Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
{T)\

Mim lowin’ it

90F
79F

SUNNY WITH
~3e< THUNDERSHOWER

Volume: 105 No.190

The Tribune

=USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

HIGH
LOW



MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Tera Wat ”
oppression dg LSE E

Se ei,

Parents tell of their
joy after ‘miracle’
of pair’s discovery

=
=
=
“0)
=



Teen killed in
police shootout

with robbers

18-year-old
dies during
street chase



A TEENAGER was
shot dead after he was
caught up in a shootout
between police and armed
robbers.

The incident happened
in the Kemp Road area on
Thursday night when two
men entered the nearby
City Market on Village
Road.

They held up a cashier,
demanded cash, and made
good their escape. But as
they were chased through
the streets by police, an
exchange of gunfire shot
and killed an 18-year-old
man who was walking
nearby.






By NATARIO MCKENZIE

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE FAMILY of two young
boys who went missing on
Andros more than a month ago
expressed joy and relief last
night after the children were
discovered alive by relative.

Deangelo Clarke, nine, and
Marcelo Clarke, seven, went
missing from their grandmoth-

er’s house in the remote settle-
ment of Smith’s Hill on June 9.

The boys had left the house
to hunt for crabs around 6pm
and were never heard from
again.

After days of fruitless search-
ing, police scaled down their
operations.

But family members said they

SEE page 10

Lil Wayne sued for failing to

perform at Nassau concert

MULTI-platinum rapper Lil Wayne is being
sued for nearly half a million dollars for failing
to perform at a concert in Nassau last Septem-

ber.

According to reports, Lil Wayne, 26, whose
real name is Dawyne Michael Carter Jr, is being
sued by Red City Entertainment for $432,000.

The suit, filed on June 29, in Manhattan
Supreme Court on behalf of Red City Enter-
tainment, alleges that the company paid Lil
Wayne $432,000 to be the headliner at the Pop-
pin’ Bottles concert held at the Bristol Wine and Spirits grounds on

September 27, 2008.

MINNA RE

The event had reportedly been postponed from the original
date of Friday, September 26, to Saturday, September 27, because

SEE page 10

Sale Ends
July 26th

Tel: 394-5656

Me AE Det ee lL
www. bossbahamas.com

Staples, Clips & Highlighters

Staples

Paper Clips
500 ct

Accent
Highlighters










THE BAHAMAS celebrated the 36th
anniversary of its Independence on Friday
with an explosion of colour, music and
dance at Fort Charlotte.

e SEE PAGES TWO, FIVE, 17, 19, 20, 21



. ry

os

+ aN Felipé Major/Tribune staff





SEE page 10

Man is charged
with murder of

American woman

A 22-YEAR-OLD man
charged wth the murder of
American Anna Garrison has
been arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court.

Zyndall McKinney, of Isabel-
la Boulevard, Nassau, is accused
of intentionally causing Ms Gar-
rison’s death between Sunday,
February 25, and Saturday, July
4, 2009, while being concerned
with another.

Ms Garrison’s badly decom-
posed body was discovered by
walkers in a bushy area off Fox
Hill Road south, near the Blue
Water Cay development, on
Saturday, July 4, at around 6.20
pm. She had been shrouded in
sheets and her feet were
wrapped in plastic bags.

The 33-year-old first came
to police attention on February
25, 2009, when they received a
missing person report from the

SEE page 10

Man shot
in the hand

A MAN was shot in the hand
while walking in the Bacardi
Road area yesterday.

At about 1.52pm, the victim,
John Gafford, was approached
by two men in a small grey vehi-
cle. One of them produced a
handgun and shot him in the
hand.

Mr Gafford was taken to hos-
pital and treated for his injury
which was described as “not life
threatening”.

Police Investigations continue.

BREAKFAST SANOWIUN
we YY 4
> 2.39

hebse with your CHOIGE OI

nacen, r turkey
PRICES MAY VARY

a)

$400

$00 per box

Stop in TODAY and LOOK for the
BOSS Target for MORE great DEALS!

Quiznos

b0g + Ul

2 AG :
anes } 1S oso,





NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Mini Famous Bowl * oll + tfc Drink

Ir. Twister Combo

oy Weta + Feequiar Fries * ifint Drink

I Snacker Combo

Snacke = Reguir Fries * 1bor Drink

* Chicken Deal

ce LS
= : 1 Po Chicken « oll = Requiar Fries = 1Gor Drink

—_

17" starting « at

€1.15 jsq. ft. 8
(Includes Java

Legne? series)

Just

ft.
gage /sd-
(cash a, Carry only)

ith
oo neksplash

35% off on Bac only)

(c ash Be

ALL DAY, EVERNY DAY.
SPOCY (TALLAM - TRA

TEGGIE DELITE ty
TURRET BREAST & LACK FOREST HAM

BLT - COLD COT COmao

VEN ROASTED CHICIEN BREAST
ITALIAN BML - TERMED BREAST
BLACK FOREST HAW
DAI 2009

WEATBALL WARIHARA oss ye <= = =<

LOCAL NEWS

INDEPENDENCE
CELEBRATIONS

ACTION from the spectacular
Independence celebrations at
Fort Charlotte on Friday.
¢ SEE PAGE FIVE for the
Prime Minister’s
Independence message.

¢ SEE PAGES 17, 19, 20 and 21

for more photos ‘from the
celebrations.

uae
is)
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157

moving into
their new
Builders Mall
Showroom!

Ask your
Sales Representative
about more

XQ throughout the store!

‘>
bie 2 ob i ATI Se

FOOTLONGS on > f

a

a

— * FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!
f AT PARTICIPATING STORES





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009, PAGE 3



Pelican Bay to
launch new logo,
construct $7.1m
meeting facility

By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net :

FREEPORT -— The Peli-
can Bay at Lucaya is reposi-
tioning its hotel, launching a
new logo and constructing a
$7.1 million meeting facility

which is expected to be com- i

pleted early next year.

The logo unveiling was
held during a champagne
reception at Canal House,
the new five-storey meet-
ing/conference building
which is still under construc-
tion.

Magnus Alnebeck, manag-

ing director/general manag-
er, said the new logo of a
‘Happy Pelican’ donning
sunglasses evokes a happy
feeling and will be placed at
touch points preceding
guests’ arrival at the hotel.
“We made the pelican

happier. It injects a breath of

fresh air, colour, and vibran-
cy into the property with
Caribbean colours of
turquoise, warm red orange
with a mix of yellow,” he
said.

also in keeping with the
“Meet Happy” slogan for
Canal House, which will
cater to various functions,
meetings, and events.

Mr Alnebeck said the $7
million meeting facility rep-
resents a “serious invest-
ment” for Pelican Bay,

which is owned by Sundt AS,

a private investment compa-
ny based in Norway.

The Canal House will con-
sist of more than 30,000 sq ft. }

There will be five meeting
rooms, a breakfast restau-
rant and office space. The
big meeting space on the
fourth and fifth levels have
wrap-around balconies that

offer views of the ocean. The

ground floor will consist of
administrative offices.

Although no new employ-
ment will be created at the
hotel, Mr Alnebeck said
there will be a lot of out-
sourcing of services, such as
food and beverage catering
for events.

Mr Alnebeck said the
hotel’s repositioning marks
completion of a strategy that
commenced five years ago.

He stated that their focus

now is on visitors as opposed i

to tourists, and providing
meeting facilities for a vari-
ety of events.

Despite the tough chal-
lenging times on Grand
Bahama, Pelican Bay is far-
ing well, he said.

“We are doing fine
because we are going after a
different market, said
Alnebeck. Freeport in my
mind is a unique place in the
region and I think we forget
that we have a lot of people
coming here who are not
tourists and need to stay in
hotels, and that is really the
market we are after.

“We want to own the local :

corporate market; we want
to make sure that anyone
who comes to Grand
Bahama for that sort of pur-
pose has Pelican Bay first in
mind.

“Obviously, we will con-
tinue to cater to tourists and
make sure they have a good
stay, but it is not a market
that we are actively going to
go after,” he said.

The 182-room hotel offers
89 waterside rooms and 93

waterside state rooms. There

are three swimming pools,
Jacuzzi, and Sabor Restau-
rant and Bar.

The property recently

received high rating in Expe-

dia.com’s exclusive Insiders’
Select List as one of the best

hotels in the world, receiving

the highest ranking in the
Bahamas, and placing 11th
in the Caribbean.

He noted that the design is

MORE than $10 million has
been spent locally on various
aspects of the design, engineering
and consultation of the airport
redevelopment project, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham said
during a groundbreaking ceremo-
ny at the Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport.

More than $14.8 million in con-
struction contracts have been
awarded to Bahamian firms.

They include Alexiou & Asso-
ciates, George V Cox & Compa-
ny, Graphite Engineering, Engi-
neering Solutions & Consulting,
Caribbean Civil Group, Engi-
neering & Technical Services,
Construction Cost Engineering,
DHP Associates, Certified Test-
ing Laboratories International,
SEV Group, and Pinder’s Cus-
toms Brokerage.

Mr Ingraham said the terminal’s
general contractor, Ledco, a Cana-
dian firm, is planning for 73 per
cent of its labour requirements to
be filled through local contractors.

Bahamian firms awarded major
contracts for the first stage of the
project include Reliable Fencing,
Bahamas Hot Mix, Basden Ele-
vators, Woslee Construction, Sen-
tinel Drilling and Water Works,
TMC Engineering Ltd.

“T am advised that a significant
amount of the work awarded to
international firms will be com-
pleted by Bahamian sub-contrac-
tors and labour,” he said.

Solid Wood

ENTIRE STOCK
Waverly
Fabrics

Financing Available Through
erotic ss-LALe

LOCAL NEWS

$10 million spent locally on
airport development project

IN TERA ATIGONAL

N FP INDLING

AIRPORT



THE REDEVELOPMENT of the airport is expected to take four years.

Approximately 40 contracts are
scheduled to be tendered in com-
ing months, including sub-con-
tracts to the terminal’s general
contractor and direct contracts
with NAD.

“Plans call for this first phase
of the redevelopment project to
open for passengers bound for US
ports, beginning in the first quarter
of 2011,” Mr Ingraham said at the
cermony.

Immediately thereafter, work is
expected to begin on converting
the existing US departure terminal
into the new international termi-
nal.

“Construction of the redevel-
opment of (LPIA) is expected to
last for four years,” he said. “At
the height of construction, approx-
imately 400 persons will be
engaged on the job site.

“Upon completion (LPIA) will
provide the infrastructure our
nation needs to prosper.”

Mr Ingraham said he is satis-

fied that when the new US termi-
nal opens, it will be “one of the
best and most modern airport
facilities in this part of the world.

“Finally, after having for far too
long ranked among the least effi-
cient and least customer friendly
airports in our region, the (LPIA)
will become a source of national
pride.”

Projects being carried out at
LPIA along with works being
undertaken at the cruise port in
Nassau Harbour to ensure its
capacity to receive Genesis class
cruise ships, would position the
Bahamian economy to take
advantage of the upturn in the
world economy, he explained.

“Tt is a manifestation of my
Government’s determination and
commitment to investing in
tourism, the major industry of our
nation, and to modernizing and
expanding our national infra-
structure,” the Prime Minister
said.

1-pc 5 Drawer Chest

Queen 8 Pc Set
King 8 Pc Set

“20% OFF NEW OUTDOOR
FABRICS FROM BRAZIL

“EXCEPT NET ITEMS, VINYL, PLASTIC

Lamps, Mirrors,
Candleholders,
Vases etc.

ate aL ae DT a

Uae Le

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080 * Fox:[242] 322-525]

CERTIFIED
PARTNER

COMMERTLAL

(Misrenet

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

at

ea

iding technology

WOTKS

£6 MADEIRA

STREET, PALMOALE + 242 328 O40

Large Selection
Upholstery &

© Drapery Fabries



+ VAN MICRONET.2S

SEN ATU aC COS

WORK on a new two-lane highway from the Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport to the College of The Bahamas will begin next year,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham revealed.

Construction of a new boardwalk along the downtown Nassau water-
front, extending from Prince George Wharf eastward to the second Par-
adise Island bridge is also planned following the transfer of commercial
shipping from downtown Bay Street to Arawak Cay, Mr Ingraham said.

“Investment in public infrastructure is essential to the long term sus-
tainable growth of the Bahamian economy in general and tourism in par-
ticular,” said Mr Ingraham.

The Government is resurfacing Bay Street from Blake Road to Mack-
ey Street, undertaking upgrades at traffic roundabouts, and installing curb-
ing along roadsides, he added.

Study Permit, medical exam required
for courses in Canada over six months

THE High Commission of
Canada in Kingston, Jamaica,
advises residents of the Bahamas
seeking to undertake studies in
Canada that a Study Permit and
medical exam are required for all
courses of over six months.

Applications received in
Kingston after Wednesday, July
15, risk missing the September
2009 intake.

Begin by a careful consultation
of www.jamaica.ge.ca for complete
and recently updated information
on applying for a Study Permit. It
is strongly recommended that all
prospective applicants consult the
website and be sure to include all
required supporting documenta-
tion in their application to avoid
delays or a possible refusal.

The correct processing fee is
$125 in Canadian funds in the form
of a bank draft payable to “High
Commission of Canada”.

Upon receipt of the application,

processing fee and two return
courier envelopes, medical forms
will be sent out.

To speed up the process, appli-
cants can chose to undergo the
medical examination, at their own
risk, pending final disposition of
their application.

Applications require up-to-date
contact information. If an appli-
cant will not be at their usual place
of residence during the summer
months, they should be sure to pro-
vide an email address or alternate
phone number where they can be
contacted.













eR Bsns
ae La
Pest Control
aC ee
322-2157

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THE Moet THoroudn Ristonanon & Cueasina Eves, on THe Jon 6 Pern!
ALAC. ONLY PROPRIA. CET Stone Casper & LPHoLaTERY CARB SYETRMt







Cop, Upholsiery, Sime and Marble Cleaning &




Restoration Specialist.

Prochem Cleaning Sysiems eames Deep & Hewry
Soil, acter, Grease, Watermarks aed Stems from
i bepeling #& Purnitene, restoring them bo like new






afd (chon af neplacomant cnet

Canpet, Sevia's, Loveseats, Chairs, Dining Chairs, Cars,

Boats, Geo, Tiles, Murhle & Stone




Porsian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Spncinket










Marble Polishing, Restoration & Care
Wood Floor Restoration

Aethonaal Stone Tach Professcnadl Contractor

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594

PU LUCA MM Le PAE

PROCHEM SYSTEM (as)

ONLY WE CAN BIT RIGHT!
We en Oe © eer © We
© pe ceerperaie ore









































ore Tina BETS.
:

\hall-al-“slaruthiati
CRESS AT DOH AM Dh ALY

aa eV Ae CNT

juveronseicon——+_[sa0 [wa | en [oo [i
pumeeewes————_c [190] [can [nn [ra
ICE AGE: DANN OFTHE DINOSAURS a | 4x20 [AS | MIA | Gra | Set | 1Oed0
rior 8 | a [a |
TRANSFORMER: REVENGE a | ist | MA | 4:00 | wa | 7:00 | 1ee00
awsome ease [200 | [50 wh [085 A
prssrrsecen a [sa 0 [wn | [as ia
arenas ct 0 [ | as [as ia
icnerat a [ass [| on [a i
THEHANGOVER ec | 00 | a | Mik | go | ae30 | 10005 |

oeacwero wer so | a6 | | to | as | 05 |

me ere us oe LL 5 bu VE

















ramos [Wat
cer A] 0 a [wa | 68 wa | wt
xc oFPenann —_¢| | 00 | wa | 61 | a0 | a0

THE HARGOVER © dt

495 | wa | 6:00 | 8:35 | 10:40]

380-FLIX





PAGE 4, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Honduras move protects its citizens

Michael Jackson —
creative, talented,
but also flawed

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Michael Jackson was truly
an amazingly talented, cre-
ative and much loved artist.
However, like the rest of us,
he did have at least a few
faults and we may do well to
keep certain things in per-
spective.

During the spectacular and
very touching memorial ser-
vice, the Rev Al Sharpton
said, with no small amount of
paranoia, that there was
“nothing strange” about him,
only about “what he had to
deal with.” Now come on,
Michael Jackson and
“strange” became virtually
synonymous in later years.

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



This, of course, should in no
way detract from his incredi-
ble accomplishments. But let
us not overlook the blanketed
baby and balcony incident, his
children’s veils, his own masks
and disguises, the obsessive
and disfiguring plastic surgery,
the creepily androgynous
appearance, the child guests
sleeping in his bed, attending
court in pyjamas, the spend-
thrift habits, the hyperbaric
chamber, and the bizarre use
of medications drugs, etc.

So many, including his chil-

dren, have said that Michael
was a wonderful father. In
many ways he probably was.
However, it is highly doubt-
ful that he had his children in
mind while he was reportedly
being anaesthetised or
drugged for “sleep”. Just sup-
pose the kids had needed him
during the night — but then I
guess that’s what the nanny
was for.

To some, it may border on
blasphemy to suggest that
although Michael could moon
walk he could not walk on
water. Nonetheless, he will be
greatly missed.

KEN W KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,
July 8, 2009.

ON learning that the Honduran army had
sent its country’s president packing to Costa
Rica, C A Smith, Bahamian ambassador to the
Organisation of American States, joined an
international protest, pledging that the Bahamas
stands “ready to assist” Honduras wherever it
can. The free world was shocked at what it per-
ceived as an army coup, especially as President
Manuel Zelaya was not even given a chance to
change out of his pyjamas for the plane ride.

However, Honduras’ Supreme Electoral Tri-
bunal, Supreme Court, Attorney General and
other national institutions and associations sup-
ported the army, declaring that it was acting
within the Honduran Constitution, which Zelaya
had breached.

In fact the army had acted on the orders of
the Supreme Court, which had instructed it to
serve an arrest warrant on the president. All
branches of the Honduran government had
accused Zelaya of violating the Constitution—
a Constitution that he had sworn to uphold and
enforce on taking the oath of office on January
27, 2006. However, in a recent interview with
The Miami Herald Col. Herberth Bayardo Ine-
stroza admitted that the only possible misstep
taken by his forces in the president’s ouster
was putting him on a plane and sending him
out of the country.

He said that the rational behind that move
was that had “Zelaya been jailed throngs of
loyal followers would have erupted into chaos
and demanded his release with violence.

“What was more beneficial, remove this gen-
tleman from Honduras or present him to pros-
ecutors and have a mob assault and burn and
destroy and for us to have to shoot?” he asked.
“If we left him here, right now we would be
burying a pile of people.”

So, to save lives, instead of arresting him
and holding him in a local jail, they went to his
home, roused him from sleep and put him on a
plane — pyjamas and all.

The Honduran Supreme Court holds that
the army acted within the country’s constitution.

Apparently, Zelaya, taking a page from the
blotted copy book of his buddy Hugo Chavez of
Venezuela, decided that he too would change
Honduras’ constitution to extend his term in
office, which ends in January next year — six
months from now.

To extend his power he unilaterally ordered
a national referendum, which had the force of
law, to be held on June 28 to decide the issue.
Under that country’s constitution only the
Supreme Electoral Tribunal has the power to do

Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS & TRUCKS

Trade-ins on
New Car Sales

this — anyone else attempting to do so is to be
removed from power under Article 239 of the
Constitution.

The Tribunal, backed by the Supreme Court
protested the referendum. And so Zelaya issued
a second decree on June 25 ordering a survey
and presenting a new constitution to replace
the existing one. On the same day, the Supreme
Court confiscated all the ballots intended for the
survey. Zelaya ordered the warehouse, where
the ballots had been secured, broken into and
the ballots rescued.

Apparently, he put the final nail in his polit-
ical coffin when he presented a new constitution
to replace the one now in force. Under article
239 of the current constitution it is provided
that anyone who attempts or intends to replace
the constitution is to be automatically removed
from office with the loss of all constitutional
powers. On investigation the Attorney Gener-
al found that Zelaya had in fact tried to highjack
the constitution — and no one, not even a pres-
ident, can thumb his nose at the law. There-
fore, he had to be removed. The National Elec-
toral Tribunal concurred and the Supreme
Court ordered an arrest warrant be served — all
legal and within the constitution.

Honduras’ Union Civica Democratica, point-
ed out that, unlike the United States, Honduras
has no impeachment laws, but that Zelaya, like
President Richard Nixon, has learned that no
citizen— not even a president — is above the
law. The Union declared that democracy in
Honduras is still “alive and strong because the
constitution worked.”

Nixon, the 39th president of the United
States, was the only American president to
resign. Facing impeachment for the Watergate
scandal, he resigned in 1974 and was later par-
doned for all federal crimes that he might have
committed while in office, thereby avoiding
impeachment hearings.

In future it would be better for our govern-
ment to mind its own business and not pledge
assistance in another man’s country until all
the details are known. Also any move support-
ed by Hugo Chavez should be treated with sus-
picion — that in itself should send a red flag to
the top of the flag pole.

Zelaya has apparently told the UN that if
returned to complete his term, he will no longer
push for constitutional change and if offered a
chance to stay in power he will turn it down.

He claims that he’s going back to his farm.
Honduras would have probably been better off
he had never left the farm.



A moonwalking, mesmerising,
unstoppable, invincible entertainer

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Most people can vividly recall their precise
whereabouts when first receiving news of the
death of a celebrity.

The assassination of US president John F
Kennedy in 1963 and the recent demise of pop
singer Michael Jackson from suspected car-
diac arrest are two prime examples. (The
deaths of Farrah Fawcett and Ed McMahon,
around the same time as Jackson’s, were prob-
ably not quite as galvanising).

As expected, speculation and media coverage
seem to have no limits, with Jackson’s inter-
ment in Los Angeles on Tuesday probably set
to become the funeral of the decade, if not the
ages.

Jackson, while on the verge of a comeback,
and on whose music most of us, including Pres-
ident Obama grew up, despite amassing a huge
fortune, reportedly left behind a few debts.

But fortunately for 75-year-old Cameroon,
African pop pioneer Manu Dibango, whose
1972 “honking, galloping funk track”, Soul
Makossa, provided the ethos of Michael Jack-
son’s Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin’, (the first
song on his best-selling Thriller album), a finan-
cial copyright agreement was worked out.

Although many listeners mistook it for non-
sense Jackson’s chant at the end of the song,
“Ma ma Se, Ma ma Sa, Ma Ma COO sa”, came
directly from Dibango’s song.

According to the current issue of the New
Yorker magazine, when Jackson died, Diban-
20, who mourned his demise and made a gra-
cious statement, was still awaiting a French
court’s decision on whether he was owed dam-
ages for pop singer Rihanna’s use of his sylla-
bles in her 2007 hit song, Don’t Stop the Music,
which was based on Jackson’s Wanna Be
Startin’ Somethin’.

In the New Yorker article, Kelefa Sanneh
writes that the true meaning of Jackson’s life
and music” spoke much louder than “the noise
from the child-molestation scandals, his mutat-
ing appearance and his escalating eccentricity.”

Most will probably hope along with Berklee
College of Music-trained American musician
John Mayer, that the seemingly indefatigable
pop star will be forever remembered as the
“moonwalking...mesmerising, unstoppable,
invincible” Michael Jackson.

SIMON ARTZI
Nassau,
July, 2009.

Independence Supplement added to my historical knowledge

Subject: Independence Sup-
plement - Article on Sir Stafford
Sands

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This is a letter to your senior
reporter Rupert Missick, which
you may print. — Raymond
Antonio.

Mr Missick:

I read with great interest
your story in today's Tribune
Independence Supplement on

DON STAINTON
PROTECTION Ltd.

Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

Sir Stafford Sands. Being born
in the 60's, I entered primary
school when our currency was
changed to Bahamian dollars,
and therefore do not have per-
sonal knowledge of events of
that era. Everything I had heard
and read about Sir Stafford
Sands to this point only focused
on two aspects of the man: (1)
his transformation of the
Bahamas’ winter tourist season
to year-round; and (2) his deep-
rooted hatred of black Bahami-
ans.

As noted in your article, he
seemed to be the UBP person-
ified, leaving other members of
that party seemingly untainted:
Noel Roberts, Sir Roland
Symonette, Sir Geoffrey John-
stone, etc.

It was quite refreshing to
read your article, which includ-
ed additional information and
details which provided more
background to this man than I
ever knew. And to read quotes

from the late Norman Solomon
was for me the icing on the
cake. As a little boy at the age
of 9, I started reading The Tri-
bune after my father was fin-
ished reading, and I was just
fascinated with letters to the
Editor from Mr. Solomon.
Accounts of his debates in Par-
lament always caught my atten-
tion.

This article, and several oth-
ers providing an insight into the
goings-on leading up to Inde-
pendence, made this supple-
ment just superb reading.

As one who vividly remem-
bers the events on Clifford Park
on the night of July 9, 1973, and
the other events on succeeding
days, your presentation has
added to my historical knowl-
edge.

RAYMOND ANTONIO

Nassau,
July 8, 2009.

ALUMINUM SECURITY SCREENS

Accepted

NOW
IN STOCK!

es, ‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE

‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

‘O06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
‘03 HYUNDAI Hi VAN

‘08 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘01 MAZDA MPV VAN

‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA

‘07 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA

ADS e 2

#1 AUTO DEALER IM THE AP AS
EAST pice STREET * 322-3775 * =i sory

sherawen ot Chea bty Ade Doles Femme bid bo ee
te Abaco Wrior ksi Don Meche Ded, 147-7910

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELTON JOSEPH of FOSTER
STRRET, CHIPPINGHAM, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

FOR SALE

Exclusive Blackbeard Cove Condominium Site
High End Community off Eastern Road

128’ x 100’ with approved plans for 6 units
2 bedroom, 2 bathroom Condo Units
All designed with spacious 19’ x 20’

private decks in rear

BEAUTYGUARD
Free Estimates

| WE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL!

\ Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978 i

$250,000.00
Tel. 325-1325 / 325-1408 / 422-4489 / 425-9388

ear = a" Cure





PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Switzerland
is the Daddy



\ X | HEN it comes to off shore
banking and financial ser-

vices, I am sure that you will all agree
that Switzerland is the master. In fact they created the business.

The offshore centres in our region either learned the business ;
from the Swiss or learned it from those who learned it fromthe ;

Swiss.

There is only one correct answer, Switzerland.
I think that we can continue to learn from them.

Financial Centres like The Bahamas and Cayman have been i
feeling pressure from the UK and the USA to provide increas- }
ingly more information about those of their citizens who patron- }
ize the services of these Financial Centres. There have been
threats of various types of retaliation. This continues, despite the }
fact that London and New York are two of the greatest off- i

shore Financial Centres in the entire world.

In recent months, UBS has been under attack and being pres-
sured by the U.S. Justice Department to provide the identity of }
about the 52,000 American account holders. The presumption is:

that they are all tax evaders.

The Swiss Government, however, has said on July 7th in court }
papers presented in a federal court in Miami that it “will use its }
legal authority to ensure that the bank cannot be pressured to }
transmit the information illegally, including if necessary by issu-
ing an order taking effective control of the data at UBS that is the :

subject of the summons.”
On their web site, the Swiss Department of Justice and Police

said on Wednesday in a statement “Switzerland makes it perfectly

clear that Swiss law prohibits UBS from complying with a possible
order by the court in Miami to hand over client information.”

The Bahamas should watch these proceedings closely. We may

still be able to learn some things from “The Daddy”.

Get
CET NY
For

Therefore in answer to the question: “Who is the Daddy?”

LOCAL NEWS

Negotiations over Bahamas
and Cuba maritime boundaries

By LINDSAY THOMPSON

THE Bahamas and the
Republic of Cuba have com-
pleted a “successful round”
of preliminary negotiations
aimed at defining the mar-
itime boundaries between
both countries, the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs
announced.

On June 10, 2009, a dele-
gation of technical experts
from various ministries
accompanied by a consultant
on maritime delimitation met
in Havana, Cuba.

They exchanged views and
scientific and legal informa-
tion that will form the frame-
work for the determination
of an equitable boundary
between the parties in accor-
dance with the relevant prin-
ciples of international law.

Although the primary pur-
pose of the negotiations is to
delimit a boundary, other
areas of mutual interest were
identified for discussions,
many of which are mandated
by the 1982 United Nations
Convention on the Law of
the Sea (UNCLOS) in the
context of maritime delimi-
tation, the ministry said.

These include matters such
aS cooperation in search and
rescue efforts, the combat-
ting of illegal trafficking in

Super Outboard TCW Ill
* Quarts * 5 Gallon Pails
¢ 55 Gallon Drums

Diesel Oil
* Quarts « Gallons ¢ 5 Gallon Pails
¢ 55 Gallon Drums

Mfring Batteries Seer

Ministry of Foreign Affairs
makes announcement

drugs and migrants, techni-
cal cooperation in areas such
as hydrography and maritime
scientific research, and in the
management of trans-bound-
ary resources — fisheries, oil
and gas deposits.

The recent meeting was
the latest in a series of dis-
cussions on delimitation
between the Bahamas and
Cuba that began in the
1990s. A further round is
scheduled to take place with-
in months.

“Both parties emphasised
the long-standing links of
friendship, respect and coop-
eration that exists between
them, and it is within that
framework that the parties
hope to eventually conclude
an agreement that would be
mutually beneficial and
acceptable,” the ministry
said.

The issue of maritime
delimitation has taken on
new importance for the
Bahamas following the
proclamation of straight
archipelagic baselines in
December 2008.

These have been deposited
with the United Nations, as
required by UNCLOS, and
enacted into domestic law by
the Archipelagic Waters and
Maritime Jurisdiction (Arch-
ipelagic Baselines) Order.

“This means that the base-
line from which the different
maritime zones of the
Bahamas are now to be mea-
sured is a line encircling all
the islands and cays of the
Bahamian archipelago, as
opposed to the low-water
mark around the individual
islands,” said the ministry.

“Naturally, where those
maritime zones overlap with
those of neighbouring states,
UNCLOS requires the par-
ties to agree their boundaries
by negotiations or otherwise
according to international
law.”

Other neighbouring states
with which the Bahamas will
eventually pursue boundary
negotiations include the
United States, the United
Kingdom (on behalf of the
Turks and Caicos Islands)
and Haiti.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

13 ENTRA, EXTRA

Large shipment

of
Wsed Cars

y ] COME CHECK

US OUT

a New Shipments Arrived








































Golf course
workers
Flee CLOTH

By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - While
there are currently no
plans for lay-offs at
Old Bahama Bay,
workers at the Arnold
Palmer Golf Course on
Grand Bahama were
let go on Thursday,
executives at Ginn sur
Mer said.

This comes after
fears were raised that
employees of the West
End resort were going
to be let go as Ginn is
reportedly set to put
the property up for
sale.

A spokesperson for
Ginn said “it is only
speculation” and there
are no plans for lay-
offs at the 71-room
hotel.

Meanwhile, work is
nearing completion on
one of the two signa-
ture golf courses at
Ginn sur Mer and some
of the workers at Ginn
Golf are expected to be
relocated for training
in other areas.

“The Arnold Palmer
Golf Course is almost
finished and they do
not need a huge con-
struction crew on site
and so lay-offs are
scheduled in this area,”
said the spokesperson.

Training

Some of the golf
course workers will be
relocated for training
associated with the
drainage.

The Tribune has
learned that developer
Bobby Ginn flew into
West End on Wednes-
day.

Ginn Resorts is
developing Ginn sur
Mer, a 2,000-acre com-
munity development at
West End. The $4.9 bil-
lion development will
contain more than

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Insurance

4,400 condominium and
hotel units and nearly
2,000 single family resi-
dential home sites.

It will also include a
private airport, two sig-
nature golf courses
designed by Jack Nick-
laus and Arnold
Palmer, clubhouses,
two large marinas, a
Monte Carlo-style casi-
no, water and swim
pavilions, a beach club
and a spa.

/H= ES

Plus...

Crawfish ff

“ * WD 40 « Marvel Mystery Oil
|, ©Puralator Engine Filters * NGK Spark
Plugs * Champion Spark Plugs and
many more.

BAY STREET
GARAGE..

Dowdeswell Street * Tel: 322-2434, 322-2082

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

CALL 322-1122

IT’S MORE THAN JUST OIL.
IT’S LIQUID ENGINEERING!

Securities On All Cheques Printed By
Executive Printers

Vieet & Surpass

All Securitie

Suggested By The CBA

(Clearing Banker’s Association of The Bahamas)
The Executive Printers of The Bahamas Tel. Number 393-5011 Fax:393-6425





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Diabetes is affecting more
Bahamians than ever before

Disease a reality for 25,000

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BLOOD sugar levels are soar-
ing at dangerous heights as dia-
betes is becoming a reality for
more Bahamians than ever before
- whether they are aware of it or
not.

If left untreated, diabetes can
lead to kidney failure, nerve dam-
age, or blindness. It can also lead
to the amputation of limbs.

In 2006 it was found to be the
country's fifth leading cause of
death.

But the disease is a reality for
around 25,000 Bahamians,
approximately eight per cent of
the population.

And a 2007 Ministry of Health
survey found that three per cent
of respondents affected by dia-
betes were not aware of it.

The non-communicable disease
characterised by the body’s inabil-
ity to convert sugars in the blood
into energy comes in two types.

Type One diabetics are usually
diagnosed in childhood as they
do not produce enough insulin,
the hormone secreted by the pan-
creas to break down glucose, and
they are therefore required to
take regular insulin injections and
follow a careful diet.

But the increasing number of
diabetics, who make up around
90 per cent of diabetics in the
country, have developed Type
Two diabetes because they have
become accustomed to a lifestyle
our bodies cannot handle.

A diet high in sugar and starch
coupled with a lack of exercise
means sugar builds up in the
blood, and although the pancreas
produces insulin, the cells of a
Type Two diabetic are not recep-
tive to it.

Type Two diabetics are there-
fore not required to take insulin
injections, but there are medica-
tions. And if it is discovered in
the early stages, Type Two dia-
betes can be completely con-
trolled by diet and exercise.

Emma Schick at the Diabetes
Research Institute in Market
Street explained: "Without
insulin, sugar builds up in your
blood and can’t go to the cells.
The blood gets more sticky and
it’s difficult to pump around the
body.

"More often than not with
Type Two diabetes you can do a
lot to assist in managing it just by
changing your diet and exercise,
and you can do that for a number
of years before you need medica-
tion.”

Ms Schick volunteers for the
Diabetes Research Institute
which was founded four years ago
by Austrian expatriate Harold
McPike.

Mr McPike, a Type One dia-
betic, wanted to help meet the
needs of Bahamians affected by
diabetes after his research pro-
ject showed the huge burden dia-
betes is building on the health-
care system.

Around 1,500 people had their
blood sugar levels tested and a
number of unsuspecting diabet-
ics were discovered as a result.

While some could seek treat-
ment, for some it was already too
late; four of the most seriously
affected diabetics died within two
months.

Ms Schick said: "We came
across quite a significant number
of persons who had elevated
blood sugars which indicated that
they needed to be referred to doc-
tors, and a lot chose not to go to
doctors.

"There was a stigma associated
with having diabetes so people
would pretend not to have it, but
a lot of people also had a number
of risk factors that showed they
should be tested on a regular
basis.”

Breaking down the stigma is
just a small element of what the
DRI is now doing.

The centre's principle focus is
to help treat Type One diabetic
children and educate them about
their condition, and the DRI pro-
vides medication and support for
around 60 of such children across
the Bahamas.

However, through its research
the DRI has also found an
increasing number of young peo-
ple are developing Type Two dia-
betes as a result of poor diet and
an inactive lifestyle.

Ms Schick said: "It is of great
concern because it's more diffi-
cult to control in younger people.
The drugs haven’t been devel-
oped with that age group in mind,
and if they have grown up eating
the wrong types of food and not
exercising it’s a very difficult
lifestyle change to make."

DRI diabetic educator Mar-
garet Daxon teaches young peo-
ple, their parents and adults about
how to eat in a way which will
control diabetes and prevent
them from developing the dis-
ease.

She explained how to ensure
you are preparing a healthy meal
by filling half of your plate with
non-starchy vegetables or fruit,
such as salad and green vegeta-
bles, a quarter of your plate with

a protein such as meat or fish, no
bigger than a deck of cards, and
another quarter with simple car-
bohydrates such as rice, pasta or
potatoes. Such a meal should be
eaten three times a day, with a
snack of fruit, vegetables and pro-
tein in between.

Mrs Daxon said: "What we
need is a well-balanced diet, to
not skip meals, and to eat at reg-
ular times.

"A lot of persons who have
diabetes often skip meals and
have one big meal during the day,
but your body will only use what
it needs and store the rest as fat,
so just give the body what it
needs; a wide variety of foods at
different times of the day."

She and three other diabetic
educators at the DRI are now
working with other institutions to
share this vital nutrition informa-
tion and spread it in the commu-
nity.

DRI administrative assistant
Nicola Fernander said the insti-
tute has been in talks with the
Ministry of Education about the
nutritional value of school meals,
which tend to be high in sugars
and carbohydrates and are not
only contributing to diabetes, but
also to behavioural problems
among young people.

She said: "A lot of kids need to
know how to eat properly
because sugar spends them up
and makes them hyperactive.”

The centre also does outreach
work at churches and community

centres, and makes annual visits
to the Family Islands.

It has become the leading
authority on diabetes in the coun-
try and facilitates the training of
healthcare workers in diabetes
education so they can become
certified diabetes educators.

In-house support sessions are
held twice a week for children
with diabetes, their parents, and
any diabetic seeking support. And
the centre operates an open door
policy so anyone can walk in and
have their blood sugar tested for
free, their blood pressure mea-
sured, or their eyes tested.

Ms Fernander said: "We want
people to be aware that there is
this condition, but you can do
something about it. It’s not a
death sentence; there are organi-
sations here to help you do some-
thing about it.

"Living with diabetes without
being aware of it will only
increase your complications.

"Most people who are diag-
nosed with diabetes have had it
for years prior to being diag-
nosed, and by then they are usu-
ally already having complications.

"They have their blood sugar
tested here and are sent to the
doctor and put on medications
immediately, so had they not
come here they would have been
carrying on without knowing
what is going on as they were."

Ms Schick added: "If your
blood sugar is elevated and par-
ticularly if it’s extremely elevated












NOTICE

Mohs Sureery in Nassau








DR. JOHN STRASSWIMMER, MOHS SURGEON
will be visiting The Skin Centre on Friday
July 17, 2009. Or Strasswimmer trained at
Harvard and Yale and is Board Certified and a
Fellow of the Mohs College.

Mohs Micrographic Surgery

is an advanced

treatment process for skin cancer which is
now offered at The Skin Centre. It offers the

highest possible cure

rate for many skin

cancers and simultaneously minimizes the
sacrifice of normal tissue. This cutting-edge

cCreatment Pequires

highly specialized

physicians that serve as surgeon, pathologist
and reconstructive surgeon.

Qur visiting Mohs Surgeon has extensive

experience in

the

Mohs Micrographic

Procedure. The technique is used to remove
the two most common forms of skin cancer:

basal cell
carcinoma.

carcinoma and squamous cell

For more information, please contact:
The Skin Centre, Harbour Bay Plaza,
East Bay Street Tel. 393-7546.

you have to seek medical advice
as soon as possible because it’s
not going to get better, it will only
get worse."

Everyone is advised to have
regular screenings to monitor
their blood sugar levels and blood
pressure at the DRI on the corner
of Market Street and Peter Street
during the opening hours from
11am to 7pm, Tuesday to Friday,
and 10am to lpm on Saturdays.
For more information call the
DRI on 326-5134.



IF IT is discovered in the early stages, Type Two diabetes can be completely
controlled by diet and exercise.














57 Golling Awe
P.O. Box N= Ge
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone: | #427 35-7 S07
1 242 322 364-6

St. Luke's Diagnostic Centre has been in operation since January, 1985, it sa full service diagnostic
centre providing medical laboratory and other health care activities.

« rays

* Environmental Testing

* Pregnancy Screen

* Anti-
* (Glucose Monitoring

Well-equipped and adequately staffed laboratory, providing consistently accurate, relevant and timely
information to facilitate the delivery of quality healthcare to persons living in all islands of The Bahamas.

Accredited and licensed by College of American Pathologist (CAP) and The Health Professions Council,

ECG & Hearing Audiometry
Pre-Employment Sconeening
BGrugs of Abuse Testing
Cholasteral

DONA Paternity Testing

«Hi! Testing

* All Major Credit Cards and
INSUFAncES Ace pied

* House Calls

* Stat and Same Day Services,

Email laboratoraavcegicorsiwave,com
diagaosiccantreiiconiware.cam

British High Commission Kingston
NOTICE TO BRITISH CITIZENS

The Vice Consul for The Bahamas (based in Kingston, Jamaica)
will visit Nassau on Thursday, 23rd July, 2009 and will be
available to discuss any individual problems concerning
passports and nationality issues.

Passport applications and renewals should continue to be sent
by courier direct to the High Commission in Kingston.

Appointments can be made by calling the Honorary Consul
in Nassau on 324-4089.

BACK To SCHOO!

LAYAWAY



NO interest - NO fees + just 3 easy payments



layaway plan
we’ve got it

Custom
COMPUTERS LIMITED

4 Stores at Cable Beach & East Bay St.
t. 242.396.1101 © 242.396.1100

Wi, CLSLOMCOnmypuiters, rs
solutions @customcomputers.bs





PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Honduras: A coup provoked

an =
o :
|
7 = = ete =

WORLD VIEW.

By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
Diplomat)

H owweras is not
a country with

which the average Caribbean
person is familiar. There-
fore, recent events there have
not been a major talking
point except among govern-
ment representatives. Yet,
there are important lessons
for the Caribbean arising
from what has been
described as a Coup d’état in
that country.

As has been widely report-
ed, the President, Manual



ht

Zelaya, was taken by the
army from his Presidential
Palace and flown to Costa
Rica in the dead of night. He
was replaced by a provision-
al President Roberto
Michetlett ii



ics/Roberto Micheletti> , the
former congressional leader.

Zelaya’s supporters outside
of Honduras wasted no time
in condemning his ouster.
Leading the demands for his
government to be reinstated
and even, at one time, threat-
ening military intervention
was Venezuela’s President
Hugo Chavez who had
recently recruited Honduras
to membership of the Boli-
varian Alternative for the

PUBLIC NOTICE

Public Consultation on Retail Pricing
for the Electronic Communications
Sector

fo ee ier
OCS

frearrs thee Pistols UPibliens

of wew.bahemeas.gov.be or ihe privatiso

of the consultotion document canbe

(ame

oiotoinecd
sion and the offices of
Governments webote

tion website of

wee bDteprivatsaion.cem and comments emailed to
consultations btcprivatisaton.cam.



_—

SIR RONALD SANDERS

Americas (ALBA) which he
initiated.

In the event, Zelaya’s
removal has been condemned
by the member government
of the Organization of Amer-
ican States (OAS) including
the governments of the
Caribbean and the United
States of America on the
basis that no government
should be removed by uncon-
stitutional means. And, that
principle, of course, is cor-
rect as far as it goes.

But, in the case of Hon-
duras there is more to the
issue than meets the eye. Mr
Zelaya is not without blame
for his own removal, and it
may very well be that, within
the confines of the Honduras
Constitution, there was no
coup at all. Indeed, it is being
argued that he was removed
from the Presidency in keep-
ing with the Constitution and
the law because he usurped
the law in an attempt to keep
himself in office.

In 1982, Honduras amend-
ed its Constitution to intro-
duce a four-year term limit
on the Presidency. The Con-
stitution also made it uncon-
stitutional to try to alter the
provision. This worked well
until Mr Zelaya became Pres-
ident in 2006 by a slim major-
ity. He is required to relin-
quish the Presidency in Jan-
uary, but sought to alter the
Constitution to extend his
term. A challenge submitted
to the Supreme Court found
that he could not do so.
Despite this, Zelaya ordered
General Romeo Vasquez to

Héagen-Dazs® ice cream available at all leading

a os a a
icity Su Ce a ociiaiiem itis

For more information, please contact:

FUN FooDs WHOLESALE, LTD.
tel 242-393-8077 | fax 242-594-6217

Email: Iburrows@lickety.com



a.
xs
P=
=
o
<=
wo
pa]
o
[==]
3]
=
o
—s

HONDURAS’ OUSTED PRESIDENT MANUEL ZELAYA meets with Dominican military officers at the national
palace in Santo Domingo, Friday, July 10, 2009.

have the military provide
logistical support for a refer-
endum anyway. Vasquez
declined on the basis of the
Supreme Court ruling and
Zelaya promptly fired him.
But the Court reinstated him.
The Supreme Electoral Tri-
bunal then ordered the
seizure of all ballot boxes
and election-related materi-
als. According to the Span-
ish daily El Pais, the ballot
boxes had been flown in from
Venezuela by the Chavez
government. The Congress,
on the strength of the
Supreme Court decision,
then decided that Mr Zelaya
had violated the Constitution
and should be removed. In
other words, they impeached
him. The member govern-
ments of the OAS seem to
have regarded this process as
a coup d’état. Hence, calls
have been made for Zelaya’s
reinstatement as President.

As Larry Binns, the Direc-
tor of the Council for Hemi-
spheric Affairs based in
Washington, has pointed out:
“By presenting his govern-
ment as under attack by
rightist, anti-constitutional
elements intent on over-
throwing his presidency,
Zelaya has managed to pre-
sent himself as an emblem of
democracy and legitimacy.”
He is far from it. Critics
believe him to be a populist
demagogue akin to Mr
Chavez. Indeed, his line up
of friends — Chazez himself
and Evo Morales, the Boli-
vian President — reveal lead-
ers who have also amended
their countries’ constitutions
to extend their term in office
amid considerable opposi-
tion.

There was an order for
Zelaya’s detention, but
instead of enforcing it, the

provisional Honduran gov-
ernment chose to take him
out of the country. They have
argued that, in doing so, they
avoided confrontation that
would have ensued, probably
causing the loss of many lives
as opposing factions clashed.
Mr Zelaya had earlier shown
himself not above leading his
supporters in a march on the
place where ballot boxes
were ordered sequestered by
the Court.

The question to be asked
in the Caribbean is: Could a
Caribbean leader ignore the
ruling of the Supreme Court
and proceed to try to hold a
referendum to amend the
Constitution, then fire the
head of the military for refus-
ing to ignore the Court’s rul-
ing? This is pretty heavy-
handed stuff that smacks of
authoritarianism and a disre-
gard for the rule of law sim-
ply to perpetuate a leader in
office.

If there is a need for Con-
stitutional change, particu-
larly of an entrenched clause
in the Constitution, a great
deal of consultation and
debate is absolutely neces-
sary. Mr Zelaya paid little
heed to the sensitivities of
the Honduran Congress and
sections of the people repre-
sented by political parties
and other groups. In tram-
pling on their rights and
flouting the Constitution and
the law, he set the scene for
retaliation.

Within the OAS, the effort
to condemn Zelaya’s removal
and to call for his reinstate-
ment appears to have been
led by the Venezuelan gov-
ernment with the help of oth-
er governments that have
aligned themselves closely
with Hugo Chavez. These
include Nicaragua, Bolivia

and Argentina, all members
of ALBA. Other govern-
ments appear to have gone
along with this call simply on
the basis of Mr Zelaya’s
removal from the country.

As this commentary is
being written, the winner of
the Nobel Peace Prize and
President of Costa Rica,
Oscar Arias, is scheduled to
mediate talks between
Zelaya and Honduras’
appointed President Roberto
Micheletti. No one can pre-
dict the outcome of these
talks; they will depend on the
willingness of the contenders
to put Honduras before their
own political ambitions, how-
ever skilful Mr Arias may be
as a mediator.

Elections for a new Presi-
dent are due in November.
Elements of a solution to the
crisis could be agreement
that Zelaya will return to
Honduras to finish his term
as President which will end
in January, but there will be
no referendum to amend the
Constitution now. The coun-
try will then choose their new
President from a fresh list of
candidates.

This would meet both the
importance of upholding con-
stitutionally-elected govern-
ments, and disapproving of
those leaders who would
tamper with the Constitution
for their political gain.

Honduras cannot afford
the social and economic dis-
ruption that would flow from
prolonged civil strife and
hemispheric isolation. Sev-
enty per cent of its more than
7 million people already live
in poverty. The Caribbean
should strongly support Mr
Arias’ efforts.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

July Independence Specials

The 6-16 Sentra is built on Nissan's 'C' platform and offers @ standard 2.0-litar
4-cylinder angine, fuel-eificiant Nissan Xtronic CVTâ„¢ (Continuously Variable
Transmission) and responsive handling, The Sentra is also available with a
range of unexpacted amenities - ranging from the luxury of leather-appointed
seating to the convenience of Nissan’s Intelligent Key keyless antry system.

SENTRA

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPINMOTORS LIMITED Te aranaee
i589 UIT Rood Thompson Bhyd. = Qakes Field
PQ). Boo Mad 1. 242.326.6377" f, 242.326.6315
1 (R42) aad? hy ee & sanping@ecoralwave.cam

Pa.
SHIFT _ihe way you move fa,
“te

INSIREAROE AVAILABLE WaTH
ACV AM TNE 1M SUR REDE
BERS & AGENTS LTD.

Sette Ba





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



Govt in ‘informal discussions’
with nurses union’ legal adviser

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net

THE government has been engag-
ing in “informal discussions” with the
Bahamas Nurses Union’s legal advis-
er and is making “every effort” to
come to an agreement with the union
on health insurance coverage for
nurses.

Labour Minister Dion Foulkes said
that both he and Health Minister
Hubert Minnis have spoken with
attorney Obie Ferguson and he hopes
that government and the union can
meet “as soon as possible” in a formal
setting to continue negotiations with
the BNU.

“We are trying to find some com-
mon ground... I don’t want to pre-

Bahamian

empt discussions ongoing
but we are making an effort
to get the matter settled,”
said Mr Foulkes.

This comes after BNU
President Cleola Hamilton
last week turned down gov-
ernment’s invitation for the
union to “reconsider” its
prior rejection of the gov-
ermment’s proposal.

She said that offer —
which would have had gov-
ernment implement the
nurses’ postponed coverage
on July 1, 2010, or before if feasible,
and cover the cost of any “work relat-
ed” sickness or injuries while provid-
ing private rooms for them to be
treated at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital - is “not an offer at all.”



DCN Sen Coe

The offer “expired” July
9. Ms Hamilton said it went
no further than what nurs-
es can already get under
the National Insurance
scheme.

They want their health
insurance this year, as was
| originally expected before
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said the govern-
ment “cannot afford” to
bring it into effect this year
in the current fiscal envi-
ronment.

It is unclear if they will take further
action to achieve their demand.

Last week Ms Hamilton said she
would “have to see some things”
before she determined the way for-
ward.

The government obtained an
injunction ordering nurses back to
work in June, after they went on a
mass sick-out to protest the delay in
their coverage.

However, The Tribune understands
that the fact that this injunction was
pursued on a “false premise” — that is,
that the nurses’ industrial agreement
was not legally registered — means it
is not binding, leaving the legality of
any further action by the nurses in
question.

The government has said that
although the unregistered agreement
itself is not binding for the govern-
ment in terms of its obligations
towards the union, it will continue to
try to come to a resolution with the
nurses out of concern for their wel-
fare and the public interest.

summer

intern
ne Kes

Power Co

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Summer
intern Shonique Miller is
proving to be a team player
in a male dominated field of
engineering at the Grand
Bahama Power Company.

Ms Miller returned to the
power company two weeks
ago for her second year as a
summer intern in the Engi-
neering Department.

She has been working with
Mr Meyer Kao, a consultant
for the company in Protection
Engineering. Under the direc-
tion of Mr Kao, Ms Miller is
being trained in the technical
aspects of protection system
programming.

Ms Miller, 25, obtained a
Bachelor’s degree in Electrical
Engineering from North Car-
olina A&T State in Decem-
ber 2008. She placed second
in her engineering class and
took on a fellowship offered
by the school so she can
obtain her Master’s degree in
Engineering.

Grand Bahama Power
Company executives are very
excited about Ms Miller’s
potential and are impressed
with her work so far.

Mr Derick King, Transmis-
sion and Distribution Direc-
tor, was very impressed with
Ms Miller’s enthusiasm on the
job.

He said the company is
always in search of potential
talent, however, attracting
good talent has been a big
challenge over the past few
years.

DERICK KING, Transmission and Distribution director at Grand Bahama Power Company is pictured



with Summer Intern Shonique Miller.

“Tam very excited about Ms
Miller’s potential, and I’m
impressed with her energy to
get involved, and her enthusi-
asm about hands on work
experience,” he said.

“Ms Miller shows great
potential to be part of a team
to ensure that we stay on the
cutting edge with new tech-
nology.”

Ms Miller’s specific field of
study will be power system
design and control.

“Right now Grand Bahama
is not growing in numbers, but
our needs are changing. Plan-
ning and foreseeing future
needs is part of what I will be
studying.

“It’s challenging and ’m
loving it,” she said.

Tanya Wildgoose, the only
female engineer with GBPC,
is also working with Ms Miller.
Together, the women are
breaking stereotypes by suc-
ceeding in a male-dominated
field.

Although there have been
a lot of naysayers and dis-
couraging comments from
some males, Ms Miller is not

letting their remarks deter
her from a career in engineer-
ing.

She intends to break barri-
ers and prove that women can
succeed in this field here in
the Bahamas. Her mother is
her biggest motivator.

“My mother has been there
making sure I don’t give up,
never letting me forget my
vision.

“My advice to younger stu-
dents is the same one I shared
with the Tabernacle graduates
when I spoke at their gradua-
tion this year, you have to
have a vision. Like the Bible
says, without a vision people
would perish, you need to
write a vision for your life and
follow it through, no matter
what.”

Ms Miller is ready for the
challenges her field will bring.
While students are relaxing
for the summer, she will be
learning and getting real
hands on experience while at
home.

Grand Bahama Power
Company Ltd employs more
than 180 Bahamians.

NY Philharmonic says Cuba
tour prospects promising

Break away from the ordinary

- Hontluras lifts curtew
| Weeks after coup d'etat

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras

HONDURAN authorities

? on Sunday lifted a curfew

? imposed since the ousting of

? President Manuel Zelaya two

? weeks ago — a sign the interim
? government is trying to restore
? normality to life in the crisis-

: gripped country, according to

: Associated Press.

In a nationally broadcast

: announcement, the interim

: government said the

? curfew had reached its objec-

? tive to “restore calm” and curb
? crime.

The administration of

? Roberto Micheletti imposed
? the curfew after soldiers

? escorted Zelaya out of the

? country at gunpoint on June
? 28, plunging Honduras into
? political turmoil.

Hondurans were ordered to

i stay in their homes from 11

? p.m. to 4:30 a.m. nightly. The

? government briefly extended it
? from sunset to sunrise when

? Zelaya attempted to return to
? Honduras and the military

? blocked his plane from landing
? by parking vehicles on the run-
? way July 5.

NIENT TRAVEL AGENgy

ENE Charles Drive

Our Bi-Weekly Travel update
POPULAR DESTINATIONS

Miami ......cccecccesceceecccencecescecencesesse 22a!
Ft. Latdderdlalle........cccccccccsssecseeceseee 22D.
Orland cecccccssssssssssssssscesseseseeccsesesee2.28.29
OW PNR sictesectcvcncccrsnncocmcnacsnnn ee
RAPP viiccesccactincsrtccstacssiawcisscrncee a

Pea PTy OB iiiisinsitannnsendnnnscerintneesnede
Trimidad..cccccccccssssccssccccsssssessseseesst4oae!
LAS Vea sancnncsrnsninmmancmnimcann nae
Los Priel eee aetna rf
TOP Ot i csnscesensisossssacnesessssscesscessrssena tt.
Montreal vccccscsccscsscssssssseccscseseseasesese 412,09
COLLA Wa cccceccccscceccrscsccersscecrerscececsssese GO?
LOM Oftsecscuseccsccrceeceercersevessssersessset dhe Ue

Ue Rhye

OPEN FROM 9A.M. - 6P.M.



HAVANA

PROSPECTS for Cuban performances by the
New York Philharmonic look promising following
a tour of concert halls and meetings with music
officials on the island, orchestra president Zarin
Mehta said Sunday, according to Associated Press.

Mehta said a final decision will be made by the
Philharmonic’s board of directors. Eric Latzky,
the orchestra’s vice president for communica-
tions, said an official announcement could be as
much as a month off.

But Mehta said the trip looks promising, with
tentative plans for performances on Oct. 31 and
Nov. 1 at the 900-seat Teatro Amadeo Roldan, a
renovated concert hall a few blocks from the
Malecon coastal highway.

“We have to go back now and work on reper-
toires, budgets. There are practical considerations
like: how do you get the instruments in, where do
you store them?” Mehta told The Associated
Press in Havana. The Philharmonic’s incoming
music director, Alan Gilbert, would conduct.

The island’s Culture Ministry invited the orches-
tra to perform in Havana, and U.S. officials have
agreed to allow the musicians to visit under an
exemption to legal restrictions on travel to Cuba,
Latzy said.

The Communist Party daily Granma reported
on Saturday that authorities were looking for-
ward to such a tour, which would be among the
most high-profile American cultural exchanges

with communist Cuba since Fidel Castro’s rebels
came to power a half-century ago.

The Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra made a
celebrated tour of Cuba a decade ago.

Mehta said the orchestra is concentrating on
people rather than politicians: “We just want to
come and play music and let others worry about
the politics. That’s their problem.”

He noted that no major change in U.S.-North
Korean relations occurred after the orchestra
played in the North Korean capital in February
2008, the first performance by a major visiting
orchestra in that totalitarian state.

Still, Mehta said, the music did seem to touch
many of the North Korean concertgoers, who
included government officials and military officers.

“Here you have all these people who have been
taught that Americans are the devil,” he
said.

“When we played a Korean piece, you should
have seen the change in the stoic, impassive faces
of the Koreans. Many of them were weeping.”

The New York Philharmonic has a long tradi-
tion of musical diplomacy.

The late Leonard Bernstein led America’s old-
est philharmonic orchestra in a watershed tour
of the Soviet Union in 1959, and later in commu-
nist China and Eastern Bloc countries in the
1980s.

Mehta said some of the visiting musicians might
give masters classes to Cuban students and allow
them to sit in on dress rehearsals.



and discover how to experience
life to the fullest. The Isuzu
D-MAX is the ultimate
multi-purpose pick-up truck .
which enables you to drive / d
through tough roads and load
a variety of cargoes. It is
Specially designed to be
powerful, stylish and highly
functional. The Isuzu D-MAX
IS one tough vetticle that
will never let you down!

—

e: :

sf} ‘iat ais

*

TYREFLEX ear TO oe

Call us today for your new Isuzu D-MAX Pick-Up Truck at 325.4961

Wulff Road, F. 0. Box WH 9123. Nassau, The Bahamas © Faw: 323.4667



PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Armed robbery and |

shooting investigated

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Police
investigations are continuing
into an armed robbery and
shooting in the Lewis Yard
area, where a man was shot
early Friday morning.

Asst Supt Edmund Rah-
ming said the victim, Nicolas
Rolle, 45, of Freeport, was at
a house in Lewis Yard
engaged in a gambling game
with others when four masked
men robbed them.

Mr Rolle was shot by one
of the suspects. He was taken
to hospital, where he is
detained in stable condition.

ASP Rahming said the rob-
bers also stole a white Buick
Le Sable, license number
46706, to flee the area. It was
recovered by police in North
Bahamia later Friday morn-
ing.

The suspects were wearing
masks and described as being
between Sft 7in to 5ft 9in tall
of slim build.

SUDDEN DEATH

POLICE are investigating
the sudden death of a man
who was discovered in the
downtown Freeport area on
Saturday morning.

Asst Supt Edmund Rah-
ming said that sometime
around 7.35am, officers
received a call that a man was
found dead lying on the pave-
ment in the area of the Immi-
gration building.

When officers arrived at

the scene to investigate, they
discovered the body of a dark }
male who appeared to be ;

unresponsive.

EMS personnel dispatched :
to the scene confirmed that }
he was dead. The body was }
taken to the Rand Memorial :

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Hospital morgue, where an

autopsy will be performed to :
determine the cause of the :

death.

play.
GUN SEIZED

A 32-YEAR-OLD man }
was arrested after a firearm :
and ammunition was discov- }
ered at a residence in Fortune i

Bay early Sunday morning.

According to reports, a }
team of officers executed a }
search warrant on a house :
sometime around 5.45am }
Sunday. During the search, :
officers recovered a 9mm pis- }
tol along with 10 live rounds :

of ammunition.

A male occupant was tak-
en into custody. He is expect- }
ed to appear before Freeport i

Magistrate’s Court today.
SHARK ATTACK

AN American visitor was
attacked by a shark while on ;

vacation in Grand Bahama.

Although details of the
incident are sketchy, it is }
believed the attack might }

have occurred in West End.

Police said a 45-year-old }
man was taken to hospital but :
refused treatment and has }

since left the country.

Ck

COMMONWEALTH BANK

Employment Opportuni

Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed to delivering superior quality service, to
training and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in

the community.

Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for
Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco.

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

e Assisting the Branch Manager in managing the sales activities of
the Branch to enhance profitability.
Effectively leading, supporting and coaching personnel to

achieve corporate objectives.

Effectively managing a portfolio of consumer, mortgage and

commercial loans.

e Adjudicating credit lines within delegated authority.
e Managing the Branch’s collection activities and the protection of

collateral.

Following-up with client and support functions to ensure timely
completion of product requests and transactions and resolution of

inquiries and issues.

Ensuring Credit risk ratings and credit scoring practices are
adhered to at all times to minimize the risk of loan losses.
Ensuring specific objectives are developed through an
appropriate strategic plan to grow the Branch’s loan and deposit

portfolios and other offerings.

Adding value to the customers’ portfolio of financial services

by actively promoting, marketing, building and cross selling all
deposit / investment and consumer credit business. Ensuring

self and direct reports consistently provide highly courteous
customer service in an informed and thorough manner. Assisting
the Manager in attaining the targets incorporated in the Branch’s

financial plan.

QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE:

¢ Bachelor’s degree or higher in Business Administration, Banking
& Finance or a related discipline from an accredited University.
Minimum of eight years commercial banking experience with a
minimum of 3 years supervisory / managerial experience.
Experience in managing a diverse loan portfolio and assessing

loan quality.

Detailed knowledge of Retail / Commercial / Mortgage lending
practices and credit anal ysis to ensure portfolio quality.
Substantial work experience in loans and risk management with
a full understanding of financial statements and the ability to

anal yze the information.

Excellent leadership and coaching skills.

Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills.
Excellent organizational and time management skills.
Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications.

REMUNERATION PACKAGE:

Commonwealth Bank is a Great place to work! We offer an
exciting work environment with the opportunity for growth and
development. We also offer a competitive compensation package,
reflecting the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications,
including a performance based incentive plan, health, vision,
dental and life insurances anda pension plan.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before

July 24, 2009 to:

Human Resources Department
Re: Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco
P.O. Box SS-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Telefax: (242) 393-8073

ns.net

©2009 CreativeRelatios

E-mail address: hr@combankltd.com

“Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their
interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those
under consideration will be contacted.”



Police do not suspect foul

for failing to
perform at

FROM page one

of sound problems. Red City
had reportedly paid Lil :
Wayne $210,000 in advance }

to secure his performance.

Wayne and his entourage.

up.

tember 27.

HOSPITAL.

WE

CONTINUE

THIS TIME.

BAHAMAS National Trust President
Glenn Bannister said the organisation will
“shortly file a defence and counter claim” in
response to a suit brought against it.

The suit alleges that BNT behaved
“unconscionably” and even “corruptly”
towards a poor farmer, seeking to dispossess
him of land. The organisation says it has a
“long standing policy of upholding the laws
and customs of the Bahamas.”

Mr Bannister said: “At that stage, inter-
ested members of the public and the press

Lil Wayne sued |

Nassau concert:

Lil Wayne, however, failed i
to show up and was claimed
to be asleep in his hotel room. }
More than 5,000 fans report- i
edly had to be sent home at }
2.30 am due to the rapper’s }
non appearance. Red City }
was unable to recoup its mon- }
ey which allegedly included }
just over $30,000 for the ;
accommodations for Lil }

The organisers later had to }
apologise to fans, vendors, }
venue workers, police, spon- }
sors and media for the mix- }

According to an article :
posted on AllHipHop.com, }
Lil Wayne’s manager Cortez }
Bryant is reported as stating ;
that September 27 was not the }
original concert date Wayne :
was booked for and that it }
was the fault of the promoters :
for both failed concert dates ;
— September 26 and Sep- }

DEPARTMENT
PHARMACY DEPARTMENT ENTRANCE AND
ONWARD THROUGH THE
ENTRANCE OF THE ORTHOPEDIC CLINIC.

constitutionally have access to the court
records and can then follow the proceedings

if they so wish.”

“The Bahamas National Trust has much
work to do in guarding our heritage and
developing our national park system which
is a source of tremendous pride and enjoy-
ment for Bahamians and visitors and of
paramount importance for conservation,”
continued the statement.

On Wednesday The Tribune reported on
a statement of claim filed on June 26, 2009,
on behalf of farmer Charles Gibson and the
partners of Diamond Farms against the

BNT.

Man is charged
with the murder of |
American woman

FROM page one

United States Embassy in Nassau. Ms Garrison,

It alleged that executive director of the

Teen killed in

BNT to ‘file defence, counter
claim’ in response to suit

BNT, Eric Carey, on behalf of the organi-
sation, “conspired” with senior officers to

dispossess Mr Gibson and his family of land

he had worked for decades.

The statement claimed the BNT and the
Department of Lands and Surveys breached
their “fiduciary duty” towards Mr Gibson,
with both agencies concealing certain infor-
mation from him as the BNT allegedly
moved to add the land he had farmed to
the “enormous acreage” in the area of the
Harrold and Wilson Ponds for which it had
already been granted a lease.

The farmer received a letter in May 2008

telling him he had three months to vacate

a West Palm Beach resident, had last been in the

US sometime in January.

At the time police were told she may have
been in the Bahamas, in the company of a

Bahamian man.

McKinney, who is reportedly the boyfriend of
Ms Garrison’s daughter, appeared before Chief }
Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank
Lane, and was not required to enter a plea to the
murder charge. He is represented by attorney

Romona Farquharson.

The case was adjourned to Wednesday, July
15, for a fixture hearing. McKinney was remand-

ed to Her Majesty’s Prison.

FROM page one

had never given up hope that
the boys would be found alive,
and that their return was noth-
ing short of a miracle.

Relatives along with residents
of South Andros had continued
their search for the boys.

They were reportedly found
yesterday morning by a woman
relative walking in the nearby
settlement of Kemp’s Bay
around 11.30pm.

The youngsters had report-

WE WILL

RENOVATIONS TO THE ENTRANCE

ENTER

MANAGEMENT APOLOGIZES
INCONVENIENCE CAUSED AND ASK THAT
THE PUBLIC COOPERATE WITH US DURING

SIGNED: MANAGEMENT

the property.

_ police shootout

with robbers
FROM page one

An investigation has been launched to find
out who fired the fatal shot.

Superintendent Ellsworth Moss told The Tri-
bune: “The robbers exited the store and they
were followed by officers who responded to a
call of an armed robbery.

“During the chase, we received information
that there was an exchange of gunfire and as a
result a young male was shot.”

Superintendent Moss said police have deter-
mined that the young man was not in the store at
the time of the robbery.

The victim’s identity has not been released.

Missing boys found alive

edly been sleeping in holes and
feeding on wild fruit.

Vera Clarke, the mother of
the boys said. “Ellouise, my
cousin, was driving up the road,
going for one of my other
cousins to come and do some
work, when her little girl said
‘Ellouise, see Marcell and
Deangelo’.”

Ms Clarke said she was over-
come with joy over her chil-
dren’s return.

Marcelo and Deangelo were
taken to a local clinic and then
flown to Nassau late yesterday

Princess Margaret Hospital

ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC
NOTICE!

IN AN EFFORT TO IMPROVE OUR PATIENT
SERVICES AT THE PRINCESS MARGARET

UNDERGO
AND

TRIAGE AREA OF THE ACCIDENT &
EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT.v

ASK THAT PERSONS VISITING THE
THROUGH

THE

FOR ANY

eta | ,

ToT ae



afternoon. The two young boys
were brought to the Princess
Margaret Hospital along with
their mother around 5pm.

Outside the Accident and
Emergency section, Marcello’s
father Marcellin told The Tri-
bune: “I cant really say how
happy I am.

“T feel like cool water came
into my heart.

“God made a way. I was
praying for God to do a miracle
for me.

“God kept them alive for me.
I never gave up hope.”

Man in court

on firearm,
ammunition and
assault charges

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A MAN was arraigned at
Freeport Magistrate Court
Thursday on a number of
serious offences, including
firearm, ammunition and
assault charges.

Garin Gibson appeared
before Magistrate Helen
Jones in Court Three. He
pleaded not guilty to pos-
session of ammunition,
assault with a deadly
weapon, possession of unli-
censed firearm, and posses-
sion of unlicensed firearm
with intent to endanger
life.

Gibson was denied bail
and remanded to Fox Hill
Prison. The matter was
adjourned to November 30,
2009.

DRUG CHARGE

TWO men were
arraigned in court on drug
possession charges on
Thursday.

Ramon Sweeting, 31, of
Yellow Elder, New Provi-
dence, and Dennis Light-
bourne, 23, of Salinas
Point, Acklins, was charged
with possession of danger-
ous drugs with intent to
supply.

It is alleged that on July
6, the men were found in
possession of a large quan-
tity of marijuana at Dover
Sound, Grand Bahama.

According to reports,
DEU officers went to
Dover Sound where they
discovered 50 buckets of
marijuana. They also found
three large crocus bags,
each containing four bales
of marijuana.

The men were not
required to enter a plea to
the charges. They were
denied bail and remanded
to Fox Hill Prison until
July 14.



THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11
zt
i @

MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

BN, AMERICAN ZONE 11 DAVIS CUP TIE J

BAHAMAS RELEGATED

Team suffers
heartbreak
defeat to
Guatemala

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



HE Bahamas Davis Cup team
didn’t survive the "battle of the
fittest" against Guatemala over
the weekend at the National
Tennis Center and was relegated to the Amer-
ican Zone ITI for the second time in two years.

With the tie knotted at 2-2, Marvin Rolle
went four hours and eight minutes before he
lost a heart wrenching 6-7 (5), 6-4, 4-6, 6-2, 8-
6 decision to a more fatigued Julien Urigen
that sealed the 3-2 victory for Guatemala.

With the victory, Guatemala will remain in
Zone II for 2010, while the Bahamas dropped
back to Zone IIT.

"T was tired. I was drained, but I left it all on
the court," said Rolle, who got the nod from
team captain John Farrington after number
two seed Timothy Neilly was unable to play
because of an injury.

"I was serving for the match and I got a lit-
tle nervous. That happens. But I gave it all. I
have no regrets. I gave it all."

The key to the fifth and final set when Rolle
held for a 5-5 tie and broke Urigen to go up 6-
5. Serving for the match, Rolle didn't get in
any of his first serves and he was eventually
broken by Urigen or a 6-6 tie, setting up the
dramatic finish.

Urigen, who had to be treated for cramps
after he held for a 3-2 lead in the fatal fifth set,
came back and he held serve and broke Rolle
in the final two games to pull off the huge
upsetting victory over the Bahamas.

"T really expected a really tough match and
it was a tough match,” Urigen said. "I thought
I prepared my self very good. I rested well
yesterday, drank a lot of fluids and I went out
there and gave it my best.”

Urigen, who turns 18 on July 22, was playing
in just his second Davis Cup tie. But he said it
was definitely the toughest match he played in
his life and he's happy to pull off the win for
Guatemala.

The stage was set for the clincher after
Mullings needed two hours and 25 minutes
to come through with a 7-5 3-6, 6-1, 6-1 deci-
sion over Cristian Paiz in what should have
been the showdown between the two top seeds
in yesterday's opener.

Paiz had to step in for Christopher Diaz
Figueroa, who was unable to play after he
cramped up the pivotal doubles on Saturday.

"T just played solid and made him play,”
said Mullings about his victory. "In the third
and fourth sets, I was able to go right at him
and put him away."

SO

a |

The pressure was put squarely in the face on , | i pL) {PT f Heer Pret
Mullings when he started playing after he and ; ” ae appt tt ttt | tL
Rolle went five grueling sets for three hours j | st rt CoCr Tita
and 55 minutes before they lost 7-6, 7-5, 4-6, 3- = a, MITT F TTI LilTiliri tt.

6, 8-6 to Christopher Diaz Figueroa and Sebas-
tian Vidal on Saturday.

What many had predicted as a sure victory
for the Bahamas, who swept Guatemala in
their last meeting two years ago in Guatemala
in zone IL But after the first day, all of that GUATEMALA’S JULIEN URIGEN (right) is congratulated by his teammates after
changed after the Bahamas split the two sin- _ their victory over the Bahamas.
gles. While Mullings easily won the opener in :
one hour and 45 minutes with a 6-3, 6-4, 6-2
win over Uriguen, Neilly was out-classes by
Diaz Figueroa 7-5, 6-1, 6-2 in two hours.

Team captain John Farrington called it was
an unbelievable tie that Bahamians will relish
for quite some time because of the way the
team played. "We were 1-1 on Friday and lost
the doubles," Farrington said. "Devin gave
us another opportunity today to keep alive in
the tie and Marvin came up and left it all on
the court, losing in five sets.

"Every Bahamian should be proud of these
guys for what they accomplished this weekend.
We want to thank the Bahamian public for
their support over the holiday weekend. It's
just unfortunate that we have fallen back into
zone III."

While the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Associa-
tion will reassess the team's performance as
they prepare for Zone III next year,
Guatemala will take the time to relish in their
thrill of victory. "I'm satisfied with the way
the team played," said captain Manuel Chavez.
"They played with a lot of heart each and
every match and they won. To me that's very
important."

Chavez said when they came here, they
knew tat it was going to be a real challenge to
win. But once they pulled off the doubles, he
really began to believe that they could win.

"They fought hard some times for three,
four and five hours," he said. "We are going to iets =
rest for a long time and enjoy this victory. It GUATAMALA’S DOUBLES TEAM SebastiEn vidal (left) and Christopher
was so sweet to come here and pull it off." DEVIN MULLINGS plays a double-fisted backhand. Diaz Figueroa

Kevin Major

PHOTOS





PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS



Brown keeps European winning streak alive

wi \.
ef =}

3 years or 60K warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty
and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

2008 FORD RANGER

2.5 Turbo Diesel/Standard Shift
LOADED



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER missing his chance to continue his quest
for the Golden League $1 million jackpot, Chris
‘Fireman’ Brown kept his winning streak alive on
the European circuit.

Brown, back on track after missing the Bisett
Games in Oslo on June 6, dedicated Friday's win-
ning performance at the Golden Gala in Rome in
a season's best of 44.81 seconds to the Bahamian
people as he posted the second fastest time by
any Bahamian this year.

"T give the good LORD all the praise for a job
well done," said Brown in an interview with The
Tribune yesterday. "I felt pretty good about my
race and very focus it was my first 44 for the sea-
son so I definitely feel great.

"IT know I wanted to do something special for the
Bahamas since it was turning 36 yrs old, and yes I
did a season best 44.81. Happy Birthday
Bahamas."

In a pretty face race, Brown held off David
Gillick of Ireland in 44.82. Renny Quow of
Trinidad & Tobago was third in 45.02.

"It does feel good to back in Europe and even
better to walk away with another win," Brown

2008 FORD EVEREST

2.5 Turbo Diesel Automatic, Leather,
LOADED - 7 Passanger

Great Deals
On All Models

NOW THAT'S REALLY AY S31 |(@Deal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO, LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 » FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com



said. "This is only my fifth race of the season. I feel
this really proves that I'm ready for Berlin."

With the time, 30-yewar-old Brown dipped well
under the A qualifying time of 45.55 for the IAAF
World Championships in Berlin, Germany. The
national champion and national record holder
also joins injured Latoy Williams (44.73) and
Andrae Williams (44.98). Also at the meet was vet-
eran female sprinters Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie
and Chandra Sturrup. This time, however, Sturrup
avenged her last two losses, including the Nation-
al Championships, to Ferguson-McKenzie.

Running in the fastest race so far this year, Stur-
rup got the fastest start of the field, but faded toa
third place finish at the end of the women's 100 in
a season's best of 10.99. Ferguson-McKenzie got
left in the blocks, but made up enough grounds for
sixth in 11.11, a season's best as well.

"T felt very good about my performance," Stur-
rup told The Tribune. "I was having problems
with my start in the early part of my season and
was playing catch up in the races.

"IT knew that if I could get my start together
everything would come into play."

The race was won by a Jamaican sweep as Ker-
ron Stewart posted the world leading time and
setting a meet record in an impressive time of
10.75 as she stormed from behind. Shelly-Ann

Fraser was second in 10.91. Stewart easily took the
heats in 11.01 pulling Sturrup through in second in
11.08 just ahead of Ferguson-McKenzie's 11.09.
Fraser won the other heat in 11.13.

The 37-year-old Sturrup, who has joined four
other competitors who have dipped under the 11-
second barrier so far this year, said she was pleased
woth her performance into the World Champi-
onships.

"It's been about two years since I ran that fast.
I should have ran sub 10 last year but I wasn't
executing my race that well,” she noted.

"But this year, I would say that I am ready for
Berlin. I just need to stay focus and execute and
stay healthy."

Sturrup and Ferguson-McKenzie will continue
their rivalry today when they compete in the wom-
en's century at the Athens Grand Prix in Greece.
They are both expected to be matched against
Jamaican Veronica Campbell-Brown in their first
showdown for the year.

No other Bahamian has been listed on the entry
list for the meet at the site of the 2004 Olympic
Games where Campbell-Brown secured the 200
gold over American Allyson Felix with Ferguson-
McKenzie taking the bronze, while Tonique
Williams-Darling snatched the women's 400 gold
from Mexican Ana Guevara.

Women’s medley relay team

=

miss

a



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas’ bid for its
only medal came down to the
women's medley relay yester-
day at the 6th IAAF World
Youth Championships in
Sudtirol, Italy.

The team of V'Alonee
Robinson, Katarina Smith,
Rashad Brown and Katrina
Seymour went into the race
with the third fastest qualifying
time and they seemed poise to
ascend the dais.

But in the final, the team fell
short with a fourth place finish
in a personal best of two min-
utes and 9.33 seconds. The
United States won the gold in a
world leading time of 2:04.32,
while Hungary took the silver in
2:09.22 and Romania carted off
the bronze in 2:09.25.

Team manager Kermit Tay-
lor, who serves as the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associ-
ations’ public relations officer,
admitted that the squad went
out and they performed at their
best, but it wasn't quite enough.

"They finished first in their
heat and sent a strong message
to the teams in the final,” Tay-
lor said. "In the final, not trying
to make any excuses for them,
but Katrina woke up this morn-
ing with a slight eye injury.

"The doctors had to treat her
where they got her prepared to
run. She went out on the anchor
leg and ran her heart out. when
she got the baton, we were in
fifth or sixth position and she
really fought hard to get us in
medal contention.”

Coming down the stretch,
Taylor said Smith just simply
ran out of land and wasn't able
to catch the runner from Roma-
nia.

"V'Alonee ran a good race
to get us started before she
passed it on to Katarina from
Grand Bahama," Taylor said.
"she passed it on to Rashad
Brown, who held her own. But
by the time she gave it to Kat-
rina, she just left it on the track
trying to get the medal."

Taylor said from day one of
the championships, whenever
they released the heat sheet, the
Bahamian athletes found them-
selves in a position to challenge
for one of the top qualifying

—_ =

THE WOMEN’S MEDLEY RELAY TEAM: Pictured from left Rashan Brown,

es out on medal — just



Katarina Smith, V’Alonee Robinson and Katrina Seymour.

spots.

"But despite the fact that the
team didn't win any medals, I
think they performed very
well," Taylor said. "I was very
proud of them. I think they did
very well competing at this cal-
ibre of meet."

While the medley team just
fell short of a medal, Taylor said
they were disappointed that
they were not able to get the
men's medley team registered
in time to compete.

Not casting any blame on
anybody, Taylor said the IAAF
tried to work with them, but
there were a couple other teams
who also didn't register in time
and once the teams found out
the situation, they too tried to
get in.

"The IAAF told us that they
could not make the exception
to get us in because they would
have to do it for the other teams
and there was just too many
teams to accommodate," Taylor
said.

Although they didn't get to
run as arelay team, Geno Jones
and Demetri Knowles came
close to advancing to the final of
the men's 100 and 200 metres
respectively. None of them,
however, advanced.

¢ Here's a look at how our
athletes fared in the other
events:

Women's 100 metres heats

Sparkyl Cash, 5th in heat one
in 12.60.

V'Alonee Robinson, 4th in
heat seven in 12.23 to advance.

Women's 100 metres quarter-
final

V'Alonee Robinson, 7th in
heat three in 12.16.

Men's 100 metres heats

Jonathan Farquharson, 4th in
heat one in 11.08.

Geno Jones, Ist in heat three
in 11.99 to advance.

Men's 100 metres quarter-
final

Geno Jones, 3rd in heat four
in 10.79 to advance.

Men's 100 semifinal

Geno Jones, 7th in heat two
in 10.72.

Men's 400 metres

Glenwood Baillou, 6th in
heat five in 50.77.

Women's 400 metres heats

Rashad Brown, 2nd in heat
one in 56.16 to advance.

Katrina Seymour, 3rd in heat
five in 55.77 to advance.

Women's 400 semifinal

Rashad Brown, didn't finish
in heat two.

Katrina Seymour, 5th in heat
three in 56.24.

Women's 800 metres heats

Hughnique Rolle, 7th in heat
one in 2:22.50.

Men's 110 hurdles heats

Aaron Wilmore, 5th in heat
four in 14.24.

Patrick Bodie, 5th in heat five
in 14.49.

Men's 200 heats

Harold Carter, fifth in heat
four in 22.16.

Demetri Knowles, 3rd in heat
eight in 21.90 to advance.

Men's 200 semifinal

Demetri Knowles, 3rd in heat
two in 21.76.

Women's Medley Relay

V'Alonee Robinson, Katari-
na Smith, Rashad Brown and
Katrina Seymour, 1st in heat
three in 2:10.12 to advance.

V'Alonee Robinson, Katari-
na Smith, Rashan Brown and
Katrina Seymour, 4th in the
final in 2:09.33.



, THE TRIBUNE PAGE 13, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

SAILING: FRANK HANNA ALL ANDROS & BERRY ISLANDS REGATTA

New Southern Cross
proves a class act

THE 16th annual Frank Hanna All Andros & Berry Islands
Regatta was held over the weekend at the Olympic site at Morgans
Bluff in North Andros.

At the end of the three-day competition, the New Southern
Cross emerged as the A Class winner with total of 10 points, fol-
lowed by the Good News with nine. Who Dat finished third with six
points.

In the B Class, the Ants Nest came out on top with 24 points.
Coming in second was Lady Sonia wirth 20 and the Eudeva
wrapped up third place with 18.

And in the C Class, Two Friends took the title with 17 points, just
one better than second place Sweet Island Gal. Lady Eunice end-
ed up in third place with 12.


















street TRS CLASS A WINNER
New Southern Cross:
10 points.

SECOND PLACE IN CLASS A Good News: 9 points.

2ND PLACE IN
CLASS B Lady

Sonia: 20 points.

2

CLASS B WINNER Ants Nest: 24 points.

€ TOYOTA moving forward

HILUX DOUBLE CAB FEATURES:

2.7 litre VVTI engine oe tome e Pa ele CE: MU LKe le
ore M eos) MOM Lim (Le alee or

MTA MCLs ee aaa

TAT ALCL side steps

air conditioning e 4x4

The Hilux is built on advanced Toyota technology for rugged
performance with car-quality comfort. Big, strong and stylish,
the Hilux sets the standard for a new generation.

Backed by a 3-year/60,000 mile factory warranty

3 EXECUTIVE | cscsmoriori tan - 5:50pm gee
Uae Chea Oe MOTORS LTD ll 30 et 700. ;

" E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs P=
PHOTOS: Patrick Hanna/BIS AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER | Parts and service guaranteed eS

Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) e Queens Hwy, 352-6122 ¢ Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916



PAGE 14, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



DEVARD AND DEVAUGHN DARLING FOOTBALL CAMPS



Keeping an American football dream alive

By Renaldo Dorsett
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

The country's most notable gridiron
star continues the dream of bringing foot-
ball to the Bahamas, through the Devard
and Devaughn Darling Football Camps,
presented by his non-profit organization
the As One Foundation.

Darling hosted yet another successful
edition of the camps both in Grand
Bahama (July 6th-7th) and in New Prov-
idence (July 9th-10th).

During the course of the pair of two-
day camps, Darling, his NFL colleagues
and a team of coaches based in the Unit-
ed States, tutored hundred of campers
between the ages of 11-17 in the basics of
American football.

Darling was joined by fellow NFL
Players Derrick Martin and Tre Stallings
of the Baltimore Ravens, Larry John-
son, Bobby Engram, and Dwayne Bowe
of the Kansas City Chiefs, and Darrius
Heyward Bey of the Oakland Raiders
to assist the novice players with skill

development, technique, and the funda-
mentals of American Football.

Darling noted the purpose of the camp
is to encourage young Bahamian ath-
letes to pursue their education and
dreams of playing American Football,
much like he and his twin brother
Devaughn did some years ago.

“We are thrilled with the number of
quality professional athletes confirmed to
attend, coach and mentor campers at
both of the 2009 football camps,” said
Devard Darling. “The foundation would
not be able to put on successful football
camps without the help and support from
the athletic community and we are truly
grateful for their time and generosity.”

Darling said he has been pleased with
the growth and development over the
camp and the foundation itself over the
past few years.

"The camp has grown tremendously
over the years and its just been a blessing
to be apart of it all. It is about giving
these kids another opportunity to find a
way to live out their dreams, using a sport
to someday reach a professional level or

to get themselves an education," he said
"We started out with one day camps, and
the camp just continues to grow every
year. We recieve great support from the
corporate community, we do our best to
have coaches and players from around
the sport come down to the Bahamas to
give the kids a hands on opportunity for
the kids to work with, the interest con-
tinues to grow every year with more and
more kids coming out and from alot of
the repeat campers we are beginning to
see the benefits.”

The 5-year veteran receiver, now in
his second season with the Kansas City
Chiefs, said he sees the Bahmas as a
breeding ground for untapped football
talent, with the camp serving as just one
means of putting that talent on display.

"The talent level here is very impres-
sive. The Bahamas is a small country that
has tons of guys with athletic ability here
sO We expect to see some guys out here
that have a great natural skill set and can
step on the field right away and learn
pretty quickly," he said, "This camp
would be a great start for many of them

and it gives insight into what they can
do because a lot of the drills we do out
here are things you would do on the foot-
ball field or things we would do in a typ-
ical NFL practice session."

Darling said he and the foundation
look forward to the continued growth of
the camp in the very near future with
possible expansion to the family islands.

"There is always room for improve-
ment so we want to continue to make
the camp bigger and better each year by
adding new things and making it more
attractive to people that want to get
involved with the kids and what we are
doing,” he said, "Ideally we would like
for a few of these guys to use this as a
jump start to possibly become apart of
Frank's program, he's always looking for
new talent and this is about as good a
place as any to start."

The As One Foundation was created
in 2007 by Devard Darling, in loving
memory of his identical brother
Devaughn Darling who passed in 2001
during spring training.

Its goal is to provide underprivileged

youth both nationally and internation-
ally with educational and developmental
opportunities through athletic endeav-
ors, educational programming and spiri-
tual enrichment.

Specifically, the “Devard &
Deveaughn Darling Football Camps”
strive to encourage young Bahamians
ages 11 to 16 to further their athletic
skills and education at a private school in
the United States.

The cap of available camper slots is
120, and attendance will be allotted to
elite athletes with the potential of pur-
suing a collegiate or professional career
in football.

While gaining invaluable skills and
training in the game of American Foot-
ball, camp attendees also also received
free gifts, equipment and a chance to
earn the title of Camp MVP.

Camp MVP's will be judged by partic-
ipation in all activities and the chosen
honoree and one parent will win a fully
paid trip to Kansas City, Missouri during
the 2009 NFL season to spend a weekend
with Devard Darling and his family.

Team Bahamas enjoys historic baseball win

Team Bahamas went into the bottom of 6th

Gurabo, Puerto Rico came into the PONY Latin
American Caribbean Zone as the favourites to
return to the 2009 15-16 PONY COLT World Series
scheduled for August 4th - 12th in Lafayette, Indi-

ana.
Puerto Rico came in second behind the US at the

2008 World Series.

It would not happen in 2009 as the Team
Bahamas upset Gurabo, PR in the 1 - 4 Playoff
match up.

Team Bahamas made history by defeating Puer-
to Rico for the first time at an International Tour-
nament.

The President (Craig Kemp) and the Execu-
tives congratulated Team Bahamas 15-16 National

Team on this historic victory. He congratulated
Manager Patrick Knowles and Coaches Marcian
Curry & Loren Kemp on a job well done, as well as
the (16) Team members who had made the
Bahamas proud once again about baseball in the
country.

This was one of the best showing by Team
Bahamas an International Tournament.

In the game: Jeffrey Woodside pitched 4 strong
innings: Went 1-3 with 2 RBI.

In the top of 5th he ran into trouble and was
replaced by Byron Ferguson with 1 out and Run-
ners on 2nd & 3rd. Ferguson was able to get PR out
in the Sth & 6th inning, not before they scored 2
runs.

inning down 5 - 4. Alex Tapia hit a fly ball for the
first out. Jervis "Champ" Stuart stepped to the
plate and drove the 2 balls / 1 Strike pitch to straight
away centre field to tie the game 5. With one out
Theodore Trae Sweeting Jr. - (1 -1 on the day 1 RBI
& Stolen Base) was able to draw a 2nd walk on 5
pitches.

Team Bahamas now had the go ahead run on.
PR decided to change their RH pitcher for a Lefty
to keep Sweeting from stealing 2nd. Jeffrey Wood-
side struck-out, but during his at bat, Sweeting was
able to steal second.

With two out, Marcus Holbert stepped to the
plate and drove the 2-2 pitch to Right Field scoring

Sweeting from 2nd Base with the go-ahead run.

Top of the Seven inning, Team Bahamas need-
ed 3 outs for the big upset.

Manager Knowles called on Fire Baller, Marcus
Holbert to close the door for the win.

Marcus struck-out the first batter, second bat-
ter pop out to Center field.

Marcus trying to be careful, walked the 3 Batter
who stole second and went to third on a pass ball.
With the pressure on and only able to throw the fast
ball, due to the runner on 3rd base. With 3 ball &
1 strike, the 4th PR batter pulled a ball on the cor-
ner and flew-out to Andre in Left Field for the
final out. The Bahamians threw gloves and caps in
the air in celebration.

CRICKET: FIRST ASHES TEST

draw wit
Australia



ENGLAND'S James Anderson, left, and Monty Panesar walk from the pitch

after their team draw the first cricket test match.

FRED ATKINS,
Associated Press Writer
CARDIFF, Wales

England and Australia drew
the first Ashes test on Sunday
after a thrilling last wicket stand
by the home side's final pairing
of James Anderson and Monty
Panesar, according to Associat-
ed Press.

England closed on 252-9 after
a partnership by Paul Colling-
wood (74) and Graeme Swann
(31) frustrated Australia for 82
minutes after tea at Sophia Gar-
dens.

Australia had looked set for
victory when Collingwood was
caught by Michael Hussey off
Peter Siddle. But Anderson and
Panesar then batted for 40 min-
utes to steer England to safety
in a nail-biting finish, taking the
total past the 239 it needed to
force Australia to bat again.

"It was horrible to watch,"
England captain Andrew
Strauss said. "As a batsmen to
watch your number nine, 10 and
11 batsmen do your job for you
is not ideal. I thought we always
had one wicket too many down
and it was only with 18 balls to
go that I thought we had a
sniff.”

Anderson was more opti-
mistic than his captain. *Cer-
tainly when they put Marcus
North on, a part-time spinner, I
thought we had a great chance,”
he said. "Monty was batting
pretty well and we were com-
municating well.”

Australia captain Ricky
Ponting pinpointed Colling-
wood as the man who had
denied the tourists’ victory.

"He deserves all the credit

you can give him, because with-
out him and his innings Eng-
land would have been in a
whole lot of trouble,” Ponting
said. "We just weren't quite
good enough to finish off a
great five days."

England's physio and 12th
man repeatedly walked on to
the field of play in the closing
stages. Asked whether this was
contrary to the spirit of the
game, Strauss said it was due to
confusion about the number of
overs they had to face and his
opposite number Ponting, while
unimpressed, refused to use it as
an excuse. "That's not the rea-
son we didn't win it,” Ponting
said.

Ben Hilfenhaus claimed 3-47
and Nathan Hauritz 3-63 as
Australia's bowlers initially
exerted the kind of pressure
their English counterparts failed
to produce during 12 hours in
the field, after the hosts had
resumed on 20-2.

Kevin Pietersen left a ball
from Hilfenhaus that uprooted
his offstump in the fourth over
of the day to leave England on
31-3 and Strauss slashed the ball
into Brad Haddin's gloves to be
out for 17 in the 17th.

Collingwood enjoyed a
charmed life early on. He was
close to being caught off Hau-
ritz by a diving Ponting at short
leg, then scrambled the next
delivery away from the stumps
by using his pads and feet.

Matt Prior was less fortunate,
caught at first slip for 14 by
Michael Clarke after a delivery
from Hauritz that took a fero-
cious bounce, leaving England
on 70-5 in the 27th over.

Collingwood and Andrew

Jon Super/AP Photo




=

ENGLAND'S James Anderson, bottom centre right, celebrates as









Tom Hevezi/AP Photo

—

=)

fete

Ta atest

=

ENGLAND'S Monty Panesar appeals unsuccessfully for the wicket of

teammate Monty Panesar, right, shake hands with Australia's Ricky Australia's Marcus North during the third day of the first cricket test
Ponting after their teams drew the first cricket test match.

match between England and Australia in Cardiff, Wales.

Tom Hevezi/AP Photo

ENGLAND'S James Anderson, center, and Monty Panesar, left, confer with Aleem Dar during the final day of the first cricket test match between
England and Australia in Cardiff, Wales, Sunday, July 12, 2009.

Flintoff steered England
through to lunch, but a break-
through came after an hour in
the afternoon session.

Johnson belied an erractic
start when he induced an edge
from Flintoff that just carried
to Ponting at second slip.
Flintoff was out for 26, and
England was 127-6 in the 50th
over.

Stuart Broad was lucky not
to be out lbw first ball to John-
son's next delivery, but he
delayed Australia for 68 min-
utes until being out Ibw to Hau-
ritz. Swann then provided some
nuisance value. He was hit three
times in the penultimate over
of the afternoon session by Sid-
dle, but survived to frustrate
Australia for an hour after tea

until he was lbw to Hilfenhaus.

Hauritz missed the chance to
run Collingwood out in the 90th
over but just as England looked
poised to claim a draw he edged
a Siddle delivery to Hussey,
who caught him at the second
attempt.

That left Anderson and Pane-
sar with a minimum 11.3 overs
to bat out. After an astonish-

ingly tense passage of play they
passed the target of 239 needed
to force Australia to bat again
and were aided by a crucial mis-
field by Hauritz that gifted
Panesar a boundary. Their part-
nership lasted 40 for minutes
before the umpires called time,
leaving the series all square at 0-
0 ahead of Thursday's start to
the second test at Lord's.



THE TRIBUNE
D yu

Failed Four
Seasons bidder
embroiled in $8m
mortgage case

mw By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FAILED bidder for the
Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort has seen another case
involving an Exuma-based real
estate/resort project he is pro-
moting, featuring a disputed $8
million mortgage, sent back to
the Supreme Court after his bid
to throw the matter out was
rejected by the Court of Appeal.

Barry Silverton, a California-
based real estate/casino develop-
er, who led a $40 million bid to
acquire Emerald Bay — the last
one to be accepted (then fall
through) by its receivers and main
creditor before the decision was
taken to close the resort — saw
the Court of Appeal reinstate the
action launched by his 25 per cent
equity partner in the Hermitage
Estates project, finding that it had
shown an “arguable case to go to
trial”.

The legal battle between Mr
Silverton and his Hermitage
Estates company, which had been
seeking to develop a 1,700-acre
resort/real estate project on Exu-
ma’s Royal Cay, and Hamby Ltd,
has its genesis in a joint venture
agreement with the latter’s
Delaware-incorporated parent.

The Court of Appeal judgment
recorded that the parent, Talisker
Realty Ltd, and Mr Silverton and
Hermitage Estates had signed a
Letter of Intent on November 29,
2004, setting out the terms of the
agreement between the two sides.
Hamby Ltd was the Bahamian-
incorporated vehicle designed to
hold and acquire Talisker’s invest-
ment in the Hermitage Estates
project.

Appeal Justice Emanuel
Osadebay, writing the Court’s
judgment, noted that a number
of agreements were alleged to
have been concluded between the
parties, including a December 17,
2004, shareholder agreement
which stated how Hamby Ltd
would take a 25 per cent stake in
Hermitage Estates.

Via a December 23, 2004 mort-
gage, Hamby Ltd agreed to loan
Hermitage Estates “the sum of
$8 million on security of two
tracts of land comprising 1,437
acres known as the ‘Hermitage
Estates’, with a maturity and
redemption date of December 31,
2006”.

The previous day, Hermitage
Estates had also concluded a
mortgage agreement with Deidre
and Newell Bowe, where the pair
advanced $3.333 million to the
company, again secured on its
real estate. “Irrespective of the
fact that the Bowes’ mortgage
pre-dates the Hamby mortgage,
the Bowes’ mortgage expressly
recognizes the Hamby mortgage
as having priority,” the Court of
Appeal found.

However, Hermitage Estates
was now alleging that Hamby’s
mortgage simply secured the orig-
inal $8 million loan, as approved
by the Investments Board, “and
any acquisition” other than that
would be void under the Inter-
national Persons Landholding
Act.

But Hamby, and its Bahamian
attorneys, Brian Simms and Mar-
co Turnquest of Lennox Paton,
argued that the $8 million mort-
gage was part of a wider agree-
ment and acted as collateral for its
equity interest and a number of
other obligations Hermitage

SEE page 2B





in

MONDAY,



eG La

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Court problems threaten
cial sector ‘survival’

* Leading attorney: Judicial system resolving commercial disputes in ‘acceptable
timeframe’ for international business ‘not happening’

* Urges immediate fix, as ‘any further deterioration will have extremely negative impact’

* Calls for holistic solution, as current woes ‘going to have an effect on the
development of new business and the retention of existing business’

finan

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamas must
immediately fix its
judicial system’s
inability to resolve
commercial disputes
in a “timeframe acceptable” to
the international community, a
leading attorney has warned, as
“any further deterioration” will
cost the financial services industry
and other economic sectors both
current and future business.
Brian Moree, senior partner at
McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes,
told Tribune Business that the res-
olution of important, complex
commercial disputes in good time
was currently “not happening”
within the Bahamian judicial sys-
tem.

‘Complete
overhaul’
in public
sector
needed to
support
financial
services

But leading attorney
praises government on
regulatory consolidation

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas requires a
“complete overhaul” of all gov-
ernment agencies and ministries
dealing with the financial services
industry if the sector is to main-
tain its long-term competitive-
ness, a leading attorney has
warned, with this nation facing a
stark choice between necessary
reform and “just plodding along”.

Brian Moree, senior partner at
McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes,
told Tribune Business that the
“interdependent” relationship
between the different public sec-
tor bodies required a compre-
hensive, holistic approach to
reform rather than just a piece-
meal initiative that focused on
one or two areas as opposed to
the whole.

Calling for a three to five-year
“national development plan” for
financial services, Mr Moree said
any public sector reforms needed
to focus on areas such as:

¢ The judicial system and its
ability to deal with commercial
cases

¢ The Immigration Depart-
ment, and its processing of permit
applications for key expatriate
financial sector staff, plus the var-
ious residency permits for its high
net-worth clients

¢ The Registrar General’s
Department, which every finan-
cial sector player must deal with
for company incorporations and
the like

¢ The financial sector regula-
tors

¢ And key infrastructure and
the major utilities, especially the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) and the
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC)

Although reforms needed to
be enacted in concert with the
private sector, Mr Moree argued
that the impetus needed to come
from the top levels of govern-
ment. The Prime Minister and his
senior officials, he added, needed
to “exercise strong leadership....
To implement the changes which
are going to be necessary. A sig-
nificant amount of political
courage and leadership will be
required to implement this

SEE page 7B



a
BRIAN MOREE

This, he added, needed to be
“addressed in the short term” if



key sectors of the Bahamian econ-
omy were to maintain their inter-
national competitiveness, with the
financial services industry’s “sur-
vival” especially at stake.
Tribune Business understands,
from attorneys requesting
anonymity, that the judicial sys-
tem’s ability to resolve and dis-
pose of commercial cases in a
timely manner has worsened in
recent months as a result of Senior
Justice John Lyons’ departure.

ColinalImperial.

Many of the most complex
commercial matters in the court
system were before him, including
several key court-supervised liq-
uidations where clients have been
waiting months — and sometimes
years — for the return of multi-
million dollar assets.

As many commercial attorneys
had privately feared, his depar-
ture — and wait for a similarly-
skilled replacement — has left the
judicial system worse off.



seas) A

While not commenting directly
on the ramifications of Senior Jus-
tice John Lyons’ departure, Mr
Moree told Tribune Business:
“The system is having difficulty
accommodating the large number
of commercial matters in a time-
frame that is acceptable through-
out the international community.

“T think that it is something
which must be addressed in the

SEE page 2B

Manager wins profit deal breach
verdict against developer

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE former project manager for a major
Freeport-based real estate development has
seen the Court of Appeal increase the dam-
ages awarded to him for breach of a Profit
Sharing Agreement, in addition to backing a
ruling which awarded him $119,622 in damages
for wrongful dismissal by the developer.

The appellate court’s 92-page judgment,
largely drawing on the original Supreme Court
ruling, goes into graphic detail on the com-
plete breakdown of the more than 20-year
friendship between two British expatriates,
Steven Jervis and Victor Skinner, over the 76-
home Shoreline residential development and
the Profit Sharing Agreement that was sup-
posed to split the project’s net income 75/25
between the two.

The Court of Appeal judgment recorded
how the two first came to Freeport and Grand
Bahama on a 1984 rugby tour, with Mr Jervis
subsequently developing a career as an engi-
neer and Mr Skinner one as a quantity sur-
veyor in the construction industry.

The Grand Bahama links really took off in
1998, when Mr Jervis, after deciding to settle in
Freeport with his family, in May-June of that

year became interested in developing a tract of
land at Fortune Cay into what would become
the Shoreline residential subdivision.

Mr Skinner’s advice was sought on the pro-
ject, and the contacts blossomed to such an
extent that it was agreed “that they would
jointly do the project and that the net profits
would be shared as to 75 per cent [for Mr
Jervis] and 25 per cent to [Mr Skinner]. The
agreement was not put in writing at that time,
and the agreement would operate from the
beginning of their business relationship... They
also agreed on [Mr Skinner’s] salary.

“(Mr Jervis] had some money which he was
prepared at that stage to put into the project,
and [Mr Skinner] had the considerable expe-
rience needed to get it up and going.”

Mr Jervis paid $3.8 million for the land that
would become Shoreline, and Mr Skinner
started full-time employment as project man-
ager on March 1, 1999. The latter, though,
was unaware that Mr Jervis’s company, KST
Investments, had been incorporated as the
vehicle to run the project, so as to reduce his
personal liability, until he questioned its name
on his pay cheque in March 1999.

[Mr Skinner] said that he became concerned
to raise the issue because all his negotiations
and agreement in relation to the development

medical emergencies

don't study economics

... they don't know the word “recession” either. That's why you
need to maintain your insurance coverage with Colinalmperial
even when the economy is weak — to make sure hard times don't
get harder just because you fall ill or fall down on your luck.

Stay confident. Stay connected,

confidence for life

— i
\ ull

Te ec eae

FIRST AID

and his share of the profits had been with [Mr
Jervis] on a person-to-person basis without
the involvement of a corporate body,” the
Court of Appeal judgment found.

“He had asked [Mr Jervis] how the involve-
ment of [KST Investments] would affect their
agreement in terms of profit shares, and [Mr
Jervis] assured him that it would make no dif-
ference to their agreement.”

The development proceeded with Mr Skin-
ner in charge of construction, and Mr Jervis
responsible for sales, marketing, accounting,
legal and financial aspects. Operating as part-
ners, both received salaries of $7,000 per
month and $3,000 in rental allowance.

Yet by early 2001, the relationship between
the two was starting to sour. The Court of
Appeal judgment recorded: “In February 2001,
and on the insistence of [Mr Skinner], the
Profit Sharing Agreement was reduced to writ-
ing as [Mr Skinner] felt marginalized, inse-
cure and vulnerable.

“His work permit was only for one year, as
[Mr Jervis] had told him that a three-year
work permit was not available, which infor-
mation he later found out not to be true. He
had been left out by [Mr Jervis] on a discussion

SEE page 5B

ColinalImperial.





PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a =) ~~~
Failed Four Seasons bidder

embroiled in $8m mortgage case

FROM page 1B

Estates was supposed to com-
plete.

Hamby Ltd alleged that it
could apply the monies received
under the mortgage to repay any
debt Hermitage Estates owed to
it, as per the mortgage agreement.

“Tt is contended by the appel-
lant that the Letter of Intent dat-
ed November 29, 2004.......... in
this matter contemplated that fol-
lowing the contribution of the ini-
tial capital to get the project going
that Talisker, through Hamby,
would receive 100 per cent of the
net cash flow and/or capital
events’ proceeds until such time
as the loan was repaid, with the
maturity date being December
31, 2006,” the Court of Appeal
found.

“The appellant [Hamby] sub-
mits that the Hamby mortgage
had collateral advantages which,
together, formed part of the mort-
gage transaction. The various
instruments made up a composite
whole agreement between the
parties.”

Hermitage Estates, in 2005, had
sought to redeem Hamby’s mort-
gage by advancing a sum it
believed would clear its out-
standing debt under the mort-
gage. It then applied to the
Supreme Court for a redemption
order, but then-Justice John
Lyons said such a summary order
was not appropriate and
adjourned the case to a date when
both sides could give oral evi-
dence before him.

Justice Lyons’ decision was
never set aside, but 11 days after
it was given a Settlement Agree-
ment — “the purport and content
of which are sharply disputed or
contested by the parties”- was
reached on May 23, 2006.

Then, on December 23, 2006,
Hamby Ltd issued a summons
seeking a Supreme Court order
that it could foreclose on Her-
mitage Estates because it had
defaulted on its obligations. The
latter and Mr Silverton, coupled
with the other defendants, argued
that this procedure was “improp-
er” as foreclosure was governed
by Order 77, Rule one of the
Supreme Court rules.

Moves were then made to have
Hamby’s summons struck out
because “no reasonable course of
action” was disclosed against
them. The Bowes were named as
defendants by Hamby because
they were allegedly trying to use
their mortgage interest to sell the
Hermitage Estates project to
another defendant, Kendall PH
LLC, despite being subordinate
to Hamby’s interest.

Hermitage Estates then moved,
on February 27, 2008, to obtain a
Supreme Court order that Ham-
by Ltd’s action “be struck out and
the action dismissed on the
grounds that it discloses no rea-
sonable cause of action, is embar-
rassing and is otherwise an abuse
of process”.

Hamby Ltd, meanwhile, had
applied for its initial action to be
continued as a writ, arguing that
its case “discloses triable issues”

and could “only be resolved by a
full blown trial of the action with
pleadings”. Supreme Court Jus-
tice Faisool Mohammed, though,
agreed with Hermitage Estates’
position and struck out Hamby
Ltd’s action based on the written
evidence before him.

The Court of Appeal, though,
noting that striking out actions
should only happen when there is
no obvious trial case, found that
the issues raised by Hamby Ltd
were “complex and cannot simply
be determined on the documents
only”. Witnesses, the judgment
said, were needed to determine
the intent of the parties involved.

“Upon reading the documents
in this case, I cannot say that it is
clear beyond doubt that the
appellant’s claim is wholly unten-
able on the face of it,” Justice
Osadebay found, stating that the
Supreme Court “fell into error”
in determining that Hamby Ltd
had shown no arguable case to
go to trial.

While Hamby Ltd acknowl-
edged that the monies borrowed
under the $8 million mortgage
had been repaid, and the shares
representing its 25 per cent inter-
est in Hermitage Estates issued
to it, it was maintaining “that
there are still certain non-finan-
cial obligations which remain to
be satisfied”.

Ultimately, the Court of
Appeal ordered that the case be
remitted to the Supreme Court
for a hearing on Hamby Ltd’s
writ application and a “speedy
trial”.

k ;

i Se,

Call 866-957-2276

CelebrationBS.com

Wun lime

Court problems threaten
financial sector ‘survival’

FROM page 1B

short-term before there is any further deteriora-
tion. I think that we are facing a problem which, if
this is not addressed in the short-term, could have a
very negative impact on the jurisdiction.”

“A major international financial centre simply
cannot survive unless its judicial system and admin-
istration of justice can accommodate, in an efficient
way, commercial disputes and resolve them in a
timeframe acceptable to the international commu-
nity,” Mr Moree added.

“No one expects us to resolve these cases in a
record time period, but they do expect us to work
through these commercial cases in an acceptable
timeframe and, at the moment, that’s not happening.
This needs to be addressed in the short-term,
because it’s going to have an effect on the develop-
ment of new business and the retention of existing
business.”

Calling for a holistic approach that effectively
meant reform and overhaul for the entire Bahami-
an judicial system, Mr Moree told Tribune Busi-
ness: “Clearly, this does involve not only looking at
the number of judges we have, but many of the oth-
er issues we have to deal with in the system — the
staffing, the resources, the listings office, the Reg-
istry, the technology and the procedures.”

Senior Justice Lyons’ resignation has left numer-
ous commercial matters, which were before him,
still waiting to be listed before a new judge. Among
the cases he was dealing with were the liquidations
of Caledonia Corporate Management, Dominion
Investments and Leadenhall Bank & Trust, three
former Bahamas-based financial institutions whose
clients (creditors) are still awaiting the return of
substantial assets.

In Leadenhall’s case, it has been some four years
since the bank was first placed in court-supervised
liquidation, and assets have yet to be distributed
pro rata to creditors (excluding former credit card
depositors). The case has yet to be allocated to
another judge, Tribune Business understands, and
given the complexity and volume of case paper-
work involved in issues such as Leadenhall and oth-
ers, it inevitably takes time for another judge to

become seized of the matters.

This, of course, leads to frustration and unhappi-
ness among creditors and former clients of the likes
of Leadenhall, given the continued delay in recov-
ering their assets. The result? The likelihood that the
Bahamas and its judicial system may be bad-
mouthed by one set of high-net worth individuals
and their foreign attorneys to their respective peer
groups, discouraging new clients from using or com-
ing to this nation, and encouraging existing ones to
consider shifting assets elsewhere. The same applies
to international businesses and businessmen.

Any problems in resolving commercial disputes in
an expeditious timeframe will directly impact the
Bahamas’ ability to venture into new industries and
develop alternative revenue streams, especially the
proposed plan to develop this nation into a world-
recognised arbitration centre.

Senior Justice Lyons himself recognised the need
for the Bahamas to have a specialised commercial
court, stating as much in the preamble to a May 15,
2008, judgment involving a dispute between Cresta
Ltd and LP Management and its co-defendants.

Noting that the case was clearly commercial, even
though it had been listed as a general cause, Justice
Lyons said the matter should fall “within the de
fact regime we have here for the resolution of com-
mercial matters”.

He added: “We do not, as yet, in the Bahamas
have a dedicated commercial court. This will be
addressed very shortly. It is of paramount impor-
tance that if the Bahamas is to continue as an off-
shore financial centre of any credibility, it must have
a commercial court.

“That commercial court must adopt a world-class
process for resolving commercial matters as expe-
ditiously as possible. When it comes to commercial
disputes, it was once said by a learned judge (I have
forgotten the reference) that the first question that
a businessman asks of his lawyer is: ‘How long will
it take and how much will it cost?’

“Commercial courts do ‘business’. They are there
to serve business. Commercial courts are not in the
habit of inhibiting business. Commercial courts are
expected to move quickly to define the areas in dis-
pute and resolve them. That, after all, is business.”

Thank you for your
trust & support
as we continue to pro vide
Results with In tegrity.

Geadman's Bay Corporate Contr
T: 242.328.7115 through 9 | into

Wel Bay Street | Naiaeu, The Bahamas

AW, OVId ea nciad visoes niet

SprLeC eT tees

— SNACK WRAP’—





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009, PAGE 3B





175% ICB profit

rise aids JSJ

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A 175 per cent increase in
Insurance Company of the
Bahamas (ICB) net income drove
BISX-listed J. S. Johnson’s 2009
first quarter profits rise to $2.345
million, although the latter’s ordi-
nary shareholders saw their share
reduce year-over-year.

Despite a 14.27 per cent
increase in J. S. Johnson’s year-
over-year net profit from the $2.06
million achieved in the 2008 first
period, the company’s equity
investors saw their net income
share drop by 4.9 per cent to
$1.621 million, compared to $1.704
million last year.

As a result, earnings per share
(EPS) dropped from $0.21 in the
2008 first quarter to $0.20 this time
around, as non-controlling inter-
ests in J. S. Johnson saw their
share of the company’s net profits
more than double — increasing by
106 per cent from $356,000 to
$733,000.

In his 2009 first quarter mes-
sage to shareholders, Marvin
Bethell, J. S. Johnson’s managing
director, attributed the company’s
improved showing to the finan-
cial performance of its ICB affili-
ate, the general insurance carrier
in which it holds a 40 per cent
stake. The other shareholders are
J. S. Johnson directors and exec-
utives.

ICB’s enhanced showing was
largely due to a $1.236 million
swing on fees and commissions,
which went from being $137,000
in the red during the 2008 first
quarter to a positive of $1.099 mil-

* BISX-listed insurer sees net income rise 14.27% in Q1, driven by affiliate carrier’s commissions swing
* But equity investors see profit share drop by 4.9%
* Recession hits agency/brokerage business on personal lines

lion. While ICB’s net earned pre-
miums dropped slightly by 4.6 per
cent year-over-year, falling from
$2.298 million 1n 2008 to $2.193
million this time around, when
combined with the fees and com-
missions performance it drove the
carrier’s total income higher by
44.5 per cent to $3.404 million.

And aided by a 9.5 per cent
drop in insurance expenses and
claims, which collectively fell to
$1.465 million from $1.619 million
in the 2008 first quarter, ICB gen-
erated net income of $1.229 mil-
lion for this year’s period as
opposed to $447,000 last year.

“With regard to the underwrit-
ing segment, ICB’s results were
very encouraging,” Mr Bethell
told shareholders. “Although net
earned premiums were down
slightly, there was an appreciable
swing in net commissions and fees.

“Additionally, an improvement
in claims costs resulted in a reduc-
tion in insurance expenses.” The
2009 first quarter results illustrate
ICB’s value to its largest share-
holder, boosting profits when
times are hard, although it will
also make J. S. Johnson’s earn-
ings more volatile and unpre-
dictable when those hurricane-
related claims come in.

With fees and commissions
from J. S. Johnson’s agency and
brokerage business up slightly by
1.1 per cent at $4.02 million, the
BISX-listed entity’s total net fees

and commissions for the 2009 first
quarter were up 33.37 per cent on
prior year comparatives, standing
at $5.119 million compared to
$3.838 million. Total income for
the whole company was 10.7 per
cent ahead of prior year, stand-
ing at $7.499 million compared to
$6.277 million.

Mr Bethell warned that J. S.
Johnson’s agency and brokerage
business “continues to be impact-
ed by the economic downturn,
which has affected both renewals
and new business, particularly for
personal lines.

“This has not been the case on
the commercial side, as we have
seen the acquisition of some new

business from both local and inter-
national clients.”

The J. S. Johnson managing
director pledged to “carefully
watch” the company’s expenses
going forward to ensure they
remained in line with budget
expectations. Total expenses for
the 2009 first quarter increased
year-over-year by 9 per cent to
$5.145 million, compared to $4.717
million. Much of this resulted
from a 6.2 per cent increase in
staff costs to $2.205 million, com-
pared to $2.076 million in the 2008
first quarter. Other expenses shot
up by 51 per cent to $1.347 million
as opposed to $890,000 the pre-
vious year.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PATRAVI
CLOSE LIMITED

— -,——

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PATRAVI CLOSE LIMITED has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and



Legal Notice

NOTICE
GILLMAN VIEW
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LEBARON
INVESTMENTS LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LEBARON INVESTMENTS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

UPTOWN HEIGHTS INC.

——

>
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of UPTOWN HEIGHTS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Ministry of The Environment
Port Department Government
Notice Invitation for Tenders

The Government of The Bahamas is
inviting tenders for the following
Contracted Service for the Port
Department, Ministry of The Environment.

¢ The Cleaning of Potters Cay Dock

Interested parties may obtain further
information, and may collect the bid-
ding document as of 15th July, 2009 from:

The Port Department
Prince George Dock
Nassau, The Bahamas
Telephone Number: (242) 356-5639

Between the hours of 9:00a.m. and 5:00pm
Monday through Friday.

Tenders are to be _— submitted in
Triplicate (3) in a sealed envelope(s) Marked
“Tender For Cleaning of Potters Cay
Dock” addressed to:

The Chairman
Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach
P.O.Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas

No later that 5:00 p.m. on July 27th, 2009.

Tenders will be opened at 10:00a.m. at the
Office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of
Finance.

The Government Reserves The Right To
Reject Any Or All Tenders.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EVERWYCK
INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)








Legal Notice

NOTICE

COMPASS ROSE
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— H}—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of COMPASS ROSE INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QuUI/NO.00 164

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising the Eastern portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21)
containing 26,120 square feet and originally granted to Crispin
Benjamin and being Crown Grant A4-63 situate Two thousand feet
east of Gladstone Road in the Gladstone Road Crown Allotments in
the Western District of the Island of New Providence

IN THE MATTER OF THE Quieting Title Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE Petition of
JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS

NOTICE

he Petition of JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS of Cambridge
Drive, South Beach in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, in respect of:-

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising the Eastern
portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21) containing 26,120 square
eet and originally granted to Crispin Benjamin and being Crown
Grant A4-63 situate Two thousand feet east of Gladstone Road in
he Gladstone Road Crown Allotments in the Western District of the
sland of New Providence which said piece parcel or lot of land
is bounded NORTHWARDLY by Lot Number Twenty-Two (22)
originally granted to Francis A. Garraway and running thereon Five
hundred and Seventy-Seven and Eighty-Five hundredths (577.85)
eet EASTWARDLY by Lot Number Twenty-Six (26) originally
granted to Rhonda Louis Wallace Wildgoose and running thereon
Six NUndred and Thirty-Four and Sixty hundredths (634.60) feet
SOUTHWARDLY by a Thirty (30) feet wide Road Reservation
nown as and called “Rocky Pine Road” separating it from Lot
umber Twenty (20) originally granted to Herbert Cleveland
Walkine and running thereon Five hundred and Seventy-Seven
and Eighty-Five hundredths (577.85) feet and SOUTHWARDLY
by the Western Portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21) originally
granted to Crispin Benjamin and running thereon Six hundred and
Thirty-Four and Sixty hundredths (634.60) feet; which said piece
parcel or lot of land has such position shape marks and dimensions
as are more particularly described and delineated on the diagram
or plan attached hereto and thereon coloured GREEN





JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS, claims to be the beneficial
owner in fee simple in possession of the parcel of land hereinbefore
described and such ownership arise by virtue of possession of the
said land.

Copies of the filled plan may be inspected during normal office
hours at:-

The Registry of the Supreme Court, Anasbacher House, East Street.
Nassau, Bahamas;

The Chambers of Richard L. Boodle & Co., 3° Floor, Columbus
House, East & Shirley Streets, Nassau, Bahamas

Notice is hereby given to any person(s) wishing to make a claim
shall do so by filing an Adverse Claim in the Supreme Court and
serving such Statement on the Petitioners or his Attorneys by the
30!" day after the last day on which on which this Notice appears
in the daily papers. Failure by any person to file and serve a
statement of such claim on or before the said date will operate as
a bar to such claim.

Reichard L, Boodle & Ca.
RICHARD L. BOODLE & CO.
Counsels €» Attorneys-At-Law
Chambers,

3" Floor, Columbus House
East & Shirley Street

Attorneys for the Petitioner



PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘Complete overhaul’ in public sector
needed to support financial services

FROM page 1B

process”.

Suggesting that the Govern-
ment needed to appoint one per-
son with the mandate and powers
to lead such a process, Mr Moree
said reform was necessary at
many different government
departments and agencies.

He explained: “There is an
interdependency between all the
different agencies, ministries and
departments within the Govern-
ment, and there has to be a com-
plete approach. Success is very
much linked to looking at the
whole; it does not lie in one
department. The solution lies in a
complete overhaul.”

YES YOU CAN

God got with his instrument and produced the book
“Yes You Can - A Bahamian Plan”.

The world seems to be waiting; every nation it has
touched is positively affected.

Did two leaders missed it, missed it to our
detriment!

We are still here to serve your accounting needs.
For a copy of “Yes You Can” and other services

Contact us at:- M.E. LOCKHART ACCOUNTING
Tel: 242-394-3565
Cell: 242-425-0650
P.O.Box N522

Email: elshagg @coralwave.com

NOTICE

COMAS RESEARCH LIMITED
Incorporated under the Companies Act, 1992
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
Registration Number 49, 961
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

TAKE NOTICE that a general meeting of the
members of the Company was held at the Chancellors
Chambers, Samana Hill, No. 14 Village Road
North, Nassau, The Bahamas on the 4th day of
December, 2006 at 10 o’clock in the afternoon for the
purpose of dissolving the Company and to appoint
Chancellors Corporate Services Limited, Liquidator
of the Company.

A Return nothing the said general meeting was reg-
istered with the Registrar of Companies on 15th day
of January A.D. 2007 and the company has been
dissolved and removed from the Register of
Companies as of the 11th day of December,
2008 A.D.

Chancellors Corporate Services Limited
Liquidator

a,
Real Estate

— fi aru 5
TR Tea Te AOTC ae i ied

Everywhere The Te) lv]













Tel: 502 2356

for ad rates

The Bahamas’ “test”, Mr
Moree suggested, was whether it
could translate reform rhetoric
into action, implementation and
execution when it came to the
financial services industry.

“Are we capable of doing this
process or, if not, will we go with
the status quo, the rhetoric and
not see any major reform and just
plod along,” he asked.

“That’s the test confronting the
country at the moment. Are we
able to move beyond the rhetoric
to implement the correct solu-
tions...... that put us in a proac-
tive mode to take on the compe-
tition and secure our part of the
marketplace?”

Mr Moree, though, praised the
Government’s plans to consoli-
date the various financial services
sector regulators into two bodies,
amalgamating the Securities
Commission, Compliance Com-
mission and Registrar of Insur-
ance’s Office into a single
Bahamas Financial Services
Authority by year’s end.

Although the Central Bank will
remain as a standalone entity ini-
tially, the final consolidation
phase will see its Bank Supervi-
sion Department merged into the
Authority to leave a solitary
‘super regulator’.

The senior attorney said the
regulatory consolidation would
eliminate bureaucracy and reduce
costs for financial institutions and
practitioners, and also enhance
the Bahamas’ competitive posi-
tion by removing overlaps and
differences in practice/procedures
between the existing supervisors.

“T think it’s extremely impor-
tant with regard to the future of
this jurisdiction,” Mr Moree said
of financial regulatory consolida-
tion. “One of the competitive
advantages we should have as a
small jurisdiction is that we
should be able to be less bureau-
cratic and maintain high stan-
dards of regulatory oversight —
without the bureaucracy you find
in larger countries.

“Hopefully, it will bring greater

efficiency, a reduction of costs,
less red tape, shorter waiting peri-
ods for permits and approvals. It
should create a more efficient reg-
ulatory force, which will
inevitably be beneficial for the
industry without compromising
the standard of oversight.”

And he added: “Hopefully, it
will also bring a more entrepre-
neurial approach to dealing with
regulatory issues where the regu-
lators, in the mode of the Cen-
tral Bank — which in my view is
doing a god job, with high stan-
dards, not overly bureaucratic —
are very responsive and prepared
to work with the industry in its
overall development.

“Tt’ll [the consolidation] result
in a more coherent set of poli-
cies, and certainly be easier to
navigate for those persons invest-
ed in the industry. It’ll be a flat
line approach, which will be eas-
ier for the industry to understand
and work with, and makes the
development and implementation
of policy much more efficient.

five years”, Mr Moree said.

With it “very important” that
the Bahamas escape the G-
20/OECD so-called ‘grey list’, and
respond to those organisations’
demands for greater tax trans-
parency and tax information
exchange, he added that it was
critical for the public and private
sectors to work on developing a
considered response “as opposed
to having knee jerk reactions to
these issues coming from these
agencies”.

The G-20 demands also meant
there was an opportunity for the
Government to work with the
Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB) and other private
sector groups on “a national plan
that focuses on this industry with
a concerted view to not only
securing and maintaining the
industry, but how to develop the
business and expand given the
realities of the marketplace that
we are facing”.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALVENS BELLOT of
SOLDIER ROAD, P.O. BOX EE-16851, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should

send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JUDITH FLEUREMY
of TREASURE CAY, ABACO, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JESSIKA LOUIS of SAPPHIRE
RIDGE DRIVE, PRINCE CHARLES, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6" day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

ENERGY SAVING
CONSULTANTS

=, . .
Cut Your Electiic Bill

©
Up To 49%)

* Tankless Water Heaters

«Compact Fluorescent Bulbs

* Energy Saving Capacitors for
Motors, A/C, Pumps etc.

* Fridgi-tech oil additive to increase A/C
efficiency

For more information or survey
Email: enengysavingsconsuttants @ hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121 Mea gees swe ste)



NOTICE OF SALE

The Rawson Court Condominium Owners Associvtion is
offering, pursuant to Registered Charges against the herentier
described condominium units, and the power of sale vested in
the Condominium Management Company pursuant to section 21
and the other provisions contained in the Law of Property &
Conveyancing (Condominium) Act 1965;

Uinkt G03
Linit (obs
Unit Crh

3 Bedroom / 3% Bathroom
3 Bedroom {3 Bathroom
3 Bedroom / 3 Bathroom

All offers should be in writing and tendered in seuled envelopes
to the offices of:

Cedric L Parker & Co,
Neil's Comet
No. 9 Rusty Bethel Drrve
Pa, Box Wo) 95s
Nassau, Bhanns
Alitention: Miss AUP. Fernander



ment, doing what is necessary to

“Tt will obviously eliminate
those areas in the past where
there was some conflict between
the procedures of different regu-
lators, when certain regulators
did one thing, and others did
another.

“It’s essential we execute this
and bring it in on time, and I
think that would be a big achieve-

TMT

For the stories

TRU C
Wr AS
on Mondays

rationalize this industry and put it
on a more stable footing.”

The financial services indus-
try’s position as the second largest
sector in the economy made it
“so vitally important to get it right
in developing our strategy for our
national plan in the next three to

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSELYNE DORTELY
of 5401 SW 12 STREET APT., 108 NORTH, FORT
LAUDERDALE, FL 33068 is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6th
day of July 6th, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN LOUVENS of
PALM BEACH STREET, P.O. BOX EE-19248, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



JOB ADVERTISEMENT

Position: Accountant

A local insurance agency seeks to fill the position of
Accountant. The scope of work is to head the Ac-
counting Operations in preparation of monthly, quar-
terly and annual reports; to keep and maintain all
financial documents and records according to the

directives coming from the President and the Board
of Directors to ensure the efficient management of
all Bank and general ledger accounts. The position
will also be expected to make recommendations to
management to maintain the company’s viability in a
highly competitive environment.

Required:

e University Degree in accounting;

¢ Professional qualifications e.g. CPA, ACCA, CA

e At least 3 years’ work experience as an
accountant;

¢ Good knowledge of English in writing, editing and
presenting;

* Strong interpersonal, organizational and
supervisory skills;

e¢ Demonstrated capacity to work under pressure,
meet deadlines and perform work of the highest
quality.

¢ Good computer and analytical skills.

Send cover letter and Curriculum Vitae to the follow-
ing address:

The Tribune

c/o Box # 81869
P.O. Box N 3207
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE: July 25, 2009 by 5pm





THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 PAGE 5B

OOOO BUSINESS OE
Manager wins profit

deal breach verdict
against developer

FROM page 1B

he was having with the Old
Bahama Bay organisation regard-
ing the possibility of another pro-
ject.

“(Skinner’s] concern was made
stronger by the fact that he was
not given a copy of the profit
sharing agreement signed in Feb-
ruary 2001. Only one copy of the
agreement was produced and
signed by the parties, which copy
[Mr Jervis] kept, with a promise
to make a copy for [Skinner].

“That promise was never kept.
Even at the signing of the agree-
ment the pages were not initialed
by the parties, thereby leaving a
fear in the respondent’s mind that
the uninitialled pages could be
changed. By chance, [Mr Skin-
ner] found the agreement in the
office of [Mr Jervis]. He made
himself a copy, and returned the
agreement to the secret reposi-
tory where it had been placed by
[Mr Jervis].”

Eventually, relations between
the two sides deteriorated to the
point where Mr Skinner was sum-
marily dismissed as project man-
ager for “alleged fraud and mis-
conduct” in relation to KST
Investments and the Shoreline
project on January 11, 2005. This
prompted the initial writ and
statement of claim to the
Supreme Court, seeking damages
for breach of employment con-
tract and the profit sharing agree-
ment.

Noting that the burden of proof
rested with employers when it
came to justifying summary dis-
missals of employees and termi-
nation of their contracts, the
Court of Appeal said Mr Jervis’s
and KST Investments’ case lay
on three grounds:

e¢ That Mr Skinner allegedly
cost them $42,486 by charging
materials and costs used in reno-
vating his home at No. 3 Shore-
line to them, and falsifying the
books and records

¢ Using Shoreline’s credit
account with Dolly Madison for
personal use between May 1999
and December 2004

¢ Obtaining a plasma screen
TV from a Shoreline trade cus-
tomer for personal use without
an accounting

The Court of Appeal judgment
recorded that Mr Jervis had
argued that none of this, and the
use of KST Investments’ funds,
had been authorised — a matter so
grave that it justified the summa-
ry dismissal and end to the profit
sharing agreement.

However, then-acting Justice
Norris Carroll dismissed the alle-
gations about the house, finding
that as Mr Jervis lived next door,
it would have been impossible for
him not to have known about the
renovations. Mr Skinner was also
absent in South Africa, meaning it
would have been impossible to
conceal the work, and the judge
dismissed the evidence of various
witnesses as they all still worked
for KST Investments.

The allegations over the Dolly
Madison account and plasma TV
were also dismissed in the
Supreme Court. Mr Jervis and
KST Investments appealed
against the wrongful dismissal
verdict, but the Court of Appeal,
stating that it was loathe to inter-
fere with a trial judge’s findings of
fact — given that he had seen the
witnesses testify — found that
there as evidence aplenty to sup-
port the lower court’s conclusions.

The Court of Appeal found
that in assessing the evidence, the
Supreme Court was “faced with
the uncontroverted evidence”
surrounding Mr Jervis’s “recti-
tude” in his relationship and busi-
ness dealings with Mr Skinner —
his reluctance to provide him with

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



a copy of the Profit Share Agree-
ment despite repeated requests
and Mr Skinner’s entitlement; the
failure to disclose KST Invest-
ments’ existence and the fact it
employed Mr Skinner.

“Thirdly, [Mr Jervis] had, with-
out the knowledge, consent or
approval of Mr Skinner, been
using funds from the Shoreline
development account, which had
been opened fro the business in
accordance with the Profit Shar-
ing Agreement, and was in the
name of KST Investments, to
fund [Mr Jervis’s] private busi-
ness in Colorado without account-
ing for them,” the Court of
Appeal found. “Again, this fact,
uncontroverted, was discovered
by [Mr Skinner].

“Fourthly, [Mr Jervis] had,
without the knowledge, consent
or approval of [Mr Skinner], been
using the funds from the same
Shoreline development account
to take care of the personal needs
of his father and his other per-
sonal financial obligations, such as
his investment in Old Bahama
Bay, without accounting for

them.”

The Court of Appeal added:
“When all these were brought to
the attention of [Mr Jervis] in
court, his answer was that the
company was his company, imply-
ing that the accounts and all the
monies therein belonged to him
and so he did not have to account
to [Mr Skinner] for such expen-
diture.

“He had forgotten that those
funds belonged to the Shoreline
development, which accounts
were to be the subject of audit
under the Profit Sharing Agree-
ment by the accounting firm of
Pricewaterhouse, for the purpose
of distribution of profits between
him and [Mr Skinner].”

The Court of Appeal found
that, under the Profit-Sharing
Agreement, Mr Skinner had the
right to see and know how Shore-
line’s accounts were being oper-
ated, so he could determine his
share of the profits. Yet these
were kept from him, the court
finding that no audit was done as
contemplated under the Profit
Sharing Agreement, and that Mr

Bratish Liskomal Halter Hotel

Clearance

SALE

New Stock also on Sale
Everything for $20

Until the end of July
Free parking at the Hilten
P.0.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahanias
Tel! 242-329-1865
Email: gems-peais hota oon





GN-876

Works & Transport

NORTH ACKLINS ROAD
REHABILITATION

Tender Publication No.: FIR/207/15/1 (GOB)

Jervis “had no intention” of let-
ting him see the financials, instead
offering Mr Skinner a lump sum
payment whenever the profits sit-
uation was discussed.

The Court of Appeal also
determined whether the Profit
Sharing Agreement had come to
an end with Mr Skinner’s dis-
missal, as Mr Jervis contended it
had. Harvey Tynes QC, repre-
senting Mr Skinner, said the
grounds relied upon by Mr Jervis
and his company to terminate the
agreement had been rejected, and
the parties’ intent was contained
in its clause four. This said the
Profit Sharing Agreement was
“irrevocable” until the last lot and
house in Shoreline was sold.

The Court of Appeal found
that in addition to the $250,000
share of outstanding profits
awarded to Mr Skinner by the
Supreme Court, he was also enti-
tled to damages for breach of the
Profit Sharing Agreement. The
amount of damages to be award-
ed, the court said, should be cal-
culated on the fact that Shoreline
currently has 60 complete homes
and, when fully built-out, will
have 76.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

HIGH KICK PRODUCTIONS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 of the International Business Companies
Act No. 45 of 2000, HIGH KICK PRODUCTIONS
LIMITED, has been dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registrar General on the 29th day of
June, 2009.

Andium Trust Company Limited,

of 12-14 David Place, St. Helier,
Jersey JE2 4TD
Liquidator

To atlvertise in The
Tribune - the #1 newspaper
in circulation, just call
002-2371 today!



eo coat seta asertelloyseetaets

Opportunities

Do you love working ina fas [ “pace d.

challenging environment:

Are you a Con fident communicator, with a
passion to work with a professional Team?

If you want to know more, Let's Talk!

We are seeking qualified persons to fill the following positions:

¢ Senior Graphic Designer

® Sales Associate

* Accounts Control Officers



EUROPEAID/128742/M/WKS/BS (EU)

The Government of The Bahamas intends to award a works
contract for the rehabilitation of the Queen’s Highway on Acklins.
The works contract consists in the rehabilitation and provision
of periodic maintenance (pavement patching and sealing) for
about 32.3 miles (approx. 52 km) of a two-lane single carriageway
road (Queen’s Highway. About 290,000 square yards of the road
pavement will require patching and sealing maintenance, and
about 100,000 square yards of the road pavement will require the
replacement of the base course layer and the placement of a new
surface seal.

The works are co-financed by the Government of The Bahamas
and the 9th European Development Fund.

The Tender dossier is available for inspection and purchase at
the following address:

Department of Public Works

of the Ministry of Works and Transport,
John F. Kennedy Drive,

1st Floor, East Wing

Nassau, (N.P.), The Bahamas

Tel.: +242-322-4830

Fax: +242-326-7344

Sealed Tender Submissions are to be deposited in the Tender Box
located at:

Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

3rd Floor

Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tender submissions will be received no later than 4:00pm, Monday,
24th August, 2009. Any tender received after this deadline will
not be considered.

Tenders are invited to attend the Tender opening at 10am Tuesday,
25th August, 2009 at the Tenders Board.

Possible additional information or clarifications/questions shall
be published on the EuropeAid website:
http://ec.ouropa.eu/europeaid/work/funding/index_en.htm
(Select Contracts link) and will be communicated in writing to
all tenderers.

Signed,
PERMANENT SECRETARY

* Retail Sales Manager

* Showroom Floor Assistant

For more information On each position, please ViSil COLLIE website page

www.furnitureplus.com/careers

Plus Group of Companies is an established Bahamian owned group

that is growing and continuing to build its team of professionals in

Various areas.

We offer a competitive salary and benefits package as well as ongoing

profess i On al tral n i Te a na d evelop ment.

Nassau * Grand Bahama * World Wide Web

Please submit your application by Mail to:
Director of Human Resources

Or email: Ik ibs t h epluserp.ct mm

We thank all applicants, however only thease

selected for an interview will be contacted,



The Plus Group

FP ©. Box N713, Nassau, Bahamas



MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009





The stories behind the news

INSIGHT



Voluntary oppression

Bm By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

he adult Bahamian: sim-

ple, dull-witted, not qual-

ified to make indepen-

dent decisions, incapable

of moderating his or her
responses to stimuli. A helpless crea-
ture that must be led by the hand at all
times.

It would be difficult to imagine a
person thus described not taking
offence. Yet everyone who lives in
this country puts up with it in some
form on an almost daily basis, for the
most part without protest.

Examples of this can be gleaned
from virtually all aspects of public life,
but nowhere is it more palpable than
in the government’s control over the
ideas we consume, as embodied in the
Play and Film Control Board’s power
to ban films and the Immigration
Department’s ability to bar perform-
ing artists from entering the country.

AN HISTORICAL

PERSPECTIVE

Censorship in the Bahamas is often
justified as necessary for the preser-
vation of rather ambiguous priorities
such as public morality, public order,
the public interest, even public health.
Indeed, some of these phrases feature
in the law which governs the suppres-
sion of ideas and opinions.

We are by no means unique in this
respect. Censorship has been around
for as long as democracy has existed.
For almost as long, it been recognised
for what it usually is: the portrayal of
the public as in need of protection
from itself, as a means for those in
power to reinforce their positions.

The philosopher Socrates was put to
death by the world’s very first demo-
cratic society for bucking heads with
the authorities over these very ques-
tions of information and control. He
became the first in a long line of
learned men to defend the notion that
individuals should be free to receive
and impart ideas.

English poet John Milton under-
stood well the assumptions that under-
lie the notion of censorship. In 1644 he
wrote his famous defence of free
expression, the Areopagitica, in
response to a newly enacted censor-
ship law. He exhorted parliament to
"consider what Nation it is whereof
ye are, and whereof ye are the gover-
nors: a Nation not slow and dull, but of
a quick, ingenious and piercing spirit,
acute to invent, subtle and sinewy to
discourse, not beneath the reach of
any point, the highest that human
capacity can soar to."

Milton wrote that the absolute free-
dom to impart and receive ideas is
vital for the increase of knowledge
and the progress of a people. Having
supported the anti-monarchists in the
English Civil War, Milton was a fierce
advocate of democracy who believed
the public was the only legitimate
earthly sovereign; a sentiment that the
Bahamas is supposed to be a natural
heir to, as one of the oldest parlia-
mentary democracies in the world.

The intensely God-fearing poet who
gave us the poem, “Paradise Lost”,
also understood that personal moral-
ity is a question to be struggled with by
individuals and supported the view
that citizens should take their faith
“into their own hands again."

He warned religious leaders who
attempt to suppress the free expres-
sion of ideas because they fear “new
and dangerous opinions,” that think-
ing themselves the defenders of the

Long after most civilised nations have cast off the yoke of censorship,
Bahamians continue to be told what they can and cannot see and hear.
This in turn has allowed a privileged few to ensure that their opinions
always take priority. But by failing to take a stand against the suppression
of their rights, members of the public can blame no one but themselves

for this situation. INSIGHT reports...

faith, they will end up becoming “the
persecutors.”

JUSTICE MAXWELL, RACISM

AND THE CENSORS

“New and dangerous opinions”
have often been the target of censor-

ship in the Bahamas. But what seems
new and dangerous to one generation
often ends up being viewed a vital cat-
alyst for progress by the next.
Consider the example of the late
Justice Maxwell Thompson, who as a
young man founded the Citizens Com-



mittee in Nassau to fight racial dis-
crimination.

When Justice Thompson died in
2003, his obituary recounted how in
the late 1940s, his committee agitated
against the policy of the City Garden
Club of banning non-whites from its

premises, and “also prevailed on the
Governor to revoke a decision by the
Censor Board to deny the showing of
the film ‘No Way Out’, in which Sid-
ney Poitier starred” and which
denounced racially driven violence in
particular and irrational hatred in gen-
eral.

Why would the members of the
Censor Board want to ban such a
film? Perhaps they felt a public show-
ing of a movie in which a conscien-
tious and caring black doctor is
harassed, threatened, beaten and
almost killed by white men in some
southern American backwater town
might constitute a threat to the peace
in a majority black colony run by the
descendants of white British men.

At the same time, however, there
were certain aspects of the film’s mes-
sage, in the context of the changing
attitudes of the time, which might have
caused anxiety for one social group
in particular.

Justice Thompson's early accom-
plishments led to the formation of the
Bahamas People's Party, of which he
was chairman. His obituary says: "This
time, however, was the age of the
"McCarthy Communist Witch Hunt’
and they were accused of being Com-
munist because as Max said — 'every-
thing that was new and unfamiliar was
called Communist. Emotion was run-
ning quite high and the mere mention
of the word was hushed’."

An anti-racism movement could
only be equated with communism by a
power structure peopled by individu-
als astonishingly ignorant of the mean-
ing of both terms, or who out of anxi-
ety over their own positions, either
consciously or unconsciously conflate
a trend that they see as a threat to
their interests with the dominant inter-
national bogeyman of the day.

RIGHTEOUS INDIGNATION

In the present-day Bahamas, just as
in Milton’s time, “the persecutors” are
often inspired by notions of religious
fervor. Pry loose any particular
instance of censorship, and you are
very likely to find a zealot of some
description crawling about beneath it.

Religious leaders have worked
closely with the Control Board, and
often consult with Immigration offi-
cials on whether a particular per-
forming artist should be allowed into
the country.

There is, of course, nothing contro-
versial in Christian terms about the
public being viewed as “the flock” in
need of someone to lead it about,
although how some pastors have man-
aged to commandeer the role of “the
Good Shepherd” for themselves is an
interesting question.

In any case, every Bahamian is enti-
tled to ask what right pastors have

SEE page 8B

CP TOYOTA moving forward
Land Cruiser Prado 4 X 4

ee =
SEE

27L4 aL

4.0L Vé

3.0L turbo diesel
eee ithe ee ete ee Mest et
* air conditioning

immobiliser and remote Trott Ca
alloy wheels and Peta] yet a)

ABS brakes

dual Tiers ts Es

ty

siete tie eer ts ees Ae CMs a emis ees a
EMD edi atch

EXECUTI VE rn Man to Fr b at

Ser MPR CE A era TENT a(re iit tte
Parts and service Guaranteed

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER

ON-THE-SPOT au Pe ah es et ane i ee Re hep lla te ae Ps ed peg,





PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Voluntary oppression

FROM page 12

involving themselves in deci-
sions concerning the rights of
citizens in a democracy in which
religious freedom is constitu-
tionally enshrined. Surely, if
they are keen to exert their
righteousness upon a captive
audience, they already have one
in the form of their congrega-
tion.

Yet far from minding their
own business, religious leaders
are actually demanding more
say in what we are not allowed
to see and hear. Just last year,
the Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil demanded the right to screen
all films and musical acts before
they are allowed into the coun-
try. How individuals who have
neither been elected by the pub-
lic nor appointed by Cabinet
can come to imagine they have
the right to hold such sway con-
tinues to be a mystery.

Concerns about the erosion
of our freedoms aside, it would
be terrifying development for
this country if our musical
choices were to be limited to











Vacant kat 4147
(10,5579. P-Munininers

Or & Rey West Lame
Southern Heights sub
(Appraised Value
$90, 00000)

Unit #6 (409sq. &) one
{1) Bedroom, Eathroom,

hing, dining room &
fitcheneWest Bay St
Westward Villas Soh
Bogen Agger cnne nie”
[Appraised Vallee
$125,000.00)

Lat [S0°xi00"]
wGuilding 1,912sq. ft
Deweaus St (Appraised
Valae $189 000.00)

Lot 429 2 430,
{20'«100), Bik #47
wf Guilding 1,140sq. ft
Matthew St, Nassau
Village (Appraised
Value $145,000.00)

Late 45 & #6
(150x100) wyhse
Stiver Palm Lis inperial
Park (Appraiied Value
$313,651.00)

Lat #125 (50'90"]
whe 1.3428q, f-
Sunflower [south]
Sunshine Park Sub Hse
#2 [Appralsed Value
$139,000.00)

Lat #11 (107 61007)
wihse Z.026ey. -Sunset
Radec Or, Sunset Ridge
Sub Hse #28 (uppradsed
Value $206,000.00)

Andros
Beach fromt lor 9 0008q
Pt wy building 2,10¢sq
ft=Pinders #tangrove
Cay Andros (Appralsed
Value $200,000.00)
Lat 4-454) fh, wy idaplex
tileling 1,1 74aq. Mh-
Presh Creek Anelros
(Appraised Value
$04, 040.00)
Coren Hea herrea
10. Lot #20 717,150sq. fr]

wie F.O003q, I

Bike &, Section #2-Sra
Gull br, Bahama Reef
Yacht & Country Club
Suh Grand Bahama

[Appraised Valine
$250,000.00)

Vacant lot #29, Blk #9

(14,59 7so. ft]-
Yorkshire Dr, Bakamia
Wiest Replat Gramd

Wessels

what the Christian Council con-
siders acceptable — for reasons
of taste, if nothing else.

A MATTER OF OPINION

All too often, this is exactly
what censorship comes down to
— mere questions of taste, dif-
ferences of perspective. Take
for example the most recent
film to get the axe — Brokeback
Mountain.

Members of the Play and
Films Control Board made it
clear they objected to the level
of homosexual content and reli-
gious leaders supported them
energetically.

Yet at no point did anyone
bother to explain or demon-
strate exactly how homosexu-
ality threatens the public inter-
est. Many intelligent and
accomplished citizens of this
country would disagree vehe-
mently with this view, and argue
that a greater acceptance of dif-
fering lifestyles and an increase
in the level of tolerance in gen-
eral would go a long way in
remedying some of the social
ills we all recognise; for example

rttl

Bahama (Apprainedd
Value £2 5.000.00)
12. Vacant Lot #6 Blk #12
Unit #3 [12 50sq. &.]
Henny Ave Derby Sub
Gram Bahaitia
(Appraised Value
$65,000.00)
13. Lot 4s B 1002 50)
wfhse & Duplex: Nelson
Rid Poinclana Gardens
Gram Bahai
(Appraised Value
$9600 0}
14. Lot #37 (50x01 50")
wi stoplex 2 storey
Apartrmcart build ing A
Chireh 540065 ft-
Martin Town, Kits Suk
Eteht Mile Rock Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $211,200.00]
15. Lorw/ lt peom hoerel
5,0. fh, cn 4.94
“ores af beach front-
High Rock Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $1, 100.000.0004
14. Wacant kot #13, Blk #59,
Urvit #3 [22.7 528q, F.)
45° of canal fremne-
Dagenham Circle &
[ngrave Dr Emerald Bay
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$110,000.00)
Lot A415, Bik #15 Unit
#9 (90'xt25')-Derby
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$23,000 0 }
Wacant kit ¥25, Blk #15
(17, Bb6eq. A.)
Cotwater Ln Shannon
Country Club Sub Grand
Bahama [Appraised
Value $28,000.00)
19, Loraz [20,00009. te)
Wi THildbing Goneplex &
aun romat-
Highway
Holmes Rock
Commmanage Cima
Bahania (Appraised
Value $176,600,00)
Abaco
0. Lotrsd E65 00eq. ft.)
wh tripbes foundation
2.7 88a. th-Miephy
Town Abaca

violence and domestic abuse.

Both sides are entitled to
their opinion, of course, but
what qualifications do members
of the Play and Films Control
Board and officials of the Immi-
gration Department — not to
mention members of the Chris-
tian Council — possess that
prove them capable of deciding
between opposing views on so
controversial an issue?

Do they all possess academic
backgrounds in the fine arts and
the skills necessary to perceive
exactly what messages a partic-
ular film or musical perfor-
mance will convey to an audi-
ence? Are they also psycholo-
gists, capable of apprehending
the exact effect a particular pro-
duction will have on viewers?
Perhaps most importantly, are
they accomplished linguists,
capable of untangling the vari-
ous subtleties of meaning con-
tained in vague concepts as
“public morality” and “the pub-
lic good”?

A list of all the musical acts
denied the right to perform in
the Bahamas would be hard to

| BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
P.O. Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel:(242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fax:(242) 327-3047, 327-1238
www.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com

(Appraised Value
$24,096,000)
Vacant lot 94 (2 acres)
Fox Town Abaco
(Appraised Waloc
50, ono.00]
Lot 451 [15,00 thy
wbuilding-Morpay
“Toa AC
(Appraised Value
S102 420.00)
Portion of lor #69
(15,00
Murphy Town Abacos
(Appraised Valae
$25,250.00)
Lot #35 [6,9008q. ft |
iding-M arp
Tern Albvatip
(Appraised Value
$e2, 075.00)
Lot #45 [60° x1L6o'}
W144 pm neon!
S906, M-Randy Pent
Abecd (Appraiped
Value $465, 700.00)
Lot @7,120sy. Pe wt
cottages & 1 storage
hulbding, botaling
4,1 féaq, f-hand Ranks
Treasure Cz
(Appraised Value
SH00 308.00)
Eleuthera
Vacant portion of lor #7
[50's 20" pwc Paones.
Cistern Eleuthera
(Appraised Value
$18,000.00]
Cae [band

Vacant 6&5 acres at

eg. fh -Prant 59

iy Alueen

land-Arthii’s Town, Cat
lshend (Appraised
Value $90, 00000)
Lot w/12 room mobel
1.39 acres Jirthur's
Town Cat blared
(Appraised Vale
$630 10000)
Exuma
Vacant bot #8 (65.200sq
te )«Moge Town Exuma
(Appraised Value
$110,188.00)
FL Lot (3040055 fe} wy
somal beorbel 4,5: 20sq. Fe
& exclusive beach
Fortes Hill Esxocma
(Appraised Valae
$1,400, 000,00)
EY. Vacant lot #95
(80's122"] Commodore
Red Elizabeth Harbor
Est Eine (Appraised

come by, but some of the films
banned by the board over the
years suggest the existence none
of these qualities in past mem-
bers.

Among them was the 1975
masterpiece “One Flew Over
the Cuckoo's Nest”, the first
film in history to win all five
major Academy Awards. Yet
the censors ruled that it had
“nothing to offer” the Bahami-
an people — a choice of words
eerily similar to the judgment
pronounced on Brokeback
Mountain.

EVOLVING STANDARDS

The banning of “Cuckoo’s
Nest” and another great film,
“Dog Day Afternoon”, in the
first year of the board’s exis-
tence prompted a speech
denouncing censorship by
Michael Symonette to the
Rotary Club of Nassau.

He said: "The Censorship
Board should recognise that in
this year of 1976, human sexu-
ality or the use of certain words
in the vernacular of nearly
everyone, no longer constitute
the sole basis for the wielding of
sanctimonious moral judgments.

“The board made an absurd
mistake in banning these two
films. . . I believe that the nar-
rowness of the censor's view —a
view which seems limited to dis-
covering four-letter words and
the more explicit manifestations
of sex, and which continues to
pass without murmur films of
almost inconceivable violence
— must be subject to stringent
re-examination.

“Tam also puzzled by the sort
of mind that believes it is per-
fectly all right to witness tor-
ture and murder on the screen
but finds that there is something
shameful about love-making. I
believe that the intelligent
members of our generation
today have established a new
code of moral values more
moral than the old one, more
honest as well, and assuredly
less hypocritical."

The evolution of moral and
social standards has affected
censorship around the world.
In Britain, the ability to ban
writings and theatrical produc-
tions was established by the
Licensing Order of 1643, an Act

imposing pre-publication cen-
sorship and prompting Milton
to write the Areopagitica.

Outright censorship in the
UK was ended by the Theatre
Act of 1968, which calls for the
classification of all films and
productions, and the setting cer-
tain age restrictions for audi-
ence members where appropri-
ate.

In the United States, there
never has been a national licens-
ing authority for films and per-
formances, as the industry cre-
ated its own regulatory body in
an effort to ward off govern-
ment meddling following the
advent of sound in films, which
prompted a public cry for
stricter standards.

Beginning in the 1920s, local
regulations were adopted by
some states, however the 1952
Supreme Court case, Joseph
Burstyn, Inc v Wilson put an
end to this by ruling that to for-
bid the showing of a non-
licensed film or to refuse a
licence to any film judged to be
"sacrilegious," was a "restraint
on freedom of speech" and
therefore a violation of the First
Amendment.

Meanwhile, standards of
morality changed over time, and
the industry’s self-regulatory
body, the Motion Picture Asso-
ciation of America, adopted a
rating system which does not
allow for the banning of any
film.

This has been the trend
around the world in the film
industry. Exceptions include
various Islamic Fundamentalist
regimes and a diverse collection
of tin-pot dictatorships — and,
of course, the Bahamas.

One notable member of this
group is Australia, where cen-
sorship, including banning of
films, has become progressively
more severe since new legisla-
tion was passed in the 1990s.

This trend has prompted out-
rage from members of the pub-
lic. Even Janet Strickland, Chief
Censor from 1979 to 1986 spoke
out against it. In 1996, she was
quoted by the Sydney Morning
Herald as saying: "Why is it that
we are not allowed to be
shocked and offended? Where
is it written? It's good to be
shocked and offended...If we

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF
NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having claims or demands against the above-named
Estate are requested to send the same duly certified to

the undersigned on or before G August 200%,

AND NTOICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of
the late NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON will be
distributed among the persons entitled thereto having
regard only to the claims of which the Authorized
Officer of the Estate shall then have had Notice.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CU),
Athena's for the Executens
Chambers
Sassoon Howse
Shirbey Street & Victoria Awenie
P.O), Bow f-272
Klass, Gahwamias.

NOTICE

ESTATE OF HUBERT ARNOLD FARRINGTON,
late of Twynam Avenue and Yonder Road in the Island
of New Providence

ASSETS

20 (1906) Roboks Vessel ws 15 HP Bvinrede engine

se] (MÂ¥ Buddy)
Sports Vessel (Hull Only)

(1980) with (2) Folws Diesel engine (weet Oharionte]
L22' Simale Screw Steel Hull (1960) MÂ¥ Liza | Ill
vessel has a new engine reqairing imetallation. And
can be view af Bradford Marine. Grand Bahar

2) Desoe Marin
982 | Defender Vessel [

peeael (Sweet Dreams)
Leen Vashti|

(1) 03 Bent
(1) 94 Fore

(1] 92 Mack Treck

Value §45,000.00)
33. Lot #194 (7S eS"

wy two storey buikding

George Town, Bxumea

[Appraised Value

S460, 8 0)

Â¥ehitles
aravan
aicorer
(1) 97 Dodge Strabes

[2] 01 Kitchen Tandem Cheroker Trader
[1] 01 Kia Bus 12 Seater

(1) 8? LT@000 Bord Boom Truck

(1) 99 Ford F250 Trock

[1) 9? Double Ade Hack Gamp Track
(00 97 Daeble ode Mock Dimp Trick
(1) Fond Ranger Trock

(1) 2? Ford LaO00 Drill Truck
(Carmichael Rid]

The public & imeited te submit Segled bids marked “Tender” to Bahamas Development Bank, P.O. Bow M-3034,
Mecwu, Bohomes attention Finamcial Combrolber, faced bids will not be accepted of telephone 327-572) for

fal inforniation Please note that all bk onthe afereiienbianed properties and asdets chuauld by piceieid
by oF om July 17, 2009. The Bahars Developareet Bank reserves Che right to reject any or all offers. All assets

are sobd as iis.



Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are required to send their
names, addresses and particulars of the debts or claims
certified in writing to the undersigned on or before the
Sth August, A.D., 2009 required to prove such debts or
claims, or in default be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made before such debts or claims are proved;
after the above date the Executor will distribute the assets
having regard only to the proved debts or claims of which
he shall have had notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to
the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
before 5th August, 2009.

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for the Executor
Mareva House
4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas



have nothing that makes us feel
shocked, how do we know what
our value system is?”

THE LEGITIMACY

QUESTION

The question of the legitima-
cy of censorship was actually
raised by the Bahamas Minis-
ter of Home Affairs Darrell
Rolle following the enactment
of the Theatre and Cinemas
Act, 1975, which established the
Play and Film Control Board.

He said: "Admittedly the
question of censorship of plays
and films has always been and
will continue to be a matter for
public discussion. There are
those who maintain that the
state has no right to impose
restrictions on what a citizen
may or may not be allowed to
see."

"Yet each of us as members
of society has delegated the
right to lay down a code of con-
duct which will safeguard the
public good, uphold public
order, health and morality. It is
for this reason that our laws
make it an offence for one to
be drunk in a public place or to
use obscene language to the
annoyance of another and sim-
ilar petty offences. The point
being that in all these cases we
have taken this course of action
because we see the need to
establish in society a norm, a
standard of conduct, if you like,
which is in the interest of society
as a whole and indirectly in the
interest of each individual which
comprises it.”

Well, I am one member of
society who does not remem-
ber renouncing the right to reg-
ulate my own behaviour. I am
aware that the politicians we
elect and pay are obliged to cre-
ate and enforce laws that pro-
tect our rights and freedoms,
and the examples Mr Rolle
gives could fall under this cate-
gory. If public drunkenness and
obscenity are, as he suggested,
of annoyance to others, then it
can at least be argued that these
actions qualify as offences, in
that they impinge upon the right
of other citizens to exist in an
environment free of harassment
and hostility.

The banning of certain films
and performances, on the other
hand, cannot be plausibly justi-
fied in this way, because, for
one thing, the ban does not pun-
ish individuals for actions
already committed, but rather
for actions which might
arguably result from viewing
certain material. It is the equiv-
alent of banning alcohol out-
right because public drunken-
ness might result from it.

Such laws follow the same
rationale as former President
Bush's doctrine of preemptive
war: hit them before they do
anything wrong, because we
can't guarantee that they won't.
It is worse than finding a man
guilty without trial; it is finding
him guilty before he has com-
mitted the offence.

Such a law is arguably not a
law at all, particularly in a coun-
try where the constitution guar-
antees that each one of us is
presumed innocent until proven
guilty. This is a fundamental
right, and there can be no justi-
fication for curtailing it.

If, after watching a violent
film or play, an individual
engages in violence or threats
of violence, that person should
feel the full weight of the law
descend upon him. Likewise, if
anyone under the age of 18 is
caught in the audience of a film
rated for adults, the police
should throw the book at the
cinema manager.

But no one has the right to
assume that I may react in a
certain way without convincing
evidence to support this view.
Nor does anyone have the right
to include me in their scheme of
collective punishment.

THE PUBLIC’S SILENCE

Censorship is born out of the
desire to control others. It is
fueled by fear and arrogance —
the fear of those with power
that society will become some-
thing they don't approve of, and
the arrogance of those who
believe they have the right to
make choices for others.

Around 200 years after Mil-
ton died, another giant of Eng-
lish literature was still fighting
for the cause of freedom of
expression. But according to
George Orwell, censorship is
not the fault of those with pow-
er. He believed that the most
“sinister fact” about the control
of ideas in the society in which
he lived, was that it was “large-
ly voluntary.”

Could the same not be said
of us?

What do you think?
pnunez@tribunemedia.net



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009, PAGE 9B



INSIGHT



Jackson, healthy or not?
Depends on who’s talking

LOS ANGELES (AP) — In
his final days, Michael Jackson
was robust and active. Or dan-
gerously thin and frail. Begging
for access to powerful prescrip-
tion drugs. Or showing no signs
of ever having used them.

It depends on who’s talking.

A dizzying collection of puz-
zle pieces about Jackson’s
health and habits has come to
light since his death on June 25.
With as much as a month before
a toxicology report determines
the cause, more are sure to
emerge.

Each is likely to fuel further
speculation. None is sure to pro-
duce a satisfying conclusion.

Some who knew him even
seem to contradict themselves.

Here’s what’s known so far:

e During his final rehearsal
at the Staples Center, Jackson
was captured on video doing his
signature moonwalk and dance
spins. Randy Phillips, CEO of
concert promoter AEG Live,
told CNN he was “a healthy,
vibrant human being.”

e Phillips later told ABC con-
cert organisers feared that Jack-
son was losing weight and show-
ing signs of wear and tear. He
said he hired a staffer whose
purpose was to remind Jackson
to eat.

e Dr Arnold Klein, Jackson’s
dermatologist, who said he last
saw Jackson less than a week
before he died, told CNN’s Lar-
ry King that the singer was in
“very good physical condition,”
in “a very good mood,” and
“was very happy.”

¢ Klein also told CNN that
he had given Jackson the
painkiller Demerol but warned
him about using the powerful
sedative Diprivan. He also con-

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



VISITORS watch a Michael Jackson video on a huge screen at a Tower
Records store in downtown Tokyo...

firmed that Jackson was a for-
mer drug addict who went to
rehab in England.

e “The Incredible Hulk” star
Lou Ferrigno, who was helping
Jackson prepare for a planned
series of London concerts, told
The Associated Press that he
never saw Jackson take drugs,

(AP Photo: Shizuo Kambayashi)

act aloof or speedy, and the
singer wasn’t frail when he last
saw him at the end of May.
“T’ve never seen him look bet-
ter,” he said.

e Two of Jackson’s former
confidants, medium Uri Geller
and ex-bodyguard Matt Fiddes,
said they tried in vain to keep




NOTICE




ESTATE OF DOROTHY FORGIE EVANS

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having

claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certified to the
undersigned on or before 9th August 2009.

AND NTOICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of

the late:

DOROTHY FORGIE EVANS

will be

distributed among the persons entitled thereto having
regard only to the claims of which the Authorized
OÂ¥fcer of the Estate shall then have had Notice.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & O01)
Attomers for the Executors
Chambers
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue

(P.O, Box N-272
Massan, Palwirnas.

Between the evening of Tuesday June 22nd and the morning of
Wednesday June 23rd, a 1993 Ford Taurus vehicle was broken
into, while parked in a residential area off Mermaid Blvd, off
Carmichael Road. The police have been contacted regarding this
matter, but we need your help, in assisting further, in locating two
very valuable items that were stolen at this time. Description
of the items are as follows:

Two (2) sets of AUTOMOTIVE SCAN TOOLS. - They will
individually be housed in large black cases, please see

pictures below:

the pop superstar from abusing
prescription drugs. Geller said
he suffered a terrible falling-out
with Jackson over the issue, but
not before he had to “shout at
Michael, to scream at Michael”
in an effort to confiscate the
singer’s stocks of medication
during his travels in England.

e The drug Diprivan, an anes-
thetic widely used in operating
rooms to induce unconscious-
ness, was found in Jackson’s res-
idence, a law enforcement offi-
cial told the AP. Also known
as Propofol, the drug is given
intravenously and is very unusu-
al to have in a private home.

e Cherilyn Lee, a registered
nurse, told the AP she repeat-
edly rejected his demands for
Diprivan. But a frantic phone
call she received from Jackson
four days before his death made
her fear that he somehow
obtained Diprivan or another
drug to induce sleep.

e Akon, the Senegalese R&B
singer and producer with whom
Jackson recently recorded
songs, told Billboard.com that
“Michael is just one of the
healthiest people that I know.
He was pressuring me to stay
healthy, like, ‘Akon, eat right.
What are you doing out there
on the road? Are you eating?
Are you exercising? Are you
drinking a lot of water?”

¢ Klein said Jackson had been
suffering from lupus — a chron-
ic disease where the immune
system attacks the body’s own
tissue — and a skin disorder
known as vitiligo.

e Jackson’s personal physi-

cian, Dr Conrad Murray,
administered CPR on Jackson’s
bed, rather than a hard surface,
“with his hand behind his back
to provide the necessary sup-
port” because the singer was so
frail, the doctor’s attorney,
Edward Chernoff, said.

¢ Chernoff also told the AP
that Murray never gave or pre-
scribed Jackson the painkillers
Demerol or OxyContin, and
said the doctor didn’t give the
pop star any drugs that con-
tributed to his death.

e Among other things, Mur-
ray’s lawyers have acknowl-
edged it took up to 30 minutes
for paramedics to be summoned
to Jackson’s home after he was
found unresponsive.

e Jackson’s family requested
a private autopsy in part
because of questions about
Murray’s role, the Rev Jesse
Jackson has said.

e Kevin Mazur, a photogra-
pher documenting the Staples
Center rehearsals for a tour
book, told the AP that Jackson

looked in perfect health. “He
was very upbeat, very happy,
having a good time with the
dancers,” Mazur said.

e Spiritual teacher Dr Deep-
ak Chopra told the AP he had
been concerned since 2005 that
Jackson was abusing painkillers
and spoke to the pop star about
suspected drug use as recently
as six months ago. Chopra said
Jackson, a longtime friend, per-
sonally asked him for painkillers
in 2005; Chopra said he refused.

e Los Angeles police chief
William Bratton said detectives
are looking at his prescription
drug history and trying to talk
with his numerous former doc-
tors. He also says police are
waiting for the coroner’s report
before ruling out any possibili-
ties in their “comprehensive and
far-reaching” probe, which
includes the Drug Enforcement
Administration and the state
attorney general’s office.

— Associated Press writer
Michael R Blood contributed to
this report

NOTICE

NOTICE is

hereby given that

SONY ANOFILS of

#4B BURTON LANE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,

BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister

responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a

citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, RO. Box

N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Senior Manager,

Accounts.

The job oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget & Management
Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective delivery

of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the

following:

Compilation of the corporate budget.

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets

Preparation of monthly management statements
Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation
Preparation of performance reports for division , department and sections
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry recetvables (capital

contributions, rechargeable)

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices
Liaison with internal and external audits
Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief

Financial

salaries

Officer for the Board of Directors
Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required
Preparation of the business plan for the department
Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department
Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims
Overseeing the Cash Flow Management
Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment
Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form employee’s

Conducting audits of various financial activities including Employee Basic Pay
Reconciliation, Employee Loans Reconciliation and Payment Reconciliation

Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable

Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts
Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle repayments
Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule
Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans
Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to ensure
adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors
Managing the status of local and foreign vendors
Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and External Auditors
Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline. Conducting

performance appraisals

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff, manage
and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations

Job requirements include:

¢ A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting ACCA/CPA
or equivalent qualifications

¢ A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a similar
management position
Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices
Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications
Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing systems
Ability to analyze financial reports
Sound knowledge of covenants of lending institutions (e.g. IDB)
Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial software
and the system of internal control.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing
Good time management skills

Both of these items are of no use to the average person and to

this end we are offering a reward which will be

disclosed at the recovery of said items.

Anyone having ANY information may contact the following
numbers. 328-7941, 3341/4675, 557-1744 or 436-2621

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: July

All calls will be treated with the utmost confidentiality. 35 700.







PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Readers have their say...

Dear Editor,

Congratulations to your chief
reporter, Rupert Missick on his
excellent "Insight" article today.
He shows courage and dedica-
tion to his profession in finding
the truth and reporting it hon-
estly. We have all known about
these "prosperity pastors” for
many years, but they seem to
have increased in alarming
numbers very quickly. What is
worrying is how many people
are swept along on this ride of
expectation — "give till it hurts
and God will reward you a hun-
dredfold". What nonsense!

God does not expect us to
give beyond our means in order
that his "pastors" may live the
good life — the comment of
another pastor on the Bentley
that "a pastor should be com-
fortable because we do a lot of
social work." Oh, indeed. Obvi-
ously this gentleman does not
remember the early days of mis-
sionary work here when bicy-
cles were a luxury and most of
the missionaries’ travel was
done on Shanks's pony! We do
not go to church to admire the
pastor's car or house, but to
worship God in His own house.
We do not give in the collec-
tion to support an expensive
life-style for the pastor but to
make sure that he has the basic
necessities of life (like the rest
of us) and the bulk of our offer-
ings goes to help the upkeep of
our church and its ministries —
particularly to the poor and
underprivileged — or at least
in my church this is so.

Mr Missick is quite right

“Fr =
aa
= = = i =

FEEDBACK

when he blames a spiritual
hunger for the majority of our
country’s woes today. Bahami-
ans always had a deep core of
faith in a loving God. I think
they lost it when they turned
around and followed the god of
prosperity. I pray that their
basic spirituality and "Mother's
wit" will rescue them from cer-
tain misery.
— Eileen Farmer

Rupert,

Everything is relative. On the
out islands, anyone purchasing a
flashy, expensive car would be
considered "stupid" not
"blessed." City folks are really
into posturing and being super-
ficial.

And you're right about the
spiritual depth of today's pas-
tors. It seems anybody can be
ordained to shout at God and
call it preaching.

It is a known fact that most
Bahamians (leaders or follow-
ers) don't read anything that's
too deep, so in a sense, they get
what they deserve: emotional
outbursts from copy cats mim-
icking whatever trend Ameri-
can preachers are on.

— Keen Observer

NOTICE

SORBIER LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SORBIER LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business

Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 08"
July 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh of 1 Raffles

Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 13" day of July A. D. 2009



Ms. Serene Lim
Liquidator





F
h t
aa

Rupert,

I finished your article in
today's paper and the only word
that I could utter was 'wow’.
Great job! I read the article last
week on Bishop “whatever his
name is” and almost died from
laughter.

Thanks for reminding me
how grave and serious a mat-
ter this is. As a young Bahami-
an like yourself, I cringe with
embarrassment at the level of
mediocrity we've come to
accept as a people, encouraged
in many cases by the "Church".

Good luck with exposing the
unfortunate truths about our
society...I'm sure it won't be
received by all with the same
level of enthusiasm that I hope
to convey in this message.

Best regards,

" K.F. t

How hypocritical can we be?

While reading a letter by
Micheline Cervili, “Give the
Haitians a break,” in reply to
an “Insight” article on Culture
Wars, May 25, I was inspired to
put my feelings to paper. In her
article, Cervili recounts a pre-
vious article in which a writer
expressed complete disgust
towards Haitians celebrating the
May 18th Haitian Flag day in
the Bahamas. This is not an iso-
lated account in fact, many have
expressed outrage over such
expressions of national pride,
“they come to take over.” In
her research paper Cervili sup-
ports the idea of the assimila-
tion of the Haitian and Bahami-
an cultures, she feels that the
Bahamas would only benefit
from such adjustments. How-
ever, there are many that dif-
fer. People are so quick to
rebuke the notion of integra-
tion of both cultures that they
use any pathetic excuse for dis-
missal. Sadly, many fear that
this move, though inevitable will
cripple the very core of Bahami-
anisation.

Haiti was the first black
nation to establish its indepen-
dence 1904 and played a signif-
icant role in the abolishing of
slavery. Though Haiti’s inde-
pendence plays a significant role
in its history it is May 18th that
garners special attention, the
general consensus is that though
independent in theory, Haitian’s
never really experienced true
independence until May 18th.
Haitians of all colours, shapes,
sizes and economic back-
grounds unite to commemorate
and memorialise this significant



GQllwnce Franca

af

Balin &

Dale

ie
al Private Banking

Bastille Day - Fete du 14 juillet



La Provence Restaurant

Sandyport

Tuesday July 14th, 2009

An Evening of French Cuisine

Members: $55 Non-Members: $65
Wine and Soft Drinks Included

Reservations- Tel: 302-4151; 3

Puen cael

27-0985

BAP PARIBAS
WEALTH MARAGEMEWT



MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news



THE ills plaguing our society can be likened to a
beast with one great belly and many starving
mouths. Each mouth represents an endemic hunger
in our land. One mouth, the hunger for justice,
another, the hunger for an adequate education and
the third, the hunger for security...







Worshippers of
material things

mBy| Sener ieels dr

rmsetoeGbbunemedia net

Seas ‘Prosperity pastors’ are helping
to destroy the Bahamas

Ihe ills plaguing our society can be

and many starving mouths.
Bach mouth represents an endem-
ic hunger in our land, One mouth,
the hunger for justice, another, the hunger for an
adequate education and the third, the hunger

But one mouth, one gaping maw that lies at

the centre of this beast, represents the deepest armed rol

hunger, the most negleded need of our people,
the need to be fed spirit

luch of the crime we experience in the
Bahamas comes from a wound that leads us to

want to possess, an obsession for the material,
for security. whether that be money or people, which leadsto save us from this
violence manifesting itself im murder, abuse,
ery or even stealing from our jobs.
We do not value the worthwhile aspects of
our existence, the beauty of human potential,
the richness to be foun
isfaction of a truly loving relationship with fam-

abetter people, better humans.

found in knowledge, the sat- help with this task.

THE FRONT PAGE of the July ? edition of /NS/GHT...

occasion no matter where they
are. Therefore, it is only fitting
that this tradition continues by
extension we were also affected
by this staple in history.
Unfortunately, the thought
of Haitians celebrating their flag
day in the Bahamas is absurd
and should not be permitted.
Sadly, this is where we are in
2009, ignorance has reached a
new height, a level abolished
and now resurfaced in another
form. Like Micheline men-
tioned in her article, people are
so quick to reject progress that
their refutation lack neither sub-
stance nor proof and is saturat-
ed with personal feeling. Ironi-
cally, people that passionately
reject the idea of cultural assim-
ilation with Haitians are usual-
ly the first present at other non-
Bahamian cultural events post-
ed like props. Strangely enough,
these contradictors are the first
present at the American 4th
July celebrations, the Jamaican
festivities and anything foreign.
What is most disturbing is
the inferiority complex we as
Bahamians suffer from. As a
result of this inadequacy we
resort to identify theft of or bad
case of identify crisis. Subcon-
sciously and even consciously
in some cases, we believe
America is superior to us there-
fore we imitate them. We are a
people that imitate whoever we
think is superior to us. How
unfortunate! Consider Mrs Dar-
ling, originally from England
more than 28 years ago, how-
ever, she maintains her distinc-
tive English accent that has not
yet been compromised. I have a
difficulty in understanding how
in the world do you leave the

Bahamas a “full breed Bahami-
an” and two weeks upon com-
pletion of vacation or study
develop an American accent or
an (obliviously fake) English
accent? Please help me under-
stand that. Bahamians are so
quick to copy that everything
originally Bahamian is chal-
lenged and therefore compro-
mised, ‘embellished’ to accom-
modate Americanisation.
Therefore, who are we really?

Moreover, we hurt ourselves
by selling ourselves short, we
make it our life’s mission to fit
in. The Bahamas tries so hard to
maintain the respect and atten-
tion of nations like America and
China that we are willing to
conform to whatever they
demand. In fact, we sell our
birthright in some cases in order
to gain acceptance and
approval. Superior nations take
delight in exploiting us, they
taunt us by dangling wealth, sta-
diums and resorts and like infe-
rior savages we jump at their
every beck and call. Please note
that only a fool says no to a well
deserving and worthy gift, how-
ever, at what cost?

Recently, we have been
afforded with the opportunity
to host Miss Universe, a feat
not achieved by many. What
will we show the world and
what do we have to offer? It is
hoped that we utilise this oppor-
tunity to show the world that
the Bahamas is a nation found-
ed on strong principles and high
moral standards. We must dis-
play a strong people resulting
from a colorful past and a self-
defining cultural background.
Additionally, we must demon-
strate exactly what we are made

ily and friends. These are the things that can
is hunger, that can make us into

ese Virtues installed in aperson isa Nearly
job left up to the individual or family. No o
institation in our society purports to or is able to

I take that back, there is one. Well, one that’s

supposed to.
rurch claims to be our saving grace, the

plice where our peopie. cin go for this fod,
y every comer ofthis island has one and
ther — they exist in every community. But if i’s spiritual
food you wat, you'll find their pantries inex-



SEE page 5C

of, though small in stature we
are a strong nation abundant
with numerous cultural influ-
ences that echo this efferves-
cent and original culture. Unlike
other countries we are a true
representation of the world
where every race and almost
every nation is represented. The
Bahamas has a place for the
Whites, Blacks, Latins, Asians
and Yellow man, we are a
nation filled with Bahamians,
Haitians, Jamaicans, Chinese,
Mexicans, Cubans, Filipinos and
the list goes on.

Finally, imagine living or
studying in America and not
being afforded the opportunity
to unite and celebrate junkanoo
or express your Bahamian pride
the way it should be conveyed.
Honestly how would you feel?
Therefore, I agree with Cervili
that we must embrace each oth-
ers culture. In doing so,
Bahamians would develop an
even greater appreciation for
their culture. If this cultural
unanimity were to happen, food
menus would be enhanced,
bilingualism would become a
way of life, Creole could be
taught as a second language and
the calendar year’s festivities
would expand double fold. As a
developing nation we must
abandon our selfish ways and
look beyond what is personal,
let us examine facts before we
utter garbage or convert our
deep seated hatred into words.
Only in knowing our history
and empathising with others do
we truly abandon ignorance.

Inspired by Micheline Cervili
“Give the Haitians a break” -
Tribune June 8, 2009.

— LOVY JEAN

Bazard Lamour and CO.

Mount Royal Avenue and Kenwood Street

Tel:

326-0126/7
Fax:326-0128

Email: bazardlaw @ gmail.com
lamourlaw @ gmail.com





THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST



Ue 4

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

“oO

{Fl (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

CLA LC [10























z Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
iw | oe i-- High =Low W High Low W WASSAU ‘Today. SEat5-10Knots O-2Feet 10-20Miles 82°F
a - , ia - o| 1 | 213 \4 [5 } 8| ofiolt FC FIC FC FC Tuesday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
ey f al i i . el J ty Acapulco 89/31 78/25 s 87/30 79/26 pe FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
ll - LOW = | MODERATE | HIGH | ¥. HIGH Amsterdam 73/22 57/13 s 74/23 60/15 s Tuesday: Eat 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
ORLANDO N Ankara, Turkey 81/27 57/13 t 82/27 59/15 pe ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
High:93°F/34°C ) Mostly sunny; a Mainly clear; a Sun and clouds with Mostly sunny; a Clouds and sun, a Mostly sunny with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 86/30 70/21 s 90/32 73/22 s Tuesday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
- ee F/23°C —— thundershower. passing shower. a thunderstorm. thundershower. t-storm possible. thunderstorm. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 51/10 44/6 pc 55/12 53/11 s
; aah ° ° ° ° Bangkok 90/32 79/26 t 89/31 78/25 t
L @ AK Seas aes High: nh High: 30° High: 92" High: 92" Barbados 86/30 77/25 s SLE TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
TAMPA 1 High: 90 Low: 79 Low: 80 Low: 81 Low: 81 Low: 81 see eS Barcelona 80/26 69/20 s 81/27 71/21 pc
ee i y LUA Ea Ta Beijin 90/32 72/22 pc 100/37 75/23 s
High: 91° F/33°C L is 100° F 110°-91° F 112°-91° F 112°-93° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft. ar oes TIE ee eee
Low: 77° F/25°C , ryt yr The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines 7 effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:23pm. 26 6:08am. 0.2 Belgrade 85/29 65/18 s 93/33 69/20 s
aa @ ’ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low forthe day, 6:38 p.m. 0.4 Berlin 73/22 59/15 pc 79/26 67/19 c aainal
7 ee CU ne Tuesday 1200am. 24 648am. 02 Bermuda 81/27 75/23 sh 81/27 75/23 s 60/57
| Vom) TREC RETRO : 1:40pm. 27 7:31pm. 05 Bogota 6518 45/7 t 6417 45/7 + @ aa
4 ay r tatistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Tam 23 73dam 02 Brussels 77/25 55/12 pc 79/26 55/12 pc yy?
} - * Temperature MeN oom. 27 Balm. 205 Budapest 86/30 65/18 s 94/34 69/20 s (BREEZY)
y i i ie ABACO High 90° F/32°C : P Buenos Aires 57/13 36/2 pc 54412 37/2 s
J ” High: 90° F/32° C DOR eects eects nectar ee sepeee:. ihusiay en: ee Fea Cairo 100/37 77/25 s 94/34 72/22 s
2 Low: 79° F/26°C 3:02pm. 28 9:36pm. 04
C al “XK i ow: 79° F/ Normal high... esgic Or CiCdR 95/35 85/29 sh 95/35 84/28 t
4 r ~~ Normal low ; 75° F/24° C Calgary 67/19 52/11 t 55/12 46/7 pc
4 eh @ WEST PALM BEACH _— Last year's Hight .ocsossssessenenssrseee 91° F/33° C ST eB Cancun 92/33 72/22 c 92/33 73/22 sh
’ —— High: 89° F/32° C Last year's lOW oo... eseeeeeeeeeeeeeees 77° F/25° C " " Caracas 81/27 71/21 s 81/27 71/21 t Los)Angeles)
a Low: 77° F/25° C i Precipitation ss ates oo a.m. La <— p.m. Casablanca 81/27 64/17 s 76/24 62/16 s 90/64
ras a As of 2 p.m. yesterday ........eeecseecceeceeeee trace UNS OL se ‘Vo p.m. Moonset... 11:49am. — Gopenhagen 71/21 57/13 sh 73/22 59/15 pc
Az FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date 18. Last New First Full Dublin 6417 52/11 6 687 52/1 + avs
High: 89° F/32° C @ High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date .......c.ccsessessessseesseeseeee 20.91" = 7 aaa Frankfurt 78/25 68/20 sh 79/26 66/18 sh
Low: 78° F/26°C an Low: 77° F/25°C ; Geneva 85/29 60/15 sh 84/28 64/17 t
AccuWeather.com mh Halifax 66/18 54/12 c 68/20 54/12 pc Shows Miami
- @ Ww Forecasts and graphics provided by at . Havana 90/32 72/22 r 91/32 72/22 t T-storms 90/78
x MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 15 Jul. 21 Jul. 28 Helsinki 647 52/11 + 68/20 55/12 sh Rain Frente
> High: 90° F/32° C High: 91°F/33°C Hong Kong 90/32 82/27 sh 90/32 32/27 sh [*, 4] Flurries Cold
i. ) _ 6 igh: 91° ° Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
aaa Low: 78° F/26° C ; NASSAU Loa. 78° F/26°C eu oe cast a i aoe 2 PR] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Ver
High: 90° F/32° C ea 87190 GIB s 80/06 BOE [y_¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mengenli-
Low: 79° F/26° C
: <> ow shames S/d s sti a0 UY aoe] os RN 206% 40s SNR) os 70s SN
KEY WEST CATISLAND Kingston 87/30 79/26 r 89/31 78/25 sh
High: 90° F/32°C VK AY en . Lima 73/22 59/15 s 72/22 61/16 s
Low: 81°F/27°C AWS. High: 87° F/31° C London 73/22 57/13 pc 73/22 55/12 sh
i = * Low: 72° F/22°C Madrid 97/36 66/18 pc 91/32 61/16 pc P |
Manila 83/28 77/25 t 83/28 78/25 t im a . i IC AN = ie S tu RAN ‘e F
Ww “08 i. Mexico City 72/22 54/12 t 74/23 53/11 t : :
sme; Monterrey 105/40 74/23 s 106/41 76/24 s
= GREAT EXUMA WwW \ SAN SALVADOR Montreal 68/20 52/11 c 70/21 52/11 pe
High: 88° F/31° C Hi h: 90° F/32°C Moscow 84/28 64/17 pc 70/21 55/12 t
AW Low: 78° F/26° C Low: 74°F23°C Munich 77/25 60/15 sh 86/30 62/16 t
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's iner cee heute rr oo one ee es a ; if Yo B
highs and tonights's lows. an ; a u q ,
: : P—] Low: 79° F/26°C — % a Oslo 6719 S2/1 + 70/21 56/13 pe Oo Nn wh
; Paris 73/22 57/13 sh 80/26 61/16 pc
Xa
Ah Prague 78/25 56/13 pc 75/23 65/18 t VY ANY y ul 1“ ~a
ae ACCC
ee sree mi Or you can rest easy knowin
Low: 75° F/24°C Rome 86/30 68/20 s 88/31 65/18 s ¥V Md e
Today Tuestiay Tey Testiny Tolay Tussi = * MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 88/31 81/27 sh 89/31 82/27 + Pat yo have excellent insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 90° F/32° C San Juan d2/11 26/-3 s S915 31/0 s te erace no matter which
FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FC FIC Fic FIC Fe FIC +“ Low: 74° F/23°C ees aaa ae t ce as s w4 he ind bl : =
Albuquerque 96/85 69/20 pe 95/35 69/20 pc Indianapolis 83/28 64/17 pc 85/29 73/22 pc Philadelphia 84/28 66/18 s 87/30 67/19 s attag Ones pe 8 Wi OWS,
Anchorage 76/24 57/13 s 75/23 57/13 $s Jacksonville 93/33 74/23 t 90/32 73/22 t Phoenix 111/43 88/31 pc 107/41 86/30 s OS aa oma Te cane sh OEE a s y
Atlanta 85/29 70/21 t 89/31 73/22 t Kansas City 92/33 75/23 t 96/35 74/23 pc Pittsburgh 75/23 56/13 s 80/26 65/18 s RAGGEDISLAND — High:92°F/33" aauls pe a : a
Atlantic City 85/29 6518 s 96/30 69/20 s LasVegas 107/41 90/26 s 106/41 92/27 s Portland,OR 73/22 54/12 pc 82/27 5713 eee Low: 75° F/24°C a ae ma a mae nae F Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 86/30 62/16 s 86/30 65/18 s Little Rock 100/37 79/26 pc 102/38 78/25 s Raleigh-Durham 90/32 68/20 t 91/32 70/21 pc Low:71°F/22°C = % sen = ree creme .
Boston 79/26 60/15 s 80/26 GING s Los Angeles 90/32 64/17 s 84/28 6417s St. Louis 87/30 73/22 t 93/33 79/26 t . a ae aaa Ri ee ;
Buffalo 73/22 54412 s 76/24 58/14 $ Louisville 88/31 67/19 pce 91/82 78/25 t Salt Lake City 89/31 59/15 pc 84/28 59/15 ¢s GREAT INAGUA Xa Tava 98/31 73/22 c 98/31 75/23 vc
Charleston, SC 91/32 75/23 t 90/32 76/24 t Memphis 96/35 79/26 t 100/37 78/25 pc San Antonio 98/36 75/23 s 98/36 76/24 $s High: 91° F/33°C aaa 71/21 54/12 5 75/23 57/13 F
Chicago 83/28 61/46 pce 78/25 67/19 t Miami 90/32 78/25 pce 91/382 78/25 t San Diego 76/24 67/49 pce 75/23 66/18 pc Low. 76°F/24°C Trinidad 89/31 66/18 s 78/25 56/13 pc
Cleveland 78/25 56/13 s 79/26 65/18 s Minneapolis 80/26 64/17 pce 74/23 62/16 t San Francisco 75/23 55/12 pe 78/25 55/12 pe i waneonans 69/20 57/13 pe 72/22 58/14 pe ee, a INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 102/38 79/26 s 100/37 78/25 s Nashville 90/32 70/21 t 93/33 76/24 t Seattle 70/21 54/12 pc 76/24 54/12 pe Gann 78/25 69/20 pe 91/32 74/23 §
Denver 93/33 62/16 pce 91/82 54/12 pc New Orleans 94/34 77/25 $s 91/32 78/25 pc Tallahassee 94/34 74/23 t 88/31 74/23 t = Warsaw 75/23 56/13 sh 80/26 59/15 pc
Honolulu «88/81 75/23 po 9OG2 76/24 po OWahoma iy 10440 78/25 s 10900 7624 s Tuco 10900 Siar s 9505 7503 1 AS Sa fais alae oer sega) cet
onolulu pce pe anoma Ul s S ucson s pce _
Houston 96/35 77/25 s 97/36 77/25 s Orlando 93/33 73/22 t 93/33 74/23 t Washington, DC 86/30 66/18 s 88/31 72/22 s eh Ce ete ee

















Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ELD028HN4_4ZCP31 INGEST_TIME 2012-01-26T19:46:50Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01358
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.190MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH THUNDERSHOWER HIGH 90F LOW 79F I N S I G H T S EEINSIGHTSECTION S P O R T S Voluntary oppression SEEPAGEELEVEN Bahamas relegated By NATARIOMCKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE FAMILY of two young b oys who went missing on Andros more than a month ago expressed joy and relief last night after the children were discovered alive by relative. Deangelo Clarke, nine, and Marcelo Clarke, seven, wentm issing from their grandmoth er’s house in the remote settlement of Smith’s Hill on June 9. The boys had left the house to hunt for crabs around 6pm and were never heard from again. After days of fruitless search ing, police scaled down their operations. But family members said they Parents tell of their jo y after ‘mir ac le’ of pair’s discovery The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate Teen killed in police shootout with robbers Missing boys found alive 36YEARSOFBAHAMIANINDEPENDENCE THEBAHAMAS celebrated the 36th anniversary of its Independence on Friday with an explosion of colour, music and dance at Fort Charlotte. SEEPAGESTWO, FIVE, 17, 19, 20, 21 A TEENAGER was shot dead after he was caught up in a shootout between police and armed robbers. The incident happened in the Kemp Road area on Thursday night when two men entered the nearby City Market on Village Road. They held up a cashier, demanded cash, and made good their escape. But as they were chased through the streets by police, an exchange of gunfire shot and killed an 18-year-old man who was walking nearby. 18-year-old dies during str eet c hase F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page 10 MULTI-platinum rapper Lil Wayne is being sued for nearly half a million dollars for failing to perform at a concert in Nassau last September. According to reports, Lil Wayne, 26, whose real name is Dawyne Michael Carter Jr, is being sued by Red City Entertainment for $432,000. The suit, filed on June 29, in Manhattan Supreme Court on behalf of Red City Entertainment, alleges that the company paid Lil Wayne $432,000 to be the headliner at the Poppin' Bottles concert held at the Bristol Wine and Spirits grounds on September 27, 2008. The event had reportedly been postponed from the original date of Friday, September 26, to Saturday, September 27, because Lil W ayne sued for failing to perform at Nassau concert SEE page 10 LILWAYNE (AP SEE page 10 Man shot in the hand A MAN was shot in the hand while walking in the Bacardi Road area yesterday. At about 1.52pm, the victim, John Gafford, was approached by two men in a small grey vehicle. One of them produced a handgun and shot him in the hand. Mr Gafford was taken to hospital and treated for his injury which was described as “not life threatening”. Police Investigations continue. A 22-YEAR-OLD man charged wth the murder of American Anna Garrison has b een arraigned in Magistrate’s C ourt. Z yndall McKinney, of Isabella Boulevard, Nassau, is accused of intentionally causing Ms Garrison’s death between Sunday, February 25, and Saturday, July 4, 2009, while being concerned with another. Ms Garrison’s badly decomposed body was discovered by walkers in a bushy area off Fox Hill Road south, near the Blue Water Cay development, on Saturday, July 4, at around 6.20 pm. She had been shrouded in sheets and her feet were wrapped in plastic bags. The 33-year-old first came to police attention on February 25, 2009, when they received a missing person report from the Man is charged with murder of American woman SEE page 10

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEPENDENCE CELEBRATIONS ACTION from the spectacular Independence celebrations at Fort Charlotte on Friday. SEEPAGEFIVE for the Prime Minister’s Independence message. SEEPAGES 17, 19, 20 and 21 for more photos from the celebrations.

PAGE 3

MORE than $10 million has been spent locally on various aspects of the design, engineering and consultation of the airport r edevelopment project, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said during a groundbreaking ceremony at the Lynden Pindling International Airport. More than $14.8 million in construction contracts have been awarded to Bahamian firms. They include Alexiou & Assoc iates, George V Cox & Company, Graphite Engineering, Engineering Solutions & Consulting, Caribbean Civil Group, Engineering & Technical Services, Construction Cost Engineering, DHP Associates, Certified Testing Laboratories International, SEV Group, and Pinder’s Cust oms Brokerage. Mr Ingraham said the terminal’s general contractor, Ledco, a Canadian firm, is planning for 73 per cent of its labour requirements to be filled through local contractors. Bahamian firms awarded major contracts for the first stage of the project include Reliable Fencing, B ahamas Hot Mix, Basden Elev ators, Woslee Construction, Sentinel Drilling and Water Works, TMC Engineering Ltd. “I am advised that a significant amount of the work awarded to international firms will be completed by Bahamian sub-contractors and labour,” he said. Approximately 40 contracts are scheduled to be tendered in coming months, including sub-contracts to the terminal’s general contractor and direct contracts with NAD. “Plans call for this first phase of the redevelopment project to open for passengers bound for US ports, beginning in the first quarter of 2011,” Mr Ingraham said at the cermony. Immediately thereafter, work is expected to begin on converting the existing US departure terminal into the new international terminal. “Construction of the redevelopment of (LPIA last for four years,” he said. “At the height of construction, approximately 400 persons will bee ngaged on the job site. “Upon completion (LPIA provide the infrastructure our nation needs to prosper.” Mr Ingraham said he is satisfied that when the new US terminal opens, it will be “one of the best and most modern airport facilities in this part of the world. “Finally, after having for far too long ranked among the least efficient and least customer friendly airports in our region, the (LPIA will become a source of national pride.” Projects being carried out at LPIA along with works being undertaken at the cruise port in Nassau Harbour to ensure its capacity to receive Genesis class cruise ships, would position the Bahamian economy to take advantage of the upturn in the world economy, he explained. “It is a manifestation of my Government’s determination and commitment to investing int ourism, the major industry of our nation, and to modernizing and expanding our national infrastructure,” the Prime Minister said. $10 million spent locally on airport development project THE High Commission of Canada in Kingston, Jamaica, advises residents of the Bahamas seeking to undertake studies in Canada that a Study Permit and medical exam are required for all courses of over six months. Applications received in Kingston after Wednesday, July 15, risk missing the September 2009 intake. Begin by a careful consultation of www.jamaica.gc.ca for complete and recently updated information on applying for a Study Permit. It is strongly recommended that all prospective applicants consult the website and be sure to include all required supporting documentation in their application to avoid delays or a possible refusal. The correct processing fee is $125 in Canadian funds in the form of a bank draft payable to “High Commission of Canada”. Upon receipt of the application, processing fee and two return courier envelopes, medical forms will be sent out. To speed up the process, applicants can chose to undergo the medical examination, at their own risk, pending final disposition of their application. Applications require up-to-date contact information. If an applicant will not be at their usual place of residence during the summer months, they should be sure to provide an email address or alternate phone number where they can be contacted. Study Permit, medical exam required for courses in Canada over six months C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Q ueen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $ 3,440 $3,440 K ing 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $ 3,600 $3,600Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street M adeira Street ( 242)326 (242 2 335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank P P i i n n e e C C o o t t t t a a g g e e P P i i n n e e C C o o t t t t a a g g e e B y DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The Pelican Bay at Lucaya is repositioning its hotel, launching an ew logo and constructing a $ 7.1 million meeting facility which is expected to be completed early next year. The logo unveiling was held during a champagne r eception at Canal House, t he new five-storey meeti ng/conference building which is still under construction. Magnus Alnebeck, managing director/general manage r, said the new logo of a ‘Happy Pelican’ donning s unglasses evokes a happy f eeling and will be placed at touch points preceding guests’ arrival at the hotel. We made the pelican happier. It injects a breath of fresh air, colour, and vibranc y into the property with C aribbean colours of turquoise, warm red orange with a mix of yellow,” he s aid. He noted that the design is also in keeping with the Meet Happy” slogan for C anal House, which will cater to various functions, meetings, and events. Mr Alnebeck said the $7 million meeting facility represents a “serious invest m ent” for Pelican Bay, which is owned by Sundt AS, a private investment company based in Norway. The Canal House will consist of more than 30,000 sq ft. T here will be five meeting r ooms, a breakfast restau rant and office space. The big meeting space on the f ourth and fifth levels have wrap-around balconies that offer views of the ocean. The ground floor will consist ofa dministrative offices. Although no new employment will be created at the h otel, Mr Alnebeck said there will be a lot of out sourcing of services, such as food and beverage catering f or events. Mr Alnebeck said the hotel’s repositioning marksc ompletion of a strategy that commenced five years ago. He stated that their focus n ow is on visitors as opposed to tourists, and providing meeting facilities for a vari-e ty of events. Despite the tough chal lenging times on Grand Bahama, Pelican Bay is far-i ng well, he said. “We are doing fine because we are going after a different market, said Alnebeck. Freeport in my mind is a unique place in the region and I think we forget that we have a lot of people coming here who are not tourists and need to stay in hotels, and that is really the market we are after. “We want to own the local corporate market; we wantto make sure that anyone who comes to Grand Bahama for that sort of purpose has Pelican Bay first in mind. “Obviously, we will con tinue to cater to tourists and make sure they have a good stay, but it is not a market that we are actively going to go after,” he said. The 182-room hotel offers 89 waterside rooms and 93 waterside state rooms. There are three swimming pools, Jacuzzi, and Sabor Restau rant and Bar. The property recently received high rating in Expedia.com’s exclusive Insiders’ Select List as one of the best hotels in the world, receiving the highest ranking in the Bahamas, and placing 11th in the Caribbean. Pelican Bay to launch new logo, construct $7.1m meeting facility WORK on a new two-lane highway from the Lynden Pindling International Airport to the College of The Bahamas will begin next year, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham revealed. Construction of a new boardwalk along the downtown Nassau waterfront, extending from Prince George Wharf eastward to the second Paradise Island bridge is also planned following the transfer of commercial shipping from downtown Bay Street to Arawak Cay, Mr Ingraham said. “Investment in public infrastructure is essential to the long term sust ainable growth of the Bahamian economy in general and tourism in particular,” said Mr Ingraham. The Government is resurfacing Bay Street from Blake Road to Mackey Street, undertaking upgrades at traffic roundabouts, and installing curbing along roadsides, he added. Highway from airport to COB to be built THEREDEVELOPMENT of the airport is expected to take four years.

PAGE 4

Subject: Independence Sup plement Article on Sir Stafford Sands EDITOR, The Tribune. This is a letter to your senior reporter Rupert Missick, which you may print. Raymond Antonio. Mr Missick: I read with great interest your story in today's Tribune Independence Supplement on Sir Stafford Sands. Being born in the 60's, I entered primary school when our currency was changed to Bahamian dollars, and therefore do not have per sonal knowledge of events of that era. Everything I had heard and read about Sir Stafford Sands to this point only focused on two aspects of the man: (1 his transformation of the Bahamas' winter tourist season to year-round; and (2 rooted hatred of black Bahami ans. As noted in your article, he seemed to be the UBP personified, leaving other members of that party seemingly untainted: Noel Roberts, Sir Roland Symonette, Sir Geoffrey Johnstone, etc. It was quite refreshing to read your article, which included additional information and details which provided more background to this man than I ever knew. And to read quotes from the late Norman Solomon was for me the icing on the cake.As a little boy at the age of 9, I started reading The Tribune after my father was fin ished reading, and I was just fascinated with letters to the Editor from Mr. Solomon. Accounts of his debates in Parliament always caught my attention. This article, and several others providing an insight into the goings-on leading up to Inde pendence, made this supplement just superb reading. As one who vividly remembers the events on Clifford Park on the night of July 9, 1973, and the other events on succeeding days, your presentation has added to my historical knowl edge. RAYMOND ANTONIO Nassau, July 8, 2009. E DITOR, The Tribune. Michael Jackson was truly an amazingly talented, creative and much loved artist. However, like the rest of us,h e did have at least a few faults and we may do well to keep certain things in per-s pective. During the spectacular and very touching memorial ser-v ice, the Rev Al Sharpton said, with no small amount of p aranoia, that there was “nothing strange” about him, only about “what he had tod eal with.” Now come on, Michael Jackson and strange” became virtually synonymous in later years. T his, of course, should in no way detract from his incredible accomplishments. But letu s not overlook the blanketed baby and balcony incident, his c hildren’s veils, his own masks and disguises, the obsessive and disfiguring plastic surgery,t he creepily androgynous appearance, the child guests sleeping in his bed, attendingc ourt in pyjamas, the spendthrift habits, the hyperbaric chamber, and the bizarre use o f medications drugs, etc. So many, including his children, have said that Michael w as a wonderful father. In many ways he probably was. However, it is highly doubtful that he had his children in mind while he was reportedly being anaesthetised ord rugged for “sleep”. Just suppose the kids had needed him during the night but then Ig uess that’s what the nanny was for. To some, it may border on b lasphemy to suggest that although Michael could moon w alk he could not walk on water. Nonetheless, he will be greatly missed. KEN W KNOWLES, MD N assau, July 8, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm ON learning that the Honduran army had s ent its country’s president packing to Costa Rica, C A Smith, Bahamian ambassador to theO rganisation of American States, joined an international protest, pledging that the Bahamas s tands “ready to assist” Honduras wherever it can. The free world was shocked at what it perceived as an army coup, especially as President Manuel Zelaya was not even given a chance to change out of his pyjamas for the plane ride. H owever, Honduras’ Supreme Electoral Tribunal, Supreme Court, Attorney General and o ther national institutions and associations sup ported the army, declaring that it was acting within the Honduran Constitution, which Zelaya had breached. In fact the army had acted on the orders of t he Supreme Court, which had instructed it to serve an arrest warrant on the president. Allb ranches of the Honduran government had accused Zelaya of violating the Constitution a Constitution that he had sworn to uphold and enforce on taking the oath of office on January 27, 2006. However, in a recent interview with The Miami Herald Col. Herberth Bayardo Inestroza admitted that the only possible misstep t aken by his forces in the president’s ouster was putting him on a plane and sending him o ut of the country. He said that the rational behind that move w as that had “Zelaya been jailed throngs of loyal followers would have erupted into chaosand demanded his release with violence. “What was more beneficial, remove this gentleman from Honduras or present him to pros e cutors and have a mob assault and burn and destroy and for us to have to shoot?” he asked. If we left him here, right now we would be burying a pile of people.” S o, to save lives, instead of arresting him and holding him in a local jail, they went to his home, roused him from sleep and put him on a plane pyjamas and all. The Honduran Supreme Court holds that the army acted within the country’s constitution. Apparently, Zelaya, taking a page from the b lotted copy book of his buddy Hugo Chavez of Venezuela, decided that he too would change Honduras’ constitution to extend his term in office, which ends in January next year sixm onths from now. To extend his power he unilaterally ordered a national referendum, which had the force of law, to be held on June 28 to decide the issue. Under that country’s constitution only the Supreme Electoral Tribunal has the power to do this anyone else attempting to do so is to be r emoved from power under Article 239 of the Constitution. T he Tribunal, backed by the Supreme Court protested the referendum. And so Zelaya issued a second decree on June 25 ordering a survey and presenting a new constitution to replace the existing one. On the same day, the Supreme Court confiscated all the ballots intended for the survey. Zelaya ordered the warehouse, wheret he ballots had been secured, broken into and the ballots rescued. A pparently, he put the final nail in his polit ical coffin when he presented a new constitution to replace the one now in force. Under article 239 of the current constitution it is provided that anyone who attempts or intends to replace t he constitution is to be automatically removed from office with the loss of all constitutionalp owers. On investigation the Attorney General found that Zelaya had in fact tried to highjack t he constitution and no one, not even a pres ident, can thumb his nose at the law. Therefore, he had to be removed. The National Electoral Tribunal concurred and the Supreme Court ordered an arrest warrant be served all l egal and within the constitution. Honduras’ Union Civica Democratica, point e d out that, unlike the United States, Honduras has no impeachment laws, but that Zelaya, like P resident Richard Nixon, has learned that no citizen not even a president is above the law. The Union declared that democracy in Honduras is still “alive and strong because the constitution worked.” N ixon, the 39th president of the United States, was the only American president to r esign. Facing impeachment for the Watergate scandal, he resigned in 1974 and was later par d oned for all federal crimes that he might have committed while in office, thereby avoiding impeachment hearings. In future it would be better for our govern ment to mind its own business and not pledge assistance in another man’s country until all the details are known. Also any move support-e d by Hugo Chavez should be treated with sus picion that in itself should send a red flag to the top of the flag pole. Zelaya has apparently told the UN that if r eturned to complete his term, he will no longer push for constitutional change and if offered a c hance to stay in power he will turn it down. He claims that he’s going back to his farm. Honduras would have probably been better off he had never left the farm. Michael Jackson – creative, talented, but also flawed LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Honduras move protects its citizens 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW (/721-26(3+RI)267(5 6755(7&+,33,1*+$01$66$8%$+$0$6 LV DSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG &LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH %DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\ UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOG VHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQ WZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH WK GD\ RI -XO\ WRWKH 0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 127,&( E DITOR, The Tribune. M ost people can vividly recall their precise whereabouts when first receiving news of thed eath of a celebrity. The assassination of US president John F Kennedy in 1963 and the recent demise of pops inger Michael Jackson from suspected cardiac arrest are two prime examples. (The deaths of Farrah Fawcett and Ed McMahon, around the same time as Jackson’s, were probably not quite as galvanising). A s expected, speculation and media coverage seem to have no limits, with Jackson’s interment in Los Angeles on Tuesday probably sett o become the funeral of the decade, if not the ages. J ackson, while on the verge of a comeback, and on whose music most of us, including Pres ident Obama grew up, despite amassing a huge f ortune, reportedly left behind a few debts. But fortunately for 75-year-old Cameroon, A frican pop pioneer Manu Dibango, whose 1972 “honking, galloping funk track”, Soul Makossa, provided the ethos of Michael Jack s on’s Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin’, (the first song on his best-selling Thriller album), a finan cial copyright agreement was worked out. A lthough many listeners mistook it for nonsense Jackson’s chant at the end of the song, Ma ma se, ma ma sa, ma ma coo sa”, came directly from Dibango’s song. A ccording to the current issue of the New Yorker magazine, when Jackson died, Diban go, who mourned his demise and made a gra c ious statement, was still awaiting a French court’s decision on whether he was owed dam ages for pop singer Rihanna’s use of his sylla bles in her 2007 hit song, Don’t Stop the Music, which was based on Jackson’s Wanna BeS tartin’ Somethin’. In the New Yorker article, Kelefa Sanneh writes that the true meaning of Jackson’s lifea nd music” spoke much louder than “the noise from the child-molestation scandals, his mutati ng appearance and his escalating eccentricity.” Most will probably hope along with Berklee College of Music-trained American musicianJ ohn Mayer, that the seemingly indefatigable pop star will be forever remembered as the moonwalking...mesmerising, unstoppable, invincible” Michael Jackson. S IMON ARTZI Nassau, July, 2009. A moonwalking, mesmerising, unstoppable, invincible entertainer Independence Supplement added to my historical knowledge

PAGE 5

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By LINDSAY THOMPSON THE Bahamas and the Republic of Cuba have completed a “successful round” o f preliminary negotiations a imed at defining the mari time boundaries between both countries, the Ministry ofForeignAffairs announced. On June 10, 2009, a delegation of technical experts from various ministries accompanied by a consultant on maritime delimitation meti n Havana, Cuba. They exchanged views and scientific and legal information that will form the framew ork for the determination of an equitable boundary between the parties in accord ance with the relevant princ iples of international law. A lthough the primary purpose of the negotiations is tod elimit a boundary, other a reas of mutual interest were identified for discussions, many of which are mandated by the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS context of maritime delimit ation, the ministry said. T hese include matters such as cooperation in search and r escue efforts, the combatt ing of illegal trafficking in drugs and migrants, technical cooperation in areas such as hydrography and maritime s cientific research, and in the m anagement of trans-bounda ry resources fisheries, oil and gas deposits. The recent meeting was the latest in a series of disc ussions on delimitation b etween the Bahamas and C uba that began in the 1990s. A further round iss cheduled to take place withi n months. “Both parties emphasised the long-standing links of friendship, respect and cooperation that exists between them, and it is within that f ramework that the parties h ope to eventually conclude an agreement that would be mutually beneficial anda cceptable,” the ministry said. The issue of maritime delimitation has taken on new importance for the Bahamas following the proclamation of straight a rchipelagic baselines in D ecember 2008. These have been deposited with the United Nations, as required by UNCLOS, and e nacted into domestic law by t he Archipelagic Waters and M aritime Jurisdiction (Archipelagic Baselines) Order. “This means that the baseline from which the different m aritime zones of the B ahamas are now to be meas ured is a line encircling all the islands and cays of theB ahamian archipelago, as o pposed to the low-water mark around the individual islands,” said the ministry. “Naturally, where those maritime zones overlap with those of neighbouring states, U NCLOS requires the part ies to agree their boundaries by negotiations or otherwise according to internationall aw.” Other neighbouring states with which the Bahamas will eventually pursue boundary negotiations include the United States, the United Kingdom (on behalf of the T urks and Caicos Islands) a nd Haiti. Negotiations over Bahamas and Cuba maritime boundaries By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport R eporter d maycock@ tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – While there are currently no plans for lay-offs at Old Bahama Bay, workers at the Arnold Palmer Golf Course on Grand Bahama were l et go on Thursday, e xecutives at Ginn sur M er said. T his comes after f ears were raised that e mployees of the West End resort were going to be let go as Ginn is reportedly set to put the property up for sale. A spokesperson for G inn said “it is only speculation” and there are no plans for layo ffs at the 71-room h otel. M eanwhile, work is nearing completion on one of the two signa t ure golf courses at Ginn sur Mer and some of the workers at Ginn Golf are expected to ber elocated for training in other areas. “The Arnold Palmer Golf Course is almostf inished and they do not need a huge con struction crew on site a nd so lay-offs are s cheduled in this area,” said the spokesperson. T r aining S ome of the golf c ourse workers will be relocated for training associated with the d rainage. T he Tribune h as learned that developer Bobby Ginn flew into W est End on Wednesd ay. Ginn Resorts is developing Ginn sur Mer, a 2,000-acre com munity development at West End. The $4.9 billion development will contain more than 4,400 condominium and hotel units and nearly 2,000 single family residential home sites. It will also include a private airport, two signature golf courses designed by Jack Nick laus and Arnold Palmer, clubhouses, two large marinas, a Monte Carlo-style casino, water and swim pavilions, a beach club and a spa. Golf course workers are let go W HEN it comes to off shore banking and financial services, I am sure that you will all agree that Switzerland is the master. In fact they created the business.The offshore centres in our region either learned the business f rom the Swiss or learned it from those who learned it from the Swiss. Therefore in answer to the question: “Who is the Daddy?” There is only one correct answer, Switzerland. I think that we can continue to learn from them. Financial Centres like The Bahamas and Cayman have been f eeling pressure from the UK and the USA to provide increasingly more information about those of their citizens who patroni ze the services of these Financial Centres. There have been t hreats of various types of retaliation. This continues, despite the fact that London and New York are two of the greatest offshore Financial Centres in the entire world. In recent months, UBS has been under attack and being press ured by the U.S. Justice Department to provide the identity of about the 52,000 American account holders. The presumption is t hat they are all tax evaders. T he Swiss Government, however, has said on July 7th in court papers presented in a federal court in Miami that it “will use its legal authority to ensure that the bank cannot be pressured to transmit the information illegally, including if necessary by issui ng an order taking effective control of the data at UBS that is the s ubject of the summons.” On their web site, the Swiss Department of Justice and Police s aid on Wednesday in a statement “Switzerland makes it perfectly clear that Swiss law prohibits UBS from complying with a possible o rder by the court in Miami to hand over client information.” T he Bahamas should watch these proceedings closely. We may s till be able to learn some things from “The Daddy”. Switzerland is the Daddy V IEW FROM A FAR J OHNISSA Ministry of Foreign Affairs makes announcement

PAGE 6

By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net BLOOD sugar levels are soaring at dangerous heights as diabetes is becoming a reality for more Bahamians than ever before whether they are aware of it or not. If left untreated, diabetes can lead to kidney failure, nerve damage, or blindness. It can also lead to the amputation of limbs. In 2006 it was found to be the country's fifth leading cause of death. But the disease is a reality for around 25,000 Bahamians, approximately eight per cent of the population. And a 2007 Ministry of Health survey found that three per cent of respondents affected by diabetes were not aware of it. The non-communicable disease characterised by the body’s inability to convert sugars in the blood into energy comes in two types. Type One diabetics are usually d iagnosed in childhood as they do not produce enough insulin, the hormone secreted by the pancreas to break down glucose, and they are therefore required to take regular insulin injections and follow a careful diet. B ut the increasing number of diabetics, who make up around 9 0 per cent of diabetics in the country, have developed Type Two diabetes because they have become accustomed to a lifestyleour bodies cannot handle. A diet high in sugar and starch coupled with a lack of exercise m eans sugar builds up in the blood, and although the pancreas produces insulin, the cells of a Type Two diabetic are not receptive to it. Type Two diabetics are therefore not required to take insulin injections, but there are medica tions. And if it is discovered in the early stages, Type Two diabetes can be completely controlled by diet and exercise. Emma Schick at the Diabetes Research Institute in Market Street explained: "Without insulin, sugar builds up in your blood and can’t go to the cells. The blood gets more sticky and it’s difficult to pump around the body. "More often than not with Type Two diabetes you can do a lot to assist in managing it just by changing your diet and exercise, and you can do that for a numberof years before you need medica tion." Ms Schick volunteers for the Diabetes Research Institute which was founded four years ago by Austrian expatriate Harold McPike. Mr McPike, a Type One dia betic, wanted to help meet the needs of Bahamians affected by diabetes after his research pro ject showed the huge burden diabetes is building on the healthcare system. Around 1,500 people had their blood sugar levels tested and a number of unsuspecting diabet ics were discovered as a result. While some could seek treat ment, for some it was already too late; four of the most seriously affected diabetics died within two months. Ms Schick said: "We came across quite a significant number of persons who had elevated blood sugars which indicated that they needed to be referred to doc tors, and a lot chose not to go to doctors. "There was a stigma associated with having diabetes so people would pretend not to have it, but a lot of people also had a number of risk factors that showed they should be tested on a regular basis." Breaking down the stigma is just a small element of what the DRI is now doing. The centre's principle focus is to help treat Type One diabetic children and educate them about their condition, and the DRI pro vides medication and support for around 60 of such children across the Bahamas. However, through its research the DRI has also found an increasing number of young people are developing Type Two dia betes as a result of poor diet and an inactive lifestyle. Ms Schick said: "It is of great concern because it's more difficult to control in younger people. The drugs haven’t been developed with that age group in mind, and if they have grown up eating the wrong types of food and not exercising it’s a very difficult lifestyle change to make." DRI diabetic educator Mar garet Daxon teaches young peo ple, their parents and adults about how to eat in a way which will control diabetes and prevent them from developing the disease. She explained how to ensure you are preparing a healthy mealby filling half of your plate with non-starchy vegetables or fruit, such as salad and green vegeta bles, a quarter of your plate with a protein such as meat or fish, no bigger than a deck of cards, and another quarter with simple carbohydrates such as rice, pasta or potatoes. Such a meal should be eaten three times a day, with a snack of fruit, vegetables and protein in between. Mrs Daxon said: "What we need is a well-balanced diet, to not skip meals, and to eat at regular times. "A lot of persons who have diabetes often skip meals and have one big meal during the day, but your body will only use what it needs and store the rest as fat, so just give the body what it needs; a wide variety of foods at different times of the day." She and three other diabetic educators at the DRI are now working with other institutions to share this vital nutrition information and spread it in the community. DRI administrative assistant Nicola Fernander said the institute has been in talks with the Ministry of Education about the nutritional value of school meals, w hich tend to be high in sugars and carbohydrates and are not only contributing to diabetes, but also to behavioural problems among young people. She said: "A lot of kids need to know how to eat properly because sugar spends them up and makes them hyperactive." The centre also does outreach work at churches and community centres, and makes annual visits to the Family Islands. It has become the leading authority on diabetes in the country and facilitates the training of healthcare workers in diabetes education so they can become certified diabetes educators. In-house support sessions are held twice a week for children with diabetes, their parents, and any diabetic seeking support. And the centre operates an open door policy so anyone can walk in and have their blood sugar tested for free, their blood pressure measured, or their eyes tested. Ms Fernander said: "We want people to be aware that there is this condition, but you can do something about it. It’s not a death sentence; there are organisations here to help you do something about it. "Living with diabetes without being aware of it will only increase your complications. "Most people who are diagnosed with diabetes have had it for years prior to being diagnosed, and by then they are usua lly already having complications. "They have their blood sugar tested here and are sent to the doctor and put on medications immediately, so had they not come here they would have been carrying on without knowing what is going on as they were." Ms Schick added: "If your blood sugar is elevated and particularly if it’s extremely elevated you have to seek medical advice as soon as possible because it’s not going to get better, it will only get worse." Everyone is advised to have regular screenings to monitor their blood sugar levels and blood pressure at the DRI on the cornero f Market Street and Peter Street during the opening hours from 11am to 7pm, Tuesday to Friday, and 10am to 1pm on Saturdays. For more information call the DRI on 326-5134. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009, PAGE 7 Diabetes is affecting more Bahamians than ever before IF IT is discovered in the early stages, Type Two diabetes can be completely controlled by diet and exercise. Disease a reality for 25,000

PAGE 7

By SIR RONALD SANDERS ( The writer is a Consultant a nd former Caribbean Diplomat) H ONDURAS is not a country with w hich the average Caribbean p erson is familiar. Therefore, recent events there have not been a major talking point except among govern-m ent representatives. Yet, t here are important lessons for the Caribbean arising f rom what has been described as a Coup d’tat int hat country. A s has been widely reporte d, the President, Manual Zelaya, was taken by the a rmy from his Presidential P alace and flown to Costa R ica in the dead of night. He was replaced by a provisional President Roberto Micheletti , the f ormer congressional leader. Z elaya’s supporters outside of Honduras wasted no time in condemning his ouster. Leading the demands for hisg overnment to be reinstated a nd even, at one time, threatening military intervention w as Venezuela’s President Hugo Chavez who hadr ecently recruited Honduras t o membership of the Boliv arian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA initiated. In the event, Zelaya’s r emoval has been condemned b y the member government of the Organization of Ameri can States (OAS the governments of the C aribbean and the United S tates of America on the basis that no government s hould be removed by uncons titutional means. And, that principle, of course, is correct as far as it goes. But, in the case of Hond uras there is more to the issue than meets the eye. Mr Z elaya is not without blame f or his own removal, and it may very well be that, within the confines of the Honduras C onstitution, there was no c oup at all. Indeed, it is being a rgued that he was removed from the Presidency in keepi ng with the Constitution and the law because he usurped the law in an attempt to keeph imself in office. I n 1982, Honduras amende d its Constitution to introd uce a four-year term limit on the Presidency. The Constitution also made it unconstitutional to try to alter the p rovision. This worked well until Mr Zelaya became President in 2006 by a slim majori ty. He is required to relin quish the Presidency in Jan uary, but sought to alter the C onstitution to extend his term. A challenge submitted to the Supreme Court found that he could not do so.D espite this, Zelaya ordered General Romeo Vasquez to h ave the military provide l ogistical support for a referendum anyway. Vasquez declined on the basis of the Supreme Court ruling and Zelaya promptly fired him. But the Court reinstated him.T he Supreme Electoral Tribunal then ordered the seizure of all ballot boxes and election-related materials. According to the Spanish daily El Pa’s, the ballot boxes had been flown in fromV enezuela by the Chavez government. The Congress, on the strength of theS upreme Court decision, t hen decided that Mr Zelaya had violated the Constitution and should be removed. In other words, they impeached him. The member govern ments of the OAS seem to h ave regarded this process as a coup d’tat. Hence, calls have been made for Zelaya’s reinstatement as President. A s Larry Binns, the Direc tor of the Council for Hemi spheric Affairs based in W ashington, has pointed out: “By presenting his government as under attack byr ightist, anti-constitutional elements intent on overthrowing his presidency, Zelaya has managed to pre s ent himself as an emblem of democracy and legitimacy.” He is far from it. Criticsb elieve him to be a populist demagogue akin to Mr Chavez. Indeed, his line upo f friends – Chazez himself and Evo Morales, the Bolivian President – reveal leaders who have also amended t heir countries’ constitutions to extend their term in office amid considerable opposition. There was an order for Zelaya’s detention, but instead of enforcing it, the p rovisional Honduran gove rnment chose to take him out of the country. They have argued that, in doing so, they avoided confrontation that would have ensued, probably causing the loss of many livesa s opposing factions clashed. Mr Zelaya had earlier shown himself not above leading his supporters in a march on the place where ballot boxes were ordered sequestered by the Court. T he question to be asked in the Caribbean is: Could a Caribbean leader ignore ther uling of the Supreme Court a nd proceed to try to hold a referendum to amend the Constitution, then fire the head of the military for refusing to ignore the Court’s rul ing? This is pretty heavyh anded stuff that smacks of authoritarianism and a disregard for the rule of law simply to perpetuate a leader in o ffice. If there is a need for Con stitutional change, particu l arly of an entrenched clause in the Constitution, a great deal of consultation andd ebate is absolutely necessary. Mr Zelaya paid little heed to the sensitivities of the Honduran Congress and s ections of the people represented by political parties and other groups. In tram-p ling on their rights and flouting the Constitution and the law, he set the scene forr etaliation. Within the OAS, the effort to condemn Zelaya’s removal and to call for his reinstate m ent appears to have been led by the Venezuelan gov ernment with the help of other governments that have aligned themselves closely with Hugo Chavez. These include Nicaragua, Bolivia a nd Argentina, all members o f ALBA. Other governments appear to have gone along with this call simply on the basis of Mr Zelaya’s removal from the country. As this commentary is b eing written, the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize and President of Costa Rica, Oscar Arias, is scheduled to mediate talks between Zelaya and Honduras’ appointed President RobertoM icheletti. No one can predict the outcome of these talks; they will depend on thew illingness of the contenders t o put Honduras before their own political ambitions, however skilful Mr Arias may be as a mediator. Elections for a new Presi dent are due in November. E lements of a solution to the crisis could be agreement that Zelaya will return to Honduras to finish his term a s President which will end in January, but there will be no referendum to amend the C onstitution now. The coun try will then choose their new President from a fresh list ofc andidates. This would meet both the importance of upholding constitutionally-elected govern m ents, and disapproving of those leaders who would tamper with the Constitutionf or their political gain. Honduras cannot afford the social and economic dis-r uption that would flow from prolonged civil strife and hemispheric isolation. Seventy per cent of its more than 7 million people already live in poverty. The Caribbean should strongly support Mr Arias’ efforts. Responses to: ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Honduras: A coup provoked WORLDVIEW SIRRONALD SANDERS H ONDURAS' OUSTED PRESIDENT MANUEL ZELAYA m eets with Dominican military officers at the national palace in Santo Domingo, Friday, July 10, 2009. K e n a B e t a n c u r / A P

PAGE 8

B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Summer intern Shonique Miller is proving to be a team playeri n a male dominated field of engineering at the Grand Bahama Power Company. M s Miller returned to the power company two weeks ago for her second year as a summer intern in the Engi n eering Department. S he has been working with Mr Meyer Kao, a consultant for the company in ProtectionE ngineering. Under the direc tion of Mr Kao, Ms Miller is being trained in the technical aspects of protection systemp rogramming. M s Miller, 25, obtained a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from North Car o lina A&T State in Decem ber 2008. She placed second in her engineering class and took on a fellowship offered by the school so she can obtain her Master’s degree in Engineering. Grand Bahama Power Company executives are very excited about Ms Miller’s potential and are impressed with her work so far. Mr Derick King, Transmission and Distribution Direc tor, was very impressed with Ms Miller’s enthusiasm on the job. He said the company is always in search of potential talent, however, attracting good talent has been a big challenge over the past few years. “I am very excited about Ms Miller’s potential, and I’m impressed with her energy to get involved, and her enthusi-a sm about hands on work e xperience,” he said. “Ms Miller shows great potential to be part of a team to ensure that we stay on the cutting edge with new tech nology.” Ms Miller’s specific field of study will be power system design and control. “Right now Grand Bahama is not growing in numbers, but our needs are changing. Plan ning and foreseeing future needs is part of what I will be studying. “It’s challenging and I’m loving it,” she said. Tanya Wildgoose, the only female engineer with GBPC, is also working with Ms Miller. Together, the women are breaking stereotypes by succeeding in a male-dominated field. Although there have been a lot of naysayers and discouraging comments from some males, Ms Miller is not letting their remarks deter her from a career in engineering. She intends to break barrie rs and prove that women can s ucceed in this field here in the Bahamas. Her mother is her biggest motivator. “My mother has been there making sure I don’t give up, never letting me forget my vision. “My advice to younger students is the same one I shared with the Tabernacle graduates when I spoke at their graduation this year, you have to have a vision. Like the Bible says, without a vision people would perish, you need to write a vision for your life and follow it through, no matter what.” Ms Miller is ready for the challenges her field will bring. While students are relaxing for the summer, she will be learning and getting real hands on experience while at home. Grand Bahama Power Company Ltd employs more than 180 Bahamians. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009, PAGE 9 B y ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE government has been engaging in “informal discussions” with the Bahamas Nurses Union’s legal advis-e r and is making “every effort” to come to an agreement with the union on health insurance coverage for nurses. Labour Minister Dion Foulkes said t hat both he and Health Minister H ubert Minnis have spoken with attorney Obie Ferguson and he hopes that government and the union can meet “as soon as possible” in a formal s etting to continue negotiations with the BNU. “We are trying to find some comm on ground . . . I don’t want to preempt discussions ongoing but we are making an effort to get the matter settled,” said Mr Foulkes. This comes after BNU P resident Cleola Hamilton last week turned down government’s invitation for the union to “reconsider” its prior rejection of the government’s proposal. She said that offer – which would have had government implement the n urses’ postponed coverage o n July 1, 2010, or before if feasible, a nd cover the cost of any “work relate d” sickness or injuries while providi ng private rooms for them to be t reated at the Princess Margaret Hospital – is “not an offer at all.” The offer “expired” July 9. Ms Hamilton said it went no further than what nurses can already get under the National Insurance s cheme. They want their health insurance this year, as was originally expected before Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said the government “cannot afford” to bring it into effect this year in the current fiscal envir onment. I t is unclear if they will take further a ction to achieve their demand. L ast week Ms Hamilton said she w ould “have to see some things” b efore she determined the way forward. The government obtained an injunction ordering nurses back to work in June, after they went on a mass sick-out to protest the delay in their coverage. H owever, T he Tribune u nderstands that the fact that this injunction was pursued on a “false premise” – that is, that the nurses’ industrial agreement was not legally registered – means it is not binding, leaving the legality of any further action by the nurses in question. The government has said that a lthough the unregistered agreement i tself is not binding for the govern m ent in terms of its obligations t owards the union, it will continue to t ry to come to a resolution with the n urses out of concern for their welfare and the public interest. Govt in ‘informal discussions’ with nurses union’ legal adviser D ion Foulkes DERICK KING, Transmission and Distribution director at Grand Bahama Power Company is pictured with Summer Intern Shonique Miller. TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras HONDURANauthorities o n Sunday lifted a curfew imposed since the ousting of President Manuel Zelaya two weeks ago a sign the interim government is trying to restore normality to life in the crisisgripped country, according to Associated Press. In a nationally broadcast a nnouncement, the interim government said the curfew had reached its objective to “restore calm” and curb crime. The administration of Roberto Micheletti imposed the curfew after soldiers escorted Zelaya out of the c ountry at gunpoint on June 28, plunging Honduras into political turmoil. Hondurans were ordered to stay in their homes from 11 p.m. to 4:30 a.m. nightly. The government briefly extended it from sunset to sunrise when Zelaya attempted to return to H onduras and the military blocked his plane from landing by parking vehicles on the runway July 5. Honduras lifts curfew weeks after coup d’etat Bahamian summer intern impacts Power Co HAVANA PROSPECTSfor Cuban performances by the New York Philharmonic look promising following a tour of concert halls and meetings with music officials on the island, orchestra president Zarin Mehta said Sunday, according to Associated Press. Mehta said a final decision will be made by the Philharmonic’s board of directors. Eric Latzky, the orchestra’s vice president for communications, said an official announcement could be as much as a month off. But Mehta said the trip looks promising, with tentative plans for performances on Oct. 31 and Nov. 1 at the 900-seat Teatro Amadeo Roldan, a renovated concert hall a few blocks from the Malecon coastal highway. “We have to go back now and work on repertoires, budgets. There are practical considerations like: how do you get the instruments in, where do you store them?” Mehta told The Associated Press in Havana. The Philharmonic’s incoming music director, Alan Gilbert, would conduct. The island’s Culture Ministry invited the orches tra to perform in Havana, and U.S. officials have agreed to allow the musicians to visit under an exemption to legal restrictions on travel to Cuba, Latzy said. The Communist Party daily Granma reported on Saturday that authorities were looking forward to such a tour, which would be among the most high-profile American cultural exchanges with communist Cuba since Fidel Castro’s rebels came to power a half-century ago. The Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra made a celebrated tour of Cuba a decade ago. Mehta said the orchestra is concentrating on people rather than politicians: “We just want to come and play music and let others worry about the politics. That’s their problem.” He noted that no major change in U.S.-North Korean relations occurred after the orchestra played in the North Korean capital in February 2008, the first performance by a major visiting orchestra in that totalitarian state. Still, Mehta said, the music did seem to touch many of the North Korean concertgoers, who included government officials and military officers. “Here you have all these people who have been taught that Americans are the devil,” he said. “When we played a Korean piece, you should have seen the change in the stoic, impassive faces of the Koreans. Many of them were weeping.” The New York Philharmonic has a long tradi tion of musical diplomacy. The late Leonard Bernstein led America’s old est philharmonic orchestra in a watershed tour of the Soviet Union in 1959, and later in communist China and Eastern Bloc countries in the 1980s. Mehta said some of the visiting musicians might give masters classes to Cuban students and allow them to sit in on dress rehearsals. NY Philharmonic says Cuba tour prospects promising

PAGE 9

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 38%/,& 12 Employment Opportunity Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t C ommonwealthBankisthepremierBahamianBankwith brancheslocatedinNewProvidence,AbacoandGrandBahama. Wearecommittedtodeliveringsuperiorqualityservice,tot raininganddevelopingouremployees,tocreatingvalueforour shareholdersandtopromotingeconomicgrowthandstabilityin thecommunity. Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for A ssistant Branch Manager, Abaco. CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE: AssistingtheBranchManagerinmanagingthesalesactivitiesof theBranchtoenhanceprofitability.E ffectivelyleading,supportingandcoachingpersonnelto achievecorporateobjectives.Effectivelymanagingaportfolioofconsumer,mortgageand commercialloans.Adjudicatingcreditlineswithindelegatedauthority.M anagingtheBranch’scollectionactivitiesandtheprotectionof collateral.Following-upwithclientandsupportfunctionstoensuretimely completionofproductrequestsandtransactionsandresolutionof inquiriesandissues.E nsuringCreditriskratingsandcreditscoringpracticesare adheredtoatalltimestominimizetheriskofloanlosses.Ensuringspecificobjectivesaredevelopedthroughan appropriatestrategicplantogrowtheBranch’sloananddeposit portfoliosandotherofferings.Addingvaluetothecustomers’portfoliooffinancialservices byactivelypromoting,marketing,buildingandcrosssellingall deposit/investmentandconsumercreditbusiness.Ensuring selfanddirectreportsconsistentlyprovidehighlycourteous customerserviceinaninformedandthoroughmanner.Assisting theManagerinattainingthetargetsincorporatedintheBranch’s financialplan.QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE: Bachelor’sdegreeorhigherinBusinessAdministration,Banking &FinanceorarelateddisciplinefromanaccreditedUniversity.Minimumofeightyearscommercialbankingexperiencewitha minimumof3yearssupervisory/managerialexperience.Experienceinmanagingadiverseloanportfolioandassessing loanquality.DetailedknowledgeofRetail/Commercial/Mortgagelending practicesandcreditanalysistoensureportfolioquality.Substantialworkexperienceinloansandriskmanagementwith afullunderstandingoffinancialstatementsandtheabilityto analyzetheinformation.Excellentleadershipandcoachingskills.Excellentcommunication,analyticalandreasoningskills.Excellentorganizationalandtimemanagementskills.ProficientintheuseoftheMicrosoftrangeofapplications.REMUNERATION PACKAGE: CommonwealthBankisaGreatplacetowork!Weofferan excitingworkenvironmentwiththeopportunityforgrowthand development.Wealsoofferacompetitivecompensationpackage, reflectingthesuccessfulapplicant’sexperienceandqualifications, includingaperformancebasedincentiveplan,health,vision, dentalandlifeinsurancesandapensionplan. Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before July 24, 2009to: Human Resources Department Re: Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco P.O. Box SS-6263 Nassau, Bahamas Telefax: (242393-8073 E-mail address:hr@combankltd.com Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those under consideration will be contacted.” had never given up hope that the boys would be found alive, and that their return was nothing short of a miracle. Relatives along with residents of South Andros had continued their search for the boys. They were reportedly found yesterday morning by a woman relative walking in the nearby settlement of Kemp’s Bay around 11.30pm. The youngsters had reportedly been sleeping in holes and feeding on wild fruit. Vera Clarke, the mother of the boys said. “Ellouise, my cousin, was driving up the road, going for one of my other cousins to come and do some work, when her little girl said ‘Ellouise, see Marcell and Deangelo’.” Ms Clarke said she was overcome with joy over her chil dren’s return. Marcelo and Deangelo were taken to a local clinic and then flown to Nassau late yesterday afternoon. The two young boys were brought to the Princess Margaret Hospital along with their mother around 5pm. Outside the Accident and Emergency section, Marcello’s father Marcellin told The Tribune : “I cant really say how happy I am. “I feel like cool water came into my heart. “God made a way. I was praying for God to do a miracle for me. “God kept them alive for me. I never gave up hope.” of sound problems. Red City had reportedly paid Lil Wayne $210,000 in advance t o secure his performance. Lil Wayne, however, failed to show up and was claimed to be asleep in his hotel room. More than 5,000 fans report edly had to be sent home at 2.30 am due to the rapper’s non appearance. Red City was unable to recoup its money which allegedly included just over $30,000 for the accommodations for Lil Wayne and his entourage. The organisers later had to apologise to fans, vendors, venue workers, police, spon sors and media for the mixup. According to an article posted on AllHipHop.com, Lil Wayne’s manager Cortez Bryant is reported as stating that September 27 was not the original concert date Wayne was booked for and that it was the fault of the promoters for both failed concert dates September 26 and Sep tember 27. An investigation has been launched to find o ut who fired the fatal shot. S uperintendent Ellsworth Moss told T he Tri b une : “The robbers exited the store and they were followed by officers who responded to a call of an armed robbery. “During the chase, we received information that there was an exchange of gunfire and as a result a young male was shot.” Superintendent Moss said police have determined that the young man was not in the store at the time of the robbery. The victim’s identity has not been released. United States Embassy in Nassau. Ms Garrison, a West Palm Beach resident, had last been in the US sometime in January. At the time police were told she may have been in the Bahamas, in the company of a Bahamian man. McKinney, who is reportedly the boyfriend of Ms Garrison’s daughter, appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane, and was not required to enter a plea to the murder charge. He is represented by attorney Romona Farquharson. The case was adjourned to Wednesday, July 15, for a fixture hearing. McKinney was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – Police investigations are continuing into an armed robbery and shooting in the Lewis Yard area, where a man was shote arly Friday morning. Asst Supt Edmund Rahming said the victim, Nicolas Rolle, 45, of Freeport, was at a house in Lewis Yarde ngaged in a gambling game with others when four masked men robbed them. Mr Rolle was shot by one of the suspects. He was takent o hospital, where he is detained in stable condition. A SP Rahming said the robbers also stole a white Buick L e Sable, license number 46706, to flee the area. It was recovered by police in NorthB ahamia later Friday morning. T he suspects were wearing masks and described as being between 5ft 7in to 5ft 9in tallo f slim build. SUDDEN DEATH POLICE are investigating t he sudden death of a man who was discovered in the downtown Freeport area on Saturday morning. A sst Supt Edmund Rahming said that sometime around 7.35am, officers received a call that a man was found dead lying on the pave-m ent in the area of the Immigration building. When officers arrived at t he scene to investigate, they discovered the body of a dark male who appeared to be unresponsive. EMS personnel dispatched t o the scene confirmed that h e was dead. The body was taken to the Rand Memorial Hospital morgue, where an autopsy will be performed tod etermine the cause of the d eath. Police do not suspect foul play. GUN SEIZED A 32-YEAR-OLD man was arrested after a firearma nd ammunition was discove red at a residence in Fortune Bay early Sunday morning. A ccording to reports, a team of officers executed a search warrant on a houses ometime around 5.45am Sunday. During the search, o fficers recovered a 9mm pistol along with 10 live rounds of ammunition. A male occupant was tak en into custody. He is expect e d to appear before Freeport Magistrate’s Court today. S HARK ATTACK AN American visitor was attacked by a shark while on vacation in Grand Bahama. A lthough details of the incident are sketchy, it is believed the attack mighth ave occurred in West End. Police said a 45-year-old m an was taken to hospital but refused treatment and has since left the country. Armed robbery and shooting investigated By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net BAHAMAS National Trust President Glenn Bannister said the organisation will “shortly file a defence and counter claim” in response to a suit brought against it. The suit alleges that BNT behaved “unconscionably” and even “corruptly” towards a poor farmer, seeking to dispossess him of land. The organisation says it has a “long standing policy of upholding the laws and customs of the Bahamas.” Mr Bannister said: “At that stage, interested members of the public and the press constitutionally have access to the court records and can then follow the proceedings if they so wish.” “The Bahamas National Trust has much work to do in guarding our heritage and developing our national park system which i s a source of tremendous pride and enjoym ent for Bahamians and visitors and of p aramount importance for conservation,” continued the statement. On Wednesday The Tribune reported on a statement of claim filed on June 26, 2009, on behalf of farmer Charles Gibson and the partners of Diamond Farms against the BNT. It alleged that executive director of the BNT, Eric Carey, on behalf of the organisation, “conspired” with senior officers to dispossess Mr Gibson and his family of land he had worked for decades. The statement claimed the BNT and the Department of Lands and Surveys breached t heir “fiduciary duty” towards Mr Gibson, w ith both agencies concealing certain inform ation from him as the BNT allegedly moved to add the land he had farmed to the “enormous acreage” in the area of the Harrold and Wilson Ponds for which it had already been granted a lease. The farmer received a letter in May 2008 telling him he had three months to vacate the property. BNT to ‘file defence, counter claim’ in response to suit By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune FreeportR eporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net A MAN was arraigned at Freeport Magistrate Court Thursday on a number of serious offences, including firearm, ammunition and assault charges. Garin Gibson appeared before Magistrate Helen Jones in Court Three. He pleaded not guilty to possession of ammunition, assault with a deadly weapon, possession of unlicensed firearm, and possession of unlicensed firearm with intent to endanger life. Gibson was denied bail and remanded to Fox Hill Prison. The matter was adjourned to November 30, 2009. DRUG CHARGE TWO men were arraigned in court on drug possession charges on Thursday. Ramon Sweeting, 31, of Yellow Elder, New Provi dence, and Dennis Lightbourne, 23, of Salinas Point, Acklins, was charged with possession of dangerous drugs with intent to supply. It is alleged that on July 6, the men were found in possession of a large quantity of marijuana at Dover Sound, Grand Bahama. According to reports, DEU officers went to Dover Sound where they discovered 50 buckets of marijuana. They also found three large crocus bags, each containing four bales of marijuana. The men were not required to enter a plea to the charges. They were denied bail and remanded to Fox Hill Prison until July 14. Man in court on firearm, ammunition and assault charges Lil Wayne sued for failing to perform at Nassau concert FROM page one FROM page one Missing bo ys found alive Man is charged with the murder of American woman FROM page one Teen killed in police shootout with robbers F ROM page one

PAGE 10

C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE11 I NSIDE England in thrilling draw with Australia MARVIN ROLLE serves as Devin Mullings waits at the net. BAHAMAS RELEGATED By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net T HE Bahamas Davis Cup team d idn’t survive the "battle of the fittest" against Guatemala over t he weekend at the National Tennis Center and was relegated to the Ameri can Zone III for the second time in two years. With the tie knotted at 2-2, Marvin Rolle went four hours and eight minutes before he lost a heart wrenching 6-7 (5 6 decision to a more fatigued Julien Urigen t hat sealed the 3-2 victory for Guatemala. With the victory, Guatemala will remain in Z one II for 2010, while the Bahamas dropped back to Zone III. " I was tired. I was drained, but I left it all on the court," said Rolle, who got the nod from team captain John Farrington after number two seed Timothy Neilly was unable to play because of an injury. " I was serving for the match and I got a little nervous. That happens. But I gave it all. I h ave no regrets. I gave it all." The key to the fifth and final set when Rolle h eld for a 5-5 tie and broke Urigen to go up 65. Serving for the match, Rolle didn't get in any of his first serves and he was eventually broken by Urigen or a 6-6 tie, setting up the dramatic finish. U rigen, who had to be treated for cramps after he held for a 3-2 lead in the fatal fifth set, c ame back and he held serve and broke Rolle in the final two games to pull off the huge u psetting victory over the Bahamas. "I really expected a really tough match and it was a tough match," Urigen said. "I thought I prepared my self very good. I rested well yesterday, drank a lot of fluids and I went outt here and gave it my best." Urigen, who turns 18 on July 22, was playing in just his second Davis Cup tie. But he said it was definitely the toughest match he played in his life and he's happy to pull off the win forG uatemala. The stage was set for the clincher after M ullings needed two hours and 25 minutes to come through with a 7-5 3-6, 6-1, 6-1 decision over Cristian Paiz in what should have been the showdown between the two top seeds in yesterday's opener. Paiz had to step in for Christopher Diaz Figueroa, who was unable to play after he cramped up the pivotal doubles on Saturday. "I just played solid and made him play," said Mullings about his victory. "In the third and fourth sets, I was able to go right at him and put him away." The pressure was put squarely in the face on Mullings when he started playing after he and Rolle went five grueling sets for three hours and 55 minutes before they lost 7-6, 7-5, 4-6, 36, 8-6 to Christopher Diaz Figueroa and Sebastian Vidal on Saturday. What many had predicted as a sure victory for the Bahamas, who swept Guatemala in their last meeting two years ago in Guatemala in zone III. But after the first day, all of that changed after the Bahamas split the two singles. While Mullings easily won the opener in one hour and 45 minutes with a 6-3, 6-4, 6-2 win over Uriguen, Neilly was out-classes by Diaz Figueroa 7-5, 6-1, 6-2 in two hours. Team captain John Farrington called it was an unbelievable tie that Bahamians will relish for quite some time because of the way the team played. "We were 1-1 on Friday and lost the doubles," Farrington said. "Devin gave us another opportunity today to keep alive in the tie and Marvin came up and left it all on the court, losing in five sets. "Every Bahamian should be proud of these guys for what they accomplished this weekend. We want to thank the Bahamian public for their support over the holiday weekend. It's just unfortunate that we have fallen back into zone III." While the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association will reassess the team's performance as they prepare for Zone III next year, Guatemala will take the time to relish in their thrill of victory. "I'm satisfied with the way the team played," said captain Manuel Chavez. "They played with a lot of heart each and every match and they won. To me that's very important." Chavez said when they came here, they knew tat it was going to be a real challenge to win. But once they pulled off the doubles, he really began to believe that they could win. "They fought hard some times for three, four and five hours," he said. "We are going to rest for a long time and enjoy this victory. It was so sweet to come here and pull it off." AMERICANZONE 11 DAVISCUP TIE Team suffers heartbreak defeat to Guatemala MARVIN ROLLE returns a volley. GUATEMALA’S JULIEN URIGEN (right their victory over the Bahamas. DEVIN MULLINGS plays a double-fisted backhand. GUATAMALA’S DOUBLES TEAM SebastiEn vidal (left Diaz Figueroa P H O T O S : K e v i n M a j o r

PAGE 11

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net AFTER missing his chance to continue his quest for the Golden League $1 million jackpot, Chris 'Fireman' Brown kept his winning streak alive on the European circuit. Brown, back on track after missing the Bisett Games in Oslo on June 6, dedicated Friday's winning performance at the Golden Gala in Rome in a season's best of 44.81 seconds to the Bahamian people as he posted the second fastest time by a ny Bahamian this year. " I give the good LORD all the praise for a job w ell done," said Brown in an interview with The Tribune yesterday. "I felt pretty good about my race and very focus it was my first 44 for the season so I definitely feel great. "I know I wanted to do something specialfor the Bahamas since it was turning 36 yrs old, and yes I dida season best 44.81. Happy Birthday Bahamas." In a pretty face race, Brown held off David Gillick of Ireland in 44.82. Renny Quow of Trinidad & Tobago was third in 45.02. "It does feel good to back in Europe and even better to walk away with another win," Brown said. "This is only my fifth race of the season. I feel this really proves that I'm ready for Berlin." With the time, 30-yewar-old Brown dipped well under the A qualifying time of 45.55 for the IAAF World Championships in Berlin, Germany. The national champion and national record holder also joins injured Latoy Williams (44.73 Andrae Williams (44.98 eran female sprinters Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and Chandra Sturrup. This time, however, Sturrup avenged her last two losses, including the National Championships, to Ferguson-McKenzie. Running in the fastest race so far this year, Sturrup got the fastest start of the field, but faded to a third place finish at the end of the women's 100 in a season's best of 10.99. Ferguson-McKenzie got left in the blocks, but made up enough grounds for sixth in 11.11, a season's best as well. "I felt very good about my performance," Sturrup told The Tribune. "I was having problems with my start in the early part of my season and was playing catch up in the races. "I knew that if I could get my start together everything would come into play." The race was won by a Jamaican sweep as Kerron Stewart posted the world leading time and setting a meet record in an impressive time of 10.75 as she stormed from behind. Shelly-Ann Fraser was second in 10.91. Stewart easily took the heats in 11.01 pulling Sturrup through in second in 11.08 just ahead of Ferguson-McKenzie's 11.09. Fraser won the other heat in 11.13. The 37-year-old Sturrup, who has joined four other competitors who have dipped under the 11second barrier so far this year, said she was pleased woth her performance into the World Championships. "It's been about two years since I ran that fast. I should have ran sub 10 last year but I wasn't executing my race that well," she noted. "But this year, I would say that I am ready for Berlin. I just need to stay focus and execute and stay healthy." Sturrup and Ferguson-McKenzie will continue their rivalry today when they compete in the women's century at the Athens Grand Prix in Greece. They are both expected to be matched against Jamaican Veronica Campbell-Brown in their first showdown for the year. No other Bahamian has been listed on the entry list for the meet at the site of the 2004 Olympic Games where Campbell-Brown secured the 200 gold over American Allyson Felix with FergusonMcKenzie taking the bronze, while Tonique Williams-Darling snatched the women's 400 gold from Mexican Ana Guevara. By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas' bid for its only medal came down to the women's medley relay yesterday at the 6th IAAF World Youth Championships in Sudtirol, Italy. The team of V'Alonee Robinson, Katarina Smith, Rashad Brown and Katrina Seymour went into the race with the third fastest qualifying time and they seemed poise to ascend the dais. But in the final, the team fell short with a fourth place finish in a personal best of two minutes and 9.33 seconds. The United States won the gold in a world leading time of 2:04.32, while Hungary took the silver in 2:09.22 and Romania carted off the bronze in 2:09.25. Team manager Kermit Tay lor, who serves as the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations' public relations officer, admitted that the squad went out and they performed at their best, but it wasn't quite enough. "They finished first in their heat and sent a strong message to the teams in the final," Tay lor said. "In the final, not trying to make any excuses for them, but Katrina woke up this morning with a slight eye injury. "The doctors had to treat her where they got her prepared to run. She went out on the anchor leg and ran her heart out. when she got the baton, we were in fifth or sixth position and she really fought hard to get us in medal contention." Coming down the stretch, Taylor said Smith just simply ran out of land and wasn't able to catch the runner from Roma nia. "V'Alonee ran a good race to get us started before she passed it on to Katarina from Grand Bahama," Taylor said. "she passed it on to Rashad Brown, who held her own. But by the time she gave it to Kat rina, she just left it on the track trying to get the medal." Taylor said from day one of the championships, whenever they released the heat sheet, the Bahamian athletes found themselves in a position to challenge for one of the top qualifying spots. "But despite the fact that the team didn't win any medals, I think they performed very well," Taylor said. "I was very proud of them. I think they did very well competing at this calibre of meet." While the medley team just fell short of a medal, Taylor said they were disappointed that they were not able to get the men's medley team registered in time to compete. Not casting any blame on anybody, Taylor said the IAAF tried to work with them, but there were a couple other teams who also didn't register in time and once the teams found out the situation, they too tried to get in. "The IAAF told us that they could not make the exception to get us in because they would have to do it for the other teams and there was just too many teams to accommodate," Taylor said. Although they didn't get to run as a relay team, Geno Jones and Demetri Knowles came close to advancing to the final of the men's 100 and 200 metres respectively. None of them, however, advanced. Here's a look at how our athletes fared in the other events: Women's 100 metres heats Sparkyl Cash, 5th in heat one in 12.60. V'Alonee Robinson, 4th in heat seven in 12.23 to advance. Women's 100 metres quarterfinal V'Alonee Robinson, 7th in heat three in 12.16. Men's 100 metres heats Jonathan Farquharson, 4th in heat one in 11.08. Geno Jones, 1st in heat three in 11.99 to advance. Men's 100 metres quarterfinal Geno Jones, 3rd in heat four in 10.79 to advance. Men's 100 semifinal Geno Jones, 7th in heat two in 10.72. Men's 400 metres Glenwood Baillou, 6th in heat five in 50.77. Women's 400 metres heats Rashad Brown, 2nd in heat one in 56.16 to advance. Katrina Seymour, 3rd in heat five in 55.77 to advance. Women's 400 semifinal Rashad Brown, didn't finish in heat two. Katrina Seymour, 5th in heat three in 56.24. Women's 800 metres heats Hughnique Rolle, 7th in heat one in 2:22.50. Men's 110 hurdles heats Aaron Wilmore, 5th in heat four in 14.24. Patrick Bodie, 5th in heat five in 14.49. Men's 200 heats Harold Carter, fifth in heat four in 22.16. Demetri Knowles, 3rd in heat eight in 21.90 to advance. Men's 200 semifinal Demetri Knowles, 3rd in heat two in 21.76. Women's Medley Relay V'Alonee Robinson, Katari na Smith, Rashad Brown and Katrina Seymour, 1st in heat three in 2:10.12 to advance. V'Alonee Robinson, Katarina Smith, Rashan Brown and Katrina Seymour, 4th in the final in 2:09.33. GOLDENGALA, ROME Brown keeps European winning streak alive O N FIRE: C hris ‘Fireman’ Brown. DEMETRI KNOWLES competing in the men’s 200 metres semi-finals. KATRINA SEYMOUR anchoring the women’s medley relay. THEWOMEN’SMEDLEYRELAYTEAM: Pictured from left Rashan Brown, Katarina Smith, V’Alonee Robinson and Katrina Seymour. 6TH IAAF WORLDYOUTHCHAMPIONSHIPS, ITALY Women’s medley relay team misses out on medal – just

PAGE 12

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS ,THE TRIBUNE PAGE 13, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 PHOTOS: Patrick Hanna/BIS SAILING: FRANKHANNAALLANDROS & BERRYISLANDSREGATTA CLASS A WINNER New Southern Cross: 10 points. THE B CLASS starting. 2ND PLACE IN CLASS B Lady Sonia: 20 points. THE 16th annual Frank Hanna All Andros & Berry Islands Regatta was held over the weekend at the Olympic site at Morgans Bluff in North Andros. At the end of the three-day competition, the New Southern Cross emerged as the A Class winner with total of 10 points, followed by the Good News with nine. Who Dat finished third with six points. In the B Class, the Ants Nest came out on top with 24 points. Coming in second was Lady Sonia wirth 20 and the Eudeva wrapped up third place with 18. And in the C Class, Two Friends took the title with 17 points, just one better than second place Sweet Island Gal. Lady Eunice ended up in third place with 12. New Southern Cross proves a class act SECOND PLACEINCLASSA Good News: 9 points. CLASS B WINNER Ants Nest: 24 points. THE CLASS A boats. THE CLASS B fleet.

PAGE 13

C M Y K C M Y K LOCALANDINTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE FRED ATKINS, Associated Press Writer CARDIFF, Wales England and Australia drew the first Ashes test on Sunday after a thrilling last wicket standby the home side's final pairing of James Anderson and Monty Panesar, according to Associated Press . England closed on 252-9 after a partnership by Paul Colling wood (74(31 frustrated Australia for 82 minutes after tea at Sophia Gar-dens. Australia had looked set for victory when Collingwood was caught by Michael Hussey off Peter Siddle. But Anderson and Panesar then batted for 40 min utes to steer England to safety in a nail-biting finish, taking the total past the 239 it needed to force Australia to bat again. "It was horrible to watch," England captain Andrew Strauss said. "As a batsmen to watch your number nine, 10 and 11 batsmen do your job for youis not ideal. I thought we always had one wicket too many down and it was only with 18 balls togo that I thought we had a sniff." Anderson was more optimistic than his captain. "Cer tainly when they put Marcus North on, a part-time spinner, I thought we had a great chance," he said. "Monty was batting pretty well and we were communicating well." Australia captain Ricky Ponting pinpointed Collingwood as the man who had denied the tourists' victory. "He deserves all the credit you can give him, because without him and his innings Eng land would have been in a whole lot of trouble," Ponting said. "We just weren't quite good enough to finish off a great five days." England's physio and 12th man repeatedly walked on to the field of play in the closing stages. Asked whether this was contrary to the spirit of the game, Strauss said it was due to confusion about the number of overs they had to face and his opposite number Ponting, while unimpressed, refused to use it as an excuse. "That's not the rea son we didn't win it," Ponting said. Ben Hilfenhaus claimed 3-47 and Nathan Hauritz 3-63 as Australia's bowlers initially exerted the kind of pressure their English counterparts failed to produce during 12 hours in the field, after the hosts had resumed on 20-2. Kevin Pietersen left a ball from Hilfenhaus that uprooted his offstump in the fourth over of the day to leave England on 31-3 and Strauss slashed the ball into Brad Haddin's gloves to be out for 17 in the 17th. Collingwood enjoyed a charmed life early on. He was close to being caught off Hauritz by a diving Ponting at short leg, then scrambled the next delivery away from the stumps by using his pads and feet. Matt Prior was less fortunate, caught at first slip for 14 by Michael Clarke after a delivery from Hauritz that took a ferocious bounce, leaving England on 70-5 in the 27th over. Collingwood and Andrew Flintoff steered England through to lunch, but a breakthrough came after an hour in the afternoon session. Johnson belied an erractic start when he induced an edge from Flintoff that just carried to Ponting at second slip. Flintoff was out for 26, and England was 127-6 in the 50th over. Stuart Broad was lucky not to be out lbw first ball to Johnson's next delivery, but he delayed Australia for 68 min utes until being out lbw to Hauritz. Swann then provided some nuisance value. He was hit three times in the penultimate over of the afternoon session by Siddle, but survived to frustrate Australia for an hour after tea until he was lbw to Hilfenhaus. Hauritz missed the chance to run Collingwood out in the 90th over but just as England looked poised to claim a draw he edged a Siddle delivery to Hussey, who caught him at the second attempt. That left Anderson and Panesar with a minimum 11.3 overs to bat out. After an astonishingly tense passage of play they passed the target of 239 needed to force Australia to bat again and were aided by a crucial mis field by Hauritz that gifted Panesar a boundary. Their partnership lasted 40 for minutes before the umpires called time, leaving the series all square at 0-0 ahead of Thursday's start to the second test at Lord's. England force draw with Australia ENGLAND'S James Anderson, bottom centre right, celebrates as teammate Monty Panesar, right, shake hands with Australia's Ricky Ponting after their teams drew the first cricket test match. ENGLAND'S James Anderson, left, and Monty Panesar walk from the pitch after their team draw the first cricket test match. ENGLAND'S Monty Panesar appeals unsuccessfully for the wicket of Australia's Marcus North during the third day of the first cricket test match between England and Australia in Cardiff, Wales. CRICKET: FIRSTASHESTEST J o n S u p e r / A P P h o t o T o m H e v e z i / A P P h o t o T o m H e v e z i / A P P h o t o ENGLAND'S James Anderson, center, and Monty Panesar, left, confer with Aleem Dar during the final day of the first cricket test match between England and Australia in Cardiff, Wales, Sunday, July 12, 2009. B y Renaldo Dorsett Tribune Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net T he country's most notable gridiron star continues the dream of bringing football to the Bahamas, through the Devard and Devaughn Darling Football Camps,p resented by his non-profit organization the As One Foundation. Darling hosted yet another successful edition of the camps both in Grand B ahama (July 6th-7th idence (July 9th-10th During the course of the pair of twoday camps, Darling, his NFL colleagues and a team of coaches based in the Unit-e d States, tutored hundred of campers between the ages of 11-17 in the basics of American football. Darling was joined by fellow NFL P layers Derrick Martin and Tre Stallings of the Baltimore Ravens, Larry Johnson, Bobby Engram, and Dwayne Bowe of the Kansas City Chiefs, and Darrius Heyward Bey of the Oakland Raiderst o assist the novice players with skill development, technique, and the fundamentals of American Football. D arling noted the purpose of the camp is to encourage young Bahamian athletes to pursue their education and dreams of playing American Football, m uch like he and his twin brother Devaughn did some years ago. “We are thrilled with the number of quality professional athletes confirmed to attend, coach and mentor campers at both of the 2009 football camps,” said Devard Darling. “The foundation would not be able to put on successful football camps without the help and support from t he athletic community and we are truly grateful for their time and generosity.” Darling said he has been pleased with the growth and development over the camp and the foundation itself over the past few years. "The camp has grown tremendously over the years and its just been a blessing to be apart of it all. It is about giving t hese kids another opportunity to find a way to live out their dreams, using a sport to someday reach a professional level or to get themselves an education," he said "We started out with one day camps, andt he camp just continues to grow every year. We recieve great support from the corporate community, we do our best to have coaches and players from around t he sport come down to the Bahamas to give the kids a hands on opportunity for the kids to work with, the interest continues to grow every year with more and more kids coming out and from alot of the repeat campers we are beginning to see the benefits." The 5-year veteran receiver, now in his second season with the Kansas City C hiefs, said he sees the Bahmas as a breeding ground for untapped football talent, with the camp serving as just one means of putting that talent on display. "The talent level here is very impressive. The Bahamas is a small country that has tons of guys with athletic ability here so we expect to see some guys out here that have a great natural skill set and can s tep on the field right away and learn pretty quickly," he said, "This camp would be a great start for many of them and it gives insight into what they can do because a lot of the drills we do outh ere are things you would do on the football field or things we would do in a typical NFL practice session." Darling said he and the foundation l ook forward to the continued growth of the camp in the very near future with possible expansion to the family islands. "There is always room for improvement so we want to continue to make the camp bigger and better each year by adding new things and making it more attractive to people that want to get involved with the kids and what we are d oing," he said, "Ideally we would like for a few of these guys to use this as a jump start to possibly become apart of Frank's program, he's always looking for new talent and this is about as good a place as any to start." The As One Foundation was created in 2007 by Devard Darling, in loving memory of his identical brother D evaughn Darling who passed in 2001 during spring training. Its goal is to provide underprivileged youth both nationally and internationally with educational and developmentalo pportunities through athletic endeavors, educational programming and spiritual enrichment. Specifically, the “Devard & D eveaughn Darling Football Camps” strive to encourage young Bahamians ages 11 to 16 to further their athletic skills and education at a private school in the United States. The cap of available camper slots is 120, and attendance will be allotted to elite athletes with the potential of pursuing a collegiate or professional career i n football. While gaining invaluable skills and training in the game of American Football, camp attendees also also received free gifts, equipment and a chance to earn the title of Camp MVP. Camp MVP's will be judged by participation in all activities and the chosen honoree and one parent will win a fully p aid trip to Kansas City, Missouri during the 2009 NFL season to spend a weekend with Devard Darling and his family. Keeping an American football dream alive D EVARDANDDEVAUGHNDARLINGFOOTBALLCAMPS Gurabo, Puerto Rico came into the PONY Latin American Caribbean Zone as the favourites to return to the 2009 15-16 PONY COLT World Series scheduled for August 4th 12th in Lafayette, Indi a na. Puerto Rico came in second behind the US at the 2 008 World Series. It would not happen in 2009 as the Team B ahamasupset Gurabo, PRin the 1 4 Playoff match up. Team Bahamas made history by defeating Puerto Rico for the first time at an International Tournament. T he President (Craig Kemp tives congratulated Team Bahamas 15-16 National Team on this historic victory.He congratulated Manager Patrick Knowles and Coaches Marcian Curry& Loren Kemp on a job well done, as well as the (16 T eam memberswho hadmade the B ahamas proud once again about baseball in the country. T his was one of the best showing by Team Bahamas an International Tournament. I n the game: Jeffrey Woodside pitched4 strong innings:Went 1-3 with 2 RBI. In the top of 5th he ran into trouble and was replaced by Byron Ferguson with 1 out and Runners on 2nd & 3rd. F erguson was able to get PR out i n the5th & 6th inning, not beforethey scored2 runs. Team Bahamas went into the bottom of 6th inningdown 5 4.Alex Tapiahit a fly ball for the first out.Jervis "Champ" Stuart stepped to the plate and d rove the 2 balls / 1 Strike pitch to straight a way centre field to tie the game 5.With one out Theodore Trae Sweeting Jr. (1 -1 on the day 1 RBI& Stolen Base) was able to draw a 2nd walkon 5 pitches. T eam Bahamas now had the go ahead run on. PR decided to change their RH pitcher for a Lefty to keep Sweeting from stealing 2nd.Jeffrey Woodside struck-out, but during his at bat, Sweeting was able to steal second. W ith two out, Marcus Holbert stepped to the plate and drove the2-2 pitch to Right Field scoring Sweeting from 2nd Base with the go-ahead run. Top of the Seven inning, Team Bahamas needed 3 outs for the big upset. Manager Knowles called on Fire Baller, Marcus H olbertto close the door for thewin. Marcus struck-out the first batter, second batt er pop out to Center field. Marcus trying to be careful, walked the 3 Batter w ho stole second and went to third on a pass ball. With the pressure on and only able to throw the fast ball, due to the runner on 3rd base.With 3 ball & 1 strike, the 4th PR batter pulled a ball on the corner and flew-out to Andre in Left Field for thef inal out.The Bahamians threw gloves and caps in the air in celebration. Team Bahamas enjoys historic baseball win

PAGE 14

n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE former project manager for a major Freeport-based real estate development has seen the Court of Appeal increase the dam ages awarded to him for breach of a Profit Sharing Agreement, in addition to backing ar uling which awarded him $119,622 in damages for wrongful dismissal by the developer. The appellate court’s 92-page judgment, largely drawing on the original Supreme Court ruling, goes into graphic detail on the com plete breakdown of the more than 20-year friendship between two British expatriates, Steven Jervis and Victor Skinner, over the 76home Shoreline residential development andt he Profit Sharing Agreement that was sup posed to split the project’s net income 75/25 between the two. The Court of Appeal judgment recorded how the two first came to Freeport and Grand Bahama on a 1984 rugby tour, with Mr Jervis subsequently developing a career as an engineer and Mr Skinner one as a quantity surveyor in the construction industry. T he Grand Bahama links really took off in 1998, when Mr Jervis, after deciding to settle in Freeport with his family, in May-June of that year became interested in developing a tract of land at Fortune Cay into what would become the Shoreline residential subdivision. Mr Skinner’s advice was sought on the project, and the contacts blossomed to such an extent that it was agreed “that they would jointly do the project and that the net profits would be shared as to 75 per cent [for Mr Jervis] and 25 per cent to [Mr Skinner]. The agreement was not put in writing at that time, and the agreement would operate from the beginning of their business relationship...They also agreed on [Mr Skinner’s] salary. “[Mr Jervis] had some money which he was prepared at that stage to put into the project, and [Mr Skinner] had the considerable expe rience needed to get it up and going.” Mr Jervis paid $3.8 million for the land that would become Shoreline, and Mr Skinner started full-time employment as project manager on March 1, 1999. The latter, though, was unaware that Mr Jervis’s company, KST Investments, had been incorporated as the vehicle to run the project, so as to reduce his personal liability, until he questioned its name on his pay cheque in March 1999. [Mr Skinner] said that he became concerned to raise the issue because all his negotiations and agreement in relation to the development and his share of the profits had been with [Mr Jervis] on a person-to-person basis without the involvement of a corporate body,” the Court of Appeal judgment found. “He had asked [Mr Jervis] how the involvement of [KST Investments] would affect their agreement in terms of profit shares, and [Mr Jervis] assured him that it would make no dif ference to their agreement.” The development proceeded with Mr Skinner in charge of construction, and Mr Jervis responsible for sales, marketing, accounting, legal and financial aspects. Operating as partners, both received salaries of $7,000 per month and $3,000 in rental allowance. Yet by early 2001, the relationship between the two was starting to sour. The Court of Appeal judgment recorded: “In February 2001, and on the insistence of [Mr Skinner], the Profit Sharing Agreement was reduced to writing as [Mr Skinner] felt marginalized, inse cure and vulnerable. “His work permit was only for one year, as [Mr Jervis] had told him that a three-year work permit was not available, which information he later found out not to be true. He had been left out by [Mr Jervis] on a discussion C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4.68$4.51$4.69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.21 $4.30 $4.25 n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he Bahamas must immediately fix its judicial system’s inability to resolve commercial disputes in a “timeframe acceptable” tot he international community, a leading attorney has warned, as “any further deterioration” will cost the financial services industry and other economic sectors both current and future business. Brian Moree, senior partner at McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes, told Tribune Business that the reso lution of important, complex commercial disputes in good time was currently “not happening” within the Bahamian judicial system. This, he added, needed to be “addressed in the short term” if key sectors of the Bahamian economy were to maintain their international competitiveness, with the financial services industry’s “survival” especially at stake. Tribune Business understands, from attorneys requesting anonymity, that the judicial system’s ability to resolve and dispose of commercial cases in a timely manner has worsened in recent months as a result of Senior Justice John Lyons’ departure. Many of the most complex commercial matters in the court system were before him, including several key court-supervised liquidations where clients have been waiting months – and sometimes years – for the return of multimillion dollar assets. As many commercial attorneys had privately feared, his departure – and wait for a similarlyskilled replacement – has left the judicial system worse off. While not commenting directly on the ramifications of Senior Justice John Lyons’ departure, Mr Moree told Tribune Business: “The system is having difficulty accommodating the large number of commercial matters in a timeframe that is acceptable throughout the international community. “I think that it is something which must be addressed in the Court problems threaten financial sector ‘survival’ n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A FAILED bidder for the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort has seen another case involving an Exuma-based real estate/resort project he is promoting, featuring a disputed $8 million mortgage, sent back to the Supreme Court after his bid to throw the matter out wasr ejected by the Court of Appeal. Barry Silverton, a Californiabased real estate/casino developer, who led a $40 million bid to acquire Emerald Bay – the lastone to be accepted (then fall through) by its receivers and main creditor before the decision was taken to close the resort – saw t he Court of Appeal reinstate the action launched by his 25 per cent equity partner in the Hermitage Estates project, finding that it had shown an “arguable case to go to trial”. The legal battle between Mr Silverton and his Hermitage Estates company, which had been s eeking to develop a 1,700-acre resort/real estate project on Exuma’s Royal Cay, and Hamby Ltd, has its genesis in a joint venture agreement with the latter’s Delaware-incorporated parent. The Court of Appeal judgment recorded that the parent, Talisker Realty Ltd, and Mr Silverton andH ermitage Estates had signed a Letter of Intent on November 29, 2004, setting out the terms of the agreement between the two sides. Hamby Ltd was the Bahamianincorporated vehicle designed to hold and acquire Talisker’s invest ment in the Hermitage Estates project. A ppeal Justice Emanuel Osadebay, writing the Court’s judgment, noted that a numberof agreements were alleged to have been concluded between the parties, including a December 17, 2004, shareholder agreement which stated how Hamby Ltd would take a 25 per cent stake in H ermitage Estates. Via a December 23, 2004 mortgage, Hamby Ltd agreed to loan Hermitage Estates “the sum of $8 million on security of two tracts of land comprising 1,437 acres known as the ‘Hermitage Estates’, with a maturity and redemption date of December 31, 2 006”. The previous day, Hermitage Estates had also concluded a mortgage agreement with Deidre and Newell Bowe, where the pair advanced $3.333 million to the company, again secured on its real estate. “Irrespective of the fact that the Bowes’ mortgage pre-dates the Hamby mortgage, the Bowes’ mortgage expressly recognizes the Hamby mortgage as having priority,” the Court of Appeal found. However, Hermitage Estates was now alleging that Hamby’s mortgage simply secured the original $8 million loan, as approved by the Investments Board, “and any acquisition” other than that would be void under the Inter national Persons Landholding Act. But Hamby, and its Bahamian attorneys, Brian Simms and Marco Turnquest of Lennox Paton, argued that the $8 million mortgage was part of a wider agree ment and acted as collateral for its equity interest and a number of other obligations Hermitage Failed Four Seasons bidder embroiled in $8m mortgage case Manager wins profit deal breach ver dict against developer But leading attorney praises government on regulatory consolidation n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas requires a “complete overhaul” of all gov ernment agencies and ministries dealing with the financial services industry if the sector is to maintain its long-term competitiveness, a leading attorney has warned, with this nation facing a stark choice between necessary reform and “just plodding along”. Brian Moree, senior partner at McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes, told Tribune Business that the “interdependent” relationship between the different public sector bodies required a comprehensive, holistic approach to reform rather than just a piecemeal initiative that focused on one or two areas as opposed to the whole. Calling for a three to five-year “national development plan” for financial services, Mr Moree said any public sector reforms needed to focus on areas such as: The judicial system and its ability to deal with commercial cases The Immigration Department, and its processing of permit applications for key expatriate financial sector staff, plus the various residency permits for its high net-worth clients The Registrar General’s Department, which every finan cial sector player must deal with for company incorporations and the like The financial sector regulators And key infrastructure and the major utilities, especially the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC Although reforms needed to be enacted in concert with the private sector, Mr Moree argued that the impetus needed to come from the top levels of govern ment. The Prime Minister and his senior officials, he added, needed to “exercise strong leadership. To implement the changes which are going to be necessary. A sig nificant amount of political courage and leadership will be required to implement this ‘Complete overhaul’ in pub lic sector needed to suppor t financial services * Leading attorney: Judicial system resolving commercial disputes in ‘acceptable timeframe’ for international business ‘not happening’ * Urges immediate fix, as ‘any further deterioration will have extremely negative impact’ * Calls for holistic solution, as current woes ‘going to have an effect on the development of new business and the retention of existing business’ BRIAN MOREE S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e ? ? B B

PAGE 15

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Estates was supposed to complete. Hamby Ltd alleged that it could apply the monies received under the mortgage to repay any debt Hermitage Estates owed to it, as per the mortgage agreement. “It is contended by the appellant that the Letter of Intent dated November 29, 2004. in this matter contemplated that following the contribution of the initial capital to get the project going that Talisker, through Hamby, would receive 100 per cent of the net cash flow and/or capital events’ proceeds until such time as the loan was repaid, with the maturity date being December 31, 2006,” the Court of Appeal found. “The appellant [Hamby] submits that the Hamby mortgage had collateral advantages which, together, formed part of the mort-gage transaction. The various instruments made up a composite whole agreement between the parties.” Hermitage Estates, in 2005, had sought to redeem Hamby’s mort-gage by advancing a sum it believed would clear its out standing debt under the mortgage. It then applied to the Supreme Court for a redemption order, but then-Justice John Lyons said such a summary order was not appropriate and adjourned the case to a date whenboth sides could give oral evidence before him. Justice Lyons’ decision was never set aside, but 11 days after it was given a Settlement Agreement – “the purport and content of which are sharply disputed or contested by the parties”was reached on May 23, 2006. Then, on December 23, 2006, Hamby Ltd issued a summons seeking a Supreme Court order that it could foreclose on Hermitage Estates because it had defaulted on its obligations. The latter and Mr Silverton, coupled with the other defendants, argued that this procedure was “improper” as foreclosure was governed by Order 77, Rule one of the Supreme Court rules. Moves were then made to have Hamby’s summons struck out because “no reasonable course of action” was disclosed against them. The Bowes were named as defendants by Hamby because they were allegedly trying to use their mortgage interest to sell the Hermitage Estates project to another defendant, Kendall PH LLC, despite being subordinate to Hamby’s interest. Hermitage Estates then moved, on February 27, 2008, to obtain a Supreme Court order that Hamby Ltd’s action “be struck out and the action dismissed on the grounds that it discloses no reasonable cause of action, is embarrassing and is otherwise an abuse of process”. Hamby Ltd, meanwhile, had applied for its initial action to be continued as a writ, arguing that its case “discloses triable issues” and could “only be resolved by a full blown trial of the action with pleadings”. Supreme Court Justice Faisool Mohammed, though, agreed with Hermitage Estates’ position and struck out Hamby Ltd’s action based on the written evidence before him. The Court of Appeal, though, noting that striking out actions should only happen when there is no obvious trial case, found that the issues raised by Hamby Ltd were “complex and cannot simply be determined on the documents only”. Witnesses, the judgment said, were needed to determine the intent of the parties involved. “Upon reading the documents in this case, I cannot say that it is clear beyond doubt that the appellant’s claim is wholly untenable on the face of it,” Justice Osadebay found, stating that the Supreme Court “fell into error” in determining that Hamby Ltd had shown no arguable case to go to trial. While Hamby Ltd acknowledged that the monies borrowed under the $8 million mortgage had been repaid, and the shares representing its 25 per cent interest in Hermitage Estates issued to it, it was maintaining “that there are still certain non-financial obligations which remain to be satisfied”. Ultimately, the Court of Appeal ordered that the case be remitted to the Supreme Court for a hearing on Hamby Ltd’s writ application and a “speedy trial”. Failed Four Seasons bidder embroiled in $8m mortgage case Court problems threaten financial sector ‘survival’ short-term before there is any further deterioration. I think that we are facing a problem which, if this is not addressed in the short-term, could have a very negative impact on the jurisdiction.” “A major international financial centre simply cannot survive unless its judicial system and administration of justice can accommodate, in an efficient way, commercial disputes and resolve them in a t imeframe acceptable to the international community,” Mr Moree added. “No one expects us to resolve these cases in a record time period, but they do expect us to work through these commercial cases in an acceptable timeframe and, at the moment, that’s not happening. This needs to be addressed in the short-term, because it’s going to have an effect on the development of new business and the retention of existing b usiness.” Calling for a holistic approach that effectively meant reform and overhaul for the entire Bahamian judicial system, Mr Moree told Tribune Business: “Clearly, this does involve not only looking at the number of judges we have, but many of the other issues we have to deal with in the system – the staffing, the resources, the listings office, the Reg istry, the technology and the procedures.” S enior Justice Lyons’ resignation has left numerous commercial matters, which were before him, still waiting to be listed before a new judge. Among the cases he was dealing with were the liquidations of Caledonia Corporate Management, Dominion Investments and Leadenhall Bank & Trust, three former Bahamas-based financial institutions whose clients (creditors substantial assets. In Leadenhall’s case, it has been some four years s ince the bank was first placed in court-supervised liquidation, and assets have yet to be distributed pro rata to creditors (excluding former credit card depositors). The case has yet to be allocated to another judge, Tribune Business understands, and given the complexity and volume of case paperwork involved in issues such as Leadenhall and oth ers, it inevitably takes time for another judge to become seized of the matters. This, of course, leads to frustration and unhappiness among creditors and former clients of the likes of Leadenhall, given the continued delay in recovering their assets. The result? The likelihood that the Bahamas and its judicial system may be badmouthed by one set of high-net worth individuals and their foreign attorneys to their respective peer groups, discouraging new clients from using or coming to this nation, and encouraging existing ones to consider shifting assets elsewhere. The same applies to international businesses and businessmen. Any problems in resolving commercial disputes in an expeditious timeframe will directly impact the Bahamas’ ability to venture into new industries and develop alternative revenue streams, especially the proposed plan to develop this nation into a worldrecognised arbitration centre. Senior Justice Lyons himself recognised the need for the Bahamas to have a specialised commercial court, stating as much in the preamble to a May 15, 2008, judgment involving a dispute between Cresta Ltd and LP Management and its co-defendants. Noting that the case was clearly commercial, even though it had been listed as a general cause, Justice Lyons said the matter should fall “within the de fact regime we have here for the resolution of commercial matters”. He added: “We do not, as yet, in the Bahamas have a dedicated commercial court. This will be addressed very shortly. It is of paramount impor tance that if the Bahamas is to continue as an offshore financial centre of any credibility, it must havea commercial court. “That commercial court must adopt a world-class process for resolving commercial matters as expe ditiously as possible. When it comes to commercial disputes, it was once said by a learned judge (I have forgotten the reference) that the first question that a businessman asks of his lawyer is: ‘How long will it take and how much will it cost?’ “Commercial courts do ‘business’. They are there to serve business. Commercial courts are not in the habit of inhibiting business. Commercial courts are expected to move quickly to define the areas in dispute and resolve them. That, after all, is business.” F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 16

n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A 175 per cent increase in Insurance Company of the Bahamas (ICB BISX-listed J. S. Johnson’s 2009 first quarter profits rise to $2.345 million, although the latter’s ordinary shareholders saw their share reduce year-over-year. Despite a 14.27 per cent increase in J. S. Johnson’s yearover-year net profit from the $2.06 million achieved in the 2008 first period, the company’s equity investors saw their net income share drop by 4.9 per cent to $1.621 million, compared to $1.704 million last year. As a result, earnings per share (EPS 2008 first quarter to $0.20 this time around, as non-controlling inter e sts in J. S. Johnson saw their share of the company’s net profits m ore than double – increasing by 106 per cent from $356,000 to $733,000. In his 2009 first quarter message to shareholders, Marvin Bethell, J. S. Johnson’s managing director, attributed the company’s improved showing to the financial performance of its ICB affilia te, the general insurance carrier in which it holds a 40 per cent stake. The other shareholders are J. S. Johnson directors and executives. ICB’s enhanced showing was largely due to a $1.236 million swing on fees and commissions, which went from being $137,000 i n the red during the 2008 first quarter to a positive of $1.099 million. While ICB’s net earned premiums dropped slightly by 4.6 per cent year-over-year, falling from $2.298 million in 2008 to $2.193 million this time around, when combined with the fees and commissions performance it drove the carrier’s total income higher by 44.5 per cent to $3.404 million. And aided by a 9.5 per cent drop in insurance expenses and claims, which collectively fell to $1.465 million from $1.619 million in the 2008 first quarter, ICB generated net income of $1.229 million for this year’s period as opposed to $447,000 last year. “With regard to the underwriting segment, ICB’s results were very encouraging,” Mr Bethell told shareholders. “Although net earned premiums were down slightly, there was an appreciable swing in net commissions and fees. “Additionally, an improvement in claims costs resulted in a reduction in insurance expenses.” The 2009 first quarter results illustrate ICB’s value to its largest shareholder, boosting profits when times are hard, although it will also make J. S. Johnson’s earnings more volatile and unpre dictable when those hurricanerelated claims come in. With fees and commissions from J. S. Johnson’s agency and brokerage business up slightly by 1.1 per cent at $4.02 million, the BISX-listed entity’s total net fees and commissions for the 2009 first quarter were up 33.37 per cent on prior year comparatives, standing at $5.119 million compared to $3.838 million. Total income for the whole company was 10.7 per cent ahead of prior year, standing at $7.499 million compared to $6.277 million. Mr Bethell warned that J. S. Johnson’s agency and brokerage business “continues to be impacted by the economic downturn, which has affected both renewals and new business, particularly for personal lines. “This has not been the case on the commercial side, as we have seen the acquisition of some new business from both local and international clients.” The J. S. Johnson managing director pledged to “carefully watch” the company’s expenses going forward to ensure they remained in line with budget expectations. Total expenses for the 2009 first quarter increased year-over-year by 9 per cent to $5.145 million, compared to $4.717 million. Much of this resulted from a 6.2 per cent increase in staff costs to $2.205 million, compared to $2.076 million in the 2008 first quarter. Other expenses shot up by 51 per cent to $1.347 million as opposed to $890,000 the previous year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tKLUOH\WUHHWVDVVDX%DKDPDV 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWRDQ\SHUVRQVfZLVKLQJWRPDNHFODLP VKDOOGRVROLQJDQ$GYHUVH&ODLPLQWKH6XSUHPH&RXUWDQG VHUYLQJVXFK6WDWHPHQWRQWKH3HWLWLRQHUVRUKLV$WWRUQH\VWKH WKGD\DIWHUWKHODVWGD\RQZKLFKRQZKLFKWKLV1RWLFHDSSHDUV LQWKHGDLO\SDSHUV)DLOXUHDQ\SHUVRQWRDQGVHUYH VWDWHPHQWRIVXFKFODLPRQRUEHIRUHWKHVDLGGDWHZLOORSHUDWHDVD EDUWRVXFKFODLP 5LFKDUG/%RRGOHt&R 5,&+$5'/%22'/(t&2 &RXQVHOVt$WWRUQH\V$W/DZ &KDPEHUV UG)ORRU&ROXPEXV+RXVH (DVWtKLUOH\WUHHW $WWRUQH\VIRUWKHHWLWLRQHU 0LQLVWU\RIKH(QYLURQPHQW 3RUW'HSDUWPHQW*RYHUQPHQW 1RWLFH,QYLWDWLRQIRUHQGHUV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q WKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $ UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV 175% ICB profit rise aids JSJ * BISX-listed insurer sees net income rise 14.27% in Q1, driven by affiliate carrier’s commissions swing * But equity investors see profit share drop by 4.9% * Recession hits agency/brokerage business on personal lines

PAGE 17

process”. Suggesting that the Government needed to appoint one person with the mandate and powers to lead such a process, Mr Moree said reform was necessary at many different government departments and agencies. He explained: “There is an interdependency between all the different agencies, ministries and departments within the Government, and there has to be a complete approach. Success is very much linked to looking at the whole; it does not lie in one department. The solution lies in a complete overhaul.” The Bahamas’ “test”, Mr Moree suggested, was whether it could translate reform rhetoric into action, implementation and execution when it came to the financial services industry. “Are we capable of doing this process or, if not, will we go with the status quo, the rhetoric and not see any major reform and just plod along,” he asked. “That’s the test confronting the country at the moment. Are we able to move beyond the rhetoric to implement the correct solutions that put us in a proactive mode to take on the competition and secure our part of the marketplace?” Mr Moree, though, praised the Government’s plans to consolidate the various financial services sector regulators into two bodies, amalgamating the Securities Commission, Compliance Commission and Registrar of Insurance’s Office into a single Bahamas Financial Services Authority by year’s end. Although the Central Bank will remain as a standalone entity initially, the final consolidation phase will see its Bank Supervision Department merged into the Authority to leave a solitary ‘super regulator’. The senior attorney said the regulatory consolidation would eliminate bureaucracy and reduce costs for financial institutions and practitioners, and also enhance the Bahamas’ competitive position by removing overlaps and differences in practice/procedures between the existing supervisors. “I think it’s extremely important with regard to the future of this jurisdiction,” Mr Moree said of financial regulatory consolidation. “One of the competitive advantages we should have as a small jurisdiction is that we should be able to be less bureaucratic and maintain high standards of regulatory oversight – without the bureaucracy you find in larger countries. “Hopefully, it will bring greater efficiency, a reduction of costs, less red tape, shorter waiting periods for permits and approvals. It should create a more efficient regulatory force, which will inevitably be beneficial for the industry without compromising the standard of oversight.” And he added: “Hopefully, it will also bring a more entrepreneurial approach to dealing with regulatory issues where the regulators, in the mode of the Central Bank – which in my view is doing a god job, with high standards, not overly bureaucratic – are very responsive and prepared to work with the industry in its overall development. “It’ll [the consolidation] result in a more coherent set of policies, and certainly be easier to navigate for those persons invested in the industry. It’ll be a flat line approach, which will be easier for the industry to understand and work with, and makes the development and implementation of policy much more efficient. “It will obviously eliminate those areas in the past where there was some conflict between the procedures of different regulators, when certain regulators did one thing, and others did another. “It’s essential we execute this and bring it in on time, and I think that would be a big achievement, doing what is necessary to rationalize this industry and put it on a more stable footing.” The financial services industry’s position as the second largest sector in the economy made it “so vitally important to get it right in developing our strategy for our national plan in the next three to five years”, Mr Moree said. With it “very important” that the Bahamas escape the G20/OECD so-called ‘grey list’, and respond to those organisations’ demands for greater tax transparency and tax information exchange, he added that it was critical for the public and private sectors to work on developing a considered response “as opposed to having knee jerk reactions to these issues coming from these agencies”. The G-20 demands also meant there was an opportunity for the Government to work with the Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB sector groups on “a national plan that focuses on this industry with a concerted view to not only securing and maintaining the industry, but how to develop the business and expand given the realities of the marketplace that we are facing”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osition:AccountantA local insurance agency seeks to ll the position of Accountant. The scope of work is to head the Accounting Operations in preparation of monthly, quarterly and annual reports; to keep and maintain all nancial documents and records according to the directives coming from the President and the Board of Directors to ensure the efcient management of all Bank and general ledger accounts. The position will also be expected to make recommendations to management to maintain the company’s viability in a highly competitive environment. 5HTXLUHG accountant; presenting; supervisory skills; meet deadlines and perform work of the highest quality. ing address: The Tribune c/o Box # 81869 P.O. Box N 3207 Nassau, Bahamas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‘Complete overhaul’ in public sector needed to support financial services INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 18

he was having with the Old Bahama Bay organisation regarding the possibility of another project. “[Skinner’s] concern was made stronger by the fact that he was not given a copy of the profit sharing agreement signed in February 2001. Only one copy of the agreement was produced and signed by the parties, which copy [Mr Jervis] kept, with a promise to make a copy for [Skinner]. “That promise was never kept. Even at the signing of the agreement the pages were not initialed by the parties, thereby leaving a fear in the respondent’s mind that the uninitialled pages could be changed. By chance, [Mr Skinner] found the agreement in the office of [Mr Jervis]. He made himself a copy, and returned the agreement to the secret repository where it had been placed by [Mr Jervis].” Eventually, relations between the two sides deteriorated to the point where Mr Skinner was sum marily dismissed as project manager for “alleged fraud and misconduct” in relation to KST Investments and the Shoreline project on January 11, 2005. This prompted the initial writ and statement of claim to the Supreme Court, seeking damages for breach of employment contract and the profit sharing agreement. Noting that the burden of proof rested with employers when it came to justifying summary dismissals of employees and termination of their contracts, the Court of Appeal said Mr Jervis’s and KST Investments’ case layon three grounds: That Mr Skinner allegedly cost them $42,486 by charging materials and costs used in reno vating his home at No. 3 Shoreline to them, and falsifying the books and records Using Shoreline’s credit account with Dolly Madison for personal use between May 1999 and December 2004 Obtaining a plasma screen TV from a Shoreline trade customer for personal use without an accounting The Court of Appeal judgment recorded that Mr Jervis had argued that none of this, and the use of KST Investments’ funds, had been authorised – a matter so grave that it justified the summa ry dismissal and end to the profit sharing agreement. However, then-acting Justice Norris Carroll dismissed the allegations about the house, finding that as Mr Jervis lived next door, it would have been impossible forhim not to have known about the renovations. Mr Skinner was also absent in South Africa, meaning it would have been impossible to conceal the work, and the judge dismissed the evidence of various witnesses as they all still worked for KST Investments. The allegations over the Dolly Madison account and plasma TV were also dismissed in the Supreme Court. Mr Jervis and KST Investments appealed against the wrongful dismissal verdict, but the Court of Appeal, stating that it was loathe to interfere with a trial judge’s findings of fact – given that he had seen the witnesses testify – found that there as evidence aplenty to sup port the lower court’s conclusions. The Court of Appeal found that in assessing the evidence, the Supreme Court was “faced with the uncontroverted evidence” surrounding Mr Jervis’s “recti tude” in his relationship and busi ness dealings with Mr Skinner – his reluctance to provide him with a copy of the Profit Share Agreement despite repeated requests and Mr Skinner’s entitlement; the failure to disclose KST Investments’ existence and the fact it employed Mr Skinner. “Thirdly, [Mr Jervis] had, without the knowledge, consent or approval of Mr Skinner, been using funds from the Shoreline development account, which had been opened fro the business in accordance with the Profit Sharing Agreement, and was in the name of KST Investments, to fund [Mr Jervis’s] private business in Colorado without accounting for them,” the Court of Appeal found. “Again, this fact, uncontroverted, was discovered by [Mr Skinner]. “Fourthly, [Mr Jervis] had, without the knowledge, consent or approval of [Mr Skinner], been using the funds from the same Shoreline development account to take care of the personal needs of his father and his other personal financial obligations, such as his investment in Old Bahama Bay, without accounting for them.” The Court of Appeal added: “When all these were brought to the attention of [Mr Jervis] in court, his answer was that the company was his company, implying that the accounts and all the monies therein belonged to him and so he did not have to account to [Mr Skinner] for such expenditure. “He had forgotten that those funds belonged to the Shoreline development, which accounts were to be the subject of audit under the Profit Sharing Agreement by the accounting firm of Pricewaterhouse, for the purpose of distribution of profits between him and [Mr Skinner].” The Court of Appeal found that, under the Profit-Sharing Agreement, Mr Skinner had the right to see and know how Shoreline’s accounts were being operated, so he could determine his share of the profits. Yet these were kept from him, the court finding that no audit was done as contemplated under the Profit Sharing Agreement, and that Mr Jervis “had no intention” of letting him see the financials, instead offering Mr Skinner a lump sum payment whenever the profits situation was discussed. The Court of Appeal also determined whether the Profit Sharing Agreement had come to an end with Mr Skinner’s dismissal, as Mr Jervis contended it had. Harvey Tynes QC, representing Mr Skinner, said the grounds relied upon by Mr Jervis and his company to terminate the agreement had been rejected, and the parties’ intent was contained in its clause four. This said the Profit Sharing Agreement was “irrevocable” until the last lot and house in Shoreline was sold. The Court of Appeal found that in addition to the $250,000 share of outstanding profits awarded to Mr Skinner by the Supreme Court, he was also entitled to damages for breach of the Profit Sharing Agreement. The amount of damages to be awarded, the court said, should be calculated on the fact that Shoreline currently has 60 complete homes and, when fully built-out, will have 76. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 PAGE 5B $QGLXPUXVW&RPSDQ\/LPLWHG -HUVH\-(' / LTXLGDWRU Manager wins profit deal breach verdict against developer To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today! Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 19

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 73F/23C Low: 77F/25C Low: 77F/25C Low: 78F/26C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 81F/27C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 93F/34C High: 91F/33C High: 89 F/32 C High: 89 F/32 C High: 90F/32C High: 90 F/32C High: 90F/32C Low: 79F/26C High: 90F/32C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 71F/22C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 78F/26C High: 88 F/31 Low: 72F/22C High: 87F/31C Low: 74 F/23C High: 90F/32C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 92F/33C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 89F/32C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 90F/32C Low: 76F/24C High: 91 F/33 C Low: 79F/26C High: 94F/34C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 13 TH 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Mostly sunny; a thundershower. Mainly clear; a passing shower. Sun and clouds with a thunderstorm. Mostly sunny; a thundershower. Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 79 High: 90 High: 90 High: 92 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Mostly sunny with a thunderstorm. High: 92 Low: 80 Low: 81 Low: 81 AccuWeather RealFeel 100F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 83F 98-87F 110-91F 112-91F 112-93F Low: 81 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................90F/32C Low ....................................................81F/27C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 77 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................trace Year to date ................................................18.50" Normal year to date ....................................20.91" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full Jul. 15 Jul. 21Jul. 28Aug. 5 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:29 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:03 p.m. Moonrise . . . 11:45 p.m. Moonset . . . . 11:45 a.m. Today Tuesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 12:23 p.m.2.66:08 a.m.0.2 -----6:38 p.m.0.4 12:39 a.m.2.46:48 a.m.0.2 1:10 p.m.2.77:31 p.m.0.5 1:28 a.m.2.37:34 a.m.0.2 2:03 p.m.2.78:31 p.m.0.5 2:24 a.m.2.28:28 a.m.0.2 3:02 p.m.2.89:36 p.m.0.4 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco89/3178/25s87/3079/26pc Amsterdam73/2257/13s74/2360/15s Ankara, Turkey81/2757/13t82/2759/15pc Athens86/3070/21s90/3273/22s Auckland51/1044/6pc55/1253/11s Bangkok90/3279/26t89/3178/25t Barbados86/3077/25s86/3077/25sh Barcelona80/2668/20s81/2771/21pc Beijing90/3272/22pc100/3775/23s Beirut84/2875/23s78/2575/23s Belgrade85/2965/18s93/3369/20s Berlin73/2259/15pc79/2667/19c Bermuda81/2775/23sh81/2775/23s Bogota65/1845/7t64/1745/7r Brussels77/2555/12pc79/2655/12pc Budapest86/3065/18s94/3469/20s Buenos Aires57/1336/2pc54/1237/2s Cairo100/3777/25s94/3472/22s Calcutta95/3585/29sh95/3584/28t Calgary67/1952/11t55/1246/7pc Cancun92/3372/22c92/3373/22sh Caracas81/2771/21s81/2771/21t Casablanca81/2764/17s76/2462/16s Copenhagen71/2157/13sh73/2259/15pc Dublin64/1752/11r63/1752/11r Frankfurt78/2568/20sh79/2666/18sh Geneva 85/29 60/15 sh 84/2864/17t Halifax 66/18 54/12 c 68/20 54/12 pc Havana 90/32 72/22 r 91/32 72/22 t Helsinki 64/17 52/11r68/2055/12sh Hong Kong 90/32 82/27 sh 90/32 82/27sh Islamabad 103/39 81/27 pc 95/35 80/26 t Istanbul80/2667/19sh79/2672/22pc Jerusalem 87/30 61/16s80/2659/15s Johannesburg 58/1438/3s53/1133/0s Kingston 87/3079/26r89/3178/25sh Lima73/2259/15s72/2261/16s London73/2257/13pc73/2255/12sh Madrid97/3666/18pc91/3261/16pc Manila83/2877/25t83/2878/25t Mexico City72/2254/12t74/2353/11t Monterrey105/4074/23s106/4176/24s Montreal68/2052/11c70/2152/11pc Moscow84/2864/17pc70/2155/12t Munich77/2560/15sh86/3062/16t Nairobi81/2755/12pc77/2555/12r New Delhi 90/3279/26t91/3282/27t Oslo67/1952/11r70/2156/13pc Paris73/2257/13sh80/2661/16pc Prague 78/25 56/13 pc 75/23 65/18 t Rio de Janeiro75/2365/18pc71/2165/18pc Riyadh108/4282/27s104/4081/27s Rome 86/30 68/20 s 88/31 65/18 s St. Thomas88/3181/27sh89/3182/27r San Juan52/1126/-3s59/1531/0s San Salvador 87/30 74/23 t 88/31 75/23 s Santiago 63/1741/5pc64/1739/3s Santo Domingo85/2973/22sh87/3074/23s Sao Paulo 71/21 53/11 pc 63/17 54/12c Seoul86/3072/22sh81/2770/21r Stockholm 73/22 55/12 sh 73/22 57/13 sh Sydney 64/17 48/8 pc63/1748/8s Taipei89/3182/27sh91/3280/26t T okyo 88/31 73/22 c 88/31 75/23 pc T oronto 71/2154/12s75/2357/13s Trinidad89/3166/18s78/2556/13pc V ancouver 69/20 57/13 pc 72/2258/14pc Vienna 78/2569/20pc91/3274/23s W arsaw 75/23 56/13 sh 80/26 59/15 pc Winnipeg 74/23 53/11 pc 66/1852/11c H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Tuesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Tuesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Tuesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque96/3569/20pc95/3569/20pc Anchorage76/2457/13s75/2357/13s Atlanta85/2970/21t89/3173/22t Atlantic City85/2965/18s86/3069/20s Baltimore86/3062/16s86/3065/18s Boston79/2660/15s80/2661/16s Buffalo73/2254/12s76/2458/14s Charleston, SC91/3275/23t90/3276/24t Chicago83/2861/16pc78/2567/19t Cleveland78/2556/13s79/2665/18s Dallas102/3879/26s100/3778/25s Denver93/3362/16pc91/3254/12pc Detroit76/2459/15s78/2563/17pc Honolulu88/3175/23pc90/3276/24pc Houston96/3577/25s97/3677/25s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday TodayTuesdayTodayTuesday Indianapolis83/2864/17pc85/2973/22pc Jacksonville93/3374/23t90/3273/22t Kansas City92/3375/23t96/3574/23pc Las Vegas107/4180/26s106/4182/27s Little Rock100/3779/26pc102/3878/25s Los Angeles90/3264/17s84/2864/17s Louisville88/3167/19pc91/3278/25t Memphis96/3579/26t100/3778/25pc Miami90/3278/25pc91/3278/25t Minneapolis80/2664/17pc74/2362/16t Nashville90/3270/21t93/3376/24t New Orleans94/3477/25s91/3278/25pc New York84/2865/18s85/2967/19s Oklahoma City104/4078/25s103/3976/24s Orlando93/3373/22t93/3374/23t Philadelphia84/2866/18s87/3067/19s Phoenix 111/43 88/31 pc 107/4186/30s Pittsburgh75/2356/13s80/2665/18s Portland, OR 73/2254/12pc82/2757/13s Raleigh-Durham 90/32 68/20 t 91/32 70/21 pc St. Louis87/3073/22t93/3379/26t Salt Lake City 89/31 59/15 pc 84/2859/15s San Antonio 98/36 75/23 s 98/36 76/24 s San Diego76/2467/19pc75/2366/18pc San Francisco 75/23 55/12 pc 78/2555/12pc Seattle70/2154/12pc76/2454/12pc T allahassee 94/3474/23t88/3174/23t T ampa 91/32 77/25 t 92/33 77/25t Tucson103/3981/27s95/3575/23pc W ashington, DC 86/30 66/18s88/3172/22s UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 20

INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT M ONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 The stories behind the news n By PACO NUNEZ Tribune News Editor T he adult Bahamian: simple, dull-witted, not qualified to make independ ent decisions, incapable o f moderating his or her r esponses to stimuli. A helpless creature that must be led by the hand at all times. It would be difficult to imagine a person thus described not taking offence. Yet everyone who lives in this country puts up with it in some form on an almost daily basis, for the most part without protest. Examples of this can be gleaned from virtually all aspects of public life, but nowhere is it more palpable than in the government’s control over the ideas we consume, as embodied in the Play and Film Control Board’s power to ban films and the Immigration Department’s ability to bar perform ing artists from entering the country. A A N N H H I I S S T T O O R R I I C C A A L L P P E E R R S S P P E E C C T T I I V V E E Censorship in the Bahamas is often justified as necessary for the preser vation of rather ambiguous priorities such as public morality, public order, the public interest, even public health. Indeed, some of these phrases feature in the law which governs the suppression of ideas and opinions. We are by no means unique in this respect. Censorship has been around for as long as democracy has existed. For almost as long, it been recognised for what it usually is: the portrayal of the public as in need of protection from itself, as a means for those in power to reinforce their positions. The philosopher Socrates was put to death by the world’s very first demo cratic society for bucking heads with the authorities over these very ques tions of information and control. He became the first in a long line of learned men to defend the notion that individuals should be free to receive and impart ideas. English poet John Milton understood well the assumptions that underlie the notion of censorship. In 1644 he wrote his famous defence of free expression, the Areopagitica, in response to a newly enacted censorship law. He exhorted parliament to "consider what Nation it is whereof ye are, and whereof ye are the governors: a Nation not slow and dull, but of a quick, ingenious and piercing spirit, acute to invent, subtle and sinewy to discourse, not beneath the reach of any point, the highest that human capacity can soar to." Milton wrote that the absolute free dom to impart and receive ideas is vital for the increase of knowledge and the progress of a people. Having supported the anti-monarchists in the English Civil War, Milton was a fierce advocate of democracy who believed the public was the only legitimate earthly sovereign; a sentiment that the Bahamas is supposed to be a natural heir to, as one of the oldest parlia mentary democracies in the world. The intensely God-fearing poet who gave us the poem, “Paradise Lost”, also understood that personal morality is a question to be struggled with by individuals and supported the view that citizens should take their faith “into their own hands again." He warned religious leaders who attempt to suppress the free expression of ideas because they fear “new and dangerous opinions,” that thinking themselves the defenders of the faith, they will end up becoming “the persecutors.” J J U U S S T T I I C C E E M M A A X X W W E E L L L L , , R R A A C C I I S S M M A A N N D D T T H H E E C C E E N N S S O O R R S S “New and dangerous opinions” have often been the target of censorship in the Bahamas. But what seems new and dangerous to one generation often ends up being viewed a vital cat alyst for progress by the next. Consider the example of the late Justice Maxwell Thompson, who as a young man founded the Citizens Committee in Nassau to fight racial discrimination. When Justice Thompson died in 2003, his obituary recounted how in the late 1940s, his committee agitated against the policy of the City Garden Club of banning non-whites from its premises, and "also prevailed on the G overnor to revoke a decision by the Censor Board to deny the showing of the film ‘No Way Out’, in which Sid ney Poitier starred" and which denounced racially driven violence in particular and irrational hatred in gen eral. W hy would the members of the C ensor Board want to ban such a film? Perhaps they felt a public showing of a movie in which a conscientious and caring black doctor is harassed, threatened, beaten and almost killed by white men in some southern American backwater town might constitute a threat to the peace in a majority black colony run by the descendants of white British men. At the same time, however, there were certain aspects of the film’s message, in the context of the changing attitudes of the time, which might have caused anxiety for one social group in particular. Justice Thompson's early accom plishments led to the formation of the Bahamas People's Party, of which he was chairman. His obituary says: "This time, however, was the age of the 'McCarthy Communist Witch Hunt' andthey were accused of being Communist because as Max said – 'everything that was new and unfamiliar was called Communist. Emotion was running quite high and the mere mention of the word was hushed'." An anti-racism movement could only be equated with communism by a power structure peopled by individu als astonishingly ignorant of the mean ing of both terms, or who out of anxiety over their own positions, either consciously or unconsciously conflate a trend that they see as a threat to their interests with the dominant international bogeyman of the day. R R I I G G H H T T E E O O U U S S I I N N D D I I G G N N A A T T I I O O N N In the present-day Bahamas, just as in Milton’s time, “the persecutors” are often inspired by notions of religious fervor. Pry loose any particular instance of censorship, and you are very likely to find a zealot of some description crawling about beneath it. Religious leaders have worked closely with the Control Board, and often consult with Immigration offi cials on whether a particular performing artist should be allowed into the country. There is, of course, nothing controversial in Christian terms about the public being viewed as “the flock” in need of someone to lead it about, although how some pastors have man aged to commandeer the role of “the Good Shepherd” for themselves is an interesting question. In any case, every Bahamian is entitled to ask what right pastors have Voluntary oppression Long after most civilised nations have cast off the yoke of censorship, Bahamians continue to be told what they can and cannot see and hear. This in turn has allowed a privileged few to ensure that their opinions always take priority. But by failing to take a stand against the suppression of their rights, members of the public can blame no one but themselves for this situation. INSIGHT reports... S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B IF , after watching a violent film or play, an individual engages in violence or threats of violence, that person should feel the full weight of the law descend upon him. Likewise, if anyone under the age of 18 is caught in the audience of a film rated for adults, the police should throw the book at the cinema manager...

PAGE 21

Dear Editor, Congratulations to your chief r eporter, Rupert Missick on his e xcellent "Insight" article today. H e shows courage and dedication to his profession in finding the truth and reporting it hon-estly. We have all known about these "prosperity pastors" for many years, but they seem to have increased in alarming numbers very quickly. What is worrying is how many people are swept along on this ride of expectation "give till it hurts and God will reward you a hundredfold". What nonsense! God does not expect us to give beyond our means in order that his "pastors" may live the good life the comment of another pastor on the Bentley that "a pastor should be comfortable because we do a lot of social work." Oh, indeed. Obviously this gentleman does not remember the early days of missionary work here when bicycles were a luxury and most of the missionaries' travel was done on Shanks's pony! We do not go to church to admire the pastor's car or house, but to worship God in His own house.We do not give in the collect ion to support an expensive l ife-style for the pastor but to m ake sure that he has the basic necessities of life (like the rest of us) and the bulk of our offerings goes to help the upkeep of our church and its ministries particularly to the poor and underprivileged or at least in my church this is so. Mr Missick is quite right when he blames a spiritual hunger for the majority of our country's woes today. Bahamians always had a deep core of faith in a loving God. I think they lost it when they turned around and followed the god of prosperity. I pray that their basic spirituality and "Mother's wit" will rescue them from certain misery. E E i i l l e e e e n n F F a a r r m m e e r r Rupert, Everything is relative. On the out islands, anyone purchasing a flashy, expensive car would be considered "stupid" not "blessed." City folks are really into posturing and being superficial. And you're right about the spiritual depth of today's pastors. It seems anybody can be ordained to shout at God and call it preaching. It is a known fact that most Bahamians (leaders or followers) don't read anything that's too deep, so in a sense, they get what they deserve: emotional outbursts from copy cats mimicking whatever trendAmerican preachers are on. K K e e e e n n O O b b s s e e r r v v e e r r Rupert, I finished your article in today's paper and the only word that I could utter was 'wow'. Great job!I read the article last week on Bishop “whatever his name is” and almost died from laughter. Thanks for reminding me how grave and serious a matter this is.As a young Bahamian like yourself, I cringe with embarrassment at the level of mediocrity we've come to accept as a people, encouraged in many cases by the "Church". Good luck with exposing the unfortunate truths about our society...I'm sure it won't be received by all with the same level of enthusiasm that I hope to convey in this message. Best regards, " " K K . . F F . . " " H H o o w w h h y y p p o o c c r r i i t t i i c c a a l l c c a a n n w w e e b b e e ? ? While reading a letter by Micheline Cervili, “Give the Haitians a break,” in reply to an “Insight” article on Culture Wars, May 25, I was inspired to put my feelings to paper. In her article, Cervili recounts a pre vious article in which a writer expressed complete disgust towards Haitians celebrating the May 18th Haitian Flag day in the Bahamas. This is not an isolated account in fact, many have expressed outrage over such expressions of national pride, “they come to take over.” In her research paper Cervili supports the idea of the assimilation of the Haitian and Bahami an cultures, she feels that the Bahamas would only benefit from such adjustments. How ever, there are many that dif fer. People are so quick to rebuke the notion of integra tion of both cultures that they use any pathetic excuse for dismissal. Sadly, many fear that this move, though inevitable will cripple the very core of Bahamianisation. Haiti was the first black n ation to establish its independ ence 1904 and played a signif icant role in the abolishing of slavery. Though Haiti’s independence plays a significant role in its history it is May 18th that garners special attention, the general consensus is that thoughi ndependent in theory, Haitian’s never really experienced true independence until May 18th. Haitians of all colours, shapes, sizes and economic backgrounds unite to commemorate and memorialise this significant occasion no matter where they are. Therefore, it is only fitting that this tradition continues by extension we were also affected by this staple in history. Unfortunately, the thought of Haitians celebrating their flag day in the Bahamas is absurd and should not be permitted. Sadly, this is where we are in 2009, ignorance has reached a new height, a level abolished and now resurfaced in another form. Like Micheline men tioned in her article, people are so quick to reject progress that their refutation lack neither sub stance nor proof and is saturated with personal feeling. Ironically, people that passionately reject the idea of cultural assim ilation with Haitians are usually the first present at other nonBahamian cultural events post ed like props. Strangely enough, these contradictors are the first present at the American 4th July celebrations, the Jamaican festivities and anything foreign. What is most disturbing is the inferiority complex we as Bahamians suffer from. As a result of this inadequacy we resort to identify theft of or bad case of identify crisis. Subconsciously and even consciously in some cases, we believe America is superior to us therefore we imitate them. We are a people that imitate whoever we think is superior to us. How unfortunate! Consider Mrs Darling, originally from England more than 28 years ago, however, she maintains her distinctive English accent that has not yet been compromised. I have a difficulty in understanding how in the world do you leave the Bahamas a “full breed Bahami an” and two weeks upon completion of vacation or study develop an American accent or an (obliviously fake accent? Please help me understand that. Bahamians are so quick to copy that everything originally Bahamian is challenged and therefore compromised, ‘embellished’ to accommodate Americanisation. Therefore, who are we really? Moreover, we hurt ourselves by selling ourselves short, we make it our life’s mission to fit in. The Bahamas tries so hard to maintain the respect and attention of nations like America and China that we are willing to conform to whatever they demand. In fact, we sell our birthright in some cases in order to gain acceptance and approval. Superior nations take delight in exploiting us, they taunt us by dangling wealth, stadiums and resorts and like inferior savages we jump at their every beck and call. Please note that only a fool says no to a well deserving and worthy gift, however, at what cost? Recently, we have been afforded with the opportunity to host Miss Universe, a feat not achieved by many. What will we show the world and what do we have to offer? It is hoped that we utilise this oppor tunity to show the world that the Bahamas is a nation founded on strong principles and high moral standards. We must display a strong people resulting from a colorful past and a selfdefining cultural background. Additionally, we must demon strate exactly what we are made of, though small in stature we are a strong nation abundant with numerous cultural influences that echo this efferves cent and original culture. Unlike other countries we are a true representation of the world where every race and almost every nation is represented. The Bahamas has a place for the Whites, Blacks, Latins, Asians and Yellow man, we are a nation filled with Bahamians, Haitians, Jamaicans, Chinese, Mexicans, Cubans, Filipinos and the list goes on. Finally, imagine living or studying in America and not being afforded the opportunity to unite and celebrate junkanoo or express your Bahamian pride the way it should be conveyed. Honestly how would you feel? Therefore, I agree with Cervili that we must embrace each others culture. In doing so, Bahamians would develop an even greater appreciation for their culture. If this cultural unanimity were to happen, food menus would be enhanced, bilingualism would become a way of life, Creole could be taught as a second language and the calendar year’s festivities would expand double fold. As a developing nation we must abandon our selfish ways and look beyond what is personal, let us examine facts before we utter garbage or convert our deep seated hatred into words. Only in knowing our history and empathising with others do we truly abandon ignorance. Inspired by Micheline Cervili “Give the Haitians a break” Tribune June 8, 2009. L L O O V V Y Y J J E E A A N N C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Readers have their say... INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K T he Tribune INSIGHT M ONDAY, JULY 6, 2009T he stories behind the news n By RUPERT MISSICK Jr Chief Reporter rmissick@tribunemedia.netTh e ills plaguing our society can be likened to a beast with one great belly and many starving mouths. Each mouth represents an endem-i c hunger in our land. One mouth, the hunger for justice, another, the hunger for an adequate education and the third, the hungerf or security. But one mouth, one gaping maw that lies at the centre of this beast, represents the deepest hunger, the most neglected need of our people,t he need to be fed spiritually. Much of the crime we experience in the Bahamas comes from a wound that leads us to w ant to possess, an obsession for the material, whether that be money or people, which leads to violence manifesting itself in murder, abuse, armed robbery or even stealing from our jobs. W e do not value the worthwhile aspects of our existence, the beauty of human potential, the richness to be found in knowledge, the sat-i sfaction of a truly loving relationship with fami ly and friends. These are the things that can save us from this hunger, that can make us into a better people, better humans. Having these virtues installed in a person is a j ob left up to the individual or family. No other institution in our society purports to or is able to help with this task. I take that back, there is one. Well, one that’s s upposed to. The church claims to be our saving grace, the place where our people can go for this food. Nearly every corner of this island has one andt hey exist in every community. But if it’s spiritual food you want, you’ll find their pantries inex-Worshippers of material things ‘Prosperity pastors’ are helping to destroy the Bahamas S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 C C THE ills plaguing our society can be likened to a beast with one great belly and many starving mouths. Each mouth represents an endemic hunger in our land. One mouth, the hunger for justice, another, the hunger for an adequate education and the third, the hunger for security... FEEDBACK THE FRONT PAGE of the July ? edition of INSIGHT ...

PAGE 22

LOS ANGELES (AP his final days, Michael Jackson was robust and active. Or dangerously thin and frail. Begging for access to powerful prescription drugs. Or showing no signs of ever having used them. It depends on who’s talking.A dizzying collection of puzzle pieces about Jackson’s health and habits has come to light since his death on June 25. With as much as a month before a toxicology report determines the cause, more are sure to emerge. Each is likely to fuel further speculation. None is sure to produce a satisfying conclusion. Some who knew him even seem to contradict themselves. Here’s what’s known so far: During his final rehearsal at the Staples Center, Jackson was captured on video doing his signature moonwalk and dance spins. Randy Phillips, CEO of concert promoter AEG Live, told CNN he was “a healthy, vibrant human being.” Phillips later told ABC concert organisers feared that Jackson was losing weight and showing signs of wear and tear. He said he hired a staffer whose purpose was to remind Jackson to eat. Dr Arnold Klein, Jackson’s dermatologist, who said he last saw Jackson less than a week before he died, told CNN’s Lar-ry King that the singer was in “very good physical condition,”in “a very good mood,” and “was very happy.” Klein also told CNN that he had given Jackson the painkiller Demerol but warned him about using the powerful sedative Diprivan. He also confirmed that Jackson was a form er drug addict who went to rehab in England. “The Incredible Hulk” star Lou Ferrigno, who was helping Jackson prepare for a planned series of London concerts, told The Associated Press that he never saw Jackson take drugs, act aloof or speedy, and the s inger wasn’t frail when he last saw him at the end of May. I’ve never seen him look better,” he said. Two of Jackson’s former confidants, medium Uri Geller and ex-bodyguard Matt Fiddes, said they tried in vain to keep the pop superstar from abusing prescription drugs. Geller said he suffered a terrible falling-out with Jackson over the issue, but not before he had to “shout at Michael, to scream at Michael” in an effort to confiscate the singer’s stocks of medication during his travels in England. The drug Diprivan, an anesthetic widely used in operating rooms to induce unconsciousness, was found in Jackson’s residence, a law enforcement official told the AP. Also known as Propofol, the drug is given intravenously and is very unusual to have in a private home. Cherilyn Lee, a registered nurse, told the AP she repeatedly rejected his demands for Diprivan. But a frantic phone call she received from Jackson four days before his death made her fear that he somehow obtained Diprivan or another drug to induce sleep. Akon, the Senegalese R&B singer and producer with whom Jackson recently recorded songs, told Billboard.com that “Michael is just one of the healthiest people that I know. He was pressuring me to stay healthy, like, ‘Akon, eat right. What are you doing out there on the road? Are you eating? Are you exercising? Are you drinking a lot of water?”’ Klein said Jackson had been suffering from lupus a chronic disease where the immune system attacks the body’s own tissue and a skin disorder known as vitiligo. Jackson’s personal physician, Dr Conrad Murray, administered CPR on Jackson’s bed, rather than a hard surface, “with his hand behind his back to provide the necessary support” because the singer was so frail, the doctor’s attorney, Edward Chernoff, said. Chernoff also told the AP that Murray never gave or prescribed Jackson the painkillers Demerol or OxyContin, and said the doctor didn’t give the pop star any drugs that contributed to his death. Among other things, Murray’s lawyers have acknowledged it took up to 30 minutes for paramedics to be summoned to Jackson’s home after he was found unresponsive. Jackson’s family requested a private autopsy in part because of questions about Murray’s role, the Rev Jesse Jackson has said. Kevin Mazur, a photographer documenting the Staples Center rehearsals for a tour book, told the AP that Jackson looked in perfect health. “He was very upbeat, very happy, having a good time with the dancers,” Mazur said. Spiritual teacher Dr Deepak Chopra told the AP he had been concerned since 2005 that Jackson was abusing painkillers and spoke to the pop star about suspected drug use as recently as six months ago. Chopra said Jackson, a longtime friend, personally asked him for painkillers in 2005; Chopra said he refused. Los Angeles police chief William Bratton said detectives are looking at his prescription drug history and trying to talk with his numerous former doctors. He also says police are waiting for the coroner’s report before ruling out any possibilities in their “comprehensive and far-reaching” probe, which includes the Drug Enforcement Administration and the state attorney general’s office. Associated Press writer Michael R Blood contributed to this report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f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–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f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ackson, healthy or not? Depends on who’s talking Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. VISITORS watch a Michael Jackson video on a huge screen at a Tower Records store in downtown Tokyo... (AP Photo: Shizuo Kambayashi

PAGE 23

involving themselves in decisions concerning the rights of citizens in a democracy in which religious freedom is constitutionally enshrined. Surely, if they are keen to exert their righteousness upon a captive audience, they already have one in the form of their congregation. Yet far from minding their own business, religious leaders are actually demanding more say in what we are not allowed to see and hear. Just last year, the Bahamas Christian Council demanded the right to screen all films and musical acts before they are allowed into the country. How individuals who haveneither been elected by the public nor appointed by Cabinet can come to imagine they have the right to hold such sway continues to be a mystery. Concerns about the erosion o f our freedoms aside, it would be terrifying development for this country if our musical choices were to be limited to what the Christian Council considers acceptable – for reasons of taste, if nothing else. A A M M A A T T T T E E R R O O F F O O P P I I N N I I O O N N All too often, this is exactly what censorship comes down to – mere questions of taste, differences of perspective. Take for example the most recent film to get the axe – Brokeback Mountain. Members of the Play and Films Control Board made it clear they objected to the level of homosexual content and religious leaders supported them energetically. Yet at no point did anyone bother to explain or demonstrate exactly how homosexuality threatens the public interest. Many intelligent and accomplished citizens of this country would disagree vehemently with this view, and argue that a greater acceptance of differing lifestyles and an increase in the level of tolerance in general would go a long way in remedying some of the sociali lls we all recognise; for example violence and domestic abuse. Both sides are entitled to their opinion, of course, but what qualifications do members of the Play and Films Control Board and officials of the Immigration Department – not to mention members of the Christian Council – possess that prove them capable of deciding between opposing views on so controversial an issue? Do they all possess academic backgrounds in the fine arts and the skills necessary to perceive exactly what messages a particular film or musical performance will convey to an audience? Are they also psychologists, capable of apprehending the exact effect a particular production will have on viewers? Perhaps most importantly, are they accomplished linguists, capable of untangling the various subtleties of meaning contained in vague concepts as “public morality” and “the public good”? A list of all the musical acts denied the right to perform int he Bahamas would be hard to come by, but some of the films banned by the board over the years suggest the existence none of these qualities in past members. Among them was the 1975 masterpiece “One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest”, the first film in history to win all five major Academy Awards. Yet the censors ruled that it had “nothing to offer” the Bahamian people – a choice of words eerily similar to the judgment pronounced on Brokeback Mountain. E E V V O O L L V V I I N N G G S S T T A A N N D D A A R R D D S S The banning of “Cuckoo’s Nest” and another great film, “Dog Day Afternoon”, in the first year of the board’s existence prompted a speech denouncing censorship by Michael Symonette to the Rotary Club of Nassau. He said: "The Censorship Board should recognise that in this year of 1976, human sexuality or the use of certain words in the vernacular of nearlye veryone, no longer constitute the sole basis for the wielding of sanctimonious moral judgments. “The board made an absurd mistake in banning these two films. . . I believe that the narrowness of the censor's view – a view which seems limited to discovering four-letter words and the more explicit manifestations of sex, and which continues to pass without murmur films of almost inconceivable violence must be subject to stringent r e-examination. I am also puzzled by the sort of mind that believes it is perfectly all right to witness torture and murder on the screen but finds that there is something shameful about love-making. I believe that the intelligent members of our generation today have established a new code of moral values more moral than the old one, more honest as well, and assuredly less hypocritical." The evolution of moral and social standards has affected censorship around the world. In Britain, the ability to ban writings and theatrical productions was established by the Licensing Order of 1643, an Act imposing pre-publication censorship and prompting Milton to write the Areopagitica. Outright censorship in the UK was ended by the Theatre Act of 1968, which calls for the classification of all films and productions, and the setting certain age restrictions for audience members where appropriate. In the United States, there never has been a national licensing authority for films and performances, as the industry created its own regulatory body in an effort to ward off government meddling following the advent of sound in films, which prompted a public cry for stricter standards. Beginning in the 1920s, local regulations were adopted by some states, however the 1952 Supreme Court case, Joseph Burstyn, Inc v Wilson put an end to this by ruling that to forbid the showing of a nonlicensed film or to refuse a licence to any film judged to be "sacrilegious," was a "restrainto n freedom of speech" and therefore a violation of the First Amendment. Meanwhile, standards of morality changed over time, and the industry’s self-regulatory body, the Motion Picture Association of America, adopted a rating system which does not allow for the banning of any film. This has been the trend around the world in the film i ndustry. Exceptions include v arious Islamic Fundamentalist r egimes and a diverse collection of tin-pot dictatorships and, of course, the Bahamas. One notable member of this group is Australia, where censorship, including banning of films, has become progressively more severe since new legisla tion was passed in the 1990s. This trend has prompted outrage from members of the public. Even Janet Strickland, Chief Censor from 1979 to 1986 spoke out against it. In 1996, she was quoted by the Sydney Morning Herald as saying: "Why is it that we are not allowed to be shocked and offended? Where is it written? It's good to be shocked and offended...If we have nothing that makes us feel shocked, how do we know what our value system is?” T T H H E E L L E E G G I I T T I I M M A A C C Y Y Q Q U U E E S S T T I I O O N N The question of the legitimacy of censorship was actually raised by the Bahamas Minister of Home Affairs Darrell Rolle following the enactment of the Theatre and Cinemas Act, 1975, which established the Play and Film Control Board. He said: "Admittedly the question of censorship of plays and films has always been and will continue to be a matter for public discussion. There are those who maintain that the state has no right to impose restrictions on what a citizen may or may not be allowed to see." "Yet each of us as members of society has delegated the right to lay down a code of conduct which will safeguard the public good, uphold public order, health and morality. It is for this reason that our lawsm ake it an offence for one to be drunk in a public place or to use obscene language to the annoyance of another and similar petty offences. The point being that in all these cases we have taken this course of action because we see the need to establish in society a norm, a standard of conduct, if you like, which is in the interest of society as a whole and indirectly in the interest of each individual which c omprises it." W ell, I am one member of s ociety who does not remember renouncing the right to regulate my own behaviour. I am aware that the politicians we elect and pay are obliged to create and enforce laws that protect our rights and freedoms, and the examples Mr Rolle gives could fall under this category. If public drunkenness and obscenity are, as he suggested, of annoyance to others, then it can at least be argued that these actions qualify as offences, in that they impinge upon the right of other citizens to exist in an environment free of harassment and hostility. The banning of certain films and performances, on the other hand, cannot be plausibly justified in this way, because, for one thing, the ban does not punish individuals for actions already committed, but rather for actions which might arguably result from viewing certain material. It is the equivalent of banning alcohol outright because public drunkenness might result from it. Such laws follow the same rationale as former President Bush's doctrine of preemptive war: hit them before they do anything wrong, because we can't guarantee that they won't. It is worse than finding a man guilty without trial; it is finding him guilty before he has com mitted the offence. Such a law is arguably not a law at all, particularly in a country where the constitution guarantees that each one of us is presumed innocent until proven guilty. This is a fundamental right, and there can be no justification for curtailing it. If, after watching a violent film or play, an individual engages in violence or threats of violence, that person should feel the full weight of the law descend upon him. Likewise, if anyone under the age of 18 is caught in the audience of a film rated for adults, the police should throw the book at the cinema manager. But no one has the right to assume that I may react in a certain way without convincing evidence to support this view. Nor does anyone have the right to include me in their scheme of collective punishment. T T H H E E P P U U B B L L I I C C S S S S I I L L E E N N C C E E Censorship is born out of the desire to control others. It is fueled by fear and arrogance the fear of those with power that society will become some thing they don't approve of, and the arrogance of those who believe they have the right to make choices for others. Around 200 years after Milton died, another giant of Eng lish literature was still fighting for the cause of freedom of expression. But according to George Orwell, censorship is not the fault of those with power. He believed that the most “sinister fact” about the control of ideas in the society in which he lived, was that it was “large ly voluntary.” Could the same not be said of us? What do you think? pnunez@tribunemedia.net C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Voluntary oppression F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 2 2




{T)\

Mim lowin’ it

90F
79F

SUNNY WITH
~3e< THUNDERSHOWER

Volume: 105 No.190

The Tribune

=USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

HIGH
LOW



MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Tera Wat ”
oppression dg LSE E

Se ei,

Parents tell of their
joy after ‘miracle’
of pair’s discovery

=
=
=
“0)
=



Teen killed in
police shootout

with robbers

18-year-old
dies during
street chase



A TEENAGER was
shot dead after he was
caught up in a shootout
between police and armed
robbers.

The incident happened
in the Kemp Road area on
Thursday night when two
men entered the nearby
City Market on Village
Road.

They held up a cashier,
demanded cash, and made
good their escape. But as
they were chased through
the streets by police, an
exchange of gunfire shot
and killed an 18-year-old
man who was walking
nearby.






By NATARIO MCKENZIE

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE FAMILY of two young
boys who went missing on
Andros more than a month ago
expressed joy and relief last
night after the children were
discovered alive by relative.

Deangelo Clarke, nine, and
Marcelo Clarke, seven, went
missing from their grandmoth-

er’s house in the remote settle-
ment of Smith’s Hill on June 9.

The boys had left the house
to hunt for crabs around 6pm
and were never heard from
again.

After days of fruitless search-
ing, police scaled down their
operations.

But family members said they

SEE page 10

Lil Wayne sued for failing to

perform at Nassau concert

MULTI-platinum rapper Lil Wayne is being
sued for nearly half a million dollars for failing
to perform at a concert in Nassau last Septem-

ber.

According to reports, Lil Wayne, 26, whose
real name is Dawyne Michael Carter Jr, is being
sued by Red City Entertainment for $432,000.

The suit, filed on June 29, in Manhattan
Supreme Court on behalf of Red City Enter-
tainment, alleges that the company paid Lil
Wayne $432,000 to be the headliner at the Pop-
pin’ Bottles concert held at the Bristol Wine and Spirits grounds on

September 27, 2008.

MINNA RE

The event had reportedly been postponed from the original
date of Friday, September 26, to Saturday, September 27, because

SEE page 10

Sale Ends
July 26th

Tel: 394-5656

Me AE Det ee lL
www. bossbahamas.com

Staples, Clips & Highlighters

Staples

Paper Clips
500 ct

Accent
Highlighters










THE BAHAMAS celebrated the 36th
anniversary of its Independence on Friday
with an explosion of colour, music and
dance at Fort Charlotte.

e SEE PAGES TWO, FIVE, 17, 19, 20, 21



. ry

os

+ aN Felipé Major/Tribune staff





SEE page 10

Man is charged
with murder of

American woman

A 22-YEAR-OLD man
charged wth the murder of
American Anna Garrison has
been arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court.

Zyndall McKinney, of Isabel-
la Boulevard, Nassau, is accused
of intentionally causing Ms Gar-
rison’s death between Sunday,
February 25, and Saturday, July
4, 2009, while being concerned
with another.

Ms Garrison’s badly decom-
posed body was discovered by
walkers in a bushy area off Fox
Hill Road south, near the Blue
Water Cay development, on
Saturday, July 4, at around 6.20
pm. She had been shrouded in
sheets and her feet were
wrapped in plastic bags.

The 33-year-old first came
to police attention on February
25, 2009, when they received a
missing person report from the

SEE page 10

Man shot
in the hand

A MAN was shot in the hand
while walking in the Bacardi
Road area yesterday.

At about 1.52pm, the victim,
John Gafford, was approached
by two men in a small grey vehi-
cle. One of them produced a
handgun and shot him in the
hand.

Mr Gafford was taken to hos-
pital and treated for his injury
which was described as “not life
threatening”.

Police Investigations continue.

BREAKFAST SANOWIUN
we YY 4
> 2.39

hebse with your CHOIGE OI

nacen, r turkey
PRICES MAY VARY

a)

$400

$00 per box

Stop in TODAY and LOOK for the
BOSS Target for MORE great DEALS!

Quiznos

b0g + Ul

2 AG :
anes } 1S oso,





NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Mini Famous Bowl * oll + tfc Drink

Ir. Twister Combo

oy Weta + Feequiar Fries * ifint Drink

I Snacker Combo

Snacke = Reguir Fries * 1bor Drink

* Chicken Deal

ce LS
= : 1 Po Chicken « oll = Requiar Fries = 1Gor Drink

—_

17" starting « at

€1.15 jsq. ft. 8
(Includes Java

Legne? series)

Just

ft.
gage /sd-
(cash a, Carry only)

ith
oo neksplash

35% off on Bac only)

(c ash Be

ALL DAY, EVERNY DAY.
SPOCY (TALLAM - TRA

TEGGIE DELITE ty
TURRET BREAST & LACK FOREST HAM

BLT - COLD COT COmao

VEN ROASTED CHICIEN BREAST
ITALIAN BML - TERMED BREAST
BLACK FOREST HAW
DAI 2009

WEATBALL WARIHARA oss ye <= = =<

LOCAL NEWS

INDEPENDENCE
CELEBRATIONS

ACTION from the spectacular
Independence celebrations at
Fort Charlotte on Friday.
¢ SEE PAGE FIVE for the
Prime Minister’s
Independence message.

¢ SEE PAGES 17, 19, 20 and 21

for more photos ‘from the
celebrations.

uae
is)
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157

moving into
their new
Builders Mall
Showroom!

Ask your
Sales Representative
about more

XQ throughout the store!

‘>
bie 2 ob i ATI Se

FOOTLONGS on > f

a

a

— * FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!
f AT PARTICIPATING STORES


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009, PAGE 3



Pelican Bay to
launch new logo,
construct $7.1m
meeting facility

By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net :

FREEPORT -— The Peli-
can Bay at Lucaya is reposi-
tioning its hotel, launching a
new logo and constructing a
$7.1 million meeting facility

which is expected to be com- i

pleted early next year.

The logo unveiling was
held during a champagne
reception at Canal House,
the new five-storey meet-
ing/conference building
which is still under construc-
tion.

Magnus Alnebeck, manag-

ing director/general manag-
er, said the new logo of a
‘Happy Pelican’ donning
sunglasses evokes a happy
feeling and will be placed at
touch points preceding
guests’ arrival at the hotel.
“We made the pelican

happier. It injects a breath of

fresh air, colour, and vibran-
cy into the property with
Caribbean colours of
turquoise, warm red orange
with a mix of yellow,” he
said.

also in keeping with the
“Meet Happy” slogan for
Canal House, which will
cater to various functions,
meetings, and events.

Mr Alnebeck said the $7
million meeting facility rep-
resents a “serious invest-
ment” for Pelican Bay,

which is owned by Sundt AS,

a private investment compa-
ny based in Norway.

The Canal House will con-
sist of more than 30,000 sq ft. }

There will be five meeting
rooms, a breakfast restau-
rant and office space. The
big meeting space on the
fourth and fifth levels have
wrap-around balconies that

offer views of the ocean. The

ground floor will consist of
administrative offices.

Although no new employ-
ment will be created at the
hotel, Mr Alnebeck said
there will be a lot of out-
sourcing of services, such as
food and beverage catering
for events.

Mr Alnebeck said the
hotel’s repositioning marks
completion of a strategy that
commenced five years ago.

He stated that their focus

now is on visitors as opposed i

to tourists, and providing
meeting facilities for a vari-
ety of events.

Despite the tough chal-
lenging times on Grand
Bahama, Pelican Bay is far-
ing well, he said.

“We are doing fine
because we are going after a
different market, said
Alnebeck. Freeport in my
mind is a unique place in the
region and I think we forget
that we have a lot of people
coming here who are not
tourists and need to stay in
hotels, and that is really the
market we are after.

“We want to own the local :

corporate market; we want
to make sure that anyone
who comes to Grand
Bahama for that sort of pur-
pose has Pelican Bay first in
mind.

“Obviously, we will con-
tinue to cater to tourists and
make sure they have a good
stay, but it is not a market
that we are actively going to
go after,” he said.

The 182-room hotel offers
89 waterside rooms and 93

waterside state rooms. There

are three swimming pools,
Jacuzzi, and Sabor Restau-
rant and Bar.

The property recently

received high rating in Expe-

dia.com’s exclusive Insiders’
Select List as one of the best

hotels in the world, receiving

the highest ranking in the
Bahamas, and placing 11th
in the Caribbean.

He noted that the design is

MORE than $10 million has
been spent locally on various
aspects of the design, engineering
and consultation of the airport
redevelopment project, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham said
during a groundbreaking ceremo-
ny at the Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport.

More than $14.8 million in con-
struction contracts have been
awarded to Bahamian firms.

They include Alexiou & Asso-
ciates, George V Cox & Compa-
ny, Graphite Engineering, Engi-
neering Solutions & Consulting,
Caribbean Civil Group, Engi-
neering & Technical Services,
Construction Cost Engineering,
DHP Associates, Certified Test-
ing Laboratories International,
SEV Group, and Pinder’s Cus-
toms Brokerage.

Mr Ingraham said the terminal’s
general contractor, Ledco, a Cana-
dian firm, is planning for 73 per
cent of its labour requirements to
be filled through local contractors.

Bahamian firms awarded major
contracts for the first stage of the
project include Reliable Fencing,
Bahamas Hot Mix, Basden Ele-
vators, Woslee Construction, Sen-
tinel Drilling and Water Works,
TMC Engineering Ltd.

“T am advised that a significant
amount of the work awarded to
international firms will be com-
pleted by Bahamian sub-contrac-
tors and labour,” he said.

Solid Wood

ENTIRE STOCK
Waverly
Fabrics

Financing Available Through
erotic ss-LALe

LOCAL NEWS

$10 million spent locally on
airport development project

IN TERA ATIGONAL

N FP INDLING

AIRPORT



THE REDEVELOPMENT of the airport is expected to take four years.

Approximately 40 contracts are
scheduled to be tendered in com-
ing months, including sub-con-
tracts to the terminal’s general
contractor and direct contracts
with NAD.

“Plans call for this first phase
of the redevelopment project to
open for passengers bound for US
ports, beginning in the first quarter
of 2011,” Mr Ingraham said at the
cermony.

Immediately thereafter, work is
expected to begin on converting
the existing US departure terminal
into the new international termi-
nal.

“Construction of the redevel-
opment of (LPIA) is expected to
last for four years,” he said. “At
the height of construction, approx-
imately 400 persons will be
engaged on the job site.

“Upon completion (LPIA) will
provide the infrastructure our
nation needs to prosper.”

Mr Ingraham said he is satis-

fied that when the new US termi-
nal opens, it will be “one of the
best and most modern airport
facilities in this part of the world.

“Finally, after having for far too
long ranked among the least effi-
cient and least customer friendly
airports in our region, the (LPIA)
will become a source of national
pride.”

Projects being carried out at
LPIA along with works being
undertaken at the cruise port in
Nassau Harbour to ensure its
capacity to receive Genesis class
cruise ships, would position the
Bahamian economy to take
advantage of the upturn in the
world economy, he explained.

“Tt is a manifestation of my
Government’s determination and
commitment to investing in
tourism, the major industry of our
nation, and to modernizing and
expanding our national infra-
structure,” the Prime Minister
said.

1-pc 5 Drawer Chest

Queen 8 Pc Set
King 8 Pc Set

“20% OFF NEW OUTDOOR
FABRICS FROM BRAZIL

“EXCEPT NET ITEMS, VINYL, PLASTIC

Lamps, Mirrors,
Candleholders,
Vases etc.

ate aL ae DT a

Uae Le

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080 * Fox:[242] 322-525]

CERTIFIED
PARTNER

COMMERTLAL

(Misrenet

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

at

ea

iding technology

WOTKS

£6 MADEIRA

STREET, PALMOALE + 242 328 O40

Large Selection
Upholstery &

© Drapery Fabries



+ VAN MICRONET.2S

SEN ATU aC COS

WORK on a new two-lane highway from the Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport to the College of The Bahamas will begin next year,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham revealed.

Construction of a new boardwalk along the downtown Nassau water-
front, extending from Prince George Wharf eastward to the second Par-
adise Island bridge is also planned following the transfer of commercial
shipping from downtown Bay Street to Arawak Cay, Mr Ingraham said.

“Investment in public infrastructure is essential to the long term sus-
tainable growth of the Bahamian economy in general and tourism in par-
ticular,” said Mr Ingraham.

The Government is resurfacing Bay Street from Blake Road to Mack-
ey Street, undertaking upgrades at traffic roundabouts, and installing curb-
ing along roadsides, he added.

Study Permit, medical exam required
for courses in Canada over six months

THE High Commission of
Canada in Kingston, Jamaica,
advises residents of the Bahamas
seeking to undertake studies in
Canada that a Study Permit and
medical exam are required for all
courses of over six months.

Applications received in
Kingston after Wednesday, July
15, risk missing the September
2009 intake.

Begin by a careful consultation
of www.jamaica.ge.ca for complete
and recently updated information
on applying for a Study Permit. It
is strongly recommended that all
prospective applicants consult the
website and be sure to include all
required supporting documenta-
tion in their application to avoid
delays or a possible refusal.

The correct processing fee is
$125 in Canadian funds in the form
of a bank draft payable to “High
Commission of Canada”.

Upon receipt of the application,

processing fee and two return
courier envelopes, medical forms
will be sent out.

To speed up the process, appli-
cants can chose to undergo the
medical examination, at their own
risk, pending final disposition of
their application.

Applications require up-to-date
contact information. If an appli-
cant will not be at their usual place
of residence during the summer
months, they should be sure to pro-
vide an email address or alternate
phone number where they can be
contacted.













eR Bsns
ae La
Pest Control
aC ee
322-2157

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THE Moet THoroudn Ristonanon & Cueasina Eves, on THe Jon 6 Pern!
ALAC. ONLY PROPRIA. CET Stone Casper & LPHoLaTERY CARB SYETRMt







Cop, Upholsiery, Sime and Marble Cleaning &




Restoration Specialist.

Prochem Cleaning Sysiems eames Deep & Hewry
Soil, acter, Grease, Watermarks aed Stems from
i bepeling #& Purnitene, restoring them bo like new






afd (chon af neplacomant cnet

Canpet, Sevia's, Loveseats, Chairs, Dining Chairs, Cars,

Boats, Geo, Tiles, Murhle & Stone




Porsian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Spncinket










Marble Polishing, Restoration & Care
Wood Floor Restoration

Aethonaal Stone Tach Professcnadl Contractor

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594

PU LUCA MM Le PAE

PROCHEM SYSTEM (as)

ONLY WE CAN BIT RIGHT!
We en Oe © eer © We
© pe ceerperaie ore









































ore Tina BETS.
:

\hall-al-“slaruthiati
CRESS AT DOH AM Dh ALY

aa eV Ae CNT

juveronseicon——+_[sa0 [wa | en [oo [i
pumeeewes————_c [190] [can [nn [ra
ICE AGE: DANN OFTHE DINOSAURS a | 4x20 [AS | MIA | Gra | Set | 1Oed0
rior 8 | a [a |
TRANSFORMER: REVENGE a | ist | MA | 4:00 | wa | 7:00 | 1ee00
awsome ease [200 | [50 wh [085 A
prssrrsecen a [sa 0 [wn | [as ia
arenas ct 0 [ | as [as ia
icnerat a [ass [| on [a i
THEHANGOVER ec | 00 | a | Mik | go | ae30 | 10005 |

oeacwero wer so | a6 | | to | as | 05 |

me ere us oe LL 5 bu VE

















ramos [Wat
cer A] 0 a [wa | 68 wa | wt
xc oFPenann —_¢| | 00 | wa | 61 | a0 | a0

THE HARGOVER © dt

495 | wa | 6:00 | 8:35 | 10:40]

380-FLIX


PAGE 4, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Honduras move protects its citizens

Michael Jackson —
creative, talented,
but also flawed

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Michael Jackson was truly
an amazingly talented, cre-
ative and much loved artist.
However, like the rest of us,
he did have at least a few
faults and we may do well to
keep certain things in per-
spective.

During the spectacular and
very touching memorial ser-
vice, the Rev Al Sharpton
said, with no small amount of
paranoia, that there was
“nothing strange” about him,
only about “what he had to
deal with.” Now come on,
Michael Jackson and
“strange” became virtually
synonymous in later years.

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



This, of course, should in no
way detract from his incredi-
ble accomplishments. But let
us not overlook the blanketed
baby and balcony incident, his
children’s veils, his own masks
and disguises, the obsessive
and disfiguring plastic surgery,
the creepily androgynous
appearance, the child guests
sleeping in his bed, attending
court in pyjamas, the spend-
thrift habits, the hyperbaric
chamber, and the bizarre use
of medications drugs, etc.

So many, including his chil-

dren, have said that Michael
was a wonderful father. In
many ways he probably was.
However, it is highly doubt-
ful that he had his children in
mind while he was reportedly
being anaesthetised or
drugged for “sleep”. Just sup-
pose the kids had needed him
during the night — but then I
guess that’s what the nanny
was for.

To some, it may border on
blasphemy to suggest that
although Michael could moon
walk he could not walk on
water. Nonetheless, he will be
greatly missed.

KEN W KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,
July 8, 2009.

ON learning that the Honduran army had
sent its country’s president packing to Costa
Rica, C A Smith, Bahamian ambassador to the
Organisation of American States, joined an
international protest, pledging that the Bahamas
stands “ready to assist” Honduras wherever it
can. The free world was shocked at what it per-
ceived as an army coup, especially as President
Manuel Zelaya was not even given a chance to
change out of his pyjamas for the plane ride.

However, Honduras’ Supreme Electoral Tri-
bunal, Supreme Court, Attorney General and
other national institutions and associations sup-
ported the army, declaring that it was acting
within the Honduran Constitution, which Zelaya
had breached.

In fact the army had acted on the orders of
the Supreme Court, which had instructed it to
serve an arrest warrant on the president. All
branches of the Honduran government had
accused Zelaya of violating the Constitution—
a Constitution that he had sworn to uphold and
enforce on taking the oath of office on January
27, 2006. However, in a recent interview with
The Miami Herald Col. Herberth Bayardo Ine-
stroza admitted that the only possible misstep
taken by his forces in the president’s ouster
was putting him on a plane and sending him
out of the country.

He said that the rational behind that move
was that had “Zelaya been jailed throngs of
loyal followers would have erupted into chaos
and demanded his release with violence.

“What was more beneficial, remove this gen-
tleman from Honduras or present him to pros-
ecutors and have a mob assault and burn and
destroy and for us to have to shoot?” he asked.
“If we left him here, right now we would be
burying a pile of people.”

So, to save lives, instead of arresting him
and holding him in a local jail, they went to his
home, roused him from sleep and put him on a
plane — pyjamas and all.

The Honduran Supreme Court holds that
the army acted within the country’s constitution.

Apparently, Zelaya, taking a page from the
blotted copy book of his buddy Hugo Chavez of
Venezuela, decided that he too would change
Honduras’ constitution to extend his term in
office, which ends in January next year — six
months from now.

To extend his power he unilaterally ordered
a national referendum, which had the force of
law, to be held on June 28 to decide the issue.
Under that country’s constitution only the
Supreme Electoral Tribunal has the power to do

Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS & TRUCKS

Trade-ins on
New Car Sales

this — anyone else attempting to do so is to be
removed from power under Article 239 of the
Constitution.

The Tribunal, backed by the Supreme Court
protested the referendum. And so Zelaya issued
a second decree on June 25 ordering a survey
and presenting a new constitution to replace
the existing one. On the same day, the Supreme
Court confiscated all the ballots intended for the
survey. Zelaya ordered the warehouse, where
the ballots had been secured, broken into and
the ballots rescued.

Apparently, he put the final nail in his polit-
ical coffin when he presented a new constitution
to replace the one now in force. Under article
239 of the current constitution it is provided
that anyone who attempts or intends to replace
the constitution is to be automatically removed
from office with the loss of all constitutional
powers. On investigation the Attorney Gener-
al found that Zelaya had in fact tried to highjack
the constitution — and no one, not even a pres-
ident, can thumb his nose at the law. There-
fore, he had to be removed. The National Elec-
toral Tribunal concurred and the Supreme
Court ordered an arrest warrant be served — all
legal and within the constitution.

Honduras’ Union Civica Democratica, point-
ed out that, unlike the United States, Honduras
has no impeachment laws, but that Zelaya, like
President Richard Nixon, has learned that no
citizen— not even a president — is above the
law. The Union declared that democracy in
Honduras is still “alive and strong because the
constitution worked.”

Nixon, the 39th president of the United
States, was the only American president to
resign. Facing impeachment for the Watergate
scandal, he resigned in 1974 and was later par-
doned for all federal crimes that he might have
committed while in office, thereby avoiding
impeachment hearings.

In future it would be better for our govern-
ment to mind its own business and not pledge
assistance in another man’s country until all
the details are known. Also any move support-
ed by Hugo Chavez should be treated with sus-
picion — that in itself should send a red flag to
the top of the flag pole.

Zelaya has apparently told the UN that if
returned to complete his term, he will no longer
push for constitutional change and if offered a
chance to stay in power he will turn it down.

He claims that he’s going back to his farm.
Honduras would have probably been better off
he had never left the farm.



A moonwalking, mesmerising,
unstoppable, invincible entertainer

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Most people can vividly recall their precise
whereabouts when first receiving news of the
death of a celebrity.

The assassination of US president John F
Kennedy in 1963 and the recent demise of pop
singer Michael Jackson from suspected car-
diac arrest are two prime examples. (The
deaths of Farrah Fawcett and Ed McMahon,
around the same time as Jackson’s, were prob-
ably not quite as galvanising).

As expected, speculation and media coverage
seem to have no limits, with Jackson’s inter-
ment in Los Angeles on Tuesday probably set
to become the funeral of the decade, if not the
ages.

Jackson, while on the verge of a comeback,
and on whose music most of us, including Pres-
ident Obama grew up, despite amassing a huge
fortune, reportedly left behind a few debts.

But fortunately for 75-year-old Cameroon,
African pop pioneer Manu Dibango, whose
1972 “honking, galloping funk track”, Soul
Makossa, provided the ethos of Michael Jack-
son’s Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin’, (the first
song on his best-selling Thriller album), a finan-
cial copyright agreement was worked out.

Although many listeners mistook it for non-
sense Jackson’s chant at the end of the song,
“Ma ma Se, Ma ma Sa, Ma Ma COO sa”, came
directly from Dibango’s song.

According to the current issue of the New
Yorker magazine, when Jackson died, Diban-
20, who mourned his demise and made a gra-
cious statement, was still awaiting a French
court’s decision on whether he was owed dam-
ages for pop singer Rihanna’s use of his sylla-
bles in her 2007 hit song, Don’t Stop the Music,
which was based on Jackson’s Wanna Be
Startin’ Somethin’.

In the New Yorker article, Kelefa Sanneh
writes that the true meaning of Jackson’s life
and music” spoke much louder than “the noise
from the child-molestation scandals, his mutat-
ing appearance and his escalating eccentricity.”

Most will probably hope along with Berklee
College of Music-trained American musician
John Mayer, that the seemingly indefatigable
pop star will be forever remembered as the
“moonwalking...mesmerising, unstoppable,
invincible” Michael Jackson.

SIMON ARTZI
Nassau,
July, 2009.

Independence Supplement added to my historical knowledge

Subject: Independence Sup-
plement - Article on Sir Stafford
Sands

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This is a letter to your senior
reporter Rupert Missick, which
you may print. — Raymond
Antonio.

Mr Missick:

I read with great interest
your story in today's Tribune
Independence Supplement on

DON STAINTON
PROTECTION Ltd.

Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

Sir Stafford Sands. Being born
in the 60's, I entered primary
school when our currency was
changed to Bahamian dollars,
and therefore do not have per-
sonal knowledge of events of
that era. Everything I had heard
and read about Sir Stafford
Sands to this point only focused
on two aspects of the man: (1)
his transformation of the
Bahamas’ winter tourist season
to year-round; and (2) his deep-
rooted hatred of black Bahami-
ans.

As noted in your article, he
seemed to be the UBP person-
ified, leaving other members of
that party seemingly untainted:
Noel Roberts, Sir Roland
Symonette, Sir Geoffrey John-
stone, etc.

It was quite refreshing to
read your article, which includ-
ed additional information and
details which provided more
background to this man than I
ever knew. And to read quotes

from the late Norman Solomon
was for me the icing on the
cake. As a little boy at the age
of 9, I started reading The Tri-
bune after my father was fin-
ished reading, and I was just
fascinated with letters to the
Editor from Mr. Solomon.
Accounts of his debates in Par-
lament always caught my atten-
tion.

This article, and several oth-
ers providing an insight into the
goings-on leading up to Inde-
pendence, made this supple-
ment just superb reading.

As one who vividly remem-
bers the events on Clifford Park
on the night of July 9, 1973, and
the other events on succeeding
days, your presentation has
added to my historical knowl-
edge.

RAYMOND ANTONIO

Nassau,
July 8, 2009.

ALUMINUM SECURITY SCREENS

Accepted

NOW
IN STOCK!

es, ‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE

‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

‘O06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
‘03 HYUNDAI Hi VAN

‘08 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘01 MAZDA MPV VAN

‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA

‘07 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA

ADS e 2

#1 AUTO DEALER IM THE AP AS
EAST pice STREET * 322-3775 * =i sory

sherawen ot Chea bty Ade Doles Femme bid bo ee
te Abaco Wrior ksi Don Meche Ded, 147-7910

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELTON JOSEPH of FOSTER
STRRET, CHIPPINGHAM, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

FOR SALE

Exclusive Blackbeard Cove Condominium Site
High End Community off Eastern Road

128’ x 100’ with approved plans for 6 units
2 bedroom, 2 bathroom Condo Units
All designed with spacious 19’ x 20’

private decks in rear

BEAUTYGUARD
Free Estimates

| WE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL!

\ Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978 i

$250,000.00
Tel. 325-1325 / 325-1408 / 422-4489 / 425-9388

ear = a" Cure


PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Switzerland
is the Daddy



\ X | HEN it comes to off shore
banking and financial ser-

vices, I am sure that you will all agree
that Switzerland is the master. In fact they created the business.

The offshore centres in our region either learned the business ;
from the Swiss or learned it from those who learned it fromthe ;

Swiss.

There is only one correct answer, Switzerland.
I think that we can continue to learn from them.

Financial Centres like The Bahamas and Cayman have been i
feeling pressure from the UK and the USA to provide increas- }
ingly more information about those of their citizens who patron- }
ize the services of these Financial Centres. There have been
threats of various types of retaliation. This continues, despite the }
fact that London and New York are two of the greatest off- i

shore Financial Centres in the entire world.

In recent months, UBS has been under attack and being pres-
sured by the U.S. Justice Department to provide the identity of }
about the 52,000 American account holders. The presumption is:

that they are all tax evaders.

The Swiss Government, however, has said on July 7th in court }
papers presented in a federal court in Miami that it “will use its }
legal authority to ensure that the bank cannot be pressured to }
transmit the information illegally, including if necessary by issu-
ing an order taking effective control of the data at UBS that is the :

subject of the summons.”
On their web site, the Swiss Department of Justice and Police

said on Wednesday in a statement “Switzerland makes it perfectly

clear that Swiss law prohibits UBS from complying with a possible
order by the court in Miami to hand over client information.”

The Bahamas should watch these proceedings closely. We may

still be able to learn some things from “The Daddy”.

Get
CET NY
For

Therefore in answer to the question: “Who is the Daddy?”

LOCAL NEWS

Negotiations over Bahamas
and Cuba maritime boundaries

By LINDSAY THOMPSON

THE Bahamas and the
Republic of Cuba have com-
pleted a “successful round”
of preliminary negotiations
aimed at defining the mar-
itime boundaries between
both countries, the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs
announced.

On June 10, 2009, a dele-
gation of technical experts
from various ministries
accompanied by a consultant
on maritime delimitation met
in Havana, Cuba.

They exchanged views and
scientific and legal informa-
tion that will form the frame-
work for the determination
of an equitable boundary
between the parties in accor-
dance with the relevant prin-
ciples of international law.

Although the primary pur-
pose of the negotiations is to
delimit a boundary, other
areas of mutual interest were
identified for discussions,
many of which are mandated
by the 1982 United Nations
Convention on the Law of
the Sea (UNCLOS) in the
context of maritime delimi-
tation, the ministry said.

These include matters such
aS cooperation in search and
rescue efforts, the combat-
ting of illegal trafficking in

Super Outboard TCW Ill
* Quarts * 5 Gallon Pails
¢ 55 Gallon Drums

Diesel Oil
* Quarts « Gallons ¢ 5 Gallon Pails
¢ 55 Gallon Drums

Mfring Batteries Seer

Ministry of Foreign Affairs
makes announcement

drugs and migrants, techni-
cal cooperation in areas such
as hydrography and maritime
scientific research, and in the
management of trans-bound-
ary resources — fisheries, oil
and gas deposits.

The recent meeting was
the latest in a series of dis-
cussions on delimitation
between the Bahamas and
Cuba that began in the
1990s. A further round is
scheduled to take place with-
in months.

“Both parties emphasised
the long-standing links of
friendship, respect and coop-
eration that exists between
them, and it is within that
framework that the parties
hope to eventually conclude
an agreement that would be
mutually beneficial and
acceptable,” the ministry
said.

The issue of maritime
delimitation has taken on
new importance for the
Bahamas following the
proclamation of straight
archipelagic baselines in
December 2008.

These have been deposited
with the United Nations, as
required by UNCLOS, and
enacted into domestic law by
the Archipelagic Waters and
Maritime Jurisdiction (Arch-
ipelagic Baselines) Order.

“This means that the base-
line from which the different
maritime zones of the
Bahamas are now to be mea-
sured is a line encircling all
the islands and cays of the
Bahamian archipelago, as
opposed to the low-water
mark around the individual
islands,” said the ministry.

“Naturally, where those
maritime zones overlap with
those of neighbouring states,
UNCLOS requires the par-
ties to agree their boundaries
by negotiations or otherwise
according to international
law.”

Other neighbouring states
with which the Bahamas will
eventually pursue boundary
negotiations include the
United States, the United
Kingdom (on behalf of the
Turks and Caicos Islands)
and Haiti.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

13 ENTRA, EXTRA

Large shipment

of
Wsed Cars

y ] COME CHECK

US OUT

a New Shipments Arrived








































Golf course
workers
Flee CLOTH

By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - While
there are currently no
plans for lay-offs at
Old Bahama Bay,
workers at the Arnold
Palmer Golf Course on
Grand Bahama were
let go on Thursday,
executives at Ginn sur
Mer said.

This comes after
fears were raised that
employees of the West
End resort were going
to be let go as Ginn is
reportedly set to put
the property up for
sale.

A spokesperson for
Ginn said “it is only
speculation” and there
are no plans for lay-
offs at the 71-room
hotel.

Meanwhile, work is
nearing completion on
one of the two signa-
ture golf courses at
Ginn sur Mer and some
of the workers at Ginn
Golf are expected to be
relocated for training
in other areas.

“The Arnold Palmer
Golf Course is almost
finished and they do
not need a huge con-
struction crew on site
and so lay-offs are
scheduled in this area,”
said the spokesperson.

Training

Some of the golf
course workers will be
relocated for training
associated with the
drainage.

The Tribune has
learned that developer
Bobby Ginn flew into
West End on Wednes-
day.

Ginn Resorts is
developing Ginn sur
Mer, a 2,000-acre com-
munity development at
West End. The $4.9 bil-
lion development will
contain more than

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Insurance

4,400 condominium and
hotel units and nearly
2,000 single family resi-
dential home sites.

It will also include a
private airport, two sig-
nature golf courses
designed by Jack Nick-
laus and Arnold
Palmer, clubhouses,
two large marinas, a
Monte Carlo-style casi-
no, water and swim
pavilions, a beach club
and a spa.

/H= ES

Plus...

Crawfish ff

“ * WD 40 « Marvel Mystery Oil
|, ©Puralator Engine Filters * NGK Spark
Plugs * Champion Spark Plugs and
many more.

BAY STREET
GARAGE..

Dowdeswell Street * Tel: 322-2434, 322-2082

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

CALL 322-1122

IT’S MORE THAN JUST OIL.
IT’S LIQUID ENGINEERING!

Securities On All Cheques Printed By
Executive Printers

Vieet & Surpass

All Securitie

Suggested By The CBA

(Clearing Banker’s Association of The Bahamas)
The Executive Printers of The Bahamas Tel. Number 393-5011 Fax:393-6425


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Diabetes is affecting more
Bahamians than ever before

Disease a reality for 25,000

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BLOOD sugar levels are soar-
ing at dangerous heights as dia-
betes is becoming a reality for
more Bahamians than ever before
- whether they are aware of it or
not.

If left untreated, diabetes can
lead to kidney failure, nerve dam-
age, or blindness. It can also lead
to the amputation of limbs.

In 2006 it was found to be the
country's fifth leading cause of
death.

But the disease is a reality for
around 25,000 Bahamians,
approximately eight per cent of
the population.

And a 2007 Ministry of Health
survey found that three per cent
of respondents affected by dia-
betes were not aware of it.

The non-communicable disease
characterised by the body’s inabil-
ity to convert sugars in the blood
into energy comes in two types.

Type One diabetics are usually
diagnosed in childhood as they
do not produce enough insulin,
the hormone secreted by the pan-
creas to break down glucose, and
they are therefore required to
take regular insulin injections and
follow a careful diet.

But the increasing number of
diabetics, who make up around
90 per cent of diabetics in the
country, have developed Type
Two diabetes because they have
become accustomed to a lifestyle
our bodies cannot handle.

A diet high in sugar and starch
coupled with a lack of exercise
means sugar builds up in the
blood, and although the pancreas
produces insulin, the cells of a
Type Two diabetic are not recep-
tive to it.

Type Two diabetics are there-
fore not required to take insulin
injections, but there are medica-
tions. And if it is discovered in
the early stages, Type Two dia-
betes can be completely con-
trolled by diet and exercise.

Emma Schick at the Diabetes
Research Institute in Market
Street explained: "Without
insulin, sugar builds up in your
blood and can’t go to the cells.
The blood gets more sticky and
it’s difficult to pump around the
body.

"More often than not with
Type Two diabetes you can do a
lot to assist in managing it just by
changing your diet and exercise,
and you can do that for a number
of years before you need medica-
tion.”

Ms Schick volunteers for the
Diabetes Research Institute
which was founded four years ago
by Austrian expatriate Harold
McPike.

Mr McPike, a Type One dia-
betic, wanted to help meet the
needs of Bahamians affected by
diabetes after his research pro-
ject showed the huge burden dia-
betes is building on the health-
care system.

Around 1,500 people had their
blood sugar levels tested and a
number of unsuspecting diabet-
ics were discovered as a result.

While some could seek treat-
ment, for some it was already too
late; four of the most seriously
affected diabetics died within two
months.

Ms Schick said: "We came
across quite a significant number
of persons who had elevated
blood sugars which indicated that
they needed to be referred to doc-
tors, and a lot chose not to go to
doctors.

"There was a stigma associated
with having diabetes so people
would pretend not to have it, but
a lot of people also had a number
of risk factors that showed they
should be tested on a regular
basis.”

Breaking down the stigma is
just a small element of what the
DRI is now doing.

The centre's principle focus is
to help treat Type One diabetic
children and educate them about
their condition, and the DRI pro-
vides medication and support for
around 60 of such children across
the Bahamas.

However, through its research
the DRI has also found an
increasing number of young peo-
ple are developing Type Two dia-
betes as a result of poor diet and
an inactive lifestyle.

Ms Schick said: "It is of great
concern because it's more diffi-
cult to control in younger people.
The drugs haven’t been devel-
oped with that age group in mind,
and if they have grown up eating
the wrong types of food and not
exercising it’s a very difficult
lifestyle change to make."

DRI diabetic educator Mar-
garet Daxon teaches young peo-
ple, their parents and adults about
how to eat in a way which will
control diabetes and prevent
them from developing the dis-
ease.

She explained how to ensure
you are preparing a healthy meal
by filling half of your plate with
non-starchy vegetables or fruit,
such as salad and green vegeta-
bles, a quarter of your plate with

a protein such as meat or fish, no
bigger than a deck of cards, and
another quarter with simple car-
bohydrates such as rice, pasta or
potatoes. Such a meal should be
eaten three times a day, with a
snack of fruit, vegetables and pro-
tein in between.

Mrs Daxon said: "What we
need is a well-balanced diet, to
not skip meals, and to eat at reg-
ular times.

"A lot of persons who have
diabetes often skip meals and
have one big meal during the day,
but your body will only use what
it needs and store the rest as fat,
so just give the body what it
needs; a wide variety of foods at
different times of the day."

She and three other diabetic
educators at the DRI are now
working with other institutions to
share this vital nutrition informa-
tion and spread it in the commu-
nity.

DRI administrative assistant
Nicola Fernander said the insti-
tute has been in talks with the
Ministry of Education about the
nutritional value of school meals,
which tend to be high in sugars
and carbohydrates and are not
only contributing to diabetes, but
also to behavioural problems
among young people.

She said: "A lot of kids need to
know how to eat properly
because sugar spends them up
and makes them hyperactive.”

The centre also does outreach
work at churches and community

centres, and makes annual visits
to the Family Islands.

It has become the leading
authority on diabetes in the coun-
try and facilitates the training of
healthcare workers in diabetes
education so they can become
certified diabetes educators.

In-house support sessions are
held twice a week for children
with diabetes, their parents, and
any diabetic seeking support. And
the centre operates an open door
policy so anyone can walk in and
have their blood sugar tested for
free, their blood pressure mea-
sured, or their eyes tested.

Ms Fernander said: "We want
people to be aware that there is
this condition, but you can do
something about it. It’s not a
death sentence; there are organi-
sations here to help you do some-
thing about it.

"Living with diabetes without
being aware of it will only
increase your complications.

"Most people who are diag-
nosed with diabetes have had it
for years prior to being diag-
nosed, and by then they are usu-
ally already having complications.

"They have their blood sugar
tested here and are sent to the
doctor and put on medications
immediately, so had they not
come here they would have been
carrying on without knowing
what is going on as they were."

Ms Schick added: "If your
blood sugar is elevated and par-
ticularly if it’s extremely elevated












NOTICE

Mohs Sureery in Nassau








DR. JOHN STRASSWIMMER, MOHS SURGEON
will be visiting The Skin Centre on Friday
July 17, 2009. Or Strasswimmer trained at
Harvard and Yale and is Board Certified and a
Fellow of the Mohs College.

Mohs Micrographic Surgery

is an advanced

treatment process for skin cancer which is
now offered at The Skin Centre. It offers the

highest possible cure

rate for many skin

cancers and simultaneously minimizes the
sacrifice of normal tissue. This cutting-edge

cCreatment Pequires

highly specialized

physicians that serve as surgeon, pathologist
and reconstructive surgeon.

Qur visiting Mohs Surgeon has extensive

experience in

the

Mohs Micrographic

Procedure. The technique is used to remove
the two most common forms of skin cancer:

basal cell
carcinoma.

carcinoma and squamous cell

For more information, please contact:
The Skin Centre, Harbour Bay Plaza,
East Bay Street Tel. 393-7546.

you have to seek medical advice
as soon as possible because it’s
not going to get better, it will only
get worse."

Everyone is advised to have
regular screenings to monitor
their blood sugar levels and blood
pressure at the DRI on the corner
of Market Street and Peter Street
during the opening hours from
11am to 7pm, Tuesday to Friday,
and 10am to lpm on Saturdays.
For more information call the
DRI on 326-5134.



IF IT is discovered in the early stages, Type Two diabetes can be completely
controlled by diet and exercise.














57 Golling Awe
P.O. Box N= Ge
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone: | #427 35-7 S07
1 242 322 364-6

St. Luke's Diagnostic Centre has been in operation since January, 1985, it sa full service diagnostic
centre providing medical laboratory and other health care activities.

« rays

* Environmental Testing

* Pregnancy Screen

* Anti-
* (Glucose Monitoring

Well-equipped and adequately staffed laboratory, providing consistently accurate, relevant and timely
information to facilitate the delivery of quality healthcare to persons living in all islands of The Bahamas.

Accredited and licensed by College of American Pathologist (CAP) and The Health Professions Council,

ECG & Hearing Audiometry
Pre-Employment Sconeening
BGrugs of Abuse Testing
Cholasteral

DONA Paternity Testing

«Hi! Testing

* All Major Credit Cards and
INSUFAncES Ace pied

* House Calls

* Stat and Same Day Services,

Email laboratoraavcegicorsiwave,com
diagaosiccantreiiconiware.cam

British High Commission Kingston
NOTICE TO BRITISH CITIZENS

The Vice Consul for The Bahamas (based in Kingston, Jamaica)
will visit Nassau on Thursday, 23rd July, 2009 and will be
available to discuss any individual problems concerning
passports and nationality issues.

Passport applications and renewals should continue to be sent
by courier direct to the High Commission in Kingston.

Appointments can be made by calling the Honorary Consul
in Nassau on 324-4089.

BACK To SCHOO!

LAYAWAY



NO interest - NO fees + just 3 easy payments



layaway plan
we’ve got it

Custom
COMPUTERS LIMITED

4 Stores at Cable Beach & East Bay St.
t. 242.396.1101 © 242.396.1100

Wi, CLSLOMCOnmypuiters, rs
solutions @customcomputers.bs


PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Honduras: A coup provoked

an =
o :
|
7 = = ete =

WORLD VIEW.

By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
Diplomat)

H owweras is not
a country with

which the average Caribbean
person is familiar. There-
fore, recent events there have
not been a major talking
point except among govern-
ment representatives. Yet,
there are important lessons
for the Caribbean arising
from what has been
described as a Coup d’état in
that country.

As has been widely report-
ed, the President, Manual



ht

Zelaya, was taken by the
army from his Presidential
Palace and flown to Costa
Rica in the dead of night. He
was replaced by a provision-
al President Roberto
Michetlett ii



ics/Roberto Micheletti> , the
former congressional leader.

Zelaya’s supporters outside
of Honduras wasted no time
in condemning his ouster.
Leading the demands for his
government to be reinstated
and even, at one time, threat-
ening military intervention
was Venezuela’s President
Hugo Chavez who had
recently recruited Honduras
to membership of the Boli-
varian Alternative for the

PUBLIC NOTICE

Public Consultation on Retail Pricing
for the Electronic Communications
Sector

fo ee ier
OCS

frearrs thee Pistols UPibliens

of wew.bahemeas.gov.be or ihe privatiso

of the consultotion document canbe

(ame

oiotoinecd
sion and the offices of
Governments webote

tion website of

wee bDteprivatsaion.cem and comments emailed to
consultations btcprivatisaton.cam.



_—

SIR RONALD SANDERS

Americas (ALBA) which he
initiated.

In the event, Zelaya’s
removal has been condemned
by the member government
of the Organization of Amer-
ican States (OAS) including
the governments of the
Caribbean and the United
States of America on the
basis that no government
should be removed by uncon-
stitutional means. And, that
principle, of course, is cor-
rect as far as it goes.

But, in the case of Hon-
duras there is more to the
issue than meets the eye. Mr
Zelaya is not without blame
for his own removal, and it
may very well be that, within
the confines of the Honduras
Constitution, there was no
coup at all. Indeed, it is being
argued that he was removed
from the Presidency in keep-
ing with the Constitution and
the law because he usurped
the law in an attempt to keep
himself in office.

In 1982, Honduras amend-
ed its Constitution to intro-
duce a four-year term limit
on the Presidency. The Con-
stitution also made it uncon-
stitutional to try to alter the
provision. This worked well
until Mr Zelaya became Pres-
ident in 2006 by a slim major-
ity. He is required to relin-
quish the Presidency in Jan-
uary, but sought to alter the
Constitution to extend his
term. A challenge submitted
to the Supreme Court found
that he could not do so.
Despite this, Zelaya ordered
General Romeo Vasquez to

Héagen-Dazs® ice cream available at all leading

a os a a
icity Su Ce a ociiaiiem itis

For more information, please contact:

FUN FooDs WHOLESALE, LTD.
tel 242-393-8077 | fax 242-594-6217

Email: Iburrows@lickety.com



a.
xs
P=
=
o
<=
wo
pa]
o
[==]
3]
=
o
—s

HONDURAS’ OUSTED PRESIDENT MANUEL ZELAYA meets with Dominican military officers at the national
palace in Santo Domingo, Friday, July 10, 2009.

have the military provide
logistical support for a refer-
endum anyway. Vasquez
declined on the basis of the
Supreme Court ruling and
Zelaya promptly fired him.
But the Court reinstated him.
The Supreme Electoral Tri-
bunal then ordered the
seizure of all ballot boxes
and election-related materi-
als. According to the Span-
ish daily El Pais, the ballot
boxes had been flown in from
Venezuela by the Chavez
government. The Congress,
on the strength of the
Supreme Court decision,
then decided that Mr Zelaya
had violated the Constitution
and should be removed. In
other words, they impeached
him. The member govern-
ments of the OAS seem to
have regarded this process as
a coup d’état. Hence, calls
have been made for Zelaya’s
reinstatement as President.

As Larry Binns, the Direc-
tor of the Council for Hemi-
spheric Affairs based in
Washington, has pointed out:
“By presenting his govern-
ment as under attack by
rightist, anti-constitutional
elements intent on over-
throwing his presidency,
Zelaya has managed to pre-
sent himself as an emblem of
democracy and legitimacy.”
He is far from it. Critics
believe him to be a populist
demagogue akin to Mr
Chavez. Indeed, his line up
of friends — Chazez himself
and Evo Morales, the Boli-
vian President — reveal lead-
ers who have also amended
their countries’ constitutions
to extend their term in office
amid considerable opposi-
tion.

There was an order for
Zelaya’s detention, but
instead of enforcing it, the

provisional Honduran gov-
ernment chose to take him
out of the country. They have
argued that, in doing so, they
avoided confrontation that
would have ensued, probably
causing the loss of many lives
as opposing factions clashed.
Mr Zelaya had earlier shown
himself not above leading his
supporters in a march on the
place where ballot boxes
were ordered sequestered by
the Court.

The question to be asked
in the Caribbean is: Could a
Caribbean leader ignore the
ruling of the Supreme Court
and proceed to try to hold a
referendum to amend the
Constitution, then fire the
head of the military for refus-
ing to ignore the Court’s rul-
ing? This is pretty heavy-
handed stuff that smacks of
authoritarianism and a disre-
gard for the rule of law sim-
ply to perpetuate a leader in
office.

If there is a need for Con-
stitutional change, particu-
larly of an entrenched clause
in the Constitution, a great
deal of consultation and
debate is absolutely neces-
sary. Mr Zelaya paid little
heed to the sensitivities of
the Honduran Congress and
sections of the people repre-
sented by political parties
and other groups. In tram-
pling on their rights and
flouting the Constitution and
the law, he set the scene for
retaliation.

Within the OAS, the effort
to condemn Zelaya’s removal
and to call for his reinstate-
ment appears to have been
led by the Venezuelan gov-
ernment with the help of oth-
er governments that have
aligned themselves closely
with Hugo Chavez. These
include Nicaragua, Bolivia

and Argentina, all members
of ALBA. Other govern-
ments appear to have gone
along with this call simply on
the basis of Mr Zelaya’s
removal from the country.

As this commentary is
being written, the winner of
the Nobel Peace Prize and
President of Costa Rica,
Oscar Arias, is scheduled to
mediate talks between
Zelaya and Honduras’
appointed President Roberto
Micheletti. No one can pre-
dict the outcome of these
talks; they will depend on the
willingness of the contenders
to put Honduras before their
own political ambitions, how-
ever skilful Mr Arias may be
as a mediator.

Elections for a new Presi-
dent are due in November.
Elements of a solution to the
crisis could be agreement
that Zelaya will return to
Honduras to finish his term
as President which will end
in January, but there will be
no referendum to amend the
Constitution now. The coun-
try will then choose their new
President from a fresh list of
candidates.

This would meet both the
importance of upholding con-
stitutionally-elected govern-
ments, and disapproving of
those leaders who would
tamper with the Constitution
for their political gain.

Honduras cannot afford
the social and economic dis-
ruption that would flow from
prolonged civil strife and
hemispheric isolation. Sev-
enty per cent of its more than
7 million people already live
in poverty. The Caribbean
should strongly support Mr
Arias’ efforts.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

July Independence Specials

The 6-16 Sentra is built on Nissan's 'C' platform and offers @ standard 2.0-litar
4-cylinder angine, fuel-eificiant Nissan Xtronic CVTâ„¢ (Continuously Variable
Transmission) and responsive handling, The Sentra is also available with a
range of unexpacted amenities - ranging from the luxury of leather-appointed
seating to the convenience of Nissan’s Intelligent Key keyless antry system.

SENTRA

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPINMOTORS LIMITED Te aranaee
i589 UIT Rood Thompson Bhyd. = Qakes Field
PQ). Boo Mad 1. 242.326.6377" f, 242.326.6315
1 (R42) aad? hy ee & sanping@ecoralwave.cam

Pa.
SHIFT _ihe way you move fa,
“te

INSIREAROE AVAILABLE WaTH
ACV AM TNE 1M SUR REDE
BERS & AGENTS LTD.

Sette Ba


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



Govt in ‘informal discussions’
with nurses union’ legal adviser

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net

THE government has been engag-
ing in “informal discussions” with the
Bahamas Nurses Union’s legal advis-
er and is making “every effort” to
come to an agreement with the union
on health insurance coverage for
nurses.

Labour Minister Dion Foulkes said
that both he and Health Minister
Hubert Minnis have spoken with
attorney Obie Ferguson and he hopes
that government and the union can
meet “as soon as possible” in a formal
setting to continue negotiations with
the BNU.

“We are trying to find some com-
mon ground... I don’t want to pre-

Bahamian

empt discussions ongoing
but we are making an effort
to get the matter settled,”
said Mr Foulkes.

This comes after BNU
President Cleola Hamilton
last week turned down gov-
ernment’s invitation for the
union to “reconsider” its
prior rejection of the gov-
ermment’s proposal.

She said that offer —
which would have had gov-
ernment implement the
nurses’ postponed coverage
on July 1, 2010, or before if feasible,
and cover the cost of any “work relat-
ed” sickness or injuries while provid-
ing private rooms for them to be
treated at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital - is “not an offer at all.”



DCN Sen Coe

The offer “expired” July
9. Ms Hamilton said it went
no further than what nurs-
es can already get under
the National Insurance
scheme.

They want their health
insurance this year, as was
| originally expected before
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said the govern-
ment “cannot afford” to
bring it into effect this year
in the current fiscal envi-
ronment.

It is unclear if they will take further
action to achieve their demand.

Last week Ms Hamilton said she
would “have to see some things”
before she determined the way for-
ward.

The government obtained an
injunction ordering nurses back to
work in June, after they went on a
mass sick-out to protest the delay in
their coverage.

However, The Tribune understands
that the fact that this injunction was
pursued on a “false premise” — that is,
that the nurses’ industrial agreement
was not legally registered — means it
is not binding, leaving the legality of
any further action by the nurses in
question.

The government has said that
although the unregistered agreement
itself is not binding for the govern-
ment in terms of its obligations
towards the union, it will continue to
try to come to a resolution with the
nurses out of concern for their wel-
fare and the public interest.

summer

intern
ne Kes

Power Co

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Summer
intern Shonique Miller is
proving to be a team player
in a male dominated field of
engineering at the Grand
Bahama Power Company.

Ms Miller returned to the
power company two weeks
ago for her second year as a
summer intern in the Engi-
neering Department.

She has been working with
Mr Meyer Kao, a consultant
for the company in Protection
Engineering. Under the direc-
tion of Mr Kao, Ms Miller is
being trained in the technical
aspects of protection system
programming.

Ms Miller, 25, obtained a
Bachelor’s degree in Electrical
Engineering from North Car-
olina A&T State in Decem-
ber 2008. She placed second
in her engineering class and
took on a fellowship offered
by the school so she can
obtain her Master’s degree in
Engineering.

Grand Bahama Power
Company executives are very
excited about Ms Miller’s
potential and are impressed
with her work so far.

Mr Derick King, Transmis-
sion and Distribution Direc-
tor, was very impressed with
Ms Miller’s enthusiasm on the
job.

He said the company is
always in search of potential
talent, however, attracting
good talent has been a big
challenge over the past few
years.

DERICK KING, Transmission and Distribution director at Grand Bahama Power Company is pictured



with Summer Intern Shonique Miller.

“Tam very excited about Ms
Miller’s potential, and I’m
impressed with her energy to
get involved, and her enthusi-
asm about hands on work
experience,” he said.

“Ms Miller shows great
potential to be part of a team
to ensure that we stay on the
cutting edge with new tech-
nology.”

Ms Miller’s specific field of
study will be power system
design and control.

“Right now Grand Bahama
is not growing in numbers, but
our needs are changing. Plan-
ning and foreseeing future
needs is part of what I will be
studying.

“It’s challenging and ’m
loving it,” she said.

Tanya Wildgoose, the only
female engineer with GBPC,
is also working with Ms Miller.
Together, the women are
breaking stereotypes by suc-
ceeding in a male-dominated
field.

Although there have been
a lot of naysayers and dis-
couraging comments from
some males, Ms Miller is not

letting their remarks deter
her from a career in engineer-
ing.

She intends to break barri-
ers and prove that women can
succeed in this field here in
the Bahamas. Her mother is
her biggest motivator.

“My mother has been there
making sure I don’t give up,
never letting me forget my
vision.

“My advice to younger stu-
dents is the same one I shared
with the Tabernacle graduates
when I spoke at their gradua-
tion this year, you have to
have a vision. Like the Bible
says, without a vision people
would perish, you need to
write a vision for your life and
follow it through, no matter
what.”

Ms Miller is ready for the
challenges her field will bring.
While students are relaxing
for the summer, she will be
learning and getting real
hands on experience while at
home.

Grand Bahama Power
Company Ltd employs more
than 180 Bahamians.

NY Philharmonic says Cuba
tour prospects promising

Break away from the ordinary

- Hontluras lifts curtew
| Weeks after coup d'etat

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras

HONDURAN authorities

? on Sunday lifted a curfew

? imposed since the ousting of

? President Manuel Zelaya two

? weeks ago — a sign the interim
? government is trying to restore
? normality to life in the crisis-

: gripped country, according to

: Associated Press.

In a nationally broadcast

: announcement, the interim

: government said the

? curfew had reached its objec-

? tive to “restore calm” and curb
? crime.

The administration of

? Roberto Micheletti imposed
? the curfew after soldiers

? escorted Zelaya out of the

? country at gunpoint on June
? 28, plunging Honduras into
? political turmoil.

Hondurans were ordered to

i stay in their homes from 11

? p.m. to 4:30 a.m. nightly. The

? government briefly extended it
? from sunset to sunrise when

? Zelaya attempted to return to
? Honduras and the military

? blocked his plane from landing
? by parking vehicles on the run-
? way July 5.

NIENT TRAVEL AGENgy

ENE Charles Drive

Our Bi-Weekly Travel update
POPULAR DESTINATIONS

Miami ......cccecccesceceecccencecescecencesesse 22a!
Ft. Latdderdlalle........cccccccccsssecseeceseee 22D.
Orland cecccccssssssssssssssscesseseseeccsesesee2.28.29
OW PNR sictesectcvcncccrsnncocmcnacsnnn ee
RAPP viiccesccactincsrtccstacssiawcisscrncee a

Pea PTy OB iiiisinsitannnsendnnnscerintneesnede
Trimidad..cccccccccssssccssccccsssssessseseesst4oae!
LAS Vea sancnncsrnsninmmancmnimcann nae
Los Priel eee aetna rf
TOP Ot i csnscesensisossssacnesessssscesscessrssena tt.
Montreal vccccscsccscsscssssssseccscseseseasesese 412,09
COLLA Wa cccceccccscceccrscsccersscecrerscececsssese GO?
LOM Oftsecscuseccsccrceeceercersevessssersessset dhe Ue

Ue Rhye

OPEN FROM 9A.M. - 6P.M.



HAVANA

PROSPECTS for Cuban performances by the
New York Philharmonic look promising following
a tour of concert halls and meetings with music
officials on the island, orchestra president Zarin
Mehta said Sunday, according to Associated Press.

Mehta said a final decision will be made by the
Philharmonic’s board of directors. Eric Latzky,
the orchestra’s vice president for communica-
tions, said an official announcement could be as
much as a month off.

But Mehta said the trip looks promising, with
tentative plans for performances on Oct. 31 and
Nov. 1 at the 900-seat Teatro Amadeo Roldan, a
renovated concert hall a few blocks from the
Malecon coastal highway.

“We have to go back now and work on reper-
toires, budgets. There are practical considerations
like: how do you get the instruments in, where do
you store them?” Mehta told The Associated
Press in Havana. The Philharmonic’s incoming
music director, Alan Gilbert, would conduct.

The island’s Culture Ministry invited the orches-
tra to perform in Havana, and U.S. officials have
agreed to allow the musicians to visit under an
exemption to legal restrictions on travel to Cuba,
Latzy said.

The Communist Party daily Granma reported
on Saturday that authorities were looking for-
ward to such a tour, which would be among the
most high-profile American cultural exchanges

with communist Cuba since Fidel Castro’s rebels
came to power a half-century ago.

The Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra made a
celebrated tour of Cuba a decade ago.

Mehta said the orchestra is concentrating on
people rather than politicians: “We just want to
come and play music and let others worry about
the politics. That’s their problem.”

He noted that no major change in U.S.-North
Korean relations occurred after the orchestra
played in the North Korean capital in February
2008, the first performance by a major visiting
orchestra in that totalitarian state.

Still, Mehta said, the music did seem to touch
many of the North Korean concertgoers, who
included government officials and military officers.

“Here you have all these people who have been
taught that Americans are the devil,” he
said.

“When we played a Korean piece, you should
have seen the change in the stoic, impassive faces
of the Koreans. Many of them were weeping.”

The New York Philharmonic has a long tradi-
tion of musical diplomacy.

The late Leonard Bernstein led America’s old-
est philharmonic orchestra in a watershed tour
of the Soviet Union in 1959, and later in commu-
nist China and Eastern Bloc countries in the
1980s.

Mehta said some of the visiting musicians might
give masters classes to Cuban students and allow
them to sit in on dress rehearsals.



and discover how to experience
life to the fullest. The Isuzu
D-MAX is the ultimate
multi-purpose pick-up truck .
which enables you to drive / d
through tough roads and load
a variety of cargoes. It is
Specially designed to be
powerful, stylish and highly
functional. The Isuzu D-MAX
IS one tough vetticle that
will never let you down!

—

e: :

sf} ‘iat ais

*

TYREFLEX ear TO oe

Call us today for your new Isuzu D-MAX Pick-Up Truck at 325.4961

Wulff Road, F. 0. Box WH 9123. Nassau, The Bahamas © Faw: 323.4667
PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Armed robbery and |

shooting investigated

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Police
investigations are continuing
into an armed robbery and
shooting in the Lewis Yard
area, where a man was shot
early Friday morning.

Asst Supt Edmund Rah-
ming said the victim, Nicolas
Rolle, 45, of Freeport, was at
a house in Lewis Yard
engaged in a gambling game
with others when four masked
men robbed them.

Mr Rolle was shot by one
of the suspects. He was taken
to hospital, where he is
detained in stable condition.

ASP Rahming said the rob-
bers also stole a white Buick
Le Sable, license number
46706, to flee the area. It was
recovered by police in North
Bahamia later Friday morn-
ing.

The suspects were wearing
masks and described as being
between Sft 7in to 5ft 9in tall
of slim build.

SUDDEN DEATH

POLICE are investigating
the sudden death of a man
who was discovered in the
downtown Freeport area on
Saturday morning.

Asst Supt Edmund Rah-
ming said that sometime
around 7.35am, officers
received a call that a man was
found dead lying on the pave-
ment in the area of the Immi-
gration building.

When officers arrived at

the scene to investigate, they
discovered the body of a dark }
male who appeared to be ;

unresponsive.

EMS personnel dispatched :
to the scene confirmed that }
he was dead. The body was }
taken to the Rand Memorial :

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Hospital morgue, where an

autopsy will be performed to :
determine the cause of the :

death.

play.
GUN SEIZED

A 32-YEAR-OLD man }
was arrested after a firearm :
and ammunition was discov- }
ered at a residence in Fortune i

Bay early Sunday morning.

According to reports, a }
team of officers executed a }
search warrant on a house :
sometime around 5.45am }
Sunday. During the search, :
officers recovered a 9mm pis- }
tol along with 10 live rounds :

of ammunition.

A male occupant was tak-
en into custody. He is expect- }
ed to appear before Freeport i

Magistrate’s Court today.
SHARK ATTACK

AN American visitor was
attacked by a shark while on ;

vacation in Grand Bahama.

Although details of the
incident are sketchy, it is }
believed the attack might }

have occurred in West End.

Police said a 45-year-old }
man was taken to hospital but :
refused treatment and has }

since left the country.

Ck

COMMONWEALTH BANK

Employment Opportuni

Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed to delivering superior quality service, to
training and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in

the community.

Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for
Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco.

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

e Assisting the Branch Manager in managing the sales activities of
the Branch to enhance profitability.
Effectively leading, supporting and coaching personnel to

achieve corporate objectives.

Effectively managing a portfolio of consumer, mortgage and

commercial loans.

e Adjudicating credit lines within delegated authority.
e Managing the Branch’s collection activities and the protection of

collateral.

Following-up with client and support functions to ensure timely
completion of product requests and transactions and resolution of

inquiries and issues.

Ensuring Credit risk ratings and credit scoring practices are
adhered to at all times to minimize the risk of loan losses.
Ensuring specific objectives are developed through an
appropriate strategic plan to grow the Branch’s loan and deposit

portfolios and other offerings.

Adding value to the customers’ portfolio of financial services

by actively promoting, marketing, building and cross selling all
deposit / investment and consumer credit business. Ensuring

self and direct reports consistently provide highly courteous
customer service in an informed and thorough manner. Assisting
the Manager in attaining the targets incorporated in the Branch’s

financial plan.

QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE:

¢ Bachelor’s degree or higher in Business Administration, Banking
& Finance or a related discipline from an accredited University.
Minimum of eight years commercial banking experience with a
minimum of 3 years supervisory / managerial experience.
Experience in managing a diverse loan portfolio and assessing

loan quality.

Detailed knowledge of Retail / Commercial / Mortgage lending
practices and credit anal ysis to ensure portfolio quality.
Substantial work experience in loans and risk management with
a full understanding of financial statements and the ability to

anal yze the information.

Excellent leadership and coaching skills.

Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills.
Excellent organizational and time management skills.
Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications.

REMUNERATION PACKAGE:

Commonwealth Bank is a Great place to work! We offer an
exciting work environment with the opportunity for growth and
development. We also offer a competitive compensation package,
reflecting the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications,
including a performance based incentive plan, health, vision,
dental and life insurances anda pension plan.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before

July 24, 2009 to:

Human Resources Department
Re: Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco
P.O. Box SS-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Telefax: (242) 393-8073

ns.net

©2009 CreativeRelatios

E-mail address: hr@combankltd.com

“Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their
interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those
under consideration will be contacted.”



Police do not suspect foul

for failing to
perform at

FROM page one

of sound problems. Red City
had reportedly paid Lil :
Wayne $210,000 in advance }

to secure his performance.

Wayne and his entourage.

up.

tember 27.

HOSPITAL.

WE

CONTINUE

THIS TIME.

BAHAMAS National Trust President
Glenn Bannister said the organisation will
“shortly file a defence and counter claim” in
response to a suit brought against it.

The suit alleges that BNT behaved
“unconscionably” and even “corruptly”
towards a poor farmer, seeking to dispossess
him of land. The organisation says it has a
“long standing policy of upholding the laws
and customs of the Bahamas.”

Mr Bannister said: “At that stage, inter-
ested members of the public and the press

Lil Wayne sued |

Nassau concert:

Lil Wayne, however, failed i
to show up and was claimed
to be asleep in his hotel room. }
More than 5,000 fans report- i
edly had to be sent home at }
2.30 am due to the rapper’s }
non appearance. Red City }
was unable to recoup its mon- }
ey which allegedly included }
just over $30,000 for the ;
accommodations for Lil }

The organisers later had to }
apologise to fans, vendors, }
venue workers, police, spon- }
sors and media for the mix- }

According to an article :
posted on AllHipHop.com, }
Lil Wayne’s manager Cortez }
Bryant is reported as stating ;
that September 27 was not the }
original concert date Wayne :
was booked for and that it }
was the fault of the promoters :
for both failed concert dates ;
— September 26 and Sep- }

DEPARTMENT
PHARMACY DEPARTMENT ENTRANCE AND
ONWARD THROUGH THE
ENTRANCE OF THE ORTHOPEDIC CLINIC.

constitutionally have access to the court
records and can then follow the proceedings

if they so wish.”

“The Bahamas National Trust has much
work to do in guarding our heritage and
developing our national park system which
is a source of tremendous pride and enjoy-
ment for Bahamians and visitors and of
paramount importance for conservation,”
continued the statement.

On Wednesday The Tribune reported on
a statement of claim filed on June 26, 2009,
on behalf of farmer Charles Gibson and the
partners of Diamond Farms against the

BNT.

Man is charged
with the murder of |
American woman

FROM page one

United States Embassy in Nassau. Ms Garrison,

It alleged that executive director of the

Teen killed in

BNT to ‘file defence, counter
claim’ in response to suit

BNT, Eric Carey, on behalf of the organi-
sation, “conspired” with senior officers to

dispossess Mr Gibson and his family of land

he had worked for decades.

The statement claimed the BNT and the
Department of Lands and Surveys breached
their “fiduciary duty” towards Mr Gibson,
with both agencies concealing certain infor-
mation from him as the BNT allegedly
moved to add the land he had farmed to
the “enormous acreage” in the area of the
Harrold and Wilson Ponds for which it had
already been granted a lease.

The farmer received a letter in May 2008

telling him he had three months to vacate

a West Palm Beach resident, had last been in the

US sometime in January.

At the time police were told she may have
been in the Bahamas, in the company of a

Bahamian man.

McKinney, who is reportedly the boyfriend of
Ms Garrison’s daughter, appeared before Chief }
Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank
Lane, and was not required to enter a plea to the
murder charge. He is represented by attorney

Romona Farquharson.

The case was adjourned to Wednesday, July
15, for a fixture hearing. McKinney was remand-

ed to Her Majesty’s Prison.

FROM page one

had never given up hope that
the boys would be found alive,
and that their return was noth-
ing short of a miracle.

Relatives along with residents
of South Andros had continued
their search for the boys.

They were reportedly found
yesterday morning by a woman
relative walking in the nearby
settlement of Kemp’s Bay
around 11.30pm.

The youngsters had report-

WE WILL

RENOVATIONS TO THE ENTRANCE

ENTER

MANAGEMENT APOLOGIZES
INCONVENIENCE CAUSED AND ASK THAT
THE PUBLIC COOPERATE WITH US DURING

SIGNED: MANAGEMENT

the property.

_ police shootout

with robbers
FROM page one

An investigation has been launched to find
out who fired the fatal shot.

Superintendent Ellsworth Moss told The Tri-
bune: “The robbers exited the store and they
were followed by officers who responded to a
call of an armed robbery.

“During the chase, we received information
that there was an exchange of gunfire and as a
result a young male was shot.”

Superintendent Moss said police have deter-
mined that the young man was not in the store at
the time of the robbery.

The victim’s identity has not been released.

Missing boys found alive

edly been sleeping in holes and
feeding on wild fruit.

Vera Clarke, the mother of
the boys said. “Ellouise, my
cousin, was driving up the road,
going for one of my other
cousins to come and do some
work, when her little girl said
‘Ellouise, see Marcell and
Deangelo’.”

Ms Clarke said she was over-
come with joy over her chil-
dren’s return.

Marcelo and Deangelo were
taken to a local clinic and then
flown to Nassau late yesterday

Princess Margaret Hospital

ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC
NOTICE!

IN AN EFFORT TO IMPROVE OUR PATIENT
SERVICES AT THE PRINCESS MARGARET

UNDERGO
AND

TRIAGE AREA OF THE ACCIDENT &
EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT.v

ASK THAT PERSONS VISITING THE
THROUGH

THE

FOR ANY

eta | ,

ToT ae



afternoon. The two young boys
were brought to the Princess
Margaret Hospital along with
their mother around 5pm.

Outside the Accident and
Emergency section, Marcello’s
father Marcellin told The Tri-
bune: “I cant really say how
happy I am.

“T feel like cool water came
into my heart.

“God made a way. I was
praying for God to do a miracle
for me.

“God kept them alive for me.
I never gave up hope.”

Man in court

on firearm,
ammunition and
assault charges

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A MAN was arraigned at
Freeport Magistrate Court
Thursday on a number of
serious offences, including
firearm, ammunition and
assault charges.

Garin Gibson appeared
before Magistrate Helen
Jones in Court Three. He
pleaded not guilty to pos-
session of ammunition,
assault with a deadly
weapon, possession of unli-
censed firearm, and posses-
sion of unlicensed firearm
with intent to endanger
life.

Gibson was denied bail
and remanded to Fox Hill
Prison. The matter was
adjourned to November 30,
2009.

DRUG CHARGE

TWO men were
arraigned in court on drug
possession charges on
Thursday.

Ramon Sweeting, 31, of
Yellow Elder, New Provi-
dence, and Dennis Light-
bourne, 23, of Salinas
Point, Acklins, was charged
with possession of danger-
ous drugs with intent to
supply.

It is alleged that on July
6, the men were found in
possession of a large quan-
tity of marijuana at Dover
Sound, Grand Bahama.

According to reports,
DEU officers went to
Dover Sound where they
discovered 50 buckets of
marijuana. They also found
three large crocus bags,
each containing four bales
of marijuana.

The men were not
required to enter a plea to
the charges. They were
denied bail and remanded
to Fox Hill Prison until
July 14.
THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11
zt
i @

MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

BN, AMERICAN ZONE 11 DAVIS CUP TIE J

BAHAMAS RELEGATED

Team suffers
heartbreak
defeat to
Guatemala

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



HE Bahamas Davis Cup team
didn’t survive the "battle of the
fittest" against Guatemala over
the weekend at the National
Tennis Center and was relegated to the Amer-
ican Zone ITI for the second time in two years.

With the tie knotted at 2-2, Marvin Rolle
went four hours and eight minutes before he
lost a heart wrenching 6-7 (5), 6-4, 4-6, 6-2, 8-
6 decision to a more fatigued Julien Urigen
that sealed the 3-2 victory for Guatemala.

With the victory, Guatemala will remain in
Zone II for 2010, while the Bahamas dropped
back to Zone IIT.

"T was tired. I was drained, but I left it all on
the court," said Rolle, who got the nod from
team captain John Farrington after number
two seed Timothy Neilly was unable to play
because of an injury.

"I was serving for the match and I got a lit-
tle nervous. That happens. But I gave it all. I
have no regrets. I gave it all."

The key to the fifth and final set when Rolle
held for a 5-5 tie and broke Urigen to go up 6-
5. Serving for the match, Rolle didn't get in
any of his first serves and he was eventually
broken by Urigen or a 6-6 tie, setting up the
dramatic finish.

Urigen, who had to be treated for cramps
after he held for a 3-2 lead in the fatal fifth set,
came back and he held serve and broke Rolle
in the final two games to pull off the huge
upsetting victory over the Bahamas.

"T really expected a really tough match and
it was a tough match,” Urigen said. "I thought
I prepared my self very good. I rested well
yesterday, drank a lot of fluids and I went out
there and gave it my best.”

Urigen, who turns 18 on July 22, was playing
in just his second Davis Cup tie. But he said it
was definitely the toughest match he played in
his life and he's happy to pull off the win for
Guatemala.

The stage was set for the clincher after
Mullings needed two hours and 25 minutes
to come through with a 7-5 3-6, 6-1, 6-1 deci-
sion over Cristian Paiz in what should have
been the showdown between the two top seeds
in yesterday's opener.

Paiz had to step in for Christopher Diaz
Figueroa, who was unable to play after he
cramped up the pivotal doubles on Saturday.

"T just played solid and made him play,”
said Mullings about his victory. "In the third
and fourth sets, I was able to go right at him
and put him away."

SO

a |

The pressure was put squarely in the face on , | i pL) {PT f Heer Pret
Mullings when he started playing after he and ; ” ae appt tt ttt | tL
Rolle went five grueling sets for three hours j | st rt CoCr Tita
and 55 minutes before they lost 7-6, 7-5, 4-6, 3- = a, MITT F TTI LilTiliri tt.

6, 8-6 to Christopher Diaz Figueroa and Sebas-
tian Vidal on Saturday.

What many had predicted as a sure victory
for the Bahamas, who swept Guatemala in
their last meeting two years ago in Guatemala
in zone IL But after the first day, all of that GUATEMALA’S JULIEN URIGEN (right) is congratulated by his teammates after
changed after the Bahamas split the two sin- _ their victory over the Bahamas.
gles. While Mullings easily won the opener in :
one hour and 45 minutes with a 6-3, 6-4, 6-2
win over Uriguen, Neilly was out-classes by
Diaz Figueroa 7-5, 6-1, 6-2 in two hours.

Team captain John Farrington called it was
an unbelievable tie that Bahamians will relish
for quite some time because of the way the
team played. "We were 1-1 on Friday and lost
the doubles," Farrington said. "Devin gave
us another opportunity today to keep alive in
the tie and Marvin came up and left it all on
the court, losing in five sets.

"Every Bahamian should be proud of these
guys for what they accomplished this weekend.
We want to thank the Bahamian public for
their support over the holiday weekend. It's
just unfortunate that we have fallen back into
zone III."

While the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Associa-
tion will reassess the team's performance as
they prepare for Zone III next year,
Guatemala will take the time to relish in their
thrill of victory. "I'm satisfied with the way
the team played," said captain Manuel Chavez.
"They played with a lot of heart each and
every match and they won. To me that's very
important."

Chavez said when they came here, they
knew tat it was going to be a real challenge to
win. But once they pulled off the doubles, he
really began to believe that they could win.

"They fought hard some times for three,
four and five hours," he said. "We are going to iets =
rest for a long time and enjoy this victory. It GUATAMALA’S DOUBLES TEAM SebastiEn vidal (left) and Christopher
was so sweet to come here and pull it off." DEVIN MULLINGS plays a double-fisted backhand. Diaz Figueroa

Kevin Major

PHOTOS


PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS



Brown keeps European winning streak alive

wi \.
ef =}

3 years or 60K warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty
and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

2008 FORD RANGER

2.5 Turbo Diesel/Standard Shift
LOADED



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER missing his chance to continue his quest
for the Golden League $1 million jackpot, Chris
‘Fireman’ Brown kept his winning streak alive on
the European circuit.

Brown, back on track after missing the Bisett
Games in Oslo on June 6, dedicated Friday's win-
ning performance at the Golden Gala in Rome in
a season's best of 44.81 seconds to the Bahamian
people as he posted the second fastest time by
any Bahamian this year.

"T give the good LORD all the praise for a job
well done," said Brown in an interview with The
Tribune yesterday. "I felt pretty good about my
race and very focus it was my first 44 for the sea-
son so I definitely feel great.

"IT know I wanted to do something special for the
Bahamas since it was turning 36 yrs old, and yes I
did a season best 44.81. Happy Birthday
Bahamas."

In a pretty face race, Brown held off David
Gillick of Ireland in 44.82. Renny Quow of
Trinidad & Tobago was third in 45.02.

"It does feel good to back in Europe and even
better to walk away with another win," Brown

2008 FORD EVEREST

2.5 Turbo Diesel Automatic, Leather,
LOADED - 7 Passanger

Great Deals
On All Models

NOW THAT'S REALLY AY S31 |(@Deal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO, LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 » FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com



said. "This is only my fifth race of the season. I feel
this really proves that I'm ready for Berlin."

With the time, 30-yewar-old Brown dipped well
under the A qualifying time of 45.55 for the IAAF
World Championships in Berlin, Germany. The
national champion and national record holder
also joins injured Latoy Williams (44.73) and
Andrae Williams (44.98). Also at the meet was vet-
eran female sprinters Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie
and Chandra Sturrup. This time, however, Sturrup
avenged her last two losses, including the Nation-
al Championships, to Ferguson-McKenzie.

Running in the fastest race so far this year, Stur-
rup got the fastest start of the field, but faded toa
third place finish at the end of the women's 100 in
a season's best of 10.99. Ferguson-McKenzie got
left in the blocks, but made up enough grounds for
sixth in 11.11, a season's best as well.

"T felt very good about my performance," Stur-
rup told The Tribune. "I was having problems
with my start in the early part of my season and
was playing catch up in the races.

"IT knew that if I could get my start together
everything would come into play."

The race was won by a Jamaican sweep as Ker-
ron Stewart posted the world leading time and
setting a meet record in an impressive time of
10.75 as she stormed from behind. Shelly-Ann

Fraser was second in 10.91. Stewart easily took the
heats in 11.01 pulling Sturrup through in second in
11.08 just ahead of Ferguson-McKenzie's 11.09.
Fraser won the other heat in 11.13.

The 37-year-old Sturrup, who has joined four
other competitors who have dipped under the 11-
second barrier so far this year, said she was pleased
woth her performance into the World Champi-
onships.

"It's been about two years since I ran that fast.
I should have ran sub 10 last year but I wasn't
executing my race that well,” she noted.

"But this year, I would say that I am ready for
Berlin. I just need to stay focus and execute and
stay healthy."

Sturrup and Ferguson-McKenzie will continue
their rivalry today when they compete in the wom-
en's century at the Athens Grand Prix in Greece.
They are both expected to be matched against
Jamaican Veronica Campbell-Brown in their first
showdown for the year.

No other Bahamian has been listed on the entry
list for the meet at the site of the 2004 Olympic
Games where Campbell-Brown secured the 200
gold over American Allyson Felix with Ferguson-
McKenzie taking the bronze, while Tonique
Williams-Darling snatched the women's 400 gold
from Mexican Ana Guevara.

Women’s medley relay team

=

miss

a



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas’ bid for its
only medal came down to the
women's medley relay yester-
day at the 6th IAAF World
Youth Championships in
Sudtirol, Italy.

The team of V'Alonee
Robinson, Katarina Smith,
Rashad Brown and Katrina
Seymour went into the race
with the third fastest qualifying
time and they seemed poise to
ascend the dais.

But in the final, the team fell
short with a fourth place finish
in a personal best of two min-
utes and 9.33 seconds. The
United States won the gold in a
world leading time of 2:04.32,
while Hungary took the silver in
2:09.22 and Romania carted off
the bronze in 2:09.25.

Team manager Kermit Tay-
lor, who serves as the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associ-
ations’ public relations officer,
admitted that the squad went
out and they performed at their
best, but it wasn't quite enough.

"They finished first in their
heat and sent a strong message
to the teams in the final,” Tay-
lor said. "In the final, not trying
to make any excuses for them,
but Katrina woke up this morn-
ing with a slight eye injury.

"The doctors had to treat her
where they got her prepared to
run. She went out on the anchor
leg and ran her heart out. when
she got the baton, we were in
fifth or sixth position and she
really fought hard to get us in
medal contention.”

Coming down the stretch,
Taylor said Smith just simply
ran out of land and wasn't able
to catch the runner from Roma-
nia.

"V'Alonee ran a good race
to get us started before she
passed it on to Katarina from
Grand Bahama," Taylor said.
"she passed it on to Rashad
Brown, who held her own. But
by the time she gave it to Kat-
rina, she just left it on the track
trying to get the medal."

Taylor said from day one of
the championships, whenever
they released the heat sheet, the
Bahamian athletes found them-
selves in a position to challenge
for one of the top qualifying

—_ =

THE WOMEN’S MEDLEY RELAY TEAM: Pictured from left Rashan Brown,

es out on medal — just



Katarina Smith, V’Alonee Robinson and Katrina Seymour.

spots.

"But despite the fact that the
team didn't win any medals, I
think they performed very
well," Taylor said. "I was very
proud of them. I think they did
very well competing at this cal-
ibre of meet."

While the medley team just
fell short of a medal, Taylor said
they were disappointed that
they were not able to get the
men's medley team registered
in time to compete.

Not casting any blame on
anybody, Taylor said the IAAF
tried to work with them, but
there were a couple other teams
who also didn't register in time
and once the teams found out
the situation, they too tried to
get in.

"The IAAF told us that they
could not make the exception
to get us in because they would
have to do it for the other teams
and there was just too many
teams to accommodate," Taylor
said.

Although they didn't get to
run as arelay team, Geno Jones
and Demetri Knowles came
close to advancing to the final of
the men's 100 and 200 metres
respectively. None of them,
however, advanced.

¢ Here's a look at how our
athletes fared in the other
events:

Women's 100 metres heats

Sparkyl Cash, 5th in heat one
in 12.60.

V'Alonee Robinson, 4th in
heat seven in 12.23 to advance.

Women's 100 metres quarter-
final

V'Alonee Robinson, 7th in
heat three in 12.16.

Men's 100 metres heats

Jonathan Farquharson, 4th in
heat one in 11.08.

Geno Jones, Ist in heat three
in 11.99 to advance.

Men's 100 metres quarter-
final

Geno Jones, 3rd in heat four
in 10.79 to advance.

Men's 100 semifinal

Geno Jones, 7th in heat two
in 10.72.

Men's 400 metres

Glenwood Baillou, 6th in
heat five in 50.77.

Women's 400 metres heats

Rashad Brown, 2nd in heat
one in 56.16 to advance.

Katrina Seymour, 3rd in heat
five in 55.77 to advance.

Women's 400 semifinal

Rashad Brown, didn't finish
in heat two.

Katrina Seymour, 5th in heat
three in 56.24.

Women's 800 metres heats

Hughnique Rolle, 7th in heat
one in 2:22.50.

Men's 110 hurdles heats

Aaron Wilmore, 5th in heat
four in 14.24.

Patrick Bodie, 5th in heat five
in 14.49.

Men's 200 heats

Harold Carter, fifth in heat
four in 22.16.

Demetri Knowles, 3rd in heat
eight in 21.90 to advance.

Men's 200 semifinal

Demetri Knowles, 3rd in heat
two in 21.76.

Women's Medley Relay

V'Alonee Robinson, Katari-
na Smith, Rashad Brown and
Katrina Seymour, 1st in heat
three in 2:10.12 to advance.

V'Alonee Robinson, Katari-
na Smith, Rashan Brown and
Katrina Seymour, 4th in the
final in 2:09.33.
, THE TRIBUNE PAGE 13, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

SAILING: FRANK HANNA ALL ANDROS & BERRY ISLANDS REGATTA

New Southern Cross
proves a class act

THE 16th annual Frank Hanna All Andros & Berry Islands
Regatta was held over the weekend at the Olympic site at Morgans
Bluff in North Andros.

At the end of the three-day competition, the New Southern
Cross emerged as the A Class winner with total of 10 points, fol-
lowed by the Good News with nine. Who Dat finished third with six
points.

In the B Class, the Ants Nest came out on top with 24 points.
Coming in second was Lady Sonia wirth 20 and the Eudeva
wrapped up third place with 18.

And in the C Class, Two Friends took the title with 17 points, just
one better than second place Sweet Island Gal. Lady Eunice end-
ed up in third place with 12.


















street TRS CLASS A WINNER
New Southern Cross:
10 points.

SECOND PLACE IN CLASS A Good News: 9 points.

2ND PLACE IN
CLASS B Lady

Sonia: 20 points.

2

CLASS B WINNER Ants Nest: 24 points.

€ TOYOTA moving forward

HILUX DOUBLE CAB FEATURES:

2.7 litre VVTI engine oe tome e Pa ele CE: MU LKe le
ore M eos) MOM Lim (Le alee or

MTA MCLs ee aaa

TAT ALCL side steps

air conditioning e 4x4

The Hilux is built on advanced Toyota technology for rugged
performance with car-quality comfort. Big, strong and stylish,
the Hilux sets the standard for a new generation.

Backed by a 3-year/60,000 mile factory warranty

3 EXECUTIVE | cscsmoriori tan - 5:50pm gee
Uae Chea Oe MOTORS LTD ll 30 et 700. ;

" E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs P=
PHOTOS: Patrick Hanna/BIS AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER | Parts and service guaranteed eS

Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) e Queens Hwy, 352-6122 ¢ Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916
PAGE 14, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



DEVARD AND DEVAUGHN DARLING FOOTBALL CAMPS



Keeping an American football dream alive

By Renaldo Dorsett
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

The country's most notable gridiron
star continues the dream of bringing foot-
ball to the Bahamas, through the Devard
and Devaughn Darling Football Camps,
presented by his non-profit organization
the As One Foundation.

Darling hosted yet another successful
edition of the camps both in Grand
Bahama (July 6th-7th) and in New Prov-
idence (July 9th-10th).

During the course of the pair of two-
day camps, Darling, his NFL colleagues
and a team of coaches based in the Unit-
ed States, tutored hundred of campers
between the ages of 11-17 in the basics of
American football.

Darling was joined by fellow NFL
Players Derrick Martin and Tre Stallings
of the Baltimore Ravens, Larry John-
son, Bobby Engram, and Dwayne Bowe
of the Kansas City Chiefs, and Darrius
Heyward Bey of the Oakland Raiders
to assist the novice players with skill

development, technique, and the funda-
mentals of American Football.

Darling noted the purpose of the camp
is to encourage young Bahamian ath-
letes to pursue their education and
dreams of playing American Football,
much like he and his twin brother
Devaughn did some years ago.

“We are thrilled with the number of
quality professional athletes confirmed to
attend, coach and mentor campers at
both of the 2009 football camps,” said
Devard Darling. “The foundation would
not be able to put on successful football
camps without the help and support from
the athletic community and we are truly
grateful for their time and generosity.”

Darling said he has been pleased with
the growth and development over the
camp and the foundation itself over the
past few years.

"The camp has grown tremendously
over the years and its just been a blessing
to be apart of it all. It is about giving
these kids another opportunity to find a
way to live out their dreams, using a sport
to someday reach a professional level or

to get themselves an education," he said
"We started out with one day camps, and
the camp just continues to grow every
year. We recieve great support from the
corporate community, we do our best to
have coaches and players from around
the sport come down to the Bahamas to
give the kids a hands on opportunity for
the kids to work with, the interest con-
tinues to grow every year with more and
more kids coming out and from alot of
the repeat campers we are beginning to
see the benefits.”

The 5-year veteran receiver, now in
his second season with the Kansas City
Chiefs, said he sees the Bahmas as a
breeding ground for untapped football
talent, with the camp serving as just one
means of putting that talent on display.

"The talent level here is very impres-
sive. The Bahamas is a small country that
has tons of guys with athletic ability here
sO We expect to see some guys out here
that have a great natural skill set and can
step on the field right away and learn
pretty quickly," he said, "This camp
would be a great start for many of them

and it gives insight into what they can
do because a lot of the drills we do out
here are things you would do on the foot-
ball field or things we would do in a typ-
ical NFL practice session."

Darling said he and the foundation
look forward to the continued growth of
the camp in the very near future with
possible expansion to the family islands.

"There is always room for improve-
ment so we want to continue to make
the camp bigger and better each year by
adding new things and making it more
attractive to people that want to get
involved with the kids and what we are
doing,” he said, "Ideally we would like
for a few of these guys to use this as a
jump start to possibly become apart of
Frank's program, he's always looking for
new talent and this is about as good a
place as any to start."

The As One Foundation was created
in 2007 by Devard Darling, in loving
memory of his identical brother
Devaughn Darling who passed in 2001
during spring training.

Its goal is to provide underprivileged

youth both nationally and internation-
ally with educational and developmental
opportunities through athletic endeav-
ors, educational programming and spiri-
tual enrichment.

Specifically, the “Devard &
Deveaughn Darling Football Camps”
strive to encourage young Bahamians
ages 11 to 16 to further their athletic
skills and education at a private school in
the United States.

The cap of available camper slots is
120, and attendance will be allotted to
elite athletes with the potential of pur-
suing a collegiate or professional career
in football.

While gaining invaluable skills and
training in the game of American Foot-
ball, camp attendees also also received
free gifts, equipment and a chance to
earn the title of Camp MVP.

Camp MVP's will be judged by partic-
ipation in all activities and the chosen
honoree and one parent will win a fully
paid trip to Kansas City, Missouri during
the 2009 NFL season to spend a weekend
with Devard Darling and his family.

Team Bahamas enjoys historic baseball win

Team Bahamas went into the bottom of 6th

Gurabo, Puerto Rico came into the PONY Latin
American Caribbean Zone as the favourites to
return to the 2009 15-16 PONY COLT World Series
scheduled for August 4th - 12th in Lafayette, Indi-

ana.
Puerto Rico came in second behind the US at the

2008 World Series.

It would not happen in 2009 as the Team
Bahamas upset Gurabo, PR in the 1 - 4 Playoff
match up.

Team Bahamas made history by defeating Puer-
to Rico for the first time at an International Tour-
nament.

The President (Craig Kemp) and the Execu-
tives congratulated Team Bahamas 15-16 National

Team on this historic victory. He congratulated
Manager Patrick Knowles and Coaches Marcian
Curry & Loren Kemp on a job well done, as well as
the (16) Team members who had made the
Bahamas proud once again about baseball in the
country.

This was one of the best showing by Team
Bahamas an International Tournament.

In the game: Jeffrey Woodside pitched 4 strong
innings: Went 1-3 with 2 RBI.

In the top of 5th he ran into trouble and was
replaced by Byron Ferguson with 1 out and Run-
ners on 2nd & 3rd. Ferguson was able to get PR out
in the Sth & 6th inning, not before they scored 2
runs.

inning down 5 - 4. Alex Tapia hit a fly ball for the
first out. Jervis "Champ" Stuart stepped to the
plate and drove the 2 balls / 1 Strike pitch to straight
away centre field to tie the game 5. With one out
Theodore Trae Sweeting Jr. - (1 -1 on the day 1 RBI
& Stolen Base) was able to draw a 2nd walk on 5
pitches.

Team Bahamas now had the go ahead run on.
PR decided to change their RH pitcher for a Lefty
to keep Sweeting from stealing 2nd. Jeffrey Wood-
side struck-out, but during his at bat, Sweeting was
able to steal second.

With two out, Marcus Holbert stepped to the
plate and drove the 2-2 pitch to Right Field scoring

Sweeting from 2nd Base with the go-ahead run.

Top of the Seven inning, Team Bahamas need-
ed 3 outs for the big upset.

Manager Knowles called on Fire Baller, Marcus
Holbert to close the door for the win.

Marcus struck-out the first batter, second bat-
ter pop out to Center field.

Marcus trying to be careful, walked the 3 Batter
who stole second and went to third on a pass ball.
With the pressure on and only able to throw the fast
ball, due to the runner on 3rd base. With 3 ball &
1 strike, the 4th PR batter pulled a ball on the cor-
ner and flew-out to Andre in Left Field for the
final out. The Bahamians threw gloves and caps in
the air in celebration.

CRICKET: FIRST ASHES TEST

draw wit
Australia



ENGLAND'S James Anderson, left, and Monty Panesar walk from the pitch

after their team draw the first cricket test match.

FRED ATKINS,
Associated Press Writer
CARDIFF, Wales

England and Australia drew
the first Ashes test on Sunday
after a thrilling last wicket stand
by the home side's final pairing
of James Anderson and Monty
Panesar, according to Associat-
ed Press.

England closed on 252-9 after
a partnership by Paul Colling-
wood (74) and Graeme Swann
(31) frustrated Australia for 82
minutes after tea at Sophia Gar-
dens.

Australia had looked set for
victory when Collingwood was
caught by Michael Hussey off
Peter Siddle. But Anderson and
Panesar then batted for 40 min-
utes to steer England to safety
in a nail-biting finish, taking the
total past the 239 it needed to
force Australia to bat again.

"It was horrible to watch,"
England captain Andrew
Strauss said. "As a batsmen to
watch your number nine, 10 and
11 batsmen do your job for you
is not ideal. I thought we always
had one wicket too many down
and it was only with 18 balls to
go that I thought we had a
sniff.”

Anderson was more opti-
mistic than his captain. *Cer-
tainly when they put Marcus
North on, a part-time spinner, I
thought we had a great chance,”
he said. "Monty was batting
pretty well and we were com-
municating well.”

Australia captain Ricky
Ponting pinpointed Colling-
wood as the man who had
denied the tourists’ victory.

"He deserves all the credit

you can give him, because with-
out him and his innings Eng-
land would have been in a
whole lot of trouble,” Ponting
said. "We just weren't quite
good enough to finish off a
great five days."

England's physio and 12th
man repeatedly walked on to
the field of play in the closing
stages. Asked whether this was
contrary to the spirit of the
game, Strauss said it was due to
confusion about the number of
overs they had to face and his
opposite number Ponting, while
unimpressed, refused to use it as
an excuse. "That's not the rea-
son we didn't win it,” Ponting
said.

Ben Hilfenhaus claimed 3-47
and Nathan Hauritz 3-63 as
Australia's bowlers initially
exerted the kind of pressure
their English counterparts failed
to produce during 12 hours in
the field, after the hosts had
resumed on 20-2.

Kevin Pietersen left a ball
from Hilfenhaus that uprooted
his offstump in the fourth over
of the day to leave England on
31-3 and Strauss slashed the ball
into Brad Haddin's gloves to be
out for 17 in the 17th.

Collingwood enjoyed a
charmed life early on. He was
close to being caught off Hau-
ritz by a diving Ponting at short
leg, then scrambled the next
delivery away from the stumps
by using his pads and feet.

Matt Prior was less fortunate,
caught at first slip for 14 by
Michael Clarke after a delivery
from Hauritz that took a fero-
cious bounce, leaving England
on 70-5 in the 27th over.

Collingwood and Andrew

Jon Super/AP Photo




=

ENGLAND'S James Anderson, bottom centre right, celebrates as









Tom Hevezi/AP Photo

—

=)

fete

Ta atest

=

ENGLAND'S Monty Panesar appeals unsuccessfully for the wicket of

teammate Monty Panesar, right, shake hands with Australia's Ricky Australia's Marcus North during the third day of the first cricket test
Ponting after their teams drew the first cricket test match.

match between England and Australia in Cardiff, Wales.

Tom Hevezi/AP Photo

ENGLAND'S James Anderson, center, and Monty Panesar, left, confer with Aleem Dar during the final day of the first cricket test match between
England and Australia in Cardiff, Wales, Sunday, July 12, 2009.

Flintoff steered England
through to lunch, but a break-
through came after an hour in
the afternoon session.

Johnson belied an erractic
start when he induced an edge
from Flintoff that just carried
to Ponting at second slip.
Flintoff was out for 26, and
England was 127-6 in the 50th
over.

Stuart Broad was lucky not
to be out lbw first ball to John-
son's next delivery, but he
delayed Australia for 68 min-
utes until being out Ibw to Hau-
ritz. Swann then provided some
nuisance value. He was hit three
times in the penultimate over
of the afternoon session by Sid-
dle, but survived to frustrate
Australia for an hour after tea

until he was lbw to Hilfenhaus.

Hauritz missed the chance to
run Collingwood out in the 90th
over but just as England looked
poised to claim a draw he edged
a Siddle delivery to Hussey,
who caught him at the second
attempt.

That left Anderson and Pane-
sar with a minimum 11.3 overs
to bat out. After an astonish-

ingly tense passage of play they
passed the target of 239 needed
to force Australia to bat again
and were aided by a crucial mis-
field by Hauritz that gifted
Panesar a boundary. Their part-
nership lasted 40 for minutes
before the umpires called time,
leaving the series all square at 0-
0 ahead of Thursday's start to
the second test at Lord's.
THE TRIBUNE
D yu

Failed Four
Seasons bidder
embroiled in $8m
mortgage case

mw By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FAILED bidder for the
Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort has seen another case
involving an Exuma-based real
estate/resort project he is pro-
moting, featuring a disputed $8
million mortgage, sent back to
the Supreme Court after his bid
to throw the matter out was
rejected by the Court of Appeal.

Barry Silverton, a California-
based real estate/casino develop-
er, who led a $40 million bid to
acquire Emerald Bay — the last
one to be accepted (then fall
through) by its receivers and main
creditor before the decision was
taken to close the resort — saw
the Court of Appeal reinstate the
action launched by his 25 per cent
equity partner in the Hermitage
Estates project, finding that it had
shown an “arguable case to go to
trial”.

The legal battle between Mr
Silverton and his Hermitage
Estates company, which had been
seeking to develop a 1,700-acre
resort/real estate project on Exu-
ma’s Royal Cay, and Hamby Ltd,
has its genesis in a joint venture
agreement with the latter’s
Delaware-incorporated parent.

The Court of Appeal judgment
recorded that the parent, Talisker
Realty Ltd, and Mr Silverton and
Hermitage Estates had signed a
Letter of Intent on November 29,
2004, setting out the terms of the
agreement between the two sides.
Hamby Ltd was the Bahamian-
incorporated vehicle designed to
hold and acquire Talisker’s invest-
ment in the Hermitage Estates
project.

Appeal Justice Emanuel
Osadebay, writing the Court’s
judgment, noted that a number
of agreements were alleged to
have been concluded between the
parties, including a December 17,
2004, shareholder agreement
which stated how Hamby Ltd
would take a 25 per cent stake in
Hermitage Estates.

Via a December 23, 2004 mort-
gage, Hamby Ltd agreed to loan
Hermitage Estates “the sum of
$8 million on security of two
tracts of land comprising 1,437
acres known as the ‘Hermitage
Estates’, with a maturity and
redemption date of December 31,
2006”.

The previous day, Hermitage
Estates had also concluded a
mortgage agreement with Deidre
and Newell Bowe, where the pair
advanced $3.333 million to the
company, again secured on its
real estate. “Irrespective of the
fact that the Bowes’ mortgage
pre-dates the Hamby mortgage,
the Bowes’ mortgage expressly
recognizes the Hamby mortgage
as having priority,” the Court of
Appeal found.

However, Hermitage Estates
was now alleging that Hamby’s
mortgage simply secured the orig-
inal $8 million loan, as approved
by the Investments Board, “and
any acquisition” other than that
would be void under the Inter-
national Persons Landholding
Act.

But Hamby, and its Bahamian
attorneys, Brian Simms and Mar-
co Turnquest of Lennox Paton,
argued that the $8 million mort-
gage was part of a wider agree-
ment and acted as collateral for its
equity interest and a number of
other obligations Hermitage

SEE page 2B





in

MONDAY,



eG La

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Court problems threaten
cial sector ‘survival’

* Leading attorney: Judicial system resolving commercial disputes in ‘acceptable
timeframe’ for international business ‘not happening’

* Urges immediate fix, as ‘any further deterioration will have extremely negative impact’

* Calls for holistic solution, as current woes ‘going to have an effect on the
development of new business and the retention of existing business’

finan

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamas must
immediately fix its
judicial system’s
inability to resolve
commercial disputes
in a “timeframe acceptable” to
the international community, a
leading attorney has warned, as
“any further deterioration” will
cost the financial services industry
and other economic sectors both
current and future business.
Brian Moree, senior partner at
McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes,
told Tribune Business that the res-
olution of important, complex
commercial disputes in good time
was currently “not happening”
within the Bahamian judicial sys-
tem.

‘Complete
overhaul’
in public
sector
needed to
support
financial
services

But leading attorney
praises government on
regulatory consolidation

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas requires a
“complete overhaul” of all gov-
ernment agencies and ministries
dealing with the financial services
industry if the sector is to main-
tain its long-term competitive-
ness, a leading attorney has
warned, with this nation facing a
stark choice between necessary
reform and “just plodding along”.

Brian Moree, senior partner at
McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes,
told Tribune Business that the
“interdependent” relationship
between the different public sec-
tor bodies required a compre-
hensive, holistic approach to
reform rather than just a piece-
meal initiative that focused on
one or two areas as opposed to
the whole.

Calling for a three to five-year
“national development plan” for
financial services, Mr Moree said
any public sector reforms needed
to focus on areas such as:

¢ The judicial system and its
ability to deal with commercial
cases

¢ The Immigration Depart-
ment, and its processing of permit
applications for key expatriate
financial sector staff, plus the var-
ious residency permits for its high
net-worth clients

¢ The Registrar General’s
Department, which every finan-
cial sector player must deal with
for company incorporations and
the like

¢ The financial sector regula-
tors

¢ And key infrastructure and
the major utilities, especially the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) and the
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC)

Although reforms needed to
be enacted in concert with the
private sector, Mr Moree argued
that the impetus needed to come
from the top levels of govern-
ment. The Prime Minister and his
senior officials, he added, needed
to “exercise strong leadership....
To implement the changes which
are going to be necessary. A sig-
nificant amount of political
courage and leadership will be
required to implement this

SEE page 7B



a
BRIAN MOREE

This, he added, needed to be
“addressed in the short term” if



key sectors of the Bahamian econ-
omy were to maintain their inter-
national competitiveness, with the
financial services industry’s “sur-
vival” especially at stake.
Tribune Business understands,
from attorneys requesting
anonymity, that the judicial sys-
tem’s ability to resolve and dis-
pose of commercial cases in a
timely manner has worsened in
recent months as a result of Senior
Justice John Lyons’ departure.

ColinalImperial.

Many of the most complex
commercial matters in the court
system were before him, including
several key court-supervised liq-
uidations where clients have been
waiting months — and sometimes
years — for the return of multi-
million dollar assets.

As many commercial attorneys
had privately feared, his depar-
ture — and wait for a similarly-
skilled replacement — has left the
judicial system worse off.



seas) A

While not commenting directly
on the ramifications of Senior Jus-
tice John Lyons’ departure, Mr
Moree told Tribune Business:
“The system is having difficulty
accommodating the large number
of commercial matters in a time-
frame that is acceptable through-
out the international community.

“T think that it is something
which must be addressed in the

SEE page 2B

Manager wins profit deal breach
verdict against developer

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE former project manager for a major
Freeport-based real estate development has
seen the Court of Appeal increase the dam-
ages awarded to him for breach of a Profit
Sharing Agreement, in addition to backing a
ruling which awarded him $119,622 in damages
for wrongful dismissal by the developer.

The appellate court’s 92-page judgment,
largely drawing on the original Supreme Court
ruling, goes into graphic detail on the com-
plete breakdown of the more than 20-year
friendship between two British expatriates,
Steven Jervis and Victor Skinner, over the 76-
home Shoreline residential development and
the Profit Sharing Agreement that was sup-
posed to split the project’s net income 75/25
between the two.

The Court of Appeal judgment recorded
how the two first came to Freeport and Grand
Bahama on a 1984 rugby tour, with Mr Jervis
subsequently developing a career as an engi-
neer and Mr Skinner one as a quantity sur-
veyor in the construction industry.

The Grand Bahama links really took off in
1998, when Mr Jervis, after deciding to settle in
Freeport with his family, in May-June of that

year became interested in developing a tract of
land at Fortune Cay into what would become
the Shoreline residential subdivision.

Mr Skinner’s advice was sought on the pro-
ject, and the contacts blossomed to such an
extent that it was agreed “that they would
jointly do the project and that the net profits
would be shared as to 75 per cent [for Mr
Jervis] and 25 per cent to [Mr Skinner]. The
agreement was not put in writing at that time,
and the agreement would operate from the
beginning of their business relationship... They
also agreed on [Mr Skinner’s] salary.

“(Mr Jervis] had some money which he was
prepared at that stage to put into the project,
and [Mr Skinner] had the considerable expe-
rience needed to get it up and going.”

Mr Jervis paid $3.8 million for the land that
would become Shoreline, and Mr Skinner
started full-time employment as project man-
ager on March 1, 1999. The latter, though,
was unaware that Mr Jervis’s company, KST
Investments, had been incorporated as the
vehicle to run the project, so as to reduce his
personal liability, until he questioned its name
on his pay cheque in March 1999.

[Mr Skinner] said that he became concerned
to raise the issue because all his negotiations
and agreement in relation to the development

medical emergencies

don't study economics

... they don't know the word “recession” either. That's why you
need to maintain your insurance coverage with Colinalmperial
even when the economy is weak — to make sure hard times don't
get harder just because you fall ill or fall down on your luck.

Stay confident. Stay connected,

confidence for life

— i
\ ull

Te ec eae

FIRST AID

and his share of the profits had been with [Mr
Jervis] on a person-to-person basis without
the involvement of a corporate body,” the
Court of Appeal judgment found.

“He had asked [Mr Jervis] how the involve-
ment of [KST Investments] would affect their
agreement in terms of profit shares, and [Mr
Jervis] assured him that it would make no dif-
ference to their agreement.”

The development proceeded with Mr Skin-
ner in charge of construction, and Mr Jervis
responsible for sales, marketing, accounting,
legal and financial aspects. Operating as part-
ners, both received salaries of $7,000 per
month and $3,000 in rental allowance.

Yet by early 2001, the relationship between
the two was starting to sour. The Court of
Appeal judgment recorded: “In February 2001,
and on the insistence of [Mr Skinner], the
Profit Sharing Agreement was reduced to writ-
ing as [Mr Skinner] felt marginalized, inse-
cure and vulnerable.

“His work permit was only for one year, as
[Mr Jervis] had told him that a three-year
work permit was not available, which infor-
mation he later found out not to be true. He
had been left out by [Mr Jervis] on a discussion

SEE page 5B

ColinalImperial.


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a =) ~~~
Failed Four Seasons bidder

embroiled in $8m mortgage case

FROM page 1B

Estates was supposed to com-
plete.

Hamby Ltd alleged that it
could apply the monies received
under the mortgage to repay any
debt Hermitage Estates owed to
it, as per the mortgage agreement.

“Tt is contended by the appel-
lant that the Letter of Intent dat-
ed November 29, 2004.......... in
this matter contemplated that fol-
lowing the contribution of the ini-
tial capital to get the project going
that Talisker, through Hamby,
would receive 100 per cent of the
net cash flow and/or capital
events’ proceeds until such time
as the loan was repaid, with the
maturity date being December
31, 2006,” the Court of Appeal
found.

“The appellant [Hamby] sub-
mits that the Hamby mortgage
had collateral advantages which,
together, formed part of the mort-
gage transaction. The various
instruments made up a composite
whole agreement between the
parties.”

Hermitage Estates, in 2005, had
sought to redeem Hamby’s mort-
gage by advancing a sum it
believed would clear its out-
standing debt under the mort-
gage. It then applied to the
Supreme Court for a redemption
order, but then-Justice John
Lyons said such a summary order
was not appropriate and
adjourned the case to a date when
both sides could give oral evi-
dence before him.

Justice Lyons’ decision was
never set aside, but 11 days after
it was given a Settlement Agree-
ment — “the purport and content
of which are sharply disputed or
contested by the parties”- was
reached on May 23, 2006.

Then, on December 23, 2006,
Hamby Ltd issued a summons
seeking a Supreme Court order
that it could foreclose on Her-
mitage Estates because it had
defaulted on its obligations. The
latter and Mr Silverton, coupled
with the other defendants, argued
that this procedure was “improp-
er” as foreclosure was governed
by Order 77, Rule one of the
Supreme Court rules.

Moves were then made to have
Hamby’s summons struck out
because “no reasonable course of
action” was disclosed against
them. The Bowes were named as
defendants by Hamby because
they were allegedly trying to use
their mortgage interest to sell the
Hermitage Estates project to
another defendant, Kendall PH
LLC, despite being subordinate
to Hamby’s interest.

Hermitage Estates then moved,
on February 27, 2008, to obtain a
Supreme Court order that Ham-
by Ltd’s action “be struck out and
the action dismissed on the
grounds that it discloses no rea-
sonable cause of action, is embar-
rassing and is otherwise an abuse
of process”.

Hamby Ltd, meanwhile, had
applied for its initial action to be
continued as a writ, arguing that
its case “discloses triable issues”

and could “only be resolved by a
full blown trial of the action with
pleadings”. Supreme Court Jus-
tice Faisool Mohammed, though,
agreed with Hermitage Estates’
position and struck out Hamby
Ltd’s action based on the written
evidence before him.

The Court of Appeal, though,
noting that striking out actions
should only happen when there is
no obvious trial case, found that
the issues raised by Hamby Ltd
were “complex and cannot simply
be determined on the documents
only”. Witnesses, the judgment
said, were needed to determine
the intent of the parties involved.

“Upon reading the documents
in this case, I cannot say that it is
clear beyond doubt that the
appellant’s claim is wholly unten-
able on the face of it,” Justice
Osadebay found, stating that the
Supreme Court “fell into error”
in determining that Hamby Ltd
had shown no arguable case to
go to trial.

While Hamby Ltd acknowl-
edged that the monies borrowed
under the $8 million mortgage
had been repaid, and the shares
representing its 25 per cent inter-
est in Hermitage Estates issued
to it, it was maintaining “that
there are still certain non-finan-
cial obligations which remain to
be satisfied”.

Ultimately, the Court of
Appeal ordered that the case be
remitted to the Supreme Court
for a hearing on Hamby Ltd’s
writ application and a “speedy
trial”.

k ;

i Se,

Call 866-957-2276

CelebrationBS.com

Wun lime

Court problems threaten
financial sector ‘survival’

FROM page 1B

short-term before there is any further deteriora-
tion. I think that we are facing a problem which, if
this is not addressed in the short-term, could have a
very negative impact on the jurisdiction.”

“A major international financial centre simply
cannot survive unless its judicial system and admin-
istration of justice can accommodate, in an efficient
way, commercial disputes and resolve them in a
timeframe acceptable to the international commu-
nity,” Mr Moree added.

“No one expects us to resolve these cases in a
record time period, but they do expect us to work
through these commercial cases in an acceptable
timeframe and, at the moment, that’s not happening.
This needs to be addressed in the short-term,
because it’s going to have an effect on the develop-
ment of new business and the retention of existing
business.”

Calling for a holistic approach that effectively
meant reform and overhaul for the entire Bahami-
an judicial system, Mr Moree told Tribune Busi-
ness: “Clearly, this does involve not only looking at
the number of judges we have, but many of the oth-
er issues we have to deal with in the system — the
staffing, the resources, the listings office, the Reg-
istry, the technology and the procedures.”

Senior Justice Lyons’ resignation has left numer-
ous commercial matters, which were before him,
still waiting to be listed before a new judge. Among
the cases he was dealing with were the liquidations
of Caledonia Corporate Management, Dominion
Investments and Leadenhall Bank & Trust, three
former Bahamas-based financial institutions whose
clients (creditors) are still awaiting the return of
substantial assets.

In Leadenhall’s case, it has been some four years
since the bank was first placed in court-supervised
liquidation, and assets have yet to be distributed
pro rata to creditors (excluding former credit card
depositors). The case has yet to be allocated to
another judge, Tribune Business understands, and
given the complexity and volume of case paper-
work involved in issues such as Leadenhall and oth-
ers, it inevitably takes time for another judge to

become seized of the matters.

This, of course, leads to frustration and unhappi-
ness among creditors and former clients of the likes
of Leadenhall, given the continued delay in recov-
ering their assets. The result? The likelihood that the
Bahamas and its judicial system may be bad-
mouthed by one set of high-net worth individuals
and their foreign attorneys to their respective peer
groups, discouraging new clients from using or com-
ing to this nation, and encouraging existing ones to
consider shifting assets elsewhere. The same applies
to international businesses and businessmen.

Any problems in resolving commercial disputes in
an expeditious timeframe will directly impact the
Bahamas’ ability to venture into new industries and
develop alternative revenue streams, especially the
proposed plan to develop this nation into a world-
recognised arbitration centre.

Senior Justice Lyons himself recognised the need
for the Bahamas to have a specialised commercial
court, stating as much in the preamble to a May 15,
2008, judgment involving a dispute between Cresta
Ltd and LP Management and its co-defendants.

Noting that the case was clearly commercial, even
though it had been listed as a general cause, Justice
Lyons said the matter should fall “within the de
fact regime we have here for the resolution of com-
mercial matters”.

He added: “We do not, as yet, in the Bahamas
have a dedicated commercial court. This will be
addressed very shortly. It is of paramount impor-
tance that if the Bahamas is to continue as an off-
shore financial centre of any credibility, it must have
a commercial court.

“That commercial court must adopt a world-class
process for resolving commercial matters as expe-
ditiously as possible. When it comes to commercial
disputes, it was once said by a learned judge (I have
forgotten the reference) that the first question that
a businessman asks of his lawyer is: ‘How long will
it take and how much will it cost?’

“Commercial courts do ‘business’. They are there
to serve business. Commercial courts are not in the
habit of inhibiting business. Commercial courts are
expected to move quickly to define the areas in dis-
pute and resolve them. That, after all, is business.”

Thank you for your
trust & support
as we continue to pro vide
Results with In tegrity.

Geadman's Bay Corporate Contr
T: 242.328.7115 through 9 | into

Wel Bay Street | Naiaeu, The Bahamas

AW, OVId ea nciad visoes niet

SprLeC eT tees

— SNACK WRAP’—


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009, PAGE 3B





175% ICB profit

rise aids JSJ

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A 175 per cent increase in
Insurance Company of the
Bahamas (ICB) net income drove
BISX-listed J. S. Johnson’s 2009
first quarter profits rise to $2.345
million, although the latter’s ordi-
nary shareholders saw their share
reduce year-over-year.

Despite a 14.27 per cent
increase in J. S. Johnson’s year-
over-year net profit from the $2.06
million achieved in the 2008 first
period, the company’s equity
investors saw their net income
share drop by 4.9 per cent to
$1.621 million, compared to $1.704
million last year.

As a result, earnings per share
(EPS) dropped from $0.21 in the
2008 first quarter to $0.20 this time
around, as non-controlling inter-
ests in J. S. Johnson saw their
share of the company’s net profits
more than double — increasing by
106 per cent from $356,000 to
$733,000.

In his 2009 first quarter mes-
sage to shareholders, Marvin
Bethell, J. S. Johnson’s managing
director, attributed the company’s
improved showing to the finan-
cial performance of its ICB affili-
ate, the general insurance carrier
in which it holds a 40 per cent
stake. The other shareholders are
J. S. Johnson directors and exec-
utives.

ICB’s enhanced showing was
largely due to a $1.236 million
swing on fees and commissions,
which went from being $137,000
in the red during the 2008 first
quarter to a positive of $1.099 mil-

* BISX-listed insurer sees net income rise 14.27% in Q1, driven by affiliate carrier’s commissions swing
* But equity investors see profit share drop by 4.9%
* Recession hits agency/brokerage business on personal lines

lion. While ICB’s net earned pre-
miums dropped slightly by 4.6 per
cent year-over-year, falling from
$2.298 million 1n 2008 to $2.193
million this time around, when
combined with the fees and com-
missions performance it drove the
carrier’s total income higher by
44.5 per cent to $3.404 million.

And aided by a 9.5 per cent
drop in insurance expenses and
claims, which collectively fell to
$1.465 million from $1.619 million
in the 2008 first quarter, ICB gen-
erated net income of $1.229 mil-
lion for this year’s period as
opposed to $447,000 last year.

“With regard to the underwrit-
ing segment, ICB’s results were
very encouraging,” Mr Bethell
told shareholders. “Although net
earned premiums were down
slightly, there was an appreciable
swing in net commissions and fees.

“Additionally, an improvement
in claims costs resulted in a reduc-
tion in insurance expenses.” The
2009 first quarter results illustrate
ICB’s value to its largest share-
holder, boosting profits when
times are hard, although it will
also make J. S. Johnson’s earn-
ings more volatile and unpre-
dictable when those hurricane-
related claims come in.

With fees and commissions
from J. S. Johnson’s agency and
brokerage business up slightly by
1.1 per cent at $4.02 million, the
BISX-listed entity’s total net fees

and commissions for the 2009 first
quarter were up 33.37 per cent on
prior year comparatives, standing
at $5.119 million compared to
$3.838 million. Total income for
the whole company was 10.7 per
cent ahead of prior year, stand-
ing at $7.499 million compared to
$6.277 million.

Mr Bethell warned that J. S.
Johnson’s agency and brokerage
business “continues to be impact-
ed by the economic downturn,
which has affected both renewals
and new business, particularly for
personal lines.

“This has not been the case on
the commercial side, as we have
seen the acquisition of some new

business from both local and inter-
national clients.”

The J. S. Johnson managing
director pledged to “carefully
watch” the company’s expenses
going forward to ensure they
remained in line with budget
expectations. Total expenses for
the 2009 first quarter increased
year-over-year by 9 per cent to
$5.145 million, compared to $4.717
million. Much of this resulted
from a 6.2 per cent increase in
staff costs to $2.205 million, com-
pared to $2.076 million in the 2008
first quarter. Other expenses shot
up by 51 per cent to $1.347 million
as opposed to $890,000 the pre-
vious year.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PATRAVI
CLOSE LIMITED

— -,——

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PATRAVI CLOSE LIMITED has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and



Legal Notice

NOTICE
GILLMAN VIEW
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LEBARON
INVESTMENTS LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LEBARON INVESTMENTS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

UPTOWN HEIGHTS INC.

——

>
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of UPTOWN HEIGHTS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Ministry of The Environment
Port Department Government
Notice Invitation for Tenders

The Government of The Bahamas is
inviting tenders for the following
Contracted Service for the Port
Department, Ministry of The Environment.

¢ The Cleaning of Potters Cay Dock

Interested parties may obtain further
information, and may collect the bid-
ding document as of 15th July, 2009 from:

The Port Department
Prince George Dock
Nassau, The Bahamas
Telephone Number: (242) 356-5639

Between the hours of 9:00a.m. and 5:00pm
Monday through Friday.

Tenders are to be _— submitted in
Triplicate (3) in a sealed envelope(s) Marked
“Tender For Cleaning of Potters Cay
Dock” addressed to:

The Chairman
Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach
P.O.Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas

No later that 5:00 p.m. on July 27th, 2009.

Tenders will be opened at 10:00a.m. at the
Office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of
Finance.

The Government Reserves The Right To
Reject Any Or All Tenders.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EVERWYCK
INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)








Legal Notice

NOTICE

COMPASS ROSE
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— H}—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of COMPASS ROSE INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QuUI/NO.00 164

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising the Eastern portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21)
containing 26,120 square feet and originally granted to Crispin
Benjamin and being Crown Grant A4-63 situate Two thousand feet
east of Gladstone Road in the Gladstone Road Crown Allotments in
the Western District of the Island of New Providence

IN THE MATTER OF THE Quieting Title Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE Petition of
JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS

NOTICE

he Petition of JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS of Cambridge
Drive, South Beach in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, in respect of:-

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising the Eastern
portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21) containing 26,120 square
eet and originally granted to Crispin Benjamin and being Crown
Grant A4-63 situate Two thousand feet east of Gladstone Road in
he Gladstone Road Crown Allotments in the Western District of the
sland of New Providence which said piece parcel or lot of land
is bounded NORTHWARDLY by Lot Number Twenty-Two (22)
originally granted to Francis A. Garraway and running thereon Five
hundred and Seventy-Seven and Eighty-Five hundredths (577.85)
eet EASTWARDLY by Lot Number Twenty-Six (26) originally
granted to Rhonda Louis Wallace Wildgoose and running thereon
Six NUndred and Thirty-Four and Sixty hundredths (634.60) feet
SOUTHWARDLY by a Thirty (30) feet wide Road Reservation
nown as and called “Rocky Pine Road” separating it from Lot
umber Twenty (20) originally granted to Herbert Cleveland
Walkine and running thereon Five hundred and Seventy-Seven
and Eighty-Five hundredths (577.85) feet and SOUTHWARDLY
by the Western Portion of Lot Number Twenty-One (21) originally
granted to Crispin Benjamin and running thereon Six hundred and
Thirty-Four and Sixty hundredths (634.60) feet; which said piece
parcel or lot of land has such position shape marks and dimensions
as are more particularly described and delineated on the diagram
or plan attached hereto and thereon coloured GREEN





JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SANDS, claims to be the beneficial
owner in fee simple in possession of the parcel of land hereinbefore
described and such ownership arise by virtue of possession of the
said land.

Copies of the filled plan may be inspected during normal office
hours at:-

The Registry of the Supreme Court, Anasbacher House, East Street.
Nassau, Bahamas;

The Chambers of Richard L. Boodle & Co., 3° Floor, Columbus
House, East & Shirley Streets, Nassau, Bahamas

Notice is hereby given to any person(s) wishing to make a claim
shall do so by filing an Adverse Claim in the Supreme Court and
serving such Statement on the Petitioners or his Attorneys by the
30!" day after the last day on which on which this Notice appears
in the daily papers. Failure by any person to file and serve a
statement of such claim on or before the said date will operate as
a bar to such claim.

Reichard L, Boodle & Ca.
RICHARD L. BOODLE & CO.
Counsels €» Attorneys-At-Law
Chambers,

3" Floor, Columbus House
East & Shirley Street

Attorneys for the Petitioner
PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘Complete overhaul’ in public sector
needed to support financial services

FROM page 1B

process”.

Suggesting that the Govern-
ment needed to appoint one per-
son with the mandate and powers
to lead such a process, Mr Moree
said reform was necessary at
many different government
departments and agencies.

He explained: “There is an
interdependency between all the
different agencies, ministries and
departments within the Govern-
ment, and there has to be a com-
plete approach. Success is very
much linked to looking at the
whole; it does not lie in one
department. The solution lies in a
complete overhaul.”

YES YOU CAN

God got with his instrument and produced the book
“Yes You Can - A Bahamian Plan”.

The world seems to be waiting; every nation it has
touched is positively affected.

Did two leaders missed it, missed it to our
detriment!

We are still here to serve your accounting needs.
For a copy of “Yes You Can” and other services

Contact us at:- M.E. LOCKHART ACCOUNTING
Tel: 242-394-3565
Cell: 242-425-0650
P.O.Box N522

Email: elshagg @coralwave.com

NOTICE

COMAS RESEARCH LIMITED
Incorporated under the Companies Act, 1992
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
Registration Number 49, 961
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

TAKE NOTICE that a general meeting of the
members of the Company was held at the Chancellors
Chambers, Samana Hill, No. 14 Village Road
North, Nassau, The Bahamas on the 4th day of
December, 2006 at 10 o’clock in the afternoon for the
purpose of dissolving the Company and to appoint
Chancellors Corporate Services Limited, Liquidator
of the Company.

A Return nothing the said general meeting was reg-
istered with the Registrar of Companies on 15th day
of January A.D. 2007 and the company has been
dissolved and removed from the Register of
Companies as of the 11th day of December,
2008 A.D.

Chancellors Corporate Services Limited
Liquidator

a,
Real Estate

— fi aru 5
TR Tea Te AOTC ae i ied

Everywhere The Te) lv]













Tel: 502 2356

for ad rates

The Bahamas’ “test”, Mr
Moree suggested, was whether it
could translate reform rhetoric
into action, implementation and
execution when it came to the
financial services industry.

“Are we capable of doing this
process or, if not, will we go with
the status quo, the rhetoric and
not see any major reform and just
plod along,” he asked.

“That’s the test confronting the
country at the moment. Are we
able to move beyond the rhetoric
to implement the correct solu-
tions...... that put us in a proac-
tive mode to take on the compe-
tition and secure our part of the
marketplace?”

Mr Moree, though, praised the
Government’s plans to consoli-
date the various financial services
sector regulators into two bodies,
amalgamating the Securities
Commission, Compliance Com-
mission and Registrar of Insur-
ance’s Office into a single
Bahamas Financial Services
Authority by year’s end.

Although the Central Bank will
remain as a standalone entity ini-
tially, the final consolidation
phase will see its Bank Supervi-
sion Department merged into the
Authority to leave a solitary
‘super regulator’.

The senior attorney said the
regulatory consolidation would
eliminate bureaucracy and reduce
costs for financial institutions and
practitioners, and also enhance
the Bahamas’ competitive posi-
tion by removing overlaps and
differences in practice/procedures
between the existing supervisors.

“T think it’s extremely impor-
tant with regard to the future of
this jurisdiction,” Mr Moree said
of financial regulatory consolida-
tion. “One of the competitive
advantages we should have as a
small jurisdiction is that we
should be able to be less bureau-
cratic and maintain high stan-
dards of regulatory oversight —
without the bureaucracy you find
in larger countries.

“Hopefully, it will bring greater

efficiency, a reduction of costs,
less red tape, shorter waiting peri-
ods for permits and approvals. It
should create a more efficient reg-
ulatory force, which will
inevitably be beneficial for the
industry without compromising
the standard of oversight.”

And he added: “Hopefully, it
will also bring a more entrepre-
neurial approach to dealing with
regulatory issues where the regu-
lators, in the mode of the Cen-
tral Bank — which in my view is
doing a god job, with high stan-
dards, not overly bureaucratic —
are very responsive and prepared
to work with the industry in its
overall development.

“Tt’ll [the consolidation] result
in a more coherent set of poli-
cies, and certainly be easier to
navigate for those persons invest-
ed in the industry. It’ll be a flat
line approach, which will be eas-
ier for the industry to understand
and work with, and makes the
development and implementation
of policy much more efficient.

five years”, Mr Moree said.

With it “very important” that
the Bahamas escape the G-
20/OECD so-called ‘grey list’, and
respond to those organisations’
demands for greater tax trans-
parency and tax information
exchange, he added that it was
critical for the public and private
sectors to work on developing a
considered response “as opposed
to having knee jerk reactions to
these issues coming from these
agencies”.

The G-20 demands also meant
there was an opportunity for the
Government to work with the
Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB) and other private
sector groups on “a national plan
that focuses on this industry with
a concerted view to not only
securing and maintaining the
industry, but how to develop the
business and expand given the
realities of the marketplace that
we are facing”.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALVENS BELLOT of
SOLDIER ROAD, P.O. BOX EE-16851, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should

send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JUDITH FLEUREMY
of TREASURE CAY, ABACO, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JESSIKA LOUIS of SAPPHIRE
RIDGE DRIVE, PRINCE CHARLES, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6" day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

ENERGY SAVING
CONSULTANTS

=, . .
Cut Your Electiic Bill

©
Up To 49%)

* Tankless Water Heaters

«Compact Fluorescent Bulbs

* Energy Saving Capacitors for
Motors, A/C, Pumps etc.

* Fridgi-tech oil additive to increase A/C
efficiency

For more information or survey
Email: enengysavingsconsuttants @ hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121 Mea gees swe ste)



NOTICE OF SALE

The Rawson Court Condominium Owners Associvtion is
offering, pursuant to Registered Charges against the herentier
described condominium units, and the power of sale vested in
the Condominium Management Company pursuant to section 21
and the other provisions contained in the Law of Property &
Conveyancing (Condominium) Act 1965;

Uinkt G03
Linit (obs
Unit Crh

3 Bedroom / 3% Bathroom
3 Bedroom {3 Bathroom
3 Bedroom / 3 Bathroom

All offers should be in writing and tendered in seuled envelopes
to the offices of:

Cedric L Parker & Co,
Neil's Comet
No. 9 Rusty Bethel Drrve
Pa, Box Wo) 95s
Nassau, Bhanns
Alitention: Miss AUP. Fernander



ment, doing what is necessary to

“Tt will obviously eliminate
those areas in the past where
there was some conflict between
the procedures of different regu-
lators, when certain regulators
did one thing, and others did
another.

“It’s essential we execute this
and bring it in on time, and I
think that would be a big achieve-

TMT

For the stories

TRU C
Wr AS
on Mondays

rationalize this industry and put it
on a more stable footing.”

The financial services indus-
try’s position as the second largest
sector in the economy made it
“so vitally important to get it right
in developing our strategy for our
national plan in the next three to

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSELYNE DORTELY
of 5401 SW 12 STREET APT., 108 NORTH, FORT
LAUDERDALE, FL 33068 is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6th
day of July 6th, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN LOUVENS of
PALM BEACH STREET, P.O. BOX EE-19248, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



JOB ADVERTISEMENT

Position: Accountant

A local insurance agency seeks to fill the position of
Accountant. The scope of work is to head the Ac-
counting Operations in preparation of monthly, quar-
terly and annual reports; to keep and maintain all
financial documents and records according to the

directives coming from the President and the Board
of Directors to ensure the efficient management of
all Bank and general ledger accounts. The position
will also be expected to make recommendations to
management to maintain the company’s viability in a
highly competitive environment.

Required:

e University Degree in accounting;

¢ Professional qualifications e.g. CPA, ACCA, CA

e At least 3 years’ work experience as an
accountant;

¢ Good knowledge of English in writing, editing and
presenting;

* Strong interpersonal, organizational and
supervisory skills;

e¢ Demonstrated capacity to work under pressure,
meet deadlines and perform work of the highest
quality.

¢ Good computer and analytical skills.

Send cover letter and Curriculum Vitae to the follow-
ing address:

The Tribune

c/o Box # 81869
P.O. Box N 3207
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE: July 25, 2009 by 5pm


THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009 PAGE 5B

OOOO BUSINESS OE
Manager wins profit

deal breach verdict
against developer

FROM page 1B

he was having with the Old
Bahama Bay organisation regard-
ing the possibility of another pro-
ject.

“(Skinner’s] concern was made
stronger by the fact that he was
not given a copy of the profit
sharing agreement signed in Feb-
ruary 2001. Only one copy of the
agreement was produced and
signed by the parties, which copy
[Mr Jervis] kept, with a promise
to make a copy for [Skinner].

“That promise was never kept.
Even at the signing of the agree-
ment the pages were not initialed
by the parties, thereby leaving a
fear in the respondent’s mind that
the uninitialled pages could be
changed. By chance, [Mr Skin-
ner] found the agreement in the
office of [Mr Jervis]. He made
himself a copy, and returned the
agreement to the secret reposi-
tory where it had been placed by
[Mr Jervis].”

Eventually, relations between
the two sides deteriorated to the
point where Mr Skinner was sum-
marily dismissed as project man-
ager for “alleged fraud and mis-
conduct” in relation to KST
Investments and the Shoreline
project on January 11, 2005. This
prompted the initial writ and
statement of claim to the
Supreme Court, seeking damages
for breach of employment con-
tract and the profit sharing agree-
ment.

Noting that the burden of proof
rested with employers when it
came to justifying summary dis-
missals of employees and termi-
nation of their contracts, the
Court of Appeal said Mr Jervis’s
and KST Investments’ case lay
on three grounds:

e¢ That Mr Skinner allegedly
cost them $42,486 by charging
materials and costs used in reno-
vating his home at No. 3 Shore-
line to them, and falsifying the
books and records

¢ Using Shoreline’s credit
account with Dolly Madison for
personal use between May 1999
and December 2004

¢ Obtaining a plasma screen
TV from a Shoreline trade cus-
tomer for personal use without
an accounting

The Court of Appeal judgment
recorded that Mr Jervis had
argued that none of this, and the
use of KST Investments’ funds,
had been authorised — a matter so
grave that it justified the summa-
ry dismissal and end to the profit
sharing agreement.

However, then-acting Justice
Norris Carroll dismissed the alle-
gations about the house, finding
that as Mr Jervis lived next door,
it would have been impossible for
him not to have known about the
renovations. Mr Skinner was also
absent in South Africa, meaning it
would have been impossible to
conceal the work, and the judge
dismissed the evidence of various
witnesses as they all still worked
for KST Investments.

The allegations over the Dolly
Madison account and plasma TV
were also dismissed in the
Supreme Court. Mr Jervis and
KST Investments appealed
against the wrongful dismissal
verdict, but the Court of Appeal,
stating that it was loathe to inter-
fere with a trial judge’s findings of
fact — given that he had seen the
witnesses testify — found that
there as evidence aplenty to sup-
port the lower court’s conclusions.

The Court of Appeal found
that in assessing the evidence, the
Supreme Court was “faced with
the uncontroverted evidence”
surrounding Mr Jervis’s “recti-
tude” in his relationship and busi-
ness dealings with Mr Skinner —
his reluctance to provide him with

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



a copy of the Profit Share Agree-
ment despite repeated requests
and Mr Skinner’s entitlement; the
failure to disclose KST Invest-
ments’ existence and the fact it
employed Mr Skinner.

“Thirdly, [Mr Jervis] had, with-
out the knowledge, consent or
approval of Mr Skinner, been
using funds from the Shoreline
development account, which had
been opened fro the business in
accordance with the Profit Shar-
ing Agreement, and was in the
name of KST Investments, to
fund [Mr Jervis’s] private busi-
ness in Colorado without account-
ing for them,” the Court of
Appeal found. “Again, this fact,
uncontroverted, was discovered
by [Mr Skinner].

“Fourthly, [Mr Jervis] had,
without the knowledge, consent
or approval of [Mr Skinner], been
using the funds from the same
Shoreline development account
to take care of the personal needs
of his father and his other per-
sonal financial obligations, such as
his investment in Old Bahama
Bay, without accounting for

them.”

The Court of Appeal added:
“When all these were brought to
the attention of [Mr Jervis] in
court, his answer was that the
company was his company, imply-
ing that the accounts and all the
monies therein belonged to him
and so he did not have to account
to [Mr Skinner] for such expen-
diture.

“He had forgotten that those
funds belonged to the Shoreline
development, which accounts
were to be the subject of audit
under the Profit Sharing Agree-
ment by the accounting firm of
Pricewaterhouse, for the purpose
of distribution of profits between
him and [Mr Skinner].”

The Court of Appeal found
that, under the Profit-Sharing
Agreement, Mr Skinner had the
right to see and know how Shore-
line’s accounts were being oper-
ated, so he could determine his
share of the profits. Yet these
were kept from him, the court
finding that no audit was done as
contemplated under the Profit
Sharing Agreement, and that Mr

Bratish Liskomal Halter Hotel

Clearance

SALE

New Stock also on Sale
Everything for $20

Until the end of July
Free parking at the Hilten
P.0.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahanias
Tel! 242-329-1865
Email: gems-peais hota oon





GN-876

Works & Transport

NORTH ACKLINS ROAD
REHABILITATION

Tender Publication No.: FIR/207/15/1 (GOB)

Jervis “had no intention” of let-
ting him see the financials, instead
offering Mr Skinner a lump sum
payment whenever the profits sit-
uation was discussed.

The Court of Appeal also
determined whether the Profit
Sharing Agreement had come to
an end with Mr Skinner’s dis-
missal, as Mr Jervis contended it
had. Harvey Tynes QC, repre-
senting Mr Skinner, said the
grounds relied upon by Mr Jervis
and his company to terminate the
agreement had been rejected, and
the parties’ intent was contained
in its clause four. This said the
Profit Sharing Agreement was
“irrevocable” until the last lot and
house in Shoreline was sold.

The Court of Appeal found
that in addition to the $250,000
share of outstanding profits
awarded to Mr Skinner by the
Supreme Court, he was also enti-
tled to damages for breach of the
Profit Sharing Agreement. The
amount of damages to be award-
ed, the court said, should be cal-
culated on the fact that Shoreline
currently has 60 complete homes
and, when fully built-out, will
have 76.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

HIGH KICK PRODUCTIONS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 of the International Business Companies
Act No. 45 of 2000, HIGH KICK PRODUCTIONS
LIMITED, has been dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registrar General on the 29th day of
June, 2009.

Andium Trust Company Limited,

of 12-14 David Place, St. Helier,
Jersey JE2 4TD
Liquidator

To atlvertise in The
Tribune - the #1 newspaper
in circulation, just call
002-2371 today!



eo coat seta asertelloyseetaets

Opportunities

Do you love working ina fas [ “pace d.

challenging environment:

Are you a Con fident communicator, with a
passion to work with a professional Team?

If you want to know more, Let's Talk!

We are seeking qualified persons to fill the following positions:

¢ Senior Graphic Designer

® Sales Associate

* Accounts Control Officers



EUROPEAID/128742/M/WKS/BS (EU)

The Government of The Bahamas intends to award a works
contract for the rehabilitation of the Queen’s Highway on Acklins.
The works contract consists in the rehabilitation and provision
of periodic maintenance (pavement patching and sealing) for
about 32.3 miles (approx. 52 km) of a two-lane single carriageway
road (Queen’s Highway. About 290,000 square yards of the road
pavement will require patching and sealing maintenance, and
about 100,000 square yards of the road pavement will require the
replacement of the base course layer and the placement of a new
surface seal.

The works are co-financed by the Government of The Bahamas
and the 9th European Development Fund.

The Tender dossier is available for inspection and purchase at
the following address:

Department of Public Works

of the Ministry of Works and Transport,
John F. Kennedy Drive,

1st Floor, East Wing

Nassau, (N.P.), The Bahamas

Tel.: +242-322-4830

Fax: +242-326-7344

Sealed Tender Submissions are to be deposited in the Tender Box
located at:

Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

3rd Floor

Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tender submissions will be received no later than 4:00pm, Monday,
24th August, 2009. Any tender received after this deadline will
not be considered.

Tenders are invited to attend the Tender opening at 10am Tuesday,
25th August, 2009 at the Tenders Board.

Possible additional information or clarifications/questions shall
be published on the EuropeAid website:
http://ec.ouropa.eu/europeaid/work/funding/index_en.htm
(Select Contracts link) and will be communicated in writing to
all tenderers.

Signed,
PERMANENT SECRETARY

* Retail Sales Manager

* Showroom Floor Assistant

For more information On each position, please ViSil COLLIE website page

www.furnitureplus.com/careers

Plus Group of Companies is an established Bahamian owned group

that is growing and continuing to build its team of professionals in

Various areas.

We offer a competitive salary and benefits package as well as ongoing

profess i On al tral n i Te a na d evelop ment.

Nassau * Grand Bahama * World Wide Web

Please submit your application by Mail to:
Director of Human Resources

Or email: Ik ibs t h epluserp.ct mm

We thank all applicants, however only thease

selected for an interview will be contacted,



The Plus Group

FP ©. Box N713, Nassau, Bahamas
MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009





The stories behind the news

INSIGHT



Voluntary oppression

Bm By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

he adult Bahamian: sim-

ple, dull-witted, not qual-

ified to make indepen-

dent decisions, incapable

of moderating his or her
responses to stimuli. A helpless crea-
ture that must be led by the hand at all
times.

It would be difficult to imagine a
person thus described not taking
offence. Yet everyone who lives in
this country puts up with it in some
form on an almost daily basis, for the
most part without protest.

Examples of this can be gleaned
from virtually all aspects of public life,
but nowhere is it more palpable than
in the government’s control over the
ideas we consume, as embodied in the
Play and Film Control Board’s power
to ban films and the Immigration
Department’s ability to bar perform-
ing artists from entering the country.

AN HISTORICAL

PERSPECTIVE

Censorship in the Bahamas is often
justified as necessary for the preser-
vation of rather ambiguous priorities
such as public morality, public order,
the public interest, even public health.
Indeed, some of these phrases feature
in the law which governs the suppres-
sion of ideas and opinions.

We are by no means unique in this
respect. Censorship has been around
for as long as democracy has existed.
For almost as long, it been recognised
for what it usually is: the portrayal of
the public as in need of protection
from itself, as a means for those in
power to reinforce their positions.

The philosopher Socrates was put to
death by the world’s very first demo-
cratic society for bucking heads with
the authorities over these very ques-
tions of information and control. He
became the first in a long line of
learned men to defend the notion that
individuals should be free to receive
and impart ideas.

English poet John Milton under-
stood well the assumptions that under-
lie the notion of censorship. In 1644 he
wrote his famous defence of free
expression, the Areopagitica, in
response to a newly enacted censor-
ship law. He exhorted parliament to
"consider what Nation it is whereof
ye are, and whereof ye are the gover-
nors: a Nation not slow and dull, but of
a quick, ingenious and piercing spirit,
acute to invent, subtle and sinewy to
discourse, not beneath the reach of
any point, the highest that human
capacity can soar to."

Milton wrote that the absolute free-
dom to impart and receive ideas is
vital for the increase of knowledge
and the progress of a people. Having
supported the anti-monarchists in the
English Civil War, Milton was a fierce
advocate of democracy who believed
the public was the only legitimate
earthly sovereign; a sentiment that the
Bahamas is supposed to be a natural
heir to, as one of the oldest parlia-
mentary democracies in the world.

The intensely God-fearing poet who
gave us the poem, “Paradise Lost”,
also understood that personal moral-
ity is a question to be struggled with by
individuals and supported the view
that citizens should take their faith
“into their own hands again."

He warned religious leaders who
attempt to suppress the free expres-
sion of ideas because they fear “new
and dangerous opinions,” that think-
ing themselves the defenders of the

Long after most civilised nations have cast off the yoke of censorship,
Bahamians continue to be told what they can and cannot see and hear.
This in turn has allowed a privileged few to ensure that their opinions
always take priority. But by failing to take a stand against the suppression
of their rights, members of the public can blame no one but themselves

for this situation. INSIGHT reports...

faith, they will end up becoming “the
persecutors.”

JUSTICE MAXWELL, RACISM

AND THE CENSORS

“New and dangerous opinions”
have often been the target of censor-

ship in the Bahamas. But what seems
new and dangerous to one generation
often ends up being viewed a vital cat-
alyst for progress by the next.
Consider the example of the late
Justice Maxwell Thompson, who as a
young man founded the Citizens Com-



mittee in Nassau to fight racial dis-
crimination.

When Justice Thompson died in
2003, his obituary recounted how in
the late 1940s, his committee agitated
against the policy of the City Garden
Club of banning non-whites from its

premises, and “also prevailed on the
Governor to revoke a decision by the
Censor Board to deny the showing of
the film ‘No Way Out’, in which Sid-
ney Poitier starred” and which
denounced racially driven violence in
particular and irrational hatred in gen-
eral.

Why would the members of the
Censor Board want to ban such a
film? Perhaps they felt a public show-
ing of a movie in which a conscien-
tious and caring black doctor is
harassed, threatened, beaten and
almost killed by white men in some
southern American backwater town
might constitute a threat to the peace
in a majority black colony run by the
descendants of white British men.

At the same time, however, there
were certain aspects of the film’s mes-
sage, in the context of the changing
attitudes of the time, which might have
caused anxiety for one social group
in particular.

Justice Thompson's early accom-
plishments led to the formation of the
Bahamas People's Party, of which he
was chairman. His obituary says: "This
time, however, was the age of the
"McCarthy Communist Witch Hunt’
and they were accused of being Com-
munist because as Max said — 'every-
thing that was new and unfamiliar was
called Communist. Emotion was run-
ning quite high and the mere mention
of the word was hushed’."

An anti-racism movement could
only be equated with communism by a
power structure peopled by individu-
als astonishingly ignorant of the mean-
ing of both terms, or who out of anxi-
ety over their own positions, either
consciously or unconsciously conflate
a trend that they see as a threat to
their interests with the dominant inter-
national bogeyman of the day.

RIGHTEOUS INDIGNATION

In the present-day Bahamas, just as
in Milton’s time, “the persecutors” are
often inspired by notions of religious
fervor. Pry loose any particular
instance of censorship, and you are
very likely to find a zealot of some
description crawling about beneath it.

Religious leaders have worked
closely with the Control Board, and
often consult with Immigration offi-
cials on whether a particular per-
forming artist should be allowed into
the country.

There is, of course, nothing contro-
versial in Christian terms about the
public being viewed as “the flock” in
need of someone to lead it about,
although how some pastors have man-
aged to commandeer the role of “the
Good Shepherd” for themselves is an
interesting question.

In any case, every Bahamian is enti-
tled to ask what right pastors have

SEE page 8B

CP TOYOTA moving forward
Land Cruiser Prado 4 X 4

ee =
SEE

27L4 aL

4.0L Vé

3.0L turbo diesel
eee ithe ee ete ee Mest et
* air conditioning

immobiliser and remote Trott Ca
alloy wheels and Peta] yet a)

ABS brakes

dual Tiers ts Es

ty

siete tie eer ts ees Ae CMs a emis ees a
EMD edi atch

EXECUTI VE rn Man to Fr b at

Ser MPR CE A era TENT a(re iit tte
Parts and service Guaranteed

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER

ON-THE-SPOT au Pe ah es et ane i ee Re hep lla te ae Ps ed peg,


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Voluntary oppression

FROM page 12

involving themselves in deci-
sions concerning the rights of
citizens in a democracy in which
religious freedom is constitu-
tionally enshrined. Surely, if
they are keen to exert their
righteousness upon a captive
audience, they already have one
in the form of their congrega-
tion.

Yet far from minding their
own business, religious leaders
are actually demanding more
say in what we are not allowed
to see and hear. Just last year,
the Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil demanded the right to screen
all films and musical acts before
they are allowed into the coun-
try. How individuals who have
neither been elected by the pub-
lic nor appointed by Cabinet
can come to imagine they have
the right to hold such sway con-
tinues to be a mystery.

Concerns about the erosion
of our freedoms aside, it would
be terrifying development for
this country if our musical
choices were to be limited to











Vacant kat 4147
(10,5579. P-Munininers

Or & Rey West Lame
Southern Heights sub
(Appraised Value
$90, 00000)

Unit #6 (409sq. &) one
{1) Bedroom, Eathroom,

hing, dining room &
fitcheneWest Bay St
Westward Villas Soh
Bogen Agger cnne nie”
[Appraised Vallee
$125,000.00)

Lat [S0°xi00"]
wGuilding 1,912sq. ft
Deweaus St (Appraised
Valae $189 000.00)

Lot 429 2 430,
{20'«100), Bik #47
wf Guilding 1,140sq. ft
Matthew St, Nassau
Village (Appraised
Value $145,000.00)

Late 45 & #6
(150x100) wyhse
Stiver Palm Lis inperial
Park (Appraiied Value
$313,651.00)

Lat #125 (50'90"]
whe 1.3428q, f-
Sunflower [south]
Sunshine Park Sub Hse
#2 [Appralsed Value
$139,000.00)

Lat #11 (107 61007)
wihse Z.026ey. -Sunset
Radec Or, Sunset Ridge
Sub Hse #28 (uppradsed
Value $206,000.00)

Andros
Beach fromt lor 9 0008q
Pt wy building 2,10¢sq
ft=Pinders #tangrove
Cay Andros (Appralsed
Value $200,000.00)
Lat 4-454) fh, wy idaplex
tileling 1,1 74aq. Mh-
Presh Creek Anelros
(Appraised Value
$04, 040.00)
Coren Hea herrea
10. Lot #20 717,150sq. fr]

wie F.O003q, I

Bike &, Section #2-Sra
Gull br, Bahama Reef
Yacht & Country Club
Suh Grand Bahama

[Appraised Valine
$250,000.00)

Vacant lot #29, Blk #9

(14,59 7so. ft]-
Yorkshire Dr, Bakamia
Wiest Replat Gramd

Wessels

what the Christian Council con-
siders acceptable — for reasons
of taste, if nothing else.

A MATTER OF OPINION

All too often, this is exactly
what censorship comes down to
— mere questions of taste, dif-
ferences of perspective. Take
for example the most recent
film to get the axe — Brokeback
Mountain.

Members of the Play and
Films Control Board made it
clear they objected to the level
of homosexual content and reli-
gious leaders supported them
energetically.

Yet at no point did anyone
bother to explain or demon-
strate exactly how homosexu-
ality threatens the public inter-
est. Many intelligent and
accomplished citizens of this
country would disagree vehe-
mently with this view, and argue
that a greater acceptance of dif-
fering lifestyles and an increase
in the level of tolerance in gen-
eral would go a long way in
remedying some of the social
ills we all recognise; for example

rttl

Bahama (Apprainedd
Value £2 5.000.00)
12. Vacant Lot #6 Blk #12
Unit #3 [12 50sq. &.]
Henny Ave Derby Sub
Gram Bahaitia
(Appraised Value
$65,000.00)
13. Lot 4s B 1002 50)
wfhse & Duplex: Nelson
Rid Poinclana Gardens
Gram Bahai
(Appraised Value
$9600 0}
14. Lot #37 (50x01 50")
wi stoplex 2 storey
Apartrmcart build ing A
Chireh 540065 ft-
Martin Town, Kits Suk
Eteht Mile Rock Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $211,200.00]
15. Lorw/ lt peom hoerel
5,0. fh, cn 4.94
“ores af beach front-
High Rock Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $1, 100.000.0004
14. Wacant kot #13, Blk #59,
Urvit #3 [22.7 528q, F.)
45° of canal fremne-
Dagenham Circle &
[ngrave Dr Emerald Bay
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$110,000.00)
Lot A415, Bik #15 Unit
#9 (90'xt25')-Derby
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$23,000 0 }
Wacant kit ¥25, Blk #15
(17, Bb6eq. A.)
Cotwater Ln Shannon
Country Club Sub Grand
Bahama [Appraised
Value $28,000.00)
19, Loraz [20,00009. te)
Wi THildbing Goneplex &
aun romat-
Highway
Holmes Rock
Commmanage Cima
Bahania (Appraised
Value $176,600,00)
Abaco
0. Lotrsd E65 00eq. ft.)
wh tripbes foundation
2.7 88a. th-Miephy
Town Abaca

violence and domestic abuse.

Both sides are entitled to
their opinion, of course, but
what qualifications do members
of the Play and Films Control
Board and officials of the Immi-
gration Department — not to
mention members of the Chris-
tian Council — possess that
prove them capable of deciding
between opposing views on so
controversial an issue?

Do they all possess academic
backgrounds in the fine arts and
the skills necessary to perceive
exactly what messages a partic-
ular film or musical perfor-
mance will convey to an audi-
ence? Are they also psycholo-
gists, capable of apprehending
the exact effect a particular pro-
duction will have on viewers?
Perhaps most importantly, are
they accomplished linguists,
capable of untangling the vari-
ous subtleties of meaning con-
tained in vague concepts as
“public morality” and “the pub-
lic good”?

A list of all the musical acts
denied the right to perform in
the Bahamas would be hard to

| BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
P.O. Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel:(242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fax:(242) 327-3047, 327-1238
www.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com

(Appraised Value
$24,096,000)
Vacant lot 94 (2 acres)
Fox Town Abaco
(Appraised Waloc
50, ono.00]
Lot 451 [15,00 thy
wbuilding-Morpay
“Toa AC
(Appraised Value
S102 420.00)
Portion of lor #69
(15,00
Murphy Town Abacos
(Appraised Valae
$25,250.00)
Lot #35 [6,9008q. ft |
iding-M arp
Tern Albvatip
(Appraised Value
$e2, 075.00)
Lot #45 [60° x1L6o'}
W144 pm neon!
S906, M-Randy Pent
Abecd (Appraiped
Value $465, 700.00)
Lot @7,120sy. Pe wt
cottages & 1 storage
hulbding, botaling
4,1 féaq, f-hand Ranks
Treasure Cz
(Appraised Value
SH00 308.00)
Eleuthera
Vacant portion of lor #7
[50's 20" pwc Paones.
Cistern Eleuthera
(Appraised Value
$18,000.00]
Cae [band

Vacant 6&5 acres at

eg. fh -Prant 59

iy Alueen

land-Arthii’s Town, Cat
lshend (Appraised
Value $90, 00000)
Lot w/12 room mobel
1.39 acres Jirthur's
Town Cat blared
(Appraised Vale
$630 10000)
Exuma
Vacant bot #8 (65.200sq
te )«Moge Town Exuma
(Appraised Value
$110,188.00)
FL Lot (3040055 fe} wy
somal beorbel 4,5: 20sq. Fe
& exclusive beach
Fortes Hill Esxocma
(Appraised Valae
$1,400, 000,00)
EY. Vacant lot #95
(80's122"] Commodore
Red Elizabeth Harbor
Est Eine (Appraised

come by, but some of the films
banned by the board over the
years suggest the existence none
of these qualities in past mem-
bers.

Among them was the 1975
masterpiece “One Flew Over
the Cuckoo's Nest”, the first
film in history to win all five
major Academy Awards. Yet
the censors ruled that it had
“nothing to offer” the Bahami-
an people — a choice of words
eerily similar to the judgment
pronounced on Brokeback
Mountain.

EVOLVING STANDARDS

The banning of “Cuckoo’s
Nest” and another great film,
“Dog Day Afternoon”, in the
first year of the board’s exis-
tence prompted a speech
denouncing censorship by
Michael Symonette to the
Rotary Club of Nassau.

He said: "The Censorship
Board should recognise that in
this year of 1976, human sexu-
ality or the use of certain words
in the vernacular of nearly
everyone, no longer constitute
the sole basis for the wielding of
sanctimonious moral judgments.

“The board made an absurd
mistake in banning these two
films. . . I believe that the nar-
rowness of the censor's view —a
view which seems limited to dis-
covering four-letter words and
the more explicit manifestations
of sex, and which continues to
pass without murmur films of
almost inconceivable violence
— must be subject to stringent
re-examination.

“Tam also puzzled by the sort
of mind that believes it is per-
fectly all right to witness tor-
ture and murder on the screen
but finds that there is something
shameful about love-making. I
believe that the intelligent
members of our generation
today have established a new
code of moral values more
moral than the old one, more
honest as well, and assuredly
less hypocritical."

The evolution of moral and
social standards has affected
censorship around the world.
In Britain, the ability to ban
writings and theatrical produc-
tions was established by the
Licensing Order of 1643, an Act

imposing pre-publication cen-
sorship and prompting Milton
to write the Areopagitica.

Outright censorship in the
UK was ended by the Theatre
Act of 1968, which calls for the
classification of all films and
productions, and the setting cer-
tain age restrictions for audi-
ence members where appropri-
ate.

In the United States, there
never has been a national licens-
ing authority for films and per-
formances, as the industry cre-
ated its own regulatory body in
an effort to ward off govern-
ment meddling following the
advent of sound in films, which
prompted a public cry for
stricter standards.

Beginning in the 1920s, local
regulations were adopted by
some states, however the 1952
Supreme Court case, Joseph
Burstyn, Inc v Wilson put an
end to this by ruling that to for-
bid the showing of a non-
licensed film or to refuse a
licence to any film judged to be
"sacrilegious," was a "restraint
on freedom of speech" and
therefore a violation of the First
Amendment.

Meanwhile, standards of
morality changed over time, and
the industry’s self-regulatory
body, the Motion Picture Asso-
ciation of America, adopted a
rating system which does not
allow for the banning of any
film.

This has been the trend
around the world in the film
industry. Exceptions include
various Islamic Fundamentalist
regimes and a diverse collection
of tin-pot dictatorships — and,
of course, the Bahamas.

One notable member of this
group is Australia, where cen-
sorship, including banning of
films, has become progressively
more severe since new legisla-
tion was passed in the 1990s.

This trend has prompted out-
rage from members of the pub-
lic. Even Janet Strickland, Chief
Censor from 1979 to 1986 spoke
out against it. In 1996, she was
quoted by the Sydney Morning
Herald as saying: "Why is it that
we are not allowed to be
shocked and offended? Where
is it written? It's good to be
shocked and offended...If we

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF
NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having claims or demands against the above-named
Estate are requested to send the same duly certified to

the undersigned on or before G August 200%,

AND NTOICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of
the late NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON will be
distributed among the persons entitled thereto having
regard only to the claims of which the Authorized
Officer of the Estate shall then have had Notice.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CU),
Athena's for the Executens
Chambers
Sassoon Howse
Shirbey Street & Victoria Awenie
P.O), Bow f-272
Klass, Gahwamias.

NOTICE

ESTATE OF HUBERT ARNOLD FARRINGTON,
late of Twynam Avenue and Yonder Road in the Island
of New Providence

ASSETS

20 (1906) Roboks Vessel ws 15 HP Bvinrede engine

se] (MÂ¥ Buddy)
Sports Vessel (Hull Only)

(1980) with (2) Folws Diesel engine (weet Oharionte]
L22' Simale Screw Steel Hull (1960) MÂ¥ Liza | Ill
vessel has a new engine reqairing imetallation. And
can be view af Bradford Marine. Grand Bahar

2) Desoe Marin
982 | Defender Vessel [

peeael (Sweet Dreams)
Leen Vashti|

(1) 03 Bent
(1) 94 Fore

(1] 92 Mack Treck

Value §45,000.00)
33. Lot #194 (7S eS"

wy two storey buikding

George Town, Bxumea

[Appraised Value

S460, 8 0)

Â¥ehitles
aravan
aicorer
(1) 97 Dodge Strabes

[2] 01 Kitchen Tandem Cheroker Trader
[1] 01 Kia Bus 12 Seater

(1) 8? LT@000 Bord Boom Truck

(1) 99 Ford F250 Trock

[1) 9? Double Ade Hack Gamp Track
(00 97 Daeble ode Mock Dimp Trick
(1) Fond Ranger Trock

(1) 2? Ford LaO00 Drill Truck
(Carmichael Rid]

The public & imeited te submit Segled bids marked “Tender” to Bahamas Development Bank, P.O. Bow M-3034,
Mecwu, Bohomes attention Finamcial Combrolber, faced bids will not be accepted of telephone 327-572) for

fal inforniation Please note that all bk onthe afereiienbianed properties and asdets chuauld by piceieid
by oF om July 17, 2009. The Bahars Developareet Bank reserves Che right to reject any or all offers. All assets

are sobd as iis.



Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are required to send their
names, addresses and particulars of the debts or claims
certified in writing to the undersigned on or before the
Sth August, A.D., 2009 required to prove such debts or
claims, or in default be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made before such debts or claims are proved;
after the above date the Executor will distribute the assets
having regard only to the proved debts or claims of which
he shall have had notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to
the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
before 5th August, 2009.

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for the Executor
Mareva House
4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas



have nothing that makes us feel
shocked, how do we know what
our value system is?”

THE LEGITIMACY

QUESTION

The question of the legitima-
cy of censorship was actually
raised by the Bahamas Minis-
ter of Home Affairs Darrell
Rolle following the enactment
of the Theatre and Cinemas
Act, 1975, which established the
Play and Film Control Board.

He said: "Admittedly the
question of censorship of plays
and films has always been and
will continue to be a matter for
public discussion. There are
those who maintain that the
state has no right to impose
restrictions on what a citizen
may or may not be allowed to
see."

"Yet each of us as members
of society has delegated the
right to lay down a code of con-
duct which will safeguard the
public good, uphold public
order, health and morality. It is
for this reason that our laws
make it an offence for one to
be drunk in a public place or to
use obscene language to the
annoyance of another and sim-
ilar petty offences. The point
being that in all these cases we
have taken this course of action
because we see the need to
establish in society a norm, a
standard of conduct, if you like,
which is in the interest of society
as a whole and indirectly in the
interest of each individual which
comprises it.”

Well, I am one member of
society who does not remem-
ber renouncing the right to reg-
ulate my own behaviour. I am
aware that the politicians we
elect and pay are obliged to cre-
ate and enforce laws that pro-
tect our rights and freedoms,
and the examples Mr Rolle
gives could fall under this cate-
gory. If public drunkenness and
obscenity are, as he suggested,
of annoyance to others, then it
can at least be argued that these
actions qualify as offences, in
that they impinge upon the right
of other citizens to exist in an
environment free of harassment
and hostility.

The banning of certain films
and performances, on the other
hand, cannot be plausibly justi-
fied in this way, because, for
one thing, the ban does not pun-
ish individuals for actions
already committed, but rather
for actions which might
arguably result from viewing
certain material. It is the equiv-
alent of banning alcohol out-
right because public drunken-
ness might result from it.

Such laws follow the same
rationale as former President
Bush's doctrine of preemptive
war: hit them before they do
anything wrong, because we
can't guarantee that they won't.
It is worse than finding a man
guilty without trial; it is finding
him guilty before he has com-
mitted the offence.

Such a law is arguably not a
law at all, particularly in a coun-
try where the constitution guar-
antees that each one of us is
presumed innocent until proven
guilty. This is a fundamental
right, and there can be no justi-
fication for curtailing it.

If, after watching a violent
film or play, an individual
engages in violence or threats
of violence, that person should
feel the full weight of the law
descend upon him. Likewise, if
anyone under the age of 18 is
caught in the audience of a film
rated for adults, the police
should throw the book at the
cinema manager.

But no one has the right to
assume that I may react in a
certain way without convincing
evidence to support this view.
Nor does anyone have the right
to include me in their scheme of
collective punishment.

THE PUBLIC’S SILENCE

Censorship is born out of the
desire to control others. It is
fueled by fear and arrogance —
the fear of those with power
that society will become some-
thing they don't approve of, and
the arrogance of those who
believe they have the right to
make choices for others.

Around 200 years after Mil-
ton died, another giant of Eng-
lish literature was still fighting
for the cause of freedom of
expression. But according to
George Orwell, censorship is
not the fault of those with pow-
er. He believed that the most
“sinister fact” about the control
of ideas in the society in which
he lived, was that it was “large-
ly voluntary.”

Could the same not be said
of us?

What do you think?
pnunez@tribunemedia.net
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009, PAGE 9B



INSIGHT



Jackson, healthy or not?
Depends on who’s talking

LOS ANGELES (AP) — In
his final days, Michael Jackson
was robust and active. Or dan-
gerously thin and frail. Begging
for access to powerful prescrip-
tion drugs. Or showing no signs
of ever having used them.

It depends on who’s talking.

A dizzying collection of puz-
zle pieces about Jackson’s
health and habits has come to
light since his death on June 25.
With as much as a month before
a toxicology report determines
the cause, more are sure to
emerge.

Each is likely to fuel further
speculation. None is sure to pro-
duce a satisfying conclusion.

Some who knew him even
seem to contradict themselves.

Here’s what’s known so far:

e During his final rehearsal
at the Staples Center, Jackson
was captured on video doing his
signature moonwalk and dance
spins. Randy Phillips, CEO of
concert promoter AEG Live,
told CNN he was “a healthy,
vibrant human being.”

e Phillips later told ABC con-
cert organisers feared that Jack-
son was losing weight and show-
ing signs of wear and tear. He
said he hired a staffer whose
purpose was to remind Jackson
to eat.

e Dr Arnold Klein, Jackson’s
dermatologist, who said he last
saw Jackson less than a week
before he died, told CNN’s Lar-
ry King that the singer was in
“very good physical condition,”
in “a very good mood,” and
“was very happy.”

¢ Klein also told CNN that
he had given Jackson the
painkiller Demerol but warned
him about using the powerful
sedative Diprivan. He also con-

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



VISITORS watch a Michael Jackson video on a huge screen at a Tower
Records store in downtown Tokyo...

firmed that Jackson was a for-
mer drug addict who went to
rehab in England.

e “The Incredible Hulk” star
Lou Ferrigno, who was helping
Jackson prepare for a planned
series of London concerts, told
The Associated Press that he
never saw Jackson take drugs,

(AP Photo: Shizuo Kambayashi)

act aloof or speedy, and the
singer wasn’t frail when he last
saw him at the end of May.
“T’ve never seen him look bet-
ter,” he said.

e Two of Jackson’s former
confidants, medium Uri Geller
and ex-bodyguard Matt Fiddes,
said they tried in vain to keep




NOTICE




ESTATE OF DOROTHY FORGIE EVANS

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having

claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certified to the
undersigned on or before 9th August 2009.

AND NTOICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of

the late:

DOROTHY FORGIE EVANS

will be

distributed among the persons entitled thereto having
regard only to the claims of which the Authorized
OÂ¥fcer of the Estate shall then have had Notice.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & O01)
Attomers for the Executors
Chambers
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue

(P.O, Box N-272
Massan, Palwirnas.

Between the evening of Tuesday June 22nd and the morning of
Wednesday June 23rd, a 1993 Ford Taurus vehicle was broken
into, while parked in a residential area off Mermaid Blvd, off
Carmichael Road. The police have been contacted regarding this
matter, but we need your help, in assisting further, in locating two
very valuable items that were stolen at this time. Description
of the items are as follows:

Two (2) sets of AUTOMOTIVE SCAN TOOLS. - They will
individually be housed in large black cases, please see

pictures below:

the pop superstar from abusing
prescription drugs. Geller said
he suffered a terrible falling-out
with Jackson over the issue, but
not before he had to “shout at
Michael, to scream at Michael”
in an effort to confiscate the
singer’s stocks of medication
during his travels in England.

e The drug Diprivan, an anes-
thetic widely used in operating
rooms to induce unconscious-
ness, was found in Jackson’s res-
idence, a law enforcement offi-
cial told the AP. Also known
as Propofol, the drug is given
intravenously and is very unusu-
al to have in a private home.

e Cherilyn Lee, a registered
nurse, told the AP she repeat-
edly rejected his demands for
Diprivan. But a frantic phone
call she received from Jackson
four days before his death made
her fear that he somehow
obtained Diprivan or another
drug to induce sleep.

e Akon, the Senegalese R&B
singer and producer with whom
Jackson recently recorded
songs, told Billboard.com that
“Michael is just one of the
healthiest people that I know.
He was pressuring me to stay
healthy, like, ‘Akon, eat right.
What are you doing out there
on the road? Are you eating?
Are you exercising? Are you
drinking a lot of water?”

¢ Klein said Jackson had been
suffering from lupus — a chron-
ic disease where the immune
system attacks the body’s own
tissue — and a skin disorder
known as vitiligo.

e Jackson’s personal physi-

cian, Dr Conrad Murray,
administered CPR on Jackson’s
bed, rather than a hard surface,
“with his hand behind his back
to provide the necessary sup-
port” because the singer was so
frail, the doctor’s attorney,
Edward Chernoff, said.

¢ Chernoff also told the AP
that Murray never gave or pre-
scribed Jackson the painkillers
Demerol or OxyContin, and
said the doctor didn’t give the
pop star any drugs that con-
tributed to his death.

e Among other things, Mur-
ray’s lawyers have acknowl-
edged it took up to 30 minutes
for paramedics to be summoned
to Jackson’s home after he was
found unresponsive.

e Jackson’s family requested
a private autopsy in part
because of questions about
Murray’s role, the Rev Jesse
Jackson has said.

e Kevin Mazur, a photogra-
pher documenting the Staples
Center rehearsals for a tour
book, told the AP that Jackson

looked in perfect health. “He
was very upbeat, very happy,
having a good time with the
dancers,” Mazur said.

e Spiritual teacher Dr Deep-
ak Chopra told the AP he had
been concerned since 2005 that
Jackson was abusing painkillers
and spoke to the pop star about
suspected drug use as recently
as six months ago. Chopra said
Jackson, a longtime friend, per-
sonally asked him for painkillers
in 2005; Chopra said he refused.

e Los Angeles police chief
William Bratton said detectives
are looking at his prescription
drug history and trying to talk
with his numerous former doc-
tors. He also says police are
waiting for the coroner’s report
before ruling out any possibili-
ties in their “comprehensive and
far-reaching” probe, which
includes the Drug Enforcement
Administration and the state
attorney general’s office.

— Associated Press writer
Michael R Blood contributed to
this report

NOTICE

NOTICE is

hereby given that

SONY ANOFILS of

#4B BURTON LANE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,

BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister

responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a

citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, RO. Box

N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS

FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Senior Manager,

Accounts.

The job oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget & Management
Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective delivery

of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the

following:

Compilation of the corporate budget.

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets

Preparation of monthly management statements
Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation
Preparation of performance reports for division , department and sections
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry recetvables (capital

contributions, rechargeable)

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices
Liaison with internal and external audits
Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief

Financial

salaries

Officer for the Board of Directors
Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required
Preparation of the business plan for the department
Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department
Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims
Overseeing the Cash Flow Management
Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment
Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form employee’s

Conducting audits of various financial activities including Employee Basic Pay
Reconciliation, Employee Loans Reconciliation and Payment Reconciliation

Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable

Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts
Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle repayments
Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule
Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans
Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to ensure
adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors
Managing the status of local and foreign vendors
Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and External Auditors
Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline. Conducting

performance appraisals

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff, manage
and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations

Job requirements include:

¢ A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting ACCA/CPA
or equivalent qualifications

¢ A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a similar
management position
Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices
Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications
Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing systems
Ability to analyze financial reports
Sound knowledge of covenants of lending institutions (e.g. IDB)
Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial software
and the system of internal control.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing
Good time management skills

Both of these items are of no use to the average person and to

this end we are offering a reward which will be

disclosed at the recovery of said items.

Anyone having ANY information may contact the following
numbers. 328-7941, 3341/4675, 557-1744 or 436-2621

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: July

All calls will be treated with the utmost confidentiality. 35 700.




PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JULY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Readers have their say...

Dear Editor,

Congratulations to your chief
reporter, Rupert Missick on his
excellent "Insight" article today.
He shows courage and dedica-
tion to his profession in finding
the truth and reporting it hon-
estly. We have all known about
these "prosperity pastors” for
many years, but they seem to
have increased in alarming
numbers very quickly. What is
worrying is how many people
are swept along on this ride of
expectation — "give till it hurts
and God will reward you a hun-
dredfold". What nonsense!

God does not expect us to
give beyond our means in order
that his "pastors" may live the
good life — the comment of
another pastor on the Bentley
that "a pastor should be com-
fortable because we do a lot of
social work." Oh, indeed. Obvi-
ously this gentleman does not
remember the early days of mis-
sionary work here when bicy-
cles were a luxury and most of
the missionaries’ travel was
done on Shanks's pony! We do
not go to church to admire the
pastor's car or house, but to
worship God in His own house.
We do not give in the collec-
tion to support an expensive
life-style for the pastor but to
make sure that he has the basic
necessities of life (like the rest
of us) and the bulk of our offer-
ings goes to help the upkeep of
our church and its ministries —
particularly to the poor and
underprivileged — or at least
in my church this is so.

Mr Missick is quite right

“Fr =
aa
= = = i =

FEEDBACK

when he blames a spiritual
hunger for the majority of our
country’s woes today. Bahami-
ans always had a deep core of
faith in a loving God. I think
they lost it when they turned
around and followed the god of
prosperity. I pray that their
basic spirituality and "Mother's
wit" will rescue them from cer-
tain misery.
— Eileen Farmer

Rupert,

Everything is relative. On the
out islands, anyone purchasing a
flashy, expensive car would be
considered "stupid" not
"blessed." City folks are really
into posturing and being super-
ficial.

And you're right about the
spiritual depth of today's pas-
tors. It seems anybody can be
ordained to shout at God and
call it preaching.

It is a known fact that most
Bahamians (leaders or follow-
ers) don't read anything that's
too deep, so in a sense, they get
what they deserve: emotional
outbursts from copy cats mim-
icking whatever trend Ameri-
can preachers are on.

— Keen Observer

NOTICE

SORBIER LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SORBIER LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business

Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 08"
July 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh of 1 Raffles

Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 13" day of July A. D. 2009



Ms. Serene Lim
Liquidator





F
h t
aa

Rupert,

I finished your article in
today's paper and the only word
that I could utter was 'wow’.
Great job! I read the article last
week on Bishop “whatever his
name is” and almost died from
laughter.

Thanks for reminding me
how grave and serious a mat-
ter this is. As a young Bahami-
an like yourself, I cringe with
embarrassment at the level of
mediocrity we've come to
accept as a people, encouraged
in many cases by the "Church".

Good luck with exposing the
unfortunate truths about our
society...I'm sure it won't be
received by all with the same
level of enthusiasm that I hope
to convey in this message.

Best regards,

" K.F. t

How hypocritical can we be?

While reading a letter by
Micheline Cervili, “Give the
Haitians a break,” in reply to
an “Insight” article on Culture
Wars, May 25, I was inspired to
put my feelings to paper. In her
article, Cervili recounts a pre-
vious article in which a writer
expressed complete disgust
towards Haitians celebrating the
May 18th Haitian Flag day in
the Bahamas. This is not an iso-
lated account in fact, many have
expressed outrage over such
expressions of national pride,
“they come to take over.” In
her research paper Cervili sup-
ports the idea of the assimila-
tion of the Haitian and Bahami-
an cultures, she feels that the
Bahamas would only benefit
from such adjustments. How-
ever, there are many that dif-
fer. People are so quick to
rebuke the notion of integra-
tion of both cultures that they
use any pathetic excuse for dis-
missal. Sadly, many fear that
this move, though inevitable will
cripple the very core of Bahami-
anisation.

Haiti was the first black
nation to establish its indepen-
dence 1904 and played a signif-
icant role in the abolishing of
slavery. Though Haiti’s inde-
pendence plays a significant role
in its history it is May 18th that
garners special attention, the
general consensus is that though
independent in theory, Haitian’s
never really experienced true
independence until May 18th.
Haitians of all colours, shapes,
sizes and economic back-
grounds unite to commemorate
and memorialise this significant



GQllwnce Franca

af

Balin &

Dale

ie
al Private Banking

Bastille Day - Fete du 14 juillet



La Provence Restaurant

Sandyport

Tuesday July 14th, 2009

An Evening of French Cuisine

Members: $55 Non-Members: $65
Wine and Soft Drinks Included

Reservations- Tel: 302-4151; 3

Puen cael

27-0985

BAP PARIBAS
WEALTH MARAGEMEWT



MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news



THE ills plaguing our society can be likened to a
beast with one great belly and many starving
mouths. Each mouth represents an endemic hunger
in our land. One mouth, the hunger for justice,
another, the hunger for an adequate education and
the third, the hunger for security...







Worshippers of
material things

mBy| Sener ieels dr

rmsetoeGbbunemedia net

Seas ‘Prosperity pastors’ are helping
to destroy the Bahamas

Ihe ills plaguing our society can be

and many starving mouths.
Bach mouth represents an endem-
ic hunger in our land, One mouth,
the hunger for justice, another, the hunger for an
adequate education and the third, the hunger

But one mouth, one gaping maw that lies at

the centre of this beast, represents the deepest armed rol

hunger, the most negleded need of our people,
the need to be fed spirit

luch of the crime we experience in the
Bahamas comes from a wound that leads us to

want to possess, an obsession for the material,
for security. whether that be money or people, which leadsto save us from this
violence manifesting itself im murder, abuse,
ery or even stealing from our jobs.
We do not value the worthwhile aspects of
our existence, the beauty of human potential,
the richness to be foun
isfaction of a truly loving relationship with fam-

abetter people, better humans.

found in knowledge, the sat- help with this task.

THE FRONT PAGE of the July ? edition of /NS/GHT...

occasion no matter where they
are. Therefore, it is only fitting
that this tradition continues by
extension we were also affected
by this staple in history.
Unfortunately, the thought
of Haitians celebrating their flag
day in the Bahamas is absurd
and should not be permitted.
Sadly, this is where we are in
2009, ignorance has reached a
new height, a level abolished
and now resurfaced in another
form. Like Micheline men-
tioned in her article, people are
so quick to reject progress that
their refutation lack neither sub-
stance nor proof and is saturat-
ed with personal feeling. Ironi-
cally, people that passionately
reject the idea of cultural assim-
ilation with Haitians are usual-
ly the first present at other non-
Bahamian cultural events post-
ed like props. Strangely enough,
these contradictors are the first
present at the American 4th
July celebrations, the Jamaican
festivities and anything foreign.
What is most disturbing is
the inferiority complex we as
Bahamians suffer from. As a
result of this inadequacy we
resort to identify theft of or bad
case of identify crisis. Subcon-
sciously and even consciously
in some cases, we believe
America is superior to us there-
fore we imitate them. We are a
people that imitate whoever we
think is superior to us. How
unfortunate! Consider Mrs Dar-
ling, originally from England
more than 28 years ago, how-
ever, she maintains her distinc-
tive English accent that has not
yet been compromised. I have a
difficulty in understanding how
in the world do you leave the

Bahamas a “full breed Bahami-
an” and two weeks upon com-
pletion of vacation or study
develop an American accent or
an (obliviously fake) English
accent? Please help me under-
stand that. Bahamians are so
quick to copy that everything
originally Bahamian is chal-
lenged and therefore compro-
mised, ‘embellished’ to accom-
modate Americanisation.
Therefore, who are we really?

Moreover, we hurt ourselves
by selling ourselves short, we
make it our life’s mission to fit
in. The Bahamas tries so hard to
maintain the respect and atten-
tion of nations like America and
China that we are willing to
conform to whatever they
demand. In fact, we sell our
birthright in some cases in order
to gain acceptance and
approval. Superior nations take
delight in exploiting us, they
taunt us by dangling wealth, sta-
diums and resorts and like infe-
rior savages we jump at their
every beck and call. Please note
that only a fool says no to a well
deserving and worthy gift, how-
ever, at what cost?

Recently, we have been
afforded with the opportunity
to host Miss Universe, a feat
not achieved by many. What
will we show the world and
what do we have to offer? It is
hoped that we utilise this oppor-
tunity to show the world that
the Bahamas is a nation found-
ed on strong principles and high
moral standards. We must dis-
play a strong people resulting
from a colorful past and a self-
defining cultural background.
Additionally, we must demon-
strate exactly what we are made

ily and friends. These are the things that can
is hunger, that can make us into

ese Virtues installed in aperson isa Nearly
job left up to the individual or family. No o
institation in our society purports to or is able to

I take that back, there is one. Well, one that’s

supposed to.
rurch claims to be our saving grace, the

plice where our peopie. cin go for this fod,
y every comer ofthis island has one and
ther — they exist in every community. But if i’s spiritual
food you wat, you'll find their pantries inex-



SEE page 5C

of, though small in stature we
are a strong nation abundant
with numerous cultural influ-
ences that echo this efferves-
cent and original culture. Unlike
other countries we are a true
representation of the world
where every race and almost
every nation is represented. The
Bahamas has a place for the
Whites, Blacks, Latins, Asians
and Yellow man, we are a
nation filled with Bahamians,
Haitians, Jamaicans, Chinese,
Mexicans, Cubans, Filipinos and
the list goes on.

Finally, imagine living or
studying in America and not
being afforded the opportunity
to unite and celebrate junkanoo
or express your Bahamian pride
the way it should be conveyed.
Honestly how would you feel?
Therefore, I agree with Cervili
that we must embrace each oth-
ers culture. In doing so,
Bahamians would develop an
even greater appreciation for
their culture. If this cultural
unanimity were to happen, food
menus would be enhanced,
bilingualism would become a
way of life, Creole could be
taught as a second language and
the calendar year’s festivities
would expand double fold. As a
developing nation we must
abandon our selfish ways and
look beyond what is personal,
let us examine facts before we
utter garbage or convert our
deep seated hatred into words.
Only in knowing our history
and empathising with others do
we truly abandon ignorance.

Inspired by Micheline Cervili
“Give the Haitians a break” -
Tribune June 8, 2009.

— LOVY JEAN

Bazard Lamour and CO.

Mount Royal Avenue and Kenwood Street

Tel:

326-0126/7
Fax:326-0128

Email: bazardlaw @ gmail.com
lamourlaw @ gmail.com


THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST



Ue 4

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

“oO

{Fl (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

CLA LC [10























z Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
iw | oe i-- High =Low W High Low W WASSAU ‘Today. SEat5-10Knots O-2Feet 10-20Miles 82°F
a - , ia - o| 1 | 213 \4 [5 } 8| ofiolt FC FIC FC FC Tuesday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
ey f al i i . el J ty Acapulco 89/31 78/25 s 87/30 79/26 pe FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
ll - LOW = | MODERATE | HIGH | ¥. HIGH Amsterdam 73/22 57/13 s 74/23 60/15 s Tuesday: Eat 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
ORLANDO N Ankara, Turkey 81/27 57/13 t 82/27 59/15 pe ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
High:93°F/34°C ) Mostly sunny; a Mainly clear; a Sun and clouds with Mostly sunny; a Clouds and sun, a Mostly sunny with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 86/30 70/21 s 90/32 73/22 s Tuesday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
- ee F/23°C —— thundershower. passing shower. a thunderstorm. thundershower. t-storm possible. thunderstorm. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 51/10 44/6 pc 55/12 53/11 s
; aah ° ° ° ° Bangkok 90/32 79/26 t 89/31 78/25 t
L @ AK Seas aes High: nh High: 30° High: 92" High: 92" Barbados 86/30 77/25 s SLE TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
TAMPA 1 High: 90 Low: 79 Low: 80 Low: 81 Low: 81 Low: 81 see eS Barcelona 80/26 69/20 s 81/27 71/21 pc
ee i y LUA Ea Ta Beijin 90/32 72/22 pc 100/37 75/23 s
High: 91° F/33°C L is 100° F 110°-91° F 112°-91° F 112°-93° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft. ar oes TIE ee eee
Low: 77° F/25°C , ryt yr The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines 7 effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:23pm. 26 6:08am. 0.2 Belgrade 85/29 65/18 s 93/33 69/20 s
aa @ ’ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low forthe day, 6:38 p.m. 0.4 Berlin 73/22 59/15 pc 79/26 67/19 c aainal
7 ee CU ne Tuesday 1200am. 24 648am. 02 Bermuda 81/27 75/23 sh 81/27 75/23 s 60/57
| Vom) TREC RETRO : 1:40pm. 27 7:31pm. 05 Bogota 6518 45/7 t 6417 45/7 + @ aa
4 ay r tatistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Tam 23 73dam 02 Brussels 77/25 55/12 pc 79/26 55/12 pc yy?
} - * Temperature MeN oom. 27 Balm. 205 Budapest 86/30 65/18 s 94/34 69/20 s (BREEZY)
y i i ie ABACO High 90° F/32°C : P Buenos Aires 57/13 36/2 pc 54412 37/2 s
J ” High: 90° F/32° C DOR eects eects nectar ee sepeee:. ihusiay en: ee Fea Cairo 100/37 77/25 s 94/34 72/22 s
2 Low: 79° F/26°C 3:02pm. 28 9:36pm. 04
C al “XK i ow: 79° F/ Normal high... esgic Or CiCdR 95/35 85/29 sh 95/35 84/28 t
4 r ~~ Normal low ; 75° F/24° C Calgary 67/19 52/11 t 55/12 46/7 pc
4 eh @ WEST PALM BEACH _— Last year's Hight .ocsossssessenenssrseee 91° F/33° C ST eB Cancun 92/33 72/22 c 92/33 73/22 sh
’ —— High: 89° F/32° C Last year's lOW oo... eseeeeeeeeeeeeeees 77° F/25° C " " Caracas 81/27 71/21 s 81/27 71/21 t Los)Angeles)
a Low: 77° F/25° C i Precipitation ss ates oo a.m. La <— p.m. Casablanca 81/27 64/17 s 76/24 62/16 s 90/64
ras a As of 2 p.m. yesterday ........eeecseecceeceeeee trace UNS OL se ‘Vo p.m. Moonset... 11:49am. — Gopenhagen 71/21 57/13 sh 73/22 59/15 pc
Az FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date 18. Last New First Full Dublin 6417 52/11 6 687 52/1 + avs
High: 89° F/32° C @ High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date .......c.ccsessessessseesseeseeee 20.91" = 7 aaa Frankfurt 78/25 68/20 sh 79/26 66/18 sh
Low: 78° F/26°C an Low: 77° F/25°C ; Geneva 85/29 60/15 sh 84/28 64/17 t
AccuWeather.com mh Halifax 66/18 54/12 c 68/20 54/12 pc Shows Miami
- @ Ww Forecasts and graphics provided by at . Havana 90/32 72/22 r 91/32 72/22 t T-storms 90/78
x MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 15 Jul. 21 Jul. 28 Helsinki 647 52/11 + 68/20 55/12 sh Rain Frente
> High: 90° F/32° C High: 91°F/33°C Hong Kong 90/32 82/27 sh 90/32 32/27 sh [*, 4] Flurries Cold
i. ) _ 6 igh: 91° ° Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
aaa Low: 78° F/26° C ; NASSAU Loa. 78° F/26°C eu oe cast a i aoe 2 PR] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Ver
High: 90° F/32° C ea 87190 GIB s 80/06 BOE [y_¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mengenli-
Low: 79° F/26° C
: <> ow shames S/d s sti a0 UY aoe] os RN 206% 40s SNR) os 70s SN
KEY WEST CATISLAND Kingston 87/30 79/26 r 89/31 78/25 sh
High: 90° F/32°C VK AY en . Lima 73/22 59/15 s 72/22 61/16 s
Low: 81°F/27°C AWS. High: 87° F/31° C London 73/22 57/13 pc 73/22 55/12 sh
i = * Low: 72° F/22°C Madrid 97/36 66/18 pc 91/32 61/16 pc P |
Manila 83/28 77/25 t 83/28 78/25 t im a . i IC AN = ie S tu RAN ‘e F
Ww “08 i. Mexico City 72/22 54/12 t 74/23 53/11 t : :
sme; Monterrey 105/40 74/23 s 106/41 76/24 s
= GREAT EXUMA WwW \ SAN SALVADOR Montreal 68/20 52/11 c 70/21 52/11 pe
High: 88° F/31° C Hi h: 90° F/32°C Moscow 84/28 64/17 pc 70/21 55/12 t
AW Low: 78° F/26° C Low: 74°F23°C Munich 77/25 60/15 sh 86/30 62/16 t
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's iner cee heute rr oo one ee es a ; if Yo B
highs and tonights's lows. an ; a u q ,
: : P—] Low: 79° F/26°C — % a Oslo 6719 S2/1 + 70/21 56/13 pe Oo Nn wh
; Paris 73/22 57/13 sh 80/26 61/16 pc
Xa
Ah Prague 78/25 56/13 pc 75/23 65/18 t VY ANY y ul 1“ ~a
ae ACCC
ee sree mi Or you can rest easy knowin
Low: 75° F/24°C Rome 86/30 68/20 s 88/31 65/18 s ¥V Md e
Today Tuestiay Tey Testiny Tolay Tussi = * MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 88/31 81/27 sh 89/31 82/27 + Pat yo have excellent insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 90° F/32° C San Juan d2/11 26/-3 s S915 31/0 s te erace no matter which
FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FC FIC Fic FIC Fe FIC +“ Low: 74° F/23°C ees aaa ae t ce as s w4 he ind bl : =
Albuquerque 96/85 69/20 pe 95/35 69/20 pc Indianapolis 83/28 64/17 pc 85/29 73/22 pc Philadelphia 84/28 66/18 s 87/30 67/19 s attag Ones pe 8 Wi OWS,
Anchorage 76/24 57/13 s 75/23 57/13 $s Jacksonville 93/33 74/23 t 90/32 73/22 t Phoenix 111/43 88/31 pc 107/41 86/30 s OS aa oma Te cane sh OEE a s y
Atlanta 85/29 70/21 t 89/31 73/22 t Kansas City 92/33 75/23 t 96/35 74/23 pc Pittsburgh 75/23 56/13 s 80/26 65/18 s RAGGEDISLAND — High:92°F/33" aauls pe a : a
Atlantic City 85/29 6518 s 96/30 69/20 s LasVegas 107/41 90/26 s 106/41 92/27 s Portland,OR 73/22 54/12 pc 82/27 5713 eee Low: 75° F/24°C a ae ma a mae nae F Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 86/30 62/16 s 86/30 65/18 s Little Rock 100/37 79/26 pc 102/38 78/25 s Raleigh-Durham 90/32 68/20 t 91/32 70/21 pc Low:71°F/22°C = % sen = ree creme .
Boston 79/26 60/15 s 80/26 GING s Los Angeles 90/32 64/17 s 84/28 6417s St. Louis 87/30 73/22 t 93/33 79/26 t . a ae aaa Ri ee ;
Buffalo 73/22 54412 s 76/24 58/14 $ Louisville 88/31 67/19 pce 91/82 78/25 t Salt Lake City 89/31 59/15 pc 84/28 59/15 ¢s GREAT INAGUA Xa Tava 98/31 73/22 c 98/31 75/23 vc
Charleston, SC 91/32 75/23 t 90/32 76/24 t Memphis 96/35 79/26 t 100/37 78/25 pc San Antonio 98/36 75/23 s 98/36 76/24 $s High: 91° F/33°C aaa 71/21 54/12 5 75/23 57/13 F
Chicago 83/28 61/46 pce 78/25 67/19 t Miami 90/32 78/25 pce 91/382 78/25 t San Diego 76/24 67/49 pce 75/23 66/18 pc Low. 76°F/24°C Trinidad 89/31 66/18 s 78/25 56/13 pc
Cleveland 78/25 56/13 s 79/26 65/18 s Minneapolis 80/26 64/17 pce 74/23 62/16 t San Francisco 75/23 55/12 pe 78/25 55/12 pe i waneonans 69/20 57/13 pe 72/22 58/14 pe ee, a INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 102/38 79/26 s 100/37 78/25 s Nashville 90/32 70/21 t 93/33 76/24 t Seattle 70/21 54/12 pc 76/24 54/12 pe Gann 78/25 69/20 pe 91/32 74/23 §
Denver 93/33 62/16 pce 91/82 54/12 pc New Orleans 94/34 77/25 $s 91/32 78/25 pc Tallahassee 94/34 74/23 t 88/31 74/23 t = Warsaw 75/23 56/13 sh 80/26 59/15 pc
Honolulu «88/81 75/23 po 9OG2 76/24 po OWahoma iy 10440 78/25 s 10900 7624 s Tuco 10900 Siar s 9505 7503 1 AS Sa fais alae oer sega) cet
onolulu pce pe anoma Ul s S ucson s pce _
Houston 96/35 77/25 s 97/36 77/25 s Orlando 93/33 73/22 t 93/33 74/23 t Washington, DC 86/30 66/18 s 88/31 72/22 s eh Ce ete ee