Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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S8F
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SUNNY,
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Surviving 33
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SEE INSIGHT SECTION












Sit Milo Butler's
grandson shot

Businessman
is held up
by robbers

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

A WELL-KNOWN busi-
nessman and member of a
prominent political family was
lucky to escape with his life
after he was held up and shot by
robbers on Saturday night.

Allan Butler, 34, one of the
grandsons of the late Governor

on Baillou Hill Road.

General Sir Milo Butler and
cousin to a Cabinet Minister,
was closing up the family-run
Butler’s Bargain Mart and
Home Centre on Baillou Hill
Road at 10.14pm when he was
accosted by two masked men.

The men were armed with
guns and demanded that Mr
Butler hand over the money
deposit bags he was carrying at
the time.

Supt Elsworth Moss, officer
in-charge of the Central Detec-

tive Unit (CDU), told The Tri-
bune yesterday that one of the
gunmen was able to get the
deposit bags from Mr Butler
after shooting him in the thigh.
The two robbers afterwards
escaped in an unknown direc-
tion.

Mr Butler remains detained
at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital where he is being treated
for the gun shot wound, which

SEE page 10

Residents are ‘on the edge of
despair’ over low water pressure

RESIDENTS of a community in eastern New Providence, some
of whom living with serious illnesses, said they are on the edge of
despair, having suffered from low to non-existent water pressure for

more than three years now.

“We have been forgotten, this must be the most hateful place in
Nassau to live. Our ancestors must have buried dead people in this
ground that’s why we’re so cursed,” one resident of Star Estates,

SEE page 10






















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ipé Major/Tribune staff

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By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE victims of the Sea-
hauler/United Star maritime
tragedy will be able to access
thousands more dollars in
funds this week as donations
collected almost a year ago by
radio station More94 FM are
to be paid out.

The funds were collected
by the radio station in 2008
and due to a difficulty in
determining who were the real
“victims” of the August 2,
2003, tragedy, forwarded by
the station to Government for
disbursement.

While the Ministry did not
yesterday identify how much
money would be paid out in
total, it is understood to be
around $12,000 to be shared
between about 41 people. The
Government itself made a one
time $1 million payment from
the public treasury to the vic-
tims in May 2008.

Four people were killed and
25 injured in the night time
collision between the two
mailboats. After receiving the
payment from Government
some of those affected com-
plained the funds would not
amount to much once they
had paid off immediate debts.

Thanking More 94 FM for
being a “responsible corpo-
rate citizen” by organising the

SEE page 10







PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

SEE PAGE ELEVEN



lipé Major/Tribune staff

oral

y

A POLICE MOTORCYCLIST was seriously injured last night after a collision with a squad car during a high-
speed chase. The two police vehicles were pursuing a trail bike when they collided on Soldier Road short-
ly after 7pm. The police motorcyclist was taken to hospital and hadn’t regained consciousness at the time
of going to press. While three officers in the patrol car also sustained injuries, the driver suffered the brunt
of the impact. The trail bike got away. Police are not releasing the names of the officers, however the
motorcyclist was attached to the Traffic Division and the patrol car was attached to Wulff Road Police Sta-
tion. Police last night were at the preliminary stages of their investigation and could not say what led

to the collision.



IDB anticipates the Bahamas will have
borrowed $300m between 2008 and 2012

THE Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank anticipates that
the Bahamas will have bor-
rowed as much as $300 million
from the organisation between
the years 2008 and 2012.

According to the IDB’s
Operational Programme for the
Bahamas, these loans will
include $50 million for an air
transportation programme, $50
million for a BEC support pro-
gramme, and $10 million for the
land use policy administration
programme.

Asked about the borrowing
while in Haiti this weekend,
where he was attending the
Regional Forum on the occa-
sion of the Inter-American
Development Bank’s 50th
anniversary, Mr Ingraham said
the “alternative to (borrowing)
is further misery for the
Bahamian people.”

“Having managed the econo-
my well over the years we are
now able to use the fiscal space
we have to be able to cause a
reduction in the amount of suf-
fering that would take place in
society if we didn’t do the bor-
rowing.”

“We are fortunate as com-
pared to many of our brethren
in the Caribbean who have bor-
rowed up to their max and who
are maxed out and who are
unable to engage in any addi-
tional borrowing,” he said.

Mr Ingraham noted that the
IDB is the only multi-lateral
institution from which The
Bahamas can access funding. In
view of this, he said, its “adjust-
ed policies and programmes are
welcomed.”

“The need to replenish the
Bank’s Ordinary Capital and
Funds for Special Projects in
light of the current global eco-
nomic crisis is supported by
The Bahamas,” he told dele-
gates as he addressed the con-
ference.

“We urge all developed coun-
tries, who qualify to increase

the Bank’s resources...and to
accept that action is needed
now.”

Responding to the current
economic global crisis, the
prime minister told the confer-
ence that the Bahamas has
employed a number of mitigat-

SEE page 10

Over 800 invasive lionfish



A LARGE number of invasive lionfish
were removed from Bahamian waters
during Nassau’s first lionfish control
event on Saturday.

half a day

WITH over 800 invasive
lionfish removed from
Bahamian waters in half a day
and enthusiasm growing for
the fish as a source of food the
Department of Marine
} Resources declared Nassau’s
| first lionfish control event on
Saturday a success.
|) Eighteen boats working in

competition with one another
| pulled in the haul of venomous
fish during the earlier part of
Saturday, with “Jojo”, piloted
by several members of the
| Maillis family, bringing in 300
‘| of them alone, winning them
a $500 prize.

Boaters and members of the
public swamped the Green
‘| Parrot Restaurant and Bar
where those competing for the

yy prize of catching the single

biggest, smallest and the most
lionfish came to have their
catch weighed and counted.
Michael Braynen, Director
of the Department of Marine
Resources said: “Certainly it

SEE page 10

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE






























SUMMER SIZZLER

A TOTAL of 172 Haitian
migrants were apprehended
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On Saturday afternoon,
after receiving information of
a Haitian sloop spotted a half
mile east of Hawksbill Rock in
the Exuma Cays, police on
Exuma, with the help of local
residents, assisted in remoy-
ing the migrants from their
unsanitary vessel and detain-
ing them on Duck Cay.

Defence Force patrol ves-
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area to remove the migrants
— 130 men and 42 women.

The first vessel, HMBS P-
48, arrived in the capital on
Sunday afternoon with 72 of

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the migrants, and the Guana-
hani was expected to arrive
later in the evening with the
remaining 100 migrants.

All of the immigrants were
handed over to Immigration
officials and are currently
being detained at the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre.

Petty Officer

Jonathan Rolle



More suspected Haitian
Ey ao immigrants apprehended

ABOVE: Some of the suspected Haitian immigrants onboard
HMBS P-48, as they arrived at the Defence Force Base.



LEFT: Some of the suspected immigrants onboard HIBS P-
48 on the way to Nassau on Sunday afternoon. A total of 172
suspected immigrants were picked up after their vessel
was sighted off Hawksbill Rock in the Exuma Cays.



SOME of the suspected Haitian immigrants preparing to disembark HMBS
P-48, after they arrived at the Defence Force Coral Harbour Base on Sun-
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Three expected
tobe charged |
in connection
with murder

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Three
local men are expected to
be charged in Freeport
Magistrate’s Court on
Monday in the murder of
a prominent Eight Mile
Rock resident.

The men — ages 27 and
30 years — are accused of
the murder of 30-year-old
Denzil Jones Jr of Eight
Mile Rock.

Mr Jones was stabbed
to death by intruders last
Wednesday at his apart-
ment in Jones Town.

He was taken by ambu-
lance to hospital, but later
died of his injuries.

His death records
the fifth homicide for
the year on Grand
Bahama.

Asst Supt Welbourne
Bootle said the suspects
will be arraigned at 10am
on Monday.

Mr Jones is the grand-
son of well-known local
pastor Rev Raymond
Jones. His father, the late
Denzil Jones, was a
beloved teacher at Eight
Mile Rock High, who
died of cancer several
years ago.

And his uncle, Ray-
mond Jones, is Chief
Operating Officer of the
Freeport Container Port.

The family is devastat-
ed by his death.

Revolver found
after police stop
and search man

POLICE officers of the
Eastern Division were on
routine patrol in the area
of Elizabeth Estates at
9am on Sunday when they
stopped and searched a
man who was found in
possession of a 38
revolver and one live bul-
let for the firearm.

The man is expected to
be arraigned in court on
formal charges some time
this week.

EARNEST efforts and pro-
motions to attract visitors to
countries in the Caribbean
region, including the Bahamas,
have so far failed in bringing the
number of tourists to our shores

are similarly severely negatively
impacted,” he said.
Furthermore, the impact of
the economic crisis on the
Caribbean and the Bahamas has
resulted in the slowdown in new

cent in 2009, he confirmed.
Christine Thompson, Chief

economist in the Office of the

Prime Minister, and Louis

Harold Joseph, Ambassador to
the Bahamas from the Republic

of Haiti, accompanied the prime
minister to the forum which
focused on the “Economic
Transformation and Strength-
ening of Caribbean Economies
in Challenging Times.”

to match last year’s numbers,
Prime Minister Ingraham
revealed.

Speaking at the Regional
Forum on the Occasion of the
Inter-American Development
Bank’s 50th Anniversary in Port-
au-Prince, Haiti on Friday, Mr
Ingraham said that despite seri-
ous discounting and other incen-
tives offered in the travel and
hotel deals, occupancy levels
remain well below those
achieved last year by all of the
Caribbean tourism economies.

And on the employment
front, he said, to date the eco-
nomic downturn has resulted in
2,200 lay-offs in the Bahamas’
hotel sector, which amounts to
one per cent of the country’s
entire work force.

Mr Ingraham said that the
Bahamas was one of the first
countries in the region to feel
the effects of the slowing global
economy.

“Those countries that rely
heavily on the North American
market as a source for their vis-
itors, like the Bahamas, were
impacted earlier. But as the
global economic downturn
enveloped Western European
and Asian markets, all



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham
addressed the Regional Forum on the
occasion of the Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank’s 50th anniversary in
Port-au-Prince, Haiti on Friday.

Caribbean tourism economies,
like those of Barbados and the
Organisation of Eastern
Caribbean States, have suffered
widespread retrenchment,” he
said.

The impact of the decline in
visitor numbers, Mr Ingraham
said, “is being felt in all tourism-
related businesses including food
and beverage, beach sports,
handicraft and souvenir sales,
ground transportation, land and
sea excursions and tours, luxury
shopping and entertainment.”

“And suppliers to the sector

construction of hotels and
resorts, vacation homes, other
businesses and commercial
buildings, the prime minister
said.

“As in more developed
economies, construction serves
as a bell-weather for the state of
the economies of small
Caribbean economies,” he said.

“The slowdown in construc-
tion in our region has signalled
reduced foreign direct invest-
ment inflows with implications
for foreign reserves. Inevitably,
the slowdown in important eco-
nomic sectors is contributing to
an increase in unemployment.”

The tourism sector provides
employment for thousands of
independent entrepreneurs who
make good incomes from the
industry.

“The vast majority of these
small business operators have
seen their incomes reduced,
some drastically,” Mr Ingraham
said.

“Such shedding of high wage
earning labour is likely to have a
downward multiplier effect on
other sectors as a result of the
fall in aggregate demand.”

The Bahamian economy is
expected to contract by 3.9 per



Armed robbery and burglary investigated

By DENISE MAYCOCK

Mr Maycock, 50, a former police officer, was clos-






































arnthen
Te AM DAILY

hve rorves gwaureuooo | isto [WA | to [40 [mm [rote |

=

Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police are investigating an armed
robbery and burglary that occurred at a residence on
Raleigh Drive, where one person was gun-butted
and injured by intruders.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle said the incident
occurred sometime around 1.53am on Friday when
four masked men stormed into a home and demand-
ed cash.

A complainant told police that she was at home
with her brother and children at the time. She
described one of the suspects as about 6ft tall, of
dark complexion, wearing a white mask and armed
with a handgun.

ASP Bootle reported that the brother was gun
butted, while the woman was able to flee the house
and escape. The children were not harmed, he said.

The suspects took the woman’s handbag, which is
valued at $50. Mr Bootle said the brother was treat-
ed for his injury at hospital.

Investigations are continuing into the shooting
and armed robbery of businessman Leslie Maycock,

ing his store around 10.45pm on Wednesday, July 15,
when two masked men robbed him of cash and shot
him in his left side.

The businessman remains in stable, but critical
condition in the Intensive Care Unit at Rand Memo-
rial Hospital.

Mr Bootle said no have arrests have made in the
matter. He said the police are urging members of the
public who can assist them to come forward.

“Anyone who may have been in the area between
9pm and 10.45pm and saw anything is asked to con-
tact 911 or the Crime tipster at 352-1919,” he said.

Mr Bootle stressed that the identity of persons
calling the crime tipster hotline will be held in the
strictest confidence.

He is urging businesspersons to be vigilant and
take precautions when operating, especially late in
the evening hours.

He said that cash deposits should be made fre-
quently, but not routinely at the same time.

Persons should also take note of individuals hang-
ing around their premises or lurking in the vicinity.

Mr Bootle is also advising persons to conduct
background checks of individuals before hiring

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THE TRIBUNE



By LLONELLA GILBERT
Bahamas Information Services

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham has criticised more developed
and industrialised countries of
sometimes arbitrarily changing the
rules for off-shore financial cen-
tres such as the Bahamas without
considering that lower standards
for the sector exist in their own
jurisdictions.

While the Bahamas remains
focused on meeting international
best standards in its financial ser-
vices industry, Mr Ingraham said
that any reform in the sector is
becoming increasingly difficult as
the industrialised countries
“appear to move the goal posts
for international financial centres
at will and without regard to low-
er standards being observed in
their own jurisdiction.”

Initiatives

Addressing the Regional Forum
on the occasion of the Inter-Amer-
ican Development Bank’s 50th
anniversary in Port-au-Prince,
Haiti on Friday, Mr Ingraham said
the Bahamas has forged ahead
with initiatives to better rationalise
the country’s tax regime, improve
efficiencies and strengthen its
financial regulatory framework.

While focused on devising mea-
sures to mitigate the effects of the
crisis and exploring means of
strengthening the country’s finan-
cial regulatory framework, the
government is fully conscious of
the origins of the global crisis and
the need for reform of the inter-
national financial architecture to
meet the interests of both devel-
oped and developing countries,
Mr Ingraham said.

A reform of special interest to
small Caribbean economies as it
relates to a level playing field in
the provision of international
financial services, he said, “is
increasingly important to us in
light of the limited scope for our
structurally dependent economies
to diversify.”

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Already many Caribbean coun-
tries have expended “considerable
resources” in reforming the finan-
cial services sector, beginning in
1999, with particular attention to
improving regulation and trans-
parency and in facilitating effective
exchange of information, he said.

He further told delegates that
the financial services sector pro-
vides important employment for
developing world professionals —
lawyers, accountants, insurance
and investment specialists, bankers
— many of whom would be other-
wise lost through “brain drain” to
the developed world.

“The cost of losing professionals
to the developed world is greater
than the loss of the individuals,” he
said. “In far too many instances,
the individual will have been edu-
cated and trained at public
expense.”

Mr Ingraham stressed that there
is a clear and urgent need for real
reform that will create a more
robust global financial system and
a more enduring world economy
capable of lifting all people to
higher standards of living.

Responding to the current eco-
nomic global crisis, the prime min-
ister said the Bahamas has
employed a number of mitigating
measures to alleviate the short-

term negative shock to highly vul-
nerable sectors of the society occa-
sioned by the global economic cri-
sis.

“Importantly, the Bahamas has
forged ahead with initiatives to
better rationalise our tax regime,
improve efficiencies and strength-
en our financial regulatory frame-
work.”

Crisis

While focused on devising mea-
sures to mitigate the effects of the
crisis and exploring means of
strengthening the country’s finan-
cial regulatory framework, the
government is fully conscious of
the origins of the global crisis and
the need for reform of the inter-
national financial architecture to
meet the interests of both devel-
oped and developing countries,
Mr Ingraham said.

A reform of special interest to
small Caribbean economies as it
relates to a level playing field in
the provision of international
financial services, he said, “is
increasingly important to us in
light of the limited scope for our
structurally dependent economies
to diversify.”

Already many Caribbean coun-

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tries have expended “considerable
resources” in reforming the finan-
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1999, with particular attention to
improving regulation and trans-
parency and in facilitating effective
exchange of information, he said.

Mr Ingraham said his govern-
ment supports the response of the
Inter-American Development
Bank to the current global eco-
nomic crisis.

“As the only multilateral insti-

MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 5

PM criticises industrialised countries over financial rules

tution from which the Bahamas
can access funding the IDB’s
adjusted policies and programmes
are welcomed.

“The need to replenish the
Bank’s Ordinary Capital and
Funds for Special Projects in light
of the current global economic cri-
sis is Supported by the Bahamas,”
he said. “We urge all developed
countries, who qualify to increase
the Bank’s resources and to accept
that action is needed now.”



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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



IT’S NO MYSTERY Queen's Certificate and Batige of Honour recipients

Bahamas real
estate today

Carmen Massoni



YOU don’t need a crystal ball to
try to predict the future of the real
estate market. Every time there is
a downturn, an upward trend
always follows.

The best course of action is to look at the causes, and
make decisions based on unbiased facts and incontestable
history.

As the choice of loan options grew these last few years, con-
sumers could buy a home more easily.

In the US Wall Street took notice of all the hot action in real
estate, and investment firms were able to shift the ownership of
mortgages to their managers and clients.

Then about three years ago, the market began cooling, as
incomes did not increase at the frantic pace that home prices did.
Investors had created an atmosphere of unrealistically high
appreciation.

The perfect storm was brewing.

This cycle of up and then down seems more drastic now,
because we enjoyed a longer than usual boom of activity, a full
decade of it between 1995 and 2005.

We should be seeing improvement across the board as 2009
draws to a close.

If you can, it’s wise to buy now — before the ball lands back
in the sellers’ court.

Great Western Pub & Grill

Home of The Great Western
Burger and many fine native



dishes.

St. Alban’s Drive (East)
Nassau, Bahamas










On Friday Government House
announced that the following
people will receive the Queen’s
Certificate and Badge of Honour
in the 2009 Queen’s Birthday
Honours:

Valentine Ronald

Farquharson

Nassau

In recognition of long service to
the community.

Reginald Haven Gibson
Nassau

In recognition of long service to
the community.

Celestine Eneas

Nassau

In recognition of outstanding
service to the Tourism Industry
(Straw Market) and to the
Church.

Ambrose Gouthro

Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
service to the community.

Joseph “Joe” Thompson
Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of services to busi-
ness, community service and
sports.

Raleigh Rexford Carroll
Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Neville Fritz Simmons
Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
and exemplary work in World
War II, the Public Service and
the hotel industry.

Philip Hilary Cartwright
Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Kay Hardy

Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition outstanding con-
tribution the field of education
and performing arts.

Eileen DeGregory

Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Evangelist Eulamae Johnson
Burnt Ground, Long Island

In recognition of long outstand-
ing public service career, also for
religion and community service.

Jerry Knowles
Simms, Long Island
In recognition of community ser-

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vice in the area of transporta-
tion.

Osborne A. Pinder

Miller’s Long Island

In recognition of long public ser-
vice career as an educator also
for religion and community ser-
vice.

Catechist Maxwell Knowles
Mangrove Bush, Long Island

In recognition of services to reli-
gion and the community.

Ezelia Carroll

McKenzie Hill, Long Island

In recognition of dedicated com-
munity and religious service.

Daniel Wallace

Duncan Town, Ragged Island
In recognition of dedicated com-
munity and religious service.

Nurse Inez Spence

Simms, Long Island

In recognition of dedicated and
committed service to the com-
munity in the area of health.

Ovina Cartwright

Cartwright, Long Island

In recognition of committed
and dedicated service in the
field of health and the commu-
nity.

Henry Knowles

Simms, Long Island

In recognition of committed and
dedicated service as a communi-
ty leader.

Richard Cartwright

Deadman’s Cay, Long Island

In recognition of services to reli-
gion, civic and community ser-
vices

Cyril Cartwright

McKenzie Hill, South Long
Island

In recognition of committed
community service.

Pastor Curtis Lawrence Moss
Fairfield, Crooked Island

In recognition of many years of
outstanding and dedicated ser-
vice to the community of
Crooked Island.

Maria Louise Pickering
Inagua

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Iva Rebecca Nixon

Mathew Town, Inagua

In recognition of many years of
dedicated and committed com-
munity service.

Alexander James Pratt
Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated services in civics
and to the community over many
long years.

Reverend Julius Dianza
Chisholm

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated service in the area of
religion, hospitality and construc-
tion.

Reverend Cleveland Murphy
Betsy Bay, Mayaguana

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated service in religion and
to the community over many
long years.

Cynthia Brown

Pirates Well, Mayaguana

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated services in business
and to the community over many
long years.

Nurse Gheneen Lindo

Nassau

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated services in the area of
health and to the community
over many long years.

Evangeline Rolle

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated services in the hospi-
tality industry, church and to the
community.

Myrthlyn Jones

Nassau

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated service as a public offi-
cer and also in child care and in
the church.

Percy Vincent Miller

Nassau

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated services in the hospi-
tality industry, church and to the
community.

Esther Ferguson-Curry

Nassau

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated services in the hospi-
tality industry, church and poli-
tics.

Reverend H. Hugh Smith
Nassau

In recognition of services to edu-
cation, religion, community ser-
vice and politics.

Howard Daniel Barr

Nassau

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated service in the areas of
education, religion and the com-
munity.

Sandra Clarke

Freeport, Grand Bahama.

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Queenie Hanna

Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Ronald Darville

Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Ivan George Davis
Nassau

OTe seek

Rael

ee Meee cad ee Wm yay

Kay Veronica Betgune

March 23rd, 1958 - July 20th, 2006

In recognition of services as a
community activist.

Esther Maria Davis

Nassau

In recognition of distinguished
public service as an accountant
in the Ministry of Agriculture.

Esther Burrows Cartwright
Nassau

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Reverend Dr. Genius Wells
Pastor, Chapel on the Hill
Nassau

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated service in the area
of religion.

Genevieve McKenzie

Nassau

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated community service

Inez Cooper

Palmetto Point, Eleuthera

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated community service.

Franklin Cooper

Savannah Sound, Eleuthera

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated community service.

Reverend Samuel Johnson
Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated community ser-
vice.

Helen Davis

Rock Sound, Eleuthera

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated community service.

Reverend Oral Pinder

Captain Lewis Augustus Cay,
Abaco

In recognition of 35 years of ser-
vice in the area of aviation, espe-
cially the numerous night flights.

Cecil Mills

Abaco

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated community ser-
vice.

Ann Charlotte Parotti

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated community ser-
vice.

Vernon Malone

Abaco

In recognition of outstanding
and devoted service in the area
of business and religion.

Ritchie Albury

Man-O-War Cay, Abaco

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated community ser-
vice in the areas of business and
community service.

Bateman Sands

Cherokee Sound, Abaco

In recognition of 40 outstanding
years in the public service.

Walter Sweeting

Abaco

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated community ser-
vice.

Benjamin Pinder

Sandy Point, Abaco

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated community ser-
vice.

Scott Weatherford

Man-O-War Cay, Abaco

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated community service.

Benjamin Havelock Rahming
Manager

Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC)
East Bay Street

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated public service.

Reverend Carl Oliver

Nicholls Town, Andros

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated service in the area
of religion and to the communi-

ty.

Ve odd an
tC ONY Memory

The Lord is my shepherd: | shall not want

He maketh me to lie down in green pastures; he laadeth me
beside the still waters

He reslorath my soul: he leadath me in fa palhs of righteousness
far Fis rarna’s sake.

Yea. though | walk through the valley of tha shadew af death;
| will ear na avi for thow art with me:
thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.

Thou preparest a table before me in the presance of ming
enemies: thaw enaintest my head with oil: my cup runneth ower

Surely goodness.and marcy shall follow me all fie days of my life;
and i will devel in the house of the Lord for ewer,

Gone but nat forgotten!

Love Ginger, "her special Merk
DMS Staff Freasportand Nassau

The International Bazaar and host of friends and family





THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

Animals do their part to keep Miami zoo green



MIAMI become more eco-friendly and has saved the
park over $20,000.

THE animals at Miami’s Metrozoo are doing Tom Trump, Metrozoo’s horticulture super-
their part to help reduce the park’s ecological visor, says it made sense to recycle and reuse
footprint, according to Associated Press. whatever they could.

The excrements of elephants, giraffes, rhinos Which residents are making the largest con-

and other herbivores are being recycled every tribution? The five elephants at the zoo pro-

day to save landfill space. The poop is used asa _ — duce 1,400 pounds of poop per day. Nine rhi-

fertiziler and even to decorate the zoo grounds. noceroses deposit 750 pounds daily. And five
The project began last year in an effort to _ giraffes discharge about 500 pounds of dung.

Excellent Employment

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Latvian IMF lessons for the Caribbean

By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)

| HERE may be
lessons for

Caribbean countries in nego-
tiations between Latvia and
the International Monetary
Fund (IMF) for a rescue pro-
gramme totalling about
US$10.4 billion.

Latvia is a relatively small
member country of the Euro-




=
in
ss

WORLD VIEW

pean Union (EU). Its popu-
lation of 2.3 million is rough-
ly the same as the
Caribbean’s Jamaica. Until
1991 it was a member of the
Union of Soviet Socialist
Republics (USSR) dominat-
ed by Russia. With the break-
up of the USSR, Latvia

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regained its independent sta-
tus and elected to join the
EU in 2004.

Between 2000 and 2007,
Latvia enjoyed one of the
highest GDP growth rates in
the EU, but this collapsed in
late 2008 exacerbated by the
global economic crisis and
shortage of credit.

The economy dramatically
fell in the first quarter of
2009 by 18 per cent, the
biggest fall experienced by
any EU country.

Since last year, the Lat-
vian government has been
engaged in negotiations with
both the EU and the IMF on
the $10.4 billion bailout pro-
gramme.

Anxious to help an EU
member state, and mindful
that Latvia has pegged its
currency to the Euro — the
official currency of most of
the EU members - the EU
Commissioner for Econom-
ic and Monetary Affairs
Joaquin Almunia has
announced the release of $1.6
billion as a rescue loan pay-
ment but only after extract-
ing budget cuts worth $1 bil-
lion from the Latvian gov-
ernment.

In the event, the EU loan
is only 10 per cent of Latvia’s
needs, and it is the IMF to
which the government is
looking for the greater part
of its borrowing.

The going has not been
good. And, despite the
rhetoric about more flexibil-
ity in fiscal and monetary
policies in light of the pre-
sent and ongoing global
financial crisis, the IMF is still
pushing tight fiscal policy,
cuts in government spending





SIR RONALD SANDERS

and very low inflation as con-
ditions for its lending.

Before Latvia, Romania
faced similar problems with
the IMF. It is reported that
the IMF mission chief for
Romania said that in
exchange for $17.5 billion,
there were requirements to
bring down budget deficits
below 3 per cent of GDP,
restructure wages policies,
recalibrate pension schemes
and reduce inflation.

In this regard, the much
vaunted increase in IMF
resources up to $750 billion
after the G20 meeting in
London last April could
mean little. It seems that
what remains vital is the need
for reform of IMF terms for
lending, or, as the Third
World Network has suggest-
ed, “additional resources to
the IMF would give it the
means by which to discipline
crisis-hot countries the wrong
way, worsening the crisis for
them.”

Going back to Latvia
specifically, the government
announced that the IMF has
imposed fresh conditions for
it to qualify for rescue funds.
Other reports also indicate,
as this commentary is being
written, that Latvia has been
given a deadline by the IMF
to agree its conditions, or the
negotiations will end.

The Prime Minister, Vald-
is Dombrovskis, said the
negotiations had turned con-
tentious, largely over how
quickly to cut the country’s
budget deficit. The govern-



ment wants to reduce the
budget deficit, which could
hit 10 per cent of GDP this
year, to 3 per cent by 2012,
but the IMF wants a faster
rate of reduction.

Following riots in its Capi-
tal City, the Latvian govern-
ment is naturally unwilling to
accept the IMF proposals lest
discontent in the country
results in further upheavals.

The IMF also wanted
Latvia to devalue its curren-
cy, arguing that the present
link to the Euro is unsustain-
able. A devalued currency,
they say, would make Lat-
vian exports cheaper. But it
would also make imports
more costly and push-up the
cost of living. Fortunately
for Latvia the IMF appears
to be persuaded by the EU
to back-off from a require-
ment for devaluation at this
time.

N pies Latvia is
not out of the

woods. The Prime Minister
has said that IMF backing for
its whole programme is nec-
essary even if the govern-
ment raises the money it
needs from other sources.
The major areas of con-
tention appear to be: cutting
budget deficit levels, further
tax rises and reducing spend-
ing in key areas like educa-
tion, welfare and health even
though Latvia has already
made cuts that included
reductions in public sector
salaries and a 10 per cent
reduction in pensions.

Several Caribbean coun-
tries are now considering
engagement with the IMF to
help their ailing economics.

A few of them have
already entered special
arrangements that are not
rescue programmes.

For instance, St Vincent
and the Grenadines has an
arrangement under the
Exogenous Shocks Facility
(ESF) which has a higher
degree of flexibility and does
not include structural condi-
tions but does require a low
inflation rate.

Dominica has also received
$5.1 million from the IMF

under the same ESF. The
government had to commit
to aim for annual primary
surpluses of at least 3 per
cent of GDP so as to reduce
public debt.

It also had to agree to
finance capital largely with
external concessional
resources — a hard task
indeed at a time when con-
cessionary financing is dry-
ing-up.

Jamaica is presently talk-
ing with the IMF about a
possible Standby Agreement
for Foreign Exchange Bal-
ance of Payment Support.
The details of the sort of pro-
gramme that Jamaica is seek-
ing and the terms that the
IMF has put on the table are
not known as this commen-
tary is being written. But the
Finance Minister Audley
Shaw has said that “there is
no need for the great concern
for conditionalities that will
be oppressive; that will be
destructive to the social sec-
tor; that will be destructive
to the financial sector. Not
at all.”

Jamaica has enough expe-
rience with the IMF and
enough people who have
worked within the IMF, to
negotiate the best terms pos-
sible.

But, it is as well for all
Caribbean countries to keep
their eyes focused on the Lat-
vian experience to which the
IMF would be much more
sympathetic because of the
EU’s lobbying and the place
of its key member states on
the Executive Board. So far,
the IMF does not appear to
have relaxed its tough con-
ditionalities.

It is also necessary for the
Caribbean to join with oth-
ers for meaningful reform of
the IMF’s lending terms. The
existing terms could make
hard-hit economies worse
rather than better.

The forthcoming Com-
monwealth Finance Ministers
meeting is a good place to
advance the arguments for
urgent reform.

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

IDB anticipates the Bahamas |
will have borrowed $300m

between 2008 and 2012
FROM page one

ing measures to alleviate the short-term negative shock to highly :
vulnerable sectors of the society occasioned by the global eco- }

nomic crisis.

He told the forum delegates that for the first time the Bahamas

has put in place an unemployment benefit system.

“Our social safety net has been bolstered through increased }
social service benefits to the most vulnerable in our society. The }
government has taken steps to minimise the adverse effects of high }

electricity costs.”

To preserve jobs and create new employment opportunities, the :
government has accelerated a number of planned infrastructural }
projects, including major road and port improvements, the con- }
struction of the Nassau straw market, and accelerated construction }
or completion of a number of government office complexes, Mr }

Ingraham said.

Additional road works and general environment upgrade of :
parks and other recreational facilities around the country are }

also being undertaken.

“The government has put in place incentives to encourage i
the private sector to use the period of the downturn to upgrade }
and reposition their business enterprises, better positioning them- {
selves to take advantage of the economic turn around when it }

occurs,” he said.

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COMMONWEALTH BANK

FROM page one

appears that the event has been successful in terms
of raising awareness. They had lots of participation,
people enjoyed themselves and they seemed to have
removed a significant number of lionfish from the
environment and as far as we’re concerned that’s a
very good thing.”

The event was organised by the Bahamas Nation-
al Trust in conjunction with the Department of
Marine Resources and the College of the Bahamas.
Fried lionfish fillets prepared by Alexandra Maillis-
Lynch from the August Moon Cafe at Lyford Cay
proved very popular among participants and curious
members of the public.

People compared the taste of the non-native fish,
which has raised major alarm bells as its highly
predatory nature and expanding population threat-
ens local marine life, to hogfish, grouper and yel-
lowtail.

Mr Braynen added: “It has helped to expose even
more people to the fact that lionfish can be used as
food and we think that this is perhaps the best
avenue that we will be able to pursue to reduce the
numbers of lionfish in the environment by turning
them into a fish that people see as a food source, that
commercial fishermen will want to take and that
people will want to buy.”

The heaviest single fish speared was also caught by
the crew of the boat “Shezam”. Weighing in at 1.98
pounds it was large, but fell far below the four to five
pounds to which lionfish have been known to grow.

Meanwhile, those determining who would take the
prize for the smallest fish had to resort to measuring
it by length not weight after the scale on site proved
not sensitive enough to differentiate between the five
tiniest fish caught, each weighing in at a mere two
tenths of a pound. The crew of “Too Reel” fol-
lowed by the Maillis family onboard “Jojo” won
first and second prize in this category.

There were several lionfish-related injuries on
the day, with two people having to sit out the
remainder of the event after receiving a lionfish
spine to the hand. In each instance the fish slid
down the spear, its venomous spines — which are on
top and bottom of the fish — puncturing the soft tis-
sue on the hands, leaving them swollen and the
divers in serious pain.

However, Mr Braynen said the key point is that

FROM page one

drive for the funds, and those
members of the public who con-
tributed, the Ministry of Labour

PUBLIC NOTICE

The: Beard
ranches) obs would Ee ood lis

Victims of tragedy

and Social Development yester-
day called for victims to come and
collect their monies from its

Healdiregss

riers! obo oa

HOPNTER,
THAN
on

BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST members Linda Turtle
and Robin Symonette, wife of Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette, hold up T-shirts that are being sold
to raise awareness of the need to control lion fish.

Invasive lionfish

such an incident is not as debilitating as some
believe.

“Although they are not happy about it they are
not on the floor, they are not dying,” he said.

He did note, however, that some people may be
more sensitive to the venom than others. “It is still
something very significant that we want people to be
aware of.”

Bronson Braynen, who was spearing with the
team onboard the boat “Ultimanovia,” said he took
part in the event as he feels it’s time for humans to
take the initiative to tackle the influx of the voracious
fish, which has no predators in the Atlantic as it
does in its native Pacific and Indian Oceans.

“It’s not good for the reef cos’ they eat every-
thing on the reef. So we’ve got to try and take charge
and spear some of them,” he said.

Peter Maillis said his team were able to pick up the
300 they captured primarily in the southwest of New
Providence. Other teams that went to the area of
Rose Island found the lionfish to be much less plen-
tiful. “Mostly we got them from wrecks and deeper
water, at between eight and 30 feet,” said Mr Mail-
lis.

Later this week the committee will present a
cheque to the BNT of the funds raised by the event,
which they expect to put towards more awareness
raising seminars in the out islands in particular.

headquarters on East Hill
Street on Tuesday and Wednes-
day this week between the
hours of 9am and Spm.

Cheques can be collected by
victims and their representa-
tives upon the production of
“satisfactory identification such
as a passport, voters card or
drivers license,” said the Min-
istry.

“Representatives of victims
must also produce written
authorisation allowing them to
collect cheques on behalf of the
victims of the Sea Hauler/Unit-
ed Star tragedy,” it added.

Victims and relatives of vic-

Lied hae



Water pressure

FROM page one

located behind the Sea-
grapes plaza, told The Tri-
bune.

The resident, who wished
to remain anonymous, said
that his wife suffers from a
kidney disease that requires
her to use the bathroom very
frequently. Unfortunately,
because of the problem with
the water in the area he said
this poses an incredible chal-
lenge.

“You can hardly flush the
toilet. We have to use buck-
ets for everything. We have
to gather some water in
buckets to be able to flush
toilets and bathe.

“Tt’s unhygienic, unsani-
tary and dangerous to our
health. It’s stinks and it’s
dirty,” he said.

The concerned husband
said that if his wife suffers
any health issues due to the
lack of water he is willing to
take legal action against the
government for Water and
Sewerage’s failure to provide
them with a basic human
necessity.

In addition to the concerns
about hygiene, the resident
said that bills for plumbing
work and toilet equipment
are also piling up.

“We constantly have to fix
things, clean the plumbing
because there is no water.
Who is going to pay those
bills?” he wanted to know.

A another resident of the
area, Antoinette Wells, who
has lived in Star Estates for
four years, said that water
pressure has always been
bad in the community, but
the situation has become
especially dire in the last

ear.

“Not only do we have to
use buckets to bathe our
skin, the water is also red,
rusty,” she said.

Ms Wells said that after a
long day at work she cannot
even come home to look for-
ward to a bath.

“T can’t even wash my

clothes, sometimes I take the
long journey to my daugh-

tims who may collect cheques

Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco
are: Tenneson Leslie, Carmen

dere 0 he © may Te AG 1a

ne a its que ty to make ope harks

GSO oly

ourchsses

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed to delivering superior quality service, to
training and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in
the community.

Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for
Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco.

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
Assisting the Branch Manager in managing the sales activities of
the Branch to enhance profitability.
Effectively leading, supporting and coaching personnel to
achieve corporate objectives.
Effectively managing a portfolio of consumer, mortgage and
commercial loans.
Adjudicating credit lines within delegated authority.
Managing the Branch’s collection activities and the protection of
collateral.
Following-up with client and support functions to ensure timely
completion of product requests and transactions and resolution of
inquiries and issues.
Ensuring Credit risk ratings and credit scoring practices are
adhered to at all times to minimize the risk of loan losses.
Ensuring specific objectives are developed through an
appropriate strategic plan to grow the Branch’s loan and deposit
portfolios and other offerings.
Adding value to the customers’ portfolio of financial services
by actively promoting, marketing, building and cross selling all
deposit / investment and consumer credit business. Ensuring
self and direct reports consistently provide highly courteous
customer service in an informed and thorough manner. Assisting
the Manager in attaining the targets incorporated in the Branch’s
financial plan

QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE:
Bachelor’s degree or higher in Business Administration, Banking
& Finance or a related discipline from an accredited University.
Minimum of eight years commercial banking experience with a
minimum of 3 years supervisory / managerial experience.
Experience in managing a diverse loan portfolio and assessing
loan quality.

Detailed knowledge of Retail / Commercial / Mortgage lending
practices and credit anal ysis to ensure portfolio quality.
Substantial work experience in loans and risk management with
a full understanding of financial statements and the ability to
anal yze the information.

Excellent leadership and coaching skills

Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills
Excellent organizational and time management skills

Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications.

REMUNERATION PACKAGE:

Commonwealth Bank is a Great place to work! We offer an
exciting work environment with the opportunity for growth and
development. We also offer a competitive compensation package,
reflecting the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications,
including a performance based incentive plan, health, vision,
dental and life insurances anda pension plan.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before

July 24, 2009 to:

Human Resources Department
Re: Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco
P.O. Box SS-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Telefax: (242) 393-8073
E-mail address: hr@combankltd.com

©2009 CreativeRelations.net

“Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their
interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those
under consideration will be contacted.”



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ter to wash my clothes
there,” she said.

Up until now the residents
said they have only received
vague explanations and emp-
ty promises from the Water
and Sewerage Corporation
regarding their problem.

Attempts by The Tribune
to reach executives of the
Water and Sewerage Corpo-
ration over the weekend
were unsuccessful.

Sir Milo Butler's
grandson shot
FROM page one

reportedly nicked his femur
bone but did not rupture any
major blood vessels.

Minister of State for Social
Services Loretta Butler-
Turner, first cousin to Mr
Butler, said that her family is
especially grateful to the per-
sons who were in the area
that night and immediately
assisted in the situation.

“He was the only one
there at night when it hap-
pened, but fortunately there
were some passersby who
came to help as soon as they
heard the gunshot. They
were some really good peo-
ple who reached out to him.
They acted expeditiously
and got an ambulance to the
scene and the family was
able to meet him at the hos-
pital,” she said.

Mrs Butler-Turner said
that following the shooting
the family immediately dis-
cussed the fact that more
security will be required at
the business.

Mr Moss said police are
concerned that the robbers
were purposefully targeting
any member of the Butler
family who was closing up
the establishment that night.

He said CDU will be
meeting with the southern
police division who in turn
will speak to business owners
in that area about security
measures.

“We’re going to discuss
some safety tips with them
and some assistance that
may be rendered once
they’re closing their stores,”
he said.

Supt Moss said police are
appealing to anyone with
information concerning Sat-
urday night’s shooting to
contact the authorities as
soon as possible.

The Butler family was
recently the recipient of bad
news when former speaker
of the House of the Assem-
bly Milo Butler Jr died last
month at the age of 72 after
a long battle with heart dis-
ease.



THE TRIBUNE

S
i



MONDAY, JULY 20,

Darling regains
bodytuilding title

New
woman
champion
emerges



trophy.

DONNA WILLIAMS

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



HILE James
‘Jay’ Darling
regained his
men’s nation-
al title, a new female emerged as
champion in the Bahamas Body-
building and Fitness Federation’s
29th Mr/Ms Bahamas National
Championships.

Darling once again dominated
the middleweight division and
out-posed bantamweight cham-
pion Paul ‘Mighty Mouse’ Wil-
son, welterweight Raymond
Tucker, light-middleweight Ray
Whylly, light-heavy Desmond
Bain, heavyweight Charles John-
son and super-heavy Teddy Gray
to cart off the Mr. Bahamas title
that he lost last year to Aaron
Green.

But the large crowd at the
National Center for Performing
Arts were stunned on Saturday
night when first year heavyweight
Donna Williams stepped on stage.

SEE page 12

Faye Rolle.

E



2009

MINISTER OF STATE for Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard presents James Darling with the winning

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NEW CHAMPION Donna Williams is matched against last year’s champion

PHOTOS: Ashley Taylor

Atkins prepares for shot at
another medal in Germany

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH the IAAF World Championships in Ath-
letics less than a month away, sprinter Derrick
Atkins finally got in high gear as he prepares for a
shot at another medal in Berlin, Germany.

Atkins, the reigning silver medalist from the 2007
Championships in Osaka, Japan, raced to a sea-
son’s best of 10.00 seconds in a meet in Zaragoza on
the European Athletics Premium Meeting.

Francis Obikwelu of France finished second in
10.08 and Samuel Francis of Qatar took third place
in the same time.

Atkins, the national 100 champion, took the first
of his second semifinal heat in 10.13. Both times
improved on their previous season’s best of 10.17 in
Berkeley, California that he ran on May 1.

Atkins’ performance came two days after Olympic
triple champion and world record holder Usain Bolt
sped to a meet record of 9.79 in Paris, France on Fri-

day. In that Golden League meet, Chris ‘Bay’ Brown
had to settle for second place in 45.44 behind reign-
ing world champion Jeremy Wariner of the United
States, who won the men’s 400 in 45.28.

Brown, however, got some revenge on Ameri-
can David Neville, who dove across the finish line at
the Olympic Games last year in Beijing, China to
edge him out for the bronze. Neville was fourth Fri-
day in 45.49.

Veteran Chandra Sturrup continues to prove to be
a contender, this time coming up second in the wom-
en’s 100 in 11.15 behind Jamaican world leader Ker-
ron Stewart, who won in 10.99.

“My race went well, but my start was terrible,”
said Sturrup about her performance. “I am happy
that I was still able to place top two. I looking for-
ward to running sub 10 but I will take the second
place for now.”

Also Paris, Olympic bronze medalist Leevan
‘Superman’ Sands cleared 16.78 metres for sixth
place.

The winning leap was 17.17 by Phillips Idowu of
Great Britain.





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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS












































FORMER MULTIPLE national
champion Della Thomas makes a
return.

BANTAM WEIGHT champion Paul
“Mighty Mouse” Wilson.

Wednesday July 15th, 2009
from Camperdown (east Nassau)

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DR. NORMAN GAY, a long-time bodybuilding competitor and e

xecutive, is presented with a Lifetime Achieve-

ment Award. Pictured from left to right are: Richard Demeritte, BOA president Wellington Miller, Dr. Gay, Min-
ister of State for Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard, and BBFF president Danny Sumner.

BODY fitness competitors.



Williams turned out to be a giant killer as she
dethroned her Ironman training partner Faye Rolle
and former national and international queen Della
Thomas in taking the Ms. Bahamas overall title.

“T felt good especially after you put your effort
into your dieting and you hope that you go out
there and put on a good show,” said Williams, who
ever competed in any sport prior to Saturday.

“T tried hard and I prayed before I went out, ask-
ing God to help me to get through the competition.
I was really surprised that I was able to preserved.”

Williams credited a lot of her success to the train-
ing that she got from Wellington ‘Cat’ Sears, who
helped her to trim down from what she called an
“oversize woman who never wore a two piece biki-
niin public.”

Surprised herself with her performance, Williams
said she had to keep reminding herself that she was
going up against some great female competitors in
runner-up Faye Rolle and third place finisher Del-
la Thomas.

“But I did it,” she said.

Williams said she will now prepare herself for
the Central American and Caribbean Championship
coming up in September and hopefully produce
another stunning performance.

“T like winning. It’s a beautiful feeling,” Darling
said. “This year, I didn’t have anybody to train, so I
just concentrated fully on me and it paid off.”

With the CAC fast approaching, Darling said he
will definitely going after the pro card, awarded to
the overall champion. But if he doesn’t get it, he will
continue to work hard at it.

“T’m not just going to focus on the pro card, but
the competition itself,” he said. “I thought this year,
Teddy (Gray) looked pretty good and Desmond
(Bain) was much tighter. So I was really pleased
that I won and now I can get ready for CAC.”

The showdown was actually between Darling and
Gray, who won the super-heavyweight title over
Kenny Green and Shawn McPhee.

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MIXED PAIRS champions Stephen Robinson
and Faye Rolle.

Darling regains national title

FROM page 11

“T’ve been training around the clock, so this was a
good opportunity to see where I’m at against Jay
Darling,” said Gray, a former track sprinter. “I real-
ly want to go to CAC and see if I can get my pro
card.”

Charles Kemp, however, was hoping for another
upset after he dethroned last year’s Mr. Bahamas
Aaron Green in the heavyweight division.

“It was a rough one. Last year, I followed Aaron
Green and this year, I bucked him again,” said the
media cameraman. “It was really good to finally
get the win over him. But this is a sport of age and
every year, I’m going to just take it one step at a time
until I finally win it all. Thanks to Joel Stubbs’ help,
I’m getting there.”

In the fitness competition, Teshell Mackey cap-
tured the overall title, while Charnice Bain from
Grand Bahama was awarded the body fitness title.

“T think I did very well. I came here to win and I
think I did that very well,” said Mackey, the fitness
tall champion. “My routine was perfect and I exe-
cuted it well. I just have to do some changes for
CAC and I will be okay.”

Bain, who won the body fitness C category over
fellow Grand Bahamian Petra Brice and Mackey,
said her performance was just “awesome” and she
gave God “the glory.”

The repeat champion who went on to finish fourth
at the CAC Championships said she worked
extremely hard to get ready for this year’s competi-
tion. “I want to finally get the gold for the Bahamas,”
said Bain, the wife of light-heavyeight champion
Desmond Bain. “I’m just extremely happy that I
won and I will get to compete for the Bahamas
again.”

Cecilee Hilton won the body fitness A over
Lakeisha Miller and Dawnita Fry, while Anglique
Williamson was the body fitness A champion.

“At first, I was nervous, but as the competition
went on, I got more relaxed,” said Williamson,
whose been training under Sears for the past 15
years but finally decided to enter a competition this
year. “I just have to train a little harder.”

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Tel: (242) 302-0130 Fax: (242) 323-7272






© Boxing

Floyd Seymour
to return

home to help
amateur boxing
programme

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

HAVING moved to Mary-
land where he has estab-
lished an amateur boxing
club, ‘Pretty Boy’ Floyd Sey-
mour has decided to return
home to give back to the
amateur boxing programme
that has helped him in his
career.

Seymour, now a full-time
trainer, presented his cousin,
Andre Seymour, with a bag
full of training gear for his
Carmichael Knockout Box-
ing Club while he came
home for a break this past
weekend.

“This donation is to help
out with the boxers as I try
to give something back,”
said Floyd Seymour, who has
been in the United States for
more than a decade after he
quit boxing.

“Whatever I can, I will try
to help. I know that the guys
are always in need, so I will
try to come back home every
quarter, three months or so,
and help the association and
the amateur programme.”

The Inagua native, who
represented the Bahamas at
a number of international
amateur competition, said
that too many Bahamians
have left and excelled over-
seas, but they never return to
help the programme that got
them started.

“By me being a Bahamian,
leaving here at the age of 22
years old, whatever I can do
in my power, I got to do it,”
he said. “For me being in the
position that Iam in now,
this is because of the
Bahamas.

“T think if we do some-
thing like this that ’m doing,
if the track, basketball and
other athletes do the same
thing, we could be a much
better position. We need to
do more for the kids who are
coming up.”

Seymour said all Andre
Seymour has to do is give
him a call and he will assist
him.

Coaching

While in town, Seymour
also took the time out to
share his coaching expertise
with Carl Hield and Valenti-
no Knowles, who are prepar-
ing to go to their third and
second World Champi-
onships at the end of August.

Seymour has also opened
his home and his training
facility to the two boxers to
come to Maryland to get in
some training in Maryland
before they go to the World
Championships. Andre Sey-
mour, who also serves as the
national coach for the World
Championships, scheduled
for Japan, said he’s pleased
that Floyd Seymour has
agreed to assist his Knockout
Boxing Club and the nation-
al amateur programme.

“The equipment that he
brought with him, we will
definitely be putting them to
good use,” Seymour said.
“We have a number of
young boxers in our club and
we are always in need for
equipment for them to train
with.”

As for the training camp
that will be set up in Mary-
land, Seymour said it will be
good for both Hield and
Knowles to travel there to
train, especially considering
the fact that the training
facilities in Cuba is now
closed for the summer.

Both Hield and Knowles
have indicated that they are
excited about teaming up
with Floyd Seymour in
Maryland as they prepare for
the biggest tournament for
the year.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
eteto Mal Tfo/ ars
on Mondays



PAGE 14, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



CENTROBASKET U-17 CHAMPIONSHIPS, MEXICO

Women’s team to return home winless

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE women’s national team didn’t stand a chance
against their competitors at the Centrobasket Under-
17 Championships in Aguas Calientes, Mexico.

The team will return home winless, having lost
all five of their games played by more than 20 points
as they finished at the bottom of the standings.

The tournament served as qualifier for the 2010
FIBA U-19 World Championships for Women. The
top three advanced to the championships.

Although they didn’t win a game, the Bahamas
placed a couple of players in the top ten individual
categories.

Leading the way was Taneka Sandiford, who was
seventh in points with a total of 63 for an average of
12.6 per game. She also led the free throws made with
35 for a 7.0 average, was ninth in rebounds with 37
(28 offensive and nine defensive) for a 7.4 average,
was third in free throws average, making 35-of-61 for
57.4 and was fifth in steals with 18 for a 3.6 average.

Britenique Harrison followed Sandiford at No.10
in rebounds with 36 (24 offense and 12 defense) for
a 7.2 average and she led in block shots with a total
of 13 for a 2.6 average.

The others were Shadell Williams, who was 10th in

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blocks with three for a 0.6 average and Latonya
Hamilton, who was ninth in steals with 16 for a 3.2.
average.

¢ Summaries of their games played are as follows:

On Saturday, the Bahamas played its final game,
losing 61-48 to previously winless Guatemala. The
Bahamas trailed 15-9 after the first quarter and out-
scored Guatemala 12-8 in the second half for a 23-21
deficit at the half.

But in the third quarter, Guatemala went on a
22-10 spurt and they never looked back, although the
Bahamas tried one final comeback in the fourth on
a 16-15 run.

Sandiford led the way for the Bahamas with 13
points and 11 rebounds in 38 minutes of play. Hamil-
ton had 11 points, 10 rebounds and assists in 34 min-
utes and Harrison 10 points and three rebounds in 27
minutes.

On Friday, the Bahamas were routed by Mexico
115-35 after falling behind 24-13 after the first peri-
od. They were out-scored 33-9 in the second quarter,
31-7 in the third and 27-6 in the fourth.

Sandiford once again had the hot hands for the
Bahamas with 10 points and 11 rebounds in 36 min-
utes. Aren Pratt was the next highest scorer with
eight points, four rebounds and three steals in 28
minutes.

In their third game on Thursday, the Bahamas

fell 68-52 to Costa Rica in what was probably their
best production as they fell behind only 10-7 after the
first quarter, 26-19 at the half and 47-42 at the end of
the third.

Harrison had the high honors for the Bahamas
with 12 points and 12 rebounds in 27 minutes; San-
diford had nine points and eight rebounds in 37 min-
utes and both Pratt and Williams chipped in with
eight.

In their second game on Wednesday, the Bahamas
had another good showing, despite losing 77-34 to
Puerto Rico. They actually only trailed 25-10 after
the first quarter and 45-21 at the half. But in the
third, they were out-scored 24-4 as the game got
away from them.

Sandiford came up with 10 points and five
rebounds in 36 minutes and Harrison, Williams and
Ashlee Bethel all contributed six. Hamilton added
five.

And in their opener against the Virgin Islands on
Tuesday, the Bahamas dropped a 74-54 decision
after falling behind 16-11 at the end of the first and
38-22 at the half. They were out-scored 20-7 in the
third.

Sandiford finished with a game high 21 points
with eight steals in 26 minutes. Harrison had nine
points and 11 rebounds and Hamilton seven points
and 10 rebounds.

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 15

Illegal immigration issues

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

AS THE summer heat bears
down upon us, so it seems does the
unbearable influx of illegal immi-
grants, for as to quote a Bahamian
song, “they coming by boat, they
coming by plane, some coming in
wheelchair and walking with cane.”

Of course, for those familiar with
the song, they aren’t coming to “‘see
Theresa, the Bahamian Mona
Lisa!”

These days, thousands of illegal
Haitians, Jamaicans, Chinese, Euro-
peans and Dominicans are invad-
ing our territorial boundaries.
Although Jamaicans, Europeans,
Dominicans and the Chinese
migrate illegally in much smaller
numbers, we must ensure that they
do not become the forgotten ille-
gal immigrants, who are eventually
emboldened to operate with
impunity.

More than any other group of
immigrants, hordes of illegal
Haitians stealthily make the trek
up the Bahama Island chain, some-
times with the assistance of treaso-
nous Bahamian boat
captains/sailors. Just last week the
Royal Bahamas Defence Force
apprehended nearly 200 illegal Hait-
ian immigrants. However, if much
of the RBDF’s meager resources
were primarily focused on one area
of New Providence during the last
apprehension exercise, can you
imagine how many illegals would
have entered town if several, say
three or four, rickety boats had
docked at different entry points with
only one of them being arrested?

In recent years, the immigrant
tide has been swelling with the large
exodus of boat people from a land
of stifling poverty. Haiti has failed to
complete its transition from a tra-
dition society to a social and eco-
nomic modernity. It has instead
become a nation crippled by coups,
a hotbed of tyranny and political
instability and a nation whose citi-
zens have emigrated in mass to
become an economic/social mill-
stone around the necks of neigh-
boring countries.

Haiti’s leaders have left their
countrymen to languish in a state
of unspeakable poverty. The Hait-
ian economy/society is in tatters due
to misrule and its poor governance
since its bloody assumption of Inde-
pendence more than 200 years ago.
The despotic rule of politicians, who
abused power and ripped-off the
national treasury in their voracious
bid to enhance their personal for-
tunes, have fuelled emigration from
Haiti and caused it to come to be
seen as the Western Hemisphere’s
hungriest and perhaps most tragic
independent state. In many
instances, much of Haiti’s misfor-
tune is self-inflicted, through cen-
turies of corruption, grotesque vio-
lence and mismanagement.

For many Haitians, the Bahamas
is a gateway to their pursuit of hap-
piness and a better life and/or a pas-
sageway to America. Illegal immi-
grants, of all nationalities, are a
strain on this country’s safety nets.
While most Bahamians exhibit a
prickliness about illegal immigrants,
sadly, many of them appear to have
become indifferent and accustomed
to bad news on immigration.

Indiscipline, corruption, specula-
tion and bureaucratic inertia are the
four main vices weighing down our
society/economy, and it’s ever more
apparent in our wishy-washy, self-
serving outlook on combating illegal
immigration. It is high-time we
enunciate a clear strategy in our
fight against this social plague.

Similar to the bush people of
Africa, we have the bush people of
the Bahamas, who populate the
bushes of Cowpen Road,
Carmichael Road, Fox Hill and
Adelaide. Anyone who wanders
deep enough into these bushy

*y

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YOUNG MAN’S VIEW

A DRI AN

enclaves would stumble upon
sprawls of squalor, as camps of
squatters occupy clapboard huts
jammed together without sanita-
tion—no doubt also creating a
breeding ground for disease. In the
bush, these illegal immigrants pay
no rent or property tax, no national
insurance, no water or phone bills
and no electricity charges—many
times running drop-cords from one
end of the bush to another. Some-
times, these persons do pay
unscrupulous Bahamians, who
threaten to alert the authorities or
purport to own the land on which
they squat, $50 or more per
week/month. Wasn’t there a move

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afoot a few years ago to demolish all
new shanty homes in Marsh Har-
bour? Did that ever come to
fruition? These firetraps do not
adhere to the government’s building
codes nor do illegals have permis-
sion from the relevant agencies for
building permits or the use of
Crown Land?

While I’m empathetic to their
plight and desperation, it is not fea-
sible for our country’s survival if it’s
overrun by parasitic foreign enti-
ties—illegal migrants.

If the immigration department
really wants to conduct an audit of
Haitian nationals living here, it
should start by launching hiking



expeditions, rambling through the
bushes of Cowpen, Carmichael, Fox
Hill, Exuma and Abaco. In the
bushes is where the real answers
lie! If this department is serious
about flushing out illegal immi-
grants, it would check the bushes
and locate the remote, dusty vil-
lages that are stashed away in the
rough, shrub terrain of certain parts
of the Bahamas. Bush raids and
raids on suspected business places
would undoubtedly net thousands
of illegal immigrants. Gun-toting
Immigration and Defence Force
officers should also mount road-
blocks in areas suspected of being
heavily populated by immigrants—
this would also discourage legal res-
idents from harbouring their illegal
countrymen.

Immigration officials must spend
more time carrying out follow-ups

SEE page 16

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PAGE 16, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





FROM page 15

and spot checks to ensure that if
work permits have expired and are
not being renewed, that these for-
mer holders of work permits would
have departed the country. As it
relates to many other foreign
nationals, immigration officers
should check the status of those per-
sons holding white-collar positions
at private/commercial banks,
accounting firms, hotel management
and those Chinese restaurants/food
stores.

Illegal immigration had unques-
tionably also brought a streak of
nastiness and criminality. According
to a source at the prison, “there is a
rising number of Haitian-Bahami-
ans, Haitians and other immigrants
in prison for violent crimes.” It is
safe to assume that a good percent-
age of the street violence being per-

Illegal immigration

petrated today is by disenfranchised
Haitian-Bahamians who are state-
less, bitter and feel rejected by the
only society that they know.

In many instances, these indi-
viduals are unable to obtain good
jobs, travel overseas or obtain a col-
lege degree as the odds are stacked
against them and their lack of status
is an overriding impediment to their
upward mobility socially.

Has COB modified its policy
that required Bahamian-born stu-
dents, who did not possess proof of
citizenship, to pay the rate of non-
Bahamians and therefore spend
twice as much time saving as they
are also handicapped when trying to
attain scholarships? Has this pre-
ventable privation many students
have faced due to the ineptitude of

the immigration officials and the
inflexible, apathetic stance of COB
representatives, been ironed out?

After proper and reasonably
timed vetting, citizenship should be
granted to the qualified offspring
of immigrants born here, therefore
allowing them to integrate and have
a greater appreciation for and an
allegiance to this country. Although
the Bahamas has a distinct cultural
identity and a stable Parliamentary
democracy, our society has the bear-
ings of a peaceful melting pot that
should unquestionably answer ques-
tions about assimilation and nation-
al identity for those who feel dis-
enfranchised.

In order to combat the illegal
migration quagmire that our coun-
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down with, we must refocus our
efforts on apprehending of ALL
illegals—not discriminating—and
offering rewards/bounties to any-
one willing to give information
(snitch) as to the whereabouts of
illegal migrants as well as those peo-
ple hiring and assisting them.

We must also serve to protect
immigrants from exploitation by
police officers and conduct stings
and fire crooked
immigration/defence force officers,
while also protecting legal immi-
grants from exploitation for slave
wages or sex. I’m told that some
persons brought into households as
baby sitters, housekeepers and
maids—Filipinos, Jamaicans, etc—
are quite frequently blackmailed
for sexual favours, especially if their
work permits are up for renewal.

Bahamian citizens and consec-

utive governments have taken too
much of a blasé approach to illegal
immigration, now and then bleat-
ing and griping about the problem
but failing to act, many times even
hiring “my Haitian” to perform
tasks for little to no pay.

When will the US cease its unfair
policies on immigration and grant
the same wet foot/dry foot policy
granted to the Cubans to the
Haitians? Why are the Haitians not
afforded the same privilege? Could
it be race related?

Over the years, the political
approach to the immigration crisis
has given little hope. Avaricious
politicians who spend time talking
and using immigration as a political
prop to arouse the passions of the
electorate every campaign season
should cease this sick, politically
expedient practice and offer real

solutions. The hypocrisy of these
same politicians who mouth plati-
tudes about stamping out illegal
immigration from a political plat-
form every five years leaves me,
and definitely most discerning
Bahamians, frothing at the mouth.
With that said, I must also note that
the present minister of state and his
director have shown flashes of
reform in their struggle against ille-
gal immigration and promotion of
immigration reform.

As we face gloomy economic
times, the government should also
look at reserving deportations by
plane for longer distances and
deport illegals from this region to
their Caribbean homesteads on mail
boats or barges.

Mass illegal immigration is a
Frankenstein-type monster that, if
not properly handled, will inevitably
turn and devour nearly every aspect
of our identity. We must realize that
in our response to all illegal immi-
gration, we are serving as custodians
of our cultural beliefs. Indeed, we
do live in an age of globalization
and must cope with a global soci-
ety—just not illegals.

Yes, let’s let tolerance and
enforcement cohabit with compas-
sion and toughness as we combat
this ever growing problem. I do not
propose bigotry or xenophobia—
only that we reclaim our birthright
and protect our national identity
before it’s lost!

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THE TRIBUNE
q
b US



CLICO
liquidator
in talks
over sale
of critical
asset

* “Two to three buyers’
interested in Florida
real estate development
that accounts for 63% of
company’s $116m assets

* Sale at right price would
cover all company’s
secured creditors

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CLICO (Bahamas) liquida-
tor is in talks with two to three
potential buyers of the Florida-
based real estate development
that accounts for almost 63 per
cent of the insolvent insurer’s
assets, with the sale and pur-
chase price key to determining
whether all secured creditors
recover 100 per cent of what is
due to them.

Tribune Business has
obtained US court documents
showing that Craig A. ‘Tony’
Gomez, the Baker Tilly Gomez
partner acting as CLICO
(Bahamas) court-appointed liq-
uidator, has been appointed
president of Wellington Pre-
serve, the Florida-based real
estate project in which some
$73.628 million of the insurer’s
$116.965 million total assets
were ultimately directed into.

Mr Gomez’s appointment is
designed to protect and pre-
serve Wellington Preserve as an
asset for the benefit of CLICO
(Bahamas) policyholders,
depositors and creditors. He will
be able to prevent the disposal
of any cash or other assets held
by the project, and protect it
from potential litigants and
creditors.

And Tribune Business can
also reveal that Mr Gomez’s
appointment as Wellington Pre-
serve president has coincided
with the south Florida US
Bankruptcy Court granting
CLICO (Bahamas) liquidation
recognition as a ‘recognised for-
eign main proceeding’ under
US Chapter 15 bankruptcy
laws.

This development, as Mr
Gomez urged in his pleadings,
will give him “breathing room
to conduct an orderly review”
of CLICO (Bahamas) US-
based assets which, apart from
Wellington Preserve, are also
alleged to include an investment
in the ‘W’ hotel property locat-
ed in Fort Lauderdale, Broward
County.

Recognition by the US bank-
ruptcy court will enable Mr

SEE page 9B

a third |
une ean not be held



WEDNESDAY,

in

O.CalsOrB ESR 23a





2008

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

10,000 yards target for
4-month cruise ‘D-day’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Nassau har-
bour dredging
must extract an
average 10,000
cubic yards of fill
per day to meet the Govern-
ment’s autumn 2009 deadline
for the port to accommodate
RoyalCaribbean’s largest cruise
ship class, an Environmental
Impact Assessment (EIA) also
confirming that the Ingraham
administration and its advisers



TENNYSON WELLS

Ex-FNM
minister

blasts

Arawak
port

* Says PLP’s proposed Clifton
Pier port could have been
constructed for ‘half’
$200m quoted, more
like $100-$150m

* Wells says he advocated
for Clifton or Coral
Harbour since 1987

* Hits at government for
lack of transparency and
fact public ‘doesn’t know a
Christ thing that’s going on’

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

AN ex-FNM MP and Cabi-
net Minister believes the
Christie administration’s plan
to move the Bay Street ship-
ping facilities to a new port at
Clifton Pier could have been
done for half the $200 million
cost quoted, and backed PLP
claims that so-called ‘special
interest groups’ drove the cur-
rent Government to choose
Arawak Cay as the new loca-
tion.

Tennyson Wells told Tribune
Business that he had suggested
since 1987 that the downtown
Nassau shipping facilities be
moved from Bay Street to
either Clifton Pier or Coral
Harbour.

"As a nationalist and some-
body who would look toward
the country moving forward, I
would not have put the port on
Arawak Cay. I would take the
risk and spend $100 to $150 mil-
lion [on Clifton Pier]," said Mr
Wells.

He suggested that the Ingra-
ham administration was lacking
in transparency when it came

SEE page 8B

Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life



* Government rejected construction of new island to store Nassau harbour dredge, report says

* PLP’s south-west port plan ‘suffers disadvantages’, with Arawak Cay
only site from cost and proximity basis for dredge storage

* Arawak Cay extension to impact fishermen and tour boat operators, EIA suggests

* Silver Cay ‘available for sale’

did consider creating an entire-
ly new island west of Arawak
Cay.

The EJA for the storage/use
of dredged material produced

by the Nassau harbour excava-
tion, produced by Bahamas-
based Blue Engineering, said
Boskalis, the company con-
tracted to do the Nassau Har-

2% Stamp Tax

‘will not

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN realtors
would “love it” if Stamp Tax
rates were rationalised to a
uniform 2 per cent as it would
likely increase real estate

happen’

Realtors would
‘love it as no brainer’
on transaction
volume boost

transaction volumes, a leading industry executive told Tribune
Business, but the Government’s desperate need for revenue
meant “it’s never going to happen”.

Mike Lightbourne, president of Coldwell Banker Light-
bourne Realty, commenting on a two-year old proposal sub-
mitted to government to reduce all Stamp Tax rates to 2
per cent, said: “We’d love it, but government revenues would
fall enormously. It’s not going to happen.”

Pointing out that at one time Stamp tax rates for all real
estate transactions involving Bahamians stood at 6 per cent,
with 12 per cent for foreigners, Mr Lightbourne told Tri-
bune Business: “I just don’t think, from the Government’s
standpoint, that they can afford to do that, because every time
you turn around someone’s not paying Customs or the taxes

they owe.

“They’d [the Government] have to make it up from some-
where else, and I don’t know if it’s possible to do that.”

As to the impact on the Bahamian real estate industry if
Stamp Tax rates were reduced to 2 per cent across the Board,

Mr Lightbourne added: “It
would be fantastic. It would

SEE page 8B



bour dredging, would have to
employ a pump to suck the
excavated material into a
pipeline that would then trans-
port it to Arawak Cay.

“Dredging production is an
extremely important aspect of
this project,” the EJA said,

SEE page 6B

Cabinet backs
Training plan
with no change

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Cabinet has approved
the proposal for the National
Training Programme without
making any amendments to it,
the minister for labour and
social development has con-
firmed to Tribune Business.

Dion Foulkes, speaking from
Mayaguana, confirmed to this
newspaper that Cabinet had
approved all the recommenda-
tions from the committee that
was set up to develop and over-
see the initiative, which is
designed to re-train some 1,000
Bahamians who were laid-off
from their jobs as a result of the
economic recession.

“T can confirm that it [the
Training Programme] has been
approved, and we will formally
make an announcement
[today],” Mr Foulkes told Tri-

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bune Business. “The entire pro-
posal was accepted without
amendment.

The minister said that the
Training Programme would be
a year-long initiative lasting
until June next year, and would
involve three different phases.

When asked by Tribune Busi-
ness whether the Government
was eyeing the National Train-
ing Programme as a long-term
initiative, Mr Foulkes replied:
“Tnitially, the feeling is to see
the effectiveness of the current
project, and after this is finished
we will do an assessment to
where we go from there. I don’t
want to pre-empt any decision
the Cabinet may make.”

Meanwhile, Khaalis Rolle,
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s president who is also
heading the committee over-

SEE page 4B

—_
Colinalmperial.





PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

ee



By Fidelity Capital
Markets

LAST week was quiet in the
Bahamian market, with
investors trading in five out of
the 24 listed securities.

Of these, one advanced, one
declined and three remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 3,100 shares
changed hands, representing a
decrease of 5,922 shares or 66
per cent, compared to the pre-
vious week's trading volume of
9,022 shares.

Consolidated Water Compa-
ny (CWCB) was the sole
advancer last week with 1,000

International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold





International Stock Market Indexes:

DJIA

S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei

BRITISH

Weekly % Change
0.8961 +4.10
1.6340 -0.12
1.4108 +0.48
Weekly % Change
$64.32 +6.26
$937.20 +2.68
Weekly % Change
8,743.94 +6.85
940.38 +6.54
1,886.61 +7.65
9,395.32 +1.12



shares trading hands, its stock
ending the week at $2.99.

FamGuard Corporation
(FAM) fell by $0.39 to end the
week at a new 52-week low of
$6.60 on a volume of 1,000
shares.

BOND MARKET

Investors traded $2,000 (par
value) Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
Series D Notes Due 2015
(FBB15).

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

There were no financial
results reported by any of the 24
listed companies during the
week.

Dividend Notes:
e Consolidated Water

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BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
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AML $1.39 $- 0 -18.71%
BBL $0.63 $- 0 -4.55%
BOB $6.94 $- 0 -9.16%
BPF $11.00 $- 0 -6.78%
BSL $7.92 $- 0 -22.28%
BWL $3.15 $- 0 0.00%
CAB $11.39 $- 300 -18.82%
CBL $5.64 $- 0 -19.43%
CHL $2.74 $- 0 -3.18%
CIB $10.38 $- 0 -0.67%
CWCB — $2.99 $0.02 1,000 32.89%
DHS $1.82 $- 0 -28.63%
FAM $6.60 $-0.39 1,000 -15.38%
FBB $2.37 $- 0 0.00%
FCC $0.30 $- 0 0.00%
FCL $5.03 $- 0 -2.71%
FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%
FIN $10.90 $- 0 -8.17%
ICD $5.50 $- 800 -10.28%
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 3B



OO ———OOlnoeeeUS NESS eee
Financial growth plan ‘separate’ from G-20

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas “may not
have focused as much” as it
should have on using its private
wealth management base to
develop new business lines for
growing its financial services
industry, a government minis-
ter has conceded, with a
renewed emphasis being placed
on this nation becoming an
‘Americas’ investment hub and
attracting clients to base them-
selves here.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, told Tribune
Business that initiatives to grow
the Bahamian financial services
industry were “separate and
apart” from any moves to com-
ply with the G-20/0ECD
demands for greater tax trans-
parency and information
exchange, and remove this
nation from their so-called ‘grey
list’.

“Tn any business plan, you use

Minister concedes Bahamas ‘may not have focused as much’ on exploiting private
wealth management base for new growth areas as it should have done

ZHIVARGO LAING



your existing client base to grow
new opportunities,” he said.
“We may not have in the past
focused on that as much. Now is
as good a time to do so.”

Mr Laing effectively outlined

Worker productivity

is recession ‘upside’



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

INCREASED productivity
from Bahamian workers who
have retained their jobs is “the
upside” resulting from the
recession, the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce’s president
has told Tribune Business, with
employees unable to “job hop”
due to the scarcity of posts
available.

Khaalis Rolle, who is also
marketing director for Bahamas
Ferries, said workforce and
labour productivity had always
been the Bahamas’ “achilles
heel”, with the economy’s abil-
ity to accommodate the annual
5,000-6,000 high school leavers,
around 3,500-4,000 of whom do
not go on to higher education,
“always a concern”.

“That has always been our
major concern, and we’ve not
seen where it will diminish any
time soon,” said Mr Rolle of
the productivity situation.

“There’s good and bad about
the economic state we’re in.

People are more inclined to
produce, because they can’t job
hop as the jobs are not there as
in the past. So they tend to be
more productive. That’s the
upside.”

However, on the downside,
Mr Rolle said school leavers
unable to afford to go on to
higher education would be
forced to enter the workforce,
where they might become
“stuck at a level that may not be
the best thing for the private
sector/business community”.

With a skilled workforce key
for the private sector, Mr Rolle
said that it was difficult to
improve labour quality if com-
panies had to “accommodate”
school leavers prior to them
obtaining better qualifications.

“High school leavers are lim-
ited in what they can produce,”
Mr Rolle said. “The reality is,
because the economy is in such
a dire state, many of those indi-
viduals are unable to afford to
go on to higher education, and
are left to choose from a limited
number of jobs.”

the broad-based parameters of
the Government’s strategy dur-
ing his 2009-2010 Budget com-
munication, which emphasised
enhancing existing services to
high and ultra high net-worth
individuals, and encouraging
those clients and their families
to base themselves and their
business/investing activities in
the Bahamas as a primary
domicile.

In theory, this would lead to
spin-off boosts for industries
such as real estate and con-
struction, plus a whole host of
other sectors. It directly taps
into the private trust compa-
ny/family office market, and
could lead to the establishment
of Bahamas-based business
operations.

The Government and private
sector are also exploring the
Bahamas’ potential to act as an
investment gateway into the
entire Americas’ region,
exploiting its US proximity, tax
neutral platform and stable
political climate to facilitate cap-
ital investment into other coun-
tries by major international
investors. To do so would
involve the Bahamas entering

into a wide range of investment
treaties.

Mr Laing told Tribune Busi-
ness: “The reality is that we
have an advantage in terms of
location, being so near the US,
and in the path way between
Latin America and the entire
region for all manner of activi-
ties.

“So it only makes sense to
exploit our location, and the
kind of business environment
we provide could provide a plat-
form for entrepreneurs to do
business in the region. We cer-
tainly believe there are oppor-
tunities.”

Several financial services
executives have suggested to
Tribune Business that Latin
American countries would like-
ly want the Bahamas to enter
into Tax Information Exchange
Agreements (TIEAs) with them
in return for agreeing to invest-
ment treaties, but Mr Laing said
the two initiatives were sepa-
rate and would not work ‘hand-
in-glove’.

With the Bahamas requiring
12 TIEAs to exit the G-
20/OECD ‘grey list’, and cur-
rently having only one with the

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tea ges we ale

US, it will have to move quick-
ly on meeting so-called inter-
national standards.

But Mr Laing said: “All of
that is separate and apart from
this strategic focus we are seek-
ing to have. We have already
made a commitment to meet-
ing the OECD standard. We

have said we will do the neces-
sary to meet that commitment.
“Tt may mean a series of ini-
tiatives. We are focused on
meeting the standard, but that is
separate and apart from focus-
ing on what we need to do to
enhance the Bahamas as a com-
petitive global jurisdiction.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given

that

SONY ANOFILS_ of

#4B BURTON LANE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,

BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given

that ALVENS BELLOT of

SOLDIER ROAD, P.O. BOX EE-16851, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why

registration/naturalization

should not be granted,

should

send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.






NOTICE






NOTICE is hereby given

that

JEAN LOUVENS of

PALM BEACH STREET, P.O. BOX EE-19248, NASSAU,






BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a



citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any



reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,



should send a written and signed statement of the facts within



twenty-eight days from the 13 day of July, 2009 to the




Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box







N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS



Viet our website at wwercobeda is




IMPORTANT DATES

Fall Semester 2009
New Student Orientation

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF Bethany Jones Major late of Wilson Street
n the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF Robert Douglas Erskine late of 303 East
Street on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of The

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. Parents’ Evening

Tuesday, 18th August, 2009

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or 6:30 p.m. — 8:00 p.m

demand against the above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the Undersigned on or before the 10th
day of August, A.D., 2009, after which date the Executors will
proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of
which they shall then have had notice.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the Undersigned on or before the 10th
day of August, A.D., 2009, after which date the Executors will
proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of
which they shall then have had notice.

Orientation
Wednesday, 19th August, 2009
8:00 a.m. — 1:00 p.m.

Advisement & Registration
Wednesday, 19th August, 2009
1:4) p.m. — 7:00 p.m.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate of Bethany Jones Major are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the said
Estate of Robert Douglas Erskine are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.
Advisement, Registration & Bill Payment
Thursday, 20th August, 2009 and
Friday, 21st August, 2009
9:00 a.m. — 7:00 p.m.

LEANDRA A. ESFAKIS
Attorney for the Executors
Chambers
P.O. Box SS-19269
No. 16 Market Street
Nassau, New Providence
The Bahamas

LEANDRA A. ESFAKIS
Attorney for the Executors
Chambers
P.O. Box SS-19269
No. 16 Market Street
Nassau, New Providence
The Bahamas

Venue:
Front of Portia Smith Student Services
Centre,
Poinciana Drive

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON
late of 4B Winton Higghwea ¥: Eastern District, New
Providence,

RA

os be L

Bahamas, deceased, A global leader in awdit, tax and advisory services

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
chims or demands against the above-nanved Estate are
reepunssbercd to send the same d uly certified tio the undersagnind
onor before Sh August J

We are currently seeking a bright, amargetic, honest and confidant Individual to jolm our Finm ae oc

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the Lite
NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON will be distribubled
among the persons entitled thereto having regard only to
the claims of which the Execulor of the Estate shall then
have had erties.

Candidates will ba requirad to provide messenger and other sarvicas on a dally basle. The ideal candidate should
gives:

a

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A valid driver's lioanse

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Sasson House

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Pi). Box M-272
Nassau, Bahamas,

Attention: 5, Smith

Applicants showld submit. cover letter, resume, police record, — of passport end copies of academic qualifications io: KPMG, Human
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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Dredging to deepen Nassau
Harbour to between 38-40 feet

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE DREDGING of Nas-
sau Harbour will likely cause
the loss of 2.3 million square
feet of "sea grass, rare small
coral heads and benthic biota”,
according to the Environmental
Impact Assessment (EIA) for
the project, while creating a sub-
stantially deeper and wider
approach for a new class of
mega cruise vessel the Govern-
ment hopes will augment a
steadily declining sector.

The EIA assessment of the
Bahamas' cruise industry said

that "cruise ship arrivals in the
Bahamas have declined in
recent years and will continue
to decline without this project”.

The dredging of the harbour
is considered crucial to the sur-
vival of the Bahamas cruise-
based tourism industry and this
country's competitive position-
ing in the region.

"The Bahamas is a favoured
destination. However, Nassau,
the cradle of tourism and cruise
shipping in the Bahamas can-
not accommodate the large
mega liners now entering the
market owing to its physio-
graphic constraints. In addition,
the Bahamas government is

VXel Tey

presently completing a major
port and waterfront develop-
ment project for Nassau Har-
bour," said the EJA.

The dredging project will
deepen Nassau harbour to
between 38 feet to 40 feet, while
widening the turning basin with-
in the harbour through the
excavation of 812,000 square
feet of sand and bedrock on the
north edge of the seabed, and
727,000 square feet on the south
edge.

This will allow for the new,
larger cruise vessels to navigate
safely through the harbour.

The approach to Nassau har-
bour, which lies just outside the

visible west break water and the
dilapidated east breakwater just
west of the lighthouse, will also
be dredged to allow easier
access to Nassau's cruise port.
This will also receive minor
dredging and the installation of
mooring dolphins to accommo-
date longer ships.

Company

Boskalis, the company that
won the bid for the harbour
dredging, along with the Min-
istry of Environment and
Bahamas Environment, Science
and Technology (BEST) Com-
mission has developed a com-
prehensive EJA with myriad
mitigation protocols.

Boskalis is also currently
completing an Environmental
Management Plan (EMP),
which will identify ways in
which it will minimise any pos-
sible impact to the surrounding

areas.

The company and the Gov-
ernment have suggested the
continued use of turbidity bar-
riers during the dredging
process in order to reduce the
amount of free floating sedi-
ment that will be stirred up dur-
ing the project.

Plumes of fine silt from the
sea bed are one of the greatest
environmental concerns of both
the dredging project and exten-
sion of the western end of
Arawak Cay.

According to the EJA for
both projects, there is a danger
of coral and other marine
organisms being smothered by
the fine silt as it settles.

The assessments concede
there will be "short-term irre-
versible loss of existing sea grass
and coral communities”

They also suggest that 50 per
cent of the coral communities
observed in the areas to be

dredged comprise dead indi-
viduals. Those live colonies will
take 10 to 30 years for regener-
ation, according to the EIA.

To assess the impact of the
dredging, compliance stations
will be floated about the har-
bour during all stages of the
project looking for visible tur-
bidity plumes.

Some of the environmental
impact mitigation efforts
include good dredging practices,
turbidity barriers, independent
environmental monitoring, dis-
couraged use of blasting and
dredging in such a way to
encourage future growth of
marine life.

The EIA suggests there will
be no hindrance to shipping
within the harbour.

The Government has also
suggested restoring the east
breakwater at the entrance to
the harbour, but has not
finalised plans to do so.

Cabinet backs Training

General Counsel

plan with no change

A vacancy exists at The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited and Port Group
Limited for the position of General Counsel. Applicants aré invited from
interested and suitably qualified individuals to fill this position, with the primary

responsibility of the overall direction and management of the Legal Department
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Structure and manage the company's Internal legal function and staff

Lead varlous projects including litigation management; direction of leases,

deeds of release, and conveyances; privacy and employment matters,
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matters requiring legal support

Obtain and oversee the work of outside counse

Provide senior management with effective legal opinions on company
strategies and implementation

Serve as advisor on all major business transactions and in negotiating critical

contracts

Play a key role in managing risk and helping to make sound business decisions

Develop and implement all legal and corporate governance policies

Serve as Company Secretary and participate in meetings of the Board of

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Advise and counsel corporate departments on general and specialized legal
matters including complex international and commercial business transactions

Provide legal representation on International and local projects at preliminary
stage of negotiations and throughout development

Provide legal counsel and advice regarding various corporate business transac
tans ta ensure compliance with Bahamian Law and company policies and

procedures.

KNOWLEDGE AND QUALIFICATIONS

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15. or more years of commercial transactional legal background, along with
combined in-house and law firm legal experience

Strong transactional and general business and commercial law experience,
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Strong presentation and negotiation skills, solid business instincts and
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executives and managers, and contribute to strategic planning.

INTERESTED PERSONS SHOULD SEND CURRICULUM VITAE AND
ee aU CMP LO Sa PP EO Re ay lace Ree lb kame] s) mee)
THE GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITY, LIMITED

ee Oh eras 2)

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND



FROM page 1B

seeing the National Training
Programme, told Tribune Busi-
ness that the initiative would be
discussed over the weekend
during a retreat for the Cham-
ber’s directors.

“We’re still working on the
National Training Programme,
and are actively involved with
it,” he confirmed. “Obviously,
we are keenly supportive of it,
because at the end of the day
there are direct benefits to us. A
better trained workforce cer-
tainly benefits the business com-

munity.”

While not wishing to pre-
empt any decisions made down
the line, Mr Rolle said the
Chamber had “committed” to
approaching the private sector
and its members for funding for
the National Training Pro-
gramme, which would supple-
ment the $250,000 provided by
the Government.

The institutions involved will
be the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BTVI)
and the College of the Bahamas
(COB). Those being re-trained
will be the 1,000 unemployed
Bahamians selected from those

who had registered with the
National Insurance Board’s
(NIB) unemployment benefit
scheme.

Mr Rolle added: “My goal is
to make it an ubiquitous pro-
ject, a sustainable project, and a
meaningful project for the coun-
try in the future. The way it’s
structured now, it fills more of a
social need, and rightfully so,
but by no means does it dimin-
ish the potential for a long-term,
sustainable project.

“T think the Government has
it in the back of their minds, the
private sector has it in the front
of their minds.”

Employment Opportunity

Senior Collections Officer

An employment opportunity exists for an innovative,
persuasive leader with a passion for success, a desire to
succeed and the ability to initiate progress.

Skill Requirements

Excellent oral and written communication skills
Excellent motivation & coaching skills

Ability to execute priority based workload
Possess excellent planning, organizational and
implementation skills
Ability to operate and familiarity with POS

systems

Proficient in Microsoft Office applications
Possess strong foundation of accounting
practices and procedures
Strong multitasking ability
Strong leadership & managerial skills
Strong internet skills i.e. Emailing, group
messaging and research
Ability to exert initiative
Recording, summarizing, analyzing, verifying and
reporting of results of financial transactions

Minimum Experience Requirements

Tertiary level — with degree in related field;
Collections executive with at least 4 years
experience in collections or related field ;

At least three years experience in supervisory
post;
Strong knowledge and application of MS
Microsoft Suite

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:

srcollectionsofficer@yahoo.com





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 5B



Total exports
increase by 4.6
per cent in 2008

THE Bahamas saw its total
exports increase by 4.6 per cent
during 2008 despite the onset
of a global recession, rising from
$670.088 million to $701.533
million, according to the
Department of Statistics.

The Department, unveiling

the 2008 foreign trade statistics,
reported that Bahamian-origi-
nating exports accounted for
$409.6 million or 58 per cent of
total exports, with re-exports
accounting for $291.9 million or
42 per cent.

The main Bahamian-origi-

nating export category was
chemicals (polystyrene and oth-
er plastics), which accounted for
55.2 per cent of the total, fol-
lowed by food and live animals
(mainly crawfish, rum and salt),
which took a 20 per cent share.

“More significantly, of these

two categories, three commodi-
ties alone - expansible poly-
styrene valued at $150.1 million,
other compounds containing a
pyrimidine ring, at $67.4 mil-
lion, and spiny lobster frozen at
$77.6 million accounted for
some 72 per cent of total
domestic exports,” the Depart-
ment said.

Some 92 per cent of that
polystyrene total was exported
to the US, with 4 per cent going
to the UK and the remaining 4
per cent to Australia and
Argentina.

Of the pyrimidine ring com-
pounds, 45 per cent was export-
ed to Canada and 27.2 per cent
to the Netherlands. Some 65.5
per cent of the crawfish went
to the US, and 32 per cent to
France.

Mineral fuels, valued at
$141.5 million, and machinery
and transport equipment worth
$67.3 million, together account-
ed for almost three-quarters of
re-exports, holding a 49 per cent
and 23 per cent share respec-
tively.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2009/CLE/gen/qui/850
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF all that piece parcel or lot of land
comprising 719.77 acres situate on the Eastern side of the
Queenis Highway in the Settlement of Taits in the Island of
Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

AND
IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Veronica C. Miller (nee Major)

NOTICE

The Petition of VERONICA C. MILLER (nee Major) of
Taits, Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas in respect of:-

“ALL that piece parcel or lot of land situate on the Eastern
Side of the Queen’s Highway in the Settlement of Taits,
Long Island comprising 719.77 acres and which said
parcel of land is bounded on the NORTHWEST by a
loose stone wall separating it from other portions of the
original Grant to the Earl of Dunmore said to be the
property of Samuel Carroll and Nathan Major and running
thereon Eight thousand One hundred and Eight (8,108)
feet more or less on the NORTHEAST by the Atlantic
Ocean and running thereon in several courses Five
thousand and Seventy-one (5,071) feet more or less on
the SOUTHEAST by a loose stone wall separating it
from land originally granted to James Rose now said to
be the property of Timothy Darville and Ernest Dean and
running thereon Nine thousand Eight hundred and Thi

two (9,832) feet more or less on the SOUTHWEST by
land said to be the property of Emily Major and running
thereon Five hundred and Ninety-three and Forty-four
hundredths (593.44) feet on the NORTHWEST by land
said to be the property of Theresa Major and running
thereon Three hundred and Thirty-seven and Forty-nine
(337.49) feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property of
the said Theresa Major and running thereon Four hundred
and Seventy-eight and Twenty-two hundredths (478.22)
feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property of Melvin
Major and running thereon One thousand Five hundred
and Three and Ninety-two hundredths (1,503.92) feet
and by a Twenty (20) foot road reservation leading to the
Queen’s Highway, on the NORTHWEST by the property
of William Mortimer and running thereon Three hundred
and Thirty-five and Eighty-seven hundredths (335.87)
feet and on the SOUTHWEST by the property of the
said William Mortimer and running thereon Eight hundred
and Thirty-five and Eighty-one hundredths feet (835.81)
and which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position
shape marks boundaries and dimensions as are shown on
the plan filed herein and recorded in the Department of
Lands and Surveys and Plan “296 L.I” and thereon
outlined in Pink.

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

52wk-Low
Abaco Markets

10.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.35
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.40
10.00

Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)

VERONICA C. MILLER (nee Major) claims to be the
owner in fee simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme
Court in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section
3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have her title to the
said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said
Act.

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

52wk-Low

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal

office hours in the following places:

0.20 RND Holdings

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the said City
of Nassau;

(b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes,
Mareva House, 4 George Street in the City of Nassau,
Attorneys for the Petitioner; and

(c) The office of the Administrator at Clarence Town,
Long Island.

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low
1.3231
2.8952
1.4031
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

CFAL Bond Fund

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower or a
right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the 14th day of September,
2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed
form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of
any such person to file and serve a statement of his claim
on or before the said 14th day of September, 2009 will

: BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
operate as a bar to such claim.

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
Mareva House
George Street
Nassau, Bahamas.

Attorneys for the Petitioner

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007



Securit y

Bahamas Property Fund

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

Security

Fidelity Bank Note 17
Fidelity Bank Note 22
Fidelity Bank Note 13
Fidelity Bank Note 15

Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

Fund Name

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

= Colina.

Holdings Bahamas

—








































CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Risk & Compliance Officer

Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified
professional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer. This is an
executive position and the successful applicant should possess the following:

Qualifications & Experience

Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university

Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance

Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a
law degree

Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations
for improvements to a compliance culture

Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of
duties

Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and
best practices

Confidentiality

Excellent oral and written communication skills

Duties & Responsibilities:

Design and implement a risk framework.

Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps
taken to foster good compliance.

Implement and maintain a compliance monitoring programme. This will
serve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures.

Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws,
regulations and policies applicable to the institution.

Provide management with guidance in the development, implementation
and maintenance of policies, procedures and practices to cover
regulated activities.

Create programmes that educate, train and encourage directors,
managers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and
regulations.

Serve as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators.

The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with
experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a cover
letter and resume to the following e-mail address no later than 27 July 2009:

E-mail: careers@c olinaimperial.com
RE: Risk and Compliance Officer

Absolutely no phone calls will be accepted

E°"s

CFAL
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 17 JULY 2009

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
Za
COLONIAL

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.84] CHG -0.10 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -141.52 | YTD % -8.26

FINDEX: CLOSE 786.23 | YTD -5.83% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Previous Close Today's Close EPS $ Div $
1.39 1.39
11.00 11.00
6.94 6.94
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
208 2.37
11.39 11.39
2.74 2.74
5.64 5.64
3.07 2.98
1.82 1.82
6.60 6.60
10.90 10.90
10.38 10.38
5.03 5.03
1.00 1.00
0.30 0.30
5.50 5.50
10.40 10.40
10.00 10.00

Change Daily Vol.

0.00

0.00
-0.09

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00
ases)

Interest

7%

Prime + 1.75%
7%

Prime + 1.75%

Last Sale
100.00
100.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13 100.00
FBB15 100.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Last Price

Change Daily Vol. Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

Series A
Series B
Series C
Series D

+
@
+
+

Weekly Vol. EPS$ Div$

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 4.75
2.8952 -3.18
14777 5.31
3.1031 -13.82
12.9801 5.79
101.6693 1.67
93.1992 -6.76
1.0000 0.00
9.2765 -2.98
1.0622 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 243
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $- A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

0.00%

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
10-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

3.07
-8.35
2.87
1.10
-3.33
0.00
2.00
2.56

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525



PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Law Firm is seeking skilled professional litigation legal
secretary. The following are needed:

* Proficiency in Microsoft Word

* Experience in drafting legal letters with little supervision

* Experience in drafting legal documents with
little supervision

* Ability to confidently speak with clients

* Ability to take instructions and carry same out with
little supervision

* Excellent organizational skills

* Excellent memory

* Ability to multi-task

* Works beyond the standard 9 to 5 when necessary

* Energetic

* Self-motivated

* Pleasant personality

* Despises mediocrity

et AA

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY FORGIE EV ANS late of
#17 London Terrace, Eastern Distinct, New Providence,
Bahamas, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given thal all persons having
Claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested bo send the same duly certified to the undersigned
on or before Sto Aupust IE

AND NOTICE is hereby also piven that al the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the late
DOROTHY FORGIE EVANS will be distributed among the
persons entitled therets having, regard only to the claims of
which the Executor of the Estate shall then have had Notice

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & (0).
Allorneys for the Execubors
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue

PO. Box N-272
Nassau, Balianmas
Attention: & Smith



10,000 yards
target for 4-
month cruise

‘D-day’

FROM page 1B

implying that the Government
and companies involved were
working to a tight timetable.

“Cutter section dredges [such
as the one to be used on Nassau
Harbour] generally work 24
hours a day. However, mainte-
nance and downtime due to
repairs, pipeline moves and
pipeline blockages result in an
efficiency rate of 60 to 75 per
cent.

“To meet the scheduled
arrival of new-build cruise ships
in the fall of 2009, and assuming
a dredge start in July 2009, cur-
rent planning requires that a
portion of the two million cubic
yards of dredging (the area nec-
essary for the Oasis of the Seas
to enter and depart from the
harbour) be completed within
four months.

“This requires a dredge with
an average production rate of
10,000 cubic yards per day. This
will likely require a dredge with

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Senior Manager,

Accounts.

The job oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget & Management
Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective delivery

of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the

following:
Compilation of the corporate budget.

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets

Preparation of monthly management statements

Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation
Preparation of performance reports for division , department and sections
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry receivables (capital

contributions, rechargeable)

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices

Liaison with internal and extemal audits

Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief

Financial
Officer for the Board of Directors

Preparation of the business plan for the department

Overseeing the Cash Flow Management
Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment

salaries

Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required

Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department
Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims

Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form employee’s

Conducting audits of various financial activities including Employee Basic Pay
Reconciliation, Employee Loans Reconciliation and Payment Reconciliation

Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable

Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts

Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle repayments

Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule
Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans

Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to ensure

adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors
Managing the status of local and foreign vendors

Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and External Auditors
Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline. Conducting

performance appraisals

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff, manage

and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations

Job requirements include:

¢ A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting ACCA/CPA

or equivalent qualifications

A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a similar

management position

Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices

Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet

applications

Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing systems

Ability to analyze financial reports

Sound knowledge of covenants of lending institutions (e.g. IDB)
Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial software

and the system of internal control.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing

Good time management skills

Interested persons should apply by completing and retuming an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: July

22, 2009.



a 27 to 30-inch discharge pipe.
This discharge pipe would first
discharge into stilling ponds on
Arawak Cay. Once the avail-
able space on Arawak Cay is to
capacity, discharge will be to
the west end of Arawak Cay to
extend the Cay.”

While consideration had been
given to limiting dredging activ-
ities to the outgoing tide, the
EIA said this would prevent the
Government “from meeting
their commitment to Royal
Caribbean Cruise Lines to allow
the entry of the Oasis of the
Seas [the flagship for its Gene-
sis Class cruise ships] by the end
of November. It would also
double the period of dredging,
and it would double the cost of
the project”.

With Arawak Cay currently
able to accommodate 600,000
cubic yards of the material
dredged from Nassau Harbour,
the EJA said the feasibility of
trucking the remaining 1.4 mil-
lion cubic yards over to the
man-made island was assessed.

However, this was quickly
dropped because of the fill’s wet
nature and the inability of any
trucking operation to match the
10,000 cubic yards per day
extraction rate.

The EIA also confirmed that
the Government’s chief engi-
neering consultants on the har-
bour dredging/Arawak Cay port
relocation, Cox & SHAL Con-
sultants, had presented the cre-
ation of an entirely new, sepa-
rate island to Arawak Cay’s
west as one option for storing
the remaining 1.4 million cubic
yards of fill.

Referring to these options,
Blue Engineering’s EIA said:
“These included a separate

island to the west of Arawak
Cay, with bridges to access the
island, and the filling of the area
between Arawak Cay and New
Providence, as well as the exten-
sion of Arawak Cay to the west.

“The Government has con-
sidered all of these options, and
due to construction logistics
involved and relative costs has
determined an extension to the
west as the preferred option,
and the only option now to be
considered.

“The preferred option, which
has been accepted by the Gov-
ernment, is the westward exten-
sion to Arawak Cay..... It is con-
sidered likely that this option
will have the least impact on
the environment.”

The EIA said that Arawak
Cay’s ample unused land pro-
vided enough space to stockpile
the dredged material, with the
first 600,000 cubic yards to be
stored in two piles either side
of the existing road leading to
the asphalt plant and aggregate
storage complex. With the Gov-
ernment owning Arawak Cay, it
was currently modifying and
reviewing lease agreements to
accommodate the stockpiling.

The remaining 1.4 million
cubic yards of fill will be accom-
modated via the 1,000 foot
extension of Arawak Cay to the
west, a move intended to also
accommodate the re-located
container shipping facilities
presently situated on Bay Street
in downtown Nassau.

To facilitate the port re-loca-
tion, Arawak Cay’s curved ends
will be made straight through
the 1,000 foot extension, so ves-
sels can be moored there. Steel
sheet pile walls, tied to anchor
blocks, will form the wall bulk-

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New Stock also on Sale
Everything for $20

Until the end of July
Free parking at the Hilten
P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel 242-323-1865
Email: gems-pearis hotmail.com

detriment!



God got with his instrument and produced the book
“Yes You Can - A Bahamian Plan”.

The world seems to be waiting; every nation it has
touched is positively affected.

Did two leaders missed it, missed it to our

We are still here to serve your accounting needs.
For a copy of “Yes You Can” and other services

Contact us at:- M.E. LOCKHART ACCOUNTING
Tel: 242-394-3565
Cell: 242-425-0650
P.O.Box N522

Email: elshagg @coralwave.com





head, with 900,000 cubic yards
of fill taking up the space
behind it.

The remaining 500,000 cubic
yards of fill extracted from Nas-
sau Harbour will then be stored
on the Arawak Cay extension.

The EJA suggested there was
little to no alternative to dis-
posing of the material dredged
from Nassau Harbour on
Arawak Cay, given that the fill
had been earmarked for use in
both the new port’s construc-
tion and the extension of Wood-
es Rogers Wharf as part of the
downtown Nassau revitalisation
project.

“No other appropriate sites
for on-land disposal were found
in close proximity to the pro-
posed dredging operations oth-
er than at Arawak Cay, primar-
ily due to the need to re-locate
the Bay Street shipping before
the planned redevelopment of
Nassau Harbour can proceed,”
the Blue Engineering report
said.

“Disposing of the material
further afield than Arawak Cay
would require additional
pumps, and therefore a greater
cost to the project.”

While disposal of the fill at
sea was also an option, the EIA
added: “The Government of the
Bahamas recognises that the
dredged material is a valuable
resource, and wishes to stock-
pile as much of this material as
possible for use elsewhere, in
particular the Nassau harbour
redevelopment.

“The use of the material for
the Nassau harbour redevelop-
ment further emphasises the
importance of storing the
dredged material near to the
dredging site so as to reduce the
distance that the material would
have to be transported, once
the shipping along Bay Street
is moved and the material is
used.”

The Blue Engineering EIA,
in what could be considered a
direct rebuttal to the PLP-led
outcry over the Arawak Cay
port and the decision to forego
the former Christie administra-
tion’s plans to switch the Bay
Street shipping facilities to a
port at Clifton Pier, said “Alter-
native locations for the shipping
facilities are very limited.

“One previously identified
location on the south-west coast
of New Providence has been
briefly considered, but suffers
disadvantages with respect to
geographical location, physical
topography at the proposed site,
avoidable impact to a natural
area, and induced impacts to
local ecology. Fundamentally,
the site is too far from the
majority of existing develop-
ments.”

When it came to negative
impacts from the Nassau har-
bour dredging/Arawak Cay
extension, the Blue Engineer-
ing EIA pointed out that fish-
ermen’s access to the area
behind the Fish Fry would be
restricted, and they would lose
the location as a storage area.
Increased “noise, dust, odour
and traffic” could also affect
business at the Fish Fry and the
nearby Haynes Cricket Oval.

And the proposed Arawak
Cay extension would also
reduce the depth, and width, of
the existing channel between
Arawak Cay and Silver Cay, the
island where the still-closed
Coral Island Marine Park is
located. The EIA said Silver
Cay, which was once owned by
tycoon Philip Ruffin before
being sold as part of the Baha
Mar deal, was “dilapidated and
available for sale”.

The reduced channel width
and depth, the EIA said, would
impact the tour excursion boats
- such as those that take cruise
passengers and other guests to
islands such as Blackbeard’s
Cay. Future dredging was rec-
ommended to solve the prob-
lem, as “these impacts could
further have an impact on the
tourism industry as excursions
may no longer take place”.



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





% Stamp Tax ‘will not happen’

FROM page 1B

make transactions a hell of a lot
easier. Instead of paying 10 per
cent on deals valued at above

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



$250,000, you’d be paying 2 per
cent. That’s a no-brainer.”

But, adopting a more sober
assessment of the all-round
implications of such a reduc-
tion, Mr Lightbourne said the
effects would be similar to those
resulting from the Stamp Tax
incentives granted to Ginn
Development Company for its
$4.9 billion Ginn sur mer pro-
ject.

Referring to the $200 million
worth of real estate that Ginn
claimed to have previously sold
at the West End site, Mr Light-
bourne said that given all these
transactions were valued at
above $250,000, some $20 mil-
lion in taxes would have been
due to the Government at a 10
per cent rate.

However, the former Christie

ABACOMARKETS

aNnOunces

the Annual General Meeting
of Shareholders

will be held on the 21° of July, 2009
at 6 p.m.

The Convention Centre - Salon III
The Wyndham Nassau Resort &
Crystal Palace Casino
West Bay Street, Nassau

Holders of Ordinary Shares as of
19"" of June, 2009 are invited



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAWAND EQUITY DIVISION CLE/GEN/00443

BETWEEN

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
JACQUELINE JOHNSON
Defendant

ADVERTISEMENT OF SERVICE OF
WRIT OF SUMMONS

TAKE NOTICE that an action has been commenced
against you in the Supreme Court, Common Law
and Equity Division, Action No. CLE/GEN/00443
of 2008 in which the Plaintiff, BANK OF THE
BAHAMAS LIMITED, has issued a Writ of Summons
out of the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on the
20th March, 2008 claiming against you the sum of
$17,476.70 arising from your default of the loan
granted by the Plaintiff to you on or about the 11th

August, 2002 in the principal amount of $7,500.00

and interest at the rate of 15% per annum.
AND THAT it has been ordered by
Ms. Marilyn Meeres, Deputy Registrar of the
Supreme Court on the 17th March, 2009 that
service of the Writ of Summons in the said
action on you be effected by this advertisement.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE | that
you must within fourteen (14) days from the
publication of this advertisement inclusive of the
day of such publication, acknowledge service
of the said Writ of Summons by completing a
prescribed form of Acknowledgement of Service
which may be obtained on requested from the
Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise Judgment may be entered against you.

Dated this 17th day of March, A.D., 2009

GIBSON, RIGBY & Co.
CHAMBERS
Ki-Malex House
Dowdeswell Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Plaintiff



administration had given Ginn a
tiered Stamp Tax incentive for
the project, which meant that
the rate being paid in the ini-
tial year was 2 per cent. Using
this rate, Mr Lightbourne said
the Government had only col-
lected $4 million in Stamp Tax -
a difference of $16 million.

“T just don’t think they can
do that,” Mr Lightbourne
added of a wider 2 per cent
Stamp Tax introduction,
explaining that the 10 per cent
rate was not usually a ‘make or
break’ factor in purchases of
high-end homes.

“Normally, the high-end
transactions aren’t stymied by
the Stamp Tax,” he said. “Peo-
ple know that’s what they have
to pay - 10 per cent. It’s in the
head from the start.”

Current Budget numbers
demonstrate just how reliant
the Government is on real
estate-related Stamp Tax as rev-
enue generator, and what the
impact would be if the 2 per
cent across-the-board rate was
ever implemented.

For the 2009-2010 Budget
year, the Government is fore-




Enrollment Limited
fo aat! persons

Leet nS sein

casting that it will earn $141.905
million from Stamp Tax on real
estate transactions. Yet if the 2
per cent Stamp Tax rate were
implemented, this figure would
drop to $32.656 million, a 77 per
cent decline.

But Richard Almy, the
author of the 2 per cent pro-
posal in a February 21, 2007,
report prepared as part of the
Inter-American Development
Bank-financed (IDB) Land Use
Policy and Administration Pro-
ject, said this could be made-up
over time via an increase in rev-
enues from real property taxes.

“Although a dollar-for-dol-
lar substitution would be diffi-
cult to achieve, competently
done studies of tax burdens and
shifts should make it possible
to achieve rough ‘revenue neu-
trality’ and to design ameliora-
tive measures, such as rate roll-
backs, and to cushion extreme
individual increases by phas-
ing,” he suggested.

The report added that while
scrapping real property taxes
may be tempting for the
Bahamian government,
strengthen their collection and

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increasing revenues from this
source was “an option worth
pursuing” to reduce the Gov-
ernment’s reliance on import
duties.

“Although continued politi-
cal inaction may have a certain
appeal, popular respect for the
Government of the Bahamas
will almost certainly continue
to erode,” the report said. “As
difficult as a real estate tax
improvement programme may
be, it will be more manageable
than a full-fledged crisis. A
more equitable real estate tax
would benefit all who own real
estate in the Bahamas.

“Continued neglect of the
real estate tax is unwise from
the perspectives of the nation’s
tax equity and revenue produc-
tivity goals. The challenges that
the Government of the
Bahamas faces in improving the
fairness and efficiency of the
real estate tax are numerous
and substantial, but not insur-
mountable.”

Mr Almy effectively implied
that real property tax payments
boiled down to whether own-
ers wanted to pay or not, since it

was not seen as a mandatory
requirement.

For instance, real estate own-
ers could fail to register own-
ership of their land assets and
not declare them to the Chief
Valuation Officer for real prop-
erty tax purposes. Real proper-
ty taxes could be ignored until a
sale or transfer of real estate
was contemplated, and pur-
chase prices could be under-
stated to avoid Stamp Tax.

The report, in its instructions
to the Government, said: “To
ensure equity - and to increase
revenue potential - it needs to
ensure that all assessable prop-
erty has been listed and
described accurately. It is telling
that statistics on the number of
properties assessed and on the
number of properties waiting
to be assessed are not readily
available.”

The report called for a uni-
form valuation date to be estab-
lished for real property tax
assessments to be carried out.
The Valuation Unit’s staffing,
resources, expertise and tech-
nology all needed to be
strengthened.

EXx-ENM minister
blasts Arawak port

FROM page 1B

to its agreements with foreign
companies contracted to do the
work on the Nassau harbour
dredging and Arawak Cay port
development.

"The public is spending $50
odd-million to dredge Nassau
Harbour, and the contract was
awarded to a European firm,"
Mr Wells said, referring to win-
ning bidder Boskalis. He
claimed, though, that Boskalis
had subsequently contracted
out parts of the harbour dredge
to other companies, namely
American Bridge and a
Bahamian firm, believed to be
Bahamas Marine.

“The European firm then
sub-contracted it to American
Bridge, an American company,
and then American Bridge sub-
contracted it to a Bahamian
company. Generally, the pub-

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lic don't know a Christ thing
that is happening,” Mr Wells
said.

“That is the situation, and
that is what is happening in this
country today. It’s been hap-
pening from the 1950s coming
straight through.

"I say what I believe, and I
don't care if the media don't
like it or the opposition don't
like it or the Government don't
like it."

Speaking at the Rotary Club
of West Nassau's weekly meet-
ing, Mr Wells said he had fund-
ed studies on the relocation of
the container port facilitries,
and suggested south-west New
Providence was the best place
for such a development.

However, he said that envi-
ronmental issues arose with the
Coral Harbour site, though he
conceded that any location
would have some sort of envi-
ronmental impact.

"When you are doing devel-
opment you are going to affect
the environment," he said.

According to Mr Wells, ‘spe-
cial interest groups’ were push-
ing for the port’s relocation to
Arawak Cay, which he suggest-
ed may be able to be completed
for half the $55-$56 million cost
quoted. However, many figures
have been circulated as to the
final cost of the Arawak Cay
move.

It is unclear what the PLP
and Mr Wells mean by ‘special
interest groups’, as the partici-
pants have not been identified.
However, it seems to be a ref-
erence to the FNM’s support-
ers in the shipping industry.

Mr Wells admitted his fami-
ly's stake in the shipping facili-
ties move, as they own real
estate holdings in the Arawak
Cay area, but suggested strong-
ly that he advocates against the
move for the best interest of the
country.

"IT have been an FNM basi-
cally all my life," he said. "I
decided to make a stand against
what was wrong in this society."

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 9B



CLICO liquidator in talks
over sale of critical asset

FROM page 1B

Gomez to protect and preserve
CLICO (Bahamas) principal
assets from potential litigants
and other creditors, thus
enabling him to maximise their
value for the benefit of Bahami-
an policyholders, depositors and
other creditors.

Informed sources close to
developments told Tribune
Business late last week that Mr
Gomez was holding negotia-
tions with two to three potential
buyers of Wellington Preserve,
at least one of whom is believed
to be a major US-based real
estate developer.

The CLICO (Bahamas) lig-
uidator could not be reached
for comment, but a potential
sale of Wellington Preserve -
and the realisation of a purchase
price close to the original $73
million loan - is the key to how
successful the insurer’s wind-
ing-up will be.

A price close to that figure
would enable Mr Gomez to
cover 100 per cent of what is
owed to secured creditors, Tri-
bune Business understands, as
interest in Wellington Preserve
seemingly bucks the depressed
Florida real estate market and a
US economy still mired in
recession.

It also represents a change to
the position Mr Gomez outlined
in his first report to the
Supreme Court on the CLICO
(Bahamas) situation, at a time
when he was still only a provi-
sional liquidator. He then
described Wellington Preserve,
which had been financed by the
$73 million loan from CLICO
(Bahamas) to its CLICO Enter-
prises subsidiary, as “not antic-

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

ipated to be realised in the short
term”, making the insurer insol-
vent and a natural liquidation
candidate.

“The loan to CLICO Enter-
prises of approximately $73 mil-
lion is not considered presently
collectible, and thus endangers
the asset base of the company
and places policy values in per-
il. The funds advanced to CLI-
CO Enterprises were advanced
by CLICO Enterprises to
Wellington Preserve, the whol-
ly-owned subsidiary of CLICO
Enterprises, which acquired its
real estate holding in Florida,
US,” Mr Gomez said.

“This real estate is not
presently considered mar-
ketable as a result of the signif-
icant downturn in the Florida
real estate market.”

Outlining Wellington Pre-
serve’s importance in the grand
scheme of things, Mr Gomez
added: “As at December 31,
2008, approximately $73 million
had been advanced to CLICO
Enterprises, but it is unlikely







that this loan can be recovered
at full value as CLICO Enter-
prises’ December 31, 2008,
unaudited financial statements
reflect a deficit of $21 million
as the assets are $108 million
and its liabilities are $129 mil-
lion.

“Included in CLICO Enter-
prises’ assets is a loan due from
Wellington Preserve, a wholly-
owned subsidiary of CLICO
Enterprises, for $70 million.

“The December 31, 2008
unaudited financial of Welling-
ton Preserve includes invest-
ment property in Florida and
valued at $127 million. Howev-
er, the same real estate valued
on an ‘as is’ basis is worth
approximately $62 million.
Beside the loan to Wellington
Preserve, CLICO Enterprises
also made a direct investment in
Wellington Preserve for $13
million.

“The Wellington Preserve
real estate project in Florida
consists principally of 80 resi-
dential lots and various ameni-

NOTICE

NEW TELEPHONE
NUMBER

To our valued Members, please be advised that













Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative




Credit Union Limited, has up graded its



telephone service to better assist our members

as follows:

All Departments:
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Member Services Department:

242-502-9200
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Please note that we can still be reached at our

old telephone numbers:

242-323-4488

242-323-4492

242-323-4495
242-323-4411-4

Exclusive private members club on New Providence Island requires a suitable
candidate to fill the position of General Manager.

Main Responsibilities:

¢ Oversee all aspects of Club operations to ensure achievement of strategic
priorities as set by the Board of Directors.

* To develop and maintain operating & capital budgets.

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team.

¢ To facilitate & coordinate all aspects of member relations.

* To oversee & ensure the upkeep of all company assets including but not
limited to buildings, grounds & equipment.

¢ To develop events & programs to enhance revenue as well as the overall
experience of club members.

Qualifications and Experience:

Bachelors Degree in Hospitality Management, Business Administration or

similar studies.

Prior experience in Food & Beverage Management in an international

setting.

Proven management & leadership skills, with at least five years experience
in a senior management position within a 5-star organization.

* Excellent oral & written communications.

¢ Excellent organizational skills.

¢ Must be proficient with Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point & various
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Remuneration:

Salary will be based upon experience and qualifications. We offer an excellent

benefit package.

Interested persons should submit their resume by email to
careeropportunity09@ yahoo.com
on or before Thursday, July 23, 2009.

ties and commercial sites laid
out in a 523-acre tract. It was to
be a high end residential sub-
division with an equestrian/polo
theme. Most of the residential
lots are connected to or contain
polo pitches and horse stables.
Unfortunately, the project
requires a substantial cash injec-
tion of a minimum of $42 mil-
lion before it can be reasonably
presented for sale.”


















>,
AP

Dheinperee (spss

Ledcor is seeking contractors to assist in completion of Stage

Meanwhile, Mr Gomez is
understood to be still pursuing
the transfer of CLICO
(Bahamas) life and health poli-
cy portfolio to another

Bahamas-based insurer, fol-
lowing the Government’s
pledge to underwrite this by
providing a $30 million guaran-
tee.

The transfer will ultimately
require the approval of both the

REQUEST FOR
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PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Surviving 3d days and nights

FROM page 16

Kemp’s Bay.

They were on the side of the
road, in the shorts and t-shirts
they ‘had been wearing 33 days

Gastroenterology

Doctors Hospital Sessional Clinic
aa |

DOR taco ty meme
following symptoms?

+ Difficulty swallowing

« Heartburn

+ Dyspepsia (gas, bloating)

+ Nausea and vomiting

¢ Unintentional weight loss

« Diarrhea & Constipation

+ Abdominal pain

+ Diseases of the pancreas

+ Liver disease

¢ Jaundice

« Colon cancer screening

« Family history of colon cancer

¢ Rectal bleeding

Internal Medicine
Gastroenterology



Ri. bbon. Homer 4. Unerihans

SCREENING and
CONSULTATION

By Appointment Only

Call: 302-4684

Date: Wednesday, July 22 ‘09
Open: 9:00 am

9] DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

before, both thin and dehydrat-
ed, Marcell barefoot, carrying
mangoes and cocoplums.

When Ms Taylor, 50, a nurse
at the local health clinic, asked
the boys about where they had
been, Deangelo answered.

“T expected them to say
someone had them, but they
said they had been in the bush
looking for crabs and they just
got lost,” Ms Taylor said.

“T asked where they were
sleeping and they said they slept
in holes and during the day they
were trying to find home.

“T asked how they found their
way out after all that time and
they said they heard cars and
dogs barking and they followed
the sound to the road.”

The boys said they had found
their way out of the forest
around half a mile further
south, near a house occupied
by German expatriates, where
they went to ask for fruit to eat
before continuing the walk
home.

“They were dirty, dehydrated
and they had odour,” Ms Taylor
said recalling how she picked
them up sometime after 11am.

“There were spiderwebs and
pieces of sticks in their hair, and
they were severely dehydrated.

“Their eyes were bulging, and
their skin was sagging and when
I lifted their shirt you could see
all their ribs.

“They didn’t say much, they
were just answering questions,
the only thing Deangelo volun-
teered was they wouldn’t go
back in the bush looking for
crabs by themselves.”

As Ms Taylor approached the
Clarke’s house their mother
didn’t recognise her emaciated
sons, and when she did, she
screamed.

She had sprained her knee
when searching for the boys,
and yet continued to look for
them, hopping as she must, but
she ran to her children when
Ms Taylor brought them home.

The boys were silent as the
family went into a frenzy
brought on by the unbelievable
reality that they had come home
alive.

PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, The Caribbean Baptist Fellowship (CBF) is a regional Association, whose
membership comprises National Baptist Associations from countries across the Caribbean

region:

AND WHEREAS, each year the Carbbean Baptist Fellowship organizes and
execuies an annual combined youth festival in one of its member countries, which is
designed to bring together youth from the respective countries for the purpose of fostaring
unity and fellowship among delegates, while engaging them in wide-ranging discussion of
contemporary issues presently affecting the youth in the 21st Century:

AND WHEREAS, The Bahamas National Baptist Missionary and Educational
Convention, an umbrella organization which represents Baptist Churches across The
Bahamas and is a member of the Caribbean Baptist Fellowship, will join forces with the
regional body in the joint sponsorship of this year’s Youth Festival:

AND WHEREAS, the 2009 Caribbean Baptist Fellowship Youth Festival, the 8th ina
serias of such Festivals, is scheduled to be held in The Bahamas at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort & Crystal Palace Casino during the period 22nd to 26th July, 2009, under the theme
“Stomp Pun De Enemy", with Senptural reference drawn from Luke 10:17 - 20;

AND WHEREAS, It is expected that the CBF Youth Festival will attract approximately
one thousand delegates from the Family Islands, the Caribbean, the United States and

other parts of the world:

NOW, THEREFORE, |, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the period Monday, 20th July to Sunday, 26th July, 2009
as “CARIBBEAN BAPTIST YOUTH WEEK”.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF,
| have hereunto set my Hand and
Seal this 15th day of July, 2009

HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER





Photos by Megan Reynolds

A WHITE SAND memorial that was made in memory of the boys one
month after they disappeared...

“They were so frail and weak
and down,” Mrs Clarke said. “It
was so sad. The whole family
was just screaming.

“My son just lay down on the
ground screaming, ‘Look at
these children, look at these
children!’

“They looked starved.”

Rushed to the clinic and then
to Nassau within hours of their
discovery, the boys are recov-
ering in the paediatric ward of
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal, building up strength on a
diet of Ensure and offered their
parents glimpses into the hap-
penings of their misadventure
piece by piece.

According to their family, the
boys have said Marcell fell into
one of the many cavernous
holes puncturing the forest
floor, and then Deangelo, as he
reached for him, tumbled in
behind.

They ate pigeon plums and
cocoplums, they told Mrs
Clarke, and drank water from a
stream and limestone potholes
filled with rainwater.

While Marcell has told his
father they were stuck in the
hole for the 33 days and nights
they were missing, Deangelo
maintains they were only stuck
in the same whole for two or
three days, Mr Sylverin said.

And as Marcell, in particular,
has started talking more, the
story is becoming stranger.

Marcell has apparently attest-
ed to an old man visiting while
he was stuck in the hole — a man
dressed in black, with pale
hands, whose face he never saw.

The man Marcell believes
was the grandfather who died
when he was an infant, fed Mar-

cell the food of his dreams —
pizza, watermelon, macaroni —
and when he went to wake his
brother to join the feast, ‘Pa’
stopped him.

He had cared for him and
washed his back, but never hurt
him, Mr Sylverin said. And
Deangelo never saw the man.

On the day Marcell escaped
from the hole, he noticed a tree
growing out of it he had not
seen in the month he had been
there, he told his father.

“As though it had magically
appeared?” | asked.

Mr Sylverin’s eyes burst wide
open, a mixture of conviction
and disbelief rendering him
speechless.

He added: “Before he
climbed the tree he saw the man
coming and he gave him a hand
to get out of the hole and he
got out before Deangelo.

“Then Deangelo came out
and he didn’t see Pa anymore.”

The day they emerged, July
12, was the anniversary of their
grandfather’s death on July 12,
2003.

He has linked Marcell’s story
to a strange sighting he said
Vera had the night before the
boys were found, of a man
dressed in black, whose face she
could not discern, but who, as
she went closer, disappeared
into the bush, and then reap-
peared suddenly some distance
down the road — a distance no
human could make, he said.

Mr Sylverin also spoke of an
unearthly noise coming from
the forest when the boys
returned home, a noise that
shook the earth, but which Mrs
Clarke said she had not heard.

While she’s inclined to

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believe her grandsons survived
in the forest, Mrs Clarke does
not see why “Pa”, if he were to
reveal himself, would not show
his face, or hide from Deangelo.
Nor does she know of any
“sperret” dressed in black wan-
dering around Smith’s Hill.

But not everyone in the set-
tlement is as sceptical as Mrs
Clarke.

“Some people here will
believe that,” said Emily Rah-
ming, a local government
employee from Congo Town as
she sat by Long Bay Cays’
beautiful white sand beach dis-
cussing the town’s latest mys-
tery.

Like many who grew up in
South Andros, Mrs Rahming
was taught to respect the poten-
tial existence of “sperrets” and
the world of the unseen and the
unexplained.

Although she may not whole-
heartedly believe in ghosts and
spirits, she has heard enough
stories to demand respect for
the mystical.

“There are two stories in my
family,” she said, going into the
details of one.

“My husband’s sister and her
father were out planting cassava
and when he looked around,
she had gone.

“He looked around the field
calling her and he didn’t find
her so he notified the commu-
nity, and everyone went out
looking up and down, and saw
her in a hole and she wouldn’t
come out.

“She was afraid of her father;
she said there was a man in the
hole who looked like her father
and he gave her his hand and so
she went.

“We hear a lot of stories like
that so it’s not so far-fetched.”

Another case of two children
who went missing from High
Rock, a settlement north of
Smith’s Hill, several years ago is
another real life case that has
grown to mythical proportions;
the story being that the siblings
who had disappeared for
around two weeks had met their
grandmother in the woods — she
went to feed them bananas.

And then there was the 16-
year-old boy from Mars Bay
who was lost in the woods for
over two weeks, undetected by
full-scale searches, until he final-
ly emerged on his own.

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MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 , PAGE 13B





OLEGREAN CLARKE at home with her daughter Petrola (far right) and
some of her 27 grandchildren...

every time someone’s lost and I
don’t know if they ever went in
and found someone in the
bush,” a South Andros local
said.

When search parties lost
hope for Deangelo and Mar-
cell, Mrs Clarke had the feeling
they too, would walk home
independently.

She said: “I still had hope
they would find them, and I
said if everybody search and
they don’t come they are going
to walk out on their own and
that’s exactly what happened.”

While almost everyone in
South Andros has been lost in
the forest, or knows someone
who has, for a few hours, a
night, or up to a week, many
are sceptical the boys could
have survived for so long on
their own.

“Tf they were there I feel like
we would have found them,”
my guide said as we hacked our
way through the thick brush,
dodging poisonwood trees, spi-
derwebs and children-swallow-
ing caves, which are, apparent-
ly, up to 50ft deep.

“There were so many of us
— five or six different groups
searching different areas, some
starting in the north, and some
in the south.

“We looked in every hole,
we called their names, and they





1



| 1a Tat

oc. ‘Hone

never answered.

“T honestly don’t believe they
were there.”

Mr Rolle does not believe in
ghosts either. If there was a
mysterious man in black, he
thinks it was probably a drug
dealer involved in a marijuana
deal that allegedly went wrong
in the weeks before the boys
disappeared.

Talk amongst the sceptics in
South Andros is that someone
had been told to stash some
high-grade cannabis for a deal-
er in Andros and stole some of
the drugs. In the days before
the boys disappeared the deal-
ers were reportedly looking for
the stash, and to get back at the
partner who had double-
crossed them.

The boys disappeared, and
some think they were taken off
the island on a boat.

Then five days before the
boys were found, a man was
allegedly caught trying to smug-
gle 10lbs of marijuana on the
mail boat. Five days later, a
boat was heard pulling into
Kemp’s Bay at around 2am,
and hours later the boys were
found.

“Tf they came in a boat then
it’s a drug trade gone bad and
they picked up the wrong chil-
dren,” Mr Rolle said.

“Either it’s a case of them



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INSIGHT

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ELLOUISE TAYLOR and her niece
Godfrineka Taylor, 14, found the
boys half a mile from their home
more than a month after they dis-
appeared...

being taken by the wrong peo-
ple or the kids ran away, but
[I’m going to have to wait for
them to come out of the hospi-
tal to tell us what happened
before I wrap up my investiga-
tion.”

Attempts to interview the
police in Kemp’s Bay were not
successful, but Superintendent
for the Family Islands, Hulan
Hanna, has said the investiga-
tion will continue in earnest
when the children are well and
able to talk.

The probability of getting
kidnapped by drug dealers may
seem more likely than surviving
on fruits that are currently out
of season, but the mystery of
the missing children remains
for now.

With so many stories of oth-
er mystical happenings in a land
steeped in myth and legend, the
land of the Chick Charneys that
legend has it bedeviled the
political future of a British
prime minister, and the “sper-
ret” that spins your head
around and disorientates you
as you walk in the forest, it
seems nothing is impossible.

Even the sceptical Mr Rolle,
who knows the South Andros
bush better than most locals,
has felt “his head get turned”,
and subsequently walked for
hours in circles and had to fall
asleep before he could once
again get his sense of direction.

Even with a guide, just graz-
ing at the outer edge of the
thick coppice, where it was still
possible to hear the sea, or the
road, or the “sperret”, it

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seemed like east and west were
at a 90 degree angle.

The mystical quality of the
forest, and the land, moved
16th century Spanish explorers
to name her “Isla Espiritu San-
tos”, the island of the Holy
Spirit.

“It’s the holey land,” Mr
Rolle joked as we dodged caves
trekking through the forest.

“Anything is possible.”

Even the children’s mother
is finding it hard to swallow her
children’s story at this stage,
wondering if they could have
been kidnapped, or held in the
woods, and threatened into
telling the story of their disap-
pearance.

While the children recover in
hospital their whereabouts over
those 33 lost days remains a
mystery.

Psychologist David Allen






explained the mythical story as
a way of filling the terrifying
space of the unknown with an
answer of mythical proportions.

“This is the land of the Chick
Charneys and it’s very much a
part of our folklore,” Dr Allen
said.

“Folklore is made in the deep
unconscious, it’s where our
fears congregate and become
condensed.

“In our natural mind we can’t
go there but in the unconscious
mind the folklore starts to play
out; trees grab them or caves
eat them up. There is an old
man who is a spirit who takes
them in and it makes a great
fairytale.

“But in actual fact we don’t
know what happened.”

To learn the truth, Dr Allen
said, the children need to recov-
er from their feelings of aban-

donment, rejection and help-
lessness, as well as the shock of
being found.

They need a safe holding
environment with stability, con-
sistency and predictability,
before they come out with the
truth, he said.

When questioned immedi-
ately after a traumatic experi-
ence and before a full recov-
ery, children will endeavour to
please the questioner, and as a
result the information they pro-
vide will be around 70 per cent
inaccurate, Dr Allen said.

And while Marcell and
Deangelo’s family are desper-
ate for answers, as is the com-
munity of Smith’s Hill, Kemp’s
Bay, the South Andros settle-
ments and the world at large, it
will surely be some time before
we know what really happened,
if indeed, we will ever know.

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PAGE 14B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Readers have their say...
insight

INSIGHT Censorship —
Voluntary Suppression —
July 13, 2009

PACO I simply loved your
article. I totally enjoyed the
read. WOW! It was ground
breaking....Very, very well
written.

Keep up the superb work
my brother. I am however not
surprised. I expect this kind
of quality work from you.

— Omar

Hi Paco,

Just to let you know that I
really enjoyed reading your
article “Voluntary Oppres-
sion.” It was obviously well
researched, with some apt lit-
erary references and thor-
oughly well argued.

The Christian Council and
the Film Board might not
have found as much enjoy-
ment as I did however!

— SMA

The Insight column of
Monday, July 13th, is definite-
ly a “cut above” the tabloid
journalism of John Marquis.
Marquis raised investigative
journalism to new heights,
and now Paco Nunez raises it
to new literary heights.
Describing various forms of
censorship throughout history
as set against similar action in
the Bahamas should give
pause for thought to Tribune
readers. Censorship for “the
greater good” is the unfortu-
nate “vision of the anointed”
purporting to know all that is
good and worthy for a society.
Paco Nunez makes the critical
observation that he does not
“remember renouncing his
right to regulate his own
behaviour.”

— Joan Thompson

The Nassau Institute

I am Bahamian. I am an
adult. I have an education. I
have an open mind. I value
my freedom of action and
thought. I think most
Bahamians should do the

FEEDBACK



The Insight column of Monday, July
13th, is definitely a “cut above” the tabloid
journalism of John Marquis. Marquis raised
investigative journalism to new heights,
and now Paco Nunez raises it to new literary
heights. Describing various forms of
censorship throughout history as set against
similar action in the Bahamas should give
pause for thought to Tribune readers.
Censorship for “the greater good” is

the unfortunate “vision of the anointed

”%

purporting to know all that is good and
worthy for a society. Paco Nunez makes
the critical observation that he does
not “remember renouncing his right to
regulate his own behaviour.”

same, but I see mostly apathy
compounded by the most
abject ignorance when it
comes to such things.

We have it so good that we
don’t want to improve the
things that aren’t good,
because we are afraid of
change, growth, development,
the unknown, new experi-
ences or ways of looking at
things. This is generally an
intellectually suffocating
country for the masses.
Thought and free expression
are generally not encouraged.
We are inherently uncurious,
which is very sad.

I don’t believe in censor-
ship at all and I take it as a
personal attack on my consti-

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— Joan Thompson

tutionally assured right that
an organisation with a reli-
gious agenda is allowed to
have influence over what
plays or films I should or
should not be allowed to see.
I don’t think, in a country
where religious freedom is
guaranteed, that the Christian
Council should be allowed
any say whatsoever over gov-
ernment issues of any kind. I
certainly didn’t vote for them
and they aren’t accountable
to anyone that I know of.

With Uncle Sam right next
door rating every movie any
Bahamian is ever going to
see, why not save the money
that we waste paying people
on the Plays and Films Com-
mission Board and put it to
good use either promoting
the Bahamas as a destination
for making movies or, even
better, helping young
Bahamians learn the art of
film. The time for putting
Bahamian tax dollars to bet-
ter use than “same ole, same
ole” is well past due. Busi-
ness as usual must not be the
order of the day. To me it
isn’t just the censorship
aspect; it is a waste of the
people’s time and money that
could be put to vastly more
productive use.

Finally, what is happening
with Bruno? They will proba-
bly block that, but the silly
Movies portraying gangster
life, fast cars and cheap
women are always allowed to
play. We wonder how we got
here...

— Erasmus Folly

TOUGH CALL —

My 2 cents ...which, in
today's economy, is not worth
much!

Agreed that the “environ-
mentalists" by and large go
off half cocked without learn-
ing the facts — e.g. the LNG

MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

Voluntary oppression

â„¢ By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

Ihe adult Bahamian: sim-
ple, dull-witted, not qual-
ified to make indepen-
dent decisions, incapable
of moderating his or her

responses to stimuli. A helpless crea-
ture that must be led by the hand at all

Long after most civilised nations have cast off the yoke of censorship,
Bahamians continue to be told what they can and cannot see and hear.
This in turn has allowed a privileged few to ensure that their opinions

tured always take priority. But by failing to take a stand against the suppression
of their rights, members of the public can blame no one but themselves
for this situation. INSIGHT reports...

Tt would be difficult to imagine a
person thus described not taking
offence. Yet everyone who lives in
this country puts up with it in some
form on an almost daily basis, for the
most part without protest.
Examples of this can be gleaned
from virtually all aspects of public life,





butnowhere is it more palpable than
in the government's control over the
ideas we consume, as embodied in the
Play and Film Control Board’s power
to ban films and the Immigration
Department's ability to bar perform-
ing artists from entering the country.

AN HISTORICAL

PERSPECTIVE

Censorship in the Bahamas is often
justified as necessary for the preser-
vation of rather ambiguous priorities
such as public morality, public order,
the public interest, even public health.
Indeed, some of these phrases feature
in the law which governs the suppres-
sion of ideas and opinions.

We are by no means unique in this
respect. Censorship has been around
for as long as democracy has existed.
For almost as long, it been recognised
for what it usually is: the portrayal of
the public as in need of protection
from itself, as a means for those in
power to reinforce their positions.

The philosopher Socrates was put to
death by the world’s very first demo-
cratic society for bucking heads with
the authorities over these very ques-
tions of information and control. He
became the first in a long line of
learned men to defend the notion that
individuals should be free to receive
and impart ideas.

English poet John Milton under-
stood well the assumptions that under-
lie the notion of censorship. In 1644 he
wrote his famous defence of free
expression, the Areopagitica, in
response to a newly enacted censor-
ship law. He exhorted parliament to
“consider what Nation it is whereof
ye are, and whereof ye are the gover-
nors: a Nation not slow and dull, but of
a quick, ingenious and piercing spirit,
acute to invent, subtle and sinewy to
discourse, not beneath the reach of
any point, the highest that human
capacity can soar to."

Milton wrote that the absolute free-
dom to impart and receive ideas is
yital for the increase of knowledge
and the progress of a people. Having
supported the anti-monarchists in the
English Civil War, Milton was a fierce
advocate of democracy who believed
the public was the only legitimate
earthly sovereign; a sentiment that the
Bahamas is supposed to be a natural
heir to, as one of the oldest parlia- i
mentary democracies in the world.

The intensely God-fearing poet who
gave us the poem, “Paradise Lost”,
also understood that personal moral-
ity is a question to be struggled with by
individuals and supported the view
that citizens should take their faith
“into their own hands again."

He warned religious leaders who
attempt to suppress the free expres-
sion of ideas because they fear “new
and dangerous opinions,” that think-
ing themselves the defenders of the



persecutors.”

faith, they will end up becoming “the

JUSTICE MAXWELL, RACISM

AND THE CENSORS

“New and dangerous opinions”
have often been the target of censor-

UM ee iene OCI m ROM EVA)

Gee eee aia Ce cea ec e

ORT ics uete ese nmol ems CoD

weight of the law descend upon him. Like-

r if anyone under the age of 18 is

ci LUO ee kOe CLC

adults, the police should throw the book at
Litre neue Mn t (a

ship in the Bahamas, But what seems
new and dangerous to one generation
often ends up being viewed a vital cat-
alyst for progress by the next.
Consider the example of the late
Justice Maxwell Thompson, who as a
young man founded the Citizens Com-

THE FRONT PAGE of the July 13 edition of INSIGHT...

controversy. But, on the oth-
er hand, why, oh why, doesn't
Government make a deci-
sion!?

True, casuarinas are an
invasive species, but those
along the western beaches
have been there ever since I
can remember — and that's a
long time! I suspect the E's
have a point in that the native
plants would help to hold the
sand, but why do we have to
have seagrape hedges every-
where, blocking the sea view.
Seagrape trees are lovely,
would serve the same pur-
pose, yet allow the view. See
Western Esplanade and Fort
Montagu "park".

Indeed, Government does-
n't inform the Public suffi-
ciently. I got more out of
your column, Larry (Smith —
Tough Call, published every
Wednesday) in re: proposed
Arawak Cay port facility than
from any other source.

Thank you. Maps would be
helpful, too. I still don't
know where the "new"

east/west road to the south of
the island (nothing to do with
Arawak Cay) is nor how to
get on it! One map published
in the newspaper would speak
volumes!

Now, if only you could get
more than TALK out of Gov-
ernment in re the fish ramp at
Montagu junction of Shirley
Street and East Bay Streets!
There is still time for this gov-
ernment to relocate it (to the
adjacent filled land to the
west) with running water and
mandatory off-street parking
and with traffic controlled by
the existing light at the north-
ern end of the Village Road
extension, making the right
hand lane on East Bay Street
turn right at the light and go
straight through to Village
Road only, with traffic for
Shirley Street continue east
through the light, turning
right opposite the ramp and
thence into Shirley Street and
thence be controlled by the
light at junction of Shirley
Street and Village Road.

mittee in Nassau to fight racial dis-
crimination.

When Justice Thompson died in
2003, his obituary recounted how in
the late 1940s, his committee agitated
against the policy of the City Garden
Club of banning non-whites from its

premises, and "also prevailed on the
Governor to revoke a decision by the
Censor Board to deny the showing of
the film ‘No Way Out, in which Sid-
ney Poitier starred" and which
denounced racially driven violence in
| particular and irrational hatred in gen-
eral.

Why would the members of the
Censor Board want to ban such a
film? Perhaps they felt a public show-
ing of a movie in which a conscien-
tious and caring black doctor is
harassed, threatened, beaten and
almost killed by white men in some
southern American backwater town
might constitute a threat to the peace
in a majority black colony run by the
descendants of white British men.

At the same time, however, there
were certain aspects of the film’s mes-
sage, in the context of the changing
attitudes of the time, which might have
caused anxiety for one social group
in particular.

Justice Thompson's early accom-
plishments led to the formation of the
Bahamas People's Party, of which he
was chairman. His obituary says: "This
time, however, was the age of the
‘McCarthy Communist Witch Hunt!
| and they were accused of being Com-
munist because as Max said - ‘every-
thing that was new and unfamiliar was
called Communist. Emotion was run-
ning quite high and the mere mention
of the word was hushed."

An anti-racism movement could
only be equated with communism by a
power structure peopled by individu-
als astonishingly ignorant of the mean-
ing of both terms, or who out of anxi-
ety over their own positions, either
consciously or unconsciously conflate
a trend that they see as a threat to
their interests with the dominant inter-
national bogeyman of the day.

RIGHTEOUS INDIGNATION
In the present-day Bahamas, just as
in Milton’s time, “the persecutors” are
often inspired by notions of religious
fervor. Pry loose any particular
instance of censorship, and you are
yery likely to find a zealot of some
description crawling about beneath it.
Religious leaders have worked
| closely with the Control Board, and
| often consult with Immigration offi-
cials on whether a particular per-
forming artist should be allowed into
the country.

There is, of course, nothing contro-
yersial in Christian terms about the
public being viewed as “the flock” in
need of someone to lead it about,
although how some pastors have man-
aged to commandeer the role of “the
Good Shepherd” for themselves is an
interesting question.

In any case, every Bahamian is enti-
tled to ask what right pastors have

SEE page 8B





Traffic could enter the relo-
cated fish market via the turn-
ing off Bay Street by the
Yacht Club or travelling
north via the Village Road
extension. Got that? Wish I
could supply a map...The
handful of votes represented
by the reluctant fishermen
would be so delighted by the
relocated market by the time
of the next election that
they'd all vote to return the
present government!

I agree with you that for-
eign boats should have to pay
up front a hefty deposit to fish
our waters, be given "The
Rules", and, if they want most
of their deposit returned,
should undergo an inspection
of their deep freezer, fish
wells, etc, to ensure they have
only the legal number of
fish/conch/crawfish. Maybe
they should only be allowed
to catch fish for immediate
consumption.

Keep on writing. We learn
much from you!

— Joan Lightbourn

Pa eT oe
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 502-2371 today!

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ORLANDO —
High: 85° F/29° C

Low: 70°F/21°C ©

KEY WEST
High: 90° F/32°C
Low: 80° F/27°C

>»

x

Partly sunny, a
t-storm; breezy.

High: 88°

ICE acc

100° F

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ee is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

@ WEST PALM BEACH

FT. LAUDERDALE

High: 89°F/32°C os

Low: 76° F/24°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Tuesday

Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston

High
F/C
98/36
67/19
84/28
81/27
83/28
81/27
78/25
90/32
78/25
79/26
93/33
92/33
80/26
89/31
94/34

Today

Low

F/C
68/20
55/12
64/17
63/17
66/18
62/16
61/16
69/20
59/15
60/15
75/23
58/14
61/16
76/24
76/24

Ww

pe
C
pe
pe
t
pe
pe
t
s
pce
t
t
pe
s
t

High

F/C
93/33
66/18
85/29
82/27
82/27
76/24
75/23
86/30
80/26
81/27
96/35
86/30
83/28
88/31
94/34

Low

F/C
69/20
54/12
67/19
67/19
66/18
64/17
65/18
71/21
64/17
63/17
74/23
57/13
63/17
75/23
74/23

Ww

HO tm OO tO

oO

oO

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando

couple of t-storms.

Rather cloudy, a

Mostly cloudy,

t-storms; breezy.

High: 89°
Low: 80° Low: 80°
105°-81° F

High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 75° F/24°C

@
MIAMI
High: 90° F/32°C

Low: 78° F/26° C



High
F/C
80/26
90/32
85/29
108/42
90/32
87/30
83/28
86/30
90/32
79/26
84/28
88/31
81/27
91/32
85/29

Today
Low

F/C
60/15
69/20
64/17
84/28
68/20
67/19
62/16
69/20
78/25
63/17
58/14
72/22
69/20
69/20
70/21

WwW

Ss

High

F/C
82/27
86/30
81/27
109/42
81/27
82/27
87/30
84/28
89/31
79/26
87/30
90/32
81/27
89/31
89/31

@
FREEPORT

Tuesday

Low

F/C
63/17
72/22
63/17
88/31
69/20
67/19
63/17
71/21
79/26
64/17
64/17
74/23
69/20
65/18
74/23

High: 89° F/32° C

Low: 76° F/24° C

F

ANDROS
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 79° F/26° C

ABACO
High: 90° F/32° C

Low: 80° F/27°C
25
i.

Fz

A couple of showers
and a t-storm.

High:
Low:

89°
80°

100°-88° F

NASSAU
High: 88° F/31°C

Low: 80° F/27°C
@

Today

W High Low
F/C F/C

pe Philadelphia 83/28 68/20
t Phoenix 111/43 39/31
t Pittsburgh 76/24 59/15
s Portland, OR 93/33 60/15
t Raleigh-Durham 386/30 65/18
Ss St. Louis 84/28 65/18
pe Salt Lake City 94/34 68/20
pc San Antonio 93/33 75/23
t San Diego 77/25 69/20
t San Francisco 68/20 55/12
pc Seattle 83/28 59/15
t Tallahassee 91/32 65/18
t Tampa 86/30 72/22
t Tucson 104/40 80/26
t Washington, DC 82/27 67/19

Ww

pe
s
pe
pe
t
s
t
t
pe
pe
pe
pe
t
pe
t

AccuWeather.com ‘Cae’
Forecasts and graphics provided by i sy
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 21 Jul. 28 Aug. 5 Aug. 13
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 81°F/27°C
————
all CATISLAND
High: 85° F/29° C
Low: 76° F/24°C
. 7
GREATEXUMA pe
REAT EXUN ‘a SAN SALVADOR
High: 84 F/29 C High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 79° F/26° C Low: 78° F/26° c
oat at
LONG ISLAND
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 78° F/26°C MAYAGUANA
Tuesday
High Low W ck High: 87° F/31°C
F/c FIC Low: 78° F/26° C
82/27 70/21
111/43 87/30 pc CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS
78/25 60/15 t RAGGEDISLAND [ian ee eee
91/32 61/16 s eee ae ow: 80° F/27
High: 88° F/31° C -_
83/28 66/18 t Low:76°F/24°C eS yr
84/28 66/18 pc . hen 4
93/33 68/20 pc
sear et GREAT INAGUA
76/24 69/20 pe Low B1°F27°C
68/20 56/13 pc :
86/30 58/14 s 3
90/32 69/20 t Py
88/31 74/23 t i,
101/38 79/26 pc
82/27 69/20 t




ae 4
ari INDEX TODAY



o|1|2

LOW

3|4|5|6

MODERATE





— t+ =

Some sun with a Partly sunny and



t-storm; breezy. breezy.
High: 91° High: 90°
Low: 81° Low: 80°
ETCH cl
100°-92° F 109°-92° F High Ht. (ft.
Tod 6:39am. 2.5
oN 72pm. 33
Tuesd 738am. 27
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday 333am. 29
Temperature Malnstay 5 pm. 3.3
Hig Whi, LOW wn gz Fs? ¢ | Thursday or 33
Normal high... 88° F/31°C —— ;
Normal low 75° F/24° C
Last year's Nigh oo... ceceeteteeeeeeees 91° F/33° C

Last year's LOW oo. ccccceseseteeeeeeeees 81° F/27° C



Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:32 a.m. Moonrise..... 4:38 a.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....ccccccsssssssssssssesseeen 0.00" Sunset....... 8:01 p.m. Moonset..... 6:55 p.m.
Year to date as New Full Last

First

Normal year to date



7|8|9|10

HIGH |



\. HIGH

Low
12:43 a.m.

12:36 p.m.

1:37 a.m.
1:36 p.m.
2:28 a.m.
2:33 p.m.
3:18 a.m.
3:29 p.m.

dieccliecT, aE LEAT:



The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Posy

ch
-0.2

-0.1
-0.3
-0.2
-0.3
-0.3
-0.3



ae TS

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
91/32
68/20
88/31
91/32
55/12
90/32
86/30
75/23
93/33
91/32
85/29
68/20
80/26
66/18
68/20
82/27
61/16
100/37
95/35
71/21
93/33
83/28
97/36
66/18
61/16
72/22
78/25
77/25
92/33
77/25
90/32
97/36
83/28
86/30
61/16
838/31
70/21
70/21
93/33
86/30
74/23
102/38
77/25
82/27
66/18
79/26
93/33
65/18
75/23
71/21
69/20
109/42
82/27
88/31
56/13
86/30
54/12
84/28
63/17
838/31
66/18
70/21
93/33
86/30
73/22
92/33
78/25
75/23
68/20
76/24

ii

Today

Low
F/C
79/26
57/13
59/15
75/23
43/6
79/26
77/25
64/17
75/23
79/26
62/16
54/12
M5128
45/7
51/10
60/15
52/11
79/26
81/27
43/8
72/22
71/21
73/22
54/12
52/11
56/13
62/16
57/13
72/22
57/13
81/27
81/27
69/20
63/17
39/3
80/26
58/14
54/12
60/15
77/25
51/10
75/23
63/17
63/17
55/12
55/12
82/27
55/12
60/15
55/12
63/17
88/31
66/18
79/26
40/4
74/23
34/1
74/23
55/12
72/22
59/15
48/8
83/28
75/23
59/15
65/18
61/16
60/15
55/12
60/15

pe

t



High
F/C
88/31
72/22
85/29
92/33
59/15
91/32
86/30
78/25
91/32
90/32
92/33
73/22
81/27
67/19
78/25
85/29
54/12
102/38
93/33
73/22
92/33
82/27
96/35
71/21
59/15
79/26
83/28
73/22
90/32
70/21
91/32
95/35
88/31
85/29
60/15
87/30
69/20
68/20
95/35
86/30
74/23
109/42
81/27
72/22
80/26
77/25
95/35
66/18
84/28
77/25
17/25
111/43
86/30
88/31
61/16
87/30
46/7
85/29
74/23
82/27
70/21
72/22
95/35
79/26
75/23
93/33
78/25
81/27
73/22
73/22

Tuesday
Low
F/C
78/25
63/17
55/12
74/23
50/10
81/27
77/25
67/19
72/22
79/26
67/19
61/16
e123
47/8
62/16
67/19
42/5
78/25
81/27
52/11
71/21
72/22
70/21
55/12
54/12
68/20
62/16
57/13
72/22
55/12
82/27
80/26
68/20
66/18
38/3
80/26
56/13
57/13
59/15
77/25
51/10
76/24
64/17
58/14
mile
55/12
81/27
56/13
64/17
60/15
70/21
88/31
66/18
80/26
32/0
74/23
34/1
73/22
62/16
66/18
55/12
52/11
85/29
75/23
59/15
66/18
61/16
68/20
53/11
57/13

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MarINE FORECAST

© ie

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sh
pe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace





MONDAY, JULY 20TH, 2009, PAGE 15B




WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 86° F
Tuesday: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 86° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 85° F
Tuesday: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 85° F
Tuesday: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 85° F



Hy)

Billings
84/57, >
(COOL) oe New York?

Minneapolis

79/63 =

87/67)

Miami
90/78

Showers
T-storms
37] Rain





Fronts
[x4 Pluie: Shown are noon positions of weather systems and ni
Be] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm fitenfiient@e
[v=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Menge
10s| 0s [0s /| 10s 20s [Osi] 40s SOs 60s 70s 80s [Gts//AU0e Iie)





ua

You Can Be Blown
Away f yA Hurricane

_ Or you_can rest easy knowing
that yowhave excellent insurance
coe rage no matter which

ay the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

CS



Tet (282) 34-3585



MONDAY JULY 20, 2009





The stories behind the news

INSIGHT



Surviving 33 days, nights

Deangelo Clarke and Marcell Sylverin Clarke have shared their miraculous survival story after
being missing for 33 days and nights in the South Andros wilderness. Now, guide Joshua Rolle
takes reporter Megan Reynolds, of The Tribune, through a thick, 3,000 square foot stretch
of bush on the largest island in the Bahamas. INSIGHT reports...

lm By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

isappearances, partic-

ularly of young chil-

dren, rarely have hap-

py endings. Even

when children return
to their frantic parents, there is often
some horror of kidnapping, abuse, tor-
ture, if they are not found dead. Per-
haps that is why it is so hard to accept
the story Deangelo Clarke and Mar-
cell Sylverin Clarke have told about
the circumstances of their disappear-
ance.

It seems impossible that two boys,
Deangelo aged nine and Marcell, six,
could survive in the South Andros
“bush” for 33 days and nights. Grant-
ed they would have had water to
drink, as June’s heavy rains would
have collected in the many caves and
holes in the limestone rock on the for-
est ground.

And ripe dillys hang heavy on trees
in the dense coppice, as do wild
tamarind, and mangoes on the occa-
sional mango tree, but the “plums”
they told their parents, their grand-
mother and the doctor they had eaten,
are not in season.

Cocoplums may grow along the
coast of nearby Kemp’s Bay at this
time of year, but rarely in the bush, my
guide Joshua Rolle explained as he
led me through the thick coppice
stretching out for some 3,000 square
feet from South Andros settlements
on the coast right across to the west
coast of the country’s largest island.

But pigeon plums are either so dried
out they are flaking off the seed or
budding green, and certainly inedible,
he said.

Mr Rolle is a local so familiar with
the South Andros bush he led one of
three teams of Defence Force officers
sent from Nassau along with the K-9
dog unit to carry out a full-scale search
for the boys in the week after they
went missing on June 9.

Deangelo, who lives with the grand-
mother who raised him, Olegrean
Clarke, 67, across the road from the
forest in Smith’s Hill, was going out to
catch crabs at around 5.30pm on that
Tuesday evening as he has done every
evening since he was around four
years old, Mrs Clarke said.

And his younger half-brother Mar-
cell, who was visiting from Nassau
where he lives with their mother, Vera
Clarke, in Kemp Road, followed as
he does whenever they are together.

It was not unusual for the boys to go
out crabbing, or to walk the road in
this remote settlement on their own,
but as the light began to fade at
around 7.30pm, and the brothers had
not returned, the search began.

The grandmother of 27 said the
boys don’t usually go into the bush to
catch crabs, which walk brazenly into
the road at any time of day.

She waited in the road for them to
come home as her son, with cousins
and friends, searched the woods.

A passing neighbour gave her hope
when they said the children were not

S$ SUZUKI

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Grand Vitara features:
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OUP celia lee et

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING




MARCELL SYLVERIN CLARKE & DEANGELO CLARKE

far to the south, walking back towards
the house at around 8.30pm.

But when they didn’t come home,
police were called, and a crowd of
some 20 concerned neighbours
stopped to search as word travelled.

At around 1am the search party dis-
persed, only to rise the next morning,

around 100 people strong.

The boys’ mother flew in from Nas-
sau with Marcell’s father, Deangelo’s
stepfather, Marcellin Sylverin, 28, an
employee on the Captain Moxey mail
boat, which travels between South
Andros and Nassau.

After two days of searching the fam-

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ily criticised police for not stepping
up the search effort, and aired their
views in The Tribune, and by June 12
teams of Defence Force officers and
police search dogs joined the search.

A US Coast Guard helicopter flew
low over the dense forest using a
searchlight and heat sensor technolo-
gy to detect the boys.

But with still no sign of the lost
brothers, hope was fading fast.

Police called off the search parties
after two weeks; the effort seemingly
futile.

Local pastors held a candlelight ser-
vice in the Clarke’s front yard and
around 150 people prayed for the safe
return of the boys one month after
they had disappeared.

Ribbons were strung along the mile-
long stretch of road from Smith’s Hill
to Kemp’s Bay, and white sand was

Photos by Megan Reynolds

GUIDE Joshua Rolle stands over one of the
many deep holes in South Andros landscape
(seen above)...

poured around the tree in Mrs
Clarke’s front yard to be topped with
flowers, soft toys and teddy bears.

The white sand, reminiscent of the
white sand cemetery in Kemp’s Bay,
the flowers and the overwhelming loss
meant the family started to mourn the
children.

“It was comforting,” Mrs Clarke
said, her voice cracking with emotion.

“Everybody was just one big family,
the only disturbance was the children
being missing.”

Perhaps it was their prayers that
seemingly spat the children out of the
woods on July 12, but many in South
Andros think it was something more
sinister.

It was 13-year-old Godfrineka Tay-
lor who spotted the boys from her
aunt Ellouise Taylor’s car as they were
passing between Smith’s Hill and

SEE pages 12 & 13





Full Text



PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.196MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY, T-STORM HIGH 88F LOW 80F SEEINSIGHTSECTION S P O R T S Surviving 33 days, nights SEEPAGEELEVEN Darling retains his title B y KARIN HERIG T ribune Staff Reporter kherig@tribunemedia.net A WELL-KNOWNbusinessman and member of a prominent political family wasl ucky to escape with his life after he was held up and shot by robbers on Saturday night. Allan Butler, 34, one of the g randsons of the late Governor G eneral Sir Milo Butler and cousin to a Cabinet Minister, was closing up the family-run Butler’s Bargain Mart and Home Centre on Baillou Hill Road at 10.14pm when he was accosted by two masked men. The men were armed with g uns and demanded that Mr Butler hand over the money deposit bags he was carrying at the time. Supt Elsworth Moss, officer in-charge of the Central Detec tive Unit (CDU The Trib une y esterday that one of the gunmen was able to get thed eposit bags from Mr Butler after shooting him in the thigh. The two robbers afterwards escaped in an unknown direction. Mr Butler remains detained at the Princess Margaret Hos p ital where he is being treated for the gun shot wound, which The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com Sir Milo Butler’s grandson shot I N S I G H T I N S I G H T C M Y K C M Y K T h e T r i b u n e I N S I G H T M O N D A Y J U L Y 2 0 , 2 0 0 9T h e s t o r i e s b e h i n d t h e n e w s n B y M E G A N R E Y N O L D S T r i b u n e S t a f f R e p o r t e r m r e y n o l d s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e tDi s a p p e a r a n c e s , p a r t i c u l a r l y o f y o u n g c h i l d r e n , r a r e l y h a v e h a p p y e n d i n g s . E v e n w h e n c h i l d r e n r e t u r n t o t h e i r f r a n t i c p a r e n t s , t h e r e i s o f t e n s o m e h o r r o r o f k i d n a p p i n g , a b u s e , t o r t u r e , i f t h e y a r e n o t f o u n d d e a d . P e r h a p s t h a t i s w h y i t i s s o h a r d t o a c c e p t t h e s t o r y D e a n g e l o C l a r k e a n d M a r c e l l S y l v e r i n C l a r k e h a v e t o l d a b o u t t h e c i r c u m s t a n c e s o f t h e i r d i s a p p e a r a n c e . I t s e e m s i m p o s s i b l e t h a t t w o b o y s , D e a n g e l o a g e d n i n e a n d M a r c e l l , s i x , c o u l d s u r v i v e i n t h e S o u t h A n d r o s b u s h f o r 3 3 d a y s a n d n i g h t s . G r a n t e d t h e y w o u l d h a v e h a d w a t e r t o d r i n k , a s J u n e s h e a v y r a i n s w o u l d h a v e c o l l e c t e d i n t h e m a n y c a v e s a n d h o l e s i n t h e l i m e s t o n e r o c k o n t h e f o r e s t g r o u n d . A n d r i p e d i l l y s h a n g h e a v y o n t r e e s i n t h e d e n s e c o p p i c e , a s d o w i l d t a m a r i n d , a n d m a n g o e s o n t h e o c c a s i o n a l m a n g o t r e e , b u t t h e p l u m s t h e y t o l d t h e i r p a r e n t s , t h e i r g r a n d m o t h e r a n d t h e d o c t o r t h e y h a d e a t e n , a r e n o t i n s e a s o n . C o c o p l u m s m a y g r o w a l o n g t h e c o a s t o f n e a r b y K e m p s B a y a t t h i s t i m e o f y e a r , b u t r a r e l y i n t h e b u s h , m y g u i d e J o s h u a R o l l e e x p l a i n e d a s h e l e d m e t h r o u g h t h e t h i c k c o p p i c e s t r e t c h i n g o u t f o r s o m e 3 , 0 0 0 s q u a r e f e e t f r o m S o u t h A n d r o s s e t t l e m e n t s o n t h e c o a s t r i g h t a c r o s s t o t h e w e s t c o a s t o f t h e c o u n t r y s l a r g e s t i s l a n d . B u t p i g e o n p l u m s a r e e i t h e r s o d r i e d o u t t h e y a r e f l a k i n g o f f t h e s e e d o r b u d d i n g g r e e n , a n d c e r t a i n l y i n e d i b l e , h e s a i d . M r R o l l e i s a l o c a l s o f a m i l i a r w i t h t h e S o u t h A n d r o s b u s h h e l e d o n e o f t h r e e t e a m s o f D e f e n c e F o r c e o f f i c e r s s e n t f r o m N a s s a u a l o n g w i t h t h e K 9 d o g u n i t t o c a r r y o u t a f u l l s c a l e s e a r c h f o r t h e b o y s i n t h e w e e k a f t e r t h e y w e n t m i s s i n g o n J u n e 9 . D e a n g e l o , w h o l i v e s w i t h t h e g r a n d m o t h e r w h o r a i s e d h i m , O l e g r e a n C l a r k e , 6 7 , a c r o s s t h e r o a d f r o m t h e f o r e s t i n S m i t h s H i l l , w a s g o i n g o u t t o c a t c h c r a b s a t a r o u n d 5 . 3 0 p m o n t h a t T u e s d a y e v e n i n g a s h e h a s d o n e e v e r y e v e n i n g s i n c e h e w a s a r o u n d f o u r y e a r s o l d , M r s C l a r k e s a i d . A n d h i s y o u n g e r h a l f b r o t h e r M a r c e l l , w h o w a s v i s i t i n g f r o m N a s s a u w h e r e h e l i v e s w i t h t h e i r m o t h e r , V e r a C l a r k e , i n K e m p R o a d , f o l l o w e d a s h e d o e s w h e n e v e r t h e y a r e t o g e t h e r . I t w a s n o t u n u s u a l f o r t h e b o y s t o g o o u t c r a b b i n g , o r t o w a l k t h e r o a d i n t h i s r e m o t e s e t t l e m e n t o n t h e i r o w n , b u t a s t h e l i g h t b e g a n t o f a d e a t a r o u n d 7 . 3 0 p m , a n d t h e b r o t h e r s h a d n o t r e t u r n e d , t h e s e a r c h b e g a n . T h e g r a n d m o t h e r o f 2 7 s a i d t h e b o y s d o n t u s u a l l y g o i n t o t h e b u s h t o c a t c h c r a b s , w h i c h w a l k b r a z e n l y i n t o t h e r o a d a t a n y t i m e o f d a y . S h e w a i t e d i n t h e r o a d f o r t h e m t o c o m e h o m e a s h e r s o n , w i t h c o u s i n s a n d f r i e n d s , s e a r c h e d t h e w o o d s . A p a s s i n g n e i g h b o u r g a v e h e r h o p e w h e n t h e y s a i d t h e c h i l d r e n w e r e n o t f a r t o t h e s o u t h , w a l k i n g b a c k t o w a r d s t h e h o u s e a t a r o u n d 8 . 3 0 p m . B u t w h e n t h e y d i d n t c o m e h o m e , p o l i c e w e r e c a l l e d , a n d a c r o w d o f s o m e 2 0 c o n c e r n e d n e i g h b o u r s s t o p p e d t o s e a r c h a s w o r d t r a v e l l e d . A t a r o u n d 1 a m t h e s e a r c h p a r t y d i s p e r s e d , o n l y t o r i s e t h e n e x t m o r n i n g , a r o u n d 1 0 0 p e o p l e s t r o n g . T h e b o y s m o t h e r f l e w i n f r o m N a s s a u w i t h M a r c e l l s f a t h e r , D e a n g e l o s s t e p f a t h e r , M a r c e l l i n S y l v e r i n , 2 8 , a n e m p l o y e e o n t h e C a p t a i n M o x e y m a i l b o a t , w h i c h t r a v e l s b e t w e e n S o u t h A n d r o s a n d N a s s a u . A f t e r t w o d a y s o f s e a r c h i n g t h e f a m i l y c r i t i c i s e d p o l i c e f o r n o t s t e p p i n g u p t h e s e a r c h e f f o r t , a n d a i r e d t h e i r v i e w s i n T h e T r i b u n e , a n d b y J u n e 1 2 t e a m s o f D e f e n c e F o r c e o f f i c e r s a n d p o l i c e s e a r c h d o g s j o i n e d t h e s e a r c h . A U S C o a s t G u a r d h e l i c o p t e r f l e w l o w o v e r t h e d e n s e f o r e s t u s i n g a s e a r c h l i g h t a n d h e a t s e n s o r t e c h n o l o g y t o d e t e c t t h e b o y s . B u t w i t h s t i l l n o s i g n o f t h e l o s t b r o t h e r s , h o p e w a s f a d i n g f a s t . P o l i c e c a l l e d o f f t h e s e a r c h p a r t i e s a f t e r t w o w e e k s ; t h e e f f o r t s e e m i n g l y f u t i l e . L o c a l p a s t o r s h e l d a c a n d l e l i g h t s e r v i c e i n t h e C l a r k e s f r o n t y a r d a n d a r o u n d 1 5 0 p e o p l e p r a y e d f o r t h e s a f e r e t u r n o f t h e b o y s o n e m o n t h a f t e r t h e y h a d d i s a p p e a r e d . R i b b o n s w e r e s t r u n g a l o n g t h e m i l e l o n g s t r e t c h o f r o a d f r o m S m i t h s H i l l t o K e m p s B a y , a n d w h i t e s a n d w a s p o u r e d a r o u n d t h e t r e e i n M r s C l a r k e s f r o n t y a r d t o b e t o p p e d w i t h f l o w e r s , s o f t t o y s a n d t e d d y b e a r s . T h e w h i t e s a n d , r e m i n i s c e n t o f t h e w h i t e s a n d c e m e t e r y i n K e m p s B a y , t h e f l o w e r s a n d t h e o v e r w h e l m i n g l o s s m e a n t t h e f a m i l y s t a r t e d t o m o u r n t h e c h i l d r e n . I t w a s c o m f o r t i n g , M r s C l a r k e s a i d , h e r v o i c e c r a c k i n g w i t h e m o t i o n . E v e r y b o d y w a s j u s t o n e b i g f a m i l y , t h e o n l y d i s t u r b a n c e w a s t h e c h i l d r e n b e i n g m i s s i n g . P e r h a p s i t w a s t h e i r p r a y e r s t h a t s e e m i n g l y s p a t t h e c h i l d r e n o u t o f t h e w o o d s o n J u l y 1 2 , b u t m a n y i n S o u t h A n d r o s t h i n k i t w a s s o m e t h i n g m o r e s i n i s t e r . I t w a s 1 3 y e a r o l d G o d f r i n e k a T a y l o r w h o s p o t t e d t h e b o y s f r o m h e r a u n t E l l o u i s e T a y l o r s c a r a s t h e y w e r e p a s s i n g b e t w e e n S m i t h s H i l l a n d S u r v i v i n g 3 3 d a y s , n i g h t s D e a n g e l o C l a r k e a n d M a r c e l l S y l v e r i n C l a r k e h a v e s h a r e d t h e i r m i r a c u l o u s s u r v i v a l s t o r y a f t e r b e i n g m i s s i n g f o r 3 3 d a y s a n d n i g h t s i n t h e S o u t h A n d r o s w i l d e r n e s s . N o w , g u i d e J o s h u a R o l l e t a k e s r e p o r t e r M e g a n R e y n o l d s , o f T h e T r i b u n e , t h r o u g h a t h i c k , 3 , 0 0 0 s q u a r e f o o t s t r e t c h o f b u s h o n t h e l a r g e s t i s l a n d i n t h e B a h a m a s . I N S I G H T r e p o r t s . . . S E E p a g e s 1 2 & 1 3 M A R C E L L S Y L V E R I N C L A R K E & D E A N G E L O C L A R K E G U I D E J o s h u a R o l l e s t a n d s o v e r o n e o f t h e m a n y d e e p h o l e s i n S o u t h A n d r o s l a n d s c a p e ( s e e n a b o v e ) . . . T R I B U N EEX C L U S I VE P h o t o s b yM e g a n R e y n o l d s B AHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Businessman is held up by robbers OFFICER SERIOUSLYINJURED IN COLLISION BETWEEN MOTORCYCLE ANDPOLICE CAR APOLICE MOTORCYCLIST was seriously injured last night after a collision with a squad car during a highspeed chase. The two police vehicles were pursuing a trail bike when they collided on Soldier Road short l y after 7pm. The police motorcyclist was taken to hospital and hadn’t regained consciousness at the time of going to press. While three officers in the patrol car also sustained injuries, the driver suffered the brunt of the impact. The trail bike got away. Police are not releasing the names of the officers, however the motorcyclist was attached to the Traffic Division and the patrol car was attached to Wulff Road Police Sta tion. Police last night were at the preliminary stages of their investigation and could not say what led to the collision. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f ALLAN BUTLER was held up at Butler’s Bargain Mart and Home Centre o n Baillou Hill Road. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page 10 THE Inter-American Devel o pment Bank anticipates that the Bahamas will have borrowed as much as $300 millionf rom the organisation between the years 2008 and 2012. According to the IDB’s O perational Programme for the Bahamas, these loans will include $50 million for an air transportation programme, $50 million for a BEC support programme, and $10 million for the land use policy administration programme. Asked about the borrowing while in Haiti this weekend, where he was attending the Regional Forum on the occasion of the Inter-American Development Bank’s 50th anniversary, Mr Ingraham said the “alternative to (borrowing is further misery for the Bahamian people.” “Having managed the economy well over the years we are now able to use the fiscal space we have to be able to cause a reduction in the amount of suffering that would take place in society if we didn’t do the bor rowing.” “We are fortunate as com pared to many of our brethren in the Caribbean who have borrowed up to their max and who are maxed out and who are unable to engage in any additional borrowing,” he said. Mr Ingraham noted that the IDB is the only multi-lateral institution from which The Bahamas can access funding. In view of this, he said, its “adjust ed policies and programmes are welcomed.” “The need to replenish the B ank’s Ordinary Capital and Funds for Special Projects in light of the current global eco-n omic crisis is supported by The Bahamas,” he told dele gates as he addressed the conf erence. “We urge all developed countries, who qualify to increase the Bank’s resourcesand to a ccept that action is needed now.” Responding to the current e conomic global crisis, the prime minister told the confer ence that the Bahamas has e mployed a number of mitigat IDB anticipates the Bahamas will have borrowed $300m between 2008 and 2012 By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE victims of the Sea hauler/United Star maritime tragedy will be able to access thousands more dollars in funds this week as donations collected almost a year ago by radio station More94 FM are to be paid out. The funds were collected by the radio station in 2008 and due to a difficulty in determining who were the real “victims” of the August 2, 2003, tragedy, forwarded by the station to Government for disbursement. While the Ministry did not yesterday identify how much money would be paid out in total, it is understood to be around $12,000 to be shared between about 41 people. The Government itself made a one time $1 million payment from the public treasury to the victims in May 2008. Four people were killed and 25 injured in the night time collision between the two mailboats. After receiving the payment from Government some of those affected complained the funds would not amount to much once they had paid off immediate debts. Thanking More 94 FM for being a “responsible corpo rate citizen” by organising the Victims of maritime tragedy to receive donated funds SEE page 10 WITH over 800 invasive lionfish removed from Bahamian waters in half a day and enthusiasm growing for the fish as a source of food the Department of Marine Resources declared Nassau’s first lionfish control event on Saturday a success. Eighteen boats working in competition with one another pulled in the haul of venomous fish during the earlier part of Saturday, with “Jojo”, piloted by several members of the Maillis family, bringing in 300 of them alone, winning them a $500 prize. Boaters and members of the public swamped the Green Parrot Restaurant and Bar where those competing for the prize of catching the single biggest, smallest and the most lionfish came to have their catch weighed and counted. Michael Braynen, Director of the Department of Marine Resources said: “Certainly it SEE page 10 Ov er 800 in vasive lionfish ar e caught in half a da y A LARGE number of invasive lionfish were removed from Bahamian waters during Nassau’s first lionfish control event on Saturday. SEE page 10 RESIDENTS of a community in eastern New Providence, some of whom living with serious illnesses, said they are on the edge of despair, having suffered from low to non-existent water pressure for more than three years now. “We have been forgotten, this must be the most hateful place in Nassau to live. Our ancestors must have buried dead people in this ground that’s why we’re so cursed,” one resident of Star Estates, Residents are ‘on the edge of despair’ over low water pressure SEE page 10 Alison Lowe

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A TOTAL of 172 Haitian migrants were apprehended in the Central Bahamas on Saturday by officers of the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEU T his follows after last w eek’s apprehension exercises that netted some 189 suspected illegal Haitian immigrants. On Saturday afternoon, after receiving information of a Haitian sloop spotted a half mile east of Hawksbill Rock in t he Exuma Cays, police on E xuma, with the help of local r esidents, assisted in removing the migrants from theiru nsanitary vessel and detain i ng them on Duck Cay. Defence Force patrol vessels HMBS P-48 and Guana hani were dispatched to the area to remove the migrants 130 men and 42 women. The first vessel, HMBS P4 8, arrived in the capital on S unday afternoon with 72 of t he migrants, and the Guanahani was expected to arrive later in the evening with ther emaining 100 migrants. All of the immigrants were handed over to Immigration officials and are currently b eing detained at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE More suspected Haitian immigrants apprehended LEFT: Some of the suspected immigrants onboard HMBS P48 on the way to Nassau on Sunday afternoon. A total of 172 suspected immigrants were picked up after their vessel was sighted off Hawksbill Rock in the Exuma Cays. ABOVE: Some of the suspected Haitian immigrants onboard HMBS P-48, as they arrived at the Defence Force Base. S OME o f the suspected Haitian immigrants preparing to disembark HMBS P-48, after they arrived at the Defence Force Coral Harbour Base on Sunday afternoon. RBDF Photos: Petty Officer J onathan Rolle

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EARNEST efforts and promotions to attract visitors to countries in the Caribbean region, including the Bahamas, have so far failed in bringing then umber of tourists to our shores to match last year’s numbers, Prime Minister Ingraham revealed. Speaking at the Regional F orum on the Occasion of the Inter-American Development B ank’s 50th Anniversary in Portau-Prince, Haiti on Friday, Mr Ingraham said that despite serious discounting and other incentives offered in the travel and hotel deals, occupancy levels remain well below those achieved last year by all of the Caribbean tourism economies. And on the employment front, he said, to date the economic downturn has resulted in 2,200 lay-offs in the Bahamas’h otel sector, which amounts to one per cent of the country’s entire work force. M r Ingraham said that the Bahamas was one of the first c ountries in the region to feel t he effects of the slowing global economy. Those countries that rely heavily on the North American market as a source for their visitors, like the Bahamas, were impacted earlier. But as the g lobal economic downturn enveloped Western European a nd Asian markets, all Caribbean tourism economies, like those of Barbados and the Organisation of Eastern C aribbean States, have suffered w idespread retrenchment,” he s aid. T he impact of the decline in visitor numbers, Mr Ingraham s aid, “is being felt in all tourismrelated businesses including food and beverage, beach sports,h andicraft and souvenir sales, ground transportation, land and sea excursions and tours, luxury shopping and entertainment.” “And suppliers to the sector are similarly severely negatively impacted,” he said. Furthermore, the impact of the economic crisis on the Caribbean and the Bahamas hasr esulted in the slowdown in new construction of hotels and resorts, vacation homes, other businesses and commercial buildings, the prime minister s aid. “As in more developed e conomies, construction serves as a bell-weather for the state of the economies of small Caribbean economies,” he said. “The slowdown in construction in our region has signalled reduced foreign direct investment inflows with implications for foreign reserves. Inevitably, the slowdown in important economic sectors is contributing to an increase in unemployment.” The tourism sector provides e mployment for thousands of independent entrepreneurs who make good incomes from the i ndustry. “The vast majority of these s mall business operators have s een their incomes reduced, some drastically,” Mr Ingraham s aid. “Such shedding of high wage earning labour is likely to have a downward multiplier effect on other sectors as a result of the f all in aggregate demand.” The Bahamian economy is e xpected to contract by 3.9 per cent in 2009, he confirmed. Christine Thompson, Chief economist in the Office of the Prime Minister, and Louis Harold Joseph, Ambassador tot he Bahamas from the Republic of Haiti, accompanied the prime minister to the forum which focused on the “Economic Transformation and Strengthening of Caribbean Economiesi n Challenging Times.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,730 $3,730 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $3,940 $3,940Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a PM:Caribbean occupancy levels well below 2008 Armed robbery and burglary investigated By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Police are investigating an armed robbery and burglary that occurred at a residence on R aleigh Drive, where one person was gun-butted and injured by intruders. A sst Supt Welbourne Bootle said the incident occurred sometime around 1.53am on Friday when four masked men stormed into a home and demanded cash. A complainant told police that she was at home with her brother and children at the time. She described one of the suspects as about 6ft tall, of dark complexion, wearing a white mask and armed with a handgun. ASP Bootle reported that the brother was gun butted, while the woman was able to flee the house and escape. The children were not harmed, he said. The suspects took the woman’s handbag, which is valued at $50. Mr Bootle said the brother was treated for his injury at hospital. Investigations are continuing into the shooting and armed robbery of businessman Leslie Maycock, who is detained in hospital. Mr Maycock, 50, a former police officer, was closing his store around 10.45pm on Wednesday, July 15, when two masked men robbed him of cash and shot him in his left side. The businessman remains in stable, but critical condition in the Intensive Care Unit at Rand Memorial Hospital. Mr Bootle said no have arrests have made in the matter. He said the police are urging members of the public who can assist them to come forward. “Anyone who may have been in the area between 9pm and 10.45pm and saw anything is asked to contact 911 or the Crime tipster at 352-1919,” he said. Mr Bootle stressed that the identity of persons calling the crime tipster hotline will be held in the strictest confidence. He is urging businesspersons to be vigilant and take precautions when operating, especially late in the evening hours. He said that cash deposits should be made fre quently, but not routinely at the same time. Persons should also take note of individuals hanging around their premises or lurking in the vicinity. Mr Bootle is also advising persons to conduct background checks of individuals before hiring them. By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@ tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Three l ocal men are expected to b e charged in Freeport M agistrate’s Court on Monday in the murder ofa prominent Eight Mile R ock resident. T he men ages 27 and 3 0 years are accused of t he murder of 30-year-old Denzil Jones Jr of Eight Mile Rock. M r Jones was stabbed to death by intruders last Wednesday at his apartment in Jones Town. H e was taken by ambulance to hospital, but later died of his injuries. H is death records t he fifth homicide for t he year on Grand Bahama. A sst Supt Welbourne B ootle said the suspects will be arraigned at 10am on Monday. Mr Jones is the grandson of well-known local pastor Rev Raymond Jones. His father, the late D enzil Jones, was a b eloved teacher at Eight Mile Rock High, who d ied of cancer several y ears ago. A nd his uncle, Raymond Jones, is Chief Operating Officer of theF reeport Container Port. The family is devastated by his death. Three expected to be charged in connection with murder POLICE officers of the E astern Division were on r outine patrol in the area of Elizabeth Estates at 9am on Sunday when they stopped and searched a man who was found in possession of a .38 revolver and one live bullet for the firearm. The man is expected to be arraigned in court on f ormal charges some time t his week. Revolver found after police stop and search man In brief PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham addressed the Regional Forum on the occasion of the Inter-American Development Bank’s 50th anniversary in Port-au-Prince, Haiti on Friday. L l o n e l l a G i l b e r t / B I S

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By LLONELLA GILBERT Bahamas Information Services PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham has criticised more developed and industrialised countries of sometimes arbitrarily changing the rules for off-shore financial centres such as the Bahamas without considering that lower standards for the sector exist in their own jurisdictions. While the Bahamas remains focused on meeting international best standards in its financial services industry, Mr Ingraham said that any reform in the sector is becoming increasingly difficult as the industrialised countries “appear to move the goal posts for international financial centres at will and without regard to lower standards being observed in their own jurisdiction.” Initiatives Addressing the Regional Forum on the occasion of the Inter-American Development Bank’s 50th anniversary in Port-au-Prince, H aiti on Friday, Mr Ingraham said the Bahamas has forged ahead with initiatives to better rationalise the country’s tax regime, improve efficiencies and strengthen its financial regulatory framework. While focused on devising measures to mitigate the effects of the crisis and exploring means of strengthening the country’s financ ial regulatory framework, the government is fully conscious of the origins of the global crisis and the need for reform of the international financial architecture to meet the interests of both developed and developing countries, Mr Ingraham said. A reform of special interest to s mall Caribbean economies as it relates to a level playing field in the provision of international financial services, he said, “is increasingly important to us in light of the limited scope for our structurally dependent economies to diversify.” Already many Caribbean countries have expended “considerable resources” in reforming the financial services sector, beginning in 1999, with particular attention to improving regulation and transparency and in facilitating effective exchange of information, he said. He further told delegates that the financial services sector provides important employment for developing world professionals – lawyers, accountants, insurance and investment specialists, bankers many of whom would be otherwise lost through “brain drain” to the developed world. “The cost of losing professionals to the developed world is greater than the loss of the individuals,” he said. “In far too many instances, the individual will have been educated and trained at public expense.” Mr Ingraham stressed that there is a clear and urgent need for real reform that will create a more robust global financial system anda more enduring world economy capable of lifting all people to higher standards of living. Responding to the current economic global crisis, the prime minister said the Bahamas has employed a number of mitigating measures to alleviate the shortterm negative shock to highly vulnerable sectors of the society occasioned by the global economic crisis. “Importantly, the Bahamas has forged ahead with initiatives to better rationalise our tax regime, improve efficiencies and strengthen our financial regulatory framework.” C risis While focused on devising measures to mitigate the effects of the crisis and exploring means of strengthening the country’s financial regulatory framework, the government is fully conscious of the origins of the global crisis and the need for reform of the international financial architecture to meet the interests of both developed and developing countries, Mr Ingraham said. A reform of special interest to small Caribbean economies as it relates to a level playing field in the provision of international financial services, he said, “is increasingly important to us in light of the limited scope for our structurally dependent economies to diversify.” Already many Caribbean countries have expended “considerable resources” in reforming the financial services sector, beginning in 1999, with particular attention to improving regulation and transparency and in facilitating effective exchange of information, he said. Mr Ingraham said his government supports the response of the Inter-American Development Bank to the current global economic crisis. “As the only multilateral institution from which the Bahamas can access funding the IDB’s adjusted policies and programmes are welcomed. “The need to replenish the Bank’s Ordinary Capital and Funds for Special Projects in light of the current global economic crisis is supported by the Bahamas,” he said. “We urge all developed countries, who qualify to increase the Bank’s resources and to accept that action is needed now.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS P HONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 PM criticises industrialised countries over financial rules H ubert Ingraham

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On Friday Government House announced that the following people will receive the Queen’s Certificate and Badge of Honour in the 2009 Queen’s Birthday Honours: Valentine Ronald Farquharson Nassau In recognition of long service to the community. Reginald Haven Gibson Nassau In recognition of long service to the community. Celestine Eneas Nassau In recognition of outstanding service to the Tourism Industry (Straw Market Church. Ambrose Gouthro Freeport, Grand Bahama In recognition of outstanding service to the community. Joseph “Joe” Thompson Freeport, Grand Bahama In recognition of services to business, community service and sports. Raleigh Rexford Carroll Freeport, Grand Bahama In recognition of outstanding community service. Neville Fritz Simmons Freeport, Grand Bahama In recognition of outstanding and exemplary work in World War II, the Public Service and the hotel industry. Philip Hilary Cartwright Freeport, Grand Bahama In recognition of outstanding community service. Kay Hardy Freeport, Grand Bahama In recognition outstanding contribution the field of education and performing arts. Eileen DeGregory Freeport, Grand Bahama In recognition of outstanding community service. Evangelist Eulamae Johnson Burnt Ground, Long Island In recognition of long outstand ing public service career, also for religion and community service. Jerry Knowles Simms, Long Island In recognition of community service in the area of transportation. Osborne A. Pinder Miller’s Long Island In recognition of long public service career as an educator also for religion and community service. Catechist Maxwell Knowles Mangrove Bush, Long Island In recognition of services to religion and the community. Ezelia Carroll McKenzie Hill, Long Island In recognition of dedicated community and religious service. Daniel Wallace Duncan Town, Ragged Island In recognition of dedicated community and religious service. Nurse Inez Spence Simms, Long Island In recognition of dedicated and committed service to the community in the area of health. Ovina Cartwright Cartwright, Long Island In recognition of committed and dedicated service in the field of health and the community. Henry Knowles Simms, Long Island In recognition of committed and dedicated service as a community leader. Richard Cartwright Deadman’s Cay, Long Island In recognition of services to religion, civic and community services Cyril Cartwright McKenzie Hill, South Long Island In recognition of committed community service. Pastor Curtis Lawrence Moss Fairfield, Crooked Island In recognition of many years of outstanding and dedicated service to the community of Crooked Island. Maria Louise Pickering Inagua In recognition of outstanding community service. Iva Rebecca Nixon Mathew Town, Inagua In recognition of many years of dedicated and committed community service. Alexander James Pratt Freeport, Grand Bahama In recognition of outstanding and dedicated services in civics and to the community over many long years. Reverend Julius Dianza Chisholm In recognition of outstanding and dedicated service in the area of religion, hospitality and construction. Reverend Cleveland Murphy Betsy Bay, Mayaguana In recognition of outstanding and dedicated service in religion and to the community over many long years. Cynthia Brown Pirates Well, Mayaguana In recognition of outstanding and dedicated services in business and to the community over many long years. Nurse Gheneen Lindo Nassau In recognition of outstanding and dedicated services in the area of health and to the community over many long years. Evangeline Rolle In recognition of outstanding and dedicated services in the hospitality industry, church and to the community. Myrthlyn Jones Nassau In recognition of outstanding and dedicated service as a public officer and also in child care and in the church. Percy Vincent Miller Nassau In recognition of outstanding and dedicated services in the hospitality industry, church and to the community. Esther Ferguson-Curry Nassau In recognition of outstanding and dedicated services in the hospi tality industry, church and politics. Reverend H. Hugh Smith Nassau In recognition of services to education, religion, community service and politics. Howard Daniel Barr Nassau In recognition of outstanding and dedicated service in the areas of education, religion and the community. Sandra Clarke Freeport, Grand Bahama. In recognition of outstanding community service. Queenie Hanna Freeport, Grand Bahama In recognition of outstanding community service. Ronald Darville Freeport, Grand Bahama In recognition of outstanding community service. Ivan George Davis Nassau In recognition of services as a community activist. Esther Maria Davis Nassau In recognition of distinguished public service as an accountant in the Ministry of Agriculture. Esther Burrows Cartwright Nassau In recognition of outstanding community service. Reverend Dr. Genius Wells Pastor, Chapel on the Hill Nassau In recognition of outstanding and dedicated service in the area of religion. Genevieve McKenzie Nassau In recognition of outstanding and dedicated community service Inez Cooper Palmetto Point, Eleuthera In recognition of outstanding and dedicated community service. Franklin Cooper Savannah Sound, Eleuthera In recognition of outstanding and dedicated community service. Reverend Samuel Johnson Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera In recognition of outstanding and dedicated community service. Helen Davis Rock Sound, Eleuthera In recognition of outstanding and dedicated community service. Reverend Oral Pinder Captain Lewis Augustus Cay, Abaco In recognition of 35 years of service in the area of aviation, especially the numerous night flights. Cecil Mills Abaco In recognition of outstanding and dedicated community service. Ann Charlotte Parotti In recognition of outstanding and dedicated community service. Vernon Malone Abaco In recognition of outstanding and devoted service in the area of business and religion. Ritchie Albury Man-O-War Cay, Abaco In recognition of outstanding and dedicated community service in the areas of business and community service. Bateman Sands Cherokee Sound, Abaco In recognition of 40 outstanding years in the public service. Walter Sweeting Abaco In recognition of outstanding and dedicated community ser vice. Benjamin Pinder Sandy Point, Abaco In recognition of outstanding and dedicated community service. Scott Weatherford Man-O-War Cay, Abaco In recognition of outstanding and dedicated community service. Benjamin Havelock Rahming Manager Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC East Bay Street In recognition of outstanding and dedicated public service. Reverend Carl Oliver Nicholls Town, Andros In recognition of outstanding and dedicated service in the area of religion and to the communi ty. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE COMING SOONGreat Western Pub & GrillHome of The Great Western Burger and many fine native dishes.St. Alban’s Drive (EastNassau, Bahamas YOUdon’t need a crystal ball to try to predict the future of the reale state market. Every time there is a downturn, an upward trenda lways follows. The best course of action is to look at the causes, and make decisions based on unbiased facts and incontestable history. As the choice of loan options grew these last few years, cons umers could buy a home more easily. In the US Wall Street took notice of all the hot action in real estate, and investment firms were able to shift the ownership of mortgages to their managers and clients. Then about three years ago, the market began cooling, as incomes did not increase at the frantic pace that home prices did. Investors had created an atmosphere of unrealistically higha ppreciation. T he perfect storm was brewing. This cycle of up and then down seems more drastic now, because we enjoyed a longer than usual boom of activity, a fulld ecade of it between 1995 and 2005. W e should be seeing improvement across the board as 2009 d raws to a close. I f you can, it’s wise to buy now before the ball lands back in the sellers’ court. IT’S NO MYSTERY Queen’s Certificate and Badge of Honour recipients Bahamas real e state today Carmen Massoni

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A NEWLY-FORMED a ssociation created to promote and uphold the h ighest ideals and standards of journalism” int he Bahamas announced y esterday that one of its first goals will be a “major push” for a Freedom of Information Act. The Bahamas National Press Association (BNPA p resident Ed Bethel, a v eteran journalist; vicepresident Steve McKinn ey, and treasurer Anthon y Newbold. I n a release issued yesterday, Mr Bethel said the BNPA is “not a union andd oesn’t intend to function as one,” but instead was “organised out of a need to foster new growth, ded-i cation and a higher level of professionalism among journalists.” Conf ident We believe that the media/press as the Fourth Estate ought to live up toits public duty and expect ation. To do this we must be organised, trained, educated, confident,r eady and willing, and m ost of all respected by all for what we do and the contributions we make daily,” he added. I n this regard, the BNPA wishes to “encour age the exchange of ideas a nd experiences, offer p rofessional development opportunities and recognise outstanding work.” The association came out of the now defunct Bahamas Press Club, which floundered and died in 2003, said Mr Bethel. Between them, the association’s leaders have many decades of experi ence across numerous media platforms in the Bahamas. Experience Mr Bethel, who served as Consul General of the Bahamas to New York from 2003 to 2006, has more than four decades of experience in print, radio and television, having been a former radio and television manager at the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas, and former president of the Bahamas Press Club. Meanwhile, vice-presi dent of the BNPA Steve McKinney has experience in print and electronic media with The Tribune and the Broadcasting Cor poration, as well as with Bahamas Information Services, and has hosted talk shows on radio sta tions such as More FM, ZNS, Island FM andGEMS New Media Net work. Treasurer Mr Newbold currently serves as deputy general manager of the Parliamentary Channel 40, and also has print experience with the Bahama Journal. He has managed news at Love 97 and at ZNS and is presently the host of the ZNS programme Legends, and also serves as host of the Channel 40’s parliamentary cover age. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 7 New association to push for Freedom of Information Act STEVE MCKINNEY , Ed Bethel and Anthony Newbold. M IAMI THEanimals at Miami’s Metrozoo are doing their part to help reduce the park’s ecological footprint, according to Associated Press. The excrements of elephants, giraffes, rhinos and other herbivores are being recycled everyd ay to save landfill space. The poop is used as a f ertiziler and even to decorate the zoo grounds. The project began last year in an effort to b ecome more eco-friendly and has saved the p ark over $20,000. Tom Trump, Metrozoo’s horticulture supervisor, says it made sense to recycle and reuse whatever they could. Which residents are making the largest contribution? The five elephants at the zoo pro-d uce 1,400 pounds of poop per day. Nine rhin oceroses deposit 750 pounds daily. And five giraffes discharge about 500 pounds of dung. Animals do their part to keep Miami zoo green

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By SIR RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a Consultant a nd former Caribbean diplomat) T HERE may be lessonsfor C aribbean countries in negot iations between Latvia and the International Monetary Fund (IMF gramme totalling about US$10.4 billion. Latvia is a relatively small member country of the European Union (EU lation of 2.3 million is roughly the same as the Caribbean’s Jamaica. Until 1991 it was a member of the U nion of Soviet Socialist R epublics (USSR e d by Russia. With the breakup of the USSR, Latvia regained its independent status and elected to join the EU in 2004. Between 2000 and 2007, Latvia enjoyed one of the h ighest GDP growth rates in t he EU, but this collapsed in l ate 2008 exacerbated by the global economic crisis and shortage of credit. The economy dramatically f ell in the first quarter of 2 009 by 18 per cent, the b iggest fall experienced by a ny EU country. S ince last year, the Latv ian government has been engaged in negotiations with both the EU and the IMF on the $10.4 billion bailout programme. Anxious to help an EU member state, and mindful t hat Latvia has pegged its currency to the Euro – the official currency of most oft he EU members – the EU Commissioner for Economi c and Monetary Affairs Joaquin Almunia has announced the release of $1.6 b illion as a rescue loan payment but only after extracti ng budget cuts worth $1 billion from the Latvian government. I n the event, the EU loan is only 10 per cent of Latvia’s n eeds, and it is the IMF to which the government is looking for the greater parto f its borrowing. The going has not been g ood. And, despite the rhetoric about more flexibil ity in fiscal and monetary policies in light of the pre-s ent and ongoing global financial crisis, the IMF is still pushing tight fiscal policy,c uts in government spending and very low inflation as conditions for its lending. Before Latvia, Romania faced similar problems with the IMF. It is reported that the IMF mission chief for R omania said that in e xchange for $17.5 billion, there were requirements to b ring down budget deficits b elow 3 per cent of GDP, r estructure wages policies, recalibrate pension schemes and reduce inflation. I n this regard, the much vaunted increase in IMF r esources up to $750 billion after the G20 meeting in London last April couldm ean little. It seems that what remains vital is the need f or reform of IMF terms for lending, or, as the Third W orld Network has suggested, “additional resources to the IMF would give it the m eans by which to discipline crisis-hot countries the wrong way, worsening the crisis for them.” Going back to Latvia s pecifically, the government announced that the IMF has i mposed fresh conditions for it to qualify for rescue funds. Other reports also indicate,a s this commentary is being written, that Latvia has been given a deadline by the IMF to agree its conditions, or then egotiations will end. T he Prime Minister, Vald is Dombrovskis, said the negotiations had turned con-t entious, largely over how quickly to cut the country’s budget deficit. The govern m ent wants to reduce the budget deficit, which could hit 10 per cent of GDP this year, to 3 per cent by 2012, but the IMF wants a faster rate of reduction. Following riots in its Capit al City, the Latvian governm ent is naturally unwilling to accept the IMF proposals lest discontent in the country results in further upheavals. The IMF also wanted Latvia to devalue its currenc y, arguing that the present l ink to the Euro is unsustainable. A devalued currency, they say, would make Lat-v ian exports cheaper. But it would also make importsm ore costly and push-up the c ost of living. Fortunately for Latvia the IMF appears to be persuaded by the EU to back-off from a requirement for devaluation at this time. N o netheless, Latvia is not out of the w oods. The Prime Minister h as said that IMF backing for i ts whole programme is necessary even if the government raises the money itn eeds from other sources. The major areas of contention appear to be: cutting budget deficit levels, further t ax rises and reducing spending in key areas like education, welfare and health even t hough Latvia has already m ade cuts that included r eductions in public sector salaries and a 10 per centr eduction in pensions. S everal Caribbean countries are now considering engagement with the IMF to help their ailing economies. A few of them have a lready entered special arrangements that are not rescue programmes. F or instance, St Vincent and the Grenadines has an arrangement under the Exogenous Shocks Facility( ESF) which has a higher degree of flexibility and does not include structural condi tions but does require a low i nflation rate. Dominica has also received $5.1 million from the IMF u nder the same ESF. The government had to commit to aim for annual primary surpluses of at least 3 per cent of GDP so as to reduce public debt. It also had to agree to f inance capital largely with e xternalconcessional resources – a hard task indeed at a time when concessionary financing is drying-up. Jamaica is presently talki ng with the IMF about a p ossible Standby Agreement for Foreign Exchange Balance of Payment Support.T he details of the sort of programme that Jamaica is seek-i ng and the terms that the I MF has put on the table are not known as this commentary is being written. But the Finance Minister Audley Shaw has said that “there is no need for the great concern for conditionalities that will b e oppressive; that will be d estructive to the social sector; that will be destructive t o the financial sector. Not a t all.” J amaica has enough experience with the IMF and enough people who havew orked within the IMF, to negotiate the best terms possible. But, it is as well for all C aribbean countries to keep their eyes focused on the Latvian experience to which the I MF would be much more s ympathetic because of the E U’s lobbying and the place of its key member states ont he Executive Board. So far, t he IMF does not appear to have relaxed its tough conditionalities. It is also necessary for the C aribbean to join with othe rs for meaningful reform of the IMF’s lending terms. The existing terms could makeh ard-hit economies worse rather than better. The forthcoming Com monwealth Finance Ministersm eeting is a good place to advance the arguments for urgent reform. Responses to: ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Latvian IMF lessons for the Caribbean WORLDVIEW SIRRONALD SANDERS

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drive for the funds, and those members of the public who con-t ributed, the Ministry of Labour and Social Development yesterday called for victims to come and collect their monies from its head quarters on East Hill Street on Tuesday and Wednesday this week between the hours of 9am and 5pm. Cheques can be collected by victims and their representatives upon the production of “satisfactory identification such as a passport, voters card or drivers license,” said the Min istry. “Representatives of victims must also produce written authorisation allowing them to collect cheques on behalf of the victims of the Sea Hauler/United Star tragedy,” it added. Victims and relatives of victims who may collect cheques are: Tenneson Leslie, Carmen Brown, Cedric Hart, Sherell Johnson, Maxwell Lorfillis, Paulette Ramsay Dean, Chris tine Hepburn, Gail Roker-Gra ham, Warren Brown, Miniesha (Marmeicher Dawkins, Rosemary Smith, Glen Rolle, Brendamae Dawkins, Sophia Farrington, Elaine Lightbourne, Donna Sweeting, Judith Williams, Juli et Adderley-Williams, Crystal Missick-Storr, Perry Davis, Craig Taylor, Anya StubbsHall, Erica Fox, Kelson Brown, Allen Burrows, Diego Brown, Prince Dean, Athenia Ferguson, Lessayde Francis, Delano Francis, Branae Smith, Carlissa Kathrina Edgecombe, Cloeman Carl Edgecombe, Kenroy Ellis, Brittney Denise Smith, Lloydel Ellis, Renado Hall, La Shandel Smith, Vanessa Seymour, Hazel Dawkins. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Employment Opportunity Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t C ommonwealthBankisthepremierBahamianBankwith brancheslocatedinNewProvidence,AbacoandGrandBahama. Wearecommittedtodeliveringsuperiorqualityservice,to traininganddevelopingouremployees,tocreatingvalueforour shareholdersandtopromotingeconomicgrowthandstabilityin thecommunity. Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco. CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE: AssistingtheBranchManagerinmanagingthesalesactivitiesof theBranchtoenhanceprofitability.Effectivelyleading,supportingandcoachingpersonnelto achievecorporateobjectives.Effectivelymanagingaportfolioofconsumer,mortgageand commercialloans.Adjudicatingcreditlineswithindelegatedauthority.ManagingtheBranch’scollectionactivitiesandtheprotectionof collateral.Following-upwithclientandsupportfunctionstoensuretimely completionofproductrequestsandtransactionsandresolutionof inquiriesandissues.EnsuringCreditriskratingsandcreditscoringpracticesare adheredtoatalltimestominimizetheriskofloanlosses.Ensuringspecificobjectivesaredevelopedthroughan appropriatestrategicplantogrowtheBranch’sloananddeposit portfoliosandotherofferings.Addingvaluetothecustomers’portfoliooffinancialservices byactivelypromoting,marketing,buildingandcrosssellingall deposit/investmentandconsumercreditbusiness.Ensuring selfanddirectreportsconsistentlyprovidehighlycourteous customerserviceinaninformedandthoroughmanner.Assisting theManagerinattainingthetargetsincorporatedintheBranch’s financialplan.QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE: Bachelor’sdegreeorhigherinBusinessAdministration,Banking &FinanceorarelateddisciplinefromanaccreditedUniversity.Minimumofeightyearscommercialbankingexperiencewitha minimumof3yearssupervisory/managerialexperience.Experienceinmanagingadiverseloanportfolioandassessing loanquality.DetailedknowledgeofRetail/Commercial/Mortgagelending practicesandcreditanalysistoensureportfolioquality.Substantialworkexperienceinloansandriskmanagementwith afullunderstandingoffinancialstatementsandtheabilityto analyzetheinformation.Excellentleadershipandcoachingskills.Excellentcommunication,analyticalandreasoningskills.Excellentorganizationalandtimemanagementskills.ProficientintheuseoftheMicrosoftrangeofapplications.REMUNERATION PACKAGE: CommonwealthBankisaGreatplacetowork!Weofferan excitingworkenvironmentwiththeopportunityforgrowthand development.Wealsoofferacompetitivecompensationpackage, reflectingthesuccessfulapplicant’sexperienceandqualifications, includingaperformancebasedincentiveplan,health,vision, dentalandlifeinsurancesandapensionplan. Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before July 24, 2009to: Human Resources Department Re: Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco P.O. Box SS-6263 Nassau, Bahamas Telefax: (242393-8073 E-mail address:hr@combankltd.com Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those under consideration will be contacted.” reportedly nicked his femur bone but did not rupture any major blood vessels. Minister of State for Social Services Loretta ButlerTurner, first cousin to Mr Butler, said that her family is especially grateful to the per sons who were in the area that night and immediately assisted in the situation. “He was the only one there at night when it happened, but fortunately there were some passersby who came to help as soon as they heard the gunshot. They were some really good people who reached out to him. They acted expeditiously and got an ambulance to the scene and the family was able to meet him at the hos pital,” she said. Mrs Butler-Turner said that following the shooting the family immediately dis cussed the fact that more security will be required at the business. Mr Moss said police are concerned that the robbers were purposefully targeting any member of the Butler family who was closing up the establishment that night. He said CDU will be meeting with the southern police division who in turn will speak to business owners in that area about security measures. “We’re going to discuss some safety tips with them and some assistance that may be rendered once they’re closing their stores,” he said. Supt Moss said police are appealing to anyone with information concerning Saturday night’s shooting to contact the authorities as soon as possible. The Butler family was recently the recipient of bad news when former speaker of the House of the Assem bly Milo Butler Jr died last month at the age of 72 aftera long battle with heart dis ease. located behind the Seagrapes plaza, told The Tribune. The resident, who wished to remain anonymous, saidt hat his wife suffers from a kidney disease that requires her to use the bathroom very frequently. Unfortunately, because of the problem with the water in the area he said this poses an incredible chal-l enge. “You can hardly flush the toilet. We have to use buckets for everything. We have to gather some water in buckets to be able to flush t oilets and bathe. It’s unhygienic, unsanitary and dangerous to our health. It’s stinks and it’s dirty,” he said. The concerned husband said that if his wife suffersa ny health issues due to the l ack of water he is willing to t ake legal action against the g overnment for Water and Sewerage’s failure to provide t hem with a basic human n ecessity. In addition to the concerns about hygiene, the resident s aid that bills for plumbing w ork and toilet equipment a re also piling up. We constantly have to fix t hings, clean the plumbing because there is no water. W ho is going to pay those b ills?” he wanted to know. A another resident of the a rea, Antoinette Wells, who has lived in Star Estates for four years, said that water pressure has always been bad in the community, butt he situation has become especially dire in the last y ear. “Not only do we have to use buckets to bathe our skin, the water is also red, rusty,” she said. M s Wells said that after a long day at work she cannot even come home to look for w ard to a bath. “I can’t even wash my clothes, sometimes I take thel ong journey to my daugh ter to wash my clothes there,” she said. Up until now the residents s aid they have only received vague explanations and empty promises from the Water a nd Sewerage Corporation regarding their problem. Attempts by The Tribune t o reach executives of the Water and Sewerage Corpo ration over the weekend were unsuccessful. i ng measures to alleviate the short-term negative shock to highly v ulnerable sectors of the society occasioned by the global economic crisis. He told the forum delegates that for the first time the Bahamas has put in place an unemployment benefit system. “Our social safety net has been bolstered through increased s ocial service benefits to the most vulnerable in our society. The g overnment has taken steps to minimise the adverse effects of high e lectricity costs.” To preserve jobs and create new employment opportunities, the government has accelerated a number of planned infrastructural projects, including major road and port improvements, the construction of the Nassau straw market, and accelerated constructiono r completion of a number of government office complexes, Mr I ngraham said. A dditional road works and general environment upgrade of parks and other recreational facilities around the country are also being undertaken. “The government has put in place incentives to encourage the private sector to use the period of the downturn to upgradea nd reposition their business enterprises, better positioning thems elves to take advantage of the economic turn around when it occurs,” he said. appears that the event has been successful in terms of raising awareness. They had lots of participation, people enjoyed themselves and they seemed to have removed a significant number of lionfish from the environment and as far as we’re concerned that’s a very good thing.” The event was organised by the Bahamas National Trust in conjunction with the Department of Marine Resources and the College of the Bahamas. Fried lionfish fillets prepared by Alexandra MaillisLynch from the August Moon Cafe at Lyford Cay proved very popular among participants and curious members of the public. People compared the taste of the non-native fish, which has raised major alarm bells as its highly predatory nature and expanding population threatens local marine life, to hogfish, grouper and yellowtail. Mr Braynen added: “It has helped to expose even more people to the fact that lionfish can be used as food and we think that this is perhaps the best avenue that we will be able to pursue to reduce the numbers of lionfish in the environment by turning them into a fish that people see as a food source, that commercial fishermen will want to take and that people will want to buy.” The heaviest single fish speared was also caught by the crew of the boat “Shezam”. Weighing in at 1.98 pounds it was large, but fell far below the four to five pounds to which lionfish have been known to grow. Meanwhile, those determining who would take the prize for the smallest fish had to resort to measuring it by length not weight after the scale on site proved not sensitive enough to differentiate between the five tiniest fish caught, each weighing in at a mere two tenths of a pound. The crew of “Too Reel” followed by the Maillis family onboard “Jojo” won first and second prize in this category. There were several lionfish-related injuries on the day, with two people having to sit out the remainder of the event after receiving a lionfish spine to the hand. In each instance the fish slid d own the spear, its venomous spines which are on top and bottom of the fish puncturing the soft tissue on the hands, leaving them swollen and the divers in serious pain. However, Mr Braynen said the key point is that such an incident is not as debilitating as some believe. “Although they are not happy about it they are not on the floor, they are not dying,” he said. He did note, however, that some people may be more sensitive to the venom than others. “It is still something very significant that we want people to be aware of.” Bronson Braynen, who was spearing with the team onboard the boat “Ultimanovia,” said he took part in the event as he feels it’s time for humans to take the initiative to tackle the influx of the voracious fish, which has no predators in the Atlantic as it does in its native Pacific and Indian Oceans. “It’s not good for the reef cos’ they eat everything on the reef. So we’ve got to try and take charge and spear some of them,” he said. Peter Maillis said his team were able to pick up the 300 they captured primarily in the southwest of New Providence. Other teams that went to the area of Rose Island found the lionfish to be much less plentiful. “Mostly we got them from wrecks and deeper water, at between eight and 30 feet,” said Mr Maillis. Later this week the committee will present a cheque to the BNT of the funds raised by the event, which they expect to put towards more awareness raising seminars in the out islands in particular. IDB anticipates the Bahamas will have borrowed $300m between 2008 and 2012 F ROM page one FROM page one Victims of tragedy FROM page one Sir Milo Butler’s grandson shot FROM page one Water pressure FROM page one Invasive lionfish BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST members Linda Turtle and Robin Symonette, wife of Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette, hold up T-shirts that are being soldt o raise awareness of the need to control lion fish.

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C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE England’s Ashes win in doubt B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net W H ILE James ‘Jay’ Darling r egained his men’s national title, a new female emerged as champion in the Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fitness Federation’s 29th Mr/Ms Bahamas National Championships. Darling once again dominated the middleweight division and out-posed bantamweight champion Paul ‘Mighty Mouse’ Wilson, welterweight Raymond Tucker, light-middleweight Ray Whylly, light-heavy Desmond Bain, heavyweight Charles John son and super-heavy Teddy Gray to cart off the Mr. Bahamas title that he lost last year to Aaron Green. But the large crowd at the National Center for Performing Arts were stunned on Saturday night when first year heavyweight Donna Williams stepped on stage. Darling regains bodybuilding title By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net WITH the IAAF World Championships in Athletics less than a month away, sprinter Derrick Atkins finally got in high gear as he prepares for a shot at another medal in Berlin, Germany. Atkins, the reigning silver medalist from the 2007 Championships in Osaka, Japan, raced to a sea son’s best of 10.00 seconds in a meet in Zaragoza on the European Athletics Premium Meeting. Francis Obikwelu of France finished second in 10.08 and Samuel Francis of Qatar took third place in the same time. Atkins, the national 100 champion, took the first of his second semifinal heat in 10.13. Both times improved on their previous season’s best of 10.17 in Berkeley, California that he ran on May 1. Atkins’ performance came two days after Olympic triple champion and world record holder Usain Bolt sped to a meet record of 9.79 in Paris, France on Friday. In that Golden League meet, Chris ‘Bay’ Brown had to settle for second place in 45.44 behind reign ing world champion Jeremy Wariner of the United States, who won the men’s 400 in 45.28. Brown, however, got some revenge on American David Neville, who dove across the finish line at the Olympic Games last year in Beijing, China to edge him out for the bronze. Neville was fourth Fri day in 45.49. Veteran Chandra Sturrup continues to prove to be a contender, this time coming up second in the women’s 100 in 11.15 behind Jamaican world leader Kerron Stewart, who won in 10.99. “My race went well, but my start was terrible,” said Sturrup about her performance. “I am happy that I was still able to place top two. I looking forward to running sub 10 but I will take the second place for now.” Also Paris, Olympic bronze medalist Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands cleared 16.78 metres for sixth place. The winning leap was 17.17 by Phillips Idowu of Great Britain. Atkins prepares for shot at another medal in Germany MR/MS BAHAMASNATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS New woman champion emerges MINISTER OF STATE for Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard presents James Darling with the winning trophy. PHOTOS: Ashley T aylor BODYBUILDING queen Jan Johnson presents trophy to body fitness champion Charnice Bain. NEW CHAMPION Donna Williams is matched against last year’s champion Faye Rolle. DONNA WILLIAMS is crowned the new Ms Bahamas. DONNA WILLIAMS SEE page 12

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE On-the-spot financing and insurance. 24-month/24,000-mile factory warranty. ShirleyStreetWebsite:www.hondabahamas.comThe2008Accorddramaticstylingcombinedwiththe greatestrangeofadvancedtechnologyinthemodel's 33-yearhistory.Italladdsuptoloweremissions, betterfueleconomy,largercabin,top-ratedsafety, lowmaintenancecostsandhighresalevalue. Special Model-Year Close-out Prices—While They Last! DR. NORMANGAY , a long-time bodybuilding competitor and executive, is presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award. Pictured from left to right are: Richard Demeritte, BOA president Wellington Miller, Dr. Gay, Minister of State for Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard, and BBFF president Danny Sumner. FORMERMULTIPLE national champion Della Thomas makes a return. MIXED PAIRS champions Stephen Robinson and Faye Rolle. BANTAMWEIGHT champion Paul “Mighty Mouse” Wilson. STEPHENROBINSON and Jay Darling competing in the middleweight division. By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net H AVING moved to Maryland where he has established an amateur boxing club, ‘Pretty Boy’ Floyd Seymour has decided to return home to give back to the amateur boxing programmet hat has helped him in his career. S eymour, now a full-time trainer, presented his cousin, Andre Seymour, with a bagf ull of training gear for his Carmichael Knockout Boxi ng Club while he came home for a break this past weekend. This donation is to help o ut with the boxers as I try to give something back,” said Floyd Seymour, who hasb een in the United States for more than a decade after he quit boxing. “Whatever I can, I will try to help. I know that the guysa re always in need, so I will try to come back home every quarter, three months or so,a nd help the association and the amateur programme.” T he Inagua native, who represented the Bahamas at a number of international a mateur competition, said that too many Bahamians have left and excelled overseas, but they never return to help the programme that got them started. By me being a Bahamian, leaving here at the age of 22 years old, whatever I can do in my power, I got to do it,” he said. “For me being in thep osition that I am in now, this is because of the Bahamas. I think if we do some thing like this that I’m doing, i f the track, basketball and other athletes do the same thing, we could be a muchb etter position. We need to do more for the kids who are coming up.” Seymour said all Andre Seymour has to do is giveh im a call and he will assist him. Coac hing W hile in town, Seymour also took the time out to share his coaching expertise with Carl Hield and Valentino Knowles, who are prepar ing to go to their third and second World Championships at the end of August. Seymour has also opened his home and his training facility to the two boxers to come to Maryland to get in some training in Maryland before they go to the World Championships. Andre Seymour, who also serves as the national coach for the World Championships, scheduled for Japan, said he’s pleased that Floyd Seymour has agreed to assist his Knockout Boxing Club and the national amateur programme. “The equipment that he brought with him, we will definitely be putting them to good use,” Seymour said. “We have a number of young boxers in our club and we are always in need for equipment for them to train with.” As for the training camp that will be set up in Maryland, Seymour said it will be good for both Hield and Knowles to travel there to train, especially considering the fact that the training facilities in Cuba is now closed for the summer. Both Hield and Knowles have indicated that they are excited about teaming up with Floyd Seymour in Maryland as they prepare for the biggest tournament for the year. BODYBUILDING CHAMPIONSHIPS Floyd Seymour to return h ome to help amateur boxing programme Boxing Williams turned out to be a giant killer as she d ethroned her Ironman training partner Faye Rolle and former national and international queen Della T homas in taking the Ms. Bahamas overall title. “I felt good especially after you put your effort into your dieting and you hope that you go out there and put on a good show,” said Williams, who ever competed in any sport prior to Saturday. I tried hard and I prayed before I went out, asking God to help me to get through the competition.I was really surprised that I was able to preserved.” Williams credited a lot of her success to the traini ng that she got from Wellington ‘Cat’ Sears, who helped her to trim down from what she called an “oversize woman who never wore a two piece biki ni in public.” Surprised herself with her performance, Williams said she had to keep reminding herself that she was going up against some great female competitors in runner-up Faye Rolle and third place finisher Del la Thomas. But I did it,” she said. Williams said she will now prepare herself for t he Central American and Caribbean Championship coming up in September and hopefully produce a nother stunning performance. “I like winning. It’s a beautiful feeling,” Darling said. “This year, I didn’t have anybody to train, so I just concentrated fully on me and it paid off.” With the CAC fast approaching, Darling said he will definitely going after the pro card, awarded to the overall champion. But if he doesn’t get it, he will continue to work hard at it. “I’m not just going to focus on the pro card, but the competition itself,” he said. “I thought this year, Teddy (Gray (Bain that I won and now I can get ready for CAC.” The showdown was actually between Darling and Gray, who won the super-heavyweight title over Kenny Green and Shawn McPhee. “I’ve been training around the clock, so this was a good opportunity to see where I’m at against Jay Darling,” said Gray, a former track sprinter. “I real l y want to go to CAC and see if I can get my pro card.” C harles Kemp, however, was hoping for another upset after he dethroned last year’s Mr. Bahamas A aron Green in the heavyweight division. “It was a rough one. Last year, I followed Aaron Green and this year, I bucked him again,” said the media cameraman. “It was really good to finally get the win over him. But this is a sport of age and every year, I’m going to just take it one step at a time until I finally win it all. Thanks to Joel Stubbs’ help, I ’m getting there.” In the fitness competition, Teshell Mackey capt ured the overall title, while Charnice Bain from Grand Bahama was awarded the body fitness title. “I think I did very well. I came here to win and I think I did that very well,” said Mackey, the fitness tall champion. “My routine was perfect and I exe cuted it well. I just have to do some changes for CAC and I will be okay.” B ain, who won the body fitness C category over fellow Grand Bahamian Petra Brice and Mackey, s aid her performance was just “awesome” and she gave God “the glory.” T he repeat champion who went on to finish fourth at the CAC Championships said she worked e xtremely hard to get ready for this year’s competition. “I want to finally get the gold for the Bahamas,” said Bain, the wife of light-heavyeight champion Desmond Bain. “I’m just extremely happy that I won and I will get to compete for the Bahamas again.” Cecilee Hilton won the body fitness A over Lakeisha Miller and Dawnita Fry, while Anglique Williamson was the body fitness A champion. “At first, I was nervous, but as the competition went on, I got more relaxed,” said Williamson, whose been training under Sears for the past 15 years but finally decided to enter a competition this year. “I just have to train a little harder.” Darling regains national title FROM page 11 I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s BODY fitness competitors .

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCALANDINTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE women’s national team didn’t stand a chance against their competitors at the Centrobasket Under1 7 Championships in Aguas Calientes, Mexico. The team will return home winless, having lost all five of their games played by more than 20 points as they finished at the bottom of the standings. The tournament served as qualifier for the 2010 FIBA U-19 World Championships for Women. The top three advanced to the championships. Although they didn’t win a game, the Bahamas placed a couple of players in the top ten individual c ategories. Leading the way was Taneka Sandiford, who was seventh in points with a total of 63 for an average of 12.6 per game. She also led the free throws made with 35 for a 7.0 average, was ninth in rebounds with 37 (28 offensive and nine defensive was third in free throws average, making 35-of-61 for 57.4 and was fifth in steals with 18 for a 3.6 average. Britenique Harrison followed Sandiford at No.10 i n rebounds with 36 (24 offense and 12 defense a 7.2 average and she led in block shots with a total of 13 for a 2.6 average. The others were Shadell Williams, who was 10th in blocks with three for a 0.6 average and Latonya Hamilton, who was ninth in steals with 16 for a 3.2. average. Summaries of their games played are as follows: On Saturday, the Bahamas played its final game, losing 61-48 to previously winless Guatemala. The Bahamas trailed 15-9 after the first quarter and outs cored Guatemala 12-8 in the second half for a 23-21 deficit at the half. But in the third quarter, Guatemala went on a 22-10 spurt and they never looked back, although the Bahamas tried one final comeback in the fourth ona 16-15 run. Sandiford led the way for the Bahamas with 13 points and 11 rebounds in 38 minutes of play. Hamilton had 11 points, 10 rebounds and assists in 34 minu tes and Harrison 10 points and three rebounds in 27 minutes. On Friday, the Bahamas were routed by Mexico 115-35 after falling behind 24-13 after the first period. They were out-scored 33-9 in the second quarter,3 1-7 in the third and 27-6 in the fourth. Sandiford once again had the hot hands for the Bahamas with 10 points and 11 rebounds in 36 minutes. Aren Pratt was the next highest scorer with e ight points, four rebounds and three steals in 28 minutes. In their third game on Thursday, the Bahamas fell 68-52 to Costa Rica in what was probably their best production as they fell behind only 10-7 after the first quarter, 26-19 at the half and 47-42 at the end oft he third. Harrison had the high honors for the Bahamas with 12 points and 12 rebounds in 27 minutes; Sandiford had nine points and eight rebounds in 37 minu tes and both Pratt and Williams chipped in with eight. In their second game on Wednesday, the Bahamas had another good showing, despite losing 77-34 to Puerto Rico. They actually only trailed 25-10 aftert he first quarter and 45-21 at the half. But in the third, they were out-scored 24-4 as the game got away from them. Sandiford came up with 10 points and five r ebounds in 36 minutes and Harrison, Williams and Ashlee Bethel all contributed six. Hamilton added five. And in their opener against the Virgin Islands on Tuesday, the Bahamas dropped a 74-54 decisiona fter falling behind 16-11 at the end of the first and 38-22 at the half. They were out-scored 20-7 in the third. Sandiford finished with a game high 21 points w ith eight steals in 26 minutes. Harrison had nine points and 11 rebounds and Hamilton seven points and 10 rebounds. Women’s team to return home winless CENTROBASKETU-17 CHAMPIONSHIPS, MEXICO Australia halt England’s march towards victory In brief Australia, seething from a sense of injustice over umpiring blunders, showed enough resilience to r aise doubts over England's march towards their first Lord's Ashes win in 75 years. At 2.55pm on the fourth afternoon of the second Test, England were on course to claim a 1-0 lead in the npower Ashes series after off-spinner Graeme S wann bowled Marcus North to leave Australia reeling on 128 for five, still trailing by 393 runs. With 47 overs remaining of the day and the final two recognised batsmen – Michael Clarke and Brad Haddin – at the crease, England's progress towards victory seemed a formality. But three and a half hours later, when Clarke and Haddin accepted the offer of bad light with 12 overs remaining of the day, England were no nearer completing their victory a fter Australia battled defiantly to reach 313 for five, just 209 runs away from one of the great Test wins. Australia were fired up for their daunting task by a number of umpiring decisions which contributed to the downfall of three key members of their top order after England declared overnight to set them an unlikely victory target of 522. Opener Simon Katich, Phillip Hughes and Michael Hussey were all u nlucky to be dismissed.

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By ADRIAN GIBSON ajbahama@hotmail.com AS THE summer heat bears down upon us, so it seems does the unbearable influx of illegal immigrants, for as to quote a Bahamian song, “they coming by boat, they coming by plane, some coming in wheelchair and walking with cane.” Of course, for those familiar with the song, they aren’t coming to “see Theresa, the Bahamian Mona Lisa!” These days, thousands of illegal Haitians, Jamaicans, Chinese, Europeans and Dominicans are invading our territorial boundaries. Although Jamaicans, Europeans, Dominicans and the Chinese migrate illegally in much smaller numbers, we must ensure that theydo not become the forgotten illegal immigrants, who are eventually emboldened to operate with impunity. More than any other group of immigrants, hordes of illegal Haitians stealthily make the trek up the Bahama Island chain, sometimes with the assistance of treasonous Bahamian boat captains/sailors. Just last week the Royal Bahamas Defence Force apprehended nearly 200 illegal Haitian immigrants. However, if muchof the RBDF’s meager resources were primarily focused on one areaof New Providence during the last apprehension exercise, can you imagine how many illegals would have entered town if several, say three or four, rickety boats had docked at different entry points with only one of them being arrested? In recent years, the immigrant tide has been swelling with the large exodus of boat people from a land of stifling poverty. Haiti has failed to complete its transition from a tradition society to a social and economic modernity. It has instead become a nation crippled by coups,a hotbed of tyranny and political instability and a nation whose citizens have emigrated in mass to become an economic/social millstone around the necks of neighboring countries. Haiti’s leaders have left their c ountrymen to languish in a state of unspeakable poverty. The Hait ian economy/society is in tatters due to misrule and its poor governance since its bloody assumption of Independence more than 200 years ago.The despotic rule of politicians, who abused power and ripped-off the national treasury in their voraciousb id to enhance their personal fortunes, have fuelled emigration from Haiti and caused it to come to be seen as the Western Hemisphere’s hungriest and perhaps most tragic independent state. In many instances, much of Haiti’s misfor tune is self-inflicted, through centuries of corruption, grotesque vio l ence and mismanagement. For many Haitians, the Bahamas is a gateway to their pursuit of happiness and a better life and/or a passageway to America. Illegal immigrants, of all nationalities, are a strain on this country’s safety nets. While most Bahamians exhibit a prickliness about illegal immigrants, sadly, many of them appear to have become indifferent and accustomed to bad news on immigration. Indiscipline, corruption, speculation and bureaucratic inertia are the four main vices weighing down our society/economy, and it’s ever more apparent in our wishy-washy, selfserving outlook on combating illegal immigration. It is high-time we enunciate a clear strategy in our fight against this social plague. Similar to the bush people of Africa, we have the bush people of the Bahamas, who populate the bushes of Cowpen Road, Carmichael Road, Fox Hill and Adelaide. Anyone who wanders deep enough into these bushy enclaves would stumble upon sprawls of squalor, as camps of squatters occupy clapboard huts jammed together without sanitationno doubt also creating a breeding ground for disease. In the bush, these illegal immigrants pay n o rent or property tax, no national insurance, no water or phone bills and no electricity chargesmany times running drop-cords from one end of the bush to another. Sometimes, these persons do pay unscrupulous Bahamians, who threaten to alert the authorities or purport to own the land on which t hey squat, $50 or more per week/month. Wasn’t there a move afoot a few years ago to demolish all new shanty homes in Marsh Harbour? Did that ever come to fruition? These firetraps do not adhere to the government’s building codes nor do illegals have permission from the relevant agencies for b uilding permits or the use of Crown Land? While I’m empathetic to their plight and desperation, it is not feasible for our country’s survival if it’s overrun by parasitic foreign entitiesillegal migrants. If the immigration department really wants to conduct an audit of H aitian nationals living here, it should start by launching hiking expeditions, rambling through the bushes of Cowpen, Carmichael, Fox Hill, Exuma and Abaco. In the bushes is where the real answers lie! If this department is serious about flushing out illegal immigrants, it would check the bushes and locate the remote, dusty vill ages that are stashed away in the rough, shrub terrain of certain parts of the Bahamas. Bush raids and raids on suspected business places would undoubtedly net thousands of illegal immigrants. Gun-toting Immigration and Defence Force officers should also mount roadblocks in areas suspected of being h eavily populated by immigrants this would also discourage legal residents from harbouring their illegal countrymen. Immigration officials must spend more time carrying out follow-ups C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 15 Illegal immigration issues SEE page 16 Y OUNG M AN S V IEW A DRIANGIBSON

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and spot checks to ensure that if work permits have expired and are not being renewed, that these former holders of work permits would have departed the country. As it relates to many other foreign nationals, immigration officers should check the status of those persons holding white-collar positions at private/commercial banks, accounting firms, hotel management and those Chinese restaurants/food stores. Illegal immigration had unquestionably also brought a streak of nastiness and criminality. According to a source at the prison, “there is a rising number of Haitian-Bahamians, Haitians and other immigrants in prison for violent crimes.” It is safe to assume that a good percentage of the street violence being perpetrated today is by disenfranchised Haitian-Bahamians who are stateless, bitter and feel rejected by the only society that they know. I n many instances, these individuals are unable to obtain good jobs, travel overseas or obtain a college degree as the odds are stacked against them and their lack of status is an overriding impediment to their upward mobility socially. Has COB modified its policy that required Bahamian-born stud ents, who did not possess proof of citizenship, to pay the rate of nonBahamians and therefore spend twice as much time saving as they are also handicapped when trying to attain scholarships? Has this preventable privation many students have faced due to the ineptitude of the immigration officials and the inflexible, apathetic stance of COB representatives, been ironed out? After proper and reasonably t imed vetting, citizenship should be granted to the qualified offspring of immigrants born here, therefore allowing them to integrate and have a greater appreciation for and an allegiance to this country. Although the Bahamas has a distinct cultural identity and a stable Parliamentary democracy, our society has the beari ngs of a peaceful melting pot that should unquestionably answer questions about assimilation and national identity for those who feel disenfranchised. In order to combat the illegal migration quagmire that our country has for so long been bogged down with, we must refocus our efforts on apprehending of ALL illegalsnot discriminatingand o ffering rewards/bounties to anyone willing to give information (snitchas to the whereabouts of illegal migrants as well as those people hiring and assisting them. We must also serve to protect immigrants from exploitation by police officers and conduct stings andfirecrooked i mmigration/defence force officers, while also protecting legal immigrants from exploitation for slave wages or sex. I’m told that some persons brought into households as baby sitters, housekeepers and maidsFilipinos, Jamaicans, etc are quite frequently blackmailed for sexual favours, especially if their w ork permits are up for renewal. Bahamian citizens and consecutive governments have taken too much of a blas approach to illegal immigration, now and then bleati ng and griping about the problem but failing to act, many times even hiring “my Haitian” to perform tasks for little to no pay. When will the US cease its unfair policies on immigration and grant the same wet foot/dry foot policy granted to the Cubans to the Haitians? Why are the Haitians not a fforded the same privilege? Could it be race related? Over the years, the political approach to the immigration crisis has given little hope. Avaricious politicians who spend time talking and using immigration as a political prop to arouse the passions of the electorate every campaign season s hould cease this sick, politically expedient practice and offer real solutions. The hypocrisy of these same politicians who mouth platitudes about stamping out illegal immigration from a political platform every five years leaves me, and definitely most discerning Bahamians, frothing at the mouth. With that said, I must also note that the present minister of state and his director have shown flashes of reform in their struggle against illegal immigration and promotion of immigration reform. As we face gloomy economic times, the government should also look at reserving deportations by plane for longer distances and deport illegals from this region to their Caribbean homesteads on mail boats or barges. Mass illegal immigration is a Frankenstein-type monster that, if not properly handled, will inevitably turn and devour nearly every aspect of our identity. We must realize that in our response to all illegal immigration, we are serving as custodians of our cultural beliefs. Indeed, we do live in an age of globalization and must cope with a global societyjust not illegals. Yes, let’s let tolerance and enforcement cohabit with compassion and toughness as we combat this ever growing problem. I do not propose bigotry or xenophobia only that we reclaim our birthright and protect our national identity before it’s lost! C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 16, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE FROM page 15 Illegal immigration OFFICERS SEARCH for suspected illegal immigrants.

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2% Stamp Tax ‘will not happen’ n B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN realtors w ould “love it” if Stamp Tax rates were rationalised to a uniform 2 per cent as it would l ikely increase real estate transaction volumes, a leading industry executive told Tribune Business, but the Government’s desperate need for revenue meant “it’s never going to happen”. M ike Lightbourne, president of Coldwell Banker Light bourne Realty, commenting on a two-year old proposal sub mitted to government to reduce all Stamp Tax rates to 2 p er cent, said: “We’d love it, but government revenues would fall enormously. It’s not going to happen.” Pointing out that at one time Stamp tax rates for all real estate transactions involving Bahamians stood at 6 per cent, with 12 per cent for foreigners, Mr Lightbourne told Tribune Business: “I just don’t think, from the Government’s s tandpoint, that they can afford to do that, because every time you turn around someone’s not paying Customs or the taxes t hey owe. “They’d [the Government] have to make it up from somewhere else, and I don’t know if it’s possible to do that.” As to the impact on the Bahamian real estate industry if Stamp Tax rates were reduced to 2 per cent across the Board, Mr Lightbourne added: “It would be fantastic. It would C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2008 THETRIBUNE $4.68$4.51$4.69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.21 $4.30 $4.10 n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T h e Nassau harbour dredging m ust extract an average 10,000c ubic yards of fill p er day to meet the Governm ent’s autumn 2009 deadline for the port to accommodate RoyalCaribbean’s largest cruise s hip class, an Environmental I mpact Assessment (EIA confirming that the Ingraham a dministration and its advisers did consider creating an entire l y new island west of Arawak Cay. The EIA for the storage/use of dredged material produced by the Nassau harbour excava t ion, produced by Bahamasbased Blue Engineering, said Boskalis, the company contracted to do the Nassau Harbour dredging, would have to e mploy a pump to suck the excavated material into a pipeline that would then transport it to Arawak Cay. “Dredging production is an e xtremely important aspect of this project,” the EIA said, 10,000 yards target for 4-month cruise ‘D-day’ * ‘Two to three buyers’ interested in Florida real estate development that accounts for 63% of company’s $116m assets * Sale at right price would cover all company’s secured creditors n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor C LICO (Bahamas tor is in talks with two to three potential buyers of the Floridabased real estate developmentt hat accounts for almost 63 per cent of the insolvent insurer’s assets, with the sale and pur c hase price key to determining whether all secured creditors recover 100 per cent of what isd ue to them. T ribune Business has obtained US court documents showing that Craig A. ‘Tony’G omez, the Baker Tilly Gomez partner acting as CLICO (Bahamas u idator, has been appointed president of Wellington Pre serve, the Florida-based real e state project in which some $73.628 million of the insurer’s $116.965 million total assets were ultimately directed into. M r Gomez’s appointment is designed to protect and preserve Wellington Preserve as ana sset for the benefit of CLICO (Bahamas depositors and creditors. He willb e able to prevent the disposal of any cash or other assets held by the project, and protect it from potential litigants and creditors. And Tribune Business can also reveal that Mr Gomez’s appointment as Wellington Pre serve president has coincided with the south Florida US Bankruptcy Court granting CLICO (Bahamas recognition as a ‘recognised foreign main proceeding’ under US Chapter 15 bankruptcy laws. This development, as Mr Gomez urged in his pleadings, will give him “breathing room to conduct an orderly review” of CLICO (Bahamas based assets which, apart from Wellington Preserve, are also alleged to include an investment in the ‘W’ hotel property locat ed in Fort Lauderdale, Broward County. Recognition by the US bankruptcy court will enable Mr CLICO liquidator in talks over sale of critical asset * Says PLP’s proposed Clifton Pier port could have been constructed for ‘half $200m quoted, more like $100-$150m * Wells says he advocated for Clifton or Coral Harbour since 1987 * Hits at government for lack of transparency and fact public ‘doesn’ t know a Christ thing that’s going on’ n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net AN ex-FNM MP and Cabi net Minister believes the Christie administration’s plan to move the Bay Street ship ping facilities to a new port at Clifton Pier could have been done for half the $200 million cost quoted, and backed PLP claims that so-called ‘special interest groups’ drove the current Government to choose Arawak Cay as the new loca tion. Tennyson Wells told Tribune Business that he had suggested since 1987 that the downtown Nassau shipping facilities be moved from Bay Street to either Clifton Pier or Coral Harbour. "As a nationalist and somebody who would look toward the country moving forward, I would not have put the port on Arawak Cay. I would take the risk and spend $100 to $150 mil lion [on Clifton Pier]," said Mr Wells. He suggested that the Ingraham administration was lacking in transparency when it came Ex-FNM minister b lasts Arawak port S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B * Government rejected construction of new island to store Nassau harbour dredge, report says * PLP’s south-west port plan ‘suffers disadvantages’, with Arawak Cay only site from cost and proximity basis for dredge storage * Arawak Cay extension to impact fishermen and tour boat operators, EIA suggests * Silver Cay ‘available for sale’ TENNYSON WELLS Realtors would ‘love it as no brainer’ on transaction volume boost n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor THE Cabinet has approved t he proposal for the National Training Programme without making any amendments to it,t he minister for labour and s ocial development has con firmed to Tribune Business. Dion Foulkes, speaking from M ayaguana, confirmed to this newspaper that Cabinet had approved all the recommenda t ions from the committee that was set up to develop and over see the initiative, which is designed to re-train some 1,000B ahamians who were laid-off from their jobs as a result of the economic recession. I can confirm that it [the Training Programme] has been approved, and we will formally make an announcement[ today],” Mr Foulkes told Tribune Business. “The entire pro posal was accepted without a mendment. The minister said that the Training Programme would bea year-long initiative lasting until June next year, and would involve three different phases. When asked by Tribune Busin ess whether the Government was eyeing the National Training Programme as a long-term i nitiative, Mr Foulkes replied: “Initially, the feeling is to see the effectiveness of the currentp roject, and after this is finished w e will do an assessment to where we go from there. I don’t want to pre-empt any decision t he Cabinet may make.” Meanwhile, Khaalis Rolle, the Bahamas Chamber of Com-m erce’s president who is also heading the committee overCabinet backs Training plan with no change S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By Fidelity Capital M arkets LAST week was quiet in the Bahamian market, with investors trading in five out of the 24 listed securities. O f these, one advanced, one d eclined and three remained unchanged. E E Q Q U U I I T T Y Y M M A A R R K K E E T T A total of 3,100 shares c hanged hands, representing a d ecrease of 5,922 shares or 66 per cent, compared to the previous week's trading volume of 9,022 shares. Consolidated Water Compan y (CWCB a dvancer last week with 1,000 shares trading hands, its stock ending the week at $2.99. F amGuard Corporation ( FAM) fell by $0.39 to end the week at a new 52-week low of $6.60 on a volume of 1,000 shares. B B O O N N D D M M A A R R K K E E T T I nvestors traded $2,000 (par v alue) Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Series D Notes Due 2015 (FBB15 C C O O M M P P A A N N Y Y N N E E W W S S E E a a r r n n i i n n g g s s R R e e l l e e a a s s e e s s : : There were no financial results reported by any of the 24 listed companies during the week. D D i i v v i i d d e e n n d d N N o o t t e e s s : : Consolidated Water (CWCO dend of $0.013 per share,p ayable on August 10, 2009, to a ll shareholders of record date July 1, 2009. A A n n n n u u a a l l G G e e n n e e r r a a l l M M e e e e t t i i n n g g ( ( A A G G M M ) ) N N o o t t e e s s : : Abaco Markets (AML a nnounced it will be holding its A nnual General Meeting on Tuesday, July 21, 2009 at 6pm at The Wyndam Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino, West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. S hareholders of record as of June 19, 2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting. Benchmark (Bahamas (BBL holding its Annual General Meeting on Thursday, July 23,2 009, at 6:30pm at the British C olonial Hilton, Governor's B allroom, Bay Street, Nassau, B ahamas. Shareholders of record as of June 23, 2009, will be qualified t o vote at the Annual Meeting. ROYAL FIDELITY MARKETWRAP The Bahamian Stock Market B B I I S S X X C C L L O O S S I I N N G G C C H H A A N N G G E E V V O O L L U U M M E E Y Y T T D D P P R R I I C C E E S S Y Y M M B B O O L L P P R R I I C C E E C C H H A A N N G G E E A ML$1.39 $-0-18.71% B BL$0.63 $-0-4.55% BOB$6.94 $-0-9.16% BPF$11.00 $-0-6.78% BSL$7.92 $-0-22.28% BWL$3.15 $-00.00% CAB$11.39$-300-18.82%C BL$5.64 $-0-19.43% CHL$2.74 $-0-3.18% CIB$10.38 $-0-0.67% CWCB$2.99 $0.021,00032.89% DHS$1.82 $-0-28.63% FAM$6.60 $-0.391,000-15.38% FBB$2.37 $-00.00%F CC$0.30 $-00.00% FCL$5.03 $-0-2.71% FCLB$1.00 $-00.00% FIN$10.90$-0-8.17%I CD$5.50 $-800-10.28% JSJ$10.40 $-0-6.31% PRE$10.00 $-00.00% International Markets F F O O R R E E X X R R a a t t e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C A A D D $ $ 0 .8961+4.10 G G B B P P 1 .6340-0.12 E E U U R R 1 .4108+0.48 C C o o m m m m o o d d i i t t i i e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C r r u u d d e e O O i i l l $64.32+6.26 G G o o l l d d $937.20+2.68 I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l S S t t o o c c k k M M a a r r k k e e t t I I n n d d e e x x e e s s : : W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e D D J J I I A A 8,743.94+6.85 S S & & P P 5 5 0 0 0 0 9 40.38+6.54 N N A A S S D D A A Q Q 1,886.61+7.65 N N i i k k k k e e i i 9,395.32 +1.12 For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas “may not have focused as much” as its hould have on using its private w ealth management base to develop new business lines for growing its financial services industry, a government minister has conceded, with a renewed emphasis being placedo n this nation becoming an Americas’ investment hub and attracting clients to base themselves here. Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, told Tribune B usiness that initiatives to grow t he Bahamian financial services i ndustry were “separate and apart” from any moves to comply with the G-20/OECD demands for greater tax transparency and informatione xchange, and remove this nation from their so-called ‘grey list’. In any business plan, you use your existing client base to grow new opportunities,” he said. “We may not have in the past focused on that as much. Now is a s good a time to do so.” M r Laing effectively outlined t he broad-based parameters of t he Government’s strategy duri ng his 2009-2010 Budget communication, which emphasised enhancing existing services to high and ultra high net-worth individuals, and encouragingt hose clients and their families t o base themselves and their business/investing activities in the Bahamas as a primary domicile. In theory, this would lead to spin-off boosts for industries such as real estate and con-s truction, plus a whole host of other sectors. It directly taps into the private trust company/family office market, and could lead to the establishment of Bahamas-based business o perations. The Government and private s ector are also exploring the Bahamas’ potential to act as an investment gateway into thee ntire Americas’ region, e xploiting its US proximity, tax neutral platform and stable political climate to facilitate capi tal investment into other coun t ries by major international investors. To do so would i nvolve the Bahamas entering i nto a wide range of investment t reaties. M r Laing told Tribune Business: “The reality is that we have an advantage in terms of location, being so near the US, and in the path way betweenL atin America and the entire r egion for all manner of activities. “So it only makes sense to exploit our location, and the kind of business environment we provide could provide a platform for entrepreneurs to dob usiness in the region. We certainly believe there are opportunities.” Several financial services executives have suggested to Tribune Business that Latin A merican countries would likely want the Bahamas to enter i nto Tax Information Exchange Agreements (TIEAs in return for agreeing to invest m ent treaties, but Mr Laing said t he two initiatives were separate and would not work ‘handin-glove’. W ith the Bahamas requiring 1 2 TIEAs to exit the G20/OECD ‘grey list’, and curr ently having only one with the U S, it will have to move quickl y on meeting so-called intern ational standards. But Mr Laing said: “All of that is separate and apart from this strategic focus we are seeking to have. We have alreadym ade a commitment to meeti ng the OECD standard. We h ave said we will do the necess ary to meet that commitment. It may mean a series of initiatives. We are focused on meeting the standard, but that is separate and apart from focusing on what we need to do toe nhance the Bahamas as a comp etitive global jurisdiction.”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obert Douglas Erskine late of 303 East Street on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or demand againstthe above Estate are required to send the same 10th day of August, A.D., 2009 , after which date the Executors will proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of which they shall then have had notice. AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the said Estate of Robert Douglas Erskine are requested to make full settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned. LEANDRAA. ESFAKIS Attorney for the Executors Chambers P.O. Box SS-19269 No. 16 Market Street Nassau, New Providence The Bahamas NOTICEIN THE ESTATE OF Bethany Jones Major late of Wilson Street n the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or demand againstthe above Estate are required to send the same 10th day of August, A.D., 2009 , after which date the Executors will proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of which they shall then have had notice. AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the said Estate of Bethany Jones Major are requested to make full settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned. LEANDRAA. ESFAKIS Attorney for the Executors Chambers P.O. Box SS-19269 No. 16 Market Street Nassau, New Providence The Bahamas Financial growth plan ‘separate’ from G-20 M inister concedes Bahamas ‘may not have focused as much’ on exploiting private wealth management base for new growth areas as it should have done n B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor INCREASED productivity from Bahamian workers who h ave retained their jobs is “the u pside” resulting from the recession, the Bahamas Chamb er of Commerce’s president has told Tribune Business, with employees unable to “job hop” due to the scarcity of posts available. K haalis Rolle, who is also marketing director for Bahamas Ferries, said workforce andl abour productivity had always been the Bahamas’ “achilles heel”, with the economy’s abil i ty to accommodate the annual 5,000-6,000 high school leavers, around 3,500-4,000 of whom do not go on to higher education, always a concern”. “That has always been our major concern, and we’ve not s een where it will diminish any time soon,” said Mr Rolle of the productivity situation. There’s good and bad about the economic state we’re in. P eople are more inclined to produce, because they can’t job hop as the jobs are not there as in the past. So they tend to be more productive. That’s the upside.” H owever, on the downside, M r Rolle said school leavers unable to afford to go on to higher education would bef orced to enter the workforce, where they might become “stuck at a level that may not be t he best thing for the private s ector/business community”. With a skilled workforce key for the private sector, Mr Rolle s aid that it was difficult to improve labour quality if com panies had to “accommodate” s chool leavers prior to them o btaining better qualifications. “High school leavers are lim i ted in what they can produce,” Mr Rolle said. “The reality is, because the economy is in such a dire state, many of those indi v iduals are unable to afford to go on to higher education, and are left to choose from a limited number of jobs.” Worker productivity is recession ‘upside’ Z HIVARGO LAING

PAGE 17

n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net THE DREDGING of Nassau Harbour will likely cause the loss of 2.3 million square feet of "sea grass, rare smallc oral heads and benthic biota”, a ccording to the Environmental I mpact Assessment (EIA the project, while creating a substantially deeper and wider approach for a new class ofmega cruise vessel the Governm ent hopes will augment a s teadily declining sector. The EIA assessment of the Bahamas' cruise industry said that "cruise ship arrivals in the Bahamas have declined in recent years and will continue t o decline without this project”. T he dredging of the harbour is considered crucial to the survival of the Bahamas cruisebased tourism industry and this country's competitive positioning in the region. " The Bahamas is a favoured d estination. However, Nassau, the cradle of tourism and cruise shipping in the Bahamas cannot accommodate the large mega liners now entering the market owing to its physio-g raphic constraints. In addition, t he Bahamas government is presently completing a major port and waterfront development project for Nassau Harb our," said the EIA. T he dredging project will deepen Nassau harbour to between 38 feet to 40 feet, while widening the turning basin within the harbour through the excavation of 812,000 squaref eet of sand and bedrock on the n orth edge of the seabed, and 727,000 square feet on the south edge. This will allow for the new, larger cruise vessels to navigate safely through the harbour. T he approach to Nassau harb our, which lies just outside the visible west break water and the dilapidated east breakwater just west of the lighthouse, will also b e dredged to allow easier a ccess to Nassau's cruise port. This will also receive minor dredging and the installation of mooring dolphins to accommodate longer ships. Company Boskalis, the company that won the bid for the harbour dredging, along with the Ministry of Environment and Bahamas Environment, Sciencea nd Technology (BEST m ission has developed a comp rehensive EIA with myriad m itigation protocols. B oskalis is also currently c ompleting an Environmental M anagement Plan (EMP which will identify ways in w hich it will minimise any pos s ible impact to the surrounding areas. The company and the Government have suggested the c ontinued use of turbidity barr iers during the dredging process in order to reduce the amount of free floating sediment that will be stirred up during the project. Plumes of fine silt from the s ea bed are one of the greatest e nvironmental concerns of both the dredging project and extension of the western end of Arawak Cay. According to the EIA for both projects, there is a dangero f coral and other marine o rganisms being smothered by t he fine silt as it settles. T he assessments concede t here will be "short-term irrev ersible loss of existing sea grass a nd coral communities” They also suggest that 50 per c ent of the coral communities o bserved in the areas to be dredged comprise dead individuals. Those live colonies will take 10 to 30 years for regenera tion, according to the EIA. T o assess the impact of the dredging, compliance stations will be floated about the harbour during all stages of the project looking for visible turbidity plumes. S ome of the environmental i mpact mitigation efforts include good dredging practices, turbidity barriers, independent environmental monitoring, discouraged use of blasting and dredging in such a way toe ncourage future growth of m arine life. T he EIA suggests there will b e no hindrance to shipping w ithin the harbour. T he Government has also s uggested restoring the east breakwater at the entrance to t he harbour, but has not f inalised plans to do so. seeing the National Training Programme, told Tribune Business that the initiative would bed iscussed over the weekend during a retreat for the Chamber’s directors. We’re still working on the National Training Programme, and are actively involved withi t,” he confirmed. “Obviously, we are keenly supportive of it, because at the end of the day there are direct benefits to us. Ab etter trained workforce certainly benefits the business comm unity.” W hile not wishing to preempt any decisions made down the line, Mr Rolle said the C hamber had “committed” to approaching the private sector and its members for funding fort he National Training Prog ramme, which would supple ment the $250,000 provided by the Government. T he institutions involved will be the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI a nd the College of the Bahamas (COB). Those being re-trained will be the 1,000 unemployed Bahamians selected from those w ho had registered with the N ational Insurance Board’s (NIB scheme. M r Rolle added: “My goal is to make it an ubiquitous project, a sustainable project, and am eaningful project for the count ry in the future. The way it’s structured now, it fills more of a social need, and rightfully so,b ut by no means does it diminish the potential for a long-term, sustainable project. I think the Government has it in the back of their minds, the private sector has it in the front of their minds.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Employment Opportunity Senior Collections Officer An employment opportunity exists for an innovative, persuasive leader with a passion for success, a desire to succeed and the ability to initiate progress. Skill Requirements Excellent oral and written communication skills Excellent motivation & coaching skills Ability to execute priority based workload Possess excellent planning, organizational and implementation skills Ability to operate and familiarity with POS systems Proficient in Microsoft Office applications Possess strong foundation of accounting practices and procedures Strong multitasking ability Strong leadership & managerial skills Strong internet skills i.e. Emailing, group messaging and research Ability to exert initiative Recording, summarizing, a nalyzing, verifying and reporting of results of financial transactions Minimum Experience Requirements Tertiary level with degree in related field; Collections executive with at least 4 years experience in collections or related field ; At least three years experience in supervisory post; Strong knowledge and application of MS Microsoft Suite APPLY VIA EMAIL TO: srcollectionsofficer@yahoo.com Cabinet backs Training plan with no change F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Dredging to deepen Nassau Harbour to between 38-40 feet

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THE Bahamas saw its total exports increase by 4.6 per cent during 2008 despite the onset of a global recession, rising from $670.088 million to $701.533 m illion, according to the Department of Statistics. T he Department, unveiling the 2008 foreign trade statistics, reported that Bahamian-originating exports accounted for $409.6 million or 58 per cent of total exports, with re-exports a ccounting for $291.9 million or 42 per cent. T he main Bahamian-originating export category was chemicals (polystyrene and other plastics), which accounted for 55.2 per cent of the total, followed by food and live animals ( mainly crawfish, rum and salt), which took a 20 per cent share. More significantly, of these two categories, three commodities alone expansible polys tyrene valued at $150.1 million, o ther compounds containing a p yrimidine ring, at $67.4 million, and spiny lobster frozen at $77.6 million accounted for some 72 per cent of total domestic exports,” the Depart m ent said. Some 92 per cent of that p olystyrene total was exported t o the US, with 4 per cent going to the UK and the remaining 4 per cent to Australia and A rgentina. O f the pyrimidine ring compounds, 45 per cent was export ed to Canada and 27.2 per cent t o the Netherlands. Some 65.5 per cent of the crawfish went to the US, and 32 per cent to F rance. M ineral fuels, valued at $ 141.5 million, and machinery and transport equipment worth $ 67.3 million, together account ed for almost three-quarters of re-exports, holding a 49 per centa nd 23 per cent share respectively. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 5B CAREER OPPORTUNITY R isk & Compliance OfficerColina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified professional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer. This isan executive position and the successful applicant should possess the following: Qualifications & Experience x Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university x Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance x Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a l aw degree x Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations f or improvements to a compliance culture x Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of d uties x Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and b est practices x Confidentiality x Excellent oral and written communication skills Duties & Responsibilities: x Design and implement a risk framework. x Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps t aken to foster good compliance. x Implement and maintaina compliance monitoring programme. This will s erve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures. x Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws, r egulations and policies applicable to the institution. x Provide management with guidance in the development, implementation a nd maintenance of policies, proceduresand practices tocover r egulated activities. x Create programmes thateducate, train and encourage directors, m anagers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and regulations. x Serve as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators. The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a cover l etter and resume to the following e-mail address no later than 27 July 2009: E-mail: careers@colinaimperial.com R E: Risk and Compliance Officer A bsolutely no phone callswill be accepted 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.28Abaco Markets1.391.390.000.1270.00010.90.00% 1 1.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.94Bank of Bahamas6.946.940.000.2440.26028.43.75% 0 .890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3911.390.003001.4060.2508.12.19% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.645.640.000.4190.36013.56.38% 4 .781.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.072.98-0.091,0000.1110.05226.81.74% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital1.821.820.000.2400.0807.64.40% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.5010.00Finco10.9010.900.000.3220.52033.94.77% 11.7110.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.3810.380.000.7940.35013.13.37% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.035.030.000.3320.15015.22.98% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.60013.510.91% 12.0010.40J. S. Johnson10.4010.400.000.9520.64010.96.15% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 Prime + 1.75% 7% BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320 FRIDAY, 17 JULY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.84| CHG -0.10 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -141.52 | YTD % -8.26BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 Interest 7%FINDEX: CLOSE 786.23 | YTD -5.83% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.38601.3231CFAL Bond Fund1.38602.404.75 3.03512.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8952-1.52-3.18 1.47761.4031CFAL Money Market Fund1.47773.075.31 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1031-8.35-13.82 12.980112.3289Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.98012.875.79 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.000093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund93.1992-3.33-6.76 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.47339.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.27652.00-2.98 1.06221.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06222.566.22 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0243-0.842.43 1.05851.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05852.045.85 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007 7% 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 NAV DateTO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Jun-09 31-Mar-09 31-Dec-07 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 10-Jul-09 30-Jun-09MARKET TERMS31-May-09 Prime + 1.75% 30-Jun-09 Total exports increase by 4.6 per cent in 2008 F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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implying that the Government and companies involved were w orking to a tight timetable. Cutter section dredges [such as the one to be used on Nassau Harbour] generally work 24 hours a day. However, maintenance and downtime due to repairs, pipeline moves andp ipeline blockages result in an efficiency rate of 60 to 75 per cent. “To meet the scheduled arrival of new-build cruise ships in the fall of 2009, and assuming a dredge start in July 2009, curr ent planning requires that a portion of the two million cubic yards of dredging (the area nec-e ssary for the Oasis of the Seas to enter and depart from the harbour) be completed within f our months. This requires a dredge with an average production rate of 10,000 cubic yards per day. This w ill likely require a dredge with a 27 to 30-inch discharge pipe. T his discharge pipe would first d ischarge into stilling ponds on A rawak Cay. Once the availa ble space on Arawak Cay is to c apacity, discharge will be to the west end of Arawak Cay to e xtend the Cay.” W hile consideration had been given to limiting dredging activi ties to the outgoing tide, the EIA said this would prevent the Government “from meeting their commitment to Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines to allow t he entry of the Oasis of the Seas [the flagship for its Gene s is Class cruise ships] by the end o f November. It would also double the period of dredging, and it would double the cost of the project”. W ith Arawak Cay currently a ble to accommodate 600,000 cubic yards of the material d redged from Nassau Harbour, the EIA said the feasibility of t rucking the remaining 1.4 mil lion cubic yards over to the man-made island was assessed. However, this was quickly d ropped because of the fill’s wet nature and the inability of any trucking operation to match the 10,000 cubic yards per day e xtraction rate. The EIA also confirmed that the Government’s chief engin eering consultants on the har bour dredging/Arawak Cay port relocation, Cox & SHAL Con-s ultants, had presented the crea tion of an entirely new, sepa rate island to Arawak Cay’s west as one option for storingt he remaining 1.4 million cubic yards of fill. Referring to these options, Blue Engineering’s EIA said: These included a separate i sland to the west of Arawak C ay, with bridges to access the i sland, and the filling of the area b etween Arawak Cay and New P rovidence, as well as the extens ion of Arawak Cay to the west. “The Government has cons idered all of these options, and d ue to construction logistics involved and relative costs has d etermined an extension to the west as the preferred option, and the only option now to be considered. “The preferred option, which h as been accepted by the Government, is the westward exten s ion to Arawak Cay..... It is cons idered likely that this option will have the least impact on the environment.” The EIA said that Arawak C ay’s ample unused land prov ided enough space to stockpile the dredged material, with the f irst 600,000 cubic yards to be stored in two piles either side o f the existing road leading to the asphalt plant and aggregate storage complex. With the Gov ernment owning Arawak Cay, it w as currently modifying and reviewing lease agreements to accommodate the stockpiling. The remaining 1.4 million c ubic yards of fill will be accommodated via the 1,000 foot extension of Arawak Cay to the w est, a move intended to also accommodate the re-located container shipping facilitiesp resently situated on Bay Street i n downtown Nassau. To facilitate the port re-loca tion, Arawak Cay’s curved ends w ill be made straight through the 1,000 foot extension, so ves sels can be moored there. Steel sheet pile walls, tied to anchor b locks, will form the wall bulkh ead, with 900,000 cubic yards o f fill taking up the space b ehind it. T he remaining 500,000 cubic y ards of fill extracted from Nass au Harbour will then be stored on the Arawak Cay extension. T he EIA suggested there was l ittle to no alternative to disposing of the material dredged f rom Nassau Harbour on Arawak Cay, given that the fill had been earmarked for use in both the new port’s construction and the extension of Woode s Rogers Wharf as part of the downtown Nassau revitalisation p roject. No other appropriate sites for on-land disposal were found in close proximity to the proposed dredging operations othe r than at Arawak Cay, primari ly due to the need to re-locate the Bay Street shipping before t he planned redevelopment of Nassau Harbour can proceed,” t he Blue Engineering report said. “Disposing of the material further afield than Arawak Cayw ould require additional pumps, and therefore a greater cost to the project.” While disposal of the fill at s ea was also an option, the EIA added: “The Government of the Bahamas recognises that the d redged material is a valuable resource, and wishes to stockpile as much of this material asp ossible for use elsewhere, in p articular the Nassau harbour redevelopment. “The use of the material for t he Nassau harbour redevelop ment further emphasises the importance of storing the dredged material near to the d redging site so as to reduce the distance that the material would have to be transported, oncet he shipping along Bay Street is moved and the material is used.” The Blue Engineering EIA, in what could be considered a direct rebuttal to the PLP-led outcry over the Arawak Cay p ort and the decision to forego the former Christie administration’s plans to switch the Bay Street shipping facilities to a port at Clifton Pier, said “Alternative locations for the shipping facilities are very limited. “One previously identified location on the south-west coast of New Providence has been briefly considered, but suffers disadvantages with respect to geographical location, physical topography at the proposed site, avoidable impact to a natural area, and induced impacts to local ecology. Fundamentally, the site is too far from the majority of existing develop ments.” When it came to negative impacts from the Nassau har bour dredging/Arawak Cay extension, the Blue Engineering EIA pointed out that fishermen’s access to the area behind the Fish Fry would be restricted, and they would lose the location as a storage area. Increased “noise, dust, odour and traffic” could also affect business at the Fish Fry and the nearby Haynes Cricket Oval. And the proposed Arawak Cay extension would also reduce the depth, and width, of the existing channel between Arawak Cay and Silver Cay, the island where the still-closed Coral Island Marine Park is located. The EIA said Silver Cay, which was once owned by tycoon Philip Ruffin before being sold as part of the Baha Mar deal, was “dilapidated and available for sale”. The reduced channel width and depth, the EIA said, would impact the tour excursion boatssuch as those that take cruise passengers and other guests to islands such as Blackbeard’s Cay. Future dredging was rec ommended to solve the problem, as “these impacts could further have an impact on the tourism industry as excursions may no longer take place”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f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–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f $ELOLW\WRWURXEOHVKRRWDFFRXQWLQJSURFHVVHVDVWKH\UHODWHWRQDQFLDOVRIWZDUH DQG WKHV\VWHPRILQWHUQDOFRQWURO *RRGMXGJPHQWDQGVRXQGUHDVRQLQJDELOLW\ $ELOLW\WRFRPPXQLFDWHHIIHFWLYHO\ERWKRUDOO\DQGLQZULWLQJ *RRGWLPHPDQDJHPHQWVNLOOV ,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVVKRXOGDSSO\FRPSOHWLQJDQGUHWXUQLQJDQ$SSOLFDWLRQ)RUPWR 7KH0DQDJHU+XPDQ5HVRXUFHV7UDLQLQJ'HSDUWPHQW%DKDPDV(OHFWULFLW\ &RUSRUDWLRQ %OXH +LOO t 7XFNHU3%R[1DVVDX%DKDPDV RQ RUEHIRU-XO\ 10,000 yards target for 4month cruise ‘D-day’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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to its agreements with foreign c ompanies contracted to do the work on the Nassau harbour dredging and Arawak Cay portd evelopment. "The public is spending $50 odd-million to dredge NassauH arbour, and the contract was awarded to a European firm," Mr Wells said, referring to win ning bidder Boskalis. He c laimed, though, that Boskalis had subsequently contracted out parts of the harbour dredge t o other companies, namely American Bridge and a Bahamian firm, believed to beB ahamas Marine. The European firm then sub-contracted it to American Bridge, an American company,a nd then American Bridge subcontracted it to a Bahamian company. Generally, the public don't know a Christ thing t hat is happening,” Mr Wells said. “That is the situation, and that is what is happening in this country today. It’s been happ ening from the 1950s coming straight through. " I say what I believe, and I don't care if the media don't like it or the opposition don'tl ike it or the Government don't like it." Speaking at the Rotary Club of West Nassau's weekly meet-i ng, Mr Wells said he had fund ed studies on the relocation of the container port facilitries, a nd suggested south-west New Providence was the best place for such a development. H owever, he said that envi r onmental issues arose with the Coral Harbour site, though he conceded that any locationw ould have some sort of environmental impact. "When you are doing development you are going to affect the environment," he said. According to Mr Wells, ‘spec ial interest groups’ were push ing for the port’s relocation to A rawak Cay, which he suggested may be able to be completed for half the $55-$56 million cost quoted. However, many figures have been circulated as to the final cost of the Arawak Cay move. It is unclear what the PLP and Mr Wells mean by ‘special interest groups’, as the partici pants have not been identified. However, it seems to be a ref erence to the FNM’s supporters in the shipping industry. Mr Wells admitted his fami ly's stake in the shipping facilities move, as they own real estate holdings in the Arawak Cay area, but suggested strong ly that he advocates against the move for the best interest of the country. "I have been an FNM basi cally all my life," he said. "I decided to make a stand against what was wrong in this society." make transactions a hell of a lot e asier. Instead of paying 10 per cent on deals valued at above $ 250,000, you’d be paying 2 per c ent. That’s a no-brainer.” But, adopting a more sober assessment of the all-round implications of such a reduction, Mr Lightbourne said thee ffects would be similar to those r esulting from the Stamp Tax incentives granted to Ginn Development Company for its $4.9 billion Ginn sur mer project. Referring to the $200 million w orth of real estate that Ginn claimed to have previously sold at the West End site, Mr Lightbourne said that given all these transactions were valued at above $250,000, some $20 million in taxes would have beend ue to the Government at a 10 p er cent rate. However, the former Christie a dministration had given Ginn a t iered Stamp Tax incentive for the project, which meant that the rate being paid in the initial year was 2 per cent. Using this rate, Mr Lightbourne saidt he Government had only coll ected $4 million in Stamp Tax a difference of $16 million. “I just don’t think they can do that,” Mr Lightbourne added of a wider 2 per cent Stamp Tax introduction,e xplaining that the 10 per cent rate was not usually a ‘make or break’ factor in purchases of high-end homes. “Normally, the high-end transactions aren’t stymied by the Stamp Tax,” he said. “Peo-p le know that’s what they have t o pay 10 per cent. It’s in the head from the start.” Current Budget numbers demonstrate just how reliant the Government is on real estate-related Stamp Tax as revenue generator, and what the impact would be if the 2 perc ent across-the-board rate was ever implemented. For the 2009-2010 Budget y ear, the Government is forec asting that it will earn $141.905 m illion from Stamp Tax on real estate transactions. Yet if the 2 per cent Stamp Tax rate were implemented, this figure would drop to $32.656 million, a 77 perc ent decline. B ut Richard Almy, the author of the 2 per cent proposal in a February 21, 2007, report prepared as part of the Inter-American Development Bank-financed (IDBP olicy and Administration Project, said this could be made-up over time via an increase in revenues from real property taxes. “Although a dollar-for-dollar substitution would be difficult to achieve, competentlyd one studies of tax burdens and s hifts should make it possible to achieve rough ‘revenue neutrality’ and to design ameliorative measures, such as rate rollbacks, and to cushion extreme individual increases by phasing,” he suggested. The report added that while s crapping real property taxes may be tempting for the Bahamian government,s trengthen their collection and i ncreasing revenues from this s ource was “an option worth pursuing” to reduce the Government’s reliance on import duties. “Although continued politic al inaction may have a certain a ppeal, popular respect for the Government of the Bahamas will almost certainly continue to erode,” the report said. “As difficult as a real estate tax improvement programme mayb e, it will be more manageable than a full-fledged crisis. A more equitable real estate tax would benefit all who own real estate in the Bahamas. “Continued neglect of the real estate tax is unwise fromt he perspectives of the nation’s t ax equity and revenue productivity goals. The challenges that the Government of the Bahamas faces in improving the fairness and efficiency of the real estate tax are numerous and substantial, but not insurmountable.” M r Almy effectively implied that real property tax payments boiled down to whether own-e rs wanted to pay or not, since it w as not seen as a mandatory r equirement. For instance, real estate owners could fail to register ownership of their land assets and not declare them to the ChiefV aluation Officer for real prope rty tax purposes. Real property taxes could be ignored until a sale or transfer of real estate was contemplated, and purchase prices could be understated to avoid Stamp Tax. T he report, in its instructions to the Government, said: “To ensure equity and to increase revenue potential it needs to ensure that all assessable property has been listed and described accurately. It is tellingt hat statistics on the number of p roperties assessed and on the number of properties waiting to be assessed are not readily available.” The report called for a uniform valuation date to be established for real property tax assessments to be carried out.T he Valuation Unit’s staffing, resources, expertise and tech nology all needed to be s trengthened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tamp Tax ‘will not happen’ I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Ex-FNM minister blasts Arawak port F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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G omez to protect and preserve C LICO (Bahamas assets from potential litigants and other creditors, thus enabling him to maximise their value for the benefit of Bahami-a n policyholders, depositors and o ther creditors. Informed sources close to developments told Tribune Business late last week that Mr Gomez was holding negotiations with two to three potential b uyers of Wellington Preserve, at least one of whom is believed t o be a major US-based real estate developer. The CLICO (Bahamas u idator could not be reached f or comment, but a potential sale of Wellington Preserve and the realisation of a purchase p rice close to the original $73 million loan is the key to how successful the insurer’s wind-i ng-up will be. A price close to that figure would enable Mr Gomez to cover 100 per cent of what is owed to secured creditors, Tribune Business understands, as interest in Wellington Preserves eemingly bucks the depressed Florida real estate market and a US economy still mired in recession. It also represents a change to the position Mr Gomez outlined i n his first report to the S upreme Court on the CLICO (Bahamas when he was still only a provi-s ional liquidator. He then described Wellington Preserve, which had been financed by the $73 million loan from CLICO( Bahamas) to its CLICO Enter prises subsidiary, as “not antici pated to be realised in the short term”, making the insurer insolvent and a natural liquidation candidate. “The loan to CLICO Enterprises of approximately $73 mill ion is not considered presently c ollectible, and thus endangers the asset base of the company and places policy values in peril. The funds advanced to CLICO Enterprises were advancedb y CLICO Enterprises to W ellington Preserve, the wholl y-owned subsidiary of CLICO Enterprises, which acquired its r eal estate holding in Florida, US,” Mr Gomez said. This real estate is not presently considered mar ketable as a result of the significant downturn in the Florida real estate market.” Outlining Wellington Pres erve’s importance in the grand s cheme of things, Mr Gomez added: “As at December 31, 2008, approximately $73 million h ad been advanced to CLICO Enterprises, but it is unlikely t hat this loan can be recovered at full value as CLICO Enterprises’ December 31, 2008, unaudited financial statements reflect a deficit of $21 million as the assets are $108 million a nd its liabilities are $129 mill ion. “Included in CLICO Enterprises’ assets is a loan due from Wellington Preserve, a whollyowned subsidiary of CLICOE nterprises, for $70 million. The December 31, 2008 u naudited financial of Wellington Preserve includes investm ent property in Florida and valued at $127 million. Howeve r, the same real estate valued on an ‘as is’ basis is worth approximately $62 million. Beside the loan to Wellington Preserve, CLICO Enterprises also made a direct investment inW ellington Preserve for $13 m illion. “The Wellington Preserve real estate project in Florida c onsists principally of 80 resi dential lots and various amenit ies and commercial sites laid out in a 523-acre tract. It was to be a high end residential subdivision with an equestrian/polo theme. Most of the residential lots are connected to or contain p olo pitches and horse stables. U nfortunately, the project requires a substantial cash injection of a minimum of $42 million before it can be reasonably presented for sale.” M eanwhile, Mr Gomez is understood to be still pursuing the transfer of CLICO (Bahamas cy portfolio to another Bahamas-based insurer, foll owing the Government’s p ledge to underwrite this by providing a $30 million guarantee. The transfer will ultimately require the approval of both the S upreme Court and Insurance Commission. While British American Financial has been the keenest suitor for CLICO (Bahamas Tribune Business understands t hat ColinaImperial Insurance C ompany still remains the favourite because it has the greatest availability of surplus assets to match to any insurance liabilities it may inherit. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 9B CLICO liquidator in talks over sale of critical asset F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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Kemp’s Bay. They were on the side of the road, in the shorts and t-shirts they had been wearing 33 days before, both thin and dehydrated, Marcell barefoot, carrying mangoes and cocoplums. When Ms Taylor, 50, a nurse at the local health clinic, asked the boys about where they had been, Deangelo answered. “I expected them to say someone had them, but they said they had been in the bush looking for crabs and they just got lost,” Ms Taylor said. “I asked where they were sleeping and they said they slept in holes and during the day they were trying to find home. “I asked how they found their way out after all that time and they said they heard cars and dogs barking and they followed the sound to the road.” The boys said they had found their way out of the forest around half a mile further south, near a house occupied by German expatriates, where they went to ask for fruit to eat before continuing the walk home. “They were dirty, dehydrated a nd they had odour,” Ms Taylor s aid recalling how she picked t hem up sometime after 11am. “There were spiderwebs and pieces of sticks in their hair, and they were severely dehydrated. “Their eyes were bulging, and their skin was sagging and whenI lifted their shirt you could see all their ribs. “They didn’t say much, they were just answering questions, the only thing Deangelo volunteered was they wouldn’t go back in the bush looking for crabs by themselves.” As Ms Taylor approached the Clarke’s house their mother didn’t recognise her emaciated sons, and when she did, she screamed. She had sprained her knee when searching for the boys, and yet continued to look for them, hopping as she must, but she ran to her children when Ms Taylor brought them home. The boys were silent as the family went into a frenzy brought on by the unbelievable reality that they had come home alive. “They were so frail and weak and down,” Mrs Clarke said. “It was so sad. The whole family was just screaming. “My son just lay down on the ground screaming, ‘Look at these children, look at these children!’ “They looked starved.” Rushed to the clinic and then to Nassau within hours of their d iscovery, the boys are recove ring in the paediatric ward of t he Princess Margaret Hospital, building up strength on a diet of Ensure and offered their parents glimpses into the happenings of their misadventure piece by piece. According to their family, the boys have said Marcell fell into one of the many cavernous holes puncturing the forest floor, and then Deangelo, as he reached for him, tumbled in behind. They ate pigeon plums and c ocoplums, they told Mrs Clarke, and drank water from a stream and limestone potholes filled with rainwater. While Marcell has told his father they were stuck in the hole for the 33 days and nights they were missing, Deangelo maintains they were only stuck in the same whole for two or three days, Mr Sylverin said. And as Marcell, in particular, has started talking more, the story is becoming stranger. Marcell has apparently attest ed to an old man visiting while he was stuck in the hole – a man dressed in black, with pale hands, whose face he never saw. The man Marcell believes was the grandfather who died when he was an infant, fed Marcell the food of his dreams – pizza, watermelon, macaroni – and when he went to wake his brother to join the feast, ‘Pa’ stopped him. He had cared for him and washed his back, but never hurt him, Mr Sylverin said. And Deangelo never saw the man. On the day Marcell escaped from the hole, he noticed a tree g rowing out of it he had not s een in the month he had been t here, he told his father. “As though it had magically appeared?” I asked. Mr Sylverin’s eyes burst wide open, a mixture of conviction and disbelief rendering him speechless. He added: “Before he climbed the tree he saw the man coming and he gave him a hand to get out of the hole and he got out before Deangelo. “Then Deangelo came out and he didn’t see Pa anymore.” T he day they emerged, July 12, was the anniversary of their grandfather’s death on July 12, 2003. He has linked Marcell’s story to a strange sighting he said Vera had the night before the boys were found, of a man dressed in black, whose face she could not discern, but who, as she went closer, disappeared into the bush, and then reap peared suddenly some distance down the road – a distance no human could make, he said. Mr Sylverin also spoke of an unearthly noise coming from the forest when the boys returned home, a noise that shook the earth, but which Mrs Clarke said she had not heard. While she’s inclined to believe her grandsons survived in the forest, Mrs Clarke does not see why “Pa”, if he were to reveal himself, would not show his face, or hide from Deangelo. Nor does she know of any “sperret” dressed in black wandering around Smith’s Hill. But not everyone in the settlement is as sceptical as Mrs Clarke. “Some people here will believe that,” said Emily Rahming, a local government employee from Congo Town as she sat by Long Bay Cays’ beautiful white sand beach discussing the town’s latest mystery. Like many who grew up in South Andros, Mrs Rahming was taught to respect the potential existence of “sperrets” and the world of the unseen and the unexplained. Although she may not wholeheartedly believe in ghosts and spirits, she has heard enough stories to demand respect for the mystical. There are two stories in my f amily,” she said, going into the d etails of one. “My husband’s sister and her father were out planting cassava and when he looked around, she had gone. “He looked around the field calling her and he didn’t find her so he notified the community, and everyone went out looking up and down, and saw her in a hole and she wouldn’t come out. “She was afraid of her father; she said there was a man in the hole who looked like her father and he gave her his hand and so she went. “We hear a lot of stories like that so it’s not so far-fetched.” Another case of two children who went missing from High Rock, a settlement north of Smith’s Hill, several years ago is another real life case that has grown to mythical proportions; the story being that the siblings who had disappeared for around two weeks had met their grandmother in the woods – she went to feed them bananas. And then there was the 16year-old boy from Mars Bay who was lost in the woods for over two weeks, undetected by full-scale searches, until he finally emerged on his own. “They do the same search C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE GastroenterologyDoctorsHospitalSessionalClinicSCREENINGand CONSULTATIONDoyouhaveanyofthe followingsymptoms?Dicultyswallowing Heartburn Dyspepsia(gas,bloating) Nauseaandvomiting Unintentionalweightloss Diarrhea&Constipation Abdominalpain Diseasesofthepancreas Liverdisease Jaundice Coloncancerscreening Familyhistoryofcoloncancer Rectalbleeding Dr.MarcusCooperI nternal Medicine G astroenterologyByAppointmentOnlyCall:302-4684Date:Wednesday, July 22 `09 Open:9:00am Surviving 33 days and nights F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 6 6 S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e A WHITE SAND memorial that was made in memory of the boys one month after they disappeared... P h o t o s b y M e g a n R e y n o l d s

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every time someone’s lost and I don’t know if they ever went in and found someone in the bush,” a South Andros local said. When search parties lost hope for Deangelo and Marcell, Mrs Clarke had the feeling they too, would walk home independently. She said: “I still had hope they would find them, and I said if everybody search and they don’t come they are goingt o walk out on their own and that’s exactly what happened.” While almost everyone in South Andros has been lost in the forest, or knows someone who has, for a few hours, a night, or up to a week, many are sceptical the boys could have survived for so long on their own. “If they were there I feel like we would have found them,” my guide said as we hacked ourw ay through the thick brush, d odging poisonwood trees, spi derwebs and children-swallow ing caves, which are, apparently, up to 50ft deep. “There were so many of us five or six different groups searching different areas, some starting in the north, and somein the south. “We looked in every hole, we called their names, and they never answered. “I honestly don’t believe they were there.” Mr Rolle does not believe in ghosts either. If there was a mysterious man in black, he thinks it was probably a drug dealer involved in a marijuana deal that allegedly went wrong in the weeks before the boys disappeared. Talk amongst the sceptics in South Andros is that someone had been told to stash someh igh-grade cannabis for a dealer in Andros and stole some of the drugs. In the days before the boys disappeared the dealers were reportedly looking for the stash, and to get back at the partner who had doublecrossed them. The boys disappeared, and some think they were taken off the island on a boat. Then five days before the boys were found, a man wasa llegedly caught trying to smugg le 10lbs of marijuana on the mail boat. Five days later, a boat was heard pulling into Kemp’s Bay at around 2am, and hours later the boys were found. “If they came in a boat then it’s a drug trade gone bad and they picked up the wrong children,” Mr Rolle said. “Either it’s a case of them being taken by the wrong people or the kids ran away, but I’m going to have to wait for them to come out of the hospital to tell us what happened before I wrap up my investigation.” Attempts to interview the police in Kemp’s Bay were not successful, but Superintendent for the Family Islands, Hulan Hanna, has said the investigation will continue in earnest when the children are well and able to talk. The probability of getting kidnapped by drug dealers may seem more likely than surviving on fruits that are currently out of season, but the mystery of the missing children remains for now. With so many stories of other mystical happenings in a land steeped in myth and legend, the land of the Chick Charneys that legend has it bedeviled the political future of a British prime minister, and the “sperret” that spins your head around and disorientates youa s you walk in the forest, it s eems nothing is impossible. Even the sceptical Mr Rolle, who knows the South Andros bush better than most locals, has felt “his head get turned”, and subsequently walked for hours in circles and had to falla sleep before he could once again get his sense of direction. Even with a guide, just graz ing at the outer edge of the thick coppice, where it was still possible to hear the sea, or the road, or the “sperret”, it seemed like east and west were at a 90 degree angle. The mystical quality of the forest, and the land, moved 16th century Spanish explorers to name her “Isla Espiritu Santos”, the island of the Holy Spirit. “It’s the holey land,” Mr Rolle joked as we dodged caves trekking through the forest. “Anything is possible.” Even the children’s mother is finding it hard to swallow her children’s story at this stage, wondering if they could have been kidnapped, or held in the woods, and threatened into telling the story of their disappearance. While the children recover in hospital their whereabouts over those 33 lost days remains a mystery. Psychologist David Allen explained the mythical story as a way of filling the terrifying space of the unknown with an answer of mythical proportions. “This is the land of the Chick Charneys and it’s very much a part of our folklore,” Dr Allen said. “Folklore is made in the deep unconscious, it’s where our fears congregate and become condensed. “In our natural mind we can’t go there but in the unconscious mind the folklore starts to play out; trees grab them or caves eat them up. There is an old man who is a spirit who takes them in and it makes a great fairytale. “But in actual fact we don’t know what happened.” To learn the truth, Dr Allen said, the children need to recover from their feelings of abandonment, rejection and helplessness, as well as the shock of being found. They need a safe holding environment with stability, consistency and predictability, before they come out with the truth, he said. When questioned immediately after a traumatic experience and before a full recovery, children will endeavour to please the questioner, and as a result the information they provide will be around 70 per cent inaccurate, Dr Allen said. And while Marcell and Deangelo’s family are desperate for answers, as is the community of Smith’s Hill, Kemp’s Bay, the South Andros settlements and the world at large, it will surely be some time before we know what really happened, if indeed, we will ever know. C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 , PAGE 13B in South Andros wilderness OLEGREAN CLARKE at home with her daughter Petrola (far right some of her 27 grandchildren... ELLOUISE TAYLOR and her niece Godfrineka Taylor, 14, found the boys half a mile from their home more than a month after they disappeared...

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I I N N S S I I G G H H T T C C e e n n s s o o r r s s h h i i p p V V o o l l u u n n t t a a r r y y S S u u p p p p r r e e s s s s i i o o n n J J u u l l y y 1 1 3 3 , , 2 2 0 0 0 0 9 9 P ACO I simply loved your article. I totally enjoyed the read. WOW! It was ground b reaking....Very, very well written. Keep up the superb work my brother. I am however not s urprised. I expect this kind of quality work from you. O O m m a a r r Hi Paco, J ust to let you know that I really enjoyed reading your article “Voluntary Oppres-s ion.”It was obviously well r esearched, with some apt lite rary references and thoro ughly well argued. T he Christian Council and t he Film Board might not h ave found as much enjoym ent as I did however! S S M M A A T he Insight column of Monday, July 13th, is definitely a “cut above” the tabloid j ournalism of John Marquis. Marquis raised investigative j ournalism to new heights, a nd now Paco Nunez raises it t o new literary heights. D escribing various forms of c ensorship throughout history as set against similar action in t he Bahamas should give p ause for thought to Tribune readers. Censorship for “the g reater good” is the unfortunate “vision of the anointed” purporting to know all that is good and worthy for a society.P aco Nunez makes the critical observation that he does not “remember renouncing his r ight to regulate his own behaviour.” J J o o a a n n T T h h o o m m p p s s o o n n T T h h e e N N a a s s s s a a u u I I n n s s t t i i t t u u t t e e I am Bahamian. I am an a dult. I have an education. I h ave an open mind.I value my freedom of action and thought. I think mostB ahamians should do the s ame, but I see mostly apathy compounded by the most a bject ignorance when it comes to such things. W e have it so good that we don’t want to improve the things that aren’t good,b ecause we are afraid of change, growth, development, the unknown, new experi-e nces or ways of looking at things.This is generally an intellectually suffocatingc ountry for the masses. T hought and free expression are generally not encouraged.W e are inherently uncurious, w hich is very sad. I don’t believe in censors hip at all and I take it as a personal attack on my consti t utionally assured right that an organisation with a relig ious agenda is allowed to have influence over whatp lays or films I should or should not be allowed to see. I don’t think, in a countryw here religious freedom is guaranteed, that the Christian Council should be alloweda ny say whatsoever over gov ernment issues of any kind. I certainly didn’t vote for thema nd they aren’t accountable t o anyone that I know of. With Uncle Sam right next d oor rating every movie any B ahamian is ever going to see, why not save the money t hat we waste paying people on the Plays and Films Com mission Board and put it to good use either promoting the Bahamas as a destinationf or making movies or, even b etter, helping young Bahamians learn the art of film.The time for puttingB ahamian tax dollars to bet ter use than “same ole, same ole” is well past due. Busi n ess as usual must not be the order of the day. T o me it isn’t just the censorshipa spect; it is a waste of the p eople’s time and money that could be put to vastly more productive use. Finally, what is happening with Bruno?They will probably block that, but the silly movies portraying gangster life, fast cars and cheap women are always allowed to play.We wonder how we got here E E r r a a s s m m u u s s F F o o l l l l y y T T O O U U G G H H C C A A L L L L My 2 cents which, in today's economy, is not worth much! Agreed that the "environmentalists" by and large go off half cocked without learn ing the facts e.g. the LNG controversy. But, on the other hand, why, oh why, doesn't Government make a deci sion!? T rue, casuarinas are an invasive species, but thosea long the western beaches have been there ever since I can remember and that's al ong time! I suspect the E's have a point in that the native plants would help to hold the s and, but why do we have to have seagrape hedges every where, blocking the sea view. Seagrape trees are lovely, would serve the same purpose, yet allow the view. See Western Esplanade and Fort Montagu "park". Indeed, Government doesn't inform the Public sufficiently. I got more out of your column, Larry (Smith Tough Call, publishedevery Wednesday) in re: proposed Arawak Cay port facility than from any other source. Thank you. Maps would be helpful, too. I still don't know where the "new" east/west road to the south of the island (nothing to do with Arawak Cay) is nor how to get on it! One map publishedi n the newspaper would speak volumes! N ow, if only you could get more than TALK out of Gov ernment in re the fish ramp atM ontagu junction of Shirley Street and East Bay Streets! There is still time for this gove rnment to relocate it (to the adjacent filled land to the west) with running water and mandatory off-street parking and with traffic controlled by the existing light at the northern end of the Village Road extension, making the right hand lane on East Bay Street turn right at the light and go straight through to Village Road only, with traffic for Shirley Street continue east through the light, turning right opposite the ramp and thence into Shirley Street and thence be controlled by the light at junction of Shirley Street and Village Road. Traffic could enter the relocated fish market via the turning off Bay Street by the Yacht Club or travellingn orth via the Village Road extension. Got that? Wish Ic ould supply a map...The handful of votes represented by the reluctant fishermenw ould be so delighted by the relocated market by the time of the next election that t hey'd all vote to return the present government! I agree with you that for eign boats should have to pay up front a hefty deposit to fish our waters, be given "The Rules", and, if they want most of their deposit returned, should undergo an inspection of their deep freezer, fish wells, etc, to ensure they have only the legal number of fish/conch/crawfish. Maybe they should only be allowed to catch fish for immediate consumption. Keep on writing. We learn much from you! J J o o a a n n L L i i g g h h t t b b o o u u r r n n C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 14B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs Bright +Effective 322-2188/9 You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. Long life Spiral lamps 2 0 0 8 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t Readers have their say... To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today! FEEDBACK THE FRONT PAGE of the July 13 edition of INSIGHT... The Insight column of Monday, July 13th, is definitely a “cut above” the tabloid journalism of John Marquis. Marquis raised investigative journalism to new heights, and now Paco Nunez raises it to new literary heights. Describing various forms of censorship throughout history as set against similar action in the Bahamas should give pause for thought to Tribune readers. Censorship for “the greater good” is the unfortunate “vision of the anointed” purporting to know all that is good and worthy for a society. Paco Nunez makes the critical observation that he does not “remember renouncing his right to regulate his own behaviour Joan Thompson

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 70F/21C Low: 72F/22C Low: 75F/24C Low: 76F/24C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 85F/29C High: 86F/30C High: 88 F/31 C High: 89 F/32 C High: 90F/32C High: 90 F/32C High: 88F/31C Low: 80F/27C High: 90F/32C Low: 81 F/27 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 76F/24C High: 88 F/31 C Low: 79F/26C High: 84 F/29 Low: 76F/24C High: 85F/29C Low: 78 F/26C High: 87F/31C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 89F/32C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 89F/32C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 87F/31C Low: 81F/27C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 79F/26C High: 90F/32C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 20 TH , 2009, PAGE 15B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny, a t-storm; breezy. Rather cloudy, a couple of t-storms. Mostly cloudy, t-storms; breezy. A couple of showers and a t-storm. Some sun with a t-storm; breezy. High: 88 Low: 80 High: 89 High: 89 High: 91 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny and breezy. High: 90 Low: 80 Low: 80 Low: 81 AccuWeather RealFeel 100F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 84F 105-81F 100-88F 100-92F 109-92F Low: 80 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................93F/34C Low ....................................................82F/28C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 81 F/27C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................18.56" Normal year to date ....................................22.37" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU New First Full Last Jul. 21 Jul. 28Aug. 5Aug. 13 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:32 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:01 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 4:38 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 6:55 p.m. Today Tuesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 6:39 a.m.2.512:43 a.m.0.1 7:12 p.m.3.312:36 p.m.-0.2 7:38 a.m.2.71:37 a.m.-0.1 8:08 p.m.3.41:36 p.m.-0.3 8:33 a.m.2.92:28 a.m.-0.2 9:01 p.m.3.32:33 p.m.-0.3 9:27 a.m.3.03:18 a.m.-0.3 9:52 p.m.3.33:29 p.m.-0.3 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco91/3279/26pc88/3178/25t Amsterdam68/2057/13sh72/2263/17sh Ankara, Turkey88/3159/15s85/2955/12s Athens91/3275/23s92/3374/23s Auckland55/1243/6pc59/1550/10s Bangkok90/3279/26t91/3281/27t Barbados86/3077/25r86/3077/25sh Barcelona75/2364/17pc78/2567/19s Beijing93/3375/23t91/3272/22pc Beirut91/3279/26s90/3279/26s Belgrade85/2962/16s92/3367/19s Berlin68/2054/12sh73/2261/16pc Bermuda80/2675/23s81/2775/23s Bogota66/1845/7c67/1947/8c Brussels68/2051/10c78/2562/16c Budapest82/2760/15pc85/2967/19pc Buenos Aires61/1652/11pc54/1242/5r Cairo100/3779/26s102/3878/25s Calcutta95/3581/27t93/3381/27t Calgary71/2148/8s73/2252/11s Cancun93/3372/22s92/3371/21s Caracas83/2871/21t82/2772/22t Casablanca97/3673/22s96/3570/21s Copenhagen66/1854/12r71/2155/12pc Dublin61/1652/11pc59/1554/12r Frankfurt72/2256/13r79/2668/20pc Geneva 78/25 62/16 pc 83/2862/16t Halifax 77/25 57/13 s 73/22 57/13 c Havana 92/33 72/22 s 90/32 72/22 r Helsinki 77/25 57/13r70/2155/12pc Hong Kong 90/32 81/27 t 91/32 82/27t Islamabad 97/36 81/27 pc 95/35 80/26 t Istanbul83/2869/20pc88/3168/20s Jerusalem 86/30 63/17s85/2966/18s Johannesburg 61/1639/3s60/1538/3s Kingston 88/3180/26s87/3080/26sh Lima70/2158/14s69/2056/13pc London70/2154/12pc68/2057/13r Madrid93/3360/15pc95/3559/15s Manila86/3077/25t86/3077/25t Mexico City74/2351/10t74/2351/10t Monterrey102/3875/23pc109/4276/24s Montreal77/2563/17pc81/2764/17pc Moscow82/2763/17pc72/2258/14r Munich66/1855/12c80/2657/13pc Nairobi79/2655/12pc77/2555/12c New Delhi 93/3382/27t95/3581/27t Oslo65/1855/12r66/1856/13r Paris75/2360/15s84/2864/17pc Prague 71/21 55/12 sh 77/25 60/15 pc Rio de Janeiro69/2063/17sh77/2570/21pc Riyadh109/4288/31s111/4388/31s Rome 82/27 66/18 s 86/30 66/18 s St. Thomas88/3179/26r88/3180/26r San Juan56/1340/4r61/1632/0c San Salvador 86/30 74/23 pc 87/30 74/23 t Santiago 54/1234/1c46/734/1sh Santo Domingo84/2874/23r85/2973/22sh Sao Paulo 63/17 55/12 c 74/23 62/16c Seoul88/3172/22pc82/2766/18sh Stockholm 66/18 59/15 sh 70/21 55/12 pc Sydney 70/21 48/8 s72/2252/11pc Taipei93/3383/28t95/3585/29pc T okyo 86/30 75/23 pc 79/26 75/23 r T oronto 73/2259/15pc75/2359/15t Trinidad92/3365/18pc93/3366/18s V ancouver 78/25 61/16 pc 78/2561/16s Vienna 75/2360/15pc81/2768/20pc W arsaw 68/20 55/12 sh 73/22 53/11 sh Winnipeg 76/24 60/15 t 73/2257/13pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles86F Tuesday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles86F Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles85F Tuesday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles85F Today:E at 7-14 Knots2-3 Feet10-20 Miles85F Tuesday:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet6-10 Miles85F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque98/3668/20pc93/3369/20t Anchorage67/1955/12c66/1854/12r Atlanta84/2864/17pc85/2967/19pc Atlantic City81/2763/17pc82/2767/19t Baltimore83/2866/18t82/2766/18t Boston81/2762/16pc76/2464/17c Buffalo78/2561/16pc75/2365/18t Charleston, SC90/3269/20t86/3071/21t Chicago78/2559/15s80/2664/17pc Cleveland79/2660/15pc81/2763/17t Dallas93/3375/23t96/3574/23t Denver92/3358/14t86/3057/13t Detroit80/2661/16pc83/2863/17t Honolulu89/3176/24s88/3175/23s Houston94/3476/24t94/3474/23t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday TodayTuesdayTodayTuesday Indianapolis80/2660/15s82/2763/17pc Jacksonville90/3269/20t86/3072/22t Kansas City85/2964/17pc81/2763/17t Las Vegas108/4284/28s109/4288/31s Little Rock90/3268/20pc81/2769/20t Los Angeles87/3067/19s82/2767/19s Louisville83/2862/16s87/3063/17pc Memphis86/3069/20s84/2871/21pc Miami90/3278/25t89/3179/26t Minneapolis79/2663/17pc79/2664/17t Nashville84/2858/14s87/3064/17pc New Orleans88/3172/22pc90/3274/23t New York81/2769/20pc81/2769/20t Oklahoma City91/3269/20t89/3165/18t Orlando85/2970/21t89/3174/23t Philadelphia83/2868/20pc82/2770/21t Phoenix 111/43 89/31 s 111/4387/30pc Pittsburgh76/2459/15pc78/2560/15t Portland, OR 93/3360/15pc91/3261/16s Raleigh-Durham 86/30 65/18 t 83/28 66/18 t St. Louis84/2865/18s84/2866/18pc Salt Lake City 94/34 68/20 t 93/3368/20pc San Antonio 93/33 75/23 t 95/35 75/23 pc San Diego77/2569/20pc76/2469/20pc San Francisco 68/20 55/12 pc 68/2056/13pc Seattle83/2859/15pc86/3058/14s T allahassee 91/3265/18pc90/3269/20t T ampa 86/30 72/22 t 88/31 74/23t Tucson104/4080/26pc101/3879/26pc W ashington, DC 82/27 67/19t82/2769/20t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 26

INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT M ONDAY JULY 20, 2009 The stories behind the news n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net D isappearances, particularly of young children, rarely have happy endings. Even when children return to their frantic parents, there is often some horror of kidnapping, abuse, torture, if they are not found dead. Perhaps that is why it is so hard to accept the story Deangelo Clarke and Mar cell Sylverin Clarke have told about the circumstances of their disappearance. It seems impossible that two boys, Deangelo aged nine and Marcell, six, could survive in the South Andros “bush” for 33 days and nights. Grant ed they would have had water to drink, as June’s heavy rains would have collected in the many caves and holes in the limestone rock on the forest ground. And ripe dillys hang heavy on trees i n the dense coppice, as do wild t amarind, and mangoes on the occa sional mango tree, but the “plums” they told their parents, their grandmother and the doctor they had eaten, are not in season. Cocoplums may grow along the coast of nearby Kemp’s Bay at thist ime of year, but rarely in the bush, my guide Joshua Rolle explained as he led me through the thick coppice stretching out for some 3,000 square feet from South Andros settlements on the coast right across to the west coast of the country’s largest island. But pigeon plums are either so dried out they are flaking off the seed or budding green, and certainly inedible, he said. Mr Rolle is a local so familiar with the South Andros bush he led one of three teams of Defence Force officers sent from Nassau along with the K-9 dog unit to carry out a full-scale search for the boys in the week after they went missing on June 9. Deangelo, who lives with the grand mother who raised him, Olegrean Clarke, 67, across the road from the forest in Smith’s Hill, was going out to catch crabs at around 5.30pm on that Tuesday evening as he has done every evening since he was around four years old, Mrs Clarke said. And his younger half-brother Mar cell, who was visiting from Nassau where he lives with their mother, Vera Clarke, in Kemp Road, followed as he does whenever they are together. It was not unusual for the boys to go out crabbing, or to walk the road in this remote settlement on their own, but as the light began to fade at around 7.30pm, and the brothers had not returned, the search began. The grandmother of 27 said the boys don’t usually go into the bush to catch crabs, which walk brazenly into the road at any time of day. She waited in the road for them to come home as her son, with cousins and friends, searched the woods. A passing neighbour gave her hope when they said the children were not far to the south, walking back towards the house at around 8.30pm. But when they didn’t come home, police were called, and a crowd of some 20 concerned neighbours stopped to search as word travelled. At around 1am the search party dispersed, only to rise the next morning, around 100 people strong. The boys’ mother flew in from Nassau with Marcell’s father, Deangelo’s stepfather, Marcellin Sylverin, 28, an employee on the Captain Moxey mail boat, which travels between South Andros and Nassau. After two days of searching the fam ily criticised police for not stepping up the search effort, and aired their views in The Tribune, and by June 12 teams of Defence Force officers and police search dogs joined the search. A US Coast Guard helicopter flew low over the dense forest using a searchlight and heat sensor technology to detect the boys. But with still no sign of the lost brothers, hope was fading fast. Police called off the search parties after two weeks; the effort seemingly futile. Local pastors held a candlelight service in the Clarke’s front yard and around 150 people prayed for the safe return of the boys one month after they had disappeared. Ribbons were strung along the milelong stretch of road from Smith’s Hill to Kemp’s Bay, and white sand was poured around the tree in Mrs Clarke’s front yard to be topped with flowers, soft toys and teddy bears. The white sand, reminiscent of the white sand cemetery in Kemp’s Bay, the flowers and the overwhelming loss meant the family started to mourn the children. “It was comforting,” Mrs Clarke said, her voice cracking with emotion. “Everybody was just one big family, the only disturbance was the children being missing.” Perhaps it was their prayers that seemingly spat the children out of the woods on July 12, but many in South Andros think it was something more sinister. It was 13-year-old Godfrineka Taylor who spotted the boys from her aunt Ellouise Taylor’s car as they were passing between Smith’s Hill and Surviving 33 days, nights Deangelo Clarke and Marcell Sylverin Clarke have shared their miraculous survival story after being missing for 33 days and nights in the South Andros wilderness. Now, guide Joshua Rolle takes reporter Megan Reynolds, of The T ribune , through a thick, 3,000 square foot stretch of bush on the largest island in the Bahamas. INSIGHT reports... S S E E E E p p a a g g e e s s 1 1 2 2 & & 1 1 3 3 MARCELL SYLVERIN CLARKE & DEANGELO CLARKE GUIDE Joshua Rolle stands over one of the many deep holes in South Andros landscape (seen above TRIB UNE E XCLUSIV E P h o t o s b y M e g a n R e y n o l d s


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SEE INSIGHT SECTION












Sit Milo Butler's
grandson shot

Businessman
is held up
by robbers

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

A WELL-KNOWN busi-
nessman and member of a
prominent political family was
lucky to escape with his life
after he was held up and shot by
robbers on Saturday night.

Allan Butler, 34, one of the
grandsons of the late Governor

on Baillou Hill Road.

General Sir Milo Butler and
cousin to a Cabinet Minister,
was closing up the family-run
Butler’s Bargain Mart and
Home Centre on Baillou Hill
Road at 10.14pm when he was
accosted by two masked men.

The men were armed with
guns and demanded that Mr
Butler hand over the money
deposit bags he was carrying at
the time.

Supt Elsworth Moss, officer
in-charge of the Central Detec-

tive Unit (CDU), told The Tri-
bune yesterday that one of the
gunmen was able to get the
deposit bags from Mr Butler
after shooting him in the thigh.
The two robbers afterwards
escaped in an unknown direc-
tion.

Mr Butler remains detained
at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital where he is being treated
for the gun shot wound, which

SEE page 10

Residents are ‘on the edge of
despair’ over low water pressure

RESIDENTS of a community in eastern New Providence, some
of whom living with serious illnesses, said they are on the edge of
despair, having suffered from low to non-existent water pressure for

more than three years now.

“We have been forgotten, this must be the most hateful place in
Nassau to live. Our ancestors must have buried dead people in this
ground that’s why we’re so cursed,” one resident of Star Estates,

SEE page 10






















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By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE victims of the Sea-
hauler/United Star maritime
tragedy will be able to access
thousands more dollars in
funds this week as donations
collected almost a year ago by
radio station More94 FM are
to be paid out.

The funds were collected
by the radio station in 2008
and due to a difficulty in
determining who were the real
“victims” of the August 2,
2003, tragedy, forwarded by
the station to Government for
disbursement.

While the Ministry did not
yesterday identify how much
money would be paid out in
total, it is understood to be
around $12,000 to be shared
between about 41 people. The
Government itself made a one
time $1 million payment from
the public treasury to the vic-
tims in May 2008.

Four people were killed and
25 injured in the night time
collision between the two
mailboats. After receiving the
payment from Government
some of those affected com-
plained the funds would not
amount to much once they
had paid off immediate debts.

Thanking More 94 FM for
being a “responsible corpo-
rate citizen” by organising the

SEE page 10







PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

SEE PAGE ELEVEN



lipé Major/Tribune staff

oral

y

A POLICE MOTORCYCLIST was seriously injured last night after a collision with a squad car during a high-
speed chase. The two police vehicles were pursuing a trail bike when they collided on Soldier Road short-
ly after 7pm. The police motorcyclist was taken to hospital and hadn’t regained consciousness at the time
of going to press. While three officers in the patrol car also sustained injuries, the driver suffered the brunt
of the impact. The trail bike got away. Police are not releasing the names of the officers, however the
motorcyclist was attached to the Traffic Division and the patrol car was attached to Wulff Road Police Sta-
tion. Police last night were at the preliminary stages of their investigation and could not say what led

to the collision.



IDB anticipates the Bahamas will have
borrowed $300m between 2008 and 2012

THE Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank anticipates that
the Bahamas will have bor-
rowed as much as $300 million
from the organisation between
the years 2008 and 2012.

According to the IDB’s
Operational Programme for the
Bahamas, these loans will
include $50 million for an air
transportation programme, $50
million for a BEC support pro-
gramme, and $10 million for the
land use policy administration
programme.

Asked about the borrowing
while in Haiti this weekend,
where he was attending the
Regional Forum on the occa-
sion of the Inter-American
Development Bank’s 50th
anniversary, Mr Ingraham said
the “alternative to (borrowing)
is further misery for the
Bahamian people.”

“Having managed the econo-
my well over the years we are
now able to use the fiscal space
we have to be able to cause a
reduction in the amount of suf-
fering that would take place in
society if we didn’t do the bor-
rowing.”

“We are fortunate as com-
pared to many of our brethren
in the Caribbean who have bor-
rowed up to their max and who
are maxed out and who are
unable to engage in any addi-
tional borrowing,” he said.

Mr Ingraham noted that the
IDB is the only multi-lateral
institution from which The
Bahamas can access funding. In
view of this, he said, its “adjust-
ed policies and programmes are
welcomed.”

“The need to replenish the
Bank’s Ordinary Capital and
Funds for Special Projects in
light of the current global eco-
nomic crisis is supported by
The Bahamas,” he told dele-
gates as he addressed the con-
ference.

“We urge all developed coun-
tries, who qualify to increase

the Bank’s resources...and to
accept that action is needed
now.”

Responding to the current
economic global crisis, the
prime minister told the confer-
ence that the Bahamas has
employed a number of mitigat-

SEE page 10

Over 800 invasive lionfish



A LARGE number of invasive lionfish
were removed from Bahamian waters
during Nassau’s first lionfish control
event on Saturday.

half a day

WITH over 800 invasive
lionfish removed from
Bahamian waters in half a day
and enthusiasm growing for
the fish as a source of food the
Department of Marine
} Resources declared Nassau’s
| first lionfish control event on
Saturday a success.
|) Eighteen boats working in

competition with one another
| pulled in the haul of venomous
fish during the earlier part of
Saturday, with “Jojo”, piloted
by several members of the
| Maillis family, bringing in 300
‘| of them alone, winning them
a $500 prize.

Boaters and members of the
public swamped the Green
‘| Parrot Restaurant and Bar
where those competing for the

yy prize of catching the single

biggest, smallest and the most
lionfish came to have their
catch weighed and counted.
Michael Braynen, Director
of the Department of Marine
Resources said: “Certainly it

SEE page 10

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE






























SUMMER SIZZLER

A TOTAL of 172 Haitian
migrants were apprehended
in the Central Bahamas on
Saturday by officers of the
Drug Enforcement Agency

4" Block Was $1.58
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8" Block Was $1.86

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This follows after last
week’s apprehension exercis-
es that netted some 189 sus-
pected illegal Haitian immi-
grants.

On Saturday afternoon,
after receiving information of
a Haitian sloop spotted a half
mile east of Hawksbill Rock in
the Exuma Cays, police on
Exuma, with the help of local
residents, assisted in remoy-
ing the migrants from their
unsanitary vessel and detain-
ing them on Duck Cay.

Defence Force patrol ves-
sels HMBS P-48 and Guana-
hani were dispatched to the
area to remove the migrants
— 130 men and 42 women.

The first vessel, HMBS P-
48, arrived in the capital on
Sunday afternoon with 72 of

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the migrants, and the Guana-
hani was expected to arrive
later in the evening with the
remaining 100 migrants.

All of the immigrants were
handed over to Immigration
officials and are currently
being detained at the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre.

Petty Officer

Jonathan Rolle



More suspected Haitian
Ey ao immigrants apprehended

ABOVE: Some of the suspected Haitian immigrants onboard
HMBS P-48, as they arrived at the Defence Force Base.



LEFT: Some of the suspected immigrants onboard HIBS P-
48 on the way to Nassau on Sunday afternoon. A total of 172
suspected immigrants were picked up after their vessel
was sighted off Hawksbill Rock in the Exuma Cays.



SOME of the suspected Haitian immigrants preparing to disembark HMBS
P-48, after they arrived at the Defence Force Coral Harbour Base on Sun-
day afternoon.

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MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Three expected
tobe charged |
in connection
with murder

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Three
local men are expected to
be charged in Freeport
Magistrate’s Court on
Monday in the murder of
a prominent Eight Mile
Rock resident.

The men — ages 27 and
30 years — are accused of
the murder of 30-year-old
Denzil Jones Jr of Eight
Mile Rock.

Mr Jones was stabbed
to death by intruders last
Wednesday at his apart-
ment in Jones Town.

He was taken by ambu-
lance to hospital, but later
died of his injuries.

His death records
the fifth homicide for
the year on Grand
Bahama.

Asst Supt Welbourne
Bootle said the suspects
will be arraigned at 10am
on Monday.

Mr Jones is the grand-
son of well-known local
pastor Rev Raymond
Jones. His father, the late
Denzil Jones, was a
beloved teacher at Eight
Mile Rock High, who
died of cancer several
years ago.

And his uncle, Ray-
mond Jones, is Chief
Operating Officer of the
Freeport Container Port.

The family is devastat-
ed by his death.

Revolver found
after police stop
and search man

POLICE officers of the
Eastern Division were on
routine patrol in the area
of Elizabeth Estates at
9am on Sunday when they
stopped and searched a
man who was found in
possession of a 38
revolver and one live bul-
let for the firearm.

The man is expected to
be arraigned in court on
formal charges some time
this week.

EARNEST efforts and pro-
motions to attract visitors to
countries in the Caribbean
region, including the Bahamas,
have so far failed in bringing the
number of tourists to our shores

are similarly severely negatively
impacted,” he said.
Furthermore, the impact of
the economic crisis on the
Caribbean and the Bahamas has
resulted in the slowdown in new

cent in 2009, he confirmed.
Christine Thompson, Chief

economist in the Office of the

Prime Minister, and Louis

Harold Joseph, Ambassador to
the Bahamas from the Republic

of Haiti, accompanied the prime
minister to the forum which
focused on the “Economic
Transformation and Strength-
ening of Caribbean Economies
in Challenging Times.”

to match last year’s numbers,
Prime Minister Ingraham
revealed.

Speaking at the Regional
Forum on the Occasion of the
Inter-American Development
Bank’s 50th Anniversary in Port-
au-Prince, Haiti on Friday, Mr
Ingraham said that despite seri-
ous discounting and other incen-
tives offered in the travel and
hotel deals, occupancy levels
remain well below those
achieved last year by all of the
Caribbean tourism economies.

And on the employment
front, he said, to date the eco-
nomic downturn has resulted in
2,200 lay-offs in the Bahamas’
hotel sector, which amounts to
one per cent of the country’s
entire work force.

Mr Ingraham said that the
Bahamas was one of the first
countries in the region to feel
the effects of the slowing global
economy.

“Those countries that rely
heavily on the North American
market as a source for their vis-
itors, like the Bahamas, were
impacted earlier. But as the
global economic downturn
enveloped Western European
and Asian markets, all



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham
addressed the Regional Forum on the
occasion of the Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank’s 50th anniversary in
Port-au-Prince, Haiti on Friday.

Caribbean tourism economies,
like those of Barbados and the
Organisation of Eastern
Caribbean States, have suffered
widespread retrenchment,” he
said.

The impact of the decline in
visitor numbers, Mr Ingraham
said, “is being felt in all tourism-
related businesses including food
and beverage, beach sports,
handicraft and souvenir sales,
ground transportation, land and
sea excursions and tours, luxury
shopping and entertainment.”

“And suppliers to the sector

construction of hotels and
resorts, vacation homes, other
businesses and commercial
buildings, the prime minister
said.

“As in more developed
economies, construction serves
as a bell-weather for the state of
the economies of small
Caribbean economies,” he said.

“The slowdown in construc-
tion in our region has signalled
reduced foreign direct invest-
ment inflows with implications
for foreign reserves. Inevitably,
the slowdown in important eco-
nomic sectors is contributing to
an increase in unemployment.”

The tourism sector provides
employment for thousands of
independent entrepreneurs who
make good incomes from the
industry.

“The vast majority of these
small business operators have
seen their incomes reduced,
some drastically,” Mr Ingraham
said.

“Such shedding of high wage
earning labour is likely to have a
downward multiplier effect on
other sectors as a result of the
fall in aggregate demand.”

The Bahamian economy is
expected to contract by 3.9 per



Armed robbery and burglary investigated

By DENISE MAYCOCK

Mr Maycock, 50, a former police officer, was clos-






































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Te AM DAILY

hve rorves gwaureuooo | isto [WA | to [40 [mm [rote |

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Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police are investigating an armed
robbery and burglary that occurred at a residence on
Raleigh Drive, where one person was gun-butted
and injured by intruders.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle said the incident
occurred sometime around 1.53am on Friday when
four masked men stormed into a home and demand-
ed cash.

A complainant told police that she was at home
with her brother and children at the time. She
described one of the suspects as about 6ft tall, of
dark complexion, wearing a white mask and armed
with a handgun.

ASP Bootle reported that the brother was gun
butted, while the woman was able to flee the house
and escape. The children were not harmed, he said.

The suspects took the woman’s handbag, which is
valued at $50. Mr Bootle said the brother was treat-
ed for his injury at hospital.

Investigations are continuing into the shooting
and armed robbery of businessman Leslie Maycock,

ing his store around 10.45pm on Wednesday, July 15,
when two masked men robbed him of cash and shot
him in his left side.

The businessman remains in stable, but critical
condition in the Intensive Care Unit at Rand Memo-
rial Hospital.

Mr Bootle said no have arrests have made in the
matter. He said the police are urging members of the
public who can assist them to come forward.

“Anyone who may have been in the area between
9pm and 10.45pm and saw anything is asked to con-
tact 911 or the Crime tipster at 352-1919,” he said.

Mr Bootle stressed that the identity of persons
calling the crime tipster hotline will be held in the
strictest confidence.

He is urging businesspersons to be vigilant and
take precautions when operating, especially late in
the evening hours.

He said that cash deposits should be made fre-
quently, but not routinely at the same time.

Persons should also take note of individuals hang-
ing around their premises or lurking in the vicinity.

Mr Bootle is also advising persons to conduct
background checks of individuals before hiring

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By LLONELLA GILBERT
Bahamas Information Services

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham has criticised more developed
and industrialised countries of
sometimes arbitrarily changing the
rules for off-shore financial cen-
tres such as the Bahamas without
considering that lower standards
for the sector exist in their own
jurisdictions.

While the Bahamas remains
focused on meeting international
best standards in its financial ser-
vices industry, Mr Ingraham said
that any reform in the sector is
becoming increasingly difficult as
the industrialised countries
“appear to move the goal posts
for international financial centres
at will and without regard to low-
er standards being observed in
their own jurisdiction.”

Initiatives

Addressing the Regional Forum
on the occasion of the Inter-Amer-
ican Development Bank’s 50th
anniversary in Port-au-Prince,
Haiti on Friday, Mr Ingraham said
the Bahamas has forged ahead
with initiatives to better rationalise
the country’s tax regime, improve
efficiencies and strengthen its
financial regulatory framework.

While focused on devising mea-
sures to mitigate the effects of the
crisis and exploring means of
strengthening the country’s finan-
cial regulatory framework, the
government is fully conscious of
the origins of the global crisis and
the need for reform of the inter-
national financial architecture to
meet the interests of both devel-
oped and developing countries,
Mr Ingraham said.

A reform of special interest to
small Caribbean economies as it
relates to a level playing field in
the provision of international
financial services, he said, “is
increasingly important to us in
light of the limited scope for our
structurally dependent economies
to diversify.”

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Already many Caribbean coun-
tries have expended “considerable
resources” in reforming the finan-
cial services sector, beginning in
1999, with particular attention to
improving regulation and trans-
parency and in facilitating effective
exchange of information, he said.

He further told delegates that
the financial services sector pro-
vides important employment for
developing world professionals —
lawyers, accountants, insurance
and investment specialists, bankers
— many of whom would be other-
wise lost through “brain drain” to
the developed world.

“The cost of losing professionals
to the developed world is greater
than the loss of the individuals,” he
said. “In far too many instances,
the individual will have been edu-
cated and trained at public
expense.”

Mr Ingraham stressed that there
is a clear and urgent need for real
reform that will create a more
robust global financial system and
a more enduring world economy
capable of lifting all people to
higher standards of living.

Responding to the current eco-
nomic global crisis, the prime min-
ister said the Bahamas has
employed a number of mitigating
measures to alleviate the short-

term negative shock to highly vul-
nerable sectors of the society occa-
sioned by the global economic cri-
sis.

“Importantly, the Bahamas has
forged ahead with initiatives to
better rationalise our tax regime,
improve efficiencies and strength-
en our financial regulatory frame-
work.”

Crisis

While focused on devising mea-
sures to mitigate the effects of the
crisis and exploring means of
strengthening the country’s finan-
cial regulatory framework, the
government is fully conscious of
the origins of the global crisis and
the need for reform of the inter-
national financial architecture to
meet the interests of both devel-
oped and developing countries,
Mr Ingraham said.

A reform of special interest to
small Caribbean economies as it
relates to a level playing field in
the provision of international
financial services, he said, “is
increasingly important to us in
light of the limited scope for our
structurally dependent economies
to diversify.”

Already many Caribbean coun-

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tries have expended “considerable
resources” in reforming the finan-
cial services sector, beginning in
1999, with particular attention to
improving regulation and trans-
parency and in facilitating effective
exchange of information, he said.

Mr Ingraham said his govern-
ment supports the response of the
Inter-American Development
Bank to the current global eco-
nomic crisis.

“As the only multilateral insti-

MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 5

PM criticises industrialised countries over financial rules

tution from which the Bahamas
can access funding the IDB’s
adjusted policies and programmes
are welcomed.

“The need to replenish the
Bank’s Ordinary Capital and
Funds for Special Projects in light
of the current global economic cri-
sis is Supported by the Bahamas,”
he said. “We urge all developed
countries, who qualify to increase
the Bank’s resources and to accept
that action is needed now.”



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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



IT’S NO MYSTERY Queen's Certificate and Batige of Honour recipients

Bahamas real
estate today

Carmen Massoni



YOU don’t need a crystal ball to
try to predict the future of the real
estate market. Every time there is
a downturn, an upward trend
always follows.

The best course of action is to look at the causes, and
make decisions based on unbiased facts and incontestable
history.

As the choice of loan options grew these last few years, con-
sumers could buy a home more easily.

In the US Wall Street took notice of all the hot action in real
estate, and investment firms were able to shift the ownership of
mortgages to their managers and clients.

Then about three years ago, the market began cooling, as
incomes did not increase at the frantic pace that home prices did.
Investors had created an atmosphere of unrealistically high
appreciation.

The perfect storm was brewing.

This cycle of up and then down seems more drastic now,
because we enjoyed a longer than usual boom of activity, a full
decade of it between 1995 and 2005.

We should be seeing improvement across the board as 2009
draws to a close.

If you can, it’s wise to buy now — before the ball lands back
in the sellers’ court.

Great Western Pub & Grill

Home of The Great Western
Burger and many fine native



dishes.

St. Alban’s Drive (East)
Nassau, Bahamas










On Friday Government House
announced that the following
people will receive the Queen’s
Certificate and Badge of Honour
in the 2009 Queen’s Birthday
Honours:

Valentine Ronald

Farquharson

Nassau

In recognition of long service to
the community.

Reginald Haven Gibson
Nassau

In recognition of long service to
the community.

Celestine Eneas

Nassau

In recognition of outstanding
service to the Tourism Industry
(Straw Market) and to the
Church.

Ambrose Gouthro

Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
service to the community.

Joseph “Joe” Thompson
Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of services to busi-
ness, community service and
sports.

Raleigh Rexford Carroll
Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Neville Fritz Simmons
Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
and exemplary work in World
War II, the Public Service and
the hotel industry.

Philip Hilary Cartwright
Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Kay Hardy

Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition outstanding con-
tribution the field of education
and performing arts.

Eileen DeGregory

Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Evangelist Eulamae Johnson
Burnt Ground, Long Island

In recognition of long outstand-
ing public service career, also for
religion and community service.

Jerry Knowles
Simms, Long Island
In recognition of community ser-

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vice in the area of transporta-
tion.

Osborne A. Pinder

Miller’s Long Island

In recognition of long public ser-
vice career as an educator also
for religion and community ser-
vice.

Catechist Maxwell Knowles
Mangrove Bush, Long Island

In recognition of services to reli-
gion and the community.

Ezelia Carroll

McKenzie Hill, Long Island

In recognition of dedicated com-
munity and religious service.

Daniel Wallace

Duncan Town, Ragged Island
In recognition of dedicated com-
munity and religious service.

Nurse Inez Spence

Simms, Long Island

In recognition of dedicated and
committed service to the com-
munity in the area of health.

Ovina Cartwright

Cartwright, Long Island

In recognition of committed
and dedicated service in the
field of health and the commu-
nity.

Henry Knowles

Simms, Long Island

In recognition of committed and
dedicated service as a communi-
ty leader.

Richard Cartwright

Deadman’s Cay, Long Island

In recognition of services to reli-
gion, civic and community ser-
vices

Cyril Cartwright

McKenzie Hill, South Long
Island

In recognition of committed
community service.

Pastor Curtis Lawrence Moss
Fairfield, Crooked Island

In recognition of many years of
outstanding and dedicated ser-
vice to the community of
Crooked Island.

Maria Louise Pickering
Inagua

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Iva Rebecca Nixon

Mathew Town, Inagua

In recognition of many years of
dedicated and committed com-
munity service.

Alexander James Pratt
Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated services in civics
and to the community over many
long years.

Reverend Julius Dianza
Chisholm

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated service in the area of
religion, hospitality and construc-
tion.

Reverend Cleveland Murphy
Betsy Bay, Mayaguana

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated service in religion and
to the community over many
long years.

Cynthia Brown

Pirates Well, Mayaguana

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated services in business
and to the community over many
long years.

Nurse Gheneen Lindo

Nassau

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated services in the area of
health and to the community
over many long years.

Evangeline Rolle

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated services in the hospi-
tality industry, church and to the
community.

Myrthlyn Jones

Nassau

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated service as a public offi-
cer and also in child care and in
the church.

Percy Vincent Miller

Nassau

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated services in the hospi-
tality industry, church and to the
community.

Esther Ferguson-Curry

Nassau

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated services in the hospi-
tality industry, church and poli-
tics.

Reverend H. Hugh Smith
Nassau

In recognition of services to edu-
cation, religion, community ser-
vice and politics.

Howard Daniel Barr

Nassau

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated service in the areas of
education, religion and the com-
munity.

Sandra Clarke

Freeport, Grand Bahama.

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Queenie Hanna

Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Ronald Darville

Freeport, Grand Bahama

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Ivan George Davis
Nassau

OTe seek

Rael

ee Meee cad ee Wm yay

Kay Veronica Betgune

March 23rd, 1958 - July 20th, 2006

In recognition of services as a
community activist.

Esther Maria Davis

Nassau

In recognition of distinguished
public service as an accountant
in the Ministry of Agriculture.

Esther Burrows Cartwright
Nassau

In recognition of outstanding
community service.

Reverend Dr. Genius Wells
Pastor, Chapel on the Hill
Nassau

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated service in the area
of religion.

Genevieve McKenzie

Nassau

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated community service

Inez Cooper

Palmetto Point, Eleuthera

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated community service.

Franklin Cooper

Savannah Sound, Eleuthera

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated community service.

Reverend Samuel Johnson
Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated community ser-
vice.

Helen Davis

Rock Sound, Eleuthera

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated community service.

Reverend Oral Pinder

Captain Lewis Augustus Cay,
Abaco

In recognition of 35 years of ser-
vice in the area of aviation, espe-
cially the numerous night flights.

Cecil Mills

Abaco

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated community ser-
vice.

Ann Charlotte Parotti

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated community ser-
vice.

Vernon Malone

Abaco

In recognition of outstanding
and devoted service in the area
of business and religion.

Ritchie Albury

Man-O-War Cay, Abaco

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated community ser-
vice in the areas of business and
community service.

Bateman Sands

Cherokee Sound, Abaco

In recognition of 40 outstanding
years in the public service.

Walter Sweeting

Abaco

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated community ser-
vice.

Benjamin Pinder

Sandy Point, Abaco

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated community ser-
vice.

Scott Weatherford

Man-O-War Cay, Abaco

In recognition of outstanding and
dedicated community service.

Benjamin Havelock Rahming
Manager

Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC)
East Bay Street

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated public service.

Reverend Carl Oliver

Nicholls Town, Andros

In recognition of outstanding
and dedicated service in the area
of religion and to the communi-

ty.

Ve odd an
tC ONY Memory

The Lord is my shepherd: | shall not want

He maketh me to lie down in green pastures; he laadeth me
beside the still waters

He reslorath my soul: he leadath me in fa palhs of righteousness
far Fis rarna’s sake.

Yea. though | walk through the valley of tha shadew af death;
| will ear na avi for thow art with me:
thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.

Thou preparest a table before me in the presance of ming
enemies: thaw enaintest my head with oil: my cup runneth ower

Surely goodness.and marcy shall follow me all fie days of my life;
and i will devel in the house of the Lord for ewer,

Gone but nat forgotten!

Love Ginger, "her special Merk
DMS Staff Freasportand Nassau

The International Bazaar and host of friends and family


THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

Animals do their part to keep Miami zoo green



MIAMI become more eco-friendly and has saved the
park over $20,000.

THE animals at Miami’s Metrozoo are doing Tom Trump, Metrozoo’s horticulture super-
their part to help reduce the park’s ecological visor, says it made sense to recycle and reuse
footprint, according to Associated Press. whatever they could.

The excrements of elephants, giraffes, rhinos Which residents are making the largest con-

and other herbivores are being recycled every tribution? The five elephants at the zoo pro-

day to save landfill space. The poop is used asa _ — duce 1,400 pounds of poop per day. Nine rhi-

fertiziler and even to decorate the zoo grounds. noceroses deposit 750 pounds daily. And five
The project began last year in an effort to _ giraffes discharge about 500 pounds of dung.

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Latvian IMF lessons for the Caribbean

By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)

| HERE may be
lessons for

Caribbean countries in nego-
tiations between Latvia and
the International Monetary
Fund (IMF) for a rescue pro-
gramme totalling about
US$10.4 billion.

Latvia is a relatively small
member country of the Euro-




=
in
ss

WORLD VIEW

pean Union (EU). Its popu-
lation of 2.3 million is rough-
ly the same as the
Caribbean’s Jamaica. Until
1991 it was a member of the
Union of Soviet Socialist
Republics (USSR) dominat-
ed by Russia. With the break-
up of the USSR, Latvia

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regained its independent sta-
tus and elected to join the
EU in 2004.

Between 2000 and 2007,
Latvia enjoyed one of the
highest GDP growth rates in
the EU, but this collapsed in
late 2008 exacerbated by the
global economic crisis and
shortage of credit.

The economy dramatically
fell in the first quarter of
2009 by 18 per cent, the
biggest fall experienced by
any EU country.

Since last year, the Lat-
vian government has been
engaged in negotiations with
both the EU and the IMF on
the $10.4 billion bailout pro-
gramme.

Anxious to help an EU
member state, and mindful
that Latvia has pegged its
currency to the Euro — the
official currency of most of
the EU members - the EU
Commissioner for Econom-
ic and Monetary Affairs
Joaquin Almunia has
announced the release of $1.6
billion as a rescue loan pay-
ment but only after extract-
ing budget cuts worth $1 bil-
lion from the Latvian gov-
ernment.

In the event, the EU loan
is only 10 per cent of Latvia’s
needs, and it is the IMF to
which the government is
looking for the greater part
of its borrowing.

The going has not been
good. And, despite the
rhetoric about more flexibil-
ity in fiscal and monetary
policies in light of the pre-
sent and ongoing global
financial crisis, the IMF is still
pushing tight fiscal policy,
cuts in government spending





SIR RONALD SANDERS

and very low inflation as con-
ditions for its lending.

Before Latvia, Romania
faced similar problems with
the IMF. It is reported that
the IMF mission chief for
Romania said that in
exchange for $17.5 billion,
there were requirements to
bring down budget deficits
below 3 per cent of GDP,
restructure wages policies,
recalibrate pension schemes
and reduce inflation.

In this regard, the much
vaunted increase in IMF
resources up to $750 billion
after the G20 meeting in
London last April could
mean little. It seems that
what remains vital is the need
for reform of IMF terms for
lending, or, as the Third
World Network has suggest-
ed, “additional resources to
the IMF would give it the
means by which to discipline
crisis-hot countries the wrong
way, worsening the crisis for
them.”

Going back to Latvia
specifically, the government
announced that the IMF has
imposed fresh conditions for
it to qualify for rescue funds.
Other reports also indicate,
as this commentary is being
written, that Latvia has been
given a deadline by the IMF
to agree its conditions, or the
negotiations will end.

The Prime Minister, Vald-
is Dombrovskis, said the
negotiations had turned con-
tentious, largely over how
quickly to cut the country’s
budget deficit. The govern-



ment wants to reduce the
budget deficit, which could
hit 10 per cent of GDP this
year, to 3 per cent by 2012,
but the IMF wants a faster
rate of reduction.

Following riots in its Capi-
tal City, the Latvian govern-
ment is naturally unwilling to
accept the IMF proposals lest
discontent in the country
results in further upheavals.

The IMF also wanted
Latvia to devalue its curren-
cy, arguing that the present
link to the Euro is unsustain-
able. A devalued currency,
they say, would make Lat-
vian exports cheaper. But it
would also make imports
more costly and push-up the
cost of living. Fortunately
for Latvia the IMF appears
to be persuaded by the EU
to back-off from a require-
ment for devaluation at this
time.

N pies Latvia is
not out of the

woods. The Prime Minister
has said that IMF backing for
its whole programme is nec-
essary even if the govern-
ment raises the money it
needs from other sources.
The major areas of con-
tention appear to be: cutting
budget deficit levels, further
tax rises and reducing spend-
ing in key areas like educa-
tion, welfare and health even
though Latvia has already
made cuts that included
reductions in public sector
salaries and a 10 per cent
reduction in pensions.

Several Caribbean coun-
tries are now considering
engagement with the IMF to
help their ailing economics.

A few of them have
already entered special
arrangements that are not
rescue programmes.

For instance, St Vincent
and the Grenadines has an
arrangement under the
Exogenous Shocks Facility
(ESF) which has a higher
degree of flexibility and does
not include structural condi-
tions but does require a low
inflation rate.

Dominica has also received
$5.1 million from the IMF

under the same ESF. The
government had to commit
to aim for annual primary
surpluses of at least 3 per
cent of GDP so as to reduce
public debt.

It also had to agree to
finance capital largely with
external concessional
resources — a hard task
indeed at a time when con-
cessionary financing is dry-
ing-up.

Jamaica is presently talk-
ing with the IMF about a
possible Standby Agreement
for Foreign Exchange Bal-
ance of Payment Support.
The details of the sort of pro-
gramme that Jamaica is seek-
ing and the terms that the
IMF has put on the table are
not known as this commen-
tary is being written. But the
Finance Minister Audley
Shaw has said that “there is
no need for the great concern
for conditionalities that will
be oppressive; that will be
destructive to the social sec-
tor; that will be destructive
to the financial sector. Not
at all.”

Jamaica has enough expe-
rience with the IMF and
enough people who have
worked within the IMF, to
negotiate the best terms pos-
sible.

But, it is as well for all
Caribbean countries to keep
their eyes focused on the Lat-
vian experience to which the
IMF would be much more
sympathetic because of the
EU’s lobbying and the place
of its key member states on
the Executive Board. So far,
the IMF does not appear to
have relaxed its tough con-
ditionalities.

It is also necessary for the
Caribbean to join with oth-
ers for meaningful reform of
the IMF’s lending terms. The
existing terms could make
hard-hit economies worse
rather than better.

The forthcoming Com-
monwealth Finance Ministers
meeting is a good place to
advance the arguments for
urgent reform.

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

IDB anticipates the Bahamas |
will have borrowed $300m

between 2008 and 2012
FROM page one

ing measures to alleviate the short-term negative shock to highly :
vulnerable sectors of the society occasioned by the global eco- }

nomic crisis.

He told the forum delegates that for the first time the Bahamas

has put in place an unemployment benefit system.

“Our social safety net has been bolstered through increased }
social service benefits to the most vulnerable in our society. The }
government has taken steps to minimise the adverse effects of high }

electricity costs.”

To preserve jobs and create new employment opportunities, the :
government has accelerated a number of planned infrastructural }
projects, including major road and port improvements, the con- }
struction of the Nassau straw market, and accelerated construction }
or completion of a number of government office complexes, Mr }

Ingraham said.

Additional road works and general environment upgrade of :
parks and other recreational facilities around the country are }

also being undertaken.

“The government has put in place incentives to encourage i
the private sector to use the period of the downturn to upgrade }
and reposition their business enterprises, better positioning them- {
selves to take advantage of the economic turn around when it }

occurs,” he said.

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appears that the event has been successful in terms
of raising awareness. They had lots of participation,
people enjoyed themselves and they seemed to have
removed a significant number of lionfish from the
environment and as far as we’re concerned that’s a
very good thing.”

The event was organised by the Bahamas Nation-
al Trust in conjunction with the Department of
Marine Resources and the College of the Bahamas.
Fried lionfish fillets prepared by Alexandra Maillis-
Lynch from the August Moon Cafe at Lyford Cay
proved very popular among participants and curious
members of the public.

People compared the taste of the non-native fish,
which has raised major alarm bells as its highly
predatory nature and expanding population threat-
ens local marine life, to hogfish, grouper and yel-
lowtail.

Mr Braynen added: “It has helped to expose even
more people to the fact that lionfish can be used as
food and we think that this is perhaps the best
avenue that we will be able to pursue to reduce the
numbers of lionfish in the environment by turning
them into a fish that people see as a food source, that
commercial fishermen will want to take and that
people will want to buy.”

The heaviest single fish speared was also caught by
the crew of the boat “Shezam”. Weighing in at 1.98
pounds it was large, but fell far below the four to five
pounds to which lionfish have been known to grow.

Meanwhile, those determining who would take the
prize for the smallest fish had to resort to measuring
it by length not weight after the scale on site proved
not sensitive enough to differentiate between the five
tiniest fish caught, each weighing in at a mere two
tenths of a pound. The crew of “Too Reel” fol-
lowed by the Maillis family onboard “Jojo” won
first and second prize in this category.

There were several lionfish-related injuries on
the day, with two people having to sit out the
remainder of the event after receiving a lionfish
spine to the hand. In each instance the fish slid
down the spear, its venomous spines — which are on
top and bottom of the fish — puncturing the soft tis-
sue on the hands, leaving them swollen and the
divers in serious pain.

However, Mr Braynen said the key point is that

FROM page one

drive for the funds, and those
members of the public who con-
tributed, the Ministry of Labour

PUBLIC NOTICE

The: Beard
ranches) obs would Ee ood lis

Victims of tragedy

and Social Development yester-
day called for victims to come and
collect their monies from its

Healdiregss

riers! obo oa

HOPNTER,
THAN
on

BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST members Linda Turtle
and Robin Symonette, wife of Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette, hold up T-shirts that are being sold
to raise awareness of the need to control lion fish.

Invasive lionfish

such an incident is not as debilitating as some
believe.

“Although they are not happy about it they are
not on the floor, they are not dying,” he said.

He did note, however, that some people may be
more sensitive to the venom than others. “It is still
something very significant that we want people to be
aware of.”

Bronson Braynen, who was spearing with the
team onboard the boat “Ultimanovia,” said he took
part in the event as he feels it’s time for humans to
take the initiative to tackle the influx of the voracious
fish, which has no predators in the Atlantic as it
does in its native Pacific and Indian Oceans.

“It’s not good for the reef cos’ they eat every-
thing on the reef. So we’ve got to try and take charge
and spear some of them,” he said.

Peter Maillis said his team were able to pick up the
300 they captured primarily in the southwest of New
Providence. Other teams that went to the area of
Rose Island found the lionfish to be much less plen-
tiful. “Mostly we got them from wrecks and deeper
water, at between eight and 30 feet,” said Mr Mail-
lis.

Later this week the committee will present a
cheque to the BNT of the funds raised by the event,
which they expect to put towards more awareness
raising seminars in the out islands in particular.

headquarters on East Hill
Street on Tuesday and Wednes-
day this week between the
hours of 9am and Spm.

Cheques can be collected by
victims and their representa-
tives upon the production of
“satisfactory identification such
as a passport, voters card or
drivers license,” said the Min-
istry.

“Representatives of victims
must also produce written
authorisation allowing them to
collect cheques on behalf of the
victims of the Sea Hauler/Unit-
ed Star tragedy,” it added.

Victims and relatives of vic-

Lied hae



Water pressure

FROM page one

located behind the Sea-
grapes plaza, told The Tri-
bune.

The resident, who wished
to remain anonymous, said
that his wife suffers from a
kidney disease that requires
her to use the bathroom very
frequently. Unfortunately,
because of the problem with
the water in the area he said
this poses an incredible chal-
lenge.

“You can hardly flush the
toilet. We have to use buck-
ets for everything. We have
to gather some water in
buckets to be able to flush
toilets and bathe.

“Tt’s unhygienic, unsani-
tary and dangerous to our
health. It’s stinks and it’s
dirty,” he said.

The concerned husband
said that if his wife suffers
any health issues due to the
lack of water he is willing to
take legal action against the
government for Water and
Sewerage’s failure to provide
them with a basic human
necessity.

In addition to the concerns
about hygiene, the resident
said that bills for plumbing
work and toilet equipment
are also piling up.

“We constantly have to fix
things, clean the plumbing
because there is no water.
Who is going to pay those
bills?” he wanted to know.

A another resident of the
area, Antoinette Wells, who
has lived in Star Estates for
four years, said that water
pressure has always been
bad in the community, but
the situation has become
especially dire in the last

ear.

“Not only do we have to
use buckets to bathe our
skin, the water is also red,
rusty,” she said.

Ms Wells said that after a
long day at work she cannot
even come home to look for-
ward to a bath.

“T can’t even wash my

clothes, sometimes I take the
long journey to my daugh-

tims who may collect cheques

Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco
are: Tenneson Leslie, Carmen

dere 0 he © may Te AG 1a

ne a its que ty to make ope harks

GSO oly

ourchsses

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed to delivering superior quality service, to
training and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in
the community.

Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for
Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco.

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
Assisting the Branch Manager in managing the sales activities of
the Branch to enhance profitability.
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achieve corporate objectives.
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commercial loans.
Adjudicating credit lines within delegated authority.
Managing the Branch’s collection activities and the protection of
collateral.
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Ensuring specific objectives are developed through an
appropriate strategic plan to grow the Branch’s loan and deposit
portfolios and other offerings.
Adding value to the customers’ portfolio of financial services
by actively promoting, marketing, building and cross selling all
deposit / investment and consumer credit business. Ensuring
self and direct reports consistently provide highly courteous
customer service in an informed and thorough manner. Assisting
the Manager in attaining the targets incorporated in the Branch’s
financial plan

QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE:
Bachelor’s degree or higher in Business Administration, Banking
& Finance or a related discipline from an accredited University.
Minimum of eight years commercial banking experience with a
minimum of 3 years supervisory / managerial experience.
Experience in managing a diverse loan portfolio and assessing
loan quality.

Detailed knowledge of Retail / Commercial / Mortgage lending
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Excellent leadership and coaching skills

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Commonwealth Bank is a Great place to work! We offer an
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Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before

July 24, 2009 to:

Human Resources Department
Re: Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco
P.O. Box SS-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Telefax: (242) 393-8073
E-mail address: hr@combankltd.com

©2009 CreativeRelations.net

“Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their
interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those
under consideration will be contacted.”



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ter to wash my clothes
there,” she said.

Up until now the residents
said they have only received
vague explanations and emp-
ty promises from the Water
and Sewerage Corporation
regarding their problem.

Attempts by The Tribune
to reach executives of the
Water and Sewerage Corpo-
ration over the weekend
were unsuccessful.

Sir Milo Butler's
grandson shot
FROM page one

reportedly nicked his femur
bone but did not rupture any
major blood vessels.

Minister of State for Social
Services Loretta Butler-
Turner, first cousin to Mr
Butler, said that her family is
especially grateful to the per-
sons who were in the area
that night and immediately
assisted in the situation.

“He was the only one
there at night when it hap-
pened, but fortunately there
were some passersby who
came to help as soon as they
heard the gunshot. They
were some really good peo-
ple who reached out to him.
They acted expeditiously
and got an ambulance to the
scene and the family was
able to meet him at the hos-
pital,” she said.

Mrs Butler-Turner said
that following the shooting
the family immediately dis-
cussed the fact that more
security will be required at
the business.

Mr Moss said police are
concerned that the robbers
were purposefully targeting
any member of the Butler
family who was closing up
the establishment that night.

He said CDU will be
meeting with the southern
police division who in turn
will speak to business owners
in that area about security
measures.

“We’re going to discuss
some safety tips with them
and some assistance that
may be rendered once
they’re closing their stores,”
he said.

Supt Moss said police are
appealing to anyone with
information concerning Sat-
urday night’s shooting to
contact the authorities as
soon as possible.

The Butler family was
recently the recipient of bad
news when former speaker
of the House of the Assem-
bly Milo Butler Jr died last
month at the age of 72 after
a long battle with heart dis-
ease.
THE TRIBUNE

S
i



MONDAY, JULY 20,

Darling regains
bodytuilding title

New
woman
champion
emerges



trophy.

DONNA WILLIAMS

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



HILE James
‘Jay’ Darling
regained his
men’s nation-
al title, a new female emerged as
champion in the Bahamas Body-
building and Fitness Federation’s
29th Mr/Ms Bahamas National
Championships.

Darling once again dominated
the middleweight division and
out-posed bantamweight cham-
pion Paul ‘Mighty Mouse’ Wil-
son, welterweight Raymond
Tucker, light-middleweight Ray
Whylly, light-heavy Desmond
Bain, heavyweight Charles John-
son and super-heavy Teddy Gray
to cart off the Mr. Bahamas title
that he lost last year to Aaron
Green.

But the large crowd at the
National Center for Performing
Arts were stunned on Saturday
night when first year heavyweight
Donna Williams stepped on stage.

SEE page 12

Faye Rolle.

E



2009

MINISTER OF STATE for Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard presents James Darling with the winning

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NEW CHAMPION Donna Williams is matched against last year’s champion

PHOTOS: Ashley Taylor

Atkins prepares for shot at
another medal in Germany

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH the IAAF World Championships in Ath-
letics less than a month away, sprinter Derrick
Atkins finally got in high gear as he prepares for a
shot at another medal in Berlin, Germany.

Atkins, the reigning silver medalist from the 2007
Championships in Osaka, Japan, raced to a sea-
son’s best of 10.00 seconds in a meet in Zaragoza on
the European Athletics Premium Meeting.

Francis Obikwelu of France finished second in
10.08 and Samuel Francis of Qatar took third place
in the same time.

Atkins, the national 100 champion, took the first
of his second semifinal heat in 10.13. Both times
improved on their previous season’s best of 10.17 in
Berkeley, California that he ran on May 1.

Atkins’ performance came two days after Olympic
triple champion and world record holder Usain Bolt
sped to a meet record of 9.79 in Paris, France on Fri-

day. In that Golden League meet, Chris ‘Bay’ Brown
had to settle for second place in 45.44 behind reign-
ing world champion Jeremy Wariner of the United
States, who won the men’s 400 in 45.28.

Brown, however, got some revenge on Ameri-
can David Neville, who dove across the finish line at
the Olympic Games last year in Beijing, China to
edge him out for the bronze. Neville was fourth Fri-
day in 45.49.

Veteran Chandra Sturrup continues to prove to be
a contender, this time coming up second in the wom-
en’s 100 in 11.15 behind Jamaican world leader Ker-
ron Stewart, who won in 10.99.

“My race went well, but my start was terrible,”
said Sturrup about her performance. “I am happy
that I was still able to place top two. I looking for-
ward to running sub 10 but I will take the second
place for now.”

Also Paris, Olympic bronze medalist Leevan
‘Superman’ Sands cleared 16.78 metres for sixth
place.

The winning leap was 17.17 by Phillips Idowu of
Great Britain.





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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS












































FORMER MULTIPLE national
champion Della Thomas makes a
return.

BANTAM WEIGHT champion Paul
“Mighty Mouse” Wilson.

Wednesday July 15th, 2009
from Camperdown (east Nassau)

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DR. NORMAN GAY, a long-time bodybuilding competitor and e

xecutive, is presented with a Lifetime Achieve-

ment Award. Pictured from left to right are: Richard Demeritte, BOA president Wellington Miller, Dr. Gay, Min-
ister of State for Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard, and BBFF president Danny Sumner.

BODY fitness competitors.



Williams turned out to be a giant killer as she
dethroned her Ironman training partner Faye Rolle
and former national and international queen Della
Thomas in taking the Ms. Bahamas overall title.

“T felt good especially after you put your effort
into your dieting and you hope that you go out
there and put on a good show,” said Williams, who
ever competed in any sport prior to Saturday.

“T tried hard and I prayed before I went out, ask-
ing God to help me to get through the competition.
I was really surprised that I was able to preserved.”

Williams credited a lot of her success to the train-
ing that she got from Wellington ‘Cat’ Sears, who
helped her to trim down from what she called an
“oversize woman who never wore a two piece biki-
niin public.”

Surprised herself with her performance, Williams
said she had to keep reminding herself that she was
going up against some great female competitors in
runner-up Faye Rolle and third place finisher Del-
la Thomas.

“But I did it,” she said.

Williams said she will now prepare herself for
the Central American and Caribbean Championship
coming up in September and hopefully produce
another stunning performance.

“T like winning. It’s a beautiful feeling,” Darling
said. “This year, I didn’t have anybody to train, so I
just concentrated fully on me and it paid off.”

With the CAC fast approaching, Darling said he
will definitely going after the pro card, awarded to
the overall champion. But if he doesn’t get it, he will
continue to work hard at it.

“T’m not just going to focus on the pro card, but
the competition itself,” he said. “I thought this year,
Teddy (Gray) looked pretty good and Desmond
(Bain) was much tighter. So I was really pleased
that I won and now I can get ready for CAC.”

The showdown was actually between Darling and
Gray, who won the super-heavyweight title over
Kenny Green and Shawn McPhee.

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MIXED PAIRS champions Stephen Robinson
and Faye Rolle.

Darling regains national title

FROM page 11

“T’ve been training around the clock, so this was a
good opportunity to see where I’m at against Jay
Darling,” said Gray, a former track sprinter. “I real-
ly want to go to CAC and see if I can get my pro
card.”

Charles Kemp, however, was hoping for another
upset after he dethroned last year’s Mr. Bahamas
Aaron Green in the heavyweight division.

“It was a rough one. Last year, I followed Aaron
Green and this year, I bucked him again,” said the
media cameraman. “It was really good to finally
get the win over him. But this is a sport of age and
every year, I’m going to just take it one step at a time
until I finally win it all. Thanks to Joel Stubbs’ help,
I’m getting there.”

In the fitness competition, Teshell Mackey cap-
tured the overall title, while Charnice Bain from
Grand Bahama was awarded the body fitness title.

“T think I did very well. I came here to win and I
think I did that very well,” said Mackey, the fitness
tall champion. “My routine was perfect and I exe-
cuted it well. I just have to do some changes for
CAC and I will be okay.”

Bain, who won the body fitness C category over
fellow Grand Bahamian Petra Brice and Mackey,
said her performance was just “awesome” and she
gave God “the glory.”

The repeat champion who went on to finish fourth
at the CAC Championships said she worked
extremely hard to get ready for this year’s competi-
tion. “I want to finally get the gold for the Bahamas,”
said Bain, the wife of light-heavyeight champion
Desmond Bain. “I’m just extremely happy that I
won and I will get to compete for the Bahamas
again.”

Cecilee Hilton won the body fitness A over
Lakeisha Miller and Dawnita Fry, while Anglique
Williamson was the body fitness A champion.

“At first, I was nervous, but as the competition
went on, I got more relaxed,” said Williamson,
whose been training under Sears for the past 15
years but finally decided to enter a competition this
year. “I just have to train a little harder.”

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Tel: (242) 302-0130 Fax: (242) 323-7272






© Boxing

Floyd Seymour
to return

home to help
amateur boxing
programme

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

HAVING moved to Mary-
land where he has estab-
lished an amateur boxing
club, ‘Pretty Boy’ Floyd Sey-
mour has decided to return
home to give back to the
amateur boxing programme
that has helped him in his
career.

Seymour, now a full-time
trainer, presented his cousin,
Andre Seymour, with a bag
full of training gear for his
Carmichael Knockout Box-
ing Club while he came
home for a break this past
weekend.

“This donation is to help
out with the boxers as I try
to give something back,”
said Floyd Seymour, who has
been in the United States for
more than a decade after he
quit boxing.

“Whatever I can, I will try
to help. I know that the guys
are always in need, so I will
try to come back home every
quarter, three months or so,
and help the association and
the amateur programme.”

The Inagua native, who
represented the Bahamas at
a number of international
amateur competition, said
that too many Bahamians
have left and excelled over-
seas, but they never return to
help the programme that got
them started.

“By me being a Bahamian,
leaving here at the age of 22
years old, whatever I can do
in my power, I got to do it,”
he said. “For me being in the
position that Iam in now,
this is because of the
Bahamas.

“T think if we do some-
thing like this that ’m doing,
if the track, basketball and
other athletes do the same
thing, we could be a much
better position. We need to
do more for the kids who are
coming up.”

Seymour said all Andre
Seymour has to do is give
him a call and he will assist
him.

Coaching

While in town, Seymour
also took the time out to
share his coaching expertise
with Carl Hield and Valenti-
no Knowles, who are prepar-
ing to go to their third and
second World Champi-
onships at the end of August.

Seymour has also opened
his home and his training
facility to the two boxers to
come to Maryland to get in
some training in Maryland
before they go to the World
Championships. Andre Sey-
mour, who also serves as the
national coach for the World
Championships, scheduled
for Japan, said he’s pleased
that Floyd Seymour has
agreed to assist his Knockout
Boxing Club and the nation-
al amateur programme.

“The equipment that he
brought with him, we will
definitely be putting them to
good use,” Seymour said.
“We have a number of
young boxers in our club and
we are always in need for
equipment for them to train
with.”

As for the training camp
that will be set up in Mary-
land, Seymour said it will be
good for both Hield and
Knowles to travel there to
train, especially considering
the fact that the training
facilities in Cuba is now
closed for the summer.

Both Hield and Knowles
have indicated that they are
excited about teaming up
with Floyd Seymour in
Maryland as they prepare for
the biggest tournament for
the year.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
eteto Mal Tfo/ ars
on Mondays
PAGE 14, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



CENTROBASKET U-17 CHAMPIONSHIPS, MEXICO

Women’s team to return home winless

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE women’s national team didn’t stand a chance
against their competitors at the Centrobasket Under-
17 Championships in Aguas Calientes, Mexico.

The team will return home winless, having lost
all five of their games played by more than 20 points
as they finished at the bottom of the standings.

The tournament served as qualifier for the 2010
FIBA U-19 World Championships for Women. The
top three advanced to the championships.

Although they didn’t win a game, the Bahamas
placed a couple of players in the top ten individual
categories.

Leading the way was Taneka Sandiford, who was
seventh in points with a total of 63 for an average of
12.6 per game. She also led the free throws made with
35 for a 7.0 average, was ninth in rebounds with 37
(28 offensive and nine defensive) for a 7.4 average,
was third in free throws average, making 35-of-61 for
57.4 and was fifth in steals with 18 for a 3.6 average.

Britenique Harrison followed Sandiford at No.10
in rebounds with 36 (24 offense and 12 defense) for
a 7.2 average and she led in block shots with a total
of 13 for a 2.6 average.

The others were Shadell Williams, who was 10th in

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blocks with three for a 0.6 average and Latonya
Hamilton, who was ninth in steals with 16 for a 3.2.
average.

¢ Summaries of their games played are as follows:

On Saturday, the Bahamas played its final game,
losing 61-48 to previously winless Guatemala. The
Bahamas trailed 15-9 after the first quarter and out-
scored Guatemala 12-8 in the second half for a 23-21
deficit at the half.

But in the third quarter, Guatemala went on a
22-10 spurt and they never looked back, although the
Bahamas tried one final comeback in the fourth on
a 16-15 run.

Sandiford led the way for the Bahamas with 13
points and 11 rebounds in 38 minutes of play. Hamil-
ton had 11 points, 10 rebounds and assists in 34 min-
utes and Harrison 10 points and three rebounds in 27
minutes.

On Friday, the Bahamas were routed by Mexico
115-35 after falling behind 24-13 after the first peri-
od. They were out-scored 33-9 in the second quarter,
31-7 in the third and 27-6 in the fourth.

Sandiford once again had the hot hands for the
Bahamas with 10 points and 11 rebounds in 36 min-
utes. Aren Pratt was the next highest scorer with
eight points, four rebounds and three steals in 28
minutes.

In their third game on Thursday, the Bahamas

fell 68-52 to Costa Rica in what was probably their
best production as they fell behind only 10-7 after the
first quarter, 26-19 at the half and 47-42 at the end of
the third.

Harrison had the high honors for the Bahamas
with 12 points and 12 rebounds in 27 minutes; San-
diford had nine points and eight rebounds in 37 min-
utes and both Pratt and Williams chipped in with
eight.

In their second game on Wednesday, the Bahamas
had another good showing, despite losing 77-34 to
Puerto Rico. They actually only trailed 25-10 after
the first quarter and 45-21 at the half. But in the
third, they were out-scored 24-4 as the game got
away from them.

Sandiford came up with 10 points and five
rebounds in 36 minutes and Harrison, Williams and
Ashlee Bethel all contributed six. Hamilton added
five.

And in their opener against the Virgin Islands on
Tuesday, the Bahamas dropped a 74-54 decision
after falling behind 16-11 at the end of the first and
38-22 at the half. They were out-scored 20-7 in the
third.

Sandiford finished with a game high 21 points
with eight steals in 26 minutes. Harrison had nine
points and 11 rebounds and Hamilton seven points
and 10 rebounds.

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 15

Illegal immigration issues

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

AS THE summer heat bears
down upon us, so it seems does the
unbearable influx of illegal immi-
grants, for as to quote a Bahamian
song, “they coming by boat, they
coming by plane, some coming in
wheelchair and walking with cane.”

Of course, for those familiar with
the song, they aren’t coming to “‘see
Theresa, the Bahamian Mona
Lisa!”

These days, thousands of illegal
Haitians, Jamaicans, Chinese, Euro-
peans and Dominicans are invad-
ing our territorial boundaries.
Although Jamaicans, Europeans,
Dominicans and the Chinese
migrate illegally in much smaller
numbers, we must ensure that they
do not become the forgotten ille-
gal immigrants, who are eventually
emboldened to operate with
impunity.

More than any other group of
immigrants, hordes of illegal
Haitians stealthily make the trek
up the Bahama Island chain, some-
times with the assistance of treaso-
nous Bahamian boat
captains/sailors. Just last week the
Royal Bahamas Defence Force
apprehended nearly 200 illegal Hait-
ian immigrants. However, if much
of the RBDF’s meager resources
were primarily focused on one area
of New Providence during the last
apprehension exercise, can you
imagine how many illegals would
have entered town if several, say
three or four, rickety boats had
docked at different entry points with
only one of them being arrested?

In recent years, the immigrant
tide has been swelling with the large
exodus of boat people from a land
of stifling poverty. Haiti has failed to
complete its transition from a tra-
dition society to a social and eco-
nomic modernity. It has instead
become a nation crippled by coups,
a hotbed of tyranny and political
instability and a nation whose citi-
zens have emigrated in mass to
become an economic/social mill-
stone around the necks of neigh-
boring countries.

Haiti’s leaders have left their
countrymen to languish in a state
of unspeakable poverty. The Hait-
ian economy/society is in tatters due
to misrule and its poor governance
since its bloody assumption of Inde-
pendence more than 200 years ago.
The despotic rule of politicians, who
abused power and ripped-off the
national treasury in their voracious
bid to enhance their personal for-
tunes, have fuelled emigration from
Haiti and caused it to come to be
seen as the Western Hemisphere’s
hungriest and perhaps most tragic
independent state. In many
instances, much of Haiti’s misfor-
tune is self-inflicted, through cen-
turies of corruption, grotesque vio-
lence and mismanagement.

For many Haitians, the Bahamas
is a gateway to their pursuit of hap-
piness and a better life and/or a pas-
sageway to America. Illegal immi-
grants, of all nationalities, are a
strain on this country’s safety nets.
While most Bahamians exhibit a
prickliness about illegal immigrants,
sadly, many of them appear to have
become indifferent and accustomed
to bad news on immigration.

Indiscipline, corruption, specula-
tion and bureaucratic inertia are the
four main vices weighing down our
society/economy, and it’s ever more
apparent in our wishy-washy, self-
serving outlook on combating illegal
immigration. It is high-time we
enunciate a clear strategy in our
fight against this social plague.

Similar to the bush people of
Africa, we have the bush people of
the Bahamas, who populate the
bushes of Cowpen Road,
Carmichael Road, Fox Hill and
Adelaide. Anyone who wanders
deep enough into these bushy

*y

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A DRI AN

enclaves would stumble upon
sprawls of squalor, as camps of
squatters occupy clapboard huts
jammed together without sanita-
tion—no doubt also creating a
breeding ground for disease. In the
bush, these illegal immigrants pay
no rent or property tax, no national
insurance, no water or phone bills
and no electricity charges—many
times running drop-cords from one
end of the bush to another. Some-
times, these persons do pay
unscrupulous Bahamians, who
threaten to alert the authorities or
purport to own the land on which
they squat, $50 or more per
week/month. Wasn’t there a move

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afoot a few years ago to demolish all
new shanty homes in Marsh Har-
bour? Did that ever come to
fruition? These firetraps do not
adhere to the government’s building
codes nor do illegals have permis-
sion from the relevant agencies for
building permits or the use of
Crown Land?

While I’m empathetic to their
plight and desperation, it is not fea-
sible for our country’s survival if it’s
overrun by parasitic foreign enti-
ties—illegal migrants.

If the immigration department
really wants to conduct an audit of
Haitian nationals living here, it
should start by launching hiking



expeditions, rambling through the
bushes of Cowpen, Carmichael, Fox
Hill, Exuma and Abaco. In the
bushes is where the real answers
lie! If this department is serious
about flushing out illegal immi-
grants, it would check the bushes
and locate the remote, dusty vil-
lages that are stashed away in the
rough, shrub terrain of certain parts
of the Bahamas. Bush raids and
raids on suspected business places
would undoubtedly net thousands
of illegal immigrants. Gun-toting
Immigration and Defence Force
officers should also mount road-
blocks in areas suspected of being
heavily populated by immigrants—
this would also discourage legal res-
idents from harbouring their illegal
countrymen.

Immigration officials must spend
more time carrying out follow-ups

SEE page 16

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THE TRIBUNE





FROM page 15

and spot checks to ensure that if
work permits have expired and are
not being renewed, that these for-
mer holders of work permits would
have departed the country. As it
relates to many other foreign
nationals, immigration officers
should check the status of those per-
sons holding white-collar positions
at private/commercial banks,
accounting firms, hotel management
and those Chinese restaurants/food
stores.

Illegal immigration had unques-
tionably also brought a streak of
nastiness and criminality. According
to a source at the prison, “there is a
rising number of Haitian-Bahami-
ans, Haitians and other immigrants
in prison for violent crimes.” It is
safe to assume that a good percent-
age of the street violence being per-

Illegal immigration

petrated today is by disenfranchised
Haitian-Bahamians who are state-
less, bitter and feel rejected by the
only society that they know.

In many instances, these indi-
viduals are unable to obtain good
jobs, travel overseas or obtain a col-
lege degree as the odds are stacked
against them and their lack of status
is an overriding impediment to their
upward mobility socially.

Has COB modified its policy
that required Bahamian-born stu-
dents, who did not possess proof of
citizenship, to pay the rate of non-
Bahamians and therefore spend
twice as much time saving as they
are also handicapped when trying to
attain scholarships? Has this pre-
ventable privation many students
have faced due to the ineptitude of

the immigration officials and the
inflexible, apathetic stance of COB
representatives, been ironed out?

After proper and reasonably
timed vetting, citizenship should be
granted to the qualified offspring
of immigrants born here, therefore
allowing them to integrate and have
a greater appreciation for and an
allegiance to this country. Although
the Bahamas has a distinct cultural
identity and a stable Parliamentary
democracy, our society has the bear-
ings of a peaceful melting pot that
should unquestionably answer ques-
tions about assimilation and nation-
al identity for those who feel dis-
enfranchised.

In order to combat the illegal
migration quagmire that our coun-
try has for so long been bogged














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down with, we must refocus our
efforts on apprehending of ALL
illegals—not discriminating—and
offering rewards/bounties to any-
one willing to give information
(snitch) as to the whereabouts of
illegal migrants as well as those peo-
ple hiring and assisting them.

We must also serve to protect
immigrants from exploitation by
police officers and conduct stings
and fire crooked
immigration/defence force officers,
while also protecting legal immi-
grants from exploitation for slave
wages or sex. I’m told that some
persons brought into households as
baby sitters, housekeepers and
maids—Filipinos, Jamaicans, etc—
are quite frequently blackmailed
for sexual favours, especially if their
work permits are up for renewal.

Bahamian citizens and consec-

utive governments have taken too
much of a blasé approach to illegal
immigration, now and then bleat-
ing and griping about the problem
but failing to act, many times even
hiring “my Haitian” to perform
tasks for little to no pay.

When will the US cease its unfair
policies on immigration and grant
the same wet foot/dry foot policy
granted to the Cubans to the
Haitians? Why are the Haitians not
afforded the same privilege? Could
it be race related?

Over the years, the political
approach to the immigration crisis
has given little hope. Avaricious
politicians who spend time talking
and using immigration as a political
prop to arouse the passions of the
electorate every campaign season
should cease this sick, politically
expedient practice and offer real

solutions. The hypocrisy of these
same politicians who mouth plati-
tudes about stamping out illegal
immigration from a political plat-
form every five years leaves me,
and definitely most discerning
Bahamians, frothing at the mouth.
With that said, I must also note that
the present minister of state and his
director have shown flashes of
reform in their struggle against ille-
gal immigration and promotion of
immigration reform.

As we face gloomy economic
times, the government should also
look at reserving deportations by
plane for longer distances and
deport illegals from this region to
their Caribbean homesteads on mail
boats or barges.

Mass illegal immigration is a
Frankenstein-type monster that, if
not properly handled, will inevitably
turn and devour nearly every aspect
of our identity. We must realize that
in our response to all illegal immi-
gration, we are serving as custodians
of our cultural beliefs. Indeed, we
do live in an age of globalization
and must cope with a global soci-
ety—just not illegals.

Yes, let’s let tolerance and
enforcement cohabit with compas-
sion and toughness as we combat
this ever growing problem. I do not
propose bigotry or xenophobia—
only that we reclaim our birthright
and protect our national identity
before it’s lost!

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THE TRIBUNE
q
b US



CLICO
liquidator
in talks
over sale
of critical
asset

* “Two to three buyers’
interested in Florida
real estate development
that accounts for 63% of
company’s $116m assets

* Sale at right price would
cover all company’s
secured creditors

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CLICO (Bahamas) liquida-
tor is in talks with two to three
potential buyers of the Florida-
based real estate development
that accounts for almost 63 per
cent of the insolvent insurer’s
assets, with the sale and pur-
chase price key to determining
whether all secured creditors
recover 100 per cent of what is
due to them.

Tribune Business has
obtained US court documents
showing that Craig A. ‘Tony’
Gomez, the Baker Tilly Gomez
partner acting as CLICO
(Bahamas) court-appointed liq-
uidator, has been appointed
president of Wellington Pre-
serve, the Florida-based real
estate project in which some
$73.628 million of the insurer’s
$116.965 million total assets
were ultimately directed into.

Mr Gomez’s appointment is
designed to protect and pre-
serve Wellington Preserve as an
asset for the benefit of CLICO
(Bahamas) policyholders,
depositors and creditors. He will
be able to prevent the disposal
of any cash or other assets held
by the project, and protect it
from potential litigants and
creditors.

And Tribune Business can
also reveal that Mr Gomez’s
appointment as Wellington Pre-
serve president has coincided
with the south Florida US
Bankruptcy Court granting
CLICO (Bahamas) liquidation
recognition as a ‘recognised for-
eign main proceeding’ under
US Chapter 15 bankruptcy
laws.

This development, as Mr
Gomez urged in his pleadings,
will give him “breathing room
to conduct an orderly review”
of CLICO (Bahamas) US-
based assets which, apart from
Wellington Preserve, are also
alleged to include an investment
in the ‘W’ hotel property locat-
ed in Fort Lauderdale, Broward
County.

Recognition by the US bank-
ruptcy court will enable Mr

SEE page 9B

a third |
une ean not be held



WEDNESDAY,

in

O.CalsOrB ESR 23a





2008

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

10,000 yards target for
4-month cruise ‘D-day’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Nassau har-
bour dredging
must extract an
average 10,000
cubic yards of fill
per day to meet the Govern-
ment’s autumn 2009 deadline
for the port to accommodate
RoyalCaribbean’s largest cruise
ship class, an Environmental
Impact Assessment (EIA) also
confirming that the Ingraham
administration and its advisers



TENNYSON WELLS

Ex-FNM
minister

blasts

Arawak
port

* Says PLP’s proposed Clifton
Pier port could have been
constructed for ‘half’
$200m quoted, more
like $100-$150m

* Wells says he advocated
for Clifton or Coral
Harbour since 1987

* Hits at government for
lack of transparency and
fact public ‘doesn’t know a
Christ thing that’s going on’

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

AN ex-FNM MP and Cabi-
net Minister believes the
Christie administration’s plan
to move the Bay Street ship-
ping facilities to a new port at
Clifton Pier could have been
done for half the $200 million
cost quoted, and backed PLP
claims that so-called ‘special
interest groups’ drove the cur-
rent Government to choose
Arawak Cay as the new loca-
tion.

Tennyson Wells told Tribune
Business that he had suggested
since 1987 that the downtown
Nassau shipping facilities be
moved from Bay Street to
either Clifton Pier or Coral
Harbour.

"As a nationalist and some-
body who would look toward
the country moving forward, I
would not have put the port on
Arawak Cay. I would take the
risk and spend $100 to $150 mil-
lion [on Clifton Pier]," said Mr
Wells.

He suggested that the Ingra-
ham administration was lacking
in transparency when it came

SEE page 8B

Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life



* Government rejected construction of new island to store Nassau harbour dredge, report says

* PLP’s south-west port plan ‘suffers disadvantages’, with Arawak Cay
only site from cost and proximity basis for dredge storage

* Arawak Cay extension to impact fishermen and tour boat operators, EIA suggests

* Silver Cay ‘available for sale’

did consider creating an entire-
ly new island west of Arawak
Cay.

The EJA for the storage/use
of dredged material produced

by the Nassau harbour excava-
tion, produced by Bahamas-
based Blue Engineering, said
Boskalis, the company con-
tracted to do the Nassau Har-

2% Stamp Tax

‘will not

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN realtors
would “love it” if Stamp Tax
rates were rationalised to a
uniform 2 per cent as it would
likely increase real estate

happen’

Realtors would
‘love it as no brainer’
on transaction
volume boost

transaction volumes, a leading industry executive told Tribune
Business, but the Government’s desperate need for revenue
meant “it’s never going to happen”.

Mike Lightbourne, president of Coldwell Banker Light-
bourne Realty, commenting on a two-year old proposal sub-
mitted to government to reduce all Stamp Tax rates to 2
per cent, said: “We’d love it, but government revenues would
fall enormously. It’s not going to happen.”

Pointing out that at one time Stamp tax rates for all real
estate transactions involving Bahamians stood at 6 per cent,
with 12 per cent for foreigners, Mr Lightbourne told Tri-
bune Business: “I just don’t think, from the Government’s
standpoint, that they can afford to do that, because every time
you turn around someone’s not paying Customs or the taxes

they owe.

“They’d [the Government] have to make it up from some-
where else, and I don’t know if it’s possible to do that.”

As to the impact on the Bahamian real estate industry if
Stamp Tax rates were reduced to 2 per cent across the Board,

Mr Lightbourne added: “It
would be fantastic. It would

SEE page 8B



bour dredging, would have to
employ a pump to suck the
excavated material into a
pipeline that would then trans-
port it to Arawak Cay.

“Dredging production is an
extremely important aspect of
this project,” the EJA said,

SEE page 6B

Cabinet backs
Training plan
with no change

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Cabinet has approved
the proposal for the National
Training Programme without
making any amendments to it,
the minister for labour and
social development has con-
firmed to Tribune Business.

Dion Foulkes, speaking from
Mayaguana, confirmed to this
newspaper that Cabinet had
approved all the recommenda-
tions from the committee that
was set up to develop and over-
see the initiative, which is
designed to re-train some 1,000
Bahamians who were laid-off
from their jobs as a result of the
economic recession.

“T can confirm that it [the
Training Programme] has been
approved, and we will formally
make an announcement
[today],” Mr Foulkes told Tri-

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bune Business. “The entire pro-
posal was accepted without
amendment.

The minister said that the
Training Programme would be
a year-long initiative lasting
until June next year, and would
involve three different phases.

When asked by Tribune Busi-
ness whether the Government
was eyeing the National Train-
ing Programme as a long-term
initiative, Mr Foulkes replied:
“Tnitially, the feeling is to see
the effectiveness of the current
project, and after this is finished
we will do an assessment to
where we go from there. I don’t
want to pre-empt any decision
the Cabinet may make.”

Meanwhile, Khaalis Rolle,
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s president who is also
heading the committee over-

SEE page 4B

—_
Colinalmperial.


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

ee



By Fidelity Capital
Markets

LAST week was quiet in the
Bahamian market, with
investors trading in five out of
the 24 listed securities.

Of these, one advanced, one
declined and three remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 3,100 shares
changed hands, representing a
decrease of 5,922 shares or 66
per cent, compared to the pre-
vious week's trading volume of
9,022 shares.

Consolidated Water Compa-
ny (CWCB) was the sole
advancer last week with 1,000

International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold





International Stock Market Indexes:

DJIA

S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei

BRITISH

Weekly % Change
0.8961 +4.10
1.6340 -0.12
1.4108 +0.48
Weekly % Change
$64.32 +6.26
$937.20 +2.68
Weekly % Change
8,743.94 +6.85
940.38 +6.54
1,886.61 +7.65
9,395.32 +1.12



shares trading hands, its stock
ending the week at $2.99.

FamGuard Corporation
(FAM) fell by $0.39 to end the
week at a new 52-week low of
$6.60 on a volume of 1,000
shares.

BOND MARKET

Investors traded $2,000 (par
value) Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
Series D Notes Due 2015
(FBB15).

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

There were no financial
results reported by any of the 24
listed companies during the
week.

Dividend Notes:
e Consolidated Water

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¢ Benchmark (Bahamas)
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Shareholders of record as of
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ot
mel

O

The Bahamian Stock Market

BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $1.39 $- 0 -18.71%
BBL $0.63 $- 0 -4.55%
BOB $6.94 $- 0 -9.16%
BPF $11.00 $- 0 -6.78%
BSL $7.92 $- 0 -22.28%
BWL $3.15 $- 0 0.00%
CAB $11.39 $- 300 -18.82%
CBL $5.64 $- 0 -19.43%
CHL $2.74 $- 0 -3.18%
CIB $10.38 $- 0 -0.67%
CWCB — $2.99 $0.02 1,000 32.89%
DHS $1.82 $- 0 -28.63%
FAM $6.60 $-0.39 1,000 -15.38%
FBB $2.37 $- 0 0.00%
FCC $0.30 $- 0 0.00%
FCL $5.03 $- 0 -2.71%
FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%
FIN $10.90 $- 0 -8.17%
ICD $5.50 $- 800 -10.28%
JSJ $10.40 $- 0 -6.31%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 3B



OO ———OOlnoeeeUS NESS eee
Financial growth plan ‘separate’ from G-20

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas “may not
have focused as much” as it
should have on using its private
wealth management base to
develop new business lines for
growing its financial services
industry, a government minis-
ter has conceded, with a
renewed emphasis being placed
on this nation becoming an
‘Americas’ investment hub and
attracting clients to base them-
selves here.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, told Tribune
Business that initiatives to grow
the Bahamian financial services
industry were “separate and
apart” from any moves to com-
ply with the G-20/0ECD
demands for greater tax trans-
parency and information
exchange, and remove this
nation from their so-called ‘grey
list’.

“Tn any business plan, you use

Minister concedes Bahamas ‘may not have focused as much’ on exploiting private
wealth management base for new growth areas as it should have done

ZHIVARGO LAING



your existing client base to grow
new opportunities,” he said.
“We may not have in the past
focused on that as much. Now is
as good a time to do so.”

Mr Laing effectively outlined

Worker productivity

is recession ‘upside’



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

INCREASED productivity
from Bahamian workers who
have retained their jobs is “the
upside” resulting from the
recession, the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce’s president
has told Tribune Business, with
employees unable to “job hop”
due to the scarcity of posts
available.

Khaalis Rolle, who is also
marketing director for Bahamas
Ferries, said workforce and
labour productivity had always
been the Bahamas’ “achilles
heel”, with the economy’s abil-
ity to accommodate the annual
5,000-6,000 high school leavers,
around 3,500-4,000 of whom do
not go on to higher education,
“always a concern”.

“That has always been our
major concern, and we’ve not
seen where it will diminish any
time soon,” said Mr Rolle of
the productivity situation.

“There’s good and bad about
the economic state we’re in.

People are more inclined to
produce, because they can’t job
hop as the jobs are not there as
in the past. So they tend to be
more productive. That’s the
upside.”

However, on the downside,
Mr Rolle said school leavers
unable to afford to go on to
higher education would be
forced to enter the workforce,
where they might become
“stuck at a level that may not be
the best thing for the private
sector/business community”.

With a skilled workforce key
for the private sector, Mr Rolle
said that it was difficult to
improve labour quality if com-
panies had to “accommodate”
school leavers prior to them
obtaining better qualifications.

“High school leavers are lim-
ited in what they can produce,”
Mr Rolle said. “The reality is,
because the economy is in such
a dire state, many of those indi-
viduals are unable to afford to
go on to higher education, and
are left to choose from a limited
number of jobs.”

the broad-based parameters of
the Government’s strategy dur-
ing his 2009-2010 Budget com-
munication, which emphasised
enhancing existing services to
high and ultra high net-worth
individuals, and encouraging
those clients and their families
to base themselves and their
business/investing activities in
the Bahamas as a primary
domicile.

In theory, this would lead to
spin-off boosts for industries
such as real estate and con-
struction, plus a whole host of
other sectors. It directly taps
into the private trust compa-
ny/family office market, and
could lead to the establishment
of Bahamas-based business
operations.

The Government and private
sector are also exploring the
Bahamas’ potential to act as an
investment gateway into the
entire Americas’ region,
exploiting its US proximity, tax
neutral platform and stable
political climate to facilitate cap-
ital investment into other coun-
tries by major international
investors. To do so would
involve the Bahamas entering

into a wide range of investment
treaties.

Mr Laing told Tribune Busi-
ness: “The reality is that we
have an advantage in terms of
location, being so near the US,
and in the path way between
Latin America and the entire
region for all manner of activi-
ties.

“So it only makes sense to
exploit our location, and the
kind of business environment
we provide could provide a plat-
form for entrepreneurs to do
business in the region. We cer-
tainly believe there are oppor-
tunities.”

Several financial services
executives have suggested to
Tribune Business that Latin
American countries would like-
ly want the Bahamas to enter
into Tax Information Exchange
Agreements (TIEAs) with them
in return for agreeing to invest-
ment treaties, but Mr Laing said
the two initiatives were sepa-
rate and would not work ‘hand-
in-glove’.

With the Bahamas requiring
12 TIEAs to exit the G-
20/OECD ‘grey list’, and cur-
rently having only one with the

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tea ges we ale

US, it will have to move quick-
ly on meeting so-called inter-
national standards.

But Mr Laing said: “All of
that is separate and apart from
this strategic focus we are seek-
ing to have. We have already
made a commitment to meet-
ing the OECD standard. We

have said we will do the neces-
sary to meet that commitment.
“Tt may mean a series of ini-
tiatives. We are focused on
meeting the standard, but that is
separate and apart from focus-
ing on what we need to do to
enhance the Bahamas as a com-
petitive global jurisdiction.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given

that

SONY ANOFILS_ of

#4B BURTON LANE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,

BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given

that ALVENS BELLOT of

SOLDIER ROAD, P.O. BOX EE-16851, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why

registration/naturalization

should not be granted,

should

send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.






NOTICE






NOTICE is hereby given

that

JEAN LOUVENS of

PALM BEACH STREET, P.O. BOX EE-19248, NASSAU,






BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a



citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any



reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,



should send a written and signed statement of the facts within



twenty-eight days from the 13 day of July, 2009 to the




Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box







N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS



Viet our website at wwercobeda is




IMPORTANT DATES

Fall Semester 2009
New Student Orientation

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF Bethany Jones Major late of Wilson Street
n the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF Robert Douglas Erskine late of 303 East
Street on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of The

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. Parents’ Evening

Tuesday, 18th August, 2009

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or 6:30 p.m. — 8:00 p.m

demand against the above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the Undersigned on or before the 10th
day of August, A.D., 2009, after which date the Executors will
proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of
which they shall then have had notice.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the Undersigned on or before the 10th
day of August, A.D., 2009, after which date the Executors will
proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of
which they shall then have had notice.

Orientation
Wednesday, 19th August, 2009
8:00 a.m. — 1:00 p.m.

Advisement & Registration
Wednesday, 19th August, 2009
1:4) p.m. — 7:00 p.m.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate of Bethany Jones Major are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the said
Estate of Robert Douglas Erskine are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.
Advisement, Registration & Bill Payment
Thursday, 20th August, 2009 and
Friday, 21st August, 2009
9:00 a.m. — 7:00 p.m.

LEANDRA A. ESFAKIS
Attorney for the Executors
Chambers
P.O. Box SS-19269
No. 16 Market Street
Nassau, New Providence
The Bahamas

LEANDRA A. ESFAKIS
Attorney for the Executors
Chambers
P.O. Box SS-19269
No. 16 Market Street
Nassau, New Providence
The Bahamas

Venue:
Front of Portia Smith Student Services
Centre,
Poinciana Drive

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON
late of 4B Winton Higghwea ¥: Eastern District, New
Providence,

RA

os be L

Bahamas, deceased, A global leader in awdit, tax and advisory services

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
chims or demands against the above-nanved Estate are
reepunssbercd to send the same d uly certified tio the undersagnind
onor before Sh August J

We are currently seeking a bright, amargetic, honest and confidant Individual to jolm our Finm ae oc

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the Lite
NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON will be distribubled
among the persons entitled thereto having regard only to
the claims of which the Execulor of the Estate shall then
have had erties.

Candidates will ba requirad to provide messenger and other sarvicas on a dally basle. The ideal candidate should
gives:

a

2 to 3 years working experiance

A valid driver's lioanse

Excollent interpersonal and customer service skills

Excallant communication ski lle

Experience in handling cash

The ability to werk Independently and under pressure to meet etrict deadlines
Uneampromising personal and business ethies

oa 0

1 a
a

"
ui

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO,

. We offer a competitive compensation and an attractive benefits package. Assurance |e given that avery applicant
Allorneys for the Execubors

: will be treated in ther strictest of confidence
Sasson House

Shirley Street & Vicboria Avenue
Pi). Box M-272
Nassau, Bahamas,

Attention: 5, Smith

Applicants showld submit. cover letter, resume, police record, — of passport end copies of academic qualifications io: KPMG, Human
Resources Manager, P.O. Bow M23, Nassau, Bahamers cer jad tpecombs by Friday, July 24, 2005

bourne
AUDIT = TAM =» ADVISORY

2 2009 EPG, & Bahn portrays, and a manmiser finn of thes KPMG mark of bepecient mambar fires aMiliated with KPRG Intannetional, a
Swins cooperatives, All rights. neers




PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Dredging to deepen Nassau
Harbour to between 38-40 feet

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE DREDGING of Nas-
sau Harbour will likely cause
the loss of 2.3 million square
feet of "sea grass, rare small
coral heads and benthic biota”,
according to the Environmental
Impact Assessment (EIA) for
the project, while creating a sub-
stantially deeper and wider
approach for a new class of
mega cruise vessel the Govern-
ment hopes will augment a
steadily declining sector.

The EIA assessment of the
Bahamas' cruise industry said

that "cruise ship arrivals in the
Bahamas have declined in
recent years and will continue
to decline without this project”.

The dredging of the harbour
is considered crucial to the sur-
vival of the Bahamas cruise-
based tourism industry and this
country's competitive position-
ing in the region.

"The Bahamas is a favoured
destination. However, Nassau,
the cradle of tourism and cruise
shipping in the Bahamas can-
not accommodate the large
mega liners now entering the
market owing to its physio-
graphic constraints. In addition,
the Bahamas government is

VXel Tey

presently completing a major
port and waterfront develop-
ment project for Nassau Har-
bour," said the EJA.

The dredging project will
deepen Nassau harbour to
between 38 feet to 40 feet, while
widening the turning basin with-
in the harbour through the
excavation of 812,000 square
feet of sand and bedrock on the
north edge of the seabed, and
727,000 square feet on the south
edge.

This will allow for the new,
larger cruise vessels to navigate
safely through the harbour.

The approach to Nassau har-
bour, which lies just outside the

visible west break water and the
dilapidated east breakwater just
west of the lighthouse, will also
be dredged to allow easier
access to Nassau's cruise port.
This will also receive minor
dredging and the installation of
mooring dolphins to accommo-
date longer ships.

Company

Boskalis, the company that
won the bid for the harbour
dredging, along with the Min-
istry of Environment and
Bahamas Environment, Science
and Technology (BEST) Com-
mission has developed a com-
prehensive EJA with myriad
mitigation protocols.

Boskalis is also currently
completing an Environmental
Management Plan (EMP),
which will identify ways in
which it will minimise any pos-
sible impact to the surrounding

areas.

The company and the Gov-
ernment have suggested the
continued use of turbidity bar-
riers during the dredging
process in order to reduce the
amount of free floating sedi-
ment that will be stirred up dur-
ing the project.

Plumes of fine silt from the
sea bed are one of the greatest
environmental concerns of both
the dredging project and exten-
sion of the western end of
Arawak Cay.

According to the EJA for
both projects, there is a danger
of coral and other marine
organisms being smothered by
the fine silt as it settles.

The assessments concede
there will be "short-term irre-
versible loss of existing sea grass
and coral communities”

They also suggest that 50 per
cent of the coral communities
observed in the areas to be

dredged comprise dead indi-
viduals. Those live colonies will
take 10 to 30 years for regener-
ation, according to the EIA.

To assess the impact of the
dredging, compliance stations
will be floated about the har-
bour during all stages of the
project looking for visible tur-
bidity plumes.

Some of the environmental
impact mitigation efforts
include good dredging practices,
turbidity barriers, independent
environmental monitoring, dis-
couraged use of blasting and
dredging in such a way to
encourage future growth of
marine life.

The EIA suggests there will
be no hindrance to shipping
within the harbour.

The Government has also
suggested restoring the east
breakwater at the entrance to
the harbour, but has not
finalised plans to do so.

Cabinet backs Training

General Counsel

plan with no change

A vacancy exists at The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited and Port Group
Limited for the position of General Counsel. Applicants aré invited from
interested and suitably qualified individuals to fill this position, with the primary

responsibility of the overall direction and management of the Legal Department
of The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited and Port Group Limited, and:

® Manage and lead strategic and tactical legal initiatives for the Group of

Companies

Structure and manage the company's Internal legal function and staff

Lead varlous projects including litigation management; direction of leases,

deeds of release, and conveyances; privacy and employment matters,
corporate povernance, domestic and international compliance and other
matters requiring legal support

Obtain and oversee the work of outside counse

Provide senior management with effective legal opinions on company
strategies and implementation

Serve as advisor on all major business transactions and in negotiating critical

contracts

Play a key role in managing risk and helping to make sound business decisions

Develop and implement all legal and corporate governance policies

Serve as Company Secretary and participate in meetings of the Board of

Directors

Advise and counsel corporate departments on general and specialized legal
matters including complex international and commercial business transactions

Provide legal representation on International and local projects at preliminary
stage of negotiations and throughout development

Provide legal counsel and advice regarding various corporate business transac
tans ta ensure compliance with Bahamian Law and company policies and

procedures.

KNOWLEDGE AND QUALIFICATIONS

Judicial degree along with international expertise

15. or more years of commercial transactional legal background, along with
combined in-house and law firm legal experience

Strong transactional and general business and commercial law experience,
including drafting and negotiating commercial contracts and licenses

Significant intellectual property experience

Experience in both public and global companies

Results-oriented, with skills to influence change and drive compliance

Strong presentation and negotiation skills, solid business instincts and
judgment, and outstanding written and verbal communication skills

Creative and flexible problem-solving skills

Ability and interpersonal skills to relate with internal and external customers,
including government, business professionals, the community, corporate
executives and managers, and contribute to strategic planning.

INTERESTED PERSONS SHOULD SEND CURRICULUM VITAE AND
ee aU CMP LO Sa PP EO Re ay lace Ree lb kame] s) mee)
THE GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITY, LIMITED

ee Oh eras 2)

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND



FROM page 1B

seeing the National Training
Programme, told Tribune Busi-
ness that the initiative would be
discussed over the weekend
during a retreat for the Cham-
ber’s directors.

“We’re still working on the
National Training Programme,
and are actively involved with
it,” he confirmed. “Obviously,
we are keenly supportive of it,
because at the end of the day
there are direct benefits to us. A
better trained workforce cer-
tainly benefits the business com-

munity.”

While not wishing to pre-
empt any decisions made down
the line, Mr Rolle said the
Chamber had “committed” to
approaching the private sector
and its members for funding for
the National Training Pro-
gramme, which would supple-
ment the $250,000 provided by
the Government.

The institutions involved will
be the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BTVI)
and the College of the Bahamas
(COB). Those being re-trained
will be the 1,000 unemployed
Bahamians selected from those

who had registered with the
National Insurance Board’s
(NIB) unemployment benefit
scheme.

Mr Rolle added: “My goal is
to make it an ubiquitous pro-
ject, a sustainable project, and a
meaningful project for the coun-
try in the future. The way it’s
structured now, it fills more of a
social need, and rightfully so,
but by no means does it dimin-
ish the potential for a long-term,
sustainable project.

“T think the Government has
it in the back of their minds, the
private sector has it in the front
of their minds.”

Employment Opportunity

Senior Collections Officer

An employment opportunity exists for an innovative,
persuasive leader with a passion for success, a desire to
succeed and the ability to initiate progress.

Skill Requirements

Excellent oral and written communication skills
Excellent motivation & coaching skills

Ability to execute priority based workload
Possess excellent planning, organizational and
implementation skills
Ability to operate and familiarity with POS

systems

Proficient in Microsoft Office applications
Possess strong foundation of accounting
practices and procedures
Strong multitasking ability
Strong leadership & managerial skills
Strong internet skills i.e. Emailing, group
messaging and research
Ability to exert initiative
Recording, summarizing, analyzing, verifying and
reporting of results of financial transactions

Minimum Experience Requirements

Tertiary level — with degree in related field;
Collections executive with at least 4 years
experience in collections or related field ;

At least three years experience in supervisory
post;
Strong knowledge and application of MS
Microsoft Suite

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:

srcollectionsofficer@yahoo.com


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 5B



Total exports
increase by 4.6
per cent in 2008

THE Bahamas saw its total
exports increase by 4.6 per cent
during 2008 despite the onset
of a global recession, rising from
$670.088 million to $701.533
million, according to the
Department of Statistics.

The Department, unveiling

the 2008 foreign trade statistics,
reported that Bahamian-origi-
nating exports accounted for
$409.6 million or 58 per cent of
total exports, with re-exports
accounting for $291.9 million or
42 per cent.

The main Bahamian-origi-

nating export category was
chemicals (polystyrene and oth-
er plastics), which accounted for
55.2 per cent of the total, fol-
lowed by food and live animals
(mainly crawfish, rum and salt),
which took a 20 per cent share.

“More significantly, of these

two categories, three commodi-
ties alone - expansible poly-
styrene valued at $150.1 million,
other compounds containing a
pyrimidine ring, at $67.4 mil-
lion, and spiny lobster frozen at
$77.6 million accounted for
some 72 per cent of total
domestic exports,” the Depart-
ment said.

Some 92 per cent of that
polystyrene total was exported
to the US, with 4 per cent going
to the UK and the remaining 4
per cent to Australia and
Argentina.

Of the pyrimidine ring com-
pounds, 45 per cent was export-
ed to Canada and 27.2 per cent
to the Netherlands. Some 65.5
per cent of the crawfish went
to the US, and 32 per cent to
France.

Mineral fuels, valued at
$141.5 million, and machinery
and transport equipment worth
$67.3 million, together account-
ed for almost three-quarters of
re-exports, holding a 49 per cent
and 23 per cent share respec-
tively.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2009/CLE/gen/qui/850
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF all that piece parcel or lot of land
comprising 719.77 acres situate on the Eastern side of the
Queenis Highway in the Settlement of Taits in the Island of
Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

AND
IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Veronica C. Miller (nee Major)

NOTICE

The Petition of VERONICA C. MILLER (nee Major) of
Taits, Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas in respect of:-

“ALL that piece parcel or lot of land situate on the Eastern
Side of the Queen’s Highway in the Settlement of Taits,
Long Island comprising 719.77 acres and which said
parcel of land is bounded on the NORTHWEST by a
loose stone wall separating it from other portions of the
original Grant to the Earl of Dunmore said to be the
property of Samuel Carroll and Nathan Major and running
thereon Eight thousand One hundred and Eight (8,108)
feet more or less on the NORTHEAST by the Atlantic
Ocean and running thereon in several courses Five
thousand and Seventy-one (5,071) feet more or less on
the SOUTHEAST by a loose stone wall separating it
from land originally granted to James Rose now said to
be the property of Timothy Darville and Ernest Dean and
running thereon Nine thousand Eight hundred and Thi

two (9,832) feet more or less on the SOUTHWEST by
land said to be the property of Emily Major and running
thereon Five hundred and Ninety-three and Forty-four
hundredths (593.44) feet on the NORTHWEST by land
said to be the property of Theresa Major and running
thereon Three hundred and Thirty-seven and Forty-nine
(337.49) feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property of
the said Theresa Major and running thereon Four hundred
and Seventy-eight and Twenty-two hundredths (478.22)
feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property of Melvin
Major and running thereon One thousand Five hundred
and Three and Ninety-two hundredths (1,503.92) feet
and by a Twenty (20) foot road reservation leading to the
Queen’s Highway, on the NORTHWEST by the property
of William Mortimer and running thereon Three hundred
and Thirty-five and Eighty-seven hundredths (335.87)
feet and on the SOUTHWEST by the property of the
said William Mortimer and running thereon Eight hundred
and Thirty-five and Eighty-one hundredths feet (835.81)
and which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position
shape marks boundaries and dimensions as are shown on
the plan filed herein and recorded in the Department of
Lands and Surveys and Plan “296 L.I” and thereon
outlined in Pink.

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

52wk-Low
Abaco Markets

10.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.35
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.40
10.00

Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)

VERONICA C. MILLER (nee Major) claims to be the
owner in fee simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme
Court in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section
3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have her title to the
said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said
Act.

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

52wk-Low

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal

office hours in the following places:

0.20 RND Holdings

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the said City
of Nassau;

(b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes,
Mareva House, 4 George Street in the City of Nassau,
Attorneys for the Petitioner; and

(c) The office of the Administrator at Clarence Town,
Long Island.

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low
1.3231
2.8952
1.4031
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

CFAL Bond Fund

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower or a
right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the 14th day of September,
2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed
form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of
any such person to file and serve a statement of his claim
on or before the said 14th day of September, 2009 will

: BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
operate as a bar to such claim.

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
Mareva House
George Street
Nassau, Bahamas.

Attorneys for the Petitioner

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007



Securit y

Bahamas Property Fund

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

Security

Fidelity Bank Note 17
Fidelity Bank Note 22
Fidelity Bank Note 13
Fidelity Bank Note 15

Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

Fund Name

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

= Colina.

Holdings Bahamas

—








































CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Risk & Compliance Officer

Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified
professional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer. This is an
executive position and the successful applicant should possess the following:

Qualifications & Experience

Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university

Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance

Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a
law degree

Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations
for improvements to a compliance culture

Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of
duties

Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and
best practices

Confidentiality

Excellent oral and written communication skills

Duties & Responsibilities:

Design and implement a risk framework.

Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps
taken to foster good compliance.

Implement and maintain a compliance monitoring programme. This will
serve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures.

Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws,
regulations and policies applicable to the institution.

Provide management with guidance in the development, implementation
and maintenance of policies, procedures and practices to cover
regulated activities.

Create programmes that educate, train and encourage directors,
managers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and
regulations.

Serve as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators.

The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with
experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a cover
letter and resume to the following e-mail address no later than 27 July 2009:

E-mail: careers@c olinaimperial.com
RE: Risk and Compliance Officer

Absolutely no phone calls will be accepted

E°"s

CFAL
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 17 JULY 2009

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
Za
COLONIAL

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.84] CHG -0.10 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -141.52 | YTD % -8.26

FINDEX: CLOSE 786.23 | YTD -5.83% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Previous Close Today's Close EPS $ Div $
1.39 1.39
11.00 11.00
6.94 6.94
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
208 2.37
11.39 11.39
2.74 2.74
5.64 5.64
3.07 2.98
1.82 1.82
6.60 6.60
10.90 10.90
10.38 10.38
5.03 5.03
1.00 1.00
0.30 0.30
5.50 5.50
10.40 10.40
10.00 10.00

Change Daily Vol.

0.00

0.00
-0.09

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00
ases)

Interest

7%

Prime + 1.75%
7%

Prime + 1.75%

Last Sale
100.00
100.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13 100.00
FBB15 100.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Last Price

Change Daily Vol. Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

Series A
Series B
Series C
Series D

+
@
+
+

Weekly Vol. EPS$ Div$

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 4.75
2.8952 -3.18
14777 5.31
3.1031 -13.82
12.9801 5.79
101.6693 1.67
93.1992 -6.76
1.0000 0.00
9.2765 -2.98
1.0622 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 243
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $- A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

0.00%

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
10-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

3.07
-8.35
2.87
1.10
-3.33
0.00
2.00
2.56

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525
PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Law Firm is seeking skilled professional litigation legal
secretary. The following are needed:

* Proficiency in Microsoft Word

* Experience in drafting legal letters with little supervision

* Experience in drafting legal documents with
little supervision

* Ability to confidently speak with clients

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little supervision

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* Works beyond the standard 9 to 5 when necessary

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et AA

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY FORGIE EV ANS late of
#17 London Terrace, Eastern Distinct, New Providence,
Bahamas, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given thal all persons having
Claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested bo send the same duly certified to the undersigned
on or before Sto Aupust IE

AND NOTICE is hereby also piven that al the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the late
DOROTHY FORGIE EVANS will be distributed among the
persons entitled therets having, regard only to the claims of
which the Executor of the Estate shall then have had Notice

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & (0).
Allorneys for the Execubors
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue

PO. Box N-272
Nassau, Balianmas
Attention: & Smith



10,000 yards
target for 4-
month cruise

‘D-day’

FROM page 1B

implying that the Government
and companies involved were
working to a tight timetable.

“Cutter section dredges [such
as the one to be used on Nassau
Harbour] generally work 24
hours a day. However, mainte-
nance and downtime due to
repairs, pipeline moves and
pipeline blockages result in an
efficiency rate of 60 to 75 per
cent.

“To meet the scheduled
arrival of new-build cruise ships
in the fall of 2009, and assuming
a dredge start in July 2009, cur-
rent planning requires that a
portion of the two million cubic
yards of dredging (the area nec-
essary for the Oasis of the Seas
to enter and depart from the
harbour) be completed within
four months.

“This requires a dredge with
an average production rate of
10,000 cubic yards per day. This
will likely require a dredge with

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Senior Manager,

Accounts.

The job oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget & Management
Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective delivery

of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the

following:
Compilation of the corporate budget.

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets

Preparation of monthly management statements

Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation
Preparation of performance reports for division , department and sections
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry receivables (capital

contributions, rechargeable)

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices

Liaison with internal and extemal audits

Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief

Financial
Officer for the Board of Directors

Preparation of the business plan for the department

Overseeing the Cash Flow Management
Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment

salaries

Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required

Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department
Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims

Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form employee’s

Conducting audits of various financial activities including Employee Basic Pay
Reconciliation, Employee Loans Reconciliation and Payment Reconciliation

Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable

Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts

Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle repayments

Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule
Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans

Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to ensure

adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors
Managing the status of local and foreign vendors

Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and External Auditors
Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline. Conducting

performance appraisals

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff, manage

and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations

Job requirements include:

¢ A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting ACCA/CPA

or equivalent qualifications

A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a similar

management position

Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices

Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet

applications

Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing systems

Ability to analyze financial reports

Sound knowledge of covenants of lending institutions (e.g. IDB)
Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial software

and the system of internal control.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing

Good time management skills

Interested persons should apply by completing and retuming an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: July

22, 2009.



a 27 to 30-inch discharge pipe.
This discharge pipe would first
discharge into stilling ponds on
Arawak Cay. Once the avail-
able space on Arawak Cay is to
capacity, discharge will be to
the west end of Arawak Cay to
extend the Cay.”

While consideration had been
given to limiting dredging activ-
ities to the outgoing tide, the
EIA said this would prevent the
Government “from meeting
their commitment to Royal
Caribbean Cruise Lines to allow
the entry of the Oasis of the
Seas [the flagship for its Gene-
sis Class cruise ships] by the end
of November. It would also
double the period of dredging,
and it would double the cost of
the project”.

With Arawak Cay currently
able to accommodate 600,000
cubic yards of the material
dredged from Nassau Harbour,
the EJA said the feasibility of
trucking the remaining 1.4 mil-
lion cubic yards over to the
man-made island was assessed.

However, this was quickly
dropped because of the fill’s wet
nature and the inability of any
trucking operation to match the
10,000 cubic yards per day
extraction rate.

The EIA also confirmed that
the Government’s chief engi-
neering consultants on the har-
bour dredging/Arawak Cay port
relocation, Cox & SHAL Con-
sultants, had presented the cre-
ation of an entirely new, sepa-
rate island to Arawak Cay’s
west as one option for storing
the remaining 1.4 million cubic
yards of fill.

Referring to these options,
Blue Engineering’s EIA said:
“These included a separate

island to the west of Arawak
Cay, with bridges to access the
island, and the filling of the area
between Arawak Cay and New
Providence, as well as the exten-
sion of Arawak Cay to the west.

“The Government has con-
sidered all of these options, and
due to construction logistics
involved and relative costs has
determined an extension to the
west as the preferred option,
and the only option now to be
considered.

“The preferred option, which
has been accepted by the Gov-
ernment, is the westward exten-
sion to Arawak Cay..... It is con-
sidered likely that this option
will have the least impact on
the environment.”

The EIA said that Arawak
Cay’s ample unused land pro-
vided enough space to stockpile
the dredged material, with the
first 600,000 cubic yards to be
stored in two piles either side
of the existing road leading to
the asphalt plant and aggregate
storage complex. With the Gov-
ernment owning Arawak Cay, it
was currently modifying and
reviewing lease agreements to
accommodate the stockpiling.

The remaining 1.4 million
cubic yards of fill will be accom-
modated via the 1,000 foot
extension of Arawak Cay to the
west, a move intended to also
accommodate the re-located
container shipping facilities
presently situated on Bay Street
in downtown Nassau.

To facilitate the port re-loca-
tion, Arawak Cay’s curved ends
will be made straight through
the 1,000 foot extension, so ves-
sels can be moored there. Steel
sheet pile walls, tied to anchor
blocks, will form the wall bulk-

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head, with 900,000 cubic yards
of fill taking up the space
behind it.

The remaining 500,000 cubic
yards of fill extracted from Nas-
sau Harbour will then be stored
on the Arawak Cay extension.

The EJA suggested there was
little to no alternative to dis-
posing of the material dredged
from Nassau Harbour on
Arawak Cay, given that the fill
had been earmarked for use in
both the new port’s construc-
tion and the extension of Wood-
es Rogers Wharf as part of the
downtown Nassau revitalisation
project.

“No other appropriate sites
for on-land disposal were found
in close proximity to the pro-
posed dredging operations oth-
er than at Arawak Cay, primar-
ily due to the need to re-locate
the Bay Street shipping before
the planned redevelopment of
Nassau Harbour can proceed,”
the Blue Engineering report
said.

“Disposing of the material
further afield than Arawak Cay
would require additional
pumps, and therefore a greater
cost to the project.”

While disposal of the fill at
sea was also an option, the EIA
added: “The Government of the
Bahamas recognises that the
dredged material is a valuable
resource, and wishes to stock-
pile as much of this material as
possible for use elsewhere, in
particular the Nassau harbour
redevelopment.

“The use of the material for
the Nassau harbour redevelop-
ment further emphasises the
importance of storing the
dredged material near to the
dredging site so as to reduce the
distance that the material would
have to be transported, once
the shipping along Bay Street
is moved and the material is
used.”

The Blue Engineering EIA,
in what could be considered a
direct rebuttal to the PLP-led
outcry over the Arawak Cay
port and the decision to forego
the former Christie administra-
tion’s plans to switch the Bay
Street shipping facilities to a
port at Clifton Pier, said “Alter-
native locations for the shipping
facilities are very limited.

“One previously identified
location on the south-west coast
of New Providence has been
briefly considered, but suffers
disadvantages with respect to
geographical location, physical
topography at the proposed site,
avoidable impact to a natural
area, and induced impacts to
local ecology. Fundamentally,
the site is too far from the
majority of existing develop-
ments.”

When it came to negative
impacts from the Nassau har-
bour dredging/Arawak Cay
extension, the Blue Engineer-
ing EIA pointed out that fish-
ermen’s access to the area
behind the Fish Fry would be
restricted, and they would lose
the location as a storage area.
Increased “noise, dust, odour
and traffic” could also affect
business at the Fish Fry and the
nearby Haynes Cricket Oval.

And the proposed Arawak
Cay extension would also
reduce the depth, and width, of
the existing channel between
Arawak Cay and Silver Cay, the
island where the still-closed
Coral Island Marine Park is
located. The EIA said Silver
Cay, which was once owned by
tycoon Philip Ruffin before
being sold as part of the Baha
Mar deal, was “dilapidated and
available for sale”.

The reduced channel width
and depth, the EIA said, would
impact the tour excursion boats
- such as those that take cruise
passengers and other guests to
islands such as Blackbeard’s
Cay. Future dredging was rec-
ommended to solve the prob-
lem, as “these impacts could
further have an impact on the
tourism industry as excursions
may no longer take place”.
PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





% Stamp Tax ‘will not happen’

FROM page 1B

make transactions a hell of a lot
easier. Instead of paying 10 per
cent on deals valued at above

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



$250,000, you’d be paying 2 per
cent. That’s a no-brainer.”

But, adopting a more sober
assessment of the all-round
implications of such a reduc-
tion, Mr Lightbourne said the
effects would be similar to those
resulting from the Stamp Tax
incentives granted to Ginn
Development Company for its
$4.9 billion Ginn sur mer pro-
ject.

Referring to the $200 million
worth of real estate that Ginn
claimed to have previously sold
at the West End site, Mr Light-
bourne said that given all these
transactions were valued at
above $250,000, some $20 mil-
lion in taxes would have been
due to the Government at a 10
per cent rate.

However, the former Christie

ABACOMARKETS

aNnOunces

the Annual General Meeting
of Shareholders

will be held on the 21° of July, 2009
at 6 p.m.

The Convention Centre - Salon III
The Wyndham Nassau Resort &
Crystal Palace Casino
West Bay Street, Nassau

Holders of Ordinary Shares as of
19"" of June, 2009 are invited



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAWAND EQUITY DIVISION CLE/GEN/00443

BETWEEN

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
JACQUELINE JOHNSON
Defendant

ADVERTISEMENT OF SERVICE OF
WRIT OF SUMMONS

TAKE NOTICE that an action has been commenced
against you in the Supreme Court, Common Law
and Equity Division, Action No. CLE/GEN/00443
of 2008 in which the Plaintiff, BANK OF THE
BAHAMAS LIMITED, has issued a Writ of Summons
out of the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on the
20th March, 2008 claiming against you the sum of
$17,476.70 arising from your default of the loan
granted by the Plaintiff to you on or about the 11th

August, 2002 in the principal amount of $7,500.00

and interest at the rate of 15% per annum.
AND THAT it has been ordered by
Ms. Marilyn Meeres, Deputy Registrar of the
Supreme Court on the 17th March, 2009 that
service of the Writ of Summons in the said
action on you be effected by this advertisement.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE | that
you must within fourteen (14) days from the
publication of this advertisement inclusive of the
day of such publication, acknowledge service
of the said Writ of Summons by completing a
prescribed form of Acknowledgement of Service
which may be obtained on requested from the
Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise Judgment may be entered against you.

Dated this 17th day of March, A.D., 2009

GIBSON, RIGBY & Co.
CHAMBERS
Ki-Malex House
Dowdeswell Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Plaintiff



administration had given Ginn a
tiered Stamp Tax incentive for
the project, which meant that
the rate being paid in the ini-
tial year was 2 per cent. Using
this rate, Mr Lightbourne said
the Government had only col-
lected $4 million in Stamp Tax -
a difference of $16 million.

“T just don’t think they can
do that,” Mr Lightbourne
added of a wider 2 per cent
Stamp Tax introduction,
explaining that the 10 per cent
rate was not usually a ‘make or
break’ factor in purchases of
high-end homes.

“Normally, the high-end
transactions aren’t stymied by
the Stamp Tax,” he said. “Peo-
ple know that’s what they have
to pay - 10 per cent. It’s in the
head from the start.”

Current Budget numbers
demonstrate just how reliant
the Government is on real
estate-related Stamp Tax as rev-
enue generator, and what the
impact would be if the 2 per
cent across-the-board rate was
ever implemented.

For the 2009-2010 Budget
year, the Government is fore-




Enrollment Limited
fo aat! persons

Leet nS sein

casting that it will earn $141.905
million from Stamp Tax on real
estate transactions. Yet if the 2
per cent Stamp Tax rate were
implemented, this figure would
drop to $32.656 million, a 77 per
cent decline.

But Richard Almy, the
author of the 2 per cent pro-
posal in a February 21, 2007,
report prepared as part of the
Inter-American Development
Bank-financed (IDB) Land Use
Policy and Administration Pro-
ject, said this could be made-up
over time via an increase in rev-
enues from real property taxes.

“Although a dollar-for-dol-
lar substitution would be diffi-
cult to achieve, competently
done studies of tax burdens and
shifts should make it possible
to achieve rough ‘revenue neu-
trality’ and to design ameliora-
tive measures, such as rate roll-
backs, and to cushion extreme
individual increases by phas-
ing,” he suggested.

The report added that while
scrapping real property taxes
may be tempting for the
Bahamian government,
strengthen their collection and

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increasing revenues from this
source was “an option worth
pursuing” to reduce the Gov-
ernment’s reliance on import
duties.

“Although continued politi-
cal inaction may have a certain
appeal, popular respect for the
Government of the Bahamas
will almost certainly continue
to erode,” the report said. “As
difficult as a real estate tax
improvement programme may
be, it will be more manageable
than a full-fledged crisis. A
more equitable real estate tax
would benefit all who own real
estate in the Bahamas.

“Continued neglect of the
real estate tax is unwise from
the perspectives of the nation’s
tax equity and revenue produc-
tivity goals. The challenges that
the Government of the
Bahamas faces in improving the
fairness and efficiency of the
real estate tax are numerous
and substantial, but not insur-
mountable.”

Mr Almy effectively implied
that real property tax payments
boiled down to whether own-
ers wanted to pay or not, since it

was not seen as a mandatory
requirement.

For instance, real estate own-
ers could fail to register own-
ership of their land assets and
not declare them to the Chief
Valuation Officer for real prop-
erty tax purposes. Real proper-
ty taxes could be ignored until a
sale or transfer of real estate
was contemplated, and pur-
chase prices could be under-
stated to avoid Stamp Tax.

The report, in its instructions
to the Government, said: “To
ensure equity - and to increase
revenue potential - it needs to
ensure that all assessable prop-
erty has been listed and
described accurately. It is telling
that statistics on the number of
properties assessed and on the
number of properties waiting
to be assessed are not readily
available.”

The report called for a uni-
form valuation date to be estab-
lished for real property tax
assessments to be carried out.
The Valuation Unit’s staffing,
resources, expertise and tech-
nology all needed to be
strengthened.

EXx-ENM minister
blasts Arawak port

FROM page 1B

to its agreements with foreign
companies contracted to do the
work on the Nassau harbour
dredging and Arawak Cay port
development.

"The public is spending $50
odd-million to dredge Nassau
Harbour, and the contract was
awarded to a European firm,"
Mr Wells said, referring to win-
ning bidder Boskalis. He
claimed, though, that Boskalis
had subsequently contracted
out parts of the harbour dredge
to other companies, namely
American Bridge and a
Bahamian firm, believed to be
Bahamas Marine.

“The European firm then
sub-contracted it to American
Bridge, an American company,
and then American Bridge sub-
contracted it to a Bahamian
company. Generally, the pub-

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lic don't know a Christ thing
that is happening,” Mr Wells
said.

“That is the situation, and
that is what is happening in this
country today. It’s been hap-
pening from the 1950s coming
straight through.

"I say what I believe, and I
don't care if the media don't
like it or the opposition don't
like it or the Government don't
like it."

Speaking at the Rotary Club
of West Nassau's weekly meet-
ing, Mr Wells said he had fund-
ed studies on the relocation of
the container port facilitries,
and suggested south-west New
Providence was the best place
for such a development.

However, he said that envi-
ronmental issues arose with the
Coral Harbour site, though he
conceded that any location
would have some sort of envi-
ronmental impact.

"When you are doing devel-
opment you are going to affect
the environment," he said.

According to Mr Wells, ‘spe-
cial interest groups’ were push-
ing for the port’s relocation to
Arawak Cay, which he suggest-
ed may be able to be completed
for half the $55-$56 million cost
quoted. However, many figures
have been circulated as to the
final cost of the Arawak Cay
move.

It is unclear what the PLP
and Mr Wells mean by ‘special
interest groups’, as the partici-
pants have not been identified.
However, it seems to be a ref-
erence to the FNM’s support-
ers in the shipping industry.

Mr Wells admitted his fami-
ly's stake in the shipping facili-
ties move, as they own real
estate holdings in the Arawak
Cay area, but suggested strong-
ly that he advocates against the
move for the best interest of the
country.

"IT have been an FNM basi-
cally all my life," he said. "I
decided to make a stand against
what was wrong in this society."

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VARVARA RVeARQOsQOseses | e7

ge Colina General
wot Insurance Agency

Ta our Valued Customers,

WE ARE MOVING!

We wish to advise that Colina General will be relocating to #12 Village Road north.

Effective 4" August 2000

You will be able to make premium payments at any of these locations: Colina General, Oakes Field
in the Nassau Cruardian Building; Colina Imperial at Rosetta Street; Bahama Life & Property located
in the Henry F. Storr Building on Mackey Street, and at our new location at #12

Willage Road north.

Our telephone number, 325-3809, will remain the same,

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009, PAGE 9B



CLICO liquidator in talks
over sale of critical asset

FROM page 1B

Gomez to protect and preserve
CLICO (Bahamas) principal
assets from potential litigants
and other creditors, thus
enabling him to maximise their
value for the benefit of Bahami-
an policyholders, depositors and
other creditors.

Informed sources close to
developments told Tribune
Business late last week that Mr
Gomez was holding negotia-
tions with two to three potential
buyers of Wellington Preserve,
at least one of whom is believed
to be a major US-based real
estate developer.

The CLICO (Bahamas) lig-
uidator could not be reached
for comment, but a potential
sale of Wellington Preserve -
and the realisation of a purchase
price close to the original $73
million loan - is the key to how
successful the insurer’s wind-
ing-up will be.

A price close to that figure
would enable Mr Gomez to
cover 100 per cent of what is
owed to secured creditors, Tri-
bune Business understands, as
interest in Wellington Preserve
seemingly bucks the depressed
Florida real estate market and a
US economy still mired in
recession.

It also represents a change to
the position Mr Gomez outlined
in his first report to the
Supreme Court on the CLICO
(Bahamas) situation, at a time
when he was still only a provi-
sional liquidator. He then
described Wellington Preserve,
which had been financed by the
$73 million loan from CLICO
(Bahamas) to its CLICO Enter-
prises subsidiary, as “not antic-

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

ipated to be realised in the short
term”, making the insurer insol-
vent and a natural liquidation
candidate.

“The loan to CLICO Enter-
prises of approximately $73 mil-
lion is not considered presently
collectible, and thus endangers
the asset base of the company
and places policy values in per-
il. The funds advanced to CLI-
CO Enterprises were advanced
by CLICO Enterprises to
Wellington Preserve, the whol-
ly-owned subsidiary of CLICO
Enterprises, which acquired its
real estate holding in Florida,
US,” Mr Gomez said.

“This real estate is not
presently considered mar-
ketable as a result of the signif-
icant downturn in the Florida
real estate market.”

Outlining Wellington Pre-
serve’s importance in the grand
scheme of things, Mr Gomez
added: “As at December 31,
2008, approximately $73 million
had been advanced to CLICO
Enterprises, but it is unlikely







that this loan can be recovered
at full value as CLICO Enter-
prises’ December 31, 2008,
unaudited financial statements
reflect a deficit of $21 million
as the assets are $108 million
and its liabilities are $129 mil-
lion.

“Included in CLICO Enter-
prises’ assets is a loan due from
Wellington Preserve, a wholly-
owned subsidiary of CLICO
Enterprises, for $70 million.

“The December 31, 2008
unaudited financial of Welling-
ton Preserve includes invest-
ment property in Florida and
valued at $127 million. Howev-
er, the same real estate valued
on an ‘as is’ basis is worth
approximately $62 million.
Beside the loan to Wellington
Preserve, CLICO Enterprises
also made a direct investment in
Wellington Preserve for $13
million.

“The Wellington Preserve
real estate project in Florida
consists principally of 80 resi-
dential lots and various ameni-

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ties and commercial sites laid
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>,
AP

Dheinperee (spss

Ledcor is seeking contractors to assist in completion of Stage

Meanwhile, Mr Gomez is
understood to be still pursuing
the transfer of CLICO
(Bahamas) life and health poli-
cy portfolio to another

Bahamas-based insurer, fol-
lowing the Government’s
pledge to underwrite this by
providing a $30 million guaran-
tee.

The transfer will ultimately
require the approval of both the

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PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Surviving 3d days and nights

FROM page 16

Kemp’s Bay.

They were on the side of the
road, in the shorts and t-shirts
they ‘had been wearing 33 days

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before, both thin and dehydrat-
ed, Marcell barefoot, carrying
mangoes and cocoplums.

When Ms Taylor, 50, a nurse
at the local health clinic, asked
the boys about where they had
been, Deangelo answered.

“T expected them to say
someone had them, but they
said they had been in the bush
looking for crabs and they just
got lost,” Ms Taylor said.

“T asked where they were
sleeping and they said they slept
in holes and during the day they
were trying to find home.

“T asked how they found their
way out after all that time and
they said they heard cars and
dogs barking and they followed
the sound to the road.”

The boys said they had found
their way out of the forest
around half a mile further
south, near a house occupied
by German expatriates, where
they went to ask for fruit to eat
before continuing the walk
home.

“They were dirty, dehydrated
and they had odour,” Ms Taylor
said recalling how she picked
them up sometime after 11am.

“There were spiderwebs and
pieces of sticks in their hair, and
they were severely dehydrated.

“Their eyes were bulging, and
their skin was sagging and when
I lifted their shirt you could see
all their ribs.

“They didn’t say much, they
were just answering questions,
the only thing Deangelo volun-
teered was they wouldn’t go
back in the bush looking for
crabs by themselves.”

As Ms Taylor approached the
Clarke’s house their mother
didn’t recognise her emaciated
sons, and when she did, she
screamed.

She had sprained her knee
when searching for the boys,
and yet continued to look for
them, hopping as she must, but
she ran to her children when
Ms Taylor brought them home.

The boys were silent as the
family went into a frenzy
brought on by the unbelievable
reality that they had come home
alive.

PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, The Caribbean Baptist Fellowship (CBF) is a regional Association, whose
membership comprises National Baptist Associations from countries across the Caribbean

region:

AND WHEREAS, each year the Carbbean Baptist Fellowship organizes and
execuies an annual combined youth festival in one of its member countries, which is
designed to bring together youth from the respective countries for the purpose of fostaring
unity and fellowship among delegates, while engaging them in wide-ranging discussion of
contemporary issues presently affecting the youth in the 21st Century:

AND WHEREAS, The Bahamas National Baptist Missionary and Educational
Convention, an umbrella organization which represents Baptist Churches across The
Bahamas and is a member of the Caribbean Baptist Fellowship, will join forces with the
regional body in the joint sponsorship of this year’s Youth Festival:

AND WHEREAS, the 2009 Caribbean Baptist Fellowship Youth Festival, the 8th ina
serias of such Festivals, is scheduled to be held in The Bahamas at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort & Crystal Palace Casino during the period 22nd to 26th July, 2009, under the theme
“Stomp Pun De Enemy", with Senptural reference drawn from Luke 10:17 - 20;

AND WHEREAS, It is expected that the CBF Youth Festival will attract approximately
one thousand delegates from the Family Islands, the Caribbean, the United States and

other parts of the world:

NOW, THEREFORE, |, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the period Monday, 20th July to Sunday, 26th July, 2009
as “CARIBBEAN BAPTIST YOUTH WEEK”.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF,
| have hereunto set my Hand and
Seal this 15th day of July, 2009

HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER





Photos by Megan Reynolds

A WHITE SAND memorial that was made in memory of the boys one
month after they disappeared...

“They were so frail and weak
and down,” Mrs Clarke said. “It
was so sad. The whole family
was just screaming.

“My son just lay down on the
ground screaming, ‘Look at
these children, look at these
children!’

“They looked starved.”

Rushed to the clinic and then
to Nassau within hours of their
discovery, the boys are recov-
ering in the paediatric ward of
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal, building up strength on a
diet of Ensure and offered their
parents glimpses into the hap-
penings of their misadventure
piece by piece.

According to their family, the
boys have said Marcell fell into
one of the many cavernous
holes puncturing the forest
floor, and then Deangelo, as he
reached for him, tumbled in
behind.

They ate pigeon plums and
cocoplums, they told Mrs
Clarke, and drank water from a
stream and limestone potholes
filled with rainwater.

While Marcell has told his
father they were stuck in the
hole for the 33 days and nights
they were missing, Deangelo
maintains they were only stuck
in the same whole for two or
three days, Mr Sylverin said.

And as Marcell, in particular,
has started talking more, the
story is becoming stranger.

Marcell has apparently attest-
ed to an old man visiting while
he was stuck in the hole — a man
dressed in black, with pale
hands, whose face he never saw.

The man Marcell believes
was the grandfather who died
when he was an infant, fed Mar-

cell the food of his dreams —
pizza, watermelon, macaroni —
and when he went to wake his
brother to join the feast, ‘Pa’
stopped him.

He had cared for him and
washed his back, but never hurt
him, Mr Sylverin said. And
Deangelo never saw the man.

On the day Marcell escaped
from the hole, he noticed a tree
growing out of it he had not
seen in the month he had been
there, he told his father.

“As though it had magically
appeared?” | asked.

Mr Sylverin’s eyes burst wide
open, a mixture of conviction
and disbelief rendering him
speechless.

He added: “Before he
climbed the tree he saw the man
coming and he gave him a hand
to get out of the hole and he
got out before Deangelo.

“Then Deangelo came out
and he didn’t see Pa anymore.”

The day they emerged, July
12, was the anniversary of their
grandfather’s death on July 12,
2003.

He has linked Marcell’s story
to a strange sighting he said
Vera had the night before the
boys were found, of a man
dressed in black, whose face she
could not discern, but who, as
she went closer, disappeared
into the bush, and then reap-
peared suddenly some distance
down the road — a distance no
human could make, he said.

Mr Sylverin also spoke of an
unearthly noise coming from
the forest when the boys
returned home, a noise that
shook the earth, but which Mrs
Clarke said she had not heard.

While she’s inclined to

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believe her grandsons survived
in the forest, Mrs Clarke does
not see why “Pa”, if he were to
reveal himself, would not show
his face, or hide from Deangelo.
Nor does she know of any
“sperret” dressed in black wan-
dering around Smith’s Hill.

But not everyone in the set-
tlement is as sceptical as Mrs
Clarke.

“Some people here will
believe that,” said Emily Rah-
ming, a local government
employee from Congo Town as
she sat by Long Bay Cays’
beautiful white sand beach dis-
cussing the town’s latest mys-
tery.

Like many who grew up in
South Andros, Mrs Rahming
was taught to respect the poten-
tial existence of “sperrets” and
the world of the unseen and the
unexplained.

Although she may not whole-
heartedly believe in ghosts and
spirits, she has heard enough
stories to demand respect for
the mystical.

“There are two stories in my
family,” she said, going into the
details of one.

“My husband’s sister and her
father were out planting cassava
and when he looked around,
she had gone.

“He looked around the field
calling her and he didn’t find
her so he notified the commu-
nity, and everyone went out
looking up and down, and saw
her in a hole and she wouldn’t
come out.

“She was afraid of her father;
she said there was a man in the
hole who looked like her father
and he gave her his hand and so
she went.

“We hear a lot of stories like
that so it’s not so far-fetched.”

Another case of two children
who went missing from High
Rock, a settlement north of
Smith’s Hill, several years ago is
another real life case that has
grown to mythical proportions;
the story being that the siblings
who had disappeared for
around two weeks had met their
grandmother in the woods — she
went to feed them bananas.

And then there was the 16-
year-old boy from Mars Bay
who was lost in the woods for
over two weeks, undetected by
full-scale searches, until he final-
ly emerged on his own.

“They do the same search

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009 , PAGE 13B





OLEGREAN CLARKE at home with her daughter Petrola (far right) and
some of her 27 grandchildren...

every time someone’s lost and I
don’t know if they ever went in
and found someone in the
bush,” a South Andros local
said.

When search parties lost
hope for Deangelo and Mar-
cell, Mrs Clarke had the feeling
they too, would walk home
independently.

She said: “I still had hope
they would find them, and I
said if everybody search and
they don’t come they are going
to walk out on their own and
that’s exactly what happened.”

While almost everyone in
South Andros has been lost in
the forest, or knows someone
who has, for a few hours, a
night, or up to a week, many
are sceptical the boys could
have survived for so long on
their own.

“Tf they were there I feel like
we would have found them,”
my guide said as we hacked our
way through the thick brush,
dodging poisonwood trees, spi-
derwebs and children-swallow-
ing caves, which are, apparent-
ly, up to 50ft deep.

“There were so many of us
— five or six different groups
searching different areas, some
starting in the north, and some
in the south.

“We looked in every hole,
we called their names, and they





1



| 1a Tat

oc. ‘Hone

never answered.

“T honestly don’t believe they
were there.”

Mr Rolle does not believe in
ghosts either. If there was a
mysterious man in black, he
thinks it was probably a drug
dealer involved in a marijuana
deal that allegedly went wrong
in the weeks before the boys
disappeared.

Talk amongst the sceptics in
South Andros is that someone
had been told to stash some
high-grade cannabis for a deal-
er in Andros and stole some of
the drugs. In the days before
the boys disappeared the deal-
ers were reportedly looking for
the stash, and to get back at the
partner who had double-
crossed them.

The boys disappeared, and
some think they were taken off
the island on a boat.

Then five days before the
boys were found, a man was
allegedly caught trying to smug-
gle 10lbs of marijuana on the
mail boat. Five days later, a
boat was heard pulling into
Kemp’s Bay at around 2am,
and hours later the boys were
found.

“Tf they came in a boat then
it’s a drug trade gone bad and
they picked up the wrong chil-
dren,” Mr Rolle said.

“Either it’s a case of them



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INSIGHT

in South Andros wilerness



ELLOUISE TAYLOR and her niece
Godfrineka Taylor, 14, found the
boys half a mile from their home
more than a month after they dis-
appeared...

being taken by the wrong peo-
ple or the kids ran away, but
[I’m going to have to wait for
them to come out of the hospi-
tal to tell us what happened
before I wrap up my investiga-
tion.”

Attempts to interview the
police in Kemp’s Bay were not
successful, but Superintendent
for the Family Islands, Hulan
Hanna, has said the investiga-
tion will continue in earnest
when the children are well and
able to talk.

The probability of getting
kidnapped by drug dealers may
seem more likely than surviving
on fruits that are currently out
of season, but the mystery of
the missing children remains
for now.

With so many stories of oth-
er mystical happenings in a land
steeped in myth and legend, the
land of the Chick Charneys that
legend has it bedeviled the
political future of a British
prime minister, and the “sper-
ret” that spins your head
around and disorientates you
as you walk in the forest, it
seems nothing is impossible.

Even the sceptical Mr Rolle,
who knows the South Andros
bush better than most locals,
has felt “his head get turned”,
and subsequently walked for
hours in circles and had to fall
asleep before he could once
again get his sense of direction.

Even with a guide, just graz-
ing at the outer edge of the
thick coppice, where it was still
possible to hear the sea, or the
road, or the “sperret”, it

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seemed like east and west were
at a 90 degree angle.

The mystical quality of the
forest, and the land, moved
16th century Spanish explorers
to name her “Isla Espiritu San-
tos”, the island of the Holy
Spirit.

“It’s the holey land,” Mr
Rolle joked as we dodged caves
trekking through the forest.

“Anything is possible.”

Even the children’s mother
is finding it hard to swallow her
children’s story at this stage,
wondering if they could have
been kidnapped, or held in the
woods, and threatened into
telling the story of their disap-
pearance.

While the children recover in
hospital their whereabouts over
those 33 lost days remains a
mystery.

Psychologist David Allen






explained the mythical story as
a way of filling the terrifying
space of the unknown with an
answer of mythical proportions.

“This is the land of the Chick
Charneys and it’s very much a
part of our folklore,” Dr Allen
said.

“Folklore is made in the deep
unconscious, it’s where our
fears congregate and become
condensed.

“In our natural mind we can’t
go there but in the unconscious
mind the folklore starts to play
out; trees grab them or caves
eat them up. There is an old
man who is a spirit who takes
them in and it makes a great
fairytale.

“But in actual fact we don’t
know what happened.”

To learn the truth, Dr Allen
said, the children need to recov-
er from their feelings of aban-

donment, rejection and help-
lessness, as well as the shock of
being found.

They need a safe holding
environment with stability, con-
sistency and predictability,
before they come out with the
truth, he said.

When questioned immedi-
ately after a traumatic experi-
ence and before a full recov-
ery, children will endeavour to
please the questioner, and as a
result the information they pro-
vide will be around 70 per cent
inaccurate, Dr Allen said.

And while Marcell and
Deangelo’s family are desper-
ate for answers, as is the com-
munity of Smith’s Hill, Kemp’s
Bay, the South Andros settle-
ments and the world at large, it
will surely be some time before
we know what really happened,
if indeed, we will ever know.

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PAGE 14B, MONDAY, JULY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Readers have their say...
insight

INSIGHT Censorship —
Voluntary Suppression —
July 13, 2009

PACO I simply loved your
article. I totally enjoyed the
read. WOW! It was ground
breaking....Very, very well
written.

Keep up the superb work
my brother. I am however not
surprised. I expect this kind
of quality work from you.

— Omar

Hi Paco,

Just to let you know that I
really enjoyed reading your
article “Voluntary Oppres-
sion.” It was obviously well
researched, with some apt lit-
erary references and thor-
oughly well argued.

The Christian Council and
the Film Board might not
have found as much enjoy-
ment as I did however!

— SMA

The Insight column of
Monday, July 13th, is definite-
ly a “cut above” the tabloid
journalism of John Marquis.
Marquis raised investigative
journalism to new heights,
and now Paco Nunez raises it
to new literary heights.
Describing various forms of
censorship throughout history
as set against similar action in
the Bahamas should give
pause for thought to Tribune
readers. Censorship for “the
greater good” is the unfortu-
nate “vision of the anointed”
purporting to know all that is
good and worthy for a society.
Paco Nunez makes the critical
observation that he does not
“remember renouncing his
right to regulate his own
behaviour.”

— Joan Thompson

The Nassau Institute

I am Bahamian. I am an
adult. I have an education. I
have an open mind. I value
my freedom of action and
thought. I think most
Bahamians should do the

FEEDBACK



The Insight column of Monday, July
13th, is definitely a “cut above” the tabloid
journalism of John Marquis. Marquis raised
investigative journalism to new heights,
and now Paco Nunez raises it to new literary
heights. Describing various forms of
censorship throughout history as set against
similar action in the Bahamas should give
pause for thought to Tribune readers.
Censorship for “the greater good” is

the unfortunate “vision of the anointed

”%

purporting to know all that is good and
worthy for a society. Paco Nunez makes
the critical observation that he does
not “remember renouncing his right to
regulate his own behaviour.”

same, but I see mostly apathy
compounded by the most
abject ignorance when it
comes to such things.

We have it so good that we
don’t want to improve the
things that aren’t good,
because we are afraid of
change, growth, development,
the unknown, new experi-
ences or ways of looking at
things. This is generally an
intellectually suffocating
country for the masses.
Thought and free expression
are generally not encouraged.
We are inherently uncurious,
which is very sad.

I don’t believe in censor-
ship at all and I take it as a
personal attack on my consti-

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— Joan Thompson

tutionally assured right that
an organisation with a reli-
gious agenda is allowed to
have influence over what
plays or films I should or
should not be allowed to see.
I don’t think, in a country
where religious freedom is
guaranteed, that the Christian
Council should be allowed
any say whatsoever over gov-
ernment issues of any kind. I
certainly didn’t vote for them
and they aren’t accountable
to anyone that I know of.

With Uncle Sam right next
door rating every movie any
Bahamian is ever going to
see, why not save the money
that we waste paying people
on the Plays and Films Com-
mission Board and put it to
good use either promoting
the Bahamas as a destination
for making movies or, even
better, helping young
Bahamians learn the art of
film. The time for putting
Bahamian tax dollars to bet-
ter use than “same ole, same
ole” is well past due. Busi-
ness as usual must not be the
order of the day. To me it
isn’t just the censorship
aspect; it is a waste of the
people’s time and money that
could be put to vastly more
productive use.

Finally, what is happening
with Bruno? They will proba-
bly block that, but the silly
Movies portraying gangster
life, fast cars and cheap
women are always allowed to
play. We wonder how we got
here...

— Erasmus Folly

TOUGH CALL —

My 2 cents ...which, in
today's economy, is not worth
much!

Agreed that the “environ-
mentalists" by and large go
off half cocked without learn-
ing the facts — e.g. the LNG

MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

Voluntary oppression

â„¢ By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

Ihe adult Bahamian: sim-
ple, dull-witted, not qual-
ified to make indepen-
dent decisions, incapable
of moderating his or her

responses to stimuli. A helpless crea-
ture that must be led by the hand at all

Long after most civilised nations have cast off the yoke of censorship,
Bahamians continue to be told what they can and cannot see and hear.
This in turn has allowed a privileged few to ensure that their opinions

tured always take priority. But by failing to take a stand against the suppression
of their rights, members of the public can blame no one but themselves
for this situation. INSIGHT reports...

Tt would be difficult to imagine a
person thus described not taking
offence. Yet everyone who lives in
this country puts up with it in some
form on an almost daily basis, for the
most part without protest.
Examples of this can be gleaned
from virtually all aspects of public life,





butnowhere is it more palpable than
in the government's control over the
ideas we consume, as embodied in the
Play and Film Control Board’s power
to ban films and the Immigration
Department's ability to bar perform-
ing artists from entering the country.

AN HISTORICAL

PERSPECTIVE

Censorship in the Bahamas is often
justified as necessary for the preser-
vation of rather ambiguous priorities
such as public morality, public order,
the public interest, even public health.
Indeed, some of these phrases feature
in the law which governs the suppres-
sion of ideas and opinions.

We are by no means unique in this
respect. Censorship has been around
for as long as democracy has existed.
For almost as long, it been recognised
for what it usually is: the portrayal of
the public as in need of protection
from itself, as a means for those in
power to reinforce their positions.

The philosopher Socrates was put to
death by the world’s very first demo-
cratic society for bucking heads with
the authorities over these very ques-
tions of information and control. He
became the first in a long line of
learned men to defend the notion that
individuals should be free to receive
and impart ideas.

English poet John Milton under-
stood well the assumptions that under-
lie the notion of censorship. In 1644 he
wrote his famous defence of free
expression, the Areopagitica, in
response to a newly enacted censor-
ship law. He exhorted parliament to
“consider what Nation it is whereof
ye are, and whereof ye are the gover-
nors: a Nation not slow and dull, but of
a quick, ingenious and piercing spirit,
acute to invent, subtle and sinewy to
discourse, not beneath the reach of
any point, the highest that human
capacity can soar to."

Milton wrote that the absolute free-
dom to impart and receive ideas is
yital for the increase of knowledge
and the progress of a people. Having
supported the anti-monarchists in the
English Civil War, Milton was a fierce
advocate of democracy who believed
the public was the only legitimate
earthly sovereign; a sentiment that the
Bahamas is supposed to be a natural
heir to, as one of the oldest parlia- i
mentary democracies in the world.

The intensely God-fearing poet who
gave us the poem, “Paradise Lost”,
also understood that personal moral-
ity is a question to be struggled with by
individuals and supported the view
that citizens should take their faith
“into their own hands again."

He warned religious leaders who
attempt to suppress the free expres-
sion of ideas because they fear “new
and dangerous opinions,” that think-
ing themselves the defenders of the



persecutors.”

faith, they will end up becoming “the

JUSTICE MAXWELL, RACISM

AND THE CENSORS

“New and dangerous opinions”
have often been the target of censor-

UM ee iene OCI m ROM EVA)

Gee eee aia Ce cea ec e

ORT ics uete ese nmol ems CoD

weight of the law descend upon him. Like-

r if anyone under the age of 18 is

ci LUO ee kOe CLC

adults, the police should throw the book at
Litre neue Mn t (a

ship in the Bahamas, But what seems
new and dangerous to one generation
often ends up being viewed a vital cat-
alyst for progress by the next.
Consider the example of the late
Justice Maxwell Thompson, who as a
young man founded the Citizens Com-

THE FRONT PAGE of the July 13 edition of INSIGHT...

controversy. But, on the oth-
er hand, why, oh why, doesn't
Government make a deci-
sion!?

True, casuarinas are an
invasive species, but those
along the western beaches
have been there ever since I
can remember — and that's a
long time! I suspect the E's
have a point in that the native
plants would help to hold the
sand, but why do we have to
have seagrape hedges every-
where, blocking the sea view.
Seagrape trees are lovely,
would serve the same pur-
pose, yet allow the view. See
Western Esplanade and Fort
Montagu "park".

Indeed, Government does-
n't inform the Public suffi-
ciently. I got more out of
your column, Larry (Smith —
Tough Call, published every
Wednesday) in re: proposed
Arawak Cay port facility than
from any other source.

Thank you. Maps would be
helpful, too. I still don't
know where the "new"

east/west road to the south of
the island (nothing to do with
Arawak Cay) is nor how to
get on it! One map published
in the newspaper would speak
volumes!

Now, if only you could get
more than TALK out of Gov-
ernment in re the fish ramp at
Montagu junction of Shirley
Street and East Bay Streets!
There is still time for this gov-
ernment to relocate it (to the
adjacent filled land to the
west) with running water and
mandatory off-street parking
and with traffic controlled by
the existing light at the north-
ern end of the Village Road
extension, making the right
hand lane on East Bay Street
turn right at the light and go
straight through to Village
Road only, with traffic for
Shirley Street continue east
through the light, turning
right opposite the ramp and
thence into Shirley Street and
thence be controlled by the
light at junction of Shirley
Street and Village Road.

mittee in Nassau to fight racial dis-
crimination.

When Justice Thompson died in
2003, his obituary recounted how in
the late 1940s, his committee agitated
against the policy of the City Garden
Club of banning non-whites from its

premises, and "also prevailed on the
Governor to revoke a decision by the
Censor Board to deny the showing of
the film ‘No Way Out, in which Sid-
ney Poitier starred" and which
denounced racially driven violence in
| particular and irrational hatred in gen-
eral.

Why would the members of the
Censor Board want to ban such a
film? Perhaps they felt a public show-
ing of a movie in which a conscien-
tious and caring black doctor is
harassed, threatened, beaten and
almost killed by white men in some
southern American backwater town
might constitute a threat to the peace
in a majority black colony run by the
descendants of white British men.

At the same time, however, there
were certain aspects of the film’s mes-
sage, in the context of the changing
attitudes of the time, which might have
caused anxiety for one social group
in particular.

Justice Thompson's early accom-
plishments led to the formation of the
Bahamas People's Party, of which he
was chairman. His obituary says: "This
time, however, was the age of the
‘McCarthy Communist Witch Hunt!
| and they were accused of being Com-
munist because as Max said - ‘every-
thing that was new and unfamiliar was
called Communist. Emotion was run-
ning quite high and the mere mention
of the word was hushed."

An anti-racism movement could
only be equated with communism by a
power structure peopled by individu-
als astonishingly ignorant of the mean-
ing of both terms, or who out of anxi-
ety over their own positions, either
consciously or unconsciously conflate
a trend that they see as a threat to
their interests with the dominant inter-
national bogeyman of the day.

RIGHTEOUS INDIGNATION
In the present-day Bahamas, just as
in Milton’s time, “the persecutors” are
often inspired by notions of religious
fervor. Pry loose any particular
instance of censorship, and you are
yery likely to find a zealot of some
description crawling about beneath it.
Religious leaders have worked
| closely with the Control Board, and
| often consult with Immigration offi-
cials on whether a particular per-
forming artist should be allowed into
the country.

There is, of course, nothing contro-
yersial in Christian terms about the
public being viewed as “the flock” in
need of someone to lead it about,
although how some pastors have man-
aged to commandeer the role of “the
Good Shepherd” for themselves is an
interesting question.

In any case, every Bahamian is enti-
tled to ask what right pastors have

SEE page 8B





Traffic could enter the relo-
cated fish market via the turn-
ing off Bay Street by the
Yacht Club or travelling
north via the Village Road
extension. Got that? Wish I
could supply a map...The
handful of votes represented
by the reluctant fishermen
would be so delighted by the
relocated market by the time
of the next election that
they'd all vote to return the
present government!

I agree with you that for-
eign boats should have to pay
up front a hefty deposit to fish
our waters, be given "The
Rules", and, if they want most
of their deposit returned,
should undergo an inspection
of their deep freezer, fish
wells, etc, to ensure they have
only the legal number of
fish/conch/crawfish. Maybe
they should only be allowed
to catch fish for immediate
consumption.

Keep on writing. We learn
much from you!

— Joan Lightbourn

Pa eT oe
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 502-2371 today!

~\)\ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

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THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT kt

5-Day FORECAST

TAMPA
High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 72° F/22°C

@

-

ORLANDO —
High: 85° F/29° C

Low: 70°F/21°C ©

KEY WEST
High: 90° F/32°C
Low: 80° F/27°C

>»

x

Partly sunny, a
t-storm; breezy.

High: 88°

ICE acc

100° F

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ee is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

@ WEST PALM BEACH

FT. LAUDERDALE

High: 89°F/32°C os

Low: 76° F/24°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Tuesday

Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston

High
F/C
98/36
67/19
84/28
81/27
83/28
81/27
78/25
90/32
78/25
79/26
93/33
92/33
80/26
89/31
94/34

Today

Low

F/C
68/20
55/12
64/17
63/17
66/18
62/16
61/16
69/20
59/15
60/15
75/23
58/14
61/16
76/24
76/24

Ww

pe
C
pe
pe
t
pe
pe
t
s
pce
t
t
pe
s
t

High

F/C
93/33
66/18
85/29
82/27
82/27
76/24
75/23
86/30
80/26
81/27
96/35
86/30
83/28
88/31
94/34

Low

F/C
69/20
54/12
67/19
67/19
66/18
64/17
65/18
71/21
64/17
63/17
74/23
57/13
63/17
75/23
74/23

Ww

HO tm OO tO

oO

oO

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando

couple of t-storms.

Rather cloudy, a

Mostly cloudy,

t-storms; breezy.

High: 89°
Low: 80° Low: 80°
105°-81° F

High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 75° F/24°C

@
MIAMI
High: 90° F/32°C

Low: 78° F/26° C



High
F/C
80/26
90/32
85/29
108/42
90/32
87/30
83/28
86/30
90/32
79/26
84/28
88/31
81/27
91/32
85/29

Today
Low

F/C
60/15
69/20
64/17
84/28
68/20
67/19
62/16
69/20
78/25
63/17
58/14
72/22
69/20
69/20
70/21

WwW

Ss

High

F/C
82/27
86/30
81/27
109/42
81/27
82/27
87/30
84/28
89/31
79/26
87/30
90/32
81/27
89/31
89/31

@
FREEPORT

Tuesday

Low

F/C
63/17
72/22
63/17
88/31
69/20
67/19
63/17
71/21
79/26
64/17
64/17
74/23
69/20
65/18
74/23

High: 89° F/32° C

Low: 76° F/24° C

F

ANDROS
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 79° F/26° C

ABACO
High: 90° F/32° C

Low: 80° F/27°C
25
i.

Fz

A couple of showers
and a t-storm.

High:
Low:

89°
80°

100°-88° F

NASSAU
High: 88° F/31°C

Low: 80° F/27°C
@

Today

W High Low
F/C F/C

pe Philadelphia 83/28 68/20
t Phoenix 111/43 39/31
t Pittsburgh 76/24 59/15
s Portland, OR 93/33 60/15
t Raleigh-Durham 386/30 65/18
Ss St. Louis 84/28 65/18
pe Salt Lake City 94/34 68/20
pc San Antonio 93/33 75/23
t San Diego 77/25 69/20
t San Francisco 68/20 55/12
pc Seattle 83/28 59/15
t Tallahassee 91/32 65/18
t Tampa 86/30 72/22
t Tucson 104/40 80/26
t Washington, DC 82/27 67/19

Ww

pe
s
pe
pe
t
s
t
t
pe
pe
pe
pe
t
pe
t

AccuWeather.com ‘Cae’
Forecasts and graphics provided by i sy
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 21 Jul. 28 Aug. 5 Aug. 13
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 81°F/27°C
————
all CATISLAND
High: 85° F/29° C
Low: 76° F/24°C
. 7
GREATEXUMA pe
REAT EXUN ‘a SAN SALVADOR
High: 84 F/29 C High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 79° F/26° C Low: 78° F/26° c
oat at
LONG ISLAND
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 78° F/26°C MAYAGUANA
Tuesday
High Low W ck High: 87° F/31°C
F/c FIC Low: 78° F/26° C
82/27 70/21
111/43 87/30 pc CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS
78/25 60/15 t RAGGEDISLAND [ian ee eee
91/32 61/16 s eee ae ow: 80° F/27
High: 88° F/31° C -_
83/28 66/18 t Low:76°F/24°C eS yr
84/28 66/18 pc . hen 4
93/33 68/20 pc
sear et GREAT INAGUA
76/24 69/20 pe Low B1°F27°C
68/20 56/13 pc :
86/30 58/14 s 3
90/32 69/20 t Py
88/31 74/23 t i,
101/38 79/26 pc
82/27 69/20 t




ae 4
ari INDEX TODAY



o|1|2

LOW

3|4|5|6

MODERATE





— t+ =

Some sun with a Partly sunny and



t-storm; breezy. breezy.
High: 91° High: 90°
Low: 81° Low: 80°
ETCH cl
100°-92° F 109°-92° F High Ht. (ft.
Tod 6:39am. 2.5
oN 72pm. 33
Tuesd 738am. 27
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday 333am. 29
Temperature Malnstay 5 pm. 3.3
Hig Whi, LOW wn gz Fs? ¢ | Thursday or 33
Normal high... 88° F/31°C —— ;
Normal low 75° F/24° C
Last year's Nigh oo... ceceeteteeeeeeees 91° F/33° C

Last year's LOW oo. ccccceseseteeeeeeeees 81° F/27° C



Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:32 a.m. Moonrise..... 4:38 a.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....ccccccsssssssssssssesseeen 0.00" Sunset....... 8:01 p.m. Moonset..... 6:55 p.m.
Year to date as New Full Last

First

Normal year to date



7|8|9|10

HIGH |



\. HIGH

Low
12:43 a.m.

12:36 p.m.

1:37 a.m.
1:36 p.m.
2:28 a.m.
2:33 p.m.
3:18 a.m.
3:29 p.m.

dieccliecT, aE LEAT:



The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Posy

ch
-0.2

-0.1
-0.3
-0.2
-0.3
-0.3
-0.3



ae TS

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
91/32
68/20
88/31
91/32
55/12
90/32
86/30
75/23
93/33
91/32
85/29
68/20
80/26
66/18
68/20
82/27
61/16
100/37
95/35
71/21
93/33
83/28
97/36
66/18
61/16
72/22
78/25
77/25
92/33
77/25
90/32
97/36
83/28
86/30
61/16
838/31
70/21
70/21
93/33
86/30
74/23
102/38
77/25
82/27
66/18
79/26
93/33
65/18
75/23
71/21
69/20
109/42
82/27
88/31
56/13
86/30
54/12
84/28
63/17
838/31
66/18
70/21
93/33
86/30
73/22
92/33
78/25
75/23
68/20
76/24

ii

Today

Low
F/C
79/26
57/13
59/15
75/23
43/6
79/26
77/25
64/17
75/23
79/26
62/16
54/12
M5128
45/7
51/10
60/15
52/11
79/26
81/27
43/8
72/22
71/21
73/22
54/12
52/11
56/13
62/16
57/13
72/22
57/13
81/27
81/27
69/20
63/17
39/3
80/26
58/14
54/12
60/15
77/25
51/10
75/23
63/17
63/17
55/12
55/12
82/27
55/12
60/15
55/12
63/17
88/31
66/18
79/26
40/4
74/23
34/1
74/23
55/12
72/22
59/15
48/8
83/28
75/23
59/15
65/18
61/16
60/15
55/12
60/15

pe

t



High
F/C
88/31
72/22
85/29
92/33
59/15
91/32
86/30
78/25
91/32
90/32
92/33
73/22
81/27
67/19
78/25
85/29
54/12
102/38
93/33
73/22
92/33
82/27
96/35
71/21
59/15
79/26
83/28
73/22
90/32
70/21
91/32
95/35
88/31
85/29
60/15
87/30
69/20
68/20
95/35
86/30
74/23
109/42
81/27
72/22
80/26
77/25
95/35
66/18
84/28
77/25
17/25
111/43
86/30
88/31
61/16
87/30
46/7
85/29
74/23
82/27
70/21
72/22
95/35
79/26
75/23
93/33
78/25
81/27
73/22
73/22

Tuesday
Low
F/C
78/25
63/17
55/12
74/23
50/10
81/27
77/25
67/19
72/22
79/26
67/19
61/16
e123
47/8
62/16
67/19
42/5
78/25
81/27
52/11
71/21
72/22
70/21
55/12
54/12
68/20
62/16
57/13
72/22
55/12
82/27
80/26
68/20
66/18
38/3
80/26
56/13
57/13
59/15
77/25
51/10
76/24
64/17
58/14
mile
55/12
81/27
56/13
64/17
60/15
70/21
88/31
66/18
80/26
32/0
74/23
34/1
73/22
62/16
66/18
55/12
52/11
85/29
75/23
59/15
66/18
61/16
68/20
53/11
57/13

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MarINE FORECAST

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sh
pe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace





MONDAY, JULY 20TH, 2009, PAGE 15B




WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 86° F
Tuesday: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 86° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 85° F
Tuesday: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 85° F
Tuesday: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 6-10 Miles 85° F



Hy)

Billings
84/57, >
(COOL) oe New York?

Minneapolis

79/63 =

87/67)

Miami
90/78

Showers
T-storms
37] Rain





Fronts
[x4 Pluie: Shown are noon positions of weather systems and ni
Be] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm fitenfiient@e
[v=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Menge
10s| 0s [0s /| 10s 20s [Osi] 40s SOs 60s 70s 80s [Gts//AU0e Iie)





ua

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Away f yA Hurricane

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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

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CS



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MONDAY JULY 20, 2009





The stories behind the news

INSIGHT



Surviving 33 days, nights

Deangelo Clarke and Marcell Sylverin Clarke have shared their miraculous survival story after
being missing for 33 days and nights in the South Andros wilderness. Now, guide Joshua Rolle
takes reporter Megan Reynolds, of The Tribune, through a thick, 3,000 square foot stretch
of bush on the largest island in the Bahamas. INSIGHT reports...

lm By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

isappearances, partic-

ularly of young chil-

dren, rarely have hap-

py endings. Even

when children return
to their frantic parents, there is often
some horror of kidnapping, abuse, tor-
ture, if they are not found dead. Per-
haps that is why it is so hard to accept
the story Deangelo Clarke and Mar-
cell Sylverin Clarke have told about
the circumstances of their disappear-
ance.

It seems impossible that two boys,
Deangelo aged nine and Marcell, six,
could survive in the South Andros
“bush” for 33 days and nights. Grant-
ed they would have had water to
drink, as June’s heavy rains would
have collected in the many caves and
holes in the limestone rock on the for-
est ground.

And ripe dillys hang heavy on trees
in the dense coppice, as do wild
tamarind, and mangoes on the occa-
sional mango tree, but the “plums”
they told their parents, their grand-
mother and the doctor they had eaten,
are not in season.

Cocoplums may grow along the
coast of nearby Kemp’s Bay at this
time of year, but rarely in the bush, my
guide Joshua Rolle explained as he
led me through the thick coppice
stretching out for some 3,000 square
feet from South Andros settlements
on the coast right across to the west
coast of the country’s largest island.

But pigeon plums are either so dried
out they are flaking off the seed or
budding green, and certainly inedible,
he said.

Mr Rolle is a local so familiar with
the South Andros bush he led one of
three teams of Defence Force officers
sent from Nassau along with the K-9
dog unit to carry out a full-scale search
for the boys in the week after they
went missing on June 9.

Deangelo, who lives with the grand-
mother who raised him, Olegrean
Clarke, 67, across the road from the
forest in Smith’s Hill, was going out to
catch crabs at around 5.30pm on that
Tuesday evening as he has done every
evening since he was around four
years old, Mrs Clarke said.

And his younger half-brother Mar-
cell, who was visiting from Nassau
where he lives with their mother, Vera
Clarke, in Kemp Road, followed as
he does whenever they are together.

It was not unusual for the boys to go
out crabbing, or to walk the road in
this remote settlement on their own,
but as the light began to fade at
around 7.30pm, and the brothers had
not returned, the search began.

The grandmother of 27 said the
boys don’t usually go into the bush to
catch crabs, which walk brazenly into
the road at any time of day.

She waited in the road for them to
come home as her son, with cousins
and friends, searched the woods.

A passing neighbour gave her hope
when they said the children were not

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ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING




MARCELL SYLVERIN CLARKE & DEANGELO CLARKE

far to the south, walking back towards
the house at around 8.30pm.

But when they didn’t come home,
police were called, and a crowd of
some 20 concerned neighbours
stopped to search as word travelled.

At around 1am the search party dis-
persed, only to rise the next morning,

around 100 people strong.

The boys’ mother flew in from Nas-
sau with Marcell’s father, Deangelo’s
stepfather, Marcellin Sylverin, 28, an
employee on the Captain Moxey mail
boat, which travels between South
Andros and Nassau.

After two days of searching the fam-

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ily criticised police for not stepping
up the search effort, and aired their
views in The Tribune, and by June 12
teams of Defence Force officers and
police search dogs joined the search.

A US Coast Guard helicopter flew
low over the dense forest using a
searchlight and heat sensor technolo-
gy to detect the boys.

But with still no sign of the lost
brothers, hope was fading fast.

Police called off the search parties
after two weeks; the effort seemingly
futile.

Local pastors held a candlelight ser-
vice in the Clarke’s front yard and
around 150 people prayed for the safe
return of the boys one month after
they had disappeared.

Ribbons were strung along the mile-
long stretch of road from Smith’s Hill
to Kemp’s Bay, and white sand was

Photos by Megan Reynolds

GUIDE Joshua Rolle stands over one of the
many deep holes in South Andros landscape
(seen above)...

poured around the tree in Mrs
Clarke’s front yard to be topped with
flowers, soft toys and teddy bears.

The white sand, reminiscent of the
white sand cemetery in Kemp’s Bay,
the flowers and the overwhelming loss
meant the family started to mourn the
children.

“It was comforting,” Mrs Clarke
said, her voice cracking with emotion.

“Everybody was just one big family,
the only disturbance was the children
being missing.”

Perhaps it was their prayers that
seemingly spat the children out of the
woods on July 12, but many in South
Andros think it was something more
sinister.

It was 13-year-old Godfrineka Tay-
lor who spotted the boys from her
aunt Ellouise Taylor’s car as they were
passing between Smith’s Hill and

SEE pages 12 & 13