Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
WEATHER

The Tribune

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

TRY OUR
BBQ CHIPOTLE
SNACK WRAP

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Mim blowin’ it

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Volume: 105 No.192



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Emotions on

Canvas



Mother suspicious
over Andros boys’
conflicting stories

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE mother of two boys who
disappeared in Andros for nearly
five weeks said a kidnapping
could explain their mysterious
disappearance.

Vera Clarke, of Kemp Road,
Nassau, said she is suspicious as
her sons have told her conflict-
ing stories about their where-
abouts during the 33 days they
were missing.

After leaving their grandmoth-
er’s house in Smith’s Hill, south
east Andros, at around 6pm on

June 9, Marcell Clarke, 6, told his
mother he fell in a cave-like hole
and was stuck there for the entire
time he was away from home.

But his half-brother Deange-
lo, 9, said they were only trapped
in the hole for two or three days,
raising questions about where
they were for the rest of the time
they were missing.

Ms Clarke said: “When they
were gone I thought they had
been kidnapped, and I think they
would tell me if they had been,
unless somebody threatened
them.

SEE page eight

Police ‘will not be targeting
Dwight Major’ when he returns

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

COMMISSIONER of Police Reginald Ferguson yesterday did not
criticise the ruling of a US Federal court that sentenced self confessed
drug dealer Dwight Major to less than nine years behind bars.

Although Major was sentenced to 108 months in prison with super-
vised release after five years, his sentence will take into account the 78

SEE page eight

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Coroner’s inquest
into teen’s cell
death to start soon

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

A CORONER'S inquest into
the death of teenager Michael
Knowles, who was found hanged
in a cell at the East Street South
police station, is expected to start
soon, said Police Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson.

Meanwhile, Knowles' mother
Donna Wilson said she still has
unanswered questions about his
death as she prepares for his
funeral on Thursday.

Yesterday, the police chief
would not reveal details of the
police investigation into the boy's
death or the results of the state's
autopsy only saying the findings
— which were recently turned
over to the Coroner's Court —
would be made public through
the inquest proceedings.

"A lot depends on what the

SEE page eight

Located on Em

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009



Mackey Streets

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Mornings are
Great for GRITS
ait Wendys !

+>» Chandra takes

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Bahamian
authorities work

channels



FNM leadership candidates ‘will push
for deputy’ if PM won’t stand in 2012

IN THE event that Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham will not offer for re-election in the 2012 general
election, candidates for the leadership of the party
are reportedly set to make a push for the deputy
leadership post at the FNM’s upcoming conven-
tion, The Tribune was told.

While these intentions, which are being heavily
guarded in the run up to the convention, have start-
ed to leak out to the general public, there are also
reports that the chairman of the party, Johnley
Ferguson could also face a challenge to his position.



Hubert Ingraham

SEE page eight




















Prosecution closes case in
Harl Taylor murder trial

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

McNeil, 22, the son of Tay-
lor’s former business partner
Troy McNeil, is accused of caus-
ing Taylor’s death between Sat-
urday, November 17, and Sun-
day, November 18, 2007 while
being concerned with another.
Taylor, 37, was found dead at

SEE page eight

THE Prosecution closed its
case yesterday against Troyniko
McNeil who is accused of the
November 2007 murder of
internationally recognised hand-
bag designer Harl Taylor.



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

through diplomatic

Police awaiting
US clearance to
interview murder
victim’s daughter

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN police are
awaiting clearance from
American authorities to
travel to the United States
to interview the teenage
daughter of murder victim
Anna Garrison in connec-
tion with her mother’s
death.

Police Superintendent
Elsworth Moss said Bahami-
an authorities are “making
progress” in this regard,
working through diplomatic
channels in their efforts to
speak with Madison Pugh,
who also goes by the names
Madison Sweeting and
Madison McKinney.

According to the senior
officer, police are already
aware of where the teenag-
er, said to be aged around
16 years old, is currently
residing.

They say Madison left
The Bahamas for the US.

SEE page eight



Road paving
issues blamed on
PLP govt’s joint
venture insistence

THE delay and waste of money
associated with the paving of a
major road in Acklins was as a
direct result of the former govern-
ment’s insistence that two compa-
nies joint venture to repair the
same stretch of highway, it was
claimed yesterday.

Caribbean Asphalt Products Ltd
(CAP), which had been in busi-
ness for more than 30 years, was
reportedly made to joint venture
with M&R Road Builders to carry
out road construction in South
Acklins.

It is claimed that the joint ven-
ture was a condition of CAP
receiving the contract for the road
construction.

CAP’s first and only contract
under the former PLP administra-
tion was in 2006 when it was
claimed the company was instruct-
ed by the Ministry of Public Works
to joint venture with a company
called M&R Road Builders to car-
ry out road construction in South
Acklins. The principals in this com-
pany were two Acklins business-
men, both strong PLP supporters.

At the time M&R Road
Builders was a novice company in
road building.

The joint venture turned out to

SEE page eight

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Deadline for
investors in BIC
privatisation
PPOCESS

GOVERNMENT has
set a July 28 deadline for
investors interested in
registering for the first
phase in the privatisation
process of the Bahamas
Telecommunications
Company (BTC).

Yesterday, government
officially issued a notice
of privatisation and
announced the launch of
the process to sell a 51
per cent stake in BTC.

In the notice, which
was featured in several
local and international
publications, the Bahami-
an government encour-
ages interested parties to
participate in the regis-
tration and pre-qualifica-
tion process.

The government is
seeking a strategic part-
ner who can offer the fol-
lowing: “A strong reputa-
tion in the telecommuni-
cations industry; ability
and commitment to gen-
erate value-added rev-
enue and cost synergies
with BTC operations;
financial strength and
operational platform to
be able to enhance BTC’s
underlying network, ser-
vices, billing and cus-
tomer service, and a his-
tory of strong financial
performance.”

Interested parties are
invited to register for the
privatisation process of
BTC through the submis-
sion of a registration
form and the payment of
a processing fee of
US$25,000 on or before
3pm (EST) on July 28,
2009.

The registration form
and guidelines on the
submission of the form
are available at
http://www.btcprivatiza-
tion.com.

Qualified parties will
be invited to participate
in the due diligence
phase, giving them access
to a data room, financial
vendor due diligence
report, technical due dili-
gence report, manage-
ment presentation and
site visits.

After the due diligence
phase, investors/consor-
tiums will be invited to
submit binding bids for
the stake in BTC.

Ua
US)

tee hay

PHONE: $22-2157



From your wife, Esther and your
sons, Darian & DaRon.



Independence celebration
leaves a mess in Montagu

PROUD Bahamians were horrified
to find the Montagu foreshore littered
with garbage following three days of cel-
ebration throughout the Independence
Day holiday weekend.

Nassau residents taking a morning
walk along the waterfront on Monday
morning said they were disgusted to find
a stinking mess of food containers, beer
cans, bottles and plastic littering the pub-
lic park and coastline.

They said garbage cans stood empty
while litter was apparently strewn across
the ground by hundreds of revellers
enjoying a ‘No Boat Regatta’ held on
Friday, Saturday and Sunday at the Mon-
tagu foreshore.

Julie Pinder, who was among the
group who found the mess, said: “There
were empty garbage cans and garbage
everywhere.

“People were there to pick it up, but
that’s not the point - the point is that it
shouldn’t be there in the first place.

“Tt shouldn’t be there any day of the
week, but isn’t Independence Day all
about pride in our country?

“If people are going to be having func-
tions out there, there should be a law
that it should be cleaned up before they
leave. It’s disgusting. It stank. And every-
one agreed it’s a disgrace,” she said.

BERNARD CRAWLEY WENDY DAWKINS

ONE of the world’s biggest
beauty pageants - The Miss
Universe Pageant - is coming
to town at a time when
Bahamians are suffering from
the effects of the global eco-
nomic downturn.

The Tribune hit the streets
yesterday to ask if the average
Bahamian would be enticed
to attend the event even
though the least expensive
ticket is selling for $175.

Bernard Crawley

“Yes (I would attend)
because for a lot of Bahami-
ans it’s a status thing, it does-
n't have anything to do with
the pageant itself, it’s the fact
of being able to say ‘I can go.’

It’s right here versus hav-
ing to take a flight somewhere
and then pay to go to the
pageant, its right here, its right
in the Bahamas. For a very
long time there won’t be a
another Miss Universe
Pageant here. For most of us

Local News
Sports

Business
Arts/Taste
Comics
Weather

Editorial/Letters. .........

rs

A oe

GIA ANDERSON

— US, Cuba resume migration

we just see when it’s on tele-
vision so this is better.”

Wendy Dawkins

pay

ery, but they will do it.”

Gia Anderson

“This is the first time they }
are having Miss Universe }
over here, so trust me they }
will spend their money to go }

out and see it.”

DJ Crazy

“T will go and support it, }
besides you have guys who go }
just to see them legs. If I have }
the money I will go just to see }
what other countries get out }

of the experience.”

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Piberoroueoaule

Apnea eee e eee eenn ea Nenee te P4

Ee Onda

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

P1,2,3,4,5,6
oe Ome

CLASSIFIED SECTION 16 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



“Yeah, I think people will

“It doesn’t matter what it }
costs, if a person wants to doa i
thing or wants to get it, trust
me they will find the money :
and do it. It could cost a mil- |
lion dollars, theyll do it, but ;
tomorrow they will be hun- :

a aga
i 2 ae




































































MONTAGU foreshore was littered with garbage on Monday morning alee a three-day party over the Meee Day holiday weekend.

DJ CRAZY




talks after six year pause

WASHINGTON

THE United States and Cuba are renewing negotiations on the
U.S.-Cuba Migration accords, according to Associated Press.

The State Department said department official Craig Kelly headed
the U.S. delegation meeting Tuesday with Cuban negotiators in New

York.

The talks’ focus will be on promotion of safe, legal and orderly
migration between the two countries.

The Obama administration proposed on May 22 to resume talks to
implement the 15-year-old accords. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton announced May 31 that Cuba had agreed.

Former President George W. Bush suspended the talks after the last

session in 2003.

Puerto Rico reports its
first swine flu death

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

PUERTO RICO is reporting
the U.S. island's first death from
swine flu, and another eight
deaths are being investigated,
according to Associated Press.

The Health Department says
the victim was a 27-year-old
man who had a history of asth-
ma. He died July 6 but the
cause was not confirmed until
Tuesday.

Puerto Rico's chief epidemi-

ologist, Johnny Rullan, says 35
local cases of the H1INI1 virus
have been confirmed by the
U.S. Centers for Disease Con-
trol. Another 290 potential cas-
es are still being evaluated.

Gov. Luis Fortuno says
authorities are seeing the per-
son-to-person spread of the
virus in the Caribbean island of
nearly 4 million inhabitants. He
is urging anyone with flu-like
symptoms to seek treatment
immediately.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Suspected
cocaine
worth
$600,000
is seized

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A large
quantity of suspected
cocaine valued at
$600,000 was seized by
Bahamian and United
States law enforcement
officials on Grand
Bahama this week.

Asst Supt Welbourne
Bootle, police press liai-
son officer, said the drug
bust occurred at the
Freeport Container Port
on Monday afternoon.

Information

He said that sometime
around 4pm, acting on
information received,
officers of the Drug
Enforcement Unit
(DEV), US Drug
Enforcement Agency,
and US Customs went to
the container port.

The officers, along with
container port security,
conducted a search of a
20ft container, in which
they discovered 24 pack-

ages of suspected cocaine. }

ASP Bootle said no
arrests have made in con-
nection with the matter
and investigations are
continuing.

@ TOUGH CALL
COLUMN

TOUGH Call, written
by columnist Larry Smith,
will not be published in
today’s Tribune.

The column will appear
next Wednesday when Mr
Smith returns from vaca-
tion.

- Vigilante justice over
boat thefts ‘not far off

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AS SOME Abaconians warn
that vigilante justice is not far off
in the face of a rising tide of boat
thefts in the islands, the Commis-
sioner of Police says he is “focus-
ing” on the problem.

Commissioner Reginald Fer-
guson said yesterday that the lead-
ership of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force is “fully cognisant of
the importance of the yachting
community in that area of the
Bahamas” and is “making as
much effort as it can to assist local
law enforcement” in addressing
the problem.

In Green Turtle Cay, Abaco,
some islanders told The Tribune
that they feel the unprecedented

increase in boat thefts over the
last two years comes down sim-
ply to the police’s inability to “be
in all places at all times.”

Police

However, many others have
become so disillusioned with the
ever increasing number of boat
thefts from their marinas and pri-
vate docks that they fear that
some police could even be com-
plicit in the robberies.

“At best they are simply indif-
ferent, at worst, involved in the
crimes,” suggested one Green

Turtle Cay (GTC) resident.
While police have been reluc-
tant to provide statistics upon
request, a spokesman from one
insurance company said his firm
has had to pay out in connection

eee Ua iN dad bs

with 58 Abaco boat thefts in 2008.
Among the most popular tar-
gets for thieves are Intrepids and
Contenders with powerful
engines, especially Yamahas.
One insurance company repre-
sentative, who did not wished to
be named, said: “It is quite an epi-
demic. All insurance brokers are
feeling the pinch in Abaco.”
Some say the threat of vigilante
justice is in the air, while others
have started to take matters into
their own hands in less contro-
versial ways — for example by
forming crime watch committees
and pushing for more security
cameras in targeted zones.
There is widespread concern if
such crimes can continue to occur
with frequency, it will be the
island’s traditionally thriving
marine tourism industry that will



FAMILY AND friends of 18-year-old Brenton Smith nathiered in prayer led by family friend and pastor
Bill Higgs of Trinity Methodist Church outside the morgue on Monday.

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are still searching for two suspects wanted
in connection with the armed robbery of a cashier at
the City Market food store on Village Road last week.

Meanwhile, an autopsy and ballistics report on the
death of teenager Brenton Smith should be complet-
ed by the end of the week, a senior police officer said.
Smith, a bystander, was shot and killed when gunfire
broke out during a police chase of the two suspects last
Thursday night. Two men are reported to have burst
into the food store just after 8pm that night, one of

them armed with a handgun.

Just after the robbery, officers on patrol nearby
spotted two men running and pursued them before
shots were fired and Smith was killed.

"We're still looking for he two suspects," said head
of the Central Detective Unit Superintendent Elsworth

Moss.

He added that police have an idea of who they are
looking for and are preparing to circulate some pho-

tographs.

After the shooting, police said they did not think
Smith, 18, was at the store at the time of the robbery.

His family says the youth was an

"innocent"

pedestrian who was shot after leaving a friend's house.

Family and friends converged outside the Princess
Margaret Hospital's morgue on Monday morning to
mourn the death of the popular boy.

His uncle Darren Strachan said the family launched
an independent investigation which led them to believe
the police shot Smith.

He said the family wants the police to come clean
and tell the truth.

Supt Moss said he cannot not confirm or deny the
family's claims before the reports are finished.

When asked if there was any evidence to suggest the

suspects fired shots during the chase, Mr Moss said he
could not comment. He also could not say if a coro-
net’s inquest into the shooting would take place.
Smith, a 2008 graduate of St Augustine's College,
was said to have been a bright, fun-loving young man

who stayed out of trouble.

A friend said the victim had just finished a work-
related training course and was thinking about attend-
ing college abroad.

Lottery ‘would create
cycle of corruption’

ESTABLISHING a nation-
al lottery to help fund the coun-
try’s education system would
create a cycle of social and
moral corruption, according to a
group of churches.

In a joint press statement
issued yesterday, representa-
tives of Grace Community
Church, Bahamas Conference
of the Methodist Church, Cal-
vary Bible Church, Kingdom
Life Church, New Mount Zion
Missionary Baptist Church and
Temple Baptist Church spoke
out against the proposal which
calls for the possible introduc-
tion of “a special tax and a
national lottery” to better fund
the nation’s public schools.

The possibility of creating a
national lottery to benefit the
schools is one of the suggestions
in the government’s 10-year
plan for education.

However, the church repre-
sentatives said that the consid-
eration given to the lottery pro-
posal by the Ministry of Edu-
cation is “tragically unfortu-
nate.”

Said the group of churches:
“From our perspective it is both
contradictory and hypocritical
for such an esteemed educa-
tional system that believes and
teaches that hard work, indus-
try, and self-discipline are the
(fundamental) elements of edu-
cation to seek to have that lofty

and worthwhile endeavour
funded by an immoral means
that caters to chance and indis-
cipline and promotes a disre-
gard for a wholesome work eth-
ic.”

To have a national lottery
financially supporting the edu-
cation system would “under-
mine the very lofty ideals and
spirit of discipline the Ministry
of Education is trying to imcul-
cate in the youth of our nation
and, in fact, actually help to cre-
ate a cycle of the very adverse
social and moral corruption it
is trying to prevent,” the church
representatives said.

“The folly of such a course of
action is heightened when one
considers that our schools are
presently suffering from a
national ‘D’ average. Present-
ly, the average businessman is
complaining about the difficul-
ty of finding people to hire who

can do basic math. Imagine
therefore what further legalisa-
tion of gambling will do to the
mindset of an emerging work
force that even now is viewed as
incompetent, unskilled, and
undisciplined in many quarters.”

The group of churches is call-
ing on the Ministry of Educa-
tion to carefully consider
research that has been done on
the topic of young people and
gambling.

According to the church rep-
resentatives, research by Loma
Linda University Medical
School's Professor Durand
Jacobs shows that once exposed,
teenagers are three times as
likely as adults to become
addicted to gambling. “The
same researcher discovered that
at least one in 10 teens engages
in illegal activity (stealing,
shoplifting, selling drugs or pros-
titution) to finance their gam-

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bling.” The group of churches
said it would also like to point
out to the Ministry of Educa-
tion that legalised gambling
“will bring devastating costs to
families and society at large,
such as divorce, poverty, child
abuse, the creation of addicts,
increased crime associated with
gambling losses, and the further
erosion of our already weak
national work ethic.”

Umbrellas
Loungers
Drinks Trolleys

suffer, along with the livelihoods
of those who depend on it.

The trend comes at a particu-
larly bad time for the islands, as
they are also suffering the effects
of the downturn in the global
economy. The streets of GTC are
noticeably more quiet than at this
time in previous years.

A recent billfishing tournament
organised by a local marina
expected to attract at least 25 par-
ticipants, but saw only four regis-
ter, The Tribune was informed.

Serious

Speaking of the boat thefts,
Hope Town resident and sailor
Dwayne Wallas said: “There’s
definitely been a drastic increase.
I think it’s pretty serious situation
and almost without a doubt there
is some pretty high level organ-
ised crime ring going on. It’s being
done very professionally.

“From what I hear 10 to 15 per
cent are being recovered and rest
are never to be seen again.”

Green Turtle Cay Club and
Marina General Manager Lynn
Johnson said: “It has definitely
had a negative affect on the area.
I don’t feel that enough is being
done. We have one police officer
on the island and he really is try-
ing to make a difference, getting
out and doing patrols, but the
island has several harbours and
its impossible to be in all the
places at one time.”

“T can’t say we’ve actually lost
business because of it yet but it is
affecting Abaco’s reputation,” she
added.

Wade Cash, owned of Sunset

Marine, a boatyard in the Black
Sound area of GTC, recently
organised a community meeting
to discuss the issue.

Out of this, an association was
formed of around 12 men who are
shortly set to begin a local crime
watch, patrolling the island in an
effort to help keep the situation
under control.

“Basically we just need to get it
stopped, it’s totally ridiculous
what’s been going on,” he said.
“On a couple of occasions police
have picked guys up but they can’t
seem to pin anything on anyone.”

Besides carrying out their
patrols, the association hopes to
raise funds to install closed cir-
cuit television cameras which can
be used to monitor and record
nighttime activities in certain
areas,

Speaking of the police’s reac-
tion to the threat, Commissioner
Ferguson admitted that they have
yet to arrest anyone in connec-
tion with the thefts, but are “doing
some things” that he cannot dis-
cuss in detail.

“You can’t police in the press,”
he said.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham’s speedboat, which is docked
in Green Turtle Cay, was found to
have been “tampered with” earli-
er this year. Some who saw the
condition of the vessel conclud-
ed that it had been used to com-
mit another robbery in the area.

Commenting on the investiga-
tion into that incident yesterday,
Commissioner Ferguson said no
one was charged in the matter as
it would appear the evidence
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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
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WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

America’s gun culture outdated

IT WAS a bit of a culture shock to listen to
Senator Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) questioning
Judge Sonia Sotomayor at her confirmation
hearings yesterday morning. He was con-
cerned about her position on the right of
every American citizen to carry a gun.

Senator Hatch, who is on record as having
praised a Senate vote allowing people to car-
ry firearms into America’s national parks
and wildlife refuges, seemed seriously con-
cerned about the judge’s ability to sit as a
Supreme Court judge if she had any doubts
about this “fundamental right.”

We say a “culture shock” because having
been brought up in a no gun tradition, we
find it difficult to reconcile the idea that any
private citizen should have the right to carry
a gun. At one time the British “bobby” and
the Bahamian policeman could only arm
themselves with a “billy.” And so it was a
surprise to watch this venerable-looking,
white-haired gentleman with his serious pok-
er face, taking this right of gun possession
so much to heart.

It is a surprise that a country like America,
having matured to the position of a world
leader, still has the Wild West mentality
coursing through its people’s veins. Appar-
ently it is an inherent part of America’s cul-
ture, and regardless of how many innocents
are slain by the gun on its streets, in its
schools, homes and public places, no one can
even question that constitutionally
entrenched “fundamental right.” When will
they wake up?

In the early years of the settlement of
America when the Pilgrims first arrived in
1620 we can understand the need for the gun.
These Europeans had set foot on a vast,
untamed land, populated by Indians and wild
animals. They had no police force, no Army,
no National Guard to protect them. They
had to be rugged and self-sufficient and take
care of themselves. In addition to their crude
cooking utensils and their hatchet, they could
not survive without their gun. Each man used
his iron piece to protect his family and shoot
venison for the evening meal.

Later as the “homesteader” under Abra-
ham Lincoln staked out his government-alot-
ted 160-acre plot of land, with no neighbour
within shouting distance, his gun was his only
protection. It was the gun that he used to
conquer the untamed frontier. The gun
became a part of him, his constant companion
without which he did not sleep well at night.

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However, America has grown and pros-
pered. In other words, the young nation in
short pants, has now grown up and dropped
into long pants. The divided states were unit-
ed, a federal government was knit together,
and Army, Air Force, Navy, National Guard
and strong police force, at great expense to
the taxpayer, was formed to protect the
nation and its citizens. One would have
thought at that stage of their development the
citizens would have turned in their arms.

And so the statement by Samuel Adams,
signer of the Declaration of Independence
and cousin of John Adams, second US pres-
ident, today seems a contradiction. Said
Adams: “The Constitution shall never be
construed to authorise Congress to prevent
the people of the United States, who are
peaceable citizens, from keeping their own
arms.”

Of course those were still frontier days
and the “peaceable citizens” still needed the
shotgun. But not so today. If in addition to
the strong protection provided by the state,
they still have to carry a gun for their personal
protection, then they are not “peaceable cit-
izens.”

In 2008 the Supreme Court struck down
Washington, DC’s ban on handguns, despite
the high level of gun crime that the capitol
was trying to suppress.

It quoted the Constitution’s Second
Amendment in which a reference to a “well
regulated Militia” showed that the legisla-
tors of those days were still legislating for a
frontier country and writing in frontier lan-
guage.

Surely Americans are no longer governed
by frontiersmen. Surely, they are wise enough
to understand that today’s guns in the hands
of today’s Americans have been turned
against that country’s citizens. It is now time
to abolish them.

However, if America can honestly face
the world with the argument that it still needs
its private guns to protect its citizens, then
what argument can it have against the North
Koreans who claim they need nuclear
weapons to protect their citizens? Both
propositions are madness.

We agree with those level-headed Amer-
icans who argue that America’s “gun cul-
ture” has outlived its usefulness.

And yesterday to watch a seemingly level-
headed, elderly American senator argue oth-
erwise was certainly disconcerting.



IN STOCK!

Cuba: July
anniversaries of

two massacres

Unpunished, but not forgotten
LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

On the anniversary of the Tug-
boat massacre, we submit for
publication our release of 2007 in
memory of all who have lost their
lives attempting to flee Cuba.

July 6, 2007, Summit, New Jer-
sey:

Among the most flagrant
atrocities committed by the Cas-
tro regime in its long history of
human rights’ abuses, two inci-
dents stand out -the Canimar
River Massacre of 1980 and the
Tugboat Massacre of 1994. Both
took place in the month of July
and poignantly illustrate the
Cuban leadership’s profound dis-
regard for human life and their
egregious violation of the funda-
mental right of citizens to leave
their country.

On July 6, 1980 three young-
sters hijacked an excursion boat
that was to navigate inland along
the scenic Canimar river flowing
into Matanzas Bay. Surprised pas-
sengers screamed their approval
to go to the United States, but
the security guard resisted and
shot at the youngsters, who
wounded him with firearms clan-
destinely obtained from their mil-
itary service. Concerned for his
health, they sent him back to
shore with a passenger who
refused to leave. Alerted author-
ities commanded a chase. High-
speed Cuban Navy patrol boats
fired on the escapees and
attempted to sink the vessel.
Then, a Cuban Air Force plane
overflew the boat and opened
fire. Finally, most not yet wound-
ed or dead drowned when a spe-
cial boat used for heavy industri-
al work was brought in to ram
and sink the vessel.

The excursion boat had capac-
ity for 100 passengers, yet only
10 survived. Reportedly, there
were at least 56 victims, including
four children, ages 3, 9, 11, and 17.
The actual number was kept
secret and recovered bodies were
not handed to the families, com-
munal funerals forbidden. The

letters@tribunemedia net



Cuban government claimed it was
an accident, but survivors were
threatened with prison into
silence and kept under surveil-
lance for years

Fourteen years later, on July
13, 1994, a group of around 70
family members and friends,
including many children, boarded
the tugboat “13 de marzo” in the
middle of the night planning to
escape to the United States. As
they made their way out of
Havana’s harbour, three tugboats
that had been waiting in the dark
started a chase. Relentlessly, they
sprayed the boat with high pres-
sure water jets, ripping children
from their parents’ arms and
sweeping passengers off to sea.
Finally, the attackers rammed the
“13 de marzo” enough to make it
sink. Passengers who had taken
refuge in the cargo hold were
pinned down and desperately
pounded on the walls, the chil-
dren wailing in horror, as they
went down. Survivors who then
clung to life in high seas, con-
tended with the three pursuing
tugboats circling them and creat-
ing wave turbulence and eddies
for them to drown. The attack
stopped suddenly when a mer-
chant ship with a Greek flag
approached Havana Harbour and
Cuban Navy ships picked up sur-
vivors. Brought to shore, the
stunned women and children
were interrogated and sent home.
The men were kept in detention
for months and given psy-
chotropic drugs. No bodies of the
37 victims (including 11 children)
were returned to their families
for burial. Survivors and relatives
of the dead were denied infor-
mation and put under surveil-
lance. Many were dismissed from
their jobs and systematically
harassed by the authorities.

It later transpired that an infil-
trator in the group had helped

plan the operation to set an exam-
ple with its violent suppression.
The Cuban government claimed
it was an accident and blamed it
on the escapees and United
States’ immigration policies. An
international outcry prompted the
government to promise an inves-
tigation, but instead it awarded
the head of the operation, tug-
boat pilot Jestis Gonzalez
Machin, received a "Hero of the
Cuban Revolution" medal.
Requests by international orga-
nizations for information and
redress have been all disregarded.

These and similar tragedies in
Cuba remain largely ignored by
world media and public opinion.
Yet, the Castro regime has for
decades systematically murdered
civilians for trying to escape their
country. Hundreds, perhaps thou-
sands, may have been killed by
government authorities for
attempting to escape by sea, for
seeking asylum in foreign
embassies, or trying to cross into
the U.S. Naval Base at Guanta-
namo. Today the U.S. Naval base
in Cuba remains sealed off by
barbed wire and mines, with
Cuban border guards ready to
shoot to kill. Cuba's Penal Code
punishes attempts to leave the
national territory without gov-
ernment authorization with up to
20 years in prison or death. Over
the course of decades thousands
have served prison, under dire
conditions, for these so-called
crimes. Still today, a number of
political prisoners are serving very
long sentences for attempting to
escape the country.

Cuba Archive calls on world
governments, international organ-
isations, and all people of good-
will to hold the Cuban govern-
ment accountable for its crimes
and demand respect for the fun-
damental rights of Cuba’s citizens
to life, safety, and the right to
leave their country at will.

CUBA ARCHIVE

Summit,
New Jersey,
July 13, 2009

Is this the example a man of God should he setting?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I recently read that a Bahamian pastor got a $1/4
million vehicle for $68,000. That is almost a 73 per
cent discount. I am not greedy. I do not need a 1/4
million dollar car or a $68,000 car, as a matter of fact
I drive a scooter for about $2,000 licensed and
inspected. Far be it from me to judge anyone, much
less a man of God, but I cannot help but wonder. If
this preacher had bought three Kia picantos for
20,000 each or six chevy microvans (11,000) instead
of a Bentley, could he have donated vehicles to
local charity? Would he? Did he consider this

option?

Some of our fellow Bahamians are not worried

cost of the car after this “blessing” of a rebate. I
would also like to point out the difference in service

costs and fuel. 50 to 60 dollars a week in a Bentley
would translate to 30 to 40 in a smaller car. The
cost of parts and service is ungodly by comparison.

Tam happy for a person that can afford this type
of luxury, but I would be more encouraged or
inspired by a show of modesty or charity.

This is not the example a man of God should be
setting. In my humble opinion, an example of mod-
esty, wise investment and charitable donation is
needed not only to get our congregations, but our
entire population, through these times. I would

rather catch a jitney to heaven than drive a Bentley

about what they drive and simply need a place to

sleep. A one bedroom apartment at $550 per month
could have it’s rent paid for 10 years! As a matter of
fact you could actually purchase a house for the

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



© In brief

-Hanna-Martin raises suspicions

THE man found dead at
a downtown building com-
plex in Grand Bahama on
Sunday has been identified
by police as Steven Rolle,
47, of Freeport.

According to police
reports, the body was dis-
covered sometime around
8am at the Churchill Build-
ing, near the Immigration
Department.

Mr Rolle’s body was tak-
en to the Rand Memorial
Hospital morgue, where an
autopsy will be held to
determine the cause of
death. Police said foul play
is not suspected at this time.

20 illegal
Immigrants
in Bimini

IMMIGRATION offi-
cials apprehended 25 ille-
gal immigrants, including
Chinese, Haitian and
Jamaican nationals, at a
private residence in Bimi-
ni.

Acting on intelligence
received, Defence Force
and Immigration officers
on July 7 searched the
home of a local man in
South Bimini.

The search led to the
discovery of seven Chi-
nese men, five Chinese
women, one Jamaican
man, three Haitian
women, eight Haitian
men and a eight-year-old
Haitian boy.

Immigration officers
questioned the persons
about their status in the
Bahamas, but were
unable to ascertain
whether the migrants had
entered the country legal-
ly as none of them had
the necessary documents.

Further questioning
revealed that group of
migrants arrived in Bimi-
ni from Nassau on July 5
and July 6 in two sepa-
rate groups.

The 25 immigrants
were taken to Alice
Town police station for
processing and were then
transferred to the
Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre.

Arrangements are
being made to repatriate
the migrants to their
respective countries as
soon as possible.

over container port relocation

SUSPICIONS over government’s
“arrogant” decision to relocate the
container port from downtown Nas-
sau to Arawak Cay have been raised
by Glenys Hanna Martin.

The PLP chairwoman has said the
“sross lack of transparency” shown by
the FNM government in their deci-
sion-making process has given her rea-
son to speculate about the reasoning
behind their decision.

Mrs Hanna Martin’s main concern is
over plans for a joint public-private
land-owning venture that will report-
edly give a combined entity of private
businesses a controlling share of the
container port; with a shareholding of
40 per cent, and a public share offering
of 20 per cent.

“First and foremost the Minister (of
the Environment) announces that land
owned by the Bahamian people is to
be utilised in some sort of jomt venture

with a collection of
private entities,
many of whom
now control the
shipping industry
in the Bahamas,
and some of whom
are known finan-
cial supporters of
the Free National
Movement,” the
PLP chairwoman
said.

“And there are
other concerns [@RiWanrUnEe EU
which heighten sus-
picions about the entire process.”

She echoed concerns raised by PLP
Senator Jerome Fitzgerald this week-
end about the environmental impact of
dredging and increased maritime activ-
ity in the area, access to local beaches
and traffic congestion.



Mr Fitzgerald
launched an aware-
| ness campaign on
Friday to inform
people about the
cost of relocating
the container port
to Arawak Cay and
raised a number of
questions about
whether an Envi-
ronmental Impact
Assessment (EIA)
for the develop-
ment would be
done, and when the
findings would be disclosed.

His questions were put to Minister of
the Environment Earl Deveaux yes-
terday, but were not answered before
The Tribune went to press.

Mrs Hanna Martin said: “There has
been no dialogue, no full information-

Jerome Fitzgerald

sharing... The process has grossly
lacked transparency; instead of a full
disclosure of the issues which include
the radical and unceremonious rever-
sal of a decision made by a previous
government, a decision which was
based on scientific studies duly com-
missioned.

“The Bahamian people are entitled
to know all the facts surrounding the
government’s decision to relocate the
port to Arawak Cay and in so doing
hand a significant economic windfall to
an elite group without having the cour-
tesy to communicate with its popula-
tion.

“The government should be warned
that Bahamians are watching very
carefully with a scrutinising and suspect
eye. It is hereby now demanded that
the government engage in proper and
transparent discourse with the people
of the Bahamas.”

Junkanoo to bring ‘economic
benefits’ to Grand Bahama

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — ‘Just Rush’
promoter Peter Adderley
announced that the popular
summer junkanoo event is set
for August 15 and said it will
bring a much needed eco-
nomic boost to Grand
Bahama.

Mr Adderley, president of
Creative Works, said four
major junkanoo groups — the
Saxon Superstars and the Val-
ley Boys of Nassau, and the
Classic Dancers and Swingers
of Grand Bahama -— will be
participating in the third annu-
al Just Rush Junkanoo
Parade.

He said a number of activi-
ties have been planned for Fri-
day, August 14 through Sun-
day, August 16.

Mr Adderley said activities
get underway with a launch
party, junkanoo skills compe-
tition, and all-Bahamian con-
cert on Friday.

The main event, the
junkanoo parade, will be held
on Saturday at Explorers Way
in downtown Freeport.

The weekend will climax
with a church service followed
by the announcement of the
parade results at a family
beach party on Taino Beach
on Sunday, August 16.

Mr Adderley pointed out
that the parade will showcase
the biggest rivalry in
junkanoo, as the Bay Street
Boxing Day champions, the
Valley boys, will face off

against the New Year’s Day
winners, the Saxons Super-
stars.

“After years, decades, of
brilliant battles and heralded
controversy over who got
robbed, the two big boys hit
the streets of Freeport for a
historic showdown. This is it,”
Mr Adderley said.

He said junkanoo fans are
also anticipating a rivalry
between the groups from
Grand Bahama and those out
of New Providence.

While the public is antici-
pating the fun and excitement
of Just Rush, local merchants
are looking forward to the
economic benefits the event
will bring.

Mr Adderley noted that the
groups invited to compete in
the parade must bring a mini-
mum of 150 members, but
often surpass that require-
ment.

“All groups reportedly

MP: political reasons behind
Queen’s Highway paving decision

DESPITE his asser-
tions that there are
political reasons
behind the govern-
ment’s decision to
only pave the north-
ern portion of the
Queen’s Highway in
Acklins, the results of
the 2007 election
reveal that the PLP
MP for MICAL
Alfred Gray won all
of the polling divi-
sions in this portion
of the island.

Enraged by an

advertisement from the Ministry of Works
calling for tenders for the road work in
the northern section of Lovely Bay, Mr
Gray said it made more sense to him for
the government to pave the dilapidated
roads between the airport in Spring Point

and Salina Point.

He said residents across Acklins are
inconvenienced by the “impassable” 25 to
30 mile southern section of the road, but
residents in the south, where the majority
of his PLP supporters live, are the most

badly affected.

The MP said: “The people in the south-
ern part of the island are more conserva-
tive and support me as MP and I
don’t think they ought to suffer because of

that.

“Once a government is elected I expect
the government to serve all people equal-
ly and to serve the part of the island where

ALFRED GRAY



52 to 45.

28

their support might be is wrong.”

However, according to the 2007 elec-
tion results for MICAL, Mr Gray won
both division four and division five, which
cover the northern end of Acklins.

At polling division four, Lovely Bay,
which includes Chesters and Pinefield, 102
voters were registered and 99 persons vot-
ed. Mr Gray defeated Senator Foulkes by

At polling division five, Hard Hill, Mr
Gray’s hometown, 70 voters were regis-
tered with 63 persons voting.

Mr Gray won by 35 votes to Mr Foulkes’

It was only at polling division number
six in central Acklins (Spring Point, Delec-
table Bay, and Pompey Bay) that Mr
Foulkes gained the upper hand on Mr
Gray, by beating him by 39 votes to 25.



more than double these
requirements, and the num-
bers show benefits at local
hotels, rental car companies,
restaurants, retail clothing
stores, barber shops, beauty
salons, and bars,” he said.

“Junkanooers come by the
hundreds, and domestic and
international visitors come in
by the thousands to experi-
ence and enjoy this uniquely
Bahamian event.”

Mr Adderley said that he
has created both the Feel The
Rush and Just Rush events to
boost Grand Bahama’s cul-
tural and economic life.

“Grand Bahama has long
been craving an annual signa-
ture event, and Just Rush has
satisfied that craving,” he said.

Major sponsors for this
year’s Just Rush are the
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty, Grand Bahama Power, the
Ministry Of Tourism, and
Ross University.



— :
SE



Tough Body
Trauble-frae
Easy to Maintain

NISSAN PICKUP

Closing submissions
TRIAL

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

CLOSING submissions
were presented yesterday in
the trial of a man and a
teenager charged in the
stabbing death of Khodee
Davis.

Davis, 16, an 11th grade
Temple Christian student,
was stabbed in the chest dur-
ing a fight between two
groups of men at Cabbage
Beach, Paradise Island on
May 12 last year.

Andy Francis, 22, and a
17-year-old boy, both of Fox
Hill, have been charged with
Davis’ death. They have
pleaded not guilty.

During her closing sub-
missions yesterday, lead
prosecutor Sandra Dee Gar-
diner told the jury that the
juvenile had initiated the
fight that ultimately led to
Davis’ death.

Ms Gardiner said that the
juvenile had made a com-
ment to the effect that some-
one was going to die that
day.

She said that according to
witnesses, Davis was on a hill
talking to a group of girls
when the fight began.

Ms Gardiner told the
jurors that Davis had no
weapon and ran to the fight
to act as a peacemaker.

According to witnesses,
she said, Davis had held
Francis’ hand and told him
to stop the fight, but Francis
had pushed him away and

stabbed him with a silver
coloured blade.

Davis died from a four to
five inch stab wound to the
chest. Ms Gardiner told the
jury that the juvenile is
charged because he adopt-
ed Francis’ actions and hit
Davis with a bottle after
Francis had stabbed him.

Attorney Michael Hanna,
who is representing Francis,
told the jury that the prose-
cution had not discharged its
burden of proof and high-
lighted the fact that the
Crown had closed its case
without calling some 15 wit-
nesses.

Mr Hanna noted that in
his unsworn statement, Fran-
cis had claimed that Davis
had been the one with the
knife.

The juvenile’s attorney
Romona Farquharson told
the jury her client had noth-
ing to do with Davis’ mur-
der and was leaving Cabbage
Beach when the fight broke
out.

She told the court that out
of the 15 witnesses who took
the stand, only three had giv-
en testimony relating to her
client.

Ms Farquharson noted
that pathologist Dr Govin-
da Raju had identified no
injuries on the deceased that
were consistent with him
having been hit with a bottle.

Justice Jon Isaacs is
expected to give his summa-
tion of the case when the tri-
al resumes this morning at
10 o'clock.



July Independence Specials
rela le Od [le llel eer

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are making news

improvements in the area or have
won an award. If so, call us on
322-1986 and share your story.



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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NASA aiming for
space shuttle
launch totlay

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

NASA is hoping the weath-

er finally cooperates for its
sixth launch attempt for
space shuttle Endeavour,
according to Associated
Press.

Endeavour is poised to
take off for the international
space station early Wednes-

astronauts. Forecasters put
the odds of good weather at
60 percent.

Thunderstorms have
delayed the mission three
times and hydrogen gas leaks
have caused two delays.
Endeavour holds the final
piece of Japan’s space lab,
which should have flown last
month.

NASA must launch
Endeavour by Wednesday —
possibly Thursday if man-
agers agree to shorten the
flight. Otherwise, the shuttle
will have to step aside for a
Russian supply run to the
space station. That would
bump the shuttle launch to
July 26.

Successful education is the
result of factors we control

: By JANYNE M HODDER
i President College of

? Bahamas

day evening, along with seven :

| HANK you for allow-
ing me space in your

i newspaper to respond to an
? editorial published in The Tri-
? bune on Thursday July 9, 2009.
i I write to present a different
i view from the one which was
i? expressed, one which suggested
? that we need to accept that not
? all children are academically
: gifted and that we would do
i better to accept that many stu-
i dents cannot succeed academi-
: cally and should be directed to
? menial jobs which we, in turn,
? should value rather than to
: demand higher performance
i from our education system. I
? challenge this view on several
i grounds.

YOUR SAY

First, it suggests that poor
academic performance is some-
how the consequence of innate
characteristics in the learners
and that successful secondary
education is not an attainable
goal for most students. Why
would this be true for Bahami-
ans and not for citizens of oth-
er countries which assume sec-
ondary education to the mini-
mum level of attainment
expected for anyone with nor-
mal ability? Indeed, over and
over, research has demonstrat-
ed that successful secondary
education is the result of a
number of factors upon which

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Cadet; Lynell Thurston, Police Cadet; Dr Hubert Minnis, Minister of Health; Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
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we do have control. These are,
among others, the quality of
teaching, the quality of the cur-
riculum, the aspiration level of
parents and the expectation lev-
el of the educational system
and the society. Poor students
typically do worse but this is
not a consequence of their abil-
ity and many poor students do
achieve. For too many, howev-
er, it is a consequence of pover-
ty itself: coming to school hun-
gry and tired, having no place
to study, having disengaged and
inattentive parents, having
teachers who accept failure,
having no dream that life
tomorrow could be better than
it is today and not seeing any
link between life inside and out-
side the classroom. Clearly, the
education system can act on
such factors and has the oblig-
ation to do so.

What if the essential prob-
lem of education lay not with
the students but with us and
our outdated assumptions
about how learning occurs? In a
world where young people mas-
ter computer games, Facebook,
Twitter and texting, where they
are fascinated by the complex
computer-generated special
effects of popular movies and
commercials, where they use
new codes to communicate,
how dreary the classroom
where the preferred mode of
instruction is chalk and talk. No
wonder students might fidget.

The successful classroom of
today is more likely the place
where all are actively engaged,
working on problems in teams
and small groups, experiment-
ing, talking and creating.

A place where students are
learning to think through a
math problem, to argue and
debate a story, to grow a gar-
den and watch compost take
shape, to stage a play, to write
and perform a song, to swim
on the reef and understand the
effects of climate change on our
fragile ecosystem — a place
where you do something, not
one where something is done
to you. I am sure there are
many such classrooms across
The Bahamas as there are
many teachers who foster high
levels of student learning.
Indeed, we have seen the
results of such work in the
many successful students and
alumni at The College who
have come through public
schools. We must find and
champion such teachers and
make their classrooms the mod-
els for others to emulate.

Second, the idea that sec-
ondary education is only for the
‘talented’ assumes that the
Bahamas of tomorrow has a
place in which uneducated
masses can make a decent liv-

AYN an ete b)) se



ing. How can we hold that
assumption when everyone else
in the world recognises that
only those societies that pro-
vide highly skilled human cap-
ital will be able to ensure sus-
tainable development? How
can we face the challenges of a
global and integrated economy,
of the kind already under
development as a result of the
EPA and growing in both the
tourism and financial services
sectors as a result of the cur-
rent economic crisis, if we do
not commit as a matter of
national urgency and impor-
tance to increasing the educa-
tion attainment of the next gen-
eration? Refusing to face this
challenge head on is akin to
burying one’s head in the sand
and hoping that tomorrow will
look like yesterday. It won’t.

If we are to have employees
who deliver more than good
enough performance, they need
to have the new basic skills: the
ability to communicate effec-
tively, the ability to think criti-
cally, the ability to solve prob-
lems and to work in teams, the
ability to work comfortably
with new information and com-
munication technologies.
Indeed, car mechanics today
need more than a wrench and a
good arm. They need to under-
stand the complex computer
systems that now are part of
cars.

In Grand Bahama today, the
stevedores of the past have
been replaced by operators
atop huge straddlers who use
sophisticated computer systems
to locate and move containers
across the port.

Third, it is not only improved
performance at secondary level
that we require but increased
participation in post-secondary
education if we are to compete
successfully in this new global
world. According to UNESCO,
“the number of students pur-
suing tertiary education has
skyrocketed over the past 37
years, growing five-fold from
28.6 million in 1970 to 152.5
million in 2007. This translates
into an average annual increase
of 4.6 per cent, with the average
number of tertiary students
doubling every fifteen years.”
How are we performing against
this global trend? Again,

according to UNESCO statis-
tics, the tertiary gross enrol-
ment ratio in Europe and North
America — a measure of partic-
ipation for the population of
students for the five years after
high school — has grown from
30 per cent in 1970 to 71 per
cent in 2007. In Latin America
and the Caribbean, this ratio
has grown from 6 per cent to
34 per cent, in East Asia and
the Pacific, from 7 per cent to
26 per cent and on and on.
While the study does not report
directly on The Bahamas, we
understand that participation
rates for the 18-24-year-old
population in The Bahamas
hovers around 14 per cent,
putting us, a relatively wealthy
nation, only above some of the
poorest countries in sub-Saha-
ran Africa (5.6 per cent) and in
South and West Asia (11 per
cent).

Finally, education today is
not about remembering dates
of history or memorising poems
or even reading the classics —
though all of these might be of
value and interest. There is
simply too much knowledge
growing at too rapid a rate for
any education system to aspire
to teach all the knowledge you
need to know. Education today
is about learning how to learn.
It is about preparing graduates
to communicate effectively, to
reflect on their lives, to think
critically, to be creative, to solve
problems and to be engaged
and active citizens. Some of
these may then choose to be
highly-skilled air-conditioning
technicians who assist in help-
ing us to reduce energy costs, or
competent horticulturists run-
ning landscaping companies
that make better use of green
technologies, or members of
any other professions which
require the use of both hands
and mind — mechanics, den-
tists, musicians and surgeons
among others.

The distinction between
those who work with their
hands and those who work with
their minds no longer holds.
We need people who can do
both. Adding value to goods
and services is the only way to
build the future Bahamians
across the archipelago have a
right to expect, and we will only
add value if we have the highly-
skilled human capital to do this
—in any field.

Failure to meet this challenge
is to condemn the next genera-
tion to environmental degrada-
tion, to poverty, to poor public
health and to increased levels of
crime. If sustainable develop-
ment means meeting the needs
of today while protecting the
capacity of future generations,
then higher levels of educa-
tional attainment must be our
top priority.

¢ Janyne M Hodder, BA,
MA, DCL (Hon), is president
of the College of the
Bahamas).

ea NG ReU atu

vice-president Francis Dimitri.
By GENA GIBBS

MEMBERS of Alliance
Francaise called on Gover-
nor General Arthur D Han-
na for brief cultural exchange
session.

They introduced their new
president, Nathalie Feix-
Scott, and presented the gov-
ernor general with a CD of
French folk music by icon
Charles Trenet.



FROM LEFT ARE: Dominique LeFevre, Honorary Consul Thierry Boeuf, Governor General Arthur Hanna,
Alliance Frangaise president Nathalie Feix- Scott, treasurer and administrator Italia Watkins-Jan, and

Alliance Francaise also
invited Mr Hanna to partici-
pate in its cultural activities,
the most popular being the
Cine Club which showcases
French movies with English
subtitles.

The Hanna family has
been part of the Alliance
Francaise for some time, not-
ed treasurer and administra-
tor, Italia Watkins-Jan.

“Since Bahamians can

Derek Smith



travel to France without a
tourist visa, it is a good time
for cultural exchanges
between the two countries,”
she said.

French Consul Marc-Olivi-
er Gendry presented his Let-
ters of Credence as France’s
new ambassador to the
Bahamas on May 21.

There are about 200
French ex-pats in the
Bahamas.



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 7



AMERICAN BOAT CAPTAIN SURVIVES SHARK ATTACK

LUCKY TO BE ALIVE

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

AMERICAN boat Captain
John Cooper is lucky to be
alive after surviving a shark
attack sparked when a diver
panicked and speared the
predator in the head.

According to reports on
WSVN Channel 7 News,
Cooper was spearfishing with
a group of people in waters
off Grand Bahama on Satur-
day when the reef shark
attacked him.

He sustained a huge gash to
the leg.

Mr Cooper has been taking
people spear fishing in the
Bahamas for 20 years.

“The guys panicked and got
a little close, and out of self-
defence shot the shark in the
head and it went crazy,” he
said, adding that this was
when the six foot shark bit
him.

Mr Cooper, who decided
against being treated in
Freeport, is now recovering in
a Florida hospital.

Channel 7 TV news
reporter Don Kavara said Mr
Cooper was taken to hospital
in Freeport, but decided to
board a friend’s plane for the
55-minute flight to Miami
International Airport.

On Sunday, Grand Bahama
Police confirmed the incident.
ASP Edmund Rahming said
the victim had refused treat-

A STOCK PICTURE of a reef shark. American boat captain John Cooper was attacked by a similar shark while spearfishing.

ment at the hospital in
Freeport and had left the
country.

Upon Mr Cooper’s arrival
at Miami International Air-
port, he was taken by ambu-

lance to Jackson Memorial
Hospital for surgery.
The surgeon said Mr Coop-

New plan to improve bidding
process for school repairs

Strategy to boost transparency and competitiveness

TO increase transparency
and competitiveness in the
bidding process for the yearly
summer school repairs, the
Ministry of Education yester-
day announced a new plan to
award contracts.

The contracts are valued at
more than $50,000 and the
total value of work that will
be awarded by the way of this
enhanced process will be $3
million.

On Monday government
began gazetting notices in the
daily newspapers inviting
interested qualified contrac-
tors, builders, plumbers and
electricians to tender for the
award of school repair con-
tracts in designated islands
throughout the country.

Said the ministry: “All ten-
ders will be independently
evaluated and awarded by the
Tenders Board, not by the
Ministry of Education and/or
the Ministry of Public Works
and Transport.

“There will no longer as a
general rule, be any negotiat-
ed bids with contractors.

“Any qualified contractor
will have the right to obtain
scopes of works and to make
an offer to perform the work,
which bids will be fairly and
independently considered.”

The gazetted notice invites

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

“All tenders will
be independently
evaluated and
awarded by the
Tenders Board, not
by the Ministry of
Education and/or
the Ministry of
Public Works and
Transport.”



tenders for school repair work
exceeding a value of $50,000
in Abaco, Andros

Eleuthera, Grand Bahama,
New Providence and San Sal-
vador.

All school summer repair
work will have to be complet-
ed within a four-week time
frame.

All tenders in the designat-
ed Family Islands and Grand
Bahama should be delivered
to the respective island admin-
istrators’ offices by 10am on
Friday, July 17.

All tenders for work in
New Providence should be
delivered to the office of the
Financial Secretary at the

same time on the same date.
All tenders will be opened at
the Ministry of Finance in
Nassau, and at the Family
Island administrators’ offices
in the respective Family
Islands and Grand Bahama.

“The general public should
be reminded that the Ministry
of Education has again this
year, forwarded roughly
$100,000 to each school dis-
trict in the Family Islands, for
a total of $1 million, for the
award of small-scale summer
repair work throughout the
Family Islands. These con-
tracts are awarded by local
government authorities in con-
sultation with the District
Superintendents of the Min-
istry of Education, and the
school principals,” the min-
istry said.

The award of these small-
scale local contracts is gov-
erned by the due diligence and
transparent requirements of
the Financial Administration
and Audit Act, which requires
the obtaining of three bids
from different contractors, in
respect of every contract
awarded by local government
authorities as outlined.

The Ministry of Education
in New Providence is not in
any way involved in the eval-
uation of bids, the award of

OPT esrb

rele

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd



contracts or the assessment of
the quality of the work.

“This new initiative gov-
erning the award of larger-
scale contracts for school sum-
mer repairs is yet another step
towards enhanced trans-
parency in the process of gov-
ernment procurement, and is
yet another major step made
by the Ministry of Education
over the past year to comply
with the announced policy of
the government to implement
all of the recommendations
made by the Crown Agents in
their review of government
procurement, which was com-
pleted in 2006,” the ministry
said.

“The general public should
also be reminded that this is
another step towards greater
transparency in the issuance
of government contracts by
the Ministry of Education that
took place earlier when, for
the first time, the ministry ear-
lier this year invited public
tenders for school busing con-
tracts.

“In respect of these con-
tracts the bids have been
received. The in-house evalu-
ations have been conducted,
and the Tenders Board should
be making its recommenda-
tions in the near future.”



er was “very lucky”.
“A centimeter one way or
the other could have cut a



“A centimeter
one way or the
other could
have cuta
major artery or
nerve. Most of
the skin was
still intact and
we managed to
stretch it to
cover pretty
much the
wound.”



major artery or nerve. Most
of the skin was still intact and
we managed to stretch it to
cover pretty much the
wound,” said the surgeon.

Mr Kavara said that a simi-
lar attack occurred in the
Bahamas in May. The victim,
American Luis Fernandez,
was also spearfishing.

Mr Cooper said the attack
will not deter him from
spearfishing.

He suggested that as a result
of the spread of shark feed-
ing operations, sharks are
becoming more aggressive and
less fearful of people.

NOTICE

Mohs Surgery in Nassau

DR. JOHN STRASSWIMMER, MOHS SURGEON
will be visiting The Skin Centre on Friday
July 17, 2009. Or Strasswimmer trained at
Harvard and Yale and is Board Certified and a
Fellow of the Mohs College.

Mohs Micrographic Surgery

is an advanced

treatment process for skin cancer which is
now offered at The Skin Centre. It offers the

highest possible cure

rate for many skin

cancers and simultaneously minimizes the
sacrifice of mormal tissue. This cutting-edge

treatment

requires

highly specialized

physicians that serve as surgeon, pathologist
and reconstructive surgeon,

Our visiting Mohs Surgeon has extensive

expenence — in

the

Mohs Micrographic

Procedure. The technique is used to remove
the two most common forms of skin cancer:

basal cell
carcinoma.

carcinoma and squamous cell

For more information, please contact:
The Skin Centre, Harbour Bay Plaza,
East Bay Street Tel, 393-7546.



British High Commission Kingston
NOTICE TO BRITISH CITIZENS

The Vice Consul for The Bahamas (based in Kingston, Jamaica)
will visit Nassau on Thursday, 23rd July, 2009 and will be
available to discuss any individual problems concerning
passports and nationality issues.

Passport applications and renewals should continue to be sent
by courier direct to the High Commission in Kingston.

Appointments can be made by calling the Honorary Consul
in Nassau on 324-4089.





PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FNM candidates
FROM page one

According to
the information
reaching The
Tribune, there
are currently
five cabinet min-
isters who have
reportedly
expressed their
desire to chal-
lenge deputy
Prime Minister
Brent Symon-
ette for his post.

These names include, but are
not limited to Dr Hubert Min-
nis, Zhivargo Laing, Tommy
Turnquest, Carl Bethel, and
Dion Foulkes.

In addition to these Ministers,
there is also a minister of state,
Branville McCartney who has
been considered by many to be
the “dark horse” of the party
who, despite his popularity with
the public, may face a consider-
able battle to win this deputy
leadership post inside the party.

Since the pronouncements of
former deputy prime minister
Frank Watson that Prime Minis-
ter Ingraham was the only per-
son fit to lead the party at this
time, there has been speculation
as to the future of the FNM and
its leadership going forward.

Directly dismissing many of
the old would-be leaders within
the party, Mr Watson said that
unless someone were to come
out of the blue, “we would wel-
come the prime minister staying
for some further period of time.”

While Mr Symonette current-
ly holds the most support within
the FNM to follow Mr Ingraham,
there still remains an opposition
to the St Anne’s representative’s
skin colour, which may contin-
ue to be an issue for him.

Prime Minister Ingraham
became leader of the FNM in
1990 and served as prime minis-
ter from 1992 to 2002, when he
stepped down as head of the par-
ly

Brent Symonette

Tommy Turnquest, current
National Security Minister, won
a hotly contestant leadership
race to succeed Mr Ingraham,
but was defeated in the 2002
election by PLP leader Perry
Christie.

Previously, Mr Ingraham had
said he intended to serve only
two consecutive terms as leader,
but returned to the party’s
helm in late 2005 after requests
from his supporters and is
currently serving his third, non-
consecutive term as Prime Min-
ister.



: FROM page one

? be lopsided with one company exhausting
? the resources of the other. Apparently
? CAP’s initials instructions from the Min-
i istry to “show M&R Road Builders how to
? construct roads” ultimately tied the experi-
? enced firm with a company that nearly
i ruined it.

CAP complained to the Minister of

? Works that M&R was falling short in equip-
? ment and that the company had no road
? building experience prior to the compulso-
i ry arrangement.

The relationship with M&R began to

? deteriorate several weeks into the project
: when payment requests from CAP were
? not being honoured by M&R, it was
i? claimed.

Following several alleged financial trans-

actions by M&R, the principals of CAP felt
? they were forced to terminate M&R’s ser-
vices in March 2007, two months before the

Road paving issues

May general election.

Following the termination CAP felt that
M&R used every available opportunity to
denigrate, insult and sully its company’s
reputation not only to the residents of Ack-
lins, but also to government officials, officers
and agents of the Ministry of Works, while
holding CAP completely responsible for
every delay and/or drawback experienced
throughout the course of this assignment.

The ministry under the former PLP gov-
ernment instructed CAP to continue work
on the project which it did using personal
funds to assist with expenses right up until
July 2007 when under the new administra-
tion the company received a letter from the
ministry advising the company that all work
was to be suspended until further review. At
that point the road had been scarified, in
other words its top surface had been
removed, but not replaced. It has further

deteriorated.

In a press conference last Wednesday
MICAL MP V Alfred Gray hit out at gov-
ernment accusing it of only arranging to
repair the “better part” of Acklins’ dilapi-
dated Queen’s Highway while leaving the
worst part — the part worked on by the
joint venture team — in ruins.

He said residents across Acklins are
inconvenienced by the “impassable” 25 to 30
mile southern section of the road, but resi-
dents in the south, where the majority of his
PLP supporters live, are the most badly
affected.

Mr Gray said he was “enraged” upon
seeing the Ministry of Works’ advertise-
ment which only called for tenders to repair
the northern part of the road.

However, the road work that the FNM
government has announced for the north is
the completion of an agreement left in place
by the PLP. It was the PLP that had nego-
tiated the Acklins road works with the Euro-
pean Union (EU). The EU has to approve

all contracts for the repair and upgrade of
roads that use EU money. The FNM is now
trying to complete this road negotiated
under the PLP.

The road works under these negotiations
were divided into three parts. The one now
being finalised under this agreement is the
Northern Acklins Road. A part of this con-
tract with money from the European Union,
includes repair of a part of the road on
Ragged Island in addition to a new dock
and the upgrade of the airport for that
island.

Before this misadventure with M&R,
Caribbean Asphalt from 1994-1998, under
the FNM government, had successfully con-
structed more than 34 miles of road in
Crooked Island and extended the Ragged
Island Airstrip to more than 4,000 miles.

Both projects on completion were thor-
oughly inspected and approved not only by
the Ministry of Works, but also by engi-
neers and agents from the Department of
Aviation and Transport.

FROM page one

“They are little children, and
if somebody threatened them
it’s possible they wouldn’t want
to tell.”

Speculation was sparked
when Ms Clarke’s cousin
reported hearing a motorboat
pull into the Kemp’s Bay area at
around 2am on the morning
they were found and media
reports claimed the 3,000 square
mile forest is a hideout for drug
lords managing large scale mar-
iyuana plantations in the woods.

A police search supported by
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force, the US Coast Guard, and
the community, was scaled
down when nothing was found
two weeks after the boys disap-
peared, but Ms Clarke said she
always believed the boys were
still alive.

She said: “I knew they were
living, I thought they might
have been kidnapped, but I
knew they were alive.

“Tam glad to have them back
now but I think there’s a little
bit more in the back of it.

“They’re living and they’re
safe, but I want to know what
happened.”

Ms Clarke said Deangelo told
her how Marcell fell in the hole
and when he reached in to pull
him out, he fell in behind him.

But while Deangelo had the
strength to climb out, his
younger brother did not. They
slept in the cave, which provid-
ed shelter from the rain, and
during the day Deangelo would
search for food, water and the
way home. But Deangelo said
they were only there for a few
days, while Marcell maintains
they were there longer.

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Were my sons

Ms Clarke said: “I think the
little one didn’t realise it was
only a couple of days. I think
the big one is probably telling
the truth, because I feel like he’s
old enough to know the differ-
ence between a month and a
couple of days.

“Right now it doesn’t make
much sense and there is proba-
bly something else to it, but I
need to give them some time to
catch themselves before we will
get the whole story.”

Ms Clarke said Deangelo told
her how Marcell pulled himself
out of the hole when they heard
dogs barking, and they followed
the sound of the dogs straight to
the road at around 6am on Sun-
day. They have also said they
climbed a tree out of the cave to
find their way to the road.

They then approached two
American men at a nearby
house and asked for mangoes
and coco plums before heading
off together to find their way
home.

Deangelo, who lives in
Smith’s Hill, Andros, with his
grandmother Olgarean Clarke,
67, lost about 30lbs during the
time he was missing, and his
brother Marcell, who lives with
his mother in Kemp Road, Nas-
sau, and was visiting his grand-
mother in Andros, is thought to
have lost even more weight.

They are being treated at
Princess Margaret Hospital for
dehydration and are expected
to be released next week.

Police say they are still inves-
tigating the incident and are
keeping an open mind about
what happened.





ST Tg

+ Conditions appl * Fadarrerk of The Bank of Nona Seti, use under cence
BSOTO8

FROM page one

Mountbatten House on West Hill
Street with multiple stab wounds.

Prosecutor Neil Brathwaite
made the application to close the
Crown’s case without calling six
remaining witnesses. Twenty-four
witnesses have testified. Senior
Justice Anita Allen granted leave
to the Crown to close its case.
Attorneys met in a closed hearing
in the absence of the jury yester-
day afternoon.

Lead investigator in the case
ASP Leon Bethel testified yes-
terday that he went to Mount-
batten House around 9.15 am on
November 18, 2007 and there
spoke to crime scene investiga-
tors. ASP Bethel said he entered
the residence and saw blood
stains on a railing leading upstairs.
He also testified that there was
blood on the upstairs floor. ASP
Bethel told the court that in the
upstairs bedroom, he observed
the partially nude body of a man
with multiple stab wounds. ASP
Bethel told the court that he
observed blood stains and splat-
tered blood all over the room. He
told the court that he also
observed blood stains on the
upstairs bathroom door, face
bowl, toilet bowl and floor.

ASP Bethel testified that after
receiving additional information
from Inspector Kenroy Ferguson,
he and several other officers con-
ducted unsuccessful searches for
McNeil. He told the court that he

Dwight Major

FROM page one

months he served in the Bahamas after the extradition
order was filed against him in 2003. ;
This along with the 15 per cent usually taken off }
sentences in the US for good behaviour means that }
Major could be released in just over a year anda }
half — even less if he offers to serve his time in the }

Bahamas.

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday in his office at }
Police Headquarters, Mr Ferguson said that the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force will not be targeting Major
when he is released from prison in what is expected to
be less than 18 months. In addition Mr Ferguson said }
the police do not want to address speculation that }
there could be an increase in drug related crime or }
“reprisals” for any plea bargain that may or may not }

have been reached.

“See I do not want to prejudge a situation andI do }
not want us to speculate on what may or may not }
happen because I think that might even contribute to }
the problem in our society. And so we have to be care- }
ful how we comment on things as they happen.

“If we know what the sentence has been for this
young man and we see what the possibilities are with }
him being back in society, but who is to say that he }
does not become a Christian and start keeping }

church? We do not know.

“But certainly if it were to occur that he is back in }
society and is involved in breaking the law, our jobis }
still to enforce the law. That is what we will have to do. }
If he is in breach of any laws in this Commonwealth ;
of the Bahamas, we have the responsibility to enforce }
the law, and it will be enforced against him or anybody }
else who breaks the law,” Mr Ferguson said. i

The Commissioner added, however, that the Police :
Force will not be approaching Mr Major with any }
particular focus or attention as it is truly up to him }
what kind of lifestyle he will engage in after his release

into Bahamian society.

“See we don’t want to give the impression that we
are targeting people, because the man was in breach
of certain laws of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas }
and other places. He has been dealt with. There isa i
penalty involved which he has to satisfy. Once that has }
happened then he is freed back into society.

“Except he behaves in a way that warrants law }
enforcement to be enforcing the law against him, he }
is free to live in society. He is not being singled out.
Anybody who is in breech of the law will get the }
attention of the police. Anyone. So we don’t want to }
appear as though we are targeting an innocent person, }
but certainly if anybody is in breach of the law we will
be taking the appropriate action all the time.” i

FROM page one

outcome is at the Coroner's
Court which will make a deci-
sion as to whether the matter
will be sent to the Attorney
General's Office with certain
recommendations, and then cer-
tain instructions will come down
to the police as to what direc-
tion to take," Mr Ferguson told
The Tribune yesterday.

Knowles, 15, was found
hanged in his cell with what
appeared to be a string from his
shorts tied around his neck on
May 31. Police initially ruled
the death an apparent suicide.

He had been in custody for a
little over three days.

But Ms Wilson challenged
the police's version of the
events and charged that if her
son had killed himself while in
police custody then the RBPF
should be found culpable of
neglect.

"Whatever happened in that

Prosecution closes case

went to Miami, Florida, on July 3
and visited the office of Home-
land Security where he saw
McNeil and identified himself as
a police officer.

ASP Bethel testified that he
next saw McNeil at the Central
Detective Unit around 11.32 am
on August 15, 2008. ASP Bethel
said he spoke to McNeil in the
presence of his attorneys, Alex
Morley and Simone Smith. He
said he cautioned McNeil by
telling him that he did not have to
say anything and if he did it
would be written down and could
be used as evidence in court. ASP
Bethel said he told McNeil that
he had information that he had
gone to Mountbatten House,
attacked Taylor and stabbed him
about the body, causing his death.
According to ASP Bethel,
McNeil responded that he had no
comment on the advice of his
attorneys. ASP Bethel said that
McNeil responded similarly to
some 60 other questions.

ASP Bethel told the court that
on August 17, 2008, he received
information from the police
forensic lab and charged McNeil
the following day with Taylor’s
murder.

During cross-examination by
McNeil’s attorney, Murrio
Ducille, Mr Bethel was asked
whether he had received a report
from the DNA lab on August 18.
ASP Bethel told the court that

he had received no written DNA
analysis report on that day, but
had received a verbal report
which he made a note of on the
case file. Mr Ducille went on to
suggest to ASP Bethel that on
August 18, 2007, he had not one
scintilla of evidence to charge
McNeil.

ASP Bethel did not agree with
the suggestion saying that police
did have evidence.

Inspector Solomon Cash testi-
fied yesterday that around noon
on August 14, 2008, he was on
duty at the Lynden Pindling
International airport when
McNeil was handed over by US
Immigration and Customs agents
Hector and Alex Gonzales.
Inspector Cash said he arrested
McNeil and told him that he was
suspected of Taylor’s murder.
Inspector Cash told the court that
McNeil did not reply. Inspector
Cash told the court that he was
also present in the interview suite
at the Central Detective Unit
when ASP Bethel asked McNeil a
series of questions in the pres-
ence of his attorneys. He said that
McNeil did not answer the ques-
tions, but stated that on the
advice of his attorneys he had no
comment. Inspector Cash said
that he was also present at CDU
on August 18, when ASP Bethel
charged McNeil with Taylor’s
murder. The trial resumes this
morning at 11 am.

Police awaiting US clearance

FROM page one

after her mother’s death, which is likely to have
occurred around two months ago, but sometime
before the 33-year-old’s badly decomposed body
was discovered in a bushy area off Fox Hill Road
south on Saturday, July 4, 2009.

Bahamian Zyndall McKinney, 22, said to be
the teenager’s boyfriend, was arraigned in court
last Thursday charged with intentionally causing
the death of 33-year-old Garrison, a resident of
West Palm Beach, Florida, whilst “concerned
with another.”

Yesterday Paul Jukic, political officer at the
USS. Embassy in Nassau, said he would be unable
to provide any update from the U.S. side on where
the efforts to get to Madison stand, referring The

Tribune to the RBPF. Bahamian police stated

last week that it was in conjunction with the USS.
Embassy in Nassau and the U.S. government’s
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) that they
were seeking to locate “an American relative”
of Garrison’s who they suspect also might have
taken “part in her death”.

Meanwhile, the family of one of Ms Garrison’s
ex-husbands, also the father and custodian of a 10-
year-old son whom she abandoned at birth, told

The Tribune over the weekend that they had not

paper.

him.

heard of her death until contacted by this news-

According to the family, the child Garrison
had with the Delaware man had not seen his
mother since she left him at 10 months old and the
family had, up until hearing of her death, been
hoping that they could have persuaded her to
return to the United States to spend time with

“He’d just reached the stage where he was get-
ting curious about who his mum is,” said the

child’s grandmother. She claimed Garrison had

child.

she died.

Teen’s death

cell we don't know, the public
don't know, the nation don't
know. Only Michael and God
can tell me the truth," she told
The Tribune yesterday.

After Michael's death a
woman who claimed to be jailed
in a cell near his claimed she
overheard Michael threaten to
kill himself. She also claimed
she called out to the police to
alert them.

According to published
reports, an order of protection
was also served on authorities
last month prohibiting them
from interfering with another
teen that the family's lawyer,
Keod Smith, claims is a poten-
tial witness to Michael's death.

Mr Smith claimed the 14-
year-old boy, who was arrested
with Knowles in connection
with suspected housebreaking,
had allegedly been intimidated
by police after he was released

been concerned that if she returned to the area she
would be arrested by authorities for leaving the

“We told her that that’s her child and if she
wanted to see him she had nothing to worry
about,” added the relative.

Garrison first came to police attention in The
Bahamas on February 25, 2009, when they
received a missing persons report from the Unit-
ed States Embassy in Nassau stating that she may
have been “in the company of a Bahamian male.”

Police are still awaiting the results of an autop-
sy conducted on her body that will tell them how

on bail, published reports state.

Ms Wilson, who is still haunt-
ed by nightmares over son's
death, said she too fears police
may target her because of her
public challenge of their
account of her son's death.

The cash-strapped single
mother said that although her
son's body had been released
to the family for two weeks the
funeral was postponed because
of her financial challenges.

She said the funeral will be
paid for through donations
raised by her MP Cynthia
“Mother” Pratt and assistance
from her two sisters.

Ms Wilson said the funeral
home had reduced the cost of
the funeral from around $6,000
to $3,000.

She said her son's burial plot
was paid for by the Department
of Social Services. The funeral
is planned for 11 am Thursday
at the Praise and Worship
Church on Ragged Island
Street.



THE TRIBUNE

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 9





Bahamas
set to host

Caribbean

JUDO athletes from Barba-
dos, Puerto Rico, The Cayman
Islands, the Dutch Antilles and
the Bahamas are expected to
face off this weekend in the
Caribbean Judo Cup.

The 1pm to 4pm event is set
to be held at Loyola Hall,
Gladstone Road, on July 18.

Trials were held over the
weekend to determine who
would represent the Bahamas
against its Caribbean neigh-
bours.

The team will consist of
Wellington Mullings (73Kg),
Chrisnell Cooper (78 Kg),
D’Arcy Rahming Jr (66 Kg),
Cynthia Rahming (52 Kg), and
Nathan Williams (48 Kg).

Open

There will also be an open
tournament in which about 50
Bahamian and US athletes are
expected to attend.

In preparation for the event,
top US coach Gerald Lafon has
been busy training Bahamian
athletes at an intensive train-
ing camp.

He has also been running a
national coaches course in
which all Bahamas Judo Fed-
eration (BJF) schools are tak-
ing part.

"I am pleased to see the
cooperation between schools
of the (BJF). Coaches seem to
be eager to learn what steps
are necessary to take the
Bahamas to the next level,"
said Coach Lafon. "The ath-
letes in the training camp have

improved significantly since I
was here a year ago."

The course is being held at
Island Jujutsu on Carmichael
Road and All Star Family Cen-
ter, Joe Farrington Road.





TRIALS were held over the week-
end to determine who would rep-
resent the Bahamas against its
Caribbean neighbours. The team
will consist of Wellington
Mullings (73Kg), Chrisnell Coop-
er (78 Kg), D’Arcy Rahming Jr
(66 Kg), Cynthia Rahming (52
Kg), and Nathan Williams (48
Kg).

YOUNG judo athletes take part
ina training camp...

Photos courtesy
of the Bahamas
Judo Federation

Cavendish wins 10th Tour stage

Bg By JEROME PUGMIRE
AP Sports Writer

ISSOUDUN, France (AP) —
Teammates Alberto Contador and
Lance Armstrong remained second
and third in the Tour de France after
a technology-free day of riding in
which Britain’s Mark Cavendish won
the 10th stage.

Organizers banned rider earpieces
for Tuesday’s 121-mile route, forcing
cyclists to devise tactics without radio
instructions from team cars.

Rinaldo Nocentini of Italy kept the
leader’s yellow jersey on a flat route
favoring sprinters. Contador crossed
the line in 40th place. Armstrong, the
seven-time champion, finished in the
main pack at 46th. Overall, Nocentini
stayed six seconds ahead of Contador
and eight in front of Armstrong.

Armstrong is coming out of 3 1/2
years of retirement and chasing an
eighth Tour title. Contador is aiming
for a second title after winning in 2007.
The Spanish mountain specialist was
unable to defend his title last year
because his Astana team was barred
from the race because of doping scan-
dals.

Cavendish edged Thor Hushovd of
Norway in a sprint finish, breaking
ahead in the final 200 yards. It was
the British sprinter’s third stage victory
of this Tour and seventh of his career.
Tyler Farrar of the United States fin-
ished third.

“Tt was a really hard finish, slightly
uphill with a lot of corners,” said
Cavendish, who rides for Team
Columbia-High Road, said. “I was
scared that I attacked too early but
(teammate Mark) Renshaw helped
me a lot.”

The Tour hoped to inject drama
into this race by eliminating earpieces
in the 10th and 13th stages. Many rid-
ers — Armstrong, Contador and
Nocentini among them — criticized
the decision.

“T think that for us and for the
whole team it is not a good thing,”
Nocentini said. “We spoke about the
earpieces before the start. The fact is
for us it’s dangerous not to have them.
There are dangers on the road.”

Armstrong joked about the matter
as he got off his Astana team bus and
mounted his bike to go to the start
line.

“T can’t hear anything; I don’t know
anything. ... I feel naked,” the 37-year-
old Texan said. “I think it’s a lot to do
about nothing.”

Astana team director Johan
Bruyneel had campaigned for the ban
to be overturned. But it was upheld



MARK CAVENDISH of Britain reacts as he crosses the finish line to win the 10th stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 194.5 kilometers (120.9 miles) with start in Limo-
ges and finish in Issoudun, central France on Tuesday. Center rear is Thor Hushovd of Norway, wearing the best sprinter's green jersey, who finished second.

and is also scheduled for Friday, a
tricky stage featuring one big climb
and possibly many attacks. Teams are
still pressuring organizers to overturn
the ban.

“My impression is that we’ll have
the radio on Friday,” Armstrong said.

With the backing of the cycling’s
governing body, Tour organizers
decided last month that rider radios
and TV sets in cars would be banned
for two stages. Earlier in the race,
Bruyneel said the Tour was not the
place for such an “experiment.”

Earpieces allow riders to be linked
to directors in team cars. Riders can be
informed of developments and told

when they need to attack or chase rid-
ers in a breakaway.

The strategy was popularized by
Armstrong when he won his first Tour
in 1999. Some riders and former cham-
pions say the tactic makes cycling too
clinical.

“There are arguments to both sides,
to have them or not to have them,”
Armstrong said. “But, on balance, I
think it’s better to have them. In
cycling, we have other, more impor-
tant, things to care about.”

On Tuesday, Thierry Hupond,
Benoit Vaugrenard, Mikhail Ignatiev
and Samuel Dumoulin were caught
following a long breakaway with just

under a mile to go. Cavendish then
turned into the home straightaway
and was pressured by Hushovd but
held on.

“Cavendish is very, very fast, but
it’s true that he also has a very quick
team,” Hushovd said. “I lost four or
five meters (yards) to him in the last
turn.”

Cavendish, who last year won four
stages but did not finish the Tour, was
timed in 4 hours, 46 minutes, 43 sec-
onds.

“We had all nine guys there at the
finish, working 100 percent and deliv-
ering perfectly,” Cavendish said.

Hushovd, who kept the sprinter’s

(AP Photo: Laurent Rebours)

green jersey despite losing points to
Cavendish, and Farrar received the
same time as Cavendish.

With two more flat stages Wednes-
day and Thursday, Cavendish has
Hushovd’s green jersey in his sights.
Hushovd has 147 points and
Cavendish 141.

Cavendish said he feels fresh
because his teammates nursed him
through the Pyrenees mountain stages.

“T hope to win more (stages) in the
next two days,” he said.

¢ AP Sports Writer Samuel Petre-
quin contributed to this report



PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS

Bahamas 5th place at junior
amateur golf championships

THE Bahamas Junior Golf
Association’s national team has
returned with a fifth place finish
after Caribbean Amateur
Junior Golf Championships in
Jamaica last week.

The Bahamas, with its best
showing coming from Benjamin
Davis in the boys’ 14-15 divi-
sion, is now preparing to host

Bulls buy out
F Tim Thomas

CHICAGO (AP) — For-
ward Tim Thomas and the
Chicago Bulls have agreed
on a contract buyout, ending
the veteran's second stint
with the Bulls.

The team announced the
move Tuesday.

Acquired from the New
York Knicks in February,
Thomas averaged 5.8 points
and 2.3 rebounds in 18
games with Chicago. He was
scheduled to make about
$6.4 million next season, but
the Bulls had no room for
him after drafting forwards
James Johnson and Taj Gib-
son last month.

The 32-year old Thomas
has averaged 11.6 points and
4.1 rebounds for six teams
in 12 years. He was also
dealt from the Knicks to the
Bulls before the 2005-06 sea-
son, but played just three
games for Chicago and was
waived the following March.

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



next year’s championships.

The Bahamas accumulated a
total of 93 points at the three-
day competition between nine
participating countries for the
Hank James Trophy.

Winning the title was Puerto
Rico with 158. Trinidad &
Tobago got second with 136 fol-
lowed by Dominican Republic
with 122 and Jamaica with 100.

The competition was held in
three age groups in the boys
and girls. They were 13-and-
under, 14-15 and 16-17.

Davis turned in a three-day
score of 220 (77-71-72) to cart
off the individual title in the
boys 14-15 division. His near-
est rival was Jake Delaney of
Trinidad & Tobago with 223
(74-77-72).

Davis’ teammates Osbourne
Cooper was 15th with 256 (84-
80-92) and Rasheed Robinson
was 17th with 266 (87-89-90).

Denier Weech turned in the
next best individual perfor-
mance for the Bahamas with
sixth place in the girls 13-and-
under. She shot a 103-103-95
for her total of 301.

Puerto Rico’s Yudika
Rodriguez took the divisional
title with rounds of 80-95-86 for
her total of 261.

Asif Robinson, competing in
the boys 13-and-under division,
was eighth with a 265 (93-86-
86). His teammate Harrison
Collins was 11th with 292 (101-
93-98).

The divisional title went to
Frederick Thon of Puerto Rico
with 228 (75-81-72).

Taneka Sandiford, compet-
ing in the girls 14-15 division,
was eighth with a 279 (92-94-
93).

Bijan Lockhart, her team-
mate, was tied with another for
13th, but neither turned in a
card.

Maria Torres of Puerto Rico
won the divisional title with 242
(82-84-76).

In the girls 16-17 division,
Tleah Knowles ended up 10th
after she shot rounds of 110,
110, 94 for her total of 301, just

E—

ahead of teammate Eugenie
Adderley, who shot 304 (110,
100, 94).

And Kyle King has the best
showing of the Bahamian trio
in the boys 16-17. With rounds
of 90-89-86, King shot a 265 for
17th place.

Teammates Charlie Butler
was tied with another for 18th
with 283 (96-90-97) while
Rashad Ferguson’s 285 (96-89-
100) placed him 20th.

Simon Proverbs of Barbados
shot a 226 (82-72-72) to take
the divisional crown.

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Photos by Gavin Collins



ASIF ROBINSON, competing in the boys 13-and-under division, was

eighth with a 265 (93-86-86)...

Under-19
cricket team
heats Argentina
and avoits
relegation

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas’ under-19
team salvaged a less than desir-
able performance at the Inter-
national Cricket Council Amer-
icas Regional tournament, cap-
ping the four-day event with its
only victory.

The team won its final match
against Argentina and, by doing
so, avoided relegation to a low-
er division in the region. It was
the first win for the Bahamas
in the history of the regional
qualifier.

Up first at bat, the Bahamas
scored 187 runs for seven wick-
ets, while Argentina was held
to 88 runs for seven wickets.

The Bahamas took the match
by 57 runs.

Shridat Jadoo led the
Bahamas’ balanced scoring
attack with a game high 34 runs.

Odane Tucker finished with
29, Julio Jameson added 25
Orlando Stuart finished with 23
runs while Marc Taylor finished
with 21.

The Bahamian bowlers dom-
inated Argentina and combined
with efficient defense in the
field, limiting them to just dou-
ble figures in runs.

Taylor, who was also named
“Man of the Match”, took three
wickets while Stuart and Ash-
meid Allie and each took one.

Canada prevailed as tourna-
ment champions after finishing
the tournament undefeated at
5-0, including a 62 run margin of
victory over the US in the semi-
finals.

The Americans finished sec-
ond at 4-1, Bermuda was third
at 3-2, the Bahamas at 1-4 and
Argentina rounded out the field
winless at 0-5.

The US was the tournament’s
leading scorer with a total of
1030 runs, while Canada boast-
ed the top defense, allowing just
409. The Bahamas scored a
total of 421 runs while they gave
up 776.

The team received tourna-
ment acclaim when Stuart fin-
ished second amongst leading
bowlers with 11 wickets.

Christopher Douglas of
Bermuda led the list with 14
wickets.

The Bahamas opened the
tournament with a loss to the
US by 249 runs, 325-79.

In their next match against
the eventual tournament cham-
pions, Canada, the Bahamas
lost by nine wickets.

They fared little better in
their third match of the tourna-
ment, a loss to the Cayman
Islands by eight wickets, and
against Bermuda they lost by
106 runs.

The ICC Americas Regional
Tournament is a bi-annual tour-
nament that is a part of the
council’s international develop-
ment programme.

The Bahamas is scheduled to
host the ICC under 15 Tourna-
ment in Nassau this August.
Teams from the Cayman
Islands and Belize have already
committed to attend.

Tips from a veteran bodybuilder

PAUL Melbourne, a winner
of numerous national titles and
multiple Central American and
Caribbean Championships
medals, provides some impor-
tant tips for competitors in the
Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fit-
ness Federation’s 36th Indepen-
dence National Bodybuilding
Championships.

The championships is sched-
uled for 7:30pm July 18 at the
Centre of Performing Arts on
Shirley Street.

“When a competitor comes
on stage, he/she must come on
stage as though he is the only
competitor. He has to come on
with a lot of excitement,” Mel-
bourne said.

“He must express to the
judges the feeling that there is
nobody better than him on stage.
All too often competitors come
on stage slouchy, not showing
any kind of energy and basically
looking like they don’t want to
compete in the first place even
though they’ve spent months
training for the event.”

Melbourne said the truth of
the matter is that when they
walk on stage, they must make a
statement to the judges that
‘here I am. I have worked for
this many months and I am here
to show you my best.”

“They must form their pose
in the right form or fashion. If



PAUL MELBOURNE

they are showing their thighs, it
is important that they have their
legs in the right position, they
must have their hands in the
right position, they must have
their chin in the right position
and they must have their body
upright and tight.”

Melbourne clarified that the
third most important thing for
the bodybuilder is to remember
that their music must be thrilling
and exciting.

“A lot of guys come out with
music that puts you to sleep,”
he said. “That throws the audi-
ence off. He may be the com-
petitor with the best muscles,
but because his music is not grip-

ping, he could fall down.

“Music is supposed to be filled
with dramatics so that when it
comes on it excites the crowd
and makes them want to see him
and the judges want to see what
he has to offer,” Melbourne said.

Melbourne, who has been
competing since 1982, said many
of the bodybuilders have failed
because they did not adhere to
these categories.

“That is why we are teaching
them to flex their entire body
because many people just flex
the top half of their body and
forget the legs,” he said. “They
must remember their legs as
well.

“They must learn how to
express, how to control, how to
contract their muscles so that
the audience can see the finished
product of their merchandise.”

Melbourne further stated that
the younger builders are eager to
develop themselves for tourna-
ments to come.

“They have showed that they
are good listeners. They ask
senior bodybuilders like myself,
Aaron Green, Raymond Tucker,
Wellington Sears, Nardo Dean
and Paul Wong to assist them in
helping to get all of the mechan-
ics right,” he said.

“T think we should have a very
good crop of senior contenders
at this year’s championships.”



THE TRIBUNE

S

PAGE 1




Tey
. A Cavendish
» wins 10th

Tour stage...





ke
WEDNESDAY, JULY 15,

2009



i a
cao
a] .

—
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lum



— See page 9

‘Golden Girl’ Chandra
takes the No. 2 snot

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

hile the

Bahamas

Association

of Athletic
Associations (BAAA) has
not yet released the
Bahamian team for the
IAAF World Champi-
onships in Athletics, the
elite athletes are making
their presence felt before
the trip to Berlin, Germany,
August 15-23.

At the conclusion of the
Athens Grand Prix track
meet on Monday, veteran
sprinter Chandra Sturrup
climbed to No. 2 on the
World Athletics Tour that
will allow athletes to earn a
berth in the World Athletics
Final in Stuttgart, Germany,
in September.

Despite coming in sixth in
the women’s 100m in
Athens, Sturrup has accu-
mulated a total of 59 points [_
over five meets to trail
Jamaican speedster Kerron |
Stewart, who leads with 88 7
points over five meets as
well.

On Saturday in Rome,
Sturrup turned in her sea-
son’s best of 10.99 seconds,
better only by five other ath-
letes, including three
Jamaicans headed by Stew-
art, who won the race in an
impressive 10.75.

Double national sprint
champion Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie, who has posted
three of the last four meet-
ings between her and Stur-
rup, is sitting at No. 6 on the
world’s list. She did her sea-
son’s best of 11.04 in
Athens.

In the 200m, Ferguson-
McKenzie is ranked at No.
9, having ran a season’s best
of 22.56 in New York on
May 30.

Chris “Bay” Brown, who
missed out on a chance to
contend for the Golden
League $1 million jackpot
after he didn’t participate in
the second of the first three
meets on the circuit, has the
best showing by the men.

He is also sitting in sec-
ond place in the men’s 400
with 51 points over four
meets behind African cham-
pion Gary Kikaya. Brown
has the seventh fastest time
and the second by a
Bahamian in 44.81 that he
recorded on Saturday in
Rome.

Newcomer Latoy Williams, who is
still recovering from an injury at the
Nationals, has the fastest time by a
Bahamian of 44.73, the third best this
season. But he’s not listed on the
World Athletics Tour, having not com-
peted in Europe yet.

Michael Mathieu is tied with three
others for 15th place on the list, but
his season’s best is just 45.80 that he ran
on June 10 in Thessaloniki.

Andrae Williams, the third fastest
Bahamian so far this year with a time
of 44.98 on May 7 in Lubbock, Texas, is

Shamar Sands

Derrick ens

i ms ed.
Ferguson-McKenzie

Mee Williams

Christine Amertil

Petros Giannakouris/AP



OLYMPIC Champion Veronica Campbell Brown (right), of Jamaica, pulls away from Bahamian Chandra Sturrup to win the 100m during the IAAF Athens Grand Prix Tsiklitiria at the

Olympic stadium on Monday...

27th on the World Athletics Tour.

Andretti Bain, last year’s NCAA
champion who is coming off an injured
season earlier this year, is ranked at
No. 33, but his best has been posted at
46.02 on June 27 at the Nationals.

On the women’s side, Christine
Amertil is listed at No. 15 with 17
points over the three meets she com-
peted in. Her season’s best of 51.43 in

Leevan Sands

Belém on May 24 has her at No. 21 on
the performance list.

Currently sitting in third on the
men’s triple jump standings is Olympic
bronze medallist Leevan “Superman”
Sands. He has competed in three meets
and racked up 20 points. But his sea-
son’s best of 17.14 at the Nationals is
14th on the performance list.

After getting off to a sizzling start,

Nitec erly

Michael Mathieu

Shamar Sands has cooled down a bit in
the men’s 110m hurdles. He is now No.
10 on the World Athletics Tour with 38
points over five meets. His season’s
best of 13.38 on June 17 in Ostrava
has him at No. 18.

World Championships silver medal-
list Derrick Atkins is tied with nine
others at No. 90 in the men’s 100m.
He has posted a season’s best of 10.17



Latoy Williams

in Berkeley, California, on April 24.

And world champion Donald
Thomas continues to struggle in the
men’s high jump, coming off his second
straight meet without clearing a height
in Athens.

Thomas, however, is sitting in sev-
enth spot and has done a season’s best
of 2.30 in Auburn, Alabama, on April

Donald Thomas



PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Seven charged with killing
Florida couple, stealing safe

BILL KACZOR,
Associated Press Writer
MELISSA NELSON,
Associated Press Writer
PENSACOLA, Fla.

An ex-convict who taught self-
defense to children. A day labor-
er who served prison time for
killing a man in a fight. An Air
Force staff sergeant attached to
an elite special operations unit.

Somehow, authorities say, they
ended up part of a loosely con-
nected group of seven men
charged in the shooting deaths of
Byrd and Melanie Billings, a
wealthy Florida Panhandle couple
known for adopting children with
special needs.

The suspects, some dressed as
ninjas, stole a safe and other items
during the break-in Thursday at
the sprawling Billings home west
of Pensacola. Nine of the couple's
13 adopted children were home at
the time. Three saw the intrud-
ers but were not hurt. Authori-
ties would not say what was in
the safe or what else was taken.

Some of the masked men
entered through the front door,
while others slipped in through
an unlocked utility door in the
back. They were in and out in
under 10 minutes. The crime was
captured by an extensive video
surveillance system the Billings
used to keep tabs on their many
children. "It was a very well-
planned and well-executed oper-
ation,” said Escambia County
Sheriff David Morgan.

The last three of the seven sus-
pects were arrested Tuesday,
though Morgan said there still
might be more arrests. State
Attorney Bill Eddins said rob-
bery was the main motive for the
crime. Adult daughter Ashley
Markham — one of four Billings
children from previous marriages
— sobbed Tuesday as she hugged
Morgan, who said he kept a
promise made to her the night of
the slayings.

"It is my honor today to tell
you, Ashley, your family we have
found them and they are in cus-
tody," Morgan said.

The suspects ranged in age
from 16 to 56, and several were
day laborers who knew each oth-



AP Photo/Katie King, The Pensacola News Journal

ASHLEY MARKHAM, 26, daughter of Melanie Billings, is comforted by
Sheriff David Morgan after his announcement of a seventh arrest

year-old was charged Sunday
night with evidence tampering
after authorities said he tried to
cover up some damage on a red
van seen on surveillance video
pulling away from the house.
Officials said the damage was
unrelated to the crime. Tips from
the public led police to the van
Saturday.

The elder Gonzalez owned a
pressure washing business and
may have visited the Billings
property once before. Another
man arrested and charged with
murder Sunday, day laborer
Wayne Coldiron, 41, sometimes
worked for him and also may
have visited the property, Mor-
gan said. Coldiron, who appeared
in court Tuesday and said he had
lost his job as a plumber, served
two years in a Tennessee prison in
the early 1990s after killing a man

during a fight. He also served
nearly two years in prison in
Florida on an aggravated assault
charge.

The other four suspects were
arrested Monday and Tuesday.

Authorities in neighboring
Okaloosa County arrested 31-
year-old Gary Sumner, another
day laborer who was in a county
jail on an unrelated traffic charge.
On Tuesday, three more men
were arrested: Stallworth, 19-
year-old Frederick Lee Thorton,
and a 16-year-old whom officials
are not naming because he is a
minor. Eddins, the prosecutor,
said he would seek first-degree
murder indictments from a grand
jury against all the suspects,
including Gonzalez Sr. He would
not say whether he will seek the
death penalty. Escambia County
Judge Tom Johnson refused to

set bail for the younger Gonzalez
and Coldiron at the request of
State Attorney Bill Eddins. John-
son set their arraignments for
Aug. 6. Bond for the elder Gon-
zalez had already been set at
$500,000. The suspects arrested
Monday and Tuesday are due in
court this week except for Stall-
worth, who must be extradited
from Alabama, where he was
arrested.

The Billings family attended
the hearing Tuesday but made no
statements. Some were in tears
afterward. Friends, meanwhile,
struggled to understand how the
couple could have been killed in
such a horrific way. "Melanie and
Byrd both would give you the
shirt off their back and maybe
they were too trusting," said Pat-
sy Brown, who had known
Melanie Billings for 22 years.

Tuesday, July 14, 2009. Masked suspects, some dressed as ninjas,
stole a safe and other items during a deadly break-in at the sprawling
Florida Panhandle home of a couple known for adopting children
with special needs, authorities said Tuesday.

er through a pressure washing
business and an auto detailer they
worked for. One, Donnie Ray
Stallworth, was with the Air
Force Special Operations Com-
mand with an aircraft mainte-
nance squadron at Hurlburt Field
near Fort Walton Beach. It wasn't
clear how he knew the others.

"We're dealing with a group of
folks with rare exception — of
course, there's a couple of people
who are not — that again are
basically day laborer sorts, folks
that get odd jobs, part-time jobs
and they drift," Morgan said.
"With the exception of Mr. Stall-
worth you don't have any career-
minded people in this group.”

Morgan called 35-year-old sus-
pect Leonard Gonzalez Jr. a "piv-
otal person" in organizing the
crime, but stopped short of iden-
tifying him as the mastermind.
He was charged Sunday with
murder. In court Tuesday, he
read a statement proclaiming his
innocence.

"The sheriff intentionally thrust
me into the public's eye without
any charges being filed and also
intentionally placed me in a sui-
cide ward to make me look even

guiltier," Gonzalez said. News
clippings provided a very different
picture of Gonzalez, a former
National Guard member and
martial arts expert who taught
self-defense classes for women
and children. In 2007, he and his
wife founded a martial-arts course
that taught children to defend
themselves against sexual preda-
tors.

Gwinn Corley, a spokesman
for acommunity group that gave
Gonzalez and his wife an award
for their program, said they
brought their six young children
to self-defense presentations.

"We were impressed with
them," Corley said. "He was talk-
ing about children and their
respect for their elders. They both
seemed to have a passion to
teaching the arts to abused
women and kids, they had a
vision for how to give free self
defense."

But records show Gonzalez,
who was arrested Sunday in the
Billings case, served time in Flori-
da State Prison on burglary and
forgery charges in the mid-1990s.

His father, Leonard Gonzalez
Sr., was also arrested. The 56-

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"TEACHING VACANCIES

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications from quali-
fied Teachers for position available.

One (1) Social Studies (Geography)
One (1) Substitute Clothing Construction

Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor or Master Degrees from an ac-
credited University or College and Teaching Certificate need apply.

For further details and application from, please contact the Anglican Central
Education Authority on Sands Road at telephone (242) 322-3015/6/7.

Letters of application and/or completed application forms with copies of
required documents must be sent by Friday, July 31st 2009 to the Angli-
can Education Department addressed to:-

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O. Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas

WIND JAMMER

CASTING CALL BAHAMIAN MOVIE

An independent motion picture, shooting this summer
in the Bahamas is looking to fill roles for a new movie
shooting in August. Actors will be compensated for
their work. Experience is not necessary but a good
sense of humor will go a long way!
We are the looking for
-Three older white men with a sly sense of humor and a refined look.

-A young black Bahamian male between 14-16 who likes Junkanoo

-An older white man with a heavy foreign accent.

Please contact:



or call 394.6579





THE TRIBUNE

USINCSS

WEDNESDAY,

Ur Le elo 2 0

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Casino bidder
‘head and
shoulders’

above rivals

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ONE poten-
tial replacement
for Grand |
Bahama’s sole
casino operator
“stands head
and shoulders”
above the more
than 10 other
proposals
received, the
minister of
tourism and aviation said yes-
terday, with the Cabinet and
other relevant government
agencies set to determine the
issue next week.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace
told Tribune Business he and

Â¥

es elcles



* Government ‘very, very
excited’ about one potential
replacement for Isle of Capri

* Minister ‘fairly confident’
new operator found before
Capri’s agreement expires in
August, based on interest
that resulted in more
than 10 proposals

* Government due to discuss
issue next week, with key
lying in ‘quality of solution’
and new operator’s
brand/marketing reach

SEE page 4B

BTC’s $50m core network
in place in ‘18 months’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC)
expects to complete the more
than $50 million implementa-
tion of its IP next generation
network infrastructure over
“the next 18 months”, Tribune
Business was told yesterday,
with the first phase of its new
$14-$15 million billing system
scheduled for an _ end-
August/September finish.

Marlon Johnson, BTC’s vice-
president of sales and market-
ing, said the company’s Inter-
net Protocol (IP) next genera-
tion network would “increase
operating efficiencies” at the
state-owned carrier, just as the
Government formally com-
mences the process to privatise

* Targets end-August/
September deadline
for $14-$15m billing
system implementation

* New IP system to
‘enhance operating
efficiencies’

* No more major projects
due to privatisation

it by selling a 51 per cent stake
to a strategic partner.

“This is our new generation
network that will transition us
from the digital infrastructure
we have now to what is a state-

SEE page 3B

Operator urges price controls
for dominant telecom firms

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

PRICE controls must be
included in the licences issued
to the Bahamas Telecommuni-
cations Company (BTC) and
Cable Bahamas, a rival tele-
coms operator has warned, in
order to prevent “significant dis-
tortion of the market” and
“irreparable damage” being
caused to competitors.

Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, pres-
ident of Systems Resource
Group (SRG), the parent of
IndiGo Networks, BTC’s only
legal competitor in landline
voice services, said that in the
absence of price controls that
were inbuilt into their licence,
operators with significant mar-
ket power (SMP) could inflict
major damage through practices

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



* SRG fears ‘significant
distortion of the market’
and ‘irreparable damage’
caused if BIC, Cable
Bahamas licences do
not have controlling
mechanisms to prevent
predatory pricing

such as predatory pricing before
regulators were able to act.

Responding to the communi-
cations licensing reform paper,
published by the Government-
appointed BTC privatisation
committee, Mr Hutton-Ashken-
ny said SRG was concerned
that the draft licences did not
impose price control or service
bundling obligations on com-
munications operators with
SMP.

BTC has been defined as an
operator with SMP in both the
provision of fixed landline and
cellular voice telephony ser-
vices, while Cable Bahamas has
SMP in cable television services.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said
that while the new communica-
tions sector regulator, URCA,
would be empowered by the
new legislation to assess abuse
of a dominant position by the
likes of Cable Bahamas and
BTC, the time taken to act and
impose a decision “can lead to
irreparable damage to other
operators and lead to signifi-
cant distortion of the market”.

Recalling SRG’s experience
as the new entrant to the fixed-
line voice market, Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny, in a thinly-veiled ref-

SEE page 2B



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Sandals eyes deal
for Emerald Bay

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Sandals resort chain is eye-
ing the purchase of Exuma’s
closed Emerald Bay resort,
Tribune Business can reveal,
and is among the remaining
bidders in negotiations with the properties
PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) receivers.

The Jamaica-headquartered chain, owned
by Gordon ‘Butch’ Stewart and his family,
already has a strong presence in the
Bahamas through its Royal Bahamian
resort on Cable Beach, and was said by
informed sources yesterday to be “very
interested” in acquiring Emerald Bay pro-
vided the price was right.

One hotel industry source, speaking to
Tribune Business on condition of anonymi-
ty, said yesterday: “I’m aware that they’re
[Sandals] very interested in it [Emerald
Bay], but it will all come down to price and
financing.”

The source said senior Sandals execu-
tives had already met with Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham over the Emerald Bay

Rival bidding group includes
PI resort owner RIU

issue.

Other contacts have told Tribune Busi-
ness that the Prime Minister and his gov-
ernment have been actively encouraging
existing owners/developers of Bahamas-
based resorts to assess the feasibility of
acquiring Emerald Bay, believing that their
track record and knowledge of this nation
would leave them best-placed to solve the
so-called Exuma anchor property’s prob-
lems.

Sandals and Mr Stewart already have
resort interests in the Exumas via their bou-
tique Royal Plantation chain, which will
have a 21-villa property on 50-acre Fowl
Cay by end-2009.

Another source told Tribune Business
that Sandals executives had been “seen
down there several times” carrying out due



diligence on the Emerald Bay property.

“That would probably be the best bet,”
he added of the prospects for a Sandals
purchase. “They know the lay of the land
and promise to be a good corporate citi-
zen.”

And another source with knowledge of
Sandals’ interest told Tribune Business:
“Sandals is a known entity, and comes with
pre-packaged marketing. They have the
Sandals brand identity, the extremely effi-
cient reservations system, 1,000 things going
for them and are not tight for money.”

The source added, though, that it was
important for any buyer to conclude a pur-
chase agreement with PwC and Emerald
Bay’s main creditor, the London office of

SEE page 4B

Accounting body urged: ‘Get back on the road’

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Fears BICA has lost influence it once had in the profession

A FOUNDER of the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants (BICA) yesterday
told newly-elected council
members yesterday that the
institution has lost the influence
it once held within the indus-
try, while another said it was
time to get "back on the road”.

Ronald Atkinson, speaking
at the induction ceremony for
those new council members,
admonished BICA for not mov-
ing towards aligning itself with
similar entities in the US, and
warned members that the win-
dow of opportunity to do so was
quickly closing.

He said accounting firms can
no longer be all things to all
people, and suggested that
accountants exchange the

pedantry for specialisation.

This comes as BICA moves
to adopt a regional practice
monitoring and peer review
programme being spearheaded
by the International Institute of
Chartered Accountants of the
Caribbean.

Incoming BICA president
Reece Chipman, in his address
to the new council members,
acknowledged the challenges
facing BICA with respect to the
accounting industry, given the
volatility of the economy.

"We are expected to channel
a course through international
agreements, as well as a course
through G20 and OECD frame-
works of ‘best practices’ and
‘level playing field’,” he said.

"With this in mind we must
maintain public confidence in

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professional accountants and
auditors, and the services they
provide for the public.

“We should recognise and
prioritise the public interest
through a wide range of profes-
sional services, including many
that are externally regulated."

Mr Chipman said the Associ-
ation of Chartered Certified
Accountants (ACCA) is cur-
rently working on an ‘Interna-
tional Competency Framework’
to address the competencies
required by firms to prepare
financial information.

"As a result of this, BICA
encourages all professional
accountants (public and private
practices) to become members
of BICA, and to remain in good
standing," he said.

According to Mr Chipman,

one of the most important
focuses for BICA will be public
sector accounting and the intro-
duction of accrual basis accout-
ing.
“With governments bailing
out, packaging assistance and
privatisation, these initiatives
will undoubtedly find itself on
the country’s balance sheet,”
Mr Chipman said.
“Accordingly, proper use of
accrual basis accounting in the
public sector becomes critically
important. This initiative of gov-
ernment’s adoption of accrual
basis accounting versus cash
basis accounting is supported
by IFAC and the World Bank
in light of the economic crisis,
and the IMF’s mandate for
greater transparency and
accountability.”

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE

There will be a meeting for all members
of the Honorable Society of the Middle
Temple on Thursday July 23rd

6:00 p.m. @ S.G. Hambros.
All are asked to attend.

NOTICE

NOTICE is h given that MR. OVAN PIERRE OF NASSAU
VILLAGE, MA U, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
regestration/ naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration’
naturalization should not ba granted, should sand a written
and signed statement of tha tae within twenty-eight days

Ask Questions

Daddy, what’s that? If I hada
dime for every time they asked
that question I would be writing
this article from my mountain
top estate. Remember, I have
twins so everything is double,
even including the dimes.

The lesson here - ASK
QUESTIONS. A lot of us do
not ask enough questions. My
kids ask questions until they
understand completely what it is
they need to know. It should be
the same when we are talking to
clients.

from the 16TH day of JULY, 2008 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Directions

Daddy, where are we going?
What another powerful ques-
tion. Ask your clients where it is
they want to go. Once you
know where they want to go, it
is just a matter of how. And
that’s the job of the sales and
marketing person.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that Mr. JOHN BERNARD of
Lovely Bay, Acklins, Bahamas, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15" day of July, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Visions And Decisions

My kids make decisions.
When they see something they
want they are gone. And it
should be the same with our-
selves and clients. Get the
vision, see it and go after it.
Don’t let anything get in your
way. This applies to sales and
marketing professionals as well
as clients. This relates back to
my last article on GOALS.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RANDOLPH SAINTIL of
#31 WOODCOCK LN, ARDENT FOREST, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
15th day of JULY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

FROM page 1B

RCS a 2
Tribune - the #1 newspaper
in circulation, just call
HT Perey AB CL

erence to BTC, said: “In the
recent past, the dominant fixed
voice operator in the Bahamas
has acted in a manner that
would have had the effect of
causing lasting market distor-
tion had the regulator not acted.

“In the absence of the price
control conditions placed upon
the dominant operator in its
licence, irreparable damage
would have been caused that
could not have been resolved
by a subsequent ruling by the
regulator that the subject action
was deemed to be anti-compet-
itive.

“In the time it would have
taken even a highly efficient and
powerful regulator to react, the
damage would have been done,
and whilst the dominant opera-
tor might have suffered a fine,
that would have been of little
comfort to other operators who
may have been driven from the
market in the meanwhile.”

Urging that the draft licence
be modified to require the likes
of BTC and Cable Bahamas to
obtain URCA’s prior approval
for any change in their tariff
prices, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
added: “This would not only
help guard against predatory
practices, such as those
described above, but would also
serve to protect the consumer
from an ex-monopolist raising
its prices prior to competitive
market entry by a new operator,
followed by a subsequent price
reduction when competition
became established.”

RFG @ Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd
POSITION AVAILABLE:

Client Relationship Officer for International Bank

British Colonial Hilton Hetel
Marlborough St. Slop a

Clearance
SALE
New Stock also on Sale
Everything for $20

Until the end of July
Free parking at the Hilton

P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel! 242-323-1865

Email: gems-pears i hotmail.com



Applicants must have demonstrated experience and ability to develop new
business for non-resident, high net-worth market.

REQUIREMENTS:

Excellent knowledge of private banking products and services; fluency in Eng-
lish, French and any other language skills would be an asset; 15 years’ private
banking; knowledge of Bahamian regulatory requirements; university degree and/
or related professional designation.

DUTIES:

Marketing of private banking and portfolio management services; extensive
traveling; acquisition and development of new clients.

Compensation will be commensurate with experience.

Interested applicants must submit applications to: Human Resources
Manager, (Re: Client Relationship Position), P.O. Box SS 6289, Nassau,
Bahamas, by 20th July, 2009 or fax to (242) 502-5428.



Promotional
Marketing

ANee LM Me TIE KOT



I Don’t Want To!

This is another way of
expressing: “I really don’t
understand.” (Bottom line: I did
not explain myself clearly
enough). Once I slow down
and explain to my boys all of
the details, even though they
may not grasp everything there
are always one or two words
they will connect with and I can
see their expressions change.

This reminds me of when I
am dealing with some clients.
Though I can see (vision) clear-
ly and the direction needed to
achieve a goal, my client still
does not. This is basically
because I have not in DETAIL
explained the five W’s. Who,
What, Why, Where and When.
Slow down when talking with
clients and explain things as
SLOWLY and clearly as possi-
ble, then ask: “DO YOU
UNDERSTAND?”

Simplify -— Speak in your
client’s language, not yours
So I do not hear the same

The SRG president also
called for licence restrictions to
account for services in other
markets where the licensee did
not have dominant SMP power.

In a likely reference to both
BTC and Cable Bahamas, he
said: “An operator with a sunk
cost of infrastructure in one
market will be able to adopt
unfair pricing and bundling
strategies that leverage its infra-
structure in new markets, even
in the absence of SMP in those
markets.”

Significant market power was
also a central theme in SRG’s
concerns over the transition
from the existing telecommuni-
cations industry regulatory
regime, overseen by the Public
Utilities Commission (PUC), to
URCA and the wider commu-
nications legislative and super-
visory framework.

While the new legislation
enabled URCA to address con-
cerns relating to a market in
which an SMP operator was
currently licensed, and prevent
it from “leveraging SMP in its

The

question over and over from my
twins, I try to speak in their lan-
guage. Guess what? It usually
works. Do the same with your
clients and you will be sur-
prised.

Using flashy jargons and
expressions from your industry
is exactly that. Your client does
not know what a superimper-
danticulator is (neither do I). If
you have to use some terminol-
ogy from your industry, follow it
up with plain English and
explain clearly what it is and
how it works. Remember an old
expression - K.LS.S. Keep it
simple stupid. Well? Do it. It
works.

You Can Say No!

Lastly, the second most pow-
erful word in the dictionary
after it is no!

Saying no is sometimes diffi-
cult for a lot of people. Boy, let
me tell you, I’m learning fast. I
have to say no twice as fast as
most people. Saying no is a
good thing, and especially with
children. Say No and explain
why it is important as well.

With some people, what they
are asking is either impossible in
the timeframe or simply will not
work. Saying No to a client is
healthy for both parties
involved. The same as it is with
our children; it’s good for them

existing market into new mar-
kets and thereby distorting com-
petition”, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
felt “a potential loophole”
remained when it came to
ensuring fair competition during
the transition between regula-
tory regimes.

“Such efforts will have been
in vain if an operator with SMP
in its existing market was
deemed to have satisfied the
obligations placed upon it, but
was separately engaged in activ-
ity that had the effect of dis-
torting competition in the new
market,” he warned.

As a result, the SRG presi-
dent recommended that any
company with SMP be prevent-
ed from entering new commu-
nications markets “until such
time that URCA has confirmed
its acceptance that no activity
exists that would have the effect
of distorting competition in the
new market”.

Otherwise, URCA would be
in the position of permitting an
anti-competitive position to
develop during the regulatory

A iwintiics

The Bahamas Source For Homes, Apartment Communities & Rentals

ee Be led

Keeping it simple
is just child’s play

and us parents.

Never promise something
you can’t deliver. Ever
promised your kids something
and did not do it? Ouuuuccchh.
Man, they are like elephants
and never forget it. Well, the
same goes for sales profession-
als. If you can’t do it, say no.
However, if you really can’t
provide something they are
looking for, help them find
someone who can. This will
only strengthen your relation-
ship. All of these marketing
strategies are certain to keep
your business on top during
these challenging economic
times. Have a productive and
profitable week! Remember:
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT.”

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products. Established
over 27 years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted
Bahamian businesses from var-
ious industries, ranging from
tourism and banking to
telecommunications, in mar-
keting themselves. Readers can
contact Mr Farrington at Sun-
Tee EmbroidMe on East
Shirley Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
phone at 242-393-3104.

Operator urges price controls
for dominant telecom firms

regime transition, then be
forced to resolve it at a later
date.

In response to SRG’s con-
cerns, the BTC privatisation
committee said SMP and Uni-
versal Service Obligations
(USO) would be introduced
from the date the Communica-
tions Act took effect “to ensure
that new entrants are not dis-
advantaged”.

“This would not amount to
an unfair regulatory burden on
incumbent operators that have
the benefit of an entrenched
position, incumbency advantage
and significant market share,”
the committee said.

It added that the issues of
price control and service
bundling would be addressed in
separate consultations but, in a
nod to SRG’s concerns, said:
“Licensees that are presumed
to have SMP will not be able to
enter new markets until they
have demonstrated compliance
with the SMP conditions deter-
mined pursuant to the transi-
tional provisions.”

(Con To

| Tel: 502 2356 we





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 3B





Skills Bank placing
60 jobs per month

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Department of
Labour’s Skills Bank is placing
Bahamians in permansent jobs
at arate of 60 per month, a gov-
ernment minister said yester-
daym and while the labour mar-
ket was not as vibrant as before
some jobs were available for
students graduating high school
and college.

Dion Foulkes, minister of
labour, told Tribune Business:
"There are some job opportu-
nities out there and we encour-
age high school and college stu-
dents to continue to pursue
those jobs.”

The summer employment
programmes offered by many
private businesses and public
entities were feared threatened
by the recession, but Mr
Foulkes said the Government
had allocated $2 million for its
summer programme and argued
that thousands of high school
and college students had been
placed this summer.

He told this newspaper yes-
terday that within 48 hours, the
Labour Department's skills
bank placed eight welders on a
dredging project; a sous-chef in
one of the hotels; a legal secre-
tary in a law firm; a nurse in a
private medical centre; four
cashiers at a food store chain;
and four security personnel in a

security firm.

"Business-
es on a daily
basis
approach the
skills bank
for referrals
and, by and
large, our
referral sys-
tem works,"
said Mr
Foulkes. "We
have a high
success rate
and we would
wish to encourage unemployed
Bahamians and recent gradu-
ates to register with us.

"If you do not register with
the labour exchange, we do not



know you are looking for a
job."

Opposition leader Perry
Christie recently criticised the
Government’s efforts to curb
the rising unemployment fig-
ures, urging that it show greater
commitment to preserving and
creating jobs.

Meanwhile, the newly created
unemployment benefit topped
10,000 registrants, with 8,785 of
those qualifying and receiving
the benefit, according to the lat-
est numbers.

The Government is now
preparing to commence its
training programme for 1,000
unemployed Bahamians.

This pilot training pro-
gramme, sponsored also by the

BTC’s $50m core network
in place in ‘18 months’

FROM page 1B

of-the-art IP infrastructure,” Mr
Johnson told this newspaper.
“They’re changing the core
infrastructure to what all the
company’s services will be pro-
vided on.

“It will increase operating
efficiencies because we'll be
able to make the switches, the
telephone exchanges, more
compact and easier to maintain.
It will also allow us to offer
expanded services, such as cable
television, if the company
chooses to go in that direction,
and enhance our Internet
broadband capacity and the
like.”

With all major global tele-
coms carriers switching to IP
systems and technology, Mr
Johnson said the new network
would place BTC “on par” with
international operators.

“This is a little bit of a gener-
ational leap to implement for
us in keeping pace with the
international telecoms market,”
he added.

BTC’s technology/equipment
provider, and installation spe-

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

cialist, Sonus Networks, yester-
day said the first phase of the IP
network implementation and
migration had been completed,
with all the Bahamian carrier’s
international traffic now being
routed on it.

Mr Johnson told Tribune
Business that the IP network
installation was something that
would “be done over the next
18 months”, and revealed that
BTC was also in the midst of a
project to “change our billing
system” to allow various ser-
vices to be charged on one bill.

Pegging the costs of this pro-
ject at around $14-$15 million,
Mr Johnson said phase one of
the Cerillion system’s installa-
tion was “substantially com-
plete”. It was expected to go
live in late August/early Sep-
tember 2009, and will allow
BTC to include landline, Inter-
net and post-paid cellular
charges on the same bill
received by consumers.

“That will allow customers to
have multiple services on a sin-
gle bill,” Mr Johnson said,
explaining that currently BTC’s
customers received different
bills for cellular, fixed-line and

Internet services. These were
also often on different billing
cycles, and the new system was
designed to remove these inef-
ficiencies by consolidating all
services into one bill and cycle.
The BTC executive added
that the new system was intend-
ed to enable its customer to go
on-line and access their bills
there, delivering consumer effi-
clencies, too. Customers could
look at condensed versions of
their bill, and the reduction in
paperwork would also reduce
BTC’s environmental footprint.
“The next phase after that
will be to move pre-paid cus-
tomers over to that billing sys-
tem,” Mr Johnson said.
However, the start of the pri-
vatisation process will prevent
BTC from commencing any
more capital expenditure pro-
jects. “The privatisation process
will have commenced, so one
of the things governing our deci-
sion-making is that we will not
want to undertake anything
substantial,” Mr Johnson said.
Major capital spending while
BTC is up for sale could deter
bidders, as it would represent a
material change to the compa-

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)
ELEGANTE INC.

No. 83,502 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000), ELEGANTE INC.,

is in Dissolution

Any person having a Claim against the ELEGANTE INC. is required on or
before 16th June 2009 to send their name, address and particulars of the debt or
claim to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they may be ex-
cluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such claim is approved

The date of Commencement of dissolution was 30th day of June 2009.

We, Sovereign Managers Limited c/o Suites 1601-1603 Floor, Kinwick Cen-
tre, 32 Hollywood Road, Central, Hong Kong is the Liquidator of ELEGANTE

INC.

SIGNED
For & On Behalf Of

oo wb

Lighted or

(-—\) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

‘fF

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

ny’s financial condition - chiefly
its balance sheet, but also the
income statement. It would also
likely impact the price bidders
would be prepared to pay, and
as potential incoming own-
ers/managers, they would want
to have the sole say on all
BTC’s investment decisions.

“Timagine we’ll just work on
tightening up on customer ser-
vice, work on those projects
already budgeted for, but we
don’t expect to be moving on
anything too substantive until
the privatisation process is com-
plete,” Mr Johnson said.

The Government com-
menced the formal sales process
for BTC yesterday, with bid-
ders having until August 14,
2009, to submit their pre-quali-
fication applications. A $25,000
registration fee must be paid by
July 28, 2009.

BTC was marketed as a com-
pany that provides services to
334,000 cellular customers,
132,000 fixed-line and 18,500
Internet customers. It also has
190 roaming agreements in
place.

SHOW YOUR SUPPORT

Bahamas Technical and Voca-
tional Institute (BTVI) and the
College of the Bahamas, is
scheduled to begin in Septem-
ber and run for one year.

According to Mr Foulkes, if
the Government's review of the
programme is favourable it
could be extended past Sep-
tember 2010.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

No. 45 of 2000
TRAVINVEST CONSULTANTS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, TRAVINVEST CONSULTANTS
LTD. is in dissolution. The date of commencement
of dissolution was the 16th day of June, 2009. Dillon
Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
TRAVINVEST CONSULTANTS LTD.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR



Legal Notice

NOTICE
GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY
INTERNATIONAL SERVICES LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL SERVICES
LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the International

Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 9 July
2009 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and registered

by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Amit Singhania of Sheikh
Rashid Road, ENOC House IJ, P.O. Box 6442, Dubai, United Arab

Emirates.

Dated the 13th day of July, 2009.

H&J Corporate Services Ltd.
Registered Agent
for the above-named Company



for the National Park System of The Bahamas
and join us as we Celebrate our 50th Anniversary
with a Cool Early Morning

Fun Run/WALK

and help Keep ‘em flocking

Date: July 18th Time: 6:00 AM

Flamingo Rowte: Starting at the Retreat Gardens North on Village Road, then
West onto Shirley Street, North onto Church Street (St.
Matthews Church), crossing onto the "New" Paradise Island
Bridge, over to Paradise Beach Drive, East to the traffic
circle, rotating fo The “Old” Pl, Bridge. East onte East Bay
Street, passing Montague Beach then South onte Village
Road ending at The Retreat Gardens.

Want To Be An

EAH
BETA

SUioimisce tm uelis

yaar y

BEGINNING SEPTEMBER
(FALL) 2009

Ear a Bachelor of Science Degree in Small Island
Sustainability with a concentration in
* Integrated Sustainable Development Planning
* Environmental & Eco-systems Management
(Sustainable Agriculture)
OR

Ear a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Small Island
Sustainabiliey with a concentration in
* Ecotourism & Development
* Policy Studies

Green Turtle Route: Starting at the Retreat Gardens North on Village Road, then
West onto Shiney Street, Nerth anto Church Street (St.
Matthews Church), East onto East Bay Street pass
Montague Beach then South onto Village Road ending al
The Retreat Gardens,

Be
fertsVam stots teh
ete tae ras
ni e
and help drive
Se EL [a
TTS Tear car

Deadline For Enrolment: July 31, 2009 Healthy refreshments and souse available for sale afterwards.

ee eee Ce me Reece Mn petit oan teed aad
Rig ice OM ERO oscar 2 FID
Pia iaedy suet eet sry

Wear comfortable walking shoes. = Bring a water bottle and hand towel,





PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Sandals eye



deal for the
Emerald Bay

FROM page 1B

Japanese insurer, Mitsui, urgently.

This was because, while many of the resort’s
Four Seasons-trained staff were still hanging
on in Exuma, hoping the property would soon
re-open, they were beginning to lose hope
and would soon migrate to other Bahamian
islands in search of work.

“The economy has dried up,” the source
said. “It’s an economic drought in Exuma,
and Sandals could bring in the Spring weath-
er it so badly needs.”

Tribune Business can also reveal that anoth-
er group bidding on Emerald Bay included
RIU Hotels, the Spanish-owned resort chain
that is also already in the Bahamas via its
property on Paradise Island.

Vincent s, minister of tourism and aviation,
declined to confirm the identity of any of the
potential Emerald Bay purchasers yesterday
when contacted by Tribune Business.

He added: “We know of a number of peo-
ple we have been providing assistance to on
Emerald Bay, and are quite excited” about
some of them.

It is thought that the departure of Four Sea-
sons, with its burdensome brand/operating
contract, and the reduction in purchase price
have attracted the likes of Sandals and RIU to

closely examine acquisition prospects.

The last bid accepted by the receivers, which
collapsed prior to Emerald Bay’s closure and
the loss of almost 500 jobs, was understood to
have valued the property at $40 million - much
less than the $120 million debt owed to Mitsui
when it placed the resort in receivership in
2007.

Informed sources are now suggesting that a
purchase price of as little as $20-$30 million
might be enough to close a deal. Entry point
is key for acquisitions in the Bahamian hotel
sector, as the price largely determines return
on investment for owners, given this nation’s
high operating costs.

Emerald Bay was losing $5 million per year
when it was mothballed by Mitsui, and Four
Seasons - whose contract entitled it to fees
equivalent to 7-8 per cent of gross revenues,
said by many to be too much - is understood to
have told the insurer that the property
required a minimum $25 million in capital
spending to bring it into line with its five-star
status. A further $7 million is needed to recon-
figure its marina.

Several sources, though, suggested these
sums were too low, and a $50-$100 million
investment will ultimately be required by any
potential purchaser to upgrade Emerald Bay
and complete its build-out.



PS 77

(ea Bye TEC
just call 502-2371 today!



g Casino bidder

‘head and
shoulders’
above rivals

FROM page 1B

the Government were “fairly
confident” that a replacement
for the Isle of Capri could be
found before the company’s
lease extension expired at end-
August, a development that
could potentially place some
234 in jeopardy, given the level
of interest received.

The minister added that apart
from reaching a new lease and
other agreements with Our
Lucaya’s owner, Hutchison
Whampoa, the key factor that
would determine the new casino
operator - as far as the Govern-
ment was concerned - was the
brand quality, client/patron pool
and marketing reach that it
would bring to enhancing
Grand Bahama’s overall
tourism product.

“We’re going to discuss that
matter next week,” Mr Van-
derpool-Wallace said, when
asked how the search for Isle
of Capri’s replacement was pro-
gressing.

“We’ve had a number of
very, very strong proposals, and
another set of proposals that
kind of fit the bill, but there’s
one in particular that we’re
very, very excited about. This
one is head and shoulders above
the rest.”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
declined to name any of the
potential replacements, but said
in relation to the proposals sub-
mitted: “There are easily more

“ewarding. My work at The Tribune ts creative and challenging. | enjoy

contributing to the look of our newspaper, while meeting the needs of

out advertisers. I enjoy working here. The Tribune is my mewspaper.”

The Tribune

ESTHER BARRY

My Voice. My Houpaper!

PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE

than 10.”

He added: “Some of them are
casino companies that we would
consider quite reluctantly,
because we do not consider
them to have a strong market-
ing reach in terms of what we
want to do with Grand
Bahama.”

Apart from the Cabinet, next
week’s discussions on Isle of
Capri’s replacement will also
include the likes of Hutchison
Whampoa, as casino landlord,
and the Ministry of Tourism,
while any new operator will
“have to pass muster with the
Gaming Board”. The Hotel
Corporation, led by managing
director Sir Baltron Bethel, is
understood to be leading the
effort to replace Isle of Capri.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
Isle of Capri’s replacement
would be a casino operator with
a long track record and who
could “bring that great quality”
to Grand Bahama.

“We’re quite excited by the
number of companies who have
shown interest,” the minister
added, explaining that the key
issue confronting the Govern-
ment getting it right and “the
quality of the solution”.

Freeport has not proven to
be a happy experience for Isle
of Capri, its our Lucaya-based
casino suffering a $2.934 mil-
lion net operating loss for the
financial year to April 26, 2009,
a 7.7 per cent increase upon the
previous year’s losses.

The operator of Our Lucaya’s



casino unveiled a slight increase
to the $2.275 million net oper-
ating loss incurred during its
2008 financial year, based on a
29.5 per cent reduction in rev-
enues for the 12 months to end-
April 2009.

The Isle-Our Lucaya casino
saw its net gaming revenues
drop from $15.548 million to
$10.969 million during its 2009
financial year, with the gross
operating loss more than
tripling from $826,000 to $2.917
million.

A $17,000 depreciation
charge took Isle of Capri’s net
losses from its Grand Bahama-
based casino to $2.934 million.

Isle of Capri was making
annual rental payments of $1.9
million to Hutchison Whampoa
under the terms of a two-year
lease that it signed on June 1,
2007. The property is a 19,000
square foot casino and offers
303 slot machines, 25 table
games and a 110-seat restau-
rant.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 5B



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



House health plan to
boost taxes on rich

@ By DAVID ESPO
and ERICA WERNER
Associated Press Writers

WASHINGTON (AP) —
House Democrats unveiled
ambitious legislation Tuesday
to remake the nation’s health
care system and called on med-
ical providers, businesses and
the wealthiest Americans to
pick up the tab for President
Barack Obama’s top domestic
priority.

“This bill is a starting point
and a path to success,” House
Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.,
told a news conference where
she and other Democratic lead-
ers promised to pass a bill
before the August congression-
al recess.

Obama has pushed the
House and Senate aggressively
to stick to the timetable, in
hopes of signing comprehensive
legislation in October.

“We are going to accomplish
what many people felt wouldn’t
happen in our lifetime,” said
Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Calif.,
chairman of one of three com-
mittees responsible for health
care. Waxman, Pelosi and oth-
ers stood before a banner that
read: “Quality Affordable
Health Care for the Middle
Class.”

The sweeping measure would
imposes penalties on employ-
ers who fail to provide health
insurance for their workers and
on individuals who refuse to
buy it.

The bill, to be debated in
committee beginning later this
week, also would require insur-
ance companies to offer cover-
age, without exceptions or high-
er premiums in cases of pre-
existing medical conditions. It
also would allow the govern-
ment to sell insurance in com-
petition with private firms, a
provision that has sparked
objections from Republicans
and even some Democrats.

The bill’s release came one
day after President Barack
Obama met with key Democ-
rats in a White House session in
which he told a powerful Senate
chairman he wants legislation
by week’s end in his commit-
tee.

In all, the draft House bill
runs more than 1,000 pages, and
is designed to fulfill Obama’s
call for legislation that will
extend coverage to millions who
lack it, as well as begin to slow
the rate of growth in health care
generally.

In a statement, Obama
praised the proposal, saying it
“will begin the process of fix-
ing what’s broken about our
health care system, reducing
costs for all, building on what
works and covering an estimat-
ed 97 per cent of all Americans.
And by emphasizing prevention
and wellness, it will also help
improve the quality of health
care for every American.”

Key elements of the legisla-
tion include federal subsidies
for poorer individuals and fam-
ilies to help them afford cover-
age.

Financing would come from a
federal surtax on the upper
income — up to 5.4 per cent on
the income of taxpayers mak-
ing more than $1 million a year
— as well as hundreds of bil-
lions of dollars in cuts in pro-
jected Medicare and Medicaid
spending.

The new income tax on the
wealthy is estimated to raise
more than $500 billion over the
next decade, and reductions in
Medicaid and Medicare would
account for nearly as much.

Democrats did not say in
advance what the overall legis-
lation would cost.

Numerous issues remain sub-
ject to change as the bill makes
its way through committee. In
particular, moderate to conser-
vative Democrats have been
negotiating for several days,
asking for changes affecting rur-
al health care as well as other
issues.

Employers who do not offer
coverage would be required to
pay eight per cent of each unin-
sured worker’s salary, with
exemptions for smaller firms
built into the legislation.

Individuals who refused to
buy affordable coverage would
be assessed as much as 2.5 per
cent of their adjusted gross
income, up to the cost of an
average health insurance plan,
according to the legislation.

The legislation would set up a
new government-run health
insurance program to compete



US PRESIDENT Barack Obama talks about health care reform as he announces his nominee for Surgeon General, Dr Regina Benjamin (INSET), in the

Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Monday, July 13, 2009.

with private coverage. The
plan’s payments to medical
providers such as hospitals and
doctors would be keyed to the
rates paid by Medicare, which
are lower than what private
insurers pay.

Eventually, all individuals and
employers would be offered the
option of joining the public
plan. The insurance industry
says that would drive many pri-
vate insurers out of business.

As House leaders unveiled
their bill, the business commu-
nity sent a letter to lawmakers
charging that parts of the legis-
lation would damage the coun-
try’s medical system and econ-
omy. They cited the proposed
government-run insurance plan,
a federal council that would
make some decisions on bene-
fits and a requirement that
employers provide health cov-
erage or pay a new tax.

“Exempting some micro-busi-
nesses will not prevent this pro-
vision from killing many jobs,”
the letter said. “Congress should
allow market forces and

employer autonomy to deter-
mine what benefits employers
provide, rather than deciding
by fiat.”

Thirty-one major business
groups signed the letter, includ-
ing the U.S. Chamber of Com-
merce, the Business Roundtable
representing top corporate
CEOs and the National Retail
Federation.

Across the Capitol, the Sen-
ate Health, Education, Labor
and Pensions Committee
slogged toward passage of its
version of the bill on what is
expected to be a party-line vote.

Because of jurisdictional
issues, the Senate Finance Com-
mittee, a separate panel, retains
control over the drafting of pro-
visions paying for any legisla-
tion.

Obama told the committee’s
chairman, Sen. Max Baucus, on
Monday at the White House he
wants legislation by week’s end,
officials reported. The president
did not say whether he prefers a
bipartisan bill, which Baucus
has been trying to piece togeth-

JOB ADVERTISEMENT

Position: Accountant

A local insurance agency seeks to fill the position of
Accountant. The scope of work is to head the Ac-
counting Operations in preparation of monthly, quar-
terly and annual reports; to keep and maintain all
financial documents and records according to the
directives coming from the President and the Board
of Directors to ensure the efficient management of
all Bank and general ledger accounts. The position
will also be expected to make recommendations to
management to maintain the company’s viability in a
highly competitive environment.

Required:

e University Degree in accounting;
¢ Professional qualifications e.g. CPA, ACCA, CA
e At least 3 years’ work experience as an

accountant;

er with Sen. Charles Grassley
of Iowa, or a bill tailored more

(AP Photas)

to Democratic specifications.
Obama has urged Congress

to pass legislation through both
houses before lawmakers leave
the Capitol on a summer vaca-
tion.

While Pelosi and Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid,
D-Nev., have both expressed
support for the timetable, their
efforts have been slowed in
recent days by internal squab-
bling.

Additionally, some House
Democrats have privately
expressed concern that they will
be required to vote on higher
taxes, only to learn later that
the Senate does not intend to
follow through with legislation
of its own. That would leave
rank and file House Democrats
in the uncomfortable situation
of having to explain their vote
on a costly bill that never
reached Obama’s desk or
became law.

In the Finance Committee
some controversial issues
remain unresolved, including
how to pay for the bill and a
Democratic demand for the
government to sell insurance in
competition with private indus-
try, a proposal Republicans
oppose strongly. Finance mem-
bers have been laboring to pro-
duce a bipartisan bill, but Grass-
ley, the panel’s top Republican,
told The Associated Press on
Tuesday it’s “still up in the air”
whether any bill produced this
week would be bipartisan.

¢ Associated Press writers
Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and
Alan Fram contributed to this
report

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Senior Manager,

Accounts.

The job oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget & Management
Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective delivery

of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the

following:

¢ Compilation of the corporate budget.

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets

Preparation of monthly management statements
Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation
Preparation of performance reports for division , department and sections
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry recetvables (capital

contributions, rechargeable)

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices
Liaison with internal and external audits
Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief

Financial

salaries

Officer for the Board of Directors
Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required
Preparation of the business plan for the department
Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department
Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims
Overseeing the Cash Flow Management
Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment
Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form employee’s

Conducting audits of various financial activities including Employee Basic Pay
Reconciliation, Employee Loans Reconciliation and Payment Reconciliation

Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable

Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts
Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle repayments
Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule
Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans
Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to ensure
adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors
Managing the status of local and foreign vendors
Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and External Auditors
Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline. Conducting

performance appraisals



* Good knowledge of English in writing, editing and
presenting;

® Strong interpersonal, organizational and
supervisory skills;

e Demonstrated capacity to work under pressure,
meet deadlines and perform work of the highest
quality.

¢ Good computer and analytical skills.

Send cover letter and Curriculum Vitae to the follow-
ing address:

The Tribune

c/o Box # 81869
P.O. Box N 3207
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE: July 25, 2009 by 5pm

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff, manage
and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations

Job requirements include:

¢ A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting ACCA/CPA
or equivalent qualifications

¢ A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a similar
management position
Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices
Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications
Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing systems
Ability to analyze financial reports
Sound knowledge of covenants of lending institutions (e.g. IDB)
Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial software
and the system of internal control.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing
Good time management skills

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: July,
22,2009.





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



Goldman Sachs’
$2.7bn profit
shows firm’s

prowess

mg By STEPHEN BERNARD
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Gold-
man Sachs is emerging as the
king of post-meltdown Wall
Street.

The New York-based bank-
ing giant took advantage of
improving markets to widen the
gap between itself and its com-
petitors, earning more than $2.7
billion during the second quar-
ter.

The result is a remarkably
speedy recovery from last fall,
when Goldman lost $3.29 bil-
lion in four months during the
worst of the financial crisis.
Goldman, which was already
the strongest financial institu-
tion heading into the financial
crisis, has now staked its claim
as the undisputed powerhouse
on Wall Street with the ability
to take on more risk than its
struggling competitors.

“Goldman really is in a class
by themselves,” said Phillip Sil-
itschanu, a senior analyst with
Aite Group. “They’ve always
been the golden child of the
market.”

That has been even more
amplified during the recent
credit crisis and ensuing recov-
ery as credit and debt markets
have started to open up. While
other banks have been trying
to preserve cash to protect
against further losses, Goldman
has been getting back to its core
businesses that made it so prof-
itable in the past.

Profits at Goldman, the first
bank to report second-quarter
earnings, came from strength
in underwriting stock and debt
offers, and higher-risk trading.
Goldman’s peers, meanwhile,

52wk-Low
1.28
10.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.35
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.40
10.00

Benchmark

Fidelity Bank

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

S2wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

52wk-Low

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Bahamas Waste

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

Security Last Sale

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol

14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Fund Name

have been stung by greater loan
losses because of their focus in
retail banking, and thus have
had to stick with a more con-
servative approach to business.

“Some competitors reimed in
risk-taking activity,” said Cubil-
las Ding, a senior analyst with
consulting and research firm
Celent. Goldman’s historically
strong and disciplined risk man-
agement allowed it to enter
trading where its competitors
might have been more hesitant,
Ding added.

Also during the second quar-
ter, Goldman freed itself of
restrictions tied to the govern-
ment’s Troubled Asset Relief
Program. Last fall, as the cred-
it crunch worsened and Gold-
man’s competitor Lehman
Brothers collapsed, the US
Treasury Department launched
a program to provide $700 bil-
lion in funds to the financial
sector.

Though it had adequate cap-
ital to handle the downturn,
Goldman was compelled to par-
ticipate in the programme,
receiving $10 billion. As part of
the program, the government
placed certain restrictions on
banks, such as additional over-
sight and executive compensa-
tion caps.

Goldman, relying on its
healthy capital base, paid back
those funds in June, freeing
itself of the added restrictions.
Not all other banks have been
able to repay their government
debt yet. Bank of America
Corp. and Citigroup Inc. have
been among the hardest hit by
the downturn and each received
$45 billion from the govern-
ment.

The government is now in the

midst of converting part of its
loan to Citigroup for about a
one-third stake in the compa-
ny. Both Bank of America and
Citigroup are expected to
report second-quarter results
later in the week.

Goldman’s profit would have
been even larger during the sec-
ond quarter had it not recorded
a one-time charge to repay the
$10 billion to the government.
The charge reduced earnings
by 78 cents per share.

While Goldman was prepar-
ing to repay the government, it
was also taking advantage of
the thawing credit markets and
a rallying equity market. With
its own balance sheet intact,
Goldman became a primary
source for other companies
looking for an underwriter to
help them tap the reopened
markets.

“When times are bad, the
thinking goes, go with the best
of the best,” Aite Group’s Sil-
itschanu said.

Goldman’s equity underwrit-
ing division generated record
revenue from the surging busi-
ness. Trading revenue also
soared, jumping more than 51
per cent from the previous
quarter and nearly doubled
from the comparable period last
year. Goldman was able to cash
in on fixed-income, currency
and commodities trading dur-
ing the April through June peri-
od.

Goldman earned $2.72 bil-
lion, or $4.93 per share, after
paying preferred dividends, for
the quarter ended June 26.

Analysts polled by Thomson
Reuters, on average, forecast
earnings of $3.54 per share for
the quarter. Profit also exceed-

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 14 JULY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.14] CHG -2.79 | %CHG -0.18 | YTD -142.22 | YTD % -8.31

FINDEX: CLOSE 787.12 | YTD -5.72% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.39
11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.39
2.74
5.64
3.05
1.82
6.99
10.90
10.38
5.03
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.40
10.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.05
0.00

-0.39
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.39
11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.39
2.74
5.64
3.00
1.82
6.60
10.90
10.38
5.03
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.40
10.00

Change Daily Vol.
100.00
100.00
100.00

100.00

0.00

0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Weekly Vol.
8.42
6.25
0.40

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

30.13
0.45

31.59

29.00

0.55 0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NAV

YTD%

Last 12 Months Div $

EPS $

0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%
0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%

EPS $

1.3231
2.8952
1.4019
3.1031
12.2702
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

1.3860
2.8952
1.4763
3.1031
12.9209
100.5448
93.1992
1.0000
9.2765
1.0622
1.0243
1.0585

MARKET TERMS

2.40
-1.52
2.97
-8.35
2.40
-0.02
-3.33
0.00
2.00
2.56
-0.84
2.04

4.75
-3.18
5.30
-13.82
5.79
0.54
-6.76
0.00
-2.98
6.22
2.43
5.85

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful



IN THIS June 12, 2007 file photo, the building on Broad Street in New York's Financial District that houses the
brokerage firm Goldman Sachs, is shown. Goldman Sachs Group Inc. said Tuesday that its second-quarter prof-
it easily surpassed expectations as profit was buoyed by strength in its trading and underwriting businesses.

ed last year’s fiscal second-quar-
ter results. For that period,
which ended May 30, Goldman
earned $2.05 billion, or $4.58
per share.

Despite Goldman’s strong

FG CAPTTAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

COLONTAL

Div $ P/E
10.9
11.1
28.4
N/M

0.127
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.1
0.249 11.0
0.419 13.5
0.111 27.0
0.240 76
0.420 15.7
0.322 33.9
0.794 13.1
0.332 15.2
0.000 N/M
0.035 8.6
0.407 13.5
0.952 10.9
0.180 55.6

ases)

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

Div $ P/E
0.300 N/M
0.480 N/M
0.000 256.6

Yield
2.05%
7.80%
0.00%

-0.041
0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

0.00%
0.00%
Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
3-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
31-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525



earnings, its shares fell 39 cents
to $149.05 in afternoon trading.
Investors and analysts were
widely expecting a big profit,

(AP Photo: Richard Drew)

and pushed shares higher by
more than five per cent Mon-
day ahead of the earnings
report.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON
late of #48 Winton Highway, Eastern District, New

Providence, Baharnas, deceased

NOTECE is hereby given that all persons haying

chims of demands against the above-named Estate are

requestt do to send the same d uly certified to the undersigned

on or before Sh Ayupuest Be,

AND NOTICE is hereby also gly en that at the
expiration cf the time mentioned above, the aseets of the late

NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON

will be distributed

among the persons entitled thereto having regard only bo
the claims of which the Executor of the Estate shall then

have had Notice,

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.
Alliorneys for the Exeoulors

Sassoon Mouse
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.0. Bar Py dt?
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attention: 5, Smith

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY FORGIE EV ANS late of
#17 London Terrace, Easbern Destrict, New Providence,

Bahamas, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having:
Claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requesbed to send the same duly certified to the undersigmed

on oF before Air ust TW

AND NOTICE is hereby also given thal al the
expiration Om the time nentioned above, the aseels of the late
DOROTHY PORGIE EVANS will be distributed among the:
persons entitled thereto having regard only te the claims of
which the Executor of the Estate shall then have had Notice,

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO,
Atborneys for the Execubors

Sassoon Flouse
Shirley Sireet & Vieboria Avenue
P.O. Box N-272
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: 5, Smith





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
eS







The Tribune

ee



By ALEX MISSICK ; a
Tribune Features Reporter = i ata
e amissick@tribunemedia.net , — oa

en

BAHAMIAN’S taste in culture is said ia

to be as diverse as our love for food

and all things savoury. Many Bahami-

ans are opening their palettes to the

unique and healthy gourmet products

appearing on the shelves. Balduccino

fine foods, located in the Cotton Tree

Traders Plaza on East Bay Street, is one

of the newest specialty gourmet markets

offering foods from across the globe to - ’ oe 4 es oo cy) a
: SS ee a es + TF ie cp
answer the call of the curious eater. . : = diy tes iho hol a. Ae

General Manager, Anton Alexiou, said although = om aes ,
he had been in retail for about 15 years, he and his
brother have talked about the concept for about 10
years.

“We met a very nice couple from New York, Mr
and Mrs Balducci, who own a chain of markets in
New York City and retired to Paradise Island. We
happened to speak with them and they have been
assisting and consulting with us on the business.
They allowed us to use their name and although we
are not a franchise of Balducci’s, we could use Bal-
duccino which is ‘little Balducci’,” Mr Alexiou said.

Customers will find a wide variety of specialty
gourmet products including an international deli
selection of meats, cheeses, freshly baked goods dai-
ly, specialty health foods, signature sandwiches and
one of Mr Alexiou’s favourties, gourmet prepared
carry-home foods.

“Our executive chef, Vanessa Riley is a very cre-
ative chef and everyday she comes up with new cre-
ations. The gourmet prepared take home meals is
really one of our focuses aside from our hot signa-
ture sandwiches and the cold deli sandwiches. We
try to do meals everyday that you can take home and
eat. Everyday we have our signature roast chicken
with an orange rub. Often times she does one pot
meals such as Sheppard’s pie or lobster pot pie. I
give her free reign over the prepared foods because
it’s her creative side that I want to bring out,” Mr
Alexiou said. : : / :

As for the market itself, Balduccino carries a vast ABOVE: Pick from a wide selcetion of fresh fruit.
selection of items that are rare or impossible to find































in the Bahamas.

“We buy through their parent company. All of the
Ut ee MCU NOL OLIN AOL Lem UE crcUnse goods we buy come through Balducci’s. Some of these
products have never been in Nassau before. In our
bakery, the Red Velvet cupcakes have been very pop-
ular because they are very hard to find in Nassau. We

BELOW: Some of the many delicious cheeses at Balduccino’s. work with a lot of up and coming chefs and buy direct
from them. This gives us a nice variety so we are not









stuck on just what we are able to make or just what
one large company is able to produce. Our aim is to
try and bring in interesting specialty products consis-
tently and at a fair price,” Mr Alexiou said.

Mr Alexiou said to service the sushi lovers, Balduc-
cino will also have a sushi bar.

“Tt will be a small set up and will probably only be
available several days a week for now. As we get bet-
ter at production, we will probably do it every day
with different types of sushi such as simple California
rolls and vegetarian options,” Mr Alexiou said.

As for the future of Balduccino, Mr Alexiou said
there are a lot of interesting of plans for the fine food
market.

“We want to make pairings between what we offer
in the store and the recipes we produce. We try to use
as many of the products on the shelves in the prepara-
tion. Where we are trying to be a little bit different is
where we offer something on the shelf and in prepara-
tion, we are going to give the customers the recipe and
have it available. So if you like something we are serv-
ing, you can go find the ingredients on the shelf and
take the recipe home and make it yourself. We are
also focusing on something called dream dinners
where we put together baskets of everything you need
to prepare the meal in the correct proportion with the
recipe. I have been surprised with the response to
organic foods and we have gotten a tremendous recep-
tion from Bahamians. It’s amazing how many people
are looking for that type of food that is untampered
with so we are headed strongly in that direction.”



THE TRIBUNE

o
=
=
—
im
[om
o
aio
Fam

Although the independence
celebrations have conclud-
ed, the party does not have
to stop and once again The
Tribune’s Things 2 Do
countdown is the place to
keep you in the know.

. An exhibition by Net-

tie Symonette will pre-
mier this Friday at the Cen-
tral Bank’s Art Center. The
75-year-old multitalented
artist will present close to
96 abstract pieces that have
already been compared to
the likes of Picasso,
Michaél Bellon, and Barnett
Newman. The collection
which was first started in
2003 in the Abacos while
Mrs Symonette was work-
ing on her memoirs, uses
mirror like illusion to tell
her story of life and emo-
tions. The exhibition which
Starts at 6pm, there will be
light refreshments available
and the exhibition will
continue until August 7,
2009.

» The Bahamas Hot

Rad Association along
with the Juke Box presents
The Shop Wars Drag Rac-
ing Invitational. Set to kick-
off this Saturday at the
BHRA Motorsport Park at
the rear of the QE Sporting
complex, the event will
showcase the best in drag
racing among some of the
most decked out machines
here on the islands. Teams
from Ultimate Performance,
BAM Auto, JAP Perfor-
mance, Dirty South, the
Juke Box, and others will
compete for the coveted
title of ‘King Of The Street.’
The event starts at 1pm,
and is free for kids under
12, and $5 for everyone
else.

«The National Art

Gallery of the Bahamas
continues with its summer
of love Film Series, this
Thursday with the film Cii-
mates. The 101 minute
Turkish/French film (that
includes English subtitles)
written by internationally
acclaimed director Nuri
Bilge Ceylan, tells of a Turk-
ish professor who travels to
the Aegean coast with his
girlfriend, however while
there the two undergo a
terrible break-up. As the
film develops, the story of
the broken couple’s rekin-
dling love becomes the
centerpiece for the movie.
It begins at 8 pm at the
NAGB property on West
and West Hill Street. The
event is $5, with light bev-
erages served afterward.

» The Junkanoo Sum-

mer Festival continues
on Bay Street this Saturday
and will showcase tradi-
tional Goombay music, live
bands, and lot of local food
and fun. The all day event
which will continue every
Saturday in July, will also
feature local crafts,
Bahamian books, and vari-
ous traditional contest.

. This weekend its all

about the art of
Karaoke singing. If you’re
the next Mariah Carey, or
the next William Wong,
answer the call and show
the Bahamas what you’re
made of. Tonight, its Crazy
Johnnies from 8 to 12
located in the two story
building after On The Run
East Bay Street. Then on
Saturday, The Corner Motel
in Carmichael will have its
karaoke night. That event
begins at 10pm and ends at
3am. Both events are free
for all.

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net



IN exactly one month, Mario’s Bowling and
Family Entertainment Palace, the largest family
entertainment centre in the country, will open its
doors to offer Bahamians a world of exciting
new options the entire family can enjoy.

Leslie Miller, former Minster
of Trade and Industry, said the
$10 million, 80,000 square foot
palace has been in the making
for about 10 years.

“This type of centre is the
prototype for the future. It was
the vision of my son, the late
Mario Miller who will have a
bust of his image in the fountain
that guards the front entrance,”
Mr Miller said

With a $15 entrance fee for
adults and $10 for children, the
state of the art centre can hold
2,000 to 3,000 persons and will
have a concession stand, food
franchises such as the pizza par-
lour Tuscanos, a 30,000 square
foot outdoor roller skating rink,
billiards, dart room, and game
room with over $400,000 worth
of games. The dinning room,
which seats up to 350 persons, is
elevated to give guests a 360
degree view of the majestic
building. However, the main
focal point will be bowling.

“There has been a massive
resurgent in bowling over the
last 10 to 15 years in the United
States. It is now the number one
indoor sport in the world again.
You have over a billion people
bowling and the market for
bowling is now some $28 billion
a year. There will be a 10 foot
screen in the back of every lane.
We have 50 screens in this
building, so while you are bowl-

WORKER prepping one of the many bowling lanes that will be ready for bowling fans in a matte

ing you can watch the game as
well,” Mr Miller said.

Mr Miller said it is a family
centre, every Sunday will be
church day and as of next year,
he is looking to host all of the
Miss Bahamas events.

“We are giving them some-
place where they could be
appreciated as Bahamians. Only
religious music will be played
in here all day on Sundays. We
will have buffets especially for
the churches. What we want to
do that is unique is have a fash-
10n show every Sunday. There
will also be a local entertainer to
sing gospel music on Sundays
and once a month we will bring
over one of the big stars in the
United States such as Kirk
Franklin. This is a place where
they can have a wonderful expe-
rience with the entire family
where Sunday is reserved for
God,” Mr Miller said.

As for security, Mr Miller
said there will be a no tolerance
policy.

“To avoid problems, we will
have 58 cameras through out
the building. The minute you
use profanity, you are out of
there for one month, second
time is three months- there is
no third time. I think there are
more good people than bad, so
why tolerate the bad? When
people come here they want to
make sure their entire family is

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE B9



ABOVE: The grand entance of the Mario Miller Bowling and Family Entertainment Palace will feature a
bust of the late Mario Miller in his honor.



MEN working tirelessly to complete the reception of this massive entertainment centre.

safe and secure. There will be
no fighting. There are also four
metal detectors at the front
entrance,” Mr Miller said.

For those who prefer a more
private setting, Mr Miller said
he has them covered.

“We will be offering some-
thing that is unique and was just
started in the United States and
Europe-four private bowling
lanes. You can rent those at
$3,500 a night with food and
drinks included, your own bar,
and two forty-two inch LCD
televisions. We also have a pri-
vate club where you pay a mem-
bership fee of probably at
$1,000 a year. If you register
early you can come every night
for free. Without that, you pay
$100 to enter. In this club, we
also to tell the life stories of

r of weeks.

great Bahamian entertainers
such as Freddy Munnings Jr,
40’s and 50’s musical legend
Paul Mayers and we are naming
the club after Ronnie Butler.
Bahamians would see the his-
tory of our entertainers,” Mr
Miller said.

Mr Miller said one of the
great things he is doing with the
palace, is using it as a hurricane
relief centre.

“The building can withstand
180 miles and hour winds. We
have two stand-by generators
at double the capacity for what
we need so in case it is needed,
we can provide that to the
Bahamian people,” Mr Miller
said.

As for the future of Mario’s
Bowling and Family Entertain-
ment Palace, Mr Miller said

every three years the building
will undergo renovations to
keep it at its best.

“We look forward to a good
future because it is the only
family entertainment centre in
this country and it is second to
none in the world. We want the
Bahamas to be first class and
we are really giving the people
first class entertainment. Mari-
o’s birthday is January 24 and
every January we want to give a
scholarship of about $20,000 to
a student at St Augustine’s col-
lege. We look forward to giv-
ing back to the community
because the community is what
is going to make us successful or
fail. If you want to succeed you
get everybody involved in what
you are doing and giving back.”





PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

Mervin Smith Vincent Laschiazza-Paul

THE MEN OF

Donovan Rolle Roosevelt Joseph Omar Francis

MEET



Freddie Lightbourne Terrance LCN,

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

ed secret until the final night competi-
tion, and a panel of international and
local celebrity judges will select the over-
all winner.

The competitors for the fastest, fittest,

; aa strongest, and most intelligent Bahami-
a | ae an man for 2009/2010 include Roosevelt
: | Joseph, Terrance Kelly, Omar Francis,
Mervin Smith, Vincent Laschiazza-Paul,
Kendrick Tynes, Robert Farquahson,
and Freddie Lightbourne.

The winner of the Mr Caribbean
Bahamas Fitness Challenge will win
over $5,000 in cash and prizes and will
represent The Bahamas in the 2009 Mr
Caribbean International Competition, in
Runaway Bay, Jamaica, October 5-12.

Scores from the preliminary events
and online voting will be combined with
the final night competition scores to
determine the overall winner of this
year’s fitness challenge and physique
competition.

Entertainment will be provided by
Tada, Sammy Starr, Sketch, Bodine
Johnson, and Metellus Chipman, Mr
Caribbean International 2006.

Tickets for the Final Night Competi-
tion are priced at $25 for general admis-
sion, $60 for VIP seating, and $100 for
Platinum seating. Tickets may be pur-
chased at Bally Total Fitness, Body-
zone, Mystical Gym, the Jukebox in the
Mall at Marathon, and from the Box
Office of the Sheraton Cable Resort
(Saturday, July 25 and Sunday, July 26
until the final night competition).

Members of the international com-
munity and local public can be a part of
selecting this year’s winner by voting
online for their favourite competitor at
www.mrcaribbahamas.com, until 12 am
Sunday, July 26. Online voting counts
for 10 per cent of the competitors’ over-
all score and the competitor with the
highest number of votes will win the
Mr. Caribbean Bahamas FanChoice
Awardâ„¢,

Eight athletic and physical- | ys é
ly fit young men have been pave

center BAHAMAS FITNESS CHALLENGE 2009

. . ’
4 i ) « ;
7 | } J } !

i ,
ad 7
| 7 ; tl K . 7



2009 Mr Caribbean
Bahamas Fitness Challenge
and Physique Competition,
scheduled to be held July
24 to July 26.

The young men will have a grueling
weekend of competition starting on Fri-
day, July 24 with the Blind Date Dinner
and Personality Competition. Each com-
petitor will be paired with a randomly
selected, female blind date, and placed
in a supervised dining setting, where the
young ladies will interview and judge
their personality, confidence, and per-
sonal style on special scorecards during
the evening. Interested young ladies,
over the age of 18, may complete a form
for the Blind Date random drawing,
which will be done live on radio, when
they purchase any of the Platinum tick-
ets for the event.

The men will then compete in the
Bally Total Fitness Challenge, a mili-
tary style obstacle course and fitness
competition, sponsored by Bally Total
Fitness on Saturday, July 25 at Sandy-
port Beach, from 2 pm to 5 pm. The
event is free and open to the public.

The Final Night/Physique Competi-
tion will be held in the Independence
Ballroom of the Sheraton Cable Beach
Resort at 7.30 pm, under the theme:
“Area Code 242: War Against Vio-
lence.” The event will also aid The
Bahamas Crisis Centre, as part of its
domestic violence prevention initiative,
“M.V.P.: Men for Violence Prevention.”

The hosts for this event will be two
surprise celebrity guests, a closely-guard-







Treemonisha -
a true class act

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

IT was a pleasure to view the
recent opera Treemonisha
which was staged as part of the
Independence Celebrations last
week at the Dundas. During a
time when Bahamian patrio-
tism was at an all time high, I
was so proud to see the profes-
sionalism and talent that the all
Bahamian cast displayed and
to hear that crowds flocked the
Dundas Centre for the Per-
forming Arts each night.

Treemonisha - an opera writ-
ten by American composer
Scott Joplin is set in 1866 imme-
diately after the Civil War and
the end of slavery. The plays
develops as an educated adopt-
ed young lady proves through
tremendous strife that educa-
tion is far more productive than
witchcraft or Obeah.

A stellar cast of more than
50 Bahamians did an amazing
job in bringing Joplin’s vision
to life under the direction of
noted musician Cleveland
Williams through spectacular
singing and dance, colourful
costumes and a truly talented
orchestra.

As a fan of classical music, I
was excited to see this perfor-
mance which brought a decid-
edly different flavour to recent
performances at the Dundas.

In the three act opera tells
the story of very superstitious
former slaves left alone on a
plantation and how the title
character Treemonisha (the
adopted daughter of Ned and
Monisha) brings to light the
importance of education in a
budding society.

The lead role was shared by
noted sopranos Candace Bost-
wick ( who performed the night
T attended and did a superb job)
and Nikita- Thompson- Wells,
with Portia Barnet and Lillian
Bastian playing Monisha, (Por-
tia performed the night I
attended) Kermit Strachan
playing Ned, and Demetrius
Delancy who played Remus.

My one piece of advice,
should the producers decide on
an encore presentation- create a
more vibrant set and have the
orchestra play softer so that all
the solos can be heard.

All in all, it was a delightful
evening showcasing some of the
best talent the country has to
offer.





















































a

a tee. 1 ;
k er a
4 he Z i 2 ' a

rt a

»

= i
~
ry Pe ie ee
I i E
| i a
Lo

ee
ni

ABOVE: Nettie Symonette: “One
particular day things were going
really bad, and | just decided to
pour my soul into this piece that
I’ve labeled ‘When The Going
Gets Tough.”

INFLUENCED from the commer-
cial district of Mombasa, Symon-
ette’s art has been compared to
the likes of Picasso, Michaél Bee-
line, and Barnett Newman.

Emotions
on canvas

FROM page 12

Emerging artist 75-year-old
Nettie Symonette, says since she
began learning the concept of
abstract art more than 9 years
ago, expressing her feelings
through art has practically
become second nature.

Her debut exhibition will be
featured at the Central Bank this
Friday where Mrs Symonette
plans to showcase more than 90
unique abstract creations.

Preferring acrylics to tran-
scend her sometimes tumultuous
emotions onto canvas, she said
her style can be described as a
“burst of colour,” and has been
compared to the likes of Picasso,
Michaél Bellon, and Barnett
Newman.

However she said unlike her
predecessors who have been
painting most of their lives, she
has only recently acquired this
unique skill.

“When I was a child I wanted
to learn to draw. I remember
trying to draw a hibiscus, a
sheep, and even a banana, and I
couldn’t. However this skill was
like a gift from God, it’s unique
and it truly allows me to tell the
stories of my life.”

She explained after a trip to
Mombasa in 2005, her skill was
enhanced even more after
observing how Africans
embraced bright colours.

She said: “The colours were
so vibrant, they were so strong,
and I found that when I came
home I suddenly became sort of
excited about how colours can
maximise the essence of my
work.”

Now in her golden years, Mrs
Symonette’s art has become her
new canvas for self expression,
and she is loving every minute of
it.

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award.

Tf so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.



THE TRIBUNE









Gia SA i

Mostly sunny, a
t-storm possible.




















ORLANDO 4 Some sunshine with
High: 90° F/32° C a thunderstorm.

Partly sunny with a Partly cloudy with a

stray shower.

Partly sunny, a
t-storm; breezy.

Partly sunny, a

thunderstorm. t-storm possible.












Low: 74° F/23°C
a High: 90° High: 92° High: 92° High: 91°
c ine High: 90° Low: 81° Low: 81° Low: 81° Low: 81° Low: 80° see EO
TAMPA Ls ; ET AccuWeather RealFeel
High: 90° F/32° C . = 101°-92° F [| 110°-90°F 111°-86° F 101°-91° F High _Ht.(ft.)_ Low
Low: 77° F/25°C ae r. The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:28am. 23 7:34am. ae
< @ F : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 2:03pm. 27 831p.m. 05
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7 1 msON 3:02pm. 28 9:36pm. 04
3 “a ? Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Friday 36am. 0D O27am. 01
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a we) @ WEST PALM BEACH recat Last year's High ....ssecccsscccsssecssseeee or Fssc | ONT MIM TIN
4 ed High: 90° F/32° C Last year's VOW eee eee eeeeeeeeeeeeees 71° F/22° C " "
ar Low: 77° F/25°C Precipitation |}j|| ~~ Sunrise...... 6:29. a.m. Moonrise. ... 12:19 a.m.
rat As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccscssssessscsseeesesseeeee 0.00" Sunset....... 8:02 p.m. Moonset..... 1:37 p.m.
alll, ; FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date .. 18. Last New First Full
High: 89° F/32° C @ High: 90° F/32° C Normal year to date oo... eee 21.33" = ‘ ss
Low: 80° F/27°C ” Low: 77° F/25° ie
ay AccuWeather.com =
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; MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul.15 = Jul. 21 Jul, 28
Z -* High: 90° F/32° C High: 92° F/33° C
othe ’ Low: 80°F/27°C NASSAU tig “a ee
High: 90° F/32°C oe:
= Low: 81° F/27°C .
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KEY WEST —— “cg _ GATISLAND
High: 90° F/32" C High: 88° F/31° C
Low: 83° F/28° C Low: 74° F/23°C
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High: 90° F/32° C 5 ah. 9° E290
Low: 80°F/27°C Hae Eee e
; : Low: 76° F/24° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 95° F/35° C ——- -
Low: 81° F/27°C ¢ ss Py,
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“RX #
LONG ISLAND
Low: 76° F/24°C
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday i MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 92° F/33°C
Fe FC Fe FC Fe FC Fe FC FC F/G Fe FC — Low: 76° F/24°C
Albuquerque 97/36 70/21 t 97/36 68/20 $s Indianapolis 86/30 66/18 t 83/28 63/17 pc Philadelphia 86/30 70/21 s 86/30 70/21 t
Anchorage 74/23 58/14 p 75/23 58/14 c Jacksonville 92/33 72/22 t 93/33 74/23 t Phoenix 110/43 87/30 s 111/43 88/31 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 92/33 69/20 s 90/32 71/21 t Kansas City 88/31 67/19 t 89/31 65/18 t Pittsburgh 84/28 68/20 po 82/27 60/15 pc RAGGEDISLAND Uigh:94°F/s4°c
Atlantic City 84/28 66/18 s 86/30 67/19 t Las Vegas 108/42 81/27 s 110/43 87/30 s Portland, OR 90/32 60/15 s 90/32 60/15 pc High: 92° F/33° C Low: 78° F/26°C
Baltimore 89/31 68/20 s 88/31 68/20 t Little Rock 101/38 76/24 s 96/35 73/22 t Raleigh-Durham 92/33 71/21 s 92/33 74/23 t Low: 74°F/23°C &.
Boston 80/26 65/18 s 84/28 67/19 t Los Angeles 88/31 66/18 s 89/31 66/18 pc St. Louis 90/32 71/21 t 89/31 67/19 t .
Buffalo 82/27 64/17 p 76/24 58/14 c Louisville 90/32 72/22 t 86/30 67/19 pc Salt Lake City 91/382 63/17 s 96/35 68/20 $s GREAT INAGUA Bn
Charleston, SC 90/32 72/22 t 94/34 76/24 t Memphis 98/36 78/25 pe 91/382 75/23 t San Antonio 101/38 76/24 s 99/37 76/24 ¢ High: 95° F/35° C
Chicago 84/28 64/17 t 81/27 59/15 s Miami 90/32 80/26 t 90/32 79/26 t San Diego 76/24 68/20 p 77/25 68/20 pc Low. 77°F/25°C
Cleveland 82/27 69/20 t 80/26 60/15 pc Minneapolis 78/25 59/15 pe 74/23 55/12 s San Francisco 79/26 58/14 p 78/25 57/13 pe .
Dallas 100/37 78/25 s 103/39 77/25 s Nashville 94/34 69/20 t 85/29 69/20 t Seattle 80/26 57/13 s 81/27 56/13 s
Denver 85/29 57/13 p 93/33 5915 t New Orleans 92/33 77/25 t 92/33 77/25 t Tallahassee 92/33 73/22 t 92/33 74/23 t ca
Detroit 84/28 66/18 t 82/27 59/15 pc New York 84/28 71/21 s 86/30 72/22 t Tampa 90/32 77/25 t 91/32 77/25 t :
Honolulu 88/31 76/24 s 90/32 75/23 $s Oklahoma City 100/37 72/22 s 99/37 70/21 t Tucson 103/39 79/26 t 104/40 80/26 s Be
Houston 96/35 77/25 s 96/35 76/24 t Orlando 90/32 74/23 t 92/33 75/23 t Washington, DC 90/32 72/22 s 86/30 69/20 t

Vv
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. EXT.

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3|4|5

MODERATE



6|7

HIGH



\. HIGH

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.





Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg



High
F/C
90/32
72/22
17/25
91/32
59/15
89/31
86/30
80/26
100/37
86/30
97/36
77/25
82/27
65/18
75/23
97/36
52/11
97/36
91/32
68/20
90/32
81/27
79/26
76/24
66/18
81/27
79/26
69/20
90/32
72/22
91/32
105/40
83/28
79/26
52/11
89/31
73/22
73/22
91/32
86/30
77/25
102/38
75/23
75/23
78/25
77/25
93/33
72/22
77/25
77/25
71/21
102/38
88/31
91/32
63/17
88/31
57/13
90/32
63/17
86/30
75/23
61/16
93/33
91/32
17/25
86/30
76/24
88/31
86/30
66/18








Low
F/C
77/25
59/15
55/12
76/24
49/9
79/26
77/25
69/20
75/23
75/23
71/21
61/16
77/25
44/6
SoZ
70/21
43/6
73/22
81/27
43/8
M5iZ8
71/21
66/18
58/14
54/12
57/13
61/16
54/12
72/22
54/12
82/27
83/28
70/21
62/16
30/-1
79/26
61/16
55/12
61/16

|

Today





77/25 t
54/12 t
75/23

63/17
54/12
56/13
54/12

82/27 t

56/13
61/16
58/14
65/18
79/26
68/20
81/27

32/0
68/20

36/2
73/22
57/13
68/20
59/15

45/7
82/27
75/23
61/16
63/17
59/15
70/21
68/20

48/8

sh
pc

sh
s

pc
pc
pc
pc

sh

pe
pc
pe

oat Ow me

c

High
F/C
92/33
76/24
73/22
93/33
63/17
90/32
86/30
83/28
85/29
79/26
94/34
79/26
82/27
66/18
79/26
95/35
52/11
98/36
92/33
71/21
93/33
82/27
83/28
75/23
63/17
84/28
87/30
70/21
91/32
75/23
91/32
106/41
88/31
83/28
57/13
92/33
73/22
75/23
97/36
83/28
78/25
102/38
73/22
82/27
85/29
77/25
99/37
75/23
82/27
84/28
74/23
104/40
94/34
91/32
65/18
89/31
66/18
87/30
73/22
90/32
73/22
60/15
94/34
88/31
17/25
91/32
75/23
87/30
81/27
60/15

Thursday

Low
F/C
79/26
61/16
54/12
75/23
52/11
79/26
77/25
69/20
79/26
77/25
71/21
61/16
77/25
45/7
61/16
64/17
43/6
74/23
81/27
48/8
75/23
71/21
65/18
60/15
52/11
63/17
62/16
55/12
5128
55/12
82/27
85/29
75/23
63/17
36/2
80/26
59/15
57/13
63/17
77/25
53/11
75/23
61/16
59/15
56/13
53/11
82/27
57/13
64/17
57/13
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MARINE FORECAST

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15tx, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS &



; AGENTS







WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
Thursday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Thursday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Thursday: __E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F



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precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

A a

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Miami
90/80

Fronts

Cold

War filienflltnflite

Stationary Mag—eefit-

is | 05 | 10s 20s (305) 40s (50s 60s 70s 80s (S0s)//i00st/Ai08)

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Meet the men of en loods of Baliuccino’s
Mr Caribbean go’ Page eight

Bahamas Fitness
see page 10




WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009



Titled ‘Caged,’ this is one of several dozen pieces included in
the upcoming Nettie Symonette art exhibit at Central Bank.

@motTions
Canvas

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

ABSTRACT art is described as one of the few forms
of expression allowing artist to create stories with no
reference to elements of the world.

This freedom not only paves the way for the artist
to capture the world as they see it, but according to
some it also exposes the true essence of what art
was meant to be.



Full Text
WEATHER

The Tribune

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

TRY OUR
BBQ CHIPOTLE
SNACK WRAP

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LOW

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Volume: 105 No.192



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Emotions on

Canvas



Mother suspicious
over Andros boys’
conflicting stories

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE mother of two boys who
disappeared in Andros for nearly
five weeks said a kidnapping
could explain their mysterious
disappearance.

Vera Clarke, of Kemp Road,
Nassau, said she is suspicious as
her sons have told her conflict-
ing stories about their where-
abouts during the 33 days they
were missing.

After leaving their grandmoth-
er’s house in Smith’s Hill, south
east Andros, at around 6pm on

June 9, Marcell Clarke, 6, told his
mother he fell in a cave-like hole
and was stuck there for the entire
time he was away from home.

But his half-brother Deange-
lo, 9, said they were only trapped
in the hole for two or three days,
raising questions about where
they were for the rest of the time
they were missing.

Ms Clarke said: “When they
were gone I thought they had
been kidnapped, and I think they
would tell me if they had been,
unless somebody threatened
them.

SEE page eight

Police ‘will not be targeting
Dwight Major’ when he returns

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

COMMISSIONER of Police Reginald Ferguson yesterday did not
criticise the ruling of a US Federal court that sentenced self confessed
drug dealer Dwight Major to less than nine years behind bars.

Although Major was sentenced to 108 months in prison with super-
vised release after five years, his sentence will take into account the 78

SEE page eight

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(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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y of ZNS

ures courtes

Coroner’s inquest
into teen’s cell
death to start soon

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

A CORONER'S inquest into
the death of teenager Michael
Knowles, who was found hanged
in a cell at the East Street South
police station, is expected to start
soon, said Police Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson.

Meanwhile, Knowles' mother
Donna Wilson said she still has
unanswered questions about his
death as she prepares for his
funeral on Thursday.

Yesterday, the police chief
would not reveal details of the
police investigation into the boy's
death or the results of the state's
autopsy only saying the findings
— which were recently turned
over to the Coroner's Court —
would be made public through
the inquest proceedings.

"A lot depends on what the

SEE page eight

Located on Em

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009



Mackey Streets

lh



Mornings are
Great for GRITS
ait Wendys !

+>» Chandra takes

ey. spot

Bahamian
authorities work

channels



FNM leadership candidates ‘will push
for deputy’ if PM won’t stand in 2012

IN THE event that Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham will not offer for re-election in the 2012 general
election, candidates for the leadership of the party
are reportedly set to make a push for the deputy
leadership post at the FNM’s upcoming conven-
tion, The Tribune was told.

While these intentions, which are being heavily
guarded in the run up to the convention, have start-
ed to leak out to the general public, there are also
reports that the chairman of the party, Johnley
Ferguson could also face a challenge to his position.



Hubert Ingraham

SEE page eight




















Prosecution closes case in
Harl Taylor murder trial

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

McNeil, 22, the son of Tay-
lor’s former business partner
Troy McNeil, is accused of caus-
ing Taylor’s death between Sat-
urday, November 17, and Sun-
day, November 18, 2007 while
being concerned with another.
Taylor, 37, was found dead at

SEE page eight

THE Prosecution closed its
case yesterday against Troyniko
McNeil who is accused of the
November 2007 murder of
internationally recognised hand-
bag designer Harl Taylor.



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

through diplomatic

Police awaiting
US clearance to
interview murder
victim’s daughter

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN police are
awaiting clearance from
American authorities to
travel to the United States
to interview the teenage
daughter of murder victim
Anna Garrison in connec-
tion with her mother’s
death.

Police Superintendent
Elsworth Moss said Bahami-
an authorities are “making
progress” in this regard,
working through diplomatic
channels in their efforts to
speak with Madison Pugh,
who also goes by the names
Madison Sweeting and
Madison McKinney.

According to the senior
officer, police are already
aware of where the teenag-
er, said to be aged around
16 years old, is currently
residing.

They say Madison left
The Bahamas for the US.

SEE page eight



Road paving
issues blamed on
PLP govt’s joint
venture insistence

THE delay and waste of money
associated with the paving of a
major road in Acklins was as a
direct result of the former govern-
ment’s insistence that two compa-
nies joint venture to repair the
same stretch of highway, it was
claimed yesterday.

Caribbean Asphalt Products Ltd
(CAP), which had been in busi-
ness for more than 30 years, was
reportedly made to joint venture
with M&R Road Builders to carry
out road construction in South
Acklins.

It is claimed that the joint ven-
ture was a condition of CAP
receiving the contract for the road
construction.

CAP’s first and only contract
under the former PLP administra-
tion was in 2006 when it was
claimed the company was instruct-
ed by the Ministry of Public Works
to joint venture with a company
called M&R Road Builders to car-
ry out road construction in South
Acklins. The principals in this com-
pany were two Acklins business-
men, both strong PLP supporters.

At the time M&R Road
Builders was a novice company in
road building.

The joint venture turned out to

SEE page eight

niMon-Fri 10am-4pm, Sat 10am-2pm Wh 242.394.4111 4 www.bahamahandprints.com
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Deadline for
investors in BIC
privatisation
PPOCESS

GOVERNMENT has
set a July 28 deadline for
investors interested in
registering for the first
phase in the privatisation
process of the Bahamas
Telecommunications
Company (BTC).

Yesterday, government
officially issued a notice
of privatisation and
announced the launch of
the process to sell a 51
per cent stake in BTC.

In the notice, which
was featured in several
local and international
publications, the Bahami-
an government encour-
ages interested parties to
participate in the regis-
tration and pre-qualifica-
tion process.

The government is
seeking a strategic part-
ner who can offer the fol-
lowing: “A strong reputa-
tion in the telecommuni-
cations industry; ability
and commitment to gen-
erate value-added rev-
enue and cost synergies
with BTC operations;
financial strength and
operational platform to
be able to enhance BTC’s
underlying network, ser-
vices, billing and cus-
tomer service, and a his-
tory of strong financial
performance.”

Interested parties are
invited to register for the
privatisation process of
BTC through the submis-
sion of a registration
form and the payment of
a processing fee of
US$25,000 on or before
3pm (EST) on July 28,
2009.

The registration form
and guidelines on the
submission of the form
are available at
http://www.btcprivatiza-
tion.com.

Qualified parties will
be invited to participate
in the due diligence
phase, giving them access
to a data room, financial
vendor due diligence
report, technical due dili-
gence report, manage-
ment presentation and
site visits.

After the due diligence
phase, investors/consor-
tiums will be invited to
submit binding bids for
the stake in BTC.

Ua
US)

tee hay

PHONE: $22-2157



From your wife, Esther and your
sons, Darian & DaRon.



Independence celebration
leaves a mess in Montagu

PROUD Bahamians were horrified
to find the Montagu foreshore littered
with garbage following three days of cel-
ebration throughout the Independence
Day holiday weekend.

Nassau residents taking a morning
walk along the waterfront on Monday
morning said they were disgusted to find
a stinking mess of food containers, beer
cans, bottles and plastic littering the pub-
lic park and coastline.

They said garbage cans stood empty
while litter was apparently strewn across
the ground by hundreds of revellers
enjoying a ‘No Boat Regatta’ held on
Friday, Saturday and Sunday at the Mon-
tagu foreshore.

Julie Pinder, who was among the
group who found the mess, said: “There
were empty garbage cans and garbage
everywhere.

“People were there to pick it up, but
that’s not the point - the point is that it
shouldn’t be there in the first place.

“Tt shouldn’t be there any day of the
week, but isn’t Independence Day all
about pride in our country?

“If people are going to be having func-
tions out there, there should be a law
that it should be cleaned up before they
leave. It’s disgusting. It stank. And every-
one agreed it’s a disgrace,” she said.

BERNARD CRAWLEY WENDY DAWKINS

ONE of the world’s biggest
beauty pageants - The Miss
Universe Pageant - is coming
to town at a time when
Bahamians are suffering from
the effects of the global eco-
nomic downturn.

The Tribune hit the streets
yesterday to ask if the average
Bahamian would be enticed
to attend the event even
though the least expensive
ticket is selling for $175.

Bernard Crawley

“Yes (I would attend)
because for a lot of Bahami-
ans it’s a status thing, it does-
n't have anything to do with
the pageant itself, it’s the fact
of being able to say ‘I can go.’

It’s right here versus hav-
ing to take a flight somewhere
and then pay to go to the
pageant, its right here, its right
in the Bahamas. For a very
long time there won’t be a
another Miss Universe
Pageant here. For most of us

Local News
Sports

Business
Arts/Taste
Comics
Weather

Editorial/Letters. .........

rs

A oe

GIA ANDERSON

— US, Cuba resume migration

we just see when it’s on tele-
vision so this is better.”

Wendy Dawkins

pay

ery, but they will do it.”

Gia Anderson

“This is the first time they }
are having Miss Universe }
over here, so trust me they }
will spend their money to go }

out and see it.”

DJ Crazy

“T will go and support it, }
besides you have guys who go }
just to see them legs. If I have }
the money I will go just to see }
what other countries get out }

of the experience.”

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Piberoroueoaule

Apnea eee e eee eenn ea Nenee te P4

Ee Onda

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

P1,2,3,4,5,6
oe Ome

CLASSIFIED SECTION 16 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



“Yeah, I think people will

“It doesn’t matter what it }
costs, if a person wants to doa i
thing or wants to get it, trust
me they will find the money :
and do it. It could cost a mil- |
lion dollars, theyll do it, but ;
tomorrow they will be hun- :

a aga
i 2 ae




































































MONTAGU foreshore was littered with garbage on Monday morning alee a three-day party over the Meee Day holiday weekend.

DJ CRAZY




talks after six year pause

WASHINGTON

THE United States and Cuba are renewing negotiations on the
U.S.-Cuba Migration accords, according to Associated Press.

The State Department said department official Craig Kelly headed
the U.S. delegation meeting Tuesday with Cuban negotiators in New

York.

The talks’ focus will be on promotion of safe, legal and orderly
migration between the two countries.

The Obama administration proposed on May 22 to resume talks to
implement the 15-year-old accords. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton announced May 31 that Cuba had agreed.

Former President George W. Bush suspended the talks after the last

session in 2003.

Puerto Rico reports its
first swine flu death

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

PUERTO RICO is reporting
the U.S. island's first death from
swine flu, and another eight
deaths are being investigated,
according to Associated Press.

The Health Department says
the victim was a 27-year-old
man who had a history of asth-
ma. He died July 6 but the
cause was not confirmed until
Tuesday.

Puerto Rico's chief epidemi-

ologist, Johnny Rullan, says 35
local cases of the H1INI1 virus
have been confirmed by the
U.S. Centers for Disease Con-
trol. Another 290 potential cas-
es are still being evaluated.

Gov. Luis Fortuno says
authorities are seeing the per-
son-to-person spread of the
virus in the Caribbean island of
nearly 4 million inhabitants. He
is urging anyone with flu-like
symptoms to seek treatment
immediately.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Suspected
cocaine
worth
$600,000
is seized

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A large
quantity of suspected
cocaine valued at
$600,000 was seized by
Bahamian and United
States law enforcement
officials on Grand
Bahama this week.

Asst Supt Welbourne
Bootle, police press liai-
son officer, said the drug
bust occurred at the
Freeport Container Port
on Monday afternoon.

Information

He said that sometime
around 4pm, acting on
information received,
officers of the Drug
Enforcement Unit
(DEV), US Drug
Enforcement Agency,
and US Customs went to
the container port.

The officers, along with
container port security,
conducted a search of a
20ft container, in which
they discovered 24 pack-

ages of suspected cocaine. }

ASP Bootle said no
arrests have made in con-
nection with the matter
and investigations are
continuing.

@ TOUGH CALL
COLUMN

TOUGH Call, written
by columnist Larry Smith,
will not be published in
today’s Tribune.

The column will appear
next Wednesday when Mr
Smith returns from vaca-
tion.

- Vigilante justice over
boat thefts ‘not far off

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AS SOME Abaconians warn
that vigilante justice is not far off
in the face of a rising tide of boat
thefts in the islands, the Commis-
sioner of Police says he is “focus-
ing” on the problem.

Commissioner Reginald Fer-
guson said yesterday that the lead-
ership of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force is “fully cognisant of
the importance of the yachting
community in that area of the
Bahamas” and is “making as
much effort as it can to assist local
law enforcement” in addressing
the problem.

In Green Turtle Cay, Abaco,
some islanders told The Tribune
that they feel the unprecedented

increase in boat thefts over the
last two years comes down sim-
ply to the police’s inability to “be
in all places at all times.”

Police

However, many others have
become so disillusioned with the
ever increasing number of boat
thefts from their marinas and pri-
vate docks that they fear that
some police could even be com-
plicit in the robberies.

“At best they are simply indif-
ferent, at worst, involved in the
crimes,” suggested one Green

Turtle Cay (GTC) resident.
While police have been reluc-
tant to provide statistics upon
request, a spokesman from one
insurance company said his firm
has had to pay out in connection

eee Ua iN dad bs

with 58 Abaco boat thefts in 2008.
Among the most popular tar-
gets for thieves are Intrepids and
Contenders with powerful
engines, especially Yamahas.
One insurance company repre-
sentative, who did not wished to
be named, said: “It is quite an epi-
demic. All insurance brokers are
feeling the pinch in Abaco.”
Some say the threat of vigilante
justice is in the air, while others
have started to take matters into
their own hands in less contro-
versial ways — for example by
forming crime watch committees
and pushing for more security
cameras in targeted zones.
There is widespread concern if
such crimes can continue to occur
with frequency, it will be the
island’s traditionally thriving
marine tourism industry that will



FAMILY AND friends of 18-year-old Brenton Smith nathiered in prayer led by family friend and pastor
Bill Higgs of Trinity Methodist Church outside the morgue on Monday.

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are still searching for two suspects wanted
in connection with the armed robbery of a cashier at
the City Market food store on Village Road last week.

Meanwhile, an autopsy and ballistics report on the
death of teenager Brenton Smith should be complet-
ed by the end of the week, a senior police officer said.
Smith, a bystander, was shot and killed when gunfire
broke out during a police chase of the two suspects last
Thursday night. Two men are reported to have burst
into the food store just after 8pm that night, one of

them armed with a handgun.

Just after the robbery, officers on patrol nearby
spotted two men running and pursued them before
shots were fired and Smith was killed.

"We're still looking for he two suspects," said head
of the Central Detective Unit Superintendent Elsworth

Moss.

He added that police have an idea of who they are
looking for and are preparing to circulate some pho-

tographs.

After the shooting, police said they did not think
Smith, 18, was at the store at the time of the robbery.

His family says the youth was an

"innocent"

pedestrian who was shot after leaving a friend's house.

Family and friends converged outside the Princess
Margaret Hospital's morgue on Monday morning to
mourn the death of the popular boy.

His uncle Darren Strachan said the family launched
an independent investigation which led them to believe
the police shot Smith.

He said the family wants the police to come clean
and tell the truth.

Supt Moss said he cannot not confirm or deny the
family's claims before the reports are finished.

When asked if there was any evidence to suggest the

suspects fired shots during the chase, Mr Moss said he
could not comment. He also could not say if a coro-
net’s inquest into the shooting would take place.
Smith, a 2008 graduate of St Augustine's College,
was said to have been a bright, fun-loving young man

who stayed out of trouble.

A friend said the victim had just finished a work-
related training course and was thinking about attend-
ing college abroad.

Lottery ‘would create
cycle of corruption’

ESTABLISHING a nation-
al lottery to help fund the coun-
try’s education system would
create a cycle of social and
moral corruption, according to a
group of churches.

In a joint press statement
issued yesterday, representa-
tives of Grace Community
Church, Bahamas Conference
of the Methodist Church, Cal-
vary Bible Church, Kingdom
Life Church, New Mount Zion
Missionary Baptist Church and
Temple Baptist Church spoke
out against the proposal which
calls for the possible introduc-
tion of “a special tax and a
national lottery” to better fund
the nation’s public schools.

The possibility of creating a
national lottery to benefit the
schools is one of the suggestions
in the government’s 10-year
plan for education.

However, the church repre-
sentatives said that the consid-
eration given to the lottery pro-
posal by the Ministry of Edu-
cation is “tragically unfortu-
nate.”

Said the group of churches:
“From our perspective it is both
contradictory and hypocritical
for such an esteemed educa-
tional system that believes and
teaches that hard work, indus-
try, and self-discipline are the
(fundamental) elements of edu-
cation to seek to have that lofty

and worthwhile endeavour
funded by an immoral means
that caters to chance and indis-
cipline and promotes a disre-
gard for a wholesome work eth-
ic.”

To have a national lottery
financially supporting the edu-
cation system would “under-
mine the very lofty ideals and
spirit of discipline the Ministry
of Education is trying to imcul-
cate in the youth of our nation
and, in fact, actually help to cre-
ate a cycle of the very adverse
social and moral corruption it
is trying to prevent,” the church
representatives said.

“The folly of such a course of
action is heightened when one
considers that our schools are
presently suffering from a
national ‘D’ average. Present-
ly, the average businessman is
complaining about the difficul-
ty of finding people to hire who

can do basic math. Imagine
therefore what further legalisa-
tion of gambling will do to the
mindset of an emerging work
force that even now is viewed as
incompetent, unskilled, and
undisciplined in many quarters.”

The group of churches is call-
ing on the Ministry of Educa-
tion to carefully consider
research that has been done on
the topic of young people and
gambling.

According to the church rep-
resentatives, research by Loma
Linda University Medical
School's Professor Durand
Jacobs shows that once exposed,
teenagers are three times as
likely as adults to become
addicted to gambling. “The
same researcher discovered that
at least one in 10 teens engages
in illegal activity (stealing,
shoplifting, selling drugs or pros-
titution) to finance their gam-

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bling.” The group of churches
said it would also like to point
out to the Ministry of Educa-
tion that legalised gambling
“will bring devastating costs to
families and society at large,
such as divorce, poverty, child
abuse, the creation of addicts,
increased crime associated with
gambling losses, and the further
erosion of our already weak
national work ethic.”

Umbrellas
Loungers
Drinks Trolleys

suffer, along with the livelihoods
of those who depend on it.

The trend comes at a particu-
larly bad time for the islands, as
they are also suffering the effects
of the downturn in the global
economy. The streets of GTC are
noticeably more quiet than at this
time in previous years.

A recent billfishing tournament
organised by a local marina
expected to attract at least 25 par-
ticipants, but saw only four regis-
ter, The Tribune was informed.

Serious

Speaking of the boat thefts,
Hope Town resident and sailor
Dwayne Wallas said: “There’s
definitely been a drastic increase.
I think it’s pretty serious situation
and almost without a doubt there
is some pretty high level organ-
ised crime ring going on. It’s being
done very professionally.

“From what I hear 10 to 15 per
cent are being recovered and rest
are never to be seen again.”

Green Turtle Cay Club and
Marina General Manager Lynn
Johnson said: “It has definitely
had a negative affect on the area.
I don’t feel that enough is being
done. We have one police officer
on the island and he really is try-
ing to make a difference, getting
out and doing patrols, but the
island has several harbours and
its impossible to be in all the
places at one time.”

“T can’t say we’ve actually lost
business because of it yet but it is
affecting Abaco’s reputation,” she
added.

Wade Cash, owned of Sunset

Marine, a boatyard in the Black
Sound area of GTC, recently
organised a community meeting
to discuss the issue.

Out of this, an association was
formed of around 12 men who are
shortly set to begin a local crime
watch, patrolling the island in an
effort to help keep the situation
under control.

“Basically we just need to get it
stopped, it’s totally ridiculous
what’s been going on,” he said.
“On a couple of occasions police
have picked guys up but they can’t
seem to pin anything on anyone.”

Besides carrying out their
patrols, the association hopes to
raise funds to install closed cir-
cuit television cameras which can
be used to monitor and record
nighttime activities in certain
areas,

Speaking of the police’s reac-
tion to the threat, Commissioner
Ferguson admitted that they have
yet to arrest anyone in connec-
tion with the thefts, but are “doing
some things” that he cannot dis-
cuss in detail.

“You can’t police in the press,”
he said.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham’s speedboat, which is docked
in Green Turtle Cay, was found to
have been “tampered with” earli-
er this year. Some who saw the
condition of the vessel conclud-
ed that it had been used to com-
mit another robbery in the area.

Commenting on the investiga-
tion into that incident yesterday,
Commissioner Ferguson said no
one was charged in the matter as
it would appear the evidence
did not lend itself to this conclu-
sion.























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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
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WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

America’s gun culture outdated

IT WAS a bit of a culture shock to listen to
Senator Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) questioning
Judge Sonia Sotomayor at her confirmation
hearings yesterday morning. He was con-
cerned about her position on the right of
every American citizen to carry a gun.

Senator Hatch, who is on record as having
praised a Senate vote allowing people to car-
ry firearms into America’s national parks
and wildlife refuges, seemed seriously con-
cerned about the judge’s ability to sit as a
Supreme Court judge if she had any doubts
about this “fundamental right.”

We say a “culture shock” because having
been brought up in a no gun tradition, we
find it difficult to reconcile the idea that any
private citizen should have the right to carry
a gun. At one time the British “bobby” and
the Bahamian policeman could only arm
themselves with a “billy.” And so it was a
surprise to watch this venerable-looking,
white-haired gentleman with his serious pok-
er face, taking this right of gun possession
so much to heart.

It is a surprise that a country like America,
having matured to the position of a world
leader, still has the Wild West mentality
coursing through its people’s veins. Appar-
ently it is an inherent part of America’s cul-
ture, and regardless of how many innocents
are slain by the gun on its streets, in its
schools, homes and public places, no one can
even question that constitutionally
entrenched “fundamental right.” When will
they wake up?

In the early years of the settlement of
America when the Pilgrims first arrived in
1620 we can understand the need for the gun.
These Europeans had set foot on a vast,
untamed land, populated by Indians and wild
animals. They had no police force, no Army,
no National Guard to protect them. They
had to be rugged and self-sufficient and take
care of themselves. In addition to their crude
cooking utensils and their hatchet, they could
not survive without their gun. Each man used
his iron piece to protect his family and shoot
venison for the evening meal.

Later as the “homesteader” under Abra-
ham Lincoln staked out his government-alot-
ted 160-acre plot of land, with no neighbour
within shouting distance, his gun was his only
protection. It was the gun that he used to
conquer the untamed frontier. The gun
became a part of him, his constant companion
without which he did not sleep well at night.

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However, America has grown and pros-
pered. In other words, the young nation in
short pants, has now grown up and dropped
into long pants. The divided states were unit-
ed, a federal government was knit together,
and Army, Air Force, Navy, National Guard
and strong police force, at great expense to
the taxpayer, was formed to protect the
nation and its citizens. One would have
thought at that stage of their development the
citizens would have turned in their arms.

And so the statement by Samuel Adams,
signer of the Declaration of Independence
and cousin of John Adams, second US pres-
ident, today seems a contradiction. Said
Adams: “The Constitution shall never be
construed to authorise Congress to prevent
the people of the United States, who are
peaceable citizens, from keeping their own
arms.”

Of course those were still frontier days
and the “peaceable citizens” still needed the
shotgun. But not so today. If in addition to
the strong protection provided by the state,
they still have to carry a gun for their personal
protection, then they are not “peaceable cit-
izens.”

In 2008 the Supreme Court struck down
Washington, DC’s ban on handguns, despite
the high level of gun crime that the capitol
was trying to suppress.

It quoted the Constitution’s Second
Amendment in which a reference to a “well
regulated Militia” showed that the legisla-
tors of those days were still legislating for a
frontier country and writing in frontier lan-
guage.

Surely Americans are no longer governed
by frontiersmen. Surely, they are wise enough
to understand that today’s guns in the hands
of today’s Americans have been turned
against that country’s citizens. It is now time
to abolish them.

However, if America can honestly face
the world with the argument that it still needs
its private guns to protect its citizens, then
what argument can it have against the North
Koreans who claim they need nuclear
weapons to protect their citizens? Both
propositions are madness.

We agree with those level-headed Amer-
icans who argue that America’s “gun cul-
ture” has outlived its usefulness.

And yesterday to watch a seemingly level-
headed, elderly American senator argue oth-
erwise was certainly disconcerting.



IN STOCK!

Cuba: July
anniversaries of

two massacres

Unpunished, but not forgotten
LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

On the anniversary of the Tug-
boat massacre, we submit for
publication our release of 2007 in
memory of all who have lost their
lives attempting to flee Cuba.

July 6, 2007, Summit, New Jer-
sey:

Among the most flagrant
atrocities committed by the Cas-
tro regime in its long history of
human rights’ abuses, two inci-
dents stand out -the Canimar
River Massacre of 1980 and the
Tugboat Massacre of 1994. Both
took place in the month of July
and poignantly illustrate the
Cuban leadership’s profound dis-
regard for human life and their
egregious violation of the funda-
mental right of citizens to leave
their country.

On July 6, 1980 three young-
sters hijacked an excursion boat
that was to navigate inland along
the scenic Canimar river flowing
into Matanzas Bay. Surprised pas-
sengers screamed their approval
to go to the United States, but
the security guard resisted and
shot at the youngsters, who
wounded him with firearms clan-
destinely obtained from their mil-
itary service. Concerned for his
health, they sent him back to
shore with a passenger who
refused to leave. Alerted author-
ities commanded a chase. High-
speed Cuban Navy patrol boats
fired on the escapees and
attempted to sink the vessel.
Then, a Cuban Air Force plane
overflew the boat and opened
fire. Finally, most not yet wound-
ed or dead drowned when a spe-
cial boat used for heavy industri-
al work was brought in to ram
and sink the vessel.

The excursion boat had capac-
ity for 100 passengers, yet only
10 survived. Reportedly, there
were at least 56 victims, including
four children, ages 3, 9, 11, and 17.
The actual number was kept
secret and recovered bodies were
not handed to the families, com-
munal funerals forbidden. The

letters@tribunemedia net



Cuban government claimed it was
an accident, but survivors were
threatened with prison into
silence and kept under surveil-
lance for years

Fourteen years later, on July
13, 1994, a group of around 70
family members and friends,
including many children, boarded
the tugboat “13 de marzo” in the
middle of the night planning to
escape to the United States. As
they made their way out of
Havana’s harbour, three tugboats
that had been waiting in the dark
started a chase. Relentlessly, they
sprayed the boat with high pres-
sure water jets, ripping children
from their parents’ arms and
sweeping passengers off to sea.
Finally, the attackers rammed the
“13 de marzo” enough to make it
sink. Passengers who had taken
refuge in the cargo hold were
pinned down and desperately
pounded on the walls, the chil-
dren wailing in horror, as they
went down. Survivors who then
clung to life in high seas, con-
tended with the three pursuing
tugboats circling them and creat-
ing wave turbulence and eddies
for them to drown. The attack
stopped suddenly when a mer-
chant ship with a Greek flag
approached Havana Harbour and
Cuban Navy ships picked up sur-
vivors. Brought to shore, the
stunned women and children
were interrogated and sent home.
The men were kept in detention
for months and given psy-
chotropic drugs. No bodies of the
37 victims (including 11 children)
were returned to their families
for burial. Survivors and relatives
of the dead were denied infor-
mation and put under surveil-
lance. Many were dismissed from
their jobs and systematically
harassed by the authorities.

It later transpired that an infil-
trator in the group had helped

plan the operation to set an exam-
ple with its violent suppression.
The Cuban government claimed
it was an accident and blamed it
on the escapees and United
States’ immigration policies. An
international outcry prompted the
government to promise an inves-
tigation, but instead it awarded
the head of the operation, tug-
boat pilot Jestis Gonzalez
Machin, received a "Hero of the
Cuban Revolution" medal.
Requests by international orga-
nizations for information and
redress have been all disregarded.

These and similar tragedies in
Cuba remain largely ignored by
world media and public opinion.
Yet, the Castro regime has for
decades systematically murdered
civilians for trying to escape their
country. Hundreds, perhaps thou-
sands, may have been killed by
government authorities for
attempting to escape by sea, for
seeking asylum in foreign
embassies, or trying to cross into
the U.S. Naval Base at Guanta-
namo. Today the U.S. Naval base
in Cuba remains sealed off by
barbed wire and mines, with
Cuban border guards ready to
shoot to kill. Cuba's Penal Code
punishes attempts to leave the
national territory without gov-
ernment authorization with up to
20 years in prison or death. Over
the course of decades thousands
have served prison, under dire
conditions, for these so-called
crimes. Still today, a number of
political prisoners are serving very
long sentences for attempting to
escape the country.

Cuba Archive calls on world
governments, international organ-
isations, and all people of good-
will to hold the Cuban govern-
ment accountable for its crimes
and demand respect for the fun-
damental rights of Cuba’s citizens
to life, safety, and the right to
leave their country at will.

CUBA ARCHIVE

Summit,
New Jersey,
July 13, 2009

Is this the example a man of God should he setting?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I recently read that a Bahamian pastor got a $1/4
million vehicle for $68,000. That is almost a 73 per
cent discount. I am not greedy. I do not need a 1/4
million dollar car or a $68,000 car, as a matter of fact
I drive a scooter for about $2,000 licensed and
inspected. Far be it from me to judge anyone, much
less a man of God, but I cannot help but wonder. If
this preacher had bought three Kia picantos for
20,000 each or six chevy microvans (11,000) instead
of a Bentley, could he have donated vehicles to
local charity? Would he? Did he consider this

option?

Some of our fellow Bahamians are not worried

cost of the car after this “blessing” of a rebate. I
would also like to point out the difference in service

costs and fuel. 50 to 60 dollars a week in a Bentley
would translate to 30 to 40 in a smaller car. The
cost of parts and service is ungodly by comparison.

Tam happy for a person that can afford this type
of luxury, but I would be more encouraged or
inspired by a show of modesty or charity.

This is not the example a man of God should be
setting. In my humble opinion, an example of mod-
esty, wise investment and charitable donation is
needed not only to get our congregations, but our
entire population, through these times. I would

rather catch a jitney to heaven than drive a Bentley

about what they drive and simply need a place to

sleep. A one bedroom apartment at $550 per month
could have it’s rent paid for 10 years! As a matter of
fact you could actually purchase a house for the

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



© In brief

-Hanna-Martin raises suspicions

THE man found dead at
a downtown building com-
plex in Grand Bahama on
Sunday has been identified
by police as Steven Rolle,
47, of Freeport.

According to police
reports, the body was dis-
covered sometime around
8am at the Churchill Build-
ing, near the Immigration
Department.

Mr Rolle’s body was tak-
en to the Rand Memorial
Hospital morgue, where an
autopsy will be held to
determine the cause of
death. Police said foul play
is not suspected at this time.

20 illegal
Immigrants
in Bimini

IMMIGRATION offi-
cials apprehended 25 ille-
gal immigrants, including
Chinese, Haitian and
Jamaican nationals, at a
private residence in Bimi-
ni.

Acting on intelligence
received, Defence Force
and Immigration officers
on July 7 searched the
home of a local man in
South Bimini.

The search led to the
discovery of seven Chi-
nese men, five Chinese
women, one Jamaican
man, three Haitian
women, eight Haitian
men and a eight-year-old
Haitian boy.

Immigration officers
questioned the persons
about their status in the
Bahamas, but were
unable to ascertain
whether the migrants had
entered the country legal-
ly as none of them had
the necessary documents.

Further questioning
revealed that group of
migrants arrived in Bimi-
ni from Nassau on July 5
and July 6 in two sepa-
rate groups.

The 25 immigrants
were taken to Alice
Town police station for
processing and were then
transferred to the
Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre.

Arrangements are
being made to repatriate
the migrants to their
respective countries as
soon as possible.

over container port relocation

SUSPICIONS over government’s
“arrogant” decision to relocate the
container port from downtown Nas-
sau to Arawak Cay have been raised
by Glenys Hanna Martin.

The PLP chairwoman has said the
“sross lack of transparency” shown by
the FNM government in their deci-
sion-making process has given her rea-
son to speculate about the reasoning
behind their decision.

Mrs Hanna Martin’s main concern is
over plans for a joint public-private
land-owning venture that will report-
edly give a combined entity of private
businesses a controlling share of the
container port; with a shareholding of
40 per cent, and a public share offering
of 20 per cent.

“First and foremost the Minister (of
the Environment) announces that land
owned by the Bahamian people is to
be utilised in some sort of jomt venture

with a collection of
private entities,
many of whom
now control the
shipping industry
in the Bahamas,
and some of whom
are known finan-
cial supporters of
the Free National
Movement,” the
PLP chairwoman
said.

“And there are
other concerns [@RiWanrUnEe EU
which heighten sus-
picions about the entire process.”

She echoed concerns raised by PLP
Senator Jerome Fitzgerald this week-
end about the environmental impact of
dredging and increased maritime activ-
ity in the area, access to local beaches
and traffic congestion.



Mr Fitzgerald
launched an aware-
| ness campaign on
Friday to inform
people about the
cost of relocating
the container port
to Arawak Cay and
raised a number of
questions about
whether an Envi-
ronmental Impact
Assessment (EIA)
for the develop-
ment would be
done, and when the
findings would be disclosed.

His questions were put to Minister of
the Environment Earl Deveaux yes-
terday, but were not answered before
The Tribune went to press.

Mrs Hanna Martin said: “There has
been no dialogue, no full information-

Jerome Fitzgerald

sharing... The process has grossly
lacked transparency; instead of a full
disclosure of the issues which include
the radical and unceremonious rever-
sal of a decision made by a previous
government, a decision which was
based on scientific studies duly com-
missioned.

“The Bahamian people are entitled
to know all the facts surrounding the
government’s decision to relocate the
port to Arawak Cay and in so doing
hand a significant economic windfall to
an elite group without having the cour-
tesy to communicate with its popula-
tion.

“The government should be warned
that Bahamians are watching very
carefully with a scrutinising and suspect
eye. It is hereby now demanded that
the government engage in proper and
transparent discourse with the people
of the Bahamas.”

Junkanoo to bring ‘economic
benefits’ to Grand Bahama

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — ‘Just Rush’
promoter Peter Adderley
announced that the popular
summer junkanoo event is set
for August 15 and said it will
bring a much needed eco-
nomic boost to Grand
Bahama.

Mr Adderley, president of
Creative Works, said four
major junkanoo groups — the
Saxon Superstars and the Val-
ley Boys of Nassau, and the
Classic Dancers and Swingers
of Grand Bahama -— will be
participating in the third annu-
al Just Rush Junkanoo
Parade.

He said a number of activi-
ties have been planned for Fri-
day, August 14 through Sun-
day, August 16.

Mr Adderley said activities
get underway with a launch
party, junkanoo skills compe-
tition, and all-Bahamian con-
cert on Friday.

The main event, the
junkanoo parade, will be held
on Saturday at Explorers Way
in downtown Freeport.

The weekend will climax
with a church service followed
by the announcement of the
parade results at a family
beach party on Taino Beach
on Sunday, August 16.

Mr Adderley pointed out
that the parade will showcase
the biggest rivalry in
junkanoo, as the Bay Street
Boxing Day champions, the
Valley boys, will face off

against the New Year’s Day
winners, the Saxons Super-
stars.

“After years, decades, of
brilliant battles and heralded
controversy over who got
robbed, the two big boys hit
the streets of Freeport for a
historic showdown. This is it,”
Mr Adderley said.

He said junkanoo fans are
also anticipating a rivalry
between the groups from
Grand Bahama and those out
of New Providence.

While the public is antici-
pating the fun and excitement
of Just Rush, local merchants
are looking forward to the
economic benefits the event
will bring.

Mr Adderley noted that the
groups invited to compete in
the parade must bring a mini-
mum of 150 members, but
often surpass that require-
ment.

“All groups reportedly

MP: political reasons behind
Queen’s Highway paving decision

DESPITE his asser-
tions that there are
political reasons
behind the govern-
ment’s decision to
only pave the north-
ern portion of the
Queen’s Highway in
Acklins, the results of
the 2007 election
reveal that the PLP
MP for MICAL
Alfred Gray won all
of the polling divi-
sions in this portion
of the island.

Enraged by an

advertisement from the Ministry of Works
calling for tenders for the road work in
the northern section of Lovely Bay, Mr
Gray said it made more sense to him for
the government to pave the dilapidated
roads between the airport in Spring Point

and Salina Point.

He said residents across Acklins are
inconvenienced by the “impassable” 25 to
30 mile southern section of the road, but
residents in the south, where the majority
of his PLP supporters live, are the most

badly affected.

The MP said: “The people in the south-
ern part of the island are more conserva-
tive and support me as MP and I
don’t think they ought to suffer because of

that.

“Once a government is elected I expect
the government to serve all people equal-
ly and to serve the part of the island where

ALFRED GRAY



52 to 45.

28

their support might be is wrong.”

However, according to the 2007 elec-
tion results for MICAL, Mr Gray won
both division four and division five, which
cover the northern end of Acklins.

At polling division four, Lovely Bay,
which includes Chesters and Pinefield, 102
voters were registered and 99 persons vot-
ed. Mr Gray defeated Senator Foulkes by

At polling division five, Hard Hill, Mr
Gray’s hometown, 70 voters were regis-
tered with 63 persons voting.

Mr Gray won by 35 votes to Mr Foulkes’

It was only at polling division number
six in central Acklins (Spring Point, Delec-
table Bay, and Pompey Bay) that Mr
Foulkes gained the upper hand on Mr
Gray, by beating him by 39 votes to 25.



more than double these
requirements, and the num-
bers show benefits at local
hotels, rental car companies,
restaurants, retail clothing
stores, barber shops, beauty
salons, and bars,” he said.

“Junkanooers come by the
hundreds, and domestic and
international visitors come in
by the thousands to experi-
ence and enjoy this uniquely
Bahamian event.”

Mr Adderley said that he
has created both the Feel The
Rush and Just Rush events to
boost Grand Bahama’s cul-
tural and economic life.

“Grand Bahama has long
been craving an annual signa-
ture event, and Just Rush has
satisfied that craving,” he said.

Major sponsors for this
year’s Just Rush are the
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty, Grand Bahama Power, the
Ministry Of Tourism, and
Ross University.



— :
SE



Tough Body
Trauble-frae
Easy to Maintain

NISSAN PICKUP

Closing submissions
TRIAL

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

CLOSING submissions
were presented yesterday in
the trial of a man and a
teenager charged in the
stabbing death of Khodee
Davis.

Davis, 16, an 11th grade
Temple Christian student,
was stabbed in the chest dur-
ing a fight between two
groups of men at Cabbage
Beach, Paradise Island on
May 12 last year.

Andy Francis, 22, and a
17-year-old boy, both of Fox
Hill, have been charged with
Davis’ death. They have
pleaded not guilty.

During her closing sub-
missions yesterday, lead
prosecutor Sandra Dee Gar-
diner told the jury that the
juvenile had initiated the
fight that ultimately led to
Davis’ death.

Ms Gardiner said that the
juvenile had made a com-
ment to the effect that some-
one was going to die that
day.

She said that according to
witnesses, Davis was on a hill
talking to a group of girls
when the fight began.

Ms Gardiner told the
jurors that Davis had no
weapon and ran to the fight
to act as a peacemaker.

According to witnesses,
she said, Davis had held
Francis’ hand and told him
to stop the fight, but Francis
had pushed him away and

stabbed him with a silver
coloured blade.

Davis died from a four to
five inch stab wound to the
chest. Ms Gardiner told the
jury that the juvenile is
charged because he adopt-
ed Francis’ actions and hit
Davis with a bottle after
Francis had stabbed him.

Attorney Michael Hanna,
who is representing Francis,
told the jury that the prose-
cution had not discharged its
burden of proof and high-
lighted the fact that the
Crown had closed its case
without calling some 15 wit-
nesses.

Mr Hanna noted that in
his unsworn statement, Fran-
cis had claimed that Davis
had been the one with the
knife.

The juvenile’s attorney
Romona Farquharson told
the jury her client had noth-
ing to do with Davis’ mur-
der and was leaving Cabbage
Beach when the fight broke
out.

She told the court that out
of the 15 witnesses who took
the stand, only three had giv-
en testimony relating to her
client.

Ms Farquharson noted
that pathologist Dr Govin-
da Raju had identified no
injuries on the deceased that
were consistent with him
having been hit with a bottle.

Justice Jon Isaacs is
expected to give his summa-
tion of the case when the tri-
al resumes this morning at
10 o'clock.



July Independence Specials
rela le Od [le llel eer

a a |




The Tribune
wants to hear
from people who

in their
neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are
raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for

Share your news

: (=
are making news

improvements in the area or have
won an award. If so, call us on
322-1986 and share your story.



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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NASA aiming for
space shuttle
launch totlay

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

NASA is hoping the weath-

er finally cooperates for its
sixth launch attempt for
space shuttle Endeavour,
according to Associated
Press.

Endeavour is poised to
take off for the international
space station early Wednes-

astronauts. Forecasters put
the odds of good weather at
60 percent.

Thunderstorms have
delayed the mission three
times and hydrogen gas leaks
have caused two delays.
Endeavour holds the final
piece of Japan’s space lab,
which should have flown last
month.

NASA must launch
Endeavour by Wednesday —
possibly Thursday if man-
agers agree to shorten the
flight. Otherwise, the shuttle
will have to step aside for a
Russian supply run to the
space station. That would
bump the shuttle launch to
July 26.

Successful education is the
result of factors we control

: By JANYNE M HODDER
i President College of

? Bahamas

day evening, along with seven :

| HANK you for allow-
ing me space in your

i newspaper to respond to an
? editorial published in The Tri-
? bune on Thursday July 9, 2009.
i I write to present a different
i view from the one which was
i? expressed, one which suggested
? that we need to accept that not
? all children are academically
: gifted and that we would do
i better to accept that many stu-
i dents cannot succeed academi-
: cally and should be directed to
? menial jobs which we, in turn,
? should value rather than to
: demand higher performance
i from our education system. I
? challenge this view on several
i grounds.

YOUR SAY

First, it suggests that poor
academic performance is some-
how the consequence of innate
characteristics in the learners
and that successful secondary
education is not an attainable
goal for most students. Why
would this be true for Bahami-
ans and not for citizens of oth-
er countries which assume sec-
ondary education to the mini-
mum level of attainment
expected for anyone with nor-
mal ability? Indeed, over and
over, research has demonstrat-
ed that successful secondary
education is the result of a
number of factors upon which

ml ae a AN ue



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Dion Foulkes (Labour) in a brisk Independence walk. Pictured from left are D’Andrea McClure, Police
Cadet; Lynell Thurston, Police Cadet; Dr Hubert Minnis, Minister of Health; Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham; H Campbell Cleare, attorney; Azaria Clare, Miss Global Bahamas; Senator Dion Foulkes, Minister
of Labour and Social Development, and his son, Dion William.

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we do have control. These are,
among others, the quality of
teaching, the quality of the cur-
riculum, the aspiration level of
parents and the expectation lev-
el of the educational system
and the society. Poor students
typically do worse but this is
not a consequence of their abil-
ity and many poor students do
achieve. For too many, howev-
er, it is a consequence of pover-
ty itself: coming to school hun-
gry and tired, having no place
to study, having disengaged and
inattentive parents, having
teachers who accept failure,
having no dream that life
tomorrow could be better than
it is today and not seeing any
link between life inside and out-
side the classroom. Clearly, the
education system can act on
such factors and has the oblig-
ation to do so.

What if the essential prob-
lem of education lay not with
the students but with us and
our outdated assumptions
about how learning occurs? In a
world where young people mas-
ter computer games, Facebook,
Twitter and texting, where they
are fascinated by the complex
computer-generated special
effects of popular movies and
commercials, where they use
new codes to communicate,
how dreary the classroom
where the preferred mode of
instruction is chalk and talk. No
wonder students might fidget.

The successful classroom of
today is more likely the place
where all are actively engaged,
working on problems in teams
and small groups, experiment-
ing, talking and creating.

A place where students are
learning to think through a
math problem, to argue and
debate a story, to grow a gar-
den and watch compost take
shape, to stage a play, to write
and perform a song, to swim
on the reef and understand the
effects of climate change on our
fragile ecosystem — a place
where you do something, not
one where something is done
to you. I am sure there are
many such classrooms across
The Bahamas as there are
many teachers who foster high
levels of student learning.
Indeed, we have seen the
results of such work in the
many successful students and
alumni at The College who
have come through public
schools. We must find and
champion such teachers and
make their classrooms the mod-
els for others to emulate.

Second, the idea that sec-
ondary education is only for the
‘talented’ assumes that the
Bahamas of tomorrow has a
place in which uneducated
masses can make a decent liv-

AYN an ete b)) se



ing. How can we hold that
assumption when everyone else
in the world recognises that
only those societies that pro-
vide highly skilled human cap-
ital will be able to ensure sus-
tainable development? How
can we face the challenges of a
global and integrated economy,
of the kind already under
development as a result of the
EPA and growing in both the
tourism and financial services
sectors as a result of the cur-
rent economic crisis, if we do
not commit as a matter of
national urgency and impor-
tance to increasing the educa-
tion attainment of the next gen-
eration? Refusing to face this
challenge head on is akin to
burying one’s head in the sand
and hoping that tomorrow will
look like yesterday. It won’t.

If we are to have employees
who deliver more than good
enough performance, they need
to have the new basic skills: the
ability to communicate effec-
tively, the ability to think criti-
cally, the ability to solve prob-
lems and to work in teams, the
ability to work comfortably
with new information and com-
munication technologies.
Indeed, car mechanics today
need more than a wrench and a
good arm. They need to under-
stand the complex computer
systems that now are part of
cars.

In Grand Bahama today, the
stevedores of the past have
been replaced by operators
atop huge straddlers who use
sophisticated computer systems
to locate and move containers
across the port.

Third, it is not only improved
performance at secondary level
that we require but increased
participation in post-secondary
education if we are to compete
successfully in this new global
world. According to UNESCO,
“the number of students pur-
suing tertiary education has
skyrocketed over the past 37
years, growing five-fold from
28.6 million in 1970 to 152.5
million in 2007. This translates
into an average annual increase
of 4.6 per cent, with the average
number of tertiary students
doubling every fifteen years.”
How are we performing against
this global trend? Again,

according to UNESCO statis-
tics, the tertiary gross enrol-
ment ratio in Europe and North
America — a measure of partic-
ipation for the population of
students for the five years after
high school — has grown from
30 per cent in 1970 to 71 per
cent in 2007. In Latin America
and the Caribbean, this ratio
has grown from 6 per cent to
34 per cent, in East Asia and
the Pacific, from 7 per cent to
26 per cent and on and on.
While the study does not report
directly on The Bahamas, we
understand that participation
rates for the 18-24-year-old
population in The Bahamas
hovers around 14 per cent,
putting us, a relatively wealthy
nation, only above some of the
poorest countries in sub-Saha-
ran Africa (5.6 per cent) and in
South and West Asia (11 per
cent).

Finally, education today is
not about remembering dates
of history or memorising poems
or even reading the classics —
though all of these might be of
value and interest. There is
simply too much knowledge
growing at too rapid a rate for
any education system to aspire
to teach all the knowledge you
need to know. Education today
is about learning how to learn.
It is about preparing graduates
to communicate effectively, to
reflect on their lives, to think
critically, to be creative, to solve
problems and to be engaged
and active citizens. Some of
these may then choose to be
highly-skilled air-conditioning
technicians who assist in help-
ing us to reduce energy costs, or
competent horticulturists run-
ning landscaping companies
that make better use of green
technologies, or members of
any other professions which
require the use of both hands
and mind — mechanics, den-
tists, musicians and surgeons
among others.

The distinction between
those who work with their
hands and those who work with
their minds no longer holds.
We need people who can do
both. Adding value to goods
and services is the only way to
build the future Bahamians
across the archipelago have a
right to expect, and we will only
add value if we have the highly-
skilled human capital to do this
—in any field.

Failure to meet this challenge
is to condemn the next genera-
tion to environmental degrada-
tion, to poverty, to poor public
health and to increased levels of
crime. If sustainable develop-
ment means meeting the needs
of today while protecting the
capacity of future generations,
then higher levels of educa-
tional attainment must be our
top priority.

¢ Janyne M Hodder, BA,
MA, DCL (Hon), is president
of the College of the
Bahamas).

ea NG ReU atu

vice-president Francis Dimitri.
By GENA GIBBS

MEMBERS of Alliance
Francaise called on Gover-
nor General Arthur D Han-
na for brief cultural exchange
session.

They introduced their new
president, Nathalie Feix-
Scott, and presented the gov-
ernor general with a CD of
French folk music by icon
Charles Trenet.



FROM LEFT ARE: Dominique LeFevre, Honorary Consul Thierry Boeuf, Governor General Arthur Hanna,
Alliance Frangaise president Nathalie Feix- Scott, treasurer and administrator Italia Watkins-Jan, and

Alliance Francaise also
invited Mr Hanna to partici-
pate in its cultural activities,
the most popular being the
Cine Club which showcases
French movies with English
subtitles.

The Hanna family has
been part of the Alliance
Francaise for some time, not-
ed treasurer and administra-
tor, Italia Watkins-Jan.

“Since Bahamians can

Derek Smith



travel to France without a
tourist visa, it is a good time
for cultural exchanges
between the two countries,”
she said.

French Consul Marc-Olivi-
er Gendry presented his Let-
ters of Credence as France’s
new ambassador to the
Bahamas on May 21.

There are about 200
French ex-pats in the
Bahamas.
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 7



AMERICAN BOAT CAPTAIN SURVIVES SHARK ATTACK

LUCKY TO BE ALIVE

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

AMERICAN boat Captain
John Cooper is lucky to be
alive after surviving a shark
attack sparked when a diver
panicked and speared the
predator in the head.

According to reports on
WSVN Channel 7 News,
Cooper was spearfishing with
a group of people in waters
off Grand Bahama on Satur-
day when the reef shark
attacked him.

He sustained a huge gash to
the leg.

Mr Cooper has been taking
people spear fishing in the
Bahamas for 20 years.

“The guys panicked and got
a little close, and out of self-
defence shot the shark in the
head and it went crazy,” he
said, adding that this was
when the six foot shark bit
him.

Mr Cooper, who decided
against being treated in
Freeport, is now recovering in
a Florida hospital.

Channel 7 TV news
reporter Don Kavara said Mr
Cooper was taken to hospital
in Freeport, but decided to
board a friend’s plane for the
55-minute flight to Miami
International Airport.

On Sunday, Grand Bahama
Police confirmed the incident.
ASP Edmund Rahming said
the victim had refused treat-

A STOCK PICTURE of a reef shark. American boat captain John Cooper was attacked by a similar shark while spearfishing.

ment at the hospital in
Freeport and had left the
country.

Upon Mr Cooper’s arrival
at Miami International Air-
port, he was taken by ambu-

lance to Jackson Memorial
Hospital for surgery.
The surgeon said Mr Coop-

New plan to improve bidding
process for school repairs

Strategy to boost transparency and competitiveness

TO increase transparency
and competitiveness in the
bidding process for the yearly
summer school repairs, the
Ministry of Education yester-
day announced a new plan to
award contracts.

The contracts are valued at
more than $50,000 and the
total value of work that will
be awarded by the way of this
enhanced process will be $3
million.

On Monday government
began gazetting notices in the
daily newspapers inviting
interested qualified contrac-
tors, builders, plumbers and
electricians to tender for the
award of school repair con-
tracts in designated islands
throughout the country.

Said the ministry: “All ten-
ders will be independently
evaluated and awarded by the
Tenders Board, not by the
Ministry of Education and/or
the Ministry of Public Works
and Transport.

“There will no longer as a
general rule, be any negotiat-
ed bids with contractors.

“Any qualified contractor
will have the right to obtain
scopes of works and to make
an offer to perform the work,
which bids will be fairly and
independently considered.”

The gazetted notice invites

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

“All tenders will
be independently
evaluated and
awarded by the
Tenders Board, not
by the Ministry of
Education and/or
the Ministry of
Public Works and
Transport.”



tenders for school repair work
exceeding a value of $50,000
in Abaco, Andros

Eleuthera, Grand Bahama,
New Providence and San Sal-
vador.

All school summer repair
work will have to be complet-
ed within a four-week time
frame.

All tenders in the designat-
ed Family Islands and Grand
Bahama should be delivered
to the respective island admin-
istrators’ offices by 10am on
Friday, July 17.

All tenders for work in
New Providence should be
delivered to the office of the
Financial Secretary at the

same time on the same date.
All tenders will be opened at
the Ministry of Finance in
Nassau, and at the Family
Island administrators’ offices
in the respective Family
Islands and Grand Bahama.

“The general public should
be reminded that the Ministry
of Education has again this
year, forwarded roughly
$100,000 to each school dis-
trict in the Family Islands, for
a total of $1 million, for the
award of small-scale summer
repair work throughout the
Family Islands. These con-
tracts are awarded by local
government authorities in con-
sultation with the District
Superintendents of the Min-
istry of Education, and the
school principals,” the min-
istry said.

The award of these small-
scale local contracts is gov-
erned by the due diligence and
transparent requirements of
the Financial Administration
and Audit Act, which requires
the obtaining of three bids
from different contractors, in
respect of every contract
awarded by local government
authorities as outlined.

The Ministry of Education
in New Providence is not in
any way involved in the eval-
uation of bids, the award of

OPT esrb

rele

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd



contracts or the assessment of
the quality of the work.

“This new initiative gov-
erning the award of larger-
scale contracts for school sum-
mer repairs is yet another step
towards enhanced trans-
parency in the process of gov-
ernment procurement, and is
yet another major step made
by the Ministry of Education
over the past year to comply
with the announced policy of
the government to implement
all of the recommendations
made by the Crown Agents in
their review of government
procurement, which was com-
pleted in 2006,” the ministry
said.

“The general public should
also be reminded that this is
another step towards greater
transparency in the issuance
of government contracts by
the Ministry of Education that
took place earlier when, for
the first time, the ministry ear-
lier this year invited public
tenders for school busing con-
tracts.

“In respect of these con-
tracts the bids have been
received. The in-house evalu-
ations have been conducted,
and the Tenders Board should
be making its recommenda-
tions in the near future.”



er was “very lucky”.
“A centimeter one way or
the other could have cut a



“A centimeter
one way or the
other could
have cuta
major artery or
nerve. Most of
the skin was
still intact and
we managed to
stretch it to
cover pretty
much the
wound.”



major artery or nerve. Most
of the skin was still intact and
we managed to stretch it to
cover pretty much the
wound,” said the surgeon.

Mr Kavara said that a simi-
lar attack occurred in the
Bahamas in May. The victim,
American Luis Fernandez,
was also spearfishing.

Mr Cooper said the attack
will not deter him from
spearfishing.

He suggested that as a result
of the spread of shark feed-
ing operations, sharks are
becoming more aggressive and
less fearful of people.

NOTICE

Mohs Surgery in Nassau

DR. JOHN STRASSWIMMER, MOHS SURGEON
will be visiting The Skin Centre on Friday
July 17, 2009. Or Strasswimmer trained at
Harvard and Yale and is Board Certified and a
Fellow of the Mohs College.

Mohs Micrographic Surgery

is an advanced

treatment process for skin cancer which is
now offered at The Skin Centre. It offers the

highest possible cure

rate for many skin

cancers and simultaneously minimizes the
sacrifice of mormal tissue. This cutting-edge

treatment

requires

highly specialized

physicians that serve as surgeon, pathologist
and reconstructive surgeon,

Our visiting Mohs Surgeon has extensive

expenence — in

the

Mohs Micrographic

Procedure. The technique is used to remove
the two most common forms of skin cancer:

basal cell
carcinoma.

carcinoma and squamous cell

For more information, please contact:
The Skin Centre, Harbour Bay Plaza,
East Bay Street Tel, 393-7546.



British High Commission Kingston
NOTICE TO BRITISH CITIZENS

The Vice Consul for The Bahamas (based in Kingston, Jamaica)
will visit Nassau on Thursday, 23rd July, 2009 and will be
available to discuss any individual problems concerning
passports and nationality issues.

Passport applications and renewals should continue to be sent
by courier direct to the High Commission in Kingston.

Appointments can be made by calling the Honorary Consul
in Nassau on 324-4089.


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FNM candidates
FROM page one

According to
the information
reaching The
Tribune, there
are currently
five cabinet min-
isters who have
reportedly
expressed their
desire to chal-
lenge deputy
Prime Minister
Brent Symon-
ette for his post.

These names include, but are
not limited to Dr Hubert Min-
nis, Zhivargo Laing, Tommy
Turnquest, Carl Bethel, and
Dion Foulkes.

In addition to these Ministers,
there is also a minister of state,
Branville McCartney who has
been considered by many to be
the “dark horse” of the party
who, despite his popularity with
the public, may face a consider-
able battle to win this deputy
leadership post inside the party.

Since the pronouncements of
former deputy prime minister
Frank Watson that Prime Minis-
ter Ingraham was the only per-
son fit to lead the party at this
time, there has been speculation
as to the future of the FNM and
its leadership going forward.

Directly dismissing many of
the old would-be leaders within
the party, Mr Watson said that
unless someone were to come
out of the blue, “we would wel-
come the prime minister staying
for some further period of time.”

While Mr Symonette current-
ly holds the most support within
the FNM to follow Mr Ingraham,
there still remains an opposition
to the St Anne’s representative’s
skin colour, which may contin-
ue to be an issue for him.

Prime Minister Ingraham
became leader of the FNM in
1990 and served as prime minis-
ter from 1992 to 2002, when he
stepped down as head of the par-
ly

Brent Symonette

Tommy Turnquest, current
National Security Minister, won
a hotly contestant leadership
race to succeed Mr Ingraham,
but was defeated in the 2002
election by PLP leader Perry
Christie.

Previously, Mr Ingraham had
said he intended to serve only
two consecutive terms as leader,
but returned to the party’s
helm in late 2005 after requests
from his supporters and is
currently serving his third, non-
consecutive term as Prime Min-
ister.



: FROM page one

? be lopsided with one company exhausting
? the resources of the other. Apparently
? CAP’s initials instructions from the Min-
i istry to “show M&R Road Builders how to
? construct roads” ultimately tied the experi-
? enced firm with a company that nearly
i ruined it.

CAP complained to the Minister of

? Works that M&R was falling short in equip-
? ment and that the company had no road
? building experience prior to the compulso-
i ry arrangement.

The relationship with M&R began to

? deteriorate several weeks into the project
: when payment requests from CAP were
? not being honoured by M&R, it was
i? claimed.

Following several alleged financial trans-

actions by M&R, the principals of CAP felt
? they were forced to terminate M&R’s ser-
vices in March 2007, two months before the

Road paving issues

May general election.

Following the termination CAP felt that
M&R used every available opportunity to
denigrate, insult and sully its company’s
reputation not only to the residents of Ack-
lins, but also to government officials, officers
and agents of the Ministry of Works, while
holding CAP completely responsible for
every delay and/or drawback experienced
throughout the course of this assignment.

The ministry under the former PLP gov-
ernment instructed CAP to continue work
on the project which it did using personal
funds to assist with expenses right up until
July 2007 when under the new administra-
tion the company received a letter from the
ministry advising the company that all work
was to be suspended until further review. At
that point the road had been scarified, in
other words its top surface had been
removed, but not replaced. It has further

deteriorated.

In a press conference last Wednesday
MICAL MP V Alfred Gray hit out at gov-
ernment accusing it of only arranging to
repair the “better part” of Acklins’ dilapi-
dated Queen’s Highway while leaving the
worst part — the part worked on by the
joint venture team — in ruins.

He said residents across Acklins are
inconvenienced by the “impassable” 25 to 30
mile southern section of the road, but resi-
dents in the south, where the majority of his
PLP supporters live, are the most badly
affected.

Mr Gray said he was “enraged” upon
seeing the Ministry of Works’ advertise-
ment which only called for tenders to repair
the northern part of the road.

However, the road work that the FNM
government has announced for the north is
the completion of an agreement left in place
by the PLP. It was the PLP that had nego-
tiated the Acklins road works with the Euro-
pean Union (EU). The EU has to approve

all contracts for the repair and upgrade of
roads that use EU money. The FNM is now
trying to complete this road negotiated
under the PLP.

The road works under these negotiations
were divided into three parts. The one now
being finalised under this agreement is the
Northern Acklins Road. A part of this con-
tract with money from the European Union,
includes repair of a part of the road on
Ragged Island in addition to a new dock
and the upgrade of the airport for that
island.

Before this misadventure with M&R,
Caribbean Asphalt from 1994-1998, under
the FNM government, had successfully con-
structed more than 34 miles of road in
Crooked Island and extended the Ragged
Island Airstrip to more than 4,000 miles.

Both projects on completion were thor-
oughly inspected and approved not only by
the Ministry of Works, but also by engi-
neers and agents from the Department of
Aviation and Transport.

FROM page one

“They are little children, and
if somebody threatened them
it’s possible they wouldn’t want
to tell.”

Speculation was sparked
when Ms Clarke’s cousin
reported hearing a motorboat
pull into the Kemp’s Bay area at
around 2am on the morning
they were found and media
reports claimed the 3,000 square
mile forest is a hideout for drug
lords managing large scale mar-
iyuana plantations in the woods.

A police search supported by
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force, the US Coast Guard, and
the community, was scaled
down when nothing was found
two weeks after the boys disap-
peared, but Ms Clarke said she
always believed the boys were
still alive.

She said: “I knew they were
living, I thought they might
have been kidnapped, but I
knew they were alive.

“Tam glad to have them back
now but I think there’s a little
bit more in the back of it.

“They’re living and they’re
safe, but I want to know what
happened.”

Ms Clarke said Deangelo told
her how Marcell fell in the hole
and when he reached in to pull
him out, he fell in behind him.

But while Deangelo had the
strength to climb out, his
younger brother did not. They
slept in the cave, which provid-
ed shelter from the rain, and
during the day Deangelo would
search for food, water and the
way home. But Deangelo said
they were only there for a few
days, while Marcell maintains
they were there longer.

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Were my sons

Ms Clarke said: “I think the
little one didn’t realise it was
only a couple of days. I think
the big one is probably telling
the truth, because I feel like he’s
old enough to know the differ-
ence between a month and a
couple of days.

“Right now it doesn’t make
much sense and there is proba-
bly something else to it, but I
need to give them some time to
catch themselves before we will
get the whole story.”

Ms Clarke said Deangelo told
her how Marcell pulled himself
out of the hole when they heard
dogs barking, and they followed
the sound of the dogs straight to
the road at around 6am on Sun-
day. They have also said they
climbed a tree out of the cave to
find their way to the road.

They then approached two
American men at a nearby
house and asked for mangoes
and coco plums before heading
off together to find their way
home.

Deangelo, who lives in
Smith’s Hill, Andros, with his
grandmother Olgarean Clarke,
67, lost about 30lbs during the
time he was missing, and his
brother Marcell, who lives with
his mother in Kemp Road, Nas-
sau, and was visiting his grand-
mother in Andros, is thought to
have lost even more weight.

They are being treated at
Princess Margaret Hospital for
dehydration and are expected
to be released next week.

Police say they are still inves-
tigating the incident and are
keeping an open mind about
what happened.





ST Tg

+ Conditions appl * Fadarrerk of The Bank of Nona Seti, use under cence
BSOTO8

FROM page one

Mountbatten House on West Hill
Street with multiple stab wounds.

Prosecutor Neil Brathwaite
made the application to close the
Crown’s case without calling six
remaining witnesses. Twenty-four
witnesses have testified. Senior
Justice Anita Allen granted leave
to the Crown to close its case.
Attorneys met in a closed hearing
in the absence of the jury yester-
day afternoon.

Lead investigator in the case
ASP Leon Bethel testified yes-
terday that he went to Mount-
batten House around 9.15 am on
November 18, 2007 and there
spoke to crime scene investiga-
tors. ASP Bethel said he entered
the residence and saw blood
stains on a railing leading upstairs.
He also testified that there was
blood on the upstairs floor. ASP
Bethel told the court that in the
upstairs bedroom, he observed
the partially nude body of a man
with multiple stab wounds. ASP
Bethel told the court that he
observed blood stains and splat-
tered blood all over the room. He
told the court that he also
observed blood stains on the
upstairs bathroom door, face
bowl, toilet bowl and floor.

ASP Bethel testified that after
receiving additional information
from Inspector Kenroy Ferguson,
he and several other officers con-
ducted unsuccessful searches for
McNeil. He told the court that he

Dwight Major

FROM page one

months he served in the Bahamas after the extradition
order was filed against him in 2003. ;
This along with the 15 per cent usually taken off }
sentences in the US for good behaviour means that }
Major could be released in just over a year anda }
half — even less if he offers to serve his time in the }

Bahamas.

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday in his office at }
Police Headquarters, Mr Ferguson said that the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force will not be targeting Major
when he is released from prison in what is expected to
be less than 18 months. In addition Mr Ferguson said }
the police do not want to address speculation that }
there could be an increase in drug related crime or }
“reprisals” for any plea bargain that may or may not }

have been reached.

“See I do not want to prejudge a situation andI do }
not want us to speculate on what may or may not }
happen because I think that might even contribute to }
the problem in our society. And so we have to be care- }
ful how we comment on things as they happen.

“If we know what the sentence has been for this
young man and we see what the possibilities are with }
him being back in society, but who is to say that he }
does not become a Christian and start keeping }

church? We do not know.

“But certainly if it were to occur that he is back in }
society and is involved in breaking the law, our jobis }
still to enforce the law. That is what we will have to do. }
If he is in breach of any laws in this Commonwealth ;
of the Bahamas, we have the responsibility to enforce }
the law, and it will be enforced against him or anybody }
else who breaks the law,” Mr Ferguson said. i

The Commissioner added, however, that the Police :
Force will not be approaching Mr Major with any }
particular focus or attention as it is truly up to him }
what kind of lifestyle he will engage in after his release

into Bahamian society.

“See we don’t want to give the impression that we
are targeting people, because the man was in breach
of certain laws of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas }
and other places. He has been dealt with. There isa i
penalty involved which he has to satisfy. Once that has }
happened then he is freed back into society.

“Except he behaves in a way that warrants law }
enforcement to be enforcing the law against him, he }
is free to live in society. He is not being singled out.
Anybody who is in breech of the law will get the }
attention of the police. Anyone. So we don’t want to }
appear as though we are targeting an innocent person, }
but certainly if anybody is in breach of the law we will
be taking the appropriate action all the time.” i

FROM page one

outcome is at the Coroner's
Court which will make a deci-
sion as to whether the matter
will be sent to the Attorney
General's Office with certain
recommendations, and then cer-
tain instructions will come down
to the police as to what direc-
tion to take," Mr Ferguson told
The Tribune yesterday.

Knowles, 15, was found
hanged in his cell with what
appeared to be a string from his
shorts tied around his neck on
May 31. Police initially ruled
the death an apparent suicide.

He had been in custody for a
little over three days.

But Ms Wilson challenged
the police's version of the
events and charged that if her
son had killed himself while in
police custody then the RBPF
should be found culpable of
neglect.

"Whatever happened in that

Prosecution closes case

went to Miami, Florida, on July 3
and visited the office of Home-
land Security where he saw
McNeil and identified himself as
a police officer.

ASP Bethel testified that he
next saw McNeil at the Central
Detective Unit around 11.32 am
on August 15, 2008. ASP Bethel
said he spoke to McNeil in the
presence of his attorneys, Alex
Morley and Simone Smith. He
said he cautioned McNeil by
telling him that he did not have to
say anything and if he did it
would be written down and could
be used as evidence in court. ASP
Bethel said he told McNeil that
he had information that he had
gone to Mountbatten House,
attacked Taylor and stabbed him
about the body, causing his death.
According to ASP Bethel,
McNeil responded that he had no
comment on the advice of his
attorneys. ASP Bethel said that
McNeil responded similarly to
some 60 other questions.

ASP Bethel told the court that
on August 17, 2008, he received
information from the police
forensic lab and charged McNeil
the following day with Taylor’s
murder.

During cross-examination by
McNeil’s attorney, Murrio
Ducille, Mr Bethel was asked
whether he had received a report
from the DNA lab on August 18.
ASP Bethel told the court that

he had received no written DNA
analysis report on that day, but
had received a verbal report
which he made a note of on the
case file. Mr Ducille went on to
suggest to ASP Bethel that on
August 18, 2007, he had not one
scintilla of evidence to charge
McNeil.

ASP Bethel did not agree with
the suggestion saying that police
did have evidence.

Inspector Solomon Cash testi-
fied yesterday that around noon
on August 14, 2008, he was on
duty at the Lynden Pindling
International airport when
McNeil was handed over by US
Immigration and Customs agents
Hector and Alex Gonzales.
Inspector Cash said he arrested
McNeil and told him that he was
suspected of Taylor’s murder.
Inspector Cash told the court that
McNeil did not reply. Inspector
Cash told the court that he was
also present in the interview suite
at the Central Detective Unit
when ASP Bethel asked McNeil a
series of questions in the pres-
ence of his attorneys. He said that
McNeil did not answer the ques-
tions, but stated that on the
advice of his attorneys he had no
comment. Inspector Cash said
that he was also present at CDU
on August 18, when ASP Bethel
charged McNeil with Taylor’s
murder. The trial resumes this
morning at 11 am.

Police awaiting US clearance

FROM page one

after her mother’s death, which is likely to have
occurred around two months ago, but sometime
before the 33-year-old’s badly decomposed body
was discovered in a bushy area off Fox Hill Road
south on Saturday, July 4, 2009.

Bahamian Zyndall McKinney, 22, said to be
the teenager’s boyfriend, was arraigned in court
last Thursday charged with intentionally causing
the death of 33-year-old Garrison, a resident of
West Palm Beach, Florida, whilst “concerned
with another.”

Yesterday Paul Jukic, political officer at the
USS. Embassy in Nassau, said he would be unable
to provide any update from the U.S. side on where
the efforts to get to Madison stand, referring The

Tribune to the RBPF. Bahamian police stated

last week that it was in conjunction with the USS.
Embassy in Nassau and the U.S. government’s
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) that they
were seeking to locate “an American relative”
of Garrison’s who they suspect also might have
taken “part in her death”.

Meanwhile, the family of one of Ms Garrison’s
ex-husbands, also the father and custodian of a 10-
year-old son whom she abandoned at birth, told

The Tribune over the weekend that they had not

paper.

him.

heard of her death until contacted by this news-

According to the family, the child Garrison
had with the Delaware man had not seen his
mother since she left him at 10 months old and the
family had, up until hearing of her death, been
hoping that they could have persuaded her to
return to the United States to spend time with

“He’d just reached the stage where he was get-
ting curious about who his mum is,” said the

child’s grandmother. She claimed Garrison had

child.

she died.

Teen’s death

cell we don't know, the public
don't know, the nation don't
know. Only Michael and God
can tell me the truth," she told
The Tribune yesterday.

After Michael's death a
woman who claimed to be jailed
in a cell near his claimed she
overheard Michael threaten to
kill himself. She also claimed
she called out to the police to
alert them.

According to published
reports, an order of protection
was also served on authorities
last month prohibiting them
from interfering with another
teen that the family's lawyer,
Keod Smith, claims is a poten-
tial witness to Michael's death.

Mr Smith claimed the 14-
year-old boy, who was arrested
with Knowles in connection
with suspected housebreaking,
had allegedly been intimidated
by police after he was released

been concerned that if she returned to the area she
would be arrested by authorities for leaving the

“We told her that that’s her child and if she
wanted to see him she had nothing to worry
about,” added the relative.

Garrison first came to police attention in The
Bahamas on February 25, 2009, when they
received a missing persons report from the Unit-
ed States Embassy in Nassau stating that she may
have been “in the company of a Bahamian male.”

Police are still awaiting the results of an autop-
sy conducted on her body that will tell them how

on bail, published reports state.

Ms Wilson, who is still haunt-
ed by nightmares over son's
death, said she too fears police
may target her because of her
public challenge of their
account of her son's death.

The cash-strapped single
mother said that although her
son's body had been released
to the family for two weeks the
funeral was postponed because
of her financial challenges.

She said the funeral will be
paid for through donations
raised by her MP Cynthia
“Mother” Pratt and assistance
from her two sisters.

Ms Wilson said the funeral
home had reduced the cost of
the funeral from around $6,000
to $3,000.

She said her son's burial plot
was paid for by the Department
of Social Services. The funeral
is planned for 11 am Thursday
at the Praise and Worship
Church on Ragged Island
Street.
THE TRIBUNE

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 9





Bahamas
set to host

Caribbean

JUDO athletes from Barba-
dos, Puerto Rico, The Cayman
Islands, the Dutch Antilles and
the Bahamas are expected to
face off this weekend in the
Caribbean Judo Cup.

The 1pm to 4pm event is set
to be held at Loyola Hall,
Gladstone Road, on July 18.

Trials were held over the
weekend to determine who
would represent the Bahamas
against its Caribbean neigh-
bours.

The team will consist of
Wellington Mullings (73Kg),
Chrisnell Cooper (78 Kg),
D’Arcy Rahming Jr (66 Kg),
Cynthia Rahming (52 Kg), and
Nathan Williams (48 Kg).

Open

There will also be an open
tournament in which about 50
Bahamian and US athletes are
expected to attend.

In preparation for the event,
top US coach Gerald Lafon has
been busy training Bahamian
athletes at an intensive train-
ing camp.

He has also been running a
national coaches course in
which all Bahamas Judo Fed-
eration (BJF) schools are tak-
ing part.

"I am pleased to see the
cooperation between schools
of the (BJF). Coaches seem to
be eager to learn what steps
are necessary to take the
Bahamas to the next level,"
said Coach Lafon. "The ath-
letes in the training camp have

improved significantly since I
was here a year ago."

The course is being held at
Island Jujutsu on Carmichael
Road and All Star Family Cen-
ter, Joe Farrington Road.





TRIALS were held over the week-
end to determine who would rep-
resent the Bahamas against its
Caribbean neighbours. The team
will consist of Wellington
Mullings (73Kg), Chrisnell Coop-
er (78 Kg), D’Arcy Rahming Jr
(66 Kg), Cynthia Rahming (52
Kg), and Nathan Williams (48
Kg).

YOUNG judo athletes take part
ina training camp...

Photos courtesy
of the Bahamas
Judo Federation

Cavendish wins 10th Tour stage

Bg By JEROME PUGMIRE
AP Sports Writer

ISSOUDUN, France (AP) —
Teammates Alberto Contador and
Lance Armstrong remained second
and third in the Tour de France after
a technology-free day of riding in
which Britain’s Mark Cavendish won
the 10th stage.

Organizers banned rider earpieces
for Tuesday’s 121-mile route, forcing
cyclists to devise tactics without radio
instructions from team cars.

Rinaldo Nocentini of Italy kept the
leader’s yellow jersey on a flat route
favoring sprinters. Contador crossed
the line in 40th place. Armstrong, the
seven-time champion, finished in the
main pack at 46th. Overall, Nocentini
stayed six seconds ahead of Contador
and eight in front of Armstrong.

Armstrong is coming out of 3 1/2
years of retirement and chasing an
eighth Tour title. Contador is aiming
for a second title after winning in 2007.
The Spanish mountain specialist was
unable to defend his title last year
because his Astana team was barred
from the race because of doping scan-
dals.

Cavendish edged Thor Hushovd of
Norway in a sprint finish, breaking
ahead in the final 200 yards. It was
the British sprinter’s third stage victory
of this Tour and seventh of his career.
Tyler Farrar of the United States fin-
ished third.

“Tt was a really hard finish, slightly
uphill with a lot of corners,” said
Cavendish, who rides for Team
Columbia-High Road, said. “I was
scared that I attacked too early but
(teammate Mark) Renshaw helped
me a lot.”

The Tour hoped to inject drama
into this race by eliminating earpieces
in the 10th and 13th stages. Many rid-
ers — Armstrong, Contador and
Nocentini among them — criticized
the decision.

“T think that for us and for the
whole team it is not a good thing,”
Nocentini said. “We spoke about the
earpieces before the start. The fact is
for us it’s dangerous not to have them.
There are dangers on the road.”

Armstrong joked about the matter
as he got off his Astana team bus and
mounted his bike to go to the start
line.

“T can’t hear anything; I don’t know
anything. ... I feel naked,” the 37-year-
old Texan said. “I think it’s a lot to do
about nothing.”

Astana team director Johan
Bruyneel had campaigned for the ban
to be overturned. But it was upheld



MARK CAVENDISH of Britain reacts as he crosses the finish line to win the 10th stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 194.5 kilometers (120.9 miles) with start in Limo-
ges and finish in Issoudun, central France on Tuesday. Center rear is Thor Hushovd of Norway, wearing the best sprinter's green jersey, who finished second.

and is also scheduled for Friday, a
tricky stage featuring one big climb
and possibly many attacks. Teams are
still pressuring organizers to overturn
the ban.

“My impression is that we’ll have
the radio on Friday,” Armstrong said.

With the backing of the cycling’s
governing body, Tour organizers
decided last month that rider radios
and TV sets in cars would be banned
for two stages. Earlier in the race,
Bruyneel said the Tour was not the
place for such an “experiment.”

Earpieces allow riders to be linked
to directors in team cars. Riders can be
informed of developments and told

when they need to attack or chase rid-
ers in a breakaway.

The strategy was popularized by
Armstrong when he won his first Tour
in 1999. Some riders and former cham-
pions say the tactic makes cycling too
clinical.

“There are arguments to both sides,
to have them or not to have them,”
Armstrong said. “But, on balance, I
think it’s better to have them. In
cycling, we have other, more impor-
tant, things to care about.”

On Tuesday, Thierry Hupond,
Benoit Vaugrenard, Mikhail Ignatiev
and Samuel Dumoulin were caught
following a long breakaway with just

under a mile to go. Cavendish then
turned into the home straightaway
and was pressured by Hushovd but
held on.

“Cavendish is very, very fast, but
it’s true that he also has a very quick
team,” Hushovd said. “I lost four or
five meters (yards) to him in the last
turn.”

Cavendish, who last year won four
stages but did not finish the Tour, was
timed in 4 hours, 46 minutes, 43 sec-
onds.

“We had all nine guys there at the
finish, working 100 percent and deliv-
ering perfectly,” Cavendish said.

Hushovd, who kept the sprinter’s

(AP Photo: Laurent Rebours)

green jersey despite losing points to
Cavendish, and Farrar received the
same time as Cavendish.

With two more flat stages Wednes-
day and Thursday, Cavendish has
Hushovd’s green jersey in his sights.
Hushovd has 147 points and
Cavendish 141.

Cavendish said he feels fresh
because his teammates nursed him
through the Pyrenees mountain stages.

“T hope to win more (stages) in the
next two days,” he said.

¢ AP Sports Writer Samuel Petre-
quin contributed to this report
PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS

Bahamas 5th place at junior
amateur golf championships

THE Bahamas Junior Golf
Association’s national team has
returned with a fifth place finish
after Caribbean Amateur
Junior Golf Championships in
Jamaica last week.

The Bahamas, with its best
showing coming from Benjamin
Davis in the boys’ 14-15 divi-
sion, is now preparing to host

Bulls buy out
F Tim Thomas

CHICAGO (AP) — For-
ward Tim Thomas and the
Chicago Bulls have agreed
on a contract buyout, ending
the veteran's second stint
with the Bulls.

The team announced the
move Tuesday.

Acquired from the New
York Knicks in February,
Thomas averaged 5.8 points
and 2.3 rebounds in 18
games with Chicago. He was
scheduled to make about
$6.4 million next season, but
the Bulls had no room for
him after drafting forwards
James Johnson and Taj Gib-
son last month.

The 32-year old Thomas
has averaged 11.6 points and
4.1 rebounds for six teams
in 12 years. He was also
dealt from the Knicks to the
Bulls before the 2005-06 sea-
son, but played just three
games for Chicago and was
waived the following March.

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



next year’s championships.

The Bahamas accumulated a
total of 93 points at the three-
day competition between nine
participating countries for the
Hank James Trophy.

Winning the title was Puerto
Rico with 158. Trinidad &
Tobago got second with 136 fol-
lowed by Dominican Republic
with 122 and Jamaica with 100.

The competition was held in
three age groups in the boys
and girls. They were 13-and-
under, 14-15 and 16-17.

Davis turned in a three-day
score of 220 (77-71-72) to cart
off the individual title in the
boys 14-15 division. His near-
est rival was Jake Delaney of
Trinidad & Tobago with 223
(74-77-72).

Davis’ teammates Osbourne
Cooper was 15th with 256 (84-
80-92) and Rasheed Robinson
was 17th with 266 (87-89-90).

Denier Weech turned in the
next best individual perfor-
mance for the Bahamas with
sixth place in the girls 13-and-
under. She shot a 103-103-95
for her total of 301.

Puerto Rico’s Yudika
Rodriguez took the divisional
title with rounds of 80-95-86 for
her total of 261.

Asif Robinson, competing in
the boys 13-and-under division,
was eighth with a 265 (93-86-
86). His teammate Harrison
Collins was 11th with 292 (101-
93-98).

The divisional title went to
Frederick Thon of Puerto Rico
with 228 (75-81-72).

Taneka Sandiford, compet-
ing in the girls 14-15 division,
was eighth with a 279 (92-94-
93).

Bijan Lockhart, her team-
mate, was tied with another for
13th, but neither turned in a
card.

Maria Torres of Puerto Rico
won the divisional title with 242
(82-84-76).

In the girls 16-17 division,
Tleah Knowles ended up 10th
after she shot rounds of 110,
110, 94 for her total of 301, just

E—

ahead of teammate Eugenie
Adderley, who shot 304 (110,
100, 94).

And Kyle King has the best
showing of the Bahamian trio
in the boys 16-17. With rounds
of 90-89-86, King shot a 265 for
17th place.

Teammates Charlie Butler
was tied with another for 18th
with 283 (96-90-97) while
Rashad Ferguson’s 285 (96-89-
100) placed him 20th.

Simon Proverbs of Barbados
shot a 226 (82-72-72) to take
the divisional crown.

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Photos by Gavin Collins



ASIF ROBINSON, competing in the boys 13-and-under division, was

eighth with a 265 (93-86-86)...

Under-19
cricket team
heats Argentina
and avoits
relegation

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas’ under-19
team salvaged a less than desir-
able performance at the Inter-
national Cricket Council Amer-
icas Regional tournament, cap-
ping the four-day event with its
only victory.

The team won its final match
against Argentina and, by doing
so, avoided relegation to a low-
er division in the region. It was
the first win for the Bahamas
in the history of the regional
qualifier.

Up first at bat, the Bahamas
scored 187 runs for seven wick-
ets, while Argentina was held
to 88 runs for seven wickets.

The Bahamas took the match
by 57 runs.

Shridat Jadoo led the
Bahamas’ balanced scoring
attack with a game high 34 runs.

Odane Tucker finished with
29, Julio Jameson added 25
Orlando Stuart finished with 23
runs while Marc Taylor finished
with 21.

The Bahamian bowlers dom-
inated Argentina and combined
with efficient defense in the
field, limiting them to just dou-
ble figures in runs.

Taylor, who was also named
“Man of the Match”, took three
wickets while Stuart and Ash-
meid Allie and each took one.

Canada prevailed as tourna-
ment champions after finishing
the tournament undefeated at
5-0, including a 62 run margin of
victory over the US in the semi-
finals.

The Americans finished sec-
ond at 4-1, Bermuda was third
at 3-2, the Bahamas at 1-4 and
Argentina rounded out the field
winless at 0-5.

The US was the tournament’s
leading scorer with a total of
1030 runs, while Canada boast-
ed the top defense, allowing just
409. The Bahamas scored a
total of 421 runs while they gave
up 776.

The team received tourna-
ment acclaim when Stuart fin-
ished second amongst leading
bowlers with 11 wickets.

Christopher Douglas of
Bermuda led the list with 14
wickets.

The Bahamas opened the
tournament with a loss to the
US by 249 runs, 325-79.

In their next match against
the eventual tournament cham-
pions, Canada, the Bahamas
lost by nine wickets.

They fared little better in
their third match of the tourna-
ment, a loss to the Cayman
Islands by eight wickets, and
against Bermuda they lost by
106 runs.

The ICC Americas Regional
Tournament is a bi-annual tour-
nament that is a part of the
council’s international develop-
ment programme.

The Bahamas is scheduled to
host the ICC under 15 Tourna-
ment in Nassau this August.
Teams from the Cayman
Islands and Belize have already
committed to attend.

Tips from a veteran bodybuilder

PAUL Melbourne, a winner
of numerous national titles and
multiple Central American and
Caribbean Championships
medals, provides some impor-
tant tips for competitors in the
Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fit-
ness Federation’s 36th Indepen-
dence National Bodybuilding
Championships.

The championships is sched-
uled for 7:30pm July 18 at the
Centre of Performing Arts on
Shirley Street.

“When a competitor comes
on stage, he/she must come on
stage as though he is the only
competitor. He has to come on
with a lot of excitement,” Mel-
bourne said.

“He must express to the
judges the feeling that there is
nobody better than him on stage.
All too often competitors come
on stage slouchy, not showing
any kind of energy and basically
looking like they don’t want to
compete in the first place even
though they’ve spent months
training for the event.”

Melbourne said the truth of
the matter is that when they
walk on stage, they must make a
statement to the judges that
‘here I am. I have worked for
this many months and I am here
to show you my best.”

“They must form their pose
in the right form or fashion. If



PAUL MELBOURNE

they are showing their thighs, it
is important that they have their
legs in the right position, they
must have their hands in the
right position, they must have
their chin in the right position
and they must have their body
upright and tight.”

Melbourne clarified that the
third most important thing for
the bodybuilder is to remember
that their music must be thrilling
and exciting.

“A lot of guys come out with
music that puts you to sleep,”
he said. “That throws the audi-
ence off. He may be the com-
petitor with the best muscles,
but because his music is not grip-

ping, he could fall down.

“Music is supposed to be filled
with dramatics so that when it
comes on it excites the crowd
and makes them want to see him
and the judges want to see what
he has to offer,” Melbourne said.

Melbourne, who has been
competing since 1982, said many
of the bodybuilders have failed
because they did not adhere to
these categories.

“That is why we are teaching
them to flex their entire body
because many people just flex
the top half of their body and
forget the legs,” he said. “They
must remember their legs as
well.

“They must learn how to
express, how to control, how to
contract their muscles so that
the audience can see the finished
product of their merchandise.”

Melbourne further stated that
the younger builders are eager to
develop themselves for tourna-
ments to come.

“They have showed that they
are good listeners. They ask
senior bodybuilders like myself,
Aaron Green, Raymond Tucker,
Wellington Sears, Nardo Dean
and Paul Wong to assist them in
helping to get all of the mechan-
ics right,” he said.

“T think we should have a very
good crop of senior contenders
at this year’s championships.”
THE TRIBUNE

S

PAGE 1




Tey
. A Cavendish
» wins 10th

Tour stage...





ke
WEDNESDAY, JULY 15,

2009



i a
cao
a] .

—
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lum



— See page 9

‘Golden Girl’ Chandra
takes the No. 2 snot

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

hile the

Bahamas

Association

of Athletic
Associations (BAAA) has
not yet released the
Bahamian team for the
IAAF World Champi-
onships in Athletics, the
elite athletes are making
their presence felt before
the trip to Berlin, Germany,
August 15-23.

At the conclusion of the
Athens Grand Prix track
meet on Monday, veteran
sprinter Chandra Sturrup
climbed to No. 2 on the
World Athletics Tour that
will allow athletes to earn a
berth in the World Athletics
Final in Stuttgart, Germany,
in September.

Despite coming in sixth in
the women’s 100m in
Athens, Sturrup has accu-
mulated a total of 59 points [_
over five meets to trail
Jamaican speedster Kerron |
Stewart, who leads with 88 7
points over five meets as
well.

On Saturday in Rome,
Sturrup turned in her sea-
son’s best of 10.99 seconds,
better only by five other ath-
letes, including three
Jamaicans headed by Stew-
art, who won the race in an
impressive 10.75.

Double national sprint
champion Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie, who has posted
three of the last four meet-
ings between her and Stur-
rup, is sitting at No. 6 on the
world’s list. She did her sea-
son’s best of 11.04 in
Athens.

In the 200m, Ferguson-
McKenzie is ranked at No.
9, having ran a season’s best
of 22.56 in New York on
May 30.

Chris “Bay” Brown, who
missed out on a chance to
contend for the Golden
League $1 million jackpot
after he didn’t participate in
the second of the first three
meets on the circuit, has the
best showing by the men.

He is also sitting in sec-
ond place in the men’s 400
with 51 points over four
meets behind African cham-
pion Gary Kikaya. Brown
has the seventh fastest time
and the second by a
Bahamian in 44.81 that he
recorded on Saturday in
Rome.

Newcomer Latoy Williams, who is
still recovering from an injury at the
Nationals, has the fastest time by a
Bahamian of 44.73, the third best this
season. But he’s not listed on the
World Athletics Tour, having not com-
peted in Europe yet.

Michael Mathieu is tied with three
others for 15th place on the list, but
his season’s best is just 45.80 that he ran
on June 10 in Thessaloniki.

Andrae Williams, the third fastest
Bahamian so far this year with a time
of 44.98 on May 7 in Lubbock, Texas, is

Shamar Sands

Derrick ens

i ms ed.
Ferguson-McKenzie

Mee Williams

Christine Amertil

Petros Giannakouris/AP



OLYMPIC Champion Veronica Campbell Brown (right), of Jamaica, pulls away from Bahamian Chandra Sturrup to win the 100m during the IAAF Athens Grand Prix Tsiklitiria at the

Olympic stadium on Monday...

27th on the World Athletics Tour.

Andretti Bain, last year’s NCAA
champion who is coming off an injured
season earlier this year, is ranked at
No. 33, but his best has been posted at
46.02 on June 27 at the Nationals.

On the women’s side, Christine
Amertil is listed at No. 15 with 17
points over the three meets she com-
peted in. Her season’s best of 51.43 in

Leevan Sands

Belém on May 24 has her at No. 21 on
the performance list.

Currently sitting in third on the
men’s triple jump standings is Olympic
bronze medallist Leevan “Superman”
Sands. He has competed in three meets
and racked up 20 points. But his sea-
son’s best of 17.14 at the Nationals is
14th on the performance list.

After getting off to a sizzling start,

Nitec erly

Michael Mathieu

Shamar Sands has cooled down a bit in
the men’s 110m hurdles. He is now No.
10 on the World Athletics Tour with 38
points over five meets. His season’s
best of 13.38 on June 17 in Ostrava
has him at No. 18.

World Championships silver medal-
list Derrick Atkins is tied with nine
others at No. 90 in the men’s 100m.
He has posted a season’s best of 10.17



Latoy Williams

in Berkeley, California, on April 24.

And world champion Donald
Thomas continues to struggle in the
men’s high jump, coming off his second
straight meet without clearing a height
in Athens.

Thomas, however, is sitting in sev-
enth spot and has done a season’s best
of 2.30 in Auburn, Alabama, on April

Donald Thomas
PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Seven charged with killing
Florida couple, stealing safe

BILL KACZOR,
Associated Press Writer
MELISSA NELSON,
Associated Press Writer
PENSACOLA, Fla.

An ex-convict who taught self-
defense to children. A day labor-
er who served prison time for
killing a man in a fight. An Air
Force staff sergeant attached to
an elite special operations unit.

Somehow, authorities say, they
ended up part of a loosely con-
nected group of seven men
charged in the shooting deaths of
Byrd and Melanie Billings, a
wealthy Florida Panhandle couple
known for adopting children with
special needs.

The suspects, some dressed as
ninjas, stole a safe and other items
during the break-in Thursday at
the sprawling Billings home west
of Pensacola. Nine of the couple's
13 adopted children were home at
the time. Three saw the intrud-
ers but were not hurt. Authori-
ties would not say what was in
the safe or what else was taken.

Some of the masked men
entered through the front door,
while others slipped in through
an unlocked utility door in the
back. They were in and out in
under 10 minutes. The crime was
captured by an extensive video
surveillance system the Billings
used to keep tabs on their many
children. "It was a very well-
planned and well-executed oper-
ation,” said Escambia County
Sheriff David Morgan.

The last three of the seven sus-
pects were arrested Tuesday,
though Morgan said there still
might be more arrests. State
Attorney Bill Eddins said rob-
bery was the main motive for the
crime. Adult daughter Ashley
Markham — one of four Billings
children from previous marriages
— sobbed Tuesday as she hugged
Morgan, who said he kept a
promise made to her the night of
the slayings.

"It is my honor today to tell
you, Ashley, your family we have
found them and they are in cus-
tody," Morgan said.

The suspects ranged in age
from 16 to 56, and several were
day laborers who knew each oth-



AP Photo/Katie King, The Pensacola News Journal

ASHLEY MARKHAM, 26, daughter of Melanie Billings, is comforted by
Sheriff David Morgan after his announcement of a seventh arrest

year-old was charged Sunday
night with evidence tampering
after authorities said he tried to
cover up some damage on a red
van seen on surveillance video
pulling away from the house.
Officials said the damage was
unrelated to the crime. Tips from
the public led police to the van
Saturday.

The elder Gonzalez owned a
pressure washing business and
may have visited the Billings
property once before. Another
man arrested and charged with
murder Sunday, day laborer
Wayne Coldiron, 41, sometimes
worked for him and also may
have visited the property, Mor-
gan said. Coldiron, who appeared
in court Tuesday and said he had
lost his job as a plumber, served
two years in a Tennessee prison in
the early 1990s after killing a man

during a fight. He also served
nearly two years in prison in
Florida on an aggravated assault
charge.

The other four suspects were
arrested Monday and Tuesday.

Authorities in neighboring
Okaloosa County arrested 31-
year-old Gary Sumner, another
day laborer who was in a county
jail on an unrelated traffic charge.
On Tuesday, three more men
were arrested: Stallworth, 19-
year-old Frederick Lee Thorton,
and a 16-year-old whom officials
are not naming because he is a
minor. Eddins, the prosecutor,
said he would seek first-degree
murder indictments from a grand
jury against all the suspects,
including Gonzalez Sr. He would
not say whether he will seek the
death penalty. Escambia County
Judge Tom Johnson refused to

set bail for the younger Gonzalez
and Coldiron at the request of
State Attorney Bill Eddins. John-
son set their arraignments for
Aug. 6. Bond for the elder Gon-
zalez had already been set at
$500,000. The suspects arrested
Monday and Tuesday are due in
court this week except for Stall-
worth, who must be extradited
from Alabama, where he was
arrested.

The Billings family attended
the hearing Tuesday but made no
statements. Some were in tears
afterward. Friends, meanwhile,
struggled to understand how the
couple could have been killed in
such a horrific way. "Melanie and
Byrd both would give you the
shirt off their back and maybe
they were too trusting," said Pat-
sy Brown, who had known
Melanie Billings for 22 years.

Tuesday, July 14, 2009. Masked suspects, some dressed as ninjas,
stole a safe and other items during a deadly break-in at the sprawling
Florida Panhandle home of a couple known for adopting children
with special needs, authorities said Tuesday.

er through a pressure washing
business and an auto detailer they
worked for. One, Donnie Ray
Stallworth, was with the Air
Force Special Operations Com-
mand with an aircraft mainte-
nance squadron at Hurlburt Field
near Fort Walton Beach. It wasn't
clear how he knew the others.

"We're dealing with a group of
folks with rare exception — of
course, there's a couple of people
who are not — that again are
basically day laborer sorts, folks
that get odd jobs, part-time jobs
and they drift," Morgan said.
"With the exception of Mr. Stall-
worth you don't have any career-
minded people in this group.”

Morgan called 35-year-old sus-
pect Leonard Gonzalez Jr. a "piv-
otal person" in organizing the
crime, but stopped short of iden-
tifying him as the mastermind.
He was charged Sunday with
murder. In court Tuesday, he
read a statement proclaiming his
innocence.

"The sheriff intentionally thrust
me into the public's eye without
any charges being filed and also
intentionally placed me in a sui-
cide ward to make me look even

guiltier," Gonzalez said. News
clippings provided a very different
picture of Gonzalez, a former
National Guard member and
martial arts expert who taught
self-defense classes for women
and children. In 2007, he and his
wife founded a martial-arts course
that taught children to defend
themselves against sexual preda-
tors.

Gwinn Corley, a spokesman
for acommunity group that gave
Gonzalez and his wife an award
for their program, said they
brought their six young children
to self-defense presentations.

"We were impressed with
them," Corley said. "He was talk-
ing about children and their
respect for their elders. They both
seemed to have a passion to
teaching the arts to abused
women and kids, they had a
vision for how to give free self
defense."

But records show Gonzalez,
who was arrested Sunday in the
Billings case, served time in Flori-
da State Prison on burglary and
forgery charges in the mid-1990s.

His father, Leonard Gonzalez
Sr., was also arrested. The 56-

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"TEACHING VACANCIES

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications from quali-
fied Teachers for position available.

One (1) Social Studies (Geography)
One (1) Substitute Clothing Construction

Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor or Master Degrees from an ac-
credited University or College and Teaching Certificate need apply.

For further details and application from, please contact the Anglican Central
Education Authority on Sands Road at telephone (242) 322-3015/6/7.

Letters of application and/or completed application forms with copies of
required documents must be sent by Friday, July 31st 2009 to the Angli-
can Education Department addressed to:-

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O. Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas

WIND JAMMER

CASTING CALL BAHAMIAN MOVIE

An independent motion picture, shooting this summer
in the Bahamas is looking to fill roles for a new movie
shooting in August. Actors will be compensated for
their work. Experience is not necessary but a good
sense of humor will go a long way!
We are the looking for
-Three older white men with a sly sense of humor and a refined look.

-A young black Bahamian male between 14-16 who likes Junkanoo

-An older white man with a heavy foreign accent.

Please contact:



or call 394.6579


THE TRIBUNE

USINCSS

WEDNESDAY,

Ur Le elo 2 0

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Casino bidder
‘head and
shoulders’

above rivals

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ONE poten-
tial replacement
for Grand |
Bahama’s sole
casino operator
“stands head
and shoulders”
above the more
than 10 other
proposals
received, the
minister of
tourism and aviation said yes-
terday, with the Cabinet and
other relevant government
agencies set to determine the
issue next week.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace
told Tribune Business he and

Â¥

es elcles



* Government ‘very, very
excited’ about one potential
replacement for Isle of Capri

* Minister ‘fairly confident’
new operator found before
Capri’s agreement expires in
August, based on interest
that resulted in more
than 10 proposals

* Government due to discuss
issue next week, with key
lying in ‘quality of solution’
and new operator’s
brand/marketing reach

SEE page 4B

BTC’s $50m core network
in place in ‘18 months’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC)
expects to complete the more
than $50 million implementa-
tion of its IP next generation
network infrastructure over
“the next 18 months”, Tribune
Business was told yesterday,
with the first phase of its new
$14-$15 million billing system
scheduled for an _ end-
August/September finish.

Marlon Johnson, BTC’s vice-
president of sales and market-
ing, said the company’s Inter-
net Protocol (IP) next genera-
tion network would “increase
operating efficiencies” at the
state-owned carrier, just as the
Government formally com-
mences the process to privatise

* Targets end-August/
September deadline
for $14-$15m billing
system implementation

* New IP system to
‘enhance operating
efficiencies’

* No more major projects
due to privatisation

it by selling a 51 per cent stake
to a strategic partner.

“This is our new generation
network that will transition us
from the digital infrastructure
we have now to what is a state-

SEE page 3B

Operator urges price controls
for dominant telecom firms

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

PRICE controls must be
included in the licences issued
to the Bahamas Telecommuni-
cations Company (BTC) and
Cable Bahamas, a rival tele-
coms operator has warned, in
order to prevent “significant dis-
tortion of the market” and
“irreparable damage” being
caused to competitors.

Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, pres-
ident of Systems Resource
Group (SRG), the parent of
IndiGo Networks, BTC’s only
legal competitor in landline
voice services, said that in the
absence of price controls that
were inbuilt into their licence,
operators with significant mar-
ket power (SMP) could inflict
major damage through practices

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



* SRG fears ‘significant
distortion of the market’
and ‘irreparable damage’
caused if BIC, Cable
Bahamas licences do
not have controlling
mechanisms to prevent
predatory pricing

such as predatory pricing before
regulators were able to act.

Responding to the communi-
cations licensing reform paper,
published by the Government-
appointed BTC privatisation
committee, Mr Hutton-Ashken-
ny said SRG was concerned
that the draft licences did not
impose price control or service
bundling obligations on com-
munications operators with
SMP.

BTC has been defined as an
operator with SMP in both the
provision of fixed landline and
cellular voice telephony ser-
vices, while Cable Bahamas has
SMP in cable television services.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said
that while the new communica-
tions sector regulator, URCA,
would be empowered by the
new legislation to assess abuse
of a dominant position by the
likes of Cable Bahamas and
BTC, the time taken to act and
impose a decision “can lead to
irreparable damage to other
operators and lead to signifi-
cant distortion of the market”.

Recalling SRG’s experience
as the new entrant to the fixed-
line voice market, Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny, in a thinly-veiled ref-

SEE page 2B



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Sandals eyes deal
for Emerald Bay

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Sandals resort chain is eye-
ing the purchase of Exuma’s
closed Emerald Bay resort,
Tribune Business can reveal,
and is among the remaining
bidders in negotiations with the properties
PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) receivers.

The Jamaica-headquartered chain, owned
by Gordon ‘Butch’ Stewart and his family,
already has a strong presence in the
Bahamas through its Royal Bahamian
resort on Cable Beach, and was said by
informed sources yesterday to be “very
interested” in acquiring Emerald Bay pro-
vided the price was right.

One hotel industry source, speaking to
Tribune Business on condition of anonymi-
ty, said yesterday: “I’m aware that they’re
[Sandals] very interested in it [Emerald
Bay], but it will all come down to price and
financing.”

The source said senior Sandals execu-
tives had already met with Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham over the Emerald Bay

Rival bidding group includes
PI resort owner RIU

issue.

Other contacts have told Tribune Busi-
ness that the Prime Minister and his gov-
ernment have been actively encouraging
existing owners/developers of Bahamas-
based resorts to assess the feasibility of
acquiring Emerald Bay, believing that their
track record and knowledge of this nation
would leave them best-placed to solve the
so-called Exuma anchor property’s prob-
lems.

Sandals and Mr Stewart already have
resort interests in the Exumas via their bou-
tique Royal Plantation chain, which will
have a 21-villa property on 50-acre Fowl
Cay by end-2009.

Another source told Tribune Business
that Sandals executives had been “seen
down there several times” carrying out due



diligence on the Emerald Bay property.

“That would probably be the best bet,”
he added of the prospects for a Sandals
purchase. “They know the lay of the land
and promise to be a good corporate citi-
zen.”

And another source with knowledge of
Sandals’ interest told Tribune Business:
“Sandals is a known entity, and comes with
pre-packaged marketing. They have the
Sandals brand identity, the extremely effi-
cient reservations system, 1,000 things going
for them and are not tight for money.”

The source added, though, that it was
important for any buyer to conclude a pur-
chase agreement with PwC and Emerald
Bay’s main creditor, the London office of

SEE page 4B

Accounting body urged: ‘Get back on the road’

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Fears BICA has lost influence it once had in the profession

A FOUNDER of the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants (BICA) yesterday
told newly-elected council
members yesterday that the
institution has lost the influence
it once held within the indus-
try, while another said it was
time to get "back on the road”.

Ronald Atkinson, speaking
at the induction ceremony for
those new council members,
admonished BICA for not mov-
ing towards aligning itself with
similar entities in the US, and
warned members that the win-
dow of opportunity to do so was
quickly closing.

He said accounting firms can
no longer be all things to all
people, and suggested that
accountants exchange the

pedantry for specialisation.

This comes as BICA moves
to adopt a regional practice
monitoring and peer review
programme being spearheaded
by the International Institute of
Chartered Accountants of the
Caribbean.

Incoming BICA president
Reece Chipman, in his address
to the new council members,
acknowledged the challenges
facing BICA with respect to the
accounting industry, given the
volatility of the economy.

"We are expected to channel
a course through international
agreements, as well as a course
through G20 and OECD frame-
works of ‘best practices’ and
‘level playing field’,” he said.

"With this in mind we must
maintain public confidence in

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professional accountants and
auditors, and the services they
provide for the public.

“We should recognise and
prioritise the public interest
through a wide range of profes-
sional services, including many
that are externally regulated."

Mr Chipman said the Associ-
ation of Chartered Certified
Accountants (ACCA) is cur-
rently working on an ‘Interna-
tional Competency Framework’
to address the competencies
required by firms to prepare
financial information.

"As a result of this, BICA
encourages all professional
accountants (public and private
practices) to become members
of BICA, and to remain in good
standing," he said.

According to Mr Chipman,

one of the most important
focuses for BICA will be public
sector accounting and the intro-
duction of accrual basis accout-
ing.
“With governments bailing
out, packaging assistance and
privatisation, these initiatives
will undoubtedly find itself on
the country’s balance sheet,”
Mr Chipman said.
“Accordingly, proper use of
accrual basis accounting in the
public sector becomes critically
important. This initiative of gov-
ernment’s adoption of accrual
basis accounting versus cash
basis accounting is supported
by IFAC and the World Bank
in light of the economic crisis,
and the IMF’s mandate for
greater transparency and
accountability.”

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE

There will be a meeting for all members
of the Honorable Society of the Middle
Temple on Thursday July 23rd

6:00 p.m. @ S.G. Hambros.
All are asked to attend.

NOTICE

NOTICE is h given that MR. OVAN PIERRE OF NASSAU
VILLAGE, MA U, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
regestration/ naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration’
naturalization should not ba granted, should sand a written
and signed statement of tha tae within twenty-eight days

Ask Questions

Daddy, what’s that? If I hada
dime for every time they asked
that question I would be writing
this article from my mountain
top estate. Remember, I have
twins so everything is double,
even including the dimes.

The lesson here - ASK
QUESTIONS. A lot of us do
not ask enough questions. My
kids ask questions until they
understand completely what it is
they need to know. It should be
the same when we are talking to
clients.

from the 16TH day of JULY, 2008 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Directions

Daddy, where are we going?
What another powerful ques-
tion. Ask your clients where it is
they want to go. Once you
know where they want to go, it
is just a matter of how. And
that’s the job of the sales and
marketing person.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that Mr. JOHN BERNARD of
Lovely Bay, Acklins, Bahamas, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15" day of July, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Visions And Decisions

My kids make decisions.
When they see something they
want they are gone. And it
should be the same with our-
selves and clients. Get the
vision, see it and go after it.
Don’t let anything get in your
way. This applies to sales and
marketing professionals as well
as clients. This relates back to
my last article on GOALS.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RANDOLPH SAINTIL of
#31 WOODCOCK LN, ARDENT FOREST, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
15th day of JULY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

FROM page 1B

RCS a 2
Tribune - the #1 newspaper
in circulation, just call
HT Perey AB CL

erence to BTC, said: “In the
recent past, the dominant fixed
voice operator in the Bahamas
has acted in a manner that
would have had the effect of
causing lasting market distor-
tion had the regulator not acted.

“In the absence of the price
control conditions placed upon
the dominant operator in its
licence, irreparable damage
would have been caused that
could not have been resolved
by a subsequent ruling by the
regulator that the subject action
was deemed to be anti-compet-
itive.

“In the time it would have
taken even a highly efficient and
powerful regulator to react, the
damage would have been done,
and whilst the dominant opera-
tor might have suffered a fine,
that would have been of little
comfort to other operators who
may have been driven from the
market in the meanwhile.”

Urging that the draft licence
be modified to require the likes
of BTC and Cable Bahamas to
obtain URCA’s prior approval
for any change in their tariff
prices, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
added: “This would not only
help guard against predatory
practices, such as those
described above, but would also
serve to protect the consumer
from an ex-monopolist raising
its prices prior to competitive
market entry by a new operator,
followed by a subsequent price
reduction when competition
became established.”

RFG @ Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd
POSITION AVAILABLE:

Client Relationship Officer for International Bank

British Colonial Hilton Hetel
Marlborough St. Slop a

Clearance
SALE
New Stock also on Sale
Everything for $20

Until the end of July
Free parking at the Hilton

P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel! 242-323-1865

Email: gems-pears i hotmail.com



Applicants must have demonstrated experience and ability to develop new
business for non-resident, high net-worth market.

REQUIREMENTS:

Excellent knowledge of private banking products and services; fluency in Eng-
lish, French and any other language skills would be an asset; 15 years’ private
banking; knowledge of Bahamian regulatory requirements; university degree and/
or related professional designation.

DUTIES:

Marketing of private banking and portfolio management services; extensive
traveling; acquisition and development of new clients.

Compensation will be commensurate with experience.

Interested applicants must submit applications to: Human Resources
Manager, (Re: Client Relationship Position), P.O. Box SS 6289, Nassau,
Bahamas, by 20th July, 2009 or fax to (242) 502-5428.



Promotional
Marketing

ANee LM Me TIE KOT



I Don’t Want To!

This is another way of
expressing: “I really don’t
understand.” (Bottom line: I did
not explain myself clearly
enough). Once I slow down
and explain to my boys all of
the details, even though they
may not grasp everything there
are always one or two words
they will connect with and I can
see their expressions change.

This reminds me of when I
am dealing with some clients.
Though I can see (vision) clear-
ly and the direction needed to
achieve a goal, my client still
does not. This is basically
because I have not in DETAIL
explained the five W’s. Who,
What, Why, Where and When.
Slow down when talking with
clients and explain things as
SLOWLY and clearly as possi-
ble, then ask: “DO YOU
UNDERSTAND?”

Simplify -— Speak in your
client’s language, not yours
So I do not hear the same

The SRG president also
called for licence restrictions to
account for services in other
markets where the licensee did
not have dominant SMP power.

In a likely reference to both
BTC and Cable Bahamas, he
said: “An operator with a sunk
cost of infrastructure in one
market will be able to adopt
unfair pricing and bundling
strategies that leverage its infra-
structure in new markets, even
in the absence of SMP in those
markets.”

Significant market power was
also a central theme in SRG’s
concerns over the transition
from the existing telecommuni-
cations industry regulatory
regime, overseen by the Public
Utilities Commission (PUC), to
URCA and the wider commu-
nications legislative and super-
visory framework.

While the new legislation
enabled URCA to address con-
cerns relating to a market in
which an SMP operator was
currently licensed, and prevent
it from “leveraging SMP in its

The

question over and over from my
twins, I try to speak in their lan-
guage. Guess what? It usually
works. Do the same with your
clients and you will be sur-
prised.

Using flashy jargons and
expressions from your industry
is exactly that. Your client does
not know what a superimper-
danticulator is (neither do I). If
you have to use some terminol-
ogy from your industry, follow it
up with plain English and
explain clearly what it is and
how it works. Remember an old
expression - K.LS.S. Keep it
simple stupid. Well? Do it. It
works.

You Can Say No!

Lastly, the second most pow-
erful word in the dictionary
after it is no!

Saying no is sometimes diffi-
cult for a lot of people. Boy, let
me tell you, I’m learning fast. I
have to say no twice as fast as
most people. Saying no is a
good thing, and especially with
children. Say No and explain
why it is important as well.

With some people, what they
are asking is either impossible in
the timeframe or simply will not
work. Saying No to a client is
healthy for both parties
involved. The same as it is with
our children; it’s good for them

existing market into new mar-
kets and thereby distorting com-
petition”, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
felt “a potential loophole”
remained when it came to
ensuring fair competition during
the transition between regula-
tory regimes.

“Such efforts will have been
in vain if an operator with SMP
in its existing market was
deemed to have satisfied the
obligations placed upon it, but
was separately engaged in activ-
ity that had the effect of dis-
torting competition in the new
market,” he warned.

As a result, the SRG presi-
dent recommended that any
company with SMP be prevent-
ed from entering new commu-
nications markets “until such
time that URCA has confirmed
its acceptance that no activity
exists that would have the effect
of distorting competition in the
new market”.

Otherwise, URCA would be
in the position of permitting an
anti-competitive position to
develop during the regulatory

A iwintiics

The Bahamas Source For Homes, Apartment Communities & Rentals

ee Be led

Keeping it simple
is just child’s play

and us parents.

Never promise something
you can’t deliver. Ever
promised your kids something
and did not do it? Ouuuuccchh.
Man, they are like elephants
and never forget it. Well, the
same goes for sales profession-
als. If you can’t do it, say no.
However, if you really can’t
provide something they are
looking for, help them find
someone who can. This will
only strengthen your relation-
ship. All of these marketing
strategies are certain to keep
your business on top during
these challenging economic
times. Have a productive and
profitable week! Remember:
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT.”

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products. Established
over 27 years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted
Bahamian businesses from var-
ious industries, ranging from
tourism and banking to
telecommunications, in mar-
keting themselves. Readers can
contact Mr Farrington at Sun-
Tee EmbroidMe on East
Shirley Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
phone at 242-393-3104.

Operator urges price controls
for dominant telecom firms

regime transition, then be
forced to resolve it at a later
date.

In response to SRG’s con-
cerns, the BTC privatisation
committee said SMP and Uni-
versal Service Obligations
(USO) would be introduced
from the date the Communica-
tions Act took effect “to ensure
that new entrants are not dis-
advantaged”.

“This would not amount to
an unfair regulatory burden on
incumbent operators that have
the benefit of an entrenched
position, incumbency advantage
and significant market share,”
the committee said.

It added that the issues of
price control and service
bundling would be addressed in
separate consultations but, in a
nod to SRG’s concerns, said:
“Licensees that are presumed
to have SMP will not be able to
enter new markets until they
have demonstrated compliance
with the SMP conditions deter-
mined pursuant to the transi-
tional provisions.”

(Con To

| Tel: 502 2356 we


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 3B





Skills Bank placing
60 jobs per month

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Department of
Labour’s Skills Bank is placing
Bahamians in permansent jobs
at arate of 60 per month, a gov-
ernment minister said yester-
daym and while the labour mar-
ket was not as vibrant as before
some jobs were available for
students graduating high school
and college.

Dion Foulkes, minister of
labour, told Tribune Business:
"There are some job opportu-
nities out there and we encour-
age high school and college stu-
dents to continue to pursue
those jobs.”

The summer employment
programmes offered by many
private businesses and public
entities were feared threatened
by the recession, but Mr
Foulkes said the Government
had allocated $2 million for its
summer programme and argued
that thousands of high school
and college students had been
placed this summer.

He told this newspaper yes-
terday that within 48 hours, the
Labour Department's skills
bank placed eight welders on a
dredging project; a sous-chef in
one of the hotels; a legal secre-
tary in a law firm; a nurse in a
private medical centre; four
cashiers at a food store chain;
and four security personnel in a

security firm.

"Business-
es on a daily
basis
approach the
skills bank
for referrals
and, by and
large, our
referral sys-
tem works,"
said Mr
Foulkes. "We
have a high
success rate
and we would
wish to encourage unemployed
Bahamians and recent gradu-
ates to register with us.

"If you do not register with
the labour exchange, we do not



know you are looking for a
job."

Opposition leader Perry
Christie recently criticised the
Government’s efforts to curb
the rising unemployment fig-
ures, urging that it show greater
commitment to preserving and
creating jobs.

Meanwhile, the newly created
unemployment benefit topped
10,000 registrants, with 8,785 of
those qualifying and receiving
the benefit, according to the lat-
est numbers.

The Government is now
preparing to commence its
training programme for 1,000
unemployed Bahamians.

This pilot training pro-
gramme, sponsored also by the

BTC’s $50m core network
in place in ‘18 months’

FROM page 1B

of-the-art IP infrastructure,” Mr
Johnson told this newspaper.
“They’re changing the core
infrastructure to what all the
company’s services will be pro-
vided on.

“It will increase operating
efficiencies because we'll be
able to make the switches, the
telephone exchanges, more
compact and easier to maintain.
It will also allow us to offer
expanded services, such as cable
television, if the company
chooses to go in that direction,
and enhance our Internet
broadband capacity and the
like.”

With all major global tele-
coms carriers switching to IP
systems and technology, Mr
Johnson said the new network
would place BTC “on par” with
international operators.

“This is a little bit of a gener-
ational leap to implement for
us in keeping pace with the
international telecoms market,”
he added.

BTC’s technology/equipment
provider, and installation spe-

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

cialist, Sonus Networks, yester-
day said the first phase of the IP
network implementation and
migration had been completed,
with all the Bahamian carrier’s
international traffic now being
routed on it.

Mr Johnson told Tribune
Business that the IP network
installation was something that
would “be done over the next
18 months”, and revealed that
BTC was also in the midst of a
project to “change our billing
system” to allow various ser-
vices to be charged on one bill.

Pegging the costs of this pro-
ject at around $14-$15 million,
Mr Johnson said phase one of
the Cerillion system’s installa-
tion was “substantially com-
plete”. It was expected to go
live in late August/early Sep-
tember 2009, and will allow
BTC to include landline, Inter-
net and post-paid cellular
charges on the same bill
received by consumers.

“That will allow customers to
have multiple services on a sin-
gle bill,” Mr Johnson said,
explaining that currently BTC’s
customers received different
bills for cellular, fixed-line and

Internet services. These were
also often on different billing
cycles, and the new system was
designed to remove these inef-
ficiencies by consolidating all
services into one bill and cycle.
The BTC executive added
that the new system was intend-
ed to enable its customer to go
on-line and access their bills
there, delivering consumer effi-
clencies, too. Customers could
look at condensed versions of
their bill, and the reduction in
paperwork would also reduce
BTC’s environmental footprint.
“The next phase after that
will be to move pre-paid cus-
tomers over to that billing sys-
tem,” Mr Johnson said.
However, the start of the pri-
vatisation process will prevent
BTC from commencing any
more capital expenditure pro-
jects. “The privatisation process
will have commenced, so one
of the things governing our deci-
sion-making is that we will not
want to undertake anything
substantial,” Mr Johnson said.
Major capital spending while
BTC is up for sale could deter
bidders, as it would represent a
material change to the compa-

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)
ELEGANTE INC.

No. 83,502 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000), ELEGANTE INC.,

is in Dissolution

Any person having a Claim against the ELEGANTE INC. is required on or
before 16th June 2009 to send their name, address and particulars of the debt or
claim to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they may be ex-
cluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such claim is approved

The date of Commencement of dissolution was 30th day of June 2009.

We, Sovereign Managers Limited c/o Suites 1601-1603 Floor, Kinwick Cen-
tre, 32 Hollywood Road, Central, Hong Kong is the Liquidator of ELEGANTE

INC.

SIGNED
For & On Behalf Of

oo wb

Lighted or

(-—\) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

‘fF

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

ny’s financial condition - chiefly
its balance sheet, but also the
income statement. It would also
likely impact the price bidders
would be prepared to pay, and
as potential incoming own-
ers/managers, they would want
to have the sole say on all
BTC’s investment decisions.

“Timagine we’ll just work on
tightening up on customer ser-
vice, work on those projects
already budgeted for, but we
don’t expect to be moving on
anything too substantive until
the privatisation process is com-
plete,” Mr Johnson said.

The Government com-
menced the formal sales process
for BTC yesterday, with bid-
ders having until August 14,
2009, to submit their pre-quali-
fication applications. A $25,000
registration fee must be paid by
July 28, 2009.

BTC was marketed as a com-
pany that provides services to
334,000 cellular customers,
132,000 fixed-line and 18,500
Internet customers. It also has
190 roaming agreements in
place.

SHOW YOUR SUPPORT

Bahamas Technical and Voca-
tional Institute (BTVI) and the
College of the Bahamas, is
scheduled to begin in Septem-
ber and run for one year.

According to Mr Foulkes, if
the Government's review of the
programme is favourable it
could be extended past Sep-
tember 2010.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

No. 45 of 2000
TRAVINVEST CONSULTANTS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, TRAVINVEST CONSULTANTS
LTD. is in dissolution. The date of commencement
of dissolution was the 16th day of June, 2009. Dillon
Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
TRAVINVEST CONSULTANTS LTD.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR



Legal Notice

NOTICE
GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY
INTERNATIONAL SERVICES LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL SERVICES
LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the International

Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 9 July
2009 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and registered

by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Amit Singhania of Sheikh
Rashid Road, ENOC House IJ, P.O. Box 6442, Dubai, United Arab

Emirates.

Dated the 13th day of July, 2009.

H&J Corporate Services Ltd.
Registered Agent
for the above-named Company



for the National Park System of The Bahamas
and join us as we Celebrate our 50th Anniversary
with a Cool Early Morning

Fun Run/WALK

and help Keep ‘em flocking

Date: July 18th Time: 6:00 AM

Flamingo Rowte: Starting at the Retreat Gardens North on Village Road, then
West onto Shirley Street, North onto Church Street (St.
Matthews Church), crossing onto the "New" Paradise Island
Bridge, over to Paradise Beach Drive, East to the traffic
circle, rotating fo The “Old” Pl, Bridge. East onte East Bay
Street, passing Montague Beach then South onte Village
Road ending at The Retreat Gardens.

Want To Be An

EAH
BETA

SUioimisce tm uelis

yaar y

BEGINNING SEPTEMBER
(FALL) 2009

Ear a Bachelor of Science Degree in Small Island
Sustainability with a concentration in
* Integrated Sustainable Development Planning
* Environmental & Eco-systems Management
(Sustainable Agriculture)
OR

Ear a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Small Island
Sustainabiliey with a concentration in
* Ecotourism & Development
* Policy Studies

Green Turtle Route: Starting at the Retreat Gardens North on Village Road, then
West onto Shiney Street, Nerth anto Church Street (St.
Matthews Church), East onto East Bay Street pass
Montague Beach then South onto Village Road ending al
The Retreat Gardens,

Be
fertsVam stots teh
ete tae ras
ni e
and help drive
Se EL [a
TTS Tear car

Deadline For Enrolment: July 31, 2009 Healthy refreshments and souse available for sale afterwards.

ee eee Ce me Reece Mn petit oan teed aad
Rig ice OM ERO oscar 2 FID
Pia iaedy suet eet sry

Wear comfortable walking shoes. = Bring a water bottle and hand towel,


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Sandals eye



deal for the
Emerald Bay

FROM page 1B

Japanese insurer, Mitsui, urgently.

This was because, while many of the resort’s
Four Seasons-trained staff were still hanging
on in Exuma, hoping the property would soon
re-open, they were beginning to lose hope
and would soon migrate to other Bahamian
islands in search of work.

“The economy has dried up,” the source
said. “It’s an economic drought in Exuma,
and Sandals could bring in the Spring weath-
er it so badly needs.”

Tribune Business can also reveal that anoth-
er group bidding on Emerald Bay included
RIU Hotels, the Spanish-owned resort chain
that is also already in the Bahamas via its
property on Paradise Island.

Vincent s, minister of tourism and aviation,
declined to confirm the identity of any of the
potential Emerald Bay purchasers yesterday
when contacted by Tribune Business.

He added: “We know of a number of peo-
ple we have been providing assistance to on
Emerald Bay, and are quite excited” about
some of them.

It is thought that the departure of Four Sea-
sons, with its burdensome brand/operating
contract, and the reduction in purchase price
have attracted the likes of Sandals and RIU to

closely examine acquisition prospects.

The last bid accepted by the receivers, which
collapsed prior to Emerald Bay’s closure and
the loss of almost 500 jobs, was understood to
have valued the property at $40 million - much
less than the $120 million debt owed to Mitsui
when it placed the resort in receivership in
2007.

Informed sources are now suggesting that a
purchase price of as little as $20-$30 million
might be enough to close a deal. Entry point
is key for acquisitions in the Bahamian hotel
sector, as the price largely determines return
on investment for owners, given this nation’s
high operating costs.

Emerald Bay was losing $5 million per year
when it was mothballed by Mitsui, and Four
Seasons - whose contract entitled it to fees
equivalent to 7-8 per cent of gross revenues,
said by many to be too much - is understood to
have told the insurer that the property
required a minimum $25 million in capital
spending to bring it into line with its five-star
status. A further $7 million is needed to recon-
figure its marina.

Several sources, though, suggested these
sums were too low, and a $50-$100 million
investment will ultimately be required by any
potential purchaser to upgrade Emerald Bay
and complete its build-out.



PS 77

(ea Bye TEC
just call 502-2371 today!



g Casino bidder

‘head and
shoulders’
above rivals

FROM page 1B

the Government were “fairly
confident” that a replacement
for the Isle of Capri could be
found before the company’s
lease extension expired at end-
August, a development that
could potentially place some
234 in jeopardy, given the level
of interest received.

The minister added that apart
from reaching a new lease and
other agreements with Our
Lucaya’s owner, Hutchison
Whampoa, the key factor that
would determine the new casino
operator - as far as the Govern-
ment was concerned - was the
brand quality, client/patron pool
and marketing reach that it
would bring to enhancing
Grand Bahama’s overall
tourism product.

“We’re going to discuss that
matter next week,” Mr Van-
derpool-Wallace said, when
asked how the search for Isle
of Capri’s replacement was pro-
gressing.

“We’ve had a number of
very, very strong proposals, and
another set of proposals that
kind of fit the bill, but there’s
one in particular that we’re
very, very excited about. This
one is head and shoulders above
the rest.”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
declined to name any of the
potential replacements, but said
in relation to the proposals sub-
mitted: “There are easily more

“ewarding. My work at The Tribune ts creative and challenging. | enjoy

contributing to the look of our newspaper, while meeting the needs of

out advertisers. I enjoy working here. The Tribune is my mewspaper.”

The Tribune

ESTHER BARRY

My Voice. My Houpaper!

PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE

than 10.”

He added: “Some of them are
casino companies that we would
consider quite reluctantly,
because we do not consider
them to have a strong market-
ing reach in terms of what we
want to do with Grand
Bahama.”

Apart from the Cabinet, next
week’s discussions on Isle of
Capri’s replacement will also
include the likes of Hutchison
Whampoa, as casino landlord,
and the Ministry of Tourism,
while any new operator will
“have to pass muster with the
Gaming Board”. The Hotel
Corporation, led by managing
director Sir Baltron Bethel, is
understood to be leading the
effort to replace Isle of Capri.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
Isle of Capri’s replacement
would be a casino operator with
a long track record and who
could “bring that great quality”
to Grand Bahama.

“We’re quite excited by the
number of companies who have
shown interest,” the minister
added, explaining that the key
issue confronting the Govern-
ment getting it right and “the
quality of the solution”.

Freeport has not proven to
be a happy experience for Isle
of Capri, its our Lucaya-based
casino suffering a $2.934 mil-
lion net operating loss for the
financial year to April 26, 2009,
a 7.7 per cent increase upon the
previous year’s losses.

The operator of Our Lucaya’s



casino unveiled a slight increase
to the $2.275 million net oper-
ating loss incurred during its
2008 financial year, based on a
29.5 per cent reduction in rev-
enues for the 12 months to end-
April 2009.

The Isle-Our Lucaya casino
saw its net gaming revenues
drop from $15.548 million to
$10.969 million during its 2009
financial year, with the gross
operating loss more than
tripling from $826,000 to $2.917
million.

A $17,000 depreciation
charge took Isle of Capri’s net
losses from its Grand Bahama-
based casino to $2.934 million.

Isle of Capri was making
annual rental payments of $1.9
million to Hutchison Whampoa
under the terms of a two-year
lease that it signed on June 1,
2007. The property is a 19,000
square foot casino and offers
303 slot machines, 25 table
games and a 110-seat restau-
rant.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 5B



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



House health plan to
boost taxes on rich

@ By DAVID ESPO
and ERICA WERNER
Associated Press Writers

WASHINGTON (AP) —
House Democrats unveiled
ambitious legislation Tuesday
to remake the nation’s health
care system and called on med-
ical providers, businesses and
the wealthiest Americans to
pick up the tab for President
Barack Obama’s top domestic
priority.

“This bill is a starting point
and a path to success,” House
Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.,
told a news conference where
she and other Democratic lead-
ers promised to pass a bill
before the August congression-
al recess.

Obama has pushed the
House and Senate aggressively
to stick to the timetable, in
hopes of signing comprehensive
legislation in October.

“We are going to accomplish
what many people felt wouldn’t
happen in our lifetime,” said
Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Calif.,
chairman of one of three com-
mittees responsible for health
care. Waxman, Pelosi and oth-
ers stood before a banner that
read: “Quality Affordable
Health Care for the Middle
Class.”

The sweeping measure would
imposes penalties on employ-
ers who fail to provide health
insurance for their workers and
on individuals who refuse to
buy it.

The bill, to be debated in
committee beginning later this
week, also would require insur-
ance companies to offer cover-
age, without exceptions or high-
er premiums in cases of pre-
existing medical conditions. It
also would allow the govern-
ment to sell insurance in com-
petition with private firms, a
provision that has sparked
objections from Republicans
and even some Democrats.

The bill’s release came one
day after President Barack
Obama met with key Democ-
rats in a White House session in
which he told a powerful Senate
chairman he wants legislation
by week’s end in his commit-
tee.

In all, the draft House bill
runs more than 1,000 pages, and
is designed to fulfill Obama’s
call for legislation that will
extend coverage to millions who
lack it, as well as begin to slow
the rate of growth in health care
generally.

In a statement, Obama
praised the proposal, saying it
“will begin the process of fix-
ing what’s broken about our
health care system, reducing
costs for all, building on what
works and covering an estimat-
ed 97 per cent of all Americans.
And by emphasizing prevention
and wellness, it will also help
improve the quality of health
care for every American.”

Key elements of the legisla-
tion include federal subsidies
for poorer individuals and fam-
ilies to help them afford cover-
age.

Financing would come from a
federal surtax on the upper
income — up to 5.4 per cent on
the income of taxpayers mak-
ing more than $1 million a year
— as well as hundreds of bil-
lions of dollars in cuts in pro-
jected Medicare and Medicaid
spending.

The new income tax on the
wealthy is estimated to raise
more than $500 billion over the
next decade, and reductions in
Medicaid and Medicare would
account for nearly as much.

Democrats did not say in
advance what the overall legis-
lation would cost.

Numerous issues remain sub-
ject to change as the bill makes
its way through committee. In
particular, moderate to conser-
vative Democrats have been
negotiating for several days,
asking for changes affecting rur-
al health care as well as other
issues.

Employers who do not offer
coverage would be required to
pay eight per cent of each unin-
sured worker’s salary, with
exemptions for smaller firms
built into the legislation.

Individuals who refused to
buy affordable coverage would
be assessed as much as 2.5 per
cent of their adjusted gross
income, up to the cost of an
average health insurance plan,
according to the legislation.

The legislation would set up a
new government-run health
insurance program to compete



US PRESIDENT Barack Obama talks about health care reform as he announces his nominee for Surgeon General, Dr Regina Benjamin (INSET), in the

Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Monday, July 13, 2009.

with private coverage. The
plan’s payments to medical
providers such as hospitals and
doctors would be keyed to the
rates paid by Medicare, which
are lower than what private
insurers pay.

Eventually, all individuals and
employers would be offered the
option of joining the public
plan. The insurance industry
says that would drive many pri-
vate insurers out of business.

As House leaders unveiled
their bill, the business commu-
nity sent a letter to lawmakers
charging that parts of the legis-
lation would damage the coun-
try’s medical system and econ-
omy. They cited the proposed
government-run insurance plan,
a federal council that would
make some decisions on bene-
fits and a requirement that
employers provide health cov-
erage or pay a new tax.

“Exempting some micro-busi-
nesses will not prevent this pro-
vision from killing many jobs,”
the letter said. “Congress should
allow market forces and

employer autonomy to deter-
mine what benefits employers
provide, rather than deciding
by fiat.”

Thirty-one major business
groups signed the letter, includ-
ing the U.S. Chamber of Com-
merce, the Business Roundtable
representing top corporate
CEOs and the National Retail
Federation.

Across the Capitol, the Sen-
ate Health, Education, Labor
and Pensions Committee
slogged toward passage of its
version of the bill on what is
expected to be a party-line vote.

Because of jurisdictional
issues, the Senate Finance Com-
mittee, a separate panel, retains
control over the drafting of pro-
visions paying for any legisla-
tion.

Obama told the committee’s
chairman, Sen. Max Baucus, on
Monday at the White House he
wants legislation by week’s end,
officials reported. The president
did not say whether he prefers a
bipartisan bill, which Baucus
has been trying to piece togeth-

JOB ADVERTISEMENT

Position: Accountant

A local insurance agency seeks to fill the position of
Accountant. The scope of work is to head the Ac-
counting Operations in preparation of monthly, quar-
terly and annual reports; to keep and maintain all
financial documents and records according to the
directives coming from the President and the Board
of Directors to ensure the efficient management of
all Bank and general ledger accounts. The position
will also be expected to make recommendations to
management to maintain the company’s viability in a
highly competitive environment.

Required:

e University Degree in accounting;
¢ Professional qualifications e.g. CPA, ACCA, CA
e At least 3 years’ work experience as an

accountant;

er with Sen. Charles Grassley
of Iowa, or a bill tailored more

(AP Photas)

to Democratic specifications.
Obama has urged Congress

to pass legislation through both
houses before lawmakers leave
the Capitol on a summer vaca-
tion.

While Pelosi and Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid,
D-Nev., have both expressed
support for the timetable, their
efforts have been slowed in
recent days by internal squab-
bling.

Additionally, some House
Democrats have privately
expressed concern that they will
be required to vote on higher
taxes, only to learn later that
the Senate does not intend to
follow through with legislation
of its own. That would leave
rank and file House Democrats
in the uncomfortable situation
of having to explain their vote
on a costly bill that never
reached Obama’s desk or
became law.

In the Finance Committee
some controversial issues
remain unresolved, including
how to pay for the bill and a
Democratic demand for the
government to sell insurance in
competition with private indus-
try, a proposal Republicans
oppose strongly. Finance mem-
bers have been laboring to pro-
duce a bipartisan bill, but Grass-
ley, the panel’s top Republican,
told The Associated Press on
Tuesday it’s “still up in the air”
whether any bill produced this
week would be bipartisan.

¢ Associated Press writers
Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and
Alan Fram contributed to this
report

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Senior Manager,

Accounts.

The job oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget & Management
Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective delivery

of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the

following:

¢ Compilation of the corporate budget.

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets

Preparation of monthly management statements
Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation
Preparation of performance reports for division , department and sections
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry recetvables (capital

contributions, rechargeable)

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices
Liaison with internal and external audits
Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief

Financial

salaries

Officer for the Board of Directors
Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required
Preparation of the business plan for the department
Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department
Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims
Overseeing the Cash Flow Management
Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment
Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form employee’s

Conducting audits of various financial activities including Employee Basic Pay
Reconciliation, Employee Loans Reconciliation and Payment Reconciliation

Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable

Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts
Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle repayments
Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule
Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans
Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to ensure
adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors
Managing the status of local and foreign vendors
Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and External Auditors
Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline. Conducting

performance appraisals



* Good knowledge of English in writing, editing and
presenting;

® Strong interpersonal, organizational and
supervisory skills;

e Demonstrated capacity to work under pressure,
meet deadlines and perform work of the highest
quality.

¢ Good computer and analytical skills.

Send cover letter and Curriculum Vitae to the follow-
ing address:

The Tribune

c/o Box # 81869
P.O. Box N 3207
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE: July 25, 2009 by 5pm

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff, manage
and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations

Job requirements include:

¢ A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting ACCA/CPA
or equivalent qualifications

¢ A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a similar
management position
Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices
Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications
Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing systems
Ability to analyze financial reports
Sound knowledge of covenants of lending institutions (e.g. IDB)
Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial software
and the system of internal control.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing
Good time management skills

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: July,
22,2009.


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



Goldman Sachs’
$2.7bn profit
shows firm’s

prowess

mg By STEPHEN BERNARD
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Gold-
man Sachs is emerging as the
king of post-meltdown Wall
Street.

The New York-based bank-
ing giant took advantage of
improving markets to widen the
gap between itself and its com-
petitors, earning more than $2.7
billion during the second quar-
ter.

The result is a remarkably
speedy recovery from last fall,
when Goldman lost $3.29 bil-
lion in four months during the
worst of the financial crisis.
Goldman, which was already
the strongest financial institu-
tion heading into the financial
crisis, has now staked its claim
as the undisputed powerhouse
on Wall Street with the ability
to take on more risk than its
struggling competitors.

“Goldman really is in a class
by themselves,” said Phillip Sil-
itschanu, a senior analyst with
Aite Group. “They’ve always
been the golden child of the
market.”

That has been even more
amplified during the recent
credit crisis and ensuing recov-
ery as credit and debt markets
have started to open up. While
other banks have been trying
to preserve cash to protect
against further losses, Goldman
has been getting back to its core
businesses that made it so prof-
itable in the past.

Profits at Goldman, the first
bank to report second-quarter
earnings, came from strength
in underwriting stock and debt
offers, and higher-risk trading.
Goldman’s peers, meanwhile,

52wk-Low
1.28
10.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.35
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.40
10.00

Benchmark

Fidelity Bank

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

S2wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

52wk-Low

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Bahamas Waste

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

Security Last Sale

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol

14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Fund Name

have been stung by greater loan
losses because of their focus in
retail banking, and thus have
had to stick with a more con-
servative approach to business.

“Some competitors reimed in
risk-taking activity,” said Cubil-
las Ding, a senior analyst with
consulting and research firm
Celent. Goldman’s historically
strong and disciplined risk man-
agement allowed it to enter
trading where its competitors
might have been more hesitant,
Ding added.

Also during the second quar-
ter, Goldman freed itself of
restrictions tied to the govern-
ment’s Troubled Asset Relief
Program. Last fall, as the cred-
it crunch worsened and Gold-
man’s competitor Lehman
Brothers collapsed, the US
Treasury Department launched
a program to provide $700 bil-
lion in funds to the financial
sector.

Though it had adequate cap-
ital to handle the downturn,
Goldman was compelled to par-
ticipate in the programme,
receiving $10 billion. As part of
the program, the government
placed certain restrictions on
banks, such as additional over-
sight and executive compensa-
tion caps.

Goldman, relying on its
healthy capital base, paid back
those funds in June, freeing
itself of the added restrictions.
Not all other banks have been
able to repay their government
debt yet. Bank of America
Corp. and Citigroup Inc. have
been among the hardest hit by
the downturn and each received
$45 billion from the govern-
ment.

The government is now in the

midst of converting part of its
loan to Citigroup for about a
one-third stake in the compa-
ny. Both Bank of America and
Citigroup are expected to
report second-quarter results
later in the week.

Goldman’s profit would have
been even larger during the sec-
ond quarter had it not recorded
a one-time charge to repay the
$10 billion to the government.
The charge reduced earnings
by 78 cents per share.

While Goldman was prepar-
ing to repay the government, it
was also taking advantage of
the thawing credit markets and
a rallying equity market. With
its own balance sheet intact,
Goldman became a primary
source for other companies
looking for an underwriter to
help them tap the reopened
markets.

“When times are bad, the
thinking goes, go with the best
of the best,” Aite Group’s Sil-
itschanu said.

Goldman’s equity underwrit-
ing division generated record
revenue from the surging busi-
ness. Trading revenue also
soared, jumping more than 51
per cent from the previous
quarter and nearly doubled
from the comparable period last
year. Goldman was able to cash
in on fixed-income, currency
and commodities trading dur-
ing the April through June peri-
od.

Goldman earned $2.72 bil-
lion, or $4.93 per share, after
paying preferred dividends, for
the quarter ended June 26.

Analysts polled by Thomson
Reuters, on average, forecast
earnings of $3.54 per share for
the quarter. Profit also exceed-

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 14 JULY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.14] CHG -2.79 | %CHG -0.18 | YTD -142.22 | YTD % -8.31

FINDEX: CLOSE 787.12 | YTD -5.72% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.39
11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.39
2.74
5.64
3.05
1.82
6.99
10.90
10.38
5.03
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.40
10.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.05
0.00

-0.39
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.39
11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.39
2.74
5.64
3.00
1.82
6.60
10.90
10.38
5.03
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.40
10.00

Change Daily Vol.
100.00
100.00
100.00

100.00

0.00

0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Weekly Vol.
8.42
6.25
0.40

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

30.13
0.45

31.59

29.00

0.55 0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NAV

YTD%

Last 12 Months Div $

EPS $

0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%
0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%

EPS $

1.3231
2.8952
1.4019
3.1031
12.2702
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

1.3860
2.8952
1.4763
3.1031
12.9209
100.5448
93.1992
1.0000
9.2765
1.0622
1.0243
1.0585

MARKET TERMS

2.40
-1.52
2.97
-8.35
2.40
-0.02
-3.33
0.00
2.00
2.56
-0.84
2.04

4.75
-3.18
5.30
-13.82
5.79
0.54
-6.76
0.00
-2.98
6.22
2.43
5.85

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful



IN THIS June 12, 2007 file photo, the building on Broad Street in New York's Financial District that houses the
brokerage firm Goldman Sachs, is shown. Goldman Sachs Group Inc. said Tuesday that its second-quarter prof-
it easily surpassed expectations as profit was buoyed by strength in its trading and underwriting businesses.

ed last year’s fiscal second-quar-
ter results. For that period,
which ended May 30, Goldman
earned $2.05 billion, or $4.58
per share.

Despite Goldman’s strong

FG CAPTTAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

COLONTAL

Div $ P/E
10.9
11.1
28.4
N/M

0.127
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.1
0.249 11.0
0.419 13.5
0.111 27.0
0.240 76
0.420 15.7
0.322 33.9
0.794 13.1
0.332 15.2
0.000 N/M
0.035 8.6
0.407 13.5
0.952 10.9
0.180 55.6

ases)

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

Div $ P/E
0.300 N/M
0.480 N/M
0.000 256.6

Yield
2.05%
7.80%
0.00%

-0.041
0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

0.00%
0.00%
Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
3-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
31-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525



earnings, its shares fell 39 cents
to $149.05 in afternoon trading.
Investors and analysts were
widely expecting a big profit,

(AP Photo: Richard Drew)

and pushed shares higher by
more than five per cent Mon-
day ahead of the earnings
report.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON
late of #48 Winton Highway, Eastern District, New

Providence, Baharnas, deceased

NOTECE is hereby given that all persons haying

chims of demands against the above-named Estate are

requestt do to send the same d uly certified to the undersigned

on or before Sh Ayupuest Be,

AND NOTICE is hereby also gly en that at the
expiration cf the time mentioned above, the aseets of the late

NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON

will be distributed

among the persons entitled thereto having regard only bo
the claims of which the Executor of the Estate shall then

have had Notice,

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.
Alliorneys for the Exeoulors

Sassoon Mouse
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.0. Bar Py dt?
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attention: 5, Smith

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY FORGIE EV ANS late of
#17 London Terrace, Easbern Destrict, New Providence,

Bahamas, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having:
Claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requesbed to send the same duly certified to the undersigmed

on oF before Air ust TW

AND NOTICE is hereby also given thal al the
expiration Om the time nentioned above, the aseels of the late
DOROTHY PORGIE EVANS will be distributed among the:
persons entitled thereto having regard only te the claims of
which the Executor of the Estate shall then have had Notice,

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO,
Atborneys for the Execubors

Sassoon Flouse
Shirley Sireet & Vieboria Avenue
P.O. Box N-272
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: 5, Smith


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
eS







The Tribune

ee



By ALEX MISSICK ; a
Tribune Features Reporter = i ata
e amissick@tribunemedia.net , — oa

en

BAHAMIAN’S taste in culture is said ia

to be as diverse as our love for food

and all things savoury. Many Bahami-

ans are opening their palettes to the

unique and healthy gourmet products

appearing on the shelves. Balduccino

fine foods, located in the Cotton Tree

Traders Plaza on East Bay Street, is one

of the newest specialty gourmet markets

offering foods from across the globe to - ’ oe 4 es oo cy) a
: SS ee a es + TF ie cp
answer the call of the curious eater. . : = diy tes iho hol a. Ae

General Manager, Anton Alexiou, said although = om aes ,
he had been in retail for about 15 years, he and his
brother have talked about the concept for about 10
years.

“We met a very nice couple from New York, Mr
and Mrs Balducci, who own a chain of markets in
New York City and retired to Paradise Island. We
happened to speak with them and they have been
assisting and consulting with us on the business.
They allowed us to use their name and although we
are not a franchise of Balducci’s, we could use Bal-
duccino which is ‘little Balducci’,” Mr Alexiou said.

Customers will find a wide variety of specialty
gourmet products including an international deli
selection of meats, cheeses, freshly baked goods dai-
ly, specialty health foods, signature sandwiches and
one of Mr Alexiou’s favourties, gourmet prepared
carry-home foods.

“Our executive chef, Vanessa Riley is a very cre-
ative chef and everyday she comes up with new cre-
ations. The gourmet prepared take home meals is
really one of our focuses aside from our hot signa-
ture sandwiches and the cold deli sandwiches. We
try to do meals everyday that you can take home and
eat. Everyday we have our signature roast chicken
with an orange rub. Often times she does one pot
meals such as Sheppard’s pie or lobster pot pie. I
give her free reign over the prepared foods because
it’s her creative side that I want to bring out,” Mr
Alexiou said. : : / :

As for the market itself, Balduccino carries a vast ABOVE: Pick from a wide selcetion of fresh fruit.
selection of items that are rare or impossible to find































in the Bahamas.

“We buy through their parent company. All of the
Ut ee MCU NOL OLIN AOL Lem UE crcUnse goods we buy come through Balducci’s. Some of these
products have never been in Nassau before. In our
bakery, the Red Velvet cupcakes have been very pop-
ular because they are very hard to find in Nassau. We

BELOW: Some of the many delicious cheeses at Balduccino’s. work with a lot of up and coming chefs and buy direct
from them. This gives us a nice variety so we are not









stuck on just what we are able to make or just what
one large company is able to produce. Our aim is to
try and bring in interesting specialty products consis-
tently and at a fair price,” Mr Alexiou said.

Mr Alexiou said to service the sushi lovers, Balduc-
cino will also have a sushi bar.

“Tt will be a small set up and will probably only be
available several days a week for now. As we get bet-
ter at production, we will probably do it every day
with different types of sushi such as simple California
rolls and vegetarian options,” Mr Alexiou said.

As for the future of Balduccino, Mr Alexiou said
there are a lot of interesting of plans for the fine food
market.

“We want to make pairings between what we offer
in the store and the recipes we produce. We try to use
as many of the products on the shelves in the prepara-
tion. Where we are trying to be a little bit different is
where we offer something on the shelf and in prepara-
tion, we are going to give the customers the recipe and
have it available. So if you like something we are serv-
ing, you can go find the ingredients on the shelf and
take the recipe home and make it yourself. We are
also focusing on something called dream dinners
where we put together baskets of everything you need
to prepare the meal in the correct proportion with the
recipe. I have been surprised with the response to
organic foods and we have gotten a tremendous recep-
tion from Bahamians. It’s amazing how many people
are looking for that type of food that is untampered
with so we are headed strongly in that direction.”
THE TRIBUNE

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Fam

Although the independence
celebrations have conclud-
ed, the party does not have
to stop and once again The
Tribune’s Things 2 Do
countdown is the place to
keep you in the know.

. An exhibition by Net-

tie Symonette will pre-
mier this Friday at the Cen-
tral Bank’s Art Center. The
75-year-old multitalented
artist will present close to
96 abstract pieces that have
already been compared to
the likes of Picasso,
Michaél Bellon, and Barnett
Newman. The collection
which was first started in
2003 in the Abacos while
Mrs Symonette was work-
ing on her memoirs, uses
mirror like illusion to tell
her story of life and emo-
tions. The exhibition which
Starts at 6pm, there will be
light refreshments available
and the exhibition will
continue until August 7,
2009.

» The Bahamas Hot

Rad Association along
with the Juke Box presents
The Shop Wars Drag Rac-
ing Invitational. Set to kick-
off this Saturday at the
BHRA Motorsport Park at
the rear of the QE Sporting
complex, the event will
showcase the best in drag
racing among some of the
most decked out machines
here on the islands. Teams
from Ultimate Performance,
BAM Auto, JAP Perfor-
mance, Dirty South, the
Juke Box, and others will
compete for the coveted
title of ‘King Of The Street.’
The event starts at 1pm,
and is free for kids under
12, and $5 for everyone
else.

«The National Art

Gallery of the Bahamas
continues with its summer
of love Film Series, this
Thursday with the film Cii-
mates. The 101 minute
Turkish/French film (that
includes English subtitles)
written by internationally
acclaimed director Nuri
Bilge Ceylan, tells of a Turk-
ish professor who travels to
the Aegean coast with his
girlfriend, however while
there the two undergo a
terrible break-up. As the
film develops, the story of
the broken couple’s rekin-
dling love becomes the
centerpiece for the movie.
It begins at 8 pm at the
NAGB property on West
and West Hill Street. The
event is $5, with light bev-
erages served afterward.

» The Junkanoo Sum-

mer Festival continues
on Bay Street this Saturday
and will showcase tradi-
tional Goombay music, live
bands, and lot of local food
and fun. The all day event
which will continue every
Saturday in July, will also
feature local crafts,
Bahamian books, and vari-
ous traditional contest.

. This weekend its all

about the art of
Karaoke singing. If you’re
the next Mariah Carey, or
the next William Wong,
answer the call and show
the Bahamas what you’re
made of. Tonight, its Crazy
Johnnies from 8 to 12
located in the two story
building after On The Run
East Bay Street. Then on
Saturday, The Corner Motel
in Carmichael will have its
karaoke night. That event
begins at 10pm and ends at
3am. Both events are free
for all.

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net



IN exactly one month, Mario’s Bowling and
Family Entertainment Palace, the largest family
entertainment centre in the country, will open its
doors to offer Bahamians a world of exciting
new options the entire family can enjoy.

Leslie Miller, former Minster
of Trade and Industry, said the
$10 million, 80,000 square foot
palace has been in the making
for about 10 years.

“This type of centre is the
prototype for the future. It was
the vision of my son, the late
Mario Miller who will have a
bust of his image in the fountain
that guards the front entrance,”
Mr Miller said

With a $15 entrance fee for
adults and $10 for children, the
state of the art centre can hold
2,000 to 3,000 persons and will
have a concession stand, food
franchises such as the pizza par-
lour Tuscanos, a 30,000 square
foot outdoor roller skating rink,
billiards, dart room, and game
room with over $400,000 worth
of games. The dinning room,
which seats up to 350 persons, is
elevated to give guests a 360
degree view of the majestic
building. However, the main
focal point will be bowling.

“There has been a massive
resurgent in bowling over the
last 10 to 15 years in the United
States. It is now the number one
indoor sport in the world again.
You have over a billion people
bowling and the market for
bowling is now some $28 billion
a year. There will be a 10 foot
screen in the back of every lane.
We have 50 screens in this
building, so while you are bowl-

WORKER prepping one of the many bowling lanes that will be ready for bowling fans in a matte

ing you can watch the game as
well,” Mr Miller said.

Mr Miller said it is a family
centre, every Sunday will be
church day and as of next year,
he is looking to host all of the
Miss Bahamas events.

“We are giving them some-
place where they could be
appreciated as Bahamians. Only
religious music will be played
in here all day on Sundays. We
will have buffets especially for
the churches. What we want to
do that is unique is have a fash-
10n show every Sunday. There
will also be a local entertainer to
sing gospel music on Sundays
and once a month we will bring
over one of the big stars in the
United States such as Kirk
Franklin. This is a place where
they can have a wonderful expe-
rience with the entire family
where Sunday is reserved for
God,” Mr Miller said.

As for security, Mr Miller
said there will be a no tolerance
policy.

“To avoid problems, we will
have 58 cameras through out
the building. The minute you
use profanity, you are out of
there for one month, second
time is three months- there is
no third time. I think there are
more good people than bad, so
why tolerate the bad? When
people come here they want to
make sure their entire family is

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE B9



ABOVE: The grand entance of the Mario Miller Bowling and Family Entertainment Palace will feature a
bust of the late Mario Miller in his honor.



MEN working tirelessly to complete the reception of this massive entertainment centre.

safe and secure. There will be
no fighting. There are also four
metal detectors at the front
entrance,” Mr Miller said.

For those who prefer a more
private setting, Mr Miller said
he has them covered.

“We will be offering some-
thing that is unique and was just
started in the United States and
Europe-four private bowling
lanes. You can rent those at
$3,500 a night with food and
drinks included, your own bar,
and two forty-two inch LCD
televisions. We also have a pri-
vate club where you pay a mem-
bership fee of probably at
$1,000 a year. If you register
early you can come every night
for free. Without that, you pay
$100 to enter. In this club, we
also to tell the life stories of

r of weeks.

great Bahamian entertainers
such as Freddy Munnings Jr,
40’s and 50’s musical legend
Paul Mayers and we are naming
the club after Ronnie Butler.
Bahamians would see the his-
tory of our entertainers,” Mr
Miller said.

Mr Miller said one of the
great things he is doing with the
palace, is using it as a hurricane
relief centre.

“The building can withstand
180 miles and hour winds. We
have two stand-by generators
at double the capacity for what
we need so in case it is needed,
we can provide that to the
Bahamian people,” Mr Miller
said.

As for the future of Mario’s
Bowling and Family Entertain-
ment Palace, Mr Miller said

every three years the building
will undergo renovations to
keep it at its best.

“We look forward to a good
future because it is the only
family entertainment centre in
this country and it is second to
none in the world. We want the
Bahamas to be first class and
we are really giving the people
first class entertainment. Mari-
o’s birthday is January 24 and
every January we want to give a
scholarship of about $20,000 to
a student at St Augustine’s col-
lege. We look forward to giv-
ing back to the community
because the community is what
is going to make us successful or
fail. If you want to succeed you
get everybody involved in what
you are doing and giving back.”


PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

Mervin Smith Vincent Laschiazza-Paul

THE MEN OF

Donovan Rolle Roosevelt Joseph Omar Francis

MEET



Freddie Lightbourne Terrance LCN,

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

ed secret until the final night competi-
tion, and a panel of international and
local celebrity judges will select the over-
all winner.

The competitors for the fastest, fittest,

; aa strongest, and most intelligent Bahami-
a | ae an man for 2009/2010 include Roosevelt
: | Joseph, Terrance Kelly, Omar Francis,
Mervin Smith, Vincent Laschiazza-Paul,
Kendrick Tynes, Robert Farquahson,
and Freddie Lightbourne.

The winner of the Mr Caribbean
Bahamas Fitness Challenge will win
over $5,000 in cash and prizes and will
represent The Bahamas in the 2009 Mr
Caribbean International Competition, in
Runaway Bay, Jamaica, October 5-12.

Scores from the preliminary events
and online voting will be combined with
the final night competition scores to
determine the overall winner of this
year’s fitness challenge and physique
competition.

Entertainment will be provided by
Tada, Sammy Starr, Sketch, Bodine
Johnson, and Metellus Chipman, Mr
Caribbean International 2006.

Tickets for the Final Night Competi-
tion are priced at $25 for general admis-
sion, $60 for VIP seating, and $100 for
Platinum seating. Tickets may be pur-
chased at Bally Total Fitness, Body-
zone, Mystical Gym, the Jukebox in the
Mall at Marathon, and from the Box
Office of the Sheraton Cable Resort
(Saturday, July 25 and Sunday, July 26
until the final night competition).

Members of the international com-
munity and local public can be a part of
selecting this year’s winner by voting
online for their favourite competitor at
www.mrcaribbahamas.com, until 12 am
Sunday, July 26. Online voting counts
for 10 per cent of the competitors’ over-
all score and the competitor with the
highest number of votes will win the
Mr. Caribbean Bahamas FanChoice
Awardâ„¢,

Eight athletic and physical- | ys é
ly fit young men have been pave

center BAHAMAS FITNESS CHALLENGE 2009

. . ’
4 i ) « ;
7 | } J } !

i ,
ad 7
| 7 ; tl K . 7



2009 Mr Caribbean
Bahamas Fitness Challenge
and Physique Competition,
scheduled to be held July
24 to July 26.

The young men will have a grueling
weekend of competition starting on Fri-
day, July 24 with the Blind Date Dinner
and Personality Competition. Each com-
petitor will be paired with a randomly
selected, female blind date, and placed
in a supervised dining setting, where the
young ladies will interview and judge
their personality, confidence, and per-
sonal style on special scorecards during
the evening. Interested young ladies,
over the age of 18, may complete a form
for the Blind Date random drawing,
which will be done live on radio, when
they purchase any of the Platinum tick-
ets for the event.

The men will then compete in the
Bally Total Fitness Challenge, a mili-
tary style obstacle course and fitness
competition, sponsored by Bally Total
Fitness on Saturday, July 25 at Sandy-
port Beach, from 2 pm to 5 pm. The
event is free and open to the public.

The Final Night/Physique Competi-
tion will be held in the Independence
Ballroom of the Sheraton Cable Beach
Resort at 7.30 pm, under the theme:
“Area Code 242: War Against Vio-
lence.” The event will also aid The
Bahamas Crisis Centre, as part of its
domestic violence prevention initiative,
“M.V.P.: Men for Violence Prevention.”

The hosts for this event will be two
surprise celebrity guests, a closely-guard-







Treemonisha -
a true class act

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

IT was a pleasure to view the
recent opera Treemonisha
which was staged as part of the
Independence Celebrations last
week at the Dundas. During a
time when Bahamian patrio-
tism was at an all time high, I
was so proud to see the profes-
sionalism and talent that the all
Bahamian cast displayed and
to hear that crowds flocked the
Dundas Centre for the Per-
forming Arts each night.

Treemonisha - an opera writ-
ten by American composer
Scott Joplin is set in 1866 imme-
diately after the Civil War and
the end of slavery. The plays
develops as an educated adopt-
ed young lady proves through
tremendous strife that educa-
tion is far more productive than
witchcraft or Obeah.

A stellar cast of more than
50 Bahamians did an amazing
job in bringing Joplin’s vision
to life under the direction of
noted musician Cleveland
Williams through spectacular
singing and dance, colourful
costumes and a truly talented
orchestra.

As a fan of classical music, I
was excited to see this perfor-
mance which brought a decid-
edly different flavour to recent
performances at the Dundas.

In the three act opera tells
the story of very superstitious
former slaves left alone on a
plantation and how the title
character Treemonisha (the
adopted daughter of Ned and
Monisha) brings to light the
importance of education in a
budding society.

The lead role was shared by
noted sopranos Candace Bost-
wick ( who performed the night
T attended and did a superb job)
and Nikita- Thompson- Wells,
with Portia Barnet and Lillian
Bastian playing Monisha, (Por-
tia performed the night I
attended) Kermit Strachan
playing Ned, and Demetrius
Delancy who played Remus.

My one piece of advice,
should the producers decide on
an encore presentation- create a
more vibrant set and have the
orchestra play softer so that all
the solos can be heard.

All in all, it was a delightful
evening showcasing some of the
best talent the country has to
offer.





















































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ABOVE: Nettie Symonette: “One
particular day things were going
really bad, and | just decided to
pour my soul into this piece that
I’ve labeled ‘When The Going
Gets Tough.”

INFLUENCED from the commer-
cial district of Mombasa, Symon-
ette’s art has been compared to
the likes of Picasso, Michaél Bee-
line, and Barnett Newman.

Emotions
on canvas

FROM page 12

Emerging artist 75-year-old
Nettie Symonette, says since she
began learning the concept of
abstract art more than 9 years
ago, expressing her feelings
through art has practically
become second nature.

Her debut exhibition will be
featured at the Central Bank this
Friday where Mrs Symonette
plans to showcase more than 90
unique abstract creations.

Preferring acrylics to tran-
scend her sometimes tumultuous
emotions onto canvas, she said
her style can be described as a
“burst of colour,” and has been
compared to the likes of Picasso,
Michaél Bellon, and Barnett
Newman.

However she said unlike her
predecessors who have been
painting most of their lives, she
has only recently acquired this
unique skill.

“When I was a child I wanted
to learn to draw. I remember
trying to draw a hibiscus, a
sheep, and even a banana, and I
couldn’t. However this skill was
like a gift from God, it’s unique
and it truly allows me to tell the
stories of my life.”

She explained after a trip to
Mombasa in 2005, her skill was
enhanced even more after
observing how Africans
embraced bright colours.

She said: “The colours were
so vibrant, they were so strong,
and I found that when I came
home I suddenly became sort of
excited about how colours can
maximise the essence of my
work.”

Now in her golden years, Mrs
Symonette’s art has become her
new canvas for self expression,
and she is loving every minute of
it.

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award.

Tf so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.
THE TRIBUNE









Gia SA i

Mostly sunny, a
t-storm possible.




















ORLANDO 4 Some sunshine with
High: 90° F/32° C a thunderstorm.

Partly sunny with a Partly cloudy with a

stray shower.

Partly sunny, a
t-storm; breezy.

Partly sunny, a

thunderstorm. t-storm possible.












Low: 74° F/23°C
a High: 90° High: 92° High: 92° High: 91°
c ine High: 90° Low: 81° Low: 81° Low: 81° Low: 81° Low: 80° see EO
TAMPA Ls ; ET AccuWeather RealFeel
High: 90° F/32° C . = 101°-92° F [| 110°-90°F 111°-86° F 101°-91° F High _Ht.(ft.)_ Low
Low: 77° F/25°C ae r. The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:28am. 23 7:34am. ae
< @ F : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 2:03pm. 27 831p.m. 05
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7 1 msON 3:02pm. 28 9:36pm. 04
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4 ed High: 90° F/32° C Last year's VOW eee eee eeeeeeeeeeeeees 71° F/22° C " "
ar Low: 77° F/25°C Precipitation |}j|| ~~ Sunrise...... 6:29. a.m. Moonrise. ... 12:19 a.m.
rat As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccscssssessscsseeesesseeeee 0.00" Sunset....... 8:02 p.m. Moonset..... 1:37 p.m.
alll, ; FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date .. 18. Last New First Full
High: 89° F/32° C @ High: 90° F/32° C Normal year to date oo... eee 21.33" = ‘ ss
Low: 80° F/27°C ” Low: 77° F/25° ie
ay AccuWeather.com =
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; MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul.15 = Jul. 21 Jul, 28
Z -* High: 90° F/32° C High: 92° F/33° C
othe ’ Low: 80°F/27°C NASSAU tig “a ee
High: 90° F/32°C oe:
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KEY WEST —— “cg _ GATISLAND
High: 90° F/32" C High: 88° F/31° C
Low: 83° F/28° C Low: 74° F/23°C
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High: 90° F/32° C 5 ah. 9° E290
Low: 80°F/27°C Hae Eee e
; : Low: 76° F/24° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 95° F/35° C ——- -
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LONG ISLAND
Low: 76° F/24°C
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday i MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 92° F/33°C
Fe FC Fe FC Fe FC Fe FC FC F/G Fe FC — Low: 76° F/24°C
Albuquerque 97/36 70/21 t 97/36 68/20 $s Indianapolis 86/30 66/18 t 83/28 63/17 pc Philadelphia 86/30 70/21 s 86/30 70/21 t
Anchorage 74/23 58/14 p 75/23 58/14 c Jacksonville 92/33 72/22 t 93/33 74/23 t Phoenix 110/43 87/30 s 111/43 88/31 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 92/33 69/20 s 90/32 71/21 t Kansas City 88/31 67/19 t 89/31 65/18 t Pittsburgh 84/28 68/20 po 82/27 60/15 pc RAGGEDISLAND Uigh:94°F/s4°c
Atlantic City 84/28 66/18 s 86/30 67/19 t Las Vegas 108/42 81/27 s 110/43 87/30 s Portland, OR 90/32 60/15 s 90/32 60/15 pc High: 92° F/33° C Low: 78° F/26°C
Baltimore 89/31 68/20 s 88/31 68/20 t Little Rock 101/38 76/24 s 96/35 73/22 t Raleigh-Durham 92/33 71/21 s 92/33 74/23 t Low: 74°F/23°C &.
Boston 80/26 65/18 s 84/28 67/19 t Los Angeles 88/31 66/18 s 89/31 66/18 pc St. Louis 90/32 71/21 t 89/31 67/19 t .
Buffalo 82/27 64/17 p 76/24 58/14 c Louisville 90/32 72/22 t 86/30 67/19 pc Salt Lake City 91/382 63/17 s 96/35 68/20 $s GREAT INAGUA Bn
Charleston, SC 90/32 72/22 t 94/34 76/24 t Memphis 98/36 78/25 pe 91/382 75/23 t San Antonio 101/38 76/24 s 99/37 76/24 ¢ High: 95° F/35° C
Chicago 84/28 64/17 t 81/27 59/15 s Miami 90/32 80/26 t 90/32 79/26 t San Diego 76/24 68/20 p 77/25 68/20 pc Low. 77°F/25°C
Cleveland 82/27 69/20 t 80/26 60/15 pc Minneapolis 78/25 59/15 pe 74/23 55/12 s San Francisco 79/26 58/14 p 78/25 57/13 pe .
Dallas 100/37 78/25 s 103/39 77/25 s Nashville 94/34 69/20 t 85/29 69/20 t Seattle 80/26 57/13 s 81/27 56/13 s
Denver 85/29 57/13 p 93/33 5915 t New Orleans 92/33 77/25 t 92/33 77/25 t Tallahassee 92/33 73/22 t 92/33 74/23 t ca
Detroit 84/28 66/18 t 82/27 59/15 pc New York 84/28 71/21 s 86/30 72/22 t Tampa 90/32 77/25 t 91/32 77/25 t :
Honolulu 88/31 76/24 s 90/32 75/23 $s Oklahoma City 100/37 72/22 s 99/37 70/21 t Tucson 103/39 79/26 t 104/40 80/26 s Be
Houston 96/35 77/25 s 96/35 76/24 t Orlando 90/32 74/23 t 92/33 75/23 t Washington, DC 90/32 72/22 s 86/30 69/20 t

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The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.





Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg



High
F/C
90/32
72/22
17/25
91/32
59/15
89/31
86/30
80/26
100/37
86/30
97/36
77/25
82/27
65/18
75/23
97/36
52/11
97/36
91/32
68/20
90/32
81/27
79/26
76/24
66/18
81/27
79/26
69/20
90/32
72/22
91/32
105/40
83/28
79/26
52/11
89/31
73/22
73/22
91/32
86/30
77/25
102/38
75/23
75/23
78/25
77/25
93/33
72/22
77/25
77/25
71/21
102/38
88/31
91/32
63/17
88/31
57/13
90/32
63/17
86/30
75/23
61/16
93/33
91/32
17/25
86/30
76/24
88/31
86/30
66/18








Low
F/C
77/25
59/15
55/12
76/24
49/9
79/26
77/25
69/20
75/23
75/23
71/21
61/16
77/25
44/6
SoZ
70/21
43/6
73/22
81/27
43/8
M5iZ8
71/21
66/18
58/14
54/12
57/13
61/16
54/12
72/22
54/12
82/27
83/28
70/21
62/16
30/-1
79/26
61/16
55/12
61/16

|

Today





77/25 t
54/12 t
75/23

63/17
54/12
56/13
54/12

82/27 t

56/13
61/16
58/14
65/18
79/26
68/20
81/27

32/0
68/20

36/2
73/22
57/13
68/20
59/15

45/7
82/27
75/23
61/16
63/17
59/15
70/21
68/20

48/8

sh
pc

sh
s

pc
pc
pc
pc

sh

pe
pc
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c

High
F/C
92/33
76/24
73/22
93/33
63/17
90/32
86/30
83/28
85/29
79/26
94/34
79/26
82/27
66/18
79/26
95/35
52/11
98/36
92/33
71/21
93/33
82/27
83/28
75/23
63/17
84/28
87/30
70/21
91/32
75/23
91/32
106/41
88/31
83/28
57/13
92/33
73/22
75/23
97/36
83/28
78/25
102/38
73/22
82/27
85/29
77/25
99/37
75/23
82/27
84/28
74/23
104/40
94/34
91/32
65/18
89/31
66/18
87/30
73/22
90/32
73/22
60/15
94/34
88/31
17/25
91/32
75/23
87/30
81/27
60/15

Thursday

Low
F/C
79/26
61/16
54/12
75/23
52/11
79/26
77/25
69/20
79/26
77/25
71/21
61/16
77/25
45/7
61/16
64/17
43/6
74/23
81/27
48/8
75/23
71/21
65/18
60/15
52/11
63/17
62/16
55/12
5128
55/12
82/27
85/29
75/23
63/17
36/2
80/26
59/15
57/13
63/17
77/25
53/11
75/23
61/16
59/15
56/13
53/11
82/27
57/13
64/17
57/13
67/19
79/26
72/22
79/26
34/1
74/23
43/6
72/22
58/14
68/20
ale
40/4
79/26
77/25
57/13
63/17
59/15
66/18
61/16
50/10

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MARINE FORECAST

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15tx, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS &



; AGENTS







WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
Thursday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Thursday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Thursday: __E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F



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Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

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Miami
90/80

Fronts

Cold

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Stationary Mag—eefit-

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Or you 2 rest easy knowing

way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

Tel (282 351-500

have excellent insurance
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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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| TH: (242) sommes Tafa ahaa | tl cron








Meet the men of en loods of Baliuccino’s
Mr Caribbean go’ Page eight

Bahamas Fitness
see page 10




WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009



Titled ‘Caged,’ this is one of several dozen pieces included in
the upcoming Nettie Symonette art exhibit at Central Bank.

@motTions
Canvas

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

ABSTRACT art is described as one of the few forms
of expression allowing artist to create stories with no
reference to elements of the world.

This freedom not only paves the way for the artist
to capture the world as they see it, but according to
some it also exposes the true essence of what art
was meant to be.






PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Were my sons kidnapped? C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.192WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH T-STORM HIGH 90F LOW 81F F E A T U R E S SEE‘THEARTS’ SECTION S P O R T S Emotions on SEEPAGE ELEVEN canvas Chandra takes No.2 spot By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE mother of two boys who d isappeared in Andros for nearly five weeks said a kidnapping c ould explain their mysterious disappearance. Vera Clarke, of Kemp Road, Nassau, said she is suspicious as her sons have told her conflicting stories about their where abouts during the 33 days they w ere missing. After leaving their grandmother’s house in Smith’s Hill, south east Andros, at around 6pm on June 9, Marcell Clarke, 6, told his mother he fell in a cave-like hole and was stuck there for the entire time he was away from home. But his half-brother Deange l o, 9, said they were only trapped in the hole for two or three days, r aising questions about where they were for the rest of the time they were missing. Ms Clarke said: “When they were gone I thought they had been kidnapped, and I think they would tell me if they had been, unless somebody threatened them. Mother suspicious o v er Andr os boys’ conflicting stories The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E SEE page eight Police awaiting USclearance to interview murder victim’s daughter B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net B AHAMIAN police are awaiting clearance from A merican authorities to travel to the United States to interview the teenage daughter of murder victim Anna Garrison in connec t ion with her mother’s death. P olice Superintendent Elsworth Moss said Bahamia n authorities are “making progress” in this regard, working through diplomatic channels in their efforts to speak with Madison Pugh, w ho also goes by the names Madison Sweeting and M adison McKinney. According to the senior o fficer, police are already aware of where the teenag er, said to be aged around 16 years old, is currently residing. T hey say Madison left The Bahamas for the U.S. Bahamian authorities work through diplomatic channels SEE page eight By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net COMMISSIONER of Police Reginald Ferguson yesterday did not criticise the ruling of a US Federal court that sentenced self confessed drug dealer Dwight Major to less than nine years behind bars. Although Major was sentenced to 108 months in prison with supervised release after five years, his sentence will take into account the 78 Police ‘will not be targeting Dwight Major’ when he returns SEE page eight P i c t u r e s c o u r t e s y o f Z N S MARCELL CLARKE , six, and Deangelo Clarke, nine. THE delay and waste of money associated with the paving of a major road in Acklins was as a direct result of the former govern ment’s insistence that two companies joint venture to repair the same stretch of highway, it was claimed yesterday. Caribbean Asphalt Products Ltd (CAP ness for more than 30 years, was reportedly made to joint venture with M&R Road Builders to carry out road construction in South Acklins. It is claimed that the joint venture was a condition of CAP receiving the contract for the road construction. CAP’s first and only contract under the former PLP administration was in 2006 when it was claimed the company was instructed by the Ministry of Public Works to joint venture with a company called M&R Road Builders to carry out road construction in South Acklins. The principals in this company were two Acklins businessmen, both strong PLP supporters. At the time M&R Road Builders was a novice company in road building. The joint venture turned out to Road paving issues blamed on PLP govt’ s joint venture insistence SEE page eight By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net THE Prosecution closed its case yesterday against Troyniko McNeil who is accused of the November 2007 murder of internationally recognised handbag designer Harl Taylor. McNeil, 22, the son of Taylor’s former business partner Troy McNeil, is accused of caus ing Taylor’s death between Saturday, November 17, and Sunday, November 18, 2007 while being concerned with another. Taylor, 37, was found dead at IN THE event that Prime Minister Hubert Ingra ham will not offer for re-election in the 2012 general election, candidates for the leadership of the party are reportedly set to make a push for the deputy leadership post at the FNM’s upcoming convention, The Tribune was told. While these intentions, which are being heavily guarded in the run up to the convention, have start ed to leak out to the general public, there are also reports that the chairman of the party, Johnley Ferguson could also face a challenge to his position. FNM leadership candidates ‘will push for deputy’ if PM won’t stand in 2012 SEE page eight Hubert Ingraham Prosecution closes case in Harl Taylor murder trial SEE page eight By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A CORONER'S inquest into the death of teenager Michael Knowles, who was found hanged in a cell at the East Street South police station, is expected to start soon, said Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson. Meanwhile, Knowles' mother Donna Wilson said she still has unanswered questions about his death as she prepares for his funeral on Thursday. Yesterday, the police chief would not reveal details of the police investigation into the boy's death or the results of the state's autopsy only saying the findings which were recently turned over to the Coroner's Court would be made public through the inquest proceedings. "A lot depends on what the Coroner’s inquest into teen’ s cell death to start soon SEE page eight

PAGE 2

ONE of the world’s biggest beauty pageants The Miss Universe Pageant is coming to town at a time when Bahamians are suffering from the effects of the global eco nomic downturn. The Tribune hit the streets yesterday to ask if the average Bahamian would be enticed to attend the event even though the least expensive ticket is selling for $175. Bernard Crawley “Yes (I would attend because for a lot of Bahami ans it’s a status thing, it does n’t have anything to do with the pageant itself, it’s the fact of being able to say ‘I can go.’ It’s right here versus having to take a flight somewhere and then pay to go to the pageant, its right here, its right in the Bahamas. For a very long time there won’t be a another Miss Universe Pageant here. For most of us we just see when it’s on television so this is better.” Wendy Dawkins “Yeah, I think people will pay. “It doesn’t matter what it costs, if a person wants to do a thing or wants to get it, trust me they will find the money and do it. It could cost a mil lion dollars, they’ll do it, but tomorrow they will be hungry, but they will do it.” Gia Anderson “This is the first time they are having Miss Universe over here, so trust me they will spend their money to go out and see it.” DJ Crazy “I will go and support it, besides you have guys who go just to see them legs. If I have the money I will go just to see what other countries get out of the experience.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News ............................. P1,2,3,6,7,8,12 Editorial/Letters. ......................................... P4 Sports ..............................................P9,10,11, BUSINESS/AR TS SECTION Business ...................................... P1,2,3,4,5,6 Arts/Taste.......................................P8,9,10,12 Comics........................................................P7W eather.....................................................P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 16 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES GOVERNMENT has s et a July 28 deadline for i nvestors interested in registering for the first phase in the privatisation process of the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC Y esterday, government o fficially issued a notice of privatisation and announced the launch ofthe process to sell a 51 per cent stake in BTC. I n the notice, which was featured in several l ocal and international publications, the Bahamian government encourages interested parties to participate in the registration and pre-qualification process. T he government is s eeking a strategic partner who can offer the following: “A strong reputat ion in the telecommunications industry; ability and commitment to gen-e rate value-added revenue and cost synergies with BTC operations; financial strength and operational platform to be able to enhance BTC’s u nderlying network, serv ices, billing and customer service, and a history of strong financialp erformance.” Interested parties are invited to register for the p rivatisation process of B TC through the submission of a registration form and the payment of a processing fee of US$25,000 on or before 3pm (EST 2 009. T he registration form and guidelines on the submission of the forma re available at http://www.btcprivatiza tion.com. Q ualified parties will be invited to participate in the due diligence phase, giving them access t o a data room, financial vendor due diligence report, technical due dilig ence report, management presentation and site visits. A fter the due diligence p hase, investors/consor tiums will be invited tos ubmit binding bids for t he stake in BTC. Deadline for investors in BTC privatisation process Bahamians have their say on the Miss Universe Pageant PROUD Bahamians were horrified to find the Montagu foreshore littered w ith garbage following three days of cele bration throughout the Independence Day holiday weekend. Nassau residents taking a morning walk along the waterfront on Monday morning said they were disgusted to find a stinking mess of food containers, beer c ans, bottles and plastic littering the publ ic park and coastline. They said garbage cans stood empty while litter was apparently strewn across the ground by hundreds of revellers enjoying a ‘No Boat Regatta’ held onF riday, Saturday and Sunday at the Mont agu foreshore. Julie Pinder, who was among the group who found the mess, said: “There w ere empty garbage cans and garbage everywhere. People were there to pick it up, but that’s not the point the point is that it shouldn’t be there in the first place. “It shouldn’t be there any day of the week, but isn’t Independence Day all a bout pride in our country? If people are going to be having funct ions out there, there should be a law that it should be cleaned up before they leave. It’s disgusting. It stank. And every-o ne agreed it’s a disgrace,” she said. Independence celebration leaves a mess in Montagu MONTAGU foreshore was littered with garbage on Monday morning following a three-day party over the Independence Day holiday weekend. BERNARD CRAWLEY WENDY DAWKINS GIA ANDERSON DJ CRAZY T ALK STREET WASHINGTON THE United States and Cuba are renewing negotiations on the U.S.-Cuba Migration accords, according to Associated Press. The State Department said department official Craig Kelly headed the U.S. delegation meeting Tuesday with Cuban negotiators in New York. The talks' focus will be on promotion of safe, legal and orderly migration between the two countries. The Obama administration proposed on May 22 to resume talks to implement the 15-year-old accords. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton announced May 31 that Cuba had agreed. Former President George W. Bush suspended the talks after the last session in 2003. US, Cuba r esume migration talks after six year pause SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico PUERTO RICOis reporting the U.S. island's first death from swine flu, and another eight deaths are being investigated, according to Associated Press. The Health Department says the victim was a 27-year-old man who had a history of asthma. He died July 6 but the cause was not confirmed until Tuesday. Puerto Rico's chief epidemi ologist, Johnny Rullan, says 35 local cases of the H1N1 virus have been confirmed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Con trol. Another 290 potential cases are still being evaluated. Gov. Luis Fortuno says authorities are seeing the person-to-person spread of the virus in the Caribbean island of nearly 4 million inhabitants. He is urging anyone with flu-like symptoms to seek treatment immediately. Puerto Rico reports its first swine flu death Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 3

ESTABLISHING a national lottery to help fund the country’s education system would create a cycle of social and moral corruption, according to a group of churches. In a joint press statement issued yesterday, representatives of Grace Community Church, Bahamas Conferenceof the Methodist Church, Calvary Bible Church, Kingdom Life Church, New Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church and Temple Baptist Church spoke out against the proposal which calls for the possible introduc-tion of “a special tax and a national lottery” to better fund the nation’s public schools. The possibility of creating a national lottery to benefit the schools is one of the suggestions in the government’s 10-year plan for education. However, the church representatives said that the consideration given to the lottery pro posal by the Ministry of Education is “tragically unfortunate.” Said the group of churches: “From our perspective it is both contradictory and hypocritical for such an esteemed educational system that believes and teaches that hard work, indus try, and self-discipline are the (fundamental cation to seek to have that lofty and worthwhile endeavour funded by an immoral means that caters to chance and indiscipline and promotes a disregard for a wholesome work ethic.” To have a national lottery financially supporting the education system would “undermine the very lofty ideals and spirit of discipline the Ministry of Education is trying to inculcate in the youth of our nation and, in fact, actually help to create a cycle of the very adverse social and moral corruption it is trying to prevent,” the church representatives said. “The folly of such a course of action is heightened when one considers that our schools are presently suffering from a national ‘D’ average. Presently, the average businessman is complaining about the difficul ty of finding people to hire who can do basic math. Imagine therefore what further legalisation of gambling will do to the mindset of an emerging work force that even now is viewed as incompetent, unskilled, and undisciplined in many quarters.” The group of churches is calling on the Ministry of Education to carefully consider research that has been done on the topic of young people and gambling. According to the church representatives, research by Loma Linda University Medical School's Professor Durand Jacobs shows that once exposed, teenagers are three times as likely as adults to become addicted to gambling. “The same researcher discovered that at least one in 10 teens engages in illegal activity (stealing, shoplifting, selling drugs or pros titution) to finance their gambling.” The group of churches said it would also like to point out to the Ministry of Education that legalised gambling “will bring devastating costs to families and society at large, such as divorce, poverty, child abuse, the creation of addicts, increased crime associated with gambling losses, and the further erosion of our already weak national work ethic.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 3 T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242 2335 2335 Soft and durable Diversatex Soft and durable DiversatexTM TMcushion is fade and mildew cushion is fade and mildew resistant and is available in resistant and is available in blue, green or terracotta blue, green or terracotta x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsOutdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport R eporter dmaycock@ tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A large q uantity of suspected cocaine valued at $600,000 was seized byB ahamian and United States law enforcement o fficials on Grand Bahama this week. Asst Supt Welbourne B ootle, police press liaison officer, said the drug bust occurred at theF reeport Container Port on Monday afternoon. Information He said that sometime a round 4pm, acting on information received, o fficers of the Drug Enforcement Unit (DEU Enforcement Agency, and US Customs went to the container port. T he officers, along with container port security, conducted a search of a2 0ft container, in which they discovered 24 pack a ges of suspected cocaine. ASP Bootle said no arrests have made in con-n ection with the matter and investigations are continuing. Suspected cocaine worth $600,000 is seized In brief n TOUGHCALL COLUMN TOUGH Call, written by columnist Larry Smith, will not be published in today’s Tribune. T he column will appear next Wednesday when Mr Smith returns from vacation. By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net AS SOMEAbaconians warn that vigilante justice is not far offi n the face of a rising tide of boat thefts in the islands, the Commissioner of Police says he is “focusing” on the problem. Commissioner Reginald Ferg uson said yesterday that the leadership of the Royal Bahamas Police Force is “fully cognisant of the importance of the yachtingc ommunity in that area of the Bahamas” and is “making as much effort as it can to assist local law enforcement” in addressing the problem. I n Green Turtle Cay, Abaco, some islanders told The Tribune that they feel the unprecedented increase in boat thefts over the last two years comes down simply to the police’s inability to “be in all places at all times.” Police However, many others have become so disillusioned with the ever increasing number of boat t hefts from their marinas and private docks that they fear that some police could even be complicit in the robberies. At best they are simply indifferent, at worst, involved in the crimes,” suggested one Green Turtle Cay (GTC While police have been reluct ant to provide statistics upon request, a spokesman from one insurance company said his firm has had to pay out in connection with 58 Abaco boat thefts in 2008. Among the most popular targets for thieves are Intrepids and Contenders with powerfule ngines, especially Yamahas. One insurance company representative, who did not wished to be named, said: “It is quite an epid emic. All insurance brokers are feeling the pinch in Abaco.” Some say the threat of vigilante justice is in the air, while others have started to take matters intot heir own hands in less controversial ways – for example by forming crime watch committees and pushing for more security c ameras in targeted zones. There is widespread concern if such crimes can continue to occur with frequency, it will be the island’s traditionally thrivingm arine tourism industry that will suffer, along with the livelihoods of those who depend on it. The trend comes at a particularly bad time for the islands, ast hey are also suffering the effects of the downturn in the global economy. The streets of GTC are noticeably more quiet than at this t ime in previous years. A recent billfishing tournament organised by a local marina expected to attract at least 25 participants, but saw only four regis-t er, T he Tribune w as informed. Serious Speaking of the boat thefts, Hope Town resident and sailor D wayne Wallas said: “There’s definitely been a drastic increase. I think it’s pretty serious situation and almost without a doubt therei s some pretty high level organised crime ring going on. It’s being done very professionally. “From what I hear 10 to 15 per cent are being recovered and rest are never to be seen again.” G reen Turtle Cay Club and Marina General Manager LynnJ ohnson said: “It has definitely had a negative affect on the area. I don’t feel that enough is being done. We have one police officer on the island and he really is trying to make a difference, getting out and doing patrols, but thei sland has several harbours and its impossible to be in all the places at one time.” “I can’t say we’ve actually lost b usiness because of it yet but it is affecting Abaco’s reputation,” she added. Wade Cash, owned of Sunset Marine, a boatyard in the Black Sound area of GTC, recently organised a community meeting to discuss the issue. O ut of this, an association was formed of around 12 men who are shortly set to begin a local crime watch, patrolling the island in an e ffort to help keep the situation under control. “Basically we just need to get it stopped, it’s totally ridiculous what’s been going on,” he said. On a couple of occasions police have picked guys up but they can’t seem to pin anything on anyone.” Besides carrying out their p atrols, the association hopes to raise funds to install closed circuit television cameras which can be used to monitor and record nighttime activities in certaina reas. Speaking of the police’s reaction to the threat, Commissioner Ferguson admitted that they have yet to arrest anyone in connection with the thefts, but are “doings ome things” that he cannot discuss in detail. You can’t police in the press,” he said. P rime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s speedboat, which is docked i n Green Turtle Cay, was found to have been “tampered with” earlier this year. Some who saw thec ondition of the vessel concluded that it had been used to com-m it another robbery in the area. Commenting on the investigat ion into that incident yesterday, Commissioner Ferguson said no o ne was charged in the matter as it would appear the evidence did not lend itself to this conclusion. Vigilante justice over boat thefts ‘not far of By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net P OLICE are still searching for two suspects wanted in connection with the armed robbery of a cashier att he City Market food store on Village Road last week. Meanwhile, an autopsy and ballistics report on the d eath of teenager Brenton Smith should be complet ed by the end of the week, a senior police officer said. Smith, a bystander, was shot and killed when gunfire broke out during a police chase of the two suspects last Thursday night. Two men are reported to have burst i nto the food store just after 8pm that night, one of them armed with a handgun. J ust after the robbery, officers on patrol nearby spotted two men running and pursued them before s hots were fired and Smith was killed. "We're still looking for he two suspects," said head of the Central Detective Unit Superintendent Elsworth Moss. He added that police have an idea of who they are l ooking for and are preparing to circulate some pho tographs. After the shooting, police said they did not think Smith, 18, was at the store at the time of the robbery. His family says the youth was an "innocent" pedestrian who was shot after leaving a friend's house. F amily and friends converged outside the Princess Margaret Hospital's morgue on Monday morning tom ourn the death of the popular boy. His uncle Darren Strachan said the family launched a n independent investigation which led them to believe the police shot Smith. He said the family wants the police to come clean and tell the truth. Supt Moss said he cannot not confirm or deny the f amily's claims before the reports are finished. When asked if there was any evidence to suggest the s uspects fired shots during the chase, Mr Moss said he could not comment. He also could not say if a coron er’s inquest into the shooting would take place. Smith, a 2008 graduate of St Augustine's College, was said to have been a bright, fun-loving young man who stayed out of trouble. A friend said the victim had just finished a workr elated training course and was thinking about attend ing college abroad. Lottery ‘would create cycle of corruption’ POLICESTILLSEARCHINGFORROBBERYSUSPECTS FAMILY AND friends of 18-year-old Brenton Smith gathered in prayer led by family friend and pastor Bill Higgs of Trinity Methodist Church outside the morgue on Monday.

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. On the anniversary of the Tugboat massacre, we submit for p ublication our release of 2007 in memory of all who have lost their lives attempting to flee Cuba. July 6, 2007, Summit, New Jersey: Among the most flagrant atrocities committed by the Cast ro regime in its long history of human rights’ abuses, two incidents stand out –the Canimar R iver Massacre of 1980 and the Tugboat Massacre of 1994. Both took place in the month of Julya nd poignantly illustrate the C uban leadership’s profound disregard for human life and their e gregious violation of the fundamental right of citizens to leave their country. On July 6, 1980 three youngsters hijacked an excursion boatt hat was to navigate inland along the scenic Canimar river flowing i nto Matanzas Bay. Surprised passengers screamed their approval t o go to the United States, but the security guard resisted and shot at the youngsters, who wounded him with firearms cland estinely obtained from their military service. Concerned for his health, they sent him back tos hore with a passenger who r efused to leave. Alerted authorities commanded a chase. Highspeed Cuban Navy patrol boats fired on the escapees and attempted to sink the vessel. Then, a Cuban Air Force plane overflew the boat and openedf ire. Finally, most not yet wound ed or dead drowned when a special boat used for heavy industrial work was brought in to ram a nd sink the vessel. T he excursion boat had capacity for 100 passengers, yet only 10 survived. Reportedly, there were at least 56 victims, including four children, ages 3, 9, 11, and 17. The actual number was kept secret and recovered bodies were n ot handed to the families, communal funerals forbidden. The C uban government claimed it was an accident, but survivors were threatened with prison into silence and kept under surveillance for years F ourteen years later, on July 13, 1994, a group of around 70 family members and friends, including many children, boarded t he tugboat de marzo” in the middle of the night planning to escape to the United States. As t hey made their way out of Havana’s harbour, three tugboatst hat had been waiting in the dark started a chase. Relentlessly, they s prayed the boat with high press ure water jets, ripping children from their parents’ arms and s weeping passengers off to sea. Finally, the attackers rammed the 13 de marzo” enough to make it sink. Passengers who had takenr efuge in the cargo hold were pinned down and desperately p ounded on the walls, the children wailing in horror, as they went down. Survivors who then clung to life in high seas, contended with the three pursuingt ugboats circling them and creating wave turbulence and eddies f or them to drown. The attack stopped suddenly when a merchant ship with a Greek flag approached Havana Harbour and Cuban Navy ships picked up surv ivors. Brought to shore, the stunned women and childrenw ere interrogated and sent home. The men were kept in detention f or months and given psy chotropic drugs. No bodies of the 37 victims (including 11 children were returned to their families for burial. Survivors and relatives o f the dead were denied information and put under surveil l ance. Many were dismissed from their jobs and systematically h arassed by the authorities. It later transpired that an infil trator in the group had helped plan the operation to set an example with its violent suppression. The Cuban government claimed it was an accident and blamed it o n the escapees and United States’ immigration policies. An international outcry prompted the g overnment to promise an investigation, but instead it awarded the head of the operation, tugboat pilot Jess Gonzlez Mach’n, received a "Hero of the C uban Revolution" medal. Requests by international organizations for information and r edress have been all disregarded. These and similar tragedies in Cuba remain largely ignored byw orld media and public opinion. Y et, the Castro regime has for decades systematically murdered c ivilians for trying to escape their country. Hundreds, perhaps thousands, may have been killed by government authorities for attempting to escape by sea, fors eeking asylum in foreign embassies, or trying to cross into t he U.S. Naval Base at Guantnamo. Today the U.S. Naval base i n Cuba remains sealed off by barbed wire and mines, with Cuban border guards ready to shoot to kill. Cuba's Penal Code p unishes attempts to leave the national territory without government authorization with up to2 0 years in prison or death. Over t he course of decades thousands have served prison, under dire conditions, for these so-called crimes. Still today, a number of political prisoners are serving very long sentences for attempting to escape the country. C uba Archive calls on world governments, international organisations, and all people of goodwill to hold the Cuban governm ent accountable for its crimes a nd demand respect for the fundamental rights of Cuba’s citizens to life, safety, and the right to leave their country at will. CUBA ARCHIVE Summit, N ew Jersey, July 13, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm I T WAS a bit of a culture shock to listen to S enator Orrin Hatch (R-Utah J udge Sonia Sotomayor at her confirmation hearings yesterday morning. He was concerned about her position on the right of every American citizen to carry a gun. Senator Hatch, who is on record as having praised a Senate vote allowing people to carry firearms into America’s national parks and wildlife refuges, seemed seriously concerned about the judge’s ability to sit as a Supreme Court judge if she had any doubts about this “fundamental right.” We say a “culture shock” because having been brought up in a no gun tradition, we find it difficult to reconcile the idea that any private citizen should have the right to carrya gun. At one time the British “bobby” and the Bahamian policeman could only arm themselves with a “billy.” And so it was a surprise to watch this venerable-looking, white-haired gentleman with his serious poker face, taking this right of gun possessionso much to heart. It is a surprise that a country like America, having matured to the position of a world leader, still has the Wild West mentality coursing through its people’s veins. Appar ently it is an inherent part of America’s culture, and regardless of how many innocents are slain by the gun on its streets, in its schools, homes and public places, no one can even question that constitutionally entrenched “fundamental right.” When will they wake up? In the early years of the settlement of America when the Pilgrims first arrived in 1620 we can understand the need for the gun. These Europeans had set foot on a vast, untamed land, populated by Indians and wild animals. They had no police force, no Army, no National Guard to protect them. They had to be rugged and self-sufficient and take care of themselves. In addition to their crude cooking utensils and their hatchet, they could not survive without their gun. Each man used his iron piece to protect his family and shoot venison for the evening meal. Later as the “homesteader” under Abra ham Lincoln staked out his government-alotted 160-acre plot of land, with no neighbour within shouting distance, his gun was his only protection. It was the gun that he used to conquer the untamed frontier. The gun became a part of him, his constant companion without which he did not sleep well at night. H owever, America has grown and prosp ered. In other words, the young nation in s hort pants, has now grown up and dropped into long pants. The divided states were united, a federal government was knit together, and Army, Air Force, Navy, National Guard and strong police force, at great expense to the taxpayer, was formed to protect the nation and its citizens. One would have thought at that stage of their development the citizens would have turned in their arms. And so the statement by Samuel Adams, signer of the Declaration of Independence and cousin of John Adams, second US president, today seems a contradiction. Said Adams: “The Constitution shall never be construed to authorise Congress to prevent the people of the United States, who are peaceable citizens , from keeping their own arms.” Of course those were still frontier days and the “peaceable citizens” still needed the shotgun. But not so today. If in addition to the strong protection provided by the state, they still have to carry a gun for their personal protection, then they are not “peaceable citizens.” In 2008 the Supreme Court struck down Washington, DC’s ban on handguns, despite the high level of gun crime that the capitol was trying to suppress. It quoted the Constitution’s Second Amendment in which a reference to a “well regulated Militia” showed that the legislators of those days were still legislating for a frontier country and writing in frontier lan guage. Surely Americans are no longer governed by frontiersmen. Surely, they are wise enough to understand that today’s guns in the hands of today’s Americans have been turned against that country’s citizens. It is now time to abolish them. However, if America can honestly face the world with the argument that it still needs its private guns to protect its citizens, then what argument can it have against the North Koreans who claim they need nuclear weapons to protect their citizens? Both propositions are madness. We agree with those level-headed Amer icans who argue that America’s “gun cul ture” has outlived its usefulness. And yesterday to watch a seemingly levelheaded, elderly American senator argue otherwise was certainly disconcerting. Cuba: July anniversaries of two massacres LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net America’s gun culture outdated Unpunished, but not forgotten EDITOR, The Tribune. I recently read that a Bahamian pastor got a $1/4 m illion vehicle for $68,000. That is almost a 73 per c ent discount. I am not greedy. I do not need a 1/4 million dollar car or a $68,000 car, as a matter of fact I drive a scooter for about $2,000 licensed and inspected. Far be it from me to judge anyone, much less a man of God, but I cannot help but wonder. If this preacher had bought three Kia picantos for 2 0,000 each or six chevy microvans (11,000 of a Bentley, could he have donated vehicles to l ocal charity? Would he? Did he consider this o ption? Some of our fellow Bahamians are not worried about what they drive and simply need a place to sleep. A one bedroom apartment at $550 per month could have it’s rent paid for 10 years! As a matter of fact you could actually purchase a house for the cost of the car after this “blessing” of a rebate. I would also like to point out the difference in service costs and fuel. 50 to 60 dollars a week in a Bentleyw ould translate to 30 to 40 in a smaller car. The c ost of parts and service is ungodly by comparison. I am happy for a person that can afford this type of luxury, but I would be more encouraged or inspired by a show of modesty or charity. This is not the example a man of God should be setting. In my humble opinion, an example of mode sty, wise investment and charitable donation is needed not only to get our congregations, but our e ntire population, through these times. I would r ather catch a jitney to heaven than drive a Bentley to that other place. ANCILLENO DAVIS, MSc Nassau, July, 2009. Is this the example a man of God should be setting?

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 5 DESPITE his assertions that there are political reasons behind the government’s decision to only pave the northern portion of the Queen’s Highway in Acklins, the results of the 2007 election reveal that the PLPMP for MICAL Alfred Gray won all of the polling divisions in this portionof the island. Enraged by an advertisement from the Ministry of Works calling for tenders for the road work in the northern section of Lovely Bay, Mr Gray said it made more sense to him for the government to pave the dilapidated roads between the airport in Spring Point and Salina Point. He said residents across Acklins are inconvenienced by the “impassable” 25 to 30 mile southern section of the road, but residents in the south, where the majority of his PLP supporters live, are the most badly affected. The MP said: “The people in the southern part of the island are more conservative and support me as MP and I don’t think they ought to suffer because of that. “Once a government is elected I expect the government to serve all people equal ly and to serve the part of the island where their support might be is wrong.” However, according to the 2007 election results for MICAL, Mr Gray won both division four and division five, which cover the northern end of Acklins. At polling division four, Lovely Bay, which includes Chesters and Pinefield, 102 voters were registered and 99 persons voted. Mr Gray defeated Senator Foulkes by 52 to 45. At polling division five, Hard Hill, Mr Gray’s hometown, 70 voters were registered with 63 persons voting. Mr Gray won by 35 votes to Mr Foulkes’ 28. It was only at polling division number six in central Acklins (Spring Point, Delectable Bay, and Pompey Bay) that Mr Foulkes gained the upper hand on Mr Gray, by beating him by 39 votes to 25. B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – ‘Just Rush’ p romoter Peter Adderley a nnounced that the popular summer junkanoo event is set f or August 15 and said it will b ring a much needed economic boost to Grand Bahama. Mr Adderley, president of Creative Works, said fourm ajor junkanoo groups – the Saxon Superstars and the Val ley Boys of Nassau, and the C lassic Dancers and Swingers of Grand Bahama – will be p articipating in the third annu al Just Rush Junkanoo Parade. H e said a number of activi ties have been planned for Fri day, August 14 through Sun day, August 16. Mr Adderley said activities g et underway with a launch party, junkanoo skills compe tition, and all-Bahamian con cert on Friday. The main event, the j unkanoo parade, will be held on Saturday at Explorers Way in downtown Freeport. The weekend will climax with a church service followedb y the announcement of the parade results at a family beach party on Taino Beach on Sunday, August 16. Mr Adderley pointed out that the parade will showcase the biggest rivalry in junkanoo, as the Bay Street Boxing Day champions, the Valley boys, will face off a gainst the New Year’s Day winners, the Saxons Superstars. “After years, decades, of brilliant battles and heraldedc ontroversy over who got robbed, the two big boys hit the streets of Freeport for a historic showdown. This is it,” Mr Adderley said. H e said junkanoo fans are also anticipating a rivalry between the groups from Grand Bahama and those out of New Providence. W hile the public is antici pating the fun and excitement of Just Rush, local merchants a re looking forward to the economic benefits the event will bring. Mr Adderley noted that the groups invited to compete in the parade must bring a mini mum of 150 members, but often surpass that requirement. “All groups reportedly m ore than double these requirements, and the numbers show benefits at local hotels, rental car companies, restaurants, retail clothings tores, barber shops, beauty salons, and bars,” he said. “Junkanooers come by the hundreds, and domestic and international visitors come inb y the thousands to experience and enjoy this uniquely Bahamian event.” Mr Adderley said that he has created both the Feel TheR ush and Just Rush events to boost Grand Bahama’s cultural and economic life. Grand Bahama has long been craving an annual signature event, and Just Rush has satisfied that craving,” he said. Major sponsors for this year’s Just Rush are the Grand Bahama Port Authori ty, Grand Bahama Power, the Ministry Of Tourism, and Ross University. Junkanoo to bring ‘economic benefits’ to Grand Bahama Man found dead is identified IMMIGRATION officials apprehended 25 illegal immigrants, includingC hinese, Haitian and Jamaican nationals, at a private residence in Bimi-n i. Acting on intelligence received, Defence Force a nd Immigration officers on July 7 searched the h ome of a local man in South Bimini. The search led to the d iscovery of seven Chinese men, five Chinese women, one Jamaican man, three Haitian women, eight Haitianm en and a eight-year-old Haitian boy. Immigration officers questioned the persons about their status in theB ahamas, but were unable to ascertain whether the migrants hade ntered the country legally as none of them had t he necessary documents. Further questioning revealed that group ofm igrants arrived in Bimini from Nassau on July 5 and July 6 in two separate groups. The 25 immigrants were taken to Alice Town police station for processing and were then transferred to the Carmichael Road Detention Centre. Arrangements are being made to repatriate the migrants to their respective countries as soon as possible. THE man found dead at a downtown building complex in Grand Bahama on Sunday has been identified by police as Steven Rolle, 47, of Freeport. A ccording to police r eports, the body was disc overed sometime around 8am at the Churchill Building, near the Immigration Department. Mr Rolle’s body was taken to the Rand Memorial Hospital morgue, where an autopsy will be held to determine the cause of death. Police said foul play is not suspected at this time. In brief 25 illegal immigrants apprehended in Bimini SUSPICIONS over government’s “arrogant” decision to relocate thec ontainer port from downtown Nassau to Arawak Cay have been raised by Glenys Hanna Martin. The PLP chairwoman has said the “gross lack of transparency” shown byt he FNM government in their decision-making process has given her reason to speculate about the reasoning behind their decision. M rs Hanna Martin’s main concern is over plans for a joint public-private land-owning venture that will report-e dly give a combined entity of private businesses a controlling share of the c ontainer port; with a shareholding of 40 per cent, and a public share offering of 20 per cent. First and foremost the Minister (of the Environment) announces that land o wned by the Bahamian people is to be utilised in some sort of joint venture with a collection of private entities,m any of whom now control the shipping industry in the Bahamas, and some of whoma re known financial supporters of the Free National Movement,” theP LP chairwoman said. “And there are o ther concerns which heighten susp icions about the entire process.” She echoed concerns raised by PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald this week-e nd about the environmental impact of dredging and increased maritime activi ty in the area, access to local beaches and traffic congestion. Mr Fitzgerald launched an aware-n ess campaign on Friday to inform people about the cost of relocating the container portt o Arawak Cay and raised a number of questions about whether an Envi-r onmental Impact Assessment (EIA for the develop-m ent would be done, and when the f indings would be disclosed. His questions were put to Minister of the Environment Earl Deveaux yes-t erday, but were not answered before The Tribune went to press. M rs Hanna Martin said: “There has been no dialogue, no full informationsharing The process has grossly lacked transparency; instead of a fulld isclosure of the issues which include the radical and unceremonious reversal of a decision made by a previous government, a decision which was based on scientific studies duly com-m issioned. “The Bahamian people are entitled to know all the facts surrounding the government’s decision to relocate thep ort to Arawak Cay and in so doing hand a significant economic windfall to an elite group without having the cour-t esy to communicate with its population. The government should be warned that Bahamians are watching very carefully with a scrutinising and suspecte ye. It is hereby now demanded that the government engage in proper and t ransparent discourse with the people of the Bahamas.” Hanna-Martin raises suspicions over container port relocation B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net CLOSING submissions were presented yesterday in the trial of a man and a teenager charged in the s tabbing death of Khodee Davis. Davis, 16, an 11th grade T emple Christian student, was stabbed in the chest dur i ng a fight between two groups of men at Cabbage Beach, Paradise Island onM ay 12 last year. Andy Francis, 22, and a 1 7-year-old boy, both of Fox Hill, have been charged with Davis’ death. They havep leaded not guilty. During her closing submissions yesterday, lead prosecutor Sandra Dee Gar diner told the jury that the j uvenile had initiated the fight that ultimately led to Davis’ death. Ms Gardiner said that the juvenile had made a com m ent to the effect that someone was going to die that day. S he said that according to witnesses, Davis was on a hill talking to a group of girls when the fight began. Ms Gardiner told the jurors that Davis had no weapon and ran to the fight to act as a peacemaker. According to witnesses, she said, Davis had held Francis’ hand and told him to stop the fight, but Francis had pushed him away and stabbed him with a silver coloured blade. D avis died from a four to five inch stab wound to the c hest. Ms Gardiner told the jury that the juvenile is charged because he adopt-e d Francis’ actions and hit Davis with a bottle after Francis had stabbed him. Attorney Michael Hanna, who is representing Francis,t old the jury that the prosecution had not discharged its burden of proof and highlighted the fact that the Crown had closed its casew ithout calling some 15 witnesses. Mr Hanna noted that in h is unsworn statement, Francis had claimed that Davis h ad been the one with the knife. The juvenile’s attorney R omona Farquharson told the jury her client had nothing to do with Davis’ murder and was leaving Cabbage Beach when the fight brokeo ut. She told the court that out of the 15 witnesses who took the stand, only three had given testimony relating to herc lient. Ms Farquharson noted that pathologist Dr Govinda Raju had identified no injuries on the deceased that were consistent with him having been hit with a bottle. Justice Jon Isaacs is expected to give his summation of the case when the trial resumes this morning at 10 o’clock. Closing submissions in stabbing death trial Glenys Hanna-Martin Jerome Fitzgerald MP:political reasons behind Queen’s Highway paving decision Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hearfr om people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. ALFRED GRAY

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we do have control. These are, among others, the quality of teaching, the quality of the curriculum, the aspiration level of parents and the expectation level of the educational system and the society. Poor students typically do worse but this is not a consequence of their ability and many poor students do achieve. For too many, howev-e r, it is a consequence of poverty itself: coming to school hungry and tired, having no place to study, having disengaged and inattentive parents, havingt eachers who accept failure, having no dream that life t omorrow could be better than i t is today and not seeing any link between life inside and outs ide the classroom. Clearly, the e ducation system can act on s uch factors and has the obliga tion to do so. What if the essential probl em of education lay not with the students but with us and our outdated assumptionsa bout how learning occurs? In a world where young people mast er computer games, Facebook, Twitter and texting, where they are fascinated by the complex computer-generated special effects of popular movies andc ommercials, where they use new codes to communicate, how dreary the classroom w here the preferred mode of instruction is chalk and talk. No wonder students might fidget. T he successful classroom of today is more likely the place where all are actively engaged, working on problems in teamsa nd small groups, experimenting, talking and creating. A place where students are l earning to think through a math problem, to argue and debate a story, to grow a gar d en and watch compost take s hape, to stage a play, to write and perform a song, to swim on the reef and understand thee ffects of climate change on our fragile ecosystem a place where you do something, not one where something is done t o you. I am sure there are many such classrooms across The Bahamas as there arem any teachers who foster high levels of student learning. Indeed, we have seen ther esults of such work in the many successful students and alumni at The College who have come through publics chools. We must find and champion such teachers and make their classrooms the models for others to emulate. Second, the idea that secondary education is only for the ‘talented’ assumes that the Bahamas of tomorrow has a place in which uneducated masses can make a decent liv ing. How can we hold that assumption when everyone else i n the world recognises that only those societies that provide highly skilled human cap i tal will be able to ensure sust ainable development? How can we face the challenges of a global and integrated economy, of the kind already under development as a result of the EPA and growing in both thet ourism and financial services sectors as a result of the current economic crisis, if we do not commit as a matter of national urgency and importance to increasing the educat ion attainment of the next gene ration? Refusing to face this challenge head on is akin to burying one’s head in the sanda nd hoping that tomorrow will look like yesterday. It won’t. If we are to have employees who deliver more than good e nough performance, they need to have the new basic skills: the ability to communicate effec t ively, the ability to think criti cally, the ability to solve prob lems and to work in teams, the a bility to work comfortably w ith new information and com munication technologies. Indeed, car mechanics todayn eed more than a wrench and a good arm. They need to understand the complex computers ystems that now are part of cars. In Grand Bahama today, the stevedores of the past have b een replaced by operators atop huge straddlers who use sophisticated computer systems t o locate and move containers across the port. Third, it is not only improved p erformance at secondary level that we require but increased participation in post-secondarye ducation if we are to compete successfully in this new global world. According to UNESCO, “the number of students pur s uing tertiary education has skyrocketed over the past 37 years, growing five-fold from 28.6 million in 1970 to 152.5 million in 2007. This translates into an average annual increase of 4.6 per cent, with the average number of tertiary students doubling every fifteen years.” How are we performing against this global trend? Again, according to UNESCO statistics, the tertiary gross enrol-m ent ratio in Europe and North A merica – a measure of participation for the population of students for the five years after high school – has grown from 30 per cent in 1970 to 71 per cent in 2007. In Latin Americaa nd the Caribbean, this ratio h as grown from 6 per cent to 34 per cent, in East Asia and the Pacific, from 7 per cent to 26 per cent and on and on. While the study does not report d irectly on The Bahamas, we understand that participation rates for the 18-24-year-oldp opulation in The Bahamas hovers around 14 per cent, putting us, a relatively wealthyn ation, only above some of the poorest countries in sub-Saha-r an Africa (5.6 per cent S outh and West Asia (11 per c ent). Finally, education today is not about remembering dateso f history or memorising poems or even reading the classics – though all of these might be ofv alue and interest. There is s imply too much knowledge growing at too rapid a rate for any education system to aspire t o teach all the knowledge you need to know. Education today is about learning how to learn.I t is about preparing graduates t o communicate effectively, to reflect on their lives, to think critically, to be creative, to solve problems and to be engaged and active citizens. Some of these may then choose to beh ighly-skilled air-conditioning technicians who assist in help ing us to reduce energy costs, or competent horticulturists run n ing landscaping companies that make better use of green technologies, or members ofa ny other professions which require the use of both hands and mind mechanics, den-t ists, musicians and surgeons among others. The distinction between those who work with theirh ands and those who work with their minds no longer holds. We need people who can do b oth. Adding value to goods and services is the only way to build the future Bahamiansa cross the archipelago have a right to expect, and we will only add value if we have the highlyskilled human capital to do this in any field. Failure to meet this challenge is to condemn the next generation to environmental degradation, to poverty, to poor public health and to increased levels ofc rime. If sustainable development means meeting the needs of today while protecting the capacity of future generations, then higher levels of educa tional attainment must be our top priority. ( Janyne M Hodder, BA, MA, DCL (Hon of the College of the Bahamas ). By JANYNE M HODDER President College of B ahamas T HANK you for allowing me space in your newspaper to respond to ane ditorial published in The Trib une on Thursday July 9, 2009. I write to present a different view from the one which was expressed, one which suggested that we need to accept that not all children are academically gifted and that we would do better to accept that many stu-d ents cannot succeed academically and should be directed tom enial jobs which we, in turn, s hould value rather than to d emand higher performance f rom our education system. I challenge this view on several g rounds. First, it suggests that poor academic performance is somehow the consequence of innate characteristics in the learners and that successful secondary education is not an attainable goal for most students. Why would this be true for Bahamians and not for citizens of other countries which assume secondary education to the mini-m um level of attainment expected for anyone with normal ability? Indeed, over and over, research has demonstrated that successful secondarye ducation is the result of a number of factors upon which C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Successful education is the result of factors we control Y OUR S AY By GENA GIBBS MEMBERS of Alliance Franaise called on Gover nor General Arthur D Hanna for brief cultural exchange session. They introduced their new president, Nathalie FeixScott, and presented the gov ernor general with a CD of French folk music by icon Charles Trenet. Alliance Franaise also invited Mr Hanna to participate in its cultural activities, the most popular being the Cine Club which showcases French movies with English subtitles. The Hanna family has been part of the Alliance Franaise for some time, not ed treasurer and administrator, Italia Watkins-Jan. “Since Bahamians can travel to France without a tourist visa, it is a good time for cultural exchanges between the two countries,” she said. French Consul Marc-Olivi er Gendry presented his Let ters of Credence as France’s new ambassador to the Bahamas on May 21. There are about 200 French ex-pats in the Bahamas. J ANYNE M HODDER FROM LEFT ARE: Dominique LeFevre, Honorary Consul Thierry Boeuf, Governor General Arthur Hanna, Alliance Franaise president Nathalie Feix-Scott, treasurer and administrator Italia Watkins-Jan, and vice-president Francis Dimitri.D e r e k S m i t h GOVERNOR GENERAL MAKES FRENCH CONNECTION PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham joined Cabinet Ministers Dr Hubert Minnis (Health D ion Foulkes (Labour C adet; Lynell Thurston, Police Cadet; Dr Hubert Minnis, Minister of Health; Prime Minister Hubert Ingra ham; H Campbell Cleare, attorney; Azaria Clare, Miss Global Bahamas; Senator Dion Foulkes, Minister of Labour and Social Development, and his son, Dion William. M a r c u s M c C l u r e , P o l i c e C a d e t PRIMEMINISTER AT INDEPENDENCE WALK CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. N ASA is hoping the weathe r finally cooperates for its sixth launch attempt for space shuttle Endeavour, according to Associated Press. Endeavour is poised to t ake off for the international s pace station early Wednesday evening, along with seven astronauts. Forecasters put the odds of good weather at 60 percent. Thunderstorms have d elayed the mission three t imes and hydrogen gas leaks have caused two delays. Endeavour holds the final piece of Japan’s space lab, which should have flown last m onth. N ASA must launch Endeavour by Wednesday p ossibly Thursday if managers agree to shorten the flight. Otherwise, the shuttle will have to step aside for a Russian supply run to the space station. That would b ump the shuttle launch to J uly 26. NASA aiming for space shuttle launch today

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B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net AMERICAN boat Captain J ohn Cooper is lucky to be alive after surviving a shark attack sparked when a diver panicked and speared the predator in the head. According to reports on W SVN Channel 7 News, Cooper was spearfishing with a group of people in waters o ff Grand Bahama on Saturday when the reef shark a ttacked him. He sustained a huge gash to the leg. M r Cooper has been taking people spear fishing in the Bahamas for 20 years. “The guys panicked and got a little close, and out of selfdefence shot the shark in the h ead and it went crazy,” he said, adding that this was when the six foot shark bith im. Mr Cooper, who decided against being treated in Freeport, is now recovering ina Florida hospital. C hannel 7 TV news reporter Don Kavara said Mr Cooper was taken to hospitali n Freeport, but decided to board a friend’s plane for the 5 5-minute flight to Miami International Airport. O n Sunday, Grand Bahama Police confirmed the incident. ASP Edmund Rahming saidt he victim had refused treatm ent at the hospital in Freeport and had left the country. U pon Mr Cooper’s arrival at Miami International Airport, he was taken by ambul ance to Jackson Memorial Hospital for surgery. The surgeon said Mr Coope r was “very lucky”. “A centimeter one way or the other could have cut a major artery or nerve. Most of the skin was still intact andw e managed to stretch it to cover pretty much the w ound,” said the surgeon. Mr Kavara said that a similar attack occurred in theB ahamas in May. The victim, American Luis Fernandez, was also spearfishing. Mr Cooper said the attack will not deter him from spearfishing. H e suggested that as a result of the spread of shark feedi ng operations, sharks are becoming more aggressive and less fearful of people. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 7 TO increase transparency and competitiveness in the bidding process for the yearly summer school repairs, the Ministry of Education yesterday announced a new plan to award contracts. The contracts are valued at more than $50,000 and the t otal value of work that will be awarded by the way of this enhanced process will be $3 million. On Monday government began gazetting notices in the daily newspapers inviting interested qualified contrac tors, builders, plumbers and electricians to tender for the award of school repair con tracts in designated islands throughout the country. Said the ministry: “All tenders will be independently evaluated and awarded by the Tenders Board, not by the Ministry of Education and/or the Ministry of Public Works and Transport. “There will no longer as a general rule, be any negotiat ed bids with contractors. “Any qualified contractor will have the right to obtain scopes of works and to make an offer to perform the work, which bids will be fairly and independently considered.” The gazetted notice invites tenders for school repair work exceeding a value of $50,000 in Abaco, Andros Eleuthera, Grand Bahama, New Providence and San Salvador. All school summer repair work will have to be completed within a four-week time frame. All tenders in the designated Family Islands and Grand Bahama should be delivered to the respective island administrators’ offices by 10am on Friday, July 17. All tenders for work in New Providence should be delivered to the office of the Financial Secretary at the same time on the same date. All tenders will be opened at the Ministry of Finance in Nassau, and at the Family Island administrators’ offices in the respective Family Islands and Grand Bahama. “The general public should be reminded that the Ministry o f Education has again this year, forwarded roughly $100,000 to each school district in the Family Islands, for a total of $1 million, for the award of small-scale summer repair work throughout the Family Islands. These con tracts are awarded by local government authorities in consultation with the District Superintendents of the Min istry of Education, and the school principals,” the ministry said. The award of these smallscale local contracts is gov erned by the due diligence and transparent requirements of the Financial Administration and Audit Act, which requires the obtaining of three bids from different contractors, in respect of every contract awarded by local government authorities as outlined. The Ministry of Education in New Providence is not in any way involved in the evaluation of bids, the award of contracts or the assessment of t he quality of the work. “This new initiative gov erning the award of largerscale contracts for school summer repairs is yet another step towards enhanced transparency in the process of government procurement, and isy et another major step made by the Ministry of Education over the past year to comply with the announced policy of the government to implement all of the recommendations made by the Crown Agents in their review of government procurement, which was completed in 2006,” the ministry said. “The general public should also be reminded that this is another step towards greater transparency in the issuance of government contracts by the Ministry of Education that took place earlier when, for the first time, the ministry earlier this year invited public tenders for school busing contracts. “In respect of these contracts the bids have been received. The in-house evalu ations have been conducted, and the Tenders Board should be making its recommendations in the near future.” New plan to improve bidding process for school repairs LUCKYTOBEALIVE A MERICANBOATCAPTAINSURVIVESSHARKATTACK “A centimeter one way or the other could have cut a major artery or nerve. Most of the skin was still intact and we managed to stretch it to cover prettym uch the wound.” A STOCK PICTURE of a reef shark. American boat captain John Cooper was attacked by a similar shark while spearfishing. Strategy to boost transparency and competitiveness “All tenders will be independently evaluated and awarded by the Tenders Board, not by the Ministry of Education and/or the Ministry of Public Works and Transport.” Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y .

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE “They are little children, and if somebody threatened them it’s possible they wouldn’t want to tell.” Speculation was sparked when Ms Clarke’s cousin reported hearing a motorboat p ull into the Kemp’s Bay area at around 2am on the morning they were found and media reports claimed the 3,000 square mile forest is a hideout for drug l ords managing large scale mari juana plantations in the woods. A police search supported by t he Royal Bahamas Defence Force, the US Coast Guard, and t he community, was scaled down when nothing was foundt wo weeks after the boys disappeared, but Ms Clarke said she a lways believed the boys were still alive. She said: “I knew they were living, I thought they might have been kidnapped, but Ik new they were alive. “I am glad to have them back n ow but I think there’s a little bit more in the back of it. They’re living and they’re safe, but I want to know what happened.” Ms Clarke said Deangelo told her how Marcell fell in the hole a nd when he reached in to pull him out, he fell in behind him. B ut while Deangelo had the strength to climb out, his y ounger brother did not. They slept in the cave, which provided shelter from the rain, and during the day Deangelo would search for food, water and the w ay home. But Deangelo said they were only there for a fewd ays, while Marcell maintains they were there longer. M s Clarke said: “I think the l ittle one didn’t realise it was only a couple of days. I think the big one is probably telling the truth, because I feel like he’s o ld enough to know the difference between a month and a couple of days. “Right now it doesn’t make m uch sense and there is probably something else to it, but I need to give them some time to catch themselves before we willg et the whole story.” Ms Clarke said Deangelo told h er how Marcell pulled himself out of the hole when they heard d ogs barking, and they followed the sound of the dogs straight to the road at around 6am on Sunday. They have also said they climbed a tree out of the cave tof ind their way to the road. They then approached two A merican men at a nearby house and asked for mangoes a nd coco plums before heading off together to find their way home. Deangelo, who lives in Smith’s Hill, Andros, with hisg randmother Olgarean Clarke, 67, lost about 30lbs during the t ime he was missing, and his brother Marcell, who lives with h is mother in Kemp Road, Nassau, and was visiting his grand mother in Andros, is thought to have lost even more weight. They are being treated at P rincess Margaret Hospital for dehydration and are expected t o be released next week. Police say they are still invest igating the incident and are keeping an open mind about what happened. months he served in the Bahamas after the extradition order was filed against him in 2003. T his along with the 15 per cent usually taken off sentences in the US for good behaviour means that M ajor could be released in just over a year and a half even less if he offers to serve his time in the B ahamas. Speaking with The Tribune yesterday in his office at Police Headquarters, Mr Ferguson said that the Royal Bahamas Police Force will not be targeting Major when he is released from prison in what is expected to b e less than 18 months. In addition Mr Ferguson said the police do not want to address speculation that t here could be an increase in drug related crime or “reprisals” for any plea bargain that may or may not h ave been reached. “See I do not want to prejudge a situation and I do not want us to speculate on what may or may not happen because I think that might even contribute to the problem in our society. And so we have to be careful how we comment on things as they happen. “If we know what the sentence has been for this y oung man and we see what the possibilities are with him being back in society, but who is to say that he d oes not become a Christian and start keeping church? We do not know. “But certainly if it were to occur that he is back in society and is involved in breaking the law, our job is still to enforce the law. That is what we will have to do. If he is in breach of any laws in this Commonwealth of the Bahamas, we have the responsibility to enforce the law, and it will be enforced against him or anybody else who breaks the law,” Mr Ferguson said. The Commissioner added, however, that the Police Force will not be approaching Mr Major with any particular focus or attention as it is truly up to him what kind of lifestyle he will engage in after his release into Bahamian society. “See we don’t want to give the impression that we are targeting people, because the man was in breach of certain laws of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas and other places. He has been dealt with. There is a penalty involved which he has to satisfy. Once that has happened then he is freed back into society. “Except he behaves in a way that warrants law enforcement to be enforcing the law against him, he is free to live in society. He is not being singled out. Anybody who is in breech of the law will get the attention of the police. Anyone. So we don’t want to appear as though we are targeting an innocent person, but certainly if anybody is in breach of the law we will be taking the appropriate action all the time.” outcome is at the Coroner's Court which will make a deci sion as to whether the matter will be sent to the Attorney General's Office with certain recommendations, and then certain instructions will come down to the police as to what direc tion to take," Mr Ferguson told The Tribune yesterday. Knowles, 15, was found hanged in his cell with what appeared to be a string from his shorts tied around his neck on May 31. Police initially ruled the death an apparent suicide. He had been in custody for a little over three days. But Ms Wilson challenged the police's version of the events and charged that if her son had killed himself while in police custody then the RBPF should be found culpable of neglect. "Whatever happened in that cell we don't know, the public don't know, the nation don't know. Only Michael and God can tell me the truth," she told The Tribune yesterday. After Michael's death a woman who claimed to be jailed in a cell near his claimed she overheard Michael threaten to kill himself. She also claimed she called out to the police to alert them. According to published reports, an order of protection was also served on authorities last month prohibiting them from interfering with another teen that the family's lawyer, Keod Smith, claims is a potential witness to Michael's death. Mr Smith claimed the 14year-old boy, who was arrested with Knowles in connection with suspected housebreaking, had allegedly been intimidated by police after he was released on bail, published reports state. Ms Wilson, who is still haunted by nightmares over son's death, said she too fears police may target her because of her public challenge of their account of her son's death. The cash-strapped single mother said that although her son's body had been released to the family for two weeks the funeral was postponed because of her financial challenges. She said the funeral will be paid for through donations raised by her MP Cynthia “Mother” Pratt and assistance from her two sisters. Ms Wilson said the funeral home had reduced the cost of the funeral from around $6,000 to $3,000. She said her son's burial plot was paid for by the Department of Social Services. The funeral is planned for 11 am Thursday at the Praise and Worship Church on Ragged Island Street. According to t he information r eaching T he Tribune , there are currently five cabinet mini sters who have reportedly expressed their desire to chall enge deputy P rime Minister Brent Symonette for his post. These names include, but are n ot limited to Dr Hubert Minnis, Zhivargo Laing, Tommy Turnquest, Carl Bethel, and Dion Foulkes. I n addition to these Ministers, t here is also a minister of state, Branville McCartney who has been considered by many to be the “dark horse” of the party w ho, despite his popularity with the public, may face a considerable battle to win this deputy leadership post inside the party. S ince the pronouncements of f ormer deputy prime minister Frank Watson that Prime Minister Ingraham was the only person fit to lead the party at this t ime, there has been speculation as to the future of the FNM and its leadership going forward. Directly dismissing many of the old would-be leaders within the party, Mr Watson said thatu nless someone were to come out of the blue, “we would wel-c ome the prime minister staying for some further period of time.” W hile Mr Symonette currently holds the most support within the FNM to follow Mr Ingraham, there still remains an opposition to the St Anne’s representative’ss kin colour, which may continue to be an issue for him. P rime Minister Ingraham became leader of the FNM in 1 990 and served as prime minister from 1992 to 2002, when he s tepped down as head of the par ty. Tommy Turnquest, current National Security Minister, won a hotly contestant leadership r ace to succeed Mr Ingraham, but was defeated in the 2002 e lection by PLP leader Perry Christie. P reviously, Mr Ingraham had said he intended to serve only two consecutive terms as leader, but returned to the party’s helm in late 2005 after requests f rom his supporters and is currently serving his third, nonc onsecutive term as Prime Min ister. Mountbatten House on West Hill Street with multiple stab wounds. Prosecutor Neil Brathwaite made the application to close the Crown’s case without calling six remaining witnesses. Twenty-four witnesses have testified. Senior J ustice Anita Allen granted leave to the Crown to close its case. Attorneys met in a closed hearing in the absence of the jury yester day afternoon. Lead investigator in the case A SP Leon Bethel testified yesterday that he went to Mountb atten House around 9.15 am on November 18, 2007 and there s poke to crime scene investigators. ASP Bethel said he enteredt he residence and saw blood stains on a railing leading upstairs. H e also testified that there was blood on the upstairs floor. ASP Bethel told the court that in the upstairs bedroom, he observed the partially nude body of a manw ith multiple stab wounds. ASP Bethel told the court that heo bserved blood stains and splattered blood all over the room. He t old the court that he also observed blood stains on the upstairs bathroom door, face bowl, toilet bowl and floor. ASP Bethel testified that after r eceiving additional information from Inspector Kenroy Ferguson,h e and several other officers conducted unsuccessful searches for M cNeil. He told the court that he went to Miami, Florida, on July 3 and visited the office of Home-l and Security where he saw McNeil and identified himself as a police officer. ASP Bethel testified that he n ext saw McNeil at the Central Detective Unit around 11.32 am on August 15, 2008. ASP Bethel said he spoke to McNeil in the presence of his attorneys, AlexM orley and Simone Smith. He said he cautioned McNeil by t elling him that he did not have to s ay anything and if he did it would be written down and could b e used as evidence in court. ASP Bethel said he told McNeil that h e had information that he had gone to Mountbatten House, attacked Taylor and stabbed him a bout the body, causing his death. A ccording to ASP Bethel, M cNeil responded that he had no comment on the advice of his a ttorneys. ASP Bethel said that McNeil responded similarly to s ome 60 other questions. ASP Bethel told the court that on August 17, 2008, he received information from the police forensic lab and charged McNeil t he following day with Taylor’s murder. D uring cross-examination by McNeil’s attorney, Murrio D ucille, Mr Bethel was asked whether he had received a report from the DNA lab on August 18. ASP Bethel told the court that he had received no written DNA analysis report on that day, buth ad received a verbal report which he made a note of on the case file. Mr Ducille went on to suggest to ASP Bethel that on A ugust 18, 2007, he had not one scintilla of evidence to charge McNeil. ASP Bethel did not agree with the suggestion saying that policed id have evidence. Inspector Solomon Cash testif ied yesterday that around noon o n August 14, 2008, he was on duty at the Lynden Pindling I nternational airport when McNeil was handed over by US I mmigration and Customs agents Hector and Alex Gonzales. Inspector Cash said he arrested M cNeil and told him that he was s uspected of Taylor’s murder. I nspector Cash told the court that McNeil did not reply. Inspector C ash told the court that he was also present in the interview suite a t the Central Detective Unit when ASP Bethel asked McNeil a series of questions in the presence of his attorneys. He said that McNeil did not answer the quest ions, but stated that on the advice of his attorneys he had no c omment. Inspector Cash said that he was also present at CDU o n August 18, when ASP Bethel charged McNeil with Taylor’s murder. The trial resumes this morning at 11 am. after her mother’s death, which is likely to have occurred around two months ago, but sometime b efore the 33-year-old’s badly decomposed body was discovered in a bushy area off Fox Hill Road s outh on Saturday, July 4, 2009. Bahamian Zyndall McKinney, 22, said to be t he teenager’s boyfriend, was arraigned in court last Thursday charged with intentionally causing the death of 33-year-old Garrison, a resident of West Palm Beach, Florida, whilst “concerned with another.” Y esterday Paul Jukic, political officer at the U.S. Embassy in Nassau, said he would be unable t o provide any update from the U.S. side on where the efforts to get to Madison stand, referring The T ribune t o the RBPF. Bahamian police stated last week that it was in conjunction with the U.S. E mbassy in Nassau and the U.S. government’s Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI were seeking to locate “an American relative”o f Garrison’s who they suspect also might have taken “part in her death”. M eanwhile, the family of one of Ms Garrison’s ex-husbands, also the father and custodian of a 10year-old son whom she abandoned at birth, told The Tribune over the weekend that they had not heard of her death until contacted by this newspaper. According to the family, the child Garrison had with the Delaware man had not seen his mother since she left him at 10 months old and the family had, up until hearing of her death, been hoping that they could have persuaded her to return to the United States to spend time with him. “He’d just reached the stage where he was getting curious about who his mum is,” said the child’s grandmother. She claimed Garrison had been concerned that if she returned to the area she would be arrested by authorities for leaving the child. “We told her that that’s her child and if she wanted to see him she had nothing to worry about,” added the relative. Garrison first came to police attention in The Bahamas on February 25, 2009, when they received a missing persons report from the Unit ed States Embassy in Nassau stating that she may have been “in the company of a Bahamian male.” Police are still awaiting the results of an autopsy conducted on her body that will tell them how she died. be lopsided with one company exhausting the resources of the other. Apparently CAP’s initials instructions from the Ministry to “show M&R Road Builders how to construct roads” ultimately tied the experie nced firm with a company that nearly ruined it. CAP complained to the Minister of Works that M&R was falling short in equipment and that the company had no road building experience prior to the compulsory arrangement. The relationship with M&R began to deteriorate several weeks into the project w hen payment requests from CAP were not being honoured by M&R, it was claimed. Following several alleged financial transactions by M&R, the principals of CAP felt they were forced to terminate M&R’s services in March 2007, two months before the May general election. F ollowing the termination CAP felt that M &R used every available opportunity to denigrate, insult and sully its company’s reputation not only to the residents of Acklins, but also to government officials, officers a nd agents of the Ministry of Works, while holding CAP completely responsible for every delay and/or drawback experienced throughout the course of this assignment. T he ministry under the former PLP gove rnment instructed CAP to continue work on the project which it did using personal funds to assist with expenses right up until July 2007 when under the new administra-t ion the company received a letter from the ministry advising the company that all work was to be suspended until further review. At that point the road had been scarified, in o ther words its top surface had been r emoved, but not replaced. It has further deteriorated. I n a press conference last Wednesday MICAL MP V Alfred Gray hit out at government accusing it of only arranging to repair the “better part” of Acklins’ dilapidated Queen’s Highway while leaving thew orst part the part worked on by the joint venture team in ruins. He said residents across Acklins are inconvenienced by the “impassable” 25 to 30 m ile southern section of the road, but residents in the south, where the majority of his PLP supporters live, are the most badly affected. Mr Gray said he was “enraged” upon s eeing the Ministry of Works’ advertisement which only called for tenders to repair the northern part of the road. However, the road work that the FNM g overnment has announced for the north is the completion of an agreement left in place by the PLP. It was the PLP that had negotiated the Acklins road works with the European Union (EU all contracts for the repair and upgrade of r oads that use EU money. The FNM is now trying to complete this road negotiated under the PLP. The road works under these negotiations were divided into three parts. The one nowb eing finalised under this agreement is the Northern Acklins Road. A part of this contract with money from the European Union, includes repair of a part of the road on R agged Island in addition to a new dock and the upgrade of the airport for that island. Before this misadventure with M&R, Caribbean Asphalt from 1994-1998, undert he FNM government, had successfully constructed more than 34 miles of road in Crooked Island and extended the Ragged Island Airstrip to more than 4,000 miles. B oth projects on completion were thoroughly inspected and approved not only by the Ministry of Works, but also by engineers and agents from the Department of Aviation and Transport. FNM candidates FROM page one Brent Symonette F ROM page one Road paving issues Were my sons FROM page one F ROM page one Prosecution closes case Dwight Major FROM page one Police awaiting USclearance FROM page one FROM page one Teen’s death

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 9 n By JEROME PUGMIRE AP Sports Writer ISSOUDUN, France (AP Teammates Alberto Contador and Lance Armstrong remained second and third in the Tour de France after a technology-free day of riding in which Britain’s Mark Cavendish won the 10th stage. Organizers banned rider earpieces for Tuesday’s 121-mile route, forcing cyclists to devise tactics without radio instructions from team cars. Rinaldo Nocentini of Italy kept the leader’s yellow jersey on a flat route favoring sprinters. Contador crossed the line in 40th place. Armstrong, the seven-time champion, finished in the main pack at 46th. Overall, Nocentini stayed six seconds ahead of Contador and eight in front of Armstrong. Armstrong is coming out of 3 1/2 years of retirement and chasing an eighth Tour title. Contador is aiming for a second title after winning in 2007. The Spanish mountain specialist was unable to defend his title last year because his Astana team was barred from the race because of doping scan dals. Cavendish edged Thor Hushovd of Norway in a sprint finish, breaking ahead in the final 200 yards. It was the British sprinter’s third stage victory of this Tour and seventh of his career. Tyler Farrar of the United States finished third. “It was a really hard finish, slightly uphill with a lot of corners,” said Cavendish, who rides for Team Columbia-High Road, said. “I was scared that I attacked too early but (teammate Mark me a lot.” The Tour hoped to inject drama into this race by eliminating earpieces in the 10th and 13th stages. Many rid ers Armstrong, Contador and Nocentini among them criticized the decision. “I think that for us and for the whole team it is not a good thing,” Nocentini said. “We spoke about the earpieces before the start. The fact is for us it’s dangerous not to have them. There are dangers on the road.” Armstrong joked about the matter as he got off his Astana team bus and mounted his bike to go to the start line. “I can’t hear anything; I don’t know anything. ... I feel naked,” the 37-yearold Texan said. “I think it’s a lot to do about nothing.” Astana team director Johan Bruyneel had campaigned for the ban to be overturned. But it was upheld and is also scheduled for Friday, a tricky stage featuring one big climb and possibly many attacks. Teams are still pressuring organizers to overturn the ban. “My impression is that we’ll have the radio on Friday,” Armstrong said. With the backing of the cycling’s governing body, Tour organizers decided last month that rider radios and TV sets in cars would be banned for two stages. Earlier in the race, Bruyneel said the Tour was not the place for such an “experiment.” Earpieces allow riders to be linked to directors in team cars. Riders can be informed of developments and told when they need to attack or chase riders in a breakaway. The strategy was popularized by Armstrong when he won his first Tour in 1999. Some riders and former cham pions say the tactic makes cycling too clinical. “There are arguments to both sides, to have them or not to have them,” Armstrong said. “But, on balance, I think it’s better to have them. In cycling, we have other, more important, things to care about.” On Tuesday, Thierry Hupond, Benoit Vaugrenard, Mikhail Ignatiev and Samuel Dumoulin were caught following a long breakaway with just under a mile to go. Cavendish then turned into the home straightaway and was pressured by Hushovd but held on. “Cavendish is very, very fast, but it’s true that he also has a very quick team,” Hushovd said. “I lost four or five meters (yards turn.” Cavendish, who last year won four stages but did not finish the Tour, was timed in 4 hours, 46 minutes, 43 seconds. “We had all nine guys there at the finish, working 100 percent and delivering perfectly,” Cavendish said. Hushovd, who kept the sprinter’s green jersey despite losing points to Cavendish, and Farrar received the same time as Cavendish. With two more flat stages Wednes day and Thursday, Cavendish has Hushovd’s green jersey in his sights. Hushovd has 147 points and Cavendish 141. Cavendish said he feels fresh because his teammates nursed him through the Pyrenees mountain stages. “I hope to win more (stages next two days,” he said. AP Sports Writer Samuel Petre quin contributed to this report Cavendish wins 10th T our stage MARK CAVENDISH of Britain reacts as he crosses the finish line to win the 10th stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 194.5 kilometers (120.9 miles ges and finish in Issoudun, central France on Tuesday. Center rear is Thor Hushovd of Norway, wearing the best sprinter's green jersey, who finished second. (AP Photo: Laurent Rebours Bahamas set to host Caribbean Judo Cup JUDO athletes from Barbados, Puerto Rico, The Cayman Islands, the Dutch Antilles and the Bahamas are expected to face off this weekend in the Caribbean Judo Cup. The 1pm to 4pm event is set to be held at Loyola Hall, Gladstone Road, on July 18. Trials were held over the weekend to determine who would represent the Bahamas against its Caribbean neighbours. The team will consist of Wellington Mullings (73Kg Chrisnell Cooper (78 Kg D’Arcy Rahming Jr (66 Kg Cynthia Rahming (52 Kg Nathan Williams (48 Kg Open There will also be an open tournament in which about 50 Bahamian and US athletes are expected to attend. In preparation for the event, top US coach Gerald Lafon has been busy training Bahamian athletes at an intensive training camp. He has also been running a national coaches course in which all Bahamas Judo Fed eration (BJF ing part. "I am pleased to see the cooperation between schools of the (BJF be eager to learn what steps are necessary to take the Bahamas to the next level," said Coach Lafon. "The ath letes in the training camp have improved significantly since I was here a year ago." The course is being held at Island Jujutsu on Carmichael Road and All Star Family Center, Joe Farrington Road. TRIALS were held over the weekend to determine who would represent the Bahamas against its Caribbean neighbours. The team will consist of Wellington Mullings (73Kg er (78 Kg (66 Kg), Cynthia Rahming (52 Kg), and Nathan Williams (48 Kg). YOUNG judo athletes take part in a training camp... Photos courtesy of the Bahamas J udo Federation

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Under-19 cricket team beats Argentina and avoids relegation THE Bahamas Junior Golf Association’s national team has returned with a fifth place finish after Caribbean Amateur Junior Golf Championships in Jamaica last week. The Bahamas, with its best showing coming from Benjamin Davis in the boys’ 14-15 division, is now preparing to host next year’s championships. The Bahamas accumulated a total of 93 points at the threeday competition between nine participating countries for the Hank James Trophy. Winning the title was Puerto Rico with 158. Trinidad & Tobago got second with 136 followed by Dominican Republic with 122 and Jamaica with 100. The competition was held in three age groups in the boys and girls. They were 13-andunder, 14-15 and 16-17. Davis turned in a three-day score of 220 (77-71-72 off the individual title in the boys 14-15 division. His nearest rival was Jake Delaney of Trinidad & Tobago with 223 (74-77-72 Davis’ teammates Osbourne Cooper was 15th with 256 (8480-92) and Rasheed Robinson was 17th with 266 (87-89-90 Denier Weech turned in the next best individual performance for the Bahamas with sixth place in the girls 13-andunder. She shot a 103-103-95 for her total of 301. Puerto Rico’s Yudika Rodriguez took the divisional title with rounds of 80-95-86 for her total of 261. Asif Robinson, competing in the boys 13-and-under division, was eighth with a 265 (93-8686). His teammate Harrison Collins was 11th with 292 (10193-98). The divisional title went to Frederick Thon of Puerto Rico with 228 (75-81-72 Taneka Sandiford, compet ing in the girls 14-15 division, was eighth with a 279 (92-9493). Bijan Lockhart, her team mate, was tied with another for 13th, but neither turned in a card. Maria Torres of Puerto Rico won the divisional title with 242 (82-84-76 In the girls 16-17 division, I’leah Knowles ended up 10th after she shot rounds of 110, 110, 94 for her total of 301, just a head of teammate Eugenie Adderley, who shot 304 (110, 100, 94). And Kyle King has the best showing of the Bahamian trio in the boys 16-17. With rounds of 90-89-86, King shot a 265 for1 7th place. Teammates Charlie Butler was tied with another for 18th with 283 (96-90-97 Rashad Ferguson’s 285 (96-89100) placed him 20th. Simon Proverbs of Barbados shot a 226 (82-72-72 the divisional crown. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Bahamas 5th place at junior amateur golf championships BENJAMIN DAVIS won the individual title in the boys 14-15 division... ASIF ROBINSON , competing in the boys 13-and-under division, was eighth with a 265 (93-86-86 F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s Bulls buy out F Tim Thomas CHICAGO (AP ward Tim Thomas and the Chicago Bulls have agreed on a contract buyout, ending the veteran's second stint with the Bulls. The team announced the move Tuesday. Acquired from the New York Knicks in February, Thomas averaged 5.8 points and 2.3 rebounds in 18 games with Chicago. He was scheduled to make about $6.4 million next season, but the Bulls had no room for him after drafting forwards James Johnson and Taj Gibson last month. The 32-year old Thomas has averaged 11.6 points and 4.1 rebounds for six teams in 12 years. He was also dealt from the Knicks to the Bulls before the 2005-06 season, but played just three games for Chicago and was waived the following March. P h o t o s b y G a v i n C o l l i n s n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas’ under-19 team salvaged a less than desirable performance at the International Cricket Council Americas Regional tournament, capping the four-day event with its only victory. The team won its final match against Argentina and, by doing so, avoided relegation to a lower division in the region. It was the first win for the Bahamas in the history of the regional qualifier. Up first at bat, the Bahamas scored 187 runs for seven wickets, while Argentina was held to 88 runs for seven wickets. The Bahamas took the match by 57 runs. Shridat Jadoo led the Bahamas’ balanced scoring attack with a game high 34 runs. Odane Tucker finished with 29, Julio Jameson added 25 Orlando Stuart finished with 23 r uns while Marc Taylor finished w ith 21. T he Bahamian bowlers dominated Argentina and combined with efficient defense in the field, limiting them to just double figures in runs. Taylor, who was also named “Man of the Match”, took three wickets while Stuart and Ashmeid Allie and each took one. Canada prevailed as tournament champions after finishing the tournament undefeated at 5-0, including a 62 run margin of victory over the US in the semi finals. The Americans finished second at 4-1, Bermuda was third at 3-2, the Bahamas at 1-4 and Argentina rounded out the field winless at 0-5. The US was the tournament’s leading scorer with a total of 1030 runs, while Canada boast ed the top defense, allowing just 409. The Bahamas scored a total of 421 runs while they gave up 776. The team received tournament acclaim when Stuart finished second amongst leading bowlers with 11 wickets. Christopher Douglas of Bermuda led the list with 14 wickets. The Bahamas opened the tournament with a loss to the US by 249 runs, 325-79. In their next match against the eventual tournament cham pions, Canada, the Bahamas lost by nine wickets. They fared little better in their third match of the tournament, a loss to the Cayman Islands by eight wickets, and against Bermuda they lost by 106 runs. The ICC Americas Regional Tournament is a bi-annual tournament that is a part of the council’s international develop ment programme. The Bahamas is scheduled to host the ICC under 15 Tournament in Nassau this August. Teams from the Cayman Islands and Belize have already committed to attend. PAUL Melbourne, a winner of numerous national titles and multiple Central American and Caribbean Championships medals, provides some important tips for competitors in the Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fit ness Federation’s 36th Independence National Bodybuilding Championships. The championships is scheduled for 7:30pm July 18 at the Centre of Performing Arts on Shirley Street. “When a competitor comes on stage, he/she must come on stage as though he is the only competitor. He has to come on with a lot of excitement,” Melbourne said. “He must express to the judges the feeling that there is nobody better than him on stage. All too often competitors come on stage slouchy, not showing any kind of energy and basically looking like they don’t want to compete in the first place even though they’ve spent months training for the event.” Melbourne said the truth of the matter is that when they walk on stage, they must make a statement to the judges that ‘here I am. I have worked for this many months and I am here to show you my best.’” “They must form their pose in the right form or fashion. If they are showing their thighs, it is important that they have their legs in the right position, they must have their hands in the right position, they must have their chin in the right position and they must have their body upright and tight.” Melbourne clarified that the third most important thing for the bodybuilder is to remember that their music must be thrilling and exciting. “A lot of guys come out with music that puts you to sleep,” he said. “That throws the audi ence off. He may be the com petitor with the best muscles, but because his music is not gripping, he could fall down. “Music is supposed to be filled with dramatics so that when it comes on it excites the crowd and makes them want to see him and the judges want to see what he has to offer,” Melbourne said. Melbourne, who has been competing since 1982, said many of the bodybuilders have failed because they did not adhere to these categories. “That is why we are teaching them to flex their entire body because many people just flex the top half of their body and forget the legs,” he said. “They must remember their legs as well. “They must learn how to express, how to control, how to contract their muscles so that the audience can see the finished product of their merchandise.” Melbourne further stated that the younger builders are eager to develop themselves for tourna ments to come. “They have showed that they are good listeners. They ask senior bodybuilders like myself, Aaron Green, Raymond Tucker, Wellington Sears, Nardo Dean and Paul Wong to assist them in helping to get all of the mechanics right,” he said. “I think we should have a very good crop of senior contenders at this year’s championships.” T ips from a veteran bodybuilder PAUL MELBOURNE

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C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 9 Bahamas set to host Caribbean Judo Cup... ‘Golden Girl’ Chandra takes the No. 2 spot n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net W hile the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA not yet released the Bahamian team for the IAAF World Championships in Athletics, the elite athletes are making their presence felt before the trip to Berlin, Germany, August 15-23. At the conclusion of the Athens Grand Prix track meet on Monday, veteran sprinter Chandra Sturrup climbed to No. 2 on the World Athletics Tour that will allow athletes to earn a berth in the World Athletics Final in Stuttgart, Germany, in September. Despite coming in sixth in the women’s 100m in Athens, Sturrup has accumulated a total of 59 points over five meets to trail Jamaican speedster Kerron Stewart, who leads with 88 points over five meets as well. On Saturday in Rome, Sturrup turned in her sea son’s best of 10.99 seconds, better only by five other ath letes, including three Jamaicans headed by Stew art, who won the race in an impressive 10.75. Double national sprint champion Debbie FergusonMcKenzie, who has posted three of the last four meetings between her and Stur rup, is sitting at No. 6 on the world’s list. She did her sea son’s best of 11.04 in Athens. In the 200m, FergusonMcKenzie is ranked at No. 9, having ran a season’s best of 22.56 in New York on May 30. Chris “Bay” Brown, who missed out on a chance to contend for the Golden League $1 million jackpot after he didn’t participate in the second of the first three meets on the circuit, has the best showing by the men. He is also sitting in sec ond place in the men’s 400 with 51 points over four meets behind African cham pion Gary Kikaya. Brown has the seventh fastest time and the second by a Bahamian in 44.81 that he recorded on Saturday in Rome. Newcomer Latoy Williams, who is still recovering from an injury at the Nationals, has the fastest time by a Bahamian of 44.73, the third best this season. But he’s not listed on the World Athletics Tour, having not competed in Europe yet. Michael Mathieu is tied with three others for 15th place on the list, but his season’s best is just 45.80 that he ran on June 10 in Thessaloniki. Andrae Williams, the third fastest Bahamian so far this year with a time of 44.98 on May 7 in Lubbock, Texas, is 27th on the World Athletics Tour. Andretti Bain, last year’s NCAA champion who is coming off an injured season earlier this year, is ranked at No. 33, but his best has been posted at 46.02 on June 27 at the Nationals. On the women’s side, Christine Amertil is listed at No. 15 with 17 points over the three meets she competed in. Her season’s best of 51.43 in Belm on May 24 has her at No. 21 on the performance list. Currently sitting in third on the men’s triple jump standings is Olympic bronze medallist Leevan “Superman” Sands. He has competed in three meets and racked up 20 points. But his season’s best of 17.14 at the Nationals is 14th on the performance list. After getting off to a sizzling start, Shamar Sands has cooled down a bit in the men’s 110m hurdles. He is now No. 10 on the World Athletics Tour with 38 points over five meets. His season’s best of 13.38 on June 17 in Ostrava has him at No. 18. World Championships silver medallist Derrick Atkins is tied with nine others at No. 90 in the men’s 100m. He has posted a season’s best of 10.17 in Berkeley, California, on April 24. And world champion Donald Thomas continues to struggle in the men’s high jump, coming off his second straight meet without clearing a height in Athens. Thomas, however, is sitting in seventh spot and has done a season’s best of 2.30 in Auburn, Alabama, on April 4. OLYMPIC Champion Veronica Campbell Brown (right Olympic stadium on Monday... P e t r o s G i a n n a k o u r i s / A P Ferguson-McKenzie Latoy Williams Donald Thomas Michael Mathieu Andrae Williams Andretti Bain Christine Amertil Shamar Sands Leevan Sands Derrick Atkins Chris Brown Cavendish wins 10th Tour stage... See page 9

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE WIND JAMMERS CASTING CALL BAHAMIAN MOVIE An independent motion picture, shooting this summer in the Bahamas is looking to ll roles for a new movie shooting in August. Actors will be compensated for their work. Experience is not necessary but a good sense of humor will go a long way! We are the looking for: -Three older white men with a sly sense of humor and a rened look. -A young black Bahamian male between 14-16 who likes Junkanoo -An older white man with a heavy foreign accent.Please contact: kmortimer@windjammersthemovie.com or call 394.6579 B ILL KACZOR, A ssociated Press Writer MELISSA NELSON, Associated Press Writer PENSACOLA, Fla. A n ex-convict who taught selfdefense to children. A day laborer who served prison time for killing a man in a fight. An Air Force staff sergeant attached to a n elite special operations unit. Somehow, authorities say, they ended up part of a loosely connected group of seven men charged in the shooting deaths of Byrd and Melanie Billings, a wealthy Florida Panhandle couple known for adopting children with special needs. T he suspects, some dressed as n injas, stole a safe and other items during the break-in Thursday at the sprawling Billings home west of Pensacola. Nine of the couple's 13 adopted children were home at the time. Three saw the intrud e rs but were not hurt. Authorities would not say what was in the safe or what else was taken. S ome of the masked men entered through the front door, w hile others slipped in through a n unlocked utility door in the b ack. They were in and out in under 10 minutes. The crime was captured by an extensive video surveillance system the Billings used to keep tabs on their many children. "It was a very well-p lanned and well-executed operation," said Escambia County S heriff David Morgan. The last three of the seven suspects were arrested Tuesday, t hough Morgan said there still might be more arrests. State A ttorney Bill Eddins said robb ery was the main motive for the crime. Adult daughter Ashley M arkham one of four Billings children from previous marriages sobbed Tuesday as she hugged M organ, who said he kept a promise made to her the night of t he slayings. "It is my honor today to tell you, Ashley, your family we have found them and they are in custody," Morgan said. T he suspects ranged in age from 16 to 56, and several were day laborers who knew each other through a pressure washing b usiness and an auto detailer they worked for. One, Donnie RayS tallworth, was with the Air Force Special Operations Comm and with an aircraft maintenance squadron at Hurlburt Field near Fort Walton Beach. It wasn't clear how he knew the others. "We're dealing with a group of f olks with rare exception of course, there's a couple of peoplew ho are not that again are basically day laborer sorts, folks t hat get odd jobs, part-time jobs and they drift," Morgan said. "With the exception of Mr. Stallworth you don't have any careerminded people in this group." M organ called 35-year-old suspect Leonard Gonzalez Jr. a "piv o tal person" in organizing the crime, but stopped short of iden t ifying him as the mastermind. He was charged Sunday with murder. In court Tuesday, he read a statement proclaiming his innocence. " The sheriff intentionally thrust me into the public's eye withouta ny charges being filed and also intentionally placed me in a suic ide ward to make me look even guiltier," Gonzalez said. News c lippings provided a very different picture of Gonzalez, a formerN ational Guard member and martial arts expert who taught s elf-defense classes for women and children. In 2007, he and his wife founded a martial-arts course that taught children to defend themselves against sexual preda-t ors. Gwinn Corley, a spokesman f or a community group that gave Gonzalez and his wife an award f or their program, said they brought their six young children to self-defense presentations. "We were impressed with them," Corley said. "He was talki ng about children and their respect for their elders. They boths eemed to have a passion to teaching the arts to abused w omen and kids, they had a vision for how to give free self defense." But records show Gonzalez, who was arrested Sunday in the B illings case, served time in Flori da State Prison on burglary andf orgery charges in the mid-1990s. His father, Leonard Gonzalez S r., was also arrested. The 56year-old was charged Sunday n ight with evidence tampering after authorities said he tried to cover up some damage on a red van seen on surveillance video pulling away from the house. Officials said the damage was unrelated to the crime. Tips fromt he public led police to the van Saturday. The elder Gonzalez owned a pressure washing business and m ay have visited the Billings property once before. Another man arrested and charged with murder Sunday, day laborer Wayne Coldiron, 41, sometimes worked for him and also may have visited the property, Morg an said. Coldiron, who appeared in court Tuesday and said he had l ost his job as a plumber, served two years in a Tennessee prison in the early 1990s after killing a man during a fight. He also served n early two years in prison in Florida on an aggravated assault charge. The other four suspects were arrested Monday and Tuesday. Authorities in neighboring Okaloosa County arrested 31-y ear-old Gary Sumner, another day laborer who was in a county jail on an unrelated traffic charge. On Tuesday, three more men w ere arrested: Stallworth, 19year-old Frederick Lee Thorton, and a 16-year-old whom officials are not naming because he is a minor. Eddins, the prosecutor, said he would seek first-degree murder indictments from a grand j ury against all the suspects, including Gonzalez Sr. He would n ot say whether he will seek the death penalty. Escambia County Judge Tom Johnson refused to set bail for the younger Gonzalez and Coldiron at the request ofS tate Attorney Bill Eddins. Johnson set their arraignments for Aug. 6. Bond for the elder Gonzalez had already been set at $ 500,000. The suspects arrested Monday and Tuesday are due in court this week except for Stallworth, who must be extradited from Alabama, where he wasa rrested. The Billings family attended the hearing Tuesday but made no statements. Some were in tears a fterward. Friends, meanwhile, struggled to understand how the couple could have been killed in such a horrific way. "Melanie and Byrd both would give you thes hirt off their back and maybe they were too trusting," said Patsy Brown, who had known Melanie Billings for 22 years. Seven charged with killing Florida couple, stealing safe ASHLEY MARKHAM , 26, daughter of Melanie Billings, is comforted by Sheriff David Morgan after his announcement of a seventh arrest Tuesday, July 14, 2009. Masked suspects, some dressed as ninjas, stole a safe and other items during a deadly break-in at the sprawling Florida Panhandle home of a couple known for adopting children with special needs, authorities said Tuesday. A P P h o t o / K a t i e K i n g , T h e P e n s a c o l a N e w s J o u r n a l TEACHINGVACANCIESThe Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications from qualiOne (1Geography O ne (1-T he Director of Education Anglican Central Education Authority P.O. Box N-656 N assau, Bahamas

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he Sandals resort chain is eyeing the purchase of Exuma’s closed Emerald Bay resort, Tribune Business can reveal, and is among the remaining bidders in negotiations with the properties PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC The Jamaica-headquartered chain, owned by Gordon ‘Butch’ Stewart and his family, already has a strong presence in the Bahamas through its Royal Bahamian resort on Cable Beach, and was said by informed sources yesterday to be “very interested” in acquiring Emerald Bay provided the price was right. One hotel industry source, speaking to Tribune Business on condition of anonymity, said yesterday: “I’m aware that they’re [Sandals] very interested in it [Emerald Bay], but it will all come down to price and financing.” The source said senior Sandals execu tives had already met with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham over the Emerald Bay issue. Other contacts have told Tribune Business that the Prime Minister and his government have been actively encouraging existing owners/developers of Bahamasbased resorts to assess the feasibility of acquiring Emerald Bay, believing that their track record and knowledge of this nation would leave them best-placed to solve the so-called Exuma anchor property’s prob lems. Sandals and Mr Stewart already have resort interests in the Exumas via their boutique Royal Plantation chain, which will have a 21-villa property on 50-acre Fowl Cay by end-2009. Another source told Tribune Business that Sandals executives had been “seen down there several times” carrying out due diligence on the Emerald Bay property. “That would probably be the best bet,” he added of the prospects for a Sandals purchase. “They know the lay of the land and promise to be a good corporate citizen.” And another source with knowledge of Sandals’ interest told Tribune Business: “Sandals is a known entity, and comes with pre-packaged marketing. They have the Sandals brand identity, the extremely efficient reservations system, 1,000 things going for them and are not tight for money.” The source added, though, that it was important for any buyer to conclude a purchase agreement with PwC and Emerald Bay’s main creditor, the London office of n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor ONE potential replacement for Grand Bahama’s sole casino operator “stands head and shoulders” above the more than 10 other proposals received, the minister of tourism and aviation said yesterday, with the Cabinet and other relevant government agencies set to determine the issue next week. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace told Tribune Business he and n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A FOUNDER of the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants (BICA told newly-elected council members yesterday that the institution has lost the influence it once held within the indus try, while another said it was time to get "back on the road”. Ronald Atkinson, speaking at the induction ceremony for those new council members, admonished BICA for not mov ing towards aligning itself with similar entities in the US, and warned members that the window of opportunity to do so was quickly closing. He said accounting firms can no longer be all things to all people, and suggested that accountants exchange the pedantry for specialisation. This comes as BICA moves to adopt a regional practice monitoring and peer reviewp rogramme being spearheaded b y the International Institute of Chartered Accountants of the Caribbean. Incoming BICA president Reece Chipman, in his address to the new council members, acknowledged the challenges facing BICA with respect to the accounting industry, given the volatility of the economy. "We are expected to channel a course through international agreements, as well as a course through G20 and OECD frameworks of 'best practices' and 'level playing field'," he said. "With this in mind we must maintain public confidence in professional accountants and auditors, and the services they provide for the public. “We should recognise and p rioritise the public interest t hrough a wide range of profes sional services, including many that are externally regulated." Mr Chipman said the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA rently working on an ‘Interna tional Competency Framework’ to address the competencies required by firms to prepare financial information. "As a result of this, BICA encourages all professional accountants (public and private practices) to become members of BICA, and to remain in good standing," he said. According to Mr Chipman, one of the most important focuses for BICA will be public sector accounting and the intro duction of accrual basis accouti ng. With governments bailing out, packaging assistance and privatisation, these initiatives will undoubtedly find itself on the country’s balance sheet,” Mr Chipman said. “Accordingly, proper use of accrual basis accounting in the public sector becomes critically important. This initiative of gov ernment’s adoption of accrual basis accounting versus cash basis accounting is supported by IFAC and the World Bank in light of the economic crisis, and the IMF’s mandate for greater transparency and accountability.” n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor PRICE controls must be included in the licences issued to the Bahamas Telecommuni cations Company (BTC Cable Bahamas, a rival tele coms operator has warned, in order to prevent “significant distortion of the market” and “irreparable damage” being caused to competitors. Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, president of Systems Resource Group (SRG IndiGo Networks, BTC’s only legal competitor in landline voice services, said that in the absence of price controls that were inbuilt into their licence, operators with significant market power (SMP major damage through practices such as predatory pricing before regulators were able to act. Responding to the communications licensing reform paper, published by the Governmentappointed BTC privatisation committee, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said SRG was concerned that the draft licences did not impose price control or service bundling obligations on communications operators with SMP. BTC has been defined as an operator with SMP in both the provision of fixed landline and cellular voice telephony services, while Cable Bahamas has SMP in cable television services. Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said that while the new communications sector regulator, URCA, would be empowered by the new legislation to assess abuse of a dominant position by the likes of Cable Bahamas and BTC, the time taken to act and impose a decision “can lead to irreparable damage to other operators and lead to signifi cant distortion of the market”. Recalling SRG’s experience as the new entrant to the fixedline voice market, Mr HuttonAshkenny, in a thinly-veiled refC M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $4.21 $4.30 $4.25 Operator urges price controls for dominant telecom firms * SRG fears ‘significant distortion of the market’ and ‘irreparable damage’ caused if BTC, Cable Bahamas licences do not have controlling mechanisms to prevent predatory pricing S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC expects to complete the more than $50 million implementa tion of its IP next generation network infrastructure over “the next 18 months”, Tribune Business was told yesterday, with the first phase of its new $14-$15 million billing system scheduled for an endAugust/September finish. Marlon Johnson, BTC’s vicepresident of sales and marketing, said the company’s Internet Protocol (IP tion network would “increase operating efficiencies” at the state-owned carrier, just as the Government formally commences the process to privatise it by selling a 51 per cent stake to a strategic partner. “This is our new generation network that will transition us from the digital infrastructure we have now to what is a stateBTC’s $50m core network in place in months’ Accounting body urged: ‘Get back on the road’ Fears BICA has lost influence it once had in the profession * T argets end-August/ September deadline for $14-$15m billing system implementation * New IP system to ‘enhance operating efficiencies’ * No more major projects due to privatisation S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B Casino bidder ‘head and shoulder above rivals * Government ‘very, very e xcited’ about one potential replacement for Isle of Capri * Minister ‘fairly confident’ n ew operator found before Capri’s agreement expires in August, based on interest t hat resulted in more than 10 proposals * Government due to discuss i ssue next week, with key lying in ‘quality of solution’ and new operator’s b rand/marketing reach V-Wallace Sandals eyes deal for Emerald Bay Rival bidding group includes PI resort owner RIU

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erence to BTC, said: “In the recent past, the dominant fixed voice operator in the Bahamas has acted in a manner that would have had the effect of causing lasting market distor tion had the regulator not acted. “In the absence of the price control conditions placed upon the dominant operator in its licence, irreparable damage would have been caused that could not have been resolved by a subsequent ruling by the regulator that the subject action was deemed to be anti-competitive. “In the time it would have taken even a highly efficient and powerful regulator to react, the damage would have been done, and whilst the dominant operator might have suffered a fine, that would have been of little comfort to other operators who may have been driven from the market in the meanwhile.” Urging that the draft licence be modified to require the likes of BTC and Cable Bahamas to obtain URCA’s prior approval for any change in their tariff prices, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny added: “This would not only help guard against predatory practices, such as those described above, but would also serve to protect the consumer from an ex-monopolist raising its prices prior to competitive market entry by a new operator, followed by a subsequent price reduction when competition became established.” The SRG president also called for licence restrictions toa ccount for services in other markets where the licensee did not have dominant SMP power. In a likely reference to both BTC and Cable Bahamas, he said: “An operator with a sunk cost of infrastructure in one market will be able to adopt unfair pricing and bundling strategies that leverage its infrastructure in new markets, even in the absence of SMP in those markets.” Significant market power was also a central theme in SRG’s concerns over the transition from the existing telecommunications industry regulatory regime, overseen by the Public Utilities Commission (PUC URCA and the wider communications legislative and supervisory framework. While the new legislation enabled URCA to address concerns relating to a market in which an SMP operator was currently licensed, and prevent it from “leveraging SMP in its existing market into new markets and thereby distorting com-p etition”, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny felt “a potential loophole” remained when it came to ensuring fair competition during the transition between regulatory regimes. “Such efforts will have been in vain if an operator with SMP in its existing market was deemed to have satisfied the obligations placed upon it, but was separately engaged in activity that had the effect of distorting competition in the new market,” he warned. As a result, the SRG presi dent recommended that any company with SMP be prevented from entering new communications markets “until such time that URCA has confirmed its acceptance that no activity exists that would have the effect of distorting competition in the new market”. Otherwise, URCA would be in the position of permitting an anti-competitive position to develop during the regulatory regime transition, then be forced to resolve it at a laterd ate. In response to SRG’s concerns, the BTC privatisation committee said SMP and Universal Service Obligations (USO from the date the Communica tions Act took effect “to ensure that new entrants are not dis advantaged”. “This would not amount to an unfair regulatory burden on incumbent operators that have the benefit of an entrenched position, incumbency advantage and significant market share,” the committee said. It added that the issues of price control and service bundling would be addressed in separate consultations but, in a nod to SRG’s concerns, said: “Licensees that are presumed to have SMP will not be able to enter new markets until they have demonstrated compliance with the SMP conditions determined pursuant to the transi tional provisions.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE POSITION AVAILABLE: REQUIREMENTS: DUTIES: Human Resources Manager, (Re: Client Relationship Position), P.O. Box SS 6289, Nassau, Bahamas, by 20th July, 2009 or fax to (242 NOTICE There will be a meeting for all members of the Honorable Society of the Middle Temple on Thursday July 23rd 6:00 p.m. @ S.G. Hambros. All are asked to attend. 1 27,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW 0U-2+1%(51$5'RI / RYHO\%D\$FNOLQV%DKDPDV LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHU UHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQ Q DWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDW D SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQ QDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQ D QGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\V I URPWKH WKG RI-XO\ WRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOH IRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[1DVVDX % DKDPDV127,&( To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 502-2371 today! A A s s k k Q Q u u e e s s t t i i o o n n s s Daddy, what’s that? If I had a dime for every time they asked that question I would be writing this article from my mountain top estate. Remember, I have twins so everything is double, even including the dimes. The lesson here ASK QUESTIONS. A lot of us do not ask enough questions. My kids ask questions until they understand completely what it is they need to know. It should be the same when we are talking to clients. D D i i r r e e c c t t i i o o n n s s Daddy, where are we going? What another powerful question. Ask your clients where it is they want to go. Once you know where they want to go, it is just a matter of how. And that’s the job of the sales and marketing person. V V i i s s i i o o n n s s A A n n d d D D e e c c i i s s i i o o n n s s M y kids make decisions. W hen they see something they want they are gone. And it should be the same with ourselves and clients. Get the vision, see it and go after it. Don’t let anything get in your way. This applies to sales and marketing professionals as well as clients. This relates back to my last article on GOALS. I I D D o o n n t t W W a a n n t t T T o o ! ! This is another way of expressing: “I really don’t understand.” (Bottom line: I did not explain myself clearly enough). Once I slow down and explain to my boys all of the details, even though they may not grasp everything there are always one or two words they will connect with and I can see their expressions change. This reminds me of when I am dealing with some clients. Though I can see (vision ly and the direction needed to achieve a goal, my client still does not. This is basically because I have not in DETAIL explained the five W’s. Who, What, Why, Where and When. Slow down when talking with clients and explain things as SLOWLY and clearly as possi ble, then ask: “DO YOU UNDERSTAND?” S S i i m m p p l l i i f f y y S S p p e e a a k k i i n n y y o o u u r r c c l l i i e e n n t t s s l l a a n n g g u u a a g g e e , , n n o o t t y y o o u u r r s s S o I do not hear the same question over and over from my twins, I try to speak in their language. Guess what? It usually works. Do the same with your clients and you will be surprised. Using flashy jargons and expressions from your industry is exactly that. Your client does not know what a superimperdanticulator is (neither do I you have to use some terminology from your industry, follow it up with plain English and explain clearly what it is and how it works. Remember an old expression K.I.S.S. Keep it simple stupid. Well? Do it. It works. Y Y o o u u C C a a n n S S a a y y N N o o ! ! Lastly, the second most powerful word in the dictionary after it is no! Saying no is sometimes difficult for a lot of people. Boy, let me tell you, I’m learning fast. I h ave to say no twice as fast as m ost people. Saying no is a g ood thing, and especially with children. Say No and explain why it is important as well. With some people, what they are asking is either impossible in the timeframe or simply will not work. Saying No to a client is healthy for both parties involved. The same as it is with our children; it’s good for them and us parents. Never promise something you can’t deliver. Ever promised your kids something and did not do it? Ouuuuccchh. Man, they are like elephants and never forget it. Well, the same goes for sales professionals. If you can’t do it, say no. However, if you really can’t provide something they are looking for, help them find someone who can. This will only strengthen your relationship. All of these marketing strategies are certain to keep your business on top during these challenging economic times. Have a productive and profitable week! Remember: “THOSE WHO MARKET WILL MAKE IT.” N N B B : : S S c c o o t t t t F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n i i s s p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t o o f f S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e , , a a p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l a a n n d d m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g c c o o m m p p a a n n y y s s p p e e c c i i a a l l i i s s i i n n g g i i n n p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l p p r r o o d d u u c c t t s s . . E E s s t t a a b b l l i i s s h h e e d d o o v v e e r r 2 2 7 7 y y e e a a r r s s a a g g o o , , S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e h h a a s s a a s s s s i i s s t t e e d d B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s e e s s f f r r o o m m v v a a r r i i o o u u s s i i n n d d u u s s t t r r i i e e s s , , r r a a n n g g i i n n g g f f r r o o m m t t o o u u r r i i s s m m a a n n d d b b a a n n k k i i n n g g t t o o t t e e l l e e c c o o m m m m u u n n i i c c a a t t i i o o n n s s , , i i n n m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g t t h h e e m m s s e e l l v v e e s s . . R R e e a a d d e e r r s s c c a a n n c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M r r F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n a a t t S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e o o n n E E a a s s t t S S h h i i r r l l e e y y S S t t r r e e e e t t , , b b y y e e m m a a i i l l a a t t s s c c o o t t t t @ @ s s u u n n t t e e e e . . c c o o m m o o r r b b y y t t e e l l e e p p h h o o n n e e a a t t 2 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 3 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 4 4 . . Keeping it simple is just child’s play Promotional Marketing by Scott Farrington Operator ur ges price controls for dominant telecom fir ms F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE Department of Labour’s Skills Bank is placing Bahamians in permansent jobs at a rate of 60 per month, a government minister said yesterdaym and while the labour market was not as vibrant as before some jobs were available for students graduating high school and college. Dion Foulkes, minister of labour, told Tribune Business: "There are some job opportunities out there and we encourage high school and college students to continue to pursue those jobs.” The summer employment programmes offered by many private businesses and public entities were feared threatened by the recession, but Mr Foulkes said the Government had allocated $2 million for its summer programme and argued that thousands of high school and college students had been placed this summer. He told this newspaper yesterday that within 48 hours, the Labour Department's skills bank placed eight welders on a dredging project; a sous-chef in one of the hotels; a legal secretary in a law firm; a nurse in a private medical centre; four cashiers at a food store chain; and four security personnel in a security firm. "Businesses on a daily basis approach the skills bank for referrals and, by and large, our referral system works," said Mr Foulkes."We have a high success rate and we would wish to encourage unemployed Bahamians and recent graduates to register with us. "If you do not register with the labour exchange, we do not know you are looking for a job." Opposition leader Perry Christie recently criticised the Government’s efforts to curb the rising unemployment figures, urging that it show greater commitment to preserving and creating jobs. Meanwhile, the newly created unemployment benefit topped 10,000 registrants, with 8,785 of those qualifying and receiving the benefit, according to the latest numbers. The Government is now preparing to commence its training programme for 1,000 unemployed Bahamians. This pilot training programme, sponsored also by the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI College of the Bahamas, is scheduled to begin in September and run for one year. According to Mr Foulkes, if the Government's review of the programme is favourable it could be extended past September 2010. of-the-art IP infrastructure,” Mr Johnson told this newspaper. “They’re changing the core infrastructure to what all the company’s services will be pro vided on. “It will increase operating efficiencies because we’ll beable to make the switches, the telephone exchanges, more compact and easier to maintain.It will also allow us to offer expanded services, such as cable television, if the company chooses to go in that direction, and enhance our Internet broadband capacity and the like.” With all major global telecoms carriers switching to IP systems and technology, MrJohnson said the new network would place BTC “on par” with international operators. “This is a little bit of a generational leap to implement for us in keeping pace with the international telecoms market,” he added. BTC’s technology/equipment provider, and installation specialist, Sonus Networks, yesterday said the first phase of the IP network implementation and migration had been completed, with all the Bahamian carrier’s international traffic now being routed on it. Mr Johnson told Tribune Business that the IP network installation was something that would “be done over the next 18 months”, and revealed that BTC was also in the midst of a project to “change our billing system” to allow various services to be charged on one bill. Pegging the costs of this pro ject at around $14-$15 million, Mr Johnson said phase one of the Cerillion system’s installation was “substantially complete”. It was expected to gol ive in late August/early September 2009, and will allow BTC to include landline, Inter net and post-paid cellular charges on the same bill received by consumers. “That will allow customers to h ave multiple services on a sing le bill,” Mr Johnson said, explaining that currently BTC’s customers received different bills for cellular, fixed-line and Internet services. These were also often on different billing cycles, and the new system was designed to remove these inefficiencies by consolidating all services into one bill and cycle. The BTC executive added that the new system was intend ed to enable its customer to go on-line and access their bills there, delivering consumer efficiencies, too. Customers could look at condensed versions of their bill, and the reduction in paperwork would also reduce BTC’s environmental footprint. “The next phase after that will be to move pre-paid customers over to that billing system,” Mr Johnson said. However, the start of the privatisation process will preventB TC from commencing any more capital expenditure projects. “The privatisation process will have commenced, so one of the things governing our decision-making is that we will not want to undertake anythings ubstantial,” Mr Johnson said. M ajor capital spending while BTC is up for sale could deter bidders, as it would represent a material change to the compa ny’s financial condition chiefly its balance sheet, but also the income statement. It would also likely impact the price bidders would be prepared to pay, and as potential incoming owners/managers, they would want to have the sole say on all BTC’s investment decisions. “I imagine we’ll just work on tightening up on customer service, work on those projects already budgeted for, but we don’t expect to be moving on anything too substantive until the privatisation process is com plete,” Mr Johnson said. The Government commenced the formal sales process for BTC yesterday, with bidders having until August 14, 2009, to submit their pre-quali f ication applications. A $25,000 registration fee must be paid by July 28, 2009. BTC was marketed as a com pany that provides services to 334,000 cellular customers, 132,000 fixed-line and 18,500I nternet customers. It also has 1 90 roaming agreements in place. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE 3B Legal NoticeNOTICE GLOBALTECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL SERVICES LIMITEDNOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:(a GLOBALTECHNOLOGYINTERNATIONALSERVICES L IMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000. (bThe dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 9 July 2009 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General. ( c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Amit Singhania of Sheikh Rashid Road, ENOC House I, P.O. Box 6442, Dubai, United Arab E mirates. Dated the 13th day of July, 2009.H&J Corporate Services Ltd. Registered Agent for the above-named Company N OTICEINTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT(No.46 of 2000ELEGANTE INC.No. 83,502 B (In Voluntary Liquidation)NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000 ELEGANTE INC., is in Dissolution Any person having a Claim against the ELEGANTE INC. is required on or before 16th June 2009 to send their name, address and particulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they may be exThe date of Commencement of dissolution was 30th day of June 2009. We, Sovereign Managers Limited c/o Suites 1601-1603 Floor, Kinwick Centre, 32 Hollywood Road, Central, Hong Kong is the Liquidator of ELEGANTE INC. SIGNED For & On Behalf Of NOTICE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT N o. 45 of 2000T RAVINVEST CONSULTANTS LTD.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 1 37 of The International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, TRAVINVEST CONSULTANTS L TD. is in dissolution. The date of commencement o f dissolution was the 16th day of June, 2009. Dillon D ean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of T RAVINVESTCONSULTANTS LTD. Dillon Dean L IQUIDATOR Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhapsyou are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986and shar e your story. Skills Bank placing 60 jobs per month Foulkes BTC’s $50m core network in place in months’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Casino bidder ‘head and shoulder above rivals the Government were “fairly confident” that a replacement for the Isle of Capri could be found before the company’s lease extension expired at endAugust, a development that could potentially place some 234 in jeopardy, given the level of interest received. The minister added that apart from reaching a new lease and other agreements with Our Lucaya’s owner, Hutchison Whampoa, the key factor that would determine the new casino operator as far as the Government was concerned was the brand quality, client/patron pool and marketing reach that it would bring to enhancing Grand Bahama’s overall tourism product. “We’re going to discuss that matter next week,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said, when asked how the search for Isle of Capri’s replacement was progressing. “We’ve had a number of very, very strong proposals, and another set of proposals that kind of fit the bill, but there’s one in particular that we’re very, very excited about. This one is head and shoulders above the rest.” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace declined to name any of thep otential replacements, but said i n relation to the proposals sub mitted: “There are easily more than 10.” He added: “Some of them are casino companies that we would consider quite reluctantly, because we do not consider them to have a strong marketing reach in terms of what we want to do with Grand Bahama.” Apart from the Cabinet, next week’s discussions on Isle of Capri’s replacement will also include the likes of Hutchison Whampoa, as casino landlord, and the Ministry of Tourism, while any new operator will “have to pass muster with the Gaming Board”. The Hotel Corporation, led by managing director Sir Baltron Bethel, is understood to be leading the effort to replace Isle of Capri. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said Isle of Capri’s replacement would be a casino operator with a long track record and who could “bring that great quality” to Grand Bahama. “We’re quite excited by the number of companies who have shown interest,” the ministera dded, explaining that the key i ssue confronting the Govern ment getting it right and “the quality of the solution”. Freeport has not proven to be a happy experience for Isle of Capri, its our Lucaya-based casino suffering a $2.934 mil-l ion net operating loss for the financial year to April 26, 2009, a 7.7 per cent increase upon the previous year’s losses. The operator of Our Lucaya’s casino unveiled a slight increase to the $2.275 million net operating loss incurred during its 2008 financial year, based on a 29.5 per cent reduction in revenues for the 12 months to endApril 2009. The Isle-Our Lucaya casino saw its net gaming revenues drop from $15.548 million to $10.969 million during its 2009 financial year, with the gross operating loss more than tripling from $826,000 to $2.917 million. A $17,000 depreciation charge took Isle of Capri’s net losses from its Grand Bahamabased casino to $2.934 million. Isle of Capri was making annual rental payments of $1.9 million to Hutchison Whampoa under the terms of a two-year lease that it signed on June 1, 2007. The property is a 19,000 square foot casino and offers 303 slot machines, 25 table games and a 110-seat restau rant. Sandals eyes deal for the Emerald Bay Japanese insurer, Mitsui, urgently. This was because, while many of the resort’s Four Seasons-trained staff were still hanging on in Exuma, hoping the property would soon re-open, they were beginning to lose hope and would soon migrate to other Bahamian islands in search of work. “The economy has dried up,” the source said. “It’s an economic drought in Exuma, and Sandals could bring in the Spring weather it so badly needs.” Tribune Business can also reveal that another group bidding on Emerald Bay included RIU Hotels, the Spanish-owned resort chain that is also already in the Bahamas via its property on Paradise Island. Vincent s, minister of tourism and aviation, declined to confirm the identity of any of the potential Emerald Bay purchasers yesterday when contacted by Tribune Business. He added: “We know of a number of people we have been providing assistance to onE merald Bay, and are quite excited” about some of them. I t is thought that the departure of Four Seasons, with its burdensome brand/operating c ontract, and the reduction in purchase price have attracted the likes of Sandals and RIU to closely examine acquisition prospects. The last bid accepted by the receivers, which collapsed prior to Emerald Bay’s closure and the loss of almost 500 jobs, was understood to have valued the property at $40 million much less than the $120 million debt owed to Mitsui when it placed the resort in receivership in 2007. I nformed sources are now suggesting that a purchase price of as little as $20-$30 million might be enough to close a deal. Entry point is key for acquisitions in the Bahamian hotel sector, as the price largely determines return on investment for owners, given this nation’s high operating costs. Emerald Bay was losing $5 million per year when it was mothballed by Mitsui, and Four Seasons whose contract entitled it to fees equivalent to 7-8 per cent of gross revenues, said by many to be too much is understood to have told the insurer that the property required a minimum $25 million in capital spending to bring it into line with its five-star status. A further $7 million is needed to reconfigure its marina. Several sources, though, suggested these sums were too low, and a $50-$100 million investment will ultimately be required by any potential purchaser to upgrade Emerald Bay and complete its build-out. I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today!

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n By DAVID ESPO and ERICA WERNER Associated Press Writers WASHINGTON (AP House Democrats unveiled ambitious legislation Tuesday to remake the nation’s health care system and called on medical providers, businesses and the wealthiest Americans to pick up the tab for President Barack Obama’s top domestic priority. “This bill is a starting point a nd a path to success,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., told a news conference where she and other Democratic leaders promised to pass a bill before the August congression-al recess. Obama has pushed the House and Senate aggressivelyto stick to the timetable, in hopes of signing comprehensive legislation in October. “We are going to accomplish what many people felt wouldn’t happen in our lifetime,” said Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Calif., chairman of one of three committees responsible for health care. Waxman, Pelosi and others stood before a banner that read: “Quality Affordable Health Care for the Middle Class.” The sweeping measure would imposes penalties on employ-ers who fail to provide health insurance for their workers andon individuals who refuse to buy it. The bill, to be debated in committee beginning later thisweek, also would require insur ance companies to offer coverage, without exceptions or higher premiums in cases of preexisting medical conditions. It also would allow the government to sell insurance in com petition with private firms, a provision that has sparked objections from Republicans and even some Democrats. The bill’s release came one day after President Barack Obama met with key Democ rats in a White House session in which he told a powerful Senate chairman he wants legislation by week’s end in his commit tee. In all, the draft House bill runs more than 1,000 pages, andis designed to fulfill Obama’s call for legislation that will extend coverage to millions who lack it, as well as begin to slow the rate of growth in health care generally. In a statement, Obama praised the proposal, saying it “will begin the process of fixing what’s broken about our health care system, reducing costs for all, building on what works and covering an estimat-ed 97 per cent of all Americans. And by emphasizing prevention and wellness, it will also help improve the quality of health care for every American.” Key elements of the legisla tion include federal subsidies for poorer individuals and families to help them afford coverage. Financing would come from a federal surtax on the upper income up to 5.4 per cent on the income of taxpayers making more than $1 million a year as well as hundreds of bil lions of dollars in cuts in pro jected Medicare and Medicaid spending. The new income tax on the wealthy is estimated to raise more than $500 billion over the next decade, and reductions in Medicaid and Medicare would account for nearly as much. Democrats did not say in advance what the overall legislation would cost. Numerous issues remain subject to change as the bill makes its way through committee. In particular, moderate to conservative Democrats have beennegotiating for several days, asking for changes affecting rural health care as well as other issues. Employers who do not offer coverage would be required to pay eight per cent of each unin sured worker’s salary, with exemptions for smaller firms built into the legislation. Individuals who refused to buy affordable coverage would be assessed as much as 2.5 per cent of their adjusted gross income, up to the cost of an average health insurance plan, according to the legislation. The legislation would set up a new government-run health insurance program to compete with private coverage. The plan’s payments to medical providers such as hospitals and doctors would be keyed to the rates paid by Medicare, which are lower than what private insurers pay. Eventually, all individuals and employers would be offered the option of joining the public plan. The insurance industry says that would drive many private insurers out of business. As House leaders unveiled their bill, the business community sent a letter to lawmakers charging that parts of the legislation would damage the country’s medical system and econ omy. They cited the proposed government-run insurance plan,a federal council that would make some decisions on benefits and a requirement that employers provide health coverage or pay a new tax. Exempting some micro-busi nesses will not prevent this provision from killing many jobs,” the letter said. “Congress should allow market forces and employer autonomy to deter mine what benefits employers provide, rather than deciding by fiat.” Thirty-one major business groups signed the letter, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Business Roundtable representing top corporate CEOs and the National Retail Federation. Across the Capitol, the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee slogged toward passage of its version of the bill on what is expected to be a party-line vote. Because of jurisdictional issues, the Senate Finance Com mittee, a separate panel, retains control over the drafting of pro visions paying for any legisla tion. Obama told the committee’s chairman, Sen. Max Baucus, on Monday at the White House hew ants legislation by week’s end, officials reported. The president did not say whether he prefers a bipartisan bill, which Baucus has been trying to piece together with Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa, or a bill tailored more to Democratic specifications. Obama has urged Congress to pass legislation through both houses before lawmakers leave the Capitol on a summer vacation. While Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., have both expressed support for the timetable, their efforts have been slowed in recent days by internal squabbling. Additionally, some House Democrats have privately expressed concern that they will be required to vote on higher taxes, only to learn later that the Senate does not intend to follow through with legislation of its own. That would leave rank and file House Democrats in the uncomfortable situation of having to explain their vote on a costly bill that never reached Obama’s desk or became law. In the Finance Committee some controversial issues remain unresolved, including how to pay for the bill and a Democratic demand for the government to sell insurance in competition with private industry, a proposal Republicans oppose strongly. Finance members have been laboring to produce a bipartisan bill, but Grassley, the panel’s top Republican, told The Associated Press on Tuesday it’s “still up in the air” whether any bill produced thisw eek would be bipartisan. Associated Press writers Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Alan Fram contributed to this report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f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–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f $ELOLW\WRWURXEOHVKRRWDFFRXQWLQJSURFHVVHVDVWKH\UHODWHWRQDQFLDOVRIWZDUH DQGWKHV\VWHPRILQWHUQDOFRQWURO *RRGMXGJPHQWDQGVRXQGUHDVRQLQJDELOLW\ $ELOLW\WRFRPPXQLFDWHHIIHFWLYHO\ERWKRUDOO\DQGLQZULWLQJ *RRGWLPHPDQDJHPHQWVNLOOV ,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVVKRXOGDSSO\FRPSOHWLQJDQGUHWXUQLQJDQ$SSOLFDWLRQ)RUPWR 7KH0DQDJHU+XPDQ5HVRXUFHV7UDLQLQJ'HSDUWPHQW%DKDPDV(OHFWULFLW\ &RUSRUDWLRQ %OXH +LOO7XFNHU3%R[1DVVDX%DKDPDV RQ RUEHIRU-XO\ JOB ADVERTISEMENTPosition:AccountantA local insurance agency seeks to ll the position of Accountant. The scope of work is to head the Accounting Operations in preparation of monthly, quarterly and annual reports; to keep and maintain all nancial documents and records according to the directives coming from the President and the Board of Directors to ensure the efcient management of all Bank and general ledger accounts. The position will also be expected to make recommendations to management to maintain the company’s viability in a highly competitive environment. 5HTXLUHG accountant; presenting; supervisory skills; meet deadlines and perform work of the highest quality. ing address: The Tribune c/o Box # 81869 P.O. Box N 3207 Nassau, Bahamas U S PRESIDENT B arack Obama talks about health care reform as he announces his nominee for Surgeon General, Dr Regina Benjamin (INSET Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Monday, July 13, 2009. (AP Photos House health plan to boost taxes on rich

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n By STEPHEN BERNARD A P Business Writer NEW YORK (AP m an Sachs is emerging as the king of post-meltdown Wall S treet. The New York-based banki ng giant took advantage of improving markets to widen the g ap between itself and its competitors, earning more than $2.7 billion during the second quarter. T he result is a remarkably s peedy recovery from last fall, when Goldman lost $3.29 billion in four months during the worst of the financial crisis. Goldman, which was alreadyt he strongest financial institut ion heading into the financial crisis, has now staked its claim as the undisputed powerhouse on Wall Street with the ability to take on more risk than itss truggling competitors. Goldman really is in a class by themselves,” said Phillip Silitschanu, a senior analyst with Aite Group. “They’ve alwaysb een the golden child of the market.” T hat has been even more amplified during the recent credit crisis and ensuing recovery as credit and debt marketsh ave started to open up. While other banks have been trying t o preserve cash to protect against further losses, Goldman h as been getting back to its core businesses that made it so prof i table in the past. Profits at Goldman, the first b ank to report second-quarter earnings, came from strength i n underwriting stock and debt offers, and higher-risk trading.G oldman’s peers, meanwhile, have been stung by greater loan losses because of their focus in retail banking, and thus have had to stick with a more conservative approach to business. Some competitors reined in r isk-taking activity,” said Cubillas Ding, a senior analyst with consulting and research firm Celent. Goldman’s historically strong and disciplined risk man-a gement allowed it to enter trading where its competitors might have been more hesitant, Ding added. Also during the second quarter, Goldman freed itself ofr estrictions tied to the government’s Troubled Asset Relief P rogram. Last fall, as the credit crunch worsened and Goldman’s competitor Lehman Brothers collapsed, the UST reasury Department launched a program to provide $700 bill ion in funds to the financial sector. T hough it had adequate capital to handle the downturn, G oldman was compelled to participate in the programme,r eceiving $10 billion. As part of the program, the governmentp laced certain restrictions on banks, such as additional oversight and executive compensa tion caps. G oldman, relying on its healthy capital base, paid back those funds in June, freeing itself of the added restrictions. Not all other banks have been able to repay their government debt yet. Bank of America Corp. and Citigroup Inc. have been among the hardest hit by the downturn and each received $45 billion from the government. The government is now in the midst of converting part of its loan to Citigroup for about a one-third stake in the company. Both Bank of America and Citigroup are expected tor eport second-quarter results l ater in the week. Goldman’s profit would have been even larger during the second quarter had it not recorded a one-time charge to repay the $ 10 billion to the government. The charge reduced earnings by 78 cents per share. While Goldman was preparing to repay the government, it was also taking advantage oft he thawing credit markets and a rallying equity market. With i ts own balance sheet intact, Goldman became a primary source for other companies looking for an underwriter toh elp them tap the reopened markets. When times are bad, the thinking goes, go with the best o f the best,” Aite Group’s Silitschanu said. G oldman’s equity underwriting division generated recordr evenue from the surging business. Trading revenue alsos oared, jumping more than 51 per cent from the previous quarter and nearly doubled from the comparable period lasty ear. Goldman was able to cash in on fixed-income, currency and commodities trading during the April through June period. Goldman earned $2.72 bil lion, or $4.93 per share, after paying preferred dividends, for the quarter ended June 26. Analysts polled by Thomson Reuters, on average, forecast earnings of $3.54 per share for the quarter. Profit also exceeded last year’s fiscal second-quar t er results. For that period, which ended May 30, Goldmane arned $2.05 billion, or $4.58 per share. Despite Goldman’s strong earnings, its shares fell 39 cents t o $149.05 in afternoon trading. Investors and analysts werew idely expecting a big profit, and pushed shares higher by m ore than five per cent Monday ahead of the earningsr eport. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE IN THIS June 12, 2007 file photo, the building on Broad Street in New York's Financial District that houses the brokerage firm Goldman Sachs, is shown. Goldman Sachs Group Inc. said Tuesday that its second-quarter prof it easily surpassed expectations as profit was buoyed by strength in its trading and underwriting businesses. ( AP Photo: Richard Drew) Goldman Sachs’ $2.7bn profit shows firm’s prowess 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.28Abaco Markets1.391.390.000.1270.00010.90.00% 1 1.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.94Bank of Bahamas6.946.940.000.2440.26028.43.75% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3911.390.001.4060.2508.12.19% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.645.640.000.4190.36013.56.38% 4.781.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.053.00-0.050.1110.05227.01.73% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital1.821.820.000.2400.0807.64.40% 8 .206.60Famguard6.996.60-0.391,0000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.5010.00Finco10.9010.900.000.3220.52033.94.77% 11.7110.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.3810.380.000.7940.35013.13.37% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.035.030.000.3320.15015.22.98% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.008000.4070.60013.510.91% 12.0010.40J. S. Johnson10.4010.400.000.9520.64010.96.15% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1460 1425 BahamasSupermarkets 792 842 1460 0041 0300 N/M 205% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% 7% Interest 7% Prime + 1.75%FINDEX: CLOSE 787.12 | YTD -5.72% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities30 May 2013 29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320 TUESDAY, 14 JULY 2009B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,570.14| CHG -2.79 | %CHG -0.18 | YTD -142.22 | YTD % -8.31BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases) 14 . 60 14 . 25 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 . 92 8 . 42 14 . 60 0 . 041 0 . 300 N/M 2 . 05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.38601.3231CFAL Bond Fund1.38602.404.75 3.03512.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8952-1.52-3.18 1.47631.4019CFAL Money Market Fund1.47632.975.30 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1031-8.35-13.82 12.920912.2702Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.92092.405.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.5448-0.020.54 100.000093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund93.1992-3.33-6.76 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.47339.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.27652.00-2.98 1.06221.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06222.566.22 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0243-0.842.43 1.05851.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05852.045.85 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007NAV Date 31-May-09 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 31-Mar-09 30-Jun-09TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Jun-09 31-Mar-09 31-Dec-07 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 3-Jul-09 30-Jun-09MARKET TERMS Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds

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Fin E foods Balduccino’s of C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T h e T r i b u n e By ALEX MISSICK T ribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net B A HAMIAN’S t aste in culture is said to be as diverse as our love for food and all things savoury. Many Bahamians are opening their palettes to the u niq ue and healt h y gour me t pr oducts appearing on the shelves. Balduccino fine foods, located in the Cotton Tree T r aders Plaza on East Ba y S treet, is one of the newest specialty gourmet markets offering foods from across the globe to answer the call of the curious eater. General Manager, Anton Alexiou, said although he had been in retail for about 15 years, he and his brother have talked about the concept for about 10 years. “We met a very nice couple from New York, Mr and Mrs Balducci, who own a chain of markets in New York City and retired to Paradise Island. We happened to speak with them and they have been assisting and consulting with us on the business. They allowed us to use their name and although we are not a franchise of Balducci’s, we could use Balduccino which is ‘little Balducci’,” Mr Alexiou said. Customers will find a wide variety of specialty gourmet products including an international deli selection of meats, cheeses, freshly baked goods daily, specialty health foods, signature sandwiches and one of Mr Alexiou’s favourties, gourmet prepared carry-home foods. “Our executive chef, Vanessa Riley is a very cre ative chef and everyday she comes up with new creations. The gourmet prepared take home meals is really one of our focuses aside from our hot signature sandwiches and the cold deli sandwiches. We try to do meals everyday that you can take home and eat. Everyday we have our signature roast chicken with an orange rub. Often times she does one pot meals such as Sheppard’s pie or lobster pot pie. I give her free reign over the prepared foods because it’s her creative side that I want to bring out,” Mr Alexiou said. As for the market itself, Balduccino carries a vast selection of items that are rare or impossible to find in the Bahamas. “We buy through their parent company. All of the goods we buy come through Balducci’s. Some of these products have never been in Nassau before. In our bakery, the Red Velvet cupcakes have been very popular because they are very hard to find in Nassau. We work with a lot of up and coming chefs and buy direct from them. This gives us a nice variety so we are not stuck on just what we are able to make or just what one large company is able to produce. Our aim is to try and bring in interesting specialty products consis tently and at a fair price,” Mr Alexiou said. Mr Alexiou said to service the sushi lovers, Balduc cino will also have a sushi bar. “It will be a small set up and will probably only be available several days a week for now. As we get better at production, we will probably do it every day with different types of sushi such as simple California rolls and vegetarian options,” Mr Alexiou said. As for the future of Balduccino, Mr Alexiou said there are a lot of interesting of plans for the fine food market. “We want to make pairings between what we offer in the store and the recipes we produce. We try to use as many of the products on the shelves in the preparation. Where we are trying to be a little bit different is where we offer something on the shelf and in preparation, we are going to give the customers the recipe and have it available. So if you like something we are serv ing, you can go find the ingredients on the shelf and take the recipe home and make it yourself. We are also focusing on something called dream dinners where we put together baskets of everything you need to prepare the meal in the correct proportion with the recipe. I have been surprised with the response to organic foods and we have gotten a tremendous reception from Bahamians. It’s amazing how many people are looking for that type of food that is untampered with so we are headed strongly in that direction.” TOP: A variety of yummy baked treats. ABOVE: Pick from a wide selcetion of fresh fruit. BELOW: Some of the many delicious cheeses at Balduccino’s.

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Leslie Miller, former Minster of Trade and Industry, said the $10 million, 80,000 square foot palace has been in the making for about 10 years. “This type of centre is the p rototype for the future. It was t he vision of my son, the late Mario Miller who will have a bust of his image in the fountain that guards the front entrance,” Mr Miller said With a $15 entrance fee for adults and $10 for children, thes tate of the art centre can hold 2,000 to 3,000 persons and will have a concession stand, food franchises such as the pizza par lour Tuscanos, a 30,000 square foot outdoor roller skating rink, billiards, dart room, and game room with over $400,000 worth of games. The dinning room, which seats up to 350 persons, is elevated to give guests a 360 degree view of the majestic building. However, the main focal point will be bowling. “There has been a massive resurgent in bowling over the last 10 to 15 years in the United States. It is now the number one indoor sport in the world again. You have over a billion people bowling and the market for bowling is now some $28 billion a year. There will be a 10 foot screen in the back of every lane. We have 50 screens in this building, so while you are bowling you can watch the game as well,” Mr Miller said. Mr Miller said it is a family centre, every Sunday will be church day and as of next year, he is looking to host all of theM iss Bahamas events. We are giving them someplace where they could be appreciated as Bahamians. Only religious music will be played in here all day on Sundays. We will have buffets especially for the churches. What we want tod o that is unique is have a fashion show every Sunday. There will also be a local entertainer to sing gospel music on Sundays and once a month we will bring over one of the big stars in the United States such as Kirk Franklin. This is a place where they can have a wonderful experience with the entire family where Sunday is reserved for God,” Mr Miller said. As for security, Mr Miller said there will be a no tolerance policy. “To avoid problems, we will have 58 cameras through out the building. The minute you use profanity, you are out of there for one month, second time is three monthsthere is no third time. I think there are more good people than bad, so why tolerate the bad? When people come here they want to make sure their entire family is safe and secure. There will be no fighting. There are also four metal detectors at the front entrance,” Mr Miller said. For those who prefer a more private setting, Mr Miller said he has them covered. “We will be offering some thing that is unique and was just started in the United States and Europe-four private bowling lanes. You can rent those at $3,500 a night with food and drinks included, your own bar, and two forty-two inch LCD televisions. We also have a private club where you pay a mem bership fee of probably at $1,000 a year. If you register early you can come every night for free. Without that, you pay $100 to enter. In this club, we also to tell the life stories of great Bahamian entertainers such as Freddy Munnings Jr, 40’s and 50’s musical legend Paul Mayers and we are naming the club after Ronnie Butler. Bahamians would see the his tory of our entertainers,” Mr Miller said. Mr Miller said one of the great things he is doing with the palace, is using it as a hurricane relief centre. “The building can withstand 180 miles and hour winds. We have two stand-by generators at double the capacity for what we need so in case it is needed, we can provide that to the Bahamian people,” Mr Miller said. As for the future of Mario’s Bowling and Family Entertainment Palace, Mr Miller said every three years the building will undergo renovations to keep it at its best. “We look forward to a good future because it is the only family entertainment centre in this country and it is second to none in the world. We want the Bahamas to be first class and we are really giving the people first class entertainment. Mario’s birthday is January 24 and every January we want to give a scholarship of about $20,000 toa student at St Augustine’s col lege. We look forward to giving back to the community because the community is what is going to make us successful or fail. If you want to succeed you get everybody involved in what you are doing and giving back.” C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009, PAGE B9 T h e T r i b u n e things 2 DO By ALEX MISSICK T ribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net IN exactly one month, Mario’s Bowling and Family Entertainment Palace, the largest family entertainment centre in the country, will open its doors to offer Bahamians a world of exciting n ew options the entire family can enjoy. Fun for the whole family Mario’s M EN w orking tirelessly to complete the reception of this massive entertainment centre. ABOVE: Thegrand entance of the Mario Miller Bowling and Family Entertainment Palace will feature a bust of the late Mario Miller in his honor. WORKER prepping one of the many bowling lanes that will be ready for bowling fans in a matter of weeks. Although the independence celebrations have concluded, the party does not have to stop and once again The Tribune’s Things 2 Do countdown is the place to k eep you in the know. 1 . An exhibition by Nettie Symonette will premier this Friday at the Central Bank’s Art Center. The 75-year-old multitalented artist will present close to 96 abstract pieces that have already been compared to the likes of Picasso, M icha‘l Bellon, and Barnett Newman. The collection which was first started in 2003 in the Abacos while Mrs Symonette was work ing on her memoirs, uses m irror like illusion to tell h er story of life and emo t ions. The exhibition which s tarts at 6pm, there will be l ight refreshments available and the exhibition will c ontinue until August 7, 2 009. 2 . The Bahamas Hot R od Association along with the Juke Box presents The Shop Wars Drag Rac ing Invitational. Set to kickoff this Saturday at the BHRA Motorsport Park at the rear of the QE Sporting c omplex, the event will showcase the best in drag racing among some of the most decked out machines here on the islands. Teams from Ultimate Performance, BAM Auto, JAP Perfor mance, Dirty South, the J uke Box, and others will compete for the coveted title of ‘King Of The Street.’ The event starts at 1pm, and is free for kids under 12, and $5 for everyone else. 3 . The National Art Gallery of the Bahamas continues with its summer of love Film Series, this Thursday with the film Cli mates . The 101 minute Turkish/French film (that includes English subtitles) written by internationally acclaimed director Nuri Bilge Ceylan, tells of a Turk ish professor who travels to the Aegean coast with his girlfriend, however while there the two undergo a terrible break-up. As the film develops, the story of the broken couple’s rekindling love becomes the centerpiece for the movie. It begins at 8 pm at the NAGB property on West and West Hill Street. The event is $5, with light beverages served afterward. 4 . The Junkanoo Summer Festival continues on Bay Street this Saturday and will showcase traditional Goombay music, live bands, and lot of local food and fun. The all day event which will continue every Saturday in July, will also feature local crafts, Bahamian books, and various traditional contest. 5 . This weekend its all about the art of Karaoke singing. If you’re the next Mariah Carey, or the next William Wong, answer the call and show the Bahamas what you’re made of. Tonight, its Crazy Johnnies from 8 to 12 located in the two story building after On The Run East Bay Street. Then on Saturday, The Corner Motel in Carmichael will have its karaoke night. That event begins at 10pm and ends at 3am. Both events are free for all.

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By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net E ight athletic and physicall y fit young men have been selected to compete in the 2009 Mr Caribbean Bahamas Fitness Challenge and Physique Competition, scheduled to be held July 2 4 to July 26. The young men will have a grueling weekend of competition starting on Frid ay, July 24 with the Blind Date Dinner and Personality Competition. Each competitor will be paired with a randomly selected, female blind date, and placed in a supervised dining setting, where the y oung ladies will interview and judge their personality, confidence, and personal style on special scorecards during the evening. Interested young ladies, o ver the age of 18, may complete a form for the Blind Date random drawing, which will be done live on radio, when they purchase any of the Platinum tickets for the event. T he men will then compete in the B ally Total Fitness Challenge, a mili tary style obstacle course and fitness competition, sponsored by Bally Total F itness on Saturday, July 25 at Sandyp ort Beach, from 2 pm to 5 pm. The event is free and open to the public. The Final Night/Physique Competit ion will be held in the Independence Ballroom of the Sheraton Cable Beach Resort at 7.30 pm, under the theme: “Area Code 242: War Against Violence.” The event will also aid The Bahamas Crisis Centre, as part of its d omestic violence prevention initiative, “M.V.P.: Men for Violence Prevention.” The hosts for this event will be two surprise celebrity guests, a closely-guarde d secret until the final night competition, and a panel of international and local celebrity judges will select the overall winner. The competitors for the fastest, fittest, strongest, and most intelligent Bahamian man for 2009/2010 include Roosevelt J oseph, Terrance Kelly, Omar Francis, M ervin Smith, Vincent Laschiazza-Paul, Kendrick Tynes, Robert Farquahson, and Freddie Lightbourne. The winner of the Mr Caribbean Bahamas Fitness Challenge will win over $5,000 in cash and prizes and will represent The Bahamas in the 2009 Mr Caribbean International Competition, in Runaway Bay, Jamaica, October 5-12. Scores from the preliminary events a nd online voting will be combined with the final night competition scores to determine the overall winner of this y ear’s fitness challenge and physique c ompetition. Entertainment will be provided by Tada, Sammy Starr, Sketch, Bodine J ohnson, and Metellus Chipman, Mr Caribbean International 2006. Tickets for the Final Night Competition are priced at $25 for general admission, $60 for VIP seating, and $100 for Platinum seating. Tickets may be purchased at Bally Total Fitness, Bodyzone, Mystical Gym, the Jukebox in the Mall at Marathon, and from the Box Office of the Sheraton Cable Resort( Saturday, July 25 and Sunday, July 26 until the final night competition). Members of the international com munity and local public can be a part of selecting this year’s winner by voting online for their favourite competitor at www.mrcaribbahamas.com, until 12 am Sunday, July 26. Online voting counts for 10 per cent of the competitors’ over all score and the competitor with the highest number of votes will win the Mr. Caribbean Bahamas FanChoice Award. B y CARA BRENNENBETHEL Tribune Features Editor IT was a pleasure to view the recent opera Treemonisha which was staged as part of the Independence Celebrations last week at the Dundas. During a time when Bahamian patrio-t ism was at an all time high, I was so proud to see the profess ionalism and talent that the all B ahamian cast displayed and to hear that crowds flocked the Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts each night. Treemonisha an opera written by American composer Scott Joplin is set in 1866 immediately after the Civil War and the end of slavery. The plays develops as an educated adopt-ed young lady proves through tremendous strife that education is far more productive than witchcraft or Obeah. A stellar cast of more than 50 Bahamians did an amazing job in bringing Joplin’s visionto life under the direction of noted musician Cleveland Williams through spectacular singing and dance, colourful costumes and a truly talented orchestra. As a fan of classical music, I was excited to see this performance which brought a decidedly different flavour to recent performances at the Dundas. In the three act opera tells the story of very superstitious former slaves left alone on a plantation and how the title character Treemonisha (the adopted daughter of Ned and Monisha) brings to light the importance of education in a budding society. The lead role was shared by noted sopranos Candace Bostwick ( who performed the night I attended and did a superb job) and NikitaThompsonWells, with Portia Barnet and Lillian Bastian playing Monisha, (Por tia performed the night I attended) Kermit Strachan playing Ned, and Demetrius Delancy who played Remus. My one piece of advice, should the producers decide on an encore presentationcreate a more vibrant set and have the orchestra play softer so that all the solos can be heard. All in all, it was a delightful evening showcasing some of the best talent the country has to offer. T r eemonisha a tr ue class act REVIEW O pera C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE MEET THE MEN OF MR CARIBBEAN BAHAMAS FITNESS CHALLENGE 2009 Donovan RolleRobert FarquahsonKendrick TynesRoosevelt JosephFreddie LightbourneOmar FrancisMervin SmithTerrance Kelly V incent Laschiazza-Paul Emerging artist 75-year-old Nettie Symonette, says since sheb egan learning the concept of abstract art more than 9 yearsa go, expressing her feelings through art has practically b ecome second nature. Her debut exhibition will be featured at the Central Bank this Friday where Mrs Symonette plans to showcase more than 90 unique abstract creations. Preferring acrylics to tran s cend her sometimes tumultuous emotions onto canvas, she said her style can be described as a “burst of colour,” and has been compared to the likes of Picasso, Micha‘l Bellon, and Barnett Newman. However she said unlike her predecessors who have been painting most of their lives, she has only recently acquired this unique skill. “When I was a child I wanted to learn to draw. I remember trying to draw a hibiscus, a sheep, and even a banana, and I couldn’t. However this skill was like a gift from God, it’s unique and it truly allows me to tell the stories of my life.” She explained after a trip to Mombasa in 2005, her skill was enhanced even more after observing how Africans embraced bright colours. She said: “The colours were so vibrant, they were so strong, and I found that when I came home I suddenly became sort of excited about how colours can maximise the essence of my work.” Now in her golden years, Mrs Symonette’s art has become her new canvas for self expression, and she is loving every minute of it. Emotions on canvas FROM page 12 Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. ABOVE: Nettie Symonette: “One particular day things were going really bad, and I just decided to pour my soul into this piece that I’ve labeled ‘When The Going Gets Tough.’” INFLUENCED from the commercial district of Mombasa, Symon ette’s art has been compared to the likes of Picasso, Micha‘l Bee line, and Barnett Newman.

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 74F/23C Low: 77F/25C Low: 77F/25C Low: 80F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 83F/28C Low: 81 F/27 C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 90F/32C High: 90F/32C High: 90 F/32 C High: 89 F/32 C High: 90F/32C High: 90 F/32C High: 90F/32C Low: 80F/27C High: 91F/33C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 92F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 80F/27C High: 90 F/32 Low: 74F/23C High: 88F/31C Low: 76 F/24C High: 92F/33C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 94F/34C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 93F/34C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 92F/33C Low: 77F/25C High: 95 F/35 C Low: 81F/27C High: 95F/35C High: 90 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 15 TH , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Partly cloudy with a stray shower. Partly sunny, a t-storm; breezy. Some sunshine with a thunderstorm. Mostly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 81 High: 90 High: 92 High: 92 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 91 Low: 81 Low: 81 Low: 81 AccuWeather RealFeel 107F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 85F 101-92F 110-90F 111-86F 101-91F Low: 80 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................93F/34C Low ....................................................81F/27C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 71 F/22C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................18.55" Normal year to date ....................................21.33" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full Jul. 15 Jul. 21Jul. 28Aug. 5 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:29 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:02 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 12:19 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 1:37 p.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 1:28 a.m.2.37:34 a.m.0.2 2:03 p.m.2.78:31 p.m.0.5 2:24 a.m.2.28:28 a.m.0.2 3:02 p.m.2.89:36 p.m.0.4 3:26 a.m.2.29:27 a.m.0.1 4:06 p.m.2.910:41 p.m.0.3 4:32 a.m.2.210:30 a.m.0.1 5:11 p.m.3.011:44 p.m.0.2 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3277/25t92/3379/26pc Amsterdam72/2259/15sh76/2461/16s Ankara, Turkey77/2555/12c73/2254/12c Athens91/3276/24s93/3375/23s Auckland59/1549/9pc63/1752/11r Bangkok89/3179/26sh90/3279/26t Barbados86/3077/25sh86/3077/25sh Barcelona80/2669/20s83/2869/20s Beijing100/3775/23pc85/2979/26c Beirut86/3075/23s79/2677/25s Belgrade97/3671/21s94/3471/21s Berlin77/2561/16sh79/2661/16s Bermuda82/2777/25t82/2777/25t Bogota65/1844/6pc66/1845/7sh Brussels75/2355/12pc79/2661/16pc Budapest97/3670/21s95/3564/17t Buenos Aires52/1143/6c52/1143/6c Cairo97/3673/22s98/3674/23s Calcutta91/3281/27c92/3381/27sh Calgary68/2048/8s71/2148/8s Cancun90/3275/23pc93/3375/23pc Caracas81/2771/21t82/2771/21t Casablanca79/2666/18s83/2865/18s Copenhagen76/2458/14sh75/2360/15s Dublin66/1854/12sh63/1752/11r Frankfurt81/2757/13sh84/2863/17pc Geneva 79/26 61/16 t 87/3062/16s Halifax 69/20 54/12 pc 70/21 55/12 c Havana 90/32 72/22 t 91/32 75/23 t Helsinki 72/22 54/12sh75/2355/12sh Hong Kong 91/32 82/27 pc 91/32 82/27pc Islamabad 105/40 83/28 t 106/41 85/29 s Istanbul83/2870/21s88/3175/23sh Jerusalem 79/26 62/16s83/2863/17s Johannesburg 52/1130/-1s57/1336/2s Kingston 89/3179/26pc92/3380/26sh Lima73/2261/16s73/2259/15s London73/2255/12pc75/2357/13pc Madrid91/3261/16s97/3663/17s Manila86/3077/25t83/2877/25r Mexico City77/2554/12t78/2553/11t Monterrey102/3875/23s102/3875/23s Montreal75/2363/17pc73/2261/16t Moscow75/2354/12pc82/2759/15pc Munich78/2556/13r85/2956/13s Nairobi77/2554/12r77/2553/11sh New Delhi 93/3382/27t99/3782/27pc Oslo72/2256/13sh75/2357/13t Paris77/2561/16pc82/2764/17pc Prague 77/25 58/14 r 84/28 57/13 s Rio de Janeiro71/2165/18sh74/2367/19pc Riyadh102/3879/26s104/4079/26pc Rome 88/31 68/20 s 94/34 72/22 s St. Thomas91/3281/27pc91/3279/26s San Juan63/1732/0pc65/1834/1s San Salvador 88/31 68/20 pc 89/31 74/23 s Santiago 57/1336/2pc66/1843/6s Santo Domingo90/3273/22t87/3072/22sh Sao Paulo 63/17 57/13 sh 73/22 58/14c Seoul86/3068/20c90/3268/20pc Stockholm 75/23 59/15 pc 73/22 57/13 sh Sydney 61/16 45/7 pc60/1540/4s Taipei93/3382/27pc94/3479/26pc T okyo 91/32 75/23 s 88/31 77/25 pc T oronto 77/2561/16t77/2557/13c Trinidad86/3063/17s91/3263/17s V ancouver 76/24 59/15 s 75/2359/15s Vienna 88/3170/21s87/3066/18s W arsaw 86/30 68/20 s 81/27 61/16 pc Winnipeg 66/18 48/8 c 60/1550/10pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Thursday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Thursday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Thursday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque97/3670/21t97/3668/20s Anchorage74/2358/14pc75/2358/14c Atlanta92/3369/20s90/3271/21t Atlantic City84/2866/18s86/3067/19t Baltimore89/3168/20s88/3168/20t Boston80/2665/18s84/2867/19t Buffalo82/2764/17pc76/2458/14c Charleston, SC90/3272/22t94/3476/24t Chicago84/2864/17t81/2759/15s Cleveland82/2769/20t80/2660/15pc Dallas100/3778/25s103/3977/25s Denver85/2957/13pc93/3359/15t Detroit84/2866/18t82/2759/15pc Honolulu88/3176/24s90/3275/23s Houston96/3577/25s96/3576/24t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday TodayThursdayTodayThursday Indianapolis86/3066/18t83/2863/17pc Jacksonville92/3372/22t93/3374/23t Kansas City88/3167/19t89/3165/18t Las Vegas108/4281/27s110/4387/30s Little Rock101/3876/24s96/3573/22t Los Angeles88/3166/18s89/3166/18pc Louisville90/3272/22t86/3067/19pc Memphis98/3678/25pc91/3275/23t Miami90/3280/26t90/3279/26t Minneapolis78/2559/15pc74/2355/12s Nashville94/3469/20t85/2969/20t New Orleans92/3377/25t92/3377/25t New York84/2871/21s86/3072/22t Oklahoma City100/3772/22s99/3770/21t Orlando90/3274/23t92/3375/23t Philadelphia86/3070/21s86/3070/21t Phoenix 110/43 87/30 s 111/4388/31s Pittsburgh84/2868/20pc82/2760/15pc Portland, OR 90/3260/15s90/3260/15pc Raleigh-Durham 92/33 71/21 s 92/33 74/23 t St. Louis90/3271/21t89/3167/19t Salt Lake City 91/32 63/17 s 96/3568/20s San Antonio 101/38 76/24 s 99/37 76/24 s San Diego76/2468/20pc77/2568/20pc San Francisco 79/26 58/14 pc 78/2557/13pc Seattle80/2657/13s81/2756/13s T allahassee 92/3373/22t92/3374/23t T ampa 90/32 77/25 t 91/32 77/25t Tucson103/3979/26t104/4080/26s W ashington, DC 90/32 72/22s86/3069/20t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONB I N S I D E F i n e f o o d s o f B a l d u c c i n o s S e e p a g e e i g h t WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2009 Meet the men of Mr Caribbean Bahamas Fitness See page 10 By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net ABSTRACT art is described as one of the few forms of expression allowing artist to create stories with nor ef erence to elements of the world. This freedom not only paves the way for the artist t o cap tur e t he w or ld as t hey see it, but according to some it also exposes the true essence of what art was meant to be. e m o T ions c anv a s on SEE page 10 Titled ‘Caged,’ this is one of several dozen pieces included in the upcoming Nettie Symonette art exhibit at Central Bank.


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