Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 105 No.193



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The Tribu

SA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

Ba

"Available at

Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875





PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

OBITUARIES

Two murders
in three hours

Teen shot, prominent
member of community
is stabbed to death

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
and DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Staff Reporters
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net;
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A 17-YEAR-OLD boy was
killed in a drive-by shooting and
a prominent member of the
Eight Mile Rock community
was stabbed to death yesterday,
all in the space of less than three
hours.

In New Providence, William
Ingraham, 17, of Lynden Pin-
dling Estates, was shot and
killed at around 4am in the
Robinson Road area, and in
Grand Bahama Denzil Jones Jr,
30, was stabbed to death by
intruders at his home in Jones
Town.

William Ingraham was
gunned down while sitting at
the side of the road on Ida
Street with two others when a
dark car pulled up and several
shots were fired from the vehi-
cle at around 4am, police said.

The teenager was shot in the
chest and upper arm. He fell to
the ground and died at the
scene.

An 18-year-old resident of
Miami Street sitting with him

was shot in the left leg, and a 16-
year-old resident of Mackey
Street was shot in the right leg.

Police were called just after
4am and the two survivors were
rushed to Princess Margaret
Hospital where their condition
is considered “not life-threat-
ening,” Police Supt Elsworth
Moss said.

A murder investigation has
been launched into the young
man’s death.

Supt Moss, officer in-charge
of the Central Detective Unit,
said: “We don’t know yet how
many people were in the car
and we have yet to determine
the motive of the shooting.

“If anyone has any informa-
tion that may assist investiga-
tions please call Crime Stoppers
or CDU.”

Meanwhile, in Grand
Bahama the murder of Denzil
Jones Jr left the close-knit com-
munity of Jones Town in shock.

Mr Jones was stabbed to
death by intruders in his apart-
ment in the early hours of yes-
terday.

The victim and his family are

SEE page 10

we TiC

Sai



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

POLICE AND DEFENCE FORCE officers came to the aid of two of their own yesterday, Able Seaman Vandyke
Adderley and Constable Ferguson, and helped them to rebuild their home in the Grove after a fire destroyed it

on Sunday morning.



Minister's former law partner questioned in
Connection with missing money allegations

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER law partner
of a Cabinet Minister is being
held at the Grove Police Sta-
tion for questioning in con-
nection with allegations that
more than a quarter of a mil-
lion dollars is missing from a

client’s account.

According to Supt Elsworth | served yesterday when a jury unanimously convicted Andy

Moss, the lawyer has been in} Francis, 22, of her son’s murder.

police custody from Tuesday :

afternoon. He is being ques-

SEE page nine

_

rTM et
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE



Troyniko
McNeil: I
did not kill
Harl Taylor

Murder accused
tells jury he had
nothing to do
with murder

By NATARIO
McKENZIE

Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

“T HAVE
been charged
for a murder
I did not
commit,”
murder
accused
Troyniko
McNeil told
the jury in
the Harl Tay-
lor murder tri-
al yesterday.

In his unsworn state-
ment from the prisoner’s
dock, McNeil, 22, told the
jury that he had nothing
to do with Taylor’s mur-
der and that he had no
reason to kill the noted
handbag designer.

McNeil, the son of Tay-
lor’s former business part-
ner Troy McNeil is
accused of causing Tay-
lor’s death between Sat-
urday November 17 and
Sunday November 18,
2007 while being con-
cerned with another. Tay-
lor, 37, was found dead at
Mountbatten House on
West Hill Street with mul-
tiple stab wounds.

McNeil told the jury
that his father had lived at
Mountbatten House and
that he had even worked
there before. He said that
prior to Taylor’s murder
he had made reservations
to travel to the United
States to receive treatment
for an injury he had
received while playing
basketball. He told the

SEE page nine

Troyniko
McNeil





Accused found guilty of

Khodee Davis murder

FOR the mother of 16-year-old Khodee Davis justice was

The jury found Francis’ co-accused, 18-year-old Robert Out-

: ten also of Fox Hill, not guilty of Davis’ murder 11-1. Justice Jon

tioned by CID officers. With } Jgaacs told Outten that he had been given an opportunity to get

i right oe an eile i his life in order. Outten’s relatives shouted praises to God after
ve nee ‘ ae 7 ees i the verdict was handed down. Outten was represented by lawyer
Said that the police have by + Romona Farquharson. Francis is expected back in court on

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THE southeast Bahamas may
be hit by thunderstorms and
showers within the next 36
hours as a well defined tropical
wave passing near Hispaniola
inches closer to the islands,
Chief Meteorologist Basil Dean
said yesterday.

Mr Dean said the Depart-
ment of Meteorology is watch-
ing the large tropical wave
which is fast moving towards
the Bahamas at 20 to 25 miles
per hour.

However, he said the system
is not showing any signs of
development and is not expect-
ed to be a threat to the
Bahamas. Nor does he expect
the wave to develop into a pos-
sible storm or depression, at
least within the next 48 hours.

THE TRIBUNE



Southeast Bahamas are

set for stormy weather

"With that kind of speed it
will push it through the area
very quickly. Even if it devel-
ops into something it would not
pose much of a threat to the
Bahamas," he said yesterday.

Mr Dean said it is not unusu-
al for things to be quiet on the
tropical storm front during this
time, adding that the season
should become active around
August.

"The tropics are very quiet
at the moment, for how long we
don't know, but we hope it
remains that way.

"This is not abnormal, we've
had numerous seasons when
we’ve had a late start.

“The peak (storm) season is
normally between August and
September,” he said.

Defence Force apprehends
suspected illegal immigrants

THE Defence Force has reported the apprehension of a number
of suspected illegal immigrants just off the coast of New Providence.

The detainees, all Haitians, were taken into custody after their
sloop was spotted by the Defence Force Air-wing reconnaissance
team near Green Cay early yesterday morning.

The Defence Force patrol craft HMBS P-121 was dispatched to

the area to investigate.

The crew discovered a 45-foot grey and white Haitian sloop
with a large number of Haitian aboard.

RBDF Patrol crafts HMBS P-48 and P-49 were dispatched to the
area to assist in the removal of the detainees.

They are expected to arrive in the capital early this morning.

PM: no vacancy for a
new chief justice as yet

ALTHOUGH
opposition leader
Perry Christie has
called for the prime
minister to consult
with him on the
question of who will
replace the outgoing
Chief Justice, Hubert
Ingraham yesterday
suggested he sees no

rush. S ie
mL am Nee UEUN

The Cabinet
Office announced on
June 26 that Chief Justice Sir
Burton Hall is set to leave the
Bahamas in August, after serv-
ing in the post for eight years,
to become a Permanent Judge
at the International Criminal
Tribunal for the Former
Yugoslavia.

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EXTERMINATORS

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Asked yesterday
whether he had con-
sidered who will
replace Sir Burton,
the prime minister
would only respond
that “there is no
vacancy” for a new
chief justice as yet.

Mr Christie said Mr
Ingraham has yet to
consult with him on
the issue of who will
replace Sir Burton
but added that he has “noted
to the prime minister that the
discussion needs to take
place.”

Under the constitution, the
appointment is made by the
governor-general, in accor-
dance with the recommenda-
tion of the prime minister, who
must have consulted with the
leader of the opposition.

Some attorneys have sug-
gested that Senior Supreme
Court Justice Anita Allen
would be the most likely and
worthy replacement.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Policewoman
and husband
accused of
assaulting
Freeport man

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A Freeport
man who claims to have been
assaulted by a female police
officer and her husband fears
that the incident is not being
taken seriously by Grand
Bahama police.

Frederick Morley said he suf-
fered a torn ligament in his arm
during the attack, which took
place on June 27 in the Caravel
Beach area.

Mr Morley said he reported
the matter to the police but has
not heard back from anyone on
the status of the investigation.

He is concerned that the mat-
ter will be swept under the rug.

Mr Morley claims the attack
has left him physically injured
and emotionally traumatised.
He said he has sought legal
advice.

“T cannot sleep at night, can’t
function and work properly, and
something needs to be done
about this,” Mr Morley said.

He claims the incident started
when he was approached by the
female officer who was not in
uniform at the time.

“T was doing lawn work in a
yard in Caravel Beach when the
officer approached me and
accused me of breaking her van
glass.

“T told her I did not break the
glass and she kept saying ‘you
break my glass.’ She then came
around the fence and attacked
me, tore my shirt off and kept
thumping me. Then her hus-
band came around and choked
me,” he claimed.

Mr Morley said the neigh-
bours heard his cries for help
and came out to assist, but was
told by the woman officer to
mind their business. He went to
the police station to report the
matter. “I told them that she
assaulted me and they kept me
there waiting for over an hour
before they dealt with me,” said
Mr Morley.

Mr Morley said a doctor
examined him and said he had
torn a ligament in his arm.

He said he took the doctor’s
report to the Central Police Sta-
tion, where an officer there told
him to take it to the Port
Lucaya Station, but when he
arrived he was told to go back
to Central. “I was treated worse
than a dog. I don’t think it is
right and I want Assistant Com-
missioner Dames to look into
this,” said Mr Morley.

His wife pointed out that
police officers are not above
law. “My husband is a hard
working man and if she hada
complaint about him, she could
have gone to him and worked it
out. There are procedures she
should have taken as an officer
of the law.

“She should have known bet-
ter. The police are here to pro-
tect us from the bad guys, not to
inflict harm on anyone. She
would have arrested him if he
had attacked or assaulted her,”
she said. Mrs Morley said her
husband has been deeply affect-
ed by the incident and has had
difficulty sleeping.

Community activist Troy
Garvey was able set up a meet-
ing between the Morleys and
ACP Marvin Dames, who said
police are investigating the mat-
ter. Mr Garvey claims the
woman officer has told him she
is willing to apologise if that is
what the Morleys want. “You
can’t go around taking advan-
tage of people. We will seek jus-
tice, but I hope that we can
bring resolution to the matter,”
Mr Garvey said.

Preliminary
inquiry set to
start in October

A PRELIMINARY inquiry
into the murder of American
Anna Garrison is scheduled to
begin on October 26.

Zyndall McKinney, 22, of
Isabella Boulevard is accused of
intentionally and unlawfully
causing Garrison’s death
between Sunday, February 25
and Saturday, July 4, 2009,
while being concerned with
another. He was arraigned on
the charge last week.

The preliminary inquiry will
be held before Magistrate
Ancella Williams in Court Six,
Parliament Street. Garrison’s
badly decomposed body was
discovered by walkers in a
bushy area off Fox Hill Road
south, near the Blue Water Cay
development, on Saturday July
4. Garrison, 33, first came to the
attention of the police on Feb-
ruary 25, 2009, when they
received a missing person report
from the United States Embassy
in Nassau.

Govt owes millions to Bahamians
dispossessed of land, claims MP

Mitchell tells parliament outstanding debts should be settled ‘expeditiously’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE government owes mil-
lions of dollars to Bahamians
who it dispossessed of their land
in order to undertake public
works projects, it was claimed in
parliament.

MP for Fox Hill Fred
Mitchell yesterday called for
government to “expeditiously”
settle the outstanding debts that
it owes to those people whose
land has been acquired over
many years.

He said that when the PLP
government came to power in
2002 there was $50 million owed
to people for “hundreds if not
thousands” of acres of land
acquired. In documents tabled
by the MP, it is evident that
much of this land was used in
the construction of new road
corridors, as well as for airports,
housing, schools and parks.

The Tribune was unable to
ascertain yesterday precisely



FRED MITCHELL

where this figure stands at pre-
sent.

Mr Mitchell said: “This is
something which we must
account for. The constitution
says that you can acquire some-
body’s land for a public pur-
pose, but you must compensate
them for their land and some

people have been waiting years
and years for their compensa-
tion,” said Mr Mitchell, sug-
gesting that his party also failed
to dispose of the debt during
their five year tenure in office
which came after their 2002
election victory.

Cavalier

“It seems to me that we can-
not treat people’s property in
such a cavalier fashion and this
must be dealt with expeditious-
ly. I don’t even know if this $50
million is on the books as a debt
owed by the country, as part of
the national debt. Nevertheless
the debt is outstanding and It
should be settled,” he added.

The MP was speaking as he
moved a resolution for the for-
mation of a parliamentary select
committee to investigate mat-
ters connected with Crown land.

Coming on the heels of a
series of articles in The Tribune
outlining questionable land
grants during the tenure of the

Mortician denies claims teen’s body
removed from morgue without consent

THE mortician who co-ordi-
nated the funeral arrangements
for Michael Knowles, the teen
found hanged in a police holding
cell in May, strongly refuted
reports that the boy’s body was
removed from the state morgue
and embalmed without official
consent.

Llewellyn Astwood Jr, co-direc-
tor of Demeritte’s Funeral Home,
said he was in possession of signed
documents that prove he received
written consent from the boy's
family and the relieving officer at
Princess Margaret Hospital for
the release of the body to the
funeral home.

He said the home then did what
any "sensible" mortician would
do — embalmed the body.

"It's impossible for us to get a
body without proper authorisa-
tion,” Mr Astwood said yester-
day. “Without proper authorisa-
tion from a family member it's
impossible for the funeral home to
even inquire on the person. A
funeral home can't just get a body
and say ‘I want to embalm it’.”

His comments came in response
to an article published in the
Bahama Journal on Wednesday,
which reported that a source
claimed that Knowles’ body was
"removed from the morgue and
embalmed before a second autop-
sy could be performed ... With-
out official consent.”

Knowles was found dead in his
cell in the East Street south sta-
tion on May 31, with what
appeared to be a cord from his
trousers wrapped around his neck.

Although police ruled the death
an apparent suicide, many specu-
lated that Knowles may have been

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“It is impossible for us to
get a body without proper
authorisation.”



Llewellyn Astwood Jr

the victim of foul play or police
negligence.

Autopsy

According to previous reports,
the family's lawyer had planned
for a second independent autopsy
by a foreign pathologist.

Wednesday's report in the
Journal claimed this could not be
performed because Knowles’
body had been embalmed.

But Mr Astwood yesterday
said he had "no idea" the family
wanted an independent autopsy
performed until he heard it on the
news. "No one called me and said
that a second autopsy was to be

done. I heard about it on the
news. After the initial embalm-
ing we secured all of his vital
organs in case they wanted to
have a second autopsy done (but)
nobody even called me to say
we’re going for a second autopsy
and I heard nothing from them
so I prepped the body for burial,"
Mr Astwood said. He said after
a body has been embalmed, a sec-
ond autopsy is possible, however
due to the presence of embalming
fluid in the body, a toxicology
report would be fruitless.

Knowles’ funeral is scheduled
for today at 11 am.

A Coroner’s Inquest into his
death is expected to be held soon.

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recently-resigned director of
lands and surveys, Tex Turn-
quest — including some to his
own family and friends, some
of the land having been
“flipped” for large profits soon

after — Mr Mitchell’s proposal
led into a debate among MPs
on the question of the distribu-
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by the government in the
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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master














































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Lax US guns laws affect Bahamas

LAST WEEK we watched a programme
about Chicago’s growing crime and the fact
that more than 150 children of that state have
been killed in the past three years — all because
of guns.

A report done by the University of Chicago
Crime Laboratory, an academic group research-
ing effective ways to reduce violent crime, found
that the social cost of Chicago’s gun violence
totals about $2.5 billion each year.

It is said that every year 30,000 Americans
die by being at the wrong end of a gun — at
least 10,000 of them murders.

According to reports this is twice the number
of 4,316 US soldiers killed in the six-year Iraq
war.

In 1982 Chicago became the first major US
city to enact a handgun freeze. Soon other sub-
urbs began passing gun law legislation.

Of course, the politically powerful National
Rifle Association, has fought every inch of the
way to protect the American’s “fundamental
right” to be armed.

But the most powerful blow to groups that
want to remove guns from the streets came in a
Supreme Court ruling that “struck down two
parts of the country’s strictest gun control law
adopted in Washington, DC, 32 years ago — the
ban on private handgun possession and the
requirement that firearms kept at home be
unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trig-
ger lock.”

Of course, the ruling won praise from former
President George W Bush, defeated Republican
presidential candidate John McCain and Wayne
LaPierre of the National Rifle Association.
According to LaPierre the ruling was “a great
moment in American history.”

However, although President Barack Obama
believed the Second Amendment to the US
Constitution protected the right of Americans to
bear arms, he also identified “with the need for
crime-ravaged communities to save their chil-
dren from the violence that plagues our streets
through common sense, and effective safety
measures.”

During his election campaign the Rifle Asso-
ciation ran multi-million dollar advertisements
to make voters believe that, if elected, he would
be the most anti-gun president in US history and
that their firearms would be confiscated.

So far Mr Obama has not looked in the direc-
tion of the gun lobby, but many fearful Ameri-
cans hope he will eventually get around to it.

According to a Reuters report the United

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States is estimated to have the world’s highest
civilian gun ownership rate.

And soon Arizona will allow citizens to car-
ry concealed licensed weapons into its bars just
as Billy the Kid did in the days of the swing-door
saloon — only in those days Billy didn’t need a
licence.

It is claamed that Americans can walk into
bars in 40 of its 50 states with their “funda-
mental right” in their hip pocket.

And a gun-toting pastor in a Louisville, Ken-
tucky, Assembly of God church maintains that
“God and guns were part of the foundation of
this country.”

He invited his 150-member congregation and
their friends to carry their guns into the sanc-
tuary on a Saturday night to “celebrate our
right as Americans!”

It is true that the world is full of crackpots,
but it seems that America has more than her fair
share of them.

On the programme discussing Chicago’s
crime problem, a speaker involved in trying to
bring sanity back to the streets, said he would
like to see all guns removed from the streets.
Asked by the programme host if in his experi-
ence he had seen fewer deaths in areas where
guns were outlawed, he admitted to knowing of
none.

This seemed to answer the question for the
programme host.

Why remove guns if the murder rate did not
go down?

But what seemed to escape both of them
was that there is no good for one state to ban
firearms, when Americans just have to cross
state lines to purchase a gun in a neighbouring
state and smuggle it back home.

As long as this can happen the killing will
continue.

This is the problem that the Bahamas faces.
As long as Americans glorify guns, and —
despite what they say — allow them to get into
so many irresponsible hands, the Bahamas will
continue to have a gun problem on its own
streets.

It’s incredible the lengths to which Bahamians
will go to smuggle firearms into this country.

And so until Americans decide to grow up,
and shake the dust of the Wild West from their
cowboy boots, and the National Rifle Associa-
tion comes to its senses, the Bahamas will con-
tinue to have a gun problem.

And, of course, the gun deaths will continue
— both here and in America.

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Call for education
privatisation seems
naive and theoretical

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Comment on “Privatize edu-
cation system, Govt urged”: an
article in The Tribune, July 14,
2009, page 3.

The above cited article con-
tained several important ideas.

Firstly, the article reported
the views of the President of
the Nassau Institute, Mrs. Joan
Thompson; and she criticized
the Prime Minister for his com-
ment on the 10-year plan of the
Department of Education. That
criticism seems intemperate and
ill-informed based on what he
said and what occurred at the
Education Summit.

Specifically, Prime Minister
stated that “our success in get-
ting every child into a classroom
has not translated into every
child having achieved his full
potential...today too many stu-
dents leave our secondary
schools only semi-literate and
semi-numerate.” This a clear
and valid statement.

Yes, the Department of Edu-
cation (DOE) did present a 65-
page “10 Year Education Plan”
at the summit that contained 22
goals, each containing numer-
ous short and long term objec-
tives. These objectives are
extended “wish” lists and were
aptly described in the document
itself as “hopes.” And... the lit-
eracy problem so clearly identi-
fied in the Prime Minister's

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



comment was the number three
goal behind “Developing a
More Relevant Curriculum”
and “Developing National
Pride, Civic Responsibility and
a Strong Work Ethic in Stu-
dents.”

The Goal 3 on “Literacy and
Numeracy” had 16 objectives
that included some curriculum
changes, more teacher training
and on-the-job teacher mentor-
ing. To many these changes do
not address the severity of the
academic failure and illiteracy
problems in the Public Schools.

And...the surprise of all sur-
prises is that the plan was clear-
ly marked DRAFT. It would
appear that the Department of
Education was diplomatically
sent back to the drawing boards
to develop an acceptable plan.

Secondly, the President of
the Nassau Institute, lays out a
plan of privatization that seems
naive and theoretical. If one
looks at the world and asks:
“Are the best national systems
publicly or privately owned?”
one would have to admit that
they are mostly Government-
owned and/or directed and
financed.

One international school

testing organization shows that
the world's top-five systems are
Singapore, South Korea Hong
Kong, Taiwan and Japan. All
of these governments have cre-
ated schools to produce a mili-
tarily strong nation or to
increase the nation's human
skills and capabilities. All of
these countries have cultures
that support hard work and dis-
cipline. Some have made mis-
takes; but all have been willing
to modify their systems.

It is ironic that The Nassau
Institute has published and is
widely distributing the “The
Learning Crisis” essay. That
document accepts the impor-
tance of Government in educa-
tion and proposes specific pro-
grammes designed to change
the culture of the classroom by
proposing innovative schools
that have a proven track record
in educating under privileged
children.

One can be a sceptic and say
that nothing changes in the
Bahamas, especially the DOE.
But...the Prime Minister's com-
ment suggests that the country
will get another draft of a 10-
year plan; and that is a good
sign. We will just have to wait
and see.

RALPH J MASSEY
Economist & Consultant
Nassau,

July 15, 2009.

ob years on, do we have more national pride?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Being in the age group that still remembers the
unnerving silence that befell Clifford Park on July 10,
1973 I was thinking whether we have more nation-
al pride today than we had in 1973 to what is wit-

nessed today?

Colourful ‘T’ shirts in our national colours means
nothing to me if that same person refuses totally to
respect their fellow Bahamian in a manner fitting
recognising that that person like you is also a

Bahamian.

and discoloured that I could not imagine any respon-
sible person allowing these examples to fly but these

flags flew for months.

Check the beaches come Saturday, July 11th, and
witness the piles of litter — soda cans and garbage
we took from home, enjoyed the food and left every-

thing remaining right there on the beach and we

call ourselves good citizens?

I was down there in Rawson Square yesterday
for the traditional Police Beating of the Retreat
across where I stood with my family were the VIPs,

but it seems this year with the FNM in office Inde-

Then there is the person who is bedecked in all the
finery and is cussing and throwing as much litter as
they can muster all over God’s fine earth, but also
feels he is as equal as anyone else.

36 years on we still have people who are unable to
sing our national anthem without a text — I notice
more and more children are unable to sing the
anthem.

We disrespect our flag — government buildings fly
a tattered flag or a flag faded so much you cannot
really see the distinctive colours. For months not so
many weeks ago in the back area of Victoria Gar-
dens there were two flags which were so damaged

pendence is only for them — not a soul from the
PLP Opposition. I remarked to my children — look
just how silly we are.

If we really understood what our fine national
anthem says this would be God’s country as those so
well chosen words of Timothy Gibson are idyllic to
the extreme and should inspire us all to imitate
God’s commandments, but look what we do?

M SAWYER
Nassau,
July 5, 2009.

I don’t believe more taxes are necessary

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This is in response to Mr
Thomas Smith’s letter on tax-

employees such as maids and
gardeners I feel there would be
enough funds generated to
avoid new taxes.

es. I personally can recall that

Evidently he had some infor-
mation which was proven to be
wrong.

I hope that someone in the
proper position with govern-

I really don’t believe that
more taxes are necessary.

If the proper government
agency would investigate every-
one who should be paying
National Insurance on their

about a year ago I had an agent
visit me about my maid and her
insurance.

I happily showed him all the
past payments I made and he
seemed rather impressed.

ment will take heed!

HELEN ASARITA (Mrs.)
Nassau,
June 28m 2009

Dowdeswell Street * Tel: 322-1103

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Magistrate ‘to leave post next year’

MAGISTRATE William
Campbell, who presides over the
Coroner’s Court, expects to leave
his post next year when his three-
year contract comes to an end in
November, 2010, he confirmed to
The Tribune yesterday.

The judge said he had been
extended three renewable three-
year contracts, the last of which
comes to an end next year, as is
customary.

Still, Magistrate Campbell said
he would not be adverse to any
opportunity to retain his post.

Magistrate Campell presided

"O” down

over a number of high-profile
inquests, including that of Daniel
Smith, the son of late American
celebrity Anna Nicole Smith.

The inquest started in Novem-
ber 2007 after several postpone-
ments and a revolving door of
magistrates.

Testimony was drawn out over
five months before a seven-
member jury concluded the
young man died from an acci-
dental overdose of a cocktail of
drugs.

Mr Campbell also previously
held the post of chief coroner.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Troops seize police
Station in Venezuela

CARACAS, Venezuela

DOZENS of National Guard | ;
troops seized control of a police }
station controlled by a leading ;
opponent of President Hugo
Chavez on Wednesday, adding }
to tensions between Venezue-
la’s government and elected :
opposition officials, according }

to Associated Press.

About 40 National Guard }
troops tossed tear gas canisters }
at a police precinct post in the }
town of Curiepe, east of Cara- }
cas, shortly before dawn, said :
Elisio Guzman, director of the i
Miranda state police. He said }
the officers inside were forced to }
leave and the National Guard :

occupied the building.

Guzman said the motive }
behind the takeover was unclear }
and national government offi- :
cials could not immediately be :

reached for comment.

N eighbourhood comes together
to tackle rising crime problem

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

RISING crime in a Nassau neigh-
bourhood has brought a community
together to share information and
coordinate security efforts to keep their
area Safe.

Residents of Harmony Hill, off Vil-
lage Road, and near Ryswick Road
and Starlight Drive, started talking
about how to keep their homes safe
following a series of burglaries in May.

On Mother’s Day, a robber broke
into a woman’s bedroom as she was
sleeping in the early morning hours.

The community realised later that

the burglar’s intrusion could have been
prevented if residents had told each
other that they had seen a strange man
lurking in the area and attempting to
break into a another home just two
hours before.

Some weeks prior to that incident,
five burglaries were reported in nearby
Greenwood Road where items were
stolen from homes, or boats and trail-
ers were taken from yards. Four of
these robberies occurred during the
night.

And on another occasion a burglar
broke in through the front door of a
house in Harmony Hill to steal a flat-
screen television while the homeown-
ers slept upstairs.

“Tt seems like nothing will stop these
guys,” the resident said.

“They come when people are asleep
and that is what scares me.”

An innovative crime watch scheme
launched as a result of these incidents
has now gained 100 per cent partici-
pation from residents, linking around
90 homes in the area through modern
technology so local residents can keep
each other updated about suspicious
happenings in the neighbourhood.

Instant sharing of information is
already benefitting the tightening net-
work of residents and preventing
unnecessary calls to the police. And
the community is working with police
officers to ensure they are up-to-date

with the latest security systems and
aware of the details police will require
when they are called.

As neighbours are communicating,
talks of integrating security systems
and organising a nightly neighbour-
hood patrol are in motion.

A Harmony Hill resident of 27 years
said: “I suppose the current climate
has made people more inclined to be
connected, and there’s a lot more
awareness now, we are cooperating
completely.

“The exchange of ideas has been
phenomenal and I think putting in the
measures we are talking about will
make it a lot harder to get into the
neighbourhood after this.”

(BE ‘B BP Bahamas Business

CLE Sac Oe CoP

xerox @,) COPY CENTER
DELIVERS

SENATOR Dion Foulkes,
Minister of Labour and Social
Services, held a series of meet-
ings in Freeport, Grand Bahama,
on Tuesday in a continuing effort
to get feedback from social part-
ners on the FNM government’s
proposed National Training Pro-
gramme.

The draft framework for the
programme, which is aimed at
training and retraining recently
laid off Bahamians, was recently
submitted to the government by
Khaalis Rolle, president of the
Chamber of Commerce and
chairman of the National Training
Implementation Committee.

Mr Foulkes met with senior
managers from the Grand
Bahama Shipyard, Freeport Con-
tainer Port, the Home Centre,
Xanadu Hotel, Island Seas and
Island Palm Condominiums and
the Isle of Capri Casino.

A National Training Pro-
gramme Committee for Grand
Bahama has been established
under the chairmanship of
Tyrone Gibson, deputy director
of Labour, with representatives
from the business community,
trade unions and the Grand
Bahama Christian Council.

“The programme will be

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Princess Margaret Hospital

ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC
NOTICE!

IN AN EFFORT TO IMPROVE OUR PATIENT
SERVICES AT THE PRINCESS MARGARET
HOSPITAL. WE WILL UNDERGO
RENOVATIONS TO THE ENTRANCE AND
TRIAGE AREA OF THE ACCIDENT &
EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT.v

WE ASK THAT PERSONS VISITING THE
DEPARTMENT ENTER THROUGH ~ THE
PHARMACY DEPARTMENT ENTRANCE AND
CONTINUE ONWARD THROUGH THE
ENTRANCE OF THE ORTHOPEDIC CLINIC.

MANAGEMENT APOLOGIZES FOR’ ANY
INCONVENIENCE CAUSED AND ASK THAT
THE PUBLIC COOPERATE WITH US DURING
THIS TIME.

SIGNED: MANAGEMENT

ARO ABE
-* fit,

Foulkes consults on Grand
Bahama training programme



DION FOULKES met with executives from the Container Port on the National Training Programme. Pictured are Alpheus
Forbes, deputy permanent secretary; Charles Hunt, human resources consultant; J Malvese Capron, human resources
director of the Freeport Container Port; Minister Foulkes: Raymond L Jones, Chief Operating Officer; Tyrone Gibson,



deputy director of Labour; and Sammy Gardiner, administrator in the Office of the Prime Minister.

geared towards training workers
in areas where there is a strong
demand from the business sec-
tor,” the minister said.

“These areas will include, but
not be limited to the following:
Masonry, carpentry, welding, tile-
laying, electrical, landscaping,
data processing, computer skills,
customer service, day care assis-
tant, housekeeping and language
skills. Even in these hard times
there are still some jobs available

Marine poster
competition
TSE CL

OVER 450 students from
schools throughout the Bahamas
went head-to-head this year in the
Dolphin Encounters’ 2009 Marine
Education Poster Competition. In
the end, 12 students, including two
from the Family Islands, walked
away with top honours at an award
ceremony held on Blue Lagoon
Island.

Hundreds of students logged on
to the Dolphin Encounters web-
site to download applications for
this year’s contest, which was held
under the theme “Invasive Species
— The Pirates of the Caribbean.”
Students were invited to learn
about the negative effects of inva-
sive species and create posters that
reflected their thoughts and con-
cerns. The competition, which is in
its ninth year, was open to all stu-
dents throughout the Bahamas
from kindergarten through 12th
grade, and the winning entries were
chosen by a panel of judges at a
recent judging ceremony at the
Bahamas National Trust.

The winning entries were cho-
sen by a panel of judges including
Charlene Carey of the Bahamas
Reef Environment Educational
Foundation (BREEF); Janeen
Bullard, Bahamas National Trust;
Stacey Gray of the BEST Com-
mission; Lakeshia Anderson of the
Ministry of Agriculture and Marine

EDIEAMIBYIMEDIEINEICEN

for those with the relevant skills,
and there are likely to be more of
these when the global economy
turns around. Some of them, for
instance ship welding, are quite
lucrative.”

Mr Foulkes also informed
stakeholders in Grand Bahama
that the courses will be for 10 to
15 weeks and are being offered by
the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BT VI) and
the College of the Bahamas in

Freeport.

“The programme will be made
available to 1,000 unemployed
Bahamians who will be selected
from those persons who have
already registered for the Nation-
al Insurance Unemployment Ben-
efit,” said Senator Foulkes.

He said he was pleased with
the response from all the social
partners in Grand Bahama who
have agreed to work with the gov-
ernment in this new programme.






2009 DOLPHIN ENCOUNTERS Marine Education Poster Competition winners:
(Back row I-r) Annette Dempsey, director of Education at Dolphin Encounters;
Sophia Taylor; Brianna Eccleston; Franz Taylor; Enrico Rio, and Sophia Smith
of the Dolphin Encounters — Project BEACH. (Front row I-r); Saifuddin
Rahimi, Anju Bimal; La Tifia Payne, and Sacha Hussey.

Resources; Sharrah Moss, the
Nature Conservancy, and Lorraine
Cox of the BEST Commission.

The winners were recognised for
their art during an award ceremony
held by Dolphin Encounters at the
Project BEACH education centre
on Blue Lagoon Island.

The winners of the four entry
categories are:

K-2

1. La Tifia Payne - See Saw
Academy

2. Saifuddin S Rahimi - St John’s
College

3. Johnny Bethel - Man-O-War
Primary School

Grades 3-5

1. Anju Bimal - Xavier’s Lower
School

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2. Sacha Hussey - St Andrews
School

3. Ariannah Bain - Summit
Academy

Grades 6-8

1. Falon Williams - St Andrews
School

2. Enrico Rio -Tambearly School

3. Abel Abraham -St Paul’s
Methodist College

Grades 9-12

1. Franz Taylor - Lyford Cay
School

2. Sophia Taylor - Lyford Cay
School

3. Brianna Eccleston - Lyford
Cay School

First place winner in the 9-12th
grade category, Franz Taylor, of
Lyford Cay School, felt strongly
about the message in his winning
poster, “I have always been con-
cerned about the negative effects of
invasive species in our environment
and my poster reflects that. I want-
ed to show that both our native
plants and animals are being hurt
by invasives and that we need to
take action.”

“My poster shows small native
plants trying to grow under a
Casuarina tree and they are say-
ing “Casuarina Tree You Don’t
Grow On Me,” said Sacha Hussey,
of St Andrew’s School, second
place winner in the 3-5th grade cat-
egory.

“T painted the little plants try-
ing to grow and the roots and nee-
dles of the Casuarina plant is stop-
ping them.

“Invasive species hurt our native
plants.”



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Half of $20m unemployment
money has been exhausted

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE National Insurance Board has
exhausted almost half of the $20 million
allotted for the national unemployment
benefit plan since payments began in early
May.

Yesterday NIB Chairman Algernon
Cargill told The Tribune that, to date, the
board had approved 8,785 claims and paid
out $9.1 million, an average of $1.1 million
a week.

"Up to July 7, we'd received 10,529 appli-
cations. Of that number, 706 persons were
not approved. Up to that point we had paid
out in total... $9.1 million,” he said during
an interview with The Tribune yesterday.
"We have approved, all together, 8,785 per-
sons who are in receipt of claims, up to
date. We currently pay out approximately
$1.1 million a week.”

He said given the current number of
applicants, the $20 million transferred from
NIB's Medical Benefits Fund — which

finances phase one of the scheme — is
expected to be depleted by October or
November of this year.

During the second phase of the plan, gov-
ernment has said it will establish a fund
into which all employers and employees
will contribute 0.5 per cent of the employ-
ee’s insurable wage to sustain the pro-
gramme.

Fund

Mr Cargill said an average of $130 a week
is paid out to each recipient of the fund
with an average of 100 people a day apply-
ing for the scheme.

The plan provides a maximum of $200 a
week for up to 13 weeks at a time; recipients
will not be eligible for the benefit again
until a period of 52 weeks has passed.

Mr Cargill added that since the plan's
inception, nearly 50 people have attempted
to defraud the fund by collecting unem-
ployment benefits by false pretences.

He said that such cases were quickly iden-

tified by authorities at NIB and after inves-
tigation, turned over to the police.

"The first thing we do when we detect
that someone may have committed unem-
ployment fraud is to stop the benefit. And
after we've stopped the benefit we would do
our own internal investigations. The sec-
ond phase would require that we refer these
matters to the police, and that's what we've
done in most of those cases already,” he
said.

The chairman said many of the suspected
fraudsters were unemployed when they
applied for the fund but then got employ-
ment and continued to receive the benefit.

He said the board was alerted when NIB
contributions from employers began being
paid for persons who were still receiving
the benefit.

In other cases, he said, NIB received tips
about the fraudsters or spotted claimants on
the job.

"Unfortunately some persons find it nec-
essary to try to receive the unemployment
benefit while they're still working,” he
said.

‘Children of God’ to open 2009
Bahamas International Film Festival

THE Bahamas Internation-
al Film Festival (BIFF)
announced yesterday that
Kareem Mortimer’s acclaimed
indie drama “Children of
God” will be the opening film
at this year’s festival, which
takes place from December
10-17 in Nassau.

The intimate drama is slat-
ed to screen on Friday,
December 11.

“Children of God”, origi-
nally titled “Daybreak”, was
shot last summer entirely in
Nassau and Eleuthera. The
film was written, directed and
produced by Mr Mortimer.

Said the filmmaker: “It is
also a subtle and haunting
look at race, sexuality and
religion in the Bahamas which
makes it a very timely and
important film and also an
extremely gorgeous one to
look at. We are very proud of
this effort and to open at the
Bahamas International Film
Festival is a dream come
true.”

The film stars Van Brown,
Johnny Ferro, Mark Ford,
Margaret Kemp, Stephen
Tyrone Williams and a many
other Bahamians.

The movie depicts the reli-
gious concept of human
beings regarded by God as his
children. It is the story of two
individuals who learn that in
order to live a truly happy life
they have to risk speaking and
acting on their true feelings.

Set against the backdrop of
a nation grappling with vio-
lent homophobia, this film

Create the V9

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BIFF FOUNDER and axecttye
director Leslie Vanderpool
tells the story of Jon, a white
Bahamian artist who faces los-
ing his scholarship at a local
university, and Lena, a con-

servative religious woman
who is struggling with her
crumbling marriage. Both
escape from city life in Nas-
sau to the island of Eleuthera,
where their worlds collide in a
way that will surprise audi-
ences.

Said BIFF founder and
executive director Leslie Van-
derpool:

“We are thrilled to once
again have a Bahamian film
open this year’s festival. This
is Kareem Mortimer’s debut
feature film, and to see that
BIFF has assisted Kareem
throughout his nascent career
means a lot. A participant in
the BIFF filmmaker residency
programme in 2007, (he) is
sure to be an award-winning
filmmaker at many film festi-

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





SEEN FROM LEFT ARE: Rebecca Harris of St Paul’s Methodist College; Leaniqua Martin, St Georges
High; Shermae Martin, Bishop Michael Eldon School; Vanessa Henderson, Bishop Michael Eldon High;
Kristine Henfield, St Georges High; Christopher Duncanson, returning summer student; Theresa Martin,
human resources assistant; and Valerie Barry, human resources manager.


























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Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university

Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance

Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a
law degree

Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations
for improvements to a compliance culture

Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of
duties

Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and
best practices

Confidentiality

Excellent oral and written communication skills

& Responsibilities:

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Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps
taken to foster good compliance.

Implement and maintain a compliance monitoring programme. This will
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E-mail: careers@c olinaimperial.com
RE: Risk and Compliance Officer

Absolutely no phone calls will be accepted

Firm offers
job training
for students

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - At a time
when many companies are
cutting jobs, Polymers Inter-
national Limited decided to
hire several summer students
and put them through a job
training programme.

Human resource manager
Valerie Barry said PIL has
enrolled seven young students
from various high schools on
the island in an ecight-
week summer student pro-
gramme.

She said the students are in
their second week of training,
receiving work experience and
on the job training in five dif-
ferent areas at the plant on
Queens Highway.

Polymers International has
been in operation for 13 years
on Grand Bahama, and cur-
rently employs 74 workers.
The company manufactures



“We believe it will help the
Bahamas in the future and also
give our youth the experience
required to get them to move

forward.”



PIL human resource manager Valerie Barry

the materials used to make
Styrofoam products and plas-
tics.

“We export to various
plants across the world and
our main customers are in the
US,” Miss Barry said.

She noted that despite the
recession, PIL has not laid off
any workers.

“Even though most compa-
nies are cutting back, we
decided to continue with the
summer student programme
because we feel that investing
and spending time developing

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our youth is important for our
future.

“We believe it will help the
Bahamas in the future and
also give our youth the expe-
rience required to get them to
move forward.

“We run a two-year pro-
gramme, and this year we
have four new students and
three students from last year
who are in their second year
of the programme.”

Ms Barry said the summer
students are between 16 and
18 years old. They are moni-
tored and every week depart-
ment heads meet on Friday to
discuss their progress and
achievements.

“They get to find out what
the working environment is
like and they get to learn
about professionalism; what
is expected of individuals in a
working environment.

“IT hope they can take this
experience back with them
and eventually amalgamate
that in their learning and
become productive and pro-
fessional adults later on in
life,” she said.

The students participating
this year are: Shermae Mar-
tin, Shipping Department;
Leaniqua Martin, Accounts
Department; Kristine Hen-
field, Safety Department;
Rebecca Harris, Quality Lab
Department; Rashae Lewis,
Water Lab Department;
Vanessa Henderson, Human
Resources; and Christopher
Duncanson, Parts Depart-
ment.

Leaniqua Martin, a student
at St Georges High, said she is
very excited to be working
and training this summer.

“This is my first summer job
and I am excited about being
given a chance to do some-
thing for the summer instead
of staying at home doing noth-
ing.
“T want to be an accountant
and this experience will help
me learn basic accounting pro-
cedures and how to work well
with others,” she said.

Rebecca Harris, of St Paul’s
Methodist College, said that
the experience she will gained
at PIL will help her in the
future.

Christopher Duncanson
said training at PIL has afford-
ed him the opportunity to
improve his communication
skills.

“T want to be a nurse and
you have to be able to com-
municate with people and so
this experience is very valu-
able,” he said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Accused
found guilty
of Khowdee
Davis murder

FROM page one

August 20.

Francis was represented
by attorney Michael Han-
na.

Outside the courtroom
following the ruling, Davis’
mother, Sonia Dill, said she
was satisfied with the out-
come of the case and is
looking for her son’s killer
to receive the death penal-
ty. Sandra Dee Gardiner,
lead prosecutor on the case
said that the Crown is seek-
ing to have Francis receive
the death penalty.

Davis, 16, an 11th grade
Temple Christian student
was stabbed in the chest
during a fight between two
groups of males at Cab-
bage Beach Paradise Island
on May 12, last year.

Community activist
Rodney Moncur com-
plained yesterday that
there was not sufficient
security at the court, claim-
ing that he and some of the
witnesses in the case had
been threatened by sup-
porters of the two men
who had stood trial.

Former law partner
of Minister questioned
FROM page one

this evening to either charge
or release the lawyer.

Reportedly, the officers
are working on a complaint
by a former expatriate
client of the firm who
alleges that more than
$250,000 was taken from his
account.

This investigation Mr
Moss said is being conduct-
ed based on a complaint
that was brought to the
attention of CDU sometime
last year.

FROM page one

jury that he had travelled to
the US, came back to the
Bahamas and went back to
the US again during which
time his passport had
expired. He said that he
applied for a new passport
and while waiting in the US
he learned that Bahamian
police were looking for him.
McNeil said that as soon as
he was informed that he
could collect his passport,
he made reservations to
return home. However, he
said that when he went to
get his passport, he was
arrested.

“Tam not a murderer and
I never killed anybody,”
McNeil said. “I have two
children I love very much
and they love me very
much,” he said. McNeil said

Troyniko McNeil

that that police have
deprived him of his freedom
for over a year without
cause.

“T have been charged for
a murder I did not commit.
Up to this day I feel like
they don’t have anything to
show why they charge me.
I’m just ready to be with my
children, my children need
me,” he said.

McNeil called one wit-
ness in his defence yester-
day. Robert Miller told the
court that he had known the
accused for three years. He
said he got to know McNeil
through working with his
father doing private func-
tions at Mountbatten
House. He said that he
worked with the accused as

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a server and bartender. He
said his work for McNeil’s
father ended a day before
Taylor’s murder.

Miller said that there had
been a function at Mount-
batten House on the night
of November 16, 2008, but
he did not work at the func-
tion. He told the court that
functions were held in the
foyer or terrace area of
Mountbatten House.

In closing his case yester-













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that the prosecution had
advanced no evidence at all
to connect McNeil to Tay-
lor’s murder. He said his
client is a victim.

The prosecution and
defence are expected to
make their closing submis-
sions today. Senior Justice
Anita Allen is expected to
give her summation of the
trial on Friday.



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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



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Two murders
in three hours

Eight Mile Rock.
FROM page one

prominent residents of Eight
Mile Rock. His death brings
the homicide count to five for
the year on Grand Bahama.

Grand Bahama police are
questioning several persons
who were taken into custody
in connection with the mat-
ter.

Asst Supt Welbourne Boo-
tle said sometime around
6.40am police received a call
from an unidentified male
caller who reported that a
man was lying on the ground
in the area of the Four C’s
Clothing Store in Jones Town.

When officers arrived at
the scene they discovered a
black male lying on his back.
The victim was wearing red
boxer shorts and a white sin-

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ASP CLARENCE RECKLEY speaks at the murder sc





ene in Jones Town,

glet soaked in blood.

Mr Bootle said that the vic-
tim told officers that he was
attacked by two men who
entered his apartment and
demanded money.

After telling his attackers
that he did not have any mon-
ey, he was gun-butted,
stabbed, and thrown through
a window from his second-
floor apartment, said Mr Boo-
tle. The victim was taken to
Rand Memorial Hospital
where he died of his injury.

The crime scene was cor-
doned off by police as a crowd
of onlookers gathered in the
area.

According to unconfirmed
reports, it is believed that a
white vehicle used by the sus-
pects and abandoned in the
area, near the scene of the
murder, was recovered by
police.

Mr Jones was an employee
of the Freeport Container
Port.

He is the grandson of well-
known local pastor Rev Ray-
mond Jones. His father, the
late Denzil Jones, was a
beloved teacher at the Eight
Mile Rock High, who died of
cancer several years ago.

Se



from by his attackers.

And his uncle, Raymond
Jones, is Chief Operating
Officer at the Freeport Con-
tainer Port.

The family was devastated
by his death. “His mother is
not taking it well and his aunts
are in shock,” said a close
family member.

Many residents expressed
sadness over the incident.

—_— | a
Cc ABLE BAHAMAS

Jones’ colleagues at the Con-
tainer Port are also shocked
by his death.

“This is a tragedy for this
entire Eight Mile Rock com-
munity,” said a resident of
Jones Town.

Police investigations are
continuing and an arrest in
the matter could be made
soon.

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THE TRIBUNE



Zelaya’s supporters call

for strikes in Honduras

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras

SUPPORTERS of ousted Pres-
ident Manuel Zelaya called for
labor strikes demanding his return
Wednesday, one day after the
exiled leader said citizens had the
right to rebel against the interim
government, according to Associ-
ated Press.

Labor leader Israel Salinas, one
of the main figures in the pro-
Zelaya movement, told thousands
of demonstrators who marched
through the capital that workers at
state-owned companies plan walk-
outs later this week.

He said protest organizers were
talking with union leaders at pri-
vate companies to see if they could
mount a general strike against
interim President Roberto
Micheletti, who has threatened to
jail Zelaya if he tries to return.

Salinas also said sympathetic
unions in neighboring Nicaragua
and El Salvador would try to block
border crossings later this week “in
solidarity with our struggle.”

At the five-hour protest, tem-
pers were high. Demonstrators
threw rocks at a government build-
ing that houses the country’s wom-
en’s’ institute. Police showed up
but no injuries were reported.

Zelaya, a wealthy rancher who
shifted to the left after being elect-
ed, said Tuesday that the Hon-
duran people “have the right to
insurrection” against the acting
government that forced him out of
the country June 28. Those
remarks could augur an escalation
in a conflict that has already cost
the life of one protester.

Soldiers seized Zelaya and put
him on a plane after he ignored
the Supreme Court and Congress
in pressing ahead with plans for a
referendum that many critics
depicted as a bid to install a con-
stitutional assembly that could
rewrite laws and extend his power
after his term ends in January.

“We are going to install the con-
stitutional assembly. We are going
to burn the Congress,” protest
leader Miriam Miranda vowed at
the latest demonstration for Zelaya.

Costa Rican President Oscar
Arias is mediating talks aimed at
resolving the impasse, but Zelaya
has grown frustrated by the lack
of progress.

On Monday, Zelaya announced
that if the interim government did
not agree to reinstate him at the
next round of negotiations, “the

mediation effort will be considered
failed and other measures will be
taken.” He did not say what those
measures would be.

The talks are scheduled to
resume Saturday after two earlier
rounds failed to produce a break-
through. Arias, who won the 1987
Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts
in ending Central America’s wars,
has urged Zelaya to “be patient.”

Micheletti’s administration insists
Zelaya was ousted legally beause

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he violated the constitution by
pushing for a referendum on
retooling the charter. It has refused
to bend on reinstating him despite
international condemnation of the
coup, including from the United
States.

The interim government accuses
Zelaya of trying to extend his time
in office. Zelaya denies that, saying
he merely wanted to reform the
constitution to make it better serve
the poor.






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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, JULY 16,



PAGE



12
Zz F



2009





PAGE 14° Brent Stubbs’ opinion on Davis Cup...



Judo athletes
get ready for
big event...

See page 15



Giving hack to Rolletown

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

gridiron superstar,

known as much

for his exploits on

the field as for his
extraordinary achievement in
the classroom, is expected to
officially announce his plan to
improve medical services in the
place of his roots.

Myron Rolle, former Florida
State Seminoles free safety and
recent Rhodes Scholar recipi-
ent, is today set to officially
announce his intentions to con-
struct a free medical clinic and
sports complex on the island of
Exuma.

During a press conference at
the site of the Pompey statue
in Steventon, Exuma, Rolle and
executives of the Myron Rolle
Foundation will detail formal
plans for the much anticipated
project.

The project will be executed
in conjunction with the
Bahamas Ministry of Health
and the Florida State Universi-
ty College of Medicine.

The Myron L Rolle Founda-
tion is a tax-exempt, non-profit
organisation dedicated to the
support of health, wellness, edu-
cational and other charitable
initiatives throughout the world
that benefit children and fami-
lies in need.

The Foundation was estab-
lished in 2009 by the Rhodes
scholar and college football All-
American and his family.

Myron Rolle Foundation plans to build a free
medical clinic and sports complex on Exuma



MYRON ROLLE can be seen with his family — shown I-r are Rolle, his brother McKinlan, mother Beverly and father Whitney Rolle...

Rolle rose to national promi-
nence in his high school foot-

ball days in Princeton, New Jer-
sey, where he was awarded All-

American honours.
He was ranked the top player

in the country by ESPN’s
recruiting services for high

BIC Notice of Privatization

REQUEST FOR REGISTRATION OF INTERESTED PARTIES FOR THE PRIVATIZATION OF
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY LTD.

school prospects and ranked as
the 12 player nationally by
Rivals.com.

A member of Kappa Alpha
Psi Fraternity Inc, Rolle fulfilled
his requirements to earn his
bachelor’s degree in exercise
science in just 2.5 years.

Currently completing a mas-
ter of public administration
degree, Rolle garnered interna-
tional media attention when he
announced he would postpone
a possible career in the Nation-
al Football League to pursue
his studies at Oxford University
after receiving the Rhodes
scholarship.

The 6’2” 215 pound safety
will complete his studies to earn
an M A in Medical Anthropol-
ogy and plans to enter the 2010
NFL Draft.

Rolle has been featured on
various programmes foreshad-
owing his intentions to give
back to the Bahamas, a place
he routinely calls “home.”

On ESPN’s “Rome is Burn-
ing” with Jim Rome aired
December 8, 2008, Rolle first
spoke of his plans to open a free
health services clinic in Rol-
letown following a career as a
neurosurgeon in the United
States.

He has also been featured on
other ESPN programming,
including Outside the Lines,
Sportscenter, and First Take.

Ivan Ferguson, administrator
of Exuma and Dr Alma Little,
of FSU School of Medicine, are
expected to attend the press
conference.

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas (the “Goverment” is seeking a partner to acquire a 51% shareholding, including operational contral,
in The Bahamas Telecommunications Campany Ltd. ("BTC" or the “Company"). incorporated under the laws of The Bahamas.

The Company currently provides services to over 334,000 wireless (through its GSM and CDMA networks), 132.000 fixed line and 18,500 broadband customers
throughout The Bahamas. In addition, BTC has some 170 roaming agreements in place serving more than 4 million tourists wha visit the Bahamas each year.

Given the importance of the telecommunications industry ta The Bohamas and its economy, the Govemment seeks a strategic partner in BIC, who is able ta

demonstrate that they can bring many. if not all of the following attibutes to BTC:

» Strang reputation in the telecommunications industry

» Ability and commitment to generate value-odded revenue and cost synergies with BIC operations

» Financial strength and operational platform te be able to enhance BIC's underlying network, services, billing and customer service

* A history of strong financial performance

Interested parties ore invited to register for the privatization process of BTC through the submission of a registration form (the “Registration Form") and the pay-
ment of a processing fee of U3$25,000 (the “Registration Fee") on or before 15:00 hours (EST) on July 28, 2007. The Registration Form and guidelines on the submission
of the Registration Form are available at: hitp://weyw.btcprivatization.com/

Upon submitting the Registration Form, partes will be supplied with a document describing the investment opportunity. Once the payment of the Registration
Fee is confirmed, interested parties will receive a pre-qualification package ("the Pre-Qualification Package") with additional detaik on the process and ai list of
information requirements on the interested parties for evaluation by the Govemment. All duly completed applications for pre-qualification must be submitted on
or before August 14, 2009. Should the relevant party not be chosen by the Government to move forward to the due diligence phase of the process, the Registration
Fee will be refunded. However, if and when a participant é invited to the due diligence process, this fee will become non-refundable.

Qualified parties wil be invited to participate in the due diligence phase, giving thern access to a dota room, financial vendor due diligence report, technical
due diligence report, management presentation and ste visits. After the due diligence phase. investors/consortiums will be invited to submit binding bids for the
stake in BTC.

The Goverment reserves the nght, in their sole discretion, to reject or accept any Registration Form, Pre-Galification Package or other document received
pursuant to this privatization process: and/or to consider, accept or reject any application on the basis of the criteria set out above and in the Pre-Qualification
Package: to extend the deadiine for the submission of the Registration Form and/or pre-qualification information and for any other action to be taken,

Ms





THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS

‘We are eager to test our athletes’
against those in the Bahamas

THE Barbados Judo Federa-
tion cadet team is in New Provi-
dence to compete in the
Caribbean Cup set for 1-4pm July
18 at Loyola Hall, Gladstone
Road.

"We are very excited to be
here,” says Ian Weithers, chief
national coach for Barbados.
"The Bahamas’ level has been
climbing steadily and we are
eager to test our athletes against
them."

Both teams are undergoing
training with top US coach Ger-
ald Lafon, whose emphasis is on
competitive fundamentals.

According to D'Arcy Rahming,
president of the Bahamas Judo
Federation, it is important for the
Caribbean to hold these types of
events to raise the level in the
region.

Together the region can
demand more resources and will
be able to host larger Pan Amer-
ican tournaments and bring in
sports tourism revenues.

The teams are scheduled to
travel afterward to Hungary for
the World Cadet Championships.

Persons interested in helping
the Bahamas Judo Federation can
call 364-6773.

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THE TRIBUNE





Our younger
tennis players
heed to ‘step
up their game’

THE Amer- STUBBS
ican Zone II _

Davis Cup tie a,
over the week-
end should
have been a
learning lesson
for our young
vibrant players



- don’t take
anybody for
granted.

The team of
Devin
Mullings, Tim- OPINION
othy Neilly, mm —
Bjorn Munroe,

Marvin Rolle and rookie Rod-
ney Carey Jr hosted a
Guatemala team that came here
on a mission. They had nothing
to lose, but everything to gain
and they didn’t hold back at all.

When the Guatemalans could
have easily surrendered to the
pressure of the scorching heat,
they stuck in there and battled it
out.

It seemed as if they were
more prepared for the heat than
we were.

When they were faced with
the excruciating pain and
cramps, they got the necessary
treatment and were back on the
court, giving it their all as if
there was no tomorrow.

We had too many injuries to
deal with that changed the com-
plex of our line-up. And when
our team had the Guatemalans’
backs pinned against the wall,
we watched as they fought off

“Not taking anything away
from our players, I think
they went out there and

they fought hard. To go the
distance, in some cases to
five matches, was evident of
that. But I just don’t think
all of our players exhibited
the same type of heart and
determination as the
Guatemalans that was
required for us to pull
off the tie...”
— Brent Stubbs

the adversity and prevailed like
only true warriors do.

If only we could have turned
the hands of time.

For all five matches in the tie
at the National Tennis Center,
the Guatemalans displayed the
type of resilience that showed
why they will remain in Zone
II in 2010 and we will be rele-
gated to Zone III.

Not taking anything away
from our players, I think they
went out there and they fought
hard. To go the distance, in
some cases to five matches, was
evident of that.

But I just don’t think all of
our players exhibited the same
type of heart and determination
as the Guatemalans that was
required for us to pull off the
tie.

Not even the pulsating sound
of the junkanoo music could
propel our players to dig down
deeper and find that intestinal
fortitude to get the job done.

This was one time that we felt
the home crowd advantage
should have worked in our
favour and it didn’t. There was
no way that we should have
gone down the way we did to
Guatemala.

I think this may be a blessing
in disguise for our team and
captain John Farrington.

I think Farrington, or who-
ever succeeds him in the future,
should ensure that our players
come prepared to play whether
it’s at home or on the road.

We have too much talent not
to be performing at a higher
standard.

After the loss, especially in
the pivotal doubles, it showed
how much we missed having the
appearance of touring pro Mark
Knowles.

While I think we could have
used his experience, I think it’s
time for the younger players to
start getting the exposure that
they need to get us to the next
level.

Sure Knowles could have
made a difference in the dou-
bles, but that was just one
match. He’s not playing singles,
which accounts for at least 70
per cent of the team’s success or
failure.

So I think it’s vital for the
younger players to step up their
game, especially at home. Con-
sidering that the Guatemalans
just emerged out of Zone III,
there’s no reason why we
should have played as hard and
as long as we did and still lost.





y uU

THE TRIBUNE



Wek S 1D Ave

©
c ie
i ,



il

Or Cave eG A200

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



Bahamas must
‘not be casualty’
of consolidation
in private banks

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas has “got a lit-
tle bit of work to do” to ensure
it “does not become a casual-
ty” of increasing consolidation
in the global private bank-
ing/wealth management indus-
try, a senior industry executive
said yesterday.

Simon Townend, a KPMG
partner and head of its corpo-
rate finance practice for the
Bahamas and the Caribbean,
expanding on a firm survey that
suggested “consolidation poten-
tial remains high” in the global
private banking market, told
Tribune Business “had a lot of
strategic work” in front of it to
position itself as an interna-
tional financial centre of choice.

“T think the Bahamas is going
to see more consolidation in the
sector and/or international pri-
vate banking groups looking to
spin-off arms of their business,”
Mr Townend said.

“This is being driven by two
factors. One would be the
economies, the efficiencies and
the technology, and the other
would be the increasing G-20
pressures being placed on finan-
cial services business in the
islands.

“Tt’s already happening across
the offshore jurisdictions, we’re
seeing consolidations and spin-
offs.”

Consolidation trends have
already exposed themselves in
the Bahamian private banking
sector, as a result of Qatar
National Bank’s (QNB) deci-
sion to reduce its offshore foot-
print and concentrate on mar-
kets nearer to home.

That allowed the A. F. Hold-
ings group (formerly the Colina
Financial Group) to acquire
QNB’s Ansbacher (Bahamas)
subsidiary earlier this year, and
merge it with its existing Sen-
tinel Bank & Trust operation.

SEE page 9B

Bank ‘can appoint’
receiver without
getting court order

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

PROPOSED legislative
amendments appear to give the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
the power to appoint a receiv-
er/manager for any of its bank
and trust company licensees
without first seeking court
approval, a study of the changes
by Tribune Business has shown.

The Central Bank, in its con-
sultation paper on proposed
amendments to the Banks &
Trust Companies Regulation
Act 2000, is planning to change
section 18 to “expressly allow
the Bank to appoint a receiv-
er-manager where it is desirable
for the receiver to operate a
licensee as a going concern”.

In addition, the amendments
- if passed into statute law - will
“permit the appointment by the
[Central] Bank of a temporary
manager which, in the Bank’s
opinion is, inter alia, carrying
on business in a manner detri-
mental to the public interest”.
Other violations leading to this
action are breaches of law and
licence obligations.

These amendments appear
remarkably similar to the
changes Parliament recently
passed to the Domestic Insur-

Amendments appear
designed to give Central
Bank same sweeping
powers handed to insurance
regulator in the wake of
CLICO (Bahamas) debacle

ance Act, and which generated
considerable opposition from
that industry - namely the fact
the regulator, in that case the
Registrar of Insurance, could
appoint a receiver/manager for
an insurance company without
even obtaining an ex-parte
Order from the Supreme Court
approving such action.

In the insurance industry’s
case, the sector was concerned
that there was no structured
process involved in appointing a
receiver or manager, and it was
open to too much subjectivity -
even being carried out on a
whim or personal opinion.

The Banks and Trust Com-
panies Regulation Act 2000
amendments appear to be an
effort by the Government to
harmonise the powers granted
to the different financial ser-
vices regulators ahead of their

SEE page 8B

NASSAU = PAHAMAS

2m ‘yards apart
on Arawak Cay

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

redged material in excess of

900,000 cubic yards will be

used to extend Arawak Cay

1,000 ft to the west, resulting

in the loss of 32 acres of sea
bed containing some sea life, the Environ-
mental Impact Assessment (EIA) on the
use/storage of material produced by the Nas-
sau harbour dredging has revealed.

The EJA prepared by Blue Engineering,
which has not formally been released by the
Government, which has been silent on details
pertaining to the Arawak Cay port develop-
ment, also revealed a number of other nega-
tive effects of the extension project.

The report outlined potential impacts to
the sea life in the area surrounding Arawak
and Silver Cays, most of all the settlement of
suspended silt on coral reefs and sponge beds
living in and around the area.

In the proposed changes to Arawak Cay,
two million cubic yards of hard limestone
material and sand will be dredged from Nas-
sau Harbour and stored there.

According to the EJA, the 1,000 foot exten-
sion is necessary to accommodate the dredged
material and the port. Of the two million

PLP continues to oppose
harbour dredge and port
requiring 1,000 foot
cay extension

cubic yards to be extracted, only 600,000 cubic
yards would have been able to be stored with-
out the Arawak Cay extension. There is con-
cern that the dredged material could produce
some level of water contamination, includ-
ing possible contamination to the city water
supply.

"The storage and use of the dredged mate-
rial has the potential to reintroduce and redis-
tribute toxic chemicals deposited in the sedi-
ments to be dredged into the water column.
Owing to the presence of various operations
in the vicinity of Nassau Harbour, it was
decided at the outset of the earlier ETA stud-
ies to carry out chemical determinations for
potential metal contaminants in the harbour
sediments," the EIA read.

The EIA also offers a number of mitigation

SEE page 2B





Government told:

reduce property

Stamp Tax to two per cent

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has long
been urged to reduce Stamp
Tax on all Bahamas-based
property transfers to a uniform
2 per cent, it was revealed yes-
terday, as this would remove
“high societal costs” and “min-
imise incentives to avoid or
evade the tax”.

A February 21, 2007, report
prepared for the Government
as part of the Inter-American
Development Bank-financed
(IDB) Land Use Policy and
Administration Project, advised
the Government that it was

“desirable to reduce Stamp Tax
rates substantially to no more
than 2 per cent”.

The report, authored by a
Richard Almy and tabled in
Parliament yesterday, ques-
tioned whether it was desirable
for the Government to be earn-
ing more from Stamp Tax on
property transfers than real
property taxes, noting that the
former generated $88 million
for the Government in the 2004-
2005 Budget year compared to
the latter’s $54 million.

The report conceded that the
Stamp Tax was “well estab-
lished”, and generated substan-
tial government revenues for

minimal administrative costs, as
the tax was levied on the
recording of deeds/obtaining a
title certificate.

However, it added that taxes
imposed on the transfer of real
estate were “usually not more
productive” than annually
recurring real estate taxes, such
as real property taxes.

“High, progressive taxes have
several inherent disadvantages
that may not be fully appreciat-
ed in the Bahamas,” the report
added. “International experi-
ence suggests that high, pro-
gressive transfer taxes have a

SEE page 4B



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BID for Bay
legislation
‘reatly to go
by year-end’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

LEGISLATION to create
the Business Improvement Dis-
trict (BID) that will spearhead
downtown Nassau’s revitalisa-
tion “should be ready to go” by
year-end, Tribune Business was
told yesterday, with that and
the identification/implementa-
tion of short-term projects for
Bay Street the “key focus right

Charles Klonaris, co-chair of
the Downtown Nassau Part-
nership (DNP), the private/pub-
lic sector body leading the effort
to overhaul downtown Bay
Street, suggested that the exist-
ing Nassau Tourism and Devel-
opment Board (NTDB) was
likely to be absorbed into the
BID once it was created via leg-
islation.

“The focus right now is on
the legislation for the BID -
that’s critical - and also the iden-

SEE page 9B

The information contained is from a third.
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report, -

~~





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‘yards apart’

on Arawak Cay

FROM page 1B

methods to produce the least
amount of impact on the envi-
ronment.

In the case of the existing sea
grass beds near the construc-
tion site, the EIA proposes their
re-location, and with regard to
the water supply it suggests the
Water and Sewerage corpora-
tion closely monitor it.

The EJA also suggests the
dredging and storage of the fill

TST

For the stories

TTT RT Ta
GUMS)
Montlays

material could cause increased
noise and vibration, modifica-
tion of wave patterns and shore-
line, loss of biological sea life,
and unpleasant odors.

When the project is complet-
ed and container transport from
the new Arawak Cay port
starts, the EIA revealed
instances of possible road traffic
increase, sea traffic increase,
impaired visual beauty,
increased noise and vibration,
miscellaneous hazards and pos-
sible deterioration of water
quality.

The relocation of the con-
tainer port to Arawak Cay in
earlier studies found it to be the
sixth best location, even below
leaving it at its present location
downtown.

However, it is thought that
the revitalisation of the down-
town Bay Street area will not
be able to start in earnest until
the shipping facilities are relo-
cated to an alternative site.

Some of the dredged fill
stored in the Arawak Cay
extension will be used to cre-
ate an extension to the existing
port area downtown for the
construction of a promenade.

According to the EJA: "The
relief to the congestion of the

Whirlpool

Tha gome0 be get More dene.

existing downtown area of Nas-
sau itself is a major advantage
of the project. The opportunity
for the developing old town
area to enhance its amenity and
visual advantages for recre-
ational and non-commercial
usage should be taken.”

The EJA outlines proposals
for the mitigation of the many
of the possible negative effects
of the extension of Arawak
Cay, including proper installa-
tion of turbidity barriers and
the employment of appropriate
water quality and beach moni-
toring techniques "starting
before construction activities”.

The report also contains a
contingency plan for the aban-
donment of the project should
that be necessary.

Senator Jerome Fitzgerald,
who has been extremely vocal
on the Government’s persistent
intransigence in revealing the
details of the Arawak Cay port
relocation, told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday that "they were
going ahead with this before
they had the EIA. Everything
about this is just wrong”

Mr Fitzgerald is scheduled to
hold a press conference at
Arawak Cay today in protest at
the port relocation.

cabrio_

MTT

NACK WRAP’"—





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 3B



AU ey



Budding
trader
passes
course

Antoine Bain, whose career
ambition is to become a securi-
ties trader, has successfully com-
pleted the Canadian Securities
Course (CSC) after studying
with the Nassau-based Securi-
ties Training Institute (STI).

Ms Albury, STI’s course
administrator, said: “This com-
prehensive study programme
greatly assists in enhancing the
student’s understanding of
financial products and markets,
which acts as a solid foundation
for those interested in pursuing
a career in financial services”.

Cable’s BTC favouritism.
claims ‘robustly’ denied

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas’ claim that
the rival Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC)
enjoyed “preferential treatment
and influence” in the commu-
nications reform process has
been dismissed by the govern-
ment-appointed privatisation































Continental Airlines’
Blue Skyway aircraft visited
Nassau yesterday as part of
the airline’s 75th anniver-
sary celebrations.

The new Boeing 737-
9O0ER aircraft was paint-
ed with a retro livery to
commemorate the anniver-
sary, which is today.

The new aircraft's retro
livery was originally used
on aircraft beginning in
1947, and is called The Blue
Skyway. The livery was
selected by Continental
employees for this celebra-
tion.

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committee, which said a “robust
approach” had been taken to
implementing “safeguards” in
the process.

While admitting that three
members of the nine-strong pri-
vatisation committee were BTC
executives, and another was the
Broadcasting Corporation of
the Bahamas (BCB) chairman,
the committee said in its reply

Airline makes special flying
visit to New Providence

to Cable Bahamas that they had
all been “selected for their tech-
nical competencies and experi-
ence”, not to represent their
companies.

Apart from executive chair-
man Julian Francis, the BTC
representatives were Felicity
Johnson, BTC’s company sec-
retary/vice-president for legal,
regulatory and interconnection,

Unique Security Co.

Have immediate opening for the following
position:
Professional Armored Security Officer

Qualifications
¢ High school Diploma

* 3-5 years in a security related field

Professional, well spoken

Must be willing to work with others

Must be flexible with hours

* Clean police record within the last three months

Must be license to carry a firearm

Requirements
¢ Valid driver’s license
¢ 2 Passport Photos

¢ Valid Bahamian Passport
¢ National Insurance card
¢ 3 Professional References (Non Relatives)

Unique Security Co
East Street & Balfour Ave
Or call
242-325-2258 for more information

Deadline is July 18,2009

Bazard Lamour and CO.

Mount Royal Avenue and Kenwood Street

Tel:

326-0126/7
Fax:326-0128

Email: bazardlaw @ gmail.com
lamourlaw @ gmail.com

FirstCaribbean

and Tellis Symonette, BTC’s
senior vice-president for the
Family Islands and administra-
tion.

In its response to Cable
Bahamas, the privatisation com-
mittee said professional advi-
sors, drawn from accounting
firm KPMG and the UK-based
law firm, Charles Russell LLP,
had played a major role in
designing the communications
regulatory regime.

And, the committee added,
it was ultimately the Govern-
ment that approved or reject-
ed the regulatory reform pro-
posals put to it.

Cable Bahamas’ assertion
that KPMG had been responsi-
ble for formulating BTC’s busi-
ness plan, and had been
retained by BTC to undertake
other work for it, were also
denied by the privatisation com-
mittee.

“While KPMG has been
engaged by the committee to
advise it on the privatisation
exercise, Cable Bahamas’ claim
is not correct,” the privatisation
committee added. “BTC is
responsible for the formulation
of its own business plan, and
indeed it appointed external
advisors (not KPMG) to assist it
in the formulation of its latest
plan.”

Pointing to the separate advi-

sory committee, headed by
Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, to which it
reports, the privatisation com-
mittee said: “There are a variety
of safeguards and measures that
the Government has taken to
ensure a robust and transpar-
ent process, which a minority
of three members of the com-
mittee would have no influence
over.”

And it added: “The structure
and process developed for the
new electronic communications
regulatory regime is robust,
transparent, and is serving the
primary objectives of the new
legislation, which include,
amongst others, the desire to
enhance the efficiency of the
communications sector, to pro-
mote investment and innova-
tion, to encourage sustainable
competition, and to enhance the
competitiveness of the
Bahamas, all of which lead to
the benefit of individuals and
companies in the Bahamas.

“Accordingly, there are no
plans to change the structure
that has been established for
the privatisation of BTC or
development of the new com-
munications regulatory regime,
or to change the composition
of the two committees that have
been appointed or the mandates
of their advisors.”

ABACOMARKETS

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the Annual General Meeting
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will be held on the 21° of July, 2009
at 6 p.m.

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West Bay Street, Nassau

Holders of Ordinary Shares as of
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CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

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GET THERE. TOGETHER.





PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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award.

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and share your story.





Government told: reduce property
Stamp Tax to two per cent

FROM page 1B

negligible effect on the accu-
mulation of wealth.
“Experience also suggests
that they encourage evasion and
avoidance (as is recognised).
Parties may be encouraged to
risk not recording deeds to

avoid having to settle arrears in
the real estate tax, and to avoid
incurring the Stamp Tax. They
may be encouraged to misstate
the amount of consideration to
reduce the tax...

“By acting as a deterrent to
the formalisation of property
transfers, high Stamp taxes











































JOB ADVERTISEMENT

Position: Accountant

NOTICE

ALL ENTRANCES
to the grounds of
ST. FRANCIS XAVIER
CATHEDRAL
WILL BE CLOSED

A local insurance agency seeks to fill the position of
Accountant. The scope of work is to head the Ac-
counting Operations in preparation of monthly, quar-
terly and annual reports; to keep and maintain all
financial documents and records according to the
directives coming from the President and the Board
of Directors to ensure the efficient management of
all Bank and general ledger accounts. The position
will also be expected to make recommendations to
management to maintain the company’s viability in a
highly competitive environment.

Required:

e University Degree in accounting;

¢ Professional qualifications e.g. CPA, ACCA, CA

¢ At least 3 years’ work experience as an
accountant;

¢ Good knowledge of English in writing, editing and
presenting;

* Strong interpersonal, organizational and
supervisory skills;

e Demonstrated capacity to work under pressure,
meet deadlines and perform work of the highest
quality.

¢ Good computer and analytical skills.

To retain ownership rights
between the hours of
6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

MONDAY,
AUGUST 3rd, 2009.

Send cover letter and Curriculum Vitae to the follow-
ing address:

The Tribune

c/o Box # 81869
P.O. Box N 3207
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE: July 25, 2009 by 5pm

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

COLONTAL

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 14 JULY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.14] CHG -2.79 | %CHG -0.18 | YTD -142.22 | YTD % -8.31
FINDEX: CLOSE 787.12 | YTD -5.72% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.39 1.39 0.00 0.127 10.9
10.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992 11.1
6.94 Bank of Bahamas 6.94 6.94 0.00 0.244 28.4
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877 N/M
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.078 40.4
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 43.1
10.18 Cable Bahamas 11.39 11.39 0.00 1.406 8.1
2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00 0.249 11.0
5.50 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 5.64 5.64 0.00 0.419 13.5
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.05 3.00 -0.05 0.111 27.0
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 1.82 1.82 0.00 0.240 76
6.60 Famguard 6.99 6.60 -0.39 0.420 15.7
10.00 Finco 10.90 10.90 0.00 0.322 33.9
10.35 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.38 10.38 0.00 0.794 13.1
4.95 Focol (S) 5.03 5.03 0.00 0.332 15.2
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 N/M
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.00 0.035 8.6
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00 0.407 13.5
10.40 J. S. Johnson 10.40 10.40 0.00 0.952 10.9
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180 55.6
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricingb ases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.60
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00
0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $
CFAL Bond Fund 1.3860 2.40 4.75
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8952 -1,.52 -3.18
CFAL Money Market Fund 1.4763 2.97 5.30
3.1031 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.2702 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.9209 2.40 5.79
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.5448 -0.02 0.54
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 93.1992 -3.33 -6.76
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

S52wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
-0.041 0.300 N/M
0.000 0.480 N/M
0.001 0.000 256.6

Weekly Vol.

4.540
0.002

0.000 9.03
0.000 261.90

52wk-Low
1.3231
2.8952
1.4019

Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
3-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
31-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

encourage private conveyanc-
ing to the detriment of an open,
efficient property market. Over-
all welfare is reduced by sub-
optimal land use. Moreover,
high Stamp taxes adversely
affect housing affordability.
Thus, the Stamp Tax incurs high
societal costs.”

The Government has moved
to tackle some of these con-
cerns, having eliminated Stamp
Tax for first-time home buyers
on real estate transactions val-
ued at $500,000 and below.

It has also introduced a fines
structure for real estate con-
veyancings that are not brought
forward for Stamping and
recording in a timely manner.

But the IDB project report
added: “Consideration should
be given to reducing Stamp
Taxes on real estate transfers
(and leases), and to reducing
the degree of progressivity.
Although there are no norms, it
is believed that transfer taxes
should be less than about 2 per
cent to minimise incentives to
evade or avoid tax.

“To avoid disruptions to the
nation’s revenue system, Stamp
Tax reductions could be offset
by increases in real estate tax
yields that would result from a
general reassessment and fur-
ther increases in collection effi-
ciency.”

The current Stamp Tax struc-
ture in the Bahamas is:

Properties valued at between
$0-$20,000: 2 per cent

$20,000-$50,000: 4 per cent

$50,000-$100,000: 6 per cent

$100,000-$250,000: 8 per cent

More than $250,000: 10 per
cent

The Land Use and Adminis-
tration Project report also called
for the Registrar General’s
Department to publish lists of
property transfers, including
details of the property location,
the purchaser, the seller, the
price paid and date of sale.

“Although there mat be a pri-
vacy interest that is served by
making it more difficult to
obtain transfer information,
there is no legal reason for the
current situation in the
Bahamas,” the report said.

“The belief that an open-mar-
ket transfer is secret or confi-
dential largely is illusory; the
chief beneficiaries of non-dis-
closure of transfers are real
estate professionals, who have a
proprietary interest in their
sales data.”

The report also criticised the
numerous real property tax
exemptions that existed, espe-
cially for undeveloped Bahami-
an-owned land in New Provi-
dence and Bahamian-owned
property on all other islands, as
“fully shielding taxpayers from
the real estate tax weakens the
social contract between them
and their government”.

In addition, the real property
tax exemptions allowed owners
holding exempt properties “to
hold more property than they
can use productively or encour-
age uneconomic use of land”.

And the report added: “The
real estate tax incentives grant-
ed to hotels are of dubious val-
ue, given the generally low lev-
el of real estate taxation and
the fact competitive pressures
in an attractive destination pro-
vide sufficient inducement to
build and maintain hotel prop-
erties.”

NOTICE

COMAS RESEARCH LIMITED
Incorporated under the Companies Act, 1992
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
Registration Number 49, 961
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

TAKE NOTICE that a general meeting of the
members of the Company was held at the Chancellors
Chambers, Samana Hill, No. 14 Village Road
North, Nassau, The Bahamas on the 4th day of
December, 2006 at 10 o’clock in the afternoon for the
purpose of dissolving the Company and to appoint
Chancellors Corporate Services Limited, Liquidator
of the Company.

A Return of the said general meeting was regis-
tered with the Registrar of Companies on 15th day
of January A.D. 2007 and the company has been
dissolved and removed from the Register of
Companies as of the 11th day of December,
2008.

Chancellors Corporate Services Limited
Liquidator

Management Opportunity
Awell established company is considering highly qualified
applicants for the role of

Financial Controller

Requirements & Responsibilities:
- Lead and motivate accounting staff

- Experience in the preparation and interpretation of Financial
Statements

- Must be able to develop and maintain an effective system of internal
accounting and operational controls in a Hotel environment

- Must possess five years experience in a supervisory accounting
position

- Self motivated with strong analytical and problem-solving skills

- Must be conversant with hotel accounting software, with emphasis in
areas Food & Beverage, Front Office and Payroll

- Liaise with external Auditors, third party service providers and relevant
Regulatory & Compliance Authorities

- Preparation of budgets

- Timely and accurate preparation, presentation and interpretation of
financial reports

- Excellent written and oral communication skills

- Able to work extended hours, weekends and holidays

QUALIFICATIONS

- BAin Accounting from an accredited University

- International accounting designation (CPA/CA) with minimum of
5 years post qualification experience,

- Advance working knowledge of Excel

- Working knowledge of Microsoft Word

Interested persons should apply on or before July 24, 2009

Attention: CONTROLLER
DA 81270
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Suitably qualified candidates need only apply.
Salary is commensurate with experience and qualification.



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 5B



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



Federal Reserve:

Unemployment

will top 10 per
cent this year

@ By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The Federal Reserve expects
the economy this year will sink
at a slower pace than it previ-
ously thought, but that unem-
ployment will top 10 per cent
and remain high for the next
few years, according to a new
forecast released Wednesday.

The Fed now predicts the
economy will shrink between
one and 1.5 per cent this year,
an improvement from its old
forecast issued in May. At that
time, the Fed projected the
economy would contract
between 1.3 and two per cent.

The upgrade — which helped
major stock indicators jump
about three per cent and the
Dow Jones industrial average
to add 257 points — comes from
the expectation that the econo-
my’s downhill slide in the first
half of 2009 wasn’t as bad as
previously thought. The Fed
said the economy should start
growing again in the second half
of this year, although the pace is
likely to be plodding.

In fact, most Fed policymak-
ers said it could take “five or six
years” for the economy and the
labor market to get back on a
path of full health in the long
term. And, most officials saw
“the economy as still quite weak
and vulnerable to further
adverse shocks.”

Against that backdrop, the
Fed’s forecast for unemploy-
ment this year worsened. The
central bank predicted the job-
less rate could rise as high as
10.1 per cent, compared with
the previous forecast of 9.6 per
cent.

The nation’s unemployment
rate climbed to 9.5 per cent in
June, a 26-year high.

The predictions are based on
what the Fed calls its “central
tendency,” which exclude the
three highest and three lowest
forecasts made by Fed officials.
The central bank also gives a
range of all the forecasts. That
range showed that some offi-
cials expect the jobless rate
could rise as high as 10.5 per
cent this year, and 10.6 per cent
in 2010. The post-World War IT
high was 10.8 per cent at the end
of 1982, when the country had
suffered through a severe reces-
sion. The jobless rate averaged
5.8 per cent last year.

For 2010, the Fed predicted
the economy would grow
between 2.1 and 3.3 pe rcent.
That’s a slight upgrade from its
old forecast of growth between
two and three per cent.

The Fed’s estimate is based
on comparing projected activity
in the fourth quarter of one year
to the same period a year earli-
er. The economy dipped 0.8 per
cent in 2008 by that measure.

Still, it would mark a slow
recovery and that will keep
unemployment elevated well
into 2011, the Fed said. Com-
panies won’t be in any mood to
ramp up hiring until they are
certain that any recovery has
staying power. Some Fed offi-
cials predicted the jobless rate
could hover in the 8 percent
range or as high as 9.2 per cent
in 2011.

To help lift the country out
of recession, the Fed has slashed
interest rates to a record low
near zero. In March, the Fed
launched a $1.2 trillion effort to
drive down interest rates to
revive lending and get Ameri-
cans to spend more freely.
Those actions — along with
President Barack Obama’s $787
billion stimulus package of tax
cuts and increased government
spending — should help the
economy return to growth in the
second half of this year.

Fed officials at their June
meeting observed “the eco-
nomic contraction was slowing
and that the decline in activity
could cease before long.” Con-
sumer spending appeared to
have stabilized, new-home sales
were flattening out and declines
in capital spending did not look
as severe as they had at the
beginning of the year.

At the June meeting, Fed
Chairman Ben Bernanke and
his colleagues pledged to hold its
key bank lending rate near zero
for an extended period of time

to help brace the economy.
Many analysts believe the Fed
will leave rates at record lows
through the rest of this year.

The Fed last month also
decided against expanding its
$1.2 trillion programme of buy-
ing government bonds and
mortgage-backed securities to
drive down rates on mortgages
and other consumer debt.

Part of the reason the Fed
stayed the course was out of fear
that expanding the programmes
could stir up investor fears that
the central bank’s aggressive
actions could spur inflation lat-
er on, documents of the closed-
door June meeting indicated. In
addition, “it seemed that eco-
nomic activity was in the process
of leveling out.”

On the inflation front, Fed
policymakers did bump up their
forecasts for this year and next.
The Fed expects inflation to rise
between one and 1.4 per cent in
2009, reflecting the influence of

higher oil and commodity prices.
The old forecast called for a gain
of between 0.6 and 0.9 per cent
this year.

Even with the projected pick-
up, the Fed believes inflation
“would remain subdued for
some time” and be lower than
the 1.9 per cent increase logged
in 2008. The sluggish recovery,
idle plants, a weak employment
market and cautious consumers
will restrain companies from
jacking up prices.

Next year, inflation should
rise between 1.2 and 1.8 per
cent, the Fed said. That’s up
from the old forecast of between
a one and 1.6 per cent gain.

Several Fed participants,
though, worried that investors
and consumers might start to
expect that prices will march
higher if the central bank’s
aggressive steps to stimulate the
economy “were not unwound
in a timely fashion as the econ-
omy recovers.”

Unique Security Co.

Have immediate opening for the following
position:

Professional Security Officer

Qualifications
* High school Diploma

* 3-5 years in a security related field

* Professional, well spoken

* Must be willing to work with others
* Clean police record within the last six months

* Must be flexible with hours

Requirements

* 2 Passport Photos

* Valid Bahamian Passport
* National Insurance card

* 3 Professional References

(Non Relatives)

Unique Security Co
East Street & Balfour Ave
Or call
242-325-2258 for more information
Deadline is July 18,2009

Gastroenterology

Doctors Hospital Sessional Clinic

Dee ota C Karty mime
following symptoms?

+ Difficulty swallowing

+ Heartburn

+ Dyspepsia (gas, bloating)

+ Nausea and vomiting

¢ Unintentional weight loss

« Diarrhea & Constipation

+ Abdominal pain

+ Diseases of the pancreas

« Liver disease

¢ Jaundice

+ Colon cancer screening

« Family history of colon cancer

¢ Rectal bleeding

Internal Medicine
Gastroenterology

SCREENING and
CONSULTATION

By Appointment Only

Call: 302-4684

Date: Wednesday, July 22 ‘09
Open: 9:00 am

9] DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

‘ é \)) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

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etait roacs

aaeTuty
ETM its eRe hts

sustainable
A oer

Deadline For Enrolment: July 31, 2009
See ee eae Reece Ment nic aarmet Aart
Dice Um Ee elem mete He
PU ant atcae ee A

EFG Q Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd
POSITION AVAILABLE:

Client Relationship Officer for International Bank

Applicants must have demonstrated experience and ability to develop new
business for non-resident, high net-worth market.

REQUIREMENTS:

Excellent knowledge of private banking products and services; fluency in
English, French and any other language skills would be an asset; 15 years’ private
banking; knowledge of Bahamian regulatory requirements; university degree and/
or related professional designation.

DUTIES:

Marketing of private banking and portfolio management services; extensive
traveling; acquisition and development of new clients.

Compensation will be commensurate with experience.

Interested applicants must submit applications to: Human Resources
Manager, (Re: Client Relationship Position), P.O. Box SS 6289, Nassau,
Bahamas, by 20th July, 2009 or fax to (242) 502-5428.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

PERSPECTIVE

HUMAN RESOURCES CONSULTING

NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR/HELPDESK ANALYST
Our client i§ an international health management company that assests clients to successfully

Their Network and Infrastructure Team is qurrently seeking a Network Administrator/ HelpDesk
Analyst who will assist in the first-level technical support, planning, administration, testing and
maintenance of user PC's, Laptops and Local Area Network

The Network Administrater/HalpDesk Analyst will play a direct role providing entry level
bechnical support for hardware, software, peripherals, connectivity. The candidate must be
able to troubleshoot a wide range of software and hardware products generally on Windows
PO's with Microsoft Office.

This is an excellent entry level opportunity to learn more advanced skills such a6 Windows
2000/2003 and Active Directory, SQL 2000/5 Server, Exchange, Cisco server
Firewall VPN configuration and support. The successful candidate will be part of a larger team
working directly with Sr. Network Adminestrators, Database
Architect, Middleware Analysts and Project Managers with a globally recognized leader in
health management,

Server

Qualihcations:

Candidate must show hands-on experiance and good working knowledge of the
following:
TCP/IP
Microsoft Windows 2000/2003 Server, Microsoft XP and Microsoft Office
General Networking concepts
Effective written and oral communication skills
Excellent customer service skills

Salary is commensurate with experience.

Email: perspective.hr1@gmail.com



THE TRIBUNE

@ By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Industrial companies cut back
production yet again in June
but not nearly as deeply as they
have been, another sign the
recession is easing its grip.

The Federal Reserve report-
ed Wednesday that production
at the nation’s factories, mines
and utilities fell 0.4 per cent last
month as the recession crimped
demand for a wide range of
manufactured goods, including
cars, machinery and household
appliances.

The decline, however, was
not as bad as May. Industrial
activity posted a revised 1.2 per
cent drop then, which turned
out to be slightly worse than
first reported.

The contraction in industrial

TST

For the stories
TAU Uy
aac
Insight on
Mondays

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 7B
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Industrial
output fall
less than
anticipated.

activity in June was less than
the 0.6 per cent decline that
economists were projecting,
although it marked the eighth
month in a row of production
cuts.

“The pace of declines contin-
ues to moderate, suggesting at
least a stabilization of the econ-
omy, even if not an outright
recovery,” said T J Marta, mar-
ket strategist and founder of
Marta on the Markets, a finan-
cial research firm.

For the second quarter as a
whole, industrial production fell
at an annual rate of 11.6 per
cent, not as sharp as the 19.1
per cent annualized decline
experienced during the first
three months of this year.

The recession has taken a bite
out of demand in the US for all
kinds of manufactured goods,
especially those related to hous-
ing, such as appliances, furni-
ture and building materials. At
the same time, factories are cop-
ing with less demand from for-
eign buyers coping with eco-
nomic problems in their own
countries.

John Engler, president of the
National Association of Manu-
facturers, in an interview with
The Associated Press, said even
with the slower pace of decline
the industrial production fig-
ures “are disappointing still.”
And, he wasn’t optimistic that
factories would be getting back
on their feet any time soon.
“Consumers aren’t in a position
to lead the economy back,” he
said.

Given crimped customer
appetites, industrial companies
idled more of their plants and
equipment in June.

The overall operating rate fell

to 68, a record low dating to
1967. The previous low of 68.2
was in May.

Production at factories — the
biggest slice of the industrial
sector — fell by 0.6 per cent in
June, compared with a 1.1 per
cent decline in May.

Troubles in the auto sector
probably factored into June’s
weakness.

Makers of cars and parts cut
production 2.6 per cent last
month, following a deeper 8.2
per cent cut in May.

Plant shutdowns at Chrysler
and General Motors, which
both recently emerged from
bankruptcy protection, are
expected to weigh on factory
production through part of the
summer, analysts say.

Meanwhile, makers of
machinery trimmed output by
1.9 per cent in June, down from
a 3.2 per cent cut in May.

Production of home elec-
tronics dipped 1.1 per cent, after
a 2.5 per cent cut the previous
month.

Makers of appliances, furni-
ture and carpeting sliced pro-
duction by 1.9 per cent last
month, following a 1.6 per cent
cut in May.

The pullbacks figured into a
drop in the operating rate at
factories, which fell to 64.6 in
June, the lowest on records dat-
ing to 1948. The previous low
was set in May.

In other industrial sectors, the
report showed that output at
mines dipped 0.5 per cent in
June, versus a 1.9 per cent
decline in May.

However, production at util-
ities rose 0.8 per cent in June,
following a 1.3 per cent drop in
the previous month.

Chester Bonefish Lodge

bor reservations:
Telephones 242) 356-3418

Cells242-557-9597
beryliergusom Pyahoo.com

Welcomes you to the

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Weekend July 30th - August 3rd

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Complimcntary bahiren
soap, Shampoo, oo

Packages a5 low a5 $135.00 per night

NOTICE

The office of KPMG in Nassau will be
closed on Friday, July 17, 2009.

Business will resume on Monday,
July 20, 2009 at 9:00 a.m.

We apologize for any inconvenience caused.

AUDIT ® TAX ® ADVISORY





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Probate Side

IN THE ESTATE OF RUPERT A.R. CULMER,
late of No. 3 Imperial Park,

in the Eastern District of New

Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

; ; ; FROM page 1B
NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any

claim or demand against the above Estate are required to
send the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned
on or before the 20th August, 2009 after which date the
Executrix will proceed to distribute the assets having
regard only to the claims of which she shall then have had
notice.

planned consolidation into a
Bahamas Financial Services
Authority.

The Government appears to
have embarked upon a process
of giving the regulators
immense powers to intervene
in a company’s affairs in the
wake of the CLICO (Bahamas)
debacle, seemingly believing the
instantaneous appointment of
a regulator/manager is the best
way to protect depositors and

JOSEPH Cc. LEDEE creditors.
Chambers It is unclear how the

Suite No. 6, Grosvenor Close Bahamas-based bank and trust

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

* company sector will react to the
Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas proposed reforms, which

require a licensee to pay for the

costs of a receiver/manager

imposed by the Central Bank.
The actual wording of the

Attorney for the Executrix

(July 9, 16, 23)

amendments is remarkably sim-
ilar to the language the Gov-
ernment drafted - and Parlia-
ment passed - in the Domestic
Insurance Act amendments.

When a temporary receiv-
er/manager is appointed for a
licensee, the Central Bank will
“have full and exclusive pow-
ers of management and control
of the licensee”, including the
ability to “continue or discon-
tinue its operations”; “stop or
limit the payment of its obliga-
tions”; make decisions on
staffing and employment levels;
and handle any litigation the
licensee is involved in.

Within 90 days of assuming
temporary management of a
licensee, the Central Bank has
to either hand the bank and
trust company back to its
appointed Board of Directors

and owners, or “revoke the
licence and apply to the
Supreme Court for an order
that the licensee be forthwith
wound up by that Court”.

In its consultation document,
the Central Bank said it was
“proposing several amendments
which the Bank believes will
strengthen the regulatory
framework for its licensees, and
will give the Central Bank more
flexibility and wider powers to
address supervisory issues.” The
changes are also designed to

Bank ‘can appoint receiver
without getting court order

remove impractical impedi-
ments to the conduct of busi-
ness.

Wendy Craigg, the Central
Bank governor, did not return a
Tribune Business call seeking
comment on the amendments
prior to press time.

The Act changes will also
“expressly empower” the Cen-
tral Bank to enter into Memo-
randums of Understanding
(MoUs) with other regulators
to enable consolidated supervi-
sion of licensees to take place.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSUE MERICE OF
STAPLEDON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SB-50202, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registratonm'naturalization as










a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registrations naturalization should not be

ranted, should send a written and signed statement of the
acts within twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of JUNE,
2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.0.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that || MAKALO JAVAN
WIILIAMS of #1 KNOWLES DRIVE, TONIQUE
WILLIAMS DARLING HIGHWAY, P.O. BOX N-1258,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name tt MAKALO
JAVAN BANNISTER. |f there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MERLEN MESIDOR of
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9" day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

faWen

4 global leader in audit, tax and advisory services

We ere currently seeking a bright, amargetic, honest and confidant Individual to joim our Finm ae oc

Candidates will ba requirad to provide messenger and other sarviceas on a dalhy basis. The ideal candidate should
haves!

2 to 3 years working experiance

4 valid driver's license

Exomilent interpersonal and customer service skills

Exoallant communication skills

Experience in handling cash

Thee ability to work Independently and under pressure to meet etriet deadlines

Uncoamproamising personal and business athies

We offer a competitive compensation and an attractive benefits package. Assurance le given that avery applicant
will be treated in the strictest of confidence

Applicants shold suboelta cower better, sesunees, polloe second, copy of passport and copies of academic qualifications to: KPMG, Human
Resources Mlamager, PLO. Bow A123, Nassau, Bahamas cer jal) het tou e ne of pre oor beg bay Frida Wa July a4, 2005

AUDIT = TAX = ADVISORY

2 200 RPRG, @ Balen partrenrcis, and a manioer finn of tes PMG motwork of independ mambar fires aMiliated with KPRIG Intannetonal, a
Sai es qoerative, All rights. reserved

Colina.
Holdings Bahamas

=e
—

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Risk & Compliance Officer

Job Opportunity

Position: Senior Floor Supervisor.

Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified
professional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer. This is an
executive position and the successful applicant should possess the following:

Qualifications Qualifications & Experience

Excellent customer relations skills Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university

Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance

Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a
law degree

Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations
for improvements to a compliance culture

Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of
duties

Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and
best practices

Confidentiality

Excellent oral and written communication skills

Excellent communication skills

Working knowledge of Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Word

and Quick books

Possess the ability to stand for extended periods

Ability to work varied hours/days, including nights, weekends

and holidays as needed.

Minimum of three years working experience & Responsibilities:

Design and implement a risk framework.

Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps
taken to foster good compliance.

Implement and maintain a compliance monitoring programme. This will
serve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures.

Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws,
regulations and policies applicable to the institution.

Provide management with guidance in the development, implementation
and maintenance of policies, procedures and practices to cover
regulated activities.

Create programmes that educate, train and encourage directors,
managers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and
regulations.

Serve as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators.

BSc in Business Management

Responsibilities

¢ Coordinate merchandising
Ensure each customer receives outstanding customer service
Maintenance of the store and its equipment
Supervising staff

Assisting store manager in daily functions.

The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with
experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a cover
letter and resume to the following e-mail address no later than 27 July 2009:

Apply in writing to:

Saveco
P.O.Box EE-15945
Nassau, Bahamas

E-mail: careers@c olinaimperial.com
RE: Risk and Compliance Officer

Absolutely no phone calls will be accepted

Unsuitable applications will not be acknowledged.





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 9B





Bahamas must
‘not be casualty’
of consolidation
in private banks

FROM page 1B

The acquisition gives A. F.
Holdings and Sentinel and
expanded book of business and
greater scale in an industry
where smaller, standalone play-
ers are finding it increasingly
difficult to survive.

Mr Townend told Tribune
Business that global private
banking consolidation would
take place gradually over time,
with smaller niche players find-
ing it difficult to keep up with
the increased demands and
costs associated with higher reg-
ulatory standards.

With the private banking
industry set to “see its fair
share” of mergers and acquisi-
tions as the global transactions
market emerged from the cur-
rent recession, Mr Townend
added: “One real strength for
the Bahamas is its private client
banking product.




“The Bahamas still continues
to attract not just your interna-
tional client, but the client that
wants to come to the Bahamas
for a second home, the tourist
client.”

But he said: “I think there’s a
lot of work to do from a strate-
gic perspective to continue to
position the Bahamas as a
financial centre of choice.”

While the Bahamas Financial
Services Board (BFSB) and
other industry bodies were
working on strategy and initia-
tives, Mr Townend said the
industry as a whole had “to
push the agenda forward”.

He explained that the key
question facing the Bahamas
and its financial services indus-
try was “how to strengthen and
consolidate what we have, and
look for ways to continue to dif-
ferentiate.... our existing prod-
uct

“The other areas the Goy-
ernment has been looking at
with the private sector, such as
the international arbitration-
type initiatives, all these are
great add-ons.” The Govern-
ment and private sector are also
focusing on developing yacht
and private aircraft registries to
augment the private wealth
management offering.

But Mr Townend added: “I
would say at this point in time
that we’ve got a little bit of
work to do to ensure that when
some of the larger groups look
at consolidation, the Bahamas
does not become a casualty.”

However, with the global
base of wealth and high net-
worth individuals continuing to
grow, especially in the medium-
term, “it is essential for the
Bahamas to ensure we capture
our share of that market and
increase it”.

Commercial Properties for Lease

Nearly 8,000 sq. feet. of space on Market St. (100 feet south of Bay St.)
Ground floor can accommodate retail store/restaurant second floor and












loft can accommodate offices.

Office suites located at Market & King Sts. near Bay St.



ideal for professional offices.

Southland Shopping Centre - Four hundred square feet of retail space

Contact Wm H Astwood-Walkine

Chartered Accountant

Ph. 326-8963/328-6995/328-6993.

BID for Bay
legislation
‘ready to go
by year-end’

FROM page 1B

tification of short-term pro-
jects,” Mr Klonaris told Tribune
Business. “Those are the two
focus points right now for the
DNP.

“T would say we’re hoping
towards the end of the year that
the [BID] legislation will be
ready to go for the following
year. That’s the key to what
we’re trying to push for.”

Mr Klonaris said the BID leg-
islation was key to “defining the
scope” of the authority that will
oversee downtown Nassau’s
hoped-for renaissance.

Besides determining the geo-
graphical boundaries of the area
overseen by the BID, Mr
Klonaris, who is also the NTD-
B’s current chairman, explained
that the legislation would deter-
mine its revenue-raising pow-
ers - what monies it could col-
lect and how - plus its ability to
provide services such as garbage
collection and street cleaning.

The legislation will also deter-
mine the BID’s composition,
who sits on its Board and the

split between public and private
sector representatives.

“This is the most difficult part
of it,” Mr Klonaris told Tribune
Business. “We have to be so
certain, careful and positive
about the authority, the level
of the BID authority and its
functions. These are really the
keys to the success of down-
town.”

When it came to short-term
projects to enhance downtown
Bay Street’s appearance and
amenities, Mr Klonaris said the
DNP was looking at “mainly
street-scaping, pedestrianising
some of the streets that run per-
pendicular between Woodes
Rogers Wharf and Bay Street,
short-term parking and manag-
ing parking with meters, and
extending the sidewalks to bring
proper green-scaping and land-
scaping to downtown”.

Work was also being done to
establish Nassau’s city centre
boundaries, something Mr
Klonaris said was “key to the
short-term goals”.

The DNP co-chair added that
Bahamian architect Jackson

2

a

Burnside would produce all the
working drawings to illustrate
the vision for downtown Nas-
sau, the body having “agreed
on his proposals”. When Mr
Burnside’s work is completed,
the DNP will be “ready to go
out for bid” on construction
work.

Mr Klonaris described Mr
Burnside’s work as not just “a
vision, but what the final reality
will be”. And he added: “The
vision for the NTDB was to
really become the BID. It will
morph into the BID, hopefully
in a year’s time.

“The ultimate goal was to
work through the BID. For
many years the NTDB was a
voice in the wilderness, but we
kept plugging away. The Gov-
ernment has grasped that, and
understands it, and where we
are now is the vision of many
years.

“The city is an important part
of this country as an engine for
employment, and it’s important
to have a vibrant city to sup-
port Atlantis and all the hotels
we have.”

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Senior Manager,
Accounts.

The job oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget & Management
Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective delivery
of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the
following:

* Compilation of the corporate budget.

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets

Preparation of monthly management statements

Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation

Preparation of performance reports for division , department and sections
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry recetvables (capital
contributions, rechargeable)

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices

Liaison with internal and external audits

Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief
Financial

Officer for the Board of Directors

Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required
Preparation of the business plan for the department

Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department

Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims

Overseeing the Cash Flow Management

Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment

Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form employee’s
salaries

Conducting audits of various financial activities including Employee Basic Pay
Reconciliation, Employee Loans Reconciliation and Payment Reconciliation
Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable

Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts

Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle repayments
Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule

Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans

Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to ensure
adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors

Managing the status of local and foreign vendors

Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and External Auditors
Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline. Conducting
performance appraisals

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff, manage
and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations

Job requirements include:
¢ A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting ACCA/CPA
h 7 : or equivalent qualifications

“Reporting for The Tribune is a ¢ A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a similar
management position
Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices
Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications
Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing systems
Ability to analyze financial reports
Sound knowledge of covenants of lending institutions (e.g. IDB)
Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial software
and the system of internal control.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability

responsibility and privilege. We
respect and honour the people’s
right to know everyday. I'm
proud to be a part of the leading
print medium in The Bahamas,

The Tribune is my newspaper.”

The Tribune

My Voice. Wy Honxpaper!

RUPERT MISSICK, JR.
CHIEF REPORTER, THE TRIBUNE

To report the news, call our
News Tips Line at 502-2359.

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing
Good time management skills

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: July,
22,2009.







GN-883

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT



PORT DEPARTMENT

Notice of Sitting for New Providence Port Authority

To consider Application For Licence Under The Boat Registration
Act Chapter (277) & Commercial Recreational Watercraft Act 2006

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the New Providence Port Authority Board
for New Providence and the Family Islands will be held at the Port Administration
Building, Prince George Wharf on Thursday the 30" July, 2009 at 3:00pm for the
purpose of granting Licences under The Boat Registration Act Chapter (277) &
Commercial Recreational Watercraft Act 2006.

Any Person entitled to and wishing to object to any application should do so at least
six (6) days before the date of the hearing by submitting his/her objections in writing
to the Board and to the applicant.

Persons attending the meeting on behalf of an applicant must produce written
authorization at the meeting.

Applicants for renewals are not required to attend, unless they have received
written notification from the New Providence Port Autho rity Board.

The undermentioned persons have applied for grant the licences as specified below.

NEW MASTER’S LICENCE - NEW PROVIDENCE

LICENCE NO. NAME CLASS
NB/29/09 Butler Shavad N.B B
P.O. Box N-8509
Nassau, Bahamas
NB/30/09 Coleby Cadrington M B
P.O. Box N-7
Nassau, Bahamas
NB/31/09 Lewis Cyril D B
P.O. Box SS-5700
Nassau, Bahamas
NB/32/09 Williams Thomas L B

P.O. Box N-3733
Nassau, Bahamas

NEW MASTER’S LICENCE —-FAMILY ISLAND





LICENCE NO NAME CLASS
NB/02/09 Strachan Tevon T A
P.O. Box AB-22554
Treasure Cay, Abaco
TRANSFER OF BOAT-NEW PROVIDENCE
REGNO PREVIOUS NEW OWNER CLASS PASS USE
QWNER
NP: 357 Vacation in Turnquest Sean & B 30 Charter
Paradise Shabane
P.O. Box SS-5804 P.O. Box SS-19570
Nassau, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas
RENEWAL OF BOAT LICENCE-NEW PROVIDENCE
REG NO APPLICATION BOAT NAME CLASS PASS USE
NP: 965 Inter Coastal “Renegade” A 0 Tug
Marine 50ft
P.O. Box SS-19016 Steel Hull
Nassau, Bahamas
NP: 6523 Inter Coastal “Suard IV” A 0 Barge
Marine 110ft

P.O. Box SS-19016 Steel Hull
Nassau, Bahamas

RENEWAL OF COMMERICAL RECREATIONAL WATERCRAFT

REG NO

NP: 132 ATE

NP: 826 BSC

NP: 825 BSC

NP: 505 SAN

(JET SKT) -NEW PROVIDENCE

APPLICATION BOATNAME CLASS PASS’ USE
Collie Dudley J “No Name” D 2 Rental
P.O. Box CB-12875 = 9ft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski
McKenzie Inez “No Name” D 2 Rental
Nassau, Bahamas oft
Jet Ski
McKenzie Inez “No Name” D 2 Rental
Nassau, Bahamas oft :
Jet ski
Marc Christie “No Name” D 2 Rental

P.O. Box SS-6203 Oft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

RENEWAL OF MASTER’S LICENCE —-FAMILY ISLAND

LICENCE NO



8452

LICENCE #



7523

8259

7313

8038

NAME CLASS
Brown Tracy R A

Wemyss Bight, Eleuthera

RENEWAL OF MASTER’S — NEW PROVIDENCE



NAME CLASS

Braithwaite William F A
P.O. Box CB-12649
Nassau, Bahamas

Brown Livingston A
P.O. Box N-97744 B
Nassau, Bahamas

Miller Stephen B A
P.O. Box N-8212
Nassau, Bahamas

Stubbs Alpheus G A
Nassau, Bahamas

Bi? ib

Commander Patrick McNeil
Port Controller

PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



US Treasury
chief pitches
to Mid-East

m@ By ADAM SCHRECK
AP Business Writer

ABU DHABI, United Arab
Emirates (AP) — US Treasury
Secretary Timothy Geithner
pressed ahead with his sales
pitch to Gulf Arab nations
Wednesday, telling oil-rich
Mideast allies Washington is
committed to keeping the dol-
lar strong and promoting sus-
tainable growth as the world
pulls out of a recession.

Geithner’s comments in the
United Arab Emirates capital
Abu Dhabi came on the sec-
ond leg of a two-day trip to the
Middle East, where he is seek-
ing to convince Arab leaders
on the Obama administration’s
efforts to fix the US economy.

“We want to rebuild a
stronger foundation for more
balanced growth globally,”
Geithner said after a closed-
door meeting about education
and economic development
with UAE Foreign Trade Min-
ister Sheikha Lubna al-Qasi-
mi and other officials. “We
need to make sure as we
emerge from this crisis we’re
not sowing the seeds of imbal-
ances that will lead to future
crises.”

Geithner’s visit to the UAE,
the second largest Arab econ-
omy after Saudi Arabia, came
a day after he met with Saudi
King Abdullah and business-
men in the kingdom. The
UAE, which is the end of the
Mideast tour, is also home to
the Persian Gulf commercial
and financial hub Dubai.

Aim

A key aim of the trip, which
follows a series of overtures to
the Middle East by President
Barack Obama, is to reassure
major oil producers in the six-
nation Gulf Cooperation
Council that America still wel-
comes their business and will
safeguard the value of the dol-
lar and their vast US invest-
ments by forging a way out of
the financial crisis.

“The UAE and the GCC
countries have played an
important stabilizing role (in
the global economy). You’ve
seen them intervene in support
of US banking institutions,”
said Nasser Saidi, chief econo-
mist of the Dubai Internation-
al Financial Center. “What we
need to see is a recognition of
the important role of the GCC

Legal Notice
NOTICE

ZAPATTO VILLA INC.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Noticeis hereby given thatin accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, ZAPATTO VILLA INC. is in dissolution as

of July 13, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, PO. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR






Legal Notice
NOTICE

RODRASTIL CORP.

In Voluntary Liquidation



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, RODRASTIL CORP. is in dissolution as of

July 13, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice
NOTICE

EVOMAN BUSINESS LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section
Companies Act. 2000,

138(4) of the International

Business
EVOMAN BUSINESS

LTD. is in dissolution as of July 13, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

on the international level.”

The Gulf states’ wealth sky-
rocketed during oil’s earlier
boom years, adding to their
political clout in the process.
But leaders in the region have
grown increasingly concerned
as crude prices and the value of
their investments soured in
recent months.

Five of the Gulf Coopera-
tion Council nations — Saudi
Arabia, the UAE, Oman,
Bahrain and Qatar — peg their
currency to the dollar. Kuwait
uses a basket of currencies that
includes the greenback.

In an interview with Arabic-
language news network Al
Arabiya, Geithner said the US
would work to ensure the
strength of the dollar.

“Tt is the policy of the Unit-
ed States and it will remain the
policy of the United States to
remain committed to a strong
dollar,” he said in a transcript
of the exchange provided to
reporters.

“My view, and this is the
view I heard expressed here,
is the dollar ... will remain the
principal reserve currency,” he
added.

As a group, Gulf govern-
ments hold more than $400 bil-
lion worth of US investments,
making them second only to
China as America’s biggest
creditor, Saidi said.

“Income from foreign assets
in terms of investment posi-
tions is becoming as important
as income from oil. People
tend to forget that,” Saidi said.

Geithner’s schedule in the
UAE included meetings with
the crown prince, the head of
the central bank and the coun-
try’s deputy finance minister.

The treasury secretary also
held talks with top officials
from some of the sheikdom’s
sovereign wealth funds, which
have invested billions of dollars
in US companies such as Citi-
group Inc. From the UAE, he
heads to Paris.

“Gulf countries are very
important as investors, even
though they don’t have that
much money to spend this
year” because of lower oil
prices, said Eckart Woertz,
programme manager for eco-
nomics at the Gulf Research
Center in Dubai.

“That’s a large part of why
he’s coming.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TST

For the stories
TAU
aac
ST
TEES





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 11B



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



US consumer prices increase

@ By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Consumer prices shot up in June
by the largest amount in 11
months, reflecting the biggest
jump in gasoline prices in nearly
five years.

The Labour Department said
Wednesday that inflation at the
consumer level rose by 0.7 per
cent last month, slightly higher

than the 0.6 per cent increase
that economists were expecting.
It was the biggest one-month
gain since a 0.7 per cent increase
last July.

The big jump was seen as a
temporary blip, however. Infla-
tion is not expected to be a prob-
lem any time soon given a severe
recession which is keeping a lid
on wage pressures.

The Federal Reserve reported
Wednesday that industrial pro-
duction fell 0.4 per cent in June

as the recession crimped output
for a wide range of manufac-
tured goods including cars,
machinery and household appli-
ances. However, the decline was
not as severe as the 1.4 per cent
plunge in May, a possible sign
that the recession is easing its
grip.

Underscoring the low threat
of accelerating inflation, prices in
June compared to a year ago
were actually down by 1.4 per
cent, the biggest year-over-year

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decline in nearly six decades.

Core inflation, which excludes
food and energy, posted a mod-
erate 0.2 per cent rise in June,
slightly higher than the 0.1 per
cent rise that economists had
expected.

The absence of an inflation
threat has allowed the Federal
Reserve to drive a key interest
rate to a record low in an effort
to fight a severe recession which
is already the longest since
World War II. The central bank
pushed its target for the federal
funds rate to near zero in
December and it is expected to
remain there until the nation’s
unemployment rate, currently at
a 26-year high of 9.5 per cent,
stops rising.

The 0.7 per cent jump in the
Consumer Price Index in June
followed three months of mod-
eration including a small 0.1 per
cent rise in May.

The upward surge was driven
by a 7.4 per cent rise in energy
prices, reflecting a 17.3 per cent
increase in gasoline prices, the
biggest one-month jump in gas
prices since a 20.9 per cent spurt
in September 2005 after Hurri-
cane Katrina had shut Gulf
Coast refineries.

Analysts are looking for gaso-
line and other energy costs to
retreat in coming months.
Already, gasoline pump prices
are down by about a dime since
the start of July.

Food costs edged up a small

0.1 per cent in June, held back
by a big drop in the cost of dairy
products.

The 0.2 per cent rise in core
inflation left the core inflation
rate rising by a moderate 1.7 per
cent over the past 12 months,
reflecting the downward pres-
sure on costs coming from the
prolonged recession.

For June, new car prices
jumped by 0.7 per cent and
clothing costs were also up 0.7
per cent. However, those gains
ere offset by a 0.6 per cent drop
in airline fares. Price increases
were also moderate in the health
area with medical care edging
up by 0.2 per cent, the smallest
gain in three months.

NOTICE

TO: Ms. Carla Johnson

No. 52B Churchill Road

South Bahamia

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Kindly remove your personal property from the above-
mentioned address, failure to do so within seven (7)
days from the date of this notice will result in the
removal of your personal property from the above-

mentioned address, without further notice to you, The
owners shall not be liable for any loss and/or damage
oocasioned to your personal property atter the expiry

of this notice,

DATED the 30th day of June, 2009,

THE OWNERS
No. 352, Churchill Road

South Bahamia
Freeport, Grand Bahama



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THE TRIBUNE

France approves

PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

eae Le
THE RULES OF

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Sunday opening

m@ By EMMANUEL
GEORGES-PICOT
Associated Press Writer

PARIS (AP) — France’s low-
er house of parliament on
Wednesday approved a divisive
bill to allow more stores to stay
open — and more people to
work — on Sundays.

The bill, passed in a 282-238
vote Wednesday, now goes to
the Senate for debate.

Expanding Sunday working
hours is one of President Nicolas
Sarkozy’s reform pledges. Sup-
porters of such a move say it
would give the French economy
a much-needed jolt as the nation
wrestles with recession.

France’s leftist opposition,
however, calls it an affront to
labour protections, and tradi-
tionalists decry it as an attack
on the time-honoured day of
rest.

Under the new measure,
shops in France’s three largest
metropolitan areas — Paris,
Marseille and Lille — would be

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Employees would have the
choice to refuse Sunday work-
ing hours, and employers must
pay those who agree to work
double overtime. Shops in
another 500 towns and villages
deemed to be of “tourist inter-
est” could also open, but without
the obligation to pay employees
double overtime.

The bill seeks to bring order
to the tangle of loopholes that
have sprung up since a 1906 law
that established Sunday as a
mandatory day off. That law was
passed after a deadly mining
accident that helped mobilize
support for greater worker
rights. The opposition Socialist,
Green and Communist parties
voted against the bill.

“What is presented to us as
an anecdotal little text...is in fact
opening a large breach in the
French social model,” Socialist
lawmaker Christian Eckert said.

Ten lawmakers from
Sarkozy’s UMP conservative
party voted against the bill, and

15 abstained.

A minority of French stores
has been allowed to open on
Sundays through a patchwork of
exceptions, such as one that
allows shops in tourist zones like
Paris’ Champs-Elysees Avenue
to open if their wares or services
fit a vaguely defined category of
entertainment and cultural
goods.

In other areas, such as the
French capital’s tourist-packed
Marais quarter, shops selling
jewellery and clothing benefit
from authorities turning a blind
eye.

European Union data show
that France’s restrictions on
business activity on Sundays are
similar to those in several other
Western European nations, with
about 15 per cent of French peo-
ple surveyed saying they usually
work Sundays, compared with
the EU average of around 14
per cent.

The French Senate, dominat-
ed by Sarkozy’s party, is sched-
uled to debate the bill July 21-23.

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P.0.Box N-3034
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Tel:(242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
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THE TRIBUNE



a See
Aid meetings continue

over troubled lender

@ By DANIEL WAGNER
AP Business Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
With banks repaying bailout
money, credit markets begin-
ning to flow and Goldman
Sachs posting stunning profits,
the financial sector would
appear to be stabilizing. But
CIT Group Inc., one of the
nation’s largest lenders to small-
and mid-sized businesses,
teeters on the brink of collapse.

In meetings that recall last
fall’s late-night negotiations
over failing financial firms, rep-
resentatives from the Treasury
Department, the Federal
Reserve and the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corp. were
locked in tense meetings Tues-
day about how to bail out the
firm — or whether to do so at
all. The debate hinges on ques-
tions about how bad off CIT
really is, and how its failure
could affect about a million
small businesses — from
Dunkin’ Donuts franchisees to
retailer Dillards Inc. — that
depend on it for credit.

Corporate customers started
to draw down on their credit
lines Monday and Tuesday,
according to a report Wednes-
day in The Wall Street Journal,
which cited unidentified people
familiar with the situation.
Those people told the newspa-
per the drawdowns amounted
to several hundred million dol-
lars, with one number men-
tioned as high as $775 million.

A spokesman for New York-
based CIT on Wednesday was
not immediately available for
comment.

CIT, which in April posted a
bigger-than-expected first-quar-
ter loss, has seen funding
options disappear as investors
shy away from purchasing all
but the safest forms of debt.
The lender has $7.4 billion in
debt coming due in the first
quarter of 2010, plus other
obligations. The recent down-
grades of its credit ratings will
make it harder to refinance that
debt in coming months, raising
fears that it could default. CIT
said Saturday it retained the law
firm Skadden Arps, a bank-
ruptcy specialist, as an adviser.

Regulators know they cannot
be seen as insensitive to small
businesses, which could fail if
their funding is disrupted. Small
businesses are critical to the
nation’s economic recovery,
providing about half of all pri-

vate-sector jobs.

Yet the administration faces
mounting criticism about the
skyrocketing costs of bailout
and stimulus plans, and the con-
tinuing rise in unemployment.
Critics wonder whether the gov-
ernment should prop up firms
like CIT that can’t stand on
their own. Unlike Citigroup Inc.
and Bank of America Corp.,
whose failures would have
upended the banking system
and created financial chaos,
some say CIT may not pose
such broad risks.

“This is all about where you
draw the line, and a very big
call has to be made,” said Simon
Johnson, a former chief econo-
mist with the International
Monetary Fund and now a pro-
fessor at the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology’s Sloan
School of Business.

Johnson and others argue
that CIT should not be deemed
“too big to fail.” But Rep. Albio
Sires, D-N.J., who owned a title
insurance agency that employed
12 people, sent a letter last week
to FDIC Chairman Sheila Bair
imploring her to approve CIT
for a programme that would
provide federal guarantees for
its debt. That programme has
been at the center of the official
debate over how to help CIT.

If CIT fails, “A lot of small-
and mid-sized businesses would
get hurt. I don’t think at this
stage, with the economy as it is,
we can afford that,” said Sires.

“Their role in the market ris-
es to the systemic level,” said
Scott Talbott, a lobbyist with
the Financial Services Round-
table, which represents CIT and
other large finance companies.

The FDIC has so far resisted
calls to give the firm that key
subsidy, maintaining that its
loan guarantee programme is
the wrong prescription for the
company, according to govern-
ment and industry officials
familiar with the matter.

They say Bair, the FDIC’s
famously independent chair-
man, believes the Temporary
Liquidity Guarantee Pro-
gramme was designed to
unfreeze credit markets, not bail
out companies. Backing CIT’s
debt also would put at risk the
insurance fund used to repay
deposits when banks fail — an
event that itself could under-
mine financial stability. The offi-
cials spoke anonymously
because CIT’s application is still
pending.

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The temporary programme is
due to be wound down this fall,
and banks that have repaid fed-
eral bailout money are no
longer eligible to participate.

FDIC spokesman Andrew
Gray said the agency can’t com-
ment on pending applications.
Curt Ritter, a spokesman for
CIT, on Tuesday would say only
that negotiations are ongoing.

“The administration is close-
ly monitoring” the situation,
said White House spokes-
woman Jennifer Psaki. Shares
of CIT added 26 cents, or more
than 19 per cent, to $1.61 Tues-
day on hopes that the govern-
ment would throw the company
a financial lifeline.

CIT also has explored a trans-
fer of assets and cash between
the parent holding company
and CIT’s smaller bank. But
that move would require FDIC
approval. The FDIC must
ensure that the bank is not trad-
ing cash for overvalued assets,
which could save the parent
company but leave the FDIC
on the hook for deposits if the
bank fails.

The FDIC must remain
focused on its obligation to safe-
guard its reserves in case of
future bank failures, said
Wayne Abernathy of the Amer-
ican Bankers Association.

“T don’t think we want to do
anything to cause depositors to
doubt the effectiveness of the
deposit insurance system,” he
said. Abernathy spoke general-
ly about the FDIC, and did not
refer to any particular bank’s
situation.

Another option for CIT is
getting additional bailout funds
on top of the $2.3 billion it
received in December from the
$700 billion financial bailout
plan. But analysts say the com-
pany’s problems are deeper
than a short-term cash crunch.

“We believe CIT’s funding
model is broken and have our
doubts over whether an addi-
tional capital injection would
cure the problem,” the research
firm Creditsights Inc. wrote in a
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plan, CIT would fail and anoth-
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move might require the Fed or
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firm against losses on CIT’s
loans.

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*))

NEWS, | §
STORIES
AND
Onl enn ame
EVENTS

RELIGIOUS *





The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, July 16, 2009® PG 21

for

«change

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter — mi, *

amissick@tribunemedia.net ag. i
mr x.

IN life, we all have a call-

ing and a purpose. God ee
gave each of us the chance Brown, also
and the choice to change the chant =
way we live our lives and mor A Pen 5
Deon Marlon Brown, also : eCniG
known as “Change” is more i i gospel music.
than ready to make one. ' ; /

“T got the name Change as an inspi- ie PF ’ Jd F

ration from God. Change really means
Christ has a new good earth-that’s what
he went to prepare for us so I feel that
I should use the name change because
I am trying to change a lot of folks to
find God,” Change said.

Change said he found God a few
years back.

“Tt has been a rugged road and I fell
short of his glory. However, I re-found
him on May 3 during a visit to a friend’s
church called Soul Winning Church of
God in Christ. After going there and
listening to the bishop, I said to myself
I need to go back on the road I was on
because I realise Satan was trying to
use me. I got back into my Bible study-
ing and back into church,” Change
said.

Change said he had always liked to
write his own songs and his friends
took notice.

“They would always say to me that I
was wasting my talent and I should use
it. The song Manners and Respect came
to me after my experiences on the bus.
Watching other people on the bus and
no one was saying good morning and so
forth. I saw kids and big folks not say-
ing excuse me to older people. So I
wrote that song. The Lord then gave
me the inspiration to make sure every-
thing was in the right place,” Change
said.

As for his sound, Change said he
prefers the rap genre.

“T am versatile but I rap about man-
ners and respect and use it for the glory
of God. I want to touch the hearts of
the youth and the people of the coun-
try,” Change said.

Change said he is into the music
scene to help people seek God.

“The message in my music is to tell
people to find God and seek him in
their life. These are the last evil days
and I want them to realise the life they
are living will lead to total destruc-
tion.”





PG 22 © Thursday, July 16, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune

res Er eam
aA SF ‘y i
bbe |hvillo: |e © Be clear

“To the Jews who had
believed him, Jesus
said, “If you hold to my
teaching, you are really
my disciples. Then you
will know the truth,
and the truth shall set
you free.”

John 8:31-32 (N.I.V)

ICY Yl



See what you might see, if you really saw what you did
see- yet were curious about the reality behind what was
there.

When I see you, your physical is trivial, and your interi-
or- superior. When I hear you, your voice is the tick tock
of a clock- high and low, your sounds get dirty in my ears,
the message lost forever- the challenge of your words, a

Ny 0 al fos EWN a el oP aan “resemble mine, however your face

does not. Your lips, your eyes, your tries and your lies- I
S qd 1 ' enjoy a great deal. Your imperfection is simply a reflection

a U f <8 0 y of the fact you’re susceptible to the world’s appetite.

Your time, your heart, your light and your height- I
enjoy a great deal. Your perfection is simply a reflection of
the fact youw’re in it for real. I see what I see, I know what
I know- I hide nothing. I read truth, I want truth, I need
truth, I believe truth and I live truth. I am transparent- we
are transparent.

When did truth become an annoyance? A weakness, a
guilt trip or a regret. How is it that lies feel better than
truths. Lies and their disfiguration of a healthy, vibrant,
evolving reality- softly caressing an ego to a state of sunny
ignorance- both a state to lie and a lie in state.

To open our eyes takes courage, dedication and a sound
mind; to choose a life of transparent living- to literally
choose reality over fantasy and a real life over strife; is to
choose faith, hope, love and an eternal passion to come
and go as you are.

Knowing without knowing; you are born anew. There
is a book that holds a truth available for all to claim; a truth
that refuses to change and will always remain the same.
And with reverence to His name; we believe as believers,
the message His Son Jesus Christ proclaimed. Not some
truth, but all truth.

In closing- if the world wants change, truth must precede
it, thus allowing for a transparent nature to receive it.

¢ Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian writer and poet, currently
residing in Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to the article
can be sent to fearless247@gmail.com

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The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, July 16, 2009 ® PG 23



Sing me a



By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

A LOCAL Pastor is gearing
up to launch a first of its
kind summer singing camp
called the National Music
Honors Programme, and
says should all go well it
could likely lead to the start
of the National High School

Music Honours Programme.
Pastor Trent Davis, Pastor of
Administration at Golden Gates
Assembly’s World Outreach Ministries,
said the idea for the unique music camp
was born from his previous work in a

SONG

similar youth programme in
Washington DC several years ago.

He explained: “I had the opportuni-
ty to work with some gifted kids at the
Eastern High School in Washington,
and during that time I witnessed these
kids achieve national renowned status
and perform at several major events
including performances at the White
House, and also the Capitol Building.

“That was an inner city programme
designed to give high school students
an opportunity through singing to
make inroads into other areas and lead-
ership roles in life, and so I wanted to
transfer that programme here.”

Mr Davis who has helped to arrange
music for some of the biggest names in
gospel music including Yolanda
Adams, Richard Smallwood, Daryl
Collie, and Karin Clarke, is now work-

FROM Left to right: Summer interns Ryan Smith, Lloydia Steed, Dereck
Storr, and Coordinator Trent Davis. Working with the upcoming National

Music Honors Programme at Golden Gates Assembly, the group is hoping
to attract a healthy crop of music hopefuls to the singing programme.

ing with the Ministry of Youth to help
develop some of the young music hope-
fuls here in the Bahamas.

With a staff of 8, he has now trans-
formed the church into a singing oasis
where auditions have been ongoing
since Monday and will continue until
this Friday.

19-year-old Lloydia Steed who is a
summer intern at the programme, is
one of 8 staff members at the camp who
have worked on bringing the singing
workshop to life.

She explained: “Being placed in a
leadership position in this programme
has helped me to learn how to get
things done quickly and accurately, P’ve
learnt how to get ideas on the table to
draw people into programmes like
this.”

Helping out with the creation of fly-
ers, a face book profile for the project,
and sending dozens of email to poten-
tial applicants, Ms Steed said her work
has been truly rewarding and she looks
forward to the official start of the pro-
gramme’s workshop which begins next
Monday and will run until July 29.



She said the programme is available
to persons between the ages of thirteen
to eighteen, and does not require them
to have had extended vocal training.

However the programme has already
recruited almost a dozen teens who
sing as if they’ve been singing from
birth she explained.

She also explained the programme is
free to all, and allows successful appli-
cants a chance to learn a tremendous
amount ranging from vocal presenta-
tion, harmony, vocal care, group
singing, reading music, and much more.

Based on the successful outcome of
the programme, Mr Davis explained
that he has arranged for further discus-
sion with the Ministry of Youth and
with the Ministry of Education to begin
the groundwork for the future creation
of the National High School Music
Honours Society.

He said parents can rest assured that
their kids will learn all they need in the
areas of music production and perform-
ances, and he is simply happy to be a
part of this important music develop-
ment here in Nassau.



PG 24 ® Thursday, July 16, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

Ricardo Clarke in concert

GOSPEL recording artist Ricardo Clarke, who
released his debut Gospel/Reggae album on
February 27 has taken the local Christian communi-
ty by storm with lyrics which not only speak of the
challenges of being saved or unsaved, but also on the
realities of living in an economically crunched envi-
ronment.

Hundreds came to support Ricardo Clarke w/ The
Higher Level Band which featured some of the pre-
miere acts in gospel music and was the introduction
of the newest gospel face Countella, who provided
"down home" comedy.

The inspirational message of Not Settlin has been
wide spread, and has crossed all boundaries and is
beginning to spread internationally.

Inclement weather forced a postponement last
month, but it won't deter Ricardo Clarke, and he's
not settling for anything less than a stellar perform-
ance. As a result, the new date for Ricardo Clarke's
"Not Settling Encore " concert with the Higher
Level Band has been confirmed for Friday, July 17,
at the original venue, Calvary Deliverance Church
on East Street south.

"Not Settling” is Clarke's biggest hit off the album
"Uprising" and the song is still in heavy rotation, as
the lyrics continue to inspire: "I'm not Settling, I
Deserve the Best, Not Going to Live My Life Like
the Rest ..." is a message not to be taken lightly.

He will be joined on the night of the concert by fel-
low artists such as Najee Dun, Mr Beedz, DJ
Counsellor, Derek and Charlie, the yellow
Bahamian Parrot and Reubin Heights. Showtime is
7.30pm and free phone cards will be given out all
night.

Mr Clarke who is busy promoting his singles "No
Minutes" as well as "Once I'm in Zion" also off the
"Uprising" album, recently made a monetary dona-
tion to the Sister/Sister Breast Cancer Support
Group, as he strives to use his popularity to get more
people and his fans involved in charity projects, and
highlight their work

in any way possible.

Mr Clarke's hit single "Not Settling” has been
growing from strength to strength and his conscious
and inspiring lyrics account for his growing fan base

in the Caribbean as well as internationally. He is not
just in the top 10 on the AOL charts but is also num-
ber one on riddimjamaica.net.

Check out this encore performance by Ricardo



Clarke 7.30pm at Calvary Deliverance Church, East
Street South.

For further information, contact the church office
@ 325-1802.



Church of God of Prophecy Commissions the Ministry of Social Outreach

THE Church of God of Prophecy
celebrates 100 years of ministry in the
Bahamas this year and over the years
has always been an organisation that
has been responsive to the needs of the
poor and those with other social needs.

According to committee member
Elizabeth Keju, the church has been
involved in prison ministry, hospital
ministry and seniors ministry on a
national level. The various local
churches have for many years operated
soup kitchens, distributed clothing,
school supplies and adopted schools.

National Overseer, Bishop Elgarnet
B Rahming wanted to bring all of the
various branches under one umbrella
for improved effectiveness and better
use of the limited resources.

At a recent press conference, the

recently appointed director of the
Social Outreach Ministry Patricia
Bethel, outlined plans to officially
launch the new venture. The team will
be working with the twenty pastors and
district overseer in New Providence
and in the near future the programme
will be extended to Grand Bahama and
the Family Islands.

A commissioning service is sched-
uled for this Saturday, July 18 at 9 am
at the Church of God of Prophecy's
Children’s’ Chapel, Sunlight Village
Corner. Bishop Rahming will be on
hand to formally introduce the recent-
ly appointed workers in this ministry
and to outline the role this ministry will
play in the outreach ministry of the
Church.

“The focus of this operation is to

provide food for the hungry and
clothes for the less fortunate. We still
believe in the effectual fervent prayer
of the saints and divine healing and
through this ministry we are commit-
ted to rescuing “at-risk” neglected, tru-
ant and abused youths, we will meet
the needs of the impoverished elderly
and the homeless; but most important-
ly we will offer the message of salva-
tion and the hope and peace that only
Christ can give,” Ms Bethel said.

The Minister for Social Services,
Loretta Butler Turner will also address
the session on behalf of the Bahamas'
Government. The message of the
vision for this commissioning session
will be delivered by Bishop Shelton
Beneby. He will speak on the theme
“Catch the Vision”. All Bahamians

and residents in the commonwealth are
invited to be present

Bishop Beneby acknowledged that
the harvest is great and there is a lot of
work ahead for this committee.

Bishop Dale Moss explained that a
panel discussion will also be held dur-
ing the service. Panelists will be on
hand to field answers and accept sug-
gestions from the floor on the role of
the church, the government and the
community in addressing the social ills
of the country.

Bishop Moss also discussed the cur-
rent involvement that the Shirley
Street Church has with various non-
profit groups like “Hands for Hunger,”
which provides hot meals for persons
in the neighbouring Kemp Road
Community.



The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, July 16, 2009 ® PG 25

Inner Harmony release new reggae single



Psalms 121

Inner Harmony, one of the longest
running contemporary female gospel
vocal groups in the country, has released
another single that is set to be a hit with
gospel music enthusiasts across The
Bahamas. The group is pleased to
announce the release of their single
Psalm 121 which was taken directly from
the scripture and presented in a sultry
reggae style.

“T will lift up mine eyes unto the hills,
from whence cometh my help. My help
cometh from the LORD, which made
heaven and earth. He will not suffer thy
foot to be moved: he that keepeth thee will
not slumber. Behold, he that keepeth

Israel shall neither slumber nor sleep.”
Psalms 121: 1-4.

“We are very pleased with this single,”
says group leader Patrice, “The track
causes you to focus on the Lord as your
help, especially as we go through one of
the toughest economic times in recent
history.”

“It gives listeners hope. Help does not
come from the government or men. But
it comes from the Lord,” says Antonise.

Inner Harmony has teamed up with
gospel reggae music giant Mr Lynx who
produced the music and also performed
on the single. “Mr Lynx did a great job
with lead vocals,” said Alma, the group's
alto and lead vocalist. The combined
smooth sultry sounds of Inner Harmony

and the musical and vocal genius that is
Mr Lynx has produced a product that is
uplifting to the mind and spirit.

For the past nine years Inner Harmony
has been ministering the gospel in song.
The group comprising of five female
vocalists has traveled the islands of the
Bahamas and Florida representing the
Kingdom of God through the art of
music.

In addition, Inner Harmony hosts an
annual conference called “Women in
Worship” and a seminar for young
women called “Developing Inward
Beauty.”

“We believe that worship is a lifestyle”
says Patrice, “therefore coming from var-
ious career backgrounds we can influ-

ence women and girls as worshippers no
matter what sphere of the marketplace or
social background they are employed or
come from.”

“It is our desire that this song is a bless-
ing to all people during these hard eco-
nomic times,” says Kenice and Otalia
added :“We know the struggles that
women face on a daily basis because we
are women too”

Inner Harmony is comprised of
Antonise - Banker, mother, Pastor's wife,
Otalia - Government, former Senator's
wife, Patrice - single, executive secretary,
Alma - psalmist, mother beautician, and
Kenice - wife, mother and doctor.

For booking contact Patrice Paul at 361-
5626 or e-mail patricepaul254@msn.com



PG 26 @ Thursday, July 16, 2009

RELIGION

An ear to hear!

IN Revelation chapter 2 and 3
Yeshuwa Messiah writes to the church-
es and each of them were given this
admonishment: He that hath an ear,
Let him hear what the Spirit saith unto
the churches;

Today the Spirit is yet speaking, but
the angels of these churches (bishops,
apostles, prophets, doctors, etc;) are so
disconnected from Father Yahweh due
to their erroneous religious beliefs;
they're in no position to hear what the
Spirit is saying. As a result the enemy is
wreaking havoc throughout the nation.
It is evident that the hit and miss God
of the religious churches today is not
the Most High God of Abraham, Isaac
and Jacob.

Ninety percent of the churches here
in the Bahamas are operating as an out
of control freight train that is hauling
flammable substances, and loaded with
passengers. It's only a matter of time
before disaster strikes.

The enemy has cunningly worked his
way into what we call the church today;
and through various shades of his
Babylonian religions has deceived
many leaders, left, right and center.
This religious spirit and the tradition of
men is so powerful in that it has literal-
ly caused church leaders to accept and
operate from the position and title of
religious leaders.

Before we go any further think of
this for a few moments: With over four
thousand churches throughout the
Bahamas, how is it that the enemy can
wreak such havoc in this country? As
I've stated before and will continue to
herald: “The hardest spirit to drive out;
is the spirit that's been invited in”

As far as today’s religious leaders are
concern: there is nothing wrong with
their church; because they're having
the conferences, seminars, workshops
and revivals, and the people are being
blessed in Jesus’ name. The apostle
Paul said to the saints, Galatians.3:1 O'
Foolish Galatians who hath bewitched
you, that you should not obey the
truth? Likewise I humbly and respect-
fully ask the church leaders of the





PASTOR

MATTHEW

ALLEN





Bahamas “Who hath bewitched you?”

As a patriotic, passionate son of the
soil, I would love nothing more than to
see the Bahamas being a pace setter on
the global scene in various areas of life.
There is absolutely nothing wrong with
holding the political leaders of this
country accountable for integrity gov-
ernance; but I must declare that the
brunt of the deterioration that this
nation faces lies at the feet / doors of
the powerless, religious church.

Why or how could I make such a

leaders and are in stiff competition with
each other, to see who can built the
largest church and fill it with religious
Christians; whereas the church that
Yeshuwa has built, He's filling it with
true disciples and not religious
Christians. The center of attention in
religion is and will always be the lead-
ers of that religion, Selah. The organ-
ised religious church belongs to the
denomination, the bishop, apostle etc;
of whom the congregations have be
methodically trained to worship and
serve in one facet or another.

He that hath an ear, Let him hear
what the Spirit saith unto the churches:
Through the incomplete (not incorrect)
prosperity gospel; the religious leaders
are responsible via erroneous, contam-
inated teachings for the people priori-
tising and seeking after the blessings of

inety percent of the churches here in
the Bahamas are operating as an out of

control freight train that is hauling flammable
substances, and loaded with passengers. It's
only a matter of time before disaster strikes.

statement? The answer is very simple;
I've carefully watched and diligently
listen to the religious leaders as they
talk about what their churches are
doing via programs, conferences, etc.

Then I'm reminded by the Spirit of
what Yeshuwa meant when He
responded to the answer Peter gave via
revelation from Yahweh in
Matthew.16:16. Here's Yeshuwa's reply
Matt.16:18b. And upon this rock I will
build my church; and the gates of hell
shall not prevail against it”

The problem with the church today is
that the leaders have allowed religion
to be their god; henceforth they are
well known in the country as religious



God; rather then them seeking the face
of God.

Religion has deceived the church so
badly to the point that leaders see noth-
ing wrong with merchandising the
gospel and have set up ministries to
execute their agendas. As if fleecing
and pimping the people from the pul-
pits aren't bad enough; attending these
money making conferences is liken to
the nail, in the coffin where the people
are financially charged to attend. These
chargers are often given a religious title
and excuse or reason. They're some-
times call registration fees to help meet
the budget.

The religious leaders and their spe-
cial guest / pimping partners through

The Tribune

the spirit of manipulation, compelling-
ly forces the sales of their products
(books, c.d's tapes, etc) upon their guilt
driven if they don't buy victims

This merchandising religious practice
in the church is nothing new, it’s just
that today’s leaders have up their game
in this area; but Yeshuwa's principles
and stands on this sort of practice
remains the same. Watch this!

Matt.21:12. And Yeshuwa went into
the temple of God, and cast out all
them that sold and brought in the tem-
ple, and overthrew the tables of the
money changers, and the seat of them
that sold dove Verse: 13. And said unto
them, It is written, My house shall be
called the house of prayer; but ye have
made ita DEN OF THIEVES.

I wonder what He (Yeshuwa) would
say if He was ever invited to attend
these annual money making religious
conferences. Here's a quick reminder
to the religious leaders who have built
their dynasty by this and many other
tactics; 1John.1:9. If we confess our
sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us
our sins, and to cleanse us from all
unrighteousness.

And also to you religious (nuts) fol-
lowers who are buying everybody's
books seeking prosperity and success.
Stop wasting the little money you do
have and become a disciple of
Yeshuwa. Here's what the Bible (God's
word) says about your prosperity and
success.

Joshua.1:8.This book shall not depart
out of thy mouth; but thou shalt medi-
tate therein day and night, that thou
mayest observe to do according to all
that is written therein: for then thou
shalt make thy way prosperous, and
then thou shalt have good success.

He that hath an ear, Let him hear
what the Spirit saith unto the churches.

e Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen,
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l,

For questions and comments contact us
via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
Ph.1-242-441-2021 or 225-3850





Eight Caribbean Baptist Fellowship Youth Festival

YOUTH from thirteen nations and
ten family islands will be in Nassau to
attend the eight Caribbean Baptist
Fellowship Youth Festival next week.

The festival which is held every three
years will include participants from ten
family islands and The United States,
India, Guyana, Jamaica, Trinidad and
Tobago, Antigua, Barbados, The Turks
and Caicos Islands, St Kitts, Dominica,
Haiti, and Grenada.

During their time, here participants
will discuss a number of varied and vex-
ing issues affecting youth of the world.

Organisers of the event say that it
will have a tremendous financial impact

on the country by providing business to
many local entrepreneurs and estab-
lished businesses such as graphic
designs, printing, garment manufactur-
ing, entertainment, photography, audio
and video services, food veneering, san-
itation and transportation contracts.

The Wyndham Resorts are also set to
benefit with an average of over four
hundred hotel nights.

Topics to be discussed include: crime
and violence, cyber addiction, gadget
gospel, love and abstinence, environ-
mental stewardship, youth ministry for
the 21st century and many more.

Presenters include: Rev Emmett

Dunn, Baptist World Programme
Coordinator and Youth Director, Dr
Michael Taylor, earth scientist and
president of the Caribbean Baptist
Fellowship Youth Dept., Rev Diana
Francis, Rev Ulric Smith, and many of
the leading local and regional ministers
including: Pastor Dave Burrows, Pastor
Sterling Mcphee,a nd Pastor Carlos
Reid.

Some of the highlights of the festival
include:

A Dis is a Bahamian ting-welcome
celebration, CBF Youth Ball, honoring
distinguished Youth Leaders of the
region and the launching of the CBF

Youth Ambassador Programme

Global March and Rally and a
Caribbean Praise: Cross/Cultural
Victory Concert featuring top
Bahamian and Caribbean gospel artists

The festival is hosted by the
Bahamas National Baptist Missionary
and Educational Convention, a mem-
ber body of the Caribbean Baptist
Fellowship (CBF).The Reverend
Clinton L Minnis former Baptist youth
director and vice president of the CBF
youth dept is providing executive lead-
ership for the management of the festi-
val and Br Wellington Smith serves as
the local coordinator.



The Tribune

ABACO was also known as
Habocoa, Ibico, Habacor and
Incayonique. The island was settled
temporarily by the French in 1685.
The Loyalists arrived in 1785 from
New England. In 1783 the population
of Abaco is recorded as nil, but by
1786, after the arrival of the
Loyalists, the figure is 686, including
384 slaves.

Joseph Paul and his family arrived
at Carleton (four miles from Treasure
Cay) in 1783, but no record exists of
any work he might have done among
the black population during the peri-
od he remained here.

THE FIRST MINISTER ARRIVES

In June, 1815 the Reverend Joseph
Ward, the fourth minister sent to the
Bahamas by the British Methodist
Church, arrived at Green Turtle Cay.
In a letter dated August 11, 1815,
Reverend Ward explains that he came
to Abaco in response to the petition
and to get rid of 'a bilious complaint’.
His passage was provided by
Benjamin Lowe, "a pious
Abaconian", who was a boat captain.

Reverend Ward landed at Green
Turtle Cay on June 21, 1815, a
Sunday, and his text that day was,
"Behold, I bring you good tidings!"
Ward is described as: " ... undoubted-
ly one of the most talented and most
ardent missionaries ever seen in the
West Indian field ... "

The Reverend John Rutledge, an
Irish missionary, described Ward as "
... the greatest labourer our part of the
vineyard can boast of." His ministry
in Abaco lasted less than one year,
after which he was sent to Harbour
Island. He died in Nassau in
September, 1817, after a ministry
which was described as having been
‘as short as it was brilliant’. The
Reverend Michael Head, who suc-
ceeded Ward at Green Turtle towards
the end of 1815, also died in 1817. By
1836, there were 300 members at
Green Turtle Cay.

HOPE TOWN AND CHEROKEE
SOUND BEGINNINGS

A Methodist society was formed at
Hope Town (then also known as
Great Harbour) in 1820. There are
few details available surrounding this
development.

In 1827, the Cherokee Sound
Society was opened by the Reverend
James Horne. It is known, from the
records of Joseph Ward, that there
was a settlement called Cherokee
Sound in 1815, which Ward passed on
his way to Green Turtle Cay. A chapel
was built at Cherokee Sound the fol-
lowing year.

In 1841, there were more than 700
members in the Green Turtle Cay

RELIGION
@r THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS



Noe? j JIM
p_ LAWLOR

Church. They worshipped in a wood-
en chapel. In 1843 a corner-stone was
laid for the erection of a new chapel,
which was completed in 1856. This
was a stone building, which was
destroyed by the hurricane of 1932,
and a photograph of the chapel is to
be found in the Albert Lowe Museum
at Green Turtle Cay.

A SOCIETY FORMED
IN MARSH HARBOUR
In 1845, a society was formed in
Marsh Harbour. The Synod minutes
for 1846 read:

"At this settlement we have
formed a class of sincere souls, most
of whom are only seeking the power
of godliness. They are sometimes vis-
ited on the Sabbath Day by an
Exhorter from Great Harbour (Hope
Town)."

A Sunday-school was also formed
at Marsh Harbour in 1845. There
were twelve students and one
teacher.

FIRST BAHAMIAN MINISTER IN ABACO

The appointment of the Reverend
Alexander J Thompson to the circuit
occurred in 1848. He was the second
Bahamian minister, and the first
Bahamian appointed to the Abaco
Circuit. Thompson's ministry was pri-
marily concerned with the racial seg-
regation which was being practised in
the church. The District had formu-
lated regulations against this, and
sent the Reverend Thompson to
enforce them.

"The Methodist Districts resolved
that there should be no colour dis-
tinctions in seats. However, in 1847,
John Blackwell, the Methodist mis-
sionary at Green Turtle Cay, compro-
mised by allowing the whites to sit on
one side and the blacks on the other.
This ruling was condemned by the
District meeting, but in 1848, his suc-
cessor Samuel Annear was violently
opposed and ill-treated for trying to
enforce the District's regulations.
Annear finally had to be removed."

It was to this situation that
Thompson was appointed in 1848.
The tension caused by racial segrega-
tion was so great, that many white
people left Green Turtle Cay for Key
West. The white and black popula-
tion had toiled on the building of a
chapel, but the whites were experi-
encing some difficulties in accepting
their black brethren as equals. It is to



Part 36 —- Methodists in Abaco 1

Joseph Paul and the Loyalists

be remembered that many of the
blacks were formerly slaves of the
whites, so this was a radical change
for them.

OLD PLACE BEGINS
The next development in the circuit
occurred in 1869. A class of 14 mem-
bers was started at Old Place. The
Circuit report for 1869 reads:

"We have commenced preaching in
a place on the mainland of Abaco dis-
tant from Green Turtle Cay about 15
miles, with hopeful signs of success. It
promises to be a prosperous village or
neighbourhood and may be a station
of some importance in a few years. We
formed a class of 14 members and
expect to add to their number in a
short time."

In 1870, the membership in the cir-
cuit is 295. The Marsh Harbour
Sunday-school has 13 pupils and two
teachers (both male). Meanwhile,
there is report of improvement at Old
Place, and plans to build a chapel. In
1875, the Reverend Elijah Sumner
reported to Synod that the circuit was
grateful to " ... a brother whose faith-
ful oversight is respected by all the
members and blessed by God in keep-
ing the society together." He reports
pleasant, profitable visits, and that the
people of the society are poor, and live
far apart, some of them having to walk
as many as 10 miles to church. From
1869 to 1878, the Methodists wor-
shipped at the Baptist chapel, and the
Methodist chapel was under construc-
tion from 1875 to 1878.

MAN-O-WAR SOCIETY

The society at Man-a-War Cay was
started in 1870 with six members.
This was never a large society, and
was eventually closed during the mid-
1970's

By 1878, reports are that the racial
strife, which was particularly severe
in Green Turtle Cay had abated, and
that relations were much more har-
monious. In that year there were 58
members, an increase of five over the
previous year. The Sunday-school
reported seven teachers and 43
pupils.

CIRCUIT'S FIRST CANDIDATE
FOR MINISTRY

In 1955, the District Synod accepted
Charles Christopher Curry as a candi-
date for the ministry. He was the first
Abaconian to candidate. The
Reverend Curry, a native of Green
Turtle Cay gave years of dedicated
service, and became the first
Bahamian Chairman of the District in
1978.

(Next time: Part 37 — Methodists in
Abaco 2)

Thursday, July 16, 2009 ® PG 27

Tat
PLS
ACLU demands changes

after jail removes Bible verses
from letters to inmate

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Prisoner
and free-speech advocates are demand-
ing a written guarantee that inmates at a
Virginia jail can receive letters contain-
ing religious material after a prisoner
said his mail was censored.

The American Civil Liberties Union,
its Virginia chapter and several other
civil, religious and prisoner rights organ-
izations sent a letter to Rappahannock
Regional Jail Superintendent Joseph
Higgs Jr. requesting that the issue be
resolved without litigation.

Anna Williams, whose son was
detained at the jail for several months,
said officials cut out entire sections of
several letters she sent to her son that
contained Bible verses or religious
material. She said the jail cited prohibi-
tions on Internet material and religious
material sent from home.

"Obviously for security issues the
right to practice religion while incarcer-
ated is a balancing act to some extent,
but that can't possibly apply to a mother
sending religious passages to her son,"
said Kent Willis, executive director of
the ACLU of Virginia.

Higgs said in a written statement that
the letter prompted him to initiate an
internal investigation. The U.S.
Supreme Court has said that inmates
have the right to practice religion as
long as it doesn't interfere with their
other obligations or create a security
risk.

Birmingham ‘religion’
billboard brings debate

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — A
billboard that was put up by the
Alabama Freethought Association is
causing debate, with some saying the
sign reading "Imagine No Religion” is
offensive and should be removed.

The billboard along Interstate 20
near Pell City was placed there by the
association as part of a national cam-
paign by the Freedom From Religion
Foundation. The background of the
sign is of a stained glass window with
the words sung by John Lennon in the
song "Imagine" on top.

Annie Laurie Gaylor, co-president
of the foundation in Madison, Wis.,
said the sign will be up for a month.
The group had wanted a billboard
near the Birmingham-Shuttlesworth
International Airport, but Lamar
Advertising declined.

"We got censored by Lamar,” she
said.

"It was offensive to me," said Tom
Traylor, general manager of Lamar
Advertising in Birmingham. "We have
the autonomy to decide what's in the
best interests of our company and
what's offensive. I don't think it was
the kind of message we wanted to
stand behind.



PG 28 @ Thursday, July 16, 2009

ON Saturday, July 18, the community
known as “The Valley” will come alive
when the St George’s Anglican Church
holds its annual “Thrill of the Grill and
Parish Fair.”

“The church fair is the major
fundraising event which assists with the
operating expenses of our church and
its ministry to our members and the
wider community. The Anglican
Church Men of our parish will man the
grills where delicious steaks and chick-
ens will headline the food items which
will be available at the fair” said

hh

Thrill of the Grill

Brenda Archer chairperson of the
organising committee.

Local foods including a conch of
every type, home cookery and new
items including roast corn and “chicken
in da bag” will be available to purchase.

“Even more important than the funds
we hope to raise, is the opportunity to
fellowship and get to know each other
better,” said Fr Kingsley Knowles, rec-
tor of the parish.

The youth department will man the
soft drinks, daiquiri, ice-cream and
snowball stalls said Allison Estwick,

RELIGION

youth coordinator of the parish. In
addition the youth will offer computer
games, hamburgers and hot-dogs, face
painting and the bouncing castle to
keep the kids busy during the fair.

Of course we can’t do without our
cakes and pastries , so this year we
intend to make this stall even bigger
and better, said Betty Smith, president
of the church’s Guild to Help the Sick
and Needy.

“Our Guild goes all out to provide
cakes, pastries, pies and tarts of every
description and we expect no less this

The Tribune

— _

PARISHIONERS enjoy the many activities
and food items which were available at St
George’s annual Thrill of The Grill and
Parish Fair last year.



year

In addition to all these booths Agnes
Munnings and Virgil Briggs will man
the plants and books stall which has
always been a great hit, said Ms Archer.

Games of chance including bingo,
white elephant, hoop-la and punch
board with a number of great prizes will
be available.

Live coverage of the fair will come via
STAR 106.5 FM with Brad Hanna from
2 to 6 pm. The Grill Out and Parish
Fair will end with a Junkanoo Rush-
Out with the Valley Boys.



Full Text


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Volume: 105 No.193



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The Tribu

SA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

Ba

"Available at

Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875





PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

OBITUARIES

Two murders
in three hours

Teen shot, prominent
member of community
is stabbed to death

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
and DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Staff Reporters
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net;
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A 17-YEAR-OLD boy was
killed in a drive-by shooting and
a prominent member of the
Eight Mile Rock community
was stabbed to death yesterday,
all in the space of less than three
hours.

In New Providence, William
Ingraham, 17, of Lynden Pin-
dling Estates, was shot and
killed at around 4am in the
Robinson Road area, and in
Grand Bahama Denzil Jones Jr,
30, was stabbed to death by
intruders at his home in Jones
Town.

William Ingraham was
gunned down while sitting at
the side of the road on Ida
Street with two others when a
dark car pulled up and several
shots were fired from the vehi-
cle at around 4am, police said.

The teenager was shot in the
chest and upper arm. He fell to
the ground and died at the
scene.

An 18-year-old resident of
Miami Street sitting with him

was shot in the left leg, and a 16-
year-old resident of Mackey
Street was shot in the right leg.

Police were called just after
4am and the two survivors were
rushed to Princess Margaret
Hospital where their condition
is considered “not life-threat-
ening,” Police Supt Elsworth
Moss said.

A murder investigation has
been launched into the young
man’s death.

Supt Moss, officer in-charge
of the Central Detective Unit,
said: “We don’t know yet how
many people were in the car
and we have yet to determine
the motive of the shooting.

“If anyone has any informa-
tion that may assist investiga-
tions please call Crime Stoppers
or CDU.”

Meanwhile, in Grand
Bahama the murder of Denzil
Jones Jr left the close-knit com-
munity of Jones Town in shock.

Mr Jones was stabbed to
death by intruders in his apart-
ment in the early hours of yes-
terday.

The victim and his family are

SEE page 10

we TiC

Sai



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

POLICE AND DEFENCE FORCE officers came to the aid of two of their own yesterday, Able Seaman Vandyke
Adderley and Constable Ferguson, and helped them to rebuild their home in the Grove after a fire destroyed it

on Sunday morning.



Minister's former law partner questioned in
Connection with missing money allegations

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER law partner
of a Cabinet Minister is being
held at the Grove Police Sta-
tion for questioning in con-
nection with allegations that
more than a quarter of a mil-
lion dollars is missing from a

client’s account.

According to Supt Elsworth | served yesterday when a jury unanimously convicted Andy

Moss, the lawyer has been in} Francis, 22, of her son’s murder.

police custody from Tuesday :

afternoon. He is being ques-

SEE page nine

_

rTM et
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE



Troyniko
McNeil: I
did not kill
Harl Taylor

Murder accused
tells jury he had
nothing to do
with murder

By NATARIO
McKENZIE

Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

“T HAVE
been charged
for a murder
I did not
commit,”
murder
accused
Troyniko
McNeil told
the jury in
the Harl Tay-
lor murder tri-
al yesterday.

In his unsworn state-
ment from the prisoner’s
dock, McNeil, 22, told the
jury that he had nothing
to do with Taylor’s mur-
der and that he had no
reason to kill the noted
handbag designer.

McNeil, the son of Tay-
lor’s former business part-
ner Troy McNeil is
accused of causing Tay-
lor’s death between Sat-
urday November 17 and
Sunday November 18,
2007 while being con-
cerned with another. Tay-
lor, 37, was found dead at
Mountbatten House on
West Hill Street with mul-
tiple stab wounds.

McNeil told the jury
that his father had lived at
Mountbatten House and
that he had even worked
there before. He said that
prior to Taylor’s murder
he had made reservations
to travel to the United
States to receive treatment
for an injury he had
received while playing
basketball. He told the

SEE page nine

Troyniko
McNeil





Accused found guilty of

Khodee Davis murder

FOR the mother of 16-year-old Khodee Davis justice was

The jury found Francis’ co-accused, 18-year-old Robert Out-

: ten also of Fox Hill, not guilty of Davis’ murder 11-1. Justice Jon

tioned by CID officers. With } Jgaacs told Outten that he had been given an opportunity to get

i right oe an eile i his life in order. Outten’s relatives shouted praises to God after
ve nee ‘ ae 7 ees i the verdict was handed down. Outten was represented by lawyer
Said that the police have by + Romona Farquharson. Francis is expected back in court on

Plaid Skirts Starting @

Plain Skirts Starting @

Jumpers Starting @
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& Blouses Starting
Monogram Shirts/blouses





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C

THE southeast Bahamas may
be hit by thunderstorms and
showers within the next 36
hours as a well defined tropical
wave passing near Hispaniola
inches closer to the islands,
Chief Meteorologist Basil Dean
said yesterday.

Mr Dean said the Depart-
ment of Meteorology is watch-
ing the large tropical wave
which is fast moving towards
the Bahamas at 20 to 25 miles
per hour.

However, he said the system
is not showing any signs of
development and is not expect-
ed to be a threat to the
Bahamas. Nor does he expect
the wave to develop into a pos-
sible storm or depression, at
least within the next 48 hours.

THE TRIBUNE



Southeast Bahamas are

set for stormy weather

"With that kind of speed it
will push it through the area
very quickly. Even if it devel-
ops into something it would not
pose much of a threat to the
Bahamas," he said yesterday.

Mr Dean said it is not unusu-
al for things to be quiet on the
tropical storm front during this
time, adding that the season
should become active around
August.

"The tropics are very quiet
at the moment, for how long we
don't know, but we hope it
remains that way.

"This is not abnormal, we've
had numerous seasons when
we’ve had a late start.

“The peak (storm) season is
normally between August and
September,” he said.

Defence Force apprehends
suspected illegal immigrants

THE Defence Force has reported the apprehension of a number
of suspected illegal immigrants just off the coast of New Providence.

The detainees, all Haitians, were taken into custody after their
sloop was spotted by the Defence Force Air-wing reconnaissance
team near Green Cay early yesterday morning.

The Defence Force patrol craft HMBS P-121 was dispatched to

the area to investigate.

The crew discovered a 45-foot grey and white Haitian sloop
with a large number of Haitian aboard.

RBDF Patrol crafts HMBS P-48 and P-49 were dispatched to the
area to assist in the removal of the detainees.

They are expected to arrive in the capital early this morning.

PM: no vacancy for a
new chief justice as yet

ALTHOUGH
opposition leader
Perry Christie has
called for the prime
minister to consult
with him on the
question of who will
replace the outgoing
Chief Justice, Hubert
Ingraham yesterday
suggested he sees no

rush. S ie
mL am Nee UEUN

The Cabinet
Office announced on
June 26 that Chief Justice Sir
Burton Hall is set to leave the
Bahamas in August, after serv-
ing in the post for eight years,
to become a Permanent Judge
at the International Criminal
Tribunal for the Former
Yugoslavia.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

eR EE
PHONE: 322-2157





Asked yesterday
whether he had con-
sidered who will
replace Sir Burton,
the prime minister
would only respond
that “there is no
vacancy” for a new
chief justice as yet.

Mr Christie said Mr
Ingraham has yet to
consult with him on
the issue of who will
replace Sir Burton
but added that he has “noted
to the prime minister that the
discussion needs to take
place.”

Under the constitution, the
appointment is made by the
governor-general, in accor-
dance with the recommenda-
tion of the prime minister, who
must have consulted with the
leader of the opposition.

Some attorneys have sug-
gested that Senior Supreme
Court Justice Anita Allen
would be the most likely and
worthy replacement.

SUMMER SIZZLER
ITE ay

4" Block Was $1.58
NOW $1.50

6" Block Was $1.72
Now $1.60

8" Block Was $1.86

Come in to
JBR and take
advantage of
these summer

savings!

Delivery
Charges On
Block
was 15¢

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oreo ht eee Ces

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Telephone: (242) 202-9250

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GRAND BAHAMA
Cate ee ean eh
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Telephone: (242) 352-7022

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Policewoman
and husband
accused of
assaulting
Freeport man

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A Freeport
man who claims to have been
assaulted by a female police
officer and her husband fears
that the incident is not being
taken seriously by Grand
Bahama police.

Frederick Morley said he suf-
fered a torn ligament in his arm
during the attack, which took
place on June 27 in the Caravel
Beach area.

Mr Morley said he reported
the matter to the police but has
not heard back from anyone on
the status of the investigation.

He is concerned that the mat-
ter will be swept under the rug.

Mr Morley claims the attack
has left him physically injured
and emotionally traumatised.
He said he has sought legal
advice.

“T cannot sleep at night, can’t
function and work properly, and
something needs to be done
about this,” Mr Morley said.

He claims the incident started
when he was approached by the
female officer who was not in
uniform at the time.

“T was doing lawn work in a
yard in Caravel Beach when the
officer approached me and
accused me of breaking her van
glass.

“T told her I did not break the
glass and she kept saying ‘you
break my glass.’ She then came
around the fence and attacked
me, tore my shirt off and kept
thumping me. Then her hus-
band came around and choked
me,” he claimed.

Mr Morley said the neigh-
bours heard his cries for help
and came out to assist, but was
told by the woman officer to
mind their business. He went to
the police station to report the
matter. “I told them that she
assaulted me and they kept me
there waiting for over an hour
before they dealt with me,” said
Mr Morley.

Mr Morley said a doctor
examined him and said he had
torn a ligament in his arm.

He said he took the doctor’s
report to the Central Police Sta-
tion, where an officer there told
him to take it to the Port
Lucaya Station, but when he
arrived he was told to go back
to Central. “I was treated worse
than a dog. I don’t think it is
right and I want Assistant Com-
missioner Dames to look into
this,” said Mr Morley.

His wife pointed out that
police officers are not above
law. “My husband is a hard
working man and if she hada
complaint about him, she could
have gone to him and worked it
out. There are procedures she
should have taken as an officer
of the law.

“She should have known bet-
ter. The police are here to pro-
tect us from the bad guys, not to
inflict harm on anyone. She
would have arrested him if he
had attacked or assaulted her,”
she said. Mrs Morley said her
husband has been deeply affect-
ed by the incident and has had
difficulty sleeping.

Community activist Troy
Garvey was able set up a meet-
ing between the Morleys and
ACP Marvin Dames, who said
police are investigating the mat-
ter. Mr Garvey claims the
woman officer has told him she
is willing to apologise if that is
what the Morleys want. “You
can’t go around taking advan-
tage of people. We will seek jus-
tice, but I hope that we can
bring resolution to the matter,”
Mr Garvey said.

Preliminary
inquiry set to
start in October

A PRELIMINARY inquiry
into the murder of American
Anna Garrison is scheduled to
begin on October 26.

Zyndall McKinney, 22, of
Isabella Boulevard is accused of
intentionally and unlawfully
causing Garrison’s death
between Sunday, February 25
and Saturday, July 4, 2009,
while being concerned with
another. He was arraigned on
the charge last week.

The preliminary inquiry will
be held before Magistrate
Ancella Williams in Court Six,
Parliament Street. Garrison’s
badly decomposed body was
discovered by walkers in a
bushy area off Fox Hill Road
south, near the Blue Water Cay
development, on Saturday July
4. Garrison, 33, first came to the
attention of the police on Feb-
ruary 25, 2009, when they
received a missing person report
from the United States Embassy
in Nassau.

Govt owes millions to Bahamians
dispossessed of land, claims MP

Mitchell tells parliament outstanding debts should be settled ‘expeditiously’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE government owes mil-
lions of dollars to Bahamians
who it dispossessed of their land
in order to undertake public
works projects, it was claimed in
parliament.

MP for Fox Hill Fred
Mitchell yesterday called for
government to “expeditiously”
settle the outstanding debts that
it owes to those people whose
land has been acquired over
many years.

He said that when the PLP
government came to power in
2002 there was $50 million owed
to people for “hundreds if not
thousands” of acres of land
acquired. In documents tabled
by the MP, it is evident that
much of this land was used in
the construction of new road
corridors, as well as for airports,
housing, schools and parks.

The Tribune was unable to
ascertain yesterday precisely



FRED MITCHELL

where this figure stands at pre-
sent.

Mr Mitchell said: “This is
something which we must
account for. The constitution
says that you can acquire some-
body’s land for a public pur-
pose, but you must compensate
them for their land and some

people have been waiting years
and years for their compensa-
tion,” said Mr Mitchell, sug-
gesting that his party also failed
to dispose of the debt during
their five year tenure in office
which came after their 2002
election victory.

Cavalier

“It seems to me that we can-
not treat people’s property in
such a cavalier fashion and this
must be dealt with expeditious-
ly. I don’t even know if this $50
million is on the books as a debt
owed by the country, as part of
the national debt. Nevertheless
the debt is outstanding and It
should be settled,” he added.

The MP was speaking as he
moved a resolution for the for-
mation of a parliamentary select
committee to investigate mat-
ters connected with Crown land.

Coming on the heels of a
series of articles in The Tribune
outlining questionable land
grants during the tenure of the

Mortician denies claims teen’s body
removed from morgue without consent

THE mortician who co-ordi-
nated the funeral arrangements
for Michael Knowles, the teen
found hanged in a police holding
cell in May, strongly refuted
reports that the boy’s body was
removed from the state morgue
and embalmed without official
consent.

Llewellyn Astwood Jr, co-direc-
tor of Demeritte’s Funeral Home,
said he was in possession of signed
documents that prove he received
written consent from the boy's
family and the relieving officer at
Princess Margaret Hospital for
the release of the body to the
funeral home.

He said the home then did what
any "sensible" mortician would
do — embalmed the body.

"It's impossible for us to get a
body without proper authorisa-
tion,” Mr Astwood said yester-
day. “Without proper authorisa-
tion from a family member it's
impossible for the funeral home to
even inquire on the person. A
funeral home can't just get a body
and say ‘I want to embalm it’.”

His comments came in response
to an article published in the
Bahama Journal on Wednesday,
which reported that a source
claimed that Knowles’ body was
"removed from the morgue and
embalmed before a second autop-
sy could be performed ... With-
out official consent.”

Knowles was found dead in his
cell in the East Street south sta-
tion on May 31, with what
appeared to be a cord from his
trousers wrapped around his neck.

Although police ruled the death
an apparent suicide, many specu-
lated that Knowles may have been

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“It is impossible for us to
get a body without proper
authorisation.”



Llewellyn Astwood Jr

the victim of foul play or police
negligence.

Autopsy

According to previous reports,
the family's lawyer had planned
for a second independent autopsy
by a foreign pathologist.

Wednesday's report in the
Journal claimed this could not be
performed because Knowles’
body had been embalmed.

But Mr Astwood yesterday
said he had "no idea" the family
wanted an independent autopsy
performed until he heard it on the
news. "No one called me and said
that a second autopsy was to be

done. I heard about it on the
news. After the initial embalm-
ing we secured all of his vital
organs in case they wanted to
have a second autopsy done (but)
nobody even called me to say
we’re going for a second autopsy
and I heard nothing from them
so I prepped the body for burial,"
Mr Astwood said. He said after
a body has been embalmed, a sec-
ond autopsy is possible, however
due to the presence of embalming
fluid in the body, a toxicology
report would be fruitless.

Knowles’ funeral is scheduled
for today at 11 am.

A Coroner’s Inquest into his
death is expected to be held soon.

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recently-resigned director of
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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master














































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Lax US guns laws affect Bahamas

LAST WEEK we watched a programme
about Chicago’s growing crime and the fact
that more than 150 children of that state have
been killed in the past three years — all because
of guns.

A report done by the University of Chicago
Crime Laboratory, an academic group research-
ing effective ways to reduce violent crime, found
that the social cost of Chicago’s gun violence
totals about $2.5 billion each year.

It is said that every year 30,000 Americans
die by being at the wrong end of a gun — at
least 10,000 of them murders.

According to reports this is twice the number
of 4,316 US soldiers killed in the six-year Iraq
war.

In 1982 Chicago became the first major US
city to enact a handgun freeze. Soon other sub-
urbs began passing gun law legislation.

Of course, the politically powerful National
Rifle Association, has fought every inch of the
way to protect the American’s “fundamental
right” to be armed.

But the most powerful blow to groups that
want to remove guns from the streets came in a
Supreme Court ruling that “struck down two
parts of the country’s strictest gun control law
adopted in Washington, DC, 32 years ago — the
ban on private handgun possession and the
requirement that firearms kept at home be
unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trig-
ger lock.”

Of course, the ruling won praise from former
President George W Bush, defeated Republican
presidential candidate John McCain and Wayne
LaPierre of the National Rifle Association.
According to LaPierre the ruling was “a great
moment in American history.”

However, although President Barack Obama
believed the Second Amendment to the US
Constitution protected the right of Americans to
bear arms, he also identified “with the need for
crime-ravaged communities to save their chil-
dren from the violence that plagues our streets
through common sense, and effective safety
measures.”

During his election campaign the Rifle Asso-
ciation ran multi-million dollar advertisements
to make voters believe that, if elected, he would
be the most anti-gun president in US history and
that their firearms would be confiscated.

So far Mr Obama has not looked in the direc-
tion of the gun lobby, but many fearful Ameri-
cans hope he will eventually get around to it.

According to a Reuters report the United

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States is estimated to have the world’s highest
civilian gun ownership rate.

And soon Arizona will allow citizens to car-
ry concealed licensed weapons into its bars just
as Billy the Kid did in the days of the swing-door
saloon — only in those days Billy didn’t need a
licence.

It is claamed that Americans can walk into
bars in 40 of its 50 states with their “funda-
mental right” in their hip pocket.

And a gun-toting pastor in a Louisville, Ken-
tucky, Assembly of God church maintains that
“God and guns were part of the foundation of
this country.”

He invited his 150-member congregation and
their friends to carry their guns into the sanc-
tuary on a Saturday night to “celebrate our
right as Americans!”

It is true that the world is full of crackpots,
but it seems that America has more than her fair
share of them.

On the programme discussing Chicago’s
crime problem, a speaker involved in trying to
bring sanity back to the streets, said he would
like to see all guns removed from the streets.
Asked by the programme host if in his experi-
ence he had seen fewer deaths in areas where
guns were outlawed, he admitted to knowing of
none.

This seemed to answer the question for the
programme host.

Why remove guns if the murder rate did not
go down?

But what seemed to escape both of them
was that there is no good for one state to ban
firearms, when Americans just have to cross
state lines to purchase a gun in a neighbouring
state and smuggle it back home.

As long as this can happen the killing will
continue.

This is the problem that the Bahamas faces.
As long as Americans glorify guns, and —
despite what they say — allow them to get into
so many irresponsible hands, the Bahamas will
continue to have a gun problem on its own
streets.

It’s incredible the lengths to which Bahamians
will go to smuggle firearms into this country.

And so until Americans decide to grow up,
and shake the dust of the Wild West from their
cowboy boots, and the National Rifle Associa-
tion comes to its senses, the Bahamas will con-
tinue to have a gun problem.

And, of course, the gun deaths will continue
— both here and in America.

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Call for education
privatisation seems
naive and theoretical

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Comment on “Privatize edu-
cation system, Govt urged”: an
article in The Tribune, July 14,
2009, page 3.

The above cited article con-
tained several important ideas.

Firstly, the article reported
the views of the President of
the Nassau Institute, Mrs. Joan
Thompson; and she criticized
the Prime Minister for his com-
ment on the 10-year plan of the
Department of Education. That
criticism seems intemperate and
ill-informed based on what he
said and what occurred at the
Education Summit.

Specifically, Prime Minister
stated that “our success in get-
ting every child into a classroom
has not translated into every
child having achieved his full
potential...today too many stu-
dents leave our secondary
schools only semi-literate and
semi-numerate.” This a clear
and valid statement.

Yes, the Department of Edu-
cation (DOE) did present a 65-
page “10 Year Education Plan”
at the summit that contained 22
goals, each containing numer-
ous short and long term objec-
tives. These objectives are
extended “wish” lists and were
aptly described in the document
itself as “hopes.” And... the lit-
eracy problem so clearly identi-
fied in the Prime Minister's

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



comment was the number three
goal behind “Developing a
More Relevant Curriculum”
and “Developing National
Pride, Civic Responsibility and
a Strong Work Ethic in Stu-
dents.”

The Goal 3 on “Literacy and
Numeracy” had 16 objectives
that included some curriculum
changes, more teacher training
and on-the-job teacher mentor-
ing. To many these changes do
not address the severity of the
academic failure and illiteracy
problems in the Public Schools.

And...the surprise of all sur-
prises is that the plan was clear-
ly marked DRAFT. It would
appear that the Department of
Education was diplomatically
sent back to the drawing boards
to develop an acceptable plan.

Secondly, the President of
the Nassau Institute, lays out a
plan of privatization that seems
naive and theoretical. If one
looks at the world and asks:
“Are the best national systems
publicly or privately owned?”
one would have to admit that
they are mostly Government-
owned and/or directed and
financed.

One international school

testing organization shows that
the world's top-five systems are
Singapore, South Korea Hong
Kong, Taiwan and Japan. All
of these governments have cre-
ated schools to produce a mili-
tarily strong nation or to
increase the nation's human
skills and capabilities. All of
these countries have cultures
that support hard work and dis-
cipline. Some have made mis-
takes; but all have been willing
to modify their systems.

It is ironic that The Nassau
Institute has published and is
widely distributing the “The
Learning Crisis” essay. That
document accepts the impor-
tance of Government in educa-
tion and proposes specific pro-
grammes designed to change
the culture of the classroom by
proposing innovative schools
that have a proven track record
in educating under privileged
children.

One can be a sceptic and say
that nothing changes in the
Bahamas, especially the DOE.
But...the Prime Minister's com-
ment suggests that the country
will get another draft of a 10-
year plan; and that is a good
sign. We will just have to wait
and see.

RALPH J MASSEY
Economist & Consultant
Nassau,

July 15, 2009.

ob years on, do we have more national pride?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Being in the age group that still remembers the
unnerving silence that befell Clifford Park on July 10,
1973 I was thinking whether we have more nation-
al pride today than we had in 1973 to what is wit-

nessed today?

Colourful ‘T’ shirts in our national colours means
nothing to me if that same person refuses totally to
respect their fellow Bahamian in a manner fitting
recognising that that person like you is also a

Bahamian.

and discoloured that I could not imagine any respon-
sible person allowing these examples to fly but these

flags flew for months.

Check the beaches come Saturday, July 11th, and
witness the piles of litter — soda cans and garbage
we took from home, enjoyed the food and left every-

thing remaining right there on the beach and we

call ourselves good citizens?

I was down there in Rawson Square yesterday
for the traditional Police Beating of the Retreat
across where I stood with my family were the VIPs,

but it seems this year with the FNM in office Inde-

Then there is the person who is bedecked in all the
finery and is cussing and throwing as much litter as
they can muster all over God’s fine earth, but also
feels he is as equal as anyone else.

36 years on we still have people who are unable to
sing our national anthem without a text — I notice
more and more children are unable to sing the
anthem.

We disrespect our flag — government buildings fly
a tattered flag or a flag faded so much you cannot
really see the distinctive colours. For months not so
many weeks ago in the back area of Victoria Gar-
dens there were two flags which were so damaged

pendence is only for them — not a soul from the
PLP Opposition. I remarked to my children — look
just how silly we are.

If we really understood what our fine national
anthem says this would be God’s country as those so
well chosen words of Timothy Gibson are idyllic to
the extreme and should inspire us all to imitate
God’s commandments, but look what we do?

M SAWYER
Nassau,
July 5, 2009.

I don’t believe more taxes are necessary

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This is in response to Mr
Thomas Smith’s letter on tax-

employees such as maids and
gardeners I feel there would be
enough funds generated to
avoid new taxes.

es. I personally can recall that

Evidently he had some infor-
mation which was proven to be
wrong.

I hope that someone in the
proper position with govern-

I really don’t believe that
more taxes are necessary.

If the proper government
agency would investigate every-
one who should be paying
National Insurance on their

about a year ago I had an agent
visit me about my maid and her
insurance.

I happily showed him all the
past payments I made and he
seemed rather impressed.

ment will take heed!

HELEN ASARITA (Mrs.)
Nassau,
June 28m 2009

Dowdeswell Street * Tel: 322-1103

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Magistrate ‘to leave post next year’

MAGISTRATE William
Campbell, who presides over the
Coroner’s Court, expects to leave
his post next year when his three-
year contract comes to an end in
November, 2010, he confirmed to
The Tribune yesterday.

The judge said he had been
extended three renewable three-
year contracts, the last of which
comes to an end next year, as is
customary.

Still, Magistrate Campbell said
he would not be adverse to any
opportunity to retain his post.

Magistrate Campell presided

"O” down

over a number of high-profile
inquests, including that of Daniel
Smith, the son of late American
celebrity Anna Nicole Smith.

The inquest started in Novem-
ber 2007 after several postpone-
ments and a revolving door of
magistrates.

Testimony was drawn out over
five months before a seven-
member jury concluded the
young man died from an acci-
dental overdose of a cocktail of
drugs.

Mr Campbell also previously
held the post of chief coroner.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Troops seize police
Station in Venezuela

CARACAS, Venezuela

DOZENS of National Guard | ;
troops seized control of a police }
station controlled by a leading ;
opponent of President Hugo
Chavez on Wednesday, adding }
to tensions between Venezue-
la’s government and elected :
opposition officials, according }

to Associated Press.

About 40 National Guard }
troops tossed tear gas canisters }
at a police precinct post in the }
town of Curiepe, east of Cara- }
cas, shortly before dawn, said :
Elisio Guzman, director of the i
Miranda state police. He said }
the officers inside were forced to }
leave and the National Guard :

occupied the building.

Guzman said the motive }
behind the takeover was unclear }
and national government offi- :
cials could not immediately be :

reached for comment.

N eighbourhood comes together
to tackle rising crime problem

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

RISING crime in a Nassau neigh-
bourhood has brought a community
together to share information and
coordinate security efforts to keep their
area Safe.

Residents of Harmony Hill, off Vil-
lage Road, and near Ryswick Road
and Starlight Drive, started talking
about how to keep their homes safe
following a series of burglaries in May.

On Mother’s Day, a robber broke
into a woman’s bedroom as she was
sleeping in the early morning hours.

The community realised later that

the burglar’s intrusion could have been
prevented if residents had told each
other that they had seen a strange man
lurking in the area and attempting to
break into a another home just two
hours before.

Some weeks prior to that incident,
five burglaries were reported in nearby
Greenwood Road where items were
stolen from homes, or boats and trail-
ers were taken from yards. Four of
these robberies occurred during the
night.

And on another occasion a burglar
broke in through the front door of a
house in Harmony Hill to steal a flat-
screen television while the homeown-
ers slept upstairs.

“Tt seems like nothing will stop these
guys,” the resident said.

“They come when people are asleep
and that is what scares me.”

An innovative crime watch scheme
launched as a result of these incidents
has now gained 100 per cent partici-
pation from residents, linking around
90 homes in the area through modern
technology so local residents can keep
each other updated about suspicious
happenings in the neighbourhood.

Instant sharing of information is
already benefitting the tightening net-
work of residents and preventing
unnecessary calls to the police. And
the community is working with police
officers to ensure they are up-to-date

with the latest security systems and
aware of the details police will require
when they are called.

As neighbours are communicating,
talks of integrating security systems
and organising a nightly neighbour-
hood patrol are in motion.

A Harmony Hill resident of 27 years
said: “I suppose the current climate
has made people more inclined to be
connected, and there’s a lot more
awareness now, we are cooperating
completely.

“The exchange of ideas has been
phenomenal and I think putting in the
measures we are talking about will
make it a lot harder to get into the
neighbourhood after this.”

(BE ‘B BP Bahamas Business

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DELIVERS

SENATOR Dion Foulkes,
Minister of Labour and Social
Services, held a series of meet-
ings in Freeport, Grand Bahama,
on Tuesday in a continuing effort
to get feedback from social part-
ners on the FNM government’s
proposed National Training Pro-
gramme.

The draft framework for the
programme, which is aimed at
training and retraining recently
laid off Bahamians, was recently
submitted to the government by
Khaalis Rolle, president of the
Chamber of Commerce and
chairman of the National Training
Implementation Committee.

Mr Foulkes met with senior
managers from the Grand
Bahama Shipyard, Freeport Con-
tainer Port, the Home Centre,
Xanadu Hotel, Island Seas and
Island Palm Condominiums and
the Isle of Capri Casino.

A National Training Pro-
gramme Committee for Grand
Bahama has been established
under the chairmanship of
Tyrone Gibson, deputy director
of Labour, with representatives
from the business community,
trade unions and the Grand
Bahama Christian Council.

“The programme will be

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MANAGEMENT APOLOGIZES FOR’ ANY
INCONVENIENCE CAUSED AND ASK THAT
THE PUBLIC COOPERATE WITH US DURING
THIS TIME.

SIGNED: MANAGEMENT

ARO ABE
-* fit,

Foulkes consults on Grand
Bahama training programme



DION FOULKES met with executives from the Container Port on the National Training Programme. Pictured are Alpheus
Forbes, deputy permanent secretary; Charles Hunt, human resources consultant; J Malvese Capron, human resources
director of the Freeport Container Port; Minister Foulkes: Raymond L Jones, Chief Operating Officer; Tyrone Gibson,



deputy director of Labour; and Sammy Gardiner, administrator in the Office of the Prime Minister.

geared towards training workers
in areas where there is a strong
demand from the business sec-
tor,” the minister said.

“These areas will include, but
not be limited to the following:
Masonry, carpentry, welding, tile-
laying, electrical, landscaping,
data processing, computer skills,
customer service, day care assis-
tant, housekeeping and language
skills. Even in these hard times
there are still some jobs available

Marine poster
competition
TSE CL

OVER 450 students from
schools throughout the Bahamas
went head-to-head this year in the
Dolphin Encounters’ 2009 Marine
Education Poster Competition. In
the end, 12 students, including two
from the Family Islands, walked
away with top honours at an award
ceremony held on Blue Lagoon
Island.

Hundreds of students logged on
to the Dolphin Encounters web-
site to download applications for
this year’s contest, which was held
under the theme “Invasive Species
— The Pirates of the Caribbean.”
Students were invited to learn
about the negative effects of inva-
sive species and create posters that
reflected their thoughts and con-
cerns. The competition, which is in
its ninth year, was open to all stu-
dents throughout the Bahamas
from kindergarten through 12th
grade, and the winning entries were
chosen by a panel of judges at a
recent judging ceremony at the
Bahamas National Trust.

The winning entries were cho-
sen by a panel of judges including
Charlene Carey of the Bahamas
Reef Environment Educational
Foundation (BREEF); Janeen
Bullard, Bahamas National Trust;
Stacey Gray of the BEST Com-
mission; Lakeshia Anderson of the
Ministry of Agriculture and Marine

EDIEAMIBYIMEDIEINEICEN

for those with the relevant skills,
and there are likely to be more of
these when the global economy
turns around. Some of them, for
instance ship welding, are quite
lucrative.”

Mr Foulkes also informed
stakeholders in Grand Bahama
that the courses will be for 10 to
15 weeks and are being offered by
the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BT VI) and
the College of the Bahamas in

Freeport.

“The programme will be made
available to 1,000 unemployed
Bahamians who will be selected
from those persons who have
already registered for the Nation-
al Insurance Unemployment Ben-
efit,” said Senator Foulkes.

He said he was pleased with
the response from all the social
partners in Grand Bahama who
have agreed to work with the gov-
ernment in this new programme.






2009 DOLPHIN ENCOUNTERS Marine Education Poster Competition winners:
(Back row I-r) Annette Dempsey, director of Education at Dolphin Encounters;
Sophia Taylor; Brianna Eccleston; Franz Taylor; Enrico Rio, and Sophia Smith
of the Dolphin Encounters — Project BEACH. (Front row I-r); Saifuddin
Rahimi, Anju Bimal; La Tifia Payne, and Sacha Hussey.

Resources; Sharrah Moss, the
Nature Conservancy, and Lorraine
Cox of the BEST Commission.

The winners were recognised for
their art during an award ceremony
held by Dolphin Encounters at the
Project BEACH education centre
on Blue Lagoon Island.

The winners of the four entry
categories are:

K-2

1. La Tifia Payne - See Saw
Academy

2. Saifuddin S Rahimi - St John’s
College

3. Johnny Bethel - Man-O-War
Primary School

Grades 3-5

1. Anju Bimal - Xavier’s Lower
School

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2. Sacha Hussey - St Andrews
School

3. Ariannah Bain - Summit
Academy

Grades 6-8

1. Falon Williams - St Andrews
School

2. Enrico Rio -Tambearly School

3. Abel Abraham -St Paul’s
Methodist College

Grades 9-12

1. Franz Taylor - Lyford Cay
School

2. Sophia Taylor - Lyford Cay
School

3. Brianna Eccleston - Lyford
Cay School

First place winner in the 9-12th
grade category, Franz Taylor, of
Lyford Cay School, felt strongly
about the message in his winning
poster, “I have always been con-
cerned about the negative effects of
invasive species in our environment
and my poster reflects that. I want-
ed to show that both our native
plants and animals are being hurt
by invasives and that we need to
take action.”

“My poster shows small native
plants trying to grow under a
Casuarina tree and they are say-
ing “Casuarina Tree You Don’t
Grow On Me,” said Sacha Hussey,
of St Andrew’s School, second
place winner in the 3-5th grade cat-
egory.

“T painted the little plants try-
ing to grow and the roots and nee-
dles of the Casuarina plant is stop-
ping them.

“Invasive species hurt our native
plants.”
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Half of $20m unemployment
money has been exhausted

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE National Insurance Board has
exhausted almost half of the $20 million
allotted for the national unemployment
benefit plan since payments began in early
May.

Yesterday NIB Chairman Algernon
Cargill told The Tribune that, to date, the
board had approved 8,785 claims and paid
out $9.1 million, an average of $1.1 million
a week.

"Up to July 7, we'd received 10,529 appli-
cations. Of that number, 706 persons were
not approved. Up to that point we had paid
out in total... $9.1 million,” he said during
an interview with The Tribune yesterday.
"We have approved, all together, 8,785 per-
sons who are in receipt of claims, up to
date. We currently pay out approximately
$1.1 million a week.”

He said given the current number of
applicants, the $20 million transferred from
NIB's Medical Benefits Fund — which

finances phase one of the scheme — is
expected to be depleted by October or
November of this year.

During the second phase of the plan, gov-
ernment has said it will establish a fund
into which all employers and employees
will contribute 0.5 per cent of the employ-
ee’s insurable wage to sustain the pro-
gramme.

Fund

Mr Cargill said an average of $130 a week
is paid out to each recipient of the fund
with an average of 100 people a day apply-
ing for the scheme.

The plan provides a maximum of $200 a
week for up to 13 weeks at a time; recipients
will not be eligible for the benefit again
until a period of 52 weeks has passed.

Mr Cargill added that since the plan's
inception, nearly 50 people have attempted
to defraud the fund by collecting unem-
ployment benefits by false pretences.

He said that such cases were quickly iden-

tified by authorities at NIB and after inves-
tigation, turned over to the police.

"The first thing we do when we detect
that someone may have committed unem-
ployment fraud is to stop the benefit. And
after we've stopped the benefit we would do
our own internal investigations. The sec-
ond phase would require that we refer these
matters to the police, and that's what we've
done in most of those cases already,” he
said.

The chairman said many of the suspected
fraudsters were unemployed when they
applied for the fund but then got employ-
ment and continued to receive the benefit.

He said the board was alerted when NIB
contributions from employers began being
paid for persons who were still receiving
the benefit.

In other cases, he said, NIB received tips
about the fraudsters or spotted claimants on
the job.

"Unfortunately some persons find it nec-
essary to try to receive the unemployment
benefit while they're still working,” he
said.

‘Children of God’ to open 2009
Bahamas International Film Festival

THE Bahamas Internation-
al Film Festival (BIFF)
announced yesterday that
Kareem Mortimer’s acclaimed
indie drama “Children of
God” will be the opening film
at this year’s festival, which
takes place from December
10-17 in Nassau.

The intimate drama is slat-
ed to screen on Friday,
December 11.

“Children of God”, origi-
nally titled “Daybreak”, was
shot last summer entirely in
Nassau and Eleuthera. The
film was written, directed and
produced by Mr Mortimer.

Said the filmmaker: “It is
also a subtle and haunting
look at race, sexuality and
religion in the Bahamas which
makes it a very timely and
important film and also an
extremely gorgeous one to
look at. We are very proud of
this effort and to open at the
Bahamas International Film
Festival is a dream come
true.”

The film stars Van Brown,
Johnny Ferro, Mark Ford,
Margaret Kemp, Stephen
Tyrone Williams and a many
other Bahamians.

The movie depicts the reli-
gious concept of human
beings regarded by God as his
children. It is the story of two
individuals who learn that in
order to live a truly happy life
they have to risk speaking and
acting on their true feelings.

Set against the backdrop of
a nation grappling with vio-
lent homophobia, this film

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BIFF FOUNDER and axecttye
director Leslie Vanderpool
tells the story of Jon, a white
Bahamian artist who faces los-
ing his scholarship at a local
university, and Lena, a con-

servative religious woman
who is struggling with her
crumbling marriage. Both
escape from city life in Nas-
sau to the island of Eleuthera,
where their worlds collide in a
way that will surprise audi-
ences.

Said BIFF founder and
executive director Leslie Van-
derpool:

“We are thrilled to once
again have a Bahamian film
open this year’s festival. This
is Kareem Mortimer’s debut
feature film, and to see that
BIFF has assisted Kareem
throughout his nascent career
means a lot. A participant in
the BIFF filmmaker residency
programme in 2007, (he) is
sure to be an award-winning
filmmaker at many film festi-

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





SEEN FROM LEFT ARE: Rebecca Harris of St Paul’s Methodist College; Leaniqua Martin, St Georges
High; Shermae Martin, Bishop Michael Eldon School; Vanessa Henderson, Bishop Michael Eldon High;
Kristine Henfield, St Georges High; Christopher Duncanson, returning summer student; Theresa Martin,
human resources assistant; and Valerie Barry, human resources manager.


























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law degree

Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations
for improvements to a compliance culture

Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of
duties

Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and
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RE: Risk and Compliance Officer

Absolutely no phone calls will be accepted

Firm offers
job training
for students

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - At a time
when many companies are
cutting jobs, Polymers Inter-
national Limited decided to
hire several summer students
and put them through a job
training programme.

Human resource manager
Valerie Barry said PIL has
enrolled seven young students
from various high schools on
the island in an ecight-
week summer student pro-
gramme.

She said the students are in
their second week of training,
receiving work experience and
on the job training in five dif-
ferent areas at the plant on
Queens Highway.

Polymers International has
been in operation for 13 years
on Grand Bahama, and cur-
rently employs 74 workers.
The company manufactures



“We believe it will help the
Bahamas in the future and also
give our youth the experience
required to get them to move

forward.”



PIL human resource manager Valerie Barry

the materials used to make
Styrofoam products and plas-
tics.

“We export to various
plants across the world and
our main customers are in the
US,” Miss Barry said.

She noted that despite the
recession, PIL has not laid off
any workers.

“Even though most compa-
nies are cutting back, we
decided to continue with the
summer student programme
because we feel that investing
and spending time developing

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our youth is important for our
future.

“We believe it will help the
Bahamas in the future and
also give our youth the expe-
rience required to get them to
move forward.

“We run a two-year pro-
gramme, and this year we
have four new students and
three students from last year
who are in their second year
of the programme.”

Ms Barry said the summer
students are between 16 and
18 years old. They are moni-
tored and every week depart-
ment heads meet on Friday to
discuss their progress and
achievements.

“They get to find out what
the working environment is
like and they get to learn
about professionalism; what
is expected of individuals in a
working environment.

“IT hope they can take this
experience back with them
and eventually amalgamate
that in their learning and
become productive and pro-
fessional adults later on in
life,” she said.

The students participating
this year are: Shermae Mar-
tin, Shipping Department;
Leaniqua Martin, Accounts
Department; Kristine Hen-
field, Safety Department;
Rebecca Harris, Quality Lab
Department; Rashae Lewis,
Water Lab Department;
Vanessa Henderson, Human
Resources; and Christopher
Duncanson, Parts Depart-
ment.

Leaniqua Martin, a student
at St Georges High, said she is
very excited to be working
and training this summer.

“This is my first summer job
and I am excited about being
given a chance to do some-
thing for the summer instead
of staying at home doing noth-
ing.
“T want to be an accountant
and this experience will help
me learn basic accounting pro-
cedures and how to work well
with others,” she said.

Rebecca Harris, of St Paul’s
Methodist College, said that
the experience she will gained
at PIL will help her in the
future.

Christopher Duncanson
said training at PIL has afford-
ed him the opportunity to
improve his communication
skills.

“T want to be a nurse and
you have to be able to com-
municate with people and so
this experience is very valu-
able,” he said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Accused
found guilty
of Khowdee
Davis murder

FROM page one

August 20.

Francis was represented
by attorney Michael Han-
na.

Outside the courtroom
following the ruling, Davis’
mother, Sonia Dill, said she
was satisfied with the out-
come of the case and is
looking for her son’s killer
to receive the death penal-
ty. Sandra Dee Gardiner,
lead prosecutor on the case
said that the Crown is seek-
ing to have Francis receive
the death penalty.

Davis, 16, an 11th grade
Temple Christian student
was stabbed in the chest
during a fight between two
groups of males at Cab-
bage Beach Paradise Island
on May 12, last year.

Community activist
Rodney Moncur com-
plained yesterday that
there was not sufficient
security at the court, claim-
ing that he and some of the
witnesses in the case had
been threatened by sup-
porters of the two men
who had stood trial.

Former law partner
of Minister questioned
FROM page one

this evening to either charge
or release the lawyer.

Reportedly, the officers
are working on a complaint
by a former expatriate
client of the firm who
alleges that more than
$250,000 was taken from his
account.

This investigation Mr
Moss said is being conduct-
ed based on a complaint
that was brought to the
attention of CDU sometime
last year.

FROM page one

jury that he had travelled to
the US, came back to the
Bahamas and went back to
the US again during which
time his passport had
expired. He said that he
applied for a new passport
and while waiting in the US
he learned that Bahamian
police were looking for him.
McNeil said that as soon as
he was informed that he
could collect his passport,
he made reservations to
return home. However, he
said that when he went to
get his passport, he was
arrested.

“Tam not a murderer and
I never killed anybody,”
McNeil said. “I have two
children I love very much
and they love me very
much,” he said. McNeil said

Troyniko McNeil

that that police have
deprived him of his freedom
for over a year without
cause.

“T have been charged for
a murder I did not commit.
Up to this day I feel like
they don’t have anything to
show why they charge me.
I’m just ready to be with my
children, my children need
me,” he said.

McNeil called one wit-
ness in his defence yester-
day. Robert Miller told the
court that he had known the
accused for three years. He
said he got to know McNeil
through working with his
father doing private func-
tions at Mountbatten
House. He said that he
worked with the accused as

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a server and bartender. He
said his work for McNeil’s
father ended a day before
Taylor’s murder.

Miller said that there had
been a function at Mount-
batten House on the night
of November 16, 2008, but
he did not work at the func-
tion. He told the court that
functions were held in the
foyer or terrace area of
Mountbatten House.

In closing his case yester-













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day, McNeil’s lawyer, Mur-
rio Ducille, told the jury
that the prosecution had
advanced no evidence at all
to connect McNeil to Tay-
lor’s murder. He said his
client is a victim.

The prosecution and
defence are expected to
make their closing submis-
sions today. Senior Justice
Anita Allen is expected to
give her summation of the
trial on Friday.



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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



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Two murders
in three hours

Eight Mile Rock.
FROM page one

prominent residents of Eight
Mile Rock. His death brings
the homicide count to five for
the year on Grand Bahama.

Grand Bahama police are
questioning several persons
who were taken into custody
in connection with the mat-
ter.

Asst Supt Welbourne Boo-
tle said sometime around
6.40am police received a call
from an unidentified male
caller who reported that a
man was lying on the ground
in the area of the Four C’s
Clothing Store in Jones Town.

When officers arrived at
the scene they discovered a
black male lying on his back.
The victim was wearing red
boxer shorts and a white sin-

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in the Mall at Marathon on Saturday
July 18th from 10am - 2pm

ASP CLARENCE RECKLEY speaks at the murder sc





ene in Jones Town,

glet soaked in blood.

Mr Bootle said that the vic-
tim told officers that he was
attacked by two men who
entered his apartment and
demanded money.

After telling his attackers
that he did not have any mon-
ey, he was gun-butted,
stabbed, and thrown through
a window from his second-
floor apartment, said Mr Boo-
tle. The victim was taken to
Rand Memorial Hospital
where he died of his injury.

The crime scene was cor-
doned off by police as a crowd
of onlookers gathered in the
area.

According to unconfirmed
reports, it is believed that a
white vehicle used by the sus-
pects and abandoned in the
area, near the scene of the
murder, was recovered by
police.

Mr Jones was an employee
of the Freeport Container
Port.

He is the grandson of well-
known local pastor Rev Ray-
mond Jones. His father, the
late Denzil Jones, was a
beloved teacher at the Eight
Mile Rock High, who died of
cancer several years ago.

Se



from by his attackers.

And his uncle, Raymond
Jones, is Chief Operating
Officer at the Freeport Con-
tainer Port.

The family was devastated
by his death. “His mother is
not taking it well and his aunts
are in shock,” said a close
family member.

Many residents expressed
sadness over the incident.

—_— | a
Cc ABLE BAHAMAS

Jones’ colleagues at the Con-
tainer Port are also shocked
by his death.

“This is a tragedy for this
entire Eight Mile Rock com-
munity,” said a resident of
Jones Town.

Police investigations are
continuing and an arrest in
the matter could be made
soon.

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THE TRIBUNE



Zelaya’s supporters call

for strikes in Honduras

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras

SUPPORTERS of ousted Pres-
ident Manuel Zelaya called for
labor strikes demanding his return
Wednesday, one day after the
exiled leader said citizens had the
right to rebel against the interim
government, according to Associ-
ated Press.

Labor leader Israel Salinas, one
of the main figures in the pro-
Zelaya movement, told thousands
of demonstrators who marched
through the capital that workers at
state-owned companies plan walk-
outs later this week.

He said protest organizers were
talking with union leaders at pri-
vate companies to see if they could
mount a general strike against
interim President Roberto
Micheletti, who has threatened to
jail Zelaya if he tries to return.

Salinas also said sympathetic
unions in neighboring Nicaragua
and El Salvador would try to block
border crossings later this week “in
solidarity with our struggle.”

At the five-hour protest, tem-
pers were high. Demonstrators
threw rocks at a government build-
ing that houses the country’s wom-
en’s’ institute. Police showed up
but no injuries were reported.

Zelaya, a wealthy rancher who
shifted to the left after being elect-
ed, said Tuesday that the Hon-
duran people “have the right to
insurrection” against the acting
government that forced him out of
the country June 28. Those
remarks could augur an escalation
in a conflict that has already cost
the life of one protester.

Soldiers seized Zelaya and put
him on a plane after he ignored
the Supreme Court and Congress
in pressing ahead with plans for a
referendum that many critics
depicted as a bid to install a con-
stitutional assembly that could
rewrite laws and extend his power
after his term ends in January.

“We are going to install the con-
stitutional assembly. We are going
to burn the Congress,” protest
leader Miriam Miranda vowed at
the latest demonstration for Zelaya.

Costa Rican President Oscar
Arias is mediating talks aimed at
resolving the impasse, but Zelaya
has grown frustrated by the lack
of progress.

On Monday, Zelaya announced
that if the interim government did
not agree to reinstate him at the
next round of negotiations, “the

mediation effort will be considered
failed and other measures will be
taken.” He did not say what those
measures would be.

The talks are scheduled to
resume Saturday after two earlier
rounds failed to produce a break-
through. Arias, who won the 1987
Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts
in ending Central America’s wars,
has urged Zelaya to “be patient.”

Micheletti’s administration insists
Zelaya was ousted legally beause

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he violated the constitution by
pushing for a referendum on
retooling the charter. It has refused
to bend on reinstating him despite
international condemnation of the
coup, including from the United
States.

The interim government accuses
Zelaya of trying to extend his time
in office. Zelaya denies that, saying
he merely wanted to reform the
constitution to make it better serve
the poor.






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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, JULY 16,



PAGE



12
Zz F



2009





PAGE 14° Brent Stubbs’ opinion on Davis Cup...



Judo athletes
get ready for
big event...

See page 15



Giving hack to Rolletown

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

gridiron superstar,

known as much

for his exploits on

the field as for his
extraordinary achievement in
the classroom, is expected to
officially announce his plan to
improve medical services in the
place of his roots.

Myron Rolle, former Florida
State Seminoles free safety and
recent Rhodes Scholar recipi-
ent, is today set to officially
announce his intentions to con-
struct a free medical clinic and
sports complex on the island of
Exuma.

During a press conference at
the site of the Pompey statue
in Steventon, Exuma, Rolle and
executives of the Myron Rolle
Foundation will detail formal
plans for the much anticipated
project.

The project will be executed
in conjunction with the
Bahamas Ministry of Health
and the Florida State Universi-
ty College of Medicine.

The Myron L Rolle Founda-
tion is a tax-exempt, non-profit
organisation dedicated to the
support of health, wellness, edu-
cational and other charitable
initiatives throughout the world
that benefit children and fami-
lies in need.

The Foundation was estab-
lished in 2009 by the Rhodes
scholar and college football All-
American and his family.

Myron Rolle Foundation plans to build a free
medical clinic and sports complex on Exuma



MYRON ROLLE can be seen with his family — shown I-r are Rolle, his brother McKinlan, mother Beverly and father Whitney Rolle...

Rolle rose to national promi-
nence in his high school foot-

ball days in Princeton, New Jer-
sey, where he was awarded All-

American honours.
He was ranked the top player

in the country by ESPN’s
recruiting services for high

BIC Notice of Privatization

REQUEST FOR REGISTRATION OF INTERESTED PARTIES FOR THE PRIVATIZATION OF
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY LTD.

school prospects and ranked as
the 12 player nationally by
Rivals.com.

A member of Kappa Alpha
Psi Fraternity Inc, Rolle fulfilled
his requirements to earn his
bachelor’s degree in exercise
science in just 2.5 years.

Currently completing a mas-
ter of public administration
degree, Rolle garnered interna-
tional media attention when he
announced he would postpone
a possible career in the Nation-
al Football League to pursue
his studies at Oxford University
after receiving the Rhodes
scholarship.

The 6’2” 215 pound safety
will complete his studies to earn
an M A in Medical Anthropol-
ogy and plans to enter the 2010
NFL Draft.

Rolle has been featured on
various programmes foreshad-
owing his intentions to give
back to the Bahamas, a place
he routinely calls “home.”

On ESPN’s “Rome is Burn-
ing” with Jim Rome aired
December 8, 2008, Rolle first
spoke of his plans to open a free
health services clinic in Rol-
letown following a career as a
neurosurgeon in the United
States.

He has also been featured on
other ESPN programming,
including Outside the Lines,
Sportscenter, and First Take.

Ivan Ferguson, administrator
of Exuma and Dr Alma Little,
of FSU School of Medicine, are
expected to attend the press
conference.

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas (the “Goverment” is seeking a partner to acquire a 51% shareholding, including operational contral,
in The Bahamas Telecommunications Campany Ltd. ("BTC" or the “Company"). incorporated under the laws of The Bahamas.

The Company currently provides services to over 334,000 wireless (through its GSM and CDMA networks), 132.000 fixed line and 18,500 broadband customers
throughout The Bahamas. In addition, BTC has some 170 roaming agreements in place serving more than 4 million tourists wha visit the Bahamas each year.

Given the importance of the telecommunications industry ta The Bohamas and its economy, the Govemment seeks a strategic partner in BIC, who is able ta

demonstrate that they can bring many. if not all of the following attibutes to BTC:

» Strang reputation in the telecommunications industry

» Ability and commitment to generate value-odded revenue and cost synergies with BIC operations

» Financial strength and operational platform te be able to enhance BIC's underlying network, services, billing and customer service

* A history of strong financial performance

Interested parties ore invited to register for the privatization process of BTC through the submission of a registration form (the “Registration Form") and the pay-
ment of a processing fee of U3$25,000 (the “Registration Fee") on or before 15:00 hours (EST) on July 28, 2007. The Registration Form and guidelines on the submission
of the Registration Form are available at: hitp://weyw.btcprivatization.com/

Upon submitting the Registration Form, partes will be supplied with a document describing the investment opportunity. Once the payment of the Registration
Fee is confirmed, interested parties will receive a pre-qualification package ("the Pre-Qualification Package") with additional detaik on the process and ai list of
information requirements on the interested parties for evaluation by the Govemment. All duly completed applications for pre-qualification must be submitted on
or before August 14, 2009. Should the relevant party not be chosen by the Government to move forward to the due diligence phase of the process, the Registration
Fee will be refunded. However, if and when a participant é invited to the due diligence process, this fee will become non-refundable.

Qualified parties wil be invited to participate in the due diligence phase, giving thern access to a dota room, financial vendor due diligence report, technical
due diligence report, management presentation and ste visits. After the due diligence phase. investors/consortiums will be invited to submit binding bids for the
stake in BTC.

The Goverment reserves the nght, in their sole discretion, to reject or accept any Registration Form, Pre-Galification Package or other document received
pursuant to this privatization process: and/or to consider, accept or reject any application on the basis of the criteria set out above and in the Pre-Qualification
Package: to extend the deadiine for the submission of the Registration Form and/or pre-qualification information and for any other action to be taken,

Ms


THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS

‘We are eager to test our athletes’
against those in the Bahamas

THE Barbados Judo Federa-
tion cadet team is in New Provi-
dence to compete in the
Caribbean Cup set for 1-4pm July
18 at Loyola Hall, Gladstone
Road.

"We are very excited to be
here,” says Ian Weithers, chief
national coach for Barbados.
"The Bahamas’ level has been
climbing steadily and we are
eager to test our athletes against
them."

Both teams are undergoing
training with top US coach Ger-
ald Lafon, whose emphasis is on
competitive fundamentals.

According to D'Arcy Rahming,
president of the Bahamas Judo
Federation, it is important for the
Caribbean to hold these types of
events to raise the level in the
region.

Together the region can
demand more resources and will
be able to host larger Pan Amer-
ican tournaments and bring in
sports tourism revenues.

The teams are scheduled to
travel afterward to Hungary for
the World Cadet Championships.

Persons interested in helping
the Bahamas Judo Federation can
call 364-6773.

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THE TRIBUNE





Our younger
tennis players
heed to ‘step
up their game’

THE Amer- STUBBS
ican Zone II _

Davis Cup tie a,
over the week-
end should
have been a
learning lesson
for our young
vibrant players



- don’t take
anybody for
granted.

The team of
Devin
Mullings, Tim- OPINION
othy Neilly, mm —
Bjorn Munroe,

Marvin Rolle and rookie Rod-
ney Carey Jr hosted a
Guatemala team that came here
on a mission. They had nothing
to lose, but everything to gain
and they didn’t hold back at all.

When the Guatemalans could
have easily surrendered to the
pressure of the scorching heat,
they stuck in there and battled it
out.

It seemed as if they were
more prepared for the heat than
we were.

When they were faced with
the excruciating pain and
cramps, they got the necessary
treatment and were back on the
court, giving it their all as if
there was no tomorrow.

We had too many injuries to
deal with that changed the com-
plex of our line-up. And when
our team had the Guatemalans’
backs pinned against the wall,
we watched as they fought off

“Not taking anything away
from our players, I think
they went out there and

they fought hard. To go the
distance, in some cases to
five matches, was evident of
that. But I just don’t think
all of our players exhibited
the same type of heart and
determination as the
Guatemalans that was
required for us to pull
off the tie...”
— Brent Stubbs

the adversity and prevailed like
only true warriors do.

If only we could have turned
the hands of time.

For all five matches in the tie
at the National Tennis Center,
the Guatemalans displayed the
type of resilience that showed
why they will remain in Zone
II in 2010 and we will be rele-
gated to Zone III.

Not taking anything away
from our players, I think they
went out there and they fought
hard. To go the distance, in
some cases to five matches, was
evident of that.

But I just don’t think all of
our players exhibited the same
type of heart and determination
as the Guatemalans that was
required for us to pull off the
tie.

Not even the pulsating sound
of the junkanoo music could
propel our players to dig down
deeper and find that intestinal
fortitude to get the job done.

This was one time that we felt
the home crowd advantage
should have worked in our
favour and it didn’t. There was
no way that we should have
gone down the way we did to
Guatemala.

I think this may be a blessing
in disguise for our team and
captain John Farrington.

I think Farrington, or who-
ever succeeds him in the future,
should ensure that our players
come prepared to play whether
it’s at home or on the road.

We have too much talent not
to be performing at a higher
standard.

After the loss, especially in
the pivotal doubles, it showed
how much we missed having the
appearance of touring pro Mark
Knowles.

While I think we could have
used his experience, I think it’s
time for the younger players to
start getting the exposure that
they need to get us to the next
level.

Sure Knowles could have
made a difference in the dou-
bles, but that was just one
match. He’s not playing singles,
which accounts for at least 70
per cent of the team’s success or
failure.

So I think it’s vital for the
younger players to step up their
game, especially at home. Con-
sidering that the Guatemalans
just emerged out of Zone III,
there’s no reason why we
should have played as hard and
as long as we did and still lost.


y uU

THE TRIBUNE



Wek S 1D Ave

©
c ie
i ,



il

Or Cave eG A200

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



Bahamas must
‘not be casualty’
of consolidation
in private banks

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas has “got a lit-
tle bit of work to do” to ensure
it “does not become a casual-
ty” of increasing consolidation
in the global private bank-
ing/wealth management indus-
try, a senior industry executive
said yesterday.

Simon Townend, a KPMG
partner and head of its corpo-
rate finance practice for the
Bahamas and the Caribbean,
expanding on a firm survey that
suggested “consolidation poten-
tial remains high” in the global
private banking market, told
Tribune Business “had a lot of
strategic work” in front of it to
position itself as an interna-
tional financial centre of choice.

“T think the Bahamas is going
to see more consolidation in the
sector and/or international pri-
vate banking groups looking to
spin-off arms of their business,”
Mr Townend said.

“This is being driven by two
factors. One would be the
economies, the efficiencies and
the technology, and the other
would be the increasing G-20
pressures being placed on finan-
cial services business in the
islands.

“Tt’s already happening across
the offshore jurisdictions, we’re
seeing consolidations and spin-
offs.”

Consolidation trends have
already exposed themselves in
the Bahamian private banking
sector, as a result of Qatar
National Bank’s (QNB) deci-
sion to reduce its offshore foot-
print and concentrate on mar-
kets nearer to home.

That allowed the A. F. Hold-
ings group (formerly the Colina
Financial Group) to acquire
QNB’s Ansbacher (Bahamas)
subsidiary earlier this year, and
merge it with its existing Sen-
tinel Bank & Trust operation.

SEE page 9B

Bank ‘can appoint’
receiver without
getting court order

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

PROPOSED legislative
amendments appear to give the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
the power to appoint a receiv-
er/manager for any of its bank
and trust company licensees
without first seeking court
approval, a study of the changes
by Tribune Business has shown.

The Central Bank, in its con-
sultation paper on proposed
amendments to the Banks &
Trust Companies Regulation
Act 2000, is planning to change
section 18 to “expressly allow
the Bank to appoint a receiv-
er-manager where it is desirable
for the receiver to operate a
licensee as a going concern”.

In addition, the amendments
- if passed into statute law - will
“permit the appointment by the
[Central] Bank of a temporary
manager which, in the Bank’s
opinion is, inter alia, carrying
on business in a manner detri-
mental to the public interest”.
Other violations leading to this
action are breaches of law and
licence obligations.

These amendments appear
remarkably similar to the
changes Parliament recently
passed to the Domestic Insur-

Amendments appear
designed to give Central
Bank same sweeping
powers handed to insurance
regulator in the wake of
CLICO (Bahamas) debacle

ance Act, and which generated
considerable opposition from
that industry - namely the fact
the regulator, in that case the
Registrar of Insurance, could
appoint a receiver/manager for
an insurance company without
even obtaining an ex-parte
Order from the Supreme Court
approving such action.

In the insurance industry’s
case, the sector was concerned
that there was no structured
process involved in appointing a
receiver or manager, and it was
open to too much subjectivity -
even being carried out on a
whim or personal opinion.

The Banks and Trust Com-
panies Regulation Act 2000
amendments appear to be an
effort by the Government to
harmonise the powers granted
to the different financial ser-
vices regulators ahead of their

SEE page 8B

NASSAU = PAHAMAS

2m ‘yards apart
on Arawak Cay

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

redged material in excess of

900,000 cubic yards will be

used to extend Arawak Cay

1,000 ft to the west, resulting

in the loss of 32 acres of sea
bed containing some sea life, the Environ-
mental Impact Assessment (EIA) on the
use/storage of material produced by the Nas-
sau harbour dredging has revealed.

The EJA prepared by Blue Engineering,
which has not formally been released by the
Government, which has been silent on details
pertaining to the Arawak Cay port develop-
ment, also revealed a number of other nega-
tive effects of the extension project.

The report outlined potential impacts to
the sea life in the area surrounding Arawak
and Silver Cays, most of all the settlement of
suspended silt on coral reefs and sponge beds
living in and around the area.

In the proposed changes to Arawak Cay,
two million cubic yards of hard limestone
material and sand will be dredged from Nas-
sau Harbour and stored there.

According to the EJA, the 1,000 foot exten-
sion is necessary to accommodate the dredged
material and the port. Of the two million

PLP continues to oppose
harbour dredge and port
requiring 1,000 foot
cay extension

cubic yards to be extracted, only 600,000 cubic
yards would have been able to be stored with-
out the Arawak Cay extension. There is con-
cern that the dredged material could produce
some level of water contamination, includ-
ing possible contamination to the city water
supply.

"The storage and use of the dredged mate-
rial has the potential to reintroduce and redis-
tribute toxic chemicals deposited in the sedi-
ments to be dredged into the water column.
Owing to the presence of various operations
in the vicinity of Nassau Harbour, it was
decided at the outset of the earlier ETA stud-
ies to carry out chemical determinations for
potential metal contaminants in the harbour
sediments," the EIA read.

The EIA also offers a number of mitigation

SEE page 2B





Government told:

reduce property

Stamp Tax to two per cent

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has long
been urged to reduce Stamp
Tax on all Bahamas-based
property transfers to a uniform
2 per cent, it was revealed yes-
terday, as this would remove
“high societal costs” and “min-
imise incentives to avoid or
evade the tax”.

A February 21, 2007, report
prepared for the Government
as part of the Inter-American
Development Bank-financed
(IDB) Land Use Policy and
Administration Project, advised
the Government that it was

“desirable to reduce Stamp Tax
rates substantially to no more
than 2 per cent”.

The report, authored by a
Richard Almy and tabled in
Parliament yesterday, ques-
tioned whether it was desirable
for the Government to be earn-
ing more from Stamp Tax on
property transfers than real
property taxes, noting that the
former generated $88 million
for the Government in the 2004-
2005 Budget year compared to
the latter’s $54 million.

The report conceded that the
Stamp Tax was “well estab-
lished”, and generated substan-
tial government revenues for

minimal administrative costs, as
the tax was levied on the
recording of deeds/obtaining a
title certificate.

However, it added that taxes
imposed on the transfer of real
estate were “usually not more
productive” than annually
recurring real estate taxes, such
as real property taxes.

“High, progressive taxes have
several inherent disadvantages
that may not be fully appreciat-
ed in the Bahamas,” the report
added. “International experi-
ence suggests that high, pro-
gressive transfer taxes have a

SEE page 4B



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Money Fast.

MoneyGram.

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BankBahamevOnlinecom

BID for Bay
legislation
‘reatly to go
by year-end’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

LEGISLATION to create
the Business Improvement Dis-
trict (BID) that will spearhead
downtown Nassau’s revitalisa-
tion “should be ready to go” by
year-end, Tribune Business was
told yesterday, with that and
the identification/implementa-
tion of short-term projects for
Bay Street the “key focus right

Charles Klonaris, co-chair of
the Downtown Nassau Part-
nership (DNP), the private/pub-
lic sector body leading the effort
to overhaul downtown Bay
Street, suggested that the exist-
ing Nassau Tourism and Devel-
opment Board (NTDB) was
likely to be absorbed into the
BID once it was created via leg-
islation.

“The focus right now is on
the legislation for the BID -
that’s critical - and also the iden-

SEE page 9B

The information contained is from a third.
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report, -

~~





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THE TRIBUNE





‘yards apart’

on Arawak Cay

FROM page 1B

methods to produce the least
amount of impact on the envi-
ronment.

In the case of the existing sea
grass beds near the construc-
tion site, the EIA proposes their
re-location, and with regard to
the water supply it suggests the
Water and Sewerage corpora-
tion closely monitor it.

The EJA also suggests the
dredging and storage of the fill

TST

For the stories

TTT RT Ta
GUMS)
Montlays

material could cause increased
noise and vibration, modifica-
tion of wave patterns and shore-
line, loss of biological sea life,
and unpleasant odors.

When the project is complet-
ed and container transport from
the new Arawak Cay port
starts, the EIA revealed
instances of possible road traffic
increase, sea traffic increase,
impaired visual beauty,
increased noise and vibration,
miscellaneous hazards and pos-
sible deterioration of water
quality.

The relocation of the con-
tainer port to Arawak Cay in
earlier studies found it to be the
sixth best location, even below
leaving it at its present location
downtown.

However, it is thought that
the revitalisation of the down-
town Bay Street area will not
be able to start in earnest until
the shipping facilities are relo-
cated to an alternative site.

Some of the dredged fill
stored in the Arawak Cay
extension will be used to cre-
ate an extension to the existing
port area downtown for the
construction of a promenade.

According to the EJA: "The
relief to the congestion of the

Whirlpool

Tha gome0 be get More dene.

existing downtown area of Nas-
sau itself is a major advantage
of the project. The opportunity
for the developing old town
area to enhance its amenity and
visual advantages for recre-
ational and non-commercial
usage should be taken.”

The EJA outlines proposals
for the mitigation of the many
of the possible negative effects
of the extension of Arawak
Cay, including proper installa-
tion of turbidity barriers and
the employment of appropriate
water quality and beach moni-
toring techniques "starting
before construction activities”.

The report also contains a
contingency plan for the aban-
donment of the project should
that be necessary.

Senator Jerome Fitzgerald,
who has been extremely vocal
on the Government’s persistent
intransigence in revealing the
details of the Arawak Cay port
relocation, told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday that "they were
going ahead with this before
they had the EIA. Everything
about this is just wrong”

Mr Fitzgerald is scheduled to
hold a press conference at
Arawak Cay today in protest at
the port relocation.

cabrio_

MTT

NACK WRAP’"—


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 3B



AU ey



Budding
trader
passes
course

Antoine Bain, whose career
ambition is to become a securi-
ties trader, has successfully com-
pleted the Canadian Securities
Course (CSC) after studying
with the Nassau-based Securi-
ties Training Institute (STI).

Ms Albury, STI’s course
administrator, said: “This com-
prehensive study programme
greatly assists in enhancing the
student’s understanding of
financial products and markets,
which acts as a solid foundation
for those interested in pursuing
a career in financial services”.

Cable’s BTC favouritism.
claims ‘robustly’ denied

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas’ claim that
the rival Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC)
enjoyed “preferential treatment
and influence” in the commu-
nications reform process has
been dismissed by the govern-
ment-appointed privatisation































Continental Airlines’
Blue Skyway aircraft visited
Nassau yesterday as part of
the airline’s 75th anniver-
sary celebrations.

The new Boeing 737-
9O0ER aircraft was paint-
ed with a retro livery to
commemorate the anniver-
sary, which is today.

The new aircraft's retro
livery was originally used
on aircraft beginning in
1947, and is called The Blue
Skyway. The livery was
selected by Continental
employees for this celebra-
tion.

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committee, which said a “robust
approach” had been taken to
implementing “safeguards” in
the process.

While admitting that three
members of the nine-strong pri-
vatisation committee were BTC
executives, and another was the
Broadcasting Corporation of
the Bahamas (BCB) chairman,
the committee said in its reply

Airline makes special flying
visit to New Providence

to Cable Bahamas that they had
all been “selected for their tech-
nical competencies and experi-
ence”, not to represent their
companies.

Apart from executive chair-
man Julian Francis, the BTC
representatives were Felicity
Johnson, BTC’s company sec-
retary/vice-president for legal,
regulatory and interconnection,

Unique Security Co.

Have immediate opening for the following
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Professional, well spoken

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Requirements
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FirstCaribbean

and Tellis Symonette, BTC’s
senior vice-president for the
Family Islands and administra-
tion.

In its response to Cable
Bahamas, the privatisation com-
mittee said professional advi-
sors, drawn from accounting
firm KPMG and the UK-based
law firm, Charles Russell LLP,
had played a major role in
designing the communications
regulatory regime.

And, the committee added,
it was ultimately the Govern-
ment that approved or reject-
ed the regulatory reform pro-
posals put to it.

Cable Bahamas’ assertion
that KPMG had been responsi-
ble for formulating BTC’s busi-
ness plan, and had been
retained by BTC to undertake
other work for it, were also
denied by the privatisation com-
mittee.

“While KPMG has been
engaged by the committee to
advise it on the privatisation
exercise, Cable Bahamas’ claim
is not correct,” the privatisation
committee added. “BTC is
responsible for the formulation
of its own business plan, and
indeed it appointed external
advisors (not KPMG) to assist it
in the formulation of its latest
plan.”

Pointing to the separate advi-

sory committee, headed by
Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, to which it
reports, the privatisation com-
mittee said: “There are a variety
of safeguards and measures that
the Government has taken to
ensure a robust and transpar-
ent process, which a minority
of three members of the com-
mittee would have no influence
over.”

And it added: “The structure
and process developed for the
new electronic communications
regulatory regime is robust,
transparent, and is serving the
primary objectives of the new
legislation, which include,
amongst others, the desire to
enhance the efficiency of the
communications sector, to pro-
mote investment and innova-
tion, to encourage sustainable
competition, and to enhance the
competitiveness of the
Bahamas, all of which lead to
the benefit of individuals and
companies in the Bahamas.

“Accordingly, there are no
plans to change the structure
that has been established for
the privatisation of BTC or
development of the new com-
munications regulatory regime,
or to change the composition
of the two committees that have
been appointed or the mandates
of their advisors.”

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GET THERE. TOGETHER.


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Share your news

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are making news in their
neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
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campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an









award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





Government told: reduce property
Stamp Tax to two per cent

FROM page 1B

negligible effect on the accu-
mulation of wealth.
“Experience also suggests
that they encourage evasion and
avoidance (as is recognised).
Parties may be encouraged to
risk not recording deeds to

avoid having to settle arrears in
the real estate tax, and to avoid
incurring the Stamp Tax. They
may be encouraged to misstate
the amount of consideration to
reduce the tax...

“By acting as a deterrent to
the formalisation of property
transfers, high Stamp taxes











































JOB ADVERTISEMENT

Position: Accountant

NOTICE

ALL ENTRANCES
to the grounds of
ST. FRANCIS XAVIER
CATHEDRAL
WILL BE CLOSED

A local insurance agency seeks to fill the position of
Accountant. The scope of work is to head the Ac-
counting Operations in preparation of monthly, quar-
terly and annual reports; to keep and maintain all
financial documents and records according to the
directives coming from the President and the Board
of Directors to ensure the efficient management of
all Bank and general ledger accounts. The position
will also be expected to make recommendations to
management to maintain the company’s viability in a
highly competitive environment.

Required:

e University Degree in accounting;

¢ Professional qualifications e.g. CPA, ACCA, CA

¢ At least 3 years’ work experience as an
accountant;

¢ Good knowledge of English in writing, editing and
presenting;

* Strong interpersonal, organizational and
supervisory skills;

e Demonstrated capacity to work under pressure,
meet deadlines and perform work of the highest
quality.

¢ Good computer and analytical skills.

To retain ownership rights
between the hours of
6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

MONDAY,
AUGUST 3rd, 2009.

Send cover letter and Curriculum Vitae to the follow-
ing address:

The Tribune

c/o Box # 81869
P.O. Box N 3207
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE: July 25, 2009 by 5pm

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

COLONTAL

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 14 JULY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.14] CHG -2.79 | %CHG -0.18 | YTD -142.22 | YTD % -8.31
FINDEX: CLOSE 787.12 | YTD -5.72% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.39 1.39 0.00 0.127 10.9
10.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992 11.1
6.94 Bank of Bahamas 6.94 6.94 0.00 0.244 28.4
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877 N/M
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.078 40.4
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 43.1
10.18 Cable Bahamas 11.39 11.39 0.00 1.406 8.1
2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00 0.249 11.0
5.50 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 5.64 5.64 0.00 0.419 13.5
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.05 3.00 -0.05 0.111 27.0
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 1.82 1.82 0.00 0.240 76
6.60 Famguard 6.99 6.60 -0.39 0.420 15.7
10.00 Finco 10.90 10.90 0.00 0.322 33.9
10.35 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.38 10.38 0.00 0.794 13.1
4.95 Focol (S) 5.03 5.03 0.00 0.332 15.2
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 N/M
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.00 0.035 8.6
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00 0.407 13.5
10.40 J. S. Johnson 10.40 10.40 0.00 0.952 10.9
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180 55.6
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricingb ases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.60
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00
0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $
CFAL Bond Fund 1.3860 2.40 4.75
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8952 -1,.52 -3.18
CFAL Money Market Fund 1.4763 2.97 5.30
3.1031 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.2702 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.9209 2.40 5.79
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.5448 -0.02 0.54
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 93.1992 -3.33 -6.76
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

S52wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
-0.041 0.300 N/M
0.000 0.480 N/M
0.001 0.000 256.6

Weekly Vol.

4.540
0.002

0.000 9.03
0.000 261.90

52wk-Low
1.3231
2.8952
1.4019

Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
3-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
31-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

encourage private conveyanc-
ing to the detriment of an open,
efficient property market. Over-
all welfare is reduced by sub-
optimal land use. Moreover,
high Stamp taxes adversely
affect housing affordability.
Thus, the Stamp Tax incurs high
societal costs.”

The Government has moved
to tackle some of these con-
cerns, having eliminated Stamp
Tax for first-time home buyers
on real estate transactions val-
ued at $500,000 and below.

It has also introduced a fines
structure for real estate con-
veyancings that are not brought
forward for Stamping and
recording in a timely manner.

But the IDB project report
added: “Consideration should
be given to reducing Stamp
Taxes on real estate transfers
(and leases), and to reducing
the degree of progressivity.
Although there are no norms, it
is believed that transfer taxes
should be less than about 2 per
cent to minimise incentives to
evade or avoid tax.

“To avoid disruptions to the
nation’s revenue system, Stamp
Tax reductions could be offset
by increases in real estate tax
yields that would result from a
general reassessment and fur-
ther increases in collection effi-
ciency.”

The current Stamp Tax struc-
ture in the Bahamas is:

Properties valued at between
$0-$20,000: 2 per cent

$20,000-$50,000: 4 per cent

$50,000-$100,000: 6 per cent

$100,000-$250,000: 8 per cent

More than $250,000: 10 per
cent

The Land Use and Adminis-
tration Project report also called
for the Registrar General’s
Department to publish lists of
property transfers, including
details of the property location,
the purchaser, the seller, the
price paid and date of sale.

“Although there mat be a pri-
vacy interest that is served by
making it more difficult to
obtain transfer information,
there is no legal reason for the
current situation in the
Bahamas,” the report said.

“The belief that an open-mar-
ket transfer is secret or confi-
dential largely is illusory; the
chief beneficiaries of non-dis-
closure of transfers are real
estate professionals, who have a
proprietary interest in their
sales data.”

The report also criticised the
numerous real property tax
exemptions that existed, espe-
cially for undeveloped Bahami-
an-owned land in New Provi-
dence and Bahamian-owned
property on all other islands, as
“fully shielding taxpayers from
the real estate tax weakens the
social contract between them
and their government”.

In addition, the real property
tax exemptions allowed owners
holding exempt properties “to
hold more property than they
can use productively or encour-
age uneconomic use of land”.

And the report added: “The
real estate tax incentives grant-
ed to hotels are of dubious val-
ue, given the generally low lev-
el of real estate taxation and
the fact competitive pressures
in an attractive destination pro-
vide sufficient inducement to
build and maintain hotel prop-
erties.”

NOTICE

COMAS RESEARCH LIMITED
Incorporated under the Companies Act, 1992
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
Registration Number 49, 961
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

TAKE NOTICE that a general meeting of the
members of the Company was held at the Chancellors
Chambers, Samana Hill, No. 14 Village Road
North, Nassau, The Bahamas on the 4th day of
December, 2006 at 10 o’clock in the afternoon for the
purpose of dissolving the Company and to appoint
Chancellors Corporate Services Limited, Liquidator
of the Company.

A Return of the said general meeting was regis-
tered with the Registrar of Companies on 15th day
of January A.D. 2007 and the company has been
dissolved and removed from the Register of
Companies as of the 11th day of December,
2008.

Chancellors Corporate Services Limited
Liquidator

Management Opportunity
Awell established company is considering highly qualified
applicants for the role of

Financial Controller

Requirements & Responsibilities:
- Lead and motivate accounting staff

- Experience in the preparation and interpretation of Financial
Statements

- Must be able to develop and maintain an effective system of internal
accounting and operational controls in a Hotel environment

- Must possess five years experience in a supervisory accounting
position

- Self motivated with strong analytical and problem-solving skills

- Must be conversant with hotel accounting software, with emphasis in
areas Food & Beverage, Front Office and Payroll

- Liaise with external Auditors, third party service providers and relevant
Regulatory & Compliance Authorities

- Preparation of budgets

- Timely and accurate preparation, presentation and interpretation of
financial reports

- Excellent written and oral communication skills

- Able to work extended hours, weekends and holidays

QUALIFICATIONS

- BAin Accounting from an accredited University

- International accounting designation (CPA/CA) with minimum of
5 years post qualification experience,

- Advance working knowledge of Excel

- Working knowledge of Microsoft Word

Interested persons should apply on or before July 24, 2009

Attention: CONTROLLER
DA 81270
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Suitably qualified candidates need only apply.
Salary is commensurate with experience and qualification.
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 5B



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



Federal Reserve:

Unemployment

will top 10 per
cent this year

@ By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The Federal Reserve expects
the economy this year will sink
at a slower pace than it previ-
ously thought, but that unem-
ployment will top 10 per cent
and remain high for the next
few years, according to a new
forecast released Wednesday.

The Fed now predicts the
economy will shrink between
one and 1.5 per cent this year,
an improvement from its old
forecast issued in May. At that
time, the Fed projected the
economy would contract
between 1.3 and two per cent.

The upgrade — which helped
major stock indicators jump
about three per cent and the
Dow Jones industrial average
to add 257 points — comes from
the expectation that the econo-
my’s downhill slide in the first
half of 2009 wasn’t as bad as
previously thought. The Fed
said the economy should start
growing again in the second half
of this year, although the pace is
likely to be plodding.

In fact, most Fed policymak-
ers said it could take “five or six
years” for the economy and the
labor market to get back on a
path of full health in the long
term. And, most officials saw
“the economy as still quite weak
and vulnerable to further
adverse shocks.”

Against that backdrop, the
Fed’s forecast for unemploy-
ment this year worsened. The
central bank predicted the job-
less rate could rise as high as
10.1 per cent, compared with
the previous forecast of 9.6 per
cent.

The nation’s unemployment
rate climbed to 9.5 per cent in
June, a 26-year high.

The predictions are based on
what the Fed calls its “central
tendency,” which exclude the
three highest and three lowest
forecasts made by Fed officials.
The central bank also gives a
range of all the forecasts. That
range showed that some offi-
cials expect the jobless rate
could rise as high as 10.5 per
cent this year, and 10.6 per cent
in 2010. The post-World War IT
high was 10.8 per cent at the end
of 1982, when the country had
suffered through a severe reces-
sion. The jobless rate averaged
5.8 per cent last year.

For 2010, the Fed predicted
the economy would grow
between 2.1 and 3.3 pe rcent.
That’s a slight upgrade from its
old forecast of growth between
two and three per cent.

The Fed’s estimate is based
on comparing projected activity
in the fourth quarter of one year
to the same period a year earli-
er. The economy dipped 0.8 per
cent in 2008 by that measure.

Still, it would mark a slow
recovery and that will keep
unemployment elevated well
into 2011, the Fed said. Com-
panies won’t be in any mood to
ramp up hiring until they are
certain that any recovery has
staying power. Some Fed offi-
cials predicted the jobless rate
could hover in the 8 percent
range or as high as 9.2 per cent
in 2011.

To help lift the country out
of recession, the Fed has slashed
interest rates to a record low
near zero. In March, the Fed
launched a $1.2 trillion effort to
drive down interest rates to
revive lending and get Ameri-
cans to spend more freely.
Those actions — along with
President Barack Obama’s $787
billion stimulus package of tax
cuts and increased government
spending — should help the
economy return to growth in the
second half of this year.

Fed officials at their June
meeting observed “the eco-
nomic contraction was slowing
and that the decline in activity
could cease before long.” Con-
sumer spending appeared to
have stabilized, new-home sales
were flattening out and declines
in capital spending did not look
as severe as they had at the
beginning of the year.

At the June meeting, Fed
Chairman Ben Bernanke and
his colleagues pledged to hold its
key bank lending rate near zero
for an extended period of time

to help brace the economy.
Many analysts believe the Fed
will leave rates at record lows
through the rest of this year.

The Fed last month also
decided against expanding its
$1.2 trillion programme of buy-
ing government bonds and
mortgage-backed securities to
drive down rates on mortgages
and other consumer debt.

Part of the reason the Fed
stayed the course was out of fear
that expanding the programmes
could stir up investor fears that
the central bank’s aggressive
actions could spur inflation lat-
er on, documents of the closed-
door June meeting indicated. In
addition, “it seemed that eco-
nomic activity was in the process
of leveling out.”

On the inflation front, Fed
policymakers did bump up their
forecasts for this year and next.
The Fed expects inflation to rise
between one and 1.4 per cent in
2009, reflecting the influence of

higher oil and commodity prices.
The old forecast called for a gain
of between 0.6 and 0.9 per cent
this year.

Even with the projected pick-
up, the Fed believes inflation
“would remain subdued for
some time” and be lower than
the 1.9 per cent increase logged
in 2008. The sluggish recovery,
idle plants, a weak employment
market and cautious consumers
will restrain companies from
jacking up prices.

Next year, inflation should
rise between 1.2 and 1.8 per
cent, the Fed said. That’s up
from the old forecast of between
a one and 1.6 per cent gain.

Several Fed participants,
though, worried that investors
and consumers might start to
expect that prices will march
higher if the central bank’s
aggressive steps to stimulate the
economy “were not unwound
in a timely fashion as the econ-
omy recovers.”

Unique Security Co.

Have immediate opening for the following
position:

Professional Security Officer

Qualifications
* High school Diploma

* 3-5 years in a security related field

* Professional, well spoken

* Must be willing to work with others
* Clean police record within the last six months

* Must be flexible with hours

Requirements

* 2 Passport Photos

* Valid Bahamian Passport
* National Insurance card

* 3 Professional References

(Non Relatives)

Unique Security Co
East Street & Balfour Ave
Or call
242-325-2258 for more information
Deadline is July 18,2009

Gastroenterology

Doctors Hospital Sessional Clinic

Dee ota C Karty mime
following symptoms?

+ Difficulty swallowing

+ Heartburn

+ Dyspepsia (gas, bloating)

+ Nausea and vomiting

¢ Unintentional weight loss

« Diarrhea & Constipation

+ Abdominal pain

+ Diseases of the pancreas

« Liver disease

¢ Jaundice

+ Colon cancer screening

« Family history of colon cancer

¢ Rectal bleeding

Internal Medicine
Gastroenterology

SCREENING and
CONSULTATION

By Appointment Only

Call: 302-4684

Date: Wednesday, July 22 ‘09
Open: 9:00 am

9] DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

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POSITION AVAILABLE:

Client Relationship Officer for International Bank

Applicants must have demonstrated experience and ability to develop new
business for non-resident, high net-worth market.

REQUIREMENTS:

Excellent knowledge of private banking products and services; fluency in
English, French and any other language skills would be an asset; 15 years’ private
banking; knowledge of Bahamian regulatory requirements; university degree and/
or related professional designation.

DUTIES:

Marketing of private banking and portfolio management services; extensive
traveling; acquisition and development of new clients.

Compensation will be commensurate with experience.

Interested applicants must submit applications to: Human Resources
Manager, (Re: Client Relationship Position), P.O. Box SS 6289, Nassau,
Bahamas, by 20th July, 2009 or fax to (242) 502-5428.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

PERSPECTIVE

HUMAN RESOURCES CONSULTING

NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR/HELPDESK ANALYST
Our client i§ an international health management company that assests clients to successfully

Their Network and Infrastructure Team is qurrently seeking a Network Administrator/ HelpDesk
Analyst who will assist in the first-level technical support, planning, administration, testing and
maintenance of user PC's, Laptops and Local Area Network

The Network Administrater/HalpDesk Analyst will play a direct role providing entry level
bechnical support for hardware, software, peripherals, connectivity. The candidate must be
able to troubleshoot a wide range of software and hardware products generally on Windows
PO's with Microsoft Office.

This is an excellent entry level opportunity to learn more advanced skills such a6 Windows
2000/2003 and Active Directory, SQL 2000/5 Server, Exchange, Cisco server
Firewall VPN configuration and support. The successful candidate will be part of a larger team
working directly with Sr. Network Adminestrators, Database
Architect, Middleware Analysts and Project Managers with a globally recognized leader in
health management,

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Qualihcations:

Candidate must show hands-on experiance and good working knowledge of the
following:
TCP/IP
Microsoft Windows 2000/2003 Server, Microsoft XP and Microsoft Office
General Networking concepts
Effective written and oral communication skills
Excellent customer service skills

Salary is commensurate with experience.

Email: perspective.hr1@gmail.com
THE TRIBUNE

@ By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Industrial companies cut back
production yet again in June
but not nearly as deeply as they
have been, another sign the
recession is easing its grip.

The Federal Reserve report-
ed Wednesday that production
at the nation’s factories, mines
and utilities fell 0.4 per cent last
month as the recession crimped
demand for a wide range of
manufactured goods, including
cars, machinery and household
appliances.

The decline, however, was
not as bad as May. Industrial
activity posted a revised 1.2 per
cent drop then, which turned
out to be slightly worse than
first reported.

The contraction in industrial

TST

For the stories
TAU Uy
aac
Insight on
Mondays

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 7B
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Industrial
output fall
less than
anticipated.

activity in June was less than
the 0.6 per cent decline that
economists were projecting,
although it marked the eighth
month in a row of production
cuts.

“The pace of declines contin-
ues to moderate, suggesting at
least a stabilization of the econ-
omy, even if not an outright
recovery,” said T J Marta, mar-
ket strategist and founder of
Marta on the Markets, a finan-
cial research firm.

For the second quarter as a
whole, industrial production fell
at an annual rate of 11.6 per
cent, not as sharp as the 19.1
per cent annualized decline
experienced during the first
three months of this year.

The recession has taken a bite
out of demand in the US for all
kinds of manufactured goods,
especially those related to hous-
ing, such as appliances, furni-
ture and building materials. At
the same time, factories are cop-
ing with less demand from for-
eign buyers coping with eco-
nomic problems in their own
countries.

John Engler, president of the
National Association of Manu-
facturers, in an interview with
The Associated Press, said even
with the slower pace of decline
the industrial production fig-
ures “are disappointing still.”
And, he wasn’t optimistic that
factories would be getting back
on their feet any time soon.
“Consumers aren’t in a position
to lead the economy back,” he
said.

Given crimped customer
appetites, industrial companies
idled more of their plants and
equipment in June.

The overall operating rate fell

to 68, a record low dating to
1967. The previous low of 68.2
was in May.

Production at factories — the
biggest slice of the industrial
sector — fell by 0.6 per cent in
June, compared with a 1.1 per
cent decline in May.

Troubles in the auto sector
probably factored into June’s
weakness.

Makers of cars and parts cut
production 2.6 per cent last
month, following a deeper 8.2
per cent cut in May.

Plant shutdowns at Chrysler
and General Motors, which
both recently emerged from
bankruptcy protection, are
expected to weigh on factory
production through part of the
summer, analysts say.

Meanwhile, makers of
machinery trimmed output by
1.9 per cent in June, down from
a 3.2 per cent cut in May.

Production of home elec-
tronics dipped 1.1 per cent, after
a 2.5 per cent cut the previous
month.

Makers of appliances, furni-
ture and carpeting sliced pro-
duction by 1.9 per cent last
month, following a 1.6 per cent
cut in May.

The pullbacks figured into a
drop in the operating rate at
factories, which fell to 64.6 in
June, the lowest on records dat-
ing to 1948. The previous low
was set in May.

In other industrial sectors, the
report showed that output at
mines dipped 0.5 per cent in
June, versus a 1.9 per cent
decline in May.

However, production at util-
ities rose 0.8 per cent in June,
following a 1.3 per cent drop in
the previous month.

Chester Bonefish Lodge

bor reservations:
Telephones 242) 356-3418

Cells242-557-9597
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Packages a5 low a5 $135.00 per night

NOTICE

The office of KPMG in Nassau will be
closed on Friday, July 17, 2009.

Business will resume on Monday,
July 20, 2009 at 9:00 a.m.

We apologize for any inconvenience caused.

AUDIT ® TAX ® ADVISORY


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Probate Side

IN THE ESTATE OF RUPERT A.R. CULMER,
late of No. 3 Imperial Park,

in the Eastern District of New

Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

; ; ; FROM page 1B
NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any

claim or demand against the above Estate are required to
send the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned
on or before the 20th August, 2009 after which date the
Executrix will proceed to distribute the assets having
regard only to the claims of which she shall then have had
notice.

planned consolidation into a
Bahamas Financial Services
Authority.

The Government appears to
have embarked upon a process
of giving the regulators
immense powers to intervene
in a company’s affairs in the
wake of the CLICO (Bahamas)
debacle, seemingly believing the
instantaneous appointment of
a regulator/manager is the best
way to protect depositors and

JOSEPH Cc. LEDEE creditors.
Chambers It is unclear how the

Suite No. 6, Grosvenor Close Bahamas-based bank and trust

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

* company sector will react to the
Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas proposed reforms, which

require a licensee to pay for the

costs of a receiver/manager

imposed by the Central Bank.
The actual wording of the

Attorney for the Executrix

(July 9, 16, 23)

amendments is remarkably sim-
ilar to the language the Gov-
ernment drafted - and Parlia-
ment passed - in the Domestic
Insurance Act amendments.

When a temporary receiv-
er/manager is appointed for a
licensee, the Central Bank will
“have full and exclusive pow-
ers of management and control
of the licensee”, including the
ability to “continue or discon-
tinue its operations”; “stop or
limit the payment of its obliga-
tions”; make decisions on
staffing and employment levels;
and handle any litigation the
licensee is involved in.

Within 90 days of assuming
temporary management of a
licensee, the Central Bank has
to either hand the bank and
trust company back to its
appointed Board of Directors

and owners, or “revoke the
licence and apply to the
Supreme Court for an order
that the licensee be forthwith
wound up by that Court”.

In its consultation document,
the Central Bank said it was
“proposing several amendments
which the Bank believes will
strengthen the regulatory
framework for its licensees, and
will give the Central Bank more
flexibility and wider powers to
address supervisory issues.” The
changes are also designed to

Bank ‘can appoint receiver
without getting court order

remove impractical impedi-
ments to the conduct of busi-
ness.

Wendy Craigg, the Central
Bank governor, did not return a
Tribune Business call seeking
comment on the amendments
prior to press time.

The Act changes will also
“expressly empower” the Cen-
tral Bank to enter into Memo-
randums of Understanding
(MoUs) with other regulators
to enable consolidated supervi-
sion of licensees to take place.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSUE MERICE OF
STAPLEDON GARDENS, P.O. BOX SB-50202, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registratonm'naturalization as










a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registrations naturalization should not be

ranted, should send a written and signed statement of the
acts within twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of JUNE,
2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.0.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that || MAKALO JAVAN
WIILIAMS of #1 KNOWLES DRIVE, TONIQUE
WILLIAMS DARLING HIGHWAY, P.O. BOX N-1258,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name tt MAKALO
JAVAN BANNISTER. |f there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MERLEN MESIDOR of
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9" day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

faWen

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We ere currently seeking a bright, amargetic, honest and confidant Individual to joim our Finm ae oc

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Experience in handling cash

Thee ability to work Independently and under pressure to meet etriet deadlines

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will be treated in the strictest of confidence

Applicants shold suboelta cower better, sesunees, polloe second, copy of passport and copies of academic qualifications to: KPMG, Human
Resources Mlamager, PLO. Bow A123, Nassau, Bahamas cer jal) het tou e ne of pre oor beg bay Frida Wa July a4, 2005

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Colina.
Holdings Bahamas

=e
—

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Risk & Compliance Officer

Job Opportunity

Position: Senior Floor Supervisor.

Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified
professional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer. This is an
executive position and the successful applicant should possess the following:

Qualifications Qualifications & Experience

Excellent customer relations skills Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university

Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance

Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a
law degree

Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations
for improvements to a compliance culture

Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of
duties

Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and
best practices

Confidentiality

Excellent oral and written communication skills

Excellent communication skills

Working knowledge of Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Word

and Quick books

Possess the ability to stand for extended periods

Ability to work varied hours/days, including nights, weekends

and holidays as needed.

Minimum of three years working experience & Responsibilities:

Design and implement a risk framework.

Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps
taken to foster good compliance.

Implement and maintain a compliance monitoring programme. This will
serve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures.

Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws,
regulations and policies applicable to the institution.

Provide management with guidance in the development, implementation
and maintenance of policies, procedures and practices to cover
regulated activities.

Create programmes that educate, train and encourage directors,
managers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and
regulations.

Serve as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators.

BSc in Business Management

Responsibilities

¢ Coordinate merchandising
Ensure each customer receives outstanding customer service
Maintenance of the store and its equipment
Supervising staff

Assisting store manager in daily functions.

The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with
experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a cover
letter and resume to the following e-mail address no later than 27 July 2009:

Apply in writing to:

Saveco
P.O.Box EE-15945
Nassau, Bahamas

E-mail: careers@c olinaimperial.com
RE: Risk and Compliance Officer

Absolutely no phone calls will be accepted

Unsuitable applications will not be acknowledged.


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 9B





Bahamas must
‘not be casualty’
of consolidation
in private banks

FROM page 1B

The acquisition gives A. F.
Holdings and Sentinel and
expanded book of business and
greater scale in an industry
where smaller, standalone play-
ers are finding it increasingly
difficult to survive.

Mr Townend told Tribune
Business that global private
banking consolidation would
take place gradually over time,
with smaller niche players find-
ing it difficult to keep up with
the increased demands and
costs associated with higher reg-
ulatory standards.

With the private banking
industry set to “see its fair
share” of mergers and acquisi-
tions as the global transactions
market emerged from the cur-
rent recession, Mr Townend
added: “One real strength for
the Bahamas is its private client
banking product.




“The Bahamas still continues
to attract not just your interna-
tional client, but the client that
wants to come to the Bahamas
for a second home, the tourist
client.”

But he said: “I think there’s a
lot of work to do from a strate-
gic perspective to continue to
position the Bahamas as a
financial centre of choice.”

While the Bahamas Financial
Services Board (BFSB) and
other industry bodies were
working on strategy and initia-
tives, Mr Townend said the
industry as a whole had “to
push the agenda forward”.

He explained that the key
question facing the Bahamas
and its financial services indus-
try was “how to strengthen and
consolidate what we have, and
look for ways to continue to dif-
ferentiate.... our existing prod-
uct

“The other areas the Goy-
ernment has been looking at
with the private sector, such as
the international arbitration-
type initiatives, all these are
great add-ons.” The Govern-
ment and private sector are also
focusing on developing yacht
and private aircraft registries to
augment the private wealth
management offering.

But Mr Townend added: “I
would say at this point in time
that we’ve got a little bit of
work to do to ensure that when
some of the larger groups look
at consolidation, the Bahamas
does not become a casualty.”

However, with the global
base of wealth and high net-
worth individuals continuing to
grow, especially in the medium-
term, “it is essential for the
Bahamas to ensure we capture
our share of that market and
increase it”.

Commercial Properties for Lease

Nearly 8,000 sq. feet. of space on Market St. (100 feet south of Bay St.)
Ground floor can accommodate retail store/restaurant second floor and












loft can accommodate offices.

Office suites located at Market & King Sts. near Bay St.



ideal for professional offices.

Southland Shopping Centre - Four hundred square feet of retail space

Contact Wm H Astwood-Walkine

Chartered Accountant

Ph. 326-8963/328-6995/328-6993.

BID for Bay
legislation
‘ready to go
by year-end’

FROM page 1B

tification of short-term pro-
jects,” Mr Klonaris told Tribune
Business. “Those are the two
focus points right now for the
DNP.

“T would say we’re hoping
towards the end of the year that
the [BID] legislation will be
ready to go for the following
year. That’s the key to what
we’re trying to push for.”

Mr Klonaris said the BID leg-
islation was key to “defining the
scope” of the authority that will
oversee downtown Nassau’s
hoped-for renaissance.

Besides determining the geo-
graphical boundaries of the area
overseen by the BID, Mr
Klonaris, who is also the NTD-
B’s current chairman, explained
that the legislation would deter-
mine its revenue-raising pow-
ers - what monies it could col-
lect and how - plus its ability to
provide services such as garbage
collection and street cleaning.

The legislation will also deter-
mine the BID’s composition,
who sits on its Board and the

split between public and private
sector representatives.

“This is the most difficult part
of it,” Mr Klonaris told Tribune
Business. “We have to be so
certain, careful and positive
about the authority, the level
of the BID authority and its
functions. These are really the
keys to the success of down-
town.”

When it came to short-term
projects to enhance downtown
Bay Street’s appearance and
amenities, Mr Klonaris said the
DNP was looking at “mainly
street-scaping, pedestrianising
some of the streets that run per-
pendicular between Woodes
Rogers Wharf and Bay Street,
short-term parking and manag-
ing parking with meters, and
extending the sidewalks to bring
proper green-scaping and land-
scaping to downtown”.

Work was also being done to
establish Nassau’s city centre
boundaries, something Mr
Klonaris said was “key to the
short-term goals”.

The DNP co-chair added that
Bahamian architect Jackson

2

a

Burnside would produce all the
working drawings to illustrate
the vision for downtown Nas-
sau, the body having “agreed
on his proposals”. When Mr
Burnside’s work is completed,
the DNP will be “ready to go
out for bid” on construction
work.

Mr Klonaris described Mr
Burnside’s work as not just “a
vision, but what the final reality
will be”. And he added: “The
vision for the NTDB was to
really become the BID. It will
morph into the BID, hopefully
in a year’s time.

“The ultimate goal was to
work through the BID. For
many years the NTDB was a
voice in the wilderness, but we
kept plugging away. The Gov-
ernment has grasped that, and
understands it, and where we
are now is the vision of many
years.

“The city is an important part
of this country as an engine for
employment, and it’s important
to have a vibrant city to sup-
port Atlantis and all the hotels
we have.”

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Senior Manager,
Accounts.

The job oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget & Management
Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective delivery
of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the
following:

* Compilation of the corporate budget.

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets

Preparation of monthly management statements

Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation

Preparation of performance reports for division , department and sections
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry recetvables (capital
contributions, rechargeable)

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices

Liaison with internal and external audits

Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief
Financial

Officer for the Board of Directors

Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required
Preparation of the business plan for the department

Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department

Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims

Overseeing the Cash Flow Management

Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment

Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form employee’s
salaries

Conducting audits of various financial activities including Employee Basic Pay
Reconciliation, Employee Loans Reconciliation and Payment Reconciliation
Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable

Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts

Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle repayments
Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule

Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans

Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to ensure
adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors

Managing the status of local and foreign vendors

Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and External Auditors
Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline. Conducting
performance appraisals

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff, manage
and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations

Job requirements include:
¢ A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting ACCA/CPA
h 7 : or equivalent qualifications

“Reporting for The Tribune is a ¢ A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a similar
management position
Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices
Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications
Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing systems
Ability to analyze financial reports
Sound knowledge of covenants of lending institutions (e.g. IDB)
Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial software
and the system of internal control.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability

responsibility and privilege. We
respect and honour the people’s
right to know everyday. I'm
proud to be a part of the leading
print medium in The Bahamas,

The Tribune is my newspaper.”

The Tribune

My Voice. Wy Honxpaper!

RUPERT MISSICK, JR.
CHIEF REPORTER, THE TRIBUNE

To report the news, call our
News Tips Line at 502-2359.

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing
Good time management skills

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: July,
22,2009.




GN-883

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT



PORT DEPARTMENT

Notice of Sitting for New Providence Port Authority

To consider Application For Licence Under The Boat Registration
Act Chapter (277) & Commercial Recreational Watercraft Act 2006

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the New Providence Port Authority Board
for New Providence and the Family Islands will be held at the Port Administration
Building, Prince George Wharf on Thursday the 30" July, 2009 at 3:00pm for the
purpose of granting Licences under The Boat Registration Act Chapter (277) &
Commercial Recreational Watercraft Act 2006.

Any Person entitled to and wishing to object to any application should do so at least
six (6) days before the date of the hearing by submitting his/her objections in writing
to the Board and to the applicant.

Persons attending the meeting on behalf of an applicant must produce written
authorization at the meeting.

Applicants for renewals are not required to attend, unless they have received
written notification from the New Providence Port Autho rity Board.

The undermentioned persons have applied for grant the licences as specified below.

NEW MASTER’S LICENCE - NEW PROVIDENCE

LICENCE NO. NAME CLASS
NB/29/09 Butler Shavad N.B B
P.O. Box N-8509
Nassau, Bahamas
NB/30/09 Coleby Cadrington M B
P.O. Box N-7
Nassau, Bahamas
NB/31/09 Lewis Cyril D B
P.O. Box SS-5700
Nassau, Bahamas
NB/32/09 Williams Thomas L B

P.O. Box N-3733
Nassau, Bahamas

NEW MASTER’S LICENCE —-FAMILY ISLAND





LICENCE NO NAME CLASS
NB/02/09 Strachan Tevon T A
P.O. Box AB-22554
Treasure Cay, Abaco
TRANSFER OF BOAT-NEW PROVIDENCE
REGNO PREVIOUS NEW OWNER CLASS PASS USE
QWNER
NP: 357 Vacation in Turnquest Sean & B 30 Charter
Paradise Shabane
P.O. Box SS-5804 P.O. Box SS-19570
Nassau, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas
RENEWAL OF BOAT LICENCE-NEW PROVIDENCE
REG NO APPLICATION BOAT NAME CLASS PASS USE
NP: 965 Inter Coastal “Renegade” A 0 Tug
Marine 50ft
P.O. Box SS-19016 Steel Hull
Nassau, Bahamas
NP: 6523 Inter Coastal “Suard IV” A 0 Barge
Marine 110ft

P.O. Box SS-19016 Steel Hull
Nassau, Bahamas

RENEWAL OF COMMERICAL RECREATIONAL WATERCRAFT

REG NO

NP: 132 ATE

NP: 826 BSC

NP: 825 BSC

NP: 505 SAN

(JET SKT) -NEW PROVIDENCE

APPLICATION BOATNAME CLASS PASS’ USE
Collie Dudley J “No Name” D 2 Rental
P.O. Box CB-12875 = 9ft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski
McKenzie Inez “No Name” D 2 Rental
Nassau, Bahamas oft
Jet Ski
McKenzie Inez “No Name” D 2 Rental
Nassau, Bahamas oft :
Jet ski
Marc Christie “No Name” D 2 Rental

P.O. Box SS-6203 Oft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

RENEWAL OF MASTER’S LICENCE —-FAMILY ISLAND

LICENCE NO



8452

LICENCE #



7523

8259

7313

8038

NAME CLASS
Brown Tracy R A

Wemyss Bight, Eleuthera

RENEWAL OF MASTER’S — NEW PROVIDENCE



NAME CLASS

Braithwaite William F A
P.O. Box CB-12649
Nassau, Bahamas

Brown Livingston A
P.O. Box N-97744 B
Nassau, Bahamas

Miller Stephen B A
P.O. Box N-8212
Nassau, Bahamas

Stubbs Alpheus G A
Nassau, Bahamas

Bi? ib

Commander Patrick McNeil
Port Controller

PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



US Treasury
chief pitches
to Mid-East

m@ By ADAM SCHRECK
AP Business Writer

ABU DHABI, United Arab
Emirates (AP) — US Treasury
Secretary Timothy Geithner
pressed ahead with his sales
pitch to Gulf Arab nations
Wednesday, telling oil-rich
Mideast allies Washington is
committed to keeping the dol-
lar strong and promoting sus-
tainable growth as the world
pulls out of a recession.

Geithner’s comments in the
United Arab Emirates capital
Abu Dhabi came on the sec-
ond leg of a two-day trip to the
Middle East, where he is seek-
ing to convince Arab leaders
on the Obama administration’s
efforts to fix the US economy.

“We want to rebuild a
stronger foundation for more
balanced growth globally,”
Geithner said after a closed-
door meeting about education
and economic development
with UAE Foreign Trade Min-
ister Sheikha Lubna al-Qasi-
mi and other officials. “We
need to make sure as we
emerge from this crisis we’re
not sowing the seeds of imbal-
ances that will lead to future
crises.”

Geithner’s visit to the UAE,
the second largest Arab econ-
omy after Saudi Arabia, came
a day after he met with Saudi
King Abdullah and business-
men in the kingdom. The
UAE, which is the end of the
Mideast tour, is also home to
the Persian Gulf commercial
and financial hub Dubai.

Aim

A key aim of the trip, which
follows a series of overtures to
the Middle East by President
Barack Obama, is to reassure
major oil producers in the six-
nation Gulf Cooperation
Council that America still wel-
comes their business and will
safeguard the value of the dol-
lar and their vast US invest-
ments by forging a way out of
the financial crisis.

“The UAE and the GCC
countries have played an
important stabilizing role (in
the global economy). You’ve
seen them intervene in support
of US banking institutions,”
said Nasser Saidi, chief econo-
mist of the Dubai Internation-
al Financial Center. “What we
need to see is a recognition of
the important role of the GCC

Legal Notice
NOTICE

ZAPATTO VILLA INC.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Noticeis hereby given thatin accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, ZAPATTO VILLA INC. is in dissolution as

of July 13, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, PO. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR






Legal Notice
NOTICE

RODRASTIL CORP.

In Voluntary Liquidation



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, RODRASTIL CORP. is in dissolution as of

July 13, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice
NOTICE

EVOMAN BUSINESS LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section
Companies Act. 2000,

138(4) of the International

Business
EVOMAN BUSINESS

LTD. is in dissolution as of July 13, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

on the international level.”

The Gulf states’ wealth sky-
rocketed during oil’s earlier
boom years, adding to their
political clout in the process.
But leaders in the region have
grown increasingly concerned
as crude prices and the value of
their investments soured in
recent months.

Five of the Gulf Coopera-
tion Council nations — Saudi
Arabia, the UAE, Oman,
Bahrain and Qatar — peg their
currency to the dollar. Kuwait
uses a basket of currencies that
includes the greenback.

In an interview with Arabic-
language news network Al
Arabiya, Geithner said the US
would work to ensure the
strength of the dollar.

“Tt is the policy of the Unit-
ed States and it will remain the
policy of the United States to
remain committed to a strong
dollar,” he said in a transcript
of the exchange provided to
reporters.

“My view, and this is the
view I heard expressed here,
is the dollar ... will remain the
principal reserve currency,” he
added.

As a group, Gulf govern-
ments hold more than $400 bil-
lion worth of US investments,
making them second only to
China as America’s biggest
creditor, Saidi said.

“Income from foreign assets
in terms of investment posi-
tions is becoming as important
as income from oil. People
tend to forget that,” Saidi said.

Geithner’s schedule in the
UAE included meetings with
the crown prince, the head of
the central bank and the coun-
try’s deputy finance minister.

The treasury secretary also
held talks with top officials
from some of the sheikdom’s
sovereign wealth funds, which
have invested billions of dollars
in US companies such as Citi-
group Inc. From the UAE, he
heads to Paris.

“Gulf countries are very
important as investors, even
though they don’t have that
much money to spend this
year” because of lower oil
prices, said Eckart Woertz,
programme manager for eco-
nomics at the Gulf Research
Center in Dubai.

“That’s a large part of why
he’s coming.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TST

For the stories
TAU
aac
ST
TEES


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 11B



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



US consumer prices increase

@ By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Consumer prices shot up in June
by the largest amount in 11
months, reflecting the biggest
jump in gasoline prices in nearly
five years.

The Labour Department said
Wednesday that inflation at the
consumer level rose by 0.7 per
cent last month, slightly higher

than the 0.6 per cent increase
that economists were expecting.
It was the biggest one-month
gain since a 0.7 per cent increase
last July.

The big jump was seen as a
temporary blip, however. Infla-
tion is not expected to be a prob-
lem any time soon given a severe
recession which is keeping a lid
on wage pressures.

The Federal Reserve reported
Wednesday that industrial pro-
duction fell 0.4 per cent in June

as the recession crimped output
for a wide range of manufac-
tured goods including cars,
machinery and household appli-
ances. However, the decline was
not as severe as the 1.4 per cent
plunge in May, a possible sign
that the recession is easing its
grip.

Underscoring the low threat
of accelerating inflation, prices in
June compared to a year ago
were actually down by 1.4 per
cent, the biggest year-over-year

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WIND JTAMMER'S

CASTING CALL BAHAMIAN MOVIE

An independent motion picture, shooting this summer
in the Bahamas is looking to fill roles for a new movie
shooting in August. Actors will be compensated for
their work. Experience is not necessary but a good

decline in nearly six decades.

Core inflation, which excludes
food and energy, posted a mod-
erate 0.2 per cent rise in June,
slightly higher than the 0.1 per
cent rise that economists had
expected.

The absence of an inflation
threat has allowed the Federal
Reserve to drive a key interest
rate to a record low in an effort
to fight a severe recession which
is already the longest since
World War II. The central bank
pushed its target for the federal
funds rate to near zero in
December and it is expected to
remain there until the nation’s
unemployment rate, currently at
a 26-year high of 9.5 per cent,
stops rising.

The 0.7 per cent jump in the
Consumer Price Index in June
followed three months of mod-
eration including a small 0.1 per
cent rise in May.

The upward surge was driven
by a 7.4 per cent rise in energy
prices, reflecting a 17.3 per cent
increase in gasoline prices, the
biggest one-month jump in gas
prices since a 20.9 per cent spurt
in September 2005 after Hurri-
cane Katrina had shut Gulf
Coast refineries.

Analysts are looking for gaso-
line and other energy costs to
retreat in coming months.
Already, gasoline pump prices
are down by about a dime since
the start of July.

Food costs edged up a small

0.1 per cent in June, held back
by a big drop in the cost of dairy
products.

The 0.2 per cent rise in core
inflation left the core inflation
rate rising by a moderate 1.7 per
cent over the past 12 months,
reflecting the downward pres-
sure on costs coming from the
prolonged recession.

For June, new car prices
jumped by 0.7 per cent and
clothing costs were also up 0.7
per cent. However, those gains
ere offset by a 0.6 per cent drop
in airline fares. Price increases
were also moderate in the health
area with medical care edging
up by 0.2 per cent, the smallest
gain in three months.

NOTICE

TO: Ms. Carla Johnson

No. 52B Churchill Road

South Bahamia

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Kindly remove your personal property from the above-
mentioned address, failure to do so within seven (7)
days from the date of this notice will result in the
removal of your personal property from the above-

mentioned address, without further notice to you, The
owners shall not be liable for any loss and/or damage
oocasioned to your personal property atter the expiry

of this notice,

DATED the 30th day of June, 2009,

THE OWNERS
No. 352, Churchill Road

South Bahamia
Freeport, Grand Bahama



Excellent Employment

Opportunities

Do you love working ina fas rg “pac eC d.

challenging environment?

Are you a Confident communicator, with a
passion to work with a professional Team?

If you want to know more, Let's Talk!

We are secking qualified persons to fill the following positions:

¢ Senior Graphic Designer

® Sales Associate

* Accounts Control Officers

* Retail Sales Manager

* Showroom Floor Assistant

For more information Cn each position, please WISI COLL website page

www.furnitureplus.com/careers

sense of humor will go a long way!

We are the looking for:
-Three older white men with a sly sense of humor and a refined look.
-A young black Bahamian male between 14-16 who likes Junkanoo

-An older white man with a heavy foreign accent.

Please contact:

kmortimer @ windjammersthemovie.com
or call 394.6579



Plus Group of Companies is an established Bahamian owned group
that is growing and continuing bo build its team of professionals in

Varlous areas.

We offer a competitive salary and benefits package as well as ongoing

profess i On al tral n i Te a nd d evel op ment,

Nassau * Grand Bahama * World Wide Web

Please submit your application by Mail to:
Director of Human Resources

The Plus Group

P.O. Box N713, Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: jobst@ theplusgrp.com

We thank all applicancs, however only thease

selected for an interview W ill he contacted,


THE TRIBUNE

France approves

PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009

eae Le
THE RULES OF

=o iloy ale)

TRE PANIS

Your EDUCATION IS SERIOUS BUSINESS!!

Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute
Call us at 502-6300 Visit www.btvi.org.bs

Apply Today

Employment Opportunity

Senior Collections Officer

An employment opportunity exists for an innovative,
persuasive leader with a passion for success, a desire to
succeed and the ability to initiate progress.

Skill Requirements

Excellent oral and written communication skills
Excellent motivation & coaching skills

Ability to execute priority based workload
Possess excellent planning, organizational and
implementation skills

Ability to operate and familiarity with POS
systems

Proficient in Microsoft Office applications
Possess strong foundation of accounting
practices and procedures

Strong multitasking ability

Strong leadership & managerial skills

Strong internet skills i.e. Emailing, group
messaging and research

Ability to exert initiative

Recording, summarizing, analyzing, verifying and
reporting of results of financial transactions

Minimum Experience Requirements

Tertiary level — with degree in related field;
Collections executive with at least 4 years
experience in collections or related field ;

At least three years experience in supervisory
post;

Strong knowledge and application of MS
Microsoft Suite

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:
srcollectionsofficer@yahoo.com



Sunday opening

m@ By EMMANUEL
GEORGES-PICOT
Associated Press Writer

PARIS (AP) — France’s low-
er house of parliament on
Wednesday approved a divisive
bill to allow more stores to stay
open — and more people to
work — on Sundays.

The bill, passed in a 282-238
vote Wednesday, now goes to
the Senate for debate.

Expanding Sunday working
hours is one of President Nicolas
Sarkozy’s reform pledges. Sup-
porters of such a move say it
would give the French economy
a much-needed jolt as the nation
wrestles with recession.

France’s leftist opposition,
however, calls it an affront to
labour protections, and tradi-
tionalists decry it as an attack
on the time-honoured day of
rest.

Under the new measure,
shops in France’s three largest
metropolitan areas — Paris,
Marseille and Lille — would be

Taq), Ot. - Muri gs
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permitted to open on Sundays.
Employees would have the
choice to refuse Sunday work-
ing hours, and employers must
pay those who agree to work
double overtime. Shops in
another 500 towns and villages
deemed to be of “tourist inter-
est” could also open, but without
the obligation to pay employees
double overtime.

The bill seeks to bring order
to the tangle of loopholes that
have sprung up since a 1906 law
that established Sunday as a
mandatory day off. That law was
passed after a deadly mining
accident that helped mobilize
support for greater worker
rights. The opposition Socialist,
Green and Communist parties
voted against the bill.

“What is presented to us as
an anecdotal little text...is in fact
opening a large breach in the
French social model,” Socialist
lawmaker Christian Eckert said.

Ten lawmakers from
Sarkozy’s UMP conservative
party voted against the bill, and

15 abstained.

A minority of French stores
has been allowed to open on
Sundays through a patchwork of
exceptions, such as one that
allows shops in tourist zones like
Paris’ Champs-Elysees Avenue
to open if their wares or services
fit a vaguely defined category of
entertainment and cultural
goods.

In other areas, such as the
French capital’s tourist-packed
Marais quarter, shops selling
jewellery and clothing benefit
from authorities turning a blind
eye.

European Union data show
that France’s restrictions on
business activity on Sundays are
similar to those in several other
Western European nations, with
about 15 per cent of French peo-
ple surveyed saying they usually
work Sundays, compared with
the EU average of around 14
per cent.

The French Senate, dominat-
ed by Sarkozy’s party, is sched-
uled to debate the bill July 21-23.

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
P.0.Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel:(242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fan: (242) 327-3047, 327-1238
www, bahamasdevelopmentbank.com

sel ws
Soe) wy 10 HP Yamaha engine (1| 34

rttl

Bahama (Appraised
val ue £25.000.00)
acount Lot #6 Blk #12

Unit #3 4 [1121 Sis. &.]
Henny Ave Derby Sub
Gramd Bahan
(Appraised Value
$465,000.00 }

13. Lota43 B1L00s2 St")

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(Appraised Value
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THE TRIBUNE



a See
Aid meetings continue

over troubled lender

@ By DANIEL WAGNER
AP Business Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
With banks repaying bailout
money, credit markets begin-
ning to flow and Goldman
Sachs posting stunning profits,
the financial sector would
appear to be stabilizing. But
CIT Group Inc., one of the
nation’s largest lenders to small-
and mid-sized businesses,
teeters on the brink of collapse.

In meetings that recall last
fall’s late-night negotiations
over failing financial firms, rep-
resentatives from the Treasury
Department, the Federal
Reserve and the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corp. were
locked in tense meetings Tues-
day about how to bail out the
firm — or whether to do so at
all. The debate hinges on ques-
tions about how bad off CIT
really is, and how its failure
could affect about a million
small businesses — from
Dunkin’ Donuts franchisees to
retailer Dillards Inc. — that
depend on it for credit.

Corporate customers started
to draw down on their credit
lines Monday and Tuesday,
according to a report Wednes-
day in The Wall Street Journal,
which cited unidentified people
familiar with the situation.
Those people told the newspa-
per the drawdowns amounted
to several hundred million dol-
lars, with one number men-
tioned as high as $775 million.

A spokesman for New York-
based CIT on Wednesday was
not immediately available for
comment.

CIT, which in April posted a
bigger-than-expected first-quar-
ter loss, has seen funding
options disappear as investors
shy away from purchasing all
but the safest forms of debt.
The lender has $7.4 billion in
debt coming due in the first
quarter of 2010, plus other
obligations. The recent down-
grades of its credit ratings will
make it harder to refinance that
debt in coming months, raising
fears that it could default. CIT
said Saturday it retained the law
firm Skadden Arps, a bank-
ruptcy specialist, as an adviser.

Regulators know they cannot
be seen as insensitive to small
businesses, which could fail if
their funding is disrupted. Small
businesses are critical to the
nation’s economic recovery,
providing about half of all pri-

vate-sector jobs.

Yet the administration faces
mounting criticism about the
skyrocketing costs of bailout
and stimulus plans, and the con-
tinuing rise in unemployment.
Critics wonder whether the gov-
ernment should prop up firms
like CIT that can’t stand on
their own. Unlike Citigroup Inc.
and Bank of America Corp.,
whose failures would have
upended the banking system
and created financial chaos,
some say CIT may not pose
such broad risks.

“This is all about where you
draw the line, and a very big
call has to be made,” said Simon
Johnson, a former chief econo-
mist with the International
Monetary Fund and now a pro-
fessor at the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology’s Sloan
School of Business.

Johnson and others argue
that CIT should not be deemed
“too big to fail.” But Rep. Albio
Sires, D-N.J., who owned a title
insurance agency that employed
12 people, sent a letter last week
to FDIC Chairman Sheila Bair
imploring her to approve CIT
for a programme that would
provide federal guarantees for
its debt. That programme has
been at the center of the official
debate over how to help CIT.

If CIT fails, “A lot of small-
and mid-sized businesses would
get hurt. I don’t think at this
stage, with the economy as it is,
we can afford that,” said Sires.

“Their role in the market ris-
es to the systemic level,” said
Scott Talbott, a lobbyist with
the Financial Services Round-
table, which represents CIT and
other large finance companies.

The FDIC has so far resisted
calls to give the firm that key
subsidy, maintaining that its
loan guarantee programme is
the wrong prescription for the
company, according to govern-
ment and industry officials
familiar with the matter.

They say Bair, the FDIC’s
famously independent chair-
man, believes the Temporary
Liquidity Guarantee Pro-
gramme was designed to
unfreeze credit markets, not bail
out companies. Backing CIT’s
debt also would put at risk the
insurance fund used to repay
deposits when banks fail — an
event that itself could under-
mine financial stability. The offi-
cials spoke anonymously
because CIT’s application is still
pending.

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The temporary programme is
due to be wound down this fall,
and banks that have repaid fed-
eral bailout money are no
longer eligible to participate.

FDIC spokesman Andrew
Gray said the agency can’t com-
ment on pending applications.
Curt Ritter, a spokesman for
CIT, on Tuesday would say only
that negotiations are ongoing.

“The administration is close-
ly monitoring” the situation,
said White House spokes-
woman Jennifer Psaki. Shares
of CIT added 26 cents, or more
than 19 per cent, to $1.61 Tues-
day on hopes that the govern-
ment would throw the company
a financial lifeline.

CIT also has explored a trans-
fer of assets and cash between
the parent holding company
and CIT’s smaller bank. But
that move would require FDIC
approval. The FDIC must
ensure that the bank is not trad-
ing cash for overvalued assets,
which could save the parent
company but leave the FDIC
on the hook for deposits if the
bank fails.

The FDIC must remain
focused on its obligation to safe-
guard its reserves in case of
future bank failures, said
Wayne Abernathy of the Amer-
ican Bankers Association.

“T don’t think we want to do
anything to cause depositors to
doubt the effectiveness of the
deposit insurance system,” he
said. Abernathy spoke general-
ly about the FDIC, and did not
refer to any particular bank’s
situation.

Another option for CIT is
getting additional bailout funds
on top of the $2.3 billion it
received in December from the
$700 billion financial bailout
plan. But analysts say the com-
pany’s problems are deeper
than a short-term cash crunch.

“We believe CIT’s funding
model is broken and have our
doubts over whether an addi-
tional capital injection would
cure the problem,” the research
firm Creditsights Inc. wrote in a
report early Tuesday.

The government also could
broker a deal between CIT and
another company. Under that
plan, CIT would fail and anoth-
er firm would step in to make
sure its borrowers still have
access to credit. But such a
move might require the Fed or
Treasury to guarantee the new
firm against losses on CIT’s
loans.

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NEWS, | §
STORIES
AND
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EVENTS

RELIGIOUS *


The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, July 16, 2009® PG 21

for

«change

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter — mi, *

amissick@tribunemedia.net ag. i
mr x.

IN life, we all have a call-

ing and a purpose. God ee
gave each of us the chance Brown, also
and the choice to change the chant =
way we live our lives and mor A Pen 5
Deon Marlon Brown, also : eCniG
known as “Change” is more i i gospel music.
than ready to make one. ' ; /

“T got the name Change as an inspi- ie PF ’ Jd F

ration from God. Change really means
Christ has a new good earth-that’s what
he went to prepare for us so I feel that
I should use the name change because
I am trying to change a lot of folks to
find God,” Change said.

Change said he found God a few
years back.

“Tt has been a rugged road and I fell
short of his glory. However, I re-found
him on May 3 during a visit to a friend’s
church called Soul Winning Church of
God in Christ. After going there and
listening to the bishop, I said to myself
I need to go back on the road I was on
because I realise Satan was trying to
use me. I got back into my Bible study-
ing and back into church,” Change
said.

Change said he had always liked to
write his own songs and his friends
took notice.

“They would always say to me that I
was wasting my talent and I should use
it. The song Manners and Respect came
to me after my experiences on the bus.
Watching other people on the bus and
no one was saying good morning and so
forth. I saw kids and big folks not say-
ing excuse me to older people. So I
wrote that song. The Lord then gave
me the inspiration to make sure every-
thing was in the right place,” Change
said.

As for his sound, Change said he
prefers the rap genre.

“T am versatile but I rap about man-
ners and respect and use it for the glory
of God. I want to touch the hearts of
the youth and the people of the coun-
try,” Change said.

Change said he is into the music
scene to help people seek God.

“The message in my music is to tell
people to find God and seek him in
their life. These are the last evil days
and I want them to realise the life they
are living will lead to total destruc-
tion.”


PG 22 © Thursday, July 16, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune

res Er eam
aA SF ‘y i
bbe |hvillo: |e © Be clear

“To the Jews who had
believed him, Jesus
said, “If you hold to my
teaching, you are really
my disciples. Then you
will know the truth,
and the truth shall set
you free.”

John 8:31-32 (N.I.V)

ICY Yl



See what you might see, if you really saw what you did
see- yet were curious about the reality behind what was
there.

When I see you, your physical is trivial, and your interi-
or- superior. When I hear you, your voice is the tick tock
of a clock- high and low, your sounds get dirty in my ears,
the message lost forever- the challenge of your words, a

Ny 0 al fos EWN a el oP aan “resemble mine, however your face

does not. Your lips, your eyes, your tries and your lies- I
S qd 1 ' enjoy a great deal. Your imperfection is simply a reflection

a U f <8 0 y of the fact you’re susceptible to the world’s appetite.

Your time, your heart, your light and your height- I
enjoy a great deal. Your perfection is simply a reflection of
the fact youw’re in it for real. I see what I see, I know what
I know- I hide nothing. I read truth, I want truth, I need
truth, I believe truth and I live truth. I am transparent- we
are transparent.

When did truth become an annoyance? A weakness, a
guilt trip or a regret. How is it that lies feel better than
truths. Lies and their disfiguration of a healthy, vibrant,
evolving reality- softly caressing an ego to a state of sunny
ignorance- both a state to lie and a lie in state.

To open our eyes takes courage, dedication and a sound
mind; to choose a life of transparent living- to literally
choose reality over fantasy and a real life over strife; is to
choose faith, hope, love and an eternal passion to come
and go as you are.

Knowing without knowing; you are born anew. There
is a book that holds a truth available for all to claim; a truth
that refuses to change and will always remain the same.
And with reverence to His name; we believe as believers,
the message His Son Jesus Christ proclaimed. Not some
truth, but all truth.

In closing- if the world wants change, truth must precede
it, thus allowing for a transparent nature to receive it.

¢ Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian writer and poet, currently
residing in Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to the article
can be sent to fearless247@gmail.com

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If so, call us on 322-1986
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The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, July 16, 2009 ® PG 23



Sing me a



By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

A LOCAL Pastor is gearing
up to launch a first of its
kind summer singing camp
called the National Music
Honors Programme, and
says should all go well it
could likely lead to the start
of the National High School

Music Honours Programme.
Pastor Trent Davis, Pastor of
Administration at Golden Gates
Assembly’s World Outreach Ministries,
said the idea for the unique music camp
was born from his previous work in a

SONG

similar youth programme in
Washington DC several years ago.

He explained: “I had the opportuni-
ty to work with some gifted kids at the
Eastern High School in Washington,
and during that time I witnessed these
kids achieve national renowned status
and perform at several major events
including performances at the White
House, and also the Capitol Building.

“That was an inner city programme
designed to give high school students
an opportunity through singing to
make inroads into other areas and lead-
ership roles in life, and so I wanted to
transfer that programme here.”

Mr Davis who has helped to arrange
music for some of the biggest names in
gospel music including Yolanda
Adams, Richard Smallwood, Daryl
Collie, and Karin Clarke, is now work-

FROM Left to right: Summer interns Ryan Smith, Lloydia Steed, Dereck
Storr, and Coordinator Trent Davis. Working with the upcoming National

Music Honors Programme at Golden Gates Assembly, the group is hoping
to attract a healthy crop of music hopefuls to the singing programme.

ing with the Ministry of Youth to help
develop some of the young music hope-
fuls here in the Bahamas.

With a staff of 8, he has now trans-
formed the church into a singing oasis
where auditions have been ongoing
since Monday and will continue until
this Friday.

19-year-old Lloydia Steed who is a
summer intern at the programme, is
one of 8 staff members at the camp who
have worked on bringing the singing
workshop to life.

She explained: “Being placed in a
leadership position in this programme
has helped me to learn how to get
things done quickly and accurately, P’ve
learnt how to get ideas on the table to
draw people into programmes like
this.”

Helping out with the creation of fly-
ers, a face book profile for the project,
and sending dozens of email to poten-
tial applicants, Ms Steed said her work
has been truly rewarding and she looks
forward to the official start of the pro-
gramme’s workshop which begins next
Monday and will run until July 29.



She said the programme is available
to persons between the ages of thirteen
to eighteen, and does not require them
to have had extended vocal training.

However the programme has already
recruited almost a dozen teens who
sing as if they’ve been singing from
birth she explained.

She also explained the programme is
free to all, and allows successful appli-
cants a chance to learn a tremendous
amount ranging from vocal presenta-
tion, harmony, vocal care, group
singing, reading music, and much more.

Based on the successful outcome of
the programme, Mr Davis explained
that he has arranged for further discus-
sion with the Ministry of Youth and
with the Ministry of Education to begin
the groundwork for the future creation
of the National High School Music
Honours Society.

He said parents can rest assured that
their kids will learn all they need in the
areas of music production and perform-
ances, and he is simply happy to be a
part of this important music develop-
ment here in Nassau.
PG 24 ® Thursday, July 16, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

Ricardo Clarke in concert

GOSPEL recording artist Ricardo Clarke, who
released his debut Gospel/Reggae album on
February 27 has taken the local Christian communi-
ty by storm with lyrics which not only speak of the
challenges of being saved or unsaved, but also on the
realities of living in an economically crunched envi-
ronment.

Hundreds came to support Ricardo Clarke w/ The
Higher Level Band which featured some of the pre-
miere acts in gospel music and was the introduction
of the newest gospel face Countella, who provided
"down home" comedy.

The inspirational message of Not Settlin has been
wide spread, and has crossed all boundaries and is
beginning to spread internationally.

Inclement weather forced a postponement last
month, but it won't deter Ricardo Clarke, and he's
not settling for anything less than a stellar perform-
ance. As a result, the new date for Ricardo Clarke's
"Not Settling Encore " concert with the Higher
Level Band has been confirmed for Friday, July 17,
at the original venue, Calvary Deliverance Church
on East Street south.

"Not Settling” is Clarke's biggest hit off the album
"Uprising" and the song is still in heavy rotation, as
the lyrics continue to inspire: "I'm not Settling, I
Deserve the Best, Not Going to Live My Life Like
the Rest ..." is a message not to be taken lightly.

He will be joined on the night of the concert by fel-
low artists such as Najee Dun, Mr Beedz, DJ
Counsellor, Derek and Charlie, the yellow
Bahamian Parrot and Reubin Heights. Showtime is
7.30pm and free phone cards will be given out all
night.

Mr Clarke who is busy promoting his singles "No
Minutes" as well as "Once I'm in Zion" also off the
"Uprising" album, recently made a monetary dona-
tion to the Sister/Sister Breast Cancer Support
Group, as he strives to use his popularity to get more
people and his fans involved in charity projects, and
highlight their work

in any way possible.

Mr Clarke's hit single "Not Settling” has been
growing from strength to strength and his conscious
and inspiring lyrics account for his growing fan base

in the Caribbean as well as internationally. He is not
just in the top 10 on the AOL charts but is also num-
ber one on riddimjamaica.net.

Check out this encore performance by Ricardo



Clarke 7.30pm at Calvary Deliverance Church, East
Street South.

For further information, contact the church office
@ 325-1802.



Church of God of Prophecy Commissions the Ministry of Social Outreach

THE Church of God of Prophecy
celebrates 100 years of ministry in the
Bahamas this year and over the years
has always been an organisation that
has been responsive to the needs of the
poor and those with other social needs.

According to committee member
Elizabeth Keju, the church has been
involved in prison ministry, hospital
ministry and seniors ministry on a
national level. The various local
churches have for many years operated
soup kitchens, distributed clothing,
school supplies and adopted schools.

National Overseer, Bishop Elgarnet
B Rahming wanted to bring all of the
various branches under one umbrella
for improved effectiveness and better
use of the limited resources.

At a recent press conference, the

recently appointed director of the
Social Outreach Ministry Patricia
Bethel, outlined plans to officially
launch the new venture. The team will
be working with the twenty pastors and
district overseer in New Providence
and in the near future the programme
will be extended to Grand Bahama and
the Family Islands.

A commissioning service is sched-
uled for this Saturday, July 18 at 9 am
at the Church of God of Prophecy's
Children’s’ Chapel, Sunlight Village
Corner. Bishop Rahming will be on
hand to formally introduce the recent-
ly appointed workers in this ministry
and to outline the role this ministry will
play in the outreach ministry of the
Church.

“The focus of this operation is to

provide food for the hungry and
clothes for the less fortunate. We still
believe in the effectual fervent prayer
of the saints and divine healing and
through this ministry we are commit-
ted to rescuing “at-risk” neglected, tru-
ant and abused youths, we will meet
the needs of the impoverished elderly
and the homeless; but most important-
ly we will offer the message of salva-
tion and the hope and peace that only
Christ can give,” Ms Bethel said.

The Minister for Social Services,
Loretta Butler Turner will also address
the session on behalf of the Bahamas'
Government. The message of the
vision for this commissioning session
will be delivered by Bishop Shelton
Beneby. He will speak on the theme
“Catch the Vision”. All Bahamians

and residents in the commonwealth are
invited to be present

Bishop Beneby acknowledged that
the harvest is great and there is a lot of
work ahead for this committee.

Bishop Dale Moss explained that a
panel discussion will also be held dur-
ing the service. Panelists will be on
hand to field answers and accept sug-
gestions from the floor on the role of
the church, the government and the
community in addressing the social ills
of the country.

Bishop Moss also discussed the cur-
rent involvement that the Shirley
Street Church has with various non-
profit groups like “Hands for Hunger,”
which provides hot meals for persons
in the neighbouring Kemp Road
Community.
The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, July 16, 2009 ® PG 25

Inner Harmony release new reggae single



Psalms 121

Inner Harmony, one of the longest
running contemporary female gospel
vocal groups in the country, has released
another single that is set to be a hit with
gospel music enthusiasts across The
Bahamas. The group is pleased to
announce the release of their single
Psalm 121 which was taken directly from
the scripture and presented in a sultry
reggae style.

“T will lift up mine eyes unto the hills,
from whence cometh my help. My help
cometh from the LORD, which made
heaven and earth. He will not suffer thy
foot to be moved: he that keepeth thee will
not slumber. Behold, he that keepeth

Israel shall neither slumber nor sleep.”
Psalms 121: 1-4.

“We are very pleased with this single,”
says group leader Patrice, “The track
causes you to focus on the Lord as your
help, especially as we go through one of
the toughest economic times in recent
history.”

“It gives listeners hope. Help does not
come from the government or men. But
it comes from the Lord,” says Antonise.

Inner Harmony has teamed up with
gospel reggae music giant Mr Lynx who
produced the music and also performed
on the single. “Mr Lynx did a great job
with lead vocals,” said Alma, the group's
alto and lead vocalist. The combined
smooth sultry sounds of Inner Harmony

and the musical and vocal genius that is
Mr Lynx has produced a product that is
uplifting to the mind and spirit.

For the past nine years Inner Harmony
has been ministering the gospel in song.
The group comprising of five female
vocalists has traveled the islands of the
Bahamas and Florida representing the
Kingdom of God through the art of
music.

In addition, Inner Harmony hosts an
annual conference called “Women in
Worship” and a seminar for young
women called “Developing Inward
Beauty.”

“We believe that worship is a lifestyle”
says Patrice, “therefore coming from var-
ious career backgrounds we can influ-

ence women and girls as worshippers no
matter what sphere of the marketplace or
social background they are employed or
come from.”

“It is our desire that this song is a bless-
ing to all people during these hard eco-
nomic times,” says Kenice and Otalia
added :“We know the struggles that
women face on a daily basis because we
are women too”

Inner Harmony is comprised of
Antonise - Banker, mother, Pastor's wife,
Otalia - Government, former Senator's
wife, Patrice - single, executive secretary,
Alma - psalmist, mother beautician, and
Kenice - wife, mother and doctor.

For booking contact Patrice Paul at 361-
5626 or e-mail patricepaul254@msn.com
PG 26 @ Thursday, July 16, 2009

RELIGION

An ear to hear!

IN Revelation chapter 2 and 3
Yeshuwa Messiah writes to the church-
es and each of them were given this
admonishment: He that hath an ear,
Let him hear what the Spirit saith unto
the churches;

Today the Spirit is yet speaking, but
the angels of these churches (bishops,
apostles, prophets, doctors, etc;) are so
disconnected from Father Yahweh due
to their erroneous religious beliefs;
they're in no position to hear what the
Spirit is saying. As a result the enemy is
wreaking havoc throughout the nation.
It is evident that the hit and miss God
of the religious churches today is not
the Most High God of Abraham, Isaac
and Jacob.

Ninety percent of the churches here
in the Bahamas are operating as an out
of control freight train that is hauling
flammable substances, and loaded with
passengers. It's only a matter of time
before disaster strikes.

The enemy has cunningly worked his
way into what we call the church today;
and through various shades of his
Babylonian religions has deceived
many leaders, left, right and center.
This religious spirit and the tradition of
men is so powerful in that it has literal-
ly caused church leaders to accept and
operate from the position and title of
religious leaders.

Before we go any further think of
this for a few moments: With over four
thousand churches throughout the
Bahamas, how is it that the enemy can
wreak such havoc in this country? As
I've stated before and will continue to
herald: “The hardest spirit to drive out;
is the spirit that's been invited in”

As far as today’s religious leaders are
concern: there is nothing wrong with
their church; because they're having
the conferences, seminars, workshops
and revivals, and the people are being
blessed in Jesus’ name. The apostle
Paul said to the saints, Galatians.3:1 O'
Foolish Galatians who hath bewitched
you, that you should not obey the
truth? Likewise I humbly and respect-
fully ask the church leaders of the





PASTOR

MATTHEW

ALLEN





Bahamas “Who hath bewitched you?”

As a patriotic, passionate son of the
soil, I would love nothing more than to
see the Bahamas being a pace setter on
the global scene in various areas of life.
There is absolutely nothing wrong with
holding the political leaders of this
country accountable for integrity gov-
ernance; but I must declare that the
brunt of the deterioration that this
nation faces lies at the feet / doors of
the powerless, religious church.

Why or how could I make such a

leaders and are in stiff competition with
each other, to see who can built the
largest church and fill it with religious
Christians; whereas the church that
Yeshuwa has built, He's filling it with
true disciples and not religious
Christians. The center of attention in
religion is and will always be the lead-
ers of that religion, Selah. The organ-
ised religious church belongs to the
denomination, the bishop, apostle etc;
of whom the congregations have be
methodically trained to worship and
serve in one facet or another.

He that hath an ear, Let him hear
what the Spirit saith unto the churches:
Through the incomplete (not incorrect)
prosperity gospel; the religious leaders
are responsible via erroneous, contam-
inated teachings for the people priori-
tising and seeking after the blessings of

inety percent of the churches here in
the Bahamas are operating as an out of

control freight train that is hauling flammable
substances, and loaded with passengers. It's
only a matter of time before disaster strikes.

statement? The answer is very simple;
I've carefully watched and diligently
listen to the religious leaders as they
talk about what their churches are
doing via programs, conferences, etc.

Then I'm reminded by the Spirit of
what Yeshuwa meant when He
responded to the answer Peter gave via
revelation from Yahweh in
Matthew.16:16. Here's Yeshuwa's reply
Matt.16:18b. And upon this rock I will
build my church; and the gates of hell
shall not prevail against it”

The problem with the church today is
that the leaders have allowed religion
to be their god; henceforth they are
well known in the country as religious



God; rather then them seeking the face
of God.

Religion has deceived the church so
badly to the point that leaders see noth-
ing wrong with merchandising the
gospel and have set up ministries to
execute their agendas. As if fleecing
and pimping the people from the pul-
pits aren't bad enough; attending these
money making conferences is liken to
the nail, in the coffin where the people
are financially charged to attend. These
chargers are often given a religious title
and excuse or reason. They're some-
times call registration fees to help meet
the budget.

The religious leaders and their spe-
cial guest / pimping partners through

The Tribune

the spirit of manipulation, compelling-
ly forces the sales of their products
(books, c.d's tapes, etc) upon their guilt
driven if they don't buy victims

This merchandising religious practice
in the church is nothing new, it’s just
that today’s leaders have up their game
in this area; but Yeshuwa's principles
and stands on this sort of practice
remains the same. Watch this!

Matt.21:12. And Yeshuwa went into
the temple of God, and cast out all
them that sold and brought in the tem-
ple, and overthrew the tables of the
money changers, and the seat of them
that sold dove Verse: 13. And said unto
them, It is written, My house shall be
called the house of prayer; but ye have
made ita DEN OF THIEVES.

I wonder what He (Yeshuwa) would
say if He was ever invited to attend
these annual money making religious
conferences. Here's a quick reminder
to the religious leaders who have built
their dynasty by this and many other
tactics; 1John.1:9. If we confess our
sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us
our sins, and to cleanse us from all
unrighteousness.

And also to you religious (nuts) fol-
lowers who are buying everybody's
books seeking prosperity and success.
Stop wasting the little money you do
have and become a disciple of
Yeshuwa. Here's what the Bible (God's
word) says about your prosperity and
success.

Joshua.1:8.This book shall not depart
out of thy mouth; but thou shalt medi-
tate therein day and night, that thou
mayest observe to do according to all
that is written therein: for then thou
shalt make thy way prosperous, and
then thou shalt have good success.

He that hath an ear, Let him hear
what the Spirit saith unto the churches.

e Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen,
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l,

For questions and comments contact us
via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
Ph.1-242-441-2021 or 225-3850





Eight Caribbean Baptist Fellowship Youth Festival

YOUTH from thirteen nations and
ten family islands will be in Nassau to
attend the eight Caribbean Baptist
Fellowship Youth Festival next week.

The festival which is held every three
years will include participants from ten
family islands and The United States,
India, Guyana, Jamaica, Trinidad and
Tobago, Antigua, Barbados, The Turks
and Caicos Islands, St Kitts, Dominica,
Haiti, and Grenada.

During their time, here participants
will discuss a number of varied and vex-
ing issues affecting youth of the world.

Organisers of the event say that it
will have a tremendous financial impact

on the country by providing business to
many local entrepreneurs and estab-
lished businesses such as graphic
designs, printing, garment manufactur-
ing, entertainment, photography, audio
and video services, food veneering, san-
itation and transportation contracts.

The Wyndham Resorts are also set to
benefit with an average of over four
hundred hotel nights.

Topics to be discussed include: crime
and violence, cyber addiction, gadget
gospel, love and abstinence, environ-
mental stewardship, youth ministry for
the 21st century and many more.

Presenters include: Rev Emmett

Dunn, Baptist World Programme
Coordinator and Youth Director, Dr
Michael Taylor, earth scientist and
president of the Caribbean Baptist
Fellowship Youth Dept., Rev Diana
Francis, Rev Ulric Smith, and many of
the leading local and regional ministers
including: Pastor Dave Burrows, Pastor
Sterling Mcphee,a nd Pastor Carlos
Reid.

Some of the highlights of the festival
include:

A Dis is a Bahamian ting-welcome
celebration, CBF Youth Ball, honoring
distinguished Youth Leaders of the
region and the launching of the CBF

Youth Ambassador Programme

Global March and Rally and a
Caribbean Praise: Cross/Cultural
Victory Concert featuring top
Bahamian and Caribbean gospel artists

The festival is hosted by the
Bahamas National Baptist Missionary
and Educational Convention, a mem-
ber body of the Caribbean Baptist
Fellowship (CBF).The Reverend
Clinton L Minnis former Baptist youth
director and vice president of the CBF
youth dept is providing executive lead-
ership for the management of the festi-
val and Br Wellington Smith serves as
the local coordinator.
The Tribune

ABACO was also known as
Habocoa, Ibico, Habacor and
Incayonique. The island was settled
temporarily by the French in 1685.
The Loyalists arrived in 1785 from
New England. In 1783 the population
of Abaco is recorded as nil, but by
1786, after the arrival of the
Loyalists, the figure is 686, including
384 slaves.

Joseph Paul and his family arrived
at Carleton (four miles from Treasure
Cay) in 1783, but no record exists of
any work he might have done among
the black population during the peri-
od he remained here.

THE FIRST MINISTER ARRIVES

In June, 1815 the Reverend Joseph
Ward, the fourth minister sent to the
Bahamas by the British Methodist
Church, arrived at Green Turtle Cay.
In a letter dated August 11, 1815,
Reverend Ward explains that he came
to Abaco in response to the petition
and to get rid of 'a bilious complaint’.
His passage was provided by
Benjamin Lowe, "a pious
Abaconian", who was a boat captain.

Reverend Ward landed at Green
Turtle Cay on June 21, 1815, a
Sunday, and his text that day was,
"Behold, I bring you good tidings!"
Ward is described as: " ... undoubted-
ly one of the most talented and most
ardent missionaries ever seen in the
West Indian field ... "

The Reverend John Rutledge, an
Irish missionary, described Ward as "
... the greatest labourer our part of the
vineyard can boast of." His ministry
in Abaco lasted less than one year,
after which he was sent to Harbour
Island. He died in Nassau in
September, 1817, after a ministry
which was described as having been
‘as short as it was brilliant’. The
Reverend Michael Head, who suc-
ceeded Ward at Green Turtle towards
the end of 1815, also died in 1817. By
1836, there were 300 members at
Green Turtle Cay.

HOPE TOWN AND CHEROKEE
SOUND BEGINNINGS

A Methodist society was formed at
Hope Town (then also known as
Great Harbour) in 1820. There are
few details available surrounding this
development.

In 1827, the Cherokee Sound
Society was opened by the Reverend
James Horne. It is known, from the
records of Joseph Ward, that there
was a settlement called Cherokee
Sound in 1815, which Ward passed on
his way to Green Turtle Cay. A chapel
was built at Cherokee Sound the fol-
lowing year.

In 1841, there were more than 700
members in the Green Turtle Cay

RELIGION
@r THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS



Noe? j JIM
p_ LAWLOR

Church. They worshipped in a wood-
en chapel. In 1843 a corner-stone was
laid for the erection of a new chapel,
which was completed in 1856. This
was a stone building, which was
destroyed by the hurricane of 1932,
and a photograph of the chapel is to
be found in the Albert Lowe Museum
at Green Turtle Cay.

A SOCIETY FORMED
IN MARSH HARBOUR
In 1845, a society was formed in
Marsh Harbour. The Synod minutes
for 1846 read:

"At this settlement we have
formed a class of sincere souls, most
of whom are only seeking the power
of godliness. They are sometimes vis-
ited on the Sabbath Day by an
Exhorter from Great Harbour (Hope
Town)."

A Sunday-school was also formed
at Marsh Harbour in 1845. There
were twelve students and one
teacher.

FIRST BAHAMIAN MINISTER IN ABACO

The appointment of the Reverend
Alexander J Thompson to the circuit
occurred in 1848. He was the second
Bahamian minister, and the first
Bahamian appointed to the Abaco
Circuit. Thompson's ministry was pri-
marily concerned with the racial seg-
regation which was being practised in
the church. The District had formu-
lated regulations against this, and
sent the Reverend Thompson to
enforce them.

"The Methodist Districts resolved
that there should be no colour dis-
tinctions in seats. However, in 1847,
John Blackwell, the Methodist mis-
sionary at Green Turtle Cay, compro-
mised by allowing the whites to sit on
one side and the blacks on the other.
This ruling was condemned by the
District meeting, but in 1848, his suc-
cessor Samuel Annear was violently
opposed and ill-treated for trying to
enforce the District's regulations.
Annear finally had to be removed."

It was to this situation that
Thompson was appointed in 1848.
The tension caused by racial segrega-
tion was so great, that many white
people left Green Turtle Cay for Key
West. The white and black popula-
tion had toiled on the building of a
chapel, but the whites were experi-
encing some difficulties in accepting
their black brethren as equals. It is to



Part 36 —- Methodists in Abaco 1

Joseph Paul and the Loyalists

be remembered that many of the
blacks were formerly slaves of the
whites, so this was a radical change
for them.

OLD PLACE BEGINS
The next development in the circuit
occurred in 1869. A class of 14 mem-
bers was started at Old Place. The
Circuit report for 1869 reads:

"We have commenced preaching in
a place on the mainland of Abaco dis-
tant from Green Turtle Cay about 15
miles, with hopeful signs of success. It
promises to be a prosperous village or
neighbourhood and may be a station
of some importance in a few years. We
formed a class of 14 members and
expect to add to their number in a
short time."

In 1870, the membership in the cir-
cuit is 295. The Marsh Harbour
Sunday-school has 13 pupils and two
teachers (both male). Meanwhile,
there is report of improvement at Old
Place, and plans to build a chapel. In
1875, the Reverend Elijah Sumner
reported to Synod that the circuit was
grateful to " ... a brother whose faith-
ful oversight is respected by all the
members and blessed by God in keep-
ing the society together." He reports
pleasant, profitable visits, and that the
people of the society are poor, and live
far apart, some of them having to walk
as many as 10 miles to church. From
1869 to 1878, the Methodists wor-
shipped at the Baptist chapel, and the
Methodist chapel was under construc-
tion from 1875 to 1878.

MAN-O-WAR SOCIETY

The society at Man-a-War Cay was
started in 1870 with six members.
This was never a large society, and
was eventually closed during the mid-
1970's

By 1878, reports are that the racial
strife, which was particularly severe
in Green Turtle Cay had abated, and
that relations were much more har-
monious. In that year there were 58
members, an increase of five over the
previous year. The Sunday-school
reported seven teachers and 43
pupils.

CIRCUIT'S FIRST CANDIDATE
FOR MINISTRY

In 1955, the District Synod accepted
Charles Christopher Curry as a candi-
date for the ministry. He was the first
Abaconian to candidate. The
Reverend Curry, a native of Green
Turtle Cay gave years of dedicated
service, and became the first
Bahamian Chairman of the District in
1978.

(Next time: Part 37 — Methodists in
Abaco 2)

Thursday, July 16, 2009 ® PG 27

Tat
PLS
ACLU demands changes

after jail removes Bible verses
from letters to inmate

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Prisoner
and free-speech advocates are demand-
ing a written guarantee that inmates at a
Virginia jail can receive letters contain-
ing religious material after a prisoner
said his mail was censored.

The American Civil Liberties Union,
its Virginia chapter and several other
civil, religious and prisoner rights organ-
izations sent a letter to Rappahannock
Regional Jail Superintendent Joseph
Higgs Jr. requesting that the issue be
resolved without litigation.

Anna Williams, whose son was
detained at the jail for several months,
said officials cut out entire sections of
several letters she sent to her son that
contained Bible verses or religious
material. She said the jail cited prohibi-
tions on Internet material and religious
material sent from home.

"Obviously for security issues the
right to practice religion while incarcer-
ated is a balancing act to some extent,
but that can't possibly apply to a mother
sending religious passages to her son,"
said Kent Willis, executive director of
the ACLU of Virginia.

Higgs said in a written statement that
the letter prompted him to initiate an
internal investigation. The U.S.
Supreme Court has said that inmates
have the right to practice religion as
long as it doesn't interfere with their
other obligations or create a security
risk.

Birmingham ‘religion’
billboard brings debate

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — A
billboard that was put up by the
Alabama Freethought Association is
causing debate, with some saying the
sign reading "Imagine No Religion” is
offensive and should be removed.

The billboard along Interstate 20
near Pell City was placed there by the
association as part of a national cam-
paign by the Freedom From Religion
Foundation. The background of the
sign is of a stained glass window with
the words sung by John Lennon in the
song "Imagine" on top.

Annie Laurie Gaylor, co-president
of the foundation in Madison, Wis.,
said the sign will be up for a month.
The group had wanted a billboard
near the Birmingham-Shuttlesworth
International Airport, but Lamar
Advertising declined.

"We got censored by Lamar,” she
said.

"It was offensive to me," said Tom
Traylor, general manager of Lamar
Advertising in Birmingham. "We have
the autonomy to decide what's in the
best interests of our company and
what's offensive. I don't think it was
the kind of message we wanted to
stand behind.
PG 28 @ Thursday, July 16, 2009

ON Saturday, July 18, the community
known as “The Valley” will come alive
when the St George’s Anglican Church
holds its annual “Thrill of the Grill and
Parish Fair.”

“The church fair is the major
fundraising event which assists with the
operating expenses of our church and
its ministry to our members and the
wider community. The Anglican
Church Men of our parish will man the
grills where delicious steaks and chick-
ens will headline the food items which
will be available at the fair” said

hh

Thrill of the Grill

Brenda Archer chairperson of the
organising committee.

Local foods including a conch of
every type, home cookery and new
items including roast corn and “chicken
in da bag” will be available to purchase.

“Even more important than the funds
we hope to raise, is the opportunity to
fellowship and get to know each other
better,” said Fr Kingsley Knowles, rec-
tor of the parish.

The youth department will man the
soft drinks, daiquiri, ice-cream and
snowball stalls said Allison Estwick,

RELIGION

youth coordinator of the parish. In
addition the youth will offer computer
games, hamburgers and hot-dogs, face
painting and the bouncing castle to
keep the kids busy during the fair.

Of course we can’t do without our
cakes and pastries , so this year we
intend to make this stall even bigger
and better, said Betty Smith, president
of the church’s Guild to Help the Sick
and Needy.

“Our Guild goes all out to provide
cakes, pastries, pies and tarts of every
description and we expect no less this

The Tribune

— _

PARISHIONERS enjoy the many activities
and food items which were available at St
George’s annual Thrill of The Grill and
Parish Fair last year.



year

In addition to all these booths Agnes
Munnings and Virgil Briggs will man
the plants and books stall which has
always been a great hit, said Ms Archer.

Games of chance including bingo,
white elephant, hoop-la and punch
board with a number of great prizes will
be available.

Live coverage of the fair will come via
STAR 106.5 FM with Brad Hanna from
2 to 6 pm. The Grill Out and Parish
Fair will end with a Junkanoo Rush-
Out with the Valley Boys.



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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Two murders in thr ee hours C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.193THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH T-STORM HIGH 90F LOW 81F B y MEGAN REYNOLDS a nd DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Staff Reporters mreynolds@tribunemedia.net; d maycock@tribunemedia.net A 17-YEAR-OLD boy was killed in a drive-by shooting and a prominent member of the Eight Mile Rock community was stabbed to death yesterday,a ll in the space of less than three hours. In New Providence, William I ngraham, 17, of Lynden Pindling Estates, was shot and killed at around 4am in the Robinson Road area, and in Grand Bahama Denzil Jones Jr, 30, was stabbed to death by intruders at his home in Jones Town. William Ingraham was gunned down while sitting at the side of the road on Ida Street with two others when a dark car pulled up and several shots were fired from the vehicle at around 4am, police said. The teenager was shot in the chest and upper arm. He fell to the ground and died at the scene. An 18-year-old resident of Miami Street sitting with him was shot in the left leg, and a 16year-old resident of Mackey Street was shot in the right leg. Police were called just after 4 am and the two survivors were r ushed to Princess Margaret Hospital where their condition is considered “not life-threat e ning,” Police Supt Elsworth Moss said. A murder investigation has been launched into the young m an’s death. Supt Moss, officer in-charge of the Central Detective Unit,s aid: “We don’t know yet how many people were in the car and we have yet to determine the motive of the shooting. “If anyone has any information that may assist investiga tions please call Crime Stoppers or CDU.” Meanwhile, in Grand Bahama the murder of Denzil Jones Jr left the close-knit community of Jones Town in shock. Mr Jones was stabbed to death by intruders in his apartment in the early hours of yes terday. The victim and his family are Teen shot, prominent member of community is stabbed to death The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER SEEPAGES 18, 19, 20 I N S I D E OBITUARIES and RELIGION INTODAY’STRIBUNE JOBSAND HELPWANTED L L O O A A D D S S O O F F SEE page 10 By NATARIO M cKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net I HAVE been charged for a murder I did notc ommit,” murder accusedT royniko M cNeil told the jury in the Harl Tay lor murder tri a l yesterday. In his unsworn statement from the prisoner’sd ock, McNeil, 22, told the jury that he had nothing to do with Taylor’s murder and that he had no r eason to kill the noted h andbag designer. McNeil, the son of Tay lor’s former business part ner Troy McNeil is a ccused of causing Tay lor’s death between Saturday November 17 and Sunday November 18, 2007 while being concerned with another. Taylor, 37, was found dead at Mountbatten House on West Hill Street with multiple stab wounds. McNeil told the jury that his father had lived at Mountbatten House and that he had even worked there before. He said that prior to Taylor’s murder he had made reservations to travel to the United States to receive treatment for an injury he had received while playing basketball. He told the Troyniko McNeil: I did not kill Harl Taylor Murder accused tells jury he had nothing to do with murder Troyniko M cNeil SEE page nine POLICE AND DEFENCE FORCE officers came to the aid of two of their own yesterday, Able Seaman Vandyke Adderley and Constable Ferguson, and helped them to rebuild their home in the Grove after a fire destroyed it on Sunday morning. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net A FORMER law partner of a Cabinet Minister is being held at the Grove Police Station for questioning in con nection with allegations that more than a quarter of a mil lion dollars is missing from a client’s account. According to Supt Elsworth Moss, the lawyer has been in police custody from Tuesday afternoon. He is being questioned by CID officers. With the right to hold an individual for up to 48 hours, Mr Moss said that the police have by Minister s former law partner questioned in connection with missing money allegations SEE page nine FOR the mother of16-year-old Khodee Davis justice was served yesterday when a jury unanimously convicted Andy Francis, 22, of her son’s murder. The jury found Francis’ co-accused, 18-year-old Robert Out ten also of Fox Hill, not guilty of Davis’ murder 11-1. Justice Jon Isaacs told Outten that he had been given an opportunity to get his life in order. Outten’s relatives shouted praises to God after the verdict was handed down. Outten was represented by lawyer Romona Farquharson. Francis is expected back in court on Accused found guilty of Khodee Davis murder SEE page nine OFFICERSCOMETOTHEAIDOFCOLLEAGUES

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A LTHOUGH opposition leader Perry Christie hasc alled for the prime m inister to consult with him on the question of who willr eplace the outgoing C hief Justice, Hubert Ingraham yesterday s uggested he sees no rush. The Cabinet Office announced on J une 26 that Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall is set to leave the Bahamas in August, after serving in the post for eight years, to become a Permanent Judge at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Y ugoslavia. A sked yesterday whether he had considered who willr eplace Sir Burton, t he prime minister would only respond that “there is nov acancy” for a new c hief justice as yet. Mr Christie said Mr I ngraham has yet to consult with him on the issue of who will replace Sir Burton b ut added that he has “noted to the prime minister that the discussion needs to take place.” Under the constitution, the appointment is made by the governor-general, in accord ance with the recommendation of the prime minister, who must have consulted with the leader of the opposition. S ome attorneys have suggested that Senior Supreme Court Justice Anita Allen would be the most likely and worthy replacement. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE REFRESH YOURSELFICED SHAKEN TEAC OME IN FOR A N 2009 Starbucks Coffee Company. All rights reserved. PASSIONTMTEA BLACK TEA PERFECT ANY TIME.NOW, FOR INSTANCE.Marina Village Woodes Rodgers Wharf Wyndham Casino Palmdale Harbour Bay Marathon Mall Oakes Field The Reef At Atlantis 328.8087 326.0130 THE southeast Bahamas may b e hit by thunderstorms and showers within the next 36h ours as a well defined tropical wave passing near Hispaniola inches closer to the islands, Chief Meteorologist Basil Dean said yesterday. M r Dean said the Departm ent of Meteorology is watching the large tropical wave which is fast moving towards the Bahamas at 20 to 25 miles per hour. However, he said the system i s not showing any signs of d evelopment and is not expected to be a threat to the Bahamas. Nor does he expect the wave to develop into a possible storm or depression, at least within the next 48 hours. "With that kind of speed it w ill push it through the area very quickly. Even if it devel-o ps into something it would not pose much of a threat to the Bahamas," he said yesterday. Mr Dean said it is not unusual for things to be quiet on thet ropical storm front during this t ime, adding that the season should become active around August. "The tropics are very quiet at the moment, for how long we don't know, but we hope it r emains that way. " This is not abnormal, we've had numerous seasons when we’ve had a late start. “The peak (storm normally between August and September," he said. Southeast Bahamas are set for stormy weather B ASILDEAN T HE Defence Force has reported the apprehension of a number of suspected illegal immigrants just off the coast of New Providence. T he detainees, all Haitians, were taken into custody after their sloop was spotted by the Defence Force Air-wing reconnaissance team near Green Cay early yesterday morning. T he Defence Force patrol craft HMBS P-121 was dispatched to the area to investigate. T he crew discovered a 45-foot grey and white Haitian sloop w ith a large number of Haitian aboard. R BDF Patrol crafts HMBS P-48 and P-49 were dispatched to the area to assist in the removal of the detainees. They are expected to arrive in the capital early this morning. Defence Force apprehends suspected illegal immigrants PM: no vacancy for a new chief justice as yet Hubert Ingraham

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By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE government owes millions of dollars to Bahamians who it dispossessed of their land in order to undertake public works projects, it was claimed in parliament. MP for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell yesterday called for government to “expeditiously” settle the outstanding debts that it owes to those people whose land has been acquired over many years. He said that when the PLP government came to power in 2002 there was $50 million owed to people for “hundreds if not thousands” of acres of land acquired. In documents tabled by the MP, it is evident that much of this land was used in the construction of new road corridors, as well as for airports, housing, schools and parks. The Tribune was unable to ascertain yesterday precisely w here this figure stands at present. Mr Mitchell said: “This is something which we must account for. The constitution says that you can acquire somebody’s land for a public purpose, but you must compensate them for their land and some people have been waiting years and years for their compensation,” said Mr Mitchell, suggesting that his party also failed to dispose of the debt during their five year tenure in office which came after their 2002 election victory. Cavalier “It seems to me that we cannot treat people’s property in such a cavalier fashion and this must be dealt with expeditiously. I don’t even know if this $50 million is on the books as a debt owed by the country, as part of the national debt. Nevertheless the debt is outstanding and It should be settled,” he added. The MP was speaking as he moved a resolution for the formation of a parliamentary select c ommittee to investigate matt ers connected with Crown land. C oming on the heels of a series of articles in The Tribune outlining questionable land grants during the tenure of the recently-resigned director of lands and surveys, Tex Turnquest – including some to his own family and friends, some of the land having been “flipped” for large profits soon after – Mr Mitchell’s proposal led into a debate among MPs on the question of the distribution and management of land by the government in the Bahamas. THE mortician who co-ordi n ated the funeral arrangements f or Michael Knowles, the teen f ound hanged in a police holding c ell in May, strongly refuted r eports that the boy’s body was removed from the state morgue and embalmed without official consent. Llewellyn Astwood Jr, co-director of Demeritte’s Funeral Home, said he was in possession of signed documents that prove he receivedw ritten consent from the boy's f amily and the relieving officer at P rincess Margaret Hospital for the release of the body to the funeral home. He said the home then did what any "sensible" mortician would do – embalmed the body. "It's impossible for us to get a body without proper authorisa-t ion,” Mr Astwood said yesterday. “Without proper authorisation from a family member it's impossible for the funeral home to even inquire on the person. A funeral home can't just get a body and say ‘I want to embalm it’.” His comments came in response t o an article published in the Bahama Journal on Wednesday,w hich reported that a source c laimed that Knowles' body was "removed from the morgue and embalmed before a second autop sy could be performed . . . Without official consent." Knowles was found dead in his cell in the East Street south sta tion on May 31, with whata ppeared to be a cord from his trousers wrapped around his neck. Although police ruled the death an apparent suicide, many speculated that Knowles may have been the victim of foul play or police negligence. Autopsy According to previous reports, t he family's lawyer had planned for a second independent autopsy b y a foreign pathologist. Wednesday's report in the Journal claimed this could not be performed because Knowles' body had been embalmed. But Mr Astwood yesterday said he had "no idea" the family wanted an independent autopsy performed until he heard it on the n ews. "No one called me and said that a second autopsy was to be done. I heard about it on the news. After the initial embalming we secured all of his vital o rgans in case they wanted to have a second autopsy done (but n obody even called me to say we’re going for a second autopsy a nd I heard nothing from them so I prepped the body for burial," Mr Astwood said. He said after a body has been embalmed, a second autopsy is possible, however due to the presence of embalming fluid in the body, a toxicology report would be fruitless. Knowles' funeral is scheduled f or today at 11 am. A Coroner’s Inquest into his death is expected to be held soon. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 3 Govt owes millions to Bahamians dispossessed of land, claims MP Mortician denies claims teen’s body removed from morgue without consent B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A Freeport man who claims to have been assaulted by a female police officer and her husband fears that the incident is not being t aken seriously by Grand Bahama police. Frederick Morley said he suffered a torn ligament in his arm during the attack, which took place on June 27 in the Caravel Beach area. Mr Morley said he reported the matter to the police but hasn ot heard back from anyone on the status of the investigation. He is concerned that the matter will be swept under the rug. M r Morley claims the attack has left him physically injured and emotionally traumatised. He said he has sought legal advice. “I cannot sleep at night, can’t f unction and work properly, and something needs to be donea bout this,” Mr Morley said. He claims the incident started w hen he was approached by the female officer who was not in uniform at the time. “I was doing lawn work in a yard in Caravel Beach when theo fficer approached me and accused me of breaking her vang lass. “I told her I did not break the g lass and she kept saying ‘you break my glass.’ She then came around the fence and attacked me, tore my shirt off and kept thumping me. Then her husb and came around and choked me,” he claimed. M r Morley said the neighbours heard his cries for help a nd came out to assist, but was told by the woman officer to mind their business. He went to the police station to report the matter. “I told them that she a ssaulted me and they kept me there waiting for over an hourb efore they dealt with me,” said Mr Morley. M r Morley said a doctor examined him and said he had torn a ligament in his arm. He said he took the doctor’s report to the Central Police Station, where an officer there told him to take it to the Port L ucaya Station, but when he arrived he was told to go back t o Central. “I was treated worse than a dog. I don’t think it is right and I want Assistant Com missioner Dames to look into this,” said Mr Morley. His wife pointed out that police officers are not above l aw. “My husband is a hard working man and if she had a c omplaint about him, she could have gone to him and worked it o ut. There are procedures she should have taken as an officer o f the law. “She should have known better. The police are here to protect us from the bad guys, not to inflict harm on anyone. She would have arrested him if he had attacked or assaulted her,” she said. Mrs Morley said her husband has been deeply affected by the incident and has had difficulty sleeping. Community activist Troy Garvey was able set up a meet ing between the Morleys and ACP Marvin Dames, who said police are investigating the matter. Mr Garvey claims the woman officer has told him she is willing to apologise if that is what the Morleys want. “You can’t go around taking advan tage of people. We will seek jus tice, but I hope that we can bring resolution to the matter,” Mr Garvey said. Policewoman and husband accused of assaulting Freeport man A PRELIMINARY inquiry into the murder of American Anna Garrison is scheduled to begin on October 26. Zyndall McKinney, 22, of Isabella Boulevard is accused of intentionally and unlawfully causing Garrison’s death between Sunday, February 25 and Saturday, July 4, 2009, while being concerned with another. He was arraigned on the charge last week. The preliminary inquiry will be held before Magistrate Ancella Williams in Court Six, Parliament Street. Garrison’s badly decomposed body was discovered by walkers in a bushy area off Fox Hill Road south, near the Blue Water Cay development, on Saturday July 4. Garrison, 33, first came to the attention of the police on Feb ruary 25, 2009, when they received a missing person report from the United States Embassy in Nassau. Preliminary inquir y set to start in October Mitchell tells parliament outstanding debts should be settled ‘expeditiously’ FRED MITCHELL In brief “It is impossible for us to get a body without proper authorisation Llewellyn Astwood Jr

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Comment on “Privatize education system, Govt urged”: an article in The Tribune, July 14, 2009, page 3. The above cited article contained several important ideas. Firstly, the article reported the views of the President of the Nassau Institute, Mrs. Joan Thompson; and she criticized the Prime Minister for his comment on the 10-year plan of the Department of Education. That criticism seems intemperate and ill-informed based on what he said and what occurred at the Education Summit. Specifically, Prime Minister stated that “our success in getting every child into a classroom h as not translated into every child having achieved his full p otential...today too many students leave our secondary s chools only semi-literate and semi-numerate.” This a clear and valid statement. Yes, the Department of Education (DOE page Year Education Plan” at the summit that contained 22 goals, each containing numerous short and long term objectives. These objectives are extended “wish” lists and were aptly described in the document itself as “hopes.” And the literacy problem so clearly identified in the Prime Minister's comment was the number three goal behind “Developing a More Relevant Curriculum” and “Developing National Pride, Civic Responsibility and a Strong Work Ethic in Students.” T he Goal 3 on “Literacy and N umeracy” had 16 objectives t hat included some curriculum changes, more teacher training and on-the-job teacher mentoring. To many these changes do not address the severity of the academic failure and illiteracy problems in the Public Schools. And...the surprise of all surprises is that the plan was clearly marked DRAFT. It would appear that the Department of Education was diplomatically sent back to the drawing boards to develop an acceptable plan. Secondly, the President of the Nassau Institute, lays out a plan of privatization that seems naive and theoretical. If one looks at the world and asks: “Are the best national systems publicly or privately owned?” one would have to admit that they are mostly Governmentowned and/or directed and financed. O ne international school testing organization shows that the world's top-five systems are Singapore, South Korea Hong Kong, Taiwan and Japan. All of these governments have created schools to produce a militarily strong nation or to increase the nation's human skills and capabilities. All of these countries have cultures that support hard work and discipline. Some have made mistakes; but all have been willing to modify their systems. It is ironic that The Nassau Institute has published and is widely distributing the “The Learning Crisis” essay. That document accepts the importance of Government in education and proposes specific programmes designed to change t he culture of the classroom by proposing innovative schools t hat have a proven track record in educating under privileged c hildren. One can be a sceptic and say that nothing changes in the Bahamas, especially the DOE. But...the Prime Minister's comment suggests that the country will get another draft of a 10year plan; and that is a good sign. We will just have to wait and see. RALPH J MASSEY Economist & Consultant Nassau, July 15, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm L AST WEEK we watched a programme about Chicago’s growing crime and the fact t hat more than 150 children of that state have b een killed in the past three years all because of guns. A report done by the University of Chicago C rime Laboratory, an academic group researchi ng effective ways to reduce violent crime, found that the social cost of Chicago’s gun violence totals about $2.5 billion each year. I t is said that every year 30,000 Americans die by being at the wrong end of a gun at least 10,000 of them murders. A ccording to reports this is twice the number of 4,316 US soldiers killed in the six-year Iraq war. I n 1982 Chicago became the first major US c ity to enact a handgun freeze. Soon other suburbs began passing gun law legislation. Of course, the politically powerful National R ifle Association, has fought every inch of the w ay to protect the American’s “fundamental right” to be armed. But the most powerful blow to groups that want to remove guns from the streets came in a Supreme Court ruling that “struck down two parts of the country’s strictest gun control law a dopted in Washington, DC, 32 years ago the ban on private handgun possession and the requirement that firearms kept at home be unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trig-g er lock.” Of course, the ruling won praise from former President George W Bush, defeated Republican presidential candidate John McCain and WayneL aPierre of the National Rifle Association. According to LaPierre the ruling was “a great moment in American history.” H owever, although President Barack Obama believed the Second Amendment to the US Constitution protected the right of Americans to bear arms, he also identified “with the need forc rime-ravaged communities to save their children from the violence that plagues our streets through common sense, and effective safety m easures.” During his election campaign the Rifle Association ran multi-million dollar advertisements to make voters believe that, if elected, he wouldb e the most anti-gun president in US history and that their firearms would be confiscated. So far Mr Obama has not looked in the direc tion of the gun lobby, but many fearful Americans hope he will eventually get around to it. According to a Reuters report the United S tates is estimated to have the world’s highest civilian gun ownership rate. A nd soon Arizona will allow citizens to carr y concealed licensed weapons into its bars just as Billy the Kid did in the days of the swing-door s aloon only in those days Billy didn’t need a l icence. I t is claimed that Americans can walk into bars in 40 of its 50 states with their “fundamental right” in their hip pocket. A nd a gun-toting pastor in a Louisville, Kentucky, Assembly of God church maintains that “God and guns were part of the foundation of t his country.” He invited his 150-member congregation and their friends to carry their guns into the sanct uary on a Saturday night to “celebrate our r ight as Americans!” It is true that the world is full of crackpots, but it seems that America has more than her fair s hare of them. O n the programme discussing Chicago’s crime problem, a speaker involved in trying to bring sanity back to the streets, said he would like to see all guns removed from the streets. Asked by the programme host if in his experience he had seen fewer deaths in areas where g uns were outlawed, he admitted to knowing of none. This seemed to answer the question for the programme host. W hy remove guns if the murder rate did not go down? But what seemed to escape both of them was that there is no good for one state to banf irearms, when Americans just have to cross state lines to purchase a gun in a neighbouring state and smuggle it back home. A s long as this can happen the killing will continue. This is the problem that the Bahamas faces. As long as Americans glorify guns, and d espite what they say allow them to get into so many irresponsible hands, the Bahamas will continue to have a gun problem on its own s treets. It’s incredible the lengths to which Bahamians will go to smuggle firearms into this country. And so until Americans decide to grow up, a nd shake the dust of the Wild West from their cowboy boots, and the National Rifle Association comes to its senses, the Bahamas will con tinue to have a gun problem. And, of course, the gun deaths will continue both here and in America. Call for education privatisation seems naive and theoretical LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Lax US guns laws affect Bahamas EDITOR, The Tribune. Being in the age group that still remembers the u nnerving silence that befell Clifford Park on July 10, 1973 I was thinking whether we have more nationa l pride today than we had in 1973 to what is witnessed today? C olourful ‘T’ shirts in our national colours means nothing to me if that same person refuses totally to respect their fellow Bahamian in a manner fitting recognising that that person like you is also a Bahamian. T hen there is the person who is bedecked in all the finery and is cussing and throwing as much litter ast hey can muster all over God’s fine earth, but also feels he is as equal as anyone else. 3 6 years on we still have people who are unable to sing our national anthem without a text I notice more and more children are unable to sing the anthem. We disrespect our flag government buildings fly a tattered flag or a flag faded so much you cannot really see the distinctive colours. For months not som any weeks ago in the back area of Victoria Gardens there were two flags which were so damaged and discoloured that I could not imagine any respon s ible person allowing these examples to fly but these flags flew for months. C heck the beaches come Saturday, July 11th, and witness the piles of litter soda cans and garbage w e took from home, enjoyed the food and left everything remaining right there on the beach and we c all ourselves good citizens? I was down there in Rawson Square yesterday for the traditional Police Beating of the Retreat across where I stood with my family were the VIPs, but it seems this year with the FNM in office Inde p endence is only for them not a soul from the PLP Opposition. I remarked to my children lookj ust how silly we are. If we really understood what our fine national a nthem says this would be God’s country as those so well chosen words of Timothy Gibson are idyllic to the extreme and should inspire us all to imitate God’s commandments, but look what we do? M SAWYER Nassau, J uly 5, 2009. 36 years on, do we have mor e national pride? EDITOR, The Tribune. This is in response to Mr Thomas Smith’s letter on taxes. I really don’t believe that more taxes are necessary. If the proper government agency would investigate every one who should be paying National Insurance on their employees such as maids and gardeners I feel there would be enough funds generated to avoid new taxes. I personally can recall that about a year ago I had an agent visit me about my maid and her insurance. I happily showed him all the past payments I made and he seemed rather impressed. Evidently he had some information which was proven to be wrong. I hope that someone in the proper position with government will take heed! HELEN ASARITA (Mrs. Nassau, June 28m 2009 I don’ t believe more taxes are necessary

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MAGISTRATE William Campbell, who presides over the Coroner’s Court, expects to leave his post next year when his threeyear contract comes to an end in November, 2010, he confirmed to The Tribune yesterday. The judge said he had been extended three renewable threeyear contracts, the last of which comes to an end next year, as is customary. Still, Magistrate Campbell said he would not be adverse to any opportunity to retain his post. Magistrate Campell presided over a number of high-profile inquests, including that of Daniel Smith, the son of late American celebrity Anna Nicole Smith. The inquest started in November 2007 after several postponements and a revolving door of magistrates. Testimony was drawn out over five months before a sevenmember jury concluded the young man died from an accidental overdose of a cocktail of drugs. Mr Campbell also previously held the post of chief coroner. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS P HONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM( DF55) Magistrate ‘to leave post next year’

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OVER 450 students from schools throughout the Bahamas went head-to-head this year in the Dolphin Encounters’ 2009 Marine Education Poster Competition. In the end, 12 students, including two from the Family Islands, walked away with top honours at an award ceremony held on Blue Lagoon Island. Hundreds of students logged on to the Dolphin Encounters web site to download applications for this year’s contest, which was held under the theme “Invasive Species The Pirates of the Caribbean.” Students were invited to learn about the negative effects of invasive species and create posters that reflected their thoughts and concerns. The competition, which is in its ninth year, was open to all students throughout the Bahamas from kindergarten through 12th grade, and the winning entries were chosen by a panel of judges at a recent judging ceremony at the Bahamas National Trust. The winning entries were chosen by a panel of judges including Charlene Carey of the Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation (BREEF Bullard, Bahamas National Trust; Stacey Gray of the BEST Commission; Lakeshia Anderson of the Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources; Sharrah Moss, the Nature Conservancy, and Lorraine Cox of the BEST Commission. The winners were recognised for their art during an award ceremony held by Dolphin Encounters at the Project BEACH education centre on Blue Lagoon Island. The winners of the four entry categories are: K-2 1. La Tifia PayneSee Saw Academy 2. Saifuddin S Rahimi St John’s College 3. Johnny Bethel Man-O-War Primary School Grades 3-5 1. Anju Bimal Xavier’s Lower School 2. Sacha Hussey St Andrews School 3. Ariannah Bain -Summit Academy Grades 6-8 1. Falon Williams St Andrews School 2. Enrico Rio -Tambearly School 3. Abel Abraham -St Paul’s Methodist College Grades 9-12 1. Franz Taylor Lyford Cay School 2. Sophia Taylor Lyford Cay School 3. Brianna Eccleston Lyford Cay School First place winner in the 9-12th grade category, Franz Taylor, of Lyford Cay School, felt strongly about the message in his winning poster, “I have always been con cerned about the negative effects of invasive species in our environment and my poster reflects that. I wanted to show that both our native plants and animals are being hurt by invasives and that we need to take action.” “My poster shows small native plants trying to grow under a Casuarina tree and they are saying “Casuarina Tree You Don’t Grow On Me,” said Sacha Hussey, of St Andrew’s School, second place winner in the 3-5th grade category. “I painted the little plants trying to grow and the roots and needles of the Casuarina plant is stop ping them. “Invasive species hurt our native plants.” SENATOR Dion Foulkes, Minister of Labour and Social Services, held a series of meetings in Freeport, Grand Bahama, on Tuesday in a continuing effort to get feedback from social part ners on the FNM government’s proposed National Training Programme. The draft framework for the programme, which is aimed at training and retraining recently laid off Bahamians, was recently submitted to the government by Khaalis Rolle, president of the Chamber of Commerce and chairman of the National Training Implementation Committee. Mr Foulkes met with senior managers from the Grand Bahama Shipyard, Freeport Container Port, the Home Centre, Xanadu Hotel, Island Seas and Island Palm Condominiums and the Isle of Capri Casino. A National Training Pro gramme Committee for Grand Bahama has been established under the chairmanship of Tyrone Gibson, deputy director of Labour, with representatives from the business community, trade unions and the Grand Bahama Christian Council. “The programme will be geared towards training workers in areas where there is a strong demand from the business sec tor,” the minister said. “These areas will include, but not be limited to the following: Masonry, carpentry, welding, tilelaying, electrical, landscaping, data processing, computer skills, customer service, day care assistant, housekeeping and language skills. Even in these hard times there are still some jobs available for those with the relevant skills, and there are likely to be more of these when the global economy turns around. Some of them, for instance ship welding, are quite lucrative.” Mr Foulkes also informed stakeholders in Grand Bahama that the courses will be for 10 to 15 weeks and are being offered by the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI the College of the Bahamas in Freeport. “The programme will be made available to 1,000 unemployed Bahamians who will be selected from those persons who have already registered for the Nation al Insurance Unemployment Benefit,” said Senator Foulkes. He said he was pleased with the response from all the social partners in Grand Bahama who have agreed to work with the government in this new programme. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 38%/,& 12 By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net RISING crime in a Nassau neighb ourhood has brought a community together to share information and coordinate security efforts to keep their area safe. Residents of Harmony Hill, off Village Road, and near Ryswick Road a nd Starlight Drive, started talking a bout how to keep their homes safe f ollowing a series of burglaries in May. On Mother’s Day, a robber broke into a woman’s bedroom as she was sleeping in the early morning hours. The community realised later that the burglar’s intrusion could have been prevented if residents had told each other that they had seen a strange man lurking in the area and attempting to b reak into a another home just two h ours before. S ome weeks prior to that incident, five burglaries were reported in nearby Greenwood Road where items were stolen from homes, or boats and trailers were taken from yards. Four oft hese robberies occurred during the n ight. And on another occasion a burglar broke in through the front door of a house in Harmony Hill to steal a flatscreen television while the homeowners slept upstairs. “It seems like nothing will stop these guys,” the resident said. “They come when people are asleep and that is what scares me.” A n innovative crime watch scheme l aunched as a result of these incidents h as now gained 100 per cent participation from residents, linking around 90 homes in the area through modern technology so local residents can keep each other updated about suspicioush appenings in the neighbourhood. I nstant sharing of information is already benefitting the tightening network of residents and preventing unnecessary calls to the police. And the community is working with police officers to ensure they are up-to-date with the latest security systems and aware of the details police will require when they are called. As neighbours are communicating, t alks of integrating security systems a nd organising a nightly neighbourh ood patrol are in motion. A Harmony Hill resident of 27 years said: “I suppose the current climate has made people more inclined to be connected, and there’s a lot morea wareness now, we are cooperating c ompletely. “The exchange of ideas has been phenomenal and I think putting in the measures we are talking about will make it a lot harder to get into the neighbourhood after this.” Neighbourhood comes together to tackle rising crime problem Foulkes consults on Grand Bahama training programme DION FOULKES met with executives from the Container Port on the National Training Programme. Pictured are Alpheus Forbes, deputy permanent secretary; Charles Hunt, human resources consultant; J Malvese Capron, human resources director of the Freeport Container Port; Minister Foulkes; Raymond L Jones, Chief Operating Officer; Tyrone Gibson, deputy director of Labour; and Sammy Gardiner, administrator in the Office of the Prime Minister. CARACAS, Venezuela DOZENSof National Guard troops seized control of a police station controlled by a leading opponent of President Hugo Chavez on Wednesday, adding to tensions between Venezuela’s government and elected opposition officials, according to Associated Press. About 40 National Guard troops tossed tear gas canisters at a police precinct post in the town of Curiepe, east of Caracas, shortly before dawn, said Elisio Guzman, director of the Miranda state police. He said the officers inside were forced to leave and the National Guard occupied the building. Guzman said the motive behind the takeover was unclear and national government officials could not immediately be reached for comment. Troops seize police station in Venezuela 2009 DOLPHIN ENCOUNTERS Marine Education Poster Competition winners: (Back row l-r Sophia Taylor; Brianna Eccleston; Franz Taylor; Enrico Rio, and Sophia Smith of the Dolphin Encounters – Project BEACH. (Front row l-r Rahimi, Anju Bimal; La Tifia Payne, and Sacha Hussey. Marine poster competition winners named

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THE Bahamas International Film Festival (BIFF announced yesterday that Kareem Mortimer’s acclaimed indie drama “Children ofG od” will be the opening film at this year’s festival, which takes place from December 10-17 in Nassau. The intimate drama is slated to screen on Friday, D ecember 11. Children of God”, originally titled “Daybreak”, was shot last summer entirely inN assau and Eleuthera. The film was written, directed and produced by Mr Mortimer. S aid the filmmaker: “It is also a subtle and haunting look at race, sexuality and religion in the Bahamas which m akes it a very timely and important film and also an extremely gorgeous one to look at. We are very proud of t his effort and to open at the Bahamas International Film Festival is a dream come true.” The film stars Van Brown, Johnny Ferro, Mark Ford,M argaret Kemp, Stephen Tyrone Williams and a many other Bahamians. T he movie depicts the relig ious concept of human beings regarded by God as his children. It is the story of twoi ndividuals who learn that in order to live a truly happy life they have to risk speaking anda cting on their true feelings. Set against the backdrop of a nation grappling with violent homophobia, this film t ells the story of Jon, a white Bahamian artist who faces losing his scholarship at a localu niversity, and Lena, a conservative religious woman who is struggling with her crumbling marriage. Both escape from city life in Nassau to the island of Eleuthera,w here their worlds collide in a way that will surprise audi ences. Said BIFF founder and executive director Leslie Vanderpool: We are thrilled to once a gain have a Bahamian film open this year’s festival. This is Kareem Mortimer’s debutf eature film, and to see that BIFF has assisted Kareem throughout his nascent career m eans a lot. A participant in the BIFF filmmaker residency programme in 2007, (he sure to be an award-winning f ilmmaker at many film festivals around the globe and we wish Kareem all the success.” BIFF 2009 begins on Thursday, December 10, and runs through Thursday,D ecember 17. Additional announcements pertaining to the festival will be made throughout the year. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 7 B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE National Insurance Board has exhausted almost half of the $20 million allotted for the national unemployment benefit plan since payments began in early M ay. Y esterday NIB Chairman Algernon Cargill told The Tribune that, to date, the board had approved 8,785 claims and paid o ut $9.1 million, an average of $1.1 million a week. "Up to July 7, we'd received 10,529 applications. Of that number, 706 persons werenot approved. Up to that point we had paid o ut in total . . . $9.1 million," he said during an interview with The Tribune yesterday. "We have approved, all together, 8,785 persons who are in receipt of claims, up to date. We currently pay out approximately $ 1.1 million a week.” He said given the current number of applicants, the $20 million transferred fromN IB's Medical Benefits Fund which f inances phase one of the scheme is expected to be depleted by October orN ovember of this year. During the second phase of the plan, government has said it will establish a fund i nto which all employers and employees will contribute 0.5 per cent of the employe e’s insurable wage to sustain the programme. Fund Mr Cargill said an average of $130 a week i s paid out to each recipient of the fund with an average of 100 people a day applying for the scheme. The plan provides a maximum of $200 a week for up to 13 weeks at a time; recipients will not be eligible for the benefit again until a period of 52 weeks has passed. Mr Cargill added that since the plan's inception, nearly 50 people have attempted to defraud the fund by collecting unem-p loyment benefits by false pretences. H e said that such cases were quickly ident ified by authorities at NIB and after investigation, turned over to the police. "The first thing we do when we detect that someone may have committed unemployment fraud is to stop the benefit. And after we've stopped the benefit we would do o ur own internal investigations. The second phase would require that we refer thesem atters to the police, and that's what we've done in most of those cases already," he said. The chairman said many of the suspected fraudsters were unemployed when they applied for the fund but then got employment and continued to receive the benefit. He said the board was alerted when NIB c ontributions from employers began being paid for persons who were still receiving the benefit. In other cases, he said, NIB received tips about the fraudsters or spotted claimants on the job. " Unfortunately some persons find it necessary to try to receive the unemployment b enefit while they're still working," he s aid. Half of $20m unemployment money has been exhausted ‘Children of God’ to open 2009 Bahamas International Film Festival BIFF FOUNDER and executive d irector Leslie Vanderpool

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – At a time w hen many companies are c utting jobs, Polymers Intern ational Limited decided to h ire several summer students a nd put them through a job training programme. Human resource manager Valerie Barry said PIL has enrolled seven young students from various high schools on the island in an eightw eek summer student programme. She said the students are in t heir second week of training, receiving work experience and o n the job training in five different areas at the plant on Queens Highway. P olymers International has been in operation for 13 years o n Grand Bahama, and currently employs 74 workers. The company manufactures the materials used to make S tyrofoam products and plast ics. “We export to various p lants across the world and our main customers are in the U S,” Miss Barry said. She noted that despite the recession, PIL has not laid off a ny workers. “Even though most compan ies are cutting back, we decided to continue with the summer student programmeb ecause we feel that investing and spending time developing our youth is important for our f uture. We believe it will help the Bahamas in the future and a lso give our youth the experience required to get them to m ove forward. “We run a two-year programme, and this year we h ave four new students and three students from last year w ho are in their second year of the programme.” Ms Barry said the summer s tudents are between 16 and 18 years old. They are monit ored and every week department heads meet on Friday to discuss their progress and a chievements. “They get to find out what t he working environment is like and they get to learna bout professionalism; what i s expected of individuals in a working environment. “I hope they can take this experience back with thema nd eventually amalgamate that in their learning and become productive and pro f essional adults later on in life,” she said. The students participating this year are: Shermae Mar t in, Shipping Department; L eaniqua Martin, Accounts Department; Kristine Henfield, Safety Department;R ebecca Harris, Quality Lab Department; Rashae Lewis, Water Lab Department; V anessa Henderson, Human R esources; and Christopher D uncanson, Parts Department. Leaniqua Martin, a student a t St Georges High, said she is very excited to be working and training this summer. “This is my first summer job and I am excited about being given a chance to do some thing for the summer instead of staying at home doing nothing. “I want to be an accountant and this experience will help me learn basic accounting pro cedures and how to work well with others,” she said. Rebecca Harris, of St Paul’s Methodist College, said that the experience she will gained at PIL will help her in the future. Christopher Duncanson said training at PIL has afforded him the opportunity to improve his communication skills. “I want to be a nurse and you have to be able to communicate with people and so this experience is very valu able,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Nassau Collins Ave 242 322 2341 Thompson Blvd 242 325 8776 Soldier Rd North 242 393 6286 Family Islands Freeport 242 352 7119 Abaco 242 367 2688 Exuma 242 336 2420www.jsjohnson.com ADWORKS 2009Peace of mind comes with knowing were all covered --no matter what CAREER OPPORTUNITY Risk & Compliance OfficerColina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified p rofessional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer. This isan e xecutive position and the successful applicant should possess the following: Qualifications & Experience x Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university x Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance x Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a law degree x Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations f or improvements to a compliance culture x Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of duties x Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and best practices x Confidentiality x Excellent oral and written communication skills D uties & Responsibilities: x Design and implement a risk framework. x Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps taken to foster good compliance. x Implement and maintaina compliance monitoring programme. This will serve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures. x Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws, regulations and policies applicable to the institution. x Provide management with guidance in the development, implementation and maintenance of policies, proceduresand practices tocover regulated activities. x Create programmes thateducate, train and encourage directors, managers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and regulations. x Serve as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators. The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a cover letter and resume to the following e-mail address no later than 27 July 2009: E-mail: careers@colinaimperial.com RE: Risk and Compliance Officer Absolutely no phone callswill be accepted N O T I C EThe Law Firm ofHarry B. Sands, Lobosky & Company will be closed onFriday, July 17, 2009for the Firm’sAnnual Fun Day Firm offers job training for students SEEN FROM LEFT ARE: Rebecca Harris of St Paul’s Methodist College; Leaniqua Martin, St Georges H igh; Shermae Martin, Bishop Michael Eldon School; Vanessa Henderson, Bishop Michael Eldon High; K ristine Henfield, St Georges High; Christopher Duncanson, returning summer student; Theresa Martin, h uman resources assistant; and Valerie Barry, human resources manager. W W e e b b e e l l i i e e v v e e i i t t w w i i l l l l h h e e l l p p t t h h e e B B a a h h a a m m a a s s i i n n t t h h e e f f u u t t u u r r e e a a n n d d a a l l s s o o g g i i v v e e o o u u r r y y o o u u t t h h t t h h e e e e x x p p e e r r i i e e n n c c e e r r e e q q u u i i r r e e d d t t o o g g e e t t t t h h e e m m t t o o m m o o v v e e f f o o r r w w a a r r d d . . PIL human resource manager Valerie Barry Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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jury that he had travelled to the US, came back to the Bahamas and went back to the US again during which time his passport had e xpired. He said that he a pplied for a new passport a nd while waiting in the US he learned that Bahamian police were looking for him. McNeil said that as soon as he was informed that he could collect his passport, he made reservations to return home. However, he s aid that when he went to get his passport, he was arrested. “I am not a murderer and I never killed anybody,” McNeil said. “I have two c hildren I love very much a nd they love me very much,” he said. McNeil said that that police have deprived him of his freedom for over a year withoutc ause. “I have been charged for a murder I did not commit. Up to this day I feel like they don’t have anything to show why they charge me. I’m just ready to be with my c hildren, my children need m e,” he said. M cNeil called one witness in his defence yesterday. Robert Miller told the court that he had known the accused for three years. He said he got to know McNeil through working with his father doing private functions at Mountbatten House. He said that he worked with the accused as a server and bartender. He said his work for McNeil’s father ended a day before Taylor’s murder. Miller said that there had been a function at Mountb atten House on the night o f November 16, 2008, but h e did not work at the function. He told the court that functions were held in the foyer or terrace area of Mountbatten House. In closing his case yesterday, McNeil’s lawyer, Murrio Ducille, told the jury that the prosecution had advanced no evidence at all to connect McNeil to Taylor’s murder. He said his c lient is a victim. T he prosecution and d efence are expected to make their closing submissions today. Senior Justice Anita Allen is expected to give her summation of the trial on Friday. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 9 The Mercedes M-Class. Beauty, brains and brawn. TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz M-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667When you think of the average SUV on the road today, you think of roadhogging, air-polluting gas guzzlers that wouldnt know the meaning of high precision and fuel efficiency if it were emblazoned on their windshields. But there is an alternative. The refined M-Class from Mercedes-Benz. Withits superior German styling utilising only high-grade materials, its robust engine power delivering exemplary turn-on-a-dime performance whilst still being frugal on fuel and its handling of pot-holed roads and 1.5 ft. flooded streets, the Mercedes-Benz M-Class is clearly the best choice in SUVs. 3 DVFKH%DQNt7UXVW/WG 6XEVLGLDU\RI LVVHHNLQJFDQGLGDWHVIRUWKHSRVLWLRQRI 5HODWLRQVKLSDQDJHU“ULYDWH%DQNHU S J &DQGLGDWHVVKRXOGSRVVHVVWKHIROORZLQJTXDOLDFWLRQV S J T % 8QLYHUVLW\'HJUHHLQ)LQDQFH%DQNLQJRU%XVLQHVV$GPLQLVWUDWLRQDQGRU UHODWHGSURIHVVLRQDOGHVLJQDWLRQ $ PLQLPXPRIWR\HDUVEDQNLQJH[SHULHQFH 2ZQFOLHQWSRUWIROLR 7KRURXJKNQRZOHGJHRISULYDWHEDQNLQJSURGXFWVDQGVHUYLFHV .QRZOHGJHRI%DKDPLDQUHJXODWRU\UHTXLUHPHQWV )OXHQF\RUZRUNLQJNQRZOHGJHfRI)UHQFKZRXOGEHDQDVVHW 5HVSRQVLELOLWLHV S 3HUVRQDOXDOLWLHV 4 2XWVWDQGLQJVDOHVVNLOOV $ VWURQJVHUYLFHHWKLFZLWKDIRFXVRQH[LVWLQJFOLHQWVDQGSURVSHFWV ([FHSWLRQDOYHUEDODQGZULWWHQFRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOV 0XVWEHDEOHWRZRUNLQDG\QDPLFHQYLURQPHQWZLWKPLQLPDOVXSHUYLVLRQ 0XVWSRVVHVVVWURQJRUJDQLVDWLRQDOVNLOOV 6XSHULRUFOLHQWVHUYLFHDQGSUREOHPVROYLQJVNLOOV 3OHDVHDSSO\WR 3$3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV (PDLO JLOOHVVFKDQHQ#SDVFKHFK this evening to either charge o r release the lawyer. Reportedly, the officers are working on a complaint by a former expatriatec lient of the firm who alleges that more than $250,000 was taken from hisa ccount. T his investigation Mr Moss said is being conducted based on a complaint that was brought to thea ttention of CDU sometime last year. August 20. Francis was represented b y attorney Michael Hann a. O utside the courtroom following the ruling, Davis’ mother, Sonia Dill, said she was satisfied with the outcome of the case and is looking for her son’s killert o receive the death penalt y. Sandra Dee Gardiner, l ead prosecutor on the case s aid that the Crown is seeki ng to have Francis receive the death penalty. Davis, 16, an 11th grade Temple Christian student was stabbed in the chestd uring a fight between two groups of males at Cabb age Beach Paradise Island o n May 12, last year. Community activist R odney Moncur complained yesterday that t here was not sufficient security at the court, claiming that he and some of the w itnesses in the case had been threatened by supporters of the two menwho had stood trial. Accused found guilty of Khodee Davis murder FROM page one Former law partner of Minister questioned F ROM page one FROM page one Troyniko McNeil Harl Taylor

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prominent residents of Eight Mile Rock. His death brings t he homicide count to five for t he year on Grand Bahama. Grand Bahama police are q uestioning several persons w ho were taken into custody i n connection with the matter. Asst Supt Welbourne Boo t le said sometime around 6.40am police received a call from an unidentified male caller who reported that a man was lying on the ground in the area of the Four C’s Clothing Store in Jones Town. W hen officers arrived at t he scene they discovered a black male lying on his back. T he victim was wearing red b oxer shorts and a white singlet soaked in blood. M r Bootle said that the victim told officers that he was a ttacked by two men who entered his apartment and demanded money. A fter telling his attackers that he did not have any mone y, he was gun-butted, stabbed, and thrown through a window from his secondf loor apartment, said Mr Bootle. The victim was taken to R and Memorial Hospital where he died of his injury. The crime scene was cordoned off by police as a crowd of onlookers gathered in thea rea. According to unconfirmed r eports, it is believed that a white vehicle used by the suspects and abandoned in the a rea, near the scene of the murder, was recovered by police. Mr Jones was an employee o f the Freeport Container P ort. He is the grandson of wellk nown local pastor Rev Ray m ond Jones. His father, the late Denzil Jones, was a beloved teacher at the Eight Mile Rock High, who died ofc ancer several years ago. A nd his uncle, Raymond Jones, is Chief Operating Officer at the Freeport Con tainer Port. T he family was devastated b y his death. “His mother is not taking it well and his aunts are in shock,” said a closef amily member. Many residents expressed sadness over the incident. J ones’ colleagues at the Container Port are also shocked by his death. “This is a tragedy for this e ntire Eight Mile Rock comm unity,” said a resident of Jones Town. Police investigations are c ontinuing and an arrest in the matter could be made soon. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Two murders in three hours FROM page one B LOOD STAINED s econd storey window that the victim was thrown f rom by his attackers. ASP CLARENCE RECKLEY speaks at the murder scene in Jones Town, Eight Mile Rock.D e r e k C a r r o l l

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TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras SUPPORTERSof ousted President Manuel Zelaya called for labor strikes demanding his return Wednesday, one day after the exiled leader said citizens had the right to rebel against the interim government, according to Associated Press. Labor leader Israel Salinas, one of the main figures in the proZelaya movement, told thousands of demonstrators who marched through the capital that workers at state-owned companies plan walkouts later this week. He said protest organizers were talking with union leaders at private companies to see if they could mount a general strike against interim President Roberto Micheletti, who has threatened to jail Zelaya if he tries to return. Salinas also said sympathetic unions in neighboring Nicaragua and El Salvador would try to block border crossings later this week “in solidarity with our struggle.” At the five-hour protest, tempers were high. Demonstrators threw rocks at a government building that houses the country’s women’s’ institute. Police showed up but no injuries were reported. Zelaya, a wealthy rancher who shifted to the left after being elected, said Tuesday that the Honduran people “have the right to insurrection” against the acting government that forced him out of the country June 28. Those remarks could augur an escalationin a conflict that has already cost the life of one protester. Soldiers seized Zelaya and put him on a plane after he ignored the Supreme Court and Congress in pressing ahead with plans for a referendum that many critics depicted as a bid to install a constitutional assembly that could rewrite laws and extend his power after his term ends in January. “We are going to install the constitutional assembly. We are goingto burn the Congress,” protest leader Miriam Miranda vowed at the latest demonstration for Zelaya. Costa Rican President Oscar Arias is mediating talks aimed at resolving the impasse, but Zelaya has grown frustrated by the lack of progress. On Monday, Zelaya announced that if the interim government did not agree to reinstate him at the next round of negotiations, “the mediation effort will be considered failed and other measures will be taken.” He did not say what those measures would be. The talks are scheduled to resume Saturday after two earlier rounds failed to produce a breakthrough. Arias, who won the 1987 Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts in ending Central America’s wars, has urged Zelaya to “be patient.” Micheletti’s administration insists Zelaya was ousted legally beause he violated the constitution by pushing for a referendum on retooling the charter. It has refused to bend on reinstating him despite international condemnation of the coup, including from the United States. The interim government accuses Zelaya of trying to extend his time in office. Zelaya denies that, saying he merely wanted to reform the constitution to make it better serve the poor. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 11 CMV = Chevrolet Micro Van FOR ALL LIFE’S ROADS CMV On-the-spotnancingandinsurance. 24-month/24,000-milefactorywarranty. Designed with strength and capability to take on any project.Cargo Van Passenger VanFeatures:Fuel-ecient, 38-hp, 800cc, 3-cylinder SOHC-engineExcellent load/passenger capacityFront disc brakes, rear drum brakesOptional air conditioning 729$/8('&86720(563OHDVHGEHDGYLVHGWKDWSUHVHQWO\ZHDUH H[SHULHQFLQJGLIFXOWLHVZLWKRXUSKRQHOLQHV DWERWKRXU&ROOLQV$YHQXHDQG+DUERXU%D\ ORFDWLRQV 'HVSLWHWKHGLVUXSWLRQWKHIROORZLQJSKRQH FRQWDFWOLQHVUHPDLQIXQFWLRQDO :HEVLWHZZZQXDLQVXUDQFHFRP:HDSRORJL]HIRUDQ\LQFRQYHQLHQFHFDXVHG Zelays supporters call for strikes in Honduras

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C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 12 P AGE 14 Brent Stubbs’ opinion on Davis Cup... Judo athletes get ready for big event... See page 13 n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net A gridiron superstar, known as much for his exploits on the field as for his extraordinary achievement in the classroom, is expected to officially announce his plan to improve medical services in the place of his roots. Myron Rolle, former Florida State Seminoles free safety and recent Rhodes Scholar recipient, is today set to officially announce his intentions to con struct a free medical clinic and sports complex on the island of Exuma. During a press conference at the site of the Pompey statue in Steventon, Exuma, Rolle and executives of the Myron Rolle Foundation will detail formal plans for the much anticipated project. The project will be executed in conjunction with the Bahamas Ministry of Health and the Florida State Universi ty College of Medicine. The Myron L Rolle Foundation is a tax-exempt, non-profit organisation dedicated to the support of health, wellness, educational and other charitable initiatives throughout the world that benefit children and families in need. The Foundation was established in 2009 by the Rhodes scholar and college football AllAmerican and his family. Rolle rose to national prominence in his high school foot ball days in Princeton, New Jersey, where he was awarded AllAmerican honours. He was ranked the top player in the country by ESPN’s recruiting services for high school prospects and ranked as the 12 player nationally by Rivals.com. A member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc, Rolle fulfilled his requirements to earn his bachelor’s degree in exercise science in just 2.5 years. Currently completing a master of public administration degree, Rolle garnered international media attention when he a nnounced he would postpone a possible career in the Nationa l Football League to pursue his studies at Oxford University after receiving the Rhodes scholarship. The 6” 215 pound safety will complete his studies to earn an M A in Medical Anthropology and plans to enter the 2010 NFL Draft. Rolle has been featured on various programmes foreshadowing his intentions to give back to the Bahamas, a place he routinely calls “home.” On ESPN’s “Rome is Burning” with Jim Rome aired December 8, 2008, Rolle first spoke of his plans to open a free health services clinic in Rol letown following a career as a neurosurgeon in the United States. He has also been featured on other ESPN programming, including Outside the Lines, Sportscenter, and First Take. Ivan Ferguson, administrator of Exuma and Dr Alma Little, of FSU School of Medicine, are expected to attend the press conference. Giving back to Rolletown Myron Rolle Foundation plans to build a free medical clinic and sports complex on Exuma M YRON ROLLE c an be seen with his family – shown l-r are Rolle, his brother McKinlan, mother Beverly and father Whitney Rolle...

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 13 THE Barbados Judo Federation cadet team is in New Providence to compete in the Caribbean Cup set for 1-4pm July 18 at Loyola Hall, Gladstone Road. "We are very excited to be here," says Ian Weithers, chief national coach for Barbados. "The Bahamas’ level has been climbing steadily and we are eager to test our athletes against them." Both teams are undergoing training with top US coach Gerald Lafon, whose emphasis is on competitive fundamentals. According to D'Arcy Rahming, president of the Bahamas Judo Federation, it is important for the Caribbean to hold these types ofevents to raise the level in the region. Together the region can demand more resources and will be able to host larger Pan American tournaments and bring in sports tourism revenues. The teams are scheduled to travel afterward to Hungary for the World Cadet Championships. Persons interested in helping the Bahamas Judo Federation can call 364-6773. e are eager to test our athletes’ against those in the Bahamas Barbados’ national coach says his team is excited to be in New Providence for Caribbean Cup MEMBERS of Team Bahamas and Barbados can be seen during a training session...

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 40-60% OFF! UPPER LEVEL, TOWN CENTRE MALLPHONE NO: 322-6593 SUMMER CLEARANCE! TENNIS SHOESOVER 250 STYLES! EXERCISE EQUIPMENTSELECT TREADMILLS, BENCHES, ELLIPTICALS, THE AB DOER XTREME AB SCISSORMEN’S CLOTHING5 FULL RACKS OF SELECT SPORTS AND CASUAL CLOTHING!!WOMEN’S CLOTHING6 FULL RACKS OF SELECT SPORTS AND CASUAL CLOTHING!!KID’S CLOTHING5 FULL RACKS OF SELECT SPORTS AND CASUAL CLOTHING!! SPORTS EQUIPMENTSELECT SPORTS EQUIPMENT & ACCESSORIES INCLUDING CAPS, BAGS, TENNIS RACKETS, PORTABLE BASKETBALL SETS SOCKS, SOCCER, KARATE GEAR & MORE!!NEW ARRIVALS!! 40-60% OFF! 40-60% OFF! Prices good until July 26th ~ while stocks last 40-60% OFF! 40-60% OFF! 40-60% OFF!Volleyball Equipment & AccessoriesExercise Bikes! Sandals THE American Zone II Davis Cup tie over the weekend should have been a learning lesson for our young vibrant players don’t take anybody for granted. The team of Devin Mullings, Timothy Neilly, Bjorn Munroe, Marvin Rolle and rookie Rodney Carey Jr hosted a Guatemala team that came here on a mission. They had nothing to lose, but everything to gain and they didn’t hold back at all. When the Guatemalans could have easily surrendered to thep ressure of the scorching heat, they stuck in there and battled it out. It seemed as if they were more prepared for the heat than we were. When they were faced with the excruciating pain and cramps, they got the necessary treatment and were back on the court, giving it their all as if there was no tomorrow. We had too many injuries to d eal with that changed the comp lex of our line-up. And when o ur team had the Guatemalans’ backs pinned against the wall, we watched as they fought off the adversity and prevailed like only true warriors do. If only we could have turned the hands of time. For all five matches in the tie at the National Tennis Center, the Guatemalans displayed the type of resilience that showed why they will remain in Zone II in 2010 and we will be rele gated to Zone III. Not taking anything away from our players, I think they went out there and they fought hard. To go the distance, in some cases to five matches, was evident of that. But I just don’t think all of our players exhibited the same type of heart and determination as the Guatemalans that was required for us to pull off the tie. Not even the pulsating sound of the junkanoo music could propel our players to dig down deeper and find that intestinal fortitude to get the job done. This was one time that we felt the home crowd advantage should have worked in our favour and it didn’t. There was no way that we should have gone down the way we did to Guatemala. I think this may be a blessing in disguise for our team and captain John Farrington. I think Farrington, or who ever succeeds him in the future, should ensure that our players come prepared to play whether it’s at home or on the road. We have too much talent not to be performing at a higher standard. After the loss, especially in the pivotal doubles, it showed how much we missed having the appearance of touring pro Mark Knowles. While I think we could have used his experience, I think it’s time for the younger players to start getting the exposure that they need to get us to the next level. Sure Knowles could have made a difference in the doubles, but that was just one match. He’s not playing singles, which accounts for at least 70 per cent of the team’s success or failure. So I think it’s vital for the younger players to step up their game, especially at home. Considering that the Guatemalans just emerged out of Zone III, there’s no reason why we should have played as hard and as long as we did and still lost. Our younger tennis players need to ‘step up their game’ OPINION S TUBBS “Not taking anything away f rom our players, I think the y w ent out ther e and the y fought hard. To go the d istance, in some cases to five matches, was evident of that. But I just don’ t think all of our pla y e r s e xhibited the same type of hear t and determination as the Guatemalans that was required for us to pull off the tie... – Brent Stubbs

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HE Bahamas has “got a litt le bit of work to do” to ensure it “does not become a casualty” of increasing consolidation in the global private banking/wealth management industry, a senior industry executive said yesterday. Simon Townend, a KPMG partner and head of its corporate finance practice for the Bahamas and the Caribbean, expanding on a firm survey that suggested “consolidation potent ial remains high” in the global p rivate banking market, told Tribune Business “had a lot of strategic work” in front of it to position itself as an international financial centre of choice. “I think the Bahamas is going to see more consolidation in the sector and/or international private banking groups looking to spin-off arms of their business,” Mr Townend said. “This is being driven by two factors. One would be the economies, the efficiencies and the technology, and the other would be the increasing G-20 pressures being placed on financial services business in the islands. “It’s already happening across the offshore jurisdictions, we’re seeing consolidations and spinoffs.” Consolidation trends have already exposed themselves in the Bahamian private banking sector, as a result of Qatar National Bank’s (QNB sion to reduce its offshore footprint and concentrate on markets nearer to home. That allowed the A. F. Holdings group (formerly the Colina Financial Group) to acquire QNB’s Ansbacher (Bahamas subsidiary earlier this year, and merge it with its existing Sentinel Bank & Trust operation. n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor LEGISLATION to create the Business Improvement District (BID downtown Nassau’s revitalisation “should be ready to go” by year-end, Tribune Business was told yesterday, with that and the identification/implementation of short-term projects for Bay Street the “key focus right now”. Charles Klonaris, co-chair of the Downtown Nassau Partnership (DNP lic sector body leading the effort to overhaul downtown Bay Street, suggested that the existing Nassau Tourism and Development Board (NTDB likely to be absorbed into the BID once it was created via legislation. “The focus right now is on the legislation for the BID that’s critical and also the iden n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor PROPOSED legislative amendments appear to give theC entral Bank of the Bahamas t he power to appoint a receiver/manager for any of its bank and trust company licensees without first seeking court approval, a study of the changes by Tribune Business has shown. T he Central Bank, in its consultation paper on proposed amendments to the Banks & Trust Companies Regulation Act 2000, is planning to change section 18 to “expressly allow the Bank to appoint a receiv er-manager where it is desirable for the receiver to operate a licensee as a going concern”. In addition, the amendments if passed into statute law will “permit the appointment by the [Central] Bank of a temporary manager which, in the Bank’s opinion is, inter alia, carryingon business in a manner detri mental to the public interest”. Other violations leading to this action are breaches of law and licence obligations. These amendments appear remarkably similar to the changes Parliament recently passed to the Domestic Insur ance Act, and which generated considerable opposition from that industry namely the fact the regulator, in that case the Registrar of Insurance, could appoint a receiver/manager for an insurance company without even obtaining an ex-parte Order from the Supreme Court approving such action. In the insurance industry’s case, the sector was concerned that there was no structured process involved in appointing a receiver or manager, and it was open to too much subjectivity even being carried out on a whim or personal opinion. The Banks and Trust Companies Regulation Act 2000 amendments appear to be an effort by the Government to harmonise the powers granted to the different financial services regulators ahead of their C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.21 $4.30 $4.10 Bank ‘can appoint’ r eceiver without getting court order Amendments appear designed to give Central Bank same sweeping powers handed to insurance regulator in the wake of CLICO (Bahamas S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Government has long been urged to reduce Stamp Tax on all Bahamas-basedp roperty transfers to a uniform 2 per cent, it was revealed yes terday, as this would remove “high societal costs” and “minimise incentives to avoid or evade the tax”. A February 21, 2007, report prepared for the Government as part of the Inter-American Development Bank-financed (IDB Administration Project, advised the Government that it was “desirable to reduce Stamp Tax rates substantially to no more than 2 per cent”. The report, authored by a Richard Almy and tabled in Parliament yesterday, questioned whether it was desirable for the Government to be earning more from Stamp Tax on property transfers than real property taxes, noting that the former generated $88 million for the Government in the 20042005 Budget year compared to the latter’s $54 million. The report conceded that the Stamp Tax was “well estab lished”, and generated substantial government revenues for minimal administrative costs, as the tax was levied on the recording of deeds/obtaining a title certificate. However, it added that taxes imposed on the transfer of real estate were “usually not more productive” than annually recurring real estate taxes, such as real property taxes. “High, progressive taxes have several inherent disadvantages that may not be fully appreciated in the Bahamas,” the report added. “International experi ence suggests that high, progressive transfer taxes have a Go v er nment told: r educe pr oper ty Stamp Tax to two per cent S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B BID for Bay legislation ‘ready to go by year-end’ Bahamas must ‘not be casualty’ of consolidation in private banks n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net D redged material in excess of 900,000 cubic yards will be used to extend Arawak Cay 1,000 ft to the west, resulting i n the loss of 32 acres of sea b ed containing some sea life, the Environ mental Impact Assessment (EIA use/storage of material produced by the Nassau harbour dredging has revealed. The EIA prepared by Blue Engineering, which has not formally been released by the Government, which has been silent on details pertaining to the Arawak Cay port development, also revealed a number of other negative effects of the extension project. The report outlined potential impacts to the sea life in the area surrounding Arawak and Silver Cays, most of all the settlement of suspended silt on coral reefs and sponge beds living in and around the area. In the proposed changes to Arawak Cay, two million cubic yards of hard limestone material and sand will be dredged from Nassau Harbour and stored there. According to the EIA, the 1,000 foot exten sion is necessary to accommodate the dredged material and the port. Of the two million cubic yards to be extracted, only 600,000 cubic yards would have been able to be stored without the Arawak Cay extension. There is concern that the dredged material could produce some level of water contamination, including possible contamination to the city water supply. "The storage and use of the dredged mate rial has the potential to reintroduce and redistribute toxic chemicals deposited in the sediments to be dredged into the water column. Owing to the presence of various operations in the vicinity of Nassau Harbour, it was decided at the outset of the earlier EIA studies to carry out chemical determinations for potential metal contaminants in the harbour sediments," the EIA read. The EIA also offers a number of mitigation 2m ‘yards apart’ on Arawak Cay PLP continues to oppose harbour dredge and port requiring 1,000 foot cay extension S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 2m ‘yards apart’ on Arawak Cay methods to produce the least amount of impact on the environment. In the case of the existing sea grass beds near the construction site, the EIA proposes their re-location, and with regard to the water supply it suggests the W ater and Sewerage corporation closely monitor it. The EIA also suggests the dredging and storage of the fill material could cause increased noise and vibration, modification of wave patterns and shoreline, loss of biological sea life, and unpleasant odors. When the project is completed and container transport from the new Arawak Cay port starts, the EIA revealed instances of possible road traffic increase, sea traffic increase, impaired visual beauty, increased noise and vibration, miscellaneous hazards and possible deterioration of water quality. The relocation of the container port to Arawak Cay in earlier studies found it to be the sixth best location, even below leaving it at its present location downtown. However, it is thought that the revitalisation of the downtown Bay Street area will not be able to start in earnest until the shipping facilities are relocated to an alternative site. Some of the dredged fill stored in the Arawak Cay extension will be used to create an extension to the existing port area downtown for the construction of a promenade. According to the EIA: "The relief to the congestion of the existing downtown area of Nassau itself is a major advantage of the project. The opportunity for the developing old town area to enhance its amenity and visual advantages for recreational and non-commercial usage should be taken." The EIA outlines proposals for the mitigation of the many of the possible negative effects of the extension of Arawak Cay, including proper installation of turbidity barriers and the employment of appropriate water quality and beach monitoring techniques "starting before construction activities”. The report also contains a contingency plan for the abandonment of the project should that be necessary. Senator Jerome Fitzgerald, who has been extremely vocal on the Government’s persistent intransigence in revealing the details of the Arawak Cay port relocation, told Tribune Business yesterday that "they were going ahead with this before they had the EIA. Everything about this is just wrong” Mr Fitzgerald is scheduled to hold a press conference at Arawak Cay today in protest at the port relocation. INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CABLE Bahamas’ claim that the rival Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC enjoyed “preferential treatment a nd influence” in the commun ications reform process has b een dismissed by the government-appointed privatisation committee, which said a “robust approach” had been taken to implementing “safeguards” in the process. While admitting that three members of the nine-strong privatisation committee were BTC executives, and another was the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas (BCB the committee said in its reply to Cable Bahamas that they had all been “selected for their technical competencies and experience”, not to represent their companies. Apart from executive chairman Julian Francis, the BTC representatives were Felicity Johnson, BTC’s company secretary/vice-president for legal, regulatory and interconnection, and Tellis Symonette, BTC’s senior vice-president for the Family Islands and administration. In its response to Cable Bahamas, the privatisation committee said professional advisors, drawn from accounting firm KPMG and the UK-based law firm, Charles Russell LLP, had played a major role in designing the communications regulatory regime. And, the committee added, it was ultimately the Government that approved or rejected the regulatory reform proposals put to it. Cable Bahamas’ assertion that KPMG had been responsible for formulating BTC’s business plan, and had been retained by BTC to undertake other work for it, were also denied by the privatisation committee. “While KPMG has been engaged by the committee to advise it on the privatisation exercise, Cable Bahamas’ claim is not correct,” the privatisation committee added. “BTC is responsible for the formulation of its own business plan, and indeed it appointed external advisors (not KPMG in the formulation of its latest plan.” Pointing to the separate advisory committee, headed by Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, to which it reports, the privatisation committee said: “There are a variety of safeguards and measures that the Government has taken to ensure a robust and transparent process, which a minority of three members of the committee would have no influence over.” And it added: “The structure and process developed for the new electronic communications regulatory regime is robust, transparent, and is serving the primary objectives of the new legislation, which include, amongst others, the desire to enhance the efficiency of the communications sector, to promote investment and innovation, to encourage sustainable competition, and to enhance the competitiveness of the Bahamas, all of which lead to the benefit of individuals and companies in the Bahamas. “Accordingly, there are no plans to change the structure that has been established for the privatisation of BTC or development of the new communications regulatory regime, or to change the composition of the two committees that have been appointed or the mandates of their advisors.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 3B 8QLTXHHFXULW\&R+ DYHLPPHGLDWHRSHQLQJIRUWKHIROORZLQJ SRVLWLRQ 3 URIHVVLRQDO$UPRUHGHFXULW\IFHU4XDOLFDWLRQV +LJKVFKRRO'LSORPD \HDUVLQDVHFXULW\UHODWHGHOG 3URIHVVLRQDOZHOOVSRNHQ 0XVWEHZLOOLQJWRZRUNZLWKRWKHUV &OHDQSROLFHUHFRUGZLWKLQWKHODVWWKUHHPRQWKV 0XVWEHH[LEOHZLWKKRXUV 0XVWEHOLFHQVHWRFDUU\DUHDUP 5HTXLUHPHQWV 9DOLGGULYHUVOLFHQVH 3DVVSRUWKRWRV 9DOLG%DKDPLDQDVVSRUW 1DWLRQDO,QVXUDQFHFDUG 3URIHVVLRQDOHIHUHQFHVRQHODWLYHVf8QLTXHHFXULW\&R (DVWWUHHWt%DOIRXU$YH 2UFDOO Antoine Bain, whose career ambition is to become a securities trader, has successfully completed the Canadian Securities Course (CSC with the Nassau-based Securities Training Institute (STI Ms Albury, STI’s course administrator, said: “This comprehensive study programme greatly assists in enhancing the student’s understanding of financial products and markets, which acts as a solid foundation for those interested in pursuinga career in financial services”. Budding trader passes course Cable’s BTC favouritism claims ‘robustly’ denied ANTOINE BAIN Airline makes special flying visit to New Providence C C o o n n t t i i n n e e n n t t a a l l A A i i r r l l i i n n e e s s B B l l u u e e S S k k y y w w a a y y a a i i r r c c r r a a f f t t v v i i s s i i t t e e d d N N a a s s s s a a u u y y e e s s t t e e r r d d a a y y a a s s p p a a r r t t o o f f t t h h e e a a i i r r l l i i n n e e s s 7 7 5 5 t t h h a a n n n n i i v v e e r r s s a a r r y y c c e e l l e e b b r r a a t t i i o o n n s s . . T T h h e e n n e e w w B B o o e e i i n n g g 7 7 3 3 7 7 9 9 0 0 0 0 E E R R a a i i r r c c r r a a f f t t w w a a s s p p a a i i n n t t e e d d w w i i t t h h a a r r e e t t r r o o l l i i v v e e r r y y t t o o c c o o m m m m e e m m o o r r a a t t e e t t h h e e a a n n n n i i v v e e r r s s a a r r y y , , w w h h i i c c h h i i s s t t o o d d a a y y . . T T h h e e n n e e w w a a i i r r c c r r a a f f t t ' ' s s r r e e t t r r o o l l i i v v e e r r y y w w a a s s o o r r i i g g i i n n a a l l l l y y u u s s e e d d o o n n a a i i r r c c r r a a f f t t b b e e g g i i n n n n i i n n g g i i n n 1 1 9 9 4 4 7 7 , , a a n n d d i i s s c c a a l l l l e e d d T T h h e e B B l l u u e e S S k k y y w w a a y y . . T T h h e e l l i i v v e e r r y y w w a a s s s s e e l l e e c c t t e e d d b b y y C C o o n n t t i i n n e e n n t t a a l l e e m m p p l l o o y y e e e e s s f f o o r r t t h h i i s s c c e e l l e e b b r r a a t t i i o o n n . .

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negligible effect on the accumulation of wealth. “Experience also suggests that they encourage evasion and a voidance (as is recognised P arties may be encouraged to r isk not recording deeds to avoid having to settle arrears in the real estate tax, and to avoid incurring the Stamp Tax. They may be encouraged to misstate t he amount of consideration to r educe the tax.... By acting as a deterrent to the formalisation of property transfers, high Stamp taxes encourage private conveyancing to the detriment of an open, efficient property market. Overall welfare is reduced by subo ptimal land use. Moreover, h igh Stamp taxes adversely a ffect housing affordability. Thus, the Stamp Tax incurs high societal costs.” The Government has moved to tackle some of these concerns, having eliminated Stamp Tax for first-time home buyers on real estate transactions valued at $500,000 and below. It has also introduced a fines structure for real estate conveyancings that are not brought forward for Stamping and r ecording in a timely manner. B ut the IDB project report added: “Consideration should be given to reducing Stamp Taxes on real estate transfers (and leases the degree of progressivity. Although there are no norms, it is believed that transfer taxes should be less than about 2 per cent to minimise incentives to evade or avoid tax. “To avoid disruptions to the nation’s revenue system, Stamp Tax reductions could be offset by increases in real estate tax yields that would result from a general reassessment and further increases in collection effic iency.” The current Stamp Tax structure in the Bahamas is: Properties valued at between $0-$20,000: 2 per cent $20,000-$50,000: 4 per cent $50,000-$100,000: 6 per cent$ 100,000-$250,000: 8 per cent More than $250,000: 10 per cent The Land Use and Administration Project report also called for the Registrar General’s Department to publish lists of p roperty transfers, including d etails of the property location, t he purchaser, the seller, the price paid and date of sale. “Although there mat be a privacy interest that is served by making it more difficult to obtain transfer information, there is no legal reason for the current situation in the Bahamas,” the report said. “The belief that an open-market transfer is secret or confidential largely is illusory; the chief beneficiaries of non-disc losure of transfers are real e state professionals, who have a proprietary interest in their sales data.” The report also criticised the numerous real property tax exemptions that existed, especially for undeveloped Bahamian-owned land in New Providence and Bahamian-owned property on all other islands, as “fully shielding taxpayers from the real estate tax weakens the social contract between them and their government”. In addition, the real property tax exemptions allowed owners holding exempt properties “to hold more property than they c an use productively or encoura ge uneconomic use of land”. And the report added: “The real estate tax incentives granted to hotels are of dubious value, given the generally low level of real estate taxation and the fact competitive pressuresi n an attractive destination provide sufficient inducement to build and maintain hotel prop erties.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.28Abaco Markets1.391.390.000.1270.00010.90.00% 1 1.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.94Bank of Bahamas6.946.940.000.2440.26028.43.75% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3911.390.001.4060.2508.12.19% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.645.640.000.4190.36013.56.38% 4.781.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.053.00-0.050.1110.05227.01.73% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital1.821.820.000.2400.0807.64.40% 8 .206.60Famguard6.996.60-0.391,0000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.5010.00Finco10.9010.900.000.3220.52033.94.77% 11.7110.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.3810.380.000.7940.35013.13.37% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.035.030.000.3320.15015.22.98% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.008000.4070.60013.510.91% 12.0010.40J. S. Johnson10.4010.400.000.9520.64010.96.15% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1460 1425 BahamasSupermarkets 792 842 1460 0041 0300 N/M 205% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 P rime + 1.75% 7% Interest 7% Prime + 1.75%FINDEX: CLOSE 787.12 | YTD -5.72% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities30 May 2013 29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320 TUESDAY, 14 JULY 2009B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.14| CHG -2.79 | %CHG -0.18 | YTD -142.22 | YTD % -8.31BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases) 14 . 60 14 . 25 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 . 92 8 . 42 14 . 60 0 . 041 0 . 300 N/M 2 . 05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.38601.3231CFAL Bond Fund1.38602.404.75 3.03512.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8952-1.52-3.18 1.47631.4019CFAL Money Market Fund1.47632.975.30 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1031-8.35-13.82 12.920912.2702Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.92092.405.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.5448-0.020.54 100.000093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund93.1992-3.33-6.76 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.47339.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.27652.00-2.98 1.06221.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06222.566.22 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0243-0.842.43 1.05851.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05852.045.85 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007NAV Date 31-May-09 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 31-Mar-09 30-Jun-09TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Jun-09 31-Mar-09 31-Dec-07 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 3-Jul-09 30-Jun-09MARKET TERMS Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds JOB ADVERTISEMENTPosition:AccountantA local insurance agency seeks to ll the position of A ccountant. The scope of work is to head the Acc ounting Operations in preparation of monthly, quarterly and annual reports; to keep and maintain all nancial documents and records according to the d irectives coming from the President and the Board o f Directors to ensure the efcient management of all Bank and general ledger accounts. The position will also be expected to make recommendations to m anagement to maintain the company’s viability in a highly competitive environment. 5HTXLUHG accountant; p resenting; s upervisory skills; meet deadlines and perform work of the highest quality. i ng address: T he Tribune c /o Box # 81869 P.O. Box N 3207 N assau, Bahamas )LQDQFLDO&RQWUROOHU5H TXLUHPHQWVtHVSRQVLELOLWLHV /HDGDQGPRWLYDWHDFFRXQWLQJVWDI ([SHULHQFHLQWKHSUHSDUDWLRQDQGLQWHUSUHWDWLRQRI WDWHPHQWV XVWEHDEOHWRGHYHORSDQGPDLQWDLQDQHIIHFWLYHV\VWHPRILQWHUQDO DFFRXQWLQJDQGRSHUDWLRQDOFRQWUROVLQD+RWHOHQYLURQPHQW XVWSRVVHVVYH\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQDVXSHUYLVRU\DFFRXQWLQJ SRVLWLRQ HOIPRWLYDWHGZLWKVWURQJDQDO\WLFDODQGSUREOHPVROYLQJVNLOOV XVWEHFRQYHUVDQWZLWKKRWHODFFRXQWLQJVRIWZDUHZLWKHPSKDVLVLQ DUHDV)RRGt%HYHUDJH)URQWIFHDQGD\UROO /LDLVHZLWKH[WHUQDO$XGLWRUVWKLUGSDUW\VHUYLFHSURYLGHUVDQGUHOHYDQW HJXODWRU\t&RPSOLDQFH$XWKRULWLHV UHSDUDWLRQRIEXGJHWV 7LPHO\DQGDFFXUDWHSUHSDUDWLRQSUHVHQWDWLRQDQGLQWHUSUHWDWLRQRI QDQFLDOUHSRUWV ([FHOOHQWZULWWHQDQGRUDOFRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOV $EOHWRZRUNH[WHQGHGKRXUVZHHNHQGVDQGKROLGD\V 48$/,),&$7,216 $FFRXQWLQJIURPDQDFFUHGLWHGQLYHUVLW\ ,QWHUQDWLRQDODFFRXQWLQJGHVLJQDWLRQ&3$&$fZLWKPLQLPXPRI \HDUVSRVWTXDOLFDWLRQH[SHULHQFH $GYDQFHZRUNLQJNQRZOHGJHRI([FHO RUNLQJNQRZOHGJHRILFURVRIW:RUG,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVVKRXOGDSSO\RQRUEHIRUH-XO\$WWHQWLRQ&21752//(5 '$ FRKHULEXQH 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV6XLWDEO\TXDOLHGFDQGLGDWHVQHHGRQO\DSSO\ 6DODU\LVFRPPHQVXUDWHZLWKH[SHULHQFHDQGTXDOLFDWLRQ0DQDJHPHQWSSRUWXQLW\ $ZHOOHVWDEOLVKHGFRPSDQ\LVFRQVLGHULQJKLJKO\TXDOLHG DSSOLFDQWVIRUWKHUROHRI Government told: reduce property Stamp Tax to two per cent F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Share your news T he Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in theirn eighbourhoods. P erhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, c ampaigning for improvements in thea rea or have won an a ward. I f so, call us on 322-1986 a nd share your story.

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n By JEANNINE AVERSA AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP The Federal Reserve expects the economy this year will sink at a slower pace than it previously thought, but that unemployment will top 10 per cent and remain high for the next few years, according to a new forecast released Wednesday. The Fed now predicts the economy will shrink between one and 1.5 per cent this year, an improvement from its old forecast issued in May. At that time, the Fed projected the economy would contract between 1.3 and two per cent. The upgrade which helped major stock indicators jump about three per cent and the Dow Jones industrial average to add 257 points comes from the expectation that the economy’s downhill slide in the first half of 2009 wasn’t as bad aspreviously thought. The Fed said the economy should start growing again in the second half of this year, although the pace is likely to be plodding. In fact, most Fed policymak ers said it could take “five or six years” for the economy and the labor market to get back on a path of full health in the long term. And, most officials saw “the economy as still quite weak and vulnerable to further adverse shocks.” Against that backdrop, the Fed’s forecast for unemploy-ment this year worsened. The central bank predicted the job less rate could rise as high as 10.1 per cent, compared witht he previous forecast of 9.6 per cent. The nation’s unemployment rate climbed to 9.5 per cent in June, a 26-year high. The predictions are based on what the Fed calls its “centralt endency,” which exclude the t hree highest and three lowest forecasts made by Fed officials. The central bank also gives a range of all the forecasts. That range showed that some officials expect the jobless rate c ould rise as high as 10.5 per cent this year, and 10.6 per cent in 2010. The post-World War II high was 10.8 per cent at the end of 1982, when the country had suffered through a severe recession. The jobless rate averaged 5.8 per cent last year. For 2010, the Fed predicted the economy would grow between 2.1 and 3.3 pe rcent. That’s a slight upgrade from its old forecast of growth betweentwo and three per cent. The Fed’s estimate is based on comparing projected activity in the fourth quarter of one year to the same period a year earlier. The economy dipped 0.8 per cent in 2008 by that measure. Still, it would mark a slow recovery and that will keep unemployment elevated well into 2011, the Fed said. Companies won’t be in any mood to ramp up hiring until they are certain that any recovery has staying power. Some Fed officials predicted the jobless rate could hover in the 8 percent range or as high as 9.2 per cent in 2011. To help lift the country out of recession, the Fed has slashed interest rates to a record low near zero. In March, the Fed launched a $1.2 trillion effort to drive down interest rates to revive lending and get Americans to spend more freely. Those actions along with President Barack Obama’s $787 billion stimulus package of tax cuts and increased government spending should help the economy return to growth in the second half of this year. Fed officials at their June meeting observed “the economic contraction was slowing and that the decline in activity could cease before long.” Con sumer spending appeared to have stabilized, new-home sales were flattening out and declinesin capital spending did not look as severe as they had at the beginning of the year. At the June meeting, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and his colleagues pledged to hold its key bank lending rate near zero for an extended period of time to help brace the economy. Many analysts believe the Fed will leave rates at record lows through the rest of this year. The Fed last month also decided against expanding its $1.2 trillion programme of buyi ng government bonds and m ortgage-backed securities to d rive down rates on mortgages and other consumer debt. Part of the reason the Fed stayed the course was out of fear that expanding the programmes could stir up investor fears that the central bank’s aggressive actions could spur inflation later on, documents of the closeddoor June meeting indicated. In addition, “it seemed that economic activity was in the processof leveling out.” O n the inflation front, Fed policymakers did bump up their forecasts for this year and next. The Fed expects inflation to rise between one and 1.4 per cent in 2009, reflecting the influence of higher oil and commodity prices. The old forecast called for a gain of between 0.6 and 0.9 per cent this year. Even with the projected pickup, the Fed believes inflation “would remain subdued for s ome time” and be lower than t he 1.9 per cent increase logged i n 2008. The sluggish recovery, idle plants, a weak employment market and cautious consumers will restrain companies from jacking up prices. Next year, inflation should rise between 1.2 and 1.8 per cent, the Fed said. That’s up from the old forecast of betweena one and 1.6 per cent gain. Several Fed participants, though, worried that investors and consumers might start to e xpect that prices will march higher if the central bank’s aggressive steps to stimulate the economy “were not unwound in a timely fashion as the economy recovers.” C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 5B GastroenterologyDoctorsHospitalSessionalClinicSCREENINGand CONSULTATIONDoyouhaveanyofthe followingsymptoms?Dicultyswallowing Heartburn Dyspepsia(gas,bloating) Nauseaandvomiting Unintentionalweightloss Diarrhea&Constipation Abdominalpain Diseasesofthepancreas Liverdisease Jaundice Coloncancerscreening Familyhistoryofcoloncancer Rectalbleeding Dr.MarcusCooperInternal Medicine GastroenterologyByAppointmentOnlyCall:302-4684Date:Wednesday, July 22 `09 Open:9:00am 8QLTXHHFXULW\&R+ DYHLPPHGLDWHRSHQLQJIRUWKHIROORZLQJ SRVLWLRQ3URIHVVLRQDOHFXULW\IFHU4 XDOLFDWLRQV +LJKVFKRRO'LSORPD \HDUVLQDVHFXULW\UHODWHGHOG 3URIHVVLRQDOZHOOVSRNHQ 0XVWEHZLOOLQJWRZRUNZLWKRWKHUV &OHDQSROLFHUHFRUGZLWKLQWKHODVWVL[PRQWKV 0XVWEHH[LEOHZLWKKRXUV 5 HTXLUHPHQWV 3DVVSRUWKRWRV 9DOLG%DKDPLDQDVVSRUW 1DWLRQDO,QVXUDQFHFDUG 3URIHVVLRQDOHIHUHQFHVRQHODWLYHVf8QLTXHHFXULW\&R (DVWWUHHWt%DOIRXU$YH 2UFDOO POSITION AVAILABLE: REQUIREMENTS: DUTIES: H uman Resources Manager, (Re: Client Relationship Position), P.O. Box SS 6289, Nassau, Bahamas, by 20th July, 2009 or fax to (242 Federal Reserve: Unemployment will top 10 per cent this year

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 7B n By JEANNINE AVERSA AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP Industrial companies cut back production yet again in June but not nearly as deeply as they have been, another sign the recession is easing its grip. The Federal Reserve reported Wednesday that production at the nation’s factories, mines and utilities fell 0.4 per cent last month as the recession crimped demand for a wide range of manufactured goods, including cars, machinery and household appliances. The decline, however, was not as bad as May. Industrial activity posted a revised 1.2 per cent drop then, which turned out to be slightly worse than first reported. The contraction in industrial activity in June was less than the 0.6 per cent decline that economists were projecting, although it marked the eighth month in a row of production cuts. “The pace of declines continues to moderate, suggesting at least a stabilization of the economy, even if not an outright r ecovery,” said T J Marta, mark et strategist and founder of M arta on the Markets, a financial research firm. For the second quarter as a whole, industrial production fell at an annual rate of 11.6 per cent, not as sharp as the 19.1 per cent annualized decline experienced during the first three months of this year. The recession has taken a bite out of demand in the US for all kinds of manufactured goods, especially those related to hous ing, such as appliances, furniture and building materials. At the same time, factories are cop ing with less demand from for eign buyers coping with eco nomic problems in their own countries. John Engler, president of the National Association of Manu facturers, in an interview with The Associated Press, said even with the slower pace of decline the industrial production fig ures “are disappointing still.” And, he wasn’t optimistic that factories would be getting backon their feet any time soon. “Consumers aren’t in a position to lead the economy back,” he said. Given crimped customer appetites, industrial companies idled more of their plants and equipment in June. The overall operating rate fell to 68, a record low dating to 1967. The previous low of 68.2 was in May. Production at factories the biggest slice of the industrial sector fell by 0.6 per cent in June, compared with a 1.1 per cent decline in May. Troubles in the auto sector probably factored into June’s w eakness. M akers of cars and parts cut p roduction 2.6 per cent last month, following a deeper 8.2 per cent cut in May. Plant shutdowns at Chrysler and General Motors, which both recently emerged from bankruptcy protection, are expected to weigh on factory production through part of the summer, analysts say. Meanwhile, makers of machinery trimmed output by 1.9 per cent in June, down froma 3.2 per cent cut in May. Production of home electronics dipped 1.1 per cent, aftera 2.5 per cent cut the previous month. Makers of appliances, furniture and carpeting sliced production by 1.9 per cent last month, following a 1.6 per cent cut in May. The pullbacks figured into a drop in the operating rate at factories, which fell to 64.6 in June, the lowest on records dating to 1948. The previous low was set in May. In other industrial sectors, the report showed that output at mines dipped 0.5 per cent in June, versus a 1.9 per cent decline in May. However, production at util ities rose 0.8 per cent in June, following a 1.3 per cent drop in the previous month. Industrial output fall less than anticipated INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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planned consolidation into a B ahamas Financial Services A uthority. T he Government appears to have embarked upon a process of giving the regulators immense powers to intervene in a company’s affairs in the wake of the CLICO (Bahamas debacle, seemingly believing the instantaneous appointment of a regulator/manager is the best way to protect depositors and creditors. It is unclear how the Bahamas-based bank and trust company sector will react to the proposed reforms, which require a licensee to pay for the costs of a receiver/manager imposed by the Central Bank. T he actual wording of the amendments is remarkably simi lar to the language the Gove rnment drafted and Parliam ent passed in the Domestic Insurance Act amendments. When a temporary receiver/manager is appointed for a licensee, the Central Bank will “have full and exclusive powers of management and control of the licensee”, including the ability to “continue or discontinue its operations”; “stop or limit the payment of its obligations”; make decisions on staffing and employment levels; a nd handle any litigation the licensee is involved in. Within 90 days of assuming temporary management of a licensee, the Central Bank has to either hand the bank and trust company back to its appointed Board of Directors and owners, or “revoke the l icence and apply to the S upreme Court for an order t hat the licensee be forthwith wound up by that Court”. In its consultation document, the Central Bank said it was “proposing several amendments which the Bank believes will strengthen the regulatory framework for its licensees, and will give the Central Bank more flexibility and wider powers to address supervisory issues.” The changes are also designed to remove impractical impedim ents to the conduct of busin ess. W endy Craigg, the Central Bank governor, did not return a Tribune Business call seeking comment on the amendments prior to press time. The Act changes will also “expressly empower” the Central Bank to enter into Memorandums of Understanding (MoUs to enable consolidated supervision of licensees to take place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isk & Compliance OfficerColina Holdings Bahamas Limited seeks to employ a suitably qualified professional for the position of Risk and Compliance Officer. This isan executive position and the successful applicant should possess the following: Qualifications & Experience x Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university x Minimum of seven (7) years full-time experience in compliance x Graduate degree in business administration, public administration, or a law degree x Proven ability to create, implement, monitor and make recommendations for improvements to a compliance culture x Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of duties x Knowledge of relevant Bahamian laws, regulations, guidance notes, and best practices x Confidentiality x Excellent oral and written communication skills Duties & Responsibilities: x Design and implement a risk framework. x Develop a compliance programme which outlines the strategic steps taken to foster good compliance. x Implement and maintaina compliance monitoring programme. This will serve to identify risk and breaches in controls and procedures. x Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of laws, regulations and policies applicable to the institution. x Provide management with guidance in the development, implementation and maintenance of policies, proceduresand practices tocover regulated activities. x Create programmes thateducate, train and encourage directors, managers and staff to operate in compliance with relevant laws and regulations. x Serve as the organization’s liaison officer with regulators. The Company offers excellent benefits, and salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a cover letter and resume to the following e-mail address no later than 27 July 2009: E-mail: careers@colinaimperial.com RE: Risk and Compliance Officer Absolutely no phone callswill be accepted Bank ‘can appoint’ receiver without getting court order F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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f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–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f $ELOLW\WRWURXEOHVKRRWDFFRXQWLQJSURFHVVHVDVWKH\UHODWHWRQDQFLDOVRIWZDUH DQGWKHV\VWHPRILQWHUQDOFRQWURO *RRGMXGJPHQWDQGVRXQGUHDVRQLQJDELOLW\ $ELOLW\WRFRPPXQLFDWHHIIHFWLYHO\ERWKRUDOO\DQGLQZULWLQJ *RRGWLPHPDQDJHPHQWVNLOOV ,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVVKRXOGDSSO\FRPSOHWLQJDQGUHWXUQLQJDQ$SSOLFDWLRQ)RUPWR 7KH0DQDJHU+XPDQ5HVRXUFHV7UDLQLQJ'HSDUWPHQW%DKDPDV(OHFWULFLW\ &RUSRUDWLRQ %OXH +LOO7XFNHU3%R[1DVVDX%DKDPDV RQ RUEHIRU-XO\ &RPPHUFLDOURSHUWLHVIRU/HDVH tification of short-term projects,” Mr Klonaris told Tribune Business. “Those are the two focus points right now for the DNP. “I would say we’re hoping towards the end of the year that the [BID] legislation will be ready to go for the following year. That’s the key to what we’re trying to push for.” Mr Klonaris said the BID leg islation was key to “defining the scope” of the authority that will oversee downtown Nassau’s hoped-for renaissance. Besides determining the geographical boundaries of the area overseen by the BID, Mr Klonaris, who is also the NTDB’s current chairman, explained that the legislation would determine its revenue-raising powers what monies it could col lect and how plus its ability to provide services such as garbage collection and street cleaning. The legislation will also determine the BID’s composition, who sits on its Board and the split between public and private sector representatives. “This is the most difficult part of it,” Mr Klonaris told Tribune Business. “We have to be so certain, careful and positive about the authority, the level of the BID authority and its functions. These are really the keys to the success of downtown.” When it came to short-term projects to enhance downtown Bay Street’s appearance and amenities, Mr Klonaris said the DNP was looking at “mainly street-scaping, pedestrianising some of the streets that run perpendicular between Woodes Rogers Wharf and Bay Street, short-term parking and managing parking with meters, and extending the sidewalks to bring proper green-scaping and landscaping to downtown”. Work was also being done to establish Nassau’s city centre boundaries, something Mr Klonaris said was “key to the short-term goals”. The DNP co-chair added that Bahamian architect Jackson Burnside would produce all the working drawings to illustrate the vision for downtown Nassau, the body having “agreed on his proposals”. When Mr Burnside’s work is completed, the DNP will be “ready to go out for bid” on construction work. Mr Klonaris described Mr Burnside’s work as not just “a vision, but what the final reality will be”. And he added: “The vision for the NTDB was to really become the BID. It will morph into the BID, hopefully in a year’s time. “The ultimate goal was to work through the BID. For many years the NTDB was a voice in the wilderness, but we kept plugging away. The Government has grasped that, and understands it, and where we are now is the vision of many years. “The city is an important part of this country as an engine for employment, and it’s important to have a vibrant city to sup port Atlantis and all the hotels we have.” BID for Bay legislation eady to go by year-end’ Bahamas must ‘not be casualty’ of consolidation in private banks The acquisition gives A. F. Holdings and Sentinel and expanded book of business and greater scale in an industry where smaller, standalone players are finding it increasingly difficult to survive. Mr Townend told Tribune Business that global private banking consolidation would take place gradually over time, with smaller niche players finding it difficult to keep up with the increased demands and costs associated with higher regulatory standards. With the private banking industry set to “see its fair share” of mergers and acquisitions as the global transactions market emerged from the current recession, Mr Townend added: “One real strength for the Bahamas is its private client banking product. “The Bahamas still continues to attract not just your international client, but the client that wants to come to the Bahamas for a second home, the tourist client.” But he said: “I think there’s a lot of work to do from a strategic perspective to continue to position the Bahamas as a financial centre of choice.” While the Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB other industry bodies were working on strategy and initiatives, Mr Townend said the industry as a whole had “to push the agenda forward”. He explained that the key question facing the Bahamas and its financial services industry was “how to strengthen and consolidate what we have, and look for ways to continue to differentiate.... our existing product “The other areas the Government has been looking at with the private sector, such as the international arbitrationtype initiatives, all these are great add-ons.” The Government and private sector are also focusing on developing yacht and private aircraft registries to augment the private wealth management offering. But Mr Townend added: “I would say at this point in time that we’ve got a little bit of work to do to ensure that when some of the larger groups look at consolidation, the Bahamas does not become a casualty.” However, with the global base of wealth and high networth individuals continuing to grow, especially in the mediumterm, “it is essential for the Bahamas to ensure we capture our share of that market and increase it”. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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n By ADAM SCHRECK AP Business Writer ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates (AP S ecretary Timothy Geithner p ressed ahead with his sales p itch to Gulf Arab nations Wednesday, telling oil-richM ideast allies Washington is committed to keeping the dollar strong and promoting sus-t ainable growth as the world pulls out of a recession. G eithner’s comments in the United Arab Emirates capital Abu Dhabi came on the second leg of a two-day trip to the Middle East, where he is seeki ng to convince Arab leaders o n the Obama administration’s efforts to fix the US economy. We want to rebuild a s tronger foundation for more balanced growth globally,” G eithner said after a closedd oor meeting about education and economic development w ith UAE Foreign Trade Minister Sheikha Lubna al-Qasi-m i and other officials. “We n eed to make sure as we emerge from this crisis we’re n ot sowing the seeds of imbal a nces that will lead to future crises.” Geithner’s visit to the UAE, the second largest Arab economy after Saudi Arabia, camea day after he met with Saudi K ing Abdullah and businessmen in the kingdom. The U AE, which is the end of the M ideast tour, is also home to t he Persian Gulf commercial and financial hub Dubai. Aim A key aim of the trip, which f ollows a series of overtures to t he Middle East by President Barack Obama, is to reassure m ajor oil producers in the sixn ation Gulf Cooperation Council that America still welc omes their business and will safeguard the value of the dol lar and their vast US invest-m ents by forging a way out of the financial crisis. “The UAE and the GCC c ountries have played an i mportant stabilizing role (in t he global economy). You’ve s een them intervene in support o f US banking institutions,” said Nasser Saidi, chief economist of the Dubai International Financial Center. “What we need to see is a recognition oft he important role of the GCC on the international level.” The Gulf states’ wealth skyrocketed during oil’s earlier boom years, adding to their p olitical clout in the process. But leaders in the region have g rown increasingly concerned a s crude prices and the value of t heir investments soured in recent months. F ive of the Gulf Cooperation Council nations Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Oman, Bahrain and Qatar peg their c urrency to the dollar. Kuwait u ses a basket of currencies that includes the greenback. I n an interview with Arabicl anguage news network Al Arabiya, Geithner said the US w ould work to ensure the strength of the dollar. “It is the policy of the Unite d States and it will remain the policy of the United States to remain committed to a strong d ollar,” he said in a transcript o f the exchange provided to r eporters. My view, and this is the v iew I heard expressed here, is the dollar ... will remain the principal reserve currency,” he added. As a group, Gulf governm ents hold more than $400 bill ion worth of US investments, making them second only toC hina as America’s biggest creditor, Saidi said. “Income from foreign assets i n terms of investment positions is becoming as importanta s income from oil. People t end to forget that,” Saidi said. Geithner’s schedule in the UAE included meetings witht he crown prince, the head of the central bank and the country’s deputy finance minister. T he treasury secretary also held talks with top officials from some of the sheikdom’ss overeign wealth funds, which have invested billions of dollars in US companies such as Citi-g roup Inc. From the UAE, he heads to Paris. “Gulf countries are very important as investors, event hough they don’t have that much money to spend thisy ear” because of lower oil p rices, said Eckart Woertz, programme manager for econ omics at the Gulf Research Center in Dubai. “That’s a large part of why he’s coming.”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reasury chief pitches to Mid-East Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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n By MARTIN CRUTSINGERAP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP Consumer prices shot up in June by the largest amount in 11 months, reflecting the biggest j ump in gasoline prices in nearly five years. The Labour Department said Wednesday that inflation at the c onsumer level rose by 0.7 per cent last month, slightly higher t han the 0.6 per cent increase that economists were expecting. It was the biggest one-month gain since a 0.7 per cent increase last July. The big jump was seen as a temporary blip, however. Inflation is not expected to be a problem any time soon given a severe recession which is keeping a lid on wage pressures. The Federal Reserve reported Wednesday that industrial production fell 0.4 per cent in June a s the recession crimped output for a wide range of manufactured goods including cars, machinery and household appliances. However, the decline was not as severe as the 1.4 per cent plunge in May, a possible sign that the recession is easing its grip. Underscoring the low threat of accelerating inflation, prices in June compared to a year ago were actually down by 1.4 per cent, the biggest year-over-year d ecline in nearly six decades. Core inflation, which excludes food and energy, posted a moderate 0.2 per cent rise in June, slightly higher than the 0.1 per cent rise that economists had expected. The absence of an inflation threat has allowed the Federal Reserve to drive a key interest rate to a record low in an effort to fight a severe recession which is already the longest since World War II. The central bank pushed its target for the federal funds rate to near zero in December and it is expected to remain there until the nation’s unemployment rate, currently at a 26-year high of 9.5 per cent, stops rising. The 0.7 per cent jump in the Consumer Price Index in June followed three months of moderation including a small 0.1 per cent rise in May. The upward surge was driven by a 7.4 per cent rise in energy prices, reflecting a 17.3 per cent increase in gasoline prices, the biggest one-month jump in gas p rices since a 20.9 per cent spurt in September 2005 after Hurricane Katrina had shut Gulf Coast refineries. A nalysts are looking for gasoline and other energy costs to retreat in coming months. Already, gasoline pump prices are down by about a dime since the start of July. Food costs edged up a small 0 .1 per cent in June, held back by a big drop in the cost of dairy products. The 0.2 per cent rise in core inflation left the core inflation rate rising by a moderate 1.7 per cent over the past 12 months, reflecting the downward pressure on costs coming from the prolonged recession. F or June, new car prices jumped by 0.7 per cent and clothing costs were also up 0.7 per cent. However, those gains ere offset by a 0.6 per cent drop in airline fares. Price increases were also moderate in the health area with medical care edging up by 0.2 per cent, the smallest gain in three months. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 11B GE Mechanical Room Style+ # ASV10# ASQ12A# ASQ14A You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. US consumer prices increase

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Employment Opportunity Senior Collections Officer An employment opportunity exists for an innovative, persuasive leader with a passion for success, a desire to succeed and the ability to initiate progress. Skill Requirements Excellent oral and written communication skills Excellent motivation & coaching skills Ability to execute priority based workload Possess excellent planning, organizational and implementation skills Ability to operate and familiarity with POS systems Proficient in Microsoft Office applications Possess strong foundation of accounting practices and procedures Strong multitasking ability Strong leadership & managerial skills Strong internet skills i.e. Emailing, group messaging and research Ability to exert initiative Recording, summarizing, a nalyzing, verifying and reporting of results of financial transactions Minimum Experience Requirements Tertiary level with degree in related field; Collections executive with at least 4 years experience in collections or related field ; At least three years experience in supervisory post; Strong knowledge and application of MS Microsoft Suite APPLY VIA EMAIL TO: srcollectionsofficer@yahoo.com n By EMMANUEL GEORGES-PICOT Associated Press Writer PARIS (AP er house of parliament on Wednesday approved a divisive bill to allow more stores to stay o pen and more people to work on Sundays. The bill, passed in a 282-238 vote Wednesday, now goes to t he Senate for debate. Expanding Sunday working hours is one of President Nicolas Sarkozy’s reform pledges. Supporters of such a move say it would give the French economy a much-needed jolt as the nation wrestles with recession. France’s leftist opposition, however, calls it an affront to labour protections, and traditionalists decry it as an attack on the time-honoured day of rest. Under the new measure, shops in France’s three largest m etropolitan areas Paris, Marseille and Lille would be permitted to open on Sundays. Employees would have the choice to refuse Sunday working hours, and employers must pay those who agree to work double overtime. Shops in another 500 towns and villages deemed to be of “tourist interest” could also open, but without the obligation to pay employees double overtime. The bill seeks to bring order to the tangle of loopholes that have sprung up since a 1906 law that established Sunday as a mandatory day off. That law was passed after a deadly mining accident that helped mobilize support for greater worker rights. The opposition Socialist, Green and Communist parties voted against the bill. “What is presented to us as an anecdotal little text...is in fact opening a large breach in the French social model,” Socialist lawmaker Christian Eckert said. T en lawmakers from Sarkozy’s UMP conservative party voted against the bill, and 15 abstained. A minority of French stores has been allowed to open on Sundays through a patchwork of exceptions, such as one that allows shops in tourist zones like Paris’ Champs-Elysees Avenue to open if their wares or services fit a vaguely defined category of entertainment and cultural goods. In other areas, such as the French capital’s tourist-packed Marais quarter, shops selling jewellery and clothing benefit from authorities turning a blind eye. European Union data show that France’s restrictions on business activity on Sundays are similar to those in several other Western European nations, with about 15 per cent of French people surveyed saying they usually work Sundays, compared with the EU average of around 14 per cent. T he French Senate, dominated by Sarkozy’s party, is scheduled to debate the bill July 21-23. France approves Sunday opening

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009, PAGE 15B www.babnancial.com 2 42-461-1000 Freeport242-352-7209Exuma242-336-3035Abaco242-367-5601 Clockwisefromtop:RashedaBodie, ShantelMajorDorma,JanetHanna,HelenGardiner, OliveLightbourne&JoyannePageotBritishAmericanFinancial President’sCircleQualiers PresidentsCircle n By DANIEL WAGNER AP Business Writer W ASHINGTON (AP With banks repaying bailout money, credit markets beginning to flow and Goldman Sachs posting stunning profits, the financial sector would appear to be stabilizing. ButC IT Group Inc., one of the nation’s largest lenders to smalland mid-sized businesses, teeters on the brink of collapse. In meetings that recall last fall’s late-night negotiations over failing financial firms, rep-r esentatives from the Treasury Department, the Federal Reserve and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. werel ocked in tense meetings Tuesd ay about how to bail out the f irm or whether to do so at a ll. The debate hinges on quest ions about how bad off CIT r eally is, and how its failure could affect about a million s mall businesses from D unkin’ Donuts franchisees to r etailer Dillards Inc. that d epend on it for credit. Corporate customers started to draw down on their credit lines Monday and Tuesday, according to a report Wednes-d ay in The Wall Street Journal, which cited unidentified people f amiliar with the situation. Those people told the newspaper the drawdowns amounted to several hundred million dollars, with one number ment ioned as high as $775 million. A spokesman for New Yorkbased CIT on Wednesday wasn ot immediately available for comment. CIT, which in April posted a b igger-than-expected first-quar ter loss, has seen funding options disappear as investors shy away from purchasing all b ut the safest forms of debt. The lender has $7.4 billion in debt coming due in the first q uarter of 2010, plus other obligations. The recent down grades of its credit ratings will m ake it harder to refinance that debt in coming months, raising fears that it could default. CIT said Saturday it retained the lawf irm Skadden Arps, a bankruptcy specialist, as an adviser. Regulators know they cannot b e seen as insensitive to small businesses, which could fail if their funding is disrupted. Small businesses are critical to the n ation’s economic recovery, providing about half of all pri vate-sector jobs. Yet the administration faces mounting criticism about thes kyrocketing costs of bailout and stimulus plans, and the continuing rise in unemployment. Critics wonder whether the government should prop up firms l ike CIT that can’t stand on their own. Unlike Citigroup Inc. a nd Bank of America Corp., whose failures would have upended the banking system and created financial chaos, some say CIT may not pose such broad risks. “This is all about where you draw the line, and a very big call has to be made,” said Simon Johnson, a former chief economist with the InternationalM onetary Fund and now a prof essor at the Massachusetts I nstitute of Technology’s Sloan S chool of Business. Johnson and others argue that CIT should not be deemed “too big to fail.” But Rep. Albio Sires, D-N.J., who owned a title i nsurance agency that employed 12 people, sent a letter last week t o FDIC Chairman Sheila Bair i mploring her to approve CIT for a programme that would p rovide federal guarantees for its debt. That programme hasb een at the center of the official d ebate over how to help CIT. I f CIT fails, “A lot of smalla nd mid-sized businesses would get hurt. I don’t think at this s tage, with the economy as it is, we can afford that,” said Sires. Their role in the market rise s to the systemic level,” said Scott Talbott, a lobbyist with the Financial Services Roundtable, which represents CIT and other large finance companies. T he FDIC has so far resisted calls to give the firm that key s ubsidy, maintaining that its l oan guarantee programme is the wrong prescription for the company, according to govern-m ent and industry officials familiar with the matter. They say Bair, the FDIC’s famously independent chair-m an, believes the Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Programme was designed to u nfreeze credit markets, not bail out companies. Backing CIT’s debt also would put at risk the insurance fund used to repay d eposits when banks fail an event that itself could undermine financial stability. The offi cials spoke anonymously because CIT’s application is still pending. The temporary programme is due to be wound down this fall, and banks that have repaid fed-e ral bailout money are no longer eligible to participate. FDIC spokesman Andrew Gray said the agency can’t comment on pending applications. C urt Ritter, a spokesman for CIT, on Tuesday would say only t hat negotiations are ongoing. “The administration is closely monitoring” the situation, said White House spokeswoman Jennifer Psaki. Shares of CIT added 26 cents, or more than 19 per cent, to $1.61 Tuesday on hopes that the government would throw the company a financial lifeline. CIT also has explored a transf er of assets and cash between t he parent holding company a nd CIT’s smaller bank. But t hat move would require FDIC approval. The FDIC must ensure that the bank is not trading cash for overvalued assets, which could save the parent c ompany but leave the FDIC on the hook for deposits if the b ank fails. T he FDIC must remain focused on its obligation to safeg uard its reserves in case of future bank failures, saidW ayne Abernathy of the Ameri can Bankers Association. I don’t think we want to do a nything to cause depositors to doubt the effectiveness of the d eposit insurance system,” he said. Abernathy spoke general-l y about the FDIC, and did not r efer to any particular bank’s situation. Another option for CIT is getting additional bailout funds on top of the $2.3 billion itr eceived in December from the $700 billion financial bailout p lan. But analysts say the com p any’s problems are deeper than a short-term cash crunch. “We believe CIT’s funding m odel is broken and have our doubts over whether an additional capital injection would cure the problem,” the researchf irm Creditsights Inc. wrote in a report early Tuesday. The government also could b roker a deal between CIT and another company. Under that plan, CIT would fail and anoth er firm would step in to makes ure its borrowers still have access to credit. But such a move might require the Fed or Treasury to guarantee the new firm against losses on CIT’s loans. Aid meetings continue over troubled lender

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The Tribune The T ribune M y V o i c e , M y N e w s p a p e r ! Thursday, July 16th, 2009

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The Tribune P G 2 0 Thursday, July 16, 2009 RELIGION RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND CHURCH EVENTS Pg. 20 The Tribune THURSDAY July 16, 2009

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The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, July 16, 2009 PG 21 B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net IN lif e, we all have a calling and a purpose. God gave each of us the chance and the choice to change the way we live our lives and Deon Mar lon Brown, also known as “Change” is more than ready to make one. “I got the name Change as an inspiration from God. Change really means Christ has a new good earth-that’s what he went to prepare for us so I feel thatI should use the name change because I am tr ying to change a lot of folks to find God,” Change said. Change said he found God a few years back. “It has been a rugged road and I fell short of his glory. However, I re-found him on May 3 during a visit to a friend’s chur ch called Soul Winning Church of God in Christ. After going ther e and listening to the bishop, I said to myself I need to go back on the r oad I was on because I realise Satan was trying to use me. I got back into my Bible studying and back into church,” Change said. Change said he had always liked to write his own songs and his friends took notice. “They would always say to me that I was wasting my talent and I should use it. The song Manners and Respect came to me after my experiences on the bus. Watching other people on the bus and no one was saying good mor ning and so forth. I saw kids and big folks not saying excuse me to older people. So I wr ote that song. The Lor d then gave me the inspiration to make sur e ever ything was in the right place,” Change said. As for his sound, Change said he prefers the rap genre. “I am versatile but I rap about manners and respect and use it for the glory of God. I want to touch the hearts of the youth and the people of the coun tr y,” Change said. Change said he is into the music scene to help people seek God. “The message in my music is to tell people to find God and seek him in their life. These are the last evil days and I want them to realise the life they are living will lead to total destruction.” a Time change for DEON MARLON Brown, also known as “Change” is ready to make a difference in gospel music.

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FEARLESS The Tribune P G 22 Thursday, July 16, 2009 RELIGION “To the Jews who had believed him, Jesus said, “If you hold to my teaching, you are really my disciples. Then you will know the truth, and the truth shall set you free.” J J o o h h n n 8 8 : : 3 3 1 1 3 3 2 2 ( ( N N . . I I . . V V ) ) See what you might see, if you really saw what you did seeyet were curious about the reality behind what was there. When I see you, your physical is trivial, and your interiorsuperior. When I hear you, your voice is the tick tock of a clockhigh and low, your sounds get dirty in my ears, the message lost foreverthe challenge of your words, a marathon I prepare to run. Your movements resemble mine, however your face does not. Your lips, your eyes, your tries and your liesI enjoy a great deal. Your imperfection is simply a reflection of the fact you’re susceptible to the world’s appetite. Your time, your heart, your light and your heightI enjoy a great deal. Your perfection is simply a reflection of the fact you’re in it for real. I see what I see, I know what I knowI hide nothing. I r ead tr uth, I want tr uth, I need truth, I believe truth and I live truth. I am transparentwe ar e transpar ent. When did truth become an annoyance? A weakness, a guilt trip or a regret. How is it that lies feel better than tr uths. Lies and their disfiguration of a healthy, vibrant, evolving realitysoftly caressing an ego to a state of sunny ignoranceboth a state to lie and a lie in state. T o open our eyes takes courage, dedication and a sound mind; to choose a life of transparent livingto literally choose reality over fantasy and a real life over strife; is to choose faith, hope, love and an eternal passion to come and go as you are. Knowing without knowing; you are born anew. There is a book that holds a truth available for all to claim; a truth that refuses to change and will always remain the same. And with r ever ence to His name; we believe as believers, the message His Son Jesus Christ pr oclaimed. Not some truth, but all truth. In closingif the world wants change, tr uth must pr ecede it, thus allowing for a transparent nature to receive it. T oni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian writer and poet, currently residing in Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to the article can be sent to fearless247@gmail.com Be clear TONI STYLES Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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The Tribune Thursday, July 16, 2009 PG 23 RELIGION By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net A L OC AL P astor is gearing up t o launc h a f irst of its kind summer singing camp called the National Music Honors Pr ogr amme, and says should all go well it could likely lead to the start of t he N ational High Sc hool Music Honours Programme. Pastor T r ent Davis, Pastor of Administration at Golden Gates Assembly’s World Outreach Ministries, said the idea for the unique music camp was born from his previous work in a similar youth pr ogramme in Washington DC several years ago. He explained: “I had the oppor tuni ty to work with some gifted kids at the Eastern High School in Washington, and during that time I witnessed these kids achieve national renowned status and perform at several major events including per for mances at the White House, and also the Capitol Building. “That was an inner city programme designed to give high school students an opportunity through singing to make inroads into other areas and leadership roles in life, and so I wanted to transfer that programme here.” Mr Davis who has helped to arrange music for some of the biggest names in gospel music including Yolanda Adams, Richard Smallwood, Daryl Collie, and Karin Clarke, is now work ing with the Ministr y of Y outh to help develop some of the young music hope fuls here in the Bahamas. W ith a staf f of 8, he has now trans for med the chur ch into a singing oasis where auditions have been ongoing since Monday and will continue until this Friday. 19-year-old Lloydia Steed who is a summer inter n at the pr ogramme, is one of 8 staff members at the camp who have worked on bringing the singing workshop to life. She explained: “Being placed in a leadership position in this programme has helped me to learn how to get things done quickly and accurately, I’ve learnt how to get ideas on the table to draw people into pr ogrammes like this.” Helping out with the creation of flyers, a face book pr ofile for the pr oject, and sending dozens of email to poten tial applicants, Ms Steed said her work has been truly rewarding and she looks forward to the official start of the programme’s workshop which begins next Monday and will r un until July 29. She said the pr ogramme is available to persons between the ages of thir teen to eighteen, and does not require them to have had extended vocal training. However the pr ogramme has alr eady recruited almost a dozen teens who sing as if they’ve been singing from birth she explained. She also explained the programme is fr ee to all, and allows successful appli cants a chance to learn a tremendous amount ranging from vocal presentation, har mony , vocal car e, gr oup singing, r eading music, and much mor e. Based on the successful outcome of the programme, Mr Davis explained that he has arranged for further discussion with the Ministry of Youth and with the Ministr y of Education to begin the groundwork for the future creation of the National High School Music Honours Society . He said par ents can r est assured that their kids will learn all they need in the areas of music production and performances, and he is simply happy to be a part of this important music development her e in Nassau. Sing me a son G FROM Left to right: Summer interns Ryan Smith, Lloydia Steed, Dereck Storr, and Coordinator Trent Davis. Working with the upcoming National Music Honors Programme at Golden Gates Assembly , the group is hoping to attract a healthy crop of music hopefuls to the singing programme.

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The Tribune P G 24 Thursday, July 16, 2009 RELIGION GOSPELrecording artist Ricardo Clarke, who released his debut Gospel/Reggae album on February 27 has taken the local Christian community by storm with lyrics which not only speak of the challenges of being saved or unsaved, but also on the realities of living in an economically crunched environment. Hundreds came to support Ricardo Clarke w/ The Higher Level Band which featured some of the premiere acts in gospel music and was the introduction of the newest gospel face Countella, who provided "down home" comedy. The inspirational message of Not Settlin has been wide spread, and has crossed all boundaries and is beginning to spread internationally. Inclement weather forced a postponement last month, but it won't deter Ricardo Clarke, and he's not settling for anything less than a stellar performance. As a result, the new date for Ricardo Clarke's "Not Settling Encore " concert with the Higher Level Band has been confirmed for Friday, July 17,at the original venue, Calvary Deliverance Church on East Street south. "Not Settling" is Clarke's biggest hit off the album "Uprising" and the song is still in heavy rotation, as the lyrics continue to inspire: "I'm not Settling, I Deserve the Best, Not Going to Live My Life Like the Rest . . ." is a message not to be taken lightly. He will be joined on the night of the concer t by fel low artists such as Najee Dun, Mr Beedz, DJ Counsellor , Der ek and Charlie, the yellow Bahamian Par r ot and Reubin Heights. Showtime is 7. 30 pm and free phone cards will be given out all night. Mr Clarke who is busy promoting his singles "No Minutes" as well as "Once I'm in Zion" also off the "Uprising" album, recently made a monetary donation to the Sister/Sister Breast Cancer Support Group, as he strives to use his popularity to get more people and his fans involved in charity pr ojects, and highlight their work in any way possible. Mr Clarke's hit single "Not Settling" has been gr owing fr om str ength to str ength and his conscious and inspiring lyrics account for his growing fan base in the Caribbean as well as inter nationally . He is not just in the top 10 on the AOL charts but is also number one on riddimjamaica.net. Check out this encore performance by Ricardo Clarke 7.30pm at Calvar y Deliverance Chur ch, East Street South. For further information, contact the church office @ 325-1802. Ricardo Clarke in concert THEChurch of God of Prophecy celebrates 100 years of ministr y in the Bahamas this year and over the years has always been an organisation that has been responsive to the needs of the poor and those with other social needs. According to committee member Elizabeth Keju, the chur ch has been involved in prison ministry, hospital ministry and seniors ministry on a national level. The various local chur ches have for many years operated soup kitchens, distributed clothing, school supplies and adopted schools. National Overseer, Bishop Elgarnet B Rahming wanted to bring all of the various branches under one umbr ella for improved effectiveness and better use of the limited resources. At a r ecent pr ess confer ence, the recently appointed director of the Social Outr each Ministr y Patricia Bethel, outlined plans to of ficially launch the new venture. The team will be working with the twenty pastors and district overseer in New Providence and in the near future the programme will be extended to Grand Bahama and the Family Islands. A commissioning service is scheduled for this Satur day , July 18 at 9 am at the Chur ch of God of Pr ophecy's Children’s' Chapel, Sunlight Village Corner. Bishop Rahming will be on hand to formally introduce the recently appointed workers in this ministry and to outline the r ole this ministr y will play in the outreach ministry of the Church. “The focus of this operation is to provide food for the hungry and clothes for the less for tunate. W e still believe in the ef fectual fer vent prayer of the saints and divine healing and through this ministry we are committed to rescuing “at-risk” neglected, truant and abused youths, we will meet the needs of the impoverished elderly and the homeless; but most importantly we will offer the message of salvation and the hope and peace that only Christ can give,” Ms Bethel said. The Minister for Social Services, Loretta Butler Turner will also address the session on behalf of the Bahamas' Government. The message of the vision for this commissioning session will be delivered by Bishop Shelton Beneby. He will speak on the theme “Catch the V ision”. All Bahamians and residents in the commonwealth are invited to be pr esent Bishop Beneby acknowledged that the harvest is great and there is a lot of work ahead for this committee. Bishop Dale Moss explained that a panel discussion will also be held during the ser vice. Panelists will be on hand to field answers and accept suggestions from the floor on the role of the chur ch, the gover nment and the community in addr essing the social ills of the country. Bishop Moss also discussed the current involvement that the Shirley Street Church has with various nonpr ofit gr oups like “Hands for Hunger which provides hot meals for persons in the neighbouring Kemp Road Community . Church of God of Prophecy Commissions the Ministry of Social Outreach

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The Tribune Thursday, July 16, 2009 PG 25 RELIGION Psalms 121 Inner Harmony, one of the longest running contemporary female gospel vocal groups in the country, has released another single that is set to be a hit with gospel music enthusiasts acr oss The Bahamas. The gr oup is pleased to announce the release of their single Psalm 121 which was taken directly from the scripture and presented in a sultryr eggae style. “I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills, fr om whence cometh my help. My help cometh fr om the LORD, which made heaven and ear th. He will not suf fer thy foot to be moved: he that keepeth thee will not slumber. Behold, he that keepeth Israel shall neither slumber nor sleep.” Psalms 121: 1-4. e are very pleased with this single,” says group leader Patrice, “The track causes you to focus on the Lor d as your help, especially as we go through one of the toughest economic times in recent history.” “It gives listeners hope. Help does not come from the government or men. But it comes from the Lord,” says Antonise. Inner Harmony has teamed up with gospel reggae music giant Mr Lynx who produced the music and also performed on the single. “Mr Lynx did a great job with lead vocals,” said Alma, the group's alto and lead vocalist. The combined smooth sultr y sounds of Inner Har mony and the musical and vocal genius that is Mr Lynx has produced a product that is uplifting to the mind and spirit. For the past nine years Inner Harmony has been ministering the gospel in song. The group comprising of five female vocalists has traveled the islands of the Bahamas and Florida representing the kingdom of God through the art of music. In addition, Inner Harmony hosts an annual conference called “Women in Worship” and a seminar for young women called “Developing Inward Beauty.” e believe that worship is a lifestyle” says Patrice, “ther efore coming from various car eer backgr ounds we can influence women and girls as worshippers no matter what sphere of the marketplace or social background they are employed or come from.” “It is our desir e that this song is a bless ing to all people during these hard economic times,” says Kenice and Otalia added :“We know the struggles that women face on a daily basis because we are women too” Inner Harmony is comprised of Antonise Banker, mother, Pastor's wife, Otalia Government, former Senator's wife, Patrice single, executive secretary, Alma psalmist, mother beautician, and Kenice wife, mother and doctor. For booking contact Patrice Paul at 3615626 or e-mail patricepaul254@msn.com Inner Harmony release new reggae single

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IN Revelation chapter 2 and 3 Yeshuwa Messiah writes to the churches and each of them were given this admonishment: He that hath an ear, Let him hear what the Spirit saith unto the churches; Today the Spirit is yet speaking, but the angels of these churches (bishops, apostles, prophets, doctors, etc;) are so disconnected from Father Yahweh due to their erroneous religious beliefs; they're in no position to hear what the Spirit is saying. As a result the enemy is wreaking havoc throughout the nation.I t is evident that the hit and miss God o f the religious churches today is not t he Most High God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. Ninety percent of the churches here in the Bahamas are operating as an out of control freight train that is hauling flammable substances, and loaded with passengers. It's only a matter of time before disaster strikes. The enemy has cunningly worked his way into what we call the church today; and through various shades of his Babylonian religions has deceived many leaders, left, right and center. This religious spirit and the tradition of men is so powerful in that it has literally caused church leaders to accept and operate from the position and title of religious leaders. Before we go any further think of this for a few moments: With over four thousand churches throughout the Bahamas, how is it that the enemy can wr eak such havoc in this country? As I've stated before and will continue to herald: “The hardest spirit to drive out; is the spirit that's been invited in” As far as today's religious leaders are concer n: ther e is nothing wrong with their church; because they're having the confer ences, seminars, workshops and r evivals, and the people ar e being blessed in Jesus' name. The apostle Paul said to the saints, Galatians.3:1 O' Foolish Galatians who hath bewitched you, that you should not obey the tr uth? Likewise I humbly and r espect fully ask the church leaders of the Bahamas “Who hath bewitched you?” As a patriotic, passionate son of the soil, I would love nothing more than to see the Bahamas being a pace setter on t he global scene in various areas of life. There is absolutely nothing wrong with holding the political leaders of this country accountable for integrity governance; but I must declare that the br unt of the deterioration that this n ation faces lies at the feet / doors of the powerless, religious church. Why or how could I make such a statement? The answer is ver y simple; I've car efully watched and diligently listen to the r eligious leaders as they talk about what their chur ches ar e doing via pr ograms, conferences, etc. Then I'm reminded by the Spirit of what Y eshuwa meant when He r esponded to the answer Peter gave via revelation from Yahweh in Matthew .16:16. Her e's Y eshuwa's r eply Matt.16:18b. And upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell shall not pr evail against it” The problem with the church today is that the leaders have allowed r eligion to be their god; hencefor th they ar e well known in the country as religious leaders and are in stiff competition with each other, to see who can built the largest church and fill it with religious Christians; whereas the church that Yeshuwa has built, He's filling it with true disciples and not religious Christians. The center of attention in religion is and will always be the leaders of that religion, Selah. The organised religious church belongs to the denomination, the bishop, apostle etc; of whom the congregations have be methodically trained to worship and serve in one facet or another. H e that hath an ear, Let him hear w hat the Spirit saith unto the churches: T hrough the incomplete (not incorrect prosperity gospel; the religious leaders are responsible via erroneous, contaminated teachings for the people prioritising and seeking after the blessings of God; rather then them seeking the face of God. Religion has deceived the church so badly to the point that leaders see noth ing wrong with merchandising the gospel and have set up ministries to execute their agendas. As if fleecing and pimping the people from the pulpits ar en't bad enough; attending these money making conferences is liken to the nail, in the cof fin where the people ar e financially char ged to attend. These chargers are often given a religious title and excuse or r eason. They'r e sometimes call registration fees to help meet the budget. The r eligious leaders and their spe cial guest / pimping partners through the spirit of manipulation, compellingly forces the sales of their products (books, c.d's tapes, etc driven if they don't buy victims This merchandising religious practice in the church is nothing new, it's just that today's leaders have up their game in this area; but Yeshuwa's principles and stands on this sort of practice remains the same. Watch this! Matt.21:12. And Yeshuwa went into the temple of God, and cast out all them that sold and brought in the temple, and overthrew the tables of them oney changers, and the seat of them t hat sold dove Verse: 13. And said unto t hem, It is written, My house shall be called the house of prayer; but ye have made it a DEN OF THIEVES. I wonder what He (Yeshuwa) would say if He was ever invited to attend these annual money making religious conferences. Here's a quick reminder to the religious leaders who have built their dynasty by this and many other tactics; 1John.1:9. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. And also to you religious (nuts lowers who are buying everybody's books seeking prosperity and success. Stop wasting the little money you do have and become a disciple of Yeshuwa. Here's what the Bible (God's word) says about your prosperity and success. Joshua.1:8.This book shall not depart out of thy mouth; but thou shalt medi tate therein day and night, that thou mayest observe to do according to all that is written ther ein: for then thou shalt make thy way prosperous, and then thou shalt have good success. He that hath an ear, Let him hear what the Spirit saith unto the chur ches. Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen, Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l, For questions and comments contact us via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or Ph.1-242-441-2021 or 225-3850 The Tribune PG 26 Thursday, July 16, 2009 RELIGION PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN An ear to hear! YOUTH fr om thir teen nations and ten family islands will be in Nassau to attend the eight Caribbean Baptist Fellowship Youth Festival next week. The festival which is held every three years will include participants from ten family islands and The United States, India, Guyana, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, Antigua, Barbados, The Turks and Caicos Islands, St Kitts, Dominica, Haiti, and Gr enada. During their time, here participants will discuss a number of varied and vexing issues affecting youth of the world. Organisers of the event say that it will have a tr emendous financial impact on the countr y by pr oviding business to many local entr epr eneurs and estab lished businesses such as graphic designs, printing, garment manufacturing, entertainment, photography, audio and video services, food veneering, sanitation and transpor tation contracts. The Wyndham Resorts are also set to benefit with an average of over four hundr ed hotel nights. T opics to be discussed include: crime and violence, cyber addiction, gadget gospel, love and abstinence, environmental stewardship, youth ministry for the 21st century and many more. Pr esenters include: Rev Emmett Dunn, Baptist W orld Pr ogramme Coor dinator and Y outh Dir ector, Dr Michael Taylor, earth scientist and president of the Caribbean Baptist Fellowship Youth Dept., Rev Diana Francis, Rev Ulric Smith, and many of the leading local and r egional ministers including: Pastor Dave Burrows, Pastor Sterling Mcphee,a nd Pastor Carlos Reid. Some of the highlights of the festival include: A Dis is a Bahamian ting-welcome celebration, CBF Youth Ball, honoring distinguished Youth Leaders of ther egion and the launching of the CBF Y outh Ambassador Pr ogramme Global Mar ch and Rally and a Caribbean Praise: Cross/Cultural Victory Concert featuring top Bahamian and Caribbean gospel artists The festival is hosted by the Bahamas National Baptist Missionar y and Educational Convention, a member body of the Caribbean Baptist Fellowship (CBF end Clinton L Minnis for mer Baptist youth director and vice president of the CBF youth dept is providing executive leadership for the management of the festival and Br Wellington Smith serves as the local coor dinator. Eight Caribbean Baptist Fellowship Youth Festival Ninety percent of the churches here in t he Bahamas are operating as an out of control freight train that is hauling flammable substances, and loaded with passengers. It's only a matter of time before disaster strikes.

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The Tribune Thursday, July 16, 2009 PG 27 RELIGION religion BRIEFS ACLU demands changes after jail removes Bible verses from letters to inmate RICHMOND, Va. (AP and free-speech advocates are demanding a written guarantee that inmates at a Virginia jail can receive letters containing religious material after a prisoner said his mail was censored. The American Civil Liberties Union, i ts Virginia chapter and several other civil, religious and prisoner rights organizations sent a letter to Rappahannock Regional Jail Superintendent Joseph Higgs Jr. requesting that the issue be resolved without litigation. A nna Williams, whose son was detained at the jail for several months, said officials cut out entire sections of several letters she sent to her son that contained Bible verses or religious material. She said the jail cited prohibitions on Internet material and religious material sent from home. "Obviously for security issues the right to practice religion while incarcerated is a balancing act to some extent, but that can't possibly apply to a mother sending religious passages to her son," said Kent Willis, executive director of the ACLU of V ir ginia. Higgs said in a written statement that the letter prompted him to initiate an inter nal investigation. The U.S. Supreme Court has said that inmates have the right to practice r eligion as long as it doesn't interfere with their other obligations or cr eate a security risk. Birmingham 'religion' billboard brings debate BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP billboar d that was put up by the Alabama Freethought Association is causing debate, with some saying the sign reading "Imagine No Religion" is offensive and should be removed. The billboar d along Interstate 20 near Pell City was placed there by the association as part of a national campaign by the Fr eedom Fr om Religion Foundation. The backgr ound of the sign is of a stained glass window with the words sung by John Lennon in the song "Imagine" on top. Annie Laurie Gaylor, co-president of the foundation in Madison, W is., said the sign will be up for a month. The group had wanted a billboard near the Bir mingham-Shuttleswor th Inter national Airpor t, but Lamar Advertising declined. "We got censored by Lamar," she said. "It was offensive to me," said Tom T raylor, general manager of Lamar Advertising in Birmingham. "We have the autonomy to decide what's in the best inter ests of our company and what's of fensive. I don't think it was the kind of message we wanted to stand behind. ABACOwas also known as Habocoa, Ibico, Habacor and Incayonique. The island was settled temporarily by the French in 1685. The Loyalists arrived in 1785 from New England. In 1783 the populationof Abaco is recorded as nil, but by 1786, after the arrival of the Loyalists, the figure is 686, including 384 slaves. Joseph Paul and his family arrived at Carleton (four miles from Treasure Cay) in 1783, but no record exists of any work he might have done among the black population during the peri-od he remained here. THE FIRST MINISTER ARRIVES In June, 1815 the Reverend Joseph Ward, the fourth minister sent to the Bahamas by the British Methodist Church, arrived at Green Turtle Cay. In a letter dated August 11, 1815, Reverend Ward explains that he came to Abaco in response to the petition and to get rid of 'a bilious complaint'. His passage was provided by Benjamin Lowe, "a pious Abaconian", who was a boat captain. Rever end W ar d landed at Gr een Turtle Cay on June 21, 1815, a Sunday, and his text that day was, "Behold, I bring you good tidings!"W ard is described as: " ... undoubtedly one of the most talented and most ardent missionaries ever seen in theW est Indian field ... " The Reverend John Rutledge, an Irish missionary, described Ward as " ... the greatest labourer our part of the vineyard can boast of." His ministry in Abaco lasted less than one year, after which he was sent to Harbour Island. He died in Nassau in September, 1817, after a ministry which was described as having been 'as shor t as it was brilliant'. The Reverend Michael Head, who succeeded Ward at Green Turtle towards the end of 1815, also died in 1817. By 1836, there were 300 members at Gr een Turtle Cay. HOPE TOWN AND CHEROKEE SOUND BEGINNINGS A Methodist society was for med at Hope T own (then also known as Great Harbour) in 1820. There are few details available sur r ounding this development. In 1827, the Cherokee Sound Society was opened by the Reverend James Horne. It is known, from the records of Joseph Ward, that there was a settlement called Cher okee Sound in 1815, which W ard passed on his way to Green Turtle Cay. A chapel was built at Cher okee Sound the fol lowing year. In 1841, there were more than 700 members in the Green Turtle Cay Church. They worshipped in a wooden chapel. In 1843 a corner-stone was laid for the erection of a new chapel, which was completed in 1856. This was a stone building, which was destroyed by the hurricane of 1932, and a photograph of the chapel is to be found in the Albert Lowe Museum at Green Turtle Cay. A SOCIETY FORMED IN MARSH HARBOUR In 1845, a society was formed in Marsh Harbour. The Synod minutes for 1846 read: "At this settlement we have formed a class of sincere souls, most of whom ar e only seeking the power of godliness. They ar e sometimes vis ited on the Sabbath Day by an Exhorter from Great Harbour (HopeT own)." A Sunday-school was also formed at Marsh Harbour in 1845. Ther e were twelve students and one teacher . FIRST BAHAMIAN MINISTER IN ABACO The appointment of the Rever end Alexander J Thompson to the circuit occurred in 1848. He was the second Bahamian minister, and the first Bahamian appointed to the Abaco Cir cuit. Thompson's ministr y was primarily concerned with the racial segregation which was being practised in the chur ch. The District had for mu lated r egulations against this, and sent the Reverend Thompson to enforce them. "The Methodist Districts resolved that there should be no colour distinctions in seats. However , in 1847, John Blackwell, the Methodist missionary at Green Turtle Cay, compromised by allowing the whites to sit on one side and the blacks on the other . This ruling was condemned by the District meeting, but in 1848, his suc cessor Samuel Annear was violently opposed and ill-treated for trying to enforce the District's regulations. Annear finally had to be removed." It was to this situation that Thompson was appointed in 1848. The tension caused by racial segr egation was so great, that many white people left Gr een T ur tle Cay for Key West. The white and black population had toiled on the building of a chapel, but the whites were experiencing some difficulties in accepting their black brethren as equals. It is to be remembered that many of the blacks were formerly slaves of the whites, so this was a radical change for them. OLD PLACE BEGINS The next development in the circuit occurred in 1869. A class of 14 members was started at Old Place. The Circuit report for 1869 reads: "We have commenced preaching in a place on the mainland of Abaco distant from Green Turtle Cay about 15 miles, with hopeful signs of success. It promises to be a prosperous village or neighbourhood and may be a station of some importance in a few years. We formed a class of 14 members and expect to add to their number in a shor t time." In 1870, the membership in the circuit is 295. The Marsh Harbour Sunday-school has 13 pupils and two teachers (both male there is report of improvement at Old Place, and plans to build a chapel. In 1875, the Reverend Elijah Sumner r epor ted to Synod that the cir cuit was grateful to " ... a br other whose faith ful oversight is respected by all the members and blessed by God in keeping the society together ." He r epor ts pleasant, pr ofitable visits, and that the people of the society ar e poor , and live far apart, some of them having to walk as many as 10 miles to chur ch. Fr om 1869 to 1878, the Methodists worshipped at the Baptist chapel, and the Methodist chapel was under construction from 1875 to 1878. MAN-O-WAR SOCIETY The society at Man-a-War Cay was star ted in 1870 with six members. This was never a large society, and was eventually closed during the mid1970's By 1878, r epor ts ar e that the racial strife, which was particularly severe in Green Turtle Cay had abated, and that relations were much more harmonious. In that year there were 58 members, an incr ease of five over the previous year. The Sunday-school reported seven teachers and 43 pupils. CIRCUIT'S FIRST CANDIDA TE FOR MINISTR Y In 1955, the District Synod accepted Charles Christopher Cur r y as a candi date for the ministr y . He was the first Abaconian to candidate. The Reverend Curry, a native of Green Turtle Cay gave years of dedicated service, and became the first Bahamian Chair man of the District in 1978. (Next time: Par t 37 – Methodists in Abaco 2) Joseph Paul and the Loyalists J IM L AWLOR THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS Part 36 – Methodists in Abaco 1

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The Tribune PG 28 Thursday, July 16, 2009 RELIGION ONSaturday, July 18, the community known as “The Valley” will come alive when the St George’s Anglican Church holds its annual “Thrill of the Grill and Parish Fair “The church fair is the major fundraising event which assists with the operating expenses of our chur ch and its ministry to our members and the wider community. The Anglican Church Men of our parish will man the grills where delicious steaks and chickens will headline the food items which will be available at the fair” said Brenda Archer chairperson of the organising committee. Local foods including a conch of ever y type, home cooker y and new items including roast corn and “chicken in da bag” will be available to purchase. “Even mor e impor tant than the funds we hope to raise, is the oppor tunity to fellowship and get to know each other better,” said Fr Kingsley Knowles, rector of the parish. The youth department will man the soft drinks, daiquiri, ice-cr eam and snowball stalls said Allison Estwick, youth coordinator of the parish. In addition the youth will offer computer games, hamburgers and hot-dogs, face painting and the bouncing castle to keep the kids busy during the fair. Of course we can’t do without our cakes and pastries , so this year we intend to make this stall even bigger and better, said Betty Smith, president of the church’s Guild to Help the Sick and Needy. “Our Guild goes all out to provide cakes, pastries, pies and tar ts of every description and we expect no less this year In addition to all these booths Agnes Munnings and Virgil Briggs will man the plants and books stall which has always been a great hit, said Ms Archer. Games of chance including bingo, white elephant, hoop-la and punch boar d with a number of gr eat prizes will be available. Live coverage of the fair will come via STAR 106.5 FM with Brad Hanna from2 to 6 pm. The Grill Out and Parish Fair will end with a Junkanoo RushOut with the Valley Boys. Thrill of the Grill PARISHIONERS enjoy the many activities and food items which were available at St George’s annual Thrill of The Grill and Parish Fair last year.