi-
nald Dumont, Errol Hepburn,
Ronnie Bannister, Vincent
Charlton, Haverson McKenzie,
Kilroy Coakley, Harcourt Wal-
lace, Paul Thompson, Erring-
ton Watkins, Fr Rodney Bur-
rows, Arthur Yearwood, Edwin
“Cheno” Knowles, Irrington
“Fish” Dean, Wilfred Jack,
Bertram Davis, George
“Shoes” Poitier, Leland Turner,
Lemond Seymour, Ezra Curry,
Dustan Babb, Alonzo Butler,
Dorthan Chandler, Cordell
Delancey, Larry Johnson, Ellis
Peet, Retired Secretary, Labour
Tribunal, Supentindent of
Boy’s Industrial School, New-
ton McDonald, Former Under-
secretary, Garth Johnson, Leon
Johnson, Wilton Strachan,
Fritzroy Antoine.

Road Traffic: Fred Neely,
Leroy Braithwaite, (both for-
mer police officers), Mr Charles
Clarke - Former Deputy Con-
troller.

Customs: Mrs Patsy Wring
(née Poitier), Mr Leslie “White
man” Albury, Mr Arlington
Miller, ete:

Immigration: Mr Fred Stra-
chan, Mrs Joan Clarke (nee
Hanna) Former Deputy Per-
manent Secretary, Mrs Barbara
Pierre, Former Director.

There are several retirees
who could be utilised if only
part time: eg Police Depart-
ment retirees CID experience:
Reading of crime cases, mak-
ing recommendations: etc: Mr
Paul Thompson Consultant
Ministry of National Security.

Education: There are many

English. Classrooms could be
assisted ie Literature: Shake-
speare, Merchant of Venice,
Macbeth, King Lear; Hamlet
Prince of Denmark. Reference:
Mr Livingstone V Taylor, I
recall this modest gentleman as
a Family Island Headmaster
when in 1949 I was appointed
pupil teacher. Note during that
era pupil/asst teachers could
have acted as head masters
whenever necessary. Some
were appointed head masters
from the said position. Permit
me to refer to Rev Dr Charles
W Saunders who preached at
his church some time last year.
This service related to Retired
Police Officers. He made an
analogy ie: the death of Christ
when simultaneously the tem-
ple was split: The Atonement
which made the possibility of
going to the high priest obso-
lete. As an educator he illus-
trated ie: Geometry: The equi-
lateral, triangle: The straight
perpendicular line from the
base to the apex. He explained
“No acute, obtuse, right angle:”
He reiterated the straight line
could reach God. I was stimu-
lated and impressed. He depict-
ed the talent of educators mak-
ing a pertinent point. The nam-
ing of Charles W Saunders
Highway is meritorious and
most appropriate.

There are categories of
retirees eg: The Police, Educa-
tion, Prison, Customs, etc; they
should independently form an
association so that functions,
committees, profiles, testimo-
nials etc, could be organised
other than expecting the gov-
ernment of the day to always
intervene.

There are crucial times for
the nation, therefore, retirees
as we are, have to maintain
patience and not to be per-
ceived as imprudent. In time
hopefully something would be
worked out.

Some retired public offi-
cers/civil servants who are Jus-
tices of the Peace could be
utilised as Lay Magistrates.

Especially such Justices of
the Peace with propensities, eg,
legal/court matters. This could
alleviate backlog of minor
offences and facilitate the hear-
ing of such cases.

The FNM government merits
congratulations relative to some
unemployed contributors hav-
ing been considered payment
benefits under The National
Insurance Board. It should be
noted that retirees generally
reflect a most arduous past: in
retirement many experience
physical repercussions as a con-
sequence. With regards to util-
isation of retirees, suggestions,
modifications are strongly rec-
ommended.

There was a philosopher L
Ron Hubbard, one of his ren-
ditions: knowledge experience
not imparted is atrophied,
(waste personified), unequivo-
cally I wish to point out that
the retirees hope that the pow-
ers that be would at their con-
venience, remember us while
we are still in the realm of exis-
tence and that relevant sugges-
tions mentioned may be
brought to fruition. We are
privy to the fact that the
Bahamas is experiencing eco-
nomic, financial, crisis which of
course is not insurmountable
hence, whatever is done would
be appreciated immensely.

C ADRIEL HUTCHIN-
SON

Retired Chief Inspector of
Police

converence to any home, : eas ; ; teachers retired with special- Nassau,
Sens oe tne coe aie enc Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative ties: Reading Mathematics, Tune, 2009.

service calls within 48 hours, usually on the
same day.

Credit Union Limited, has up graded its Excitement as Barack Obama

makes his footprint in history

EDITOR, The Tribune.

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in the world.

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was a night of excitement in Chicago and The Bahamas
when he was chosen as the next President of the United
States of America.

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character. You are like a fresh wind breeze. The World
was crying out for more peace, love and waited patiently for
your arrival.

We here in The Bahamas would be watching every step
you make all your ups and downs, sorrows and joys. The
Lord raises up great men of loyalty and good character to
lead.

Make your own footprint in the sand and legend so the
World would remember Barack Obama.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 5



0 In brief



Estate agent
named Pilot

Club president

for Freeport

ESTATE agent Donna
Laing-Jones, of H G
Christie in Grand
Bahama, was recently
named president for the
Pilot Club of Freeport for
2009/2010.

When asked about her
involvement in this par-
ticular organisation, Ms
Laing-Jones replied, “I
joined our club over 17
years ago, and for me it
has been a fantastic
understanding of real ser-
vice and friendship. I
have been able to connect
with women from all
around the world with
one common desire, to
serve. As president of the
Pilot Club of Freeport,
my theme for 2009/2010
is ‘Let the journey
begin’.”

Pilot International was
founded and chartered in
1921 as an international
service organisation. The
river boat pilots of the
early 1900s are the inspi-
ration for the name.
These pilots were
admired for their ability
to steer a "true course"
through challenging con-
ditions and obstacles.

The Bahamas is home
to six Pilot Clubs with a
combined membership of
approximately 165 who
have been answering the
needs in their community
through various worth-
while service projects and
fundraisers since 1974.

H G Christie is a full-
service real estate com-
pany in the Bahamas
offering sales, rentals,
appraisals, and property
management.

Bahamians

and tourists
outraged at
cancelled flight

A GROUP of
Bahamians and tourists
were outraged on Mon-
day when a Spirit Air
flight was cancelled,
leaving them stranded
in Florida without com-
pensation to cover their
overnight accommoda-
tion.

According to an irate
passenger, the airline
announced that the
4pm flight from Fort
Lauderdale to Nassau
would be cancelled
because of weather, but
allowed a Spirit Air
flight to Freeport to
depart at the same time.

One traveller, noting
that the airline’s policy
is not to pay out for
accommodation if the
cancellation is “weath-
er-related”, said passen-
gers were sceptical that
this was the true cause
for cancelling the
flight.

“They left a couple
hundred people strand-
ed and booked them on
the next flight,” said the
traveller, who added
that he had to postpone
a morning meeting for
today in view of the
cancellation.

Attempts to reach
Spirit Air in the
Bahamas for comment
yesterday afternoon
were unsuccessful.

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Govt set to give
Disease Prescription Dru

SOME $5.4 million is
expected to be contributed by
government to start the first
phase of the Chronic Disease
Prescription Drug Plan
(CDPDP) to cover approxi-
mately 32,000 persons.

Representatives of the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) apprised government
and opposition members of
parliament on the CDPDP
during a special presentation at
the Police Conference Centre
on East Street yesterday.

Addressing the parliamen-
tarians, NIB director Alger-
non Cargill said: “It is impor-
tant to note that phase one is
not calling on any additional
contributions from the gov-
ernment or the persons who
will be covered,” he said.
“Phase one will be funded
entirely from the National
Insurance Board.”

There will be a second
reading in the House of
Assembly on September 2 of
the Bill for the CDPDP.

Once the legislation is
enacted, the prescription drug
plan, which is similar to that
of Jamaica, will be adminis-
tered in two phases beginning
with a pilot phase of NIB pen-
sioners, invalids and children
under 18 or up to 25 if in uni-
versity.

Future phases, which will
cover 48,000 persons, will
include employed and self-

employed persons, indigents,
persons in government insti-
tutions and voluntary mem-
bers.

Mr Cargill said the drug
plan will address national con-
cerns regarding the burden of
chronic diseases — which
affect one in three Bahamians
— timely access to essential

drugs, and the financial bur-
den to patients, families and
government.

“The key benefit of the
plan is quality, cost effective
drugs, associated medical plans
including syringes and test
strips,” he said. “The medical
supplies or prescription
drugs will be provided on a

ALGERNON
CARGILL, director
of the National
Insurance Board.

ick Hanna/BIS

5



monthly basis.”

The initial list of drugs cov-
ers 93 items that will be
reviewed and amended.

Mr Cargill said the plan is
intended to cover 11 chronic
diseases, including arthritis,
breast and prostate cancer,
glaucoma, hypertension, high
cholesterol, asthma and

5.4m to Chronic
g Plan

ischaemic heart disease.

“For this plan to be suc-
cessful and for us to operate as
efficiently as possible, tech-
nology is going to be a big con-
tributor to the success in terms
of ensuring that the pharma-
cies remain on board in its exe-
cution,” he said.

Public and private pharma-
cies will be contracted as
providers.

“We recognise that in some
of the Family Island pharma-
cies there is no technology and
we are making special arrange-
ments to have the prescription
drugs to be dispensed through
the various clinics,” said Mr
Cargill.

The plan will also assist in
funding health and wellness
projects.

“The other part of the plan
is the Healthy People Pro-
gramme,” he said. “The objec-
tive is to partner with the Min-
istry of Health to provide sup-
port and grant funds for well-
designed community projects
to create more awareness
about healthy lifestyles.

“Proposals will be invited
from formally established pub-
lic and community organisa-
tions to ensure that we create
an awareness about health
benefits because the more
awareness we create, the less
prescription drugs hopefully
will be required,” said Mr
Cargill.

Government lease renewal not
automatic says Prime Minister

RENEWAL of commer-
cial leases of government
land is not automatic,
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has warned.

“Renewals are based
upon evidence of satisfac-
tory compliance with ‘key
performance indicators’ as
set out in the lease agree-
ment,” he said in a com-
munication to the House of
Assembly on Monday on
the Disposition of Crown
and Government Owned
Land.

These performance indi-
cators include financial
commitment, likely public
benefits to be derived from
the development, ongoing
use, and sustainability of
the development, he said.

“The government
reserves the right to revisit
lease terms and conditions
at the time of each renew-
al,” the prime minister said.

Agreement

The conditional lease
purchase of Crown land
agreement stipulates fees,
rents, a specified time
frame and other develop-
ment conditions or mark-
ers to be met by the lessee.

“In the event that the
conditions of the lease are
not met the land reverts to
the inventory of Crown
lands,” Mr Ingraham said.

Bahamian applicants
have been approved and
issued Crown grants and
conditional purchase lease
agreements for properties
along the Carmichael,
Gladstone and Marshall
Roads corridors in New
Providence for commercial
development.

The prime minister said



Hubert Ingraham

he was pleased to have
been the instrument
through which independent
Bahamian entrepreneurs at
the Down Home Fish Fry
were approved for renew-
able Crown leases. Howev-
er, he said he is disappoint-
ed that so many lessees
are behind in their pay-
ments.

Infrastructure

“Following upon the
receipt of those leases and
the installation of public
infrastructure by the gov-
ernment,” he said, “some
of the shacks at the
entrance to Arawak Cay
were transformed into
attractive restaurants,
which are frequented by
Bahamians of all walks of
life and countless visitors
to New Providence.

“T have recently noted
my disappointment that a
large number of these
lessees are years in arrears

Deep sea explorers object
to judge recommendation

TAMPA, Fla.

DEEP-SEA explorers based in Florida have filed an
objection to a judge’s recommendation that they give 17 tons
of shipwreck treasure back to Spain, according to Associat-

ed Press.

Odyssey Marine Exploration filed its objection in Tampa

federal court on Tuesday.

The dispute concerns the 200-year-old wreck of a Spanish
galleon that carried tons of silver and other artifacts esti-
mated to be worth $500 million.

The ship is believed to be the Nuestra Senora de las Mer-

cedes y las Animas.

Odyssey says they don’t have enough evidence to confirm
that the recovered cargo is from the Mercedes. The company
argues that if it is, the Mercedes was engaged in commercial
activity when it exploded, which would nullify Spain’s sov-

ereign immunity claim.

in the payment of their
lease fees.”

The government accel-
erated the creation of new
Crown subdivisions during
its first term in office, Mr
Ingraham said.

New subdivisions were




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Abaco, Grand Bahama,
Andros and Exuma, mak-
ing land more easily and
reasonably available to
Bahamians for the con-
struction of residences, he
said.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



GB sub-division
renamed to
honour popular
Bantist peicher

By SIMON LEWIS
Bahamas Information
Service

FREEPORT -— The
government’s housing
subdivision at Hawksbill,
Grand Bahama, will carry
the name of a prominent
Baptist preacher.

This was revealed by
Housing Minister Ken-
neth Russell who con-
firmed the renaming of
the Sister Mary Patricia

Russell Estate to Welling-

ton Pinder Heights.

Mr Russell said the
government felt it more
fitting to place Sister
Mary Patricia Russell’s
name on the new junior
high school at Freeport,
since her contribution to
the nation was mainly in
education.

“This development has
opened the door for
another stalwart commu-
nity leader to be hon-
oured,” said Mr Russell.
“Dr Pinder has given
excellent service to the

Grand Bahama communi- }

ty in religious, social and
civil sectors of our soci-
ety.”

Born November 3,

1920, and a product of the

Pinder lineage of Pinder’s
Point, Grand Bahama,
Rev Dr Wellington Pin-
der succeeded his father
Rev William Pinder as

pastor of the Zion Baptist

Church in Eight Mile
Rock in 1961.

Two years later he was
challenged to establish a
church in the Pinder’s
Point community. Thus
was born the Upper Zion
Baptist Church which was
completed and a service
of dedication held on
November 7, 1965.

Rev Pinder was mar-
ried to the late Verdell
Pinder nee Smith. That
marriage produced nine
children, three of whom
became religious minis-

ters. After his wife died in

1989, Rev Pinder married
Valurine Bain the follow-
ing year.

Nowadays, Rev Pinder
is enjoying retirement.
He remains one of Grand

Bahama’s most influential }

leaders, having served as
moderator for the Zion
Churches for 30 years,
pastor of Upper Zion for
35 years, as a member of
the local board of Works
for 29 years, member of
the Independence Com-
mittee, honorary presi-
dent of the Grand
Bahama Christian Coun-
cil, and most worthy offi-
cer in the Grand United
Order of Odd-fellows
Lodge.

He is also a Justice of
the Peace and a recipient
of the Queen’s Badge of
Honour.

Bahamas to import
directly from Haiti

THE Bahamas is to import
agricultural products directly
from Haiti, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham confirmed.

He said the Bahamas
wants to grow more of its own
food but it cannot produce an
adequate amount for domes-
tic consumption and the hotel
sector.

“It will benefit the
Bahamas if crops are import-
ed from Haiti because fewer
Haitians would leave home in
search of jobs if they had
employment opportunities in
Haiti,” he said in an interview
with BIS and ZNS following
the IDB Forum in Haiti last
weekend.

Prime Minister Ingraham
also met privately with Hait-
ian President René Préval at
the National Palace, Port-au-
Prince, when they discussed
topics of mutual interests.

Trip

On his trip to Haiti, he was
accompanied by Christine
Thompson, Chief Economist,
Ministry of Finance, and
Haiti’s Ambassador to the
Bahamas Louis Harold
Joseph. They were met in
Port-au-Prince by the
Bahamas’ Ambassador to
Haiti Davy Rolle.

Mr Ingraham pointed out
that The Bahamas is selling
in its food stores Haitian
mangoes imported from Mia-
mi.

“Why can we not import
the mangoes directly from
Haiti to Nassau?” he asked.
“Would it not be cheaper to
do so?”

The same goes for vegeta-
bles grown in Haiti, he said.

“We have had complica-
tions in terms of certifying
fruits grown in Haiti, as an







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PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham bids Haitian President René
Préval goodbye before leaving the reception held for delegates
attending the 50th anniversary of the creation of the Inter-American

Development Bank, July 16.

2

example,” said the Prime
Minister. “The Americans
have found a way to deal
with it why can’t we?”

Mr. Ingraham said he
promised the Haitian Presi-
dent that by the end of the
year, crops such as mangoes
should be coming directly
from Haiti without jeopar-
dising The Bahamas’ agricul-
tural sector.

“We in The Bahamas
have a long history of impos-
ing on ourselves require-
ments and standards that are
not in our interest,” he said.

“At one time we would not
import beef from Argentina

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because of some rules that
we have.

“But the Argentines could
export beef into the United
States and we could buy the
beef from there.

“We are going to seek to
overcome that kind of thing.”

Meanwhile, the Govern-
ment is going to maximize
opportunities for Bahamians
to go into food production.

“One of the things we can
do in The Bahamas is
increase the supply of goods
and services to the tourism
sector,” he said.

“It would create numer-
ous jobs if Bahamians pro-

NANCY KELLY and Dame
Marguerite Pindling (seated),
standing are Pauline Allen
Dean, raffle chairperson;
Michelangiolo Baccelli, com-
mittee member, and newly
elected Red Cross president
Brendon Watson.



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PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham sends sarerlletione on behalf
of CARICOM nations to the Inter-American Development Bank as it cel-
ebrated the 50th anniversary of its creation, July 16, Port-au-Prince,
Haiti. Pictured are IDB President, Luis Alberto Moreno (right) and Hait-
ian President René Préval.

duced more things the
tourists use, because while
there are only 300,000 peo-
ple residing in the country,
nearly 5 million tourists pass
through The Bahamas every
year.”

Because the attraction and
demand to get to the
Bahamas “is so great,” said
the Prime Minister, migration
of Haitians there “is over-
whelming.”

Immigrants

“We have intensified our
efforts to stem the flow of
illegal immigrants into the
Bahamas,” he said.

“At the same time, we have
been seeking as best as we
can to deal with those who
are there, who are undocu-
mented.

“We have also been pro-
viding status for those who
have been in The Bahamas
for long periods of time and
who have a connection to the

Official launch of 2009
HTM SSC Lt

society.”

The Government, he said,
is employing a multi-pronged
approach to handling the ille-
gal immigration problem.

“We have been able to
beef up our protection,” he
said.

“We have craft stationed
permanently at Inagua.

“We are working with the
European Union to build a
new docking facility at
Ragged Island where
Defence Force craft will be
stationed.”

The Government recent-
ly purchased two aircraft for
the Defence Force.

“The Haitian authorities
have been most co-operative
with The Bahamas in terms
of returning to Haiti
those persons who come to
our country illegally,” he said.

“At the same time we
have been very fair in dealing
with those who have been in
the country and who have
made a contribution to our
development.”





A GROUP of prominent Bahamians came together to
support the Bahamas Red Cross Society at the recent launch
of its grand raffle to raise funds for humanitarian services and

disaster relief.

Among those voicing their public support were Dame
Marguerite Pindling; Nancy Kelly of Kelly’s Home Centre;
Rupert Roberts of Super Value; Freddie Albury of Execu-
tive Motors, and Wayde Christie, senior executive at Sco-

tiabank.

The raffle’s opening day took place in front of the Scotia-

bank branch on Bay Street.

Dame Marguerite, a long-time supporter of the Red Cross,
urged people to purchase raffle tickets for a good cause.

“Funds raised from this 2009 raffle will be used for the Soci-
ety’s humanitarian services throughout the Bahamas, and dis-
aster relief. In light of this, it is very important that the Soci-
ety has sufficient funds to respond to emergencies as they

arise,” she said.

“The Red Cross is one of the major emergency relief
organisations in the Bahamas and is a member of the Nation-
al Emergency Management Agency (NEMA).

“Red Cross plays a significant role in youth development,
whether through it training in first aid, after school pro-
grammes, or teaching young people to help the needy in

their communities.”

Dame Marguerite said she is especially pleased to welcome
Mrs Kelly and Mr Roberts, “two of our most prominent
businesspersons, who have again this year taken time out of
their busy schedules to give of their personal time to assist the
Bahamas Red Cross fundraising efforts.”

“T am pleased to be joined by Mr and Mrs Freddie Albury
of Executive Motors, who I understand has given a sub-
stantial discount to Red Cross on the purchase of the 2009
Toyota Corolla which is the first prize in this year’s raffle,”

she said.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



PASSPORT

PARADISE

SHOOTS
PILOT

B AHAMIAN culture and entertain-
ment will be beamed to people
around the world with the success of the new
television magazine, Passport to Paradise. A
pilot for the television show is being taped
around the Bahamas with Producers exploring
options for international distribution.

Preparations are underway to deliver a 12 to
16 episode series to either the Network or
Cable Channel that picks up this informative
and entertaining new show. Taped segments
have included shopping on Bay Street; the fes-
tive “Junkanoo” festivities; and fine dining at
Luciano's. Future shows will feature other exot-
ic spots and dining centres with behind-the-
scenes glimpses at what makes vacation visits all
the more memorable. The show's exciting pace
is given a witty edge by an attractive host
Rachael Carr, a British model who has worked
as a double for several stars, including Brit-
ney Spears, Christina Aguilera and Kylie
Minoque.

Capturing the best elements of the Bahami-
an vacation experience, Passport to Paradise
brought in the creative team of Lou Maggio
and Rob Mason. Mason is a partner at Los
Angeles based RobCyn Entertainment Group
and Maggio an Executive Producer and partner
at Maven Films. Maggio, who has produced
three feature films and numerous segments for
the E! Entertainment show “Wild On” is no
stranger to the Bahamas.

“As Director of Photography for Venus
Swimwear for 18 years, I directed photo shoots
on some of the most beautiful beaches in the
Caribbean and Mexico,” Maggio stated, “but I
always came back to the Bahamas. With the
beautiful beaches, great history and warm lov-
ing people... it always felt like home to me.”

Alana Phillips, a London make up artist,
who is part of the team, said working on Pass-
port to Paradise was like a dream come true.
“To be able to work in such a beautiful place
alongside great people, to experience such dif-
ferent and rich culture and to be so welcomed
by everyone was just amazing,” she said.

Among the many VIPs and celebrities that
Passport to Paradise chose to interview for its

axthis



Esk? OUTLETS

show was
Vincent Van-
derpool-Wal-
lace, the
Bahamian
Minister of
Tourism

and Avia-
tion. Support-
ing the show's
theme for qual-
ity locations,
Minister Van-
derpool-
Wallace
pointed out
that the
demo-
graphics of
visitors to the

Bahamas remain high

quality guests who are interest-

ed in participating in a wide range of
activities. In response to the current economy,
the Bahamas, like other vacation destinations,
has seen a decrease in travellers from distant
places, so the country's marketing strategies
have changed to reflect the shift.

“You will find us spending a great deal more
of our time, energy, and money in places that
have non-stop flights, lower cost flights and
again places closer by,” Minister Vanderpool-
Wallace said. “Because you are finding almost
everywhere, when you look at the fall off in
business, it is from points distant from wherever
the destination is. So very clearly, we are going
to be in places like Florida, in the northeastern
United States and other non-stop places.”

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace concluded,
“Bahamas marketing will be strong as far away
as London because of the non-stop service to
the country. People are travelling for shorter
periods, so they want to get where they are
going directly, rapidly and inexpensively.”

The Passport to Paradise television show
pilot is a joint project of The Tribune and USA
Today, and is a spinoff of the Passport to Par-
adise Magazine, which is published by the Tri-
bune.

Honduras orders Venezuelan diplomats expelled

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras

Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez has been the most

gations and — holed up in the
embassy along with a consular

HONDURAS’ interim gov-
ernment ordered Venezuelan
diplomats on Tuesday to leave
the country as the interna-
tional community threatened
new sanctions on the Central
American nation if negotia-
tions fail to resolve the crisis,
according to Associated Press.

Venezuelan Embassy
charge d’affaires Ariel Vargas
said he received a letter from
the Honduran Foreign Min-
istry ordering his diplomats to
leave in 72 hours.

vociferous critic of what he
calls the “gorilla” government
that overthrew his ally Manuel
Zelaya on June 28.

The government of Roberto
Micheletti, whom congress
swore in as president after the
coup, accused Venezuela of
meddling in its affairs and of
threatening to use its armed
forces against Honduras,
according to a copy of the let-
ter obtained by The Associat-
ed Press.

Vargas dismissed the alle-

officer also affected by the
order — vowed to defy it.

“We only have relations
with the government of Presi-
dent Manuel Zelaya,” Vargas
told reporters outside the
building. He said the expul-
sion order “does not exist for
us, because the Micheletti gov-
ernment does not exist. It is a
usurper government, a coup
government, a government
that is not recognized by any-
one on an international lev-
el.”

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Earlier impacts on the
New Providence shoreline

TOUGH CALL

By LARRY SMITH

THE argument over the
Arawak Cay port, the harbour
dredging and Saunders Beach
has grown more heated lately,
so we thought we'd take a look
at earlier shoreline impacts on
New Providence to provide
some much-needed perspec-
tive on this issue.

There is something that biol-
ogists refer to as the "shifting
baseline", which describes the
way significant changes to an
ecosystem are measured
against previous standards,
which themselves differ radi-
cally from original conditions.
In this way, large declines in
ecosystems or species over long
periods of time are masked.

This is similar to what we
are experiencing today with the
coastline around Nassau. The
fact is that Nassau harbour and
adjacent shorelines have been
hugely affected by human
action for more than a century.

Perhaps the most visible
impact has been the growth of
casuarinas along the shore.
These trees are native to the
western Pacific and were intro-
duced to the Bahamas in the
1920s as fast-growing replace-
ments for the loss of native
trees to hurricanes.

"In those days no-one could
foresee the extent of the engulf-
ment of our landscape," wrote
Pericles Maillis when he was
president of the Bahamas
National Trust in the late 1990s.
"And I will fight to eradicate
this raging weed to make room
for trees that belong to, or ben-
efit, the Bahamas."

Early photographs show
that our shorelines were cov-
ered in low scrub and native
dune vegetation — such as sea
oats, sea purslane, coco plums,
railroad vine, sea grapes and
buttonwood. But the picture is
decidedly different today, with
dense thickets of casuarinas
edging almost every beach.

According to Dr David
Campbell in his book, The
Ephemeral Islands, casuarinas
are "the most pernicious plants
to have invaded the Bahamas
via the hand of man...most peo-
ple stroll under their singing
boughs oblivious to their
destructive nature...native veg-
etation is smothered by a
wasteland of casuarina stems."

Recent research has also
shown that casuarinas have a
devastating effect on beaches,
where erosion is caused by the
suppression of native vegeta-
tion beneath the trees. This
leads to sand blown onshore
not being trapped to form
dunes, so that during storms
there is nothing to stop mas-
sive sand loss.

The accompanying photo-
graph of Fort Montagu in 1910
shows a wide expanse of beach
with no trees on New Provi-
dence or Paradise Island. A
road was later built on the dune

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ARRY SMITH

and the beach has virtually dis-
appeared today, with the road
retained by a sea wall that
requires frequent and costly
repair.

The 1883 Dredging

Nassau became one of the
busiest ports in the region dur-
ing the American civil war in
the 1860s. At that time, the
Nassau Guardian compared
the harbour to its pre-war state:
"There were no quays along
the strand, and instead of ves-
sels lying, as they now do, along
the shore loaded and unloaded
by a steam crane, they were
approached only from the mid-
dle of the harbour by lighters."

Regular steamship service
began in the mid-19th century,
and was accompanied by the
construction of the island's first
hotel — the 90-room Royal
Victoria, which was then the
largest building in town. During
the late 1800s there was
steamship service from New
York, Savannah, Jacksonville
and Miami.

In 1883 an act was passed
to provide for the dredging of
the harbour, and the following
year Francisco Aranha, a civil
engineer (whose great grand-
son is retired airline pilot Paul
Aranha), was contracted to
build two barges for the pro-
ject. Aranha had come to the
Bahamas from Brazil in 1849 as
foreman of the Inagua Salt
Company, and he was a well-
known boat builder of the time.

The government ordered
steam dredging equipment
from London, and the disused
Vendue House on Bay Street
(once a slave market) was
assigned to the Board of
Pilotage as a storehouse for
"gear, machinery and coal".
But the extent of this early
dredging is unclear. In his trav-
elogue, Sketches of Summer-
land, written in 1900, George
Northcroft described the har-
bour in much the same terms as
the earlier Nassau Guardian
account:

"..many sailing vessels come
and go and occasional steamers
anchor off the bar or venture
inside if of light draught: hosts
of sponging boats, mail
schooners and others that trade
with foreign ports, and vessels
that casually visit the colony or
carry freights among the
islands, are lashed to the
wharves or lying in the stream."

The 1922 Dredging

When the Americans made
alcohol illegal from 1919 to
1933, the Bahamas enjoyed
another economic boom. And
the Development Board

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applied most of the windfall
revenues from bootlegging to
pay for public works to make
the country more attractive to
investors. These infrastructure
projects included a water and
sewerage system for the city,
expansion of the electricity grid,
and a new cruise ship port for
the harbour.

According to Mary Mose-
ley's 1926 Bahamas Handbook,
"The deepening of Nassau har-
bour, which had been under
consideration for nearly a cen-
tury and which was taken up
seriously by the House of
Assembly in 1911 and 1912,
was definitely authorised by
the harbour dredging act of
1921 and dredging operations
commenced in 1922."

This was the first time that
Nassau harbour became suit-
able for deep-draft vessels such
as passenger liners. Before,
large ships had to anchor over
the harbour bar, with their car-
goes transshipped by lighters
and passengers landed by ten-
ders. In rough weather, ships
had to anchor off Clifton, and
passengers travelled 16 miles
to Nassau on a bad road.

The 1922 act approved
deepening the harbour
entrance to a depth of 35 feet
with a 33-foot channel and
basin at a cost of 250,000
pounds. The bar and harbour
were dredged to allow entry,
turning and mooring for ves-
sels with 27-foot drafts, and a
600-foot long concrete dock
(named after Prince George)
was connected to Rawson
Square by a steel bridge. This
project was completed in 1928.

It turned out to have been a
prudent investment. When the
economy collapsed after Pro-
hibition ended in 1933, Gover-
nor Sir Bede Clifford said the
colony had to choose between
"the tourist industry and bank-
ruptcy.” And the new cruise
port was a major asset in the
development of tourism over
the next 30 years.

Spoil from the harbour
dredging was used to create
Clifford Park (named after the
governor) and pumped over
Paradise Island to create what
we now know as Lighthouse
Beach. During this period,
dredged fill was also pumped
from areas off Cable Beach for
the development of the Hobby
Horse Hall racetrack and the
Bahamas Country Club golf
course. This led to a loss of
sand from the offshore system,
which eventually degraded the
beaches in that area.

The 1966 Dredging
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have been even greater impacts
on the harbour and adjacent
shorelines. In 1966 — during
another economic boom — the
government spent $18 million
to dredge the harbour to a
depth of 36 feet with a 1500-
foot turning basin. Also includ-
ed were two breakwaters at the
harbour entrance, an artificial
island, and a new pier and ter-
minal for the cruise port. A
total of 3.5 million cubic yards
of material was excavated by
the US-based Frederick Snare
Corporation.

Most of that spoil was used
to create Arawak Cay, which
can be considered the most sig-
nificant impact in history on
the state of Nassau's coastline.
At the time, the opposition
Progressive Liberal Party com-
plained bitterly about govern-
ment secrecy over the project
and suggested that the premier,
Sir Roland Symonette, was
planning to prevent public
access to Saunders Beach,
where he owned land.

This dredging was tied to a
landmark investment project
involving the sale of large tracts
of Paradise Island by Hunting-
ton Hartford to the Mary
Carter Paint Company (which
later became Resorts Interna-
tional) for tourist development,
and included the construction
of the Paradise Island bridge
at a cost of $1.5 million.

Hartford was a winter resi-
dent who had acquired 750
acres of Hog Island (as it was
then known) for $9.5 million
in 1961. His redevelopment of
the island included dredging
part of the eastern end of the
harbour to fill a scalloped area
called Three Bays opposite
Fort Montagu. A golf course
and later an airstrip was built
on this reclaimed land, which is
now part of the residential
enclave known as Ocean
Estates.

The 1989 Dredging
The fourth harbour dredg-
ing project was conceived in
1986 and awarded to the Cana-
dian firm, Balfour Beatty, two
years later. The contract includ-
ed a feasibility study for build-

MONTAGU BEACH in 1910, looking towards Three Bays on Paradise Island, taken from Reminiscing 11,

ing anew port at Clifton, which
was rejected due to environ-
mental concerns.

The harbour entrance chan-
nel was widened to 600 feet
and dredged to a depth of 37
feet’ with a 1700' turning basin.
The cruise port was expanded
to berth 11 ships, up from the
previous eight, Woodes Rogers
Wharf was enlarged, and there
was some reclamation of the
foreshore at Malcolm's Park as
well as an extension of Potters
Cay to the east and west.

This contract also included
work on so-called mini cruise
ports at Morgan's Bluff on
Andros, Governor's Harbour
on Eleuthera and Snake Cay
on Abaco — none of which
ever saw a cruise ship. The final
cost was $52.4 million and most
of the work was finished by late
1990.

According to the then chair-
man of the Port Authority:
"Whatever disturbances that
occur during the building of
our new port we should
remember that it's for the over-
all good of the country. This
will take us well into the 21st
century.” But the opposition
Free National Movement
alleged that "something smells
in Nassau harbour" and com-
plained loudly that the project
was "shrouded in secrecy."

Environmental concerns at
the time were largely confined
to the impact the dredging
might have on the Coral World
facility at Silver Cay. This
marine park had only just been
developed in 1987 and included
an underwater observatory
topped by a 100-foot tower. A
sea wall was built between
Arawak Cay and New Provi-
dence in an effort to prevent
silt from affecting the under-
water tower.

Meanwhile, Woodes Rogers
Wharf has been extended sev-
eral times. In the 1940s it was
taken as far west as the old
Prince George Hotel. In the
1950s more seabed was
reclaimed to extend the prom-
enade to the British Colonial
Hotel. And in the 1980s it was
widened to 38 feet over its
entire length.

Christie allowed Golden Gates
Church land grant variation

FROM page one

Christie in the House of Assembly. Mr Ingraham said that Mr
Smith knew something about this deal.

In a brief interview with The Tribune yesterday, Mr Christie
stated that he met with the leaders of the church to confirm
their support on the change to the grant, noting the increasing
demand for low cost housing at the time.

“There were two applications that had affected a variation.
When the application was dealt with by (Prime Minister Ingra-
ham) there was one thing, but when I dealt with it there was a
variation that I had to sign off on the change.

“At the time I did it I knew it was a variation and I signed off
on it as a variation because at the time I was dealing with the
fact that this was going to create home ownership and that is in

fact exactly what happened.”

Mr Christie added that he effected a second variation to a
church application in respect of Bishop Simeon Hall, which he
said is expected to produce some housing development as well.

Bahamian man found
shot dead in Florida

FROM page one

to his sick father's face.
"He was always smiling,
always cheerful. He was
always making daddy
laugh. He was the last son
and we just buried our
oldest brother in Febru-
ary and this is really hard
for us right now," she told
The Tribune yesterday,
adding that the family was
dealing with the grief of
plans to take their father
off life support this week.

She added that her
brother was the kind of
person who would not
turn a blind-eye to wrong-
doing and suggested he
may have been killed
because of something he
witnessed.

"He was like most of
our family, we always
stood up for things going
on. I don't know if he saw
something going on and
stood up for someone,"
she speculated yesterday.

Investigations into the

lS ie a ek



The 2009 Dredging

In April of this year the gov-
ernment signed a $50 million
contract with the Dutch firm,
Royal Westminster Boskalis,
to dredge 1.9 million cubic
yards of material from the har-
bour.

The spoil will be used to add
some 40 acres to the western
end of Arawak Cay and extend
the eastern end of Woodes
Rogers Wharf as far as Arm-
strong Street to a width of
some 30 feet.

This promenade will include
a boardwalk, landscaping, ser-
vice road and utility corridor
and is a component of the
downtown redevelopment pro-
ject.

It will cost an additional $24
million.

"The contract will enable us
to welcome into Nassau Har-
bour the largest cruise ships,"
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said recently. "The coastal
analysis has indicated minimal
change to beaches and tidal
flow as a result of the deepen-
ing. There has also been no
indication of potential adverse
effects on the Western
Esplanade beach from dredg-
ing activities."

But once again there are
complaints about a lack of
information and fears of poten-
tial damage to nearby beaches,
especially Saunders Beach.
Coastal experts say it is unlike-
ly that the extension to Arawak
Cay will affect the area any fur-
ther as the shielding of the
beach and restriction of flow
along the shore already exist.

The problem now is to res-
urrect the beach with the sand
that is available in the coastal
system. Regardless of any past
abuse, the re-alignment of
West Bay Street inland and
replacing the casuarinas with
native plants will restore Saun-
ders Beach eventually, where-
as leaving things as they are
will certainly lead to its even-
tual total loss.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

Tourist
FROM page one

body was cold from being
in the water for so long,
but it was not a very
bloody scene.”

Jetski drivers said more
should be done to keep
tourists safe from boats
and jetskis by ensuring
they swim within the buoy
marking the safe swim-
ming zone, and boats do
not drive within the barri-
er.

There were no updates
on the woman’s condition
before The Tribune went
to press last night.

murder are continuing,
and police in West Palm
Beach are appealing for
witnesses to come for-
ward.

According to residents
in the area, the Palm
Beach County, with an
estimated population of
1.4 million people, had
about 90 murders in 2008.

By contrast, the
Bahamas, with an esti-
mated population of
330,000, had 72 murders
last year and 78 in 2007.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS

‘Peace on da Streets’ basketball
classic expected to tip off today

Bahamas
‘can’t buy
win’ at World
Baseball
Challenge

FROM page 11

of 16 and 22 with the oldest at
28, compared to the other
teams who have players 22
years and older.

“But it’s a good experience
for the guys. I just think that if
we had gotten some of the
eight players that we left
behind who played with us
when we played in Cuba, that
would have made a differ-
ence. But for some reason,
most of the senior guys could
not have traveled with us on
this trip.”

Once the team gets back,
Kemp said the federation is
definitely going to have to
find a way to get the local
players to start playing more
baseball.

“We need facilities, we
need to play more baseball
and we need to host more
tournaments,” he stressed.
“We need to get the guys who
are going to be able to play at
this level to travel and play
together in smaller tourna-
ments and more series of
games.

“Tt’s not an easy thing to
do, but we know what we
need to do. So we just have to
find a way to put our guys at
an advantage where they can
get ready to play in the next
tournament here in two
years.”

Here’s a summary of the
three games the team played
so far:

Prince George Axemen 13,

Bahamas 3:

Johnathan Groezinger went
5.1 innings, giving up seven
hits and 11 runs, five earned
in suffering the loss before
Amad Williams came in relief
giving up the final two runs
on three hits.

Right fielder Raymond
Grant was the top batter,
going 1-for-3 with two runs
scored. Left fielder Sherman
Ferguson and center fielder
Diondre Rolle both had a hit
with a RBI. First baseman
Darren Bowleg also had a
RBI.

After scoring first two runs
in the bottom of the first, the
Bahamas watched as Prince
George struck for a run in the
second, two in the third, one
in the fourth, two in the fifth
and seven in the sixth. The
Bahamas final run came in
the seventh.

Germany 20, Bahamas 3:

Darren Bowleg got the
start, but only lasted three
innings on the mound after
he was issued eight runs, sev-
en earned on five hits. He
only had one strike out before
he was relieved by Amad
Williams, who gave way to
Diondre Williams to finish up
in the fourth.

Jason Curry, playing sec-
ond base as the lead off bat-
ter, went 1-for-2 with two runs
scored and left fielder Sher-
man Ferguson was 1-for-2
with a RBI and run. Short-
stop Sharad Johnson was 1-
for-3 with a RBI.

While the Bahamas drew
first blood scoring twice in the
first and another in the third,
Germany got three in the bot-
tom, two in the second, one in
the third and 14 in the fourth
to blow the game wide open.

Team Canada 14,

Team Bahamas 0:

Three pitchers went on the
mound with M Holbert suf-
fering the loss on nine hits
with 12 runs, nine earned in
three innings before he was
relieved by David Sweeting
before Jason Curry came in
to finish up in the sixth.

The Bahamas, however,
avoided getting completely
shutout as three batters were
walked by Canada’s winning
pitcher J Rawlky, who went
five innings with seven strike
outs.

The Bahamas gave up three
runs in the first, one in both
the second and third, eight in
the fourth and another in the
sixth.

INSIGHT

For stories behind
hews, read /nsight
Mondays

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THE Nelson Cooper “Peace on da
Streets” Basketball Classic is expected
to tip off today with its 15th annual
edition at the Kendal Isaacs Gymna-
sium.

Organisers of the tournament,
scheduled to start at 6pm each day
(but at 9am on Saturday) are expect-
ing perhaps the largest turnout of
spectators and teams in its history.

Nearly 40 teams are expected to
take the floor over the course of the
four-day tournament which culminates
Saturday night with a series of cham-
pionship games and exhibitions.

According to Carlos Reid, founder
of Youth Against Violence, the teams
will be placed into brackets within
their divisions at 6pm, while play will
officially begin at 6:30pm.

Teams from Family Islands, colle-
giate players and coaches from the
United States are scheduled to com-
pete, making it one of the largest tour-

naments of all time.

Reid said the opening night will
foreshadow what fans should expect
from the tournament over the four
days.

“Wednesday night should set the
tone and start us off on a good pace
for all the exciting action that will fol-
low throughout the tournament,” he
said. “It is an exciting year for the
organisers, for the fans and for the
players themselves. We are almost
maxed out now at full capacity for the
numbers of teams.”

Reid said with the large number of
people from a cross section of society
taking part in the event, the ultimate
goal is to create a Bahamian version of
the NBA-AIll Star weekend.

“This tournament, more than the
previous years, is for the first time
bringing together people from every
different sector of society,” he said.
“Tt is bringing together politicians,
clergy, singers, both gospel and secu-
lar, reporters, basketball players,
media members, high society and peo-
ple from the inner city all coming



CARLOS REID, founder of Youth Against Violence...

together to make one common goal to
make a statement that we need peace
on the streets.”

One of several new innovations will
be the Media/Entertainers division.

The winning team in the division will
be awarded the Phil Smith/Anthony
“Fatback” Marshall floating trophy in
memory of the media icons who
recently passed.



FROM page 11

Ten Championships: 100
yards and 220 yards in 1960
and 1961, 60 yards in 1959
and 1961, and the 300 yards
in 1959, 1960, and 1961.

At the NCAA Champi-
onships Robinson was an
All American in 1960, fin-
ishing fifth in both 100 yards
and 220 yards.

That summer the
Bahamas participated for
the first time in the Central
American and Caribbean
Games in Kingston in 1962.
Robinson captured the
100m, defeating several
world record holders,
including Cuba’s Enrique
Figuerola, Jamaica’s Dennis
Johnson, and Venezuela’s
Arquimedes Herrera.
Rafael Romero and Horacio
Esteves in the process in
10.4 secs.

Later that year he won the
silver medal in the 100 yards
in the British Empire and
Commonwealth Games in
Perth, Australia.

Robinson ran the first two
rounds in Perth but with-
drew from the semi-final
because he felt he was not
prepared for it. He never
again ran this event, which
many people considered his
best, in international compe-
tition.

While in Nassau that year,
after graduation, he was a
substitute teacher at Gov-
ernment High in French and
Spanish.

In September of 1963 he
studied business for one
semester at the University of
Toronto. He returned to
Nassau and worked at Com-
monwealth Industrial Bank
for a couple months.

At an indoor meet in
Saskatoon, Canada, in Feb-
ruary of 1964, Robinson set
a new world indoor record
in the 300m.

Robinson returned to
Jamaica in the summer of
1964, winning the 100m at
the West Indian Federation
Games in 10.3secs.

At the 1964 Tokyo
Olympic Games Robinson
finished second to world
record holder Bob Hayes
from the United States in
the semi-final. He became
the first Bahamian track and
field athlete to advance to
an Olympic final.

Track and Field News, in
its October/November issue
of 1964, covered the final
and wrote: “Robinson
pulled a muscle while run-
ning fourth and was starting
to move on the leaders at
about 65 metres”. Robinson
finished eighth in 10.57 secs.

One of Robinson’s most
memorable races was at the
Commonwealth Games held
in Kingston in 1966. Earlier
that summer Canada’s Har-
ry Jerome had tied the
world record in the 100
yards of 9.1 secs in Edmon-
ton, Canada. Harry was the
1964 Tokyo 100m bronze
medallist. Jerome had also
previously tied the world
100m record of 10.0 secs.

The race was so close that
it took some 50 minutes to
declare the winner. Jerome
at 9.41 secs was awarded the
win over Robinson at 9.44
secs. Jerome even came to
congratulate Robinson after

i

the finish. 2008.
That year Robinson
worked at Texaco for about
a year from 1965, moving to
the Human Resources
department of Mary Carter
Paints, the owner of Par-

adise Island Limited and the a

forerunner of Kerzner in
late 1966, where he stayed
until 1975.

A veteran at 29, Robinson
failed to make the final in
the 100m at the Pan Ameri-
can Games in Winnipeg,
Canada, in 1967, finishing
sixth in the semi-final in 10.7
secs.

Throughout his stellar
career, Robinson had been
challenged with hamstring
injuries. In the 1968 Mexico
City Olympics, Robinson
did not finish the sixth heat
of the 100m.

Robinson did participate
in the quarter-final of the
400m relay, which included
Norris Stubbs, Kevin John-
son, and Bernard Nottage.
Their time of 39.45 secs was
anew Bahamian national
record which was not bro-
ken until 1993, 25 years lat-
er.
In the semi-final Robin-
son had another hamstring
injury which caused the
team not to finish.

Robinson’s last outing was
at the 1970 Commonwealth
Games in Edinburgh, Scot-
land. Robinson was the
team manager in Edinburgh
and also a member of the
400m relay team. Unfortu-
nately, Gerald Wisdom was
supposed to pass the baton
to Robinson. The team nev-
er finished the race as Wis-
dom was unable to catch
Robinson. This was the end
of a colourful career of the :
first Bahamian participant in
track and field in the
Olympic Games. The career
spanned 15 years and four
Olympic Games.

Don Canham was Tom-
my’s coach at the University
of Michigan.

Tommy was coached &
locally by Henry Crawford
and De’Yanza Burrows.

In 1972 Robinson entered
politics, running for the Free
National Movement in the
general elections.

He was contesting a seat
for the Culmersville Con-
stituency, which he lost to
his cousin, Arlington Butler,
who had been the president
of the Bahamas Amateur
Athletic Association from
1964 to 1968, and would be
elected as president of the
Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion in 1973, serving until

Robinson made another

a A

ATURDAY 25TH JULY FROM 9AM

Ks OFF @ 5PM

@ DA BASEMENT

‘ee



THOMAS AUGUSTUS ROBINSON was one of the premier Bahamian athletes of the 20th century...

try at political office in the
1977 general elections, this

_ NELS@N CS@PER
yi44 ON DA ST EEY

it

r

For application forms & more info call 358 6549
or 326 7269 of visil The Hope Center Thompson Blvd,
thehopecenter242@gmail.com www.thebahamas.org

FAMILY NIGHT KIC

PASTORS MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT

2NS,100 JAMZ, THE TRIBUNE & MEDIA ALLSTARS
@ JMEL ENTERPRISE

DUNK

time for the Salem Con-
stituency. He carried the
Bahamian Democratic Party
banner and was defeated by
David Knowles of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party.

Twenty-five years after he
first competed in the
Olympic Games, the track
and field stadium in Nassau
was named in his honour.

In 1985 Robinson was giv-
en the Hall of Honour
Award by the University of
Michigan.

He has five children,
Tanya and Erika, Scott,
Robbie and Jake, a brother
Kingsley Robinson and two
sisters Brenda Archer and
Ernestine Douglas. Robin-
son worships at St George's
Anglican Church in The
Valley.

ro

=

SHOOTING HOOPS INSTEAD OF GUNS

DOOR PRIZES
Courtesy of

bre:

Courtesy of
oe Eeabemas: ||
25, sete tow

Family Guardian, Scotia Bank, Basil Ingraham & Co, 1.5, Johason, Purity Bakery, Chilly Willy

SU GU WO eC ee



Ministry of Youth & Sports, LG investments Limited, KFC. Thompson Trading, The Sport Center
Fee TT ea Re et Leu iii Loa aul
PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Bahamas Cycling Federation's ‘09 National Cycling Championship



TONY Mackey Jr rode to victory
in the junior division of the Bahamas
Cycling Federation’s 2009 National
Cycling Championship on Saturday.

It was an all out sprint to the finish
line as Mackey Jr pulled off the vic-
tory amidst cheers from spectators.

Here’s a look at the official results
posted:

JUNIORS U-17

24 miles

1st - Tony Mackey 1:14:40.06

Tony Mackey Jr rides to

victory in junior division

2nd - Jay Major 1:14:40.35

3rd - Anthony Colebrook
1:14:39.19

4th - Dangelo Sturrup 1:14:39.61

Contador, Armstrong
stay 1-2 at Tour in Alps

@ By JAMEY KEATEN
Associated Press Writer

BOURG-SAINT-MAURICE,
France (AP) — Alberto Contador
rode hard to keep the Tour de
France’s yellow jersey in the Alps on
Tuesday, while teammate Lance
Armstrong produced a dazzling burst
of speed to remain in second place.

Mikel Astarloza of Spain won the
16th stage, a 99-mile route from the
Swiss town of Martigny to Bourg-
Saint-Maurice. Contador and Arm-
strong finished in the main pack
behind Astarloza and other break-
away riders.

Contador, the 2007 Tour winner
from Spain, fought off an attack led
by brothers Andy and Frank Schleck
of Luxembourg in the day’s second
big climb.

“We had expected (an attack) and
I gave my maximum. I could resist
but not without difficulty,” Contador
said. “I’m happy after this difficult
day.”

Astarloza, who rides on the Euska-
di Euskaltel team, thrust his fists in
the air and kissed his fingers as he
crossed the line in 4 hours, 14 min-
utes, 20 seconds. He was six seconds
ahead of French riders Sandy Casar
and Pierrick Fedrigo. The three-week
Tour ends Sunday in Paris.

With a little more than a mile to go
Tuesday, Astarloza escaped three
other breakaway riders with him and
held for his first Tour stage win.

“T was lucky to leave alone and fin-
ish alone,” Astarloza said. “ma
complete rider but I’m not good at
the sprint, so I have to attack from far
away. This is the biggest day of my
career.”

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Contador, Armstrong, fourth-place
Astana teammate Andreas Kloeden
and third-place Bradley Wiggins of
Britain all crossed 59 seconds after
Astarloza.

Overall, Contador leads Armstrong
by 1:37. Wiggins is third, 1:46 back,
while Kloeden is 2:17 behind and
Andy Schleck is fifth, trailing by 2:26.

With nearly 23 miles left, Andy
Schleck attacked. He was quickly
joined by Contador and a few other
riders, but not Armstrong.

The 37-year-old Texan had
dropped back by as much as 35 sec-
onds. He then showed great speed to
return to that small group of favorites,
which included Schleck, Contador
and Wiggins.

“Tjust didn’t want follow that quick
acceleration like I tried to do on Ver-
bier” — the first Alpine stage on Sun-
day, Armstrong said. “I’ve stayed
with the other group, and then I real-
ized the race was basically going away
from us.

“So, [had no choice other than try-
ing to make the cross,” Armstrong
said. “So I waited until we had a
steeper section and then I got away
with an acceleration.”

Contador was impressed.

“Tt’s easy to explain — he’s a very
great rider,” the Spaniard said. “He
was in the past, and he showed it once
again.”

Two-time runner-up Cadel Evans
of Australia, who finished 3:55 back,
was one of the big losers on the day.
He fell to 17th from 14th and now
trails Contador by 7:23.

The course ended with a 19-mile
downhill run. Downhills make it hard
for breakaway riders to outpace the
fast-moving pack.

Sth - Justin Minnis 1:17:01.43

6th - Rahiame Colebrook
1:17:01.65

7th - Michael Holowesko 1:17:02.21

8th - Bruce Hall 1:17:03.21
JUNIOR GIRLS

Lee Farmer

1st - Antinece Simmons 1:17:36.66

OPEN WOMEN
1st - Carmel Stucci 1:15:00.79

2nd - Linda Holowesko 1:24:19:67

JUNIORS II

12 miles

1st - Liam Holowesko 37:37.88
2nd - Adrian Canter 41:03.00
JUNIOR GIRLS

Ist - Abagail Minnis 53:44.98

Bas Czerwinski/AP



STAGE WINNER Mikel Astarloza of Spain (left), followed by Jurgen van den Broeck of
Belgium, climb Petit-Saint-Bernard pass during the 16th stage of the Tour de France
race over 159 kilometers (98.8 miles) with start in Martigny, Switzerland and finish in

Bourg-Saint-Maurice, Alps region, France,

Riders scaled the highest peak of
this Tour, the snowcapped Grand-
Saint-Bernard pass on the Swiss-Ital-
ian border that is 8,113 feet. Its sister,
the Petit-Saint-Bernard pass on the
Italian-French border, was the day’s
other big climb, and each was at least
13 1/2 miles.

The final descent was perilous: Jens
Voigt of Germany crashed either
from a bicycle malfunction or a bump
in the road. The Tour’s medical staff
said he severely bruised his face and
right elbow, and was flown by heli-
copter to a hospital in the French city
of Grenoble.

“He lost consciousness for a while,
but he should be OK,” CSC team
manager Bjarne Riis said. “For me,
it’s a good sign.”

yesterday...

During the stage, an Astana vehicle
was stopped and searched by customs
officials at the Swiss-French border,
the team said, adding nothing of con-
cern was found.

Pope Benedict XVI sent greetings
to Tour riders and organizers as the
pack passed close to the Alpine
retreat of Les Combes, overlooking
Mont Blanc, where the pontiff is stay-
ing.

Wednesday’s stage features what
some riders fear is the toughest
Alpine route this year — a 105-mile
ride from Bourg-Saint-Maurice to Le
Grand-Bornand marked by five
tough climbs and another downhill
finish.

¢ AP Sports Writer Samuel Petre-
quin contributed to this report

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wins senior
division

In the senior division, the
extreme temperature did not
hinder anyone registered
from racing. After an open-
ing prayer, the 23 cyclists
started out together for the
first of two gruelling 18-mile
loops.

Lee Farmer soon edged a
comfortable distance out from
the rest of the pack. During
the sixth of a six-mile loop,
the riders fell into groups in
their categories so the finish
line held lots of action, as
sprints to it gave position,
determined by hundredths of
seconds, to riders.

RESULTS

OVERALL WINNER -

Lee Farmer

Senior I

72 miles

Ist Lee Farmer 3:18:41:12

2nd Tracy Sweeting

3:23:36.95

3rd Barron Musgrove

3:23:36.97

4th Rowshan Jones

3:23:37.20

5th Kim Thompson

3:23:37.54

6th Rich Hincapie

3:23:37.91

7th Mark Holowesko

3:23:38.20

8th Scott Hirshorn

3:23:51.04

Senior IT

1st Stephen Holowesko

3:34:19.76

2nd Stefan Krauskopf

3:36:50.95

3rd Wayne Price 3:39:47.91

Senior [IT

Ist - Van Demeritte

3:36:49.84

48 miles

Senior HIT

Ist - Mackey Williams

2:27.30.96

2nd - Robert Bethel

2:27:31.04

3rd - Robert Jones

2:27:31.79

4th - Lashane Dean

2:42:17.79

Sth - Tommy Mackey

2:50:21.39

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THE TRIBUNE

sp

-_
|
|
h

PAGE 11

Or



WEDNESDAY, JULY 22,

Thomas

Robinson
set to be
honoured

@ By ALPHEUS ‘HAWK’
FINLAYSON
Special to The Tribune

THOMAS ROBINSON is
scheduled to be honoured by
acommittee, headed by
Alpheus ‘Hawk’ Finlayson,
during a luncheon at Sandals
Royal Bahamian Resort &
Spa 2pm Sunday...

BAHAMIAN national
hero Thomas Augustus
Robinson was one of the
premier Bahamian athletes
of the 20th century.

Tommy Robinson, who
attended St John’s College
in Nassau and the University
of Michigan in the United
States, was born on March
16, 1938.

Robinson graduated from
St John’s College in Nassau
in December of 1953 and
was employed at the
Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration in January, 1954. He
worked at the Customs
Department from late 1954
to September 1957.

In 1958, at the tender age
of 20, Robinson shocked the
track and field world, win-
ning the gold medal in the
220 yards and the silver
medal in the 100 yards at the
British Empire Games in
Cardiff, Wales.

Robinson’s first interna-
tional team was the 1955
Pan American Games in
Mexico City. He finished
fifth in the semi-final of the
100m and 200m.

In 1956, Robinson became
the first Bahamian to partic-
ipate in track and field in the
Olympic Games, finishing
fourth in the first round of
the 100m and 200m in Mel-
bourne, Australia.

The following year Robin-
son became the first
Bahamian to win a medal in
international competition,
when he won a bronze
medal in the 100m in the
West Indian Federation
Games in Kingston,
Jamaica. He also participat-
ed in the 400m relay team
with Oscar Francis, Tom
Grant, and Enoch Backford.

Tommy enrolled at the
University of Michigan in
the fall of 1957. It was at
Michigan that Jessie Owens
set or tied five world records
in 1935, the year before the
Berlin Olympics.

In 1958, the year of the
general strike in the
Bahamas, Robinson
equalled the new British
Empire Games and British
All Comers record of 9.5
seconds in the first race of
the first round of the 100
yards. In the final, Robinson
finished second to Jamaica’s
Keith Gardener in 9.6 secs.

In the semi-final of the
220 yards, Robinson ran 20.9
secs to win, establishing a
new games and British
Empire and Commonwealth
and national record. In the
final, running out of the out-
side lane, the boy from
Hawkins Hill won the gold
medal in 21.1 secs, defeating
Jamaica’s Keith Gardener.

In the Rome Olympics of
1960 Robinson made it to
the semi-final in both 100m
in a time of 10.69 secs the
and 200m in a time of 21.67
secs, just missing the final in
both events.

Earlier that summer
Robinson won the 100m at
the second West Indian Fed-
eration Games in Kingston,
Jamaica.

Robinson had been a
member of the St George’s
Athletic Club and upon his
return to Nassau in 1961,
joined the newly formed
Pioneers Sporting Club.

Tommy graduated from
the University of Michigan
in 1962.

While at Michigan Robin-
son won nine individual Big

SEE page 9




ts

2009






Contador,
Armstrong
stay 1-2 at

Tour...
See page 10

Bahamas ‘can’t buy win’ at
World Baseball Challenge

B By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

he Bahamas’ first appear-

ance in the World Baseball

Challenge has been more

than Bahamas Baseball
Federation (BBF) president Craig
“Salty” Kemp envisioned.

Through the first three games
played this week at the Prince George
Citizen Field in Prince George, British
Colombia, the Bahamas has remained

winless and will need a miracle to turn
things around before the tournament
wraps up on Sunday.

“We’re not fearing too well,” said
Kemp as the team was preparing to
play the United States in last night’s
feature contest. “We are still winless
and it’s only going to get tougher as we
move on.”

The Bahamas is scheduled to play
its final game during the round robin
today against Team British Colom-
bia. Currently sitting in the sixth and
final spot, the Bahamas will play the

third place team to determine who
they will go on to play in the playoff
on Saturday.

So far, the Bahamas has not had a
good showing against any of the teams
they played, losing 13-3 to Prince
George Axemen in their opener on
Saturday, then 20-3 to Germany on
Sunday before they were shutout 14-0
by Team Canada Monday.

“The first two games we hit, but we
didn’t play defense,” Kemp said. “Yes-
terday we played defense, but we did-
mt hit. We were just trying to do what-

ever it took to win a ball game. But
our pitching is not as strong as it needs
to be at this level with the pitchers
that we have.”

Not having the opportunity to play
semior baseball in the country has also
been a negative sign for the Bahamian
players at the tournament.

“Most of the kids that we have are
playing in college, but they are very
young,” said Kemp of the team that is
made up of players between the ages

SEE page 9

CARL HIELD



VALENTINO KNOWLES

boxers eager to train
with ‘Pretty Boy’ Floyd

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

VALENTINO Knowles
and Carl Hield, in prepara-
tion for their second and third
consecutive appearance
respectively at the World
Championships — set for
August — are hoping to take
advantage of the opportuni-
ty to train in the United
States.

The duo, who are back
home after training facilities
in Cuba closed for the sum-
mer break, are expected to

travel to Washington DC
where they are expected to
train with former amateur
boxer turned coach “Pretty
Boy” Floyd Seymour starting
next week.

Seymour was in town over
the weekend when he sealed
the deal for the boxers to
travel. At the same time, he
also presented Andre Sey-
mour and his Carmichael
Knockout Boxing Club with
boxing equipment from
Washington.

While Seymour said he’s
elated to be able to continue
to make a contribution to the



COACH “Pretty Boy” Floyd Seymour (left) presents boxing equipment
to coach Andre Seymour, Carmichael Knockout Boxing Club...

local programme, the boxers
are eager to make another
trip overseas.

“T’ve been living and train-
ing in Cuba with the best,”
said Hield about his trip to
continue his training. “But
I’m now looking forward to
going to the United States
and see what it’s like and
doing the same thing that I
was doing in Cuba.”

Hield, who emerged from
the junior circuit and made
his first trip to the 2005 World
Championships in Mianyang,
China, and again in Chicago
in 2007 where he lost in the
first round in both trips, said
he’s now in his prime.

“TPve already been on the
circuit for a while, so I have to
do it now,” he insisted. “I
can’t wait for another shot.
This is my shot here. I have to
shine now.”

At age 21, Hield said his
goal is to go to Italy and
unleash the dragon.

“Tcan’t say I’m going to go
there and do it,” he charged.
“T have to go out there and
do it. can’t just go there and
lose in the first round again.”

In his first trip to the cham-
pionships, Knowles also suf-
fered a first-round loss, but
he noted that he was just as
eager and hungry to go to
Italy and improve.

“The first time I was
younger,” he pointed out.
“Now this time, ’m looking
forward to a different expe-
rience because I’m more
experienced and I’m ready.”

Knowles, 20, said since the
last championships, he was
able to go to Cuba through

the assistance of the federa-
tion and that has helped him
to improve tremendously.

But he said the trip to
Washington should really
fine-tune his skills.

“T think the trip to Wash-
ington will be another step
forward,” Knowles said. “So
I’m looking forward to going
there and giving it my best in
training.”

Andre Seymour, the head
coach for the two boxers
when they travel to Italy, said
the trip to Washington should
really be beneficial for his
protégés.

“Floyd has offered us the

JR. CHEESEBURGER
Paes re

Jn. BACON
CHEESEBURGER

invitation to come to Wash-
ington and because the gym in
China is closed, we are going
to take advantage of it,” Sey-
mour said.

“They have some very good
training facilities that I know
will really help to keep them
in shape for the World Cham-
pionships. So we are really
going to utilize what they
have to offer.”

Floyd Seymour, a cousin of
Andre Seymour, said once the
boxers get there, they will
move around and train at a
number of gyms so that they
get to face as many different
opponents as possible.

6 pc CHICKEN
Nuccets Compo

ae ets
ern eek eel ce


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

BRITISH AMERICAN’S
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THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

400 people collect
applications for govt
funded job training

FROM page one

tres across the island.

In Grand Bahama, 50 job
seekers picked up applica-
tion forms at the Depart-
ment of Labour in
Freeport, and three got
them at Urban Renewal
Centres on the island.

Just one Exuma resident
collected a form from the
Local Government Admin-
istrator’s office yesterday,
while no one in Abaco has
yet shown interest in the
scheme. Figures for the
other Family Islands were
not reported by the
Department of Labour yes-
terday.

Mr Dion Foulkes said it
has been difficult to predict
demand for the scheme as
nothing like it has ever
been done in the country
before.

Training courses in voca-
tions construction, engine
repair, accounting, com-
puter applications and
landscaping will be provid-
ed to successful applicants
to help them develop more
marketable job skills
without any cost to the
trainee.

Mr Foulkes said: “There
is obviously a strong
demand for this new train-
ing programme, with 429
people taking application
forms yesterday.

“We are very pleased
with the interest shown to
date.”

Displaced workers, who
are actively seeking work
and receive the National
Insurance Benefit, have just
over a week to return com-

pleted application forms for
courses starting at College
of the Bahamas (COB) and
the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute
(BTVI) on September 7.

A total of 1,000 appli-
cants will be selected for
the courses divided into
three 10 week semesters
taking around 333 trainees
per term.

All courses are fully
funded by a $250,000 gov-
ernment grant and $70,000
investment from businesses
and trade unions for
administrative courses.

The launch of the
National Training Pro-
gramme yesterday follows
the National Insurance
Board’s Unemployment
Benefit introduced this
year to ease the financial
burdens forced upon thou-
sands of Bahamians who
lost their jobs as a result of
the global economic down-
turn.

According to the latest
figures around 12 per cent
of New Providence work-
ers lost their jobs as a result
of the recession, in addition
to 14 per cent in Grand
Bahama.

Mr Foulkes said the
National Insurance Board
has issued more than 30,000
cheques to over 9,000
unemployed Bahamians
since the first cheques were
handed out on May 4.

The Department of
Labour has also created
over 4,000 jobs through
aggressive economic stim-
ulus initiatives, Mr Foulkes
said.

And entrepreneurs have
been encouraged by the

department’s self-starters
programme which provides
grants of up to $5,000 to
help people start their own
businesses.

Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce president and
chairman of the Implemen-
tation Advisory Commit-
tee, Khaalis Rolle, said he
hopes the National Train-
ing Programme will contin-
ue in the long-term.

He said: “When we look
at some of the basic needs
of businesses to be effec-
tive and profitable you look
to your labour pool to exe-
cute the task flawlessly, and
a better qualified labour
pool allows you to execute
better business, so this pro-
gramme has tremendous
long-term value.”

Application forms can be
collected from the Depart-
ment of Labour buildings
in Nassau and Freeport,
Urban Renewal Centres
across the islands, and
Local Government Admin-
istrator’s offices in the
Family Islands.

Successful candidates
from the Family Islands will
not have to pay for the cost
of travel to cither New
Providence or Grand
Bahama to attend training
courses.

Applications must be
returned to the Depart-
ment of Labour by
Wednesday, July 29. Inter-
views will be held the fol-
lowing week, from August
4 to 7.

For more information
about the National Train-
ing Programme call the
Department of Labour at
302-2550.

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@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

oyalFidelity Mer-

chant Bank &

Trust was only

able to place 60
per cent of its second index-
linked international invest-
ment sub-fund, raising $3 mil-
lion instead of the targeted $5
million, although its president
yesterday said this represent-
eda “huge amount” given the
skittishness of Bahamian
investors towards interna-
tional markets.

Michael Anderson con-
firmed that the TIGRS Series
2 sub-fund had raised $3 mil-
lion during its offering, which

THE TRIBUNE

uSiIness

2009

WEDNESDAY,

eu) eve

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

RoyalFidelity fund
gets 60% of target

* Merchant bank’s second index-linked international
investment sub-fund raises $3m of $5m goal

* But president says ‘neither success nor failure’,
due to uncertainty over investor appetite

* Amount allocated for principal protection
rises to 80 per cent from 75 per cent

closed on June 22, 2009, and
told Tribune Business: “It’s
not a bad result, but it’s not
what we hoped for.”

He added: “We went out
for up to $5 million, and we
raised $3 million. We were
always a little unsure as to

Funds business lays-off
15 as it readies to close

m By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
and NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

A BAHAMAS-based fund
administrator has laid-off
some 15 staff over several
months in a downsizing
designed to lead to the clo-
sure of its operations by Sep-
tember 2009, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal, with that and
other recent redundancies
amounting to almost 40 job
losses in the international
financial services sector.

Butterfield Fulcrum Group
(BFG), the Montague Ster-
ling Centre-based fund
administrator, was said to
have made 15 redundancies
over the span of several
months, in preparation for the
closure of its Bahamian office
and the transfer of its busi-
ness book to BFG’s offices in
Bermuda and the Cayman
Islands.

* Butterfield Fulcrum
preparing to close
Bahamas office by
September 2009 and
switch business to
Cayman or Bermuda

* Recession and
financial crunch
hitting Bahamian
sector, as CIBC
Trust declines to
comment on lay-offs

And, in addition to the 24
Ansbacher (Bahamas) staff
terminated by A. F. Holdings
on Friday, Tribune Business
has also learnt that CIBC
Trust Company (Bahamas)
released five employees - a
clear indication that the glob-

SEE page 5B

30,000 square ft Abaco Markets
format anchors new town centre

ABACO Markets last night
confirmed its new premium
food market format had been
selected as the 30,000 square
foot anchor tenant for New
Providence Development
Company’s proposed 20-acre,
multi-million dollar new town
centre for western New Prov-
idence.

Shareholders in the BISX-
listed retail group were told
the news at last night’s annu-
al general meeting (AGM),
as securing Solomon’s Fresh
Food Market as the anchor
tenant for its mixed-use town
centre development has
paved the way for New Prov-
idence Development Compa-
ny to move the project from
the three-year planning stage
to full development. The new
Abaco Markets’ store is
expected to open in spring
2011.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



BISx-listed retail group's
new high-end premium
format to form centrepiece
at the New Providence
Development Company's
60,000 square foot,
20-acre project for
western end of island

Rhys Duggan, New Provi-
dence Development Compa-
ny’s chief executive, had told
Tribune Business last year of
the company’s plans to cre-
ate a new town centre for the
western end of the island,
effectively moving the existing
Lyford Cay Shopping Centre
- which it owns - to a more
central location closer to the
Charlotteville and Old Fort
Bay developments.

The mixed-use town cen-
tre, featuring both retail and
commercial tenants, will be
some 60,000 square feet in
size.

Solomon’s Fresh Food
Market, meanwhile, will be
targeted at the premium,
high-end of the food market,
no doubt aiming to capture
the wealthy, higher spending
consumers living in commu-
nities such as Lyford Cay, Old
Fort Bay, Charlotteville and
the Albany and Lyford Hills
projects.

Mr Duggan said in state-
ment: “This represents the
realisation of a key compo-
nent of our regional develop-
ment plan for the western end
of the island — one which is
inclusive of key conveniences,
social and activity centres,

SEE page 5B

what the appeal was in the
market.

“We've had this general
lack of interest by investors
in international markets, so
trying to get $3 million raised

people have been doing.”
And Mr Anderson said:
“For us, to be honest, whether
we got $5 million or $2 million
did not make much differ-
ence. It was difficult for us to

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com



Share price ‘does not show
FOCOL underlying value’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor Director and largest

shareholder says 10-
year, $10m stock
buy back initiative
best way to ‘create
short-term value’ for
investors and guard
against desperate
sellers

FREEPORT Oil Holdings
(FOCOL) largest shareholder
yesterday told Tribune Busi-
ness that its Board of Direc-
tors believed the current share
price “does not reflect the
underlying value of the com-
pany”, forcing it to embark on
a $10 million share repurchase
programme to boost liquidity
and “create short-term value”
for investors.

Franklyn Wilson, a FOCOL
director and chairman of Sun-
shine Holdings/Arawak Homes, said the stock buy-back pro-
gramme, which was launched on Monday and will last for 10
years, would protect the BISX-listed company’s share price
from investors prepared to sell-out at especially low prices to
meet their needs for cash in this economic recession.

“We believe it’s in the interests of all stockholders,” Mr
Wilson said of the share repurchase plan. “The market, in our
view, does not reflect the underlying value of the company, and

for international investing is a
huge amount relative to what

Sandals

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Sandals |
resort chain is the
buyer who has the
Emerald Bay resort
“under contract” and
is hoping to close the
purchase within 45
days, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal, the
minister of tourism [7
yesterday confirming [yi :
the Government’s uenelleres
priority was to get
Exuma’s ‘anchor property’ open and
operational “as quickly as possible”.

Although declining to confirm that
Sandals was the purchaser who had inked
an agreement with Emerald Bay’s
receivers, Vincent Vanderpool- Wallace
told this newspaper that there was “a
very strong interest” in the property,
implying that a recognised hotel own-
er/developer or resort chain had come
through as a potential buyer.

Multiple sources, though, confirmed
to Tribune Business that Sandals, the
Jamaica-headquartered chain owned by
Gordon ‘Butch’ Stewart and his family,
was indeed the prospective purchaser of
Emerald Bay.



ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

SEE page 3B

we believe it’s in the interests of

the stockholders to protect their

SEE page 4B

is Emerald Bay purchaser

Minister says ‘in good position of having very strong interest’ in the
resort, with government seeking its re-opening ‘as quickly as possible’

Tribune Business had revealed the
company’s “strong interest” in acquir-
ing the property, and that it was in talks
with the PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC)
receivers, last week. And this newspa-
per’s contacts again confirmed that senior
Sandals executives were spotted in Exu-
ma yesterday.

A Sandals spokeswoman yesterday
said the resort chain was unable to com-
ment on developments surrounding
Emerald Bay.

However, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said: “We’re in a good position of having
a very strong interest in the property.”

He added that the Government’s pri-
ority was to facilitate the completion of
the resort’s purchase, then get Emerald
Bay back open and operational as rapid-
ly as possible, so as to rescue Exuma’s
economy.

The island’s economy was plunged into
a tailspin when the PWC receivers and
Emerald Bay’s main creditor, the Japan-
ese insurer, Mitsui, decided to close the
resort in order to eliminate losses running
at around $5 million annually.

The put some 500 Bahamian employ-
ees, the lifeblood for many other Exuma-

Where do you want to be?

We can get you there!

BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

PU Velo)
St. Michael: 246.435.1955

ey ENA)

based businesses, out of work. While
many have remained on the island in the
hope that a purchase and re-opening of
Emerald Bay could be accomplished
quickly, they are likely to soon lose hope
and move to other islands in search of
work if no deal is forthcoming soon.

“We want to get that property open
and operational as quickly as possible,”
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said. “It is very
important for us to get this going as
quickly as possible.”

This urgency was borne out by com-
ments from the main PwC receiver for
Emerald Bay, Russell Downs, who indi-
cated to Tribune Business yesterday that
the Government was fully on board with
the buyer, and was prepared to rapidly
move through the approvals process to
secure a deal.

That, in turn, indicates that the pur-
chaser must be someone who the Gov-
ernment knows and trusts, with a proven
track record in resort development and
ownership in the Bahamas - another clue
that it is Sandals.

The resort chain, apart from the Roy-

SEE page 2B

> Pension Plans

> Mutual Funds

> Stock Brokerage

> Corporate Finance

> Investment Management
> Trusts & Estate Planning

> Personal Pension Plan Accounts

> Education Investment Accounts

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Cen iol 4


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



=
Tune into client needs or face being tuned out

WHEN you get a potential
client to sit down with you,
do the following and you will
be out the door the same way
you walked in — empty hand-
ed.

Straight to the point, right?
Even while you are reading
this you may start to tune out.
So here it is.




Talk About Yourself

Everybody loves to spend
their time listening about
someone else, right?

WRONG! Remember, take
the cotton out of your ears
and insert it in your mouth.
Leave the cotton in your ears,
talk about yourself and watch
your prospect’s reaction. They

start looking at e-mails,
answering calls, looking
around on their desk, etc.
They are not interested in
you; they are interested in
what you can do for them.

Make Small Talk
Small talk is exactly that:
SMALL. Most prospective

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The main respongibilities of the position holder include:





Manatee a small team

Manage alactronic file documents
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Qualifications

= Atleast 2 years of management experience
Strong organizational akilis




clients don’t care about what
you did over the weekend or
anything else. Get straight to
the point; they know why you
are there and so should you.
Business. What’s in it for
them? That’s why you’re
there. If you can’t demon-
strate that in 15 seconds you
are half way out the door.

Show Off your awards

and accomplishments

Brag and boast about what
you and/or your company has
done. Yeah, they love to hear
this. Break out awards and
plaques, and show them off.
This is the perfect way to tune
out a prospect.

When you make contact
with a prospective client -
either by telephone or in a
face-to-face meeting -you
have an extremely short win-
dow of time to connect with
them. If you fail to achieve
this they will quickly tune you
out. Here are several things
you can do to lose your
prospect's attention in the
first five seconds of the con-
versation:

Give them Pamphlets

Promotional
Marketing

by Scott Farrington



and Brochures

Everyone needs more
paper and pictures to look at,
right? WRONG! We are so
saturated with information,
paper and brochures. Typi-
cally, what happens is that
most of the literature gets
filed in the oval filing draw
(meaning garbage can).

Bottom Line - Straight

to the point, right?

The more time you spend
talking about yourself, your
product, your company, the
quicker you will tune out your
prospect. The more you talk
about your prospect, their
company and focus on their
needs, their problems and
offer solutions, the more they
will tune into you and your
potential to solve their prob-
lems. You only have a few
seconds. In sports, seconds

count BIG TIME. So the
same applies when meeting
with prospects.

I kept this article short and
to the point for a reason.
Everyone’s time is valuable.
Hope you tune in next week.

All of these marketing
strategies are certain to keep
your business on top during
these challenging economic
times. Have a productive and
profitable week. Remember,
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT.”

NB: Scott Farrington is
president of SunTee
EmbroidMe, a promotional
and marketing company spe-
cialising in promotional prod-
ucts. Established over 27
years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted
Bahamian businesses in vari-
ous industries, ranging from
tourism and banking to
telecommunications, in mar-
keting themselves. Readers
can contact Mr Farrington at
SunTee EmbroidMe on East
Shirley Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
phone at 242-393-3104.

































Ability: to multitass

Attention to detal and quality cllant service
Salf motivated

Proficiency in MS Office Applications
Knowledge of IBM Content Manager a plus

Please send your resume, on or before Friday July 24th to:

nrbahamasiiuhs com

It starts with you.

item er

gee Colina.
— Holdings Bahamas

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Risk & Compliance Officer

Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified
professional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer. This is an
executive position and the successful applicant should possess the following:

Qualifications & Experience

Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university

Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance

Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a
law degree

Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations
for improvements to a compliance culture

Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of
duties

Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and
best practices

Confidentiality

Excellent oral and written communication skills

Duties & Responsibilities:

Design and implement a risk framework.

Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps
taken to foster good compliance.

Implement and maintain a compliance monitoring programme. This will
serve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures.

Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws,
regulations and policies applicable to the institution.

Provide management with guidance in the development, implementation
and maintenance of policies, procedures and practices to cover
regulated activities.

Create programmes that educate, train and encourage directors,
managers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and
regulations.

Serve as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators.

The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with
experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a cover
letter and resume to the following e-mail address no later than 27 July 2009 :

E-mail: careers@c olinaimperial.com
RE: Risk and Compliance Officer

Absolutely no phone calls will be accepted

Sandals is Emerald Bay purchaser

al Bahamian property at Cable Beach, already
has resort interests in the Exumas via its bou-
tique Royal Plantation chain, which will have
a 21-villa property on 50-acre Fowl Cay by
end-2009.

When asked whether the Government want-
ed a proven resort owner/operator for Emer-
ald Bay, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace responded
yesterday: “That, I suppose, is one of the cri-
teria for anyone to operate there.

“You’re talking about an island beyond Nas-
sau and Paradise Island. You need someone
who has great knowledge of these islands, this
part of the world.”

It seems likely that the removal of Four Sea-
sons as the brand/management partner for
Emerald Bay, and the substantial reduction
in purchase price, was enough to pave the way
for Sandals’ purchase. Having inherited $120
million in debt, Mitsui was initially looking
for at least that sum when it placed the resort
in receivership in 2007.

The last bid accepted by the receivers, which
collapsed prior to Emerald Bay’s closure, was
understood to have valued the property at $40
million.

Informed sources are now suggesting that a
purchase price of as little as $20-$30 million
might be enough to close a deal. Entry point is

key for acquisitions in the Bahamian hotel
sector, as the price largely determines return
on investment for owners, given this nation’s
high operating costs.

It is by no means certain, though, that a
rapid re-opening of Emerald Bay is on the
cards should Sandals close a purchase. Mr
Downs, the receiver, said on Tuesday any buy-
er would be faced with a choice of “doing the
resort first and bringing the builders in, or
opening up and getting trade in, and do the
building works at a later date. There is more on
the purchaser’s ‘to do’ list than ours”.

It is quite possible that construction will
come first. Four Seasons, whose contract enti-
tled it to fees equivalent to 7-8 per cent of
gross revenues - said by many to be too much
- is understood to have told the insurer that the
property required a minimum $25 million in
capital spending to bring it into line with its
five-star status. A further $7 million is needed
to reconfigure its marina, and the Greg Nor-
man Golf Course costs $300,000 per month
to maintain despite having no members.

Several sources, though, suggested these
sums were too low, and a $50-$100 million
investment will ultimately be required by any
potential purchaser to upgrade Emerald Bay
and complete its build-out.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

MANAGER, REVENUE ACCOUNTING
CUSTOMER SERVICES DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue

Accounting,

The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and the
Family Islands and the reconciliation ofall revenue accounts other than miscellaneous

receivables,

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

* Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in New Providence and

the Family Islands.

Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers.

Prepares the sales budget.

Prepares the Revenue Accounting Department Budget. .
Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Receivable Reconciliation.
Oversees the training of all Customer Services staff in the new billing software.

Prepares monthly Board reports,

Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenue reports.

Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of Statistics
Provides statistical billing information for Family Island managers,
Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in the

Family Islands.

Attends yearly community meetings as well as ad hoc meetings required during

acquisition of new locations.

Develops and implements rules, guidelines and procedures for the efficient

operation of the department.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Accounts or equivalent

A minimum of 8+ years of expenence in accounting practice and theory.
Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualifications

Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas,

Sound reasoning and good judgment skills.
Ability to interpret financial reports.

Geod time management skills.

*
2
‘a
=
. Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing,
.
J
*
*

Project management skills.

Interested persons should apply by completing and retuming an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7309, Nassau, Hahamas on or before:

July 31, 20009,
THE TRIBUNE



Bank’s in-house move
to boost e-commerce

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

E-COMMERCE could arrive full
force in the Bahamas by end-2009, Bank
of the Bahamas International’s managing
director said, with some businesses
already benefiting from the bank's intro-
duction of hardware that will expand the
online business community.

Paul McWeeney told Tribune Busi-
ness that the bank’s $2 million invest-
ment to bring all its credit card process-
ing in house will lead to the growth of
Bank of the Bahamas’ e-commerce capa-
bilities.

Mr McWeeney said the infrastructural
upgrades will include components to
allow businesses greater access to online
money transfers and direct payment
deposits form credit card payments made
online.

for the move
to a full e-
commerce
operation for
competitive
reasons, Mr
er ead
said
SWITC H
mechanism is
needed to
make deposits
for online
payments
possible. He
would not say
whether the
bank had
acquired the mechanism.

However, one business known to this
paper, Bahamas Virtual Mall
(BVM.com), uses the Bank of the
Bahamas’ online deposit system on their
site.

Paul Neeenny



Buyers can purchase a wide range of
products through BVM.com, including
clothing, car parts and baby items.

It was thought that e-commerce in the
Bahamas could not develop without the
implementation of an Automatic Clear-
ing House, which would allow for greater
communication between local commer-
cial banks.

Bank of the Bahamas International
has invested some $2 million in bringing
its card processing in-house, and Mr
McWeeney told this paper recently: “The
bank expects there to be tremendous
internal synergies that result from out-
sourcing.

“With that coming in-house we will be
able to benefit from transaction volumes
and offer more to the public. Because
we will control the whole process. We
have plans to do more in terms of e-com-
merce activity and payment card process-
es that will help us to launch e-commerce
in the not too distant future.”

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 3B

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY FORGIE EVANS late of
#17 London Terrace, Eastern District, New Providence,
Bahamas, deceased

NOTICE is hereby piven that all persons having
Claims or demands ayainsl the above-named Estate are
requested bo send the same duly certified bo the undersigned
on or before Aueust JOM,

AND NOTICE is hereby also given thal al the
expiration of the tine mentioned above, the assels of the late
DOROTHY PORGIE EVANS will be distributed arcing: the
persons entitled thereto having regard only to the claims of
which the Executor of the Estate shall then have had Notice,

GERARAM, THOMPSON & CO,
Altorneys tor the Execu bors
Sasccn Hic
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O. Box W-272
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: S Smith

Not wanting to reveal detailed plans

RoyalFidelity fund gets 60% of target

FROM page 1B

assess what the appetite was,
so I don’t see it as a success or
failure.

“The general view locally
is that the international mar-
kets are more volatile than
investors are interested in and
they are keeping cash safe in
bank deposits. They are movy-
ing away generally from the
equities side and getting into
investments in fixed income
and bank deposits.”

The global trend of
investors fleeing from equi-
ties into perceived safer
havens, such as fixed income
instruments and bank
deposits, has arrived in the
Bahamas, Mr Anderson con-
firmed, with RoyalFidelity’s
Growth & Income fund con-
tinuing to see redemption
requests, but its fixed income
investments receiving addi-
tional interest.

The RoyalFidelity presi-
dent said the merchant bank
now planned to get the
TIGRS 2 Series sub-fund list-
ed on the Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange
(BISX), and hoped that as
investor confidence and inter-
national share/asset prices
improved, there would be
opportunities for other
Bahamian investors to buy in
when their peers cashed out.

The TIGRS 2 Series sub-
fund has already purchased
its options in the four indices
to which it is linked - the
iShares Emerging Markets
Index, the S&P 500 Index, the
Dow Jones Euro STOXX



Index, and Nikkei 225 Index -
and Mr Anderson said: “We
need to see how it does over
the next five years or so.”

As with the TIGRS series 1
sub-fund, RoyalFidelity’s
inaugural index-linked sub-
fund that was also launched
under the institution’s Inter-
national Investment Fund, the
principal invested in the
Series 2 fund will also be
“protected” or guaranteed.

This time, though, 80 per
cent instead of 75 per cent of
investor capital will be used
for principal protection, Mr
Anderson explaining that this

eee cae mas

Tribune)_
rte Estate

was because the five-year
time horizon meant RoyalFi-
delity had to settle for lower
interest rates on the principal
protected sum.

This will be invested in
Bahamas-domiciled fixed
income securities, such as
bonds and certificates of
deposit.

The interest earned on
these latter investments will
ensure that Bahamian
investors recover 100 per cent
of their principal when their
Series 2 investment matures
in five years’ time - on June
30, 2014.

Pe eel) eEtD ls

Everywhere The ee Are!

dows ad rates

at

Available August Ist, 2009
PROSPECT RIDGE CONDOMINIUM.

PAA tee eR UAT et eli eee ONTUT TOTO) TnI

SH Lel ts

patio/deck gated, pool, oceanview includes water and gas.

Phone: 357-9274 or 325-4465

—r
NA

Magsau Airport
Geesiopreni Corp

REQUEST FOR
PREQUALIFICATION

LPIA Expansion Project Stage |
US Departures Terminal

Ledcor is seeking contractors to assist in completion of Stage | of the LPIA Expansion

Praject (WS Departures Terminal), All contractors, particularly Bahamian contractors, are

encouraged to participate in this significant national provect. Scopes to be tendered to

complete the fit 0

# Masonry
# Millwork
# Speciaities
+ Point

Prequalification will include, based on the tend

mut of the new terminal include:

+ Doorn & Hordwore + Mechanical
# Glectical

+ Interior Glazing
+ Drywall
+ Flooring

er packapes, the following cntena:

Ability to bond, provide letter of credit o demonstrate finanola! capacity

Experience

References

Bahamian ownership / content

Frequatifcaton packages wall de aati dor pont ap at che dagtar Comtmetin Bahamas Limvted! ote alfice ar
Lynden Floating Javermationay Arport Minoiar Fatt foad by phone at MPTP SI? a by emai regen af
infotl 30 @ledcor.com. isterested contractor mort eltait 2 preqeniicanon package by Aywar 7 AMY
















































Gastroenterology

Doctors Hospital Sessional Clinic

Do you have any of the
CO UCe ASUS Tee A ONT ELON EE EES

« Difficulty swallowing

« Heartburn

+» Dyspepsia (gas, bloating)

+ Nausea and vomiting

« Unintentional weight loss
» Diarrhea & Constipation

« Abdominal pain

« Diseases of the pancreas

« Liver disease

+ Jaundice

« Colon cancer screening

SCREENING and
CONSULTATION

« Family history of colon cancer

+ Rectal bleeding

By Appointment Only

Call: 302-4684

Date: Wednesday, July 22°09
Open: 9:00 am

ie f

Dr. hiarca Cooper
Internal Medicine
Gastroenterology

ee DOCTORS HOSPITAL

feats Pa

GENERAL MANAGER

Exclusive private members club on New Providence Island requires a suitable
candidate to fill the position of General Manager.

Main Responsibilities:

¢ Oversee all aspects of Club operations to ensure achievement of strategic
priorities as set by the Board of Directors.

* To develop and maintain operating & capital budgets.

¢ To provide leadership, supervision & direction to the Club’s management
team.

¢ To facilitate & coordinate all aspects of member relations.

¢ To oversee & ensure the upkeep of all company assets including but not
limited to buildings, grounds & equipment.

¢ To develop events & programs to enhance revenue as well as the overall
experience of club members.

Qualifications and Experience:

¢ Bachelors Degree in Hospitality Management, Business Administration or
similar studies.

¢ Prior experience in Food & Beverage Management in an international
setting.

¢ Proven management & leadership skills, with at least five years experience
in a senior management position within a 5-star organization.

¢ Excellent oral & written communications.

¢ Excellent organizational skills.

¢ Must be proficient with Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point & various
restaurant POS Systems.

Remuneration:

Salary will be based upon experience and qualifications. We offer an excellent
benefit package.

Interested persons should submit their resume by email to
careeropportunity09@ yahoo.com
on or before Thursday, July 23, 2009.
PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
































NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON
late of #48 Winton Highway, Eastern District, New
Providence, Bahamas, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Eslale are
requested to send the same duly certified bo the undersigned
onor before * August SOCK,

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
eX piraticen of the time mentioned above, the asserts of the late
NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON will be distributed
among the persons entitled thereto having regard only to
the claims of which the Execubor of the Estate shall then
have had Notice.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO,
Atborineys for the Execuitors
SSISSCer Hiren
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O7. Box M-272
Nassau, Balrnas.

Allention: 5. Seilh

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS =. 2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION CLE/GEN/00443

BETWEEN

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
JACQUELINE JOHNSON
Defendant

ADVERTISEMENT OF SERVICE OF
WRIT OF SUMMONS

TAKE NOTICE that an action has been commenced
against you in the Supreme Court, Common Law
and Equity Division, Action No. CLE/GEN/00443
of 2008 in which the Plaintiff, BANK OF THE
BAHAMAS LIMITED, has issued a Writof Summons
out of the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on the
20th March, 2008 claiming against you the sum of
$17,476.70 arising from your default of the loan
granted by the Plaintiff to you on or about the 11th
August, 2002 in the principal amount of $7,500.00
and interest at the rate of 15% per annum.

AND THAT it has been ordered by
Ms. Marilyn Meeres, Deputy Registrar of the
Supreme Court on the 1/th March, 2009 that
service of the Writ of Summons in the said
action on you be effected by this advertisement.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that
you must within fourteen (14) days from the
publication of this advertisement inclusive of the
day of such publication, acknowledge service
of the said Writ of Summons by completing a
prescribed form of Acknowledgement of Service
which may be obtained on requested from the
Attomeys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise Judgment may be entered against you.

Dated this 17th day of March, A.D., 2009

GIBSON, RIGBY & Co,
CHAMBERS
Ki-Malex House
Dowdeswell Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Plaintiff

Share price ‘does
not show FOCOL
underlying value’

FROM page 1B

value through this initiative.

“Secondly, those stock-
holders who wish to exit the
company, for whatever rea-
son - we would recommend
that they don’t, but we can
understand it in this econom-
ic climate - we would prefer
them not to sell at a price that
would be significantly under-
valued.”

Mr Wilson added that
based on FOCOL’s
“prospects, underlying trends

and the quality of the man-
agement”, the company’s
share price was undervalued
on the Bahamas Internation-
al Securities Exchange
(BISX). The stock is current-
ly trading at $5.03 per share,
its 52-week range lying
between a $5.53 high and a
$4.95 low following FOCOL’s
four-for-one stock split in
2007.

Stock repurchase pro-
grammes, where companies
buy back their own shares,
are nothing new in the

Bahamas. Cable Bahamas has
been running its own for sev-
eral years, in a bid to prop up
its share price in an illiquid
market, where retail investors
are prepared to cash out at
prices markedly below a
stock’s true value. Such pro-
grammes also create liquidity
for investors.

FOCOL plans to use the
shares it repurchases for an
employee stock ownership
programme (ESOP), or oth-
erwise cancel them.

Mr Wilson added on the

stock repurchase: “T think it’s
a sign of when you’re dealing
with a quality company, qual-
ity companies do things like
that.

“The directors have faith in
the company, and have an
interest in protecting value
for all shareholders. There are
occasions, from time to time,
when it is necessary to show
the market we have confi-
dence in it, and this is a good,
dependable company.”

He said: “We can grow by
various ways, acquiring busi-

Law Firm is seeking skilled professional litigation legal

secretary. The following are needed:

+ Proficiency in Microsoft Word

« Experience in drafting legal letters with little supervision

« Experience in drafting legal documents with
little supervision

+ Ability to confidently speak with clients

+ Ability to take instructions and carry same out with
little supervision

« Excellent organizational skills

* Excellent memory

+ Ability to multi-task

« Works beyond the standard 9 to 5 when necessary

+ Energetic

+ Self-motivated

+ Pleasant personality

* Despises mediocrity

clo The Tribune ¢ P.O. Box N-3207¢ D/A #81242

HELP WANTED

LEGAL SOTHOR

NOTICE

WASHING PEBBLES INC.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
13%(4) of the Intemational Business Companies Act, 20000,
WASHING PEBBLES INC. is in dissolution as of July
15, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 354
Regent Sirect, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liguidater.

LIQUIDATOR

mango

Transfer Solutions Providers Limited is a Bahamian software
company specializing in micro-payments, with an aggressive
implementation time-table. In order to meet these goals we
require the services of a Chief Technical Officer immediately.

Chief Technical Offi
Minimum requirements:

e University degree in Science/Engineering
e 10+ years experience in:

Major systems design

Programming (C, C++, .net}

Large scale database design

Large scale networking and associated protocols
e Experience in card-based financial systems
e Experience working for Government level institutions
e Experience working in an international environment

All interested parties please submit CV by e-mail to harvey.morris@ts
pbahamas.com or by fax to 394-6763. No telephone calls accepted.

o

St. Anne’s School, Fox Hill, invites
applicants for its 2009/10 Nursey Class

¢ Children must be three years or older on before 31
July 2009

¢ Application Forms may be collected from the
school’s office from 9:00 - 3:00 daily

* For additional information please contact the office
at 324-1203, 324-1226



nesses, paying dividends.
What we are saying is that
rather than pursue these alter-
natives, the best way we can
create value for shareholders
in the short-term is to let the
market reflect the true value
of the stock.”

Despite the “tough cli-
mate”, Mr Wilson said
FOCOL was performing well,
with management having a
“good plan and good strate-
gy” for the company that was
already being implemented.

NOTICE

NOTICE is h given that MR. OVAN PIERRE OF NASSAU
VILLAGE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration‘naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration’
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15TH day of JULY, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, R'O.Box N-7 147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the

news, read
Insight on
Mondays

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RANDOLPH SAINTIL of
#31 WOODCOCK LN, ARDENT FOREST, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
15th day of JULY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that Mr. JOHN BERNARD of
Lovely Bay, Acklins, Bahamas, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15" day of July, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

aS

TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications trom qualified Christian for the following posi-
tions for the 2009 - 2010 School Year.

Dean of St nt

Applicants must:

A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing to
subscribe to the statement of Faith of Temple Christian
School.

B. Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or Higher from
a recognized College or University.

C. Possess excellent organization, Inter-personal
communicative skills.

D. Be able to assist with all aspect of the Administration.
E. Be able to discipline, counsel students.

F. Have high morals standards.

Application must be picked up at the High School Office
on Shirley Street 23rd July, 2009 and be returned with
the following: a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph, church affiliation, pastor’s name and three
references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is July 30th, 2009
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 5B



FUNDS, from 1B

al recession and the loss of
wealth as a result of last Sep-
tember’s stock market crash
are now beginning to impact
the Bahamian financial ser-
vices industry.

On the Butterfield Fulcrum
front, one financial industry
source said of the Bahamas
office: “I think they’re clos-
ing it, and relocating the busi-
ness to Cayman or some-
where else like Bermuda.

“The fund business has
dried up for them, probably,
and they are relocating to
where they have scale, which
would be Cayman or Bermu-
da.”

This was confirmed by
sources close to Butterfield
Fulcrum’s Bahamas opera-
tions, who said the lay-offs
and downsizing were linked
to the contracting investment
funds (hedge and mutual
funds) industry.

This sector of the global
financial services industry has
also borne the brunt of the
credit crunch and economic

recession, with many funds
suffering huge redemption
requests from investors des-
perate to pull their money out
and find safer havens for it.

These redemption requests
have been enough to put
some funds out of business,
while other fund
managers/promoters have
either suspended redemptions
or decided to wind-up their
existing funds. All this would
negatively impact a fund
administrator such as Butter-
field Fulcrum, reducing its
business.

Indeed, the entire interna-
tional financial services sec-
tor has experienced a reduc-
tion in fee income, this is
linked to assets under admin-
istration/management. These
have shrunk as a result of the
stock market crash and, with
revenues declining, players in
the Bahamian financial ser-
vices industry have been left
with no choice but to align
staffing levels with business.

And, with Cayman and
Bermuda having a much
stronger presence and repu-

tation in the funds adminis-
tration business, it would be
an easy choice for Butterfield
Fulcrum’s Bermuda head
office to close operations here
and switch the business to
either of these jurisdictions.

A statement prepared by
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas),
designed to distinguish itself
as a separate entity unaffected
by the lay-offs, revealed that
it was informed by Butterfield
Fulcrum Group that "sever-
al positions within the their
company are being made
redundant”.

BFG is an affiliate of But-
terfield Bank (Bahamas),
though with an autonomous
management team and board
of directors.

"Although the loss of posi-
tions at Butterfield Fulcrum
Group in the Bahamas is
unfortunate, we believe that
Butterfield Fulcrum Group
management is acting in the
best interests of the compa-
ny, and the employees are
being treated fairly and with
respect. The employees
impacted were employees of

ABACO MARKETS, from 1B

open spaces, parks and both commercial and
residential spaces to meet both the existing
and the growing demand in the area.

“Development of the town centre with the
high-end Solomon’s Fresh Food Market will
bring a new level of shopping experience to the
rapidly growing western region of the island. In
addition to the existing population in the area,
there is also a clear move west for many look-
ing for a different quality of life defined by
an ease of living, working and shopping right
here.”

Mr Duggan added: “We are very pleased
with our partnership with Abaco Markets,
which shares our vision of offering a com-
pletely new food shopping experience not yet
available anywhere in the Bahamas.

“Our respective organisations have worked
very hard on the plans for both the town cen-
tre and for Solomon’s Fresh Food Market.
We are confident this partnership will deliver
the high quality standards we - and residents in
the area — are demanding.”

Abaco Markets pledged that Solomon’s
Fresh Food Market would feature an eco-
friendly design intended to appeal to the more
“discerning customer”, and focus on an upscale
shopping experience with high quality products
and gourmet selection.

“We are excited about this opportunity to
bring about a new standard for food shopping
in the Bahamas. Everything about the store is
focused on delivering a superior shopping
experience,” said Gavin Watchorn, Abaco
Markets president and chief executive.

“From the state-of-the-art facility, which is
being designed with new energy efficient and

‘green’ standards, and the ease of shopping
to our premium product selection, service, and
gourmet deli, customers will enjoy an entirely
new experience at Solomon’s Fresh Food Mar-
ket.”

He added: “This agreement for Solomon’s
Fresh Food Market marks a new era for our
group, which has been revived by our perfor-
mance and much improved market share over
the past two years. As a result, we have devel-
oped an exciting new model that we are con-
fident not only addresses the dynamic needs of
the area but will serve as a new standard for us
all in the food business.”

Abaco Markets’ new format will likely com-
pete directly with retailers such as Gourmet
Market at Caves Village. It is also unclear
what has happened to plans by Rupert
Roberts, Supervalue’s president, for his own
niche, high-end health food store in western
New Providence.

Meanwhile, Mr Watchorn told shareholders
at last night’s Abaco Markets AGM that the
company was in talks to open another Domi-
no’s Pizza outlet at the western town centre.

New Providence Development Company,
the largest private land owner on New Provi-
dence with more than 2,300 acres, developed
Old Fort Bay and the Old Fort Club, and owns
the New Providence Water Development
Company. It is also an affiliate of the Tavistock
Group, the Albany developer. Both it and
Tavistock Group are owned by Joe Lewis, the
Lyford Cay-based billionaire. Mr Lewis’s busi-
ness partner, Terry White, is an investor in
both Albany and New Providence Develop-
ment Company.

Important

Notice

SERVICE INTERRUPTION

Butterfield Fund Services
(Bahamas) (a subsidiary of
the Bank) prior to January
2009, at which time they
became employees of Butter-
field Fulcrum Group," But-
terfield Bank's statement said.

"The bank's operations in
the Bahamas are not affect-
ed by the actions being taken
by Butterfield Fulcrum
Group. We continue to offer
private banking, personal
trust and corporate trust ser-
vices to clients from our
offices in Montague Sterling
Centre East Bay Street."

Butterfield Fulcrum’s
Bahamas business has gone
through two ownership
changes in five years. Origi-
nally known as Deerfield
Fund Services, it was acquired
by Butterfield Bank in Janu-
ary 2004 and renamed But-
terfield Fund Services
(Bahamas).

Then, in July 2008, Butter-
field decided to merge all its
funds services operations -
including those in the
Bahamas - with Fulcrum,
retaining a 40 per cent stake
in the merged Butterfield Ful-

crum.

When Butterfield acquired
Deerfield, it had 12 staff and
assets under administration
of $1.8 billion. The latter fig-
ure had grown to $2.9 billion
by year-end 2004, and its size
at the time of the Fulcrum
deal can be gauged by the fact
that, at year-end 2007, But-
terfield’s assets under admin-
istration in the Bahamas
(when it still owned both the
funds business and the bank),
were $5.447 billion.

At year-end 2008, when the
funds business had been
merged into Butterfield Ful-
crum, assets under adminis-
tration in the Bahamas
totalled just $2.349 billion.
This implied that Butterfield
Fulcrum’s Bahamas opera-
tions had almost $3.1 billion in
assets under administration
by year-end 2008.

Its loss would deal a blow
to the Bahamas’ standing as a
domicile for investment funds
and their administration.

Heather Bellot, the unit’s
managing director when it
was under the Deerfield and
Butterfield Services

(Bahamas) brands, was said
to no longer be with the com-
pany when it was contacted
by Tribune Business yester-
day. Current managing direc-
tor, Sandra Gilbert, did not
return this newspaper’s calls
seeking comment.

Meanwhile, CIBC Trust
Company (Bahamas) was said
by sources to have let go five
employees. When questioned
about the lay-offs, deputy
general manager, Carlis
Chisholm, replied: "No com-
ment!"

Minister of Labour Dion
Foulkes said he was not
appraised of layoffs at either
Butterfield Fulcrum Group or
CIBC Trust, but said he
would look into the matters.

"T have not received any
communication from CIBC
Trust with respect to any
pending lay-offs," said Mr
Foulkes.

"The code of industrial
practice mandates that when-
ever a business establishment
plans to make any employees
redundant they must the alert
the Ministry of Labour. I am
totally unaware of this."

VACANCY

Create ma@el elas)

A vacancy exists at The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited and Port Group

Limited for the position of General Counsel.

Applicants are invited from

interested and suitably qualified individuals ta fill this position, with the primary
responsibility of the overall direction and management of the Legal Department
of The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited and Port Group Limited, and:

-

® Manage and lead strategic and tactical legal initiatives for the Group of

COM panes

Structure and manage the company’s internal legal function and statt

Lead various projects Including litigation management: direction of leases,
deeds of release, and conveyances; privacy and employment matters,
corporate governance, domestic and international compliance and other
matters requiring legal suppart

Obtain and oversee the work of outside counsel

Provide senior managernent with effective legal opinians on company
Strategies and implementation

Serve as adviser on all major business transactions and in negotiating critical

contracts

Play a key role in managing risk and helping to make sound business decisions

Develop and implement all legal and corporate governance policies

Serve as Company Secretary and participate in meetings of the Board of

Directors

From 1:00 am to 8:00 am
July 26th, 2009.

Advise and counsel corporate departments on general and specialized legal
matters including complex international and commercial business transactions

Provide legal representation on International and local projects at preliminary
stage of negotiations and throughout development

Provide legal counsel and advice regarding various corporate business tramsac-

tions to ensure compliance with Bahamian Law and company policies and
procedures.

KNOWLEDGE AND QUALIFICATIONS

Judiclal degree along with international expertise

As we continue efforts to improve our service to you, we ask
you to take note that our Electronic Banking System will be
temporarily unavailable during the time listed above while
we conduct routine maintenance.

We apologise for any inconvenience that this may cause.

15 or more years of commercial transactional legal background, along with
combined in-house and law firm legal experience

Strong transactional and general business and commercial law experience,
including drafting and negetiating commercial contracts and licenses

During this period, the following services will be unavailable:

Significant intellectual property experience

e ABM
e VISA transactions via ABM

e Internet Banking & Telephone Banking
(from 1:00 am to 11:00 am July 26th, 2009)

Experience in both public and global companies
Results-oriented, with skills to influence change and drive compliance

Strang presentation and negotiation skills, solid business instinets and
judgment, and outstanding written and verbal communication skills

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this necessary Creative and flexible problem-solving skills

maintenance. Ability and interpersonal skills to relate with Internal and external customers,

including government, business professionals, the community, corporate
executives and managers, and contribute to strategic planning.

USSR ee ee ORR Seen Ee |e
SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS TO GENERALCOUNSEL@GBPA.COM
eee eR el
P, 0. BOX F-42666
PaO PC PR elim) ed) LB

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com GET THERE. TOGETHER.


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
TASTE







The Tribune



Welcome to the

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

OR busy moms and snack lovers, cookies

have been a life saver for a quick mess

free and preparation free nibble. Laurel
Handfield, owner of The Cookie Mill located in

Freeport, Grand Bahama, has taken on the Chocolate Brownie

growing cookie craze.

According to kitchenproject.com, the first cookies were cre-
ated by accident.

“Cooks used a small amount of cake batter to test their oven
temperature before baking a large cake. These little test cakes
were called ‘koekje’, meaning ‘little cake’ in Dutch. Originally
called ‘little cakes,’ cookies are made with sweet dough or bat-
ter, baked in single-sized servings and eaten out-of-hand. Per-
fect for snacking or as dessert, cookies are consumed in 95.2
percent of US households. Americans alone consume over 2
billion cookies a year, or 300 cookies for each person annually,”
the website said.

Mrs Handfield, who is originally from Pennsylvania, said she i,
thought about entering the cookie business when she first ;
moved to the Bahamas several years ago.

“For the past few months, I ended up baking as a hobby for
family, friends and kids around the neighborhood. I had been
thinking about getting into business but was reluctant with the
state of the economy. A few Sundays back, I was in church
(Freeport Bible) and my pastor spoke on how we have to create
our own opportunities. That was my sign and I haven't looked
back since,” Mrs Handfield said.

As for the uniqueness of the name, Mrs Handfield said it _
came from her husband.

“Honestly, my husband and I had a few names in mind but all
were taken when we tried to create a website. Then my hus-
band suggested The Cookie Mill and I liked it. To me it sug-
gested that we were all cookies all the time. When we went to
create the website, the name wasn't taken so we stuck with it.
Next in line was Cookie Supreme but that sounded a little too
pretentious to me,” Mrs Handfield said.

The Cookie Mill bakes several dozen cookies a week with 4 a
their 2 for 1 special going on for the month of July which also 4
includes brownies and mini-cheesecakes.

“We have our old-fashioned chocolate chip, traditional oat-
meal raisin, chocolate chocolatey chip cookies, iced sugar cook-
ies, double stuffed chocolate brownies with a milk chocolate
drizzle, chocolate chip blonde brownie with the creamy choco-
late drizzle, and miniature cheesecakes. We also just introduced
the peanut butter delight,” Mrs Handfield said.

Although the Cookie Mill is always looking to expand the
menu, the more popular flavors are the double stuffed choco-
late brownie and the old fashioned chocolate chip cookie.

“Our specialty is definitely the chocolate chip cookie. I like to
make them flaky on the outside while making the inside chewy.
Talso found a trick on how to make them thick. I'm in the
process of creating a great recipe for a chocolate brownie cup
with nuts, which is like a brownie cupcake for those that wish to
keep the gooey chocolate off their fingers,” Mrs Handfield said.

Unfortunately, for those cookie lovers who are located on
other islands, Mrs Handfield said although she does not ship
outside of Grand Bahama, she is looking into finding ways of
getting these tasty bites to them.

“Our products are fresh, made-to-order so there are no
added preservatives. That may present an obstacle depending
upon how long it would take to get to another island. I need to
keep costs as low as possible and keep quality up and shipping
may raise the price too high,” Mrs Handfield said.

For other cookie lovers who want to get into the cookie busi-
ness, Mrs Handfield urges them to start small. , P : onl —

“Do your research and start off small scale if you are hesitant. 2 7 | ii
! a : _ Chocolate Chip Cookies —



Peanut Butter delight










Believe me, I am queen of hesitation and
business now would be crazy. What I d
concentrating on a delicious no-frills tr
for a great price. Who can say no to 24 c@
Handfield said.

She has high hopes for the future of the

“T see us concentrating on a larger scale
individual cookie lovers. My next target
ness meetings of larger companies or €
pick me up gift for their students. The possi
Mrs Handfield said.





Chocolate Chip White Brownies
THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 9B













The Tribune

GONE 100 SOON

Bahamian entertainer Frydeh passes away

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

LOCAL entertainer
Frydeh from the
Make-Um-Listen
movement shocked
many in the industry
after his death last
Monday.

The Stars competition, and in 1998, he was
part of a local choir arranged for the grand
opening of the Atlantis Royal Towers where
he had the chance to work with artists such as
Bebe Winans, Michael Jackson, Baron Cage,
Stephanie Mills, and Donnie McClurkin.

Frydeh described his music as a crossover
between diverse genres including pop, reggae,
rap, RnB, Reggaeton, and Caribbean beats.
Influenced by artists such as Kenny Latti-
more, Brian McKnight, Brandy, Mariah
Carey, and Eric Benet, Frydeh successfully
molded his own sound helping him to expe-
rience beauty in life, and music was undoubt-
edly his true passion.

In the days leading up to his death, his moth-
er explained that there was nothing on his
mind other than singing and continuing his
work with the Make-Um-Listen movement.

She said: “He was my all, he was my inspi-
ration, he was a very independent person.
The last thing he said to me was ‘Mommy, I
have something to say, you know what, I see
God. Mommy please, I don’t want to die
here, I want to die home in your hands.’ My
baby gone too soon.”

Expressing her condolences, his manager
Ms Chatti said never before has she met an
artist like Frydeh, she said his devotion to the
vision of Make-Um-Listen has been unwa-
vering from the start.

She said although he resided on the eastern
end of the island, Frydeh would do what he
had to when the time came to attend group
meetings at her home office on Gladstone
Road or to any other engagements.

“He was a true star, and I have no doubt
that he was headed for nothing but greatness,
and my heart feels as empty as that of a wid-
ow because I have lost an important member
of my team and family.”

Recently performing alongside Davey
Yarborough in the Jazz Summer Festival
event held at Mount Batton House, he is
remembered as an artist with loads of stage
presence and a big voice.

Survived by his parents and his siblings
Damar Leadon, Fredricka Minns, and Deliska
Minns, he is missed and will forever be
remembered as a true musician gone before

THE local music industry is
mourning the death of yet anoth-
er entertainer, Ryan Andrews aka
Frydeh who died at Princess Mar-
garet Hospital last Monday after
a three year battle with cancer.

According to his manager Patricia Catti, the
news came as a shock as the fallen entertainer
was due to perform at a concert on July 10 in
Cat Island.

Making several unsuccessful attempts to
contact Frydeh in the days leading up to the
event, Ms Chatti assumed that something had
come up and that Frydeh would eventually
contact her.

During an emotional interview last Friday,
Ms Catti said unfortunately that call she was
waiting on never came through, and instead
she did received a call from radio personality
Randy C who confirmed that the artist had
passed away.

Career

Frydeh who was best known for his mem-
bership in the world renowned Bahamian pop
group Bahamen (2004 to 2006), was also on
the verge of starting his solo career having
already released a list of hit songs including
the popular Joy ft Apollo Kreed (a remake of
Joy originally composed by Blackstreet in
1995), Handle It, Pil be, and others.

Born September 1, 1979, to Vincent
Andrews and Dolly Deveaux, he possesed a
special love for singing from early on.

According to his mother, he would pick up
anything he could find to use as a mic and
would belt out his favourite tune at the drop of
a dime.

This love for music lead to his future
achievements including becoming a part of
the New Born Church of God youth chior in
1994, winning the 1995 local Searching For

things 2D0



This weeks events include a synergetic art
and entertainment event, some old school :

music and a street festival Bahamian style.
. Local artist Terez Hepburn is set to

release her new single Mister Bus Driver 3

during a “night of expression,” at Tehillah
Lounge in the Reggae Café at Breezes Hotel
this Saturday at 8pm. In addition to that per-
formance, artist Kevin Rolle will showcase his

latest art exhibition. There will also be an ama-

teur poetry and spoken word segment allow-
ing audience to become involved in the event.
Tickets are $10, and can be purchased at
100 per cent Bible Bookstore, or by visiting
www.tehillanlounge.com.
» The Junkanoo Summer Festival con-
tinues on Bay Street this Saturday

when dozens of local souvenir producers and :
venders will get to showcase their crafts. The :

event will also feature live Goombay music,

live-bands, and lots of local food and fun. It’s

free for all, so come and show your support
for all things Bahamian.
« The Nettie Symonette art exhibit at
Central Bank continues until August 7,
and already it has received rave reviews. This

75-year-old artist presents 75 abstract pieces

that have been compared to the likes of
Picasso, Michael Bellon, and Barnett New-

man. The collection which was first started in
2003 in the Abacos while Mrs Symonette was

working on her memoirs, uses mirror like
illusion to tell the story of life and emotions.
The exhibition can be seen from Monday to
Friday between 9.30am and 4.30pm.

» Former Mr Caribbean/model/stylist

and local icon Kendrick Kemp is using
his celebrity status to bring the Envy Beach
Night Club back to life with his upcoming
event called Sweet Dreams. The event which
promises a heavy mix of appearances from
many in the entertainment industry, backed
by music from DJ Reds, Urban Empire, and
JDX sounds just to name a few, promises to
be an event like none other. At the cost of
$10, you can rub shoulders with the stars

while partying in a safe and comfortable envi-

ronment.
. On Friday, the National Art Gallery of
The Bahamas will be transformed into
the infamous Drum Beat Club as a host of
music veterans seek to bring the nostalgic
club back to life.
Chickie Horn, Chippie Chipman, Peanut

Taylor, and others who were part of the origi-

nal cast at the club, will play their hearts
away for guests at NAGB. Starting at 8pm,
tickets are $40 for NAGB members, and $45
for all others.

his time.



-Mr Beeds makes history | The best in Bahamian
with debut video

MOVIEMAKER to musicmaker,
Ricardo 'Mr Beeds' Forbes has made
history in the local entertainment indus-
try with his debut music video for his hit
song Achoo (Bless You). Combining
hip hop with the Bahamian folk sound
of rake 'n' scrape, Mr Beeds is the first
artist from his country to use several
types of animation throughout his entire
video.

“Having already won film awards and

i working in theatre I think a lot of people

expected me to come from a familiar
angle,” he admitted. “However, it was
great to see everyone's reaction when it
turned out I was hardly featured thanks
to the wonders of animation.”

The video was officially launched dur-
ing Youth Alive, one of the region's
major events for young people featuring
some of the biggest names in positive
music. By the end of the night, North
Americans were requesting to take
copies of the video back home with
them and by the end of the week Face-

book and YouTube comments were

pouring in.

“T feel like progress is being made,”
says Mr Beeds who released his first
album Peak State in January 2009.

“T wrote the vision, made it plain, left
in to God and he made it a reality. lam
happy with the response from people

i but I am most humbled with the love

that Bahamians have shown. People say
that if you want an honest critique you
have to ask a Bahamian and they have

i been honest and I thank them for being

so supportive. The one constant com-
ment I keep getting is that the video is so
original.”

Mr Beeds credits his friend, compos-
itor Al Rahming as the mastermind

behind the artistry. Viewers enjoy the

tion.

tempted beyond what you can bear,

can stand above it. ”

Mr Beeds, who has been busy hit-

ting up different venues on his sum- ; test. It started off as a five

mer tour of New Providence each ; Minute show and by the

weekend, is excited about the oppor- / time we were done we were

tunities which have presented them- ; ON television. We finished a
selves for the video. The video is }
expected to air on MTV Tempo this }
summer and has been submitted to }
BET and VHI1. Fans who can't wait }

may check out the video on YouTube :

or Mr Beeds' Facebook page.



BY ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features

amissick@tribunemedia.net

OVER the past few years,

“Alis an amazing artist and it was a a a of rpg
blessing that he not only poured out } ae cn hase ora .
so many styles in this but that he gave i 7“ :
all he had aie turning the video an in } tainment industry to anoth-
only six weeks,” said Mr Beeds. “We : © level by experimenting
came up with the concept together -
the whole good versus evil aspect. Peo- | Sounds. However, to get
ple who know the song often joke }
about it being the worst day ever for :
someone. I mean, the person I sing }
about proposes to a woman he finds }
out is actually married, tries to help an }
old woman who turns out to be a rob- }
ber in disguise and he's like on the }
verge of throwing in the towel. But in }
the video we get to see that there is a }
demon assigned to bring him down and }
an angel assigned to help him rise }
above it all. The thing is we need to : Patrick Major, said they
be tested sometimes and the video can } :
be perceived as an allegory of a biblical

text that talks about when you are

Bahamian music and enter-

with different genres and

those unique products and
music out to the public and
the world, artists need a
media outlet and Bahamian
Entertainment Television
(BeTv) has been one of
those outlets for the past
four years.

BeTv has existed since
November of 2006 and its
owners Ian Pinder and

have big plans for the com-
pany.
“We wanted to really do

God will provide a way out so that you what ie do and make sure
? our vision was actually

viable so it started out as a

season so everything just
happened. Everywhere we
went people were interested
and hype about it so we kept
going.

Mr Major said BeTv’s

? main goal among other
i things,
: Bahamians.

is to entertain

“Where ever we have to

? go for that entertainment is
i where we will go. We are
: looking to basically travel
i the globe. Season two may
? not take us to Japan but we
i hope in season’s three and
: four we will get there. We
? want to touch Europe, Cana-
? da, the United States, and
i the Caribbean, so we want
: to basically bring entertain-
? ment from all over the globe.
i; We have Bahamians in those

entertainment - BETV

cut out animation similar to the style }
used in South Park in the first verse of }
the song featuring a cameo by one of the }
Bahamas’ leading DJs Dion Da Butcha. } Reporter
Mr Rahming also experimented with }
sketch, 3-D and scribble animation, all of }

which ends up in perfect synchronisa- }

places so we want to give
them some shine and show
us the hot spots. We have
some guys out there who are
on top in the US and we
have a lot of big Bahamians
all over the world. A lot of
people when they think of
Bahamians they only think
about the Bahamas, but this
is a global thing,” Mr Major
said.

Due to the many genres
of entertainment present in
the Bahamas, Mr Pinder
said BeTv is not mainly
focused on music, but the
culture of Bahamians.

“Whether it be the graph-
ic artists, craftsman, musi-
cians and so forth, it is basi-
cally trying to push all arti-
sans out there as Bahami-
ans. If you go in the straw
market and see some of the
wood carvings that some of
those guys do you would be
amazed. There are a lot of
Bahamians that don’t know
about the work of other
Bahamians,” Mr Pinder
said.

“We have to make sure
we get them out there. Our
five man production team
works around the clock to
work hard and get the mate-
rial out,” Mr Major said.

Mr Pinder said BeTv is
also hoping to relaunch their
website, as MyBeTVv to pro-
vide a sense of ownership to
Bahamians instead of the
older BeTv Live. Persons
will be able to go online and
watch the shows they missed
on television.

“We have a lot of talent
here in the Bahamas and a
lot of radio stations. How-
ever, radio can only push
content so far. It might only
reach as far as South Flori-
da. Video, television and
internet can reach world-
wide and that is the avenue
we want to take Bahamians-
world wide,” Mr Pinder said.
PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



TASTE

Miss Universe Pageant Fashion Show

THE 88 contestants of the 58th Miss Uni-
verse Pageant will take to the catwalk during
the pageant’s official fashion show to be held
at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort on
Wednesday August 12 wearing the outfits of
three outstanding Bahamian designers and
locally manufactured fabrics of Androsia and

Bahama Hand Prints .

Owen Bethel, chairman of
the host planning committee
and pageant coordinator,
explained: “Not only is this
significant as the first time
that The Bahamas is hosting

the Miss Universe Pageant,
but also because the fashion
show will feature another
aspect of the islands’ creativ-
ity and culture as displayed
in fashion. This will certainly

have the potential of cata-
pulting the local fashion
industry into the internation-
al spotlight. It is important for
other designers and novices
to take advantage of this and
continue to build on the
opportunity.”

The three designers chosen
after an open call are: Rachel
Turnquest-Garcia of Rachel’s
Boutique, Basheva Eve of La
Maison de Besh, and Sabrina
Francis of SE’B Fashions.
Also contributing to the night
of elegance and splendour will
be noted Bahamian designer
Brynda Knowles, who will

design the evening’s outfits
for the reigning Miss Uni-
verse, Dayana Mendoza. Ms
Mendoza will share the stage
as co-host of the event with
Charles Sealey. The newly-
crowned Miss Universe will
receive an outfit created by
prominent Bahamian design-
er Jeff St John, of the House
of St John, which she will
wear at her press briefing on
the morning after her crown-
ing. She will also receive a
specially-crafted bag from
internationally-acclaimed
Harl Taylor BAG.

The fashion show is being

organised and produced by
Mode Iles Ltd, producers of
the award-winning Islands of
the World Fashion Week.
Tickets are available online
at www.tourismtoday.com or
at the box office at the Shera-
ton Nassau Beach Resort,
Cable Beach. Telephone #
(242) 702-5812.

Immediately following the
fashion show the contestants
will view and participate in a
junkanoo rush-out along the
Cable Beach Strip.For further
information, please contact
Ms Arianne Etuk at 242-356-
6133.



Ene Mendoza

Members of the Bahamas National Symphony Orchestra



The Bahamas National Symphony Orchestra Performed in Canada

By JENNIFER HUDSON

FOURTEEN members of the
Bahamas National Symphony
Orchestra (BNSO) traveled to Cana-
da on June 18 to spend a week as
guests of the musicians of Le Jardin
de Violons. Although the BNSO has
performed in the Family Islands, this
was its first international trip and
was the result of a Bahamian- Cana-
dian exchange programme begun last
year when sixteen members of Le
Jardin des Violons performed with
the BNSO in its annual gala concert
on Paradise Island, Nassau.

Having rehearsed separately dur-
ing the year, the Bahamian and
Canadian musicians came together
for two rehearsals after arrival in

Canada in order to adjust final
details before the performance on
June 21 in the magnificent church of
Saint Louis de France in Terrebonne,
just north of Montreal. The well
attended concert was an outstand-
ing success with the appreciative
audience rising to give the musicians
multiple standing ovations.
Michael Smith, Bahamas High
Commissioner to Canada, journeyed
from Ottowa with his wife, Suzanne,
to attend the concert. Following the
performance, Mr Smith expressed
pride in the way in which ties have
been forged between the Bahamian
and Canadian musicians bringing the
cultures of the two countries togeth-
er in such a magnificent way. He also
presented medals to each of the
Bahamian musicians on behalf of the

TRIBUNE TIP OF THE DAY

Starting your day on the right track

¢ Now that summer is here and
we're in the middle of daylight
savings time, it’s hard not to be
absolutely exhausted after a long
day at work, and even more tired
by the time morning rolls around.

Rather than trying to constant-
ly catch up with everything that’s
happening around you, attempt to

(CY MOVIE REVIEW

In this image
released by
Warner Bros.,
Daniel Radcliffe
is shown in a
scene from
"Harry Potter
and the Half-
Blood Prince."

Jaap Buitendjik/AP Photo

make three little adjustments that
could help brighten your day even
before it gets started.

1. Start planning a daily sched-
ule. Knowing what to expect
tomorrow at work is a great way
to keep your tasks organised, and
thus keeps you from feeling
stressed and over worked.

2. Take a minute to collect
yourself the moment you wake-



musicians of Le Jardin des Violins.

The programme included works
by Corelli, Vivaldi, Kreisler and Karl
Jenkins with the Bahamian contin-
gent also performing a lively rendi-
tion of the old Bahamian favourite
‘Sponger Money’ which showcased
Bahamian culture and thrilled the
audience.

The generosity of many helped
make this exchange experience very
special. Accommodations for the
Bahamian musicians were very gen-
erously provided by the families of
musicians of Le Jardin des Violons.
Cellos and a Double Bass were kind-
ly loaned by the music workshop of
Monsieur Jules Saint- Michel, long-
standing supporter of the violin
school, and a drum set was loaned by
another friend in order to eliminate

up. Some people use prayer as a
means of harnessing positive ener-
gy for their day ahead, visualising
yourself relaxed and in control
can also propel you to a more
fruitful day filled with blissful
thoughts.

3. Add some exercise to your
morning routine. It has been
proven that moderate morning
exercise helps to increase the acu-

the problem of transporting such
bulky instruments.

Special thanks are due to Mar-
tine Cardinal, Director/ Founder of
Le Jardin des Violons and Alexandre
Da Costa, Artistic Director, a
renowned violinist, who not only act-
ed as master of ceremonies but also
performed a solo from his latest CD
accompanied by the Bahamian musi-
cians. Additionally, thanks go out to
Helene Peloquin and Denis Don-
aldson of the BNSO who worked
tirelessly along with Ms Cardinal to
organise the exchange trip and a pre-
trip concert to assist in raising funds
towards defraying expenses.

Very close friendships have been
forged between the musicians of the
two countries and all are looking for-
ward to the next exchange.

ity of your brain. A brisk 10 to 20
minute walk or run in the morning
can also help to create a feeling of
accomplishment that can keep
you confident, alert, and ener-
gised all day long.

At the end of the day, you can’t
do much about having a busy day.
However you can take the time to
put it in perspective, so remember
to get your day started right.

All the flowers

FROM page 12

Mrs Mackey said she also dis-
covered, tourists are quite put
off when they discover an item
made in China or somewhere
else other than The Bahamas.

“I have made a number of
items thus far. They include
trendy table top items such as
table runners, placemats, nap-
kin rings. I also make pillow
slip covers, scarves, bow ties,
and I am getting into some oth-
er stuff,” Mrs Mackey said.

Mrs Mackey said she must
give all the credit to God and
her mentor, Dr Deryl G. Hunt.

“T lived in the US for about
16 years, and while there met
some of the most wonderful
people, who had a very positive
impact on my life. Dr Hunt was
one of them, a colleague and
advisor. I met him while study-
ing for my masters at Florida
International University. At that
time he was a professor at the
university. He taught me about
sustainable living and intro-
duced me to The Ellison Model.
The Ellison Model, which is a
way of life, has three basic
tenets, caring, sharing and lov-
ing. Further it provides a cyclical
approach to learning: teaching
while being taught. Because the
framework of the model is so
palatable, it can be used to
undergird any program. One in
particular was The Ozzie
Ritchey Endowment for
Bahamian Students developed
by Dr. Hunt. This program
helped to ease the financial bur-
den encountered by Bahamian
students during their matricula-
tion at Florida International
University. Many students
including myself were able to
tremendously benefit from the
program. As a result, this model
became my way of life,” Mrs
Mackey said.

Prices for the flowers are $7
each, hibiscus plant (her signa-
ture collection starts at $30),
baskets $50 small and $120
large. Mrs Mackey also provides
arrangements for weddings
including bridal bouquets as well
as special occasions/events.
These prices vary according to
order sizes.

“T would love to use the
Bahama Hand Print (fabric) and
eventually make my own batik
design. I was directed by Ben-
jamin Rahming at BAIC toa
young woman who is now train-
ing in batik design. That’s won-
derful for the Bahamas because
we need more persons teaching
the skills we would otherwise
have to look outward to obtain.
In essence, these things not only
aid us in becoming self sufficient
but they sustain us as a people.”

To find out more about My
Andro Batik and these authentic
creations, Mrs Mackey can be
reached at 242-445-8854.



Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince

By JASON DONALD

Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Michael Gambon,

Emma Watson, Rupert Grint

REMEMBER the days when we’d go to just
watch a stand alone film? I don’t. Now we’ve got
trilogies, franchises, reboots and sub-series - mul-
tiple films about the same characters in similar

situations.

It’s tiring at the best times, but nothing can
compare to the commitment needed to keep up
with the Harry Potter series - now in it’s sixth
movie with two more still to go.

Anyone other than fans of the books has prob-
ably forgotten how the last one ended - I’m losing
track myself - but it seems the evil Lord Volde-
mort is still tightening his grip over Harry’s magi-
cal world and there’s still a sense of impending
doom. Basically, business as usual at Hogwart’s
School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

This time though, there’s a generous sprinkling
of Twilight-style teen heartbreak, with Harry,
Hermoine and Ron all caught up in complicated
relationships. We’re also given a glimpse into

Voldemort’s past, when Harry uses a device to
explore memories showing Tom Riddle at Hog-

warts - before he turned to dark magic.

This is all nicely done and without a doubt The
Half Blood Prince is the most visually accom-

plished of the films so far. There’s a dynamite
opening set piece with ‘death eaters’ swooping
through the streets of London and director David
Yates injects some real creepiness at times. But

the film is always battling against its origins on

mood.

the printed page. Unlike a lengthy book, you
can’t really put a movie down for a couple of
hours, then get back to it when you're in the

Scenes which may have worked as little
vignettes in the novel just seem redundant here.
And the format of each film being a term at Hog-
warts is becoming tiresome, I was already glanc-
ing at my watch before Harry made his annual
Christmas trip to the Weasleys’s.

Now we’re faced with the prospect of the last
book being split into two movies - a real error of
judgment in my opinion. Hardcore Harry Potter
fans might be happy at that prospect, but I’m
already beginning to feel the magic wear off.













tS

THE WEATHER REPORTK&

5-Day FORECAST



WEDNESDAY, JULY 22np, 2009, PAGE 11B

{INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST
Today Thursday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.








































































y; g- = > eee = High = Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 86° F
ao ‘ a, v, ‘ ¥ af ~~ ~~ : 0| 1 |2 3 l4|5 ( FC FC F/C F/C Thursday: _E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 86° F
hy f ' all ll ll | Acapulco 93/33 77/25 t 93/33 79/26 pe FREEPORT Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet {0-20 Miles 85° F
vi, ; a a Low | MODERATE | HIGH Amsterdam 74/23 57/13 sh 72/22 59/15 pc Thursday: Eat 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 85° F
cE ORLANDO N Ankara, Turkey 82/27 50/10 s 84/28 50/10 Ss ABACO ‘Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 85°F
High:90°F22°C = Thunderstorms, some Showers and a Some sun with a Sun and some Partly sunny with a Clouds and sun, a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 93/33 74/23 s 91/32 75/23 s Thursday: _E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 85° F
ie Low: 75°F/24°C 7 sun: windy. heavier thunderstorm. t-storm: breezy. clouds. shower possible. t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 61/16 53/11 sh 50/15 48/8 +
vf9: all sth ae 5 sh ae Sree Bangkok 90/32 78/25 r 89/31 78/25 1
(2 @ 8 High: 86° owen ee He toe o roe - ae Sa i rT Barbados 86/30 77/25 sh 86/30 76/24 sh
TAMPA Ly | IDES FOR NASSAU Barcelona 83/28 70/21 pc 86/30 72/22 s iy aH:
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am @ - , elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 9:01pm. 33 2:33pm. -0.3 Berlin 81/27 70/21 sh 79/96 64/17 sh (WARM)
ef oe CO testy en oo eam ag bermuda Cae
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, i Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Friday ‘(019am. 31 405am. 03 Brussels 72/22 57/13 sh 75/23 59/15 pc Severe (NICE) Z
j r a ABACO Temperature 10:42pm. 34 4:24pm. -0.2 Budapest 94/34 64/17 s 95/35 68/20 s @
f i ta High: 88° F/31°C HigQh oaeccscccsssssccesssssseessssseeesssssetesssseees 82° F/28°C )8=— ——77ATam 37 d53am a ~—-——«=Buenos Aires 43/6 34/1 45/7 32/0 pe
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* @ ; Forecasts and graphics provided by : i Havana 91/32 73/22 t 89/31 76/24 5 Showers Miami
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——> GREAT EXUMA ak SAN SALVADOR Montreal 75/23 63/17 sh 77/25 66/18 sh
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Houston 95/35 74/23 po 94/34 74/23 t Orlando 90/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23 t Washington, DC 88/31 72/22 pce 87/30 71/21 t storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace
Welcome to Bahamian
the Cookie entertainer

Mill Frydeh passes
see page eight away

see page nine ‘7

i j Fi
The Tribune SECTION Be






WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009

19

os

Orange and red Androsia floral orice lANe VAN =MAl

Red Androsia floral arrangement

Independance flowers

Multi colored Androsa floral arrangement



all.
flowers

Samara Saunders-Mackey uses her gifted hands to create gorgeous Androsia print flowers



By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

THE flora and fauna of the
Bahamas are some of the
most beautiful in the world
and Samara Saunders-
Mackey, owner of My Andro
Batik, Ltd., saw an opportu-
nity to recreate some of

those gorgeous flowers.

Mrs Mackey said she started mak-
ing table top items and home acces-
sories using vibrant Androsia fabric.

“I never intended to make flowers
but rather, the appliqués to place on
my products, which I thought would
enhance the look. The flowers were
just an experiment that turned out to
be an excellent idea, and thus began
the creation of them. I got my inspira-
tion from live flowers and because of
my love for them, I wanted to find a
way to preserve them. The fabric and
finish gives them a sort of perma-
nence,” Mrs Mackey said.

Mrs Mackey said she fell in love
with Androsia fabrics during her
childhood.

“The colours are a true representa-
tion of my personality: lively, outgo-
ing, warm and loving. I have incorpo-
rated a lot of trendy styles with the
fabric. After doing a market study of
the Bahamian and tourist popula-
tions, I discovered Bahamians more
than anything want trends and so do
tourists. Tourists prefer authentic
Bahamian products when they visit
The Bahamas,” Mrs Mackey said.

Although flowers may appear to be
rather simple in their anatomy, Mrs
IW ET coy y-b COND OLem Oy ROLCeSw Kosa MLB UNILS
consuming. However, Mrs Mackey
SY-UCC Solem bUOTel has KoluNeCeur-mUUT-LeNUIotemBOrAUE
can do all the work for her.

“First, IT would cut out a model/pat-
tern (leaf or petal), take the pattern
and draw it on the cloth. I would then
cut the pattern from the cloth and after
gluing, begin making the flower
design,” Mrs Mackey said.

SEE page 10




PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.198WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER T-STORM, SOMESUN HIGH 86F LOW 80F SEEBUSINESSFRONT Sandals is Emerald Bay purchaser SEEPAGESEVEN Passport to P aradise shoots TV pilot B y TANEKA T HOMPSON Tribune StaffR eporter t thompson@ tribunemedia.net POLICE in Florida are searching for the killer of Bahamian business man Kahil Holmes, who was found half naked and shot to death in the middle of a residential street. Mr Holmes, a 33-year-old father-of-two, was found dead on 22nd Street in West Palm Beach around 8 pm last week Tuesday. According to reports, Mr Holmes was found face down, wearing only a t-shirt and a pair of socks. Officers responded to the scene after receiving a report of a man being shot, according to a statement from the West Palm Beach Police Department (WPBPD Yesterday, detectives would not discuss a possible motive or details relating to the case. P olice press officer Peter Robbins would only say MrH olmes was shot m ultiple times. However, reports reaching The Tri b une i ndicate the v ictim was found in a "run-down" area of town, well known for drug-related violence. I t is believed Mr Holmes was stripped of his clothes after being shot, and the attack may have been gang related. The victim's half-sister, Juliet, said her brother was only expected to be in Florida for one day as he had promised to return to his ail ing father's side. She said she did not know the purpose of her brother's trip. She added that Mr Holmes who owned a car and scooter rental company was good natured and knew how to bring a smile The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com B AHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Businessman’s half nak ed bod y found in West Palm Beach Bahamian shot dead in Florida B y PAUL G T URNQUEST T ribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ t ribunemedia.net FORMER Prime Minister Perry Christie i nformed T he Tribune yesterday that he was the one who signed off on the variation to the orig i nal Crown land grant issued to the Golden G ates Assembly church, w hich created a housing subdivision instead of the intended old folks homef or which the application was originally made. Noting that the origi nal grant to the church was made for an old folks home, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham told t he House Monday that he found the case sur rounding Golden Gates Assembly very “interest i ng.” “Now Golden Gates is an interesting one because I approved for Golden Gates to build an old folks home. The conveyance was signed by m y predecessor in office. The land was sold and a housing subdivision is on it, named after the reverend,” Mr Ingraham said. The Prime Minister then motioned to the PLP MP for St Thomas More, Frank Smith, who was seated behind Mr Christie allowed Golden Gates Church land grant variation Former PM speaks on change to old folks home application SEE page eight SEE page eight DREDGING THE HARB OUR WORKERS PREPARE to lay pipes for the dredging of Nassau Harbour. The harbour is to be made deeper in order to accommodate the world’s largest cruise ships. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f AN AMERICAN tourist was involved in a horror acci dent with a speed boat while snorkelling off the beach of a major resort yesterday. According to reports, the woman was hit by the vessel while swimming near the Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort on Cable Beach with her husband. Eyewitnesses claimed she was hit by the propellor of a speed boat they believed was operated by Sandals. Her arm was “nearly sev ered” they said, and she received a “huge gash” in her leg. A jetski operator in the area said he rushed to help the woman onto the boat, and tied towels around her wounds to stem the bleed ing. He added: “It nearly took off her hand and her foot was slashed with the propellor. “I helped her on the boat, secured the wound on her arm, and secured the wound on her leg.” The woman was reportedly conscious and calm as she was taken to hospital for treatment. Another jetski driver who saw the accident said: “Her Tourist involved in horrific accident with speed boat SEE page eight By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ tribunemedia.net JOB SEEKERS appear enthusiastic about applying for government funded training courses as more than 400 col lected application forms after the National Training Scheme was launched yes terday. Labour Minister Dion Foulkes said the department is “very pleased” with the interest shown on the first day of the innovative scheme to improve job skills in the labour market and the unemployed’s chances of finding work. A total of 300 displaced workers collected application forms from the Department of Labour on Thompson Boulevard, Nassau, and another 75 New Providence residents collected forms from Urban Renewal Cen400 collect applications for govt funded job training SEE page 12 Dion Foulkes B U S I N E S S S h a r e p r i c e d o e s n o t s h o w F O C O L u n d e r l y i n g v a l u e n B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r F R E E P O R T O i l H o l d i n g s ( F O C O L ) l a r g e s t s h a r e h o l d e r y e s t e r d a y t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t i t s B o a r d o f D i r e c t o r s b e l i e v e d t h e c u r r e n t s h a r e p r i c e d o e s n o t r e f l e c t t h e u n d e r l y i n g v a l u e o f t h e c o m p a n y , f o r c i n g i t t o e m b a r k o n a $ 1 0 m i l l i o n s h a r e r e p u r c h a s e p r o g r a m m e t o b o o s t l i q u i d i t y a n d c r e a t e s h o r t t e r m v a l u e f o r i n v e s t o r s . F r a n k l y n W i l s o n , a F O C O L d i r e c t o r a n d c h a i r m a n o f S u n s h i n e H o l d i n g s / A r a w a k H o m e s , s a i d t h e s t o c k b u y b a c k p r o g r a m m e , w h i c h w a s l a u n c h e d o n M o n d a y a n d w i l l l a s t f o r 1 0 y e a r s , w o u l d p r o t e c t t h e B I S X l i s t e d c o m p a n y s s h a r e p r i c e f r o m i n v e s t o r s p r e p a r e d t o s e l l o u t a t e s p e c i a l l y l o w p r i c e s t o m e e t t h e i r n e e d s f o r c a s h i n t h i s e c o n o m i c r e c e s s i o n . W e b e l i e v e i t s i n t h e i n t e r e s t s o f a l l s t o c k h o l d e r s , M r W i l s o n s a i d o f t h e s h a r e r e p u r c h a s e p l a n . T h e m a r k e t , i n o u r v i e w , d o e s n o t r e f l e c t t h e u n d e r l y i n g v a l u e o f t h e c o m p a n y , a n d w e b e l i e v e i t s i n t h e i n t e r e s t s o f t h e s t o c k h o l d e r s t o p r o t e c t t h e i r n B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T H E S a n d a l s r e s o r t c h a i n i s t h e b u y e r w h o h a s t h e E m e r a l d B a y r e s o r t u n d e r c o n t r a c t a n d i s h o p i n g t o c l o s e t h e p u r c h a s e w i t h i n 4 5 d a y s , T r i b u n e B u s i n e s sc a n r e v e a l , t h e m i n i s t e r o f t o u r i s m y e s t e r d a y c o n f i r m i n g t h e G o v e r n m e n t s p r i o r i t y w a s t o g e t E x u m a s a n c h o r p r o p e r t y o p e n a n d o p e r a t i o n a l a s q u i c k l y a s p o s s i b l e . A l t h o u g h d e c l i n i n g t o c o n f i r m t h a t S a n d a l s w a s t h e p u r c h a s e r w h o h a d i n k e d a n a g r e e m e n t w i t h E m e r a l d B a y s r e c e i v e r s , V i n c e n t V a n d e r p o o l W a l l a c e t o l d t h i s n e w s p a p e r t h a t t h e r e w a s a v e r y s t r o n g i n t e r e s t i n t h e p r o p e r t y , i m p l y i n g t h a t a r e c o g n i s e d h o t e l o w n e r / d e v e l o p e r o r r e s o r t c h a i n h a d c o m e t h r o u g h a s a p o t e n t i a l b u y e r . M u l t i p l e s o u r c e s , t h o u g h , c o n f i r m e d t o T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t S a n d a l s , t h e J a m a i c a h e a d q u a r t e r e d c h a i n o w n e d b y G o r d o n B u t c h S t e w a r t a n d h i s f a m i l y , w a s i n d e e d t h e p r o s p e c t i v e p u r c h a s e r o f E m e r a l d B a y . T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s h a d r e v e a l e d t h e c o m p a n y s s t r o n g i n t e r e s t i n a c q u i r i n g t h e p r o p e r t y , a n d t h a t i t w a s i n t a l k s w i t h t h e P r i c e w a t e r h o u s e C o o p e r s ( P w C ) r e c e i v e r s , l a s t w e e k . A n d t h i s n e w s p a p e r s c o n t a c t s a g a i n c o n f i r m e d t h a t s e n i o r S a n d a l s e x e c u t i v e s w e r e s p o t t e d i n E x u m a y e s t e r d a y . A S a n d a l s s p o k e s w o m a n y e s t e r d a y s a i d t h e r e s o r t c h a i n w a s u n a b l e t o c o m m e n t o n d e v e l o p m e n t s s u r r o u n d i n g E m e r a l d B a y . H o w e v e r , M r V a n d e r p o o l W a l l a c e s a i d : W e r e i n a g o o d p o s i t i o n o f h a v i n g a v e r y s t r o n g i n t e r e s t i n t h e p r o p e r t y . H e a d d e d t h a t t h e G o v e r n m e n t s p r i o r i t y w a s t o f a c i l i t a t e t h e c o m p l e t i o n o f t h e r e s o r t s p u r c h a s e , t h e n g e t E m e r a l d B a y b a c k o p e n a n d o p e r a t i o n a l a s r a p i d l y a s p o s s i b l e , s o a s t o r e s c u e E x u m a s e c o n o m y . T h e i s l a n d s e c o n o m y w a s p l u n g e d i n t o a t a i l s p i n w h e n t h e P W C r e c e i v e r s a n d E m e r a l d B a y s m a i n c r e d i t o r , t h e J a p a n e s e i n s u r e r , M i t s u i , d e c i d e d t o c l o s e t h e r e s o r t i n o r d e r t o e l i m i n a t e l o s s e s r u n n i n g a t a r o u n d $ 5 m i l l i o n a n n u a l l y . T h e p u t s o m e 5 0 0 B a h a m i a n e m p l o y e e s , t h e l i f e b l o o d f o r m a n y o t h e r E x u m a b a s e d b u s i n e s s e s , o u t o f w o r k . W h i l e m a n y h a v e r e m a i n e d o n t h e i s l a n d i n t h e h o p e t h a t a p u r c h a s e a n d r e o p e n i n g o f E m e r a l d B a y c o u l d b e a c c o m p l i s h e d q u i c k l y , t h e y a r e l i k e l y t o s o o n l o s e h o p e a n d m o v e t o o t h e r i s l a n d s i n s e a r c h o f w o r k i f n o d e a l i s f o r t h c o m i n g s o o n . W e w a n t t o g e t t h a t p r o p e r t y o p e n a n d o p e r a t i o n a l a s q u i c k l y a s p o s s i b l e , M r V a n d e r p o o l W a l l a c e s a i d . I t i s v e r y i m p o r t a n t f o r u s t o g e t t h i s g o i n g a s q u i c k l y a s p o s s i b l e . T h i s u r g e n c y w a s b o r n e o u t b y c o m m e n t s f r o m t h e m a i n P w C r e c e i v e r f o r E m e r a l d B a y , R u s s e l l D o w n s , w h o i n d i c a t e d t o T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s y e s t e r d a y t h a t t h e G o v e r n m e n t w a s f u l l y o n b o a r d w i t h t h e b u y e r , a n d w a s p r e p a r e d t o r a p i d l y m o v e t h r o u g h t h e a p p r o v a l s p r o c e s s t o s e c u r e a d e a l . T h a t , i n t u r n , i n d i c a t e s t h a t t h e p u r c h a s e r m u s t b e s o m e o n e w h o t h e G o v e r n m e n t k n o w s a n d t r u s t s , w i t h a p r o v e n t r a c k r e c o r d i n r e s o r t d e v e l o p m e n t a n d o w n e r s h i p i n t h e B a h a m a s a n o t h e r c l u e t h a t i t i s S a n d a l s . T h e r e s o r t c h a i n , a p a r t f r o m t h e R o y A B A C O M a r k e t s l a s t n i g h t c o n f i r m e d i t s n e w p r e m i u m f o o d m a r k e t f o r m a t h a d b e e n s e l e c t e d a s t h e 3 0 , 0 0 0 s q u a r e f o o t a n c h o r t e n a n t f o r N e w P r o v i d e n c e D e v e l o p m e n t C o m p a n y s p r o p o s e d 2 0 a c r e , m u l t i m i l l i o n d o l l a r n e w t o w n c e n t r e f o r w e s t e r n N e w P r o v i d e n c e . S h a r e h o l d e r s i n t h e B I S X l i s t e d r e t a i l g r o u p w e r e t o l d t h e n e w s a t l a s t n i g h t s a n n u a l g e n e r a l m e e t i n g ( A G M ) , a s s e c u r i n g S o l o m o n s F r e s h F o o d M a r k e t a s t h e a n c h o r t e n a n t f o r i t s m i x e d u s e t o w n c e n t r e d e v e l o p m e n t h a s p a v e d t h e w a y f o r N e w P r o v i d e n c e D e v e l o p m e n t C o m p a n y t o m o v e t h e p r o j e c t f r o m t h e t h r e e y e a r p l a n n i n g s t a g e t o f u l l d e v e l o p m e n t . T h e n e w A b a c o M a r k e t s s t o r e i s e x p e c t e d t o o p e n i n s p r i n g 2 0 1 1 . R h y s D u g g a n , N e w P r o v i d e n c e D e v e l o p m e n t C o m p a n y s c h i e f e x e c u t i v e , h a d t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s l a s t y e a r o f t h e c o m p a n y s p l a n s t o c r e a t e a n e w t o w n c e n t r e f o r t h e w e s t e r n e n d o f t h e i s l a n d , e f f e c t i v e l y m o v i n g t h e e x i s t i n g L y f o r d C a y S h o p p i n g C e n t r e w h i c h i t o w n s t o a m o r e c e n t r a l l o c a t i o n c l o s e r t o t h e C h a r l o t t e v i l l e a n d O l d F o r t B a y d e v e l o p m e n t s . T h e m i x e d u s e t o w n c e n t r e , f e a t u r i n g b o t h r e t a i l a n d c o m m e r c i a l t e n a n t s , w i l l b e s o m e 6 0 , 0 0 0 s q u a r e f e e t i n s i z e . S o l o m o n s F r e s h F o o d M a r k e t , m e a n w h i l e , w i l l b e t a r g e t e d a t t h e p r e m i u m , h i g h e n d o f t h e f o o d m a r k e t , n o d o u b t a i m i n g t o c a p t u r e t h e w e a l t h y , h i g h e r s p e n d i n g c o n s u m e r s l i v i n g i n c o m m u n i t i e s s u c h a s L y f o r d C a y , O l d F o r t B a y , C h a r l o t t e v i l l e a n d t h e A l b a n y a n d L y f o r d H i l l s p r o j e c t s . M r D u g g a n s a i d i n s t a t e m e n t : T h i s r e p r e s e n t s t h e r e a l i s a t i o n o f a k e y c o m p o n e n t o f o u r r e g i o n a l d e v e l o p m e n t p l a n f o r t h e w e s t e r n e n d o f t h e i s l a n d o n e w h i c h i s i n c l u s i v e o f k e y c o n v e n i e n c e s , s o c i a l a n d a c t i v i t y c e n t r e s , C M Y K C M Y K S E C T I O N B b u s i n e s s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t W E D N E S D A Y , J U L Y 2 2 , 2 0 0 9 T H E T R I B U N E $ 4 . 2 1 $ 3 . 9 0 $ 4 . 1 0 S a n d a l s i s E m e r a l d B a y p u r c h a s e r3 0 , 0 0 0 s q u a r e f t A b a c o M a r k e t s f o r m a t a n c h o r s n e w t o w n c e n t r eB I S X l i s t e d r e t a i l g r o u p s n e w h i g h e n d p r e m i u m f o r m a t t o f o r m c e n t r e p i e c e a t t h e N e w P r o v i d e n c e D e v e l o p m e n t C o m p a n y s 6 0 , 0 0 0 s q u a r e f o o t , 2 0 a c r e p r o j e c t f o r w e s t e r n e n d o f i s l a n dS E E p a g e 5 B M i n i s t e r s a y s i n g o o d p o s i t i o n o f h a v i n g v e r y s t r o n g i n t e r e s t i n t h e r e s o r t , w i t h g o v e r n m e n t s e e k i n g i t s r e o p e n i n g a s q u i c k l y a s p o s s i b l e V W a l l a c eS E E p a g e 2 B n B y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r c r o b a r d s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t a n d N E I L H A R T N E L L B u s i n e s s E d i t o r A B A H A M A S b a s e d f u n d a d m i n i s t r a t o r h a s l a i d o f f s o m e 1 5 s t a f f o v e r s e v e r a l m o n t h s i n a d o w n s i z i n g d e s i g n e d t o l e a d t o t h e c l o s u r e o f i t s o p e r a t i o n s b y S e p t e m b e r 2 0 0 9 , T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s c a n r e v e a l , w i t h t h a t a n d o t h e r r e c e n t r e d u n d a n c i e s a m o u n t i n g t o a l m o s t 4 0 j o b l o s s e s i n t h e i n t e r n a t i o n a l f i n a n c i a l s e r v i c e s s e c t o r . B u t t e r f i e l d F u l c r u m G r o u p ( B F G ) , t h e M o n t a g u e S t e r l i n g C e n t r e b a s e d f u n d a d m i n i s t r a t o r , w a s s a i d t o h a v e m a d e 1 5 r e d u n d a n c i e s o v e r t h e s p a n o f s e v e r a l m o n t h s , i n p r e p a r a t i o n f o r t h e c l o s u r e o f i t s B a h a m i a n o f f i c e a n d t h e t r a n s f e r o f i t s b u s i n e s s b o o k t o B F G s o f f i c e s i n B e r m u d a a n d t h e C a y m a n I s l a n d s . A n d , i n a d d i t i o n t o t h e 2 4 A n s b a c h e r ( B a h a m a s ) s t a f f t e r m i n a t e d b y A . F . H o l d i n g s o n F r i d a y , T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s h a s a l s o l e a r n t t h a t C I B C T r u s t C o m p a n y ( B a h a m a s ) r e l e a s e d f i v e e m p l o y e e s a c l e a r i n d i c a t i o n t h a t t h e g l o b F u n d s b u s i n e s s l a y s o f f 1 5 a s i t r e a d i e s t o c l o s e * B u t t e r f i e l d F u l c r u m p r e p a r i n g t o c l o s e B a h a m a s o f f i c e b y S e p t e m b e r 2 0 0 9 a n d s w i t c h b u s i n e s s t o C a y m a n o r B e r m u d a * R e c e s s i o n a n d f i n a n c i a l c r u n c h h i t t i n g B a h a m i a n s e c t o r , a s C I B C T r u s t d e c l i n e s t o c o m m e n t o n l a y o f f s S E E p a g e 5 B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B BD i r e c t o r a n d l a r g e s t s h a r e h o l d e r s a y s 1 0 y e a r , $ 1 0 m s t o c k b u y b a c k i n i t i a t i v e b e s t w a y t o c r e a t e s h o r t t e r m v a l u e f o r i n v e s t o r s a n d g u a r d a g a i n s t d e s p e r a t e s e l l e r s n B y N E I L H A R T N E L L B u s i n e s s E d i t o rRo y a l F i d e l i t y M e r c h a n t B a n k & T r u s t w a s o n l y a b l e t o p l a c e 6 0 p e r c e n t o f i t s s e c o n d i n d e x l i n k e d i n t e r n a t i o n a l i n v e s t m e n t s u b f u n d , r a i s i n g $ 3 m i l l i o n i n s t e a d o f t h e t a r g e t e d $ 5 m i l l i o n , a l t h o u g h i t s p r e s i d e n t y e s t e r d a y s a i d t h i s r e p r e s e n t e d a h u g e a m o u n t g i v e n t h e s k i t t i s h n e s s o f B a h a m i a n i n v e s t o r s t o w a r d s i n t e r n a t i o n a l m a r k e t s . M i c h a e l A n d e r s o n c o n f i r m e d t h a t t h e T I G R S S e r i e s 2 s u b f u n d h a d r a i s e d $ 3 m i l l i o n d u r i n g i t s o f f e r i n g , w h i c h c l o s e d o n J u n e 2 2 , 2 0 0 9 , a n d t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s : I t s n o t a b a d r e s u l t , b u t i t s n o t w h a t w e h o p e d f o r . H e a d d e d : W e w e n t o u t f o r u p t o $ 5 m i l l i o n , a n d w e r a i s e d $ 3 m i l l i o n . W e w e r e a l w a y s a l i t t l e u n s u r e a s t o w h a t t h e a p p e a l w a s i n t h e m a r k e t . W e v e h a d t h i s g e n e r a l l a c k o f i n t e r e s t b y i n v e s t o r s i n i n t e r n a t i o n a l m a r k e t s , s o t r y i n g t o g e t $ 3 m i l l i o n r a i s e d f o r i n t e r n a t i o n a l i n v e s t i n g i s a h u g e a m o u n t r e l a t i v e t o w h a t p e o p l e h a v e b e e n d o i n g . A n d M r A n d e r s o n s a i d : F o r u s , t o b e h o n e s t , w h e t h e r w e g o t $ 5 m i l l i o n o r $ 2 m i l l i o n d i d n o t m a k e m u c h d i f f e r e n c e . I t w a s d i f f i c u l t f o r u s t o R o y a l F i d e l i t y f u n d g e t s 6 0 % o f t a r g e tS S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B * M e r c h a n t b a n k s s e c o n d i n d e x l i n k e d i n t e r n a t i o n a l i n v e s t m e n t s u b f u n d r a i s e s $ 3 m o f $ 5 m g o a l * B u t p r e s i d e n t s a y s n e i t h e r s u c c e s s n o r f a i l u r e , d u e t o u n c e r t a i n t y o v e r i n v e s t o r a p p e t i t e * A m o u n t a l l o c a t e d f o r p r i n c i p a l p r o t e c t i o n r i s e s t o 8 0 p e r c e n t f r o m 7 5 p e r c e n t Kahil Holmes I N S I D E S P R I N G 0 9 T R I B U N E / U S A T O D A YC o r a S k i n n e r p i c t u r e d i n S t a n i e l C a y , B a h a m a s , 2 0 0 9

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TWO men charged with the drive-by shooting of a 17-year-old boy were arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Reginald Chase, 22, and Emmanuel Rolle, 20, both of Nassau Village, have been charged with the murder of William Farrington, of Sir Lynden Pindling Estates. The teenager was killed in a drive-by shooting on Ida Street around 4am last Wednesday. He was report edly hit in the chest and upper arm. Two other men were also wounded. Chase and Rolle, who appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court 1, Bank Lane, have also been charged with caus ing grievous harm to Jamal Edgecombe and Kelcio Clarke. The men pleaded not guilty to the charges and were not required to enter a plea to the murder charge. The accused were remanded to her Majesty’s Prison. The case has been adjourned to July 28 and transferred to Court 5, Bank Lane. By PAUL G TURNQUEST T ribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE SELECT Committee designed to investigate all aspects relating to the sale and disposition of Crown land in t he Bahamas is expected to be formally named and commiss ioned in the House of Assem bly today. H eading the committee will be PLP MP Fred Mitchell who i s expected to be joined by the PLP’s MP for Cat Island and San Salvador Philip Davis. Three FNM MPs will join Mr Mitchell and Mr Davis, but t heir names are unknown at this time. The committee is expected to review all the docu mentation tabled by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham in t he House of Assembly on Monday and make further inquiries before it makes its formal report in October of this year. Speaking with The Tri b une y esterday, Mr Mitchell said that one of the aspects the c ommittee will have to investigate are the “missing” files thatM r Ingraham said they are unable to locate at this time. D uring his contribution, Mr Ingraham noted that the list he was tabling before parliament on all Crown grants issued between 1950 and 2009 was in h is estimation not a complete list. “There is a book of Crown g rants, book number A4 which includes (grants issued in the y ears) 1960 to 1963. This book has not been located. It has been missing for quite some time,” he said. Mr Ingraham said there s hould be some very “interesting names” in this book. We have also sought to compare that which is availablew ith that at the Registrar General’s office and at the end of t he day we may revert back to parliament to say whether they are missing. “And once we have verified they are missing we will then c onsider whether or not there is any grant that does not showu p at the Registrar General’s office or in other information w e have, whether or not we should cause parliament to pass a Bill that declares any such grant to be null and void,” he said. Careful H owever, Mr Mitchell warned that in this case the prime minister must be very careful in his approach. “You can’t use a cannon for s omething that really requires a fly swat. You have to be careful a bout the rule of law and people’s right to property. Notwithstanding how poor ly we feel about the ethics of it, you can’t lawfully strip people of their rights without compensation,” Mr Mitchell said. The Fox Hill MP added that the committee will be open to all ideas that are in the public domain, but stopped short of saying if it will recommend any criminal charges at the end of its investigations. As he waits to see who will be named from the FNM to join the committee, Mr Mitchell said it will be interesting to see if government is serious about the Crown land issue. The House of Assembly is expected to meet this morning at 10am. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net MINISTRY of Education officials want their proposed t en-year education plan to be finanalised by December and implemented by next January, but the head of the Bahamas U nion of Teachers (BUT While noting that she thinks the plan which is currently in draft form is an "excellent idea", BUT's presidentB elinda Wilson said at least another year of extensive background work is needed for the programme to be successful. " Based on looking at the document, I don't see it being completed by December. If it's going to be done in a proper manner, I think December is an unrealistic date. I wouldt hink that this needs at least a full year's work, another year's work, with the view for it to be implemented for S eptember 2010," Ms Wilson told T he Tribune y esterday when asked how she felt about the ministry's target date for implementation. " In my mind, you have to be working on this document and the procedures (outlined it cannot be done with just a few persons working partt ime or in set groups.” She said educators also n eeded more time to peruse and discuss the 65page document whichw as presented to education stakeholders at the N ational Education Sum mit two weeks ago. Yesterday, Marcellus T aylor, director of plan ning and co-chair of the e ducational plan committ ee, said the implementa tion timeline is based on ministry's current sched ule. Ministry officials plan t o meet again with edu cators when the fall semes ter begins to get detailed feedback on the draft and will also h old a number of town meetings on the issue, Mr Taylor said at a press briefing yesterday at the Ministry of Education. T he plan comprises 22 goals, each with accompanying short-term and long-term objectives, that the ministry said is a blueprint to transforming the country's educational sys t em. Whether or not the plan meets its objectives will ulti mately boil down to whether it receives sufficient govern ment funding. However, the committee does not know how much it will c ost to implement the programme as it needs to perform a cost analysis for each goal, said Mr Taylor. The idea of starting a national lottery or a national tax to fund the plan are suggested in the blueprint but according to another local daily this plan was quashed by PrimeM inister Hubert Ingraham. The committee was commissioned in April 2008 and has spent the last 13 months compiling ideas from focus groups and educational stakeholders. The draft can be viewed in its entirety at www.bahamaseducation.com and feedback on the plan can be sent to tenyearplan@bahamaseducation.com. Ministry wants education plan finalised by December Police motorcyclist in ‘stable condition’ after Sunday’s collision with squad car By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE officer who was seriously injured when his motorcycle collided with a squad car during a dramatic police chase on Sunday night is in stable condition in hospital. Officer Nelson Rahming, a father of two sons and a well-known member of the Fox Hill community, had been pursuing a trail bike on his motorcycle with a police patrol car when the vehicles crashed on Soldier Road shortly after 7pm. The trail bike made off and the police motorcyclistw as rushed to hospital unconscious. Police in the Traffic Division reported yesterday that Officer Rahming, a resident of Cockburn Street, is now stable, but could not confirm if he had regained consciousness. So far, their investigation has not revealed any information about what may have caused the accident, police said. The three police officers who were in the Wulff Road Police Station squad car at the time of the crasha lso sustained injuries in the collision and were treated in hospital. Anyone who witnessed the crash or may have anyi nformation which could assist investigations should call the Traffic Division on 393-7714 or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on3 28-TIPS (8477 F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f CRASHFLASHBACK: The aftermath of Sunday’s collision in which a policeman was seriously injured after a collision with a squad car during a high-speed chase. The two police vehicles were pursuing a trail bike when they collided on Soldier Road shortly after 7pm. The police motorcyclist was tak en to hospital. Committee designed to probe Crown land sale expected to be formally named today FRED MITCHELL Pair char ged with drive-by shooting of 17-year -old boy Magistrate’s Court Based on looking at the document, I don't see it beingc ompleted by D ecember . If it's going to be done in a proper manner, It hink December is an unr ealistic date.” Belinda W ilson

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By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net BAHAMAS Hotel Association (BHA Robert Sands yesterday con-f irmed that, as revealed by P rime Minister Hubert Ingra ham, tourism numbers con tinue to decline despite all efforts to attract visitors. While statistics are still b eing compiled for the annua l Tourism Outlook Survey which will be released next week, Mr Sands said it appears the number of tourists visiting the islands is declining month by month as they have been since the glob al economic crisis hit last year. Last week Mr Ingraham told the Regional Forum at the Inter-American Development Bank’s 50th anniversary in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, how occupancy levels at hotels remain well below those achieved last year in tourism economies across the Caribbean despite discounts and other incentives to attract visitors. The economic downturn has resulted in 2,200 lay-offs in the Bahamas’ hotel sector, which amounts to one per cent of the country’s entire work force, Mr Ingraham said, as the country was one of the first in the region to feel the effects of the slowing global economy. However, Mr Sands yesterday praised efforts to revamp the airport, cruise ship port, and clean up the islands to improve the tourism product and ensure the visitors who do come to the Bahamas leave with a positive impression and a mind to return, as well as the inclination to report good things to friends and family at home. “Notwithstanding the current situation is the fact that the efforts of all those involved in private sector tourism and public sector tourism are working to be more creative in the marketplace, and to keep the name of the Bahamas out there in an attempt to make up for financial losses. “We are in the process of trying to complete the economic survey we do annually, so I am not in a position to comment on it, but the trend remains the same, arrivals are still showing decreases in terms of the occupancy rate and revenue, so although it appears to be slowing it has not changed. “There are pockets of property doing better than some, we have one or two of the major hotels showing slight improvements over last year, but we have to look at this in the aggregate, the experiences of a few small properties and one or two medium sized hotels is not a good indication of our state of industry.” He added: “The Bahamas could have taken the position where they see that it’s tough and not do anything about it, so it would continue to dete riorate, but we are not doing that, we are seeing work, it may not be manifesting itself in terms of increased arrivals, but people who visit here will recommend the destination based on their experience that they had.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 3 x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsT T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h he e J Ja a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242)326 2335 2335Outdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance Court By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A 30-YEAR-OLD man was lucky to survive after being shot at least four times in a d rive-by shooting in Nassau’s inner-city. The victim was on Lifebuoy Street, off East Street, when he was gunned down by t he driver or passenger of a passing vehicle at around 10pm on Monday, police said. Police Supt Elsworth Moss, officer incharge of the Central Detective Unit ( CDU), said police have not received any d escription of the vehicle, or its occupants, a nd are appealing to the public for information. “The injured man is in critical, but stable condition in the hospital’s Intensive Care Unit. “He was shot about four or five times about the body. We don’t know what the motive for the s hooting was at this stage. “Hopefully once he improves we can speak to him and see if we can find the m otive,” Mr Moss said. The violent shooting was one of two in the capital within three hours. Quinten Walker, 18, was engaged in an a rgument with another man on Cumberb atch Alley, off Wulff Road, at around 1 2.40am yesterday when shots were fired. As they were arguing, in what police say was simply a verbal altercation, a third man appeared and fired several shots at the teenager. Grazed A bullet grazed the side of Mr Walker’s f ace and another hit the rental car he had b een driving. P olice have two men in custody for quest ioning in connection with the incident. S upt Moss said: “We believe the man who fired the shots was a friend of the person he was arguing with.” N o arrests have yet been made in connection with the Lifebuoy Street shooting. Anyone who may have witnessed the shooting in Lifebuoy Street, or have anyi nformation which may assist investigations, should call the Criminal Detective Unit u rgently on 502-9991 or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 All calls to Crime Stoppers are answered in the United States and ensure total anonymity. Drive-by shooting victim hit at least four times Tourism numbers declining – despite bid to woo visitors A 30-YEAR-OLD-MAN was shot several times in a drive-by shooting in Lifebouy street of East street Tuesday night. By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A POLICE officer testified yesterday that local mortician Dorneil Ferguson t old him that his co-worker D udley Moree had shot him a nd his wife. Sergeant Alexander Pierre told the court that around 2.40 am on Thursday, June 26, he was on patrol and ordered to go to the Family Street area. On arrival he was stopped by a civilian who pointed out an apartment and gave him certain information. Sergeant Pierre said he kicked in the front door of the apartment and also a bedroom door. Inside he saw a man, a woman and a baby in bed. He said he noticed the man had gunshot wounds to his right hand and lower back. The woman, he said, had been shot in the left leg. Sgt Pierre said he asked Mr Ferguson who had shot him. Mr Ferguson told him: “Officer I ain feel like I gern make it. My co-worker Dudley Moree who live off Cow pen Road shot us, I saw him through our bedroom window.” Sgt Pierre told the court how a few minutes later, EMS personnel arrived and took Mr Ferguson and his wife to hospital. Notepad During cross-examination b y Moree’s attorney, Murrio Ducille, Sgt Pierre said he recorded what Mr Ferguson had told him on a notepad but did not know where it was. Mr Ducille also sug gested Mr Ferguson had n ever said those words. Sgt P ierre denied the sugges tion. Housekeeper Cassandra Evans told the court she knew the accused and the deceased who worked at Butler’s Funeral Home. She recalled an altercation between the two men during which she saw Mr Ferguson beating up Moree. She said Moree just stood there and took the blows. Ms Evans also said she heard Moree tell Mr Fergu son he was going to shoot him, but Mr Ferguson replied that he wasn’t going to shoot anyone. Ms Evans also recalled an incident at the funeral home three weeks later. She said Moree said he was going to kill Mr Ferguson and she watched as Mr Ferguson came and pushed Moree in his head. She told the court that a month after that inci dent, she learned that Mr Ferguson had died. Moree, 23, of Faith Gardens is accused of murdering 38-year-old Ferguson. Moree is also charged with attempted murder and pos session of a firearm with the intent to endanger the life of another. The trial continues today. Policeman: mortician told me his co-worker shot him and wife T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y . 30-year-old man in critical condition Officers ask public for information Police say motive remains unclear “... arrivals are still showing decreases in terms of the occupancy rate and revenue....” BHA president confirms the comments of Ingraham R OBERT SANDS HUBERT INGRAHAM Robert Sands

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R e:Requesting Government to Review Pensions Of Retired Public Officers/Servants B ) Utilization of Some Retirees Etc: EDITOR, The Tribune. To my knowledge, it has been a long time since a review of pensions was carried out, ie,p ublic servants and public officers. There is a policy by government which is appreciated by us retirees that soon after a n increase of public servants/public officers, an additional increase reflected retirees’ pensions, ie, a small amount across the board. S ome time last year, there w as an increase for government: public officers/servants approximately received $63.00 per month. Mr John Pinder, President of The Bahamas Pub l ic Services Union, usually proposed for retirees at least halfg iven to public officers be con sidered. Although half of this s eems small, but it would be a help for the time being: To date at the demise of a pensioner the spouse/beneficiary is given one year of ad eceased pensioner, upon request by application. Hope-f ully at the discretion of gov ernment a longer period may b e considered. Some pensioners passed away not long after retirement, while others could live for a very long period. A review of p ensions when carried out should be commensurate at l east the nineteen sixties com pared to the two thousands. T he vast contrast would be observed. Relative to the police department: a constable’s pension is about $1,200 per month. This analogy could refer to othe r government departments. Some retirees are earning m onthly pensions less than $1,000, including the combinat ion of National Insurance. It should be realised that we retirees are living in the same era of consistent escalation of the cost of living. Following are names of some retirees: Education: Mr Livingstone V Taylor the most senior e ducator; Mrs Mildred Dilette (nee King female educator; Mr Filex Deleveaux Family Island; Rev Dr Charles Saunders: Fam ily Island, former deputy permanent secretary. The naming of the highway in his honour most appropriate and merito rious, including other persons mentioned can be termed as legendary, 1 educators. Percy Strachan, Hexon Pratt also Island Commissioner, L B D’Arville, Catherina Cartwright, Maria Ferguson (ne Taylor Minnis (ne Moncur Mounts (ne Lockhart S trachan (ne Coakley cipal, Beryl Francis-Culmer Principal, Vylma Curling, Marina Walcott (ne Thompson Principal, Paula Holder (ne G ibbs), Nathilee Hutcheson (ne Russell Mrs Leona Jane Fernander, Mrs Thelma Ferguson of USA. M essrs: Vincent Wilson, Frank Reid, Gibson, Raul Dean, Dr Moree Holder. The latter six educators are also former police officers. Mr Richard E Dean, an educator to be remembered also as Asst Director, Immigration, Deputy Secr etary, Gaming Board, Superintendent Boy’s Industrial S chool, Mr Albert Smith, Ms Alice Watson, Mrs Josephine Parker, Mrs Claudette Lundy etc. Police Department: Rudley ( Diamond) Ferguson Most Senior Police Officers, retiredC harles McKinney, Frederick Brooks. These three retirees a re the last survivors of the famous Burma Road Riot, 1942 Sgts: Bynoe, Carl Lynch, Dennis John, Ezra Flowers, “OldA be” Stuart, Allan McPhee, I nspector John “Stinger” Moss, ASP Wilmore Dames, Hugh S andford, Lewis Hennings, Edmund Stubbs, Ormond Brigg s, Charles Fernander, Avery Ferguson (former teacher Addington D’Arville (former headmaster, Roses, Long Island), Stanley Moir, Ashton Miller, Keith Mason, Errol Farquharson, Arnold Farquharson, Kenneth Andrews, Ms Agatha Rodgers (ne Gibson F orbes, Mrs Agnes Saunders, Dezerina Schroeter (ne Lewis), Whitfield Major, Salathiel “All night” Wilson, Irrington “Fish” Dean, Alfred Williams, Irvin Taylor, Reginald Dumont, Errol Hepburn, Ronnie Bannister, Vincent Charlton, Haverson McKenzie, K ilroy Coakley, Harcourt Wallace, Paul Thompson, Errington Watkins, Fr Rodney Burrows, Arthur Yearwood, Edwin “Cheno” Knowles, Irrington “Fish” Dean, Wilfred Jack, Bertram Davis, George “Shoes” Poitier, Leland Turner, Lemond Seymour, Ezra Curry, D ustan Babb, Alonzo Butler, Dorthan Chandler, Cordell Delancey, Larry Johnson, Ellis Peet, Retired Secretary, Labour Tribunal, Supentindent of Boy’s Industrial School, Newton McDonald, Former Under-s ecretary, Garth Johnson, Leon Johnson, Wilton Strachan, F ritzroy Antoine. Road Traffic: Fred Neely, L eroy Braithwaite, (both for mer police officers), Mr Charles Clarke Former Deputy Controller. Customs: Mrs Patsy Wring (ne Poitier man” Albury, Mr Arlington Miller, etc: Immigration: Mr Fred Strachan, Mrs Joan Clarke (nee Hanna) Former Deputy Permanent Secretary, Mrs Barbara Pierre, Former Director. There are several retirees who could be utilised if only part time: eg Police Depart ment retirees CID experience: Reading of crime cases, making recommendations: etc: Mr Paul Thompson Consultant Ministry of National Security. Education: There are many teachers retired with specialties: Reading Mathematics, E nglish. Classrooms could be assisted ie Literature: Shakespeare, Merchant of Venice, Macbeth, King Lear; Hamlet P rince of Denmark. Reference: Mr Livingstone V Taylor, I recall this modest gentleman as a Family Island Headmaster when in 1949 I was appointed p upil teacher. Note during that era pupil/asst teachers could have acted as head masters whenever necessary. Somew ere appointed head masters from the said position. Permit me to refer to Rev Dr CharlesW Saunders who preached at h is church some time last year. This service related to Retired Police Officers. He made an analogy ie: the death of Christ when simultaneously the tem-p le was split: The Atonement w hich made the possibility of going to the high priest obso lete. As an educator he illustrated ie: Geometry: The equilateral, triangle: The straightp erpendicular line from the base to the apex. He explained No acute, obtuse, right angle:” He reiterated the straight line c ould reach God. I was stimulated and impressed. He depict ed the talent of educators making a pertinent point. The naming of Charles W SaundersH ighway is meritorious and most appropriate. T here are categories of retirees eg: The Police, Educat ion, Prison, Customs, etc; they should independently form an association so that functions, committees, profiles, testimo nials etc, could be organisedo ther than expecting the government of the day to always i ntervene. There are crucial times for t he nation, therefore, retirees as we are, have to maintain patience and not to be perceived as imprudent. In time hopefully something would be w orked out. Some retired public offic ers/civil servants who are Jus tices of the Peace could be u tilised as Lay Magistrates. Especially such Justices of the Peace with propensities, eg, legal/court matters. This could alleviate backlog of minor offences and facilitate the hearing of such cases. The FNM government merits congratulations relative to some u nemployed contributors hav ing been considered payment benefits under The National Insurance Board. It should be noted that retirees generally reflect a most arduous past: in retirement many experience physical repercussions as a consequence. With regards to util isation of retirees, suggestions, modifications are strongly recommended. There was a philosopher L Ron Hubbard, one of his ren ditions: knowledge experience not imparted is atrophied, (waste personified cally I wish to point out that the retirees hope that the pow ers that be would at their convenience, remember us while we are still in the realm of exis tence and that relevant suggestions mentioned may be brought to fruition. We are privy to the fact that the Bahamas is experiencing economic, financial, crisis which of course is not insurmountable hence, whatever is done would be appreciated immensely. C ADRIEL HUTCHINSON Retired Chief Inspector of Police Nassau, June, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm BAHAMIANS aspire to first world stan d ards, but many are not prepared to make the effort to achieve them. Not only do theyw ant the luxury without the required effort, but they get upset if experts are brought in to s how them how to improve themselves. “Hey, man, you trying to show us up, eh?” Oh, how often have we heard that stupid, Third World lament even in an office set t ing. In the early days of the PLP regime, u nder the late Sir Lynden Pindling, we were shocked one day when the Opposition UBP offered a word of advice in the House of Assembly. “You think just because we black we don’t know, eh?” was Sir Lynden’s angry r etort. The fact was that they did not know. T hey needed help and direction from a group of legislators, who, having ruled the c ountry for generations, had administrative know-how in their genes. The PLP were not ignorant of the art of government because they were black. They were ignorant because they had never had the opportunity to learn a bout administration at any level. Suddenly they were in a position to experiment on t he Bahamian people. But what made them a danger to the country was their attitude. T hey were too proud to accept guidance. They were afraid of being “shown up.” As a consequence this country took many wrong turns. It is a miracle it has done as well as ithas despite all the road blocks put in the w ay by people puffed up with false pride, stupid arrogance, and envy. W e have qualified our statement by the use of the word “many” because obviously t his attitude does not apply to all Bahamians who are hard working and who fully deserve to enjoy the fruits of their labours. Today the Bahamas is behind in many areas. Facing global competition for which Bahamians are not ready, there is muchc atching up to do. Government has brought in needed foreign experts many of whom, from the con versations we have had, have come up a gainst the very attitude that we are now discussing. M any of these projects are backed by European financing, about which we have heard grudging remarks by those who fear that any improvement requiring more effort might change their laid-back lifestyle. How m any times have we seen a brilliant foreigner shake his head in frustration notk nowing how to complete a project because he is held back by a local staff unwilling to l earn. He knows he is wasting his time, and that they will slip back into their old ways as soon as he leaves. This week we were talking to a friend w ho described the feelings of some foreign experts in some of government’s ministries. They are experienced foreigners,” our friend said, “who were contracted by government to undertake a major project in a particular ministry that government sees as necessary to modernise, to make more e fficient and productive. “Despite working on average around 12 h ours a day, and on weekends, they were dismayed to have someone bring to their a ttention comments made in a Bahamian internet chat forum where someone with knowledge of the workings of their department, believed to be an employee, was making disparaging comments about them. They were being accused of getting paid too much, taking jobs that Bahamians in the m inistry could have had, and of generally being superfluous, when in fact their work h as been praised as having the potential of being very transformative. “Its goals are numerous and address areas where it is well known we are in serious need of reform. While this seriously disillusioned at least one of the group, they have also been dis t urbed by what they see as the apparent dis regard for their work by the various agencies a nd department that its success hinges on,” said our friend. “One said to me that he feels almost certain that all of their efforts will be lost once they leave. It really has not sunk in with those who need help whether the cause is ineptitude, indifference or hostility againstf oreigners, they didn't attempt to say.” These consultants, used to a First World work ethic, were shocked by how many in their department leave work at 2.30pm top ick up their children from school, but never return. I t certainly makes one wonder how many of them could survive a full eight-hour work day, not to mention the 12 hours often required daily to build a successful nation. Remember the retirees – while we are still here! LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net EDITOR, The Tribune. Allow me a space in your newspaper to congratulate the first African-American person to such an extreme position in the world. The man I'm talking about is President Barack Obama. It was a night of excitement in Chicago and The Bahamas when he was chosen as the next President of the United States of America. When coming to office in January 20, 2009. The next two years the road is a long, hard one. Stay focused and committed to a job that your people entrust you to do. At this time, and place the world needs strong men of your character. You are like a fresh wind breeze. The World was crying out for more peace, love and waited patiently for your arrival. We here in The Bahamas would be watching every step you make all your ups and downs, sorrows and joys. The Lord raises up great men of loyalty and good character to lead. Make your own footprint in the sand and legend so the World would remember Barack Obama. SHEENA THOMPSON Nassau, 2009. Excitement as Barack Obama makes his footprint in history Attitude to work and to for eigners

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R ENEWAL of commercial leases of government land is not automatic,P rime Minister Hubert Ingraham has warned. “Renewals are based upon evidence of satisfac-t ory compliance with ‘key p erformance indicators’ as set out in the lease agreement,” he said in a com m unication to the House of Assembly on Monday on the Disposition of Crown and Government OwnedL and. These performance indi cators include financial commitment, likely public b enefits to be derived from the development, ongoing use, and sustainability of t he development, he said. The government reserves the right to revisit lease terms and conditions at the time of each renewal,” the prime minister said. Agreement The conditional lease purchase of Crown land agreement stipulates fees, rents, a specified time frame and other development conditions or mark ers to be met by the lessee. “In the event that the conditions of the lease are not met the land reverts to the inventory of Crown lands,” Mr Ingraham said. Bahamian applicants have been approved and issued Crown grants and conditional purchase lease agreements for properties along the Carmichael, Gladstone and Marshall Roads corridors in New Providence for commercial development. The prime minister said h e was pleased to have been the instrument through which independent Bahamian entrepreneurs at the Down Home Fish Fry were approved for renewable Crown leases. Howev er, he said he is disappointed that so many lessees are behind in their pay ments. Infrastructure “Following upon the receipt of those leases and the installation of public infrastructure by the gov ernment,” he said, “some of the shacks at the entrance to Arawak Cay were transformed into attractive restaurants, which are frequented by Bahamians of all walks of life and countless visitors to New Providence. “I have recently noted my disappointment that a large number of these lessees are years in arrears i n the payment of their lease fees.” The government accel e rated the creation of new Crown subdivisions during its first term in office, Mr Ingraham said. N ew subdivisions were c reated in New Providence, Abaco, Grand Bahama, Andros and Exuma, mak i ng land more easily and reasonably available to Bahamians for the con struction of residences, he s aid. SOME $5.4 million is expected to be contributed byg overnment to start the first phase of the Chronic DiseaseP rescription Drug Plan (CDPDP mately 32,000 persons. Representatives of the National Insurance Board( NIB) apprised government and opposition members of parliament on the CDPDP during a special presentation at the Police Conference Centre on East Street yesterday. Addressing the parliament arians, NIB director Algern on Cargill said: “It is important to note that phase one is not calling on any additional contributions from the gov-e rnment or the persons who w ill be covered,” he said. Phase one will be funded entirely from the National I nsurance Board.” There will be a second reading in the House ofA ssembly on September 2 of t he Bill for the CDPDP. Once the legislation is enacted, the prescription drug plan, which is similar to that of Jamaica, will be administered in two phases beginningw ith a pilot phase of NIB pensioners, invalids and children under 18 or up to 25 if in university. Future phases, which will cover 48,000 persons, will i nclude employed and selfemployed persons, indigents, persons in government insti t utions and voluntary members. Mr Cargill said the drug plan will address national concerns regarding the burden of chronic diseases which a ffect one in three Bahamians timely access to essential drugs, and the financial burden to patients, families andg overnment. “The key benefit of the plan is quality, cost effective drugs, associated medical plans including syringes and test strips,” he said. “The medical s upplies or prescription d rugs will be provided on a monthly basis.” The initial list of drugs cov e rs 93 items that will be reviewed and amended. Mr Cargill said the plan is intended to cover 11 chronic diseases, including arthritis, breast and prostate cancer, g laucoma, hypertension, high c holesterol, asthma and ischaemic heart disease. “For this plan to be succ essful and for us to operate as efficiently as possible, tech-n ology is going to be a big contributor to the success in terms of ensuring that the pharmacies remain on board in its execution,” he said. P ublic and private pharmacies will be contracted as providers. “We recognise that in some of the Family Island pharmacies there is no technology and we are making special arrangem ents to have the prescription d rugs to be dispensed through the various clinics,” said Mr Cargill. The plan will also assist in f unding health and wellness p rojects. The other part of the plan is the Healthy People Prog ramme,” he said. “The objective is to partner with the Ministry of Health to provide sup p ort and grant funds for welld esigned community projects to create more awareness about healthy lifestyles. “Proposals will be invited from formally established public and community organisa-t ions to ensure that we create an awareness about health benefits because the more awareness we create, the less prescription drugs hopefully will be required,” said Mr C argill. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 5 Government lease renewal not automatic sa ys Pr ime Minister E STATE agent Donna L aing-Jones, of H G C hristie in Grand Bahama, was recentlynamed president for the Pilot Club of Freeport for 2009/2010. When asked about her involvement in this particular organisation, Ms L aing-Jones replied, “I j oined our club over 17 years ago, and for me ithas been a fantastic u nderstanding of real service and friendship. I have been able to connect with women from all a round the world with one common desire, to serve. As president of theP ilot Club of Freeport, my theme for 2009/2010 i s ‘Let the journey begin’.” Pilot International was f ounded and chartered in 1921 as an international s ervice organisation. The river boat pilots of the early 1900s are the inspir ation for the name. These pilots were a dmired for their ability to steer a "true course" through challenging con-d itions and obstacles. The Bahamas is home t o six Pilot Clubs with a combined membership of a pproximately 165 who have been answering the needs in their community through various worthwhile service projects andf undraisers since 1974. H G Christie is a fullservice real estate com pany in the Bahamas offering sales, rentals,a ppraisals, and property management. Estate agent named Pilot Club president for Freeport Govt set to give $5.4m to Chronic Disease Prescription Drug Plan A GROUP of B ahamians and tourists were outraged on Monday when a Spirit Air flight was cancelled, leaving them stranded in Florida without com pensation to cover their overnight accommodation. According to an irate passenger, the airline announced that the 4pm flight from Fort Lauderdale to Nassau would be cancelledbecause of weather, but allowed a Spirit Air flight to Freeport to depart at the same time. One traveller, noting that the airline’s policy is not to pay out for accommodation if the cancellation is “weather-related”, said passen gers were sceptical that this was the true cause for cancelling the flight. “They left a couple hundred people stranded and booked them on the next flight,” said the traveller, who added that he had to postpone a morning meeting for today in view of the cancellation. Attempts to reach Spirit Air in the Bahamas for comment yesterday afternoon were unsuccessful. Bahamians and tourists outraged at cancelled flight In brief ALGERNON CARGILL , director of the National Insurance Board. P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S Hubert Ingraham Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986and share your story. TAMPA, Fla. DEEP-SEA explorers based in Florida have filed an objection to a judge’s recommendation that they give 17 tons of shipwreck treasure back to Spain, according to Associated Press. Odyssey Marine Exploration filed its objection in Tampa federal court on Tuesday. The dispute concerns the 200-year-old wreck of a Spanish galleon that carried tons of silver and other artifacts estimated to be worth $500 million. The ship is believed to be the Nuestra Senora de las Mer cedes y las Animas. Odyssey says they don’t have enough evidence to confirm that the recovered cargo is from the Mercedes. The company argues that if it is, the Mercedes was engaged in commercial activity when it exploded, which would nullify Spain’s sov ereign immunity claim. Deep sea explorers object to judge recommendation

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A GROUP of prominent Bahamians came together to s upport the Bahamas Red Cross Society at the recent launch of its grand raffle to raise funds for humanitarian services and disaster relief. A mong those voicing their public support were Dame M arguerite Pindling; Nancy Kelly of Kelly’s Home Centre; R upert Roberts of Super Value; Freddie Albury of Executive Motors, and Wayde Christie, senior executive at Scotiabank. T he raffle’s opening day took place in front of the Scotia b ank branch on Bay Street. Dame Marguerite, a long-time supporter of the Red Cross, urged people to purchase raffle tickets for a good cause. “Funds raised from this 2009 raffle will be used for the Society’s humanitarian services throughout the Bahamas, and disaster relief. In light of this, it is very important that the Society has sufficient funds to respond to emergencies as they arise,” she said. “The Red Cross is one of the major emergency relief organisations in the Bahamas and is a member of the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA “Red Cross plays a significant role in youth development, whether through it training in first aid, after school pro grammes, or teaching young people to help the needy in their communities.” Dame Marguerite said she is especially pleased to welcome Mrs Kelly and Mr Roberts, “two of our most prominent businesspersons, who have again this year taken time out of their busy schedules to give of their personal time to assist the Bahamas Red Cross fundraising efforts.” “I am pleased to be joined by Mr and Mrs Freddie Albury of Executive Motors, who I understand has given a substantial discount to Red Cross on the purchase of the 2009 Toyota Corolla which is the first prize in this year’s raffle,” she said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By SIMON LEWIS Bahamas Information Service FREEPORT – The government’s housings ubdivision at Hawksbill, Grand Bahama, will carry the name of a prominent Baptist preacher. This was revealed by Housing Minister Kenneth Russell who conf irmed the renaming of the Sister Mary Patricia Russell Estate to Welling-ton Pinder Heights. Mr Russell said the government felt it moref itting to place Sister M ary Patricia Russell’s name on the new junior high school at Freeport, since her contribution tot he nation was mainly in e ducation. “This development has opened the door for another stalwart commun ity leader to be hono ured,” said Mr Russell. Dr Pinder has given e xcellent service to the Grand Bahama communit y in religious, social and c ivil sectors of our socie ty.” B orn November 3, 1920, and a product of the P inder lineage of Pinder’s Point, Grand Bahama, Rev Dr Wellington Pin d er succeeded his father Rev William Pinder as p astor of the Zion Baptist Church in Eight Mile Rock in 1961. Two years later he was challenged to establish ac hurch in the Pinder’s Point community. Thus was born the Upper ZionB aptist Church which was completed and a service of dedication held on N ovember 7, 1965. Rev Pinder was married to the late Verdell Pinder nee Smith. Thatm arriage produced nine children, three of whom became religious minist ers. After his wife died in 1989, Rev Pinder married Valurine Bain the follow-i ng year. N owadays, Rev Pinder is enjoying retirement. He remains one of GrandB ahama’s most influential leaders, having served as moderator for the Zion Churches for 30 years, p astor of Upper Zion for 35 years, as a member of the local board of Works f or 29 years, member of the Independence Com mittee, honorary presid ent of the Grand Bahama Christian Council, and most worthy officer in the Grand United Order of Odd-fellows Lodge. He is also a Justice of the Peace and a recipient of the Queen’s Badge of Honour. G B sub-division renamed to h onour popular Baptist preacher THE Bahamas is to import a gricultural products directly f rom Haiti, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham confirmed. He said the Bahamas wants to grow more of its own food but it cannot produce an adequate amount for domes-t ic consumption and the hotel s ector. “It will benefit the Bahamas if crops are imported from Haiti because fewer Haitians would leave home in search of jobs if they hade mployment opportunities in H aiti,” he said in an interview with BIS and ZNS following the IDB Forum in Haiti last weekend. Prime Minister Ingraham also met privately with Haitian President Ren Prval at t he National Palace, Port-auP rince, when they discussed topics of mutual interests. T rip O n his trip to Haiti, he was accompanied by ChristineT hompson, Chief Economist, M inistry of Finance, and H aiti’s Ambassador to the Bahamas Louis Harold Joseph. They were met in P ort-au-Prince by the Bahamas’ Ambassador to Haiti Davy Rolle. M r Ingraham pointed out t hat The Bahamas is selling in its food stores Haitian mangoes imported from Miami. “Why can we not import the mangoes directly fromH aiti to Nassau?” he asked. “Would it not be cheaper to do so?” The same goes for vegeta b les grown in Haiti, he said. “We have had complica tions in terms of certifying f ruits grown in Haiti, as an e xample,” said the Prime M inister. “The Americans have found a way to deal w ith it why can’t we?” Mr. Ingraham said he promised the Haitian Presi d ent that by the end of the y ear, crops such as mangoes should be coming directly from Haiti without jeopardising The Bahamas’ agricultural sector. “We in The Bahamas h ave a long history of impos ing on ourselves requirements and standards that are n ot in our interest,” he said. “At one time we would not import beef from Argentina b ecause of some rules that w e have. “But the Argentines could e xport beef into the United States and we could buy the beef from there. We are going to seek to o vercome that kind of thing.” Meanwhile, the Government is going to maximize opportunities for Bahamians to go into food production. “One of the things we can d o in The Bahamas is increase the supply of goods and services to the tourism s ector,” he said. “It would create numer ous jobs if Bahamians pro duced more things the t ourists use, because while there are only 300,000 peo-p le residing in the country, n early 5 million tourists pass t hrough The Bahamas every year.” Because the attraction and d emand to get to the Bahamas “is so great,” said the Prime Minister, migrationo f Haitians there “is overwhelming.” Immigrants “We have intensified our efforts to stem the flow of i llegal immigrants into the Bahamas,” he said. At the same time, we have b een seeking as best as we can to deal with those who are there, who are undocu m ented. “We have also been pro viding status for those who have been in The Bahamas f or long periods of time and who have a connection to the society.” T he Government, he said, is employing a multi-prongeda pproach to handling the illeg al immigration problem. We have been able to beef up our protection,” he said. We have craft stationed permanently at Inagua. “We are working with the E uropean Union to build a new docking facility at Ragged Island where Defence Force craft will be stationed.” T he Government recently purchased two aircraft for t he Defence Force. “The Haitian authorities have been most co-operative with The Bahamas in terms of returning to Haiti those persons who come to our country illegally,” he said. At the same time we have been very fair in dealing with those who have been int he country and who have m ade a contribution to our development.” Bahamas to import directly from Haiti NANCY KELLY and Dame Marguerite Pindling (seated standing are Pauline Allen Dean, raffle chairperson; Michelangiolo Baccelli, committee member, and newly elected Red Cross president Brendon Watson. Of ficial launch of 2009 Red Cr oss Grand Raffle P RIME MINISTER H ubert Ingraham bids Haitian President Ren Prval goodbye before leaving the reception held for delegates attending the 50th anniversary of the creation of the Inter-American Development Bank, July 16. P RIME MINISTER H ubert Ingraham sends congratulations on behalf of CARICOM nations to the Inter-American Development Bank as it cele brated the 50th anniversary of its creation, July 16, Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Pictured are IDB President, Luis Alberto Moreno (righti an President Ren Prval. T h e B a h a m a s E m b a s s y i n H a i t i

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B A HAMIAN culture and entertainment will be beamed to people around the world with the success of the new television magazine, Passport to Paradise. A pilot for the television show is being taped around the Bahamas with Producers exploringo ptions for international distribution. Preparations are underway to deliver a 12 to 16 episode series to either the Network or Cable Channel that picks up this informative and entertaining new show. Taped segments have included shopping on Bay Street; the festive “Junkanoo” festivities; and fine dining atL uciano's. Future shows will feature other exotic spots and dining centres with behind-thescenes glimpses at what makes vacation visits allt he more memorable. The show's exciting pace i s given a witty edge by an attractive host Rachael Carr, a British model who has worked as a double for several stars, including Brit n ey Spears, Christina Aguilera and Kylie Minoque. Capturing the best elements of the Bahami a n vacation experience, P assport to Paradise brought in the creative team of Lou Maggio and Rob Mason. Mason is a partner at Los Angeles based RobCyn Entertainment Group a nd Maggio an Executive Producer and partner at Maven Films. Maggio, who has produced three feature films and numerous segments for t he E! Entertainment show “Wild On” is no stranger to the Bahamas. “As Director of Photography for Venus S wimwear for 18 years, I directed photo shoots on some of the most beautiful beaches in the Caribbean and Mexico,” Maggio stated, “but I a lways came back to the Bahamas. With the beautiful beaches, great history and warm lov ing people it always felt like home to me.” Alana Phillips, a London make up artist, w ho is part of the team, said working on Passport to Paradise was like a dream come true. “To be able to work in such a beautiful placea longside great people, to experience such different and rich culture and to be so welcomed by everyone was just amazing,” she said. A mong the many VIPs and celebrities that Passport to Paradise chose to interview for its s how was Vincent Vand erpool-Wallace, the Bahamian Minister of Tourism a nd Aviation. Support ing the show's t heme for quality locations, Minister Vand erpoolW allace p ointed out that the d emo graphics of visitors to theB ahamas remain high quality guests who are interest ed in participating in a wide range of a ctivities. In response to the current economy, the Bahamas, like other vacation destinations, has seen a decrease in travellers from distant places, so the country's marketing strategies h ave changed to reflect the shift. “You will find us spending a great deal more of our time, energy, and money in places that h ave non-stop flights, lower cost flights and again places closer by,” Minister VanderpoolWallace said. “Because you are finding almoste verywhere, when you look at the fall off in b usiness, it is from points distant from wherever the destination is. So very clearly, we are going to be in places like Florida, in the northeasternU nited States and other non-stop places.” Minister Vanderpool-Wallace concluded, “Bahamas marketing will be strong as far away as London because of the non-stop service to t he country. People are travelling for shorter periods, so they want to get where they are going directly, rapidly and inexpensively.” T he P assport to Paradise t elevision show pilot is a joint project of The Tribune and USA Today, and is a spinoff of the Passport to Para dise Magazine, w hich is published by the Tribune. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 7 PASSPORT TO PARADISE MAGAZINE SHOOTS TV PILOT TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras HONDURAS’ interim government ordered Venezuelan diplomats on Tuesday to leave the country as the international community threatened new sanctions on the Central American nation if negotiations fail to resolve the crisis, according to Associated Press. Venezuelan Embassy charge d’affaires Ariel Vargas said he received a letter from the Honduran Foreign Min istry ordering his diplomats to leave in 72 hours. Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez has been the most vociferous critic of what he calls the “gorilla” government that overthrew his ally Manuel Zelaya on June 28. The government of Roberto Micheletti, whom congress swore in as president after the coup, accused Venezuela of meddling in its affairs and of threatening to use its armed forces against Honduras, according to a copy of the letter obtained by The Associat ed Press. Vargas dismissed the allegations and holed up in the embassy along with a consular officer also affected by the order vowed to defy it. “We only have relations with the government of President Manuel Zelaya,” Vargas told reporters outside the building. He said the expulsion order “does not exist for us, because the Micheletti government does not exist. It is a usurper government, a coup government, a government that is not recognized by any one on an international level.” Honduras orders Venezuelan diplomats expelled

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By LARRYSMITH THE argument over the Arawak Cay port, the harbour dredging and Saunders Beach h as grown more heated lately, s o we thought we'd take a look at earlier shoreline impacts on New Providence to provide some much-needed perspective on this issue. T here is something that biolo gists refer to as the "shifting b aseline", which describes the way significant changes to an ecosystem are measured against previous standards, which themselves differ radi-c ally from original conditions. In this way, large declines in e cosystems or species over long periods of time are masked. T his is similar to what we a re experiencing today with the c oastline around Nassau. The fact is that Nassau harbour and adjacent shorelines have been hugely affected by human action for more than a century. P erhaps the most visible i mpact has been the growth of c asuarinas along the shore. T hese trees are native to the western Pacific and were introd uced to the Bahamas in the 1920s as fast-growing replace-m ents for the loss of native t rees to hurricanes. "In those days no-one could foresee the extent of the engulfment of our landscape," wrote P ericles Maillis when he was p resident of the Bahamas National Trust in the late 1990s. " And I will fight to eradicate this raging weed to make room for trees that belong to, or benefit, the Bahamas." E arly photographs show t hat our shorelines were cov ered in low scrub and native d une vegetation such as sea oats, sea purslane, coco plums, railroad vine, sea grapes and buttonwood. But the picture isd ecidedly different today, with dense thickets of casuarinas edging almost every beach. According to Dr David C ampbell in his book, T he Ephemeral Islands, casuarinas are "the most pernicious plants t o have invaded the Bahamas via the hand of man...most peo ple stroll under their singing b oughs oblivious to their d estructive nature...native vegetation is smothered by a wasteland of casuarina stems." Recent research has also shown that casuarinas have a devastating effect on beaches, where erosion is caused by the s uppression of native vegeta tion beneath the trees. This leads to sand blown onshoren ot being trapped to form d unes, so that during storms there is nothing to stop mas sive sand loss. The accompanying photo graph of Fort Montagu in 1910 shows a wide expanse of beach with no trees on New Providence or Paradise Island. A road was later built on the dune and the beach has virtually disappeared today, with the roadr etained by a sea wall that requires frequent and costly repair. The 1883 Dredging Nassau became one of the busiest ports in the region dur-i ng the American civil war in t he 1860s. At that time, the N assau Guardian c ompared t he harbour to its pre-war state: "There were no quays along the strand, and instead of vess els lying, as they now do, along the shore loaded and unloaded by a steam crane, they werea pproached only from the middle of the harbour by lighters." Regular steamship service b egan in the mid-19th century, and was accompanied by the construction of the island's first h otel the 90-room Royal V ictoria, which was then the largest building in town. During the late 1800s there wass teamship service from New York, Savannah, Jacksonville and Miami. I n 1883 an act was passed t o provide for the dredging of the harbour, and the following year Francisco Aranha, a civil e ngineer (whose great grandson is retired airline pilot Paul Aranha), was contracted tob uild two barges for the proj ect. Aranha had come to the Bahamas from Brazil in 1849 as foreman of the Inagua SaltC ompany, and he was a wellknown boat builder of the time. The government ordered s team dredging equipment from London, and the disused Vendue House on Bay Street (once a slave market a ssigned to the Board of Pilotage as a storehouse for "gear, machinery and coal". B ut the extent of this early dredging is unclear. In his travelogue, Sketches of Summer l and , written in 1900, George Northcroft described the harbour in much the same terms as the earlier Nassau Guardian a ccount : "...many sailing vessels come and go and occasional steamersa nchor off the bar or venture inside if of light draught: hosts of sponging boats, mails chooners and others that trade with foreign ports, and vessels that casually visit the colony or carry freights among the islands, are lashed to the wharves or lying in the stream." The 1922 Dredging When the Americans made alcohol illegal from 1919 to 1933, the Bahamas enjoyed another economic boom. And the Development Board applied most of the windfall revenues from bootlegging top ay for public works to make the country more attractive to investors. These infrastructure projects included a water and sewerage system for the city, expansion of the electricity grid, and a new cruise ship port fort he harbour. A ccording to Mary Mosel ey's 1926 B ahamas Handbook , " The deepening of Nassau harbour, which had been under consideration for nearly a cent ury and which was taken up seriously by the House of Assembly in 1911 and 1912,w as definitely authorised by the harbour dredging act of 1921 and dredging operationsc ommenced in 1922." This was the first time that Nassau harbour became suita ble for deep-draft vessels such a s passenger liners. Before, large ships had to anchor over the harbour bar, with their car-g oes transshipped by lighters and passengers landed by tenders. In rough weather, ships h ad to anchor off Clifton, and p assengers travelled 16 miles to Nassau on a bad road. The 1922 act approved d eepening the harbour entrance to a depth of 35 feet with a 33-foot channel andb asin at a cost of 250,000 p ounds. The bar and harbour were dredged to allow entry, turning and mooring for ves s els with 27-foot drafts, and a 600-foot long concrete dock (named after Prince George w as connected to Rawson Square by a steel bridge. This project was completed in 1928. It turned out to have been a p rudent investment. When the economy collapsed after Pro hibition ended in 1933, Gover n or Sir Bede Clifford said the colony had to choose between "the tourist industry and bank r uptcy." And the new cruise port was a major asset in the development of tourism over the next 30 years. S poil from the harbour dredging was used to create Clifford Park (named after theg overnor) and pumped over Paradise Island to create what we now know as LighthouseB each. During this period, dredged fill was also pumped from areas off Cable Beach for the development of the Hobby Horse Hall racetrack and the Bahamas Country Club golf course. This led to a loss of sand from the offshore system, which eventually degraded the beaches in that area. The 1966 Dredging In more recent times, there h ave been even greater impacts o n the harbour and adjacent shorelines. In 1966 during another economic boom the g overnment spent $18 million t o dredge the harbour to a depth of 36 feet with a 1500f oot turning basin. Also included were two breakwaters at the harbour entrance, an artificial island, and a new pier and term inal for the cruise port. A t otal of 3.5 million cubic yards of material was excavated by t he US-based Frederick Snare Corporation. Most of that spoil was used to create Arawak Cay, which can be considered the most sign ificant impact in history on the state of Nassau's coastline. A t the time, the opposition P rogressive Liberal Party complained bitterly about government secrecy over the project and suggested that the premier, S ir Roland Symonette, was p lanning to prevent public access to Saunders Beach, w here he owned land. This dredging was tied to a landmark investment projecti nvolving the sale of large tracts of Paradise Island by Hunting ton Hartford to the Mary C arter Paint Company (which later became Resorts Interna tional) for tourist development, and included the constructiono f the Paradise Island bridge at a cost of $1.5 million. Hartford was a winter resid ent who had acquired 750 acres of Hog Island (as it was then known) for $9.5 millioni n 1961. His redevelopment of t he island included dredging part of the eastern end of the harbour to fill a scalloped areac alled Three Bays opposite Fort Montagu. A golf course and later an airstrip was built on this reclaimed land, which is n ow part of the residential enclave known as Ocean Estates. The 1989 Dredging The fourth harbour dredging project was conceived in 1986 and awarded to the Cana dian firm, Balfour Beatty, two years later. The contract included a feasibility study for buildi ng a new port at Clifton, which w as rejected due to environmental concerns. The harbour entrance chann el was widened to 600 feet a nd dredged to a depth of 37 feet' with a 1700' turning basin. T he cruise port was expanded to berth 11 ships, up from the previous eight, Woodes Rogers Wharf was enlarged, and there w as some reclamation of the f oreshore at Malcolm's Park as well as an extension of Potters C ay to the east and west. This contract also included work on so-called mini cruise ports at Morgan's Bluff on Andros, Governor's Harbour o n Eleuthera and Snake Cay on Abaco none of which e ver saw a cruise ship. The final c ost was $52.4 million and most of the work was finished by late 1990. According to the then chairm an of the Port Authority: " Whatever disturbances that occur during the building of o ur new port we should remember that it's for the overall good of the country. Thisw ill take us well into the 21st century." But the opposition Free National Movementa lleged that "something smells in Nassau harbour" and com plained loudly that the project was "shrouded in secrecy." E nvironmental concerns at the time were largely confined to the impact the dredging m ight have on the Coral World facility at Silver Cay. This marine park had only just beend eveloped in 1987 and included a n underwater observatory topped by a 100-foot tower. A sea wall was built betweenA rawak Cay and New Provi dence in an effort to prevent silt from affecting the underwater tower. M eanwhile, Woodes Rogers Wharf has been extended several times. In the 1940s it wast aken as far west as the old Prince George Hotel. In the 1950s more seabed was reclaimed to extend the prom enade to the British Colonial Hotel. And in the 1980s it was widened to 38 feet over its entire length. T he 2009 Dredging I n April of this year the government signed a $50 million contract with the Dutch firm, R oyal Westminster Boskalis, t o dredge 1.9 million cubic yards of material from the harb our. The spoil will be used to add some 40 acres to the western end of Arawak Cay and extend t he eastern end of Woodes R ogers Wharf as far as Armstrong Street to a width of s ome 30 feet. This promenade will include a boardwalk, landscaping, service road and utility corridor and is a component of the d owntown redevelopment project. I t will cost an additional $24 m illion. "The contract will enable us to welcome into Nassau Harbour the largest cruise ships," P rime Minister Hubert Ingrah am said recently. "The coastal analysis has indicated minimal c hange to beaches and tidal flow as a result of the deepening. There has also been noi ndication of potential adverse effects on the Western Esplanade beach from dredg i ng activities." But once again there are complaints about a lack of information and fears of poten t ial damage to nearby beaches, especially Saunders Beach. Coastal experts say it is unlikel y that the extension to Arawak Cay will affect the area any fur ther as the shielding of the b each and restriction of flow a long the shore already exist. The problem now is to res urrect the beach with the sand t hat is available in the coastal system. Regardless of any past abuse, the re-alignment of West Bay Street inland and r eplacing the casuarinas with native plants will restore Saunders Beach eventually, where a s leaving things as they are will certainly lead to its even tual total loss. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Earlier impacts on the New Providence shoreline M ONTAGU BEACH i n 1910, looking towards Three Bays on Paradise Island, taken from Reminiscing 11, c ourtesy of Ron Lightbourn. to his sick father's face. "He was always smiling, always cheerful. He was always making daddy laugh. He was the last son and we just buried our oldest brother in Febru ary and this is really hard for us right now," she told The Tribune yesterday, adding that the family was dealing with the grief of plans to take their father off life support this week. She added that her brother was the kind of person who would not turn a blind-eye to wrongdoing and suggested he may have been killed because of something he witnessed. "He was like most of our family, we always stood up for things going on. I don't know if he saw something going on and stood up for someone," she speculated yesterday. Investigations into the murder are continuing, and police in West Palm Beach are appealing for witnesses to come forward. According to residents in the area, the Palm Beach County, with an estimated population of 1.4 million people, had about 90 murders in 2008. By contrast, the Bahamas, with an estimated population of 330,000, had 72 murders last year and 78 in 2007. body was cold from being in the water for so long, but it was not a very bloody scene.” Jetski drivers said more should be done to keep tourists safe from boats and jetskis by ensuring they swim within the buoy marking the safe swim ming zone, and boats do not drive within the barrier. There were no updates on the woman’s condition before The Tribune went to press last night. Christie in the House of Assembly. Mr Ingraham said that Mr Smith knew something about this deal. In a brief interview with The Tribune yesterday, Mr Christie stated that he met with the leaders of the church to confirm their support on the change to the grant, noting the increasing demand for low cost housing at the time. “There were two applications that had affected a variation. When the application was dealt with by (Prime Minister Ingraham) there was one thing, but when I dealt with it there was a variation that I had to sign off on the change. “At the time I did it I knew it was a variation and I signed off on it as a variation because at the time I was dealing with the fact that this was going to create home ownership and that is in fact exactly what happened.” Mr Christie added that he effected a second variation to a church application in respect of Bishop Simeon Hall, which he said is expected to produce some housing development as well. FROM page one Bahamian man found shot dead in Florida Christie allowed Golden Gates Church land grant variation FROM page one Tourist FROM page one

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n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net THE Nelson Cooper “Peace on da Streets” Basketball Classic is expected to tip off today with its 15th annual edition at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. Organisers of the tournament, scheduled to start at 6pm each day (but at 9am on Saturday ing perhaps the largest turnout of spectators and teams in its history. Nearly 40 teams are expected to take the floor over the course of the four-day tournament which culminates Saturday night with a series of championship games and exhibitions. According to Carlos Reid, founder of Youth Against Violence, the teams will be placed into brackets within their divisions at 6pm, while play will officially begin at 6:30pm. Teams from Family Islands, collegiate players and coaches from the United States are scheduled to compete, making it one of the largest tournaments of all time. Reid said the opening night will foreshadow what fans should expect from the tournament over the four days. “Wednesday night should set the tone and start us off on a good pace for all the exciting action that will follow throughout the tournament,” he said. “It is an exciting year for the organisers, for the fans and for the players themselves. We are almost maxed out now at full capacity for the numbers of teams.” Reid said with the large number of people from a cross section of society taking part in the event, the ultimate goal is to create a Bahamian version of the NBA-All Star weekend. “This tournament, more than the previous years, is for the first time bringing together people from every different sector of society,” he said. “It is bringing together politicians, clergy, singers, both gospel and secular, reporters, basketball players, media members, high society and people from the inner city all coming together to make one common goal to make a statement that we need peace on the streets.” One of several new innovations will be the Media/Entertainers division. The winning team in the division will be awarded the Phil Smith/Anthony “Fatback” Marshall floating trophy in memory of the media icons who recently passed. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 9 Ten Championships: 100 yards and 220 yards in 1960 and 1961, 60 yards in 1959 and 1961, and the 300 yards in 1959, 1960, and 1961. At the NCAA Champi onships Robinson was an All American in 1960, fin ishing fifth in both 100 yards and 220 yards. That summer the Bahamas participated for the first time in the Central American and Caribbean Games in Kingston in 1962. Robinson captured the 100m, defeating several world record holders, including Cuba’s Enrique Figuerola, Jamaica’s Dennis Johnson, and Venezuela’s Arquimedes Herrera. Rafael Romero and Horacio Esteves in the process in 10.4 secs. Later that year he won the silver medal in the 100 yards in the British Empire and Commonwealth Games in Perth, Australia. Robinson ran the first two rounds in Perth but with drew from the semi-final because he felt he was not prepared for it. He never again ran this event, which many people considered his best, in international competition. While in Nassau that year, after graduation, he was a substitute teacher at Gov ernment High in French and Spanish. In September of 1963 he studied business for one semester at the University of Toronto. He returned to Nassau and worked at Commonwealth Industrial Bank for a couple months. At an indoor meet in Saskatoon, Canada, in February of 1964, Robinson set a new world indoor record in the 300m. Robinson returned to Jamaica in the summer of 1964, winning the 100m at the West Indian Federation Games in 10.3secs. At the 1964 Tokyo Olympic Games Robinson finished second to world record holder Bob Hayes from the United States in the semi-final. He became the first Bahamian track and field athlete to advance to an Olympic final. Track and Field News, in its October/November issue of 1964, covered the final and wrote: “Robinson pulled a muscle while run ning fourth and was starting to move on the leaders at about 65 metres”. Robinson finished eighth in 10.57 secs. One of Robinson’s most memorable races was at the Commonwealth Games held in Kingston in 1966. Earlier that summer Canada’s Har ry Jerome had tied the world record in the 100 yards of 9.1 secs in Edmonton, Canada. Harry was the 1964 Tokyo 100m bronze medallist. Jerome had also previously tied the world 100m record of 10.0 secs. The race was so close that it took some 50 minutes to declare the winner. Jerome at 9.41 secs was awarded the win over Robinson at 9.44 secs. Jerome even came to congratulate Robinson after the finish. That year Robinson worked at Texaco for abouta year from 1965, moving to t he Human Resources department of Mary Carter Paints, the owner of Par adise Island Limited and the forerunner of Kerzner in late 1966, where he stayed until 1975. A veteran at 29, Robinson f ailed to make the final in the 100m at the Pan Ameri can Games in Winnipeg, Canada, in 1967, finishing sixth in the semi-final in 10.7 secs. Throughout his stellar career, Robinson had been challenged with hamstring injuries. In the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, Robinson did not finish the sixth heat of the 100m. Robinson did participate in the quarter-final of the 400m relay, which included Norris Stubbs, Kevin Johnson, and Bernard Nottage. Their time of 39.45 secs was a new Bahamian national record which was not broken until 1993, 25 years lat er. In the semi-final Robinson had another hamstring injury which caused the team not to finish. Robinson’s last outing was at the 1970 Commonwealth Games in Edinburgh, Scotland. Robinson was the team manager in Edinburgh and also a member of the 400m relay team. Unfortunately, Gerald Wisdom was supposed to pass the baton to Robinson. The team nev er finished the race as Wis dom was unable to catch Robinson. This was the end of a colourful career of the first Bahamian participant in track and field in the Olympic Games. The career spanned 15 years and four Olympic Games. Don Canham was Tom my’s coach at the University of Michigan. Tommy was coached locally by Henry Crawford and De’Yanza Burrows. In 1972 Robinson entered politics, running for the Free National Movement in the general elections. He was contesting a seat for the Culmersville Constituency, which he lost to his cousin, Arlington Butler, who had been the president of the Bahamas Amateur Athletic Association from 1964 to 1968, and would be elected as president of the Bahamas Olympic Association in 1973, serving until 2008. Robinson made another try at political office in the 1977 general elections, this time for the Salem Constituency. He carried the Bahamian Democratic Party banner and was defeated by David Knowles of the Progressive Liberal Party. Twenty-five years after he first competed in the Olympic Games, the track and field stadium in Nassau was named in his honour. In 1985 Robinson was giv en the Hall of Honour Award by the University of Michigan. He has five children, Tanya and Erika, Scott, Robbie and Jake, a brother Kingsley Robinson and two sisters Brenda Archer and Ernestine Douglas. Robin son worships at St George's Anglican Church in The Valley. Thomas Robinson set to be honoured at special luncheon F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 THOMAS AUGUSTUS ROBINSON was one of the premier Bahamian athletes of the 20th century... Bahamas t buy win’ at World Baseball Challenge of 16 and 22 with the oldest at 28, compared to the other teams who have players 22 years and older. “But it’s a good experience for the guys. I just think that if we had gotten some of the eight players that we left behind who played with us when we played in Cuba, that would have made a difference. But for some reason, most of the senior guys could not have traveled with us on this trip.” Once the team gets back, Kemp said the federation is definitely going to have to find a way to get the local players to start playing more baseball. “We need facilities, we need to play more baseball and we need to host more tournaments,” he stressed. “We need to get the guys who are going to be able to play at this level to travel and play together in smaller tournaments and more series of games. “It’s not an easy thing to do, but we know what we need to do. So we just have to find a way to put our guys at an advantage where they can get ready to play in the next tournament here in two years.” Here’s a summary of the three games the team played so far: P P r r i i n n c c e e G G e e o o r r g g e e A A x x e e m m e e n n 1 1 3 3 , , B B a a h h a a m m a a s s 3 3 : : J ohnathan Groezinger went 5.1 innings, giving up seven hits and 11 runs, five earned in suffering the loss before Amad Williams came in relief giving up the final two runs on three hits. R ight fielder Raymond Grant was the top batter, going 1-for-3 with two runs scored. Left fielder Sherman Ferguson and center fielder Diondre Rolle both had a hit with a RBI. First baseman Darren Bowleg also had a RBI. After scoring first two runs in the bottom of the first, the Bahamas watched as Prince George struck for a run in the second, two in the third, one in the fourth, two in the fifth and seven in the sixth. The Bahamas final run came in the seventh. G G e e r r m m a a n n y y 2 2 0 0 , , B B a a h h a a m m a a s s 3 3 : : Darren Bowleg got the start, but only lasted three innings on the mound after he was issued eight runs, seven earned on five hits. He only had one strike out before he was relieved by Amad Williams, who gave way to Diondre Williams to finish up in the fourth. Jason Curry, playing second base as the lead off batter, went 1-for-2 with two runs scored and left fielder Sherman Ferguson was 1-for-2 with a RBI and run. Short stop Sharad Johnson was 1for-3 with a RBI. While the Bahamas drew first blood scoring twice in the first and another in the third, Germany got three in the bot tom, two in the second, one in the third and 14 in the fourth to blow the game wide open. T T e e a a m m C C a a n n a a d d a a 1 1 4 4 , , T T e e a a m m B B a a h h a a m m a a s s 0 0 : : Three pitchers went on the mound with M Holbert suffering the loss on nine hits with 12 runs, nine earned in three innings before he was relieved by David Sweeting before Jason Curry came in to finish up in the sixth. The Bahamas, however, avoided getting completely shutout as three batters were walked by Canada’s winning pitcher J Rawlky, who went five innings with seven strike outs. The Bahamas gave up three runs in the first, one in both the second and third, eight in the fourth and another in the sixth. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 INSIGHT For stories behind news, read Insight Mondays ‘Peace on da Streets’ basketball classic expected to tip off today CARLOS REID , founder of Youth Against Violence...

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TONY Mackey Jr rode to victory in the junior division of the Bahamas Cycling Federation’s 2009 National Cycling Championship on Saturday. It was an all out sprint to the finish line as Mackey Jr pulled off the victory amidst cheers from spectators. Here’s a look at the official results posted: J J U U N N I I O O R R S S U U 1 1 7 7 24 miles 1st Tony Mackey 1:14:40.06 2nd Jay Major 1:14:40.35 3rd Anthony Colebrook 1:14:39.19 4th Dangelo Sturrup 1:14:39.61 5th Justin Minnis 1:17:01.43 6th Rahiame Colebrook 1:17:01.65 7th Michael Holowesko 1:17:02.21 8th Bruce Hall 1:17:03.21 J J U U N N I I O O R R G G I I R R L L S S 1st Antinece Simmons 1:17:36.66 O O P P E E N N W W O O M M E E N N 1st Carmel Stucci 1:15:00.79 2nd Linda Holowesko 1:24:19:67 J J U U N N I I O O R R S S I I I I 12 miles 1st Liam Holowesko 37:37.88 2nd Adrian Canter 41:03.00 J J U U N N I I O O R R G G I I R R L L S S 1st Abagail Minnis 53:44.98 Bahamas Cycling Federation’s National Cycling Championship Tony Mackey Jr rides to victory in junior division In the senior division, the extreme temperature did not hinder anyone registered from racing. After an opening prayer, the 23 cyclists started out together for the first of two gruelling 18-mile loops. Lee Farmer soon edged a c omfortable distance out from the rest of the pack. During the sixth of a six-mile loop, the riders fell into groups in their categories so the finish line held lots of action, as sprints to it gave position, determined by hundredths of seconds, to riders. R R E E S S U U L L T T S S O O V V E E R R A A L L L L W W I I N N N N E E R R Lee Farmer Senior I 72 miles 1st Lee Farmer 3:18:41:12 2nd Tracy Sweeting 3:23:36.95 3rd Barron Musgrove 3:23:36.97 4th Rowshan Jones 3:23:37.20 5th Kim Thompson 3:23:37.54 6th Rich Hincapie 3:23:37.91 7th Mark Holowesko 3:23:38.20 8th Scott Hirshorn 3:23:51.04 Senior II 1st Stephen Holowesko 3:34:19.76 2nd Stefan Krauskopf 3:36:50.95 3rd Wayne Price 3:39:47.91 Senior III 1st Van Demeritte 3:36:49.84 48 miles Senior IIII 1 st Mackey Williams 2:27.30.96 2nd Robert Bethel 2:27:31.04 3rd Robert Jones 2:27:31.79 4th Lashane Dean 2 :42:17.79 5 th Tommy Mackey 2:50:21.39 Lee Farmer wins senior division n By JAMEY KEATEN Associated Press Writer BOURG-SAINT-MAURICE, France (AP rode hard to keep the Tour de France’s yellow jersey in the Alps on Tuesday, while teammate Lance Armstrong produced a dazzling burst of speed to remain in second place. Mikel Astarloza of Spain won the 16th stage, a 99-mile route from the Swiss town of Martigny to BourgSaint-Maurice. Contador and Armstrong finished in the main pack behind Astarloza and other breakaway riders. Contador, the 2007 Tour winner from Spain, fought off an attack led by brothers Andy and Frank Schleck of Luxembourg in the day’s second big climb. “We had expected (an attack I gave my maximum. I could resist but not without difficulty,” Contador said. “I’m happy after this difficult day.” Astarloza, who rides on the Euskadi Euskaltel team, thrust his fists in the air and kissed his fingers as he crossed the line in 4 hours, 14 minutes, 20 seconds. He was six seconds ahead of French riders Sandy Casar and Pierrick Fedrigo. The three-week Tour ends Sunday in Paris. With a little more than a mile to go Tuesday, Astarloza escaped three other breakaway riders with him and held for his first Tour stage win. “I was lucky to leave alone and finish alone,” Astarloza said. “I’m a complete rider but I’m not good at the sprint, so I have to attack from far away. This is the biggest day of my career.” Contador, Armstrong, fourth-place Astana teammate Andreas Kloeden and third-place Bradley Wiggins of Britain all crossed 59 seconds after Astarloza. Overall, Contador leads Armstrong by 1:37. Wiggins is third, 1:46 back, while Kloeden is 2:17 behind and Andy Schleck is fifth, trailing by 2:26. With nearly 23 miles left, Andy Schleck attacked. He was quickly joined by Contador and a few other r iders, but not Armstrong. T he 37-year-old Texan had d ropped back by as much as 35 seconds. He then showed great speed to return to that small group of favorites, which included Schleck, Contador and Wiggins. “I just didn’t want follow that quick acceleration like I tried to do on Verbier” the first Alpine stage on Sunday, Armstrong said. “I’ve stayed with the other group, and then I realized the race was basically going away from us. “So, I had no choice other than trying to make the cross,” Armstrong said. “So I waited until we had a steeper section and then I got away with an acceleration.” Contador was impressed. “It’s easy to explain he’s a very great rider,” the Spaniard said. “He was in the past, and he showed it once again.” Two-time runner-up Cadel Evans of Australia, who finished 3:55 back, was one of the big losers on the day. He fell to 17th from 14th and now trails Contador by 7:23. The course ended with a 19-mile downhill run. Downhills make it hard for breakaway riders to outpace the fast-moving pack. Riders scaled the highest peak of this Tour, the snowcapped GrandSaint-Bernard pass on the Swiss-Italian border that is 8,113 feet. Its sister, the Petit-Saint-Bernard pass on the Italian-French border, was the day’s other big climb, and each was at least 13 1/2 miles. The final descent was perilous: Jens Voigt of Germany crashed either from a bicycle malfunction or a bump in the road. The Tour’s medical staff said he severely bruised his face and right elbow, and was flown by helicopter to a hospital in the French city of Grenoble. “He lost consciousness for a while, but he should be OK,” CSC team manager Bjarne Riis said. “For me, it’s a good sign.” During the stage, an Astana vehicle was stopped and searched by customs officials at the Swiss-French border, the team said, adding nothing of concern was found. Pope Benedict XVI sent greetings to Tour riders and organizers as the pack passed close to the Alpine retreat of Les Combes, overlooking Mont Blanc, where the pontiff is staying. Wednesday’s stage features what some riders fear is the toughest Alpine route this year a 105-mile ride from Bourg-Saint-Maurice to Le Grand-Bornand marked by five tough climbs and another downhill finish. AP Sports Writer Samuel Petrequin contributed to this report Contador, Armstrong stay 1-2 at Tour in Alps STAGE WINNER Mikel Astarloza of Spain (left Belgium, climb Petit-Saint-Bernard pass during the 16th stage of the Tour de France race over 159 kilometers (98.8 miles Bourg-Saint-Maurice, Alps region, France, yesterday... B a s C z e r w i n s k i / A P

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n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net VALENTINO Knowles and Carl Hield, in prepara tion for their second and third consecutive appearance respectively at the World Championships – set for August – are hoping to take advantage of the opportunity to train in the United States. The duo, who are back home after training facilities in Cuba closed for the sum mer break, are expected to travel to Washington DC where they are expected to train with former amateur boxer turned coach “Pretty Boy” Floyd Seymour starting next week. Seymour was in town over the weekend when he sealed the deal for the boxers to travel. At the same time, he also presented Andre Seymour and his Carmichael Knockout Boxing Club with boxing equipment from Washington. While Seymour said he’s elated to be able to continue to make a contribution to the local programme, the boxers are eager to make another trip overseas. “I’ve been living and train ing in Cuba with the best,” said Hield about his trip to continue his training. “But I’m now looking forward to going to the United States and see what it’s like and doing the same thing that I was doing in Cuba.” Hield, who emerged from the junior circuit and made his first trip to the 2005 World Championships in Mianyang, China, and again in Chicago in 2007 where he lost in the first round in both trips, said he’s now in his prime. “I’ve already been on the circuit for a while, so I have to do it now,” he insisted. “I can’t wait for another shot. This is my shot here. I have to shine now.” At age 21, Hield said his goal is to go to Italy and unleash the dragon. “I can’t say I’m going to go there and do it,” he charged. “I have to go out there and do it. I can’t just go there and lose in the first round again.” In his first trip to the championships, Knowles also suffered a first-round loss, but he noted that he was just as eager and hungry to go to Italy and improve. “The first time I was younger,” he pointed out. “Now this time, I’m looking forward to a different experience because I’m more experienced and I’m ready.” Knowles, 20, said since the last championships, he was able to go to Cuba through the assistance of the federation and that has helped him to improve tremendously. But he said the trip to Washington should really fine-tune his skills. “I think the trip to Washington will be another step forward,” Knowles said. “So I’m looking forward to going there and giving it my best in training.” Andre Seymour, the head coach for the two boxers when they travel to Italy, said the trip to Washington should really be beneficial for his protgs. “Floyd has offered us the invitation to come to Washington and because the gym in China is closed, we are going to take advantage of it,” Sey mour said. “They have some very good training facilities that I know will really help to keep them in shape for the World Championships. So we are really going to utilize what they have to offer.” Floyd Seymour, a cousin of Andre Seymour, said once the boxers get there, they will move around and train at a number of gyms so that they get to face as many different opponents as possible. Thomas Robinson set to be honoured C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 9 Nelson Cooper Basketball Classic tips off today... n By ALPHEUS ‘HAWK’ FINLAYSON Special to The Tribune THOMAS ROBINSON is scheduled to be honoured by a committee, headed by Alpheus ‘Hawk’ Finlayson, during a luncheon at Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa 2pm Sunday... BAHAMIAN national hero Thomas Augustus Robinson was one of the premier Bahamian athletes of the 20th century. Tommy Robinson, who attended St John’s College in Nassau and the University of Michigan in the United States, was born on March 16, 1938. Robinson graduated from St John’s College in Nassau in December of 1953 andwas employed at the Bahamas Electricity Corporation in January, 1954. He worked at the CustomsD epartment from late 1954 to September 1957. In 1958, at the tender age of 20, Robinson shocked the track and field world, winning the gold medal in the 220 yards and the silverm edal in the 100 yards at the B ritish Empire Games in Cardiff, Wales. Robinson’s first interna tional team was the 1955 Pan American Games in Mexico City. He finishedfifth in the semi-final of the 100m and 200m. In 1956, Robinson became the first Bahamian to participate in track and field in the Olympic Games, finishing fourth in the first round of the 100m and 200m in Melbourne, Australia. The following year Robinson became the first Bahamian to win a medal in international competition, when he won a bronze medal in the 100m in the West Indian Federation Games in Kingston, Jamaica. He also participat-ed in the 400m relay team with Oscar Francis, Tom Grant, and Enoch Backford. Tommy enrolled at the University of Michigan in the fall of 1957. It was at Michigan that Jessie Owens set or tied five world records in 1935, the year before the Berlin Olympics. In 1958, the year of the general strike in the Bahamas, Robinson equalled the new British Empire Games and British All Comers record of 9.5 seconds in the first race of the first round of the 100 yards. In the final, Robinson finished second to Jamaica’s Keith Gardener in 9.6 secs. In the semi-final of the 220 yards, Robinson ran 20.9 secs to win, establishing anew games and British Empire and Commonwealth and national record. In the final, running out of the outside lane, the boy from Hawkins Hill won the gold medal in 21.1 secs, defeating Jamaica’s Keith Gardener. In the Rome Olympics of 1960 Robinson made it to the semi-final in both 100m in a time of 10.69 secs the and 200m in a time of 21.67 secs, just missing the final in both events. Earlier that summer Robinson won the 100m at the second West Indian Fed eration Games in Kingston, Jamaica. Robinson had been a member of the St George’s Athletic Club and upon his return to Nassau in 1961, joined the newly formed Pioneers Sporting Club. Tommy graduated from the University of Michigan in 1962. While at Michigan Robinson won nine individual Big S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 Bahamas ‘can’t buy win’ at World Baseball Challenge n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T he Bahamas’ first appearance in the World Baseball Challenge has been more than Bahamas Baseball Federation (BBF “Salty” Kemp envisioned. Through the first three games played this week at the Prince George Citizen Field in Prince George, British Colombia, the Bahamas has remained winless and will need a miracle to turn t hings around before the tournament wraps up on Sunday. “We’re not fearing too well,” said Kemp as the team was preparing to play the United States in last night’s feature contest. “We are still winless and it’s only going to get tougher as we move on.” The Bahamas is scheduled to play its final game during the round robin today against Team British Colombia. Currently sitting in the sixth and final spot, the Bahamas will play the third place team to determine who t hey will go on to play in the playoff on Saturday. So far, the Bahamas has not had a good showing against any of the teams they played, losing 13-3 to Prince George Axemen in their opener on Saturday, then 20-3 to Germany on Sunday before they were shutout 14-0 by Team Canada Monday. “The first two games we hit, but we didn’t play defense,” Kemp said. “Yesterday we played defense, but we didn’t hit. We were just trying to do whatever it took to win a ball game. But o ur pitching is not as strong as it needs to be at this level with the pitchers that we have.” Not having the opportunity to play senior baseball in the country has also been a negative sign for the Bahamian players at the tournament. “Most of the kids that we have are playing in college, but they are very young,” said Kemp of the team that is made up of players between the ages S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 C ARL HIELD VALENTINO KNOWLES COACH “Pretty Boy” Floyd Seymour (left presents boxing equipment to coach Andre Seymour, Carmichael Knockout Boxing Club... Boxers eager to train with ‘Pretty Boy’ Floyd Contador, A rmstrong stay 1-2 at Tour... See page 10

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C M Y K L OCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE www.babnancial.com 242-461-1000 Freeport242-352-7209Exuma242-336-3035Abaco242-367-5601 T o p i c s I n c l u d e :M oney Matter s Investing mad e simpleMind and Body WellnessW hy Insurance is still thebest investm entWom en who w ant to rule theWorld -ther es lots of room at the topHom e Owner ship if you donthave one -why now is the best tim eRetir em ent and BeyondBA Headstart Kids learningF r ee blood pr essur e, cholesterol andglucose testingT he M oney Ga m e for teenager sB ack from College Choosing the right car eerRefr eshm ents will be servedItsBack!Bigger&BetterthisYear!!Thursday,July23rd,6:30pmatourIndependenceDriveGroundsCall323-4434or322-8718 oremailusatinfo@banancial.comB RITISHAMERICANS LECTURESERIESM i d s u m m e rvNightSchool A nnual Fr e e E v e n t ! Re g i s t e r T o d a y . . .S p a c e i s l i m i t e d ! tres across the island. In Grand Bahama, 50 job seekers picked up application forms at the Department of Labour in Freeport, and three got them at Urban Renewal C entres on the island. J ust one Exuma resident collected a form from the L ocal Government Admini strator’s office yesterday, w hile no one in Abaco has yet shown interest in the s cheme. Figures for the o ther Family Islands were not reported by the Department of Labour yesterday. Mr Dion Foulkes said it has been difficult to predict demand for the scheme as n othing like it has ever b een done in the country b efore. T raining courses in vocat ions construction, engine r epair, accounting, computer applications and landscaping will be provided to successful applicants to help them develop more marketable job skills without any cost to the t rainee. Mr Foulkes said: “There is obviously a strong d emand for this new traini ng programme, with 429 p eople taking application forms yesterday. “We are very pleased w ith the interest shown to date.” Displaced workers, who are actively seeking worka nd receive the National Insurance Benefit, have just over a week to return com pleted application forms for courses starting at College of the Bahamas (COB the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI A total of 1,000 applicants will be selected for the courses divided into three 10 week semesters taking around 333 trainees per term. A ll courses are fully f unded by a $250,000 government grant and $70,000 i nvestment from businesses a nd trade unions for a dministrative courses. The launch of the National Training Pro-g ramme yesterday follows the National Insurance Board’s Unemployment Benefit introduced this year to ease the financial burdens forced upon thousands of Bahamians who l ost their jobs as a result of t he global economic downt urn. According to the latest f igures around 12 per cent o f New Providence workers lost their jobs as a result of the recession, in addition to 14 per cent in Grand Bahama. Mr Foulkes said the National Insurance Board h as issued more than 30,000 c heques to over 9,000 unemployed Bahamians since the first cheques were handed out on May 4. T he Department of Labour has also created over 4,000 jobs through aggressive economic stimulus initiatives, Mr Foulkes said. And entrepreneurs have b een encouraged by the department’s self-starters programme which provides grants of up to $5,000 to help people start their own businesses. Bahamas Chamber of C ommerce president and chairman of the Implementation Advisory Committee, Khaalis Rolle, said he hopes the National Training Programme will continu e in the long-term. H e said: “When we look at some of the basic needs o f businesses to be effect ive and profitable you look t o your labour pool to execute the task flawlessly, anda better qualified labour p ool allows you to execute better business, so this programme has tremendous long-term value.” Application forms can be collected from the Department of Labour buildings i n Nassau and Freeport, U rban Renewal Centres a cross the islands, and Local Government Admin-i strator’s offices in the F amily Islands. Successful candidates from the Family Islands will not have to pay for the cost of travel to either New Providence or Grand Bahama to attend training c ourses. A pplications must be returned to the Depart ment of Labour by Wednesday, July 29. Inter v iews will be held the following week, from August4 to 7. For more information about the National Train ing Programme call the Department of Labour at3 02-2550. 400 people collect applications for govt funded job training F ROM page one

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Share price ‘does not show FOCOL underlying value’ n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor FREEPORT Oil Holdings (FOCOL yesterday told Tribune Business that its Board of Directors believed the current sharep rice “does not reflect the underlying value of the company”, forcing it to embark ona $10 million share repurchase programme to boost liquidity and “create short-term value” for investors. Franklyn Wilson, a FOCOL director and chairman of Sun shine Holdings/Arawak Homes, said the stock buy-back programme, which was launched on Monday and will last for 10 years, would protect the BISX-listed company’s share price from investors prepared to sell-out at especially low prices to meet their needs for cash in this economic recession. “We believe it’s in the interests of all stockholders,” Mr Wilson said of the share repurchase plan. “The market, in our view, does not reflect the underlying value of the company, and we believe it’s in the interests of the stockholders to protect their n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Sandals r esort chain is the buyer who has the Emerald Bay resort “under contract” and is hoping to close the purchase within 45 days, Tribune Busi n ess c an reveal, the m inister of tourism yesterday confirming the Government’s priority was to get Exuma’s ‘anchor property’ open and operational “as quickly as possible”. Although declining to confirm that Sandals was the purchaser who had inked an agreement with Emerald Bay’s receivers, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace told this newspaper that there was “a very strong interest” in the property, implying that a recognised hotel own er/developer or resort chain had come through as a potential buyer. Multiple sources, though, confirmed to Tribune Business that Sandals, the Jamaica-headquartered chain owned by Gordon ‘Butch’ Stewart and his family, was indeed the prospective purchaser of Emerald Bay. Tribune Business had revealed the company’s “strong interest” in acquir ing the property, and that it was in talks with the PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC receivers, last week. And this newspaper’s contacts again confirmed that senior Sandals executives were spotted in Exu ma yesterday. A Sandals spokeswoman yesterday said the resort chain was unable to com ment on developments surrounding Emerald Bay. However, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said: “We’re in a good position of havinga very strong interest in the property.” He added that the Government’s priority was to facilitate the completion of the resort’s purchase, then get Emerald Bay back open and operational as rapid ly as possible, so as to rescue Exuma’s economy. The island’s economy was plunged into a tailspin when the PWC receivers and Emerald Bay’s main creditor, the Japanese insurer, Mitsui, decided to close the resort in order to eliminate losses running at around $5 million annually. The put some 500 Bahamian employees, the lifeblood for many other Exumabased businesses, out of work. While many have remained on the island in the hope that a purchase and re-opening of Emerald Bay could be accomplished quickly, they are likely to soon lose hope and move to other islands in search of work if no deal is forthcoming soon. “We want to get that property open and operational as quickly as possible,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said. “It is very important for us to get this going as quickly as possible.” This urgency was borne out by comments from the main PwC receiver for Emerald Bay, Russell Downs, who indicated to Tribune Business yesterday that the Government was fully on board with the buyer, and was prepared to rapidly move through the approvals process to secure a deal. That, in turn, indicates that the purchaser must be someone who the Government knows and trusts, with a proven track record in resort development and ownership in the Bahamas another clue that it is Sandals. The resort chain, apart from the Roy ABACO Markets last night confirmed its new premium food market format had been selected as the 30,000 square foot anchor tenant for New Providence Development Company’s proposed 20-acre, multi-million dollar new town centre for western New Providence. Shareholders in the BISXlisted retail group were told the news at last night’s annual general meeting (AGM as securing Solomon’s Fresh Food Market as the anchor tenant for its mixed-use town centre development has paved the way for New Providence Development Compa ny to move the project from the three-year planning stageto full development. The new Abaco Markets’ store is expected to open in spring 2011. Rhys Duggan, New Provi dence Development Company’s chief executive, had told Tribune Business last year of the company’s plans to create a new town centre for the western end of the island, effectively moving the existing Lyford Cay Shopping Centrewhich it owns to a more central location closer to the Charlotteville and Old Fort Bay developments. The mixed-use town centre, featuring both retail and commercial tenants, will be some 60,000 square feet in size. Solomon’s Fresh Food Market, meanwhile, will be targeted at the premium, high-end of the food market, no doubt aiming to capture the wealthy, higher spending consumers living in commu nities such as Lyford Cay, Old Fort Bay, Charlotteville and the Albany and Lyford Hills projects. Mr Duggan said in statement: “This represents the realisation of a key compo nent of our regional development plan for the western end of the island – one which is inclusive of key conveniences, social and activity centres, C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.21 $3.90 $4.10 Sandals is Emerald Bay purchaser 30,000 square ft Abaco Markets format anchors new town centre BISX-listed retail group’ s new high-end premium format to form centrepiece at the New Providence Development Company’s 60,000 square foot, 20-acre project for western end of island S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B Minister says ‘in good position of having very strong interest’ in the resort, with government seeking its re-opening ‘as quickly as possible’ V-Wallace S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net a nd NEIL HARTNELL Business Editor A BAHAMAS-based fund administrator has laid-off some 15 staff over several months in a downsizing designed to lead to the clo sure of its operations by September 2009, Tribune Busi ness can reveal, with that and other recent redundancies amounting to almost 40 job losses in the international financial services sector. Butterfield Fulcrum Group (BFG ling Centre-based fund administrator, was said to have made 15 redundancies over the span of several months, in preparation for the closure of its Bahamian office and the transfer of its busi n ess book to BFG’s offices in B ermuda and the Cayman Islands. And, in addition to the 24 Ansbacher (Bahamas terminated by A. F. Holdings on Friday, Tribune Business has also learnt that CIBC Trust Company (Bahamas released five employees a clear indication that the globFunds business lays-off 15 as it readies to close * Butterfield Fulcrum preparing to close Bahamas office by September 2009 and switch business to Cayman or Bermuda * Recession and financial crunch hitting Bahamian sector, as CIBC Trust declines to comment on lay-offs S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B Director and largest shareholder says 10year, $10m stock buy back initiative best way to ‘create short-term value’ for investors and guard against desperate sellers n By NEIL HARTNELL Business Editor R oyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust was only able to place 60 per cent of its second indexlinked international investment sub-fund, raising $3 million instead of the targeted $5 million, although its president yesterday said this represented a “huge amount” given the skittishness of Bahamian investors towards interna tional markets. Michael Anderson confirmed that the TIGRS Series 2 sub-fund had raised $3 million during its offering, which closed on June 22, 2009, and told Tribune Business: “It’s not a bad result, but it’s not what we hoped for.” He added: “We went out for up to $5 million, and we raised $3 million. We were always a little unsure as to what the appeal was in the market. “We’ve had this general lack of interest by investors in international markets, so trying to get $3 million raised for international investing is a huge amount relative to what people have been doing.” And Mr Anderson said: “For us, to be honest, whether we got $5 million or $2 million did not make much difference. It was difficult for us to RoyalFidelity fund gets 60% of target S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B * Merchant bank’s second index-linked international investment sub-fund raises $3m of $5m goal * But president says ‘neither success nor failure’, due to uncertainty over investor appetite * Amount allocated for principal protection rises to 80 per cent from 75 per cent

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WHEN you get a potential client to sit down with you, do the following and you will be out the door the same way you walked in – empty handed. Straight to the point, right? Even while you are reading t his you may start to tune out. S o here it is. T T a a l l k k A A b b o o u u t t Y Y o o u u r r s s e e l l f f Everybody loves to spend their time listening about someone else, right? WRONG! Remember, take the cotton out of your ears and insert it in your mouth. Leave the cotton in your ears, t alk about yourself and watch y our prospect’s reaction. They start looking at e-mails, answering calls, looking around on their desk, etc. They are not interested in you; they are interested in what you can do for them. M M a a k k e e S S m m a a l l l l T T a a l l k k S mall talk is exactly that: S MALL. Most prospective clients don’t care about what you did over the weekend or anything else. Get straight to the point; they know why you are there and so should you. Business. What’s in it for them? That’s why you’re there. If you can’t demons trate that in 15 seconds you a re half way out the door. S S h h o o w w O O f f f f y y o o u u r r a a w w a a r r d d s s a a n n d d a a c c c c o o m m p p l l i i s s h h m m e e n n t t s s Brag and boast about what you and/or your company has done. Yeah, they love to hear this. Break out awards and plaques, and show them off. This is the perfect way to tune out a prospect. When you make contact with a prospective client either by telephone or in a f ace-to-face meeting -you have an extremely short window of time to connect with them. If you fail to achieve this they will quickly tune you out. Here are several things you can do to lose your prospect's attention in the first five seconds of the conversation: G G i i v v e e t t h h e e m m P P a a m m p p h h l l e e t t s s a a n n d d B B r r o o c c h h u u r r e e s s Everyone needs more paper and pictures to look at, right? WRONG! We are so saturated with information, paper and brochures. Typically, what happens is that most of the literature gets filed in the oval filing draw (meaning garbage can B B o o t t t t o o m m L L i i n n e e S S t t r r a a i i g g h h t t t t o o t t h h e e p p o o i i n n t t , , r r i i g g h h t t ? ? The more time you spend talking about yourself, your product, your company, the quicker you will tune out your prospect. The more you talk about your prospect, their company and focus on their needs, their problems and offer solutions, the more they will tune into you and your potential to solve their prob lems. You only have a few seconds. In sports, seconds count BIG TIME. So the same applies when meeting with prospects. I kept this article short and to the point for a reason. Everyone’s time is valuable. Hope you tune in next week. All of these marketing s trategies are certain to keep y our business on top during t hese challenging economic times. Have a productive and profitable week. Remember, “THOSE WHO MARKET WILL MAKE IT.” N N B B : : S S c c o o t t t t F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n i i s s p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t o o f f S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e , , a a p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l a a n n d d m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g c c o o m m p p a a n n y y s s p p e e c c i i a a l l i i s s i i n n g g i i n n p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l p p r r o o d d u u c c t t s s . . E E s s t t a a b b l l i i s s h h e e d d o o v v e e r r 2 2 7 7 y y e e a a r r s s a a g g o o , , S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e h h a a s s a a s s s s i i s s t t e e d d B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s e e s s i i n n v v a a r r i i o o u u s s i i n n d d u u s s t t r r i i e e s s , , r r a a n n g g i i n n g g f f r r o o m m t t o o u u r r i i s s m m a a n n d d b b a a n n k k i i n n g g t t o o t t e e l l e e c c o o m m m m u u n n i i c c a a t t i i o o n n s s , , i i n n m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g t t h h e e m m s s e e l l v v e e s s . . R R e e a a d d e e r r s s c c a a n n c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M r r F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n a a t t S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e o o n n E E a a s s t t S S h h i i r r l l e e y y S S t t r r e e e e t t , , b b y y e e m m a a i i l l a a t t s s c c o o t t t t @ @ s s u u n n t t e e e e . . c c o o m m o o r r b b y y t t e e l l e e p p h h o o n n e e a a t t 2 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 3 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 4 4 . . C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE CAREER OPPORTUNITY Risk & Compliance OfficerColina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified professional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer. This isan executive position and the successful applicant should possess the following: Qualifications & Experience Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a law degree Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations for improvements to a compliance culture Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of duties Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and best practices Confidentiality Excellent oral and written communication skills Duties & Responsibilities: Design and implement a risk framework. Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps taken to foster good compliance. Implement and maintaina compliance monitoring programme. This will serve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures. Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws, regulations and policies applicable to the institution. Provide management with guidance in the development, implementation and maintenance of policies, proceduresand practices tocover regulated activities. Create programmes thateducate, train and encourage directors, managers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and regulations. Serve as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators. The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a cover letter and resume to the following e-mail address no later than 27 July 2009: E-mail: careers@colinaimperial.com RE: Risk and Compliance Officer Absolutely no phone callswill be accepted Promotional M arketing by Scott Farrington Tune into client needs or face being tuned out al Bahamian property at Cable Beach, already has resort interests in the Exumas via its boutique Royal Plantation chain, which will have a 21-villa property on 50-acre Fowl Cay by end-2009. When asked whether the Government wanted a proven resort owner/operator for Emerald Bay, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace responded yesterday: “That, I suppose, is one of the crit eria for anyone to operate there. You’re talking about an island beyond Nass au and Paradise Island. You need someone who has great knowledge of these islands, this part of the world.” It seems likely that the removal of Four Sea sons as the brand/management partner for Emerald Bay, and the substantial reduction in purchase price, was enough to pave the way for Sandals’ purchase. Having inherited $120 million in debt, Mitsui was initially looking for at least that sum when it placed the resort in receivership in 2007. The last bid accepted by the receivers, which collapsed prior to Emerald Bay’s closure, was understood to have valued the property at $40 million. Informed sources are now suggesting that a purchase price of as little as $20-$30 million might be enough to close a deal. Entry point is key for acquisitions in the Bahamian hotel sector, as the price largely determines return on investment for owners, given this nation’s high operating costs. It is by no means certain, though, that a rapid re-opening of Emerald Bay is on the cards should Sandals close a purchase. Mr Downs, the receiver, said on Tuesday any buyer would be faced with a choice of “doing the r esort first and bringing the builders in, or o pening up and getting trade in, and do the b uilding works at a later date. There is more on the purchaser’s ‘to do’ list than ours”. It is quite possible that construction will come first. Four Seasons, whose contract enti tled it to fees equivalent to 7-8 per cent of gross revenues said by many to be too much is understood to have told the insurer that the property required a minimum $25 million in capital spending to bring it into line with its five-star status. A further $7 million is needed to reconfigure its marina, and the Greg Norman Golf Course costs $300,000 per month to maintain despite having no members. Several sources, though, suggested these sums were too low, and a $50-$100 million investment will ultimately be required by any potential purchaser to upgrade Emerald Bay and complete its build-out. Sandals is Emerald Bay purchaser

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 3B n By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net E-COMMERCE could arrive full force in the Bahamas by end-2009, Bankof the Bahamas International’s managing director said, with some businesses already benefiting from the bank's introduction of hardware that will expand the online business community. Paul McWeeney told Tribune Business that the bank’s $2 million investment to bring all its credit card processing in house will lead to the growth of Bank of the Bahamas' e-commerce capab ilities. Mr McWeeney said the infrastructural upgrades will include components to allow businesses greater access to online money transfers and direct payment deposits form credit card payments made online. Not wanting to reveal detailed plans for the move to a full ecommerce operation for competitive reasons, Mr McWeeney said a SWITCH mechanism is needed to make deposits for online payments possible. He would not say whether the bank had acquired the mechanism. However, one business known to this paper, Bahamas Virtual Mall (BVM.com Bahamas' online deposit system on their site. Buyers can purchase a wide range of products through BVM.com, including clothing, car parts and baby items. It was thought that e-commerce in the Bahamas could not develop without the implementation of an Automatic Clearing House, which would allow for greater communication between local commercial banks. Bank of the Bahamas International has invested some $2 million in bringing its card processing in-house, and Mr McWeeney told this paper recently: “The bank expects there to be tremendous internal synergies that result from outsourcing. “With that coming in-house we will be able to benefit from transaction volumes and offer more to the public. Because we will control the whole process. We have plans to do more in terms of e-commerce activity and payment card processes that will help us to launch e-commerce in the not too distant future.” Bank’s in-house move to boost e-commerce RoyalFidelity fund gets 60% of target assess what the appetite was, so I don’t see it as a success or failure. The general view locally i s that the international markets are more volatile than investors are interested in and they are keeping cash safe in bank deposits. They are moving away generally from the equities side and getting into investments in fixed income and bank deposits.” The global trend of investors fleeing from equities into perceived safer havens, such as fixed income instruments and bank deposits, has arrived in the Bahamas, Mr Anderson con firmed, with RoyalFidelity’s Growth & Income fund continuing to see redemption requests, but its fixed income investments receiving addi tional interest. The RoyalFidelity president said the merchant bank now planned to get the TIGRS 2 Series sub-fund list ed on the Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX investor confidence and inter national share/asset prices improved, there would be opportunities for other Bahamian investors to buy in when their peers cashed out. The TIGRS 2 Series subfund has already purchased its options in the four indices to which it is linked the iShares Emerging Markets Index, the S&P 500 Index, the Dow Jones Euro STOXX Index, and Nikkei 225 Index and Mr Anderson said: “We need to see how it does over the next five years or so.” As with the TIGRS series 1 sub-fund, RoyalFidelity’s inaugural index-linked subfund that was also launched under the institution’s International Investment Fund, the principal invested in the Series 2 fund will also be “protected” or guaranteed. This time, though, 80 per cent instead of 75 per cent of investor capital will be used for principal protection, Mr Anderson explaining that this was because the five-year time horizon meant RoyalFidelity had to settle for lower interest rates on the principal protected sum. This will be invested in Bahamas-domiciled fixed income securities, such as bonds and certificates of deposit. The interest earned on these latter investments will ensure that Bahamian investors recover 100 per cent of their principal when their Series 2 investment matures in five years’ time on June 30, 2014. Paul McWeeney F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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value through this initiative. “Secondly, those stockholders who wish to exit the company, for whatever reason we would recommend that they don’t, but we can understand it in this economic climate we would prefer them not to sell at a price that would be significantly undervalued.” Mr Wilson added that based on FOCOL’s “prospects, underlying trends and the quality of the management”, the company’s share price was undervalued on the Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX ly trading at $5.03 per share, its 52-week range lying between a $5.53 high and a $4.95 low following FOCOL’s four-for-one stock split in 2007. Stock repurchase programmes, where companies buy back their own shares, are nothing new in the Bahamas. Cable Bahamas has been running its own for several years, in a bid to prop up its share price in an illiquid market, where retail investors are prepared to cash out at prices markedly below a stock’s true value. Such programmes also create liquidity for investors. FOCOL plans to use the shares it repurchases for an employee stock ownership programme (ESOP erwise cancel them. Mr Wilson added on the stock repurchase: “I think it’s a sign of when you’re dealing with a quality company, quality companies do things like that. “The directors have faith in the company, and have an interest in protecting value for all shareholders. There are occasions, from time to time, when it is necessary to show the market we have confidence in it, and this is a good, dependable company.” He said: “We can grow by various ways, acquiring businesses, paying dividends. What we are saying is that rather than pursue these alternatives, the best way we canc reate value for shareholders in the short-term is to let the market reflect the true value of the stock.” Despite the “tough climate”, Mr Wilson said FOCOL was performing well, with management having a “good plan and good strategy” for the company that was already being implemented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hare price ‘does not show FOCOL underlying value’ Share your news T he Tribune wants to hear f rom people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a g ood cause, campaigning f or improvements in the a rea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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al recession and the loss of wealth as a result of last September’s stock market crash are now beginning to impact the Bahamian financial services industry. On the Butterfield Fulcrum front, one financial industry source said of the Bahamas office: “I think they’re closing it, and relocating the business to Cayman or somewhere else like Bermuda. “The fund business has dried up for them, probably, and they are relocating to where they have scale, which would be Cayman or Bermuda.” This was confirmed by sources close to Butterfield F ulcrum’s Bahamas operat ions, who said the lay-offs a nd downsizing were linked to the contracting investment funds (hedge and mutual funds) industry. This sector of the global financial services industry has also borne the brunt of the credit crunch and economic recession, with many funds suffering huge redemption requests from investors desperate to pull their money out and find safer havens for it. These redemption requests have been enough to put some funds out of business, while other fund managers/promoters have either suspended redemptions or decided to wind-up their existing funds. All this would negatively impact a fund administrator such as Butterfield Fulcrum, reducing its business. Indeed, the entire international financial services sector has experienced a reduction in fee income, this is linked to assets under administration/management. These have shrunk as a result of the stock market crash and, with revenues declining, players in the Bahamian financial services industry have been left with no choice but to align staffing levels with business. And, with Cayman and Bermuda having a much stronger presence and reputation in the funds administration business, it would be an easy choice for Butterfield Fulcrum’s Bermuda head office to close operations here and switch the business to either of these jurisdictions. A statement prepared by Butterfield Bank (Bahamas designed to distinguish itself as a separate entity unaffected by the lay-offs, revealed that it was informed by Butterfield Fulcrum Group that "several positions within the their company are being made redundant”. BFG is an affiliate of Butterfield Bank (Bahamas though with an autonomous management team and board of directors. "Although the loss of positions at Butterfield Fulcrum Group in the Bahamas is unfortunate, we believe that Butterfield Fulcrum Group management is acting in the best interests of the company, and the employees are being treated fairly and with respect. The employees impacted were employees of Butterfield Fund Services (Bahamas) (a subsidiary of the Bank) prior to January 2009, at which time they became employees of Butterfield Fulcrum Group," Butterfield Bank's statement said. "The bank's operations in the Bahamas are not affected by the actions being taken by Butterfield Fulcrum Group. We continue to offer private banking, personal trust and corporate trust services to clients from our offices in Montague Sterling Centre East Bay Street." Butterfield Fulcrum’s Bahamas business has gone through two ownership changes in five years. Originally known as Deerfield Fund Services, it was acquired by Butterfield Bank in January 2004 and renamed Butterfield Fund Services (Bahamas Then, in July 2008, Butterfield decided to merge all its funds services operations including those in the Bahamas with Fulcrum, retaining a 40 per cent stake in the merged Butterfield Fulcrum. When Butterfield acquired Deerfield, it had 12 staff and assets under administration of $1.8 billion. The latter figure had grown to $2.9 billion by year-end 2004, and its size at the time of the Fulcrum deal can be gauged by the fact that, at year-end 2007, Butterfield’s assets under administration in the Bahamas (when it still owned both the funds business and the bank), were $5.447 billion. At year-end 2008, when the funds business had been merged into Butterfield Fulcrum, assets under administration in the Bahamas totalled just $2.349 billion. This implied that Butterfield Fulcrum’s Bahamas operations had almost $3.1 billion in assets under administration by year-end 2008. Its loss would deal a blow to the Bahamas’ standing as a domicile for investment funds and their administration. Heather Bellot, the unit’s managing director when it was under the Deerfield and Butterfield Services (Bahamas to no longer be with the company when it was contacted by Tribune Business yesterday. Current managing director, Sandra Gilbert, did not return this newspaper’s calls seeking comment. Meanwhile, CIBC Trust Company (Bahamas by sources to have let go five employees. When questioned about the lay-offs, deputy general manager, Carlis Chisholm, replied: "No comment!" Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes said he was not appraised of layoffs at either Butterfield Fulcrum Group or CIBC Trust, but said he would look into the matters. "I have not received any communication from CIBC Trust with respect to any pending lay-offs," said Mr Foulkes. "The code of industrial practice mandates that whenever a business establishment plans to make any employees redundant they must the alert the Ministry of Labour. I am totally unaware of this." C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 5B open spaces, parks and both commercial and residential spaces to meet both the existing and the growing demand in the area. “Development of the town centre with the high-end Solomon’s Fresh Food Market will bring a new level of shopping experience to the rapidly growing western region of the island. In addition to the existing population in the area, there is also a clear move west for many looking for a different quality of life defined by an ease of living, working and shopping right here.” Mr Duggan added: “We are very pleased with our partnership with Abaco Markets, which shares our vision of offering a completely new food shopping experience not yet available anywhere in the Bahamas. “Our respective organisations have worked very hard on the plans for both the town centre and for Solomon’s Fresh Food Market. We are confident this partnership will deliver the high quality standards we and residents in the area – are demanding.” Abaco Markets pledged that Solomon’s Fresh Food Market would feature an ecofriendly design intended to appeal to the more “discerning customer”, and focus on an upscale shopping experience with high quality productsa nd gourmet selection. We are excited about this opportunity to bring about a new standard for food shopping in the Bahamas. Everything about the store is focused on delivering a superior shopping experience,” said Gavin Watchorn, Abaco Markets president and chief executive. “From the state-of-the-art facility, which is b eing designed with new energy efficient and ‘green’ standards, and the ease of shopping to our premium product selection, service, and gourmet deli, customers will enjoy an entirely new experience at Solomon’s Fresh Food Mar ket.” He added: “This agreement for Solomon’s Fresh Food Market marks a new era for our group, which has been revived by our performance and much improved market share over the past two years. As a result, we have developed an exciting new model that we are confident not only addresses the dynamic needs of the area but will serve as a new standard for us all in the food business.” Abaco Markets’ new format will likely compete directly with retailers such as Gourmet Market at Caves Village. It is also unclear what has happened to plans by Rupert Roberts, Supervalue’s president, for his own niche, high-end health food store in western New Providence. Meanwhile, Mr Watchorn told shareholders at last night’s Abaco Markets AGM that the company was in talks to open another Domino’s Pizza outlet at the western town centre. New Providence Development Company, the largest private land owner on New Provi dence with more than 2,300 acres, developed O ld Fort Bay and the Old Fort Club, and owns t he New Providence Water Development Company. It is also an affiliate of the Tavistock Group, the Albany developer. Both it and Tavistock Group are owned by Joe Lewis, the Lyford Cay-based billionaire. Mr Lewis’s business partner, Terry White, is an investor in both Albany and New Providence Develop-m ent Company. A A B B A A C C O O M M A A R R K K E E T T S S , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B F F U U N N D D S S , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T h e T r i b u n e By ALEX MISSICK T ribune Features Reporter a missick@tribunemedia.net F OR busy moms and snack lovers, cookies have been a life saver for a quick mess free and preparation free nibble. Laurel Handfield, owner of The Cookie Mill located in Freeport, Grand Bahama, has taken on the growing cookie craze. According to kitchenproject.com, the first cookies were created by accident. “Cooks used a small amount of cake batter to test their oven temperature before baking a large cake. These little test cakes were called ‘koekje’, meaning ‘little cake’ in Dutch. Originally called ‘little cakes,’ cookies are made with sweet dough or batter, baked in single-sized servings and eaten out-of-hand. Perfect for snacking or as dessert, cookies are consumed in 95.2 percent of US households. Americans alone consume over 2 billion cookies a year, or 300 cookies for each person annually,” the website said. Mrs Handfield, who is originally from Pennsylvania, said she thought about entering the cookie business when she first moved to the Bahamas several years ago. “For the past few months, I ended up baking as a hobby for family, friends and kids around the neighborhood. I had been thinking about getting into business but was reluctant with the state of the economy. A few Sundays back, I was in church (Freeport Bible our own opportunities. That was my sign and I haven't looked back since,” Mrs Handfield said. As for the uniqueness of the name, Mrs Handfield said it came from her husband. “Honestly, my husband and I had a few names in mind but all were taken when we tried to create a website. Then my husband suggested The Cookie Mill and I liked it. To me it sug gested that we were all cookies all the time. When we went to create the website, the name wasn't taken so we stuck with it. Next in line was Cookie Supreme but that sounded a little too pretentious to me,” Mrs Handfield said. The Cookie Mill bakes several dozen cookies a week with their 2 for 1 special going on for the month of July which also includes brownies and mini-cheesecakes. “We have our old-fashioned chocolate chip, traditional oatmeal raisin, chocolate chocolatey chip cookies, iced sugar cook ies, double stuffed chocolate brownies with a milk chocolate drizzle, chocolate chip blonde brownie with the creamy chocolate drizzle, and miniature cheesecakes. We also just introduced the peanut butter delight,” Mrs Handfield said. Although the Cookie Mill is always looking to expand the menu, the more popular flavors are the double stuffed choco late brownie and the old fashioned chocolate chip cookie. “Our specialty is definitely the chocolate chip cookie. I like to make them flaky on the outside while making the inside chewy. I also found a trick on how to make them thick. I'm in the process of creating a great recipe for a chocolate brownie cup with nuts, which is like a brownie cupcake for those that wish to keep the gooey chocolate off their fingers,” Mrs Handfield said. Unfortunately, for those cookie lovers who are located on other islands, Mrs Handfield said although she does not ship outside of Grand Bahama, she is looking into finding ways of getting these tasty bites to them. “Our products are fresh, made-to-order so there are no added preservatives. That may present an obstacle depending upon how long it would take to get to another island. I need to keep costs as low as possible and keep quality up and shipping may raise the price too high,” Mrs Handfield said. For other cookie lovers who want to get into the cookie business, Mrs Handfield urges them to start small. “Do your research and start off small scale if you are hesitant. Believe me, I am queen of hesitation and felt like starting a business now would be crazy. What I did was start off small, concentrating on a delicious no-frills treat that could be offered for a great price. Who can say no to 24 cookies for $8?” Mrs Handfield said. She has high hopes for the future of the Cookie Mill “I see us concentrating on a larger scale business as well as individual cookie lovers. My next target would be those busi ness meetings of larger companies or even teachers as a little pick me up gift for their students. The possibilities are endless,” Mrs Handfield said. Welcome to the Cookie Mill Chocolate Brownie Peanut Butter delight Chocolate Chip Cookies Chocolate Chip White Brownies

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According to his manager Patricia Catti, the news came as a shock as the fallen entertainerwas due to perform at a concert on July 10 in Cat Island. Making several unsuccessful attempts to contact Frydeh in the days leading up to the event, Ms Chatti assumed that something had come up and that Frydeh would eventually contact her. During an emotional interview last Friday, Ms Catti said unfortunately that call she was waiting on never came through, and instead she did received a call from radio personality Randy C who confirmed that the artist had passed away. Career F rydeh who was best known for his membership in the world renowned Bahamian popgroup Bahamen (2004 to 2006 the verge of starting his solo career having already released a list of hit songs including the popular Joy ft Apollo Kreed (a remake of Joy originally composed by Blackstreet in 1995), Handle It, I’ll be , and others. Born September 1, 1979, to Vincent Andrews and Dolly Deveaux, he possesed a special love for singing from early on. According to his mother, he would pick up anything he could find to use as a mic and would belt out his favourite tune at the drop ofa dime. This love for music lead to his future achievements including becoming a part of the New Born Church of God youth chior in 1994, winning the 1995 local Searching For The Stars competition, and in 1998, he was part of a local choir arranged for the grand opening of the Atlantis Royal Towers where he had the chance to work with artists such as Bebe Winans, Michael Jackson, Baron Cage, Stephanie Mills, and Donnie McClurkin. Frydeh described his music as a crossover between diverse genres including pop, reggae, rap, RnB, Reggaeton, and Caribbean beats. Influenced by artists such as Kenny Latti more, Brian McKnight, Brandy, Mariah Carey, and Eric Benet, Frydeh successfully molded his own sound helping him to experience beauty in life, and music was undoubtedly his true passion. In the days leading up to his death, his mother explained that there was nothing on his mind other than singing and continuing his work with the Make-Um-Listen movement. She said: “He was my all, he was my inspiration, he was a very independent person. The last thing he said to me was ‘Mommy, I have something to say, you know what, I see God. Mommy please, I don’t want to die here, I want to die home in your hands.’ My baby gone too soon.” Expressing her condolences, his manager Ms Chatti said never before has she met an artist like Frydeh, she said his devotion to the vision of Make-Um-Listen has been unwa vering from the start. She said although he resided on the eastern end of the island, Frydeh would do what he had to when the time came to attend group meetings at her home office on Gladstone Road or to any other engagements. “He was a true star, and I have no doubt that he was headed for nothing but greatness, and my heart feels as empty as that of a wid ow because I have lost an important member of my team and family.” Recently performing alongside Davey Yarborough in the Jazz Summer Festival event held at Mount Batton House, he isr emembered as an artist with loads of stage presence and a big voice. Survived by his parents and his siblings Damar Leadon, Fredricka Minns, and Deliska Minns, he is missed and will forever be remembered as a true musician gone before his time. C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009, PAGE 9B T h e T r i b u n e By LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net T HE local music industry is mourning the death of yet another entertainer, Ryan Andrews aka Frydeh who died at Princess Margaret Hospital last Monday after a t hree year battle with cancer. GONE TOO SOON LOCAL entertainer Frydeh from the Make-Um-Listen movement shocked many in the industry after his death last Monday. Bahamian entertainer Frydeh passes away BY ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net OVER the past few years, the youth of the country have been taking the Bahamian music and entertainment industry to another level by experimenting with different genres and sounds. However, to get those unique products and music out to the public and the world, artists need a media outlet and Bahamian Entertainment Television (BeTv those outlets for the past four years. BeTv has existed since November of 2006 and its owners Ian Pinder and Patrick Major, said they have big plans for the company. “We wanted to really do what we do and make sure our vision was actually viable so it started out as a test. It started off as a five minute show and by the time we were done we were on television. We finished a season so everything just happened. Everywhere we went people were interested and hype about it so we kept going. Mr Major said BeTv’s main goal among other things, is to entertain Bahamians. “Where ever we have to go for that entertainment is where we will go. We are looking to basically travel the globe. Season two may not take us to Japan but we hope in season’s three and four we will get there. We want to touch Europe, Canada, the United States, and the Caribbean, so we want to basically bring entertainment from all over the globe. We have Bahamians in those places so we want to give them some shine and show us the hot spots. We have some guys out there who are on top in the US and we have a lot of big Bahamians all over the world. A lot of people when they think of Bahamians they only think about the Bahamas, but this is a global thing,” Mr Major said. Due to the many genres of entertainment present in the Bahamas, Mr Pinder said BeTv is not mainly focused on music, but the culture of Bahamians. “Whether it be the graphic artists, craftsman, musicians and so forth, it is basi cally trying to push all artisans out there as Bahamians. If you go in the straw market and see some of the wood carvings that some of those guys do you would be amazed. There are a lot of Bahamians that don’t know about the work of other Bahamians,” Mr Pinder said. “We have to make sure we get them out there. Our five man production team works around the clock to work hard and get the mate rial out,” Mr Major said. Mr Pinder said BeTv is also hoping to relaunch their website, as MyBeTv to provide a sense of ownership to Bahamians instead of the older BeTv Live. Persons will be able to go online and watch the shows they missed on television. “We have a lot of talent here in the Bahamas and a lot of radio stations. However, radio can only push content so far. It might only reach as far as South Florida. Video, television and internet can reach world wide and that is the avenue we want to take Bahamiansworld wide,” Mr Pinder said. The best in Bahamian entertainment BETV This weeks events include a synergetic art a nd entertainment event, some old school music and a street festival Bahamian style. 1 . Local artist Terez Hepburn is set to release her new single Mister Bus Driver during a “night of expression,” at Tehillah Lounge in the Reggae Caf at Breezes Hotel this Saturday at 8pm. In addition to that per formance, artist Kevin Rolle will showcase his latest art exhibition. There will also be an ama teur poetry and spoken word segment allow ing audience to become involved in the event. Tickets are $10, and can be purchased at 100 per cent Bible Bookstore, or by visiting www.tehillahlounge.com. 2 . The Junkanoo Summer Festival con tinues on Bay Street this Saturday when dozens of local souvenir producers and venders will get to showcase their crafts. The event will also feature live Goombay music, live-bands, and lots of local food and fun. It’s free for all, so come and show your support for all things Bahamian. 3 . The Nettie Symonette art exhibit at Central Bank continues until August 7, and already it has received rave reviews. This 75-year-old artist presents 75 abstract pieces that have been compared to the likes of Picasso, Michael Bellon, and Barnett Newman. The collection which was first started in 2003 in the Abacos while Mrs Symonette was working on her memoirs, uses mirror like illusion to tell the story of life and emotions. The exhibition can be seen from Monday to Friday between 9.30am and 4.30pm. 4 . Former Mr Caribbean/model/stylist and local icon Kendrick Kemp is using his celebrity status to bring the Envy Beach Night Club back to life with his upcoming event called Sweet Dreams. The event which promises a heavy mix of appearances from many in the entertainment industry, backed by music from DJ Reds, Urban Empire, and JDX sounds just to name a few, promises to be an event like none other. At the cost of $10, you can rub shoulders with the stars while partying in a safe and comfortable environment. 5 . On Friday, the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas will be transformed into the infamous Drum Beat Club as a host of music veterans seek to bring the nostalgic club back to life. Chickie Horn, Chippie Chipman, Peanut Taylor, and others who were part of the original cast at the club, will play their hearts away for guests at NAGB. Starting at 8pm, tickets are $40 for NAGB members, and $45 for all others. things 2 DO MOVIEMAKERto musicmaker, Ricardo 'Mr Beeds' Forbes has made history in the local entertainment industry with his debut music video for his hit song Achoo (Bless You . Combining hip hop with the Bahamian folk sound of rake 'n' scrape, Mr Beeds is the first artist from his country to use several types of animation throughout his entire video. “Having already won film awards and working in theatre I think a lot of people expected me to come from a familiar angle,” he admitted. “However, it was great to see everyone's reaction when it turned out I was hardly featured thanks to the wonders of animation.” The video was officially launched during Youth Alive, one of the region's major events for young people featuring some of the biggest names in positive music. By the end of the night, North Americans were requesting to take copies of the video back home with them and by the end of the week Facebook and YouTube comments were pouring in. “I feel like progress is being made,” says Mr Beeds who released his first album Peak State in January 2009. “I wrote the vision, made it plain, left in to God and he made it a reality. I am happy with the response from people but I am most humbled with the love that Bahamians have shown. People say that if you want an honest critique you have to ask a Bahamian and they have been honest and I thank them for being so supportive. The one constant comment I keep getting is that the video is so original.” Mr Beeds credits his friend, compositor Al Rahming as the mastermind behind the artistry. Viewers enjoy the cut out animation similar to the style used in South Park in the first verse of the song featuring a cameo by one of the Bahamas' leading DJs Dion Da Butcha. Mr Rahming also experimented with sketch, 3-D and scribble animation, all of which ends up in perfect synchronisation. “Al is an amazing artist and it was a blessing that he not only poured out so many styles in this but that he gave all he had into turning the video out in only six weeks,” said Mr Beeds. “We came up with the concept together the whole good versus evil aspect. People who know the song often joke about it being the worst day ever for someone. I mean, the person I sing about proposes to a woman he finds out is actually married, tries to help an old woman who turns out to be a robber in disguise and he's like on the verge of throwing in the towel. But in the video we get to see that there is a demon assigned to bring him down and an angel assigned to help him rise above it all. The thing is we need to be tested sometimes and the video can be perceived as an allegory of a biblical text that talks about when you are tempted beyond what you can bear, God will provide a way out so that you can stand above it. ” Mr Beeds, who has been busy hitting up different venues on his summer tour of New Providence each weekend, is excited about the opportunities which have presented them selves for the video. The video is expected to air on MTV Tempo this summer and has been submitted to BET and VH1. Fans who can't wait may check out the video on YouTube or Mr Beeds' Facebook page. Mr Beeds mak es history with debut video An animated scene from the video.

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Owen Bethel, chairman of the host planning committee and pageant coordinator, explained: “Not only is this s ignificant as the first time t hat The Bahamas is hosting the Miss Universe Pageant, but also because the fashion show will feature another aspect of the islands’ creativi ty and culture as displayed i n fashion. This will certainly have the potential of catapulting the local fashion industry into the international spotlight. It is important for other designers and novices to take advantage of this and continue to build on the opportunity.” The three designers chosen after an open call are: Rachel Turnquest-Garcia of Rachel’s Boutique, Basheva Eve of La Maison de Besh, and Sabrina Francis of SE’B Fashions. Also contributing to the night of elegance and splendour will be noted Bahamian designer Brynda Knowles, who will design the evening’s outfits for the reigning Miss Universe, Dayana Mendoza. Ms Mendoza will share the stage as co-host of the event with Charles Sealey. The newlycrowned Miss Universe will receive an outfit created by prominent Bahamian designer Jeff St John, of the House of St John, which she will wear at her press briefing on the morning after her crowning. She will also receive a specially-crafted bag from internationally-acclaimed Harl Taylor BAG. The fashion show is being organised and produced by Mode les Ltd, producers of the award-winning Islands of the World Fashion Week. Tickets are available online at www.tourismtoday.com or at the box office at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort, Cable Beach. Telephone # (242 Immediately following the fashion show the contestants will view and participate in a junkanoo rush-out along the Cable Beach Strip.For further information, please contact Ms Arianne Etuk at 242-3566133. C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By JASON DONALD Starring: Daniel Radcliffe,Michael Gambon, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint REMEMBER the days when we’d go to just watch a stand alone film? I don’t. Now we’ve got trilogies, franchises, reboots and sub-series mul tiple films about the same characters in similar situations. It’s tiring at the best times, but nothing can compare to the commitment needed to keep up with the Harry Potter series now in it’s sixth movie with two more still to go. Anyone other than fans of the books has probably forgotten how the last one ended I’m losing track myself but it seems the evil Lord Volde mort is still tightening his grip over Harry’s magical world and there’s still a sense of impending doom. Basically, business as usual at Hogwart’s School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. This time though, there’s a generous sprinkling of Twilight-style teen heartbreak, with Harry, Hermoine and Ron all caught up in complicated relationships. We’re also given a glimpse into Voldemort’s past, when Harry uses a device to explore memories showing Tom Riddle at Hog warts before he turned to dark magic. This is all nicely done and without a doubt The Half Blood Prince is the most visually accom plished of the films so far. There’s a dynamite opening set piece with ‘death eaters’ swooping through the streets of London and director David Yates injects some real creepiness at times. But the film is always battling against its origins on the printed page. Unlike a lengthy book, you can’t really put a movie down for a couple of hours, then get back to it when you’re in the mood. Scenes which may have worked as little vignettes in the novel just seem redundant here. And the format of each film being a term at Hog warts is becoming tiresome, I was already glancing at my watch before Harry made his annual Christmas trip to the Weasleys’s. Now we’re faced with the prospect of the last book being split into two movies a real error of judgment in my opinion. Hardcore Harry Potter fans might be happy at that prospect, but I’m already beginning to feel the magic wear off. Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince MOVIE REVIEW In this image released by Warner Bros., Daniel Radcliffe is shown in a scene from "Harry Potter and the HalfBlood Prince." J a a p B u i t e n d j i k / A P P h o t o THE88 contestants of the 58th Miss Univ erse Pageant will take to the catwalk during the pageant’s official fashion show to be held at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort on W ednesday August 12 wearing the outfits of three outstanding Bahamian designers and locally manufactured fabrics of Androsia andB ahama Hand Prints . Members of the Bahamas National Symphony Orchestra Miss Universe Pageant Fashion Show Dayana Mendoza Mrs Mackey said she also discovered, tourists are quite put off when they discover an item made in China or somewhere else other than The Bahamas. “I have made a number of items thus far. They include trendy table top items such as table runners, placemats, napkin rings. I also make pillow slip covers, scarves, bow ties, and I am getting into some other stuff,” Mrs Mackey said. Mrs Mackey said she must give all the credit to God and her mentor, Dr Deryl G. Hunt. “I lived in the US for about 16 years, and while there met some of the most wonderful people, who had a very positive impact on my life. Dr Hunt was one of them, a colleague and advisor. I met him while studying for my masters at Florida International University. At that time he was a professor at the university. He taught me about sustainable living and intro duced me to The Ellison Model. T he Ellison Model, which is a way of life, has three basic tenets, caring, sharing and loving. Further it provides a cyclical approach to learning: teaching while being taught. Because the framework of the model is sop alatable, it can be used to undergird any program. One in particular was The Ozzie Ritchey Endowment for Bahamian Students developed by Dr. Hunt. This program helped to ease the financial bur-d en encountered by Bahamian students during their matricula tion at Florida International University. Many students including myself were able to tremendously benefit from the program. As a result, this model became my way of life,” Mrs Mackey said. Prices for the flowers are $7 each, hibiscus plant (her signature collection starts at $30), baskets $50 small and $120 large. Mrs Mackey also provides arrangements for weddings including bridal bouquets as well as special occasions/events. These prices vary according to order sizes. “I would love to use the Bahama Hand Print (fabric eventually make my own batik design. I was directed by Benjamin Rahming at BAIC to a young woman who is now training in batik design. That’s won derful for the Bahamas because we need more persons teaching the skills we would otherwise have to look outward to obtain. In essence, these things not only aid us in becoming self sufficient but they sustain us as a people.” To find out more about My Andro Batik and these authentic creations, Mrs Mackey can be reached at 242-445-8854. All the flowers F ROM page 12 By JENNIFER HUDSON FOURTEEN members of the Bahamas National Symphony Orchestra (BNSO da on June 18 to spend a week as guests of the musicians of Le Jardin de Violons. Although the BNSO has performed in the Family Islands, this was its first international trip and was the result of a BahamianCanadian exchange programme begun last year when sixteen members of Le Jardin des Violons performed with the BNSO in its annual gala concert on Paradise Island, Nassau. Having rehearsed separately dur ing the year, the Bahamian and Canadian musicians came together for two rehearsals after arrival in Canada in order to adjust final details before the performance on June 21 in the magnificent church of Saint Louis de France in Terrebonne, just north of Montreal. The well attended concert was an outstand ing success with the appreciative audience rising to give the musicians multiple standing ovations. Michael Smith, Bahamas High Commissioner to Canada, journeyed from Ottowa with his wife, Suzanne, to attend the concert. Following the performance, Mr Smith expressed pride in the way in which ties have been forged between the Bahamian and Canadian musicians bringing the cultures of the two countries together in such a magnificent way. He also presented medals to each of the Bahamian musicians on behalf of the musicians of Le Jardin des Violins. The programme included works by Corelli, Vivaldi, Kreisler and Karl Jenkins with the Bahamian contin gent also performing a lively rendition of the old Bahamian favourite 'Sponger Money' which showcased Bahamian culture and thrilled the audience. The generosity of many helped make this exchange experience very special. Accommodations for the Bahamian musicians were very generously provided by the families of musicians of Le Jardin des Violons. Cellos and a Double Bass were kind ly loaned by the music workshop of Monsieur Jules SaintMichel, longstanding supporter of the violin school, and a drum set was loaned by another friend in order to eliminate the problem of transporting such bulky instruments. Special thanks are due to Martine Cardinal, Director/ Founder of Le Jardin des Violons and Alexandre Da Costa, Artistic Director, a renowned violinist, who not only act ed as master of ceremonies but also performed a solo from his latest CD accompanied by the Bahamian musicians. Additionally, thanks go out to Helene Peloquin and Denis Donaldson of the BNSO who worked tirelessly along with Ms Cardinal to organise the exchange trip and a pretrip concert to assist in raising funds towards defraying expenses. Very close friendships have been forged between the musicians of the two countries and all are looking for ward to the next exchange. The Bahamas National Symphony Orchestra Performed in Canada Starting your day on the right track Now that summer is here and we‘re in the middle of daylight savings time, it’s hard not to be absolutely exhausted after a long day at work, and even more tired by the time morning rolls around. Rather than trying to constant ly catch up with everything that’s happening around you, attempt to make three little adjustments that could help brighten your day even before it gets started. 1. Start planning a daily schedule. Knowing what to expect tomorrow at work is a great way to keep your tasks organised, and thus keeps you from feeling stressed and over worked. 2. Take a minute to collect yourself the moment you wakeup. Some people use prayer as a means of harnessing positive energy for their day ahead, visualising yourself relaxed and in control can also propel you to a more fruitful day filled with blissful thoughts. 3. Add some exercise to your morning routine. It has been proven that moderate morning exercise helps to increase the acuity of your brain. A brisk 10 to 20 minute walk or run in the morning can also help to create a feeling of accomplishment that can keep you confident, alert, and energised all day long. At the end of the day, you can’t do much about having a busy day. However you can take the time to put it in perspective, so remember to get your day started right. TRIBUNE TIP OF THE DAY

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 75F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 79F/26C Low: 78F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 81F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 81 F/27 C High: 90F/32C High: 91F/33C High: 86 F/30 C High: 86 F/30 C High: 88F/31C High: 88 F/31C High: 86F/30C Low: 82F/28C High: 88F/31C Low: 82 F/28 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 78F/26C High: 87 F/31 C Low: 82F/28C High: 90 F/32 Low: 79F/26C High: 87F/31C Low: 80 F/27C High: 89F/32C Low: 81 F/27 C High: 90F/32C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 88F/31C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 87F/31C Low: 81F/27C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 80F/27C High: 88F/31C High: 86 F/30 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 22 ND , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Thunderstorms, some sun; windy. Showers and a heavier thunderstorm. Some sun with a t-storm; breezy. Sun and some clouds. Partly sunny with a shower possible. High: 86 Low: 80 High: 87 High: 88 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 77 AccuWeather RealFeel 92F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 80F 97-85F 99-86F 108-84F 104-80F Low: 76 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................82F/28C Low ....................................................77F/25C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 92 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 81 F/27C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.24" Year to date ................................................18.82" Normal year to date ....................................22.79" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Jul. 28 Aug. 5Aug. 13Aug. 20 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:33 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:00 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 7:00 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 8:37 p.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 8:33 a.m.2.92:28 a.m.-0.2 9:01 p.m.3.32:33 p.m.-0.3 9:27 a.m.3.03:18 a.m.-0.3 9:52 p.m.3.33:29 p.m.-0.3 10:19 a.m.3.14:05 a.m.-0.3 10:42 p.m.3.14:24 p.m.-0.2 11:11 a.m.3.14:53 a.m.-0.3 11:32 p.m.2.95:19 p.m.-0.1 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco93/3377/25t93/3379/26pc Amsterdam74/2357/13sh72/2259/15pc Ankara, Turkey82/2750/10s84/2850/10s Athens93/3374/23s91/3275/23s Auckland61/1653/11sh59/1548/8r Bangkok90/3278/25r89/3178/25r Barbados86/3077/25sh86/3076/24sh Barcelona83/2870/21pc86/3072/22s Beijing93/3375/23t88/3173/22t Beirut82/2777/25s81/2777/25s Belgrade97/3670/21s103/3974/23s Berlin81/2770/21sh79/2664/17sh Bermuda85/2973/22s83/2877/25sh Bogota67/1943/6sh66/1844/6pc Brussels72/2257/13sh75/2359/15pc Budapest94/3464/17s95/3568/20s Buenos Aires43/634/1c45/732/0pc Cairo102/3877/25s103/3976/24s Calcutta91/3281/27sh93/3383/28pc Calgary82/2753/11s77/2553/11pc Cancun91/3275/23pc91/3275/23s Caracas81/2772/22pc82/2771/21t Casablanca86/3064/17s81/2768/20s Copenhagen78/2564/17sh74/2362/16r Dublin64/1754/12sh66/1854/12r Frankfurt83/2864/17pc79/2664/17r Geneva 85/29 61/16 t 85/2960/15pc Halifax 70/21 57/13 r 73/22 57/13 pc Havana 91/32 73/22 t 89/31 76/24 r Helsinki 68/20 52/11sh72/2254/12pc Hong Kong 91/32 81/27 pc 91/32 81/27t Islamabad 97/36 81/27 t 96/35 79/26 pc Istanbul88/3170/21s89/3174/23s Jerusalem 88/31 65/18s88/3164/17s Johannesburg 58/1440/4s60/1538/3s Kingston 86/3075/23t90/3280/26r Lima70/2157/13pc70/2157/13pc London72/2255/12sh72/2257/13sh Madrid93/3364/17pc86/3059/15pc Manila84/2877/25r85/2978/25r Mexico City79/2655/12t77/2551/10t Monterrey104/4075/23s104/4075/23s Montreal75/2363/17sh77/2566/18sh Moscow72/2252/11pc73/2255/12t Munich86/3056/13pc92/3358/14pc Nairobi74/2356/13c76/2457/13sh New Delhi 97/3684/28t95/3582/27t Oslo72/2253/11sh68/2054/12sh Paris73/2259/15sh75/2361/16sh Prague 87/30 64/17 pc 90/32 63/17 pc Rio de Janeiro87/3073/22s81/2769/20s Riyadh104/4082/27s104/4081/27pc Rome 88/31 67/19 s 91/32 69/20 s St. Thomas90/3281/27sh91/3281/27s San Juan48/828/-2c39/315/-9sn San Salvador 88/31 68/20 t 89/31 74/23 t Santiago 46/725/-3pc52/1132/0s Santo Domingo86/3074/23t87/3073/22sh Sao Paulo 79/26 60/15 pc 68/20 54/12pc Seoul81/2766/18s82/2768/20pc Stockholm 73/22 57/13 pc 70/21 57/13 r Sydney 72/22 45/7 pc63/1743/6pc Taipei95/3582/27pc94/3482/27pc T okyo 82/27 73/22 r 86/30 73/22 r T oronto 76/2463/17pc75/2363/17t Trinidad90/3272/22pc77/2554/12t V ancouver 74/23 60/15 s 75/2360/15pc Vienna 88/3168/20s95/3574/23s W arsaw 82/27 64/17 pc 86/30 66/18 pc Winnipeg 77/25 57/13 pc 76/2458/14t H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles86F Thursday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles86F Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles85F Thursday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles85F Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles85F Thursday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles85F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque87/3064/17t93/3369/20t Anchorage64/1754/12sh65/1854/12pc Atlanta88/3169/20t88/3170/21t Atlantic City84/2871/21pc86/3068/20t Baltimore84/2868/20pc86/3068/20t Boston80/2665/18c74/2367/19t Buffalo80/2665/18pc74/2364/17t Charleston, SC90/3272/22t86/3073/22t Chicago78/2559/15t82/2761/16t Cleveland76/2463/17t77/2563/17t Dallas88/3169/20pc84/2870/21pc Denver90/3261/16t98/3660/15pc Detroit74/2359/15t79/2662/16t Honolulu88/3176/24s89/3175/23pc Houston95/3574/23pc94/3474/23t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday TodayThursdayTodayThursday Indianapolis76/2460/15t82/2763/17t Jacksonville88/3172/22t87/3074/23t Kansas City86/3065/18s87/3070/21s Las Vegas111/4383/28s111/4389/31s Little Rock85/2967/19pc90/3265/18pc Los Angeles90/3266/18s86/3066/18s Louisville78/2564/17t85/2966/18pc Memphis82/2771/21t89/3170/21pc Miami88/3179/26t91/3277/25t Minneapolis80/2662/16t83/2866/18pc Nashville80/2663/17t88/3164/17pc New Orleans88/3175/23t89/3174/23t New York82/2772/22pc85/2971/21t Oklahoma City86/3063/17pc90/3265/18s Orlando90/3275/23t91/3275/23t Philadelphia84/2870/21pc84/2870/21t Phoenix 112/44 89/31 t 111/4389/31t Pittsburgh78/2562/16t80/2662/16t Portland, OR 86/3060/15s86/3059/15s Raleigh-Durham 88/31 69/20 pc 88/31 70/21 t St. Louis80/2666/18pc86/3067/19s Salt Lake City 97/36 68/20 s 98/3670/21s San Antonio 98/36 74/23 pc 91/32 75/23 t San Diego76/2469/20pc76/2469/20pc San Francisco 70/21 55/12 pc 69/2056/13pc Seattle80/2657/13s80/2657/13pc T allahassee 92/3372/22s94/3472/22t T ampa 91/32 77/25 t 91/32 77/25t Tucson103/3979/26t104/4080/26t W ashington, DC 88/31 72/22pc87/3071/21t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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C M Y K C M Y K I N S I D E Welcome to the Cookie Mill See page eight WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2009 By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net THE flora and fauna of the Bahamas ar e some of t he most beautiful in the world and Samara SaundersMackey, owner of My Andro Batik, Ltd., saw an opportunity to recreate some of t hose gorgeous flowers. Mrs Mackey said she started making table top items and home acces sories using vibrant Androsia fabric. “I never intended to make flowers but rather, the appliqus to place on my products, which I thought would enhance the look. The flowers were just an experiment that turned out to be an excellent idea, and thus began the creation of them. I got my inspiration from live flowers and because of my love for them, I wanted to find a way to preserve them. The fabric and finish gives them a sort of permanence,” Mrs Mackey said. Mrs Mackey said she fell in love with Androsia fabrics during her childhood. “The colours are a true representation of my personality: lively, outgo ing, warm and loving. I have incorporated a lot of trendy styles with the fabric. After doing a market study of the Bahamian and tourist populations, I discovered Bahamians more than anything want trends and so do tourists. Tourists prefer authentic Bahamian products when they visit The Bahamas,” Mrs Mackey said. Although flowers may appear to be rather simple in their anatomy, Mrs Mackey said the process is very time consuming. However, Mrs Mackey said she finally found a machine that can do all the work for her. “First, I would cut out a model/pattern (leaf or petal and draw it on the cloth. I would then cut the pattern from the cloth and after gluing, begin making the flower design,” Mrs Mackey said. The Tribune SECTIONB Bahamian entertainer Frydeh passes away See page nine all flowers the SEE page 10 I n d e p e n d a n c e f l o w e r s R e d A n d r o s i a f l o r a l a r r a n g e m e n t O r a n g e a n d r e d A n d r o s i a f l o r a l a r r a n g e m e n tMulti colored Androsa floral arrangementE l e g a n t b l u e a n d b l a c k A n d r o s i a f l o r a l a r r a n g e m e n tPink and purple Androsia floral arrangement Independance flower in detailP i n k a n d R e d A n d r o s i a f l o w e r a r r a n g e m e n t Samara Saunders-Mackey uses her gifted hands to create gorgeous Androsia print flowers