Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Pim blowin’ it

92F
SOF

PARTLY
SUNNY

Volume: 105 No.189

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

Me Pate
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Tel:326-1875








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LCT MeL tS

CLASSIFIEDS TRADER CL i IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

Man ties after
Gaylignt stabbing

Police make
arrest after
deadly brawl

BYSTANDERS looked on in
horror as a midday brawl turned
deadly when a man was stabbed



FBI, Bahamian
police seeking
female relative of
murdered woman

Bahamian man in custody
in connection with death

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE in the Bahamas are working with the Federal
Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the United States
embassy in an effort to find a woman relative of mur-
dered American Anna Garrison who they believe may
have played a part in her killing.

The development came as police report that a 22-
year-old Bahamian man, who lives on Lightbourne
Avenue, is expected to be arraigned in court later this
week in relation to Ms Garrison’s death.

The 33-year-old’s badly decomposed corpse was dis-

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

to death outside a Mackey Street
electronics store.

The normal rhythm of the busy
thoroughfare was broken sud-
denly around 12.15pm, as shop-
pers, business persons and
motorists stopped in their tracks
upon seeing two men burst out of
the headquarters of Bahama Life
and Properties insurance compa-
ny already engaged in a violent
altercation.

One of the men, who was said
to be armed with a screwdriver,
eventually attempted to walk
away, but the other, armed with a
knife, ran up behind him and
plunged the weapon into his
back.

A witness said: “They were
pushing each other back and
forth. One had a screwdriver in
his hand and the other had a
knife. When the first one turned
his back to walk away, the other
guy stabbed him in the back. He
stood over the victim for a few
seconds, then got in a car and
sped off.”

After being stabbed, the vic-
tim collapsed on the doorstep of
the Henry F Storr Electric Com-
pany, where he remained until
police and paramedics arrived.

Receiving a tip, The Tribune
arrived on the scene only

moments after the incident. A
crowd had already gathered and
traffic had come to a standstill as
police officers worked to block
off the crime scene.

The victim, who police have
yet to identify, was then taken to
Princess Margaret Hospital,
where he was pronounced dead
on arrival.

Police have taken one man
into custody in connection with
the incident and say their inves-
tigations are continuing.





x PARAMEDICS treat
the stabbing victim

at the scene on

Mackey Street yesterday.



‘New leads’ in British
banker murder case

on that.

HYWEL JONES

POLICE investigating the murder of British
banker Hywel Jones say they have received some

_ | new leads that may help advance the case.
Assistant Commissioner Raymond Gibson said
he hopes police may be able to provide an update

on the case in the next week or two.

“We’ve been receiving some information com-
ing in to our control rooms and we are working

“Hopefully that will take us a bit further,” said

SEE page eight

Mother claims teenage
son beaten by officers

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER yesterday
expressed her fears for her
teenage son after he claimed
he was beaten up by officers

in a Fox Hill police cell after
being picked up for ques-
tioning in connection with
the suspected hanging mur-
der of Adrian Major.
Commissioner of Police,

SEE page 10



covered by walkers in a bushy area off Fox Hill Road
south, near the Blue Water Cay development, on Sat-
urday, July 4, at around 6.20pm. She had been shrouded
in sheets and her feet were wrapped in plastic bags.

At a press conference at the Criminal Investigation
Department on Thompson Boulevard, Assistant Com-
missioner in charge of Crime Raymond Gibson said Ms

SEE page 10



Harl Taylor died from
‘haemorrhagic shock’

By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
nmckenzie@
tribunemedia.net

POPULAR hand-
bag designer Harl
Taylor died from
“haemorrhagic
shock,” a forensic
pathologist testified in
Supreme Court yes-
terday.

Troyniko McNeil, 22, the son
of Taylor’s former business
partner Troy McNeil, is charged
with intentionally causing the
death of Harl Taylor between
Saturday, November 17, and
Sunday, November 18, 2007
while being concerned together
with another. Taylor, 37, was
found dead at Mountbatten
House on West Hill Street.

Forensic pathologist Dr
Govinda Raju took the witness
stand again on Wednesday, tes-
tifying that Taylor, 37, had died
from haemorrhagic shock due
to blood loss from multiple stab
wounds. According to Dr Raju,
Taylor would have died a max-
imum of 30 minutes after sus-
taining his injuries. He told the
court that a sharp cutting object
had caused the injuries. Dr

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Raju told the court
that Taylor's left lung
was collapsed and
that Taylor had three
injuries to his lungs.
Dr Raju told the
court that the knife
found on Taylor's bed
could have been used
to kill him. He told
the court that some of
Taylor's wounds were
three and five inches
deep, indicating that
the blade of the
weapon could have been four

SEE page eight



DUE TO THE
INDEPENDENCE
WEEKEND HOLIDAY,
THE TRIBUNE WILL
NEXT APPEAR ON
NEWSSTANDS ON
MONDAY.





PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS































SUMMER SIZZLER
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Owned NOW 10¢

CUTER GU UT SS

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

MICAL MP V Alfred Gray hit
out at government yesterday,
accusing it of only arranging to
repair the “better part” of Ack-
lins’ dilapidated Queen’s High-
way while leaving the worst part
in ruin.

The PLP MP alleged in a press
conference that there may be
political motivations behind the
contract to repair only the north-
ern section of the road.

Acklins residents have suffered
with a dysfunctional highway for
several years, and the southern
part of the road between the air-
port in Spring Point and Salina
Point was further destroyed when
the tarmac was scraped off under
a 2007 PLP contract but never
replaced, as the contract was can-
celled by the incoming FNM gov-
ernment, Mr Gray said.

He said residents across Ack-
lins are inconvenienced by the

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Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

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A VEHICLE crashed into a building in Dowdeswell Street after reportedly
colliding with another vehicle. The incident occurred shortly after 4 p.m.
yesterday. Nobody was hurt.
























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MP hits out at government

Worst part of
Queen’s Highway
‘left in ruin’

“impassable” 25 to 30 mile south-
ern section of the road, but resi-
dents in the south, where the
majority of his PLP supporters
live, are the most badly affected.

The MP said: “The people in
the southern part of the island
are more conservative and sup-
port me as MP and I don’t think
they ought to suffer because of
that.

“Once a government is elected
T expect the government to serve
all people equally and to serve
the part of the island where their
support might be is wrong.”

Tenders

Mr Gray was enraged upon
seeing the Ministry of Works
advertisement published yester-
day, which only called for tenders
to repair the northern part of the
road.

He said it is his duty to speak
out on behalf of the people of his
constituency regardless of their
political allegiance.

“Tam very disappointed the
government issued a tender for
the repairs and rebuilding of the
best and drivable parts of the
Acklins Road, between the air-
port at Spring Point and Lovely
Bay, rather than the worst parts,
between the airport and Salina
Point,” he said.

“I believe that it must be for
political reasons because good
sense, if it prevails, would sug-
gest we fix the worst part of the
road first. But they are doing the
exact opposite.

“T’m hoping it’s not too late for
government to reconsider it’s
position and allow for repairs to
the south Acklins road first and
then do the second part of the
road if there is money left.”

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
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CONGRATULATIONS
Patrick ON YOUR UUTSTANDING GRADES

Patrick, son of Jeffrey and Judy (Roberts) Waugh and grandson of
Rupert and Margaret Roberts, President of Super Value Food Stores
Limited and grandson of Joyce Waugh and the late Marcel Waugh
Graduates from the Pendleton School and IMG Academics,
Bradenton, Florida.

Patrick excelled In baseball and has been recrulted for his baseball
Skills as a left handed pitcher at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg,
Florida.

Patrick's sister, Paige Waugh will be returning to the University of
Tampa where she accomplished outstanding grades and is still
currently achieving the required grades to be on the Honors
Program. Palge now a junior returns to the

University of Tampa for her third year.

Paige and Patrick both attended St. Andrew's
School In Nassau.

Patrick has just returned from a trip to Zulla
State, Venezuela with the Bahamas Junior
National Baseball Team which participated in
the 2009 Latin American Big League Caribbean
Zone Baseball Tournament.

CoNGRATULATIONS Patrick AND PAIcE
KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK.

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THE TRIBUNE

0 In bri

Man, *
arraigned
on murder
charge

A 24-year-old Old Cedar
Street man was arraigned in
Magistrate's Court yesterday
on a murder charge.

Anthony Clarke appeared
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court One,
Bank Lane, charged in the
May 3 murder of Marc
Estimable.

Mr Estimable, 29, was shot
and killed at his Gamble
Heights home around lam
on Sunday, May 3.

He was the 24th homicide
victim of the year.

Clarke, who was repre-
sented by attorney Willie
Moss, was not required to
enter a plea to the murder
charge. He was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison and the
case has been adjourned to
September 9.

Clarke is the fourth person
to be charged in connection
with Estimable's death.

On May 13, Ramal Cole-
broke, 23, of Nassau Village;
Blake Rahming, 22, of Old
Cedar Street; and a 16-year-
old boy were also charged
with murder.

Man ties
from carbon
monoxite
poisoning

A MAN has died and
another is fighting for his life
after inhaling carbon monox-
ide while working on a mail
boat yesterday.

The two men were report-
edly working in the base-
ment of the MV Legacy
when they inhaled the taste-
less and colourlous poiso-
nous gas.

The MV Legacy sails from
Nassau to Hope Town,
Marsh Harbour, Turtle Cay
and Green Turtle Cay on
Tuesdays and returns to Nas-
sau on Thursdays.

Police were not able to
confirm reports before The
Tribune went to press.

New Zealand
man shot to
death in
Jamaica

KINGSTON, Jamaica

Police in Jamaica say they
are investigating the fatal
shooting of a New Zealand
man during a street robbery,
according to Associated Press.

Police spokesman Karl
Angell says a robber shot Tiki
Hunia late Tuesday after he
refused to hand over his cel-
lular phone in the Caribbean
island's capital, Kingston.

The 27-year-old victim was
hit three times and died at a
hospital.

Angell said Wednesday that
Hunia's wife was with him at
the time of the shooting but
was not harmed.

Police say Hunia was a New
Zealand citizen working as an
information technology con-
sultant based in Hong Kong.

Jamaica has one of the
world's highest murder rates,
but the violence stems mainly
from gang battles in the cities
and rarely affects tourists.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

TROPICAL
Sars pel
eee
a er aT |

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

MAGISTRATE’S COURT: Jamile Ferguson, Yvenel Milfort, Brenric Knowles



“Former policeman among trio
facing armed robbery charges

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER police officer
was among three men
arraigned on armed robbery
charges in the Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Former police Constable
Jamile Ferguson, 25, of St
Martin Street; Yvenel Milfort,
25, of Prince Charles Drive,
and Brenric Knowles, 30, of
Bellot Road, appeared before
Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court One, Bank
Lane, yesterday.

It is alleged that the three
men on Thursday, June 4, at
Paradise Island, stole from
John Bull two Cartier watches,

Accusations include stealing two Cartier watches from John Bull

together valued at $19,000.

Ferguson and Knowles
pleaded not guilty to the
charges while Milfort plead-
ed guilty with an explanation.

The men are also accused

of conspiring to commit armed
robbery on Sunday, June 28.

It is further alleged that on
the same day, the men robbed
Brenda Frackleton of two sil-
ver Breitling Cockpit watch-
es valued at $13,056 and one
silver stainless steel diamond
Breitling Cockpit watch val-
ued at $8,602, the property of
the Breitling Boutique on Par-
adise Island.

The men were not required

to enter a plea to the charges.
It is also alleged that on Sun-
day, July 5, the accused con-
spired to commit armed rob-
bery, and further that on the
same day they robbed William
Carey of a silver stainless steel
platinum Bezel special addi-
tion Breitling watch valued at
$11,781 and a silver Breitling
for Bentley watch valued at
$7,951.

The men are also charged
with receiving the watches.
They were not required to
enter a plea to the charges.
Milfort and Knowles were
remanded to Her Majesty's
Prison. Ferguson, who is rep-

ee er Ne enim iis laren

missing out on school repair jobs



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

UNEMPLOYED contrac-
tors in the Family Islands have
been overlooked by govern-
ment as requests for school
building repairs have been
made directly to working civ-
il servants, MICAL MP V
Alfred Gray claimed yester-
day.

The MP for Mayaguana,
Inagua, Crooked Island, Ack-
lins and Long Island said at
least 12 contracts have been
sent out by the Ministry of
Education to civil servants
within his constituency while
poor contractors struggle to
find work.

Jobs to repair school build-
ings over the summer vaca-
tion have been signed over to
politically connected police
officers, healthcare workers
and other government
employees by ministry offi-
cials in Nassau without any
consideration having been giv-
en to the unemployed, the MP
claims.

At least four such contracts
have been sent to civil ser-
vants in Crooked Island, two
in Mayaguana, two in Inagua
and four in Acklins, Mr Gray
said.

The PLP MP criticised the
contracts as political patron-
age and called on the govern-
ment to change their tack.

He said: “I’m appalled and
disgusted, when unemploy-
ment is rampant in the con-
stituency, that they would give
to the haves and bypass the
have-nots because of politics.

“To send a private contract
to a civil servant who already
has a job and leave others out
of work is fundamentally
wrong especially in these eco-
nomic times when things are





eT

PC RIE RS at
On











Alfred Gray

as bad as they are.

Painful

“There’s really no economy
in those islands — those who
work are civil servants — so
you can see how painful it is
for a man who has five chil-
dren to feed to watch police
get the contract while his chil-
dren starve.












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“I did not expect the gov-

ernment to be so hard on poor

“I'm appalled and
disgusted, when
unemployment is
rampant in the
constituency, that
they would give to
the haves and
bypass the
have-nots because
of politics.”



people because they pay taxes
too and when it’s blatantly
unfair it goes to the heart of
the matter.

“TI don’t know how they
fathom that they could do that
and get away with it.

“Tm just asking the govern-
ment to do the right thing.

“Tf it’s wrong it’s simply
wrong, and if the PLP was
doing it I would speak out just
as I am speaking out right
now.”

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380-FLIX





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 9,2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited


















































































NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Another look at education

EVERY PARENT wants his child to suc-
ceed at school. No parent wants to read a report
card with failing grades, and, pass or fail, they
expect their Joe or Jane to be on the graduation
line with that much coveted certificate — a cer-
tificate that means nothing in the real world if a
D grade is all that it records.

In this society of instant gratification, when
the most important objective is to win at all
costs, are we demanding more of our children
than they can deliver? Instead of insisting on
them heading their class would it not be better
to encourage them to excel to the best of their
ability — regardless of where that best is mea-
sured on life’s social scale?

As Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said at
the closing of the Ministry of Education’s con-
ference this week, the Bahamas must face the
fact that only a minority — “some say a talent-
ed tenth” — of any population will excel acad-
emically. Whether we like it or not this is true.
Throughout nature there is harmony when
every atom fits correctly into the whole.

Parents have to accept that children are not
all academically gifted.

We suspect that much of the dysfunction in
our schools today is caused by too many stu-
dents taking up space in our classrooms, who are
either not interested in what is being taught,
or who are discouraged because they cannot
keep up academically.

And so they will fidget, throw spitballs around
the class and generally create an atmosphere in
which no one — not even the serious student —
can learn.

This turns a teacher into a disciplinarian try-
ing to keep order until the bell rings, rather
than imparting knowledge.

We do not condone teachers cursing stu-
dents, calling them names and throwing objects
— as the students have claimed.

However, as there are always two sides to
every tale, witnessing the attitude and behav-
ioural patterns of some of today’s young people
we can understand how they could — as Smoky
Joe would have said in the old days — “yuck up
ones vexation.”

It is unfortunate, as Mr Ingraham has
observed, that getting every child into the class-
room has not translated into every child achiev-
ing his/her full potential.

In the first half of the 20th century, he point-
ed out, most children completing primary school
could read and write, but today too many stu-
dents leave secondary schools only semi-literate
and semi-numerate.

“In earlier times,” he said, “academically
weak students dropped out of school, learned a
trade or became one of a large unskilled and
semi-literate work force. They never had an
opportunity to attend secondary school.”

Today students have to stay in school until
they are 18, but still leave school unprepared to
earn a living.

Society has to face the fact that all persons
are not academics, and never will be, regardless
of how long they sit on a school bench.

However, to be able to support themselves on
leaving school, they should be able to read,
write, do basic arithmetic and have a trade.
Possibly the selection should be made sooner as
to those who should be encouraged to continue
preparations toward university and a profes-
sion and those who should be directed into a
trade.

The most important goal should be to have
these young people performing to the best of
their ability — regardless of what that ability is.
There is no disgrace in a labourer’s job. The
only disgrace is when that labourer, although
capable, does not do his job well.

In every organisation, each and every staff
member is important, even down to the man
who cleans our presses and the janitors who
clean the offices after everyone has left. Let
anyone of them fall down on their job and we all
suffer.

As the late Dr Cleveland Eneas, a dentist,
often said: If it weren’t for the menial workers
— those who cleaned his car, mowed his lawn
and did all the other household chores — he
would not be free to attend to his patients.

And so these menial workers are much need-
ed in our society. It is now for society to show
that they are also much appreciated and encour-
age them to perform these tasks to the best of
their ability.

We all know the old saying that “you can’t
make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear”, and so you
cannot make an academic out of someone who
would be a better mechanic, gardener or even
handy man. The only criteria demanded of them
is excellence in whatever they choose to do.

Parents and educators today have to deter-
mine in what area each child would excel, give
him the basic skills to take care of himself and
his future family and let him get on with it.
Those young people who want an education
and a profession can then be taught in an atmos-
phere conducive to learning with teachers who
are no longer so stressed out that they throw
textbooks at them.

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Christmas comes
early with resignation
of Sir Burton Hall

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There are few times in life that
Christmas falls on a summer
month and the announcement of
the resignation of Sir Burton Hall
is just one of those moments.

In my opinion Sir Burton will
go down as one of the most inef-
fective administrative heads the
judicial system has ever had.
While the state of disrepair of this
system is not fully his to blame, a
significant percentage lay at his
feet. From the appointment of
the controversial Judge Ruby
Nottage to the inaction of not
dealing with Justice Lyons and
others presumed conflict of inter-
est sooner or not at all, and all
manner of things in between, Sir
Burton it appears was not up to
the task of administering his
responsibility as head of this vital
stream of governance.

What the government is pre-
sented with now is a good exam-
ple of a Christmas gift that, if the
correct appointments are made,
would be the gift that keeps on
giving far into the future. This is a
good moment to examine how
Chief Justices are appointed and
to reform and bring transparency
to how these administrative heads
go about selecting judges for the
court system. As it stands now
there is no window into how this
body of persons, headed by the
Chief Justice, select and eventu-
ally appoints judges in our court
system. Hence there was great
shock, and rightly so, to the
appointment of Mrs Nottage as
a judge in the system.

Although there should always
be separation of powers when it
comes to the judicial branch vers-
es the legislative branch, now
would be a good time for a review
of this structure to allow better
collaboration between the two

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



branches in the form of a judicial
parliamentary committee that can
interface with the judiciary so that
a better understanding of what is
needed in the judicial system and
what works and what does not
work when it comes to the admin-
istration of justice can be derived.
I think Mrs. Maynard-Gibson was
on to something or at least was in
the ball park with her idea of
“Swift Justice.” However the
major problem was that it was
too heavy on marketing with no
substantive solutions and it lacked
support from the judiciary, hence
the backlash from the bench
months after that idea was imple-
mented — egos and icons have a
need to be fed a special diet as
opposed to the feed found in the
common man's trough.

So I hope that all parties
involved uses this gift wisely
because the state of our judiciary
is getting worse by the years and
months that pass. We do not have
the luxury anymore of debating
and talking to infinity about com-
mon problems and practices. A
gift like this only comes around a
few times every two decades so
now is the time to become as
pragmatic as possible to better
stream-line this system.

...to a better day.

ERIC B. STRACHAN

(If Mr Strachan wants to know
how Chief Justices and the other
Justices of the Supreme Court
are appointed and removed, he
should read the Constitution
Chapter VII, s. 93-97.

(Justices of the Supreme Court
— as was the case of Mrs. Ruby

Nottage — are appointed by the
Governor General acting on the
advice of the Judicial and Legal
Service Commission, of which the
Chief Justice is chairman. Other
members are chairman of the
Public Service Commission, a
Justice of the Supreme Court or
Justice of Appeal and two per-
son, both legally qualified,
appointed by the Governor-Gen-
eral acting on the recommenda-
tion of the Prime Minister after
consultation with the Leader of
the Opposition. At the time of
Mrs Nottage’s appointment
Opposition Leader Perry Christie
was Prime Minister, and Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham was
Opposition Leader.

(A Justice of the Supreme
holds office until the age of 65
years. When that time comes a
Justice who has reached the age
limit — as in the case of Mrs Not-
tage — can have his/her term
extended by the Governor-Gen-
eral acting on the recommenda-
tion of the Prime Minister after
consultation with the Opposition
leader. When it came time for
Mrs. Nottage’s term to be extend-
ed, Prime Minister Ingraham was
the Prime Minister with Mr
Christie as Opposition Leader. In
the case of Mrs Nottage her term
was not extended because Mr
Ingraham failed to make the
required recommendation. As far
as consultation with the leader of
the Opposition on these matters
is concerned, it can be almost con-
sidered as a “courtesy call.”
Although the Prime Minister has
to consult with the Opposition
leader, he does not have to take
his advice if it is contrary to his
own wishes.

(As for Justice Lyons, he
saved all those concerned a lot of
trouble by resigning. — Ed).

We must stop pouring abuse on hardworking police officers

EDITOR, The Tribune.

be prepared to support them by congratulating them
when they do a good job and by giving them perti-

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There are several issues which are causing me
concern in the country today.

Firstly, there seems to be a concerted effort from
various groups and persons in the country to deni-
grate and abuse the Royal Bahamas Police Force,
and its officers.

We are all aware of the serious crime situation in
the country which does not seem to be getting any
better, but too many of our citizens seem to forget
that the only body which protects us from the very
thugs and criminals who force us to live as prisoners
in our own homes and to fear going out during day-
light and nighttime hours are the dedicated members
of the Bahamas Royal Police Force. It is true that
this body, like any other, has bad apples but it is clear
that the present Commissioner is doing his best to
rid the force of these persons, as we see officers
charged with offences like any other members of the
community.

However, if we continue to pour abuse upon the
honest and hardworking officers of this force the
result will be an undermining of the respect which
this body should have and which will greatly curtail
the work which this body is doing to protect the
citizens of and visitors to this county. This can ulti-
mately lead to anarchy.

Our police force needs our support not our com-
plaints and abuse. I am not saying that we should
turn a blind eye to the bad things which may be
done by certain members of the force but we must

nent information, even if this may hurt a relative or
friend, to assist them in apprehending criminals.

Secondly, the leaders of our country, both civil
and religious must temper their remarks so that we
do not have a worsening of relationships between
groups of persons in the country.

For instance, only recently a religious leader was
quoted as saying that illegal immigrants are adding
to the crime problem.

I do not know if this statement was made based on
impirical or anecdotal evidence, as the basis for the
statement was not reported, however, most of us
are aware of the tensions which exist between the
members of one non-Bahamian community and
Bahamians and anything which can breed animosi-
ty can lead to violence or potential violence.

Thirdly, as I agree with the statement that we are
a nation in crisis, I would urge the members of the
various political parties to try and work together
for the good of our country instead of trying to
score cheap political points at every turn.

Let us teach our young people that there are
mature politicians in this country who can work for
the betterment of this country and lead our people
to think rationally instead of emotionally according
to the red or the yellow.

JEANNE I THOMPSON
Nassau,
June, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 9,2009 , PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



THE BAHAMAS GAMING REFORM COMMITTEE WELCOMES GOVERNMENT MOVE

Praise for ‘gambling laws review

THE government has been
praised for forming a commit-
tee to examine the country’s
gambling laws.

The Bahamas Gaming
Reform Committee (BGR),
which is hoping the review will
result in the legalisation of
gambling for Bahamians, wel-
comed the decision.

However, the BGR said it
is concerned the government
failed to ensure the necessary
diversity of representation on
the committee.

“The Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation is but one group to be
heard from on the matter.
However, it is not the only
stakeholder group with rele-
vant views and concerns on
the situation,” said the BGR in
a Statement yesterday.

The group cited the follow-
ing principles as fundamental-
ly important to gaming law
reform:

* openness and transparen-
cy;

¢ an independent local and
international industry review;

¢ accountability and tried
and proven financial report-
ing methods;

¢ Bahamian control of a reg-
ulated government gaming
network;

¢ a complete review of all
gaming laws with a view of
ending discrimination and
hypocrisy;

¢ clear guidelines for use of
funds from a national gaming
network;

¢ employment for Bahami-
ans;

¢ the use of modern, proven
systems and technologies;

¢ the implementation of
socially responsible methods
and means;

¢ Bahamian private sector
involvement.

Sidney Strachan, BGR
spokesperson, said: “Done
right, a national gaming net-
work regulated by government
based on smart systems, best
practices, responsible methods
and proven financial report-
ing can generate thousands of

WHEEL OF FORTUNE: The roulette wheel, a familiar casino sight.

jobs for Bahamians, millions
in incremental revenue for
government and enriched
social, educational and health
programmes.

The government must
ensure that reform is based on
the best research, broad con-
sultation and adherence to the
highest performance stan-
dards. BGR has important
input to make on the matter
and intends to ask for a seat
for at least one of its members,
on the newly appointed com-
mittee.”

Economic

The BGR said it has been
in contact with regulated gam-
ing jurisdictions outside the
country and has been advised
that the combined economic
impact of a national gaming
network in the Bahamas could
potentially exceed $60 million
and full-time- employment
opportunities across all sectors
and areas of economic activity,
both private and public, could
range from 1,500 to 2,000 jobs.

“Industry research indicates
that the regulation of gaming
in the Bahamas will generate
non-gaming revenue of as

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such things as food, beverage
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data also suggests that a mini-
mum $10 million in direct
salaried employment will
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direct beneficiaries. Direct
employment from a national
VLT wide area network in the
Bahamas will approximate 400
persons,” Mr Strachan said.

He said it is estimated that
proceeds to government will
be upward of $30 million.

“That money will be spent
on schools, hospitals, infra-
structure, and support pro-
grammes, all of which will gen-
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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 9,2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS






Patrick Hanna/BIS

4 4 7 f 4

MINISTER OF STATE in the Ministry of Labour and Social Development Loretta Butler-Turner and BAIC exec-
utive chairman Edison Key arrive for the launch of the woodturning programme at Simpson Penn School.



al

THE Bahamas A gricultur-
al and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) has launched a
woodturning programme for
residents at the Simpson
Penn Centre for Boys.

And next week, a straw
craft course will commence
for residents of the Williemae
Pratt Centre for Girls, com-
pliments of BAIC’s handi-
craft development and mar-
keting department.

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Woodturning programme
launched for Simpson Penn

in the lives of these wonder-
ful children,” said executive
chairman Edison Key during
ceremonies on Monday.

“These programmes, we
are certain, can make a huge
difference between these
youngsters returning to busi-
ness as usual, or taking the
step to bigger and better
things.”

Minister of State in the
Ministry of Labour and
Social Development Loretta
Butler-Turner threw her full

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BAIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN
Edison Key told of projects for



support behind the projects.

“These programmes will
undoubtedly provide empow-
erment, substance, and val-
ue to our rehabilitative pro-
grammes,” she said.

“These boys can find their
niche in these vocations,
become entrepreneurs and
productive citizens.”

Simpson Penn Superinten-
dent Wensworth Butler
pledged his staff’s support to
make the venture a success.

The instructor for the
course is mechanical engineer
Vaughn Minnis, an expert
Bahamian woodturner.

A member of various
woodturning guilds in South
Florida, Mr Minnis operated
his own company, Mahogany
Woodcrafts, which imported
exotic woods from South
America and Africa.

His works have been dis-
played at Fairchild Garden
in Miami, Florida, among
other places.

Woodturning is the spin-
ning of a block of wood ona
lath while shaping the wood
with a variety of chisels.

Woodturners are able to
create items ranging from sal-
ad bowls, candle holders and
vases to ink pens, all of which
can be used.

The course is designed to
give the students an in-depth
understanding of all the
facets of woodturning.

Mr Key encouraged stu-
dents to be a part of the
annual BahamArts Festival
where authentically Bahami-
an-made items are show-
cased.

He also told of other ven-
tures BAIC was planning for
Simpson Penn.

“We have identified about
15 acres of land on which we
want to help you establish an
agriculture and livestock pro-
gramme,” he told them.

“Why spend scarce money
purchasing food products
that you can produce right
here while helping the young-
sters along the path of inde-
pendence?

“We are willing to assist
with proper land preparation,
the planting of a variety of
vegetables, the establishment
of a nursery to teach graft-
ing and other techniques, and
an introduction to green-
house farming.

“We want to help develop
an area where sheep and
goats and chickens can be
grown, along with support-
ing pastures.

“We even have a small pig-
gery in mind. The remainder
of the land can be used to
grow a variety fruit trees on,”
Mr Key said.

“This is going to give the
youngsters solid on- the-job
training in agriculture and
livestock rearing so that
when they leave this place
they will have some skills to
become self employed or
even employable. Their time
in here would not have been
wasted.

“The woodturning exercise
with Mr Minnis is but the
first step in a thousand miles.
One step at a time and I am
confident we can make the
kind of positive impact envi-
sioned.”

Also attending the cere-
mony were BAIC board
member Sony Russell; Min-
istry of Labour and Social
Development undersecretary
Carl Brennen; Department
of Social Services deputy
director Marva Minns;
Williemae Pratt Centre
for Girls acting Supt
Salomie Gibson, and BAIC
general manager Benjamin
Rahming.



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 7



"TD 4 24) Bahamas’ proximity advantage

has been ‘severely eroded’

PUBLIC WORKS and Transport Minister Neko Grant visited the taxi
centre at Prince George Wharf on Monday. Pictured from left are
Minister Grant, security manager at the Port Department Devin
Moss and Acting Port Controller Patrick McNeil.

POET Te a
PUTA UCT ie TE

THE system of administration
at the Road Traffic Department
is “antiquated” and there are
“too many processes being done
manually,” Transport Minister
Neko Grant admitted.

Mr Grant said the govern-
ment is working to give visitors a
better experience at the Prince
George Wharf and the Lynden
Pindling International Airport
(LPIA), and is making efforts
to improve ground transporta-
tion for tourists.

“We've been concerned for
some time now with the way our
visitors are ushered into the
ground transport system,” he
said.

“We’ve looked at some alter-
native methods that we can use
to improve the visitor experi-
ence rather than have the tourist
wait for so long. We will seek
to implement those as soon as
possible.”

Mr Grant said his ministry
will also speak with the Nassau
Airport Development Compa-
ny (NAD) on how waiting and
parking facilities for taxi-drivers
in the domestic area at LPIA
might be improved.

“We’re also not particularly
pleased with the congregation
of the drivers at the arrival area
and so we have to speak with
NAD about providing a hold-
ing area for them,” he added.

Mr Grant made these obser-
vations following a tour of Road
Traffic Department units on
Monday.

nn

———
€c ABLE



He led a team from his min- :
istry on a tour of the Road Traf- }
fic Department at Thompson }
Boulevard, the Inspection Cen- }
tre at Fort Charlotte, the taxi i
call-up centre at Prince George }
Wharf, the Carmichael Road :
unit, and the taxi centre at the }
airport. i

The minister and his team }
used the occasion to familiarise }
themselves with the operations }
of the department and to meet }
staff members. i

Mr Grant found that the sys- }
tem of administration at the }
Road Traffic Department is }
“antiquated” and there are “too }
many processes being done }
manually.” i

He pointed to the need to }
computerise the department.

“We understand and appre- }
ciate that this can only come }
once the funds are available,” :
he said. i

Accompanying him were per- }
manent secretary Colin Higgs, i
undersecretary Nicole Camp- }
bell, Road Traffic Controller :
Philip Turner, and assistant con- i
trollers Ernestine Fernander and }
Bradley Smith. i

The Road Traffic Department ;
was created to deal specifically :
with all government activities i
related to road safety, traffic reg- :
ulations, vehicle licensing, vehi- }
cle registration, vehicle inspec- i
tion, individual drivers licences, !
and the collection of road fees ;
and taxes related to public and }
private road transportation. i

BAHAMAS

THE advantage the Bahamas
enjoys over other tourism destina-
tions due to its proximity to the
United States has been severely
eroded over the years, according to
Minister of Tourism Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace.

Addressing the second wave of
the Ministry of Tourism and Avi-
ation’s summer employment pro-
gramme, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said Grand Bahama is a prime
example of this change.

He pointed out that Freeport is
just 111 miles away from Miami,
much closer than other tourism
competitors, but the cost of flying
to Freeport has kept travellers
away.

It has been claimed that Grand
Bahama has suffered from a lack
of advertising, But Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said the high ticket
prices are the main why Grand
Bahama visitor numbers have
dwindled over the last 30 years,
while Nassau arrivals have steadi-
ly increased.

“The customer is saying, ‘It’s
too expensive. I’m not buying that’
and we continue to believe that
advertising can overcome non-
sense,” he said, adding that it is
cheaper to fly from Miami to Nas-
sau, Cancun, Puerto Rico, San
Juan and even Las Vegas that it is
to fly to Grand Bahama.

“It’s 1,900 miles to Las Vegas
and I am going to spend more
money to fly 111 miles and get
what they have on Grand Bahama
compared to going to Las Vegas
which is 1,900 miles away? People
like to believe I get better value if
I go a much farther distance for

or

fe
re
is
&
i
ue



less cost. So please, let us stop the
madness that has been going on
for a very long period of time,” he
said.

The minister noted that in the
Family Islands, the number of
arrivals today is roughly the same
as it was 30 years ago — again,
because of price.

“Tf I live in New York City, it is
less expensive for me to fly from
New York to London or New
York to Paris or New York to
Rome than it is to fly from New
York to Exuma,” he said. “And
here is the killer part of it —I get to
London, Paris or Rome quicker
than I get to Exuma. So explain
to me, why somebody would wake
up one morning and say ‘I want
to get to Exuma,’ when it is more
expensive to get there and it takes
me a lot longer to get there.”

In addition to working to restore
the proximity advantage, Minister
Vanderpool-Wallace told the stu-
dents they must take note of the
need to maximise the advantage
the Bahamas has because of its
beaches and waters. Beaches are

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BE OUD

MINISTER OF
Tourism and
Aviation Vin-
cent Vander-
pool-Wallace
addresses par-
ticipants of
the Ministry’s
summer
employment
programme.

one of the primary reasons visitors
come to the Bahamas, according to
Ministry of Tourism exit surveys.
Future Brand, a company
researching the perception of coun-
tries in several categories, has
ranked the Bahamas as number

Happy 36"

three in the world in perception
of waters and beaches. The Mal-
dives and Tahiti are numbers one
and two, respectively.

“This country of islands has
more beaches than any country in
the western hemisphere because
of so many islands in so many
places,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said. “Nobody else comes close.
But it’s a thing we diminish all day
long. We’ve got 100,000 square
miles of a spa. That’s what people
think about our waters. When they
go in that, they feel it’s healing,
but we don’t understand the pow-
er of it.”

He challenged the students to
use their talents and knowledge of
technology to help promote the
Bahamas and advance the tourism
sector.

Anniversary

Bahamas from

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE


















tube of Taylor's blood, urine and
stomach contents.

During cross-examination by
McNeil's attorney Murrio Ducille,
Dr Raju told the court that if blood
is outside the body and it is not
preserved, decomposition could
set in after a couple of hours. He
also noted that when blood dries
or clots, decomposition slows
down. He also admitted that he

FROM page one

to five inches long. After examin-
ing the blade of the knife the pros-
ecution had submitted into evi-
dence, Dr Raju said that the blade
which is 7.5 to 8 inches long, could
have caused Taylor's injuries. The
pathologist also told the court that

OTLCR I = during the autopsy, he collected a

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Harl Taylor died from ‘haemorrhagic shock’.

CEA
For

had not labelled the vile of Tay-
lor's blood, but that a police officer ;
had labelled it as his hands were :
dirty, and so he initialled it after-
wards. i

The trial, which is before Senior
Justice Anita Allen, continues
today. Director of Public Prose- :
cutions Bernard Turner, Neil ;
Brathwaite and Darnell Dorsette :
represent the Crown. i

FROM page one

the senior officer, when asked if
there was any update on the
matter.

Mr Jones, 55, a resident of
the Bahamas, was shot in the
head outside the office of his




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‘New leads’ in British
banker murder case

company, the Britannia Con-
sulting Group on April 22, 2009.
He remained in a coma in hos-
pital until May 8, when he died
of his injuries.

The circumstances of the inci-
dent led police to believe the
shooting was an arranged hit.
Mr Jones had previously told
friends and family that he had
feared for his life following two
home invasions and a physical
assault in 2007.

Independence
Supplement

goes online

THE TRIBUNE’S Indepen-
dence Supplement which
appeared in Wednesday’s news-
paper will be available to view
online at www.tribune242.com
from Friday.

Anti-Chavez mayor
of Caracas ends
hunger strike

CARACAS, Venezuela

THE MAYOR of Venezuela’s
capital ended a hunger strike
Wednesday after the head of the
Organization of American States
agreed to meet with him and oth-
er opposition leaders to discuss
moves by the government they say
erode their authority, according
to Associated Press.

Caracas Mayor Antonio Ledez-
ma’s protest fast lasted five days
and was aimed at urging the OAS
to mediate in Venezuela over
moves by President Hugo Chavez
that have taken away powers and
funding from the mayor and other
politicians who oppose his leftist
policies.

Ledezma stopped after speak-
ing by phone Wednesday with
OAS Secretary-General Jose
Miguel Insulza, who agreed to
meet with a delegation of opposi-
tion politicians in Washington, said
Mitzy Capriles, the mayor’s wife.

Ledezma began the hunger
strike at the OAS office in Caracas
on Friday to protest what he calls
a violation of Venezuela’s consti-
tution in Chavez’s naming of a
member of his ruling party to a
new post as top authority in the
capital. The pro-Chavez National
Assembly has transferred nearly
all of the city’s budget and ser-
vices to the new federal authority.

Princess Margaret Hospital

ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC

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MANAGEMENT APOLOGIZES FOR’ ANY
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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 9

Healthcare reform
in the Bahamas

By MARCUS C BETHEL, MD
Former Minister of Health
2002-2006

Goak: “To provide equitable
access to quality care for all,
delivered in an effective and
efficient manner by healthcare
professionals.”

| here is a pressing need

for healthcare reform
in the Bahamas because the
escalating cost of healthcare
delivery has outstripped the
ability of the government to
adequately fund public health-
care out of the Consolidated
Fund.

It is estimated that $200 to
300 million is expended annu-
ally in the delivery of health-
care at the public healthcare
facilities (hospitals and clinics)
and is increasing annually
largely due to chronic non-
communicable diseases includ-
ing diabetes, hypertension, can-
cer and cardiovascular diseases.

The problem is compounded
by the steady population
growth of the Bahamas, the
cost of modern medical tech-
nologies, and the additional
stress on the system due to the
large population of illegal
immigrants and their disease
burden.

The high transactional cost
of infrastructural development
due to the archipelagic nature
of our country and the regres-
sive tax structure also adverse-
ly impact the cost of health-
care delivery.

PUBLIC-PRIVATE
PARTNERSHIP

| he proposed way for-
ward is a partnership
between the public health care

sector and the private health-
care sector.

The private sector has
demonstrated efficiencies in
healthcare delivery, innovation
and introduction of advanced
medical technologies in the
Bahamas.

There exists a great need for
more efficient integration of
healthcare services so that
there is a seamless transition
for patient services between
Family Island community clin-
ics and hospitals to ensure
timely delivery of services and
follow-up care to patients.

There also exists the need
for integration of IT (informa-
tion technology) systems in
community clinics, hospitals
and Ministry of Health to
ensure efficiencies in the col-
lection and collation of health
data, medical records storage
and retrieval, and pharmaceu-
ticals acquisition and dispens-
ing.
In addition, there is a need
for integrated public education
programmes concerning
healthy lifestyles utilising the
media, schools, churches and
civic organisations.

A true and meaningful part-
nership requires a paradigm
shift in the thinking and behav-
iour of both public and private
sectors.

The public sector must rid
itself of the “us and them men-
tality” in healthcare delivery
and embrace necessary insti-
tutional changes; while the pri-
vate sector must be more
responsive to the needs of the
wider community through
meaningful, sustained cooper-



ation and support of the public
sector.

There exists no national
healthcare development strat-
egy that incorporates both pub-
lic and private sectors.

This is a necessary first step
to improve operational effi-
ciencies and eliminate dupli-
cation of efforts in infrastruc-
tural and human resource
developments.

Adoption of a national
healthcare plan by both sec-
tors and the public will create a
framework for public policy
and a road map for long-term
development of our healthcare
system.

This process must be a joint
collaborative exercise involv-
ing all stakeholders including
the Ministry of Health, Public
Hospitals Authority, Medical
Association of the Bahamas,
Nurses Association of the
Bahamas, Allied Health Pro-
fessionals, private healthcare
institutions, College of the
Bahamas, Chamber of Com-
merce and the business com-
munity, unions, churches and
the public.

HEALTHCARE
FUNDING

Axes of health-
care funding is

fundamental to achieving the
goal stated earlier and hence
is at the core of healthcare
reform.

Healthcare funding is a uni-
versal challenge and each
nation must customise its fund-
ing mechanism to meet its



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needs and objectives as “no
one size fits all.”

Almost 15 per cent of our
national budget is allocated to
health care, yet the public
health care system cannot meet
the health care needs of the
population it serves.

Inadequate financial
resources combined with a lack
of efficiencies are the primary
reasons for the existing gaps
and barriers to care.

The national health insur-
ance plan, which was passed
into law December 2006 with
the full support of both sides in
Parliament and following wide
public consultation, should be
implemented as soon as
possible to provide medical
insurance coverage to all
eligible persons in our coun-
try.
This is particularly impor-
tant with so many of our citi-
zens, 30-50 per cent, unable to
afford neither health insurance
nor private healthcare.

This plan is also designed to

fund the development of our
medical infrastructure (hospi-
tals and clinics).

In addition, the hiring and
compensation of our health
professionals (nurses, doctors
and allied health profession-
als) are funded under this plan
and healthy lifestyles pro-
grammes promoted.

All first world countries,
except the USA, have univer-
sal healthcare plans, and many
developing countries have
implemented some form of
healthcare coverage for their
citizens.

The Bahamas remains one
of a few countries that has not
implemented a universal
healthcare plan.

As we are celebrating 36
years of Independence and in
view of the global environment
and the competing national pri-
orities, decisions should be
made today to guarantee and
safeguard the health and
wealth of the population of our
beautiful Bahamas.

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FBI and Bahamian police
seeking relative of woman

Kingsway Academy High School Invites
qualified applicants for the following
teaching positions for September, 2009.

Spanish
French

Art and Design
Music

Successful applicants must:

¢ Be born again Christians, with
minimum qualifications of a
Bachelor’s Degree in the
appropriate subject areas
Have a valid Teachers Certificate
Be willing to participate in
Extra Curricular activities, etc

Application Forms can be collected from
the Human Resources section at the
Business Office, Bernard Road,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Tel. 242-324-6269 / 324-6887

Deadline for Applications:
Friday, July 17, 2009

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, JULY 12TH, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer / Sis. Alice Woodside
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer / Bro. Jamicko Forde (B)
7:00 p.m. Bro, Ernest Miller’ Board of General Education
Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

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FROM page one

Garrison first came to police attention
on February 25, 2009, when they received
a missing person report from the United
States embassy in Nassau.

She had last been seen in the US some-
time in January, and officers were told at
that time she may have been in the
Bahamas “in the company of a Bahamian
male.”

According to information gathered by
police, Ms Garrison was no stranger to
the Bahamas, with her first visit to the
country in 2005, and spending her time
“between here and the US” from then
until she met her death.

Police would not reveal if the man now
set to be charged is the same man she was
believed to have been in the company of
when she was reported missing, or if he
had any prior relationship with Ms Garri-
son.

ACP Gibson said he would “need to
check” why a description of Ms Garrison
was not made public when the missing
persons report was received by Bahamian
police.

He said normal procedure is that “if
somebody’s reported missing we will fol-
low alert all the stations then try to get it to
the public as quickly as we possibly can.”

Updating initial reports, police yesterday
suggested they now suspect Ms Garrison
met her demise a “couple of months” ago.

ACP Gibson said he “did not want to
speculate” as to a motive for her killing

FROM page one

Reginald Ferguson says he is
“checking into” 38-year-old

THE BODY of American Anna Garrison was found in this re

and police are still awaiting an autopsy
report which will tell them how she died.
Police have been in contact with her fam-
ily, he added.

The American’s murder was a popular
topic of discussion on the internet for the
last few days.

One writer on a community message
board said she was disturbed by the pos-
sibility that Ms Garrison may be the same
“white woman with long sandy coloured
hair” she had “recently” seen crying in
a “Chinese restaurant in the Fox Hill
area.”

“She was very dirty, had sand all over
the left side of her and was crying. I rushed
over and asked her what had happened —
T assumed she fell and was possibly drunk.
As I got to talk to her she revealed to me

Mother claims son beaten

police custody on Monday in

she said.



that her boyfriend had just beat her and
she took her hand from her face — her
nose was busted and she had scratches
over her eye,” the internet user claimed.

The woman, she alleged, told her she
had come from the States to the Bahamas
with a Bahamian man who had “promised
to marry her.”

The internet user said that after pleading
with the woman to let her help her and
“take her somewhere safe,” she left her at
the restaurant “against (her) better judg-
ment.”

“IT pray to God that was not the same
woman. My gut told me that day to call the
police,” added the internet user.

ACP Gibson said police still have “work
to do” in relation to the case and investi-
gations continue.

“They can’t be doing this.
What if he ends up like that 15
year old that hung himself in
the cell? It is wrong,” she

Antoinette Fernander’s claim
that her 18-year-old son Anto-
nio Russell suffered blows
that left him in “fear for his
life,” with his face “black and
blue.”

However, officer in charge
at Fox Hill police station,
Inspector Marlon Fulford, said
he has “no knowledge” of
such abuse.

According to Ms Fernan-
der, her son was taken into

connection with the death of
Major, who was found bound,
gagged and hanging by a seat-
belt from a tree on Saturday,
June 27, 2009.

As Russell is currently on
bail charged in connection
with the killing of Mario
Humes in June 2007, Ms Fer-
nander said she can under-
stand why he may have been
picked up by police.

“He is in the system,”





BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH|
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL __|

‘Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching iiam & 7:30pm EWANGELISTIC





Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday Gam - 2N5 2
Wed, Prayer & Praise 7:20pm




PasiorcH. Kills

"Preaching the Bible as is, bo men as they are”
(Pastor: H. Mills * Prone: 393-0563 * Box N-a622 |

Grace and | eetT Wesleyan Church
A Soeclety of The Free Methodist Church of
a aM bed |

WHERE GoD Us ADORED A

LVD EPERVONE IS AFFIRMED

Worship Time: ff art.

Prayer Time: 10:1 5a.m.

Church School during Worship Service

Place:

Tevnam Heights

off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

MO). Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2558

Telefax mui ber:

324-2557

COME TO WORSHIP LEAVE TO SERVE

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &

.

Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm

Place:
The Madeira
Shopping Center

Gesred To The Future

f ow. ;
= .

Rev. De. Franklin Koenwles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O Bax FE- T6807
Telephone number 325-5 712
ay

EMAIL - Ivnnk@ batelnet

However, the mother com-
plained that this does not give
police an excuse to abuse him
or anyone else they have in
their custody.

“My son was all swell up,
his face was black and blue —
he can’t even breathe proper-
ly. I asked if I could take him
to the doctor, they would not
allow me to take him to the
doctor. He said ‘Mummy, they
putting a plastic bag over my
face and beating me!’ He said
he is scared they are going to
kill him.”

Ms Fernander said that dur-
ing a 20-minute conversation
with Russell at the station he
told her officers had placed a
bag over his head before
attacking him.

added, referring to the case of
Michael Knowles, who was
found dead in a police cell.
Knowles’ mother claimed wit-
nesses told her he had been
beaten by officers.

Inspector Fulford of Fox
Hill station said that when he
last saw Russell yesterday
morning he was “in good
health.”

“We have no knowledge of
that,” he stated, when ques-
tioned about the complaint.

He contradicted Mrs Fer-
nander, saying Russell was
picked up on Tuesday, not
Monday, and claimed that
Fox Hill police station is mere-
ly “holding” him for the
Criminal Investigation
Department.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 11



‘Justice, Unity, Generosity
and Service’ gives donations

THE Elizabeth Estates Chil-
dren’s Home and_ the
HIV/AIDS Foundation were
the beneficiaries of donations
by Justice, Unity, Generosity
and Service (JUGS) during the
organisation’s second confer-
ence in the Bahamas.

“Breaking Barriers — Build-
ing Communities” was the
theme of this year’s conference,
which attracted 80 members
and their families.

The 42nd Annual Conven-
tion was held last Wednesday
at the Breezes Resort and was
officially opened by Rev
Angela Palacious.

She welcomed the American
delegates to the Bahamas and
encouraged the organisation in
their quest of uplifting educa-
tional aspirations of children
and teenagers.

At the team-building work-
shop, Agatha Marcelle from
the Centre for Organisational
and Personal Performance
(COPP) explained the ways in
which to achieve the maximum
contribution from each mem-
ber.

Following the workshop, the
10 standing committee meet-
ings were held. Each chapter
was represented in order to
properly discuss the issues and
the way forward for the JUGS
organisation.

Members were also treated
to an island-style cocktail party
and a community service
awards luncheon.

At the luncheon the JUGS
Nassau sisters introduced their
US counterparts to the local
community.

The speakers were Rosamae
Bain and Lynette Deveaux,
both of the HIV/AIDS Centre.

Representatives of the two
charities JUGS supports - the
Elizabeth Estates Children’s
Home and the HIV/AIDS
Foundation - were present and
received a donation from the
JUGS International Organisa-
tion.

A student from Elizabeth
Estates Children’s Home, Greg
Smith, received a four-year
scholarship to the college of his
choice. Community Service
Awards were also presented to
Arlene Nash-Ferguson for cul-
ture and community work;
Bishop Walter Hanchell was
awarded for religion and com-
munity service; Dorothy King
was awarded for humanitarian
services and community work,
and Rev Carlos Reid was pre-
sented with an award for youth
development and community
service. Additional awards
were presented to persons for
their continued service to
JUGS over the past years. They
were Phyllis Albury-Garroway

Appliances ta Y

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Way Apply

and Valerie Thompson of Orig-
inal Patties and Holy Cross
Anglican Church. A travel



the Detroit Chapter of JUGS
for having the most members
travel to the conference in Nas-

“With Approved Credit

award was also presented to

Sau.



NOTICE

Mohs Surgery in Nassau

DR. JOHN STRASSWIMMER, MOHS SURGEON

will be visiting The Skin Centre on Friday

July 17, 2009. DOr Strasswimmer trained at
Harvard and Yale and is Board Certified and a
Fellow of the Mohs College.

Mohs Micrographic Surgery is an advanced

treatment process for skin cancer which is
[t offers the
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cancers and simultaneously minimizes the
sacrifice of normal tissue. This cutting-edge

now offered at The Skin Centre.
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treatment requires highly specialized

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and reconstructive surgeon,

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experience in the Mohs
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The Skin Centre, Harbour Bay Plaza,
East Bay Street Tel. 393-7546.

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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 12

spor

THURSDAY, JULY 9,

ts

2009



RAGE 14 ®@ ‘Peace on da Streets’ Basketball Classic...

At World Youth Games in Italy...

Young athletes advance
to the Second round

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

he Bahamas’ 11

member team, at the

International Asso-

ciation of Athletic
Federation’s World Youth
Games in Italy, began competi-
tion today at the sixth annual
edition of the meet.

Seven members took to the
track dominated by 100m
sprinters and quartermilers
advancing to the second round
in their respective events.

In the morning session,
Sparkyl Cash and V’Alonee
Robinson opened competition
in the women’s 100m.

Robinson was the first team
member to advance when she
ran in heat seven, out of lane
four.

Her time of 12.23s finished
fourth, ultimately placing her
26th out of 31 athletes to
advance to the next round.



V'Alonee Robinson

Cash failed to qualify with
her time of 12.60s, which was
good enough for fifth place in
heat one.

Ashton Purvis of the United
States advanced with the fastest
qualifying time of 11.57s.

In the men’s 100m, a pair of
former Carifta medallists head-
lined the event for the
Bahamas.

Geno Jones won his heat in
10.99s, well off his season’s best
time of 10.67s. Jones’ time

placed him 28th of the 36 even-
tual qualifiers.

Farquharson just missed out
on qualification.

He was one of three com-
petitors to finish with a time of
11.08 along with Riski Latip of
Indonesia and Yateya Kam-
pepera of Botswana.

Latip advanced by edging out
Farquharson in a photo finish.

In the afternoon session,
quartermilers took precedence
with the dynamic pair Rashan
Brown and Katrina Seymour
advancing through to the sec-
ond round.

Brown finished second in
heat six, in a time of 56.16s,
while Seymour was third in heat
five in a time of 55.77s.

Seymour advanced with the
ninth fastest time while Brown
was 14th of 24 qualifiers.

Michelle Brown of the Unit-
ed States qualified with the
fastest time of 54.39s.

SEE next page

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Senior Manager,
Accounts.

The job oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget & Management
Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective delivery
of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the
following:

Compilation of the corporate budget.

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets

Preparation of monthly management statements

Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation

Preparation of performance reports for division , department and sections
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry receivables (capital
contributions, rechargeable)

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices

Liaison with internal and external audits

Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief
Financial

Officer for the Board of Directors

Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required
Preparation of the business plan for the department

Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department

Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims

Overseeing the Cash Flow Management

Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment

Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form employee’s
salaries

Conducting audits of various financial activities including Employee Basic Pay
Reconciliation, Employee Loans Reconciliation and Payment Reconciliation
Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable

Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts

Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle repayments
Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule

Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans

Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to ensure
adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors

Managing the status of local and foreign vendors

Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and External Auditors
Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline. Conducting
performance appraisals

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff, manage
and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations

Job requirements include:

¢ A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting ACCA/CPA
or equivalent qualifications
A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a similar
management position
Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices
Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications
Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing systems
Ability to analyze financial reports
Sound knowledge of covenants of lending institutions (e.g. IDB)
Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial software
and the system of internal control.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing
Good time management skills

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: July
22,2009.





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PAGE 13, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

SPORTS

NORCECA: Canada
sweeps Bahamas
in straight sets

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

AFTER an awe-inspiring
performance last month at the
NORCECA Pool D Champi-
onships, the women’s senior
national volleyball team has
faced misfortune thus far in
NORCECA Pool I against
regional powerhouses.

For the second consecutive
match, the Bahamas failed to
win a set when they were
defeated by Canada in straight
sets, 25-12, 25-4, 25-9. The
Bahamas fell to 0-2 and are
scheduled to face Jamaica at
Spm Thursday.

Team captain Kelsie John-
son finished with a team high

ix points (five attacks, one
block), however received little
support on offense as the
Bahamas struggled to reach
double figures.

Young athletes
advance to

second round
FROM page 12

Brown and Seymour look to
repeat their 2009 Carifta per-
formance where they initially
finished second and third
respectively and nearly shared
the medal stand before Sey-
mour was disqualified for a lane
violation.

Glenwood Baillou was the
lone competitor in the men’s
400m and failed to qualify when
he finished sixth in heat five in
50.77s. Jones, Robinson, Sey-
mour and Brown will each com-
pete in the semifinals today with
the 100m finals concluding the
afternoon session.

Cheryse Rolle finished with
three points while Tasamine
Emmanuel-Potier added two.

It took just 52 minutes for
the Canadians to complete the
straight set sweep of the
Bahamas.

In the opening round, the
Bahamas fell in straight sets at
the hands of the heavily
favoured Puerto Rican team
25-15, 25-7, 25-10 in the third
round tournament of the FIVB
Women’s World Champi-
onship at the Hector Beza
Solares Coliseum in Caguas,
Puerto Rico.

Puerto Rico held a distinct
statistical advantage as they fin-
ished ahead 40-9 in attacks, 6-2
in blocks, and 13-10 in service
aces.

Cheryse Rolle led the
Bahamas with five points, while
Tasmine Emmanuel-Potier
added three and Melinda Bas-
tian finished with two.

Sarai Alvarez led Puerto
Rico with 12 points while
Alexandra Oquendo finished
with six.

In a match that took just
under an hour to complete, the
Puerto Ricans led early 7-0
before the Bahamas scored
their first pomt of the contest.

The winner of the NORCE-
CA Pool I will be the lone
team to advance to the final
round of the event held in 2010
throughout various cities in
Japan.

While head coach Joe Smith
knew his team faced uphill
odds heading into the compe-
tition, he said the team would
take away whatever lesson it
was able to from the experi-
ence. “Our approach is to take
advantage of every match and
learn from it for the develop-
ment of our volleyball,” he
said. “Our goal is to play up to
our best possible level.”

SOME of the young athletes have lunch at airport in London

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 14



THE most prestigious bas-
ketball tournament of the sum-
mer in the Bahamas is slated to
tip off with its 15th annual edi-
tion in less than two weeks. And
the organisers are expecting
perhaps the largest turnaround
in its history.

The Nelson Cooper “Peace
on da Streets” Basketball Clas-
sic is scheduled for July 22 to
25 at the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium.

Youth Against Violence
founder Carlos Reid said the
tournament serves various pur-
poses for the youth.

DaeKeorenleranae
b-ball tourney

THE Bahamas Basketball
Federation is scheduled to
host its 2nd Annual Inde-
pendence Round Robin
Basketball Tournament July
9-12 at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.



“This basketball tournament
is an effort to continue the work
of Nelson Cooper and YAV to
bring peace to our streets,” he
said.

“Most of the persons killed
this year were young people
under the age of 25 and most
of those charged for these same
murders were also juveniles
under the age of 25. So far for
2009 there have been over 34
reported murders. Youth
Against Violence continues to
be at the forefront in the fight
against crime and violence. We
refuse to put our heads in the
sand and pretend as if we don’t
have a problem. We will con-
tinue our commitment to pro-
vide positive alternatives for the
youth of our nation and
abroad.”

The tournament will include
five divisions, 18 and Under, 16
& Under, Church Division and
Open Division.

And for the first time ever,
there will be a Celebrity Divi-
sion comprised of radio per-
sonalities and entertainers
including ZNS, The Tribune,

SPORTS

Come out and support the ‘Peace on da Streets’ Basketball Classic



YOUTH Against Violence founder Carlos Reid...

100 Jamz and a team of enter-
tainers led by radio host
“Naughty.”

This year’s Celebrity Division
will be in honour of Anthony
“Fat Back” Marshall who
recently passed away.

This year, a Family Night is
being planned for 5pm July 25.
This night will feature champi-
onship games, a Slam Dunk
Contest, 3-point Shoot Out and
a special Celebrity Game fea-
turing members of parliament
playing against some of our

local pastors.

All games will be held at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
starting at 6pm July 22 to 24.
Saturday’s games begin at 9am
and last until the tournament
ends.

There will be a number of
great door prizes, including
round-trip tickets for two cour-
tesy of Bahamasair and cell
phones and phone cards cour-
tesy of BTC along with other
prizes. This year’s tournament
promises to be competitive as

well as exciting with a team
coming from California in the
Open Division as well as a team
from Freeport joining our 16 &
Under Division.

“Again, we expect a number
of our Bahamian college players
to play this summer as this
event has become an elite bas-
ketball tournament in the
Bahamas. Our Classic has
become the most highly antici-
pated summer event in New
Providence and over the past
several years we have attract-
ed some college coaches from
the US who come down with
the hopes of offering scholar-
ships to some of our young
players,” Reid said.

“We would like to thank the
public for supporting us over
the years and we look forward
to your continued support. We
would also like to thank our
sponsors without whom this
event would not be possible.”

The tournament began in
1995 and was first named the
National Park League Champi-
onships. The name was changed
to the Nelson Cooper Peace on

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da Streets Basketball Classic in
1996.

The late Nelson Cooper was
the leader of a gang called the
Border Boys. He gave his life
to the Lord and went into the
Mason’s Addition community
to encourage other gang mem-
bers to stop the violence. He
was shot the night he entered
that same community and died
a week later.

Event sponsors include Fur-
niture Plus who has been with
the event since its inception,
more 94.9 FM, Spirit 92.5 Fam-
ily Guardian, Scotia Bank, Basil
Ingraham & Co, J.S. Johnson,
Purity Bakery, Chilly Willy,
Original Patties, Nassau Paper
Company, JMEL, First Car-
ribean Bank, KLG Investments
Ltd, KFC, Thompson Trading,
Commonwealth Bank, Royal
Star Assurance, Coca-Cola,
Prince Lock & Key, Commis-
sioner of Police and Dunking
Donuts.

“We encourage everyone out
there to come out and support
this event,” Reid said, “Our
children need you.”

(Clearing Banker’s Association of The Bahamas)
The Executive Printers of The Bahamas Tel: 393-5011 Fax: 393-6425

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THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 15 TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

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‘Inconsistency’
at Customs
hits energy

efficient firms

* Businesses in field ‘finding
it very difficult to function’
as some imports come in
duty-free, while others
have taxes levied

* Government's duty
exemptions to encourage
energy efficiency being
undermined, says ex-
Chamber president

* Firms being deterred
from undertaking energy
efficient projects

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN
suppliers of
energy efficient
equipment and
technology are
“finding it very
difficult to func-
tion” because of
the inconsistent
treatment their
imported prod-
ucts receive
from the Customs Department,
a former Chamber of Com-
merce president said yesterday,
with some shipments allowed
in duty-free and others charged
the full 45 per cent.

Dionisio D’Aguilar, Super-
wash’s president, said the uncer-
tainty and inconsistency associ-
ated with Customs’ treatment
of such imports was not only
undermining the Governmen-
t’s efforts to encourage energy
efficiency among Bahamian
households and businesses
through the elimination of
duties, but was also deterring
companies such as his own from
implementing energy-saving
projects.

Mr D’Aguilar told Tribune
Business that Superwash had
been contemplating the impor-
tation and installation of
$150,000-worth of solar panels,
as part of an energy-saving ini-
tiative across the laundromat
chain.

The Government, as part of
its 2008-2009 Budget,
announced a range of fiscal
incentives designed to encour-
age energy efficiency as global
oil prices skyrocketed, and
made the importation of ener-
gy-saving light bulbs, solar
lamps and panels, batteries,
converters and wind engines
duty-free.

However, Mr D’Aguilar said
Superwash’s supplier and others
in the energy-saving technology
field had told him of problems
experienced in getting their
shipments cleared by Customs
duty-free.

D’ Aguilar

SEE page 2B

THE TRIBUNE

o U





THURSDAY,

©
n r

t

i = ;

—~

Teele ao



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

$100m-$150m upgrade
for Bahamas terminal

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Norwegian-

based oil and

gas giant yes-

terday said it

would invest
between $100-$150 million in
upgrading the Grand Bahama-
based oil storage terminal it
plans to acquire for $263.2 mil-
lion, but the deal’s closing is
dependent on agreeing a long-
term lease with the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Cor-
poration (BAIC).

Cathrine Torp, a StatoilHy-
dro spokeswoman, said the
company was “looking at a
long-term engagement beyond
2019” in the Bahamas through
its planned purchase of the
South Riding Point oil storage
and transhipment facility from
World Point Terminals, the
owner since January 1, 1990.

The current lease between
South Riding Point and its
BAIC landlord expires in 2019,
and while Ms Torp said Statoil
could not disclose the extension
it was seeking, she added: “We
need a return on our invest-
ment.

Cable ‘confident’
on voice licence

* BISX-listed firm believes
Columbus buy-out will
‘facilitate’ services
expansion and local
acquisitions, hinting
at new move for SRG

* Aiming to use negotiations
on cable TV licence renewal
to push for basic
package rate increase

* Incurred $0.5m in new
signal costs, and channel
line-up risen by 67%

* Cable invested $230m
in infrastructure, providing
barrier to entry of rivals

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas is planning
to use negotiations with the
Government over the renewal
of its cable T'V licence to push
for a “mild” increase in the $30
basic cable package rate over
the next three years, Tribune
Business can reveal, with the
BISX-listed company “confi-
dent” that it will obtain a voice
telecommunications licence
once the sector is liberalised.

A copy of the private place-

SEE page 7B

Sealed Bid Auction

4 Bedroom / 3 Bath Home Near The Beach
Nicholl’s Town, Andros

she

FEATURES
*12,000 sq. ft. lot *3,100 sq. ft. interior *Fully Furnished *A/C
*1,000 sq. ft. patio *Near the marina *Beach Access

Preview Dates:

July 9" to July 30", 2009 (By appointment only)

Deadline for Bids: July 30", 2009 on or before 5 p.m.

Deposit:

$10,000 (Refundable if bid is not accepted)

Notification of Bid: August 6", 2009
Photos and details online at www.HGChristie.com - Ref. DS10579

HG Cie

SAMARA ALBURY

T: 242 322-1041

[par Z eA Sase ter- 0

E: samara@hgchristie.com

* Norwegian buyer unveils $263m purchase of South Riding Point in GB
* Deal contingent on extension of BAIC lease beyond 2019, with
purchaser seeking ‘long-term investment horizon of 30-50 years’

“When we look at this
kind of investment, we’re
looking at a timeline of
30 to 50 years, just to give
a general statement on
this type of investment
and the time we look at.”
That would imply that
Statoil would at least
want the lease on South
Riding Point to be
extended until 2049-2050.

Agreeing a long-term exten-
sion of the lease with BAIC and
the Bahamian government is
one of the key conditions to
closing the transaction between
World Point and Statoil, the for-
mer warning that the sales
agreement could terminate -
unless an extension was agreed
- by October 1, 2009, if this was
not met.

Other key conditions include
obtaining the necessary Nation-
al Economic Council (NEC)
and Investments Board (mean-
ing the Cabinet) approvals for

Cable projects

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas’ manage-
ment has projected that net
income levels will fall below the
$25.866 million generated in
2008 for its next three financial
years, but will recover in the
medium term to reach $36.777
million by 2015.

The projections, contained in
the private placement memo-
randum for its $40 million pref-
erence share issue, which will
help to finance the $80 million
buy-out of Columbus Commu-
nications’ controlling stake in
the company, show that man-
agement has likely budgeted for
a worst-case scenario for fiscal
2009, with net income projected





















Cartwright



the Statoil purchase, and
the Norwegian firm com-
pleting satisfactory due
diligence.

Ms Torp said Statoil,
which has leased space
at the oil storage, blend-
ing and transhipment
facility for the past 16
years, saw the purchase
as a logical extension of
its long-term growth
plans.

It had desired to both extend
its lease at South Riding Point
and invest in upgrading its facil-
ities there, due to the increased
volume of oil being shipped
from Brazil - developments that
seemingly led into acquisition
talks with World Point.

“The terminal is very well
positioned for the US market,
and will support our trading
activities from our Stanford
office,” Ms Torp said. “It was
the need for investment and the
fact the current lease was going

to end shortly.”

She added that Statoil
planned to invest between $100
million and $150 million in
upgrading South Riding Point,
which features 10 storage tanks
and two berths. The company
has some 55 Bahamian employ-
ees, all of whom Statoil is asking
to stay.

Larry Cartwright, minister of
agriculture and fisheries, who
has responsibility for BAIC,
said “the ball is in their court”
when asked about the lease
extension and South Riding
Point deal.

The Government, he added,
had yet to see written details
on the World Point deal and
the Statoil proposal, although
the two sides had been sched-
uled to “get back to us” by
tomorrow or, more likely, Mon-
day. “Something in writing has
to come across the desk of the

SEE page 8B

$36m-plus net income by 2015

* Columbus to get base $1.4m management fee,
with incentive capped at 80% of this amount

to drop 23.4 per cent to $19.827
million.

Year-on-year revenue growth
is projected to drop to 3.9 per
cent for 2009, compared to a 7.2
per cent growth rate in 2008,
with total revenues expanding
from $81.461 million last year
to $84.636 million.

However, the year-over-year
percentage revenue growth is
projected to stabilise at 4.1 per
cent between 2012 to 2015, with
operating income as a percent-
age of total revenues standing at
a consistent 51 per cent over
the same period.

The main determinants of

Cable Bahamas’ growth over
the next six years, apart from
the probable renewal of its
cable TV licence and generating
growth from that mature sec-
tor and its Internet business,
will be its ability to enter new
telecoms markets and expand
via that route.

Net income, although pro-
jected to lag behind 2008’s per-
formance with $20.195 million
and $23.595 million in 2011, will
go beyond that with $26.651
million in 2012 and continue on
a projected rising trend after

SEE page 8B



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Money Fast.

Gram.

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$300k outlay

‘shoe-in’ for

‘phenomenal
response’

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE mastermind behind a
new US-style shoe store con-
cept for the Bahamas yesterday
said there had been “a phe-
nomenal response” from cus-
tomers in the first 17 days since
it launched, adding that its self-
service format had kept over-
heads low and “prices up to 50
per cent” below rivals.

Lincoln Bain said he had
modelled Bani’s Shoe Ware-
house, located on Mackey
Street next to the Royal Bank
of Canada, as a larger version of
the likes of Payless in the US,
where customers were able to
effectively serve themselves - a
concept that kept staff numbers
low.

Telling Tribune Business he
had invested more than
$300,000 in initial start-up costs,
Mr Bain said: “It’s had a phe-
nomenal response. Everyone’s
saying there’s a recession, but
we decided to do it right and
do something big. It’s the first
self-service shoe store in the
Bahamas.”

SEE page 4B

The information contained is ft
party and The Tribune can

responsible for erroi
from the daily report. —_ ail



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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





SHOWN (front row L-R) Yvette
Sands, secretary; Mr Rolle; the
Prime Minister; Gershan Major,
first vice-president; Darron Cash,
treasurer. Middle row (L-R): Tim
Covington, director; Pedro
Roberts, director; Dr Sophia Rolle,
chairperson, Chamber Week 2009;
Creswell Gardiner, director. Back
Row (L-R) Aaron Brice, director;
Merritt Storr, director; Odley Aritis,
director; Robert Myers, director;
Rick Hazlewood, director; Philip
Simon, executive director.

(Photo by Tim Aylen)





























































































Pictured from left:

1. Leonard Henderson, JD, CLU
Financial Services Marketing Consultant
Platinum Master Agency Award

Julie Adderley-MclIntosh
Agency Manager
Bronze International Management Award

John Hepburn, Jr.
Agency Manager
Silver Frontline Leader Award

Vernelle Butler, MBA, CLU, IFA
Agency Manager
: Bronze Frontline Leader Award
PG. ee ep . Katina Roach, BSc.
mia Agency Manager
promotes the SS cl Bronze Frontline Leader Award
TU MTSU TOE STATO
1rough education, researc and networking
international memberships. ae

Ann Marie Major

Agency Manager

Bronze Frontline Leader Award
Deborah Delancy, BA
Agency Manager

Bronze Frontline Leader Award

ears, GAMA has recognised nearly 36,000
ers in the industry worldwide through its —
COSMETIC

Financial Strength Rating

call us today at 396-1400

SALES OFFICES: NASSAU | FREEPORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET | www.famguardbahamas.com

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

& FAMILY GUARDIAN

Chamber
executives

meet

REPRESENTING the inter-
ests and concerns of the private
sector, the Chamber of Com-
merce’s new slate of officers and
directors for the 2009-2010
administrative year paid a cour-
tesy call on Prime Minister

PM

Hubert A Ingraham.

Headed by the Chamber’s
president, Khaalis Rolle, the
group’s visit to the Prime Min-
ister was one of several activities
that took place during the
recent Chamber Week 2009.

‘Inconsistency’
at Customs
hits energy

efficient firms

FROM page 1B

This was largely because Cus-
toms officials lacked specialist
knowledge and expertise in the
sector, and were thus unable to
determine which
technology/equipment was
energy efficient - and thus qual-
ified for the duty exemptions -
and which was not.

Mr D’Aguilar said his con-
tractor had told him: “I can’t
tell you what happens when the
shipment lands. It depends on
who you get on the day.”

He pointed out that if import
duties were levied on $150,000
worth of Superwash’s solar pan-
el imports, that translated into
“a pretty significant amount of
duty” - some $67,500 at a 45 per
cent rate.

“That’s a $67,000 question.
Do I take the risk, or don’t I
take the risk?” Mr D’ Aguilar
said on the possibility of being
charged duties, something that
would deter Bahamian compa-
nies and residences from mov-
ing towards becoming more
energy efficient.

“People in this business of
trying to sell energy efficient
products to Bahamian homes
and businesses need to operate
with consistency of duty rate.
Right now, they can’t do that,”
he added. “What the Govern-
ment is trying to do with one
hand, Customs is taking away
with the other.

“T know of one company that
brought in a shipment of ener-

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



gy-efficient light bulbs, and the
Customs officer on duty said:
‘No problem, let them in duty
free’. The company then
brought in a second shipment,
and the Customs officer they
dealt with then said: ‘No, it’s
not energy efficient’ and
charged them 45 per cent.”

Mr D’Aguilar added: “Cus-
toms officers are not really sure
what is energy efficient and
what is not energy efficient. The
technology is changing so quick-
ly, and the field is so dynamic,
that Customs officers just do
not know.

“The companies on that field
end up having to try and con-
vince Customs officers that their
shipments are energy efficient,
and the officers just do not
know.”

Import

Uncertainty over whether
they would be charged import
duties or not was creating havoc
for Bahamian energy-efficient
technology suppliers when it
came to providing clients with
quotes and pricing their ser-
vices, Mr D’ Aguilar said.

“Tt makes it very difficult for
businesses in that field to func-
tion and provide energy effi-
cient products that are tax
exempt,” he added. “It makes it
very difficult for them to oper-
ate, because they do not know
what will happen when they
bring goods in.

“It’s very hard to be in that
business because it’s not con-
sistent. It’s a problem and they
need to address it.” Mr
D’Aguilar said that Customs
officers needed to consult per-
sons in the industry if they were
unsure whether imports were
energy efficient and thus quali-
fied for duty exemptions,
adding: “It’s OK for a civil ser-
vant to say: ‘I don’t know’.”

Mr D’Aguilar praised the
Government for attempting to
reduce the Bahamas’ depen-
dency on fossil fuels and asso-
ciated foreign currency outflows
through energy efficiency incen-
tives, adding: “It’s creating a
new, different, diverse field for
Bahamians.”

Apart from making the duty-
free import of energy-saving
light bulbs, solar lamps, batter-
ies, converters and wind
engines, duty-free, the 2008-
2009 Budget reduced import
duties on energy-saving home
appliances from 35 per cent to
15 per cent.

The import duty rates on
energy-efficient windows, low-
flow shower heads and low-flow
toilets were dropped to 15 per
cent.

Peri:

NACK WRAP’"—



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 3B



BUSINESS
The ‘Fund-ation’ for greater regulation

THE Investment Funds Act
2003 was enacted on the Decem-
ber 15, 2003, and effectively
replaced the Mutual Funds Act
199. The Investment Funds Reg-
ulations were enacted on Decem-
ber 16, 2003.

Under the Act, an investment
fund is defined as: “A unit trust,
company, or partnership that
issues or has equity interests, the
purpose or effect of which is the
pooling of investor funds with the
aim of spreading investment risks
and achieving profits or gains aris-
ing from the acquisition, holding,
management or disposal of invest-
ments”.

It is important to note that, in
addition to the definition of an
investment fund, an investment
fund must have a ‘nexus’ to the
Bahamas in order to be consid-
ered a Bahamian-based invest-
ment fund. This means that for
unit trusts, the trustee, adminis-
trator, investment advisor or
investment manager must be
either a company incorporated
or registered in the Bahamas, a
person who has a place of busi-
ness in the Bahamas, or who uses
an address in the Bahamas. Alter-
natively, the trust instrument for
the unit trust must be governed
by the laws of the Bahamas.

For a company to be consid-
ered a Bahamian-based invest-
ment fund, it must be either one
of the following:

* Incorporated or registered in
the Bahamas

* The administrator, invest-
ment advisor or investment man-
ager must be either a company
or companies incorporated or reg-
istered in the Bahamas

* One or more companies or
individuals, any one of whom has
a place of business in the
Bahamas, or which uses an
address in the Bahamas

* A company whose adminis-
tration or management (includ-
ing control of substantially all of
its assets) must be carried on in or
from the Bahamas.

In order to be considered a
Bahamian-based fund, a partner-
ship must have either of these
qualities:

* One or more of the general
partners incorporated or regis-
tered in the Bahamas

* A person who resides in the
Bahamas or uses an address in
the Bahamas

* The partnership articles must
be governed by the laws of the
Bahamas

* The administrator, invest-
ment advisor or investment man-
ager must be either a company

incorporated or registered in the
Bahamas, or a person who has a
place of business in the Bahamas
or uses an address in the
Bahamas.

All non-Bahamas based funds
wishing to sell units or shares in
or from the Bahamas must
appoint a representative
approved by the Securities Com-
mission of the Bahamas, in accor-
dance with the requirements
under the regulations.

The Act is important to the
development of investment funds
in the Bahamas, as it will enable
both companies incorporated
under the Companies Act 1992
(as amended) and companies
incorporated under the Interna-
tional Business Companies Act
2000 (as amended) to engage in
the investment fund business with
the consent of the Securities
Commission or investment fund
administrators, where applicable,
and to be registered as segregated
accounts companies under the
Segregated Accounts Companies
Act 2004.

Segregated accounts compa-
nies will be allowed to establish
accounts containing assets and
liabilities that are legally separat-
ed from the assets and liabilities
of the investment fund’s ordinary
account. This structure will pre-
vent the assets of one account
from being affected by the liabil-
ities of another account.

There are four (4) classes of
investment funds under the Act:

* The Standard Fund

* The Professional Fund

* The Recognised Foreign
Fund

* The SMART Fund

The Standard Fund is similar
to the ‘regulated funds’ under the
repealed Mutual Funds Act, and
is designed to operate as a tradi-
tional collective investment
scheme. Typically, standard funds
are those funds which do not sat-



isfy the requirements of a Profes-
sional Fund, Recognised Fund or
a SMART Fund. It is intended
that Standard Funds will be high-
ly regulated, since they will be
offered to the general public and
they may be only be licensed,
under the Act, by the Commis-
sion.

Professional Funds are
designed for the sophisticated
investor and may only be offered
to the following categories of per-
sons:

* Any bank or trust company
licensed under the Bank and
Trust Companies Regulation Act
2000 or licensed in a prescribed
jurisdiction, whether acting in its
individual or fiduciary capacity

* Any registered broker-dealer
or firm registered as a securities
investment adviser under the
Securities Industry Act 1999,
which maintains a minimum of
B$120,000 of regulatory capital
or is a broker-dealer or firm of
securities investment advisers reg-
istered in a prescribed jurisdic-
tion

* Any insurance company
licensed under the Insurance Act
1969 or licensed in a prescribed
jurisdiction

* Any investment fund licensed
or registered under the Act or
regulated in a prescribed juris-
diction

* Any natural person whose
individual net worth, or joint net
worth with the person’s spouse,
exceeds B$1 million

* Any natural person who has

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MERLEN MESIDOR of
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,

and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Chester Bonefish Lodge

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Telephones 247) 356-3418

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an individual income in excess of
B$200,000 or joint income with
that person’s spouse in excess of
B$300,000 in each of the two most
recent years, and has a reason-
able expectation of reaching the
same income level in the current
year

* Any trust with total assets in
excess of B$5 million

Where the financial institution
has a discretionary management
agreement with its customers, it
may set up an investment fund
with such customers which would
meet the requirements of this
template

SMF 002
This template applies in

instances where there are no
more than ten 10 investors in the
investment fund. The investor
would qualify to be an investor
in a Professional Fund, and the
majority of the investors have the
power to appoint and remove
operators of the investment fund.

SEE LEGAL, page 8B

* Any entity in which all of the
equity owners satisfy one of the
foregoing requirements

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BARRY PACKINGTON
of TREASURE COVE, P.O. BOX FH-14010, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 2â„¢ day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

A Recognised Foreign Fund is
the same as an Exempt Fund
under the repealed Mutual Funds
Act, where the equity interests of
the investment fund are listed on
a securities exchange prescribed
by the Securities Commission and
the investment fund is not
licensed in the Bahamas, or
where the investment fund is
licensed or registered in a juris-
diction prescribed by the Com-
mission and not suspended from
operation

A SMART Fund (Specific
Mandate Alternative Regulato-
ry Test Fund) must satisfy cer-
tain prescribed parameters and
requirements of a category, class
or type of investment fund. The
Commission has pre-approved
four template and has published
the parameters for the templates
in approved rules. A SMART
Fund that meets the requirements
prescribed in one of the pre-
approved rules may be licensed
by an unrestricted investment
fund administrator or the Com-
mission.

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LUO) Olen
Bolom lta Cys







-UBLIC NOTICE
CHANGE OF NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CLINTON
{NARD DORSETT of #4 Anguilla Road, Royal
°O, Box F-43838, have legally
e by deed poll to CLINTON
|| GRAY, The Deed Poll has
lV recorded at the Registrar Generals Office.

r at
WANTED:
ASSISTANT HEAD SWIM COACH
Swim Club seeks level 2 ASCA Certified
swim coach, Previous experience and good
administrative skills required. Involves
working with young children. Competitive

salary.





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Contact 326-6121 MY feygpigersts MeN a0]

Mail to:
P.O. Box SP-61353
or
bahamasswimelub@ yahoo.com

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

Wanted
Merchandising Manager

Minimum requirements:

' ' : LUNDBERG TRADING INC.
Five years’ experience

BA or equivalent degree
Proficient in all MS Applications

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), the Dissolution of LUNDBERG TRADING INC.
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 26th
day of June, 2009.

Please fax all resumés to 394-0282

or call 677-6731 for more information
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

TUESDAY, 7 JULY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,576.92 | CHG -0.07 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -135.44 | YTD % -7.91
FINDEX: CLOSE 788.56 | YTD -5.55% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Daily Vol. EPS$ Div$

mrrmeel | pata ore, Ie

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
Zi

COLONIAL

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

Security Yield
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Previous Close Today's Close Change

‘phenomenal
response’

FROM page 1B

At 7,500 square feet, Mr Bain
said the store was much larger
than its contemporaries in the
US, which enabled it to carry
more than 15,000 pairs of shoes
at any one time. The average
Payless, he said, could only car-
ry 6,000 pairs.

When asked where his inspi-
ration for the store came from,
Mr Bain replied: “From the
heavens. I just wanted to do
something different. We did a
shoe store because it’s large vol-
ume, and we saw the need for
variety.

“It’s been phenomenal. I
think we’ve really got a huge
part of the market share so far.”

Mr Bain explained that he
decided upon the self-service
format to meet customer needs.
Many persons, he said, were
only able to shop during their



lunch breaks from work, and
often complained that they had
to wait 20 minutes in a shoe
store for a member of staff to
become available to serve them.

“Tt takes for too long,” Mr
Bain added. Bani’s Shoe Ware-
house employed eight staff, he
said, but would have had to
employ far more if it was not a
self-service store, given the vol-
umes of business it was han-
dling.

Retailer

The retailer was covering
every shoe price point, Mr Bain
said, from $10 to $200. It was
currently focusing on women’s
shoes because women were esti-
mated to account for 80 per
cent of shoe purchases, but chil-
dren’s shoes are set to follow in
one month, with men’s shoes
several months down the line.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicis hereby advised that |, CECIL BRAD BETHEL of
Western District of the said Island of New Providence, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to CECIL BRAD DASSLER.-
BETHEL. [f there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

Biritish Lok

smal Haltom Hebel
Marlboraugh St.,

Shop a]

Clearance
SALE

Everything for $20
Until the end of July
Free parking at the Hilton

P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tal: 242-325-1865

Email: gams-peans@hotmail.com

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.40 10.40
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 ‘
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) FBB17 100.00 0.00 1%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
(
(

A
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dovelopmont Company

10.40
10.00
ases)
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

PRICE INQUIRY

P-110 Generators

Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) FBB13 100.00 0.00 1%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3787 483
2.8952 3.18
1.4750 5.74
3.1821 -13.90
12.9209 5.79
100.5448 0.54
93.1992 6.76
1.0000 0.00
9.2511 412
1.0578 5.78
1.0271 271
1.0554 i 5.54
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.
N/M
N/M

566.6 Nassau Airport Develooment Company (MAD) & pleased to

arnaunoe the release of Pl-110 Generakors for fhe Lynden

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

Findling inemational Airport Expardion Project
The purchase inquiry incudes

52wk-Low
1.3124
2.8952
1.3948
3.1821
12.2702
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
26-Jun-09
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Supply of to (2) 1600 KMWOO0 KYA, 2TTMBD WAC new
factory assembled motor generator sets complete with
NEMA 3 endesure and day tank
Commesioning and Site Acceptance Tests following
nétaliehon by MAD's aontrasctor, and

+ § year or 1500 operating hours warranty

The Pl-110 Document wil be available for pick up after
1:00pm, Tuesday June 23rd, 2009. Please contact
Traci Grisby to register at the NAD Project office.

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
$1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Goniack Tread Brisk

(Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Eepemcenn Project

Ph: (242) 702 POG6 | Faw: (242) ST P-ST
PO. Boo AP So, Mesaeu, Bahamas
Email: traci brshyiiires bs





THE TRIBUNE



Oil prices tumble
near $60 as gas
supplies surge

= By ERNEST SCHEYDER
AP Energy Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil
prices neared $60 per barrel
Wednesday as the government
reported unused gasoline held
in storage surged yet again.

Retail gas prices have fallen
every day for more than two
weeks, and gasoline futures fell
more than nine cents a gallon.

Energy markets are under-
going an extended sell-off, the
longest in 10 months, with new
economic reports dampening
optimism about any economic
recovery.

Benchmark crude for August
delivery fell more than four per
cent, or $2.79, to settle at $60.14
a barrel on the New York Mer-
cantile Exchange.

In just over one week, oil
prices have fallen more than 18
per cent.

“The recession is far from
over,” said analyst Stephen
Schork. “Perhaps the run-up in
prices was a bit overstated.”

Crude prices by last week had
more than doubled from lows
reached January, when a bar-
rel of crude cost just over $30.
That was just six months
removed from record highs near
$150 per barrel last summer.

Cheap oil sparked a new
round of investment, as did a
dollar that had been weakened
by government efforts to bail
out major banks and automak-
ers.

Crude is priced in the dollar,
so it effectively becomes cheap-
er internationally.

Yet dismal economic data
continues to emerge and the
fundamentals of supply and
demand appeared to take con-
trol of the market again last

week.

International Monetary Fund
on Wednesday lowered its glob-
al economic forecast, the latest
that would not support high
energy prices.

Since peaking at $73.38 last
Tuesday, crude futures have
fallen by almost $13 per barrel.
Gasoline, heating oil and nat-
ural gas futures are also tanking.

The Organisation of Petrole-
um Exporting Countries pre-
dicted Wednesday that demand
for crude has fallen so sharply, it
will take another four years to
recover to 2008 levels.

Billions

Americans are driving billions
fewer miles than they had in
recent years with millions losing
their jobs.

Even though refiners have
been slashing production, gaso-
line continues to pile up.

The Department of Energy
reported Wednesday that gaso-
line supplies grew by another
1.9 million barrels last week, the
fifth straight week that storage
levels have grown.

The volatile energy markets
may lead to increased scrutiny,
both in the US and overseas.

Federal regulators said Tues-
day they would examine
whether the government should
impose limits on the number of
futures contracts in oil and oth-
er energy commodities held by
speculative traders.

Concerns about the affect of
volatile energy prices has spread
overseas as well. It will be one
of the topics discussed by world
leaders meeting in Rome for
the Group of Eight summit.

In an editorial published by
The Wall Street Journal, British

Prime Minister Gordon Brown
and French President Nicolas
Sarkozy also called for closer
government oversight of the oil-
trading markets.

Retail gasoline prices
dropped again overnight, the
16th straight day, to a new
national average of $2.593 per
gallon. Last year, prices were
above $4 at this time, accord-
ing to AAA and the Oil Price
Information Service.

In other Nymex trading, gaso-
line for August delivery slid by
9.9 cents to settle at $1.6333 a
gallon and heating oil lost about
6.2 cents to $1.5386. Natural gas
for August delivery fell 6.7 cents
to $3.362 per 1,000 cubic feet.

In London, Brent prices shed
$2.02 to $61.21 a barrel on the
ICE Futures exchange.

¢ Associated Press writers
Eileen Ng in Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia, and George Jahn in
Vienna contributed to this report

TST

a ULAR
Wey

aa eT
Insight on
Monilays



THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 5B

Society of Trust & Estate
5 T E P Practitioners (Bahamas)

The Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners

STEP BAHAMAS BRANCH

Invites applications for a scholarship for one module of the STEP Diploma program in

International Trust Management

Applicants should meet the following entena-

Fi

# Bahamian citizen

‘oundation Certificate or have been officially exempted from the

Foundation Certificate Proeram

* Currently employed in the trust industry or seeking a career 1n the trust industry

Application forms should be obtained from STEP Bahamas at its administrative office below, and

submutted together with the following:

Proof of Bahamian citizenship (certified copy passport]
¢ Current resume detailing employment history and career

aspirations

# Details of any other funding sources

Completed applications should be submitted ‘delivered to -

STEP Bahamas

(roodman’s Bay Corporate Centre, First Floor
P.O). Box N-17i4

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 323-6612

Deadline for applications is July 31, 2009

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Real People, Real Results!





THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

ment memorandum for Cable
Bahamas $40 million preference
share issue, parts of which have
been seen by Tribune Business,
indicates the company believes
the buy-out of its 30.2 per cent
controlling foreign sharehold-
er, Columbus Communications,
will ease its path to expanding
into new telecoms markets via
both new licences and the
acquisition of other operators.

The latter is an indication that
Cable Bahamas is likely to
revive its attempts to acquire
Systems Resource Group
(SRG), parent company of Indi-
Go Networks, the only existing
rival fixed-line telecoms oper-
ator to the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC).

Tribune Business previously
revealed that Cable Bahamas
attempted to execute the pur-
chase option, which allows it to
acquire either a portion of or
all of SRG’s issued share capi-
tal, in 2007, but the Govern-
ment and Central Bank refused
to give approval for the deal -
largely, it is believed, to protect
the declining value of BTC.

Cable Bahamas’ audited
financial statements for 2008
show it has invested some
$4.244 million in attempting to
acquire SRG to date. And its
preference share offering docu-
ment said the removal of
Columbus Communications’
foreign ownership would allow
it to “more freely pursue local
acquisitions”.

It added: “By virtue of being
fully Bahamian-owned, the
company will not need to seek
approvals from the Bahamas
Central Bank for acquisitions.
The ability to act quickly on
opportunities in a liberalising
environment would allow Cable
Bahamas to retain strategic
agility that will fuel future
growth.”

And, while BTC might
acquire a cable TV/video
licence to enable it to compete
directly with Cable Bahamas in
a liberalised market, post-pri-
vatisation, the BISX-listed util-
ity provider’s management were
“confident that Cable
Bahamas will be granted a voice
licence”.

“This entry into the voice
market should be facilitated by
Cable Bahamas being fully
Bahamian owned, with a large
equity stake held by the Gov-
ernment,” the offering docu-
ment added.

That is a reference to the fact
that the National Insurance
Board (NIB) presently owns
15.4 per cent of Cable Bahamas,
with the Treasury owning a fur-

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 7B

Cable ‘confident’
on voice licence

ther 5.1 per cent.

“The company anticipates
being granted licences for new
products (i.e. telephony) which
can be rolled out very quickly
and, given the level of penetra-
tion of basic cable and Internet
service subscribers within its
network, should be rapidly
absorbed as a result of the value
proposition of a triple-play to
subscribers,” Cable Bahamas’
offering document said.

As for its 15-year exclusive
cable TV licence, which expires
in October 2009, Cable
Bahamas’ offering document
said it had been advised by the
minister responsible for cable
television “that the Govern-
ment is prepared to renew the
cable television licence, albeit
on different terms that are cur-
rently in place and with the loss
of exclusivity”.

The company added that
renewal of the cable TV licence,
although not 100 per cent cer-
tain, was of “high probability”
because it was the only compa-
ny that had the infrastructure
to provide such services in the
Bahamas, having invested $230
million in building its network
infrastructure over the last 15
years.

The high costs associated with
infrastructure build-out, and
creating a rival network, acted
as a major barrier to entry for
any rivals planning to enter the
Bahamian cable TV market,
Cable Bahamas added, sound-
ing a confident note about
maintaining its dominant mar-
ket position.

There was, Cable Bahamas
said, “the lack of a viable alter-

native” operator, and if the
Government declined to renew
its licence it could still provide
services in Freeport, where it
was licensed by the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA).

“Tt is difficult to imagine a
scenario where a significant por-
tion of the population are made
to forego television, while those
in Freeport have full access to
it,” the Cable Bahamas offer-
ing document said.

“Neither satellite, not BTC,
can provide a viable alternative
as there is no legal/licensed
satellite provider footprint, pro-
gramme offerings are poor, and
the telephone company has cur-
rently no licence or infrastruc-
ture to provide these services.”

On the issue of an increase
in the basic cable TV rate, the
private placement rationale said
the $30 charge had existed since
Cable Bahamas began provid-
ing services in 1994, yet the
package’s channel line-up had
increased by 67 per cent, going
from 36 to 54 channels. And,
correspondingly, signal fees,
utility costs and other factors of
production had increased.

Cable Bahamas had recently
incurred a $0.5 million signal
fee increase as a result of agree-
ments with the likes of MTV,
Oxygen, Disney and BET, and
the offering document said:
“The company believes that a
mild rate increase over the next
three years will not significant-
ly impact subscribers, and will
allow the company to continue
to augment its channel line-up
with in-demand programming
and enhanced features.”

NOTICE OF SALE

The Rawson Court

Condominium

Owners Association is

offering, pursuant to Registered Charges ;
ribed condominiwn units, and the px

OMpany Pursu: on PI

ed in the Law of Property &

the Condominium Management

and the other pro
Conveyancing (Combon

Unit (03
inet Cele
Unit (ih

All oti

to the offices of:

3 Bedroom / 3 4 Bathroom
3 Bedroom /3 Bathroom
3 Bedroom {3 Bathroom

should be in writing and tendered in seuled envelopes

Cedric L. Parker & Co,
Neil's Comrt
No. 9 Risiy Bethel Detve
Po Bow Wel o5t
Nassau, Bohan
Attention: Miss AUP. Fermander

The Bahamas National Trust

Past, Present and Future

Thoughts from the 1958 Exuma Expedition Leader

Special Presentation:

G. Carleton Ray, PhD. Research Professor
Department of Environmental Sciences
University of Virginia

Date: Wednesday, July 15
Time: 7:00 pm SHARP!
Prace: Nassau Yacht Club, East Bay Street

BNT and NYC members FREE
General Public $2

For more information call: 393-1317
Email: bnt@bnt.bs ¢ www.bnt.bs





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



TERMINAL, from 1B
Investments Board,” the min-
ister said.

There had been some contact
between the two sides and the
Government already, Mr
Cartwright indicated, confirm-
ing that World Point had
already been in discussions with
BAIC over extending the lease
that expires in 2019.

Mr Cartwright added that the
Government normally gave
lease extensions, which in South

LEGAL, from 3B

SMF 003

Where a SMART Fund was
operating as an Exempt Fund
under the repealed Mutual Funds
Act (for example, the equity
interests were held by not more
than 15 investors, the majority of
whom were able to appoint or
remove the operator of the fund),
it must now be licensed as an
SMF 003 Fund but may continue
to carry on business as an exempt
fund for the prescribed time peri-
od (extensions may be approved
and authorised by the Commis-
sion) in the Act.

SMF 004

Where there are no more than
five investors and the investment
fund operates as a private invest-
ment company, the investment
fund may be licensed as an SMF
004 (e.g. family business)
















WE'VE MOVED

Riding Point’s case covers 763
acres - 155 acres on land, the
rest being the sea bed and off-
shore jetty - for 21 years. How-
ever, it could modify this for
shorter or longer periods.
“The acquisition is a strate-
gic move which supports Sta-
toilHydro’s global growth ambi-
tion. It will strengthen Statoil-
Hydro’s marketing and trading
position in North America by
securing the full terminal capac-
ity,” says Jon A Jacobsen, exec-
utive vice president for manu-

It should noted that there are
other funds which are defined
under the Act, such as the Self-
administered Fund, which is an
investment fund administered by
its own operators performing the
functions of the investment fund
administrator. These funds are
recognised as regulated invest-
ment funds and are required to
hold an investment fund license
or be registered with the Com-
mission.

A Dormant Fund is an invest-
ment fund that ceases trading and
liquidates its assets without for-
mally liquidating its structure.
Such a fund must notify the Com-
mission within 14 days of becom-
ing a dormant investment fund.
A Dormant Fund may re-launch
its operations within one year
from the date that it becomes dor-
mant, and such period can be
extended by the Commission for

Ln i Lit

facturing and marketing.

“StatoilHydro’s objective is
to upgrade the terminal to allow
for blending of all types of
crude oils, including heavy oils,”
he continues.

Deal

Statoil’s deal also includes
World Point’s 50 per cent inter-
est in the Grand Bahama-based
tug business, Freepoint, which
has 42 employees. In 2008, the
company’s six tugs handled 95

a total period not exceeding 18
months.

Under the regulations, an
investment fund must appoint
one or more persons as custodi-
ans of the assets of the invest-
ment fund, unless the operators
certify in writing that the structure
of the investment fund or the
nature of the assets are such that
they do not require a custodian to
be appointed to hold the assets
of the investment fund. However,
the Commission does have the
power to determine whether an
investment fund is required to
appoint a custodian.

The custodian of an investment
fund must be independent of the
operator and administrator,
unless a specific exemption is
received from the licensor or they
are deemed independent pur-
suant to the tegulations. They
must be one of the following:

Bae Lamour and CO.

Mount Royal Avenue and Kenwood Street

Tel: 326-0126/7












Fax:326-0128

Email: bazardlaw @ gmail.com
lamourlaw @ gmail.com



















DOCTORS HOSPITAL

bh)

1. em

7 ee

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES

SPEAKER:

Dr. Madlene Sawyer

Perinatology Obstetrics Gynecology

Purpose:

THIS MONTHS TOPIC:
Women’s Health

LECTURE DATE

Thursday, July 16th‘09 @ 6PM
Doctors Hospital Conference Room
RSVP « Seating is Limited « 302-4603

Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues

affecting society today.

LECTURE SERIES

To educate the public about
the important health issues,
presented by distinguished

physicians,

Womens Health
Dr. Madelene Sawyer

per cent of the traffic at the
Freeport Container Port.

StatoilHydro’s involvement
in the Bahamian market began
in May this year, when it
announced its joint venture with
BPC Ltd to operate three off-
shore oil exploration licences in
the south-western Bahamas. Ms
Torp, though, said the South
Riding Point acquisition had no
connection to this.

The reason for World Point’s
decision to sell is unclear,
although the company yester-

* A bank and trust company
licensed by the Central Bank of
the Bahamas

* A financial institution in a
prescribed jurisdiction

* Such other person as
approved by the Commission

With regard to auditors, under
the Act auditors must be
approved by the Commission and
must satisfy the Commission that
they are members of the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants in good standing, or
members in good standing of an
international accounting body
prescribed by the Commission.

The Act also outlines certain
duties of the investment fund
administrator, which include, but
are not limited to:

* Ensuring that the investment
fund does not carry on or attempt
to carry on business contrary to
the provisions of the Act, and that
the operations of the investment
fund are carried on in accordance
with the provisions of the Offer-
ing Memorandum and other con-
stitutive documents (Memoran-
dum and Articles of Association,
Administration Agreement,
Investment Management Agree-
ment)

* Ensuring that the investment
fund does not in any way carry
on business in a manner that may
be prejudicial to the holders of
equity interests or the creditors

CABLE, from 1B
that.

While Columbus Communi-
cations will no longer have an
equity interest in Cable
Bahamas once the transaction is
completed, it will still have a
relationship with the latter via a
management services agree-
ment with the company.

According to the Cable
Bahamas offering document, it
appears that the management
fees Columbus Communica-
tions will earn will be more than
the $1.429 million in dividends it
received from the BISX-listed
company in 2008.

Columbus will receive a flat
annual fee of $1.4 million, plus
an incentive fee based on
achieving a targeted percentage
of Cable Bahamas’ operating
income. Yet the performance
fee is capped at 80 per cent of

SHOW YOUR SUPPORT

day referred to a “restructur-
ing” that was taking place. The
company invested last year in
adding two new storage tanks,
with a combined extra 1.5 mil-
lion barrels of storage space, at
South Riding Point, expanding
its capacity by 29 per cent.

For 2008, South Riding
Point’s revenues rose by 25 per
cent or $4.432 million over 2007,
with fourth quarter revenues of
$8.469 million up 91 per cent
year-over-year. And Freepoint’s
revenues were ahead by

of the investment fund

* Reporting to the Commission
on an ongoing basis and as
required by the Act

* Maintaining the books and
preparing financial reports of the
investment fund, ensuring that
audited financial statements of
the investment funds are sent to
investors within four months of
the financial year.

The Act also gives the Com-
mission more extensive powers
of regulation, enforcement and
compliance, which include:

* The power to conduct on-site
and off-site examinations of the
business of investment funds, and
parties related to investment
funds, on a regular basis

* The power to instruct any
investment fund to have its
accounts audited at any time, and
to submit its audited financial
statements to the Commission
within a specified period

* The power to revoke the
license and registration of an
investment fund where the invest-
ment fund has ceased to carry on
its business, or if the investment
fund becomes insolvent or goes
into liquidation or is wound up
or otherwise dissolved.

* The power to conduct regu-
latory hearings and to impose

the base fee, meaning the max-
imum this will be in any one
year is $1.12 million. As a result,
the maximum Columbus Com-
munications can earn is $2.52
million.

Outlining its fundamentals,
Cable Bahamas said its infra-
structure passed 90 per cent of
all homes in the Bahamas, with
cable TV subscriber and Inter-
net subscriber penetration
standing at 75 per cent and 45
per cent respectively as at end-
2008.

The $40 million preference
share issue, which is likely to
be listed on the Bahamas Inter-
national Securities Exchange
(BISX) once completed, is
scheduled to close in three-and-
a-half weeks time on July 31,
2009. The $40 million prefer-
ence share issue includes a $20
million US dollar component,

$350,000 or 14 per cent com-
pared to 2007, with fourth quar-
ter revenues up 37 per cent or
$815,000.

The Statoil deal is thus the
second acquisition of a Grand
Bahama-based oil storage ter-
minal within two years, the
combination of private equity
firm First Reserve and VOPAK
having purchased the BORCO
terminal from PDVSA, the
state-owned oil firm of
Venezuela, for around $900 mil-
lion in 2008.

sanctions, remedies or other relief
as a result of the settlement of a
dispute.

With regard to some of the fees
charged for investment funds, the
initial application fee for a licence
is B$750 for a Standard, Profes-
sional and SMART Fund. The
annual licence fee for such funds
is B$950, payable in the first year
and pro-rated from the date of
licensing to December 31 of that
year. The annual license fee for
Self-administered Funds is
B$1,000, payable in the first year
and pro-rated from the date of
licensing to December 31 of that
year. The annual fee for a Recog-
nised Foreign Fund is B$100.

Copyright 2009. Tyrone L. E.
Fitzgerald. All rights reserved.

NB: The information contained
in this article does not constitute
nor is it a substitute for legal
advice. Persons reading this arti-
cle and/or column, generally, are
encouraged to seek the relevant
legal advice and assistance regard-
ing issues that may affect them
and may relate to the informa-
tion presented.

Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an
attorney with Fitzgerald &
Fitzgerald. Should you have any
comments regarding this article,
you may contact Mr Fitzgerald at
Suite 212, Lagoon Court Build-
ing, Olde Towne Mall at Sandy-
port, West Bay St., P.O. Box CB-
11173, Nassau, Bahamas or at
tyrone@tlefitzgeraldgroup.com.

and a $20 million Bahamian
dollar one. Investors will have
the option to convert those pref-
erence shares into ordinary
Cable Bahamas shares after two
years, with the preference
shares paying an interest rate
of 8 per cent. The preference
share issue is a private place-
ment targeted at invited
investors only, so members of
the Bahamian public should not
apply to become involved.

Cable Bahamas is also financ-
ing the transaction with a $105
million syndicated loan put
together by Royal Bank of
Canada, FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas) and
Scotiabank, a portion of which
will be used to refinance the
company’s existing $60 million
debt and credit facilities, plus
pay transaction costs and fund
working capital.

ha

for the National Park System of The Bahamas
and join us as we Celebrate our 50th Anniversary
with a Cool Early Morning

Fun RuNn/WALK

and help Keep ‘em flocking

Screenings:

Get your Free Blood
Pressure, Cholesterol, and
Glucose testing between

Spm & fp.

Arthritis
Dr. Vincent Nwosa

RSVP:
To ensure available seating
Phone: 302-4603

Obesity in Children
Dr. Brian Humblestone

Breast Cancer
Dr, Theodore Turnquest

* DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Pieater Pow ae

Date: July 18th Time: 6:00 AM

Flamingo Route: Starting at the Retreat Gardens North on Village Aged, then
West onte Shirley Street, North ote Church Street (St.
Matthews Church), crossing anto the "New" Paradise Island
Bridge, over to Paradise Beach Drive, East to the traffic
circle, rotating to The "Old" Pl. Bridge. East onto East Bay
Street, passing Montague Beach then South onto Village
Road ending at The Retreat Gardens.

Green Turtle Route: Starting at the Retreat Gardens North on Village Ros, then
West onto Shirley Street, North oate Church Street (St.
Matthies Church), East onte East Bay Street pass
Montague Beach then South onte Village Road ending at
The Retreat Gardens

Healthy refreshments and souse available for sale afterwards.

Wear comfortable walking shoes. * Bring a water bottle and hand towel,





THE TRIBUNE



A global look ||
at economic
developments

@ By The Associated Press

A look at economic develop-
ments and stock market activity
around the world Wednesday:

World leaders on
global economy

L’AQUILA, Italy — World
leaders agreed that the global
economy is too shaky to begin
rolling back massive fiscal stim-
ulus plans right now, according
to a draft of the Group of Eight
statement on the world econo-
my obtained by The Associated
Press. The leaders said in the
draft that they “note some signs
of stabilization” but continued
to stress the difficult outlook
instead of concerns over debt
and high spending.

Oil recovery to
“08 levels will take
another four years

VIENNA — Demand for
OPEC crude has fallen so
sharply because of the world
recession that it will take anoth-
er four years to recover to 2008
levels, the 12-nation oil pro-
ducers’ organisation predicted.

The Organisation of the
Petroleum Exporting Countries
said there was decline in the
world’s appetite for oil because
of falling industrial production
and related developments.

Japan’s core
machinery orders
fall in May

TOKYO — Japan’s core
machinery orders, a closely
watched indicator of corporate
capital spending, fell unexpect-
edly in May amid uncertain
prospects for a global econom-
ic recovery.

In Asian markets, Japan’s
benchmark Nikkei 225 stock
average tumbled 227.04 points,
or 2.4 per cent, to 9,420.75 — its
sixth consecutive decline and its
lowest close in six weeks. The
yen rose to a five-month high
against the dollar.

Elsewhere, Hong Kong’s
Hang Seng index dropped 0.8
per cent to 17,721.07, while
South Korea’s Kospi lost 0.2 per
cent to 1,431.02. Mainland Chi-
na’s Shanghai Composite index
slipped 0.3 per cent, and Aus-
tralia’s key stock measure was
flat.

Industrial production
in Germany rises
3.7% in May

FRANKFURT — Industrial
production in Germany rose 3.7
per cent in May, the Economy
Ministry said, and the country
now appears to be over the
worst of the crisis.

Meanwhile, government pro-
jections showed the country will
take until 2013 to comply with a
European Union-mandated
budget deficit limit as it runs up
public debt totaling euro509 bil-
lion to counter the recession.

Separately, official figures





The Tribune

confirmed that ouput in the 16
countries that use the euro
shrank 2.5 per cent in the first
quarter of 2009 from the previ-
ous three month period. The
recession is sapping the indus-
trial exports that the euro zone
relies on for growth.

In European markets, the
FTSE 100 index of leading
British shares closed down 1.1
per cent at 4,140.23, while
France’s CAC-40 fell 1.3 per
cent to 3,009.71. Germany’s
DAX lost 0.6 per cent to finish
at 4,572.65.

IMF raises ‘09
growth forecast

BEIJING — The Interna-
tional Monetary Fund raised its
2009 growth forecast for Asia’s
developing economies to 5.5 per
cent from 4.8 per cent.

Separately, Chinese bank
lending in June more than dou-
bled from the previous month
as Beijing’s stimulus drove a
surge in credit. The country’s
banks lent 1.5 trillion yuan
($220 billion) in June, the cen-
tral bank said, up from May and
April. Economists see the jump
in lending as a sign of a nascent
economic revival as Beijing tries
to shield China from the global
slump with four trillion yuan
($586 billion) in stimulus spend-
ing.

Consumer confidence
in UK rises in June

LONDON — Consumer con-
fidence in the United Kingdom
rose in June as more people
said they expected better times
by the end of the year, a bank
said, but a drop in a closely
watched house price survey
tempered optimism about a
recovery.

Separately, Britain’s govern-
ment proposed giving new pow-
ers to financial regulators,
improving coordination among
agencies and toughening penal-
ties for misconduct.

Singapore bank bans
some of island’s biggest
financial institutions
from selling structured
notes

SINGAPORE — Singapore’s
central bank banned some of
the island’s biggest financial
institutions from selling struc-
tured notes after they improp-
erly marketed $367 million of
the bonds that were linked to
collapsed bank Lehman Broth-
ers Holdings Inc.

The Paris Club of
creditor nations says

it has canceled $62.73m
of debt owed by Haiti

PARIS — The Paris Club of
creditor nations said it has can-
celed $62.73 million of debt it is
owed by Haiti and that further
bilateral agreements have
cleared the Caribbean nation’s
remaining debt to individual
club members.

SEL

AAMT LO Tete ann



THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 9B

rnco PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

June 2009

Contact Numbers 393-2004

HOUSES

L 434. Jacaranda Subdivision, MP

2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Siee: 11,527 ay

Hinliding Sen= 1,079 a8

Appraised valve; 5220,000 10

Travel south from the eound-aboor, where West Bay Seeci
and JFE. Derive, (west of Airport and north of Lydond Cay) to
the first ooad on the bef the eatrance in Jacaranda Subdivision.
Tale a lett at the T-junction. then the first right onto Jacaranda
court. The subject property is the last on the maght painted

white tim blue

Pano of Land Rioener Senect Fea Hill, HF,
Single Family Resdilense
OH Bedroom, (1) Bacher
tla Sized ul ag

ding, Sine | O14 ag

Appraised Walue: $115,000

From Fos Hall Road tom onic Romer Street (Church Cf God
Prophecy aad Fea Hill Comunity Contre junction) travel
east easton Pomer Street to the third Gomer on the right
irae] south oy the fiverth hoese on the beR whech is af a dead
edd The subject isa split hevel peidlenc: peated oe ara
Primed white ath w tiked entrance peti

Lot}S006, Sir Linden Pindling Esuates, MP
Sirs Fray Presi dence
3 Bedroom, * Bathroom
Fra Size: 500 soft
il ding Snr 1,053 ak
Appraised Waluc: 5] 4,001

Front Chomles Saunders Highwey cater Sar Lipacken Pind leg
Fale: and fore! goth on Lady Manguorie Pondbiig Averee
fo the second! ameet.on the lefijLouren Street} towel east on
Lauren street to the second comer on left (Pear Tree Avene:
Travel north on Pear Tree Avenue to the sebject, the fifieert
Property om the left. The subject is lime green tome white.

Let¥ 1, Dioris Johmaon Estates.

Single Family Poesidence

TRealrcets, 7 Redheecers

Property Sine: 5,065 og,fl

Hindi Sox 1,684 ag 8

Appraised Value: $100,443.00

From Gladkione Bead travel ead along Rocky Pine Road for
approximately 144. feet and tem bef on Dame Dore:

dove then 2rd left and the subject property is the third from
onTEer

LeeS3 75/76 Sir Lyraken Pirelling Estas, 6.P
Sanale Farvely Rudence

4 Hetikonns, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: Pan

Building Sox. nr

Appraised Walue: $161 (HUE

From East Street & Bamboo Doulevard (south beach Police
Station) travel east on Hamboo Boslevard tn the cound-ahoet
oonlinus Leraghing caehwant on CW Sanders Hackway ake
the cocond right. Lady Margene Pandligg Avenue, thes
take the Great bef, Lauren Srest and the subject property ic
the shateench bot on che eka.

Lot#42, Prodale Subdivision, MP.
Singk: Family Poesidence

J Dedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Sime: 43529 so fl
Bunchng Sane: 1,247 yh
Appraised Waluc: 71 J0ML00

Fron Fis, Hill iced! ail Berard Riteel, revel wee on
Herein Rood, naboe the frest lett Fos Derve then the chieed eight
Sparrow Lane and the sebject property is the last om dhe lett

Lot? 278 Pratt: Close Subdivision, NP
Single Furnily Besidence

4- Bedrooms, 2 - Bathrooms

Property Size: 542

Bunliing Sane: 1,220

Appraised Waluc: $750,500 1

Frome (anmchae! and Caokdes bikes Rows travel seth Wy the
the fest comer on the onmer on the left aad the mubeject
property is the 7th cm te wighe, beloe trim wile.

Lot Maloatm Rice Fai
Single Family Pbesidence

2 Hetbooms, 2 Bathroom:
Proporty Size: 4,000 sail
Bunkikng San Bel) ay
Appraised valix= 129 000,001

From East Street South - avel cast along Maden Road
aad tem right-on Winder Termace to the tirst road on the
left contiaue for about 3M) fund the subject property is on
the lett.

Single Family Residence

Loi, Fairew Subdivision

} Renate, 7 Palheeoers

Property See 6,950 cy tt

Busi ing Stee: 28 ag ft

Agprased Walae:$ 168 000

Poem Carmichael Rood & Ancgea Street, tovel sount on
Aatigua Street, tom right a the T-Janction, St. Vincent Road,
then take the second left ie Par View Heaghis, Shaereen
Avenue, then Grst right, Sharon Court, and che

subject property is the firs! om the left

Loe JAE Team Heights Subveion, MP
Single Family Resleace
4~ Hevbenens, 2 Haheerres
BE ty Sine: 125 ag. ft
ing Sine: M2 sq. ft
Agprsed Value: $255, $03 (Hi
Prom Prisce Charles Decree terec] south along Tryna Aver
and the subpect property is the hon the rigiri after the firs
comer on Ube right

Lot 1695 Pinewood Gasdens

Single Fearnily Rewdeace
1~ Hedbooms - 7 Bathrooms

ae Sane: 5,010) a
ing Steer 1523 29 -f
Appraised Value: $163,701 04

From Pigeon Mom Avenue - tavel west along Walnut Street
eraa-over Hay Geranium Avveaue and the subpaa property
i the Jed property on the lefl,

Loival, HIkeg phase? |, Faith Cmndens
Single Fermily Residence

4 Bedeooms. 2 Hatheooms

Pr Sao: 6/000 2g ft

fluniting Sime: 2H sqft

Apporsed Value: $295,675.10)

From the tealfie light af Faith Avenue & Cow Fen Roel, travel
eval along Faith Avernee: bo the critancr: be Foath Candens;
fann left and qnetliaoe bo the beat "7" jonctae, crn right snd
The sujet panpeerty is the 1 ch oe the night

Single Fermily emdeace
Lotti, Tropical Gardens
2 Dednoms, | Detheoon
Property size: 717 sq.ft
Feumihing Siew: 1,106 sag. fh
Apporced Valec$154 390,00

Travel west on Wiest Bary Siren te dhe fiest real on the len
afer passing Travelers Rest Resonant, Windsor Drive, revel
south te the secoad road en the right, Hollyhech

tveing west, the subject pempeny b situated om the second
comer on the left called Pansy Court

Loti. Golden Gales Estates?

Single Family Resdeace

(3) Bedineerre, (2) Palhooseres

Preparty Sen: 6/0000 cay tt

Baring Siac: 180 ag fi

Agprased Value: $207,000

Travel mea on Carmichael Road from Bloc Hill oad tem
onto the thind left Golden Sun Drive the comer afier
Suliosgory's sunglican Church and before Carmichael Primary
School travel south on Sun Drove to the first, trevve! west pass
fhe second comer on the night and the sebyect doerth property
on the night. The sebject is peated white brimmed white

Lot ef? Jen Sorect, LE, Conger Sulla neiaane, PF
Single Family Resuleace
2 Hedrons, 2 Hatheonns
p ty Same: 6,061 29 ft

ing sire: 1, 15h 09
Apprased Value: $250,M0(H)
Foom Prince Charles Deter, tum into Jean Streci brevee! narih
on Jean Steet to PLE. ‘Cooper sabdivisage pentinve directly
into. E, Cooper Subiivision and the subject the ninth
property on the beh. House ie while wimmned pron

Lot Crokdes dane: 82, Subalivcion, 4.P
Single Family Residence
4 Bedrooms, 2 Batheooms
Sane: 600 oy ft

ding Sine: | WH) sq.ft
Appraised Valor: $158,500.04)
Freom Carmichael Roc & Antes Street (Coliken Corie
Asscniblicg Church) travel] south oo Arttiguss Stecct and
The suibjce! propeetty i the: sort Dol cet he etch peel dee Firat
comer an the night

Lois, Frelia, Subdivision, WP
Single Family Beadence



Bedrooms, ? Bathrooms
Property Sitec: $000) on &
Building Stag: 1270 9.0
Appeaiaal Value $197,000.00

From Faith Aeeniue and Fire Trail eat on Filth Awenue,
follow the curwe around to the right | niraaiely (L608 a
toile ext of Pah Avenue take the first left into Prelia
Subdivision, thea the fies right and the subject property ts
the Last lots om the right.

Lot!) 24 Bel-Air Estates, MP.
Sage Family Residence

3 Readiris, I Recicaens
Prequerty: Sta sianan
Buikding Sine: 949 uy. fl
Appoaized Value ietocune

Prom Carmichael Rood aed Faith Avenue trevel casi on
Cannichael Road tedce the first right [euane Wey thes the
fourth ngat, Harbour Close. and the subgect property is the
third om tar bet

Lom) 6, Fete, Newey Gast North, 6P,

Single Family Residesce

) Bedrooms, 2 Bachronens

Property Sine 6088 a

Building Sie: 2398 og. ft

Appraised Value £551,215.00

Travel cast on Proce Charles Dire; tum left nic Massa
East Moria; trereel north bo the firs! comer on fae right and
the subjedt @ the socom property on fhe eR oo Northwest
Comer. The seboa is panntal green and terrence groan;
hogact 16

Lot situated northerside of Victoria Set & Lancaster Ra.
[vanhoe Subdivision, MP

4 Bedrooms, } Bathrooms - Single Family Residence

F y Sto 12651 59-f1

Building Stee: 5396 qf

Appraisal Value: $46,695.00

From Miaaey Sire anal Windsor Aad [by Wendy's
Fisher!) ave] easton Windsor Arve tise the soond ef in
Viewer Real, Gen the fest right whieh i Laseeser Hoed, the
subject property is the first on the left on the comer,

Loot le?, Taynam Hephis Subdivision
Richends Dean

Single Family Residence

5 Baatroom, 3 Bedroom

Progeerty Sitea> E00 say

BuiklingSiae: 2,553 ca fl

Appeal Viloe $307,000.00

Travel Exel on Prisee Clarkes diver: to the comer cast td bape
Walee Winton fom right and the sudject is the second boise
ao lett The subject is panied lime green and ommed
while.

Lot susie aporocimate by 70 ft westuard of Florida Court
Single Fastily Residence:

4 Radrooms, 2 Rathore

Property Sites 60000 aa

Buiklieg Size: 1,750 s9.ft

Appaaised Valor $227,000.00

Travel east on Balfour Avenue tothe fies rigit (Florida Court)
from Florida Court take the first right onto a 10 wide road
reservation and ike sudject @ de second house on the let
while Himmed prev.

Lity44 55 Sir Lerdes Pandliag Estes

Single Family Ressdence:

2 Badr, 2 Autre

Property Sues 3479 9 ot

Building size: 922 sq.

Appraised value-.14445)H)

From the round-about at Pinewood dr. travel cast on Charles
W Saunders Higteray onto Lady Marguerite Pindling Avenue;
travel sooth on Lady Margucnie Pindling

Awvtmue onto Lauren Sect, trove cast of Lauren Steet and
the subject property is the mpcany-cighr (78) propery on the
left. (paieted lime green and cremescd white)

LoctiAl, Victoria digsders, 6P.
Single farily Residence
2 Bedrooms, | Bexhroom

7 Stone 6 O0KE sa
Bui ing Sire: 816.5) mil
Appraisal Value &15), 62000

From J, F, Eermedy Drive travel south along Ghelstene Ad

fal take the (rel earn: on et (former Ciladsiene Farml,

continue acres the inemection end contiou: in the T juscion;
tem bet, then anotier bef ond the subject property ts the tth
on the raght

VACANT LAND

Let J - CB Wi of Blue Hill Heights

Proparty Sise: 43,560 at

Appraised Wale: 5250/0010

From Alue Hill Bead end Iedependene Highoaw west along
Tonique Willian Dorling Highway and tom leftom Premiers
Avenue (Farily Guardia on comer); continee along Poomier's
Avenue [nto * Estate ond turn right on dhe fest col-de-
a the subject property is directly ahead through 2 track

Loieid, Lower Ager Elegthera

Waetsant [ial

Property Sive: 0, TH2 sy

Appraised Value: 346,000.00

Travel westaurd on Skevline and Norhward Bay Street

the subject is the first vacant land after Save More Crnug
Store on ihe ight hand sade

Lot! 23) West Winds Subdivision. NF
Vacant Land

Peopurty Sec 14320 598

Approcel Valac $275,400.00

Travel weston weal Bliny Sonset and arn into Wet Wirwk:
pass socUrty pete and continue tT" junction. Tum lett and
eontinuc arund bend to neat bendicurve end dhe subject
Property is about 3,000 feet from bend on lett

Lot 152 West Winds Subdivision, MP
Vacant Land
Poeporty Sexe: 9775 sy fh

Appromcd Vale: $135 00000

Frere dhe (nlerscction of West Bay Sicet and Fernando Road
(Cianibier hip weal alone West Hay Sted and aim
left om the Ist unpaved gravel roadstake 2nd lett after poss
security gate chen left again ond the subject property is the
Tth on the lest, on the coree (bend).

Lot HOA, West of Mangold Road & South of Hanna Road
Vacant Land
Pooperty Sane: bb 107 sy JF



Appraisal Valu: 140,000 1

Lot 145 South Seas Subdivision

Vacast Land

Property Sine 7,067 sy

Appraised Val oe $45,000.00

Poor Canrichse! Pioad imree! south along Miller Road (Hacandi
Boag) and urn left into Sonthers Sees Dieter; pass dirough
security pate and tum right al 2nd Comer (Eastwood Drive)
continue to the'T Junction and the subject property is tbe Ind
on the rgb fren the T Junction,

Lio 85, Garden Cates Eswates 32, WP

Vacaal Land

Property Sine 4,754 2g

Appmized Valox S520)

Trevel west on Carmichael Ad fom Blue Hill Rd to the first
roedeay on the lett named Guadeloupe Rd. Travel o the end
of Quadeleepe Road. the lot on the Northwest cone,

APARTMENTS/CONDOMINIUMS

Lott) Gamble Heights

Triples Apartment

L- | Bed, | Bath, / 2 2 Bedrooms, | Bathroom:
Property Size: 7,750 sg.

Bulking Sen: 2,760 ay A

Appraised Value ‘S206, 000000

Fron Hie Hill Read & Fart Uoied Way, rowel eet on
Fetth Undied Way and the subject property is on the mgt
hand side, 2000 feet cast of Faith th United Carch and oppasite

a heary equipment depot.

Loi, Hillcrest Tower Condominiom, 4p.

Condominiem

2 Hetkeom, 2 Bathrooms

Unit Sive: 1,110 aq.

Appraissd Value: 20.0040

Teavel sou on Collin Avenue to Third Tersace ror. west on

Gir termace and the sabpect 6 oortained within the second

building on the night whoch is. a condomiaiem comples. The

pare =a subject compiles is painted lime green
in ‘winte.

Le" DP sites in Mairn Sebelivisare

Duples Townline Aparinicnt

Fach wah 2 Bedmem, | Bathroom

Property Size: 5541 sql

Buolding Sore 1,210 ag

Appraised Walue: $250,027 00

From Faith Avenve trvvel wed along Cow Pen Road and tum
Tight.on the 2ad comer, continue amg the road reservation
to the 44 property on the left.

Loe l2, Seawell Manor Sablivigios, WP
Tepes Apertnest
Eack Wait with 2 Bedroceta, | Bathirocen
ae Size: 6410 agit
ding Soe 1,47
Appraised Value: $197,565.00)
From Canmichael Rid. tavel north along Gladstone Road and
tum on Ge second comer on the neht: continue eT acto

ad torn Lefl; take befl take another lefl and the subject property
© Ge 5th on the lef.

Lott, Dik), Millers Heights Subdivision, MP
Duplex Aparineat

1-2 Bebo, | Bathroom

1-2 Beaberaenrs, 2 1/T Beathrroens

Peeperty Sex 7,510) say ft

Busiding Siac | 444 gt

Agprased Vale: [9444.00

Prom Carmichael Rood ravelling west, cum left onto Ext
Avenue, trevel south on Bast Avenue to the first comer on
the right travel north thereon to the fies: comer on the lef
(Margaret Avene) continee on Melansired Aver pes the first:
intersection and the subgect i: the fiflh property on the right
Painted mustard termed peach

La] ] Kaol Winds Sohdivisen, WLP
2 Soorey § Plex Apartment
All oni are | Hecbeom, | Bathroom
Sy oa Sire: DOG 2g it
ding Sie: 3.237 59
Agprased Value: $429, 720,HI
Feom the intersection of Foo Hill Road and Joe Farmngion

Rival trerve] soak on Fea Hall Rid, tale the: first qortacr on [hay
Fight and the subject 18 the second property on the lel,

Lot East Windsor Place Seldker Road

Duplex A
2. (2) Hatt oa
Hunding Se 1580

haere Valor: $172 400K)

Travel East on Sokdier Rood to the intersection near Sugar
Kall Barat: Pood Stone tora right and treree] 0p the ered of this
We aries (he (ETSeelen a) dhe Gir Nord el add the
subyect bs the Tear property on the left, which ts adoplex, The
@uplen is recently paumied Bee and inimened white with
enclosed fencing.

Lot Rocky pine Road

Duplex Apartnes

Each Lisit 2 Bedrooms, | Bathroom
Peepurty Senc 4475 ay fl

Fasting Star: 1,7)659.1)

Appoized Value §208,000,00

From Carmichael Road -trvel norik along Gladsione Eboad
lo Rocky Pine Foad tum night and continue to the third comer,
fem right and continu: for about |4GE feet and die eubject
property on the igitenckeesd with a chain link fee),

Loot Perion of James Howe ean
ben opartraent

Bach with 2 bedrooms, | baihrosm
ae Tacs

IMding Sie: | 303 sq.ft
Appraised Valor: $147, 48).00
From the: trafite light a1 the inlersndion of Com Pen and Blu:
Hill Roads, travel south ahioag Biloe Hill Rival and tum mph

On the Gra ial; the sabgent property is the ener Lot on the:
len.

Property situated 330 fect soeth Adelaide & Con) Harbour
Drapes Apartment

| «2 Bedrooms, 7 Batheoom, |» | Bedroom, | Bath
Property Sine: §, 690 oy &

Building Sise: 200 sq. fi

Appraisal Value 5295,043,00

Travel along Canmichec! Resad to the rank ecertapad
ee onto Ade lede Read nom lett a che fewrth comer which
is amewly paved eatrance road; continue south on this road
and the sobject is the serenth howse on the left split kere!
yellow trimmed white.

Lott 1b 1) Bk 45 Nassau Village Subdivision
Moli Family Resadence

Deples

Lint | -2 Bedrooms | Ratheson

Lint 2-3 Bedinoom 2 Butirenns

Progeerty See 2,000 a 5

Building Size: 216 sq.ft

Appraised Valoe: 826,714.00

From Soldier Road travel south along Taylor Saeet {entrance
ino Nossa Village, continuc across Abenandria Houbreard
and toon bef onto Laxton Avene, Shenoright on Jackson
Senet and fhe subject peoperty is abou! 275 feet on the bef.

(Cireen trim wkile

We providing financing to qualified buyers

CONTACT INFORMATION

RBC Royal Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO Loans Collection Centre



Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada
â„¢The Lion & Gloke sanbol and REC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada

RBC
FIM



PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





IMF: Global economy
starts slow recovery

B By CHRISTOPHER S
RUGABER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The global economy is begin-
ning a sluggish recovery from
its worst recession since World
War II, the International Mon-
etary Fund said Wednesday.

The IMF increased its esti-



mate for global economic
growth in 2010 to 2.5 per cent,
from an April projection of 1.9
per cent. At the same time, it
slightly downgraded its forecast
for this year to a contraction of
1.4 per cent, from 1.3 per cent.

“The global economy is still
in recession, but we’re inching
towards the recovery,” said
Olivier Blanchard, director of

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MANAGUA S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)












Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

















Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)






Legal Notice

NOTICE
JACSONNY HILLS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

the IMF’s research department.
“It’s much too early” to cut
back on government and cen-
tral bank efforts to stimulate
growth, he said.

Even growth of 2.5 per cent
won't be enough to keep global
unemployment from growing
next year, he added.

Financial conditions have
improved faster than the IMF
expected when it made its pre-
vious global forecast in April,
the fund said, largely due to
government support for banks
and other financial companies.

Much of the global recovery
will be driven by emerging
economies such as China and
India, the IMF said. China’s
economy is expected to grow
by 8.5 per cent in 2010, a full
point higher than previously
forecast. India is expected to

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



grow 6.5 per cent next year, 0.9
percentage points higher that
the previous forecast.

Advanced economies such as
the United States, Europe and
Japan, meanwhile, aren’t
expected to show sustained
growth until the second half of
next year, the IMF said.

Central banks that still have
room to cut interest rates should
do so, the IMF said, and gov-
ernments should continue to
stimulate their economies
through 2010 with measures
such as greater spending or tax
cuts.

At a news conference, Blan-
chard declined to comment
specifically on whether the Oba-
ma administration should con-
sider a second stimulus pack-
age, as some members of Con-
gress are beginning to advocate.

But he said consumer
demand could “be very weak
for longer than we anticipate,”
in which case government stim-
ulus should continue.

At the same time, the United
States and other advanced
economies should take steps to
limit future government spend-
ing on programmes such as
health care and retirement secu-
rity, he said, to reassure finan-
cial markets.

The IMF expects the US
economy to shrink by 2.6 per
cent this year, a slight improve-
ment from its earlier estimate
of a 2.8 per cent decline and in

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW BRIDGEPORT CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

line with many private forecasts.

The US will grow 0.8 per cent
in 2010, the IMF said, up from
its expectation in April of no
growth.

Separately, President Barack
Obama and group of world
leaders meeting in Italy agreed
that the global economy is too
unstable to begin rolling back
massive fiscal stimulus plans,
according to a draft statement
obtained by The Associated
Press.

The IMF provides loans and
other assistance to troubled

IN THE SUPREME COURT

Bahamas.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS §=2009/CLE/gen/qui/850

Common Law & Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF all that piece parcel or lot of land
comprising 719.77 acres situate on the Eastern side of the
Queenis Highway in the Settlement of Taits in the Island of
Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
AND
IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Veronica C. Miller (nee Major)

NOTICE

countries and has 186 member
nations. It saw its influence
decline earlier this decade as
developing country economies
boomed due to higher oil and
other commodity prices.

But the worldwide recession
has caused countries in Eastern
Europe and elsewhere to turn
to the fund for loans to support
their crippled economies.

Last month, at the behest of
the Obama administration,
Congress agreed to set aside $5
billion to secure a $108 billion
US line of credit for the IMF.

The Petition of VERONICA C. MILLER (nee Major) of
Taits, Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas in respect of:-

“ALL that piece parcel or lot of land situate on the Eastern
Side of the Queen’s Highway in the Settlement of Taits,
Long Island comprising 719.77 acres and which said
parcel of land is bounded on the NORTHWEST by a
loose stone wall separating it from other portions of the
original Grant to the Earl of Dunmore said to be the

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

property of Samuel Carroll and Nathan Major and running
thereon Eight thousand One hundred and Eight (8,108)
feet more or less on the NORTHEAST by the Atlantic
Ocean and running thereon in several courses Five
thousand and Seventy-one (5,071) feet more or less on

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KTLA FINES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

TO: Ms. Carla Johnson

No. 52B Churchill Road

South Bahamia

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Kindly remove your personal property from the above-
mentioned address, failure to do $0 within seven (7)

the SOUTHEAST by a loose stone wall separating it
from land originally granted to James Rose now said to
be the property of Timothy Darville and Ermest Dean and
running thereon Nine thousand Eight hundred and Thirty-
two (9,832) feet more or less on the SOUTHWEST by
land said to be the property of Emily Major and running
thereon Five hundred and Ninety-three and Forty-four
hundredths (593.44) feet on the NORTHWEST by land
said to be the property of Theresa Major and running
thereon Three hundred and Thirty-seven and Forty-nine
(337.49) feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property of
the said Theresa Major and running thereon Four hundred
and Seventy-eight and Twenty-two hundredths (478.22)
feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property of Melvin
Major and running thereon One thousand Five hundred
and Three and Ninety-two hundredths (1,503.92) feet
and by a Twenty (20) foot road reservation leading to the
Queen’s Highway, on the NORTHWEST by the property
of William Mortimer and running thereon Three hundred
and Thirty-five and Eighty-seven hundredths (335.87)
feet and on the SOUTHWEST by the property of the
said William Mortimer and running thereon Eight hundred
and Thirty-five and Eighty-one hundredths feet (835.81)
and which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position
shape marks boundaries and dimensions as are shown on

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is

Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

days from the date of this notice will result in the
removal of your personal property from the above-
mentioned address, without further notice to you, The
owners shall not be liable for any loss and/or damage
occasioned to your personal property after the expiry

outlined in Pink.

the plan filed herein and recorded in the Department of
Lands and Surveys and Plan “296 L.I” and thereon

VERONICA C. MILLER (nee Major) claims to be the

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GARETA ALPS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of June 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

of this notice,

DATED the 30th day of June, 2009.
THE OWRERS
No. 32, Churchill Road
South Bahamia
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORADELL GROVES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



owner in fee simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme
Court in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section
3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have her title to the
said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said
Act.

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours in the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the said City
of Nassau;

(b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes,
Mareva House, 4 George Street in the City of Nassau,
Attorneys for the Petitioner; and

(c) The office of the Administrator at Clarence Town,
Long Island.

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower or a
right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the 14th day of September,
2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed
form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of
any such person to file and serve a statement of his claim
on or before the said 14th day of September, 2009 will
operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Mareva House
George Street
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner







THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 11B



Stricter labelling urged for bottled water

@ By EMILY FREDRIX

AP Food Industry Writer

CONSUMERS know less
about the water they pay dear-
ly for in bottles than what they
can drink almost for free from
the tap because the two are reg-
ulated differently, congression-
al investigators and nonprofit
researchers say in new reports.

Both the Government
Accountability Office and the
Environmental Working
Group, a nonprofit research and
advocacy organisation, recom-
mend in reports released
Wednesday that bottled water
be labeled with the same level
of information municipal water
providers must disclose.

The researchers urged Amer-
icans to make bottled water “a
distant second choice” to fil-
tered tap water because there
isn’t enough information about
bottled water. The working
group recommends purifying
tap water with a commercial fil-
ter, however.

Both reports were released
at a congressional subcommit-
tee Wednesday morning.

Bottled water — an industry
worth about $16 billion in sales
last year — has been suffering
lately as colleges, communities
and some governments take
measures to limit or ban its con-
sumption. As employers, they
are motivated by cost savings
and environmental concern
because the bottles often are
not recycled.

Bottled water sales were
growing by double-digit per-
centages for years and were
helping buoy the US beverage
industry overall. But they were
flat last year, according to trade
publication Beverage Digest.

Beverage Digest editor John
Sicher said some consumers are
turning on the tap during the
recession simply because it’s
cheaper.

From 1997 to 2007, the
amount of bottled water con-
sumed per person in the US
more than doubled, from 13.4
gallons to 29.3 gallons, the
GAO report said.

The issue before a subcom-
mittee of the Energy and Com-
merce Committee was less
about waste and water quality
concerns and more about the
mechanics of regulating bottled
water.

As a food product, bottled
water is regulated by the Food
and Drug Administration and
required to show nutrition
information and ingredients on
its labels. Municipal water is
under the control of the Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency.

The two agencies have similar
standards for water quality, but
the FDA has less authority to
enforce them, the GAO said,
and the environmental agency
requires much more testing.

Subcommittee chairman Rep.



IN THIS June 3, 2008, file photo, Liberty Valley Elementary School kindergarten student Tianna Swisher moves
into an arc of water for a drink at the fountain at Montour Preserve, near Washingtonville, Pa. , while classmate

Eli Zakarian awaits his turn...

Bart Stupak, D-Mich., said the
subcommittee was requesting
information Wednesday from a
dozen bottled water companies
on their water sources, treat-
ment methods and two years’
results of contaminant testing. It
was not immediately clear
which companies were being
contacted.

“Consumers may not realize
that many regulations that apply
to municipalities responsible for
tap water do not apply to com-
panies that produce bottled
water,” he said in statements

opening the hearing.

The GAO noted the FDA
has yet to set standards for
DEHP, one of several chemi-
cals known as phthalates that
are found in many household
products, while the EPA limits
the presence of phthalates in
tap water.

In a survey of officials in all
50 states and the District of
Columbia, the GAO found they
think consumers are misin-
formed about bottled water.

“Many replied that con-
sumers often believe that bot-

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

Probate Side

IN THE ESTATE OF RUPERT A.R. CULMER,
late of No. 3 Imperial Park,

in the Eastern District of New

Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any
claim or demand against the above Estate are required to
send the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned
on or before the 20th August, 2009 after which date the
Executrix will proceed to distribute the assets having

regard only to the claims of which she shall then have had
notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

JOSEPH C. LEDEE
Chambers
Suite No. 6, Grosvenor Close
Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Executrix

(July 9, 16, 23)

tA



NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS MORTGAGE CORPORATION
TENDER FOR GROUP HAZARD INSURANCE

The Bahamas Mortgage Corporation is inviting proposals
from insurance companies for the provision of hazard
insurance coverage to contractors and homeowners of
properties mortgaged to the Corporation.

The proposal should be for a three year period ist

(AP Photo: Bill Hughes)

tled water is safer or healthier
than tap water,” according to
the GAO report.

The Washington, D.C.-based

Environmental Working Group
said in its report that consumers
do not get enough information
to determine which water is best
for them.

Both groups said some bot-
tled water brands include the
same information required of
tap water providers on either
labels or company Web sites.

The GAO called for more
research but said the FDA
should start by requiring that
bottled water labels tell con-
sumers where to find out more.

Community water systems
must distribute annual reports
about their water’s source, con-
taminants and possible health
concerns.

Consumers should know
where all their water comes
from, how it is treated and what
is found in it, said Richard
Wiles, senior vice president for
policy and communications for
the Environmental Working
Group.

“Tf the municipal tap water
systems can tell their customers
this information, you would
think that bottled water com-
panies that charge 1,000 times
more for this water could also

let consumers know the same
thing,” he told The Associated
Press.

The bottled water industry’s
trade group, the International
Bottled Water Association,
planned to testify Wednesday
that the product, — subject to
the same regulation as other
soft drinks, teas, juices and oth-
er beverages — is safe. Addi-
tional standards apply for bot-
tled water products labeled as
“purified water” or “spring
water,” among other labels,
because they must prove a con-
nection to those sources,
according to planned testimo-
ny from Joseph Doss, president
and chief executive of the Inter-
national Bottled Water Associ-
ation.

Doss said consumers can
learn about bottled water by
contacting the company, read-
ing its Web site and visiting sites
run by state governments.

State safeguards for bottled
water often exceed the federal,
though they are less stringent
than for tap water, the GAO
wrote. The trade group declined
to comment on the reports
before they are released.

















































Varane bat #147
(10,55 754. Pr - Minin eens

Or & Rary Wet Lane

Southern Heigets Sub
[Appraised Vale
$90,000.00)

Unit #8 (409sq. F<
(1) Bedroom
ting, dintng room &
icitchene West Bay St
Westward Villas Soh

Bonner Agpuar one nice
(Appraised Vales
$125,000.00)

Lat (5o°x100")
wf Gullding 1,4 124q. ft
Deweaus St [Appraised
Value $1399.000.00)

Lats 429 & #30,

{S0'n 100°), Bik #47
w/building 1,140sq. ft
Matthew St, Nata
Vilbge (Appraised
Value $145,000.00)

Lat #5 EG
(150'x100') whee
Silver Palm Lia lmperial
Park (Apprabed Valuc
5313, 650,00)

Lat #135 [50°90]
wile 134238q, -
Sonfower [south]
Sunshine Park Sub Hse
f& [Appraised Value
$175,000.00)

Lat #11 (10T x00}
wihse Z.026sy. -Sunset
Radge Or, Surset Ridge
Sub Hee #28 (Appraised
Valuc $206.000.00)

Aiilros

Beach from lor 9,O008q
Pt wbuilding 2,100
ft=Pinders tangrovwe
Cay Andros (Appralsed
Value $200,000.00)
Lat 434-454) fh, wyiduplex
truilcling, 1,174aq, M-
Presh Creek, Arcl rie
(Appraised Value
604 oOo)

Toman Hahei

Bike, Section #2-Sea
Gull Dr, Bahama Reet
Yacht & Country Club
Suh Grand Bahama
[Appraised Valine
$250,000.10)

Vacant lot 49, Blk #49
(14,59 7sq. ft]-
Yorkshire Dr, Bahama
West Replat Gram

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK

Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
P.O.Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Telz(242) 327-5780/327-3793-6
Fan:(242) 327-3047, 327-1238
www. bahamasdevelopmenthank.com

rttl

Bahama (Appraised
Value $25 000,00)

L2. Vacant Lot #6 Blk #12

Unit #3 [112 50sq. &.]
Henny Ave Derby Sub
Grand Baha
(Appraised Value
$65,000.00)

LS. Lotm’s 6 [100 x1)

whe & Duplex:sMelson
Ri Poinclana Gardens
Grarwi Bahai
(Appraised Value
$96,000.00}

14. Lot #37 [50%<1 50°)

Wi Sioplex 2storey
apartrecet building &
Church 54006q, f-
Martin Town, Kites Suh
Eight Mile Rock Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $211,200.00)
Lot wf 10 mam hore!
5,0G0ey. fh, on 4.99
acres af beach front-
High Berk Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value £1, 100,000.00)

16, Wacant lot #13, Blk #59

Unit #3 [22.7 52eq. 8)
45° of canal fren
Dagenham Circle &
Ingrave Or Emerald Bay
Sub Grind Bahama
(Appraised Value
$110,000.00)

Lot #15, Bik #15 Unit
#3 (90°125']-Derby
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$2300 0)

Wacant kat #25, Blk #15
(17.866eq. f.]

Cobwater Ln Shannon
Country Chab Sub Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Valus $28,000.00)

19, Lope? (20,0009. )

wi building Gomplex &
coin Laundromat-
Queens Highway
Holmes Rock
Comioanage Crane
Bahantia (Appraised
Value $176,600,00)]
Absco

M0. Lot Add E (6 500sq. fe.)

wi triples foundation
2,728 ey. tt.-Murphy
Town Abacos

(Appraised Value
$24,096.00)

21 Vacant lot 6 [2 acres)

Pox Town fibaco
(Appraised Value
S50, b0G00)

22 Lor #51 [15,000seq tt.)

wi buikding-M orphy
Town Abaco
(Appraised Value
S102 42000)

2% Poethen af lor #69

(15 ,/0080ey. fh. -Prane Sa
Murphy Town Abaco
(Appraised Value
$29,250.00]

Loc #35 [6,900sq, ft]

Ww bik ing-M arpa
Tenn Abe t
(Appraised Value
$82,075.00)

25 Lot 45 [60's 160")

wi 14 poem teotel
S0008q, M-Sandy Point
Abec (Appraised
Value $405,700.00)
Lot 87 120sy. Pr w 4
cottages & 1 store
huthdiing: total
4,1 féaq, t-Sand Ranke
Treasure Cay Aleeon
(Appraised Value
S00 50800)
Eleuthera
Vacant portion of lot #7
(50's. LO" pees paames
Cistenn Bleuthera
(Appraised Value
S18, 000]
Cae (bana
Vacant 6&5 acres of
land-Arthirs Tien, Car
[shend (Appraised
Value $90,000.00)
Lot w/l2 room mobel
1.39 actes-s/irtour
Town Cat balare
(Appraised Value
$630 10000)

30. Vacant bot #6 [65200sq

th |-Mogs Town Exuima
(Appraised Value
$110,188.00)

TL Lot (30,4005 Pep wy
somal el 4520
& exclusive beac
Forbes HII Eauma
(Appraised Valac
$1,400, 000,00)

EY. Vacant lot #95.
(00'«122"] Commodore
Red Blixabeth Harbcar
Est. Eximea (Auppsraised
Value $45,000.00)

a. Lat #194 (7 S65")
abun storey bik ling
George Town, Exuma
[Appraised Value

september, 2009 to 31st August, 2012.

$460, P00 00)
ASSETS
Wessels
20° (15) Roboks Vessel wl 15 HP Evinrede engin
974) Seacram Veasel wf 140 HP Yaraha engine
?) Hatters Veese] (MY Buddy)

VWohicles
(1) 03 Dextge Caravan
(1) 96 Ford Eagqiorer
(1) 97 Dodge Strabes
Fiberglass Sports Vessel (Hull Only) [2101 Kitchen Tandem Cheroker Trailer

Companies interested in submitting a proposal may collect
an information package from The Bahamas Mortgage as (2) 80 KinBus 12Seater
. } 7 . } 7 Diese engine (Saree Qharkoane (1) 99 Pard F256 wk
Corporation’s Head Office, Russell Road, Oakes Field, Sexe Stel all 1960) MV is re (197 Dai Ade Mak Dap Trac
rei ri Sradtord Mi wnat iiehers . as ee Ford ce Tr i
Nassau, Bahamas. sc :1 (Sweet Dreauns) [1] 89 Ford LADOG Drill Truck

ender Vessel (Queen Vashei| (1) 92 Mack Teck (Carmichael Rd]

i imemed to submit Seabed bids marked “Tender” to Bahamas Development Be
2s attention Finacial Controller, faced bids will mot be accepted of tele
Linfortmatios, Pleas note that all boon the aferenionnioned properties and aiets f
uly 17, 2009. The Bahamas Developancmt Bank reserves Che right to reject any or all offers. All assets

ome 32

ay
ehicai led ba Pinte

The deadline for collection of the information package is
Friday, July 09, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. aresoldasts.





PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





TST

For the stories
WaT Ru

aa eT
ME
Monilays

@ By KIMBERLY HEFLING
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Projects in some of the nation’s



MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
PORT DEPARTMENT
GOVERNMENT NOTICE
INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting tenders
for the following contracted service for the Port De-
partment, Ministry of The Environment.

¢ The Cleaning of Prince George Dock

Interested parties may obtain further information,
and may collect the bidding document as of July 6
2009 from:

The Port Department
Prince George Dock
Nassau, The Bahamas
Telephone Number 322-8832

between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Mon-
day through Friday.

Tenders are to be submitted in Triplicate (3) in a
sealed envelope(s) maked “Tender For Cleaning of
Prince George Dock” addressed to:

The Chairman
Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas

no later than 5:00 p.m. on July 14, 2009.
Tenders will be opened at 10:00 a.m. on July 15,

2009 at the Office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of
Finance.

THE GOVERNMENT RESERVES THE
RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL TENDERS.



poorest areas don’t appear to
be getting a fair shake in the
spending of $787 billion in stim-
ulus funds, the chairman of the
House oversight committee said
Wednesday.

Rep. Edolphus Towns, D-
N.Y., chairman of the panel,
said he was particularly con-
cerned that transportation pro-
jects in economically distressed
areas were being left out —
even though they are supposed
to be a priority.

“There is a substantial varia-
tion among states as to what
constitutes an economically dis-
tressed area,” Towns said. “For
this reason, it is unclear whether
Recovery Act funds are going
where they are needed most.”

Towns comments came in
response to a Government
Accountability Office report
released Wednesday at a hear-
ing before his committee.

The GAO said about half the

“For this reason,
it is unclear
whether Recovery
Act funds are going
where they are

needed most.”
— Edolpbus Towns

money set aside for road and
bridge repairs is being used to
repave highways rather than
building new infrastructure.
And state officials aren’t steer-
ing the money toward counties
that need jobs the most, audi-
tors found.

The Obama administration
intended for the stimulus to
jump-start the economy, build
new schools and usher in an era

of education reform. But gov-
ernment auditors said many
states are setting aside grand
plans to stay afloat.

The GAO said the stimulus is
keeping teachers off the unem-
ployment lines, helping states
make greater Medicaid pay-
ments and providing a desper-
ately needed cushion to state
budgets.

But investigators found
repeated examples in which,
either out of desperation or con-
venience, states favored short-
term spending over long-term
efforts such as education
reform.

In Flint, Mich., for example,
new schools haven’t been built
in 30 years but the school super-
intendent told auditors he
would use federal money to
cope with budget deficits rather
than building new schools or

US states using stimulus
money to remain afloat

paying for early childhood edu-
cation.

The 400-page stimulus
includes provisions for long-
term growth, such as high-speed
rail and energy efficiency, but
their effects will be seen later.

Since Obama signed the stim-
ulus bill in February, the econ-
omy has shed more than two
million jobs. Unemployment
now stands at 9.5 per cent, the
highest in more than a quarter
century.

Robert L Nabors II, deputy
director of the Office of Man-
agement and Budget, testified
that 150,000 jobs had been cre-
ated from stimulus spending.
With the stimulus spending, he
said the nation is moving down
the right path.

“We are making progress, but
we still have a long way to go,”
Nabors said.

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in
Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.



SECRESEEE SEER ES SEEEEEEEE SE ECEEE EEE EERE EERE E EEEE EEE SE BEES 8

‘ce Neer
Oe (Gle))a a tae





$7

French Beans



Patty Pan Squash

$6"

Sugar Snap Peas

$6%

Snow Peas





Baby Zucchini



$13â„¢

Cittero Rosemary Ham
1 lh



$6"

_ SikLive Soy Vanilla Yoourt
32 OF.



$7"
Simply Gourmet also has in
a wide array of specilaty
and the finest selection of caviar
available in Nassau

Call 393-0905 or visit us at our store
on the corner of Shirley St. & Kemp Rd.
in the Fine Image Building
to find out more

$7

Sunburst Squash

TEC PRR LEER RTT E RR TEER RTE ERT TERETE ERT TERRE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/0873
Equity Side

IN THE MATTER of All that parcel of land
containing 5 Acres situate to the North North East
of The Settlement of Cherokee Sound, Abaco.

AND
IN THE MATTER ofThe Quieting Titles Act 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Charles Earl Bethel

NOTICE

The Petition of Charles Earl Bethel formerly of
Cherokee Sound, Abaco one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and now a resident
of the State of New York one of the United States
ofAmerica in respect of:-

ALL THAT parcel of land comprising Five (5)
Actes situate to the Northnortheast of the Settlement
of Cherokee Sound in the Island of Abaco one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
and which said parcel of land is bounded on the
NORTHEAST and NORTH by vacant Crown
Land and running thereon One thousand Six
hundred and Seventy-eight and Seventy-one
hundredths (1,678.71) feet on the EAST by vacant
Crown Land and running thereon One hundred
and Thirty-two (132) feet more or less on the
SOUTH and SOUTHWEST by the Sea and
running thereon One thousand Eight hundred and
Thirteen (1,813) feet more or less and on the
NORTHWEST by Grant B-87 and running
thereon One hundred and Thirty-two (132) feet
more or less and which said piece parcel or lot of
land has such position shape marks boundaries
and dimensions as are shown on the diagram or
plan filed in this matter Being Plan No.1879 AB
and is delineated on that part of the plan which is
coloured PINK.

Charles Earl Bethel claims to be the owner in fee
simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and has made application to the
Supreme Court in the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas under Section 3 of The Quieting Titles
Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title
to be granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act.

A plan of the said land may be inspected during
normal office hours in the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the
said City of Nassau;

(b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, Mareva House, 4 George Street
in the City of Nassau, Attorneys for the
Petitioner; and

(c) The office of the Administrator at Sandy
Point, Abaco.

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower
or a right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim
not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the
14th day of September, 2009 file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned
a statement of his claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure
of any such person to file and serve a statement of
his claim on or before the said 14th day of September,
2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for the Petitioner
Mareva House
4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas





THE TRIBUNE



THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST



>

TAMPA
High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 77° F/25°C

@ ¢
KEY WEST

High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 82° F/28° C

ORLANDO |
High: 89° F/32°C
Low: 72° F/22°C



Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

High

F/C

Albuquerque 93/33
Anchorage 77/25
Atlanta 85/29
Atlantic City 80/26
Baltimore 82/27
Boston 68/20
Buffalo 74/23
Charleston, SC 85/29
Chicago 82/27
Cleveland 82/27
Dallas 102/38
Denver 90/32
Detroit 80/26
Honolulu 88/31
Houston 98/36

Today

Low

F/C
68/20
57/13
68/20
59/15
62/16
56/13
60/15
69/20
69/20
62/16
78/25
61/16
63/17
75/23
76/24

Ww

High

F/C
93/33
76/24
86/30
78/25
80/26
73/22
78/25
85/29
87/30
85/29
102/38
97/36
85/29
88/31
98/36

Friday

Low

F/C
70/21
58/14
69/20
62/16
64/17
60/15
65/18
70/21
67/19
70/21
78/25
60/15
67/19
76/24
77/25

Ww

s
pce
pe
s
s
s
pe
t
t
pe
s
t
t
pe
s

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York



A full day of Clear. Bright and sunny.
sunshine.

. High: 90°
High: 92° Low: 82° Low: 81°
PETE
118° F | _108°-88° F

ae

i.

Clouds and sun, a
shower possible.

High: 89°
Low: 80°

100°-85° F

=

Partly sunny, a

t-storm possible.
High: 90°
Low: 79°
103°-82° F

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and

SN eT ee oi

INSURANCE M

AGEMENT



Mostly sunny with a

shower possible.

elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

@ WEST PALM BEACH
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 77° F/25°C

FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 91° F/33° C Qa
Low: 80° F/27°C

@
MIAMI
High: 93° F/34°C

Low: 79° F/26° C

<



High
F/C
88/31
87/30
96/35
102/38
96/35
82/27
838/31
95/35
93/33
82/27
92/33
90/32
76/24

Oklahoma City 101/38

Orlando

89/31

FT

Today

Low

F/C
66/18
70/21
74/23
78/25
72/22
62/16
68/20
75/23
79/26
66/18
68/20
76/24
63/17
75/23
72/22

Ww

High

F/C
89/31
87/30
92/33
105/40
94/34
84/28
92/33
96/35
92/33
83/28
92/33
92/33
79/26
104/40
91/32

Friday

Low

F/C
71/21
71/21
78/25
84/28
74/23
64/17
72/22
77/25
79/26
63/17
70/21
74/23
66/18
72/22
73/22

FREEPORT
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 77° F/25°C

ABACO
High: 92° F/33° C

NASSAU

Low:81°F/27°C

0

Temperature

Normal high ....

Normal low
Last year's high
Last year's low
Precipitation

As of 2 p.m. yesterday .o.....ccccccccccccetseeceneee 0.00"
Year to date a
Normal year to date

AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by

ELEUTHERA

High: 95° F/35° C
Low: 79° F/26° C

High: 92° F/33° C

Low: 82° F/28° C
&

i

ANDROS
High: 98° F/37° C
Low: 80° F/27°C

W High

F/C
t Philadelphia 82/27
t Phoenix 105/40
pe Pittsburgh 80/26
$ Portland, OR 77/25
s Raleigh-Durham 88/31
pc St. Louis 92/33
S Salt Lake City 89/31
s San Antonio 102/38
t San Diego 75/23
pc San Francisco 69/20
s Seattle 74/23
t Tallahassee 90/32
s Tampa 88/31
Ss Tucson 100/37
t Washington, DC 82/27

Today

Low

F/C
64/17
85/29
59/15
55/12
64/17
73/22
63/17
78/25
67/19
54/12
53/11
70/21
77/25
77/25
65/18

Ww

pe
s
s
pe
pe
s
s
s
pe
pe
pe
t
t
pe
pe

GREAT EXUMA

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 80° F/27° C

Friday

High Low
F/C F/C
83/28 66/18
108/42 38/31
86/30 65/18
86/30 59/15
88/31 66/18
95/35 75/23
90/32 66/18
100/37 76/24
77/25 67/19
68/20 55/12
78/25 57/13
89/31 72/22
91/32 76/24
102/38 78/25
82/27 68/20

Ww

Ss

pe

pe

nn

pe
pe

wn

on eo

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday





High: 88°
Low: 81° a ES)
AccuWeather RealFeel
96°-88° F High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht. (ft.
Tod 9:50am. 24 3:48am. 0.1
wv 10:09pm. 27 348pm. 02
Frid 10:26am. 24 F28am. 04
mV 10:43pm. 26 4:27pm. 03
Saturd 11:08am. 25 4:57am. 0.2
ay 419 pm. 26 5:08pm. 03
91° F/33° C 1142 25. 531 02
5 3 Sunday : a.m. fi : a.m. .
80° F/27° C : .
88° F/31° C 11:57pm. 25 5:50pm. 04
75° F/24° C
sore c AIT)
81° F/27° C
Sunrise...... 6:27 am. Moonrise .... 9:41 p.m.
Sunset....... 8:03 p.m. Moonset..... 8:17 a.m.
New

2

o|1|2

LOW

Last



Jul. 15



MODERATE

3|4[5|





7|8|9f1

HIGH |



\. HIGH

A] INDEX NY

wv
| 0
EXT.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

greater the need for eye and skin protection.

AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 21
CATISLAND
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 74° F/23°C
a SAN SALVADOR
High: 93° F/24° C
Low: 76° F/24° C
LONGISLAND
High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 75° F/24°C
ow: MAYAGUANA

High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 73° F/23°C

CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS

RAGGED ISLAND
High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 72° F/22° C

High: 95° F/35° C
Low: 76° F/24°C

GREAT INAGUA .

High: 94° F/34°C
Low: 76° F/24°C

wo

Jul. 28

First







Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
64/17
91/32
94/34
55/12
90/32
86/30
81/27
95/35
86/30
83/28
67/19
82/27
64/17
66/18
81/27
55/12
100/37
94/34
60/15
91/32
80/26
81/27
67/19
63/17
66/18
70/21
68/20
93/33
66/18
91/32
108/42
91/32
84/28
64/17
89/31
72/22
68/20
90/32
85/29
79/26
104/40
75/23
74/23
68/20
76/24
104/40
66/18
68/20
68/20
82/27
102/38
81/27
90/32
64/17
84/28
61/16
90/32
73/22
79/26
68/20
63/17
93/33
84/28
73/22
79/26
70/21
75/23
68/20
73/22

fi

Today

Low
F/C
77/25
54/12
57/13
73/22
42/5
79/26
77/25
65/18
72/22
77/25
62/16
52/11
77/25
45/7
50/10
61/16
39/3
74/23
84/28
39/3
77/25
71/21
64/17
55/12
43/8
50/10
52/11
48/8
5/28
54/12
81/27
83/28
77/25
63/17
41/5
79/26
59/15
52/11
63/17
77/25
54/12
75/23
57/13
63/17
46/7
53/11
86/30
54/12
52/11
52/11
69/20
80/26
61/16
79/26
32/0
70/21
34/1
73/22
60/15
68/20
SoZ
45/7
79/26
73/22
64/17
64/17
56/13
57/13
52/11
58/14

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MARINE FORECAST

—> &

<>

oO

nn
— —

= NO

pc
pc
sh
t

High
F/C
88/31
63/17
90/32
92/33
56/13
91/32
86/30
72/22
97/36
82/27
82/27
68/20
82/27
67/19
64/17
75/23
55/12
102/38
94/34
68/20
91/32
80/26
79/26
63/17
64/17
68/20
69/20
72/22
91/32
66/18
91/32
107/41
90/32
86/30
66/18
89/31
71/21
72/22
91/32
85/29
74/23
100/37
81/27
77/25
65/18
78/25
102/38
69/20
72/22
68/20
82/27
104/40
81/27
88/31
51/10
86/30
57/13
86/30
72/22
86/30
68/20
63/17
93/33
84/28
79/26
86/30
74/23
72/22
72/22
71/21

Friday

Low
F/C
75/23
54/12
59/15
73/22
43/6
78/25
77/25
66/18
75/23
77/25
63/17
52/11
77/25
42/5
54/12
59/15
39/3
78/25
85/29
48/8
75/23
71/21
61/16
56/13
50/10
50/10
49/9
52/11
72/22
55/12
81/27
85/29
74/23
65/18
40/4
79/26
60/15
54/12
64/17
78/25
51/10
75/23
64/17
57/13
48/8
52/11
86/30
54/12
52/11
51/10
70/21
80/26
59/15
79/26
23/-5
74/23
34/1
73/22
62/16
70/21
54/12
45/7
77/25
73/22
64/17
66/18
59/15
55/12
54/12
48/8

—™ toa fee + tee ee ie
oa > is

nn
=

nw
=> he

nT Nn
S23

z= TM FTT]DTTMH AA N
oa >

pe
pe
C

c

pe
pe
pc
pe
pe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SSE at 8-16 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
Friday: SE at 8-26 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 8-16 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Friday: SE at 8-16 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
ABACO Today: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Friday: $ at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

\VosyAngeles,

82/62

Showers
[XX] T-storms

Rain
*_* Flurries
pe] Snow

[y_y] Ice

-10s









a Billings
81/54

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Miami
93/79

Fronts
Cold

War Mliieilienll,

Stationary Menguaii

Os (0s | 10s 20s [S0s]) 40s 50s 60s 70s sos /S0s(//iO0ST/Aiiel

lO a GANS lem SN PslOheUh | Gis

. ‘Yo
Away

Or you can rest easy knowing

that yo

Gan Bs

Blown

ulTicane

have excellent insurance

rage no matter which
he wind

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

way

blows.

3 needs panene| weperae sot





PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

(O ard of Thanks for the late

Millied Sohnien Bowe

Suly 10th, 1930 - October Ith, 2008

We,the Family of Mildred Johnson Bowe would like to
extend our sincere thanks to all for your kind, gracious
expressions of ee assuring words, prayers,
visitations, telephone calls, floral arrangements and
other =ympatieue gestures shown to us during our
time of bereavement.

May the Lord bless and keep you and show his
gracious favour upon you.

We The Family

WS:
Neville E:. Cartwright
of Chicago and formerly, of Cartwright’s Long
Island will be held at St. Thomas More Church
on Madeira Street, Palmdale on
Saturday July 11, 2009 at 11 a.m.






ia Officiating will be Rev. Msgr. Alfred C. Culmer
“4 _assisted_by_Deacon_Dennis_Mackey.

eae a = mmr —a






THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Sean Ernest Munroe
igth March 1965 - 11th July 2008

“Like a comet blazing ‘cross the
evening sky
Gone too soon

Sean, we miss your smiling face, your
warm and tender embrace,
We are eternally grateful for the love
and care you've shown us
The times we've shared are all
pleasant memories.

Sean, you went away from us too soon
Our hearts still ache, we miss you so
sleep on Sean and take your rest
We'll always love and cherish you
Jesus loves you best

Like the loss of sunlight

on a cloudy afternoon
Gone too soon

Cherished memories are held by
Earilee, his wife; Mateo his son;
Mary Munroe his devoted mother;
sisters, Lisa Hall, Chantal Munroe
and Deborah Johnson; brothers,
Richard and Pastor Stephen Munroe;
nieces and nephews, uncles and
aunts; numerous cousins, in-law,
co-workers and friends





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES TEURSDE Ts JULY 9, e002;

Card of Thanks

URBAN SINCLAIR | of

‘*Frenchie”’ . nM mother, orandmotths Lt
MILLER JR. great grandmother

24th May 1952 - 2008

, PAGE 3

We the Miller family wish to express heartfelt gratitude
and appreciation to all of you who conveyed condolences
to us during our time of bereavement. |

We are grateful for the many telephone calls, prayers,
words of encouragement, well wishes and for every
kind gesture shown to us during our time of sorrow,

Special thanks to the doctors and nurses at P.M.H. and
the entire family at National Insurance Board.

~ The Family ~

Mrs. Ellen R. Knowles

June 197] - July 2007

We continue to be inspired when
we remember her

STRENGTH...Facing the trials of life but always
with her head held high.

INDEPENDENCE...Standing proudly on her own
with her hand in God's hand.

WISDOM...Reaching for the unbelievable and
striving for the undeniable.

GRATITUDE... Appreciating always the smallest
acts of human generosity.

With love and gratitude in our hearts forever: Ena and
Henry Major, Colleen Adderley, Olivia and Lockhart
Turnquest, Thelma and Thomas Dean, Elma and Robert
Carraway, Harriet and Clyde Pratt; grandchildren and
oreat-grandchildren.







PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

; Bishop Donald
Sweeting

22nd Sept. 1934 - July 13th, 2006

Don't grieve for me, for now I'm free | Be not burdened with times of sorrow.
I'm following the path God laid for ave, J with pow the sunshine of tomer,
took His hone when f heard him call; |
J termed my back ane lef? it oll : My life's been full, I savored mach;
: Grad friends, good tanes, a loved anes
T canld ant stay anether day, : fanch.
To lavgh, to love, to work or ploy,
Tasks left wadowe most stay thot way; | Perhaps my sre seers off foo brief;
I found that ploce at the close of day. Dont leagiies if now with wade pref,
; Lift up your heart and share with me,
ff ary parting hag left a reid, Cod wine? mie and ke ser me free.
Then fill if with remembered jor |
A friendship shared, a laugh, ao kiss;
AA yes, these things, I tec will miss, 3

Gone but not forgotten

~ The Family ~

The family of the late MICHAEL DEWEES SWEETING would like to express thanks to
the many persons who offered care during the latter years of his life, and especially
to lage whe made Lhe almost one year of illnesa and hospilalizalion easier to bear,

Michael was diagnosed with colan cancer in 2002. A team of doctors and nurses at
the Princess Margaret Hospital, led by Or, Williamson Chea, successfully saw him
through the surgery and recovery process, and he was able to return to work. In
Seplamber of 2008, Micheal was again hospitalized, and alter aaveral months of care
by tha hospital staff, returned to his home, where friends and neighbours visited. He
was hospitalized again a few montha ago, and passed away in the Princess Margaret
Hospital on ist. July, at ihe age of 72.

Or. Christine Chin has givan ouistanding cara, supported by many caring and
dedicated nurses. The family wishes to thank the Ministers of the Gospel whe visited
Michael {aspecially Rav, Brown of Central Baptist Church), his co-workers at Bahamas
Welding and Fire (especially Mr. Elliott and Mrs. Graham) and others. When at home
he Was cared for by his daughters Joanna and Janice and their husbands, and in
hospital many of the doctors and nurses want far beyond the call of duty. Special
friends and neighbours visiled ragularly and assisted with his care, especially Mr
Leonard,Skinny, Archer, Mr. Scottie Malone, Stephanie & family, Mr. Gadet and
Misa Lillian Loboaky.

Michael was predeceased by his sisters (Frances, Marie Murray and Bayverlay Honess)
and by his adopted sister (Eugia Knowles), Ha is survived by his daughters and sons-
in-law, Joanna & Stan Bethel and Janice & Mark Hayling, by his four grandchildran
(Brian & Fallon Bethel and Lagh and Noah Hayling), one graat-grand-daughtar (India),
two brothers (Sydney & Charles) and their familias, numerous nieces and nephows
and their families and other family members and friends,

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

In Loving Memory

of Our Dear Mother

It has been nine years since youive leftus
You were that special person with a special face:
Someone we loved and can't replace,
Never selfish always kind,
These are just a few of the memories you have left behind,

Always in the hearts of her children: Nathalie, Curlean,
Eldora, Annavee, Rowena, Karen and Samuel; In-Laws,
grandchildren, grea-grandchildren, brothers,
family and friends.

Too well loved to be forgotten!



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 5

Yager funeral Home & Crematorium

Queen's Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 * Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

EVELYN
*Evie’ ‘Ma’
McINTOSH
SAUNDERS, 62

a resident of Crown Haven, |
Abaco and Gold Rock Creek, |
Grand Bahama will be held on :
Saturday, July 11, 2009 at 10:30
a.m. at St. Nicholas Anglican :
Church, High Rock, Grand :
Bahama. Officiating will be :
Revid Fr. Dwight Rolle, assisted by Rev'd Fr. DeAngelo :
Bowe and interment will follow in the Freetown Public :

Cemetery.

Left to cherish her memories are her five sons: Leroy “Bobby’, |
McGrevan *OG’, Lavar ‘Rocky’ and Lavan ‘Dusty’ Saunders |
and John Clay; five daughters: Mollyann, Beryl and Monique
Saunders, Sherilyn and Marsha Cooper; seven adopted | | yhertha C oper: four daughters: Theracita Cooper-Turner,

children: Calrissa McIntosh, Javotte Cooper, Sharanna Johnson, | Mary Lewis, Madlyn Bain and Dorothy Cooper; two son-in-

Betty Milfort, Darren Curry, Alex McIntosh and Lynette Rolle; :
six sisters: Geneva McIntosh, Monica Russell, Margarita : Cooper and Calvin Albury: two adovted dauchters: Angela
Roberts, Arementha Curry, Barbra McIntosh and Christine; : ee a ee ae six brothers: Donald, Roland, Delvin and Victor McIntosh, |
Elvin Russell and Wellington Pritchard; 14 grandsons: Leonard, ! Trayor. Shani Leslie Jr.. and Divanno: 11 at
Fred, Jamal, Romaine, Corey, Toure, Shavonno, Mashard, | andeiilisea: Lavonia. Lob hae isanat
Keano, Zach, Juan, Justin, Giovanni and Cameron; 12! \qykel-Kimsley and Mvkavla-Rose. Melvin Ir.. Clinique
granddaughters: Shanise, Darnell, Jenique, Michaela, Aaliyah, | 2 ; aaa Haas E il
Jade, Miesha, Amarni, Myla, Shemia, Lavana and Azari; three
great grandsons: Amari, Deandre and Corey; two son-in-laws: ' Cooper, Canoy Laing, Nicola Cooper, Anatalie Porter-Dean,
Boston and Corey Cooper; two daughters-in-law: Laverne | qgejyaq Hepburn and Melanie Stanislaus: three
and Anishka Saunders; two grand daughters-in-law: Conika | teeshere: Rider Genius Con per, Rev. Rufus Cooper and Rev.
and Susie Munnings; 10 sisters-in-law: Priscilla, Liza and :
Rachael McIntosh, Bathsheba Pritchard, Evelyn Wilson, Ulrica : Clania. Selva and Evanceliat Vira Cooper. Mary. Murile anil
Melntosh, Cetal Curry, Eva, Eleanor and Gardina Saunders : ee Ae aes .. ee as
and Elmena Bethel; six brothers-in-law: Maxwell Roberts, : Nehemiah Albury; one aunt-in-law: Presilita Nesbitt and a
Sidney Russell, Hermis Thomas, Alpheaus, Amos and Harry : post ot other fala ops and friends
Saunders; one uncle: Ralph Russell; four aunts: Florence ; 7
Thompson, Pearl Clay, Mavis and Olive Russell; 103 nieces |

and nephews and a host of other relatives and friends. |

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral :
Home and Crematorium on Queens Highway on Thursday |

: from 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday

from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

oR eR eR

LEONARD
‘Premier’
COOPER, 78

a resident of Mather Town,

Grand Bahama and formerly of

Old Freetown, Grand Bahama

will be held on Sunday, July 12,

2009 at 1:00 p.m. at New Zion

Baptist Church, Freetown, Grand

Bahama. Officiating will be Rev.

— Preston Cooper Jr. Interment will

follow in the Freetown Public Cemetery.

| Left to cherish his memories are his devoted wife of 57 years:

laws: Leslie Lewis and Keith Bain; two adopted sons: Corey

Munnings and Marsha Cooper; 12 grandchildren: Marilyn,
Melvin, Clinton, Gaynell, Kimsley, Randy, Levar, Nakieta,

grandchildren: Lavonia, Lahae, Amber, Hannah,

Ranahj, Sanaa Marshall and Trevor Jr.; one grandson-in-law:
Sylvester Marshall; six granddaughters-in- law: Tammika

Preston Cooper Sr.; nine sisters-in-law: Cecelia, Irene, Rev.

Inez Albury; three brothers-in-law: Elan, Whitfield and

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral
Home & Crematorium on Queens Highway on Saturday from
12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m, and on Sunday at the church from
11:30 a.m, until service time.





PAGE 6,

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Yager funeral Home ¢& Crematorium

Queen's Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 © Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR
—=

NELSON EMMITT
MOXEY, 76

a resident of #19 Watlins Road,

held on Saturday, July 11, 2009

of God, Coral Road. Officiating

Interment will follow in the
Frobisher Drive.

Left to cherish his treasured memories are wife: Calouiese
Maria Moxey nee Saunders; five sons: Bernard, Derek, Rickey,
Cliff and Bradley Moxey; two adopted sons: Willis Mackey
and Nelson Vincent; four Daughters: Debbie Huyler, Kephee

Mertis Nixon; sons-in-law: George Huyler, Aaron Bain and

grandchildren: Shameka Moxey-Smith, Jermaine and Keisha
Moxey, DeCarla Bullard, Giovanni and Tanasha Moxey,

Jalinska DeLoach, Denae and Jaleesa Moxey, Akeeron, Akeelia,

Rickeith, Richera, Lynrick, Lynarchico, Rickey Jr. and
Rickendra Moxey, Ricardo Miller, Tyreka and B’Jhan Moxey,
Clynard, Corei, Ciaro and Mischa Moxey, Octeria Stuart,
Taniel Bethel and Dasha Carey, Ayanna Archer and Jacqueline

Javah, Jakeero and Xaviour Moxey, Asia DeLoach, Jamie
Keishawn and Mario Rolle; sisters-in-law: Arlene Moxey,
Ellis, Cynthia and Elva Saunders, Evelyn Pickering, Lovely
Taylor, Hilda Flowers, Carol Bowleg, Brenda and Linda
Watkins, Winnifred Perguson, Edith Burns, Madge Thurston,
Natasha Storr, Natisha, Stephanie and Shavann Moxey, Theresa
and Patrice Moxey, Majorie Joseph and Antoinette Moxey,
Phillippa and Melissa Ferguson, Stephna Saunders, Krishna,

Sophia and Dashan Sears, Demeka Garner, Sherry, Permel,
Denise, Sheena, Portia and Delphene Saunders, Gigi Curtis,

: Jennifer Bryan, Sebeda Major and Penelope Rogers; nephews:
: Kirk, Jerome, Michael and Scott Moxey, Vincent Gardiner,
: Randol Flowers, Eugene Burns, Sidney, James and John
: Watkins, Dawson Fawkes, Kermit Cooper, Marvin Storr,
: James Riley, Sean Russell, Kenneth, Keith, Dwayne, Dudley,
; : Rayshard, Joey, Wayne, Dino, Reno and Steven Saunders,
| Freeport and formerly of :

Calabash Bay, Andros will be : a host of other relatives and friends including: Rev. Alpheus
11-00 ¢ Carrel Church: | Woodside, Bishop Fred Newchurch and Family, Bishop Oliver
at 2200 am, at Central nurch } Kennedy and Family, Central Church of God Family, Linda
fl eee : Mullings, Prescola Hall (Nassau), Nurse Sylvia Butler (Nassau),
will be Bishop Fred Newchurch, : Dr. Theodore Ferguson (Nassau), Dr. Kevin McKinney, Rev.
Goan Hahscis Meanmcral Paik : Rachael Mackey (Nassau), Jean Storr, The Glinton Family,

rand Bahama Slemoral Park, ! Helena Been and Family, The Garland Family, Roland and
: Agnes Carey and Family, Jennifer Mangra and Family (Nassau),
: Trevor and Tanya Carey and Family (Nassau), Bishop Cardinal
: McIntosh and Family, Ellison Delva and Family, Collin and
: Lester DeGregory and Family, Mario Chotoosingh, The
: Coakleys, Cargills, Hinzey and Hanna Families, The Woodside,
eae ation, oe * ? Minnis and the entire Community of Calabash Bay, Andros,
Bain, Sophia Carey and Simone Moxey; one adopted daughter: } Ey7ater DeLoach and Family (Jackson, Mississippi), Inspector
; ig : : Wendell and Shrenne Smith, The Clarke Family of Moss Town
David Carey; daughters-in-law: Linda and Michelle Moxey; } by yma. Thelma Sturrup, Monique Lockhart, Kenisha Bethel
: Phillip Patton, Mary Lewis and Family, Nicole Andrews,
: Helen Barnett, Ruby Outten, Linda Kelly, Miranda Inniss
ee an oe : (Nassau), PNO Cheryl Bain, Bishop Godfrey Williams and
Aaron Jr, and Ajah Bain, Georgette and Georgae Huyler, : Family, Bishop Leslie Woodside and Family, Carolyn Walkins
: and Family, Bishop Herbert Clarke, Prince Fawkes of Exuma,
: Edmondo Moxey, Management and Staff of National Insurance,
: Management and Staff of The Ministry of Tourism, Jackie
ae oo : Richardson, Wendall and Rodney Moxey of Calabash Bay,
Clarke (adopted); great-grandchildren: Ashton Bullard, Janaya, : Andros, Staff of Moxey’s Investment Enterprise (Exuma),
Bn ee = BL Teese Net po. + Staff of The Ministry of Education (Georgetown Exuma),
Sears, Brian Armbrister, Patrick Davis, Marnique, Ontario, : Charlene Rolle and Family, Elder Majorie LaFleur and Family,
. : si : Peter Basden and Family, Pleasant Bridgewater and Family,
Ludell Ferguson, Linda Russell, Demaris Saunders, Lineta : pitton and Jan Basiae and Family, Hector and Malvern
: ‘ ; . : Williams, Barbara Walker and Family; and a host of other
Campbell and Marilyn Ferguson; brothers-in-law: Rev. Edmond : Geen - " -
Ellis and Tellis Russell; nieces: Shelia Culmer, Birdina Moxey- ; â„¢*!@tves and friends too numerous to mention.

: Thanks to Dr. Theodore Ferguson, Dr. Kevin McKinney and

Laverne Fox, Bernadette Cooper, Delores Davis, Janice Russell, Bet ee ocala eee aes

Darrell and Demetrius Sears, Timothy Major and Jason Rogers;

: Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral
: Home and Crematorium on Thursday from 12:00 noon until
: 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until
; service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009,

Rosbei U al Mork

FREEPORT
114 East Coral Rood, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas

P.O. Bom F-a2312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roods, Nossou, N.P.. Bohomeas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043. / (242) 394-8047
Roger (242) 340-6043 « Fox: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

( Thursday from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm and at the church from 8:30
| am until service time.

MR. HERBERT
CLARKE, 51

of Bluehill Estate who died at on June |
28th 2009 will be held on Saturday July :
llth 2009 at 10:00am at St. Barnabas |
Anglican Church Blue Hill Road }
Officiating will be Canon Basil Tynes, |
assisted by other ministers of the clergy :
and Interment will follow in the :
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F. |
Kennedy Drive and Gladstone Road. :

He is survived by his wife: Laverne Clarke; three sons; Leo, |
Torrine and Javon; one daughter: Lanishka Clarke; three brothers: |
Cedric Curry, Thomas Smith and Godfrey Clarke; three sisters: :
Min. Lorraine Clarke, Min. Sharon McCardy nd Jeannette Dennis |
of Atlanta, Georgia; eight brother-in-laws: Roland Clarke, Bobby |
Dennis of Atlanta, Georgia, Anthony Pinder, Dr. Derick Pinder, |
Whitney Sands, Leander Pinder, Frank Pinder, Anthony Euliln; |

thirteen sisters-in-law: Elizabeth Smith, Sheila Clarke, Lanere |

Nelly, Joanne Capron, Marva Storr, Adrian Hines, Denise Pinder,
Theresa Dean, Leveta Pinder, Nancy Williams, Renae Pinder,
Donie Adderley and Glory Whymms; one uncle: Michael Minns;
five aunts: Gertrude Clarke, Emma Rodriquez, Merlene Smith,
Vernella Curry and Dianne Malone of California; nephews: Glen,
Kevin, and Cednc Curry, Julian Smith, Ron Clarke, James Major,
Dwayne, Jermaine, Leslie and Gianno Clarke; nieces: Christine
Wong, Patrice Rolle, Lisa and Carol Curry, Cherice Sweeting,
Alisa Gibson, Shenika Deveaux, Armette Barclay of Atlanta,
Georgia, Natasha Curry, Felicia Clarke, Kennique Clarke and

Monique Cartwnght and a host of other relatives and friends |

including: Cynara Smith, Delano Ralston, Rashad Barclay, Shinazia |
Sweeting, Khylia Gibson, Lawsono Sweeting, Ana Smith, Hezekiah |
; Sweeting, James Cairwey, Latera Forbes and Peaches Pratt and
i a host of other family and friends including, Franklin Murphy,
Curry, Marva Wilson, Velthia Rolle, Yvonne Sands, Brenda Moss, |
Ivy Minns, Agnes Ferguson, Audrey, Leanna, Charlene, Judy, |
Mildred, Veralee, Simeon Smith, Reginald, Alex, Sylvia Jones, :
i Abaco, Beaverly and Family of New York, Lowe Bay Andros
Sherman and Andrew Rodriquez and Arthur Minns. :
Special thanks to Mr. and Mrs. Pinder, Home Fabrics, Pastor Allen :
Lee and the Calvary Bible Church family, Bishop Revy Francis :
§ Viewing will be held in the Celestial Suite at Restview Memorial
: Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on
Viewing will be held in the Irenic Suite at Restview Memorial :
Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd. on Robinson and Soldier Rd., on :

Gibson, Eltura Deveaux, Carolyn, Gary, Freddie, Chester, Priscilla,
Annette, Peaches, Darnell, Bernadette, Althanese and Jeffery

Maxine Minns, John, Lois Dorsette, Emmarene, Lorraine Duke,

and family and the Vista Care staff.

ERICKA DENISE
STUBBS-KELLY, 35

of Seven Hills Drive who died on June
24th, 2009 will be held on Saturday at
12:00n00n at St. Ambrose Anglican
Church Carmichael and Gladstone
Road. Officiating will be Archdeacon
James Palacious. Interment will follow
in the Southem Cemetery, Cowpen and
Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish her memories are her husband: John Kelly; her
mother, Almada Stubbs; son: Vencell Thompson; sisters: Airuda
Charlton-Joseph, Shavana Darville-Dawkins, Victoria Darville,
Maria Curtis, Sheder Parker and Parkeisha Parker; brothers: Elvis
Parker, Von Cox, and Rodney Darville brothers-in-law: Eugene
Joseph and Shandy Dawkins nieces: D’Eureka Bastian, Alseanda
Johnson, Shandera Dawkins, Rashaye Darville, and Grace Joseph;
nephews: Dashad Darville, Nicolas Fils-Aime, Bradston Fil-Aime,
and Rodney Darville Jr., aunts: Juanita Leadon, Vera Capron,
Geneva Campbell, and Luella Hanna; uncle: Clarance Amette;
cousins: Stafford, Jeff, Leroy, Rico, Kylon, Ives, Jocelyn Ferguson,
Shelina Sands, Majorie Seymour, Carolyn Saunders, Prince,
Charlene, Lealon Charlton, Frank Capron, Wade Henfield, Rudolph
Charlton, Warren, Naomi, Marsha and Renee Arahna, Leonie
Seymour, Earl Darville, Elva and Nicholas Lindo, Jennifer
Ingraham, Dennis Harvey, Mary Whyll, Jacquline and Julian
Hanna, John and Portia Bain, Ulette Clarke, Ronnie Ferguson,
Junior Bassett, Mario I, Mario II, Trumpus, Laura, Rand and
Ransel Stubbs, Carretta Poitier, Beverly Anderson, Teresita

Management and staff of Margrifill Security, Pinewood
Community, A.D. Hanna and Family, Vernon Symonette, Willie
Moss, Bearal Pratt and Family, Salumie Wheeler and family of

Community, Inagua Community, the Florida Community and
others too numerous to mention.

Thursday from 10:00am to 5:00pm and at the church from 9:30am
to service time.



PAGE 7



PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

ee

FREE
114 East Coral Rood, ea G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312

Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Poger: (242) 340-8043 « Pom: (242) 373-3005

Robinson ond Soidier Roods, Nossou, N.P.. Bohomeas
P.O. Box CB-12072

Telephone: (242) 394-8043. / (242) 394-8047

Pager: (242) 340-6043 « Fox: (42) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MRS. OLIVE LOLITTA
NAIRN, 89

of Thompson Drive, Fox Hill who |

died on July 4th, 2009 will be held |

© on Saturday at 11:00am at New |

Destiny Baptist Church, Balliou |

Hill Road. Officiating will be |

Bishop. Delton D, Fernander, assisted by other ministers |
of Religion and Interment will follow in the Western :

Cemetery Nassau Street.

Great-Grand Children: Caleb and De’Lyn Fernander | F | ts will b d aewiater dat
Step-Children: Addington Nairn and Ruth Nairn- | — renee Wee ene ego Scan bean

& rt

Pedro and Wayde Nairn, Janet Havey, Susan DaCosta, |

Strachan Step-Grand Children: William, Addington,

and Yasiman Strachan Caregiver: Audrey Wilson
Cousins: Blance Barry and family, Myrtle Hanna and
family, Maria Turner and family, Eloise Saunders and
family, Ruth Nottage and family, Irma Levarity and
family, Eleroy and Wallace Nicholls. Other Relatives

DEATH NOTICES

MS. WILLAMAE
MILLER, 78

of Dignity Gardens died at her
residence on July 6th 2009,

She is survived by her son:
Vincent Hamilton adopted son:
Glen Saunders one brother:
Rodney Johnson, relatives and

i friends including: Debrah Hamilon, Ruthlyn Saunders,
Left to mourn her passing are her Children: James and |
Sharon Grand-Children: Calpurnia and Bishop Delton |
Fernander, Dr. Cordelia Chona Nairn, Dominique Hanna; |

and Friends: Adam and Maxine Munroe, Jeanette Bain |
and family, Maria Armbrister, John and Mae Tucker |
and family, Milton and Barbara Cox and family, Douglas |
and Monique Hanna, Olanda Hanna, Isabel Robert, |
Hilbert, Bruse and Olive Pinder, Dion and Linda |
Strachan, Elder Roslyn Green, The neighbors of |
Thompson Drive, Lucky Heart Corner and the family |

of New Destiny Baptist Cathedral.

Viewing will be held in the Serenity Suite at Restview

Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Itd. Robinson |
and Soldier Roads on Thursday from 10:00am to 6:00pm :
and at the church from 9:30am to service time. |

Ormond Saunders, Glenroy Flow Saunders, Orville
Saunders, Novel Taylor and a host of other relatives
and friends.

MR. KAMERON
RAHMING, 23

of Nassau Bahamas died in Fort
Worth Texas on the 5th of July
2009.

He is survived by: His parents:
Gino and Karen Rahming
Siblings: Ginear and Kervin Campbell Grandparents:
Bertram and Alicia Rahming & Annabell Dean Aunts:
Renee Dean, Sylvana, Gina and Alicia Rahming and

§ Valencia Rolle, Grace and Fefica Dean, Vanessa Ifill,
| Terry Burrows Uncles: Andre and Kevin Dean, Bertram
| Rahming Jr., Winston Rolle, Grafton Ifill Jr., Andrew

Burrows And numerous other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

My

EAT SUN qgRISE NORTUARY

—<—y
“A New ain To Service’

eT s-) ease aes,

DEWITT ‘La La’
BUTLER, 36

of Golden Gates #2 will be held on
Saturday at 11 am. at Shaw Temple AME
Church, Baillow Hill Rd. & Peter Street.
Officiating will be Pastor Kendal Mackey
assisted by Rev. Jacob Hanna. Interment
will follow in Lakeview Gardens, J. F. K.
Drive. Born: August 18, 1972 — Died:
June 29th, 2004.

He is survived by his father: William

Butler; 14 children: Lorenzo, Justin,

Denzil, Dewitt, Kenwitt, Devon, Daquonn, Christin, Ladia, Laquell, Davonnia,
Tatianna, Shaquae & Juanita, 4 brothers: Rudolph, Anthony, Bernard &
William Butler Jr., 2 sisters: Raguel Butler & Karen Simmons; 2 sister-in-
laws: Verniece & Elsie Butler; 1 brother-in-law: Freddie Simmons; 9 uncles:
Samuel, Alexander & Epheus Butler, Bernard, Edward, Kirklin & Ednol
McPhee, Heman Nixon & George Edgecombe; 12 aunts: Rev. Francina
Watson, Kathleen Butler, Beatrice Edgecombe, Luella Watkins, Essie McPhee
of South Bay Flonda, Pecola Mackey of Delray Beach Florida, Lillian,
Ruthmar & Mary McPhee, Lilian Solomon, Karina Butler & Sylvia Johnson
of Orlando Florida; 10 nieces: Julia, Tramaine, Ragqueria, Raunice, Anniqua,
Juliann, Nikalia, Blanch, Ragina & Jenniemac; 7 mephews: Irendo, Anfernec,
Julian Jr., Zayvion, Abraham, Jeremiah & Benvel; adopted mother: Iva
Johnson; 60 cousins: including James Butler, Valarie Delancey & Gregory
Edgecombe, Sherry Butler & Tamika Liscombe, Dianne & Marvin Watson,
and a host of other relatives and triends including: Pastor Kendal Mackey &
Family, Jestina Wallace & Family, Kendra Cunningham & Family, Gladys
Lightfoot & Family, Mitzi Higgs & Family, Anthony Nesbitt & Family,
Shanique Hart & Family, Angeline Pierre & Family, Kayla Johnson & Family,
Patrice Ash, Vonne Rolle & Family, Oshe Symonette & Family, Leroy Sands
& Family, Oneal Cayardes & Family, Ava Minns, Wellington Clyde Jr., Pat
Coakley & The Cordeaux Ave. Breakfast Crew, Beaver, Spy, Gringo, Ray,
James Anderson & Family, Paul Roberts & Family, Saunders Family, Winters
Family, Henfield Family, Neely Farmuly, Velina Taylor & Family, Manawement
& Staff of All Size Tire Repair, Ambrose Family, Bethel Family, Angela
Brooks & Family, Seymour Family, Gilbert Family, Rahming Family, Dorothy
Newman, Sheldon & Virginia Gray, Greenslade Family, Wendy Rolle,
Stephanie & Emma Smith & Family, Janet Saunders & Almathea McCoy of
Miami Florida, Cray & Judy Williams, Rev. Victor Cooper & New Bethany
Baptist Church Family, The Trauma Team of PMH, The Entire Englerston
Community, Larry's Pub, Key West St, Florida C1. and Wilson Tract Family.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta Street,
Palmdale from 1 p.m. to 6 pam. on Thursday and again from 1 p.m. to 5 pom.
on Friday and at the Church from 10 a.m. on Saturday until service time.

eee i ee eee ke

ae mel initia Me deat of a et

#27 Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale,
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957
eo Be meee ee mee a ee
Vere ee AE elds ee ele] mee ed

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009,

Pinder’s Funeral Home

“Service Beyond Measure *

PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570/ 393-1351 « CELL: 357-3617
RANNIE PINDER President

Memorial Service for

William Michael "Mike" Malone, 55

of Marsh Harbour, Abaco
and formerly of Hope
‘Town, Abaco and Nassau,
New Providence, will be
held 11:00am on Saturday
July 18th at New Vision
Ministries, Marsh Harbour.

He is survived by his wife:
Deborah Malone;
daughters: Kristal and
Rayanne Malone;
grandson: Maligq Kersaint;
sisters: Elsie Carroll and
Pauline North: brothers:
Thomas and George Malone; mother-in-law: Josephine
Weatherford: brothers-in-law: Michael, Sidney and
Robert Weatherford, William "Bill" Carroll and Ronnie
North; sisters-in-law: Shelia and Debbie Malone, Patricia
and lantha Weatherford; nephews: Brian, T.J., Joshua,
Nathaniel and Jacob Malone, William Carroll Ir, Brock
North, Mikell, Daniel, Michael Jr. and Neil Weatherford:
nieces: Laura, Kelli Anne, Candace and Faith Malone,
Nicole Roberts, Courteney North, Theresa Grant, Melanie
Weatherford; nieces-in-law: Katie Malone, Sacha and
Rosandi Weatherford: nephews-in-law: Jonathon Roberts
and Ravenell Grant; significant others: Lionel and Kesean
Keraint, Joser Gedeus, Leonard and Kathy Sands &
family, Mr. Everette Hart, Mr. Don Cormish, Mr. Chad
Sawyer, Mr. & Mrs. Daren Albury and the Staff of Abaco
Hardware (especially Paul & Telanna), "adopted sons"
Franco Francois and Gesner "Giant" Merzius, The Rotary
Club of Abaco, The Central Abaco District Council, The
Abaco Chamber of Commerce, The Cherokee Sound
Group, The Andros Pigeon Hunting Crew, The Golden
Grouper Breakfast Gang (Percy, Andy, Freddie, John,
Frank, George, David, Sandra, etc.) and numerous other
family and friends,

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Cancer
Society of the Bahamas P.O, Box 55-6539 in memory of
William Mike Malone.



PAGE 9



PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 9,

2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

a Kostioe Memorial Moluay
D and Cromalorium Limited

114 East evans Freon rt, &.6., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-A2312
Telephone: (as 373- iss (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 373-3005

siiiieresi ciel ies merece HAM,
P.O. Box CB-12072

Telephone: (242) 394- nies tate) 2 Bote
Pager: (242) 340-6043 « Fox: (242) 340-8034

.P., Bohomes

LO OVE AY ICES FOR

ANGELA

DELORES WHYMNS

: Varanique, Lashelle, Katrina, Christine, Ann, Hilda,
| Paulette, Gelease, Luanne Annamae, Diana, Lillimae,
: Mavis, Minerva, Jennifer, Maxine; Iva St., Anne, Agatha,
of #13B Manton Place Freeport, |

Grand Bahama will be held on |

7 é Saturday, July 11, 2009 at 1:00 |

| p.m. at St. John’s Jubilee Cathedral, |
aS Settler’s Way, Freeport, Grand |
Bahama. Officiating will be Bishop Godfrey Williams, :
Terrance G. Morrison. Interment will |
follow in the Grand Bahama Memorial Park Section #2, |
| Relatives and Friends: Elva Davis and Family, Anita
: Doherty and Family, Miriam Johnson & Family, Jennifer

ROLLE, 49

assisted by Rev.

Frobisher Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish her precious memories are her father: Ellis |
Whymns; stepmother: Naomi Whymns; adopted |
mother/sister; Rosalie ‘Mummy’ Higgins; sons: Ventroy |
Rolle, Jaamal Johnson and Philip Rolle, Jr.; daughters: |

Ineka Johnson, Lawanda Rolle, Philize Ellis, Lanese Rolle;
sisters: Eloise Jones, Joycelyn Pratt, Anita Ferguson, |
Judy Rolle, Princess Farrington, Precious Hendfield,
Charlene and Helena Whymns; brothers: Rudy, Leo,
Lynden, Garland and Darren Whymns; grandchildren:
Ventroy Rolle Jr., Tremere Rolle, Levontae Moxey,

Kaynaan Longley, Zynique Rolle, Denae Ellis, Ernie Barr |
| Staff of Star General, Collections Department, Bank of

Jr., Treasure Strachan, Ghea Knowles and Philise Rolle;

sisters-in-law: Judy Whymns, Sharon Whymns and |
: The Management & Staff of Agave Restaurant — Port

Alvanell Whymns; aunts: Gladys Johnson of Nassau,

Clara, Sybil, Ethlyn, Laura ‘Louise’, Eva, Laurella, Vernice
and Mary; uncles: Stanley Collie and Leon; brother-in- |
law: Joe Rolle; son-in-law: Dion Ellis; daughter-in-law: |
Denise Wells-Rolle; nieces: Eunice, Rhodena, Michelle, |
Daphne, Lashan M.D., Daphne Williams, Rochelle, |
| Officials
Deandrinique, Melissa, Lashara, |
Dawn and Krystal; nephews: Rodney, Humphrey, :
lan, Dwayne, Trevor, Avard, Sheno, Shavano, Alex, Neiko, |
: Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Thursday, July
| 9, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the church on

Marilyn, Enid, Natasha, Melinda, Tanya, Gevelle, Berkell,
Ashantae, Junique,
Lashan,

Antoine, James, Prescott, Rudy Jr. Leo Jr., Gerard, Deandre,
Lynden Jr., Kareem, Lance, Jordan, Lyndero, Garland Jr.,

Valentino, Giovanni, Dashon, Rev. Elmond King, Rev. |

| Terrance G. Morrison; adopted children: Frantz Denis,
Chris Newbold, Mark Wilson Warren Dorsette; cousins:

Beatrice, Mary, Brendalee, Julia, Berthlyn, Brenell, Elva,

Erra, Monique, Shavaughn and Cheryl, Chnstine, Willadale,
Enamae, Constance, Edwyna, Rev. Silbert, Dale, Bertram,
Bersil, Alexander, Perry, Hemish, Clarance, Garth
Duncombe, Ricardo, Mario, Greg, Christopher, Lealand,
Hudon, Orman, Ucal, Ervin, Timothy, Stanley, Talbot,
Eddion, Kingsley, Rodney, Alvin, Franklyn, Jonalee,
Attwill, Winton, Sidney Collie, MP for Blue Hill, Hilbert,
Elwood, Kirkland, Derek, Malfert, Fred, Edwin Jr.; Special

Ellis & Family, Mitchello Pubten, Darren Rolle and Family,
Mike Sands, Ricardo Lightbourne, Ivan Butler & Family,
Norris Bain & Family, Martha Beneby & Family, June
White & Family, Sandra Laing, Charmaine Jagnandon &

| Family, Sharine Hall & Family, Floyd Watkins & Family,
| Daphen Neely & Family, Chris Johnson & Family, Ethel

| Knowles & Family, Betty Williams & Family, Wendy
Pratt & Family, Philip Rolle & Family, The Hudson Estate
Family including Judy Thompson, Philippa Paulino &
Family, Kermit Ferguson & Family, Louis Kemp & Family,
Bahamas Immigration Department, The Management &

the Bahamas, The Management & Staff of ZNS TV13,

Lucaya, Kwasi Thompson, M.P. for Pineridge, Desmond
Bannister Minister of Youth Sports and Culture M.P. for
Carmichael, The Doctors & Nurses - Gynecological Ward

Princess Margaret Hospital, former staff of Princess
Towers Hotel, U2 Barber Shop, The BAAA’s Junior
and others to numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held in the ‘Celestial Suite’ of Restview

Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Limited, 1 1-A East

Saturday from 11:30 a.m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

EEPOH
11 Beni Cesre seat, Freeport, G.B., Baharnas
P.O. Box F-42312
Talaphore: (242) 373-1115 f (a2) 373-1471
Roger: (242) 340-8043 » Fox: (242) 373-3005

BERTRAM LESLIE
WARD, 62

of #83 Sugar Plum Road, Sunset Division,

Freeport, Grand Bahama and formerly |
of Mastic Point, Andros bwill be held on |
Saturday, July 11, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. at |
New Canaan Zion Baptist Church, Balao |

Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Officiating will be the Rt. Rev'd Bishop
Washington Williams. Interment will :
follow in the Grand Bahama Memorial Park Section #2, Frobisher

Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

He was predeceased by his parents: Samuel and Louise Martin
Ward and left to cherish his memories are his wife: Inavie Ward;

daughters: Monique, Odessa, Cyntina and Marissa Ward, Dewanna |
and Demetria Wright of Atlantia, Georgia; som: Jamal Jarett Leslie ;
Ward; stepdaughters: Bernadette and Gerani Pierre and Shanrika |
Bain; stepsons: Owen and Mario Pierre; grandchildren: Kenya :

Smith, Santina, Tameka, Kenrick, Alexander, Oprah, Jadian, Jadon,

Odaja, Carlecia Reckley, Angel, Calvano, Owenisha, Mario Jr.;
: Frida Nortelus; children: Alton ‘Bats’, Urich of Florida, Vashawn

sisters: Janet Ward and Cathy Martin; niece: Ericka Oliver, Patricia,

Iriniese and Terricita Brown and Nickoya Cargill; nephews: Alfred :
Harris, Marvin, Melvin and Elvin Brown; aunts: Maria, Julia and |
Bernadette Martin; grandnieces: Kendra, Tally, Brianna, Marva, |
Sheneka, Elshadi, Mell and Elshdic; grandnephews: Cordero |
Adderley, Kendrick Strachan, Marion and Sheldon Murphy, Alex

Harris, Ricardo Jr. and Trevon Brown; step nieces: Aileen, Maryann, |
Kathy, Firolia, Jumie, Roobenska and Kathleen; step nephews: |
Barry and Lifaite Pierre of Florida and Dwayne; aunts: Maria, Julia |
and Bernadette Martin; uncles: Samuel, Wenzil Sr. and Glenroy |
Martin; sisters-in-law: Analic, Junette and Theresa; brothers-in- |
law: Joseph Lifaite, Lerdieu Similien of Miami, Fla. and Francois :
Similien of Canada; close friends: Clifford Bowe, Charles, The :
: Jones, Quincy Fraser and Dwight McIntosh; cousins: Abner Jr.,
Mr. Russell, Mrs. Tynes, Mr. Turmer and the Taxi Union; and a host |
of other relatives and friends including: Florinda Williams, Christian |
i Celia, Robert and Jack and a host of other relatives and close
friends. Special thanks to management and staff at the Kidney

Freeport Harbour Company, Felix Bowe, Solomon Molly, Allan,

Butler, Vernal Jr, Tony, Ricardo and Anthony Martin, Earlin, Shervin,
Joyee and Patsy Wilkinson, Kenneth Brown, Charles, Clovis, Ingrid,
Dora, Wenzil Jr., Neil, Joel, Meredith, Yasmine, Santisha, Zovia and

Leon Martin, Barbaralyn Mackey, Tashawn Brown, Vezel Gibson |
and family, Loretta Dean, Oterrine Jones, James Oliver and family, |
Jestina Baillou, Edith Saunders and family, Dorothy Noel, Oraly |
( Mortuary and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport,

Monica Sweeting and family, Edward and Vernal Eams and family, } Grand Bahama on Thursday, July 9, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00

Martin, Tad Williams, Sidney Oliver, Ellen Bowleg, Van Strachan,

Benjamin Oliver and family, Doris Tinker and family, the Murphy |
and Saunders family and the entire Mastic Point community.

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009,

U
Roads, Nassou, N.P., Boharmas
P.O” Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 340-8034

| Viewing will be held in the ‘Irenic Suite’ of Restview Memorial
| Mortuary and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport,

Grand Bahama on Thursday, July 9, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00

| p.m, and at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.

APPOLON
‘Popo’ ‘Pope’
NORTELUS JR., 44

of #24 Wood Rogers, South Bahamia,

Freeport, Grand Bahama will be held on

Saturday, July 6, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. at

St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church,

Hunter's, Grand Bahama. Officiating

will be Father Reginald Demeritte
assisted by Father Remy David and Deacon Jeffrey Hollingsworth.
Interment will follow in the Grand Bahama Memonial Park Section
#2, Frobisher Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish his fond memories are his parents: Appolon Sr. and

and Ahmad Nortelus; sisters: Arnette Jones, Irene and Monique
Nortelus, Katrina Frazer and Maria McIntosh; brothers: Arlington
‘Linky’ Sr., Audley ‘Lamps’ Sr., Fritz ‘Freeze’ Sr., Ramus Sr. and
Craig Nortelus Sr.; nieces: Lady Ancka and Princess Jones, Alexandna
‘Cookie’, Latahazz, Audetra, Audliya, Anakisha, Chandra and
Ananiah Nortelus, Kyleah Fraser and Matiah McIntosh; nephews:
Anton and Joshua Jones, Arlington iAli Jr., Lavar, Remus Jr., Audley,
Audantae, Aaron, Craig Jr., Fritz Jr., Decaprio and Remacine Nortelus;
grandnieces: Penaie and Ashnae Jones; grandnephews: Ashton
and Aman Jones aunts: Carol, Claudette, Alecia and Rachel; uncles:
Cecil, Lamant, Treason and Abner Sr.; sisters-in-law: Lavonda,
Gwendolyn and Sherlene Nortelus; brothers-in-law: Cartwright

Julienne, Theodora, Odetta, Rosette, Mario, Wesley, Peggy, Linda,
Jeffrey, Laurette, Sonia, Bridgette, Adnan, Sonless, Edith, Jenniva,

Center, doctors and nurses at the Rand Memorial, Doctor's and

Princess Margaret Hospital.

Viewing will be held in the ‘Serenity Suite’ of Restview Memorial

p.m. and at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.



PAGE 11



PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

perenne
Y and Cromalouium Limiled

‘ikea Eicecd eit proces . G.B., Bohomas
T neil ad set118/ Gan 373-1471
S }

Poger. (242) Fox: (242) 373-3005

fcisrabe ced Solio uae rics ALP, Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-1 2072
Telephone: (242) 394-H044 / (242) 34-8047
Poger: (242) 20-8043 « Fox: (242) 340-8034

| Viewing will be held in the ‘Perpetual Suite’ of Restview Memorial

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

DILLON OTNEAL
‘Pop’ ‘Tyler’
HAMILTON, 79

=| of #102B Gordon Avenue, Freeport, Grand :
| Bahama And formerly of Grand Turk, Turks
and Caicos Islands will be held on Saturday, :
m) July 11, 2009 at 11:00 a.m, at Church of i
a) Chord Temple, Peach Tree Street, Freeport, :
Grand Bahama. Officiating will be Bishop |
Lonford Bethel. Interment will follow in |
the Harbour West Public Cemetery, Bartlett |

Hill, Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish his memories are wife: Leila Helena Hamilton; 5

daughters: Maude O'Brian, Deloris Stubbs, Pearline Hamilton, Wealthy |

Hanna and McKeba Palmer; 2 sons: Noel and Floyd Hamilton; adopted | ‘Precious’ Bullard: children: Marvin and Rhonda Bullard; sisters:
| Natasha Bullard Miller, Medris Bullard of South Carolina, Miranda

Sherrille and Takira Gardiner, Dominique O’Brian, Yuoland Strachan, | Qullard-Taylor, Marion Bullard Alleyne of Virginia; brothers: Simeon,

Tequesha Wilmott, Monalisa Cooper, Letitia Nicholls, Perrinique Dawkins, : ; : = ih setis
Donique Laing, Maqueel Bennett, Murcy Palmer, Felicia and Delisha | Stanley, Bobby, Manfred and Joshua Bullard, Garth Jackson and Chery!
Hamilton, Wellington and Schamal Gardiner, Darrin and Cordero O"Brian, : \fi}ler, Hadassah and Neriah Taylor, Denise Wellington of Virginia,
Ferell, Anthonece and Travis Wilmott, Mcdermit Cooper, Malik = shantell Bullard of Nassau, Princess, Leah, Maureen, Jestine, and Leone

Thompson, Richard and Rasheid Munnings, Tyler Hanna, Thomas Stubbs, : Bullard all of Florida, Jennifer Muhammad of Michigan, Ashley Bain,

Arsenio and George Bennett, Howard Hinzey, Margarrett Roker, Kendell, :
Floyd, Caream, Wanya, Noel Otneal, Noel Rudolph, Don Hamilton and :
Al Mackey; 24 great grandchildren: Shakira Gardiner, Rayaah Meadows, :

Typhay Collie, Ranajah Munnings, Cherity, Cherish, Lyric and Cinnamin : gullard of Florida, Jason Alleyne of Virginia and Garth Jackson Jr. of
; : Nassau; aunts: Mavis McQucen, Roselyn Rolle, Fredricka Gardiner,
Anthonique Francis, Anquanique Miller, Maliah Stubbs, Kaielle Gray, | Catherine Owens. Virginia Curry and Effie Bullard: uncles: Arniinete
Tresnee Wilmott, Landante, Tania, Aaliyah and Tyra Wilmott, Jayden i phere sooth bho ary Tg ~ilheceie hp op lage lg
Ferguson, Amarian O'Brian, Herve’ Swaby and Travis Wilmott Jr; | ip-jaw: Hazel and Corae Bullard; brothers-in-law: Hensel Miller, Israel
brother: Eugene Hamilton; 31 nieces: Eudean Hamilton, Levaughn | Taytor Sr, and Simon Davis; cousins: Joel Roberts Jr,, Ricardo, Marvin,
Dean, Usual Bain, Carolyn Ward, Marsha Storr, Denise Leathen, Isadora | lington, Kenny, George and Vari McQueen, B. Harcourt, Andrew,

Williams, Terry Hamilton, Fredicka, Nora, Cassie and Margo Gordon, | Renjamin and Garvin Rolle, Lerlene Davis, Christine Pinder, Gloria,

son: Anthony Hutchinson; brother: Eugene Hamilton; 37 grandchildren:

Brown, Johnique Peterson, Jazzmine Strachan, Germine Moltire,

Wandaleen Henfield, Deborah Johnson, Ursula Reckley, Reequel Austin,

Vandaleen Outten, Younetty Knowles, Florita, Jessica and Amanda |

Outten, Oralee Missick, Shaneka Hall, Gianna Smith, Shandell Outten,

Joanna Higgs, Cindy, Letita, Tiffany, Shantell and Lewsia Outten; 21 | and Sharon Pinder, Randall, Wayne, Genet and Elone Gardiner, Jamaine

nephews: Clifford, Joc, Lloyd and Glen Hamilton, Raymond and Quinton | Roberts, Ricky McQueen, Adamaie, Coco and Danwy Burrows and a
ive: ‘i i ing: G Williams,

Winston, Omar, Rueso and Lewis Outten, Errol, Lynden and Barron | Se rae ee ae
Missick and Deon Hall; 2 daughters-in-law: Lilymae and Raina Hamilton; of West End Group, Jackie Adderley and family, doctors and nurses at
Mytris Hamilton, Fairleen Missick, Alice and Maxine Outten, Mina i a ee ee ee
Outten-Winter; 4 brothers: Edgar, Henry and Lorenzo Outten and John :
Missick; and a host of other relatives and friends including: Elsie : Viewing will be held in the “Halcyon Sulte’ of Restview Memorial
Moxey, Charles Clerveaux, Susan and Elvin Brown, Alice Smith, Albert : ioe : - tod 1124 Bact Coral Rosd F
and Tericeta Francis, Caroline Parker, Carmen and Noel Bain, Paul : ee
Johnson, Mario Durham, Cedric Gibson, Fairleen Lightbourne Smith :

and family, Johnny Munroe, Trevor and Sam Williams, Cyprinna Stubbs :

Gordon, Henry, Franklyn, Gordon, Edgar, Zigman, Derek, Dwayne,

2 sons-in-law: Joseph O'Brian and Tyrone Palmer; 5 sisters-in-law:

and Levi Palmer.

: Mortuary and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport,
? Grand Bahama on Thursday, July 16, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
? and at the Church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time,

LENWOOD LEONARD
BULLARD, 39

of West End, Grand Bahama will be held
on Saturday, July 11, 2009 at 3:00 p.m. at
St. Michael's Catholic Church, West End,
Grand Bahama. Officiating will be Father
David Cooper. Interment will follow in the
West End Public Cemetery, West End,
Grand Bahama.

He is survived by his wife: Cynthia

Dean Bullard; nieces: Jill Bullard, Vernita Cart, Andrea and Natasha

Lisa Bullard of Texas, Jaifie and Garthia Jackson of Nassau, nephews:
Frankie Miller, Ticoya Hanna, Israel Jr. and Samuel Taylor, Mario
Bullard, Omar, Kipplin and Dexter Bullard all of New Jersey, Graydon

“Leaky” McQueen, Gerald Gardiner, Ken Owens and Mr. Curry; sisters-

Muriel, Elizabeth, Barbara, Julia and Diane Rolle, Kayshawn McQueen
of Nassau, Stephanie, Alva, Judith, Carolyn Roberts, Mavrine and Kathy
McQueen, Betty Bullard, Patricia and Harry Lord, Godfrey, Tyrone, Lee

Roberts, Cora McPhee, Elizabeth Pear, Kenny Wallace, the Crazy Comer

community.

Grand Bahama on Thursday, July 9, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m,

and at the church on Saturday from 1:30 p.m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 13

oer Cacnalosaon Lmtd”

NASSAU
114 East Coral ood, Heepart — B., Bolromeas Robinson nee Toe Le cae" AP., Bahamas

Telephone: (242) aa ee 8/, (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (a2) 30a. 4 -B0AS | (2 (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager: (242) 440-8043 « Fox: (242) 340-8034

DEATH NOTICES

- BAHAMA AND FORMERLY OF MILOT, HAITI DIED
- AT THE RAND MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA ON SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009.

He is survived by his wife: Kettelie Charfilus of Haiti;
children: Maxi, Viola, Mirtha, Mamo, Liciene and Annette
Noel; numerous grandchildren; sister: Madam Destore!l
Noel: brothers: Jacsone and Boukon Noel; daughter-
in-law: Beatrice Noel and a host of other relatives and

. friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.

MR, HILTON PEDICAN SR., 65

OF #335 MELBOURN CREST, HUDSON ESTATE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA DIED AT THE RAND :
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL ON MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009. |

He is survived by his sons: Hilton Pedican Jr., Clement
and Jeremiah Beckford; daughters: Kelly Whitfield,
Elizabeth Beckford and Kimberley McIntosh; sister:
Ethlyn Wallace; numerous grandchildren, nieces, |
nephews and a host of other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date. :

MS. OLETA MARY
‘Mary Coakley’ CLYDE, 67

of #410 Nansen Avenue, Freeport, Grand Bahama died
- at the Rand Memorial Hospital, Freeport, Grand Bahama
on Tuesday, July 7, 2009,

| She is survived by her companion: Cyril Coakley; 3
daughters: Pearlamae Forbes, Valencia Knowles and
Vivian iPeachesi Coakley; 2 sons: Glenroy Strachan and

Cyril Coakley Jr.; 12 grandchildren, 8 great

- grandchildren; 3 sisters: Gwendolyn Brown, Velma

_ Miller and Leotha Clyde, numerous nieces, nephews

and a host of other relatives and friends.

MR. JEAN MAQUES NOEL, 58 3
: Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.
OF #4 GARDEN VILLAS, FREEPORT, GRAND





PAGE 14,

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KRurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020° Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 * 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

LAST RITES FOR

ROCHELLE
SHARLENE
STRACHAN, 42

of George Town, Exuma will be held on

Saturday at 2-00 P.M. at St.
Anglican Church, George Town, Exum

Andrew's :

Officiating will be Puther Mario Conlitte |

amd Rev'd Willish Johnson.

Interment in +

The Church's Cemetery, George Town, !

Exuma.

Precious memories will always linger in the }
hearts of her husband: Inspector Harcourt +

Bain/Strachan.

One step-son Dejuan |

Strachan. Her parents Milton Jr. & Irene +
Strachan: three brothers: Dwaine, Kenwin and Brent Strachan, Adogied Brother: |
Sheldon Duncombe; one sister Natasha Strachan, Adopted sister Jandilee Evans;
Mother-inlaw Mrs. Terry Strichin, Father-in-liw, Mr, Earl Strachan, of Rum Cay; +
three brother-in-laws, Robert Missick Jr, Rubini, and Jeff Strachan; six sister-in-laws, |
Marsha and Audrey Strachan, Shelia and Ano Strachan, Tamekia and Gwendilyno :

Strachan: seven nephews, Brenton, Dwaine Jr. Theodore, Omar, Jestin, Asthon, and
Rubini Jr.; three nieces Deandra Missick, Kavanna Strachan, and Demetria Strachan;

five uncles: Harry, Daniel, and Clifford Strachan, Richard Clarke and Aurina Marshall |
and Edward Bullard of Miami Fla; ten aunts: Brenda and Patricia Strachan, Rowena !
and Catherine Clarke, Lois, Joycelyn, Veronica, Thelma and Shirley Marshall, and ¢

Dame Joan Sawyer, Cousins: Tiffaney and Danial Barr, Jabina and Deron Curry, Mr,

& Mrs, Logis Herene and Mr. & Mrs, Brian Forbes of Fort Lauderdale Fla., Harry :

Strachan Jr, of Oklahoma, Stephon Strachan of Los Angeles, California and Kyle

Strachan of London, Daniel Jr. and ‘Chad Strachan, Godfrey Bowe and Family, Jamie :
Strachan, Mr. & Mirs. Brian Strachan, Eleanor Rahming, Rev. Leslie & Mrs. Curtis, |
Mr. & Mrs. Don Ferguson, Shequita Gordon, Mark, Gary, Andy, Craig and Dwight :
Clarke, Sharon Clarke, June, Lisa, Duncombe, Antoinette, Nicole and Casa Clarke, |

Hubert Smith Jr, Patrick and Robert Smith, Donna and Marsha Smith, Yvonne Kemp,
Latravia Joseph, of Miami, Fl, Sharlene, Redada and Jacovy Jefferson of Miami Fla,
Owen, Darrel and Derron Marshall, Julian, Michael, and Brian Marshall, Bernadette

Weech, Reva Campbell, Camille Moss, and Philippa Marshall: Carl and Chnoistopher +

Murshall of Miami, Fl. and Terry Marshall, Sonia Small of New York, Syivia Butler,
Christine Dean of Washington DuC., Regina Marshall, Sabrina Fowler, Marlyn, Vernon
and Lamar Farquharson, Livingstone Jr & Family, and John Marshall, Rev. Pete and
Lavern McKenzic, Patricia Munroe & Family, Jeff & Delglicia Smith, Naaman &
Sandra Forbes, Pamela Adderley, Levi Adderbey. Host of other relatives amd friends
including: Rt. Hon. Hubert Ingharam, Hon. Brent Symonette, Hon. Perry G. Christie,
Min. Toniny Turmquest, Min, Carl Bethel, Brensil Rolle & Family, Mr. Elliott Lockhart
& Farnily, Mr. & Mrs, Anthony Moss MP & Family, Mr. Joshua Sears & family,
Hon. George A. Smith & Family, Senator Johnlee Ferguson, Senator Deon Foulkes,
Senter Anthony Musgrove, The Pree National Movement Woman's Assocnition, The
entire Free National Movement Political Organization, The entire staft of Total Wee
Care Day Care, Ethel, Shelia and Oralee McPhee, Norman, Gloria. Demeico, and
Sharice Gardener, Raynard Jr and Family, John, Ernest, and Marlon McPhee, Mr. &
Mrs. Kendal McPhee & Farnily, [an and Carlos Ferguson, Brian Anderson, Anya
Tinker, Warren Rolle & Family, Latoya Rolle, Elisha Rolle Jr, Marna Rolle, Erlin
Rolle, Louann Rolle, Jean & John Curtis of FP Lauderdale Fl, Archdeacon the
Venenble Keith Cartwright, Cannon Delano Archer & Family, Father Stephen Davis
& Family, Rev, Dr. Roland T. Hamilton, Rev, Dr. Charles Saunders & Family, Rev,
Cedric Smith & Family, Rev. Adam Broen & Family, Rev. Dr. Ivan Clarke & Fumily,
Rew. Lowis Rolle & Family, Rev. Clhemon Ferguson & Family, Rev. Franklyn Mc kenzic
and Family, Pastor Alexander Taylor Jr. & Family, Pastor Daniel Morley & Family,
Rev. Heuter Rolle & Family, Rev. Flowers in Bimini, Rev. Randy Musgrove & Family,
Rev. Howard F. Williamson, and Robinson Morris Chapel A.M_E, Church Family,

Rev. Leon Williams, Jim Newman, Administrator Ivan Ferguson & Family, Mr.
Everette Hart & Family, Kenneth Nixon & Farnily, Chief Superintendent Willard
Cunningham & Family, Creswell Morley, Beatrice Morley (former teacher and frend),
Ricarde, Gina and Tina Morley, Mrs. Marie Bowe (God Mother) & her entire Family,
Pandora Smith & Family, Clyde Johnson, The Parovti Family, The entire Beneby

Family of George Town, Sharlene, Jarad and Jamal Morley, Mr, & Mrs, Eugene Pouer
of Nassau, Elsie Dean, McDonald Smith & F ‘amily, Fred and Janet Rolle of Ramsey,
Exuma, Rowgelia RollesGibson, Sharon Bethell Brown, Jacqulyn BethellFerguson,
Cpt. Edison Taylor, Nancy Bottomly & Family, Nigel Bowe & Family, Raymond
Carrol and family, Paul Smith & Family. Holland Darville & Family, Michael Minns
& Family, Basil Minns & Family, Mary Dames & Family, Luther Rolle & Family,
Willie Rolle & Family, Roland Ferguson & Family, Kermit Rolle & Family, Perry
Brown & Family, Carlton Taylor, Jacquelyn TayborSenith, Phillip Musgrove, Kingsley
Holbert, Simone Holbert, Angela Bedhel & Family, Vincent Bethel & Family, Kevin
Brown & Family, Sophia Smath & Family, Annie Diggis & Family of Nassau, Cyril
Taylor & Family of Kissimmes, FL, Olivette Taylor & Family of New York, Carmetha
Smith & Family of Miami, Fl., Virgina Ferguson & Family of Miami, Fl, Vincent
Young & Family, Edison Brice & Family, James Barr, Leanna Rolle & Family, Dolly
Saunders & Family, #ilpha Rolle, Sabrina Anmbrister & Family, BeBe Clarke &
Family, Francina Forbes & Family, Monique, Shanique & Meshach Carey of Miami,
FL, Nathalee Morley & Family, Roseselda Morley & Family, Havel Sears d& Family,
Jacintha, and Marissa Marshall, Debbie Moxey-Rolle, Cleo Clarke, Christine Dean,
Exlith Fox, Dedne Rolle, Peter Bascom, Tony Nicholls, Roselyn Sands, Exetmund Hall
Jr. Mrs, Lacie Woodside, and Tia Nixon, Mr, & Mrs, Basil Watson and Family
(Neighbours in Nassau), Maxine Knowles, Tradymae Smith, The Dept, of Education
Early Childhood Care and Education (Pre-School Unit), Leja Burrow, Ellen Rbodriques,
Theresa Balfour, #2elma Horton, Elkeno Andrews, Dr. Delton Farquarhson, Assistand
Commissioner of Police Ellison and Kimberly Greenslade, Richard Bain and Family,
Leroy Rolle and Family, Edna Brown & Family, Lorraine and Peter Pickstock, Debbie
Nixon, George Whylhy, Larone Fawkes, Phyllis Saunders, Wilfred Bullard & Family,
Paula Campbell stone and Family of Miami, Pl, Cvothia Archer and Family, Soma
Pinder, Shirley Musgrove & Family, Ceital Duncombe, Maria Pinder & Family, The
Exuma Taxt Organization, The Gow Samaritan Lodge, Wilton, Harcourt, Leslie,
David, and Maryann Rolle, Julian, Livingston, Clinton, Janice, and Jasmamn: Romer,
Albert Clarke Ir, Reeves Tumuest & Family, Alexander Taylor Sr. & Family, Bridgette:
Mossl Rolle, Ingrid Moss, Winston, Keith, Clinton, and Sean Moss, [van Bodie &
Family, Leroy Rolle & Family, Steve Smith & Family, Captain Anthony Rolle and
Family, Bill Poitier, Elvis Rolle, Gregory Mortimer, Mr. & Mrs. Michael Rolle and
Family, Maxine Bowe and Family, Vernon Curtis and Family, Perey Pox and Family,
Benard Swann and Family, Boris Rahming & Family, Nigel Gray and Family, Lynden
Gray and Fumuily, Dr, Swany, Mr. d& Mrs, Kettel & Pumuily, Larry Morley & Pumily,
the entire family of the late Henderson Strachan, Denny Williams, Dave Nixon, Mrs,
Cleora, Rose, and Leanor Ferguson, Donnales Burrows, Management and Staff of
the following businesses at Moss Town Intemational Airport, Bahamas. “vir, Continental,
Sky Bahamas, Bahamas Customs, Bahamas Immigration, Fire Dept, Civil Aviation
Dept, Security, Western Air, Anverican Eaghe, Airport Car Rental, Don Smith Rental
Car, Reggie's Express, and all of the Taxi Drivers and Baggage Handlers; Bernice
Knowles, Mrs. Thompson, Sharon and Tony Bethel, Mra. Vivan Burrows & Family,
Dwayne Rolle, Elsworth Rolle, The All Exuma Association, Exuma Regatta Conmmittee,
The Good Samaritan Laxige, Management and Staff of Local Government, Exuma
Basketball, and Sottball Assocition, Alot the Junkanoo Groups on Exam, Ricurdc
Rolle & Family, Byron Smith, Jason Ranger, Olivia McPhee, Karl McPhee, Kenyon
McPhee, Alan Michael, Reynaldo Swann, and Marco Clarke; Rev. Christopher Ferguson
& Pamily, Mr. Charlie Sturrup & Family, Mr. & Mrs. Robin Ferguson, Nyoshe
Aumibrister, and all of her close friends in Black Point, Staniel Cay, and Farmers Cay:
We the farnily, recogniae the fact that there are many other persons who contributed,
on assisted one way or the other in cur time of hereavernent, and if your nanve de tot
appear on thus obituary we humbly offer our greatest thanks anel apology,

The body will repose at Kurtics Menvorial Mortuary, Ramsey Exuma on Friday from
1200 Noon until 6:00 PM. and atthe church in George Town, Exuma on Sapurday
from 12-00) Noon until service time,





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 15

KRurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020° Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 « 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

LAST RITES FOR

MARY MARCELLA
SAUNDERS, 92

of Pinecrest Drive, South Beach :
and formerly of Stanyard Creek, :
Andros will be held on Saturday :
at 11:00 A.M. at Central Church :
of God, Coral Road Freeport, :
Grand Bahama, Officiating will :

be Bishop Fred Newchurch. :
Interment in Grand Bahama :

Memorial Park.

She is survived by 5 Daughters: Calouise Moxey, Ludell “Tiney’
Ferguson, Linda Russell, Demaris Saunders and Lineta Mae :
Ellis; | Ssiter-in-law: Adline Fowler, 2 Sons-in-law: Tellis Russell :
and Pastor Edmond Ellis; 2 Daughters-in-law: Cynthia and Elva :
Saunders; 39 Grandchildren including Derek Moxey, Debra :
: ; ¥: She is survived by Adopted Son: Michael C. Beckford Jr.; 2
Dino Saunders, Wayne Saunders, Shaniqua Saunders, Stephama ‘
Saunders, Kenneth Saunders I, Dwayne Saunders, Gigi Cooper, :
Dudley Saunders, Nikki James, Deli and Portia Saunders, :
Rayshard, Sheena, Joey, Reno, Sherry, Steven, Permal and :
Vanessa Saunders, Phillippa Edden, Melissa Ferguson, Sebeda :
Major, Penelope Rogers, Sean Russell, Darrell, Krisha and :
Demetrius Sears, Demeka Garner, Tavares, Corinthia Powell, :
and Felician Ellis; 46 Great Grandchildren including Melique :
Hepburn; 15 Great Great Grandchildren; Host of other relatives :
and frends including Wellington Sears, Arlington Hanna, George :
Huyler, Aaron Bain, Linda Moxey, Timothy Major, Denise :
Saunders, Michelle Moxey, David Carey, Jason Rogerd, Jamon :
Gamer, Deshann and Sophia Sears, Aladdin Edden, Claretta
éSmalli Duncombe, Brenda Davis, Ronald Duncombe, Iona ‘
Williams, Thomas Porter, Chester Bain, Wilfred Johnson, Floyd :
Newbold, Wilfred Williams, Kenris Carey, Charlie Bethel, Alonso :
Butler, Hue Solomon, Harrington and Margaret Fraizer. Luther :
Johnson, Zilpha Sands, Lucinda Williams, Lucille Williams, :
Hilda Munroe, Charmaine Munroe, China Ferguson, Alpheus :
Woodside, Nurse Portia Romer, Marlene Guerrier, Katherine :
Hanchell, Ms. Mckenzie, United Church of God, the Robins :
Sisters, Wesley Methodist Family, The Community of Stanyard :
Creek, Bishop B. Wenith Davis and Pastor Ismae Davis, Special :
friends; Naomi and Ellis Wymms, Doreen @Sine{f Williams, :
Renda Kemp, Lenore Neeley, Earl and Linda Pinder. :

Huyler, Rickey Moxey, Kephee Bain, Cliff Moxey, Sophia Carey,



: The body will repose at the church on Saturday from 9:00 A.M.
: until service time.

: Funeral arrangements are entrusted by Kurtiss Memorial
: Mortuary, Robinson Road and Fifth Street, Nassau Bahamas.

LORETTA
BECKFORD, 68

of Redland Acres and formerly
of Milleris Long Island will be
held on Saturday at 11:00 A.M.
at Cooperis Terrace Cathederal,
Cooperis Terrace off Kemp Road.
OMciating will be Bishop Robert
Mephee. Interment in Woodlawn
Gardens.

Adopted Grandchildren: Maya and Cameron Beckford; 3
Brothers: Othneil, Edwin and Hartman Beckford; 1 Uncles:
Gussie Turnquest; 3 Sisters-in-law: Jennifer, Rev. Edith and
Irene Beckford; 10 Nephews: Michael Sr., Gary, Nolan, Daren,
Lealand, Edwin Jr., Christopher, Brian, Anthony and Craig
Beckford; 7 Nieces: Olga Demeritte, Orbinette Watson, Aileen
Stubbs, Yvonne Smith, Sherry Bonaby, Cleora Butler, Thelma
Beckford; 6 Nephews-in-law: Elvis Demeritte, Derek Watson,
Kenneth Butler, Clay Smith, Marvin Bonaby, Trevor Butler; 3
Nieces-in-law: Linda Beckfrod, Monique Beckfoed, Jacklyn
Beckford; Numerous grandnieces and nephews; Numerous
Godchildren including Devon; and a host of other relatives and
fnends including Marina Beckford, The Beckford Family, Phyllis,
Vernenchra, Sheryl Lowe, Shirley Bryan, Christine, The Turnquest
Family, Bishop Robert Mcphee and Family, Bishop Hubert
Pinder and Family, The Gibson Family, Rebecca Knowles, Alice
Josey, Marion, Dave, Alice Miller, The Millers Family, The
Solid Rock Church of God , Redland Acres Community.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson
Road and Fifth Street on Friday from 12:00 Noon until 5:00
P.M. and at the church on Saturday from 10:00 A.m. until service
time.



PAGE 16,

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL

“A New Dimension in the Funeral Profession”
#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street « P.O. Box N-3572, Nassau, Bahamas * Tel: (242) 326-5773
William Newbold - Manager/Funeral Director

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Rose Madeleine Toussaint-Cadeus, 39

of Mount Pleasant Village and :
formerly of Cap-Haitien will be :
held on Saturday, July 11th, :
at United :
Alliance Church, Watling Street. :
Officiating will be Pastor ;
Interment |
follows in Southern Cemetery, :
Cowpen & Spikenard Roads. :

2009, at 11 :00 a.m.,

Aleonce Bazile.

She is survived by her husband: :
Claude Cadeus; mother: Evena
Augustin; two sisters: Anne :
Marjse Toussaint, Charles and :

four aunts: : Memories are: one daughter: Roselyn Newbold; one son: Donald

Josette Dolee, Camelie Dolce, | Craig Newbold Jr.; one daughter-in-law: Valona Newbold; five
Jacqueline Dolce and Micheline Dolce; three uncles: Wilfrid : grandchildren: Lavardo, Valincia, Darrese, Donald III and Marica;
| three brothers-in-law:
: Burrows; four sisters-in-law: Carmie Newbold, Nathalie, Murdena
Charles and Gregory Charles; two nieces: Anne Martine Jolimou ; 294 Diana Burrows; numerous nieces and nephews including:
: Vitlean, Ellamae, Helen, Kay, Mel and Rose Newbold, Sandra

Benty Macajouse, Joseph Dolce, Augelique Belizaire, Merlie and Rosie Armbrister, Ida Burrows, Drucilla Munnings, Rose
Dolce, Majorie Premier, Martine Casseus, Mirielle Casseus, : May Cambridge, Altamease Carey, Francetta, Dr. Verona and

: Remelda Seymour, Bennette Seymour, Annamae and Patricia

Renoude, Staff of Bahamian Haitian Center, Mary Reckley, | Burrows, Rosenell Dean, Esther Beneby, Denise Douglas,

Julie Georges, Sicume, Jeanne, Andrelle, Mme Raymond, Staff : Glendena, John, Clyde, Patrick, William, Kingston, Bernard,

Milton, Hervey, Devease, Derrick, Stewart, Dr. Paulus, Terez,
Mama, Mme Wilfrid, Eseamine, Joseph Dieuvilas, Mondesir ; Gladstone Jr., Stanford, Kirkwood, Jeffery Burrows, Oral
Florestal, Antoine St-Ilma, Gabriel Renold, Desir Josenie, ; Newbold, Marie Newbold and Mark Seymour; other relatives
‘ and friends including: Endolyn McKenzie, Euilda Poitier,
: Elizabeth Newbld, Selena Farrington, Joycelyn Bastian, Eleanor
: Lindsay, Lisa Moxey, Beth Carey, Leanamae Wright, Sheva,
: Sandra, Evelyn Bowles, Sammy, Princess, Rosemary, Charles
Brothers Chapel, Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street off Market : Newbold, Anne Burrows, Olivia Bowles, Merlene Stubbs, Cleora
and East Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday Mackey, Hensel Newbold, Dorothy Gaitor, Weeze, Lora and
. ? Efflyn, Cecilia Dean and Family, Marlon Johnson, Ronald
: Newbold, Roselyn and Renald, Derrick Miller, The Stubbs,
:; Seymour, Newbold and Thompson families, Communities of
: Cat Island especially Orange Creek and the entire Methodist

; Church family,

Elise Richard;
Dolce, Gerard Samson and Jocelyn Samson; five nephews:
Ludfy Toussaint, Junior Jolimou, Emdley Charles, Keyshawn
and Alia Louis; numerous cousins including: Mirtho Dolce,
Patrick Dolce; other relatives and friends including: Therese,
of Florida Court, Kerline, Josette, Doude, George, Lolita, Kekette,
Dorlean Jean Renald, Figaro Claire Maisthe, Jean Enock, Joseph
Harry, Joseph Mondesir and Saint Louis Berthony.

Relatives and fnends may pay their last respects at Newbold

at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

Pastor Donald Newbold, 87

of Orange Creek, Cat Island will be held on Saturday, July 11th, 3

2009, at 10:30 a.m., at Grant's Town Wesley Methodist Church,
Baillou Hill Road and Chapel Street. Officiating will be Rev.
William R. Higgs, President - Bahamas Conference of the
Methodist Church, Rev. Kenris Carey, President Emeritus, Rev.

» Charles Sweeting, Past
President, Rev. Dr. Laverne
Lockhart, Treasurer, Rev. Philip
Stubbs, Assistant Secretary,
Rev. L. Carla R. Culmer,
Minister of Grant's Town
Wesley Methodist Church, Rev.
Manette Poitier, Minister of
Great Bethel Methodist Church,
and Dr. Reginald Eldon, Dean
of C-LET. Interment follows in
Lakeview Memorial Gardens
& Mausoleums, John F.
Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish precious

Everett Armbrister, Gladstone and Paul

: Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Newbold
: Brothers Chapel, Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street off Market
: and East Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday
;at the church from 9:30 a.m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009,

(ey he Jock X o5). } ame
GatelWau a itenorials Funeral Chanel) ))

Harewood Sinclair Higgs L.F.D.

et Ee Director

SEF bdves <2’) 3 Aiped
44 jlour ev aL iia “SAS i 355)
20, uate FIEZOUY)

nin Pepe

PI ba Je te i a pel , a

a/Name}vou|Know/a)i rusty
sone a Seea casa

Reap SCRE Teer

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Vermon Chrison Rolle, 27

of Bailey Town,

Bimini will be

held on Friday

July 10th, 2009

2pm at the United

Church of God

| Bailey Town,

Bimini.

Officiating will be

Bishop Benjamin

| Rolle Assisted by

|Rev. Ephriam

Rolle, Rev.

Angelo Rolle and

other ministers of

the gospel and Interment will follow in the

Bailey Town Public Cemetery. Services

intrusted to Gate Way Memorial Funeral

Chapel, Mount Royal Avenue and Kenwood
Street.

He is survived by his mother, Veronica Rolle;
father, Christopher Rolle; stepmother, Sharon
Roll; two sons, Vermon Jr. and Elrico Rolle;
sisters, Cleo Pyfrom, Lashanti Finlayson,
Lynsey Bain, Marvette Rolle, Kerisca Kemp,
Ramona and Shaquiel Stuart; brothers, Daleon
Brown, Devon Rose, Billy Stuart Jr., and Javon
Kemp; grandfather, Angelo Rolle; aunts,

Mitirell Ellis of Freeport, Helen Bowleg,
Merlene Saunders, Evelyn Sawyer, Sherry
Roberts, Inderia Russell, Zellie Smith, Wendy
and Arnette Kelly, Patricia, Isabella, Deborah,
Francis, Geneva, Crystal, Sheena and Joycelyn
Rolle, Linda Russell of Freeport, Sandra Hinsey,
Shatara Stuart, Lillian Weech and Esther
Edgecome; uncles, Tellis Russell of Freeport,
Rev. Oriel, Phillip, Arlinton, Lawrence, Bishop
Benjamin, Alvin, Rev. Ephriam, Elvis and Hank
Rolle, Darrald, Rodney and Charles Kelly,
Kenneth Stuart, Cassius Hinzey, and Canute
Weech, Christopher Saunders, Erlin Sawyer,
Alfred Russell and Danny Smith; nieces,
Cleshae, Shanique, Lavincia, Lindeisha,
Shantae, Audra, Marlaj, Desirae, Jada, Daleona,
Dashawnaw, Aleisha, Javonia and Jasmine;
nephews, Kivirrie, Kimani Jr., Lynardo, Vernon
Jr., Daleon Jr., Kari and Javon Jr; grand aunts,
Victoria Wilkinson, Ada Williams, Berdie
Edgecombe, Verna Cooper and Enith Dames;
grand uncles, Benjamin Grant and Ralph
Hanna; god parents, Ali, Robbie, Benjamin,
Vinola, Elenor, and Magg; sir Michael and Lady
Checkley, Anne Moxey, Shana Bowe and a host
of other relatives and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at the church
in Bailey Town on Thursday from 4pm to service
time at the church on Friday.



PAGE 177



PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JULY 9,

2009

ee

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Commonteealth Funeral Aome,
: Independence Drive « Phone: 341-4055 er

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT FOR

MRS. BARBARA JEAN
SINCLAIR, 50
affectionately called "Barbie"

of Mount Tabor Drive,
held on Sunday 2:30p.m. at
Soldier Road. Dr. W.
Howard Mills will officiate

and interment will follow in

Road.

i and other friends and relatives including,
| Sandralee Rolle, Vernita Bethel, Manasseh Hepburn
: of Freeport, Kristie Stubbs, Garcia and Catherine
: Martin, Rev. Althea Poitier, Agnes Mackey, Rev.
: Kenny Mackey and family, the Taylor family,
m1 : Marlene Fowler, Juilianna Brown, Angie Forestal,
Pinewood Gardens, will be : Paulette Risque, the City Market family, Pastor and
) : Mrs. Mills and Baptist Bible Church Family.
Baptist Bible Church,

: Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE
‘CHAPEL
| ! COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier |

OF MEMORTES

INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Saturday from 11-

: 5pm _ and at the church on Sunday from 1:00 p.m.
' to service time.

Precious memories will :

linger in the hearts of: :
her husband, Stanley Sinclair; children,
Dominique, Alexandra, Starlette and Stanley Jr.; :
mother, Vernice Nottage; step-father, Ephraim :
Nottage; grand-son, Daniel; brothers, Floyd, :
Randy, Jerome, Deyvonne and Vernon; nieces, :
Denise, Dina, Jaenay, Raenay, Erica McIntosh, |
Danielle and Princess Knowles, Deanka and Kenya |
Bowe, Jeniese, Shavette, Priscilla Moxey, Tina :
Ferguson, Lakeia Bain, Shanne Huyler, Lynette
Hepburn, Katina Seymour, Abigail Forbes, Shantell :
Johnson, Margo, Rochelle, Christine, Clementina, |
Lakeisha, T'shura, Lisa, Jatau, Jerricka and Jamecia; ;
nephews, Jamaal, Shaquille, Shawn, Shannon, Tyler, |
D'vaseo, D'quan, D'angelo Thurston, Eustace Jr., :
Ryan, Chad, Matthan Levarity, Thurman, Theo :
Kemp, Llewellyn Gardiner, Don, Dave, Darron, :
Christopher, Clement Jr., Oliver Sinclair, Rico Neely,
James and Jamerics; aunts, Ruby Thurston, Hazel |
Hepburn, Garce Seymour and Ophelia Hunter; |
uncles, John Gordon, Elijah and Henry Thurston; :
sisters-in-law, Jeanette, Krista, Dianette Thurston, :
Idamae Sinclair, Stephanie Kemp, Rose Gardiner :
and Jennifer Levarity, brothers-in-law, James and |
Clement Sinclair,Llewellyn Gardiner Sr, and Stephen }
Levarity; numerous grand nieces and nephew :

DEATH NOTICE



MELVA MARIA
BROWN, 71

died at her residence
Lightbourn Street, Yellow
Elder Gardens on Tuesday,
July 7th, 2009,

She is survived by:

husband, Oswald Brown;

sons, Augustine and Jim

Brown and Harry Hanna;

daughters, Jewel Huyler,

Shantel Saunders and

Francis Johnson: sisters,

Brenda Murphy and Muriel

Storr; brothers, Bertram and Robert Murphy; 2

uncles, numerous nieces, nephews and other
relatives.

COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009,

Bemeritte’s SH uneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Christina Rolle, 80

a resident of #75 Bast Ave.,

Millars Height & formerly |
of Rolleville, Exuma, who }

died on 1 st July, 2009, will :

be held at St. Gregory's Mrs Sweeting, Mrs. Strachan, Mr. and Mrs. Campbell

: Sears, and family, Nurse Leonie Sears and family, Mrs.

Anglican Church,

Carmichael Road, on:
Saturday at 11 :00 a.m. }
Officiating will be Rev. Fr. :
Atma Budhu, assisted by |
Rev. Marie Roach. Interment :
follows in Woodlawn :!
PUTS END One vege: : Ethlyn Adderley and family, Catherine Roker and

Left to mourn her passing are her children, Allen,

Roderick, Maria, Andrew, Charles, Peter, Bertram and William Gordon Retirees; Father Budhu, the ACW,

Theressa; her son and daughters-in-law; Basil, Edith :
and Robyn; her grand children, Myra, Marilyn, Felicia ;
and Delano, Keshe, Nickeal and Nicardo Jr., Rochelle, :

Deaundra, Peter Jr. and Kendia, George Jr. and Ozie ,

: Williams, Alice Smith and Angela Moss and family
: and many other nieces, nephews, grand nieces and
: nephews, and great grand nieces and nephews too

many to mention, other relatives and friends
including, Igerine and Joe Curtis and family, and
Catherine and Alvin Taylor, Adline Thompson, Mr and

Newry and family, Katie Longley, George Minnis and
Evangeline Penn and family, Wellington and Audrey
Dorsette, Sabrina Charles and Leonie Cooper and
family, Bishop Hosea Cox and family, and Irene
Thompson and family, Mrs. Curry, Calvin and Martha
Sturrup and the entire Millars Heights community,
Ethel Rolle and family, Mr. and Mrs. Duncombe, Mrs.

family, Patsy Louis and family and the rest of the
officers and members of St Gregory Anglican Church,

the Fire Department of the Royal Bahamas Police
Force, Ministry of Education, The Central Bank of The

: Bahamas especially the Exchange Control Department,

Chantell and Candice, Burnae, Tarell and Tarron. : Officers and members of the Union of Central Bankers,

reat grand children, Shakiel, Justin, Kendisa, | suas
Archie. Brent and Asia, Fabian, Raven and Daniel, : Edwin Rolle and Family, Patricia and Charles McKinney
Dreano and Dejanae, Odderley, Christina, Damitra, } 7 : : :
Jovan, Alex, Fabian and Fabrecio, Amalia, and Miguel; : Victor and Anita McKinney and family, Gary Thompson
nieces & nephews, Magdaline and Rocca Williams :
and family, Luella McKenzie and family, Lenora |
Meadows and family, Jane Forbes and family, David :
and Carrie Thompson and family, Petricia and Leroy |
McPhcee and family, Edna Baker and family, Thelma }
Woodside and family, Prescola Rolle and family, Patricia }
Rolle and family, Charlene Rolle and family, Larry |
Rolle and family, Kim Thompson and family, Queenie |
and Faye Rolle and family, Erskine Rolle and family, : : :
James Rolle and family, Sylvia Rahming, Miriam | 204 family, Brent McDonald and family, Loretta Young
Munnings and family; Thomas Clarke, Simeon and }
Betsy Curtis, Ikel and Claudius Curtis and family, :
Edroy Rolle and family, Michael, Shirley and Winkie :
Edwards and family, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Rolle, Timmy |
Rolle and family, Christine, Esmay, Raffleleta, Ida and : ="
Cyprianna Curtis and family, Dorris and Bertha | Friday & on Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m.
McKenzie and family; Lenora Williams and Melvina :

Road and Parks, Cyril Rolle Exuma Waste Management,
and Family, Andrew and Lillis Thompson and Family,

and family, Dellarice Carroll and Family, Pastors,
Officers and members of The Church of God of
Prophecy Love Centre Family, Douglas and Gloria
McKenzie, Rev. Salatiel Rolle and Rev. Adam Brown,
Viola Rolle and Bilmore Barr and family Zeke and
Ginia Curtis and family The Rolle, McKenzie, Curtis,
Munnings, McPhee, and Stuart families and the entire
Rolleville, Exuma community, Carolyn Roberts and
family, Kimberly Thurston and family, Rosena Strachan

and family, Felix Delancy and family and a host of
relatives and friends too many to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Market Street, from 3-6:00 p.m. on

until service time.



PAGE 19



PAGE 20, THURSDAY, JULY 9,

2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bemeritte’ s Huneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 © TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Jennifer Hyacinth Francis, 48

husband, Robert Sr.; children, Robert II, Jewel
Andrew, Desiree', Adriana, Ja'Kiri,

and Gilbert; her father, Henry Thurston Sr.;

brothers, Henry Jr., Haywood, Harry, Godfrey, :
Peter, and Julian Thurston; sisters, Bernadette :
Miller, Sabrina Wright, Tanya Davis, Cheryl Smith, :
Lisa, Tricia and Marguerite Thurston; step-children, :
Robyn Francis-Darville and Angelique Benoir; :
mother-in-law, Margaret Smith; brothers-in-law, :
Raymond Francis, George Wells, Jeffery Rodgers, :
Joseph Dames, Patrick Francis, Larry Francis,
Phillip Francis, Rubin Miller, Wellington Wright, :
Larry Davis and Richard Smith; sisters-in-law, :
Vivian Jerry, Sandra Francis, Marie Rodgers, Philicia :
Rodgers, Michelle Wells, Marie & Lorraine Francis, :
and Claudine Thurston; sons-in-law, Othello |
Darville (PC2689) and Oderick Benoir; step- :
grandchildren, Oryse' and O'Rhyan Darville, :
Oderick, Rhema and Triniti Benoir; aunts, Angela |
Cartwright and Agnes McIntosh; nieces and :
newphews, Monique & Leroy Stovel, Wayne, :
Wesley, Lia, William and Sonia Wright; Melissa & :
Maquella Miller, Leah, Saschenka, Leanthea, Twyla :
and Hailey Thurston; Simone Smith, Lanessa, |
Shatara, Jerome, Nicole, Ahliyah, Julano and Raynell |

: Thurston, Lauren, Katherine and Larry Davis,
| Torcassio Bethel, Danteish Rolle, Jeffery Rodgers
a resident of Vendal Drive, |
Sunset Park #2, who died |
on 1 st July, 2009, will be :
held at St. Barnabas :
Anglican Church, Wulff
& Baillou Hill Roads, on :
Saturday at 2:30 p.m.; Rahming, Hilda Flowers, Donna Bullard, Dellareese
Officiating will be Bishop |

Gilbert A. Thompson, :

Cannon Basil L. Tynes, Fr. :

Michael Maragh & Fr. :

" Roderick Bain. Interment :
follows in St. Barnabas Cemetery, Moore Avenue. :

Jr. Raymond & Rashad Francis, Georvette &
Georante Wells, Elizabeth Rodgers, Chardai &
Raideesha, Raihonda, Raakesha, Caryne, Lashunda,
Davard, Kimberly, Lisa, Ramona, Lmar, Shereka,
and Pashun Francis, Desiree Hutchins, Robyn and
Erica Jerry; cousins, Deborah Cartwright, Keva

Bryant, Violet Cartwright-Dixon, Trevor Cartwright-
Neely, Trevor Lightboum, Barry, Crispin and
William Smith, Brad Hanna and Terrance
Cartwright; grand nieces and nephews, Roberto
Smith Jr., Nicholas and Cameron Stovel, Jehu
Wright, Lorenzo and Elani Wright, Bradley McPhee,

Shea and Samauri Williams, Richard Rambaran,
Left to cherised the memories of Jennifer are her :

Dario Shennan Jr., Alano Thurston and Sadelle
Wright, Zakevya, Dontavia, Lauren, Treston Dantya,
Jamari,
DeWayne, Christina, Precious, Cory, Damian and
Angel Francis and Corey Finney; other friends
and relatives incluing, Laura Jones, Dena Balfour,
Eunice McKenzie, Anabelle Moss, Dr. Rodriguez,
Rose Morley, Ellen Moxey and family, Melzena
Moore, Frankie Morley, Raymond & Eunice Sands,
Wealthy Winters, Linda Johnson, Hilda Taylor,
Yvette Newbold, Azelia Major, Fr. Colin Saunders
& Family, Cecil Dorsette & Family, Melly Moore,
Tracy Roberts, Ronald & Doreth Campbell, Everette
& Gigi Mackey, Marilyn Darville, Lovely Forbes,
Kim Thurston, Euwonka Saunders, Peter Campbell
& Family, Monalisa Williams, Staff of Family
Guardian Chippingham District, St. Barnabas Senior
Choir, St. Barnabas ACW and rhe entire St. Barnabas
Church family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Market Street, from 3-6:00 p.m.
on Thursday, on Friday from 3-6:00 p.m., on
Saturday from 9-12:30 p.m. & at the church from
1 :30 p.m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009,

Bemeritte’ s SHuneral dome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET e¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

, caregivers.

Debbie Maria Peterson, 50

a | Funeral Home, Rock Sound, Eleuthera, from 3-5
died on 3rd, July, 2009, will :
be held at Wesley Methodist :
Church, Governor's Harbour, :
Eleuthera, on Saturday at :
1:00 p.m. Officiating will be |
Rev. Dr. Godfrey Bethell, :
assisted by Rev. Fr. Jonathan }
Archer. Interment follows in :
Governor's Harbour Public |

Cemetery.

She is survived by her sister, Denise Clarke; her :
brother-in-law, Perry Clarke, 3 nephews, Machaello |
Clarke, Caleb Bethel, Kristman and Cameron Moss; :
1 niece, Phalan Clarke; 3 uncles: Carlton, Roderick :
"Tommy" and Edgar Pinder, Trevor Glinton Sr., Millard :
Bethel; 3 aunts, Irene Cooper, Joyce and Ardena Pinder; ;
cousins, Lona and Dwayne Hanna, Marie and Willie ;
Brown Jr., Roderick III ("Pumpkin") and Juanita, :
Dwight, Kevin and Val Pinder, Carla Glinton, Sherry |
and Shadrach Morris, Trevor Glinton Jr., Effie and :
: Left with cherished memories are his daughters:
Mark and Kerrina Pinder, Bolton, Macshula and Adrian :
Pinder, Patrice and Colin Moss, Lorenzo, Ezra, Carlos :
and Andre Bethel, Janet, Gierszewski and family, :
Mizpah Major and family, Eleanor Hunt and family, |
Eldrid Moss, Charlamae Forbes and family, Emily |

Derwin Higgs, Dewitt and Annette, Roderick, Paul,

Colebrooke, Beatrice Sears and Vera Flowers of Miami,

including; godmother, Ruth Higgs, Kingsley Bethel,

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's

p-m. on Friday & at the church in Governor's Harbour
from 7:00 p.m. until service time.

Anteno Lafrance, 81

a resident of Governor's
Harbour, Eleuthera &
formerly of Port-de-Paix,
Haiti, who died on 6 July,
2009, will be held at St.
Paul's Roman Catholic
Church, Governor's
Harbour, Eleuthera, on
Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
Officiating will be
Monsignor John Johnson.
Interment follows in
Governor's Harbour Public
Cemetery.

Mamma and Marie Lafrance; adopted daughter:
Sophie Turnquest; brothers: Michelet, Clovis and
Frank Lafrance; uncle: Noel Charles; nieces: Edlene,
Kidlene and Lidney Lafrance; sister-in-law: Ramiele
Lafrance; grand children: Bobby, Brianna and Jaden

: Lafrance; special friends and other relatives
Florida, Ormond and Charlotte Moss and family Vernon :
and Diane Moss and family, Pauline Fernander, Shadra :
Cadet and Sherlene Pinder; other relatives & friends :

including: Alfred Paul, Jack Cardy, Jack George,
Melila Meleus, Vesta and Jimmy Sylverian, Arnette
Sherie, Eric Johnson, David McKlewhite, Beatrice

! Hepburn, Janet, Emanuel, the Catholic Church family,
Ronald Bethel, Suzanne Nelus, Father Jonathan Archer, :
Agatha Forbes, Johnny, Lynn and the Gaitor family, :
Mary Fernander, Eulie Fernander and family, Sherry |
Fax and Tia Stubbs, the Wesley Methodist Church |
family of Governor's Harbour, Una Clarke and family |
of Savannah Sound, Dr. Ajero, Nurse Debbie Deal and :
Nurse Monique Turner, and the doctors and nurses of |
the Princess Margaret Hospital and her faithful :

the staff at the Governor's Harbour Clinic, the entire
community of Governor's Harbour and many others
too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Rock Sound Eleuthera from 3-5:00
p.m. on Friday & at the church in Governor's Harbour
from 7:00 p.m. until service time on Saturday.



PAGE 21



PAGE 22,

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(Cedar Crest Funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street « PO.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Service For

Bracy Doreen
Johnson, $1

a resident of Lewis Street, 3
a poerag fe aS will 3 McKenzie and her husband Shannondon, Shawn Bastian
ius Pad 11:00am Sin ery : and his wife Felicia, Sherand and Shonah Bastian, Devra
12th, 2009 at:
Centreville Seventh Day :

Adventist Church, Fifth :

Terrace, Centreville. Officiating will be Pastor Paul :
Scavella, Pastor Neville Scavella, Pastor Barrington : \ ea aici ;
Brennen and Elder Sydney Forbes. Interment will be | McKenzie, Destineé Forde and A'Miah Cooper, her God

made in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F Kennedy ; Forbes, Leah Kelly, Pedro Skippings, Donalee Brennen

: Delicia Rolle, Wycliff Miller (deceased) and Joey Carter,

Left to remember her legacy are her nephew Robert A 3 and other relatives including Maggy Bain, Hannah
Johnson and his wife Mildred Johnson, her adopted ;
children including, Donnalee Minnis-Roberts, Pandora :
Moxey, Marthalena Knowles, Patrice Scavella, Josette :
Forbes, Jennifer Roberts, Deborah Robinson, Emily : ee i nent. Beluaca Ti -
Kelly, Bloniva Brown, Branhilda Brown, Anton, Ansel : . mp Mina ; Br _ ei a Ee
and Alcott Rahming, Michelle Stubbs, Trevor Forbes, : ee ee eee
Idamae Brown and Martina McSweeney, her sons tn law :
Wayne Moxey, Philip Knowles, Keith Stubbs and :
Whitney Scavella, Grandchildren Tamika and Antonio ;
ee en panos ies pati gain agin ; Church, Bill Gattor, Isadora McPhee, Sonia Durant &
Gabriel, Whitney, Kashsna and Winston Scavella, 3
Sherryann, Brent, Daniel, Demetrius Kemp, Sgt Chryslyn :
Skipping and Arlette Pennerman, Michelle Collie, Allison :
Sawyer, Terrel Curry, Danrell Johnson, Daniel Johnson, :
Wendall Clarke, Shanell Knowles, Kedisha and Lanerdo : a : : io se
Selman, Patrick, Lavardo, Chrissy and Jerard; her adopted : family, Lucille Rolle & family, Ruth Smith & family,
sisters and their husbands Prescola Kemp, Doralyn Bain, :
Nyoka Collie, Laura and Ross Forbes, Cinderella and :
Eugene Kelly, Jenetta and Perry Ferguson, Esther :
Rahming, Brenda and Albert Rolle, Rebecca and Isaac :
come and Abin Rabine Dotld Baia and Ednol , Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street on

Collie, sisters in law Sylvia Rahming-Charlton, nieces : ) : :
. : e , : on Sunday from 9:00a.m. until service time.

July

Drive,

: and nephews Josette and Trevor Forbes, Dianne and Earl
: Roberts, Deborah and Moses Robinson, Emily Kelly,
: Donna Santiclass, Delecia, D'Shane, Gardell and Valarie
: Rolle, Arlette Jules, Jackie Russell, Hazely Blatch, Keith
: and Cindy Turnquest, Kevin & Edith Turnquest, Donald

Brennen, Ansel Rahming, Sonia Rahming, Brian and
Okell Rahming, her Grand nephews and nieces Shedell

Forde and her husband Mario, Charis, Kristen and Robynn
Johnson, Earl Il, Jayden, Jenea Roberts, Jordan Robinson,
Rinaldo, St Cyr, Keisha, Keyshell, Keleah and Keith
Stubbs, Great Grand nieces and nephews Jaleel, Shavantae
and Sharand Bastian Jr, Shannondon and Shannia

children Ann Marie Evans, Pedro Skippings, Maria

Rahming, Arnold, Carl and Freddie Rahming and their
families, Rose Forbes, Preston, Leo and Leon Johnson,
Maxine Rolle and Jennifer Moss & their families, Sylvia
Roach & family, Charles Miller & family, Hazel Cleare

Mariam Gaitor, Clifford Rahming & family, the Balfore
family, Alan (Sonny) Smith & family, Joan and Verna
Smith & family, Elizabeth Farrington & family, Pastor,
Officers & Members of Centreville Seventh Day Adventist

family, Charles & Amber Fernander & family, Jack
Pinder & family, Sylvia Charlton, Mrs Poitier of Lewis
Street, Henry & Diane Gibson, Unit # 7 Centreville
§.D.A. Sabbath School Class, the Scavella family, Pastor
& Mrs Neville Scavella, Alfred & Mary Brennen &

Monalee Ettienne & family Mr & Mrs Randolph Humes
& family, members of the Johnson Park $.D.A. family,
and others too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar

Saturday from 12:00 noon to 6:00p.m. and at the church





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 23

i, cruneral —_

“Where the river lies still.
24 HOURS A DAY
‘Sersing The Bahamas With Pride
FRANK M. “COOPER - Funeral Director
‘Professional Peaple Who Care”

Market Sireet & Bimini Avenue
PO. Bae GT 2i0F
Me: si Sy, B; phy areas
Telephone: | (242) 356-3721
Cellular; (242) 395-8931

Cockburn Town
San Salvador, Bahamas
Telephone:
(242) 331-2642

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Edwin Charles Blair
"Eddie" "Reds" Clarke, 46

of South Palmetto

Point, Eleuthera will

be held at Wesley

Methodist Church,

North Palmetto Point,

Eleuthera on Saturday,

July 11, 2009.

Officiating will be the

“ee Reverend Dr. Godfrey

> Bethell, assisted by

Brother Lorenzo

Bethel. Interment will

follow at the Seaside Public Cemetery in South
Palmetto Point.

He is survived by one son, Eric Miller (Clarke)
of Nassau, his mother, Menette Clarke of South
Palmetto Point, Eleuthera; two sisters, Julie
Moss of Miami Florida and Arlene Clarke of
Marsh Harbour, Abaco; one brother, Dale
Clarke of South Palmetto Point, Eleuthera; one
brother-in-law, Ledly Moss II; one sister-in-
law, Denise Clarke; 11 aunts: Erzilla Bethel,
Marion Sweeting, Jeanie Thompson, Helen
Gardiner, Vernitta Miller, Sterline Carey, Melva
Sweeting, Rose Johnson, Gertrude Thompson
and Geraldine and Valerie Ingraham; five uncles:

Godfrey and Eldred Ingraham; Kendrick and
Frank Thompson and Frank Pinder; 3 nieces:
Mikayla and Tiffany Moss and Dashae Clarke;
one nephew: Ledly Moss III and hosts of
cousins and other relatives and friends
including Reginald & Gladys Sands & Delrose
Sands; Meredith & Allan Demeritte, Travis and
Kevin Thompson; Freddie, Millard, Andrew &
Clearie Bethel, Alma Mingo, Ophelia Ingraham,
Elizabeth (Betty) Carey & Marilyn Sands;
Maybell Gibson, Mavis Johson, Alfreda Deal
& Nelson Sands; Sylvia Sands, Myrtle Mingo,
Hanna Culmer & Corine Shelton; Jerissa, Jolene,
Joemeko & Jomeka Carey; Jesmond Thompson
& Dudrick Richards; Desmond, Dario & Frank
Thompson; Stevano Miller; Clay Gardiner;
Percy, Tasari, Schamell & Kayden Sweeting;
Alvardo, Roneisha, Aleacha and Ameya
Johnson; Shannon & Wayne Clarke; Eunice
Rahming; Arnett Hanna; Ethel Carey, Sheila
McCartney, Sara Hall, Tessie Stubbs, Revd
Godfrey and Mina Bethel and the community
of Palmetto Point. Relatives and friends in
Eleuthera may pay their respects at Wesley
Methodist Church, North Palmetto Point,
Eleuthera on Friday from 6pm until service time
on Saturday.

Funeral arrangements are being handled by
Riverside Funeral Chapel, Market Street and
Bimini Avenue.





PAGE 24, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

“©) Bethel Brothers Morticians
"Nassau Street, .0.Box N-1026 Publish your

CARD OF THANKS

JAMES AUDLEY CAREY SR., 78

of Danottage Estates and or
formerly of Tarpum Bay,

Eleuthera will be held on
Saturday July 11th, 11:00 a.m. IN LOVING MEMORY
at Rhodes Memorial Z
Methodist Church, Montrose

Avenue. Bishop Dr. Raymond Ea
R. Neilly and Rev, Emily » . 9
Demeritte assisted by other Th T b

ministers of the Gospel will In eC rl une S a
officiate. Interment will |

follow in Woodlawn

Memorial Gardens, Soldier NEW

Road.

Left to cherish his precious memories are his "darling"
wife, Carolyn Evangeline Carey; 3 daughters, Audrey
Culmer, Michelle Carey and Janice Miller; 3 sons, James

Carey Jr, Peter Carey and Andrew Carey; 1 brother,

Albert, his wife Ivadell and their children, Sandra, James

and Don Carey; 15 grandchildren, Jaimie and Fr. Colin S K C IO N
Humes, Jason, James Andrew, Jacquia, James Audley, f

Jolanda, Aisha, Pascale, Andrea and Tara Carey, Kent

and Kendra Culmer and Akeem and Ervin Miller Jr.; 1

great-grandson, Aaron Humes; 3 daughters-in-law,

Dr. Agreta, Ingrid and Julie Carey; 2 sons-in-law, Kenneth

Culmer and Ervin Miller, relatives and friends

including, Leo and Dorothy Carey and family, Eugene

and Margaret Carey and family, Kenneth and Jacqueline
Carey sa family, icin and Christine Carey and family, Every Thursday
Alan Carey, Hilda Carey and family, Eneth Carey & he

family, Jessie Fox and family, Lillian Carey and family,

Donald Knowles and family, Mary Moss, Emma Cooper,

Anthony and Joy Kikivarakis and family, Pearl, Juliette,

Miriam Hanna, Junior Charlow, Patricia Rolle, the entire

Danottage Estates family, Gertrude Colebrooke and

family, Betty Clarke and family, Ron Atkinson and

family, Drs. John Johnson and Sidney Smith, his Rhodes ( Il t d
Church family, the Bahamas Conference of the Methodist a US O a
Church and the Department of Social Services.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers 5 02-23 5 2
Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on Thursday from 10:00

a.m. to 6:00 p.m., and on Saturday at the church from or 5()2-2354
10:00 a, m, until service time,





The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, July 9, 2009 ® PG 25





PG 26 ® Thursday, July 9, 2009

RELIGION

Maximising

” true

pot

Special prayer

; breakfast held
for 13th annual
Inter-American
Bar Association
conference


































By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

The Tribune

ential

ARTICIPANTS of the 13th annual Inter-American

Bar Association conference recently held at the

Wyndham Resort, were hosted to a special
prayer breakfast at the Wyndham Nassau Resort last

week.

Under the theme: “You Cannot Serve
God and Mammon,” guest speaker Dr
Myles Munroe - Founder and Senior
Pastor of Bahamas Faith Ministries
International - spoke on the subject of
maximising potential.

Dr Munroe started by asking the
question where was the wealthiest place
in the world.

He said while some people think it’s
the oil fields in Iran or Iraq, and others
believe it’s the diamonds minds of South
Africa, or even the gold minds of the
Ghana coast, he answered that the
cemetery is undoubtedly that place.

“You may ask why is the graveyard
the wealthiest place on earth, and it is
because buried there are books that
were never written, it’s filled with music
that was never made, it’s filled with
poetry never read, paintings never
painted, it’s filled with businesses never

opened, and law firms never established.

“The graveyard is filled with great
men who died as alcoholics, the grave-
yard is filled with awesome women who

died as prostitutes and drug addicts,
what a wealthy place the graveyard is.”

Dr Munroe said his greatest fear is a
candidate who would add to the
untapped wealth of the cemetery.

He explained: “That’s why I work so
hard, it’s because I have an appointment
with the cemetery and an arrangement
with death. The appointment is that
when I arrive there, I arrive with noth-
ing other than my empty carcass, and
with death we’ve made a pact that he
(death) gets me when there is nothing
left for me to do.”

He said every human should pursue
their goals and ambitions with an intent
to accomplish it, and in doing so their
potential would have been maximised.

He said: “Potential to me is untapped
power, dormant ability, hidden strength,
it is unused success. What I’ve discov-
ered is that when you’ve done some-
thing, it ceases to be your potential
because you’ve already achieved it, and
I believe this is why God is so bored
with some of us who become so preoc-
cupied with what we have done, that we
cease to do what we could do.”

He said one of the greatest enemies to
progress is the extended celebration of
your most recent success. While that
recent success helps to build our confi-
dence and helps to shape who we are,
the climb to achieving all of your
dreams doesn’t end until you are dead.

Challenging attendants to maximise
their ultimate potential in all areas of
life, his presentation did help to set an
energetic pace for the conference.

The conference which began June 30,
ended on July 4, with a special closing
ceremony and reception at the

Wyndham hotel, Cable Beach.
ca



The Tribune
(SY MEDITATION

RELIGION

Thursday, July 9, 2009 ® PG 27

Be an independent thinker

EACH person has to make some per-
sonal and individual decisions each day.
To plan for the future, some thought has
to be given to desired goals and obtain-
able objectives. To learn from the past,
private experiences have to be evaluat-
ed and understood. To determine how
best to take advantage of present
opportunities requires a person to lis-
ten, read, think, pray and come to a
decision concerning a course of action.

An independent thinker is open to
external influences while reserving the
right to draw personal conclusions. An
independent thinker who is also a
Christian is guided by eternal influences
which lead the person to personal con-
clusions about divine directives.

For example, we may want to be a
source of love wherever we go. We may
choose to be

a gift from God and reflect God’s
glory to the world. We may pray to be a
wonderful human being, bringing our
best to bear on any situation. We may

rl REV. ANGELA

+. PALACIOUS

ask the Lord to help us to grow better in
some way every day.

Imagine that you are the star of your
own reality show. The cameras are
always on you and the sound system
picks up your every word. No doubt you
will attempt to wake and smile at the
camera, dressing meticulously to make
a good impression on your television
audience of millions. You will arrive on
time for school or for work and conduct
yourself in an appropriate manner to
the best of your ability so as to leave a
favourable impression with your view-
ers.

You are the star of your show. You

are the leading person in the play or
movie of your life. God wants to write
your script, the Holy Spirit wants to
produce your play and the Lord wants
to be the hero who rescues you in the
nick of time.

As a nation, we need persons who
understand how to think for themselves
but who are led by godly principles.
What strides we could make as a people
if we each went beyond the call of duty,
and considered our role to be a model
of excellence in every endeavour, the
Lord being our helper.

God applauds and God rewards.
Every day as we strive to do God’s
work, we can seek to be God’s employ-
ee of the day, of the week, and of the
year. We can be a “diva of discipline” or
“a man for all spiritual seasons.”

Let us each make up our own mind to
choose to worship and serve the Lord,
and we will become a godly and God-
fearing people, politically independent
but spiritually dependent upon God.

66 Asa nation,
we need persons
who understand
how fo think for
themselves but
who are led by
godly principles.
99

Homosexuality and the Church!

NOW, it will most certainly be a sin
against heaven if you’re ever ask to
define the word hypocrite and you
don’t answer by saying; “A clear defi-
nition or description of a hypocrite, is
the religious leaders of today.”

I know that as a Christian you can’t
say that ; because your “mand-of-
God”, bishop, apostle, doctor, etc; is a
well known and well respected reli-
gious leader in this country.

Trust me I understand your posi-
tion, of being a religious Christian and
making such statement

or remark (of hypocrites) does not
sit well with your religious beliefs.
Well you’re right, that would not sit
right with your religious Christian
beliefs; but to a disciple of Yeshuwa
Messiah calling the spade, a spade is
not a struggle.

Why? Because the disciple’s
teacher; Yeshuwa Messiah, boldly
spoke out against the religious leaders
of His days; and called them hyp-
ocrites due to their nasty, wicked
ways. It was like cutting soft butter
with a hot knife

(Matt.23:1-39).

Listen! This is not a let’s beat the
homosexual article, but rather it’s one
that is aimed to expose the hypocrisy
within the religious church. Because if
the truth be told; all of us have some
kind of issue that we’re struggling
with and if you disagree with that;
youw’re the biggest hypocritical liar on
the face of God’s green earth. I don’t





PASTOR
ALLEN



care how long you’ve been saved or by
what religious title you’re called
yow’re a lying Devil.

The Bible (God’s Holy word) is
quite clear when it comes to unlawful
sexual relations. Old Testament:

Lev.18:22: Thou shalt not lie with a
mankind, as with a woman: it is abom-
ination (a disgrace)

New Testament:

Rom.1:27: And likewise also the
men, leaving the natural use of the
woman, burned in their lust one
toward another; men with men work-
ing that which is unseemly, and
receiving in themselves that recom-
pense of their error which was meet.

It is lawful or natural for male and
female to have sexual relations. But
no way under heaven is it lawful for
male and male to have sexual rela-
tions or female and female to have
sexual relations. Again, God’s word is
clear and does not need myself or any
other to defend it. For Yahweh is well
able to defend His word, for He
watches over His word to perform it
(Jer.1:12).

One of the greatest hurdles that the
religious church needs to overcome is

that of hypocrisy. How is it that
straight church leaders (some of
them) are willing to cry out against
the gay cruise ships and the gay night
clubs in the country, and yet remain
silent knowing that there are gay
bishops, apostles, pastors, doctors,
praise and worship leaders, musi-
cians, etc; in the church? No need for
you religious leaders to get angry at
me for touching this delicate subject
that you’ve been tip toeing around for
years; not wanting to offend those in
the church.

Quite frankly, I couldn’t care
whether you are angry or not; because
I would rather have you wimps angry
at me for the rest of my life for speak-
ing the truth of God’s word; than to
have God angry at me for one day, for
not speaking the truth.

Erroneous religious beliefs would
have you to believe that due to the
love of God; Yeshuwa Messiah (Jesus
Christ) was this soft, can’t we all just
get along kind of leader; absolutely
nothing could be further from the
truth.

I’ve come to understand through
studying the scriptures that at no time
did Yeshuwa ever called the religious
leaders “brothers.”

Their hypocrisy and twisted reli-
gious beliefs no doubt played a piv-
otal role in the manner with which
Yeshuwa spoke and dealt with them.
With that being the case, what do you
think He would call today’s many reli-

gious bishops, doctors, apostles, etc;
and the modern day Sanhedrin /
Christian Council?

As a pastor, it’s totally unfair and
hypocritical for me to speak out
against the spirit of homosexuality
and lesbianism in the world, and
remain silent as this spirit is allowed
to roam freely in the church; preying
upon the naive adolescents.

Here’s a word to you weak, wimpy
religious leaders who are more inter-
ested in your next money making
conference, the publishing of your
new book or getting on television.

1Peter.4: 17: For the time is come
that judgment must begin at the
house of God: and if it first begin at
us, what shall the end be of them that
obey not the gospel of God.

Matt.7:3-4: And why beholdest
thou the mote that is in thy brother’s
eye, but considerest not the beam that
is in thine own eye? Or how wilt thou
say to thy brother, let me pull out the
mote out of thine eye, and behold, a
beam is in thine own eye? Thou hyp-
ocrite, first cast out the beam out of
thine own eye; and then shalt thou see
clearly to cast out the mote out of thy
brother’s eye.

¢ For questions and comments contact us
via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
Ph.225-3850 or 1-242-441-2021.

Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int’!



PG 28 ® Thursday, July 9, 2009

RELIGION

Respect the rest

"Therefore do not worry about tomorrow,

for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each

day has enough trouble of it's own."
Matthew 6:34 (N.1.V)

This week I experienced the 8th won-
der of the world. Looking back on it,
I'm completely guilty and enormously
selfish. The question is, do I feel
remorse? Before I answer that, let me
explain.

My brother, Kenny and I have always
been very close; in fact we've almost
without fail, been able to mirror one
another in speech- our love for the
expression ‘jonesa’ takes on the ridicu-
lous, finding itself directed not only at
the self proclaimed aforementioned,
but anything from a bizarre outfit to a
fragmented bagel; in thoughts- believ-
ing it better to catch a bus rather than a
taxi, for obvious reasons (now where is
my glass slipper), and in actions-
whether choosing ham over bacon at
breakfast, or New York over Atlanta
for a trip.

However as close as we are, we do
have relentless arguments, although we
like to call them spirited debates.

If not God

REGARDLESS to how difficult
it may be, how hopeless you may
feel and what thoughts opposite to
what the word of God teaches you
may have, we must remember that
God is in control.

A few weeks ago, I was encour-
aged while in church. The sermon
was right on. It was as if the whole
sermon was tailor made just for me.
The scripture was taken from 2nd
Chronicles Ch 7:14 a familiar pas-
sage. The preacher spoke from the
topic, "If it's not God that we are
going to believe then who? If not
now then when?"

He couldn't be more right. These
are trying times and if we don’t turn
to God, who will we turn to. Just
recently, a young man killed him-
self allegedly as a result of the cur-
rent economic climate. It doesn't
matter what his reason was. As
someone said on the news -God
still sits on the throne. We cannot
forget to use the weapon of prayer.
God still listens to our prayers and
cares about all things that concern
us.

I know we are experiencing some
hard times now, but we have to give
God a chance to work on our
behalf. Everything happens for a
purpose, we just have to find out
what that purpose is. We need to

TONI
STYLES



Although, I would never, and I do mean
never- ever, get so angry as to use a
most vile, four letter word. Well on sec-
ond thought, maybe one. That being,
‘rest'-one of the greatest words you can
say to a loved one. Whether one consid-
ers it to mean, 'take a break’, 'take a
nap’, or ‘take a happy pill’, it’s all the
same really.

T like to think of rest as an opportuni-
ty to, ‘let go and let God’. Which brings
me rather abruptly- yeah, sorry- to the
subject of this article.

Last Sunday I was planning my agen-
da for the week ahead, as per usual, and
also experiencing the habitual eye rolling
and teeth clenching, that comes from the
exhausting demands one puts on them-
selves; instead of exercising their right to
simply say no- to self and others.

then who?

ALLISON
| MILLER



see that this is a a time of testing
and understand that this too shall
pass. The “number man” is tempo-
rary, the “sugar daddy” and “sweet
mamma” are temporary, the find-
ing the resources ourselves is tem-
porary. The Bible says he who
builds a house builds in vain unless
God builds it. The man who watch-
es the city watches in vain less God
watches for him. So you see, unless
God is the center of our lives and
everything that we do, all that we
are and everything that we do is in
vain and without purpose. I said all
of that to say this- we can overcome
by God's grace and God’s grace
alone -no voodoo, no taro cards
reading and or reading of the
palms.

We can and will make it but that
can only be done through God. The
Bible also declares that He is the
same yesterday, today and forever.

He was there for the children of
Israel the same way He will be
there for us.



And as the lead broke on my third
pencil, I chose a red pen for a revolu-
tionary act. For the first time I was
going to figure out how to do the impos-
sible; fit a R, E, S and T- four letters,
that make for one powerful word, onto
aseven day week. And did I ever. It was
one of those priceless experiences, that
some, would pay quite a hefty price to
receive at a spiritual retreat or tropical
resort.

During a week that would make a
newborn blush, I refused to give myself
to anyone or to anything; but in rest to
my Father God, so that He could have
all of me- mind, body and soul. For a
moment imagine being free. Or do you
already consider yourself to be free?
I'm guessing if we really looked metic-
ulously at our lives, we would see just
how much of a prisoner we truly are.
Slaving to be the best and have the
best, yet in reality, that is impossible.
What exactly is the best? What is suc-
cess? Is it what you define for yourself,
or do you consider it to be that of the
world's interpretation? For your sake,
I pray it is the former.

As humans we tend to schedule our

The Tribune

lives in a way that if we were all so for-
tunate to be identical twins, with iden-
tical goals, would make complete
sense. Seeing however, that as a major-
ity, we are not a part of this special
breed and we can't be in two places at
one time; brings me back to our most
overlooked right as God's children.
The right to say no- no to all the non-
sense. We should be living our lives,
not vice versa; and as we do, God will
be there, as the soft whisper and gentle
touch, directing us towards all the
desires of our heart. That is, if we
would only seek him first. If we would
only rest. So to answer the question, do
I feel remorse? Well I have two things
to say- no, and would you be so kind as
to get the light.

In closing, the word of the week is
rest. Respect it. God is always in con-
trol.

¢ Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian
writer and poet, currently residing in
Nassau, Bahamas.

Comments related to the article can be
sent to fearless247@gmail.com.

RELIGIOUS NOTES

¢ Heavenly Dove Prayer
Ministry will host their first
healing and deliverance service
July 9 at the British Colonial
Hilton. Service starts at 7:30 pm.
Pastor Tonya Colebrooke urges
the public to to bring the sick,
lame, depressed, oppressed and
the downtrodden to the service.
For more information contact
Pastor Colebrooke at 468-4543.

The Bahamas Jehovah
Witnesses District is hosting a3
day convention at the Wyndham
Resort where they will address
the subject of the End of The
World.

Under the theme “Keep on

the Watch,” the conference will i

take place July 10-July 12 with

Oe aU CO

several religious pundits shed-
uled to give their take on the
subject. The conference will
begin at 9.20 am each day.

An estimated 2,800 persons
are expected to attend. The
group looks forward to sharing
this important message with the
local community.






W Did you recently give birth to the newest little angel on earth? Have you and your
beloved recently tied the knot? Is your church planning a special event? /ribune Religion

wants to hear from you!

We want to know about the special things going on in your life, so go ahead and send
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This service is free. Send all information, including (especially) photographs, to fea-
tures@tribunemedia.net. Information can be hand delivered to The Tribune at Shirley and
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The Tribune

RELIGION
















































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Thursday, July 9, 2009 ® PG 29

“THE ESSENTIAL
RELATIONSHIP"

By BISHOP VG CLARKE
Calvary Deliverance Church

IF A preacher is to be a true messenger of God, he
must have the Holy Spirit in his life. The Old
Testament lays the groundwork for such an under-
standing. Each major office in the life of Israel was to
be filled by someone anointed by the Holy Spirit. The
priest and the king always (and on occasions the
prophet) began their work by being anointed with
olive oil, which was symbolic of the Spirit of God.
What qualified a’ Saul’ or a 'David' to be king in
Israel? Not their possession of the crown or the
throne or a royal lineage, it was the anointing by God.

The King of Israel was not considered to be an auto-
matic ruler. He had to be under divine control, in
order to be qualified to reign over his people. Note,
when Saul insisted on doing things his way, for exam-
ple, the Holy Spirit departed from him and came upon
David. Saul still had the crown, the throne, the body-
guard, and the palace. But David had the anointing of
God. Even while hiding in the cave for fear of his life,
David was the regal one. That may be the reason why
David prayed in Psalm 51:11; “Do not cast me from
your presence, or take your Holy Spirit from me.”

He clearly remembered the tragedy of King Saul,
who lost true kingship even though he retained all of
its symbols. David did not want to spend his life that
way. His personal gifts were of importance, but the

divine anointing made him the
true king.
The same anointing
. was required for the
_ priest and the prophet.
_ To be partners in min-
___ istry with God is an
ap | esteem honor. Those of
> us, who are called and
anointed to preach the
gospel, must walk worthy
of our call. Our city and
nation is in need of anointed
preachers who will preach the
gospel uncompromisingly.
The anointing
_ destroys the yoke and
set men free from
the works of the
flesh bringing them
into a covenant rela-
| tionship with God.















INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays



PG 30 ® Thursday, July 9, 2009



@r THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS

The Greek Orthodo Cc

of the Annunciation

The following article is the result of an
interview I had with Emanuel Kolyvas.

GREEK Orthodox Churches are
mainly named after a patron saint or
event. In the case of the pretty little
church on West Street the event remem-
bered is the Angel Gabriel announcing
to the Virgin Mary that she would give
birth to the Son of God.

The early Christian Church Fathers
were mainly Roman and Greek. In 1054,
what is known as the Great Schism
occurred when the Patriarchate of Rome
and the Patriarchate of Constantinople
mutually excommunicated each other
and the Greek Orthodox was seen as a
separate denomination from the Roman
Catholic Church.

Theologically, the first disagreement
came with the insertion of the filioque
clause into the Nicene Creed by Rome
introducing the understanding that the
Holy Spirit proceeds equally from the
Father and the Son whereas in the origi-
nal Creed it was understood that both
the Son and the Holy Spirit have their
unique origin (begotten vs procession)
from the Unoriginate Father. However
all three persons of the Holy Trinity
share the same divinity of the one
Godhead. The schism was widened in
1204 when in the 4th Crusade Western
armies sacked the leading city of the
Eastern Christians, Constantinople, on
their way to the Holy Land. In the past
the Church of Rome was viewed as being
the ‘mother’ institution but a more mod-
ern view is that the two churches are
metaphorically ‘a pair of lungs’ that
make up one body.

The Greek Orthodox community in
Nassau also has a very interesting histo-
ry. In their native Kalymnos, sponging
was the chief occupation and the centre
of life was their church. Nicholas
Vouvalis & Co. were the sponge mag-
nates and on hearing of the flourishing
sponge trade in the Bahamas sent
Aristide and George Damianos to set up
and manage branch offices. Within a few
years the Damianos brothers set up
their own business and the pattern
repeated itself as the sponge trade
increased with Vouvalis sending branch
managers, who then formed their own
business. The arrivals were Konstantine
Christophilus (1898), Theophilus
Tiliacos (1905), Michael Gerassimos
(c1905), Pericles Maillis (c1908), John
Karantonis, (c1908), Christodoulos
Esfakis (1910), Theophilos Mangos
(c1912 First Greek Consul 1928-29),
Michael Halkitis (c1920), George
Christodoulakis (c1915), | Nicholas
Mangos (1922), Anthony Zervos (1923),
George Miaoulis (1923), John Psilinakis
(1923), Michael Pantouvanis (c1923),
Michael Klonaris (1924), Anthony

Alexiou (1925), Charles (Haralambos)
Alexiou (1925), Anastasia Tiliacos
(1925), Nicholas Kokkinos (1925),
Athanasios (Manasos) Sideris (1926),
Dimitri (Jim) Glicos (1926), John Heras
(1926), John Balas (1926), Jim
(Dimitrios) Mosko (c1926/7), Ilias
Antonas (c1926/7), Sakelaris (Charles)
Klonaris (c1929), Nomikos (Mike)
Klonaris (c1929), George Galanos
(1930), Alekos (Alex) Constantakis
(1936), Constantinos Xidaris (1936) and
Haralambos (Harry) Papageorge
(1937). Some of these men brought
wives from Greece and others married
locally and soon families formed a
Greek community built up around the
sponge houses in the area of West
Street.

At first these early Greeks wor-
shipped at the Anglican or Roman
Catholic Churches but longed for that
sense of community and freedom of
worship they had experienced in
Kalymnos. By 1932 they laid the first
cornerstone of their church and soon
after completed the building. Since
Christ is the light of the world, the build-
ing is oriented toward the East so that it
experiences darkness (sunset) to light
(sunrise). The dome with its central icon
represents the Christ as ruler and sus-
tainer (the Pantocrator) of all creation,
who comes down from the heavens to
pickup and restore fallen mankind. The
traditional floor-plan of the church
building is in the form of a cross.

The beautiful décor inside, mostly the
work of artist Michael Angelikis, is also
filled with religious meaning. Just like
the Temple of Jerusalem a screen sepa-
rates the Sanctuary (The Holy of
Holies) and the Nave (Noah's Ark, the
ark of salvation). The Royal Door in the
centre of the Screen which is reserved
for the sacramental clergy portrays the
Annunciation on the lower doors and
Christ as the true High Priest on the
upper sliding door. From left to centre
are portraits of the Archangels Michael
and Gabriel on the Deacon's door, the
Annunciation, Mary as Mother of God
with the mature infant as Christ
Emmanuel. From centre to right of the
Screen are portrayed Christ who is the
Light and the Way, John the Baptist
(forerunner of Christ) and St Nicholas,
patron Saint of Seafarers. All Icons are
spiritual reminders of passages of scrip-
ture.

RELIGION

The Tribune



























































OTT? Co _S
his life as George Koly

George Kolyvas, the so
was born on the small 1
Kalymnos on 23rd October 1916â„¢
boy he had a love of learning a
excelled in Mathematics and the lan-
guages of ancient and modern Greece, ~
Italian and French. Already proficient
in Byzantine Chant he wished to study
theology at University but lack of
money forced him to apprentice as a
printer in Athens. Not finding the
opportunity to enter the printing trade
back in Kalymnos he labored with a
mason, Emanuel Skandalaris (his future
father-in-law). However work became
scarce during the Second World War
and George took a job as a meter read-
er but was quickly promoted to
Director of the Electrical Utility. After
a spell in the Greek Navy he returned to
run the Kalymnos Electrical Utility
under British Administration. George,
now married to Maria Skandalaris and a
lead chanter in the parish church was
sought out by Mr and Mrs John
Psilinakis to become a priest for the
Greek community in Nassau. He was
ordained in May 1953 and given the
name Father Theophanis. The Kolyvas
family arrived in Nassau on July 1, 1953.
He served with humility, obedience and
dedication for the next 53 years as)
priest, teacher, choir director and leade.
of Byzantine Chant. Two little wore
sum up his life teachings: Agapa
Allilous (Love One Another). He die
in 2006.

For the last few years of his life
Father Kolyvas became Pastor
Emeritus and guided Father Ignatius to
serve the parish in his stead. Father
Polycarp followed and now Father
Teodor Bita from Rumania is the shep-
herd of the descendants of those hardy
Greek immigrants now firmly estab-
lished as Bahamian citizens.

And in both islands sponging has long
since died and tourism now holds sway.
Modern Kalymnos is an island that has
developed in a unique way because of
the large number of its citizens that have
settled abroad and now contribute to
sustaining a local economy. The island is
densely populated in comparison to
other Greek islands and developing the
expertise to oversee its own archaeologi-
cal, developmental planning and envi-
ronmental programmes. It has become
Europe's "mecca" for rock climbing dur-
ing the Spring season.

(Next Time: Part 36 - Methodists in Abaco 1)





The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, July 9, 2009 ® PG 31

A\SHOWOFUNITY



Ibrahim Usta/AP Photo

Newly elected Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill,
left, and Istanbul Ecumenical Patriarch
Bartholomew I, right, gesture after they has led
Sunday prayers in a show of unity at the patriar-
chal church of Aya Yorgi (St. George) in Istanbul,
Turkey, Sunday, July 5, 2009. The churches in
Istanbul and Moscow have been jostling for influ-
ence for years, but recently have pledged to over-
come differences and achieve greater unity.
Orthodox churches are largely autonomous, but
the Istanbul-based Patriarchate is considered first
among equals.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

SCE) a ane clits
ei] .
aI Ya OLR! 7

f
i =

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

area or have won an

award.



and share your story.



PG 32 © Thursday, July 2, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

COMMONWEALTH MISSION BAPTIST

HONOURS UNSUNG HEROES

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

COMMONWEALTH Mission
Baptist Church (CMBC) on Sunday will
honour a special group of youth leaders
who have contributed significantly to
youth empowerment and development
in the country during its annual
Independence awards ceremony

Started back in 2000, the church has
identified dozens of community groups
and individuals who in some shape or
form have helped to foster better rela-
tions among Bahamians.

These have included taxi drivers,
teachers, nurses, shop owners, and sani-
tation workers, and this year they have
shifted gears to shed light on seven
unsung nation builders, past and pres-
ent.

According to the church’s administra-
tor Alecia Josey, this special service falls
in line with CMBCs commitment to
honour the efforts of the small man.

“It’s really the dream of our bishop
(Bishop Arnold Josey), who felt that
there were so many who do work in our
country but are so often overlooked.
We look at those who would otherwise
never hit the limelight, those who would
probably never be invited to govern-
ment house, and what we do is an in-
house honours service to pay special
tribute to these individuals.”

This year’s honorees are:

BRIAN CRRISTIE

¢ In 1959 at the tender age of seven,
Mr Christie enrolled in the Scouting



WILLIAM BODIE-YOUNG

APOSTLE MARINA FOWLER

Programme at the tenth Bahamas
Scout Group at St. Joseph’s Catholic
Church lead by the late Theodore
Richardson. He later became a patrol
leader in 1966. After several decades in
the organisation, Mr Christie in 1990
was appointed as the director of scout-
ing. After being renamed the National
Executive Commissioner, Mr Christie
received his Advanced Wood Badge,
the highest level of training for scout
leaders.

His vast knowledge and experience
in scouting allowed him the opportuni-
ty to make a further contribution to the
development of the group with his
2004 appointment as Chief
Commissioner of the Scout
Association of The Bahamas. He was
reappointed in 2007 for a second three
year term.

He is a graduate of Aquinas College
and attends St Joseph’s Catholic
Church, and is a resident of the Bain
Town Constituency, he is also a mem-
ber of the community’s Social and
Welfare Committee, and director of its
summer youth programme.

APOSTLE MARINA FOWLER

e A true humanitarian, Mrs Fowler
spent many years serving in the capac-
ity of a well cultivated youth leader
with the Bahamas Red Cross Society.
She has traveled the world advising
and training young leaders, making a
difference and depositing into the lives
many.

In December 2008, she established
the Save the Children Global
Ministries after nine years of planning.





CLEMENT JOHNSON

A true warrior for Christ, Mrs
Fowlers stands as a testament that fol-
lowing the direction of the Father does
come with a worthy reward.

VERNIE ROLL
e The daughter of Arnold and Lizzie
Rolle of Exuma, Mrs Rolle has for
most of her life helped to draw souls to
the cross because of her devotion to
the will of God. A long serving mem-
ber of the Salem Union Baptist
Church, she has served as director of
the Bahamas Baptist Union’s Youth
Department. At the national level, she
has contributed in numerous capacities
of the Baptist Young People’s
Fellowship of the Bahamas National
Baptist Missionary and Educational
Convention, where she was responsi-
ble for organising the annual Youth
Choir competitions. She has also
served as the founding Chairman for
the Baptist Youth Summerfest - a Bible
based programme designed to pro-
mote positive Christian living. A past
board member for Junior
Achievement Bahamas and_ the
National Youth Council, she is the
image of youth empowerment and is
well deserving of this recent honour.

WILLIAM BODIE-YOUNG

e More than 40 years ago Mr Bodie-
Young joined the Boys Brigade, and
over the years has moved up the ranks
to his present position as National
President. An avid sportsman, he has
also coached numerous community
basketball, softball, and track teams.
Married with four children, he is a















VERNIE ROLLE

model father instilling in his children
respect for others, commitment to
God, and a healthy spirit of communi-
ty development.

REVEREND SHERMA
LACLAIRE SANDS-BOWE

e Having a long serving love for chil-
dren, Rev Sands-Bowe has willingly
given more than 30-years in the teach-
ing profession, she has helped to edu-
cate children in Cat Island, San
Salvador, and in New Providence.
Saved since the age of 15, she has
extended her talents and has taught
Bible school on Cupid’s Cay,
Eleuthera and in Dumfries, Cat
Island.

Gaining some of her wisdom from
the late Reverend Dr Harriet
McDonald, Rev Sands-Bowe has been
successful in her appointment as
superintendent for her church’s
Sunday school from 1983 to 2005.

She is also involved with the Youth
Action Committee and the women
and girls council at her church.

CLEMENT JOHNSON

e Born in Gregory Town, Eleuthera,
Mr Johnson learned from an early age
the importance of leadership through
his training in the Boys Brigade.
Through that group, he has been
instrumental in guiding many young
men in the community to identify their
purpose. In his recognition through the
special CMBC service, his many years
of work are finally being rewarded and
will undoubtedly help to inspire many
more persons.































REVEREND SHERMA LACLAIRE SANDS-BOWE



Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Man dies after daylight stabbing C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.189THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY HIGH 92F LOW 80F BYSTANDERS looked on in horror as a midday brawl turned deadly when a man was stabbed to death outside a Mackey Street electronics store. The normal rhythm of the busy thoroughfare was broken suddenly around 12.15pm, as shop pers, business persons and motorists stopped in their tracks upon seeing two men burst out of the headquarters of Bahama Life and Properties insurance company already engaged in a violent altercation. One of the men, who was said t o be armed with a screwdriver, e ventually attempted to walk away, but the other, armed with a knife, ran up behind him and plunged the weapon into his back. A witness said: “They were pushing each other back and forth. One had a screwdriver in his hand and the other had a knife. When the first one turned his back to walk away, the other guy stabbed him in the back. He stood over the victim for a few seconds, then got in a car and sped off.” After being stabbed, the vic tim collapsed on the doorstep of the Henry F Storr Electric Company, where he remained until police and paramedics arrived. Receiving a tip, The Tribune arrived on the scene only moments after the incident. A crowd had already gathered and traffic had come to a standstill as police officers worked to block off the crime scene. The victim, who police have yet to identify, was then taken to Princess Margaret Hospital, where he was pronounced dead on arrival. Police have taken one man into custody in connection with the incident and say their investigations are continuing. Police make arrest after deadly brawl The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER I N S I D E OBITUARIES and RELIGION INTODAY’STRIBUNE JOBSAND HELPWANTED L L O O A A D D S S O O F F CARS! CARS! CARS! PARAMEDICS treat the stabbing victim at the scene on Mackey Street yesterday. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net POLICE in the Bahamas are working with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBIe mbassy in an effort to find a woman relative of murdered American Anna Garrison who they believe may have played a part in her killing. The development came as police report that a 22year-old Bahamian man, who lives on LightbourneA venue, is expected to be arraigned in court later this week in relation to Ms Garrison’s death. The 33-year-old’s badly decomposed corpse was discovered by walkers in a bushy area off Fox Hill Road south, near the Blue Water Cay development, on Sat-u rday, July 4, at around 6.20pm. She had been shrouded in sheets and her feet were wrapped in plastic bags. At a press conference at the Criminal Investigation Department on Thompson Boulevard, Assistant Commissioner in charge of Crime Raymond Gibson said Ms FBI, Bahamian police seeking female relative of murdered woman Bahamian man in custody in connection with death SEE page 10 By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@ tribunemedia.net POPULAR handbag designer Harl Taylor died from “haemorrhagic shock,” a forensic pathologist testified in Supreme Court yesterday. Troyniko McNeil, 22, the son of Taylor’s former business partner Troy McNeil, is charged with intentionally causing the death of Harl Taylor between Saturday, November 17, and Sunday, November 18, 2007 while being concerned together with another. Taylor, 37, was found dead at Mountbatten House on West Hill Street. Forensic pathologist Dr Govinda Raju took the witness stand again on Wednesday, testifying that Taylor, 37, had died from haemorrhagic shock due to blood loss from multiple stab wounds. According to Dr Raju, Taylor would have died a maximum of 30 minutes after sustaining his injuries. He told the court that a sharp cutting object had caused the injuries. Dr Raju told the court that Taylor's left lung was collapsed and that Taylor had three injuries to his lungs. Dr Raju told the court that the knife found on Taylor's bed could have been used to kill him. He told the court that some of Taylor's wounds were three and five inches deep, indicating that the blade of the weapon could have been four Harl Taylor died from ‘haemorrhagic shock’ HARL TAYLOR SEE page eight POLICE investigating the murder of British banker Hywel Jones say they have received some new leads that may help advance the case. Assistant Commissioner Raymond Gibson said he hopes police may be able to provide an update on the case in the next week or two. “We’ve been receiving some information coming in to our control rooms and we are working on that. “Hopefully that will take us a bit further,” said ‘New leads’ in British banker mur der case PLEASENOTE DUETOTHE INDEPENDENCE WEEKENDHOLIDAY, THETRIBUNEWILL NEXTAPPEARON NEWSSTANDSON MOND AY. SEE page eight HYWEL JONES By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A MOTHER yesterday expressed her fears for her teenage son after he claimed he was beaten up by officers in a Fox Hill police cell after being picked up for questioning in connection with the suspected hanging mur der of Adrian Major. Commissioner of Police, Mother c laims teena g e son beaten b y of f icer s SEE page 10

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B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net M ICAL MP V Alfred Gray hit out at government yesterday, accusing it of only arranging to repair the “better part” of Acklins’ dilapidated Queen’s High-w ay while leaving the worst part in ruin. The PLP MP alleged in a press conference that there may be p olitical motivations behind the contract to repair only the northern section of the road. Acklins residents have suffered with a dysfunctional highway fors everal years, and the southern part of the road between the airport in Spring Point and Salina Point was further destroyed when t he tarmac was scraped off under a 2007 PLP contract but never replaced, as the contract was canc elled by the incoming FNM government, Mr Gray said. He said residents across Acklins are inconvenienced by the “impassable” 25 to 30 mile southern section of the road, but resid ents in the south, where the majority of his PLP supporters live, are the most badly affected. The MP said: “The people in t he southern part of the island are more conservative and support me as MP and I don’t think they ought to suffer because of that. “Once a government is elected I expect the government to serve all people equally and to serve the part of the island where their s upport might be is wrong.” Tenders Mr Gray was enraged upon seeing the Ministry of Works advertisement published yesterday, which only called for tenders to repair the northern part of the r oad. He said it is his duty to speak out on behalf of the people of his constituency regardless of their political allegiance. I am very disappointed the government issued a tender for the repairs and rebuilding of the best and drivable parts of the A cklins Road, between the airport at Spring Point and Lovely Bay, rather than the worst parts, between the airport and SalinaP oint,” he said. I believe that it must be for political reasons because good sense, if it prevails, would sug gest we fix the worst part of the r oad first. But they are doing the exact opposite. I’m hoping it’s not too late for government to reconsider it’s p osition and allow for repairs to the south Acklins road first and then do the second part of the road if there is money left.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Worst part of Queen’s Highway ‘left in ruin’ MP hits out at government COLLISIONCOURSE A VEHICLE crashed into a building in Dowdeswell Street after reportedly colliding with another vehicle. The incident occurred shortly after 4 p.m. yesterday. Nobody was hurt. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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MP: Family Islands contractors missing out on school repair jobs B y MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net UNEMPLOYED contractors in the Family Islands have been overlooked by governm ent as requests for school b uilding repairs have been made directly to working civil servants, MICAL MP V A lfred Gray claimed yesterd ay. T he MP for Mayaguana, Inagua, Crooked Island, Acklins and Long Island said at least 12 contracts have been s ent out by the Ministry of E ducation to civil servants within his constituency while poor contractors struggle to find work. Jobs to repair school buildi ngs over the summer vacat ion have been signed over to politically connected police officers, healthcare workers and other government employees by ministry officials in Nassau without any consideration having been given to the unemployed, the MP claims. At least four such contracts have been sent to civil serv ants in Crooked Island, two in Mayaguana, two in Inagua and four in Acklins, Mr Gray said. The PLP MP criticised the contracts as political patronage and called on the govern ment to change their tack. He said: “I’m appalled and disgusted, when unemployment is rampant in the con stituency, that they would give to the haves and bypass the have-nots because of politics. “To send a private contract to a civil servant who already has a job and leave others out of work is fundamentally wrong especially in these economic times when things are a s bad as they are. Painful “There’s really no economy i n those islands – those who w ork are civil servants – so y ou can see how painful it is f or a man who has five child ren to feed to watch police get the contract while his chil-d ren starve. I did not expect the gov e rnment to be so hard on poor people because they pay taxes t oo and when it’s blatantly unfair it goes to the heart of t he matter. “I don’t know how they f athom that they could do that and get away with it. “I’m just asking the governm ent to do the right thing. “If it’s wrong it’s simply wrong, and if the PLP was doing it I would speak out justa s I am speaking out right now.” By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter n mckenzie@tribunemedia.net A FORMER police officer was among three men arraigned on armed robberyc harges in the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Former police Constable Jamile Ferguson, 25, of StM artin Street; Yvenel Milfort, 25, of Prince Charles Drive, and Brenric Knowles, 30, ofB ellot Road, appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger G omez in Court One, Bank Lane, yesterday. It is alleged that the three m en on Thursday, June 4, at Paradise Island, stole from John Bull two Cartier watches, t ogether valued at $19,000. Ferguson and Knowles pleaded not guilty to the charges while Milfort pleaded guilty with an explanation. T he men are also accused of conspiring to commit armed robbery on Sunday, June 28. I t is further alleged that on the same day, the men robbed Brenda Frackleton of two sil-v er Breitling Cockpit watches valued at $13,056 and one silver stainless steel diamondB reitling Cockpit watch valued at $8,602, the property of t he Breitling Boutique on Paradise Island. The men were not required t o enter a plea to the charges. It is also alleged that on Sunday, July 5, the accused conspired to commit armed robbery, and further that on thes ame day they robbed William Carey of a silver stainless steel platinum Bezel special addi-t ion Breitling watch valued at $11,781 and a silver Breitling for Bentley watch valued at$ 7,951. The men are also charged with receiving the watches.T hey were not required to enter a plea to the charges. M ilfort and Knowles were remanded to Her Majesty's Prison. Ferguson, who is repr esented by attorney Jomo Campbell, was remanded to the Police Quarter Guard u ntil July 15 when a fixture hearing will take place in Court 5, Bank Lane. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 3 Former policeman among trio facing armed robbery charges In brief A 24-year-old Old Cedar S treet man was arraigned in Magistrate's Court yesterday on a murder charge. Anthony Clarke appeared before Chief MagistrateR oger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane, charged in the May 3 murder of Marc Estimable. M r Estimable, 29, was shot and killed at his Gamble H eights home around 1am o n Sunday, May 3. He was the 24th homicide v ictim of the year. Clarke, who was represented by attorney WillieM oss, was not required to enter a plea to the murder c harge. He was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison and the case has been adjourned toS eptember 9. Clarke is the fourth person t o be charged in connection with Estimable's death. On May 13, Ramal Coleb roke, 23, of Nassau Village; Blake Rahming, 22, of Old Cedar Street; and a 16-yearold boy were also charged with murder. Man, 24, arraigned on murder charge A MAN has died and another is fighting for his lifea fter inhaling carbon monox ide while working on a mail b oat yesterday. The two men were report edly working in the basem ent of the MV Legacy when they inhaled the taste less and colourlous poisonous gas. The MV Legacy sails from N assau to Hope Town, Marsh Harbour, Turtle Cay and Green Turtle Cay on Tuesdays and returns to Nassau on Thursdays. P olice were not able to confirm reports before The Tribune went to press. Man dies from carbon monoxide poisoning New Zealand man shot to death in Jamaica Alfred Gray MAGISTRATE’SCOURT: Jamile Ferguson, Yvenel Milfort, Brenric Knowles Accusations include stealing two Cartier watches from John Bull I’m appalled and disgusted, when unemployment isr ampant in the c onstituency, that they would give to the haves andb ypass the have-nots because of politics.” KINGSTON, Jamaica Police in Jamaica say they are investigating the fatal shooting of a New Zealand man during a street robbery, according to Associated Press . Police spokesman Karl Angell says a robber shot Tiki Hunia late Tuesday after he refused to hand over his cellular phone in the Caribbean island's capital, Kingston. The 27-year-old victim was hit three times and died at a hospital. Angell said Wednesday that Hunia's wife was with him at the time of the shooting but was not harmed. Police say Hunia was a New Zealand citizen working as an information technology consultant based in Hong Kong. Jamaica has one of the world's highest murder rates, but the violence stems mainly from gang battles in the cities and rarely affects tourists. I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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EDITOR, The Tribune. T here are few times in life that Christmas falls on a summer month and the announcement of t he resignation of Sir Burton Hall i s just one of those moments. In my opinion Sir Burton will go down as one of the most ineffective administrative heads the j udicial system has ever had. While the state of disrepair of this system is not fully his to blame, as ignificant percentage lay at his f eet. From the appointment of the controversial Judge Ruby Nottage to the inaction of not d ealing with Justice Lyons and o thers presumed conflict of interest sooner or not at all, and all manner of things in between, Sir Burton it appears was not up to t he task of administering his responsibility as head of this vital stream of governance. What the government is presented with now is a good examp le of a Christmas gift that, if the correct appointments are made, would be the gift that keeps on g iving far into the future. This is a good moment to examine how Chief Justices are appointed and to reform and bring transparencyt o how these administrative heads go about selecting judges for the c ourt system. As it stands now t here is no window into how this b ody of persons, headed by the Chief Justice, select and eventua lly appoints judges in our court system. Hence there was great shock, and rightly so, to the appointment of Mrs Nottage as a judge in the system. Although there should always b e separation of powers when it comes to the judicial branch vers e s the legislative branch, now would be a good time for a review of this structure to allow better collaboration between the two b ranches in the form of a judicial parliamentary committee that can interface with the judiciary so that a better understanding of what is needed in the judicial system andw hat works and what does not work when it comes to the administration of justice can be derived.I think Mrs. Maynard-Gibson was o n to something or at least was in the ball park with her idea of “Swift Justice.” However the major problem was that it was too heavy on marketing with nos ubstantive solutions and it lacked support from the judiciary, hence the backlash from the bench months after that idea was implemented egos and icons have an eed to be fed a special diet as o pposed to the feed found in the c ommon man's trough. So I hope that all parties involved uses this gift wisely b ecause the state of our judiciary i s getting worse by the years and m onths that pass. We do not have the luxury anymore of debating a nd talking to infinity about common problems and practices. A g ift like this only comes around a few times every two decades so now is the time to become as pragmatic as possible to betters tream-line this system. to a better day. E RIC B. STRACHAN (If Mr Strachan wants to know h ow Chief Justices and the other Justices of the Supreme Court are appointed and removed, he should read the Constitution Chapter VII, s. 93-97. ( Justices of the Supreme Court as was the case of Mrs. Ruby Nottage are appointed by the Governor General acting on the advice of the Judicial and Legal Service Commission, of which the Chief Justice is chairman. Other m embers are chairman of the P ublic Service Commission, a J ustice of the Supreme Court or Justice of Appeal and two person, both legally qualified, appointed by the Governor-General acting on the recommendation of the Prime Minister after consultation with the Leader of the Opposition. At the time of Mrs Nottage’s appointment Opposition Leader Perry Christie w as Prime Minister, and Prime M inister Hubert Ingraham was O pposition Leader. ( A Justice of the Supreme holds office until the age of 65 years. When that time comes a Justice who has reached the age limit as in the case of Mrs Nott age can have his/her term extended by the Governor-General acting on the recommendat ion of the Prime Minister after c onsultation with the Opposition leader. When it came time for Mrs. Nottage’s term to be extende d, Prime Minister Ingraham was t he Prime Minister with Mr C hristie as Opposition Leader. In the case of Mrs Nottage her term was not extended because Mr Ingraham failed to make the r equired recommendation. As far a s consultation with the leader of the Opposition on these matters is concerned, it can be almost considered as a “courtesy call.” Although the Prime Minister has to consult with the Opposition leader, he does not have to take h is advice if it is contrary to his own wishes. (As for Justice Lyons, he saved all those concerned a lot of trouble by resigning. Ed). C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 9,2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm EVERY PARENT wants his child to suc ceed at school. No parent wants to read a reportc ard with failing grades, and, pass or fail, they expect their Joe or Jane to be on the graduation l ine with that much coveted certificate a certificate that means nothing in the real world if aD grade is all that it records. In this society of instant gratification, when the most important objective is to win at all c osts, are we demanding more of our children than they can deliver? Instead of insisting on t hem heading their class would it not be better to encourage them to excel to the best of their ability regardless of where that best is meas ured on life’s social scale? As Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said at the closing of the Ministry of Education’s con ference this week, the Bahamas must face the fact that only a minority “some say a talented tenth” of any population will excel academically. Whether we like it or not this is true. T hroughout nature there is harmony when every atom fits correctly into the whole. Parents have to accept that children are not all academically gifted. We suspect that much of the dysfunction in o ur schools today is caused by too many students taking up space in our classrooms, who are either not interested in what is being taught, or who are discouraged because they cannot keep up academically. A nd so they will fidget, throw spitballs around the class and generally create an atmosphere inw hich no one not even the serious student can learn. This turns a teacher into a disciplinarian tryi ng to keep order until the bell rings, rather than imparting knowledge. We do not condone teachers cursing students, calling them names and throwing objects as the students have claimed. H owever, as there are always two sides to every tale, witnessing the attitude and behav ioural patterns of some of today’s young people we can understand how they could as Smoky Joe would have said in the old days “yuck up o nes vexation.” It is unfortunate, as Mr Ingraham has o bserved, that getting every child into the classr oom has not translated into every child achieving his/her full potential. In the first half of the 20th century, he point ed out, most children completing primary school could read and write, but today too many students leave secondary schools only semi-literate and semi-numerate. “In earlier times,” he said, “academically weak students dropped out of school, learned a t rade or became one of a large unskilled and semi-literate work force. They never had an o pportunity to attend secondary school.” Today students have to stay in school until they are 18, but still leave school unprepared to earn a living. Society has to face the fact that all persons a re not academics, and never will be, regardless of how long they sit on a school bench. H owever, to be able to support themselves on leaving school, they should be able to read, write, do basic arithmetic and have a trade. P ossibly the selection should be made sooner as to those who should be encouraged to continue preparations toward university and a profes sion and those who should be directed into a trade. The most important goal should be to have these young people performing to the best of t heir ability regardless of what that ability is. There is no disgrace in a labourer’s job. The only disgrace is when that labourer, although capable, does not do his job well. In every organisation, each and every staff m ember is important, even down to the man who cleans our presses and the janitors who clean the offices after everyone has left. Let anyone of them fall down on their job and we all suffer. A s the late Dr Cleveland Eneas, a dentist, often said: If it weren’t for the menial workers those who cleaned his car, mowed his lawn and did all the other household chores he would not be free to attend to his patients. A nd so these menial workers are much need ed in our society. It is now for society to show that they are also much appreciated and encourage them to perform these tasks to the best of their ability. W e all know the old saying that “you can’t make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear”, and so you cannot make an academic out of someone who would be a better mechanic, gardener or even handy man. The only criteria demanded of them i s excellence in whatever they choose to do. Parents and educators today have to deter m ine in what area each child would excel, give h im the basic skills to take care of himself and his future family and let him get on with it. Those young people who want an education and a profession can then be taught in an atmosphere conducive to learning with teachers who are no longer so stressed out that they throw textbooks at them. Christmas comes early with resignation of Sir Burton Hall LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Another look at education TOYOTA CAMRY HYUNDAI COUPE HYUNDAI SANTA FE HYUNDAI ELANTRA HYUNDAI TERRACAN HYUNDAI H1 VAN HYUNDAI SONATA MAZDA MPV VAN HYUNDAI SONATA SUZUKI GRAND VITARA Quality Auto SalesPRE-OWNED CARS & TRUCKS Trade-ins on New Car Sales AcceptedNOWIN STOCK! E DITOR, The Tribune. T here are several issues which are causing me concern in the country today. Firstly, there seems to be a concerted effort from various groups and persons in the country to denigrate and abuse the Royal Bahamas Police Force, a nd its officers. We are all aware of the serious crime situation in t he country which does not seem to be getting any better, but too many of our citizens seem to forget t hat the only body which protects us from the very thugs and criminals who force us to live as prisoners in our own homes and to fear going out during daylight and nighttime hours are the dedicated members of the Bahamas Royal Police Force. It is true that t his body, like any other, has bad apples but it is clear that the present Commissioner is doing his best to r id the force of these persons, as we see officers charged with offences like any other members of the c ommunity. However, if we continue to pour abuse upon the honest and hardworking officers of this force the result will be an undermining of the respect which this body should have and which will greatly curtail the work which this body is doing to protect the citizens of and visitors to this county. This can ulti-m ately lead to anarchy. Our police force needs our support not our complaints and abuse. I am not saying that we should turn a blind eye to the bad things which may be done by certain members of the force but we must b e prepared to support them by congratulating them when they do a good job and by giving them pertin ent information, even if this may hurt a relative or friend, to assist them in apprehending criminals. Secondly, the leaders of our country, both civil and religious must temper their remarks so that we do not have a worsening of relationships between g roups of persons in the country. For instance, only recently a religious leader was q uoted as saying that illegal immigrants are adding to the crime problem. I do not know if this statement was made based on impirical or anecdotal evidence, as the basis for the statement was not reported, however, most of us are aware of the tensions which exist between the members of one non-Bahamian community and B ahamians and anything which can breed animosi ty can lead to violence or potential violence. T hirdly, as I agree with the statement that we are a nation in crisis, I would urge the members of the v arious political parties to try and work together for the good of our country instead of trying to score cheap political points at every turn. Let us teach our young people that there are mature politicians in this country who can work for the betterment of this country and lead our people to think rationally instead of emotionally accordingt o the red or the yellow. JEANNE I THOMPSON Nassau, June, 2009. We must stop pouring abuse on hardworking police officers

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T HE government has been praised for forming a committee to examine the country’s gambling laws. The Bahamas Gaming R eform Committee (BGR which is hoping the review will result in the legalisation of gambling for Bahamians, welcomed the decision. H owever, the BGR said it is concerned the government failed to ensure the necessary diversity of representation ont he committee. “The Bahamas Hotel Association is but one group to be heard from on the matter.H owever, it is not the only stakeholder group with relev ant views and concerns on the situation,” said the BGR in a statement yesterday. T he group cited the following principles as fundamentall y important to gaming law reform: openness and transparenc y; an independent local and international industry review; accountability and tried and proven financial reporti ng methods; Bahamian control of a regulated government gamingn etwork; a complete review of all g aming laws with a view of ending discrimination and hypocrisy; clear guidelines for use of funds from a national gamingn etwork; employment for Bahamia ns; the use of modern, proven systems and technologies; the implementation of socially responsible methods and means; Bahamian private sector involvement. Sidney Strachan, BGR spokesperson, said: “Done right, a national gaming net w ork regulated by government based on smart systems, best practices, responsible methodsa nd proven financial report ing can generate thousands of jobs for Bahamians, millions i n incremental revenue for government and enriched social, educational and healthp rogrammes. The government must ensure that reform is based ont he best research, broad consultation and adherence to the h ighest performance standards. BGR has important input to make on the mattera nd intends to ask for a seat for at least one of its members, o n the newly appointed committee.” Economic The BGR said it has been in contact with regulated gam i ng jurisdictions outside the country and has been advised that the combined economici mpact of a national gaming network in the Bahamas could p otentially exceed $60 million and full-timeemployment opportunities across all sectorsa nd areas of economic activity, both private and public, could range from 1,500 to 2,000 jobs. “Industry research indicates that the regulation of gamingi n the Bahamas will generate non-gaming revenue of as much as $5 million involving s uch things as food, beverage and entertainment. Industry data also suggests that a mini-m um $10 million in direct salaried employment will occur with Bahamians thed irect beneficiaries. Direct employment from a national V LT wide area network in the Bahamas will approximate 400 persons,” Mr Strachan said. H e said it is estimated that proceeds to government will b e upward of $30 million. “That money will be spent on schools, hospitals, infras tructure, and support programmes, all of which will gen erate new employment,” Mr S trachan said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 9,2009 , PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 Praise for gambling laws review T HE B AHAMAS G AMING R EFORM C OMMITTEEWELCOMESGOVERNMENTMOVE W HEEL OF FORTUNE: T he roulette wheel, a familiar casino sight.

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THE Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC w oodturning programme for r esidents at the Simpson Penn Centre for Boys. A nd next week, a straw c raft course will commence f or residents of the Williemae Pratt Centre for Girls, compliments of BAIC’s handi c raft development and marketing department. “We at BAIC want to make a meaningful difference in the lives of these wonderful children,” said executive chairman Edison Key during c eremonies on Monday. These programmes, we are certain, can make a huge d ifference between these y oungsters returning to busi n ess as usual, or taking the step to bigger and better things.” M inister of State in the Ministry of Labour and Social Development Loretta Butler-Turner threw her full support behind the projects. “These programmes will undoubtedly provide empowe rment, substance, and valu e to our rehabilitative programmes,” she said. These boys can find their n iche in these vocations, b ecome entrepreneurs and productive citizens.” Simpson Penn Superinten d ent Wensworth Butler pledged his staff’s support to make the venture a success. The instructor for the course is mechanical engineer Vaughn Minnis, an expert Bahamian woodturner. A member of various w oodturning guilds in South F lorida, Mr Minnis operated his own company, MahoganyW oodcrafts, which imported e xotic woods from South America and Africa. His works have been disp layed at Fairchild Garden i n Miami, Florida, among other places. Woodturning is the spinn ing of a block of wood on a lath while shaping the wood with a variety of chisels. Woodturners are able to c reate items ranging from sal ad bowls, candle holders and vases to ink pens, all of which can be used. T he course is designed to give the students an in-depth understanding of all thef acets of woodturning. M r Key encouraged stu dents to be a part of the annual BahamArts Festival w here authentically Bahami a n-made items are show cased. He also told of other ventures BAIC was planning forS impson Penn. “We have identified about 15 acres of land on which we want to help you establish an agriculture and livestock programme,” he told them. “Why spend scarce money purchasing food products that you can produce right here while helping the young sters along the path of independence? “We are willing to assist with proper land preparation, the planting of a variety of vegetables, the establishment of a nursery to teach grafting and other techniques, and an introduction to green house farming. “We want to help develop an area where sheep and goats and chickens can be grown, along with support ing pastures. “We even have a small piggery in mind. The remainder of the land can be used to grow a variety fruit trees on,” Mr Key said. “This is going to give the youngsters solid onthe-job training in agriculture and livestock rearing so that when they leave this place they will have some skills to become self employed or even employable. Their time in here would not have been wasted. “The woodturning exercise with Mr Minnis is but the first step in a thousand miles. One step at a time and I am confident we can make the kind of positive impact envi sioned.” Also attending the ceremony were BAIC board member Sony Russell; Ministry of Labour and Social Development undersecretary Carl Brennen; Department of Social Services deputy director Marva Minns; Williemae Pratt Centre for Girls acting Supt Salomie Gibson, and BAIC general manager Benjamin Rahming. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 9,2009 THE TRIBUNE MINISTER OF STATE in the Ministry of Labour and Social Development Loretta Butler-Turner and BAIC executive chairman Edison Key arrive for the launch of the woodturning programme at Simpson Penn School. P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S Woodturning programme launched for Simpson Penn BAIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Edison Key told of projects for Simpson Penn and Willamae Pratt schools.

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THE advantage the Bahamas enjoys over other tourism destinations due to its proximity to the United States has been severely eroded over the years, according to Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace. Addressing the second wave of the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation’s summer employment programme, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said Grand Bahama is a prime example of this change. He pointed out that Freeport is just 111 miles away from Miami, much closer than other tourism competitors, but the cost of flying to Freeport has kept travellers away. It has been claimed that Grand Bahama has suffered from a lack of advertising, But Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said the high ticket prices are the main why Grand Bahama visitor numbers have dwindled over the last 30 years, while Nassau arrivals have steadily increased. “The customer is saying, ‘It’s too expensive. I’m not buying that’ and we continue to believe that advertising can overcome nonsense,” he said, adding that it is cheaper to fly from Miami to Nassau, Cancun, Puerto Rico, San Juan and even Las Vegas that it is to fly to Grand Bahama. “It’s 1,900 miles to Las Vegas and I am going to spend morem oney to fly 111 miles and get what they have on Grand Bahama c ompared to going to Las Vegas which is 1,900 miles away? People like to believe I get better value ifI go a much farther distance for less cost. So please, let us stop the m adness that has been going on for a very long period of time,” he said. The minister noted that in the Family Islands, the number of arrivals today is roughly the same as it was 30 years ago – again, because of price. “If I live in New York City, it is l ess expensive for me to fly from New York to London or New York to Paris or New York to Rome than it is to fly from New York to Exuma,” he said. “And here is the killer part of it – I get to London, Paris or Rome quicker than I get to Exuma. So explain t o me, why somebody would wake up one morning and say ‘I want to get to Exuma,’ when it is more expensive to get there and it takes me a lot longer to get there.” In addition to working to restore the proximity advantage, Minister Vanderpool-Wallace told the students they must take note of then eed to maximise the advantage the Bahamas has because of its beaches and waters. Beaches are one of the primary reasons visitors c ome to the Bahamas, according to Ministry of Tourism exit surveys. Future Brand, a company researching the perception of countries in several categories, has ranked the Bahamas as number three in the world in perception of waters and beaches. The Maldives and Tahiti are numbers one and two, respectively. “This country of islands has more beaches than any country in the western hemisphere because of so many islands in so many places,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said. “Nobody else comes close. But it’s a thing we diminish all day long. We’ve got 100,000 square miles of a spa. That’s what people think about our waters. When they go in that, they feel it’s healing, but we don’t understand the power of it.” He challenged the students to use their talents and knowledge of technology to help promote the Bahamas and advance the tourism sector. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 7 PUBLIC WORKS and Transport Minister Neko Grant visited the taxi centre at Prince George Wharf on Monday. Pictured from left are Minister Grant, security manager at the Port Department Devin Moss and Acting Port Controller Patrick McNeil. THE system of administration at the Road Traffic Department is “antiquated” and there are “too many processes being done manually,” Transport Minister Neko Grant admitted. Mr Grant said the government is working to give visitors a better experience at the Prince George Wharf and the Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA to improve ground transportation for tourists. “We’ve been concerned for some time now with the way our visitors are ushered into the ground transport system,” he said. “We’ve looked at some alter native methods that we can use to improve the visitor experience rather than have the tourist wait for so long. We will seek to implement those as soon as possible.” Mr Grant said his ministry will also speak with the Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD parking facilities for taxi-drivers in the domestic area at LPIA might be improved. “We’re also not particularly pleased with the congregationof the drivers at the arrival area and so we have to speak with NAD about providing a holding area for them,” he added. Mr Grant made these observations following a tour of Road Traffic Department units on Monday. He led a team from his ministry on a tour of the Road Traffic Department at Thompson Boulevard, the Inspection Centre at Fort Charlotte, the taxi call-up centre at Prince George Wharf, the Carmichael Road unit, and the taxi centre at the airport. The minister and his team used the occasion to familiarise themselves with the operations of the department and to meet staff members. Mr Grant found that the system of administration at the Road Traffic Department is “antiquated” and there are “too many processes being done manually.” He pointed to the need to computerise the department. “We understand and appreciate that this can only come once the funds are available,” he said. Accompanying him were permanent secretary Colin Higgs, undersecretary Nicole Campbell, Road Traffic Controller Philip Turner, and assistant controllers Ernestine Fernander and Bradley Smith. The Road Traffic Department was created to deal specifically with all government activities related to road safety, traffic reg ulations, vehicle licensing, vehicle registration, vehicle inspection, individual drivers licences, and the collection of road fees and taxes related to public and private road transportation. Road Traffic Department administration ‘antiquated’ Bahamas’ proximity advantage has been ‘severely eroded’ MINISTEROF Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vander-p ool-Wallace a ddresses participantsof the Ministry’s summer employment programme.

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the senior officer, when asked if there was any update on the m atter. M r Jones, 55, a resident of t he Bahamas, was shot in the head outside the office of his company, the Britannia Consulting Group on April 22, 2009. He remained in a coma in hospital until May 8, when he died of his injuries. The circumstances of the incident led police to believe the shooting was an arranged hit. Mr Jones had previously told friends and family that he had feared for his life following two home invasions and a physical assault in 2007. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 38%/,& 12 to five inches long. After examining the blade of the knife the prosecution had submitted into evi-d ence, Dr Raju said that the blade which is 7.5 to 8 inches long, could have caused Taylor's injuries. The pathologist also told the court that during the autopsy, he collected a tube of Taylor's blood, urine and stomach contents. During cross-examination by M cNeil's attorney Murrio Ducille, Dr Raju told the court that if blood is outside the body and it is not preserved, decomposition could set in after a couple of hours. Hea lso noted that when blood dries o r clots, decomposition slows down. He also admitted that he had not labelled the vile of Taylor's blood, but that a police officer had labelled it as his hands wered irty, and so he initialled it afterwards. The trial, which is before Senior Justice Anita Allen, continues today. Director of Public Prose-c utions Bernard Turner, Neil B rathwaite and Darnell Dorsette represent the Crown. Harl Taylor died from ‘haemorrhagic shock’ F ROM page one Troyniko McNeil ‘New leads’ in British banker murder case FROM page one THETRIBUNE’SIndependence Supplement which appeared in Wednesday’s newspaper will be available to view online at www.tribune242.com from Friday. Independence Supplement goes online CARACAS, Venezuela THE MAYORof Venezuela’s capital ended a hunger strikeW ednesday after the head of the Organization of American Statesa greed to meet with him and other opposition leaders to discuss m oves by the government they say erode their authority, according to Associated Press. Caracas Mayor Antonio Ledezma’s protest fast lasted five daysa nd was aimed at urging the OAS to mediate in Venezuela overm oves by President Hugo Chavez that have taken away powers and f unding from the mayor and other politicians who oppose his leftist policies. L edezma stopped after speaking by phone Wednesday with O AS Secretary-General Jose Miguel Insulza, who agreed to m eet with a delegation of opposition politicians in Washington, said Mitzy Capriles, the mayor’s wife. Ledezma began the hunger strike at the OAS office in Caracas o n Friday to protest what he calls a violation of Venezuela’s constit ution in Chavez’s naming of a member of his ruling party to a n ew post as top authority in the capital. The pro-Chavez National Assembly has transferred nearly all of the city’s budget and ser vices to the new federal authority. Anti-Chavez mayor of Caracas ends hunger strike

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By MARCUS C BETHEL, MD Former Minister of Health 2002-2006 Goal: “To provide equitable access to quality care for all, delivered in an effective and efficient manner by healthcare professionals.” T here is a pressing need for healthcare reform in the Bahamas because the e scalating cost of healthcare delivery has outstripped the ability of the government to adequately fund public healthc are out of the Consolidated Fund. I t is estimated that $200 to 3 00 million is expended annually in the delivery of healthc are at the public healthcare facilities (hospitals and clinics and is increasing annually largely due to chronic noncommunicable diseases includ-i ng diabetes, hypertension, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. T he problem is compounded by the steady population growth of the Bahamas, the c ost of modern medical technologies, and the additional s tress on the system due to the large population of illegal immigrants and their disease b urden. The high transactional cost o f infrastructural development due to the archipelagic nature of our country and the regressive tax structure also adversely impact the cost of health c are delivery. PUBLIC-PRIVATE P ARTNERSHIP T he proposed way forw ard is a partnership b etween the public health care sector and the private healthcare sector. T he private sector has d emonstrated efficiencies in h ealthcare delivery, innovation and introduction of advanced medical technologies in the Bahamas. There exists a great need for more efficient integration of healthcare services so that t here is a seamless transition f or patient services between Family Island community clini cs and hospitals to ensure t imely delivery of services and f ollow-up care to patients. There also exists the need forintegration of IT (informa-t ion technology) systems in community clinics, hospitals and Ministry of Health to ensure efficiencies in the coll ection and collation of health data, medical records storage and retrieval, and pharmaceut icals acquisition and dispensi ng. I n addition, there is a need for integrated public educationp rogrammes concerning h ealthy lifestyles utilising the media, schools, churches and civic organisations. A true and meaningful partnership requires a paradigm shift in the thinking and behaviour of both public and privates ectors. T he public sector must rid itself of the “us and them men tality” in healthcare delivery a nd embrace necessary instit utional changes; while the pri vate sector must be more responsive to the needs of the wider community throughm eaningful, sustained cooperation and support of the public sector. T here exists no national h ealthcare development strate gy that incorporates both public and private sectors. This is a necessary first step to improve operational efficiencies and eliminate duplication of efforts in infrastructural and human resource d evelopments. A doption of a national healthcare plan by both sect ors and the public will create a f ramework for public policy a nd a road map for long-term development of our healthcare system. T his process must be a joint collaborative exercise involving all stakeholders including the Ministry of Health, Public H ospitals Authority, Medical Association of the Bahamas, Nurses Association of the B ahamas, Allied Health Prof essionals, private healthcare i nstitutions, College of the Bahamas, Chamber of Com-m erce and the business comm unity, unions, churches and the public. HEALTHCARE FUNDING A d equacy of health c are funding is fundamental to achieving the goal stated earlier and hencei s at the core of healthcare r eform. Healthcare funding is a uni versal challenge and each nation must customise its fund i ng mechanism to meet its n eeds and objectives as “no o ne size fits all.” Almost 15 per cent of our national budget is allocated to health care, yet the public health care system cannot meet the health care needs of the population it serves. Inadequate financial r esources combined with a lack o f efficiencies are the primary reasons for the existing gaps and barriers to care. The national health insurance plan, which was passed into law December 2006 with the full support of both sides in P arliament and following wide p ublic consultation, should be implemented as soon as p ossible to provide medical i nsurance coverage to all e ligible persons in our country. This is particularly import ant with so many of our citizens, 30-50 per cent, unable to afford neither health insurance nor private healthcare. This plan is also designed to f und the development of our m edical infrastructure (hospitals and clinics). In addition, the hiring and compensation of our health professionals (nurses, doctors and allied health professionals) are funded under this plan and healthy lifestyles prog rammes promoted. A ll first world countries, except the USA, have universal healthcare plans, and many developing countries have implemented some form of healthcare coverage for their citizens. T he Bahamas remains one o f a few countries that has not implemented a universal h ealthcare plan. A s we are celebrating 36 y ears of Independence and in view of the global environment and the competing national pri-o rities, decisions should be made today to guarantee and safeguard the health and wealth of the population of our beautiful Bahamas. 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Its agile sportiness coupled with a high standard of comfort makes this Sports Coup heads and shoulders above the rest. Anyone opting for a CLC buys far more than just a car. You own engineering excellence. Come into Tyreflex Star Motors and test drive a MercedesBenz CLC-Class today.OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY.TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz CLC-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 Healthcare reform in the Bahamas Y OUR S AY

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Reginald Ferguson says he is “checking into” 38-year-old Antoinette Fernander’s claim that her 18-year-old son Anto-n io Russell suffered blows that left him in “fear for his life,” with his face “black andb lue.” However, officer in charge a t Fox Hill police station, Inspector Marlon Fulford, said he has “no knowledge” ofs uch abuse. According to Ms Fernan der, her son was taken into police custody on Monday in connection with the death ofM ajor, who was found bound, gagged and hanging by a seatb elt from a tree on Saturday, June 27, 2009. As Russell is currently on b ail charged in connection with the killing of Mario Humes in June 2007, Ms Fernander said she can under stand why he may have been p icked up by police. “He is in the system,” she said. However, the mother com p lained that this does not give police an excuse to abuse him o r anyone else they have in their custody. “My son was all swell up, h is face was black and blue he can’t even breathe properly. I asked if I could take him to the doctor, they would not allow me to take him to thed octor. He said ‘Mummy, they putting a plastic bag over my face and beating me!’ He said he is scared they are going to kill him.” M s Fernander said that during a 20-minute conversation with Russell at the station het old her officers had placed a bag over his head before a ttacking him. “They can’t be doing this. What if he ends up like that 15 year old that hung himself int he cell? It is wrong,” she added, referring to the case of Michael Knowles, who wasf ound dead in a police cell. Knowles’ mother claimed witn esses told her he had been beaten by officers. Inspector Fulford of Fox H ill station said that when he last saw Russell yesterday morning he was “in good health.” “We have no knowledge of t hat,” he stated, when questioned about the complaint. He contradicted Mrs Fernander, saying Russell was picked up on Tuesday, notM onday, and claimed that Fox Hill police station is merely “holding” him for the CriminalInvestigation Department. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Garrison first came to police attention on February 25, 2009, when they receiveda missing person report from the United S tates embassy in Nassau. She had last been seen in the US sometime in January, and officers were told at that time she may have been in the Bahamas “in the company of a Bahamian male.” According to information gathered by p olice, Ms Garrison was no stranger to the Bahamas, with her first visit to the c ountry in 2005, and spending her time “between here and the US” from then until she met her death. P olice would not reveal if the man now set to be charged is the same man she was b elieved to have been in the company of when she was reported missing, or if he had any prior relationship with Ms Garri-s on. ACP Gibson said he would “need to check” why a description of Ms Garrisonw as not made public when the missing persons report was received by Bahamian p olice. He said normal procedure is that “if somebody’s reported missing we will fol-l ow alert all the stations then try to get it to the public as quickly as we possibly can.” U pdating initial reports, police yesterday suggested they now suspect Ms Garrison met her demise a “couple of months” ago. A CP Gibson said he “did not want to speculate” as to a motive for her killing and police are still awaiting an autopsy report which will tell them how she died.P olice have been in contact with her family, he added. The American’s murder was a popular topic of discussion on the internet for the last few days. O ne writer on a community message board said she was disturbed by the possibility that Ms Garrison may be the same white woman with long sandy coloured hair” she had “recently” seen crying in a “Chinese restaurant in the Fox Hill area.” “She was very dirty, had sand all over t he left side of her and was crying. I rushed over and asked her what had happened I assumed she fell and was possibly drunk. As I got to talk to her she revealed to me that her boyfriend had just beat her and she took her hand from her face hern ose was busted and she had scratches over her eye,” the internet user claimed. The woman, she alleged, told her she had come from the States to the Bahamas with a Bahamian man who had “promisedt o marry her.” The internet user said that after pleading with the woman to let her help her and take her somewhere safe,” she left her at the restaurant “against (her m ent.” “I pray to God that was not the same woman. My gut told me that day to call thep olice,” added the internet user. ACP Gibson said police still have “work to do” in relation to the case and investigations continue. FBI and Bahamian police seeking relative of woman F ROM page one Mother claims son beaten F ROM page one THEBODY of American Anna Garrison was found in this area.

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THE Elizabeth Estates Children’s Home and the H IV/AIDS Foundation were t he beneficiaries of donations b y Justice, Unity, Generosity and Service (JUGS organisation’s second conference in the Bahamas. “Breaking Barriers – Building Communities” was the theme of this year’s conference, which attracted 80 members and their families. The 42nd Annual Convention was held last Wednesday at the Breezes Resort and was officially opened by Rev Angela Palacious. She welcomed the American delegates to the Bahamas and e ncouraged the organisation in t heir quest of uplifting educational aspirations of children a nd teenagers. A t the team-building workshop, Agatha Marcelle from t he Centre for Organisational a nd Personal Performance (COPP w hich to achieve the maximum contribution from each memb er. Following the workshop, the 10 standing committee meet-i ngs were held. Each chapter was represented in order to p roperly discuss the issues and the way forward for the JUGS organisation. M embers were also treated to an island-style cocktail party a nd a community service awards luncheon. At the luncheon the JUGS N assau sisters introduced their US counterparts to the local c ommunity. The speakers were Rosamae Bain and Lynette Deveaux, both of the HIV/AIDS Centre. Representatives of the two c harities JUGS supports the E lizabeth Estates Children’s Home and the HIV/AIDS Foundation were present andr eceived a donation from the JUGS International Organisation. A student from Elizabeth E states Children’s Home, Greg Smith, received a four-year scholarship to the college of his choice. Community ServiceA wards were also presented to Arlene Nash-Ferguson for culture and community work;B ishop Walter Hanchell was a warded for religion and com munity service; Dorothy King was awarded for humanitarian services and community work, and Rev Carlos Reid was presented with an award for youth development and community service. Additional awards were presented to persons for their continued service to J UGS over the past years. They were Phyllis Albury-Garroway and Valerie Thompson of Origi nal Patties and Holy Cross A nglican Church. A travel award was also presented to the Detroit Chapter of JUGS f or having the most members t ravel to the conference in Nassau. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 11 ‘Justice, Unity, Generosity and Service’ gives donations

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C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 12 P AGE 14 ‘Peace on da Streets’ Basketball Classic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f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–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f $ELOLW\WRWURXEOHVKRRWDFFRXQWLQJSURFHVVHVDVWKH\UHODWHWRQDQFLDOVRIWZDUH DQG WKHV\VWHPRILQWHUQDOFRQWURO *RRGMXGJPHQWDQGVRXQGUHDVRQLQJDELOLW\ $ELOLW\WRFRPPXQLFDWHHIIHFWLYHO\ERWKRUDOO\DQGLQZULWLQJ *RRGWLPHPDQDJHPHQWVNLOOV ,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVVKRXOGDSSO\FRPSOHWLQJDQGUHWXUQLQJDQ$SSOLFDWLRQ)RUPWR 7KH0DQDJHU+XPDQ5HVRXUFHV7UDLQLQJ'HSDUWPHQW%DKDPDV(OHFWULFLW\ &RUSRUDWLRQ %OXH +LOO t 7XFNHU3%R[1DVVDX%DKDPDV RQRUEHIRU-XO\ n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter r dorsett@tribunemedia.net T he Bahamas’ 11 member team, at the I nternational Association of Athletic Federation’s World Youth Games in Italy, began competition today at the sixth annual edition of the meet. Seven members took to the track dominated by 100m sprinters and quartermilers advancing to the second round in their respective events. In the morning session, Sparkyl Cash and V’Alonee R obinson opened competition in the women’s 100m. Robinson was the first team member to advance when she ran in heat seven, out of lane four. Her time of 12.23s finished fourth, ultimately placing her 26th out of 31 athletes to advance to the next round. Cash failed to qualify with her time of 12.60s, which was good enough for fifth place in heat one. Ashton Purvis of the United States advanced with the fastest qualifying time of 11.57s. In the men’s 100m, a pair of former Carifta medallists head lined the event for the Bahamas. Geno Jones won his heat in 10.99s, well off his season’s best time of 10.67s. Jones’ time placed him 28th of the 36 event ual qualifiers. Farquharson just missed out on qualification. He was one of three competitors to finish with a time of 11.08 along with Riski Latip of Indonesia and Yateya Kampepera of Botswana. Latip advanced by edging out Farquharson in a photo finish. In the afternoon session, quartermilers took precedence with the dynamic pair Rashan Brown and Katrina Seymour advancing through to the second round. Brown finished second in heat six, in a time of 56.16s, while Seymour was third in heat five in a time of 55.77s. Seymour advanced with the ninth fastest time while Brown was 14th of 24 qualifiers. Michelle Brown of the Unit ed States qualified with the fastest time of 54.39s. Young athletes advance to the second round At World Youth Games in Italy... K ATRINA SEYMOUR i n action at the World Youth Games... RASHAN BROWN (No.32finished second in heat six... S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 13, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net AFTER an awe-inspiring performance last month at the NORCECA Pool D Championships, the women’s senior national volleyball team has faced misfortune thus far in NORCECA Pool I against regional powerhouses. F or the second consecutive match, the Bahamas failed to win a set when they were d efeated by Canada in straight sets, 25-12, 25-4, 25-9. The Bahamas fell to 0-2 and are s cheduled to face Jamaica at 8pm Thursday. Team captain Kelsie Johnson finished with a team high six points (five attacks, one block), however received little support on offense as the Bahamas struggled to reach double figures. Cheryse Rolle finished with three points while Tasamine Emmanuel-Potier added two. It took just 52 minutes for the Canadians to complete the straight set sweep of the Bahamas. In the opening round, the Bahamas fell in straight sets at the hands of the heavily favoured Puerto Rican team 25-15, 25-7, 25-10 in the thirdr ound tournament of the FIVB Women’s World Championship at the Hector BezaS olares Coliseum in Caguas, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico held a distinct s tatistical advantage as they finished ahead 40-9 in attacks, 6-2 in blocks, and 13-10 in service aces. Cheryse Rolle led the Bahamas with five points, while Tasmine Emmanuel-Potier added three and Melinda Bastian finished with two. Sarai Alvarez led Puerto Rico with 12 points while Alexandra Oquendo finished with six. In a match that took just under an hour to complete, the Puerto Ricans led early 7-0 before the Bahamas scored their first point of the contest. The winner of the NORCECA Pool I will be the lone team to advance to the finalr ound of the event held in 2010 throughout various cities in Japan. W hile head coach Joe Smith knew his team faced uphill odds heading into the compe-t ition, he said the team would take away whatever lesson it was able to from the experience. “Our approach is to take advantage of every match and learn from it for the development of our volleyball,” he said. “Our goal is to play up to our best possible level.” NORCECA: Canada sweeps Bahamas in straight sets Brown and Seymour look to repeat their 2009 Carifta performance where they initially finished second and third respectively and nearly shared the medal stand before Seymour was disqualified for a lane violation. Glenwood Baillou was the lone competitor in the men’s 400m and failed to qualify when he finished sixth in heat five in 50.77s. Jones, Robinson, Sey mour and Brown will each compete in the semifinals today with the 100m finals concluding the afternoon session. Y oung athletes advance to second round F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 2 2 SOME of the young athletes have lunch at airport in London

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 14 ([HFXWLYHULQWHUV0HHWV 6XUSDVVHV $OOHFXULWLHV2Q$OO&KHTXHVULQWHG%\XU&RPSDQ\6XJJHVWHG%\KH&%$ &OHDULQJ%DQNHU$VVRFLDWLRQRI7KH%DKDPDVf 7KH([HFXWLYHULQWHUVRIKH%DKDPDV THE most prestigious basketball tournament of the summer in the Bahamas is slated to tip off with its 15th annual edition in less than two weeks. And the organisers are expecting perhaps the largest turnaround in its history. The Nelson Cooper “Peace on da Streets” Basketball Classic is scheduled for July 22 to 25 at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. Youth Against Violence founder Carlos Reid said the tournament serves various purposes for the youth. “This basketball tournament is an effort to continue the work of Nelson Cooper and YAV to bring peace to our streets,” he said. “Most of the persons killed this year were young people under the age of 25 and most of those charged for these same murders were also juveniles under the age of 25. So far for 2009 there have been over 34 reported murders. Youth Against Violence continues to be at the forefront in the fight against crime and violence. We refuse to put our heads in the sand and pretend as if we don’t have a problem. We will continue our commitment to provide positive alternatives for the youth of our nation and abroad.” The tournament will include five divisions, 18 and Under, 16 & Under, Church Division and Open Division. And for the first time ever, there will be a Celebrity Division comprised of radio personalities and entertainers including ZNS, The Tribune , 100 Jamz and a team of entertainers led by radio host “Naughty.” This year’s Celebrity Division will be in honour of Anthony “Fat Back” Marshall who recently passed away. This year, a Family Night is being planned for 5pm July 25. This night will feature championship games, a Slam Dunk Contest, 3-point Shoot Out and a special Celebrity Game featuring members of parliament playing against some of our local pastors. All games will be held at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium starting at 6pm July 22 to 24. Saturday’s games begin at 9am and last until the tournament ends. There will be a number of great door prizes, including round-trip tickets for two courtesy of Bahamasair and cell phones and phone cards courtesy of BTC along with other prizes. This year’s tournament promises to be competitive as well as exciting with a team coming from California in the Open Division as well as a team from Freeport joining our 16 & Under Division. “Again, we expect a number of our Bahamian college players to play this summer as this event has become an elite basketball tournament in the Bahamas. Our Classic has become the most highly anticipated summer event in New Providence and over the past several years we have attracted some college coaches from the US who come down with the hopes of offering scholarships to some of our young players,” Reid said. “We would like to thank the public for supporting us over the years and we look forward to your continued support. We would also like to thank our sponsors without whom this event would not be possible.” The tournament began in 1995 and was first named the National Park League Championships. The name was changed to the Nelson Cooper Peace on da Streets Basketball Classic in 1996. The late Nelson Cooper was the leader of a gang called the Border Boys . He gave his life to the Lord and went into the Mason’s Addition community to encourage other gang members to stop the violence. He was shot the night he entered that same community and died a week later. Event sponsors include Furniture Plus who has been with the event since its inception, more 94.9 FM, Spirit 92.5 Family Guardian, Scotia Bank, Basil Ingraham & Co, J.S. Johnson, Purity Bakery, Chilly Willy, Original Patties, Nassau Paper Company, JMEL, First Carribean Bank, KLG Investments Ltd, KFC, Thompson Trading, Commonwealth Bank, Royal Star Assurance, Coca-Cola, Prince Lock & Key, Commissioner of Police and Dunking Donuts. “We encourage everyone out there to come out and support this event,” Reid said, “Our children need you.” Come out and support the ‘Peace on da Streets’ Basketball Classic THE Bahamas Basketball Federation is scheduled to host its 2nd Annual Independence Round Robin Basketball Tournament July 9-12 at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. Independence b-ball tourney YOUTH Against Violence founder Carlos Reid...

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 15 TRIBUNE SPORTS

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A Norwegianbased oil and g as giant yest erday said it w ould invest between $100-$150 million in upgrading the Grand Bahamabased oil storage terminal it plans to acquire for $263.2 million, but the deal’s closing is dependent on agreeing a longterm lease with the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC Cathrine Torp, a StatoilHydro spokeswoman, said the company was “looking at a l ong-term engagement beyond 2019” in the Bahamas through its planned purchase of the South Riding Point oil storage and transhipment facility from World Point Terminals, the owner since January 1, 1990. The current lease between South Riding Point and its BAIC landlord expires in 2019, and while Ms Torp said Statoil could not disclose the extension it was seeking, she added: “We need a return on our investment. “When we look at this kind of investment, we’re looking at a timeline of 30 to 50 years, just to give a general statement on this type of investment and the time we look at.” That would imply that Statoil would at least want the lease on South Riding Point to be extended until 2049-2050. Agreeing a long-term extension of the lease with BAIC and the Bahamian government is one of the key conditions to closing the transaction between W orld Point and Statoil, the form er warning that the sales a greement could terminate unless an extension was agreed by October 1, 2009, if this was not met. Other key conditions include obtaining the necessary Nation a l Economic Council (NEC a nd Investments Board (meaning the Cabinet) approvals for the Statoil purchase, and the Norwegian firm completing satisfactory due diligence. Ms Torp said Statoil, which has leased space at the oil storage, blend ing and transhipment facility for the past 16 years, saw the purchase as a logical extension of its long-term growth plans. It had desired to both extend its lease at South Riding Point and invest in upgrading its facil ities there, due to the increasedv olume of oil being shipped f rom Brazil developments that s eemingly led into acquisition talks with World Point. “The terminal is very well positioned for the US market, and will support our trading activities from our Stanfordo ffice,” Ms Torp said. “It was t he need for investment and the fact the current lease was going to end shortly.” She added that Statoil planned to invest between $100 million and $150 million in upgrading South Riding Point, which features 10 storage tanks and two berths. The company has some 55 Bahamian employees, all of whom Statoil is asking to stay. Larry Cartwright, minister of agriculture and fisheries, who has responsibility for BAIC, said “the ball is in their court” when asked about the lease extension and South Riding Point deal. T he Government, he added, h ad yet to see written details o n the World Point deal and the Statoil proposal, although the two sides had been scheduled to “get back to us” by tomorrow or, more likely, Mon day. “Something in writing has t o come across the desk of the n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE mastermind behind a new US-style shoe store conc ept for the Bahamas yesterday s aid there had been “a phen omenal response” from customers in the first 17 days since it launched, adding that its selfservice format had kept overheads low and “prices up to 50 per cent” below rivals. Lincoln Bain said he had modelled Bani’s Shoe Warehouse, located on Mackey Street next to the Royal Bank of Canada, as a larger version of the likes of Payless in the US, where customers were able to e ffectively serve themselves a concept that kept staff numbers low. Telling Tribune Business he had invested more than $300,000 in initial start-up costs, Mr Bain said: “It’s had a phenomenal response. Everyone’s saying there’s a recession, but we decided to do it right and do something big. It’s the first self-service shoe store in the Bahamas.” C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29T he information c ontained is from a third party and The T ribune can not be h eld responsible for errors and/or omission from thed aily report. $4.21 $4.30 $4.25 %' r&%(! !&+&*&%#"% +++ ntrn ft !)"*+&$ tb ttnt rb ,#-+!+&,#-ft+!''&"%+$%+&%#-,#-ft+!&%&)& "*%&+, ,*++! .#&+."%+)"&).,##-..'+"&.+!. * Businesses in field ‘finding it very difficult to function’ as some imports come in duty-free, while others have taxes levied * Government’s duty exemptions to encourage energy efficiency being undermined, says exChamber president * Firms being deterred from undertaking energy efficient projects n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN suppliers of energy efficient equipment and technology are “finding it very difficult to function” because of the inconsistent treatment their imported prod ucts receive from the Customs Department, a former Chamber of Commerce president said yesterday, with some shipments allowed in duty-free and others charged the full 45 per cent. Dionisio D’Aguilar, Superwash’s president, said the uncer tainty and inconsistency associated with Customs’ treatmento f such imports was not only undermining the Government’s efforts to encourage energy efficiency among Bahamian households and businesses through the elimination of duties, but was also deterringc ompanies such as his own from implementing energy-saving projects. Mr D’Aguilar told Tribune Business that Superwash had been contemplating the importation and installation of $150,000-worth of solar panels, as part of an energy-saving initiative across the laundromat chain. The Government, as part of its 2008-2009 Budget, announced a range of fiscal incentives designed to encour age energy efficiency as global oil prices skyrocketed, and made the importation of energy-saving light bulbs, solar lamps and panels, batteries, converters and wind engines duty-free. However, Mr D’Aguilar said Superwash’s supplier and others in the energy-saving technology field had told him of problems experienced in getting their shipments cleared by Customs duty-free. ‘Inconsistency’ at Customs hits energy efficient firms D’Aguilar Cartwright S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B * BISX-listed firm believes C olumbus buy-out will ‘facilitate’ services expansion and local acquisitions, hinting at new move for SRG * Aiming to use negotiations on cable TV licence renewal to push for basic package rate increase * Incurred $0.5m in new signal costs, and channel line-up risen by 67% * Cable invested $230m in infrastructure, providing barrier to entry of rivals n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CABLE Bahamas is planning to use negotiations with the Government over the renewal of its cable TV licence to push for a “mild” increase in the $30 basic cable package rate over the next three years, Tribune Business can reveal, with the BISX-listed company “confident” that it will obtain a voice telecommunications licence once the sector is liberalised. A copy of the private place Cable ‘confident’ on voice licence S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 7 7 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CABLE Bahamas’ manage ment has projected that net income levels will fall below the $25.866 million generated in 2008 for its next three financial years, but will recover in the medium term to reach $36.777 million by 2015. The projections, contained in the private placement memorandum for its $40 million preference share issue, which will help to finance the $80 million buy-out of Columbus Communications’ controlling stake in the company, show that man agement has likely budgeted for a worst-case scenario for fiscal 2009, with net income projected to drop 23.4 per cent to $19.827 million. Year-on-year revenue growth is projected to drop to 3.9 per cent for 2009, compared to a 7.2 per cent growth rate in 2008, with total revenues expanding from $81.461 million last year to $84.636 million. However, the year-over-year percentage revenue growth is projected to stabilise at 4.1 per cent between 2012 to 2015, with operating income as a percentage of total revenues standing at a consistent 51 per cent over the same period. The main determinants of Cable Bahamas’ growth over the next six years, apart from the probable renewal of its cable TV licence and generating growth from that mature sec tor and its Internet business, will be its ability to enter new telecoms markets and expand via that route. Net income, although projected to lag behind 2008’s performance with $20.195 million and $23.595 million in 2011, will go beyond that with $26.651 million in 2012 and continue on a projected rising trend after Cable projects $36m-plus net income by 2015 * Columbus to get base $1.4m management fee, with incentiv e capped at 80% of this amount S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B $300k outlay ‘shoe-in’ for ‘phenomenal response’ $100m-$150m upgrade for Bahamas terminal * Norwegian buyer unveils $263m purchase of South Riding Point in GB * Deal contingent on extension of BAIC lease beyond 2019, with purchaser seeking ‘long-term investment horizon of 30-50 years’

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE family guardian’sFinancialServicesDivision hasbeenawardedthe2009PlatinumMasterAgency AwardbytheGeneralAgents&ManagersAssociation International (GAMA yearthattheFinancialServicesDivisionhasbeen recognized by GAMA International. Six Agency Managers have also received individual awardsinrecognitionoftheiroutstandingrecordin leadership and sales performance. Theprestigiousawards,presentedatGAMAs Atlanta,GA,conference,highlightinsurance agencies or companies considered to be at the top of their industry. GAMApromotestheprofessionaldevelopmentof managersintheinsuranceandnancialservices industrythrougheducation,research,andnetworking through its international memberships. For over 37 years, GAMA has recognised nearly 36,000 salesleadersintheindustryworldwidethroughits management awards programme. Pictured from left: Leonard Henderson, 1 .JD, CLU Financial Services Marketing Consultant Platinum Master Agency AwardJulie Adderley-McIntosh 2 .Agency Manager Bronze International Management AwardJohn Hepburn, Jr. 3.Agency Manager Silver Frontline Leader AwardVernelle Butler, 4.MBA, CLU, IFA Agency Manager Bronze Frontline Leader AwardKatina Roach, 5.BSc. Agency Manager Bronze Frontline Leader AwardAnn Marie Major 6.Agency Manager Bronze Frontline Leader AwardDeborah Delancy, 7 .BA Agency Manager Bronze Frontline Leader AwardSALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.comcall us today at 396-1400 A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating Family Guardian’s Sales Leaders REPRESENTING the interests and concerns of the private sector, the Chamber of Commerce’s new slate of officers and directors for the 2009-2010 administrative year paid a courtesy call on Prime Minister Hubert A Ingraham. Headed by the Chamber’s president, Khaalis Rolle, the group’s visit to the Prime Minister was one of several activities that took place during the recent Chamber Week 2009. Chamber executives meet PM SHOWN (front row L-R Sands, secretary; Mr Rolle; the Prime Minister; Gershan Major, first vice-president; Darron Cash, treasurer. Middle row (L-R Covington, director; Pedro Roberts, director; Dr Sophia Rolle, chairperson, Chamber Week 2009; Creswell Gardiner, director. Back Row (L-R Merritt Storr, director; Odley Aritis, director; Robert Myers, director; Rick Hazlewood, director; Philip Simon, executive director. (Photo by Tim Aylen This was largely because Cus toms officials lacked specialist knowledge and expertise in the sector, and were thus unable to determine which technology/equipment was energy efficient and thus qual ified for the duty exemptions and which was not. Mr D’Aguilar said his con tractor had told him: “I can’t tell you what happens when the shipment lands. It depends on who you get on the day.” He pointed out that if import duties were levied on $150,000 worth of Superwash’s solar pan el imports, that translated into “a pretty significant amount of duty” some $67,500 at a 45 per cent rate. “That’s a $67,000 question. Do I take the risk, or don’t I take the risk?” Mr D’Aguilar said on the possibility of being charged duties, something that would deter Bahamian companies and residences from mov ing towards becoming more energy efficient. “People in this business of trying to sell energy efficient products to Bahamian homes and businesses need to operate with consistency of duty rate. Right now, they can’t do that,” he added. “What the Government is trying to do with one hand, Customs is taking away with the other. “I know of one company that brought in a shipment of energy-efficient light bulbs, and the Customs officer on duty said: ‘No problem, let them in duty free’. The company then brought in a second shipment, and the Customs officer they dealt with then said: ‘No, it’s not energy efficient’ and charged them 45 per cent.” Mr D’Aguilar added: “Cus toms officers are not really sure what is energy efficient and what is not energy efficient. The technology is changing so quickly, and the field is so dynamic, that Customs officers just do not know. “The companies on that field end up having to try and con vince Customs officers that their shipments are energy efficient, and the officers just do not know.” Import Uncertainty over whether they would be charged import duties or not was creating havoc for Bahamian energy-efficient technology suppliers when it came to providing clients with quotes and pricing their services, Mr D’Aguilar said. “It makes it very difficult for businesses in that field to func tion and provide energy effi cient products that are tax exempt,” he added. “It makes it very difficult for them to oper ate, because they do not know what will happen when theyb ring goods in. “It’s very hard to be in that business because it’s not consistent. It’s a problem and they need to address it.” Mr D’Aguilar said that Customs officers needed to consult per sons in the industry if they were unsure whether imports were energy efficient and thus quali fied for duty exemptions, adding: “It’s OK for a civil servant to say: ‘I don’t know’.” Mr D’Aguilar praised the Government for attempting to reduce the Bahamas’ depen dency on fossil fuels and associated foreign currency outflows through energy efficiency incentives, adding: “It’s creating a new, different, diverse field for Bahamians.” Apart from making the dutyfree import of energy-saving light bulbs, solar lamps, batter ies, converters and wind engines, duty-free, the 20082009 Budget reduced import duties on energy-saving home appliances from 35 per cent to 15 per cent. The import duty rates on energy-efficient windows, lowflow shower heads and low-flow toilets were dropped to 15 per cent. ‘Inconsistency’ at Customs hits energy efficient firms Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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THE Investment Funds Act 2003 was enacted on the Decem-b er 15, 2003, and effectively replaced the Mutual Funds Act 199. The Investment Funds Regulations were enacted on Decemb er 16, 2003. Under the Act, an investment fund is defined as: “A unit trust, company, or partnership that issues or has equity interests, the p urpose or effect of which is the pooling of investor funds with the aim of spreading investment risks and achieving profits or gains arisi ng from the acquisition, holding, management or disposal of investments”. It is important to note that, in addition to the definition of ani nvestment fund, an investment fund must have a ‘nexus’ to the Bahamas in order to be considered a Bahamian-based investm ent fund. This means that for unit trusts, the trustee, administrator, investment advisor or investment manager must be either a company incorporatedo r registered in the Bahamas, a person who has a place of business in the Bahamas, or who uses an address in the Bahamas. Altern atively, the trust instrument for the unit trust must be governed b y the laws of the Bahamas. F or a company to be conside red a Bahamian-based investment fund, it must be either one o f the following: * Incorporated or registered in t he Bahamas * The administrator, investm ent advisor or investment man ager must be either a company o r companies incorporated or registered in the Bahamas * One or more companies or individuals, any one of whom has a place of business in the B ahamas, or which uses an address in the Bahamas * A company whose adminis tration or management (including control of substantially all of its assets) must be carried on in or from the Bahamas. In order to be considered a B ahamian-based fund, a partnership must have either of these q ualities: * One or more of the general partners incorporated or registered in the Bahamas * A person who resides in the B ahamas or uses an address in the Bahamas * The partnership articles must be governed by the laws of the B ahamas * The administrator, invest ment advisor or investment manager must be either a company incorporated or registered in the Bahamas, or a person who has ap lace of business in the Bahamas or uses an address in the Bahamas. A ll non-Bahamas based funds wishing to sell units or shares in or from the Bahamas must appoint a representative approved by the Securities Com-m ission of the Bahamas, in accordance with the requirements under the regulations. The Act is important to the d evelopment of investment funds in the Bahamas, as it will enable both companies incorporated under the Companies Act 1992 (as amendedi ncorporated under the International Business Companies Act 2000 (as amended the investment fund business with t he consent of the Securities Commission or investment fund administrators, where applicable, and to be registered as segregated accounts companies under theS egregated Accounts Companies Act 2004. Segregated accounts companies will be allowed to establish a ccounts containing assets and liabilities that are legally separate d from the assets and liabilities o f the investment fund’s ordinary a ccount. This structure will prevent the assets of one account f rom being affected by the liabilities of another account. T here are four (4 investment funds under the Act: * The Standard Fund * The Professional Fund * The Recognised Foreign Fund * The SMART Fund T he Standard Fund is similar to the ‘regulated funds’ under ther epealed Mutual Funds Act, and is designed to operate as a traditional collective investment scheme. Typically, standard funds are those funds which do not satisfy the requirements of a Profess ional Fund, Recognised Fund or a SMART Fund. It is intended that Standard Funds will be highly regulated, since they will be offered to the general public andt hey may be only be licensed, under the Act, by the Commission. Professional Funds are d esigned for the sophisticated i nvestor and may only be offered to the following categories of persons: * Any bank or trust company licensed under the Bank and Trust Companies Regulation Act 2000 or licensed in a prescribed j urisdiction, whether acting in its i ndividual or fiduciary capacity * Any registered broker-dealer or firm registered as a securitiesi nvestment adviser under the Securities Industry Act 1999, which maintains a minimum of B$120,000 of regulatory capital or is a broker-dealer or firm of securities investment advisers reg-i stered in a prescribed jurisdiction * Any insurance company l icensed under the Insurance Act 1969 or licensed in a prescribed jurisdiction * Any investment fund licensed o r registered under the Act or regulated in a prescribed juris-d iction * Any natural person whose individual net worth, or joint net w orth with the person’s spouse, exceeds B$1 million * Any natural person who has an individual income in excess of B$200,000 or joint income witht hat person’s spouse in excess of B$300,000 in each of the two most recent years, and has a reasonable expectation of reaching the s ame income level in the current year * Any trust with total assets in excess of B$5 million * Any entity in which all of the equity owners satisfy one of the foregoing requirements A Recognised Foreign Fund is the same as an Exempt Fund under the repealed Mutual Funds Act, where the equity interests oft he investment fund are listed on a securities exchange prescribed by the Securities Commission and the investment fund is not l icensed in the Bahamas, or where the investment fund is licensed or registered in a jurisdiction prescribed by the Commission and not suspended fromo peration A SMART Fund (Specific Mandate Alternative Regulatory Test Fund) must satisfy cert ain prescribed parameters and requirements of a category, class o r type of investment fund. The C ommission has pre-approved f our template and has published the parameters for the templates i n approved rules. A SMART Fund that meets the requirements p rescribed in one of the preapproved rules may be licensedb y an unrestricted investment fund administrator or the Comm ission. The four (4 SMART Fund as follows: S MF 001 Where the financial institution has a discretionary managementa greement with its customers, it may set up an investment fund with such customers which would meet the requirements of this t emplate SMF 002 This template applies in instances where there are no more than ten 10 investors in thei nvestment fund. The investor would qualify to be an investor in a Professional Fund, and the majority of the investors have the p ower to appoint and remove operators of the investment fund. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 3B LifeChoicesATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD. Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue,P.O.Box SS-5915,Nassau Tel.356-5433A member of Colonial Group International:Insurance,Health,Pensions,LifeIf you could secure $300,000 family protection for the price of a daily coffee,with no medical required,would you do it? Would you invest in $300,000 family financial security,if it included a free and confidential financial review with a professional adviser? Were hoping the answer is yes,because you could have this cover,for a little less caffeine,from just $9 per week*.You’ll certainly sleep a little easier! *rates vary,applies to male age 30CALL 356-LIFEor visit www.cgigroup.bmFor the price of a coffee,you can take care of something priceless.$300,000 life cover for the price of a coffee per day! Colonial Group International is rated A-(Excellentby AM Best. WCVH6800 DCVH680E * StunningPRACTICAL 322-2188/9You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it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he ‘Fund-ation’ for greater regulation S S E E E E L L E E G G A A L L , , p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B Legal Ease by Tyrone Fitzgerald

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.28Abaco Markets1.391.390.000.1270.00010.90.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.94Bank of Bahamas6.946.940.000.2440.26028.43.75% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3911.390.001.4060.2508.12.19% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.645.640.000.4190.36013.56.38% 4.781.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.203.13-0.070.1110.05228.21.66%2 .851.32Doctor's Hospital1.771.770.000.2400.0807.44.52% 8.207.50Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5010.00Finco10.9010.900.000.3220.52033.94.77% 11.7110.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.3810.380.000.7940.35013.13.37% 5.554.95Focol (S)5.045.040.000.3320.15015.22.98% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.60013.510.91% 12.0010.40J. S. Johnson10.4010.400.000.9520.64010.96.15% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1460 1425 BahamasSupermarkets 792 842 1460 0041 0300 N/M 205% BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter SecuritiesTUESDAY, 7 JULY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,576.92 | CHG -0.07 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -135.44 | YTD % -7.91BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Interest 7%FINDEX: CLOSE 788.56 | YTD -5.55% | 2008 -12.31%Prime + 1.75% 7%30 May 2013 29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 14 . 60 14 . 25 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 . 92 8 . 42 14 . 60 0 . 041 0 . 300 N/M 2 . 05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.37871.3124CFAL Bond Fund1.37871.874.83 3.03512.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8952-1.52-3.18 1.47501.3948CFAL Money Market Fund1.47502.885.74 3.60903.1821Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.18216.01-13.90 12.920912.2702Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.92092.405.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.5448-0.020.54 100.000093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund93.1992-3.33-6.76 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.56119.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.25111.724.12 1.05781.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.05782.135.78 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0271-0.572.71 1.05541.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05541.745.54 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-May-09 31-Mar-09 31-Dec-07 30-Apr-09 31-May-09 31-May-09 31-Mar-09 31-May-09 NAV Date 30-Jun-09 26-Jun-09 30-Apr-09 31-May-09 PUBLIC NOTICECHANGE OF NAME BY DEED POLLThe Public is hereby advised that I, CLINTON BERNARD DORSETTof #4 Anguilla Road, Royal Bahamia Estates, P.O. Box F-43838, have legally changed my name by deed poll to CLINTON BERNARD DORSETT GRAY. The Deed Poll has been duly recorded at the Registrar General’s Office. $300k outlay ‘shoe-in’ for ‘phenomenal response’ At 7,500 square feet, Mr Bain said the store was much larger than its contemporaries in the US, which enabled it to carry more than 15,000 pairs of shoes at any one time. The average Payless, he said, could only carry 6,000 pairs. When asked where his inspiration for the store came from, Mr Bain replied: “From the heavens. I just wanted to do something different. We did a shoe store because it’s large volume, and we saw the need for variety. “It’s been phenomenal. I t hink we’ve really got a huge p art of the market share so far.” M r Bain explained that he decided upon the self-service format to meet customer needs. Many persons, he said, were only able to shop during their lunch breaks from work, and often complained that they had to wait 20 minutes in a shoe store for a member of staff to become available to serve them. “It takes for too long,” Mr Bain added. Bani’s Shoe Warehouse employed eight staff, he said, but would have had to employ far more if it was not a self-service store, given the volumes of business it was handling. Retailer The retailer was covering every shoe price point, Mr Bain said, from $10 to $200. It was currently focusing on women’s shoes because women were estimated to account for 80 per cent of shoe purchases, but children’s shoes are set to follow in one month, with men’s shoes several months down the line. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 5B n By ERNEST SCHEYDER AP Energy Writer NEW YORK (AP prices neared $60 per barrel Wednesday as the government reported unused gasoline held in storage surged yet again. Retail gas prices have fallen every day for more than two weeks, and gasoline futures fell more than nine cents a gallon. E nergy markets are undergoing an extended sell-off, the longest in 10 months, with new economic reports dampening optimism about any economic recovery. Benchmark crude for August delivery fell more than four per cent, or $2.79, to settle at $60.14 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. In just over one week, oil prices have fallen more than 18 per cent. “The recession is far from over,” said analyst Stephen Schork. “Perhaps the run-up in prices was a bit overstated.” Crude prices by last week had more than doubled from lows reached January, when a barrel of crude cost just over $30. That was just six months removed from record highs near $150 per barrel last summer. Cheap oil sparked a new round of investment, as did a dollar that had been weakened by government efforts to bailout major banks and automakers. Crude is priced in the dollar, so it effectively becomes cheap-er internationally. Yet dismal economic data continues to emerge and the fundamentals of supply and demand appeared to take control of the market again last week. International Monetary Fund on Wednesday lowered its global economic forecast, the latest that would not support high e nergy prices. Since peaking at $73.38 last Tuesday, crude futures have fallen by almost $13 per barrel. Gasoline, heating oil and natural gas futures are also tanking. The Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries predicted Wednesday that demand for crude has fallen so sharply, it will take another four years to recover to 2008 levels. Billions Americans are driving billions fewer miles than they had in recent years with millions losing t heir jobs. E ven though refiners have b een slashing production, gasoline continues to pile up. The Department of Energy reported Wednesday that gasoline supplies grew by another 1.9 million barrels last week, the fifth straight week that storage levels have grown. The volatile energy markets may lead to increased scrutiny, both in the US and overseas. Federal regulators said Tuesday they would examine whether the government should impose limits on the number of futures contracts in oil and oth er energy commodities held by speculative traders. Concerns about the affect of volatile energy prices has spread overseas as well. It will be one of the topics discussed by world leaders meeting in Rome for the Group of Eight summit. In an editorial published by The Wall Street Journal, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown and French President Nicolas Sarkozy also called for closer government oversight of the oiltrading markets. R etail gasoline prices dropped again overnight, the 16th straight day, to a new national average of $2.593 per gallon. Last year, prices were above $4 at this time, according to AAA and the Oil Price Information Service. In other Nymex trading, gasoline for August delivery slid by 9.9 cents to settle at $1.6333 a gallon and heating oil lost about 6.2 cents to $1.5386. Natural gas for August delivery fell 6.7 cents to $3.362 per 1,000 cubic feet. In London, Brent prices shed $2.02 to $61.21 a barrel on the ICE Futures exchange. Associated Press writers E ileen Ng in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and George Jahn in Vienna contributed to this report Oil prices tumble near $60 as gas supplies surge INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, r ead Insight on Mondays

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ment memorandum for Cable B ahamas $40 million preference s hare issue, parts of which have been seen by Tribune Business, indicates the company believes the buy-out of its 30.2 per cent controlling foreign shareholder, Columbus Communications, will ease its path to expanding into new telecoms markets via both new licences and the acquisition of other operators. The latter is an indication that Cable Bahamas is likely to revive its attempts to acquire S ystems Resource Group ( SRG), parent company of IndiGo Networks, the only existing rival fixed-line telecoms operator to the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC Tribune Business previously revealed that Cable Bahamas attempted to execute the purchase option, which allows it to acquire either a portion of or all of SRG’s issued share capital, in 2007, but the Government and Central Bank refused to give approval for the deal largely, it is believed, to protect the declining value of BTC. Cable Bahamas’ audited financial statements for 2008 show it has invested some$ 4.244 million in attempting to acquire SRG to date. And its preference share offering docu ment said the removal of Columbus Communications’ foreign ownership would allowi t to “more freely pursue local a cquisitions”. It added: “By virtue of being fully Bahamian-owned, the company will not need to seek approvals from the Bahamas Central Bank for acquisitions. The ability to act quickly ono pportunities in a liberalising environment would allow Cable Bahamas to retain strategic agility that will fuel future growth.” And, while BTC might acquire a cable TV/video licence to enable it to compete directly with Cable Bahamas ina liberalised market, post-privatisation, the BISX-listed utility provider’s management were “confident..... that Cable Bahamas will be granted a voice licence”. “This entry into the voice market should be facilitated by Cable Bahamas being fully Bahamian owned, with a large equity stake held by the Government,” the offering docu ment added. That is a reference to the fact that the National Insurance Board (NIB 15.4 per cent of Cable Bahamas, with the Treasury owning a further 5.1 per cent. “The company anticipates being granted licences for new products (i.e. telephony can be rolled out very quickly and, given the level of penetration of basic cable and Internet service subscribers within its network, should be rapidly absorbed as a result of the value proposition of a triple-play to subscribers,” Cable Bahamas’ offering document said. As for its 15-year exclusive cable TV licence, which expires in October 2009, Cable Bahamas’ offering document said it had been advised by the minister responsible for cable television “that the Government is prepared to renew the c able television licence, albeit on different terms that are currently in place and with the loss of exclusivity”. The company added that renewal of the cable TV licence, although not 100 per cent certain, was of “high probability” because it was the only company that had the infrastructure to provide such services in the Bahamas, having invested $230 million in building its network infrastructure over the last 15 years. The high costs associated with infrastructure build-out, and creating a rival network, acted as a major barrier to entry for any rivals planning to enter the Bahamian cable TV market, Cable Bahamas added, sounding a confident note about maintaining its dominant mar ket position. There was, Cable Bahamas said, “the lack of a viable alter native” operator, and if the Government declined to renew its licence it could still provide services in Freeport, where it was licensed by the Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA “It is difficult to imagine a scenario where a significant portion of the population are made to forego television, while those in Freeport have full access to it,” the Cable Bahamas offering document said. “Neither satellite, not BTC, can provide a viable alternative as there is no legal/licensed satellite provider footprint, programme offerings are poor, and the telephone company has currently no licence or infrastruct ure to provide these services.” On the issue of an increase in the basic cable TV rate, the private placement rationale said the $30 charge had existed since Cable Bahamas began providing services in 1994, yet the package’s channel line-up had increased by 67 per cent, going from 36 to 54 channels. And, correspondingly, signal fees, utility costs and other factors of production had increased. Cable Bahamas had recently incurred a $0.5 million signal fee increase as a result of agreements with the likes of MTV, Oxygen, Disney and BET, and the offering document said: “The company believes that a mild rate increase over the next three years will not significantly impact subscribers, and will allow the company to continue to augment its channel line-up with in-demand programming and enhanced features.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 7B P u b l i c E d u c a t i o n M e e t i n gThe Bahamas National TrustPast, Present and Future Thoughts from the 1958 Exuma Expedition Leader Special Presentation:G. Carleton Ray, PhD. Research Professor Department of Environmental Sciences University ofVirginia DATE: Wednesday, July 15 TIME: 7:00 pm SHARP! PLACE: Nassau Yacht Club, East Bay Street BNT and NYC members FREE General Public $2For more information call: 393-1317 Cable ‘confident’ on voice licence F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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Investments Board,” the minister said. There had been some contact between the two sides and the Government already, Mr Cartwright indicated, confirming that World Point had already been in discussions with BAIC over extending the lease that expires in 2019. Mr Cartwright added that the Government normally gave lease extensions, which in South Riding Point’s case covers 763 acres 155 acres on land, the rest being the sea bed and offshore jetty for 21 years. However, it could modify this for shorter or longer periods. “The acquisition is a strategic move which supports StatoilHydro’s global growth ambition. It will strengthen StatoilHydro’s marketing and trading position in North America by securing the full terminal capacity," says Jon A Jacobsen, executive vice president for manufacturing and marketing. “StatoilHydro’s objective is to upgrade the terminal to allow for blending of all types of crude oils, including heavy oils," he continues. Deal Statoil’s deal also includes World Point’s 50 per cent interest in the Grand Bahama-based tug business, Freepoint, which has 42 employees. In 2008, the company’s six tugs handled 95 per cent of the traffic at the Freeport Container Port. StatoilHydro’s involvement in the Bahamian market began in May this year, when it announced its joint venture with BPC Ltd to operate three offshore oil exploration licences in the south-western Bahamas. Ms Torp, though, said the South Riding Point acquisition had no connection to this. The reason for World Point’s decision to sell is unclear, although the company yesterday referred to a “restructuring” that was taking place. The company invested last year in adding two new storage tanks, with a combined extra 1.5 million barrels of storage space, at South Riding Point, expanding its capacity by 29 per cent. For 2008, South Riding Point’s revenues rose by 25 per cent or $4.432 million over 2007, with fourth quarter revenues of $8.469 million up 91 per cent year-over-year. And Freepoint’s revenues were ahead by $350,000 or 14 per cent compared to 2007, with fourth quarter revenues up 37 per cent or $815,000. The Statoil deal is thus the second acquisition of a Grand Bahama-based oil storage terminal within two years, the combination of private equity firm First Reserve and VOPAK having purchased the BORCO terminal from PDVSA, the state-owned oil firm of Venezuela, for around $900 million in 2008. SMF 003 Where a SMART Fund was o perating as an Exempt Fund under the repealed Mutual Funds Act (for example, the equity interests were held by not more t han 15 investors, the majority of w hom were able to appoint or remove the operator of the fund), it must now be licensed as an SMF 003 Fund but may continue t o carry on business as an exempt fund for the prescribed time period (extensions may be approved and authorised by the Commiss ion) in the Act. SMF 004 Where there are no more than five investors and the investment fund operates as a private investm ent company, the investment fund may be licensed as an SMF 0 04 (e.g. family business It should noted that there are other funds which are defined under the Act, such as the Selfadministered Fund, which is ani nvestment fund administered by its own operators performing the functions of the investment fund administrator. These funds are r ecognised as regulated investment funds and are required to hold an investment fund license or be registered with the Commission. A Dormant Fund is an investment fund that ceases trading and liquidates its assets without formally liquidating its structure. S uch a fund must notify the Commission within 14 days of becoming a dormant investment fund. A Dormant Fund may re-launch its operations within one year from the date that it becomes dorm ant, and such period can be extended by the Commission for a total period not exceeding 18 months. Under the regulations, an investment fund must appoint one or more persons as custodi-a ns of the assets of the investment fund, unless the operators certify in writing that the structure of the investment fund or the n ature of the assets are such that they do not require a custodian to be appointed to hold the assets of the investment fund. However, the Commission does have thep ower to determine whether an investment fund is required to appoint a custodian. The custodian of an investment f und must be independent of the operator and administrator, unless a specific exemption is received from the licensor or they are deemed independent pursuant to the tegulations. They m ust be one of the following: * A bank and trust company licensed by the Central Bank of the Bahamas * A financial institution in a prescribed jurisdiction * Such other person as approved by the Commission With regard to auditors, under t he Act auditors must be approved by the Commission and must satisfy the Commission that they are members of the Bahamas Institute of CharteredA ccountants in good standing, or members in good standing of an international accounting body prescribed by the Commission. The Act also outlines certain duties of the investment fund administrator, which include, but are not limited to: * Ensuring that the investment fund does not carry on or attempt t o carry on business contrary to the provisions of the Act, and thatt he operations of the investment fund are carried on in accordance w ith the provisions of the Offering Memorandum and other constitutive documents (Memorand um and Articles of Association, Administration Agreement, I nvestment Management Agreement) * Ensuring that the investment f und does not in any way carry on business in a manner that may be prejudicial to the holders of e quity interests or the creditors o f the investment fund * Reporting to the Commission on an ongoing basis and as required by the Act * Maintaining the books and preparing financial reports of the investment fund, ensuring that a udited financial statements of the investment funds are sent to investors within four months of the financial year. T he Act also gives the Commission more extensive powers of regulation, enforcement and compliance, which include: * The power to conduct on-site and off-site examinations of the business of investment funds, and parties related to investment funds, on a regular basis * The power to instruct any i nvestment fund to have its accounts audited at any time, andt o submit its audited financial statements to the Commission w ithin a specified period * The power to revoke the l icense and registration of an investment fund where the invest m ent fund has ceased to carry on its business, or if the investmentf und becomes insolvent or goes into liquidation or is wound up o r otherwise dissolved. * The power to conduct regul atory hearings and to impose s anctions, remedies or other relief as a result of the settlement of a dispute. With regard to some of the fees c harged for investment funds, the initial application fee for a licence is B$750 for a Standard, Professional and SMART Fund. The a nnual licence fee for such funds is B$950, payable in the first year and pro-rated from the date of licensing to December 31 of that year. The annual license fee forS elf-administered Funds is B$1,000, payable in the first year and pro-rated from the date of licensing to December 31 of that y ear. The annual fee for a Recognised Foreign Fund is B$100. Copyright 2009. Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald. All rights reserved. NB: The information contained i n this article does not constitute nor is it a substitute for legal a dvice. Persons reading this article and/or column, generally, aree ncouraged to seek the relevant legal advice and assistance regardi ng issues that may affect them and may relate to the information presented. T yrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an attorney with Fitzgerald & F itzgerald. Should you have any comments regarding this article,y ou may contact Mr Fitzgerald at Suite 212, Lagoon Court Buildi ng, Olde Towne Mall at Sandyport, West Bay St., P. O. Box CB11173, Nassau, Bahamas or at t yrone@tlefitzgeraldgroup.com. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE that. While Columbus Communi cations will no longer have an equity interest in Cable Bahamas once the transaction is completed, it will still have a relationship with the latter via a management services agree ment with the company. According to the Cable Bahamas offering document, it appears that the management fees Columbus Communications will earn will be more thant he $1.429 million in dividends it r eceived from the BISX-listed company in 2008. Columbus will receive a flat annual fee of $1.4 million, plus an incentive fee based on achieving a targeted percentage of Cable Bahamas’ operatingi ncome. Yet the performance fee is capped at 80 per cent of the base fee, meaning the maximum this will be in any one year is $1.12 million. As a result, the maximum Columbus Communications can earn is $2.52 million. Outlining its fundamentals, Cable Bahamas said its infrastructure passed 90 per cent of all homes in the Bahamas, with cable TV subscriber and Internet subscriber penetration standing at 75 per cent and 45 per cent respectively as at end2008. The $40 million preference share issue, which is likely to be listed on the Bahamas Inter national Securities Exchange (BISX scheduled to close in three-anda-half weeks time on July 31, 2009. The $40 million preference share issue includes a $20 million US dollar component, and a $20 million Bahamian dollar one. Investors will have the option to convert those pref erence shares into ordinary Cable Bahamas shares after two years, with the preference shares paying an interest rate of 8 per cent. The preference share issue is a private placement targeted at invited investors only, so members of the Bahamian public should not apply to become involved. Cable Bahamas is also financing the transaction with a $105 million syndicated loan put together by Royal Bank of Canada, FirstCaribbean Inter national Bank (Bahamas Scotiabank, a portion of which will be used to refinance the company’s existing $60 million debt and credit facilities, plus pay transaction costs and fund working capital. C C A A B B L L E E , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B L L E E G G A A L L , , f f r r o o m m 3 3 B B T T E E R R M M I I N N A A L L , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B

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n By The Associated Press A look at economic developments and stock market activity around the world Wednesday: W W o o r r l l d d l l e e a a d d e e r r s s o o n n g g l l o o b b a a l l e e c c o o n n o o m m y y L’AQUILA, Italy World leaders agreed that the global economy is too shaky to begin rolling back massive fiscal stimulus plans right now, according to a draft of the Group of Eight statement on the world economy obtained by The Associated Press. The leaders said in the d raft that they “note some signs o f stabilization” but continued t o stress the difficult outlook instead of concerns over debt and high spending. O O i i l l r r e e c c o o v v e e r r y y t t o o 0 0 8 8 l l e e v v e e l l s s w w i i l l l l t t a a k k e e a a n n o o t t h h e e r r f f o o u u r r y y e e a a r r s s VIENNA Demand for OPEC crude has fallen so sharply because of the world recession that it will take another four years to recover to 2008 l evels, the 12-nation oil producers’ organisation predicted. The Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries said there was decline in the world’s appetite for oil because of falling industrial production and related developments. J J a a p p a a n n s s c c o o r r e e m m a a c c h h i i n n e e r r y y o o r r d d e e r r s s f f a a l l l l i i n n M M a a y y TOKYO Japan’s core machinery orders, a closely watched indicator of corporate capital spending, fell unexpect edly in May amid uncertain prospects for a global economic recovery. In Asian markets, Japan’s benchmark Nikkei 225 stock average tumbled 227.04 points, or 2.4 per cent, to 9,420.75 its sixth consecutive decline and its lowest close in six weeks. The yen rose to a five-month high against the dollar. Elsewhere, Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index dropped 0.8 per cent to 17,721.07, while South Korea’s Kospi lost 0.2 per cent to 1,431.02. Mainland China’s Shanghai Composite index slipped 0.3 per cent, and Australia’s key stock measure was flat. I I n n d d u u s s t t r r i i a a l l p p r r o o d d u u c c t t i i o o n n i i n n G G e e r r m m a a n n y y r r i i s s e e s s 3 3 . . 7 7 % % i i n n M M a a y y FRANKFURT Industrial production in Germany rose 3.7 per cent in May, the Economy Ministry said, and the country now appears to be over the worst of the crisis. Meanwhile, government pro jections showed the country will take until 2013 to comply with a European Union-mandated budget deficit limit as it runs up public debt totaling euro509 billion to counter the recession. Separately, official figures confirmed that ouput in the 16 countries that use the euro shrank 2.5 per cent in the first quarter of 2009 from the previous three month period. The recession is sapping the industrial exports that the euro zone relies on for growth. In European markets, the FTSE 100 index of leading British shares closed down 1.1 per cent at 4,140.23, while France’s CAC-40 fell 1.3 per cent to 3,009.71. Germany’s DAX lost 0.6 per cent to finish at 4,572.65. I I M M F F r r a a i i s s e e s s 0 0 9 9 g g r r o o w w t t h h f f o o r r e e c c a a s s t t B EIJING The International Monetary Fund raised its 2009 growth forecast for Asia’s developing economies to 5.5 per cent from 4.8 per cent. Separately, Chinese bank lending in June more than doubled from the previous month as Beijing’s stimulus drove a surge in credit. The country’s banks lent 1.5 trillion yuan ($220 billion tral bank said, up from May and A pril. Economists see the jump in lending as a sign of a nascent economic revival as Beijing tries to shield China from the global slump with four trillion yuan ($586 billion ing. C C o o n n s s u u m m e e r r c c o o n n f f i i d d e e n n c c e e i i n n U U K K r r i i s s e e s s i i n n J J u u n n e e LONDON Consumer confidence in the United Kingdom rose in June as more people said they expected better times by the end of the year, a bank said, but a drop in a closely watched house price survey tempered optimism about a recovery. Separately, Britain’s government proposed giving new pow ers to financial regulators, improving coordination among agencies and toughening penal ties for misconduct. S S i i n n g g a a p p o o r r e e b b a a n n k k b b a a n n s s s s o o m m e e o o f f i i s s l l a a n n d d s s b b i i g g g g e e s s t t f f i i n n a a n n c c i i a a l l i i n n s s t t i i t t u u t t i i o o n n s s f f r r o o m m s s e e l l l l i i n n g g s s t t r r u u c c t t u u r r e e d d n n o o t t e e s s SINGAPORE Singapore’s central bank banned some of the island’s biggest financial institutions from selling structured notes after they improperly marketed $367 million of the bonds that were linked to collapsed bank Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. T T h h e e P P a a r r i i s s C C l l u u b b o o f f c c r r e e d d i i t t o o r r n n a a t t i i o o n n s s s s a a y y s s i i t t h h a a s s c c a a n n c c e e l l e e d d $ $ 6 6 2 2 . . 7 7 3 3 m m o o f f d d e e b b t t o o w w e e d d b b y y H H a a i i t t i i PARIS The Paris Club of creditor nations said it has canceled $62.73 million of debt it is owed by Haiti and that further bilateral agreements have cleared the Caribbean nation’s remaining debt to individual club members. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 9B A global look at economic developments

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n By CHRISTOPHER S RUGABER AP Economics Writer W ASHINGTON (AP T he global economy is beginning a sluggish recovery from its worst recession since World War II, the International Monetary Fund said Wednesday. The IMF increased its estimate for global economic growth in 2010 to 2.5 per cent, from an April projection of 1.9 per cent. At the same time, it slightly downgraded its forecast for this year to a contraction of 1.4 per cent, from 1.3 per cent. “The global economy is still in recession, but we’re inching towards the recovery,” said Olivier Blanchard, director of the IMF’s research department. “It’s much too early” to cut back on government and central bank efforts to stimulate growth, he said. Even growth of 2.5 per cent won’t be enough to keep global unemployment from growing next year, he added. Financial conditions have improved faster than the IMF expected when it made its previous global forecast in April, the fund said, largely due to government support for banks and other financial companies. Much of the global recovery will be driven by emerging economies such as China and India, the IMF said. China’s economy is expected to grow by 8.5 per cent in 2010, a full point higher than previously forecast. India is expected to grow 6.5 per cent next year, 0.9 percentage points higher that the previous forecast. Advanced economies such as the United States, Europe and Japan, meanwhile, aren’t expected to show sustained growth until the second half of next year, the IMF said. Central banks that still have room to cut interest rates should do so, the IMF said, and governments should continue to stimulate their economies through 2010 with measures such as greater spending or tax cuts. At a news conference, Blanchard declined to comment specifically on whether the Obama administration should consider a second stimulus pack age, as some members of Congress are beginning to advocate. But he said consumer demand could “be very weak for longer than we anticipate,” in which case government stimulus should continue. At the same time, the United States and other advanced economies should take steps to limit future government spending on programmes such as health care and retirement security, he said, to reassure financial markets. The IMF expects the US economy to shrink by 2.6 per cent this year, a slight improvement from its earlier estimate of a 2.8 per cent decline and in line with many private forecasts. The US will grow 0.8 per cent in 2010, the IMF said, up from its expectation in April of no growth. Separately, President Barack Obama and group of world leaders meeting in Italy agreed that the global economy is too unstable to begin rolling back massive fiscal stimulus plans, according to a draft statement obtained by The Associated Press. The IMF provides loans and other assistance to troubled countries and has 186 member nations. It saw its influence decline earlier this decade as developing country economies boomed due to higher oil and other commodity prices. But the worldwide recession has caused countries in Eastern Europe and elsewhere to turn to the fund for loans to support their crippled economies. Last month, at the behest of the Obama administration, Congress agreed to set aside $5 billion to secure a $108 billion US line of credit for the IMF. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XQH 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s IMF: Global economy starts slow recovery

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n By EMILY FREDRIX AP Food Industry Writer CONSUMERS know less about the water they pay dearly for in bottles than what they can drink almost for free from the tap because the two are regulated differently, congressional investigators and nonprofit researchers say in new reports. Both the Government Accountability Office and the Environmental Working Group, a nonprofit research and advocacy organisation, recommend in reports released Wednesday that bottled water be labeled with the same level of information municipal water providers must disclose. The researchers urged Americans to make bottled water “a distant second choice” to filtered tap water because there isn’t enough information about bottled water. The working group recommends purifying tap water with a commercial filter, however. Both reports were released at a congressional subcommittee Wednesday morning. Bottled water an industry worth about $16 billion in sales last year has been suffering lately as colleges, communities and some governments take measures to limit or ban its cons umption. As employers, they a re motivated by cost savings a nd environmental concern because the bottles often are not recycled. Bottled water sales were growing by double-digit percentages for years and were helping buoy the US beverage industry overall. But they were flat last year, according to trade publication Beverage Digest. Beverage Digest editor John Sicher said some consumers are turning on the tap during the recession simply because it’s cheaper. From 1997 to 2007, the amount of bottled water con sumed per person in the US more than doubled, from 13.4 gallons to 29.3 gallons, the GAO report said. The issue before a subcommittee of the Energy and Com merce Committee was less about waste and water quality concerns and more about the mechanics of regulating bottled water. As a food product, bottled water is regulated by the Foodand Drug Administration and required to show nutrition information and ingredients on its labels. Municipal water is under the control of the Envi ronmental Protection Agency. The two agencies have similar standards for water quality, but the FDA has less authority to enforce them, the GAO said, and the environmental agency requires much more testing. Subcommittee chairman Rep. Bart Stupak, D-Mich., said the subcommittee was requesting information Wednesday from a dozen bottled water companies on their water sources, treatment methods and two years’ results of contaminant testing. It was not immediately clear which companies were being contacted. “Consumers may not realize that many regulations that apply to municipalities responsible for tap water do not apply to companies that produce bottled water,” he said in statements opening the hearing. The GAO noted the FDA has yet to set standards for DEHP, one of several chemicals known as phthalates that are found in many household products, while the EPA limits the presence of phthalates in tap water. In a survey of officials in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, the GAO found they think consumers are misinformed about bottled water. “Many replied that consumers often believe that bottled water is safer or healthier than tap water,” according to the GAO report. The Washington, D.C.-based Environmental Working Group said in its report that consumers do not get enough information to determine which water is best for them. Both groups said some bottled water brands include the same information required of tap water providers on either labels or company Web sites. The GAO called for more research but said the FDA should start by requiring that bottled water labels tell consumers where to find out more. Community water systems must distribute annual reports about their water’s source, contaminants and possible health concerns. Consumers should know where all their water comes from, how it is treated and what is found in it, said Richard Wiles, senior vice president for policy and communications for the Environmental Working Group. “If the municipal tap water systems can tell their customers this information, you would think that bottled water companies that charge 1,000 times more for this water could also let consumers know the same thing,” he told The Associated Press. The bottled water industry’s trade group, the International Bottled Water Association, planned to testify Wednesday that the product, subject to the same regulation as other soft drinks, teas, juices and other beverages is safe. Additional standards apply for bottled water products labeled as “purified water” or “spring water,” among other labels, because they must prove a connection to those sources, according to planned testimony from Joseph Doss, president and chief executive of the International Bottled Water Association. Doss said consumers can learn about bottled water by contacting the company, reading its Web site and visiting sites run by state governments. State safeguards for bottled water often exceed the federal, though they are less stringent than for tap water, the GAO wrote. The trade group declined to comment on the reports before they are released. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 11B Stricter labelling urged for bottled water IN THIS June 3, 2008, file photo, Liberty Valley Elementary School kindergarten student Tianna Swisher moves into an arc of water for a drink at the fountain at Montour Preserve, near Washingtonville, Pa. , while classmate Eli Zakarian awaits his turn... (AP Photo: Bill Hughes

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n By KIMBERLY HEFLING Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP Projects in some of the nation’s poorest areas don’t appear to be getting a fair shake in the spending of $787 billion in stimulus funds, the chairman of the House oversight committee said Wednesday. Rep. Edolphus Towns, DN.Y., chairman of the panel, said he was particularly concerned that transportation projects in economically distressed areas were being left out even though they are supposed to be a priority. “There is a substantial variation among states as to what constitutes an economically distressed area,” Towns said. “For this reason, it is unclear whether Recovery Act funds are going where they are needed most.” Towns comments came in response to a Government Accountability Office report released Wednesday at a hearing before his committee. The GAO said about half the money set aside for road and bridge repairs is being used to repave highways rather than building new infrastructure. And state officials aren’t steering the money toward counties that need jobs the most, auditors found. The Obama administration intended for the stimulus to jump-start the economy, build new schools and usher in an era of education reform. But government auditors said many states are setting aside grand plans to stay afloat. The GAO said the stimulus is keeping teachers off the unemployment lines, helping states make greater Medicaid payments and providing a desperately needed cushion to state budgets. But investigators found repeated examples in which, either out of desperation or convenience, states favored shortterm spending over long-term efforts such as education reform. In Flint, Mich., for example, new schools haven’t been built in 30 years but the school superintendent told auditors he would use federal money to cope with budget deficits rather than building new schools or paying for early childhood education. The 400-page stimulus includes provisions for longterm growth, such as high-speed rail and energy efficiency, but their effects will be seen later. Since Obama signed the stimulus bill in February, the economy has shed more than two million jobs. Unemployment now stands at 9.5 per cent, the highest in more than a quarter century. Robert L Nabors II, deputy director of the Office of Management and Budget, testified that 150,000 jobs had been created from stimulus spending. With the stimulus spending, he said the nation is moving down the right path. “We are making progress, but we still have a long way to go,” Nabors said. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE US states using stimulus money to remain afloat INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays “...For this reason, it is unclear whether Recovery Act funds are going w here they are n eeded most.” Edolphus Towns

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 72F/22C Low: 77F/25C Low: 77F/25C Low: 80F/27C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 82F/28C Low: 82 F/28 C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 89F/32C High: 88F/31C High: 91 F/33 C High: 91 F/33 C High: 93F/34C High: 91 F/33C High: 92F/33C Low: 81F/27C High: 92F/33C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 95F/35C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 72F/22C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 80F/27C High: 90 F/32 Low: 74F/23C High: 90F/32C Low: 76 F/24C High: 93F/34C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 95F/35C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 93F/34C Low: 73 F/23 C High: 92F/33C Low: 76F/24C High: 94 F/34 C Low: 80F/27C High: 98F/37C High: 91 F/33 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 9 TH 2009, PAGE 13B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST A full day of sunshine. Clear.Bright and sunny.Clouds and sun, a shower possible. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 92 Low: 82 High: 90 High: 89 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Mostly sunny with a shower possible. High: 88 Low: 81 Low: 80 Low: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel 118F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 92F 108-88F 100-85F 103-82F 96-88F Low: 81 TODAYTONIGHTFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................80F/27C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 92 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 81 F/27C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................18.50" Normal year to date ....................................20.07" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full Jul. 15 Jul. 21Jul. 28Aug. 5 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:27 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:03 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 9:41 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 8:17 a.m. Today Friday Saturday Sunday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 9:50 a.m.2.43:48 a.m.0.1 10:09 p.m.2.73:48 p.m.0.2 10:26 a.m.2.44:23 a.m.0.1 10:43 p.m.2.64:27 p.m.0.3 11:03 a.m.2.54:57 a.m.0.2 11:19 p.m.2.65:08 p.m.0.3 11:42 a.m.2.55:31 a.m.0.2 11:57 p.m.2.55:50 p.m.0.4 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3277/25pc88/3175/23t Amsterdam64/1754/12sh63/1754/12sh Ankara, Turkey91/3257/13s90/3259/15pc Athens94/3473/22s92/3373/22s Auckland55/1242/5s56/1343/6pc Bangkok90/3279/26sh91/3278/25sh Barbados86/3077/25t86/3077/25sh Barcelona81/2765/18t72/2266/18t Beijing95/3572/22s97/3675/23pc Beirut86/3077/25s82/2777/25s Belgrade83/2862/16s82/2763/17s Berlin67/1952/11sh68/2052/11sh Bermuda82/2777/25t82/2777/25pc Bogota64/1745/7sh67/1942/5pc Brussels66/1850/10sh64/1754/12r Budapest81/2761/16s75/2359/15r Buenos Aires55/1239/3s55/1239/3c Cairo100/3774/23s102/3878/25s Calcutta94/3484/28r94/3485/29t Calgary60/1539/3t68/2048/8s Cancun91/3277/25pc91/3275/23pc Caracas80/2671/21t80/2671/21t Casablanca81/2764/17s79/2661/16s Copenhagen67/1955/12c63/1756/13pc Dublin63/1748/8pc64/1750/10pc Frankfurt66/1850/10sh68/2050/10r Geneva 70/21 52/11 c 69/2049/9sh Halifax 68/20 48/8 s 72/22 52/11 s Havana 93/33 75/23 pc 91/32 72/22 sh Helsinki 66/18 54/12r66/1855/12sh Hong Kong 91/32 81/27 s 91/32 81/27s Islamabad 108/42 83/28 c 107/41 85/29 pc Istanbul91/3277/25s90/3274/23s Jerusalem 84/28 63/17s86/3065/18s Johannesburg 64/1741/5s66/1840/4s Kingston 89/3179/26pc89/3179/26s Lima72/2259/15s71/2160/15s London68/2052/11pc72/2254/12pc Madrid90/3263/17pc91/3264/17pc Manila85/2977/25r85/2978/25r Mexico City79/2654/12t74/2351/10t Monterrey104/4075/23s100/3775/23s Montreal75/2357/13s81/2764/17pc Moscow74/2363/17sh77/2557/13r Munich68/2046/7sh65/1848/8pc Nairobi76/2453/11c78/2552/11c New Delhi 104/4086/30s102/3886/30pc Oslo66/1854/12r69/2054/12pc Paris68/2052/11pc72/2252/11pc Prague 68/20 52/11 sh 68/20 51/10 pc Rio de Janeiro82/2769/20c82/2770/21s Riyadh102/3880/26s104/4080/26pc Rome 81/27 61/16 s 81/27 59/15 s St. Thomas90/3279/26sh88/3179/26sh San Juan64/1732/0s51/1023/-5c San Salvador 84/28 70/21 t 86/30 74/23 t Santiago 61/1634/1pc57/1334/1pc Santo Domingo90/3273/22pc86/3073/22r Sao Paulo 73/22 60/15 r 72/22 62/16t Seoul79/2668/20r86/3070/21s Stockholm 68/20 55/12 r 68/20 54/12 sh Sydney 63/17 45/7 pc63/1745/7pc Taipei93/3379/26pc93/3377/25pc T okyo 84/28 73/22 r 84/28 73/22 c T oronto 73/2264/17s79/2664/17c Trinidad79/2664/17t86/3066/18pc V ancouver 70/21 56/13 pc 74/2359/15pc Vienna 75/2357/13pc72/2255/12pc W arsaw 68/20 52/11 sh 72/22 54/12 pc Winnipeg 73/22 58/14 t 71/2148/8pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SSE at 8-16 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Friday:SE at 8-26 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Today:SE at 8-16 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Friday:SE at 8-16 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Today:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Friday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque93/3368/20s93/3370/21s Anchorage77/2557/13pc76/2458/14pc Atlanta85/2968/20t86/3069/20pc Atlantic City80/2659/15pc78/2562/16s Baltimore82/2762/16pc80/2664/17s Boston68/2056/13pc73/2260/15s Buffalo74/2360/15s78/2565/18pc Charleston, SC85/2969/20t85/2970/21t Chicago82/2769/20pc87/3067/19t Cleveland82/2762/16s85/2970/21pc Dallas102/3878/25s102/3878/25s Denver90/3261/16s97/3660/15t Detroit80/2663/17s85/2967/19t Honolulu88/3175/23pc88/3176/24pc Houston98/3676/24s98/3677/25s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday TodayFridayTodayFriday Indianapolis88/3166/18s89/3171/21t Jacksonville87/3070/21t87/3071/21t Kansas City96/3574/23s92/3378/25pc Las Vegas102/3878/25s105/4084/28s Little Rock96/3572/22s94/3474/23s Los Angeles82/2762/16pc84/2864/17pc Louisville88/3168/20s92/3372/22s Memphis95/3575/23s96/3577/25s Miami93/3379/26t92/3379/26t Minneapolis82/2766/18t83/2863/17pc Nashville92/3368/20s92/3370/21s New Orleans90/3276/24t92/3374/23t New York76/2463/17pc79/2666/18s Oklahoma City101/3875/23s104/4072/22s Orlando89/3172/22t91/3273/22t Philadelphia82/2764/17pc83/2866/18s Phoenix 105/40 85/29 s 108/4288/31s Pittsburgh80/2659/15s86/3065/18pc Portland, OR 77/2555/12pc86/3059/15s Raleigh-Durham 88/31 64/17 pc 88/31 66/18 pc St. Louis92/3373/22s95/3575/23t Salt Lake City 89/31 63/17 s 90/3266/18s San Antonio 102/38 78/25 s 100/37 76/24 s San Diego75/2367/19pc77/2567/19pc San Francisco 69/20 54/12 pc 68/2055/12pc Seattle74/2353/11pc78/2557/13s T allahassee 90/3270/21t89/3172/22t T ampa 88/31 77/25 t 91/32 76/24t Tucson100/3777/25pc102/3878/25s W ashington, DC 82/27 65/18pc82/2768/20s UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

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The Tribune The Tribune M y V o i c e , M y N e w s p a p e r ! Thursday, July 9th, 2009

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The Tribune Thursday, July 9, 2009 PG 25 RELIGION RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND CHURCH EVENTS The TribunePg 25 THURSDAY July 9, 2009

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The Tribune P G 26 Thursday, July 9, 2009 RELIGION By LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net P ARTICIPANTS of the 13th annual Inter-American Bar Association conference recently held at the Wyndham Resort, were hosted to a special prayer breakfast at the Wyndham Nassau Resort last week. Under the theme: “You Cannot Serve God and Mammon,” guest speaker Dr Myles Munroe Founder and Senior Pastor of Bahamas Faith Ministries Inter national spoke on the subject of maximising potential. Dr Munroe started by asking the question wher e was the wealthiest place in the world. He said while some people think it’s the oil fields in Iran or Iraq, and others believe it’s the diamonds minds of South Africa, or even the gold minds of the Ghana coast, he answered that the cemetery is undoubtedly that place. ou may ask why is the graveyard the wealthiest place on earth, and it is because buried there are books that wer e never written, it’ s filled with music that was never made, it’ s filled with poetry never read, paintings never painted, it’ s filled with businesses never opened, and law fir ms never established. “The graveyard is filled with great men who died as alcoholics, the graveyard is filled with awesome women who died as prostitutes and drug addicts, what a wealthy place the graveyard is.” Dr Munroe said his greatest fear is a candidate who would add to the untapped wealth of the cemeter y . He explained: “That’ s why I work so hard, it’s because I have an appointment with the cemeter y and an ar rangement with death. The appointment is that when I arrive there, I arrive with nothing other than my empty car cass, and with death we’ve made a pact that he (death e is nothing left for me to do.” He said every human should pursue their goals and ambitions with an intent to accomplish it, and in doing so their potential would have been maximised. He said: “Potential to me is untapped power , dormant ability, hidden strength, it is unused success. What I’ve discover ed is that when you’ve done some thing, it ceases to be your potential because you’ve already achieved it, and I believe this is why God is so bored with some of us who become so preoccupied with what we have done, that we cease to do what we could do.” He said one of the greatest enemies to progress is the extended celebration of your most r ecent success. While that r ecent success helps to build our confi dence and helps to shape who we are, the climb to achieving all of your dreams doesn’t end until you are dead. Challenging attendants to maximise their ultimate potential in all ar eas of life, his presentation did help to set an energetic pace for the conference. The confer ence which began June 30, ended on July 4, with a special closing ceremony and reception at the Wyndham hotel, Cable Beach. Maximising true potential your Special prayer breakfast held for 13th annual Inter-American Bar Association conference

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MEDITATION The Tribune Thursday, July 9, 2009 PG 27 RELIGION EACHperson has to make some personal and individual decisions each day. To plan for the future, some thought has to be given to desired goals and obtainable objectives. To learn from the past, private experiences have to be evaluated and understood. To determine how best to take advantage of present opportunities requires a person to listen, read, think, pray and come to a decision concerning a course of action. An independent thinker is open to external influences while reserving the right to draw personal conclusions. An independent thinker who is also a Christian is guided by eternal influences which lead the person to personal conclusions about divine directives. For example, we may want to be a source of love wherever we go. We may choose to be a gift from God and reflect God’s glory to the world. We may pray to be a wonderful human being, bringing our best to bear on any situation. We may ask the Lord to help us to grow better in some way every day. Imagine that you are the star of your own reality show. The cameras are always on you and the sound system picks up your every word. No doubt you will attempt to wake and smile at the camera, dressing meticulously to makea good impression on your television audience of millions. You will arrive on time for school or for work and conduct yourself in an appropriate manner to the best of your ability so as to leave a favourable impression with your viewers. You are the star of your show. You are the leading person in the play or movie of your life. God wants to write your script, the Holy Spirit wants to produce your play and the Lord wants to be the hero who rescues you in the nick of time. As a nation, we need persons who understand how to think for themselves but who are led by godly principles. What strides we could make as a people if we each went beyond the call of duty, and considered our role to be a model of excellence in every endeavour, the Lord being our helper. God applauds and God rewards. Every day as we strive to do God’s work, we can seek to be God’s employee of the day, of the week, and of the year. We can be a “diva of discipline” or “a man for all spiritual seasons.” Let us each make up our own mind to choose to worship and serve the Lord, and we will become a godly and Godfearing people, politically independent but spiritually dependent upon God. Be an independent thinker REV.ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS As a nation, we need persons who understand how to think for themselves but who are led by godly principles. NOW , it will most certainly be a sin against heaven if you’re ever ask to define the word hypocrite and you don’ t answer by saying; “A clear defi nition or description of a hypocrite, is the religious leaders of today I know that as a Christian you can’t say that ; because your “mand-ofGod”, bishop, apostle, doctor, etc; is a well known and well r espected r eli gious leader in this country. Trust me I understand your position, of being a r eligious Christian and making such statement or r emark (of hypocrites sit well with your religious beliefs. Well you’re right, that would not sit right with your religious Christian beliefs; but to a disciple of Y eshuwa Messiah calling the spade, a spade is not a str uggle. Why? Because the disciple’s teacher; Yeshuwa Messiah, boldly spoke out against the religious leaders of His days; and called them hyp ocrites due to their nasty , wicked ways. It was like cutting soft butter with a hot knife (Matt.23:1-39 Listen! This is not a let’s beat the homosexual ar ticle, but rather it’ s one that is aimed to expose the hypocrisy within the religious church. Because if the truth be told; all of us have some kind of issue that we’r e str uggling with and if you disagree with that; you’re the biggest hypocritical liar on the face of God’ s green earth. I don’t care how long you’ve been saved or by what religious title you’re called you’r e a lying Devil. The Bible (God’s Holy word) is quite clear when it comes to unlawful sexual relations. Old Testament: Lev.18:22: Thou shalt not lie with a mankind, as with a woman: it is abomination (a disgrace New Testament: Rom.1:27: And likewise also the men, leaving the natural use of the woman, burned in their lust one toward another; men with men working that which is unseemly , and receiving in themselves that recompense of their error which was meet. It is lawful or natural for male and female to have sexual relations. But no way under heaven is it lawful for male and male to have sexual r ela tions or female and female to have sexual relations. Again, God’s word is clear and does not need myself or any other to defend it. For Yahweh is well able to defend His wor d, for He watches over His word to perform it (Jer.1:12). One of the greatest hurdles that the r eligious chur ch needs to over come is that of hypocrisy . How is it that straight church leaders (some of them) are willing to cry out against the gay cr uise ships and the gay night clubs in the country, and yet remain silent knowing that there are gay bishops, apostles, pastors, doctors, praise and worship leaders, musicians, etc; in the church?No need for you r eligious leaders to get angr y at me for touching this delicate subject that you’ve been tip toeing around for years; not wanting to of fend those in the church. Quite frankly , I couldn’ t care whether you are angry or not; because I would rather have you wimps angry at me for the rest of my life for speaking the tr uth of God’ s wor d; than to have God angry at me for one day, for not speaking the tr uth. Erroneous religious beliefs would have you to believe that due to the love of God; Yeshuwa Messiah (Jesus Christ) was this soft, can’ t we all just get along kind of leader; absolutely nothing could be further from the truth. I’ve come to understand through studying the scriptures that at no time did Y eshuwa ever called the r eligious leaders “brothers.” Their hypocrisy and twisted religious beliefs no doubt played a pivotal r ole in the manner with which Yeshuwa spoke and dealt with them. With that being the case, what do you think He would call today’ s many religious bishops, doctors, apostles, etc; and the modern day Sanhedrin / Christian Council? As a pastor , it’ s totally unfair and hypocritical for me to speak out against the spirit of homosexuality and lesbianism in the world, and remain silent as this spirit is allowed to roam freely in the church; preying upon the na•ve adolescents. Here’s a word to you weak, wimpy religious leaders who are more interested in your next money making conference, the publishing of your new book or getting on television. 1Peter.4: 17: For the time is come that judgment must begin at the house of God: and if it first begin at us, what shall the end be of them that obey not the gospel of God. Matt.7:3-4: And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother’s eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye? Or how wilt thou say to thy br other , let me pull out the mote out of thine eye, and behold, a beam is in thine own eye? Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy br other s eye. For questions and comments contact us via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or Ph.225-3850 or 1-242-441-2021. Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int’l Homosexuality and the Church! PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN

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The Tribune P G 28 Thursday, July 9, 2009 RELIGION "Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of it's own." Matthew 6:34 (N.I.V This week I experienced the 8th wonder of the world. Looking back on it, I'm completely guilty and enormously selfish. The question is, do I feel remorse? Before I answer that, let mee xplain. My brother, Kenny and I have always been very close; in fact we've almost without fail, been able to mirror one another in speechour love for the expression 'jonesa' takes on the ridiculous, finding itself directed not only at the self proclaimed aforementioned, but anything fr om a bizarre outfit to a fragmented bagel; in thoughtsbelieving it better to catch a bus rather than a taxi, for obvious reasons (now where is my glass slipper), and in actionswhether choosing ham over bacon at breakfast, or New York over Atlanta for a trip. However as close as we are, we do have relentless arguments, although we like to call them spirited debates. Although, I would never, and I do mean neverever, get so angry as to use a most vile, four letter word. Well on second thought, maybe one. That being, 'rest'-one of the greatest words you can say to a loved one. Whether one considers it to mean, 'take a break', 'take a nap', or 'take a happy pill', it's all the same really. I like to think of rest as an opportunity to, 'let go and let God'. Which brings me rather abruptlyyeah, sorryto the subject of this article. Last Sunday I was planning my agenda for the week ahead, as per usual, and also experiencing the habitual eye rolling and teeth clenching, that comes from the exhausting demands one puts on themselves; instead of exercising their right to simply say noto self and others. And as the lead broke on my third pencil, I chose a red pen for a revolutionary act. For the first time I was going to figure out how to do the impos-s ible; fit a R, E, S and Tfour letters, t hat make for one powerful word, onto a seven day week. And did I ever. It was one of those priceless experiences, that some, would pay quite a hefty price to receive at a spiritual retreat or tropical resort. During a week that would make a newborn blush, I refused to give myself to anyone or to anything; but in rest to my Father God, so that He could have all of memind, body and soul. For a moment imagine being free. Or do you already consider yourself to be free? I'm guessing if we really looked meticulously at our lives, we would see just how much of a prisoner we truly are. Slaving to be the best and have the best, yet in reality, that is impossible. What exactly is the best? What is success? Is it what you define for yourself, or do you consider it to be that of the world's interpretation? For your sake,I pray it is the former. As humans we tend to schedule our lives in a way that if we were all so fortunate to be identical twins, with identical goals, would make complete sense. Seeing however, that as a major-i ty, we are not a part of this special b reed and we can't be in two places at one time; brings me back to our most overlooked right as God's children. The right to say nono to all the nonsense. We should be living our lives, not vice versa; and as we do, God will be there, as the soft whisper and gentle touch, directing us towards all the desires of our heart. That is, if we would only seek him first. If we would only rest. So to answer the question, doI feel remorse? Well I have two things to sayno, and would you be so kind as to get the light. In closing, the word of the week is rest. Respect it. God is always in control. Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian writer and poet, currently residing in Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to the article can be sent to fearless247@gmail.com. Respect the rest REGARDLESS to how difficult it may be, how hopeless you may feel and what thoughts opposite to what the word of God teaches you may have, we must remember that God is in control. A few weeks ago, I was encouraged while in church. The sermon was right on. It was as if the whole sermon was tailor made just for me. The scripture was taken from 2nd Chronicles Ch 7:14 a familiar passage. The preacher spoke from the topic, "If it's not God that we are going to believe then who? If not now then when?" He couldn't be more right. These are trying times and if we don’t turn to God, who will we turn to. Just recently, a young man killed himself allegedly as a result of the current economic climate. It doesn't matter what his reason was. As someone said on the news -God still sits on the throne. We cannot for get to use the weapon of prayer . God still listens to our prayers and car es about all things that concer n us. I know we ar e experiencing some har d times now , but we have to give God a chance to work on our behalf. Ever ything happens for a purpose, we just have to find out what that purpose is. W e need to see that this is a a time of testing and understand that this too shall pass. The “number man” is temporar y , the “sugar daddy” and “sweet mamma” ar e temporar y, the finding the resources ourselves is temporar y . The Bible says he who builds a house builds in vain unless God builds it. The man who watches the city watches in vain less God watches for him. So you see, unless God is the center of our lives and ever ything that we do, all that we ar e and everything that we do is in vain and without purpose. I said all of that to say thiswe can over come by God's grace and God’ s grace alone -no voodoo, no taro cards r eading and or r eading of the palms. We can and will make it but that can only be done thr ough God. The Bible also declares that He is the same yesterday, today and forever. He was ther e for the childr en of Israel the same way He will be there for us. If not God then who? ALLISON MILLER n Did you recently give birth to the newest little angel on earth? Have you and your beloved recently tied the knot? Is your church planning a special event? Tribune Religion wants to hear from you! W e want to know about the special things going on in your life, so go ahead and send in your wedding photographs, birth announcements and church activities schedule to be posted in upcoming T ribune Religion sections. This service is free. Send all information, including (especially tures@tribunemedia.net. Information can be hand delivered to The Tribune at Shirley and Deveaux Streets or call the Religion section @ 502.2368. RELIGIOUS NOTES Heavenly Dove Prayer Ministr y will host their first healing and deliverance service July 9 at the British Colonial Hilton. Service starts at 7:30 pm. Pastor Tonya Colebrooke urges the public to to bring the sick, lame, depressed, oppressed and the downtr odden to the ser vice. For more information contact Pastor Colebrooke at 468-4543. The Bahamas Jehovah Witnesses District is hosting a 3 day convention at the W yndham Resort where they will address the subject of the End of The World. Under the theme “Keep on the W atch,” the confer ence will take place July 10-July 12 with several religious pundits sheduled to give their take on the subject. The conference will begin at 9.20 am each day . An estimated 2,800 persons are expected to attend. The group looks forward to sharing this important message with the local community . ] WE W ANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!! TONI STYLES

PAGE 57

The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, July 9, 2009 PG 29 By BISHOP VG CLARKE Calvary Deliverance Church IF Apreacher is to be a true messenger of God, he must have the Holy Spirit in his life. The OldT estament lays the groundwork for such an understanding. Each major office in the life of Israel was to be filled by someone anointed by the Holy Spirit. The priest and the king always (and on occasions the prophet) began their work by being anointed with olive oil, which was symbolic of the Spirit of God. What qualified a' Saul' or a 'David' to be king in Israel? Not their possession of the crown or the throne or a royal lineage, it was the anointing by God. The King of Israel was not considered to be an automatic ruler. He had to be under divine control, in order to be qualified to reign over his people. Note, when Saul insisted on doing things his way, for example, the Holy Spirit departed from him and came upon David. Saul still had the crown, the throne, the bodyguard, and the palace. But David had the anointing of God. Even while hiding in the cave for fear of his life, David was the regal one. That may be the reason why David prayed in Psalm 51:11; “Do not cast me from your pr esence, or take your Holy Spirit from me.” He clearly remembered the tragedy of King Saul, who lost true kingship even though he retained all of its symbols. David did not want to spend his life that way. His personal gifts were of importance, but the divine anointing made him the tr ue king. The same anointing was r equir ed for the priest and the pr ophet. To be partners in ministr y with God is an esteem honor . Those of us, who are called and anointed to pr each the gospel, must walk wor thy of our call. Our city and nation is in need of anointed pr eachers who will pr each the gospel uncompromisingly. The anointing destr oys the yoke and set men free from the works of the flesh bringing them into a covenant relationship with God. THE ESSENTIAL RELATIONSHIP” Bishop V G Clarke INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

PAGE 58

THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS The Tribune P G 30 Thursday, July 9, 2009 RELIGION The following article is the result of an interview I had with Emanuel Kolyvas. GREEKOrthodox Churches are mainly named after a patron saint or event. In the case of the pretty little church on West Street the event remembered is the Angel Gabriel announcing to the Virgin Mary that she would give birth to the Son of God. The early Christian Church Fathers were mainly Roman and Greek. In 1054, what is known as the Great Schism occurred when the Patriarchate of Rome and the Patriarchate of Constantinople mutually excommunicated each other and the Greek Orthodox was seen as a separate denomination from the Roman Catholic Church. Theologically, the first disagreement came with the insertion of the filioque clause into the Nicene Creed by Rome introducing the understanding that the Holy Spirit pr oceeds equally fr om the Father and the Son whereas in the original Creed it was understood that both the Son and the Holy Spirit have their unique origin (begotten vs pr ocession) fr om the Unoriginate Father. However all thr ee persons of the Holy Trinity share the same divinity of the one Godhead. The schism was widened in 1204 when in the 4th Cr usade Western ar mies sacked the leading city of the Eastern Christians, Constantinople, on their way to the Holy Land. In the past the Chur ch of Rome was viewed as being the 'mother' institution but a mor e mod er n view is that the two chur ches are metaphorically 'a pair of lungs' that make up one body . The Gr eek Or thodox community in Nassau also has a very interesting history. In their native Kalymnos, sponging was the chief occupation and the centreof life was their chur ch. Nicholas V ouvalis & Co. wer e the sponge mag nates and on hearing of the flourishing sponge trade in the Bahamas sent Aristide and George Damianos to set up and manage branch offices. Within a few years the Damianos brothers set up their own business and the pattern repeated itself as the sponge trade incr eased with V ouvalis sending branch managers, who then for med their own business. The ar rivals wer e Konstantine Christophilus (1898 Tiliacos (1905 (c1905c1908 Karantonis, (c1908 Esfakis (1910 (c1912 First Gr eek Consul 1928-29), Michael Halkitis (c1920 ge Christodoulakis (c1915 Mangos (19221923 George Miaoulis (1923 (1923c1923 Michael Klonaris (1924 Alexiou (1925Haralambos Alexiou (1925iliacos (19251925 Athanasios (Manasos1926 Dimitri (Jim1926 (19261926 (Dimitriosc1926/7 Antonas (c1926/7Charles Klonaris (c1929Mike Klonaris (c1929 (1930Alex (19361936 Haralambos (Harry (1937 wives fr om Gr eece and others mar ried locally and soon families for med a Greek community built up around the sponge houses in the area of West Str eet. At first these early Greeks worshipped at the Anglican or Roman Catholic Churches but longed for that sense of community and freedom of worship they had experienced in Kalymnos. By 1932 they laid the first cornerstone of their church and soon after completed the building. Since Christ is the light of the world, the building is oriented towar d the East so that it experiences darkness (sunset (sunrise represents the Christ as ruler and sustainer (the Pantocrator ) of all creation, who comes down from the heavensto pickupand restore fallenmankind. The traditional floor-plan of the church building is in the for m of a cr oss. The beautiful dcor inside, mostly the work of artist Michael Angelikis, is also filled with religious meaning. Just like the Temple of Jerusalem a screen separates the Sanctuary (The Holy of Holies) and the Nave (Noah's Ark, the ark of salvation). The Royal Door in the centre of the Screen which is reserved for the sacramental clergy portrays the Annunciation on the lower doors and Christ as the true High Priest on the upper sliding door.From left to centre ar e por traits of the Archangels Michael and Gabriel on the Deacon's door , the Annunciation, Mar y as Mother of God with the mature infant as Christ Emmanuel. From centre to right of the Scr een ar e por trayed Christ who is the Light and the W ay , John the Baptist (for er unner of Christ) and St Nicholas, patr on Saint of Seafar ers. All Icons ar e spiritual r eminders of passages of scrip tur e. The first priests to conduct worship were from The USA. The first resident priest Father Kalinikos came to the Bahamas from Kalymnos in 1935. He was followed by Father Theodore Spirtos, who left in 1954. The next and longest serving, beloved priest began his life as George Kolyvas. George Kolyvas, the son of a seaman was born on the small island of Kalymnos on 23rd October 1916. As a boy he had a love of learning and excelled in Mathematics and the languages of ancient and modern Greece, Italian and French. Already proficient in Byzantine Chant he wished to study theology at University but lack of money forced him to apprentice as a printer in Athens. Not finding the opportunity to enter the printing trade back in Kalymnos he labored with a mason, Emanuel Skandalaris (his future father-in-law). However work became scar ce during the Second W orld W ar and George took a job as a meter reader but was quickly promoted to Dir ector of the Electrical Utility . After a spell in the Gr eek Navy he r etur ned to r un the Kalymnos Electrical Utility under British Administration. Geor ge, now married to Maria Skandalaris and a lead chanter in the parish church was sought out by Mr and Mrs John Psilinakis to become a priest for the Greek community in Nassau. He was ordained in May 1953 and given the name Father Theophanis. The Kolyvas family ar rived in Nassau on July 1, 1953. He ser ved with humility , obedience and dedication for the next 53 years as priest, teacher , choir dir ector and leader of Byzantine Chant. T wo little wor ds sum up his life teachings: Agapate Allilous (Love One Another in 2006. For the last few years of his life Father Kolyvas became Pastor Emeritus and guided Father Ignatius to ser ve the parish in his stead. Father Polycarp followed and now Father Teodor Bita from Rumania is the shepherd of the descendants of those hardy Greek immigrants now firmly established as Bahamian citizens. And in both islands sponging has long since died and tourism now holds sway . Moder n Kalymnos is an island that has developed in a unique way because of the large number of its citizens that have settled abroad and now contribute to sustaining a local economy. The island is densely populated in comparison to other Gr eek islands and developing the exper tise to oversee its own ar chaeologi cal, developmental planning and environmental programmes. It has become Europe's "mecca" for rock climbing during the Spring season. (Next T ime: Part 36 Methodists in Abaco 1) The Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation in Nassau JIM LAWLOR

PAGE 59

The Tribune Thursday, July 9, 2009 PG 31 RELIGION Newly elected Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill, left, and Istanbul Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I, right, gesture after they has led Sunday prayers in a show of unity at the patriarchal church of Aya Yorgi (St. George Turkey, Sunday, July 5, 2009. The churches in Istanbul and Moscow have been jostling for influ ence for years, but recently have pledged to overcome differences and achieve greater unity. Orthodox churches are largely autonomous, but the Istanbul-based Patriarchate is considered first among equals. Ibrahim Usta/ AP Photo A SHOW OF UNITY Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 60

The Tribune P G 32 Thursday, July 2, 2009 RELIGION By LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net COMMONWEALTHMission Baptist Church (CMBC honour a special group of youth leaders who have contributed significantly to youth empowerment and development in the country during its annual Independence awards ceremony Started back in 2000, the church has identified dozens of community groups and individuals who in some shape or form have helped to foster better relations among Bahamians. These have included taxi drivers, teachers, nurses, shop owners, and sanitation workers, and this year they have shifted gears to shed light on seven unsung nation builders, past and present. Accor ding to the chur ch’ s administra tor Alecia Josey, this special service falls in line with CMBCs commitment to honour the ef for ts of the small man. s really the dream of our bishop (Bishop Ar nold Josey), who felt that there were so many who do work in our country but are so often overlooked. We look at those who would otherwise never hit the limelight, those who would probably never be invited to government house, and what we do is an inhouse honours ser vice to pay special tribute to these individuals.” This year s honor ees ar e: BRIAN CHRISTIE In 1959 at the tender age of seven, Mr Christie enrolled in the Scouting Programme at the tenth Bahamas Scout Group at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church lead by the late Theodore Richardson. He later became a patrol leader in 1966. After several decades in the organisation, Mr Christie in 1990 was appointed as the director of scouting. After being renamed the National Executive Commissioner, Mr Christie received his Advanced Wood Badge, the highest level of training for scout leaders. His vast knowledge and experience in scouting allowed him the opportunity to make a further contribution to the development of the group with his 2004 appointment as Chief Commissioner of the Scout Association of The Bahamas. He was reappointed in 2007 for a second three year term. He is a graduate of Aquinas College and attends St Joseph’ s Catholic Church, and is a resident of the Bain T own Constituency , he is also a mem ber of the community’ s Social and Welfare Committee, and director of its summer youth pr ogramme. APOSTLE MARINA FOWLER A true humanitarian, Mrs Fowler spent many years serving in the capacity of a well cultivated youth leader with the Bahamas Red Cr oss Society. She has traveled the world advising and training young leaders, making a dif fer ence and depositing into the lives many. In December 2008, she established the Save the Children Global Ministries after nine years of planning. A true warrior for Christ, Mrs Fowlers stands as a testament that following the direction of the Father does come with a worthy reward. VERNIE ROLLE The daughter of Arnold and Lizzie Rolle of Exuma, Mrs Rolle has for most of her life helped to draw souls to the cross because of her devotion to the will of God. A long serving member of the Salem Union Baptist Church, she has served as director of the Bahamas Baptist Union’s Youth Department. At the national level, she has contributed in numerous capacities of the Baptist Young People’s Fellowship of the Bahamas National Baptist Missionary and Educational Convention, wher e she was responsible for organising the annual Youth Choir competitions. She has also served as the founding Chairman for the Baptist Y outh Summer fest a Bible based pr ogramme designed to pr o mote positive Christian living. A past board member for Junior Achievement Bahamas and the National Youth Council, she is the image of youth empowerment and is well deserving of this recent honour. WILLIAM BODIE-YOUNG More than 40 years ago Mr BodieY oung joined the Boys Brigade, and over the years has moved up the ranks to his present position as National President. An avid sportsman, he has also coached numerous community basketball, softball, and track teams. Mar ried with four childr en, he is a model father instilling in his children respect for others, commitment to God, and a healthy spirit of community development. REVEREND SHERMA LACLAIRE SANDS-BOWE Having a long ser ving love for children, Rev Sands-Bowe has willingly given more than 30-years in the teaching profession, she has helped to educate children in Cat Island, San Salvador, and in New Providence. Saved since the age of 15, she has extended her talents and has taught Bible school on Cupid’s Cay, Eleuthera and in Dumfries, Cat Island. Gaining some of her wisdom from the late Reverend Dr Harriet McDonald, Rev Sands-Bowe has been successful in her appointment as superintendent for her chur ch’ s Sunday school fr om 1983 to 2005. She is also involved with the Youth Action Committee and the women and girls council at her chur ch. CLEMENT JOHNSON Born in Gregory Town, Eleuthera, Mr Johnson lear ned fr om an early age the importance of leadership through his training in the Boys Brigade. Thr ough that gr oup, he has been instr umental in guiding many young men in the community to identify their purpose. In his recognition through the special CMBC service, his many years of work are finally being rewarded and will undoubtedly help to inspir e many more persons. COMMONWEALTH MISSION BAPTIST HONOURS UNSUNG HEROES WILLIAM B ODIEYOUNGAPOSTLE MARINA FOWLERCLEMENT JOHNSONVERNIE ROLLEREVEREND SHERMA LACLAIRE SANDS-BOWE


{T\

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Volume: 105 No.189

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BAHAMAS EDITION

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THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

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CLASSIFIEDS TRADER CL i IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

Man ties after
Gaylignt stabbing

Police make
arrest after
deadly brawl

BYSTANDERS looked on in
horror as a midday brawl turned
deadly when a man was stabbed



FBI, Bahamian
police seeking
female relative of
murdered woman

Bahamian man in custody
in connection with death

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE in the Bahamas are working with the Federal
Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the United States
embassy in an effort to find a woman relative of mur-
dered American Anna Garrison who they believe may
have played a part in her killing.

The development came as police report that a 22-
year-old Bahamian man, who lives on Lightbourne
Avenue, is expected to be arraigned in court later this
week in relation to Ms Garrison’s death.

The 33-year-old’s badly decomposed corpse was dis-

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

to death outside a Mackey Street
electronics store.

The normal rhythm of the busy
thoroughfare was broken sud-
denly around 12.15pm, as shop-
pers, business persons and
motorists stopped in their tracks
upon seeing two men burst out of
the headquarters of Bahama Life
and Properties insurance compa-
ny already engaged in a violent
altercation.

One of the men, who was said
to be armed with a screwdriver,
eventually attempted to walk
away, but the other, armed with a
knife, ran up behind him and
plunged the weapon into his
back.

A witness said: “They were
pushing each other back and
forth. One had a screwdriver in
his hand and the other had a
knife. When the first one turned
his back to walk away, the other
guy stabbed him in the back. He
stood over the victim for a few
seconds, then got in a car and
sped off.”

After being stabbed, the vic-
tim collapsed on the doorstep of
the Henry F Storr Electric Com-
pany, where he remained until
police and paramedics arrived.

Receiving a tip, The Tribune
arrived on the scene only

moments after the incident. A
crowd had already gathered and
traffic had come to a standstill as
police officers worked to block
off the crime scene.

The victim, who police have
yet to identify, was then taken to
Princess Margaret Hospital,
where he was pronounced dead
on arrival.

Police have taken one man
into custody in connection with
the incident and say their inves-
tigations are continuing.





x PARAMEDICS treat
the stabbing victim

at the scene on

Mackey Street yesterday.



‘New leads’ in British
banker murder case

on that.

HYWEL JONES

POLICE investigating the murder of British
banker Hywel Jones say they have received some

_ | new leads that may help advance the case.
Assistant Commissioner Raymond Gibson said
he hopes police may be able to provide an update

on the case in the next week or two.

“We’ve been receiving some information com-
ing in to our control rooms and we are working

“Hopefully that will take us a bit further,” said

SEE page eight

Mother claims teenage
son beaten by officers

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER yesterday
expressed her fears for her
teenage son after he claimed
he was beaten up by officers

in a Fox Hill police cell after
being picked up for ques-
tioning in connection with
the suspected hanging mur-
der of Adrian Major.
Commissioner of Police,

SEE page 10



covered by walkers in a bushy area off Fox Hill Road
south, near the Blue Water Cay development, on Sat-
urday, July 4, at around 6.20pm. She had been shrouded
in sheets and her feet were wrapped in plastic bags.

At a press conference at the Criminal Investigation
Department on Thompson Boulevard, Assistant Com-
missioner in charge of Crime Raymond Gibson said Ms

SEE page 10



Harl Taylor died from
‘haemorrhagic shock’

By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
nmckenzie@
tribunemedia.net

POPULAR hand-
bag designer Harl
Taylor died from
“haemorrhagic
shock,” a forensic
pathologist testified in
Supreme Court yes-
terday.

Troyniko McNeil, 22, the son
of Taylor’s former business
partner Troy McNeil, is charged
with intentionally causing the
death of Harl Taylor between
Saturday, November 17, and
Sunday, November 18, 2007
while being concerned together
with another. Taylor, 37, was
found dead at Mountbatten
House on West Hill Street.

Forensic pathologist Dr
Govinda Raju took the witness
stand again on Wednesday, tes-
tifying that Taylor, 37, had died
from haemorrhagic shock due
to blood loss from multiple stab
wounds. According to Dr Raju,
Taylor would have died a max-
imum of 30 minutes after sus-
taining his injuries. He told the
court that a sharp cutting object
had caused the injuries. Dr

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Raju told the court
that Taylor's left lung
was collapsed and
that Taylor had three
injuries to his lungs.
Dr Raju told the
court that the knife
found on Taylor's bed
could have been used
to kill him. He told
the court that some of
Taylor's wounds were
three and five inches
deep, indicating that
the blade of the
weapon could have been four

SEE page eight



DUE TO THE
INDEPENDENCE
WEEKEND HOLIDAY,
THE TRIBUNE WILL
NEXT APPEAR ON
NEWSSTANDS ON
MONDAY.


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS































SUMMER SIZZLER
BLOCK SPECIAL

4" Block Was $1.58
NOW $1.50

6" Block Was $1.72
Now $1.60

8" Block Was $1.86
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Delivery
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ET eleh4 Block
Bahamian was 15¢
Owned NOW 10¢

CUTER GU UT SS

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

MICAL MP V Alfred Gray hit
out at government yesterday,
accusing it of only arranging to
repair the “better part” of Ack-
lins’ dilapidated Queen’s High-
way while leaving the worst part
in ruin.

The PLP MP alleged in a press
conference that there may be
political motivations behind the
contract to repair only the north-
ern section of the road.

Acklins residents have suffered
with a dysfunctional highway for
several years, and the southern
part of the road between the air-
port in Spring Point and Salina
Point was further destroyed when
the tarmac was scraped off under
a 2007 PLP contract but never
replaced, as the contract was can-
celled by the incoming FNM gov-
ernment, Mr Gray said.

He said residents across Ack-
lins are inconvenienced by the

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A VEHICLE crashed into a building in Dowdeswell Street after reportedly
colliding with another vehicle. The incident occurred shortly after 4 p.m.
yesterday. Nobody was hurt.
























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MP hits out at government

Worst part of
Queen’s Highway
‘left in ruin’

“impassable” 25 to 30 mile south-
ern section of the road, but resi-
dents in the south, where the
majority of his PLP supporters
live, are the most badly affected.

The MP said: “The people in
the southern part of the island
are more conservative and sup-
port me as MP and I don’t think
they ought to suffer because of
that.

“Once a government is elected
T expect the government to serve
all people equally and to serve
the part of the island where their
support might be is wrong.”

Tenders

Mr Gray was enraged upon
seeing the Ministry of Works
advertisement published yester-
day, which only called for tenders
to repair the northern part of the
road.

He said it is his duty to speak
out on behalf of the people of his
constituency regardless of their
political allegiance.

“Tam very disappointed the
government issued a tender for
the repairs and rebuilding of the
best and drivable parts of the
Acklins Road, between the air-
port at Spring Point and Lovely
Bay, rather than the worst parts,
between the airport and Salina
Point,” he said.

“I believe that it must be for
political reasons because good
sense, if it prevails, would sug-
gest we fix the worst part of the
road first. But they are doing the
exact opposite.

“T’m hoping it’s not too late for
government to reconsider it’s
position and allow for repairs to
the south Acklins road first and
then do the second part of the
road if there is money left.”

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CONGRATULATIONS
Patrick ON YOUR UUTSTANDING GRADES

Patrick, son of Jeffrey and Judy (Roberts) Waugh and grandson of
Rupert and Margaret Roberts, President of Super Value Food Stores
Limited and grandson of Joyce Waugh and the late Marcel Waugh
Graduates from the Pendleton School and IMG Academics,
Bradenton, Florida.

Patrick excelled In baseball and has been recrulted for his baseball
Skills as a left handed pitcher at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg,
Florida.

Patrick's sister, Paige Waugh will be returning to the University of
Tampa where she accomplished outstanding grades and is still
currently achieving the required grades to be on the Honors
Program. Palge now a junior returns to the

University of Tampa for her third year.

Paige and Patrick both attended St. Andrew's
School In Nassau.

Patrick has just returned from a trip to Zulla
State, Venezuela with the Bahamas Junior
National Baseball Team which participated in
the 2009 Latin American Big League Caribbean
Zone Baseball Tournament.

CoNGRATULATIONS Patrick AND PAIcE
KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK.

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THE TRIBUNE

0 In bri

Man, *
arraigned
on murder
charge

A 24-year-old Old Cedar
Street man was arraigned in
Magistrate's Court yesterday
on a murder charge.

Anthony Clarke appeared
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court One,
Bank Lane, charged in the
May 3 murder of Marc
Estimable.

Mr Estimable, 29, was shot
and killed at his Gamble
Heights home around lam
on Sunday, May 3.

He was the 24th homicide
victim of the year.

Clarke, who was repre-
sented by attorney Willie
Moss, was not required to
enter a plea to the murder
charge. He was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison and the
case has been adjourned to
September 9.

Clarke is the fourth person
to be charged in connection
with Estimable's death.

On May 13, Ramal Cole-
broke, 23, of Nassau Village;
Blake Rahming, 22, of Old
Cedar Street; and a 16-year-
old boy were also charged
with murder.

Man ties
from carbon
monoxite
poisoning

A MAN has died and
another is fighting for his life
after inhaling carbon monox-
ide while working on a mail
boat yesterday.

The two men were report-
edly working in the base-
ment of the MV Legacy
when they inhaled the taste-
less and colourlous poiso-
nous gas.

The MV Legacy sails from
Nassau to Hope Town,
Marsh Harbour, Turtle Cay
and Green Turtle Cay on
Tuesdays and returns to Nas-
sau on Thursdays.

Police were not able to
confirm reports before The
Tribune went to press.

New Zealand
man shot to
death in
Jamaica

KINGSTON, Jamaica

Police in Jamaica say they
are investigating the fatal
shooting of a New Zealand
man during a street robbery,
according to Associated Press.

Police spokesman Karl
Angell says a robber shot Tiki
Hunia late Tuesday after he
refused to hand over his cel-
lular phone in the Caribbean
island's capital, Kingston.

The 27-year-old victim was
hit three times and died at a
hospital.

Angell said Wednesday that
Hunia's wife was with him at
the time of the shooting but
was not harmed.

Police say Hunia was a New
Zealand citizen working as an
information technology con-
sultant based in Hong Kong.

Jamaica has one of the
world's highest murder rates,
but the violence stems mainly
from gang battles in the cities
and rarely affects tourists.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

TROPICAL
Sars pel
eee
a er aT |

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

MAGISTRATE’S COURT: Jamile Ferguson, Yvenel Milfort, Brenric Knowles



“Former policeman among trio
facing armed robbery charges

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER police officer
was among three men
arraigned on armed robbery
charges in the Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Former police Constable
Jamile Ferguson, 25, of St
Martin Street; Yvenel Milfort,
25, of Prince Charles Drive,
and Brenric Knowles, 30, of
Bellot Road, appeared before
Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court One, Bank
Lane, yesterday.

It is alleged that the three
men on Thursday, June 4, at
Paradise Island, stole from
John Bull two Cartier watches,

Accusations include stealing two Cartier watches from John Bull

together valued at $19,000.

Ferguson and Knowles
pleaded not guilty to the
charges while Milfort plead-
ed guilty with an explanation.

The men are also accused

of conspiring to commit armed
robbery on Sunday, June 28.

It is further alleged that on
the same day, the men robbed
Brenda Frackleton of two sil-
ver Breitling Cockpit watch-
es valued at $13,056 and one
silver stainless steel diamond
Breitling Cockpit watch val-
ued at $8,602, the property of
the Breitling Boutique on Par-
adise Island.

The men were not required

to enter a plea to the charges.
It is also alleged that on Sun-
day, July 5, the accused con-
spired to commit armed rob-
bery, and further that on the
same day they robbed William
Carey of a silver stainless steel
platinum Bezel special addi-
tion Breitling watch valued at
$11,781 and a silver Breitling
for Bentley watch valued at
$7,951.

The men are also charged
with receiving the watches.
They were not required to
enter a plea to the charges.
Milfort and Knowles were
remanded to Her Majesty's
Prison. Ferguson, who is rep-

ee er Ne enim iis laren

missing out on school repair jobs



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

UNEMPLOYED contrac-
tors in the Family Islands have
been overlooked by govern-
ment as requests for school
building repairs have been
made directly to working civ-
il servants, MICAL MP V
Alfred Gray claimed yester-
day.

The MP for Mayaguana,
Inagua, Crooked Island, Ack-
lins and Long Island said at
least 12 contracts have been
sent out by the Ministry of
Education to civil servants
within his constituency while
poor contractors struggle to
find work.

Jobs to repair school build-
ings over the summer vaca-
tion have been signed over to
politically connected police
officers, healthcare workers
and other government
employees by ministry offi-
cials in Nassau without any
consideration having been giv-
en to the unemployed, the MP
claims.

At least four such contracts
have been sent to civil ser-
vants in Crooked Island, two
in Mayaguana, two in Inagua
and four in Acklins, Mr Gray
said.

The PLP MP criticised the
contracts as political patron-
age and called on the govern-
ment to change their tack.

He said: “I’m appalled and
disgusted, when unemploy-
ment is rampant in the con-
stituency, that they would give
to the haves and bypass the
have-nots because of politics.

“To send a private contract
to a civil servant who already
has a job and leave others out
of work is fundamentally
wrong especially in these eco-
nomic times when things are





eT

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Alfred Gray

as bad as they are.

Painful

“There’s really no economy
in those islands — those who
work are civil servants — so
you can see how painful it is
for a man who has five chil-
dren to feed to watch police
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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 9,2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited


















































































NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Another look at education

EVERY PARENT wants his child to suc-
ceed at school. No parent wants to read a report
card with failing grades, and, pass or fail, they
expect their Joe or Jane to be on the graduation
line with that much coveted certificate — a cer-
tificate that means nothing in the real world if a
D grade is all that it records.

In this society of instant gratification, when
the most important objective is to win at all
costs, are we demanding more of our children
than they can deliver? Instead of insisting on
them heading their class would it not be better
to encourage them to excel to the best of their
ability — regardless of where that best is mea-
sured on life’s social scale?

As Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said at
the closing of the Ministry of Education’s con-
ference this week, the Bahamas must face the
fact that only a minority — “some say a talent-
ed tenth” — of any population will excel acad-
emically. Whether we like it or not this is true.
Throughout nature there is harmony when
every atom fits correctly into the whole.

Parents have to accept that children are not
all academically gifted.

We suspect that much of the dysfunction in
our schools today is caused by too many stu-
dents taking up space in our classrooms, who are
either not interested in what is being taught,
or who are discouraged because they cannot
keep up academically.

And so they will fidget, throw spitballs around
the class and generally create an atmosphere in
which no one — not even the serious student —
can learn.

This turns a teacher into a disciplinarian try-
ing to keep order until the bell rings, rather
than imparting knowledge.

We do not condone teachers cursing stu-
dents, calling them names and throwing objects
— as the students have claimed.

However, as there are always two sides to
every tale, witnessing the attitude and behav-
ioural patterns of some of today’s young people
we can understand how they could — as Smoky
Joe would have said in the old days — “yuck up
ones vexation.”

It is unfortunate, as Mr Ingraham has
observed, that getting every child into the class-
room has not translated into every child achiev-
ing his/her full potential.

In the first half of the 20th century, he point-
ed out, most children completing primary school
could read and write, but today too many stu-
dents leave secondary schools only semi-literate
and semi-numerate.

“In earlier times,” he said, “academically
weak students dropped out of school, learned a
trade or became one of a large unskilled and
semi-literate work force. They never had an
opportunity to attend secondary school.”

Today students have to stay in school until
they are 18, but still leave school unprepared to
earn a living.

Society has to face the fact that all persons
are not academics, and never will be, regardless
of how long they sit on a school bench.

However, to be able to support themselves on
leaving school, they should be able to read,
write, do basic arithmetic and have a trade.
Possibly the selection should be made sooner as
to those who should be encouraged to continue
preparations toward university and a profes-
sion and those who should be directed into a
trade.

The most important goal should be to have
these young people performing to the best of
their ability — regardless of what that ability is.
There is no disgrace in a labourer’s job. The
only disgrace is when that labourer, although
capable, does not do his job well.

In every organisation, each and every staff
member is important, even down to the man
who cleans our presses and the janitors who
clean the offices after everyone has left. Let
anyone of them fall down on their job and we all
suffer.

As the late Dr Cleveland Eneas, a dentist,
often said: If it weren’t for the menial workers
— those who cleaned his car, mowed his lawn
and did all the other household chores — he
would not be free to attend to his patients.

And so these menial workers are much need-
ed in our society. It is now for society to show
that they are also much appreciated and encour-
age them to perform these tasks to the best of
their ability.

We all know the old saying that “you can’t
make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear”, and so you
cannot make an academic out of someone who
would be a better mechanic, gardener or even
handy man. The only criteria demanded of them
is excellence in whatever they choose to do.

Parents and educators today have to deter-
mine in what area each child would excel, give
him the basic skills to take care of himself and
his future family and let him get on with it.
Those young people who want an education
and a profession can then be taught in an atmos-
phere conducive to learning with teachers who
are no longer so stressed out that they throw
textbooks at them.

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Christmas comes
early with resignation
of Sir Burton Hall

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There are few times in life that
Christmas falls on a summer
month and the announcement of
the resignation of Sir Burton Hall
is just one of those moments.

In my opinion Sir Burton will
go down as one of the most inef-
fective administrative heads the
judicial system has ever had.
While the state of disrepair of this
system is not fully his to blame, a
significant percentage lay at his
feet. From the appointment of
the controversial Judge Ruby
Nottage to the inaction of not
dealing with Justice Lyons and
others presumed conflict of inter-
est sooner or not at all, and all
manner of things in between, Sir
Burton it appears was not up to
the task of administering his
responsibility as head of this vital
stream of governance.

What the government is pre-
sented with now is a good exam-
ple of a Christmas gift that, if the
correct appointments are made,
would be the gift that keeps on
giving far into the future. This is a
good moment to examine how
Chief Justices are appointed and
to reform and bring transparency
to how these administrative heads
go about selecting judges for the
court system. As it stands now
there is no window into how this
body of persons, headed by the
Chief Justice, select and eventu-
ally appoints judges in our court
system. Hence there was great
shock, and rightly so, to the
appointment of Mrs Nottage as
a judge in the system.

Although there should always
be separation of powers when it
comes to the judicial branch vers-
es the legislative branch, now
would be a good time for a review
of this structure to allow better
collaboration between the two

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



branches in the form of a judicial
parliamentary committee that can
interface with the judiciary so that
a better understanding of what is
needed in the judicial system and
what works and what does not
work when it comes to the admin-
istration of justice can be derived.
I think Mrs. Maynard-Gibson was
on to something or at least was in
the ball park with her idea of
“Swift Justice.” However the
major problem was that it was
too heavy on marketing with no
substantive solutions and it lacked
support from the judiciary, hence
the backlash from the bench
months after that idea was imple-
mented — egos and icons have a
need to be fed a special diet as
opposed to the feed found in the
common man's trough.

So I hope that all parties
involved uses this gift wisely
because the state of our judiciary
is getting worse by the years and
months that pass. We do not have
the luxury anymore of debating
and talking to infinity about com-
mon problems and practices. A
gift like this only comes around a
few times every two decades so
now is the time to become as
pragmatic as possible to better
stream-line this system.

...to a better day.

ERIC B. STRACHAN

(If Mr Strachan wants to know
how Chief Justices and the other
Justices of the Supreme Court
are appointed and removed, he
should read the Constitution
Chapter VII, s. 93-97.

(Justices of the Supreme Court
— as was the case of Mrs. Ruby

Nottage — are appointed by the
Governor General acting on the
advice of the Judicial and Legal
Service Commission, of which the
Chief Justice is chairman. Other
members are chairman of the
Public Service Commission, a
Justice of the Supreme Court or
Justice of Appeal and two per-
son, both legally qualified,
appointed by the Governor-Gen-
eral acting on the recommenda-
tion of the Prime Minister after
consultation with the Leader of
the Opposition. At the time of
Mrs Nottage’s appointment
Opposition Leader Perry Christie
was Prime Minister, and Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham was
Opposition Leader.

(A Justice of the Supreme
holds office until the age of 65
years. When that time comes a
Justice who has reached the age
limit — as in the case of Mrs Not-
tage — can have his/her term
extended by the Governor-Gen-
eral acting on the recommenda-
tion of the Prime Minister after
consultation with the Opposition
leader. When it came time for
Mrs. Nottage’s term to be extend-
ed, Prime Minister Ingraham was
the Prime Minister with Mr
Christie as Opposition Leader. In
the case of Mrs Nottage her term
was not extended because Mr
Ingraham failed to make the
required recommendation. As far
as consultation with the leader of
the Opposition on these matters
is concerned, it can be almost con-
sidered as a “courtesy call.”
Although the Prime Minister has
to consult with the Opposition
leader, he does not have to take
his advice if it is contrary to his
own wishes.

(As for Justice Lyons, he
saved all those concerned a lot of
trouble by resigning. — Ed).

We must stop pouring abuse on hardworking police officers

EDITOR, The Tribune.

be prepared to support them by congratulating them
when they do a good job and by giving them perti-

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There are several issues which are causing me
concern in the country today.

Firstly, there seems to be a concerted effort from
various groups and persons in the country to deni-
grate and abuse the Royal Bahamas Police Force,
and its officers.

We are all aware of the serious crime situation in
the country which does not seem to be getting any
better, but too many of our citizens seem to forget
that the only body which protects us from the very
thugs and criminals who force us to live as prisoners
in our own homes and to fear going out during day-
light and nighttime hours are the dedicated members
of the Bahamas Royal Police Force. It is true that
this body, like any other, has bad apples but it is clear
that the present Commissioner is doing his best to
rid the force of these persons, as we see officers
charged with offences like any other members of the
community.

However, if we continue to pour abuse upon the
honest and hardworking officers of this force the
result will be an undermining of the respect which
this body should have and which will greatly curtail
the work which this body is doing to protect the
citizens of and visitors to this county. This can ulti-
mately lead to anarchy.

Our police force needs our support not our com-
plaints and abuse. I am not saying that we should
turn a blind eye to the bad things which may be
done by certain members of the force but we must

nent information, even if this may hurt a relative or
friend, to assist them in apprehending criminals.

Secondly, the leaders of our country, both civil
and religious must temper their remarks so that we
do not have a worsening of relationships between
groups of persons in the country.

For instance, only recently a religious leader was
quoted as saying that illegal immigrants are adding
to the crime problem.

I do not know if this statement was made based on
impirical or anecdotal evidence, as the basis for the
statement was not reported, however, most of us
are aware of the tensions which exist between the
members of one non-Bahamian community and
Bahamians and anything which can breed animosi-
ty can lead to violence or potential violence.

Thirdly, as I agree with the statement that we are
a nation in crisis, I would urge the members of the
various political parties to try and work together
for the good of our country instead of trying to
score cheap political points at every turn.

Let us teach our young people that there are
mature politicians in this country who can work for
the betterment of this country and lead our people
to think rationally instead of emotionally according
to the red or the yellow.

JEANNE I THOMPSON
Nassau,
June, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 9,2009 , PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



THE BAHAMAS GAMING REFORM COMMITTEE WELCOMES GOVERNMENT MOVE

Praise for ‘gambling laws review

THE government has been
praised for forming a commit-
tee to examine the country’s
gambling laws.

The Bahamas Gaming
Reform Committee (BGR),
which is hoping the review will
result in the legalisation of
gambling for Bahamians, wel-
comed the decision.

However, the BGR said it
is concerned the government
failed to ensure the necessary
diversity of representation on
the committee.

“The Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation is but one group to be
heard from on the matter.
However, it is not the only
stakeholder group with rele-
vant views and concerns on
the situation,” said the BGR in
a Statement yesterday.

The group cited the follow-
ing principles as fundamental-
ly important to gaming law
reform:

* openness and transparen-
cy;

¢ an independent local and
international industry review;

¢ accountability and tried
and proven financial report-
ing methods;

¢ Bahamian control of a reg-
ulated government gaming
network;

¢ a complete review of all
gaming laws with a view of
ending discrimination and
hypocrisy;

¢ clear guidelines for use of
funds from a national gaming
network;

¢ employment for Bahami-
ans;

¢ the use of modern, proven
systems and technologies;

¢ the implementation of
socially responsible methods
and means;

¢ Bahamian private sector
involvement.

Sidney Strachan, BGR
spokesperson, said: “Done
right, a national gaming net-
work regulated by government
based on smart systems, best
practices, responsible methods
and proven financial report-
ing can generate thousands of

WHEEL OF FORTUNE: The roulette wheel, a familiar casino sight.

jobs for Bahamians, millions
in incremental revenue for
government and enriched
social, educational and health
programmes.

The government must
ensure that reform is based on
the best research, broad con-
sultation and adherence to the
highest performance stan-
dards. BGR has important
input to make on the matter
and intends to ask for a seat
for at least one of its members,
on the newly appointed com-
mittee.”

Economic

The BGR said it has been
in contact with regulated gam-
ing jurisdictions outside the
country and has been advised
that the combined economic
impact of a national gaming
network in the Bahamas could
potentially exceed $60 million
and full-time- employment
opportunities across all sectors
and areas of economic activity,
both private and public, could
range from 1,500 to 2,000 jobs.

“Industry research indicates
that the regulation of gaming
in the Bahamas will generate
non-gaming revenue of as

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JULY 9,2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS






Patrick Hanna/BIS

4 4 7 f 4

MINISTER OF STATE in the Ministry of Labour and Social Development Loretta Butler-Turner and BAIC exec-
utive chairman Edison Key arrive for the launch of the woodturning programme at Simpson Penn School.



al

THE Bahamas A gricultur-
al and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) has launched a
woodturning programme for
residents at the Simpson
Penn Centre for Boys.

And next week, a straw
craft course will commence
for residents of the Williemae
Pratt Centre for Girls, com-
pliments of BAIC’s handi-
craft development and mar-
keting department.

“We at BAIC want to
make a meaningful difference

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Woodturning programme
launched for Simpson Penn

in the lives of these wonder-
ful children,” said executive
chairman Edison Key during
ceremonies on Monday.

“These programmes, we
are certain, can make a huge
difference between these
youngsters returning to busi-
ness as usual, or taking the
step to bigger and better
things.”

Minister of State in the
Ministry of Labour and
Social Development Loretta
Butler-Turner threw her full

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BAIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN
Edison Key told of projects for



support behind the projects.

“These programmes will
undoubtedly provide empow-
erment, substance, and val-
ue to our rehabilitative pro-
grammes,” she said.

“These boys can find their
niche in these vocations,
become entrepreneurs and
productive citizens.”

Simpson Penn Superinten-
dent Wensworth Butler
pledged his staff’s support to
make the venture a success.

The instructor for the
course is mechanical engineer
Vaughn Minnis, an expert
Bahamian woodturner.

A member of various
woodturning guilds in South
Florida, Mr Minnis operated
his own company, Mahogany
Woodcrafts, which imported
exotic woods from South
America and Africa.

His works have been dis-
played at Fairchild Garden
in Miami, Florida, among
other places.

Woodturning is the spin-
ning of a block of wood ona
lath while shaping the wood
with a variety of chisels.

Woodturners are able to
create items ranging from sal-
ad bowls, candle holders and
vases to ink pens, all of which
can be used.

The course is designed to
give the students an in-depth
understanding of all the
facets of woodturning.

Mr Key encouraged stu-
dents to be a part of the
annual BahamArts Festival
where authentically Bahami-
an-made items are show-
cased.

He also told of other ven-
tures BAIC was planning for
Simpson Penn.

“We have identified about
15 acres of land on which we
want to help you establish an
agriculture and livestock pro-
gramme,” he told them.

“Why spend scarce money
purchasing food products
that you can produce right
here while helping the young-
sters along the path of inde-
pendence?

“We are willing to assist
with proper land preparation,
the planting of a variety of
vegetables, the establishment
of a nursery to teach graft-
ing and other techniques, and
an introduction to green-
house farming.

“We want to help develop
an area where sheep and
goats and chickens can be
grown, along with support-
ing pastures.

“We even have a small pig-
gery in mind. The remainder
of the land can be used to
grow a variety fruit trees on,”
Mr Key said.

“This is going to give the
youngsters solid on- the-job
training in agriculture and
livestock rearing so that
when they leave this place
they will have some skills to
become self employed or
even employable. Their time
in here would not have been
wasted.

“The woodturning exercise
with Mr Minnis is but the
first step in a thousand miles.
One step at a time and I am
confident we can make the
kind of positive impact envi-
sioned.”

Also attending the cere-
mony were BAIC board
member Sony Russell; Min-
istry of Labour and Social
Development undersecretary
Carl Brennen; Department
of Social Services deputy
director Marva Minns;
Williemae Pratt Centre
for Girls acting Supt
Salomie Gibson, and BAIC
general manager Benjamin
Rahming.
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 7



"TD 4 24) Bahamas’ proximity advantage

has been ‘severely eroded’

PUBLIC WORKS and Transport Minister Neko Grant visited the taxi
centre at Prince George Wharf on Monday. Pictured from left are
Minister Grant, security manager at the Port Department Devin
Moss and Acting Port Controller Patrick McNeil.

POET Te a
PUTA UCT ie TE

THE system of administration
at the Road Traffic Department
is “antiquated” and there are
“too many processes being done
manually,” Transport Minister
Neko Grant admitted.

Mr Grant said the govern-
ment is working to give visitors a
better experience at the Prince
George Wharf and the Lynden
Pindling International Airport
(LPIA), and is making efforts
to improve ground transporta-
tion for tourists.

“We've been concerned for
some time now with the way our
visitors are ushered into the
ground transport system,” he
said.

“We’ve looked at some alter-
native methods that we can use
to improve the visitor experi-
ence rather than have the tourist
wait for so long. We will seek
to implement those as soon as
possible.”

Mr Grant said his ministry
will also speak with the Nassau
Airport Development Compa-
ny (NAD) on how waiting and
parking facilities for taxi-drivers
in the domestic area at LPIA
might be improved.

“We’re also not particularly
pleased with the congregation
of the drivers at the arrival area
and so we have to speak with
NAD about providing a hold-
ing area for them,” he added.

Mr Grant made these obser-
vations following a tour of Road
Traffic Department units on
Monday.

nn

———
€c ABLE



He led a team from his min- :
istry on a tour of the Road Traf- }
fic Department at Thompson }
Boulevard, the Inspection Cen- }
tre at Fort Charlotte, the taxi i
call-up centre at Prince George }
Wharf, the Carmichael Road :
unit, and the taxi centre at the }
airport. i

The minister and his team }
used the occasion to familiarise }
themselves with the operations }
of the department and to meet }
staff members. i

Mr Grant found that the sys- }
tem of administration at the }
Road Traffic Department is }
“antiquated” and there are “too }
many processes being done }
manually.” i

He pointed to the need to }
computerise the department.

“We understand and appre- }
ciate that this can only come }
once the funds are available,” :
he said. i

Accompanying him were per- }
manent secretary Colin Higgs, i
undersecretary Nicole Camp- }
bell, Road Traffic Controller :
Philip Turner, and assistant con- i
trollers Ernestine Fernander and }
Bradley Smith. i

The Road Traffic Department ;
was created to deal specifically :
with all government activities i
related to road safety, traffic reg- :
ulations, vehicle licensing, vehi- }
cle registration, vehicle inspec- i
tion, individual drivers licences, !
and the collection of road fees ;
and taxes related to public and }
private road transportation. i

BAHAMAS

THE advantage the Bahamas
enjoys over other tourism destina-
tions due to its proximity to the
United States has been severely
eroded over the years, according to
Minister of Tourism Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace.

Addressing the second wave of
the Ministry of Tourism and Avi-
ation’s summer employment pro-
gramme, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said Grand Bahama is a prime
example of this change.

He pointed out that Freeport is
just 111 miles away from Miami,
much closer than other tourism
competitors, but the cost of flying
to Freeport has kept travellers
away.

It has been claimed that Grand
Bahama has suffered from a lack
of advertising, But Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said the high ticket
prices are the main why Grand
Bahama visitor numbers have
dwindled over the last 30 years,
while Nassau arrivals have steadi-
ly increased.

“The customer is saying, ‘It’s
too expensive. I’m not buying that’
and we continue to believe that
advertising can overcome non-
sense,” he said, adding that it is
cheaper to fly from Miami to Nas-
sau, Cancun, Puerto Rico, San
Juan and even Las Vegas that it is
to fly to Grand Bahama.

“It’s 1,900 miles to Las Vegas
and I am going to spend more
money to fly 111 miles and get
what they have on Grand Bahama
compared to going to Las Vegas
which is 1,900 miles away? People
like to believe I get better value if
I go a much farther distance for

or

fe
re
is
&
i
ue



less cost. So please, let us stop the
madness that has been going on
for a very long period of time,” he
said.

The minister noted that in the
Family Islands, the number of
arrivals today is roughly the same
as it was 30 years ago — again,
because of price.

“Tf I live in New York City, it is
less expensive for me to fly from
New York to London or New
York to Paris or New York to
Rome than it is to fly from New
York to Exuma,” he said. “And
here is the killer part of it —I get to
London, Paris or Rome quicker
than I get to Exuma. So explain
to me, why somebody would wake
up one morning and say ‘I want
to get to Exuma,’ when it is more
expensive to get there and it takes
me a lot longer to get there.”

In addition to working to restore
the proximity advantage, Minister
Vanderpool-Wallace told the stu-
dents they must take note of the
need to maximise the advantage
the Bahamas has because of its
beaches and waters. Beaches are

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BE OUD

MINISTER OF
Tourism and
Aviation Vin-
cent Vander-
pool-Wallace
addresses par-
ticipants of
the Ministry’s
summer
employment
programme.

one of the primary reasons visitors
come to the Bahamas, according to
Ministry of Tourism exit surveys.
Future Brand, a company
researching the perception of coun-
tries in several categories, has
ranked the Bahamas as number

Happy 36"

three in the world in perception
of waters and beaches. The Mal-
dives and Tahiti are numbers one
and two, respectively.

“This country of islands has
more beaches than any country in
the western hemisphere because
of so many islands in so many
places,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said. “Nobody else comes close.
But it’s a thing we diminish all day
long. We’ve got 100,000 square
miles of a spa. That’s what people
think about our waters. When they
go in that, they feel it’s healing,
but we don’t understand the pow-
er of it.”

He challenged the students to
use their talents and knowledge of
technology to help promote the
Bahamas and advance the tourism
sector.

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE


















tube of Taylor's blood, urine and
stomach contents.

During cross-examination by
McNeil's attorney Murrio Ducille,
Dr Raju told the court that if blood
is outside the body and it is not
preserved, decomposition could
set in after a couple of hours. He
also noted that when blood dries
or clots, decomposition slows
down. He also admitted that he

FROM page one

to five inches long. After examin-
ing the blade of the knife the pros-
ecution had submitted into evi-
dence, Dr Raju said that the blade
which is 7.5 to 8 inches long, could
have caused Taylor's injuries. The
pathologist also told the court that

OTLCR I = during the autopsy, he collected a

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Harl Taylor died from ‘haemorrhagic shock’.

CEA
For

had not labelled the vile of Tay-
lor's blood, but that a police officer ;
had labelled it as his hands were :
dirty, and so he initialled it after-
wards. i

The trial, which is before Senior
Justice Anita Allen, continues
today. Director of Public Prose- :
cutions Bernard Turner, Neil ;
Brathwaite and Darnell Dorsette :
represent the Crown. i

FROM page one

the senior officer, when asked if
there was any update on the
matter.

Mr Jones, 55, a resident of
the Bahamas, was shot in the
head outside the office of his




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‘New leads’ in British
banker murder case

company, the Britannia Con-
sulting Group on April 22, 2009.
He remained in a coma in hos-
pital until May 8, when he died
of his injuries.

The circumstances of the inci-
dent led police to believe the
shooting was an arranged hit.
Mr Jones had previously told
friends and family that he had
feared for his life following two
home invasions and a physical
assault in 2007.

Independence
Supplement

goes online

THE TRIBUNE’S Indepen-
dence Supplement which
appeared in Wednesday’s news-
paper will be available to view
online at www.tribune242.com
from Friday.

Anti-Chavez mayor
of Caracas ends
hunger strike

CARACAS, Venezuela

THE MAYOR of Venezuela’s
capital ended a hunger strike
Wednesday after the head of the
Organization of American States
agreed to meet with him and oth-
er opposition leaders to discuss
moves by the government they say
erode their authority, according
to Associated Press.

Caracas Mayor Antonio Ledez-
ma’s protest fast lasted five days
and was aimed at urging the OAS
to mediate in Venezuela over
moves by President Hugo Chavez
that have taken away powers and
funding from the mayor and other
politicians who oppose his leftist
policies.

Ledezma stopped after speak-
ing by phone Wednesday with
OAS Secretary-General Jose
Miguel Insulza, who agreed to
meet with a delegation of opposi-
tion politicians in Washington, said
Mitzy Capriles, the mayor’s wife.

Ledezma began the hunger
strike at the OAS office in Caracas
on Friday to protest what he calls
a violation of Venezuela’s consti-
tution in Chavez’s naming of a
member of his ruling party to a
new post as top authority in the
capital. The pro-Chavez National
Assembly has transferred nearly
all of the city’s budget and ser-
vices to the new federal authority.

Princess Margaret Hospital

ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC

THE MORE YOU SAVE, THE MORE YOU EARN. SO START
SAVING WITH SCOTIABANK TODAY!

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IN AN EFFORT TO IMPROVE OUR PATIENT
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TRIAGE AREA OF THE ACCIDENT &
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WE ASK THAT PERSONS VISITING THE
DEPARTMENT ENTER THROUGH ~ THE
PHARMACY DEPARTMENT ENTRANCE AND
CONTINUE ONWARD THROUGH THE
ENTRANCE OF THE ORTHOPEDIC CLINIC.

MANAGEMENT APOLOGIZES FOR’ ANY
INCONVENIENCE CAUSED AND ASK THAT
THE PUBLIC COOPERATE WITH US DURING
THIS TIME.

SIGNED: MANAGEMENT



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850708


THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 9

Healthcare reform
in the Bahamas

By MARCUS C BETHEL, MD
Former Minister of Health
2002-2006

Goak: “To provide equitable
access to quality care for all,
delivered in an effective and
efficient manner by healthcare
professionals.”

| here is a pressing need

for healthcare reform
in the Bahamas because the
escalating cost of healthcare
delivery has outstripped the
ability of the government to
adequately fund public health-
care out of the Consolidated
Fund.

It is estimated that $200 to
300 million is expended annu-
ally in the delivery of health-
care at the public healthcare
facilities (hospitals and clinics)
and is increasing annually
largely due to chronic non-
communicable diseases includ-
ing diabetes, hypertension, can-
cer and cardiovascular diseases.

The problem is compounded
by the steady population
growth of the Bahamas, the
cost of modern medical tech-
nologies, and the additional
stress on the system due to the
large population of illegal
immigrants and their disease
burden.

The high transactional cost
of infrastructural development
due to the archipelagic nature
of our country and the regres-
sive tax structure also adverse-
ly impact the cost of health-
care delivery.

PUBLIC-PRIVATE
PARTNERSHIP

| he proposed way for-
ward is a partnership
between the public health care

sector and the private health-
care sector.

The private sector has
demonstrated efficiencies in
healthcare delivery, innovation
and introduction of advanced
medical technologies in the
Bahamas.

There exists a great need for
more efficient integration of
healthcare services so that
there is a seamless transition
for patient services between
Family Island community clin-
ics and hospitals to ensure
timely delivery of services and
follow-up care to patients.

There also exists the need
for integration of IT (informa-
tion technology) systems in
community clinics, hospitals
and Ministry of Health to
ensure efficiencies in the col-
lection and collation of health
data, medical records storage
and retrieval, and pharmaceu-
ticals acquisition and dispens-
ing.
In addition, there is a need
for integrated public education
programmes concerning
healthy lifestyles utilising the
media, schools, churches and
civic organisations.

A true and meaningful part-
nership requires a paradigm
shift in the thinking and behav-
iour of both public and private
sectors.

The public sector must rid
itself of the “us and them men-
tality” in healthcare delivery
and embrace necessary insti-
tutional changes; while the pri-
vate sector must be more
responsive to the needs of the
wider community through
meaningful, sustained cooper-



ation and support of the public
sector.

There exists no national
healthcare development strat-
egy that incorporates both pub-
lic and private sectors.

This is a necessary first step
to improve operational effi-
ciencies and eliminate dupli-
cation of efforts in infrastruc-
tural and human resource
developments.

Adoption of a national
healthcare plan by both sec-
tors and the public will create a
framework for public policy
and a road map for long-term
development of our healthcare
system.

This process must be a joint
collaborative exercise involv-
ing all stakeholders including
the Ministry of Health, Public
Hospitals Authority, Medical
Association of the Bahamas,
Nurses Association of the
Bahamas, Allied Health Pro-
fessionals, private healthcare
institutions, College of the
Bahamas, Chamber of Com-
merce and the business com-
munity, unions, churches and
the public.

HEALTHCARE
FUNDING

Axes of health-
care funding is

fundamental to achieving the
goal stated earlier and hence
is at the core of healthcare
reform.

Healthcare funding is a uni-
versal challenge and each
nation must customise its fund-
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Almost 15 per cent of our
national budget is allocated to
health care, yet the public
health care system cannot meet
the health care needs of the
population it serves.

Inadequate financial
resources combined with a lack
of efficiencies are the primary
reasons for the existing gaps
and barriers to care.

The national health insur-
ance plan, which was passed
into law December 2006 with
the full support of both sides in
Parliament and following wide
public consultation, should be
implemented as soon as
possible to provide medical
insurance coverage to all
eligible persons in our coun-
try.
This is particularly impor-
tant with so many of our citi-
zens, 30-50 per cent, unable to
afford neither health insurance
nor private healthcare.

This plan is also designed to

fund the development of our
medical infrastructure (hospi-
tals and clinics).

In addition, the hiring and
compensation of our health
professionals (nurses, doctors
and allied health profession-
als) are funded under this plan
and healthy lifestyles pro-
grammes promoted.

All first world countries,
except the USA, have univer-
sal healthcare plans, and many
developing countries have
implemented some form of
healthcare coverage for their
citizens.

The Bahamas remains one
of a few countries that has not
implemented a universal
healthcare plan.

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years of Independence and in
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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FBI and Bahamian police
seeking relative of woman

Kingsway Academy High School Invites
qualified applicants for the following
teaching positions for September, 2009.

Spanish
French

Art and Design
Music

Successful applicants must:

¢ Be born again Christians, with
minimum qualifications of a
Bachelor’s Degree in the
appropriate subject areas
Have a valid Teachers Certificate
Be willing to participate in
Extra Curricular activities, etc

Application Forms can be collected from
the Human Resources section at the
Business Office, Bernard Road,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Tel. 242-324-6269 / 324-6887

Deadline for Applications:
Friday, July 17, 2009

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, JULY 12TH, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer / Sis. Alice Woodside
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer / Bro. Jamicko Forde (B)
7:00 p.m. Bro, Ernest Miller’ Board of General Education
Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

THE BABAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS CONFERENCE q
OOF THE METHODIST COLRCH TS THE CARIBIEAN AND THE AMERICAS f {
L’EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE ET LES AMERIQUES
AASHAL CIRCUIT CF CHURCHES
1108 Montrase Avene
0, Bure ER-10579, Nase, Bakamasy Telephone: 25-0452: Fan: 328-27;
metandisteonteren esr mesn. com
REPOSITIONING FOR MURACLES WITH FRESH EXPRESSIONS
ENERGIZING THE CONFERENCE NOU (Mineture Outre Ht itwens Hsin
IMMENSE VARTETY- IMMENSE CREATIVITE- IMMENSE HOPE
“Celebrating 223 years af continuous Methodist witnes for Cherast in The Bahamas”
SINTH LORD'S DAY AFTER PESTECOST/LORD'S DAY AFTER INDEPENDENCE
JULY 1108
COLLECT: Lord Giod, Your Son, left the ries of heaven and became ocr for curser when we
prpsper save us Ercan prad, when we are weedy, save es {ram despa, that we may trust ou alone
thvough Jess Chrest cur Lond

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Maleulm Rul Eas

ran Resrerendl Edoverd J Sakis (Celetention of fe Hoty Enchanst

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RHODES MEMORIAL MEVIOMIST CHURCH (108 Memtroge Ave, sear Wolll Rl)

ham Revered Evans Lazare (Celebration of fhe Holy Enchant

10am Reverend Emly A. Clemente (Hicke Stadt

Ika Reverend Evans ararne (Childben and Youth Serve)

6pm Conducted by Rhodes Elevated Young Aduits Group

CORE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHL ICH (Rose Stet, Fox 1h

Iam Reverend Leonavd (), Roberts, Jr. (Natineel Pride Service)

PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)

iam Beton Ex. Raymmen A Neils

HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHONHST CHURCH (28 Crawford S4, Oakes Piel
am Reever! Edward J Sakis (Celeron of fe Hity Exchans}

METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD (Fire Trl Ril)

+15 pi Reverend Evans Lanire

MONASTERY PARKUCHRIST THE RING METHODIST FELLOW SHIP

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MID WEEK SERVICES:

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FROM page one

Garrison first came to police attention
on February 25, 2009, when they received
a missing person report from the United
States embassy in Nassau.

She had last been seen in the US some-
time in January, and officers were told at
that time she may have been in the
Bahamas “in the company of a Bahamian
male.”

According to information gathered by
police, Ms Garrison was no stranger to
the Bahamas, with her first visit to the
country in 2005, and spending her time
“between here and the US” from then
until she met her death.

Police would not reveal if the man now
set to be charged is the same man she was
believed to have been in the company of
when she was reported missing, or if he
had any prior relationship with Ms Garri-
son.

ACP Gibson said he would “need to
check” why a description of Ms Garrison
was not made public when the missing
persons report was received by Bahamian
police.

He said normal procedure is that “if
somebody’s reported missing we will fol-
low alert all the stations then try to get it to
the public as quickly as we possibly can.”

Updating initial reports, police yesterday
suggested they now suspect Ms Garrison
met her demise a “couple of months” ago.

ACP Gibson said he “did not want to
speculate” as to a motive for her killing

FROM page one

Reginald Ferguson says he is
“checking into” 38-year-old

THE BODY of American Anna Garrison was found in this re

and police are still awaiting an autopsy
report which will tell them how she died.
Police have been in contact with her fam-
ily, he added.

The American’s murder was a popular
topic of discussion on the internet for the
last few days.

One writer on a community message
board said she was disturbed by the pos-
sibility that Ms Garrison may be the same
“white woman with long sandy coloured
hair” she had “recently” seen crying in
a “Chinese restaurant in the Fox Hill
area.”

“She was very dirty, had sand all over
the left side of her and was crying. I rushed
over and asked her what had happened —
T assumed she fell and was possibly drunk.
As I got to talk to her she revealed to me

Mother claims son beaten

police custody on Monday in

she said.



that her boyfriend had just beat her and
she took her hand from her face — her
nose was busted and she had scratches
over her eye,” the internet user claimed.

The woman, she alleged, told her she
had come from the States to the Bahamas
with a Bahamian man who had “promised
to marry her.”

The internet user said that after pleading
with the woman to let her help her and
“take her somewhere safe,” she left her at
the restaurant “against (her) better judg-
ment.”

“IT pray to God that was not the same
woman. My gut told me that day to call the
police,” added the internet user.

ACP Gibson said police still have “work
to do” in relation to the case and investi-
gations continue.

“They can’t be doing this.
What if he ends up like that 15
year old that hung himself in
the cell? It is wrong,” she

Antoinette Fernander’s claim
that her 18-year-old son Anto-
nio Russell suffered blows
that left him in “fear for his
life,” with his face “black and
blue.”

However, officer in charge
at Fox Hill police station,
Inspector Marlon Fulford, said
he has “no knowledge” of
such abuse.

According to Ms Fernan-
der, her son was taken into

connection with the death of
Major, who was found bound,
gagged and hanging by a seat-
belt from a tree on Saturday,
June 27, 2009.

As Russell is currently on
bail charged in connection
with the killing of Mario
Humes in June 2007, Ms Fer-
nander said she can under-
stand why he may have been
picked up by police.

“He is in the system,”





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Telephone number: 324-2558

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ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

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Telephone number 325-5 712
ay

EMAIL - Ivnnk@ batelnet

However, the mother com-
plained that this does not give
police an excuse to abuse him
or anyone else they have in
their custody.

“My son was all swell up,
his face was black and blue —
he can’t even breathe proper-
ly. I asked if I could take him
to the doctor, they would not
allow me to take him to the
doctor. He said ‘Mummy, they
putting a plastic bag over my
face and beating me!’ He said
he is scared they are going to
kill him.”

Ms Fernander said that dur-
ing a 20-minute conversation
with Russell at the station he
told her officers had placed a
bag over his head before
attacking him.

added, referring to the case of
Michael Knowles, who was
found dead in a police cell.
Knowles’ mother claimed wit-
nesses told her he had been
beaten by officers.

Inspector Fulford of Fox
Hill station said that when he
last saw Russell yesterday
morning he was “in good
health.”

“We have no knowledge of
that,” he stated, when ques-
tioned about the complaint.

He contradicted Mrs Fer-
nander, saying Russell was
picked up on Tuesday, not
Monday, and claimed that
Fox Hill police station is mere-
ly “holding” him for the
Criminal Investigation
Department.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 11



‘Justice, Unity, Generosity
and Service’ gives donations

THE Elizabeth Estates Chil-
dren’s Home and_ the
HIV/AIDS Foundation were
the beneficiaries of donations
by Justice, Unity, Generosity
and Service (JUGS) during the
organisation’s second confer-
ence in the Bahamas.

“Breaking Barriers — Build-
ing Communities” was the
theme of this year’s conference,
which attracted 80 members
and their families.

The 42nd Annual Conven-
tion was held last Wednesday
at the Breezes Resort and was
officially opened by Rev
Angela Palacious.

She welcomed the American
delegates to the Bahamas and
encouraged the organisation in
their quest of uplifting educa-
tional aspirations of children
and teenagers.

At the team-building work-
shop, Agatha Marcelle from
the Centre for Organisational
and Personal Performance
(COPP) explained the ways in
which to achieve the maximum
contribution from each mem-
ber.

Following the workshop, the
10 standing committee meet-
ings were held. Each chapter
was represented in order to
properly discuss the issues and
the way forward for the JUGS
organisation.

Members were also treated
to an island-style cocktail party
and a community service
awards luncheon.

At the luncheon the JUGS
Nassau sisters introduced their
US counterparts to the local
community.

The speakers were Rosamae
Bain and Lynette Deveaux,
both of the HIV/AIDS Centre.

Representatives of the two
charities JUGS supports - the
Elizabeth Estates Children’s
Home and the HIV/AIDS
Foundation - were present and
received a donation from the
JUGS International Organisa-
tion.

A student from Elizabeth
Estates Children’s Home, Greg
Smith, received a four-year
scholarship to the college of his
choice. Community Service
Awards were also presented to
Arlene Nash-Ferguson for cul-
ture and community work;
Bishop Walter Hanchell was
awarded for religion and com-
munity service; Dorothy King
was awarded for humanitarian
services and community work,
and Rev Carlos Reid was pre-
sented with an award for youth
development and community
service. Additional awards
were presented to persons for
their continued service to
JUGS over the past years. They
were Phyllis Albury-Garroway

Appliances ta Y

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=
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* Some Stipulations

Way Apply

and Valerie Thompson of Orig-
inal Patties and Holy Cross
Anglican Church. A travel



the Detroit Chapter of JUGS
for having the most members
travel to the conference in Nas-

“With Approved Credit

award was also presented to

Sau.



NOTICE

Mohs Surgery in Nassau

DR. JOHN STRASSWIMMER, MOHS SURGEON

will be visiting The Skin Centre on Friday

July 17, 2009. DOr Strasswimmer trained at
Harvard and Yale and is Board Certified and a
Fellow of the Mohs College.

Mohs Micrographic Surgery is an advanced

treatment process for skin cancer which is
[t offers the
many skin
cancers and simultaneously minimizes the
sacrifice of normal tissue. This cutting-edge

now offered at The Skin Centre.
highest possible cure rate for

treatment requires highly specialized

physicians that serve as surgeon, pathologist

and reconstructive surgeon,

Qur visiting Mohs Surgeon has extensive
Micrographic
Procedure. The technique is used to remove

experience in the Mohs
the two most common forms of skin cancer:
basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell

carcinoma.

For more information, please contact:
The Skin Centre, Harbour Bay Plaza,
East Bay Street Tel. 393-7546.

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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 12

spor

THURSDAY, JULY 9,

ts

2009



RAGE 14 ®@ ‘Peace on da Streets’ Basketball Classic...

At World Youth Games in Italy...

Young athletes advance
to the Second round

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

he Bahamas’ 11

member team, at the

International Asso-

ciation of Athletic
Federation’s World Youth
Games in Italy, began competi-
tion today at the sixth annual
edition of the meet.

Seven members took to the
track dominated by 100m
sprinters and quartermilers
advancing to the second round
in their respective events.

In the morning session,
Sparkyl Cash and V’Alonee
Robinson opened competition
in the women’s 100m.

Robinson was the first team
member to advance when she
ran in heat seven, out of lane
four.

Her time of 12.23s finished
fourth, ultimately placing her
26th out of 31 athletes to
advance to the next round.



V'Alonee Robinson

Cash failed to qualify with
her time of 12.60s, which was
good enough for fifth place in
heat one.

Ashton Purvis of the United
States advanced with the fastest
qualifying time of 11.57s.

In the men’s 100m, a pair of
former Carifta medallists head-
lined the event for the
Bahamas.

Geno Jones won his heat in
10.99s, well off his season’s best
time of 10.67s. Jones’ time

placed him 28th of the 36 even-
tual qualifiers.

Farquharson just missed out
on qualification.

He was one of three com-
petitors to finish with a time of
11.08 along with Riski Latip of
Indonesia and Yateya Kam-
pepera of Botswana.

Latip advanced by edging out
Farquharson in a photo finish.

In the afternoon session,
quartermilers took precedence
with the dynamic pair Rashan
Brown and Katrina Seymour
advancing through to the sec-
ond round.

Brown finished second in
heat six, in a time of 56.16s,
while Seymour was third in heat
five in a time of 55.77s.

Seymour advanced with the
ninth fastest time while Brown
was 14th of 24 qualifiers.

Michelle Brown of the Unit-
ed States qualified with the
fastest time of 54.39s.

SEE next page

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNTS
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Senior Manager,
Accounts.

The job oversees the functions of the Accounting, Budget & Management
Reports and Finance Department to ensure the efficient and effective delivery
of accounting services.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the
following:

Compilation of the corporate budget.

Coordination the corporate annual budget and project budgets

Preparation of monthly management statements

Revision of the General Ledger Control Accounts reconciliation

Preparation of performance reports for division , department and sections
Overseeing of the job costing system and sundry receivables (capital
contributions, rechargeable)

Overseeing the accounting aspect of the Abaco and Eleuthera offices

Liaison with internal and external audits

Preparation and submission of monthly financial statements to the Chief
Financial

Officer for the Board of Directors

Provision of regular reports to the Chief Financial Officer as required
Preparation of the business plan for the department

Establishing and maintaining written procedures for the department

Ensuring the filing and assessing of the BEC’s insurance claims

Overseeing the Cash Flow Management

Ensuring timely posting of invoices for payment

Overseeing the Payroll Office and ensuring relevant deductions form employee’s
salaries

Conducting audits of various financial activities including Employee Basic Pay
Reconciliation, Employee Loans Reconciliation and Payment Reconciliation
Performing reconciliations of Trade/Sundry Accounts Payable

Monitoring and reviewing all other Liability Accounts

Ensuring timely disbursement of all Loans interest and principle repayments
Performing reconciliations for Long-term Debt Schedule

Calculating exchange gains and losses on long-term loans

Monitoring of daily transfer of funds to various bank accounts to ensure
adequate availability of funds for payment to vendors

Managing the status of local and foreign vendors

Liaising with and granting requests as required by Internal and External Auditors
Managing subordinate staff and administering discipline. Conducting
performance appraisals

Maintaining an effective system of two-way communication with staff, manage
and promotes sound based and harmonious industrial relations

Job requirements include:

¢ A minimum of a Bachelors degree with a certification in Accounting ACCA/CPA
or equivalent qualifications
A minimum of 8+ years of experience in a financial environment or in a similar
management position
Sound knowledge of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices
Sound knowledge of Financial Accounting Software and spreadsheet
applications
Sound knowledge of project management and related job costing systems
Ability to analyze financial reports
Sound knowledge of covenants of lending institutions (e.g. IDB)
Ability to trouble shoot accounting processes as they relate to financial software
and the system of internal control.
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing
Good time management skills

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: July
22,2009.





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PAGE 13, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

SPORTS

NORCECA: Canada
sweeps Bahamas
in straight sets

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

AFTER an awe-inspiring
performance last month at the
NORCECA Pool D Champi-
onships, the women’s senior
national volleyball team has
faced misfortune thus far in
NORCECA Pool I against
regional powerhouses.

For the second consecutive
match, the Bahamas failed to
win a set when they were
defeated by Canada in straight
sets, 25-12, 25-4, 25-9. The
Bahamas fell to 0-2 and are
scheduled to face Jamaica at
Spm Thursday.

Team captain Kelsie John-
son finished with a team high

ix points (five attacks, one
block), however received little
support on offense as the
Bahamas struggled to reach
double figures.

Young athletes
advance to

second round
FROM page 12

Brown and Seymour look to
repeat their 2009 Carifta per-
formance where they initially
finished second and third
respectively and nearly shared
the medal stand before Sey-
mour was disqualified for a lane
violation.

Glenwood Baillou was the
lone competitor in the men’s
400m and failed to qualify when
he finished sixth in heat five in
50.77s. Jones, Robinson, Sey-
mour and Brown will each com-
pete in the semifinals today with
the 100m finals concluding the
afternoon session.

Cheryse Rolle finished with
three points while Tasamine
Emmanuel-Potier added two.

It took just 52 minutes for
the Canadians to complete the
straight set sweep of the
Bahamas.

In the opening round, the
Bahamas fell in straight sets at
the hands of the heavily
favoured Puerto Rican team
25-15, 25-7, 25-10 in the third
round tournament of the FIVB
Women’s World Champi-
onship at the Hector Beza
Solares Coliseum in Caguas,
Puerto Rico.

Puerto Rico held a distinct
statistical advantage as they fin-
ished ahead 40-9 in attacks, 6-2
in blocks, and 13-10 in service
aces.

Cheryse Rolle led the
Bahamas with five points, while
Tasmine Emmanuel-Potier
added three and Melinda Bas-
tian finished with two.

Sarai Alvarez led Puerto
Rico with 12 points while
Alexandra Oquendo finished
with six.

In a match that took just
under an hour to complete, the
Puerto Ricans led early 7-0
before the Bahamas scored
their first pomt of the contest.

The winner of the NORCE-
CA Pool I will be the lone
team to advance to the final
round of the event held in 2010
throughout various cities in
Japan.

While head coach Joe Smith
knew his team faced uphill
odds heading into the compe-
tition, he said the team would
take away whatever lesson it
was able to from the experi-
ence. “Our approach is to take
advantage of every match and
learn from it for the develop-
ment of our volleyball,” he
said. “Our goal is to play up to
our best possible level.”

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 14



THE most prestigious bas-
ketball tournament of the sum-
mer in the Bahamas is slated to
tip off with its 15th annual edi-
tion in less than two weeks. And
the organisers are expecting
perhaps the largest turnaround
in its history.

The Nelson Cooper “Peace
on da Streets” Basketball Clas-
sic is scheduled for July 22 to
25 at the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium.

Youth Against Violence
founder Carlos Reid said the
tournament serves various pur-
poses for the youth.

DaeKeorenleranae
b-ball tourney

THE Bahamas Basketball
Federation is scheduled to
host its 2nd Annual Inde-
pendence Round Robin
Basketball Tournament July
9-12 at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.



“This basketball tournament
is an effort to continue the work
of Nelson Cooper and YAV to
bring peace to our streets,” he
said.

“Most of the persons killed
this year were young people
under the age of 25 and most
of those charged for these same
murders were also juveniles
under the age of 25. So far for
2009 there have been over 34
reported murders. Youth
Against Violence continues to
be at the forefront in the fight
against crime and violence. We
refuse to put our heads in the
sand and pretend as if we don’t
have a problem. We will con-
tinue our commitment to pro-
vide positive alternatives for the
youth of our nation and
abroad.”

The tournament will include
five divisions, 18 and Under, 16
& Under, Church Division and
Open Division.

And for the first time ever,
there will be a Celebrity Divi-
sion comprised of radio per-
sonalities and entertainers
including ZNS, The Tribune,

SPORTS

Come out and support the ‘Peace on da Streets’ Basketball Classic



YOUTH Against Violence founder Carlos Reid...

100 Jamz and a team of enter-
tainers led by radio host
“Naughty.”

This year’s Celebrity Division
will be in honour of Anthony
“Fat Back” Marshall who
recently passed away.

This year, a Family Night is
being planned for 5pm July 25.
This night will feature champi-
onship games, a Slam Dunk
Contest, 3-point Shoot Out and
a special Celebrity Game fea-
turing members of parliament
playing against some of our

local pastors.

All games will be held at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
starting at 6pm July 22 to 24.
Saturday’s games begin at 9am
and last until the tournament
ends.

There will be a number of
great door prizes, including
round-trip tickets for two cour-
tesy of Bahamasair and cell
phones and phone cards cour-
tesy of BTC along with other
prizes. This year’s tournament
promises to be competitive as

well as exciting with a team
coming from California in the
Open Division as well as a team
from Freeport joining our 16 &
Under Division.

“Again, we expect a number
of our Bahamian college players
to play this summer as this
event has become an elite bas-
ketball tournament in the
Bahamas. Our Classic has
become the most highly antici-
pated summer event in New
Providence and over the past
several years we have attract-
ed some college coaches from
the US who come down with
the hopes of offering scholar-
ships to some of our young
players,” Reid said.

“We would like to thank the
public for supporting us over
the years and we look forward
to your continued support. We
would also like to thank our
sponsors without whom this
event would not be possible.”

The tournament began in
1995 and was first named the
National Park League Champi-
onships. The name was changed
to the Nelson Cooper Peace on

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The late Nelson Cooper was
the leader of a gang called the
Border Boys. He gave his life
to the Lord and went into the
Mason’s Addition community
to encourage other gang mem-
bers to stop the violence. He
was shot the night he entered
that same community and died
a week later.

Event sponsors include Fur-
niture Plus who has been with
the event since its inception,
more 94.9 FM, Spirit 92.5 Fam-
ily Guardian, Scotia Bank, Basil
Ingraham & Co, J.S. Johnson,
Purity Bakery, Chilly Willy,
Original Patties, Nassau Paper
Company, JMEL, First Car-
ribean Bank, KLG Investments
Ltd, KFC, Thompson Trading,
Commonwealth Bank, Royal
Star Assurance, Coca-Cola,
Prince Lock & Key, Commis-
sioner of Police and Dunking
Donuts.

“We encourage everyone out
there to come out and support
this event,” Reid said, “Our
children need you.”

(Clearing Banker’s Association of The Bahamas)
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THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 15 TRIBUNE SPORTS

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‘Inconsistency’
at Customs
hits energy

efficient firms

* Businesses in field ‘finding
it very difficult to function’
as some imports come in
duty-free, while others
have taxes levied

* Government's duty
exemptions to encourage
energy efficiency being
undermined, says ex-
Chamber president

* Firms being deterred
from undertaking energy
efficient projects

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN
suppliers of
energy efficient
equipment and
technology are
“finding it very
difficult to func-
tion” because of
the inconsistent
treatment their
imported prod-
ucts receive
from the Customs Department,
a former Chamber of Com-
merce president said yesterday,
with some shipments allowed
in duty-free and others charged
the full 45 per cent.

Dionisio D’Aguilar, Super-
wash’s president, said the uncer-
tainty and inconsistency associ-
ated with Customs’ treatment
of such imports was not only
undermining the Governmen-
t’s efforts to encourage energy
efficiency among Bahamian
households and businesses
through the elimination of
duties, but was also deterring
companies such as his own from
implementing energy-saving
projects.

Mr D’Aguilar told Tribune
Business that Superwash had
been contemplating the impor-
tation and installation of
$150,000-worth of solar panels,
as part of an energy-saving ini-
tiative across the laundromat
chain.

The Government, as part of
its 2008-2009 Budget,
announced a range of fiscal
incentives designed to encour-
age energy efficiency as global
oil prices skyrocketed, and
made the importation of ener-
gy-saving light bulbs, solar
lamps and panels, batteries,
converters and wind engines
duty-free.

However, Mr D’Aguilar said
Superwash’s supplier and others
in the energy-saving technology
field had told him of problems
experienced in getting their
shipments cleared by Customs
duty-free.

D’ Aguilar

SEE page 2B

THE TRIBUNE

o U





THURSDAY,

©
n r

t

i = ;

—~

Teele ao



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

$100m-$150m upgrade
for Bahamas terminal

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Norwegian-

based oil and

gas giant yes-

terday said it

would invest
between $100-$150 million in
upgrading the Grand Bahama-
based oil storage terminal it
plans to acquire for $263.2 mil-
lion, but the deal’s closing is
dependent on agreeing a long-
term lease with the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Cor-
poration (BAIC).

Cathrine Torp, a StatoilHy-
dro spokeswoman, said the
company was “looking at a
long-term engagement beyond
2019” in the Bahamas through
its planned purchase of the
South Riding Point oil storage
and transhipment facility from
World Point Terminals, the
owner since January 1, 1990.

The current lease between
South Riding Point and its
BAIC landlord expires in 2019,
and while Ms Torp said Statoil
could not disclose the extension
it was seeking, she added: “We
need a return on our invest-
ment.

Cable ‘confident’
on voice licence

* BISX-listed firm believes
Columbus buy-out will
‘facilitate’ services
expansion and local
acquisitions, hinting
at new move for SRG

* Aiming to use negotiations
on cable TV licence renewal
to push for basic
package rate increase

* Incurred $0.5m in new
signal costs, and channel
line-up risen by 67%

* Cable invested $230m
in infrastructure, providing
barrier to entry of rivals

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas is planning
to use negotiations with the
Government over the renewal
of its cable T'V licence to push
for a “mild” increase in the $30
basic cable package rate over
the next three years, Tribune
Business can reveal, with the
BISX-listed company “confi-
dent” that it will obtain a voice
telecommunications licence
once the sector is liberalised.

A copy of the private place-

SEE page 7B

Sealed Bid Auction

4 Bedroom / 3 Bath Home Near The Beach
Nicholl’s Town, Andros

she

FEATURES
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*1,000 sq. ft. patio *Near the marina *Beach Access

Preview Dates:

July 9" to July 30", 2009 (By appointment only)

Deadline for Bids: July 30", 2009 on or before 5 p.m.

Deposit:

$10,000 (Refundable if bid is not accepted)

Notification of Bid: August 6", 2009
Photos and details online at www.HGChristie.com - Ref. DS10579

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* Norwegian buyer unveils $263m purchase of South Riding Point in GB
* Deal contingent on extension of BAIC lease beyond 2019, with
purchaser seeking ‘long-term investment horizon of 30-50 years’

“When we look at this
kind of investment, we’re
looking at a timeline of
30 to 50 years, just to give
a general statement on
this type of investment
and the time we look at.”
That would imply that
Statoil would at least
want the lease on South
Riding Point to be
extended until 2049-2050.

Agreeing a long-term exten-
sion of the lease with BAIC and
the Bahamian government is
one of the key conditions to
closing the transaction between
World Point and Statoil, the for-
mer warning that the sales
agreement could terminate -
unless an extension was agreed
- by October 1, 2009, if this was
not met.

Other key conditions include
obtaining the necessary Nation-
al Economic Council (NEC)
and Investments Board (mean-
ing the Cabinet) approvals for

Cable projects

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas’ manage-
ment has projected that net
income levels will fall below the
$25.866 million generated in
2008 for its next three financial
years, but will recover in the
medium term to reach $36.777
million by 2015.

The projections, contained in
the private placement memo-
randum for its $40 million pref-
erence share issue, which will
help to finance the $80 million
buy-out of Columbus Commu-
nications’ controlling stake in
the company, show that man-
agement has likely budgeted for
a worst-case scenario for fiscal
2009, with net income projected





















Cartwright



the Statoil purchase, and
the Norwegian firm com-
pleting satisfactory due
diligence.

Ms Torp said Statoil,
which has leased space
at the oil storage, blend-
ing and transhipment
facility for the past 16
years, saw the purchase
as a logical extension of
its long-term growth
plans.

It had desired to both extend
its lease at South Riding Point
and invest in upgrading its facil-
ities there, due to the increased
volume of oil being shipped
from Brazil - developments that
seemingly led into acquisition
talks with World Point.

“The terminal is very well
positioned for the US market,
and will support our trading
activities from our Stanford
office,” Ms Torp said. “It was
the need for investment and the
fact the current lease was going

to end shortly.”

She added that Statoil
planned to invest between $100
million and $150 million in
upgrading South Riding Point,
which features 10 storage tanks
and two berths. The company
has some 55 Bahamian employ-
ees, all of whom Statoil is asking
to stay.

Larry Cartwright, minister of
agriculture and fisheries, who
has responsibility for BAIC,
said “the ball is in their court”
when asked about the lease
extension and South Riding
Point deal.

The Government, he added,
had yet to see written details
on the World Point deal and
the Statoil proposal, although
the two sides had been sched-
uled to “get back to us” by
tomorrow or, more likely, Mon-
day. “Something in writing has
to come across the desk of the

SEE page 8B

$36m-plus net income by 2015

* Columbus to get base $1.4m management fee,
with incentive capped at 80% of this amount

to drop 23.4 per cent to $19.827
million.

Year-on-year revenue growth
is projected to drop to 3.9 per
cent for 2009, compared to a 7.2
per cent growth rate in 2008,
with total revenues expanding
from $81.461 million last year
to $84.636 million.

However, the year-over-year
percentage revenue growth is
projected to stabilise at 4.1 per
cent between 2012 to 2015, with
operating income as a percent-
age of total revenues standing at
a consistent 51 per cent over
the same period.

The main determinants of

Cable Bahamas’ growth over
the next six years, apart from
the probable renewal of its
cable TV licence and generating
growth from that mature sec-
tor and its Internet business,
will be its ability to enter new
telecoms markets and expand
via that route.

Net income, although pro-
jected to lag behind 2008’s per-
formance with $20.195 million
and $23.595 million in 2011, will
go beyond that with $26.651
million in 2012 and continue on
a projected rising trend after

SEE page 8B



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$300k outlay

‘shoe-in’ for

‘phenomenal
response’

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE mastermind behind a
new US-style shoe store con-
cept for the Bahamas yesterday
said there had been “a phe-
nomenal response” from cus-
tomers in the first 17 days since
it launched, adding that its self-
service format had kept over-
heads low and “prices up to 50
per cent” below rivals.

Lincoln Bain said he had
modelled Bani’s Shoe Ware-
house, located on Mackey
Street next to the Royal Bank
of Canada, as a larger version of
the likes of Payless in the US,
where customers were able to
effectively serve themselves - a
concept that kept staff numbers
low.

Telling Tribune Business he
had invested more than
$300,000 in initial start-up costs,
Mr Bain said: “It’s had a phe-
nomenal response. Everyone’s
saying there’s a recession, but
we decided to do it right and
do something big. It’s the first
self-service shoe store in the
Bahamas.”

SEE page 4B

The information contained is ft
party and The Tribune can

responsible for erroi
from the daily report. —_ ail



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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





SHOWN (front row L-R) Yvette
Sands, secretary; Mr Rolle; the
Prime Minister; Gershan Major,
first vice-president; Darron Cash,
treasurer. Middle row (L-R): Tim
Covington, director; Pedro
Roberts, director; Dr Sophia Rolle,
chairperson, Chamber Week 2009;
Creswell Gardiner, director. Back
Row (L-R) Aaron Brice, director;
Merritt Storr, director; Odley Aritis,
director; Robert Myers, director;
Rick Hazlewood, director; Philip
Simon, executive director.

(Photo by Tim Aylen)





























































































Pictured from left:

1. Leonard Henderson, JD, CLU
Financial Services Marketing Consultant
Platinum Master Agency Award

Julie Adderley-MclIntosh
Agency Manager
Bronze International Management Award

John Hepburn, Jr.
Agency Manager
Silver Frontline Leader Award

Vernelle Butler, MBA, CLU, IFA
Agency Manager
: Bronze Frontline Leader Award
PG. ee ep . Katina Roach, BSc.
mia Agency Manager
promotes the SS cl Bronze Frontline Leader Award
TU MTSU TOE STATO
1rough education, researc and networking
international memberships. ae

Ann Marie Major

Agency Manager

Bronze Frontline Leader Award
Deborah Delancy, BA
Agency Manager

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& FAMILY GUARDIAN

Chamber
executives

meet

REPRESENTING the inter-
ests and concerns of the private
sector, the Chamber of Com-
merce’s new slate of officers and
directors for the 2009-2010
administrative year paid a cour-
tesy call on Prime Minister

PM

Hubert A Ingraham.

Headed by the Chamber’s
president, Khaalis Rolle, the
group’s visit to the Prime Min-
ister was one of several activities
that took place during the
recent Chamber Week 2009.

‘Inconsistency’
at Customs
hits energy

efficient firms

FROM page 1B

This was largely because Cus-
toms officials lacked specialist
knowledge and expertise in the
sector, and were thus unable to
determine which
technology/equipment was
energy efficient - and thus qual-
ified for the duty exemptions -
and which was not.

Mr D’Aguilar said his con-
tractor had told him: “I can’t
tell you what happens when the
shipment lands. It depends on
who you get on the day.”

He pointed out that if import
duties were levied on $150,000
worth of Superwash’s solar pan-
el imports, that translated into
“a pretty significant amount of
duty” - some $67,500 at a 45 per
cent rate.

“That’s a $67,000 question.
Do I take the risk, or don’t I
take the risk?” Mr D’ Aguilar
said on the possibility of being
charged duties, something that
would deter Bahamian compa-
nies and residences from mov-
ing towards becoming more
energy efficient.

“People in this business of
trying to sell energy efficient
products to Bahamian homes
and businesses need to operate
with consistency of duty rate.
Right now, they can’t do that,”
he added. “What the Govern-
ment is trying to do with one
hand, Customs is taking away
with the other.

“T know of one company that
brought in a shipment of ener-

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



gy-efficient light bulbs, and the
Customs officer on duty said:
‘No problem, let them in duty
free’. The company then
brought in a second shipment,
and the Customs officer they
dealt with then said: ‘No, it’s
not energy efficient’ and
charged them 45 per cent.”

Mr D’Aguilar added: “Cus-
toms officers are not really sure
what is energy efficient and
what is not energy efficient. The
technology is changing so quick-
ly, and the field is so dynamic,
that Customs officers just do
not know.

“The companies on that field
end up having to try and con-
vince Customs officers that their
shipments are energy efficient,
and the officers just do not
know.”

Import

Uncertainty over whether
they would be charged import
duties or not was creating havoc
for Bahamian energy-efficient
technology suppliers when it
came to providing clients with
quotes and pricing their ser-
vices, Mr D’ Aguilar said.

“Tt makes it very difficult for
businesses in that field to func-
tion and provide energy effi-
cient products that are tax
exempt,” he added. “It makes it
very difficult for them to oper-
ate, because they do not know
what will happen when they
bring goods in.

“It’s very hard to be in that
business because it’s not con-
sistent. It’s a problem and they
need to address it.” Mr
D’Aguilar said that Customs
officers needed to consult per-
sons in the industry if they were
unsure whether imports were
energy efficient and thus quali-
fied for duty exemptions,
adding: “It’s OK for a civil ser-
vant to say: ‘I don’t know’.”

Mr D’Aguilar praised the
Government for attempting to
reduce the Bahamas’ depen-
dency on fossil fuels and asso-
ciated foreign currency outflows
through energy efficiency incen-
tives, adding: “It’s creating a
new, different, diverse field for
Bahamians.”

Apart from making the duty-
free import of energy-saving
light bulbs, solar lamps, batter-
ies, converters and wind
engines, duty-free, the 2008-
2009 Budget reduced import
duties on energy-saving home
appliances from 35 per cent to
15 per cent.

The import duty rates on
energy-efficient windows, low-
flow shower heads and low-flow
toilets were dropped to 15 per
cent.

Peri:

NACK WRAP’"—
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 3B



BUSINESS
The ‘Fund-ation’ for greater regulation

THE Investment Funds Act
2003 was enacted on the Decem-
ber 15, 2003, and effectively
replaced the Mutual Funds Act
199. The Investment Funds Reg-
ulations were enacted on Decem-
ber 16, 2003.

Under the Act, an investment
fund is defined as: “A unit trust,
company, or partnership that
issues or has equity interests, the
purpose or effect of which is the
pooling of investor funds with the
aim of spreading investment risks
and achieving profits or gains aris-
ing from the acquisition, holding,
management or disposal of invest-
ments”.

It is important to note that, in
addition to the definition of an
investment fund, an investment
fund must have a ‘nexus’ to the
Bahamas in order to be consid-
ered a Bahamian-based invest-
ment fund. This means that for
unit trusts, the trustee, adminis-
trator, investment advisor or
investment manager must be
either a company incorporated
or registered in the Bahamas, a
person who has a place of busi-
ness in the Bahamas, or who uses
an address in the Bahamas. Alter-
natively, the trust instrument for
the unit trust must be governed
by the laws of the Bahamas.

For a company to be consid-
ered a Bahamian-based invest-
ment fund, it must be either one
of the following:

* Incorporated or registered in
the Bahamas

* The administrator, invest-
ment advisor or investment man-
ager must be either a company
or companies incorporated or reg-
istered in the Bahamas

* One or more companies or
individuals, any one of whom has
a place of business in the
Bahamas, or which uses an
address in the Bahamas

* A company whose adminis-
tration or management (includ-
ing control of substantially all of
its assets) must be carried on in or
from the Bahamas.

In order to be considered a
Bahamian-based fund, a partner-
ship must have either of these
qualities:

* One or more of the general
partners incorporated or regis-
tered in the Bahamas

* A person who resides in the
Bahamas or uses an address in
the Bahamas

* The partnership articles must
be governed by the laws of the
Bahamas

* The administrator, invest-
ment advisor or investment man-
ager must be either a company

incorporated or registered in the
Bahamas, or a person who has a
place of business in the Bahamas
or uses an address in the
Bahamas.

All non-Bahamas based funds
wishing to sell units or shares in
or from the Bahamas must
appoint a representative
approved by the Securities Com-
mission of the Bahamas, in accor-
dance with the requirements
under the regulations.

The Act is important to the
development of investment funds
in the Bahamas, as it will enable
both companies incorporated
under the Companies Act 1992
(as amended) and companies
incorporated under the Interna-
tional Business Companies Act
2000 (as amended) to engage in
the investment fund business with
the consent of the Securities
Commission or investment fund
administrators, where applicable,
and to be registered as segregated
accounts companies under the
Segregated Accounts Companies
Act 2004.

Segregated accounts compa-
nies will be allowed to establish
accounts containing assets and
liabilities that are legally separat-
ed from the assets and liabilities
of the investment fund’s ordinary
account. This structure will pre-
vent the assets of one account
from being affected by the liabil-
ities of another account.

There are four (4) classes of
investment funds under the Act:

* The Standard Fund

* The Professional Fund

* The Recognised Foreign
Fund

* The SMART Fund

The Standard Fund is similar
to the ‘regulated funds’ under the
repealed Mutual Funds Act, and
is designed to operate as a tradi-
tional collective investment
scheme. Typically, standard funds
are those funds which do not sat-



isfy the requirements of a Profes-
sional Fund, Recognised Fund or
a SMART Fund. It is intended
that Standard Funds will be high-
ly regulated, since they will be
offered to the general public and
they may be only be licensed,
under the Act, by the Commis-
sion.

Professional Funds are
designed for the sophisticated
investor and may only be offered
to the following categories of per-
sons:

* Any bank or trust company
licensed under the Bank and
Trust Companies Regulation Act
2000 or licensed in a prescribed
jurisdiction, whether acting in its
individual or fiduciary capacity

* Any registered broker-dealer
or firm registered as a securities
investment adviser under the
Securities Industry Act 1999,
which maintains a minimum of
B$120,000 of regulatory capital
or is a broker-dealer or firm of
securities investment advisers reg-
istered in a prescribed jurisdic-
tion

* Any insurance company
licensed under the Insurance Act
1969 or licensed in a prescribed
jurisdiction

* Any investment fund licensed
or registered under the Act or
regulated in a prescribed juris-
diction

* Any natural person whose
individual net worth, or joint net
worth with the person’s spouse,
exceeds B$1 million

* Any natural person who has

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MERLEN MESIDOR of
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,

and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Chester Bonefish Lodge

for reservations:
Telephones 247) 356-3418

Cell-242-557-9597
berylferguson@yaboo.cons

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an individual income in excess of
B$200,000 or joint income with
that person’s spouse in excess of
B$300,000 in each of the two most
recent years, and has a reason-
able expectation of reaching the
same income level in the current
year

* Any trust with total assets in
excess of B$5 million

Where the financial institution
has a discretionary management
agreement with its customers, it
may set up an investment fund
with such customers which would
meet the requirements of this
template

SMF 002
This template applies in

instances where there are no
more than ten 10 investors in the
investment fund. The investor
would qualify to be an investor
in a Professional Fund, and the
majority of the investors have the
power to appoint and remove
operators of the investment fund.

SEE LEGAL, page 8B

* Any entity in which all of the
equity owners satisfy one of the
foregoing requirements

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BARRY PACKINGTON
of TREASURE COVE, P.O. BOX FH-14010, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 2â„¢ day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

A Recognised Foreign Fund is
the same as an Exempt Fund
under the repealed Mutual Funds
Act, where the equity interests of
the investment fund are listed on
a securities exchange prescribed
by the Securities Commission and
the investment fund is not
licensed in the Bahamas, or
where the investment fund is
licensed or registered in a juris-
diction prescribed by the Com-
mission and not suspended from
operation

A SMART Fund (Specific
Mandate Alternative Regulato-
ry Test Fund) must satisfy cer-
tain prescribed parameters and
requirements of a category, class
or type of investment fund. The
Commission has pre-approved
four template and has published
the parameters for the templates
in approved rules. A SMART
Fund that meets the requirements
prescribed in one of the pre-
approved rules may be licensed
by an unrestricted investment
fund administrator or the Com-
mission.

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LUO) Olen
Bolom lta Cys







-UBLIC NOTICE
CHANGE OF NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CLINTON
{NARD DORSETT of #4 Anguilla Road, Royal
°O, Box F-43838, have legally
e by deed poll to CLINTON
|| GRAY, The Deed Poll has
lV recorded at the Registrar Generals Office.

r at
WANTED:
ASSISTANT HEAD SWIM COACH
Swim Club seeks level 2 ASCA Certified
swim coach, Previous experience and good
administrative skills required. Involves
working with young children. Competitive

salary.





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Contact 326-6121 MY feygpigersts MeN a0]

Mail to:
P.O. Box SP-61353
or
bahamasswimelub@ yahoo.com

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

Wanted
Merchandising Manager

Minimum requirements:

' ' : LUNDBERG TRADING INC.
Five years’ experience

BA or equivalent degree
Proficient in all MS Applications

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), the Dissolution of LUNDBERG TRADING INC.
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 26th
day of June, 2009.

Please fax all resumés to 394-0282

or call 677-6731 for more information
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

TUESDAY, 7 JULY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,576.92 | CHG -0.07 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -135.44 | YTD % -7.91
FINDEX: CLOSE 788.56 | YTD -5.55% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Daily Vol. EPS$ Div$

mrrmeel | pata ore, Ie

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
Zi

COLONIAL

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

Security Yield
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Previous Close Today's Close Change

‘phenomenal
response’

FROM page 1B

At 7,500 square feet, Mr Bain
said the store was much larger
than its contemporaries in the
US, which enabled it to carry
more than 15,000 pairs of shoes
at any one time. The average
Payless, he said, could only car-
ry 6,000 pairs.

When asked where his inspi-
ration for the store came from,
Mr Bain replied: “From the
heavens. I just wanted to do
something different. We did a
shoe store because it’s large vol-
ume, and we saw the need for
variety.

“It’s been phenomenal. I
think we’ve really got a huge
part of the market share so far.”

Mr Bain explained that he
decided upon the self-service
format to meet customer needs.
Many persons, he said, were
only able to shop during their



lunch breaks from work, and
often complained that they had
to wait 20 minutes in a shoe
store for a member of staff to
become available to serve them.

“Tt takes for too long,” Mr
Bain added. Bani’s Shoe Ware-
house employed eight staff, he
said, but would have had to
employ far more if it was not a
self-service store, given the vol-
umes of business it was han-
dling.

Retailer

The retailer was covering
every shoe price point, Mr Bain
said, from $10 to $200. It was
currently focusing on women’s
shoes because women were esti-
mated to account for 80 per
cent of shoe purchases, but chil-
dren’s shoes are set to follow in
one month, with men’s shoes
several months down the line.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicis hereby advised that |, CECIL BRAD BETHEL of
Western District of the said Island of New Providence, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to CECIL BRAD DASSLER.-
BETHEL. [f there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

Biritish Lok

smal Haltom Hebel
Marlboraugh St.,

Shop a]

Clearance
SALE

Everything for $20
Until the end of July
Free parking at the Hilton

P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tal: 242-325-1865

Email: gams-peans@hotmail.com

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.40 10.40
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 ‘
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) FBB17 100.00 0.00 1%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
(
(

A
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dovelopmont Company

10.40
10.00
ases)
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

PRICE INQUIRY

P-110 Generators

Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) FBB13 100.00 0.00 1%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3787 483
2.8952 3.18
1.4750 5.74
3.1821 -13.90
12.9209 5.79
100.5448 0.54
93.1992 6.76
1.0000 0.00
9.2511 412
1.0578 5.78
1.0271 271
1.0554 i 5.54
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.
N/M
N/M

566.6 Nassau Airport Develooment Company (MAD) & pleased to

arnaunoe the release of Pl-110 Generakors for fhe Lynden

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

Findling inemational Airport Expardion Project
The purchase inquiry incudes

52wk-Low
1.3124
2.8952
1.3948
3.1821
12.2702
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
26-Jun-09
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Supply of to (2) 1600 KMWOO0 KYA, 2TTMBD WAC new
factory assembled motor generator sets complete with
NEMA 3 endesure and day tank
Commesioning and Site Acceptance Tests following
nétaliehon by MAD's aontrasctor, and

+ § year or 1500 operating hours warranty

The Pl-110 Document wil be available for pick up after
1:00pm, Tuesday June 23rd, 2009. Please contact
Traci Grisby to register at the NAD Project office.

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
$1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Goniack Tread Brisk

(Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Eepemcenn Project

Ph: (242) 702 POG6 | Faw: (242) ST P-ST
PO. Boo AP So, Mesaeu, Bahamas
Email: traci brshyiiires bs


THE TRIBUNE



Oil prices tumble
near $60 as gas
supplies surge

= By ERNEST SCHEYDER
AP Energy Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil
prices neared $60 per barrel
Wednesday as the government
reported unused gasoline held
in storage surged yet again.

Retail gas prices have fallen
every day for more than two
weeks, and gasoline futures fell
more than nine cents a gallon.

Energy markets are under-
going an extended sell-off, the
longest in 10 months, with new
economic reports dampening
optimism about any economic
recovery.

Benchmark crude for August
delivery fell more than four per
cent, or $2.79, to settle at $60.14
a barrel on the New York Mer-
cantile Exchange.

In just over one week, oil
prices have fallen more than 18
per cent.

“The recession is far from
over,” said analyst Stephen
Schork. “Perhaps the run-up in
prices was a bit overstated.”

Crude prices by last week had
more than doubled from lows
reached January, when a bar-
rel of crude cost just over $30.
That was just six months
removed from record highs near
$150 per barrel last summer.

Cheap oil sparked a new
round of investment, as did a
dollar that had been weakened
by government efforts to bail
out major banks and automak-
ers.

Crude is priced in the dollar,
so it effectively becomes cheap-
er internationally.

Yet dismal economic data
continues to emerge and the
fundamentals of supply and
demand appeared to take con-
trol of the market again last

week.

International Monetary Fund
on Wednesday lowered its glob-
al economic forecast, the latest
that would not support high
energy prices.

Since peaking at $73.38 last
Tuesday, crude futures have
fallen by almost $13 per barrel.
Gasoline, heating oil and nat-
ural gas futures are also tanking.

The Organisation of Petrole-
um Exporting Countries pre-
dicted Wednesday that demand
for crude has fallen so sharply, it
will take another four years to
recover to 2008 levels.

Billions

Americans are driving billions
fewer miles than they had in
recent years with millions losing
their jobs.

Even though refiners have
been slashing production, gaso-
line continues to pile up.

The Department of Energy
reported Wednesday that gaso-
line supplies grew by another
1.9 million barrels last week, the
fifth straight week that storage
levels have grown.

The volatile energy markets
may lead to increased scrutiny,
both in the US and overseas.

Federal regulators said Tues-
day they would examine
whether the government should
impose limits on the number of
futures contracts in oil and oth-
er energy commodities held by
speculative traders.

Concerns about the affect of
volatile energy prices has spread
overseas as well. It will be one
of the topics discussed by world
leaders meeting in Rome for
the Group of Eight summit.

In an editorial published by
The Wall Street Journal, British

Prime Minister Gordon Brown
and French President Nicolas
Sarkozy also called for closer
government oversight of the oil-
trading markets.

Retail gasoline prices
dropped again overnight, the
16th straight day, to a new
national average of $2.593 per
gallon. Last year, prices were
above $4 at this time, accord-
ing to AAA and the Oil Price
Information Service.

In other Nymex trading, gaso-
line for August delivery slid by
9.9 cents to settle at $1.6333 a
gallon and heating oil lost about
6.2 cents to $1.5386. Natural gas
for August delivery fell 6.7 cents
to $3.362 per 1,000 cubic feet.

In London, Brent prices shed
$2.02 to $61.21 a barrel on the
ICE Futures exchange.

¢ Associated Press writers
Eileen Ng in Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia, and George Jahn in
Vienna contributed to this report

TST

a ULAR
Wey

aa eT
Insight on
Monilays



THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 5B

Society of Trust & Estate
5 T E P Practitioners (Bahamas)

The Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners

STEP BAHAMAS BRANCH

Invites applications for a scholarship for one module of the STEP Diploma program in

International Trust Management

Applicants should meet the following entena-

Fi

# Bahamian citizen

‘oundation Certificate or have been officially exempted from the

Foundation Certificate Proeram

* Currently employed in the trust industry or seeking a career 1n the trust industry

Application forms should be obtained from STEP Bahamas at its administrative office below, and

submutted together with the following:

Proof of Bahamian citizenship (certified copy passport]
¢ Current resume detailing employment history and career

aspirations

# Details of any other funding sources

Completed applications should be submitted ‘delivered to -

STEP Bahamas

(roodman’s Bay Corporate Centre, First Floor
P.O). Box N-17i4

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 323-6612

Deadline for applications is July 31, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

ment memorandum for Cable
Bahamas $40 million preference
share issue, parts of which have
been seen by Tribune Business,
indicates the company believes
the buy-out of its 30.2 per cent
controlling foreign sharehold-
er, Columbus Communications,
will ease its path to expanding
into new telecoms markets via
both new licences and the
acquisition of other operators.

The latter is an indication that
Cable Bahamas is likely to
revive its attempts to acquire
Systems Resource Group
(SRG), parent company of Indi-
Go Networks, the only existing
rival fixed-line telecoms oper-
ator to the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC).

Tribune Business previously
revealed that Cable Bahamas
attempted to execute the pur-
chase option, which allows it to
acquire either a portion of or
all of SRG’s issued share capi-
tal, in 2007, but the Govern-
ment and Central Bank refused
to give approval for the deal -
largely, it is believed, to protect
the declining value of BTC.

Cable Bahamas’ audited
financial statements for 2008
show it has invested some
$4.244 million in attempting to
acquire SRG to date. And its
preference share offering docu-
ment said the removal of
Columbus Communications’
foreign ownership would allow
it to “more freely pursue local
acquisitions”.

It added: “By virtue of being
fully Bahamian-owned, the
company will not need to seek
approvals from the Bahamas
Central Bank for acquisitions.
The ability to act quickly on
opportunities in a liberalising
environment would allow Cable
Bahamas to retain strategic
agility that will fuel future
growth.”

And, while BTC might
acquire a cable TV/video
licence to enable it to compete
directly with Cable Bahamas in
a liberalised market, post-pri-
vatisation, the BISX-listed util-
ity provider’s management were
“confident that Cable
Bahamas will be granted a voice
licence”.

“This entry into the voice
market should be facilitated by
Cable Bahamas being fully
Bahamian owned, with a large
equity stake held by the Gov-
ernment,” the offering docu-
ment added.

That is a reference to the fact
that the National Insurance
Board (NIB) presently owns
15.4 per cent of Cable Bahamas,
with the Treasury owning a fur-

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 7B

Cable ‘confident’
on voice licence

ther 5.1 per cent.

“The company anticipates
being granted licences for new
products (i.e. telephony) which
can be rolled out very quickly
and, given the level of penetra-
tion of basic cable and Internet
service subscribers within its
network, should be rapidly
absorbed as a result of the value
proposition of a triple-play to
subscribers,” Cable Bahamas’
offering document said.

As for its 15-year exclusive
cable TV licence, which expires
in October 2009, Cable
Bahamas’ offering document
said it had been advised by the
minister responsible for cable
television “that the Govern-
ment is prepared to renew the
cable television licence, albeit
on different terms that are cur-
rently in place and with the loss
of exclusivity”.

The company added that
renewal of the cable TV licence,
although not 100 per cent cer-
tain, was of “high probability”
because it was the only compa-
ny that had the infrastructure
to provide such services in the
Bahamas, having invested $230
million in building its network
infrastructure over the last 15
years.

The high costs associated with
infrastructure build-out, and
creating a rival network, acted
as a major barrier to entry for
any rivals planning to enter the
Bahamian cable TV market,
Cable Bahamas added, sound-
ing a confident note about
maintaining its dominant mar-
ket position.

There was, Cable Bahamas
said, “the lack of a viable alter-

native” operator, and if the
Government declined to renew
its licence it could still provide
services in Freeport, where it
was licensed by the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA).

“Tt is difficult to imagine a
scenario where a significant por-
tion of the population are made
to forego television, while those
in Freeport have full access to
it,” the Cable Bahamas offer-
ing document said.

“Neither satellite, not BTC,
can provide a viable alternative
as there is no legal/licensed
satellite provider footprint, pro-
gramme offerings are poor, and
the telephone company has cur-
rently no licence or infrastruc-
ture to provide these services.”

On the issue of an increase
in the basic cable TV rate, the
private placement rationale said
the $30 charge had existed since
Cable Bahamas began provid-
ing services in 1994, yet the
package’s channel line-up had
increased by 67 per cent, going
from 36 to 54 channels. And,
correspondingly, signal fees,
utility costs and other factors of
production had increased.

Cable Bahamas had recently
incurred a $0.5 million signal
fee increase as a result of agree-
ments with the likes of MTV,
Oxygen, Disney and BET, and
the offering document said:
“The company believes that a
mild rate increase over the next
three years will not significant-
ly impact subscribers, and will
allow the company to continue
to augment its channel line-up
with in-demand programming
and enhanced features.”

NOTICE OF SALE

The Rawson Court

Condominium

Owners Association is

offering, pursuant to Registered Charges ;
ribed condominiwn units, and the px

OMpany Pursu: on PI

ed in the Law of Property &

the Condominium Management

and the other pro
Conveyancing (Combon

Unit (03
inet Cele
Unit (ih

All oti

to the offices of:

3 Bedroom / 3 4 Bathroom
3 Bedroom /3 Bathroom
3 Bedroom {3 Bathroom

should be in writing and tendered in seuled envelopes

Cedric L. Parker & Co,
Neil's Comrt
No. 9 Risiy Bethel Detve
Po Bow Wel o5t
Nassau, Bohan
Attention: Miss AUP. Fermander

The Bahamas National Trust

Past, Present and Future

Thoughts from the 1958 Exuma Expedition Leader

Special Presentation:

G. Carleton Ray, PhD. Research Professor
Department of Environmental Sciences
University of Virginia

Date: Wednesday, July 15
Time: 7:00 pm SHARP!
Prace: Nassau Yacht Club, East Bay Street

BNT and NYC members FREE
General Public $2

For more information call: 393-1317
Email: bnt@bnt.bs ¢ www.bnt.bs


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



TERMINAL, from 1B
Investments Board,” the min-
ister said.

There had been some contact
between the two sides and the
Government already, Mr
Cartwright indicated, confirm-
ing that World Point had
already been in discussions with
BAIC over extending the lease
that expires in 2019.

Mr Cartwright added that the
Government normally gave
lease extensions, which in South

LEGAL, from 3B

SMF 003

Where a SMART Fund was
operating as an Exempt Fund
under the repealed Mutual Funds
Act (for example, the equity
interests were held by not more
than 15 investors, the majority of
whom were able to appoint or
remove the operator of the fund),
it must now be licensed as an
SMF 003 Fund but may continue
to carry on business as an exempt
fund for the prescribed time peri-
od (extensions may be approved
and authorised by the Commis-
sion) in the Act.

SMF 004

Where there are no more than
five investors and the investment
fund operates as a private invest-
ment company, the investment
fund may be licensed as an SMF
004 (e.g. family business)
















WE'VE MOVED

Riding Point’s case covers 763
acres - 155 acres on land, the
rest being the sea bed and off-
shore jetty - for 21 years. How-
ever, it could modify this for
shorter or longer periods.
“The acquisition is a strate-
gic move which supports Sta-
toilHydro’s global growth ambi-
tion. It will strengthen Statoil-
Hydro’s marketing and trading
position in North America by
securing the full terminal capac-
ity,” says Jon A Jacobsen, exec-
utive vice president for manu-

It should noted that there are
other funds which are defined
under the Act, such as the Self-
administered Fund, which is an
investment fund administered by
its own operators performing the
functions of the investment fund
administrator. These funds are
recognised as regulated invest-
ment funds and are required to
hold an investment fund license
or be registered with the Com-
mission.

A Dormant Fund is an invest-
ment fund that ceases trading and
liquidates its assets without for-
mally liquidating its structure.
Such a fund must notify the Com-
mission within 14 days of becom-
ing a dormant investment fund.
A Dormant Fund may re-launch
its operations within one year
from the date that it becomes dor-
mant, and such period can be
extended by the Commission for

Ln i Lit

facturing and marketing.

“StatoilHydro’s objective is
to upgrade the terminal to allow
for blending of all types of
crude oils, including heavy oils,”
he continues.

Deal

Statoil’s deal also includes
World Point’s 50 per cent inter-
est in the Grand Bahama-based
tug business, Freepoint, which
has 42 employees. In 2008, the
company’s six tugs handled 95

a total period not exceeding 18
months.

Under the regulations, an
investment fund must appoint
one or more persons as custodi-
ans of the assets of the invest-
ment fund, unless the operators
certify in writing that the structure
of the investment fund or the
nature of the assets are such that
they do not require a custodian to
be appointed to hold the assets
of the investment fund. However,
the Commission does have the
power to determine whether an
investment fund is required to
appoint a custodian.

The custodian of an investment
fund must be independent of the
operator and administrator,
unless a specific exemption is
received from the licensor or they
are deemed independent pur-
suant to the tegulations. They
must be one of the following:

Bae Lamour and CO.

Mount Royal Avenue and Kenwood Street

Tel: 326-0126/7












Fax:326-0128

Email: bazardlaw @ gmail.com
lamourlaw @ gmail.com



















DOCTORS HOSPITAL

bh)

1. em

7 ee

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES

SPEAKER:

Dr. Madlene Sawyer

Perinatology Obstetrics Gynecology

Purpose:

THIS MONTHS TOPIC:
Women’s Health

LECTURE DATE

Thursday, July 16th‘09 @ 6PM
Doctors Hospital Conference Room
RSVP « Seating is Limited « 302-4603

Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues

affecting society today.

LECTURE SERIES

To educate the public about
the important health issues,
presented by distinguished

physicians,

Womens Health
Dr. Madelene Sawyer

per cent of the traffic at the
Freeport Container Port.

StatoilHydro’s involvement
in the Bahamian market began
in May this year, when it
announced its joint venture with
BPC Ltd to operate three off-
shore oil exploration licences in
the south-western Bahamas. Ms
Torp, though, said the South
Riding Point acquisition had no
connection to this.

The reason for World Point’s
decision to sell is unclear,
although the company yester-

* A bank and trust company
licensed by the Central Bank of
the Bahamas

* A financial institution in a
prescribed jurisdiction

* Such other person as
approved by the Commission

With regard to auditors, under
the Act auditors must be
approved by the Commission and
must satisfy the Commission that
they are members of the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants in good standing, or
members in good standing of an
international accounting body
prescribed by the Commission.

The Act also outlines certain
duties of the investment fund
administrator, which include, but
are not limited to:

* Ensuring that the investment
fund does not carry on or attempt
to carry on business contrary to
the provisions of the Act, and that
the operations of the investment
fund are carried on in accordance
with the provisions of the Offer-
ing Memorandum and other con-
stitutive documents (Memoran-
dum and Articles of Association,
Administration Agreement,
Investment Management Agree-
ment)

* Ensuring that the investment
fund does not in any way carry
on business in a manner that may
be prejudicial to the holders of
equity interests or the creditors

CABLE, from 1B
that.

While Columbus Communi-
cations will no longer have an
equity interest in Cable
Bahamas once the transaction is
completed, it will still have a
relationship with the latter via a
management services agree-
ment with the company.

According to the Cable
Bahamas offering document, it
appears that the management
fees Columbus Communica-
tions will earn will be more than
the $1.429 million in dividends it
received from the BISX-listed
company in 2008.

Columbus will receive a flat
annual fee of $1.4 million, plus
an incentive fee based on
achieving a targeted percentage
of Cable Bahamas’ operating
income. Yet the performance
fee is capped at 80 per cent of

SHOW YOUR SUPPORT

day referred to a “restructur-
ing” that was taking place. The
company invested last year in
adding two new storage tanks,
with a combined extra 1.5 mil-
lion barrels of storage space, at
South Riding Point, expanding
its capacity by 29 per cent.

For 2008, South Riding
Point’s revenues rose by 25 per
cent or $4.432 million over 2007,
with fourth quarter revenues of
$8.469 million up 91 per cent
year-over-year. And Freepoint’s
revenues were ahead by

of the investment fund

* Reporting to the Commission
on an ongoing basis and as
required by the Act

* Maintaining the books and
preparing financial reports of the
investment fund, ensuring that
audited financial statements of
the investment funds are sent to
investors within four months of
the financial year.

The Act also gives the Com-
mission more extensive powers
of regulation, enforcement and
compliance, which include:

* The power to conduct on-site
and off-site examinations of the
business of investment funds, and
parties related to investment
funds, on a regular basis

* The power to instruct any
investment fund to have its
accounts audited at any time, and
to submit its audited financial
statements to the Commission
within a specified period

* The power to revoke the
license and registration of an
investment fund where the invest-
ment fund has ceased to carry on
its business, or if the investment
fund becomes insolvent or goes
into liquidation or is wound up
or otherwise dissolved.

* The power to conduct regu-
latory hearings and to impose

the base fee, meaning the max-
imum this will be in any one
year is $1.12 million. As a result,
the maximum Columbus Com-
munications can earn is $2.52
million.

Outlining its fundamentals,
Cable Bahamas said its infra-
structure passed 90 per cent of
all homes in the Bahamas, with
cable TV subscriber and Inter-
net subscriber penetration
standing at 75 per cent and 45
per cent respectively as at end-
2008.

The $40 million preference
share issue, which is likely to
be listed on the Bahamas Inter-
national Securities Exchange
(BISX) once completed, is
scheduled to close in three-and-
a-half weeks time on July 31,
2009. The $40 million prefer-
ence share issue includes a $20
million US dollar component,

$350,000 or 14 per cent com-
pared to 2007, with fourth quar-
ter revenues up 37 per cent or
$815,000.

The Statoil deal is thus the
second acquisition of a Grand
Bahama-based oil storage ter-
minal within two years, the
combination of private equity
firm First Reserve and VOPAK
having purchased the BORCO
terminal from PDVSA, the
state-owned oil firm of
Venezuela, for around $900 mil-
lion in 2008.

sanctions, remedies or other relief
as a result of the settlement of a
dispute.

With regard to some of the fees
charged for investment funds, the
initial application fee for a licence
is B$750 for a Standard, Profes-
sional and SMART Fund. The
annual licence fee for such funds
is B$950, payable in the first year
and pro-rated from the date of
licensing to December 31 of that
year. The annual license fee for
Self-administered Funds is
B$1,000, payable in the first year
and pro-rated from the date of
licensing to December 31 of that
year. The annual fee for a Recog-
nised Foreign Fund is B$100.

Copyright 2009. Tyrone L. E.
Fitzgerald. All rights reserved.

NB: The information contained
in this article does not constitute
nor is it a substitute for legal
advice. Persons reading this arti-
cle and/or column, generally, are
encouraged to seek the relevant
legal advice and assistance regard-
ing issues that may affect them
and may relate to the informa-
tion presented.

Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an
attorney with Fitzgerald &
Fitzgerald. Should you have any
comments regarding this article,
you may contact Mr Fitzgerald at
Suite 212, Lagoon Court Build-
ing, Olde Towne Mall at Sandy-
port, West Bay St., P.O. Box CB-
11173, Nassau, Bahamas or at
tyrone@tlefitzgeraldgroup.com.

and a $20 million Bahamian
dollar one. Investors will have
the option to convert those pref-
erence shares into ordinary
Cable Bahamas shares after two
years, with the preference
shares paying an interest rate
of 8 per cent. The preference
share issue is a private place-
ment targeted at invited
investors only, so members of
the Bahamian public should not
apply to become involved.

Cable Bahamas is also financ-
ing the transaction with a $105
million syndicated loan put
together by Royal Bank of
Canada, FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas) and
Scotiabank, a portion of which
will be used to refinance the
company’s existing $60 million
debt and credit facilities, plus
pay transaction costs and fund
working capital.

ha

for the National Park System of The Bahamas
and join us as we Celebrate our 50th Anniversary
with a Cool Early Morning

Fun RuNn/WALK

and help Keep ‘em flocking

Screenings:

Get your Free Blood
Pressure, Cholesterol, and
Glucose testing between

Spm & fp.

Arthritis
Dr. Vincent Nwosa

RSVP:
To ensure available seating
Phone: 302-4603

Obesity in Children
Dr. Brian Humblestone

Breast Cancer
Dr, Theodore Turnquest

* DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Pieater Pow ae

Date: July 18th Time: 6:00 AM

Flamingo Route: Starting at the Retreat Gardens North on Village Aged, then
West onte Shirley Street, North ote Church Street (St.
Matthews Church), crossing anto the "New" Paradise Island
Bridge, over to Paradise Beach Drive, East to the traffic
circle, rotating to The "Old" Pl. Bridge. East onto East Bay
Street, passing Montague Beach then South onto Village
Road ending at The Retreat Gardens.

Green Turtle Route: Starting at the Retreat Gardens North on Village Ros, then
West onto Shirley Street, North oate Church Street (St.
Matthies Church), East onte East Bay Street pass
Montague Beach then South onte Village Road ending at
The Retreat Gardens

Healthy refreshments and souse available for sale afterwards.

Wear comfortable walking shoes. * Bring a water bottle and hand towel,


THE TRIBUNE



A global look ||
at economic
developments

@ By The Associated Press

A look at economic develop-
ments and stock market activity
around the world Wednesday:

World leaders on
global economy

L’AQUILA, Italy — World
leaders agreed that the global
economy is too shaky to begin
rolling back massive fiscal stim-
ulus plans right now, according
to a draft of the Group of Eight
statement on the world econo-
my obtained by The Associated
Press. The leaders said in the
draft that they “note some signs
of stabilization” but continued
to stress the difficult outlook
instead of concerns over debt
and high spending.

Oil recovery to
“08 levels will take
another four years

VIENNA — Demand for
OPEC crude has fallen so
sharply because of the world
recession that it will take anoth-
er four years to recover to 2008
levels, the 12-nation oil pro-
ducers’ organisation predicted.

The Organisation of the
Petroleum Exporting Countries
said there was decline in the
world’s appetite for oil because
of falling industrial production
and related developments.

Japan’s core
machinery orders
fall in May

TOKYO — Japan’s core
machinery orders, a closely
watched indicator of corporate
capital spending, fell unexpect-
edly in May amid uncertain
prospects for a global econom-
ic recovery.

In Asian markets, Japan’s
benchmark Nikkei 225 stock
average tumbled 227.04 points,
or 2.4 per cent, to 9,420.75 — its
sixth consecutive decline and its
lowest close in six weeks. The
yen rose to a five-month high
against the dollar.

Elsewhere, Hong Kong’s
Hang Seng index dropped 0.8
per cent to 17,721.07, while
South Korea’s Kospi lost 0.2 per
cent to 1,431.02. Mainland Chi-
na’s Shanghai Composite index
slipped 0.3 per cent, and Aus-
tralia’s key stock measure was
flat.

Industrial production
in Germany rises
3.7% in May

FRANKFURT — Industrial
production in Germany rose 3.7
per cent in May, the Economy
Ministry said, and the country
now appears to be over the
worst of the crisis.

Meanwhile, government pro-
jections showed the country will
take until 2013 to comply with a
European Union-mandated
budget deficit limit as it runs up
public debt totaling euro509 bil-
lion to counter the recession.

Separately, official figures





The Tribune

confirmed that ouput in the 16
countries that use the euro
shrank 2.5 per cent in the first
quarter of 2009 from the previ-
ous three month period. The
recession is sapping the indus-
trial exports that the euro zone
relies on for growth.

In European markets, the
FTSE 100 index of leading
British shares closed down 1.1
per cent at 4,140.23, while
France’s CAC-40 fell 1.3 per
cent to 3,009.71. Germany’s
DAX lost 0.6 per cent to finish
at 4,572.65.

IMF raises ‘09
growth forecast

BEIJING — The Interna-
tional Monetary Fund raised its
2009 growth forecast for Asia’s
developing economies to 5.5 per
cent from 4.8 per cent.

Separately, Chinese bank
lending in June more than dou-
bled from the previous month
as Beijing’s stimulus drove a
surge in credit. The country’s
banks lent 1.5 trillion yuan
($220 billion) in June, the cen-
tral bank said, up from May and
April. Economists see the jump
in lending as a sign of a nascent
economic revival as Beijing tries
to shield China from the global
slump with four trillion yuan
($586 billion) in stimulus spend-
ing.

Consumer confidence
in UK rises in June

LONDON — Consumer con-
fidence in the United Kingdom
rose in June as more people
said they expected better times
by the end of the year, a bank
said, but a drop in a closely
watched house price survey
tempered optimism about a
recovery.

Separately, Britain’s govern-
ment proposed giving new pow-
ers to financial regulators,
improving coordination among
agencies and toughening penal-
ties for misconduct.

Singapore bank bans
some of island’s biggest
financial institutions
from selling structured
notes

SINGAPORE — Singapore’s
central bank banned some of
the island’s biggest financial
institutions from selling struc-
tured notes after they improp-
erly marketed $367 million of
the bonds that were linked to
collapsed bank Lehman Broth-
ers Holdings Inc.

The Paris Club of
creditor nations says

it has canceled $62.73m
of debt owed by Haiti

PARIS — The Paris Club of
creditor nations said it has can-
celed $62.73 million of debt it is
owed by Haiti and that further
bilateral agreements have
cleared the Caribbean nation’s
remaining debt to individual
club members.

SEL

AAMT LO Tete ann



THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 9B

rnco PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

June 2009

Contact Numbers 393-2004

HOUSES

L 434. Jacaranda Subdivision, MP

2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Siee: 11,527 ay

Hinliding Sen= 1,079 a8

Appraised valve; 5220,000 10

Travel south from the eound-aboor, where West Bay Seeci
and JFE. Derive, (west of Airport and north of Lydond Cay) to
the first ooad on the bef the eatrance in Jacaranda Subdivision.
Tale a lett at the T-junction. then the first right onto Jacaranda
court. The subject property is the last on the maght painted

white tim blue

Pano of Land Rioener Senect Fea Hill, HF,
Single Family Resdilense
OH Bedroom, (1) Bacher
tla Sized ul ag

ding, Sine | O14 ag

Appraised Walue: $115,000

From Fos Hall Road tom onic Romer Street (Church Cf God
Prophecy aad Fea Hill Comunity Contre junction) travel
east easton Pomer Street to the third Gomer on the right
irae] south oy the fiverth hoese on the beR whech is af a dead
edd The subject isa split hevel peidlenc: peated oe ara
Primed white ath w tiked entrance peti

Lot}S006, Sir Linden Pindling Esuates, MP
Sirs Fray Presi dence
3 Bedroom, * Bathroom
Fra Size: 500 soft
il ding Snr 1,053 ak
Appraised Waluc: 5] 4,001

Front Chomles Saunders Highwey cater Sar Lipacken Pind leg
Fale: and fore! goth on Lady Manguorie Pondbiig Averee
fo the second! ameet.on the lefijLouren Street} towel east on
Lauren street to the second comer on left (Pear Tree Avene:
Travel north on Pear Tree Avenue to the sebject, the fifieert
Property om the left. The subject is lime green tome white.

Let¥ 1, Dioris Johmaon Estates.

Single Family Poesidence

TRealrcets, 7 Redheecers

Property Sine: 5,065 og,fl

Hindi Sox 1,684 ag 8

Appraised Value: $100,443.00

From Gladkione Bead travel ead along Rocky Pine Road for
approximately 144. feet and tem bef on Dame Dore:

dove then 2rd left and the subject property is the third from
onTEer

LeeS3 75/76 Sir Lyraken Pirelling Estas, 6.P
Sanale Farvely Rudence

4 Hetikonns, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: Pan

Building Sox. nr

Appraised Walue: $161 (HUE

From East Street & Bamboo Doulevard (south beach Police
Station) travel east on Hamboo Boslevard tn the cound-ahoet
oonlinus Leraghing caehwant on CW Sanders Hackway ake
the cocond right. Lady Margene Pandligg Avenue, thes
take the Great bef, Lauren Srest and the subject property ic
the shateench bot on che eka.

Lot#42, Prodale Subdivision, MP.
Singk: Family Poesidence

J Dedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Sime: 43529 so fl
Bunchng Sane: 1,247 yh
Appraised Waluc: 71 J0ML00

Fron Fis, Hill iced! ail Berard Riteel, revel wee on
Herein Rood, naboe the frest lett Fos Derve then the chieed eight
Sparrow Lane and the sebject property is the last om dhe lett

Lot? 278 Pratt: Close Subdivision, NP
Single Furnily Besidence

4- Bedrooms, 2 - Bathrooms

Property Size: 542

Bunliing Sane: 1,220

Appraised Waluc: $750,500 1

Frome (anmchae! and Caokdes bikes Rows travel seth Wy the
the fest comer on the onmer on the left aad the mubeject
property is the 7th cm te wighe, beloe trim wile.

Lot Maloatm Rice Fai
Single Family Pbesidence

2 Hetbooms, 2 Bathroom:
Proporty Size: 4,000 sail
Bunkikng San Bel) ay
Appraised valix= 129 000,001

From East Street South - avel cast along Maden Road
aad tem right-on Winder Termace to the tirst road on the
left contiaue for about 3M) fund the subject property is on
the lett.

Single Family Residence

Loi, Fairew Subdivision

} Renate, 7 Palheeoers

Property See 6,950 cy tt

Busi ing Stee: 28 ag ft

Agprased Walae:$ 168 000

Poem Carmichael Rood & Ancgea Street, tovel sount on
Aatigua Street, tom right a the T-Janction, St. Vincent Road,
then take the second left ie Par View Heaghis, Shaereen
Avenue, then Grst right, Sharon Court, and che

subject property is the firs! om the left

Loe JAE Team Heights Subveion, MP
Single Family Resleace
4~ Hevbenens, 2 Haheerres
BE ty Sine: 125 ag. ft
ing Sine: M2 sq. ft
Agprsed Value: $255, $03 (Hi
Prom Prisce Charles Decree terec] south along Tryna Aver
and the subpect property is the hon the rigiri after the firs
comer on Ube right

Lot 1695 Pinewood Gasdens

Single Fearnily Rewdeace
1~ Hedbooms - 7 Bathrooms

ae Sane: 5,010) a
ing Steer 1523 29 -f
Appraised Value: $163,701 04

From Pigeon Mom Avenue - tavel west along Walnut Street
eraa-over Hay Geranium Avveaue and the subpaa property
i the Jed property on the lefl,

Loival, HIkeg phase? |, Faith Cmndens
Single Fermily Residence

4 Bedeooms. 2 Hatheooms

Pr Sao: 6/000 2g ft

fluniting Sime: 2H sqft

Apporsed Value: $295,675.10)

From the tealfie light af Faith Avenue & Cow Fen Roel, travel
eval along Faith Avernee: bo the critancr: be Foath Candens;
fann left and qnetliaoe bo the beat "7" jonctae, crn right snd
The sujet panpeerty is the 1 ch oe the night

Single Fermily emdeace
Lotti, Tropical Gardens
2 Dednoms, | Detheoon
Property size: 717 sq.ft
Feumihing Siew: 1,106 sag. fh
Apporced Valec$154 390,00

Travel west on Wiest Bary Siren te dhe fiest real on the len
afer passing Travelers Rest Resonant, Windsor Drive, revel
south te the secoad road en the right, Hollyhech

tveing west, the subject pempeny b situated om the second
comer on the left called Pansy Court

Loti. Golden Gales Estates?

Single Family Resdeace

(3) Bedineerre, (2) Palhooseres

Preparty Sen: 6/0000 cay tt

Baring Siac: 180 ag fi

Agprased Value: $207,000

Travel mea on Carmichael Road from Bloc Hill oad tem
onto the thind left Golden Sun Drive the comer afier
Suliosgory's sunglican Church and before Carmichael Primary
School travel south on Sun Drove to the first, trevve! west pass
fhe second comer on the night and the sebyect doerth property
on the night. The sebject is peated white brimmed white

Lot ef? Jen Sorect, LE, Conger Sulla neiaane, PF
Single Family Resuleace
2 Hedrons, 2 Hatheonns
p ty Same: 6,061 29 ft

ing sire: 1, 15h 09
Apprased Value: $250,M0(H)
Foom Prince Charles Deter, tum into Jean Streci brevee! narih
on Jean Steet to PLE. ‘Cooper sabdivisage pentinve directly
into. E, Cooper Subiivision and the subject the ninth
property on the beh. House ie while wimmned pron

Lot Crokdes dane: 82, Subalivcion, 4.P
Single Family Residence
4 Bedrooms, 2 Batheooms
Sane: 600 oy ft

ding Sine: | WH) sq.ft
Appraised Valor: $158,500.04)
Freom Carmichael Roc & Antes Street (Coliken Corie
Asscniblicg Church) travel] south oo Arttiguss Stecct and
The suibjce! propeetty i the: sort Dol cet he etch peel dee Firat
comer an the night

Lois, Frelia, Subdivision, WP
Single Family Beadence



Bedrooms, ? Bathrooms
Property Sitec: $000) on &
Building Stag: 1270 9.0
Appeaiaal Value $197,000.00

From Faith Aeeniue and Fire Trail eat on Filth Awenue,
follow the curwe around to the right | niraaiely (L608 a
toile ext of Pah Avenue take the first left into Prelia
Subdivision, thea the fies right and the subject property ts
the Last lots om the right.

Lot!) 24 Bel-Air Estates, MP.
Sage Family Residence

3 Readiris, I Recicaens
Prequerty: Sta sianan
Buikding Sine: 949 uy. fl
Appoaized Value ietocune

Prom Carmichael Rood aed Faith Avenue trevel casi on
Cannichael Road tedce the first right [euane Wey thes the
fourth ngat, Harbour Close. and the subgect property is the
third om tar bet

Lom) 6, Fete, Newey Gast North, 6P,

Single Family Residesce

) Bedrooms, 2 Bachronens

Property Sine 6088 a

Building Sie: 2398 og. ft

Appraised Value £551,215.00

Travel cast on Proce Charles Dire; tum left nic Massa
East Moria; trereel north bo the firs! comer on fae right and
the subjedt @ the socom property on fhe eR oo Northwest
Comer. The seboa is panntal green and terrence groan;
hogact 16

Lot situated northerside of Victoria Set & Lancaster Ra.
[vanhoe Subdivision, MP

4 Bedrooms, } Bathrooms - Single Family Residence

F y Sto 12651 59-f1

Building Stee: 5396 qf

Appraisal Value: $46,695.00

From Miaaey Sire anal Windsor Aad [by Wendy's
Fisher!) ave] easton Windsor Arve tise the soond ef in
Viewer Real, Gen the fest right whieh i Laseeser Hoed, the
subject property is the first on the left on the comer,

Loot le?, Taynam Hephis Subdivision
Richends Dean

Single Family Residence

5 Baatroom, 3 Bedroom

Progeerty Sitea> E00 say

BuiklingSiae: 2,553 ca fl

Appeal Viloe $307,000.00

Travel Exel on Prisee Clarkes diver: to the comer cast td bape
Walee Winton fom right and the sudject is the second boise
ao lett The subject is panied lime green and ommed
while.

Lot susie aporocimate by 70 ft westuard of Florida Court
Single Fastily Residence:

4 Radrooms, 2 Rathore

Property Sites 60000 aa

Buiklieg Size: 1,750 s9.ft

Appaaised Valor $227,000.00

Travel east on Balfour Avenue tothe fies rigit (Florida Court)
from Florida Court take the first right onto a 10 wide road
reservation and ike sudject @ de second house on the let
while Himmed prev.

Lity44 55 Sir Lerdes Pandliag Estes

Single Family Ressdence:

2 Badr, 2 Autre

Property Sues 3479 9 ot

Building size: 922 sq.

Appraised value-.14445)H)

From the round-about at Pinewood dr. travel cast on Charles
W Saunders Higteray onto Lady Marguerite Pindling Avenue;
travel sooth on Lady Margucnie Pindling

Awvtmue onto Lauren Sect, trove cast of Lauren Steet and
the subject property is the mpcany-cighr (78) propery on the
left. (paieted lime green and cremescd white)

LoctiAl, Victoria digsders, 6P.
Single farily Residence
2 Bedrooms, | Bexhroom

7 Stone 6 O0KE sa
Bui ing Sire: 816.5) mil
Appraisal Value &15), 62000

From J, F, Eermedy Drive travel south along Ghelstene Ad

fal take the (rel earn: on et (former Ciladsiene Farml,

continue acres the inemection end contiou: in the T juscion;
tem bet, then anotier bef ond the subject property ts the tth
on the raght

VACANT LAND

Let J - CB Wi of Blue Hill Heights

Proparty Sise: 43,560 at

Appraised Wale: 5250/0010

From Alue Hill Bead end Iedependene Highoaw west along
Tonique Willian Dorling Highway and tom leftom Premiers
Avenue (Farily Guardia on comer); continee along Poomier's
Avenue [nto * Estate ond turn right on dhe fest col-de-
a the subject property is directly ahead through 2 track

Loieid, Lower Ager Elegthera

Waetsant [ial

Property Sive: 0, TH2 sy

Appraised Value: 346,000.00

Travel westaurd on Skevline and Norhward Bay Street

the subject is the first vacant land after Save More Crnug
Store on ihe ight hand sade

Lot! 23) West Winds Subdivision. NF
Vacant Land

Peopurty Sec 14320 598

Approcel Valac $275,400.00

Travel weston weal Bliny Sonset and arn into Wet Wirwk:
pass socUrty pete and continue tT" junction. Tum lett and
eontinuc arund bend to neat bendicurve end dhe subject
Property is about 3,000 feet from bend on lett

Lot 152 West Winds Subdivision, MP
Vacant Land
Poeporty Sexe: 9775 sy fh

Appromcd Vale: $135 00000

Frere dhe (nlerscction of West Bay Sicet and Fernando Road
(Cianibier hip weal alone West Hay Sted and aim
left om the Ist unpaved gravel roadstake 2nd lett after poss
security gate chen left again ond the subject property is the
Tth on the lest, on the coree (bend).

Lot HOA, West of Mangold Road & South of Hanna Road
Vacant Land
Pooperty Sane: bb 107 sy JF



Appraisal Valu: 140,000 1

Lot 145 South Seas Subdivision

Vacast Land

Property Sine 7,067 sy

Appraised Val oe $45,000.00

Poor Canrichse! Pioad imree! south along Miller Road (Hacandi
Boag) and urn left into Sonthers Sees Dieter; pass dirough
security pate and tum right al 2nd Comer (Eastwood Drive)
continue to the'T Junction and the subject property is tbe Ind
on the rgb fren the T Junction,

Lio 85, Garden Cates Eswates 32, WP

Vacaal Land

Property Sine 4,754 2g

Appmized Valox S520)

Trevel west on Carmichael Ad fom Blue Hill Rd to the first
roedeay on the lett named Guadeloupe Rd. Travel o the end
of Quadeleepe Road. the lot on the Northwest cone,

APARTMENTS/CONDOMINIUMS

Lott) Gamble Heights

Triples Apartment

L- | Bed, | Bath, / 2 2 Bedrooms, | Bathroom:
Property Size: 7,750 sg.

Bulking Sen: 2,760 ay A

Appraised Value ‘S206, 000000

Fron Hie Hill Read & Fart Uoied Way, rowel eet on
Fetth Undied Way and the subject property is on the mgt
hand side, 2000 feet cast of Faith th United Carch and oppasite

a heary equipment depot.

Loi, Hillcrest Tower Condominiom, 4p.

Condominiem

2 Hetkeom, 2 Bathrooms

Unit Sive: 1,110 aq.

Appraissd Value: 20.0040

Teavel sou on Collin Avenue to Third Tersace ror. west on

Gir termace and the sabpect 6 oortained within the second

building on the night whoch is. a condomiaiem comples. The

pare =a subject compiles is painted lime green
in ‘winte.

Le" DP sites in Mairn Sebelivisare

Duples Townline Aparinicnt

Fach wah 2 Bedmem, | Bathroom

Property Size: 5541 sql

Buolding Sore 1,210 ag

Appraised Walue: $250,027 00

From Faith Avenve trvvel wed along Cow Pen Road and tum
Tight.on the 2ad comer, continue amg the road reservation
to the 44 property on the left.

Loe l2, Seawell Manor Sablivigios, WP
Tepes Apertnest
Eack Wait with 2 Bedroceta, | Bathirocen
ae Size: 6410 agit
ding Soe 1,47
Appraised Value: $197,565.00)
From Canmichael Rid. tavel north along Gladstone Road and
tum on Ge second comer on the neht: continue eT acto

ad torn Lefl; take befl take another lefl and the subject property
© Ge 5th on the lef.

Lott, Dik), Millers Heights Subdivision, MP
Duplex Aparineat

1-2 Bebo, | Bathroom

1-2 Beaberaenrs, 2 1/T Beathrroens

Peeperty Sex 7,510) say ft

Busiding Siac | 444 gt

Agprased Vale: [9444.00

Prom Carmichael Rood ravelling west, cum left onto Ext
Avenue, trevel south on Bast Avenue to the first comer on
the right travel north thereon to the fies: comer on the lef
(Margaret Avene) continee on Melansired Aver pes the first:
intersection and the subgect i: the fiflh property on the right
Painted mustard termed peach

La] ] Kaol Winds Sohdivisen, WLP
2 Soorey § Plex Apartment
All oni are | Hecbeom, | Bathroom
Sy oa Sire: DOG 2g it
ding Sie: 3.237 59
Agprased Value: $429, 720,HI
Feom the intersection of Foo Hill Road and Joe Farmngion

Rival trerve] soak on Fea Hall Rid, tale the: first qortacr on [hay
Fight and the subject 18 the second property on the lel,

Lot East Windsor Place Seldker Road

Duplex A
2. (2) Hatt oa
Hunding Se 1580

haere Valor: $172 400K)

Travel East on Sokdier Rood to the intersection near Sugar
Kall Barat: Pood Stone tora right and treree] 0p the ered of this
We aries (he (ETSeelen a) dhe Gir Nord el add the
subyect bs the Tear property on the left, which ts adoplex, The
@uplen is recently paumied Bee and inimened white with
enclosed fencing.

Lot Rocky pine Road

Duplex Apartnes

Each Lisit 2 Bedrooms, | Bathroom
Peepurty Senc 4475 ay fl

Fasting Star: 1,7)659.1)

Appoized Value §208,000,00

From Carmichael Road -trvel norik along Gladsione Eboad
lo Rocky Pine Foad tum night and continue to the third comer,
fem right and continu: for about |4GE feet and die eubject
property on the igitenckeesd with a chain link fee),

Loot Perion of James Howe ean
ben opartraent

Bach with 2 bedrooms, | baihrosm
ae Tacs

IMding Sie: | 303 sq.ft
Appraised Valor: $147, 48).00
From the: trafite light a1 the inlersndion of Com Pen and Blu:
Hill Roads, travel south ahioag Biloe Hill Rival and tum mph

On the Gra ial; the sabgent property is the ener Lot on the:
len.

Property situated 330 fect soeth Adelaide & Con) Harbour
Drapes Apartment

| «2 Bedrooms, 7 Batheoom, |» | Bedroom, | Bath
Property Sine: §, 690 oy &

Building Sise: 200 sq. fi

Appraisal Value 5295,043,00

Travel along Canmichec! Resad to the rank ecertapad
ee onto Ade lede Read nom lett a che fewrth comer which
is amewly paved eatrance road; continue south on this road
and the sobject is the serenth howse on the left split kere!
yellow trimmed white.

Lott 1b 1) Bk 45 Nassau Village Subdivision
Moli Family Resadence

Deples

Lint | -2 Bedrooms | Ratheson

Lint 2-3 Bedinoom 2 Butirenns

Progeerty See 2,000 a 5

Building Size: 216 sq.ft

Appraised Valoe: 826,714.00

From Soldier Road travel south along Taylor Saeet {entrance
ino Nossa Village, continuc across Abenandria Houbreard
and toon bef onto Laxton Avene, Shenoright on Jackson
Senet and fhe subject peoperty is abou! 275 feet on the bef.

(Cireen trim wkile

We providing financing to qualified buyers

CONTACT INFORMATION

RBC Royal Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO Loans Collection Centre



Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada
â„¢The Lion & Gloke sanbol and REC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada

RBC
FIM
PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





IMF: Global economy
starts slow recovery

B By CHRISTOPHER S
RUGABER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The global economy is begin-
ning a sluggish recovery from
its worst recession since World
War II, the International Mon-
etary Fund said Wednesday.

The IMF increased its esti-



mate for global economic
growth in 2010 to 2.5 per cent,
from an April projection of 1.9
per cent. At the same time, it
slightly downgraded its forecast
for this year to a contraction of
1.4 per cent, from 1.3 per cent.

“The global economy is still
in recession, but we’re inching
towards the recovery,” said
Olivier Blanchard, director of

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MANAGUA S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)












Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

















Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)






Legal Notice

NOTICE
JACSONNY HILLS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

the IMF’s research department.
“It’s much too early” to cut
back on government and cen-
tral bank efforts to stimulate
growth, he said.

Even growth of 2.5 per cent
won't be enough to keep global
unemployment from growing
next year, he added.

Financial conditions have
improved faster than the IMF
expected when it made its pre-
vious global forecast in April,
the fund said, largely due to
government support for banks
and other financial companies.

Much of the global recovery
will be driven by emerging
economies such as China and
India, the IMF said. China’s
economy is expected to grow
by 8.5 per cent in 2010, a full
point higher than previously
forecast. India is expected to

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



grow 6.5 per cent next year, 0.9
percentage points higher that
the previous forecast.

Advanced economies such as
the United States, Europe and
Japan, meanwhile, aren’t
expected to show sustained
growth until the second half of
next year, the IMF said.

Central banks that still have
room to cut interest rates should
do so, the IMF said, and gov-
ernments should continue to
stimulate their economies
through 2010 with measures
such as greater spending or tax
cuts.

At a news conference, Blan-
chard declined to comment
specifically on whether the Oba-
ma administration should con-
sider a second stimulus pack-
age, as some members of Con-
gress are beginning to advocate.

But he said consumer
demand could “be very weak
for longer than we anticipate,”
in which case government stim-
ulus should continue.

At the same time, the United
States and other advanced
economies should take steps to
limit future government spend-
ing on programmes such as
health care and retirement secu-
rity, he said, to reassure finan-
cial markets.

The IMF expects the US
economy to shrink by 2.6 per
cent this year, a slight improve-
ment from its earlier estimate
of a 2.8 per cent decline and in

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW BRIDGEPORT CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

line with many private forecasts.

The US will grow 0.8 per cent
in 2010, the IMF said, up from
its expectation in April of no
growth.

Separately, President Barack
Obama and group of world
leaders meeting in Italy agreed
that the global economy is too
unstable to begin rolling back
massive fiscal stimulus plans,
according to a draft statement
obtained by The Associated
Press.

The IMF provides loans and
other assistance to troubled

IN THE SUPREME COURT

Bahamas.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS §=2009/CLE/gen/qui/850

Common Law & Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF all that piece parcel or lot of land
comprising 719.77 acres situate on the Eastern side of the
Queenis Highway in the Settlement of Taits in the Island of
Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
AND
IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Veronica C. Miller (nee Major)

NOTICE

countries and has 186 member
nations. It saw its influence
decline earlier this decade as
developing country economies
boomed due to higher oil and
other commodity prices.

But the worldwide recession
has caused countries in Eastern
Europe and elsewhere to turn
to the fund for loans to support
their crippled economies.

Last month, at the behest of
the Obama administration,
Congress agreed to set aside $5
billion to secure a $108 billion
US line of credit for the IMF.

The Petition of VERONICA C. MILLER (nee Major) of
Taits, Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas in respect of:-

“ALL that piece parcel or lot of land situate on the Eastern
Side of the Queen’s Highway in the Settlement of Taits,
Long Island comprising 719.77 acres and which said
parcel of land is bounded on the NORTHWEST by a
loose stone wall separating it from other portions of the
original Grant to the Earl of Dunmore said to be the

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

property of Samuel Carroll and Nathan Major and running
thereon Eight thousand One hundred and Eight (8,108)
feet more or less on the NORTHEAST by the Atlantic
Ocean and running thereon in several courses Five
thousand and Seventy-one (5,071) feet more or less on

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KTLA FINES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

TO: Ms. Carla Johnson

No. 52B Churchill Road

South Bahamia

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Kindly remove your personal property from the above-
mentioned address, failure to do $0 within seven (7)

the SOUTHEAST by a loose stone wall separating it
from land originally granted to James Rose now said to
be the property of Timothy Darville and Ermest Dean and
running thereon Nine thousand Eight hundred and Thirty-
two (9,832) feet more or less on the SOUTHWEST by
land said to be the property of Emily Major and running
thereon Five hundred and Ninety-three and Forty-four
hundredths (593.44) feet on the NORTHWEST by land
said to be the property of Theresa Major and running
thereon Three hundred and Thirty-seven and Forty-nine
(337.49) feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property of
the said Theresa Major and running thereon Four hundred
and Seventy-eight and Twenty-two hundredths (478.22)
feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property of Melvin
Major and running thereon One thousand Five hundred
and Three and Ninety-two hundredths (1,503.92) feet
and by a Twenty (20) foot road reservation leading to the
Queen’s Highway, on the NORTHWEST by the property
of William Mortimer and running thereon Three hundred
and Thirty-five and Eighty-seven hundredths (335.87)
feet and on the SOUTHWEST by the property of the
said William Mortimer and running thereon Eight hundred
and Thirty-five and Eighty-one hundredths feet (835.81)
and which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position
shape marks boundaries and dimensions as are shown on

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is

Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

days from the date of this notice will result in the
removal of your personal property from the above-
mentioned address, without further notice to you, The
owners shall not be liable for any loss and/or damage
occasioned to your personal property after the expiry

outlined in Pink.

the plan filed herein and recorded in the Department of
Lands and Surveys and Plan “296 L.I” and thereon

VERONICA C. MILLER (nee Major) claims to be the

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GARETA ALPS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of June 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

of this notice,

DATED the 30th day of June, 2009.
THE OWRERS
No. 32, Churchill Road
South Bahamia
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORADELL GROVES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



owner in fee simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme
Court in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section
3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have her title to the
said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said
Act.

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours in the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the said City
of Nassau;

(b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes,
Mareva House, 4 George Street in the City of Nassau,
Attorneys for the Petitioner; and

(c) The office of the Administrator at Clarence Town,
Long Island.

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower or a
right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the 14th day of September,
2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed
form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of
any such person to file and serve a statement of his claim
on or before the said 14th day of September, 2009 will
operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Mareva House
George Street
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner




THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 11B



Stricter labelling urged for bottled water

@ By EMILY FREDRIX

AP Food Industry Writer

CONSUMERS know less
about the water they pay dear-
ly for in bottles than what they
can drink almost for free from
the tap because the two are reg-
ulated differently, congression-
al investigators and nonprofit
researchers say in new reports.

Both the Government
Accountability Office and the
Environmental Working
Group, a nonprofit research and
advocacy organisation, recom-
mend in reports released
Wednesday that bottled water
be labeled with the same level
of information municipal water
providers must disclose.

The researchers urged Amer-
icans to make bottled water “a
distant second choice” to fil-
tered tap water because there
isn’t enough information about
bottled water. The working
group recommends purifying
tap water with a commercial fil-
ter, however.

Both reports were released
at a congressional subcommit-
tee Wednesday morning.

Bottled water — an industry
worth about $16 billion in sales
last year — has been suffering
lately as colleges, communities
and some governments take
measures to limit or ban its con-
sumption. As employers, they
are motivated by cost savings
and environmental concern
because the bottles often are
not recycled.

Bottled water sales were
growing by double-digit per-
centages for years and were
helping buoy the US beverage
industry overall. But they were
flat last year, according to trade
publication Beverage Digest.

Beverage Digest editor John
Sicher said some consumers are
turning on the tap during the
recession simply because it’s
cheaper.

From 1997 to 2007, the
amount of bottled water con-
sumed per person in the US
more than doubled, from 13.4
gallons to 29.3 gallons, the
GAO report said.

The issue before a subcom-
mittee of the Energy and Com-
merce Committee was less
about waste and water quality
concerns and more about the
mechanics of regulating bottled
water.

As a food product, bottled
water is regulated by the Food
and Drug Administration and
required to show nutrition
information and ingredients on
its labels. Municipal water is
under the control of the Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency.

The two agencies have similar
standards for water quality, but
the FDA has less authority to
enforce them, the GAO said,
and the environmental agency
requires much more testing.

Subcommittee chairman Rep.



IN THIS June 3, 2008, file photo, Liberty Valley Elementary School kindergarten student Tianna Swisher moves
into an arc of water for a drink at the fountain at Montour Preserve, near Washingtonville, Pa. , while classmate

Eli Zakarian awaits his turn...

Bart Stupak, D-Mich., said the
subcommittee was requesting
information Wednesday from a
dozen bottled water companies
on their water sources, treat-
ment methods and two years’
results of contaminant testing. It
was not immediately clear
which companies were being
contacted.

“Consumers may not realize
that many regulations that apply
to municipalities responsible for
tap water do not apply to com-
panies that produce bottled
water,” he said in statements

opening the hearing.

The GAO noted the FDA
has yet to set standards for
DEHP, one of several chemi-
cals known as phthalates that
are found in many household
products, while the EPA limits
the presence of phthalates in
tap water.

In a survey of officials in all
50 states and the District of
Columbia, the GAO found they
think consumers are misin-
formed about bottled water.

“Many replied that con-
sumers often believe that bot-

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

Probate Side

IN THE ESTATE OF RUPERT A.R. CULMER,
late of No. 3 Imperial Park,

in the Eastern District of New

Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any
claim or demand against the above Estate are required to
send the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned
on or before the 20th August, 2009 after which date the
Executrix will proceed to distribute the assets having

regard only to the claims of which she shall then have had
notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

JOSEPH C. LEDEE
Chambers
Suite No. 6, Grosvenor Close
Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Executrix

(July 9, 16, 23)

tA



NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS MORTGAGE CORPORATION
TENDER FOR GROUP HAZARD INSURANCE

The Bahamas Mortgage Corporation is inviting proposals
from insurance companies for the provision of hazard
insurance coverage to contractors and homeowners of
properties mortgaged to the Corporation.

The proposal should be for a three year period ist

(AP Photo: Bill Hughes)

tled water is safer or healthier
than tap water,” according to
the GAO report.

The Washington, D.C.-based

Environmental Working Group
said in its report that consumers
do not get enough information
to determine which water is best
for them.

Both groups said some bot-
tled water brands include the
same information required of
tap water providers on either
labels or company Web sites.

The GAO called for more
research but said the FDA
should start by requiring that
bottled water labels tell con-
sumers where to find out more.

Community water systems
must distribute annual reports
about their water’s source, con-
taminants and possible health
concerns.

Consumers should know
where all their water comes
from, how it is treated and what
is found in it, said Richard
Wiles, senior vice president for
policy and communications for
the Environmental Working
Group.

“Tf the municipal tap water
systems can tell their customers
this information, you would
think that bottled water com-
panies that charge 1,000 times
more for this water could also

let consumers know the same
thing,” he told The Associated
Press.

The bottled water industry’s
trade group, the International
Bottled Water Association,
planned to testify Wednesday
that the product, — subject to
the same regulation as other
soft drinks, teas, juices and oth-
er beverages — is safe. Addi-
tional standards apply for bot-
tled water products labeled as
“purified water” or “spring
water,” among other labels,
because they must prove a con-
nection to those sources,
according to planned testimo-
ny from Joseph Doss, president
and chief executive of the Inter-
national Bottled Water Associ-
ation.

Doss said consumers can
learn about bottled water by
contacting the company, read-
ing its Web site and visiting sites
run by state governments.

State safeguards for bottled
water often exceed the federal,
though they are less stringent
than for tap water, the GAO
wrote. The trade group declined
to comment on the reports
before they are released.

















































Varane bat #147
(10,55 754. Pr - Minin eens

Or & Rary Wet Lane

Southern Heigets Sub
[Appraised Vale
$90,000.00)

Unit #8 (409sq. F<
(1) Bedroom
ting, dintng room &
icitchene West Bay St
Westward Villas Soh

Bonner Agpuar one nice
(Appraised Vales
$125,000.00)

Lat (5o°x100")
wf Gullding 1,4 124q. ft
Deweaus St [Appraised
Value $1399.000.00)

Lats 429 & #30,

{S0'n 100°), Bik #47
w/building 1,140sq. ft
Matthew St, Nata
Vilbge (Appraised
Value $145,000.00)

Lat #5 EG
(150'x100') whee
Silver Palm Lia lmperial
Park (Apprabed Valuc
5313, 650,00)

Lat #135 [50°90]
wile 134238q, -
Sonfower [south]
Sunshine Park Sub Hse
f& [Appraised Value
$175,000.00)

Lat #11 (10T x00}
wihse Z.026sy. -Sunset
Radge Or, Surset Ridge
Sub Hee #28 (Appraised
Valuc $206.000.00)

Aiilros

Beach from lor 9,O008q
Pt wbuilding 2,100
ft=Pinders tangrovwe
Cay Andros (Appralsed
Value $200,000.00)
Lat 434-454) fh, wyiduplex
truilcling, 1,174aq, M-
Presh Creek, Arcl rie
(Appraised Value
604 oOo)

Toman Hahei

Bike, Section #2-Sea
Gull Dr, Bahama Reet
Yacht & Country Club
Suh Grand Bahama
[Appraised Valine
$250,000.10)

Vacant lot 49, Blk #49
(14,59 7sq. ft]-
Yorkshire Dr, Bahama
West Replat Gram

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK

Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
P.O.Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Telz(242) 327-5780/327-3793-6
Fan:(242) 327-3047, 327-1238
www. bahamasdevelopmenthank.com

rttl

Bahama (Appraised
Value $25 000,00)

L2. Vacant Lot #6 Blk #12

Unit #3 [112 50sq. &.]
Henny Ave Derby Sub
Grand Baha
(Appraised Value
$65,000.00)

LS. Lotm’s 6 [100 x1)

whe & Duplex:sMelson
Ri Poinclana Gardens
Grarwi Bahai
(Appraised Value
$96,000.00}

14. Lot #37 [50%<1 50°)

Wi Sioplex 2storey
apartrecet building &
Church 54006q, f-
Martin Town, Kites Suh
Eight Mile Rock Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $211,200.00)
Lot wf 10 mam hore!
5,0G0ey. fh, on 4.99
acres af beach front-
High Berk Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value £1, 100,000.00)

16, Wacant lot #13, Blk #59

Unit #3 [22.7 52eq. 8)
45° of canal fren
Dagenham Circle &
Ingrave Or Emerald Bay
Sub Grind Bahama
(Appraised Value
$110,000.00)

Lot #15, Bik #15 Unit
#3 (90°125']-Derby
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$2300 0)

Wacant kat #25, Blk #15
(17.866eq. f.]

Cobwater Ln Shannon
Country Chab Sub Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Valus $28,000.00)

19, Lope? (20,0009. )

wi building Gomplex &
coin Laundromat-
Queens Highway
Holmes Rock
Comioanage Crane
Bahantia (Appraised
Value $176,600,00)]
Absco

M0. Lot Add E (6 500sq. fe.)

wi triples foundation
2,728 ey. tt.-Murphy
Town Abacos

(Appraised Value
$24,096.00)

21 Vacant lot 6 [2 acres)

Pox Town fibaco
(Appraised Value
S50, b0G00)

22 Lor #51 [15,000seq tt.)

wi buikding-M orphy
Town Abaco
(Appraised Value
S102 42000)

2% Poethen af lor #69

(15 ,/0080ey. fh. -Prane Sa
Murphy Town Abaco
(Appraised Value
$29,250.00]

Loc #35 [6,900sq, ft]

Ww bik ing-M arpa
Tenn Abe t
(Appraised Value
$82,075.00)

25 Lot 45 [60's 160")

wi 14 poem teotel
S0008q, M-Sandy Point
Abec (Appraised
Value $405,700.00)
Lot 87 120sy. Pr w 4
cottages & 1 store
huthdiing: total
4,1 féaq, t-Sand Ranke
Treasure Cay Aleeon
(Appraised Value
S00 50800)
Eleuthera
Vacant portion of lot #7
(50's. LO" pees paames
Cistenn Bleuthera
(Appraised Value
S18, 000]
Cae (bana
Vacant 6&5 acres of
land-Arthirs Tien, Car
[shend (Appraised
Value $90,000.00)
Lot w/l2 room mobel
1.39 actes-s/irtour
Town Cat balare
(Appraised Value
$630 10000)

30. Vacant bot #6 [65200sq

th |-Mogs Town Exuima
(Appraised Value
$110,188.00)

TL Lot (30,4005 Pep wy
somal el 4520
& exclusive beac
Forbes HII Eauma
(Appraised Valac
$1,400, 000,00)

EY. Vacant lot #95.
(00'«122"] Commodore
Red Blixabeth Harbcar
Est. Eximea (Auppsraised
Value $45,000.00)

a. Lat #194 (7 S65")
abun storey bik ling
George Town, Exuma
[Appraised Value

september, 2009 to 31st August, 2012.

$460, P00 00)
ASSETS
Wessels
20° (15) Roboks Vessel wl 15 HP Evinrede engin
974) Seacram Veasel wf 140 HP Yaraha engine
?) Hatters Veese] (MY Buddy)

VWohicles
(1) 03 Dextge Caravan
(1) 96 Ford Eagqiorer
(1) 97 Dodge Strabes
Fiberglass Sports Vessel (Hull Only) [2101 Kitchen Tandem Cheroker Trailer

Companies interested in submitting a proposal may collect
an information package from The Bahamas Mortgage as (2) 80 KinBus 12Seater
. } 7 . } 7 Diese engine (Saree Qharkoane (1) 99 Pard F256 wk
Corporation’s Head Office, Russell Road, Oakes Field, Sexe Stel all 1960) MV is re (197 Dai Ade Mak Dap Trac
rei ri Sradtord Mi wnat iiehers . as ee Ford ce Tr i
Nassau, Bahamas. sc :1 (Sweet Dreauns) [1] 89 Ford LADOG Drill Truck

ender Vessel (Queen Vashei| (1) 92 Mack Teck (Carmichael Rd]

i imemed to submit Seabed bids marked “Tender” to Bahamas Development Be
2s attention Finacial Controller, faced bids will mot be accepted of tele
Linfortmatios, Pleas note that all boon the aferenionnioned properties and aiets f
uly 17, 2009. The Bahamas Developancmt Bank reserves Che right to reject any or all offers. All assets

ome 32

ay
ehicai led ba Pinte

The deadline for collection of the information package is
Friday, July 09, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. aresoldasts.


PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





TST

For the stories
WaT Ru

aa eT
ME
Monilays

@ By KIMBERLY HEFLING
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Projects in some of the nation’s



MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
PORT DEPARTMENT
GOVERNMENT NOTICE
INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting tenders
for the following contracted service for the Port De-
partment, Ministry of The Environment.

¢ The Cleaning of Prince George Dock

Interested parties may obtain further information,
and may collect the bidding document as of July 6
2009 from:

The Port Department
Prince George Dock
Nassau, The Bahamas
Telephone Number 322-8832

between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Mon-
day through Friday.

Tenders are to be submitted in Triplicate (3) in a
sealed envelope(s) maked “Tender For Cleaning of
Prince George Dock” addressed to:

The Chairman
Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas

no later than 5:00 p.m. on July 14, 2009.
Tenders will be opened at 10:00 a.m. on July 15,

2009 at the Office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of
Finance.

THE GOVERNMENT RESERVES THE
RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL TENDERS.



poorest areas don’t appear to
be getting a fair shake in the
spending of $787 billion in stim-
ulus funds, the chairman of the
House oversight committee said
Wednesday.

Rep. Edolphus Towns, D-
N.Y., chairman of the panel,
said he was particularly con-
cerned that transportation pro-
jects in economically distressed
areas were being left out —
even though they are supposed
to be a priority.

“There is a substantial varia-
tion among states as to what
constitutes an economically dis-
tressed area,” Towns said. “For
this reason, it is unclear whether
Recovery Act funds are going
where they are needed most.”

Towns comments came in
response to a Government
Accountability Office report
released Wednesday at a hear-
ing before his committee.

The GAO said about half the

“For this reason,
it is unclear
whether Recovery
Act funds are going
where they are

needed most.”
— Edolpbus Towns

money set aside for road and
bridge repairs is being used to
repave highways rather than
building new infrastructure.
And state officials aren’t steer-
ing the money toward counties
that need jobs the most, audi-
tors found.

The Obama administration
intended for the stimulus to
jump-start the economy, build
new schools and usher in an era

of education reform. But gov-
ernment auditors said many
states are setting aside grand
plans to stay afloat.

The GAO said the stimulus is
keeping teachers off the unem-
ployment lines, helping states
make greater Medicaid pay-
ments and providing a desper-
ately needed cushion to state
budgets.

But investigators found
repeated examples in which,
either out of desperation or con-
venience, states favored short-
term spending over long-term
efforts such as education
reform.

In Flint, Mich., for example,
new schools haven’t been built
in 30 years but the school super-
intendent told auditors he
would use federal money to
cope with budget deficits rather
than building new schools or

US states using stimulus
money to remain afloat

paying for early childhood edu-
cation.

The 400-page stimulus
includes provisions for long-
term growth, such as high-speed
rail and energy efficiency, but
their effects will be seen later.

Since Obama signed the stim-
ulus bill in February, the econ-
omy has shed more than two
million jobs. Unemployment
now stands at 9.5 per cent, the
highest in more than a quarter
century.

Robert L Nabors II, deputy
director of the Office of Man-
agement and Budget, testified
that 150,000 jobs had been cre-
ated from stimulus spending.
With the stimulus spending, he
said the nation is moving down
the right path.

“We are making progress, but
we still have a long way to go,”
Nabors said.

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in
Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.



SECRESEEE SEER ES SEEEEEEEE SE ECEEE EEE EERE EERE E EEEE EEE SE BEES 8

‘ce Neer
Oe (Gle))a a tae





$7

French Beans



Patty Pan Squash

$6"

Sugar Snap Peas

$6%

Snow Peas





Baby Zucchini



$13â„¢

Cittero Rosemary Ham
1 lh



$6"

_ SikLive Soy Vanilla Yoourt
32 OF.



$7"
Simply Gourmet also has in
a wide array of specilaty
and the finest selection of caviar
available in Nassau

Call 393-0905 or visit us at our store
on the corner of Shirley St. & Kemp Rd.
in the Fine Image Building
to find out more

$7

Sunburst Squash

TEC PRR LEER RTT E RR TEER RTE ERT TERETE ERT TERRE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/0873
Equity Side

IN THE MATTER of All that parcel of land
containing 5 Acres situate to the North North East
of The Settlement of Cherokee Sound, Abaco.

AND
IN THE MATTER ofThe Quieting Titles Act 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Charles Earl Bethel

NOTICE

The Petition of Charles Earl Bethel formerly of
Cherokee Sound, Abaco one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and now a resident
of the State of New York one of the United States
ofAmerica in respect of:-

ALL THAT parcel of land comprising Five (5)
Actes situate to the Northnortheast of the Settlement
of Cherokee Sound in the Island of Abaco one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
and which said parcel of land is bounded on the
NORTHEAST and NORTH by vacant Crown
Land and running thereon One thousand Six
hundred and Seventy-eight and Seventy-one
hundredths (1,678.71) feet on the EAST by vacant
Crown Land and running thereon One hundred
and Thirty-two (132) feet more or less on the
SOUTH and SOUTHWEST by the Sea and
running thereon One thousand Eight hundred and
Thirteen (1,813) feet more or less and on the
NORTHWEST by Grant B-87 and running
thereon One hundred and Thirty-two (132) feet
more or less and which said piece parcel or lot of
land has such position shape marks boundaries
and dimensions as are shown on the diagram or
plan filed in this matter Being Plan No.1879 AB
and is delineated on that part of the plan which is
coloured PINK.

Charles Earl Bethel claims to be the owner in fee
simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and has made application to the
Supreme Court in the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas under Section 3 of The Quieting Titles
Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title
to be granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act.

A plan of the said land may be inspected during
normal office hours in the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the
said City of Nassau;

(b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, Mareva House, 4 George Street
in the City of Nassau, Attorneys for the
Petitioner; and

(c) The office of the Administrator at Sandy
Point, Abaco.

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower
or a right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim
not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the
14th day of September, 2009 file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned
a statement of his claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure
of any such person to file and serve a statement of
his claim on or before the said 14th day of September,
2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for the Petitioner
Mareva House
4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE



THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST



>

TAMPA
High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 77° F/25°C

@ ¢
KEY WEST

High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 82° F/28° C

ORLANDO |
High: 89° F/32°C
Low: 72° F/22°C



Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

High

F/C

Albuquerque 93/33
Anchorage 77/25
Atlanta 85/29
Atlantic City 80/26
Baltimore 82/27
Boston 68/20
Buffalo 74/23
Charleston, SC 85/29
Chicago 82/27
Cleveland 82/27
Dallas 102/38
Denver 90/32
Detroit 80/26
Honolulu 88/31
Houston 98/36

Today

Low

F/C
68/20
57/13
68/20
59/15
62/16
56/13
60/15
69/20
69/20
62/16
78/25
61/16
63/17
75/23
76/24

Ww

High

F/C
93/33
76/24
86/30
78/25
80/26
73/22
78/25
85/29
87/30
85/29
102/38
97/36
85/29
88/31
98/36

Friday

Low

F/C
70/21
58/14
69/20
62/16
64/17
60/15
65/18
70/21
67/19
70/21
78/25
60/15
67/19
76/24
77/25

Ww

s
pce
pe
s
s
s
pe
t
t
pe
s
t
t
pe
s

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York



A full day of Clear. Bright and sunny.
sunshine.

. High: 90°
High: 92° Low: 82° Low: 81°
PETE
118° F | _108°-88° F

ae

i.

Clouds and sun, a
shower possible.

High: 89°
Low: 80°

100°-85° F

=

Partly sunny, a

t-storm possible.
High: 90°
Low: 79°
103°-82° F

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and

SN eT ee oi

INSURANCE M

AGEMENT



Mostly sunny with a

shower possible.

elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

@ WEST PALM BEACH
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 77° F/25°C

FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 91° F/33° C Qa
Low: 80° F/27°C

@
MIAMI
High: 93° F/34°C

Low: 79° F/26° C

<



High
F/C
88/31
87/30
96/35
102/38
96/35
82/27
838/31
95/35
93/33
82/27
92/33
90/32
76/24

Oklahoma City 101/38

Orlando

89/31

FT

Today

Low

F/C
66/18
70/21
74/23
78/25
72/22
62/16
68/20
75/23
79/26
66/18
68/20
76/24
63/17
75/23
72/22

Ww

High

F/C
89/31
87/30
92/33
105/40
94/34
84/28
92/33
96/35
92/33
83/28
92/33
92/33
79/26
104/40
91/32

Friday

Low

F/C
71/21
71/21
78/25
84/28
74/23
64/17
72/22
77/25
79/26
63/17
70/21
74/23
66/18
72/22
73/22

FREEPORT
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 77° F/25°C

ABACO
High: 92° F/33° C

NASSAU

Low:81°F/27°C

0

Temperature

Normal high ....

Normal low
Last year's high
Last year's low
Precipitation

As of 2 p.m. yesterday .o.....ccccccccccccetseeceneee 0.00"
Year to date a
Normal year to date

AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by

ELEUTHERA

High: 95° F/35° C
Low: 79° F/26° C

High: 92° F/33° C

Low: 82° F/28° C
&

i

ANDROS
High: 98° F/37° C
Low: 80° F/27°C

W High

F/C
t Philadelphia 82/27
t Phoenix 105/40
pe Pittsburgh 80/26
$ Portland, OR 77/25
s Raleigh-Durham 88/31
pc St. Louis 92/33
S Salt Lake City 89/31
s San Antonio 102/38
t San Diego 75/23
pc San Francisco 69/20
s Seattle 74/23
t Tallahassee 90/32
s Tampa 88/31
Ss Tucson 100/37
t Washington, DC 82/27

Today

Low

F/C
64/17
85/29
59/15
55/12
64/17
73/22
63/17
78/25
67/19
54/12
53/11
70/21
77/25
77/25
65/18

Ww

pe
s
s
pe
pe
s
s
s
pe
pe
pe
t
t
pe
pe

GREAT EXUMA

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 80° F/27° C

Friday

High Low
F/C F/C
83/28 66/18
108/42 38/31
86/30 65/18
86/30 59/15
88/31 66/18
95/35 75/23
90/32 66/18
100/37 76/24
77/25 67/19
68/20 55/12
78/25 57/13
89/31 72/22
91/32 76/24
102/38 78/25
82/27 68/20

Ww

Ss

pe

pe

nn

pe
pe

wn

on eo

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday





High: 88°
Low: 81° a ES)
AccuWeather RealFeel
96°-88° F High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht. (ft.
Tod 9:50am. 24 3:48am. 0.1
wv 10:09pm. 27 348pm. 02
Frid 10:26am. 24 F28am. 04
mV 10:43pm. 26 4:27pm. 03
Saturd 11:08am. 25 4:57am. 0.2
ay 419 pm. 26 5:08pm. 03
91° F/33° C 1142 25. 531 02
5 3 Sunday : a.m. fi : a.m. .
80° F/27° C : .
88° F/31° C 11:57pm. 25 5:50pm. 04
75° F/24° C
sore c AIT)
81° F/27° C
Sunrise...... 6:27 am. Moonrise .... 9:41 p.m.
Sunset....... 8:03 p.m. Moonset..... 8:17 a.m.
New

2

o|1|2

LOW

Last



Jul. 15



MODERATE

3|4[5|





7|8|9f1

HIGH |



\. HIGH

A] INDEX NY

wv
| 0
EXT.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

greater the need for eye and skin protection.

AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul. 21
CATISLAND
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 74° F/23°C
a SAN SALVADOR
High: 93° F/24° C
Low: 76° F/24° C
LONGISLAND
High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 75° F/24°C
ow: MAYAGUANA

High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 73° F/23°C

CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS

RAGGED ISLAND
High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 72° F/22° C

High: 95° F/35° C
Low: 76° F/24°C

GREAT INAGUA .

High: 94° F/34°C
Low: 76° F/24°C

wo

Jul. 28

First







Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
64/17
91/32
94/34
55/12
90/32
86/30
81/27
95/35
86/30
83/28
67/19
82/27
64/17
66/18
81/27
55/12
100/37
94/34
60/15
91/32
80/26
81/27
67/19
63/17
66/18
70/21
68/20
93/33
66/18
91/32
108/42
91/32
84/28
64/17
89/31
72/22
68/20
90/32
85/29
79/26
104/40
75/23
74/23
68/20
76/24
104/40
66/18
68/20
68/20
82/27
102/38
81/27
90/32
64/17
84/28
61/16
90/32
73/22
79/26
68/20
63/17
93/33
84/28
73/22
79/26
70/21
75/23
68/20
73/22

fi

Today

Low
F/C
77/25
54/12
57/13
73/22
42/5
79/26
77/25
65/18
72/22
77/25
62/16
52/11
77/25
45/7
50/10
61/16
39/3
74/23
84/28
39/3
77/25
71/21
64/17
55/12
43/8
50/10
52/11
48/8
5/28
54/12
81/27
83/28
77/25
63/17
41/5
79/26
59/15
52/11
63/17
77/25
54/12
75/23
57/13
63/17
46/7
53/11
86/30
54/12
52/11
52/11
69/20
80/26
61/16
79/26
32/0
70/21
34/1
73/22
60/15
68/20
SoZ
45/7
79/26
73/22
64/17
64/17
56/13
57/13
52/11
58/14

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MARINE FORECAST

—> &

<>

oO

nn
— —

= NO

pc
pc
sh
t

High
F/C
88/31
63/17
90/32
92/33
56/13
91/32
86/30
72/22
97/36
82/27
82/27
68/20
82/27
67/19
64/17
75/23
55/12
102/38
94/34
68/20
91/32
80/26
79/26
63/17
64/17
68/20
69/20
72/22
91/32
66/18
91/32
107/41
90/32
86/30
66/18
89/31
71/21
72/22
91/32
85/29
74/23
100/37
81/27
77/25
65/18
78/25
102/38
69/20
72/22
68/20
82/27
104/40
81/27
88/31
51/10
86/30
57/13
86/30
72/22
86/30
68/20
63/17
93/33
84/28
79/26
86/30
74/23
72/22
72/22
71/21

Friday

Low
F/C
75/23
54/12
59/15
73/22
43/6
78/25
77/25
66/18
75/23
77/25
63/17
52/11
77/25
42/5
54/12
59/15
39/3
78/25
85/29
48/8
75/23
71/21
61/16
56/13
50/10
50/10
49/9
52/11
72/22
55/12
81/27
85/29
74/23
65/18
40/4
79/26
60/15
54/12
64/17
78/25
51/10
75/23
64/17
57/13
48/8
52/11
86/30
54/12
52/11
51/10
70/21
80/26
59/15
79/26
23/-5
74/23
34/1
73/22
62/16
70/21
54/12
45/7
77/25
73/22
64/17
66/18
59/15
55/12
54/12
48/8

—™ toa fee + tee ee ie
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nn
=

nw
=> he

nT Nn
S23

z= TM FTT]DTTMH AA N
oa >

pe
pe
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c

pe
pe
pc
pe
pe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SSE at 8-16 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
Friday: SE at 8-26 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 8-16 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Friday: SE at 8-16 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
ABACO Today: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Friday: $ at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

\VosyAngeles,

82/62

Showers
[XX] T-storms

Rain
*_* Flurries
pe] Snow

[y_y] Ice

-10s









a Billings
81/54

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Miami
93/79

Fronts
Cold

War Mliieilienll,

Stationary Menguaii

Os (0s | 10s 20s [S0s]) 40s 50s 60s 70s sos /S0s(//iO0ST/Aiiel

lO a GANS lem SN PslOheUh | Gis

. ‘Yo
Away

Or you can rest easy knowing

that yo

Gan Bs

Blown

ulTicane

have excellent insurance

rage no matter which
he wind

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

way

blows.

3 needs panene| weperae sot


PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

ra}

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Call 866-957-2276

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«ID


The Tribune 0o"""”
OBMUARIES
RELIGION



| -< The Tribune
a OLT | tty Arcee My Meowspaper!

—‘\ ene
» \0
707.9

SS hour chaice for ine family:
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

(O ard of Thanks for the late

Millied Sohnien Bowe

Suly 10th, 1930 - October Ith, 2008

We,the Family of Mildred Johnson Bowe would like to
extend our sincere thanks to all for your kind, gracious
expressions of ee assuring words, prayers,
visitations, telephone calls, floral arrangements and
other =ympatieue gestures shown to us during our
time of bereavement.

May the Lord bless and keep you and show his
gracious favour upon you.

We The Family

WS:
Neville E:. Cartwright
of Chicago and formerly, of Cartwright’s Long
Island will be held at St. Thomas More Church
on Madeira Street, Palmdale on
Saturday July 11, 2009 at 11 a.m.






ia Officiating will be Rev. Msgr. Alfred C. Culmer
“4 _assisted_by_Deacon_Dennis_Mackey.

eae a = mmr —a






THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Sean Ernest Munroe
igth March 1965 - 11th July 2008

“Like a comet blazing ‘cross the
evening sky
Gone too soon

Sean, we miss your smiling face, your
warm and tender embrace,
We are eternally grateful for the love
and care you've shown us
The times we've shared are all
pleasant memories.

Sean, you went away from us too soon
Our hearts still ache, we miss you so
sleep on Sean and take your rest
We'll always love and cherish you
Jesus loves you best

Like the loss of sunlight

on a cloudy afternoon
Gone too soon

Cherished memories are held by
Earilee, his wife; Mateo his son;
Mary Munroe his devoted mother;
sisters, Lisa Hall, Chantal Munroe
and Deborah Johnson; brothers,
Richard and Pastor Stephen Munroe;
nieces and nephews, uncles and
aunts; numerous cousins, in-law,
co-workers and friends


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES TEURSDE Ts JULY 9, e002;

Card of Thanks

URBAN SINCLAIR | of

‘*Frenchie”’ . nM mother, orandmotths Lt
MILLER JR. great grandmother

24th May 1952 - 2008

, PAGE 3

We the Miller family wish to express heartfelt gratitude
and appreciation to all of you who conveyed condolences
to us during our time of bereavement. |

We are grateful for the many telephone calls, prayers,
words of encouragement, well wishes and for every
kind gesture shown to us during our time of sorrow,

Special thanks to the doctors and nurses at P.M.H. and
the entire family at National Insurance Board.

~ The Family ~

Mrs. Ellen R. Knowles

June 197] - July 2007

We continue to be inspired when
we remember her

STRENGTH...Facing the trials of life but always
with her head held high.

INDEPENDENCE...Standing proudly on her own
with her hand in God's hand.

WISDOM...Reaching for the unbelievable and
striving for the undeniable.

GRATITUDE... Appreciating always the smallest
acts of human generosity.

With love and gratitude in our hearts forever: Ena and
Henry Major, Colleen Adderley, Olivia and Lockhart
Turnquest, Thelma and Thomas Dean, Elma and Robert
Carraway, Harriet and Clyde Pratt; grandchildren and
oreat-grandchildren.




PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

; Bishop Donald
Sweeting

22nd Sept. 1934 - July 13th, 2006

Don't grieve for me, for now I'm free | Be not burdened with times of sorrow.
I'm following the path God laid for ave, J with pow the sunshine of tomer,
took His hone when f heard him call; |
J termed my back ane lef? it oll : My life's been full, I savored mach;
: Grad friends, good tanes, a loved anes
T canld ant stay anether day, : fanch.
To lavgh, to love, to work or ploy,
Tasks left wadowe most stay thot way; | Perhaps my sre seers off foo brief;
I found that ploce at the close of day. Dont leagiies if now with wade pref,
; Lift up your heart and share with me,
ff ary parting hag left a reid, Cod wine? mie and ke ser me free.
Then fill if with remembered jor |
A friendship shared, a laugh, ao kiss;
AA yes, these things, I tec will miss, 3

Gone but not forgotten

~ The Family ~

The family of the late MICHAEL DEWEES SWEETING would like to express thanks to
the many persons who offered care during the latter years of his life, and especially
to lage whe made Lhe almost one year of illnesa and hospilalizalion easier to bear,

Michael was diagnosed with colan cancer in 2002. A team of doctors and nurses at
the Princess Margaret Hospital, led by Or, Williamson Chea, successfully saw him
through the surgery and recovery process, and he was able to return to work. In
Seplamber of 2008, Micheal was again hospitalized, and alter aaveral months of care
by tha hospital staff, returned to his home, where friends and neighbours visited. He
was hospitalized again a few montha ago, and passed away in the Princess Margaret
Hospital on ist. July, at ihe age of 72.

Or. Christine Chin has givan ouistanding cara, supported by many caring and
dedicated nurses. The family wishes to thank the Ministers of the Gospel whe visited
Michael {aspecially Rav, Brown of Central Baptist Church), his co-workers at Bahamas
Welding and Fire (especially Mr. Elliott and Mrs. Graham) and others. When at home
he Was cared for by his daughters Joanna and Janice and their husbands, and in
hospital many of the doctors and nurses want far beyond the call of duty. Special
friends and neighbours visiled ragularly and assisted with his care, especially Mr
Leonard,Skinny, Archer, Mr. Scottie Malone, Stephanie & family, Mr. Gadet and
Misa Lillian Loboaky.

Michael was predeceased by his sisters (Frances, Marie Murray and Bayverlay Honess)
and by his adopted sister (Eugia Knowles), Ha is survived by his daughters and sons-
in-law, Joanna & Stan Bethel and Janice & Mark Hayling, by his four grandchildran
(Brian & Fallon Bethel and Lagh and Noah Hayling), one graat-grand-daughtar (India),
two brothers (Sydney & Charles) and their familias, numerous nieces and nephows
and their families and other family members and friends,

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

In Loving Memory

of Our Dear Mother

It has been nine years since youive leftus
You were that special person with a special face:
Someone we loved and can't replace,
Never selfish always kind,
These are just a few of the memories you have left behind,

Always in the hearts of her children: Nathalie, Curlean,
Eldora, Annavee, Rowena, Karen and Samuel; In-Laws,
grandchildren, grea-grandchildren, brothers,
family and friends.

Too well loved to be forgotten!
THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 5

Yager funeral Home & Crematorium

Queen's Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 * Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

EVELYN
*Evie’ ‘Ma’
McINTOSH
SAUNDERS, 62

a resident of Crown Haven, |
Abaco and Gold Rock Creek, |
Grand Bahama will be held on :
Saturday, July 11, 2009 at 10:30
a.m. at St. Nicholas Anglican :
Church, High Rock, Grand :
Bahama. Officiating will be :
Revid Fr. Dwight Rolle, assisted by Rev'd Fr. DeAngelo :
Bowe and interment will follow in the Freetown Public :

Cemetery.

Left to cherish her memories are her five sons: Leroy “Bobby’, |
McGrevan *OG’, Lavar ‘Rocky’ and Lavan ‘Dusty’ Saunders |
and John Clay; five daughters: Mollyann, Beryl and Monique
Saunders, Sherilyn and Marsha Cooper; seven adopted | | yhertha C oper: four daughters: Theracita Cooper-Turner,

children: Calrissa McIntosh, Javotte Cooper, Sharanna Johnson, | Mary Lewis, Madlyn Bain and Dorothy Cooper; two son-in-

Betty Milfort, Darren Curry, Alex McIntosh and Lynette Rolle; :
six sisters: Geneva McIntosh, Monica Russell, Margarita : Cooper and Calvin Albury: two adovted dauchters: Angela
Roberts, Arementha Curry, Barbra McIntosh and Christine; : ee a ee ae six brothers: Donald, Roland, Delvin and Victor McIntosh, |
Elvin Russell and Wellington Pritchard; 14 grandsons: Leonard, ! Trayor. Shani Leslie Jr.. and Divanno: 11 at
Fred, Jamal, Romaine, Corey, Toure, Shavonno, Mashard, | andeiilisea: Lavonia. Lob hae isanat
Keano, Zach, Juan, Justin, Giovanni and Cameron; 12! \qykel-Kimsley and Mvkavla-Rose. Melvin Ir.. Clinique
granddaughters: Shanise, Darnell, Jenique, Michaela, Aaliyah, | 2 ; aaa Haas E il
Jade, Miesha, Amarni, Myla, Shemia, Lavana and Azari; three
great grandsons: Amari, Deandre and Corey; two son-in-laws: ' Cooper, Canoy Laing, Nicola Cooper, Anatalie Porter-Dean,
Boston and Corey Cooper; two daughters-in-law: Laverne | qgejyaq Hepburn and Melanie Stanislaus: three
and Anishka Saunders; two grand daughters-in-law: Conika | teeshere: Rider Genius Con per, Rev. Rufus Cooper and Rev.
and Susie Munnings; 10 sisters-in-law: Priscilla, Liza and :
Rachael McIntosh, Bathsheba Pritchard, Evelyn Wilson, Ulrica : Clania. Selva and Evanceliat Vira Cooper. Mary. Murile anil
Melntosh, Cetal Curry, Eva, Eleanor and Gardina Saunders : ee Ae aes .. ee as
and Elmena Bethel; six brothers-in-law: Maxwell Roberts, : Nehemiah Albury; one aunt-in-law: Presilita Nesbitt and a
Sidney Russell, Hermis Thomas, Alpheaus, Amos and Harry : post ot other fala ops and friends
Saunders; one uncle: Ralph Russell; four aunts: Florence ; 7
Thompson, Pearl Clay, Mavis and Olive Russell; 103 nieces |

and nephews and a host of other relatives and friends. |

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral :
Home and Crematorium on Queens Highway on Thursday |

: from 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday

from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

oR eR eR

LEONARD
‘Premier’
COOPER, 78

a resident of Mather Town,

Grand Bahama and formerly of

Old Freetown, Grand Bahama

will be held on Sunday, July 12,

2009 at 1:00 p.m. at New Zion

Baptist Church, Freetown, Grand

Bahama. Officiating will be Rev.

— Preston Cooper Jr. Interment will

follow in the Freetown Public Cemetery.

| Left to cherish his memories are his devoted wife of 57 years:

laws: Leslie Lewis and Keith Bain; two adopted sons: Corey

Munnings and Marsha Cooper; 12 grandchildren: Marilyn,
Melvin, Clinton, Gaynell, Kimsley, Randy, Levar, Nakieta,

grandchildren: Lavonia, Lahae, Amber, Hannah,

Ranahj, Sanaa Marshall and Trevor Jr.; one grandson-in-law:
Sylvester Marshall; six granddaughters-in- law: Tammika

Preston Cooper Sr.; nine sisters-in-law: Cecelia, Irene, Rev.

Inez Albury; three brothers-in-law: Elan, Whitfield and

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral
Home & Crematorium on Queens Highway on Saturday from
12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m, and on Sunday at the church from
11:30 a.m, until service time.


PAGE 6,

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Yager funeral Home ¢& Crematorium

Queen's Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 © Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR
—=

NELSON EMMITT
MOXEY, 76

a resident of #19 Watlins Road,

held on Saturday, July 11, 2009

of God, Coral Road. Officiating

Interment will follow in the
Frobisher Drive.

Left to cherish his treasured memories are wife: Calouiese
Maria Moxey nee Saunders; five sons: Bernard, Derek, Rickey,
Cliff and Bradley Moxey; two adopted sons: Willis Mackey
and Nelson Vincent; four Daughters: Debbie Huyler, Kephee

Mertis Nixon; sons-in-law: George Huyler, Aaron Bain and

grandchildren: Shameka Moxey-Smith, Jermaine and Keisha
Moxey, DeCarla Bullard, Giovanni and Tanasha Moxey,

Jalinska DeLoach, Denae and Jaleesa Moxey, Akeeron, Akeelia,

Rickeith, Richera, Lynrick, Lynarchico, Rickey Jr. and
Rickendra Moxey, Ricardo Miller, Tyreka and B’Jhan Moxey,
Clynard, Corei, Ciaro and Mischa Moxey, Octeria Stuart,
Taniel Bethel and Dasha Carey, Ayanna Archer and Jacqueline

Javah, Jakeero and Xaviour Moxey, Asia DeLoach, Jamie
Keishawn and Mario Rolle; sisters-in-law: Arlene Moxey,
Ellis, Cynthia and Elva Saunders, Evelyn Pickering, Lovely
Taylor, Hilda Flowers, Carol Bowleg, Brenda and Linda
Watkins, Winnifred Perguson, Edith Burns, Madge Thurston,
Natasha Storr, Natisha, Stephanie and Shavann Moxey, Theresa
and Patrice Moxey, Majorie Joseph and Antoinette Moxey,
Phillippa and Melissa Ferguson, Stephna Saunders, Krishna,

Sophia and Dashan Sears, Demeka Garner, Sherry, Permel,
Denise, Sheena, Portia and Delphene Saunders, Gigi Curtis,

: Jennifer Bryan, Sebeda Major and Penelope Rogers; nephews:
: Kirk, Jerome, Michael and Scott Moxey, Vincent Gardiner,
: Randol Flowers, Eugene Burns, Sidney, James and John
: Watkins, Dawson Fawkes, Kermit Cooper, Marvin Storr,
: James Riley, Sean Russell, Kenneth, Keith, Dwayne, Dudley,
; : Rayshard, Joey, Wayne, Dino, Reno and Steven Saunders,
| Freeport and formerly of :

Calabash Bay, Andros will be : a host of other relatives and friends including: Rev. Alpheus
11-00 ¢ Carrel Church: | Woodside, Bishop Fred Newchurch and Family, Bishop Oliver
at 2200 am, at Central nurch } Kennedy and Family, Central Church of God Family, Linda
fl eee : Mullings, Prescola Hall (Nassau), Nurse Sylvia Butler (Nassau),
will be Bishop Fred Newchurch, : Dr. Theodore Ferguson (Nassau), Dr. Kevin McKinney, Rev.
Goan Hahscis Meanmcral Paik : Rachael Mackey (Nassau), Jean Storr, The Glinton Family,

rand Bahama Slemoral Park, ! Helena Been and Family, The Garland Family, Roland and
: Agnes Carey and Family, Jennifer Mangra and Family (Nassau),
: Trevor and Tanya Carey and Family (Nassau), Bishop Cardinal
: McIntosh and Family, Ellison Delva and Family, Collin and
: Lester DeGregory and Family, Mario Chotoosingh, The
: Coakleys, Cargills, Hinzey and Hanna Families, The Woodside,
eae ation, oe * ? Minnis and the entire Community of Calabash Bay, Andros,
Bain, Sophia Carey and Simone Moxey; one adopted daughter: } Ey7ater DeLoach and Family (Jackson, Mississippi), Inspector
; ig : : Wendell and Shrenne Smith, The Clarke Family of Moss Town
David Carey; daughters-in-law: Linda and Michelle Moxey; } by yma. Thelma Sturrup, Monique Lockhart, Kenisha Bethel
: Phillip Patton, Mary Lewis and Family, Nicole Andrews,
: Helen Barnett, Ruby Outten, Linda Kelly, Miranda Inniss
ee an oe : (Nassau), PNO Cheryl Bain, Bishop Godfrey Williams and
Aaron Jr, and Ajah Bain, Georgette and Georgae Huyler, : Family, Bishop Leslie Woodside and Family, Carolyn Walkins
: and Family, Bishop Herbert Clarke, Prince Fawkes of Exuma,
: Edmondo Moxey, Management and Staff of National Insurance,
: Management and Staff of The Ministry of Tourism, Jackie
ae oo : Richardson, Wendall and Rodney Moxey of Calabash Bay,
Clarke (adopted); great-grandchildren: Ashton Bullard, Janaya, : Andros, Staff of Moxey’s Investment Enterprise (Exuma),
Bn ee = BL Teese Net po. + Staff of The Ministry of Education (Georgetown Exuma),
Sears, Brian Armbrister, Patrick Davis, Marnique, Ontario, : Charlene Rolle and Family, Elder Majorie LaFleur and Family,
. : si : Peter Basden and Family, Pleasant Bridgewater and Family,
Ludell Ferguson, Linda Russell, Demaris Saunders, Lineta : pitton and Jan Basiae and Family, Hector and Malvern
: ‘ ; . : Williams, Barbara Walker and Family; and a host of other
Campbell and Marilyn Ferguson; brothers-in-law: Rev. Edmond : Geen - " -
Ellis and Tellis Russell; nieces: Shelia Culmer, Birdina Moxey- ; â„¢*!@tves and friends too numerous to mention.

: Thanks to Dr. Theodore Ferguson, Dr. Kevin McKinney and

Laverne Fox, Bernadette Cooper, Delores Davis, Janice Russell, Bet ee ocala eee aes

Darrell and Demetrius Sears, Timothy Major and Jason Rogers;

: Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral
: Home and Crematorium on Thursday from 12:00 noon until
: 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until
; service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009,

Rosbei U al Mork

FREEPORT
114 East Coral Rood, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas

P.O. Bom F-a2312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roods, Nossou, N.P.. Bohomeas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043. / (242) 394-8047
Roger (242) 340-6043 « Fox: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

( Thursday from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm and at the church from 8:30
| am until service time.

MR. HERBERT
CLARKE, 51

of Bluehill Estate who died at on June |
28th 2009 will be held on Saturday July :
llth 2009 at 10:00am at St. Barnabas |
Anglican Church Blue Hill Road }
Officiating will be Canon Basil Tynes, |
assisted by other ministers of the clergy :
and Interment will follow in the :
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F. |
Kennedy Drive and Gladstone Road. :

He is survived by his wife: Laverne Clarke; three sons; Leo, |
Torrine and Javon; one daughter: Lanishka Clarke; three brothers: |
Cedric Curry, Thomas Smith and Godfrey Clarke; three sisters: :
Min. Lorraine Clarke, Min. Sharon McCardy nd Jeannette Dennis |
of Atlanta, Georgia; eight brother-in-laws: Roland Clarke, Bobby |
Dennis of Atlanta, Georgia, Anthony Pinder, Dr. Derick Pinder, |
Whitney Sands, Leander Pinder, Frank Pinder, Anthony Euliln; |

thirteen sisters-in-law: Elizabeth Smith, Sheila Clarke, Lanere |

Nelly, Joanne Capron, Marva Storr, Adrian Hines, Denise Pinder,
Theresa Dean, Leveta Pinder, Nancy Williams, Renae Pinder,
Donie Adderley and Glory Whymms; one uncle: Michael Minns;
five aunts: Gertrude Clarke, Emma Rodriquez, Merlene Smith,
Vernella Curry and Dianne Malone of California; nephews: Glen,
Kevin, and Cednc Curry, Julian Smith, Ron Clarke, James Major,
Dwayne, Jermaine, Leslie and Gianno Clarke; nieces: Christine
Wong, Patrice Rolle, Lisa and Carol Curry, Cherice Sweeting,
Alisa Gibson, Shenika Deveaux, Armette Barclay of Atlanta,
Georgia, Natasha Curry, Felicia Clarke, Kennique Clarke and

Monique Cartwnght and a host of other relatives and friends |

including: Cynara Smith, Delano Ralston, Rashad Barclay, Shinazia |
Sweeting, Khylia Gibson, Lawsono Sweeting, Ana Smith, Hezekiah |
; Sweeting, James Cairwey, Latera Forbes and Peaches Pratt and
i a host of other family and friends including, Franklin Murphy,
Curry, Marva Wilson, Velthia Rolle, Yvonne Sands, Brenda Moss, |
Ivy Minns, Agnes Ferguson, Audrey, Leanna, Charlene, Judy, |
Mildred, Veralee, Simeon Smith, Reginald, Alex, Sylvia Jones, :
i Abaco, Beaverly and Family of New York, Lowe Bay Andros
Sherman and Andrew Rodriquez and Arthur Minns. :
Special thanks to Mr. and Mrs. Pinder, Home Fabrics, Pastor Allen :
Lee and the Calvary Bible Church family, Bishop Revy Francis :
§ Viewing will be held in the Celestial Suite at Restview Memorial
: Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on
Viewing will be held in the Irenic Suite at Restview Memorial :
Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd. on Robinson and Soldier Rd., on :

Gibson, Eltura Deveaux, Carolyn, Gary, Freddie, Chester, Priscilla,
Annette, Peaches, Darnell, Bernadette, Althanese and Jeffery

Maxine Minns, John, Lois Dorsette, Emmarene, Lorraine Duke,

and family and the Vista Care staff.

ERICKA DENISE
STUBBS-KELLY, 35

of Seven Hills Drive who died on June
24th, 2009 will be held on Saturday at
12:00n00n at St. Ambrose Anglican
Church Carmichael and Gladstone
Road. Officiating will be Archdeacon
James Palacious. Interment will follow
in the Southem Cemetery, Cowpen and
Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish her memories are her husband: John Kelly; her
mother, Almada Stubbs; son: Vencell Thompson; sisters: Airuda
Charlton-Joseph, Shavana Darville-Dawkins, Victoria Darville,
Maria Curtis, Sheder Parker and Parkeisha Parker; brothers: Elvis
Parker, Von Cox, and Rodney Darville brothers-in-law: Eugene
Joseph and Shandy Dawkins nieces: D’Eureka Bastian, Alseanda
Johnson, Shandera Dawkins, Rashaye Darville, and Grace Joseph;
nephews: Dashad Darville, Nicolas Fils-Aime, Bradston Fil-Aime,
and Rodney Darville Jr., aunts: Juanita Leadon, Vera Capron,
Geneva Campbell, and Luella Hanna; uncle: Clarance Amette;
cousins: Stafford, Jeff, Leroy, Rico, Kylon, Ives, Jocelyn Ferguson,
Shelina Sands, Majorie Seymour, Carolyn Saunders, Prince,
Charlene, Lealon Charlton, Frank Capron, Wade Henfield, Rudolph
Charlton, Warren, Naomi, Marsha and Renee Arahna, Leonie
Seymour, Earl Darville, Elva and Nicholas Lindo, Jennifer
Ingraham, Dennis Harvey, Mary Whyll, Jacquline and Julian
Hanna, John and Portia Bain, Ulette Clarke, Ronnie Ferguson,
Junior Bassett, Mario I, Mario II, Trumpus, Laura, Rand and
Ransel Stubbs, Carretta Poitier, Beverly Anderson, Teresita

Management and staff of Margrifill Security, Pinewood
Community, A.D. Hanna and Family, Vernon Symonette, Willie
Moss, Bearal Pratt and Family, Salumie Wheeler and family of

Community, Inagua Community, the Florida Community and
others too numerous to mention.

Thursday from 10:00am to 5:00pm and at the church from 9:30am
to service time.



PAGE 7
PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

ee

FREE
114 East Coral Rood, ea G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312

Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Poger: (242) 340-8043 « Pom: (242) 373-3005

Robinson ond Soidier Roods, Nossou, N.P.. Bohomeas
P.O. Box CB-12072

Telephone: (242) 394-8043. / (242) 394-8047

Pager: (242) 340-6043 « Fox: (42) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MRS. OLIVE LOLITTA
NAIRN, 89

of Thompson Drive, Fox Hill who |

died on July 4th, 2009 will be held |

© on Saturday at 11:00am at New |

Destiny Baptist Church, Balliou |

Hill Road. Officiating will be |

Bishop. Delton D, Fernander, assisted by other ministers |
of Religion and Interment will follow in the Western :

Cemetery Nassau Street.

Great-Grand Children: Caleb and De’Lyn Fernander | F | ts will b d aewiater dat
Step-Children: Addington Nairn and Ruth Nairn- | — renee Wee ene ego Scan bean

& rt

Pedro and Wayde Nairn, Janet Havey, Susan DaCosta, |

Strachan Step-Grand Children: William, Addington,

and Yasiman Strachan Caregiver: Audrey Wilson
Cousins: Blance Barry and family, Myrtle Hanna and
family, Maria Turner and family, Eloise Saunders and
family, Ruth Nottage and family, Irma Levarity and
family, Eleroy and Wallace Nicholls. Other Relatives

DEATH NOTICES

MS. WILLAMAE
MILLER, 78

of Dignity Gardens died at her
residence on July 6th 2009,

She is survived by her son:
Vincent Hamilton adopted son:
Glen Saunders one brother:
Rodney Johnson, relatives and

i friends including: Debrah Hamilon, Ruthlyn Saunders,
Left to mourn her passing are her Children: James and |
Sharon Grand-Children: Calpurnia and Bishop Delton |
Fernander, Dr. Cordelia Chona Nairn, Dominique Hanna; |

and Friends: Adam and Maxine Munroe, Jeanette Bain |
and family, Maria Armbrister, John and Mae Tucker |
and family, Milton and Barbara Cox and family, Douglas |
and Monique Hanna, Olanda Hanna, Isabel Robert, |
Hilbert, Bruse and Olive Pinder, Dion and Linda |
Strachan, Elder Roslyn Green, The neighbors of |
Thompson Drive, Lucky Heart Corner and the family |

of New Destiny Baptist Cathedral.

Viewing will be held in the Serenity Suite at Restview

Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Itd. Robinson |
and Soldier Roads on Thursday from 10:00am to 6:00pm :
and at the church from 9:30am to service time. |

Ormond Saunders, Glenroy Flow Saunders, Orville
Saunders, Novel Taylor and a host of other relatives
and friends.

MR. KAMERON
RAHMING, 23

of Nassau Bahamas died in Fort
Worth Texas on the 5th of July
2009.

He is survived by: His parents:
Gino and Karen Rahming
Siblings: Ginear and Kervin Campbell Grandparents:
Bertram and Alicia Rahming & Annabell Dean Aunts:
Renee Dean, Sylvana, Gina and Alicia Rahming and

§ Valencia Rolle, Grace and Fefica Dean, Vanessa Ifill,
| Terry Burrows Uncles: Andre and Kevin Dean, Bertram
| Rahming Jr., Winston Rolle, Grafton Ifill Jr., Andrew

Burrows And numerous other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

My

EAT SUN qgRISE NORTUARY

—<—y
“A New ain To Service’

eT s-) ease aes,

DEWITT ‘La La’
BUTLER, 36

of Golden Gates #2 will be held on
Saturday at 11 am. at Shaw Temple AME
Church, Baillow Hill Rd. & Peter Street.
Officiating will be Pastor Kendal Mackey
assisted by Rev. Jacob Hanna. Interment
will follow in Lakeview Gardens, J. F. K.
Drive. Born: August 18, 1972 — Died:
June 29th, 2004.

He is survived by his father: William

Butler; 14 children: Lorenzo, Justin,

Denzil, Dewitt, Kenwitt, Devon, Daquonn, Christin, Ladia, Laquell, Davonnia,
Tatianna, Shaquae & Juanita, 4 brothers: Rudolph, Anthony, Bernard &
William Butler Jr., 2 sisters: Raguel Butler & Karen Simmons; 2 sister-in-
laws: Verniece & Elsie Butler; 1 brother-in-law: Freddie Simmons; 9 uncles:
Samuel, Alexander & Epheus Butler, Bernard, Edward, Kirklin & Ednol
McPhee, Heman Nixon & George Edgecombe; 12 aunts: Rev. Francina
Watson, Kathleen Butler, Beatrice Edgecombe, Luella Watkins, Essie McPhee
of South Bay Flonda, Pecola Mackey of Delray Beach Florida, Lillian,
Ruthmar & Mary McPhee, Lilian Solomon, Karina Butler & Sylvia Johnson
of Orlando Florida; 10 nieces: Julia, Tramaine, Ragqueria, Raunice, Anniqua,
Juliann, Nikalia, Blanch, Ragina & Jenniemac; 7 mephews: Irendo, Anfernec,
Julian Jr., Zayvion, Abraham, Jeremiah & Benvel; adopted mother: Iva
Johnson; 60 cousins: including James Butler, Valarie Delancey & Gregory
Edgecombe, Sherry Butler & Tamika Liscombe, Dianne & Marvin Watson,
and a host of other relatives and triends including: Pastor Kendal Mackey &
Family, Jestina Wallace & Family, Kendra Cunningham & Family, Gladys
Lightfoot & Family, Mitzi Higgs & Family, Anthony Nesbitt & Family,
Shanique Hart & Family, Angeline Pierre & Family, Kayla Johnson & Family,
Patrice Ash, Vonne Rolle & Family, Oshe Symonette & Family, Leroy Sands
& Family, Oneal Cayardes & Family, Ava Minns, Wellington Clyde Jr., Pat
Coakley & The Cordeaux Ave. Breakfast Crew, Beaver, Spy, Gringo, Ray,
James Anderson & Family, Paul Roberts & Family, Saunders Family, Winters
Family, Henfield Family, Neely Farmuly, Velina Taylor & Family, Manawement
& Staff of All Size Tire Repair, Ambrose Family, Bethel Family, Angela
Brooks & Family, Seymour Family, Gilbert Family, Rahming Family, Dorothy
Newman, Sheldon & Virginia Gray, Greenslade Family, Wendy Rolle,
Stephanie & Emma Smith & Family, Janet Saunders & Almathea McCoy of
Miami Florida, Cray & Judy Williams, Rev. Victor Cooper & New Bethany
Baptist Church Family, The Trauma Team of PMH, The Entire Englerston
Community, Larry's Pub, Key West St, Florida C1. and Wilson Tract Family.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta Street,
Palmdale from 1 p.m. to 6 pam. on Thursday and again from 1 p.m. to 5 pom.
on Friday and at the Church from 10 a.m. on Saturday until service time.

eee i ee eee ke

ae mel initia Me deat of a et

#27 Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale,
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957
eo Be meee ee mee a ee
Vere ee AE elds ee ele] mee ed

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009,

Pinder’s Funeral Home

“Service Beyond Measure *

PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570/ 393-1351 « CELL: 357-3617
RANNIE PINDER President

Memorial Service for

William Michael "Mike" Malone, 55

of Marsh Harbour, Abaco
and formerly of Hope
‘Town, Abaco and Nassau,
New Providence, will be
held 11:00am on Saturday
July 18th at New Vision
Ministries, Marsh Harbour.

He is survived by his wife:
Deborah Malone;
daughters: Kristal and
Rayanne Malone;
grandson: Maligq Kersaint;
sisters: Elsie Carroll and
Pauline North: brothers:
Thomas and George Malone; mother-in-law: Josephine
Weatherford: brothers-in-law: Michael, Sidney and
Robert Weatherford, William "Bill" Carroll and Ronnie
North; sisters-in-law: Shelia and Debbie Malone, Patricia
and lantha Weatherford; nephews: Brian, T.J., Joshua,
Nathaniel and Jacob Malone, William Carroll Ir, Brock
North, Mikell, Daniel, Michael Jr. and Neil Weatherford:
nieces: Laura, Kelli Anne, Candace and Faith Malone,
Nicole Roberts, Courteney North, Theresa Grant, Melanie
Weatherford; nieces-in-law: Katie Malone, Sacha and
Rosandi Weatherford: nephews-in-law: Jonathon Roberts
and Ravenell Grant; significant others: Lionel and Kesean
Keraint, Joser Gedeus, Leonard and Kathy Sands &
family, Mr. Everette Hart, Mr. Don Cormish, Mr. Chad
Sawyer, Mr. & Mrs. Daren Albury and the Staff of Abaco
Hardware (especially Paul & Telanna), "adopted sons"
Franco Francois and Gesner "Giant" Merzius, The Rotary
Club of Abaco, The Central Abaco District Council, The
Abaco Chamber of Commerce, The Cherokee Sound
Group, The Andros Pigeon Hunting Crew, The Golden
Grouper Breakfast Gang (Percy, Andy, Freddie, John,
Frank, George, David, Sandra, etc.) and numerous other
family and friends,

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Cancer
Society of the Bahamas P.O, Box 55-6539 in memory of
William Mike Malone.



PAGE 9
PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 9,

2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

a Kostioe Memorial Moluay
D and Cromalorium Limited

114 East evans Freon rt, &.6., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-A2312
Telephone: (as 373- iss (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 373-3005

siiiieresi ciel ies merece HAM,
P.O. Box CB-12072

Telephone: (242) 394- nies tate) 2 Bote
Pager: (242) 340-6043 « Fox: (242) 340-8034

.P., Bohomes

LO OVE AY ICES FOR

ANGELA

DELORES WHYMNS

: Varanique, Lashelle, Katrina, Christine, Ann, Hilda,
| Paulette, Gelease, Luanne Annamae, Diana, Lillimae,
: Mavis, Minerva, Jennifer, Maxine; Iva St., Anne, Agatha,
of #13B Manton Place Freeport, |

Grand Bahama will be held on |

7 é Saturday, July 11, 2009 at 1:00 |

| p.m. at St. John’s Jubilee Cathedral, |
aS Settler’s Way, Freeport, Grand |
Bahama. Officiating will be Bishop Godfrey Williams, :
Terrance G. Morrison. Interment will |
follow in the Grand Bahama Memorial Park Section #2, |
| Relatives and Friends: Elva Davis and Family, Anita
: Doherty and Family, Miriam Johnson & Family, Jennifer

ROLLE, 49

assisted by Rev.

Frobisher Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish her precious memories are her father: Ellis |
Whymns; stepmother: Naomi Whymns; adopted |
mother/sister; Rosalie ‘Mummy’ Higgins; sons: Ventroy |
Rolle, Jaamal Johnson and Philip Rolle, Jr.; daughters: |

Ineka Johnson, Lawanda Rolle, Philize Ellis, Lanese Rolle;
sisters: Eloise Jones, Joycelyn Pratt, Anita Ferguson, |
Judy Rolle, Princess Farrington, Precious Hendfield,
Charlene and Helena Whymns; brothers: Rudy, Leo,
Lynden, Garland and Darren Whymns; grandchildren:
Ventroy Rolle Jr., Tremere Rolle, Levontae Moxey,

Kaynaan Longley, Zynique Rolle, Denae Ellis, Ernie Barr |
| Staff of Star General, Collections Department, Bank of

Jr., Treasure Strachan, Ghea Knowles and Philise Rolle;

sisters-in-law: Judy Whymns, Sharon Whymns and |
: The Management & Staff of Agave Restaurant — Port

Alvanell Whymns; aunts: Gladys Johnson of Nassau,

Clara, Sybil, Ethlyn, Laura ‘Louise’, Eva, Laurella, Vernice
and Mary; uncles: Stanley Collie and Leon; brother-in- |
law: Joe Rolle; son-in-law: Dion Ellis; daughter-in-law: |
Denise Wells-Rolle; nieces: Eunice, Rhodena, Michelle, |
Daphne, Lashan M.D., Daphne Williams, Rochelle, |
| Officials
Deandrinique, Melissa, Lashara, |
Dawn and Krystal; nephews: Rodney, Humphrey, :
lan, Dwayne, Trevor, Avard, Sheno, Shavano, Alex, Neiko, |
: Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Thursday, July
| 9, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the church on

Marilyn, Enid, Natasha, Melinda, Tanya, Gevelle, Berkell,
Ashantae, Junique,
Lashan,

Antoine, James, Prescott, Rudy Jr. Leo Jr., Gerard, Deandre,
Lynden Jr., Kareem, Lance, Jordan, Lyndero, Garland Jr.,

Valentino, Giovanni, Dashon, Rev. Elmond King, Rev. |

| Terrance G. Morrison; adopted children: Frantz Denis,
Chris Newbold, Mark Wilson Warren Dorsette; cousins:

Beatrice, Mary, Brendalee, Julia, Berthlyn, Brenell, Elva,

Erra, Monique, Shavaughn and Cheryl, Chnstine, Willadale,
Enamae, Constance, Edwyna, Rev. Silbert, Dale, Bertram,
Bersil, Alexander, Perry, Hemish, Clarance, Garth
Duncombe, Ricardo, Mario, Greg, Christopher, Lealand,
Hudon, Orman, Ucal, Ervin, Timothy, Stanley, Talbot,
Eddion, Kingsley, Rodney, Alvin, Franklyn, Jonalee,
Attwill, Winton, Sidney Collie, MP for Blue Hill, Hilbert,
Elwood, Kirkland, Derek, Malfert, Fred, Edwin Jr.; Special

Ellis & Family, Mitchello Pubten, Darren Rolle and Family,
Mike Sands, Ricardo Lightbourne, Ivan Butler & Family,
Norris Bain & Family, Martha Beneby & Family, June
White & Family, Sandra Laing, Charmaine Jagnandon &

| Family, Sharine Hall & Family, Floyd Watkins & Family,
| Daphen Neely & Family, Chris Johnson & Family, Ethel

| Knowles & Family, Betty Williams & Family, Wendy
Pratt & Family, Philip Rolle & Family, The Hudson Estate
Family including Judy Thompson, Philippa Paulino &
Family, Kermit Ferguson & Family, Louis Kemp & Family,
Bahamas Immigration Department, The Management &

the Bahamas, The Management & Staff of ZNS TV13,

Lucaya, Kwasi Thompson, M.P. for Pineridge, Desmond
Bannister Minister of Youth Sports and Culture M.P. for
Carmichael, The Doctors & Nurses - Gynecological Ward

Princess Margaret Hospital, former staff of Princess
Towers Hotel, U2 Barber Shop, The BAAA’s Junior
and others to numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held in the ‘Celestial Suite’ of Restview

Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Limited, 1 1-A East

Saturday from 11:30 a.m. until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

EEPOH
11 Beni Cesre seat, Freeport, G.B., Baharnas
P.O. Box F-42312
Talaphore: (242) 373-1115 f (a2) 373-1471
Roger: (242) 340-8043 » Fox: (242) 373-3005

BERTRAM LESLIE
WARD, 62

of #83 Sugar Plum Road, Sunset Division,

Freeport, Grand Bahama and formerly |
of Mastic Point, Andros bwill be held on |
Saturday, July 11, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. at |
New Canaan Zion Baptist Church, Balao |

Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Officiating will be the Rt. Rev'd Bishop
Washington Williams. Interment will :
follow in the Grand Bahama Memorial Park Section #2, Frobisher

Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

He was predeceased by his parents: Samuel and Louise Martin
Ward and left to cherish his memories are his wife: Inavie Ward;

daughters: Monique, Odessa, Cyntina and Marissa Ward, Dewanna |
and Demetria Wright of Atlantia, Georgia; som: Jamal Jarett Leslie ;
Ward; stepdaughters: Bernadette and Gerani Pierre and Shanrika |
Bain; stepsons: Owen and Mario Pierre; grandchildren: Kenya :

Smith, Santina, Tameka, Kenrick, Alexander, Oprah, Jadian, Jadon,

Odaja, Carlecia Reckley, Angel, Calvano, Owenisha, Mario Jr.;
: Frida Nortelus; children: Alton ‘Bats’, Urich of Florida, Vashawn

sisters: Janet Ward and Cathy Martin; niece: Ericka Oliver, Patricia,

Iriniese and Terricita Brown and Nickoya Cargill; nephews: Alfred :
Harris, Marvin, Melvin and Elvin Brown; aunts: Maria, Julia and |
Bernadette Martin; grandnieces: Kendra, Tally, Brianna, Marva, |
Sheneka, Elshadi, Mell and Elshdic; grandnephews: Cordero |
Adderley, Kendrick Strachan, Marion and Sheldon Murphy, Alex

Harris, Ricardo Jr. and Trevon Brown; step nieces: Aileen, Maryann, |
Kathy, Firolia, Jumie, Roobenska and Kathleen; step nephews: |
Barry and Lifaite Pierre of Florida and Dwayne; aunts: Maria, Julia |
and Bernadette Martin; uncles: Samuel, Wenzil Sr. and Glenroy |
Martin; sisters-in-law: Analic, Junette and Theresa; brothers-in- |
law: Joseph Lifaite, Lerdieu Similien of Miami, Fla. and Francois :
Similien of Canada; close friends: Clifford Bowe, Charles, The :
: Jones, Quincy Fraser and Dwight McIntosh; cousins: Abner Jr.,
Mr. Russell, Mrs. Tynes, Mr. Turmer and the Taxi Union; and a host |
of other relatives and friends including: Florinda Williams, Christian |
i Celia, Robert and Jack and a host of other relatives and close
friends. Special thanks to management and staff at the Kidney

Freeport Harbour Company, Felix Bowe, Solomon Molly, Allan,

Butler, Vernal Jr, Tony, Ricardo and Anthony Martin, Earlin, Shervin,
Joyee and Patsy Wilkinson, Kenneth Brown, Charles, Clovis, Ingrid,
Dora, Wenzil Jr., Neil, Joel, Meredith, Yasmine, Santisha, Zovia and

Leon Martin, Barbaralyn Mackey, Tashawn Brown, Vezel Gibson |
and family, Loretta Dean, Oterrine Jones, James Oliver and family, |
Jestina Baillou, Edith Saunders and family, Dorothy Noel, Oraly |
( Mortuary and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport,

Monica Sweeting and family, Edward and Vernal Eams and family, } Grand Bahama on Thursday, July 9, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00

Martin, Tad Williams, Sidney Oliver, Ellen Bowleg, Van Strachan,

Benjamin Oliver and family, Doris Tinker and family, the Murphy |
and Saunders family and the entire Mastic Point community.

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009,

U
Roads, Nassou, N.P., Boharmas
P.O” Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 340-8034

| Viewing will be held in the ‘Irenic Suite’ of Restview Memorial
| Mortuary and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport,

Grand Bahama on Thursday, July 9, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00

| p.m, and at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.

APPOLON
‘Popo’ ‘Pope’
NORTELUS JR., 44

of #24 Wood Rogers, South Bahamia,

Freeport, Grand Bahama will be held on

Saturday, July 6, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. at

St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church,

Hunter's, Grand Bahama. Officiating

will be Father Reginald Demeritte
assisted by Father Remy David and Deacon Jeffrey Hollingsworth.
Interment will follow in the Grand Bahama Memonial Park Section
#2, Frobisher Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish his fond memories are his parents: Appolon Sr. and

and Ahmad Nortelus; sisters: Arnette Jones, Irene and Monique
Nortelus, Katrina Frazer and Maria McIntosh; brothers: Arlington
‘Linky’ Sr., Audley ‘Lamps’ Sr., Fritz ‘Freeze’ Sr., Ramus Sr. and
Craig Nortelus Sr.; nieces: Lady Ancka and Princess Jones, Alexandna
‘Cookie’, Latahazz, Audetra, Audliya, Anakisha, Chandra and
Ananiah Nortelus, Kyleah Fraser and Matiah McIntosh; nephews:
Anton and Joshua Jones, Arlington iAli Jr., Lavar, Remus Jr., Audley,
Audantae, Aaron, Craig Jr., Fritz Jr., Decaprio and Remacine Nortelus;
grandnieces: Penaie and Ashnae Jones; grandnephews: Ashton
and Aman Jones aunts: Carol, Claudette, Alecia and Rachel; uncles:
Cecil, Lamant, Treason and Abner Sr.; sisters-in-law: Lavonda,
Gwendolyn and Sherlene Nortelus; brothers-in-law: Cartwright

Julienne, Theodora, Odetta, Rosette, Mario, Wesley, Peggy, Linda,
Jeffrey, Laurette, Sonia, Bridgette, Adnan, Sonless, Edith, Jenniva,

Center, doctors and nurses at the Rand Memorial, Doctor's and

Princess Margaret Hospital.

Viewing will be held in the ‘Serenity Suite’ of Restview Memorial

p.m. and at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.



PAGE 11
PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

perenne
Y and Cromalouium Limiled

‘ikea Eicecd eit proces . G.B., Bohomas
T neil ad set118/ Gan 373-1471
S }

Poger. (242) Fox: (242) 373-3005

fcisrabe ced Solio uae rics ALP, Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-1 2072
Telephone: (242) 394-H044 / (242) 34-8047
Poger: (242) 20-8043 « Fox: (242) 340-8034

| Viewing will be held in the ‘Perpetual Suite’ of Restview Memorial

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

DILLON OTNEAL
‘Pop’ ‘Tyler’
HAMILTON, 79

=| of #102B Gordon Avenue, Freeport, Grand :
| Bahama And formerly of Grand Turk, Turks
and Caicos Islands will be held on Saturday, :
m) July 11, 2009 at 11:00 a.m, at Church of i
a) Chord Temple, Peach Tree Street, Freeport, :
Grand Bahama. Officiating will be Bishop |
Lonford Bethel. Interment will follow in |
the Harbour West Public Cemetery, Bartlett |

Hill, Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish his memories are wife: Leila Helena Hamilton; 5

daughters: Maude O'Brian, Deloris Stubbs, Pearline Hamilton, Wealthy |

Hanna and McKeba Palmer; 2 sons: Noel and Floyd Hamilton; adopted | ‘Precious’ Bullard: children: Marvin and Rhonda Bullard; sisters:
| Natasha Bullard Miller, Medris Bullard of South Carolina, Miranda

Sherrille and Takira Gardiner, Dominique O’Brian, Yuoland Strachan, | Qullard-Taylor, Marion Bullard Alleyne of Virginia; brothers: Simeon,

Tequesha Wilmott, Monalisa Cooper, Letitia Nicholls, Perrinique Dawkins, : ; : = ih setis
Donique Laing, Maqueel Bennett, Murcy Palmer, Felicia and Delisha | Stanley, Bobby, Manfred and Joshua Bullard, Garth Jackson and Chery!
Hamilton, Wellington and Schamal Gardiner, Darrin and Cordero O"Brian, : \fi}ler, Hadassah and Neriah Taylor, Denise Wellington of Virginia,
Ferell, Anthonece and Travis Wilmott, Mcdermit Cooper, Malik = shantell Bullard of Nassau, Princess, Leah, Maureen, Jestine, and Leone

Thompson, Richard and Rasheid Munnings, Tyler Hanna, Thomas Stubbs, : Bullard all of Florida, Jennifer Muhammad of Michigan, Ashley Bain,

Arsenio and George Bennett, Howard Hinzey, Margarrett Roker, Kendell, :
Floyd, Caream, Wanya, Noel Otneal, Noel Rudolph, Don Hamilton and :
Al Mackey; 24 great grandchildren: Shakira Gardiner, Rayaah Meadows, :

Typhay Collie, Ranajah Munnings, Cherity, Cherish, Lyric and Cinnamin : gullard of Florida, Jason Alleyne of Virginia and Garth Jackson Jr. of
; : Nassau; aunts: Mavis McQucen, Roselyn Rolle, Fredricka Gardiner,
Anthonique Francis, Anquanique Miller, Maliah Stubbs, Kaielle Gray, | Catherine Owens. Virginia Curry and Effie Bullard: uncles: Arniinete
Tresnee Wilmott, Landante, Tania, Aaliyah and Tyra Wilmott, Jayden i phere sooth bho ary Tg ~ilheceie hp op lage lg
Ferguson, Amarian O'Brian, Herve’ Swaby and Travis Wilmott Jr; | ip-jaw: Hazel and Corae Bullard; brothers-in-law: Hensel Miller, Israel
brother: Eugene Hamilton; 31 nieces: Eudean Hamilton, Levaughn | Taytor Sr, and Simon Davis; cousins: Joel Roberts Jr,, Ricardo, Marvin,
Dean, Usual Bain, Carolyn Ward, Marsha Storr, Denise Leathen, Isadora | lington, Kenny, George and Vari McQueen, B. Harcourt, Andrew,

Williams, Terry Hamilton, Fredicka, Nora, Cassie and Margo Gordon, | Renjamin and Garvin Rolle, Lerlene Davis, Christine Pinder, Gloria,

son: Anthony Hutchinson; brother: Eugene Hamilton; 37 grandchildren:

Brown, Johnique Peterson, Jazzmine Strachan, Germine Moltire,

Wandaleen Henfield, Deborah Johnson, Ursula Reckley, Reequel Austin,

Vandaleen Outten, Younetty Knowles, Florita, Jessica and Amanda |

Outten, Oralee Missick, Shaneka Hall, Gianna Smith, Shandell Outten,

Joanna Higgs, Cindy, Letita, Tiffany, Shantell and Lewsia Outten; 21 | and Sharon Pinder, Randall, Wayne, Genet and Elone Gardiner, Jamaine

nephews: Clifford, Joc, Lloyd and Glen Hamilton, Raymond and Quinton | Roberts, Ricky McQueen, Adamaie, Coco and Danwy Burrows and a
ive: ‘i i ing: G Williams,

Winston, Omar, Rueso and Lewis Outten, Errol, Lynden and Barron | Se rae ee ae
Missick and Deon Hall; 2 daughters-in-law: Lilymae and Raina Hamilton; of West End Group, Jackie Adderley and family, doctors and nurses at
Mytris Hamilton, Fairleen Missick, Alice and Maxine Outten, Mina i a ee ee ee
Outten-Winter; 4 brothers: Edgar, Henry and Lorenzo Outten and John :
Missick; and a host of other relatives and friends including: Elsie : Viewing will be held in the “Halcyon Sulte’ of Restview Memorial
Moxey, Charles Clerveaux, Susan and Elvin Brown, Alice Smith, Albert : ioe : - tod 1124 Bact Coral Rosd F
and Tericeta Francis, Caroline Parker, Carmen and Noel Bain, Paul : ee
Johnson, Mario Durham, Cedric Gibson, Fairleen Lightbourne Smith :

and family, Johnny Munroe, Trevor and Sam Williams, Cyprinna Stubbs :

Gordon, Henry, Franklyn, Gordon, Edgar, Zigman, Derek, Dwayne,

2 sons-in-law: Joseph O'Brian and Tyrone Palmer; 5 sisters-in-law:

and Levi Palmer.

: Mortuary and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport,
? Grand Bahama on Thursday, July 16, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
? and at the Church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time,

LENWOOD LEONARD
BULLARD, 39

of West End, Grand Bahama will be held
on Saturday, July 11, 2009 at 3:00 p.m. at
St. Michael's Catholic Church, West End,
Grand Bahama. Officiating will be Father
David Cooper. Interment will follow in the
West End Public Cemetery, West End,
Grand Bahama.

He is survived by his wife: Cynthia

Dean Bullard; nieces: Jill Bullard, Vernita Cart, Andrea and Natasha

Lisa Bullard of Texas, Jaifie and Garthia Jackson of Nassau, nephews:
Frankie Miller, Ticoya Hanna, Israel Jr. and Samuel Taylor, Mario
Bullard, Omar, Kipplin and Dexter Bullard all of New Jersey, Graydon

“Leaky” McQueen, Gerald Gardiner, Ken Owens and Mr. Curry; sisters-

Muriel, Elizabeth, Barbara, Julia and Diane Rolle, Kayshawn McQueen
of Nassau, Stephanie, Alva, Judith, Carolyn Roberts, Mavrine and Kathy
McQueen, Betty Bullard, Patricia and Harry Lord, Godfrey, Tyrone, Lee

Roberts, Cora McPhee, Elizabeth Pear, Kenny Wallace, the Crazy Comer

community.

Grand Bahama on Thursday, July 9, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m,

and at the church on Saturday from 1:30 p.m. until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 13

oer Cacnalosaon Lmtd”

NASSAU
114 East Coral ood, Heepart — B., Bolromeas Robinson nee Toe Le cae" AP., Bahamas

Telephone: (242) aa ee 8/, (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (a2) 30a. 4 -B0AS | (2 (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager: (242) 440-8043 « Fox: (242) 340-8034

DEATH NOTICES

- BAHAMA AND FORMERLY OF MILOT, HAITI DIED
- AT THE RAND MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA ON SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009.

He is survived by his wife: Kettelie Charfilus of Haiti;
children: Maxi, Viola, Mirtha, Mamo, Liciene and Annette
Noel; numerous grandchildren; sister: Madam Destore!l
Noel: brothers: Jacsone and Boukon Noel; daughter-
in-law: Beatrice Noel and a host of other relatives and

. friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.

MR, HILTON PEDICAN SR., 65

OF #335 MELBOURN CREST, HUDSON ESTATE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA DIED AT THE RAND :
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL ON MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009. |

He is survived by his sons: Hilton Pedican Jr., Clement
and Jeremiah Beckford; daughters: Kelly Whitfield,
Elizabeth Beckford and Kimberley McIntosh; sister:
Ethlyn Wallace; numerous grandchildren, nieces, |
nephews and a host of other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date. :

MS. OLETA MARY
‘Mary Coakley’ CLYDE, 67

of #410 Nansen Avenue, Freeport, Grand Bahama died
- at the Rand Memorial Hospital, Freeport, Grand Bahama
on Tuesday, July 7, 2009,

| She is survived by her companion: Cyril Coakley; 3
daughters: Pearlamae Forbes, Valencia Knowles and
Vivian iPeachesi Coakley; 2 sons: Glenroy Strachan and

Cyril Coakley Jr.; 12 grandchildren, 8 great

- grandchildren; 3 sisters: Gwendolyn Brown, Velma

_ Miller and Leotha Clyde, numerous nieces, nephews

and a host of other relatives and friends.

MR. JEAN MAQUES NOEL, 58 3
: Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.
OF #4 GARDEN VILLAS, FREEPORT, GRAND


PAGE 14,

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KRurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020° Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 * 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

LAST RITES FOR

ROCHELLE
SHARLENE
STRACHAN, 42

of George Town, Exuma will be held on

Saturday at 2-00 P.M. at St.
Anglican Church, George Town, Exum

Andrew's :

Officiating will be Puther Mario Conlitte |

amd Rev'd Willish Johnson.

Interment in +

The Church's Cemetery, George Town, !

Exuma.

Precious memories will always linger in the }
hearts of her husband: Inspector Harcourt +

Bain/Strachan.

One step-son Dejuan |

Strachan. Her parents Milton Jr. & Irene +
Strachan: three brothers: Dwaine, Kenwin and Brent Strachan, Adogied Brother: |
Sheldon Duncombe; one sister Natasha Strachan, Adopted sister Jandilee Evans;
Mother-inlaw Mrs. Terry Strichin, Father-in-liw, Mr, Earl Strachan, of Rum Cay; +
three brother-in-laws, Robert Missick Jr, Rubini, and Jeff Strachan; six sister-in-laws, |
Marsha and Audrey Strachan, Shelia and Ano Strachan, Tamekia and Gwendilyno :

Strachan: seven nephews, Brenton, Dwaine Jr. Theodore, Omar, Jestin, Asthon, and
Rubini Jr.; three nieces Deandra Missick, Kavanna Strachan, and Demetria Strachan;

five uncles: Harry, Daniel, and Clifford Strachan, Richard Clarke and Aurina Marshall |
and Edward Bullard of Miami Fla; ten aunts: Brenda and Patricia Strachan, Rowena !
and Catherine Clarke, Lois, Joycelyn, Veronica, Thelma and Shirley Marshall, and ¢

Dame Joan Sawyer, Cousins: Tiffaney and Danial Barr, Jabina and Deron Curry, Mr,

& Mrs, Logis Herene and Mr. & Mrs, Brian Forbes of Fort Lauderdale Fla., Harry :

Strachan Jr, of Oklahoma, Stephon Strachan of Los Angeles, California and Kyle

Strachan of London, Daniel Jr. and ‘Chad Strachan, Godfrey Bowe and Family, Jamie :
Strachan, Mr. & Mirs. Brian Strachan, Eleanor Rahming, Rev. Leslie & Mrs. Curtis, |
Mr. & Mrs. Don Ferguson, Shequita Gordon, Mark, Gary, Andy, Craig and Dwight :
Clarke, Sharon Clarke, June, Lisa, Duncombe, Antoinette, Nicole and Casa Clarke, |

Hubert Smith Jr, Patrick and Robert Smith, Donna and Marsha Smith, Yvonne Kemp,
Latravia Joseph, of Miami, Fl, Sharlene, Redada and Jacovy Jefferson of Miami Fla,
Owen, Darrel and Derron Marshall, Julian, Michael, and Brian Marshall, Bernadette

Weech, Reva Campbell, Camille Moss, and Philippa Marshall: Carl and Chnoistopher +

Murshall of Miami, Fl. and Terry Marshall, Sonia Small of New York, Syivia Butler,
Christine Dean of Washington DuC., Regina Marshall, Sabrina Fowler, Marlyn, Vernon
and Lamar Farquharson, Livingstone Jr & Family, and John Marshall, Rev. Pete and
Lavern McKenzic, Patricia Munroe & Family, Jeff & Delglicia Smith, Naaman &
Sandra Forbes, Pamela Adderley, Levi Adderbey. Host of other relatives amd friends
including: Rt. Hon. Hubert Ingharam, Hon. Brent Symonette, Hon. Perry G. Christie,
Min. Toniny Turmquest, Min, Carl Bethel, Brensil Rolle & Family, Mr. Elliott Lockhart
& Farnily, Mr. & Mrs, Anthony Moss MP & Family, Mr. Joshua Sears & family,
Hon. George A. Smith & Family, Senator Johnlee Ferguson, Senator Deon Foulkes,
Senter Anthony Musgrove, The Pree National Movement Woman's Assocnition, The
entire Free National Movement Political Organization, The entire staft of Total Wee
Care Day Care, Ethel, Shelia and Oralee McPhee, Norman, Gloria. Demeico, and
Sharice Gardener, Raynard Jr and Family, John, Ernest, and Marlon McPhee, Mr. &
Mrs. Kendal McPhee & Farnily, [an and Carlos Ferguson, Brian Anderson, Anya
Tinker, Warren Rolle & Family, Latoya Rolle, Elisha Rolle Jr, Marna Rolle, Erlin
Rolle, Louann Rolle, Jean & John Curtis of FP Lauderdale Fl, Archdeacon the
Venenble Keith Cartwright, Cannon Delano Archer & Family, Father Stephen Davis
& Family, Rev, Dr. Roland T. Hamilton, Rev, Dr. Charles Saunders & Family, Rev,
Cedric Smith & Family, Rev. Adam Broen & Family, Rev. Dr. Ivan Clarke & Fumily,
Rew. Lowis Rolle & Family, Rev. Clhemon Ferguson & Family, Rev. Franklyn Mc kenzic
and Family, Pastor Alexander Taylor Jr. & Family, Pastor Daniel Morley & Family,
Rev. Heuter Rolle & Family, Rev. Flowers in Bimini, Rev. Randy Musgrove & Family,
Rev. Howard F. Williamson, and Robinson Morris Chapel A.M_E, Church Family,

Rev. Leon Williams, Jim Newman, Administrator Ivan Ferguson & Family, Mr.
Everette Hart & Family, Kenneth Nixon & Farnily, Chief Superintendent Willard
Cunningham & Family, Creswell Morley, Beatrice Morley (former teacher and frend),
Ricarde, Gina and Tina Morley, Mrs. Marie Bowe (God Mother) & her entire Family,
Pandora Smith & Family, Clyde Johnson, The Parovti Family, The entire Beneby

Family of George Town, Sharlene, Jarad and Jamal Morley, Mr, & Mrs, Eugene Pouer
of Nassau, Elsie Dean, McDonald Smith & F ‘amily, Fred and Janet Rolle of Ramsey,
Exuma, Rowgelia RollesGibson, Sharon Bethell Brown, Jacqulyn BethellFerguson,
Cpt. Edison Taylor, Nancy Bottomly & Family, Nigel Bowe & Family, Raymond
Carrol and family, Paul Smith & Family. Holland Darville & Family, Michael Minns
& Family, Basil Minns & Family, Mary Dames & Family, Luther Rolle & Family,
Willie Rolle & Family, Roland Ferguson & Family, Kermit Rolle & Family, Perry
Brown & Family, Carlton Taylor, Jacquelyn TayborSenith, Phillip Musgrove, Kingsley
Holbert, Simone Holbert, Angela Bedhel & Family, Vincent Bethel & Family, Kevin
Brown & Family, Sophia Smath & Family, Annie Diggis & Family of Nassau, Cyril
Taylor & Family of Kissimmes, FL, Olivette Taylor & Family of New York, Carmetha
Smith & Family of Miami, Fl., Virgina Ferguson & Family of Miami, Fl, Vincent
Young & Family, Edison Brice & Family, James Barr, Leanna Rolle & Family, Dolly
Saunders & Family, #ilpha Rolle, Sabrina Anmbrister & Family, BeBe Clarke &
Family, Francina Forbes & Family, Monique, Shanique & Meshach Carey of Miami,
FL, Nathalee Morley & Family, Roseselda Morley & Family, Havel Sears d& Family,
Jacintha, and Marissa Marshall, Debbie Moxey-Rolle, Cleo Clarke, Christine Dean,
Exlith Fox, Dedne Rolle, Peter Bascom, Tony Nicholls, Roselyn Sands, Exetmund Hall
Jr. Mrs, Lacie Woodside, and Tia Nixon, Mr, & Mrs, Basil Watson and Family
(Neighbours in Nassau), Maxine Knowles, Tradymae Smith, The Dept, of Education
Early Childhood Care and Education (Pre-School Unit), Leja Burrow, Ellen Rbodriques,
Theresa Balfour, #2elma Horton, Elkeno Andrews, Dr. Delton Farquarhson, Assistand
Commissioner of Police Ellison and Kimberly Greenslade, Richard Bain and Family,
Leroy Rolle and Family, Edna Brown & Family, Lorraine and Peter Pickstock, Debbie
Nixon, George Whylhy, Larone Fawkes, Phyllis Saunders, Wilfred Bullard & Family,
Paula Campbell stone and Family of Miami, Pl, Cvothia Archer and Family, Soma
Pinder, Shirley Musgrove & Family, Ceital Duncombe, Maria Pinder & Family, The
Exuma Taxt Organization, The Gow Samaritan Lodge, Wilton, Harcourt, Leslie,
David, and Maryann Rolle, Julian, Livingston, Clinton, Janice, and Jasmamn: Romer,
Albert Clarke Ir, Reeves Tumuest & Family, Alexander Taylor Sr. & Family, Bridgette:
Mossl Rolle, Ingrid Moss, Winston, Keith, Clinton, and Sean Moss, [van Bodie &
Family, Leroy Rolle & Family, Steve Smith & Family, Captain Anthony Rolle and
Family, Bill Poitier, Elvis Rolle, Gregory Mortimer, Mr. & Mrs. Michael Rolle and
Family, Maxine Bowe and Family, Vernon Curtis and Family, Perey Pox and Family,
Benard Swann and Family, Boris Rahming & Family, Nigel Gray and Family, Lynden
Gray and Fumuily, Dr, Swany, Mr. d& Mrs, Kettel & Pumuily, Larry Morley & Pumily,
the entire family of the late Henderson Strachan, Denny Williams, Dave Nixon, Mrs,
Cleora, Rose, and Leanor Ferguson, Donnales Burrows, Management and Staff of
the following businesses at Moss Town Intemational Airport, Bahamas. “vir, Continental,
Sky Bahamas, Bahamas Customs, Bahamas Immigration, Fire Dept, Civil Aviation
Dept, Security, Western Air, Anverican Eaghe, Airport Car Rental, Don Smith Rental
Car, Reggie's Express, and all of the Taxi Drivers and Baggage Handlers; Bernice
Knowles, Mrs. Thompson, Sharon and Tony Bethel, Mra. Vivan Burrows & Family,
Dwayne Rolle, Elsworth Rolle, The All Exuma Association, Exuma Regatta Conmmittee,
The Good Samaritan Laxige, Management and Staff of Local Government, Exuma
Basketball, and Sottball Assocition, Alot the Junkanoo Groups on Exam, Ricurdc
Rolle & Family, Byron Smith, Jason Ranger, Olivia McPhee, Karl McPhee, Kenyon
McPhee, Alan Michael, Reynaldo Swann, and Marco Clarke; Rev. Christopher Ferguson
& Pamily, Mr. Charlie Sturrup & Family, Mr. & Mrs. Robin Ferguson, Nyoshe
Aumibrister, and all of her close friends in Black Point, Staniel Cay, and Farmers Cay:
We the farnily, recogniae the fact that there are many other persons who contributed,
on assisted one way or the other in cur time of hereavernent, and if your nanve de tot
appear on thus obituary we humbly offer our greatest thanks anel apology,

The body will repose at Kurtics Menvorial Mortuary, Ramsey Exuma on Friday from
1200 Noon until 6:00 PM. and atthe church in George Town, Exuma on Sapurday
from 12-00) Noon until service time,


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009, PAGE 15

KRurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020° Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 « 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

LAST RITES FOR

MARY MARCELLA
SAUNDERS, 92

of Pinecrest Drive, South Beach :
and formerly of Stanyard Creek, :
Andros will be held on Saturday :
at 11:00 A.M. at Central Church :
of God, Coral Road Freeport, :
Grand Bahama, Officiating will :

be Bishop Fred Newchurch. :
Interment in Grand Bahama :

Memorial Park.

She is survived by 5 Daughters: Calouise Moxey, Ludell “Tiney’
Ferguson, Linda Russell, Demaris Saunders and Lineta Mae :
Ellis; | Ssiter-in-law: Adline Fowler, 2 Sons-in-law: Tellis Russell :
and Pastor Edmond Ellis; 2 Daughters-in-law: Cynthia and Elva :
Saunders; 39 Grandchildren including Derek Moxey, Debra :
: ; ¥: She is survived by Adopted Son: Michael C. Beckford Jr.; 2
Dino Saunders, Wayne Saunders, Shaniqua Saunders, Stephama ‘
Saunders, Kenneth Saunders I, Dwayne Saunders, Gigi Cooper, :
Dudley Saunders, Nikki James, Deli and Portia Saunders, :
Rayshard, Sheena, Joey, Reno, Sherry, Steven, Permal and :
Vanessa Saunders, Phillippa Edden, Melissa Ferguson, Sebeda :
Major, Penelope Rogers, Sean Russell, Darrell, Krisha and :
Demetrius Sears, Demeka Garner, Tavares, Corinthia Powell, :
and Felician Ellis; 46 Great Grandchildren including Melique :
Hepburn; 15 Great Great Grandchildren; Host of other relatives :
and frends including Wellington Sears, Arlington Hanna, George :
Huyler, Aaron Bain, Linda Moxey, Timothy Major, Denise :
Saunders, Michelle Moxey, David Carey, Jason Rogerd, Jamon :
Gamer, Deshann and Sophia Sears, Aladdin Edden, Claretta
éSmalli Duncombe, Brenda Davis, Ronald Duncombe, Iona ‘
Williams, Thomas Porter, Chester Bain, Wilfred Johnson, Floyd :
Newbold, Wilfred Williams, Kenris Carey, Charlie Bethel, Alonso :
Butler, Hue Solomon, Harrington and Margaret Fraizer. Luther :
Johnson, Zilpha Sands, Lucinda Williams, Lucille Williams, :
Hilda Munroe, Charmaine Munroe, China Ferguson, Alpheus :
Woodside, Nurse Portia Romer, Marlene Guerrier, Katherine :
Hanchell, Ms. Mckenzie, United Church of God, the Robins :
Sisters, Wesley Methodist Family, The Community of Stanyard :
Creek, Bishop B. Wenith Davis and Pastor Ismae Davis, Special :
friends; Naomi and Ellis Wymms, Doreen @Sine{f Williams, :
Renda Kemp, Lenore Neeley, Earl and Linda Pinder. :

Huyler, Rickey Moxey, Kephee Bain, Cliff Moxey, Sophia Carey,



: The body will repose at the church on Saturday from 9:00 A.M.
: until service time.

: Funeral arrangements are entrusted by Kurtiss Memorial
: Mortuary, Robinson Road and Fifth Street, Nassau Bahamas.

LORETTA
BECKFORD, 68

of Redland Acres and formerly
of Milleris Long Island will be
held on Saturday at 11:00 A.M.
at Cooperis Terrace Cathederal,
Cooperis Terrace off Kemp Road.
OMciating will be Bishop Robert
Mephee. Interment in Woodlawn
Gardens.

Adopted Grandchildren: Maya and Cameron Beckford; 3
Brothers: Othneil, Edwin and Hartman Beckford; 1 Uncles:
Gussie Turnquest; 3 Sisters-in-law: Jennifer, Rev. Edith and
Irene Beckford; 10 Nephews: Michael Sr., Gary, Nolan, Daren,
Lealand, Edwin Jr., Christopher, Brian, Anthony and Craig
Beckford; 7 Nieces: Olga Demeritte, Orbinette Watson, Aileen
Stubbs, Yvonne Smith, Sherry Bonaby, Cleora Butler, Thelma
Beckford; 6 Nephews-in-law: Elvis Demeritte, Derek Watson,
Kenneth Butler, Clay Smith, Marvin Bonaby, Trevor Butler; 3
Nieces-in-law: Linda Beckfrod, Monique Beckfoed, Jacklyn
Beckford; Numerous grandnieces and nephews; Numerous
Godchildren including Devon; and a host of other relatives and
fnends including Marina Beckford, The Beckford Family, Phyllis,
Vernenchra, Sheryl Lowe, Shirley Bryan, Christine, The Turnquest
Family, Bishop Robert Mcphee and Family, Bishop Hubert
Pinder and Family, The Gibson Family, Rebecca Knowles, Alice
Josey, Marion, Dave, Alice Miller, The Millers Family, The
Solid Rock Church of God , Redland Acres Community.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson
Road and Fifth Street on Friday from 12:00 Noon until 5:00
P.M. and at the church on Saturday from 10:00 A.m. until service
time.
PAGE 16,

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL

“A New Dimension in the Funeral Profession”
#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street « P.O. Box N-3572, Nassau, Bahamas * Tel: (242) 326-5773
William Newbold - Manager/Funeral Director

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Rose Madeleine Toussaint-Cadeus, 39

of Mount Pleasant Village and :
formerly of Cap-Haitien will be :
held on Saturday, July 11th, :
at United :
Alliance Church, Watling Street. :
Officiating will be Pastor ;
Interment |
follows in Southern Cemetery, :
Cowpen & Spikenard Roads. :

2009, at 11 :00 a.m.,

Aleonce Bazile.

She is survived by her husband: :
Claude Cadeus; mother: Evena
Augustin; two sisters: Anne :
Marjse Toussaint, Charles and :

four aunts: : Memories are: one daughter: Roselyn Newbold; one son: Donald

Josette Dolee, Camelie Dolce, | Craig Newbold Jr.; one daughter-in-law: Valona Newbold; five
Jacqueline Dolce and Micheline Dolce; three uncles: Wilfrid : grandchildren: Lavardo, Valincia, Darrese, Donald III and Marica;
| three brothers-in-law:
: Burrows; four sisters-in-law: Carmie Newbold, Nathalie, Murdena
Charles and Gregory Charles; two nieces: Anne Martine Jolimou ; 294 Diana Burrows; numerous nieces and nephews including:
: Vitlean, Ellamae, Helen, Kay, Mel and Rose Newbold, Sandra

Benty Macajouse, Joseph Dolce, Augelique Belizaire, Merlie and Rosie Armbrister, Ida Burrows, Drucilla Munnings, Rose
Dolce, Majorie Premier, Martine Casseus, Mirielle Casseus, : May Cambridge, Altamease Carey, Francetta, Dr. Verona and

: Remelda Seymour, Bennette Seymour, Annamae and Patricia

Renoude, Staff of Bahamian Haitian Center, Mary Reckley, | Burrows, Rosenell Dean, Esther Beneby, Denise Douglas,

Julie Georges, Sicume, Jeanne, Andrelle, Mme Raymond, Staff : Glendena, John, Clyde, Patrick, William, Kingston, Bernard,

Milton, Hervey, Devease, Derrick, Stewart, Dr. Paulus, Terez,
Mama, Mme Wilfrid, Eseamine, Joseph Dieuvilas, Mondesir ; Gladstone Jr., Stanford, Kirkwood, Jeffery Burrows, Oral
Florestal, Antoine St-Ilma, Gabriel Renold, Desir Josenie, ; Newbold, Marie Newbold and Mark Seymour; other relatives
‘ and friends including: Endolyn McKenzie, Euilda Poitier,
: Elizabeth Newbld, Selena Farrington, Joycelyn Bastian, Eleanor
: Lindsay, Lisa Moxey, Beth Carey, Leanamae Wright, Sheva,
: Sandra, Evelyn Bowles, Sammy, Princess, Rosemary, Charles
Brothers Chapel, Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street off Market : Newbold, Anne Burrows, Olivia Bowles, Merlene Stubbs, Cleora
and East Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday Mackey, Hensel Newbold, Dorothy Gaitor, Weeze, Lora and
. ? Efflyn, Cecilia Dean and Family, Marlon Johnson, Ronald
: Newbold, Roselyn and Renald, Derrick Miller, The Stubbs,
:; Seymour, Newbold and Thompson families, Communities of
: Cat Island especially Orange Creek and the entire Methodist

; Church family,

Elise Richard;
Dolce, Gerard Samson and Jocelyn Samson; five nephews:
Ludfy Toussaint, Junior Jolimou, Emdley Charles, Keyshawn
and Alia Louis; numerous cousins including: Mirtho Dolce,
Patrick Dolce; other relatives and friends including: Therese,
of Florida Court, Kerline, Josette, Doude, George, Lolita, Kekette,
Dorlean Jean Renald, Figaro Claire Maisthe, Jean Enock, Joseph
Harry, Joseph Mondesir and Saint Louis Berthony.

Relatives and fnends may pay their last respects at Newbold

at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

Pastor Donald Newbold, 87

of Orange Creek, Cat Island will be held on Saturday, July 11th, 3

2009, at 10:30 a.m., at Grant's Town Wesley Methodist Church,
Baillou Hill Road and Chapel Street. Officiating will be Rev.
William R. Higgs, President - Bahamas Conference of the
Methodist Church, Rev. Kenris Carey, President Emeritus, Rev.

» Charles Sweeting, Pa