Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 105 No.194

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SUNNY WITH
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Crown Land to

SSNS

Reports suggest
that 24-year-old
was attacked then
run over by car

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A 24-YEAR-OLD man
found beaten and bloodied in
an Abaco street early yester-
day morning died within an
hour of being picked up by
police.

Adam Evans, 24, of Marsh
Harbour, was found by police
lying in the road at the
entrance to Spring City,
Marsh Harbour, shortly after
4am.

He was taken to the health
clinic in Marsh Harbour with
severe head injuries and
injuries across his body and
died sometime after 5am,
police say.

Reports reaching The Tri-
bune allege Mr Evans was
beaten up by a group of thugs
and then run over by a car.

Superintendent in charge of
the Family Islands Hulan

Hanna said detectives have
yet to determine how he met
his death, but he expects infor-
mation will lead to a homicide
investigation.

Mr Hanna said: “We don’t
know what led to, or how, he
received his injuries, and right
now we are investigating the
matter.

“We have not classified the
death as yet, but it will proba-
bly lead to a homicide investi-
gation.”

The Tribune understands
Mr Evans’ mother flew to
Nassau with her son’s body
yesterday for an autopsy to be
carried out.

The family declined to
speak about Mr Evans’ death
while the police investigation
is underway.

Police confirmed Mr Evans
had served time in prison, but
Mr Hanna would not say why
he had been jailed or for how
long.

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m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

ATO ae
TT
MS:

BAHAMAS BIGGEST

OFFICERS SEARCH for suspected illegal immigrants in bushes near Yamacraw Beach yesterday. A total










Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



of 189 suspected illegal Haitian migrants were apprehended over the past two days in New Providence

and Andros.

One of the Bahamas’ most
wanted men captured in US

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ONE of the Bahamas’ most wanted men has
been captured by United States authorities in
Florida during a raid that also uncovered high-
powered weapons, drugs and cash.

David St Remy, 35, who is accused in the
2007 murder of Ryan Wood in Grand Bahama,
was picked up in the Miami Shores area by US
Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)
agents on an immigration violation.

Officers also seized an AK-47 and an M-16
rifle, as well as a handgun, around 1/3 kilo-
gramme of cocaine and $2,000 in cash from a
residence where St Remy had been living.

The joint operation with the Broward Coun-
ty Sheriff's office saw St Remy taken into cus-
tody together with another man, 28-year-old
Kervin Occean — also identified as a Bahami-
an national by US ICE agents — and will now
face charges in that country for illegally re-
entering after being deported in May 2003.

SEE page eight

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e SEE PAGE TWO

Senator investigating
REAR COR COs ETL
Arawak Cay extension

By TANEKA
THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

SENATOR — Jerome
Fitzgerald said he is investi-
gating legal options that
would possibly halt govern-
ment's extension of Arawak
Cay until there is full trans-
parency and accountability =
to the public regarding the _Jerome
controversial development. _ Fitzgerald

Mr Fitzgerald, who has recently been a
vocal opponent of the proposal, is spear-
heading the cause under the newly formed
Committee to Protect and Preserve the
Bahamas for Future Generations.

"It's definitely a matter which is open to

SEE page eight



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Businessman
shot, robbed by
masked men

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A
Grand Bahama business-
man was shot and robbed
of cash by two armed
masked men after closing
his business in the Hawks-
bill area late Wednesday
evening.

The 50-year-old victim,
who is a resident of South
Bahamia, is detained in
stable, but serious condi-
tion in the Intensive Care
Unit at Rand Memorial
Hospital.

Police are withholding
the identity of the busi-
nessman.

Asst Supt Welbourne
Bootle said the Police
Control Room received a
call around 10.45pm from
a businessman who
reported that he was shot
in the stomach outside his
store, near the Hawksbill
Service Station.

The victim told police
that he was driving him-
self to the hospital. How-
ever, he lost control of his
vehicle and overturned
near the Four Way Co-op
Plaza on Pioneers Way

SEE page eight



Crew of
oil spilling
barge has

disappeared

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

THE crew of a barge that
sunk off Cistern Cay, Exuma,
spilling oil and garbage into the
Exuma Land and Sea Park, has
disappeared and authorities said
they do not know if they are
dead or alive.

A 85ft tanker carrying two
excavators sank while passing
through the shipping channel at
around 3am on Wednesday.

The oil, which spilled into the
sea, NOW poses a major threat to
the environment and marine

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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS
=

Suspected illegal
immigrants are
apprehended

A TOTAL of 189 sus- om F 4
pected illegal Haitian 1 :
migrants were apprehend- : es:
ed over the past two days %, ad
in New Providence and tere |
Andros. HAITIAN IMMIGRANTS apprehended on Wednesday are offloaded and turned over to immigration officials to

Law enforcement officers be processed at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre.
yesterday apprehended 27
Haitian migrants in the
Yamacraw area. And an
apprehension exercise near
Andros on Wednesday
netted 162 Haitian
migrants.

After receiving reports of
a 25-ft Haitian sloop off
the shore of Seabreeze
Estates shortly after 9am
yesterday, a thorough
search of the eastern part
of the island was conducted
by police and Defence
Force officers.
PARLEPAC This resulted in the
V O| My | SUS apprehension of a group of
vce Sry 27 migrants - 18 men, eight
women and one child - who
were turned over to Immi-
gration officials for pro-
cessing.

Search

However, the search is
ongoing as it is believed
that there are many others
who escaped into the near-
by bushes.

The Department of





Marine Seaman Drissen Brennen RBDE Public Relations

a

Marine Seaman Drissen Brennen RBDF Public Relations

Marine Seaman Drissen Brennen RBDF Public Relations



who were discovered near

Green Cay, Andros on THIS HAITIAN sloop sits in
, shallow waters off Yamacraw









: ee Wednesday.
es le aie asking the public to be These 162 persons - 130 | et ldmaration ofc
DeLuxe ComBo 3 i : men and 32 women - were g 5

especially vigilant in the apprehended 27 migrants.

ast brought to New Providence
eastern district of New yesterday onboard the

Providence and to assist
ee HMBS P-48 and P-49 after
JR. BACON OA Ore) authorities in apprehend- they were spotted by the

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Ott ay] 0) ce]aia4 SANDWICH Comso ing these migrants. os Airwi
Pcs This latest exercise Dietenc Boras 2 wits

comes on the heels of
another apprehension of
some 162 Haitian migrants

Comso reconnaissance team.

Defence Force officers
dispatched to the area dis-
covered the Haitian
migrants who were not in
possession of the necessary
documentation to enter the
country.

“They were removed
from their unsanitary ves-
sel, taken aboard the
Defence Force crafts and
arrived in the capital at
8.30pm Wednesday night,”
a Statement from the
Defence Force said.

The migrants, who all
appeared to be in fair
health, were handed over
to Immigration officials for
further processing.





















Aide: Ousted Honduran
president heading back

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras

A TOP AIDE of ousted Hon-
duran President Manuel Zelaya
said he was heading back to the
country Thursday, while thousands
of his supporters blocked roads to
demand his return to power,
according to Associated Press.

Patricia Rodas, foreign minister

Of you sce these 2
auliful SISLELS today of Zelaya’s toppled government.

/ : said seed eioadent was “on
WLS ty L hem a his way” back, but refused to say

how he planned to enter the coun-
CS | at try or when he expected to arrive.
(ALY Ct Zelaya’s current whereabouts are

unclear and Honduras’ interim
leaders have promised to arrest
him if he returns.

“Our president will be in Hon-
duras at some point and a some
moment.

“He is already on his way. God
protect him and the people of the
Americas who are with him,”
Rodas told reporters in La Paz,
Bolivia.

It would be Zelaya’s second
attempt to return to Honduras
since the military deposed him and
flew him out of the country in a
June 28 coup.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Senator questions container |
ort plans, alleged phone taps |

SENATOR Allyson May-
nard-Gibson unleashed a blis-
tering attack on government
on a number of fronts yester-
day, criticising their plan to
move the container port to
Arawak Cay and demanding
to know whether the phone
lines of senior police officers
are being tapped.

Speaking in the Senate on
the issue of the container port,
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said:
“We do not need to do the
extension to Arawak Cay right
now. The experts already said,
leave it where it is rather than
move it to Arawak Cay.”

She pointed out that under
the former PLP government, a
plan to build an inland port in
southwest New Providence
was met with wide approval.

“The shipping stakeholders
on the Solomon and Mackey
Committee were enthusiastic
about an inland port as it is a
protected port. Last week in
Cuba, soon to be one of our
main competitors in tourism, I
saw what is certainly one of
the largest inland ports on the
region.

“Hundreds of Bahamians
could have been working right
now on sustainable jobs at our
inland port at southwest New
Providence. And hundreds
more could have counted on



“We do not need to do the
extension to Arawak Cay right
now. The experts already said,
leave it where it is rather than
move it to Arawak Cay.”



Allyson Maynard-Gibson

Opening businesses and hav-
ing sustainable jobs when that
inland port was finished. More
money is being wasted, to the
detriment of Bahamians hurt-
ing now and future generations
of Bahamians.”

The senator added: “Drive
by Saunders Beach. What will
you see? Non-Bahamians dri-
ving tractors in the Bahamas.
Bahamians are out of jobs and
non-Bahamians are driving
tractors and painting road
signs in the Bahamas. Who
would have thought that we’d
live to see the day when the
government would demon-
strate that Bahamians are not
qualified in their own country
to drive a tractor and move
Bahamian sand or paint a road
sign, in the Bahamas?”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson also
asked how criminals could be

swiftly punished when their
files and papers are being
“lost” while being removed by
hand from various courts.

“How can we have any con-
fidence in the system when we
hear about phone lines of
senior police officers being
tapped? Where is the govern-
ment’s voice in this critical
matter?” she asked.

“How can we believe that
the government is serious
about the administration of
justice when they say one day
that they will build the Judi-
cial Complex and the next day
they say that they will not?

“How can we believe that
they are serious when knowing
that we need judges, they
refuse to follow the custom of
renewing the contracts of
Bahamian judges and magis-
trates who are ready, willing

MP hits out over
lack of clear land

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE lack of a clear land policy
has allowed for the suspicion that
corruption and political manipu-
lation guides the granting of
Crown land, according to the MP
for Fort Charlotte.

In making this point, Alfred
Sears noted that it appears the
majority of the almost 800 Crown
grants awarded by the govern-
ment between 1992 and the pre-
sent were for land in Abaco.

“Well, I ask the question: What
policy guided the grant of so
much Crown land in Abaco? Was
it due to political considerations?
Tam not saying it was, but I have
to ask the question,” said Mr
Sears.

The MP said it is “wrong that
public land should be given out
while the average citizen of this
commonwealth cannot see a writ-
ten policy, cannot see who is get-
ting it, the terms they’re getting it
on and the policy that is guiding
the disposition.”

He was speaking during the
debate on a resolution moved by
Fred Mitchell, MP for Fox Hill,
calling for a parliamentary select
committee to be appointed to
investigate matters concerning
the disposition of publicly held
lands.

The resolution was supported
by both sides — with many mem-
bers proposing that a committee
could help guide the formation
of clearer, written guidelines gov-
erning the distribution of a fun-
damental and finite resource —
and was approved yesterday
afternoon. Who will sit on the
committee has yet to be deter-
mined.

Among the issues to be exam-
ined by the committee are:

¢ How much Crown land is
there?

¢ Who owns and manages this
land?

¢ Who has land been granted
to and on what basis?

Also to be examined are how
the charges attached to the land
that is granted are determined
and under what circumstances
public officers or their relatives
can obtain Crown land.

The committee is intended to
investigate to what extent the cur-
rent land policy results in the
open, rational and transparent
distribution of Crown land, and if
it falls short, as MPs said it does,
whether a legislative and regula-
tory regime can be created to
ensure these ideals are fulfilled.

Speaking on the parliamentary
channel during the luncheon
recess, Mr Mitchell said he
expects the committee to be able
to report within three months. He
added that he would like to see

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the committee’s hearings open to
the public.

Its appointment comes on the
heels of the resignation of former
Director of Lands and Surveys
Tex Turnquest, following a series
of articles published in this news-
paper outlining questionable land
grants during his tenure.

Praising “intrepid” Tribune
reporter Paul Turnquest for his
work, Mr Mitchell suggested it is
right that his articles should spur
an examination of issues related
to Crown land.

Given that there was no expla-
nation from the government for
why the director resigned follow-
ing the articles, he proposed that

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the committee’s work should also
result in the “full story” behind
this situation being exposed for
the first time.

The MP compared the experi-
ence of relatives of Tex Turn-
quest who were granted beach-
front land — which some of them
went on to “flip” shortly after for
hundreds of thousands of dollars
in profit — with that of many
Bahamians who have been forced
to wait years, in some cases over
a decade, for Crown grants for
their own residential or commer-
cial use.

Giving examples of individu-
als or groups who he alleged have
found the government less than
responsive to their needs, Mr
Mitchell noted that the Senior
Citizens Association in Long
Island was just recently granted
1.9 acres after putting in an appli-
cation 12 years ago for five acres
of Crown land.

Several MPs suggested that the
fact that it can take so long for
grants to be made or refused, and
that this can occur with no expla-
nation given for the delay or what
amount of land is finally grant-
ed, must be rectified.

Meanwhile, the perception that
it is easier for foreigners to get
Crown land than Bahamians and
that “kisses go by favours” when
it comes to Bahamians getting
land must be dispelled, several
opposition MPs said.

The future development of the
country hinges on the ability of
members of the public to have an

and able to serve?

“These are the things that
we ought to be debating: jobs,
crime and the right of unfet-
tered access to clean beaches
and other recreational areas.
We ought to be allocating
scarce resources to finding jobs
for hurting Bahamians, who
need to pay mortgages, rent,
utilities, school fees and buy
groceries and clothes. And we
ought to be allocating these
resources to restoring safety
in our homes and on our
streets. Enough is enough,”
she said.

‘the
olicy’

equal right to access Crown land
regardless of their political affili-
ation, family ties or social con-
nections, it was said.

“The regime I contemplate is
one that has established criteri-
on that all can access but infused
with the philosophical underpin-
ning that the land and its
distribution will be used to
empower Bahamians and to
increase their individual wealth
and our national wealth,” said Mr
Mitchell.

Contributing to the debate,
Minister of State for Lands Byran
Woodside said there is a “mis-
guided view that the governing
party has been improperly grant-
ing land to persons.”

He said that land is an “emo-
tive subject” but suggested that
Mr Mitchell’s call for a committee
was merely political.

Meanwhile, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham hit out at the
opposition during Mr Mitchell’s
statement on the committee,
alleging that the land “flipped”
by Tex Turnquest’s relatives was
“sold to foreigners” under the
PLP.

“You signed off on it,” he said,
adding: “Why didn’t you make
an issue out of it then?”

Mr Ingraham added he will
make a “full statement” on the
issue of land on Monday, “laying
out facts and policies and tabling
a number of documents that will
enlighten members of the parlia-
ment and the people of the
Bahamas.”

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Court of Appeal dismisses
MP stepmother dispute

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Court of Appeal yester-
day dismissed a long-running
legal dispute between Elizabeth
MP Malcolm Adderley and his
stepmother after the pair agreed
to settle their differences.

Mr Adderley was sued for
damages by Ruthie Mae Adder-
ley in June 2003 after she
claimed that despite being
appointed executor of his late
father’s will in 2000, Mr Adder-
ley had “failed or refused” to
carry out his parent’s wishes
with respect to her.

A 2006 Supreme Court judg-
ment did not award Mrs Adder-
ley those damages but the MP
was ordered to pay half of her
legal costs at that time after Jus-
tice Fazool Mohammed sug-
gested that had he carried out
his duties as executor more
promptly in earlier years he
could have “saved her the
expense of bringing the action”
against him.

However, Mr Adderley, PLP
MP for Elizabeth and chairman
of the Gaming Board, did not
want to pay the costs, and
appealed that decision.

Yesterday in court, the MP’s
attorney Charles Mackey told
the Justices of Appeal - Dame
Joan Sawyer, Hartman Longley
and Christopher Blackman —
that the two parties had come
to an out of court agreement
since their previous appearance.

Dame Joan said that in this
case the matter would be with-
drawn and dismissed.

Although the original legal
action against the MP dates
back to 2003 this is the first time
it has received exposure in the
press.

According to court docu-
ments obtained by The Tribune,
Ruthie Mae Adderley charged
that it took five years and a legal
action against Mr Adderley, her
late husband’s son, before he
executed a deed of assent trans-
ferring certain property left to
her by his father, and that while
she was “still in mourning” he
took steps to transfer a taxi fran-
chise held by his father into a
company bearing his name,
despite being aware that his
father had left it to Ruthie Mae
in his will.

He also did this knowing that
she relied on it for her income
and despite the fact that he then
placed himself in a “real con-
flict of interest,” it was claimed.
Mrs Adderley’s attorney’s
argued that Mr Adderley was
“unreliable and unbelievable.”

However, Supreme Court
Justice Fazool Mohammed said
in 2006 that although Mr Adder-
ley did appear to have procras-
tinated when it came to carrying
out his duties as the executor of
the will, he found it “difficult to
conclude (Mr Adderley) acted
dishonestly or incompetently.”

It was noted that when Mal-
colm Adderley senior died, the
taxi franchise he had held
became void under section 70
of the Road Traffic Act and
therefore it could not have
become part of the estate of the
deceased or trust property that
could be given out in the will.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ............

BUSINESS SECTION
Business

Comics

Weather

Pleo, 0,06

Ete enen eR RERAR EE eR etn oo P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

When a moonwalk was more than a dance move

NEW YORK — This week, after numer-
ous delays, the space shuttle Endeavour
lifted off from the Kennedy Space Centre
on a mission to the International Space
Station.

Once docked, the shuttle’s astronauts
are scheduled to make five spacewalks to
continue the station’s construction.

Forty years ago this week, Cape
Kennedy played host to a more ambitious
launch, as the huge Saturn V rocket that
would propel astronauts Neil Armstrong
and “Buzz” Aldrin to the moon lifted off
on July 16, 1969.

Four days later, an anxious mission con-
trol, nation and world heard Armstrong’s
voice announce that “the Eagle” — Apol-
lo 11’s Lunar Module — “has landed.”
Hours after that, we saw Armstrong
descend to the lunar surface in grainy
black-and-white, becoming the first man
to touch foot on a celestial body other than
Earth.

“That’s one small step for man,” we
heard him say, in what would become one
of the most enduring quotes of the 20th
century, “one giant leap for mankind.”

The millions of babies and small chil-
dren who were held in front of television
screens in living rooms across America so
that they could one day tell their children
that they had seen history being made are
in their 40s now and have children of their
own. Should they pause this week and next
to tell these children what they witnessed,
that step that once seemed to have changed
everything, they might well be greeted with
a shrug. Or questions along the lines of
“And then what happened?”

The answer to that question is a compli-
cated one that encompasses political
change on Earth, a straitened sense of our
national budget, and a certain failure of
imagination.

Not to mention that, after reaching out
and touching our closest heavenly neigh-
bour, any second act involving astronauts
rather than robotic probes remains, even all
these years later, incredibly difficult.

These days, our space milestones are

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more prosaic; this week’s Endeavour mis-
sion carried the 500th person into space.
But not since 1972’s Apollo 17 have
humans travelled farther than low Earth
orbit. For three years after that first visit to
the moon we went back, explored, con-
ducted experiments — and then, nothing.
We have sent machines to planets near
and far and into the deep, open space
beyond our solar system. But mankind,
after that giant leap, has remained within
the bounds of our home planet’s gravity.

For those, like your reporter, who were
awed by the great adventure of the Apollo
programme, this fact has been a slowly
unfolding letdown. There have been, to be
sure, triumphs in the intervening years,
such as the gorgeous vistas into space (and
back in time) afforded by the Hubble Space
Telescope and the insights gleaned by the
Mars rovers. But the promise of direct
human connection with other worlds — of
returning to the moon and venturing on
to Mars — remains a remote one for our
own space agency. As things stand, NASA
will have to scramble to keep America’s
launch capability alive after the space shut-
tles’ scheduled retirement at the end of
next year.

The plan, put forward by President
George W. Bush in 2004, to return astro-
nauts to the moon by 2020 as a stepping-
stone to a trip to Mars remains mired in
budgetary questions. International efforts,
such as those by the Chinese, to under-
take similar missions on roughly the same
timetable also seem uncertain.

The most recent progress toward a mis-
sion to Mars comes from a Russian exper-
iment in long-term human isolation —
more a baby step than a giant leap.

With the future of manned space explo-
ration unsure and distant, we might take a
moment this week to thrill once again, four
decades later, to remember a time when a
moonwalk was so much more than a sig-
nature dance move.

(This article was written by Dan Rather of
the Hearst Newspapers- c.2009).



DON STAINTON

Don’t be
complacent,
a coup could
happen here

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

For the past many years now
our Bahamas has been exem-
plarily democracy. For the most
part just about all of our gener-
al elections held over the past
50 years, we have been a model
in democracy for the whole
world.

Even Great Britain for whom
we owe our Westminster sys-
tem of government has mar-
velled how the Bahamas has
been able to maintain it. But
let’s not for one moment take it
for granted that what has hap-
pened in Honduras on June 25,
2009 cannot take place here.
The Honduran President
“Manuel Zelaya” was over-
thrown and replaced by
“Romeo Vasquez.”

When our general elections
were held last year 2007 the
final tally was the governing
party FNM 23 and the opposi-
tion PLP 17. Since that time the
numbers have changed to 24 to
16. Yet despite these numbers

letters@tripbunemedia net



which have been chosen by the
voting citizens of the Bahamas,
to this day the opposition PLP
still has not conceded defeat.
The PLP has challenged the
results of at least two con-
stituency results costing thou-
sands of tax payer dollars and
invaluable court time. As a
result of these actions we are
currently faced with a backlog
of cases as our court system was
tied up for almost one year
because of the opposition court
challenges.

There are those within the
Opposition who would if
allowed to, stop at nothing to
see the PLP be given the gov-
ernment now probably through
any means and destroy our
democratic system. In my opin-
ion the position of “Police Com-

missioner” is a very serious one
and even more so than whom
we elect as leader and Prime
Minister.

May heaven help us should
we ever get a Police Chief who
supports a coup d’état as what
took place in Honduras last
week.

I do hope that what took
place in Honduras would serve
as a wake up call for us here in
our Bahamas. Remember at
one time Honduras was also a
part of the British empire.

I call upon our leaders to re-
examine how our police com-
missioner is chosen to prevent
any future attempt of an illegal
overthrow of our government.

Please, my fellow Bahamians,
don’t be complacent and
believe that a coup cannot hap-
pen here. As we have seen in
Honduras it can (heaven for-
bid) happen here.

BRIAN O CLARKE
Nassau,
July, 2009.

No wonder crime is so high

EDITOR, The Tribune.

After watching the proceedings of Parliament
on Wednesday and Thursday, June 3 and 4, I realise
that we in the Bahamas have a serious problem to

face.

It is no wonder that crime is so high in the
Bahamas when we have people defying the rules of
Parliament and it is shown on TV for all of the pub-

lic to see.

I wonder if what took place was out of genuine
concern for the dead boy’s family or just plain grand-

standing?

Because if it was concern for the family then all
that had to be done was for the Leader of Opposition
Business in the House to allow the Member to be
the first Opposition member to take the floor and
then the Member would have had one hour to elab-
orate and say whatever the Member pleased about

this matter.

I fully support what the Member was saying as far
as there being some kind of inquiry to investigate
what took place because here again the Laws of the

Bahamas as far as I am aware say that no minor
should be interrogated without a parent or legal

guardian or counsel being present, so if this did not
happen, then it appears that another Law was broken
by the people we trust to keep the Law.

Also what I witnessed by other members of the

broken.

lives.

the Land.

June, 2009.

Opposition as they appeared to be interfering with
the Sergeant-at-Arms carrying out his duty was also
a serious case of obstruction — so another Law was

When will we as responsible citizens realise that
the public watches everything we do, so therefore we
have to show by example how they should live their

If the Members of Parliament cannot obey the
rules which they themselves make then how can we
expect for the poor and needy to follow the Law of

ABNER PINDER
Spanish Wells,

Bahamians wake up, politicians are destroying our nation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Further, I am concerned that
Bahamians are losing jobs every
day and it seems like no one
cares. But have you heard about a
politician losing jobs? No. The
politicians don’t care because that
is one of the ways they can con-
trol you. You must come to them
begging and they brag about
these Bahamians. Please wake
up, they are destroying us and
our nation. Look at the House of
Assembly where the honour

gone, look at the persons running
this country, you be the judge, I
say no more on that because it
would not sound nice.

Persons working for govern-
ment can’t even get insurance.
Just about every politician is
insured.

If a person from a government
department dies, his or her fami-
ly gets one cheque from National
Insurance and that's it, and that
person work for government for
over 30 years. Politicians just have
to work for five or 10 years and

his or her family is fixed for life. I
hope you understand what I am
saying without going into full
details, but you check it out and
be the judge.

Bahamians, let's stop, look and
listen to what they are telling us
and doing to us before it’s too
late, if only for our children and
grandchildren. It is not about us
anymore.

SAMUEL JOHNSON
Nassau,
July, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 5



Residents losing

patience over
excavation work

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

MILLARS Heights resi-
dents are losing patience as
excavation continues on farm-
land bordering their subdivi-
sion despite an investigation
launched by the Ministry of
Agriculture two weeks ago.

They claim a new trench
dipping into the community’s
water table has been dug in
the last two weeks and piles
of excavated dirt and rock sit
alongside a pile of waste pre-
sumably destined for the emp-
ty quarry pit.

Pictures of asphalt allegedly
dumped in the pit before it

was covered up this week have
also been sent to The Tribune.

The residents of Millars
Heights, off Carmichael Road,
whose homes back onto
Crown Land farmland north
of Cowpen Road, have been
calling on government officials
and police to put a stop to dai-
ly digging on the site behind
their subdivision since it began
in December last year.

Concern

Their main concern is that
the water table may be conta-
minated by waste dumped in
the quarry pit after rock has
been excavated eight feet

below the surface on around
two acres of land.

The leaseholder told The
Tribune he was given verbal
permission from government
officials to carry out the exca-
vation for agricultural pur-
poses and Golden Isles MP
Charles Maynard said he was
satisfied the leaseholder was
carrying out a viable agricul-
tural practise by excavating
the rock and nourishing the
soil with biodegradable waste
which would not pollute the
water table.

Minister of Agriculture Lar-
ry Cartwright said he under-
stands a permit is required
from the Department of Phys-
ical Planning before excava-

MP invites nephew

of Sir Harold G
Christie to a debate

CAT Island MP Philip
“Brave” Davis has invited the
nephew of the late Sir Harold
G Christie to a public debate
on the role his uncle alleged-
ly played in “hoarding land
not just in Cat Island but in
many other islands.”

Mr Davis made the com-
ment during the debate on a
resolution to form a select
committee to investigate mat-
ters in relation to Crown land
in the House of Assembly on
Wednesday.

Mr Davis, during a previ-
ous contribution on June 11,
spoke about the practices
engaged in by many, and
“particularly Sir Harold”,
under the Quieting of Titles
Act passed by parliament in
1959.

He claimed that the late Sir
Harold, founder of HG
Christie Realty, had quieted
thousands of acres of land
from poor Cat Islanders.

The MP also suggested that
Sir Harold’s heirs should be
persuaded to compensate Cat
Islanders in some form for the
land allegedly taken from
their ancestors through the
Act.

He said Sir Harold, one of
the “wealthiest men in the
country” and the area’s MP,
was able to obtain title to
thousands of acres of land on
the island “occupied by a
group of poor Bahamians.”

In a letter to the editor pub-
lished in The Tribune, Sir
Harold’s nephew William
McP Christie accused Mr
Davis of abusing his parlia-
mentary privilege and defam-
ing his uncle.

Mr Davis said that while he
would not respond to Mr
Christie, he would be more
than willing to engage him in
a public debate on land and
the role Sir Harold played in
the “hoarding of land.”

“We could have a series of
public debates on the issue
throughout the various islands
where he has been declared
the owner of lands. I welcome
it and he could hear what

Philip ‘Brave’ Davis

descendants in these islands
think about how his uncle
acquired land,” Mr Davis
said.

In defending his uncle, Mr
Christie said Sir Harold had
in 1951 purchased a planta-
tion from Mr and Mrs Henry
Rumball who had purchased
the same from the Estate of
Stanley Harris in 1927 and
continued the arrangement of
allowing the people of the
Old Bight to farm on the
land, provided they paid a
small share of their crops to
the overseers.

Sir Harold built a large
house on the estate and cre-
ated a large farm around it.

“In the early 1960s, many
of the Old Bight tenant farm-
ers refused to pay over a
share of their corps to Sir
Harold’s overseers and start-
ed to make claims of owner-
ship of the areas they were
farming, while many others
continued farming and pay-
ing their shares to the over-
seers, recognising Sir Harold’s
company’s ownership.

“At this time Sir Harold, on
the advice of his attorneys,
started an action under the
Quieting Titles Act to have
his perfect documentary title
to the land adjudicated by the
Supreme Court under which

Man stabbed
inside Subway
restaurant

A MAN was stabbed inside
a Subway restaurant during an
altercation with a female
employee yesterday afternoon,
police said.

According to head of the
CDU Supt Elsworth Moss, the
pair got into a row during
which the male was stabbed
about the body.

Supt Moss confirmed

CORRECTION

reports reaching The Tribune
that the incident occurred in
the Subway at the Town Cen-
tre Mall shortly after 3pm.

The victim was taken to hos-
pital but his condition could
not be determined up to press
time.

A woman is being ques-
tioned by police in connection
with the incident.

THE 17-year-old killed in a drive-by shooting on Wednesday
morning was William Farrington, of Lynden Pindling Estates,
New Providence, not William Ingraham, as reported by The Tri-
bune yesterday. The Tribune apologises for the error.



all persons making claim to
parts of the Estate could also
have their claims heard,” Mr
Christie said.

However, Mr Davis said
that the claim of Old Bight
residents was possessory.

“T know, I was there. Yes
HG Christie had a house on
the property, but we are talk-
ing about close to 2,000 acres.
My forefathers and those of
residents of Old Bight were
farming and working the area
of the house for at least 100
years before 1964 when the
court investigated the title.

“Yes, we know HG Christie
had a house but it did not
occupy 2,000 acres. The
Christie’s are getting about
$30 million for land the title
of which was questionable.
That’s why they approached
the court to investigate it
under Quieting of Title Act,”
he said.

Mr Davis said that the
judge had to decide between
believing “black, uneducated,
unsophisticated farmers from
Old Bight, Cat Island and
white HG Christie — a sophis-
ticated realtor and the mem-
ber of parliament for Cat
Island.”

“The deck was stacked.
There was no Court of
Appeal in the Bahamas at the
time and any grievance
against a judgment had to go
to England — to the Privy
Council. The court files went
missing — 1964. Women were
taken from their farms in
handcuffs and spent their
time in jail — for farming what
they held to be their land.

“The scar on communities
of that era remains highly vis-
ible and that is why I plead
to the prime minister to per-
suade his supporters to do
something for the depressed.
He has the relationship with
them, he can ask them,” Mr
Davis said.



WORK TAKING place at Millars Heights.

tion can be done, and he is
waiting for staff to determine
whether or not the farmland is
Crown Land before proceed-
ing with the investigation.

Investigation

Millars Heights resident
Jeanne Lundy said: “I know
they’re supposed to be doing
an investigation but I don’t
know what they have to inves-
tigate. It just seems this is tak-
ing forever.

“If he’s doing the right thing
why don’t they get an external



2! a cyt
a A Gal
hl aie La yg
rhe Stig

Heyl Pate

firm to test the water and soil
to see if there is any toxicity in
it?

“A number of residents
have complained to Mr May-
nard and he’s not doing any-
thing about it, so I really don’t
get it. It’s ridiculous.”

A source told The Tribune
the excavated rock and dirt is
being sold as fill to the
Department of Environmental
Health to cover the sanitary
landfill in Harrold Road, and
that the truck drivers dumping
waste in the quarry also have
contracts with the department
to clean up New Providence.

14" longer

Dh ree POSE Mee LT
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Lo a DL! P| ol a

Astronauts inspect space
Shuttle for launch damage

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

SPACE shuttle Endeavour’s
astronauts inspected their ship for
damage Thursday as NASA strug-
gled to understand why a normal-
ly benign section of the fuel tank
lost so much foam during liftoff,
according to Associated Press.

The slow, tedious work unfold-
ed as the shuttle rocketed toward
the international space station for
a Friday linkup. It was the first
full day in orbit for the seven
astronauts, who are delivering a
veranda for Japan’s enormous lab.
It also happened to be the 40th
anniversary of the launch of the
first manned moon landing.

Shuttle program manager John
Shannon said the thin layer of
foam insulation on the central area
of the tank peeled away in approx-
imately 6-inch strips as Endeav-
our blasted toward orbit Wednes-
day. The green primer on the met-
al skin of the tank was exposed in
places.

Fortunately, he said, the shed-
ding from this area — the so-called
intertank connecting the hydro-
gen and oxygen reservoirs —
occurred well past the critical two-
minute mark in the flight and
posed no danger to Endeavour.





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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

0 In brief

Venezuela denies
restricting

hewspapers’ imports i

? redevelopment of the Big Pond wet-

CARACAS, Venezuela jand park.

RAs ad pce ike pea updated plan for the project was pre-
agency that sells foreign cur- } ied at a-eiaeenold ti t
rency to importers is denying it fhe 1 - ao aS ors mg
hos lined ihe-supply of dale | Vee ee rean Levene

lars for newspapers, according }

to the Associated Press.

Agency chief Manuel Bar- } d
roso said in a statement Thurs- | proposal for the New Providence
day that the government has }
sold $68 million to paper }
? and protected as an urban open space

importers this year.

The National Union of Press }
Workers earlier said more than
50 regional dailies could close }
operations due to a lack of i

paper.
Under controls imposed by

importers must apply to the
agency to buy dollars at the offi-

ply.
Tensions between the gov-

licenses.



Swine flu claims 13th
fatal victim in Florida

SARASOTA, Fla.

A 22-year-old in Sarasota is
Florida’s 13th fatal case of the }
swine flu, according to the Asso- } ° li ° f ° ° ° ll ° h l e,e

eects | Liberlisation of communications sector wi improve notel competitiveness
how or when the man died. But
Dr. William Heymann, medical }
executive director of the Sara- }
sota County Health Depart- }
ment, called it a “tragic and }

sobering reminder that influen- } é y
: wide range of benefits and

ciated Press.

za is serious.”

Statewide, more than 2,100 ;
have been sickened since the }
} Saadat, director of policy and

outbreak emerged.



THE government has started the
process of relaunching the $2 million

Yesterday, the second draft of the

Bank.
Minister of Public Works and Trans-
port Neko Grant said that the loan

Road Improvement Project stipulates
that the Big Pond area is “restored

for the mitigation of any potential neg-
ative environmental impacts that may
arise from the project implementa-
tion, operation and maintenance.”
In 2001, a master plan for the Big

i ) Pond Park was completed. It included
President Hugo Chavez in 2003, : elements such boardwalks, a trail net-
? work and bird watching platforms, Mr

? Grant said at a press conference on

cial exchange rate. But falling }
oil revenue has limited that sup- Wednesday.

Plans were interrupted with the halt

i of the New Providence Road

ernment and private media | Improvement Project in 2002. In

have also become increasingly
heated, with 240 radio stations ; ‘launched.

under threat of losing their } . !
? of consultants assigned to the Big

i Pond Park project, said the updated
: master plan “improves the circulation
: in the park and accessibility for resi-
? dents to use it as an urban open space
: and a green space associated with the
: construction of the roadways. “

December 2008 the project was

Steve Seville, a member of the team

“We’re trying to have a balance

between the environment and the



Big Pond Park to be re-launched

By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

Letisha Henderson/BlS Photo

PUBLIC Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant (right) explains the updated Big Pond Park development at a press conference on
Wednesday. Pictured from left are Steve Seville, civil engineer and member of the team of consultants assigned to the project, and
Shanique Albury, environmentalist.

usable space available at Big Pond,”
he said.

The revised plan calls for the
restoration of the native plants of Big
Pond.

“The restoration component asso-

ciated with this will improve the wild
life and ecology of the area,” said Mr
Seville.

The plan also shows a “better
understanding of the connectivity of
the neighbourhoods, balancing the

wild life aspect with the urban use,
and balancing the usable areas of the
park while maintaining the green
spaces,” he said.

Designated picnic, barbecue and
play areas are also in the plan.



REGULATORY reform and
the eventual liberalisation of the
Bahamas’ electronic communi-
cations sector will provide the
Bahamas hotel industry with a

options for improving competi-
tiveness, according to Usman

-

regulation for the soon to be
established Utilities Regulation
and Competition Authority
(URCA).

Speaking at a_ recent
Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA) meeting, Mr Saadat
pointed to the positive impact
of liberalisation internationally

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and regionally.

Also speaking at the meeting
was Julian Francis, deputy
chairman of the committee for
the privatisation of BTC, who
explained that the new regime
will provide more regulatory
certainty for investors and
encourage competition while
accommodating the trend
towards convergence in the
industry.

Mr Saadat said OECD
(Organisation for Economic
Co-operation and Develop-
ment) countries have experi-
enced increased availability of
online, automated and mobile
services including 3G and 4G
technologies, as well as signifi-
cant reductions in prices and
improvements in quality and
coverage.

“Liberalisation of electronic
communications in OECD
countries has led to an increase

in triple-play and quad-play
offerings by operators along
with a 60 per cent broadband
population penetration. In the
Bahamas the current level of
penetration is less than 25 per
cent,” Mr Saadat said.

Noting the impact of liberali-
sation in the Caribbean, Mr Saa-
dat said countries in the region
have benefitted from a huge
leap in mobile communications,
especially where monopolies
have been replaced by two or
three different operators.

“These countries have also
seen price reductions and
increased speeds in broadband
offerings along with reductions
in data prices which are critical
to the competitiveness of hotels
and financial service compa-
nies,” Mr Saadat said.

Going forward, he said hotels
in the Bahamas will be better
able to meet the needs of their

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tions that will result from com-
petition and also will be able to
pass along the benefits of price
reductions.

He suggested that Bahamian
hotels could improve their
brands and reputations by offer-
ing world-class services such as
improved video and audio con-
ferencing facilities to attract
more conferences to the
Bahamas. Additionally, he said
hotels could adopt greater use
of technology to deliver more
efficient service, for example,
wireless credit card and hand-
held terminals to improve the
speed of ordering and SMS to
take restaurant and taxi book-
ings.

In the future, Mr Saadat said
URCA will assist hotels by
facilitating permits for special
needs such as radio and televi-
sion broadcast events. He added
that hotels could save on com-
munications costs through ser-
vice level agreements (SLAs)
with providers.

Finally, Mr Saadat encour-
aged hoteliers to actively par-
ticipate in the ongoing process
of reform by responding to con-
sultations.

URCA will oversee telecom-
munications as well as broad-
casting and cable television,
spectrum and numbering in the
new regulatory regime for elec-
tronic communications.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Church event to boost |

Freeport economy

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama is
expected to experience an economic
boost next week when some 400 to
500 delegates from the Churches of J
Christ throughout the Caribbean, the
United States, and the Bahamas arrive
on the island for the 39th Annual
Caribbean Lectureship.

This is the third time that the lec-
tureship is being hosted by the
Freeport Church of Christ on East ©
Beach Drive. Under the theme, “The §
Joy of the Lord of Your Strength,”
delegates will gather for four days of
Christian fellowship and spiritual edi-
fication.

Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace is expect-
ed to travel to Freeport to attend the opening on Sunday.

Elder Ellison Delva, chairman of the committee, said the
Freeport Church of Christ is pleased to again be hosting the lec-
tureship.

Delegates are expected to start arriving on the island on Fri-
day evening.

“Their presence will undoubtedly boost the island’s economy
as they will be staying in our local hotels and utilising various
amenities. In addition, we have planned local tours with the Min-
istry of Tourism to highlight all that Grand Bahama has to
offer,” said Mr Delva.

“Tt should be noted that many of our delegates are repeat vis-
itors to our shores and we hope to create more repeat visitors to
Grand Bahama through our lectureship.”

The lectureship will begin on Sunday at 9.30am at the St
George’s High School gymnasium.

The opening ceremony will be held that evening in the gym-
nasium at 6.30pm when Minister Vanderpool- Wallace is expect-
ed to bring remarks.

Mr Delva said all residents of Freeport are invited to attend
the event.

“Over the years, the lectureship has proven to be a most
effective vehicle in spreading the gospel throughout the
Bahamas.

“This is only the third time the lectureship is being held in
Grand Bahama and we hope to make this history-making event
a time of celebration. It was first held in Grand Bahama in
1984 and (then in) 1995, and has been held in New Providence
five times,” he said.

Mr Delva noted that the very first lectureship, which convened
in 1971 in Kingston, Jamaica, was the brain child of Dr Ken Dye
and his wife.

Each year the lectureship is held in a different Caribbean
country.

“The purpose of coming together once a year in this
fashion is to honour Jesus, encourage one another and to be
renewed through God’s word and the truth of the gospel,” he
said.

Guest speakers from throughout the Caribbean and parts of
the US will address pertinent issues affecting society in gener-
al and the family in particular. Family Island brethren will also
address the lectureship.

Speakers from the Bahamas include William Miller, Andrew
Major, James Miller and Keith Beneby.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace



=~ WIN
o HF



gfllogy® BACK-10-SCHOOL

y

lal

Downtown Nassau gets

Assistance
for visitors
to the capital

VISITORS to downtown
Nassau are getting some per-
sonal attention as a new corps
of tourism ambassadors
stands ready to assist them in
identifying attractions and
answering whatever questions
they may have about the
Bahamas.

Tourism Ambassadors,
recently organised by the
Ministry of Tourism, roam the
streets of downtown on Tues-
days, Fridays and Saturdays
— peak tourism days for Nas-
sau as the majority of cruise
ships arrive on those days.

The ambassadors, who are
identified by bright green
vests, are charged with wel-
coming visitors, providing
information and generally
assisting them.

Maxine Williamson, coor-
dinator of the tourism ambas-
sadors, said six ambassadors
are assigned cach day to assist
in the downtown area.

“We are principally using
College of the Bahamas stu-
dents who are engaged in
tourism studies as well as four
of our recently retired tourism
staff members,” Ms
Williamson said. “Our young
ambassadors are energetic
and the knowledge and expe-
rience of our retired tourism
professionals are invaluable.
The tourism ambassadors
(are) proving to be a very
effective way of assisting our
visitors and ensuring a satis-
fying vacation experience
(for) as many of our guests as
possible.”

Jewel Smith, one of the vet-
erans enlisted as a tourism



of 4

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tourism ambassadors



TOURISM AMBASSADOR D'Angelo Gray assists visitors with a photograph.

ambassador, said visitors have
many questions about the
Bahamas and its attractions.
She has encountered many
repeat visitors who felt they
had seen and done everything
the country has to offer. After
a few minutes spent talking
with tourists, they usually
become enthusiastic about
seeing attractions such as
Ardastra Gardens and the
forts, she said.

“T also tell them about the
Family Islands because you
have a lot of people who have
been here before and they
would think they have done
just about everything. But I
will say ‘no you haven’t
because you haven’t seen our
beach in Harbour Island with
the pink sand’.”

Carolyn Demeritte said she
did not hesitate to join the
tourism ambassadors after

retiring from the Ministry of
Tourism.

“I didn’t hesitate because
that’s what I like to do,” she
said.

“That is what I have been
doing for just about all my
life, 37 years plus. I always
liked helping people. At the
end of the day, if I can make
that visitor feel as though they

would like to return, I feel as
though I have done a good
job.”

Ms Demeritte said she has
helped countless visitors with
directions to specific stores
and attractions.

She is pleased that she was
also able to clear up many
misconceptions visitors had
about the country.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Senator investigating legal
options to halt extension

Businessman shot and —
robbed by masked men

FROM page one

and West Atlantic Drive.

Mr Bootle said officers responded to the scene and dis-
covered a 2002 Prayin sedan car overturned in the road.

He said the victim was in the vehicle suffering from an
apparent gunshot wound to his left side. He was removed
from the vehicle and taken by ambulance to the hospital.

ASP Bootle said the businessmen told police that after clos-
ing his business two men with scarves covering their faces
attacked him.

He said one of the suspects was armed with a handgun.
They robbed him of his pouch, which contained an unde-
termined amount of cash, and shot him.

The culprits fled on foot in nearby bushes.

Mr Bootle is appealing to anyone who may have infor-
mation that could assist police with their investigation to
call 911, or the Central Detective Unit at 350-3092 or 350-
3097.

One of the Bahamas’ most
wanted men captured in US

FROM page one

The re-entry charge carries with it a potential 20-year
prison sentence. Both men are already convicted criminals.

Anthony Mangione, special agent in charge of the ICE
Office of Investigations in Miami said that St Remy will
eventually be removed from the US to face justice in the
Bahamas.

“Tm proud of the hard work and diligence of our agents in
tracking down and apprehending these criminals.”

“Apprehending dangerous foreign fugitives is a top prior-
ity of ICE and now, not only has this illegal alien been
removed from the streets of South Florida, but he will even-
tually be removed from the United States to face justice in the

Bahamas.”
c

COMMONWEALTH BANK

Employment Opportuni

Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed to delivering superior quality service, to
training and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in
the community.

Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for
Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco.

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
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the Branch to enhance profitability.
Effectively leading, supporting and coaching personnel to
achieve corporate objectives.
Effectively managing a portfolio of consumer, mortgage and
commercial loans.
Adjudicating credit lines within delegated authority.
Managing the Branch’s collection activities and the protection of
collateral.
Following-up with client and support functions to ensure tmely
completion of product requests and transactions and resolution of
inquiries and issues.
Ensuring Credit risk ratings and credit scoring practices are
adhered to at all times to minimize the risk of loan losses.
Ensuring specific objectives are developed through an
appropriate strategic plan to grow the Branch’s loan and deposit
portfolios and other offerings.
Adding value to the customers’ portfolio of financial services
by actively promoting, marketing, building and cross selling all
deposit / investment and consumer credit business. Ensuring
self and direct reports consistently provide highly courteous
customer service in an informed and thorough manner. Assisting
the Manager in attaining the targets incorporated in the Branch’s
financial plan.

QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE:
Bachelor’s degree or higher in Business Administration, Banking
& Finance or a related discipline from an accredited University.
Minimum of eight years commercial banking experience with a
minimum of 3 years supervisory / managerial experience.
Experience in managing a diverse loan portfolio and assessing
loan quality.

Detailed knowledge of Retail / Commercial / Mortgage lending
practices and credit analysis to ensure portfolio quality.
Substantial work experience in loans and risk management with
a full understanding of financial statements and the ability to
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Excellent leadership and coaching skills.

Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills.
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REMUNERATION PACKAGE:

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exciting work environment with the opportunity for growth and
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reflecting the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications,
including a performance based incentive plan, health, vision,
dental and life insurances and a pension plan.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before

July 24, 2009 to:

Human Resources Department
Re: Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco
P.O. Box SS-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Telefax: (242) 393-8073
E-mail address: hr@combankltd.com

* Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their
interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those
under consideration will be contacted.”

©2009 CreativeRelations.net



FROM page one

legal action and we have a
legal team now looking at
the actions of that and
whether or not there are
steps that can be taken
through the courts in order
to prevent this, until we are
able to get the full disclo-
sure in the interests of trans-
parency and accountability
that this development
involves.

"But there is no doubt
that morally what they are
doing is totally, totally
wrong," he said at a press
conference held at the
Arawak Cay site yesterday.
He argued that residents

and businesses in the area
should have to suffer
through expected increases
in noise and traffic due to
the development.

The senator also again
claimed there has been a
shroud of "secrecy" sur-
rounding the issue and
argued that government has
yet to release an environ-
mental impact analysis
(EIA) for scrutiny. He
claimed that that he has only
received a "draft" of the
study through undisclosed
sources.

But yesterday Environ-
ment Minister Earl Deveaux
released a statement saying
an EIA prepared by Blue
Engineering is available to

the public in the Ministry of
The Environment or
the Ministry of Public
Works.

"This is contrary to the
assertion. . .That the report
has not been formally
released, (or the) suggestion
(of) some ulterior motive on
the Ministry. These docu-
ments provide a wealth of
information, including but
not limited to the existing
conditions at the site, the
potential impacts of the pro-
ject to the environment and
proposed measures for mit-
igating these impacts,” said
Mr Deveaux's statement.

Portions of the report
were first made public earli-
er this week in another local

Crew of oil spilling barge has disappeared

FROM page one

and terrestrial life there.

Bahamas National Trust (BNT)
staff in Exuma heard about the
sunken barge over the radio and fixed
lights and buoys to the wreck to pre-
vent boating collisions. BNT divers
were dispatched and closed hatches
on the barge to prevent more garbage

from spilling into the sea.

They also contacted ship owner
Michael Oakes, however, they had
not determined the number of crew
on board the barge before The Tri-

bune went to press last night.

A response team organised by Min-
ister of the Environment Earl
Deveaux will go to Exuma this morn-
ing to assess the extent of the oil spill

and organise the cleanup.

The team of officials from the Bahamas Envi-
ronment, Science and Technology (BEST) Com-
mission, Royal Bahamas Defence Force (RBDF)
the Port Department will work with BNT staff to

deal with the wreckage.

BNT Executive Director Eric Carey said: “Our
main concern is what happened to the wreck and
the people on the vessel. We have no idea where

-
MAM BIN eclUye



they are, whether they are dead or
alive, and the first thing we have to
do is ensure they are safe.

“We are also very concerned about
the marine environment and trying to
minimise the impact of the damage
due to the oil spill and trash. We want
to stop the leak and very importantly
we want to know when this is going to
be moved.

“Trying to get tractors and equip-
ment off the sea floor could create a
lot of damage and disturbance. We
will need to move two tractors and a
front-end loader with cranes which is a
major operation and we want to
ensure it’s handled as delicately as
possible.”

The sunken barge will have crushed
coral on the sea bed and the oil spill
will potentially impact beaches

throughout the park affecting protected iguanas

underwater.

and endangered sea birds.
It had been transporting heavy equipment
either to or from New Providence when it went

Mr Carey added: “We want to see it assessed

and cleaned up and the Trust is pleased the min-
ister is clearly very concerned and has organised
a full and rapid assessment.”

Pasche Bank & Trust Ltd

Subsidiary of

BASQUE

ite Private Bonking

is seeking candidates for the position of:

Relationship Manager/Private Banker

Candidates should possess the following qualifiactions:

¢ University Degree in Finance, Banking or Business Administration and/or

related professional designation
* A minimum of 5 to 10 years banking experience

* Own client portfolio

¢ Thorough knowledge of private banking products and services

* Knowledge of Bahamian regulatory requirements

¢ Fluency (or working knowledge) of French would be an asset

Responsibilities:

¢ Expanding existing client relationships

¢ Proactively contacting and profiling clients
¢ Marketing of private banking and portfolio management services

Personal Qualities:

* Outstanding sales skills

* A strong service ethic with a focus on existing clients and prospects

* Exceptional verbal and written communication skills

* Must be able to work in a dynamic environment with minimal supervision

* Must possess strong organisational skills

* Superior client service and problem-solving skills

Please apply to:
P.O. Box AP 59241
Nassau Bahamas

Fax: (242)327-1514

Email: gilles.schanen@pasche.ch



daily and in Tribune Busi-
ness.

Regarding concerns that
the development could con-
taminate the city's water
supply, the statement said:
"The EIA states that fol-
lowing sediment sampling
and laboratory testing, cont-
aminants in the dredge
material are well below lev-
els for concern based on cri-
teria established by the Unit-
ed States Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA).
The report concludes that
the potential for the release
of contaminants that could
affect either sea water qual-
ity or potable water supplies,
during dredging operation is
not a concern."

On the possible detriment
to the area's marine life the
statement said, "While the
risk exists for sediment to
harm sea life, this risk is mit-
igated by the implementa-
tion of good dredging prac-
tices to minimize sediment
suspension and dispersal, as
well as by independent envi-
ronmental monitoring to
ensure the use of turbidity
barriers and compliance with
the turbidity control stan-
dard.

"Additionally, in an
attempt to further assess and
advise on efforts to mitigate
the potential impact to sea
life, the possibility of relo-
cating viable hard and soft
corals, as well as sponges
was explored by consultants
Continental Shelf Associates
(CSA) International".

CSA was contracted by
government to assess,
restore and monitor damage
caused by the 2008 ground-
ing of the M/T Ficus near
Goulding Cay, New Provi-
dence.

"However, during their
survey of the Arawak Cay
site, CSA found that the
corals within the impacted
area were small and not very
diverse, making them unsuit-
able candidates for reloca-
tion,” said the statement.

The release added that any
the concerns "over the
increase in noise, vibration
and the

potential for unpleasant
odours should be tempered
by the fact that these
increases will be minimal,
and temporary."

Mr Fitzgerald called for
Dr Deveaux's position to be
called into question and
again accused Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symonette of
being complicit in the plan
to relocate the container
port from its current loca-
tion on Bay Street to
Arawak Cay to benefit a
special interest group of
shipping stakeholders.

Media monitor
says Sevel
photographers
detained in Iran

PARIS

MEDIA monitor
Reporters Without Borders
says five photographers and
a cameraman have been
detained in Iran over the
past week, according to
Associated Press.

The Paris-based group list-
ed five Iranian photogra-
phers seized Saturday, nearly
a month after the June 12
presidential elections that
prompted a wave of opposi-
tion protests. It says French-
Iranian cameraman Said
Movahedi was detained July
9.

The reason for the arrests
is unclear.

Reporters Without Bor-
ders said in a statement
Thursday that “The Iranian
government fears images” of
the protests.

The group says at least five
other photographers or cam-
eramen have been injured by
police or militias during the
crackdown on opposition
protesters. It says 41 journal-
ists are behind bars in Iran.





Senior national
haseball team
ready for World
Baseball Challenge

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



bstubbs @tribunemedia.net :

SINCE the inception about a i
decade ago, the Bahamas Base- :
ball Federation has had some }
relatively good performances }
on the international junior cir- }

cuit.

Now the federation is in
Prince Gorge, British Colum-
bia, Canada where president

: Caribbean Awards Sports Icons © Hepburn and Bahamas Softball
: celebrations come to town, there | Federation’s president Burkett
i will be quite a number of activi- Dorsett, both of whom have con-
i ties surrounding the gala event. | sented to come on board to stage

Craig ‘Salty’ Kemp is confident }

that they can finally make their
break through on the senior cir-
cuit.

The senior national team
arrived in Prince George since
Tuesday, have gotten acclima-

i at Breezes SuperClub from _ discplines this year.

i November 15-21. The two-week Both basketball and softball
: long celebrations will have added __ will be a part of boxing, whose
i attraction with competition in president Wellington Miller, has
i more sporting disciplines taking agreed to put on the event for
: place. another year.

tised and are now ready to start

playing in the World Baseball : who was appointed as the presention was held at the

i Regional Director of CASI fol- Jamaica Pegasus Hotel in

Challenge.

The team, managed by Jeff :

‘Sangy’ Francis and coached by } Kingston, Jamaica, the week of well attended by Caribbean

activities will not just feature the sports stars, including Jimmy
: awards presentation, but they are © Adams, Mike McCallum, Aileen
play their opener on Saturday ; looking forward to the participa- Bailey, Nesta Carter and Grace

? tion of athletes in the various Jackson.

Teddy Sweeting and Alonzo
Pratt from Grand Bahama, will

against Canada.

In an interview with The Tri- :
bune yesterday just before the

toeen ne acd OF to praciice, ordinated with the Amateur Box- award, accompanied Sturrup to

the necessary adjustments and i ing Federation of the Bahamas the ceremony, which was spon-
are ready to start play at 3 pm i and the Jamaican Boxing Board sored by Digicel and the

“We have settled in and we ; to put on a tournament,” said Jamaican Ministry of Sports.
had a workout yesterday « Sturrup, a sports journalist at the The other three Bahamians
Ciao) ae wer cuias Nassau Guardian. were track and field stars Avard

for another workout as we } ; :
speak,” Kemp said. “The team { through the Pan American McKenzie and Chandra Sturrup.

is looking good. Everybody is } Caribbean Boxing Organization, SEE page 10

Kemp said the team have made

healthy and ready to go.”

The team is comprised of the

following:

Catchers — Etienne Far-
quharson Jr and Stenard Dun- }

combe.

Infielders — Lynden Pindling
II; Lionel Ferguson Jr and }
Grand Bahama’s Jason Curry :

and Aneiko Knowles.

Outfielders — Sharad John-
son and Sherman Ferguson, }
along with Grand Bahamian ;

Raymond Grant.

Pitchers — Darren Bowleg }
(left-hand), Crandon Wallace :
(left-hand); David Sweeting
(right-hand), Grand Bahama’s
Patrick Knowles (left-hand), }
Desmond Rolle (right-hand),
Amad Williams (right-hand) }
and Diondre Rolle (right-hand) :
as well as Spanish Wells’
Johnathan Groezinger (right- ;

hand).

Looking at the team, Kemp
said it’s a very youthful squad :
after some of the other ball
players whom they wanted to }
make the trip declined the offer }

to travel.

“Despite the fact that they }
are young, they are very talent- }
ed, so we’re looking forward to i
some great things from them,” }

Kemp said.

“We just want to create an }
opportunity for them to gain }
some exposure,” Kemp said. }
“This is probably the highest }
level of baseball that we have }
been engaged in since the incep- :

tion of our federation.”

Kemp admits that it’s not }
going to be as easy for the team }
because of the calibre of com- }
petition that they are going to :

face over the next week.

But he said as long as the
players live up to their expecta- }
tions, he doesn’t see why they }

el

can’t perform at a very high lev-

“T would like to see us win a

few games,” he said. “That’s our }
objective because nobody real- }
ly know anything much about
us, we haven’t seen any of these }
teams play and they haven’t ;

seen us play.

“So we just don’t know what }
to expect. All I can expect is for }
the guys to go out there and }
play to the best of our ability }
and I think we will do very

well.”

Following their opener

against Canada, the Bahamas }
will have to get ready to play ;

Germany on Sunday.

The World Baseball Chal-
lenge, founded in 2002 in Grand i
Forks, British Columbia, is a }
biannual event that attracts }
teams from Cuba, Canada, Tai- :
wan, Dominican Republic, Rus- }
sia, Mexico and the United }

States.

The Bahamas, whose doc- }
tor/trainer is Ferriston Lock-
hart, is the only Caribbean }
country participating in this }
year’s tournament that will :

wrap up on Sunday, July 26.



FRIDAY, JULY,17, 2009



STU TITER UE
Sports Icons comes to town

By BRENT STUBBS of which Sturrup, also serves the

Senior Sports Reporter chairman.

bstubbs @ tribunemedia.net Sturrup said he has already
contacted Bahamas Basketball

WHEN the second annual Federation president Lawrence





Fred Sturrup

This year’s awards willbe held competition in their respective

According to Fred Sturrup, Last year’s inaugural awards

lowing last year’s show in Kingston in November and was

events. Elisha Obed, one of the four
“Last year in Jamaica, 1 co- Bahamian contenders for the

The tournament was organised Moncur, Debbie Ferguson-

Giving back to the

islands

Myron Rolle and family plan to
build medical and sports complex

JULY 16, 2009 (Exuma, Bahamas) — Rhodes Scholar
and College Football All-American Myron L. Rolle
and his family announced plans to build the Myron L.
Rolle Medical Clinic and Sports Complex, in Steven-
ton, Exuma in the Bahamas, where the Rolle family
originates. The Complex will provide free health ser-
vices to residents of Exuma, as well as a state-of-the-art
wellness and training facilities for athletes and visitors
to Exuma, Bahamas.

The project will be executed in conjunction with the
Bahamas Ministry of Health and the Florida State Uni-
versity College of Medicine, based in the United States.
Rolle graduated from Florida State in December 2008
with a pre-med degree and this coming school year, as a
Rhodes Scholar, will earn a Masters Degree in Medical
Anthropology from Oxford University in England.

He plans to enter the National Football League Draft
in 2010 to pursue a professional football career, and fol-
lowing football pursue a career as a medical surgeon.

"My family and I are extremely proud to announce
the construction of this Medical Clinic and Sports Com-
plex, which will provide much needed medical
resources to an area of the world that is near and dear
to our hearts," said Myron Rolle. "While I was born in
the US, Bahamas is where my parents, Whitney and
Beverly Rolle, and three of my brothers, were born and
raised. I have always thought of the Bahamas as my
second home."

A capital campaign is now underway to fund con-
struction of the Myron L. Rolle Medical Clinic and
Sports Complex, coordinated through the Myron L.
Rolle Foundation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organisation
incorporated in the United States. The clinic will be

1 : built in multiple phases, with the first being the main
a ee = health center facility.
r = = F In conjunction with that initial phase, a project will
“= = 4 = begin immediately to build a new Memorial Park adja-

MYRON Rolle stands next to an artist's rendering and construction site plans at the future home of the cent to the clinic site, featuring the statue of Pompey

Myron L. Rolle Medical Clinic in Steventon, Exuma, in the Bahamas. and restoration of an historic jailhouse as a museum.
Pompey, as a slave of Lord John Rolle, led an uprising

in Exuma in the 1830's that resulted in permanent ben-
efits for the Rolle slaves and their generations.
"It speaks volumes about the character of Myron
Rolle and the Rolle family, that he has come back to
Exuma and wants to do his part to see a better day for
our people and our future,” said Ivan Ferguson, Senior
Deputy Administrator for Exuma, during the
Announcement Ceremony.
MYRON'S father ' The Florida State University College of Medicine,
Whitney Rolle based in Tallahassee, Florida, is partnering with the
(left), who is li , Foundation to advise on the project, as well as launch a
Treasurer & Sec- % : ' new initiative through its FSU Cares Program to bring
retary ofthe ae a a medical mission to Exuma each year. During the pro-
Myron L. Rolle 1 gramme, Florida State medical students and doctors
Foundation, along | will travel to the Bahamas and provide free medical
with Myron's care and supplies to Exumians. The programme will be
brother, McKinley funded through the Myron L. Rolle Foundation.
(right), Assistant
Foundation, 8
address guests at “ Pa The Myron L. Rolle Foundation is a tax-exempt, non-profit
the Announce- aa 7 * z 7 organisation dedicated to the support of health, wellness,
ment Ceremony ’ ; educational and other charitable initiatives throughout the
of the Myron L. ¥ world that benefit children and families in need. The Founda-
Rolle Medical tion was established in 2009 by Rhodes Scholar and College
Clinic. * Football All-American Myron L. Rolle and his family.





PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS



‘King of the
Tire Throw’

set for next
weekend



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs @ tribunemedia.net

EARLIER this year, Bahamians got
an opportunity to display their skills in a
fire engine pulling competition.

Next weekend, Bahamians will get a
chance to display their skills in a tyre
throwing competition.

Dubbed the “King of the Tire
Throw,” the competition is being organ-
ised by powerlifting champion Delwin
‘Blue’ Scott and will be held on Satur-
day, July 25, starting at 11 am at the
Government High School.

“We want to see how far a Bahamian
can throw a tyire,” Scott said.

The competition is open to any and all
Bahamians, but Scott said he is primar-
ily targeting the younger competitors
because he intends to introduce it to the
school system in the new year.

The youngsters will throw tires that

adults will be throwing seven pounds.

Scott said they decided to use the two
weight classes because “we don’t know
how far the competitors can actually
throw the tyres and we want to make it
fun and exciting for everybody partici-
pating.

“We know that there are a lot of
bodybuilders and powerlifters who can
throw, but we want to get more of the
average every day Bahamian to come
out and participate.”

As this is the initial competition being
staged, winners in each category will be
crowned as the national champions and
they will be listed as the record hold-
ers.

“T think that is one of the things that
will make this competition so interest-
ing,” Scott said. “It’s never been done
better and there are a lot of competitors
out there who are looking for some-
thing different to display their skills.”

The winner of the championship will
also be awarded $225.00 for their efforts,

while second place will cart off $150.00
and third place will pocket $125.00

Scott, who has since start competing
and is now a personal trainer, said he
decided to stage the competition because
there’s been a cry for more fun oriented
activities for Bahamians to participate in.

“The good thing about competing in
an event like this is that you don’t real-
ly have to be a member of a gym,” he
said. “All you have to do is go to any
junk yard or a used tyre shop and get a
tyre and practice throwing it.”

The event, according to Scott, is
designed as a family oriented one and he
is encouraging as many persons who
have an interest in participating in some-
thing new will come out and compete.

To participate in the competition, all
a competitor has to do is show up at
GHS next Saturday before the 11 am
starting time and register.

For further information, persons can
also contact Scott at 456-2050 or 502-
0702.



















COACH Campos watches as two students demonstrate the Tachi-waza.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Request for Proposals fo
act as Registrar of the new
Utilities Appeal Tribunal

In preparation for the enactment of the new Utilities Appeal Tribu-
nal Bill, 2009, (“the Bill’) the Committee for the Privatisation of The
Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (“the Committee”)

is seeking proposals for the role of Registrar as defined in the Bill.

The Utilities Appeal Tribunal (“the Tribunal”) will be established to
setile disputes arising in the communications sector under the
new Communications Act, 2009 once it comes into force. It is the
intention to outsource the role of the Registrar of the Tribunal

(“Registrar”) to an independent organisation.

The Committee is pleased to invite the submission of proposals to
act as Registrar from suitably qualified organisations. Copies of
the request for proposal (“RFP”) document may be downloaded

from the Government's website at www.bahamas.gov.bs or the

privatisation website at www.btcprivatisation.com.

Submissions must be made by 5pm, July 31, 2009 in the manner
outlined in the RFP documents. The preferred bidder will be in-

formed no later than August 7, 2009.

weight about five pounds, while the

























â„¢
=

COACH Campos (third row) poses with judokas.



Brazilian Judo Olympian
in Town for Caribbean Cup

LAST night at the All-Star Family Center on
Joe Farrington Road, the Bahamas
national judo team found out what training is like
from Brazil's top female coach. Coach Campos is
a world renowned coach who is a two time
Olympian. She is in town to attend the Caribbean
Cup and teach a regional course to the Barba-
dos, Bahamas and Puerto Rico coaches. "I am
pleased with the attitude of the coaches and ath-
letes of the Caribbean", says coach Campus. "
Before Brazil became a top nation in judo they
first had to believe in themselves, so attitude is
very important."

Judo is a sport that is won by throwing an oppo-
nent to his back or pinning him or making him
submit with an armbar or choke. The team con-
centrated on interval training and speed training.
"The workout was intense,” said Chrisnell Coop-
er, a 20-year-old student of Judo. "I feel like I
learned alot about myself in a very short period of
time with some of the drills." The team has been
training under US coach Gerald Lafon in prepa-
ration for a series of championships beginning
with the Caribbean Cup and culminating with the
World Championship in Rotterdam in August.

The Puerto Rican team also arrived last night
and are very excited to participate in the cup. The
Caribbean Cup will be held on Saturday July 18 at
Loyola Hall on Gladstone Road between 1 pm
and 4 pm. Tickets will be available for spectators
at the door at the cost of $5. "This event is a first
in the history of Bahamas judo," says Judo Fed-
eration President D'Arcy Rahming. For more
information persons may call the Bahamas Judo
Federation at 364-6773.



PUERTO Rican judo team.









SAC class of 1984 hosts Run/Walk race

IN celebration of its 25th anniversary, the 1984
graduating class of St. Augustine’s College will
hold a fun Run/Walk race that is designed to get
the full participation of the general public.

The event is scheduled for Saturday, July 25
and will begin and finish at the Montague fore-
shore after travelling over both of the Paradise
Island bridges. The starting time is 6.30 am with
pre-registration taking place from 5.45 am.

Registration forms will be available as of Mon-
day at the box offices at Precision Cut on Nassau
Street and Subway on Paradise Charles Drive
for those persons who are interesting in signing up
before race day.

According to Neville Woodside, the co-chair-
man of SAC ‘84 Reunion Committee, the
run/walk is designed to pay tribute to the spirit of
the legendary Big Red Machine’s competitive
and athletic prowess, hence the idea for the stag-
ing of the road race.

“But this will not just be any road race,” Wood-
side said. “The SAC ‘84 fun run/walk will be a
series race. The race will be held annually over the
next five years.”

Woodside said the thought of winning a series
race will help to motivate participants to improve

their time every year. The race is scheduled to be
staged over the next five years as the ‘84 Reunion
Committee moves into its 30th anniversary cele-
brations.

Competition will be held in the following age
group categories for both men and women in the
walk and run: 19-and-under, 30-and-under 50-
and-under and over 50.

The registration fee is $15.00 for person and
$10.00 for children, inclusive of a T-shirt and a cer-
tificate of participation.

e The route for the runners are as follows:

Leave Montague foreshore and travel west
along Bay
Street to the new bridge. Travel over the bridge to
the entrance of Ocean Club Estates, returning
via the old bridge to East Bay Street, east along
East Bay Street and back to the Montague fore-
shore.

e The route for the walkers are as follows:

Leave Montague foreshore and travel west
along Bay Street to the old Paradise Island
Bridge. Travel over the bridge; go around the
round-a-bout and head back over the bridge to
East Bay Street. Travel east along East Bay Street
and back to the Montage foreshores.



nl









Caribbean

Sports Icons
Comes to town

board.

CASI is the brainchild of

Second annual = *OM ae nine

FIFA vice president Jack
Warner represented soccer,
while special advisor Ally
McNabb filled in for the min-

Awarts eee to Sturrup, while

the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture has pledged their
commitment to this year’s
event, they are still seeking
local sponsors to come on

sports promoter Al Hamilton,
MBE, who has been hosting
the successful Commonwealth
Sports Awards since 1980 in
Jamaica as well as other
Caribbea nations.

Hamilton has indicated that
they intend to attract a num-
ber of international stars to this
year’s awards presentation. He
has already made two trips
here and have indicated that
he’s been pleased with the
progress being made with the
planning so far.



THE TRIBUNE

SPORTS

FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 11



Bahamas 2-1 at
PONY Tournament —

The Bahamas is making
another dynamite showing at
13-14 PONY Tournament mak-
ing 2009 a historic year in youth
baseball for the country.

The Bahamas Baseball Fed-
eration in conjunction with
PONY (BAHAMAS) has sent
TEAM BAHAMAS 13-14
Team to the PONY Latin
American Caribbean Zone
Championship in San Juan,
Puerto from July 13th thru 19th.

TEAMS:

Puerto Rico — Host
Puerto Rico — Area
St. Martin

Anguilla

Bahamas

TEAM BAHAMAS

- 2 Wins / 1 Loss

Game #1:

TEAM BAHAMAS VS PUERTO RICO
- LOST 11-4

Game was tied after 4 innings
and Darville(LHP) ran out of
gas!!!

Losing Pitcher — Leslie
Darville

Lesile Darville -HR / Jerome
Jones / Perez Knowles /
Leighton Gibson — 1 Hit each

Game #2:

TEAM BAHAMAS VS ST. MARTIN
- WIN11-0

Byron Murray —3-4 / Two
Home Runs

Pitchers - Alex Roberts & Ian
Banks combined to pitch a
No-Hitter

Bahamas will have a Double
Header Today — Thursday July
16th 2009

Henry Thompson will get the
Start against Anguilla @
10:00am

Perez Knowles will get the
Start against Puerto Rico Area
@ 4:00pm

Game #3:

TEAM BAHAMAS VS ANGUILLA

- WIN 22-0

Team Bahamas 2nd Shoot-out
win of the tournament



Winning Picture: Henry
Thompson - Gave up | Hit in
the game

Ashton Butler: 2-4 with a Solo
HR

Byron Murray: 2-2 Triple &
Double 4 RBI's

Alex Roberts: 3-3 Double & 2
Base Hits - 3 RBI's

Puerto Rico Host Defeated
Puerto Rico Area last night.
With Team Bahamas win against
Anguilla, Team Bahamas will
either end up 2nd or 3rd. The
game at 4pm against PR Area
will determine this Round Robin
finish. PR Host has already
clinched the #1 spot with the
defeat of Team Bahamas & PR
Area. Play-off begin tomorrow
@ 10:00am with the Bronze &
Gold Medal Game on Saturday
- contact the individuals below
for tomorrow updates.

Dr. Laura Dupuch

ats

ANNOUNCEMENT

The Doctors and Staff of The Ladies Medical Centre

Dr. Dupuch is a qualified Obstetrician and
Gynaecologist and member of the Royal College
of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

BSc.(Hons.), M.B., B.S., DFFP, M.R.C.0.G.
Obstetrician & Gynaecologist

Cell: (242) 436-2016

G28 Tel: 325-5888
325-5884
Z 225-1480
Fax: 326-0913

-~

ns

in :
=
= |

































13-14

Front Row Standing: Left to Right
Darien Lockhart - 3B — Freeport
Byron Murray - P/OF — Nassau
Henry Thompson - P — Nassau
Romero Cartwright- P — Nassau
Lance Edwards - 2B — Freeport
Ashton Butler - SS — Nassau
Robin Brown -OF — Freeport

lan Banks-2B/P — Nassau

Welcomes

Dr. Laura Dupuch to our team.

Visit us online at
www .theladiesmedicalcentre.com

X






Back Row Standing: Left to Right
Patrick Knowles - Coach — Freeport
Marcian Curry Jr - Coach — Freeport
Jerome Jones - 3B/P — Freeport

Alex Roberts - C/OF — Bimini

Leighton Gibson- 1B — Nassau
Western Saunders - C — Nassau
Lesilie. Darvile - RF/P — Nassau

Perez Knowes - OF/P/1B — Freeport
Victor Cartwright - Manager — Nassau



Ist Location: No. 6 - Ist Terrace Centreville, RO. Box SS-19012, Nassau, Bahamas
2nd Location: | 3th Street North, Spanish Wells, Eleuthera Tel: 333-4633
3rd Location: Marsh Harbour Medical Centre, Marsh Harbour, Abaco Tel: 367-0050

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THE TRIBUNE

usiness

2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Mata | Foreign reserves to end
year ‘higher’ than 2008

TRANTKOMABLONTIN

Wl Holdings receive boost ‘in excess of $100m’ from foreign
borrowings, with proceeds set to help better 2008's $563m finish
MH Performance comes despite 39% fall in private foreign
investment inflows to $194m, and 35% capital account surplus

FAMILY GUARDIAN

FRIDAY, JULY INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED





‘Three in
three’ for
developer

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

next 10 years

* Survey registration
system suffering ‘serious
breakdown’ and ‘crisis of

confidence decline to $150m
. . . ; . A real estate devel. terday told Tribune Busi

* Report recommended | J Risk from oil price rises ‘not very strong’, but ‘no change’ in eee eh le ots pe cee
sub-contracting : : working on in New Providence
. fe L d interest rates or monetary policy could be completed within three
surveying Irom Lands eee : : : . years despite the economic
wins WW No ‘significant’ increase in commercial bank loan portfolio slowdown, with one possibly
and Surveys to private : : valued at between $500-$700

deterioration million at full build-out.

sector Ex-MP and attorney-general,
: By NEIL HARTNELL Ti Wells, said th t
* Real estate transaction Tribune Business Editor Lyford Hills development could
costs high at 15% of amount to that, and one-third

of phase one had been com- oO J

i
TENNYSON WELLS

The Bahamas’ foreign exchange reserves will “end the year
higher” than 2008’s $562.73 million finish, the Central Bank gov-
ernor told Tribune Business yesterday, with a 39 per cent decline in
foreign investment inflows balanced by government’s foreign cur-
rency borrowings and reduced outflows.

With external currency reserves “approaching $723 million as of”
Tuesday this week, a slight drop on end-May’s $756.63 million,
Wendy Craigg said the decline in credit demand and economic
recession had triggered a natural “adjustment mechanism” that
reduced foreign currency outflows - a development that counter-
balanced the drop in tourism and foreign direct investment-relat-

purchase price, while
surveying costs double
Florida’s

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

pleted, with water and sewer-
age infrastructure in place and
the gatehouse completed.

Mr Wells’ South Seas devel-
opment, which includes a canal, came to a standstill after
the Bahamas National Trust (BNT) questioned whether
“proper environmental safeguards” were in place to pro-
tect the natural wetlands on the property purchased by his
development company.

The Bahamas is facing a The BNT requested that government demand a stop-

critical shortage of land sur-
veyors given that 50 per cent
of sector professionals are due
to retire within the next 10
years, a report tabled in the
House of Assembly has
revealed, with the Department
of Lands and Surveys suffer-
ing from a “lack of confi-
dence” in its data manage-
ment and a “serious break-
down in the system”.

A February 21, 2007, report
submitted to the Government
as part of the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB)
financed Land Use and
Administration project rec-
ommended that given the
minimal number of surveys
carried out by the Depart-
ment, all government surveys
and Crown Land grants and
leases should be sub-contract-
ed out to private surveyors.

The report, by Grenville
Barnes of consultants Inter-
national Land Systems (ILS),
one of a series of ILS docu-
ments that show the extent of
the shambles in land admin-
istration and management in
the Bahamas, added:
“Records management at
Lands and Surveys is weak,
and has contribute to lack of
confidence in the system.”

And even the proposal to
sub-contract all government
and Crown Land surveys to
the private sector was fraught
with problems, the ILS report
disclosing that the Bahamas
Association of Land Survey-
ors needed to tackle “survey-
ing capacity in the Bahamas”.

This was because “more
than 50 per cent of the cur-

SEE page 4B

Tey ayes



ed inflows.

SEE page 3B

Regulatory Board
approval needed

for insurance regs

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The regulations accompany-
ing the Domestic Insurance Act
must first be passed by the
Insurance Commission’s Board
before they can give enforce-
ment teeth to the newly-imple-
mented legislation, the head
regulator told Tribune Business
yesterday evening, hopefully
bringing clarity to an industry
where this newspaper was told
“confusion reigns”.

Lennox McCartney, the
Commission’s superintendent,
confirmed to this newspaper
that while the former Registrar
of Insurance’s Office had been
renamed, the regulations
accompanying the Act had “not
as yet” come into force.

He explained to Tribune
Business: “The regulations have
to be passed by the Board of
the [Insurance] Commission. At
the Board’s first meeting, those
regulations will more than like-
ly be passed.

“It’s a kind of chicken and
egg situation. It should happen
very shortly, once the Board’s

SEE page 2B

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* Newly-formed
Insurance Commission’s
Board formation and
regulations sign-off to
happen ‘very shortly

* Changes to force
alterations in ICB Board
composition

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



SEE page 3B



Two PMs grant Crown
Land to developer for $1

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Both Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and his predecessor,
Perry Christie, have conveyed prime beachfront Crown Land of
multiple acreage to developers for as little as $1, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal, with there appearing to be no set policy gov-
erning the price paid in such transactions.

A report on the management and distribution of Crown Land
in the Bahamas, produced by Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology (MIT) student Nakeischa Loi in July 2007, exhibited sev-
eral certificates of Crown Land grants that were obtained from
the Department of Lands and Surveys.

One certificate, signed by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham as
the minister responsible, was said to show that a developer

SEE page 8B

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

Fish Fry’s vendors
say port ‘inevitable’



By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

SOME Fish Fry vendors at
Arawak Cay yesterday said they
were looking forward to the
extra business the relocated
container shipping facilities and
port will bring, one vendor indi-
cating they had accepted the
project was inevitable by say-
ing: “There is nothing we can
do about it anyway.”

“They already signed the con-
tract,” the owner of Candies
Enterprises told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday.

James Smith, whose conch
stall is said to have some of the
best conch salad at the Fish Fry,
said he was convinced that
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham had already sealed the deal
for the Arawak Cay Port devel-
opment.

He added that there was no
use fighting the development
because the “government done
do it”.

That is not the talk PLP Sen-
ator Jerome Fitzgerald will want
to hear. He again yesterday
appealed to the Government
for full disclosure on the plans
for the Arawak Cay container





port development, which has
been shrouded in secrecy.

Minister of the Environment,
Dr Earl Deveaux, told this
paper yesterday that the Envi-
ronmental Impact Assessment
(EIA) report on the Nassau
Harbour dredging, disclosed by
this newspaper yesterday, was
available to anyone interested
in seeing it.

The Ministry of Environment
yesterday released this state-
ment: “As is the case with all
Environmental Impact Assess-
ments (EIAs), the EIA for the
extension for Arawak Cay, pro-
duced by Blue Engineering, is
available to the public in the
Ministry of the Environment or
the Ministry of Public Works.
This is contrary to the assertion
in the article that the report has
not been formally released, sug-
gestion some ulterior motive on
the Ministry.

“These documents provide a
wealth of information, includ-
ing but not limited to the exist-
ing conditions at the site, the
potential impacts of the project
to the environment and pro-
posed measures for mitigating
these impacts.”

Mr Fitzgerald said he had
never seen the ‘draft’ report

dated April 16, 2009, until it was
e-mailed to him by a source.

“Tt appears that again under
this administration, the inter-
ests of a special few are being
promoted and underwritten by
the Bahamian under the guise
of national development,” Mr
Fitzgerald said, in a seemingly
thinly-veiled reference to the
FNM’s supporters in the ship-
ping industry.

He added that he has not
been able to gain information
on the Blue Engineering firm,
which prepared the EJA.

Director of the Bahamas
Environment, Science and
Technology (BEST) Commis-
sion, Philip Weech, said yester-
day that Blue Engineering was
sub-contracted by Cox and
SHAL, the firm hired by the
Ministry of Works to produce
an EIA for the storage/use of
dredged material for the Nas-
sau Harbour port improvement
project. According to Mr
Weech, the documents pro-
duced by that entity are avail-
able for viewing at the office of
the Best Commission.

The EIA lays out possible
negative environmental effects
from the Arawak Cay port
development, including loss of

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32 yards of sea bed and some
sea life, which the reports con-
cludes will regenerate.

“The other issue raised by the
article relates to the potential
impacts to marine life, caused
primarily by the settling of sus-
pended sediment on coral reefs
and sponge beds in the area.
While the risk exists for sedi-
ment to harm sea life, this risk is
mitigated by the implementa-
tion of good dredging practices
to minimise sediment suspen-
sion and dispersal, as well as by
independent environmental
monitoring to ensure the use of
turbidity barriers and compli-
ance with the turbidity control
standard,” the Ministry’s release
continued.

“Additionally, in an attempt
to further assess and advise on
efforts to mitigate the potential
impact to sea life, the possibili-
ty of relocating viable hard and
soft corals, as well as sponges,
was explored by consultants
Continental Shelf Associates
(CSA) International.

“CSA were contracted by the
Government to assess, restore
and monitor the damage caused
by the 2008 grounding of the
M’T Ficus near Goulding Cay,
New Providence. However, dur-
ing their survey of the Arawak
Cay site, CSA found that the
corals within the impacted area
were small and not very diverse,
making them unsuitable candi-
dates for relocation.”

Mr Fitzgerald advised yester-
day of an acre-wide hole being
dug in the centre of Arawak
Cay to provide fill for the 1,000
foot extension of that island.
The EIA suggested 900,000
cubic yards of dredged material
would be used to extend the
island. But according to Mr
Weech, the material from the
hole is being used to create a
base so that land-based (as
opposed to barge-based) cranes
could drive into the sea bed the
metal sheet piles that will con-
tain the fill and create the bulk-
head for the island’s extension.

Mr Deveaux said the hole
created will then be used as a
containment barrier and settle-
ment pond for the dredged
material from Nassau Harbour,
some of which will then be used
to extend the Woodes Rogers
Wharf outwards to create a
pedestrian promenade as a part
of the redevelopment of down-
town Nassau. “We hope that
the work finishes in a timely
manner, so we’ll have some
time to get things back rolling,”
said one Fish Fry vendor.

THE TRIBUNE

Regulatory Board approval
needed for insurance regs
FROM page 1B

appointed.” He was unable to give a precise timeframe for when
this would be accomplished.

Many in the Bahamian insurance industry were yesterday
questioning whether the regulations were in effect, given that the
Insurance Commission had sent out a release informing the sec-
tor that the Domestic Insurance Act had come into force from
July 2, 2009.

And, if the regulations were not in effect, insurance executives
questioned whether the Act could be enforced - given that the
enforcement teeth, including specifics on regulatory powers,
sanctions and fines, were not accompanying it.

Timothy Ingraham, the Bahamas General Insurance Associ-
ation’s (BGIA) president, contacted by Tribune Business while
on holiday in New York, confirmed that the Insurance Com-
mission needed to be in place and fully functional before the reg-
ulations could be implemented.

“They keep telling us they’re very close,” he said, “but I don’t
know how much they can enforce the Act without the new reg-
ulations being in effect.”

The Government and Insurance Commission’s position is
likely to be that having the regulations in effect immediately is
unlikely to be a major priority, given that all Bahamas-based car-
riers, agents, brokers and salespersons have a transition period
of one year to comply with the Domestic Insurance Act and re-
register.

This seemingly means that the Act’s provisions will only be
enforced from July 2, 2010, onwards, although the transition
period for insurance adjusters, risk managers and consultants is
50 per cent shorter - standing at six months.

Mr McCartney yesterday said the Commission’s Board had to
be appointed by the Government, and would include three to five
persons besides himself and the deputy superintendent.

While the regulations had yet to be tabled in Parliament, Mr
McCartney explained this was not a requirement before they
could be implemented - just approval by the Insurance Com-
mission’s Board. “It will all happen very shortly,” he promised.

The superintendent said the Act incorporated “a long transi-
tion period” to give the Bahamian insurance industry time to
become familiar with all its requirements.

“There are a number of important changes in solvency require-
ments and statutory reserves, changes in some capital require-
ments, deposit requirements for foreign companies,” Mr McCart-
ney added. “There are very significant changes, and the corpo-
rate governance rules are very new to the industry, although these
are mostly in the regulations.

“They are fairly extensive to govern self-dealing, related par-
ty transactions and the number of non-resident directors on the
Board.”

One insurance company head told Tribune Business that the
new Act and regulations would “require quite significant changes
in the way the industry operates”.

Tom Duff, Insurance Company of the Bahamas (ICB) general
manager, said the general insurance carrier would be required to
reform its Board, which currently consisted entirely of J. S.
Johnson executives and shareholders.

This was because the BISX-listed insurance broker owns 40 per
cent of ICB, and its directors and senior executives hold the
remaining equity. “I suppose one major area of significance is in
the make-up of this Board,” Mr Duff said. “There is quite a bit
of focus in the regulations in terms” of this.

“The superintendent wants the Board of ICB to contain a
majority of independent directors, not having a connection with
J S Johnson or other affiliates.”

The ICB general manager added that while the new Act and
regulations had increased capital and solvency requirements,
meeting them was “not going to be problematic for an established
company in the market. For a new entrant, it will be a bit more
difficult for them to raise the capital”.

Opening capital requirements are now at $2 million, and Mr
Duff said the regulations also mandated that “certain policy-
holder reserves are held in trust”.

“Tt will be more difficult for insurance companies to scale
down their reserves and remove deposits from banks, because
they will have to have the Insurance Commission’s authority to
do so,” Mr Duff explained.

“The Government will have the authority over where assets are
held, and the movement of assets.”

Mr McCartney yesterday said the Act gave the Insurance
Commission the power to carry out on-site inspections of insur-
ance companies, something it had never had before. To carry out
this function, it was looking at hiring “a handful of persons”.



"TEACHING VACANCIES

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications from quali-
fied Teachers for position available.

One (1) Social Studies (Geography)
One (1) Substitute Clothing Construction

Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor or Master Degrees from an ac-
credited University or College and Teaching Certificate need apply.

For further details and application from, please contact the Anglican Central
Education Authority on Sands Road at telephone (242) 322-3015/6/7.

Letters of application and/or completed application forms with copies of
required documents must be sent by Friday, July 31st 2009 to the Angli-
can Education Department addressed to:-

The Director of Education

Anglican Central Education Authority

P.O. Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas





THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 3B



The ‘art’ of reviving
downtown Nassau

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

THE DOWNTOWN Nassau Partnership
(DNP) is beginning its Bay Street clean-up and
beautification campaign through the placement
of artwork in derelict buildings, an initiative its
managing director said yesterday would begin at
month’s end.

Vaughn Roberts said artwork will be hung in
the windows of unused store fronts, while murals
will be painted on several unused and rundown
buildings, beginning on July 31.

He said the clean up effort and Art Exhibit
will be funded in part by the Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation, the DNP and through the volun-
teer efforts of the artists and sponsors.

The DNP was enacted to oversee the devel-
opment of a Business Improvement Districtm
which will begin the revitalisation of the down-
town area.

Mr Roberts said phase one of the redevelop-
ment plan could costs tens of millions of dollars,
but will not start in earnest until draft legislation
for the creation of the permanent BID body,
which will direct the downtown Nassau revital-
isation, is approved by Cabinet.

He added that a draft Memorandum of
Understanding, the first phase of the BID leg-
islation, should be completed by the end of
August 2009.

Funding to revitalise the city centre will be
provided through a private/public partnership.

“There is a way to get private funding for
this,” said Mr Roberts. “We are in preliminary

stages of conversations with a professional fund
raiser.

“Tf you think about gateways into downtown,
which is sort of our artistic, futuristic designate
to the entrance of downtown, there is a way to
just promote that as an opportunity for private
people to come to the table to fund the creation
of it. We’re working all around and there are
probably some grants out there.”

Charles Klonaris, co-chair of the Downtown
Nassau Partnership, had previously told 77i-
bune Business that the full legislation to create
the BID “should be ready to go” by year-end,
with the existing Nassau Tourism and Devel-
opment Board (NTDB) likely to be absorbed
into the BID.

Focus

“The focus right now is on the legislation for
the BID - that’s critical - and also the identifi-
cation of short-term projects,” Mr Klonaris told
Tribune Business. “Those are the two focus
points right now for the DNP.

“T would say we’re hoping towards the end of
the year that the [BID] legislation will be ready
to go for the following year. That’s the key to
what we’re trying to push for.”

Mr Klonaris said the BID legislation was key
to “defining the scope” of the authority that
will oversee downtown Nassau’s hoped-for
renaissance.

Besides determining the geographical bound-
aries of the area overseen by the BID, Mr
Klonaris, who is also the NT'DB’s current chair-
man, explained that the legislation would deter-

mine its revenue-raising powers - what monies it
could collect and how - plus its ability to provide
services such as garbage collection and street
cleaning.

The legislation will also determine the BID’s
composition, who sits on its Board and the split
between public and private sector representa-
tives.

“This is the most difficult part of it,” Mr
Klonaris told Tribune Business. “We have to
be so certain, careful and positive about the
authority, the level of the BID authority and
its functions. These are really the keys to the suc-
cess of downtown.”

The DNP co-chair added that Bahamian archi-
tect Jackson Burnside would produce all the
working drawings to illustrate the vision for
downtown Nassau, the body having “agreed on
his proposals”. When Mr Burnside’s work is
completed, the DNP will be “ready to go out for
bid” on construction work.

Mr Klonaris described Mr Burnside’s work
as not just “a vision, but what the final reality will
be”. And he added: “The vision for the NTDB
was to really become the BID. It will morph
into the BID, hopefully in a year’s time.

“The ultimate goal was to work through the
BID. For many years the NTDB was a voice in
the wilderness, but we kept plugging away. The
Government has grasped that, and understands
it, and where we are now is the vision of many
years.

“The city is an important part of this country
as an engine for employment, and it’s important
to have a vibrant city to support Atlantis and all
the hotels we have.”

MM Wotnocm lem aetna
for developer

FROM page 1B

page of the canal dredging until a “full assess-
ment” of its impact on the nearby Bonefish
National Park could be carried out.

Mr Wells, though, said yesterday that the devel-
opment had been given final approval by the BNT
and Bahamas Environment, Science and Tech-
nology (BEST) Commission to continue with the
canal project.

“For South Seas we have gotten our final
approval to put in the canal and complete the
marina, and we have paid the fees to the Gov-
ernment and Department of Lands and Surveys
for that - the royalties for the entire project,” he
said.

Mr Wells said much of the wetland, about 20 per
cent of the property to be developed, will be made
public, with boardwalks put in place for individu-
als to enjoy a natural mangrove forest.

“There is no other development in this country
where they can show where they left almost 20 per
cent of the land for public use,” he added.

Consultation

“We are Bahamians and we will not do anything
that will assist in destroying the environment.
They (BNT), along with our environmental
experts and BEST, prepared a management plan
in consultation with the trust.”

Mr Wells said his third development, Yuma
Estates, would have been completed if not for
the downturn in the economy.

“We should have completed Yuma, but the
economy went south. We will distribute the rest of
the lots over to the shareholders,” he said.

He suggested South Seas would be completed
within 18 months, while Lyford Hills could take up
to three years.

“We have scores of people who are employed
now working in those subdivisions,” said Mr Wells.



Foreign reserves to end year ‘higher’ than 2008

FROM page 1B

Revealing that the proceeds
from the Government’s foreign
currency borrowing activities
were “in excess of $100 mil-
lion”, Mrs Craigg told Tribune
Business: “The reserves have
benefited from the Govern-
ment’s recent foreign currency
borrowings, and we expect quite
a significant portion of those
proceeds to remain in the
reserves, so they will end the
year higher than they did last
year.”

Mrs Craigg’s comments are
encouraging from the Bahami-
an balance of payments/current
accounts perspective, as they
indicate the Bahamas will, in
the short-term at least, be in a
strong position to finance its
import needs and maintain the
one:one exchange rate parity
with the US dollar.

The Central Bank governor
added that apart from the boost
from foreign currency borrow-
ings, the Bahamas was still
attracting net positive capital
inflows from tourism and for-
eign direct investment, just not
at the level of previous years.

“We’re continuing to have
relatively positive net inflows,”
Mrs Craigg told Tribune Busi-
ness. “If you look at foreign cur-
rency transactions with the
banks and other transactions,
there are other net inflows - just
not at the level they were at the
year before. The net inflows
have not ceased, but they’re cer-
tainly at lower levels.”

She said that for the 2009 first
quarter, net private foreign
investment inflows into the
Bahamas had dropped by 39
per cent, from $317.5 million in
the 2008 comparative period to
$193.8 million this time around.

Meanwhile, the surplus on
the financial and capital account
had dropped to $149.8 million in
the 2009 first quarter, down
from $229.8 million year-over-
year, a 34.9 per cent decrease.

These figures are in line with
the International Monetary
Fund’s (IMF) projections in its
Article [TV consultation, which
forecast a 30 pet cent decline in
foreign direct investment - the
capital lifeblood for the
Bahamian economy and
employment - in 2009.

Meanwhile, Mrs Craigg told
Tribune Business that the risk
of an oil price-induced shock to
the external reserves was “not a
very strong one” currently.

While global prices had been
creeping up slowly in recent
months, closing yesterday at $62
per barrel, compared to a 52-
week low of $32.41, they were
still some 58 per cent below last
July’s $147 per barrel peak. The
Bahamas last year spent $1.1
billion on oil and fuel-related
imports.

“It’s certainly something that
we have to monitor, because
there is that degree of volatility
in those prices, but they’re sig-
nificantly below where they
were last year,” the Central
Bank governor told Tribune
Business.

“The risk is still there, but it’s
not a very strong one at this
point in time.”

However, those who believe
the relatively strong external
reserves and monetary policy
positions have created room for
the Central Bank to cut its dis-
count rate are likely to be dis-
appointed, as Mrs Craigg said
there were no plans for any
immediate shifts.

“We have not considered the
need for any changes in the
monetary policy position,” she
confirmed , “but it’s something
that we evaluate on a monthly
basis.”

The Bahamas’ foreign cur-
rency reserves have been pro-
tected by the decline in con-
sumer credit demand and “the
slowdown in economic activi-
ty”, which has reduced the
demand for inventory among
the Bahamian business com-
munity. This is what has
reduced currency outflows from
this nation.

“It’s a natural adjustment
mechanism that happens to
benefit the external reserves in
a period much like the one that

we’re currently experiencing,”
Mrs Craigg explained.

She added that while the
Central Bank was concerned
about - and continued to moni-
tor the asset quality - in
Bahamian commercial banks’
loan portfolios, there had been
no major increase in the rate of
loan defaults and non-perform-
ing loan increases.

“It’s a matter that we’re con-
tinuing to monitor very closely
with the banks,” Mrs Craigg
told Tribune Business. “We
have an enhanced monitoring
arrangement for those loans,
but we have not seen any sig-
nificant increase in the momen-
tum” of deterioration.

The Central Bank had previ-
ously reported that almost one
in five (20 per cent) of loans to
Bahamian businesses by com-
mercial banks were in default
at end-May 2009, with total
non-performing loans rising to
7.7 per cent or $468.2 million
of outstanding . This figure
increased by 4 per cent or $18.2
million in May.

The total number of loans in
arrears by at least one month

JOB ADVERTISEMENT

Position: Accountant

A local insurance agency seeks to fill the position of
Accountant. The scope of work is to head the Ac-
counting Operations in preparation of monthly, quar-
terly and annual reports; to keep and maintain all
financial documents and records according to the
directives coming from the President and the Board
of Directors to ensure the efficient management of
all Bank and general ledger accounts. The position
will also be expected to make recommendations to
management to maintain the company’s viability in a
highly competitive environment.

Required:

e University Degree in accounting;
¢ Professional qualifications e.g. CPA, ACCA, CA
e At least 3 years’ work experience as an

accountant;

* Good knowledge of English in writing, editing and

presenting;

* Strong interpersonal, organizational and

supervisory skills;

e Demonstrated capacity to work under pressure,
meet deadlines and perform work of the highest

quality.

¢ Good computer and analytical skills.

Send cover letter and Curriculum Vitae to the follow-

ing address:

The Tribune

c/o Box # 81869
P.O. Box N 3207
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE: July 25, 2009 by 5pm



increased by $6.1 million or 0.7
per cent in May, reaching a total
of $847.3 million. Total loans in
arrears increased to 13.98 per
cent as a percentage of total
loans, although the proportion
of delinquent loans - those
between 31 to 90 days past due
- declined by $12 million or 3.73
per cent to $373.3 million.

The Central Bank said at the
time: “The increase in the
arrears rate was attributed toa
worsening in the consumer

loans and residential mortgages
portfolios, by 58 basis points
and 2 basis points, to 12.45 per
cent and 13 per cent, respec-
tively.

“In contrast, the commercial
arrears rate receded to 19.83
per cent in May, from 20.61 per
cent in April.”

Mrs Craigg said what was
happening with commercial
bank loan portfolios was direct-
ly linked to events in the wider
Bahamian economy, adding

= Colina.

Holdings Bahamas

ee

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Risk & Compliance Officer

that “as long as job losses con-
tinue, you will continue to see
some deterioration in the cred-
it quality of the banks”.

Borrowers unable to meet
their obligations “need to return
to jobs”, but Mrs Craigg said
an economic recovery in the
Bahamas was unlikely to hap-
pen until the 2010 second half.

“Looking at what’s happen-
ing in the US economy, we
don’t see it happening before
then,” she added.

Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified

professional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer.

This is an

executive position and the successful applicant should possess the following:

Qualifications & Experience

Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university
Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance
Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a

law degree

Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations
for improvements to a compliance culture
Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of

duties

Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and

best practices
Confidentiality

Excellent oral and written communication skills

& Responsibilities:

Design and implement a risk framework.
Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps
taken to foster good compliance.
Implement and maintain a compliance monitoring programme. This will
serve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures.

Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws,
regulations and policies applicable to the institution.

Provide management with guidance in the development, implementation
and maintenance of policies, procedures and practices to cover
regulated activities.
Create programmes that educate, train and encourage directors,
managers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and

regulations.

Serve as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators.

The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with
experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a cover
letter and resume to the following e-mail address no later than 27 July 2009:

E-mail: careers@c olinaimperial.com

RE: Risk and Compliance Officer

Absolutely no phone calls will be accepted





PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





0% of land surveyors to
retire within next 10 years

FROM page 1B

rent active, registered survey-
ors in the private sector will
retire in the next 10 years”.

Addressing the lack of con-
fidence in the survey registra-
tion system, the ILS report
found that the number of pri-
vate surveys recorded by the
Department of Lands and
Surveys had fallen from a high
point of just under 400 in 1990
to around 200 in 2005, with a
“significant decline” from
more than 350 in 1993 to 175
the following year.

The bottom was reached in
1996, with less than 100 sur-
veys lodged for recording with
the Department.

This was despite the num-
ber of new mortgages regis-
tered at the Registrar Gener-
al’s Department numbering
between 4,000 and 5,000 for
every year between 1994-1999,
and registered conveyancings
for the same time period hov-
ering between 4,500 tO more
than 6,000.

Attempting to answer why
private surveyors were not
submitting their surveys to the



“It is clear from an examination of the
survey information archives that Lands
& Surveys are doing a very poor job of
managing the country’s [land] records. I
believe this is contributing to the
negative image that is being projected
to the surveying profession.”



Department of Lands and
Surveys, the report conclud-
ed: “There are several reasons
for this, but they appear to all
relate back to a lack of confi-
dence in the management of
survey data in Lands and Sur-
veys and the perception that
Lands and Surveys personnel
are taking advantage of their
position in government to
unfairly compete with the pri-
vate sector.

“This is a serious break-
down in the system, and it is
critical that these public-pri-
vate relationships be fostered
within the new institutional
structure.

“It is clear from an exami-

Public Notice

Ministry of Public Works & Transport Construction
of New Market, Downtown Nassau

Pre-Qualification of Contractors

The Government of Commonwealth of The Bahamas through
the Ministry of Public Works and Transport is living qualified
General Contractors to participate in a Pre-Qualification for the
Tender for the construction of a new market to be built on a
restricted site in Downtown Nassau.

The Structure will be approximately 38,724 sq. ft. with
associated external works and services.

The General Contractors will be required to provide a detailed
indication of their competence, both technically and financially,
to carry out the intended scope of work within a reasonable time.

Interested parties may

collect

the pre-qualification

documents as of Thursday, 2 July, 2009 between the hours of

9:00a.m - 5:00p.m. from:

The Office of the Director of Public Works
Ministry of Public Works and Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive

Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 322-4830

Fax:

The

completed pre-qualification

(242) 302-9770

document should be

deposited in the Tender Box at the Ministry of Finance, 3rd Floor,
Cecil Wallace-Whitfied Building, West Bay Street, PO.Box,
N-3017, Nassau, Bahamas not later than 5:00p.m. on Monday,

20 July, 2009.

The Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
has the right to reject any or all pre-qualification contractors.

Signed

Colin Higgs
Permanent Secretary








Securit

1.28
10.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.35
4.95

Abaco Markets

Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.40
10.00

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

S52wk-Hi_ 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

52wk-Low



Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade ona Percentage Pricing b

Securi Last Sale

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

nation of the survey informa-
tion archives that Lands &
Surveys are doing a very poor
job of managing the country’s
[land] records. I believe this
is contributing to the negative
image that is being projected
to the surveying profession.”

The report added: “Given
the expectations in the
Bahamas over the coming
years - higher property values,
higher volume of land trans-
actions, increased potential for
boundary conflicts, greater
pressure for foreign-funded
development - there is an
urgent need to build surveying
and mapping capacity in the
Bahamas, primarily in the pri-
vate sector.”

The ILS document recom-
mended shrinking the Depart-
ment of Lands and Surveys
into a smaller organisation
focusing on managing con-
tracts and assessing the quali-
ty of private surveys, prior to
including them in the parcel-
based land administration sys-
tem the IDB project aimed to
create.

The number of government
surveys carried out by the
Department, the report
revealed, had fallen from eight
in 2002 to just two in 2005. “In
recent years, the surveying
productivity in Lands and Sur-
veys appears to have dwindled
to the point where there is no
justification for continuing to
support a cadastral surveying
capacity,” the report conclud-
ed. High surveying costs were
prevalent, especially on Fam-
ily Islands, where surveyors
had to cut through thick bush
in determining boundary lines.
Up to 40 per cent of time and
expenses could be spent on
this task.

The estimated cost of sur-
veying a 1,500 x 1,500 foot
parcel of land in the Family
Islands was pegged by the
report at $7,995 over four days
- almost $2,000 per day. This
compared to the $1,000 per
day rate charged by a similar-
sized Florida crew.

Transactions costs in the
Bahamas were also relatively
high, at 15 per cent of the pur-
chase price for a $100,000 land
parcel in urban Nassau, com-
pared to 3-4 per cent in coun-
tries like Australia. The
biggest contributor to trans-
action costs were Stamp Tax
and the realtor’s fee, both
costing in this case $6,000 or
38.6 per cent of the cost total.
Behind that was the attorney’s
fee of 2.5 per cent of the pur-
chase price, some 16.1 per cent
of the transaction costs.

Management Opportunity
A well established company is considering highly qualified
applicants for the role of

Financial Controller

Requirements & Responsibilities:
- Lead and motivate accounting staff

- Experience in the preparation and interpretation of Financial

Statements

- Must be able to develop and maintain an effective system of internal
accounting and operational controls in a Hotel environment
- Must possess five years experience in a supervisory accounting

position

- Self motivated with strong analytical and problem-solving skills

- Must be conversant with hotel accounting software, with emphasis in
areas Food & Beverage, Front Office and Payroll

- Liaise with external Auditors, third party service providers and relevant
Regulatory & Compliance Authorities

- Preparation of budgets

- Timely and accurate preparation, presentation and interpretation of

financial reports

- Excellent written and oral communication skills
- Able to work extended hours, weekends and holidays

QUALIFICATIONS

- BAin Accounting from an accredited University

- International accounting designation (CPA/CA) with minimum of
5 years post qualification experience,

- Advance working knowledge of Excel

- Working knowledge of Microsoft Word

Interested persons should apply on or before July 24, 2009

Attention: CONTROLLER
DA 81270
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Suitably qualified candidates need only apply.
Salary is commensurate with experience and qualification.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

TUESDAY, 14 JULY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.14] CHG -2.79 | %CHG -0.18 | YTD -142.22 | YTD % -8.31
FINDEX: CLOSE 787.12 | YTD -5.72% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | [Rea UL Se 242-323-2320

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11.39
2.74
5.64
3.00
1.82
6.60

10.90

10.38
5.03

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.05
0.00
-0.39
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.00
0.30
5.50 800
10.40
10.00

Daily Vol.
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

o oo
0.00
0.00
0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $
8.42
6.25
0.40

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Weekly Vol.

EPS $

7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-0.041



FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE 6 ADYISURY. SERVICES

COLON LA L

Div $
0.127
0.992
0.244

-0.877

0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

ases)

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Div $ P/E

0.000

0.001





Google’s
slowing 2Q

ALUMI Cos
overshadow
ee TMNT TS

Photo/Jeff Chiu

AP

IN THIS PHOTO from Wednesday, May 27, 2009, a man rides an escala-
tor at the Google I/O 2009 web developers conference in San Francisco.
Google Inc. is expected to release second-quarter earnings Thursday, July
16, 2009.

MICHAEL LIEDTKE,
AP Technology Writer
SAN FRANCISCO

Google Inc.'s Internet ad sales grew at their slowest rate
ever during the spring, forcing the online search leader to tight-
en its belt another notch to propel its second-quarter profit
above analyst estimates.

The performance — punctuated by revenue growth of just 3
percent — disappointed investors. The company’s shares fell
more than 3 percent in extended trading Thursday after the
results were released. Google is the most profitable company on
the Internet, thanks to its dominance of the online advertising
market. That means its lackluster revenue growth could fore-
shadow even more significant sluggishness among other Inter-
net companies that rely on advertising and e-commerce. Many
of those companies will detail what happened in their second
quarters in the coming weeks.

Although the U.S. recession
has been making it increasingly
difficult for Google to sell ads,
Chief Executive Eric Schmidt
said he doesn't expect the cli-
mate to become any more chal-
lenging.

"We're not at the moment
looking at that downward spiral
that we thought we might see
six months ago," Schmidt told
analysts during a Thursday con-
ference call. The remarks
echoed comments made to reporters last week when he said the
recession had already appeared to hit bottom.

The Mountain View-based company earned $1.48 billion, or
$4.66 per share, during the three months ended in June. That
compared with income of $1.25 billion, or $3.92 per share, for the
same period last year.

Revenue rose to $5.52 billion from $5.34 billion in last year's
second quarter.

It marked Google's lowest growth rate since the company
went public five years ago. It was also the company's second con-
secutive quarter of single-digit revenue growth, which had nev-
er fallen below a 30 percent pace until late last year.



"We're not at the
moment looking at
that downward
spiral that we
thought we might
see six months
ago.”



Compensation

If not for stock compensation expenses, Google said it would
have made $5.36 per share. That topped the average estimate of
$5.09 per share among analysts polled by Thomson Reuters.

After subtracting ad commissions, Google's net revenue
totaled $4.1 billion — about $40 million above analyst esti-
mates. Google relied on cost cutting and an unusually low tax
rate to boost its profits amid the slowing ad sales. For instance,
the company trimmed its general and administrative expenses
by 23 percent to save about $110 million and reduced its spend-
ing on capital projects by 80 percent, or $559 million.

The financial discipline resulted in the biggest quarterly
reduction in Google's payroll since Larry Page and Sergey Brin
started the company in a Silicon Valley garage nearly 11 years
ago. Google ended June with 19,786 employees, 378 fewer than
at the end of March.

Google's second-quarter tax rate was 20 percent, well below
the 25 percent range that is typical for the company.

The company's shares fell $14.50, or 3.3 percent, after finish-
ing the regular session at $442.60, up $4.43. The stock has
surged by about 50 percent since it last traded below $300 in ear-
ly March, reflecting investors’ faith in Google to weather the
recession better than most companies.

(he Pw
ACADEMY

Open House “THIS” Saturday
July 18th 10am - 5pm.

Carmicheal Road Area

St
4

\




Bellot Road, on the side of
Christ Community Church

Ages 1 1/2 to 5 year olds

PHONE:
424-2995



Kristine Sandiford

Owner/Director
of 1 on 1 Pre-School

& now 2 by 2 Academy

Sir

IIE? El SIP KU,

cS

RND Holdings

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00

0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds

YTD% Last 12 Months
2.40 4.75
-1.52 -3.18
2.97 5.30
-8.35 -13.82
2.40 5.79
-0.02 0.54
-3.33
0.00
2.00

q/ Der €

R77 ypc
NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YVROSE ARISCA of
CARMICHAEL ROAD, P.O. BOX N-9456, NASSAU
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90



Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CPFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

NAV
1.3860
2.8952
1.4763
3.1031

12.9209
100.5448
93.1992
1.0000
9.2765
1.0622 2.56
1.0243 -0.84
1.0585 2.04
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month divid:

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
1.3231
2.8952
1.4019
3.1031
12.2702

100.0000

93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

-6.76
0.00

-2.98
6.22
2.43
5.85

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 17‘ day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
i

s divided by closing price
nd Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of C fidelity

Last Price - Last traded counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meanin gtul

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

weighted price for daily volume
eighted price for daily volume
ig price from day to day
I shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earmin as
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S11) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 5B







TIM PARADIS,
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK

Investors piled into technol-
ogy stocks again to extend the
market's rally.

Hope for more good earnings
from technology leaders made
the industry an attractive bet
again Thursday, a day after a
strong forecast from chip mak-
er Intel Corp. lifted stocks
across the board.

The tech-laden Nasdaq com-
posite index advanced for the
seventh straight day and closed
at its highest level since October
as traders prepared for profit
reports from Internet search
company Google Inc. and Inter-
national Business Machines
Corp. Both posted better-than-
expected profits after the clos-
ing bell.

What appeared to be a turn
in sentiment from economist
and New York University pro-
fessor Nouriel Roubini also
helped lift the market. Reports
said Roubini believed the worst
of the economy's troubles had
past, but in a statement after
the close of trading he said his
views are unchanged. He does-
n't expect the economy to grow
this year and still predicts the
recession will end early next
year.

Traders had welcomed what
had appeared to be a turn in his
sentiment because Roubini has
been pessimistic about the econ-
omy and was one of the few
experts to have predicted the
global financial crisis.

Some analysts attributed the
buying to short-covering, where
investors have to buy stock after
having earlier sold borrowed
shares in a bet that the market
would fall.

Modest

Stocks continued the week's
sprint-and-jog play, carving
more modest gains after surging
the day before. The market
surged Monday followed by a
flatter day Tuesday.

"There's still concern about
the market and concern about
the overall economy,” said Jon
Biele, head of capital markets at
Cowen & Co. "But the pes-
simism is moving to optimism.
People certainly want to be in a
position to gain from positive
momentum.”

The jump in stocks this week
halted a monthlong slide that
came as investors worried that a
huge rally in March and April
had gone too far as investors
hoped for an economic recov-
ery. This week's earnings
reports have given investors
some of the confirmation that
the economy isn't as bad as
feared, but they still want to see
more evidence of a turnaround.

The Dow rose 95.61, or 1.1
percent, to 8,711.82, its highest
close since June 12. The blue
chips are now down only 0.7
percent for the year.

The Standard & Poor's 500
index rose 8.06, or 0.9 percent,
to 940.74. The Nasdaq rose
22.13, or 1.2 percent, to 1,885.03,
its best finish since Oct. 3.

Bond prices rose, pushing
yields lower. The yield on the
benchmark 10-year Treasury
note fell to 3.58 percent from
3.62 percent late Wednesday.

Not all results were good.
Nokia Corp., the world's largest
cell phone maker, fell $2.22, or
14.2 percent, to $13.46 after its
second-quarter earnings tum-
bled 66 percent and it scrapped
targets to increase market share
this year.

Most results have topped
expectations. Reports are due
Friday from General Electric
Co., Bank of America Corp.
and Citigroup Inc. that likely
will set the day's tone.

"A lot of traders went into
earnings with very low expec-
tations and they are happy the
world hasn't fallen apart and
we're seeing solid results," said
Anthony Conroy, managing
director and head trader for
BNY ConvergEx Group. "A lot
of people that were short are
starting to cover because of
improved earnings that have
come out."

Financial stocks lagged the
rest of the market after small-
business lender CIT Group Inc.
said negotiations with federal
regulators about a rescue broke
off. Investors are worried the
company could file for bank-
ruptcy protection. CIT tumbled
$1.23, or 75 percent, to 41 cents.

JPMorgan Chase & Co.
reported big gains in its invest-
ment banking business, held
back somewhat by loan losses.
Its results come two days after

Goldman Sachs Group Inc. also
topped expectations with much
stronger results in underwriting
and trading. JPMorgan slipped
13 cents to $36.13.

Strong earnings from the
banks have encouraged
investors about the economy.
The results also show that many
of the nation's biggest banks are
recovering from the collapse of
credit markets last fall.

Google rose $4.43, or 1 per-
cent, to $442.60, while IBM rose
$3.42, or 3.2 percent, to $110.64.
Google lost ground in electron-
ic trading after reporting its
results while IBM rose.

Investors also drew encour-
agement from a Labor Depart-
ment report that new claims for
unemployment insurance fell
last week by 47,000 to 522,000,
the lowest level since early Jan-
uary.

Economists polled by Thom-
son Reuters predicted an
increase to 575,000. The
improved data, however, might
have been affected by the tim-
ing of automobile plant shut-
downs.

In other trading, the dollar
was mixed against other cur-
rencies. Gold prices fell.

Benchmark crude rose 48



cents to settle at $62.02 a barrel
on the New York Mercantile
Exchange.

About two stocks rose for
every one that fell on the New
York Stock Exchange, where
consolidated volume came to 5
billion shares, down from 5.5
billion Wednesday.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 6.38, or
1.2 percent, to 522.02.

Overseas, Britain's FTSE 100
rose 0.4 percent, Germany's
DAX index rose 0.6 percent,
and France's CAC-40 gained
0.9 percent. Japan's Nikkei
stock average rose 0.8 percent.

IN THIS JULY 8, 2009 PHOTO, people sit at tables in front of the New
York Stock Exchange. Stock futures traded higher Monday morning, July
13, 2009, as investors brace for a crush of earnings reports, including
key readings from the banking sector, this week.

AP Photo/Richard Drew

Gains in tech stocks extend rally

Legal Notice

Notice
BOTTICELLI HOLDINGS LTD.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000 the Dissolution of BOTTICELLI HOLDINGS
LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 3rd April
2009.

NOTICE

There will be a meeting for all members
of the Honorable Society of the Middle
Temple on Thursday July 23rd
6:00 p.m. @ $.G. Hambros.

All are asked to attend.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

LANDE ESTATES LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000). LANDE ESTATES LIMITED is in
Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 15th
day of July, 2009.

Cl Accounting Limited
Boatside Business Centre
Warden
Northumberland
NE46 4SH
Liquidator

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

PERSPECTIVE

HUMAN RESOURCES CONSULTING

NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR/HELPDESK ANALYST

Our client is an international health management company that assists clients to successfully
navigate an increasingly complex global health care system with ease and economy.

Their Network and Infrastructure Team is currently seeking a Network Administrator/HelpDesk
Analyst who will assist in the first-level technical support, planning, administration, testing and
maintenance of user PC’s, Laptops and Local Area Network.

The Network Administrator/HelpDesk Analyst will play a direct role providing entry level
technical support for hardware, software, peripherals, connectivity. The candidate must be
able to troubleshoot a wide range of software and hardware products generally on Windows
PC's with Microsoft Office.

This is an excellent entry level opportunity to learn more advanced skills such as Windows
2000/2003 server and Active Directory, SQL 2000/5 Server, Exchange, Cisco server
Firewall/VPN configuration and support. The successful candidate will be part of a larger team
working directly with Infrastructure Architects, Sr. Network Administrators, Database
Architect, Middleware Analysts and Project Managers with a globally recognized leader in
health management.

Qualifications:

- Candidate must show hands-on experience and good working knowledge of the
following:
o TCP/IP
o Microsoft Windows 2000/2003 Server, Microsoft XP and Microsoft Office
o General Networking concepts
Effective written and oral communication skills
Excellent customer service skills

Salary is commensurate with experience.

Please forward resume and salary requirements by July 25, 2009 to:

Email: perspective.hr1@gmail.com





BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Senior Manager,
Accounts.

The job oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget & Management
Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective delivery
of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the
following:

* Compilation of the corporate budget.

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets

Preparation of monthly management statements

Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation

Preparation of performance reports for division , department and sections
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry recetvables (capital
contributions, rechargeable)

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices

Liaison with internal and external audits

Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief
Financial

Officer for the Board of Directors

Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required
Preparation of the business plan for the department

Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department

Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims

Overseeing the Cash Flow Management

Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment

Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form employee’s
salaries

Conducting audits of various financial activities including Employee Basic Pay
Reconciliation, Employee Loans Reconciliation and Payment Reconciliation
Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable

Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts

Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle repayments
Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule

Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans

Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to ensure
adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors

Managing the status of local and foreign vendors

Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and External Auditors
Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline. Conducting
performance appraisals

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff, manage
and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations

Job requirements include:

¢ Aminimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting ACCA/CPA
or equivalent qualifications

¢ A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a similar
management position
Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices
Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications
Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing systems
Ability to analyze financial reports
Sound knowledge of covenants of lending institutions (e.g. IDB)
Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial software
and the system of internal control.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing
Good time management skills

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: July,
22,2009.





THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT |

5-Day FORECAST

TAMPA
High: 91° F/33° C
Low: 80° F/27°C

ORLANDO |
High: 92° F/33°C
Low: 75° F/24°C

KEY WEST
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 84° F/29° C

@



Mostly sunny with a

thunderstorm.

ig h: 92°
ICRU acl aec dt

FT. LAUDERDALE

High: 92°F/33°C

Low: 80° F/27°C

>



Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Saturday

Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston

High
F/C
98/36
72/22
86/30
86/30
90/32
84/28
72/22
90/32
70/21
74/23
98/36
90/32
74/23
89/31
95/35

Today

Low

F/C
70/21
57/13
67/19
71/21
68/20
65/18
56/13
76/24
56/13
55/12
74/23
55/12
53/11
77/25
76/24

Ww

>

oO oO

rnHOoDrtrD CCD COD CH
}

High
F/C
99/37
72/22
81/27
85/29
84/28
75/23
68/20
89/31
72/22
69/20
93/33
86/30
70/21
90/32
94/34

Low

F/C
69/20
56/13
63/17
62/16
64/17
63/17
58/14
71/21
57/13
54/12
67/19
59/15
56/13
77/25
71/21

Ww

s
pe
pe

+

oO

+O tM OHO a
oO

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando



Clear. Mostly sunny with a
thunderstorm.
High: 92°
Low: 81° Low: 81°

Le

— i

Clouds and sun, a
t-storm possible.

High: 91°
Low: 80°

ICE UC acl c |
94°-84° F

ae,

oe i



ae

—a

Clouds and sun, a
t-storm possible.

High: 90°
Low: 82°

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and

elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 78° F/26° C

= AMI

High: 92° F/33°C
Low: 81°F/27°C

<



High
F/C
76/24
94/34
82/27
111/43
88/31
86/30
80/26
88/31
92/33
68/20
84/28
90/32
88/31
92/33
92/33

Today
Low

F/C
55/12
74/23
57/13
84/28
62/16
66/18
60/15
64/17
81/27
54/12
63/17
76/24
70/21
64/17
75/23

Ww

High

F/C
71/21
91/32
81/27
111/43
88/31
86/30
76/24
83/28
94/34
74/23
79/26
91/32
81/27
87/30
93/33

@ WEST PALM BEACH

Low

F/C
54/12
72/22
58/14
89/31
60/15
66/18
57/13
62/16
81/27
60/15
58/14
72/22
69/20
62/16
73/22

FREEPORT

ABACO
High: 92° F/33° C

High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 79° F/26° C

F

ANDROS

NASSAU
High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 81°F/27°C

@

High: 95° F/35°C
Low: 79° F/26° C

Saturday
WwW

+O tt H HM

High

F/C

Philadelphia 88/31
Phoenix 112/44
Pittsburgh 78/25
Portland, OR 94/34
Raleigh-Durham 89/31
St. Louis 80/26
Salt Lake City 98/36
San Antonio —_ 100/37
San Diego 78/25
San Francisco 76/24
Seattle 85/29
Tallahassee 90/32
Tampa 91/32
Tucson 107/41

Washington, DC 90/32

Low: 82° F/28°C

Today

Low

F/C
70/21
88/31
58/14
61/16
72/22
59/15
66/18
77/25
68/20
57/13
58/14
72/22
80/26
81/27
69/20

WwW

pe
pe
t
pe
t
pe
s
t

pc

Precipitation == —“—i‘“—;SCSCSC~*C«SS unre... 6:30. a.m. Moonrise. .... 1:40 a.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... cece trace Sunset....... 8:02 p.m. Moonset ..... 3:42 p.m.
Year to date : :
Normal year to date 0... ccccceseseccseeeees 21.75" ues Fist a pons
AccuWeather.com aes
Forecasts and graphics provided by a. a5
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 21 Jul. 28 Aug.5 Aug. 13
High: 94° F/34° C
Low: 80° F/27°C
ica
all J CATISLAND
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 76° F/24°C
GREATEXUMA ee
a... SAN SALVADOR
High: 92 F/33 C High: 93° F/4° c
Low: 79° F/26° C Low: 77° F/25° c
xX zx
-*. all
ee HX
LONG ISLAND
High: 94° F/34° C
Low: 77° F/25° C : MAYAGUANA
Saturday
High Low W ort High: 93° F/34° C
Fe FC Low: 74° F/23°C
84/28 66/18 t
72/22 54/42 t igh:
84/28 5915 s RAG GED ISLAND Low: 76° Fac
39 High: 95° F/35° C ay
/31 65/18 t Low: 74° F/23° Cc w 7
77/25 59/15 s . on
99/37 71/21 $s
98/36 75/23 ¢s 7 See
76/24 68/20 pe te Tei ar
74/23 56/43 pc d
77/25 56/13 s pgp
90/32 68/20 t a
90/32 80/26 t ‘alll 7
109/42 80/26 t a4
85/29 67/19 t

Normal high ....
Normal low
Last year's high
Last year's low



Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature

lt
© | olif2|sla|sie
— a LOW MODERATE
Some sun, t-storms
possible; windy.
High: 89°
Low: 82°
AccuWeather RealFeel
96°-90° F High
Tod 3:26 a.m.
mv 4:06 pm.
Saturd 4:32 a.m.
Gee 5:11 p.m.
Sund 5:37 a.m.
ey 613 pm.
93° F/34° C 6:39 a.m.
ade F/ag¢¢ = Monday nn

AY ria NY

88° F/31° C
75° F/24° C
92° F/33° C
79° F/26° C









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Ht.(ft.) Low

2.2
29

2.2
3.0

2.3
3.2

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9:27 a.m.

10:41 p.m.

10:30 a.m.
11:44 p.m.

11:34 a.m.

12:43 a.m.
12:36 p.m.

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0.3

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0.2

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Wor_p Cities

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
95/35
72/22
82/27
94/34
57/13
90/32
86/30
79/26
79/26
86/30
97/36
838/31
82/27
66/18
70/21
95/35
61/16
98/36
96/35
84/28
91/32
82/27
77/25
78/25
64/17
75/23
69/20
68/20
93/33
72/22
91/32
108/42
91/32
84/28
58/14
91/32
72/22
66/18
86/30
86/30
79/26
104/40
73/22
79/26
91/32
78/25
93/33
73/22
72/22
87/30
83/28
104/40
93/33
91/32
68/20
86/30
63/17
91/32
17/25
79/26
75/23
62/16
95/35
86/30
72/22
88/31
78/25
838/31
83/28
66/18

Ti

Today

Low
F/C
79/26
57/13
57/13
79/26
50/10
79/26
76/24
61/16
68/20
76/24
72/22
67/19
72/22
45/7
57/13
68/20
46/7
76/24
85/29
52/11
T5E3
71/21
67/19
67/19
50/10
57/13
54/12
57/13
73/22
54/12
82/27
84/28
75/23
62/16
36/2
79/26
60/15
54/12
54/12
77/25
54/12
75/23
61/16
56/13
49/9
52/11
81/27
59/15
Sale
59/15
70/21
82/27
70/21
79/26
34/1
70/21
39/3
73/22
57/13
70/21
57/13
33/3
82/27
77/25
57/13
64/17
59/15
69/20
61/16
49/9



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High
F/C
93/33
64/17
82/27
97/36
55/12
91/32
86/30
70/21
93/33
80/26
104/40
68/20
82/27
66/18
63/17
83/28
61/16
99/37
98/36
82/27
93/33
83/28
87/30
74/23
64/17
64/17
61/16
70/21
94/34
77/25
93/33
108/42
93/33
86/30
58/14
89/31
74/23
72/22
91/32
83/28
77/25
104/40
70/21
80/26
55/12
78/25
93/33
76/24
71/21
63/17
75/23
101/38
82/27
89/31
64/17
88/31
57/13
86/30
70/21
75/23
77/25
63/17
93/33
86/30
70/21
92/33
74/23
70/21
91/32
74/23

Saturday

Low
F/C
79/26
57/13
59/15
77/25
50/10
80/26
77/25
61/16
73/22
77/25
53/11
54/12
e123
43/6
49/9
48/8
50/10
76/24
87/30
53/11
74/23
71/21
80/26
61/16
52/11

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST

51/10

51/10
59/15
74/23
57/13
84/28

86/30 s

75/23

63/17 s

38/3
78/25
60/15
52/11
59/15
77/25
55/12
76/24
59/15
59/15

47/8
52/11
81/27
58/14
55/12
53/11
60/15
80/26
87/13
79/26

33/0
74/23

36/2
73/22
50/10
68/20
61/16

36/2
84/28
75/23
57/13
64/17
58/14
53/11

49/9
57/13

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FRIDAY, JULY 17TH, 2009, PAGE 7B










WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F
Saturday: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F
Saturday: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F
ABACO Today: SE at 9-18 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 81°F
Saturday: _ ESE at 9-18 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 81°F



Denver 90/69
(H) 5190/55

Miami
92/81

Showers
[XX] T-storms
Rain









Fronts
[4 Matis Shown are noon positions of weather systems and ch
Bk. Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm itentitentMa
[yv_=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Meug~eafi
10s| 0s (0s | 10s 20s [305i] 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s (G0s)//iUnelii0)
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‘You Own

Away Gant leet Sane

Or you.can rest easy knowing

that yo have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

flaw Prevéones mg we rtf we ef wp



PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



"
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Hubert Ingraham



aA MOMS

FROM page 1B

paid $1 for a grant of 17
Crown Land acres on the sea
in 1996.

And another certificate,
from 2005, showed that then-
Prime Minister Perry Christie
allowed a company to pay $1
for a 50-acre Crown Land
tract, again on the prime
beachfront property. The
report could not be printed,
though, so the names of the
developers involved or the
location of the land in ques-
tion could not be ascertained.

But Ms Loi wrote in her
report: “The Government
continued to make large tracts
of Crown Land available to

foreign investors at conces-
sionary rates - as low as $1-$2
for entire projects - as has
been done since the enact-
ment of the International Per-
sons Landholding Act under
the [first Ingraham adminis-
tration] and recorded below
from excerpts of Crown grants
obtained from the Depart-
ment of Lands and Surveys.”

Further confirmation of the
seemingly trivial purchase
prices paid by developers
came from the list of Crown
Land grants tabled by the
opposition PLP in the House
of Assembly on Wednesday,
where the developers of Pow-
ell Point at Cape Eleuthera
paid $ 1 each for four sepa-
rate Crown Land grants under

the Christie administration on
October 25, 2005.

Documents

And the holding company
for the Walker’s Cay resort
development in Abaco, and
Grand Cay Research Compa-
ny, also in Abaco, paid $1 for
their Crown Land grants
respectively under the former
PLP administration on March
4, 2005. The documents
recording the conveyancings,
according to what was tabled
in Parliament, came from Mr
Ingraham’s law practice - a
time when he was out of
office.

It is important, though, to

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Two PMs grant Crown Land to developer for $1

put these Crown Land grants
in context. It is unclear, first of
all, how much acreage was
involved in these $1 transac-
tions, and how the land
involved was to be used.

It has been a long-estab-
lished policy of successive
Bahamian governments to
trade land for development
and foreign direct investment,
particularly in mega resort
projects, and it is possible that
the land involved in these $1
transactions was critical to the
success of individual develop-
ments - a factor that could
‘make or break’ job creation./

It is impossible, though, to
know the Government’s
thinking on each respective
transaction, which again high-
lights the need for a transpar-
ent, accountable land use and
administration policy.

Other notable developers
obtaining Crown Land grants
included Kerzner Interna-
tional, which on February 20,
2008, through Atlantis Hold-
ings (Bahamas) paid $211,370
and $9,853 respectively for
two separate Crown Land
grants on Paradise Island.

Mayaguana Island Devel-
opers paid $2 million for
Crown Land on that island on
July 26, 2007, for the 50/50
joint venture development
project between the I-Group
and the Government, acting
through the Hotel Corpora-
tion of the Bahamas.

And Gerardo Capo’s RAV
Bahamas paid $425,600 to the
Treasury for a Crown Land
grant in Bimini that will form
part of the Bimini Bay resort
project.

Clan

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight

#€ The dAlbenas Agency Ltd.

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on Mondays

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www.kellysbahamas.com

Fax: (242) 393-4096





Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.194FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH T-STORM HIGH 92F LOW 81F SEEBUSINESSFRONTPAGE S P O R T S Two PMs ‘grant Crown Land to developer for $1’ SEEPAGENINE Giving back to the islands By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net A24-YEAR-OLDman found beaten and bloodied in an Abaco street early yester-d ay morning died within an hour of being picked up by police. Adam Evans, 24, of Marsh Harbour, was found by police lying in the road at the entrance to Spring City, Marsh Harbour, shortly after 4am. He was taken to the health clinic in Marsh Harbour with severe head injuries and injuries across his body and died sometime after 5am, police say. Reports reaching The Tri bune allege Mr Evans was beaten up by a group of thugs and then run over by a car. Superintendent in charge of the Family Islands Hulan Hanna said detectives have yet to determine how he met his death, but he expects infor-m ation will lead to a homicide investigation. Mr Hanna said: “We don’t know what led to, or how, he received his injuries, and rightn ow we are investigating the matter. “We have not classified the death as yet, but it will probably lead to a homicide investigation.” The Tribune understands Mr Evans’ mother flew to Nassau with her son’s body yesterday for an autopsy to be carried out. The family declined to speak about Mr Evans’ death while the police investigation is underway. Police confirmed Mr Evans had served time in prison, but Mr Hanna would not say why he had been jailed or for how long. Reports suggest that 24-year-old was attacked then run over by car The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com Man found beaten dies B U S I N E S S T h r e e i n t h r e e f o r d e v e l o p e r C M Y K C M Y K S E C T I O N B b u s i n e s s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t F R I D A Y , J U L Y 1 7 , 2 0 0 9 T H E T R I B U N E $ 4 . 6 8 $ 4 . 5 1 $ 4 . 6 9T h e i n f o r m a t i o n c o n t a i n e d i s f r o m a t h i r d p a r t y a n d T h e T r i b u n e c a n n o t b e h e l d r e s p o n s i b l e f o r e r r o r s a n d / o r o m i s s i o n f r o m t h e d a i l y r e p o r t . $ 4 . 2 1 $ 4 . 3 0 $ 4 . 1 0 M U T U A L F U N D i n v e s t m e n t e x p e r t i n v e s t m e n t a d v i c e m u l t i p l e f u n d o p t i o n s p o t e n t i a l l y h i g h e r r e t u r n sa l l o f t h e a b o v eF A M I L Y G U A R D I A N C O R P O R A T E C E N T R E : A T T H E J U N C T I O N O F V I L L A G E R O A D , S H I R L E Y S T R E E T & E A S T B A Y S T R E E T I w w w . f a m g u a r d b a h a m a s . c o mc a l l u s t o d a y a t 3 9 6 4 0 0 0 A S U B S I D I A R Y O F 5 0 % o f l a n d s u r v e y o r s t o r e t i r e w i t h i n n e x t 1 0 y e a r s B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e B a h a m a s f o r e i g n e x c h a n g e r e s e r v e s w i l l e n d t h e y e a r h i g h e r t h a n 2 0 0 8 s $ 5 6 2 . 7 3 m i l l i o n f i n i s h , t h e C e n t r a l B a n k g o v e r n o r t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s y e s t e r d a y , w i t h a 3 9 p e r c e n t d e c l i n e i n f o r e i g n i n v e s t m e n t i n f l o w s b a l a n c e d b y g o v e r n m e n t s f o r e i g n c u r r e n c y b o r r o w i n g s a n d r e d u c e d o u t f l o w s . W i t h e x t e r n a l c u r r e n c y r e s e r v e s a p p r o a c h i n g $ 7 2 3 m i l l i o n a s o f T u e s d a y t h i s w e e k , a s l i g h t d r o p o n e n d M a y s $ 7 5 6 . 6 3 m i l l i o n , W e n d y C r a i g g s a i d t h e d e c l i n e i n c r e d i t d e m a n d a n d e c o n o m i c r e c e s s i o n h a d t r i g g e r e d a n a t u r a l a d j u s t m e n t m e c h a n i s m t h a t r e d u c e d f o r e i g n c u r r e n c y o u t f l o w s a d e v e l o p m e n t t h a t c o u n t e r b a l a n c e d t h e d r o p i n t o u r i s m a n d f o r e i g n d i r e c t i n v e s t m e n t r e l a t e d i n f l o w s . F o r e i g n r e s e r v e s t o e n d y e a r h i g h e r t h a n 2 0 0 8 H o l d i n g s r e c e i v e b o o s t i n e x c e s s o f $ 1 0 0 m f r o m f o r e i g n b o r r o w i n g s , w i t h p r o c e e d s s e t t o h e l p b e t t e r 2 0 0 8 s $ 5 6 3 m f i n i s h P e r f o r m a n c e c o m e s d e s p i t e 3 9 % f a l l i n p r i v a t e f o r e i g n i n v e s t m e n t i n f l o w s t o $ 1 9 4 m , a n d 3 5 % c a p i t a l a c c o u n t s u r p l u s d e c l i n e t o $ 1 5 0 m R i s k f r o m o i l p r i c e r i s e s n o t v e r y s t r o n g , b u t n o c h a n g e i n i n t e r e s t r a t e s o r m o n e t a r y p o l i c y N o s i g n i f i c a n t i n c r e a s e i n c o m m e r c i a l b a n k l o a n p o r t f o l i o d e t e r i o r a t i o n W E N D Y C R A I G G S E E p a g e 3 B B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e r e g u l a t i o n s a c c o m p a n y i n g t h e D o m e s t i c I n s u r a n c e A c t m u s t f i r s t b e p a s s e d b y t h e I n s u r a n c e C o m m i s s i o n s B o a r d b e f o r e t h e y c a n g i v e e n f o r c e m e n t t e e t h t o t h e n e w l y i m p l e m e n t e d l e g i s l a t i o n , t h e h e a d r e g u l a t o r t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s y e s t e r d a y e v e n i n g , h o p e f u l l y b r i n g i n g c l a r i t y t o a n i n d u s t r y w h e r e t h i s n e w s p a p e r w a s t o l d c o n f u s i o n r e i g n s . L e n n o x M c C a r t n e y , t h e C o m m i s s i o n s s u p e r i n t e n d e n t , c o n f i r m e d t o t h i s n e w s p a p e r t h a t w h i l e t h e f o r m e r R e g i s t r a r o f I n s u r a n c e s O f f i c e h a d b e e n r e n a m e d , t h e r e g u l a t i o n s a c c o m p a n y i n g t h e A c t h a d n o t a s y e t c o m e i n t o f o r c e . H e e x p l a i n e d t o T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s : T h e r e g u l a t i o n s h a v e t o b e p a s s e d b y t h e B o a r d o f t h e [ I n s u r a n c e ] C o m m i s s i o n . A t t h e B o a r d s f i r s t m e e t i n g , t h o s e r e g u l a t i o n s w i l l m o r e t h a n l i k e l y b e p a s s e d . I t s a k i n d o f c h i c k e n a n d e g g s i t u a t i o n . 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A F e b r u a r y 2 1 , 2 0 0 7 , r e p o r t s u b m i t t e d t o t h e G o v e r n m e n t a s p a r t o f t h e I n t e r A m e r i c a n D e v e l o p m e n t B a n k ( I D B ) f i n a n c e d L a n d U s e a n d A d m i n i s t r a t i o n p r o j e c t r e c o m m e n d e d t h a t g i v e n t h e m i n i m a l n u m b e r o f s u r v e y s c a r r i e d o u t b y t h e D e p a r t m e n t , a l l g o v e r n m e n t s u r v e y s a n d C r o w n L a n d g r a n t s a n d l e a s e s s h o u l d b e s u b c o n t r a c t e d o u t t o p r i v a t e s u r v e y o r s . T h e r e p o r t , b y G r e n v i l l e B a r n e s o f c o n s u l t a n t s I n t e r n a t i o n a l L a n d S y s t e m s ( I L S ) , o n e o f a s e r i e s o f I L S d o c u m e n t s t h a t s h o w t h e e x t e n t o f t h e s h a m b l e s i n l a n d a d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d m a n a g e m e n t i n t h e B a h a m a s , a d d e d : R e c o r d s m a n a g e m e n t a t L a n d s a n d S u r v e y s i s w e a k , a n d h a s c o n t r i b u t e t o l a c k o f c o n f i d e n c e i n t h e s y s t e m . A n d e v e n t h e p r o p o s a l t o s u b c o n t r a c t a l l g o v e r n m e n t a n d C r o w n L a n d s u r v e y s t o t h e p r i v a t e s e c t o r w a s f r a u g h t w i t h p r o b l e m s , t h e I L S r e p o r t d i s c l o s i n g t h a t t h e B a h a m a s A s s o c i a t i o n o f L a n d S u r v e y o r s n e e d e d t o t a c k l e s u r v e y i n g c a p a c i t y i n t h e B a h a m a s . T h i s w a s b e c a u s e m o r e t h a n 5 0 p e r c e n t o f t h e c u r -S E E p a g e 4 B B y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r c r o b a r d s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t A r e a l e s t a t e d e v e l o p e r y e s t e r d a y t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t t h r e e m u l t i m i l l i o n d o l l a r h o u s i n g p r o j e c t s h e i s w o r k i n g o n i n N e w P r o v i d e n c e c o u l d b e c o m p l e t e d w i t h i n t h r e e y e a r s d e s p i t e t h e e c o n o m i c s l o w d o w n , w i t h o n e p o s s i b l y v a l u e d a t b e t w e e n $ 5 0 0 $ 7 0 0 m i l l i o n a t f u l l b u i l d o u t . E x M P a n d a t t o r n e y g e n e r a l , T e n n y s o n W e l l s , s a i d t h e r e c e n t L y f o r d H i l l s d e v e l o p m e n t c o u l d a m o u n t t o t h a t , a n d o n e t h i r d o f p h a s e o n e h a d b e e n c o m p l e t e d , w i t h w a t e r a n d s e w e r a g e i n f r a s t r u c t u r e i n p l a c e a n d t h e g a t e h o u s e c o m p l e t e d . M r W e l l s S o u t h S e a s d e v e l o p m e n t , w h i c h i n c l u d e s a c a n a l , c a m e t o a s t a n d s t i l l a f t e r t h e B a h a m a s N a t i o n a l T r u s t ( B N T ) q u e s t i o n e d w h e t h e r p r o p e r e n v i r o n m e n t a l s a f e g u a r d s w e r e i n p l a c e t o p r o t e c t t h e n a t u r a l w e t l a n d s o n t h e p r o p e r t y p u r c h a s e d b y h i s d e v e l o p m e n t c o m p a n y . T h e B N T r e q u e s t e d t h a t g o v e r n m e n t d e m a n d a s t o p S E E p a g e 3 B T E N N Y S O N W E L L S B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r B o t h P r i m e M i n i s t e r H u b e r t I n g r a h a m a n d h i s p r e d e c e s s o r , P e r r y C h r i s t i e , h a v e c o n v e y e d p r i m e b e a c h f r o n t C r o w n L a n d o f m u l t i p l e a c r e a g e t o d e v e l o p e r s f o r a s l i t t l e a s $ 1 , T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s c a n r e v e a l , w i t h t h e r e a p p e a r i n g t o b e n o s e t p o l i c y g o v e r n i n g t h e p r i c e p a i d i n s u c h t r a n s a c t i o n s . A r e p o r t o n t h e m a n a g e m e n t a n d d i s t r i b u t i o n o f C r o w n L a n d i n t h e B a h a m a s , p r o d u c e d b y M a s s a c h u s e t t s I n s t i t u t e o f T e c h n o l o g y ( M I T ) s t u d e n t N a k e i s c h a L o i i n J u l y 2 0 0 7 , e x h i b i t e d s e v e r a l c e r t i f i c a t e s o f C r o w n L a n d g r a n t s t h a t w e r e o b t a i n e d f r o m t h e D e p a r t m e n t o f L a n d s a n d S u r v e y s . O n e c e r t i f i c a t e , s i g n e d b y P r i m e M i n i s t e r H u b e r t I n g r a h a m a s t h e m i n i s t e r r e s p o n s i b l e , w a s s a i d t o s h o w t h a t a d e v e l o p e r T w o P M s g r a n t C r o w n L a n d t o d e v e l o p e r f o r $ 1 S E E p a g e 8 B BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Businessman shot, robbed by masked men B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport R eporter dmaycock@ tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A G rand Bahama business man was shot and robbed of cash by two armedm asked men after closing his business in the Hawksbill area late Wednesday evening. The 50-year-old victim, w ho is a resident of South Bahamia, is detained in stable, but serious condition in the Intensive Care Unit at Rand MemorialH ospital. Police are withholding the identity of the busi-n essman. Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle said the Police Control Room received a call around 10.45pm froma businessman who reported that he was shot in the stomach outside his store, near the Hawksbill Service Station. T he victim told police that he was driving himself to the hospital. However, he lost control of his vehicle and overturned near the Four Way Co-op Plaza on Pioneers Way 50-year-old in serious but stable condition SEE page eight By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE crew of a barge that sunk off Cistern Cay, Exuma, spilling oil and garbage into the Exuma Land and Sea Park, has disappeared and authorities said they do not know if they are dead or alive. A 85ft tanker carrying two excavators sank while passing through the shipping channel at around 3am on Wednesday. The oil, which spilled into the sea, now poses a major threat to the environment and marine Crew of oil spilling barge has disappeared SEE page eight OFFICERS SEARCH for suspected illegal immigrants in bushes near Yamacraw Beach yesterday. A total of 189 suspected illegal Haitian migrants were apprehended over the past two days in New Providence and Andros. SEEPAGETWO Tim Clarke /Tribune staff RBDF APPREHENDS 1 89 By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net ONE of the Bahamas’ most wanted men has been captured by United States authorities in Florida during a raid that also uncovered highpowered weapons, drugs and cash. David St Remy, 35, who is accused in the 2007 murder of Ryan Wood in Grand Bahama, was picked up in the Miami Shores area by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE agents on an immigration violation. Officers also seized an AK-47 and an M-16 rifle, as well as a handgun, around 1/3 kilo gramme of cocaine and $2,000 in cash from a residence where St Remy had been living. The joint operation with the Broward Coun ty Sheriff’s office saw St Remy taken into cus tody together with another man, 28-year-old Kervin Occean also identified as a Bahami an national by US ICE agents and will now face charges in that country for illegally reentering after being deported in May 2003. By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net SENATOR Jerome Fitzgerald said he is investigating legal options that would possibly halt government's extension of Arawak Cay until there is full trans parency and accountability to the public regarding the controversial development. Mr Fitzgerald, who has recently been a vocal opponent of the proposal, is spearheading the cause under the newly formed Committee to Protect and Preserve the Bahamas for Future Generations. "It's definitely a matter which is open to Senator investigating legal options to halt Arawak Cay extension SEE page eight Jerome Fitzgerald One of the Bahamas’ most wanted men captured in US SEE page eight

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A TOTAL of 189 suspected illegal Haitian migrants were apprehended over the past two daysi n New Providence and A ndros. Law enforcement officers y esterday apprehended 27 H aitian migrants in the Yamacraw area. And an a pprehension exercise near Andros on Wednesday netted 162 Haitianm igrants. After receiving reports of a 25-ft Haitian sloop off the shore of Seabreeze Estates shortly after 9amy esterday, a thorough search of the eastern part o f the island was conducted by police and Defence Force officers. T his resulted in the apprehension of a group of 27 migrants 18 men, eight women and one child who were turned over to Immi-g ration officials for processing. Search However, the search is o ngoing as it is believed that there are many others who escaped into the near-b y bushes. The Department of Immigration is therefore asking the public to be especially vigilant in the eastern district of New Providence and to assist authorities in apprehend i ng these migrants. This latest exercise comes on the heels ofa nother apprehension of some 162 Haitian migrants w ho were discovered near Green Cay, Andros on Wednesday. T hese 162 persons 130 men and 32 women were b rought to New Providence yesterday onboard the HMBS P-48 and P-49 aftert hey were spotted by the Defence Force’s Airwing reconnaissance team. Defence Force officers dispatched to the area dis covered the Haitian m igrants who were not in possession of the necessary d ocumentation to enter the country. “They were removed f rom their unsanitary ves sel, taken aboard the Defence Force crafts and arrived in the capital at 8.30pm Wednesday night,”a statement from the Defence Force said. T he migrants, who all appeared to be in fair health, were handed over to Immigration officials for further processing. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Suspected illegal immigrants are apprehended HAITIAN IMMIGRANTS apprehended on Wednesday are offloaded and turned over to immigration officials to be processed at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre. HAITIAN MIGRANTS aboard RBDF vessel P48 on Wednesday. M a r i n e S e a m a n D r i s s e n B r e n n e n R B D F P u b l i c R e l a t i o n s M a r i n e S e a m a n D r i s s e n B r e n n e n R B D F P u b l i c R e l a t i o n s Marine Seaman Drissen Brennen RBDF Public Relations TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras A TOP AIDEof ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya said he was heading back to the country Thursday, while thousands of his supporters blocked roads to demand his return to power, according to Associated Press. Patricia Rodas, foreign minister of Zelaya’s toppled government, said the deposed president was “on his way” back, but refused to say how he planned to enter the country or when he expected to arrive. Zelaya’s current whereabouts are unclear and Honduras’ interim leaders have promised to arrest him if he returns. “Our president will be in Honduras at some point and a some moment. “He is already on his way. God protect him and the people of the Americas who are with him,” Rodas told reporters in La Paz, Bolivia. It would be Zelaya’s second attempt to return to Honduras since the military deposed him and flew him out of the country in a June 28 coup. Aide: Ousted Honduran president heading back HAITIAN MIGRANTS on the 45ft wooden sloop on Wednesday. THIS HAITIAN sloop sits in shallow waters off Yamacraw Beach yesterday morning after Immigration officials apprehended 27 migrants. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net THE lack of a clear land policy has allowed for the suspicion that corruption and political manipul ation guides the granting of Crown land, according to the MPf or Fort Charlotte. In making this point, Alfred S ears noted that it appears the majority of the almost 800 Crown grants awarded by the government between 1992 and the pre sent were for land in Abaco. “Well, I ask the question: What policy guided the grant of so m uch Crown land in Abaco? Was it due to political considerations? I am not saying it was, but I have to ask the question,” said Mr Sears. The MP said it is “wrong that public land should be given out while the average citizen of this commonwealth cannot see a writ-t en policy, cannot see who is getting it, the terms they’re getting it on and the policy that is guiding the disposition.” He was speaking during the d ebate on a resolution moved by Fred Mitchell, MP for Fox Hill, calling for a parliamentary select committee to be appointed to investigate matters concerning the disposition of publicly held lands. The resolution was supported by both sides – with many members proposing that a committee could help guide the formation of clearer, written guidelines governing the distribution of a fundamental and finite resource – and was approved yesterday afternoon. Who will sit on the committee has yet to be determined. Among the issues to be examined by the committee are: How much Crown land is there? Who owns and manages this land? Who has land been granted to and on what basis? Also to be examined are how the charges attached to the land that is granted are determined and under what circumstances public officers or their relatives can obtain Crown land. The committee is intended to investigate to what extent the cur rent land policy results in the open, rational and transparent distribution of Crown land, and if it falls short, as MPs said it does, whether a legislative and regulatory regime can be created to ensure these ideals are fulfilled. Speaking on the parliamentary channel during the luncheon recess, Mr Mitchell said he expects the committee to be able to report within three months. He added that he would like to see t he committee’s hearings open to the public. Its appointment comes on the heels of the resignation of former Director of Lands and Surveys Tex Turnquest, following a series of articles published in this news-p aper outlining questionable land grants during his tenure. P raising “intrepid” T ribune reporter Paul Turnquest for his work, Mr Mitchell suggested it is right that his articles should spur an examination of issues related to Crown land. Given that there was no explanation from the government for why the director resigned following the articles, he proposed that t he committee’s work should also result in the “full story” behind t his situation being exposed for the first time. The MP compared the experi ence of relatives of Tex Turnquest who were granted beachf ront land – which some of them went on to “flip” shortly after forh undreds of thousands of dollars in profit – with that of many B ahamians who have been forced to wait years, in some cases over a decade, for Crown grants for their own residential or commercial use. Giving examples of individuals or groups who he alleged have f ound the government less than responsive to their needs, Mr M itchell noted that the Senior Citizens Association in Long Island was just recently granted 1.9 acres after putting in an application 12 years ago for five acres of Crown land. Several MPs suggested that the fact that it can take so long for grants to be made or refused, and that this can occur with no explanation given for the delay or what amount of land is finally granted, must be rectified. Meanwhile, the perception that it is easier for foreigners to get Crown land than Bahamians and that “kisses go by favours” when it comes to Bahamians getting land must be dispelled, several opposition MPs said. The future development of the country hinges on the ability of members of the public to have an e qual right to access Crown land regardless of their political affilia tion, family ties or social con nections, it was said. “The regime I contemplate is one that has established criterion that all can access but infused w ith the philosophical underpinning that the land and its d istribution will be used to empower Bahamians and to i ncrease their individual wealth and our national wealth,” said Mr Mitchell. Contributing to the debate, Minister of State for Lands Byran Woodside said there is a “misguided view that the governing p arty has been improperly granting land to persons.” H e said that land is an “emo tive subject” but suggested that Mr Mitchell’s call for a committee was merely political. Meanwhile, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham hit out at the opposition during Mr Mitchell’s statement on the committee, alleging that the land “flipped” by Tex Turnquest’s relatives was “sold to foreigners” under the PLP. “You signed off on it,” he said, adding: “Why didn’t you make an issue out of it then?” Mr Ingraham added he will make a “full statement” on the issue of land on Monday, “laying out facts and policies and tablinga number of documents that will enlighten members of the parlia ment and the people of the Bahamas.” SENATOR Allyson Maynard-Gibson unleashed a blis-t ering attack on government o n a number of fronts yesterday, criticising their plan to move the container port to Arawak Cay and demanding to know whether the phonel ines of senior police officers are being tapped. Speaking in the Senate on the issue of the container port, Mrs Maynard-Gibson said: “We do not need to do thee xtension to Arawak Cay right now. The experts already said, leave it where it is rather thanm ove it to Arawak Cay.” She pointed out that under t he former PLP government, a plan to build an inland port in southwest New Providencew as met with wide approval. “The shipping stakeholders o n the Solomon and Mackey Committee were enthusiastic about an inland port as it is a protected port. Last week inC uba, soon to be one of our main competitors in tourism, I saw what is certainly one of t he largest inland ports on the region. Hundreds of Bahamians could have been working right now on sustainable jobs at ouri nland port at southwest New Providence. And hundreds m ore could have counted on o pening businesses and having sustainable jobs when that i nland port was finished. More money is being wasted, to the detriment of Bahamians hurt-i ng now and future generations of Bahamians.” The senator added: “Drive b y Saunders Beach. What will you see? Non-Bahamians driv ing tractors in the Bahamas. Bahamians are out of jobs and non-Bahamians are drivingt ractors and painting road signs in the Bahamas. Who w ould have thought that we’d live to see the day when the government would demon-s trate that Bahamians are not qualified in their own country t o drive a tractor and move Bahamian sand or paint a road sign, in the Bahamas?” M rs Maynard-Gibson also asked how criminals could be s wiftly punished when their files and papers are being lost” while being removed by hand from various courts. “How can we have any conf idence in the system when we hear about phone lines of senior police officers beingt apped? Where is the government’s voice in this critical m atter?” she asked. “How can we believe that the government is seriousa bout the administration of justice when they say one day t hat they will build the Judicial Complex and the next day they say that they will not? How can we believe that they are serious when knowing t hat we need judges, they refuse to follow the custom of renewing the contracts ofB ahamian judges and magistrates who are ready, willing a nd able to serve? “These are the things that we ought to be debating: jobs,c rime and the right of unfettered access to clean beaches and other recreational areas.W e ought to be allocating scarce resources to finding jobs f or hurting Bahamians, who need to pay mortgages, rent, utilities, school fees and buyg roceries and clothes. And we ought to be allocating these r esources to restoring safety in our homes and on our streets. Enough is enough,” she said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 3 INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News...............................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Advt .........................................................P12 Sports...............................................P9,10,11 BUSINESS SECTION Business....................................P1,2,7,8,9,10 Comics........................................................P8 Weather.......................................................P9 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES MP hits out o ver ‘the lack of clear land policy’ B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net T HE Court of Appeal yesterday dismissed a long-running legal dispute between Elizabeth MP Malcolm Adderley and his stepmother after the pair agreed t o settle their differences. Mr Adderley was sued for damages by Ruthie Mae Adderley in June 2003 after shec laimed that despite being appointed executor of his late father’s will in 2000, Mr Adderley had “failed or refused” to carry out his parent’s wishes w ith respect to her. A 2006 Supreme Court judgment did not award Mrs Adderley those damages but the MPw as ordered to pay half of her legal costs at that time after Justice Fazool Mohammed suggested that had he carried out his duties as executor more p romptly in earlier years he could have “saved her the expense of bringing the action” against him. H owever, Mr Adderley, PLP MP for Elizabeth and chairman of the Gaming Board, did not want to pay the costs, and appealed that decision. Yesterday in court, the MP’s a ttorney Charles Mackey told the Justices of Appeal – Dame Joan Sawyer, Hartman Longley and Christopher Blackman –t hat the two parties had come t o an out of court agreement since their previous appearance. Dame Joan said that in this case the matter would be withd rawn and dismissed. Although the original legal action against the MP dates b ack to 2003 this is the first time it has received exposure in the press. According to court documents obtained by The Tribune, Ruthie Mae Adderley charged that it took five years and a legal action against Mr Adderley, her late husband’s son, before he e xecuted a deed of assent transferring certain property left to her by his father, and that while she was “still in mourning” he t ook steps to transfer a taxi franchise held by his father into a company bearing his name, despite being aware that his father had left it to Ruthie Maei n his will. He also did this knowing that she relied on it for her income and despite the fact that he then p laced himself in a “real conflict of interest,” it was claimed. Mrs Adderley’s attorney’s argued that Mr Adderley was “unreliable and unbelievable.” H owever, Supreme Court Justice Fazool Mohammed said in 2006 that although Mr Adder ley did appear to have procrast inated when it came to carrying out his duties as the executor of t he will, he found it “difficult to conclude (Mr Adderley d ishonestly or incompetently.” It was noted that when Malc olm Adderley senior died, the t axi franchise he had held b ecame void under section 70 o f the Road Traffic Act and therefore it could not have b ecome part of the estate of the deceased or trust property that c ould be given out in the will. Court of Appeal dismisses MP, stepmother dispute Senator questions container port plans, alleged phone taps W W e e d d o o n n o o t t n n e e e e d d t t o o d d o o t t h h e e e e x x t t e e n n s s i i o o n n t t o o A A r r a a w w a a k k C C a a y y r r i i g g h h t t n n o o w w . . T T h h e e e e x x p p e e r r t t s s a a l l r r e e a a d d y y s s a a i i d d , , l l e e a a v v e e i i t t w w h h e e r r e e i i t t i i s s r r a a t t h h e e r r t t h h a a n n m m o o v v e e i i t t t t o o A A r r a a w w a a k k C C a a y y . . Allyson Maynard-Gibson Alfred Sears

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EDITOR, The Tribune. F or the past many years now our Bahamas has been exemplarily democracy. For the most part just about all of our general elections held over the past 50 years, we have been a model in democracy for the whole w orld. Even Great Britain for whom w e owe our Westminster system of government has marvelled how the Bahamas has been able to maintain it. But let’s not for one moment take it for granted that what has happened in Honduras on June 25, 2009 cannot take place here. The Honduran President “Manuel Zelaya” was overthrown and replaced by “Romeo Vasquez.” When our general elections were held last year 2007 the final tally was the governing party FNM 23 and the opposition PLP 17. Since that time the numbers have changed to 24 to 16. Yet despite these numbers which have been chosen by the voting citizens of the Bahamas, to this day the opposition PLP still has not conceded defeat. The PLP has challenged the results of at least two con stituency results costing thousands of tax payer dollars and invaluable court time. As a result of these actions we are currently faced with a backlog of cases as our court system was tied up for almost one year because of the opposition court challenges. There are those within the O pposition who would if allowed to, stop at nothing to see the PLP be given the gov ernment now probably through any means and destroy our democratic system. In my opin ion the position of “Police Com missioner” is a very serious one and even more so than whom w e elect as leader and Prime Minister. May heaven help us should we ever get a Police Chief who supports a coup d’tat as what took place in Honduras last week. I do hope that what took place in Honduras would serve a s a wake up call for us here in our Bahamas. Remember at one time Honduras was also a part of the British empire. I call upon our leaders to reexamine how our police commissioner is chosen to prevent any future attempt of an illegal overthrow of our government. Please, my fellow Bahamians, don’t be complacent and believe that a coup cannot happen here. As we have seen in Honduras it can (heaven forbid) happen here. BRIAN O CLARKE Nassau, July, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm N EW YORK This week, after numerous delays, the space shuttle Endeavour l ifted off from the Kennedy Space Centre on a mission to the International Space Station. O nce docked, the shuttle’s astronauts are scheduled to make five spacewalks to c ontinue the station’s construction. Forty years ago this week, Cape Kennedy played host to a more ambitiousl aunch, as the huge Saturn V rocket that would propel astronauts Neil Armstrong and “Buzz” Aldrin to the moon lifted off on July 16, 1969. Four days later, an anxious mission con t rol, nation and world heard Armstrong’s voice announce that “the Eagle” Apollo 11’s Lunar Module “has landed.” Hours after that, we saw Armstrong descend to the lunar surface in grainyb lack-and-white, becoming the first man to touch foot on a celestial body other than Earth. That’s one small step for man,” we heard him say, in what would become one o f the most enduring quotes of the 20th century, “one giant leap for mankind.” The millions of babies and small child ren who were held in front of television screens in living rooms across America so that they could one day tell their children that they had seen history being made are in their 40s now and have children of theiro wn. Should they pause this week and next to tell these children what they witnessed, that step that once seemed to have changed everything, they might well be greeted witha shrug. Or questions along the lines of And then what happened?” The answer to that question is a complicated one that encompasses political change on Earth, a straitened sense of our national budget, and a certain failure of imagination. Not to mention that, after reaching out and touching our closest heavenly neighbour, any second act involving astronauts rather than robotic probes remains, even all these years later, incredibly difficult. These days, our space milestones are m ore prosaic; this week’s Endeavour mission carried the 500th person into space. B ut not since 1972’s Apollo 17 have humans travelled farther than low Earth orbit. For three years after that first visit tot he moon we went back, explored, conducted experiments and then, nothing. W e have sent machines to planets near and far and into the deep, open space beyond our solar system. But mankind,a fter that giant leap, has remained within the bounds of our home planet’s gravity. For those, like your reporter, who were awed by the great adventure of the Apollo programme, this fact has been a slowlyu nfolding letdown. There have been, to be sure, triumphs in the intervening years, such as the gorgeous vistas into space (and back in time) afforded by the Hubble Space Telescope and the insights gleaned by theM ars rovers. But the promise of direct human connection with other worlds of returning to the moon and venturing ont o Mars remains a remote one for our own space agency. As things stand, NASA w ill have to scramble to keep America’s launch capability alive after the space shuttles’ scheduled retirement at the end ofn ext year. The plan, put forward by President George W. Bush in 2004, to return astronauts to the moon by 2020 as a stepping stone to a trip to Mars remains mired in b udgetary questions. International efforts, such as those by the Chinese, to under take similar missions on roughly the same timetable also seem uncertain. The most recent progress toward a mis s ion to Mars comes from a Russian exper iment in long-term human isolation more a baby step than a giant leap. With the future of manned space exploration unsure and distant, we might take a moment this week to thrill once again, four decades later, to remember a time when a moonwalk was so much more than a signature dance move. (This article was written by Dan Rather of the Hearst Newspapersc.2009). Don’t be complacent, a coup could hap pen here LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net When a moonwalk was more than a dance move E DITOR, The Tribune . A fter watching the proceedings of Parliament on Wednesday and Thursday, June 3 and 4, I realise that we in the Bahamas have a serious problem to face. It is no wonder that crime is so high in the Bahamas when we have people defying the rules of Parliament and it is shown on TV for all of the public to see. I wonder if what took place was out of genuine concern for the dead boy’s family or just plain grands tanding? B ecause if it was concern for the family then all t hat had to be donewas for the Leader of Opposition B usiness in the Houseto allow the Member to be t he first Opposition member to take the floor and then the Member would have had one hour t o elab orate and say whatever the Member pleased about this matter. I fully support what the Member was saying as far as there being some kind of inquiry to investigate what took place because here again the Laws of the B ahamas as far as I am aware say that no minor should beinterrogated without a parent or legalg uardian or counsel being present, so if this did not happen, then it appears that another Law was broken b y the people we trust to keep the Law. Also what I witnessed by other members of the Opposition as they appeared to be interfering with the Sergeant-at-Armscarrying out his duty was also a serious case of obstruction so another Law wasb roken. When will we as responsible citizens realise that the public watches everything we do, so therefore we have to show by example how they should live their l ives. If the Members of Parliament cannotobey the r ules which they themselves makethen how can we expect for the poor and needy to follow the Law of theLand. ABNER PINDER Spanish Wells, June, 2009. No wonder crime is so high E DITOR, The Tribune. F urther, I am concerned that Bahamians are losing jobs every d ay and it seems like no one cares. But have you heard about a p olitician losing jobs? No. The politicians don’t care because that i s one of the ways they can control you. You must come to them b egging and they brag about these Bahamians. Please wake up, they are destroying us and our nation. Look at the House of Assembly where the honour g one, look at the persons running this country, you be the judge, Is ay no more on that because it would not sound nice. P ersons working for government can’t even get insurance. J ust about every politician is insured. I f a person from a government department dies, his or her famil y gets one cheque from National Insurance and that's it, and that person work for government for over 30 years. Politicians just have to work for five or 10 years and h is or her family is fixed for life. I hope you understand what I ams aying without going into full details, but you check it out and b e the judge. Bahamians, let's stop, look and l isten to what they are telling us and doing to us before it’s too l ate, if only for our children and grandchildren. It is not about us a nymore. SAMUEL JOHNSON Nassau, July, 2009. Bahamians wake up, politicians ar e destroying our nation

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CAT Island MP Philip “Brave” Davis has invited the nephew of the late Sir HaroldG Christie to a public debate o n the role his uncle alleged ly played in “hoarding land not just in Cat Island but in many other islands.” Mr Davis made the com ment during the debate on a resolution to form a select committee to investigate matters in relation to Crown landin the House of Assembly on Wednesday. Mr Davis, during a previous contribution on June 11, spoke about the practices engaged in by many, and “particularly Sir Harold”, under the Quieting of Titles Act passed by parliament in 1959. He claimed that the late Sir Harold, founder of HG Christie Realty, had quieted thousands of acres of land from poor Cat Islanders. The MP also suggested that Sir Harold’s heirs should be persuaded to compensate Cat Islanders in some form for the land allegedly taken from their ancestors through the Act. He said Sir Harold, one of the “wealthiest men in the country” and the area’s MP, was able to obtain title to thousands of acres of land on the island “occupied by a group of poor Bahamians.” In a letter to the editor published in The Tribune , Sir Harold’s nephew William McP Christie accused Mr Davis of abusing his parliamentary privilege and defam ing his uncle. Mr Davis said that while he would not respond to Mr Christie, he would be more than willing to engage him ina public debate on land and the role Sir Harold played in the “hoarding of land.” “We could have a series of public debates on the issue throughout the various islands where he has been declared the owner of lands. I welcome it and he could hear what descendants in these islands think about how his uncle acquired land,” Mr Davis said. In defending his uncle, Mr Christie said Sir Harold had in 1951 purchased a planta tion from Mr and Mrs Henry Rumball who had purchased the same from the Estate of Stanley Harris in 1927 and continued the arrangement of allowing the people of the Old Bight to farm on the land, provided they paid a small share of their crops to the overseers. Sir Harold built a large house on the estate and created a large farm around it. “In the early 1960s, many of the Old Bight tenant farmers refused to pay over a share of their corps to Sir Harold’s overseers and started to make claims of ownership of the areas they were farming, while many others continued farming and pay ing their shares to the overseers, recognising Sir Harold’s company’s ownership. “At this time Sir Harold, on the advice of his attorneys, started an action under the Quieting Titles Act to have his perfect documentary title to the land adjudicated by the Supreme Court under which all persons making claim to parts of the Estate could also have their claims heard,” MrC hristie said. H owever, Mr Davis said that the claim of Old Bight residents was possessory. “I know, I was there. Yes HG Christie had a house on the property, but we are talking about close to 2,000 acres. My forefathers and those of residents of Old Bight were farming and working the area of the house for at least 100 years before 1964 when the court investigated the title. “Yes, we know HG Christie had a house but it did not occupy 2,000 acres. The Christie’s are getting about $30 million for land the title of which was questionable. That’s why they approached the court to investigate it under Quieting of Title Act,” he said. Mr Davis said that the judge had to decide between believing “black, uneducated, unsophisticated farmers from Old Bight, Cat Island and white HG Christie – a sophisticated realtor and the mem ber of parliament for Cat Island.” “The deck was stacked. There was no Court of Appeal in the Bahamas at the time and any grievance against a judgment had to go to England – to the Privy Council. The court files went missing – 1964. Women were taken from their farms in handcuffs and spent their time in jail – for farming what they held to be their land. “The scar on communities of that era remains highly vis ible and that is why I plead to the prime minister to persuade his supporters to do something for the depressed. He has the relationship with them, he can ask them,” Mr Davis said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 5 By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net MILLARS Heights residents are losing patience as excavation continues on farmland bordering their subdivi-s ion despite an investigation launched by the Ministry of Agriculture two weeks ago. They claim a new trench d ipping into the community’s water table has been dug in the last two weeks and piles of excavated dirt and rock sita longside a pile of waste presumably destined for the empt y quarry pit. Pictures of asphalt allegedly dumped in the pit before it w as covered up this week have also been sent to The Tribune . The residents of Millars Heights, off Carmichael Road, whose homes back ontoC rown Land farmland north o f Cowpen Road, have been calling on government officials and police to put a stop to dai-ly digging on the site behind their subdivision since it began in December last year. Concern Their main concern is that t he water table may be contaminated by waste dumped in t he quarry pit after rock has been excavated eight feet b elow the surface on around two acres of land. The leaseholder told The Tribune he was given verbal permission from governmento fficials to carry out the excav ation for agricultural purposes and Golden Isles MP Charles Maynard said he was satisfied the leaseholder was carrying out a viable agricultural practise by excavatingt he rock and nourishing the soil with biodegradable waste w hich would not pollute the w ater table. Minister of Agriculture Larr y Cartwright said he understands a permit is required from the Department of Phys-i cal Planning before excavat ion can be done, and he is waiting for staff to determine whether or not the farmland is Crown Land before proceeding with the investigation. Investigation Millars Heights resident J eanne Lundy said: “I know they’re supposed to be doing an investigation but I don’tk now what they have to investigate. It just seems this is taki ng forever. “If he’s doing the right thing why don’t they get an external f irm to test the water and soil to see if there is any toxicity in it? “A number of residents have complained to Mr May-n ard and he’s not doing anyt hing about it, so I really don’t g et it. It’s ridiculous.” A source told The Tribune t he excavated rock and dirt is being sold as fill to the Department of EnvironmentalH ealth to cover the sanitary landfill in Harrold Road, and t hat the truck drivers dumping waste in the quarry also have contracts with the departmentt o clean up New Providence. MP invites nephew of Sir Harold G Christie to a debate Residents losing patience over excavation work WORK TAKING place at Millars Heights. Philip ‘Brave’ Davis CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. SPACEshuttle Endeavour’s a stronauts inspected their ship for damage Thursday as NASA struggled to understand why a normally benign section of the fuel tank l ost so much foam during liftoff, a ccording to Associated Press. The slow, tedious work unfolded as the shuttle rocketed toward the international space station for a Friday linkup. It was the first full day in orbit for the seven astronauts, who are delivering a veranda for Japan’s enormous lab. I t also happened to be the 40th a nniversary of the launch of the first manned moon landing. Shuttle program manager John Shannon said the thin layer of f oam insulation on the central area of the tank peeled away in approximately 6-inch strips as Endeavour blasted toward orbit Wednesd ay. The green primer on the meta l skin of the tank was exposed in places. Fortunately, he said, the shedding from this area the so-called i ntertank connecting the hydrogen and oxygen reservoirs occurred well past the critical twominute mark in the flight and p osed no danger to Endeavour. Astronauts inspect space shuttle for launch damage A MAN was stabbed inside a Subway restaurant during an altercation with a female employee yesterday afternoon, police said. According to head of the CDU Supt Elsworth Moss, the pair got into a row during which the male was stabbed about the body. Supt Moss confirmed reports reaching The Tribune that the incident occurred in the Subway at the Town Centre Mall shortly after 3pm. The victim was taken to hospital but his condition could not be determined up to press time. A woman is being questioned by police in connection with the incident. Man stabbed inside Subway restaurant CORRECTION THE 17-year-old killed in a drive-by shooting on Wednesday morning was William Farrington, of Lynden Pindling Estates, New Providence, not William Ingraham, as reported by The Tri bune yesterday. The Tribune apologises for the error.

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REGULATORY reform and the eventual liberalisation of the Bahamas’ electronic communications sector will provide the Bahamas hotel industry with a wide range of benefits ando ptions for improving competitiveness, according to Usman Saadat, director of policy and regulation for the soon to be established Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA Speaking at a recent Bahamas Hotel Association( BHA) meeting, Mr Saadat pointed to the positive impact of liberalisation internationally and regionally. Also speaking at the meeting was Julian Francis, deputy chairman of the committee for the privatisation of BTC, who explained that the new regimew ill provide more regulatory certainty for investors and encourage competition while accommodating the trend towards convergence in the industry. Mr Saadat said OECD ( Organisation for Economic C o-operation and Develop ment) countries have experienced increased availability of online, automated and mobile services including 3G and 4G technologies, as well as significant reductions in prices andi mprovements in quality and coverage. “Liberalisation of electronic communications in OECD countries has led to an increase in triple-play and quad-play offerings by operators along with a 60 per cent broadband population penetration. In the Bahamas the current level of penetration is less than 25 perc ent,” Mr Saadat said. Noting the impact of liberalisation in the Caribbean, Mr Saa dat said countries in the region have benefitted from a huge leap in mobile communications, especially where monopoliesh ave been replaced by two or t hree different operators. “These countries have also seen price reductions and increased speeds in broadband offerings along with reductions in data prices which are critical to the competitiveness of hotelsa nd financial service companies,” Mr Saadat said. Going forward, he said hotels in the Bahamas will be better able to meet the needs of their customers through the innova tions that will result from competition and also will be able to pass along the benefits of price reductions. He suggested that Bahamian h otels could improve their brands and reputations by offering world-class services such as improved video and audio con ferencing facilities to attract more conferences to the Bahamas. Additionally, he saidh otels could adopt greater use o f technology to deliver more efficient service, for example, wireless credit card and handheld terminals to improve the speed of ordering and SMS to take restaurant and taxi bookings. I n the future, Mr Saadat said URCA will assist hotels by facilitating permits for special needs such as radio and television broadcast events. He added that hotels could save on com munications costs through ser vice level agreements (SLAs with providers. Finally, Mr Saadat encour aged hoteliers to actively participate in the ongoing process of reform by responding to con sultations. URCA will oversee telecommunications as well as broadcasting and cable television, spectrum and numbering in the new regulatory regime for elec tronic communications. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE CARACAS, Venezuela A Venezuelan government agency that sells foreign currency to importers is denying it has limited the supply of dollars for newspapers, according to the Associated Press . Agency chief Manuel Barroso said in a statement Thursday that the government has sold $68 million to paper importers this year. The National Union of Press Workers earlier said more than 50 regional dailies could close operations due to a lack of paper. Under controls imposed by President Hugo Chavez in 2003, importers must apply to the agency to buy dollars at the official exchange rate. But falling oil revenue has limited that supply. Tensions between the government and private media have also become increasingly heated, with 240 radio stations under threat of losing their licenses. Venezuela denies restricting newspapers’ imports SARASOTA, Fla. A 22-year-old in Sarasota is Florida’s 13th fatal case of the swine flu, according to the Associated Press . Health officials wouldn’t say how or when the man died. But Dr. William Heymann, medical executive director of the Sarasota County Health Department, called it a “tragic and sobering reminder that influen-za is serious.” Statewide, more than 2,100 have been sickened since the outbreak emerged. Swine flu claims 13th fatal victim in Florida In brief Liberlisation of communications sector will improve hotel competitiveness By KATHRYN CAMPBELL THE government has started the p rocess of relaunching the $2 million redevelopment of the Big Pond wetland park. Yesterday, the second draft of the updated plan for the project was pre-s ented at a stakeholders meeting at the Inter-American Development Bank. Minister of Public Works and Transport Neko Grant said that the loanp roposal for the New Providence Road Improvement Project stipulates that the Big Pond area is “restored and protected as an urban open space for the mitigation of any potential neg-a tive environmental impacts that may arise from the project implementat ion, operation and maintenance.” In 2001, a master plan for the Big P ond Park was completed. It included elements such boardwalks, a trail network and bird watching platforms, MrG rant said at a press conference on Wednesday. P lans were interrupted with the halt of the New Providence Road Improvement Project in 2002. InD ecember 2008 the project was relaunched. Steve Seville, a member of the team of consultants assigned to the BigP ond Park project, said the updated master plan “improves the circulation i n the park and accessibility for resi dents to use it as an urban open space and a green space associated with thec onstruction of the roadways. “ “We’re trying to have a balance between the environment and the u sable space available at Big Pond,” he said. The revised plan calls for the r estoration of the native plants of Big Pond. The restoration component assoc iated with this will improve the wild life and ecology of the area,” said Mr Seville. T he plan also shows a “better understanding of the connectivity of t he neighbourhoods, balancing the w ild life aspect with the urban use, and balancing the usable areas of the park while maintaining the greens paces,” he said. Designated picnic, barbecue and p lay areas are also in the plan. Big Pond Park to be re-launched PUBLIC Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant (right Wednesday. Pictured from left are Steve Seville, civil engineer and member of the team of consultants assigned to the project, and Shanique Albury, environmentalist. L e t i s h a H e n d e r s o n / B I S P h o t o

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 7 729$/8('&86720(563OHDVHGEHDGYLVHGWKDWSUHVHQWO\ZHDUH H[SHULHQFLQJGLIFXOWLHVZLWKRXUSKRQHOLQHV DWERWKRXU&ROOLQV$YHQXHDQG+DUERXU%D\ ORFDWLRQV 'HVSLWHWKHGLVUXSWLRQWKHIROORZLQJSKRQH FRQWDFWOLQHVUHPDLQIXQFWLRQDO :HEVLWHZZZQXDLQVXUDQFHFRP:HDSRORJL]HIRUDQ\LQFRQYHQLHQFHFDXVHG VISITORS to downtown N assau are getting some personal attention as a new corps of tourism ambassadors stands ready to assist them ini dentifying attractions and answering whatever questions they may have about theB ahamas. Tourism Ambassadors, r ecently organised by the Ministry of Tourism, roam the streets of downtown on Tues-d ays, Fridays and Saturdays peak tourism days for Nass au as the majority of cruise ships arrive on those days. The ambassadors, who are i dentified by bright green vests, are charged with welc oming visitors, providing information and generally assisting them. M axine Williamson, coordinator of the tourism ambassadors, said six ambassadors are assigned each day to assist in the downtown area. We are principally using College of the Bahamas students who are engaged int ourism studies as well as four of our recently retired tourism s taff members,” Ms Williamson said. “Our young ambassadors are energetica nd the knowledge and experience of our retired tourism p rofessionals are invaluable. The tourism ambassadors (aree ffective way of assisting our visitors and ensuring a satisfying vacation experience (for possible.” Jewel Smith, one of the vet erans enlisted as a tourism ambassador, said visitors have many questions about theB ahamas and its attractions. She has encountered many repeat visitors who felt theyh ad seen and done everything the country has to offer. After a few minutes spent talking with tourists, they usually become enthusiastic abouts eeing attractions such as Ardastra Gardens and the f orts, she said. “I also tell them about the Family Islands because youh ave a lot of people who have been here before and they would think they have done just about everything. But I will say ‘no you haven’t because you haven’t seen our beach in Harbour Island with the pink sand’.” C arolyn Demeritte said she did not hesitate to join the tourism ambassadors after retiring from the Ministry of Tourism. I didn’t hesitate because that’s what I like to do,” she said. That is what I have been doing for just about all my l ife, 37 years plus. I always liked helping people. At the end of the day, if I can maket hat visitor feel as though they would like to return, I feel as though I have done a goodj ob.” Ms Demeritte said she has helped countless visitors withd irections to specific stores and attractions. S he is pleased that she was also able to clear up many misconceptions visitors hada bout the country. Downtown Nassau gets tourism ambassadors By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Grand Bahama is expected to experience an economic boost next week when some 400 to 500 delegates from the Churches of Christ throughout the Caribbean, the United States, and the Bahamas arrive on the island for the 39th Annual Caribbean Lectureship. This is the third time that the lectureship is being hosted by the Freeport Church of Christ on East Beach Drive. Under the theme, “The Joy of the Lord of Your Strength,” delegates will gather for four days of Christian fellowship and spiritual edification. Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace is expected to travel to Freeport to attend the opening on Sunday. Elder Ellison Delva, chairman of the committee, said the Freeport Church of Christ is pleased to again be hosting the lectureship. Delegates are expected to start arriving on the island on Friday evening. “Their presence will undoubtedly boost the island’s economy as they will be staying in our local hotels and utilising various amenities. In addition, we have planned local tours with the Ministry of Tourism to highlight all that Grand Bahama has to offer,” said Mr Delva. “It should be noted that many of our delegates are repeat visitors to our shores and we hope to create more repeat visitors to Grand Bahama through our lectureship.” The lectureship will begin on Sunday at 9.30am at the St George’s High School gymnasium. The opening ceremony will be held that evening in the gymnasium at 6.30pm when Minister VanderpoolWallace is expected to bring remarks. Mr Delva said all residents of Freeport are invited to attend the event. “Over the years, the lectureship has proven to be a most effective vehicle in spreading the gospel throughout the Bahamas. “This is only the third time the lectureship is being held in Grand Bahama and we hope to make this history-making event a time of celebration. It was first held in Grand Bahama in 1984 and (then in five times,” he said. Mr Delva noted that the very first lectureship, which convened in 1971 in Kingston, Jamaica, was the brain child of Dr Ken Dye and his wife. Each year the lectureship is held in a different Caribbean country. “The purpose of coming together once a year in this fashion is to honour Jesus, encourage one another and to be renewed through God’s word and the truth of the gospel,” he said. Guest speakers from throughout the Caribbean and parts of the US will address pertinent issues affecting society in gener al and the family in particular. Family Island brethren will also a ddress the lectureship. S peakers from the Bahamas include William Miller, Andrew Major, James Miller and Keith Beneby. Church event to boost Freeport economy Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace T OURISM AMBASSADOR D ’Angelo Gray assists visitors with a photograph. Assistance for visitors to the capital Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who arem aking news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986a nd share your story.

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legal action and we have a legal team now looking at the actions of that andw hether or not there are steps that can be taken through the courts in order to prevent this, until we are able to get the full disclosure in the interests of trans-p arency and accountability that this development involves. " But there is no doubt that morally what they are d oing is totally, totally wrong," he said at a press conference held at theA rawak Cay site yesterday. He argued that residents a nd businesses in the area s hould have to suffer through expected increases in noise and traffic due to the development. The senator also again c laimed there has been a shroud of "secrecy" surrounding the issue and argued that government has yet to release an environmental impact analysis( EIA) for scrutiny. He claimed that that he has only received a "draft" of thes tudy through undisclosed sources. B ut yesterday Environment Minister Earl Deveaux released a statement sayinga n EIA prepared by Blue Engineering is available to t he public in the Ministry of T he Environment or the Ministry of Public Works. "This is contrary to the assertion. . .That the reporth as not been formally released, (or the (of the Ministry. These documents provide a wealth of information, including butn ot limited to the existing conditions at the site, the potential impacts of the pro-j ect to the environment and proposed measures for miti gating these impacts," said Mr Deveaux's statement. Portions of the report w ere first made public earlier this week in another local d aily and in Tribune Busin ess. Regarding concerns that the development could contaminate the city's water supply, the statement said:" The EIA states that following sediment sampling and laboratory testing, contaminants in the dredge material are well below levels for concern based on cri-t eria established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPAT he report concludes that the potential for the release o f contaminants that could affect either sea water quality or potable water supplies,d uring dredging operation is not a concern." O n the possible detriment to the area's marine life the statement said, "While ther isk exists for sediment to harm sea life, this risk is miti gated by the implementation of good dredging practices to minimize sediments uspension and dispersal, as well as by independent environmental monitoring to ensure the use of turbidity barriers and compliance witht he turbidity control standard. "Additionally, in an a ttempt to further assess and advise on efforts to mitigate t he potential impact to sea life, the possibility of relo c ating viable hard and soft corals, as well as sponges was explored by consultantsC ontinental Shelf Associates (CSA C SA was contracted by government to assess, restore and monitor damagec aused by the 2008 ground ing of the M/T Ficus near Goulding Cay, New Providence. "However, during their s urvey of the Arawak Cay site, CSA found that the corals within the impacted area were small and not very diverse, making them unsuit a ble candidates for relocation," said the statement. The release added that any the concerns "over the increase in noise, vibrationa nd the potential for unpleasant odours should be temperedb y the fact that these increases will be minimal, and temporary." M r Fitzgerald called for Dr Deveaux's position to be called into question and again accused Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette of being complicit in the plan to relocate the container port from its current location on Bay Street to Arawak Cay to benefit a special interest group of shipping stakeholders. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Employment Opportunity Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t C ommonwealthBankisthepremierBahamianBankwith brancheslocatedinNewProvidence,AbacoandGrandBahama. W earecommittedtodeliveringsuperiorqualityservice,to traininganddevelopingouremployees,tocreatingvalueforour s hareholdersandtopromotingeconomicgrowthandstabilityin thecommunity. Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco. CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE: AssistingtheBranchManagerinmanagingthesalesactivitiesof t heBranchtoenhanceprofitability.Effectivelyleading,supportingandcoachingpersonnelto a chievecorporateobjectives.Effectivelymanagingaportfolioofconsumer,mortgageand c ommercialloans.Adjudicatingcreditlineswithindelegatedauthority.ManagingtheBranch’scollectionactivitiesandtheprotectionof collateral.Following-upwithclientandsupportfunctionstoensuretimely c ompletionofproductrequestsandtransactionsandresolutionof inquiriesandissues.E nsuringCreditriskratingsandcreditscoringpracticesare adheredtoatalltimestominimizetheriskofloanlosses.E nsuringspecificobjectivesaredevelopedthroughan appropriatestrategicplantogrowtheBranch’sloananddeposit portfoliosandotherofferings.Addingvaluetothecustomers’portfoliooffinancialservices byactivelypromoting,marketing,buildingandcrosssellingall deposit/investmentandconsumercreditbusiness.Ensuring selfanddirectreportsconsistentlyprovidehighlycourteous customerserviceinaninformedandthoroughmanner.Assisting theManagerinattainingthetargetsincorporatedintheBranch’s financialplan.QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE: Bachelor’sdegreeorhigherinBusinessAdministration,Banking &FinanceorarelateddisciplinefromanaccreditedUniversity.Minimumofeightyearscommercialbankingexperiencewitha minimumof3yearssupervisory/managerialexperience.Experienceinmanagingadiverseloanportfolioandassessing loanquality.DetailedknowledgeofRetail/Commercial/Mortgagelending practicesandcreditanalysistoensureportfolioquality.Substantialworkexperienceinloansandriskmanagementwith afullunderstandingoffinancialstatementsandtheabilityto analyzetheinformation.Excellentleadershipandcoachingskills.Excellentcommunication,analyticalandreasoningskills.Excellentorganizationalandtimemanagementskills.ProficientintheuseoftheMicrosoftrangeofapplications.REMUNERATION PACKAGE: CommonwealthBankisaGreatplacetowork!Weofferan excitingworkenvironmentwiththeopportunityforgrowthand development.Wealsoofferacompetitivecompensationpackage, reflectingthesuccessfulapplicant’sexperienceandqualifications, includingaperformancebasedincentiveplan,health,vision, dentalandlifeinsurancesandapensionplan. Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before July 24, 2009to: Human Resources Department Re: Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco P.O. Box SS-6263 Nassau, Bahamas Telefax: (242393-8073 E-mail address:hr@combankltd.com Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those under consideration will be contacted.” 3 DVFKH%DQNt7UXVW/WG 6XEVLGLDU\RI LVVHHNLQJFDQGLGDWHVIRUWKHSRVLWLRQRI 5HODWLRQVKLSDQDJHU“ULYDWH%DQNHU S J &DQGLGDWHVVKRXOGSRVVHVVWKHIROORZLQJTXDOLDFWLRQV S J T % 8QLYHUVLW\'HJUHHLQ)LQDQFH%DQNLQJRU%XVLQHVV$GPLQLVWUDWLRQDQGRU UHODWHGSURIHVVLRQDOGHVLJQDWLRQ $ PLQLPXPRIWR\HDUVEDQNLQJH[SHULHQFH 2ZQFOLHQWSRUWIROLR 7KRURXJKNQRZOHGJHRISULYDWHEDQNLQJSURGXFWVDQGVHUYLFHV .QRZOHGJHRI%DKDPLDQUHJXODWRU\UHTXLUHPHQWV )OXHQF\RUZRUNLQJNQRZOHGJHfRI)UHQFKZRXOGEHDQDVVHW 5HVSRQVLELOLWLHV S 3HUVRQDOXDOLWLHV 4 2XWVWDQGLQJVDOHVVNLOOV $ VWURQJVHUYLFHHWKLFZLWKDIRFXVRQH[LVWLQJFOLHQWVDQGSURVSHFWV ([FHSWLRQDOYHUEDODQGZULWWHQFRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOV 0XVWEHDEOHWRZRUNLQDG\QDPLFHQYLURQPHQWZLWKPLQLPDOVXSHUYLVLRQ 0XVWSRVVHVVVWURQJRUJDQLVDWLRQDOVNLOOV 6XSHULRUFOLHQWVHUYLFHDQGSUREOHPVROYLQJVNLOOV 3OHDVHDSSO\WR 3$3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV (PDLO JLOOHVVFKDQHQ#SDVFKHFK T he re-entry charge carries with it a potential 20-year prison sentence. Both men are already convicted criminals. Anthony Mangione, special agent in charge of the ICE O ffice of Investigations in Miami said that St Remy will eventually be removed from the US to face justice in the Bahamas. “I’m proud of the hard work and diligence of our agents in tracking down and apprehending these criminals.” Apprehending dangerous foreign fugitives is a top priority of ICE and now, not only has this illegal alien been removed from the streets of South Florida, but he will even-t ually be removed from the United States to face justice in the Bahamas.” and West Atlantic Drive. Mr Bootle said officers responded to the scene and disc overed a 2002 Prayin sedan car overturned in the road. He said the victim was in the vehicle suffering from an apparent gunshot wound to his left side. He was removed from the vehicle and taken by ambulance to the hospital. ASP Bootle said the businessmen told police that after closi ng his business two men with scarves covering their faces attacked him. He said one of the suspects was armed with a handgun. They robbed him of his pouch, which contained an undetermined amount of cash, and shot him. T he culprits fled on foot in nearby bushes. Mr Bootle is appealing to anyone who may have information that could assist police with their investigation to call 911, or the Central Detective Unit at 350-3092 or 350-3 097. and terrestrial life there. Bahamas National Trust (BNT staff in Exuma heard about the sunken barge over the radio and fixed lights and buoys to the wreck to prevent boating collisions. BNT divers were dispatched and closed hatches on the barge to prevent more garbage from spilling into the sea. They also contacted ship owner Michael Oakes, however, they had not determined the number of crew on board the barge before The Tribune went to press last night. A response team organised by Minister of the Environment Earl Deveaux will go to Exuma this morning to assess the extent of the oil spill and organise the cleanup. T he team of officials from the Bahamas Envi ronment, Science and Technology (BEST mission, Royal Bahamas Defence Force (RBDF the Port Department will work with BNT staff to deal with the wreckage. BNT Executive Director Eric Carey said: “Our main concern is what happened to the wreck andt he people on the vessel. We have no idea where t hey are, whether they are dead or alive, and the first thing we have to d o is ensure they are safe. “We are also very concerned about the marine environment and trying to minimise the impact of the damage due to the oil spill and trash. We want to stop the leak and very importantly we want to know when this is going to be moved. “Trying to get tractors and equipment off the sea floor could create a lot of damage and disturbance. We will need to move two tractors and a front-end loader with cranes which is am ajor operation and we want to ensure it’s handled as delicately as possible.” The sunken barge will have crushed coral on the sea bed and the oil spill will potentially impact beaches throughout the park affecting protected iguanas and endangered sea birds. It had been transporting heavy equipment either to or from New Providence when it went underwater. Mr Carey added: “We want to see it assessed and cleaned up and the Trust is pleased the minister is clearly very concerned and has organiseda full and rapid assessment.” Businessman shot and robbed by masked men F ROM page one One of the Bahamas’ most wanted men captured in US FROM page one FROM page one Earl Deveaux Senator investigating legal options to halt extension F ROM page one Crew of oil spilling barge has disappeared PARIS MEDIAmonitor Reporters Without Borders says five photographers and a cameraman have been detained in Iran over the past week, according to Associated Press. The Paris-based group listed five Iranian photographers seized Saturday, nearly a month after the June 12 presidential elections that prompted a wave of opposition protests. It says FrenchIranian cameraman Said Movahedi was detained July9. The reason for the arrests is unclear. Reporters Without Borders said in a statement Thursday that “The Iranian government fears images” of the protests. The group says at least five other photographers or cameramen have been injured by police or militias during the crackdown on opposition protesters. It says 41 journalists are behind bars in Iran. Media monitor says seven photographers detained in Iran

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C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, JULY,17, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 9 I NSIDE Bahamas National Judo Team By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net S INCE the inception about a d ecade ago, the Bahamas Baseball Federation has had some relatively good performances on the international junior circuit. Now the federation is in Prince Gorge, British Columbia, Canada where president Craig ‘Salty’ Kemp is confident that they can finally make their break through on the senior circuit. The senior national team arrived in Prince George since Tuesday, have gotten acclimatised and are now ready to start playing in the World Baseball Challenge. The team, managed by Jeff ‘Sangy’ Francis and coached by Teddy Sweeting and Alonzo Pratt from Grand Bahama, will play their opener on Saturday against Canada. In an interview with The Tribune yesterday just before the team headed off to practice,Kemp said the team have made the necessary adjustments and are ready to start play at 3 pm. “We have settled in and we had a workout yesterday( Wednesday) and we are going for another workout as we speak,” Kemp said. “The teamis looking good. Everybody is healthy and ready to go.” The team is comprised of the following: C atchers – Etienne Farq uharson Jr and Stenard Duncombe. Infielders – Lynden Pindling II; Lionel Ferguson Jr and Grand Bahama’s Jason Curry and Aneiko Knowles. Outfielders – Sharad John s on and Sherman Ferguson, along with Grand Bahamian Raymond Grant. Pitchers – Darren Bowleg (left-hand (left-hand (right-hand Patrick Knowles (left-hand Desmond Rolle (right-hand Amad Williams (right-hand and Diondre Rolle (right-hand as well as Spanish Wells’ Johnathan Groezinger (righthand). Looking at the team, Kemp said it’s a very youthful squad after some of the other ball players whom they wanted tomake the trip declined the offer to travel. “Despite the fact that they are young, they are very talent ed, so we’re looking forward to some great things from them,” Kemp said. “We just want to create an opportunity for them to gain some exposure,” Kemp said. “This is probably the highest level of baseball that we have been engaged in since the inception of our federation.” Kemp admits that it’s not going to be as easy for the team because of the calibre of competition that they are going to face over the next week. But he said as long as the players live up to their expecta tions, he doesn’t see why they can’t perform at a very high level. “I would like to see us win a few games,” he said. “That’s our objective because nobody really know anything much about us, we haven’t seen any of these teams play and they haven’tseen us play. “So we just don’t know what to expect. All I can expect is for the guys to go out there and play to the best of our ability and I think we will do very well.” Following their opener against Canada, the Bahamas will have to get ready to play Germany on Sunday. The World Baseball Challenge, founded in 2002 in Grand Forks, British Columbia, is a biannual event that attractsteams from Cuba, Canada, Tai wan, Dominican Republic, Russia, Mexico and the United States. The Bahamas, whose doctor/trainer is Ferriston Lockhart, is the only Caribbean country participating in this year’s tournament that will wrap up on Sunday, July 26. Senior national baseball team ready for World Baseball Challenge JULY 16, 2009 (Exuma, Bahamas and College Football All-American Myron L. Rolle and his family announced plans to build the Myron L. Rolle Medical Clinic and Sports Complex, in Steventon, Exuma in the Bahamas, where the Rolle family originates. The Complex will provide free health ser vices to residents of Exuma, as well as a state-of-the-art wellness and training facilities for athletes and visitors to Exuma, Bahamas. The project will be executed in conjunction with the Bahamas Ministry of Health and the Florida State University College of Medicine, based in the United States. Rolle graduated from Florida State in December 2008 with a pre-med degree and this coming school year, as a Rhodes Scholar, will earn a Masters Degree in Medical Anthropology from Oxford University in England. He plans to enter the National Football League Draft in 2010 to pursue a professional football career, and fol lowing football pursue a career as a medical surgeon. "My family and I are extremely proud to announce the construction of this Medical Clinic and Sports Complex, which will provide much needed medical resources to an area of the world that is near and dear to our hearts," said Myron Rolle. "While I was born in the US, Bahamas is where my parents, Whitney and Beverly Rolle, and three of my brothers, were born and raised. I have always thought of the Bahamas as my second home." A capital campaign is now underway to fund construction of the Myron L. Rolle Medical Clinic and Sports Complex, coordinated through the Myron L. Rolle Foundation, a 501(c3 incorporated in the United States. The clinic will be built in multiple phases, with the first being the main health center facility. In conjunction with that initial phase, a project will begin immediately to build a new Memorial Park adjacent to the clinic site, featuring the statue of Pompey and restoration of an historic jailhouse as a museum. Pompey, as a slave of Lord John Rolle, led an uprising in Exuma in the 1830's that resulted in permanent benefits for the Rolle slaves and their generations. "It speaks volumes about the character of Myron Rolle and the Rolle family, that he has come back to Exuma and wants to do his part to see a better day for our people and our future," said Ivan Ferguson, Senior Deputy Administrator for Exuma, during the Announcement Ceremony. The Florida State University College of Medicine, based in Tallahassee, Florida, is partnering with the Foundation to advise on the project, as well as launch a new initiative through its FSU Cares Program to bring a medical mission to Exuma each year. During the programme, Florida State medical students and doctors will travel to the Bahamas and provide free medical care and supplies to Exumians. The programme will be funded through the Myron L. Rolle Foundation. ABOUT THE MYRON L. ROLLE FOUNDATION The Myron L. Rolle Foundation is a tax-exempt, non-profit organisation dedicated to the support of health, wellness, educational and other charitable initiatives throughout the world that benefit children and families in need. The Foundation was established in 2009 by Rhodes Scholar and College Football All-American Myron L. Rolle and his family. By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net WHEN the second annual Caribbean Awards Sports Icons celebrations come to town, there will be quite a number of activities surrounding the gala event. This year’s awards will be held at Breezes SuperClub from N ovember 15-21. The two-week long celebrations will have added attraction with competition inm ore sporting disciplines taking place. According to Fred Sturrup, who was appointed as the Regional Director of CASI following last year’s show in Kingston, Jamaica, the week of a ctivities will not just feature the awards presentation, but they are looking forward to the participa-t ion of athletes in the various events. “Last year in Jamaica, I coordinated with the Amateur Boxing Federation of the Bahamas and the Jamaican Boxing Boardt o put on a tournament,” said S turrup, a sports journalist at the Nassau Guardian. The tournament was organised through the Pan American Caribbean Boxing Organization, of which Sturrup, also serves the chairman. Sturrup said he has already contacted Bahamas BasketballF ederation president Lawrence Hepburn and Bahamas Softball Federation’s president BurkettD orsett, both of whom have consented to come on board to stage competition in their respective discplines this year. Both basketball and softball will be a part of boxing, whose president Wellington Miller, hasa greed to put on the event for another year. Last year’s inaugural awards p resention was held at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel in Kingston in November and was well attended by Caribbean sports stars, including Jimmy Adams, Mike McCallum, Aileen Bailey, Nesta Carter and GraceJ ackson. Elisha Obed, one of the four Bahamian contenders for the award, accompanied Sturrup to the ceremony, which was sponsored by Digicel and the J amaican Ministry of Sports. The other three Bahamians w ere track and field stars Avard Moncur, Debbie FergusonMcKenzie and Chandra Sturrup. Second annual Caribbean Awards Sports Icons comes to town S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 Fred Sturrup Giving back to the islands Myron Rolle and family plan to build medical and sports complex MYRON Rolle stands next to an artist's rendering and construction site plans at the future home of the Myron L. Rolle Medical Clinic in Steventon, Exuma, in the Bahamas. MYRON'S father Whitney Rolle (left Treasurer & Secretary of the Myron L. Rolle Foundation, along with Myron's brother, McKinley (right Treasurer of the Foundation, address guests at the Announce ment Ceremony of the Myron L. Rolle Medical Clinic.

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net EARLIER this year, Bahamians got an opportunity to display their skills in a fire engine pulling competition. Next weekend, Bahamians will get a chance to display their skills in a tyre throwing competition. Dubbed the “King of the Tire Throw,” the competition is being organised by powerlifting champion Delwin ‘Blue’ Scott and will be held on Saturday, July 25, starting at 11 am at the Government High School. “We want to see how far a Bahamian can throw a tyire,” Scott said. The competition is open to any and all Bahamians, but Scott said he is primarily targeting the younger competitors because he intends to introduce it to the school system in the new year. The youngsters will throw tires that weight about five pounds, while the adults will be throwing seven pounds. Scott said they decided to use the two weight classes because “we don’t know how far the competitors can actually throw the tyres and we want to make it fun and exciting for everybody participating. “We know that there are a lot of bodybuilders and powerlifters who can throw, but we want to get more of the average every day Bahamian to come out and participate.” As this is the initial competition being staged, winners in each category will be crowned as the national champions and they will be listed as the record holders. “I think that is one of the things that will make this competition so interesting,” Scott said. “It’s never been done better and there are a lot of competitors out there who are looking for something different to display their skills.” The winner of the championship will also be awarded $225.00 for their efforts, while second place will cart off $150.00 and third place will pocket $125.00 Scott, who has since start competing and is now a personal trainer, said he decided to stage the competition because there’s been a cry for more fun oriented activities for Bahamians to participate in. “The good thing about competing in an event like this is that you don’t really have to be a member of a gym,” he said. “All you have to do is go to any junk yard or a used tyre shop and get a tyre and practice throwing it.” The event, according to Scott, is designed as a family oriented one and he is encouraging as many persons who have an interest in participating in something new will come out and compete. To participate in the competition, all a competitor has to do is show up at GHS next Saturday before the 11 am starting time and register. For further information, persons can also contact Scott at 456-2050 or 5020702. ‘King of the Tire Throw’ set for next weekend IN celebration of its 25th anniversary, the 1984 graduating class of St. Augustine’s College will hold a fun Run/Walk race that is designed to get the full participation of the general public. The event is scheduled for Saturday, July 25 and will begin and finish at the Montague fore shore after travelling over both of the Paradise Island bridges. The starting time is 6.30 am with pre-registration taking place from 5.45 am. Registration forms will be available as of Monday at the box offices at Precision Cut on Nassau Street and Subway on Paradise Charles Drive for those persons who are interesting in signing up before race day. According to Neville Woodside, the co-chair man of SAC Reunion Committee, the run/walk is designed to pay tribute to the spirit of the legendary Big Red Machine’s competitive and athletic prowess, hence the idea for the staging of the road race. “But this will not just be any road race,” Woodside said. “The SAC fun run/walk will be a series race. The race will be held annually over the next five years.” Woodside said the thought of winning a series race will help to motivate participants to improve their time every year. The race is scheduled to be staged over the next five years as the Reunion Committee moves into its 30th anniversary celebrations. Competition will be held in the following age group categories for both men and women in the walk and run: 19-and-under, 30-and-under 50and-under and over 50. The registration fee is $15.00 for person and $10.00 for children, inclusive of a T-shirt and a certificate of participation. The route for the runners are as follows: Leave Montague foreshore and travel west along Bay Street to the new bridge. Travel over the bridge to the entrance of Ocean Club Estates, returning via the old bridge to East Bay Street, east along East Bay Street and back to the Montague fore shore. The route for the walkers are as follows: Leave Montague foreshore and travel west along Bay Street to the old Paradise Island Bridge. Travel over the bridge; go around the round-a-bout and head back over the bridge to East Bay Street. Travel east along East Bay Street and back to the Montage foreshores. SAC class of 1984 hosts Run/Walk race LAST night at the All-Star Family Center on Joe Farrington Road, the Bahamas nationaljudoteamfound out what training is like from Brazil's top female coach. Coach Campos is a world renowned coach who is a two time Olympian. She is in town to attend the Caribbean Cup and teach a regional course to the Barba dos, Bahamas and Puerto Rico coaches. "I am pleased with the attitude of the coaches and athletes of the Caribbean", says coach Campus. " Before Brazil became a top nation in judo they first had to believe in themselves, so attitude is very important." Judo is a sport that is won by throwing an opponent to his back or pinning him or making him submit with an armbar or choke. The team con centrated on interval training and speed training. "The workout was intense," said Chrisnell Cooper, a 20-year-old student of Judo. "I feel like I learned alot about myself in a very short period of time with some of the drills." The team has been training under US coach Gerald Lafon in preparation for a series of championships beginning with the Caribbean Cup and culminating with the World Championship in Rotterdam in August. The Puerto Rican team also arrived last night and are very excited to participate in the cup.The Caribbean Cup will be held on Saturday July 18 at Loyola Hall on Gladstone Road between 1 pm and 4 pm. Tickets will be available for spectators at the door at the cost of $5. "This event is a first in the history of Bahamas judo," says Judo Federation President D'Arcy Rahming. For more information persons may call the Bahamas Judo Federation at 364-6773. Brazilian Judo Olympian in Town for Caribbean Cup C OACH C ampos watches as two students demonstrate the Tachi-waza. COACH Campos (third row PUERTO Rican judo team. STUDENTS demonstrate Ne-waza. FIFA vice president Jack Warner represented soccer, while special advisor Ally McNabb filled in for the min istry. According to Sturrup, while the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture has pledged their commitment to this year’s event, they are still seeking local sponsors to come on board. CASI is the brainchild of sports promoter Al Hamilton, MBE, who has been hosting the successful Commonwealth Sports Awards since 1980 in Jamaica as well as other Caribbea nations. Hamilton has indicated that they intend to attract a number of international stars to this year’s awards presentation. He has already made two trips here and have indicated that he’s been pleased with the progress being made with the planning so far. Second annual Caribbean Awards Spor ts Icons comes to town F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e n n i i n n e e

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The Bahamas is making a nother dynamite showing at 1 3-14 PONY Tournament maki ng 2009 a historic year in youth baseball for the country. The Bahamas Baseball Federation in conjunction with PONY (BAHAMAS TEAM BAHAMAS 13-14 Team to the PONY Latin American Caribbean Zone Championship in San Juan, Puerto from July 13th thru 19th. T T E E A A M M S S : : Puerto Rico – Host P uerto Rico – Area St. Martin Anguilla Bahamas TEAM BAHAMAS – 2 Wins / 1 Loss G G a a m m e e # # 1 1 : : TEAM BAHAMAS VS PUERTO RICO LOST 11 4 Game was tied after 4 innings and Darville(LHP gas!!! Losing Pitcher – Leslie Darville Lesile Darville – HR / Jerome Jones / Perez Knowles / Leighton Gibson – 1 Hit each G G a a m m e e # # 2 2 : : TEAM BAHAMAS VS ST. MARTIN – WIN 11 0 Byron Murray – 3 4 / Two Home Runs Pitchers Alex Roberts & Ian Banks combined to pitch a No-Hitter Bahamas will have a Double Header Today – Thursday July 16th 2009 Henry Thompson will get the Start against Anguilla @ 10:00am Perez Knowles will get the Start against Puerto Rico Area @ 4:00pm G G a a m m e e # # 3 3 : : TEAM BAHAMAS VS ANGUILLA – WIN 22 0 Team Bahamas 2nd Shoot-out win of the tournament Winning Picture: Henry T hompson Gave up 1 Hit in t he game A shton Butler: 2-4 with a Solo HR Byron Murray: 2-2 Triple & Double 4 RBI's Alex Roberts: 3-3 Double & 2 Base Hits 3 RBI's Puerto Rico Host Defeated Puerto Rico Area last night. With Team Bahamas win against Anguilla, Team Bahamas will either end up 2nd or 3rd. The game at 4pm against PR Area w ill determine this Round Robin finish. PR Host has already clinched the #1 spot with the defeat of Team Bahamas & PR Area. Play-off begin tomorrow @ 10:00am with the Bronze & Gold Medal Game on Saturday contact the individuals below for tomorrow updates. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 11 Bahamas 2-1 at PONY Tournament TEAM BAHAMAS 13-14 TEAM Front Row Standing: Left to Right Darien Lockhart 3B – Freeport Byron Murray P/OF – Nassau Henry Thompson P – Nassau Romero CartwrightP – Nassau Lance Edwards 2B – Freeport Ashton Butler SS – Nassau R obin Brown -OF – Freeport Ian Banks-2B/P – Nassau Back Row Standing: Left to Right Patrick Knowles Coach – Freeport Marcian Curry Jr Coach – Freeport Jerome Jones 3B/P – Freeport Alex Roberts C/OF – Bimini Leighton Gibson1B – Nassau Western Saunders C – Nassau L esilie. Darvile RF/P – Nassau Perez Knowes OF/P/1B – Freeport Victor Cartwright Manager – Nassau

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‘Three in three’ for developer C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information c ontained is from a t hird party and The Tribune can not be h eld responsible for e rrors and/or o mission from the daily report. $4.21 $4.30 $4.10 MUTUAL FUND investment expert investment advice multiple fund options potentially higher returnsall of the aboveFAMILY GUARDIAN CORPORATE CENTRE: AT THE JUNCTION OF VILLAGE ROAD, SHIRLEY STREET & EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.comcall us today at 396-4000 A SUBSIDIARY OF 50% of land surveyors to retire within next 10 years By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas’ foreign exchange reserves will “end the year higher” than 2008’s $562.73 million finish, the Central Bank governor told Tribune Business yesterday, with a 39 per cent decline in foreign investment inflows balanced by government’s foreign currency borrowings and reduced outflows. With external currency reserves “approaching $723 million as of” Tuesday this week, a slight drop on end-May’s $756.63 million, Wendy Craigg said the decline in credit demand and economic recession had triggered a natural “adjustment mechanism” that reduced foreign currency outflows a development that counterbalanced the drop in tourism and foreign direct investment-related inflows. Foreign reserves to end year ‘higher’ than 2008 Holdings receive boost ‘in excess of $100m’ from foreign borrowings, with proceeds set to help better 2008’s $563m finish P erformance comes despite 39% fall in private foreign i nvestment inflows to $194m, and 35% capital account surplus decline to $150m Risk from oil price rises ‘not very strong’, but ‘no change’ in interest rates or monetary policy No ‘significant’ increase in commercial bank loan portfolio deterioration WENDY CRAIGG SEE page 3B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The regulations accompany ing the Domestic Insurance Act must first be passed by the Insurance Commission’s Board before they can give enforce ment teeth to the newly-imple mented legislation, the head regulator told Tribune Business yesterday evening, hopefully bringing clarity to an industry where this newspaper was told “confusion reigns”. Lennox McCartney, the Commission’s superintendent, confirmed to this newspaper that while the former Registrar of Insurance’s Office had been renamed, the regulations accompanying the Act had “not as yet” come into force. He explained to Tribune Business : “The regulations have to be passed by the Board of the [Insurance] Commission. At the Board’s first meeting, those regulations will more than like ly be passed. “It’s a kind of chicken and egg situation. It should happen very shortly, once the Board’s Regulatory Board approval needed for insurance regs * Newly-formed Insurance Commission’s Board formation and regulations sign-off to happen ‘very shortly * Changes to force alterations in ICB Board composition SEE page 2B * Survey registration system suffering ‘serious breakdown’ and ‘crisis of confidence * Report recommended sub-contracting surveying from Lands and Surveys to private sector * Real estate transaction costs high at 15% of purchase price, while surveying costs double Florida’s By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas is facing a c ritical shortage of land surveyors given that 50 per cent of sector professionals are due to retire within the next 10 years, a report tabled in theH ouse of Assembly has revealed, with the Department of Lands and Surveys suffer ing from a “lack of confidence” in its data manage-m ent and a “serious break down in the system”. A February 21, 2007, report s ubmitted to the Government as part of the Inter-American D evelopment Bank (IDB financed Land Use and Administration project rec-o mmended that given the minimal number of surveys carried out by the Department, all government surveys and Crown Land grants andl eases should be sub-contracted out to private surveyors. The report, by Grenville Barnes of consultants International Land Systems (ILS one of a series of ILS documents that show the extent of the shambles in land administration and management in the Bahamas, added: “Records management at Lands and Surveys is weak, and has contribute to lack of confidence in the system.” And even the proposal to sub-contract all government and Crown Land surveys to the private sector was fraught with problems, the ILS report disclosing that the Bahamas Association of Land Survey ors needed to tackle “surveying capacity in the Bahamas”. This was because “more than 50 per cent of the curSEE page 4B By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A real estate developer yesterday told Tribune Business t hat three multi-million dollar housing projects he is working on in New Providence c ould be completed within three years despite the economic slowdown, with one possibly valued at between $500-$700 million at full build-out. Ex-MP and attorney-general, Tennyson Wells, said the recent Lyford Hills development could amount to that, and one-third of phase one had been completed, with water and sewerage infrastructure in place and the gatehouse completed. Mr Wells’ South Seas development, which includes a canal, came to a standstill after the Bahamas National Trust (BNT “proper environmental safeguards” were in place to protect the natural wetlands on the property purchased by his development company. The BNT requested that government demand a stop S EE page 3B T ENNYSON WELLS By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor B oth Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and his predecessor, Perry Christie, have conveyed prime beachfront Crown Land of multiple acreage to developers for as little as $1, Tribune Busin ess c an reveal, with there appearing to be no set policy gov erning the price paid in such transactions. A report on the management and distribution of Crown Land in the Bahamas, produced by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT e ral certificates of Crown Land grants that were obtained from the Department of Lands and Surveys. One certificate, signed by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham as the minister responsible, was said to show that a developer Two PMs grant Crown Land to developer for $1 SEE page 8B

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By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net SOME Fish Fry vendors at Arawak Cay yesterday said they were looking forward to the extra business the relocated container shipping facilities and port will bring, one vendor indicating they had accepted the project was inevitable by saying: “There is nothing we can do about it anyway.” “They already signed the contract,” the owner of Candies Enterprises told Tribune Busi-n ess yesterday. James Smith, whose conch stall is said to have some of the best conch salad at the Fish Fry, said he was convinced that Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-ham had already sealed the deal for the Arawak Cay Port development. He added that there was no use fighting the development b ecause the “government done do it”. T hat is not the talk PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald will want to hear. He again yesterday appealed to the Government for full disclosure on the plans for the Arawak Cay container port development, which has been shrouded in secrecy. Minister of the Environment, Dr Earl Deveaux, told this paper yesterday that the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA Harbour dredging, disclosed by this newspaper yesterday, was available to anyone interested in seeing it. The Ministry of Environment yesterday released this statement: “As is the case with all Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs extension for Arawak Cay, produced by Blue Engineering, is available to the public in the Ministry of the Environment or the Ministry of Public Works. This is contrary to the assertion in the article that the report has not been formally released, suggestion some ulterior motive on the Ministry. “These documents provide a wealth of information, including but not limited to the existing conditions at the site, the potential impacts of the project to the environment and proposed measures for mitigating these impacts.” Mr Fitzgerald said he had never seen the ‘draft’ report dated April 16, 2009, until it was e-mailed to him by a source. “It appears that again under this administration, the interests of a special few are being promoted and underwritten by the Bahamian under the guise of national development,” Mr Fitzgerald said, in a seemingly thinly-veiled reference to the FNM’s supporters in the shipping industry. He added that he has not been able to gain information on the Blue Engineering firm, which prepared the EIA. Director of the Bahamas Environment, Science and Technology (BEST sion, Philip Weech, said yesterday that Blue Engineering was sub-contracted by Cox and SHAL, the firm hired by the Ministry of Works to produce an EIA for the storage/use of dredged material for the Nassau Harbour port improvement project. According to Mr Weech, the documents produced by that entity are available for viewing at the office of the Best Commission. The EIA lays out possible negative environmental effects from the Arawak Cay port development, including loss of 32 yards of sea bed and some sea life, which the reports concludes will regenerate. “The other issue raised by the article relates to the potential impacts to marine life, caused primarily by the settling of suspended sediment on coral reefs and sponge beds in the area. While the risk exists for sediment to harm sea life, this risk is mitigated by the implementation of good dredging practices to minimise sediment suspension and dispersal, as well as by independent environmental monitoring to ensure the use of turbidity barriers and compliance with the turbidity control standard,” the Ministry’s release continued. “Additionally, in an attempt to further assess and advise on efforts to mitigate the potential impact to sea life, the possibili ty of relocating viable hard and soft corals, as well as sponges, was explored by consultants Continental Shelf Associates (CSA “CSA were contracted by the Government to assess, restore and monitor the damage caused by the 2008 grounding of the M/T Ficus near Goulding Cay, New Providence. However, during their survey of the Arawak Cay site, CSA found that the corals within the impacted area were small and not very diverse, making them unsuitable candidates for relocation.” M r Fitzgerald advised yester day of an acre-wide hole being dug in the centre of Arawak Cay to provide fill for the 1,000 foot extension of that island. The EIA suggested 900,000 cubic yards of dredged materialw ould be used to extend the i sland. But according to Mr Weech, the material from the hole is being used to create a base so that land-based (as opposed to barge-based) cranes could drive into the sea bed the metal sheet piles that will con t ain the fill and create the bulkhead for the island’s extension. Mr Deveaux said the hole created will then be used as a containment barrier and settle ment pond for the dredged material from Nassau Harbour, some of which will then be used to extend the Woodes Rogers Wharf outwards to create a pedestrian promenade as a part of the redevelopment of down town Nassau. “We hope that the work finishes in a timely manner, so we’ll have some time to get things back rolling,” said one Fish Fry vendor. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TEACHINGVACANCIESThe Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications from quali-One (1Geography One (1-The Director of Education Anglican Central Education Authority P.O. Box N-656 Nassau, Bahamas Employment Opportunity Senior Collections Officer An employment opportunity exists for an innovative, persuasive leader with a passion for success, a desire to succeed and the ability to initiate progress. Skill Requirements Excellent oral and written communication skills Excellent motivation & coaching skills Ability to execute priority based workload Possess excellent planning, organizational and implementation skills Ability to operate and familiarity with POS systemsProficient in Microsoft Office applications Possess strong foundation of accounting practices and procedures Strong multitasking abilityStrong leadership & managerial skills Strong internet skills i.e. Emailing, group messaging and research Ability to exert initiative Recording, summarizing, a nalyzing, verifying and reporting of results of financial transactions Minimum Experience Requirements Tertiary level with degree in related field; Collections executive with at least 4 years experience in collections or related field ; At least three years experience in supervisory post; Strong knowledge and application of MS Microsoft Suite APPLY VIA EMAIL TO: srcollectionsofficer@yahoo.com appointed.” He was unable to give a precise timeframe for when this would be accomplished. Many in the Bahamian insurance industry were yesterday questioning whether the regulations were in effect, given that the Insurance Commission had sent out a release informing the sector that the Domestic Insurance Act had come into force from July 2, 2009. And, if the regulations were not in effect, insurance executives questioned whether the Act could be enforced given that the e nforcement teeth, including specifics on regulatory powers, s anctions and fines, were not accompanying it. T imothy Ingraham, the Bahamas General Insurance Association’s (BGIA on holiday in New York, confirmed that the Insurance Commission needed to be in place and fully functional before the regulations could be implemented. “They keep telling us they’re very close,” he said, “but I don’t know how much they can enforce the Act without the new regulations being in effect.” The Government and Insurance Commission’s position is likely to be that having the regulations in effect immediately is unlikely to be a major priority, given that all Bahamas-based carriers, agents, brokers and salespersons have a transition period of one year to comply with the Domestic Insurance Act and reregister. This seemingly means that the Act’s provisions will only be enforced from July 2, 2010, onwards, although the transition period for insurance adjusters, risk managers and consultants is 50 per cent shorter standing at six months. Mr McCartney yesterday said the Commission’s Board had to be appointed by the Government, and would include three to five persons besides himself and the deputy superintendent. While the regulations had yet to be tabled in Parliament, Mr McCartney explained this was not a requirement before they could be implemented just approval by the Insurance Commission’s Board. “It will all happen very shortly,” he promised. The superintendent said the Act incorporated “a long transition period” to give the Bahamian insurance industry time to become familiar with all its requirements. “There are a number of important changes in solvency requirem ents and statutory reserves, changes in some capital requirem ents, deposit requirements for foreign companies,” Mr McCartn ey added. “There are very significant changes, and the corporate governance rules are very new to the industry, although these a re mostly in the regulations. “They are fairly extensive to govern self-dealing, related party transactions and the number of non-resident directors on the Board.” One insurance company head told Tribune Business that the n ew Act and regulations would “require quite significant changes i n the way the industry operates”. Tom Duff, Insurance Company of the Bahamas (ICB manager, said the general insurance carrier would be required to reform its Board, which currently consisted entirely of J. S. Johnson executives and shareholders. This was because the BISX-listed insurance broker owns 40 per cent of ICB, and its directors and senior executives hold the remaining equity. “I suppose one major area of significance is in the make-up of this Board,” Mr Duff said. “There is quite a bit of focus in the regulations in terms” of this. “The superintendent wants the Board of ICB to contain a majority of independent directors, not having a connection with J S Johnson or other affiliates.” The ICB general manager added that while the new Act and regulations had increased capital and solvency requirements, meeting them was “not going to be problematic for an established company in the market. For a new entrant, it will be a bit more difficult for them to raise the capital”. Opening capital requirements are now at $2 million, and Mr Duff said the regulations also mandated that “certain policyholder reserves are held in trust”. “It will be more difficult for insurance companies to scale down their reserves and remove deposits from banks, because they will have to have the Insurance Commission’s authority to do so,” Mr Duff explained. “The Government will have the authority over where assets are held, and the movement of assets.” Mr McCartney yesterday said the Act gave the Insurance Commission the power to carry out on-site inspections of insurance companies, something it had never had before. To carry out this function, it was looking at hiring “a handful of persons”. Regulatory Board approval needed for insurance regs F ROM page 1B Fish Fry’s vendors say port ‘inevitable’

PAGE 14

Revealing that the proceeds from the Government’s foreign currency borrowing activities were “in excess of $100 million”, Mrs Craigg told Tribune Business : “The reserves have benefited from the Govern ment’s recent foreign currency borrowings, and we expect quitea significant portion of those proceeds to remain in the reserves, so they will end the year higher than they did last year.” Mrs Craigg’s comments are encouraging from the Bahami an balance of payments/current accounts perspective, as they indicate the Bahamas will, in the short-term at least, be in a strong position to finance its import needs and maintain the one:one exchange rate parity with the US dollar. The Central Bank governor added that apart from the boost from foreign currency borrow ings, the Bahamas was still attracting net positive capital inflows from tourism and for eign direct investment, just not at the level of previous years. “We’re continuing to have relatively positive net inflows,” Mrs Craigg told Tribune Business. “If you look at foreign cur rency transactions with the banks and other transactions, there are other net inflows just not at the level they were at the year before. The net inflows have not ceased, but they’re certainly at lower levels.” She said that for the 2009 first quarter, net private foreign investment inflows into the Bahamas had dropped by 39per cent, from $317.5 million in the 2008 comparative period to $193.8 million this time around. Meanwhile, the surplus on the financial and capital account had dropped to $149.8 million in the 2009 first quarter, down from $229.8 million year-overyear, a 34.9 per cent decrease. These figures are in line with the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF Article IV consultation, which forecast a 30 pet cent decline in foreign direct investment the capital lifeblood for the Bahamian economy and employment in 2009. Meanwhile, Mrs Craigg told Tribune Business that the risk of an oil price-induced shock to the external reserves was “not a very strong one” currently. While global prices had been creeping up slowly in recent months, closing yesterday at $62 per barrel, compared to a 52week low of $32.41, they were still some 58 per cent below last July’s $147 per barrel peak. The Bahamas last year spent $1.1 billion on oil and fuel-related imports. “It’s certainly something that we have to monitor, because there is that degree of volatility in those prices, but they’re significantly below where they were last year,” the Central Bank governor told Tribune Business . “The risk is still there, but it’s not a very strong one at this point in time.” However, those who believe the relatively strong external reserves and monetary policy positions have created room for the Central Bank to cut its discount rate are likely to be dis appointed, as Mrs Craigg said there were no plans for any immediate shifts. “We have not considered the need for any changes in the monetary policy position,” she confirmed , “but it’s something that we evaluate on a monthly basis.” The Bahamas’ foreign cur rency reserves have been protected by the decline in con sumer credit demand and “the slowdown in economic activity”, which has reduced the demand for inventory among the Bahamian business com munity. This is what has reduced currency outflows from this nation. “It’s a natural adjustment mechanism that happens to benefit the external reserves ina period much like the one that we’re currently experiencing,” Mrs Craigg explained. She added that while the Central Bank was concerned about and continued to monitor the asset quality in Bahamian commercial banks’ loan portfolios, there had been no major increase in the rate of loan defaults and non-perform ing loan increases. “It’s a matter that we’re con tinuing to monitor very closely with the banks,” Mrs Craigg told Tribune Business. “We have an enhanced monitoring arrangement for those loans, but we have not seen any sig nificant increase in the momen tum” of deterioration. The Central Bank had previ ously reported that almost one in five (20 per cent Bahamian businesses by commercial banks were in default at end-May 2009, with total non-performing loans rising to 7.7 per cent or $468.2 million of outstanding . This figure increased by 4 per cent or $18.2 million in May. The total number of loans in arrears by at least one month increased by $6.1 million or 0.7 per cent in May, reaching a total of $847.3 million. Total loans in arrears increased to 13.98 per cent as a percentage of total loans, although the proportion of delinquent loans those between 31 to 90 days past duedeclined by $12 million or 3.73 per cent to $373.3 million. The Central Bank said at the time: “The increase in the arrears rate was attributed to a worsening in the consumer loans and residential mortgages portfolios, by 58 basis points and 2 basis points, to 12.45 per cent and 13 per cent, respectively. “In contrast, the commercial arrears rate receded to 19.83 per cent in May, from 20.61 per cent in April.” Mrs Craigg said what was happening with commercial bank loan portfolios was direct ly linked to events in the wider Bahamian economy, adding that “as long as job losses con tinue, you will continue to see some deterioration in the credit quality of the banks”. Borrowers unable to meet their obligations “need to return to jobs”, but Mrs Craigg said an economic recovery in the Bahamas was unlikely to hap pen until the 2010 second half. “Looking at what’s happening in the US economy, we don’t see it happening before then,” she added. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 3B JOB ADVERTISEMENTPosition:AccountantA local insurance agency seeks to ll the position of Accountant. The scope of work is to head the Accounting Operations in preparation of monthly, quarterly and annual reports; to keep and maintain all nancial documents and records according to the directives coming from the President and the Board of Directors to ensure the efcient management of all Bank and general ledger accounts. The position will also be expected to make recommendations to management to maintain the company’s viability in a highly competitive environment. 5HTXLUHG accountant; presenting; supervisory skills; meet deadlines and perform work of the highest quality. ing address: The Tribune c/o Box # 81869 P.O. Box N 3207 Nassau, Bahamas CAREER OPPORTUNITY Risk & Compliance OfficerColina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified professional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer. This isan executive position and the successful applicant should possess the following: Qualifications & Experience x Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university x Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance x Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a law degree x Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations for improvements to a compliance culture x Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of duties x Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and best practices x Confidentiality x Excellent oral and written communication skills Duties & Responsibilities: x Design and implement a risk framework. x Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps taken to foster good compliance. x Implement and maintaina compliance monitoring programme. This will serve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures. x Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws, regulations and policies applicable to the institution. x Provide management with guidance in the development, implementation and maintenance of policies, proceduresand practices tocover regulated activities. x Create programmes thateducate, train and encourage directors, managers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and regulations. x Serve as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators. The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a cover letter and resume to the following e-mail address no later than 27 July 2009: E-mail: careers@colinaimperial.com RE: Risk and Compliance Officer Absolutely no phone callswill be accepted FROM page 1B Foreign reserves to end year ‘higher’ than 2008 page of the canal dredging until a “full assessment” of its impact on the nearby Bonefish N ational Park could be carried out. M r Wells, though, said yesterday that the develo pment had been given final approval by the BNT and Bahamas Environment, Science and Technology (BEST canal project. “For South Seas we have gotten our final approval to put in the canal and complete the marina, and we have paid the fees to the Government and Department of Lands and Surveys for that the royalties for the entire project,” he said. Mr Wells said much of the wetland, about 20 per cent of the property to be developed, will be made public, with boardwalks put in place for individua ls to enjoy a natural mangrove forest. “There is no other development in this country where they can show where they left almost 20 per cent of the land for public use,” he added. C onsultation “We are Bahamians and we will not do anything that will assist in destroying the environment. They (BNT experts and BEST, prepared a management plan in consultation with the trust.” Mr Wells said his third development, Yuma Estates, would have been completed if not for the downturn in the economy. We should have completed Yuma, but the e conomy went south. We will distribute the rest of t he lots over to the shareholders,” he said. He suggested South Seas would be completed within 18 months, while Lyford Hills could take up to three years. “We have scores of people who are employed now working in those subdivisions,” said Mr Wells. Three in three’ for developer FROM page 1B By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE DOWNTOWN Nassau Partnership (DNP beautification campaign through the placement of artwork in derelict buildings, an initiative its managing director said yesterday would begin at month’s end. Vaughn Roberts said artwork will be hung in t he windows of unused store fronts, while murals will be painted on several unused and rundown buildings, beginning on July 31. He said the clean up effort and Art Exhibit will be funded in part by the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, the DNP and through the volunteer efforts of the artists and sponsors. The DNP was enacted to oversee the development of a Business Improvement Districtm which will begin the revitalisation of the downtown area. M r Roberts said phase one of the redevelopment plan could costs tens of millions of dollars, but will not start in earnest until draft legislation for the creation of the permanent BID body, which will direct the downtown Nassau revitalisation, is approved by Cabinet. He added that a draft Memorandum of Understanding, the first phase of the BID legislation, should be completed by the end of August 2009. F unding to revitalise the city centre will be provided through a private/public partnership. “There is a way to get private funding for this,” said Mr Roberts. “We are in preliminary stages of conversations with a professional fund raiser. “If you think about gateways into downtown, which is sort of our artistic, futuristic designate to the entrance of downtown, there is a way to just promote that as an opportunity for private people to come to the table to fund the creation of it. We’re working all around and there are probably some grants out there.” Charles Klonaris, co-chair of the Downtown Nassau Partnership, had previously told Tribune Business that the full legislation to create the BID “should be ready to go” by year-end, with the existing Nassau Tourism and Development Board (NTDB into the BID. Focus “The focus right now is on the legislation for the BID that’s critical and also the identifi cation of short-term projects,” Mr Klonaris told Tribune Business. “Those are the two focus points right now for the DNP. “I would say we’re hoping towards the end of the year that the [BID] legislation will be ready to go for the following year. That’s the key tow hat we’re trying to push for.” Mr Klonaris said the BID legislation was key to “defining the scope” of the authority that will oversee downtown Nassau’s hoped-for r enaissance. Besides determining the geographical boundaries of the area overseen by the BID, Mr Klonaris, who is also the NTDB’s current chairman, explained that the legislation would determine its revenue-raising powers what monies it could collect and how plus its ability to provide services such as garbage collection and street cleaning. The legislation will also determine the BID’s composition, who sits on its Board and the split between public and private sector representatives. “This is the most difficult part of it,” Mr Klonaris told Tribune Business. “We have to be so certain, careful and positive about the authority, the level of the BID authority and its functions. These are really the keys to the success of downtown.” The DNP co-chair added that Bahamian architect Jackson Burnside would produce all the working drawings to illustrate the vision for downtown Nassau, the body having “agreed on his proposals”. When Mr Burnside’s work is completed, the DNP will be “ready to go out for bid” on construction work. Mr Klonaris described Mr Burnside’s work as not just “a vision, but what the final reality will be”. And he added: “The vision for the NTDB was to really become the BID. It will morph into the BID, hopefully in a year’s time. “The ultimate goal was to work through the BID. For many years the NTDB was a voice in the wilderness, but we kept plugging away. The Government has grasped that, and understands it, and where we are now is the vision of many years. “The city is an important part of this country as an engine for employment, and it’s important to have a vibrant city to support Atlantis and all the hotels we have.” The ‘art’ of reviving downtown Nassau

PAGE 15

rent active, registered surveyors in the private sector will retire in the next 10 years”. Addressing the lack of conf idence in the survey registration system, the ILS report found that the number of private surveys recorded by the Department of Lands andS urveys had fallen from a high p oint of just under 400 in 1990 to around 200 in 2005, with a “significant decline” fromm ore than 350 in 1993 to 175 the following year. The bottom was reached in 1 996, with less than 100 surveys lodged for recording with t he Department. T his was despite the number of new mortgages regist ered at the Registrar General’s Department numbering between 4,000 and 5,000 fore very year between 1994-1999, and registered conveyancings f or the same time period hovering between 4,500 t0 more than 6,000. A ttempting to answer why private surveyors were not s ubmitting their surveys to the D epartment of Lands and Surveys, the report concluded: “There are several reasonsf or this, but they appear to all relate back to a lack of confid ence in the management of survey data in Lands and Surveys and the perception thatL ands and Surveys personnel are taking advantage of their position in government to unfairly compete with the priv ate sector. “This is a serious breakd own in the system, and it is critical that these public-private relationships be fosteredw ithin the new institutional structure. “It is clear from an examin ation of the survey information archives that Lands & Surveys are doing a very poorj ob of managing the country’s [land] records. I believe this i s contributing to the negative image that is being projected to the surveying profession.” T he report added: “Given the expectations in the Bahamas over the coming years higher property values, h igher volume of land transactions, increased potential for b oundary conflicts, greater pressure for foreign-funded development there is anu rgent need to build surveying and mapping capacity in the Bahamas, primarily in the pri-v ate sector.” The ILS document recomm ended shrinking the Department of Lands and Surveys into a smaller organisation focusing on managing cont racts and assessing the quali ty of private surveys, prior to including them in the parcelbased land administration sys tem the IDB project aimed to c reate. T he number of government surveys carried out by the Department, the report revealed, had fallen from eight in 2002 to just two in 2005. “Inr ecent years, the surveying productivity in Lands and Surveys appears to have dwindled to the point where there is no justification for continuing tos upport a cadastral surveying capacity,” the report concluded. High surveying costs were prevalent, especially on Fam-i ly Islands, where surveyors had to cut through thick bush i n determining boundary lines. Up to 40 per cent of time and expenses could be spent ont his task. The estimated cost of surv eying a 1,500 x 1,500 foot parcel of land in the Family Islands was pegged by ther eport at $7,995 over four days almost $2,000 per day. This compared to the $1,000 perd ay rate charged by a similarsized Florida crew. T ransactions costs in the Bahamas were also relatively high, at 15 per cent of the pur-c hase price for a $100,000 land parcel in urban Nassau, comp ared to 3-4 per cent in countries like Australia. The biggest contributor to trans-a ction costs were Stamp Tax and the realtor’s fee, both c osting in this case $6,000 or 38.6 per cent of the cost total. Behind that was the attorney’sf ee of 2.5 per cent of the purchase price, some 16.1 per cent of the transaction costs. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.28Abaco Markets1.391.390.000.1270.00010.90.00% 1 1.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .306.94Bank of Bahamas6.946.940.000.2440.26028.43.75% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3911.390.001.4060.2508.12.19% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.645.640.000.4190.36013.56.38% 4.781.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.053.00-0.050.1110.05227.01.73%2 .851.32Doctor's Hospital1.821.820.000.2400.0807.64.40% 8.206.60Famguard6.996.60-0.391,0000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.5010.00Finco10.9010.900.000.3220.52033.94.77% 1 1.7110.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.3810.380.000.7940.35013.13.37% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.035.030.000.3320.15015.22.98% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0 .450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.008000.4070.60013.510.91% 12.0010.40J. S. Johnson10.4010.400.000.9520.64010.96.15% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1460 1425 BahamasSupermarkets 792 842 1460 0041 0300 N/M 205% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% 7% Interest 7% Prime + 1.75%FINDEX: CLOSE 787.12 | YTD -5.72% | 2008 -12.31%B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities30 May 2013 29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320 TUESDAY, 14 JULY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.14| CHG -2.79 | %CHG -0.18 | YTD -142.22 | YTD % -8.31BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases) 14 . 60 14 . 25 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 . 92 8 . 42 14 . 60 0 . 041 0 . 300 N/M 2 . 05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.38601.3231CFAL Bond Fund1.38602.404.75 3.03512.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8952-1.52-3.18 1.47631.4019CFAL Money Market Fund1.47632.975.30 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1031-8.35-13.82 12.920912.2702Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.92092.405.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.5448-0.020.54 100.000093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund93.1992-3.33-6.76 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.47339.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.27652.00-2.98 1.06221.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06222.566.22 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0243-0.842.43 1.05851.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05852.045.85 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007NAV Date 31-May-09 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 31-Mar-09 30-Jun-09TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Jun-09 31-Mar-09 31-Dec-07 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 3-Jul-09 30-Jun-09MARKET TERMS Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds )LQDQFLDO&RQWUROOHU5H TXLUHPHQWVtHVSRQVLELOLWLHV /HDGDQGPRWLYDWHDFFRXQWLQJVWDI ([SHULHQFHLQWKHSUHSDUDWLRQDQGLQWHUSUHWDWLRQRI 6WDWHPHQWV 0XVWEHDEOHWRGHYHORSDQGPDLQWDLQDQHIIHFWLYHV\VWHPRILQWHUQDO DFFRXQWLQJDQGRSHUDWLRQDOFRQWUROVLQD+RWHOHQYLURQPHQW 0XVWSRVVHVVYH\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQDVXSHUYLVRU\DFFRXQWLQJ SRVLWLRQ 6HOIPRWLYDWHGZLWKVWURQJDQDO\WLFDODQGSUREOHPVROYLQJVNLOOV 0XVWEHFRQYHUVDQWZLWKKRWHODFFRXQWLQJVRIWZDUHZLWKHPSKDVLVLQ DUHDV)RRGt%HYHUDJH)URQWIFHDQGD\UROO /LDLVHZLWKH[WHUQDO$XGLWRUVWKLUGSDUW\VHUYLFHSURYLGHUVDQGUHOHYDQW 5HJXODWRU\t&RPSOLDQFH$XWKRULWLHV 3UHSDUDWLRQRIEXGJHWV 7LPHO\DQGDFFXUDWHSUHSDUDWLRQSUHVHQWDWLRQDQGLQWHUSUHWDWLRQRI QDQFLDOUHSRUWV ([FHOOHQWZULWWHQDQGRUDOFRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOV $EOHWRZRUNH[WHQGHGKRXUVZHHNHQGVDQGKROLGD\V 48$/,),&$7,216 %$$FFRXQWLQJIURPDQDFFUHGLWHGQLYHUVLW\ ,QWHUQDWLRQDODFFRXQWLQJGHVLJQDWLRQ&3$&$f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ublic NoticeM inistry of Public Works & Transport Construction of New Market, Downtown NassauPre-Qualication of ContractorsThe Government of Commonwealth of The Bahamas through the Ministry of Public Works and Transport is living qualied General Contractors to participate in a Pre-Qualication for the Tender for the construction of a new market to be built on a restricted site in Downtown Nassau. The Structure will be approximately 38,724 sq. ft. with associated external works and services. T he General Contractors will be required to provide a detailed indication of their competence, both technically and nancially, to carry out the intended scope of work within a reasonable time. Interested parties may collect the pre-qualication documents as of Thursday, 2 July, 2009 between the hours of 9 :00a.m 5:00p.m. from: The Ofce of the Director of Public Works Ministry of Public Works and Transport John F. Kennedy Drive Nassau, Bahamas T elephone: (242 Fax: (242 T he completed pre-qualication document should be deposited in the Tender Box at the Ministry of Finance, 3rd Floor, Cecil Wallace-Whited Building, West Bay Street, P.O.Box, N-3017, Nassau, Bahamas not later than 5:00p.m. on Monday, 20 July, 2009. The Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas has the right to reject any or all pre-qualication contractors. Signed Colin Higgs Permanent Secretary M ICHAEL LIEDTKE, AP Technology Writer SAN FRANCISCO Google Inc.'s Internet ad sales grew at their slowest rate e ver during the spring, forcing the online search leader to tighten its belt another notch to propel its second-quarter profit above analyst estimates. T he performance punctuated by revenue growth of just 3 percent disappointed investors. The company's shares fell m ore than 3 percent in extended trading Thursday after the results were released. Google is the most profitable company on the Internet, thanks to its dominance of the online advertisingm arket. That means its lackluster revenue growth could foreshadow even more significant sluggishness among other Inter-n et companies that rely on advertising and e-commerce. Many of those companies will detail what happened in their second q uarters in the coming weeks. Although the U.S. recession has been making it increasinglyd ifficult for Google to sell ads, Chief Executive Eric Schmidt said he doesn't expect the cli mate to become any more challenging. " We're not at the moment looking at that downward spiral that we thought we might see six months ago," Schmidt told analysts during a Thursday con-f erence call. The remarks echoed comments made to reporters last week when he said the recession had already appeared to hit bottom. The Mountain View-based company earned $1.48 billion, or $4.66 per share, during the three months ended in June. Thatc ompared with income of $1.25 billion, or $3.92 per share, for the same period last year. Revenue rose to $5.52 billion from $5.34 billion in last year's s econd quarter. It marked Google's lowest growth rate since the company went public five years ago. It was also the company's second con secutive quarter of single-digit revenue growth, which had never fallen below a 30 percent pace until late last year. Compensation I f not for stock compensation expenses, Google said it would have made $5.36 per share. That topped the average estimate of $5.09 per share among analysts polled by Thomson Reuters. After subtracting ad commissions, Google's net revenue totaled $4.1 billion about $40 million above analyst estimates. Google relied on cost cutting and an unusually low tax rate to boost its profits amid the slowing ad sales. For instance, the company trimmed its general and administrative expenses by 23 percent to save about $110 million and reduced its spending on capital projects by 80 percent, or $559 million. The financial discipline resulted in the biggest quarterly reduction in Google's payroll since Larry Page and Sergey Brin started the company in a Silicon Valley garage nearly 11 years ago. Google ended June with 19,786 employees, 378 fewer than at the end of March. Google's second-quarter tax rate was 20 percent, well below the 25 percent range that is typical for the company. The company's shares fell $14.50, or 3.3 percent, after finish ing the regular session at $442.60, up $4.43. The stock has surged by about 50 percent since it last traded below $300 in early March, reflecting investors' faith in Google to weather the recession better than most companies. IN THIS PHOTO from Wednesday, May 27, 2009, a man rides an escalator at the Google I/O 2009 web developers conference in San Francisco. Google Inc. is expected to release second-quarter earnings Thursday, July 16, 2009. Google’s slowing 2Q ad sales overshadow earnings A P P h o t o / J e f f C h i u "We're not at the moment looking att hat downward spiral that we thought we might see six months ago.” 50% of land surveyors to retire within next 10 years F ROM page 1B It is clear from an examination of the s urvey information archives that Lands & Surveys are doing a very poor job of managing the country’s [land] records. I b elieve this is contributing to the n egative image that is being projected to the surveying profession.”

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TIM PARADIS, AP Business Writer NEW YORK Investors piled into technology stocks again to extend the market's rally. Hope for more good earnings from technology leaders made the industry an attractive bet again Thursday, a day after a strong forecast from chip maker Intel Corp. lifted stocks across the board. The tech-laden Nasdaq composite index advanced for the seventh straight day and closedat its highest level since October as traders prepared for profit reports from Internet search company Google Inc. and International Business Machines Corp. Both posted better-thanexpected profits after the closing bell. What appeared to be a turn in sentiment from economist and New York University prof essor Nouriel Roubini also helped lift the market. Reports said Roubini believed the worst of the economy's troubles had past, but in a statement after the close of trading he said his views are unchanged. He doesn't expect the economy to grow this year and still predicts the recession will end early next year. T raders had welcomed what had appeared to be a turn in his s entiment because Roubini has been pessimistic about the economy and was one of the few experts to have predicted the global financial crisis. Some analysts attributed the buying to short-covering, wherei nvestors have to buy stock after having earlier sold borrowed shares in a bet that the market would fall. Modest Stocks continued the week's sprint-and-jog play, carvingmore modest gains after surging the day before. The marketsurged Monday followed by a flatter day Tuesday. "There's still concern about the market and concern about the overall economy," said Jon Biele, head of capital markets at Cowen & Co. "But the pessimism is moving to optimism. People certainly want to be in a position to gain from positive momentum." The jump in stocks this week halted a monthlong slide that came as investors worried that a huge rally in March and April had gone too far as investors hoped for an economic recovery. This week's earnings reports have given investors some of the confirmation that the economy isn't as bad as feared, but they still want to see more evidence of a turnaround. The Dow rose 95.61, or 1.1 percent, to 8,711.82, its highest close since June 12. The blue chips are now down only 0.7 percent for the year. The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 8.06, or 0.9 percent,to 940.74. The Nasdaq rose 22.13, or 1.2 percent, to 1,885.03, its best finish since Oct. 3. Bond prices rose, pushing yields lower. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note fell to 3.58 percent from 3.62 percent late Wednesday. Not all results were good. Nokia Corp., the world's largest cell phone maker, fell $2.22, or 14.2 percent, to $13.46 after its second-quarter earnings tumbled 66 percent and it scrapped targets to increase market share this year. Most results have topped expectations. Reports are due Friday from General Electric Co., Bank of America Corp. and Citigroup Inc. that likely will set the day's tone. "A lot of traders went into earnings with very low expectations and they are happy the world hasn't fallen apart and we're seeing solid results," said Anthony Conroy, managing director and head trader for BNY ConvergEx Group. "A lot of people that were short are starting to cover because of improved earnings that have come out." Financial stocks lagged the rest of the market after smallbusiness lender CIT Group Inc. said negotiations with federal regulators about a rescue broke off. Investors are worried the company could file for bank ruptcy protection. CIT tumbled $1.23, or 75 percent, to 41 cents. JPMorgan Chase & Co. reported big gains in its investment banking business, held back somewhat by loan losses. Its results come two days after Goldman Sachs Group Inc. also t opped expectations with much stronger results in underwriting and trading. JPMorgan slipped 13 cents to $36.13. Strong earnings from the banks have encouraged investors about the economy. The results also show that many of the nation's biggest banks are recovering from the collapse of credit markets last fall. Google rose $4.43, or 1 percent, to $442.60, while IBM rose$ 3.42, or 3.2 percent, to $110.64. Google lost ground in electron ic trading after reporting its results while IBM rose. Investors also drew encoura gement from a Labor Department report that new claims for unemployment insurance fell last week by 47,000 to 522,000, the lowest level since early January. Economists polled by Thomson Reuters predicted an increase to 575,000. The improved data, however, might have been affected by the timing of automobile plant shutdowns. I n other trading, the dollar was mixed against other cur rencies. Gold prices fell. Benchmark crude rose 48 cents to settle at $62.02 a barrel o n the New York Mercantile Exchange. About two stocks rose for every one that fell on the New York Stock Exchange, where consolidated volume came to 5 billion shares, down from 5.5 billion Wednesday. The Russell 2000 index of smaller companies rose 6.38, or 1.2 percent, to 522.02. Overseas, Britain's FTSE 100 rose 0.4 percent, Germany'sD AX index rose 0.6 percent, and France's CAC-40 gained 0.9 percent. Japan's Nikkei stock average rose 0.8 percent. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 5B /$1'((67$7(6/,0,7(' , Q 9ROXQWDU\OLTXLGDWLRQ RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ RIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW RI /$1'((67$7(6/,0,7(' LVLQ 'LVVROXWLRQ 7 KHGDWHRIFRPPHQFHPHQWRIGLVVROXWLRQLVWKHWK GD\RI-XO\ &,$FFRXQWLQJ/LPLWHG % RDWVLGH%XVLQHVV&HQWUH :DUGHQ 1RUWKXPEHUODQG /LTXLGDWRU NOTICE There will be a meeting for all members of the Honorable Society of the Middle Temple on Thursday July 23rd 6:00 p.m. @ S.G. Hambros. All are asked to attend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f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–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f $ELOLW\WRWURXEOHVKRRWDFFRXQWLQJSURFHVVHVDVWKH\UHODWHWRQDQFLDOVRIWZDUH DQGWKHV\VWHPRILQWHUQDOFRQWURO *RRGMXGJPHQWDQGVRXQGUHDVRQLQJDELOLW\ $ELOLW\WRFRPPXQLFDWHHIIHFWLYHO\ERWKRUDOO\DQGLQZULWLQJ *RRGWLPHPDQDJHPHQWVNLOOV ,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVVKRXOGDSSO\FRPSOHWLQJDQGUHWXUQLQJDQ$SSOLFDWLRQ)RUPWR 7KH0DQDJHU+XPDQ5HVRXUFHV7UDLQLQJ'HSDUWPHQW%DKDPDV(OHFWULFLW\ &RUSRUDWLRQ %OXH+LOO7XFNHU3%R[1DVVDX%DKDPDV RQRUEHIRU-XO\ IN THIS JULY 8, 2009 PHOTO , people sit at tables in front of the New York Stock Exchange. Stock futures traded higher Monday morning, July 13, 2009, as investors brace for a crush of earnings reports, including key readings from the banking sector, this week. AP Photo/Richard Drew Gains in tech stocks extend rally WALLSTREET

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 75F/24C Low: 80F/27C Low: 78F/26C Low: 80F/27C Low: 81 F/27 C Low: 84F/29C Low: 81 F/27 C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 92F/33C High: 91F/33C High: 92 F/33 C High: 92 F/33 C High: 92F/33C High: 91 F/33C High: 92F/33C Low: 82F/28C High: 92F/33C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 94F/34C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 95 F/35 C Low: 79F/26C High: 92 F/33 Low: 76F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 77 F/25C High: 93F/34C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 96F/36C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 94F/34C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 93F/34C Low: 76F/24C High: 97 F/36 C Low: 79F/26C High: 95F/35C High: 91 F/33 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 17 T H , 2009, PAGE 7B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Mostly sunny with a thunderstorm. Clear.Mostly sunny with a thunderstorm. Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. High: 92 Low: 81 High: 92 High: 91 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Some sun, t-storms possible; windy. High: 89 Low: 81 Low: 80 Low: 82 AccuWeather RealFeel 95F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 91F 95-87F 94-84F 95-87F 96-90F Low: 82 TODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................93F/34C Low ....................................................84F/29C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 92 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 79 F/26C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................trace Year to date ................................................18.56" Normal year to date ....................................21.75" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU New First Full Last Jul. 21 Jul. 28Aug. 5Aug. 13 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:30 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:02 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 1:40 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 3:42 p.m. Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 3:26 a.m.2.29:27 a.m.0.1 4:06 p.m.2.910:41 p.m.0.3 4:32 a.m.2.210:30 a.m.0.1 5:11 p.m.3.011:44 p.m.0.2 5:37 a.m.2.311:34 a.m.0.0 6:13 p.m.3.2----6:39 a.m.2.512:43 a.m.0.1 7:12 p.m.3.312:36 p.m.-0.2 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco95/3579/26s93/3379/26s Amsterdam72/2257/13r64/1757/13r Ankara, Turkey82/2757/13pc82/2759/15s Athens94/3479/26s97/3677/25s Auckland57/1350/10r55/1250/10pc Bangkok90/3279/26t91/3280/26t Barbados86/3076/24t86/3077/25sh Barcelona79/2661/16pc70/2161/16s Beijing79/2668/20sh93/3373/22pc Beirut86/3076/24s80/2677/25s Belgrade97/3672/22s104/4053/11s Berlin88/3167/19s68/2054/12r Bermuda82/2772/22pc82/2775/23sh Bogota66/1845/7pc66/1843/6sh Brussels70/2157/13r63/1749/9sh Budapest95/3568/20s83/2848/8t Buenos Aires61/1646/7s61/1650/10s Cairo98/3676/24s99/3776/24s Calcutta96/3585/29sh98/3687/30t Calgary84/2852/11s82/2753/11s Cancun91/3275/23s93/3374/23s Caracas82/2771/21t83/2871/21t Casablanca77/2567/19s87/3080/26s Copenhagen78/2567/19pc74/2361/16t Dublin64/1750/10sh64/1752/11sh Frankfurt75/2357/13r64/1751/10r Geneva 69/20 54/12 r 61/1651/10r Halifax 68/20 57/13 sh 70/21 59/15 c Havana 93/33 73/22 s 94/34 74/23 t Helsinki 72/22 54/12s77/2557/13pc Hong Kong 91/32 82/27 sh 93/33 84/28sh Islamabad 108/42 84/28 pc 108/42 86/30 s Istanbul91/3275/23s93/3375/23s Jerusalem 84/28 62/16s86/3063/17s Johannesburg 58/1436/2s58/1438/3s Kingston 91/3279/26s89/3178/25pc Lima72/2260/15s74/2360/15s London66/1854/12r72/2252/11pc Madrid86/3054/12s91/3259/15s Manila86/3077/25r83/2877/25r Mexico City79/2654/12t77/2555/12t Monterrey104/4075/23s104/4076/24pc Montreal73/2261/16t70/2159/15r Moscow79/2656/13t80/2659/15s Munich91/3249/9t55/1247/8r Nairobi78/2552/11r78/2552/11c New Delhi 93/3381/27t93/3381/27t Oslo73/2259/15pc76/2458/14c Paris72/2257/13sh71/2155/12c Prague 87/30 59/15 s 63/17 53/11 r Rio de Janeiro83/2870/21pc75/2360/15s Riyadh104/4082/27pc101/3880/26pc Rome 93/33 70/21 s 82/27 57/13 s St. Thomas91/3279/26pc89/3179/26sh San Juan68/2034/1s64/1733/0s San Salvador 86/30 70/21 t 88/31 74/23 s Santiago 63/1739/3pc57/1336/2pc Santo Domingo91/3273/22pc86/3073/22r Sao Paulo 77/25 57/13 pc 70/21 50/10t Seoul79/2670/21r75/2368/20r Stockholm 75/23 57/13 pc 77/25 61/16 pc Sydney 62/16 38/3 pc63/1736/2s Taipei95/3582/27pc93/3384/28s T okyo 86/30 77/25 sh 86/30 75/23 c T oronto 72/2257/13t70/2157/13t Trinidad88/3164/17s92/3364/17s V ancouver 78/25 59/15 s 74/2358/14s Vienna 88/3169/20s70/2153/11r W arsaw 83/28 61/16 s 91/32 49/9 pc Winnipeg 66/18 49/9 c 74/2357/13s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 8-16 Knots1-2 Feet5-7 Miles84F Saturday:ESE at 8-16 Knots1-2 Feet5-7 Miles84F Today:SE at 8-16 Knots1-2 Feet5-7 Miles84F Saturday:ESE at 8-16 Knots1-2 Feet5-7 Miles84F Today:SE at 9-18 Knots1-2 Feet5-7 Miles81F Saturday:ESE at 9-18 Knots1-2 Feet5-7 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque98/3670/21t99/3769/20s Anchorage72/2257/13s72/2256/13pc Atlanta86/3067/19t81/2763/17pc Atlantic City86/3071/21pc85/2962/16t Baltimore90/3268/20t84/2864/17t Boston84/2865/18pc75/2363/17r Buffalo72/2256/13t68/2058/14t Charleston, SC90/3276/24t89/3171/21t Chicago70/2156/13pc72/2257/13pc Cleveland74/2355/12t69/2054/12t Dallas98/3674/23t93/3367/19pc Denver90/3255/12pc86/3059/15s Detroit74/2353/11c70/2156/13t Honolulu89/3177/25s90/3277/25s Houston95/3576/24t94/3471/21t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday TodaySaturdayTodaySaturday Indianapolis76/2455/12pc71/2154/12pc Jacksonville94/3474/23t91/3272/22t Kansas City82/2757/13s81/2758/14s Las Vegas111/4384/28pc111/4389/31s Little Rock88/3162/16t88/3160/15pc Los Angeles86/3066/18pc86/3066/18pc Louisville80/2660/15t76/2457/13pc Memphis88/3164/17t83/2862/16s Miami92/3381/27t94/3481/27t Minneapolis68/2054/12pc74/2360/15s Nashville84/2863/17t79/2658/14s New Orleans90/3276/24t91/3272/22t New York88/3170/21pc81/2769/20t Oklahoma City92/3364/17s87/3062/16pc Orlando92/3375/23t93/3373/22t Philadelphia88/3170/21pc84/2866/18t Phoenix 112/44 88/31 pc 114/4590/32pc Pittsburgh78/2558/14t72/2254/12t Portland, OR 94/3461/16pc84/2859/15s Raleigh-Durham 89/31 72/22 t 89/31 65/18 t St. Louis80/2659/15pc77/2559/15s Salt Lake City 98/36 66/18 s 99/3771/21s San Antonio 100/37 77/25 t 98/36 75/23 s San Diego78/2568/20pc76/2468/20pc San Francisco 76/24 57/13 pc 74/2356/13pc Seattle85/2958/14s77/2556/13s T allahassee 90/3272/22t90/3268/20t T ampa 91/32 80/26 t 90/32 80/26t Tucson107/4181/27t109/4280/26t W ashington, DC 90/32 69/20t85/2967/19t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 18

paid $1 for a grant of 17 Crown Land acres on the sea in 1996. And another certificate, f rom 2005, showed that thenP rime Minister Perry Christie allowed a company to pay $1 for a 50-acre Crown Land tract, again on the primeb eachfront property. The r eport could not be printed, though, so the names of the developers involved or the location of the land in question could not be ascertained. But Ms Loi wrote in her r eport: “The Government continued to make large tracts of Crown Land available to foreign investors at concessionary rates as low as $1-$2f or entire projects as has been done since the enactment of the International Persons Landholding Act under the [first Ingraham adminis-t ration] and recorded below from excerpts of Crown grants obtained from the Department of Lands and Surveys.” Further confirmation of the s eemingly trivial purchase prices paid by developers came from the list of Crown Land grants tabled by the opposition PLP in the Houseo f Assembly on Wednesday, where the developers of Powe ll Point at Cape Eleuthera paid $ 1 each for four separ ate Crown Land grants under the Christie administration on October 25, 2005. Documents And the holding company f or the Walker’s Cay resort development in Abaco, and Grand Cay Research Company, also in Abaco, paid $1 for their Crown Land grantsr espectively under the former PLP administration on March 4, 2005. The documents recording the conveyancings, according to what was tabledi n Parliament, came from Mr Ingraham’s law practice a time when he was out of office. I t is important, though, to put these Crown Land grants in context. It is unclear, first ofa ll, how much acreage was involved in these $1 transactions, and how the land involved was to be used. It has been a long-establ ished policy of successive Bahamian governments to trade land for development and foreign direct investment, particularly in mega resortp rojects, and it is possible that the land involved in these $1 transactions was critical to the success of individual developments a factor that could make or break’ job creation./ It is impossible, though, to k now the Government’s thinking on each respective t ransaction, which again highlights the need for a transparent, accountable land use anda dministration policy. Other notable developers o btaining Crown Land grants included Kerzner International, which on February 20,2 008, through Atlantis Holdings (Bahamas a nd $9,853 respectively for two separate Crown Land grants on Paradise Island. M ayaguana Island Developers paid $2 million for Crown Land on that island on July 26, 2007, for the 50/50 joint venture developmentp roject between the I-Group and the Government, acting through the Hotel Corpora t ion of the Bahamas. And Gerardo Capo’s RAV B ahamas paid $425,600 to the Treasury for a Crown Land grant in Bimini that will formp art of the Bimini Bay resort project. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Two PMs grant Crown Land to developer for $1 F ROM page 1B Perry Christie Hubert Ingraham I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s


Prt bavi if

HIGH
LOW



Volume: 105 No.194

92F
81F

SUNNY WITH
oe ESTORM

een
Crown Land to

SSNS

Reports suggest
that 24-year-old
was attacked then
run over by car

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A 24-YEAR-OLD man
found beaten and bloodied in
an Abaco street early yester-
day morning died within an
hour of being picked up by
police.

Adam Evans, 24, of Marsh
Harbour, was found by police
lying in the road at the
entrance to Spring City,
Marsh Harbour, shortly after
4am.

He was taken to the health
clinic in Marsh Harbour with
severe head injuries and
injuries across his body and
died sometime after 5am,
police say.

Reports reaching The Tri-
bune allege Mr Evans was
beaten up by a group of thugs
and then run over by a car.

Superintendent in charge of
the Family Islands Hulan

Hanna said detectives have
yet to determine how he met
his death, but he expects infor-
mation will lead to a homicide
investigation.

Mr Hanna said: “We don’t
know what led to, or how, he
received his injuries, and right
now we are investigating the
matter.

“We have not classified the
death as yet, but it will proba-
bly lead to a homicide investi-
gation.”

The Tribune understands
Mr Evans’ mother flew to
Nassau with her son’s body
yesterday for an autopsy to be
carried out.

The family declined to
speak about Mr Evans’ death
while the police investigation
is underway.

Police confirmed Mr Evans
had served time in prison, but
Mr Hanna would not say why
he had been jailed or for how
long.

ItsFinger

Ce Tal (1
Sia



m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

ATO ae
TT
MS:

BAHAMAS BIGGEST

OFFICERS SEARCH for suspected illegal immigrants in bushes near Yamacraw Beach yesterday. A total










Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



of 189 suspected illegal Haitian migrants were apprehended over the past two days in New Providence

and Andros.

One of the Bahamas’ most
wanted men captured in US

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ONE of the Bahamas’ most wanted men has
been captured by United States authorities in
Florida during a raid that also uncovered high-
powered weapons, drugs and cash.

David St Remy, 35, who is accused in the
2007 murder of Ryan Wood in Grand Bahama,
was picked up in the Miami Shores area by US
Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)
agents on an immigration violation.

Officers also seized an AK-47 and an M-16
rifle, as well as a handgun, around 1/3 kilo-
gramme of cocaine and $2,000 in cash from a
residence where St Remy had been living.

The joint operation with the Broward Coun-
ty Sheriff's office saw St Remy taken into cus-
tody together with another man, 28-year-old
Kervin Occean — also identified as a Bahami-
an national by US ICE agents — and will now
face charges in that country for illegally re-
entering after being deported in May 2003.

SEE page eight

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Tel: 393-0512, 393-8006, 393-3513
Open Monday to Friday 7am - 4pm ¢ Saturday 7am - 3pm

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e SEE PAGE TWO

Senator investigating
REAR COR COs ETL
Arawak Cay extension

By TANEKA
THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

SENATOR — Jerome
Fitzgerald said he is investi-
gating legal options that
would possibly halt govern-
ment's extension of Arawak
Cay until there is full trans-
parency and accountability =
to the public regarding the _Jerome
controversial development. _ Fitzgerald

Mr Fitzgerald, who has recently been a
vocal opponent of the proposal, is spear-
heading the cause under the newly formed
Committee to Protect and Preserve the
Bahamas for Future Generations.

"It's definitely a matter which is open to

SEE page eight



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50-year-old
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Businessman
shot, robbed by
masked men

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A
Grand Bahama business-
man was shot and robbed
of cash by two armed
masked men after closing
his business in the Hawks-
bill area late Wednesday
evening.

The 50-year-old victim,
who is a resident of South
Bahamia, is detained in
stable, but serious condi-
tion in the Intensive Care
Unit at Rand Memorial
Hospital.

Police are withholding
the identity of the busi-
nessman.

Asst Supt Welbourne
Bootle said the Police
Control Room received a
call around 10.45pm from
a businessman who
reported that he was shot
in the stomach outside his
store, near the Hawksbill
Service Station.

The victim told police
that he was driving him-
self to the hospital. How-
ever, he lost control of his
vehicle and overturned
near the Four Way Co-op
Plaza on Pioneers Way

SEE page eight



Crew of
oil spilling
barge has

disappeared

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

THE crew of a barge that
sunk off Cistern Cay, Exuma,
spilling oil and garbage into the
Exuma Land and Sea Park, has
disappeared and authorities said
they do not know if they are
dead or alive.

A 85ft tanker carrying two
excavators sank while passing
through the shipping channel at
around 3am on Wednesday.

The oil, which spilled into the
sea, NOW poses a major threat to
the environment and marine

SEE page eight

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ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS
=

Suspected illegal
immigrants are
apprehended

A TOTAL of 189 sus- om F 4
pected illegal Haitian 1 :
migrants were apprehend- : es:
ed over the past two days %, ad
in New Providence and tere |
Andros. HAITIAN IMMIGRANTS apprehended on Wednesday are offloaded and turned over to immigration officials to

Law enforcement officers be processed at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre.
yesterday apprehended 27
Haitian migrants in the
Yamacraw area. And an
apprehension exercise near
Andros on Wednesday
netted 162 Haitian
migrants.

After receiving reports of
a 25-ft Haitian sloop off
the shore of Seabreeze
Estates shortly after 9am
yesterday, a thorough
search of the eastern part
of the island was conducted
by police and Defence
Force officers.
PARLEPAC This resulted in the
V O| My | SUS apprehension of a group of
vce Sry 27 migrants - 18 men, eight
women and one child - who
were turned over to Immi-
gration officials for pro-
cessing.

Search

However, the search is
ongoing as it is believed
that there are many others
who escaped into the near-
by bushes.

The Department of





Marine Seaman Drissen Brennen RBDE Public Relations

a

Marine Seaman Drissen Brennen RBDF Public Relations

Marine Seaman Drissen Brennen RBDF Public Relations



who were discovered near

Green Cay, Andros on THIS HAITIAN sloop sits in
, shallow waters off Yamacraw









: ee Wednesday.
es le aie asking the public to be These 162 persons - 130 | et ldmaration ofc
DeLuxe ComBo 3 i : men and 32 women - were g 5

especially vigilant in the apprehended 27 migrants.

ast brought to New Providence
eastern district of New yesterday onboard the

Providence and to assist
ee HMBS P-48 and P-49 after
JR. BACON OA Ore) authorities in apprehend- they were spotted by the

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Ott ay] 0) ce]aia4 SANDWICH Comso ing these migrants. os Airwi
Pcs This latest exercise Dietenc Boras 2 wits

comes on the heels of
another apprehension of
some 162 Haitian migrants

Comso reconnaissance team.

Defence Force officers
dispatched to the area dis-
covered the Haitian
migrants who were not in
possession of the necessary
documentation to enter the
country.

“They were removed
from their unsanitary ves-
sel, taken aboard the
Defence Force crafts and
arrived in the capital at
8.30pm Wednesday night,”
a Statement from the
Defence Force said.

The migrants, who all
appeared to be in fair
health, were handed over
to Immigration officials for
further processing.





















Aide: Ousted Honduran
president heading back

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras

A TOP AIDE of ousted Hon-
duran President Manuel Zelaya
said he was heading back to the
country Thursday, while thousands
of his supporters blocked roads to
demand his return to power,
according to Associated Press.

Patricia Rodas, foreign minister

Of you sce these 2
auliful SISLELS today of Zelaya’s toppled government.

/ : said seed eioadent was “on
WLS ty L hem a his way” back, but refused to say

how he planned to enter the coun-
CS | at try or when he expected to arrive.
(ALY Ct Zelaya’s current whereabouts are

unclear and Honduras’ interim
leaders have promised to arrest
him if he returns.

“Our president will be in Hon-
duras at some point and a some
moment.

“He is already on his way. God
protect him and the people of the
Americas who are with him,”
Rodas told reporters in La Paz,
Bolivia.

It would be Zelaya’s second
attempt to return to Honduras
since the military deposed him and
flew him out of the country in a
June 28 coup.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Senator questions container |
ort plans, alleged phone taps |

SENATOR Allyson May-
nard-Gibson unleashed a blis-
tering attack on government
on a number of fronts yester-
day, criticising their plan to
move the container port to
Arawak Cay and demanding
to know whether the phone
lines of senior police officers
are being tapped.

Speaking in the Senate on
the issue of the container port,
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said:
“We do not need to do the
extension to Arawak Cay right
now. The experts already said,
leave it where it is rather than
move it to Arawak Cay.”

She pointed out that under
the former PLP government, a
plan to build an inland port in
southwest New Providence
was met with wide approval.

“The shipping stakeholders
on the Solomon and Mackey
Committee were enthusiastic
about an inland port as it is a
protected port. Last week in
Cuba, soon to be one of our
main competitors in tourism, I
saw what is certainly one of
the largest inland ports on the
region.

“Hundreds of Bahamians
could have been working right
now on sustainable jobs at our
inland port at southwest New
Providence. And hundreds
more could have counted on



“We do not need to do the
extension to Arawak Cay right
now. The experts already said,
leave it where it is rather than
move it to Arawak Cay.”



Allyson Maynard-Gibson

Opening businesses and hav-
ing sustainable jobs when that
inland port was finished. More
money is being wasted, to the
detriment of Bahamians hurt-
ing now and future generations
of Bahamians.”

The senator added: “Drive
by Saunders Beach. What will
you see? Non-Bahamians dri-
ving tractors in the Bahamas.
Bahamians are out of jobs and
non-Bahamians are driving
tractors and painting road
signs in the Bahamas. Who
would have thought that we’d
live to see the day when the
government would demon-
strate that Bahamians are not
qualified in their own country
to drive a tractor and move
Bahamian sand or paint a road
sign, in the Bahamas?”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson also
asked how criminals could be

swiftly punished when their
files and papers are being
“lost” while being removed by
hand from various courts.

“How can we have any con-
fidence in the system when we
hear about phone lines of
senior police officers being
tapped? Where is the govern-
ment’s voice in this critical
matter?” she asked.

“How can we believe that
the government is serious
about the administration of
justice when they say one day
that they will build the Judi-
cial Complex and the next day
they say that they will not?

“How can we believe that
they are serious when knowing
that we need judges, they
refuse to follow the custom of
renewing the contracts of
Bahamian judges and magis-
trates who are ready, willing

MP hits out over
lack of clear land

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE lack of a clear land policy
has allowed for the suspicion that
corruption and political manipu-
lation guides the granting of
Crown land, according to the MP
for Fort Charlotte.

In making this point, Alfred
Sears noted that it appears the
majority of the almost 800 Crown
grants awarded by the govern-
ment between 1992 and the pre-
sent were for land in Abaco.

“Well, I ask the question: What
policy guided the grant of so
much Crown land in Abaco? Was
it due to political considerations?
Tam not saying it was, but I have
to ask the question,” said Mr
Sears.

The MP said it is “wrong that
public land should be given out
while the average citizen of this
commonwealth cannot see a writ-
ten policy, cannot see who is get-
ting it, the terms they’re getting it
on and the policy that is guiding
the disposition.”

He was speaking during the
debate on a resolution moved by
Fred Mitchell, MP for Fox Hill,
calling for a parliamentary select
committee to be appointed to
investigate matters concerning
the disposition of publicly held
lands.

The resolution was supported
by both sides — with many mem-
bers proposing that a committee
could help guide the formation
of clearer, written guidelines gov-
erning the distribution of a fun-
damental and finite resource —
and was approved yesterday
afternoon. Who will sit on the
committee has yet to be deter-
mined.

Among the issues to be exam-
ined by the committee are:

¢ How much Crown land is
there?

¢ Who owns and manages this
land?

¢ Who has land been granted
to and on what basis?

Also to be examined are how
the charges attached to the land
that is granted are determined
and under what circumstances
public officers or their relatives
can obtain Crown land.

The committee is intended to
investigate to what extent the cur-
rent land policy results in the
open, rational and transparent
distribution of Crown land, and if
it falls short, as MPs said it does,
whether a legislative and regula-
tory regime can be created to
ensure these ideals are fulfilled.

Speaking on the parliamentary
channel during the luncheon
recess, Mr Mitchell said he
expects the committee to be able
to report within three months. He
added that he would like to see

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Alfred Sears

the committee’s hearings open to
the public.

Its appointment comes on the
heels of the resignation of former
Director of Lands and Surveys
Tex Turnquest, following a series
of articles published in this news-
paper outlining questionable land
grants during his tenure.

Praising “intrepid” Tribune
reporter Paul Turnquest for his
work, Mr Mitchell suggested it is
right that his articles should spur
an examination of issues related
to Crown land.

Given that there was no expla-
nation from the government for
why the director resigned follow-
ing the articles, he proposed that

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the committee’s work should also
result in the “full story” behind
this situation being exposed for
the first time.

The MP compared the experi-
ence of relatives of Tex Turn-
quest who were granted beach-
front land — which some of them
went on to “flip” shortly after for
hundreds of thousands of dollars
in profit — with that of many
Bahamians who have been forced
to wait years, in some cases over
a decade, for Crown grants for
their own residential or commer-
cial use.

Giving examples of individu-
als or groups who he alleged have
found the government less than
responsive to their needs, Mr
Mitchell noted that the Senior
Citizens Association in Long
Island was just recently granted
1.9 acres after putting in an appli-
cation 12 years ago for five acres
of Crown land.

Several MPs suggested that the
fact that it can take so long for
grants to be made or refused, and
that this can occur with no expla-
nation given for the delay or what
amount of land is finally grant-
ed, must be rectified.

Meanwhile, the perception that
it is easier for foreigners to get
Crown land than Bahamians and
that “kisses go by favours” when
it comes to Bahamians getting
land must be dispelled, several
opposition MPs said.

The future development of the
country hinges on the ability of
members of the public to have an

and able to serve?

“These are the things that
we ought to be debating: jobs,
crime and the right of unfet-
tered access to clean beaches
and other recreational areas.
We ought to be allocating
scarce resources to finding jobs
for hurting Bahamians, who
need to pay mortgages, rent,
utilities, school fees and buy
groceries and clothes. And we
ought to be allocating these
resources to restoring safety
in our homes and on our
streets. Enough is enough,”
she said.

‘the
olicy’

equal right to access Crown land
regardless of their political affili-
ation, family ties or social con-
nections, it was said.

“The regime I contemplate is
one that has established criteri-
on that all can access but infused
with the philosophical underpin-
ning that the land and its
distribution will be used to
empower Bahamians and to
increase their individual wealth
and our national wealth,” said Mr
Mitchell.

Contributing to the debate,
Minister of State for Lands Byran
Woodside said there is a “mis-
guided view that the governing
party has been improperly grant-
ing land to persons.”

He said that land is an “emo-
tive subject” but suggested that
Mr Mitchell’s call for a committee
was merely political.

Meanwhile, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham hit out at the
opposition during Mr Mitchell’s
statement on the committee,
alleging that the land “flipped”
by Tex Turnquest’s relatives was
“sold to foreigners” under the
PLP.

“You signed off on it,” he said,
adding: “Why didn’t you make
an issue out of it then?”

Mr Ingraham added he will
make a “full statement” on the
issue of land on Monday, “laying
out facts and policies and tabling
a number of documents that will
enlighten members of the parlia-
ment and the people of the
Bahamas.”

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Court of Appeal dismisses
MP stepmother dispute

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Court of Appeal yester-
day dismissed a long-running
legal dispute between Elizabeth
MP Malcolm Adderley and his
stepmother after the pair agreed
to settle their differences.

Mr Adderley was sued for
damages by Ruthie Mae Adder-
ley in June 2003 after she
claimed that despite being
appointed executor of his late
father’s will in 2000, Mr Adder-
ley had “failed or refused” to
carry out his parent’s wishes
with respect to her.

A 2006 Supreme Court judg-
ment did not award Mrs Adder-
ley those damages but the MP
was ordered to pay half of her
legal costs at that time after Jus-
tice Fazool Mohammed sug-
gested that had he carried out
his duties as executor more
promptly in earlier years he
could have “saved her the
expense of bringing the action”
against him.

However, Mr Adderley, PLP
MP for Elizabeth and chairman
of the Gaming Board, did not
want to pay the costs, and
appealed that decision.

Yesterday in court, the MP’s
attorney Charles Mackey told
the Justices of Appeal - Dame
Joan Sawyer, Hartman Longley
and Christopher Blackman —
that the two parties had come
to an out of court agreement
since their previous appearance.

Dame Joan said that in this
case the matter would be with-
drawn and dismissed.

Although the original legal
action against the MP dates
back to 2003 this is the first time
it has received exposure in the
press.

According to court docu-
ments obtained by The Tribune,
Ruthie Mae Adderley charged
that it took five years and a legal
action against Mr Adderley, her
late husband’s son, before he
executed a deed of assent trans-
ferring certain property left to
her by his father, and that while
she was “still in mourning” he
took steps to transfer a taxi fran-
chise held by his father into a
company bearing his name,
despite being aware that his
father had left it to Ruthie Mae
in his will.

He also did this knowing that
she relied on it for her income
and despite the fact that he then
placed himself in a “real con-
flict of interest,” it was claimed.
Mrs Adderley’s attorney’s
argued that Mr Adderley was
“unreliable and unbelievable.”

However, Supreme Court
Justice Fazool Mohammed said
in 2006 that although Mr Adder-
ley did appear to have procras-
tinated when it came to carrying
out his duties as the executor of
the will, he found it “difficult to
conclude (Mr Adderley) acted
dishonestly or incompetently.”

It was noted that when Mal-
colm Adderley senior died, the
taxi franchise he had held
became void under section 70
of the Road Traffic Act and
therefore it could not have
become part of the estate of the
deceased or trust property that
could be given out in the will.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

When a moonwalk was more than a dance move

NEW YORK — This week, after numer-
ous delays, the space shuttle Endeavour
lifted off from the Kennedy Space Centre
on a mission to the International Space
Station.

Once docked, the shuttle’s astronauts
are scheduled to make five spacewalks to
continue the station’s construction.

Forty years ago this week, Cape
Kennedy played host to a more ambitious
launch, as the huge Saturn V rocket that
would propel astronauts Neil Armstrong
and “Buzz” Aldrin to the moon lifted off
on July 16, 1969.

Four days later, an anxious mission con-
trol, nation and world heard Armstrong’s
voice announce that “the Eagle” — Apol-
lo 11’s Lunar Module — “has landed.”
Hours after that, we saw Armstrong
descend to the lunar surface in grainy
black-and-white, becoming the first man
to touch foot on a celestial body other than
Earth.

“That’s one small step for man,” we
heard him say, in what would become one
of the most enduring quotes of the 20th
century, “one giant leap for mankind.”

The millions of babies and small chil-
dren who were held in front of television
screens in living rooms across America so
that they could one day tell their children
that they had seen history being made are
in their 40s now and have children of their
own. Should they pause this week and next
to tell these children what they witnessed,
that step that once seemed to have changed
everything, they might well be greeted with
a shrug. Or questions along the lines of
“And then what happened?”

The answer to that question is a compli-
cated one that encompasses political
change on Earth, a straitened sense of our
national budget, and a certain failure of
imagination.

Not to mention that, after reaching out
and touching our closest heavenly neigh-
bour, any second act involving astronauts
rather than robotic probes remains, even all
these years later, incredibly difficult.

These days, our space milestones are

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more prosaic; this week’s Endeavour mis-
sion carried the 500th person into space.
But not since 1972’s Apollo 17 have
humans travelled farther than low Earth
orbit. For three years after that first visit to
the moon we went back, explored, con-
ducted experiments — and then, nothing.
We have sent machines to planets near
and far and into the deep, open space
beyond our solar system. But mankind,
after that giant leap, has remained within
the bounds of our home planet’s gravity.

For those, like your reporter, who were
awed by the great adventure of the Apollo
programme, this fact has been a slowly
unfolding letdown. There have been, to be
sure, triumphs in the intervening years,
such as the gorgeous vistas into space (and
back in time) afforded by the Hubble Space
Telescope and the insights gleaned by the
Mars rovers. But the promise of direct
human connection with other worlds — of
returning to the moon and venturing on
to Mars — remains a remote one for our
own space agency. As things stand, NASA
will have to scramble to keep America’s
launch capability alive after the space shut-
tles’ scheduled retirement at the end of
next year.

The plan, put forward by President
George W. Bush in 2004, to return astro-
nauts to the moon by 2020 as a stepping-
stone to a trip to Mars remains mired in
budgetary questions. International efforts,
such as those by the Chinese, to under-
take similar missions on roughly the same
timetable also seem uncertain.

The most recent progress toward a mis-
sion to Mars comes from a Russian exper-
iment in long-term human isolation —
more a baby step than a giant leap.

With the future of manned space explo-
ration unsure and distant, we might take a
moment this week to thrill once again, four
decades later, to remember a time when a
moonwalk was so much more than a sig-
nature dance move.

(This article was written by Dan Rather of
the Hearst Newspapers- c.2009).



DON STAINTON

Don’t be
complacent,
a coup could
happen here

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

For the past many years now
our Bahamas has been exem-
plarily democracy. For the most
part just about all of our gener-
al elections held over the past
50 years, we have been a model
in democracy for the whole
world.

Even Great Britain for whom
we owe our Westminster sys-
tem of government has mar-
velled how the Bahamas has
been able to maintain it. But
let’s not for one moment take it
for granted that what has hap-
pened in Honduras on June 25,
2009 cannot take place here.
The Honduran President
“Manuel Zelaya” was over-
thrown and replaced by
“Romeo Vasquez.”

When our general elections
were held last year 2007 the
final tally was the governing
party FNM 23 and the opposi-
tion PLP 17. Since that time the
numbers have changed to 24 to
16. Yet despite these numbers

letters@tripbunemedia net



which have been chosen by the
voting citizens of the Bahamas,
to this day the opposition PLP
still has not conceded defeat.
The PLP has challenged the
results of at least two con-
stituency results costing thou-
sands of tax payer dollars and
invaluable court time. As a
result of these actions we are
currently faced with a backlog
of cases as our court system was
tied up for almost one year
because of the opposition court
challenges.

There are those within the
Opposition who would if
allowed to, stop at nothing to
see the PLP be given the gov-
ernment now probably through
any means and destroy our
democratic system. In my opin-
ion the position of “Police Com-

missioner” is a very serious one
and even more so than whom
we elect as leader and Prime
Minister.

May heaven help us should
we ever get a Police Chief who
supports a coup d’état as what
took place in Honduras last
week.

I do hope that what took
place in Honduras would serve
as a wake up call for us here in
our Bahamas. Remember at
one time Honduras was also a
part of the British empire.

I call upon our leaders to re-
examine how our police com-
missioner is chosen to prevent
any future attempt of an illegal
overthrow of our government.

Please, my fellow Bahamians,
don’t be complacent and
believe that a coup cannot hap-
pen here. As we have seen in
Honduras it can (heaven for-
bid) happen here.

BRIAN O CLARKE
Nassau,
July, 2009.

No wonder crime is so high

EDITOR, The Tribune.

After watching the proceedings of Parliament
on Wednesday and Thursday, June 3 and 4, I realise
that we in the Bahamas have a serious problem to

face.

It is no wonder that crime is so high in the
Bahamas when we have people defying the rules of
Parliament and it is shown on TV for all of the pub-

lic to see.

I wonder if what took place was out of genuine
concern for the dead boy’s family or just plain grand-

standing?

Because if it was concern for the family then all
that had to be done was for the Leader of Opposition
Business in the House to allow the Member to be
the first Opposition member to take the floor and
then the Member would have had one hour to elab-
orate and say whatever the Member pleased about

this matter.

I fully support what the Member was saying as far
as there being some kind of inquiry to investigate
what took place because here again the Laws of the

Bahamas as far as I am aware say that no minor
should be interrogated without a parent or legal

guardian or counsel being present, so if this did not
happen, then it appears that another Law was broken
by the people we trust to keep the Law.

Also what I witnessed by other members of the

broken.

lives.

the Land.

June, 2009.

Opposition as they appeared to be interfering with
the Sergeant-at-Arms carrying out his duty was also
a serious case of obstruction — so another Law was

When will we as responsible citizens realise that
the public watches everything we do, so therefore we
have to show by example how they should live their

If the Members of Parliament cannot obey the
rules which they themselves make then how can we
expect for the poor and needy to follow the Law of

ABNER PINDER
Spanish Wells,

Bahamians wake up, politicians are destroying our nation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Further, I am concerned that
Bahamians are losing jobs every
day and it seems like no one
cares. But have you heard about a
politician losing jobs? No. The
politicians don’t care because that
is one of the ways they can con-
trol you. You must come to them
begging and they brag about
these Bahamians. Please wake
up, they are destroying us and
our nation. Look at the House of
Assembly where the honour

gone, look at the persons running
this country, you be the judge, I
say no more on that because it
would not sound nice.

Persons working for govern-
ment can’t even get insurance.
Just about every politician is
insured.

If a person from a government
department dies, his or her fami-
ly gets one cheque from National
Insurance and that's it, and that
person work for government for
over 30 years. Politicians just have
to work for five or 10 years and

his or her family is fixed for life. I
hope you understand what I am
saying without going into full
details, but you check it out and
be the judge.

Bahamians, let's stop, look and
listen to what they are telling us
and doing to us before it’s too
late, if only for our children and
grandchildren. It is not about us
anymore.

SAMUEL JOHNSON
Nassau,
July, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 5



Residents losing

patience over
excavation work

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

MILLARS Heights resi-
dents are losing patience as
excavation continues on farm-
land bordering their subdivi-
sion despite an investigation
launched by the Ministry of
Agriculture two weeks ago.

They claim a new trench
dipping into the community’s
water table has been dug in
the last two weeks and piles
of excavated dirt and rock sit
alongside a pile of waste pre-
sumably destined for the emp-
ty quarry pit.

Pictures of asphalt allegedly
dumped in the pit before it

was covered up this week have
also been sent to The Tribune.

The residents of Millars
Heights, off Carmichael Road,
whose homes back onto
Crown Land farmland north
of Cowpen Road, have been
calling on government officials
and police to put a stop to dai-
ly digging on the site behind
their subdivision since it began
in December last year.

Concern

Their main concern is that
the water table may be conta-
minated by waste dumped in
the quarry pit after rock has
been excavated eight feet

below the surface on around
two acres of land.

The leaseholder told The
Tribune he was given verbal
permission from government
officials to carry out the exca-
vation for agricultural pur-
poses and Golden Isles MP
Charles Maynard said he was
satisfied the leaseholder was
carrying out a viable agricul-
tural practise by excavating
the rock and nourishing the
soil with biodegradable waste
which would not pollute the
water table.

Minister of Agriculture Lar-
ry Cartwright said he under-
stands a permit is required
from the Department of Phys-
ical Planning before excava-

MP invites nephew

of Sir Harold G
Christie to a debate

CAT Island MP Philip
“Brave” Davis has invited the
nephew of the late Sir Harold
G Christie to a public debate
on the role his uncle alleged-
ly played in “hoarding land
not just in Cat Island but in
many other islands.”

Mr Davis made the com-
ment during the debate on a
resolution to form a select
committee to investigate mat-
ters in relation to Crown land
in the House of Assembly on
Wednesday.

Mr Davis, during a previ-
ous contribution on June 11,
spoke about the practices
engaged in by many, and
“particularly Sir Harold”,
under the Quieting of Titles
Act passed by parliament in
1959.

He claimed that the late Sir
Harold, founder of HG
Christie Realty, had quieted
thousands of acres of land
from poor Cat Islanders.

The MP also suggested that
Sir Harold’s heirs should be
persuaded to compensate Cat
Islanders in some form for the
land allegedly taken from
their ancestors through the
Act.

He said Sir Harold, one of
the “wealthiest men in the
country” and the area’s MP,
was able to obtain title to
thousands of acres of land on
the island “occupied by a
group of poor Bahamians.”

In a letter to the editor pub-
lished in The Tribune, Sir
Harold’s nephew William
McP Christie accused Mr
Davis of abusing his parlia-
mentary privilege and defam-
ing his uncle.

Mr Davis said that while he
would not respond to Mr
Christie, he would be more
than willing to engage him in
a public debate on land and
the role Sir Harold played in
the “hoarding of land.”

“We could have a series of
public debates on the issue
throughout the various islands
where he has been declared
the owner of lands. I welcome
it and he could hear what

Philip ‘Brave’ Davis

descendants in these islands
think about how his uncle
acquired land,” Mr Davis
said.

In defending his uncle, Mr
Christie said Sir Harold had
in 1951 purchased a planta-
tion from Mr and Mrs Henry
Rumball who had purchased
the same from the Estate of
Stanley Harris in 1927 and
continued the arrangement of
allowing the people of the
Old Bight to farm on the
land, provided they paid a
small share of their crops to
the overseers.

Sir Harold built a large
house on the estate and cre-
ated a large farm around it.

“In the early 1960s, many
of the Old Bight tenant farm-
ers refused to pay over a
share of their corps to Sir
Harold’s overseers and start-
ed to make claims of owner-
ship of the areas they were
farming, while many others
continued farming and pay-
ing their shares to the over-
seers, recognising Sir Harold’s
company’s ownership.

“At this time Sir Harold, on
the advice of his attorneys,
started an action under the
Quieting Titles Act to have
his perfect documentary title
to the land adjudicated by the
Supreme Court under which

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restaurant

A MAN was stabbed inside
a Subway restaurant during an
altercation with a female
employee yesterday afternoon,
police said.

According to head of the
CDU Supt Elsworth Moss, the
pair got into a row during
which the male was stabbed
about the body.

Supt Moss confirmed

CORRECTION

reports reaching The Tribune
that the incident occurred in
the Subway at the Town Cen-
tre Mall shortly after 3pm.

The victim was taken to hos-
pital but his condition could
not be determined up to press
time.

A woman is being ques-
tioned by police in connection
with the incident.

THE 17-year-old killed in a drive-by shooting on Wednesday
morning was William Farrington, of Lynden Pindling Estates,
New Providence, not William Ingraham, as reported by The Tri-
bune yesterday. The Tribune apologises for the error.



all persons making claim to
parts of the Estate could also
have their claims heard,” Mr
Christie said.

However, Mr Davis said
that the claim of Old Bight
residents was possessory.

“T know, I was there. Yes
HG Christie had a house on
the property, but we are talk-
ing about close to 2,000 acres.
My forefathers and those of
residents of Old Bight were
farming and working the area
of the house for at least 100
years before 1964 when the
court investigated the title.

“Yes, we know HG Christie
had a house but it did not
occupy 2,000 acres. The
Christie’s are getting about
$30 million for land the title
of which was questionable.
That’s why they approached
the court to investigate it
under Quieting of Title Act,”
he said.

Mr Davis said that the
judge had to decide between
believing “black, uneducated,
unsophisticated farmers from
Old Bight, Cat Island and
white HG Christie — a sophis-
ticated realtor and the mem-
ber of parliament for Cat
Island.”

“The deck was stacked.
There was no Court of
Appeal in the Bahamas at the
time and any grievance
against a judgment had to go
to England — to the Privy
Council. The court files went
missing — 1964. Women were
taken from their farms in
handcuffs and spent their
time in jail — for farming what
they held to be their land.

“The scar on communities
of that era remains highly vis-
ible and that is why I plead
to the prime minister to per-
suade his supporters to do
something for the depressed.
He has the relationship with
them, he can ask them,” Mr
Davis said.



WORK TAKING place at Millars Heights.

tion can be done, and he is
waiting for staff to determine
whether or not the farmland is
Crown Land before proceed-
ing with the investigation.

Investigation

Millars Heights resident
Jeanne Lundy said: “I know
they’re supposed to be doing
an investigation but I don’t
know what they have to inves-
tigate. It just seems this is tak-
ing forever.

“If he’s doing the right thing
why don’t they get an external



2! a cyt
a A Gal
hl aie La yg
rhe Stig

Heyl Pate

firm to test the water and soil
to see if there is any toxicity in
it?

“A number of residents
have complained to Mr May-
nard and he’s not doing any-
thing about it, so I really don’t
get it. It’s ridiculous.”

A source told The Tribune
the excavated rock and dirt is
being sold as fill to the
Department of Environmental
Health to cover the sanitary
landfill in Harrold Road, and
that the truck drivers dumping
waste in the quarry also have
contracts with the department
to clean up New Providence.

14" longer

Dh ree POSE Mee LT
Foleo, peg oe
Lo a DL! P| ol a

Astronauts inspect space
Shuttle for launch damage

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

SPACE shuttle Endeavour’s
astronauts inspected their ship for
damage Thursday as NASA strug-
gled to understand why a normal-
ly benign section of the fuel tank
lost so much foam during liftoff,
according to Associated Press.

The slow, tedious work unfold-
ed as the shuttle rocketed toward
the international space station for
a Friday linkup. It was the first
full day in orbit for the seven
astronauts, who are delivering a
veranda for Japan’s enormous lab.
It also happened to be the 40th
anniversary of the launch of the
first manned moon landing.

Shuttle program manager John
Shannon said the thin layer of
foam insulation on the central area
of the tank peeled away in approx-
imately 6-inch strips as Endeav-
our blasted toward orbit Wednes-
day. The green primer on the met-
al skin of the tank was exposed in
places.

Fortunately, he said, the shed-
ding from this area — the so-called
intertank connecting the hydro-
gen and oxygen reservoirs —
occurred well past the critical two-
minute mark in the flight and
posed no danger to Endeavour.





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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

0 In brief

Venezuela denies
restricting

hewspapers’ imports i

? redevelopment of the Big Pond wet-

CARACAS, Venezuela jand park.

RAs ad pce ike pea updated plan for the project was pre-
agency that sells foreign cur- } ied at a-eiaeenold ti t
rency to importers is denying it fhe 1 - ao aS ors mg
hos lined ihe-supply of dale | Vee ee rean Levene

lars for newspapers, according }

to the Associated Press.

Agency chief Manuel Bar- } d
roso said in a statement Thurs- | proposal for the New Providence
day that the government has }
sold $68 million to paper }
? and protected as an urban open space

importers this year.

The National Union of Press }
Workers earlier said more than
50 regional dailies could close }
operations due to a lack of i

paper.
Under controls imposed by

importers must apply to the
agency to buy dollars at the offi-

ply.
Tensions between the gov-

licenses.



Swine flu claims 13th
fatal victim in Florida

SARASOTA, Fla.

A 22-year-old in Sarasota is
Florida’s 13th fatal case of the }
swine flu, according to the Asso- } ° li ° f ° ° ° ll ° h l e,e

eects | Liberlisation of communications sector wi improve notel competitiveness
how or when the man died. But
Dr. William Heymann, medical }
executive director of the Sara- }
sota County Health Depart- }
ment, called it a “tragic and }

sobering reminder that influen- } é y
: wide range of benefits and

ciated Press.

za is serious.”

Statewide, more than 2,100 ;
have been sickened since the }
} Saadat, director of policy and

outbreak emerged.



THE government has started the
process of relaunching the $2 million

Yesterday, the second draft of the

Bank.
Minister of Public Works and Trans-
port Neko Grant said that the loan

Road Improvement Project stipulates
that the Big Pond area is “restored

for the mitigation of any potential neg-
ative environmental impacts that may
arise from the project implementa-
tion, operation and maintenance.”
In 2001, a master plan for the Big

i ) Pond Park was completed. It included
President Hugo Chavez in 2003, : elements such boardwalks, a trail net-
? work and bird watching platforms, Mr

? Grant said at a press conference on

cial exchange rate. But falling }
oil revenue has limited that sup- Wednesday.

Plans were interrupted with the halt

i of the New Providence Road

ernment and private media | Improvement Project in 2002. In

have also become increasingly
heated, with 240 radio stations ; ‘launched.

under threat of losing their } . !
? of consultants assigned to the Big

i Pond Park project, said the updated
: master plan “improves the circulation
: in the park and accessibility for resi-
? dents to use it as an urban open space
: and a green space associated with the
: construction of the roadways. “

December 2008 the project was

Steve Seville, a member of the team

“We’re trying to have a balance

between the environment and the



Big Pond Park to be re-launched

By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

Letisha Henderson/BlS Photo

PUBLIC Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant (right) explains the updated Big Pond Park development at a press conference on
Wednesday. Pictured from left are Steve Seville, civil engineer and member of the team of consultants assigned to the project, and
Shanique Albury, environmentalist.

usable space available at Big Pond,”
he said.

The revised plan calls for the
restoration of the native plants of Big
Pond.

“The restoration component asso-

ciated with this will improve the wild
life and ecology of the area,” said Mr
Seville.

The plan also shows a “better
understanding of the connectivity of
the neighbourhoods, balancing the

wild life aspect with the urban use,
and balancing the usable areas of the
park while maintaining the green
spaces,” he said.

Designated picnic, barbecue and
play areas are also in the plan.



REGULATORY reform and
the eventual liberalisation of the
Bahamas’ electronic communi-
cations sector will provide the
Bahamas hotel industry with a

options for improving competi-
tiveness, according to Usman

-

regulation for the soon to be
established Utilities Regulation
and Competition Authority
(URCA).

Speaking at a_ recent
Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA) meeting, Mr Saadat
pointed to the positive impact
of liberalisation internationally

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and regionally.

Also speaking at the meeting
was Julian Francis, deputy
chairman of the committee for
the privatisation of BTC, who
explained that the new regime
will provide more regulatory
certainty for investors and
encourage competition while
accommodating the trend
towards convergence in the
industry.

Mr Saadat said OECD
(Organisation for Economic
Co-operation and Develop-
ment) countries have experi-
enced increased availability of
online, automated and mobile
services including 3G and 4G
technologies, as well as signifi-
cant reductions in prices and
improvements in quality and
coverage.

“Liberalisation of electronic
communications in OECD
countries has led to an increase

in triple-play and quad-play
offerings by operators along
with a 60 per cent broadband
population penetration. In the
Bahamas the current level of
penetration is less than 25 per
cent,” Mr Saadat said.

Noting the impact of liberali-
sation in the Caribbean, Mr Saa-
dat said countries in the region
have benefitted from a huge
leap in mobile communications,
especially where monopolies
have been replaced by two or
three different operators.

“These countries have also
seen price reductions and
increased speeds in broadband
offerings along with reductions
in data prices which are critical
to the competitiveness of hotels
and financial service compa-
nies,” Mr Saadat said.

Going forward, he said hotels
in the Bahamas will be better
able to meet the needs of their

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He suggested that Bahamian
hotels could improve their
brands and reputations by offer-
ing world-class services such as
improved video and audio con-
ferencing facilities to attract
more conferences to the
Bahamas. Additionally, he said
hotels could adopt greater use
of technology to deliver more
efficient service, for example,
wireless credit card and hand-
held terminals to improve the
speed of ordering and SMS to
take restaurant and taxi book-
ings.

In the future, Mr Saadat said
URCA will assist hotels by
facilitating permits for special
needs such as radio and televi-
sion broadcast events. He added
that hotels could save on com-
munications costs through ser-
vice level agreements (SLAs)
with providers.

Finally, Mr Saadat encour-
aged hoteliers to actively par-
ticipate in the ongoing process
of reform by responding to con-
sultations.

URCA will oversee telecom-
munications as well as broad-
casting and cable television,
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Church event to boost |

Freeport economy

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama is
expected to experience an economic
boost next week when some 400 to
500 delegates from the Churches of J
Christ throughout the Caribbean, the
United States, and the Bahamas arrive
on the island for the 39th Annual
Caribbean Lectureship.

This is the third time that the lec-
tureship is being hosted by the
Freeport Church of Christ on East ©
Beach Drive. Under the theme, “The §
Joy of the Lord of Your Strength,”
delegates will gather for four days of
Christian fellowship and spiritual edi-
fication.

Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace is expect-
ed to travel to Freeport to attend the opening on Sunday.

Elder Ellison Delva, chairman of the committee, said the
Freeport Church of Christ is pleased to again be hosting the lec-
tureship.

Delegates are expected to start arriving on the island on Fri-
day evening.

“Their presence will undoubtedly boost the island’s economy
as they will be staying in our local hotels and utilising various
amenities. In addition, we have planned local tours with the Min-
istry of Tourism to highlight all that Grand Bahama has to
offer,” said Mr Delva.

“Tt should be noted that many of our delegates are repeat vis-
itors to our shores and we hope to create more repeat visitors to
Grand Bahama through our lectureship.”

The lectureship will begin on Sunday at 9.30am at the St
George’s High School gymnasium.

The opening ceremony will be held that evening in the gym-
nasium at 6.30pm when Minister Vanderpool- Wallace is expect-
ed to bring remarks.

Mr Delva said all residents of Freeport are invited to attend
the event.

“Over the years, the lectureship has proven to be a most
effective vehicle in spreading the gospel throughout the
Bahamas.

“This is only the third time the lectureship is being held in
Grand Bahama and we hope to make this history-making event
a time of celebration. It was first held in Grand Bahama in
1984 and (then in) 1995, and has been held in New Providence
five times,” he said.

Mr Delva noted that the very first lectureship, which convened
in 1971 in Kingston, Jamaica, was the brain child of Dr Ken Dye
and his wife.

Each year the lectureship is held in a different Caribbean
country.

“The purpose of coming together once a year in this
fashion is to honour Jesus, encourage one another and to be
renewed through God’s word and the truth of the gospel,” he
said.

Guest speakers from throughout the Caribbean and parts of
the US will address pertinent issues affecting society in gener-
al and the family in particular. Family Island brethren will also
address the lectureship.

Speakers from the Bahamas include William Miller, Andrew
Major, James Miller and Keith Beneby.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace



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lal

Downtown Nassau gets

Assistance
for visitors
to the capital

VISITORS to downtown
Nassau are getting some per-
sonal attention as a new corps
of tourism ambassadors
stands ready to assist them in
identifying attractions and
answering whatever questions
they may have about the
Bahamas.

Tourism Ambassadors,
recently organised by the
Ministry of Tourism, roam the
streets of downtown on Tues-
days, Fridays and Saturdays
— peak tourism days for Nas-
sau as the majority of cruise
ships arrive on those days.

The ambassadors, who are
identified by bright green
vests, are charged with wel-
coming visitors, providing
information and generally
assisting them.

Maxine Williamson, coor-
dinator of the tourism ambas-
sadors, said six ambassadors
are assigned cach day to assist
in the downtown area.

“We are principally using
College of the Bahamas stu-
dents who are engaged in
tourism studies as well as four
of our recently retired tourism
staff members,” Ms
Williamson said. “Our young
ambassadors are energetic
and the knowledge and expe-
rience of our retired tourism
professionals are invaluable.
The tourism ambassadors
(are) proving to be a very
effective way of assisting our
visitors and ensuring a satis-
fying vacation experience
(for) as many of our guests as
possible.”

Jewel Smith, one of the vet-
erans enlisted as a tourism



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TOURISM AMBASSADOR D'Angelo Gray assists visitors with a photograph.

ambassador, said visitors have
many questions about the
Bahamas and its attractions.
She has encountered many
repeat visitors who felt they
had seen and done everything
the country has to offer. After
a few minutes spent talking
with tourists, they usually
become enthusiastic about
seeing attractions such as
Ardastra Gardens and the
forts, she said.

“T also tell them about the
Family Islands because you
have a lot of people who have
been here before and they
would think they have done
just about everything. But I
will say ‘no you haven’t
because you haven’t seen our
beach in Harbour Island with
the pink sand’.”

Carolyn Demeritte said she
did not hesitate to join the
tourism ambassadors after

retiring from the Ministry of
Tourism.

“I didn’t hesitate because
that’s what I like to do,” she
said.

“That is what I have been
doing for just about all my
life, 37 years plus. I always
liked helping people. At the
end of the day, if I can make
that visitor feel as though they

would like to return, I feel as
though I have done a good
job.”

Ms Demeritte said she has
helped countless visitors with
directions to specific stores
and attractions.

She is pleased that she was
also able to clear up many
misconceptions visitors had
about the country.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Senator investigating legal
options to halt extension

Businessman shot and —
robbed by masked men

FROM page one

and West Atlantic Drive.

Mr Bootle said officers responded to the scene and dis-
covered a 2002 Prayin sedan car overturned in the road.

He said the victim was in the vehicle suffering from an
apparent gunshot wound to his left side. He was removed
from the vehicle and taken by ambulance to the hospital.

ASP Bootle said the businessmen told police that after clos-
ing his business two men with scarves covering their faces
attacked him.

He said one of the suspects was armed with a handgun.
They robbed him of his pouch, which contained an unde-
termined amount of cash, and shot him.

The culprits fled on foot in nearby bushes.

Mr Bootle is appealing to anyone who may have infor-
mation that could assist police with their investigation to
call 911, or the Central Detective Unit at 350-3092 or 350-
3097.

One of the Bahamas’ most
wanted men captured in US

FROM page one

The re-entry charge carries with it a potential 20-year
prison sentence. Both men are already convicted criminals.

Anthony Mangione, special agent in charge of the ICE
Office of Investigations in Miami said that St Remy will
eventually be removed from the US to face justice in the
Bahamas.

“Tm proud of the hard work and diligence of our agents in
tracking down and apprehending these criminals.”

“Apprehending dangerous foreign fugitives is a top prior-
ity of ICE and now, not only has this illegal alien been
removed from the streets of South Florida, but he will even-
tually be removed from the United States to face justice in the

Bahamas.”
c

COMMONWEALTH BANK

Employment Opportuni

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Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
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We are committed to delivering superior quality service, to
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Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for
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Managing the Branch’s collection activities and the protection of
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©2009 CreativeRelations.net



FROM page one

legal action and we have a
legal team now looking at
the actions of that and
whether or not there are
steps that can be taken
through the courts in order
to prevent this, until we are
able to get the full disclo-
sure in the interests of trans-
parency and accountability
that this development
involves.

"But there is no doubt
that morally what they are
doing is totally, totally
wrong," he said at a press
conference held at the
Arawak Cay site yesterday.
He argued that residents

and businesses in the area
should have to suffer
through expected increases
in noise and traffic due to
the development.

The senator also again
claimed there has been a
shroud of "secrecy" sur-
rounding the issue and
argued that government has
yet to release an environ-
mental impact analysis
(EIA) for scrutiny. He
claimed that that he has only
received a "draft" of the
study through undisclosed
sources.

But yesterday Environ-
ment Minister Earl Deveaux
released a statement saying
an EIA prepared by Blue
Engineering is available to

the public in the Ministry of
The Environment or
the Ministry of Public
Works.

"This is contrary to the
assertion. . .That the report
has not been formally
released, (or the) suggestion
(of) some ulterior motive on
the Ministry. These docu-
ments provide a wealth of
information, including but
not limited to the existing
conditions at the site, the
potential impacts of the pro-
ject to the environment and
proposed measures for mit-
igating these impacts,” said
Mr Deveaux's statement.

Portions of the report
were first made public earli-
er this week in another local

Crew of oil spilling barge has disappeared

FROM page one

and terrestrial life there.

Bahamas National Trust (BNT)
staff in Exuma heard about the
sunken barge over the radio and fixed
lights and buoys to the wreck to pre-
vent boating collisions. BNT divers
were dispatched and closed hatches
on the barge to prevent more garbage

from spilling into the sea.

They also contacted ship owner
Michael Oakes, however, they had
not determined the number of crew
on board the barge before The Tri-

bune went to press last night.

A response team organised by Min-
ister of the Environment Earl
Deveaux will go to Exuma this morn-
ing to assess the extent of the oil spill

and organise the cleanup.

The team of officials from the Bahamas Envi-
ronment, Science and Technology (BEST) Com-
mission, Royal Bahamas Defence Force (RBDF)
the Port Department will work with BNT staff to

deal with the wreckage.

BNT Executive Director Eric Carey said: “Our
main concern is what happened to the wreck and
the people on the vessel. We have no idea where

-
MAM BIN eclUye



they are, whether they are dead or
alive, and the first thing we have to
do is ensure they are safe.

“We are also very concerned about
the marine environment and trying to
minimise the impact of the damage
due to the oil spill and trash. We want
to stop the leak and very importantly
we want to know when this is going to
be moved.

“Trying to get tractors and equip-
ment off the sea floor could create a
lot of damage and disturbance. We
will need to move two tractors and a
front-end loader with cranes which is a
major operation and we want to
ensure it’s handled as delicately as
possible.”

The sunken barge will have crushed
coral on the sea bed and the oil spill
will potentially impact beaches

throughout the park affecting protected iguanas

underwater.

and endangered sea birds.
It had been transporting heavy equipment
either to or from New Providence when it went

Mr Carey added: “We want to see it assessed

and cleaned up and the Trust is pleased the min-
ister is clearly very concerned and has organised
a full and rapid assessment.”

Pasche Bank & Trust Ltd

Subsidiary of

BASQUE

ite Private Bonking

is seeking candidates for the position of:

Relationship Manager/Private Banker

Candidates should possess the following qualifiactions:

¢ University Degree in Finance, Banking or Business Administration and/or

related professional designation
* A minimum of 5 to 10 years banking experience

* Own client portfolio

¢ Thorough knowledge of private banking products and services

* Knowledge of Bahamian regulatory requirements

¢ Fluency (or working knowledge) of French would be an asset

Responsibilities:

¢ Expanding existing client relationships

¢ Proactively contacting and profiling clients
¢ Marketing of private banking and portfolio management services

Personal Qualities:

* Outstanding sales skills

* A strong service ethic with a focus on existing clients and prospects

* Exceptional verbal and written communication skills

* Must be able to work in a dynamic environment with minimal supervision

* Must possess strong organisational skills

* Superior client service and problem-solving skills

Please apply to:
P.O. Box AP 59241
Nassau Bahamas

Fax: (242)327-1514

Email: gilles.schanen@pasche.ch



daily and in Tribune Busi-
ness.

Regarding concerns that
the development could con-
taminate the city's water
supply, the statement said:
"The EIA states that fol-
lowing sediment sampling
and laboratory testing, cont-
aminants in the dredge
material are well below lev-
els for concern based on cri-
teria established by the Unit-
ed States Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA).
The report concludes that
the potential for the release
of contaminants that could
affect either sea water qual-
ity or potable water supplies,
during dredging operation is
not a concern."

On the possible detriment
to the area's marine life the
statement said, "While the
risk exists for sediment to
harm sea life, this risk is mit-
igated by the implementa-
tion of good dredging prac-
tices to minimize sediment
suspension and dispersal, as
well as by independent envi-
ronmental monitoring to
ensure the use of turbidity
barriers and compliance with
the turbidity control stan-
dard.

"Additionally, in an
attempt to further assess and
advise on efforts to mitigate
the potential impact to sea
life, the possibility of relo-
cating viable hard and soft
corals, as well as sponges
was explored by consultants
Continental Shelf Associates
(CSA) International".

CSA was contracted by
government to assess,
restore and monitor damage
caused by the 2008 ground-
ing of the M/T Ficus near
Goulding Cay, New Provi-
dence.

"However, during their
survey of the Arawak Cay
site, CSA found that the
corals within the impacted
area were small and not very
diverse, making them unsuit-
able candidates for reloca-
tion,” said the statement.

The release added that any
the concerns "over the
increase in noise, vibration
and the

potential for unpleasant
odours should be tempered
by the fact that these
increases will be minimal,
and temporary."

Mr Fitzgerald called for
Dr Deveaux's position to be
called into question and
again accused Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symonette of
being complicit in the plan
to relocate the container
port from its current loca-
tion on Bay Street to
Arawak Cay to benefit a
special interest group of
shipping stakeholders.

Media monitor
says Sevel
photographers
detained in Iran

PARIS

MEDIA monitor
Reporters Without Borders
says five photographers and
a cameraman have been
detained in Iran over the
past week, according to
Associated Press.

The Paris-based group list-
ed five Iranian photogra-
phers seized Saturday, nearly
a month after the June 12
presidential elections that
prompted a wave of opposi-
tion protests. It says French-
Iranian cameraman Said
Movahedi was detained July
9.

The reason for the arrests
is unclear.

Reporters Without Bor-
ders said in a statement
Thursday that “The Iranian
government fears images” of
the protests.

The group says at least five
other photographers or cam-
eramen have been injured by
police or militias during the
crackdown on opposition
protesters. It says 41 journal-
ists are behind bars in Iran.


Senior national
haseball team
ready for World
Baseball Challenge

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



bstubbs @tribunemedia.net :

SINCE the inception about a i
decade ago, the Bahamas Base- :
ball Federation has had some }
relatively good performances }
on the international junior cir- }

cuit.

Now the federation is in
Prince Gorge, British Colum-
bia, Canada where president

: Caribbean Awards Sports Icons © Hepburn and Bahamas Softball
: celebrations come to town, there | Federation’s president Burkett
i will be quite a number of activi- Dorsett, both of whom have con-
i ties surrounding the gala event. | sented to come on board to stage

Craig ‘Salty’ Kemp is confident }

that they can finally make their
break through on the senior cir-
cuit.

The senior national team
arrived in Prince George since
Tuesday, have gotten acclima-

i at Breezes SuperClub from _ discplines this year.

i November 15-21. The two-week Both basketball and softball
: long celebrations will have added __ will be a part of boxing, whose
i attraction with competition in president Wellington Miller, has
i more sporting disciplines taking agreed to put on the event for
: place. another year.

tised and are now ready to start

playing in the World Baseball : who was appointed as the presention was held at the

i Regional Director of CASI fol- Jamaica Pegasus Hotel in

Challenge.

The team, managed by Jeff :

‘Sangy’ Francis and coached by } Kingston, Jamaica, the week of well attended by Caribbean

activities will not just feature the sports stars, including Jimmy
: awards presentation, but they are © Adams, Mike McCallum, Aileen
play their opener on Saturday ; looking forward to the participa- Bailey, Nesta Carter and Grace

? tion of athletes in the various Jackson.

Teddy Sweeting and Alonzo
Pratt from Grand Bahama, will

against Canada.

In an interview with The Tri- :
bune yesterday just before the

toeen ne acd OF to praciice, ordinated with the Amateur Box- award, accompanied Sturrup to

the necessary adjustments and i ing Federation of the Bahamas the ceremony, which was spon-
are ready to start play at 3 pm i and the Jamaican Boxing Board sored by Digicel and the

“We have settled in and we ; to put on a tournament,” said Jamaican Ministry of Sports.
had a workout yesterday « Sturrup, a sports journalist at the The other three Bahamians
Ciao) ae wer cuias Nassau Guardian. were track and field stars Avard

for another workout as we } ; :
speak,” Kemp said. “The team { through the Pan American McKenzie and Chandra Sturrup.

is looking good. Everybody is } Caribbean Boxing Organization, SEE page 10

Kemp said the team have made

healthy and ready to go.”

The team is comprised of the

following:

Catchers — Etienne Far-
quharson Jr and Stenard Dun- }

combe.

Infielders — Lynden Pindling
II; Lionel Ferguson Jr and }
Grand Bahama’s Jason Curry :

and Aneiko Knowles.

Outfielders — Sharad John-
son and Sherman Ferguson, }
along with Grand Bahamian ;

Raymond Grant.

Pitchers — Darren Bowleg }
(left-hand), Crandon Wallace :
(left-hand); David Sweeting
(right-hand), Grand Bahama’s
Patrick Knowles (left-hand), }
Desmond Rolle (right-hand),
Amad Williams (right-hand) }
and Diondre Rolle (right-hand) :
as well as Spanish Wells’
Johnathan Groezinger (right- ;

hand).

Looking at the team, Kemp
said it’s a very youthful squad :
after some of the other ball
players whom they wanted to }
make the trip declined the offer }

to travel.

“Despite the fact that they }
are young, they are very talent- }
ed, so we’re looking forward to i
some great things from them,” }

Kemp said.

“We just want to create an }
opportunity for them to gain }
some exposure,” Kemp said. }
“This is probably the highest }
level of baseball that we have }
been engaged in since the incep- :

tion of our federation.”

Kemp admits that it’s not }
going to be as easy for the team }
because of the calibre of com- }
petition that they are going to :

face over the next week.

But he said as long as the
players live up to their expecta- }
tions, he doesn’t see why they }

el

can’t perform at a very high lev-

“T would like to see us win a

few games,” he said. “That’s our }
objective because nobody real- }
ly know anything much about
us, we haven’t seen any of these }
teams play and they haven’t ;

seen us play.

“So we just don’t know what }
to expect. All I can expect is for }
the guys to go out there and }
play to the best of our ability }
and I think we will do very

well.”

Following their opener

against Canada, the Bahamas }
will have to get ready to play ;

Germany on Sunday.

The World Baseball Chal-
lenge, founded in 2002 in Grand i
Forks, British Columbia, is a }
biannual event that attracts }
teams from Cuba, Canada, Tai- :
wan, Dominican Republic, Rus- }
sia, Mexico and the United }

States.

The Bahamas, whose doc- }
tor/trainer is Ferriston Lock-
hart, is the only Caribbean }
country participating in this }
year’s tournament that will :

wrap up on Sunday, July 26.



FRIDAY, JULY,17, 2009



STU TITER UE
Sports Icons comes to town

By BRENT STUBBS of which Sturrup, also serves the

Senior Sports Reporter chairman.

bstubbs @ tribunemedia.net Sturrup said he has already
contacted Bahamas Basketball

WHEN the second annual Federation president Lawrence





Fred Sturrup

This year’s awards willbe held competition in their respective

According to Fred Sturrup, Last year’s inaugural awards

lowing last year’s show in Kingston in November and was

events. Elisha Obed, one of the four
“Last year in Jamaica, 1 co- Bahamian contenders for the

The tournament was organised Moncur, Debbie Ferguson-

Giving back to the

islands

Myron Rolle and family plan to
build medical and sports complex

JULY 16, 2009 (Exuma, Bahamas) — Rhodes Scholar
and College Football All-American Myron L. Rolle
and his family announced plans to build the Myron L.
Rolle Medical Clinic and Sports Complex, in Steven-
ton, Exuma in the Bahamas, where the Rolle family
originates. The Complex will provide free health ser-
vices to residents of Exuma, as well as a state-of-the-art
wellness and training facilities for athletes and visitors
to Exuma, Bahamas.

The project will be executed in conjunction with the
Bahamas Ministry of Health and the Florida State Uni-
versity College of Medicine, based in the United States.
Rolle graduated from Florida State in December 2008
with a pre-med degree and this coming school year, as a
Rhodes Scholar, will earn a Masters Degree in Medical
Anthropology from Oxford University in England.

He plans to enter the National Football League Draft
in 2010 to pursue a professional football career, and fol-
lowing football pursue a career as a medical surgeon.

"My family and I are extremely proud to announce
the construction of this Medical Clinic and Sports Com-
plex, which will provide much needed medical
resources to an area of the world that is near and dear
to our hearts," said Myron Rolle. "While I was born in
the US, Bahamas is where my parents, Whitney and
Beverly Rolle, and three of my brothers, were born and
raised. I have always thought of the Bahamas as my
second home."

A capital campaign is now underway to fund con-
struction of the Myron L. Rolle Medical Clinic and
Sports Complex, coordinated through the Myron L.
Rolle Foundation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organisation
incorporated in the United States. The clinic will be

1 : built in multiple phases, with the first being the main
a ee = health center facility.
r = = F In conjunction with that initial phase, a project will
“= = 4 = begin immediately to build a new Memorial Park adja-

MYRON Rolle stands next to an artist's rendering and construction site plans at the future home of the cent to the clinic site, featuring the statue of Pompey

Myron L. Rolle Medical Clinic in Steventon, Exuma, in the Bahamas. and restoration of an historic jailhouse as a museum.
Pompey, as a slave of Lord John Rolle, led an uprising

in Exuma in the 1830's that resulted in permanent ben-
efits for the Rolle slaves and their generations.
"It speaks volumes about the character of Myron
Rolle and the Rolle family, that he has come back to
Exuma and wants to do his part to see a better day for
our people and our future,” said Ivan Ferguson, Senior
Deputy Administrator for Exuma, during the
Announcement Ceremony.
MYRON'S father ' The Florida State University College of Medicine,
Whitney Rolle based in Tallahassee, Florida, is partnering with the
(left), who is li , Foundation to advise on the project, as well as launch a
Treasurer & Sec- % : ' new initiative through its FSU Cares Program to bring
retary ofthe ae a a medical mission to Exuma each year. During the pro-
Myron L. Rolle 1 gramme, Florida State medical students and doctors
Foundation, along | will travel to the Bahamas and provide free medical
with Myron's care and supplies to Exumians. The programme will be
brother, McKinley funded through the Myron L. Rolle Foundation.
(right), Assistant
Foundation, 8
address guests at “ Pa The Myron L. Rolle Foundation is a tax-exempt, non-profit
the Announce- aa 7 * z 7 organisation dedicated to the support of health, wellness,
ment Ceremony ’ ; educational and other charitable initiatives throughout the
of the Myron L. ¥ world that benefit children and families in need. The Founda-
Rolle Medical tion was established in 2009 by Rhodes Scholar and College
Clinic. * Football All-American Myron L. Rolle and his family.


PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS



‘King of the
Tire Throw’

set for next
weekend



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs @ tribunemedia.net

EARLIER this year, Bahamians got
an opportunity to display their skills in a
fire engine pulling competition.

Next weekend, Bahamians will get a
chance to display their skills in a tyre
throwing competition.

Dubbed the “King of the Tire
Throw,” the competition is being organ-
ised by powerlifting champion Delwin
‘Blue’ Scott and will be held on Satur-
day, July 25, starting at 11 am at the
Government High School.

“We want to see how far a Bahamian
can throw a tyire,” Scott said.

The competition is open to any and all
Bahamians, but Scott said he is primar-
ily targeting the younger competitors
because he intends to introduce it to the
school system in the new year.

The youngsters will throw tires that

adults will be throwing seven pounds.

Scott said they decided to use the two
weight classes because “we don’t know
how far the competitors can actually
throw the tyres and we want to make it
fun and exciting for everybody partici-
pating.

“We know that there are a lot of
bodybuilders and powerlifters who can
throw, but we want to get more of the
average every day Bahamian to come
out and participate.”

As this is the initial competition being
staged, winners in each category will be
crowned as the national champions and
they will be listed as the record hold-
ers.

“T think that is one of the things that
will make this competition so interest-
ing,” Scott said. “It’s never been done
better and there are a lot of competitors
out there who are looking for some-
thing different to display their skills.”

The winner of the championship will
also be awarded $225.00 for their efforts,

while second place will cart off $150.00
and third place will pocket $125.00

Scott, who has since start competing
and is now a personal trainer, said he
decided to stage the competition because
there’s been a cry for more fun oriented
activities for Bahamians to participate in.

“The good thing about competing in
an event like this is that you don’t real-
ly have to be a member of a gym,” he
said. “All you have to do is go to any
junk yard or a used tyre shop and get a
tyre and practice throwing it.”

The event, according to Scott, is
designed as a family oriented one and he
is encouraging as many persons who
have an interest in participating in some-
thing new will come out and compete.

To participate in the competition, all
a competitor has to do is show up at
GHS next Saturday before the 11 am
starting time and register.

For further information, persons can
also contact Scott at 456-2050 or 502-
0702.



















COACH Campos watches as two students demonstrate the Tachi-waza.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Request for Proposals fo
act as Registrar of the new
Utilities Appeal Tribunal

In preparation for the enactment of the new Utilities Appeal Tribu-
nal Bill, 2009, (“the Bill’) the Committee for the Privatisation of The
Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (“the Committee”)

is seeking proposals for the role of Registrar as defined in the Bill.

The Utilities Appeal Tribunal (“the Tribunal”) will be established to
setile disputes arising in the communications sector under the
new Communications Act, 2009 once it comes into force. It is the
intention to outsource the role of the Registrar of the Tribunal

(“Registrar”) to an independent organisation.

The Committee is pleased to invite the submission of proposals to
act as Registrar from suitably qualified organisations. Copies of
the request for proposal (“RFP”) document may be downloaded

from the Government's website at www.bahamas.gov.bs or the

privatisation website at www.btcprivatisation.com.

Submissions must be made by 5pm, July 31, 2009 in the manner
outlined in the RFP documents. The preferred bidder will be in-

formed no later than August 7, 2009.

weight about five pounds, while the

























â„¢
=

COACH Campos (third row) poses with judokas.



Brazilian Judo Olympian
in Town for Caribbean Cup

LAST night at the All-Star Family Center on
Joe Farrington Road, the Bahamas
national judo team found out what training is like
from Brazil's top female coach. Coach Campos is
a world renowned coach who is a two time
Olympian. She is in town to attend the Caribbean
Cup and teach a regional course to the Barba-
dos, Bahamas and Puerto Rico coaches. "I am
pleased with the attitude of the coaches and ath-
letes of the Caribbean", says coach Campus. "
Before Brazil became a top nation in judo they
first had to believe in themselves, so attitude is
very important."

Judo is a sport that is won by throwing an oppo-
nent to his back or pinning him or making him
submit with an armbar or choke. The team con-
centrated on interval training and speed training.
"The workout was intense,” said Chrisnell Coop-
er, a 20-year-old student of Judo. "I feel like I
learned alot about myself in a very short period of
time with some of the drills." The team has been
training under US coach Gerald Lafon in prepa-
ration for a series of championships beginning
with the Caribbean Cup and culminating with the
World Championship in Rotterdam in August.

The Puerto Rican team also arrived last night
and are very excited to participate in the cup. The
Caribbean Cup will be held on Saturday July 18 at
Loyola Hall on Gladstone Road between 1 pm
and 4 pm. Tickets will be available for spectators
at the door at the cost of $5. "This event is a first
in the history of Bahamas judo," says Judo Fed-
eration President D'Arcy Rahming. For more
information persons may call the Bahamas Judo
Federation at 364-6773.



PUERTO Rican judo team.









SAC class of 1984 hosts Run/Walk race

IN celebration of its 25th anniversary, the 1984
graduating class of St. Augustine’s College will
hold a fun Run/Walk race that is designed to get
the full participation of the general public.

The event is scheduled for Saturday, July 25
and will begin and finish at the Montague fore-
shore after travelling over both of the Paradise
Island bridges. The starting time is 6.30 am with
pre-registration taking place from 5.45 am.

Registration forms will be available as of Mon-
day at the box offices at Precision Cut on Nassau
Street and Subway on Paradise Charles Drive
for those persons who are interesting in signing up
before race day.

According to Neville Woodside, the co-chair-
man of SAC ‘84 Reunion Committee, the
run/walk is designed to pay tribute to the spirit of
the legendary Big Red Machine’s competitive
and athletic prowess, hence the idea for the stag-
ing of the road race.

“But this will not just be any road race,” Wood-
side said. “The SAC ‘84 fun run/walk will be a
series race. The race will be held annually over the
next five years.”

Woodside said the thought of winning a series
race will help to motivate participants to improve

their time every year. The race is scheduled to be
staged over the next five years as the ‘84 Reunion
Committee moves into its 30th anniversary cele-
brations.

Competition will be held in the following age
group categories for both men and women in the
walk and run: 19-and-under, 30-and-under 50-
and-under and over 50.

The registration fee is $15.00 for person and
$10.00 for children, inclusive of a T-shirt and a cer-
tificate of participation.

e The route for the runners are as follows:

Leave Montague foreshore and travel west
along Bay
Street to the new bridge. Travel over the bridge to
the entrance of Ocean Club Estates, returning
via the old bridge to East Bay Street, east along
East Bay Street and back to the Montague fore-
shore.

e The route for the walkers are as follows:

Leave Montague foreshore and travel west
along Bay Street to the old Paradise Island
Bridge. Travel over the bridge; go around the
round-a-bout and head back over the bridge to
East Bay Street. Travel east along East Bay Street
and back to the Montage foreshores.



nl









Caribbean

Sports Icons
Comes to town

board.

CASI is the brainchild of

Second annual = *OM ae nine

FIFA vice president Jack
Warner represented soccer,
while special advisor Ally
McNabb filled in for the min-

Awarts eee to Sturrup, while

the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture has pledged their
commitment to this year’s
event, they are still seeking
local sponsors to come on

sports promoter Al Hamilton,
MBE, who has been hosting
the successful Commonwealth
Sports Awards since 1980 in
Jamaica as well as other
Caribbea nations.

Hamilton has indicated that
they intend to attract a num-
ber of international stars to this
year’s awards presentation. He
has already made two trips
here and have indicated that
he’s been pleased with the
progress being made with the
planning so far.
THE TRIBUNE

SPORTS

FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 11



Bahamas 2-1 at
PONY Tournament —

The Bahamas is making
another dynamite showing at
13-14 PONY Tournament mak-
ing 2009 a historic year in youth
baseball for the country.

The Bahamas Baseball Fed-
eration in conjunction with
PONY (BAHAMAS) has sent
TEAM BAHAMAS 13-14
Team to the PONY Latin
American Caribbean Zone
Championship in San Juan,
Puerto from July 13th thru 19th.

TEAMS:

Puerto Rico — Host
Puerto Rico — Area
St. Martin

Anguilla

Bahamas

TEAM BAHAMAS

- 2 Wins / 1 Loss

Game #1:

TEAM BAHAMAS VS PUERTO RICO
- LOST 11-4

Game was tied after 4 innings
and Darville(LHP) ran out of
gas!!!

Losing Pitcher — Leslie
Darville

Lesile Darville -HR / Jerome
Jones / Perez Knowles /
Leighton Gibson — 1 Hit each

Game #2:

TEAM BAHAMAS VS ST. MARTIN
- WIN11-0

Byron Murray —3-4 / Two
Home Runs

Pitchers - Alex Roberts & Ian
Banks combined to pitch a
No-Hitter

Bahamas will have a Double
Header Today — Thursday July
16th 2009

Henry Thompson will get the
Start against Anguilla @
10:00am

Perez Knowles will get the
Start against Puerto Rico Area
@ 4:00pm

Game #3:

TEAM BAHAMAS VS ANGUILLA

- WIN 22-0

Team Bahamas 2nd Shoot-out
win of the tournament



Winning Picture: Henry
Thompson - Gave up | Hit in
the game

Ashton Butler: 2-4 with a Solo
HR

Byron Murray: 2-2 Triple &
Double 4 RBI's

Alex Roberts: 3-3 Double & 2
Base Hits - 3 RBI's

Puerto Rico Host Defeated
Puerto Rico Area last night.
With Team Bahamas win against
Anguilla, Team Bahamas will
either end up 2nd or 3rd. The
game at 4pm against PR Area
will determine this Round Robin
finish. PR Host has already
clinched the #1 spot with the
defeat of Team Bahamas & PR
Area. Play-off begin tomorrow
@ 10:00am with the Bronze &
Gold Medal Game on Saturday
- contact the individuals below
for tomorrow updates.

Dr. Laura Dupuch

ats

ANNOUNCEMENT

The Doctors and Staff of The Ladies Medical Centre

Dr. Dupuch is a qualified Obstetrician and
Gynaecologist and member of the Royal College
of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

BSc.(Hons.), M.B., B.S., DFFP, M.R.C.0.G.
Obstetrician & Gynaecologist

Cell: (242) 436-2016

G28 Tel: 325-5888
325-5884
Z 225-1480
Fax: 326-0913

-~

ns

in :
=
= |

































13-14

Front Row Standing: Left to Right
Darien Lockhart - 3B — Freeport
Byron Murray - P/OF — Nassau
Henry Thompson - P — Nassau
Romero Cartwright- P — Nassau
Lance Edwards - 2B — Freeport
Ashton Butler - SS — Nassau
Robin Brown -OF — Freeport

lan Banks-2B/P — Nassau

Welcomes

Dr. Laura Dupuch to our team.

Visit us online at
www .theladiesmedicalcentre.com

X






Back Row Standing: Left to Right
Patrick Knowles - Coach — Freeport
Marcian Curry Jr - Coach — Freeport
Jerome Jones - 3B/P — Freeport

Alex Roberts - C/OF — Bimini

Leighton Gibson- 1B — Nassau
Western Saunders - C — Nassau
Lesilie. Darvile - RF/P — Nassau

Perez Knowes - OF/P/1B — Freeport
Victor Cartwright - Manager — Nassau



Ist Location: No. 6 - Ist Terrace Centreville, RO. Box SS-19012, Nassau, Bahamas
2nd Location: | 3th Street North, Spanish Wells, Eleuthera Tel: 333-4633
3rd Location: Marsh Harbour Medical Centre, Marsh Harbour, Abaco Tel: 367-0050

is

moving into
their new
Builders Mall
Showroom!

Ask your
Sales Representative
about more

XN throughout the store!

OARS tie heheh bs beh /






THE TRIBUNE

usiness

2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Mata | Foreign reserves to end
year ‘higher’ than 2008

TRANTKOMABLONTIN

Wl Holdings receive boost ‘in excess of $100m’ from foreign
borrowings, with proceeds set to help better 2008's $563m finish
MH Performance comes despite 39% fall in private foreign
investment inflows to $194m, and 35% capital account surplus

FAMILY GUARDIAN

FRIDAY, JULY INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED





‘Three in
three’ for
developer

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

next 10 years

* Survey registration
system suffering ‘serious
breakdown’ and ‘crisis of

confidence decline to $150m
. . . ; . A real estate devel. terday told Tribune Busi

* Report recommended | J Risk from oil price rises ‘not very strong’, but ‘no change’ in eee eh le ots pe cee
sub-contracting : : working on in New Providence
. fe L d interest rates or monetary policy could be completed within three
surveying Irom Lands eee : : : . years despite the economic
wins WW No ‘significant’ increase in commercial bank loan portfolio slowdown, with one possibly
and Surveys to private : : valued at between $500-$700

deterioration million at full build-out.

sector Ex-MP and attorney-general,
: By NEIL HARTNELL Ti Wells, said th t
* Real estate transaction Tribune Business Editor Lyford Hills development could
costs high at 15% of amount to that, and one-third

of phase one had been com- oO J

i
TENNYSON WELLS

The Bahamas’ foreign exchange reserves will “end the year
higher” than 2008’s $562.73 million finish, the Central Bank gov-
ernor told Tribune Business yesterday, with a 39 per cent decline in
foreign investment inflows balanced by government’s foreign cur-
rency borrowings and reduced outflows.

With external currency reserves “approaching $723 million as of”
Tuesday this week, a slight drop on end-May’s $756.63 million,
Wendy Craigg said the decline in credit demand and economic
recession had triggered a natural “adjustment mechanism” that
reduced foreign currency outflows - a development that counter-
balanced the drop in tourism and foreign direct investment-relat-

purchase price, while
surveying costs double
Florida’s

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

pleted, with water and sewer-
age infrastructure in place and
the gatehouse completed.

Mr Wells’ South Seas devel-
opment, which includes a canal, came to a standstill after
the Bahamas National Trust (BNT) questioned whether
“proper environmental safeguards” were in place to pro-
tect the natural wetlands on the property purchased by his
development company.

The Bahamas is facing a The BNT requested that government demand a stop-

critical shortage of land sur-
veyors given that 50 per cent
of sector professionals are due
to retire within the next 10
years, a report tabled in the
House of Assembly has
revealed, with the Department
of Lands and Surveys suffer-
ing from a “lack of confi-
dence” in its data manage-
ment and a “serious break-
down in the system”.

A February 21, 2007, report
submitted to the Government
as part of the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB)
financed Land Use and
Administration project rec-
ommended that given the
minimal number of surveys
carried out by the Depart-
ment, all government surveys
and Crown Land grants and
leases should be sub-contract-
ed out to private surveyors.

The report, by Grenville
Barnes of consultants Inter-
national Land Systems (ILS),
one of a series of ILS docu-
ments that show the extent of
the shambles in land admin-
istration and management in
the Bahamas, added:
“Records management at
Lands and Surveys is weak,
and has contribute to lack of
confidence in the system.”

And even the proposal to
sub-contract all government
and Crown Land surveys to
the private sector was fraught
with problems, the ILS report
disclosing that the Bahamas
Association of Land Survey-
ors needed to tackle “survey-
ing capacity in the Bahamas”.

This was because “more
than 50 per cent of the cur-

SEE page 4B

Tey ayes



ed inflows.

SEE page 3B

Regulatory Board
approval needed

for insurance regs

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The regulations accompany-
ing the Domestic Insurance Act
must first be passed by the
Insurance Commission’s Board
before they can give enforce-
ment teeth to the newly-imple-
mented legislation, the head
regulator told Tribune Business
yesterday evening, hopefully
bringing clarity to an industry
where this newspaper was told
“confusion reigns”.

Lennox McCartney, the
Commission’s superintendent,
confirmed to this newspaper
that while the former Registrar
of Insurance’s Office had been
renamed, the regulations
accompanying the Act had “not
as yet” come into force.

He explained to Tribune
Business: “The regulations have
to be passed by the Board of
the [Insurance] Commission. At
the Board’s first meeting, those
regulations will more than like-
ly be passed.

“It’s a kind of chicken and
egg situation. It should happen
very shortly, once the Board’s

SEE page 2B

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* Newly-formed
Insurance Commission’s
Board formation and
regulations sign-off to
happen ‘very shortly

* Changes to force
alterations in ICB Board
composition

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



SEE page 3B



Two PMs grant Crown
Land to developer for $1

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Both Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and his predecessor,
Perry Christie, have conveyed prime beachfront Crown Land of
multiple acreage to developers for as little as $1, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal, with there appearing to be no set policy gov-
erning the price paid in such transactions.

A report on the management and distribution of Crown Land
in the Bahamas, produced by Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology (MIT) student Nakeischa Loi in July 2007, exhibited sev-
eral certificates of Crown Land grants that were obtained from
the Department of Lands and Surveys.

One certificate, signed by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham as
the minister responsible, was said to show that a developer

SEE page 8B

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

Fish Fry’s vendors
say port ‘inevitable’



By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

SOME Fish Fry vendors at
Arawak Cay yesterday said they
were looking forward to the
extra business the relocated
container shipping facilities and
port will bring, one vendor indi-
cating they had accepted the
project was inevitable by say-
ing: “There is nothing we can
do about it anyway.”

“They already signed the con-
tract,” the owner of Candies
Enterprises told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday.

James Smith, whose conch
stall is said to have some of the
best conch salad at the Fish Fry,
said he was convinced that
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham had already sealed the deal
for the Arawak Cay Port devel-
opment.

He added that there was no
use fighting the development
because the “government done
do it”.

That is not the talk PLP Sen-
ator Jerome Fitzgerald will want
to hear. He again yesterday
appealed to the Government
for full disclosure on the plans
for the Arawak Cay container





port development, which has
been shrouded in secrecy.

Minister of the Environment,
Dr Earl Deveaux, told this
paper yesterday that the Envi-
ronmental Impact Assessment
(EIA) report on the Nassau
Harbour dredging, disclosed by
this newspaper yesterday, was
available to anyone interested
in seeing it.

The Ministry of Environment
yesterday released this state-
ment: “As is the case with all
Environmental Impact Assess-
ments (EIAs), the EIA for the
extension for Arawak Cay, pro-
duced by Blue Engineering, is
available to the public in the
Ministry of the Environment or
the Ministry of Public Works.
This is contrary to the assertion
in the article that the report has
not been formally released, sug-
gestion some ulterior motive on
the Ministry.

“These documents provide a
wealth of information, includ-
ing but not limited to the exist-
ing conditions at the site, the
potential impacts of the project
to the environment and pro-
posed measures for mitigating
these impacts.”

Mr Fitzgerald said he had
never seen the ‘draft’ report

dated April 16, 2009, until it was
e-mailed to him by a source.

“Tt appears that again under
this administration, the inter-
ests of a special few are being
promoted and underwritten by
the Bahamian under the guise
of national development,” Mr
Fitzgerald said, in a seemingly
thinly-veiled reference to the
FNM’s supporters in the ship-
ping industry.

He added that he has not
been able to gain information
on the Blue Engineering firm,
which prepared the EJA.

Director of the Bahamas
Environment, Science and
Technology (BEST) Commis-
sion, Philip Weech, said yester-
day that Blue Engineering was
sub-contracted by Cox and
SHAL, the firm hired by the
Ministry of Works to produce
an EIA for the storage/use of
dredged material for the Nas-
sau Harbour port improvement
project. According to Mr
Weech, the documents pro-
duced by that entity are avail-
able for viewing at the office of
the Best Commission.

The EIA lays out possible
negative environmental effects
from the Arawak Cay port
development, including loss of

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32 yards of sea bed and some
sea life, which the reports con-
cludes will regenerate.

“The other issue raised by the
article relates to the potential
impacts to marine life, caused
primarily by the settling of sus-
pended sediment on coral reefs
and sponge beds in the area.
While the risk exists for sedi-
ment to harm sea life, this risk is
mitigated by the implementa-
tion of good dredging practices
to minimise sediment suspen-
sion and dispersal, as well as by
independent environmental
monitoring to ensure the use of
turbidity barriers and compli-
ance with the turbidity control
standard,” the Ministry’s release
continued.

“Additionally, in an attempt
to further assess and advise on
efforts to mitigate the potential
impact to sea life, the possibili-
ty of relocating viable hard and
soft corals, as well as sponges,
was explored by consultants
Continental Shelf Associates
(CSA) International.

“CSA were contracted by the
Government to assess, restore
and monitor the damage caused
by the 2008 grounding of the
M’T Ficus near Goulding Cay,
New Providence. However, dur-
ing their survey of the Arawak
Cay site, CSA found that the
corals within the impacted area
were small and not very diverse,
making them unsuitable candi-
dates for relocation.”

Mr Fitzgerald advised yester-
day of an acre-wide hole being
dug in the centre of Arawak
Cay to provide fill for the 1,000
foot extension of that island.
The EIA suggested 900,000
cubic yards of dredged material
would be used to extend the
island. But according to Mr
Weech, the material from the
hole is being used to create a
base so that land-based (as
opposed to barge-based) cranes
could drive into the sea bed the
metal sheet piles that will con-
tain the fill and create the bulk-
head for the island’s extension.

Mr Deveaux said the hole
created will then be used as a
containment barrier and settle-
ment pond for the dredged
material from Nassau Harbour,
some of which will then be used
to extend the Woodes Rogers
Wharf outwards to create a
pedestrian promenade as a part
of the redevelopment of down-
town Nassau. “We hope that
the work finishes in a timely
manner, so we’ll have some
time to get things back rolling,”
said one Fish Fry vendor.

THE TRIBUNE

Regulatory Board approval
needed for insurance regs
FROM page 1B

appointed.” He was unable to give a precise timeframe for when
this would be accomplished.

Many in the Bahamian insurance industry were yesterday
questioning whether the regulations were in effect, given that the
Insurance Commission had sent out a release informing the sec-
tor that the Domestic Insurance Act had come into force from
July 2, 2009.

And, if the regulations were not in effect, insurance executives
questioned whether the Act could be enforced - given that the
enforcement teeth, including specifics on regulatory powers,
sanctions and fines, were not accompanying it.

Timothy Ingraham, the Bahamas General Insurance Associ-
ation’s (BGIA) president, contacted by Tribune Business while
on holiday in New York, confirmed that the Insurance Com-
mission needed to be in place and fully functional before the reg-
ulations could be implemented.

“They keep telling us they’re very close,” he said, “but I don’t
know how much they can enforce the Act without the new reg-
ulations being in effect.”

The Government and Insurance Commission’s position is
likely to be that having the regulations in effect immediately is
unlikely to be a major priority, given that all Bahamas-based car-
riers, agents, brokers and salespersons have a transition period
of one year to comply with the Domestic Insurance Act and re-
register.

This seemingly means that the Act’s provisions will only be
enforced from July 2, 2010, onwards, although the transition
period for insurance adjusters, risk managers and consultants is
50 per cent shorter - standing at six months.

Mr McCartney yesterday said the Commission’s Board had to
be appointed by the Government, and would include three to five
persons besides himself and the deputy superintendent.

While the regulations had yet to be tabled in Parliament, Mr
McCartney explained this was not a requirement before they
could be implemented - just approval by the Insurance Com-
mission’s Board. “It will all happen very shortly,” he promised.

The superintendent said the Act incorporated “a long transi-
tion period” to give the Bahamian insurance industry time to
become familiar with all its requirements.

“There are a number of important changes in solvency require-
ments and statutory reserves, changes in some capital require-
ments, deposit requirements for foreign companies,” Mr McCart-
ney added. “There are very significant changes, and the corpo-
rate governance rules are very new to the industry, although these
are mostly in the regulations.

“They are fairly extensive to govern self-dealing, related par-
ty transactions and the number of non-resident directors on the
Board.”

One insurance company head told Tribune Business that the
new Act and regulations would “require quite significant changes
in the way the industry operates”.

Tom Duff, Insurance Company of the Bahamas (ICB) general
manager, said the general insurance carrier would be required to
reform its Board, which currently consisted entirely of J. S.
Johnson executives and shareholders.

This was because the BISX-listed insurance broker owns 40 per
cent of ICB, and its directors and senior executives hold the
remaining equity. “I suppose one major area of significance is in
the make-up of this Board,” Mr Duff said. “There is quite a bit
of focus in the regulations in terms” of this.

“The superintendent wants the Board of ICB to contain a
majority of independent directors, not having a connection with
J S Johnson or other affiliates.”

The ICB general manager added that while the new Act and
regulations had increased capital and solvency requirements,
meeting them was “not going to be problematic for an established
company in the market. For a new entrant, it will be a bit more
difficult for them to raise the capital”.

Opening capital requirements are now at $2 million, and Mr
Duff said the regulations also mandated that “certain policy-
holder reserves are held in trust”.

“Tt will be more difficult for insurance companies to scale
down their reserves and remove deposits from banks, because
they will have to have the Insurance Commission’s authority to
do so,” Mr Duff explained.

“The Government will have the authority over where assets are
held, and the movement of assets.”

Mr McCartney yesterday said the Act gave the Insurance
Commission the power to carry out on-site inspections of insur-
ance companies, something it had never had before. To carry out
this function, it was looking at hiring “a handful of persons”.



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THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 3B



The ‘art’ of reviving
downtown Nassau

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

THE DOWNTOWN Nassau Partnership
(DNP) is beginning its Bay Street clean-up and
beautification campaign through the placement
of artwork in derelict buildings, an initiative its
managing director said yesterday would begin at
month’s end.

Vaughn Roberts said artwork will be hung in
the windows of unused store fronts, while murals
will be painted on several unused and rundown
buildings, beginning on July 31.

He said the clean up effort and Art Exhibit
will be funded in part by the Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation, the DNP and through the volun-
teer efforts of the artists and sponsors.

The DNP was enacted to oversee the devel-
opment of a Business Improvement Districtm
which will begin the revitalisation of the down-
town area.

Mr Roberts said phase one of the redevelop-
ment plan could costs tens of millions of dollars,
but will not start in earnest until draft legislation
for the creation of the permanent BID body,
which will direct the downtown Nassau revital-
isation, is approved by Cabinet.

He added that a draft Memorandum of
Understanding, the first phase of the BID leg-
islation, should be completed by the end of
August 2009.

Funding to revitalise the city centre will be
provided through a private/public partnership.

“There is a way to get private funding for
this,” said Mr Roberts. “We are in preliminary

stages of conversations with a professional fund
raiser.

“Tf you think about gateways into downtown,
which is sort of our artistic, futuristic designate
to the entrance of downtown, there is a way to
just promote that as an opportunity for private
people to come to the table to fund the creation
of it. We’re working all around and there are
probably some grants out there.”

Charles Klonaris, co-chair of the Downtown
Nassau Partnership, had previously told 77i-
bune Business that the full legislation to create
the BID “should be ready to go” by year-end,
with the existing Nassau Tourism and Devel-
opment Board (NTDB) likely to be absorbed
into the BID.

Focus

“The focus right now is on the legislation for
the BID - that’s critical - and also the identifi-
cation of short-term projects,” Mr Klonaris told
Tribune Business. “Those are the two focus
points right now for the DNP.

“T would say we’re hoping towards the end of
the year that the [BID] legislation will be ready
to go for the following year. That’s the key to
what we’re trying to push for.”

Mr Klonaris said the BID legislation was key
to “defining the scope” of the authority that
will oversee downtown Nassau’s hoped-for
renaissance.

Besides determining the geographical bound-
aries of the area overseen by the BID, Mr
Klonaris, who is also the NT'DB’s current chair-
man, explained that the legislation would deter-

mine its revenue-raising powers - what monies it
could collect and how - plus its ability to provide
services such as garbage collection and street
cleaning.

The legislation will also determine the BID’s
composition, who sits on its Board and the split
between public and private sector representa-
tives.

“This is the most difficult part of it,” Mr
Klonaris told Tribune Business. “We have to
be so certain, careful and positive about the
authority, the level of the BID authority and
its functions. These are really the keys to the suc-
cess of downtown.”

The DNP co-chair added that Bahamian archi-
tect Jackson Burnside would produce all the
working drawings to illustrate the vision for
downtown Nassau, the body having “agreed on
his proposals”. When Mr Burnside’s work is
completed, the DNP will be “ready to go out for
bid” on construction work.

Mr Klonaris described Mr Burnside’s work
as not just “a vision, but what the final reality will
be”. And he added: “The vision for the NTDB
was to really become the BID. It will morph
into the BID, hopefully in a year’s time.

“The ultimate goal was to work through the
BID. For many years the NTDB was a voice in
the wilderness, but we kept plugging away. The
Government has grasped that, and understands
it, and where we are now is the vision of many
years.

“The city is an important part of this country
as an engine for employment, and it’s important
to have a vibrant city to support Atlantis and all
the hotels we have.”

MM Wotnocm lem aetna
for developer

FROM page 1B

page of the canal dredging until a “full assess-
ment” of its impact on the nearby Bonefish
National Park could be carried out.

Mr Wells, though, said yesterday that the devel-
opment had been given final approval by the BNT
and Bahamas Environment, Science and Tech-
nology (BEST) Commission to continue with the
canal project.

“For South Seas we have gotten our final
approval to put in the canal and complete the
marina, and we have paid the fees to the Gov-
ernment and Department of Lands and Surveys
for that - the royalties for the entire project,” he
said.

Mr Wells said much of the wetland, about 20 per
cent of the property to be developed, will be made
public, with boardwalks put in place for individu-
als to enjoy a natural mangrove forest.

“There is no other development in this country
where they can show where they left almost 20 per
cent of the land for public use,” he added.

Consultation

“We are Bahamians and we will not do anything
that will assist in destroying the environment.
They (BNT), along with our environmental
experts and BEST, prepared a management plan
in consultation with the trust.”

Mr Wells said his third development, Yuma
Estates, would have been completed if not for
the downturn in the economy.

“We should have completed Yuma, but the
economy went south. We will distribute the rest of
the lots over to the shareholders,” he said.

He suggested South Seas would be completed
within 18 months, while Lyford Hills could take up
to three years.

“We have scores of people who are employed
now working in those subdivisions,” said Mr Wells.



Foreign reserves to end year ‘higher’ than 2008

FROM page 1B

Revealing that the proceeds
from the Government’s foreign
currency borrowing activities
were “in excess of $100 mil-
lion”, Mrs Craigg told Tribune
Business: “The reserves have
benefited from the Govern-
ment’s recent foreign currency
borrowings, and we expect quite
a significant portion of those
proceeds to remain in the
reserves, so they will end the
year higher than they did last
year.”

Mrs Craigg’s comments are
encouraging from the Bahami-
an balance of payments/current
accounts perspective, as they
indicate the Bahamas will, in
the short-term at least, be in a
strong position to finance its
import needs and maintain the
one:one exchange rate parity
with the US dollar.

The Central Bank governor
added that apart from the boost
from foreign currency borrow-
ings, the Bahamas was still
attracting net positive capital
inflows from tourism and for-
eign direct investment, just not
at the level of previous years.

“We’re continuing to have
relatively positive net inflows,”
Mrs Craigg told Tribune Busi-
ness. “If you look at foreign cur-
rency transactions with the
banks and other transactions,
there are other net inflows - just
not at the level they were at the
year before. The net inflows
have not ceased, but they’re cer-
tainly at lower levels.”

She said that for the 2009 first
quarter, net private foreign
investment inflows into the
Bahamas had dropped by 39
per cent, from $317.5 million in
the 2008 comparative period to
$193.8 million this time around.

Meanwhile, the surplus on
the financial and capital account
had dropped to $149.8 million in
the 2009 first quarter, down
from $229.8 million year-over-
year, a 34.9 per cent decrease.

These figures are in line with
the International Monetary
Fund’s (IMF) projections in its
Article [TV consultation, which
forecast a 30 pet cent decline in
foreign direct investment - the
capital lifeblood for the
Bahamian economy and
employment - in 2009.

Meanwhile, Mrs Craigg told
Tribune Business that the risk
of an oil price-induced shock to
the external reserves was “not a
very strong one” currently.

While global prices had been
creeping up slowly in recent
months, closing yesterday at $62
per barrel, compared to a 52-
week low of $32.41, they were
still some 58 per cent below last
July’s $147 per barrel peak. The
Bahamas last year spent $1.1
billion on oil and fuel-related
imports.

“It’s certainly something that
we have to monitor, because
there is that degree of volatility
in those prices, but they’re sig-
nificantly below where they
were last year,” the Central
Bank governor told Tribune
Business.

“The risk is still there, but it’s
not a very strong one at this
point in time.”

However, those who believe
the relatively strong external
reserves and monetary policy
positions have created room for
the Central Bank to cut its dis-
count rate are likely to be dis-
appointed, as Mrs Craigg said
there were no plans for any
immediate shifts.

“We have not considered the
need for any changes in the
monetary policy position,” she
confirmed , “but it’s something
that we evaluate on a monthly
basis.”

The Bahamas’ foreign cur-
rency reserves have been pro-
tected by the decline in con-
sumer credit demand and “the
slowdown in economic activi-
ty”, which has reduced the
demand for inventory among
the Bahamian business com-
munity. This is what has
reduced currency outflows from
this nation.

“It’s a natural adjustment
mechanism that happens to
benefit the external reserves in
a period much like the one that

we’re currently experiencing,”
Mrs Craigg explained.

She added that while the
Central Bank was concerned
about - and continued to moni-
tor the asset quality - in
Bahamian commercial banks’
loan portfolios, there had been
no major increase in the rate of
loan defaults and non-perform-
ing loan increases.

“It’s a matter that we’re con-
tinuing to monitor very closely
with the banks,” Mrs Craigg
told Tribune Business. “We
have an enhanced monitoring
arrangement for those loans,
but we have not seen any sig-
nificant increase in the momen-
tum” of deterioration.

The Central Bank had previ-
ously reported that almost one
in five (20 per cent) of loans to
Bahamian businesses by com-
mercial banks were in default
at end-May 2009, with total
non-performing loans rising to
7.7 per cent or $468.2 million
of outstanding . This figure
increased by 4 per cent or $18.2
million in May.

The total number of loans in
arrears by at least one month

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terly and annual reports; to keep and maintain all
financial documents and records according to the
directives coming from the President and the Board
of Directors to ensure the efficient management of
all Bank and general ledger accounts. The position
will also be expected to make recommendations to
management to maintain the company’s viability in a
highly competitive environment.

Required:

e University Degree in accounting;
¢ Professional qualifications e.g. CPA, ACCA, CA
e At least 3 years’ work experience as an

accountant;

* Good knowledge of English in writing, editing and

presenting;

* Strong interpersonal, organizational and

supervisory skills;

e Demonstrated capacity to work under pressure,
meet deadlines and perform work of the highest

quality.

¢ Good computer and analytical skills.

Send cover letter and Curriculum Vitae to the follow-

ing address:

The Tribune

c/o Box # 81869
P.O. Box N 3207
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE: July 25, 2009 by 5pm



increased by $6.1 million or 0.7
per cent in May, reaching a total
of $847.3 million. Total loans in
arrears increased to 13.98 per
cent as a percentage of total
loans, although the proportion
of delinquent loans - those
between 31 to 90 days past due
- declined by $12 million or 3.73
per cent to $373.3 million.

The Central Bank said at the
time: “The increase in the
arrears rate was attributed toa
worsening in the consumer

loans and residential mortgages
portfolios, by 58 basis points
and 2 basis points, to 12.45 per
cent and 13 per cent, respec-
tively.

“In contrast, the commercial
arrears rate receded to 19.83
per cent in May, from 20.61 per
cent in April.”

Mrs Craigg said what was
happening with commercial
bank loan portfolios was direct-
ly linked to events in the wider
Bahamian economy, adding

= Colina.

Holdings Bahamas

ee

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Risk & Compliance Officer

that “as long as job losses con-
tinue, you will continue to see
some deterioration in the cred-
it quality of the banks”.

Borrowers unable to meet
their obligations “need to return
to jobs”, but Mrs Craigg said
an economic recovery in the
Bahamas was unlikely to hap-
pen until the 2010 second half.

“Looking at what’s happen-
ing in the US economy, we
don’t see it happening before
then,” she added.

Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified

professional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer.

This is an

executive position and the successful applicant should possess the following:

Qualifications & Experience

Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university
Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance
Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a

law degree

Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations
for improvements to a compliance culture
Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of

duties

Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and

best practices
Confidentiality

Excellent oral and written communication skills

& Responsibilities:

Design and implement a risk framework.
Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps
taken to foster good compliance.
Implement and maintain a compliance monitoring programme. This will
serve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures.

Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws,
regulations and policies applicable to the institution.

Provide management with guidance in the development, implementation
and maintenance of policies, procedures and practices to cover
regulated activities.
Create programmes that educate, train and encourage directors,
managers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and

regulations.

Serve as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators.

The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with
experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a cover
letter and resume to the following e-mail address no later than 27 July 2009:

E-mail: careers@c olinaimperial.com

RE: Risk and Compliance Officer

Absolutely no phone calls will be accepted


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





0% of land surveyors to
retire within next 10 years

FROM page 1B

rent active, registered survey-
ors in the private sector will
retire in the next 10 years”.

Addressing the lack of con-
fidence in the survey registra-
tion system, the ILS report
found that the number of pri-
vate surveys recorded by the
Department of Lands and
Surveys had fallen from a high
point of just under 400 in 1990
to around 200 in 2005, with a
“significant decline” from
more than 350 in 1993 to 175
the following year.

The bottom was reached in
1996, with less than 100 sur-
veys lodged for recording with
the Department.

This was despite the num-
ber of new mortgages regis-
tered at the Registrar Gener-
al’s Department numbering
between 4,000 and 5,000 for
every year between 1994-1999,
and registered conveyancings
for the same time period hov-
ering between 4,500 tO more
than 6,000.

Attempting to answer why
private surveyors were not
submitting their surveys to the



“It is clear from an examination of the
survey information archives that Lands
& Surveys are doing a very poor job of
managing the country’s [land] records. I
believe this is contributing to the
negative image that is being projected
to the surveying profession.”



Department of Lands and
Surveys, the report conclud-
ed: “There are several reasons
for this, but they appear to all
relate back to a lack of confi-
dence in the management of
survey data in Lands and Sur-
veys and the perception that
Lands and Surveys personnel
are taking advantage of their
position in government to
unfairly compete with the pri-
vate sector.

“This is a serious break-
down in the system, and it is
critical that these public-pri-
vate relationships be fostered
within the new institutional
structure.

“It is clear from an exami-

Public Notice

Ministry of Public Works & Transport Construction
of New Market, Downtown Nassau

Pre-Qualification of Contractors

The Government of Commonwealth of The Bahamas through
the Ministry of Public Works and Transport is living qualified
General Contractors to participate in a Pre-Qualification for the
Tender for the construction of a new market to be built on a
restricted site in Downtown Nassau.

The Structure will be approximately 38,724 sq. ft. with
associated external works and services.

The General Contractors will be required to provide a detailed
indication of their competence, both technically and financially,
to carry out the intended scope of work within a reasonable time.

Interested parties may

collect

the pre-qualification

documents as of Thursday, 2 July, 2009 between the hours of

9:00a.m - 5:00p.m. from:

The Office of the Director of Public Works
Ministry of Public Works and Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive

Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 322-4830

Fax:

The

completed pre-qualification

(242) 302-9770

document should be

deposited in the Tender Box at the Ministry of Finance, 3rd Floor,
Cecil Wallace-Whitfied Building, West Bay Street, PO.Box,
N-3017, Nassau, Bahamas not later than 5:00p.m. on Monday,

20 July, 2009.

The Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
has the right to reject any or all pre-qualification contractors.

Signed

Colin Higgs
Permanent Secretary








Securit

1.28
10.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.35
4.95

Abaco Markets

Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.40
10.00

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

S52wk-Hi_ 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

52wk-Low



Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade ona Percentage Pricing b

Securi Last Sale

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

nation of the survey informa-
tion archives that Lands &
Surveys are doing a very poor
job of managing the country’s
[land] records. I believe this
is contributing to the negative
image that is being projected
to the surveying profession.”

The report added: “Given
the expectations in the
Bahamas over the coming
years - higher property values,
higher volume of land trans-
actions, increased potential for
boundary conflicts, greater
pressure for foreign-funded
development - there is an
urgent need to build surveying
and mapping capacity in the
Bahamas, primarily in the pri-
vate sector.”

The ILS document recom-
mended shrinking the Depart-
ment of Lands and Surveys
into a smaller organisation
focusing on managing con-
tracts and assessing the quali-
ty of private surveys, prior to
including them in the parcel-
based land administration sys-
tem the IDB project aimed to
create.

The number of government
surveys carried out by the
Department, the report
revealed, had fallen from eight
in 2002 to just two in 2005. “In
recent years, the surveying
productivity in Lands and Sur-
veys appears to have dwindled
to the point where there is no
justification for continuing to
support a cadastral surveying
capacity,” the report conclud-
ed. High surveying costs were
prevalent, especially on Fam-
ily Islands, where surveyors
had to cut through thick bush
in determining boundary lines.
Up to 40 per cent of time and
expenses could be spent on
this task.

The estimated cost of sur-
veying a 1,500 x 1,500 foot
parcel of land in the Family
Islands was pegged by the
report at $7,995 over four days
- almost $2,000 per day. This
compared to the $1,000 per
day rate charged by a similar-
sized Florida crew.

Transactions costs in the
Bahamas were also relatively
high, at 15 per cent of the pur-
chase price for a $100,000 land
parcel in urban Nassau, com-
pared to 3-4 per cent in coun-
tries like Australia. The
biggest contributor to trans-
action costs were Stamp Tax
and the realtor’s fee, both
costing in this case $6,000 or
38.6 per cent of the cost total.
Behind that was the attorney’s
fee of 2.5 per cent of the pur-
chase price, some 16.1 per cent
of the transaction costs.

Management Opportunity
A well established company is considering highly qualified
applicants for the role of

Financial Controller

Requirements & Responsibilities:
- Lead and motivate accounting staff

- Experience in the preparation and interpretation of Financial

Statements

- Must be able to develop and maintain an effective system of internal
accounting and operational controls in a Hotel environment
- Must possess five years experience in a supervisory accounting

position

- Self motivated with strong analytical and problem-solving skills

- Must be conversant with hotel accounting software, with emphasis in
areas Food & Beverage, Front Office and Payroll

- Liaise with external Auditors, third party service providers and relevant
Regulatory & Compliance Authorities

- Preparation of budgets

- Timely and accurate preparation, presentation and interpretation of

financial reports

- Excellent written and oral communication skills
- Able to work extended hours, weekends and holidays

QUALIFICATIONS

- BAin Accounting from an accredited University

- International accounting designation (CPA/CA) with minimum of
5 years post qualification experience,

- Advance working knowledge of Excel

- Working knowledge of Microsoft Word

Interested persons should apply on or before July 24, 2009

Attention: CONTROLLER
DA 81270
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Suitably qualified candidates need only apply.
Salary is commensurate with experience and qualification.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

TUESDAY, 14 JULY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.14] CHG -2.79 | %CHG -0.18 | YTD -142.22 | YTD % -8.31
FINDEX: CLOSE 787.12 | YTD -5.72% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | [Rea UL Se 242-323-2320

11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37

11.39
2.74
5.64
3.05
1.82
6.99

10.90

10.38
5.03.
1.00
0.30
5.50

10.40

10.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37

11.39
2.74
5.64
3.00
1.82
6.60

10.90

10.38
5.03

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.05
0.00
-0.39
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.00
0.30
5.50 800
10.40
10.00

Daily Vol.
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

o oo
0.00
0.00
0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $
8.42
6.25
0.40

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Weekly Vol.

EPS $

7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-0.041



FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE 6 ADYISURY. SERVICES

COLON LA L

Div $
0.127
0.992
0.244

-0.877

0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

ases)

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Div $ P/E

0.000

0.001





Google’s
slowing 2Q

ALUMI Cos
overshadow
ee TMNT TS

Photo/Jeff Chiu

AP

IN THIS PHOTO from Wednesday, May 27, 2009, a man rides an escala-
tor at the Google I/O 2009 web developers conference in San Francisco.
Google Inc. is expected to release second-quarter earnings Thursday, July
16, 2009.

MICHAEL LIEDTKE,
AP Technology Writer
SAN FRANCISCO

Google Inc.'s Internet ad sales grew at their slowest rate
ever during the spring, forcing the online search leader to tight-
en its belt another notch to propel its second-quarter profit
above analyst estimates.

The performance — punctuated by revenue growth of just 3
percent — disappointed investors. The company’s shares fell
more than 3 percent in extended trading Thursday after the
results were released. Google is the most profitable company on
the Internet, thanks to its dominance of the online advertising
market. That means its lackluster revenue growth could fore-
shadow even more significant sluggishness among other Inter-
net companies that rely on advertising and e-commerce. Many
of those companies will detail what happened in their second
quarters in the coming weeks.

Although the U.S. recession
has been making it increasingly
difficult for Google to sell ads,
Chief Executive Eric Schmidt
said he doesn't expect the cli-
mate to become any more chal-
lenging.

"We're not at the moment
looking at that downward spiral
that we thought we might see
six months ago," Schmidt told
analysts during a Thursday con-
ference call. The remarks
echoed comments made to reporters last week when he said the
recession had already appeared to hit bottom.

The Mountain View-based company earned $1.48 billion, or
$4.66 per share, during the three months ended in June. That
compared with income of $1.25 billion, or $3.92 per share, for the
same period last year.

Revenue rose to $5.52 billion from $5.34 billion in last year's
second quarter.

It marked Google's lowest growth rate since the company
went public five years ago. It was also the company's second con-
secutive quarter of single-digit revenue growth, which had nev-
er fallen below a 30 percent pace until late last year.



"We're not at the
moment looking at
that downward
spiral that we
thought we might
see six months
ago.”



Compensation

If not for stock compensation expenses, Google said it would
have made $5.36 per share. That topped the average estimate of
$5.09 per share among analysts polled by Thomson Reuters.

After subtracting ad commissions, Google's net revenue
totaled $4.1 billion — about $40 million above analyst esti-
mates. Google relied on cost cutting and an unusually low tax
rate to boost its profits amid the slowing ad sales. For instance,
the company trimmed its general and administrative expenses
by 23 percent to save about $110 million and reduced its spend-
ing on capital projects by 80 percent, or $559 million.

The financial discipline resulted in the biggest quarterly
reduction in Google's payroll since Larry Page and Sergey Brin
started the company in a Silicon Valley garage nearly 11 years
ago. Google ended June with 19,786 employees, 378 fewer than
at the end of March.

Google's second-quarter tax rate was 20 percent, well below
the 25 percent range that is typical for the company.

The company's shares fell $14.50, or 3.3 percent, after finish-
ing the regular session at $442.60, up $4.43. The stock has
surged by about 50 percent since it last traded below $300 in ear-
ly March, reflecting investors’ faith in Google to weather the
recession better than most companies.

(he Pw
ACADEMY

Open House “THIS” Saturday
July 18th 10am - 5pm.

Carmicheal Road Area

St
4

\




Bellot Road, on the side of
Christ Community Church

Ages 1 1/2 to 5 year olds

PHONE:
424-2995



Kristine Sandiford

Owner/Director
of 1 on 1 Pre-School

& now 2 by 2 Academy

Sir

IIE? El SIP KU,

cS

RND Holdings

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00

0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds

YTD% Last 12 Months
2.40 4.75
-1.52 -3.18
2.97 5.30
-8.35 -13.82
2.40 5.79
-0.02 0.54
-3.33
0.00
2.00

q/ Der €

R77 ypc
NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YVROSE ARISCA of
CARMICHAEL ROAD, P.O. BOX N-9456, NASSAU
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90



Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CPFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

NAV
1.3860
2.8952
1.4763
3.1031

12.9209
100.5448
93.1992
1.0000
9.2765
1.0622 2.56
1.0243 -0.84
1.0585 2.04
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month divid:

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
1.3231
2.8952
1.4019
3.1031
12.2702

100.0000

93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

-6.76
0.00

-2.98
6.22
2.43
5.85

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 17‘ day of
July, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
i

s divided by closing price
nd Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of C fidelity

Last Price - Last traded counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meanin gtul

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

weighted price for daily volume
eighted price for daily volume
ig price from day to day
I shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earmin as
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S11) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009, PAGE 5B







TIM PARADIS,
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK

Investors piled into technol-
ogy stocks again to extend the
market's rally.

Hope for more good earnings
from technology leaders made
the industry an attractive bet
again Thursday, a day after a
strong forecast from chip mak-
er Intel Corp. lifted stocks
across the board.

The tech-laden Nasdaq com-
posite index advanced for the
seventh straight day and closed
at its highest level since October
as traders prepared for profit
reports from Internet search
company Google Inc. and Inter-
national Business Machines
Corp. Both posted better-than-
expected profits after the clos-
ing bell.

What appeared to be a turn
in sentiment from economist
and New York University pro-
fessor Nouriel Roubini also
helped lift the market. Reports
said Roubini believed the worst
of the economy's troubles had
past, but in a statement after
the close of trading he said his
views are unchanged. He does-
n't expect the economy to grow
this year and still predicts the
recession will end early next
year.

Traders had welcomed what
had appeared to be a turn in his
sentiment because Roubini has
been pessimistic about the econ-
omy and was one of the few
experts to have predicted the
global financial crisis.

Some analysts attributed the
buying to short-covering, where
investors have to buy stock after
having earlier sold borrowed
shares in a bet that the market
would fall.

Modest

Stocks continued the week's
sprint-and-jog play, carving
more modest gains after surging
the day before. The market
surged Monday followed by a
flatter day Tuesday.

"There's still concern about
the market and concern about
the overall economy,” said Jon
Biele, head of capital markets at
Cowen & Co. "But the pes-
simism is moving to optimism.
People certainly want to be in a
position to gain from positive
momentum.”

The jump in stocks this week
halted a monthlong slide that
came as investors worried that a
huge rally in March and April
had gone too far as investors
hoped for an economic recov-
ery. This week's earnings
reports have given investors
some of the confirmation that
the economy isn't as bad as
feared, but they still want to see
more evidence of a turnaround.

The Dow rose 95.61, or 1.1
percent, to 8,711.82, its highest
close since June 12. The blue
chips are now down only 0.7
percent for the year.

The Standard & Poor's 500
index rose 8.06, or 0.9 percent,
to 940.74. The Nasdaq rose
22.13, or 1.2 percent, to 1,885.03,
its best finish since Oct. 3.

Bond prices rose, pushing
yields lower. The yield on the
benchmark 10-year Treasury
note fell to 3.58 percent from
3.62 percent late Wednesday.

Not all results were good.
Nokia Corp., the world's largest
cell phone maker, fell $2.22, or
14.2 percent, to $13.46 after its
second-quarter earnings tum-
bled 66 percent and it scrapped
targets to increase market share
this year.

Most results have topped
expectations. Reports are due
Friday from General Electric
Co., Bank of America Corp.
and Citigroup Inc. that likely
will set the day's tone.

"A lot of traders went into
earnings with very low expec-
tations and they are happy the
world hasn't fallen apart and
we're seeing solid results," said
Anthony Conroy, managing
director and head trader for
BNY ConvergEx Group. "A lot
of people that were short are
starting to cover because of
improved earnings that have
come out."

Financial stocks lagged the
rest of the market after small-
business lender CIT Group Inc.
said negotiations with federal
regulators about a rescue broke
off. Investors are worried the
company could file for bank-
ruptcy protection. CIT tumbled
$1.23, or 75 percent, to 41 cents.

JPMorgan Chase & Co.
reported big gains in its invest-
ment banking business, held
back somewhat by loan losses.
Its results come two days after

Goldman Sachs Group Inc. also
topped expectations with much
stronger results in underwriting
and trading. JPMorgan slipped
13 cents to $36.13.

Strong earnings from the
banks have encouraged
investors about the economy.
The results also show that many
of the nation's biggest banks are
recovering from the collapse of
credit markets last fall.

Google rose $4.43, or 1 per-
cent, to $442.60, while IBM rose
$3.42, or 3.2 percent, to $110.64.
Google lost ground in electron-
ic trading after reporting its
results while IBM rose.

Investors also drew encour-
agement from a Labor Depart-
ment report that new claims for
unemployment insurance fell
last week by 47,000 to 522,000,
the lowest level since early Jan-
uary.

Economists polled by Thom-
son Reuters predicted an
increase to 575,000. The
improved data, however, might
have been affected by the tim-
ing of automobile plant shut-
downs.

In other trading, the dollar
was mixed against other cur-
rencies. Gold prices fell.

Benchmark crude rose 48



cents to settle at $62.02 a barrel
on the New York Mercantile
Exchange.

About two stocks rose for
every one that fell on the New
York Stock Exchange, where
consolidated volume came to 5
billion shares, down from 5.5
billion Wednesday.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 6.38, or
1.2 percent, to 522.02.

Overseas, Britain's FTSE 100
rose 0.4 percent, Germany's
DAX index rose 0.6 percent,
and France's CAC-40 gained
0.9 percent. Japan's Nikkei
stock average rose 0.8 percent.

IN THIS JULY 8, 2009 PHOTO, people sit at tables in front of the New
York Stock Exchange. Stock futures traded higher Monday morning, July
13, 2009, as investors brace for a crush of earnings reports, including
key readings from the banking sector, this week.

AP Photo/Richard Drew

Gains in tech stocks extend rally

Legal Notice

Notice
BOTTICELLI HOLDINGS LTD.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000 the Dissolution of BOTTICELLI HOLDINGS
LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 3rd April
2009.

NOTICE

There will be a meeting for all members
of the Honorable Society of the Middle
Temple on Thursday July 23rd
6:00 p.m. @ $.G. Hambros.

All are asked to attend.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

LANDE ESTATES LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000). LANDE ESTATES LIMITED is in
Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 15th
day of July, 2009.

Cl Accounting Limited
Boatside Business Centre
Warden
Northumberland
NE46 4SH
Liquidator

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

PERSPECTIVE

HUMAN RESOURCES CONSULTING

NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR/HELPDESK ANALYST

Our client is an international health management company that assists clients to successfully
navigate an increasingly complex global health care system with ease and economy.

Their Network and Infrastructure Team is currently seeking a Network Administrator/HelpDesk
Analyst who will assist in the first-level technical support, planning, administration, testing and
maintenance of user PC’s, Laptops and Local Area Network.

The Network Administrator/HelpDesk Analyst will play a direct role providing entry level
technical support for hardware, software, peripherals, connectivity. The candidate must be
able to troubleshoot a wide range of software and hardware products generally on Windows
PC's with Microsoft Office.

This is an excellent entry level opportunity to learn more advanced skills such as Windows
2000/2003 server and Active Directory, SQL 2000/5 Server, Exchange, Cisco server
Firewall/VPN configuration and support. The successful candidate will be part of a larger team
working directly with Infrastructure Architects, Sr. Network Administrators, Database
Architect, Middleware Analysts and Project Managers with a globally recognized leader in
health management.

Qualifications:

- Candidate must show hands-on experience and good working knowledge of the
following:
o TCP/IP
o Microsoft Windows 2000/2003 Server, Microsoft XP and Microsoft Office
o General Networking concepts
Effective written and oral communication skills
Excellent customer service skills

Salary is commensurate with experience.

Please forward resume and salary requirements by July 25, 2009 to:

Email: perspective.hr1@gmail.com





BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Senior Manager,
Accounts.

The job oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget & Management
Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective delivery
of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the
following:

* Compilation of the corporate budget.

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets

Preparation of monthly management statements

Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation

Preparation of performance reports for division , department and sections
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry recetvables (capital
contributions, rechargeable)

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices

Liaison with internal and external audits

Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief
Financial

Officer for the Board of Directors

Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required
Preparation of the business plan for the department

Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department

Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims

Overseeing the Cash Flow Management

Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment

Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form employee’s
salaries

Conducting audits of various financial activities including Employee Basic Pay
Reconciliation, Employee Loans Reconciliation and Payment Reconciliation
Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable

Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts

Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle repayments
Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule

Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans

Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to ensure
adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors

Managing the status of local and foreign vendors

Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and External Auditors
Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline. Conducting
performance appraisals

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff, manage
and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations

Job requirements include:

¢ Aminimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting ACCA/CPA
or equivalent qualifications

¢ A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a similar
management position
Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices
Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications
Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing systems
Ability to analyze financial reports
Sound knowledge of covenants of lending institutions (e.g. IDB)
Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial software
and the system of internal control.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing
Good time management skills

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: July,
22,2009.


THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT |

5-Day FORECAST

TAMPA
High: 91° F/33° C
Low: 80° F/27°C

ORLANDO |
High: 92° F/33°C
Low: 75° F/24°C

KEY WEST
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 84° F/29° C

@



Mostly sunny with a

thunderstorm.

ig h: 92°
ICRU acl aec dt

FT. LAUDERDALE

High: 92°F/33°C

Low: 80° F/27°C

>



Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Saturday

Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston

High
F/C
98/36
72/22
86/30
86/30
90/32
84/28
72/22
90/32
70/21
74/23
98/36
90/32
74/23
89/31
95/35

Today

Low

F/C
70/21
57/13
67/19
71/21
68/20
65/18
56/13
76/24
56/13
55/12
74/23
55/12
53/11
77/25
76/24

Ww

>

oO oO

rnHOoDrtrD CCD COD CH
}

High
F/C
99/37
72/22
81/27
85/29
84/28
75/23
68/20
89/31
72/22
69/20
93/33
86/30
70/21
90/32
94/34

Low

F/C
69/20
56/13
63/17
62/16
64/17
63/17
58/14
71/21
57/13
54/12
67/19
59/15
56/13
77/25
71/21

Ww

s
pe
pe

+

oO

+O tM OHO a
oO

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando



Clear. Mostly sunny with a
thunderstorm.
High: 92°
Low: 81° Low: 81°

Le

— i

Clouds and sun, a
t-storm possible.

High: 91°
Low: 80°

ICE UC acl c |
94°-84° F

ae,

oe i



ae

—a

Clouds and sun, a
t-storm possible.

High: 90°
Low: 82°

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and

elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 78° F/26° C

= AMI

High: 92° F/33°C
Low: 81°F/27°C

<



High
F/C
76/24
94/34
82/27
111/43
88/31
86/30
80/26
88/31
92/33
68/20
84/28
90/32
88/31
92/33
92/33

Today
Low

F/C
55/12
74/23
57/13
84/28
62/16
66/18
60/15
64/17
81/27
54/12
63/17
76/24
70/21
64/17
75/23

Ww

High

F/C
71/21
91/32
81/27
111/43
88/31
86/30
76/24
83/28
94/34
74/23
79/26
91/32
81/27
87/30
93/33

@ WEST PALM BEACH

Low

F/C
54/12
72/22
58/14
89/31
60/15
66/18
57/13
62/16
81/27
60/15
58/14
72/22
69/20
62/16
73/22

FREEPORT

ABACO
High: 92° F/33° C

High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 79° F/26° C

F

ANDROS

NASSAU
High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 81°F/27°C

@

High: 95° F/35°C
Low: 79° F/26° C

Saturday
WwW

+O tt H HM

High

F/C

Philadelphia 88/31
Phoenix 112/44
Pittsburgh 78/25
Portland, OR 94/34
Raleigh-Durham 89/31
St. Louis 80/26
Salt Lake City 98/36
San Antonio —_ 100/37
San Diego 78/25
San Francisco 76/24
Seattle 85/29
Tallahassee 90/32
Tampa 91/32
Tucson 107/41

Washington, DC 90/32

Low: 82° F/28°C

Today

Low

F/C
70/21
88/31
58/14
61/16
72/22
59/15
66/18
77/25
68/20
57/13
58/14
72/22
80/26
81/27
69/20

WwW

pe
pe
t
pe
t
pe
s
t

pc

Precipitation == —“—i‘“—;SCSCSC~*C«SS unre... 6:30. a.m. Moonrise. .... 1:40 a.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... cece trace Sunset....... 8:02 p.m. Moonset ..... 3:42 p.m.
Year to date : :
Normal year to date 0... ccccceseseccseeeees 21.75" ues Fist a pons
AccuWeather.com aes
Forecasts and graphics provided by a. a5
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 21 Jul. 28 Aug.5 Aug. 13
High: 94° F/34° C
Low: 80° F/27°C
ica
all J CATISLAND
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 76° F/24°C
GREATEXUMA ee
a... SAN SALVADOR
High: 92 F/33 C High: 93° F/4° c
Low: 79° F/26° C Low: 77° F/25° c
xX zx
-*. all
ee HX
LONG ISLAND
High: 94° F/34° C
Low: 77° F/25° C : MAYAGUANA
Saturday
High Low W ort High: 93° F/34° C
Fe FC Low: 74° F/23°C
84/28 66/18 t
72/22 54/42 t igh:
84/28 5915 s RAG GED ISLAND Low: 76° Fac
39 High: 95° F/35° C ay
/31 65/18 t Low: 74° F/23° Cc w 7
77/25 59/15 s . on
99/37 71/21 $s
98/36 75/23 ¢s 7 See
76/24 68/20 pe te Tei ar
74/23 56/43 pc d
77/25 56/13 s pgp
90/32 68/20 t a
90/32 80/26 t ‘alll 7
109/42 80/26 t a4
85/29 67/19 t

Normal high ....
Normal low
Last year's high
Last year's low



Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature

lt
© | olif2|sla|sie
— a LOW MODERATE
Some sun, t-storms
possible; windy.
High: 89°
Low: 82°
AccuWeather RealFeel
96°-90° F High
Tod 3:26 a.m.
mv 4:06 pm.
Saturd 4:32 a.m.
Gee 5:11 p.m.
Sund 5:37 a.m.
ey 613 pm.
93° F/34° C 6:39 a.m.
ade F/ag¢¢ = Monday nn

AY ria NY

88° F/31° C
75° F/24° C
92° F/33° C
79° F/26° C









\. HIGH

Ht.(ft.) Low

2.2
29

2.2
3.0

2.3
3.2

25
3.3



9:27 a.m.

10:41 p.m.

10:30 a.m.
11:44 p.m.

11:34 a.m.

12:43 a.m.
12:36 p.m.

7|8|9f1

HIGH |

Vv
‘

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Se Posy

Ht. (ft.

0.1
0.3

0.1
0.2

0.0

0.1
-0.2

willl






Wor_p Cities

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
95/35
72/22
82/27
94/34
57/13
90/32
86/30
79/26
79/26
86/30
97/36
838/31
82/27
66/18
70/21
95/35
61/16
98/36
96/35
84/28
91/32
82/27
77/25
78/25
64/17
75/23
69/20
68/20
93/33
72/22
91/32
108/42
91/32
84/28
58/14
91/32
72/22
66/18
86/30
86/30
79/26
104/40
73/22
79/26
91/32
78/25
93/33
73/22
72/22
87/30
83/28
104/40
93/33
91/32
68/20
86/30
63/17
91/32
17/25
79/26
75/23
62/16
95/35
86/30
72/22
88/31
78/25
838/31
83/28
66/18

Ti

Today

Low
F/C
79/26
57/13
57/13
79/26
50/10
79/26
76/24
61/16
68/20
76/24
72/22
67/19
72/22
45/7
57/13
68/20
46/7
76/24
85/29
52/11
T5E3
71/21
67/19
67/19
50/10
57/13
54/12
57/13
73/22
54/12
82/27
84/28
75/23
62/16
36/2
79/26
60/15
54/12
54/12
77/25
54/12
75/23
61/16
56/13
49/9
52/11
81/27
59/15
Sale
59/15
70/21
82/27
70/21
79/26
34/1
70/21
39/3
73/22
57/13
70/21
57/13
33/3
82/27
77/25
57/13
64/17
59/15
69/20
61/16
49/9



ae ttt HERA HAHAH NAHNHTD

nD
a 6)

7m
oO

pc

High
F/C
93/33
64/17
82/27
97/36
55/12
91/32
86/30
70/21
93/33
80/26
104/40
68/20
82/27
66/18
63/17
83/28
61/16
99/37
98/36
82/27
93/33
83/28
87/30
74/23
64/17
64/17
61/16
70/21
94/34
77/25
93/33
108/42
93/33
86/30
58/14
89/31
74/23
72/22
91/32
83/28
77/25
104/40
70/21
80/26
55/12
78/25
93/33
76/24
71/21
63/17
75/23
101/38
82/27
89/31
64/17
88/31
57/13
86/30
70/21
75/23
77/25
63/17
93/33
86/30
70/21
92/33
74/23
70/21
91/32
74/23

Saturday

Low
F/C
79/26
57/13
59/15
77/25
50/10
80/26
77/25
61/16
73/22
77/25
53/11
54/12
e123
43/6
49/9
48/8
50/10
76/24
87/30
53/11
74/23
71/21
80/26
61/16
52/11

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST

51/10

51/10
59/15
74/23
57/13
84/28

86/30 s

75/23

63/17 s

38/3
78/25
60/15
52/11
59/15
77/25
55/12
76/24
59/15
59/15

47/8
52/11
81/27
58/14
55/12
53/11
60/15
80/26
87/13
79/26

33/0
74/23

36/2
73/22
50/10
68/20
61/16

36/2
84/28
75/23
57/13
64/17
58/14
53/11

49/9
57/13

nD nNTD
oO oO

co

Coa con — icoy > ma fa Ga fa
o

wn
—

s
s
p
r
t
r
pe
s
s
C
t
s
s
r

pe
s

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

FRIDAY, JULY 17TH, 2009, PAGE 7B










WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F
Saturday: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F
Saturday: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F
ABACO Today: SE at 9-18 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 81°F
Saturday: _ ESE at 9-18 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 81°F



Denver 90/69
(H) 5190/55

Miami
92/81

Showers
[XX] T-storms
Rain









Fronts
[4 Matis Shown are noon positions of weather systems and ch
Bk. Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm itentitentMa
[yv_=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Meug~eafi
10s| 0s (0s | 10s 20s [305i] 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s (G0s)//iUnelii0)
BDF ‘k Pe,

?
| | . B ]

»

‘You Own

Away Gant leet Sane

Or you.can rest easy knowing

that yo have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

flaw Prevéones mg we rtf we ef wp
PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



"
ae 4
i
. =



Hubert Ingraham



aA MOMS

FROM page 1B

paid $1 for a grant of 17
Crown Land acres on the sea
in 1996.

And another certificate,
from 2005, showed that then-
Prime Minister Perry Christie
allowed a company to pay $1
for a 50-acre Crown Land
tract, again on the prime
beachfront property. The
report could not be printed,
though, so the names of the
developers involved or the
location of the land in ques-
tion could not be ascertained.

But Ms Loi wrote in her
report: “The Government
continued to make large tracts
of Crown Land available to

foreign investors at conces-
sionary rates - as low as $1-$2
for entire projects - as has
been done since the enact-
ment of the International Per-
sons Landholding Act under
the [first Ingraham adminis-
tration] and recorded below
from excerpts of Crown grants
obtained from the Depart-
ment of Lands and Surveys.”

Further confirmation of the
seemingly trivial purchase
prices paid by developers
came from the list of Crown
Land grants tabled by the
opposition PLP in the House
of Assembly on Wednesday,
where the developers of Pow-
ell Point at Cape Eleuthera
paid $ 1 each for four sepa-
rate Crown Land grants under

the Christie administration on
October 25, 2005.

Documents

And the holding company
for the Walker’s Cay resort
development in Abaco, and
Grand Cay Research Compa-
ny, also in Abaco, paid $1 for
their Crown Land grants
respectively under the former
PLP administration on March
4, 2005. The documents
recording the conveyancings,
according to what was tabled
in Parliament, came from Mr
Ingraham’s law practice - a
time when he was out of
office.

It is important, though, to

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Two PMs grant Crown Land to developer for $1

put these Crown Land grants
in context. It is unclear, first of
all, how much acreage was
involved in these $1 transac-
tions, and how the land
involved was to be used.

It has been a long-estab-
lished policy of successive
Bahamian governments to
trade land for development
and foreign direct investment,
particularly in mega resort
projects, and it is possible that
the land involved in these $1
transactions was critical to the
success of individual develop-
ments - a factor that could
‘make or break’ job creation./

It is impossible, though, to
know the Government’s
thinking on each respective
transaction, which again high-
lights the need for a transpar-
ent, accountable land use and
administration policy.

Other notable developers
obtaining Crown Land grants
included Kerzner Interna-
tional, which on February 20,
2008, through Atlantis Hold-
ings (Bahamas) paid $211,370
and $9,853 respectively for
two separate Crown Land
grants on Paradise Island.

Mayaguana Island Devel-
opers paid $2 million for
Crown Land on that island on
July 26, 2007, for the 50/50
joint venture development
project between the I-Group
and the Government, acting
through the Hotel Corpora-
tion of the Bahamas.

And Gerardo Capo’s RAV
Bahamas paid $425,600 to the
Treasury for a Crown Land
grant in Bimini that will form
part of the Bimini Bay resort
project.

Clan

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight

#€ The dAlbenas Agency Ltd.

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on Mondays

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S Hore

Mall at Marathon
Monday-Friday 9:00am-8:00pm
Saturday 9:00am-9:00pm
Sunday closed
www.kellysbahamas.com

Fax: (242) 393-4096





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