Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text


Pim lovin’ it |

eH OF
Low SIF

e SUNNY WITH
FSTORM

Volurre: 105 No.195



|




At X

=m Lhe Iribune





BAHAMAS EDITION

‘www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009

Har Taylor trial

ends in hung jury

Retrial ordered
after an 8-4
suilty verdict

. NATARIO McKENZIE
tribune Staff Reporter
amckenzie@tribunemedia.net_

MANY expressed surprise
yesterday after the Harl Tay-
lor murder trial ended in a
nung jury, with the panel
anable to reach a unanimous
verdict on the murder charge.

After some three: hours of
deliberations, the jury of six
en and six women, returned
yith a verdict of guilty 8-4 on
‘°2 murder charge. Senior Jus-
uce Anita Allen said, howev-
er, that the verdict was not
one of conviction and ordered
a retrial for Troyniko McNeil,

ah z
Outside the courtroom Troy
McNeil, the father of the
accused and Taylor’s former —
siness partner, told mem-
<3 of the media that the ver-
“* "I’m very surprised actually
that the jurors came to this
decision. It is quite evident
that if you have all the items
from the scene and you also
aave my DNA, why is it that
the forensic analysis was not
dxicked up from there. Obvi-
ously Troyniko is my son and
with those items and the com-
parative view-it would have
picked it up, so it’s strange,"
Mr McNeil said.
As I see it now, my son has
veen charged with murder
because he has a fingerprint
on the door, but the murder
‘yeapon was not fingerprint-
-d and was not analysed for
jONA.and the judge said don’t
-onsider it, how is that possi-
te?" he wanted to know.
‘Mr McNeil; who lived at
Mountbatten House up to a
“eek before Taylor was killed,
‘aid it was not unusual that
s son's DNA was found
aere as Troyniko worked
there and often came to visit

the accused.

-"There were just too many
*aconsistencies and lies in this
gase, to come to this verdict
is beyond me. Some definite

SEE page nine



TROY MCNEIL, the father of



























TROYNIKO MCNEIL heading to court to hear the verdict in his IF

Sunken tanker
was not insured

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AN 85-FOOT tanker, which sank
Wednesday in the protected Exuma
Land and Sea Park spilling oil and
garbage, was not insured.

Now environment officials are wor-
ried that this might hamper efforts to
salvage the wreckage and several pieces
of heavy equipment it was transporting
which are now on the sea bed.

Meanwhile, fears that the barge’s miss-
ing crew members may have drowned
were dispelled yesterday when it was
reported that the “three or four” men
and the boat’s captain Michael Oakes
clung to the sinking boat for hours
overnight before being rescued by.a pass-
ing vessel on Wednesday morning and



brought to Nassau.

Eric Carey, Executive Director of the
Bahamas National Trust, said that in a
conversation with Mr Oakes, the boat
captain claimed that the barge sank off
Cistern Cay, Exuma, after running into a
squall at around 3am Wednesday.

‘After being rescued, Mr Oakes came
to Nassau, where Mr Carey said he
claimed he contacted authorities to
report the sinking.

However, the BNT chief said it is not
known who he reported the incident to as
the environmental organisation only
became aware of the hazard by “second
hand information.”

He noted that prompt reporting of
such an incident is crucial to minimising
the hazard the vessel posed to the sur-

SEE page nine



‘Bahamas ‘has.







By PAUL G TURNQUEST.
Tribune Staff Reporter. .....
plumquest@tribunemedta) net

STATE Min-
ister for Immi-
gration
Branville
McCartney
warned the
public yester-
day that the.




seen a spike in
illegal migra-
tion from the
impoverished
and politically
unstable country of Haid. ver
the past few weeks.

Noting that there seems to
be no justifiable reason for
this. significant increase, Mr
McCartney said that the
Department of Immigration
has been in contact with the
Bahamas’ Embassy in Haiti
to determine if there has been
any change in the country’s
economic or political land-
scape that could cause such
an influx. i

“But the answer to*that is
no. From my understanding
they (Haiti) had elections
three weeks ago and they are

BRANVILLE
MCCARTNEY

. Waiting for the results of:

elections. But there has been
nothing untoward out of the
ordinary. And the reason why
we called was to deternine
why are these persons coming
at this particular time of year,
because at this time it is usu-
ally not this frequent,” he said.

Over the past few days,

SEE page nine

Certificate for the
completion of a _
Semester at Sea found,

brought to Tribune

A CERTIFICATE for the
completion of a Semester at Sea
was brought to The Tribune
yesterday by a good samaritan.

An employee of Athéna:Café
left the certificate at The ‘Tri-
bune newsdesk after he found it
at the restaurant. ened

The owner of this certificate,
whose name is on it, should
come to The Tribune on Mon-
day after 11am and ask for Mrs
Eloise Poitier. Once they iden-
tify themselves by name,they
can collect their certificate, ’:~







PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009

imc tRIBUNE






Ashton Kutcher

Hollywood

star rushed :

to hospital
in Nassau

HOLLYWOOD actor. Ash-
ton Kutcher was rushed to a
Nassau hospital yesterday
after he suffered a ruptured
eardrum.

Kutcher, who is married to
actress Demi Moore, was film-
ing water scenes for his new
movie “Five Killers” when he
started complaining of a
severe headache and dripping
blood from his ear.

The National Enquirer
reported that doctors quickly
diagnosed and treated the

Punk’s star for a ruptured

eardrum.

He had reportedly fully
recovered and was joking
with hospital staff by the time
Demi rushed to his bedside.

According to the Mayo

Clinic, a ruptured eardrum is a i

hole or tear in the thin drum-
like tissue that separates the
ear canal from the middle ear.

A ruptured eardrum can
result in hearing loss and
make the middle ear vulnera-
ble to infections or other

injury.

However, Bahamian doc-’ :

tors gave Kutcher the all-clear
to fly back,to Georgia where
he will continue filming the
action comedy which also stars
Grey’s Anatomy actress
Katherine Heigl.






Accounts.









































of accounting services.

following:

Financial

salaries

_ management position,

applications

Responsibilities of the position include, bu

* Compilation of the corporate budget. :

* Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets

¢ Preparation of monthly management statements

° Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation

° Preparation of performance reports for division , department and sections

° Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry receivables (capital
contributions, rechargeable) :

° Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices

° Liaison with internal and extemal audits 2

+ Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief

* Officer for the Board of Directors

* Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financ

* Preparation of the business plan for the department

¢ Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department y

» Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims -

* Overseeing the Cash Flow Management

¢ Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment
. © Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form employee’s

*. Conducting audits of various finan

A NASSAU woman is des-
perate to be reunited with
her puppy after the four-
month-old pet was stolen
during a violent attack earli-
er this week.

The incident took place
around 2.30pm on Wednes-
day, when the woman was
returning home from taking
the puppy, named Sophie, to

vet.

As she got out of the car
outside her Camperdown
home, a man sprang from
some nearby trees and
demanded her handbag.

He attacked the frightened
woman, throwing her to the
ground and pulling the bag
from her hands. .

Sophie’s lead, which her
owner was holding at the
time, snapped during the
struggle.

' The culprit made his
escape carrying both the
handbag and her beloved
puppy. ;

_A friend of the victim said

she had to be taken by ambu-
lance to the hospital, “due to
the extreme blow to her head
and cuts and bruises.”

“We need to find Sophie,”
she said. “She is the love of
my friend's life and she is
absolutely distraught.”

The family is offering a
$500 reward for the return

of the pup. Anyone with

information regarding
Sophie’s whereabouts is
asked to call 427-0841.

Persons on the lookout for
Sophie are advised to keep
in-mind that she is now big-
ger and more mature than in
the photos seen here, which
were taken when she was
only seven weeks old.

The puppy has just had her
face groomed and has four
beads in her right ear. She is
white and has fluffy fur.

“Please look, out for
Sophie and tell everyone you
know and be careful,” said
the victim’s friend in a mass
e-mail.

‘Pet stolen in a bizarre attack







BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Senior Manager,

The job oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget & Management
Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective delivery

\

Job requirements include:

° A minimum ofa Bachelors degree with a certification in
or equivalent qualifications

* A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a similar

~¢ Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices
* Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet

* Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing systems
_* Ability to analyze financial reports.
* Sound knowledge of covenants of lending institutions (e.g. IDB)
* Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial software
and the system of internal control. .
* Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
° Ability to communicate effectively both orall
* Good time management skills 4

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: July.



t are not limited to, the

jal Officer as required

cial activities including Employee Basic Pay

¢ Reconciliation, Employee Loans Reconciliation and Payment Reconciliation

¢ Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable

* Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts

* Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle repayments

¢ Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule

* Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans

* Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to ensure
adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors

* Managing the status of local and foreign vendors’

¢ Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and External Auditors

¢ Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline. Conducting —
performance appraisals |

* Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff, manage
and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations

Accounting ACCA/CPA

y and in wiiting

NATIONAL
Security
Minister
Tommy
Turnquest
addressed
inmates
at the
ceremony.

NATIONAL Security Minister Tommy Turnquest (left) and Superintendent Dr Elliston Rahming view prod-—





Patrick Hanna/BIS photos

Inmates receive
trade certificates

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

aye UTE
PHONE: 322-2157



By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

NATIONAL Security Minister
Tommy Turnquest pledged gov-
ernment’s commitment to pro-
viding the infrastructure, tools and
manpower necessary to give

for completing he
_ Associates Degree in Law.
We wish you well and the
best has yet to come!
Love your family
and friends!



tute.

inmates of Her Majesty’s Prison
access to technical, vocational and
academic courses.

“Tt is the policy of this govern-
ment to ensure that the vast
majority of inmates have access
to a regime of training geared
towards improved behaviour
management, attitude adjustment,
conflict resolution, goal setting
and habit modification,” said Mr
Turnquest.

He was the keynote speaker at
a certificate presentation exercise

‘for 129 inmates at Her Majesty’s

Prison Correctional Training Insti-

Mr Turnquest described the
ceremony as “prison reform in
action.” He said such events are in
keeping with government’s aim
“not just to modernise Her
Majesty’s Prison, but indeed to
reform it.” z

The prison team is headed by
Superintendent Dr Elliston Rah-
ming. ,

Inmates received certificates in
auto mechanics, basic communi-
cations/reading, mathematics, car-
pentry, computer basics, ceram-
ics, welding, cosmetology, and:
BJCs in English arid mathematics.

“Prison reform does not mean
cuddling inmates, nor does it
mean turning this institution into
a hotel," Mr Turnquest said.
"Prison reform means devising
the. policies, developing the per-
sonnel and implementing the pro-
tocols that lead to optimum staff
morale and productivity.”

One component of prison
reform, he said, is the Correctional
Training Institute, which provides
inmates with the education and
training necessary to be employ-"
able when they are released.

Mr Turnquest told inmates that,
while society should be forgiving
to ex-offenders, unfortunately this
is not the case.

He advised them to make use
of every opportunity for success
that comes their way after they
are released.

“Your qualifications will open
possibilities for you, because the
skills you have acquired are in
demand," Mr Turnquest said.

Casual Wear .

ey,

eads

ty





THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS -

SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009, PAGE 3





sacaieratien |
fepartment
conducts ©
exercise

/ THE Depurtment of
Immigration conducted a
repatriaton exercise on
Thursety.

“Ore American, one
Douinican and 110
Hutians were repatriated
jy their respective coun-
cries.

: The Department of
Lipunigration said it

‘mains committed to

tifely repatriation of per-
S fils found illegally resid-
intg and or working in the
a amas.




af gootls
imported by
Bahainians
last year

BAHAMIANS import-
ed $3.2 billion worth of
goods into the country last
year, according to the
Department of Statistics.

The largest contributor
to this figure was the
importation of fuel which
totalled some $84'7 mil-
lion.

This was followed! close-
ly by the import of *
machinery and transport
equipment which account-
ed for $642.8 million. |

Other categories that
contributed significantly
to total imports were ma\n-
ufactured goods which

accounted for nearly $444 |

million, a
aniinals v
foralmost $430 million:

Businessman
critical but
Stable after
shooting

a]

FREEPORT - Business-
man Leslie Maycock is listed
in critical but stable condi-
tion in the Intensive Care
Unit at Rand-Memorial Hos-

pital after being shot at his ~

establishment on Thursday
evening.

Mr Maycock, 50, a retired
police officer, was accosted
byitwo armed masked men
sometime around 10.45pm

_ after closing his business near
the; Hawksbill Service Sta-
tiorl on West Sunrise High-
way.

potich and shot by the sus-
pects, who fled into nearby
bushes.

Mr Maycock, who sus-

taitied an ‘injury to his left .

side, attempted to drive him-

' self'to the hospital, but lost
control of his vehicle and
overturned in the area of the
Four Way Co-op Plaza on
West Atlantic Drive and Pio-
neers Way.

Police are investigating the
matter. Anyone with infor-
mation that could assist
police is asked to call 911.

the Tribune wants to hear

fgom people who are

raking news in their

4 neighbourhoods. Perhaps
ibe are raising funds for a
od cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

a fea or have won an

q

9 ohn worth

aude mone to alter bib

A LOCAL supplier complained on
Wednesday that officials at the Depart
ment of Customs ordered him to alte:
freight charges on the bill of lading:
that accompanied one of his shipments
so that Customs could collect a larger

rate of duty on the importation of the |:

goods.

He said that after being given the
run-around on Wednesday he was
finally told by a Customs officer on
Thursday that the reason the new
rules had not been published was that
they had not yet been approved by the
Minister.

However, the Customs officer main- |

tained that under the law Customs has
the authority to fix a minimum freight
charge on a shipment regardless of
what the bill of lading records. “I was
told,” said the businessman, “that
whatever is on the bill of lading is
between me and the company and that
Customs has the right to assess what
the freight should be regardless of what
the bill of lading says.”

The businessman said that on
Wednesday officers told him the

“I was told that
whatever is on the bill
of lading is between —
me and the company

‘and that Customs has

the right to assess
what the freight
should be regardless
of what the bill of
laling says.”

imal



Local supplier

low: They refused to release the ship-
ment wntil he changed his Customs
declaration form to reflect an amount
the department believed was correct.

The department’s attitude, said the
businessman, has actually blocked the
delivery of materials that are crucial

The businessman explained that
because of the amount of business he
conducts, he is able to negotiate a sub-
stantially lower price for the transport
of his shipments.

Customs duty is charged not only on
the value of goods coming into the
country, but also on the freight costs of
the goods, which must be documented
on a bill of lading.

The businessman said he has seen
no documentation to support the rate
scale, the department is pushing, nor
has he heard of any government notice
announcing this as a new policy.

While frustrated with Custom's posi-
tion, the supplier'feels it would be ille-
gal to falsify his bill of lading. He
vowed to stand his ground.

“I know they are trying to get more
revenue,” said the businessman, “but I
shift so many containers that this is my
contract price for transportation. In
my mind, to do what they want me to
do without any supporting documen-
tation is totally illegal. I am refusing to
do it and so they are pushing me

around, but no matter what they do, I



However, by Thursday he ye
changed his mind. After the i “ustér
officer explained to him the reag
the department’s decision, he cae
the figure on his Customs decla atio
form, and cleared his-goods. jf} (2
“However, ” he said, “I still belie,
I should be given some officiaf dof
ment to explain why the figure Oni)

‘bili of lading does not agree Wit sy

Customs form. Suppose a year, HO,
now there is some sort of i ingpity. Al:
someone asks me why these two, foci,
ments don’t agree, what official n¢ fis
do I have to explain what I have,dony
If they want to do that then, - DE
some documentation to show, He
have given Customs a figure t Be
not correspond with my bill of art
I am not totally in disagreemeg} 3 wal}
what Customs is trying to doy Pil,
think it should be open to ebay
before any new rule is implemented,
understand what they are doing, up
the way they are doing it is £9 a
wrong,” he said.

:
Messages left for Comprrgfffl”
Customs Glen Gomez were ag





amount on the bill of lading was too

for a current government project.

Rise i in boat thefts

‘likely linked to. adeath Ey

human smuggling’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE rise in boat thefts in

Lowther Abaco dslandsuigadikely
linked to the human smug-
gling trade, according to
South Abaco MP Edison
Key.

Noting that he and his con-
stituents, have “great con-

cerns” about the thefts, Mr
Key said police may need to
.do more to combat the illegal
a\ctivity in certain areas.

“I have spoken to the
police about it and the prime
minister (also MP for North
Abaco) is quite aware of it

Oe



He was robbed of a money |



ancl quite concerned.”
“From listening to the
noise in the market, there’s a
lot.of human cargo being
moved from Abaco into
Floricla and I think the theft
of the boats is connected.
“Whaat they are stealing is
very high-powered boats, and

‘sometimies they probably sell

the engines afterwards, but

‘they can move from point A

to point 13 very quickly,” Mr
Key said.

Part of, the problem, he
said, may: be that certain
islands do not have their own
local police; station.

“There’s mo police station
in Hope Town so it takes a
while to get there (if a crime

is committed). It’s a great. ~

concern for the people of

: Abaco.andit could affect our |
- economy, especially the sec-

ond home owner's.’

The MP said, that in his
opinion stiffer penalties may
be needed to deter thieves.
He suggested that they
should receive up to 25 years
in prison for such a crime.
“That would make a dliffer-
ence,” he said.

His comments came after
The Tribune received numer-
ous calls and e-mails, and

published several articles |

highlighting’ the issue of the
rise in boat thefts through-
out the Bahamas, and in tle
Abaco islands in particular.
During a recent trip to

Abaco, The Tribune was
informed by various residents .

that people are so frustrated
with the increasing number
of thefts and the failure thus
far of police to bring the cul-
prits to justice, that vigilante
justice may not be far off.
While some Abaconians

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Tropical Exterminators
322-2157



suggested that the crime
trend may be partly due to
the unavailability of police in
the islands, others have
become so disillusioned that
they even suspect that some
members of the force may be
complicit in the crimes.
Yesterday, a Nassau resi-
dent said that this was his

. suspicion when the second of

three boats he has owned in

the last two years was'stolen. |

The resident, who wished
to remain anonymous, said
he was able to get security
camera footage of a truck

being used to steal his 17-foot
Boston Whaler on Easter
2007.

Despite showing this
footage to police, no progress
was made in recovering the

boat or prosecuting: the»

thieves, he said.

When the resident later
personally located the
Whaler in a yard off Soldier
Road he took a number of
police officers to see the boat
over a period of three
months, but again, nothing
happened, he claimed.

In June 2007, he received a
call from the Wulff Road
police station who informed
him that they had “found”
his boat.

Upon viewing the vessel,
which they presented to him
at the police compound, he
discovered the boat was not
his.

“A Boston Whaler
would’ve been nice but it
wasn’t even a _ Boston
Whaler. I told them it’s not
the boat and I went back out
to the lot where it was before

and the boat has gone. It

really seemed like police col-
lusion at this point,” he said.

A replacement 34-foot
Intrepid boat belonging to
the same man was later
stolen in April 2008.

Police charge man in

connection with murder

GRAND Bahama Police. have charged a man in connection
with the murder of 30- “year -old Denzil Jones Jr of Eight Mile

Rock.

Asst Supt We Ibourne Rooile: press liaison officer, said the sus-

pect is expectedl to be arraigned before the Erpeport Magistrates ©

Court on Monday morning.

Several persons are in custody assisting police with their inves-
tigations into Mr Jones’ murder, which was the island’ s fifth homi-

cide for the year.

“As our investigation continues there could be more than one

person charged,”

said Mr Bootle.

According to reports, Mr Jones was stabbed to death in his
apartment by intruders early Wednesday morning. He was then
thrown from a second-storey window by his attackers.

Mr Jones, an employee of the Freeport Container Port, was a well
known resident of Eight Mile Rock.

eB
wen PO, 10
P13,14,15

ASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES -

_USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES:



refuse to change a legal document.”

returned upto press time yesterdavr,

Police oN td a
breakthroughs it



POLICE yesterday said ‘
they have no breakthroughs:
in the investigation into the
death of 24-year-old Adam
Evans who was found lying
beaten and bloodied in an
Abaco street.

Mr Evans was found by
police in the road at the
entrance to Spring City short-
ly after 4am on Thursday. He .
was then taken to the clinic in
‘Marsh Harbour with severe
head_and body injuries where
he died. shortly after Sam, “=
police reported. © .

Unconfirmed reports claim
that he was accosted by a gang
of thugs and run over with a
car - but police could not con-


























ASSISTANT Commissioner
Hulan Hanna

- When asked if there were

firm this.







Hulan Hanna, who heads the
police’s Family Island division,
said police have not yet uncov-
ered a possible motive behind
the suspected attack on Mr
Evans.

Officials in Marsh Harbour

Assistant Commissioner .

any suspects in custody, an
officer from the island wo uld
only say police were®*sfH]
doing some inquiries.” ook

Police have confirmed thai
the victim had previdtsly
served time in prisoncbht
would not say why or farsfiew
long he was jailed.






yesterday were tightlipped on
the investigation and details
relating to the case. -

Mr Evans' body hag atin
flown to Nassau wherotn
autopsy will be carried aut..

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sate













This is to inform the public that Martin-Essex
Solomon has retired from the Firm of Higgs
& Kelly. Godfrey Kenneth Kelly, C.M.G. ‘and
Ronald James Cole will continue to carry gh a
law partnership practicing under the firm nalné
"Higgs & Kelly” at Chambers situate at 384: ‘Bay
Street, P.O. Box N-4818, Nassau, Bahamas;

telephone 322-7511. Mr. Solomon is no longer a
partner of the Firm but continues in the capacity

of a consultant to the firm.



meee meena



PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009

i ini ino
The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master





















Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas eat
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387 |
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm



Stifled Republicans look past nominee



WASHINGTON — Lacking the votes to
block Sonia Sotomayor from the U.S. Supreme
-Court; Republicans established lines in the sand
for,challenging any future nominee for the high
court and tried to limit President Barack Oba-
ma's options if he should get another opportu-

nity to pick one.
In four days of televised-hearings, Republi-

_ cans failed to knock Sotomayor off-balance or '

pin her with the label of a liberal activist who
would make policy from the judicial bench. *

The hearings presented a high-profile oppor-',

tunity for Republicans to trumpet the causes of
their conservative base and respond to an admin-

ings to a “Kabuki dance," the highly stylized
Japanese stage play where the outcome,is known
well beforehand. .
Sotomayor and her Democratic defenders
challenged vigorously repeated Republican
efforts to portray her as a liberal activist.

Instead, she presented ‘herself as a nonideo- .

logical, cautious and thorough jurist whose
record reflected not judicial activism but a close
adherence to law in her 17 years on the federal

_- bench. She told the panel repeatedly that "Con-

gress makes the laws," not judges.
And under persistent Republican questioning,
she said she disagrees with Obama's contention





THE TRIBUNE



We love to fool
ourselves into
complacency

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The National Education
Summit demonstrated once

again how we Bahamians -

_love to fool ourselves into
complacency. We actually
believe our own propaganda
that wonderful things are
being achieved by our public
education system.

Until we call a spade a:

shovel, very little is likely to
change and all too many of
our little darlings will

remain semi-literate and

semi-numerate.

After 36 years of inde-
pendence we should be
ashamed of ourselves and

not congratulating ourselves |

in self-denial.

We must face the fact that
a serious problem exists in
our system as only then can
a solution be found and
implemented successfully. :

It’s time we faced a few
unpleasant truths.

One of the most basic

truths is that the shocking .

number of students attain-
ing only a grade D in our
public schools is simply not

istration seeking sweeping changes on health that Supreme Court justices should have "empa- acceptable.
care, taxes, global warming and other big issues. thy" and comments he made as a senator that Got that? — it is not
,. Fhey succeeded in getting Sotomayor to. dis- sometimes judges must look into their hearts acceptable ;

tance herself from Obama's wish for justices
who have "empathy" and his belief that "what is
in a judge's heart" should influence rulings.
Under Republican questioning, she rejected the
belief of some liberals that the Constitution is a
"living" document whose meaning changes over
time, and that foreign law should be used in
‘deciding cases. - :

Those responses established clear issues for
Republicans to confront any future high-court
nominee by Obama and could complicate his

* search for liberal candidates when the stakes
may be higher if a conservative justice retires or
dies.

-<@n the other hand, Sotomayor is widely
expected to be confirmed by the Senate with a

- substantial number of Republican votes,:sug-

gesting that Obama has little to fear from
Republicans. _ : ;
Sen. Jeff Sessions, the senior Republican on
’ the'Senate Judiciary Committee, said Thursday
that:Republicans would not try to block a con-
firmation vote. He said he still had “serious con-
cerns" about Sotomayor but was pleased she
had repudiated Obama's "empathy" standard.
‘Republicans used the opportunity to score
points with their political base with a spirited,
and mostly civil, volley of assaults, including
repeated but futile attempts to pin her down on
divisive issues such as abortion, same-sex mar-

\ riage, gun ownership and the death penalty.

Not wanting to challenge her too aggressive-
ly.for.fear of alienating Hispanics, a growing
voting block in the United States, they diverted
much of their fire and-cast the Obama adminis-
tration:as far to the left of mainstream Ameri-
cans.

It is a script sure to be used in next year's

midterm elections and beyond.

Party consultant Galen compared the hear-



as a last resort.

"We don't apply feelings to facts," she said.
And: "Judges can't rely on what's in their heart.
... The job of a judge is to apply the law."

That may have helped her chances for a larg-
er.confirmation margin. It.also gave Republicans
ammunition to use in the next Supreme Court
nomination battle, raising the bar for any future
Obama nominee.

Sotomayor's hearing was not as contentious

as it could have been, largely because she is ©
replacing a retiring liberal and her confirma- ~

tion will not affect the balance of the court. If the
next vacancy is a member of the court's con-
servative bloc, however, the balance would be
affected and the stakes far higher.

While Republicans did not want to antago-
nize Hispanics by being too harsh on the woman
who would be the court's first Hispanic member,
some analysts suggested that they had done so
already. :

"By not coming out for her and asking criti-

.cal questions of her, they are alienating a large

base of the Hispanic community," said American
University political scientist James Thurber. .
On Thursday, Republican Sen. Lindsey Gra-

ham asked her yet again what she had to say to

those offended by her "wise Latina" remarks.

~ "T regret that I have offended some people. I
believe that my life demonstrates that that was
not my attempt to leave the impression that

some have taken from my words."

Such comments made it hard for Republicans
to gain much traction against her.
~ Graham decided not to try further and cut her
off. "You know what judge? I agree with you,"
he said. "Good luck.” i

(This article was written by Tom Raum
of the Associated Press. —c.-2009).




ROYAL DFIDELITY

Money at Work



Another is that, not sur-
prisingly, grade D teachers
produce grade D students.
A wit once defined a
teacher/educator as one who
casts artificial pearls before
real swine and this seems to
‘describe our situation quite
well.

We cannot expect success
in the classrooms until

teachers’ pay raises are
closely tied to merit and
even rudimentary morality.
The flip side is that the
teachers should also be paid
a decent basic wage and be
dealt with honestly and
respectfully.

Year after year we insane-
ly repeat the same failed
teaching methods and
expect a different result
from grade D. .

Most of us no longer live
in an agrarian society, and
there is no earthly reason
why classes shouldn’t go on
longer throughout the day,
and the summer holidays be
markedly shortened. Both
of these proposals are
anathema to teachers.

Furthermore, although
we can accept the ineffi-
ciency and waste of the pub-

COLONIAL

COC
— \

1.81 1.28 Abaco Markets : 1.39 1,39 9. 0.00 0.127 0.000 10.9 0.00%)
11.80 10.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992 0.200 41.1 1.82%
19.30 6.94 ‘Bank of Bahamas 6.94 6.94 » 0.00 0.244 0.260 28.4 3.75%
0.89 , 0.63 Benchmark 0.63 ° 6 O.686 en's 0,00. -0.877 0.000 N/M 0.00%
3.49 3.15 Bahamas Waste Y ; 3.15 3.15> 0.00 0.078 0.090 40.4 2.86%
2.37 : 2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 T2187 0.00 0.055 0.040 43.1 1.69%
14.20 * 410.18 Cable Bahamas 11.39 11.39, ‘0.00 1.406 0.250 8.1 2.19%
2.88 2.74 Colina Holdings et Ns 2.74 . | 2.74 ‘ 0.00 0.249 0.040 11.0 1.46%
7.50 5.50 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 5.64 5.64. ‘0.00 0.419 0.360 13.5 6.38%
4.78 1.27. Consolidated Water BDRs i 3.05 353,00. 20,05 : 0.111 0.052 27.0 41.73%
2.85 1.32 Doctor's Hospital PON 182 1.82 ; 0.00 0.240 0.080 7.6 4.40%
18.20 ‘ 6.60 Famguard ; 6.99 6.60 ° » -0.39, 1,000 0.420 0.240 15.7 _ 3.64%
12.50 10.00 . Finco : 10.90 10.90 : 0.00 0.322 0.520 33.9 4.77%
11.71 10.35 FirstCaribbean Bank - 10.38 . 10.38 : 9,00 0.794 0.350 . 13.1 3.37%)
5.53 4.95 Focol (S) y 5.03 5.03 , » 0.00 ‘ 0.332 0.150 15.12 2.98%
1.00; #4 % 2 11.00 Foco! Class B Preference : 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
0.45 0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.00 0.035 0.000 8.6 0.00%
19.02 5.50 ICD Utilities 5,50 0,00. 800 0.407 0.600 13.5 10.91%
12.00 . 10.40 J. S. Johnson 10.40. 000°" 0.952) 0.640 10.9 6.15%



Estate
erate



0 55.6 + 0.00%!



52wk-Low Securi

S2wk-Hi wie Symbol “Last Sale. Change Dally Vol. Interest aturl
1000.00 1000.00. Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7% 13) October 2017
1000.00 1000.00. Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 ‘0.00 : Prime + 1.75% 19) October 2022
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series .C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7% 30 May 2013

1000.00 1000.00 Fideli Prime + 1.75%

29 May 2015 |
ie













ly, Banke Note 1° (Series D)
Le



Symbol ; j Div$
14.60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets -0.041 0.300 N/M 2.05%
8.00 6.00 Caribbean 0.000 0.480 N/M 7.80%

Crossings (Pref)
ng









0.20 RNI 0.001



sa 0.000
HE (vo ee a
29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Hol ng









co Me) ee ow
S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low .. Fund Name NAV YTD% Last.12 Months. » Div $. Yield % NAV Date
1.3860 1.3231 CFAL Bond Fund : 1.3860 2.40 . 4.76: : 30-Jun-09
13.0351 2.8952 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8952 -1.52 -3.18 30-Jun-09
1.4763 1.4019 ‘ CFAL’Money Market Fund 1.4763 2.97 5.30 3-Jul-09
3.6090 3.1031 Fidelity Bahamas G'& | Fund 3.1031 -8.35 -13.82 30-Jun-09
12.9209 ..12.2702 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12:9209 2.40: 5.79 31-May-09
100.5606 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.5448 -0.02 0.54 31-Mar-09
100.0000 93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund , 93.1992 -3.33 -6.76 31-Mar-09
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0,00 31-Dec-07
19.4733 9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.2765 2.00 -2.98 30-Jun-09
1.0622 1.0000. FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0622 2.56 6.22 30-Jun-09
T.0364 1.0000 © FG Financial Growth Fund f : 30-Jun-09





1.0000




Fo Financial Diversified Fund
aston

BISX ALL SH, 219 Dec 03
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest Closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume *
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today .

OlV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings






Bid $ -
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

30-Jun-09

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M. - Not Meaningful)...

FINDEX.- The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1.19942 100 ”

-4(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split _ Effective Date 7/11/2007
§ prem acan seta
yy 4A 4





Owes

letters@tribunemedia.net






lic’s money being spent. on
eg Bahamasair and W&SC,
etc, the waste is not accept-
able in educating our chil-
dren. They are far too pre-
cious and deserve much,
much more. Yes, it would
be nice if the students were
to learn a second or third
language and had more
access to computers and
games and so on. However,
second and third languages
other than Creole, cannot
be learned without a rea-
sonably good basic com-,
mand of the written and
spoken English language.

Likewise, the full potential

of computers cannot be
realised without being able
to read reasonably well.
Unfortunately, although.
they are not very sexy, the
three R’s are just as impor-
tant: now as they ever were
and probably even more so.
(Does Adderley’s Law ring
a bell?). Sih os

‘Amazingly, there are
indeed quite a few kids who
do well vocationally and
academically in our public
schools. :

But they do well in spite
of the public schools and not
because of them. If we don’t
make sensible radical
changes in our so-called
education system, the vast

majority will continue to
have nothing better to look

' forward to than the venera-

ble University of Wulff
Road.

Some will even eventually.

end up governing us with
their grade D mentalities

and propagate still more.

dimwits because they could-
n’t read the instructions on a.
condom package.

It is often said that so

many children have difficul.- .

ty learning because of a ter--
rible home life, or poverty,
or poor nutrition, or lack of
role models (other than

Michael Jackson of course)
and so on. There is no doubt\
these are highly significant
and challenging factors.
However, it is also quite

fashionable to blame soci--.

ety, or even the churches.
This is a cop out.
As a lay member of soci-
ety, [refuse to take respon-
sibility for poorly trained or
lecherous teachers, or for

‘incompetent Ministry of

Education desk jockeys and
paper-pushers, and espe-
cially for unimaginative self-:
serving politicos. I lay the
blame for this education
foolishness squarely ‘on their’
shoulders and not mine or
society’s.

Many of our kids are high-
ly capable of learning as is
demonstrated by the fact
that they seem to have no
difficulty learnisg the latest
hit song in its entirety, or
the latest dance moves or
foreign slang overnight! Any
school child that is capable
of learning but is disruptive,
dangerous, truant or unco-
operative should be dealt
with in a firm and lovingly

- understanding manner, and

prevailed upon to see the
error of their ways. (In the
movie ‘Crimson Tide’, Gene
Hackman, who plays an
unsavoury character, tells
Denzel Washington that if
a cattle prod is used, one
can even teach a horse to
deal cards. A bit harsh, but
probably effective).

I understand that the
word “educator” is. derived
from the Latin word for “to
lead”. \

Leadership may be sadly
lacking in our Bahamian
education context, but. the
whole country would gain

; greatly if any educator that

doesn’t wish to lead the chil-
dren would just step aside,

‘cut bait, and let those who

do care, dare to build the
nation.

KEN W KNOWLES, MD
Nassau, oaks
July 10, 2009.

Community service

EDITOR, The Tribune.

- THIS topic has bee’n a concern of mine over the past ten
years and more so now that so many young persons are criti-
cising everyone in authority and are of the opinion that they

- should step aside and. let the younger generation take over the

reigns of the public and private sectors.

I am convinced that we can only learn to be “giving and for-
get the gift.” The virtue of helping others for “nothing” must be
taught at home, and. in the church. When children help each oth-
er, run errands for neighbours, assist in cleaning up the neigh-
bourhood they are learning to be volunteers.

Students need: to be involved in community service when
they join the Boys Scouts, Boys Brigade, Brownies, Guides, Key
clubs, Sunday School, Youth groups and bands.

I am appalled when students do a good deed for example tak-
ing chairs from one classroom to another and expect to be

" paid, or dig a hole to plant a tree and expect to be paid. After

one of the recent hurricanes here on my island, groups from the
US came to assist and they were amazed and shocked that the
young people sat on the walls and watched never lifting a finger
to help clean up their surroundings and one of the groups (and

rightly si) returned to the US.

It is my strong belief that persons seeking a job or high office
should not be given the opportunity if there is no proof or evi-
dence that they have done community service at some point in
their teen years. I believe that the amount of violence that we are
witnessing in the Bahamas today can be attributed in part to our
lack of community spirit and service to each other. Quite sim-
ply, we do not have manners anymore. Proper etiquette is

obsolete.

An interesting phenomenon is unfolding on our island —
the white people are imparting their traditional skills to their
children and grandchildren. For example, hauling, hunting,
farming and even church attendance which the blacks help the
monopoly. The black children are not even attending church the
way their parents did. Surprisingly, more whites are attending
chiurch than blacks. Is there a correlation somewhere between
church and violence here in the Bahamas among the races?

The immigrants seek only to look for employment and do not

give any community service. They do not volunteer.
’ We must return to the values of the past where we were our
brothers keepers. Our professionals seek the service clubs, but
they ought to have been involved in helping their neighbour-
hoods a long time ago. Charity begins at home.

These are the gleaning of an elderly citizen, for what they are

worth.

ELVIRA.

. Marsh Harbour,
Abaco,
June 29, 2009.



THE TRIBUNE

WHY YOU





"I vex at how stupid some
people at the Ministry of
Works are. They decided to
do some sort of 'road
improvemeut' at 9am
Wednesday morning during
the peat of rush hour morn-
ing trs cffic. It look like they
wasgoing to dig up some-
thag and then pave it, but I
want to know why them lazy
bums didn't do that in the
night instead of inconve-
niencing people.

"Originally they had one
lane open, but apparently
one of the workers thought
that was too much. I saw
him place five more cones
down which re-routed traffic
from West Bay Street down
Prince George Wharf back
up Parliament Street to get
onto Bay Street. That whole

thing was a mess and caused
me to be 45-minutes late for
work.”

- Jason Duncombe,
West Ridge.

“I vex at all the buffoons -
we have sitting in parlia-
ment who masquerade as
lawmakers. I watched the
last House of Assembly ses-
sion regarding the creation
of a select committee about
the controversy surrounding
granting of Crown Land and
was disgusted by how lightly
some members seemed to
treat the. issue.

“Maybe they are too busy
jeering and casting blame to
notice the real problem of
people basically raping
Bahamian land and stealing
our birthright to get to the
bottom of the issue. No -

wonder people in the public -

service can get away with
slackness because the peo- _
ple the citizenry elects to
represent them are too busy
flinging mud than solving
problems.”

- Political Observer,
Sea Breeze.

"Tam vex at the media for
the ever changing 'facts'
concerning the two missing
boys who fell into the
Andros ‘pothole’ and have
now been found. First they
were reported.as children,
then as brothers, with the
surname Clarke same as the
mother's, then the father
appears and he has the
name Marcellin Sylerain,
then the mother's surname
is now changed to Clarke-
Sylverain and at last story
the brothers are now being
reported as half-brothers. »

"While all this is going on
the media and public have .
also been turning the mirac-
ulous reappearance of the
boys into a drama series
instead of celebrating and
giving praise to the Lord
that a miracle happened.
Celebrate the miracle."

- Jean Valjean, Nassau.

"I vex because just the
other day I was looking in
the newspaper for a job. I
thought I saw the best one
suited for my experience,

‘but to my dismay the ad
only wanted males to apply.

Now what is so ironic is
every time I see this same
insurance company advertis-
ing for.a job, they always
only prefer males. What is
wrong with our country

‘today? Does the owner of
this company believe that
only men can be productive
workers?

"I think we as women in
this great country need to
stand together and address
issues like this. I am a
woman that works extreme-
ly hard for my salary. I have

_ the ability to work just as
hard as a man or even bet-
ter. We have come so far
from those days when
women were only allowed
to stay home to cook, clean,
and take care of children. So
let me say something to that
insurance owner — lama
confident Bahamian woman
that is productive and not
easily distracted from doing
my job. As long as Iam not
breaking the laws of the
land I have a right to apply
anywhere for a job!"

- K D, Nassau.

Are you vex?

Send your complaints to
whyyouvex @tribunemedia.net
or fax to 328-2398,

By LLONELLA GILBERT
Bahamas Information
Services

JOINT maritime exercises
and Haiti’s efforts to bring
manufacturing back to the
country were among the topics
discussed between Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham and
Haitian President René Pré-
val in Port-au-Prince yester-
day.

Mr Ingraham is in Haiti for
a conference marking the 50th
anniversary of the Inter-
American Development
(IDB).

On Thursday, President of
the IDB Luis Alberto Moreno
opened the ceremony. The
theme of the conference is
‘Focusing on the Economic
Transformation and Strength-
ening of Caribbean
Economies in Changing
Times’.

Mr Ingraham yesterday
addressed delegates concern-
ing the main development
challenges for the Caribbean
region.

Following the opening cer-
emony, Mr Ingraham paid a
courtesy call on Haiti’s Presi-
dent Préval at the Royal
Palace.

They discussed initiatives of
importance to Haiti and the
Bahamas.

They agreed that as both

Lionfish event declar

LOCAL NEWS.

Prime Minister in Haiti
or IDB’s 50th anniversary

countries have similar security
needs, because of their prox-
imity to each other, it would
be useful for the Maritime
Authority in Haiti and the
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force to conduct joint training
sessions.

Mr Ingraham said he would
look into speeding up the
process to increase the num-
ber of cultural items coming
from Haiti into the Bahamas.

President Préval informed
the prime minister that Cana-
da and Spain have lowered
their advisory to level three.
This means their citizens may
visit Haiti. Before when the
level was at four, citizens were
warned about visiting Haiti.

Mr Ingraham wanted to
know what the President Pré-
val was doing to attract man-
ufacturing back into Haiti’s
economy.

President Préval explained
that Haiti is allowed to export
its goods duty-free to the
United States. It is also per-
mitted to use any material
from any country to produce
items like clothing for export
to the US.

He noted as other countries
are increasing their minimum
wages, impoverished Haitians
are being inspired to leave
home in search of a better way

of life. Unemployment is ram-

pant, he said.

SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009, PAGE 5





Tay

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham (centre) is in Haiti for the conference celebrating the 50th anniversary of
the Inter-American Development Bank. He is pictured being seen off by Secretary to the Cabinet Aijita’
Bernard and Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson.

Poor countries have already
forgiven Haiti more than $500
million in debt. This mecha-

nism forced multi-lateral agen-

cies like the International

Monetary Fund and the IDB
to forgive Haiti’s debt which is
at about $1.5 billion, the pres-
ident said.

Following the courtesy call,

él Titi

President Préval’. hosted a
reception for delegates
ing the conference
high-ranking officia
Palace.




Is at the



war On invasive species
NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EVENS: JEAN of: ‘LUDEE

By ALISON LOWE.
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net -

ALL OUT war will be
declared on the invasive lion-
fish today as 18 boats set out
from Nassau to take part ina

fun-filled lionfish control

event.

For those who like to swim
and dive, the Lionfish Con-
trol Project offers the chance
to win prizes for spearing the
single biggest or smallest, or
the most lionfish.

And from 3pm onwards
members of the public will
be able to join in at the
Green Parrot restaurant and
bar on East Bay Street where
participants will be showing
off their catch while demon-
strations on how to prepare
and cook the spikey invader
get underway.

For those who want to get
a closer look into the life of
the venomous fish, Dr Neil
Sealey from the College of
the Bahamas will be doing
on site dissections to reveal
what kinds of sealife they
have been preying on.

In previous inspections,
juvenile crawfish, parrot fish
and grouper have been found
in the stomachs of specimens
of this voracious fish, whose
population has been growing
exponentially throughout the
eastern coast of the US and
the Caribbean, as it has no
known predators in the
Atlantic ocean.

Incentive

The aim of the event,
which is being organised by
the Bahamas National Trust
in conjunction with the
Department of Marine
Resources and the College of
the Bahamas, is to provide
an educational insight into
the problems that lionfish
pose to the Bahamian marine
environment, and an incen-
tive for people to remove
from the waters around Nas-
sau of as many of the trou-
blesome species as possible.

By showing people how
they can be safely cleaned
and eaten organisers hope to
encourage the ongoing cap-
ture of lionfish for consump-
tion.

While a prick from a lion-
fish’s spine can cause days of



THE EVENT AIMS to provide an educational insight into the prob-
‘lems that lionfish pose to the Bahamian marine environment

swelling, discomfort or even
paralysis, there are tried and
tested means of making sure
an encounter does not have
toend so painfully. .
Today at Green Parrot
chefs from the August Moon

restaurant and cafe in Lyford

Cay — which has been serving
the “delicious” predator since
2007 — will be proving this as
they cook up an array of lion-
fish treats.

The Nassau event follows
on from the success ofa
recent Lionfish Control Pro-
ject held in Green Turtle
Cay, Abaco, During that
competition, 1,400 lionfish
were speared. This time
round, organisers hope to “at
least double” this total.

Rachel Lightbourne, a
BNT and lionfish project
committee member said:
“The weather’s going to be
great. It will be a fun day. We
want everyone to be really
safe and we’ve encouraged

people not to celebrate until
they get back to the dock.”

Among the winnings avail-
able for those able to those

who bring in the most, the
‘smallest or the big
fish today are +0 500 cash
prizes donated by King and

est lion-

Co and Harbourside Marine
and a $500 certificate from

Lightbourne Marine.

All proceeds from the
events, where there will be
food and t-shirts for sale, will
be presented to the BNT who
intend to put the funds
towards the continuation of
their educational campaign
on the lionfish problem.

“They want to continue to
go to the Out Islands and
give seminars to the public
about the lionfish and how it
can be cleaned and eaten. We
are trying to turn it into a
viable source of food and are
hoping commercial fishermen

will get into it,” said Ms

Lightbourne.

-LUCITO BAZARD, P.O.’

BOX N-555, NASSAU,

BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for |
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization }
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person

knows any reason why registration/naturalization shi
not be granted, should send a written and signed.statement |
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 18':day of |
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality’ and |
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas." |

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co.,

Montrose Avenue 5.
sical ae «Fax: 326-7452

. Large Shipment

of
Used Cars

wale” Shen Artived

’

‘Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and. |

Get Your First Choice... }
For Easy Financing ©
Bank And Insurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying





AGE 6, SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



|
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla,



PACE shuttle Endeavour has |
A. ‘ ‘

1 fl (he international space

hccording to Assoctated

























ivour docked atthe space :
4) Friday atternoon for a}

-and-a-halllong stay. The ;
fiyvercated the biggest crowd |
orbit at the same place;
fouls. The two crews will
s another, face to face, }
hs the hatches between :
ypened, Before dock- :
nander Mark Polansky :
ndeavour through a }
) the station astronauts

vraph the entire shut}

8 belly, The station |

By GENA GIBBS
Bahamas Information
Services _



THE Department of Co-oper-
ative Development wants more
“presence” in the Ministry of
Education’s curriculum.

The cooperative programme
introduces students to operating a
business. They learn leadership
practices, when they form a board
of directors, chair meetings, form
committees and make decisions.

“We have been trying to get
co-op education taught in the
schools, even at the college level,
for a while now,” said Nathaniel
Adderley, director of Co-opera-






iderable amount of
ation peeled away from
§ fuel tank at liftott ;




INTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

ISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921 .











11:30 A.M. Speaker

PASTOR PATRICK RUTHERFORD
‘Theme: “ Enriching Marriage And Family Life”

Bible Glaga: 945 am.» Breakin ad Service: 10:45 a.m, .
i pornnynk Outreach: 11:30 am. ¢ ening ces, 7:00 p.m.
idweek Service 7:30 p. nesdays)
lbtere’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. Fond Lieelae at ath month)

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future





Place:
The Madeira
Shopping Center



Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles
AL: ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND -
Zastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles —

pie Box EE-16807
ephone number 325-5712
ein lynnk@batelnet.bs





















SUNDAY SERVICES








Moming Worship service ....... + 6,30 a.m.
sunday School for ailages... 9.45 a.m,
Adult education say 9,45 OM,
Worship SeMic? vce fata) HAGUE:
5 BIICe 8.00 am,
6.30 pm. 1
WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Select ive Biole leaching ;
(Boys Club) 4-16 ys,
lg Club) 4-16 yes,
FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting
RADIO MINISTRY:
Sundays at 8:30 a.m, - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

t Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

| NGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God»

ple@bateinet bs Weh: www. ee, ROOK



tive Societies.

Already five schools with
cooperatives together comprising
400 students are registered with
the Department.

Importance

“The Department recognises

the importance of involving
young people in the cooperative
sector," said Agriculture and
Marine Resources Minister
Lawrence Cartwright. He has
Cabinet responsibilities for the
Department.

Mr Cartwright confirmed that
‘a formal cooperative youth pro-
gramme is being developed for
implementation within the school
system.

The Ministry of Education is

‘committed to supporting this

endeavour to ensure the perpet-
uation of the sector's future, he
said.

Junior co-operatives will be
matched with existing credit
unions for monitoring and men-
toring purposes.

“We are trying to strengthen
our relationship with the Ministry
of Education to teach a coopera-
tive programme in the schools,"
said Mr Adderley.

"We want to have a presence
within the Ministry of Education.
If the students have a habit of
consistent savings, hopefully it
will carry over into their adult
life.”

The programme introduces

students to business practices as

Youth co-ops deman
presence in education

‘they run the co- op in their

schools.

“We have been trying to work
with small groups with a detailed
approach to setting and reaching
business goals,” said Mr Adder-
ley. “For us, in general, the chal-
lenge is always human and finan-
cial resources.”

| Resilience

He touted the resilience of the

cooperative movement in the
Bahamas.
“Traditionally, co-ops have
worked well in hard times
because they were born out of
hard times," said Mr Adderley.
“We don’t encourage too
many real estate investments

MISS GOSPEL CONTESTANTS CALL ON GOVERNOR-GENERAL

By GENA GIBBS

Bahamas Information Service



because it becomes more specu-
lative and we don’t want to
encourage people to speculate
with other people’s money."

The community of Spanish
Wells, he said, is a prime example
of how cooperation works to ig
mote progress.

“Spanish Wells is nota foptel
co-op but it’s the best cc-opvin
the country when you see how
the: fishermen band. themséves
together and cooperate togejh-
er,” said Mr Adderley. oS)

The Bahamas Co-operative
League provides a two-year schol-
arship to the College of the
Bahamas annually. Studies are,in
business management, computer
science, accounting/finance,
tourism, ‘agriculture, marketing,
and banking.



crown to her successor on August 2. : : 30
Pictured from left, (seated) are Great Commission Mint

THE 14th annual Miss Gospel Bahamas contestants paid a
courtesy call on Governor-General Arthur Hanna at Gov-
ernment House this week.

Judging for the competition is based on talent, intellect, atti-
tude and presentation. Talent displays range from singing,
worship dancing, drama, musical instrument performance,

and public speaking. .
The 2008 reigning queen, Tanya McFall, will hand over the

Sunday School: 10am == FUNDAMENTAL
Preaching 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills ¢ Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622

BAGS Ri
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, JULY 19TH, 2009

— 700 a.m, Rev. Carla Culmer / Bro. Franklyn Bethel
11:00 a.m, Rev. Carla Culmer/ Bro. Livingstone Griffin
7:00 p.m. Sis, Rosemary Williams/ Rev, Carla Culmer

Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church |

A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
iia ime cere}

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m.

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive,
Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O. Box SS-5631

Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE

istries International director Minalee Hanchell; Governor-
General Hanna; reigning Miss Gospel Bahamas Tanya McFall;
(standing) committee member Tamalia Hanchell, chaperone:
of Miss Gospel Bahamas Ethlyn Hanchell; Miss All Out
Entertainment Rushan Cooper; Miss Zion Baptist East ani

Shirley Streets Shannon Evans; Miss Church of God of
Prophecy Gambier Valencia Moss; Miss Amethyst Shenique

'Gray, and Miss Bahamas Christian Fellowship Jamelf

Dawkins.



PHOTO SHOWS L-R: Ambrose Morris, Regional Manager Public’
Relations, Vinincia Strachan, Regional Manager Weddings and Hon!
eymoons, Mary Mattadeen, Administrative Assistant, Miss Bahamas,
Universe 2009, Kiara Sherman, Janet Cuffie, Senior Group. Sales’
Manager and Stephen Wells, Executive E- Commerce. Missing is Paul



Strachan, National Director.

Miss Bahamas Universe
pays courtesy call on
the Bahamas Tourist

Office in Canada

ON a promotional tour in
Canada, the reigning Miss
Bahamas Universe — Kiara
Sherman made a courtesy
call this week on the staff of
the Bahamas Tourist Office
in Toronto,

During the half-day visit,
tourism managers gave the
new queen a tour of the
office facilities, advising her
of the various departments
and functions that are car-
ried out by the team on
behalf of The Bahamas.

While in Canada, Ms Sher-
man will participate in
numerous promotional activ-
ities, organised by public
relations manager, Ambrose
Morris.

“We are thrilled to have

Miss Bahamas Universe vis-,

iting with us here in Cana-
da, and are pleased to be“
able to showcase not only:
her bracing beauty and poise,
but also her keen intelli-
gence,” Mr Morris said.

Tour

One highlight of the trip*
for Miss Bahamas Universe!
will be to participate in cul-°
tural presentations, featur->
ing the Bahamas National"
Youth Choir which is also on*
a post- -independence tour in
Canada. Performances are’
scheduled for Ottawa,
Canada’s capital, and at the,
parliament building in,
Toronto, and in Niagara
Falls.



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009, PAGE 7





Talks seen as last
chance to end =—
Honduras’ crisis ©

Zelaya say U.S.-backed talks
in Costa Rica Saturday may }



ee

over



na ons ey



sera Nassau Harbour dredging

be the last chance to avert a }
‘clash, perhaps even civil war, :
according to Associated Press. :
"” Zelaya is threatening to ;
return to his homeland with :

‘or without an agreement on }
ending the standoff and has :
said Hondurans have a consti- :
-tutional right to launch an :
insusrection against an illegit- :

imate government.

In Washington, U.S, State ;
Department spokesman P.J. :
Crowley called Friday for :
nations to support the talks :

that are being mediated by :
Costa Rican President Oscar :
‘Arias, who won the Nobel :
Peace Prize in 1987 for helping :

to end Central America’s }

‘wars. i
He also appeared to allude :



esident Hugo Chavez, a :
Zelaya ally who has called the :
negotiations a U.S.-backed :
trap and said on Friday: “In :
the next few hours, Zelaya will ;
enter Honduras and we’ll see }
what the gorillas are going to :
do” about it. i

“No country in the region }
should encourage any action :
that would potentially increase :
the risk of violence either in :
Honduras or in surrounding :
countries,” said Crowley, :
-speaking to reporters in Wash- :
“ington. :
- Interim President Roberto :
‘Micheletti has said Zelaya }

‘might try to sneak in by cross-

ing Nicaragua’s jungle-cloaked :
‘border with Honduras, but the }
jousted president apparently ;
‘was still in Nicaragua’s capi- :
tal on Friday. :
“: Zelaya told Venezuelan :
State television late Thursday :
that the weekend talks hold :
out a moment of hope for a.:
solution, but he was still ready-
ing for a return. :
~- “I am preparing various }
alternatives: by air, by land, }
and others,” he said. . :

‘In Honduras, meanwhile, }

about 2,000 Zelaya support- :
ets blocked two highways con- :
necting Tegucigalpa to the :
Caribbean and Pacific coasts }
for several hours Friday. ;
.jAmerican Airlines tem- :
porarily suspended its two dai- :
ly. U.S. flights to the capital ;
because of the political crisis, ;
airline spokeswoman Berna :
Osorto said. Continental and :
Delta were continuing their :
flights. v4
~ Arias has presented a series :
of possible compromises to :
both camps, but indicated a :
power-sharing deal in which :
Zelaya could return to serve :
out the remaining months of :
his term with limited power :
would dominate the talks. :
' Arias said discussions also :
will cover possible amnesty for :
Zelaya. :

kb
%

. ‘The Supreme Court issued :
an arrest warrant for Zelaya ;
before the coup, ruling his :
effort to hold a referendum on :
whether to form a constitu-





tional assembly was illegal. : ,

The military decided to send }
him into exile instead‘on June }
28 — a move that military :
lawyers themselves have called :
illegal but necessary. i

sMany Hondurans viewed :
the proposed referendum as
an attempt by Zelaya to push
for a socialist, Chavez-style
model of governing.

Arias said Friday both :
camps have “softened, and I :
think we are going to find ;
more flexibility.” In the first :
round of talks the two sides :
agreed only to meet again. i

Micheletti told Colombia’s :
RCN Radio that his govern- :
ment is open to dialogue but :

argues that Zelaya committed {

crimes against “the economy, i
the citizenry and against the :
constitution” and cannot be :
allowed to return to power.

He accused Zelaya of “call- ;
ing for bloodshed.” :

Micheletti said he is willing :
to.move up the elections.as a :
way out of the crisis. The con- }
gressional president, sworn in }
to replace Zelaya, also said he :
would resign “if Mr. Zelaya -:
stops inciting a revolutionary :
movement in the country and }
stops trying to return here.”

If no agreement is reached, :
Zelaya’s foreign minister Patri- ;
cia Rodas has said he would :
return to Honduras to installa :
parallel government “to direct :
what I will call the final bat- :
tle.” She did not elaborate.

Zelaya’s Sunday deadline }
for the coup leaders to back :
down falls on the 30th anniver- :
sary of Nicaragua’s July 19, :
1979, Sandinista revolution :
that toppled dictator Anasta- :
sio Somoza.

remarks by Venezuelan }



By STEWARD OF THE SEA_

CONCERNING the dredg-
ing of Nassau Harbour there is
good news and some bad.

The good news is there are
great efforts being made to
réduce the amount of silt cre-
ated by the dredging. I had pro-
posed to government they only
dredge on the outgoing tide to
prevent silt from being carried
on the incoming tide on to the
Great Bahama bank where it
could damage reefs for many
years to come. This proved to
be too expensive as well as it
might have had an ill affect on
Cable Beach reefs. The result
has been a great effort to create
two holding ponds. One is being
dug out on the island and the
fill being used to create the
berm for bulkheading the sec-
ond holding pond in the exten-
sion. A pump system will take
excess water from the dredging
out to sea by means of a spe-
cial pipe. This pipe is a single
length of 600 or 800 meters
2,624 ft, almost half a mile long,
that will be towed from Jack-
sonville. The idea is to have this
pipe send the silt out to sea
releasing it at about 20 meters
(65ft) where the sea floor slopes
to extreme depths and it will be
harmless to corals and not stir
up in rough seas. I think such a
great effort has never been done
in the Bahamas before to
reduce the ill effects of dredg-
ing. It is yet to be seen how well
this will work, but it is important
to note the efforts being made
are a good sign of responsible
stewardship.

The bad news is a number of
things. I am relying on infor-
mation acquired by asking a lot
of questions. The question to
why the fill is presently being
just pushed into the sea with
just floats to hold back the silt?
The first explanation was cost
reduction, by working with a
land based crane for installing
the bulkhead, verses.a crane on
barge, but further questioning
brought more information to
light. The bulkhead requires
dead men (a post driven in)
with a tie rod (a link to the bulk-
head from the dead man) this is
to hold the bulkhead from
expanding out from the exces-
sive pressure of the fill pushing
outward, The convenience to
do all of this on a land based



Uy

sight verses over water reduces
the cost and hardship greatly.

The next important question
was: Could the dredging have
been done without extending
Arawak Cay? The answer was
no, not without removing busi-
ness such as the shipping termi-
nal operating there now.

The conclusion is we are
between a rock and a hard place
in balancing the needs of
progress and protecting our
environment. With no Freedom
of Information Act we are
forced to trust the government
has made the right decisions
weighing cost to the people and
the environmental impact. The
contractor seems to be very pro-
fessional and politically correct
in hiring many Bahamian work-
ers, such as welders, and
machine operators. Let us hope
no natural disaster such as hur-
ricane hits us at this-vulnerable
time. Should Arawak Cay (Kel-
ly Island) have been built in the
first place? Probably not.
Should it be extended? Proba-
bly not. It is really a bit late to
go back to the drawing board.
Great effort to be environmen-
tal within a budget seems to be
policy.

Belgian Waffles

_ Boneless breast of chicken, sauteed with
_ mushrooms, white wine & sweet vermouth,

topped with ham

romano & provolone cheeses

of Seafood,

‘Rich, creanty and delicious dish.
cream and egg yolks, It was called Wenburg on
a menu of a New York restaurant until some
time later when the epicurean Mr Wenburg
became involved in a dispute with the
management. Thereafter the restaurant renamed
~ the offering seafood “Newburg” and thus a
classic was born.

Koast Leg | A Leen

- Rosemary is a perfé

lement'to lamb

Bahamian Styfled Porkloir

Slow Roasted and stuf:

with Mango, Guava,

Plantain, Sweet Bell Peppers & Onions

Dessert
Chet’s Assorted Cakes and Pies
Choice of Beverage:
Juice, Coffee, Tea, Sodas or Milk

‘SCENES OF dredging taking place at Nassau Harbour.





































































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Open Monday thru Saturday
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Village Rd., Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: 393-5310 Fax: 393-8094
www. mastertechbahamas.com

ideas for life





PAGE 8, SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009

|



KPMG Telephone 242 293 2007

PO Box N 123 Fem. 242 393 1772 F
Montague Steding Contre Internet = ew. komg.com.b5
East Bay Street ;

Nassau, Bahamas

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT

To the Shareholder of Julius Baer Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Julius Baer Trust Company (Bahamas)
Limited (‘the Company") which comprises the balance sheet as at December 31, 2008, and a
summary of significant. accounting meee and other Sey notes (logether “the financial
statement”). 2:

Management’s Respite -for the Financial Statement

Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of this financial statement in
accordance with International Financial.Reporting Standards(“IFRS"). This responsibility
includes: designing, implementing ‘and maintaining internal contro! relevant to the preparation
and fair presentation of the financial. statement that is free from material misstatement, whether
due to fraud or error; selecting’ and’ applying appropriate accounting ee and making
accounting estimates that are reasonable in the circumstances,

Auditors’ Responsibility

Our responsibility is to express an opinion ‘on. this fi nancial statement based on our audit. We:
conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those Standards
require that we comply with relevant ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to
obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial statement is free from material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to. obtain audit evidence about the amounts and
disclosures in the financial statement. The procedures selected depend on our judgment,
including the assessment of risks of material misstatement of the financial statement, whether due
to frand or error. In making those risk assessments, we consider internal control relevant to the
Company's preparation and fair Presentation of the financial statement in order to design audit
procedures that are appropriate inthe circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an
opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's intemal control. An audit also includes evaluating
the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates
made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statement,

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and SPPCOpTRTE | t provide a
basis for our audit opinion.

Opinion

In our opinion, the financial statement ceean fairly, in all inaterial respects, the financial
“position of Julios Baer Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited as of December 31, 2008 in
accordance with IFRS,

Emphasis of hae

Without qualifying our opinion we ciiitasiee that this financial. statement does not comprise a
complete set of financial statements prepared in accordance with IFRS, Information on results of '
operations, cash flows and changes.in equity. is necessary to obtain a complete understanding of
the financial position, performance and cash flows of the Company.

bebo So.

Nassau, Bahamas
July 2, 2009

J ULIUS BAER TRUST COMPANY (BAHAMAS) LIMITED









Balance Sheet
December 31, 2008, with conespondiig figures for 2007
{Expressed in Swiss francs)
_ . Note 2008 2007
Assets
Deposits due from bank — Group a AS. g gts SFr 1,509,023 1,763,856
Interest receivable — Group! 6. 4,530 4,648
Fees receivable (net of allowance of Sik 18,584

_2007 : SFr 16,086) 5 66,449 20,038
“Potal Assets ene SFr 1,580,002 1,788,542
Liabilities and Shareholder’s Equity

a

Liabilities: ; :
Accounts payable nape A SR 92074 56,436
Total liabilities rs cme 92,074 56,436
Shareholder’s equity:
Share capital Hee

ree issued and fully satis wes : :

2,000,000 shares at par value of SFri 9 each haa 2,000,000 2,000,000
Accumulated deficit es - (812,072) ” (267,894)
Total shareholder's equity Prdk ts. 1,487,928 1,732,106
Contingencies i ps : pees Ss ae
“Total Liabilities and Shareholder” say “SFr - 1,580,002 1,788,542

_ See accompanying notes to balance het. ay

This balance sheet was approved 0 on behalf of. the Board on July 2, 2009:

Director



JULIUS BAER TRUST COMPANY (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Notes to Balance Sheet

December 3 1, 2008
(Expressed in Swiss francs)



1. Corporate information

Julius Baer Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited ("the Trust") was incorporated on July 19,
2000, and licensed to carry on trust, business from within The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas under the Banks and Trust Companies Regulation Act 2001. The Trust is a wholly
owned subsidiary of Julius Baer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited (“the Bank”) which is, in
turn, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Julius Baer & Cie S.A., a company incorporated in
Switzerland, The address of its registered office is Ocean Centre, East Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas. The principal activities of the Trust consist oF conducting trust and corporate
administration business.

+ Basis of preparation
Statement of conipliance

This balance sheet is prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards
(IFRS).

Basis of measurement
The balance sheet has beén prepared on the historical cost basis.
Functional and presentation currency

This balance sheet is presented in Swiss francs (SE 1) which is the functional currency of the
’ Trust.

Use of estimates and judgements

The preparation of financial statements requires management to make judgements, estimates
and assumptions that affect the application of accounting policies and the reported amounts of
assets and liabilities. Actual results, may differ from these estimates. :



THE TRIBUNE!



Estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to
accounting estimates are recognized in the period in which the estimate is revised and in any
future periads aftected.

Information about key sources of information uncertainty can be found in the accounting
policy on Allowance for doubtfil accounts in notes 3 and 5.

Summary of significant accounting policies

The accounting policies set out below have been applied consistently to all periods presented
in this balance sheet.

Financial instruments

Demand deposits due from bank ~ group, interest receivable — group and fees receivable are
classified as loans and receivables. Accounts payable are classified as financial liabi lities not
at fair value through profit or loss.

Financial instruments are recognized initially at fair value plus any directly attributable
transaction costs. Subsequent to initial recognition, financial instruments are measured at
amortized cost using the effective interest method, less, in the case of financial assets, any
impairment losses.

A financial instrument is recognized when the Trust becomes a party to the contractual
provisions of the instrument. Financial assets are derecognized when the Trust’s contractual
rights to the cash flows from. the financial assets expire or when the Trust transfers the
financial asset to another party without retaining control or substantially afl risks and rewards
of the asset. Financial liabilities are derecognized when the Trust’s obligations specified in
the contract expire or are discharged or cancelled,

Provisions
A provision is recognized if, as a result of a past event, the Trust has a present legal or

constructive obligation that can be estimated reliably, and it is probable that an outflow of
economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation. Provisions are determined by

_ discounting the expected cash flows at a rate that reflects current market assessments of the

time value of money and, where appropriate, the risks specific to the liability.
Allowance for doubtful accounts

Specific allowances reflect the amounts required to reduce the carrying value of the
receivable balance to its estimated recoverable amount. The Trust does not generally record a
non-specific allowance to cover unidentified inherent risks in the fees reccivable portfolio.

When a receivable balance is deemed to be uncollectible, it is written off either against the
related allowance for doubttil accounts or through bad debt expense; subsequent recoveries
are credited, :

Income taxes ae
There are no income taxes imposed on the Trust in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Foreign currency translation

Monetary assets and liabilities i in foreign currencies are eranslaned into SFr-using year-end

rates of exchange.

impairment

¢

A financial asset is considered to be impaired if objective evidence indicates that ane or more .

events have had a negative effect on the estimated cash flows of that asset.. An impairment
loss in respect of a financial asset measured at amortized cost is calculated as the difference
between its carrying amount, and the present value of, the estimated future -cash flows
discounted at the original effective interest rate, An impairment loss is reversed if the reversal
can be related objectively fo an event occurring after the impairment loss was recognized.

Related party balances

Related parties include affiliates of Julius Baer & Cie S.A., major shareholders, directors and
key management personnel who have the authority and responsibility for planning, directing
and controlling the activities of the Trust.

Assets under management

No account is taken in this balance sheet of assets and fiabilities of clients administered. by

the Trust as custodian, trustee or nominee. Total-assets' under administration -as at December:

31, 2008 approximated SFr1,192-million (2007 — SFr 1113 million}. oo 2s

tERSs not yet effective

U ip to the date of this balance sheet, the International Accounting Standards Board ba issued
a number of new standards, amendments to existing standards and: interpretations which are

not yet effective for the year ended December 31, 2008 and which have not been adopted in
this balance sheet. .

The Trust is in the process of making an assessinent of what the impact of these new standards,
amendments to existing standards and interpretations is expected to be in the period of initial
application. So far it has concluded that the adoption of them is unlikely to have a significant
impact on the Trust's financial position.

Deposits due from bank group

Deposits due from bank ~ group comprise:





2008 2007
Due (to}from group — - on demand SFr (490,977) {236,144}
- money market fund 2,000,000 2,000,000

SFr 1,509,023- 1,763,856

The balances due from/(to) group have been offset in accordance with the relevant agreement
between the Bank and the Trust. Balances on demand do not earn interest. At December 31,
2008 the money market fund earned interest at a rate of 3.4375% er: 1.38%).

Fees receivable

The age profile of fees receivable is as follows: -





. 2008 2007

Up to 6 months SFr 34,010 -

*. 6~9 months 9,013 1,$33

10~— 12 months ; : 25,949 24,388

~ More than 12 months ; 16,061. 10,203
Allowance for doubtful accounts . (18,584) (16,086)

ce ee SFr__ 66,449 . 20,038

‘rrr PFC SSS

The movement during the year in the allowance for doubttil accounts is as follows:
“SUSE aha sentient mean yinheepn eeaneee ee aepear EIN EEE ERE EE EEO CCO CL L EGET L EY





2008 2007
Balance at beginning of the year SFr 16,086 aoe
Increase in allowance : 2,498 16,086
Balance at end of year . SFr 18,584 16,086
Related party balances
The balance sheet includes the following balances with related parties: -
- 2008 2007
Balances ; ;
Deposits due from bank SFr ° 1,509,023 1,763,856
Interest receivable 4,530 4,648

4 -
The Trust entered into a service level agreement with the Bank on January 1, 2007 wherein
the Bank provides certain services to or on behalf of the Trust. The Bank charges the Trust a
management fee for these services on a pro-rata basis by number of employees. The services
provided include human resources, office services, compliance, information technology and
communication services. The agreement may be terminated by either party with three
months’ prior notice in writing or as otherwise agreed between the parties,

Financial instruments

Financial risk. management objectives and policies

The Trust’s financial instruments comprise deposits with group, receivables and other
financial assets and liabilities that arise directly from its operations. -

The principal risks arising from the Trust’s financial instruments are credit risk, liquidity risk,
interest rate risk and foreign currency risk. The Board of Directors sets, reviews and agrees
policies for managing each of these risks and they are summarized below.




Heer aE eT

Sa SEE TONE STE EO Oe

fotnineneeenenrwenonseerennnncescnntnomnngteyenthe ————e



THE TRIBUNE





unken tanker



‘was not insured’

deal with the matter as being the containment
and removal of the remaining fuel on board the
vessel before it can seep into the environment.

ROM page one

théarea

n Thursday, Mr Carey noted that the BNT is
concerned about the damage that the oil now
pases to the environment and marine and ter-
restt tial life in the protected area.

Yesterday, he identified the first priotity of a
spicial team that travelled to Exuma that day to

Mare environment and other passing ships in

the coral reef.

operation.

And he said the “major challenge” and the
“greatest unknown” posed by the incident is
raising the two tractors and a front-end loader
with cranes without causing further damage to

Mr Carey said the BNT intends to “work very
carefully” with Mr e Oakes during the salvage

State minister warns over
spike in illegal immigration

FROM page one

Immigration officials have
conducted a number of raids
ini iNew Providence and
Andros netting hundreds of
illegal nationals — mostly
Hall migrants.

FE. ling short of calling this
sitgation a “crisis”, Mr
MeCartney said that the
department is capable of
dealing with these increases

ly with the continued sup-
of the public.

h daving said that, we have
to je cognizant of the fact
thai af these are human beings
wi are coming over here.

shave to be humane. We
nail to be respectful of our
approach as they are looking
foria better way of life. With

-that|in mind we have to bal-





ance the fact that the
Bahamas can only take so
much.

“We are a small country,
with a population of 350,000
people. Essential services can
only deal with so much.
Whether or not there is a cri-
sis over there, I think it has
been that way for some time

— people are looking for a,

better way of life. Our job-at
Immigration is to deal with
those persons who are com-
ing over illegally. We don’t
want to make this a place
where there is a ‘free for all’.
Those days are ended,” he
said.

The minister added that his
officers, with the Defence
Force and the Police, have

_ done an excellent job thus far

in dealing with these increas-

es. He noted that while it is
very difficult to account for
the “many” persons who are
still in the Bahamas illegally,
he hoped that Immigration
will be able to place some
individuals before the courts
who have been facilitating or

‘assisting these individuals.

“There are persons that we
must make an example of.
There is no doubt about it.
For example, this person who
was housing these (Chinese)
people I don’t know why they
aren’t before the courts. It is
someone’s house! I would
like to see ‘them: before the
courts, and charged, and
made an example of.

“That is the only way we
are going to deal with this.
We can’t just give: them a slap
on the wrist,” he said.

LOCAL NEWS

Credit risk

Credit risk is the risk that a customer or a counterparty will be unable or unwilling to meet a
commitment that it has entered into with the Trust. The Trust manages counterparty credit
risk centrally through the Bank to optimize the use of credit availability and to avoid
excessive risk concentration. Customer credit risk is managed through provisions against the
fee receivable balances. Credit risk is reduced as all demand deposits are due from the Bank.
The Trust’s maximum exposure to credit risk in the event the counterparties fail to perform
their obligations ‘as at‘ December 31,2008. in relation ta each class of recognized financial
assets is the carrying amount of those assets as indicated inthe balance sheet.

Liquidity risk

Liquidity risk is the risk that the Trust will encounter difficulty in realizing assets or
otherwise raising funds to meet commitments. The Trust manitors expected cash outflow on a
daily basis. Its policy throughout the year has been to ensure liquidity by maintaining at all
times sufficient high quality liquid asseis to cover expected net cash outflows,

Interest rate risk

Exposure to interest rate risk is the risk that arises when there is an imbalance between rate
and non rate-sensitive assets and Hiabilitics. The Trust does not experience a great deal of risk

in this area as interest rates related to its financial assets automatically reset to market.

periodically.

Foreign currency risk

Foreign currency risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrament will fluctuate-because
of changes in foreign exchange rates. The Trust ensures that the net exposure to financial
assets and Habilities not denonsinated in Swiss Franes is kept to an acceptable level by buying
or selling foreign currencies at spot rates, where necessary, to address short-term imbalances.

Net fair value of financial instruments

Financial instruments utilized by the Trust include recorded assets and liabilities. The
majority of the Trust's financial instruments are either short-term in nature or have interest
rates that automatically reset to market on a periodic basis. Accordingly, the estimated fair
value is not significantly different from the earrying value for cach major category of the
Trust’s recorded assets and liabilities. The Trost has no off-balance sheet financial
instruments as of December 31, 2008 or December,31, 2007.

. Contingent liabilities

The Trust is involved in several legal matters involving customers of the Trust. Management
of the Trust does not anticipate that the losses, if any, incurred as a result of these legal
proceedings will materially affect the financial position of the Trust. .

Other information P

On January 20, 2006, the former resident manager of the Bank, was arrested in New York

and charged by the Manhattan Federat Court for money laundering activities in connection
with the former resident manager's position and activities in another company not belonging
to the Julius Baer Group.

The accounts of the former resident manager held with the aforementioned company and
those held with the Bank were frozen in accordance with the court order dated 2 May, 2006,
and will remain frozen until otherwise notified by court order. The accounts held with the
Bank which were frozen included an account for a trast for which the Trust is the trustee. Oo
March 14, 2007 after offering a guilty plea, the former resident manager was sentenced to
four years in prison and ordered to forfeit $220,000 in proceeds. ;

No provision related to this matier has been recorded in this balance sheet.

. Fiduciary activities

The Trust provides custody, trustee and corporate administration services to third parties
which involve the Trust making decisions in relation to a wide range of financial instruments,
Those assets that are held in a fiduciary capacity are not included in this balance sheet. At the
balance sheet date the Trust had financial assets under administration estimated to amount to
approximately SFr 1,192 million (2007 — SFr 1,113 million).

. Capital adequacy

‘The Central Bank of The Bahamas requires Trust Companies to maintain minimum capital of
B$1,000,000 and to maintain a capital adequacy ratio of at least 8 percent of risk weighted

- assets at all times. The capital adequacy ratio is caleulated by dividing the Trust’s eligible

capital base by its risk-weighted exposures, The Trust uses regulatory guidelines as the basis
for the calculation of the ratio. There have been no material changes in the Bank’s
management of capital during the period.

The Trust’s actual capital amount and risk asset ratio at December 31, 2008 and 2007, as well
as the minimum regulatory requirements are as follows:

NCOOUTTTOOETOCCLLCCEEOCLEECOTCOOCLCONTCCONTCLT CLC CCLC OT ECOOCULEULCLLO OCCU CCL OLLON ELC CCOCLULNDLCNCLT CTI TCLINELONLEON NOLO LOLS LETT OCCLCCLUCLO LIEN COL ECUO COU NCCOMTCCD NOLEN NCOONCLEHICCNNCCEO CEH et Cbbestteetebietteieeetetttttttn
2008 2007

Actual Minimum Actual M spin

Capital | SFr 1,487,928 . 1,064,386 1,732,106 1,133,500
Risk asset ratio 390% 8% 459% 8%
‘#OPCEPCCEEEEECEEEOCOOPEEEOCOOCOSLCOOLCCCEELCCOCLCLLLLOCLLCEDLCCECECLTTCLCOTCLOCECCEEOOCLLCOSSABLEBEOROPOOOLOOECOLLCLCCLCLOCLOLLOLOCCOLCLLOOLCCLLGLIHOCI NAH HINSUHTTNOONONOO SOONER NNNENNNTNCEEAOHEONEE

The Trust’s policy is to maintain a strong capital base so as to maintain investor, creditor and

"market contidence and to sustain future development of the business. The impact of the level

of capital on shareholder’s return is also recognized and the Trust recognizes the need to
maintain a balance between the higher returns that might be possible with greater gearing and
the advantages and security afforded by a sound capital position.

The a has complied with the regulgtory speed capital requirements throughout the
perio





SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009, PAGE 9;








arl Taylor

FROM page one

changes will have to be done with
this retrial. There’s too much politics

in this country," he said.

McNeil’s attorney Murrio Ducille
also expressed surprise at the out-

come of the case.

"One will always have to respect |
the jury’s verdict because they are | .
the judges of the facts, but the ver- |*
dict can be unreasonable at times
because that’s one of the grounds
of appeal sometimes, that the verdict
is unreasonable having regards to
the ‘circumstances of the case," he

said.

"Our position is that the prosecution hae not
presented any evidence at all to connect this
young man with any murder and also it was
clear that the evidence of the DNA expert was
dislocated. His evidence showed clearly that he
was unreliable so I’m just wondering what the

jury gone by to come 8-4.

"Only thing I can say is that there were four
persons on the jury who were listening to the
case and who were reasoned and did not go by
any sentiment or any extraneous circumstance
to inference their decision. Because if any at all
they sat and listened to the case there is only
one verdict they could have arrived at,"

rer Taylor ]





Mr Ducille said.
Taylor's mother, Beverly Taylor;:
left the courtroom yesterday visibly
upset by the outcome of the case,
-She declined to speak to members of
| the media. Troyniko visibly disap:
| pointed, smiled at his young son as’
police escorted him back to Central
Police Station. McNeil who has been
on remand since last August will
remain on remand but could make:
| another application for bail. '
The Harl Taylor murder trial
began on July 2. In his unsworn,
statement at the trial earlier this.
week, McNeil said he had nothing to.



do with Taylor’s murder and had no reason to.

kill the noted handbag designer. He is accuse(l
of causing the death of Taylor, 37, between
Saturday, November 17, and Sunday, Novem:
ber 18, 2007 while being concerned with anoth-
er. Taylor, 37, was found dead in his bedroom
at Mountbatten House on West Hill Street

with multiple stab wounds. ‘A broken knife

was found on his bed.

The prosecution called some 24 witness to
testify and closed its case on Tuesday without,
calling six remaining witnesses. Assistant Direc-
tor of Public Prosecutions Franklyn Williams;
Neil Brathwaite and Darnell Dorsette repre:
sented the Crown.

Powerful Iranian cleric
says country in crisis

TEHRAN, Iran

IN_A sign of endurance for
Iran’s protest movement,
demonstrators clashed with
police Friday as one of the
nation’s most powerful clerics
challenged the supreme leader
during Muslim prayers, saying
the country was in crisis in the
wake of a disputed election,
according to Associated Press.

The turnout of tens of thou-
sands of worshippers for former
President Akbar Hashemi Raf-

sanjani’s sermon at Tehran Uni- -

versity and the battles with
police outside represented the
biggest opposition show of
strength in weeks. Protesters
faced fierce government sup-
pression and hundreds were
arrested following the June 12
presidential election.

Outside the university,
protests grew from several hun-
dred people before the sermon
to thousands afterward as wor-
shippers joined in, chanting
“death to the dictator,” a refer-
ence to President Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad.

Protesters

Protesters were confronted by
riot police and a menacing line
of pro-government Basiji militi-
amen on motorcycles, who
charged with batons. Plain-
clothes Basijis fired volleys of
tear gas, and young protesters
with green bandanas over their
faces kicked the canisters across
the pavement. Some set a bon-

’ fire in the street and waved their

hands in victory signs. Dozens
were arrested and taken away
in trucks, witnesses said.

Protests, which flared follow-
ing the election, had been stifled
in recent weeks, The sometimes
tearful sermon by Rafsanjani
could be a significant boost to
the movement’s staying power.
It was an open challenge to
Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali
Khamenei, aired live on nation-
wide radio from one of the coun-
try’s most potent political stages.
By openly showing the divisions
in the leadership, it punched a
hole in efforts by Khamenei and
hard-line clerics to end the con-
troversy over Ahmadinejad’s re-
election.

Worshippers chanted “azadi,
azadi,” Persian for “freedom,”
during Rafsanjani’s sermon, his
first since the election. Opposi-
tion leader Mir Hossein
Mousavi, who claims to have
won the election, sat among the
worshippers, attending the coun-
try’s main prayer service for the
first time since the turmoil
began,

Many of those gathered wore
headbands or wristbands in his
campaign color green, or had
green prayer rugs, crowding the
former soccer field. where

prayers are held and spilling into
nearby streets.

Rafsanjani denounced the
government crackdown on
protests and called for the
release of the hundreds detained.

He reprimanded the clerical.

leadership for not listening to
people’s complaints over the
election, which was declared a
victory for Ahmadinejad despite
opposition accusations of fraud.

“There is a large portion of,

the wise people who say they
have doubts (about the election).
We need to take action to
remove this doubt,” he said.
“The trust that brought the peo-
ple to vote in such large num-
bers is not there anymore. We
need to return this trust.”
Rafsanjani avoided directly
mentioning Khamenei or out-
right calling the vote fraudulent.
He couched his sermon in calls
for unity in support of Iran’s
Islamic Republic, but it was clear

_ he blamed the leadership for the

loss of unity.

Tears welled in the cleric’s
eyes as he spoke of how Islam’s
Prophet Muhammad “respect-
ed the rights” of his people. He
said the founder of Iran’s Islam-
ic Republic, Ayatollah Ruhol-
lah Khomeini, “would always
say} at if the system is not
backed hy the people, nothing
would stand.”

For Iranians. listening across
the country, the weekly Friday
sermon in Tehran is the voice of
the leadership and a symbol of
its backing by God.,

After hundreds of thousands
joined protests against the elec-
tion results. in the days follow-
ing the vote, the supreme leader
used the podium to declare
Ahmadinejad’s victory valid and
order a stop to unrest.

The crackdown was launched
soon after.

In the weeks that followed,
hard-line clerics have used the

* sermon to depict the protesters

as tools of foreign enemies and
tell worshippers to follow
Khamenei.

Rafsanjani’s sermon signaled
the broader public that the dis-
pute was internal and even Iran’s

ruling clerics are split. He direct- -

ly referred to the divisions, say-
ing the revered topmost theolo-
gians of Shia Islam, who have
millions of followers, were not
happy with the government.
Rafsanjani heads two power-
ful clerical bodies that oversee
the government and parliament,
the Expediency Council and the
Experts Council. He is a bitter
rival of Ahmadinejad and is con-
sidered Mousavi’s top supporter
within Iran’s clerical leadership.
A mercurial and savvy politi-
cian, Rafsanjani positioned him-
self as a leader emerging to
resolve the unrest, saying he
hoped his words would be a start
to “help us pass safely through a
problem that can unfortunately

be called a crisis.”

He specifically criticized his
top rivals within the clerical lead-
ership — the Guardians Council;
a body dominated by hard-liners.
The council oversaw the elec-
tion, then held a partial recount
that ‘upheld Ahmadinejad’s win
but was dismissed by the Oppo
sition.

Rafsanjani said the Guardians
Council missed an “opportunity
to unite the people and regain
their trust.” - Hi

During the service, worship-
pers traded competing chants
with some hard-liners in the con-
gregation. When the hard-liners
chanted “death to America,”
Mousavi supporters countered:
with “death to Russia” and
“death to China,” a reference to
Ahmadinejad’s alliance with
both countries.

The Iranian government has
accused the U.S. and other
Western countries of inciting the
massive street protests and inter-
fering with the election. On
Thursday, . Ahmadinejad

demanded an apology from the,

US. as a step toward dialogue,
between the two countries.

Elections:

“They tried to interfere in our’
elections. They talked nonsense.
They were rude. They fomented:
aggression against people’s
wealth and _ property,”
Ahmadinejad told a crowd of:
thousands in the northwestern
city of Mashhad. i

The U.S. has denied the gov-
ernment’s allegations.

More than 500 remain in
prison following the govern-
ment’s crackdown and at least
20 were killed.

In the past three weeks, the
opposition held only one other
significant protest before Fri-
day’s.

The scene outside the v univer-
sity on Friday was tumultuous:
Before the sermon, police fired
tear gas at hundreds of Mousavi
backers trying to enter.

When Mahdi Karroubi,
another pro-reform candidate in
the June election, headed for the
prayers, plainclothes Basijis
attacked him, shouting “death
to the opponent of Velayat-e-
Faqih,” or supreme leader, wit-
nesses said.

Also arrested was a prominent
women’s rights activist, Shadi
Sadr, who was beaten by militi-
amen; pushed into a car and dri-
ven away to an unknown loca-
tion, Mousavi’s Web site said.

Protests died down by night-
fall. After sunset, Iranians could
be heard shouting x from rooftops,
“God is great’ * and “death to the
dictator” — a show of opposi-
tion support that has been held
every night since the election,
but appeared louder and more
widespread Friday night.



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009

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Marsh Harhouy Abaco AB-~26900





Nassau Bahamas
Nassau Bahamas

Thompson : Christopher



Marsh Harbour Abaco,
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. Lhompsgon
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Nassau Bahamas
Naseau Bahamas
GeorgeTown, Exuma EX-29427
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2382

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Trace’ as ~20410
452
Nassau Bahamas
Birk : Nassau Bahamas SS-19085
Browne ig Robi : Nassau Bahamas N-1132
Campbell . Nassau Bahamas : 993

carey Nassau Bahamas N-4764 Le eaxpauncn cs
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Signed: PaticStracha -
Registna





PUBLIC NOTICE
REAL ESTATE BOARD
* LICENSED SALESMAN / SALESMANAPPRAI SERS / APPRAISERS .

This Public is notified for general information that in accordance with
(Brokers & Salesman) Act 1995, arid ag0Ga@nubeypersons listed hereunder a:

practice until Decéb2e0091

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| Dougtas _..| Gabrielle Fresh Creek, Andros i Sawyer. Stan Nassau Bahamas N~732 i
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Zann i Sweeting : 2 Nassau Bahamas CB~13272
Uy i Symonett Don Nassau Bahamas “| N-7795" i
Garren Symonete. ‘| Aldrino Nassau Bahamas | 88-19246 3%
Nicola S. - Nassau, Bahamas | Symonete RobhM . . Nassau Bahamas N-2709 i
Great Harbour Cay, Berry Thomas Pery Nassau Bahamas N-iG119
Lauren | oa Island Marsh Harbor aco JAB~20960 i
Higgs: Pleasant Nassau, Bahamas Thompson Nassau Bahamas N-1110
Margo Nassau, Bahamas i Thompson Marsh Harbouy Abaco é AB-20404
Holowesko Dunkley f Diane ° Nassau, Bahamas $S8-5977 490 i Thompson i ;
Horton Boguslawa Nassau, Bahamas N-3822 824 Wille Bitl BB-20404 i i

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f ' Registm ae ,

To advertise ALL your

~LEGAL NOTICES.

call The Tribune’s Sales Department

502-2394





PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



THE TRIBUNE'S

.
fe



I DIDN'T KNOW
UNTIL TODAY...
WAS SAVING IT

AS A SURPRISE!



NICE ENOUGH
TO GET A FREE
SANDWICH?

ARE YOU LOVELY
+ LADIES BY ANY

BUT Your
SIGN SAYS:
"WHILE YOu

DAD, HOW DOES
A LIGHT BULB

NY RIGHT. THEY'RE
SAX THATS | BOTH MAGIC.
ey



AND SHE'S
BRINGING A
FRIEND WITH HER!

1 CAN'T
BELIEVE

HE THOUGHT \y WEEKS STRAIGHT

WERE BORN
YESTERDAY!
ea

YOUR WAITS
UNTIL NEXT
TUESDAY

Zz

) FINE. DONT

BELIEVE YOUR
OWN FATHER,
WHo's BEEN

. AROUND A LOT



JUST BECAUSE IT |
WORKED FOR THREE

DOESN'T MEAN WE }

Panvose, yoy PYM “Duy “erEOpUtS seuuee4 Suny hq BODZED

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday ‘to

Sunday

















“JE He’s STUFFED, I GUESS HE CANT
GIVE AHoor” ae





Across Down - \
1 Died with heart strain — in 2 You might find merit in the
great pain? (10) meantime (7)

8 Bustling atmosphere 3 Rita’s broken bones (5)
around the street (5) 4 To occupy oneself, go into
9 Stone in great pieces (7) battle (6)
10 Carrying out a grave 5 It's designed and built as
commitment? (7) ‘an ocean container (3,4)

Difficulty Level *& *& *

CRYPTIC PUZZLE __











11 Yet one wouldn't pay a 6 The general trend in
high rent for it (5) current travel (5)
12 Abraham ties me in 7 Acut in decimal rates (10)
knots (6) 8 Sam’s abroad doing a turn
14 Vessel — showing its as a diplomat (10)
nationality? (6) 13 He drew Alice in lenient
17 Once more a profitable form (7)
deal (5) e835 15 The craft with which Spain
19 House holding an aromatic built up her empire (7)
plant (7) > 16 Exact payment for

21 That's what you think (7)
22 Abit like audible

tranquillity (5) | 18
23 Unhealthy antagonism? _

(3-7) : 20

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Scribe, 4 Hamper, 9
Tonnage, 10 Resin, 11 Linda, 12
Evening, 13 Renovations, 18 Indexes,
20 Skull, 22 Aroma, 23 Ironing, 24
Obtuse, 25 Regent.

Down: 1 Settle, 2 Run in, 3 Bravado,
5 Agree, 6 Passion, 7 Renege, 8
Generalship, 14 Endmost, 15 Inshore,
16 Mikado, 17 Flight, 19 X-rays, 21
Unite.




something on another’s
account (6)

It might be proof of
convenient absence (5)
Plane in trouble in the
Himalayas (5)

EASY PUZZLE |

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Decamp, 4 Steppe, 9
Bravura, 10 Ample, 11 Spell, 12
Running, 13 Bring to bear, 18 |
Ignoble, 20 Libel, 22 Drown, 23
Animate, 24 Mentor, 25 Amidst.
Down: 1 Debase, 2! Craze, 3
Maudlin, 5 Train, 6 Paprika, 7
Emerge, 8 Carry the day, 14 Run-
down, 15 Belgium, 16 Wisdom, 17
Albeit, 19 Banjo, 21 Brand.





©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.






APT 3-G




SITTING ON MY REAR FOR
OVER ANEAR UNTIL L
LEARNED To WALK .

5 CO
Bae
NOD

]
p



MY HAGAR
eae Lice
A HORSE /

ROGER EXPLAINS... Pf

THE GOVERNMENT OF CHINA A
DECLAREP TIM MILLS DEAD IN | THEIR SIDE,
A CLIMBING ACCIDENT, BUT HIS
WIFE REFUSED To ACCEPT IT.






SHE WAS | BUT. FINALLY,
THORN IN | SHE JUST
WENT AWAY.

SE






MARGO.

aon a
. NEE ‘|
,

REALLY Took
ITs TOLL

© 2008 by North America Syndicate, nc. Work rights reserved.




YOU MEAN
HE'S THAT.
HUNGRY 2




















©2009 by king Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

The Target
uses
words in

4 the main
body of
Chambers
2ist
Century
Dictionary

(1999
edition).



level of the Co

















ANP EVERYONE FORGOT
ALL ABOUT HER...



«

I'M VEFINITELN
GOING TO NEED A
FANNN LIFT

veww. kingfeatures.com



No... HIS TABLE MANNERS
ARE 50 BAD T MAKEHIM
EAT OLIT IN THE BARNS





HOW many words of four letters or
more can you make from the
letters shown here? In makingia
word, each fetter may be used-once
only. Each must contain the centre
letter and there must be at least
one nine-letter word.

No plurals.

TODAY'S TARGET ;
Good 21; very good 31; excellent 41
(or more) Solution tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION ‘©
acme acne ambiance amicable’
anaemic balance cabal cabin ‘cable
calamine calm came camel canal
cane cinema claim clam clan4
clean climb clime IMBALANCE
face lance mace. malice manacle
maniac manic mica mince nice



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal-block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty

nceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.












































Across Down
1 Origin of a written 2 Ill-founded (7)
work (10) 3 Courage (5)
8 Lasagne, ravioli 4 lessen (6)
etc. (5) 5 Marijuana (7)
9 Notwithstanding (7) 6 Personal
10 Living in water (7) dignity (5)
11 Bungling (5) 7 Highly successful
12 Bring about (6) book (10)
14 Celibate (6) 8 Literary theft (10)
17 Split (5) 13 Involvement (7)
19 Extreme 15 A makeshift (7)
confusion (7) 16 Mental



Truthful (7)
Bet (5)
Handwritten
document (10)

18
20

pressure (6)
Malevolence (5)
Oarsman (5)
































©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.









7/09








East dealer.
North-South vulnerable.

NORTH
@K72
Â¥962
@AJ7
&QI94
WEST EAST
@J853 #1094
¥Q 104 ¥K875
109653 @K82
&7 &A 63
SOUTH
AQ6
Â¥AI3
Q4
&K 10852
The bidding:
East South West North
Pass INT Pass 3NT

| Opening lead — five of diamonds.

This hand. from a team-of-four
contest illustrates how matches are

_ Fishing in Troubled Waters



9/6/1/2/8/3|7/4|5
2/18/317/4/5|6/1/9 7/2 1311/9 Ba ti2/6
8 {1/2 1/2)3|7
7|1/6|3/2/8]9/5/4 71312 0 W113
8/4)215/9)7 1/316 G7 19 R211 5 BO
5|3/9|4/1/6/8|7/2 116 Ba5 (6 819
1{2/8|9/3)4/5|6/7 3i7/211 8192
6|7/4/8/5/1[2/9/3 215/41 M9 /1/7 183











Declarer then led a club to the
jack, hoping that whoever had \the
ace did not have the last heart, but it
was not his lucky day. East won and
cashed his good heart, and South was
down one, losing a diamond, a,club
and three heart tricks all told. 3

At the second table, declarer*had
no trouble whatever making ,three
notrump. He saw nine sure tricks as
soon as dummy appeared, and could

sometimes won or lost for no good.

reason. Both Souths wound up in

three notrump, and at each table,

West’s opening lead was a diamond.

At the first table, declarer fol-
lowed low from dummy and lost the
finesse to East’s king. East then
returned the heart five. South’s
choice of plays was now immaterial.
When he followed low, West won
with the ten and continued with the
queen and another heart to force out

the ace.

think of no good reason to jeopatdize
the contract by attempting a diamor!
finesse at trick one. ;

So he went up with the ace of¥!la-
monds and led the club queen: trick
two. East ducked, then wondie next
club with the ace and shiftd to alow
heart, but South alreay had‘ tine
tricks — four clubs, nree spades, a
diamond and a hear.

It is granted -nat many players
would experierve at least a fleeting
temptation to wy the diamond finesse
at trick one, since two overtricks Can
be made if West has the king. How-
ever, yielding to such a temptation is
not a very good practice, since
declarer can gain only a little if’he’s
right and lose a lot if he’s wrong. '

If South’s goal was simply tovtry
to make as many tricks as possible,
he would certainly be correct to play
low from dummy at trick one.But
that is not the primary goal here:
Making the contract is the first con-
sideration.

Tomorrow: Two double-dummy problems.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.
t



THE TRIBUNE





TIRE THROW
VENUE CHANGE

e THE first Tire Throw,
competition, scheduled for
Saturday, July 25, willbe |
held at the National Cycling |
Track at the Baillou Hills

Sporting Complex and not ° | .

the Government High
School, as reported in The
Tribune on Friday.

CYCLING
NATIONAL
CHAMPIONSHIPS -

e THE Bahamas Cycling
Federation will hold its
National Cycling Chmpi-
onships beginning today on
a course that will travel
around the Western end of
the island, starting at 8am.

The championships will
wrap up on Sunday with \
competition being staged at |
the National Cycling Track
at the Baillou Hills Sporting

“Complex, starting at 3pm.

Competitors from New
Providence and Grand
‘Bahama are expected to
participate in the champi-
onships.

BODYBUILDING
NATIONAL
CHAMPIONSHIPS

¢ THE Bahamas Body-
building and Fitness Feder-
ation will hold its’annual ,
-Mr/Ms Independence
National Bodybuilding and
Fitness Championships
tonight at the National
Center for the Performance |
Arts. '
.¢The championships will
feature competitioninthe |
men and Women bedybuild- |
ing and women’s fitness cat- |
egories.

Jay Darling and Faye
Rolle are the defending
male and female bodybuild- |
ing champions. Teshell
Mackey was the top fitness
competitor.

Competitors from New
Providence, Grand Bahama
‘and Long Island are expect- |
ed to participate in the
‘championships that will get
‘underway at 8 pm.

‘ Alana Dillette
Swim team heads |
for FINA World |
Championships

nementene| NeW Breed top Mighty Mits 10



morning.
as Swimming |
sending five |
athletes to cotspete in indi- |
vidual and relays vents and |
will be competiny, against |
1470 athletes from 164 coun- |
tries. :
Elvis Vereance Burrows,
Alana Dillette, Alicia Light-
bourne, Teisha Lightbourne |
and Arianna Vanderpool- |
Wallace will represent the
Bahamas in 15 individual |
events ad two female relays. |
Swimming competition
takes place from the 26th
July to-August 2nd at the
Foro Italico venue in Rome. |
Italy. Y
The team is being coached |
by Geoff Eneas of the Dol- |
Phin Swimming Club and |
Aaron Ciarla from Auburn |
niversity.



SECTION A



18, 2009.

INSIDE © International

JEREMY WARINER of the US, right, wins the men's 400m A-final, with CHristopher Brown of Bahamas, at center,
Stade de France in Saint-Denis, north of Paris, Friday, July 17, 2009.









Jacques Brinon/AP Photo

during the AF Golden League athletics meeting, at the



Both Brown and Sturrup place second at Worlds

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

CHRIS ‘Bay’ Brown and Chandra Sturrup were just
short of pulling off upsetting victories over two of their
top contenders for the IAAF World Championships in

Athletics this year.

Competing at the Meeting Areva
at the Stade France yesterday in
Paris, Brown and Sturrup were sec-
ond in the men’s 400 metres and the
women’s 200 respectively.

And Olympic bronze medalist |

Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands had to set-
tle for a sixth place finish in the
men’s triple jump.

Brown, coming off his season’s
best 44.81 seconds on the third leg of
the Golden League meeting in Rome

-on Friday, suffered his first defeat

on the European circuit this year.

Reigning world champion Jeremy
Wariner, who was upset at last year’s
Olympics in Beijing, China, won the
race in 45.28 seconds, leaving Brown
trailing in 45.44 for second.

Leslie Djhone was third in 45.47,
while American David Neville, who
dived across the finish line to deny
Brown of the bronze in Beijing last
year, was fourth in 45.49.

With his performance, Brown has

now surged on top of the World Ath--

letics Tour with 67 points from five
meets, surpassing previous leader



Lionel Cironneau/AP Photo.

Gary Kikaya, who did not compete
in the race.

The World Athletics Tour deter-
mines who will qualify, based on
their points, for spots in the World
Athletic Final that will take place in

Stuttgart, Germany in September.
Meanwhile, Sturrup finished sec-

- ond in the women’s century in 11.15.

The race was won by Jamaican Ker-
ron Stewart, who has the world’s
fastest time of 10.75.

Another Jamaican veteran, Aileen
Bailey, was third in 11.26.

Sturrup is still holidng onto sec-
ond place on the World Athletics
Tour with 68 points from five meets.
Stewart has increased her lead with
100 points from five meets as well.

Despite not running in the meet,
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie is tied
with three others for sixth place.

And in the triple jump, Leevan



Sands scored 16.78 metres for, sixth
place. Phillips Idowu won with‘17.17,
followed by Jadel Gregorio with a
season’s best of 17.12. Arnie David
Giralt was third with 17.06. \:

Sands’ performance kept him in
third place on the World Athletics
Tour with 28 points from four meets.
Girat is out front with 34 and Phillips
is second with 32. i

The athletes are all gearing up for
the IAAF World Championships in

‘Berlin next month. While the major-

ity of the countries have already
named their teams, the Bahamas

SEE page 15

KERRON Stewart
of Jamaica, center,
wins the women's
100m, with Kelly
Ann Baptiste of
Trinidad, right, and
Chandra Sturrup of
the Bahamas, dur-
ing the AF Golden
League athletics
meeting at the
Stade de France in
Saint-Denis, north
of Paris, Friday,
July 17, 2009°:

SSS °° °° ° " —" "=e "© iF "9" 0 °° © °C 6 ve e *h——° 6" ° ee 8 * 0 e e et °° —0*™ 6 °° ™ " ”

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Mighty Mits seemingly
forgot that they had at least five
innings to play a softball game in
the New Providence Softball
Association.

. Thursday night at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex, the
Mighty Mits scored all of their
runs in the top of the first inning,
but watched helpessly as the
New Breed peaked away for a
come-from-behind victory.

In fact, it came down to the
bottom of the sixth inning when
pinch hitter Teddy Sweeting Jr.
Tipped a single up the middle to
score Euegen Pratt with the
walk-off winning run in’ a 10-3
come-from-behind decision.

“We came out sluggish, but in
the end, we did what we do in
practice,” said Pratt, who had
gotten on board with a two-run
double to highlight the five-run

rally in the sixth. “We came out
slugging.”

After falling behind 3-0, New
Breed came up with seven hits
off two pitchers used by Mighty
Mits to eventually improve their
record to 5-4 to remain in con-
tention for a playoff spot in fifth
place. Spor

The Mighty Mits, who were
shutdown on just one hit the rest
of the way by Pratt after pro-
ducing three hits and marching
eight batters to the plate in the
first, fell to 3-8 for seventh place.

Pratt, in finishing with six
strike outs, admitted that he too

was a little sluggish at the start.”

But the 6-foot-3 19-year-old
hard throwing right hander said
he was glad to get his act togeth-
er.

“T came out joking, but at the
end I calmed down and started
throwing a lot of strikes,” he
pointed out. “I knew I had to
turn things around in order for
us to win.”

If their performance was any

indication, Pratt said they have a
chance to really be a spoiler in
the league.

“This is a new young team and
we are doing well, as opposed
to the veterans in the league,”
he stated. “We’re going alright.
But we could be better.”

Mighty Mits, managered by
Alphonso ‘Chicken’ Albury,
seemed headed for a big perfor-
mance as catcher Dwight But-
ler drilled a one-out double to
plate lead off batter D’Vano
Curry with the game’s initial run.

Marcellus Hall followed with a
single and he and Butler scored
respectively on two-out RBI
walk from Dival Storr and RBI
single from Basil Dean.

But after leaving two runners
stranded on base in the bottom
of the frame, New Breed finally
got to Mighty Mits’ starting
pitcher Andrick John in the sec-
ond.

A run-producing triple from

SEE page 15

Lldty

T= 9Ts



AY
li ye
‘ “ fod fl all

20

=F LLie
aca



TEAMS W L PCT. CB
Men's Division

Dorcey Park Boyz 8 1 .888 -
Commando Security Truckers 7 1 875 5
Price Waterhouse Stingrays 6 2 150 §15
RBDF Commodores 5 3 625 2.5
Robin Hood Hitmen 5 4 555. 33
Young Breed 3 5 3754.5
Mighty Mits 3 8 212 6
Thompson Heavy Equipment 2 "6 250 5.5
Buccaneers 0 9 .000 8
Ladies Division

Pineapple Air Wildcats 8 0 1,000 -
Sigma Brackettes 5 9 625 3
Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks 4 3 O71 3.5
Queens 1 5 166 6
Bommer G Swingers 0 7 000 7.5



PAGE 14, SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009





Beckham quiet in

MLS return, Galaxy
top Red Bulls

SOCCER
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
Associated Press

THE BUZZ is off David
Beckham in Major League Soc-
cer.

Los Angeles drew 66,237 for |

its 5-4 loss at New York two
years ago, the largest soccer
crowd at Giants Stadium for a
U.S. league game in 27 years.
Attendance dropped to 46,754
for last year’s 2-2 tie and fell

by 50 percent to 23,238 on

Thursday night, when the
Galaxy beat the lowly Red
Bulls 3-1.

“Obviously, the first year was
impressive,” Beckham said.

“We’re in a recession so, you -

know, maybe that’s part of it.”

In his first club match since °

the end of the European sea-
son, Beckham was often behind
the play and seemed winded.
He had no free-kick chances
near the goal, didn’t make any
crosses that created threats and
didn’t even take all the Galaxy
corner kicks while he was in the
match.

Fans scurried down the aisles
to get better pictures when he
did take corner kicks, but he
was booed at times.

“A few tonight, but it’s to be
expected,” he said..“It’s some-
times nice to get the boos. It
gives you some inspiration.”

Galaxy coach Bruce Arena
didn’t think it was too bad.

“I think this almost a pleas-
ant environment for him
tonight,” he said. “He can deal
with a little bit of booing here.”

Alecko Eskandarian scored
on a left-footed volley that beat
goalkeeper Danny Cepero
from about 28 yards in the third
minute, Landon Donovan
scored on a right-footed shot
from about the same distance in
the 31st and Eddie Lewis from
15 yards in the 45th.

Galaxy goalkeeper Donovan
Ricketts parried Seth Stamm-
ler’s shot late in the first half,



then blocked Jorge Rojas’
attempt off the rebound.

“There was two goals that
could be goal of the season,”
Donovan said.

Los Angeles (6-3-9) has won
four straight MLS games for
the first time since September-
October 2007 and is fighting
for a playoff berth. The
Galaxy had not won at New
York since 2000.

Juan Pablo Angel had an
87th-minute penalty kick and
failed to convert one in the
90th for the Red Bulls (2-14-
4), who would be a lock for
relegation if the MLS had it.
They dropped to 0-9-2 in the
league and 0-10-2 overall since
beating San Jose on May 8.

Coach-Juan Carlos Osorio
apologized for his team’s per-
formance. .

“T feel sorry and I want to
apologize to the fans,” he said.
' Beckham. appeared to go
out of his way to be friendly
with Donovan, who in a book
out this week criticized his
teammate for allegedly quit-
ting on the Galaxy in the late
stages of a disappointing 2008
season.

Beckham and Donovan,
who regained his captain’s job
from the Englishman, shook
hands and embraced ahead of
the opening whistle. Beckham
draped his arm around Dono-
van after the American scored,
and the two hugged after
Donovan assisted on the third
goal.

“There was never a doubt
in our minds that these guys
would work together,” Arena
said. “It was certainly a great
moment with all the buildup
of, you know, the so-called
questionable relationship. It
was great. They’re going to be
good together. They’re good
professionals.”

Donovan had come to New
York on a red-eye after
attending the ESPY awards in
Los Angeles.

ford, NJ.

Bolt wins 100 meters in >



ily 16, 2009, at Giants Stadium in East Ruther-



9.79 at Areva Meeting







Bill Kostroun/AP Photo

LOS ANGELES Galaxy midfielder David Beckham controls the ball during the first half of an MLS soccer.
game against the New York Red Bulls on Thursday, Jt





7 ty seats

TRACK AND FIELD
SAINT-DENIS, France
Associated Press

WORLD record-holder
Usain Bolt comfortably. won
the 100 meters at the Areva
Meeting on Friday, just miss-
ing Tyson Gay’s season-best
time as he gears up for next
month’s world championships
in Berlin.

seconds. Gay ran 9.77 last week
at the Golden Gala in Rome.

“JT had a bad start, but Iran a
good time,” Bolt said.

Barbuda was second to Bolt in
9.91, and Yohan Blake of
Jamaica was third in 9.93.

Bolt won the 100 and 200 at
last year’s Beijing Olympics in
world records. He also: helped
Jamaica win the 400 relay in

* record time. His goal now is to
beat Gay, the defending 100
and 200 champion, in Berlin.

Also winning were Sanya
Richards of the United States at
400 meters, Kenenisa Bekele
of Ethiopia at 3,000 meters,
Yelena Isinbaeva of Russia in
the pole vault and Kerron Stew-
art of Jamaica at 100 meters.



Lionel Cironneau/AP Photo

JAMAICAN Olympic champion Usain Bolt reacts after winning the
men's 100m, during the AF Golden, League athletics meeting at the
Stade de France in Saint-Denis, north of Paris, Friday, July 17, 2009.



Wade to Lamar Odom: ‘Come home’ to Miami Heat

The Jamaican won in 9.79 °

Daniel Bailey of Antigua and -

They stayed on course for a
share of the $1 million Golden
League jackpot at the end of
the season after four legs of the
six-leg Golden League.

Bekele dominated rival
Bernard Lagat in the 3,000,
surging ahead by 30 meters with
three laps to go, and extending
the gap by the end. He won in 7
minutes, 28.64 seconds, while
Lagat finished in 7:33.15.

Richards also won in style,
but still claims the Golden

‘League jackpot is not on her

mind.
“J don’t know what it is but I
never feel pressured by the

jackpot,” she said.
She may share some of that

prize with Stewart, who cruised
home in the 100 in 10.99, well
ahead of Chandra Sturrup of
the Bahamas.

Richards beat second-place
Novlene Williams-Mills of
Jamaica by more than one sec-
ond, finishing in 49.34. That
took Richards below 50 sec-
onds for the 37th time, breaking
Marita Koch’s record for most
performances under 50.

“That makes me really
proud. I told myself: No matter
what, I’m going to go under 50



today, | don’t care if it rains or
pours or the wind is blowing
me over,” Richards. said.
“Stockholm is next on my
schedule. I’m still not 100 per-
cent sure if I’ll be competing or
not. I might just go home and
get prepared for Berlin.”

_ Richards is looking for more
success at the worlds.

“It’s time to get prepared to
become a world champion,”
she said. :

In damp and slightly windy
conditions, world record-hold-
er Isinbaeva was way short of
her best, but she still did
enough to win with a vault of 15
feet, 3 inches.

Also, Jeremy Wariner of the
United States won the men’s
400, easing up in the last 20
meters as he cruised over the
line ahead of Christopher
Brown of Bahrain. Wariner
won in 45.28 seconds, 0.16 sec-
onds ahead of Brown.

“It’s not where I wanted
timewise, but I think I executed
right,” Wariner said. “I expect-
ed somewhere in the 44 (sec-
onds) middle to low. But you
know, conditions are a little
chilly. Windy down the back-
stretch.”

S995 D000, '*E ee =r.= tr; E, onr0rwWW rd “WW” :dl_

BASKETBALL
MIAMI, Florida
Associated Press

DWYANE WADE spent much
of his rookie season picking Lamar
Odom’s brain on all aspects of the
NBA game, everything from play-
ing tips to travel advice.

He hopes those chats start again
soon. ,

The. Miami Heat, who traded
Odom to the Los Angeles Lakers
five years ago in the trade that
brought Shaquille O’Neal to South
Florida, have made the free agent
forward an offer to return and help
Wade once again. The team has not

revealed terms of the offer,

although it’s believed to be a five-

year package that could be worth
around $35 million.

“I want Lamar to do what’s best
for him and his family because we
love him as family, but on the other
hand, we want him back home, to
come home,” Wade said Friday in a
telephone interview. “His house is
still there. It’d be exciting to see
what happens.”

Odom averaged 17.1 points — the
second-highest average of his career
— in 80 games with the Heat during
the 2003-04 season. He’s spent the
past five years with the Lakers, who
pulled their contract offer to Odom
earlier this week, a move that does-
n’t necessarily mean the two sides
won’t resume talking. Odom, 29,
was a significant contributor to the

Lakers’ championship run this year.

The Heat went 42-40 that season
with Odom, winning 17 of their
final 21 regular-season games and
earning the No. 4 spot in the East-
ern Conference. That summer, Mia-
mi traded Caron Butler, Brian
Grant and Odom to the Lakers for
O’Neal, who helped Wade and the
Heat win a championship two years
later.

Wade, who has asked the Heat
to make some roster upgrades with
hopes of getting back to the cham-
pionship level, said he doesn’t need
to call Odom to lobby for his return.

“Lamar already knows how I
feel,” Wade said. “I really don’t
know how to feel. He’s really taken
time to deal with it, sit back. It’s a

very important decision in his life. It
could be about where he ends his
career.”

The Heat have also been linked
to a potential trade involving Utah
forward Carlos Boozer, another
close friend of Wade and his team-
mate from the 2008 Beijing
Olympics. The South Florida Sun-
Sentinel reported Friday that Mia-
mi “has not entered talks ... but is
monitoring” the Boozer situation.

Over his 10-year career, the ver-
satile 6-foot-10 Odom has averaged
15.1 points and 8.8 rebounds.

“Lamar and [ always had a great
relationship,” Wade said. “He’s
always been the guy, one of the
guys, that | thought really helped
me as a young player.”

THE TRIBUNE








Pca eee

Manny welcomer
with cheers, hut
Dotigers fall 3-0

BASEBALL
LOS ANGELES
Associated Press





MANNY Ramirez was:
greeted with cheers, chants
of his name and camera flash-
es that sparkled around,
Dodger Stadium. Manny,,.
wood has officially been,
restored. 35

“This is my town,” the;
dreadlocked slugger said
laughing. :

Tinseltown had hoped for:a
better result with Ramirez
playing his first home game:
sinee returning from a 50=
game suspension for violat-.
ing baseball’s drug policy.’ 25

Wandy Rodriguez com!
bined with four relievers ‘on
an eight-hitter and the Hous?
ton Astros spoiled Ramirez’s’
homecoming with a 3-0 vic
tory on Thursday night. -

“Tt was great. I was looking
forward to this gamé,;”
Ramirez said. “I’m just gladT
got that game out of the way.
I was just playing the ga
like I always do.”

Just not with his usuat
results.

Ramirez went 1 for 4 with
two strikeouts. He singled,to
lead off the eighth, but he was
erased on a double play one
batter later. __sh

“T wanted to make good
pitches to Manny and I didn’t
want to miss because he’s'a
good hitter,” Rodriguez said.
“So I made good pitches to’
him and had good location.
with my breaking ball.” | |

There were plenty of enip:,
among the,
announced crowd of 45,970,
for the game, which came.
after Ramirez rejoined the,
team at San Diego on July, 3,
for a nine-game road trip,
Owners Frank and Jamie,
McCourt were out of town,.,

“J don’t need to talk about
anything more. I just need-to
show up and play the game,”,
said Ramirez, who has
repeatedly declined .to
explain what led to his sus:
pension. i 2P|

Rodriguez (9-6) gave up
five hits in six innings, struck
out six and walked twoin
winning his fifth in a row. The:
Astros have won the left-han+:
der’s last five starts and six:
of his last seven. tart

Jose Valverde, the fourth
Astros reliever, earned his:
ninth save in 13 chafices.

“It was a great effort by’
Wandy,” Houston manager
Cecil Cooper said. “It was big














i Yor him to go out there and

throw up zeros like that
against a pretty good hitting
team. He had everything
working and he made somi:
huge pitches to get Manny,
They really kind of pushec

him in the fourth, fifth and,
sixth innings, but hé main),
tained his composure ary,
kept making pitches.” i

WY







THE TRIBUNE



As One Foundation
announces 2008
scholarship winners :

SUGARLAND, TEXAS -
Ten local high school students :
benefit from the first annual ;
scholarship grant programme :
established by the As One
Foundation. The foundation
established by NFL Wide
Receiver Devard Darling will
award $10,000 in scholarships
at the Devard and Devaughn
Darling High School Senior
Awards Luncheon, on Satur-
day, July 18th at the Sugar
Land Marriott Town Square,
16090 City Walk, Sugar Land,
TX,

The scholarship committee
is pleased to announce the fol-
lowing first year recipients

¢ Taylor Rammrath, Sugar
Land, TX

* Alyssa Matus, Houston TX

e Shivani Patel, Sugar Land, TX
e Shadi Moubayed, Sugar Land,

â„¢X ;

° Alicia Villarreal, Sugar Land,
Tâ„¢ :

° Caroline Suter, Sugar Land,
1â„¢X

e Minh Pho, Sugar Land, TX

¢ Omar Amin, Sugar Land, TX
e Matthew Powell, Sugar Land,
Tâ„¢X

e Drew Miranda, Fresno, TX

Chosen for their exceptional
commitment to education
excellence, special athletic inter-
ests and talents these young
men and women have the char-
acteristics that will make them
successful.

The foundation’s scholarship
programme established the
Devard and Devaughn Darling
High School Senior Award, in
honor of Devaughn Darling,
the. twin brother of Devard who
died February 2001.

The scholarship was designed
to give students encouragement
and financial assistance for fur-
thering their educational goals.
The scholarship funds may be
used for tuition, fees, books,
room and board, or other edu-
cational expenses, and does not
have to be repaid. ,

New Breed tops

Mighty Mits 10-3

FROM page 13

Angelo Butler knocked in
Crachad-Laing from his lead-

off triple and Addie-rintey,-

returning to the line-up after a
brief break, had an RBI sacri-
fice fly to sent Butler home
for a 3-2 deficit.
The score remained that
way until the fifth when Finley,
- batting ninth in the line-up,
led off the fifth with a walk
and after Ken Wood got on
base on an error, they both
came home on another mis-
cue that put Pratt on base.
With two out, Laing drove

home Pratt with his RBI single

to put New Breed up for good,
5-3.

And in the sixth, after the
bases was loaded on an inten-
tional walk to Wood, Angelo’
Butler and Addie Finley both
managed to scoot home on a

pass ball. :
Pratt then came up with a
two-run double that drove
home Wood and D’Andre
Rigby, setting the stage for
Teddy Sweeting Jr, who only

needed to get the ball in play.

‘Instead, he came up with a

grounder up the middle that i
enabled Pratt to race home :

with the final run as they
forced Mighty Mits to walk off
the field with an abbreviated
10-run defeat.

Tn the feature game, Heavy

Equipment Dorcey Park Boyz

ace pitcher Edney ‘the Heat’
Bethel got a strike out on the

first Robin Hood Hitmen bat-

ter,
But number two batter
Garfield Bethel drilled a shot

eh the Dorcy Park Boyz’

leftfielder and was heading

homtfor an in-the-park home
run w




r they took too
long to come\gck on.

place second

FROM page 13.

Association of Athletic

Associations have not.

However, Brown, Sturrup
and Sands, who all compet-
ed yesterday, have already
booked their tickets by turn-
ing in the A qualifying stan-
dards in their respective
events.

None of the athletes :
could be reached yesterday :
for comments following :
their performances.







A CYCLING fan with a Texas flag runs along the pack with American seven
Platzerwasel during the 13th stage of the Tour de France cyclin

17, 2009.

CYCLING
COLMAR, France
Associated Press

LANCE Armstrong stayed in third
place after a wet and chilly ride Friday
and lost a crucial ally for the rest of the
Tour de France when teammate Levi’
Leipheimer withdrew because of.a bro-

ken wrist.
Germany’s Heinrich Haussler won the

13th stage by outclassing the pack with a
solo breakaway, and Italy’s Rinaldo
Nocentini kept the yellow jersey for a
seventh straight day.

Armstrong, the seven-time champion,
remained eight seconds behind Nocenti-
ni. Astana teammate Alberto Contador,
the 2007 Tour champion, is second, six
seconds back. Armstrong, Contador and
other favorites were 6 minutes, 43 sec-
onds behind Haussler.

Leipheimer’s withdrawal is a blow to
Astana and Armstrong. He is a four-
time top-10 finisher at the Tour, includ-
ing third place finish in 2007. He had
been in fourth place, 39 seconds behind
Nocentini.

He had surgery on the wrist Friday,
and Astana said he would return to the
United States as soon as possible to begin
his recovery.

“My wrist hurts a lot but it doesn’t
compare to the pain of watching the
‘Tour leave me behind and not be able to
ride the Tour with my teammates,”
Leipheimer said in a statement. “We’ve
had a.big battle so far. We’re the
favorites, and I wanted to be part of
that.” “3

Leipheimer and Armstrong have a
close relationship within Astana, which
Armstrong says is riven by “tension”
with Contador.

“He’s a good friend of mine so it
makes it even more unfortunate, but




that’s cycling,” said Armstrong, stress-

ing that Leipheimer’s absence is a big _

loss.

“You saw even there, in some stages in
the Pyrenees, when there was an attack,
we had four guys there. And now, one’s
gone,” Armstrong said. “Not only does it
hurt us, I think it helps the others in
terms of morale, and thinking perhaps
that the team has been weakened.”

At first, it appeared Leipheimer might
remain in the race.

“It seemed like an insignificant crash
that all of a sudden turned out to be
pretty major,” Armstrong said.

Leipheimer fell off his bike less than
two miles from Thursday’s finish line in
a crash involving two-time Tour runner-
up Cadel Evans. He pulled out before
riders began the day’s 124-mile stage
through the rolling. hills of northeast
France that featured three big climbs,
including the demanding Col du Platzer-
wasel.

Haussler, a Cervelo rider who won a
stage at Paris-Nice in March, raced ahead
of the second of two fellow breakaway
riders in the last 31 miles and distanced
himself from the peloton as the finish
neared.

Haussler cupped his face in his hands
and choked up with emotion as he
crossed the line in 4:56:26 — 4:11 ahead
of second-place Amets Txurruka of
Spain. Brice Feillu of France was third,
6:13 back.

“T was really happy. I just got teary,”
said Haussler; who was born in Australia
to a German father. “I just couldn’t

believe it. ... | was just so nervous that I

was going to crash.”

Haussler, who collected his first Tour
stage victory, entered the stage in 105th
place overall — 55:24 behind Nocentini.
He rose to 83rd overall with his win,
48:41 off the leader’s pace.

TIGER WOODS of the US reacts after a shot on the 18th hole during the second round
of the British Open Golf championship, at the Turnberry golf course, Scotland, Friday,

July 17, 2009.

g race over 200 kilometers (

SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009, PAGE 15







Ki/AP Photos

Czerwins

-Bas Cz

-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong, center with black helmet, as they climb Col du
124.3 miles) with start in Vittel and finish in Colmar, central France, Friday July

Armstrong stays third at
Tour; Haussler wins stage

AMERICAN seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong, foreground, gestures:
as he rides with fellow countryman George Hincapie, rear, during the 13th stage of the
Tour de France cycling race over 200 kilometers (124.3 miles) with start in Vittel and.

finish in Colmar, central France.

Woods in big trouble after
disappointing round

GOLF
TURNBERRY, Scotland
Associated Press

TIGER Woods was unlikely to make
the British Open cut after shooting a 4-
over 74 in the second round Friday.

Woods had missed only one cut in a
major since turning pro, and that was
after the death of his father at the 2006
U.S. Open. But two double bogeys on
the back side made it highly improbable
he would get through to the weekend,
even after he birdied two of the last
three holes.

“Unfortunately, it just didn’t happen,”
Woods said. “No doubt I’m frustrated. I
was playing well the first seven holes,
right there in the championship. I felt
like if I was under par for the tourna-
ment, I would be in the top 10. I didn’t
do that. I went the other way.”

The top 70, plus ties, make it to the
final two rounds. When Woods walked
off the course, he was tied for 77th at 5-
over 145,

The British Open doesn’t have a 10-
shot rule, which would allow anyone
within 10 strokes of the lead to make
the cut. Woods was 10 shots behind co-
leaders Steve Marino and Tom Watson,
but that doesn’t matter at Turnberry.

Since the 06 miss at, Winged Foot;
Woods had made the cut in 43 consecu-
tive tournaments worldwide. er

He opened with a.disappointing 71 in’
much better conditions Thursday, was*
still in decent shape when he made the
turn at 1-over 36, then began to fall apart
after the turn.

His tee shot at No. 10 sailed wildly ,

"into the tall-grass far right of the fairway,

—a familiar problem both days — and it\
was clear he was in trouble when he
struck a provisional tee shot. Even with\
dozens of fans helping him look, Woads;
could only find someone else’s ball, tagk.,
a penalty and wound up with a double-
bogey 6. ve

He took bogey at the 12th after dri-
ving into a fairway bunker, then had
another double at 13. He was only 159,
yards away in the first cut of rough after. ,
his tee shot, then needed five moré
strokes to get down. A ragged approach,
missed the green, a sloppy chip failed
to stay on, and a missed putt from about |
5S feet sent him tumbling into an even,
deeper hole. ;

“T hit two bad 3-woods in a row,”
Woods said. “I lost them both to the!
right. With a left-to-right wind, you can’t
do that. You've got to turn them over,
and I didn’t do that.”





Cee a










Clear and very warm.









Partly sunny with a Partly sunny witha Some sun with a Some sun, t-storms Some sun.with
thunderstorm. thunderstorm. t-storm possible. . possible; breezy. t-storms possible.
. High: 89° High: 90° High: 89° High: 90°
_Low: 81° Low: 80° Low: 82° _Low: 82 _ | __ Low: 82°
! | HATH Ty
102°-86° F 101°-83° F 97°87 F | > 100°-91°F al
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm.or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Almanac



Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temporatore:. 2.2

1



High 93° F/34° C

Low . seven 82° F/28° C

Normal high: . 88° F/351°.C

Normal low.... Fa .. 15° F/24° C

Last year's NIGH... eseescessuceeeeeeene 92° F/34° C

= ~ Last year's OW oe eesesessseeesereese O1° F/27° C

Precipitation



As of 2 p.m. yesterday . 0.05"
Year to date 18.56"
Normal year to date . 21.96"

AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by



i 2 TRIBUNE

Venere Teta areas


















Today Sunday WINDS AVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W High Low W WASSAU ~ Today: SE at 7-14 Knots 2 Feet 3-5 Miles 86° F
| Sundar E at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Fret 3-5 Miles 86° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 3-5 Miles



F MODERATE



HIGH



V. HGH “68/20. 56/13. sh 3-5 Miles

4-6 Miles
4-6 Miles

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Today:
Sunda!

E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet.
SE at 8-16 Knots 2-3, Feet
E at 8-16 Knots 2-3 Feet





ABACO
The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

95/35. 78/25, ‘Ss
{ greater the need for eye and skin protection. [3°



78/25 t
/25°s
61/16 s

91/32 78/25 sh
= 86/30 77/25. sh
73/22 64/17 s



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Y 742 pm. 3.3 12:36pm. -0.2 - | :

Tuesday (38am. 2.7 1:37am. -0.1

) 8:08 p.m. 3.4 1:36 p.m. -0.3



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94/347:
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VNWNNNWNW

Sunrise......6:31.a.m. Moonrise. .... 2:31 a.m.
.....-8:01 p.m. - Moonset -.-.

First

Sunset.
New

- 4:48 p.m.

MUN NNANNNANN ANE

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“WNNNNNNNNNNNANNN

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SV VNNNNN NN NNN NR

UY MA WNNAN MN VAN NN



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_ ELEUTHERA Jul. 21 Jul. 28 Aug. 5 Aug. 13 =e
ig) 93° F/34°C 106/41 . 84/28 pc wi gi fs Co Cold =="
X Ff 4 S own are noon positions of weather systems
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm 2a
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary ns
89/31 78/25 pc
_ SAN SALVADOR
_ High:90°F/32°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's e Low: 75° F/24°C



highs and tonights's lows.

Sunday
Ww High Low
_ Fi FIC
= 96/35 70/21
68/20 56/13
83/28



RAGGED ISLAND

Atlantic City

Baltimore. High: 91° F/33°C
Boston Low: 72° F/22°C
Buffalo



91/32 Pe

68/20" S412 pe
68/20 salle t

73/22 54/12.




991/32°-72/22
96/35 61/16 Tallahassee
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Este 92/33 68/20:

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Washington, DG. 84/28 64/17. Ss. ° << 82/27: 68/20. +s








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BAHAMAS EDITION

‘www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009

Har Taylor trial

ends in hung jury

Retrial ordered
after an 8-4
suilty verdict

. NATARIO McKENZIE
tribune Staff Reporter
amckenzie@tribunemedia.net_

MANY expressed surprise
yesterday after the Harl Tay-
lor murder trial ended in a
nung jury, with the panel
anable to reach a unanimous
verdict on the murder charge.

After some three: hours of
deliberations, the jury of six
en and six women, returned
yith a verdict of guilty 8-4 on
‘°2 murder charge. Senior Jus-
uce Anita Allen said, howev-
er, that the verdict was not
one of conviction and ordered
a retrial for Troyniko McNeil,

ah z
Outside the courtroom Troy
McNeil, the father of the
accused and Taylor’s former —
siness partner, told mem-
<3 of the media that the ver-
“* "I’m very surprised actually
that the jurors came to this
decision. It is quite evident
that if you have all the items
from the scene and you also
aave my DNA, why is it that
the forensic analysis was not
dxicked up from there. Obvi-
ously Troyniko is my son and
with those items and the com-
parative view-it would have
picked it up, so it’s strange,"
Mr McNeil said.
As I see it now, my son has
veen charged with murder
because he has a fingerprint
on the door, but the murder
‘yeapon was not fingerprint-
-d and was not analysed for
jONA.and the judge said don’t
-onsider it, how is that possi-
te?" he wanted to know.
‘Mr McNeil; who lived at
Mountbatten House up to a
“eek before Taylor was killed,
‘aid it was not unusual that
s son's DNA was found
aere as Troyniko worked
there and often came to visit

the accused.

-"There were just too many
*aconsistencies and lies in this
gase, to come to this verdict
is beyond me. Some definite

SEE page nine



TROY MCNEIL, the father of



























TROYNIKO MCNEIL heading to court to hear the verdict in his IF

Sunken tanker
was not insured

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AN 85-FOOT tanker, which sank
Wednesday in the protected Exuma
Land and Sea Park spilling oil and
garbage, was not insured.

Now environment officials are wor-
ried that this might hamper efforts to
salvage the wreckage and several pieces
of heavy equipment it was transporting
which are now on the sea bed.

Meanwhile, fears that the barge’s miss-
ing crew members may have drowned
were dispelled yesterday when it was
reported that the “three or four” men
and the boat’s captain Michael Oakes
clung to the sinking boat for hours
overnight before being rescued by.a pass-
ing vessel on Wednesday morning and



brought to Nassau.

Eric Carey, Executive Director of the
Bahamas National Trust, said that in a
conversation with Mr Oakes, the boat
captain claimed that the barge sank off
Cistern Cay, Exuma, after running into a
squall at around 3am Wednesday.

‘After being rescued, Mr Oakes came
to Nassau, where Mr Carey said he
claimed he contacted authorities to
report the sinking.

However, the BNT chief said it is not
known who he reported the incident to as
the environmental organisation only
became aware of the hazard by “second
hand information.”

He noted that prompt reporting of
such an incident is crucial to minimising
the hazard the vessel posed to the sur-

SEE page nine



‘Bahamas ‘has.







By PAUL G TURNQUEST.
Tribune Staff Reporter. .....
plumquest@tribunemedta) net

STATE Min-
ister for Immi-
gration
Branville
McCartney
warned the
public yester-
day that the.




seen a spike in
illegal migra-
tion from the
impoverished
and politically
unstable country of Haid. ver
the past few weeks.

Noting that there seems to
be no justifiable reason for
this. significant increase, Mr
McCartney said that the
Department of Immigration
has been in contact with the
Bahamas’ Embassy in Haiti
to determine if there has been
any change in the country’s
economic or political land-
scape that could cause such
an influx. i

“But the answer to*that is
no. From my understanding
they (Haiti) had elections
three weeks ago and they are

BRANVILLE
MCCARTNEY

. Waiting for the results of:

elections. But there has been
nothing untoward out of the
ordinary. And the reason why
we called was to deternine
why are these persons coming
at this particular time of year,
because at this time it is usu-
ally not this frequent,” he said.

Over the past few days,

SEE page nine

Certificate for the
completion of a _
Semester at Sea found,

brought to Tribune

A CERTIFICATE for the
completion of a Semester at Sea
was brought to The Tribune
yesterday by a good samaritan.

An employee of Athéna:Café
left the certificate at The ‘Tri-
bune newsdesk after he found it
at the restaurant. ened

The owner of this certificate,
whose name is on it, should
come to The Tribune on Mon-
day after 11am and ask for Mrs
Eloise Poitier. Once they iden-
tify themselves by name,they
can collect their certificate, ’:~




PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009

imc tRIBUNE






Ashton Kutcher

Hollywood

star rushed :

to hospital
in Nassau

HOLLYWOOD actor. Ash-
ton Kutcher was rushed to a
Nassau hospital yesterday
after he suffered a ruptured
eardrum.

Kutcher, who is married to
actress Demi Moore, was film-
ing water scenes for his new
movie “Five Killers” when he
started complaining of a
severe headache and dripping
blood from his ear.

The National Enquirer
reported that doctors quickly
diagnosed and treated the

Punk’s star for a ruptured

eardrum.

He had reportedly fully
recovered and was joking
with hospital staff by the time
Demi rushed to his bedside.

According to the Mayo

Clinic, a ruptured eardrum is a i

hole or tear in the thin drum-
like tissue that separates the
ear canal from the middle ear.

A ruptured eardrum can
result in hearing loss and
make the middle ear vulnera-
ble to infections or other

injury.

However, Bahamian doc-’ :

tors gave Kutcher the all-clear
to fly back,to Georgia where
he will continue filming the
action comedy which also stars
Grey’s Anatomy actress
Katherine Heigl.






Accounts.









































of accounting services.

following:

Financial

salaries

_ management position,

applications

Responsibilities of the position include, bu

* Compilation of the corporate budget. :

* Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets

¢ Preparation of monthly management statements

° Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation

° Preparation of performance reports for division , department and sections

° Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry receivables (capital
contributions, rechargeable) :

° Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices

° Liaison with internal and extemal audits 2

+ Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief

* Officer for the Board of Directors

* Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financ

* Preparation of the business plan for the department

¢ Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department y

» Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims -

* Overseeing the Cash Flow Management

¢ Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment
. © Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form employee’s

*. Conducting audits of various finan

A NASSAU woman is des-
perate to be reunited with
her puppy after the four-
month-old pet was stolen
during a violent attack earli-
er this week.

The incident took place
around 2.30pm on Wednes-
day, when the woman was
returning home from taking
the puppy, named Sophie, to

vet.

As she got out of the car
outside her Camperdown
home, a man sprang from
some nearby trees and
demanded her handbag.

He attacked the frightened
woman, throwing her to the
ground and pulling the bag
from her hands. .

Sophie’s lead, which her
owner was holding at the
time, snapped during the
struggle.

' The culprit made his
escape carrying both the
handbag and her beloved
puppy. ;

_A friend of the victim said

she had to be taken by ambu-
lance to the hospital, “due to
the extreme blow to her head
and cuts and bruises.”

“We need to find Sophie,”
she said. “She is the love of
my friend's life and she is
absolutely distraught.”

The family is offering a
$500 reward for the return

of the pup. Anyone with

information regarding
Sophie’s whereabouts is
asked to call 427-0841.

Persons on the lookout for
Sophie are advised to keep
in-mind that she is now big-
ger and more mature than in
the photos seen here, which
were taken when she was
only seven weeks old.

The puppy has just had her
face groomed and has four
beads in her right ear. She is
white and has fluffy fur.

“Please look, out for
Sophie and tell everyone you
know and be careful,” said
the victim’s friend in a mass
e-mail.

‘Pet stolen in a bizarre attack







BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Senior Manager,

The job oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget & Management
Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective delivery

\

Job requirements include:

° A minimum ofa Bachelors degree with a certification in
or equivalent qualifications

* A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a similar

~¢ Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices
* Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet

* Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing systems
_* Ability to analyze financial reports.
* Sound knowledge of covenants of lending institutions (e.g. IDB)
* Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial software
and the system of internal control. .
* Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
° Ability to communicate effectively both orall
* Good time management skills 4

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: July.



t are not limited to, the

jal Officer as required

cial activities including Employee Basic Pay

¢ Reconciliation, Employee Loans Reconciliation and Payment Reconciliation

¢ Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable

* Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts

* Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle repayments

¢ Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule

* Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans

* Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to ensure
adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors

* Managing the status of local and foreign vendors’

¢ Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and External Auditors

¢ Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline. Conducting —
performance appraisals |

* Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff, manage
and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations

Accounting ACCA/CPA

y and in wiiting

NATIONAL
Security
Minister
Tommy
Turnquest
addressed
inmates
at the
ceremony.

NATIONAL Security Minister Tommy Turnquest (left) and Superintendent Dr Elliston Rahming view prod-—





Patrick Hanna/BIS photos

Inmates receive
trade certificates

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

aye UTE
PHONE: 322-2157



By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

NATIONAL Security Minister
Tommy Turnquest pledged gov-
ernment’s commitment to pro-
viding the infrastructure, tools and
manpower necessary to give

for completing he
_ Associates Degree in Law.
We wish you well and the
best has yet to come!
Love your family
and friends!



tute.

inmates of Her Majesty’s Prison
access to technical, vocational and
academic courses.

“Tt is the policy of this govern-
ment to ensure that the vast
majority of inmates have access
to a regime of training geared
towards improved behaviour
management, attitude adjustment,
conflict resolution, goal setting
and habit modification,” said Mr
Turnquest.

He was the keynote speaker at
a certificate presentation exercise

‘for 129 inmates at Her Majesty’s

Prison Correctional Training Insti-

Mr Turnquest described the
ceremony as “prison reform in
action.” He said such events are in
keeping with government’s aim
“not just to modernise Her
Majesty’s Prison, but indeed to
reform it.” z

The prison team is headed by
Superintendent Dr Elliston Rah-
ming. ,

Inmates received certificates in
auto mechanics, basic communi-
cations/reading, mathematics, car-
pentry, computer basics, ceram-
ics, welding, cosmetology, and:
BJCs in English arid mathematics.

“Prison reform does not mean
cuddling inmates, nor does it
mean turning this institution into
a hotel," Mr Turnquest said.
"Prison reform means devising
the. policies, developing the per-
sonnel and implementing the pro-
tocols that lead to optimum staff
morale and productivity.”

One component of prison
reform, he said, is the Correctional
Training Institute, which provides
inmates with the education and
training necessary to be employ-"
able when they are released.

Mr Turnquest told inmates that,
while society should be forgiving
to ex-offenders, unfortunately this
is not the case.

He advised them to make use
of every opportunity for success
that comes their way after they
are released.

“Your qualifications will open
possibilities for you, because the
skills you have acquired are in
demand," Mr Turnquest said.

Casual Wear .

ey,

eads

ty


THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS -

SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009, PAGE 3





sacaieratien |
fepartment
conducts ©
exercise

/ THE Depurtment of
Immigration conducted a
repatriaton exercise on
Thursety.

“Ore American, one
Douinican and 110
Hutians were repatriated
jy their respective coun-
cries.

: The Department of
Lipunigration said it

‘mains committed to

tifely repatriation of per-
S fils found illegally resid-
intg and or working in the
a amas.




af gootls
imported by
Bahainians
last year

BAHAMIANS import-
ed $3.2 billion worth of
goods into the country last
year, according to the
Department of Statistics.

The largest contributor
to this figure was the
importation of fuel which
totalled some $84'7 mil-
lion.

This was followed! close-
ly by the import of *
machinery and transport
equipment which account-
ed for $642.8 million. |

Other categories that
contributed significantly
to total imports were ma\n-
ufactured goods which

accounted for nearly $444 |

million, a
aniinals v
foralmost $430 million:

Businessman
critical but
Stable after
shooting

a]

FREEPORT - Business-
man Leslie Maycock is listed
in critical but stable condi-
tion in the Intensive Care
Unit at Rand-Memorial Hos-

pital after being shot at his ~

establishment on Thursday
evening.

Mr Maycock, 50, a retired
police officer, was accosted
byitwo armed masked men
sometime around 10.45pm

_ after closing his business near
the; Hawksbill Service Sta-
tiorl on West Sunrise High-
way.

potich and shot by the sus-
pects, who fled into nearby
bushes.

Mr Maycock, who sus-

taitied an ‘injury to his left .

side, attempted to drive him-

' self'to the hospital, but lost
control of his vehicle and
overturned in the area of the
Four Way Co-op Plaza on
West Atlantic Drive and Pio-
neers Way.

Police are investigating the
matter. Anyone with infor-
mation that could assist
police is asked to call 911.

the Tribune wants to hear

fgom people who are

raking news in their

4 neighbourhoods. Perhaps
ibe are raising funds for a
od cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

a fea or have won an

q

9 ohn worth

aude mone to alter bib

A LOCAL supplier complained on
Wednesday that officials at the Depart
ment of Customs ordered him to alte:
freight charges on the bill of lading:
that accompanied one of his shipments
so that Customs could collect a larger

rate of duty on the importation of the |:

goods.

He said that after being given the
run-around on Wednesday he was
finally told by a Customs officer on
Thursday that the reason the new
rules had not been published was that
they had not yet been approved by the
Minister.

However, the Customs officer main- |

tained that under the law Customs has
the authority to fix a minimum freight
charge on a shipment regardless of
what the bill of lading records. “I was
told,” said the businessman, “that
whatever is on the bill of lading is
between me and the company and that
Customs has the right to assess what
the freight should be regardless of what
the bill of lading says.”

The businessman said that on
Wednesday officers told him the

“I was told that
whatever is on the bill
of lading is between —
me and the company

‘and that Customs has

the right to assess
what the freight
should be regardless
of what the bill of
laling says.”

imal



Local supplier

low: They refused to release the ship-
ment wntil he changed his Customs
declaration form to reflect an amount
the department believed was correct.

The department’s attitude, said the
businessman, has actually blocked the
delivery of materials that are crucial

The businessman explained that
because of the amount of business he
conducts, he is able to negotiate a sub-
stantially lower price for the transport
of his shipments.

Customs duty is charged not only on
the value of goods coming into the
country, but also on the freight costs of
the goods, which must be documented
on a bill of lading.

The businessman said he has seen
no documentation to support the rate
scale, the department is pushing, nor
has he heard of any government notice
announcing this as a new policy.

While frustrated with Custom's posi-
tion, the supplier'feels it would be ille-
gal to falsify his bill of lading. He
vowed to stand his ground.

“I know they are trying to get more
revenue,” said the businessman, “but I
shift so many containers that this is my
contract price for transportation. In
my mind, to do what they want me to
do without any supporting documen-
tation is totally illegal. I am refusing to
do it and so they are pushing me

around, but no matter what they do, I



However, by Thursday he ye
changed his mind. After the i “ustér
officer explained to him the reag
the department’s decision, he cae
the figure on his Customs decla atio
form, and cleared his-goods. jf} (2
“However, ” he said, “I still belie,
I should be given some officiaf dof
ment to explain why the figure Oni)

‘bili of lading does not agree Wit sy

Customs form. Suppose a year, HO,
now there is some sort of i ingpity. Al:
someone asks me why these two, foci,
ments don’t agree, what official n¢ fis
do I have to explain what I have,dony
If they want to do that then, - DE
some documentation to show, He
have given Customs a figure t Be
not correspond with my bill of art
I am not totally in disagreemeg} 3 wal}
what Customs is trying to doy Pil,
think it should be open to ebay
before any new rule is implemented,
understand what they are doing, up
the way they are doing it is £9 a
wrong,” he said.

:
Messages left for Comprrgfffl”
Customs Glen Gomez were ag





amount on the bill of lading was too

for a current government project.

Rise i in boat thefts

‘likely linked to. adeath Ey

human smuggling’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE rise in boat thefts in

Lowther Abaco dslandsuigadikely
linked to the human smug-
gling trade, according to
South Abaco MP Edison
Key.

Noting that he and his con-
stituents, have “great con-

cerns” about the thefts, Mr
Key said police may need to
.do more to combat the illegal
a\ctivity in certain areas.

“I have spoken to the
police about it and the prime
minister (also MP for North
Abaco) is quite aware of it

Oe



He was robbed of a money |



ancl quite concerned.”
“From listening to the
noise in the market, there’s a
lot.of human cargo being
moved from Abaco into
Floricla and I think the theft
of the boats is connected.
“Whaat they are stealing is
very high-powered boats, and

‘sometimies they probably sell

the engines afterwards, but

‘they can move from point A

to point 13 very quickly,” Mr
Key said.

Part of, the problem, he
said, may: be that certain
islands do not have their own
local police; station.

“There’s mo police station
in Hope Town so it takes a
while to get there (if a crime

is committed). It’s a great. ~

concern for the people of

: Abaco.andit could affect our |
- economy, especially the sec-

ond home owner's.’

The MP said, that in his
opinion stiffer penalties may
be needed to deter thieves.
He suggested that they
should receive up to 25 years
in prison for such a crime.
“That would make a dliffer-
ence,” he said.

His comments came after
The Tribune received numer-
ous calls and e-mails, and

published several articles |

highlighting’ the issue of the
rise in boat thefts through-
out the Bahamas, and in tle
Abaco islands in particular.
During a recent trip to

Abaco, The Tribune was
informed by various residents .

that people are so frustrated
with the increasing number
of thefts and the failure thus
far of police to bring the cul-
prits to justice, that vigilante
justice may not be far off.
While some Abaconians

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Tropical Exterminators
322-2157



suggested that the crime
trend may be partly due to
the unavailability of police in
the islands, others have
become so disillusioned that
they even suspect that some
members of the force may be
complicit in the crimes.
Yesterday, a Nassau resi-
dent said that this was his

. suspicion when the second of

three boats he has owned in

the last two years was'stolen. |

The resident, who wished
to remain anonymous, said
he was able to get security
camera footage of a truck

being used to steal his 17-foot
Boston Whaler on Easter
2007.

Despite showing this
footage to police, no progress
was made in recovering the

boat or prosecuting: the»

thieves, he said.

When the resident later
personally located the
Whaler in a yard off Soldier
Road he took a number of
police officers to see the boat
over a period of three
months, but again, nothing
happened, he claimed.

In June 2007, he received a
call from the Wulff Road
police station who informed
him that they had “found”
his boat.

Upon viewing the vessel,
which they presented to him
at the police compound, he
discovered the boat was not
his.

“A Boston Whaler
would’ve been nice but it
wasn’t even a _ Boston
Whaler. I told them it’s not
the boat and I went back out
to the lot where it was before

and the boat has gone. It

really seemed like police col-
lusion at this point,” he said.

A replacement 34-foot
Intrepid boat belonging to
the same man was later
stolen in April 2008.

Police charge man in

connection with murder

GRAND Bahama Police. have charged a man in connection
with the murder of 30- “year -old Denzil Jones Jr of Eight Mile

Rock.

Asst Supt We Ibourne Rooile: press liaison officer, said the sus-

pect is expectedl to be arraigned before the Erpeport Magistrates ©

Court on Monday morning.

Several persons are in custody assisting police with their inves-
tigations into Mr Jones’ murder, which was the island’ s fifth homi-

cide for the year.

“As our investigation continues there could be more than one

person charged,”

said Mr Bootle.

According to reports, Mr Jones was stabbed to death in his
apartment by intruders early Wednesday morning. He was then
thrown from a second-storey window by his attackers.

Mr Jones, an employee of the Freeport Container Port, was a well
known resident of Eight Mile Rock.

eB
wen PO, 10
P13,14,15

ASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES -

_USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES:



refuse to change a legal document.”

returned upto press time yesterdavr,

Police oN td a
breakthroughs it



POLICE yesterday said ‘
they have no breakthroughs:
in the investigation into the
death of 24-year-old Adam
Evans who was found lying
beaten and bloodied in an
Abaco street.

Mr Evans was found by
police in the road at the
entrance to Spring City short-
ly after 4am on Thursday. He .
was then taken to the clinic in
‘Marsh Harbour with severe
head_and body injuries where
he died. shortly after Sam, “=
police reported. © .

Unconfirmed reports claim
that he was accosted by a gang
of thugs and run over with a
car - but police could not con-


























ASSISTANT Commissioner
Hulan Hanna

- When asked if there were

firm this.







Hulan Hanna, who heads the
police’s Family Island division,
said police have not yet uncov-
ered a possible motive behind
the suspected attack on Mr
Evans.

Officials in Marsh Harbour

Assistant Commissioner .

any suspects in custody, an
officer from the island wo uld
only say police were®*sfH]
doing some inquiries.” ook

Police have confirmed thai
the victim had previdtsly
served time in prisoncbht
would not say why or farsfiew
long he was jailed.






yesterday were tightlipped on
the investigation and details
relating to the case. -

Mr Evans' body hag atin
flown to Nassau wherotn
autopsy will be carried aut..

a +
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380-FLIX ©

sate













This is to inform the public that Martin-Essex
Solomon has retired from the Firm of Higgs
& Kelly. Godfrey Kenneth Kelly, C.M.G. ‘and
Ronald James Cole will continue to carry gh a
law partnership practicing under the firm nalné
"Higgs & Kelly” at Chambers situate at 384: ‘Bay
Street, P.O. Box N-4818, Nassau, Bahamas;

telephone 322-7511. Mr. Solomon is no longer a
partner of the Firm but continues in the capacity

of a consultant to the firm.



meee meena
PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009

i ini ino
The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master





















Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas eat
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387 |
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm



Stifled Republicans look past nominee



WASHINGTON — Lacking the votes to
block Sonia Sotomayor from the U.S. Supreme
-Court; Republicans established lines in the sand
for,challenging any future nominee for the high
court and tried to limit President Barack Oba-
ma's options if he should get another opportu-

nity to pick one.
In four days of televised-hearings, Republi-

_ cans failed to knock Sotomayor off-balance or '

pin her with the label of a liberal activist who
would make policy from the judicial bench. *

The hearings presented a high-profile oppor-',

tunity for Republicans to trumpet the causes of
their conservative base and respond to an admin-

ings to a “Kabuki dance," the highly stylized
Japanese stage play where the outcome,is known
well beforehand. .
Sotomayor and her Democratic defenders
challenged vigorously repeated Republican
efforts to portray her as a liberal activist.

Instead, she presented ‘herself as a nonideo- .

logical, cautious and thorough jurist whose
record reflected not judicial activism but a close
adherence to law in her 17 years on the federal

_- bench. She told the panel repeatedly that "Con-

gress makes the laws," not judges.
And under persistent Republican questioning,
she said she disagrees with Obama's contention





THE TRIBUNE



We love to fool
ourselves into
complacency

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The National Education
Summit demonstrated once

again how we Bahamians -

_love to fool ourselves into
complacency. We actually
believe our own propaganda
that wonderful things are
being achieved by our public
education system.

Until we call a spade a:

shovel, very little is likely to
change and all too many of
our little darlings will

remain semi-literate and

semi-numerate.

After 36 years of inde-
pendence we should be
ashamed of ourselves and

not congratulating ourselves |

in self-denial.

We must face the fact that
a serious problem exists in
our system as only then can
a solution be found and
implemented successfully. :

It’s time we faced a few
unpleasant truths.

One of the most basic

truths is that the shocking .

number of students attain-
ing only a grade D in our
public schools is simply not

istration seeking sweeping changes on health that Supreme Court justices should have "empa- acceptable.
care, taxes, global warming and other big issues. thy" and comments he made as a senator that Got that? — it is not
,. Fhey succeeded in getting Sotomayor to. dis- sometimes judges must look into their hearts acceptable ;

tance herself from Obama's wish for justices
who have "empathy" and his belief that "what is
in a judge's heart" should influence rulings.
Under Republican questioning, she rejected the
belief of some liberals that the Constitution is a
"living" document whose meaning changes over
time, and that foreign law should be used in
‘deciding cases. - :

Those responses established clear issues for
Republicans to confront any future high-court
nominee by Obama and could complicate his

* search for liberal candidates when the stakes
may be higher if a conservative justice retires or
dies.

-<@n the other hand, Sotomayor is widely
expected to be confirmed by the Senate with a

- substantial number of Republican votes,:sug-

gesting that Obama has little to fear from
Republicans. _ : ;
Sen. Jeff Sessions, the senior Republican on
’ the'Senate Judiciary Committee, said Thursday
that:Republicans would not try to block a con-
firmation vote. He said he still had “serious con-
cerns" about Sotomayor but was pleased she
had repudiated Obama's "empathy" standard.
‘Republicans used the opportunity to score
points with their political base with a spirited,
and mostly civil, volley of assaults, including
repeated but futile attempts to pin her down on
divisive issues such as abortion, same-sex mar-

\ riage, gun ownership and the death penalty.

Not wanting to challenge her too aggressive-
ly.for.fear of alienating Hispanics, a growing
voting block in the United States, they diverted
much of their fire and-cast the Obama adminis-
tration:as far to the left of mainstream Ameri-
cans.

It is a script sure to be used in next year's

midterm elections and beyond.

Party consultant Galen compared the hear-



as a last resort.

"We don't apply feelings to facts," she said.
And: "Judges can't rely on what's in their heart.
... The job of a judge is to apply the law."

That may have helped her chances for a larg-
er.confirmation margin. It.also gave Republicans
ammunition to use in the next Supreme Court
nomination battle, raising the bar for any future
Obama nominee.

Sotomayor's hearing was not as contentious

as it could have been, largely because she is ©
replacing a retiring liberal and her confirma- ~

tion will not affect the balance of the court. If the
next vacancy is a member of the court's con-
servative bloc, however, the balance would be
affected and the stakes far higher.

While Republicans did not want to antago-
nize Hispanics by being too harsh on the woman
who would be the court's first Hispanic member,
some analysts suggested that they had done so
already. :

"By not coming out for her and asking criti-

.cal questions of her, they are alienating a large

base of the Hispanic community," said American
University political scientist James Thurber. .
On Thursday, Republican Sen. Lindsey Gra-

ham asked her yet again what she had to say to

those offended by her "wise Latina" remarks.

~ "T regret that I have offended some people. I
believe that my life demonstrates that that was
not my attempt to leave the impression that

some have taken from my words."

Such comments made it hard for Republicans
to gain much traction against her.
~ Graham decided not to try further and cut her
off. "You know what judge? I agree with you,"
he said. "Good luck.” i

(This article was written by Tom Raum
of the Associated Press. —c.-2009).




ROYAL DFIDELITY

Money at Work



Another is that, not sur-
prisingly, grade D teachers
produce grade D students.
A wit once defined a
teacher/educator as one who
casts artificial pearls before
real swine and this seems to
‘describe our situation quite
well.

We cannot expect success
in the classrooms until

teachers’ pay raises are
closely tied to merit and
even rudimentary morality.
The flip side is that the
teachers should also be paid
a decent basic wage and be
dealt with honestly and
respectfully.

Year after year we insane-
ly repeat the same failed
teaching methods and
expect a different result
from grade D. .

Most of us no longer live
in an agrarian society, and
there is no earthly reason
why classes shouldn’t go on
longer throughout the day,
and the summer holidays be
markedly shortened. Both
of these proposals are
anathema to teachers.

Furthermore, although
we can accept the ineffi-
ciency and waste of the pub-

COLONIAL

COC
— \

1.81 1.28 Abaco Markets : 1.39 1,39 9. 0.00 0.127 0.000 10.9 0.00%)
11.80 10.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992 0.200 41.1 1.82%
19.30 6.94 ‘Bank of Bahamas 6.94 6.94 » 0.00 0.244 0.260 28.4 3.75%
0.89 , 0.63 Benchmark 0.63 ° 6 O.686 en's 0,00. -0.877 0.000 N/M 0.00%
3.49 3.15 Bahamas Waste Y ; 3.15 3.15> 0.00 0.078 0.090 40.4 2.86%
2.37 : 2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 T2187 0.00 0.055 0.040 43.1 1.69%
14.20 * 410.18 Cable Bahamas 11.39 11.39, ‘0.00 1.406 0.250 8.1 2.19%
2.88 2.74 Colina Holdings et Ns 2.74 . | 2.74 ‘ 0.00 0.249 0.040 11.0 1.46%
7.50 5.50 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 5.64 5.64. ‘0.00 0.419 0.360 13.5 6.38%
4.78 1.27. Consolidated Water BDRs i 3.05 353,00. 20,05 : 0.111 0.052 27.0 41.73%
2.85 1.32 Doctor's Hospital PON 182 1.82 ; 0.00 0.240 0.080 7.6 4.40%
18.20 ‘ 6.60 Famguard ; 6.99 6.60 ° » -0.39, 1,000 0.420 0.240 15.7 _ 3.64%
12.50 10.00 . Finco : 10.90 10.90 : 0.00 0.322 0.520 33.9 4.77%
11.71 10.35 FirstCaribbean Bank - 10.38 . 10.38 : 9,00 0.794 0.350 . 13.1 3.37%)
5.53 4.95 Focol (S) y 5.03 5.03 , » 0.00 ‘ 0.332 0.150 15.12 2.98%
1.00; #4 % 2 11.00 Foco! Class B Preference : 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
0.45 0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.00 0.035 0.000 8.6 0.00%
19.02 5.50 ICD Utilities 5,50 0,00. 800 0.407 0.600 13.5 10.91%
12.00 . 10.40 J. S. Johnson 10.40. 000°" 0.952) 0.640 10.9 6.15%



Estate
erate



0 55.6 + 0.00%!



52wk-Low Securi

S2wk-Hi wie Symbol “Last Sale. Change Dally Vol. Interest aturl
1000.00 1000.00. Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7% 13) October 2017
1000.00 1000.00. Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 ‘0.00 : Prime + 1.75% 19) October 2022
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series .C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7% 30 May 2013

1000.00 1000.00 Fideli Prime + 1.75%

29 May 2015 |
ie













ly, Banke Note 1° (Series D)
Le



Symbol ; j Div$
14.60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets -0.041 0.300 N/M 2.05%
8.00 6.00 Caribbean 0.000 0.480 N/M 7.80%

Crossings (Pref)
ng









0.20 RNI 0.001



sa 0.000
HE (vo ee a
29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Hol ng









co Me) ee ow
S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low .. Fund Name NAV YTD% Last.12 Months. » Div $. Yield % NAV Date
1.3860 1.3231 CFAL Bond Fund : 1.3860 2.40 . 4.76: : 30-Jun-09
13.0351 2.8952 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8952 -1.52 -3.18 30-Jun-09
1.4763 1.4019 ‘ CFAL’Money Market Fund 1.4763 2.97 5.30 3-Jul-09
3.6090 3.1031 Fidelity Bahamas G'& | Fund 3.1031 -8.35 -13.82 30-Jun-09
12.9209 ..12.2702 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12:9209 2.40: 5.79 31-May-09
100.5606 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.5448 -0.02 0.54 31-Mar-09
100.0000 93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund , 93.1992 -3.33 -6.76 31-Mar-09
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0,00 31-Dec-07
19.4733 9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.2765 2.00 -2.98 30-Jun-09
1.0622 1.0000. FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0622 2.56 6.22 30-Jun-09
T.0364 1.0000 © FG Financial Growth Fund f : 30-Jun-09





1.0000




Fo Financial Diversified Fund
aston

BISX ALL SH, 219 Dec 03
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest Closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume *
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today .

OlV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings






Bid $ -
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

30-Jun-09

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M. - Not Meaningful)...

FINDEX.- The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1.19942 100 ”

-4(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split _ Effective Date 7/11/2007
§ prem acan seta
yy 4A 4





Owes

letters@tribunemedia.net






lic’s money being spent. on
eg Bahamasair and W&SC,
etc, the waste is not accept-
able in educating our chil-
dren. They are far too pre-
cious and deserve much,
much more. Yes, it would
be nice if the students were
to learn a second or third
language and had more
access to computers and
games and so on. However,
second and third languages
other than Creole, cannot
be learned without a rea-
sonably good basic com-,
mand of the written and
spoken English language.

Likewise, the full potential

of computers cannot be
realised without being able
to read reasonably well.
Unfortunately, although.
they are not very sexy, the
three R’s are just as impor-
tant: now as they ever were
and probably even more so.
(Does Adderley’s Law ring
a bell?). Sih os

‘Amazingly, there are
indeed quite a few kids who
do well vocationally and
academically in our public
schools. :

But they do well in spite
of the public schools and not
because of them. If we don’t
make sensible radical
changes in our so-called
education system, the vast

majority will continue to
have nothing better to look

' forward to than the venera-

ble University of Wulff
Road.

Some will even eventually.

end up governing us with
their grade D mentalities

and propagate still more.

dimwits because they could-
n’t read the instructions on a.
condom package.

It is often said that so

many children have difficul.- .

ty learning because of a ter--
rible home life, or poverty,
or poor nutrition, or lack of
role models (other than

Michael Jackson of course)
and so on. There is no doubt\
these are highly significant
and challenging factors.
However, it is also quite

fashionable to blame soci--.

ety, or even the churches.
This is a cop out.
As a lay member of soci-
ety, [refuse to take respon-
sibility for poorly trained or
lecherous teachers, or for

‘incompetent Ministry of

Education desk jockeys and
paper-pushers, and espe-
cially for unimaginative self-:
serving politicos. I lay the
blame for this education
foolishness squarely ‘on their’
shoulders and not mine or
society’s.

Many of our kids are high-
ly capable of learning as is
demonstrated by the fact
that they seem to have no
difficulty learnisg the latest
hit song in its entirety, or
the latest dance moves or
foreign slang overnight! Any
school child that is capable
of learning but is disruptive,
dangerous, truant or unco-
operative should be dealt
with in a firm and lovingly

- understanding manner, and

prevailed upon to see the
error of their ways. (In the
movie ‘Crimson Tide’, Gene
Hackman, who plays an
unsavoury character, tells
Denzel Washington that if
a cattle prod is used, one
can even teach a horse to
deal cards. A bit harsh, but
probably effective).

I understand that the
word “educator” is. derived
from the Latin word for “to
lead”. \

Leadership may be sadly
lacking in our Bahamian
education context, but. the
whole country would gain

; greatly if any educator that

doesn’t wish to lead the chil-
dren would just step aside,

‘cut bait, and let those who

do care, dare to build the
nation.

KEN W KNOWLES, MD
Nassau, oaks
July 10, 2009.

Community service

EDITOR, The Tribune.

- THIS topic has bee’n a concern of mine over the past ten
years and more so now that so many young persons are criti-
cising everyone in authority and are of the opinion that they

- should step aside and. let the younger generation take over the

reigns of the public and private sectors.

I am convinced that we can only learn to be “giving and for-
get the gift.” The virtue of helping others for “nothing” must be
taught at home, and. in the church. When children help each oth-
er, run errands for neighbours, assist in cleaning up the neigh-
bourhood they are learning to be volunteers.

Students need: to be involved in community service when
they join the Boys Scouts, Boys Brigade, Brownies, Guides, Key
clubs, Sunday School, Youth groups and bands.

I am appalled when students do a good deed for example tak-
ing chairs from one classroom to another and expect to be

" paid, or dig a hole to plant a tree and expect to be paid. After

one of the recent hurricanes here on my island, groups from the
US came to assist and they were amazed and shocked that the
young people sat on the walls and watched never lifting a finger
to help clean up their surroundings and one of the groups (and

rightly si) returned to the US.

It is my strong belief that persons seeking a job or high office
should not be given the opportunity if there is no proof or evi-
dence that they have done community service at some point in
their teen years. I believe that the amount of violence that we are
witnessing in the Bahamas today can be attributed in part to our
lack of community spirit and service to each other. Quite sim-
ply, we do not have manners anymore. Proper etiquette is

obsolete.

An interesting phenomenon is unfolding on our island —
the white people are imparting their traditional skills to their
children and grandchildren. For example, hauling, hunting,
farming and even church attendance which the blacks help the
monopoly. The black children are not even attending church the
way their parents did. Surprisingly, more whites are attending
chiurch than blacks. Is there a correlation somewhere between
church and violence here in the Bahamas among the races?

The immigrants seek only to look for employment and do not

give any community service. They do not volunteer.
’ We must return to the values of the past where we were our
brothers keepers. Our professionals seek the service clubs, but
they ought to have been involved in helping their neighbour-
hoods a long time ago. Charity begins at home.

These are the gleaning of an elderly citizen, for what they are

worth.

ELVIRA.

. Marsh Harbour,
Abaco,
June 29, 2009.
THE TRIBUNE

WHY YOU





"I vex at how stupid some
people at the Ministry of
Works are. They decided to
do some sort of 'road
improvemeut' at 9am
Wednesday morning during
the peat of rush hour morn-
ing trs cffic. It look like they
wasgoing to dig up some-
thag and then pave it, but I
want to know why them lazy
bums didn't do that in the
night instead of inconve-
niencing people.

"Originally they had one
lane open, but apparently
one of the workers thought
that was too much. I saw
him place five more cones
down which re-routed traffic
from West Bay Street down
Prince George Wharf back
up Parliament Street to get
onto Bay Street. That whole

thing was a mess and caused
me to be 45-minutes late for
work.”

- Jason Duncombe,
West Ridge.

“I vex at all the buffoons -
we have sitting in parlia-
ment who masquerade as
lawmakers. I watched the
last House of Assembly ses-
sion regarding the creation
of a select committee about
the controversy surrounding
granting of Crown Land and
was disgusted by how lightly
some members seemed to
treat the. issue.

“Maybe they are too busy
jeering and casting blame to
notice the real problem of
people basically raping
Bahamian land and stealing
our birthright to get to the
bottom of the issue. No -

wonder people in the public -

service can get away with
slackness because the peo- _
ple the citizenry elects to
represent them are too busy
flinging mud than solving
problems.”

- Political Observer,
Sea Breeze.

"Tam vex at the media for
the ever changing 'facts'
concerning the two missing
boys who fell into the
Andros ‘pothole’ and have
now been found. First they
were reported.as children,
then as brothers, with the
surname Clarke same as the
mother's, then the father
appears and he has the
name Marcellin Sylerain,
then the mother's surname
is now changed to Clarke-
Sylverain and at last story
the brothers are now being
reported as half-brothers. »

"While all this is going on
the media and public have .
also been turning the mirac-
ulous reappearance of the
boys into a drama series
instead of celebrating and
giving praise to the Lord
that a miracle happened.
Celebrate the miracle."

- Jean Valjean, Nassau.

"I vex because just the
other day I was looking in
the newspaper for a job. I
thought I saw the best one
suited for my experience,

‘but to my dismay the ad
only wanted males to apply.

Now what is so ironic is
every time I see this same
insurance company advertis-
ing for.a job, they always
only prefer males. What is
wrong with our country

‘today? Does the owner of
this company believe that
only men can be productive
workers?

"I think we as women in
this great country need to
stand together and address
issues like this. I am a
woman that works extreme-
ly hard for my salary. I have

_ the ability to work just as
hard as a man or even bet-
ter. We have come so far
from those days when
women were only allowed
to stay home to cook, clean,
and take care of children. So
let me say something to that
insurance owner — lama
confident Bahamian woman
that is productive and not
easily distracted from doing
my job. As long as Iam not
breaking the laws of the
land I have a right to apply
anywhere for a job!"

- K D, Nassau.

Are you vex?

Send your complaints to
whyyouvex @tribunemedia.net
or fax to 328-2398,

By LLONELLA GILBERT
Bahamas Information
Services

JOINT maritime exercises
and Haiti’s efforts to bring
manufacturing back to the
country were among the topics
discussed between Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham and
Haitian President René Pré-
val in Port-au-Prince yester-
day.

Mr Ingraham is in Haiti for
a conference marking the 50th
anniversary of the Inter-
American Development
(IDB).

On Thursday, President of
the IDB Luis Alberto Moreno
opened the ceremony. The
theme of the conference is
‘Focusing on the Economic
Transformation and Strength-
ening of Caribbean
Economies in Changing
Times’.

Mr Ingraham yesterday
addressed delegates concern-
ing the main development
challenges for the Caribbean
region.

Following the opening cer-
emony, Mr Ingraham paid a
courtesy call on Haiti’s Presi-
dent Préval at the Royal
Palace.

They discussed initiatives of
importance to Haiti and the
Bahamas.

They agreed that as both

Lionfish event declar

LOCAL NEWS.

Prime Minister in Haiti
or IDB’s 50th anniversary

countries have similar security
needs, because of their prox-
imity to each other, it would
be useful for the Maritime
Authority in Haiti and the
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force to conduct joint training
sessions.

Mr Ingraham said he would
look into speeding up the
process to increase the num-
ber of cultural items coming
from Haiti into the Bahamas.

President Préval informed
the prime minister that Cana-
da and Spain have lowered
their advisory to level three.
This means their citizens may
visit Haiti. Before when the
level was at four, citizens were
warned about visiting Haiti.

Mr Ingraham wanted to
know what the President Pré-
val was doing to attract man-
ufacturing back into Haiti’s
economy.

President Préval explained
that Haiti is allowed to export
its goods duty-free to the
United States. It is also per-
mitted to use any material
from any country to produce
items like clothing for export
to the US.

He noted as other countries
are increasing their minimum
wages, impoverished Haitians
are being inspired to leave
home in search of a better way

of life. Unemployment is ram-

pant, he said.

SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009, PAGE 5





Tay

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham (centre) is in Haiti for the conference celebrating the 50th anniversary of
the Inter-American Development Bank. He is pictured being seen off by Secretary to the Cabinet Aijita’
Bernard and Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson.

Poor countries have already
forgiven Haiti more than $500
million in debt. This mecha-

nism forced multi-lateral agen-

cies like the International

Monetary Fund and the IDB
to forgive Haiti’s debt which is
at about $1.5 billion, the pres-
ident said.

Following the courtesy call,

él Titi

President Préval’. hosted a
reception for delegates
ing the conference
high-ranking officia
Palace.




Is at the



war On invasive species
NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EVENS: JEAN of: ‘LUDEE

By ALISON LOWE.
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net -

ALL OUT war will be
declared on the invasive lion-
fish today as 18 boats set out
from Nassau to take part ina

fun-filled lionfish control

event.

For those who like to swim
and dive, the Lionfish Con-
trol Project offers the chance
to win prizes for spearing the
single biggest or smallest, or
the most lionfish.

And from 3pm onwards
members of the public will
be able to join in at the
Green Parrot restaurant and
bar on East Bay Street where
participants will be showing
off their catch while demon-
strations on how to prepare
and cook the spikey invader
get underway.

For those who want to get
a closer look into the life of
the venomous fish, Dr Neil
Sealey from the College of
the Bahamas will be doing
on site dissections to reveal
what kinds of sealife they
have been preying on.

In previous inspections,
juvenile crawfish, parrot fish
and grouper have been found
in the stomachs of specimens
of this voracious fish, whose
population has been growing
exponentially throughout the
eastern coast of the US and
the Caribbean, as it has no
known predators in the
Atlantic ocean.

Incentive

The aim of the event,
which is being organised by
the Bahamas National Trust
in conjunction with the
Department of Marine
Resources and the College of
the Bahamas, is to provide
an educational insight into
the problems that lionfish
pose to the Bahamian marine
environment, and an incen-
tive for people to remove
from the waters around Nas-
sau of as many of the trou-
blesome species as possible.

By showing people how
they can be safely cleaned
and eaten organisers hope to
encourage the ongoing cap-
ture of lionfish for consump-
tion.

While a prick from a lion-
fish’s spine can cause days of



THE EVENT AIMS to provide an educational insight into the prob-
‘lems that lionfish pose to the Bahamian marine environment

swelling, discomfort or even
paralysis, there are tried and
tested means of making sure
an encounter does not have
toend so painfully. .
Today at Green Parrot
chefs from the August Moon

restaurant and cafe in Lyford

Cay — which has been serving
the “delicious” predator since
2007 — will be proving this as
they cook up an array of lion-
fish treats.

The Nassau event follows
on from the success ofa
recent Lionfish Control Pro-
ject held in Green Turtle
Cay, Abaco, During that
competition, 1,400 lionfish
were speared. This time
round, organisers hope to “at
least double” this total.

Rachel Lightbourne, a
BNT and lionfish project
committee member said:
“The weather’s going to be
great. It will be a fun day. We
want everyone to be really
safe and we’ve encouraged

people not to celebrate until
they get back to the dock.”

Among the winnings avail-
able for those able to those

who bring in the most, the
‘smallest or the big
fish today are +0 500 cash
prizes donated by King and

est lion-

Co and Harbourside Marine
and a $500 certificate from

Lightbourne Marine.

All proceeds from the
events, where there will be
food and t-shirts for sale, will
be presented to the BNT who
intend to put the funds
towards the continuation of
their educational campaign
on the lionfish problem.

“They want to continue to
go to the Out Islands and
give seminars to the public
about the lionfish and how it
can be cleaned and eaten. We
are trying to turn it into a
viable source of food and are
hoping commercial fishermen

will get into it,” said Ms

Lightbourne.

-LUCITO BAZARD, P.O.’

BOX N-555, NASSAU,

BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for |
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization }
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person

knows any reason why registration/naturalization shi
not be granted, should send a written and signed.statement |
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 18':day of |
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality’ and |
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas." |

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co.,

Montrose Avenue 5.
sical ae «Fax: 326-7452

. Large Shipment

of
Used Cars

wale” Shen Artived

’

‘Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and. |

Get Your First Choice... }
For Easy Financing ©
Bank And Insurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying


AGE 6, SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



|
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla,



PACE shuttle Endeavour has |
A. ‘ ‘

1 fl (he international space

hccording to Assoctated

























ivour docked atthe space :
4) Friday atternoon for a}

-and-a-halllong stay. The ;
fiyvercated the biggest crowd |
orbit at the same place;
fouls. The two crews will
s another, face to face, }
hs the hatches between :
ypened, Before dock- :
nander Mark Polansky :
ndeavour through a }
) the station astronauts

vraph the entire shut}

8 belly, The station |

By GENA GIBBS
Bahamas Information
Services _



THE Department of Co-oper-
ative Development wants more
“presence” in the Ministry of
Education’s curriculum.

The cooperative programme
introduces students to operating a
business. They learn leadership
practices, when they form a board
of directors, chair meetings, form
committees and make decisions.

“We have been trying to get
co-op education taught in the
schools, even at the college level,
for a while now,” said Nathaniel
Adderley, director of Co-opera-






iderable amount of
ation peeled away from
§ fuel tank at liftott ;




INTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

ISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921 .











11:30 A.M. Speaker

PASTOR PATRICK RUTHERFORD
‘Theme: “ Enriching Marriage And Family Life”

Bible Glaga: 945 am.» Breakin ad Service: 10:45 a.m, .
i pornnynk Outreach: 11:30 am. ¢ ening ces, 7:00 p.m.
idweek Service 7:30 p. nesdays)
lbtere’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. Fond Lieelae at ath month)

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future





Place:
The Madeira
Shopping Center



Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles
AL: ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND -
Zastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles —

pie Box EE-16807
ephone number 325-5712
ein lynnk@batelnet.bs





















SUNDAY SERVICES








Moming Worship service ....... + 6,30 a.m.
sunday School for ailages... 9.45 a.m,
Adult education say 9,45 OM,
Worship SeMic? vce fata) HAGUE:
5 BIICe 8.00 am,
6.30 pm. 1
WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Select ive Biole leaching ;
(Boys Club) 4-16 ys,
lg Club) 4-16 yes,
FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting
RADIO MINISTRY:
Sundays at 8:30 a.m, - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

t Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

| NGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God»

ple@bateinet bs Weh: www. ee, ROOK



tive Societies.

Already five schools with
cooperatives together comprising
400 students are registered with
the Department.

Importance

“The Department recognises

the importance of involving
young people in the cooperative
sector," said Agriculture and
Marine Resources Minister
Lawrence Cartwright. He has
Cabinet responsibilities for the
Department.

Mr Cartwright confirmed that
‘a formal cooperative youth pro-
gramme is being developed for
implementation within the school
system.

The Ministry of Education is

‘committed to supporting this

endeavour to ensure the perpet-
uation of the sector's future, he
said.

Junior co-operatives will be
matched with existing credit
unions for monitoring and men-
toring purposes.

“We are trying to strengthen
our relationship with the Ministry
of Education to teach a coopera-
tive programme in the schools,"
said Mr Adderley.

"We want to have a presence
within the Ministry of Education.
If the students have a habit of
consistent savings, hopefully it
will carry over into their adult
life.”

The programme introduces

students to business practices as

Youth co-ops deman
presence in education

‘they run the co- op in their

schools.

“We have been trying to work
with small groups with a detailed
approach to setting and reaching
business goals,” said Mr Adder-
ley. “For us, in general, the chal-
lenge is always human and finan-
cial resources.”

| Resilience

He touted the resilience of the

cooperative movement in the
Bahamas.
“Traditionally, co-ops have
worked well in hard times
because they were born out of
hard times," said Mr Adderley.
“We don’t encourage too
many real estate investments

MISS GOSPEL CONTESTANTS CALL ON GOVERNOR-GENERAL

By GENA GIBBS

Bahamas Information Service



because it becomes more specu-
lative and we don’t want to
encourage people to speculate
with other people’s money."

The community of Spanish
Wells, he said, is a prime example
of how cooperation works to ig
mote progress.

“Spanish Wells is nota foptel
co-op but it’s the best cc-opvin
the country when you see how
the: fishermen band. themséves
together and cooperate togejh-
er,” said Mr Adderley. oS)

The Bahamas Co-operative
League provides a two-year schol-
arship to the College of the
Bahamas annually. Studies are,in
business management, computer
science, accounting/finance,
tourism, ‘agriculture, marketing,
and banking.



crown to her successor on August 2. : : 30
Pictured from left, (seated) are Great Commission Mint

THE 14th annual Miss Gospel Bahamas contestants paid a
courtesy call on Governor-General Arthur Hanna at Gov-
ernment House this week.

Judging for the competition is based on talent, intellect, atti-
tude and presentation. Talent displays range from singing,
worship dancing, drama, musical instrument performance,

and public speaking. .
The 2008 reigning queen, Tanya McFall, will hand over the

Sunday School: 10am == FUNDAMENTAL
Preaching 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills ¢ Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622

BAGS Ri
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, JULY 19TH, 2009

— 700 a.m, Rev. Carla Culmer / Bro. Franklyn Bethel
11:00 a.m, Rev. Carla Culmer/ Bro. Livingstone Griffin
7:00 p.m. Sis, Rosemary Williams/ Rev, Carla Culmer

Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church |

A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
iia ime cere}

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m.

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive,
Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O. Box SS-5631

Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE

istries International director Minalee Hanchell; Governor-
General Hanna; reigning Miss Gospel Bahamas Tanya McFall;
(standing) committee member Tamalia Hanchell, chaperone:
of Miss Gospel Bahamas Ethlyn Hanchell; Miss All Out
Entertainment Rushan Cooper; Miss Zion Baptist East ani

Shirley Streets Shannon Evans; Miss Church of God of
Prophecy Gambier Valencia Moss; Miss Amethyst Shenique

'Gray, and Miss Bahamas Christian Fellowship Jamelf

Dawkins.



PHOTO SHOWS L-R: Ambrose Morris, Regional Manager Public’
Relations, Vinincia Strachan, Regional Manager Weddings and Hon!
eymoons, Mary Mattadeen, Administrative Assistant, Miss Bahamas,
Universe 2009, Kiara Sherman, Janet Cuffie, Senior Group. Sales’
Manager and Stephen Wells, Executive E- Commerce. Missing is Paul



Strachan, National Director.

Miss Bahamas Universe
pays courtesy call on
the Bahamas Tourist

Office in Canada

ON a promotional tour in
Canada, the reigning Miss
Bahamas Universe — Kiara
Sherman made a courtesy
call this week on the staff of
the Bahamas Tourist Office
in Toronto,

During the half-day visit,
tourism managers gave the
new queen a tour of the
office facilities, advising her
of the various departments
and functions that are car-
ried out by the team on
behalf of The Bahamas.

While in Canada, Ms Sher-
man will participate in
numerous promotional activ-
ities, organised by public
relations manager, Ambrose
Morris.

“We are thrilled to have

Miss Bahamas Universe vis-,

iting with us here in Cana-
da, and are pleased to be“
able to showcase not only:
her bracing beauty and poise,
but also her keen intelli-
gence,” Mr Morris said.

Tour

One highlight of the trip*
for Miss Bahamas Universe!
will be to participate in cul-°
tural presentations, featur->
ing the Bahamas National"
Youth Choir which is also on*
a post- -independence tour in
Canada. Performances are’
scheduled for Ottawa,
Canada’s capital, and at the,
parliament building in,
Toronto, and in Niagara
Falls.
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009, PAGE 7





Talks seen as last
chance to end =—
Honduras’ crisis ©

Zelaya say U.S.-backed talks
in Costa Rica Saturday may }



ee

over



na ons ey



sera Nassau Harbour dredging

be the last chance to avert a }
‘clash, perhaps even civil war, :
according to Associated Press. :
"” Zelaya is threatening to ;
return to his homeland with :

‘or without an agreement on }
ending the standoff and has :
said Hondurans have a consti- :
-tutional right to launch an :
insusrection against an illegit- :

imate government.

In Washington, U.S, State ;
Department spokesman P.J. :
Crowley called Friday for :
nations to support the talks :

that are being mediated by :
Costa Rican President Oscar :
‘Arias, who won the Nobel :
Peace Prize in 1987 for helping :

to end Central America’s }

‘wars. i
He also appeared to allude :



esident Hugo Chavez, a :
Zelaya ally who has called the :
negotiations a U.S.-backed :
trap and said on Friday: “In :
the next few hours, Zelaya will ;
enter Honduras and we’ll see }
what the gorillas are going to :
do” about it. i

“No country in the region }
should encourage any action :
that would potentially increase :
the risk of violence either in :
Honduras or in surrounding :
countries,” said Crowley, :
-speaking to reporters in Wash- :
“ington. :
- Interim President Roberto :
‘Micheletti has said Zelaya }

‘might try to sneak in by cross-

ing Nicaragua’s jungle-cloaked :
‘border with Honduras, but the }
jousted president apparently ;
‘was still in Nicaragua’s capi- :
tal on Friday. :
“: Zelaya told Venezuelan :
State television late Thursday :
that the weekend talks hold :
out a moment of hope for a.:
solution, but he was still ready-
ing for a return. :
~- “I am preparing various }
alternatives: by air, by land, }
and others,” he said. . :

‘In Honduras, meanwhile, }

about 2,000 Zelaya support- :
ets blocked two highways con- :
necting Tegucigalpa to the :
Caribbean and Pacific coasts }
for several hours Friday. ;
.jAmerican Airlines tem- :
porarily suspended its two dai- :
ly. U.S. flights to the capital ;
because of the political crisis, ;
airline spokeswoman Berna :
Osorto said. Continental and :
Delta were continuing their :
flights. v4
~ Arias has presented a series :
of possible compromises to :
both camps, but indicated a :
power-sharing deal in which :
Zelaya could return to serve :
out the remaining months of :
his term with limited power :
would dominate the talks. :
' Arias said discussions also :
will cover possible amnesty for :
Zelaya. :

kb
%

. ‘The Supreme Court issued :
an arrest warrant for Zelaya ;
before the coup, ruling his :
effort to hold a referendum on :
whether to form a constitu-





tional assembly was illegal. : ,

The military decided to send }
him into exile instead‘on June }
28 — a move that military :
lawyers themselves have called :
illegal but necessary. i

sMany Hondurans viewed :
the proposed referendum as
an attempt by Zelaya to push
for a socialist, Chavez-style
model of governing.

Arias said Friday both :
camps have “softened, and I :
think we are going to find ;
more flexibility.” In the first :
round of talks the two sides :
agreed only to meet again. i

Micheletti told Colombia’s :
RCN Radio that his govern- :
ment is open to dialogue but :

argues that Zelaya committed {

crimes against “the economy, i
the citizenry and against the :
constitution” and cannot be :
allowed to return to power.

He accused Zelaya of “call- ;
ing for bloodshed.” :

Micheletti said he is willing :
to.move up the elections.as a :
way out of the crisis. The con- }
gressional president, sworn in }
to replace Zelaya, also said he :
would resign “if Mr. Zelaya -:
stops inciting a revolutionary :
movement in the country and }
stops trying to return here.”

If no agreement is reached, :
Zelaya’s foreign minister Patri- ;
cia Rodas has said he would :
return to Honduras to installa :
parallel government “to direct :
what I will call the final bat- :
tle.” She did not elaborate.

Zelaya’s Sunday deadline }
for the coup leaders to back :
down falls on the 30th anniver- :
sary of Nicaragua’s July 19, :
1979, Sandinista revolution :
that toppled dictator Anasta- :
sio Somoza.

remarks by Venezuelan }



By STEWARD OF THE SEA_

CONCERNING the dredg-
ing of Nassau Harbour there is
good news and some bad.

The good news is there are
great efforts being made to
réduce the amount of silt cre-
ated by the dredging. I had pro-
posed to government they only
dredge on the outgoing tide to
prevent silt from being carried
on the incoming tide on to the
Great Bahama bank where it
could damage reefs for many
years to come. This proved to
be too expensive as well as it
might have had an ill affect on
Cable Beach reefs. The result
has been a great effort to create
two holding ponds. One is being
dug out on the island and the
fill being used to create the
berm for bulkheading the sec-
ond holding pond in the exten-
sion. A pump system will take
excess water from the dredging
out to sea by means of a spe-
cial pipe. This pipe is a single
length of 600 or 800 meters
2,624 ft, almost half a mile long,
that will be towed from Jack-
sonville. The idea is to have this
pipe send the silt out to sea
releasing it at about 20 meters
(65ft) where the sea floor slopes
to extreme depths and it will be
harmless to corals and not stir
up in rough seas. I think such a
great effort has never been done
in the Bahamas before to
reduce the ill effects of dredg-
ing. It is yet to be seen how well
this will work, but it is important
to note the efforts being made
are a good sign of responsible
stewardship.

The bad news is a number of
things. I am relying on infor-
mation acquired by asking a lot
of questions. The question to
why the fill is presently being
just pushed into the sea with
just floats to hold back the silt?
The first explanation was cost
reduction, by working with a
land based crane for installing
the bulkhead, verses.a crane on
barge, but further questioning
brought more information to
light. The bulkhead requires
dead men (a post driven in)
with a tie rod (a link to the bulk-
head from the dead man) this is
to hold the bulkhead from
expanding out from the exces-
sive pressure of the fill pushing
outward, The convenience to
do all of this on a land based



Uy

sight verses over water reduces
the cost and hardship greatly.

The next important question
was: Could the dredging have
been done without extending
Arawak Cay? The answer was
no, not without removing busi-
ness such as the shipping termi-
nal operating there now.

The conclusion is we are
between a rock and a hard place
in balancing the needs of
progress and protecting our
environment. With no Freedom
of Information Act we are
forced to trust the government
has made the right decisions
weighing cost to the people and
the environmental impact. The
contractor seems to be very pro-
fessional and politically correct
in hiring many Bahamian work-
ers, such as welders, and
machine operators. Let us hope
no natural disaster such as hur-
ricane hits us at this-vulnerable
time. Should Arawak Cay (Kel-
ly Island) have been built in the
first place? Probably not.
Should it be extended? Proba-
bly not. It is really a bit late to
go back to the drawing board.
Great effort to be environmen-
tal within a budget seems to be
policy.

Belgian Waffles

_ Boneless breast of chicken, sauteed with
_ mushrooms, white wine & sweet vermouth,

topped with ham

romano & provolone cheeses

of Seafood,

‘Rich, creanty and delicious dish.
cream and egg yolks, It was called Wenburg on
a menu of a New York restaurant until some
time later when the epicurean Mr Wenburg
became involved in a dispute with the
management. Thereafter the restaurant renamed
~ the offering seafood “Newburg” and thus a
classic was born.

Koast Leg | A Leen

- Rosemary is a perfé

lement'to lamb

Bahamian Styfled Porkloir

Slow Roasted and stuf:

with Mango, Guava,

Plantain, Sweet Bell Peppers & Onions

Dessert
Chet’s Assorted Cakes and Pies
Choice of Beverage:
Juice, Coffee, Tea, Sodas or Milk

‘SCENES OF dredging taking place at Nassau Harbour.





































































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ideas for life


PAGE 8, SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009

|



KPMG Telephone 242 293 2007

PO Box N 123 Fem. 242 393 1772 F
Montague Steding Contre Internet = ew. komg.com.b5
East Bay Street ;

Nassau, Bahamas

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT

To the Shareholder of Julius Baer Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Julius Baer Trust Company (Bahamas)
Limited (‘the Company") which comprises the balance sheet as at December 31, 2008, and a
summary of significant. accounting meee and other Sey notes (logether “the financial
statement”). 2:

Management’s Respite -for the Financial Statement

Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of this financial statement in
accordance with International Financial.Reporting Standards(“IFRS"). This responsibility
includes: designing, implementing ‘and maintaining internal contro! relevant to the preparation
and fair presentation of the financial. statement that is free from material misstatement, whether
due to fraud or error; selecting’ and’ applying appropriate accounting ee and making
accounting estimates that are reasonable in the circumstances,

Auditors’ Responsibility

Our responsibility is to express an opinion ‘on. this fi nancial statement based on our audit. We:
conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those Standards
require that we comply with relevant ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to
obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial statement is free from material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to. obtain audit evidence about the amounts and
disclosures in the financial statement. The procedures selected depend on our judgment,
including the assessment of risks of material misstatement of the financial statement, whether due
to frand or error. In making those risk assessments, we consider internal control relevant to the
Company's preparation and fair Presentation of the financial statement in order to design audit
procedures that are appropriate inthe circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an
opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's intemal control. An audit also includes evaluating
the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates
made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statement,

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and SPPCOpTRTE | t provide a
basis for our audit opinion.

Opinion

In our opinion, the financial statement ceean fairly, in all inaterial respects, the financial
“position of Julios Baer Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited as of December 31, 2008 in
accordance with IFRS,

Emphasis of hae

Without qualifying our opinion we ciiitasiee that this financial. statement does not comprise a
complete set of financial statements prepared in accordance with IFRS, Information on results of '
operations, cash flows and changes.in equity. is necessary to obtain a complete understanding of
the financial position, performance and cash flows of the Company.

bebo So.

Nassau, Bahamas
July 2, 2009

J ULIUS BAER TRUST COMPANY (BAHAMAS) LIMITED









Balance Sheet
December 31, 2008, with conespondiig figures for 2007
{Expressed in Swiss francs)
_ . Note 2008 2007
Assets
Deposits due from bank — Group a AS. g gts SFr 1,509,023 1,763,856
Interest receivable — Group! 6. 4,530 4,648
Fees receivable (net of allowance of Sik 18,584

_2007 : SFr 16,086) 5 66,449 20,038
“Potal Assets ene SFr 1,580,002 1,788,542
Liabilities and Shareholder’s Equity

a

Liabilities: ; :
Accounts payable nape A SR 92074 56,436
Total liabilities rs cme 92,074 56,436
Shareholder’s equity:
Share capital Hee

ree issued and fully satis wes : :

2,000,000 shares at par value of SFri 9 each haa 2,000,000 2,000,000
Accumulated deficit es - (812,072) ” (267,894)
Total shareholder's equity Prdk ts. 1,487,928 1,732,106
Contingencies i ps : pees Ss ae
“Total Liabilities and Shareholder” say “SFr - 1,580,002 1,788,542

_ See accompanying notes to balance het. ay

This balance sheet was approved 0 on behalf of. the Board on July 2, 2009:

Director



JULIUS BAER TRUST COMPANY (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Notes to Balance Sheet

December 3 1, 2008
(Expressed in Swiss francs)



1. Corporate information

Julius Baer Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited ("the Trust") was incorporated on July 19,
2000, and licensed to carry on trust, business from within The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas under the Banks and Trust Companies Regulation Act 2001. The Trust is a wholly
owned subsidiary of Julius Baer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited (“the Bank”) which is, in
turn, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Julius Baer & Cie S.A., a company incorporated in
Switzerland, The address of its registered office is Ocean Centre, East Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas. The principal activities of the Trust consist oF conducting trust and corporate
administration business.

+ Basis of preparation
Statement of conipliance

This balance sheet is prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards
(IFRS).

Basis of measurement
The balance sheet has beén prepared on the historical cost basis.
Functional and presentation currency

This balance sheet is presented in Swiss francs (SE 1) which is the functional currency of the
’ Trust.

Use of estimates and judgements

The preparation of financial statements requires management to make judgements, estimates
and assumptions that affect the application of accounting policies and the reported amounts of
assets and liabilities. Actual results, may differ from these estimates. :



THE TRIBUNE!



Estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to
accounting estimates are recognized in the period in which the estimate is revised and in any
future periads aftected.

Information about key sources of information uncertainty can be found in the accounting
policy on Allowance for doubtfil accounts in notes 3 and 5.

Summary of significant accounting policies

The accounting policies set out below have been applied consistently to all periods presented
in this balance sheet.

Financial instruments

Demand deposits due from bank ~ group, interest receivable — group and fees receivable are
classified as loans and receivables. Accounts payable are classified as financial liabi lities not
at fair value through profit or loss.

Financial instruments are recognized initially at fair value plus any directly attributable
transaction costs. Subsequent to initial recognition, financial instruments are measured at
amortized cost using the effective interest method, less, in the case of financial assets, any
impairment losses.

A financial instrument is recognized when the Trust becomes a party to the contractual
provisions of the instrument. Financial assets are derecognized when the Trust’s contractual
rights to the cash flows from. the financial assets expire or when the Trust transfers the
financial asset to another party without retaining control or substantially afl risks and rewards
of the asset. Financial liabilities are derecognized when the Trust’s obligations specified in
the contract expire or are discharged or cancelled,

Provisions
A provision is recognized if, as a result of a past event, the Trust has a present legal or

constructive obligation that can be estimated reliably, and it is probable that an outflow of
economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation. Provisions are determined by

_ discounting the expected cash flows at a rate that reflects current market assessments of the

time value of money and, where appropriate, the risks specific to the liability.
Allowance for doubtful accounts

Specific allowances reflect the amounts required to reduce the carrying value of the
receivable balance to its estimated recoverable amount. The Trust does not generally record a
non-specific allowance to cover unidentified inherent risks in the fees reccivable portfolio.

When a receivable balance is deemed to be uncollectible, it is written off either against the
related allowance for doubttil accounts or through bad debt expense; subsequent recoveries
are credited, :

Income taxes ae
There are no income taxes imposed on the Trust in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Foreign currency translation

Monetary assets and liabilities i in foreign currencies are eranslaned into SFr-using year-end

rates of exchange.

impairment

¢

A financial asset is considered to be impaired if objective evidence indicates that ane or more .

events have had a negative effect on the estimated cash flows of that asset.. An impairment
loss in respect of a financial asset measured at amortized cost is calculated as the difference
between its carrying amount, and the present value of, the estimated future -cash flows
discounted at the original effective interest rate, An impairment loss is reversed if the reversal
can be related objectively fo an event occurring after the impairment loss was recognized.

Related party balances

Related parties include affiliates of Julius Baer & Cie S.A., major shareholders, directors and
key management personnel who have the authority and responsibility for planning, directing
and controlling the activities of the Trust.

Assets under management

No account is taken in this balance sheet of assets and fiabilities of clients administered. by

the Trust as custodian, trustee or nominee. Total-assets' under administration -as at December:

31, 2008 approximated SFr1,192-million (2007 — SFr 1113 million}. oo 2s

tERSs not yet effective

U ip to the date of this balance sheet, the International Accounting Standards Board ba issued
a number of new standards, amendments to existing standards and: interpretations which are

not yet effective for the year ended December 31, 2008 and which have not been adopted in
this balance sheet. .

The Trust is in the process of making an assessinent of what the impact of these new standards,
amendments to existing standards and interpretations is expected to be in the period of initial
application. So far it has concluded that the adoption of them is unlikely to have a significant
impact on the Trust's financial position.

Deposits due from bank group

Deposits due from bank ~ group comprise:





2008 2007
Due (to}from group — - on demand SFr (490,977) {236,144}
- money market fund 2,000,000 2,000,000

SFr 1,509,023- 1,763,856

The balances due from/(to) group have been offset in accordance with the relevant agreement
between the Bank and the Trust. Balances on demand do not earn interest. At December 31,
2008 the money market fund earned interest at a rate of 3.4375% er: 1.38%).

Fees receivable

The age profile of fees receivable is as follows: -





. 2008 2007

Up to 6 months SFr 34,010 -

*. 6~9 months 9,013 1,$33

10~— 12 months ; : 25,949 24,388

~ More than 12 months ; 16,061. 10,203
Allowance for doubtful accounts . (18,584) (16,086)

ce ee SFr__ 66,449 . 20,038

‘rrr PFC SSS

The movement during the year in the allowance for doubttil accounts is as follows:
“SUSE aha sentient mean yinheepn eeaneee ee aepear EIN EEE ERE EE EEO CCO CL L EGET L EY





2008 2007
Balance at beginning of the year SFr 16,086 aoe
Increase in allowance : 2,498 16,086
Balance at end of year . SFr 18,584 16,086
Related party balances
The balance sheet includes the following balances with related parties: -
- 2008 2007
Balances ; ;
Deposits due from bank SFr ° 1,509,023 1,763,856
Interest receivable 4,530 4,648

4 -
The Trust entered into a service level agreement with the Bank on January 1, 2007 wherein
the Bank provides certain services to or on behalf of the Trust. The Bank charges the Trust a
management fee for these services on a pro-rata basis by number of employees. The services
provided include human resources, office services, compliance, information technology and
communication services. The agreement may be terminated by either party with three
months’ prior notice in writing or as otherwise agreed between the parties,

Financial instruments

Financial risk. management objectives and policies

The Trust’s financial instruments comprise deposits with group, receivables and other
financial assets and liabilities that arise directly from its operations. -

The principal risks arising from the Trust’s financial instruments are credit risk, liquidity risk,
interest rate risk and foreign currency risk. The Board of Directors sets, reviews and agrees
policies for managing each of these risks and they are summarized below.




Heer aE eT

Sa SEE TONE STE EO Oe

fotnineneeenenrwenonseerennnncescnntnomnngteyenthe ————e
THE TRIBUNE





unken tanker



‘was not insured’

deal with the matter as being the containment
and removal of the remaining fuel on board the
vessel before it can seep into the environment.

ROM page one

théarea

n Thursday, Mr Carey noted that the BNT is
concerned about the damage that the oil now
pases to the environment and marine and ter-
restt tial life in the protected area.

Yesterday, he identified the first priotity of a
spicial team that travelled to Exuma that day to

Mare environment and other passing ships in

the coral reef.

operation.

And he said the “major challenge” and the
“greatest unknown” posed by the incident is
raising the two tractors and a front-end loader
with cranes without causing further damage to

Mr Carey said the BNT intends to “work very
carefully” with Mr e Oakes during the salvage

State minister warns over
spike in illegal immigration

FROM page one

Immigration officials have
conducted a number of raids
ini iNew Providence and
Andros netting hundreds of
illegal nationals — mostly
Hall migrants.

FE. ling short of calling this
sitgation a “crisis”, Mr
MeCartney said that the
department is capable of
dealing with these increases

ly with the continued sup-
of the public.

h daving said that, we have
to je cognizant of the fact
thai af these are human beings
wi are coming over here.

shave to be humane. We
nail to be respectful of our
approach as they are looking
foria better way of life. With

-that|in mind we have to bal-





ance the fact that the
Bahamas can only take so
much.

“We are a small country,
with a population of 350,000
people. Essential services can
only deal with so much.
Whether or not there is a cri-
sis over there, I think it has
been that way for some time

— people are looking for a,

better way of life. Our job-at
Immigration is to deal with
those persons who are com-
ing over illegally. We don’t
want to make this a place
where there is a ‘free for all’.
Those days are ended,” he
said.

The minister added that his
officers, with the Defence
Force and the Police, have

_ done an excellent job thus far

in dealing with these increas-

es. He noted that while it is
very difficult to account for
the “many” persons who are
still in the Bahamas illegally,
he hoped that Immigration
will be able to place some
individuals before the courts
who have been facilitating or

‘assisting these individuals.

“There are persons that we
must make an example of.
There is no doubt about it.
For example, this person who
was housing these (Chinese)
people I don’t know why they
aren’t before the courts. It is
someone’s house! I would
like to see ‘them: before the
courts, and charged, and
made an example of.

“That is the only way we
are going to deal with this.
We can’t just give: them a slap
on the wrist,” he said.

LOCAL NEWS

Credit risk

Credit risk is the risk that a customer or a counterparty will be unable or unwilling to meet a
commitment that it has entered into with the Trust. The Trust manages counterparty credit
risk centrally through the Bank to optimize the use of credit availability and to avoid
excessive risk concentration. Customer credit risk is managed through provisions against the
fee receivable balances. Credit risk is reduced as all demand deposits are due from the Bank.
The Trust’s maximum exposure to credit risk in the event the counterparties fail to perform
their obligations ‘as at‘ December 31,2008. in relation ta each class of recognized financial
assets is the carrying amount of those assets as indicated inthe balance sheet.

Liquidity risk

Liquidity risk is the risk that the Trust will encounter difficulty in realizing assets or
otherwise raising funds to meet commitments. The Trust manitors expected cash outflow on a
daily basis. Its policy throughout the year has been to ensure liquidity by maintaining at all
times sufficient high quality liquid asseis to cover expected net cash outflows,

Interest rate risk

Exposure to interest rate risk is the risk that arises when there is an imbalance between rate
and non rate-sensitive assets and Hiabilitics. The Trust does not experience a great deal of risk

in this area as interest rates related to its financial assets automatically reset to market.

periodically.

Foreign currency risk

Foreign currency risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrament will fluctuate-because
of changes in foreign exchange rates. The Trust ensures that the net exposure to financial
assets and Habilities not denonsinated in Swiss Franes is kept to an acceptable level by buying
or selling foreign currencies at spot rates, where necessary, to address short-term imbalances.

Net fair value of financial instruments

Financial instruments utilized by the Trust include recorded assets and liabilities. The
majority of the Trust's financial instruments are either short-term in nature or have interest
rates that automatically reset to market on a periodic basis. Accordingly, the estimated fair
value is not significantly different from the earrying value for cach major category of the
Trust’s recorded assets and liabilities. The Trost has no off-balance sheet financial
instruments as of December 31, 2008 or December,31, 2007.

. Contingent liabilities

The Trust is involved in several legal matters involving customers of the Trust. Management
of the Trust does not anticipate that the losses, if any, incurred as a result of these legal
proceedings will materially affect the financial position of the Trust. .

Other information P

On January 20, 2006, the former resident manager of the Bank, was arrested in New York

and charged by the Manhattan Federat Court for money laundering activities in connection
with the former resident manager's position and activities in another company not belonging
to the Julius Baer Group.

The accounts of the former resident manager held with the aforementioned company and
those held with the Bank were frozen in accordance with the court order dated 2 May, 2006,
and will remain frozen until otherwise notified by court order. The accounts held with the
Bank which were frozen included an account for a trast for which the Trust is the trustee. Oo
March 14, 2007 after offering a guilty plea, the former resident manager was sentenced to
four years in prison and ordered to forfeit $220,000 in proceeds. ;

No provision related to this matier has been recorded in this balance sheet.

. Fiduciary activities

The Trust provides custody, trustee and corporate administration services to third parties
which involve the Trust making decisions in relation to a wide range of financial instruments,
Those assets that are held in a fiduciary capacity are not included in this balance sheet. At the
balance sheet date the Trust had financial assets under administration estimated to amount to
approximately SFr 1,192 million (2007 — SFr 1,113 million).

. Capital adequacy

‘The Central Bank of The Bahamas requires Trust Companies to maintain minimum capital of
B$1,000,000 and to maintain a capital adequacy ratio of at least 8 percent of risk weighted

- assets at all times. The capital adequacy ratio is caleulated by dividing the Trust’s eligible

capital base by its risk-weighted exposures, The Trust uses regulatory guidelines as the basis
for the calculation of the ratio. There have been no material changes in the Bank’s
management of capital during the period.

The Trust’s actual capital amount and risk asset ratio at December 31, 2008 and 2007, as well
as the minimum regulatory requirements are as follows:

NCOOUTTTOOETOCCLLCCEEOCLEECOTCOOCLCONTCCONTCLT CLC CCLC OT ECOOCULEULCLLO OCCU CCL OLLON ELC CCOCLULNDLCNCLT CTI TCLINELONLEON NOLO LOLS LETT OCCLCCLUCLO LIEN COL ECUO COU NCCOMTCCD NOLEN NCOONCLEHICCNNCCEO CEH et Cbbestteetebietteieeetetttttttn
2008 2007

Actual Minimum Actual M spin

Capital | SFr 1,487,928 . 1,064,386 1,732,106 1,133,500
Risk asset ratio 390% 8% 459% 8%
‘#OPCEPCCEEEEECEEEOCOOPEEEOCOOCOSLCOOLCCCEELCCOCLCLLLLOCLLCEDLCCECECLTTCLCOTCLOCECCEEOOCLLCOSSABLEBEOROPOOOLOOECOLLCLCCLCLOCLOLLOLOCCOLCLLOOLCCLLGLIHOCI NAH HINSUHTTNOONONOO SOONER NNNENNNTNCEEAOHEONEE

The Trust’s policy is to maintain a strong capital base so as to maintain investor, creditor and

"market contidence and to sustain future development of the business. The impact of the level

of capital on shareholder’s return is also recognized and the Trust recognizes the need to
maintain a balance between the higher returns that might be possible with greater gearing and
the advantages and security afforded by a sound capital position.

The a has complied with the regulgtory speed capital requirements throughout the
perio





SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009, PAGE 9;








arl Taylor

FROM page one

changes will have to be done with
this retrial. There’s too much politics

in this country," he said.

McNeil’s attorney Murrio Ducille
also expressed surprise at the out-

come of the case.

"One will always have to respect |
the jury’s verdict because they are | .
the judges of the facts, but the ver- |*
dict can be unreasonable at times
because that’s one of the grounds
of appeal sometimes, that the verdict
is unreasonable having regards to
the ‘circumstances of the case," he

said.

"Our position is that the prosecution hae not
presented any evidence at all to connect this
young man with any murder and also it was
clear that the evidence of the DNA expert was
dislocated. His evidence showed clearly that he
was unreliable so I’m just wondering what the

jury gone by to come 8-4.

"Only thing I can say is that there were four
persons on the jury who were listening to the
case and who were reasoned and did not go by
any sentiment or any extraneous circumstance
to inference their decision. Because if any at all
they sat and listened to the case there is only
one verdict they could have arrived at,"

rer Taylor ]





Mr Ducille said.
Taylor's mother, Beverly Taylor;:
left the courtroom yesterday visibly
upset by the outcome of the case,
-She declined to speak to members of
| the media. Troyniko visibly disap:
| pointed, smiled at his young son as’
police escorted him back to Central
Police Station. McNeil who has been
on remand since last August will
remain on remand but could make:
| another application for bail. '
The Harl Taylor murder trial
began on July 2. In his unsworn,
statement at the trial earlier this.
week, McNeil said he had nothing to.



do with Taylor’s murder and had no reason to.

kill the noted handbag designer. He is accuse(l
of causing the death of Taylor, 37, between
Saturday, November 17, and Sunday, Novem:
ber 18, 2007 while being concerned with anoth-
er. Taylor, 37, was found dead in his bedroom
at Mountbatten House on West Hill Street

with multiple stab wounds. ‘A broken knife

was found on his bed.

The prosecution called some 24 witness to
testify and closed its case on Tuesday without,
calling six remaining witnesses. Assistant Direc-
tor of Public Prosecutions Franklyn Williams;
Neil Brathwaite and Darnell Dorsette repre:
sented the Crown.

Powerful Iranian cleric
says country in crisis

TEHRAN, Iran

IN_A sign of endurance for
Iran’s protest movement,
demonstrators clashed with
police Friday as one of the
nation’s most powerful clerics
challenged the supreme leader
during Muslim prayers, saying
the country was in crisis in the
wake of a disputed election,
according to Associated Press.

The turnout of tens of thou-
sands of worshippers for former
President Akbar Hashemi Raf-

sanjani’s sermon at Tehran Uni- -

versity and the battles with
police outside represented the
biggest opposition show of
strength in weeks. Protesters
faced fierce government sup-
pression and hundreds were
arrested following the June 12
presidential election.

Outside the university,
protests grew from several hun-
dred people before the sermon
to thousands afterward as wor-
shippers joined in, chanting
“death to the dictator,” a refer-
ence to President Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad.

Protesters

Protesters were confronted by
riot police and a menacing line
of pro-government Basiji militi-
amen on motorcycles, who
charged with batons. Plain-
clothes Basijis fired volleys of
tear gas, and young protesters
with green bandanas over their
faces kicked the canisters across
the pavement. Some set a bon-

’ fire in the street and waved their

hands in victory signs. Dozens
were arrested and taken away
in trucks, witnesses said.

Protests, which flared follow-
ing the election, had been stifled
in recent weeks, The sometimes
tearful sermon by Rafsanjani
could be a significant boost to
the movement’s staying power.
It was an open challenge to
Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali
Khamenei, aired live on nation-
wide radio from one of the coun-
try’s most potent political stages.
By openly showing the divisions
in the leadership, it punched a
hole in efforts by Khamenei and
hard-line clerics to end the con-
troversy over Ahmadinejad’s re-
election.

Worshippers chanted “azadi,
azadi,” Persian for “freedom,”
during Rafsanjani’s sermon, his
first since the election. Opposi-
tion leader Mir Hossein
Mousavi, who claims to have
won the election, sat among the
worshippers, attending the coun-
try’s main prayer service for the
first time since the turmoil
began,

Many of those gathered wore
headbands or wristbands in his
campaign color green, or had
green prayer rugs, crowding the
former soccer field. where

prayers are held and spilling into
nearby streets.

Rafsanjani denounced the
government crackdown on
protests and called for the
release of the hundreds detained.

He reprimanded the clerical.

leadership for not listening to
people’s complaints over the
election, which was declared a
victory for Ahmadinejad despite
opposition accusations of fraud.

“There is a large portion of,

the wise people who say they
have doubts (about the election).
We need to take action to
remove this doubt,” he said.
“The trust that brought the peo-
ple to vote in such large num-
bers is not there anymore. We
need to return this trust.”
Rafsanjani avoided directly
mentioning Khamenei or out-
right calling the vote fraudulent.
He couched his sermon in calls
for unity in support of Iran’s
Islamic Republic, but it was clear

_ he blamed the leadership for the

loss of unity.

Tears welled in the cleric’s
eyes as he spoke of how Islam’s
Prophet Muhammad “respect-
ed the rights” of his people. He
said the founder of Iran’s Islam-
ic Republic, Ayatollah Ruhol-
lah Khomeini, “would always
say} at if the system is not
backed hy the people, nothing
would stand.”

For Iranians. listening across
the country, the weekly Friday
sermon in Tehran is the voice of
the leadership and a symbol of
its backing by God.,

After hundreds of thousands
joined protests against the elec-
tion results. in the days follow-
ing the vote, the supreme leader
used the podium to declare
Ahmadinejad’s victory valid and
order a stop to unrest.

The crackdown was launched
soon after.

In the weeks that followed,
hard-line clerics have used the

* sermon to depict the protesters

as tools of foreign enemies and
tell worshippers to follow
Khamenei.

Rafsanjani’s sermon signaled
the broader public that the dis-
pute was internal and even Iran’s

ruling clerics are split. He direct- -

ly referred to the divisions, say-
ing the revered topmost theolo-
gians of Shia Islam, who have
millions of followers, were not
happy with the government.
Rafsanjani heads two power-
ful clerical bodies that oversee
the government and parliament,
the Expediency Council and the
Experts Council. He is a bitter
rival of Ahmadinejad and is con-
sidered Mousavi’s top supporter
within Iran’s clerical leadership.
A mercurial and savvy politi-
cian, Rafsanjani positioned him-
self as a leader emerging to
resolve the unrest, saying he
hoped his words would be a start
to “help us pass safely through a
problem that can unfortunately

be called a crisis.”

He specifically criticized his
top rivals within the clerical lead-
ership — the Guardians Council;
a body dominated by hard-liners.
The council oversaw the elec-
tion, then held a partial recount
that ‘upheld Ahmadinejad’s win
but was dismissed by the Oppo
sition.

Rafsanjani said the Guardians
Council missed an “opportunity
to unite the people and regain
their trust.” - Hi

During the service, worship-
pers traded competing chants
with some hard-liners in the con-
gregation. When the hard-liners
chanted “death to America,”
Mousavi supporters countered:
with “death to Russia” and
“death to China,” a reference to
Ahmadinejad’s alliance with
both countries.

The Iranian government has
accused the U.S. and other
Western countries of inciting the
massive street protests and inter-
fering with the election. On
Thursday, . Ahmadinejad

demanded an apology from the,

US. as a step toward dialogue,
between the two countries.

Elections:

“They tried to interfere in our’
elections. They talked nonsense.
They were rude. They fomented:
aggression against people’s
wealth and _ property,”
Ahmadinejad told a crowd of:
thousands in the northwestern
city of Mashhad. i

The U.S. has denied the gov-
ernment’s allegations.

More than 500 remain in
prison following the govern-
ment’s crackdown and at least
20 were killed.

In the past three weeks, the
opposition held only one other
significant protest before Fri-
day’s.

The scene outside the v univer-
sity on Friday was tumultuous:
Before the sermon, police fired
tear gas at hundreds of Mousavi
backers trying to enter.

When Mahdi Karroubi,
another pro-reform candidate in
the June election, headed for the
prayers, plainclothes Basijis
attacked him, shouting “death
to the opponent of Velayat-e-
Faqih,” or supreme leader, wit-
nesses said.

Also arrested was a prominent
women’s rights activist, Shadi
Sadr, who was beaten by militi-
amen; pushed into a car and dri-
ven away to an unknown loca-
tion, Mousavi’s Web site said.

Protests died down by night-
fall. After sunset, Iranians could
be heard shouting x from rooftops,
“God is great’ * and “death to the
dictator” — a show of opposi-
tion support that has been held
every night since the election,
but appeared louder and more
widespread Friday night.
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009

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PUBLIC NOTICE
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* LICENSED SALESMAN / SALESMANAPPRAI SERS / APPRAISERS .

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THE TRIBUNE



THE TRIBUNE'S

.
fe



I DIDN'T KNOW
UNTIL TODAY...
WAS SAVING IT

AS A SURPRISE!



NICE ENOUGH
TO GET A FREE
SANDWICH?

ARE YOU LOVELY
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"WHILE YOu

DAD, HOW DOES
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Panvose, yoy PYM “Duy “erEOpUtS seuuee4 Suny hq BODZED

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday ‘to

Sunday

















“JE He’s STUFFED, I GUESS HE CANT
GIVE AHoor” ae





Across Down - \
1 Died with heart strain — in 2 You might find merit in the
great pain? (10) meantime (7)

8 Bustling atmosphere 3 Rita’s broken bones (5)
around the street (5) 4 To occupy oneself, go into
9 Stone in great pieces (7) battle (6)
10 Carrying out a grave 5 It's designed and built as
commitment? (7) ‘an ocean container (3,4)

Difficulty Level *& *& *

CRYPTIC PUZZLE __











11 Yet one wouldn't pay a 6 The general trend in
high rent for it (5) current travel (5)
12 Abraham ties me in 7 Acut in decimal rates (10)
knots (6) 8 Sam’s abroad doing a turn
14 Vessel — showing its as a diplomat (10)
nationality? (6) 13 He drew Alice in lenient
17 Once more a profitable form (7)
deal (5) e835 15 The craft with which Spain
19 House holding an aromatic built up her empire (7)
plant (7) > 16 Exact payment for

21 That's what you think (7)
22 Abit like audible

tranquillity (5) | 18
23 Unhealthy antagonism? _

(3-7) : 20

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Scribe, 4 Hamper, 9
Tonnage, 10 Resin, 11 Linda, 12
Evening, 13 Renovations, 18 Indexes,
20 Skull, 22 Aroma, 23 Ironing, 24
Obtuse, 25 Regent.

Down: 1 Settle, 2 Run in, 3 Bravado,
5 Agree, 6 Passion, 7 Renege, 8
Generalship, 14 Endmost, 15 Inshore,
16 Mikado, 17 Flight, 19 X-rays, 21
Unite.




something on another’s
account (6)

It might be proof of
convenient absence (5)
Plane in trouble in the
Himalayas (5)

EASY PUZZLE |

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Decamp, 4 Steppe, 9
Bravura, 10 Ample, 11 Spell, 12
Running, 13 Bring to bear, 18 |
Ignoble, 20 Libel, 22 Drown, 23
Animate, 24 Mentor, 25 Amidst.
Down: 1 Debase, 2! Craze, 3
Maudlin, 5 Train, 6 Paprika, 7
Emerge, 8 Carry the day, 14 Run-
down, 15 Belgium, 16 Wisdom, 17
Albeit, 19 Banjo, 21 Brand.





©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.






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DECLAREP TIM MILLS DEAD IN | THEIR SIDE,
A CLIMBING ACCIDENT, BUT HIS
WIFE REFUSED To ACCEPT IT.






SHE WAS | BUT. FINALLY,
THORN IN | SHE JUST
WENT AWAY.

SE






MARGO.

aon a
. NEE ‘|
,

REALLY Took
ITs TOLL

© 2008 by North America Syndicate, nc. Work rights reserved.




YOU MEAN
HE'S THAT.
HUNGRY 2




















©2009 by king Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

The Target
uses
words in

4 the main
body of
Chambers
2ist
Century
Dictionary

(1999
edition).



level of the Co

















ANP EVERYONE FORGOT
ALL ABOUT HER...



«

I'M VEFINITELN
GOING TO NEED A
FANNN LIFT

veww. kingfeatures.com



No... HIS TABLE MANNERS
ARE 50 BAD T MAKEHIM
EAT OLIT IN THE BARNS





HOW many words of four letters or
more can you make from the
letters shown here? In makingia
word, each fetter may be used-once
only. Each must contain the centre
letter and there must be at least
one nine-letter word.

No plurals.

TODAY'S TARGET ;
Good 21; very good 31; excellent 41
(or more) Solution tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION ‘©
acme acne ambiance amicable’
anaemic balance cabal cabin ‘cable
calamine calm came camel canal
cane cinema claim clam clan4
clean climb clime IMBALANCE
face lance mace. malice manacle
maniac manic mica mince nice



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal-block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty

nceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.












































Across Down
1 Origin of a written 2 Ill-founded (7)
work (10) 3 Courage (5)
8 Lasagne, ravioli 4 lessen (6)
etc. (5) 5 Marijuana (7)
9 Notwithstanding (7) 6 Personal
10 Living in water (7) dignity (5)
11 Bungling (5) 7 Highly successful
12 Bring about (6) book (10)
14 Celibate (6) 8 Literary theft (10)
17 Split (5) 13 Involvement (7)
19 Extreme 15 A makeshift (7)
confusion (7) 16 Mental



Truthful (7)
Bet (5)
Handwritten
document (10)

18
20

pressure (6)
Malevolence (5)
Oarsman (5)
































©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.









7/09








East dealer.
North-South vulnerable.

NORTH
@K72
Â¥962
@AJ7
&QI94
WEST EAST
@J853 #1094
¥Q 104 ¥K875
109653 @K82
&7 &A 63
SOUTH
AQ6
Â¥AI3
Q4
&K 10852
The bidding:
East South West North
Pass INT Pass 3NT

| Opening lead — five of diamonds.

This hand. from a team-of-four
contest illustrates how matches are

_ Fishing in Troubled Waters



9/6/1/2/8/3|7/4|5
2/18/317/4/5|6/1/9 7/2 1311/9 Ba ti2/6
8 {1/2 1/2)3|7
7|1/6|3/2/8]9/5/4 71312 0 W113
8/4)215/9)7 1/316 G7 19 R211 5 BO
5|3/9|4/1/6/8|7/2 116 Ba5 (6 819
1{2/8|9/3)4/5|6/7 3i7/211 8192
6|7/4/8/5/1[2/9/3 215/41 M9 /1/7 183











Declarer then led a club to the
jack, hoping that whoever had \the
ace did not have the last heart, but it
was not his lucky day. East won and
cashed his good heart, and South was
down one, losing a diamond, a,club
and three heart tricks all told. 3

At the second table, declarer*had
no trouble whatever making ,three
notrump. He saw nine sure tricks as
soon as dummy appeared, and could

sometimes won or lost for no good.

reason. Both Souths wound up in

three notrump, and at each table,

West’s opening lead was a diamond.

At the first table, declarer fol-
lowed low from dummy and lost the
finesse to East’s king. East then
returned the heart five. South’s
choice of plays was now immaterial.
When he followed low, West won
with the ten and continued with the
queen and another heart to force out

the ace.

think of no good reason to jeopatdize
the contract by attempting a diamor!
finesse at trick one. ;

So he went up with the ace of¥!la-
monds and led the club queen: trick
two. East ducked, then wondie next
club with the ace and shiftd to alow
heart, but South alreay had‘ tine
tricks — four clubs, nree spades, a
diamond and a hear.

It is granted -nat many players
would experierve at least a fleeting
temptation to wy the diamond finesse
at trick one, since two overtricks Can
be made if West has the king. How-
ever, yielding to such a temptation is
not a very good practice, since
declarer can gain only a little if’he’s
right and lose a lot if he’s wrong. '

If South’s goal was simply tovtry
to make as many tricks as possible,
he would certainly be correct to play
low from dummy at trick one.But
that is not the primary goal here:
Making the contract is the first con-
sideration.

Tomorrow: Two double-dummy problems.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.
t
THE TRIBUNE





TIRE THROW
VENUE CHANGE

e THE first Tire Throw,
competition, scheduled for
Saturday, July 25, willbe |
held at the National Cycling |
Track at the Baillou Hills

Sporting Complex and not ° | .

the Government High
School, as reported in The
Tribune on Friday.

CYCLING
NATIONAL
CHAMPIONSHIPS -

e THE Bahamas Cycling
Federation will hold its
National Cycling Chmpi-
onships beginning today on
a course that will travel
around the Western end of
the island, starting at 8am.

The championships will
wrap up on Sunday with \
competition being staged at |
the National Cycling Track
at the Baillou Hills Sporting

“Complex, starting at 3pm.

Competitors from New
Providence and Grand
‘Bahama are expected to
participate in the champi-
onships.

BODYBUILDING
NATIONAL
CHAMPIONSHIPS

¢ THE Bahamas Body-
building and Fitness Feder-
ation will hold its’annual ,
-Mr/Ms Independence
National Bodybuilding and
Fitness Championships
tonight at the National
Center for the Performance |
Arts. '
.¢The championships will
feature competitioninthe |
men and Women bedybuild- |
ing and women’s fitness cat- |
egories.

Jay Darling and Faye
Rolle are the defending
male and female bodybuild- |
ing champions. Teshell
Mackey was the top fitness
competitor.

Competitors from New
Providence, Grand Bahama
‘and Long Island are expect- |
ed to participate in the
‘championships that will get
‘underway at 8 pm.

‘ Alana Dillette
Swim team heads |
for FINA World |
Championships

nementene| NeW Breed top Mighty Mits 10



morning.
as Swimming |
sending five |
athletes to cotspete in indi- |
vidual and relays vents and |
will be competiny, against |
1470 athletes from 164 coun- |
tries. :
Elvis Vereance Burrows,
Alana Dillette, Alicia Light-
bourne, Teisha Lightbourne |
and Arianna Vanderpool- |
Wallace will represent the
Bahamas in 15 individual |
events ad two female relays. |
Swimming competition
takes place from the 26th
July to-August 2nd at the
Foro Italico venue in Rome. |
Italy. Y
The team is being coached |
by Geoff Eneas of the Dol- |
Phin Swimming Club and |
Aaron Ciarla from Auburn |
niversity.



SECTION A



18, 2009.

INSIDE © International

JEREMY WARINER of the US, right, wins the men's 400m A-final, with CHristopher Brown of Bahamas, at center,
Stade de France in Saint-Denis, north of Paris, Friday, July 17, 2009.









Jacques Brinon/AP Photo

during the AF Golden League athletics meeting, at the



Both Brown and Sturrup place second at Worlds

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

CHRIS ‘Bay’ Brown and Chandra Sturrup were just
short of pulling off upsetting victories over two of their
top contenders for the IAAF World Championships in

Athletics this year.

Competing at the Meeting Areva
at the Stade France yesterday in
Paris, Brown and Sturrup were sec-
ond in the men’s 400 metres and the
women’s 200 respectively.

And Olympic bronze medalist |

Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands had to set-
tle for a sixth place finish in the
men’s triple jump.

Brown, coming off his season’s
best 44.81 seconds on the third leg of
the Golden League meeting in Rome

-on Friday, suffered his first defeat

on the European circuit this year.

Reigning world champion Jeremy
Wariner, who was upset at last year’s
Olympics in Beijing, China, won the
race in 45.28 seconds, leaving Brown
trailing in 45.44 for second.

Leslie Djhone was third in 45.47,
while American David Neville, who
dived across the finish line to deny
Brown of the bronze in Beijing last
year, was fourth in 45.49.

With his performance, Brown has

now surged on top of the World Ath--

letics Tour with 67 points from five
meets, surpassing previous leader



Lionel Cironneau/AP Photo.

Gary Kikaya, who did not compete
in the race.

The World Athletics Tour deter-
mines who will qualify, based on
their points, for spots in the World
Athletic Final that will take place in

Stuttgart, Germany in September.
Meanwhile, Sturrup finished sec-

- ond in the women’s century in 11.15.

The race was won by Jamaican Ker-
ron Stewart, who has the world’s
fastest time of 10.75.

Another Jamaican veteran, Aileen
Bailey, was third in 11.26.

Sturrup is still holidng onto sec-
ond place on the World Athletics
Tour with 68 points from five meets.
Stewart has increased her lead with
100 points from five meets as well.

Despite not running in the meet,
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie is tied
with three others for sixth place.

And in the triple jump, Leevan



Sands scored 16.78 metres for, sixth
place. Phillips Idowu won with‘17.17,
followed by Jadel Gregorio with a
season’s best of 17.12. Arnie David
Giralt was third with 17.06. \:

Sands’ performance kept him in
third place on the World Athletics
Tour with 28 points from four meets.
Girat is out front with 34 and Phillips
is second with 32. i

The athletes are all gearing up for
the IAAF World Championships in

‘Berlin next month. While the major-

ity of the countries have already
named their teams, the Bahamas

SEE page 15

KERRON Stewart
of Jamaica, center,
wins the women's
100m, with Kelly
Ann Baptiste of
Trinidad, right, and
Chandra Sturrup of
the Bahamas, dur-
ing the AF Golden
League athletics
meeting at the
Stade de France in
Saint-Denis, north
of Paris, Friday,
July 17, 2009°:

SSS °° °° ° " —" "=e "© iF "9" 0 °° © °C 6 ve e *h——° 6" ° ee 8 * 0 e e et °° —0*™ 6 °° ™ " ”

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Mighty Mits seemingly
forgot that they had at least five
innings to play a softball game in
the New Providence Softball
Association.

. Thursday night at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex, the
Mighty Mits scored all of their
runs in the top of the first inning,
but watched helpessly as the
New Breed peaked away for a
come-from-behind victory.

In fact, it came down to the
bottom of the sixth inning when
pinch hitter Teddy Sweeting Jr.
Tipped a single up the middle to
score Euegen Pratt with the
walk-off winning run in’ a 10-3
come-from-behind decision.

“We came out sluggish, but in
the end, we did what we do in
practice,” said Pratt, who had
gotten on board with a two-run
double to highlight the five-run

rally in the sixth. “We came out
slugging.”

After falling behind 3-0, New
Breed came up with seven hits
off two pitchers used by Mighty
Mits to eventually improve their
record to 5-4 to remain in con-
tention for a playoff spot in fifth
place. Spor

The Mighty Mits, who were
shutdown on just one hit the rest
of the way by Pratt after pro-
ducing three hits and marching
eight batters to the plate in the
first, fell to 3-8 for seventh place.

Pratt, in finishing with six
strike outs, admitted that he too

was a little sluggish at the start.”

But the 6-foot-3 19-year-old
hard throwing right hander said
he was glad to get his act togeth-
er.

“T came out joking, but at the
end I calmed down and started
throwing a lot of strikes,” he
pointed out. “I knew I had to
turn things around in order for
us to win.”

If their performance was any

indication, Pratt said they have a
chance to really be a spoiler in
the league.

“This is a new young team and
we are doing well, as opposed
to the veterans in the league,”
he stated. “We’re going alright.
But we could be better.”

Mighty Mits, managered by
Alphonso ‘Chicken’ Albury,
seemed headed for a big perfor-
mance as catcher Dwight But-
ler drilled a one-out double to
plate lead off batter D’Vano
Curry with the game’s initial run.

Marcellus Hall followed with a
single and he and Butler scored
respectively on two-out RBI
walk from Dival Storr and RBI
single from Basil Dean.

But after leaving two runners
stranded on base in the bottom
of the frame, New Breed finally
got to Mighty Mits’ starting
pitcher Andrick John in the sec-
ond.

A run-producing triple from

SEE page 15

Lldty

T= 9Ts



AY
li ye
‘ “ fod fl all

20

=F LLie
aca



TEAMS W L PCT. CB
Men's Division

Dorcey Park Boyz 8 1 .888 -
Commando Security Truckers 7 1 875 5
Price Waterhouse Stingrays 6 2 150 §15
RBDF Commodores 5 3 625 2.5
Robin Hood Hitmen 5 4 555. 33
Young Breed 3 5 3754.5
Mighty Mits 3 8 212 6
Thompson Heavy Equipment 2 "6 250 5.5
Buccaneers 0 9 .000 8
Ladies Division

Pineapple Air Wildcats 8 0 1,000 -
Sigma Brackettes 5 9 625 3
Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks 4 3 O71 3.5
Queens 1 5 166 6
Bommer G Swingers 0 7 000 7.5
PAGE 14, SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009





Beckham quiet in

MLS return, Galaxy
top Red Bulls

SOCCER
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
Associated Press

THE BUZZ is off David
Beckham in Major League Soc-
cer.

Los Angeles drew 66,237 for |

its 5-4 loss at New York two
years ago, the largest soccer
crowd at Giants Stadium for a
U.S. league game in 27 years.
Attendance dropped to 46,754
for last year’s 2-2 tie and fell

by 50 percent to 23,238 on

Thursday night, when the
Galaxy beat the lowly Red
Bulls 3-1.

“Obviously, the first year was
impressive,” Beckham said.

“We’re in a recession so, you -

know, maybe that’s part of it.”

In his first club match since °

the end of the European sea-
son, Beckham was often behind
the play and seemed winded.
He had no free-kick chances
near the goal, didn’t make any
crosses that created threats and
didn’t even take all the Galaxy
corner kicks while he was in the
match.

Fans scurried down the aisles
to get better pictures when he
did take corner kicks, but he
was booed at times.

“A few tonight, but it’s to be
expected,” he said..“It’s some-
times nice to get the boos. It
gives you some inspiration.”

Galaxy coach Bruce Arena
didn’t think it was too bad.

“I think this almost a pleas-
ant environment for him
tonight,” he said. “He can deal
with a little bit of booing here.”

Alecko Eskandarian scored
on a left-footed volley that beat
goalkeeper Danny Cepero
from about 28 yards in the third
minute, Landon Donovan
scored on a right-footed shot
from about the same distance in
the 31st and Eddie Lewis from
15 yards in the 45th.

Galaxy goalkeeper Donovan
Ricketts parried Seth Stamm-
ler’s shot late in the first half,



then blocked Jorge Rojas’
attempt off the rebound.

“There was two goals that
could be goal of the season,”
Donovan said.

Los Angeles (6-3-9) has won
four straight MLS games for
the first time since September-
October 2007 and is fighting
for a playoff berth. The
Galaxy had not won at New
York since 2000.

Juan Pablo Angel had an
87th-minute penalty kick and
failed to convert one in the
90th for the Red Bulls (2-14-
4), who would be a lock for
relegation if the MLS had it.
They dropped to 0-9-2 in the
league and 0-10-2 overall since
beating San Jose on May 8.

Coach-Juan Carlos Osorio
apologized for his team’s per-
formance. .

“T feel sorry and I want to
apologize to the fans,” he said.
' Beckham. appeared to go
out of his way to be friendly
with Donovan, who in a book
out this week criticized his
teammate for allegedly quit-
ting on the Galaxy in the late
stages of a disappointing 2008
season.

Beckham and Donovan,
who regained his captain’s job
from the Englishman, shook
hands and embraced ahead of
the opening whistle. Beckham
draped his arm around Dono-
van after the American scored,
and the two hugged after
Donovan assisted on the third
goal.

“There was never a doubt
in our minds that these guys
would work together,” Arena
said. “It was certainly a great
moment with all the buildup
of, you know, the so-called
questionable relationship. It
was great. They’re going to be
good together. They’re good
professionals.”

Donovan had come to New
York on a red-eye after
attending the ESPY awards in
Los Angeles.

ford, NJ.

Bolt wins 100 meters in >



ily 16, 2009, at Giants Stadium in East Ruther-



9.79 at Areva Meeting







Bill Kostroun/AP Photo

LOS ANGELES Galaxy midfielder David Beckham controls the ball during the first half of an MLS soccer.
game against the New York Red Bulls on Thursday, Jt





7 ty seats

TRACK AND FIELD
SAINT-DENIS, France
Associated Press

WORLD record-holder
Usain Bolt comfortably. won
the 100 meters at the Areva
Meeting on Friday, just miss-
ing Tyson Gay’s season-best
time as he gears up for next
month’s world championships
in Berlin.

seconds. Gay ran 9.77 last week
at the Golden Gala in Rome.

“JT had a bad start, but Iran a
good time,” Bolt said.

Barbuda was second to Bolt in
9.91, and Yohan Blake of
Jamaica was third in 9.93.

Bolt won the 100 and 200 at
last year’s Beijing Olympics in
world records. He also: helped
Jamaica win the 400 relay in

* record time. His goal now is to
beat Gay, the defending 100
and 200 champion, in Berlin.

Also winning were Sanya
Richards of the United States at
400 meters, Kenenisa Bekele
of Ethiopia at 3,000 meters,
Yelena Isinbaeva of Russia in
the pole vault and Kerron Stew-
art of Jamaica at 100 meters.



Lionel Cironneau/AP Photo

JAMAICAN Olympic champion Usain Bolt reacts after winning the
men's 100m, during the AF Golden, League athletics meeting at the
Stade de France in Saint-Denis, north of Paris, Friday, July 17, 2009.



Wade to Lamar Odom: ‘Come home’ to Miami Heat

The Jamaican won in 9.79 °

Daniel Bailey of Antigua and -

They stayed on course for a
share of the $1 million Golden
League jackpot at the end of
the season after four legs of the
six-leg Golden League.

Bekele dominated rival
Bernard Lagat in the 3,000,
surging ahead by 30 meters with
three laps to go, and extending
the gap by the end. He won in 7
minutes, 28.64 seconds, while
Lagat finished in 7:33.15.

Richards also won in style,
but still claims the Golden

‘League jackpot is not on her

mind.
“J don’t know what it is but I
never feel pressured by the

jackpot,” she said.
She may share some of that

prize with Stewart, who cruised
home in the 100 in 10.99, well
ahead of Chandra Sturrup of
the Bahamas.

Richards beat second-place
Novlene Williams-Mills of
Jamaica by more than one sec-
ond, finishing in 49.34. That
took Richards below 50 sec-
onds for the 37th time, breaking
Marita Koch’s record for most
performances under 50.

“That makes me really
proud. I told myself: No matter
what, I’m going to go under 50



today, | don’t care if it rains or
pours or the wind is blowing
me over,” Richards. said.
“Stockholm is next on my
schedule. I’m still not 100 per-
cent sure if I’ll be competing or
not. I might just go home and
get prepared for Berlin.”

_ Richards is looking for more
success at the worlds.

“It’s time to get prepared to
become a world champion,”
she said. :

In damp and slightly windy
conditions, world record-hold-
er Isinbaeva was way short of
her best, but she still did
enough to win with a vault of 15
feet, 3 inches.

Also, Jeremy Wariner of the
United States won the men’s
400, easing up in the last 20
meters as he cruised over the
line ahead of Christopher
Brown of Bahrain. Wariner
won in 45.28 seconds, 0.16 sec-
onds ahead of Brown.

“It’s not where I wanted
timewise, but I think I executed
right,” Wariner said. “I expect-
ed somewhere in the 44 (sec-
onds) middle to low. But you
know, conditions are a little
chilly. Windy down the back-
stretch.”

S995 D000, '*E ee =r.= tr; E, onr0rwWW rd “WW” :dl_

BASKETBALL
MIAMI, Florida
Associated Press

DWYANE WADE spent much
of his rookie season picking Lamar
Odom’s brain on all aspects of the
NBA game, everything from play-
ing tips to travel advice.

He hopes those chats start again
soon. ,

The. Miami Heat, who traded
Odom to the Los Angeles Lakers
five years ago in the trade that
brought Shaquille O’Neal to South
Florida, have made the free agent
forward an offer to return and help
Wade once again. The team has not

revealed terms of the offer,

although it’s believed to be a five-

year package that could be worth
around $35 million.

“I want Lamar to do what’s best
for him and his family because we
love him as family, but on the other
hand, we want him back home, to
come home,” Wade said Friday in a
telephone interview. “His house is
still there. It’d be exciting to see
what happens.”

Odom averaged 17.1 points — the
second-highest average of his career
— in 80 games with the Heat during
the 2003-04 season. He’s spent the
past five years with the Lakers, who
pulled their contract offer to Odom
earlier this week, a move that does-
n’t necessarily mean the two sides
won’t resume talking. Odom, 29,
was a significant contributor to the

Lakers’ championship run this year.

The Heat went 42-40 that season
with Odom, winning 17 of their
final 21 regular-season games and
earning the No. 4 spot in the East-
ern Conference. That summer, Mia-
mi traded Caron Butler, Brian
Grant and Odom to the Lakers for
O’Neal, who helped Wade and the
Heat win a championship two years
later.

Wade, who has asked the Heat
to make some roster upgrades with
hopes of getting back to the cham-
pionship level, said he doesn’t need
to call Odom to lobby for his return.

“Lamar already knows how I
feel,” Wade said. “I really don’t
know how to feel. He’s really taken
time to deal with it, sit back. It’s a

very important decision in his life. It
could be about where he ends his
career.”

The Heat have also been linked
to a potential trade involving Utah
forward Carlos Boozer, another
close friend of Wade and his team-
mate from the 2008 Beijing
Olympics. The South Florida Sun-
Sentinel reported Friday that Mia-
mi “has not entered talks ... but is
monitoring” the Boozer situation.

Over his 10-year career, the ver-
satile 6-foot-10 Odom has averaged
15.1 points and 8.8 rebounds.

“Lamar and [ always had a great
relationship,” Wade said. “He’s
always been the guy, one of the
guys, that | thought really helped
me as a young player.”

THE TRIBUNE








Pca eee

Manny welcomer
with cheers, hut
Dotigers fall 3-0

BASEBALL
LOS ANGELES
Associated Press





MANNY Ramirez was:
greeted with cheers, chants
of his name and camera flash-
es that sparkled around,
Dodger Stadium. Manny,,.
wood has officially been,
restored. 35

“This is my town,” the;
dreadlocked slugger said
laughing. :

Tinseltown had hoped for:a
better result with Ramirez
playing his first home game:
sinee returning from a 50=
game suspension for violat-.
ing baseball’s drug policy.’ 25

Wandy Rodriguez com!
bined with four relievers ‘on
an eight-hitter and the Hous?
ton Astros spoiled Ramirez’s’
homecoming with a 3-0 vic
tory on Thursday night. -

“Tt was great. I was looking
forward to this gamé,;”
Ramirez said. “I’m just gladT
got that game out of the way.
I was just playing the ga
like I always do.”

Just not with his usuat
results.

Ramirez went 1 for 4 with
two strikeouts. He singled,to
lead off the eighth, but he was
erased on a double play one
batter later. __sh

“T wanted to make good
pitches to Manny and I didn’t
want to miss because he’s'a
good hitter,” Rodriguez said.
“So I made good pitches to’
him and had good location.
with my breaking ball.” | |

There were plenty of enip:,
among the,
announced crowd of 45,970,
for the game, which came.
after Ramirez rejoined the,
team at San Diego on July, 3,
for a nine-game road trip,
Owners Frank and Jamie,
McCourt were out of town,.,

“J don’t need to talk about
anything more. I just need-to
show up and play the game,”,
said Ramirez, who has
repeatedly declined .to
explain what led to his sus:
pension. i 2P|

Rodriguez (9-6) gave up
five hits in six innings, struck
out six and walked twoin
winning his fifth in a row. The:
Astros have won the left-han+:
der’s last five starts and six:
of his last seven. tart

Jose Valverde, the fourth
Astros reliever, earned his:
ninth save in 13 chafices.

“It was a great effort by’
Wandy,” Houston manager
Cecil Cooper said. “It was big














i Yor him to go out there and

throw up zeros like that
against a pretty good hitting
team. He had everything
working and he made somi:
huge pitches to get Manny,
They really kind of pushec

him in the fourth, fifth and,
sixth innings, but hé main),
tained his composure ary,
kept making pitches.” i

WY




THE TRIBUNE



As One Foundation
announces 2008
scholarship winners :

SUGARLAND, TEXAS -
Ten local high school students :
benefit from the first annual ;
scholarship grant programme :
established by the As One
Foundation. The foundation
established by NFL Wide
Receiver Devard Darling will
award $10,000 in scholarships
at the Devard and Devaughn
Darling High School Senior
Awards Luncheon, on Satur-
day, July 18th at the Sugar
Land Marriott Town Square,
16090 City Walk, Sugar Land,
TX,

The scholarship committee
is pleased to announce the fol-
lowing first year recipients

¢ Taylor Rammrath, Sugar
Land, TX

* Alyssa Matus, Houston TX

e Shivani Patel, Sugar Land, TX
e Shadi Moubayed, Sugar Land,

â„¢X ;

° Alicia Villarreal, Sugar Land,
Tâ„¢ :

° Caroline Suter, Sugar Land,
1â„¢X

e Minh Pho, Sugar Land, TX

¢ Omar Amin, Sugar Land, TX
e Matthew Powell, Sugar Land,
Tâ„¢X

e Drew Miranda, Fresno, TX

Chosen for their exceptional
commitment to education
excellence, special athletic inter-
ests and talents these young
men and women have the char-
acteristics that will make them
successful.

The foundation’s scholarship
programme established the
Devard and Devaughn Darling
High School Senior Award, in
honor of Devaughn Darling,
the. twin brother of Devard who
died February 2001.

The scholarship was designed
to give students encouragement
and financial assistance for fur-
thering their educational goals.
The scholarship funds may be
used for tuition, fees, books,
room and board, or other edu-
cational expenses, and does not
have to be repaid. ,

New Breed tops

Mighty Mits 10-3

FROM page 13

Angelo Butler knocked in
Crachad-Laing from his lead-

off triple and Addie-rintey,-

returning to the line-up after a
brief break, had an RBI sacri-
fice fly to sent Butler home
for a 3-2 deficit.
The score remained that
way until the fifth when Finley,
- batting ninth in the line-up,
led off the fifth with a walk
and after Ken Wood got on
base on an error, they both
came home on another mis-
cue that put Pratt on base.
With two out, Laing drove

home Pratt with his RBI single

to put New Breed up for good,
5-3.

And in the sixth, after the
bases was loaded on an inten-
tional walk to Wood, Angelo’
Butler and Addie Finley both
managed to scoot home on a

pass ball. :
Pratt then came up with a
two-run double that drove
home Wood and D’Andre
Rigby, setting the stage for
Teddy Sweeting Jr, who only

needed to get the ball in play.

‘Instead, he came up with a

grounder up the middle that i
enabled Pratt to race home :

with the final run as they
forced Mighty Mits to walk off
the field with an abbreviated
10-run defeat.

Tn the feature game, Heavy

Equipment Dorcey Park Boyz

ace pitcher Edney ‘the Heat’
Bethel got a strike out on the

first Robin Hood Hitmen bat-

ter,
But number two batter
Garfield Bethel drilled a shot

eh the Dorcy Park Boyz’

leftfielder and was heading

homtfor an in-the-park home
run w




r they took too
long to come\gck on.

place second

FROM page 13.

Association of Athletic

Associations have not.

However, Brown, Sturrup
and Sands, who all compet-
ed yesterday, have already
booked their tickets by turn-
ing in the A qualifying stan-
dards in their respective
events.

None of the athletes :
could be reached yesterday :
for comments following :
their performances.







A CYCLING fan with a Texas flag runs along the pack with American seven
Platzerwasel during the 13th stage of the Tour de France cyclin

17, 2009.

CYCLING
COLMAR, France
Associated Press

LANCE Armstrong stayed in third
place after a wet and chilly ride Friday
and lost a crucial ally for the rest of the
Tour de France when teammate Levi’
Leipheimer withdrew because of.a bro-

ken wrist.
Germany’s Heinrich Haussler won the

13th stage by outclassing the pack with a
solo breakaway, and Italy’s Rinaldo
Nocentini kept the yellow jersey for a
seventh straight day.

Armstrong, the seven-time champion,
remained eight seconds behind Nocenti-
ni. Astana teammate Alberto Contador,
the 2007 Tour champion, is second, six
seconds back. Armstrong, Contador and
other favorites were 6 minutes, 43 sec-
onds behind Haussler.

Leipheimer’s withdrawal is a blow to
Astana and Armstrong. He is a four-
time top-10 finisher at the Tour, includ-
ing third place finish in 2007. He had
been in fourth place, 39 seconds behind
Nocentini.

He had surgery on the wrist Friday,
and Astana said he would return to the
United States as soon as possible to begin
his recovery.

“My wrist hurts a lot but it doesn’t
compare to the pain of watching the
‘Tour leave me behind and not be able to
ride the Tour with my teammates,”
Leipheimer said in a statement. “We’ve
had a.big battle so far. We’re the
favorites, and I wanted to be part of
that.” “3

Leipheimer and Armstrong have a
close relationship within Astana, which
Armstrong says is riven by “tension”
with Contador.

“He’s a good friend of mine so it
makes it even more unfortunate, but




that’s cycling,” said Armstrong, stress-

ing that Leipheimer’s absence is a big _

loss.

“You saw even there, in some stages in
the Pyrenees, when there was an attack,
we had four guys there. And now, one’s
gone,” Armstrong said. “Not only does it
hurt us, I think it helps the others in
terms of morale, and thinking perhaps
that the team has been weakened.”

At first, it appeared Leipheimer might
remain in the race.

“It seemed like an insignificant crash
that all of a sudden turned out to be
pretty major,” Armstrong said.

Leipheimer fell off his bike less than
two miles from Thursday’s finish line in
a crash involving two-time Tour runner-
up Cadel Evans. He pulled out before
riders began the day’s 124-mile stage
through the rolling. hills of northeast
France that featured three big climbs,
including the demanding Col du Platzer-
wasel.

Haussler, a Cervelo rider who won a
stage at Paris-Nice in March, raced ahead
of the second of two fellow breakaway
riders in the last 31 miles and distanced
himself from the peloton as the finish
neared.

Haussler cupped his face in his hands
and choked up with emotion as he
crossed the line in 4:56:26 — 4:11 ahead
of second-place Amets Txurruka of
Spain. Brice Feillu of France was third,
6:13 back.

“T was really happy. I just got teary,”
said Haussler; who was born in Australia
to a German father. “I just couldn’t

believe it. ... | was just so nervous that I

was going to crash.”

Haussler, who collected his first Tour
stage victory, entered the stage in 105th
place overall — 55:24 behind Nocentini.
He rose to 83rd overall with his win,
48:41 off the leader’s pace.

TIGER WOODS of the US reacts after a shot on the 18th hole during the second round
of the British Open Golf championship, at the Turnberry golf course, Scotland, Friday,

July 17, 2009.

g race over 200 kilometers (

SATURDAY, JULY 18, 2009, PAGE 15







Ki/AP Photos

Czerwins

-Bas Cz

-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong, center with black helmet, as they climb Col du
124.3 miles) with start in Vittel and finish in Colmar, central France, Friday July

Armstrong stays third at
Tour; Haussler wins stage

AMERICAN seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong, foreground, gestures:
as he rides with fellow countryman George Hincapie, rear, during the 13th stage of the
Tour de France cycling race over 200 kilometers (124.3 miles) with start in Vittel and.

finish in Colmar, central France.

Woods in big trouble after
disappointing round

GOLF
TURNBERRY, Scotland
Associated Press

TIGER Woods was unlikely to make
the British Open cut after shooting a 4-
over 74 in the second round Friday.

Woods had missed only one cut in a
major since turning pro, and that was
after the death of his father at the 2006
U.S. Open. But two double bogeys on
the back side made it highly improbable
he would get through to the weekend,
even after he birdied two of the last
three holes.

“Unfortunately, it just didn’t happen,”
Woods said. “No doubt I’m frustrated. I
was playing well the first seven holes,
right there in the championship. I felt
like if I was under par for the tourna-
ment, I would be in the top 10. I didn’t
do that. I went the other way.”

The top 70, plus ties, make it to the
final two rounds. When Woods walked
off the course, he was tied for 77th at 5-
over 145,

The British Open doesn’t have a 10-
shot rule, which would allow anyone
within 10 strokes of the lead to make
the cut. Woods was 10 shots behind co-
leaders Steve Marino and Tom Watson,
but that doesn’t matter at Turnberry.

Since the 06 miss at, Winged Foot;
Woods had made the cut in 43 consecu-
tive tournaments worldwide. er

He opened with a.disappointing 71 in’
much better conditions Thursday, was*
still in decent shape when he made the
turn at 1-over 36, then began to fall apart
after the turn.

His tee shot at No. 10 sailed wildly ,

"into the tall-grass far right of the fairway,

—a familiar problem both days — and it\
was clear he was in trouble when he
struck a provisional tee shot. Even with\
dozens of fans helping him look, Woads;
could only find someone else’s ball, tagk.,
a penalty and wound up with a double-
bogey 6. ve

He took bogey at the 12th after dri-
ving into a fairway bunker, then had
another double at 13. He was only 159,
yards away in the first cut of rough after. ,
his tee shot, then needed five moré
strokes to get down. A ragged approach,
missed the green, a sloppy chip failed
to stay on, and a missed putt from about |
5S feet sent him tumbling into an even,
deeper hole. ;

“T hit two bad 3-woods in a row,”
Woods said. “I lost them both to the!
right. With a left-to-right wind, you can’t
do that. You've got to turn them over,
and I didn’t do that.”


Cee a










Clear and very warm.









Partly sunny with a Partly sunny witha Some sun with a Some sun, t-storms Some sun.with
thunderstorm. thunderstorm. t-storm possible. . possible; breezy. t-storms possible.
. High: 89° High: 90° High: 89° High: 90°
_Low: 81° Low: 80° Low: 82° _Low: 82 _ | __ Low: 82°
! | HATH Ty
102°-86° F 101°-83° F 97°87 F | > 100°-91°F al
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm.or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Almanac



Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temporatore:. 2.2

1



High 93° F/34° C

Low . seven 82° F/28° C

Normal high: . 88° F/351°.C

Normal low.... Fa .. 15° F/24° C

Last year's NIGH... eseescessuceeeeeeene 92° F/34° C

= ~ Last year's OW oe eesesessseeesereese O1° F/27° C

Precipitation



As of 2 p.m. yesterday . 0.05"
Year to date 18.56"
Normal year to date . 21.96"

AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by



i 2 TRIBUNE

Venere Teta areas


















Today Sunday WINDS AVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W High Low W WASSAU ~ Today: SE at 7-14 Knots 2 Feet 3-5 Miles 86° F
| Sundar E at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Fret 3-5 Miles 86° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 3-5 Miles



F MODERATE



HIGH



V. HGH “68/20. 56/13. sh 3-5 Miles

4-6 Miles
4-6 Miles

Sunda
Today:
Sunda!

E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet.
SE at 8-16 Knots 2-3, Feet
E at 8-16 Knots 2-3 Feet





ABACO
The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

95/35. 78/25, ‘Ss
{ greater the need for eye and skin protection. [3°



78/25 t
/25°s
61/16 s

91/32 78/25 sh
= 86/30 77/25. sh
73/22 64/17 s



RN







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Toda 4:32am. 22 10:30am. O4 “ee 388398554993
y SAA pm. 3.0° 11:44 p.m. 0.2 Sees a
Sunday 9:37am. 2.3 11:34am. 0.0 BGS & :
6:13 pm. 3.202" 2 geting:
Monday 6:39am. 2.5 12:43am. 0.1
Y 742 pm. 3.3 12:36pm. -0.2 - | :

Tuesday (38am. 2.7 1:37am. -0.1

) 8:08 p.m. 3.4 1:36 p.m. -0.3



aes
94/347:
ae 71/21



te ms ii

VNWNNNWNW

Sunrise......6:31.a.m. Moonrise. .... 2:31 a.m.
.....-8:01 p.m. - Moonset -.-.

First

Sunset.
New

- 4:48 p.m.

MUN NNANNNANN ANE

YNNNNNNNWVNNNANNNA
“WNNNNNNNNNNNANNN

VVNNNNNN WN?
DY VYVVNVVNNYNNWR
SV VNNNNN NN NNN NR

UY MA WNNAN MN VAN NN



fe 94/81
; AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 ij : A fs >
_ ELEUTHERA Jul. 21 Jul. 28 Aug. 5 Aug. 13 =e
ig) 93° F/34°C 106/41 . 84/28 pc wi gi fs Co Cold =="
X Ff 4 S own are noon positions of weather systems
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm 2a
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary ns
89/31 78/25 pc
_ SAN SALVADOR
_ High:90°F/32°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's e Low: 75° F/24°C



highs and tonights's lows.

Sunday
Ww High Low
_ Fi FIC
= 96/35 70/21
68/20 56/13
83/28



RAGGED ISLAND

Atlantic City

Baltimore. High: 91° F/33°C
Boston Low: 72° F/22°C
Buffalo



91/32 Pe

68/20" S412 pe
68/20 salle t

73/22 54/12.




991/32°-72/22
96/35 61/16 Tallahassee
4/23 57/43" Tampa:



“90/32 77/25 s
> gapaeaaetet



88/31 75/23

Honolulu
Este 92/33 68/20:

Tucso ~ 107/41: 80/26--t-- AOTIA 89/28. t
Washington, DG. 84/28 64/17. Ss. ° << 82/27: 68/20. +s








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