Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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‘WOMAN’ SECTION

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009



eS
al
aE aes

BAHAMAS BIGGEST

(oj ayer a =
break-in charges

Eleizer Regnier in
court in connection
with alleged
housebreaking ring

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

PROMINENT attorney Eleiz-
er Regnier was arraigned in Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday, charged
in connection with an alleged
housebreaking ring.

Mr Regnier was among six men
who appeared before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in Court 1,
Bank Lane yesterday afternoon
on charges of housebreaking,
stealing and receiving.

According to police prosecu-
tor Sergeant Sean Thurston, the

incidents allegedly occurred
between January and July of this
year. Sergeant Thurston told the
court that a number of items
allegedly stolen from several res-
idences and businesses in New
Providence total over $200,000 in
value and have been recovered.
He said that the items relative to
the charges now before the court
total over $60,000.

Mr Regnier, 56, a seasoned
attorney with a long history of
speaking out on human rights and
issues facing the Haitian commu-

SEE page seven

Dwight Major ‘could
be a free man soon’

DWIGHT Major could be a free man very soon, his
lawyer told The Tribune last night, after a US Feder-
al court sentenced the convicted drug trafficker to

108 months in prison.

Speaking from Miami after court adjourned yes-
terday, attorney Troy Ferguson said Major, 44, is very
pleased with how the US justice system has treated

SEE page two

Dwight Major

The Taste

on

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Prati: i Ngetia medium,

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albede) Glas solutely\



de lite ea tee ed

ures courtesy of ZNS

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE outraged family of slain
teenager Brenton Smith believes a
stray bullet fired by police intended
for two suspected armed robbers
led to the "innocent" victim's death.

Smith's distraught relatives now
want a full and transparent investi-
gation into the incident and are call-
ing on police to come clean with
their alleged culpability.

However, officer-in-charge of the
Central Detective Unit Superin-
tendent Elsworth Moss said it was
too early to say who was responsi-
ble for the teen's death, adding that
investigators were still waiting on
results from an autopsy and a bal-
listics report before they could dis-
cern who was to blame.

"I can't verify that, I can't deny
that ... because I have to have the
ballistics information before that
can be verified," said Mr Moss
when asked to respond to the fam-
ily's accusation.



SEE PAGE NINE

WAKE UP!

Sausage & Egg
Burrito







Missing boys
‘survived on
plums and
Stream water’

Pair spent 33
days alone in
Andros forest

*

a ee

MARCELL CLARKE, six, and Deangelo Clarke, nine, spent 33 days and nights alone before being found.

Family believes stray police
bullet killed ‘innocent’ teen



FAMILY AND friends of 18-year-old Brenton Smith gathered in prayer led



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

by family friend and pastor Bill Higgs of Trinity Methodist Church outside

the morgue.

Smith was shot dead last Thurs-
day night when he was caught in
the cross-fire of a chase between
police and two suspected
armed robbers in the Kemp Road
area.

The two men were suspected of
the hold-up of the nearby City Mar-

ket food store. Over the weekend
police said they did not suspect that
Smith was one of the men who
robbed the store.

Yesterday morning, around 30
relatives and friends waited outside

SEE page seven

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



? Prime Minister
? Perry Christie is
? reportedly not
ias popular
? amongst his par-
i liamentary
? group as he is
? with the base of
? the party, the
? preliminary results from a
? polling study have revealed.

D>

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE children who spent 33
days and nights alone in an
Andros forest survived on a
diet of plums and stream water,
family members told The Tri-
bune.

The pair, who now “look
like skeletons”, lived in a cave-
like hole after getting lost in
the country’s largest untouched
natural forest in southeast
Andros.

Marcell Clarke, six, and
Deangelo Clarke, nine, had
gone out crabbing at around
6pm on June 9 and were given
up for dead after an extensive
police search.

But a relative told how she
found them on the roadside
near Kemp’s Bay on Sunday,
around five miles from their
grandmother’s house in
Smith’s Hill where they had set
out nearly five weeks before.

The boys were flown into
Nassau on Sunday afternoon
to be treated at the Princess
Margaret Hospital for dehy-
dration, malnutrition, poison-
wood rashes, insect bites, cuts
and grazes.

Their mother Vera Clarke,
of Kemp Road, Nassau, said

SEE page seven

Study: Christie ‘not
as popular’ with
parliamentary group as
he is with party hase

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
? Tribune Staff Reporter
i pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER

Perry Christie



Although the details of this

study, which is being prepared
? for deputy leader hopeful
i Philip Davis, have yet to be
? released, The Tribune under-
i stands that the party’s rank and
: file interviewed expressed

“indifference” to Mr Christie

i staying on as leader.

SEE page seven





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009






















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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

both him and his wife, Keva.

“Dwight is ecstatic. He is anx-
ious to get back to the Bahamas;
back to his hotel in Long Island
and back to his kids,” Mr Fergu-
son said.

The sentence was delivered in a
Florida Southern District Court by
Judge Kenneth Marra yesterday
afternoon.

Dwight and Keva Major were

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Dwight Major

accused by the United States gov-
ernment of being part of a drug
trafficking conspiracy that involved
the transportation of cocaine and
marijuana between August 2002
and January 2003.

After five years of fighting an
extradition request to stand trial in
the US on drug related charges,
Dwight and Keva Major were sent
to Florida last year.

Although Major was actually
sentenced to nine years (108
months) in prison with supervised
release after five years, Mr Fergu-
son said the sentence will take into
account the 78 months served since
the extradition order was filed
against him in 2003.

This, along with the 15 per cent
typically taken off sentences in the
US for good behaviour, means
Major could be released in just over
a year in a half.

Mr Ferguson added that if Major
opts for a “treaty transfer,” which
would allow him to serve his sen-
tence in the Bahamas, he could be
released “almost immediately.”

Keva Major pleaded guilty to the
charges against her in August, 2008,
and her husband did the same in
October. When a US grand jury
brought the indictment alleging
conspiracy, Major was already serv-
ing time on an unrelated drug con-
spiracy charge.

His wife was placed on proba-
tion for three years, meaning she
cannot leave the US without the
court’s permission.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



OFducation

Privatise
education
system,
Govt urged

INSTEAD of praising failure,
a prime minister with a vision
for an educated citizenry would
take responsibility for not rais-
ing levels of literacy and
announce the privatisation of
the education system, said Joan
Thompson president of The
Nassau Institute responding to
the unveiling of government’s
10-year education plan last
week.

In his recent
speech at the
2009 National
Education
Summit Prime
Minister
Hubert Ingra-
ham said:

“T believe it
is noteworthy
that, like
health, educa-
tion has been
one of the
largest recipients of government
funding in every budget cycle
since before independence.
Regrettably, our success in get-
ting every child into a classroom
has not translated into every
child having achieved his full
potential. When, in the first half
of the 20th century, most chil-
dren completing primary school
could read and write, today too
many students leave our sec-
ondary schools only semi-liter-
ate and semi-numerate.”

Mrs Thompson pointed out
that in spite of vast sums of
money poured into education,
increasing compulsory atten-
dance from 14 to 16 years, the
level of achievement as mea-
sured by test results, is so low as
to be a national embarrassment.

“Tt could hardly be worse.
Words are cheap, and none are
cheaper than those out of the
mouths of politicians. Caught up
in self-congratulatory language
the true and unadulterated
meaning of their words is
obscured by the emotive style of
their delivery. Anyone daring to
challenge this nonsensical
obfuscation of the truth about
public education will be regard-
ed as a heretic, and banished
from polite Bahamian society.
So be it,” she said.

Mrs Thompson said that a
prime minister with a vision for
an educated citizenry would
introduce a five-year plan that
would move the government
toward privatizing the education
system. She suggested that gov-
ernment should have teachers
gradually released from the gov-
ernment payroll with salaries
reserved in a loan fund
for teachers to open schools as
education-for-profit centres.

“Initially some of the existing
school buildings will be leased
annually at favourable rates
with renewal option up to five
years. On approval of the busi-
ness plan, rental arrangements
for existing schools will be
entertained. It is anticipated
that the resulting private
schools will become self-sustain-
ing as market forces come into
play as they are not required to
compete with a state education
monopoly. The competition for
pupils at affordable rates to the
parents will raise the level of
proficiency unachievable by the
state-run schools,” the Nassau
Institute president said.

She said a number of school
buildings and teachers should
be retained for the transition
period from public to private
education. She said government
should be phased out as the
dominant education supplier in
order for the market for educa-
tion to become dynamic and
flourish as government influ-
ence and controls lessen.

“(This plan) has the potential
for meaningful change. Only a
radical rethinking for a totally
new approach will solve the
learning crisis in government
schools. Government efforts to
‘fix’ the existing structure will
require even more money with
little change in outcomes. To
continue the same dysfunctional
system commits the Bahamas to
third rate status far into the
future,” she said.

HUBERT
Mca e



Man charged with
murdering relative

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A 26-year-old man charged in the murder of a rel-

murder charge yesterday. His lawyer Murrio Ducille
told the court that his client has been receiving psy-
chiatric treatment for some time. He asked that
Farquharson be remanded to Sandilands Rehabili-
tation Centre to continue his treatment.

ative was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yester-

day afternoon.

Von Farquharson of Butler Street appeared
before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court 1,

Bank Lane on a murder charge yesterday. It is
alleged that on Wednesday, July 8, Farquharson
intentionally caused the death of Sharmon Kemp.

Kemp, 25, of Winton Meadows, was reportedly
stabbed in the back with a knife outside Henry F
Storr Electric Company during a violent alterca-
tion with another man last Wednesday. He died in
hospital a short time after the incident. Kemp’s
death raised the murder count for 2009 to 40 per-
sons. Farquharson, who is reportedly a cousin of the
deceased, was not required to enter a plea to the

EVENT PROMOTER BLAMED FOR BREACH OF CONTRACT




























Lil Wayne
responds

to suit over

mV Cae|
concert
no-show

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

MULTI-MILLION dollar
recording artist Lil Wayne has
responded to a law suit that
claims he failed to perform at a
concert in the Bahamas last year.

Blaming the promoter of the
event, Red City Entertainment
for a breach of contract, Lil
Wayne’s manager Cortez Bryant
said the promoters failed to pay
the sound company who in turn
packed up their equipment and
left the venue shortly before Lil
Wayne was scheduled to hit the
stage.

“On those grounds, at that
moment, they were in breach of
contract and forfeited their
deposit,” Mr Bryant said.

Rescheduling the event to the
following day, September 27, Lil
Wayne reportedly agreed to per-
form as long as the promoter
made arrangements that were up
to “his standards.”

“T presented their case to
Wayne and he said he would do it
if the promoters had everything
right, based on our contract,”
Bryant said. “I then told the pro-
moters to extend our rooms and
if, and only if, there were no prob-
lems at the venue, then he would
take the stage.

“When I arrived at the venue,
the security was horrible, causing
it to be an unsafe environment
and the sound system wasn't up
to our contracted standard,”
Bryant explained. “I then told the
promoters Wayne wasn’t coming
because they didn’t have their set-
up to a contracted standard for
the second night in a row.”

This second disappointment in
a row caused a major uproar at
the event with more than 5,000
fans being sent home after wait-
ing for the promised rapper for
hours. Red City Entertainment
reportedly was unable to recoup
its money which included more
than $30,000 for the accommo-
dations for Lil Wayne and his
entourage alone.

The Grammy-nominated artist,
whose real name is Dwayne
Carter, 26, is being sued for near-
ly half a million dollars by Red
City Entertainment for his
advance and travel arrangements.

Carter was the scheduled head-
liner at the Poppin Bottles con-
cert held at the Bristol Wine and
Spirits grounds on September 27,
2008. However, the event, which
was postponed from the original
date of Friday, September 26, to
Saturday, September 27, due to
sound problems never material-
ized. Meanwhile, Red City Enter-
tainment alleges they had already

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LIL' WAYNE is presented with the
award for best male hip-hop artist
at the 9th Annual BET Awards on
Sunday, June 28, 2009, in Los
Angeles.



“When I arrived at
the venue, the
security was
horrible, causing it to
be an unsafe
environment and the
sound system wasn't
up to our contracted
standard.”



Cortez Bryant

paid Lil Wayne $210,000 to
secure his performance at the
highly promoted event.

According to the promoter’s
allegations, on that evening in
question the Louisiana rapper
was found by police, lying uncon-
scious in his hotel room, after fail-
ing to show up at the venue at his
scheduled call time.

Red City is seeking $432,000
in restitution for his advance and
travel arrangements.

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Police prosecutor Sergeant Sean Thurston, how-
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quharson is facing a serious charge and that remand-
ing him to Sandilands was a security risk. He also
pointed out that the court was not in possession of
any psychiatric report relative to Farquharson.

Chief Magistrate Gomez remanded Farquhar-
son to Her Majesty’s Prison and ordered that he
receive his psychiatric treatment there.

The case has been adjourned to July 22 for men-
tion and transferred to Court 6, Parliament Street.








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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Don’t give the
Chief Justice



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Sept. may bring push for Iran sanctions

WASHINGTON — After a half-year of
extending patient feelers to Iran, President
Barack Obama has set a timeline — warning
Tehran it must show willingness to negotiate
an end to its nuclear programme by September
or face consequences.

If the West weighs new moves against Iran
this fall, as Obama suggested Friday, it will like-
ly mean new UN. sanctions or unilateral U.S.
penalties, rather than military strikes.

Obama told reporters in Italy, where he met
with other world leaders, that there is now a
September "time frame" for Iran to respond
to offers to discuss its nuclear programme.
While he did not call it a deadline, he said the
world cannot afford to wait long for Iran to
make its intentions clear.

"We're not going to just wait indefinitely and
allow for the development of the nuclear
weapon,” he said.

Obama said that in September "we will re-
evaluate Iran's posture toward negotiating the
cessation of a nuclear weapons policy.” If by
then it has not accepted the offer of talks, the
United States and "potentially a lot of other
countries" are going to say "we need to take fur-
ther steps," he said.

The president did not say what steps he has
in mind. He mentioned neither sanctions nor
military force. But it seems clear that a next
step to pressure Iran would entail some form of
sanctions.

"The administration and the other powers
would probably like to leave the toughest forms
of sanctions to be used if they feel that diplo-
macy has not gone anywhere — not in this pre-
diplomacy period," said Trita Parsi, president of
the National Iranian American Council, which
supports expanded U.S.-Iranian contacts.

Working against Obama's expression of
urgency is the political paralysis in Tehran,
where protesters last week sought to revive
street demonstrations over the country's dis-
puted presidential election. Iranian authorities,
while accusing the U.S. and other Western coun-
tries of secretly instigating the protests, seem
likely to put nuclear negotiations on the back
burner until the election dust settles.

State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley
acknowledged as much on Friday, saying, "This
(post-election turmoil) has clearly diverted the
attention of the Iranian government from offers
of engagement."

At the Group of Eight summit in Italy, world
leaders issued a joint statement deploring Iran's
crackdown on protesters. They also said they
remain committed to finding a diplomatic solu-
tion to the nuclear issue and said that in Sep-

Quality Auto Sales

tember they would “take stock of the situa-
tion" on the nuclear front.

Jon B. Alterman, director of the Middle East
programme at the Centre For Strategic and
International Studies, said that if reports of rifts
among some of Iran's ruling clerics are true,
then it will be hard for the government to agree
on a policy response to the West's offer of direct
negotiations.

He sees the prospect of movement toward
sanctions this fall. That could mean any combi-
nation of additional financial penalties, trade
restrictions, limits on travel by Iranian govern-
ment officials and other actions.

"Clearly the world is moving toward pre-
senting Iran a choice" between diplomacy and
isolation, Alterman said.

Before the June election, the Obama admin-
istration had figured that once the result was in,
the Tehran government could be expected to
make clear whether it intends to take up the
offers of nuclear talks.

"All of that has been completely put on its
head" by the post-election turmoil, said Parsi.
He believes Iran's political paralysis will con-
tinue as long the protest movement is alive.

But the clock keeps ticking, moving Iran clos-
er to obtaining the nuclear bomb that the USS.
and much of the rest of the world says it cannot
be allowed.

By USS. estimates, Iran is one to three years
away from the capability to make nuclear
weapons. Some think they are closer, and the
fact is that no one outside Iran really knows.
The five permanent members of the U.N. Secu-
rity Council — Britain, China, France, Russia
and the United States — as well as Germany
have offered Iran incentives to stop reprocess-
ing uranium that could fuel a nuclear bomb.

Iran so far has ignored the offer and continues
to amass enriched uranium, sparking grave
fears, especially in Israel, which has not ruled
out military strikes to deal with the threat.

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
insists the programme is intended only for
peaceful nuclear purposes.

The USS. has not publicly ruled out using mil-
itary force against Iran, but it seems far from
that stage. Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said Tuesday that mil-
itary action could backfire.

"I worry a great deal about the response of a
country that gets struck," he said. "It is a really
important place to not go, if we cannot go there
in any way, shape or form."

(This article was written by Robert Burns,
AP National Security writer- c-2009).



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LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I write as a concerned
Bahamian. I know that to be
Chief Justice you must be a
counsel and attorney of over 10
years standing. You should also
have a high degree of knowl-
edge and experience in all areas
of the law and some adminis-
trative skills.

I was born in The Bahamas, I
have nowhere to go. I have lim-
ited knowledge of the law, but
know what is fair in dealing with
people. Bahamas, it is time to
wake up and speak up and stop
politicians from destroying our
Bahamas before it’s too late.

How can this government
bring in a foreign person to be
Chief Justice or appoint the
most junior judge in the
Supreme Court or an outsider
with no real judicial experience
to that position? What is he say-
ing to the other judges on the
bench? We have competent
judges with experience like
Senior Justice Allen, Justice of
Appeal Longley, Justices Jon
and Stephen Isaacs who have
served diligently and well and
have more than 10 years expe-
rience in the judiciary.

It would be a slap in the face

letters@tribunemedia net



to these judges if a foreigner or
a junior judge or some other
outsider is made chief justice
over them. How would you
expect any of them to give such
a person their full and loyal sup-
port? They are human too. This
would be a travesty and cause
dissension and that would not
be in the best interest of the
administration of justice.
What is more, neither the
Attorney General, nor the
junior judge named in the news-
paper, or the attorney in pri-
vate practice, whose name has
been mentioned, has any expe-
rience in the criminal law. As
far as I know, none of them has
ever set foot in a criminal court
either as counsel or judge.
That’s remarkable at this time
when crime is so prevalent and
the criminal justice system
needs so much attention!
Word has it that the judges
named can't be controlled by
the politicians and Senior Jus-
tice Anita Allen is married to
the wrong person. Bahamians,

when Senior Justice Allen’s hus-
band was with this Govern-
ment, she was not married to
the wrong man then. This is the
same man! I didn't know that
she had got married again. The
Government should answer
that. What is due to a person
should be bestowed on them,
she is qualified, period. We, as
Bahamians need to speak up
about the wrongdoing of this
Government or any Govern-
ment, no matter whether we are
PLP or FNM.

There is a saying, what goes
up must come down, what goes
around comes around and when
you are powerful be merciful.
For example, from what I can
see from the newspaper reports,
this Judge Allen, is a hard-
working, fair and fearless
woman who has shown courage.
That’s what they don’t like. I
have seen reports of her doing
all manner of cases, she seems
to have experience in all sides of
the judiciary, and has even act-
ed in that post many times when
the Chief Justice was away.
What’s the problem now!

SAMUEL JOHNSON
Nassau,
July, 2009.

Turtle issue used to stigmatise Bahamians

EDITOR, The Tribune.

My law office has been inun-
dated with calls by Bahamians
not only supporting my views on
the save the turtle campaigners,
but expressing disgust at the per-
sonalised and mean-spirited
nature of the responses they have
elicited.

Given the apparent public per-
ception, it is easy to surmise that
the prickly defensiveness of mem-
bers of the save the turtle cam-
paign derives from a sense among
some that the campaign is led by
foreigners and “paper Bahami-
ans”. That is in fact a path down
which I have deliberately and
politely declined to be drawn.

But what I will say is that cam-
paigners do themselves and their
cause no favours by appearing to
approach the subject with a scorn-
ful attitude towards Bahamians
and the use of a casual and
sweeping stereotype.

Hence, one writer basically
ignored my logic and instead chal-
lenged me to stop “the Bahami-
ans” torturing turtles at Montagu
if I wanted to be taken seriously
(presumably by the likes of him-
self).

This use of the turtle issue to
engage in off-hand stigmatisation
of Bahamians has been surpris-
ingly persistent by campaigners,
despite being obviously counter
productive. More surprisingly, it

Oe Being Left in the Dark?

has even been engaged in by writ-
ers of obviously Bahamian origin
(perhaps the effect of Stockholm
Syndrome).

Whatever its explanation,
thinking Bahamians of all races
and backgrounds are rightfully
angered and put off by it.

Already two very prominent
white Bahamians, representing
two important fishing communi-
ties, have written letters oppos-
ing the campaign and its arrogant
sense of moral superiority.

One writer questioned, among
other things, where these cam-
paigns will end (conch? crawfish?
grouper?).

The answer to that question is
provided by some of the turtle
campaigners themselves. Promi-
nent campaigners have advanced
the extraordinary notion that tur-
tles are a marine resource belong-
ing to the world and therefore
not an exclusive resource of the
Bahamian people when they
enter our waters.

With that foolish position, cam-
paigners have inadvertently put
Bahamians on notice that this
campaign is open-ended and will
not stop with turtles.

Could the same vacant logic
not be applied to conchs, craw-
fish, grouper and anything else
that can swim or crawl across a
national frontier?

The answer to the question
“where will it end?” is simple:
anything that lives in the sea and
has legs, fins or other means of
crossing a maritime boundary.

When in Japan last, I had the
pleasure of listening to a version
of this very argument (regarding,

believe it or not, the citizenship of
whales) put forth by some nosy
and ignorant westerners. Need-
less to say, I shared a hearty laugh
with my Japanese hosts before
tucking into whale steak.

Theirs is a spurious and foolish
argument that ignores the real, if
nuanced, nature of national sov-
ereignty.

The answer to transnational
issues such as turtle conservation
is to work within the context of
the needs and capacities of each
country to confront the issue in a
coordinated fashion, not simply
to target those countries per-
ceived as weak and shame them
into shutting down whole seg-
ments of their culture and way of
life.

In the case of The Bahamas, a
sensible approach would begin
with a study to determine how
we can boost local turtle
resources relative to the pressures
exerted by local consumption
(precisely as they are now doing
in the Turks and Caicos Islands).

Bahamians have had ample
experience with “international”
groupings, whose real target is
the manipulation of the weak and
the pliable in the interests of some
utterly undemocratic and untrans-
parent “international” body.

The last thing we need now is
to encourage an outfit whose
reaction to being questioned is to
bristle rather than illuminate.

Once again, please Minister,
listen to Bahamians first.

ANDREW ALLEN
Nassau,
July, 2009.

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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIO MORTIMER of
SEQUOIA STREET, P.O. BOX SB 51984, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

TO: Ms. Carla Johnson
No. 52B Churchill Road
South Bahamia
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Kindly remove your personal property from the above-
mentioned address, failure to do so within seven (7)
days from the date of this notice will result in the
removal of your personal property from the above-
mentioned address, without further notice to you. The
owners shall not be liable for any loss andor damage
occasioned to your personal property after the expiry
of this notice,

DATED the 30th day of June, 2009,

THE OWNERS
No. 32, Churchill Road

South Bahamia
Freeport, Grand Bahama





THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Blind man makes

marine

history

Jerome Thompson pilots boat around Nassau, Paradise Island



JEROME Thompson, 45, made history on Sat-
urday by becoming the first blind person to pilot a
boat by himself around Nassau and Paradise Island.

Mr Thompson, who has been blind since the age
of 11, boarded a small powerboat at Hurricane Hole
Marina and successfully completed the circumnav-
igation of the two islands. He was accompanied by
the Defence Force who followed him at some dis-
tance in their vessels.

The inspiration for this undertaking, Mr Thomp-
son told The Tribune in an earlier interview, was the
fact that other blind persons internationally have
accomplished similar feats.

Mr Thompson said his love for the sea and passion
for boating sparked his interest in piloting a vessel by
himself.

This never before accomplished initiative by a
visually disabled person has officially been called
“the marine circumnavigation of two Bahamian
islands.”

Mr Thompson said the endeavour was made pos-
sible by the collaboration of a well put-together
support team that includes Glen Bain, a former
Defence Force officer and principal trainer; Grego-
ry Thompson, a professional meteorologist, and
Jennifer Rahming, a compliance officer in the finan-
cial industry.

The unmarried entrepreneur has also been
inspired to set up the non-profit organisation

JEROME THOMPSON launches off into the harbour as he sets out to become the first blind person to pilot
a boat by himself around Nassau and Paradise Island.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

= 2

JEROME THOMPSON at Paradise Island’s Hurricane
Hole Marina where he boarded the boat before his
historic voyage.

Adventures Unlimited Bahamas, registered in
January, to help disabled people in the Bahamas
and around the world bring their dreams to life by
supporting them in their endeavours either finan-
cially or by providing equipment and training.

New Zealand company clinches
$33.5 million airport contract

A FURTHER major step to
transform the Lynden Pindling
International Airport into a
world-class gateway was taken
yesterday with a New Zealand
company being awarded the $33.5

Project to provide baggage handling
and explosive detection technology

million contract to provide bag-
gage handling and explosive
detection technology.

The Nassau Airport Develop-
ment Company (NAD) awarded
the contract to Glidepath, which
will install a fully integrated bag-
gage handling, sorting and explo-
sives detection systems at the air-
port. The project will be carried
out in three phases and is expect-
ed to be completed in 2013, the
company said on its website.

The company will start with
supplying a new 55-counter
check-in facility at the United
States departure terminal. This
will also include a 1,800-bag-per-
hour inline explosive system
detection system, bag-weight
imaging system and automated
baggage sortation with three large
carousels totalling 3,500 linear
feet and 300 drives.

During phase two, three
inbound baggage claim systems
for international arrivals will be
installed. Phase three will then
see the construction of a new
international/domestic terminal
with 42 check-in counters and
3,200 linear feet of baggage han-
dling, security and sorting systems
equipment.

Quality

Glidepath’s North America
Chief Executive Matt Williams
said his company has a very good
reputation for the quality and reli-
ability of its high technology sys-
tems which it designs, builds,
installs and supports with after
care service.

"We are ideally positioned to
compete as we're equipped with
our own US manufacturing and
sales infrastructure, local knowl-
edge and international Glidepath
network as well as a proven track
record for innovation and relia-
bility having completed well over
100 projects in the US alone,” he
said.

Just over two weeks ago, NAD
awarded the contract for the
terminal building component of
stage one of the airport’s trans-
formation to Canadian compa-
ny Ledcor Construction.

Ledcor is reportedly planning
on for 73 per cent of its labour
requirements to be filled
through local contractors.

Stage one of the LPIA rede-
velopment includes construc-
tion of a 247,000 sq ft US
departures terminal and pier,
approximately 1,000,000 sq ft
of asphalt apron, expanded
parking facilities and new road
ways. Construction is expected
to start next month. The US
departures terminal is sched-
uled to be completed by the
first quarter of 2011.

Earlier this year, NAD
secured $265 million in financ-
ing for this stage of the airport
development project.

On Friday, ground was offi-
cially broken at LPIA.

Speaking at the ceremony,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said that so far more than
$14.8 million construction con-
tracts have been awarded to
Bahamian firms.

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will be closed on

Friday, July
17, 2009

for the Firm's
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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas real
Eom COLe eh

Carmen Massoni

Raise the
curtains

IF you’re
selling in any-
thing other
than a hot
market, you
might find |®
“staging” your
home can
help generate
more interest
and offers.



You needn’t spend thou- }
of dollars on:
improvements or profes- ;
sional consultants, howev- }
er. There are several things }
you can take into your own
hands to improve your ;

sands

home’s appeal.

Begin by removing scat-

ter rugs and knickknacks,

which can clutter a room. }
In the kitchen, remove all :
appliances from the coun- }
ters except the coffee mak- :
er and microwave. Set your }
dining table in a welcom- }

ing fashion, with plates,
flatware and napkins.

You might be tempted to }
throw everything into the }
closets, but buyers will look }
there, too, so box every- :
thing up and place into }
storage. Focus on the “fea- }
- the dining }
and living areas and mas- :
ter bedroom - keeping :
additional rooms as sparse- }
ly furnished as possible. Do

ture rooms”

your spring cleaning now,

scrubbing the walls and
floors and shining up those }

windows.
“The Complete Idiot’s

Guide to Staging Your }
Home to Sell” states that ;
you could gain up to $9,000 }
on a $200,000 house if it’s :
properly presented. You
might spend up to $100 per }
room in time and money, }
but that’s a pretty small :
investment for that kind of :
return. Your BREA real }
estate agent will have even



more suggestions.

2. |



Department of Environmental Health
doubles efforts to fight pest increase

WITH the high tempera-
tures currently being expe-
rienced in New Providence,
the Department of Environ-
mental Health Services is
advising people to practice
good sanitation to help
reduce the recent increase
in pests such as mosquitos
and rats.

“The public should be
aware that due to the recent
rains and the warm summer
temperatures, pests such as
flies, mosquitoes and rats are
present in greater numbers,”
the department said yester-
day in a press statement.

“The solid waste division
of the Department of Envi-
ronmental Health Services
has been challenged in
recent times as a result of
the rains with scheduled col-
lection in a few areas. Every
effort is being made to
ensure that we maintain
schedule so as to limit the
sources of fly breeding.”

The department said it is

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“The public
should be aware
that due to the
recent rains and
the warm summer
temperatures,
pests such as flies,
mosquitoes and
rats are present in
greater numbers.”



Department of
Environmental
Health Services

of vital importance that
property owners and occu-
pants of premises assist by
ensuring that their garbage is
properly containerised (cov-
ered) and that bins are
cleaned and disinfected after
being emptied. Fly bait and

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strips which can be readily
purchased can also be used
to limit fly presence.

“All vendors, particularly
crab and seafood vendors,
must practice good sanita-
tion by making garbage
receptacles available during
operation and ensuring that
all of the waste generated is
taken away and disposed of
properly. This will help to
minimise fly nuisances,” the
department said.

The level of rodent activi-
ty is directly related to the
amount of food sources,
shelter and harborage avail-
able.

Kitchen waste, discarded
appliances and furniture,
derelict vehicles and other
debris provide the environ-
ment for rats to survive and
produce large populations.

The environmental health
services department is ask-
ing individuals, private and
public entities, to shoulder
their responsibilities by

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ensuring that their premises
and places of occupancy and
in general, their communi-
ties, are clean and that good
garbage storage and dispos-
al practices are carried out.

Good sanitation habits will
assist in controlling the rat
population and other pests.

“The recent rains have
also help to produce large
batches of mosquitoes since
areas like ponds, depression
and excavations collect
water and hatch the mosqui-
to eggs. “Home owners are
reminded to pay special
attention to anything that
can hold water, especially
drums, buckets, tubs and
tires, as they can breed mos-
quitoes as well,” the depart-
ment said.

“Discarded items should
be disposed of in a proper
manner while items that are
in use should be properly
stored or managed so that
they cannot collect water
and support breeding of

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Plans to search for oil
and gas in the Bahamas

PICTURED are the areas where BPC Ltd, which recently part- }
nered with StatoilHydro of Norway, plans to search for oil and gas }
pending government approval of several licence applications. i

The proposed exploration areas lie in waters between Miami and }

Central Cuba.

According to the Oil and Gas Journal, five exploration wells have
already been drilled in the Bahamas by four different oil companies, }

beginning in 1947.

StatoilHydro, which announced its partnership with BPC in May,
recently signed an agreement to buy the South Riding crude oil }
storage and transshipment terminal on Grand Bahama from Cana- }
dian company World Point Terminals Inc. :

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.

Courtney Vernon Strachan Sr.

CPM; QPM
Sunrise: 26th October, 1928
Sunset: 14th July, 2008

God saw you were getting tired
And a cure was not to be,
So he put his arms around you and

Whispered, "Come to Me".
With taariul ayes we watched yo

And sav yOu pass away.
Allhough we loved you dearly
We could not make you stay.

4 Golden Heart stopped beating,

ating’

law ~

4 ie

Hard working hands at rest,

, i broke our hearis to prove to, U5: i
‘
be only takes the. best eG.
“9

AN - 9 iP
“brecious'r Metin in "the hearts
i his-v wife, Sybil a

ere Yerethece nieces, Se in iia at



mosquitoes.”

The Department of Envi-
ronmental Health Services
said it is doubling its efforts
to reduce the population of
these pests. “It is anticipated
that garbage pickup sched-
ules on those collection
routes that are off schedule,
will be regularised shortly.
The mosquito control sec-
tion of the Department of
Environmental Health Ser-
vices will strengthen its mos-
quito treatment/intervention
programme to address the
mosquito, fly and rodent
issues.

“Ground fogging exercises
will be continued and inten-
sified thorough New Provi-
dence and in those islands
that are affected,” the
department said.

“Once again the depart-
ment wishes to thank the
public for its continued
cooperation, support and
assistance in doing their part
in controlling pests.”

Training
Programme
committee
Peporis

THE proposed national
training and retraining pro-
gramme for recently laid
off workers is one step
closer to becoming reality,
as a draft presentation on
the plan has been present-
ed to Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes.

Appointed on June 14,
the implementation adviso-
ry committee for the
National Training Pro-
gramme was mandated to
research the proposal, sug-
gest a framework and noti-
fy the government of its
findings within three
weeks.

Chairman of the commit-
tee Khaalis Rolle has now
presented the report to the
minister.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham announced the
government’s plan to cre-
ate the programme during
the recent budget debate.
He said the decision was
taken after extensive con-
sultation with trade union
leaders and employers’ rep-
resentatives.

The programme will be
geared towards training
workers in areas where
there is a strong demand in
the business sector, Mr
Ingraham said.

These areas will include:
masonry, carpentry, weld-
ing, tile laying, electrical
installations, landscaping,
data processing, computer
skills, customer service, day
care, housekeeping, and
languages.

Courses will last for 10 to
15 weeks and will be run by
the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute
(BTVI) and the College of
the Bahamas.

The programme will be
open to 1,000 unemployed
Bahamians who will be
selected from those persons
who have already regis-
tered for the National
Insurance Unemployment
Benefit, the prime minister
said.

Labour Minister Foulkes
thanked those the private
sector partners who con-
tributed to the plan and
expressed his ministry’s
appreciation to those who
serve on the committee.

In addition to Mr Rolle,
the committee includes:
Rev Patrick Paul, president
of the Bahamas Christian
Council; John Pinder, pres-
ident of the NCTUB and
the BCPOU; Thomas Bast-
ian of the TUC; Dr Pando-
ra Johnson, vice- president
of COB; Dr Iva Dahl,
director of BT VI;
Dorothea Godet, deputy
director of Labour, and
Alpheus Forbes, deputy
permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Labour and
Social Development.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 7



Missing boys ‘survived on plums and stream water’

Family of

teenager
FROM page one

Princess Margaret Hospital's :
morgue for hours while the imme- :
diate family positively identified
Smith's body and spoke to offi- i
cers from the CDU. As they}
emerged from the building:
Smith's emotional mother and sis-
ter had to be supported by rela-
tives and were quickly escorted }
off the property. ;

Uncle Darren Strachan, who }
spoke on behalf of the family yes-
terday, said the family had done }
its own investigation into the
shooting and firmly believe police :
were at fault. :

"Clearly he was an innocent }
victim and we're working with the :
police to make sure this is
resolved aggressively. We believe
that he was shot — despite all the }
reports — he was not shot by any- }
one else other than the police,” }
Mr Strachan told the media while }
surrounded by grieving relatives }
outside the morgue yesterday.

"The police (are) right now just
putting together their findings but
we have done our own investiga- }
tion and we have spoken to wit-}
nesses and we know. And the:
police have said he was not a part
of the crime that happened in the }
foodstore and we know perfectly }
well, for a fact, that he was shot by :
an officer,” he said. :

Mr Strachan said once the}
investigation is complete, the fam- }
ily will decide whether or not to }
sue the RBPF. i

Supt Moss said it is in within }
police procedure to discharge a }
weapon if an officer fears for his ;
life. ;
"Tf they feel their life is threat- 3
ened they can use their weapon to }
protect themselves or someone in :
the community." ;

Smith, a 2008 graduate of Sti
Augustine's College, wasi
described by friends yesterday as }
a bright, fun-loving honour-roll
student who stayed out of trou-
ble. i
"He was a nice person, cheer- :
ful, easy to get along with,” said
schoolmate Mack Thompson of }
the promising teen. "He was far }
from a troublemaker — he liked :
to stay to himself or hang with his
family." ;

Another friend said last week i
that Smith was excited about his }
dream to attend a college over-
seas and pursue a degree in engi- }
neering. ;

According to reports Smith was :
an intern at Albany and had just
completed a job-related course. }

FROM page one

her sons do not appear to have suffered
any serious health problems and are expect-
ed to make a full recovery before they are
due to return to school in September.

The children have told their family how
they lost sight of the road as they were hunt-
ing for land crabs in the dense forest as
Deangelo, who lives with his grandmother in
Smith’s Hill, let his younger brother, visiting
from Nassau, lead the way as night closed in.

Atsome point the younger and chubbier
Marcell fell into a deep cave-like hole, and
when Deangelo reached for him, he too fell
in.

It is not clear whether the boys were
trapped in the cave for some time, but they
said they spent days walking around search-
ing for food, water and a way home, and
slept in caves and caverns.

They said they survived by eating pigeon
plums and cocoplums growing in the dense
3,000 square mile forest and drinking water
from a freshwater stream.

On their final day in the woods the boys
said they managed to climb a tree to see
above the dense coppice of mahogany, iron-
wood, and horseflesh hardwood trees and
heard the sound of a passing car before they
found the road where they were seen by
their cousin.

Their grandmother, Olgarean Clarke, 67,
said: “Deangelo was slim and he lost about
30lbs, and Marcell had been a little chubbier,
but when they came back they looked to me
like skeletons. They lost everything.

FROM page one

“They didn’t have anything proper to eat
for a whole month inside the bushes. They
were starving. They were very underfed.

“T think if someone had taken them they
would have given them more to eat than
that.

“T guess they must have been
sleeping in the hole at night, and in
the day they were walking around
in circles, looking for food, and
trying to find their way back
home.”

Police have yet to determine
the boys’ whereabouts in the 33
days they were missing.

There have been reports of a
speedboat heard approaching the
coast at around 2am on Sunday
and of an earlier sighting of the
boys on Sunday morning. There
also has been speculation over a
verbal response from the boys
reportedly heard during the police search
two weeks after the boys had disappeared.

Superintendent Hulan Hanna said detec-
tives are keeping an open mind at this stage
in the investigation.

Mr Hanna, in charge of policing the Fam-
ily Islands, said: “We need to determine
where these children were as much as we
can, but we probably won’t get them talking
right away and it’s going to take some time
to get the story.

“Speculation abounds, but we take noth-
ing for granted so we want to hear any infor-
mation the public may have.

“As we have not yet been able to objec-
tively evaluate what their claims are, every-

Top lawyer face



SUPERINTENDENT
Hulan Hanna

thing remains on the table so we have to
approach the investigation with a very open
mind.”

When 20 police officers, supported by
the Royal Bahamas Defence Force, the US
Coast Guard helicopter and local residents
failed to locate the boys their
parents criticised police for not
pursuing the search for the lost
children.

As their mother Vera Clarke
visited them in the paediatric
ward of the hospital yesterday
she said she never gave up hope
for her two sons.

She said: “T didn’t understand
why the police put off the search
so fast because I knew they were
living — I always believed they
were living and I didn’t care
what anybody said.

“T never had the feeling that
someone would come and tell me they were
dead. I just knew they were alive.

“But when Marcell and Deangelo turned
up the police couldn’t believe it.”

Former director of the Bahamas Envi-
ronmental Research Centre in Andros, Mar-
go Blackwell, said the rocky terrain and
dense forest of hardwood trees that stretch
for some 3,000 square miles across southern
Andros is one of the most difficult places in
the world to survive in the wild and has
been rated alongside Siberia for chances of
survival.

But during the summer months the woods
are filled with pigeon plums, cocoplums,
guana and poisonwood berries which are

S Study: Christie ‘not as popular’ with parliamentary group

all edible and could provide enough suste-
nance for life, and heavy rains in May and
June would have gathered in the rocky caves
and crevices on the forest floor and filled the
freshwater river from which the boys said
they drank.

Ms Blackwell said: “Andros is filled with
caves and holes which is a blessing and a
danger, so those boys are just very lucky.

“There are ways of surviving but it’s not
easy.”

She said many locals blame spirits for
making people disorientated in the forest.
She said her father was missing for nearly 10
days after landing a plane in central Andros
around eight miles from the road. She and
the boys’ grandmother have also lost their
way in the woods before, they said.

But as the investigation continues Mrs
Clarke said she is just glad to have her
grandsons safe and receiving care.

She said: “Even as they found them I
thought they would have found them dead,
but I was surprised to see that they were
alive, could walk, and even talk.

“T am proud especially of Deangelo, he
looks a lot different from when he left me,
but I thank God he’s back and he is okay.”

Deangelo is expected to return to Deep
Creek Primary School to enter grade five in
September and Marcell should be well
enough to go into grade two at Uriah
McPhee in Kemp Road at the start of the
school year.

Any information that may assist the
police investigation should be reported by
calling 911, 919 or Crime Stoppers anony-
mously on 328-TIPS (8477).

nity, was arraigned yesterday on
six counts of housebreaking and
stealing as well as five of receiv-
ing.

He is accused of breaking into
homes in the Marshall Road, Pas-
tel Gardens, Elizabeth Estates
and Sea Breeze areas between
May and July of this year. It is
alleged that he stole thousands
of dollars worth of jewellery, elec-
tronics and cash. Among the
items Mr Regnier is accused of
stealing and receiving are Rolex
watches, gold chains, video games
and DVD players. Mr Regnier,
who was represented by lawyer
Michael Kemp, elected summary
trial in Magistrate’s Court and
pleaded not guilty to all charges.

Mr Kemp told Chief Magis-
trate Roger Gomez that Mr Reg-
nier had been in police custody
for more than 48 hours and was
not granted his visitation rights.
He also told the court that Mr
Regnier suffers from congestive
heart failure and high blood pres-
sure and that remanding him to
Fox Hill Prison would be a death
sentence.

break-in charges

Chief Magistrate Gomez
granted Mr Regnier bail in the
sum of $30,000 with two sureties.
He was ordered to report to the
Elizabeth Estates Police Station
every Wednesday and Saturday.

Arlington McNeil, 21, and
Jamaric Green, 22, was arraigned
together on six counts of house-
breaking and stealing as well as
one count of receiving. They
pleaded not guilty to all charges.
McNeil and Shando King, 34, was
also arraigned together on a
housebreaking charge. The men
pleaded not guilty to the charge.
Green was also arraigned on
additional charges of house-
breaking, stealing and receiving.
He pleaded not guilty to the
charges.

Don Rahming Jr, 25, and
Anton Ferguson, 22, pleaded not
guilty to threatening to kill Tyson
Ferguson on July 6. Ferguson,
Rahming and Green also pleaded



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not guilty to breaking into the
home of Shavon Wood at Ham-
ster Road on July 6 and the home
of Monica Gomez on July 7.

Ferguson and Green who,
according to the prosecution,
have matters of a similar nature
pending before the courts as well
as McNeil, were ordered remand-
ed until July 20, when a bail hear-
ing will take place. The men are
represented by lawyer Stanley
Rolle. Rolle claimed that Fergu-
son had been beaten while in
police custody and that McNeil
had been in custody since July 8.
Rahming, who is represented by
lawyer Gregory Hilton, was
granted bail in the sum of $15,000.
King, who is represented by Mr
Kemp, was also granted $15,000
bail.

FROM page one

While sources close to this
leadership race maintain that
there are many within the PLP
with the experience and capac-
ity to lead the PLP, there still
remains the issue of personali-
ty and likeability that have yet
to be addressed.

“The question is not out
there any more who can
replace Christie, there are any
number of persons who can
and who have the capacity. But
the personality issue may be a
different story.

“What people need to realise
is that contrary to what the
political pundits suggest, when
it really boils down, Bahami-
ans as a whole are not that out
of touch with Christie,” the
source said.

With its planned convention
slated for October 18th this
year, the PLP will face consid-
erable criticism from both with-
in and outside of the party as
the public looks for the party to
embrace change and progres-
sion.

With these two qualities in
mind, political insiders have
suggested that the PLP could
accomplish this goal easily by
simply changing its deputy
leader, Cynthia Pratt, who has
already expressed her desire
not to run for the post again.
Therefore with a new deputy
at the helm and what is being
foreshadowed as “reinvented”
Perry Christie, the PLP will be
poised to rebuild its party and
regain some of the momentum
it has lost in the past two
years.






CCS cy
NOTICE TO BRITISH CITIZENS

The Vice Consul for The Bahamas (based in Kingston, Jamaica)
will visit Nassau on Thursday, 23rd July, 2009 and will be
available to discuss any individual problems concerning
passports and nationality issues.



Passport applications and renewals should continue to be sent
by courier direct to the High Commission in Kingston.

Appointments can be made by calling the Honorary Consul
in Nassau on 324-4089.





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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Highlights from the cultural
extravaganza at Clifford Park

THE BAHAMAS’ FINEST were out in force for the big event.

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Stoeeting’s Colonial

Mortuary And Crematorium

84 Blue Hill Road - P.O. Box N-8161 : Tel: 325-7867
Fax: 325-7867

a resident of Fox
Hill, will be held on
Wednesday 15th
July 2009 at the
Chapel of the Saints,
Sweeting's Colonial
Mortuary at 10:00
a.m. Officiating will
be Rev. Zeffinah
Newbold and
Associate Ministers.

Left to cherish his
= memories are his
three brothers, eunneth Williams, Gaskine and
Joseph Whitney Williams of West ‘Palm Beach,
Florida; two sisters-in-law, Elsiemae and Shirley
Williams; five nephews, Kevin Williams of Miramar
of Florida, Marvin, Dion, Montez and Scott; three
nieces, Mellessian Thompson of Harbour Island,
Carmen and Malinda Williams of West Palm and a
host of other relatives and friends Including,
Linberg, Roxbergh, Rolda, Elva, Orie and Evangelist
Bronell Williams, Vivienne Lyn, Sada Pinder, Mavis
and Bercel Pinder, Eddiemae Pratt, Beulah Morris,
Bessie Bess, Eleanor Rose, Julian, Kay, Jackson,
Philip, Michell and Michael Weech, Gilda Weech
House, Allen Cleare, Miriam Smith, Brenda Amos,
George and Albert Williams, Pearl, Rosie and Cloretta
Williams, Lilymae Thompson, Bishop Tueton Stubbs,
Carl, William, Christopher and Wentwort Stubbs,
Virdell Pinder, Leola Ford, Mildred Dillette, Bishop
Joseph, George and Charles Zonicle, Denise Williams,
Ellamae, Harry and Freeland Deveaux, Rev. Dr.
Hellen McPhee, Bernice Major, Evangelist Eleanor
Allen, Evangelist Inez Moss, Rev. Dr. William
Rahming, Annie Hepburn, Louise Weech, Gurtrude
Kelly, Inez, Harold and Carl Dawkins, Dorothy
Gilbert, Pearl Williams, Winfred Rolle, Eva Hunter,
Vahaul Thompson, the Rolles and Dawkins family,
Arthur Bain, Rev. Henry Pratt, the Davis family of
Fox Hill, Grene Higgs, Cleomie Saunders, Shirley
Johnson, Wendy, Janice, Joshua and Victor and
families.

Arrangements are entrusted to Sweeting's Colonial
Mortuary and Crematorium, #84 Blue Hill Rd.



FIREWORKS make a spectacular
background for the Bahamian flag.



Pope goes on
vacation in
Italian Alps

LES COMBES, Italy

THE Vatican says Pope
Benedict XVI has traveled to
a village in the Italian Alps for
two weeks of vacation, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

It says the pontiff was flown
to Turin on a plane Monday
and then traveled on to Les
Combes, in a region near the
French border, by helicopter.

Benedict has spent two sum-
mers at Les Combes in recent
years.

He said upon arrival that he
expected to rest and work dur-
ing his vacation.

He is scheduled to be away
until July 29, making at least
two public appearances in the
area.

Benedict’s predecessor,
John Paul II, also spent sever-
al summer at Les Combes.
While John Paul liked to hike,
Benedict spends most of his
time inside the chalet that
looks out on Mount Blanc, the
highest peak in the Alps.



THE TRIBUNE



:
5
a
ail
celle

CHRIS “BAY” BROWN continued his string of victories on the European circuit on Sunday...



TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009



(FILE phote)



Wallace chose

Celtics for
chance at

another title...
See page 10

Winning streak

Bg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

t wasn’t as fast as his pre-

vious outing, but quar-

termiler Chris “Bay”

Brown continued his
string of victories on the Euro-
pean circuit on Sunday.

And yesterday, the battle
between veteran sprinters Deb-
bie Ferguson-McKenzie and
Chandra Sturrup intensified.

Brown, competing in his third
meet in Europe, won the men’s
400m at the Meeting Interna-
tional Tangier 2009 in Tangier,
Africa.

Not too far behind in second
place behind Brown was
Jamaican Jermaine Gonzales in
45.81. Ofentse Mogawane of the
Republic of South Africa fin-
ished third in 46.13.

Just Friday, Brown was at the
Golden Gala in Rome, Italy,
where he posted a season’s best
of 44.81 seconds to secure the
win as he held off Ireland’s
David Gillick, who finished in
44.82.

Brown, 36, had a chance to
contend for a share of the $1
million jackpot from the Gold-
en League. But after winning
the opener in Berlin, he didn’t
participate in the second race
in Oslo, Norway.

He returned with a bang in
Rome, but after being elimi-
nated from the Golden League,
he is currently sitting in fourth
place with 74 points from five

Battle between ‘Golden
Girls’ Sturrup, Ferguson-
McKenzie intensifies

| =

Sturrup

F-McKenzie



meets on the World Athletics
Tour that will secure berths for
athletes to compete in the
IAAF/VTB World Athletics
Final in Stuttgart, Germany,
September 13-14.

Americans Jeremy Wariner,
the reigning world champion
and LaShawn Merritt, the
Olympic champion, have also
competed in five meets and are
leading the field with 100 and 98
points respectively.

Meanwhile, neither Fergu-
son-McKenzie or Sturrup were
in a position to contend for the
jackpot, which is based on ath-
letes’ winning performances in

the series of six meets.

But since the BAAA Nation-
al Championships in June when
Ferguson-McKenzie dethroned
Sturrup as the national 100m
champion, the two have com-
peted against each other in the
last three meets.

This time, it was Ferguson-
McKenzie who turned the
tables again on Sturrup when
they competed at the Athens
Grand Prix in Athens, Greece,
yesterday.

Still shy of dipping under the
11-second barrier this year, Fer-
guson-McKenzie lowered her
season’s best to 11.04 for a third
place finish in the century.

Fresh of her season’s best of
10.99 in Rome for third place
in the fastest race for the year,
Sturrup had to settle for fourth
in 11.15. Ferguson-McKenzie
was sixth in Rome in her then
season’s best 11.11.

On the World Athletics Tour,
Sturrup is sitting in seventh
place with 52 points after five
meets. Through five meets as
well, Ferguson-McKenzie is tied
with Kim Gevaert of Belgium
with 47 each.

BLIA president confident Davis Cup
team can get back into Zone II

B By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IN virtue of being relegated to Zone
III in 2010, the Bahamas will have to
play the Americas Davis Cup tie against
Jamaica, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica,
Aruba and Bermuda.

The seven teams will be divided into
two pools with the two winners getting
promoted to Zone II for 2011, while
the two losers will be relegated to Zone
IV.

It’s not known as yet when and where
the tie will take place.

The Bahamas has never played in
Zone IV and the way the team played
against Guatemala, Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association president Stephen
Turnquest said it should only be a mat-
ter of time before they can get back to
Zone II.

“T think the effort was there and it
was an exciting tie,” Turnquest said.
“We realised that there are some things
that we need to do as far as our prepa-
ration is concerned.

“One of our main players, Timothy
Neilly, got hurt and BJ Munroe wasn’t
able to play doubles after he got hurt.
Notwithstanding that, Marvin Rolle and
Devin Mullings gave a good account of
themselves.”

Having gone through a series of
marathon matches in the scorching sun,
Turnquest said the results could have
been slightly different with one or two
points.

But if team captain John Farrington
gets a chance to assemble the team
together a little longer than the week
they do before the tie is played, Turn-
quest said he’s confident that they will
have no problems prevailing next year.

“We just need to have better prepa-
ration to have the players better pre-
pared for the competition,” Turnquest
said. “We just have to look at the teams
that we will be playing against and we
have to work towards playing against
them.”

While the Bahamas lost to Guatemala
in their half of the relegation playoffs,
Jamaica were blanked 5-0 by the
Netherlands Antilles to also drop down

to Zone III.

They will join Cuba, Puerto Rico and
Costa Rica, who finished third through
fifth, in their Group III playoffs that
was held from April 22-26 in El Sal-
vador.

By virtue of finishing first and sec-
ond respectively, El Salvador and
Bolivia were promoted to Zone II.

And from their first and second place
finishes in Group IV the same week-
end in El Salvador, Aruba and Bermu-
da were promoted to Group III.

With the team in place, Turnquest
said the future looks bright for the
Bahamas.

“We also have a lot of young players
who are in college, who are going to be
a position to replace some of the other
players who are playing on the team
now,” Turnquest said.

Does this mean that the BLTA is
leaning on making some changes to the
current team?

Turnquest declined to confirm, only
to say: “I would like Rodney Carey (Jr)
and Jamal Adderley get a chance to
make the team. So I think the trials for
the team in December will be quite
interesting.”

Farrington, who has spent the past
nine years as the team captain, said the
players went out and gave it their best.
But he said it will only make them hun-
grier when they play out of Zone III
next year.

“We will have to play in one week,
which means we will have a match every
day,” Farrington said. “But if that’s what
it will take to get us back to Zone I,
then that is what we will have to do.”

As for whether or not he feels there
needs to be any changes to the team,
Farrington said he would prefer to leave
that decision up to the BLTA.

Bahamas Olympic Association sec-
retary general Rommel Knowles, who
was along with president Wellington
Miller, said he was impressed with what
he saw.

“The talent is definitely there, so ’m
very impressed,” he said. “We have
some talent, but I think if they can get a
little more exposure like the
Guatemalan team, I think they will be
okay.”

Photos by Kevin Major



MARVIN ROLLE (also left, right) and DEVIN
MULLINGS (also top left) talk strategy...





PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Bahamas to
host Judo

arib

READY FOR COMBAT:
Judo athletes prepare to
compete.

Judo Athletes from Barbados, Puerto Rico, The
Cayman Islands, the Dutch Antilles and the
Bahamas will face off this weekend in the Caribbean
Judo Cup at Loyola Hall on Saturday July 18.

Kick off time for the event is 1 pm and the event is
expected to run to 4 pm.

Trials were held over the weekend to determine
who would represent the Bahamas against the
Caribbean neighbours. The team will consist of
Wellington Mullings (73Kg) , Chrisnell Cooper (78
Kg), D'Arcy Rahming Jr (66 Kg), Cynthia Rahming

LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

ATHLETES TO FACE OFF AT LOYOLA HALL ON JULY 18

Cup

(52 Kg), Nathan Williams (48 Kg). There will also be
an open tournament in which some fifty Bahamian
athletes as well as US athletes are expected to attend.
In preparation for the event Top US Coach Gerald
Lafon has been busy training Bahamian athletes at
an intensive training camp.

He has also been running a national Coaches
course in which all Federation schools are taking
part.

"Tam pleased to see the cooperation between
schools of the Federation. Coaches seem to be eager




to learn what steps are necessary to take the
Bahamas to the next level," said Coach Lafon.

"The athletes in the training camp have improved
significantly since I was here a year ago."

The course are being held at Judo Federation
Schools Island Jujutsu on Carmichael Road and All
Star Family Center on Joe Farrington Road.

July 18 Tournament Tickets are available for $5 at
the door during tournament time from 12 - 4 pm or
for more information call the Bahamas Judo Feder-
ation at 364-6773.

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Pargo signs
one-year
fleal with
the Bulls

CHICAGO (AP) —
Free agent guard Jannero
Pargo has signed a one-year
deal with the Chicago Bulls.

Terms were not disclosed
Monday.

The 6-foot-1 guard,

known for his outside
shooting, was also with
Chicago from 2003-06. Par-
go played in Russia and
Greece last season. He is a
six-year NBA veteran, hav-
ing also spent time with the
Lakers, Raptors and Hor-
nets.

He has averaged 6.9
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games, while shooting 36.5
percent from the 3-point
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In 33 playoff games, his
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Pargo gives the Bulls
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lost leading scorer Ben Gor-
don to Detroit.



Cavs sign Parker

CLEVELAND (AP) — The
Cleveland Cavaliers have signed
veteran free-agent Anthony
Parker to add depth to the
backcourt.

The 34-year-old Parker
played in 80 games for the
Toronto Raptors last season
and averaged 10.7 points and
3.4 assists. Terms were not dis-
closed.

Cavs general manager Danny
Ferry says Monday that Cleve-
land went after the 6-foot-6
guard/forward for his shooting
and defensive skills.

Parker likely will be one of
the first players off the bench,
behind Cleveland starting
guards Mo Williams and
Delonte West and small for-
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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 11

















SPORTS

Darling optimistic about NFL season

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



The Chiefs
finished a dis-
appointing 2-
14, fourth in a

1995 and joins the Chiefs after a
two-year stint as offensive coor-
dinator for the Arizona Cardi-
nals.

WITH a new head coach, woeful AFC After Tom Brady went down
new offensive scheme anda Pro West. with an injury, (ironically
Bowl caliber quarterback at the “Last year | against the Chiefs) in the open-

helm, Devard Darling looks to
the 2009-10 season with great
optimism.

In his fifth National Football
League season, and second with

was a disap-
pointing sea-
son in my first
year in
Kansas City,

ing game of the season, Cassel
became the team’s starting
quarterback and finished with
3,942 passing yards and 23
touchdowns.

Darling



Mini Bowl Meal

the Kansas City Chiefs, Darling
has set lofty goals for himself
and his franchise with the acqui-
sitions of new quarterback Matt
Cassel and first year head coach
Todd Haley.

“Personally I am looking for-
ward to this being one of the
better seasons of my career.
With the addition of Matt
everyone has high hopes for the
passing game and for the future
of the offense as a whole. Once
our team remains relatively
healthy the sky is the limit for
what can happen on the field,”
Darling said.

“My ideal season, the per-
sonal goals I set this year, Jam
working toward a 1,000 yard
season, maybe even a Pro Bowl
selection should everything fall
into place, like I said, the sky is
the limit.”

Darling comes off a 2008-09
season where he caught 17 pass-
es for 247 yards and one touch-
down and exhibited his big play
ability with a career long 68-
yard reception against the Patri-
ots in November.

THE New Providence Soft-
ball Association is scheduled to
host its All-Star Classic at the
Archdeacon William Thomp-
son Softball Park, Southern
Recreational Grounds, on Sat-
urday.

Also over the weekend, the
NPOTSA officially re-name
their two divisions - The Arthur
Thompson Division (formally
the A- Division) and The
Bursell Bradshaw Division (for-
mally the B-Division).

Additionally, the NPOTSA
is slated to honour their past
presidents and some of their
loyal fans. They plan to unveil
two plaques for the contribu-
tions Herman Joseph Mackey
and Alfred ‘Yo-Yo’ Pritchard
have made during the existence
of the league.

Awards for the 2007-2008

my number improved a bit but
for the team we all wanted to do
a lot better,” Darling said.

“This season we get a fresh
start and we hope for a lot of
things to be different, the main
goal is overall improvement. As
a team that means a better reg-
ular season record, a playoff
berth and we will go from
there.”

The Chiefs struggled last year
finding a fit at the quarterback
position with Brodie Croyle,
Damon Huard, and Tyler Thig-
pen each starting under center
at various points throughout the
season.

In an off-season where the
Chiefs lost franchise leading
receiver Tony Gonzales, Dar-
ling and the remainder of the
receiving core look to figure
more prominently into the pass-
ing game.

Todd Haley joins the Chiefs
in his first head coaching job
after spending 13 years as an
assistant coach. He began his
pro career as a scouting assis-
tant with the New York Jets in

season will be presented. The
highlight of the weekend will
be a homerun challenge, which
was won last year by Gregory
Taylor.

Here’s a look at the schedule
for Saturday:

10am - The prelims of the
Homerun Challenge

llam — Challenge Game
Executives and Coaches vs The
Media

2pm — The Bursell Bradshaw
All-star Game

4pm -— The Arthur Thomp-
son All-star Game

6:30pm — Awards Presenta-
tion

The following persons (see
TABLE below) were selected
to participate in this year’s All-
Star Classic:

THE ARTHUR THOMPSON DIVISION:

President’s Squad

Manager

John Williams - Crusaders
Coaches

Sean Wilson - Pokers

Brad Smith - Dozer Pros
Players

Marcus Pratt - Dozer Pros
Kevin Hinsey - Crusaders
Keith Moss - Dozer Pros
Fred Tapia - Pokers

Harry Kemp - Crusaders
Edmond Bethell - Crusaders
Ivan Francis - Crusaders
Dwayne Dean - Pokers
Dominic Elliott - Pokers
Mario Ford - Crusaders
Rodney Forbes - Dozer Pros
Bernard Young - Crusaders
Andy Ford - Crusaders
Greg Smith - Dozer Pros
Greg Gardiner - Crusaders
George Henderson - Pokers
John Rolle - Pokers

Willard Elliott - Pokers
Sean Higgs - Crusaders
Bradley Sands - Dozers
Mike Hanna - Pokers
Pitchers

Creswell Pratt - Crusaders
Franklyn Martin - Pokers
Rudolph Williams - Dozer Pros
Tony Brown - Dozer Pros

Vice-President’s Squad
Manager

Sammy Adderley - Lions
Coaches

Anthony Huyler - Warriors
Selwyn McKenzie - Bom. George
Players

Kevin Neilly - Warriors

Ray Newbold - Lions

Brad Woods - Lions

Warfield Bain - Bommer George
Gregory Taylor - Lions

Winston Seymour - Lions
Kelson Armbrister - Warriors
Mike Smith - Bommer George
Lee Rahming - Bommer George
Fran Adderley - Warriors
Dwayne Dean - Warriors

Edney Bethell - Warriors
Richard Bastian - Lions

Dwayne Pratt - Warriors

Charlie Rolle - Lions

Kirk Johnson - Bommer George
Lorenzo Carter - Warriors
Nelson Farrington - Bommer George
Elgin Smith - Bommer George
Prince Huyler - Warriors

Darryl Isaacs - Warriors
Pitchers

Ronald Seymour - Lions

Gary Johnson - Lions

Jonathan Armbrister - Warriors
Danny Stubbs - Bommer George

THE BURSELL BRADSHAW DIVISION:

President’s Team

Manager

Clifton Smith - Michollette
Coaches

Andrew Ferguson - Corner Boyz
Players

John Wallace - Cabinet World
Preston Rahming - Corner Boyz
Sigmund Bethell - Michollette
Alexander Bain - Michollette
Kevin Thompson - Michollette
John Lockhart - Corner Boyz
Vince Williams - Corner Boyz
Hermis Ferguson - Corner Boyz
Johnny Burrows - Michollette
Tom Ferguson - Gussiemae
Frances Taylor - Corner Boyz
Dan Bourne - BTC

Anthony Bullard - BTC

Abe Johnson - Michollette
Sandy Morley - Cabinet World
Glen Saunders - Michollette
Henry Williams - 6 pack

Mark Lockhart - 6 pack
Culbert Evans - Michollette
Howard Hanna- Michollette
Keith Thompson - Michollette
Brian Capron - Gussiemae
Pitchers

Alfred Munnings - Michollette
Vernon Bowles - Gussiemae
Craig Bowe - Cabinet World
Foster Dorsette - 6 pack

Vice President’s Team

Manager

Rory Newbold - Technicians
Coaches

Christopher Bullard -Stallions
Players

Daryl Bartlett - Bahamas Divers
Brian Anderson - Stallions
Mike Moss - Bahamas Divers
Dwight Butler - Stallions

Terry Bain - Stallions

Marcellus Hall - Stallions
Charles Gaitor - Technicians
Larry Forbes - Lions

Spurgeon Johnson - Technicians
Ron Wood - Technicians

Juan Pratt - Stallions

Anton Newbold - Technicians
Cyril Miller - Royals

Danny Johnson - Lions

Richard Brown - Lions

Mike Major - Lions

Philip Paul - Lions

Joe Jones - Royals

Keith Richards - Bahamas Divers
Joe McPhee - Royals

David Gardiner - Technicians
Robert Cox - Bahamas Divers
Pitchers

Hector Rolle - Technicians
Greg Thompson - Bahamas Divers
Don Dean - Stallion

Harold Fitzgerald - Royals

Darling said the team has

welcomed Cassel with open
arms following the pre draft-
day trade.

“Definitely having that sta-

bility at the quarterback posi-
tion is crucial for any team in
the NFL to have a successful
offense. The relationship
between a quarterback and his
receivers is paramount so yeah
it has been great that Matt and
I along with the other receivers
are beginning to build a bond
on and off the field,” he said.
“Chemistry can be a major part
of that success we are looking
for.”

The Chiefs open training

camp on July 30 at the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin River Falls.

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

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THE TRIBUNE

usine

TUESDAY,



er Lan

14,



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net







ROBERT SANDS

Baha
Mar seeks
suimmary
ruling against
Harrah's

* Wants New York court
to order gaming giant
to fulfil $212m equity
capital injection pledge,
and $318m guarantee

* Cable Beach developer
takes ‘baby steps
forward’ in talks with
Chinese, with year-end
timetable still on

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

BAHA Mar is continuing
to “take baby steps forward”
with the two potential Chi-
nese-state owned partners
for its $2.6 billion Cable
Beach project, Tribune Busi-
ness was told yesterday, as
the resort developer filed a
motion for summary judg-
ment in a bid to force its for-
mer equity partner, Harrah’s
Entertainment, to fulfil its
obligations.

Court papers obtained by
Tribune Business reveal that
on Friday, July 10, Baha Mar
filed a cross-motion for sum-
mary judgment with the New
York Supreme Court seek-
ing a verdict that Harrah’s
and its Bahamian-incorpo-
rated investment vehicle,
Caesars Bahamas Invest-
ment Corporation, breached
their contract and the guar-
anty given to the Bahamian
resort developer.

Baha Mar is asking the
New York court to “order
specific performance requir-
ing Caesars Bahamas to
make its required equity con-
tribution to the joint venture
company [Baha Mar] and
otherwise fulfill its obliga-
tions under the joint venture
agreements, and Harrah’s to
cause those obligations to be

SEE page 3B



ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

‘Undue burden’ fears over
new communications fees

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

major Bahami-
an telecommu-
nications oper-
ator has
expressed con-
cern that many companies will
be unable to absorb the pro-
posed “minimum 2 per cent of
per annum revenue” increase
in industry licence fees, and
warned that the payments
schedule will lead to a “further
undue cash flow burden”.

Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, pres-
ident of Systems Resource
Group (SRG), parent of BTC’s
only legal fixed-line competi-
tor, IndiGo Networks, said the
company was concerned “by the
proposed fee structure and the
financial burden that it will
place upon operators and,
therefore, ultimately the con-
sumer” - implying that the extra
costs will be passed on to com-
munications/telecommunica-
tions end-users via price rises.

Writing to the Government-
appointed BTC privatisation

Solomon’s
Mines close
two sections
in Bay Street
anchor store

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

STRUGGLING | luxury
goods retailer Solomon’s Mines
has closed two sections in its
anchor store on Bay Street, and
two stores on Paradise Island,
employees confirmed to Tri-
bune Business yesterday.

A Tribune Business reporter
who visited Solomon’s Mines’
main Bay Street store yester-
day found that the retailer had
slashed the prices of all its items
- up to 70 per cent off - in the
remaining sections of the outlet,
while the perfume and acces-
sories areas had been closed.

The storefront windows for
the two recently-closed sections
have been covered up with
brown paper and a sign that
leads one to believe the space is
under renovation.

One employee, when asked
yesterday if "things are dire”,
replied: “Yes.” The luxury
goods retailer is a clearly trou-
bled business, its staff having
been complaining for months

SEE page 4B

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* Leading operator concerned that many firms unable to absorb
‘minimum two per cent of per annum revenue’ increase

* Rises likely to be passed to consumers via higher prices, with ‘further
undue cash flow burden’ caused by four-month payment period

* Caribbean cellular operator says Bahamas plan for ‘special taxes’
could deter market entrants and limit/inhibit competition

* But government committee dismisses concern

committee on its licensing
regime consultation paper, Mr
Hutton-Ashkenny said SRG
currently just paid the Govern-
ment a business licence fee
levied as a percentage of rev-
enue, plus a fee to cover the
Public Utilities Commission’s
(PUC) costs.

The latter fee was levied at
0.524 per cent of revenue, plus a
flat radio spectrum fee, but
under the new communications
regulatory set-up, SRG will see
its fee payments jump from two
to four.

Apart from the same business

Cable: We're ‘superior’
to BTC over Internet

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas has asserted that it has a
Internet psroduct than the rival
Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC),
having more than double the number of sub-
scribers and an average revenue per unit (ARPU)
that was 59 per cent higher the last time com-
parative figures were produced.

A copy of Cable Bahamas’ private placement
memorandum for its active $40 million prefer-
ence share issue, a copy of which has been seen by
Tribune Business, outlined the BISX-listed enti-
ty’s optimism that it would find it much easier to
launch new telecoms services as part of a ‘triple-
play’ value proposition to Bahamian consumers

SEE page 5B

“superior”

than BTC.
Cable Bahamas said

licence fee and charges to cover
the costs incurred by new sector
regulator, the Utilities Regula-
tion and Competition Authori-
ty (URCA), Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny said SRG would also
have to pay a contribution to
the Universal Service Fund
(USF) that will be created to
finance the provision of tele-
coms services to virtually all
Bahamian communities.

This, the SRG/IndiGo presi-
dent said, was likely to based
on a percentage of company
revenues, with the fourth and
final fee set to be a new “annu-

al government communications
fee”.

This, he added, was likely to
be a sum equivalent to 2 per
cent of a communications oper-
ator’s annual revenues, plus a
“currently unknown” radio
spectrum fee.

“There can be few businesses
that can sustain an overnight
increase in overhead that is a
minimum of 2 per cent of rev-
enue per annum, and potential-
ly far greater given the
unknown factors of the Univer-
sal Service Fund contribution
and the government radio spec-

Bahamian farms
at 10% capacity

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas needs “to identify priorities”
for new technology in its agriculture industry, a
report has urged, with those farmers still working
operating at 10 per cent of potential capacity and
the production of all sectors having declined
between 2005-2007.

The Inter-American Institute for Cooperation

on Agriculture’s (ICA) 2008 annual report con-
firmed that there had been a “continuous decline”
in the number of farms and farmers in the
Bahamas over the past 30 years, leaving agricul-
ture with less than 3 per cent of this nation’s per
annum gross domestic product (GDP).

The ICA report said: “The records show that

there has been a decline

ROYAL FIDELITY

aml

RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

in the number of farm-

SEE page 3B

Where do you want to be?

We can get you there!

BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801

Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

trum fee,” Mr Hutton-Ashken-
ny said.

“Moreover, the fact that the
fees are all paid annually in a
lump sum in the first four
months of the year serves to
add a further undue cash flow
burden on operators.”

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny urged
the Government and its BTC
privatisation committee advisers
to allow fees to be paid quar-
terly, and that there be “a tran-
sition period before operators
be burdened fully with addi-

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission:
from the daily report.



> Pension Plans

> Mutual Funds

> Stock Brokerage

> Corporate Finance

> Investment Management
> Trusts & Estate Planning

> Personal Pension Plan Accounts

> Education Investment Accounts

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





International Markets

FOREX Rates

Weekly
CAD$ 0.8608
GBP 1.6359
EUR 1.4041
Commodities

Weekly
Crude Oil $60.53
Gold $912.70

International Stock Market Indexes:

Weekly
DJIA 8,183.17
S & P500 882.68
NASDAQ 1,752.55
Nikkei 9,291.06



























% Change

-0.15
+0.18
+0.45



% Change
-7.77
-1.97

% Change
-1.18
-1.53
-2.45
-5.35

A World of
Choices














@ By Royal Fidelity Capital
Markets

LAST week, investors trad-
ed in six out of the 24 listed
securities, of which one
advanced, three declined and
two remained unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 9,022 shares
changed hands, representing a
decrease of 857 shares or 9 per
cent, compared to last week's
trading volume of 9,879 shares.

Focol Holdings (FCL) was
the volume leader this week

with 3,624 shares trading hands,
its stock falling by $0.01 to end
the week at $5.03.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) was the lead
advancer with 2,700 shares trad-
ing, its share price rising by
$0.05 to end the week at $1.82.

FamGuard Corporation
(FAM) was the lead decliner,
falling by $0.77 to end the week
at a new 52-week low of $6.99
on a volume of 1,000 shares.

BOND MARKET
No notes traded in the
Bahamian market last week.

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GET THERE. TOGETHER.

ST

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

J.S. Johnson Company (JSJ)
released its unaudited financial
results for the three months
ending March 31, 2009. JSJ
reported net income attribut-
able to equity holders of $1.6
million, down by $83,000 or 4.9
per cent compared to $1.7 mil-
lion in the 2008 first quarter.

Total income rose by
$722,000 or 11 per cent to $7.5
million, compared to $6.8 mil-
lion at the end of the 2008 first
quarter, while total expenses
increased by $428,000 or 9 per
cent to $5.1 million, compared
to $4.7 million in 2008.



Net premiums earned of $2.2
million decreased by $105,000
or 5 per cent in comparison to
2008, while insurance expenses
of $1.5 million decreased by
$154,000 or 10 per cent.

Income from commissions
and fees of $5.1 million
increased by $1.2 milliOn or 33
per cent quarter-over-quarter.
Earnings per share declined by
5 per cent to $0.20 versus $0.21
for the same three month peri-
od in 2008.

JSJ’s total assets and liabilities
stood at $80 million and $57
million respectively, compared
to $82 million and $60 million at
year-end 2008.

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 787.12 (-5.71%) YTD

BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $1.39 $- 0 -18.71%
BBL $0.63 $- 0 -4.55%
BOB $6.94 $- 0 -9.16%
BPF $11.00 $- 0 -6.78%
BSL $7.92 $- 0 -22.28%
BWL $3.15 $- 0 0.00%
CAB $11.39 $- 0 -18.82%
CBL $5.64 $- 528 -19.43%
CHL $2.74 $- 0 -3.18%
CIB $10.38 $- 0 -0.67%
CWCB — $2.97 $-0.14 1,000 32.00%
DHS $1.82 $0.05 2,700 -28.63%
FAM $6.99 $-0.77 1,000 -10.38%
FBB $2.37 $- 0 0.00%
EEE $0.30 $- 0 0.00%
FCL $5.03 $-0.01 3,624 -2.71%
FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%
FIN $10.90 $- 0 -8.17%
ICD $5.50 $- 170 -10.28%
JSJ $10.40 $- 0 -6.31%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%
DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

¢ J. S. Johnson (JSJ) has declared a dividend of $0.16 per
share, payable on July 15, 2009, to all shareholders of record date

July 8, 2009.

* Consolidated Water (CWCO) has declared a dividend of
$0.013 per share, payable on August 6, 2009, to all shareholders

of record date July 1, 2009.

¢ Abaco Markets (AML) announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at 6pm at
The Wyndam Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino, West Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of June
19, 2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting.

¢ Benchmark (Bahamas) (BBL) announced it will be holding
its Annual General Meeting on Thursday, July 23, 2009, at
6.30pm at the British Colonial Hilton, Governor's Ballroom, Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of June
23, 2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting.

Trl Estate

WOT OCCUR AMS TOMO ata Te ie

ee eT ie) LT





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 3B



Airport awards S21m
baggage system deal

The Nassau Airport Development
Company (NAD) has awarded a $21
million contract to supply a fully inte-
grated baggage handling, sortation and
explosive detection system at Lynden
Pindling International Airport (LPIA)
to New Zealand-owned company
Gildepath Group.

Due for completion in 2013, the Nas-
sau project is a three-stage greenfield
project, which will start with supply-
ing a new 55 counter check-in at the

Oil up

m@ By PABLO GORONDI
Associated Press Writer

Oil prices rose above $60 a barrel
on Monday, halting last week’s falling
trend, as investors turned to com-
modities for protection against a weak-
er dollar and after attacks on oil facil-
ities in Nigeria.

By midday in Europe, benchmark
crude for August delivery was up 13
cents to $60.02 a barrel in electronic
trading on the New York Mercantile
Exchange. On Friday, the contract fell
52 cents to settle at $59.89.

Earlier Monday, prices fell as low
as $58.88, as investors continued to fret
about global economic growth and

US Departures Terminal, the company
said in a statement yesterday.

The project will also involve an 1800
bag/hour inline explosive detection sys-
tem, bag-weight imaging system and
automated baggage sortation, with
three large carousels totalling 3,500
linear feet and some 300 drives.

The second stage includes three
inbound baggage claim systems for
international arrivals, and stage three
comprises a new International/Domes-

near S60 on weaker

crude demand.

The dollar was down against the
euro and the yen on Monday, luring
investors to commodities like oil and
gold as a hedge against the inflation
risks posed by a weaker dollar.

The euro rose to $1.3987 from 1.3936
on Friday, while the dollar was worth
92.26 Japanese yen, down from 92.34
yen late Friday in New York.

Prices have fallen $14 a barrel, or 19
per cent, since June 30 after poor
unemployment data from the US and
Europe sparked doubts that the global
economy was poised for a strong recov-
ery this year. “There’s been a shift in
market sentiment,” said Victor Shum,
an energy analyst with Purvin & Gertz

tic Terminal with 42 check-in counters
and 3,200 linear feet of baggage han-
dling, security and sortation systems
equipment.

Grumbling

While there is likely to be grumbling
in some quarters that NAD has award-
ed another contract to a foreign firm,
this one is for specialist technology and
equipment that only a few companies

in Singapore. “Earlier this year, there
was a lot of talk about green shoots.
Now the focus is on the green shoots
shriveling.”

Traders

Traders will be looking this week to
the first big batch of second quarter
corporate results for clues about eco-
nomic growth. Investors will also be
eyeing data on housing starts, retail
sales and industrial production.

“Expectations are that most compa-
nies are going to report poor results
and a conservative outlook,” Shum
said. “It’s not unreasonable to expect
crude prices to move down to the mid-

can provide.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
last week said that more than $10 mil-
lion has been spent locally on various
aspects of the design, engineering and
consultation of the airport redevelop-
ment project. More than $14.8 million in
construction contracts have been award-
ed to Bahamian firms. Mr Ingraham
said the terminal’s general contractor,
Ledcor, a Canadian firm, is planning
for 73 per cent of its labour require-

$50s over the coming days and weeks.”

Traders have been disappointed by
evidence of weak gasoline sales in the
US over the Independence Day holi-
day weekend of July 4, a time that usu-
ally marks the peak of gasoline
demand for the summer.

“The US summer driving season has
been a non-event for a second year in
a row,” Shum said.

In Nigeria, Africa’s largest crude
exporter, militants said they had
attacked an oil depot and loading
tankers in the country’s populous eco-
nomic center of Lagos.

The militants say they are fighting to
force the federal government to devote
more oil-industry funds to the southern

ments to be filled through local con-
tractors. Bahamian firms awarded major
contracts for the first stage of the project
include Reliable Fencing, Bahamas Hot
Mix, Basden Elevators, Woslee Con-
struction, Sentinel Drilling and Water
Works, TMC Engineering Ltd.

Approximately 40 contracts are
scheduled to be tendered in coming
months, including sub-contracts to the
terminal’s general contractor and direct
contracts with NAD.

dollar

region, which remains poor despite its
bounty of natural resources.

Attacks over the past years have cut
Nigeria’s oil output by about 25 per
cent.

In other Nymex trading, gasoline for
August delivery was down less than a
penny at $1.6502 a gallon and heating
oil dropped 0.58 cent to $1.5277. Nat-
ural gas for August delivery slid 4.4
cents to $3.329 per 1,000 cubic feet.

In London, Brent prices were up 31
cents to $60.83 a barrel on the ICE
Futures exchange.

¢ Associated Press writers Alex
Kennedy in Singapore and Bashir Adi-
gun in Abuja, Nigeria, contributed to
this report

Baha Mar seeks summary ruling against Harrah's Bahamian farms

FROM page 1B

fulfilled pursuant to the Harrah’s guarantee”.

The hearing, which Baha Mar wants scheduled
for August 11, 2009, will also ask the court to
“grant Baha Mar’s...... cross-motion for summa-
ry judgment on their first counterclaim/third
party claim for breach of contract and their
sixth-party claim for breach of guaranty.....”

Motions for summary judgment are often filed
in a bid to avoid a full trial on the substantive
issues, and Baha Mar’s move is likely to be a
response to Harrah’s filing of its own motion
for asummary judgment that was filed on May
27, 2009.

As for the specific clatms Baha Mar is seeking
summary judgment on, in its initial counterclaim
for breach of contract, it had alleged that in the
joint venture agreement Harrah’s had agreed
to commit some $212 million in equity to the pro-
ject for a 43 per cent stake.

However, Baha Mar alleged that Harrah’s
and Caesars Bahamas subsequently reneged on
their agreement despite Baha Mar having pre-
viously agreed a supplemental Heads of Agree-
ment with the Bahamian government on January

31, 2009. The Cable Beach resort developer
added that it had spent $85 million after the
joint venture agreement was signed, only for
the other side to breach it.

As for the guaranty, Baha Mar had alleged
that Harrah’s guaranteed Caesars Bahamas’
obligations up to an amount of $318 million,
including payment of the initial $212 million
capital contribution. Harrah’s, Baha Mar, is
alleging, is refusing to honour its obligations
under the guarantee.

In its cross-motion, Baha Mar is also seeking
the dismissal of Harrah’s rival summary judg-
ment motion and recovery of its costs and legal
fees.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice-presi-
dent for governmental and external affairs, con-
firmed yesterday he had known the company’s
attorneys were set to file the summary judg-
ment motion, although he was unaware of the
details.

While waiting for the New York court pro-
ceedings to be resolved, Baha Mar is “continuing
to work” on replacing Harrah’s with the China
Export-Import Bank and China State Con-
struction, the two sides having signed a Memo-
randum of Understanding (MoU) earlier this

year.

Mr Sands told Tribune Business that the time-
frame for the Chinese to complete their neces-
sary due diligence on Baha Mar and sign a more
formal deal with the Cable Beach developer
had not altered from 2009 year-end.

“They continue to do their due diligence,” he
said of the two Chinese state-owned entities.
“We don’t have a timeline, but we still seem to
be taking baby steps forward.

“They have their whole shopping list of items
required for such a project, and there have been
multiple visits of delegations looking at the pro-
ject and looking at the Bahamas as a tourist des-
tination. Delegations have been here from Chi-
na in the last month. Multiple delegations have
been visiting the destination from time to time.”

Chinese delegations had featured profession-
als ranging from interior designers to suppliers,
and Mr Sands added: “We always said it would
take at least until the end of this year, and noth-
ing has changed from that timetable. Some of the
paperwork will take us at least until the end of
the year.”

China State Construction is being eyed as the
equity and construction partner, while the Chi-
na Ex-Im Bank will provide the financing.

FROM page 1B

ers in the Bahamas from 36,246 in 1978 top 20,336 in
1994, and in 2000 it was estimated that those in pro-
duction are at just 10 per cent capacity.

“Those producing have less than 10 acres of farm-
land, and the average age was approximately 59
years-old.”

Drawing on recent data, the IICA said there had
been “a slight decline in output for the major sub-sec-
tors of fish and crops” between 2005-2007, while
poultry, red meats and ornamentals had slightly
increases. Exports were down, while the value of
products consumed in the Bahamas had risen slight-
ly.
Fisheries exports fell from $97.62 million in 2005 to
$96.477 million in 2006, and dropped by a further $5.3
million to $91.175 million in 2007. Crop exports also
fell, down from $44.96 million in 2006 to $42.006
million in 2007.

Poultry output, though, increases from just over
$16 million in 2005 and 2006 to $18.766 million in
2007, with red meats breaching the $1 million mark
that year after standing at $925,450 and $918,620 in
2005 and 2006 respectively.

Ornamental production rose from $8 million to
$9.711 million between 2006 and 2007.

Asian markets extend slide

@ By JEREMIAH MARQUEZ
AP Business Writer

HONG KONG (AP) —
Asian markets extended their
slide Monday as hopes for a
strong economic turnaround
continued to fade amid new
political uncertainty in Japan
and worries over earnings
results from major US compa-
nies. European markets were
little changed in early trade.

Every major across Asia mar-
ket dropped, with Japan’s index
racking up its ninth straight loss
as the country’s embattled
prime minister moved to dis-
solve parliament and call gen-
eral elections for next month.
Oil prices resumed their two
week sell-off to fall toward $59
a barrel.

Renewed anxiety about the
pace of recovery in the world
economy has kept stocks from
rallying further after huge gains
between March and June.

Investors are now looking to
second-quarter corporate earn-
ings and profit outlooks for the
year, to be issued in the coming
weeks, for guidance about the
economy’s prospects. This week
brings results from US bell-
wethers like Citigroup Inc., Intel
Corp. and General Electric Co.

Unless corporate profits and
major economies show more
evidence of healing, markets
could be hard pressed to move
higher for now.

“Most people are fairly cau-
tious, they think it’s been a bit
too much too soon,” said Daniel
McCormack, a strategist for
Macquarie Securities in Hong
Kong. “If economic data does-
n't keep improving we could
continue to drift off from here.”

European shares opened low-
er before recouping their losses

to trade mostly sideways, with
Britain’s FTSE up 0.1 per cent,
Germany’s DAX gaining 0.2
per cent and France’s CAC 40
flat. Wall Street futures pointed
to more losses on Monday.
Dow futures were down 30, or
0.4 per cent, at 8,055 and S&P
futures fell 3.1, or 0.4 per cent,
at 871.20.

In Japan, the Nikkei 225
stock average tumbled 236.95
points, or 2.6 per cent, to
9,050.33.

Tokyo’s market opened low-
er, but selling accelerated in the
afternoon amid reports that
Prime Minister Taro Aso will
likely dissolve the powerful low-
er house next week and that
national elections would take
place August 30.

That nearly six-week gap was
too long for comfort, analysts
said.

“Japan will essentially be
without a government during
that time,” said Masayoshi
Okamoto, head of dealing at
Jujiya Securities in Tokyo. “So
investors are trimming their
holdings as a precaution against
the political vacuum. If some-
thing happens, the country may
not be able to immediately
respond.”

Hong Kong’s Hang Seng
shed 453.79, or 2.6 per cent, to
17254.63, while South Korea’s
Kospi dived 3.5 per cent to
1,378.12.

Elsewhere, Taiwan’s market
dropped 3.5 per cent as
investors worried that a partial
free trade agreement with main-
land China would be delayed
until next year.

Australia’s index lost 1.5 per
cent and India’s benchmark was
down 1.7 per cent. Shanghai’s
main stock measure lost 1.1 per
cent.

Trade on Wall Street Friday
was uninspiring amid jitters
about earnings and as a survey
showed US consumer confi-
dence falling to its lowest level
since March.

Few expect companies to
shine in the April-June quarter.
Analysts polled by Thomson
Financial forecast that S&P 500
companies’ earnings dropped
an average 35.5 per cent in the
period from a year earlier after
falling the same amount in the
first quarter.

Instead, many investors will
be eying company forecasts to
help determine whether hopes
for a faster rebound in eco-
nomic growth, as reflected in
prices from the spring rally, are
justified or overwrought.

The Dow fell 36.65, or 0.5 per
cent, to 8,146.52, the lowest
close for the blue chips since
April 28.

The broader S&P 500 index
lost 3.55, or 0.4 per cent, to
879.13, while the Nasdaq com-
posite index rose 3.48, or 0.2
per cent, to 1,756.03.

Oil prices slid in Asia trade,
with benchmark crude for
August delivery down 58 cents
to $59.31 a barrel. The contract
fell 52 cents to settle at $59.89.

The dollar weakened to 92.29
yen from 92.43 yen, while the
euro traded slightly lower at
$1.3937 from $1.3944.

¢ AP Writer Tomoko A.
Hosaka contributed to this
report from Toyko

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



1959-2009 PSS

The Bahamas National Trust

Past, Present and Future

Thoughts from the 1958 Exuma Expedition Leader

Special Presentation:

G. Carleton Ray, PhD. Research Professor
Department of Environmental Sciences
University of Virginia

Date: Wednesday, July 15
Time: 7:00 pm SHARP!
Piace: Nassau Yacht Club, East Bay Street

BNT and NYC members FREE
General Public $2

For more information call: 393-1317
Email: bnt@bnt.bs * www.bnt.bs





PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Solomon’s Mines close two sections
in the Bay Street anchor store

FROM page 1B

that Solomon’s Mines has been
unable to meet payroll on time,
leaving them out of pocket and
struggling to meet their own
financial obligations.

The chain, which was
acquired by well-known entre-
preneur Sir Garet “Tiger’ Fin-
layson’ in 2004 from Solomon
Brothers and Martin Solomon,
has been in downsizing mode
for several years now, having
previously closed its flagship
Mall at Marathon store and

retreated from Caves Village
out west.

Now, the continued presence
of its flagship store on Bay
Street appears to be in jeop-
ardy, with the closure of two
sections indicating it is suffer-
ing from major inventory/stock
shortages. Solomon’s Mines and
its brands also appear to be
retreating from another luxury
goods hot spot, namely Paradise
Island’s Marina Village and the
Atlantis Crystal Court.

Sir Garet acquired Solomon’s
Mines with the help of a syndi-

cated loan put together by Bank
of the Bahamas International,
additional financing from Sco-
tiabank, and the payment they
received from Commonwealth
Brewery/Heineken for relin-
quishing Board and manage-
ment control at Burns House.

Sources

Financial sources have sub-
sequently told Tribune Business
that the acquisition financing
was re-financed by Citibank,
with the Finlayson family’s

stake in Associated Bahamian
Distillers and Brewers
(ABDAB) used as part-collat-
eral. ABDAB holds their stakes
in Burns House and Common-
wealth Brewery.

While Solomon’s Mines prob-
lems have undoubtedly been
exacerbated by the global reces-
sion and tourism downturn,
observers have suggested it was
already in trouble as a result of
expanding too rapidly in the
aftermath of the 2004 acquisi-
tion - growth that proved unsus-
tainable. Some 40-50 per cent

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00










NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ADELINE LOUIS of BURIAL
GROUND CORNER, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 7" day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MOMENTS IN TIME
CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HENBIT VALLFEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Boney at Work

S2wk-Low
1.28
10.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.99
10.00
10.35
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.40
10.00

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

1.39
11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

2.37
11.39
2.74
5.64
2.97
1.82
6.99
10.90
10.38
5.03
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.40
10.00
S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Securit
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

11.00

11.39

10.90
10.38

10.40
10.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Last Sale
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, KIEARAH ELIZABETH
DIEUJUSTE of #1 Faith Avenue, P.O. BOX N-1530,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to KIEARAH
ELIZABETH DIEUJUSTE-MCKAY. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAMBOR INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HIGH GLOW VISION LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Cah 1

€

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 13 JULY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,572.93] CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -139.43 | YTD % -8.14
FINDEX: CLOSE 787.12 | YTD -5.72% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

clare L. â„¢ Ts

EPS $
0.127
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.1
0.249 11.0
0.419
0.111
0.240

Div $ P/E
10.9
11.1
28.4
N/M

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.39

6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.64
2.97
1.82

13.5
26.8
7.6
6.99 0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180
ases)
Interest
7%
Prime + 1.75%
T%
Prime + 1.75%

16.6
33.9
13.1
15.2
N/M
8.6

5.03
1.00
0.30
5.50 13.5
10.9
55.6

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00 2

Daily Vol. Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

S52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $

8.42
6.25
0.40

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E
N/M
N/M

256.6

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

ABDAB
RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

31.59

0.55

29.00
0.55

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

NAV
1.3860
2.8952
1.4763
3.1031

12.9209
100.5448
93.1992
1.0000
9.2765
1.0578
1.0271
1.0554

1.3231
2.8952
1.4019
3.1031
12.2702
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Incorne Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

YTD%

2.40

-1.52

2.97

-8.35

2.40

-0.02
-3.33

0.00
2.00
2.13

-0.57

1.74

Last 12 Months
4.75
-3.18
5.30
-13.82
5.79

Div S$ Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
3-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
31-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07

0.54
-6.76
0.00
-2.98
5.78
2.71
5.54

30-Jun-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

MARKET TERMS

ing price in last 52 weeks
last 52 weeks
ighted price for daily volume
hted price for daily volume
rom day to day
r of total shares traded today

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Col

Last Price - Last traded

Weekly Vol. -
EPS $ - A compa
NAV - Net Asset Value

Trading volume of the prior week
reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.

of its staff complement are
already understood to have
been laid off.

Last month, Mark Finlayson,
Solomon’s Mines managing
director, appeared in court for
non-payment of National Insur-
ance Board (NIB) contributions
in the amount of $377,092. He
pled guilty and assured the mag-
istrate that he would work out
payment arrangements with
NIB.

Tribune Business has left
phone messages for Mr Fin-
layson over several days, none
of which have been returned.
When asked if he might return
the calls, one employee said yes-
terday: "Long shot."

Mr Finlayson told Tribune
Business earlier this year that
business levels at Solomon’s
Mines were down 30-50 per
cent depending on the month.

Labour Minister Dion

Foulkes said recently that he
and his officers had undertaken
an investigations into the alle-
gations of unpaid pay cheques
for Solomon’s Mines.

"Notwithstanding a drop in
income, he [Mr Finlayson] is
attempting to maintain as much
staff on payroll as possible,
which the government com-
mends," Mr Foulkes said. “We
will make inquiries and we will
see.”

Mr Finlayson said recently
that staff have sometimes been
paid late, but they are eventu-
ally paid.

He admitted that that the
company has been going
through difficult times, but
asserted: “We are not the only
ones in the luxury goods area
who are going through tough
times. We are not the only ones
who are paying people some-
times later than they should.”

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. If so, call us on
322-1986 and share your
story.

NOTICE

TRINAD LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) TRINAD LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business

Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 6th July, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Manex Limited,
The Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets,

Nassau, Bahamas

Dated this 14th day of July, A. D. 2009



Manex Limited
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NUVILLY HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GIANT STEPS
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnin gs
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 5B



I = 0.—)) =~
‘Undue burden’ fears over
new communications fees

FROM page 1B

tional fee to which they have previ-
ously not been subjected”.

“SRG respectfully states its view
that, in the absence of controls or
access restrictions being placed upon
services offered by foreign Voice over
the Internet operators, Bahamian oper-
ators offering competing services
should have those revenues exempt
from any form of fee,” the SRG presi-
dent said.

SRG’s position was backed to a large
extent by Digicel, the cellular operator
that has been chomping at the bit for
several years to enter this market in
the Bahamas, given that it has quickly
established a large presence through-
out the region.

In its response, Digicel described as
“best regulatory practice” the levying
of fees on communications providers to

“cover only the reasonable and trans-
parent administrative costs efficiently
incurred by the regulator”.

It had particular concern over the
proposals to charge Bahamas-based
communications business licence fees
and communications fees licence,
describing them as “special taxes”. Giv-
en that the Bahamas had no income
or corporate taxes, Digicel argued that
“special taxes can only be justified to
the extent that they apply proportion-
ately to all businesses in the Bahamas”.

And the cellular operator added: “It
seems to us that the communications
fees licence may be an additional bur-
den not matched elsewhere in industry
in the Bahamas.

“Tf this is correct, then it would be
unreasonable to impose such a fee as it
would discourage investment and
unfairly penalise any communications
company that does invest or operates
currently in the country.

“From our recent survey of 16 coun-

tries, we found that the per capita
resultant costs imposed in the
Caribbean compared to other coun-
tries vary over a huge range - from the
more expensive (more than double)
to the enormously more expensive
(nearly 100 times more.”

Digicel said its Caribbean experi-
ence had generally shown that “little if
any attention” had been given by reg-
ulators to minimising their costs, as
these were ultimately passed on to the
industry and consumers. The result was
that regulatory costs could act as a bar-
rier to new market entrants/competi-
tion, and cause a “cash drain that
weakens competition”.

None of this, though, appeared to
cut much ice with the BTC privatisa-
tion committee and its advisers. In its
response, the committee said licensees
had the burden of proving their annu-
al turnover, and it pledged that URCA
would be objective in levying its regu-
latory fees.

The committee added that URCA
would also have an annual Budget that
was published, with its financial state-
ments also audited by external auditors
and published.

And it defended the communica-
tions fee and business licence fee by
pointing out that they were levied
under different pieces of legislation,
with other industries also facing sector-
specific taxes and fees.

“To waive licence fees for any entity,
including not-for-profit companies,
would potentially lead to a distortion in
the market and possible use of such
entities to avoid licence fees,” the com-
mittee said, adding that URCA had to
levy fees on a non-discriminatory basis.

Elsewhere, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
also expressed concern on SRG’s
behalf that while the draft legislation
for the new communications sector
regulatory regime had been reviewed
by the industry prior to its passage
through Parliament, the Communica-

tions Sector Policy document had not
been made available.

He described this as a “serious omis-
sion” that meant industry players were
unable to examine the Government’s
proposals for the communications sec-
tor in their entirety, as the policy doc-
ument worked ‘hand-in-glove’ with the
legislation - much like under the exist-
ing telecommunications regulatory
regime.

“For the sake of completeness, we
should also point out that the sector
policy referred to in the Bill must be a
distinct policy document for the
planned communications sector, as
opposed to the current telecommuni-
cations sector,” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
said.

“Failure to make such a distinction
would mean that the introduction of
the new sector policy would have the
effect of replacing the existing
Telecommunications Act, and lead toa
litany of regulatory complaints.”

Cable: We’re ‘superior’ to BTC over Internet

FROM page 1B

its Internet penetration had
risen from 43 per cent at year-
end 2005 to 56 per cent at year-
end 2008, and that it had “a
more than comfortable lead
over BTC and clearly provides a
superior product”.

Drawing on 2006 statistics,
the last year for which compar-
ative figures are available as
BTC has not released annual
reports for 2007 and 2008, the
Cable Bahamas offering docu-
ment said the state-owned car-
rier then had 14,477 DSL sub-
scribers who generated $5.8 mil-
lion in annual revenues, for an
ARPU of $33.38.

Cable Bahamas, though, at
the same point in 2006 had
35,529 residential Internet sub-
scribers - “nearly 2.5 times
more” - at an ARPU that was
59 per cent higher. Residential
subscribers accounted for 87 per
cent of Cable Bahamas’ 2008
Internet revenues.

Much of Cable Bahamas’

future growth is linked to its
ability to expand into new mar-
kets, especially fixed-line and
cellular telecoms, ambitions it
makes no attempt to hide.
While it could enter the former
market by making good on its
option to purchase IndiGo Net-
works, it would need to obtain a
cellular licence from the Gov-
ernment.

Several observers suggested
yesterday that this was unlikely
to be a problem, pointing out
that the Government would
have an effective ‘conflict of
interest’ when it came to regu-
latory issues affecting Cable
Bahamas because of its share-
holdings in the company.

When Columbus Communi-
cations’ 30.2 per cent stake is
bought out, the National Insur-
ance Board (NIB) and the
Treasury will be the two largest’
Cable Bahamas’ shareholders.
One source told Tribune Busi-
ness that once the buy out is
completed, NIB will have a
22.069 per cent stake and the
Treasury a 7.16 per cent stake, a

To advertise in Zhe Tritune -
a AS ETT

29.22 per cent combined share-
holding that will be almost as
large as Columbus Communi-
cations’ present holding.

As a result, the source sug-
gested future telecoms licences
for Cable Bahamas were unlike-
ly to be a problem because the
Government would not want to
damage its holdings in the com-
pany. The irony is that the Gov-
ernment, as it exits its majority
stake in BTC through selling 51
per cent via privatisation, is
simultaneously becoming the
largest shareholder in its main
competitor.

Columbus Communications,
through the $80 million pur-
chase price it will receive, is set
to enjoy a 45 per cent or $25
million appreciation on the val-
ue of its investment in four
years, having bought in for $55
million in 2005.

In addition, the source sug-
gested the management agree-
ment reached with Cable
Bahamas would allow Colum-
bus Communications to “have
its cake and eat it, too”.

It appears that the manage-
ment fees Columbus Commu-
nications will earn will be more
than the $1.429 million in divi-
dends it received from the
BISX-listed company in 2008.

Columbus will receive a flat
annual fee of $1.4 million, plus
an incentive fee based on
achieving a targeted percentage
of Cable Bahamas’ operating

munications can earn is $2.52
million.

As for BTC’s ability to com-
pete head-to-head with Cable
Bahamas in the provision of
cable services, assuming it
obtained such a licence, the lat-
ter said experience had shown
that “expansion by cable com-
panies into voice services has
been better from a return on

invested capital and margin con-
tribution basis than expansion
by telecommunication compa-
nies into video services”.

In addition, BTC would post-
privatisation be forced to “make
significant capital investments”
to improve its telecoms infra-
structure, while Cable Bahamas’
$230 million fibre optic network
was already in place.

Stating that “it is highly
unlikely that a new entrant in
video or Internet services could
unseat Cable Bahamas as the
leading provider for these ser-
vices”, the offering document
said it could “roll out very
quickly” telephony products
and “rapidly absorb” them into
its network via a triple-play
offering.

BRFG @ Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd
POSITION AVAILABLE:

Client Relationship Officer for International Bank

Applicants must have demonstrated experience and ability to develop new
business for non-resident, high net-worth market.

REQUIREMENTS:

Excellent knowledge of private banking products and services; fluency in Eng-
lish, French and any other language skills would be an asset; 15 years’ private
banking; knowledge of Bahamian regulatory requirements; university degree and/
or related professional designation.

DUTIES:

Marketing of private banking and portfolio management services; extensive
traveling; acquisition and development of new clients.

Compensation will be commensurate with experience.

IR) rere ya CTE

income. Yet the performance
fee is capped at 80 per cent of
the base fee, meaning the max-
imum this will be in any one
year is $1.12 million. As a result,
the maximum Columbus Com-

Interested applicants must submit applications to: Human Resources
Manager, (Re: Client Relationship Position), PO. Box SS 6289, Nassau,
Bahamas, by 20th July, 2009 or fax to (242) 502-5428.



JOB ADVERTISEMENT

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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







B

The Tribune

oD YY ity

ea





ith



LOCAL entrepreneur Pauline Zonicle is among a growing number of Bahamians who not only use the Noni
juice as a health supplement, but has also began manufacturing her own blend.















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NONI JUICE

The miracle ina bottle

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

NONI juice, it’s called the healing fruit in a
bottle said to prevent and cure anything from the
common cold to high blood pressure.

Scientifically known as Morinda-Citrifolia, the
Noni fruit is found in several tropical regions
throughout the world including Tahiti, Guyana,
Suriname, Brazil, and the Bahamas.

Embraced as a naturopathic
medication, the fruit is com-
monly transformed into a liq-
uid form and then comple-
mented with sweeteners or
juices for oral consumption.

With many Bahamians
affected by chronic diseases
like diabetes, hypertension, or
various forms of cancer, it is
not difficult to understand why
so many are looking at the
Noni as their ‘miracle in a bot-
tle.’

According to one local med-
ical practitioner, the healing
potential of the Noni fruit has
long been discovered and dates
back hundred of years.

Dr Michael Ingraham - a
medical doctor and practicing
naturologist (a doctor of alter-
native medicines) for the past
28 years - from General Nutri-
tion Centre, said that over that
last few hundred years the
Noni tree and fruit have been
cultivated and harvested as a
medicinal product.

He explained: “It has been
proven that the fruit basically
helped to regulate metabolism

hypoglycemic or hyper-
glycemic.

“It works through the
immune system also, it helps
to upgrade certain immune
functions, and basically it has
so many functions.”

Dr Ingraham said the fruit
also posses antioxidants which
helps with slowing down the
aging process, along with sev-
eral other purposes.

He said in his experience
most people who suffer from
diabetes have benefited from
using the product, and thus it
continues to grown in popular-
ity locally.

This is why many like entre-
preneur Pauline Zonicle have
began to manufacture their
own Noni juice.

With her product NoniLand -
a 100 per cent Noni juice - debut-
ing at a number of local health
stores last week, she said she
envisions nothing but success.

“In 2001 I traveled to Cat
Island to visit my uncle Charles
Zonicle who I saw looked very
young and vibrant at the time,
he was 79. I asked him whether

was not hypertensive, he did
not wear glasses, and his reason
for being in such good health
he said was because of his dai-
ly Noni intake.”

She said for 5 years, she too
started drinking the product,
and almost overnight she start-
ed to see change in her own
body- her menstrual cycle
became regulated, her nightly
sinus congestions no longer
existed, and her energy level
was at an all time high.

She has also dropped from a
size 12 to 6 dress size, and says
it’s all because of the Noni
juice.

Also standing behind the
claims that the Noni fruit is a
healing product is local Tahit-
ian Noni distributor Stephen
St Clair-Serrette.

He said after first being
introduced to the Noni juice
several years ago, he has seen a
dramatic change in his health.

He explained several years
ago he suffered from a fall that
ended in a large bump on his
head and under the advice of
doctors left it alone.

However, after he had start-
ed taking the Noni juice, the
bump slowly transformed to a
“mega zit forming a head”, and
was later extracted where
before it had no head and was
hardened.

He said had it not been for
the Noni, he would still have
that bump.

Although there is still signif-
icant research required to
assert Noni as a standard heal-
ing product, its popularity con-

of sugars, and is especially he had any health problems, _ tinues to evolve in the form of

helpful for people with sugar and he said he had none. )
“He had all of his teeth, he —_ lotions.

imbalances, those who are

capsules, mixtures, and even

Botox: The anti-ager

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

FOR centuries women have been trying to
stop the aging process in its tracks and to assist
in their efforts, medical professionals discov-
ered the power of a substance that can assist in
reshaping the aging process- Botox.

According to beauty.ivillage.com, as you age,
your skin gets thinner and dryer.

“Collagen and elastin-the networks of fibers
that make your skin firm and elastic -- become
disconnected, leading to sagging and wrinkles.
Your cells simply slow down: New skin cells
don't grow as quickly and dead cells don't shed
as quickly, resulting in dull, grayish skin.”

Dr Michelle Eccles-Major has been doing
Botox injections for three years and has been
interested in it for quite some time.

“T became interested in Botox a couple of
years before I actually started doing it after
attending a dental conference in San Francis-
co. The dentist who presented the lecture was
explaining the uses within a dental practice. Bot-
ulinum toxin is a medication and a neurotoxic
protein produced by the bacterium Clostridium
botulinum and sold commercially under the
name Botox,” Dr Major said.

Dr Major explained the procedure.

“A very thin needle is used to give Botox and
it is usually given in the forehead, the glabellar
area; right above the nose, and the crows feet;
the outside the corner of the eye. Also botox can
be used in persons who suffer from migraines to
alleviate the pain,” Dr Major said.

As with all medical procedures, there are pos-

itive and negative things that can come out of
this procedure.

“The good effects from Botox are that people
can have a nice smooth appearance without hav-
ing plastic surgery. A large majority of the wrin-
kles in the treated site are removed. The down-
side is that it needs to be repeated every 4-5
months,” Dr Major said.

All of Dr Major’s of the patients are over the
age of 40 and she has seen an increase in persons
becoming more aware of the procedure.

“The interest to Botox has definitely increased
over the years, more persons are interested in
how it is done and if there are any harmful
effects. Also how often you need to repeat the
procedure. Also there are certain patients that
come regularly and have the injections done
and are very happy with the results,” Dr Major
said.

Dr Major said the patients who do Botox usu-
ally want that smooth look where the wrinkles
have been removed which gives them a younger
looking appearance.

“The persons that I would recommend for
Botox would be mid 30's to early 50's. It can be
done on persons out of this range but I evaluate
those on a case by case basis,” Dr Major said.

As for the future of Botox in the Bahamas, Dr
Major said she thinks it has a great future
because a lot of persons want a new look without
the surgery and the cost involved.

“T really enjoy doing Botox especially when
patients call back stating how pleased they are
with the results. Very little discomfort for real-
ly nice results. The best thing about Botox is
that it gives you a younger, smoother appearance
without having to do surgery.”

“A very thin
needle is

used to give
Botox and it is
Uist] Vaan
in the fore-
head, the
glabellar area;
right above the
nose, and the
crows feet:

the outside

the corner
oleae ee

— Dr Michelle
Eccles-Major





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 11B





(GY LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

Sex and the net

As we wind down from
thinking about being single
and dating we feel an
urgency to open a discus-
sion on ‘Sex and the Net.' It
would be hard not to
acknowledge the massive
Internet explosion over the



last twenty years and the increase of interest in sex that it has
brought. Human sexuality, and in particular the non biologi-
cal areas, continues to lag behind in research funding and
because of this, we still do not have adequate objective data
of the effects of the Internet on society.

However, few would disagree that the
Internet has highlighted people's fasci-
nation with anything to do with sex. This
fascination is not new but a reflection
of society's natural curiosity and need
for personal expression. For those of us
working in the human sexuality field,
this only confirms that many people are
still uncomfortable talking about sex. It
is still much easier for most people to
talk about love and romance but there
still remains a veil of shame and humili-
ation when discussing sex. Online sexu-
al activity, however, allows us to set aside
our shyness and provides a certain
amount of anonymity which then allows
many to explore and satisfy their curios-
ity.

To discriminatingly decry all online
sexual activity use as deviant, exploitive
and degrading of woman and children
would be to ignore its huge supportive
and educational use. The Internet has

the ability to join people and bypass bar-
riers such as: gender, physical appear-
ances, race, disabilities and ultimately
establishes online communities.

Individuals who feel lonely or isolated
due to a particular sexual minority or
sexual difficulty may find an under-
standing lacking in their outer life. Sup-
port sites for gays, rape survivors, herpes
sufferers, paraplegics to name a few, help
people psychologically by bringing them
information from people in similar situ-
ations. It has allowed people of differing
socioeconomic groups to communicate
and find a commonality which otherwise
they may not have found.

Educational sites allocated to provid-
ing information on contraception, sexu-
ally transmitted diseases and many med-
ical concerns enable people and adoles-
cents in particular, to feel more com-
fortable getting information. A lot of
our work as clinicians, and in particular

sex therapists, is to find a healthy balance
so that a person's online life does not
become so satisfying that they withdraw
or escape from trying to resolve their
problems in their real life.

Now that we have discussed some of
the pluses it would be unreasonable and
also neglectful not to discuss some of
the real perils of sex on the net. As a
result of the anonymity, the speed at
which we are able to communicate and
the huge number of money making com-
mercial sex sites, people who already
have a known compulsive personality
find the Internet incredibly addictive.
What we also Know is that it is a venue
for persons who have unresolved sexual
difficulties to act out or in fact repeat
old traumatic experiences. It is also not
unusual as sex therapists to see individ-
uals and couples presenting with rela-
tionship problems because of online sex-
ual activity.

For many affected partners any use is
unacceptable but for others pornogra-
phy may be tolerated but chat rooms
and cybersex is unacceptable. Cybersex
is defined as sexually satisfying commu-
nication, often with graphic pictures, sex-
ual chat or emails. It may even lead to
‘cybering’ which is mutual or one sided
masturbation while still online. As sex
therapist we assess the primary rela-
tionship and on many occasions we find
the online sexual activity is the result
not the cause of an intimacy problem
with in the couple. With reassurance and
the careful steering of a therapist many
situations can be successfully rectified.

For women the continued harassment
of explicit and demeaning emails and

texts only adds to other forms of societal
pressure and intimidation. Unfortunate-
ly, because our children have become
more knowledgeable than us on the net
they are now entering areas of the adult
world without our knowledge. Their
young age, immaturity and susceptibili-
ty to be persuaded only helps to feed
the dangerous minds of some compulsive
natures.

So what can we do? Ban all use of the
Internet? For many this is not necessary.
The first step is to move the computer so
that the screen can be viewed by others
in the house. Of course this becomes
even more difficult when some one is
living alone. Then consider installing
cyber screening software, tracking soft-
ware and, change to a pre-filtering ser-
vice provider. The next step is then to get
professional help. Assessment can then
be made to see what type of problem
exists and an individual treatment plan
can be designed. As with any other sex-
ual problems early intervention is rec-
ommended as problems that have been
left unattended take a longer time to
treat. Ultimately, the Internet is here to
stay so it is important to become proac-
tive in establishing a safer and more pro-
ductive cyber world for the future.

eMargaret Bain is an Individual and
Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a
Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical
Sex Therapist. Call for an appointment-
Relate Bahamas at 364- 7230, or email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com orwww.relate-
bahamas.blogspot.com. She is also avail-
able for speaking engagements.





Sunscreen and
hyper-pigmented
skin

JUST as any brightening
regimen must be approached
with diligence to experience
results, daily use of sun pro-
tection is just as imperative.

Even the strictest of bright-
ening regimens can be coun-
teracted by minimal exposure
to UV light. When a hyper-
pigmented area is exposed to
UV light, more melanin pro-
duction is triggered on a cel-
lular level, causing further
darkening. Ironically, this
production of melanin is just
your skin trying to protect
itself from damaging UV
light.

Daily application of SPF
will help shield skin from UV
light to control melanin pro-
duction on a cellular level. It
can even help lessen the
appearance of hyperpigmen-
tation triggered by hormone
fluctuations (such as melas-
ma) or post-inflammatory
hyperpigmentation (scarring).

your

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps you
are raising funds for a good
cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or

ONLINE sexual activity allows us to set
aside our shyness and provides a certain
amount of anonymity which then allows
many to explore and satisfy their curiosity.

have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.



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PAGE 12B, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





How to help your geriatric or senior

dog live a longer and happier life

TODAY, in The Bahamas dogs are
living much longer than they did twen-
ty years ago.

The reasons being:

I. There are many advances in vet-
erinary medicine.

2. There is better nutrition in the
commercial foods.

3.The Bahamian public has become
more educated and responsible about
the correct care of dogs.

A senior or geriatric dog refers to an
older dog that has a body that is declin-
ing with regards to effective functioning
because of the aging process. Dogs age
at different rates and this is dependent
to a large degree upon an individual
animal genetics. Big dogs tend to age
more quickly than small dogs. Breeds
like Great Danes are old at 5-7 years;
German Shepherds are old at 8-10
years. Small breeds like poodles and
SHIH-TZUS live up to 14 years. But
just like their owners, signs of aging
are extremely variable. The better care
a dog receives throughout his life, the
longer he can be expected to live. Stray
dogs usually do not have the same ben-
efits of owned pets and hence rarely
live to experience geriatrics because
they die young, usually from a combi-
nation of diseases, malnutrition and
trauma.

However, canine longevity means
owners are faced with more issues than
ever before. Elderly dogs are less
active, sleep more and may become
forgetful. They are not able to with-



stand extremes of temperature as well
as younger dogs as they lose muscle
tone.

Typically, the thighs and forelimbs
become thinner, while the neck and
body thicken and the abdomen sags.
Exertion may result in tremors of
fatigue. Joint pain from arthritis is a
common complaint and often slows the
dog down. They become cranky and
less tolerant of changes in routine. The
dog’s senses tend to dwindle with age,
which can be upsetting to your pet
when he can’t see, smell or hear the
way he used to.

They suffer some degree of dental
problems and may lose weight due to
pain when eating or due to other prob-
lems. But geriatric dogs usually suffer
from obesity from eating more than
they need and exercising less, and in
fact, obesity tends to shorten the life
span.

Old dogs may have problems with
irregularity (constipation), may suffer
from senility and often their house
training become less reliable. When

activity declines, so does the normal
wear of toe nails, which may seem to
grow faster.

The old dog’s health becomes more
fragile because the immune system’s
competency is also affected with age.
Old dogs get sicker and recover more
slowly than healthy young dogs. It is

vital to prevent prompt veterinary
attention to keep old dogs healthy.

One must recognise that dogs age
more rapidly than humans. After age
three, each canine year is roughly
equivalent to 5 human years. A chart
below compares a dog’s age to that of
a human.

Age of Dog Human Age

1yr 15 yrs
(Adolescent)
2 yrs 20 yrs
3 yrs 25 yrs
5 yrs 35 yrs
8 yrs 50 yrs
10 yrs 60 yrs
15 yrs 85 yrs

A number of diseases or conditions
typically affect geriatric canines. Renal
failure is probably the most common
cause of death in aged dogs. Kidneys
first seem to wear out more quickly
than other organs. Heart disease is
another consequence of canine aging,

because that muscle tends to weaken
after a lifetime of use. Bladder infec-
tions are a common problem. The risk
of cancer increases as the dog ages.

Cataracts, glaucoma or dry eye are
common eye problems. Intact males
may develop prostrate problems.
Elderly dogs may not tolerate hospi-
talisation that separates them from
their owners very well though, and in
these cases your veterinarian may show
you how to treat your dog at home.

Proper nutrition is vital to the old
dog’s health. Senior formulations of
commercial diets are available for the
special need of older dogs. Often, old-
er dogs do best on food that is easily
digested and/or chewed.

Most dogs can live comfortably and
happily into old age, but some envi-
ronmental modifications around your
home may help. If stair steps are a
problem provide a ramp. Move sleep-
ing quarters to a warm cozy spot. Dai-
ly or bi weekly grooming keeps your
dog looking and feeling good and also
provides an opportunity to find prob-
lems early. Give your old dog lots of
attention and understanding because
he has given you the best times of your
life, and you can now be his comfort
and friend during his golden years. It is
wise to encourage moderate exercise
that will keep him fit and limber longer
and make the last years of his life more
comfortable and enjoyable for you
both.

@x GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack

A Bahamian apple

I HAVE been writing The Green
Scene for The Tribune for over 20 years
but I have never addressed the subject
of apples. Let me redress that situa-
tion.

One of the most popular low-chill
apples in Florida, Texas and Southern
California is a semi-dwarf variety called
Dorsett Golden. I was introduced to
Dorsett Golden by my old friend
André Albury, owner of Wonderland
Nursery in Marsh Harbour. He has sev-
eral plants, but they are for his own
use, not for sale. I have watched them
from their pink flowering stage through
to mid maturity and I am looking for-
ward to tasting one soon.

Being Bahamian, I am not familiar
with apple culture and I must point out
that I have used ‘Origin and Descrip-
tion of Dorsett Golden Apple’, E. P.
Miller and Professor W. B. Sherman,
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.93: 108,109.
1980. as a technical source.

The original Dorsett Golden apple
was planted in a New Providence gar-
den by Irene Dorsett in 1953. She had
recently returned from New York and
had bought some Golden Delicious
apples there. One of the seeds grew
and produced fruit.

The tree came to the attention of
William Whitman of the Rare Fruit
Council International and in 1961 he
introduced budwood from the tree into
Florida. Two to three thousand trees
were cultivated by Newcomb Nursery
in the Miami area during the 1960s.

It was found that Dorsett Golden was
able to produce fruit successfully with a
mere 200 hours or less of chill. It was
also found to be a pollinator for anoth-
ert low-chill apple, Anna, which pro-
duces red fruits. Anna and Golden
Dorsett trees are usually grown togeth-
er.

Thousands upon thousands of apple
trees are grown in the USA that have

their origin in sunny New Providence. A
chance in a million? More like a chance
in a hundred quintillion.

Scientists doubt that Dorsett Gold-
en was grown from a Golden Delicious
seed because chilling in Golden Deli-
cious is controlled by 10 to 20 genes.
For two genes to mutate would be one
in a hundred million. Ten to 20 genes?
[ll leave you to do the math.

Where then did the original seed
come from? This is my own theory:

There has been research and devel-
opment of low-chill apples in Israel for
many years. A Golden Delicious culti-
vator was used in some cases and might
very well account for the colour and
shape of Dorsett Golden. Perhaps in
New York Mrs. Dorsett bought what
she assumed were Golden Delicious
apples but were, in fact, experimental
products from Israel that had become
mixed in with the Golden Delicious.

Whatever happened, the Dorsett

Dorsett Golden
oyelelic weal
Bahamian
miracle.



Golden is a distinct cultivator unlike
any other. It is semi-pygmy and pro-
duces fruits year round that are pale
yellow, often with a light pink blush.
Fruiting can be encouraged at the right
time by stripping the leaves from the
tree, as leaf loss is one of the conditions
that induces flowering and fruit growth.

If there are too many young fruits on
a Dorsett Golden limb they will grow
but remain small. Reducing the bunch
size will result in larger apples.

The story of Irene Dorsett and her
Dorsett Golden is both thrilling and
mysterious. It is thrilling that a major
apple cultivator originated in the semi-
tropical environs of The Bahamas. It is
mysterious because nobody really
knows the factors involved in the plan-
t’s evolution. Mutation took place, obvi-
ously, but what were the contributing
factors?

Does the original tree still stand? Or
its direct progeny? If any members of
the Dorsett family can add details to
the story I would grateful to hear from
them.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com























Diabetes and
summertime
footcare

IN my last article I addressed the
general topic of summer heat and
your feet. Although this was very
well received by my readers, there
were many questions related to dia-
betic footcare. We may say, what's
more natural than bare feet and san-
dals in the summer? Unfortunately,
there is no off-season for diabetes -
constant monitoring is crucial. I urge
diabetic patients to be aware that
prolonged hot and humid weather
can lead to a host of foot woes -
among them third-degree burns, if
they don't protect their feet proper-
ly.

The concern here is that in
extreme heat - as experienced during
summer months in the Bahamas -
diabetics can suffer swelling, dryness
and cracking from wearing sandals.
They may also have problems asso-
ciated with walking barefoot out-
doors such as puncture wounds,
burns and blisters from hot pave-
ment.

A local podiatrist cited a case
where a diabetic patient took a few
minutes walking barefoot on a hot
driveway to fetch the newspaper and
suffered bad burns on the sole of his
feet due to impaired nerve sensation
from the disease (neuropathy).

If you are diabetic and your skin
gets very dry in hot weather, you may
need to apply more moisturising
agent, such as diabetic lotion, which is
specially formulated for diabetic feet.
It contains no alcohols and chemi-
cals to dry out the skin. Further, you
need to pay special attention to your
heels as dry skin cracks easily.

Rules for diabetic footcare:

_ Inspect your feet daily for blisters,

cuts, and scratches. Always check
between your toes.

¢ Wash your feet daily. Dry carefully.

¢ Avoid extreme temperatures. Test
water with your hands or elbow before
bathing.

¢ lf your feet feel cold at night, wear
socks,

¢ Inspect the insides of your shoes daily
for foreign objects, and rough areas.

¢ For dry feet, use diabetic approved
lotion. Apply this after bathing and dry-
ing your feet.

¢ Shoes should be fitted by a foot care
specialist and be comfortable at the
time of purchase.

¢ See your family doctor regularly and
be sure to have your feet examined at
each visit.

¢ Do not smoke.
¢ Do not soak your feet in hot water
¢ Do not walk barefooted.

¢ Do not use chemical agents for the
removal of corns and calluses or cut
them; see your podiatrist.

¢ Do not wear mended stockings and
avoid stockings with seams.

¢ Do not use oils or cream between your
toes.

¢ Do not wear sandals with thongs
between the toes.

¢ Do not cross your legs. This can
cause pressure on the nerves and blood
vessels.

These necessary precautions can
reduce the risk of serious foot condi-
tions. Many products such as diabetic
approved shoes and inserts, seamfree
socks, specialty lotions and creams,
are available at specialty footwear
stores or pedorthic facilities where
staff, trained in foot pathology and
properly fitting shoes, will help you
make choices that will support your
foot care plan and accommodate any
foot problems.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified
Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solu-
tions, a health and wellness franchise that
focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit,
located in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau.
"The views expressed are those of the
author and does not necessarily repre-
sent those of Foot Solutions Incorporated
or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated
companies. Please direct any questions
or comments to
nassau@footsolutions.com or 327-FEET
(3338).

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the
news, read Insight
on Mondays








THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009



My Checklii

Why finding that special someone
is easier than you think



By LLOYD ALLEN

As simple as it seems, Alexan-

Tribune Features Reporter der said this is another reason he

lallen@tribunemedia.net has been forced to reside in
“Singleville.”

. . He said the timing feels right

R many single people, navigating through ee

the available prospects can sometimes tionship, he just wishes he could

become a challenge when the basic quali- = wave a magic wand to put all

ties you're seeking in a mate are scarce at best. —_‘h¢.Tght qualities in one women.

However 24-year-old Gina

Tribune Features spoke with a group of men Reid ‘s map to Mr Right
and women who said although the search can Deby ee a few wrong
. . oe * ums, and linding “an awesome

seem never-ending at times, it is much simpler eae one
once you learn what to look for and understand Entering the dating scene
what is expected from you. about 6 years ago, Gina said her
first choice was the infamous

thug.

Alexander Roberts, 26 — willing to trust until given a rea- She said this kind of guy

(names have been changed) said son not to, then the woman — seemed to have a unique confi-
that for the last three years, his © whom he commits to should dence, however he frequently
search for special someone has possess an equal amount of _ lacked the needed qualities for

been constantly derailed integrity. someone interested in a long
because many of the women Another challenge for him term “upward” relationship.

whom he considered rarely turn. happens while out on dates “Intimacy was there, but the
out to be what he expected. where he is expected to foot the daily affection was missing, they

He now feels the search for bill at a restaurant or movie. would rather spend time on the
Ms Right begins with preparing Although not an issue for him, blocks rather than chilling with
yourself and ensuring that the he said women sometimes don’t me. I think it was just the image
qualities you are looking for are even want to offer a friendly kiss of a bad boy that I was drawn to,
complimented by qualities you or intimate conversation at the — but I got bored after a while.”

possess. end of the date, which makes Having been with her current
Being a college graduate, him feel as though they’re not boyfriend for more than two
independent, confident, and — with him for the right reasons. years, Gina said she wished she
sociable, Alexander said he sim- had decided to date ‘the average
ply wants to be with a wonan = guy’ much sooner.
who can match him at his intel- ” “When I first met him, I
lectual level, but one who is also | could pretty much already knew he was not like
aware of her role as a woman. deal with a lot of the rest. He wasn’t like the gang-

: ter type that I to, hi
nacimuieaerertarle things, Butwhen you SST cin
being with a woman who is have a woman who maybe that was all I really need-
clingy. lw. want t ed.”
“T could pretty much deal sas hes bone tai. Auth Gina described her partner as
with a lot of things, but when call or text her when honest, affectionate, and funny,
you have a woman who always you alrive at work, all of which she considers essen-
wants you to call or texther when you’re going to _ “al ina relationship.
when you arrive at work, when y g g Although not always the fun-

you're going to lunch, and when lunch, and when niest or in the best of moods,
you’re headed home, that is you're headed home, she said her partner helps to
straight up annoying and scary.” that is straight up bring out her best.

Alexander argues that if he is ‘ 55 She said although from time
the type person who is always @NNOYING and scary. to time she still struggles with
-AlexanderRoberts er significant other being too
“gossipy,” she is happy that she
was able to look past finding
the perfect thug, and instead
commit herself to someone who
wanted the same out of life.
Far too often single people
have extreme expectations of
what they want in a mate, and
ANNOUNCEMENT ae
human is perfect, and like them
their future partner will have
The Doctors and Staff of The Ladies Medical Centre ae ee women. nial
ties identified for the perfect
man include; someone who is
Welcomes i responsible, faithful, honest,
ge compassionate, loving, and
someone able to say I’m sorry.
ye Some of the turn-offs were a
Dr. Laura Dupuch to our team. Fe lazy man, one who can’t express
4 his feelings, and one who is
always too busy for his woman.

Dr. Dupuch is a qualified Obstetrician and 4 When it comes to identifying
. x the qualities of the ideal
Gynaecologist and member of the Royal College woman, the most common char-

ei : acteristics stated by men includ-
Dr. Laura Dupuch of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. eae eae

BSc.(Hons.), MB., B.S., DFFP, M.R.C.0.G. . en someone who can cook (or at
sedaaeiag hi oo Visit us online at ; least make the effort), and one
ell: - : = i :
(242) www .theladiesmedicalcentre.com es Ener aenes
Tel: 325-5888

Turn-offs included a nagging

325-5884 Ist Location: No. 6 - Ist Terrace Centreville, RO. Box SS-19012, Nassau, Bahamas woman, an Sey oe

PPS ETT 2nd Location: | 3th Street North, Spanish Wells, Eleuthera Tel: 333-4633 eee eo

Coe) era Ee 3rd Location: Marsh Harbour Medical Centre, Marsh Harbour, Abaco Tel: 367-0050 personality, and one who is not
giving.



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Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway « 394-1759





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THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST

TUESDAY, JULY 14TH 2009, PAGE 13C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

FL (BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Wort Giries MARINE FORECAST



| av ar NY































; A Today Wednesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
a es i-- an = High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
as - 7 a ~ ~~ ~ 0| 1 |2 3 |4|5 } 18 | gi FC FIC FC FC Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
hy f all . ee Acapulco 88/31 75/23 pe 88/31 75/23 pC FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
vo -, en a a Low | MODERATE J HIGH | V.HIGH | EX. Amsterdam 75/23 59/15 sh 73/22 87/13 s Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 40-20 Miles 81°F
é mm ORLANDO A Ankara, Turkey 82/27 55/12 t 81/27 54/12 pe ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
High:90°F32°C. = Mostly sunny with a Clear, breezy and very Partly sunny with a Partly sunny, a A mix of sun and Partly sunny with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 88/31 73/22 s 91/32 73/22 s Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
= Low: 74°F/23°C " thunderstorm. warm. thunderstorm. t-storm possible. clouds, a t-storm. thunderstorm. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 59/15 53/11 pc 59/15 53/11 ¢
Le een | High: 90° High: 90° High: 92° High: 90° STS 2680 7051 wsgo Tress ML Ue
TAMPA ny i‘ High: 90 Low: 80 Low: 81 Low: 81 Low: 81 Low: 81 se eS Barcelona 81/27 71/21 c 80/26 69/20 s
J et ene Le Fr Ua ET Ta : Beijing 400/37 75/23 s 100/37 75/23 pc
High: 90° F/32°C Pa 101°-90 [107°-92°F | 112-1" F __107°-88° F High _HiL(ft.) Low HtL(ft) go RTT ETE
Low: 77 F/25°C , ry # The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines i effects of temperature, wind, aaa sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:39am. 24 6:48am. 0.2 Belgrade 96/35 72/22 s 100/37 741/21 s
@Q@ ‘ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 110pm. 27 7:31pm. 05 Berlin 77/95 63/17 sh 81/97 GI/16 ¢ .
al Wednesday !:28 a.m. 230 7:34am. 0.2 Bermuda 84/28 77/25 sh 84/28 77/25 sh ebillings Ings
Nom CO 2:03pm. 2.7 8:31pm. 05 Bogota 64/17 45/7 sh 63/17 44/6 pc [8186
Pa Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday 224am. 22 828am. 02 Brussels 77/25 57/13 pe 75/23 58/12 pe
Temperature 3:02pm. 28 9:36pm. 0.4 Budapest 91/32 66/18 s 97/36 69/20 s
ABACO wee tn p Pp
inh: 98° F/91° HIGH. <...csste il enema cakes 91° F/33° C ; Buenos Aires S7/13 41/5 s so/12 43/6 ¢
; py ae ere Low 79° Foe? ¢ Friday Ae om gg Cairo 94/34 72/22 s 97/36 73/22 s
; ai i-- oe f27 Normal high... 88° F/31°C — —___ Calcutta 95/35 84/28 sh 91/32 83/28 Fr
7 oy Normal low . 75° F/24° C Calgary 6015 44/6 c 68/20 48/8 s
4 a F,.: @ WEST PALMBEACH i co ica SUN AND MOON Cancun 90/32 75/23 pc 91/32 73/22 pe
: ee! High: 88° F/31°C — Last year's OW seesocsssessenensnseee 72° F/22° C Caracas 81/27 71/21 pc 81/27 71/21 t
oor Low: 76° F/24°C € y Precipitation a tone . ts ae ne Casablanca 76/24 62/16 s 79/26 64/17 s
ey alll ) As of 2 p.m. yesterday ........eceeceseeteenee 0.05": SUNSel... “Ue PI. SE Spleesbanl Copenhagen 75/23 62/16 sh 76/24 58/14 pc
& . FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Fre Year to date AB. last New First Full Dublin 6417 5040 + 66/18 54/12 sh
High: 86° F/30° C @ High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date .o.....c.ccsessccsesssseeseeseeee 21.12" a 7 es Frankfurt 75/23 G16 + 81/27 59/15 pc
Low: 79° F/26°C ” Low: 77° F/25°C : Geneva 84/28 64/17 t 80/26 61/16 pc
a AccuWeather.com mh Halifax 70/21 54/12 pc 69/20 54/12 s Showers Miami
; @ a mt rorecastscand@raphies provided by : a Havana 90/32 72/22 pc 90/32 73/22 t T-storms
, MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 15 Jul. 21 Jul. 28 Helsinki 68/20 54/12 pc 73/22 52/11 pe Rain Franté
: High: 90° F/32°C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 93/33 82/27 s 91/32 82/27 s Ce. 4 Flurries - feeceaeae eee Cold
~ i F fo é i ie o o own are noon positions of weatner systems an
re Low: 78° F/26° C NASSAU Deeernnc islainatiad 95/35 78/25 _pe 104/40 83/28 Be] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm iene
High: 90° F/32° C oe: oe om Te 8 er Te s [vy] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary uaguaii
=~ One ° erusaiem s s
: my _— Cr men ST saat 0 ae tet GE 10 0, sos
KEY WEST ‘alll. ; Piz ingston 78/25 pc 7 pe
High: 90° F/32°C a CAT ISLAND Lima 72/22 61/16 s 73/22 60/15 s
Low: 81°F/27°C High: 86° F/30° C London 73/22 57/13 sh 75/23 57/13 pc
: a -_ Low: 75° F/24°C Madrid 91/32 59/15 pc 93/33 59/15 s
Tih. Mani ag/3t 7025 t 838 7/05 + HURRICANE INSURANCE
- Fe Mexico City 75/23 54/12 t 73/22 53/11 t
a Monterrey 100/37 75/23 s 102/38 76/24 s
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 66/18 55/12 pc 75/23 63/17 pc
High: 88° F/31°C Bs cine 6 Moscow 81/27 57/13 c 75/23 55/12 sh
Low: 79° F/26°C ‘adie Munich 86/30 59/15 t 83/28 59/15 pc
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS : Nairobi 80/26 55/12 ¢ 79/26 54/12 5
highs and tonights's lows. High: 96° F/36° C New Delhi 90/32 82/27 t 97/36 84/28 t an J OWn
Low:81° F/27°C 25 ~ Oslo 73/22 55/12 sh 72/22 57/13 sh , : !
i. Paris 77/25 63/17 pc 79/26 61/16 s 7
i Prague 87/30 61/16 t 77/25 58/14 t a uITICane
re — ee Peay
Ss 8: , 7 : pe cepeccent
Low: 76° F/24°C Rome 88/31 65/18 s 88/31 68/20 pc
a peas na aie a arian MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 90/2 82/27 t 91/32 81/27 pc that you have ecole insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W pene High: 91° F/33°C San Juan Sd/12 33/0 c 6417 35/1 pe cov rage no matter which
FC FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC mes Low: 75° F/24° C San Salvador 88/31 70/21 pe 87/30 74/23 h d bl
Albuquerque 96/35 69/20 pc 93/33 68/20 t Indianapolis 86/30 65/18 pc 88/31 66/18 t Philadelphia © 85/29 63/17 s 86/30 70/21 pe CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santiago — 63/17 43/6 c 59/15 39/3 pe Way the win OWS.
Anchorage 75/23 5713 s 76/24 58/14 s Jacksonville 90/32 71/21 t 92/33 74/23 t Phoenix 112/44 89/31 pe 110/43 87/30 s Aa ore , ae eu ae Res pe a we r
Atlanta 91/32 70/21 pe 92/33 73/22 t Kansas City 94/34 74/23 t 89/31 67/19 t Pittsburgh 78/25 5241 s 84/28 68/20 t RAGGEDISLAND — igh:92°F/33" a0 Paulo C pe .
Atlantic City 83/28 57/13 s 82/27 70/21 pc Las Vegas 107/41 80/26 s 108/42 85/29 s Portland, OR 82/27 5713 s 88/31 605 s cw oe Low:77° F/25°C aan ae parm - os ee s Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 86/30 58/14 s 89/31 68/20 pc Little Rock 100/37 78/25 s 102/38 74/23 s Raleigh-Durham 88/31 64417 s 92/33 71/21 pc Low:74°F/23°C sen — RT : Rae Be ”
Boston 78/25 58/14 s 79/26 6518 pc LosAngeles 86/30 6417 s 88/31 64/17 s St. Louis 88/31 76/24 t 94/34 69/20 t . i. a ae aa ape aEDREEDDT i
Buffalo 72/22 5512 s 77/25 64/7 t Louisville 89/31 69/20 pe 90/32 72/22 t Salt Lake City 84/28 59/15 s 89/31 63/17 s GREAT INAGUA Tala ger ra ETE
Charleston, SC 86/30 69/20 t 92/33 74/23 t Memphis 96/35 78/25 t 99/37 76/24 pc SanAntonio 100/37 76/24 s 96/35 76/24 s High: 93° F/34° C aaa aaa aE SISTIGEL
Chicago 78/25 67/19 po 83/28 64/17 t Miami 90/32 78/25 t 91/32 80/26 t San Diego 75/23 68/20 pe 77/25 67/19 pc be ae ne
Cleveland 78/25 59/15 s 82/27 67/19 t Minneapolis 76/24 6246 t 75/23 5945 t Sanfrancisco 78/25 5713 s 76/24 56/13 pe Low: 77° F/2s° C ear oa am Be ae a : (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 102/38 78/25 s 100/37 78/25 s Nashville 94/34 72/22 pe 93/33 72/22 t Seattle 76/24 54/12 po 79/26 57/13 s -y Gees 86/30 73/22 t 90/32 68/20 t
Denver 92/383 54/12 pce 85/29 57/13 pc New Orleans 95/35 78/25 t 92/33 77/25 t Tallahassee 94/34 74/23 t 95/35 73/22 t _ Warsaw 81/27 66/18 pc 83/28 59/15 c Peemen io fumeee .
Detroit 79/26 59/15 s 82/27 Gd/t7 t | NewYork 81/27 6518 s 82/27 72/22 pc Tampa 90/32 77/25 pce 90/32 77/25 t a Winnined ae EA B47 BIO t Tel: (22) 67-204 J Vel: (242) 32-2862 ff Tel: (242) 96-254
Honolulu 88/31 76/24 pc 88/31 76/24 s OklahomaCity 105/40 76/24 s 103/39 72/22 s Tucson 105/40 81/27 pc 103/39 81/27 pc :
Houston 97/36 77/25 s 96/35 77/25 s Orlando 90/32 74/23 t 92/33 74/23 t Washington, DC 88/31 63/17 s 90/32 72/22 pc Te eh ee





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Top lawyer faces break-in charges N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.191TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH T-STORM HIGH 90F LOW 80F F E A T U R E S SEE‘WOMAN’ SECTION S P O R T S Checklist to Mr/Mrs Right SEEPAGENINE Chris Brown on winning streak By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net PROMINENT attorney Eleizer Regnier was arraigned in Mag istrate’s Court yesterday, charged in connection with an alleged housebreaking ring. Mr Regnier was among six men who appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court 1, Bank Lane yesterday afternoon on charges of housebreaking, stealing and receiving. According to police prosecu tor Sergeant Sean Thurston, the incidents allegedly occurred between January and July of this year. Sergeant Thurston told the court that a number of items allegedly stolen from several residences and businesses in New Providence total over $200,000 in value and have been recovered. He said that the items relative to the charges now before the court total over $60,000. Mr Regnier, 56, a seasoned attorney with a long history of speaking out on human rights and issues facing the Haitian commuEleizer Regnier in court in connection with alleged housebr eaking ring The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com Switch to Fidelity products they have built-in savings plans:It’s not too late to build yours...Weather the storm with Fidelity. BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Alexander Roberts, 26 (names have been changed that for the last three years, his search for special someone hasb een constantly derailed b ecause many of the women w hom he considered rarely turn out to be what he expected. He now feels the search for Ms Right begins with preparing yourself and ensuring that the qualities you are looking for are complimented by qualities you possess. B eing a college graduate, i ndependent, confident, and s ociable, Alexander said he simply wants to be with a woman w ho can match him at his intell ectual level, but one who is also aware of her role as a woman. He said the one pet-peeve he has when it comes to dating, is being with a woman who is clingy. “I could pretty much deal w ith a lot of things, but when y ou have a woman who always w ants you to call or text her when you arrive at work, when you’re going to lunch, and when you’re headed home, that is straight up annoying and scary.” Alexander argues that if he is the type person who is always willing to trust until given a reason not to, then the woman whom he commits to should possess an equal amount of integrity. A nother challenge for him h appens while out on dates where he is expected to foot the bill at a restaurant or movie. Although not an issue for him, he said women sometimes don’t even want to offer a friendly kiss or intimate conversation at the end of the date, which makes him feel as though they’re not with him for the right reasons. As simple as it seems, Alexander said this is another reason he has been forced to reside in “Singleville.” Hesaid the timing feels right for getting into a long-term rela-t ionship, he just wishes he could w ave a magic wand to put all the right qualities in one women. However 24-year-old Gina Reid ‘s map to Mr Right involved making a few wrong turns, and finding “an awesome package with no content.” Entering the dating scene about 6 years ago, Gina said her first choice was the infamous t hug. S he said this kind of guy seemed to have a unique confidence, however he frequently lacked the needed qualities for someone interested in a long term “upward” relationship. “Intimacy was there, but the daily affection was missing, they would rather spend time on theb locks rather than chilling with m e. I think it was just the image o f a bad boy that I was drawn to, but I got bored after a while.” Having been with her current boyfriend for more than two years, Gina said she wished she had decided to date ‘the average guy’ much sooner. “When I first met him, I already knew he was not like t he rest. He wasn’t like the gangs ter type that I was use to, he was a corporate gentleman, and maybe that was all I really needed.” Gina described her partner as honest, affectionate, and funny, all of which she considers essential in a relationship. Although not always the funniest or in the best of moods,s he said her partner helps to b ring out her best. She said although from time to time she still struggles with her significant other being too “gossipy,” she is happy that she was able to look past finding the perfect thug, and instead commit herself to someone who wanted the same out of life. F ar too often single people h ave extreme expectations of w hat they want in a mate, and should remember that no human is perfect, and like them their future partner will have shortcomings. Among other women, qualities identified for the perfect man include; someone who is responsible, faithful, honest, compassionate, loving, and s omeone able to say I’m sorry. S ome of the turn-offs were a lazy man, one who can’t express his feelings, and one who is always too busy for his woman. When it comes to identifying the qualities of the ideal woman, the most common characteristics stated by men included; one that is hard working, someone who can cook (or atl east make the effort), and one t hat is approved by her mate’s friends. Turn-offs included a nagging woman, an overly jealous woman, one who is stuck-up, awoman with no presence or personality, and one who is not giving. C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 B y LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.netOR many single people, navigating through the available prospects can sometimes become a challenge when the basic qualities you’re seeking in a mate are scarce at best. Tribune Features spokewith a group of men and women who said although the search can s eem never-ending at times, it is much simpler once you learn what to look for and understand what is expected from you.M y Checklist toMr/Ms RightW hy finding that special someone is easier than you think I could pretty much d eal with a lot of t hings, but when you have a woman who a lways wants you to c all or text her when you arrive at work, w hen you’re going to l unch, and when you’re headed home, that is straight up annoying and scary. Alexander RobertsF A lexander Roberts, 26 (names have been changed that for the last three years, his search for special someone has been constantly derailed because many of the women whom he considered rarely turn out to be what he expected. He now feels the search for M s Right begins with preparing y ourself and ensuring that the q ualities you are looking for are complimented by qualities you possess. Being a college graduate, independent, confident, and sociable, Alexander said he simply wants to be with a womanw ho can match him at his intell ectual level, but one who is also aware of her role as a woman. H e said the one pet-peeve he h as when it comes to dating, is being with a woman who is clingy. “I could pretty much deal with a lot of things, but when you have a woman who always wants you to call or text her when you arrive at work, when you’re going to lunch, and wheny ou’re headed home, that is s traight up annoying and scary.” A lexander argues that if he is the type person who is always w illing to trust until given a reas on not to, then the woman whom he commits to should possess an equal amount of integrity. Another challenge for him happens while out on dates where he is expected to foot the bill at a restaurant or movie. Although not an issue for him, h e said women sometimes don’t e ven want to offer a friendly kiss or intimate conversation at the end of the date, which makes him feel as though they’re not with him for the right reasons. A s simple as it seems, Alexand er said this is another reason he h as been forced to reside in “Singleville.” Hesaid the timing feels right for getting into a long-term relationship, he just wishes he could wave a magic wand to put all the right qualities in one women. However 24-year-old Gina Reid ‘s map to Mr Righti nvolved making a few wrong t urns, and finding “an awesome package with no content.” Entering the dating scene about 6 years ago, Gina said her first choice was the infamous thug. She said this kind of guy seemed to have a unique confidence, however he frequently lacked the needed qualities fors omeone interested in a long t erm “upward” relationship. “Intimacy was there, but the daily affection was missing, they would rather spend time on the blocks rather than chilling with me. I think it was just the image of a bad boy that I was drawn to, but I got bored after a while.” Having been with her current b oyfriend for more than two y ears, Gina said she wished she h ad decided to date ‘the average guy’ much sooner. “When I first met him, I already knew he was not like the rest. He wasn’t like the gangster type that I was use to, he was a corporate gentleman, and maybe that was all I really needed.” G ina described her partner as h onest, affectionate, and funny, all of which she considers essential in a relationship. Although not always the funniest or in the best of moods, she said her partner helps to bring out her best. She said although from time to time she still struggles with her significant other being too gossipy,” she is happy that she w as able to look past finding the perfect thug, and instead commit herself to someone who wanted the same out of life. Far too often single people have extreme expectations of what they want in a mate, and should remember that no human is perfect, and like them their future partner will have s hortcomings. A mong other women, qualit ies identified for the perfect man include; someone who is responsible, faithful, honest, compassionate, loving, and someone able to say I’m sorry. Some of the turn-offs were a lazy man, one who can’t express his feelings, and one who is always too busy for his woman. W hen it comes to identifying t he qualities of the ideal woman, the most common characteristics stated by men included; one that is hard working, someone who can cook (or at least make the effort), and one that is approved by her mate’s friends. Turn-offs included a nagging woman, an overly jealousw oman, one who is stuck-up, a woman with no presence or personality, and one who is not giving. C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.netO R many single people, navigating through the available prospects can sometimes become a challenge when the basic qualities you’re seeking in a mate are scarce at best. Tribune Features spokewith a group of men and women who said although the search can seem never-ending at times, it is much simpler once you learn what to look for and understand what is expected from you.M y Checklist toM r/Ms RightW hy finding that special someone is easier than you think I could pretty much d eal with a lot of t hings, but when you h ave a woman who always wants you to c all or text her when y ou arrive at work, when you’re going to l unch, and when y ou’re headed home, that is straight up annoying and scary. – Alexander RobertsF By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE children who spent 33 days and nights alone in an Andros forest survived on a diet of plums and stream water, family members told The Tribune . The pair, who now “look like skeletons”, lived in a cavelike hole after getting lost in the country’s largest untouched natural forest in southeast Andros. Marcell Clarke, six, and Deangelo Clarke, nine, had gone out crabbing at around 6pm on June 9 and were given up for dead after an extensive police search. But a relative told how she found them on the roadside near Kemp’s Bay on Sunday, around five miles from their grandmother’s house in Smith’s Hill where they had set out nearly five weeks before. The boys were flown into Nassau on Sunday afternoon to be treated at the Princess Margaret Hospital for dehy dration, malnutrition, poison wood rashes, insect bites, cuts and grazes. Their mother Vera Clarke, of Kemp Road, Nassau, said ANDR OSBROTHERS DWIGHT Major could be a free man very soon, his lawyer told The Tribune last night, after a US Feder al court sentenced the convicted drug trafficker to 108 months in prison. Speaking from Miami after court adjourned yesterday, attorney Troy Ferguson said Major, 44, is very pleased with how the US justice system has treated SEE page seven Pictures courtesy of ZNS Dwight Major ‘could be a free man soon’ SEE page two Missing boys ‘survived on plums and stream water’ Pair spent 33 days alone in Andros forest MARCELL CLARKE , six, and Deangelo Clarke, nine, spent 33 days and nights alone before being found. SEE page seven By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE outraged family of slain teenager Brenton Smith believes a stray bullet fired by police intended for two suspected armed robbers led to the "innocent" victim's death. Smith's distraught relatives now want a full and transparent investigation into the incident and are call ing on police to come clean with their alleged culpability. However, officer-in-charge of the Central Detective Unit Superintendent Elsworth Moss said it was too early to say who was responsible for the teen's death, adding that investigators were still waiting on results from an autopsy and a bal listics report before they could dis cern who was to blame. "I can't verify that, I can't deny that because I have to have the ballistics information before that can be verified," said Mr Moss when asked to respond to the family's accusation. Smith was shot dead last Thursday night when he was caught in the cross-fire of a chase between police and two suspected armed robbers in the Kemp Road area. The two men were suspected of the hold-up of the nearby City Market food store. Over the weekend police said they did not suspect that Smith was one of the men who robbed the store. Yesterday morning, around 30 relatives and friends waited outside Family believes stray police bullet killed ‘innocent’ teen SEE page seven FAMILY AND friends of 18-year-old Brenton Smith gathered in prayer led by family friend and pastor Bill Higgs of Trinity Methodist Church outside the morgue. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net FORMER Prime Minister Perry Christie is reportedly not as popular amongst his parliamentary group as he is with the base of the party, the preliminary results from a polling study have revealed. Although the details of this study, which is being prepared for deputy leader hopeful Philip Davis, have yet to be released, The Tribune understands that the party’s rank and file interviewed expressed “indifference” to Mr Christie staying on as leader. Study:Christie ‘not as popular’ with parliamentary group as he is with party base SEE page seven Perry Christie Dwight Major

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both him and his wife, Keva. “Dwight is ecstatic. He is anxious to get back to the Bahamas; back to his hotel in Long Island and back to his kids,” Mr Fergus on said. The sentence was delivered in a Florida Southern District Court by Judge Kenneth Marra yesterday afternoon. Dwight and Keva Major were a ccused by the United States government of being part of a drug trafficking conspiracy that involved the transportation of cocaine and m arijuana between August 2002 a nd January 2003. After five years of fighting an extradition request to stand trial in the US on drug related charges,D wight and Keva Major were sent to Florida last year. Although Major was actually sentenced to nine years (108 m onths) in prison with supervised r elease after five years, Mr Ferguson said the sentence will take into account the 78 months served since the extradition order was filed a gainst him in 2003. This, along with the 15 per cent t ypically taken off sentences in the US for good behaviour, means Major could be released in just over a year in a half. Mr Ferguson added that if Major o pts for a “treaty transfer,” which would allow him to serve his sentence in the Bahamas, he could be released “almost immediately.” K eva Major pleaded guilty to the charges against her in August, 2008, and her husband did the same in October. When a US grand jury brought the indictment allegingc onspiracy, Major was already serving time on an unrelated drug conspiracy charge. His wife was placed on probat ion for three years, meaning she cannot leave the US without the court’s permission. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE F ROM page one Dwight Major

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By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net MULTI-MILLION dollar r ecording artist Lil Wayne has responded to a law suit that c laims he failed to perform at a concert in the Bahamas last year. Blaming the promoter of the event, Red City Entertainment for a breach of contract, Lil W ayne’s manager Cortez Bryant said the promoters failed to payt he sound company who in turn packed up their equipment and l eft the venue shortly before Lil Wayne was scheduled to hit the stage. “On those grounds, at that moment, they were in breach of c ontract and forfeited their deposit,” Mr Bryant said. R escheduling the event to the following day, September 27, Lil W ayne reportedly agreed to perform as long as the promoter made arrangements that were up to “his standards.” “I presented their case to Wayne and he said he would do it if the promoters had everything right, based on our contract,” Bryant said. “I then told the promoters to extend our rooms and if, and only if, there were no problems at the venue, then he would take the stage. “When I arrived at the venue, the security was horrible, causing it to be an unsafe environment and the sound system wasn't up to our contracted standard,” Bryant explained. “I then told the promoters Wayne wasn’t coming because they didn’t have their set up to a contracted standard for the second night in a row.” This second disappointment in a row caused a major uproar at the event with more than 5,000 fans being sent home after wait ing for the promised rapper for hours. Red City Entertainment reportedly was unable to recoup its money which included more than $30,000 for the accommodations for Lil Wayne and his entourage alone. The Grammy-nominated artist, whose real name is Dwayne Carter, 26, is being sued for nearly half a million dollars by Red City Entertainment for his advance and travel arrangements. Carter was the scheduled headliner at the Poppin Bottles concert held at the Bristol Wine and Spirits grounds on September 27, 2008. However, the event, which was postponed from the original date of Friday, September 26, to Saturday, September 27, due to sound problems never materialized. Meanwhile, Red City Entertainment alleges they had already p aid Lil Wayne $210,000 to secure his performance at the highly promoted event. According to the promoter’s allegations, on that evening in question the Louisiana rapper was found by police, lying uncon scious in his hotel room, after failing to show up at the venue at his s cheduled call time. Red City is seeking $432,000 i n restitution for his advance and travel arrangements. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 3 LIL' WAYNE is presented with the award for best male hip-hop artist at the 9th Annual BET Awards on Sunday, June 28, 2009, in Los Angeles. I NSTEAD of praising failure, a prime minister with a vision for an educated citizenry would take responsibility for not raisi ng levels of literacy and announce the privatisation of the education system, said Joan Thompson president of The Nassau Institute responding tot he unveiling of government’s 10-year education plan last week. In his recent s peech at the 2009 National Education Summit Prime MinisterH ubert Ingraham said: “I believe it is noteworthy t hat, like health, education has been o ne of the l argest recipients of government funding in every budget cycle since before independence. Regrettably, our success in gett ing every child into a classroom has not translated into every child having achieved his full potential. When, in the first halfo f the 20th century, most child ren completing primary school could read and write, today too many students leave our secondary schools only semi-litera te and semi-numerate.” Mrs Thompson pointed out that in spite of vast sums of money poured into education, increasing compulsory atten d ance from 14 to 16 years, the level of achievement as meas ured by test results, is so low as to be a national embarrassment. It could hardly be worse. Words are cheap, and none are cheaper than those out of the mouths of politicians. Caught up in self-congratulatory language t he true and unadulterated meaning of their words is o bscured by the emotive style of their delivery. Anyone daring to c hallenge this nonsensical obfuscation of the truth about public education will be regarded as a heretic, and banished from polite Bahamian society. So be it,” she said. Mrs Thompson said that a prime minister with a vision for an educated citizenry would i ntroduce a five-year plan that would move the government toward privatizing the education system. She suggested that government should have teachers gradually released from the government payroll with salaries reserved in a loan fund for teachers to open schools as e ducation-for-profit centres. “Initially some of the existing s chool buildings will be leased annually at favourable rates with renewal option up to five years. On approval of the business plan, rental arrangementsf or existing schools will be entertained. It is anticipated t hat the resulting private schools will become self-sustaining as market forces come into play as they are not required to compete with a state education monopoly. The competition for pupils at affordable rates to the parents will raise the level of proficiency unachievable by the state-run schools,” the Nassau Institute president said. She said a number of school buildings and teachers should be retained for the transition period from public to private education. She said government should be phased out as the dominant education supplier in order for the market for education to become dynamic and flourish as government influ ence and controls lessen. “(This plan for meaningful change. Only a radical rethinking for a totally new approach will solve the learning crisis in government schools. Government efforts to ‘fix’ the existing structure will require even more money with little change in outcomes. To continue the same dysfunctional system commits the Bahamas to third rate status far into the future,” she said. Privatise education system, Govt urged By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A 26-year-old man charged in the murder of a rela tive was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday afternoon. Von Farquharson of Butler Street appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court 1, Bank Lane on a murder charge yesterday. It is alleged that on Wednesday, July 8, Farquharson intentionally caused the death of Sharmon Kemp. Kemp, 25, of Winton Meadows, was reportedly stabbed in the back with a knife outside Henry F Storr Electric Company during a violent altercation with another man last Wednesday. He died in h ospital a short time after the incident. Kemp’s d eath raised the murder count for 2009 to 40 persons. Farquharson, who is reportedly a cousin of the deceased, was not required to enter a plea to the m urder charge yesterday. His lawyer Murrio Ducille t old the court that his client has been receiving psychiatric treatment for some time. He asked that Farquharson be remanded to Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre to continue his treatment. Objected P olice prosecutor Sergeant Sean Thurston, however, objected to the request, noting that Farquharson is facing a serious charge and that remanding him to Sandilands was a security risk. He also pointed out that the court was not in possession of any psychiatric report relative to Farquharson. Chief Magistrate Gomez remanded Farquhars on to Her Majesty’s Prison and ordered that he receive his psychiatric treatment there. The case has been adjourned to July 22 for mention and transferred to Court 6, Parliament Street. Man charged with murdering relative Education Lil Wayne responds to suit over alleged concert no-show C h r i s P i z z e l l o / A P P h o t o EVENT PROMOTER BLAMED FOR BREACH OF CON TRACT When I arrived at the venue, the security wash orrible, causing it to be an unsafe environment and the sound system wasn't up to our contracted standard.” Cor tez Br yant HUBERT I NGRAHAM

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EDITOR, The Tribune. My law office has been inundated with calls by Bahamians not only supporting my views ont he save the turtle campaigners, b ut expressing disgust at the personalised and mean-spirited n ature of the responses they have elicited. Given the apparent public perception, it is easy to surmise that the prickly defensiveness of members of the save the turtle cam p aign derives from a sense among s ome that the campaign is led by foreigners and “paper Bahamia ns”. That is in fact a path down which I have deliberately and politely declined to be drawn. But what I will say is that campaigners do themselves and their cause no favours by appearing toa pproach the subject with a scorn f ul attitude towards Bahamians a nd the use of a casual and s weeping stereotype. Hence, one writer basically ignored my logic and instead challenged me to stop “the Bahamians” torturing turtles at Montagu if I wanted to be taken seriously( presumably by the likes of himself). T his use of the turtle issue to e ngage in off-hand stigmatisation of Bahamians has been surprisingly persistent by campaigners, despite being obviously counter productive. More surprisingly, it has even been engaged in by writers of obviously Bahamian origin (perhaps the effect of Stockholm Syndrome). Whatever its explanation, thinking Bahamians of all races and backgrounds are rightfully a ngered and put off by it. Already two very prominent white Bahamians, representing t wo important fishing communities, have written letters oppos ing the campaign and its arrogant sense of moral superiority. One writer questioned, among other things, where these campaigns will end (conch? crawfish? grouper?). T he answer to that question is provided by some of the turtle campaigners themselves. Promi n ent campaigners have advanced the extraordinary notion that tur tles are a marine resource belong ing to the world and therefore not an exclusive resource of the Bahamian people when they enter our waters. With that foolish position, cam p aigners have inadvertently put Bahamians on notice that this campaign is open-ended and will not stop with turtles. Could the same vacant logic not be applied to conchs, craw fish, grouper and anything else that can swim or crawl across a national frontier? The answer to the question “where will it end?” is simple: anything that lives in the sea and has legs, fins or other means of crossing a maritime boundary. When in Japan last, I had the pleasure of listening to a version of this very argument (regarding, believe it or not, the citizenship of whales) put forth by some nosy and ignorant westerners. Needless to say, I shared a hearty laugh with my Japanese hosts before tucking into whale steak. Theirs is a spurious and foolish a rgument that ignores the real, if nuanced, nature of national sovereignty. T he answer to transnational issues such as turtle conservation is to work within the context of the needs and capacities of each country to confront the issue in a coordinated fashion, not simply to target those countries perceived as weak and shame them i nto shutting down whole seg ments of their culture and way of life. I n the case of The Bahamas, a sensible approach would begin with a study to determine how we can boost local turtle resources relative to the pressures exerted by local consumption (precisely as they are now doing in the Turks and Caicos Islands). B ahamians have had ample experience with “international” groupings, whose real target is the manipulation of the weak and the pliable in the interests of some utterly undemocratic and untrans parent “international” body. The last thing we need now is to encourage an outfit whose reaction to being questioned is to bristle rather than illuminate. Once again, please Minister, listen to Bahamians first. ANDREW ALLEN Nassau, July, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. I write as a concerned Bahamian. I know that to be Chief Justice you must be a counsel and attorney of over 10 years standing. You should also have a high degree of knowledge and experience in all areas of the law and some administrative skills. I was born in The Bahamas, I have nowhere to go. I have limited knowledge of the law, but know what is fair in dealing with people. Bahamas, it is time to wake up and speak up and stop politicians from destroying our Bahamas before it’s too late. How can this government bring in a foreign person to be Chief Justice or appoint the most junior judge in the Supreme Court or an outsider with no real judicial experience to that position? What is he saying to the other judges on the bench? We have competent judges with experience like Senior Justice Allen, Justice of Appeal Longley, Justices Jon a nd Stephen Isaacs who have s erved diligently and well and h ave more than 10 years experience in the judiciary. It would be a slap in the face to these judges if a foreigner or a junior judge or some other outsider is made chief justice over them. How would you expect any of them to give sucha person their full and loyal support? They are human too. This would be a travesty and cause dissension and that would notb e in the best interest of the administration of justice. What is more, neither the Attorney General, nor the junior judge named in the newspaper, or the attorney in private practice, whose name has been mentioned, has any experience in the criminal law. As far as I know, none of them has ever set foot in a criminal court e ither as counsel or judge. T hat’s remarkable at this time w hen crime is so prevalent and the criminal justice system needs so much attention! Word has it that the judges named can't be controlled by the politicians and Senior Justice Anita Allen is married tot he wrong person. Bahamians, when Senior Justice Allen’s husband was with this Government, she was not married to the wrong man then. This is the same man! I didn't know that she had got married again. The Government should answer that. What is due to a person should be bestowed on them, she is qualified, period. We, as Bahamians need to speak up about the wrongdoing of this Government or any Government, no matter whether we are PLP or FNM. There is a saying, what goes up must come down, what goes around comes around and when you are powerful be merciful. For example, from what I can see from the newspaper reports, this Judge Allen, is a hardworking, fair and fearless woman who has shown courage. That’s what they don’t like. I have seen reports of her doing all manner of cases, she seems to have experience in all sides of the judiciary, and has even acted in that post many times when the Chief Justice was away. W hat’s the problem now! S AMUEL JOHNSON Nassau, July, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm W ASHINGTON After a half-year of extending patient feelers to Iran, President B arack Obama has set a timeline warning Tehran it must show willingness to negotiate an end to its nuclear programme by September or face consequences. If the West weighs new moves against Iran t his fall, as Obama suggested Friday, it will likely mean new U.N. sanctions or unilateral U.S.p enalties, rather than military strikes. Obama told reporters in Italy, where he met w ith other world leaders, that there is now a September "time frame" for Iran to respond t o offers to discuss its nuclear programme. While he did not call it a deadline, he said the world cannot afford to wait long for Iran to make its intentions clear. "We're not going to just wait indefinitely and a llow for the development of the nuclear weapon," he said. O bama said that in September "we will reevaluate Iran's posture toward negotiating the c essation of a nuclear weapons policy." If by then it has not accepted the offer of talks, the United States and "potentially a lot of other countries" are going to say "we need to take further steps," he said. The president did not say what steps he has in mind. He mentioned neither sanctions nor m ilitary force. But it seems clear that a next step to pressure Iran would entail some form of s anctions. "The administration and the other powers would probably like to leave the toughest forms of sanctions to be used if they feel that diplo macy has not gone anywhere not in this prediplomacy period," said Trita Parsi, president of the National Iranian American Council, which s upports expanded U.S.-Iranian contacts. Working against Obama's expression of u rgency is the political paralysis in Tehran, where protesters last week sought to revive street demonstrations over the country's dis puted presidential election. Iranian authorities, while accusing the U.S. and other Western coun tries of secretly instigating the protests, seem likely to put nuclear negotiations on the back burner until the election dust settles. State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley acknowledged as much on Friday, saying, "This (post-election turmoil attention of the Iranian government from offers of engagement." At the Group of Eight summit in Italy, world leaders issued a joint statement deploring Iran's crackdown on protesters. They also said they remain committed to finding a diplomatic solution to the nuclear issue and said that in Sep t ember they would "take stock of the situation" on the nuclear front. J on B. Alterman, director of the Middle East programme at the Centre For Strategic and International Studies, said that if reports of rifts among some of Iran's ruling clerics are true, then it will be hard for the government to agreeo n a policy response to the West's offer of direct negotiations. H e sees the prospect of movement toward sanctions this fall. That could mean any combin ation of additional financial penalties, trade restrictions, limits on travel by Iranian govern m ent officials and other actions. "Clearly the world is moving toward pre senting Iran a choice" between diplomacy and isolation, Alterman said. Before the June election, the Obama admini stration had figured that once the result was in, the Tehran government could be expected tom ake clear whether it intends to take up the offers of nuclear talks. " All of that has been completely put on its head" by the post-election turmoil, said Parsi. He believes Iran's political paralysis will continue as long the protest movement is alive. But the clock keeps ticking, moving Iran closer to obtaining the nuclear bomb that the U.S. and much of the rest of the world says it cannot b e allowed. By U.S. estimates, Iran is one to three years a way from the capability to make nuclear weapons. Some think they are closer, and the fact is that no one outside Iran really knows. The five permanent members of the U.N. Secu rity Council Britain, China, France, Russia and the United States as well as Germany have offered Iran incentives to stop reprocess i ng uranium that could fuel a nuclear bomb. Iran so far has ignored the offer and continues t o amass enriched uranium, sparking grave fears, especially in Israel, which has not ruled out military strikes to deal with the threat. Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad insists the programme is intended only for peaceful nuclear purposes. The U.S. has not publicly ruled out using military force against Iran, but it seems far from that stage. Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said Tuesday that military action could backfire. "I worry a great deal about the response of a country that gets struck," he said. "It is a really important place to not go, if we cannot go there in any way, shape or form." (This article was written by Robert Burns, AP National Security writerc-2009). Don’t give the Chief Justice job to foreigner LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Sept. may bring push forIran sanctions 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW 0$5,20257,0(5RI 6(482,$675((73%2;6%1$66$8 %$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU 1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDV FLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\ UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHG VKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQ WZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH WK GD\ RI -XO\ WRWKH 0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 127,&( Turtle issue used to stigmatise Bahamians

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A FURTHER major step to transform the Lynden Pindling International Airport into a world-class gateway was taken yesterday with a New Zealandc ompany being awarded the $33.5 million contract to provide bagg age handling and explosive detection technology. T he Nassau Airport Develop ment Company (NAD t he contract to Glidepath, which will install a fully integrated baggage handling, sorting and explo sives detection systems at the air port. The project will be carried out in three phases and is expected to be completed in 2013, the company said on its website. The company will start with supplying a new 55-counter check-in facility at the United States departure terminal. This will also include a 1,800-bag-perhour inline explosive system detection system, bag-weight imaging system and automated baggage sortation with three large carousels totalling 3,500 linear feet and 300 drives. During phase two, three inbound baggage claim systems for international arrivals will be installed. Phase three will then see the construction of a new international/domestic terminal with 42 check-in counters and 3,200 linear feet of baggage handling, security and sorting systems equipment. Quality Glidepath’s North America Chief Executive Matt Williams said his company has a very good reputation for the quality and reli ability of its high technology systems which it designs, builds, installs and supports with after care service. "We are ideally positioned to compete as we're equipped with our own US manufacturing and sales infrastructure, local knowl edge and international Glidepath network as well as a proven track record for innovation and reliability having completed well over 100 projects in the US alone,” he said. Just over two weeks ago, NAD awarded the contract for the terminal building component of stage one of the airport’s trans formation to Canadian company Ledcor Construction. Ledcor is reportedly planning on for 73 per cent of its labour requirements to be filled through local contractors. S tage one of the LPIA redevelopment includes construc t ion of a 247,000 sq ft US departures terminal and pier, a pproximately 1,000,000 sq ft of asphalt apron, expanded parking facilities and new road ways. Construction is expected to start next month. The US departures terminal is sched uled to be completed by the first quarter of 2011. E arlier this year, NAD secured $265 million in financ i ng for this stage of the airport development project. O n Friday, ground was officially broken at LPIA. Speaking at the ceremony, Prime Minister Hubert Ingra ham said that so far more than $14.8 million construction con tracts have been awarded to Bahamian firms. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 5 Superb Value!High-enddrivingwithoutthehigh-endprice.TheChevroletCaptivaisacompactsportutilitythat meetsthedemandsofamodernfamily,andoers greatvalueformoney. Advancedsafetyfeaturesincludeelectronicstability control,anti-lockbraking,dualfrontairbags,and active-rolloverprotection.TheCaptivaiswell-equipped, roomyandwell-madeforasmoothrideinalldriving conditions.Andallseats,includingthefrontpassenger seat,canbefoldeatforversatilecargo-handling. FOR ALL LIFE’S ROADS C APTIVA On-the-spotnancingandinsurance. 24-month/24,000-milefactorywarranty. 2009 Chevy CaptivaFEATURES: N O T I C EThe Law Firm ofHarry B. Sands, Lobosky & Company will be closed onFriday, July 17, 2009for the Firm’sAnnual Fun Day J EROME Thompson, 45, made history on Saturday by becoming the first blind person to pilot a boat by himself around Nassau and Paradise Island. M r Thompson, who has been blind since the age of 11, boarded a small powerboat at Hurricane Hole M arina and successfully completed the circumnavi gation of the two islands. He was accompanied by t he Defence Force who followed him at some distance in their vessels. The inspiration for this undertaking, Mr Thompson told The Tribune in an earlier interview, was the fact that other blind persons internationally have accomplished similar feats. Mr Thompson said his love for the sea and passion f or boating sparked his interest in piloting a vessel by himself. This never before accomplished initiative by a visually disabled person has officially been called “the marine circumnavigation of two Bahamian islands.” Mr Thompson said the endeavour was made possible by the collaboration of a well put-together s upport team that includes Glen Bain, a former D efence Force officer and principal trainer; Gregor y Thompson, a professional meteorologist, and Jennifer Rahming, a compliance officer in the financial industry. The unmarried entrepreneur has also been inspired to set up the non-profit organisation Adventures Unlimited Bahamas, registered in January, to help disabled people in the Bahamas and around the world bring their dreams to life by supporting them in their endeavours either financially or by providing equipment and training. Blind man makes marine history Jerome Thompson pilots boat around Nassau, Paradise Island JEROME THOMPSON launches off into the harbour as he sets out to become the first blind person to pilot a boat by himself around Nassau and Paradise Island. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f JEROME THOMPSON at Paradise Island’s Hurricane Hole Marina where he boarded the boat before his historic voyage. New Zealand company clinches $33.5 million airport contract Project to provide baggage handling and explosive detection technology

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THE proposed national training and retraining programme for recently laid off workers is one stepc loser to becoming reality, as a draft presentation on the plan has been present ed to Labour Minister DionF oulkes. Appointed on June 14, the implementation adviso ry committee for the N ational Training Programme was mandated to research the proposal, sug g est a framework and noti f y the government of its findings within three weeks. Chairman of the committ ee Khaalis Rolle has now presented the report to the minister. P rime Minister Hubert I ngraham announced the government’s plan to cre ate the programme during the recent budget debate. He said the decision was taken after extensive consultation with trade union leaders and employers’ representatives. The programme will be geared towards training workers in areas where there is a strong demand in the business sector, Mr Ingraham said. These areas will include: masonry, carpentry, welding, tile laying, electrical installations, landscaping, data processing, computer skills, customer service, day care, housekeeping, and languages. Courses will last for 10 to 15 weeks and will be run by the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI the Bahamas. The programme will be open to 1,000 unemployed Bahamians who will be selected from those persons who have already regis tered for the National Insurance Unemployment Benefit, the prime minister said. Labour Minister Foulkes thanked those the private sector partners who contributed to the plan and expressed his ministry’s appreciation to those who serve on the committee. In addition to Mr Rolle, the committee includes: Rev Patrick Paul, president of the Bahamas Christian Council; John Pinder, president of the NCTUB and the BCPOU; Thomas Bastian of the TUC; Dr Pandora Johnson, vicepresident of COB; Dr Iva Dahl, director of BTVI; Dorothea Godet, deputy director of Labour, and Alpheus Forbes, deputy permanent secretary in the Ministry of Labour and Social Development. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE W ITH the high temperatures currently being experienced in New Providence, the Department of Environmental Health Services is advising people to practice good sanitation to help r educe the recent increase in pests such as mosquitos and rats. “The public should be aware that due to the recent rains and the warm summer t emperatures, pests such as f lies, mosquitoes and rats are present in greater numbers,” t he department said yesterd ay in a press statement. The solid waste division o f the Department of Envir onmental Health Services h as been challenged in recent times as a result of the rains with scheduled col-l ection in a few areas. Every effort is being made to ensure that we maintain schedule so as to limit the s ources of fly breeding.” The department said it is of vital importance that property owners and occup ants of premises assist by e nsuring that their garbage is p roperly containerised (cove red) and that bins are c leaned and disinfected after b eing emptied. Fly bait and s trips which can be readily purchased can also be used to limit fly presence. “All vendors, particularly crab and seafood vendors, must practice good sanitation by making garbage r eceptacles available during operation and ensuring that all of the waste generated is taken away and disposed of properly. This will help to minimise fly nuisances,” the d epartment said. T he level of rodent activity is directly related to the a mount of food sources, s helter and harborage availa ble. K itchen waste, discarded a ppliances and furniture, d erelict vehicles and other debris provide the environment for rats to survive andp roduce large populations. The environmental health services department is asking individuals, private and p ublic entities, to shoulder their responsibilities by e nsuring that their premises and places of occupancy and in general, their communities, are clean and that good garbage storage and disposal practices are carried out. Good sanitation habits will a ssist in controlling the rat population and other pests. “The recent rains have also help to produce large batches of mosquitoes since areas like ponds, depression a nd excavations collect w ater and hatch the mosquito eggs. “Home owners are r eminded to pay special a ttention to anything that c an hold water, especially d rums, buckets, tubs and t ires, as they can breed mosq uitoes as well,” the department said. “Discarded items should b e disposed of in a proper manner while items that are in use should be properly stored or managed so that t hey cannot collect water and support breeding of m osquitoes.” The Department of Environmental Health Services said it is doubling its efforts to reduce the population of these pests. “It is anticipated that garbage pickup schedu les on those collection routes that are off schedule, will be regularised shortly. The mosquito control section of the Department of Environmental Health Serv ices will strengthen its mosq uito treatment/intervention programme to address the m osquito, fly and rodent i ssues. Ground fogging exercises w ill be continued and intens ified thorough New Provid ence and in those islands that are affected,” the department said. Once again the department wishes to thank the public for its continued cooperation, support and a ssistance in doing their part in controlling pests.” B ahamas real estate today Carmen Massoni Department of Environmental Health doubles efforts to fight pest increase IF you’re selling in anything other than a hot market, you m ight find staging” your home can help generate more interest and offers. Y ou needn’t spend thousands of dollars on improvements or profess ional consultants, howeve r. There are several things y ou can take into your own h ands to improve your h ome’s appeal. B egin by removing scatter rugs and knickknacks, which can clutter a room. In the kitchen, remove all appliances from the counters except the coffee mak er and microwave. Set your d ining table in a welcomi ng fashion, with plates, flatware and napkins. Y ou might be tempted to t hrow everything into the c losets, but buyers will look there, too, so box every-thing up and place into s torage. Focus on the “feature rooms” the dining and living areas and master bedroom keeping additional rooms as sparsely furnished as possible. Do your spring cleaning now, s crubbing the walls and f loors and shining up those w indows. “The Complete Idiot’s G uide to Staging Your Home to Sell” states that you could gain up to $9,000 on a $200,000 house if it’sp roperly presented. You m ight spend up to $100 per room in time and money, but that’s a pretty smalli nvestment for that kind of return. Your BREA real estate agent will have even more suggestions. Raise the curtains Training programme committee reports T T h h e e p p u u b b l l i i c c s s h h o o u u l l d d b b e e a a w w a a r r e e t t h h a a t t d d u u e e t t o o t t h h e e r r e e c c e e n n t t r r a a i i n n s s a a n n d d t t h h e e w w a a r r m m s s u u m m m m e e r r t t e e m m p p e e r r a a t t u u r r e e s s , , p p e e s s t t s s s s u u c c h h a a s s f f l l i i e e s s , , m m o o s s q q u u i i t t o o e e s s a a n n d d r r a a t t s s a a r r e e p p r r e e s s e e n n t t i i n n g g r r e e a a t t e e r r n n u u m m b b e e r r s s . . D epartment of E nvironmental H ealth Services PICTURED are the areas where BPC Ltd, which recently partnered with StatoilHydro of Norway, plans to search for oil and gas pending government approval of several licence applications. The proposed exploration areas lie in waters between Miami and Central Cuba. According to the Oil and Gas Journal, five exploration wells have already been drilled in the Bahamas by four different oil companies, beginning in 1947. StatoilHydro, which announced its partnership with BPC in May, recently signed an agreement to buy the South Riding crude oil storage and transshipment terminal on Grand Bahama from Cana dian company World Point Terminals Inc. Plans to search for oil and gas in the Bahamas Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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nity, was arraigned yesterday on s ix counts of housebreaking and stealing as well as five of receivi ng. He is accused of breaking into homes in the Marshall Road, Pastel Gardens, Elizabeth Estates and Sea Breeze areas betweenM ay and July of this year. It is alleged that he stole thousandso f dollars worth of jewellery, electronics and cash. Among the i tems Mr Regnier is accused of stealing and receiving are Rolex watches, gold chains, video games and DVD players. Mr Regnier, who was represented by lawyer M ichael Kemp, elected summary trial in Magistrate’s Court andp leaded not guilty to all charges. Mr Kemp told Chief Magist rate Roger Gomez that Mr Reg nier had been in police custody for more than 48 hours and was not granted his visitation rights. He also told the court that Mr R egnier suffers from congestive heart failure and high blood pres-s ure and that remanding him to Fox Hill Prison would be a death s entence. C hief Magistrate Gomez g ranted Mr Regnier bail in the sum of $30,000 with two sureties. He was ordered to report to the Elizabeth Estates Police Statione very Wednesday and Saturday. Arlington McNeil, 21, and J amaric Green, 22, was arraigned together on six counts of houseb reaking and stealing as well as one count of receiving. They pleaded not guilty to all charges. McNeil and Shando King, 34, was also arraigned together on a housebreaking charge. The men pleaded not guilty to the charge.G reen was also arraigned on additional charges of houseb reaking, stealing and receiving. He pleaded not guilty to the charges. Don Rahming Jr, 25, and Anton Ferguson, 22, pleaded not guilty to threatening to kill Tyson Ferguson on July 6. Ferguson, Rahming and Green also pleaded n ot guilty to breaking into the h ome of Shavon Wood at Hamster Road on July 6 and the home of Monica Gomez on July 7. Ferguson and Green who, a ccording to the prosecution, have matters of a similar naturep ending before the courts as well as McNeil, were ordered remande d until July 20, when a bail hear ing will take place. The men are represented by lawyer Stanley Rolle. Rolle claimed that Fergu son had been beaten while in police custody and that McNeil had been in custody since July 8.R ahming, who is represented by lawyer Gregory Hilton, was g ranted bail in the sum of $15,000. King, who is represented by Mr Kemp, was also granted $15,000 bail. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 7 Princess Margaret Hospital's morgue for hours while the immediate family positively identified Smith's body and spoke to officers from the CDU. As they emerged from the building Smith's emotional mother and sister had to be supported by relat ives and were quickly escorted off the property. Uncle Darren Strachan, who spoke on behalf of the family yesterday, said the family had done its own investigation into the shooting and firmly believe policewere at fault. "Clearly he was an innocent v ictim and we're working with the police to make sure this is resolved aggressively. We believe that he was shot despite all the reports he was not shot by anyone else other than the police," Mr Strachan told the media while surrounded by grieving relatives outside the morgue yesterday. " The police (are putting together their findings but we have done our own investigation and we have spoken to witnesses and we know. And the police have said he was not a part of the crime that happened in the foodstore and we know perfectly well, for a fact, that he was shot by an officer," he said. M r Strachan said once the investigation is complete, the fam-i ly will decide whether or not to sue the RBPF. S upt Moss said it is in within police procedure to discharge a weapon if an officer fears for his life. "If they feel their life is threate ned they can use their weapon to protect themselves or someone int he community." Smith, a 2008 graduate of St A ugustine's College, was described by friends yesterday as a bright, fun-loving honour-roll s tudent who stayed out of trouble. " He was a nice person, cheer ful, easy to get along with," said s choolmate Mack Thompson of the promising teen. "He was far from a troublemaker he liked to stay to himself or hang with his family." A nother friend said last week that Smith was excited about his d ream to attend a college over seas and pursue a degree in engin eering. According to reports Smith was an intern at Albany and had just completed a job-related course. her sons do not appear to have suffered a ny serious health problems and are expected to make a full recovery before they are due to return to school in September. The children have told their family how they lost sight of the road as they were hunt-i ng for land crabs in the dense forest as Deangelo, who lives with his grandmother in Smith’s Hill, let his younger brother, visiting from Nassau, lead the way as night closed in. A t some point the younger and chubbier Marcell fell into a deep cave-like hole, and when Deangelo reached for him, he too fell in. It is not clear whether the boys were t rapped in the cave for some time, but they said they spent days walking around searching for food, water and a way home, and slept in caves and caverns. T hey said they survived by eating pigeon plums and cocoplums growing in the dense 3,000 square mile forest and drinking water from a freshwater stream. On their final day in the woods the boys s aid they managed to climb a tree to see above the dense coppice of mahogany, ironwood, and horseflesh hardwood trees and heard the sound of a passing car before they f ound the road where they were seen by their cousin. Their grandmother, Olgarean Clarke, 67, said: “Deangelo was slim and he lost about 30lbs, and Marcell had been a little chubbier, but when they came back they looked to me l ike skeletons. They lost everything. “They didn’t have anything proper to eat f or a whole month inside the bushes. They were starving. They were very underfed. “I think if someone had taken them they would have given them more to eat than that. I guess they must have been sleeping in the hole at night, and in the day they were walking around in circles, looking for food, and t rying to find their way back home.” Police have yet to determine the boys’ whereabouts in the 33 days they were missing. T here have been reports of a speedboat heard approaching the coast at around 2am on Sunday and of an earlier sighting of the b oys on Sunday morning. There also has been speculation over a verbal response from the boys reportedly heard during the police search two weeks after the boys had disappeared. S uperintendent Hulan Hanna said detectives are keeping an open mind at this stage in the investigation. Mr Hanna, in charge of policing the Fami ly Islands, said: “We need to determine where these children were as much as we can, but we probably won’t get them talking right away and it’s going to take some time to get the story. Speculation abounds, but we take nothing for granted so we want to hear any information the public may have. As we have not yet been able to objectively evaluate what their claims are, everything remains on the table so we have to a pproach the investigation with a very open mind.” When 20 police officers, supported by the Royal Bahamas Defence Force, the US Coast Guard helicopter and local residents f ailed to locate the boys their parents criticised police for not pursuing the search for the lost children. A s their mother Vera Clarke visited them in the paediatric ward of the hospital yesterday she said she never gave up hope for her two sons. S he said: “I didn’t understand why the police put off the search so fast because I knew they were living I always believed they w ere living and I didn’t care what anybody said. “I never had the feeling that someone would come and tell me they were dead. I just knew they were alive. But when Marcell and Deangelo turned up the police couldn’t believe it.” Former director of the Bahamas Environmental Research Centre in Andros, Marg o Blackwell, said the rocky terrain and dense forest of hardwood trees that stretch for some 3,000 square miles across southern Andros is one of the most difficult places in the world to survive in the wild and hasb een rated alongside Siberia for chances of survival. But during the summer months the woods a re filled with pigeon plums, cocoplums, guana and poisonwood berries which are all edible and could provide enough susten ance for life, and heavy rains in May and June would have gathered in the rocky caves and crevices on the forest floor and filled the freshwater river from which the boys said they drank. M s Blackwell said: “Andros is filled with caves and holes which is a blessing and a danger, so those boys are just very lucky. “There are ways of surviving but it’s not e asy.” She said many locals blame spirits for making people disorientated in the forest. She said her father was missing for nearly 10 days after landing a plane in central Androsa round eight miles from the road. She and the boys’ grandmother have also lost their way in the woods before, they said. But as the investigation continues Mrs C larke said she is just glad to have her grandsons safe and receiving care. She said: “Even as they found them I thought they would have found them dead, but I was surprised to see that they werea live, could walk, and even talk. “I am proud especially of Deangelo, he looks a lot different from when he left me, but I thank God he’s back and he is okay.” D eangelo is expected to return to Deep Creek Primary School to enter grade five in September and Marcell should be well enough to go into grade two at Uriah McPhee in Kemp Road at the start of thes chool year. Any information that may assist the police investigation should be reported byc alling 911, 919 or Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 While sources close to this leadership race maintain that there are many within the PLP w ith the experience and capaci ty to lead the PLP, there still remains the issue of personality and likeability that have yet to be addressed. “The question is not out there any more who can replace Christie, there are any number of persons who can and who have the capacity. But the personality issue may be a different story. “What people need to realise is that contrary to what the political pundits suggest, when it really boils down, Bahami ans as a whole are not that out of touch with Christie,” the source said. With its planned convention slated for October 18th this year, the PLP will face considerable criticism from both within and outside of the party as the public looks for the party toe mbrace change and progression. W ith these two qualities in mind, political insiders have s uggested that the PLP could accomplish this goal easily by simply changing its deputy leader, Cynthia Pratt, who has already expressed her desiren ot to run for the post again. Therefore with a new deputy at the helm and what is being foreshadowed as “reinvented” Perry Christie, the PLP will be poised to rebuild its party and regain some of the momentum it has lost in the past two years. Family of teenager FROM page one FROM page one Top lawyer faces break-in charges Study: Christie ‘not as popular’ with parliamentary group FROM page one F ROM page one Missing boys ‘survived on plums and stream water’ SUPERINTENDENT Hulan Hanna

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Independence celebrations Independence celebrations Independence celebrations Independence celebrations Independence celebrations Independence celebrations Independence celebrations Independence celebrations Independence celebrations Independence celebrations Highlights from the cultural extravaganza at Clifford Park T HISBALANCINGACT c aught the eye during Friday night’s celebrations. THEBAHAMAS’ FINEST were out in force for the big event. O NTHEMARCH d uring the celebrations. K EEPING R HYTHM i n one of the night’s musical interludes. FIREWORKS make a spectacular background for the Bahamian flag. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f LES COMBES, Italy THEVatican says Pope Benedict XVI has traveled to a village in the Italian Alps for two weeks of vacation, according to Associated Press. It says the pontiff was flown to Turin on a plane Monday and then traveled on to Les Combes, in a region near the French border, by helicopter. Benedict has spent two summers at Les Combes in recent years. He said upon arrival that he expected to rest and work dur ing his vacation. He is scheduled to be away until July 29, making at least two public appearances in the area. Benedict’s predecessor, John Paul II, also spent sever al summer at Les Combes. While John Paul liked to hike, Benedict spends most of his time inside the chalet that looks out on Mount Blanc, the highest peak in the Alps. Pope goes on vacation in Italian Alps

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C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 9 P AGE 11 NPSA set to host All-Star Classic... Wallace chose C eltics for chance at another title... See page 10 n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net I t wasn’t as fast as his pre vious outing, but quartermiler Chris “Bay” Brown continued his string of victories on the European circuit on Sunday. And yesterday, the battle between veteran sprinters Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and Chandra Sturrup intensified. Brown, competing in his third meet in Europe, won the men’s 400m at the Meeting Interna tional Tangier 2009 in Tangier, Africa. Not too far behind in second place behind Brown was Jamaican Jermaine Gonzales in 45.81. Ofentse Mogawane of the Republic of South Africa finished third in 46.13. J ust Friday, Brown was at the Golden Gala in Rome, Italy, where he posted a season’s best of 44.81 seconds to secure the win as he held off Ireland’s David Gillick, who finished in 44.82. B rown, 36, had a chance to c ontend for a share of the $1 million jackpot from the Gold en League. But after winning the opener in Berlin, he didn’t participate in the second race in Oslo, Norway. He returned with a bang in Rome, but after being eliminated from the Golden League, he is currently sitting in fourth place with 74 points from five meets on the World Athletics Tour that will secure berths for athletes to compete in the IAAF/VTB World Athletics Final in Stuttgart, Germany, September 13-14. Americans Jeremy Wariner, the reigning world champion and LaShawn Merritt, the Olympic champion, have also competed in five meets and are leading the field with 100 and 98 points respectively. Meanwhile, neither Ferguson-McKenzie or Sturrup were in a position to contend for the jackpot, which is based on ath letes’ winning performances in the series of six meets. But since the BAAA National Championships in June when Ferguson-McKenzie dethroned Sturrup as the national 100m champion, the two have competed against each other in the last three meets. T his time, it was FergusonMcKenzie who turned the tables again on Sturrup when they competed at the Athens Grand Prix in Athens, Greece, yesterday. Still shy of dipping under the 11-second barrier this year, Ferguson-McKenzie lowered her season’s best to 11.04 for a third place finish in the century. Fresh of her season’s best of 10.99 in Rome for third place in the fastest race for the year, Sturrup had to settle for fourth in 11.15. Ferguson-McKenzie was sixth in Rome in her then season’s best 11.11. On the World Athletics Tour, Sturrup is sitting in seventh place with 52 points after five meets. Through five meets as well, Ferguson-McKenzie is tied with Kim Gevaert of Belgium with 47 each. ‘Bay’ Brown on winning streak Battle between ‘Golden Girls’ Sturrup, FergusonMcKenzie intensifies Sturrup F-McKenzie n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net IN virtue of being relegated to Zone III in 2010, the Bahamas will have to play the Americas Davis Cup tie against Jamaica, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica, Aruba and Bermuda. The seven teams will be divided into two pools with the two winners getting promoted to Zone II for 2011, while the two losers will be relegated to Zone IV. It’s not known as yet when and where the tie will take place. The Bahamas has never played in Zone IV and the way the team played against Guatemala, Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association president Stephen Turnquest said it should only be a matter of time before they can get back to Zone II. “I think the effort was there and it was an exciting tie,” Turnquest said. “We realised that there are some things that we need to do as far as our prepa ration is concerned. “One of our main players, Timothy Neilly, got hurt and BJ Munroe wasn’t able to play doubles after he got hurt. Notwithstanding that, Marvin Rolle and Devin Mullings gave a good account of themselves.” Having gone through a series of marathon matches in the scorching sun, Turnquest said the results could have been slightly different with one or two points. But if team captain John Farrington gets a chance to assemble the team together a little longer than the week they do before the tie is played, Turn quest said he’s confident that they will have no problems prevailing next year. “We just need to have better prepa ration to have the players better prepared for the competition,” Turnquest said. “We just have to look at the teams that we will be playing against and we have to work towards playing against them.” While the Bahamas lost to Guatemala in their half of the relegation playoffs, Jamaica were blanked 5-0 by the Netherlands Antilles to also drop down to Zone III. They will join Cuba, Puerto Rico and Costa Rica, who finished third through fifth, in their Group III playoffs that was held from April 22-26 in El Sal vador. By virtue of finishing first and sec ond respectively, El Salvador and Bolivia were promoted to Zone II. And from their first and second place finishes in Group IV the same weekend in El Salvador, Aruba and Bermuda were promoted to Group III. With the team in place, Turnquest said the future looks bright for the Bahamas. “We also have a lot of young players who are in college, who are going to be a position to replace some of the other players who are playing on the team now,” Turnquest said. Does this mean that the BLTA is leaning on making some changes to the current team? Turnquest declined to confirm, only to say: “I would like Rodney Carey (Jr and Jamal Adderley get a chance to make the team. So I think the trials for the team in December will be quite interesting.” Farrington, who has spent the past nine years as the team captain, said the players went out and gave it their best. But he said it will only make them hun grier when they play out of Zone III next year. “We will have to play in one week, which means we will have a match every day,” Farrington said. “But if that’s what it will take to get us back to Zone II, then that is what we will have to do.” As for whether or not he feels there needs to be any changes to the team, Farrington said he would prefer to leave that decision up to the BLTA. Bahamas Olympic Association secretary general Rommel Knowles, who was along with president Wellington Miller, said he was impressed with what he saw. “The talent is definitely there, so I’m very impressed,” he said. “We have some talent, but I think if they can get a little more exposure like the Guatemalan team, I think they will be okay.” BL TA president confident Davis Cup team can get back into Zone II CHRIS “BAY” BROWN continued his string of victories on the European circuit on Sunday... (FILE photo P h o t o s b y K e v i n M a j o r BALL BOYS get ready... MARVIN ROLLE (also left, right DEVIN MULLINGS (also top left

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Pargo signs one-year deal with the Bulls C M Y K C M Y K LOCALAND INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Bahamas to host Judo Carib Cup CLEVELAND (AP Cleveland Cavaliers have signed veteran free-agent Anthony Parker to add depth to the backcourt. The 34-year-old Parker played in 80 games for the Toronto Raptors last season and averaged 10.7 points and 3.4 assists. Terms were not disclosed. Cavs general manager Danny Ferry says Monday that Cleveland went after the 6-foot-6 guard/forward for his shooting and defensive skills. Parker likely will be one of the first players off the bench, behind Cleveland starting guards Mo Williams and Delonte West and small for ward LeBron James. Cavs sign Parker CHICAGO (AP Freeagent guard Jannero Pargo has signed a one-year d eal with the Chicago Bulls. T erms were not disclosed Monday. The 6-foot-1 guard, known for his outside shooting, was also with Chicago from 2003-06. Pargo played in Russia and Greece last season. He is a six-year NBA veteran, having also spent time with the Lakers, Raptors and Hornets. He has averaged 6.9 points in 316 regular-season games, while shooting 36.5 percent from the 3-point line. In 33 playoff games, his average is 6.5 points and 36.8 percent on 3-pointers. Pargo gives the Bulls backcourt depth after they lost leading scorer Ben Gordon to Detroit. Judo Athletes from Barbados, Puerto Rico, The C ayman Islands, the Dutch Antilles and the Bahamas will face off this weekend in the Caribbean Judo Cup at Loyola Hall on Saturday July 18. Kick off time for the event is 1 pm and the event is expected to run to 4 pm. T rials were held over the weekend to determine who would represent the Bahamas against the Caribbean neighbours. The team will consist of Wellington Mullings (73Kg) , Chrisnell Cooper (78 Kg), D'Arcy Rahming Jr (66 Kg), Cynthia Rahming (52 Kg48 Kg a n open tournament in which some fifty Bahamian athletes as well as US athletes are expected to attend. In preparation for the event Top US Coach Gerald Lafon has been busy training Bahamian athletes at an intensive training camp. H e has also been running a national Coaches course in which all Federation schools are taking part. "I am pleased to see the cooperation between schools of the Federation. Coaches seem to be eager to learn what steps are necessary to take the B ahamas to the next level," said Coach Lafon. "The athletes in the training camp have improved significantly since I was here a year ago." The course are being held at Judo Federation Schools Island Jujutsu on Carmichael Road and AllS tar Family Center on Joe Farrington Road. July 18 Tournament Tickets are available for $5 at the door during tournament time from 12 4 pm or for more information call the Bahamas Judo Feder ation at 364-6773. ATHLETESTOFACEOFFATLOYOLAHALL ONJULY 18 READY F OR COMBAT: Judo athletes prepare to compete.

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n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net WITH a new head coach, new offensive scheme and a Pro Bowl caliber quarterback at the helm, Devard Darling looks to the 2009-10 season with great optimism. In his fifth National Football League season, and second with the Kansas City Chiefs, Darlinghas set lofty goals for himself and his franchise with the acquisitions of new quarterback Matt Cassel and first year head coach Todd Haley. “Personally I am looking forward to this being one of the better seasons of my career. With the addition of Matt everyone has high hopes for the passing game and for the future of the offense as a whole. Once our team remains relatively healthy the sky is the limit for what can happen on the field,” Darling said. “My ideal season, the personal goals I set this year, I am working toward a 1,000 yard season, maybe even a Pro Bowl selection should everything fall into place, like I said, the sky is the limit.” Darling comes off a 2008-09 season where he caught 17 passes for 247 yards and one touchdown and exhibited his big play ability with a career long 68yard reception against the Patriots in November. The Chiefs finished a disappointing 214, fourth in a woeful AFC W est. Last year w as a disappointing season in my first year in Kansas City, my number improved a bit but for the team we all wanted to do a lot better,” Darling said. “This season we get a fresh start and we hope for a lot of things to be different, the main goal is overall improvement. Asa team that means a better regular season record, a playoff berth and we will go from there.” The Chiefs struggled last year finding a fit at the quarterback position with Brodie Croyle, Damon Huard, and Tyler Thigpen each starting under center at various points throughout the season. In an off-season where the Chiefs lost franchise leading receiver Tony Gonzales, Darling and the remainder of the receiving core look to figure more prominently into the passing game. Todd Haley joins the Chiefs i n his first head coaching job a fter spending 13 years as an a ssistant coach. He began his pro career as a scouting assistant with the New York Jets in 1995 and joins the Chiefs after a two-year stint as offensive coordinator for the Arizona Cardinals. After Tom Brady went down w ith an injury, (ironically a gainst the Chiefs) in the openi ng game of the season, Cassel became the team’s starting quarterback and finished with 3,942 passing yards and 23 touchdowns. Darling said the team has welcomed Cassel with open arms following the pre draftday trade. “Definitely having that stability at the quarterback position is crucial for any team in the NFL to have a successful offense. The relationship between a quarterback and his receivers is paramount so yeah it has been great that Matt and I along with the other receivers are beginning to build a bond on and off the field,” he said. “Chemistry can be a major part of that success we are looking for.” The Chiefs open training camp on July 30 at the University of Wisconsin River Falls. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 11 THE New Providence Softball Association is scheduled to host its All-Star Classic at the Archdeacon William Thomp son Softball Park, Southern Recreational Grounds, on Saturday. Also over the weekend, the NPOTSA officially re-name their two divisions The Arthur Thompson Division (formally the ADivision) and The Bursell Bradshaw Division (for mally the B-Division). Additionally, the NPOTSA is slated to honour their past presidents and some of their loyal fans. They plan to unveil two plaques for the contributions Herman Joseph Mackey and Alfred ‘Yo-Yo’ Pritchard have made during the existence of the league. Awards for the 2007-2008 season will be presented. The highlight of the weekend will be a homerun challenge, which was won last year by Gregory Taylor. H H e e r r e e s s a a l l o o o o k k a a t t t t h h e e s s c c h h e e d d u u l l e e f f o o r r S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y : : 1 1 0 0 a a m m T T h h e e p p r r e e l l i i m m s s o o f f t t h h e e H H o o m m e e r r u u n n C C h h a a l l l l e e n n g g e e 1 1 1 1 a a m m C C h h a a l l l l e e n n g g e e G G a a m m e e E E x x e e c c u u t t i i v v e e s s a a n n d d C C o o a a c c h h e e s s v v s s T T h h e e M M e e d d i i a a 2 2 p p m m T T h h e e B B u u r r s s e e l l l l B B r r a a d d s s h h a a w w A A l l l l s s t t a a r r G G a a m m e e 4 4 p p m m T T h h e e A A r r t t h h u u r r T T h h o o m m p p s s o o n n A A l l l l s s t t a a r r G G a a m m e e 6 6 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m A A w w a a r r d d s s P P r r e e s s e e n n t t a a t t i i o o n n The following persons (see TABLE below) were selected to participate in this year’s AllStar Classic: NPSA set to host All-Star Classic T T H H E E A A R R T T H H U U R R T T H H O O M M P P S S O O N N D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N : : P P r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t s s S S q q u u a a d d V V i i c c e e P P r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t s s S S q q u u a a d d Manager Manager John Williams Crusaders Sammy Adderley Lions C C o o a a c c h h e e s s C C o o a a c c h h e e s s Sean Wilson Pokers Anthony Huyler Warriors B rad Smith Dozer ProsSelwyn McKenzie Bom. George P P l l a a y y e e r r s s P P l l a a y y e e r r s s Marcus Pratt Dozer Pros Kevin Neilly Warriors Kevin Hinsey Crusaders Ray Newbold Lions Keith Moss Dozer Pros Brad Woods Lions Fred Tapia Pokers Warfield Bain Bommer George Harry Kemp Crusaders Gregory Taylor Lions Edmond Bethell Crusaders Winston Seymour Lions Ivan Francis CrusadersKelson Armbrister Warriors Dwayne Dean PokersMike Smith Bommer George Dominic Elliott Pokers Lee Rahming Bommer George Mario Ford Crusaders Fran Adderley Warriors Rodney Forbes Dozer Pros Dwayne Dean Warriors Bernard Young Crusaders Edney Bethell Warriors Andy Ford Crusaders Richard Bastian Lions Greg Smith Dozer Pros Dwayne Pratt Warriors Greg Gardiner Crusaders Charlie Rolle Lions George Henderson Pokers Kirk Johnson Bommer George John Rolle Pokers Lorenzo Carter Warriors Willard Elliott Pokers Nelson Farrington Bommer George Sean Higgs Crusaders Elgin Smith Bommer George Bradley Sands Dozers Prince Huyler Warriors Mike Hanna Pokers Darryl Isaacs Warriors P P i i t t c c h h e e r r s s P P i i t t c c h h e e r r s s Creswell Pratt Crusaders Ronald Seymour Lions Franklyn Martin Pokers Gary Johnson Lions Rudolph Williams Dozer ProsJonathan Armbrister Warriors Tony Brown Dozer Pros Danny Stubbs Bommer George T T H H E E B B U U R R S S E E L L L L B B R R A A D D S S H H A A W W D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N : : P P r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t s s T T e e a a m m V V i i c c e e P P r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t s s T T e e a a m m Manager Manager Clifton Smith Michollette Rory Newbold Technicians C C o o a a c c h h e e s s C C o o a a c c h h e e s s Andrew Ferguson Corner BoyzChristopher Bullard -Stallions P P l l a a y y e e r r s s P P l l a a y y e e r r s s John Wallace Cabinet WorldDaryl Bartlett Bahamas Divers Preston Rahming Corner Boyz Brian Anderson Stallions Sigmund Bethell Michollette Mike Moss Bahamas Divers Alexander Bain Michollette Dwight Butler Stallions Kevin Thompson Michollette Terry Bain Stallions John Lockhart Corner Boyz Marcellus Hall Stallions Vince Williams Corner Boyz Charles Gaitor Technicians Hermis Ferguson Corner Boyz Larry Forbes Lions Johnny Burrows Michollette Spurgeon Johnson Technicians Tom Ferguson Gussiemae Ron Wood Technicians Frances Taylor Corner Boyz Juan Pratt Stallions Dan Bourne BTC Anton Newbold Technicians Anthony Bullard BTC Cyril Miller Royals Abe Johnson Michollette Danny Johnson Lions Sandy Morley Cabinet World Richard Brown Lions Glen Saunders Michollette Mike Major Lions Henry Williams 6 pack Philip Paul Lions Mark Lockhart 6 pack Joe Jones Royals Culbert Evans Michollette Keith Richards Bahamas Divers Howard HannaMichollette Joe McPhee Royals Keith Thompson Michollette David Gardiner Technicians Brian Capron Gussiemae Robert Cox Bahamas Divers P P i i t t c c h h e e r r s s P P i i t t c c h h e e r r s s Alfred Munnings Michollette Hector Rolle Technicians Vernon Bowles Gussiemae Greg Thompson Bahamas Divers Craig Bowe Cabinet World Don Dean Stallion Foster Dorsette 6 pack Harold Fitzgerald Royals Darling Darling optimistic about NFL season F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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Cable: We’re ‘superior’ to BTC over Internet n B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor THE Bahamas needs “to identify priorities” for new technology in its agriculture industry, a report has urged, with those farmers still working operating at 10 per cent of potential capacity and the production of all sectors having declined between 2005-2007. The Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture’s (IICA firmed that there had been a “continuous decline” in the number of farms and farmers in the Bahamas over the past 30 years, leaving agriculture with less than 3 per cent of this nation’s per annum gross domestic product (GDP The IICA report said: “The records show that there has been a decline in the number of farmC M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$ $4.21 $4.30 $4.25 #nbr$'$!(b" tt) #&&##"# "$"# rr#!!$$!$ n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A major Bahamia n telecommunications operator has expressed concern that many companies will be unable to absorb the proposed “minimum 2 per cent of per annum revenue” increase in industry licence fees, and warned that the payments schedule will lead to a “further undue cash flow burden”. Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, president of Systems Resource Group (SRG only legal fixed-line competitor, IndiGo Networks, said the company was concerned “by the proposed fee structure and the financial burden that it will place upon operators and, therefore, ultimately the consumer” implying that the extra costs will be passed on to communications/telecommunica tions end-users via price rises. Writing to the Governmentappointed BTC privatisation committee on its licensing regime consultation paper, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said SRG currently just paid the Government a business licence fee levied as a percentage of revenue, plus a fee to cover the Public Utilities Commission’s (PUC The latter fee was levied at 0.524 per cent of revenue, plus a flat radio spectrum fee, but under the new communications regulatory set-up, SRG will see its fee payments jump from two to four. Apart from the same business licence fee and charges to cover the costs incurred by new sector regulator, the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA Ashkenny said SRG would also have to pay a contribution to the Universal Service Fund (USF finance the provision of telecoms services to virtually all Bahamian communities. This, the SRG/IndiGo presi dent said, was likely to based on a percentage of company revenues, with the fourth and final fee set to be a new “annual government communications fee”. This, he added, was likely to be a sum equivalent to 2 per cent of a communications operator’s annual revenues, plus a “currently unknown” radio spectrum fee. “There can be few businesses that can sustain an overnight increase in overhead that is a minimum of 2 per cent of revenue per annum, and potential ly far greater given the unknown factors of the Universal Service Fund contribution and the government radio spectrum fee,” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said. “Moreover, the fact that the fees are all paid annually in a lump sum in the first four months of the year serves to add a further undue cash flow burden on operators.” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny urged the Government and its BTC privatisation committee advisers to allow fees to be paid quarterly, and that there be “a tran sition period before operators be burdened fully with addi‘Undue burden’ fears over new communications fees * Leading operator concerned that many firms unable to absorb ‘minimum two per cent of per annum revenue’ increase * Rises likely to be passed to consumers via higher prices, with ‘further undue cash flow burden’ caused by four-month payment period * Caribbean cellular operator says Bahamas plan for ‘special taxes’ could deter market entrants and limit/inhibit competition * But government committee dismisses concern S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B * Wants New York court to order gaming giant to fulfil $212m equity capital injection pledge, and $318m guarantee * Cable Beach developer takes ‘baby steps forward’ in talks with Chinese, with year-end timetable still on n By NEIL HARTNELL Business Editor BAHA Mar is continuing to “take baby steps forward” with the two potential Chi nese-state owned partners for its $2.6 billion Cable Beach project , Tribune Busi ness was told yesterday, as the resort developer filed a motion for summary judg ment in a bid to force its for mer equity partner, Harrah’s Entertainment, to fulfil its obligations. Court papers obtained by Tribune Business reveal that on Friday, July 10, Baha Mar filed a cross-motion for summary judgment with the New York Supreme Court seek ing a verdict that Harrah’s and its Bahamian-incorpo rated investment vehicle, Caesars Bahamas Investment Corporation, breached their contract and the guar anty given to the Bahamian resort developer. Baha Mar is asking the New York court to “order specific performance requir ing Caesars Bahamas to make its required equity contribution to the joint venture company [Baha Mar] and otherwise fulfill its obligations under the joint venture agreements, and Harrah’s to cause those obligations to be Baha Mar seeks summary ruling against Harrah’s ROBERT SANDS S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net STRUGGLING luxury goods retailer Solomon’s Mines has closed two sections in its anchor store on Bay Street, and two stores on Paradise Island, employees confirmed to Tribune Business yesterday. A Tribune Business reporter who visited Solomon’s Mines’ main Bay Street store yester day found that the retailer had slashed the prices of all its items up to 70 per cent off in the remaining sections of the outlet, while the perfume and accessories areas had been closed. The storefront windows for the two recently-closed sections have been covered up with brown paper and a sign that leads one to believe the space is under renovation. One employee, when asked yesterday if "things are dire”, replied: “Yes." The luxury goods retailer is a clearly troubled business, its staff having been complaining for months Solomon’s Mines close tw o sections in Bay Street anchor store S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CABLE Bahamas has asserted that it has a “superior” Internet psroduct than the rival Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTCh aving more than double the number of subscribers and an average revenue per unit (ARPU that was 59 per cent higher the last time comparative figures were produced. A copy of Cable Bahamas’ private placement memorandum for its active $40 million preference share issue, a copy of which has been seen by Tribune Business, outlined the BISX-listed enti ty’s optimism that it would find it much easier to launch new telecoms services as part of a ‘tripleplay’ value proposition to Bahamian consumers than BTC. Cable Bahamas said S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B Bahamian far ms at 10% capacity

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The Bahamian Stock Market F F I I N N D D E E X X 7 7 8 8 7 7 . . 1 1 2 2 ( ( 5 5 . . 7 7 1 1 % % ) ) Y Y T T D D B B I I S S X X C C L L O O S S I I N N G G C C H H A A N N G G E E V V O O L L U U M M E E Y Y T T D D P P R R I I C C E E S S Y Y M M B B O O L L P P R R I I C C E E C C H H A A N N G G E E AML$1.39 $-0-18.71% BBL$0.63 $-0-4.55% BOB $6.94 $-0-9.16% BPF$11.00 $-0-6.78% BSL$7.92 $-0-22.28% BWL$3.15 $-00.00% CAB$11.39$-0-18.82% CBL$5.64 $528-19.43% CHL$2.74 $-0-3.18% CIB$10.38 $-0-0.67% CWCB$2.97 $-0.141,00032.00% DHS$1.82 $0.052,700-28.63% FAM$6.99 $-0.771,000-10.38% FBB$2.37 $-00.00% FCC$0.30 $-00.00% FCL$5.03 $-0.013,624-2.71% FCLB$1.00 $-00.00% FIN$10.90$-0-8.17% ICD$5.50 $-170-10.28% JSJ$10.40 $-0-6.31% PRE$10.00 $-00.00% D D I I V V I I D D E E N N D D / / A A G G M M N N O O T T E E S S : : J. S. Johnson (JSJ share, payable on July 15, 2009, to all shareholders of record date July 8, 2009. Consolidated Water (CWCO $0.013 per share, payable on August 6, 2009, to all shareholders of record date July 1, 2009. Abaco Markets (AML Annual General Meeting on Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at 6pm at The Wyndam Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino, West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of June 19, 2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting. Benchmark (BahamasBBL its Annual General Meeting on Thursday, July 23, 2009, at 6.30pm at the British Colonial Hilton, Governor's Ballroom, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of June 23, 2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting. n By Royal Fidelity Capital Markets LAST week, investors traded in six out of the 24 listed securities, of which one a dvanced, three declined and t wo remained unchanged. E E Q Q U U I I T T Y Y M M A A R R K K E E T T A total of 9,022 shares changed hands, representing a decrease of 857 shares or 9 per cent, compared to last week's trading volume of 9,879 shares. Focol Holdings (FCL the volume leader this week with 3,624 shares trading hands, its stock falling by $0.01 to end the week at $5.03. Doctors Hospital Health Systems (DHS advancer with 2,700 shares trading, its share price rising by $0.05 to end the week at $1.82. FamGuard Corporation (FAM falling by $0.77 to end the week at a new 52-week low of $6.99 on a volume of 1,000 shares. B B O O N N D D M M A A R R K K E E T T No notes traded in the Bahamian market last week. C C O O M M P P A A N N Y Y N N E E W W S S E E a a r r n n i i n n g g s s R R e e l l e e a a s s e e s s : : J.S. Johnson Company (JSJ released its unaudited financial results for the three months ending March 31, 2009. JSJ reported net income attributable to equity holders of $1.6 million, down by $83,000 or 4.9 per cent compared to $1.7 million in the 2008 first quarter. Total income rose by $722,000 or 11 per cent to $7.5 million, compared to $6.8 million at the end of the 2008 first quarter, while total expenses increased by $428,000 or 9 per cent to $5.1 million, compared to $4.7 million in 2008. Net premiums earned of $2.2 million decreased by $105,000 or 5 per cent in comparison to 2008, while insurance expenses of $1.5 million decreased by $154,000 or 10 per cent. Income from commissions and fees of $5.1 million increased by $1.2 milli0n or 33 per cent quarter-over-quarter. Earnings per share declined by 5 per cent to $0.20 versus $0.21 for the same three month period in 2008. JSJ’s total assets and liabilities stood at $80 million and $57 million respectively, compared to $82 million and $60 million at year-end 2008. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE International Markets F F O O R R E E X X R R a a t t e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C A A D D $ $ 0.8608-0.15 G G B B P P 1.6359+0.18 E E U U R R 1.4041+0.45 C C o o m m m m o o d d i i t t i i e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C r r u u d d e e O O i i l l $60.53-7.77 G G o o l l d d $912.70-1.97 I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l S S t t o o c c k k M M a a r r k k e e t t I I n n d d e e x x e e s s : : W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e D D J J I I A A 8,183.17-1.18 S S & & P P 5 5 0 0 0 0 882.68-1.53 N N A A S S D D A A Q Q 1,752.55-2.45 N N i i k k k k e e i i 9,291.06-5.35 ROYAL FIDELITY MARKETWRAP

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fulfilled pursuant to the Harrah’s guarantee”. T he hearing, which Baha Mar wants scheduled for August 11, 2009, will also ask the court to “grant Baha Mar’s...... cross-motion for summa ry judgment on their first counterclaim/third party claim for breach of contract and their sixth-party claim for breach of guaranty.....” Motions for summary judgment are often filed i n a bid to avoid a full trial on the substantive i ssues, and Baha Mar’s move is likely to be a response to Harrah’s filing of its own motion for a summary judgment that was filed on May 27, 2009. As for the specific claims Baha Mar is seeking summary judgment on, in its initial counterclaim for breach of contract, it had alleged that in the joint venture agreement Harrah’s had agreedto commit some $212 million in equity to the project for a 43 per cent stake. However, Baha Mar alleged that Harrah’s and Caesars Bahamas subsequently reneged on their agreement despite Baha Mar having previously agreed a supplemental Heads of Agree ment with the Bahamian government on January 31, 2009. The Cable Beach resort developer added that it had spent $85 million after the joint venture agreement was signed, only for the other side to breach it. As for the guaranty, Baha Mar had alleged that Harrah’s guaranteed Caesars Bahamas’ obligations up to an amount of $318 million, including payment of the initial $212 million capital contribution. Harrah’s, Baha Mar, is alleging, is refusing to honour its obligations under the guarantee. In its cross-motion, Baha Mar is also seeking the dismissal of Harrah’s rival summary judgment motion and recovery of its costs and legal fees. Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice-president for governmental and external affairs, con firmed yesterday he had known the company’s attorneys were set to file the summary judgment motion, although he was unaware of the details. While waiting for the New York court proceedings to be resolved, Baha Mar is “continuing to work” on replacing Harrah’s with the China Export-Import Bank and China State Con struction, the two sides having signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU year. Mr Sands told Tribune Business that the timeframe for the Chinese to complete their necessary due diligence on Baha Mar and sign a more formal deal with the Cable Beach developer had not altered from 2009 year-end. “They continue to do their due diligence,” he said of the two Chinese state-owned entities. “We don’t have a timeline, but we still seem to be taking baby steps forward. “They have their whole shopping list of items required for such a project, and there have been multiple visits of delegations looking at the project and looking at the Bahamas as a tourist destination. Delegations have been here from China in the last month. Multiple delegations have been visiting the destination from time to time.” Chinese delegations had featured profession als ranging from interior designers to suppliers, and Mr Sands added: “We always said it would take at least until the end of this year, and nothing has changed from that timetable. Some of the paperwork will take us at least until the end of the year.” China State Construction is being eyed as the equity and construction partner, while the China Ex-Im Bank will provide the financing. n By PABLO GORONDI Associated Press Writer Oil prices rose above $60 a barrel on Monday, halting last week’s falling trend, as investors turned to commodities for protection against a weaker dollar and after attacks on oil facilities in Nigeria. By midday in Europe, benchmark crude for August delivery was up 13 cents to $60.02 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. On Friday, the contract fell 52 cents to settle at $59.89. Earlier Monday, prices fell as low as $58.88, as investors continued to fret about global economic growth and crude demand. T he dollar was down against the euro and the yen on Monday, luring investors to commodities like oil and gold as a hedge against the inflation risks posed by a weaker dollar. The euro rose to $1.3987 from 1.3936 on Friday, while the dollar was worth 92.26 Japanese yen, down from 92.34 yen late Friday in New York. Prices have fallen $14 a barrel, or 19 per cent, since June 30 after poor unemployment data from the US and Europe sparked doubts that the global economy was poised for a strong recovery this year. “There’s been a shift in market sentiment,” said Victor Shum, an energy analyst with Purvin & Gertz in Singapore. “Earlier this year, there w as a lot of talk about green shoots. Now the focus is on the green shoots shriveling.” Traders Traders will be looking this week to the first big batch of second quarter corporate results for clues about economic growth. Investors will also be eyeing data on housing starts, retail sales and industrial production. “Expectations are that most companies are going to report poor results and a conservative outlook,” Shum said. “It’s not unreasonable to expect crude prices to move down to the mid$50s over the coming days and weeks.” T raders have been disappointed by evidence of weak gasoline sales in the US over the Independence Day holiday weekend of July 4, a time that usually marks the peak of gasoline demand for the summer. “The US summer driving season has been a non-event for a second year in a row,” Shum said. In Nigeria, Africa’s largest crude exporter, militants said they had attacked an oil depot and loading tankers in the country’s populous economic center of Lagos. The militants say they are fighting to force the federal government to devote more oil-industry funds to the southern region, which remains poor despite its b ounty of natural resources. Attacks over the past years have cut Nigeria’s oil output by about 25 per cent. In other Nymex trading, gasoline for August delivery was down less than a penny at $1.6502 a gallon and heating oil dropped 0.58 cent to $1.5277. Natural gas for August delivery slid 4.4 cents to $3.329 per 1,000 cubic feet. In London, Brent prices were up 31 cents to $60.83 a barrel on the ICE Futures exchange. Associated Press writers Alex Kennedy in Singapore and Bashir Adigun in Abuja, Nigeria, contributed to this report Oil up near $60 on weaker dollar C M Y K C M Y K BUSINES THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 3B P u b l i c E d u c a t i o n M e e t i n gThe Bahamas National TrustPast, Present and Future Thoughts from the 1958 Exuma Expedition Leader Special Presentation:G. Carleton Ray, PhD. Research Professor Department of Environmental Sciences University ofVirginia DATE: Wednesday, July 15 TIME: 7:00 pm SHARP! PLACE: Nassau Yacht Club, East Bay Street BNT and NYC members FREE General Public $2For more information call: 393-1317 n By JEREMIAH MARQUEZ AP Business Writer HONG KONG (AP Asian markets extended their slide Monday as hopes for a strong economic turnaround continued to fade amid new political uncertainty in Japan and worries over earnings results from major US companies. European markets were little changed in early trade. Every major across Asia market dropped, with Japan’s index racking up its ninth straight loss as the country’s embattled prime minister moved to dis solve parliament and call gen eral elections for next month. Oil prices resumed their two week sell-off to fall toward $59 a barrel. Renewed anxiety about the pace of recovery in the world economy has kept stocks from rallying further after huge gains between March and June. Investors are now looking to second-quarter corporate earnings and profit outlooks for the year, to be issued in the coming weeks, for guidance about the economy’s prospects. This week brings results from US bell wethers like Citigroup Inc., Intel Corp. and General Electric Co. Unless corporate profits and major economies show more evidence of healing, markets could be hard pressed to move higher for now. “Most people are fairly cautious, they think it’s been a bit too much too soon,” said Daniel McCormack, a strategist for Macquarie Securities in Hong Kong. “If economic data does n’t keep improving we could continue to drift off from here.” European shares opened low er before recouping their losses to trade mostly sideways, with Britain’s FTSE up 0.1 per cent, Germany’s DAX gaining 0.2 per cent and France’s CAC 40 flat. Wall Street futures pointed to more losses on Monday. Dow futures were down 30, or 0.4 per cent, at 8,055 and S&P futures fell 3.1, or 0.4 per cent, at 871.20. In Japan, the Nikkei 225 stock average tumbled 236.95 points, or 2.6 per cent, to 9,050.33. Tokyo’s market opened low er, but selling accelerated in the afternoon amid reports that Prime Minister Taro Aso will likely dissolve the powerful low er house next week and that national elections would take place August 30. That nearly six-week gap was too long for comfort, analysts said. “Japan will essentially be without a government during that time,” said Masayoshi Okamoto, head of dealing at Jujiya Securities in Tokyo. “So investors are trimming their holdings as a precaution against the political vacuum. If something happens, the country may not be able to immediately respond.” Hong Kong’s Hang Seng shed 453.79, or 2.6 per cent, to 17254.63, while South Korea’s Kospi dived 3.5 per cent to 1,378.12. Elsewhere, Taiwan’s market dropped 3.5 per cent as investors worried that a partial free trade agreement with mainland China would be delayed until next year. Australia’s index lost 1.5 per cent and India’s benchmark was down 1.7 per cent. Shanghai’s main stock measure lost 1.1 per cent. Trade on Wall Street Friday was uninspiring amid jitters about earnings and as a survey showed US consumer confi dence falling to its lowest level since March. Few expect companies to shine in the April-June quarter. Analysts polled by Thomson Financial forecast that S&P 500 companies’ earnings dropped an average 35.5 per cent in the period from a year earlier after falling the same amount in the first quarter. Instead, many investors will be eying company forecasts to help determine whether hopes for a faster rebound in eco nomic growth, as reflected in prices from the spring rally, are justified or overwrought. The Dow fell 36.65, or 0.5 per cent, to 8,146.52, the lowest close for the blue chips since April 28. The broader S&P 500 index lost 3.55, or 0.4 per cent, to 879.13, while the Nasdaq composite index rose 3.48, or 0.2 per cent, to 1,756.03. Oil prices slid in Asia trade, with benchmark crude for August delivery down 58 cents to $59.31 a barrel. The contract fell 52 cents to settle at $59.89. The dollar weakened to 92.29 yen from 92.43 yen, while the euro traded slightly lower at $1.3937 from $1.3944. AP Writer Tomoko A. Hosaka contributed to this report from Toyko Asian markets extend slide F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s The Nassau Airport Development C ompany (NAD m illion contract to supply a fully integrated baggage handling, sortation and explosive detection system at Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA to New Zealand-owned company Gildepath Group. Due for completion in 2013, the Nassau project is a three-stage greenfield project, which will start with supplying a new 55 counter check-in at the US Departures Terminal, the company s aid in a statement yesterday. T he project will also involve an 1800 bag/hour inline explosive detection system, bag-weight imaging system and automated baggage sortation, with three large carousels totalling 3,500 linear feet and some 300 drives. The second stage includes three inbound baggage claim systems for international arrivals, and stage three comprises a new International/Domestic Terminal with 42 check-in counters a nd 3,200 linear feet of baggage hand ling, security and sortation systems equipment. Grumbling While there is likely to be grumbling in some quarters that NAD has awarded another contract to a foreign firm, this one is for specialist technology and equipment that only a few companies can provide. P rime Minister Hubert Ingraham l ast week said that more than $10 million has been spent locally on various aspects of the design, engineering and consultation of the airport redevelopment project. More than $14.8 million in construction contracts have been awarded to Bahamian firms. Mr Ingraham said the terminal’s general contractor, Ledcor, a Canadian firm, is planning for 73 per cent of its labour requirements to be filled through local cont ractors. Bahamian firms awarded major c ontracts for the first stage of the project include Reliable Fencing, Bahamas Hot Mix, Basden Elevators, Woslee Construction, Sentinel Drilling and Water Works, TMC Engineering Ltd. Approximately 40 contracts are scheduled to be tendered in coming months, including sub-contracts to the terminal’s general contractor and direct contracts with NAD. Airport awards $21m baggage system deal Baha Mar seeks summar y r uling against Har rah’ s Bahamian farms ers in the Bahamas from 36,246 in 1978 top 20,336 in 1994, and in 2000 it was estimated that those in production are at just 10 per cent capacity. “Those producing have less than 10 acres of farmland, and the average age was approximately 59 years-old.” Drawing on recent data, the IICA said there had been “a slight decline in output for the major sub-sectors of fish and crops” between 2005-2007, while poultry, red meats and ornamentals had slightly increases. Exports were down, while the value of products consumed in the Bahamas had risen slightly. Fisheries exports fell from $97.62 million in 2005 to $96.477 million in 2006, and dropped by a further $5.3 million to $91.175 million in 2007. Crop exports also fell, down from $44.96 million in 2006 to $42.006 million in 2007. Poultry output, though, increases from just over $16 million in 2005 and 2006 to $18.766 million in 2007, with red meats breaching the $1 million mark that year after standing at $925,450 and $918,620 in 2005 and 2006 respectively. Ornamental production rose from $8 million to $9.711 million between 2006 and 2007. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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that Solomon’s Mines has been unable to meet payroll on time, leaving them out of pocket and struggling to meet their own financial obligations. The chain, which was acquired by well-known entrepreneur Sir Garet ‘Tiger’ Finlayson’ in 2004 from Solomon Brothers and Martin Solomon, has been in downsizing mode for several years now, having previously closed its flagship Mall at Marathon store and retreated from Caves Village out west. Now, the continued presence of its flagship store on Bay Street appears to be in jeopardy, with the closure of two sections indicating it is sufferi ng from major inventory/stock s hortages. Solomon’s Mines and its brands also appear to be retreating from another luxury goods hot spot, namely Paradise Island’s Marina Village and the Atlantis Crystal Court. Sir Garet acquired Solomon’s Mines with the help of a syndicated loan put together by Bank of the Bahamas International, additional financing from Scotiabank, and the payment they received from Commonwealth Brewery/Heineken for relinquishing Board and managem ent control at Burns House. Sources Financial sources have subsequently told Tribune Business that the acquisition financing was re-financed by Citibank, with the Finlayson family’s stake in Associated Bahamian Distillers and Brewers (ABDAB eral. ABDAB holds their stakes in Burns House and Commonwealth Brewery. While Solomon’s Mines probl ems have undoubtedly been e xacerbated by the global recession and tourism downturn, observers have suggested it was already in trouble as a result of expanding too rapidly in the aftermath of the 2004 acquisition growth that proved unsustainable. Some 40-50 per cent of its staff complement are already understood to have been laid off. Last month, Mark Finlayson, Solomon’s Mines managing director, appeared in court for non-payment of National Insura nce Board (NIB i n the amount of $377,092. He pled guilty and assured the magistrate that he would work out payment arrangements with NIB. Tribune Business has left phone messages for Mr Finlayson over several days, none of which have been returned. When asked if he might return the calls, one employee said yesterday: "Long shot." Mr Finlayson told Tribune Business earlier this year that business levels at Solomon’s Mines were down 30-50 per cent depending on the month. Labour Minister Dion Foulkes said recently that he and his officers had undertaken an investigations into the allegations of unpaid pay cheques for Solomon’s Mines. "Notwithstanding a drop in income, he [Mr Finlayson] is a ttempting to maintain as much s taff on payroll as possible, which the government commends," Mr Foulkes said. “We will make inquiries and we will see.” Mr Finlayson said recently that staff have sometimes been paid late, but they are eventually paid. He admitted that that the company has been going through difficult times, but asserted: “We are not the only ones in the luxury goods area who are going through tough times. We are not the only ones who are paying people sometimes later than they should.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.28Abaco Markets1.391.390.000.1270.00010.90.00% 1 1.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.94Bank of Bahamas6.946.940.000.2440.26028.43.75% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3911.390.001.4060.2508.12.19% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.645.640.000.4190.36013.56.38% 4.781.27Consolidated Water BDRs2.972.970.000.1110.05226.81.75% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital1.821.820.000.2400.0807.64.40% 8.206.99Famguard6.996.990.000.4200.30016.64.29% 12.5010.00Finco10.9010.900.000.3220.52033.94.77% 11.7110.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.3810.380.000.7940.35013.13.37% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.035.030.000.3320.15015.22.98% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.60013.510.91% 12.0010.40J. S. Johnson10.4010.400.000.9520.64010.96.15% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.002 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1460 1425 BahamasSupermarkets 792 842 1460 0041 0300 N/M 205% BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities30 May 2013 29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320 MONDAY, 13 JULY 2009B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,572.93| CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -139.43 | YTD % -8.14BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)F INDEX: CLOSE 787.12 | YTD -5.72% | 2008 -12.31%Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% 7% Interest 7% 14 . 60 14 . 25 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 . 92 8 . 42 14 . 60 0 . 041 0 . 300 N/M 2 . 05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.38601.3231CFAL Bond Fund1.38602.404.75 3.03512.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8952-1.52-3.18 1.47631.4019CFAL Money Market Fund1.47632.975.30 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1031-8.35-13.82 12.920912.2702Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.92092.405.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.5448-0.020.54 100.000093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund93.1992-3.33-6.76 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.47339.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.27652.00-2.98 1.05781.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.05782.135.78 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0271-0.572.71 1.05541.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05541.745.54 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-May-09 31-May-09 31-Mar-09 31-May-09Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual FundsTO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Jun-09 31-Mar-09 31-Dec-07 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 3-Jul-09 30-Jun-09MARKET TERMS31-May-09 NAV Date /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q WKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf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olomon’s Mines close two sections in the Bay Street anchor store F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning f or improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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its Internet penetration had risen from 43 per cent at yearend 2005 to 56 per cent at yearend 2008, and that it had “a more than comfortable lead over BTC and clearly provides a superior product”. Drawing on 2006 statistics, the last year for which comparative figures are available as BTC has not released annual reports for 2007 and 2008, the Cable Bahamas offering docu ment said the state-owned carrier then had 14,477 DSL subscribers who generated $5.8 mil lion in annual revenues, for an ARPU of $33.38. Cable Bahamas, though, at the same point in 2006 had 35,529 residential Internet subscribers - “nearly 2.5 times more” at an ARPU that was 59 per cent higher. Residential subscribers accounted for 87 per cent of Cable Bahamas’ 2008 Internet revenues. Much of Cable Bahamas’ future growth is linked to its ability to expand into new markets, especially fixed-line and cellular telecoms, ambitions it makes no attempt to hide. While it could enter the former market by making good on its option to purchase IndiGo Networks, it would need to obtain a cellular licence from the Gov ernment. Several observers suggested yesterday that this was unlikely to be a problem, pointing out that the Government would have an effective ‘conflict of interest’ when it came to regulatory issues affecting Cable Bahamas because of its share holdings in the company. When Columbus Communications’ 30.2 per cent stake is bought out, the National Insurance Board (NIB Treasury will be the two largest’ Cable Bahamas’ shareholders. One source told Tribune Busi ness that once the buy out is completed, NIB will have a 22.069 per cent stake and the Treasury a 7.16 per cent stake, a 29.22 per cent combined shareholding that will be almost as large as Columbus Communications’ present holding. As a result, the source suggested future telecoms licences for Cable Bahamas were unlikely to be a problem because the Government would not want to damage its holdings in the com pany. The irony is that the Government, as it exits its majority stake in BTC through selling 51 per cent via privatisation, is simultaneously becoming the largest shareholder in its main competitor. Columbus Communications, through the $80 million pur chase price it will receive, is set to enjoy a 45 per cent or $25 million appreciation on the value of its investment in four years, having bought in for $55 million in 2005. In addition, the source suggested the management agree ment reached with Cable Bahamas would allow Columbus Communications to “have its cake and eat it, too”. It appears that the management fees Columbus Communications will earn will be more than the $1.429 million in dividends it received from the BISX-listed company in 2008. C olumbus will receive a flat a nnual fee of $1.4 million, plus an incentive fee based on achieving a targeted percentage of Cable Bahamas’ operating income. Yet the performance fee is capped at 80 per cent of the base fee, meaning the maximum this will be in any one year is $1.12 million. As a result, the maximum Columbus Communications can earn is $2.52 million. As for BTC’s ability to compete head-to-head with Cable Bahamas in the provision of cable services, assuming it obtained such a licence, the latter said experience had shown that “expansion by cable companies into voice services has been better from a return on invested capital and margin contribution basis than expansion by telecommunication companies into video services”. In addition, BTC would postprivatisation be forced to “make significant capital investments” to improve its telecoms infrastructure, while Cable Bahamas’ $230 million fibre optic network was already in place. Stating that “it is highly unlikely that a new entrant in video or Internet services could unseat Cable Bahamas as the leading provider for these services”, the offering document said it could “roll out very quickly” telephony products and “rapidly absorb” them into its network via a triple-play offering. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 5B JOB ADVERTISEMENTPosition:AccountantA local insurance agency seeks to ll the position of Accountant. The scope of work is to head the Accounting Operations in preparation of monthly, quarterly and annual reports; to keep and maintain all nancial documents and records according to the directives coming from the President and the Board of Directors to ensure the efcient management of all Bank and general ledger accounts. The position will also be expected to make recommendations to management to maintain the company’s viability in a highly competitive environment. 5HTXLUHG accountant; presenting; supervisory skills; meet deadlines and perform work of the highest quality. ing address: The Tribune c/o Box # 81869 P.O. Box N 3207 Nassau, Bahamas POSITION AVAILABLE: REQUIREMENTS: D UTIES: Human Resources Manager, (Re: Client Relationship Position), P.O. Box SS 6289, Nassau, Bahamas, by 20th July, 2009 or fax to (242 ‘Undue burden’ fears over new communications fees tional fee to which they have previously not been subjected”. “SRG respectfully states its view that, in the absence of controls or access restrictions being placed upon services offered by foreign Voice over the Internet operators, Bahamian operators offering competing services should have those revenues exempt from any form of fee,” the SRG president said. SRG’s position was backed to a large extent by Digicel, the cellular operator that has been chomping at the bit for several years to enter this market in the Bahamas, given that it has quickly established a large presence throughout the region. In its response, Digicel described as “best regulatory practice” the levying of fees on communications providers to “cover only the reasonable and transparent administrative costs efficiently incurred by the regulator”. It had particular concern over the proposals to charge Bahamas-based communications business licence fees and communications fees licence, describing them as “special taxes”. Given that the Bahamas had no income or corporate taxes, Digicel argued that “special taxes can only be justified to the extent that they apply proportionately to all businesses in the Bahamas”. And the cellular operator added: “It seems to us that the communications fees licence may be an additional burden not matched elsewhere in industry in the Bahamas. “If this is correct, then it would be unreasonable to impose such a fee as it would discourage investment and unfairly penalise any communications company that does invest or operates currently in the country. “From our recent survey of 16 countries, we found that the per capita resultant costs imposed in the Caribbean compared to other countries vary over a huge range from the more expensive (more than double to the enormously more expensive (nearly 100 times more.” Digicel said its Caribbean experience had generally shown that “little if any attention” had been given by regulators to minimising their costs, as these were ultimately passed on to the industry and consumers. The result was that regulatory costs could act as a barrier to new market entrants/competition, and cause a “cash drain that weakens competition”. None of this, though, appeared to cut much ice with the BTC privatisation committee and its advisers. In its response, the committee said licensees had the burden of proving their annual turnover, and it pledged that URCA would be objective in levying its regulatory fees. The committee added that URCA would also have an annual Budget that was published, with its financial statements also audited by external auditors and published. And it defended the communications fee and business licence fee by pointing out that they were levied under different pieces of legislation, with other industries also facing sectorspecific taxes and fees. “To waive licence fees for any entity, including not-for-profit companies, would potentially lead to a distortion in the market and possible use of such entities to avoid licence fees,” the committee said, adding that URCA had to levy fees on a non-discriminatory basis. Elsewhere, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny also expressed concern on SRG’s behalf that while the draft legislation for the new communications sector regulatory regime had been reviewed by the industry prior to its passage through Parliament, the Communications Sector Policy document had not been made available. He described this as a “serious omission” that meant industry players were unable to examine the Government’s proposals for the communications sector in their entirety, as the policy document worked ‘hand-in-glove’ with the legislation much like under the existing telecommunications regulatory regime. “For the sake of completeness, we should also point out that the sector policy referred to in the Bill must be a distinct policy document for the planned communications sector, as opposed to the current telecommunications sector,” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said. “Failure to make such a distinction would mean that the introduction of the new sector policy would have the effect of replacing the existing Telecommunications Act, and lead to a litany of regulatory complaints.” Cable: Wre ‘superior’ to BTC over Internet F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B T o adver tise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today!

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Embraced as a naturopathic medication, the fruit is commonly transformed into a liq uid form and then complemented with sweeteners or juices for oral consumption. With many Bahamians affected by chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, or various forms of cancer, it is not difficult to understand why so many are looking at the Noni as their ‘miracle in a bottle.’ According to one local medical practitioner, the healing potential of the Noni fruit has long been discovered and dates back hundred of years. Dr Michael Ingraham a medical doctor and practicing naturologist (a doctor of alter native medicines) for the past 28 years -from General Nutrition Centre, said that over that last few hundred years the Noni tree and fruit have been cultivated and harvested as a medicinal product. He explained: “It has been proven that the fruit basically helped to regulate metabolism of sugars, and is especially helpful for people with sugar imbalances, those who are hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic. “It works through the immune system also, it helps to upgrade certain immune functions, and basically it has so many functions.” Dr Ingraham said the fruit also posses antioxidants which helps with slowing down the aging process, along with several other purposes. He said in his experience most people who suffer from diabetes have benefited from using the product, and thus it continues to grown in popularity locally. This is why many like entrepreneur Pauline Zonicle have began to manufacture their own Noni juice. With her product NoniLand a 100 per cent Noni juice debuting at a number of local health stores last week, she said she envisions nothing but success. “In 2001 I traveled to Cat Island to visit my uncle Charles Zonicle who I saw looked very young and vibrant at the time, he was 79. I asked him whether he had any health problems, and he said he had none. “He had all of his teeth, he was not hypertensive, he did not wear glasses, and his reason for being in such good health he said was because of his daily Noni intake.” She said for 5 years, she too started drinking the product, and almost overnight she started to see change in her own bodyher menstrual cycle became regulated, her nightly sinus congestions no longer existed, and her energy level was at an all time high. She has also dropped from a size 12 to 6 dress size, and says it’s all because of the Noni juice. Also standing behind the claims that the Noni fruit is a healing product is local Tahitian Noni distributor Stephen St Clair-Serrette. He said after first being introduced to the Noni juice several years ago, he has seen a dramatic change in his health. He explained several years ago he suffered from a fall that ended in a large bump on his head and under the advice of doctors left it alone. However, after he had started taking the Noni juice, the bump slowly transformed to a “mega zit forming a head”, and was later extracted whereb efore it had no head and was h ardened. He said had it not been for the Noni, he would still have that bump. Although there is still significant research required to assert Noni as a standard heal i ng product, its popularity con tinues to evolve in the form of capsules, mixtures, and even lotions. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net NONI juice, it’s called the healing fruit in a b ottle said to prevent and cure anything from the common cold to high blood pressure. Scientifically known as Morinda-Citrifolia, the N oni fruit is found in several tropical regions throughout the world including Tahiti, Guyana, Suriname, Brazil, and the Bahamas. LOCAL entrepreneur Pauline Zonicle is among a growing number of Bahamians who not only use the Noni juice as a health supplement, but has also began manufacturing her own blend. N ON i J U i CE The miracle in a bottle B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter a missick@tribunemedia.net FOR centuries women have been trying to stop the aging process in its tracks and to assist in their efforts, medical professionals discov ered the power of a substance that can assist in reshaping the aging processBotox. According to beauty.ivillage.com, as you age, your skin gets thinner and dryer. “Collagen and elastin-the networks of fibers that make your skin firm and elastic -become disconnected, leading to sagging and wrinkles. Your cells simply slow down: New skin cells don't grow as quickly and dead cells don't shed as quickly, resulting in dull, grayish skin.” Dr Michelle Eccles-Major has been doing Botox injections for three years and has been interested in it for quite some time. “I became interested in Botox a couple of years before I actually started doing it after attending a dental conference in San Francisco. The dentist who presented the lecture was explaining the uses within a dental practice. Botulinum toxin is a medication and a neurotoxic protein produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum and sold commercially under the name Botox,” Dr Major said. Dr Major explained the procedure. “A very thin needle is used to give Botox and it is usually given in the forehead, the glabellar area; right above the nose, and the crows feet; the outside the corner of the eye. Also botox can be used in persons who suffer from migraines to alleviate the pain,” Dr Major said. As with all medical procedures, there are positive and negative things that can come out of this procedure. “The good effects from Botox are that people can have a nice smooth appearance without having plastic surgery. A large majority of the wrinkles in the treated site are removed. The downside is that it needs to be repeated every 4-5 months,” Dr Major said. All of Dr Major’s of the patients are over the age of 40 and she has seen an increase in persons becoming more aware of the procedure. “The interest to Botox has definitely increased over the years, more persons are interested in how it is done and if there are any harmful effects. Also how often you need to repeat the procedure. Also there are certain patients that come regularly and have the injections done and are very happy with the results,” Dr Major said. Dr Major said the patients who do Botox usually want that smooth look where the wrinkles have been removed which gives them a younger looking appearance. “The persons that I would recommend for Botox would be mid 30's to early 50's. It can be done on persons out of this range but I evaluate those on a case by case basis,” Dr Major said. As for the future of Botox in the Bahamas, Dr Major said she thinks it has a great future because a lot of persons want a new look without the surgery and the cost involved. “I really enjoy doing Botox especially when patients call back stating how pleased they are with the results. Very little discomfort for really nice results. The best thing about Botox is that it gives you a younger, smoother appearance without having to do surgery.” Botox: The anti-ager A very thin needle is used to give Botox and it is usually given in the fore head, the glabellar area; right above the nose, and the crows feet; the outside the corner of the eye. – Dr Michelle Eccles-Major health BODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e

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However, few would disagree that the Internet has highlighted people's fascination with anything to do with sex. This fascination is not new but a reflection of society's natural curiosity and need for personal expression. For those of us working in the human sexuality field, this only confirms that many people are still uncomfortable talking about sex. It is still much easier for most people to talk about love and romance but there still remains a veil of shame and humiliation when discussing sex. Online sexual activity, however, allows us to set aside o ur shyness and provides a certain a mount of anonymity which then allows m any to explore and satisfy their curiosity. To discriminatingly decry all online sexual activity use as deviant, exploitive and degrading of woman and children would be to ignore its huge supportive and educational use. The Internet has the ability to join people and bypass barriers such as: gender, physical appearances, race, disabilities and ultimately establishes online communities. Individuals who feel lonely or isolated due to a particular sexual minority or sexual difficulty may find an understanding lacking in their outer life. Support sites for gays, rape survivors, herpes sufferers, paraplegics to name a few, help people psychologically by bringing them information from people in similar situations. It has allowed people of differing socioeconomic groups to communicate a nd find a commonality which otherwise t hey may not have found. E ducational sites allocated to providing information on contraception, sexually transmitted diseases and many medical concerns enable people and adolescents in particular, to feel more comfortable getting information. A lot of our work as clinicians, and in particular sex therapists, is to find a healthy balance so that a person's online life does not become so satisfying that they withdraw or escape from trying to resolve their problems in their real life. Now that we have discussed some of the pluses it would be unreasonable and also neglectful not to discuss some of the real perils of sex on the net. As a result of the anonymity, the speed at which we are able to communicate and the huge number of money making commercial sex sites, people who already have a known compulsive personality find the Internet incredibly addictive. What we also know is that it is a venue for persons who have unresolved sexual difficulties to act out or in fact repeat old traumatic experiences. It is also not unusual as sex therapists to see individuals and couples presenting with relationship problems because of online sexual activity. For many affected partners any use is unacceptable but for others pornography may be tolerated but chat rooms and cybersex is unacceptable. Cybersex is defined as sexually satisfying communication, often with graphic pictures, sexual chat or emails. It may even lead to ' cybering' which is mutual or one sided m asturbation while still online. As sex t herapist we assess the primary relationship and on many occasions we find the online sexual activity is the result not the cause of an intimacy problem with in the couple. With reassurance and the careful steering of a therapist many situations can be successfully rectified. For women the continued harassment of explicit and demeaning emails and texts only adds to other forms of societal pressure and intimidation. Unfortunately, because our children have become more knowledgeable than us on the net they are now entering areas of the adult world without our knowledge. Their young age, immaturity and susceptibility to be persuaded only helps to feed the dangerous minds of some compulsive natures. So what can we do? Ban all use of the Internet? For many this is not necessary. The first step is to move the computer so that the screen can be viewed by others in the house. Of course this becomes even more difficult when some one is living alone. Then consider installing cyber screening software, tracking software and, change to a pre-filtering service provider. The next step is then to get professional help. Assessment can then be made to see what type of problem exists and an individual treatment plan can be designed. As with any other sexual problems early intervention is recommended as problems that have been left unattended take a longer time to treat. Ultimately, the Internet is here to stay so it is important to become proactive in establishing a safer and more prod uctive cyber world for the future. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist. Call for an appointmentRelate Bahamas at 3647230, oremail relatebahamas@yahoo.com orwww.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is also available for speaking engagements. L OVING RELATIONSHIPS C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 11B Recruiting Now for the July 2009 intake www.rdicaribbean.com • 27499 Riverview Center Boulevard, Suite 111, Bonita Springs, Florida 34134, USA • Tel 1 239 444 1730 • email info@rdicaribbean.com your goalsSpecialised MBAs offered by the University of Wales: Project Management, Management Consultancy, HR Management, Service Excellence and General MBA Higher National Diploma (HND months BA/BSc 12 months Higher National Diploma (entry to top up Degrees through 2-year HND) in Business and Management, Information Technology, Travel and Tourism, Marketing, Finance FEATURED PROGRAMME: UNIVERSITY OF WALES MBA US$8,500 COMPLETE IN MINIMUM OF ONE YEAR! • Develop your career while studying • No attendance requirement • Tutor and student MASTERSMBA University of Bradford, University of Sunderland, University of Wales MSc in Public Administration & Development University of Birmingham MSc Marketing & Management University of Bradford MSc Finance, Accounting & Management University of Bradford MA Education University of Derby LLM Commercial Law University of Derby MSc Information Technology University of Teesside MSc International Hospitality ManagementMSc Telecommunications Birmingham City University Diploma in Management University of Wales (pre-MBA for non-degree holders)BACHELOR DEGREE COURSES University of Wales BA (Honstop up specialisms in Marketing, Finance, Banking University of Sunderland BA (Hons& Management (top upHons Management (top up University of Derby BSc (Hons University of Teesside LLB, BSc (Hons (top up BSc (Hons Hospitality & Tourism (top up As we wind down from thinking about being single and dating we feel an urgency to open a discus-s ion on 'Sex and the Net.' It would be hard not to acknowledge the massive Internet explosion over the last twenty years and the increase of interest in sex that it has brought. Human sexuality, and in particular the non biological areas, continues to lag behind in research funding and because of this, we still do not have adequate objective data of the effects of the Internet on society. By MAGGIE BAIN Sex and the net JUSTas any brightening regimen must be approached with diligence to experience results, daily use of sun protection is just as imperative. Even the strictest of brightening regimens can be counteracted by minimal exposure to UV light. When a hyperpigmented area is exposed to UV light, more melanin production is triggered on a cellular level, causing further darkening. Ironically, this production of melanin is just your skin trying to protect itself from damaging UVl ight. Daily application of SPF will help shield skin from UV light to control melanin production on a cellular level. It c an even help lessen the a ppearance of hyperpigmentation triggered by hormone f luctuations (such as melasma) or post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (scarring Sunscreen and hyper-pigmented skin By SARAH BEEK Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. ONLINE sexual activity allows us to set aside our shyness and provides a certain amount of anonymity which then allows many to explore and satisfy their curiosity.

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T ODAY,in The Bahamas dogs are living much longer than they did twen-ty years ago. The reasons being: I. There are many advances in veterinary medicine. 2. There is better nutrition in the commercial foods. 3.The Bahamian public has become more educated and responsible about the correct care of dogs. A senior or geriatric dog refers to an older dog that has a body that is declini ng with regards to effective functioning because of the aging process. Dogs age at different rates and this is dependent to a large degree upon an individual animal genetics. Big dogs tend to age more quickly than small dogs. Breeds like Great Danes are old at 5-7 years; German Shepherds are old at 8-10 years. Small breeds like poodles and SHIH-TZUS live up to 14 years. But just like their owners, signs of aging are extremely variable. The better care a dog receives throughout his life, the longer he can be expected to live. Stray dogs usually do not have the same benefits of owned pets and hence rarely live to experience geriatrics because they die young, usually from a combin ation of diseases, malnutrition and t rauma. H owever, canine longevity means owners are faced with more issues than ever before. Elderly dogs are less active, sleep more and may become forgetful. They are not able to withstand extremes of temperature as well as younger dogs as they lose muscle tone. Typically, the thighs and forelimbs become thinner, while the neck and body thicken and the abdomen sags. Exertion may result in tremors of fatigue. Joint pain from arthritis is a common complaint and often slows the dog down. They become cranky and less tolerant of changes in routine. The dog’s senses tend to dwindle with age, which can be upsetting to your pet when he can’t see, smell or hear the way he used to. They suffer some degree of dental problems and may lose weight due to pain when eating or due to other problems. But geriatric dogs usually suffer from obesity from eating more than they need and exercising less, and in fact, obesity tends to shorten the life span. Old dogs may have problems with irregularity (constipation from senility and often their house training become less reliable. When a ctivity declines, so does the normal wear of toe nails, which may seem to grow faster. The old dog’s health becomes more fragile because the immune system’s competency is also affected with age. Old dogs get sicker and recover more slowly than healthy young dogs. It is vital to prevent prompt veterinary attention to keep old dogs healthy. One must recognise that dogs age more rapidly than humans. After age three, each canine year is roughly e quivalent to 5 human years. A chart below compares a dog’s age to that of a human. Age of DogHuman Age 1 yr15 yrs (Adolescent 2 yrs20 yrs 3 yrs25 yrs 5 yrs35 yrs 8 yrs50 yrs 10 yrs60 yrs 15 yrs85 yrs A number of diseases or conditions typically affect geriatric canines. Renal failure is probably the most common cause of death in aged dogs. Kidneys first seem to wear out more quickly than other organs. Heart disease is another consequence of canine aging, b ecause that muscle tends to weaken after a lifetime of use. Bladder infections are a common problem. The risk of cancer increases as the dog ages. Cataracts, glaucoma or dry eye are common eye problems. Intact males may develop prostrate problems. Elderly dogs may not tolerate hospitalisation that separates them from their owners very well though, and in these cases your veterinarian may show you how to treat your dog at home. Proper nutrition is vital to the old dog’s health. Senior formulations of commercial diets are available for the special need of older dogs. Often, older dogs do best on food that is easily digested and/or chewed. Most dogs can live comfortably and happily into old age, but some environmental modifications around your home may help. If stair steps are ap roblem provide a ramp. Move sleeping quarters to a warm cozy spot. Dai ly or bi weekly grooming keeps your dog looking and feeling good and also provides an opportunity to find problems early. Give your old dog lots of attention and understanding because he has given you the best times of your life, and you can now be his comfort and friend during his golden years. It is wise to encourage moderate exercise that will keep him fit and limber longer and make the last years of his life more comfortable and enjoyable for you both. How to help your geriatric or senior dog live a longer and happier life GREEN SCENE C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 12B, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By DR BASIL SANDS INmy last article I addressed the general topic of summer heat and your feet. Although this was very well received by my readers, there were many questions related to diabetic footcare. We may say, what's more natural than bare feet and sandals in the summer? Unfortunately, there is no off-season for diabetes constant monitoring is crucial. I urge diabetic patients to be aware that prolonged hot and humid weather can lead to a host of foot woes among them third-degree burns, if they don't protect their feet properly. The concern here is that in extreme heat as experienced during summer months in the Bahamas diabetics can suffer swelling, dryness and cracking from wearing sandals. They may also have problems assoc iated with walking barefoot outdoors such as puncture wounds, burns and blisters from hot pavement. A local podiatrist cited a case where a diabetic patient took a few minutes walking barefoot on a hot driveway to fetch the newspaper and suffered bad burns on the sole of his feet due to impaired nerve sensation from the disease (neuropathy If you are diabetic and your skin gets very dry in hot weather, you may need to apply more moisturising agent, such as diabetic lotion, which is specially formulated for diabetic feet. It contains no alcohols and chemicals to dry out the skin. Further, you need to pay special attention to your heels as dry skin cracks easily. Rules for diabetic footcare: Inspect your feet daily for blisters, cuts, and scratches. Always checkb etween your toes. Wash your feet daily. Dry carefully. Avoid extreme temperatures. Test water with your hands or elbow before bathing. If your feet feel cold at night, wear socks. Inspect the insides of your shoes daily for foreign objects, and rough areas. For dry feet, use diabetic approved lotion. Apply this after bathing and drying your feet. Shoes should be fitted by a foot care specialist and be comfortable at the time of purchase. See your family doctor regularly and be sure to have your feet examined at each visit. Do not smoke. Do not soak your feet in hot water Do not walk barefooted. Do not use chemical agents for the removal of corns and calluses or cut them; see your podiatrist. Do not wear mended stockings and avoid stockings with seams. Do not use oils or cream between your toes. Do not wear sandals with thongs between the toes. Do not cross your legs. This can cause pressure on the nerves and blood vessels. These necessary precautions can reduce the risk of serious foot condi tions. Many products such as diabetic approved shoes and inserts, seamfree socks, specialty lotions and creams, are available at specialty footwear stores or pedorthic facilities where staff, trained in foot pathology and properly fitting shoes, will help you make choices that will support your foot care plan and accommodate any foot problems. Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a health and wellness franchise that focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit, located in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau. "The views expressed are those of the author and does not necessarily represent those of Foot Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any questions or comments to nassau@footsolutions.com or 327-FEET (3338 Diabetes and summertime footcare By BERNADETTE GIBSON I HAVE been writing The Green Scene for The Tribune for over 20 years but I have never addressed the subject of apples. Let me redress that situation. One of the most popular low-chill apples in Florida, Texas and Southern California is a semi-dwarf variety called Dorsett Golden. I was introduced to Dorsett Golden by my old friend Andr Albury, owner of Wonderland Nursery in Marsh Harbour. He has several plants, but they are for his own use, not for sale. I have watched them from their pink flowering stage through to mid maturity and I am looking for ward to tasting one soon. Being Bahamian, I am not familiar with apple culture and I must point out that I have used ‘Origin and Description of Dorsett Golden Apple’, E. P. Miller and Professor W. B. Sherman, Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.93: 108,109. 1980. as a technical source. The original Dorsett Golden apple was planted in a New Providence garden by Irene Dorsett in 1953. She had recently returned from New York and had bought some Golden Delicious apples there. One of the seeds grew and produced fruit. The tree came to the attention of William Whitman of the Rare Fruit Council International and in 1961 he introduced budwood from the tree into Florida. Two to three thousand trees were cultivated by Newcomb Nursery in the Miami area during the 1960s. It was found that Dorsett Golden was able to produce fruit successfully with a mere 200 hours or less of chill. It was also found to be a pollinator for another low-chill apple, Anna, which produces red fruits. Anna and Golden Dorsett trees are usually grown together. Thousands upon thousands of apple trees are grown in the USA that have their origin in sunny New Providence. A chance in a million? More like a chance in a hundred quintillion. Scientists doubt that Dorsett Golden was grown from a Golden Delicious seed because chilling in Golden Delicious is controlled by 10 to 20 genes. For two genes to mutate would be one in a hundred million. Ten to 20 genes? I’ll leave you to do the math. Where then did the original seed come from? This is my own theory: There has been research and development of low-chill apples in Israel for many years. A Golden Delicious cultivator was used in some cases and might very well account for the colour and shape of Dorsett Golden. Perhaps in New York Mrs. Dorsett bought what she assumed were Golden Delicious apples but were, in fact, experimental products from Israel that had become mixed in with the Golden Delicious. Whatever happened, the Dorsett Golden is a distinct cultivator unlike any other. It is semi-pygmy and produces fruits year round that are pale yellow, often with a light pink blush. Fruiting can be encouraged at the right time by stripping the leaves from the tree, as leaf loss is one of the conditions that induces flowering and fruit growth. If there are too many young fruits on a Dorsett Golden limb they will grow but remain small. Reducing the bunch size will result in larger apples. The story of Irene Dorsett and her Dorsett Golden is both thrilling and mysterious. It is thrilling that a major apple cultivator originated in the semitropical environs of The Bahamas. It is mysterious because nobody really knows the factors involved in the plant’s evolution. Mutation took place, obviously, but what were the contributing factors? Does the original tree still stand? Or its direct progeny? If any members of the Dorsett family can add details to the story I would grateful to hear from them. j.hardy@coralwave.com A Bahamian apple B y Gardener Jack Dorsett Golden apple A Bahamian miracle. INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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Alexander Roberts, 26 (names have been changed that for the last three years, his search for special someone has been constantly derailed because many of the women whom he considered rarely turn out to be what he expected. He now feels the search for Ms Right begins with preparing yourself and ensuring that the qualities you are looking for are complimented by qualities you possess. Being a college graduate, independent, confident, and sociable, Alexander said he sim ply wants to be with a woman w ho can match him at his intell ectual level, but one who is also aware of her role as a woman. He said the one pet-peeve he has when it comes to dating, is being with a woman who is clingy. “I could pretty much deal w ith a lot of things, but when you have a woman who always wants you to call or text her when you arrive at work, when you’re going to lunch, and when you’re headed home, that is straight up annoying and scary.” Alexander argues that if he is the type person who is always willing to trust until given a reason not to, then the woman whom he commits to should possess an equal amount of integrity. Another challenge for him happens while out on dates where he is expected to foot the bill at a restaurant or movie. Although not an issue for him, he said women sometimes don’t even want to offer a friendly kiss or intimate conversation at the end of the date, which makes him feel as though they’re not with him for the right reasons. As simple as it seems, Alexander said this is another reason he has been forced to reside in Singleville.” H e said the timing feels right f or getting into a long-term relationship, he just wishes he could wave a magic wand to put all the right qualities in one women. However 24-year-old Gina Reid ‘s map to Mr Right involved making a few wrong turns, and finding “an awesome package with no content.” Entering the dating scene about 6 years ago, Gina said her first choice was the infamous thug. She said this kind of guy seemed to have a unique confidence, however he frequently lacked the needed qualities for someone interested in a long term “upward” relationship. “Intimacy was there, but the daily affection was missing, they would rather spend time on the blocks rather than chilling with me. I think it was just the image of a bad boy that I was drawn to, but I got bored after a while.” Having been with her current boyfriend for more than two years, Gina said she wished she had decided to date ‘the average guy’ much sooner. “When I first met him, I already knew he was not like the rest. He wasn’t like the gang ster type that I was use to, he was a corporate gentleman, and maybe that was all I really needed.” Gina described her partner as honest, affectionate, and funny, all of which she considers essen tial in a relationship. Although not always the funniest or in the best of moods, she said her partner helps to bring out her best. She said although from time to time she still struggles with her significant other being too “gossipy,” she is happy that she was able to look past finding the perfect thug, and instead commit herself to someone who wanted the same out of life. Far too often single people have extreme expectations of what they want in a mate, and should remember that no human is perfect, and like them their future partner will have shortcomings. Among other women, quali ties identified for the perfect man include; someone who is responsible, faithful, honest, compassionate, loving, and someone able to say I’m sorry. Some of the turn-offs were a lazy man, one who can’t express his feelings, and one who is always too busy for his woman. When it comes to identifying the qualities of the ideal woman, the most common characteristics stated by men included; one that is hard working, someone who can cook (or at least make the effort), and one that is approved by her mate’s friends. Turn-offs included a nagging woman, an overly jealous woman, one who is stuck-up, a woman with no presence or personality, and one who is not giving. C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net OR many single people, navigating through the available prospects can sometimes become a challenge when the basic qualities y ou’re seeking in a mate are scarce at best. T ribune Features s pok e with a group of men and women who said although the search can seem never-ending at times, it is much simpler once you learn what to look for and understand what is expected from you. My Checklist to Mr/Ms Right Why finding that special someone is easier than you think I could pretty much deal with a lot of things, but when you have a woman who always wants you to call or text her when you arrive at work, when you’re going to lunch, and when you’re headed home, that is straight up annoying and scary. – Alexander Roberts F

PAGE 21

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 74F/23C Low: 77F/25C Low: 76F/24C Low: 79F/26C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 81F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 90F/32C High: 90F/32C High: 88 F/31 C High: 86 F/30 C High: 90F/32C High: 90 F/32C High: 90F/32C Low: 80F/27C High: 88F/31C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 92F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 79F/26C High: 88 F/31 Low: 75F/24C High: 86F/30C Low: 77 F/25C High: 89F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 92F/33C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 90F/32C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 77F/25C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 81F/27C High: 96F/36C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 14 TH 2009, PAGE 13C THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Mostly sunny with a thunderstorm. Clear, breezy and very warm. Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. A mix of sun and clouds, a t-storm. High: 90 Low: 80 High: 90 High: 90 High: 92 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. High: 90 Low: 81 Low: 81 Low: 81 AccuWeather RealFeel 98F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 89F 101-90F 107-92F 112-91F 107-88F Low: 81 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................79F/26C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 87 F/30C Last year's low .................................. 72 F/22C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.05" Year to date ................................................18.55" Normal year to date ....................................21.12" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full Jul. 15 Jul. 21Jul. 28Aug. 5 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:29 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:02 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . . . . none Moonset . . . . 12:40 p.m. Today Wednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 12:39 a.m.2.46:48 a.m.0.2 1:10 p.m.2.77:31 p.m.0.5 1:28 a.m.2.37:34 a.m.0.2 2:03 p.m.2.78:31 p.m.0.5 2:24 a.m.2.28:28 a.m.0.2 3:02 p.m.2.89:36 p.m.0.4 3:26 a.m.2.29:27 a.m.0.1 4:06 p.m.2.910:41 p.m.0.3 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco88/3175/23pc88/3175/23pc Amsterdam75/2359/15sh73/2257/13s Ankara, Turkey82/2755/12t81/2754/12pc Athens88/3173/22s91/3273/22s Auckland59/1553/11pc59/1553/11c Bangkok89/3178/25r89/3179/26sh Barbados86/3077/25t86/3077/25s Barcelona81/2771/21c80/2669/20s Beijing100/3775/23s100/3775/23pc Beirut78/2575/23s79/2675/23s Belgrade96/3572/22s100/3771/21s Berlin77/2563/17sh81/2761/16c Bermuda84/2877/25sh84/2877/25sh Bogota64/1745/7sh63/1744/6pc Brussels77/2557/13pc75/2355/12pc Budapest91/3266/18s97/3669/20s Buenos Aires57/1341/5s55/1243/6c Cairo94/3472/22s97/3673/22s Calcutta95/3584/28sh91/3283/28r Calgary60/1544/6c68/2048/8s Cancun90/3275/23pc91/3273/22pc Caracas81/2771/21pc81/2771/21t Casablanca76/2462/16s79/2664/17s Copenhagen75/2362/16sh76/2458/14pc Dublin64/1750/10r66/1854/12sh Frankfurt75/2361/16r81/2759/15pc Geneva 84/28 64/17 t 80/2661/16pc Halifax 70/21 54/12 pc 69/20 54/12 s Havana 90/32 72/22 pc 90/32 73/22 t Helsinki 68/20 54/12pc73/2252/11pc Hong Kong 93/33 82/27 s 91/32 82/27s Islamabad 95/35 78/25 pc 104/40 83/28 s Istanbul83/2868/20s87/3070/21s Jerusalem 80/26 59/15s82/2762/16s Johannesburg 53/1136/2s52/1133/0pc Kingston 89/3178/25pc89/3179/26pc Lima72/2261/16s73/2260/15s London73/2257/13sh75/2357/13pc Madrid91/3259/15pc93/3359/15s Manila88/3178/25t83/2877/25r Mexico City75/2354/12t73/2253/11t Monterrey100/3775/23s102/3876/24s Montreal66/1855/12pc75/2363/17pc Moscow81/2757/13c75/2355/12sh Munich86/3059/15t83/2859/15pc Nairobi80/2655/12c79/2654/12r New Delhi 90/3282/27t97/3684/28t Oslo73/2255/12sh72/2257/13sh Paris77/2563/17pc79/2661/16s Prague 87/30 61/16 t 77/25 58/14 t Rio de Janeiro71/2163/17pc71/2165/18pc Riyadh104/4079/26s104/4079/26s Rome 88/31 65/18 s 88/31 68/20 pc St. Thomas90/3282/27t91/3281/27pc San Juan55/1233/0c64/1735/1pc San Salvador 88/31 70/21 pc 87/30 74/23 t Santiago 63/1743/6c59/1539/3pc Santo Domingo91/3273/22pc86/3073/22r Sao Paulo 63/17 52/11 c 59/15 55/12pc Seoul81/2768/20r90/3270/21s Stockholm 73/22 57/13 sh 75/23 59/15 pc Sydney 63/17 45/7 s61/1645/7pc Taipei93/3382/27t91/3282/27pc T okyo 86/30 73/22 c 90/32 77/25 s T oronto 74/2355/12s77/2561/16t Trinidad75/2357/13pc86/3060/15s V ancouver 72/22 58/14 pc 74/2359/15s Vienna 86/3073/22t90/3268/20t W arsaw 81/27 66/18 pc 83/28 59/15 c Winnipeg 66/18 54/12 c 64/1751/10t H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Wednesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Wednesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Wednesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque96/3569/20pc93/3368/20t Anchorage75/2357/13s76/2458/14s Atlanta91/3270/21pc92/3373/22t Atlantic City83/2857/13s82/2770/21pc Baltimore86/3058/14s89/3168/20pc Boston78/2558/14s79/2665/18pc Buffalo72/2255/12s77/2564/17t Charleston, SC86/3069/20t92/3374/23t Chicago78/2567/19pc83/2864/17t Cleveland78/2559/15s82/2767/19t Dallas102/3878/25s100/3778/25s Denver92/3354/12pc85/2957/13pc Detroit79/2659/15s82/2764/17t Honolulu88/3176/24pc88/3176/24s Houston97/3677/25s96/3577/25s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday TodayWednesdayTodayWednesday Indianapolis86/3065/18pc88/3166/18t Jacksonville90/3271/21t92/3374/23t Kansas City94/3474/23t89/3167/19t Las Vegas107/4180/26s108/4285/29s Little Rock100/3778/25s102/3874/23s Los Angeles86/3064/17s88/3164/17s Louisville89/3169/20pc90/3272/22t Memphis96/3578/25t99/3776/24pc Miami90/3278/25t91/3280/26t Minneapolis76/2462/16t75/2359/15t Nashville94/3472/22pc93/3372/22t New Orleans95/3578/25t92/3377/25t New York81/2765/18s82/2772/22pc Oklahoma City105/4076/24s103/3972/22s Orlando90/3274/23t92/3374/23t Philadelphia85/2963/17s86/3070/21pc Phoenix 112/44 89/31 pc 110/4387/30s Pittsburgh78/2552/11s84/2868/20t Portland, OR 82/2757/13s88/3160/15s Raleigh-Durham 88/31 64/17 s 92/33 71/21 pc St. Louis88/3176/24t94/3469/20t Salt Lake City 84/28 59/15 s 89/3163/17s San Antonio 100/37 76/24 s 96/35 76/24 s San Diego75/2368/20pc77/2567/19pc San Francisco 78/25 57/13 s 76/2456/13pc Seattle76/2454/12pc79/2657/13s T allahassee 94/3474/23t95/3573/22t T ampa 90/32 77/25 pc 90/32 77/25t Tucson105/4081/27pc103/3981/27pc W ashington, DC 88/31 63/17s90/3272/22pc UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com


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‘WOMAN’ SECTION

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009



eS
al
aE aes

BAHAMAS BIGGEST

(oj ayer a =
break-in charges

Eleizer Regnier in
court in connection
with alleged
housebreaking ring

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

PROMINENT attorney Eleiz-
er Regnier was arraigned in Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday, charged
in connection with an alleged
housebreaking ring.

Mr Regnier was among six men
who appeared before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in Court 1,
Bank Lane yesterday afternoon
on charges of housebreaking,
stealing and receiving.

According to police prosecu-
tor Sergeant Sean Thurston, the

incidents allegedly occurred
between January and July of this
year. Sergeant Thurston told the
court that a number of items
allegedly stolen from several res-
idences and businesses in New
Providence total over $200,000 in
value and have been recovered.
He said that the items relative to
the charges now before the court
total over $60,000.

Mr Regnier, 56, a seasoned
attorney with a long history of
speaking out on human rights and
issues facing the Haitian commu-

SEE page seven

Dwight Major ‘could
be a free man soon’

DWIGHT Major could be a free man very soon, his
lawyer told The Tribune last night, after a US Feder-
al court sentenced the convicted drug trafficker to

108 months in prison.

Speaking from Miami after court adjourned yes-
terday, attorney Troy Ferguson said Major, 44, is very
pleased with how the US justice system has treated

SEE page two

Dwight Major

The Taste

on

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albede) Glas solutely\



de lite ea tee ed

ures courtesy of ZNS

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE outraged family of slain
teenager Brenton Smith believes a
stray bullet fired by police intended
for two suspected armed robbers
led to the "innocent" victim's death.

Smith's distraught relatives now
want a full and transparent investi-
gation into the incident and are call-
ing on police to come clean with
their alleged culpability.

However, officer-in-charge of the
Central Detective Unit Superin-
tendent Elsworth Moss said it was
too early to say who was responsi-
ble for the teen's death, adding that
investigators were still waiting on
results from an autopsy and a bal-
listics report before they could dis-
cern who was to blame.

"I can't verify that, I can't deny
that ... because I have to have the
ballistics information before that
can be verified," said Mr Moss
when asked to respond to the fam-
ily's accusation.



SEE PAGE NINE

WAKE UP!

Sausage & Egg
Burrito







Missing boys
‘survived on
plums and
Stream water’

Pair spent 33
days alone in
Andros forest

*

a ee

MARCELL CLARKE, six, and Deangelo Clarke, nine, spent 33 days and nights alone before being found.

Family believes stray police
bullet killed ‘innocent’ teen



FAMILY AND friends of 18-year-old Brenton Smith gathered in prayer led



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

by family friend and pastor Bill Higgs of Trinity Methodist Church outside

the morgue.

Smith was shot dead last Thurs-
day night when he was caught in
the cross-fire of a chase between
police and two suspected
armed robbers in the Kemp Road
area.

The two men were suspected of
the hold-up of the nearby City Mar-

ket food store. Over the weekend
police said they did not suspect that
Smith was one of the men who
robbed the store.

Yesterday morning, around 30
relatives and friends waited outside

SEE page seven

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



? Prime Minister
? Perry Christie is
? reportedly not
ias popular
? amongst his par-
i liamentary
? group as he is
? with the base of
? the party, the
? preliminary results from a
? polling study have revealed.

D>

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE children who spent 33
days and nights alone in an
Andros forest survived on a
diet of plums and stream water,
family members told The Tri-
bune.

The pair, who now “look
like skeletons”, lived in a cave-
like hole after getting lost in
the country’s largest untouched
natural forest in southeast
Andros.

Marcell Clarke, six, and
Deangelo Clarke, nine, had
gone out crabbing at around
6pm on June 9 and were given
up for dead after an extensive
police search.

But a relative told how she
found them on the roadside
near Kemp’s Bay on Sunday,
around five miles from their
grandmother’s house in
Smith’s Hill where they had set
out nearly five weeks before.

The boys were flown into
Nassau on Sunday afternoon
to be treated at the Princess
Margaret Hospital for dehy-
dration, malnutrition, poison-
wood rashes, insect bites, cuts
and grazes.

Their mother Vera Clarke,
of Kemp Road, Nassau, said

SEE page seven

Study: Christie ‘not
as popular’ with
parliamentary group as
he is with party hase

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
? Tribune Staff Reporter
i pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER

Perry Christie



Although the details of this

study, which is being prepared
? for deputy leader hopeful
i Philip Davis, have yet to be
? released, The Tribune under-
i stands that the party’s rank and
: file interviewed expressed

“indifference” to Mr Christie

i staying on as leader.

SEE page seven


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009






















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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

both him and his wife, Keva.

“Dwight is ecstatic. He is anx-
ious to get back to the Bahamas;
back to his hotel in Long Island
and back to his kids,” Mr Fergu-
son said.

The sentence was delivered in a
Florida Southern District Court by
Judge Kenneth Marra yesterday
afternoon.

Dwight and Keva Major were

TROPICAL
rs eel

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PHONE: 322-2157



Dwight Major

accused by the United States gov-
ernment of being part of a drug
trafficking conspiracy that involved
the transportation of cocaine and
marijuana between August 2002
and January 2003.

After five years of fighting an
extradition request to stand trial in
the US on drug related charges,
Dwight and Keva Major were sent
to Florida last year.

Although Major was actually
sentenced to nine years (108
months) in prison with supervised
release after five years, Mr Fergu-
son said the sentence will take into
account the 78 months served since
the extradition order was filed
against him in 2003.

This, along with the 15 per cent
typically taken off sentences in the
US for good behaviour, means
Major could be released in just over
a year in a half.

Mr Ferguson added that if Major
opts for a “treaty transfer,” which
would allow him to serve his sen-
tence in the Bahamas, he could be
released “almost immediately.”

Keva Major pleaded guilty to the
charges against her in August, 2008,
and her husband did the same in
October. When a US grand jury
brought the indictment alleging
conspiracy, Major was already serv-
ing time on an unrelated drug con-
spiracy charge.

His wife was placed on proba-
tion for three years, meaning she
cannot leave the US without the
court’s permission.

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TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



OFducation

Privatise
education
system,
Govt urged

INSTEAD of praising failure,
a prime minister with a vision
for an educated citizenry would
take responsibility for not rais-
ing levels of literacy and
announce the privatisation of
the education system, said Joan
Thompson president of The
Nassau Institute responding to
the unveiling of government’s
10-year education plan last
week.

In his recent
speech at the
2009 National
Education
Summit Prime
Minister
Hubert Ingra-
ham said:

“T believe it
is noteworthy
that, like
health, educa-
tion has been
one of the
largest recipients of government
funding in every budget cycle
since before independence.
Regrettably, our success in get-
ting every child into a classroom
has not translated into every
child having achieved his full
potential. When, in the first half
of the 20th century, most chil-
dren completing primary school
could read and write, today too
many students leave our sec-
ondary schools only semi-liter-
ate and semi-numerate.”

Mrs Thompson pointed out
that in spite of vast sums of
money poured into education,
increasing compulsory atten-
dance from 14 to 16 years, the
level of achievement as mea-
sured by test results, is so low as
to be a national embarrassment.

“Tt could hardly be worse.
Words are cheap, and none are
cheaper than those out of the
mouths of politicians. Caught up
in self-congratulatory language
the true and unadulterated
meaning of their words is
obscured by the emotive style of
their delivery. Anyone daring to
challenge this nonsensical
obfuscation of the truth about
public education will be regard-
ed as a heretic, and banished
from polite Bahamian society.
So be it,” she said.

Mrs Thompson said that a
prime minister with a vision for
an educated citizenry would
introduce a five-year plan that
would move the government
toward privatizing the education
system. She suggested that gov-
ernment should have teachers
gradually released from the gov-
ernment payroll with salaries
reserved in a loan fund
for teachers to open schools as
education-for-profit centres.

“Initially some of the existing
school buildings will be leased
annually at favourable rates
with renewal option up to five
years. On approval of the busi-
ness plan, rental arrangements
for existing schools will be
entertained. It is anticipated
that the resulting private
schools will become self-sustain-
ing as market forces come into
play as they are not required to
compete with a state education
monopoly. The competition for
pupils at affordable rates to the
parents will raise the level of
proficiency unachievable by the
state-run schools,” the Nassau
Institute president said.

She said a number of school
buildings and teachers should
be retained for the transition
period from public to private
education. She said government
should be phased out as the
dominant education supplier in
order for the market for educa-
tion to become dynamic and
flourish as government influ-
ence and controls lessen.

“(This plan) has the potential
for meaningful change. Only a
radical rethinking for a totally
new approach will solve the
learning crisis in government
schools. Government efforts to
‘fix’ the existing structure will
require even more money with
little change in outcomes. To
continue the same dysfunctional
system commits the Bahamas to
third rate status far into the
future,” she said.

HUBERT
Mca e



Man charged with
murdering relative

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A 26-year-old man charged in the murder of a rel-

murder charge yesterday. His lawyer Murrio Ducille
told the court that his client has been receiving psy-
chiatric treatment for some time. He asked that
Farquharson be remanded to Sandilands Rehabili-
tation Centre to continue his treatment.

ative was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yester-

day afternoon.

Von Farquharson of Butler Street appeared
before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court 1,

Bank Lane on a murder charge yesterday. It is
alleged that on Wednesday, July 8, Farquharson
intentionally caused the death of Sharmon Kemp.

Kemp, 25, of Winton Meadows, was reportedly
stabbed in the back with a knife outside Henry F
Storr Electric Company during a violent alterca-
tion with another man last Wednesday. He died in
hospital a short time after the incident. Kemp’s
death raised the murder count for 2009 to 40 per-
sons. Farquharson, who is reportedly a cousin of the
deceased, was not required to enter a plea to the

EVENT PROMOTER BLAMED FOR BREACH OF CONTRACT




























Lil Wayne
responds

to suit over

mV Cae|
concert
no-show

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

MULTI-MILLION dollar
recording artist Lil Wayne has
responded to a law suit that
claims he failed to perform at a
concert in the Bahamas last year.

Blaming the promoter of the
event, Red City Entertainment
for a breach of contract, Lil
Wayne’s manager Cortez Bryant
said the promoters failed to pay
the sound company who in turn
packed up their equipment and
left the venue shortly before Lil
Wayne was scheduled to hit the
stage.

“On those grounds, at that
moment, they were in breach of
contract and forfeited their
deposit,” Mr Bryant said.

Rescheduling the event to the
following day, September 27, Lil
Wayne reportedly agreed to per-
form as long as the promoter
made arrangements that were up
to “his standards.”

“T presented their case to
Wayne and he said he would do it
if the promoters had everything
right, based on our contract,”
Bryant said. “I then told the pro-
moters to extend our rooms and
if, and only if, there were no prob-
lems at the venue, then he would
take the stage.

“When I arrived at the venue,
the security was horrible, causing
it to be an unsafe environment
and the sound system wasn't up
to our contracted standard,”
Bryant explained. “I then told the
promoters Wayne wasn’t coming
because they didn’t have their set-
up to a contracted standard for
the second night in a row.”

This second disappointment in
a row caused a major uproar at
the event with more than 5,000
fans being sent home after wait-
ing for the promised rapper for
hours. Red City Entertainment
reportedly was unable to recoup
its money which included more
than $30,000 for the accommo-
dations for Lil Wayne and his
entourage alone.

The Grammy-nominated artist,
whose real name is Dwayne
Carter, 26, is being sued for near-
ly half a million dollars by Red
City Entertainment for his
advance and travel arrangements.

Carter was the scheduled head-
liner at the Poppin Bottles con-
cert held at the Bristol Wine and
Spirits grounds on September 27,
2008. However, the event, which
was postponed from the original
date of Friday, September 26, to
Saturday, September 27, due to
sound problems never material-
ized. Meanwhile, Red City Enter-
tainment alleges they had already

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LIL' WAYNE is presented with the
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at the 9th Annual BET Awards on
Sunday, June 28, 2009, in Los
Angeles.



“When I arrived at
the venue, the
security was
horrible, causing it to
be an unsafe
environment and the
sound system wasn't
up to our contracted
standard.”



Cortez Bryant

paid Lil Wayne $210,000 to
secure his performance at the
highly promoted event.

According to the promoter’s
allegations, on that evening in
question the Louisiana rapper
was found by police, lying uncon-
scious in his hotel room, after fail-
ing to show up at the venue at his
scheduled call time.

Red City is seeking $432,000
in restitution for his advance and
travel arrangements.

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Police prosecutor Sergeant Sean Thurston, how-
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pointed out that the court was not in possession of
any psychiatric report relative to Farquharson.

Chief Magistrate Gomez remanded Farquhar-
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receive his psychiatric treatment there.

The case has been adjourned to July 22 for men-
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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Don’t give the
Chief Justice



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Sept. may bring push for Iran sanctions

WASHINGTON — After a half-year of
extending patient feelers to Iran, President
Barack Obama has set a timeline — warning
Tehran it must show willingness to negotiate
an end to its nuclear programme by September
or face consequences.

If the West weighs new moves against Iran
this fall, as Obama suggested Friday, it will like-
ly mean new UN. sanctions or unilateral U.S.
penalties, rather than military strikes.

Obama told reporters in Italy, where he met
with other world leaders, that there is now a
September "time frame" for Iran to respond
to offers to discuss its nuclear programme.
While he did not call it a deadline, he said the
world cannot afford to wait long for Iran to
make its intentions clear.

"We're not going to just wait indefinitely and
allow for the development of the nuclear
weapon,” he said.

Obama said that in September "we will re-
evaluate Iran's posture toward negotiating the
cessation of a nuclear weapons policy.” If by
then it has not accepted the offer of talks, the
United States and "potentially a lot of other
countries" are going to say "we need to take fur-
ther steps," he said.

The president did not say what steps he has
in mind. He mentioned neither sanctions nor
military force. But it seems clear that a next
step to pressure Iran would entail some form of
sanctions.

"The administration and the other powers
would probably like to leave the toughest forms
of sanctions to be used if they feel that diplo-
macy has not gone anywhere — not in this pre-
diplomacy period," said Trita Parsi, president of
the National Iranian American Council, which
supports expanded U.S.-Iranian contacts.

Working against Obama's expression of
urgency is the political paralysis in Tehran,
where protesters last week sought to revive
street demonstrations over the country's dis-
puted presidential election. Iranian authorities,
while accusing the U.S. and other Western coun-
tries of secretly instigating the protests, seem
likely to put nuclear negotiations on the back
burner until the election dust settles.

State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley
acknowledged as much on Friday, saying, "This
(post-election turmoil) has clearly diverted the
attention of the Iranian government from offers
of engagement."

At the Group of Eight summit in Italy, world
leaders issued a joint statement deploring Iran's
crackdown on protesters. They also said they
remain committed to finding a diplomatic solu-
tion to the nuclear issue and said that in Sep-

Quality Auto Sales

tember they would “take stock of the situa-
tion" on the nuclear front.

Jon B. Alterman, director of the Middle East
programme at the Centre For Strategic and
International Studies, said that if reports of rifts
among some of Iran's ruling clerics are true,
then it will be hard for the government to agree
on a policy response to the West's offer of direct
negotiations.

He sees the prospect of movement toward
sanctions this fall. That could mean any combi-
nation of additional financial penalties, trade
restrictions, limits on travel by Iranian govern-
ment officials and other actions.

"Clearly the world is moving toward pre-
senting Iran a choice" between diplomacy and
isolation, Alterman said.

Before the June election, the Obama admin-
istration had figured that once the result was in,
the Tehran government could be expected to
make clear whether it intends to take up the
offers of nuclear talks.

"All of that has been completely put on its
head" by the post-election turmoil, said Parsi.
He believes Iran's political paralysis will con-
tinue as long the protest movement is alive.

But the clock keeps ticking, moving Iran clos-
er to obtaining the nuclear bomb that the USS.
and much of the rest of the world says it cannot
be allowed.

By USS. estimates, Iran is one to three years
away from the capability to make nuclear
weapons. Some think they are closer, and the
fact is that no one outside Iran really knows.
The five permanent members of the U.N. Secu-
rity Council — Britain, China, France, Russia
and the United States — as well as Germany
have offered Iran incentives to stop reprocess-
ing uranium that could fuel a nuclear bomb.

Iran so far has ignored the offer and continues
to amass enriched uranium, sparking grave
fears, especially in Israel, which has not ruled
out military strikes to deal with the threat.

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
insists the programme is intended only for
peaceful nuclear purposes.

The USS. has not publicly ruled out using mil-
itary force against Iran, but it seems far from
that stage. Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said Tuesday that mil-
itary action could backfire.

"I worry a great deal about the response of a
country that gets struck," he said. "It is a really
important place to not go, if we cannot go there
in any way, shape or form."

(This article was written by Robert Burns,
AP National Security writer- c-2009).



PRE-OWNED CARS & TRUCKS

UE

job to foreigner

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I write as a concerned
Bahamian. I know that to be
Chief Justice you must be a
counsel and attorney of over 10
years standing. You should also
have a high degree of knowl-
edge and experience in all areas
of the law and some adminis-
trative skills.

I was born in The Bahamas, I
have nowhere to go. I have lim-
ited knowledge of the law, but
know what is fair in dealing with
people. Bahamas, it is time to
wake up and speak up and stop
politicians from destroying our
Bahamas before it’s too late.

How can this government
bring in a foreign person to be
Chief Justice or appoint the
most junior judge in the
Supreme Court or an outsider
with no real judicial experience
to that position? What is he say-
ing to the other judges on the
bench? We have competent
judges with experience like
Senior Justice Allen, Justice of
Appeal Longley, Justices Jon
and Stephen Isaacs who have
served diligently and well and
have more than 10 years expe-
rience in the judiciary.

It would be a slap in the face

letters@tribunemedia net



to these judges if a foreigner or
a junior judge or some other
outsider is made chief justice
over them. How would you
expect any of them to give such
a person their full and loyal sup-
port? They are human too. This
would be a travesty and cause
dissension and that would not
be in the best interest of the
administration of justice.
What is more, neither the
Attorney General, nor the
junior judge named in the news-
paper, or the attorney in pri-
vate practice, whose name has
been mentioned, has any expe-
rience in the criminal law. As
far as I know, none of them has
ever set foot in a criminal court
either as counsel or judge.
That’s remarkable at this time
when crime is so prevalent and
the criminal justice system
needs so much attention!
Word has it that the judges
named can't be controlled by
the politicians and Senior Jus-
tice Anita Allen is married to
the wrong person. Bahamians,

when Senior Justice Allen’s hus-
band was with this Govern-
ment, she was not married to
the wrong man then. This is the
same man! I didn't know that
she had got married again. The
Government should answer
that. What is due to a person
should be bestowed on them,
she is qualified, period. We, as
Bahamians need to speak up
about the wrongdoing of this
Government or any Govern-
ment, no matter whether we are
PLP or FNM.

There is a saying, what goes
up must come down, what goes
around comes around and when
you are powerful be merciful.
For example, from what I can
see from the newspaper reports,
this Judge Allen, is a hard-
working, fair and fearless
woman who has shown courage.
That’s what they don’t like. I
have seen reports of her doing
all manner of cases, she seems
to have experience in all sides of
the judiciary, and has even act-
ed in that post many times when
the Chief Justice was away.
What’s the problem now!

SAMUEL JOHNSON
Nassau,
July, 2009.

Turtle issue used to stigmatise Bahamians

EDITOR, The Tribune.

My law office has been inun-
dated with calls by Bahamians
not only supporting my views on
the save the turtle campaigners,
but expressing disgust at the per-
sonalised and mean-spirited
nature of the responses they have
elicited.

Given the apparent public per-
ception, it is easy to surmise that
the prickly defensiveness of mem-
bers of the save the turtle cam-
paign derives from a sense among
some that the campaign is led by
foreigners and “paper Bahami-
ans”. That is in fact a path down
which I have deliberately and
politely declined to be drawn.

But what I will say is that cam-
paigners do themselves and their
cause no favours by appearing to
approach the subject with a scorn-
ful attitude towards Bahamians
and the use of a casual and
sweeping stereotype.

Hence, one writer basically
ignored my logic and instead chal-
lenged me to stop “the Bahami-
ans” torturing turtles at Montagu
if I wanted to be taken seriously
(presumably by the likes of him-
self).

This use of the turtle issue to
engage in off-hand stigmatisation
of Bahamians has been surpris-
ingly persistent by campaigners,
despite being obviously counter
productive. More surprisingly, it

Oe Being Left in the Dark?

has even been engaged in by writ-
ers of obviously Bahamian origin
(perhaps the effect of Stockholm
Syndrome).

Whatever its explanation,
thinking Bahamians of all races
and backgrounds are rightfully
angered and put off by it.

Already two very prominent
white Bahamians, representing
two important fishing communi-
ties, have written letters oppos-
ing the campaign and its arrogant
sense of moral superiority.

One writer questioned, among
other things, where these cam-
paigns will end (conch? crawfish?
grouper?).

The answer to that question is
provided by some of the turtle
campaigners themselves. Promi-
nent campaigners have advanced
the extraordinary notion that tur-
tles are a marine resource belong-
ing to the world and therefore
not an exclusive resource of the
Bahamian people when they
enter our waters.

With that foolish position, cam-
paigners have inadvertently put
Bahamians on notice that this
campaign is open-ended and will
not stop with turtles.

Could the same vacant logic
not be applied to conchs, craw-
fish, grouper and anything else
that can swim or crawl across a
national frontier?

The answer to the question
“where will it end?” is simple:
anything that lives in the sea and
has legs, fins or other means of
crossing a maritime boundary.

When in Japan last, I had the
pleasure of listening to a version
of this very argument (regarding,

believe it or not, the citizenship of
whales) put forth by some nosy
and ignorant westerners. Need-
less to say, I shared a hearty laugh
with my Japanese hosts before
tucking into whale steak.

Theirs is a spurious and foolish
argument that ignores the real, if
nuanced, nature of national sov-
ereignty.

The answer to transnational
issues such as turtle conservation
is to work within the context of
the needs and capacities of each
country to confront the issue in a
coordinated fashion, not simply
to target those countries per-
ceived as weak and shame them
into shutting down whole seg-
ments of their culture and way of
life.

In the case of The Bahamas, a
sensible approach would begin
with a study to determine how
we can boost local turtle
resources relative to the pressures
exerted by local consumption
(precisely as they are now doing
in the Turks and Caicos Islands).

Bahamians have had ample
experience with “international”
groupings, whose real target is
the manipulation of the weak and
the pliable in the interests of some
utterly undemocratic and untrans-
parent “international” body.

The last thing we need now is
to encourage an outfit whose
reaction to being questioned is to
bristle rather than illuminate.

Once again, please Minister,
listen to Bahamians first.

ANDREW ALLEN
Nassau,
July, 2009.

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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIO MORTIMER of
SEQUOIA STREET, P.O. BOX SB 51984, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

TO: Ms. Carla Johnson
No. 52B Churchill Road
South Bahamia
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Kindly remove your personal property from the above-
mentioned address, failure to do so within seven (7)
days from the date of this notice will result in the
removal of your personal property from the above-
mentioned address, without further notice to you. The
owners shall not be liable for any loss andor damage
occasioned to your personal property after the expiry
of this notice,

DATED the 30th day of June, 2009,

THE OWNERS
No. 32, Churchill Road

South Bahamia
Freeport, Grand Bahama


THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Blind man makes

marine

history

Jerome Thompson pilots boat around Nassau, Paradise Island



JEROME Thompson, 45, made history on Sat-
urday by becoming the first blind person to pilot a
boat by himself around Nassau and Paradise Island.

Mr Thompson, who has been blind since the age
of 11, boarded a small powerboat at Hurricane Hole
Marina and successfully completed the circumnav-
igation of the two islands. He was accompanied by
the Defence Force who followed him at some dis-
tance in their vessels.

The inspiration for this undertaking, Mr Thomp-
son told The Tribune in an earlier interview, was the
fact that other blind persons internationally have
accomplished similar feats.

Mr Thompson said his love for the sea and passion
for boating sparked his interest in piloting a vessel by
himself.

This never before accomplished initiative by a
visually disabled person has officially been called
“the marine circumnavigation of two Bahamian
islands.”

Mr Thompson said the endeavour was made pos-
sible by the collaboration of a well put-together
support team that includes Glen Bain, a former
Defence Force officer and principal trainer; Grego-
ry Thompson, a professional meteorologist, and
Jennifer Rahming, a compliance officer in the finan-
cial industry.

The unmarried entrepreneur has also been
inspired to set up the non-profit organisation

JEROME THOMPSON launches off into the harbour as he sets out to become the first blind person to pilot
a boat by himself around Nassau and Paradise Island.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

= 2

JEROME THOMPSON at Paradise Island’s Hurricane
Hole Marina where he boarded the boat before his
historic voyage.

Adventures Unlimited Bahamas, registered in
January, to help disabled people in the Bahamas
and around the world bring their dreams to life by
supporting them in their endeavours either finan-
cially or by providing equipment and training.

New Zealand company clinches
$33.5 million airport contract

A FURTHER major step to
transform the Lynden Pindling
International Airport into a
world-class gateway was taken
yesterday with a New Zealand
company being awarded the $33.5

Project to provide baggage handling
and explosive detection technology

million contract to provide bag-
gage handling and explosive
detection technology.

The Nassau Airport Develop-
ment Company (NAD) awarded
the contract to Glidepath, which
will install a fully integrated bag-
gage handling, sorting and explo-
sives detection systems at the air-
port. The project will be carried
out in three phases and is expect-
ed to be completed in 2013, the
company said on its website.

The company will start with
supplying a new 55-counter
check-in facility at the United
States departure terminal. This
will also include a 1,800-bag-per-
hour inline explosive system
detection system, bag-weight
imaging system and automated
baggage sortation with three large
carousels totalling 3,500 linear
feet and 300 drives.

During phase two, three
inbound baggage claim systems
for international arrivals will be
installed. Phase three will then
see the construction of a new
international/domestic terminal
with 42 check-in counters and
3,200 linear feet of baggage han-
dling, security and sorting systems
equipment.

Quality

Glidepath’s North America
Chief Executive Matt Williams
said his company has a very good
reputation for the quality and reli-
ability of its high technology sys-
tems which it designs, builds,
installs and supports with after
care service.

"We are ideally positioned to
compete as we're equipped with
our own US manufacturing and
sales infrastructure, local knowl-
edge and international Glidepath
network as well as a proven track
record for innovation and relia-
bility having completed well over
100 projects in the US alone,” he
said.

Just over two weeks ago, NAD
awarded the contract for the
terminal building component of
stage one of the airport’s trans-
formation to Canadian compa-
ny Ledcor Construction.

Ledcor is reportedly planning
on for 73 per cent of its labour
requirements to be filled
through local contractors.

Stage one of the LPIA rede-
velopment includes construc-
tion of a 247,000 sq ft US
departures terminal and pier,
approximately 1,000,000 sq ft
of asphalt apron, expanded
parking facilities and new road
ways. Construction is expected
to start next month. The US
departures terminal is sched-
uled to be completed by the
first quarter of 2011.

Earlier this year, NAD
secured $265 million in financ-
ing for this stage of the airport
development project.

On Friday, ground was offi-
cially broken at LPIA.

Speaking at the ceremony,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said that so far more than
$14.8 million construction con-
tracts have been awarded to
Bahamian firms.

NOTICE

The Law Firm of

Harry B. Sands,
Lobosky &
Company

will be closed on

Friday, July
17, 2009

for the Firm's
Annual Fun Day



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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas real
Eom COLe eh

Carmen Massoni

Raise the
curtains

IF you’re
selling in any-
thing other
than a hot
market, you
might find |®
“staging” your
home can
help generate
more interest
and offers.



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sands

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Begin by removing scat-

ter rugs and knickknacks,

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In the kitchen, remove all :
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ters except the coffee mak- :
er and microwave. Set your }
dining table in a welcom- }

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flatware and napkins.

You might be tempted to }
throw everything into the }
closets, but buyers will look }
there, too, so box every- :
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2. |



Department of Environmental Health
doubles efforts to fight pest increase

WITH the high tempera-
tures currently being expe-
rienced in New Providence,
the Department of Environ-
mental Health Services is
advising people to practice
good sanitation to help
reduce the recent increase
in pests such as mosquitos
and rats.

“The public should be
aware that due to the recent
rains and the warm summer
temperatures, pests such as
flies, mosquitoes and rats are
present in greater numbers,”
the department said yester-
day in a press statement.

“The solid waste division
of the Department of Envi-
ronmental Health Services
has been challenged in
recent times as a result of
the rains with scheduled col-
lection in a few areas. Every
effort is being made to
ensure that we maintain
schedule so as to limit the
sources of fly breeding.”

The department said it is

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“The public
should be aware
that due to the
recent rains and
the warm summer
temperatures,
pests such as flies,
mosquitoes and
rats are present in
greater numbers.”



Department of
Environmental
Health Services

of vital importance that
property owners and occu-
pants of premises assist by
ensuring that their garbage is
properly containerised (cov-
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being emptied. Fly bait and

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strips which can be readily
purchased can also be used
to limit fly presence.

“All vendors, particularly
crab and seafood vendors,
must practice good sanita-
tion by making garbage
receptacles available during
operation and ensuring that
all of the waste generated is
taken away and disposed of
properly. This will help to
minimise fly nuisances,” the
department said.

The level of rodent activi-
ty is directly related to the
amount of food sources,
shelter and harborage avail-
able.

Kitchen waste, discarded
appliances and furniture,
derelict vehicles and other
debris provide the environ-
ment for rats to survive and
produce large populations.

The environmental health
services department is ask-
ing individuals, private and
public entities, to shoulder
their responsibilities by

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ensuring that their premises
and places of occupancy and
in general, their communi-
ties, are clean and that good
garbage storage and dispos-
al practices are carried out.

Good sanitation habits will
assist in controlling the rat
population and other pests.

“The recent rains have
also help to produce large
batches of mosquitoes since
areas like ponds, depression
and excavations collect
water and hatch the mosqui-
to eggs. “Home owners are
reminded to pay special
attention to anything that
can hold water, especially
drums, buckets, tubs and
tires, as they can breed mos-
quitoes as well,” the depart-
ment said.

“Discarded items should
be disposed of in a proper
manner while items that are
in use should be properly
stored or managed so that
they cannot collect water
and support breeding of

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Plans to search for oil
and gas in the Bahamas

PICTURED are the areas where BPC Ltd, which recently part- }
nered with StatoilHydro of Norway, plans to search for oil and gas }
pending government approval of several licence applications. i

The proposed exploration areas lie in waters between Miami and }

Central Cuba.

According to the Oil and Gas Journal, five exploration wells have
already been drilled in the Bahamas by four different oil companies, }

beginning in 1947.

StatoilHydro, which announced its partnership with BPC in May,
recently signed an agreement to buy the South Riding crude oil }
storage and transshipment terminal on Grand Bahama from Cana- }
dian company World Point Terminals Inc. :

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.

Courtney Vernon Strachan Sr.

CPM; QPM
Sunrise: 26th October, 1928
Sunset: 14th July, 2008

God saw you were getting tired
And a cure was not to be,
So he put his arms around you and

Whispered, "Come to Me".
With taariul ayes we watched yo

And sav yOu pass away.
Allhough we loved you dearly
We could not make you stay.

4 Golden Heart stopped beating,

ating’

law ~

4 ie

Hard working hands at rest,

, i broke our hearis to prove to, U5: i
‘
be only takes the. best eG.
“9

AN - 9 iP
“brecious'r Metin in "the hearts
i his-v wife, Sybil a

ere Yerethece nieces, Se in iia at



mosquitoes.”

The Department of Envi-
ronmental Health Services
said it is doubling its efforts
to reduce the population of
these pests. “It is anticipated
that garbage pickup sched-
ules on those collection
routes that are off schedule,
will be regularised shortly.
The mosquito control sec-
tion of the Department of
Environmental Health Ser-
vices will strengthen its mos-
quito treatment/intervention
programme to address the
mosquito, fly and rodent
issues.

“Ground fogging exercises
will be continued and inten-
sified thorough New Provi-
dence and in those islands
that are affected,” the
department said.

“Once again the depart-
ment wishes to thank the
public for its continued
cooperation, support and
assistance in doing their part
in controlling pests.”

Training
Programme
committee
Peporis

THE proposed national
training and retraining pro-
gramme for recently laid
off workers is one step
closer to becoming reality,
as a draft presentation on
the plan has been present-
ed to Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes.

Appointed on June 14,
the implementation adviso-
ry committee for the
National Training Pro-
gramme was mandated to
research the proposal, sug-
gest a framework and noti-
fy the government of its
findings within three
weeks.

Chairman of the commit-
tee Khaalis Rolle has now
presented the report to the
minister.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham announced the
government’s plan to cre-
ate the programme during
the recent budget debate.
He said the decision was
taken after extensive con-
sultation with trade union
leaders and employers’ rep-
resentatives.

The programme will be
geared towards training
workers in areas where
there is a strong demand in
the business sector, Mr
Ingraham said.

These areas will include:
masonry, carpentry, weld-
ing, tile laying, electrical
installations, landscaping,
data processing, computer
skills, customer service, day
care, housekeeping, and
languages.

Courses will last for 10 to
15 weeks and will be run by
the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute
(BTVI) and the College of
the Bahamas.

The programme will be
open to 1,000 unemployed
Bahamians who will be
selected from those persons
who have already regis-
tered for the National
Insurance Unemployment
Benefit, the prime minister
said.

Labour Minister Foulkes
thanked those the private
sector partners who con-
tributed to the plan and
expressed his ministry’s
appreciation to those who
serve on the committee.

In addition to Mr Rolle,
the committee includes:
Rev Patrick Paul, president
of the Bahamas Christian
Council; John Pinder, pres-
ident of the NCTUB and
the BCPOU; Thomas Bast-
ian of the TUC; Dr Pando-
ra Johnson, vice- president
of COB; Dr Iva Dahl,
director of BT VI;
Dorothea Godet, deputy
director of Labour, and
Alpheus Forbes, deputy
permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Labour and
Social Development.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 7



Missing boys ‘survived on plums and stream water’

Family of

teenager
FROM page one

Princess Margaret Hospital's :
morgue for hours while the imme- :
diate family positively identified
Smith's body and spoke to offi- i
cers from the CDU. As they}
emerged from the building:
Smith's emotional mother and sis-
ter had to be supported by rela-
tives and were quickly escorted }
off the property. ;

Uncle Darren Strachan, who }
spoke on behalf of the family yes-
terday, said the family had done }
its own investigation into the
shooting and firmly believe police :
were at fault. :

"Clearly he was an innocent }
victim and we're working with the :
police to make sure this is
resolved aggressively. We believe
that he was shot — despite all the }
reports — he was not shot by any- }
one else other than the police,” }
Mr Strachan told the media while }
surrounded by grieving relatives }
outside the morgue yesterday.

"The police (are) right now just
putting together their findings but
we have done our own investiga- }
tion and we have spoken to wit-}
nesses and we know. And the:
police have said he was not a part
of the crime that happened in the }
foodstore and we know perfectly }
well, for a fact, that he was shot by :
an officer,” he said. :

Mr Strachan said once the}
investigation is complete, the fam- }
ily will decide whether or not to }
sue the RBPF. i

Supt Moss said it is in within }
police procedure to discharge a }
weapon if an officer fears for his ;
life. ;
"Tf they feel their life is threat- 3
ened they can use their weapon to }
protect themselves or someone in :
the community." ;

Smith, a 2008 graduate of Sti
Augustine's College, wasi
described by friends yesterday as }
a bright, fun-loving honour-roll
student who stayed out of trou-
ble. i
"He was a nice person, cheer- :
ful, easy to get along with,” said
schoolmate Mack Thompson of }
the promising teen. "He was far }
from a troublemaker — he liked :
to stay to himself or hang with his
family." ;

Another friend said last week i
that Smith was excited about his }
dream to attend a college over-
seas and pursue a degree in engi- }
neering. ;

According to reports Smith was :
an intern at Albany and had just
completed a job-related course. }

FROM page one

her sons do not appear to have suffered
any serious health problems and are expect-
ed to make a full recovery before they are
due to return to school in September.

The children have told their family how
they lost sight of the road as they were hunt-
ing for land crabs in the dense forest as
Deangelo, who lives with his grandmother in
Smith’s Hill, let his younger brother, visiting
from Nassau, lead the way as night closed in.

Atsome point the younger and chubbier
Marcell fell into a deep cave-like hole, and
when Deangelo reached for him, he too fell
in.

It is not clear whether the boys were
trapped in the cave for some time, but they
said they spent days walking around search-
ing for food, water and a way home, and
slept in caves and caverns.

They said they survived by eating pigeon
plums and cocoplums growing in the dense
3,000 square mile forest and drinking water
from a freshwater stream.

On their final day in the woods the boys
said they managed to climb a tree to see
above the dense coppice of mahogany, iron-
wood, and horseflesh hardwood trees and
heard the sound of a passing car before they
found the road where they were seen by
their cousin.

Their grandmother, Olgarean Clarke, 67,
said: “Deangelo was slim and he lost about
30lbs, and Marcell had been a little chubbier,
but when they came back they looked to me
like skeletons. They lost everything.

FROM page one

“They didn’t have anything proper to eat
for a whole month inside the bushes. They
were starving. They were very underfed.

“T think if someone had taken them they
would have given them more to eat than
that.

“T guess they must have been
sleeping in the hole at night, and in
the day they were walking around
in circles, looking for food, and
trying to find their way back
home.”

Police have yet to determine
the boys’ whereabouts in the 33
days they were missing.

There have been reports of a
speedboat heard approaching the
coast at around 2am on Sunday
and of an earlier sighting of the
boys on Sunday morning. There
also has been speculation over a
verbal response from the boys
reportedly heard during the police search
two weeks after the boys had disappeared.

Superintendent Hulan Hanna said detec-
tives are keeping an open mind at this stage
in the investigation.

Mr Hanna, in charge of policing the Fam-
ily Islands, said: “We need to determine
where these children were as much as we
can, but we probably won’t get them talking
right away and it’s going to take some time
to get the story.

“Speculation abounds, but we take noth-
ing for granted so we want to hear any infor-
mation the public may have.

“As we have not yet been able to objec-
tively evaluate what their claims are, every-

Top lawyer face



SUPERINTENDENT
Hulan Hanna

thing remains on the table so we have to
approach the investigation with a very open
mind.”

When 20 police officers, supported by
the Royal Bahamas Defence Force, the US
Coast Guard helicopter and local residents
failed to locate the boys their
parents criticised police for not
pursuing the search for the lost
children.

As their mother Vera Clarke
visited them in the paediatric
ward of the hospital yesterday
she said she never gave up hope
for her two sons.

She said: “T didn’t understand
why the police put off the search
so fast because I knew they were
living — I always believed they
were living and I didn’t care
what anybody said.

“T never had the feeling that
someone would come and tell me they were
dead. I just knew they were alive.

“But when Marcell and Deangelo turned
up the police couldn’t believe it.”

Former director of the Bahamas Envi-
ronmental Research Centre in Andros, Mar-
go Blackwell, said the rocky terrain and
dense forest of hardwood trees that stretch
for some 3,000 square miles across southern
Andros is one of the most difficult places in
the world to survive in the wild and has
been rated alongside Siberia for chances of
survival.

But during the summer months the woods
are filled with pigeon plums, cocoplums,
guana and poisonwood berries which are

S Study: Christie ‘not as popular’ with parliamentary group

all edible and could provide enough suste-
nance for life, and heavy rains in May and
June would have gathered in the rocky caves
and crevices on the forest floor and filled the
freshwater river from which the boys said
they drank.

Ms Blackwell said: “Andros is filled with
caves and holes which is a blessing and a
danger, so those boys are just very lucky.

“There are ways of surviving but it’s not
easy.”

She said many locals blame spirits for
making people disorientated in the forest.
She said her father was missing for nearly 10
days after landing a plane in central Andros
around eight miles from the road. She and
the boys’ grandmother have also lost their
way in the woods before, they said.

But as the investigation continues Mrs
Clarke said she is just glad to have her
grandsons safe and receiving care.

She said: “Even as they found them I
thought they would have found them dead,
but I was surprised to see that they were
alive, could walk, and even talk.

“T am proud especially of Deangelo, he
looks a lot different from when he left me,
but I thank God he’s back and he is okay.”

Deangelo is expected to return to Deep
Creek Primary School to enter grade five in
September and Marcell should be well
enough to go into grade two at Uriah
McPhee in Kemp Road at the start of the
school year.

Any information that may assist the
police investigation should be reported by
calling 911, 919 or Crime Stoppers anony-
mously on 328-TIPS (8477).

nity, was arraigned yesterday on
six counts of housebreaking and
stealing as well as five of receiv-
ing.

He is accused of breaking into
homes in the Marshall Road, Pas-
tel Gardens, Elizabeth Estates
and Sea Breeze areas between
May and July of this year. It is
alleged that he stole thousands
of dollars worth of jewellery, elec-
tronics and cash. Among the
items Mr Regnier is accused of
stealing and receiving are Rolex
watches, gold chains, video games
and DVD players. Mr Regnier,
who was represented by lawyer
Michael Kemp, elected summary
trial in Magistrate’s Court and
pleaded not guilty to all charges.

Mr Kemp told Chief Magis-
trate Roger Gomez that Mr Reg-
nier had been in police custody
for more than 48 hours and was
not granted his visitation rights.
He also told the court that Mr
Regnier suffers from congestive
heart failure and high blood pres-
sure and that remanding him to
Fox Hill Prison would be a death
sentence.

break-in charges

Chief Magistrate Gomez
granted Mr Regnier bail in the
sum of $30,000 with two sureties.
He was ordered to report to the
Elizabeth Estates Police Station
every Wednesday and Saturday.

Arlington McNeil, 21, and
Jamaric Green, 22, was arraigned
together on six counts of house-
breaking and stealing as well as
one count of receiving. They
pleaded not guilty to all charges.
McNeil and Shando King, 34, was
also arraigned together on a
housebreaking charge. The men
pleaded not guilty to the charge.
Green was also arraigned on
additional charges of house-
breaking, stealing and receiving.
He pleaded not guilty to the
charges.

Don Rahming Jr, 25, and
Anton Ferguson, 22, pleaded not
guilty to threatening to kill Tyson
Ferguson on July 6. Ferguson,
Rahming and Green also pleaded



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not guilty to breaking into the
home of Shavon Wood at Ham-
ster Road on July 6 and the home
of Monica Gomez on July 7.

Ferguson and Green who,
according to the prosecution,
have matters of a similar nature
pending before the courts as well
as McNeil, were ordered remand-
ed until July 20, when a bail hear-
ing will take place. The men are
represented by lawyer Stanley
Rolle. Rolle claimed that Fergu-
son had been beaten while in
police custody and that McNeil
had been in custody since July 8.
Rahming, who is represented by
lawyer Gregory Hilton, was
granted bail in the sum of $15,000.
King, who is represented by Mr
Kemp, was also granted $15,000
bail.

FROM page one

While sources close to this
leadership race maintain that
there are many within the PLP
with the experience and capac-
ity to lead the PLP, there still
remains the issue of personali-
ty and likeability that have yet
to be addressed.

“The question is not out
there any more who can
replace Christie, there are any
number of persons who can
and who have the capacity. But
the personality issue may be a
different story.

“What people need to realise
is that contrary to what the
political pundits suggest, when
it really boils down, Bahami-
ans as a whole are not that out
of touch with Christie,” the
source said.

With its planned convention
slated for October 18th this
year, the PLP will face consid-
erable criticism from both with-
in and outside of the party as
the public looks for the party to
embrace change and progres-
sion.

With these two qualities in
mind, political insiders have
suggested that the PLP could
accomplish this goal easily by
simply changing its deputy
leader, Cynthia Pratt, who has
already expressed her desire
not to run for the post again.
Therefore with a new deputy
at the helm and what is being
foreshadowed as “reinvented”
Perry Christie, the PLP will be
poised to rebuild its party and
regain some of the momentum
it has lost in the past two
years.






CCS cy
NOTICE TO BRITISH CITIZENS

The Vice Consul for The Bahamas (based in Kingston, Jamaica)
will visit Nassau on Thursday, 23rd July, 2009 and will be
available to discuss any individual problems concerning
passports and nationality issues.



Passport applications and renewals should continue to be sent
by courier direct to the High Commission in Kingston.

Appointments can be made by calling the Honorary Consul
in Nassau on 324-4089.





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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Highlights from the cultural
extravaganza at Clifford Park

THE BAHAMAS’ FINEST were out in force for the big event.

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Stoeeting’s Colonial

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84 Blue Hill Road - P.O. Box N-8161 : Tel: 325-7867
Fax: 325-7867

a resident of Fox
Hill, will be held on
Wednesday 15th
July 2009 at the
Chapel of the Saints,
Sweeting's Colonial
Mortuary at 10:00
a.m. Officiating will
be Rev. Zeffinah
Newbold and
Associate Ministers.

Left to cherish his
= memories are his
three brothers, eunneth Williams, Gaskine and
Joseph Whitney Williams of West ‘Palm Beach,
Florida; two sisters-in-law, Elsiemae and Shirley
Williams; five nephews, Kevin Williams of Miramar
of Florida, Marvin, Dion, Montez and Scott; three
nieces, Mellessian Thompson of Harbour Island,
Carmen and Malinda Williams of West Palm and a
host of other relatives and friends Including,
Linberg, Roxbergh, Rolda, Elva, Orie and Evangelist
Bronell Williams, Vivienne Lyn, Sada Pinder, Mavis
and Bercel Pinder, Eddiemae Pratt, Beulah Morris,
Bessie Bess, Eleanor Rose, Julian, Kay, Jackson,
Philip, Michell and Michael Weech, Gilda Weech
House, Allen Cleare, Miriam Smith, Brenda Amos,
George and Albert Williams, Pearl, Rosie and Cloretta
Williams, Lilymae Thompson, Bishop Tueton Stubbs,
Carl, William, Christopher and Wentwort Stubbs,
Virdell Pinder, Leola Ford, Mildred Dillette, Bishop
Joseph, George and Charles Zonicle, Denise Williams,
Ellamae, Harry and Freeland Deveaux, Rev. Dr.
Hellen McPhee, Bernice Major, Evangelist Eleanor
Allen, Evangelist Inez Moss, Rev. Dr. William
Rahming, Annie Hepburn, Louise Weech, Gurtrude
Kelly, Inez, Harold and Carl Dawkins, Dorothy
Gilbert, Pearl Williams, Winfred Rolle, Eva Hunter,
Vahaul Thompson, the Rolles and Dawkins family,
Arthur Bain, Rev. Henry Pratt, the Davis family of
Fox Hill, Grene Higgs, Cleomie Saunders, Shirley
Johnson, Wendy, Janice, Joshua and Victor and
families.

Arrangements are entrusted to Sweeting's Colonial
Mortuary and Crematorium, #84 Blue Hill Rd.



FIREWORKS make a spectacular
background for the Bahamian flag.



Pope goes on
vacation in
Italian Alps

LES COMBES, Italy

THE Vatican says Pope
Benedict XVI has traveled to
a village in the Italian Alps for
two weeks of vacation, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

It says the pontiff was flown
to Turin on a plane Monday
and then traveled on to Les
Combes, in a region near the
French border, by helicopter.

Benedict has spent two sum-
mers at Les Combes in recent
years.

He said upon arrival that he
expected to rest and work dur-
ing his vacation.

He is scheduled to be away
until July 29, making at least
two public appearances in the
area.

Benedict’s predecessor,
John Paul II, also spent sever-
al summer at Les Combes.
While John Paul liked to hike,
Benedict spends most of his
time inside the chalet that
looks out on Mount Blanc, the
highest peak in the Alps.
THE TRIBUNE



:
5
a
ail
celle

CHRIS “BAY” BROWN continued his string of victories on the European circuit on Sunday...



TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009



(FILE phote)



Wallace chose

Celtics for
chance at

another title...
See page 10

Winning streak

Bg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

t wasn’t as fast as his pre-

vious outing, but quar-

termiler Chris “Bay”

Brown continued his
string of victories on the Euro-
pean circuit on Sunday.

And yesterday, the battle
between veteran sprinters Deb-
bie Ferguson-McKenzie and
Chandra Sturrup intensified.

Brown, competing in his third
meet in Europe, won the men’s
400m at the Meeting Interna-
tional Tangier 2009 in Tangier,
Africa.

Not too far behind in second
place behind Brown was
Jamaican Jermaine Gonzales in
45.81. Ofentse Mogawane of the
Republic of South Africa fin-
ished third in 46.13.

Just Friday, Brown was at the
Golden Gala in Rome, Italy,
where he posted a season’s best
of 44.81 seconds to secure the
win as he held off Ireland’s
David Gillick, who finished in
44.82.

Brown, 36, had a chance to
contend for a share of the $1
million jackpot from the Gold-
en League. But after winning
the opener in Berlin, he didn’t
participate in the second race
in Oslo, Norway.

He returned with a bang in
Rome, but after being elimi-
nated from the Golden League,
he is currently sitting in fourth
place with 74 points from five

Battle between ‘Golden
Girls’ Sturrup, Ferguson-
McKenzie intensifies

| =

Sturrup

F-McKenzie



meets on the World Athletics
Tour that will secure berths for
athletes to compete in the
IAAF/VTB World Athletics
Final in Stuttgart, Germany,
September 13-14.

Americans Jeremy Wariner,
the reigning world champion
and LaShawn Merritt, the
Olympic champion, have also
competed in five meets and are
leading the field with 100 and 98
points respectively.

Meanwhile, neither Fergu-
son-McKenzie or Sturrup were
in a position to contend for the
jackpot, which is based on ath-
letes’ winning performances in

the series of six meets.

But since the BAAA Nation-
al Championships in June when
Ferguson-McKenzie dethroned
Sturrup as the national 100m
champion, the two have com-
peted against each other in the
last three meets.

This time, it was Ferguson-
McKenzie who turned the
tables again on Sturrup when
they competed at the Athens
Grand Prix in Athens, Greece,
yesterday.

Still shy of dipping under the
11-second barrier this year, Fer-
guson-McKenzie lowered her
season’s best to 11.04 for a third
place finish in the century.

Fresh of her season’s best of
10.99 in Rome for third place
in the fastest race for the year,
Sturrup had to settle for fourth
in 11.15. Ferguson-McKenzie
was sixth in Rome in her then
season’s best 11.11.

On the World Athletics Tour,
Sturrup is sitting in seventh
place with 52 points after five
meets. Through five meets as
well, Ferguson-McKenzie is tied
with Kim Gevaert of Belgium
with 47 each.

BLIA president confident Davis Cup
team can get back into Zone II

B By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IN virtue of being relegated to Zone
III in 2010, the Bahamas will have to
play the Americas Davis Cup tie against
Jamaica, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica,
Aruba and Bermuda.

The seven teams will be divided into
two pools with the two winners getting
promoted to Zone II for 2011, while
the two losers will be relegated to Zone
IV.

It’s not known as yet when and where
the tie will take place.

The Bahamas has never played in
Zone IV and the way the team played
against Guatemala, Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association president Stephen
Turnquest said it should only be a mat-
ter of time before they can get back to
Zone II.

“T think the effort was there and it
was an exciting tie,” Turnquest said.
“We realised that there are some things
that we need to do as far as our prepa-
ration is concerned.

“One of our main players, Timothy
Neilly, got hurt and BJ Munroe wasn’t
able to play doubles after he got hurt.
Notwithstanding that, Marvin Rolle and
Devin Mullings gave a good account of
themselves.”

Having gone through a series of
marathon matches in the scorching sun,
Turnquest said the results could have
been slightly different with one or two
points.

But if team captain John Farrington
gets a chance to assemble the team
together a little longer than the week
they do before the tie is played, Turn-
quest said he’s confident that they will
have no problems prevailing next year.

“We just need to have better prepa-
ration to have the players better pre-
pared for the competition,” Turnquest
said. “We just have to look at the teams
that we will be playing against and we
have to work towards playing against
them.”

While the Bahamas lost to Guatemala
in their half of the relegation playoffs,
Jamaica were blanked 5-0 by the
Netherlands Antilles to also drop down

to Zone III.

They will join Cuba, Puerto Rico and
Costa Rica, who finished third through
fifth, in their Group III playoffs that
was held from April 22-26 in El Sal-
vador.

By virtue of finishing first and sec-
ond respectively, El Salvador and
Bolivia were promoted to Zone II.

And from their first and second place
finishes in Group IV the same week-
end in El Salvador, Aruba and Bermu-
da were promoted to Group III.

With the team in place, Turnquest
said the future looks bright for the
Bahamas.

“We also have a lot of young players
who are in college, who are going to be
a position to replace some of the other
players who are playing on the team
now,” Turnquest said.

Does this mean that the BLTA is
leaning on making some changes to the
current team?

Turnquest declined to confirm, only
to say: “I would like Rodney Carey (Jr)
and Jamal Adderley get a chance to
make the team. So I think the trials for
the team in December will be quite
interesting.”

Farrington, who has spent the past
nine years as the team captain, said the
players went out and gave it their best.
But he said it will only make them hun-
grier when they play out of Zone III
next year.

“We will have to play in one week,
which means we will have a match every
day,” Farrington said. “But if that’s what
it will take to get us back to Zone I,
then that is what we will have to do.”

As for whether or not he feels there
needs to be any changes to the team,
Farrington said he would prefer to leave
that decision up to the BLTA.

Bahamas Olympic Association sec-
retary general Rommel Knowles, who
was along with president Wellington
Miller, said he was impressed with what
he saw.

“The talent is definitely there, so ’m
very impressed,” he said. “We have
some talent, but I think if they can get a
little more exposure like the
Guatemalan team, I think they will be
okay.”

Photos by Kevin Major



MARVIN ROLLE (also left, right) and DEVIN
MULLINGS (also top left) talk strategy...


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Bahamas to
host Judo

arib

READY FOR COMBAT:
Judo athletes prepare to
compete.

Judo Athletes from Barbados, Puerto Rico, The
Cayman Islands, the Dutch Antilles and the
Bahamas will face off this weekend in the Caribbean
Judo Cup at Loyola Hall on Saturday July 18.

Kick off time for the event is 1 pm and the event is
expected to run to 4 pm.

Trials were held over the weekend to determine
who would represent the Bahamas against the
Caribbean neighbours. The team will consist of
Wellington Mullings (73Kg) , Chrisnell Cooper (78
Kg), D'Arcy Rahming Jr (66 Kg), Cynthia Rahming

LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

ATHLETES TO FACE OFF AT LOYOLA HALL ON JULY 18

Cup

(52 Kg), Nathan Williams (48 Kg). There will also be
an open tournament in which some fifty Bahamian
athletes as well as US athletes are expected to attend.
In preparation for the event Top US Coach Gerald
Lafon has been busy training Bahamian athletes at
an intensive training camp.

He has also been running a national Coaches
course in which all Federation schools are taking
part.

"Tam pleased to see the cooperation between
schools of the Federation. Coaches seem to be eager




to learn what steps are necessary to take the
Bahamas to the next level," said Coach Lafon.

"The athletes in the training camp have improved
significantly since I was here a year ago."

The course are being held at Judo Federation
Schools Island Jujutsu on Carmichael Road and All
Star Family Center on Joe Farrington Road.

July 18 Tournament Tickets are available for $5 at
the door during tournament time from 12 - 4 pm or
for more information call the Bahamas Judo Feder-
ation at 364-6773.

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Pargo signs
one-year
fleal with
the Bulls

CHICAGO (AP) —
Free agent guard Jannero
Pargo has signed a one-year
deal with the Chicago Bulls.

Terms were not disclosed
Monday.

The 6-foot-1 guard,

known for his outside
shooting, was also with
Chicago from 2003-06. Par-
go played in Russia and
Greece last season. He is a
six-year NBA veteran, hav-
ing also spent time with the
Lakers, Raptors and Hor-
nets.

He has averaged 6.9
points in 316 regular-season
games, while shooting 36.5
percent from the 3-point
line.

In 33 playoff games, his
average is 6.5 points and
36.8 percent on 3-pointers.

Pargo gives the Bulls
backcourt depth after they
lost leading scorer Ben Gor-
don to Detroit.



Cavs sign Parker

CLEVELAND (AP) — The
Cleveland Cavaliers have signed
veteran free-agent Anthony
Parker to add depth to the
backcourt.

The 34-year-old Parker
played in 80 games for the
Toronto Raptors last season
and averaged 10.7 points and
3.4 assists. Terms were not dis-
closed.

Cavs general manager Danny
Ferry says Monday that Cleve-
land went after the 6-foot-6
guard/forward for his shooting
and defensive skills.

Parker likely will be one of
the first players off the bench,
behind Cleveland starting
guards Mo Williams and
Delonte West and small for-
ward LeBron James.

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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 11

















SPORTS

Darling optimistic about NFL season

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



The Chiefs
finished a dis-
appointing 2-
14, fourth in a

1995 and joins the Chiefs after a
two-year stint as offensive coor-
dinator for the Arizona Cardi-
nals.

WITH a new head coach, woeful AFC After Tom Brady went down
new offensive scheme anda Pro West. with an injury, (ironically
Bowl caliber quarterback at the “Last year | against the Chiefs) in the open-

helm, Devard Darling looks to
the 2009-10 season with great
optimism.

In his fifth National Football
League season, and second with

was a disap-
pointing sea-
son in my first
year in
Kansas City,

ing game of the season, Cassel
became the team’s starting
quarterback and finished with
3,942 passing yards and 23
touchdowns.

Darling



Mini Bowl Meal

the Kansas City Chiefs, Darling
has set lofty goals for himself
and his franchise with the acqui-
sitions of new quarterback Matt
Cassel and first year head coach
Todd Haley.

“Personally I am looking for-
ward to this being one of the
better seasons of my career.
With the addition of Matt
everyone has high hopes for the
passing game and for the future
of the offense as a whole. Once
our team remains relatively
healthy the sky is the limit for
what can happen on the field,”
Darling said.

“My ideal season, the per-
sonal goals I set this year, Jam
working toward a 1,000 yard
season, maybe even a Pro Bowl
selection should everything fall
into place, like I said, the sky is
the limit.”

Darling comes off a 2008-09
season where he caught 17 pass-
es for 247 yards and one touch-
down and exhibited his big play
ability with a career long 68-
yard reception against the Patri-
ots in November.

THE New Providence Soft-
ball Association is scheduled to
host its All-Star Classic at the
Archdeacon William Thomp-
son Softball Park, Southern
Recreational Grounds, on Sat-
urday.

Also over the weekend, the
NPOTSA officially re-name
their two divisions - The Arthur
Thompson Division (formally
the A- Division) and The
Bursell Bradshaw Division (for-
mally the B-Division).

Additionally, the NPOTSA
is slated to honour their past
presidents and some of their
loyal fans. They plan to unveil
two plaques for the contribu-
tions Herman Joseph Mackey
and Alfred ‘Yo-Yo’ Pritchard
have made during the existence
of the league.

Awards for the 2007-2008

my number improved a bit but
for the team we all wanted to do
a lot better,” Darling said.

“This season we get a fresh
start and we hope for a lot of
things to be different, the main
goal is overall improvement. As
a team that means a better reg-
ular season record, a playoff
berth and we will go from
there.”

The Chiefs struggled last year
finding a fit at the quarterback
position with Brodie Croyle,
Damon Huard, and Tyler Thig-
pen each starting under center
at various points throughout the
season.

In an off-season where the
Chiefs lost franchise leading
receiver Tony Gonzales, Dar-
ling and the remainder of the
receiving core look to figure
more prominently into the pass-
ing game.

Todd Haley joins the Chiefs
in his first head coaching job
after spending 13 years as an
assistant coach. He began his
pro career as a scouting assis-
tant with the New York Jets in

season will be presented. The
highlight of the weekend will
be a homerun challenge, which
was won last year by Gregory
Taylor.

Here’s a look at the schedule
for Saturday:

10am - The prelims of the
Homerun Challenge

llam — Challenge Game
Executives and Coaches vs The
Media

2pm — The Bursell Bradshaw
All-star Game

4pm -— The Arthur Thomp-
son All-star Game

6:30pm — Awards Presenta-
tion

The following persons (see
TABLE below) were selected
to participate in this year’s All-
Star Classic:

THE ARTHUR THOMPSON DIVISION:

President’s Squad

Manager

John Williams - Crusaders
Coaches

Sean Wilson - Pokers

Brad Smith - Dozer Pros
Players

Marcus Pratt - Dozer Pros
Kevin Hinsey - Crusaders
Keith Moss - Dozer Pros
Fred Tapia - Pokers

Harry Kemp - Crusaders
Edmond Bethell - Crusaders
Ivan Francis - Crusaders
Dwayne Dean - Pokers
Dominic Elliott - Pokers
Mario Ford - Crusaders
Rodney Forbes - Dozer Pros
Bernard Young - Crusaders
Andy Ford - Crusaders
Greg Smith - Dozer Pros
Greg Gardiner - Crusaders
George Henderson - Pokers
John Rolle - Pokers

Willard Elliott - Pokers
Sean Higgs - Crusaders
Bradley Sands - Dozers
Mike Hanna - Pokers
Pitchers

Creswell Pratt - Crusaders
Franklyn Martin - Pokers
Rudolph Williams - Dozer Pros
Tony Brown - Dozer Pros

Vice-President’s Squad
Manager

Sammy Adderley - Lions
Coaches

Anthony Huyler - Warriors
Selwyn McKenzie - Bom. George
Players

Kevin Neilly - Warriors

Ray Newbold - Lions

Brad Woods - Lions

Warfield Bain - Bommer George
Gregory Taylor - Lions

Winston Seymour - Lions
Kelson Armbrister - Warriors
Mike Smith - Bommer George
Lee Rahming - Bommer George
Fran Adderley - Warriors
Dwayne Dean - Warriors

Edney Bethell - Warriors
Richard Bastian - Lions

Dwayne Pratt - Warriors

Charlie Rolle - Lions

Kirk Johnson - Bommer George
Lorenzo Carter - Warriors
Nelson Farrington - Bommer George
Elgin Smith - Bommer George
Prince Huyler - Warriors

Darryl Isaacs - Warriors
Pitchers

Ronald Seymour - Lions

Gary Johnson - Lions

Jonathan Armbrister - Warriors
Danny Stubbs - Bommer George

THE BURSELL BRADSHAW DIVISION:

President’s Team

Manager

Clifton Smith - Michollette
Coaches

Andrew Ferguson - Corner Boyz
Players

John Wallace - Cabinet World
Preston Rahming - Corner Boyz
Sigmund Bethell - Michollette
Alexander Bain - Michollette
Kevin Thompson - Michollette
John Lockhart - Corner Boyz
Vince Williams - Corner Boyz
Hermis Ferguson - Corner Boyz
Johnny Burrows - Michollette
Tom Ferguson - Gussiemae
Frances Taylor - Corner Boyz
Dan Bourne - BTC

Anthony Bullard - BTC

Abe Johnson - Michollette
Sandy Morley - Cabinet World
Glen Saunders - Michollette
Henry Williams - 6 pack

Mark Lockhart - 6 pack
Culbert Evans - Michollette
Howard Hanna- Michollette
Keith Thompson - Michollette
Brian Capron - Gussiemae
Pitchers

Alfred Munnings - Michollette
Vernon Bowles - Gussiemae
Craig Bowe - Cabinet World
Foster Dorsette - 6 pack

Vice President’s Team

Manager

Rory Newbold - Technicians
Coaches

Christopher Bullard -Stallions
Players

Daryl Bartlett - Bahamas Divers
Brian Anderson - Stallions
Mike Moss - Bahamas Divers
Dwight Butler - Stallions

Terry Bain - Stallions

Marcellus Hall - Stallions
Charles Gaitor - Technicians
Larry Forbes - Lions

Spurgeon Johnson - Technicians
Ron Wood - Technicians

Juan Pratt - Stallions

Anton Newbold - Technicians
Cyril Miller - Royals

Danny Johnson - Lions

Richard Brown - Lions

Mike Major - Lions

Philip Paul - Lions

Joe Jones - Royals

Keith Richards - Bahamas Divers
Joe McPhee - Royals

David Gardiner - Technicians
Robert Cox - Bahamas Divers
Pitchers

Hector Rolle - Technicians
Greg Thompson - Bahamas Divers
Don Dean - Stallion

Harold Fitzgerald - Royals

Darling said the team has

welcomed Cassel with open
arms following the pre draft-
day trade.

“Definitely having that sta-

bility at the quarterback posi-
tion is crucial for any team in
the NFL to have a successful
offense. The relationship
between a quarterback and his
receivers is paramount so yeah
it has been great that Matt and
I along with the other receivers
are beginning to build a bond
on and off the field,” he said.
“Chemistry can be a major part
of that success we are looking
for.”

The Chiefs open training

camp on July 30 at the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin River Falls.

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

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THE TRIBUNE

usine

TUESDAY,



er Lan

14,



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net







ROBERT SANDS

Baha
Mar seeks
suimmary
ruling against
Harrah's

* Wants New York court
to order gaming giant
to fulfil $212m equity
capital injection pledge,
and $318m guarantee

* Cable Beach developer
takes ‘baby steps
forward’ in talks with
Chinese, with year-end
timetable still on

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

BAHA Mar is continuing
to “take baby steps forward”
with the two potential Chi-
nese-state owned partners
for its $2.6 billion Cable
Beach project, Tribune Busi-
ness was told yesterday, as
the resort developer filed a
motion for summary judg-
ment in a bid to force its for-
mer equity partner, Harrah’s
Entertainment, to fulfil its
obligations.

Court papers obtained by
Tribune Business reveal that
on Friday, July 10, Baha Mar
filed a cross-motion for sum-
mary judgment with the New
York Supreme Court seek-
ing a verdict that Harrah’s
and its Bahamian-incorpo-
rated investment vehicle,
Caesars Bahamas Invest-
ment Corporation, breached
their contract and the guar-
anty given to the Bahamian
resort developer.

Baha Mar is asking the
New York court to “order
specific performance requir-
ing Caesars Bahamas to
make its required equity con-
tribution to the joint venture
company [Baha Mar] and
otherwise fulfill its obliga-
tions under the joint venture
agreements, and Harrah’s to
cause those obligations to be

SEE page 3B



ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

‘Undue burden’ fears over
new communications fees

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

major Bahami-
an telecommu-
nications oper-
ator has
expressed con-
cern that many companies will
be unable to absorb the pro-
posed “minimum 2 per cent of
per annum revenue” increase
in industry licence fees, and
warned that the payments
schedule will lead to a “further
undue cash flow burden”.

Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, pres-
ident of Systems Resource
Group (SRG), parent of BTC’s
only legal fixed-line competi-
tor, IndiGo Networks, said the
company was concerned “by the
proposed fee structure and the
financial burden that it will
place upon operators and,
therefore, ultimately the con-
sumer” - implying that the extra
costs will be passed on to com-
munications/telecommunica-
tions end-users via price rises.

Writing to the Government-
appointed BTC privatisation

Solomon’s
Mines close
two sections
in Bay Street
anchor store

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

STRUGGLING | luxury
goods retailer Solomon’s Mines
has closed two sections in its
anchor store on Bay Street, and
two stores on Paradise Island,
employees confirmed to Tri-
bune Business yesterday.

A Tribune Business reporter
who visited Solomon’s Mines’
main Bay Street store yester-
day found that the retailer had
slashed the prices of all its items
- up to 70 per cent off - in the
remaining sections of the outlet,
while the perfume and acces-
sories areas had been closed.

The storefront windows for
the two recently-closed sections
have been covered up with
brown paper and a sign that
leads one to believe the space is
under renovation.

One employee, when asked
yesterday if "things are dire”,
replied: “Yes.” The luxury
goods retailer is a clearly trou-
bled business, its staff having
been complaining for months

SEE page 4B

SANDYPORT #4796 Luxury canalfront 3,724 sq. ft.4 bed 44 bath

townhouse with dock for boat up to 40 feet.

spacious _ living/dining,

modern

Three stories,

kitchen and oak _— flooring.

WAS $825,000 NOW $695,000. BEST BUY IN SANDYPORT!
Mark.Hussey@SothebysRealty.com 242.424.9193

Damianos |

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Member of
SIRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | #242322.2033 | The Bohamas MLS



* Leading operator concerned that many firms unable to absorb
‘minimum two per cent of per annum revenue’ increase

* Rises likely to be passed to consumers via higher prices, with ‘further
undue cash flow burden’ caused by four-month payment period

* Caribbean cellular operator says Bahamas plan for ‘special taxes’
could deter market entrants and limit/inhibit competition

* But government committee dismisses concern

committee on its licensing
regime consultation paper, Mr
Hutton-Ashkenny said SRG
currently just paid the Govern-
ment a business licence fee
levied as a percentage of rev-
enue, plus a fee to cover the
Public Utilities Commission’s
(PUC) costs.

The latter fee was levied at
0.524 per cent of revenue, plus a
flat radio spectrum fee, but
under the new communications
regulatory set-up, SRG will see
its fee payments jump from two
to four.

Apart from the same business

Cable: We're ‘superior’
to BTC over Internet

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas has asserted that it has a
Internet psroduct than the rival
Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC),
having more than double the number of sub-
scribers and an average revenue per unit (ARPU)
that was 59 per cent higher the last time com-
parative figures were produced.

A copy of Cable Bahamas’ private placement
memorandum for its active $40 million prefer-
ence share issue, a copy of which has been seen by
Tribune Business, outlined the BISX-listed enti-
ty’s optimism that it would find it much easier to
launch new telecoms services as part of a ‘triple-
play’ value proposition to Bahamian consumers

SEE page 5B

“superior”

than BTC.
Cable Bahamas said

licence fee and charges to cover
the costs incurred by new sector
regulator, the Utilities Regula-
tion and Competition Authori-
ty (URCA), Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny said SRG would also
have to pay a contribution to
the Universal Service Fund
(USF) that will be created to
finance the provision of tele-
coms services to virtually all
Bahamian communities.

This, the SRG/IndiGo presi-
dent said, was likely to based
on a percentage of company
revenues, with the fourth and
final fee set to be a new “annu-

al government communications
fee”.

This, he added, was likely to
be a sum equivalent to 2 per
cent of a communications oper-
ator’s annual revenues, plus a
“currently unknown” radio
spectrum fee.

“There can be few businesses
that can sustain an overnight
increase in overhead that is a
minimum of 2 per cent of rev-
enue per annum, and potential-
ly far greater given the
unknown factors of the Univer-
sal Service Fund contribution
and the government radio spec-

Bahamian farms
at 10% capacity

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas needs “to identify priorities”
for new technology in its agriculture industry, a
report has urged, with those farmers still working
operating at 10 per cent of potential capacity and
the production of all sectors having declined
between 2005-2007.

The Inter-American Institute for Cooperation

on Agriculture’s (ICA) 2008 annual report con-
firmed that there had been a “continuous decline”
in the number of farms and farmers in the
Bahamas over the past 30 years, leaving agricul-
ture with less than 3 per cent of this nation’s per
annum gross domestic product (GDP).

The ICA report said: “The records show that

there has been a decline

ROYAL FIDELITY

aml

RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

in the number of farm-

SEE page 3B

Where do you want to be?

We can get you there!

BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801

Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

trum fee,” Mr Hutton-Ashken-
ny said.

“Moreover, the fact that the
fees are all paid annually in a
lump sum in the first four
months of the year serves to
add a further undue cash flow
burden on operators.”

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny urged
the Government and its BTC
privatisation committee advisers
to allow fees to be paid quar-
terly, and that there be “a tran-
sition period before operators
be burdened fully with addi-

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission:
from the daily report.



> Pension Plans

> Mutual Funds

> Stock Brokerage

> Corporate Finance

> Investment Management
> Trusts & Estate Planning

> Personal Pension Plan Accounts

> Education Investment Accounts

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





International Markets

FOREX Rates

Weekly
CAD$ 0.8608
GBP 1.6359
EUR 1.4041
Commodities

Weekly
Crude Oil $60.53
Gold $912.70

International Stock Market Indexes:

Weekly
DJIA 8,183.17
S & P500 882.68
NASDAQ 1,752.55
Nikkei 9,291.06



























% Change

-0.15
+0.18
+0.45



% Change
-7.77
-1.97

% Change
-1.18
-1.53
-2.45
-5.35

A World of
Choices














@ By Royal Fidelity Capital
Markets

LAST week, investors trad-
ed in six out of the 24 listed
securities, of which one
advanced, three declined and
two remained unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 9,022 shares
changed hands, representing a
decrease of 857 shares or 9 per
cent, compared to last week's
trading volume of 9,879 shares.

Focol Holdings (FCL) was
the volume leader this week

with 3,624 shares trading hands,
its stock falling by $0.01 to end
the week at $5.03.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) was the lead
advancer with 2,700 shares trad-
ing, its share price rising by
$0.05 to end the week at $1.82.

FamGuard Corporation
(FAM) was the lead decliner,
falling by $0.77 to end the week
at a new 52-week low of $6.99
on a volume of 1,000 shares.

BOND MARKET
No notes traded in the
Bahamian market last week.

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GET THERE. TOGETHER.

ST

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

J.S. Johnson Company (JSJ)
released its unaudited financial
results for the three months
ending March 31, 2009. JSJ
reported net income attribut-
able to equity holders of $1.6
million, down by $83,000 or 4.9
per cent compared to $1.7 mil-
lion in the 2008 first quarter.

Total income rose by
$722,000 or 11 per cent to $7.5
million, compared to $6.8 mil-
lion at the end of the 2008 first
quarter, while total expenses
increased by $428,000 or 9 per
cent to $5.1 million, compared
to $4.7 million in 2008.



Net premiums earned of $2.2
million decreased by $105,000
or 5 per cent in comparison to
2008, while insurance expenses
of $1.5 million decreased by
$154,000 or 10 per cent.

Income from commissions
and fees of $5.1 million
increased by $1.2 milliOn or 33
per cent quarter-over-quarter.
Earnings per share declined by
5 per cent to $0.20 versus $0.21
for the same three month peri-
od in 2008.

JSJ’s total assets and liabilities
stood at $80 million and $57
million respectively, compared
to $82 million and $60 million at
year-end 2008.

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 787.12 (-5.71%) YTD

BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $1.39 $- 0 -18.71%
BBL $0.63 $- 0 -4.55%
BOB $6.94 $- 0 -9.16%
BPF $11.00 $- 0 -6.78%
BSL $7.92 $- 0 -22.28%
BWL $3.15 $- 0 0.00%
CAB $11.39 $- 0 -18.82%
CBL $5.64 $- 528 -19.43%
CHL $2.74 $- 0 -3.18%
CIB $10.38 $- 0 -0.67%
CWCB — $2.97 $-0.14 1,000 32.00%
DHS $1.82 $0.05 2,700 -28.63%
FAM $6.99 $-0.77 1,000 -10.38%
FBB $2.37 $- 0 0.00%
EEE $0.30 $- 0 0.00%
FCL $5.03 $-0.01 3,624 -2.71%
FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%
FIN $10.90 $- 0 -8.17%
ICD $5.50 $- 170 -10.28%
JSJ $10.40 $- 0 -6.31%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%
DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

¢ J. S. Johnson (JSJ) has declared a dividend of $0.16 per
share, payable on July 15, 2009, to all shareholders of record date

July 8, 2009.

* Consolidated Water (CWCO) has declared a dividend of
$0.013 per share, payable on August 6, 2009, to all shareholders

of record date July 1, 2009.

¢ Abaco Markets (AML) announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at 6pm at
The Wyndam Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino, West Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of June
19, 2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting.

¢ Benchmark (Bahamas) (BBL) announced it will be holding
its Annual General Meeting on Thursday, July 23, 2009, at
6.30pm at the British Colonial Hilton, Governor's Ballroom, Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of June
23, 2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting.

Trl Estate

WOT OCCUR AMS TOMO ata Te ie

ee eT ie) LT


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 3B



Airport awards S21m
baggage system deal

The Nassau Airport Development
Company (NAD) has awarded a $21
million contract to supply a fully inte-
grated baggage handling, sortation and
explosive detection system at Lynden
Pindling International Airport (LPIA)
to New Zealand-owned company
Gildepath Group.

Due for completion in 2013, the Nas-
sau project is a three-stage greenfield
project, which will start with supply-
ing a new 55 counter check-in at the

Oil up

m@ By PABLO GORONDI
Associated Press Writer

Oil prices rose above $60 a barrel
on Monday, halting last week’s falling
trend, as investors turned to com-
modities for protection against a weak-
er dollar and after attacks on oil facil-
ities in Nigeria.

By midday in Europe, benchmark
crude for August delivery was up 13
cents to $60.02 a barrel in electronic
trading on the New York Mercantile
Exchange. On Friday, the contract fell
52 cents to settle at $59.89.

Earlier Monday, prices fell as low
as $58.88, as investors continued to fret
about global economic growth and

US Departures Terminal, the company
said in a statement yesterday.

The project will also involve an 1800
bag/hour inline explosive detection sys-
tem, bag-weight imaging system and
automated baggage sortation, with
three large carousels totalling 3,500
linear feet and some 300 drives.

The second stage includes three
inbound baggage claim systems for
international arrivals, and stage three
comprises a new International/Domes-

near S60 on weaker

crude demand.

The dollar was down against the
euro and the yen on Monday, luring
investors to commodities like oil and
gold as a hedge against the inflation
risks posed by a weaker dollar.

The euro rose to $1.3987 from 1.3936
on Friday, while the dollar was worth
92.26 Japanese yen, down from 92.34
yen late Friday in New York.

Prices have fallen $14 a barrel, or 19
per cent, since June 30 after poor
unemployment data from the US and
Europe sparked doubts that the global
economy was poised for a strong recov-
ery this year. “There’s been a shift in
market sentiment,” said Victor Shum,
an energy analyst with Purvin & Gertz

tic Terminal with 42 check-in counters
and 3,200 linear feet of baggage han-
dling, security and sortation systems
equipment.

Grumbling

While there is likely to be grumbling
in some quarters that NAD has award-
ed another contract to a foreign firm,
this one is for specialist technology and
equipment that only a few companies

in Singapore. “Earlier this year, there
was a lot of talk about green shoots.
Now the focus is on the green shoots
shriveling.”

Traders

Traders will be looking this week to
the first big batch of second quarter
corporate results for clues about eco-
nomic growth. Investors will also be
eyeing data on housing starts, retail
sales and industrial production.

“Expectations are that most compa-
nies are going to report poor results
and a conservative outlook,” Shum
said. “It’s not unreasonable to expect
crude prices to move down to the mid-

can provide.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
last week said that more than $10 mil-
lion has been spent locally on various
aspects of the design, engineering and
consultation of the airport redevelop-
ment project. More than $14.8 million in
construction contracts have been award-
ed to Bahamian firms. Mr Ingraham
said the terminal’s general contractor,
Ledcor, a Canadian firm, is planning
for 73 per cent of its labour require-

$50s over the coming days and weeks.”

Traders have been disappointed by
evidence of weak gasoline sales in the
US over the Independence Day holi-
day weekend of July 4, a time that usu-
ally marks the peak of gasoline
demand for the summer.

“The US summer driving season has
been a non-event for a second year in
a row,” Shum said.

In Nigeria, Africa’s largest crude
exporter, militants said they had
attacked an oil depot and loading
tankers in the country’s populous eco-
nomic center of Lagos.

The militants say they are fighting to
force the federal government to devote
more oil-industry funds to the southern

ments to be filled through local con-
tractors. Bahamian firms awarded major
contracts for the first stage of the project
include Reliable Fencing, Bahamas Hot
Mix, Basden Elevators, Woslee Con-
struction, Sentinel Drilling and Water
Works, TMC Engineering Ltd.

Approximately 40 contracts are
scheduled to be tendered in coming
months, including sub-contracts to the
terminal’s general contractor and direct
contracts with NAD.

dollar

region, which remains poor despite its
bounty of natural resources.

Attacks over the past years have cut
Nigeria’s oil output by about 25 per
cent.

In other Nymex trading, gasoline for
August delivery was down less than a
penny at $1.6502 a gallon and heating
oil dropped 0.58 cent to $1.5277. Nat-
ural gas for August delivery slid 4.4
cents to $3.329 per 1,000 cubic feet.

In London, Brent prices were up 31
cents to $60.83 a barrel on the ICE
Futures exchange.

¢ Associated Press writers Alex
Kennedy in Singapore and Bashir Adi-
gun in Abuja, Nigeria, contributed to
this report

Baha Mar seeks summary ruling against Harrah's Bahamian farms

FROM page 1B

fulfilled pursuant to the Harrah’s guarantee”.

The hearing, which Baha Mar wants scheduled
for August 11, 2009, will also ask the court to
“grant Baha Mar’s...... cross-motion for summa-
ry judgment on their first counterclaim/third
party claim for breach of contract and their
sixth-party claim for breach of guaranty.....”

Motions for summary judgment are often filed
in a bid to avoid a full trial on the substantive
issues, and Baha Mar’s move is likely to be a
response to Harrah’s filing of its own motion
for asummary judgment that was filed on May
27, 2009.

As for the specific clatms Baha Mar is seeking
summary judgment on, in its initial counterclaim
for breach of contract, it had alleged that in the
joint venture agreement Harrah’s had agreed
to commit some $212 million in equity to the pro-
ject for a 43 per cent stake.

However, Baha Mar alleged that Harrah’s
and Caesars Bahamas subsequently reneged on
their agreement despite Baha Mar having pre-
viously agreed a supplemental Heads of Agree-
ment with the Bahamian government on January

31, 2009. The Cable Beach resort developer
added that it had spent $85 million after the
joint venture agreement was signed, only for
the other side to breach it.

As for the guaranty, Baha Mar had alleged
that Harrah’s guaranteed Caesars Bahamas’
obligations up to an amount of $318 million,
including payment of the initial $212 million
capital contribution. Harrah’s, Baha Mar, is
alleging, is refusing to honour its obligations
under the guarantee.

In its cross-motion, Baha Mar is also seeking
the dismissal of Harrah’s rival summary judg-
ment motion and recovery of its costs and legal
fees.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice-presi-
dent for governmental and external affairs, con-
firmed yesterday he had known the company’s
attorneys were set to file the summary judg-
ment motion, although he was unaware of the
details.

While waiting for the New York court pro-
ceedings to be resolved, Baha Mar is “continuing
to work” on replacing Harrah’s with the China
Export-Import Bank and China State Con-
struction, the two sides having signed a Memo-
randum of Understanding (MoU) earlier this

year.

Mr Sands told Tribune Business that the time-
frame for the Chinese to complete their neces-
sary due diligence on Baha Mar and sign a more
formal deal with the Cable Beach developer
had not altered from 2009 year-end.

“They continue to do their due diligence,” he
said of the two Chinese state-owned entities.
“We don’t have a timeline, but we still seem to
be taking baby steps forward.

“They have their whole shopping list of items
required for such a project, and there have been
multiple visits of delegations looking at the pro-
ject and looking at the Bahamas as a tourist des-
tination. Delegations have been here from Chi-
na in the last month. Multiple delegations have
been visiting the destination from time to time.”

Chinese delegations had featured profession-
als ranging from interior designers to suppliers,
and Mr Sands added: “We always said it would
take at least until the end of this year, and noth-
ing has changed from that timetable. Some of the
paperwork will take us at least until the end of
the year.”

China State Construction is being eyed as the
equity and construction partner, while the Chi-
na Ex-Im Bank will provide the financing.

FROM page 1B

ers in the Bahamas from 36,246 in 1978 top 20,336 in
1994, and in 2000 it was estimated that those in pro-
duction are at just 10 per cent capacity.

“Those producing have less than 10 acres of farm-
land, and the average age was approximately 59
years-old.”

Drawing on recent data, the IICA said there had
been “a slight decline in output for the major sub-sec-
tors of fish and crops” between 2005-2007, while
poultry, red meats and ornamentals had slightly
increases. Exports were down, while the value of
products consumed in the Bahamas had risen slight-
ly.
Fisheries exports fell from $97.62 million in 2005 to
$96.477 million in 2006, and dropped by a further $5.3
million to $91.175 million in 2007. Crop exports also
fell, down from $44.96 million in 2006 to $42.006
million in 2007.

Poultry output, though, increases from just over
$16 million in 2005 and 2006 to $18.766 million in
2007, with red meats breaching the $1 million mark
that year after standing at $925,450 and $918,620 in
2005 and 2006 respectively.

Ornamental production rose from $8 million to
$9.711 million between 2006 and 2007.

Asian markets extend slide

@ By JEREMIAH MARQUEZ
AP Business Writer

HONG KONG (AP) —
Asian markets extended their
slide Monday as hopes for a
strong economic turnaround
continued to fade amid new
political uncertainty in Japan
and worries over earnings
results from major US compa-
nies. European markets were
little changed in early trade.

Every major across Asia mar-
ket dropped, with Japan’s index
racking up its ninth straight loss
as the country’s embattled
prime minister moved to dis-
solve parliament and call gen-
eral elections for next month.
Oil prices resumed their two
week sell-off to fall toward $59
a barrel.

Renewed anxiety about the
pace of recovery in the world
economy has kept stocks from
rallying further after huge gains
between March and June.

Investors are now looking to
second-quarter corporate earn-
ings and profit outlooks for the
year, to be issued in the coming
weeks, for guidance about the
economy’s prospects. This week
brings results from US bell-
wethers like Citigroup Inc., Intel
Corp. and General Electric Co.

Unless corporate profits and
major economies show more
evidence of healing, markets
could be hard pressed to move
higher for now.

“Most people are fairly cau-
tious, they think it’s been a bit
too much too soon,” said Daniel
McCormack, a strategist for
Macquarie Securities in Hong
Kong. “If economic data does-
n't keep improving we could
continue to drift off from here.”

European shares opened low-
er before recouping their losses

to trade mostly sideways, with
Britain’s FTSE up 0.1 per cent,
Germany’s DAX gaining 0.2
per cent and France’s CAC 40
flat. Wall Street futures pointed
to more losses on Monday.
Dow futures were down 30, or
0.4 per cent, at 8,055 and S&P
futures fell 3.1, or 0.4 per cent,
at 871.20.

In Japan, the Nikkei 225
stock average tumbled 236.95
points, or 2.6 per cent, to
9,050.33.

Tokyo’s market opened low-
er, but selling accelerated in the
afternoon amid reports that
Prime Minister Taro Aso will
likely dissolve the powerful low-
er house next week and that
national elections would take
place August 30.

That nearly six-week gap was
too long for comfort, analysts
said.

“Japan will essentially be
without a government during
that time,” said Masayoshi
Okamoto, head of dealing at
Jujiya Securities in Tokyo. “So
investors are trimming their
holdings as a precaution against
the political vacuum. If some-
thing happens, the country may
not be able to immediately
respond.”

Hong Kong’s Hang Seng
shed 453.79, or 2.6 per cent, to
17254.63, while South Korea’s
Kospi dived 3.5 per cent to
1,378.12.

Elsewhere, Taiwan’s market
dropped 3.5 per cent as
investors worried that a partial
free trade agreement with main-
land China would be delayed
until next year.

Australia’s index lost 1.5 per
cent and India’s benchmark was
down 1.7 per cent. Shanghai’s
main stock measure lost 1.1 per
cent.

Trade on Wall Street Friday
was uninspiring amid jitters
about earnings and as a survey
showed US consumer confi-
dence falling to its lowest level
since March.

Few expect companies to
shine in the April-June quarter.
Analysts polled by Thomson
Financial forecast that S&P 500
companies’ earnings dropped
an average 35.5 per cent in the
period from a year earlier after
falling the same amount in the
first quarter.

Instead, many investors will
be eying company forecasts to
help determine whether hopes
for a faster rebound in eco-
nomic growth, as reflected in
prices from the spring rally, are
justified or overwrought.

The Dow fell 36.65, or 0.5 per
cent, to 8,146.52, the lowest
close for the blue chips since
April 28.

The broader S&P 500 index
lost 3.55, or 0.4 per cent, to
879.13, while the Nasdaq com-
posite index rose 3.48, or 0.2
per cent, to 1,756.03.

Oil prices slid in Asia trade,
with benchmark crude for
August delivery down 58 cents
to $59.31 a barrel. The contract
fell 52 cents to settle at $59.89.

The dollar weakened to 92.29
yen from 92.43 yen, while the
euro traded slightly lower at
$1.3937 from $1.3944.

¢ AP Writer Tomoko A.
Hosaka contributed to this
report from Toyko

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



1959-2009 PSS

The Bahamas National Trust

Past, Present and Future

Thoughts from the 1958 Exuma Expedition Leader

Special Presentation:

G. Carleton Ray, PhD. Research Professor
Department of Environmental Sciences
University of Virginia

Date: Wednesday, July 15
Time: 7:00 pm SHARP!
Piace: Nassau Yacht Club, East Bay Street

BNT and NYC members FREE
General Public $2

For more information call: 393-1317
Email: bnt@bnt.bs * www.bnt.bs


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Solomon’s Mines close two sections
in the Bay Street anchor store

FROM page 1B

that Solomon’s Mines has been
unable to meet payroll on time,
leaving them out of pocket and
struggling to meet their own
financial obligations.

The chain, which was
acquired by well-known entre-
preneur Sir Garet “Tiger’ Fin-
layson’ in 2004 from Solomon
Brothers and Martin Solomon,
has been in downsizing mode
for several years now, having
previously closed its flagship
Mall at Marathon store and

retreated from Caves Village
out west.

Now, the continued presence
of its flagship store on Bay
Street appears to be in jeop-
ardy, with the closure of two
sections indicating it is suffer-
ing from major inventory/stock
shortages. Solomon’s Mines and
its brands also appear to be
retreating from another luxury
goods hot spot, namely Paradise
Island’s Marina Village and the
Atlantis Crystal Court.

Sir Garet acquired Solomon’s
Mines with the help of a syndi-

cated loan put together by Bank
of the Bahamas International,
additional financing from Sco-
tiabank, and the payment they
received from Commonwealth
Brewery/Heineken for relin-
quishing Board and manage-
ment control at Burns House.

Sources

Financial sources have sub-
sequently told Tribune Business
that the acquisition financing
was re-financed by Citibank,
with the Finlayson family’s

stake in Associated Bahamian
Distillers and Brewers
(ABDAB) used as part-collat-
eral. ABDAB holds their stakes
in Burns House and Common-
wealth Brewery.

While Solomon’s Mines prob-
lems have undoubtedly been
exacerbated by the global reces-
sion and tourism downturn,
observers have suggested it was
already in trouble as a result of
expanding too rapidly in the
aftermath of the 2004 acquisi-
tion - growth that proved unsus-
tainable. Some 40-50 per cent

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00










NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ADELINE LOUIS of BURIAL
GROUND CORNER, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 7" day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MOMENTS IN TIME
CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HENBIT VALLFEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Boney at Work

S2wk-Low
1.28
10.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.99
10.00
10.35
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.40
10.00

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

1.39
11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

2.37
11.39
2.74
5.64
2.97
1.82
6.99
10.90
10.38
5.03
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.40
10.00
S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Securit
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

11.00

11.39

10.90
10.38

10.40
10.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Last Sale
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, KIEARAH ELIZABETH
DIEUJUSTE of #1 Faith Avenue, P.O. BOX N-1530,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to KIEARAH
ELIZABETH DIEUJUSTE-MCKAY. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAMBOR INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HIGH GLOW VISION LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Cah 1

€

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 13 JULY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,572.93] CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -139.43 | YTD % -8.14
FINDEX: CLOSE 787.12 | YTD -5.72% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

clare L. â„¢ Ts

EPS $
0.127
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.1
0.249 11.0
0.419
0.111
0.240

Div $ P/E
10.9
11.1
28.4
N/M

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.39

6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.64
2.97
1.82

13.5
26.8
7.6
6.99 0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180
ases)
Interest
7%
Prime + 1.75%
T%
Prime + 1.75%

16.6
33.9
13.1
15.2
N/M
8.6

5.03
1.00
0.30
5.50 13.5
10.9
55.6

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00 2

Daily Vol. Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

S52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $

8.42
6.25
0.40

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E
N/M
N/M

256.6

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

ABDAB
RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

31.59

0.55

29.00
0.55

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

NAV
1.3860
2.8952
1.4763
3.1031

12.9209
100.5448
93.1992
1.0000
9.2765
1.0578
1.0271
1.0554

1.3231
2.8952
1.4019
3.1031
12.2702
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Incorne Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

YTD%

2.40

-1.52

2.97

-8.35

2.40

-0.02
-3.33

0.00
2.00
2.13

-0.57

1.74

Last 12 Months
4.75
-3.18
5.30
-13.82
5.79

Div S$ Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
3-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
31-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07

0.54
-6.76
0.00
-2.98
5.78
2.71
5.54

30-Jun-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

MARKET TERMS

ing price in last 52 weeks
last 52 weeks
ighted price for daily volume
hted price for daily volume
rom day to day
r of total shares traded today

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Col

Last Price - Last traded

Weekly Vol. -
EPS $ - A compa
NAV - Net Asset Value

Trading volume of the prior week
reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.

of its staff complement are
already understood to have
been laid off.

Last month, Mark Finlayson,
Solomon’s Mines managing
director, appeared in court for
non-payment of National Insur-
ance Board (NIB) contributions
in the amount of $377,092. He
pled guilty and assured the mag-
istrate that he would work out
payment arrangements with
NIB.

Tribune Business has left
phone messages for Mr Fin-
layson over several days, none
of which have been returned.
When asked if he might return
the calls, one employee said yes-
terday: "Long shot."

Mr Finlayson told Tribune
Business earlier this year that
business levels at Solomon’s
Mines were down 30-50 per
cent depending on the month.

Labour Minister Dion

Foulkes said recently that he
and his officers had undertaken
an investigations into the alle-
gations of unpaid pay cheques
for Solomon’s Mines.

"Notwithstanding a drop in
income, he [Mr Finlayson] is
attempting to maintain as much
staff on payroll as possible,
which the government com-
mends," Mr Foulkes said. “We
will make inquiries and we will
see.”

Mr Finlayson said recently
that staff have sometimes been
paid late, but they are eventu-
ally paid.

He admitted that that the
company has been going
through difficult times, but
asserted: “We are not the only
ones in the luxury goods area
who are going through tough
times. We are not the only ones
who are paying people some-
times later than they should.”

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. If so, call us on
322-1986 and share your
story.

NOTICE

TRINAD LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) TRINAD LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business

Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 6th July, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Manex Limited,
The Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets,

Nassau, Bahamas

Dated this 14th day of July, A. D. 2009



Manex Limited
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NUVILLY HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GIANT STEPS
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnin gs
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 5B



I = 0.—)) =~
‘Undue burden’ fears over
new communications fees

FROM page 1B

tional fee to which they have previ-
ously not been subjected”.

“SRG respectfully states its view
that, in the absence of controls or
access restrictions being placed upon
services offered by foreign Voice over
the Internet operators, Bahamian oper-
ators offering competing services
should have those revenues exempt
from any form of fee,” the SRG presi-
dent said.

SRG’s position was backed to a large
extent by Digicel, the cellular operator
that has been chomping at the bit for
several years to enter this market in
the Bahamas, given that it has quickly
established a large presence through-
out the region.

In its response, Digicel described as
“best regulatory practice” the levying
of fees on communications providers to

“cover only the reasonable and trans-
parent administrative costs efficiently
incurred by the regulator”.

It had particular concern over the
proposals to charge Bahamas-based
communications business licence fees
and communications fees licence,
describing them as “special taxes”. Giv-
en that the Bahamas had no income
or corporate taxes, Digicel argued that
“special taxes can only be justified to
the extent that they apply proportion-
ately to all businesses in the Bahamas”.

And the cellular operator added: “It
seems to us that the communications
fees licence may be an additional bur-
den not matched elsewhere in industry
in the Bahamas.

“Tf this is correct, then it would be
unreasonable to impose such a fee as it
would discourage investment and
unfairly penalise any communications
company that does invest or operates
currently in the country.

“From our recent survey of 16 coun-

tries, we found that the per capita
resultant costs imposed in the
Caribbean compared to other coun-
tries vary over a huge range - from the
more expensive (more than double)
to the enormously more expensive
(nearly 100 times more.”

Digicel said its Caribbean experi-
ence had generally shown that “little if
any attention” had been given by reg-
ulators to minimising their costs, as
these were ultimately passed on to the
industry and consumers. The result was
that regulatory costs could act as a bar-
rier to new market entrants/competi-
tion, and cause a “cash drain that
weakens competition”.

None of this, though, appeared to
cut much ice with the BTC privatisa-
tion committee and its advisers. In its
response, the committee said licensees
had the burden of proving their annu-
al turnover, and it pledged that URCA
would be objective in levying its regu-
latory fees.

The committee added that URCA
would also have an annual Budget that
was published, with its financial state-
ments also audited by external auditors
and published.

And it defended the communica-
tions fee and business licence fee by
pointing out that they were levied
under different pieces of legislation,
with other industries also facing sector-
specific taxes and fees.

“To waive licence fees for any entity,
including not-for-profit companies,
would potentially lead to a distortion in
the market and possible use of such
entities to avoid licence fees,” the com-
mittee said, adding that URCA had to
levy fees on a non-discriminatory basis.

Elsewhere, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
also expressed concern on SRG’s
behalf that while the draft legislation
for the new communications sector
regulatory regime had been reviewed
by the industry prior to its passage
through Parliament, the Communica-

tions Sector Policy document had not
been made available.

He described this as a “serious omis-
sion” that meant industry players were
unable to examine the Government’s
proposals for the communications sec-
tor in their entirety, as the policy doc-
ument worked ‘hand-in-glove’ with the
legislation - much like under the exist-
ing telecommunications regulatory
regime.

“For the sake of completeness, we
should also point out that the sector
policy referred to in the Bill must be a
distinct policy document for the
planned communications sector, as
opposed to the current telecommuni-
cations sector,” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
said.

“Failure to make such a distinction
would mean that the introduction of
the new sector policy would have the
effect of replacing the existing
Telecommunications Act, and lead toa
litany of regulatory complaints.”

Cable: We’re ‘superior’ to BTC over Internet

FROM page 1B

its Internet penetration had
risen from 43 per cent at year-
end 2005 to 56 per cent at year-
end 2008, and that it had “a
more than comfortable lead
over BTC and clearly provides a
superior product”.

Drawing on 2006 statistics,
the last year for which compar-
ative figures are available as
BTC has not released annual
reports for 2007 and 2008, the
Cable Bahamas offering docu-
ment said the state-owned car-
rier then had 14,477 DSL sub-
scribers who generated $5.8 mil-
lion in annual revenues, for an
ARPU of $33.38.

Cable Bahamas, though, at
the same point in 2006 had
35,529 residential Internet sub-
scribers - “nearly 2.5 times
more” - at an ARPU that was
59 per cent higher. Residential
subscribers accounted for 87 per
cent of Cable Bahamas’ 2008
Internet revenues.

Much of Cable Bahamas’

future growth is linked to its
ability to expand into new mar-
kets, especially fixed-line and
cellular telecoms, ambitions it
makes no attempt to hide.
While it could enter the former
market by making good on its
option to purchase IndiGo Net-
works, it would need to obtain a
cellular licence from the Gov-
ernment.

Several observers suggested
yesterday that this was unlikely
to be a problem, pointing out
that the Government would
have an effective ‘conflict of
interest’ when it came to regu-
latory issues affecting Cable
Bahamas because of its share-
holdings in the company.

When Columbus Communi-
cations’ 30.2 per cent stake is
bought out, the National Insur-
ance Board (NIB) and the
Treasury will be the two largest’
Cable Bahamas’ shareholders.
One source told Tribune Busi-
ness that once the buy out is
completed, NIB will have a
22.069 per cent stake and the
Treasury a 7.16 per cent stake, a

To advertise in Zhe Tritune -
a AS ETT

29.22 per cent combined share-
holding that will be almost as
large as Columbus Communi-
cations’ present holding.

As a result, the source sug-
gested future telecoms licences
for Cable Bahamas were unlike-
ly to be a problem because the
Government would not want to
damage its holdings in the com-
pany. The irony is that the Gov-
ernment, as it exits its majority
stake in BTC through selling 51
per cent via privatisation, is
simultaneously becoming the
largest shareholder in its main
competitor.

Columbus Communications,
through the $80 million pur-
chase price it will receive, is set
to enjoy a 45 per cent or $25
million appreciation on the val-
ue of its investment in four
years, having bought in for $55
million in 2005.

In addition, the source sug-
gested the management agree-
ment reached with Cable
Bahamas would allow Colum-
bus Communications to “have
its cake and eat it, too”.

It appears that the manage-
ment fees Columbus Commu-
nications will earn will be more
than the $1.429 million in divi-
dends it received from the
BISX-listed company in 2008.

Columbus will receive a flat
annual fee of $1.4 million, plus
an incentive fee based on
achieving a targeted percentage
of Cable Bahamas’ operating

munications can earn is $2.52
million.

As for BTC’s ability to com-
pete head-to-head with Cable
Bahamas in the provision of
cable services, assuming it
obtained such a licence, the lat-
ter said experience had shown
that “expansion by cable com-
panies into voice services has
been better from a return on

invested capital and margin con-
tribution basis than expansion
by telecommunication compa-
nies into video services”.

In addition, BTC would post-
privatisation be forced to “make
significant capital investments”
to improve its telecoms infra-
structure, while Cable Bahamas’
$230 million fibre optic network
was already in place.

Stating that “it is highly
unlikely that a new entrant in
video or Internet services could
unseat Cable Bahamas as the
leading provider for these ser-
vices”, the offering document
said it could “roll out very
quickly” telephony products
and “rapidly absorb” them into
its network via a triple-play
offering.

BRFG @ Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd
POSITION AVAILABLE:

Client Relationship Officer for International Bank

Applicants must have demonstrated experience and ability to develop new
business for non-resident, high net-worth market.

REQUIREMENTS:

Excellent knowledge of private banking products and services; fluency in Eng-
lish, French and any other language skills would be an asset; 15 years’ private
banking; knowledge of Bahamian regulatory requirements; university degree and/
or related professional designation.

DUTIES:

Marketing of private banking and portfolio management services; extensive
traveling; acquisition and development of new clients.

Compensation will be commensurate with experience.

IR) rere ya CTE

income. Yet the performance
fee is capped at 80 per cent of
the base fee, meaning the max-
imum this will be in any one
year is $1.12 million. As a result,
the maximum Columbus Com-

Interested applicants must submit applications to: Human Resources
Manager, (Re: Client Relationship Position), PO. Box SS 6289, Nassau,
Bahamas, by 20th July, 2009 or fax to (242) 502-5428.



JOB ADVERTISEMENT

Position: Accountant

SCE ESEEE ESE E SESS ESSERE ESE ESSERE SEER ER SEER EEE EEE SE CEES

A local insurance agency seeks to fill the position of
Accountant. The scope of work is to head the Ac-
counting Operations in preparation of monthly, quar-
terly and annual reports; to keep and maintain all
financial documents and records according to the
directives coming from the President and the Board
of Directors to ensure the efficient management of
all Bank and general ledger accounts. The position
will also be expected to make recommendations to
management to maintain the company’s viability in a
highly competitive environment.

eae)
(Greyne a ae

sgn

Bing Cherries

* \ :

rench Baguette, Rasemary Foc: cia, Multigrain ~~
‘Sourdough, Cheddar <<" Twists-& Olive Boule

——=

Required:

$16"

Rosle Goat Cheese (per lb)

ee _

¢ University Degree in accounting; -

¢ Professional qualifications e.g. CPA, ACCA, CA

¢ At least 3 years’ work experience as an
accountant;

¢ Good knowledge of English in writing, editing and
presenting;

* Strong interpersonal, organizational and
supervisory skills;

e Demonstrated capacity to work under pressure,
meet deadlines and perform work of the highest
quality.

¢ Good computer and analytical skills.

Sen! Sot Goat Cheesy
Covered in Rosemary

Product af Spain

hes = ' ioe

16 o#. Oikos Plain Organic Greek Yogurt

$7
Patty Pan Squash

Send cover letter and Curriculum Vitae to the follow-

ing address: -

a
Sp

Sunburst Squash

The Tribune

c/o Box # 81869
P.O. Box N 3207
Nassau, Bahamas

tach & Cheese Ravioli

" é af 2 (ponies
-_.
2 k

$5*

Large Asparagus

ty deta, ts #
With Avingo, Ricatfe
=

Mini Peeled Carrots \ Parmesan & Mozzarella Cheeses

Located on the corner of Shirley St. & Kemp Re. in the Fine Image Building * Call 393-0905 or Email info®bahamasyachtmanagement.com
SSCS KSEE SESE SESE SEES SEER SEER ESSE SE SERRE EE EERE EES

DEADLINE: July 25, 2009 by 5pm


PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







B

The Tribune

oD YY ity

ea





ith



LOCAL entrepreneur Pauline Zonicle is among a growing number of Bahamians who not only use the Noni
juice as a health supplement, but has also began manufacturing her own blend.















" Xrays

* Environmental Testing
"Pregnancy Screen

* Anti-Coagulant Monitoring
* Glucose Monitoring

* HIV Testing

51 Collins Ave
P.O. Box N-4869
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone: 1 242 325-7907
1 242 322 3634-6

Fax: 1242 322 2800

Email: laboratoryservice@coralwave.com
diagnosticcentre@coralwave.com



St. Luke’s Diagnostic Centre has been in operation since January, 1985, it is a full service diagnostic
centre providing medical laboratory and other health care activities.

Well-equipped and adequately staffed laboratory, providing consistently accurate, relevant and timely
information to facilitate the delivery of quality healthcare to persons living in all islands of The Bahamas.

Accredited and licensed by College of American Pathologist (CAP) and The Health Professions Council.

() ECG & Hearing Audiometry
Pre-Employment Screening

4) Drugs of Abuse Testing

(| Cholesterol

DNA Paternity Testing

¢ All Major Credit Cards and
Insurances Accepted.

¢ House Calls

¢ Stat and Same Day Services.

NONI JUICE

The miracle ina bottle

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

NONI juice, it’s called the healing fruit in a
bottle said to prevent and cure anything from the
common cold to high blood pressure.

Scientifically known as Morinda-Citrifolia, the
Noni fruit is found in several tropical regions
throughout the world including Tahiti, Guyana,
Suriname, Brazil, and the Bahamas.

Embraced as a naturopathic
medication, the fruit is com-
monly transformed into a liq-
uid form and then comple-
mented with sweeteners or
juices for oral consumption.

With many Bahamians
affected by chronic diseases
like diabetes, hypertension, or
various forms of cancer, it is
not difficult to understand why
so many are looking at the
Noni as their ‘miracle in a bot-
tle.’

According to one local med-
ical practitioner, the healing
potential of the Noni fruit has
long been discovered and dates
back hundred of years.

Dr Michael Ingraham - a
medical doctor and practicing
naturologist (a doctor of alter-
native medicines) for the past
28 years - from General Nutri-
tion Centre, said that over that
last few hundred years the
Noni tree and fruit have been
cultivated and harvested as a
medicinal product.

He explained: “It has been
proven that the fruit basically
helped to regulate metabolism

hypoglycemic or hyper-
glycemic.

“It works through the
immune system also, it helps
to upgrade certain immune
functions, and basically it has
so many functions.”

Dr Ingraham said the fruit
also posses antioxidants which
helps with slowing down the
aging process, along with sev-
eral other purposes.

He said in his experience
most people who suffer from
diabetes have benefited from
using the product, and thus it
continues to grown in popular-
ity locally.

This is why many like entre-
preneur Pauline Zonicle have
began to manufacture their
own Noni juice.

With her product NoniLand -
a 100 per cent Noni juice - debut-
ing at a number of local health
stores last week, she said she
envisions nothing but success.

“In 2001 I traveled to Cat
Island to visit my uncle Charles
Zonicle who I saw looked very
young and vibrant at the time,
he was 79. I asked him whether

was not hypertensive, he did
not wear glasses, and his reason
for being in such good health
he said was because of his dai-
ly Noni intake.”

She said for 5 years, she too
started drinking the product,
and almost overnight she start-
ed to see change in her own
body- her menstrual cycle
became regulated, her nightly
sinus congestions no longer
existed, and her energy level
was at an all time high.

She has also dropped from a
size 12 to 6 dress size, and says
it’s all because of the Noni
juice.

Also standing behind the
claims that the Noni fruit is a
healing product is local Tahit-
ian Noni distributor Stephen
St Clair-Serrette.

He said after first being
introduced to the Noni juice
several years ago, he has seen a
dramatic change in his health.

He explained several years
ago he suffered from a fall that
ended in a large bump on his
head and under the advice of
doctors left it alone.

However, after he had start-
ed taking the Noni juice, the
bump slowly transformed to a
“mega zit forming a head”, and
was later extracted where
before it had no head and was
hardened.

He said had it not been for
the Noni, he would still have
that bump.

Although there is still signif-
icant research required to
assert Noni as a standard heal-
ing product, its popularity con-

of sugars, and is especially he had any health problems, _ tinues to evolve in the form of

helpful for people with sugar and he said he had none. )
“He had all of his teeth, he —_ lotions.

imbalances, those who are

capsules, mixtures, and even

Botox: The anti-ager

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

FOR centuries women have been trying to
stop the aging process in its tracks and to assist
in their efforts, medical professionals discov-
ered the power of a substance that can assist in
reshaping the aging process- Botox.

According to beauty.ivillage.com, as you age,
your skin gets thinner and dryer.

“Collagen and elastin-the networks of fibers
that make your skin firm and elastic -- become
disconnected, leading to sagging and wrinkles.
Your cells simply slow down: New skin cells
don't grow as quickly and dead cells don't shed
as quickly, resulting in dull, grayish skin.”

Dr Michelle Eccles-Major has been doing
Botox injections for three years and has been
interested in it for quite some time.

“T became interested in Botox a couple of
years before I actually started doing it after
attending a dental conference in San Francis-
co. The dentist who presented the lecture was
explaining the uses within a dental practice. Bot-
ulinum toxin is a medication and a neurotoxic
protein produced by the bacterium Clostridium
botulinum and sold commercially under the
name Botox,” Dr Major said.

Dr Major explained the procedure.

“A very thin needle is used to give Botox and
it is usually given in the forehead, the glabellar
area; right above the nose, and the crows feet;
the outside the corner of the eye. Also botox can
be used in persons who suffer from migraines to
alleviate the pain,” Dr Major said.

As with all medical procedures, there are pos-

itive and negative things that can come out of
this procedure.

“The good effects from Botox are that people
can have a nice smooth appearance without hav-
ing plastic surgery. A large majority of the wrin-
kles in the treated site are removed. The down-
side is that it needs to be repeated every 4-5
months,” Dr Major said.

All of Dr Major’s of the patients are over the
age of 40 and she has seen an increase in persons
becoming more aware of the procedure.

“The interest to Botox has definitely increased
over the years, more persons are interested in
how it is done and if there are any harmful
effects. Also how often you need to repeat the
procedure. Also there are certain patients that
come regularly and have the injections done
and are very happy with the results,” Dr Major
said.

Dr Major said the patients who do Botox usu-
ally want that smooth look where the wrinkles
have been removed which gives them a younger
looking appearance.

“The persons that I would recommend for
Botox would be mid 30's to early 50's. It can be
done on persons out of this range but I evaluate
those on a case by case basis,” Dr Major said.

As for the future of Botox in the Bahamas, Dr
Major said she thinks it has a great future
because a lot of persons want a new look without
the surgery and the cost involved.

“T really enjoy doing Botox especially when
patients call back stating how pleased they are
with the results. Very little discomfort for real-
ly nice results. The best thing about Botox is
that it gives you a younger, smoother appearance
without having to do surgery.”

“A very thin
needle is

used to give
Botox and it is
Uist] Vaan
in the fore-
head, the
glabellar area;
right above the
nose, and the
crows feet:

the outside

the corner
oleae ee

— Dr Michelle
Eccles-Major


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009, PAGE 11B





(GY LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

Sex and the net

As we wind down from
thinking about being single
and dating we feel an
urgency to open a discus-
sion on ‘Sex and the Net.' It
would be hard not to
acknowledge the massive
Internet explosion over the



last twenty years and the increase of interest in sex that it has
brought. Human sexuality, and in particular the non biologi-
cal areas, continues to lag behind in research funding and
because of this, we still do not have adequate objective data
of the effects of the Internet on society.

However, few would disagree that the
Internet has highlighted people's fasci-
nation with anything to do with sex. This
fascination is not new but a reflection
of society's natural curiosity and need
for personal expression. For those of us
working in the human sexuality field,
this only confirms that many people are
still uncomfortable talking about sex. It
is still much easier for most people to
talk about love and romance but there
still remains a veil of shame and humili-
ation when discussing sex. Online sexu-
al activity, however, allows us to set aside
our shyness and provides a certain
amount of anonymity which then allows
many to explore and satisfy their curios-
ity.

To discriminatingly decry all online
sexual activity use as deviant, exploitive
and degrading of woman and children
would be to ignore its huge supportive
and educational use. The Internet has

the ability to join people and bypass bar-
riers such as: gender, physical appear-
ances, race, disabilities and ultimately
establishes online communities.

Individuals who feel lonely or isolated
due to a particular sexual minority or
sexual difficulty may find an under-
standing lacking in their outer life. Sup-
port sites for gays, rape survivors, herpes
sufferers, paraplegics to name a few, help
people psychologically by bringing them
information from people in similar situ-
ations. It has allowed people of differing
socioeconomic groups to communicate
and find a commonality which otherwise
they may not have found.

Educational sites allocated to provid-
ing information on contraception, sexu-
ally transmitted diseases and many med-
ical concerns enable people and adoles-
cents in particular, to feel more com-
fortable getting information. A lot of
our work as clinicians, and in particular

sex therapists, is to find a healthy balance
so that a person's online life does not
become so satisfying that they withdraw
or escape from trying to resolve their
problems in their real life.

Now that we have discussed some of
the pluses it would be unreasonable and
also neglectful not to discuss some of
the real perils of sex on the net. As a
result of the anonymity, the speed at
which we are able to communicate and
the huge number of money making com-
mercial sex sites, people who already
have a known compulsive personality
find the Internet incredibly addictive.
What we also Know is that it is a venue
for persons who have unresolved sexual
difficulties to act out or in fact repeat
old traumatic experiences. It is also not
unusual as sex therapists to see individ-
uals and couples presenting with rela-
tionship problems because of online sex-
ual activity.

For many affected partners any use is
unacceptable but for others pornogra-
phy may be tolerated but chat rooms
and cybersex is unacceptable. Cybersex
is defined as sexually satisfying commu-
nication, often with graphic pictures, sex-
ual chat or emails. It may even lead to
‘cybering’ which is mutual or one sided
masturbation while still online. As sex
therapist we assess the primary rela-
tionship and on many occasions we find
the online sexual activity is the result
not the cause of an intimacy problem
with in the couple. With reassurance and
the careful steering of a therapist many
situations can be successfully rectified.

For women the continued harassment
of explicit and demeaning emails and

texts only adds to other forms of societal
pressure and intimidation. Unfortunate-
ly, because our children have become
more knowledgeable than us on the net
they are now entering areas of the adult
world without our knowledge. Their
young age, immaturity and susceptibili-
ty to be persuaded only helps to feed
the dangerous minds of some compulsive
natures.

So what can we do? Ban all use of the
Internet? For many this is not necessary.
The first step is to move the computer so
that the screen can be viewed by others
in the house. Of course this becomes
even more difficult when some one is
living alone. Then consider installing
cyber screening software, tracking soft-
ware and, change to a pre-filtering ser-
vice provider. The next step is then to get
professional help. Assessment can then
be made to see what type of problem
exists and an individual treatment plan
can be designed. As with any other sex-
ual problems early intervention is rec-
ommended as problems that have been
left unattended take a longer time to
treat. Ultimately, the Internet is here to
stay so it is important to become proac-
tive in establishing a safer and more pro-
ductive cyber world for the future.

eMargaret Bain is an Individual and
Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a
Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical
Sex Therapist. Call for an appointment-
Relate Bahamas at 364- 7230, or email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com orwww.relate-
bahamas.blogspot.com. She is also avail-
able for speaking engagements.





Sunscreen and
hyper-pigmented
skin

JUST as any brightening
regimen must be approached
with diligence to experience
results, daily use of sun pro-
tection is just as imperative.

Even the strictest of bright-
ening regimens can be coun-
teracted by minimal exposure
to UV light. When a hyper-
pigmented area is exposed to
UV light, more melanin pro-
duction is triggered on a cel-
lular level, causing further
darkening. Ironically, this
production of melanin is just
your skin trying to protect
itself from damaging UV
light.

Daily application of SPF
will help shield skin from UV
light to control melanin pro-
duction on a cellular level. It
can even help lessen the
appearance of hyperpigmen-
tation triggered by hormone
fluctuations (such as melas-
ma) or post-inflammatory
hyperpigmentation (scarring).

your

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps you
are raising funds for a good
cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or

ONLINE sexual activity allows us to set
aside our shyness and provides a certain
amount of anonymity which then allows
many to explore and satisfy their curiosity.

have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.



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PAGE 12B, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





How to help your geriatric or senior

dog live a longer and happier life

TODAY, in The Bahamas dogs are
living much longer than they did twen-
ty years ago.

The reasons being:

I. There are many advances in vet-
erinary medicine.

2. There is better nutrition in the
commercial foods.

3.The Bahamian public has become
more educated and responsible about
the correct care of dogs.

A senior or geriatric dog refers to an
older dog that has a body that is declin-
ing with regards to effective functioning
because of the aging process. Dogs age
at different rates and this is dependent
to a large degree upon an individual
animal genetics. Big dogs tend to age
more quickly than small dogs. Breeds
like Great Danes are old at 5-7 years;
German Shepherds are old at 8-10
years. Small breeds like poodles and
SHIH-TZUS live up to 14 years. But
just like their owners, signs of aging
are extremely variable. The better care
a dog receives throughout his life, the
longer he can be expected to live. Stray
dogs usually do not have the same ben-
efits of owned pets and hence rarely
live to experience geriatrics because
they die young, usually from a combi-
nation of diseases, malnutrition and
trauma.

However, canine longevity means
owners are faced with more issues than
ever before. Elderly dogs are less
active, sleep more and may become
forgetful. They are not able to with-



stand extremes of temperature as well
as younger dogs as they lose muscle
tone.

Typically, the thighs and forelimbs
become thinner, while the neck and
body thicken and the abdomen sags.
Exertion may result in tremors of
fatigue. Joint pain from arthritis is a
common complaint and often slows the
dog down. They become cranky and
less tolerant of changes in routine. The
dog’s senses tend to dwindle with age,
which can be upsetting to your pet
when he can’t see, smell or hear the
way he used to.

They suffer some degree of dental
problems and may lose weight due to
pain when eating or due to other prob-
lems. But geriatric dogs usually suffer
from obesity from eating more than
they need and exercising less, and in
fact, obesity tends to shorten the life
span.

Old dogs may have problems with
irregularity (constipation), may suffer
from senility and often their house
training become less reliable. When

activity declines, so does the normal
wear of toe nails, which may seem to
grow faster.

The old dog’s health becomes more
fragile because the immune system’s
competency is also affected with age.
Old dogs get sicker and recover more
slowly than healthy young dogs. It is

vital to prevent prompt veterinary
attention to keep old dogs healthy.

One must recognise that dogs age
more rapidly than humans. After age
three, each canine year is roughly
equivalent to 5 human years. A chart
below compares a dog’s age to that of
a human.

Age of Dog Human Age

1yr 15 yrs
(Adolescent)
2 yrs 20 yrs
3 yrs 25 yrs
5 yrs 35 yrs
8 yrs 50 yrs
10 yrs 60 yrs
15 yrs 85 yrs

A number of diseases or conditions
typically affect geriatric canines. Renal
failure is probably the most common
cause of death in aged dogs. Kidneys
first seem to wear out more quickly
than other organs. Heart disease is
another consequence of canine aging,

because that muscle tends to weaken
after a lifetime of use. Bladder infec-
tions are a common problem. The risk
of cancer increases as the dog ages.

Cataracts, glaucoma or dry eye are
common eye problems. Intact males
may develop prostrate problems.
Elderly dogs may not tolerate hospi-
talisation that separates them from
their owners very well though, and in
these cases your veterinarian may show
you how to treat your dog at home.

Proper nutrition is vital to the old
dog’s health. Senior formulations of
commercial diets are available for the
special need of older dogs. Often, old-
er dogs do best on food that is easily
digested and/or chewed.

Most dogs can live comfortably and
happily into old age, but some envi-
ronmental modifications around your
home may help. If stair steps are a
problem provide a ramp. Move sleep-
ing quarters to a warm cozy spot. Dai-
ly or bi weekly grooming keeps your
dog looking and feeling good and also
provides an opportunity to find prob-
lems early. Give your old dog lots of
attention and understanding because
he has given you the best times of your
life, and you can now be his comfort
and friend during his golden years. It is
wise to encourage moderate exercise
that will keep him fit and limber longer
and make the last years of his life more
comfortable and enjoyable for you
both.

@x GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack

A Bahamian apple

I HAVE been writing The Green
Scene for The Tribune for over 20 years
but I have never addressed the subject
of apples. Let me redress that situa-
tion.

One of the most popular low-chill
apples in Florida, Texas and Southern
California is a semi-dwarf variety called
Dorsett Golden. I was introduced to
Dorsett Golden by my old friend
André Albury, owner of Wonderland
Nursery in Marsh Harbour. He has sev-
eral plants, but they are for his own
use, not for sale. I have watched them
from their pink flowering stage through
to mid maturity and I am looking for-
ward to tasting one soon.

Being Bahamian, I am not familiar
with apple culture and I must point out
that I have used ‘Origin and Descrip-
tion of Dorsett Golden Apple’, E. P.
Miller and Professor W. B. Sherman,
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.93: 108,109.
1980. as a technical source.

The original Dorsett Golden apple
was planted in a New Providence gar-
den by Irene Dorsett in 1953. She had
recently returned from New York and
had bought some Golden Delicious
apples there. One of the seeds grew
and produced fruit.

The tree came to the attention of
William Whitman of the Rare Fruit
Council International and in 1961 he
introduced budwood from the tree into
Florida. Two to three thousand trees
were cultivated by Newcomb Nursery
in the Miami area during the 1960s.

It was found that Dorsett Golden was
able to produce fruit successfully with a
mere 200 hours or less of chill. It was
also found to be a pollinator for anoth-
ert low-chill apple, Anna, which pro-
duces red fruits. Anna and Golden
Dorsett trees are usually grown togeth-
er.

Thousands upon thousands of apple
trees are grown in the USA that have

their origin in sunny New Providence. A
chance in a million? More like a chance
in a hundred quintillion.

Scientists doubt that Dorsett Gold-
en was grown from a Golden Delicious
seed because chilling in Golden Deli-
cious is controlled by 10 to 20 genes.
For two genes to mutate would be one
in a hundred million. Ten to 20 genes?
[ll leave you to do the math.

Where then did the original seed
come from? This is my own theory:

There has been research and devel-
opment of low-chill apples in Israel for
many years. A Golden Delicious culti-
vator was used in some cases and might
very well account for the colour and
shape of Dorsett Golden. Perhaps in
New York Mrs. Dorsett bought what
she assumed were Golden Delicious
apples but were, in fact, experimental
products from Israel that had become
mixed in with the Golden Delicious.

Whatever happened, the Dorsett

Dorsett Golden
oyelelic weal
Bahamian
miracle.



Golden is a distinct cultivator unlike
any other. It is semi-pygmy and pro-
duces fruits year round that are pale
yellow, often with a light pink blush.
Fruiting can be encouraged at the right
time by stripping the leaves from the
tree, as leaf loss is one of the conditions
that induces flowering and fruit growth.

If there are too many young fruits on
a Dorsett Golden limb they will grow
but remain small. Reducing the bunch
size will result in larger apples.

The story of Irene Dorsett and her
Dorsett Golden is both thrilling and
mysterious. It is thrilling that a major
apple cultivator originated in the semi-
tropical environs of The Bahamas. It is
mysterious because nobody really
knows the factors involved in the plan-
t’s evolution. Mutation took place, obvi-
ously, but what were the contributing
factors?

Does the original tree still stand? Or
its direct progeny? If any members of
the Dorsett family can add details to
the story I would grateful to hear from
them.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com























Diabetes and
summertime
footcare

IN my last article I addressed the
general topic of summer heat and
your feet. Although this was very
well received by my readers, there
were many questions related to dia-
betic footcare. We may say, what's
more natural than bare feet and san-
dals in the summer? Unfortunately,
there is no off-season for diabetes -
constant monitoring is crucial. I urge
diabetic patients to be aware that
prolonged hot and humid weather
can lead to a host of foot woes -
among them third-degree burns, if
they don't protect their feet proper-
ly.

The concern here is that in
extreme heat - as experienced during
summer months in the Bahamas -
diabetics can suffer swelling, dryness
and cracking from wearing sandals.
They may also have problems asso-
ciated with walking barefoot out-
doors such as puncture wounds,
burns and blisters from hot pave-
ment.

A local podiatrist cited a case
where a diabetic patient took a few
minutes walking barefoot on a hot
driveway to fetch the newspaper and
suffered bad burns on the sole of his
feet due to impaired nerve sensation
from the disease (neuropathy).

If you are diabetic and your skin
gets very dry in hot weather, you may
need to apply more moisturising
agent, such as diabetic lotion, which is
specially formulated for diabetic feet.
It contains no alcohols and chemi-
cals to dry out the skin. Further, you
need to pay special attention to your
heels as dry skin cracks easily.

Rules for diabetic footcare:

_ Inspect your feet daily for blisters,

cuts, and scratches. Always check
between your toes.

¢ Wash your feet daily. Dry carefully.

¢ Avoid extreme temperatures. Test
water with your hands or elbow before
bathing.

¢ lf your feet feel cold at night, wear
socks,

¢ Inspect the insides of your shoes daily
for foreign objects, and rough areas.

¢ For dry feet, use diabetic approved
lotion. Apply this after bathing and dry-
ing your feet.

¢ Shoes should be fitted by a foot care
specialist and be comfortable at the
time of purchase.

¢ See your family doctor regularly and
be sure to have your feet examined at
each visit.

¢ Do not smoke.
¢ Do not soak your feet in hot water
¢ Do not walk barefooted.

¢ Do not use chemical agents for the
removal of corns and calluses or cut
them; see your podiatrist.

¢ Do not wear mended stockings and
avoid stockings with seams.

¢ Do not use oils or cream between your
toes.

¢ Do not wear sandals with thongs
between the toes.

¢ Do not cross your legs. This can
cause pressure on the nerves and blood
vessels.

These necessary precautions can
reduce the risk of serious foot condi-
tions. Many products such as diabetic
approved shoes and inserts, seamfree
socks, specialty lotions and creams,
are available at specialty footwear
stores or pedorthic facilities where
staff, trained in foot pathology and
properly fitting shoes, will help you
make choices that will support your
foot care plan and accommodate any
foot problems.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified
Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solu-
tions, a health and wellness franchise that
focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit,
located in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau.
"The views expressed are those of the
author and does not necessarily repre-
sent those of Foot Solutions Incorporated
or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated
companies. Please direct any questions
or comments to
nassau@footsolutions.com or 327-FEET
(3338).

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the
news, read Insight
on Mondays





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2009



My Checklii

Why finding that special someone
is easier than you think



By LLOYD ALLEN

As simple as it seems, Alexan-

Tribune Features Reporter der said this is another reason he

lallen@tribunemedia.net has been forced to reside in
“Singleville.”

. . He said the timing feels right

R many single people, navigating through ee

the available prospects can sometimes tionship, he just wishes he could

become a challenge when the basic quali- = wave a magic wand to put all

ties you're seeking in a mate are scarce at best. —_‘h¢.Tght qualities in one women.

However 24-year-old Gina

Tribune Features spoke with a group of men Reid ‘s map to Mr Right
and women who said although the search can Deby ee a few wrong
. . oe * ums, and linding “an awesome

seem never-ending at times, it is much simpler eae one
once you learn what to look for and understand Entering the dating scene
what is expected from you. about 6 years ago, Gina said her
first choice was the infamous

thug.

Alexander Roberts, 26 — willing to trust until given a rea- She said this kind of guy

(names have been changed) said son not to, then the woman — seemed to have a unique confi-
that for the last three years, his © whom he commits to should dence, however he frequently
search for special someone has possess an equal amount of _ lacked the needed qualities for

been constantly derailed integrity. someone interested in a long
because many of the women Another challenge for him term “upward” relationship.

whom he considered rarely turn. happens while out on dates “Intimacy was there, but the
out to be what he expected. where he is expected to foot the daily affection was missing, they

He now feels the search for bill at a restaurant or movie. would rather spend time on the
Ms Right begins with preparing Although not an issue for him, blocks rather than chilling with
yourself and ensuring that the he said women sometimes don’t me. I think it was just the image
qualities you are looking for are even want to offer a friendly kiss of a bad boy that I was drawn to,
complimented by qualities you or intimate conversation at the — but I got bored after a while.”

possess. end of the date, which makes Having been with her current
Being a college graduate, him feel as though they’re not boyfriend for more than two
independent, confident, and — with him for the right reasons. years, Gina said she wished she
sociable, Alexander said he sim- had decided to date ‘the average
ply wants to be with a wonan = guy’ much sooner.
who can match him at his intel- ” “When I first met him, I
lectual level, but one who is also | could pretty much already knew he was not like
aware of her role as a woman. deal with a lot of the rest. He wasn’t like the gang-

: ter type that I to, hi
nacimuieaerertarle things, Butwhen you SST cin
being with a woman who is have a woman who maybe that was all I really need-
clingy. lw. want t ed.”
“T could pretty much deal sas hes bone tai. Auth Gina described her partner as
with a lot of things, but when call or text her when honest, affectionate, and funny,
you have a woman who always you alrive at work, all of which she considers essen-
wants you to call or texther when you’re going to _ “al ina relationship.
when you arrive at work, when y g g Although not always the fun-

you're going to lunch, and when lunch, and when niest or in the best of moods,
you’re headed home, that is you're headed home, she said her partner helps to
straight up annoying and scary.” that is straight up bring out her best.

Alexander argues that if he is ‘ 55 She said although from time
the type person who is always @NNOYING and scary. to time she still struggles with
-AlexanderRoberts er significant other being too
“gossipy,” she is happy that she
was able to look past finding
the perfect thug, and instead
commit herself to someone who
wanted the same out of life.
Far too often single people
have extreme expectations of
what they want in a mate, and
ANNOUNCEMENT ae
human is perfect, and like them
their future partner will have
The Doctors and Staff of The Ladies Medical Centre ae ee women. nial
ties identified for the perfect
man include; someone who is
Welcomes i responsible, faithful, honest,
ge compassionate, loving, and
someone able to say I’m sorry.
ye Some of the turn-offs were a
Dr. Laura Dupuch to our team. Fe lazy man, one who can’t express
4 his feelings, and one who is
always too busy for his woman.

Dr. Dupuch is a qualified Obstetrician and 4 When it comes to identifying
. x the qualities of the ideal
Gynaecologist and member of the Royal College woman, the most common char-

ei : acteristics stated by men includ-
Dr. Laura Dupuch of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. eae eae

BSc.(Hons.), MB., B.S., DFFP, M.R.C.0.G. . en someone who can cook (or at
sedaaeiag hi oo Visit us online at ; least make the effort), and one
ell: - : = i :
(242) www .theladiesmedicalcentre.com es Ener aenes
Tel: 325-5888

Turn-offs included a nagging

325-5884 Ist Location: No. 6 - Ist Terrace Centreville, RO. Box SS-19012, Nassau, Bahamas woman, an Sey oe

PPS ETT 2nd Location: | 3th Street North, Spanish Wells, Eleuthera Tel: 333-4633 eee eo

Coe) era Ee 3rd Location: Marsh Harbour Medical Centre, Marsh Harbour, Abaco Tel: 367-0050 personality, and one who is not
giving.



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Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway « 394-1759


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THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST

TUESDAY, JULY 14TH 2009, PAGE 13C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

FL (BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Wort Giries MARINE FORECAST



| av ar NY































; A Today Wednesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
a es i-- an = High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
as - 7 a ~ ~~ ~ 0| 1 |2 3 |4|5 } 18 | gi FC FIC FC FC Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
hy f all . ee Acapulco 88/31 75/23 pe 88/31 75/23 pC FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
vo -, en a a Low | MODERATE J HIGH | V.HIGH | EX. Amsterdam 75/23 59/15 sh 73/22 87/13 s Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 40-20 Miles 81°F
é mm ORLANDO A Ankara, Turkey 82/27 55/12 t 81/27 54/12 pe ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
High:90°F32°C. = Mostly sunny with a Clear, breezy and very Partly sunny with a Partly sunny, a A mix of sun and Partly sunny with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 88/31 73/22 s 91/32 73/22 s Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
= Low: 74°F/23°C " thunderstorm. warm. thunderstorm. t-storm possible. clouds, a t-storm. thunderstorm. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 59/15 53/11 pc 59/15 53/11 ¢
Le een | High: 90° High: 90° High: 92° High: 90° STS 2680 7051 wsgo Tress ML Ue
TAMPA ny i‘ High: 90 Low: 80 Low: 81 Low: 81 Low: 81 Low: 81 se eS Barcelona 81/27 71/21 c 80/26 69/20 s
J et ene Le Fr Ua ET Ta : Beijing 400/37 75/23 s 100/37 75/23 pc
High: 90° F/32°C Pa 101°-90 [107°-92°F | 112-1" F __107°-88° F High _HiL(ft.) Low HtL(ft) go RTT ETE
Low: 77 F/25°C , ry # The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines i effects of temperature, wind, aaa sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:39am. 24 6:48am. 0.2 Belgrade 96/35 72/22 s 100/37 741/21 s
@Q@ ‘ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 110pm. 27 7:31pm. 05 Berlin 77/95 63/17 sh 81/97 GI/16 ¢ .
al Wednesday !:28 a.m. 230 7:34am. 0.2 Bermuda 84/28 77/25 sh 84/28 77/25 sh ebillings Ings
Nom CO 2:03pm. 2.7 8:31pm. 05 Bogota 64/17 45/7 sh 63/17 44/6 pc [8186
Pa Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday 224am. 22 828am. 02 Brussels 77/25 57/13 pe 75/23 58/12 pe
Temperature 3:02pm. 28 9:36pm. 0.4 Budapest 91/32 66/18 s 97/36 69/20 s
ABACO wee tn p Pp
inh: 98° F/91° HIGH. <...csste il enema cakes 91° F/33° C ; Buenos Aires S7/13 41/5 s so/12 43/6 ¢
; py ae ere Low 79° Foe? ¢ Friday Ae om gg Cairo 94/34 72/22 s 97/36 73/22 s
; ai i-- oe f27 Normal high... 88° F/31°C — —___ Calcutta 95/35 84/28 sh 91/32 83/28 Fr
7 oy Normal low . 75° F/24° C Calgary 6015 44/6 c 68/20 48/8 s
4 a F,.: @ WEST PALMBEACH i co ica SUN AND MOON Cancun 90/32 75/23 pc 91/32 73/22 pe
: ee! High: 88° F/31°C — Last year's OW seesocsssessenensnseee 72° F/22° C Caracas 81/27 71/21 pc 81/27 71/21 t
oor Low: 76° F/24°C € y Precipitation a tone . ts ae ne Casablanca 76/24 62/16 s 79/26 64/17 s
ey alll ) As of 2 p.m. yesterday ........eceeceseeteenee 0.05": SUNSel... “Ue PI. SE Spleesbanl Copenhagen 75/23 62/16 sh 76/24 58/14 pc
& . FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Fre Year to date AB. last New First Full Dublin 6417 5040 + 66/18 54/12 sh
High: 86° F/30° C @ High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date .o.....c.ccsessccsesssseeseeseeee 21.12" a 7 es Frankfurt 75/23 G16 + 81/27 59/15 pc
Low: 79° F/26°C ” Low: 77° F/25°C : Geneva 84/28 64/17 t 80/26 61/16 pc
a AccuWeather.com mh Halifax 70/21 54/12 pc 69/20 54/12 s Showers Miami
; @ a mt rorecastscand@raphies provided by : a Havana 90/32 72/22 pc 90/32 73/22 t T-storms
, MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 15 Jul. 21 Jul. 28 Helsinki 68/20 54/12 pc 73/22 52/11 pe Rain Franté
: High: 90° F/32°C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 93/33 82/27 s 91/32 82/27 s Ce. 4 Flurries - feeceaeae eee Cold
~ i F fo é i ie o o own are noon positions of weatner systems an
re Low: 78° F/26° C NASSAU Deeernnc islainatiad 95/35 78/25 _pe 104/40 83/28 Be] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm iene
High: 90° F/32° C oe: oe om Te 8 er Te s [vy] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary uaguaii
=~ One ° erusaiem s s
: my _— Cr men ST saat 0 ae tet GE 10 0, sos
KEY WEST ‘alll. ; Piz ingston 78/25 pc 7 pe
High: 90° F/32°C a CAT ISLAND Lima 72/22 61/16 s 73/22 60/15 s
Low: 81°F/27°C High: 86° F/30° C London 73/22 57/13 sh 75/23 57/13 pc
: a -_ Low: 75° F/24°C Madrid 91/32 59/15 pc 93/33 59/15 s
Tih. Mani ag/3t 7025 t 838 7/05 + HURRICANE INSURANCE
- Fe Mexico City 75/23 54/12 t 73/22 53/11 t
a Monterrey 100/37 75/23 s 102/38 76/24 s
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 66/18 55/12 pc 75/23 63/17 pc
High: 88° F/31°C Bs cine 6 Moscow 81/27 57/13 c 75/23 55/12 sh
Low: 79° F/26°C ‘adie Munich 86/30 59/15 t 83/28 59/15 pc
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS : Nairobi 80/26 55/12 ¢ 79/26 54/12 5
highs and tonights's lows. High: 96° F/36° C New Delhi 90/32 82/27 t 97/36 84/28 t an J OWn
Low:81° F/27°C 25 ~ Oslo 73/22 55/12 sh 72/22 57/13 sh , : !
i. Paris 77/25 63/17 pc 79/26 61/16 s 7
i Prague 87/30 61/16 t 77/25 58/14 t a uITICane
re — ee Peay
Ss 8: , 7 : pe cepeccent
Low: 76° F/24°C Rome 88/31 65/18 s 88/31 68/20 pc
a peas na aie a arian MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 90/2 82/27 t 91/32 81/27 pc that you have ecole insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W pene High: 91° F/33°C San Juan Sd/12 33/0 c 6417 35/1 pe cov rage no matter which
FC FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC mes Low: 75° F/24° C San Salvador 88/31 70/21 pe 87/30 74/23 h d bl
Albuquerque 96/35 69/20 pc 93/33 68/20 t Indianapolis 86/30 65/18 pc 88/31 66/18 t Philadelphia © 85/29 63/17 s 86/30 70/21 pe CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santiago — 63/17 43/6 c 59/15 39/3 pe Way the win OWS.
Anchorage 75/23 5713 s 76/24 58/14 s Jacksonville 90/32 71/21 t 92/33 74/23 t Phoenix 112/44 89/31 pe 110/43 87/30 s Aa ore , ae eu ae Res pe a we r
Atlanta 91/32 70/21 pe 92/33 73/22 t Kansas City 94/34 74/23 t 89/31 67/19 t Pittsburgh 78/25 5241 s 84/28 68/20 t RAGGEDISLAND — igh:92°F/33" a0 Paulo C pe .
Atlantic City 83/28 57/13 s 82/27 70/21 pc Las Vegas 107/41 80/26 s 108/42 85/29 s Portland, OR 82/27 5713 s 88/31 605 s cw oe Low:77° F/25°C aan ae parm - os ee s Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 86/30 58/14 s 89/31 68/20 pc Little Rock 100/37 78/25 s 102/38 74/23 s Raleigh-Durham 88/31 64417 s 92/33 71/21 pc Low:74°F/23°C sen — RT : Rae Be ”
Boston 78/25 58/14 s 79/26 6518 pc LosAngeles 86/30 6417 s 88/31 64/17 s St. Louis 88/31 76/24 t 94/34 69/20 t . i. a ae aa ape aEDREEDDT i
Buffalo 72/22 5512 s 77/25 64/7 t Louisville 89/31 69/20 pe 90/32 72/22 t Salt Lake City 84/28 59/15 s 89/31 63/17 s GREAT INAGUA Tala ger ra ETE
Charleston, SC 86/30 69/20 t 92/33 74/23 t Memphis 96/35 78/25 t 99/37 76/24 pc SanAntonio 100/37 76/24 s 96/35 76/24 s High: 93° F/34° C aaa aaa aE SISTIGEL
Chicago 78/25 67/19 po 83/28 64/17 t Miami 90/32 78/25 t 91/32 80/26 t San Diego 75/23 68/20 pe 77/25 67/19 pc be ae ne
Cleveland 78/25 59/15 s 82/27 67/19 t Minneapolis 76/24 6246 t 75/23 5945 t Sanfrancisco 78/25 5713 s 76/24 56/13 pe Low: 77° F/2s° C ear oa am Be ae a : (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 102/38 78/25 s 100/37 78/25 s Nashville 94/34 72/22 pe 93/33 72/22 t Seattle 76/24 54/12 po 79/26 57/13 s -y Gees 86/30 73/22 t 90/32 68/20 t
Denver 92/383 54/12 pce 85/29 57/13 pc New Orleans 95/35 78/25 t 92/33 77/25 t Tallahassee 94/34 74/23 t 95/35 73/22 t _ Warsaw 81/27 66/18 pc 83/28 59/15 c Peemen io fumeee .
Detroit 79/26 59/15 s 82/27 Gd/t7 t | NewYork 81/27 6518 s 82/27 72/22 pc Tampa 90/32 77/25 pce 90/32 77/25 t a Winnined ae EA B47 BIO t Tel: (22) 67-204 J Vel: (242) 32-2862 ff Tel: (242) 96-254
Honolulu 88/31 76/24 pc 88/31 76/24 s OklahomaCity 105/40 76/24 s 103/39 72/22 s Tucson 105/40 81/27 pc 103/39 81/27 pc :
Houston 97/36 77/25 s 96/35 77/25 s Orlando 90/32 74/23 t 92/33 74/23 t Washington, DC 88/31 63/17 s 90/32 72/22 pc Te eh ee