Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Mim blowin’ it

HIGH 92F
LOW 82F

SUNNY WITH
>< FSTORM

Volume: 105 No.188

The Tribune e

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

YOUR IN-DEPTH
GUIDE FOR THIS

YEAR'S CELEBRATION
INSIDE TODAY

PM backs

Tal
nar’ Taylor 0 10-year plan
r for education
0 WOU ¢ Ingraham hopes [a

develop into tribunemedia.net
¢ , ae
flexible entity





PRIME Minister
Hubert Ingraham yester-
day lent his support to the
Ministry of Education’s
10-year plan for educa-
tion, noting that he hoped
their initiative would
develop further into a
flexible entity that can
respond to the changing

Forensic pathologist
testifies in court

By NATARIO prior to his examina-

McKENZIE tion. According to Dr ae eae of the
a eee cee Dee the i aot
eee ae en reaelee address at the closing cer-

emony at the Wyndham
Nassau Resort, Mr Ingra-
ham said that it is hoped
that through such dia-
logue that has been start-
ed at this summit, the
Ministry can develop a
plan for education that
will not be a PLP, or
FNM plan, but a “nation-
al plan for education in
the Bahamas.”

“It must be a plan to

tribunemedia.net Dr Raju also told
the court that he con-
ducted an autopsy on
Taylor's body, on
November 21, 2007, at
the morgue of the
Princess Margaret
Hospital. Dr Raju
described the numer-

eG ® 10 20 MURDER ACCUSED OS wounds he
wounds, including Troyniko McNeil observed, including
abrasions, deep cut

FORENSIC
pathologist Dr
Govinda Raju testi-
fied yesterday that
internationally recog-
nised handbag
designer Harl Taylor
suffered 45 to 50



multiple cut penetrat-
wounds, incised wounds and ing wounds to Taylor's face,
head, neck, chest, abdomen and
shoulders. He also described
deep penetrating wounds to
Taylor’s lower abdomen, mid
left shoulder, right upper
abdomen and front of left shoul-
der. Dr Raju said that he also
noted that Taylor had defensive
wounds on his body.
Detective Corporal Basil
Evans told the court yesterday
that around 5.50pm while at the
Central Detective Unit, he saw
detective Inspector Solomon
Cash who pointed out a black
male he later identified as mur-
der accused Troyniko McNeil.
Corporal Evans told the court

SEE page nine

bruises.

Dr Raju told the court yes-
terday that around 2pm on
November 18, 2007, he went to
Mountbatten House for a scene
examination. There, he told the
court, he observed the lifeless
body of an adult male, later
identified as Harl Taylor, lying
in a pool of blood on the wood-
en floor of the bedroom. He told
the court that there was stiff
rigidity of Taylor's upper and
lower extremities. Dr Raju told
the court that from his observa-
tion, he concluded that there
was some violent activity going
on at the time of Taylor’s death.
He also concluded that Taylor
had died some 10 to 12 hours

HURRICANE INSURANCE









IT IS CLAIMED the charity wanted the
right to land in the area to create the

Harrold and Wilson Ponds park (above)
and to relocate their headquarters from
Village Road.


















By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE executive director of the
Bahamas National Trust and senior
employees of the Department of Lands
and Surveys have been accused of “con-
spiring” together to dispossess a poor
farmer and his family of land he had
worked for decades.

In a Statement of Claim filed in the
Supreme Court on June 26, 2009,
between farmer Charles Christopher
Gibson and the Bahamas National
Trust, the environmental organisation
through its director Eric Carey, former
Department of Lands and Surveys
director Tex Turnquest and Christo-



RNa ee UR Gy Ven Qt

S.

which future governments
and ministers of educa-
tion of whatever political
stripe can subscribe and
vigorously pursue. It must
be a plan that is under-
stood by and has the sup-
port of all sectors of our
society: the Government
of the day, the Opposi-
tion, the private sector,
trade unions, the church-
es, academia and most

SEE page nine





BAHAMIANS GIVE

pher Russell are alleged to have acted
“unconscionably” and even “corrupt-
ly” towards Mr Gibson.

It is alleged the BNT and the Depart-
ment breached their “fiduciary duty”
towards the farmer, with both agencies
allegedly concealing certain informa-
tion from him as the BNT moved to
add the land he had farmed to the
“enormous acreage” in the area for
which it had already been granted a
lease.

The farmer, who is represented by
lawyer Lionel Levine, took the BNT to
court last month after he was “devas-

SEE page nine


















JENNIFER HUDSON
performs at the
memorial service
for Michael Jack-
son at the Staples
Centre in Los Ange-
les yesterday.

The 20,000 peo-
ple gathered inside
the arena and mil-
lions watching
around the world
said a final farewell
to the ‘King of Pop’.

¢ TWO PAGE

SPECIAL ON
PAGES 10 and 11

THEIR OPINIONS ON
NATIONAL LOTTERY
AND EDUCATION

















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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



STREET

At the National Education Summit on Monday, a 10-year education development plan was unveiled. It called for, among other things, the cre-
ation of a national lottery to be established with the proceeds being used to improve the struggling public education system and raising the
national grade average from a D+. The controversial question of whether gambling should be legal for Bahamians has many proponents on
both sides of the argument. Yesterday, The Tribune hit the streets to see what the public had to say.

INTERVIEWS BY STEFFON FYNES



am



66! think that if they established a lottery
that it will generate some funds for edu-
cation and for sports, but that educa-

tion thing with D being considered a good
thing makes no sense to me, when I was a
young man you had to get an A or a B or some-
thing — not a D. D never was good for any-
body. D means you are a dunce. Iam for the
lottery . I think that it will be a good thing.”



What I

most of
the young peo-
ple don’t be into
nothing. (The
lottery) should
help provide,
but it all
depends on the

You know, most
of the people
come from a
poor area and
they don’t be
into nothing.
The national lot-
tery is a good
idea, and it

ele oe benefit
the education
US Tc cout

a hah
PHONE: 322-2157

use the money
wisely.”



»EIAIPPY
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t
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individual cause.

ss” Roberts (Fathe r)

Ty

Bahamians voice their opinions on

NATIONAL LOTTERY

and



I think a national lottery is good

for some, and it is bad for some. If

we are playing the lottery it’s good
if we are doing it to sponsor education,
but if we are not doing it for education
and we are playing it all the time, families
may not be able to eat because people
would spend money on lottery instead of
food. We call our Bahamas a Christian
nation; it depends what kind of Christian
nation we are. I am for the lottery.”

RU NO)!






6! think it’s
* a good.
— idea.
= National lottery
_ funds being

_ used for educa-
_ tion happens in
a lot of different
_ countries. Go
_ ahead with the
lottery and let it
finance educa-
tion.”

6¢ In terms of legalising the lottery, it

would mean legalising gambling across

the board. I don’t necessarily see a

problem with that. It is going to open up

more revenue as well as for the Bahamian

casino. The revenue from the lottery can be
used towards education.

“More accountability as to where the fund-
ing goes and is allocated and how it is used is
needed. We need to revamp everything — the
curriculum, teachers, classroom settings and
facilities. That is one of our problems. The
education system is failing even on the pri-
mary level. The lottery, as it factors into the
big picture, is probably small scale, because
it probably won’t change the situation com-
pletely but it will help.

“The adverse effect of legalising gambling
is another social issue that will have to be
dealt with separately. Since there are pri-
vate entities that are benefitting from the
lottery as it is now, we should be giving
some of those funds to the public. More than
just a lottery is needed to fix education
though.”

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6G Right now at the present
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aren't doing anything about it. But
if there was a drug shop on Bay
Street or Shirley Street, the police
would raid it. Why should (gam-
bling) be OK when both of them
are illegal. To use funds from gam-
bling to pay for education is equal
to stealing money to pay my child’s
school fee.”

ETT

ea oat Ea Se sage
- ~) <



Bahamians are gambling any-

how all over the place. The

people are taking the money
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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 , PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS





Health officials
expect more
swine flu

HUBERT MINNIS



WITH many families and
groups travelling abroad dur-
ing the summer months, the
Ministry of Health said it
expects to see the sporadic
emergence of new cases of the
Influenza A(H1N1) virus.

Yesterday, the ministry
reported that the Bahamas
resident who became the
country’s seventh confirmed
case of swine flu a few weeks
ago has fully recovered.

The patient was in South
Florida from June 22 to 24.

On Monday, Minister of
Health Dr Hubert Minnis con-
firmed that there are two new
cases of swine flu in the
Bahamas. It is believed that
these patients contracted the
virus when they travelled to
Orlando. The first case of
swine flu in the Bahamas was
a visitor to the country from
New York in June. So far
none of the swine flu patients
has spread the infection, the
Ministry of Health says.

Health officials are calling
on the public to observe good
respiratory hygiene practices
in an effort to prevent the
spread of A(HIN1).

Police find
large quantity
of drugs

POLICE discovered a
large quantity of illegal drugs
on Monday in the Dover
Sound area of Grand
Bahama.

Two men, aged 31 and 33,
are being questioned in con-
nection with the discovery.

Asst Supt Welbourne Boo-
tle reported that sometime
around 1.45pm, DEU offi-
cers went to Dover Sound
where they discovered 50
buckets of marijuana. They
also found three large crocus
bags, each containing four
bales of marijuana.

Investigations continue.

2009 NATIONAL EDUCATION SUMMIT

Plea for more time to study
0-year education strategy

Teachers and administrators ask for another semester to look at plan

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

EDUCATION delegates have asked
for another semester to study the 10-
year education plan reviewed at the 2009
National Education Summit yesterday.

School principals, administrators,
teachers, education officers and parents
discussed the 22-goal plan in groups on
Monday. As they presented their find-
ings and suggestions to the Ministry of
Education, some said the 50 minutes
allocated for them to review the plan on
Monday was not sufficient.

But after 14 months of preparation
— 13 months longer than was originally
anticipated — Minister of Education Carl
Bethel is keen for the proposal to be
brought to parliament so it can be imple-
mented in schools.

A leader of one of the groups said:
“Give administrators and teachers one
more look-see at the 10 year plan before
moving forward. We suggest strongly
that district superintendents are given
the go ahead to organise discussions in
their districts during the first semester to



CARL BETHEL

provide feedback.”

Points were raised and amendments
suggested in connection with a number
of proposed initiatives, including those
aiming to ensure parents are more
involved in their children’s education,
and those aiming to increase trans-
parency in funding.

Group Two looked at ways of funding

education including a plan for the allo-
cation of at least 17 per cent of the
national budget to education, seeking
funding from external organisations, and
introducing a national lottery in order
to use the proceeds to fund education.

The only issue raised by group leader
Prince Dean concerned the proposed
efforts to ensure schools take greater
responsibility for income-generation and
expenditure. School funds, he said, need
to be backed up by a system of monitor-
ing and enforcement.

Accountable

Mr Dean said: “The income generated
must be monitored to ensure local gov-
ernment is held accountable for the edu-
cational funding included in the budget
and to ensure there is a policy in place to
provide for the recovery of funds, and
imprisonment, when funds are misap-
propriated.”

Delegates also suggested schools
declare their materials to ensure new
supplies are distributed in a fair way
throughout the government school sys-
tem.

Another top priority for educators is
involving parents in their children’s edu-
cation and the leader of the group look-
ing at ways of encouraging parents said:
“The group thought it was necessary for
our ministry to seek to ensure the law
assists with the legal obligations of par-
ents. Far too many parents for far too
long have been grossly negligent of their
duties and it’s time to move beyond just
encouraging them.

“We thought we could create incen-
tives for parents to become more
involved in their children’s education.”

Group members also suggested involv-
ing parents and guardians in community
service programmes, and making schools
more hospitable to parents.

They spoke out against the suggestion
that the school day should be extended
as a way of improving student achieve-
ment and school performance, and again
called on parents to encourage children
after school.

Educators also feel there is a need to
establish a national curriculum for home
schools, as well as a training college
specifically focused on improving the
calibre of teachers.

‘Teachers curse, call us
names and throw objects’





By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

STUDENTS across the
Bahamas claim teachers curse at
them, call them names and throw
objects at them in the classroom,
according to preliminary data
gathered by the College of the
Bahamas.

Junior high school students in
grade eight and senior high school
students in grade 11 claimed in a
series of focus groups that teach-
ers need to find better ways to
relate to students and must
change their “bad attitudes.”

The preliminary findings of the
Ministry of Education and Col-
lege of the Bahamas’ (COB) sur-
vey shows that 47 per cent of 11th
grade students think teachers
need to change their attitudes,
and 19 per cent of eighth grade
students agree.

Murmurs rippled through the
crowd of around 300 education
delegates, school administrators,
principals and teachers, as the
data was presented on the sec-
ond day of the 2009 National




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Preliminary data shows students



think staff need to change attitudes

Education Summit at the Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort in Cable
Beach yesterday.

The COB representative pre-
senting the data said: “The stu-
dents said ‘some of the teachers
need to find a better way to relate
to students’, and ‘tell teachers
about changing their bad atti-
tudes’. They said teachers curse at
them and not many of us believed
that, but we began to question it
as it was consistent across the
board. It was not just one school.

“They said teachers threw
objects at them, teachers did not
treat them fairly, teachers called
them names, and we are not
going to go into the names here,
but this is what the students said.”

Almost 50 per cent of grade
eight students said their teachers
teach by reading notes for them,
and 30 per cent of eleventh
graders agreed. Around 30 per
cent of eleventh graders said their
teachers also give lectures, as did
16 per cent of eighth graders.
Only 16 per cent of eighth graders
said teachers use games as a
teaching method, and 14 per cent
said that would be their preferred
mode of learning. The majority
of students in both age groups
said using computers is their
favourite way to learn, followed
closely by the use of examples
from daily life in teaching.

The students also feel parental
support is vital to their studies,
as are adequate resources and
technology, as 29 per cent of
eleventh graders said parental

support is important, while 19 per
cent of eighth graders agreed.
Adequate resources and technol-
ogy is considered to be of high
importance by 18 per cent of
eleventh graders, and 11 per cent
of eighth graders.

“This is all preliminary data,
and it corroborates the need to
gather more data from the par-
ents,” the COB representative
added. “We need to have their
views as stakeholders in educa-
tion in this country. And we need
to have focus groups about prob-
lems in the home and make a
national effort to get parents
involved. I am pleased to see that
we are beginning this education-
al summit to express some of the
needs in this country. This summit
is a wonderful beginning to mak-
ing evidence based decisions in
relation to our education system
and education in general, creating
a national vision for education
and nation building.”

Additional data from schools,
organised according to areas of
New Providence, shows that a
number of students in grades
eight and eleven do not know
their own Grade Point Average
(GPA), with the southeastern
division of New Providence at the
top of this list. However, when
asked if they are expected to do
their best in school, more students
from the southeast answered
“yes” than was the case for any
other division — and yet many of
them said teachers do not care
about their learning.



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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Time to enforce gambling laws

WE GATHER from spot surveys done
over several years that Bahamians are grad-
ually coming to the conclusion that there
should be a national lottery and all gambling
outlets now in operation should be brought
under control. If those now operating are
allowed to continue they, like the casinos,
should pay a yearly tax.

At one time large church groups, particu-
larly the Baptists and Methodists, were
staunchly against gambling. However, in
recent years a gradual softening can be
detected in the church pews and among the
clerics.

Even we are now of the view — particu-
larly as gambling establishments are openly
operating in defiance of the law — that pub-
lic opinion has already swept the anti-gam-
bling law off the statute books.

Therefore, it is now time for government to
step in with legislation to regulate the oper-
ations.

The only way to do this is to establish a
national lottery that is tightly policed, close-
ly audited and managed as fairly and honestly
as corrupt human nature will allow. Whatev-
er revenue is raised should be specifically
earmarked for education, sports and the
building of a new hospital.

On page 2 of today’s Tribune several
Bahamians have expressed their opinions on
a national lottery and education. One of them
condemned the police for doing nothing
about the daily gambling.

It is true that over the years certain police
officers — and their numbers have not been
small — have been among the citizens stand-
ing in line to take their chance with the “num-
bers.” Naturally, as a result, there has been
much foot dragging in bringing the law to
bear on these side street establishments,
which in turn has emboldened some to
become big time operators and dare govern-
ment to do something about it.

Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson,
who has taken up the challenge, has vowed
that as long as gambling is listed as illegal in
the Penal Code his men will be out there
confiscating the equipment and proceeds of
gambling and arresting those caught in the
gaming houses when police arrive. That is as
far as the police can go. The rest is up to the
courts. This is where the officials seem to get

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the hiccups and start the foot dragging —
they can’t even bring themselves to imitate
Michael Jackson’s exquisite “moon walk.”

No wonder one of the island’s biggest
operators, after being raided by the police
in April, could assure the public that his oper-
ations would remain open and that his
employees had nothing to fear. Since that
announcement, the police have made a sec-
ond raid. But it seems that business goes on as
usual.

The owner, in an interview with The Tri-
bune after the first raid, said that he is of the
opinion — obviously acting on legal advice —
that he was breaking no laws and that he was
working in tandem with local authorities to
determine the way forward.

The Police Commissioner is probably also
acting on legal advice.

Meanwhile the law is being held up to
public ridicule and contempt. It is now up to
government to do something about it. Only
government can break the impasse. If gam-
bling is no longer illegal, then remove it from
the books, and allow the Commissioner and
his men to concentrate on other criminal
activity.

What is now of great concern is that too
many people in this country seem to believe
that they are above the law. When that hap-
pens then the country is well on the road to
anarchy.

We have the example of the House of
Assembly when Opposition members — the
very ones who wrote the rules — denounced
the Speaker for enforcing them against one of
their number who had defied his ruling.

Then there were the striking nurses —
members of an essential service who should
not even consider a strike vote.

The Supreme Court ordered them back to
work, only to be told by many of them that
they had no intention of returning until they
got an insurance plan that government cannot
afford to pay at this time. The next move by
the court should have been to cite for con-
tempt those who refused to obey. The court
did nothing.

It is of great concern that we have come to
such a pass in the affairs of state that our
laws are no longer respected.

If we have laws that the courts are reluctant
to enforce, then don’t call them into service.



Aghast at rise in
fees for aircraft

operators

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I feel sure all of us involved in
the Commercial Airline and
Charter Service in this country
are aghast with a notification
from Flight Standards about
CAD’s increase in fees for air-
craft operators in this country
scheduled for effect on Sep-
tember 10, 2009. Then this
morning in your Business Sec-
tion comes the article about
increase proposals of up to
10,000 per cent for some firms!

The question that many of us
may be asking today is “have
any of the individuals who came
up with this idea ever even
owned an aircraft, yet alone
owned a Charter Operation?”

Have they no earthly concept
of cost involved? We are but a
one man band, one of the little
guys who dared to “do it right”
and cross every ‘t’ and dot every
‘T to run a valuable and appre-
ciated service for the last 18
years here. We are overjoyed
at bringing home about 20 cents
on each dollar! (God only know
what our larger brothers are

letters@tribunemedia net



able to take home after what
must be astronomical expens-
es?)

With this vast fortune in the
pocket we now have to pay
BEC, BTC, insurance, fuel
(near $6 a gallon and $8.50 per
quart of oil) and that long for-
gotten item called ‘Mainte-
nance’. After this we then real-
ly try to pay the bank a mort-
gage and then if we are more
than lucky we get to go to Super
Value or City Meat!

Our Government needs to
take a step backward here and
check out the numbers, for very
soon if we all come to a grinding
halt one day there will be no
air transportation within this
country other than our national
carrier? No tourism, no emer-
gency flights, no Out-Island
funeral services, no weddings
and no local travellers for fam-

ily visits and local hotel clientele
transport available and so it
goes on!

Then NAD announces that
they too are going to increase
our fees at LOP International
Airport adding fuel to the fire.
While with this organisation we
note that still we are having our
main windward runways closed
for ‘maintenance’ or ‘grass cut-
ting’ during peak operating
hours backing up traffic on one
runway. Has no one taken
notice what other International
Aerodromes do with what is
called “displaced thresholds”
where aircraft can still actually
use part of the runway instead
of closing all three miles of it
to change a light bulb or cut a
section of grass down at one
end?

Aviation management in this
country appears, in a lot of
areas, is headed back to the
birds!

CAPT P HARDING
Nassau,
July 6, 2009.

Your legacy is secured Mr Ingraham - but
you should not lead the country post 2012

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please afford me the oppor-
tunity to comment on two news
articles that appeared in your
paper of last week.

I refer to “Public Service Act
set to be Introduced” in the In
Brief section of The Tribune of
Tuesday, June 9th, and “Gov-
ernment prepares for Freedom
of Information Act” by Tribune
Staff Reporter Taneka Thomp-
son, as appeared in The Tribune
of Wednesday, June 10th.

As one who has criticised our
PM in the past, I would like to
publicly congratulate Prime
Minister Ingraham at this time,
on these two bold and revolu-
tionary initiatives.

The legacy of the Rt Hon
Hubert Alexander Ingraham is
already secured for posterity’s
sake. I will always remember
PM Ingraham as the leader who
rid us of tyranny in 1992 and
incompetence in 2007.

Be that as it may Prime Min-
ister Ingraham, you are not the
best person to lead this coun-
try post 2012. Joshua will lead
where Moses cannot. The same
holds for former PM Christie,
who we all know is not capable
of defeating you in a general
election. However, do not make
the same mistake as your men-
tor did, in staying on simply
because you are capable of win-














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ning elections for your party, or
allow yourself to be unduly per-
suaded by those who do not
have your, nor the country’s
best interests at heart, but
whose primary motivation is
winning a general election.

It would be in the best inter-
est of the country were you to
step down as leader of your par-
ty during this term in office; but
please do not do it the way you
did it the last time and leave
your party in shambles.

‘Towards this end then, I have
a few suggestions.

Introduce legislation to limit
the service of a sitting prime
minister to two consecutive
terms.

This will ensure the promo-
tion of new and visionary lead-
ers to lead our country in the
future; instead of being stuck
with a prime minister who
refuses to step down simply
because he is capable of win-
ning another general election,
as is now the case.

I trust that in finally abolish-
ing the infamous General
Orders of the civil service,
greater accountability and trans-
parency will be introduced with
a view to stamping out corrup-
tion wherever and whenever it
raises its ugly head. The people
have long suffered the extra
financial burden of having to
pay twice for prompt and effi-
cient government services, and
cry out to you sir, especially
now, for relief.

Along with a Freedom of
Information Act though, please
reconsider establishing an office
of Ombudsman.

Why would a government of
transparency and openness, a
government of trust, have an
aversion to an office of
Ombudsman, especially when
the establishment of this office

remains an unfulfilled campaign
promise?

With regard to your govern-
ment’s economic stimulus plan,
the missing link is land reform.
The Government of The
Bahamas needs to pay Bahami-
ans for all land that has been
compulsorily acquired by gov-
ernment over the years, and for
which payment remains out-
standing.

Additionally I would respect-
fully suggest introducing legis-
lation to regularise the claims
of thousands of Bahamian fam-
ilies to land throughout the
length and breadth of this arch-
ipelago, known traditionally as
“generation property.” Please
unleash this vast economic
reservoir on behalf of the
Bahamian people.

Finally, please do not call
another general election with-
out first implementing much
needed campaign and electoral
reforms.

And whereas I agree with
you that incompetence was a
factor in the deficiencies of the
last electoral process, I do not
agree with you that nothing is
wrong with the system.

Again, please reconsider your
decision to ignore the findings
and recommendations of the
recent Election Court rulings,
especially with regard to the
Pinewood case.

If an incompetent prime min-
ister is able to wreak so much
havoc on our electoral process,
then you owe it to the nation
as prime minister, during this
term, to implement the neces-
sary changes that would safe-
guard the people from such a
recurrence in future.

LAVADE M DARLING
Nassau,
June 14, 2009.

Will Arawak Cay expansion

affect our Western beaches?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

















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THE TRIBUNE



Study: digital mammography offers better Dates set for the

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 5

detection for Bahamian women under 50 — _ Fox Hill Festival

DIGITAL mammography
has been determined as the best
method for detecting breast
cancer in African-American
and African-Caribbean women,
according to a new study.

The case for digital versus
traditional mammography in
certain groups of women has
been confirmed by a study
reported in the New England
Journal of Medicine.

Dean of the University of
Buckingham School of Medi-
cine Dr Karol Sikora, who sees
patients in the Bahamas in his
capacity as director of Medical
Oncology at the Cancer Cen-
tre Bahamas, said the avail-
ability of digital mammography
is especially critical for Bahami-
an women who are excellent
candidates for the new tech-
nology because of their dense
breast tissue.

This form of testing is also
of particular interest to
Bahamian women as emerging
evidence suggests that they
could be genetically predis-
posed towards getting an
aggressive variety of breast can-
cer at an earlier age.

Battle

The Imaging Centre in con-
junction with the Cancer Cen-
tre Bahamas at Centreville
Medical Pavilion on Collins
Avenue has invested in one of
the country’s first digital mam-
mogram machines, an incom-
parable tool in the continuing
battle against breast cancer.

A study that tracked mam-
mograms on nearly 50,000
women in the United States
and Canada to resolve the
debate over whether there was
a difference between tradition-
al mammography and newer
and more expensive digital
mammography showed a sig-
nificant difference in certain
categories — among them
women under 50 and those with
dense breasts.

GBPA holds



By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama Port Authority (GBPA)
for the first time held an open
bidding with licensed contractors
for the construction of the Grand
Bahama Arts and Craft Centre
in Freeport.

A total of 12 contractors par-
ticipated and entered bids ranging
from a low of $635,109 to a high
of $1,296,000.

The new craft centre will be
located on two acres of land on
East Sunrise Highway, next to the
Jasmine Corporate Centre. It will
consist of an office area, two areas
each comprising 1,000 sq ft, and a
third area comprising 2,500 sq ft.

The project is being undertak-
en by the Grand Bahama Port
Authority in conjunction with the
Bahamas Agricultural and Indus-
trial Corporation (BAIC).

Edison Key, executive chair-
man of BAIC, and deputy chair-
man Winston Pinnock were pre-
sent at the bidding on Friday in
the Port Authority boardroom.

This is the first time in its his-
tory that the GBPA has hosted
an open bid process meeting
where contractors make personal
submission of their bids.

Arthur Jones, vice-president of
Building and Development, said
the open bidding process is one
that contractors can expect with
other GBPA projects.

“This would probably become
a common occurrence here
because GBPA would like to take
the approach where most of our
licensees who are qualified to
engage in particular works would
have the opportunity to do so on
all appropriate projects,” he said.

Mr Jones explained that the
lowest bidder is in no way entitled
to the award of the contract. He
said they will analyse the bids and
get back to the contractors in
about a week to announce who
will be chosen.

The bids were as follows: Alba-
core Construction bid
$889,218.75; Allied Builders
$832,627; DBS Builders
$952,924.79; Glenerick Interna-
tional Ltd $769,315; Island Pro-
jects $1,296,000; Keystone Devel-
opment $898,447; Oral Jones
Construction $636,630.80; Pyra-
mid Construction $635,109; Qual-
ity Construction $735,000; Reef
Construction $998,927.18; San
Jose Construction $856,869; and
West Bay Construction $965,000.

Contractors commended the
Port Authority for taking the
approach of holding an open bid-
ding process.

“T have been a contractor for
more than 10 years and this is the
first time I have been invited by
the Port Authority to participate,
and I commend the Port for tak-
ing this approach,” said a repre-
sentative of Albacore Construc-
tion.

Ian Rolle, GBPA president,



“The study
was important
not only
because of its
size and the
methods it
employed, but
because the
results it
achieved were
so specific.”



Dr Karol Sikora,
Dean of the
University of
Buckingham School
of Medicine

“The results of this study,
which was funded by the
National Cancer Institute, coor-
dinated by the American Col-
lege of Radiology Imaging Net-
work and reported in the New
England Journal of Medicine,
clearly indicate a significant dif-
ference in detection in certain
categories of women, including
those with dense breast tissue
which makes screening using
traditional film methods more
difficult,” said Dr Sikora.

Fewer than one-tenth of one
per cent of all medical facili-
ties in the US offer digital
mammography, partially
because of the initial invest-
ment cost for the equipment
and because, until this study
showed the difference, the
debate continued about
whether or not the more expen-

sive technology and testing was
worthwhile.

A digital mammogram,
allowing a technician or doctor
to zoom in on a suspicious area,
to computer-enhance it for bet-
ter definition, to store it elec-
tronically for comparison pur-
poses without concern for dete-
rioration and to see through
thick, dark tissue costs about
$50 to $100 more per exam.

It is, doctors say, a small
price for what can save some-
one’s life.

“The study was important
not only because of its size and
the methods it employed, but
because the results it achieved
were so specific,” said Dr Siko-
ra, author of “The Treatment
of Cancer”- the most widely-
used textbook on cancer at the
graduate level in medical
schools in the United Kingdom.

Difference

“For the first time we are
able to show that there is a sig-
nificant difference in three key
categories between the more
widely available film mammog-
raphy and digital mammogra-
phy, although in other cases,
the difference is negligible.”

The study was conducted by
administering both forms of
breast examinations — tradi-
tional film and digital — to every
participating woman with two
views taken by each screening
method. Differences showed up
in three categories - age, race
and menopausal status.

For post-menopausal women
over 50 who did not have dense
breast tissue, there was no sig-
nificant difference between tra-
ditional film and digital. How-
ever, there was a measurable
difference in tumour or suspi-
cious area detection in pre-
menopausal women under 50
with dense breast tissue and in
those cases, digital was able to
spot what traditional film
missed.

yon ee for arts and



Vandyke Hepburn

GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITY officials held an open bidding process
with contractors for construction of the Grand Bahama Arts and Crafts Cen-
tre in Freeport. Seated from left are Arthur Jones, vice-president of building
and development; lan Rolle, GBPA president; Edison Key, executive chairman
of BAIC, and Winston Pinnock, deputy-chairman of BAIC.

said the process is significant.

“Today is a very important day
in the history of GBPA, this is
first time that we have done an
exercise of this nature and it is in
line with our making it happen
initiative.

“Mr Hannes Babak, our chair-
man, was very instrumental in
implementing this process and we
thank him very much,” he said.

Mr Key said that an arts and
crafts centre has been long over-
due in Freeport. He was very
pleased that the process has start-
ed.

“We have been talking about a
craft centre for quite a long time
here in Freeport, and I under-
stand that it has been on the
drawing board for years.

“Grand Bahama needs a shot

“To put it simply, if you or
someone you love is African-
Caribbean or African-Ameri-
can and under 50, and you want
to make sure that you or your
daughter, sister, mother or
friend is getting the most accu-
rate picture of what is going on
in her breasts knowing that ear-
ly detection is the best cure for
breast cancer, you should
request, even demand, digital
mammography,” explained Dr
Sikora.

“Tf, on the other hand, you
are over 50, have been through
menopause and are Caucasian,
chances are you will receive just
as accurate a report of your

breast condition using
traditional film mammogra-
phy.”

With one in every eight
women in the US expected to
hear the words “you have
breast cancer” at some time in
her life, determining the best
method for early detection is
crucial -- detected early
enough, breast cancer has a
better than 90 per cent cure
rate.

In addition to being one the
first in the region to offer digi-
tal mammography, the Cancer
Centre Bahamas which opened
in expanded headquarters in
January, is one of only two
medical facilities in the world
outside the US to be certified
by the American College of
Radiation Oncology (ACRO).
The other facility is located
near Vatican City, Rome.

And only a small percentage
of cancer treatment facilities in
the US are ACRO-certified.
The Imaging Centre and the
Cancer Centre Bahamas are
divisions of Centreville
Medical Pavilion which also
houses the Bahamas Heart
Centre.

With anecdotal information
suggesting that there is a high
incidence of breast cancer in
young Bahamian women, the
disease has become an issue of
critical local importance.

crafts centre

in the arm and we really appreci-
ate the Port Authority giving
BAIC some two acres of land for
the project. There are other pro-
jects in the area of agriculture
(that we want to bring on stream)
and (the Port) has some 500 plus
acres sitting idle, and we are pre-
pared to work with them to boost
Freeport because we have some
other large projects in store for
Grand Bahama very soon,” he
said.

Mr Key believes that the gov-
ernment is making “big strides” in
crafts at BAIC. He said training
has been provided to hundreds
of Bahamians.

He noted that over 500 young
Bahamians have already gradu-
ated from the training pro-
gramme, and more than 200 are
currently enrolled this year.

“We are trying to develop a
network of people so we can com-
pete with the foreign imported
items and come up with an
authentic Bahamian craft centre
here in Freeport as well as other
areas of the Bahamas,” he said.

Between the evening of Tuesday June 22nd and the morning of
Wednesday June 23rd, a 1993 Ford Taurus vehicle was broken
into, while parked in a residential area off Mermaid Blvd, off
Carmichael Road. The police have been contacted regarding this
matter, but we need your help, in assisting further, in locating two
very valuable items that were stolen at this time. Description
of the items are as follows:

Two (2)

sets of AUTOMOTIVE SCAN TOOLS.

They will

individually be housed in large black cases, please see

pictures below:

Both of these items are of no use to the average person and to

this end we are offering a

disclosed at the recovery of said items.

reward which will be

Anyone having ANY information may contact the following

numbers.

328-7941,

341/4675, 557-1744 or

436-2621

All calls will be treated with the utmost confidentiality.



THE Fox Hill Festival will be celebrated this year from

July 31 to August 11.

It will be named in honour of Charles Johnson who served
as the festival’s chairman for the past five years and who died

in May of this year.

The festival will be officially opened on Friday, July 31 on

the Fox Hill Parade beginning at 8pm.

Other highlights of the festival include the junkanoo rush

on Emancipation Day beginning at lam.

This will be followed by an Ecumenical service on the
Parade at 11am and a luncheon for the elderly in the Com-

munity Centre right after.
The usual climbing of the

place.

G Ke: SSAC
CLF den

where fife is still we and people still care
Murphyville, 2nd Right from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

MINIATURE HEREND FIGURINES
33% OFFI!!!

DRESSY PRE-TEEN DRESSES,
WHITE, CREME, AND TURQUOISE
AND WHITE ORGANZA,

$80.00 and UP, 25 TO 33% OFF!!!

ROYAL READERS 25% OFFI!!!

Cc

COMMONWEALTH BANK

Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed to delivering superior quality service, to
training and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in
the community.

Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for
Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco.

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
Assisting the Branch Manager in managing the sales activities of
the Branch to enhance profitability.
Effectively leading, supporting and coaching personnel to
achieve corporate objectives.
Effectively managing a portfolio of consumer, mortgage and
commercial loans.

e Adjudicating credit lines within delegated authority.

¢ Managing the Branch’s collection activities and the protection of
collateral.
Following-up with client and support functions to ensure timely
completion of product requests and transactions and resolution of
inquiries and issues.
Ensuring Credit risk ratings and credit scoring practices are
adhered to at all times to mimmize the risk of loan losses.
Ensuring specific objectives are developed through an
appropriate strategic plan to grow the Branch’s loan and deposit
portfolios and other offerings.
Adding value to the customers’ portfolio of financial services
by actively promoting, marketing, building and cross selling all
deposit / investment and consumer credit business. Ensuring
self and direct reports consistently provide highly courteous
customer service in an informed and thorough manner. Assisting
the Manager in attaining the targets incorporated in the Branch’s
financial plan.

QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE:
Bachelor’s degree or higher in Business Administration, Banking
& Finance or a related discipline from an accredited University.
Minimum of eight years commercial banking experience with a
minimum of 3 years supervisory / managerial experience.
Experience in managing a diverse loan portfolio and assessing
loan quality.

Detailed knowledge of Retail / Commercial / Mortgage lending
practices and credit analysis to ensure portfolio quality.
Substantial work experience in loans and risk management with
a full understanding of financial statements and the ability to
anal yze the information.

Excellent leadership and coaching skills

Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills
Excellent organizational and time management skills

Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications.

REMUNERATION PACKAGE:

Commonwealth Bank is a Great place to work! We offer an
exciting work environment with the opportunity for growth and
development. We also offer a competitive compensation package,
reflecting the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications,
including a performance based incentive plan, health, vision,
dental and life insurances and a pension plan.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before

July 24, 2009 to:

Human Resources Department
Re: Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco
P.O. Box SS-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Telefax: (242) 393-8073
E-mail address: hr@ combankltd.com

“Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their
interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those
under consideration will be contacted.”

greasy pole,
plaiting of the Maypole, live music, and games will take

©2009 CreativeRelations.net





PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS
| J a 1



Fishermen advised t
r4 e 9 oO
cash in’ on lionfish

THE Department of Fisheries has recommended that fish-
ermen “cash in on harvesting” lionfish as a means of coun-
teracting that voracious predator’s alarming growth rate.

The meat of the lionfish is edible and “is in fact being used
as a food source” in the Bahamas, Agriculture and Marine
Resources Minister Larry Cartwright said.

The Department of Marine Resources is hoping that fish-
ermen can derive some economic benefit from the harvest and
sale of lionfish, he recently told parliament.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.




















































NOTICE

NIFEST INCORPORATION LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to
Section 239 (2) of the Companies Act, 1992, that a
general meeting of the members of the above-named
company will be held at Dupuch & Turquest & Co., #308
East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas on 7" day of August,
A. D. 2009 at 10: 00 in the forenoon, for the purpose of
having an account laid before the company showing the
manner in which the winding up has been conducted and
the property of the company disposed of, and of hearing
any explanation that may be given by the liquidators, and
for the purpose of passing an extraordinary resolution
disposing of the books accounts and documents of the
company and the liquidators.

Dated the 7* day of July, A.D. 2009

ANTHONY A. M. MOREE
Liquidator

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION QATAR
LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
QATAR LIMITED in dissolution under the provisions
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said Company commenced on
the 2nd day of July,2009 when its Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is Carol G. Gray
of 16945 Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060.

Dated the 7th day of July, 2009.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT
co. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL TERMINAL INVESTMENTS
LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-
named Company are required to send particulars
thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624,
Nassau, Bahamas on or before 28th day of July, A.D.,
2009. In default thereof they will be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, TEXAS 77060

THE Bahamas National Trust (BNT) is
working with Caroline Stahala, PhD stu-
dent at Florida State University, to monitor
the 2009 Bahama Parrot nesting season in
the Abaco National Park.

Ms Stahala is also assisting with deter-
mining the effectiveness of the predator
control programme being implemented by
the Trust to control invasive feral cats which
are the major threat to Bahama Parrots
during the nesting season which begins in
late May, early June.

Forty nests have been located and four
volunteers, Uli Nowlan, Barbara Foreman,
Dr Sue Faircloth and Susie Lill, are assisting
in the watching of the nests. Parrot chicks
were banded during June and July to assist
in future individual identification.

With the support of the Rare Species
Conservation Foundation, 25 nest boxes
have been placed in various locations in
the park to see if the birds will choose to
nest above the ground.

This is being done to determine the effec-
tiveness of providing additional nesting sites
which are less susceptible to predators than
the ground cavities.

The Bahama Amazon Parrot is found in
the Abaco pine and broadleaf forest of the
southern part of Great Abaco. The Abaco
population of the Bahama Parrot is the
only new world parrot that nests in sub-
terrain rock cavities. It is believed that this
adaptation to ground nesting is due to the
few holes found in Abaco’s trees.

A clutch of two to four eggs are laid in
late May or early June. Eggs hatch asyn-
chronously 26-28 days after the female
begins incubation. There is about a 46 per
cent failure hatch rate. The eggs and the
chicks are sometimes eaten by large land



TWO TO four eggs are laid in late May or
early June.

crabs, snakes, feral cats and feral raccoons
or the nests are flooded due to heavy sum-
mer rains.

While the female sits on the eggs, the
male visits the nest four to six times a day to
feed the female. Should the male die or
abandon the female, she would be unable to
raise the chicks alone and would probably
desert the nest. Parents will return to the
nest five to seven times a day to feed the
youngsters, spending considerable time in
the area of the nest to watch and protect it.

The Trust with the assistance of Ms Sta-
hala, Dr Frank Riviera of the United States
Fish and Wildlife Service, Birdlife Interna-
tional, Friends of the Environment and oth-

BNT monitors Bahama
Parrot nesting season

, - . % i,
a | bee

A BAHAMA PARROT pictured in Abaco.



er relevant agencies is in the process of
completing the final draft of the Bahama
Parrot Management Plan for review and
distribution.

The Abaco National Park is the largest of
five national parks and protected areas in
the Abacos managed by the BNT.

Summer Safari Camp is an education

WITH the goal of intro-
ducing children to the
country’s ecosystems, the
Bahamas National Trust
(BNT) once again put on
its Summer Safari Camp.

A group of 50 young peo-
ple between the ages of
eight and 14 joined the
BNT for special field trips
to Harrold and Wilson’s
Ponds National Park, Stu-
art Cove’s Dive Bahamas
and the Bahamas Youth
Camp.

The trips allowed the
children to learn about
wetlands, coral reefs and
the fish that frequent them
and of course the unique
pine forest.

“We also wanted to pro-



Each camper kept a jour-
nal and each afternoon
there was an arts and crafts
activity complimenting the
daily learning experience.

These journals assisted
the young people in creat-
ing presentations for par-
ents and friends on the last
day of the camp.

There were presentations
on dolphins and endan-
gered species, but the need
to provide further protec-
tion for endangered sea
turtles was by the most
popular topic for the pre-
sentations.

Safari Camp culminated
in a group camp-out at the
Retreat on Village Road
on June 27 where the

vide them with some up
close and personal experi-

marine mammals, and we
appreciate the support of

assisting us in coordinating
visits to these attractions,”

young campers cooked din-
ner over an open fire

ences with some of our
endangered species and

Dolphin Encounters and
Ardastra Gardens for

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
ATAR LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the
above-named Company are required to send particulars
thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau,
Bahamas on or before 28th day of July, A.D., 2009. In
default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, TEXAS 77060

EXXONMOBIL UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (NORTH) LIMITED
NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

EXXONMOBIL UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (NORTH)
LIMITED in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said Company commenced on
the 2nd day of July, 2009 when its Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is Carol G. Gray
of 16945 Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060.

Dated the 7th day of July, 2009.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT
co. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

and shared Bahamian sto-
ries.

said Shelley Cant, BNT
education officer.

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL TERMINAL INVESTMENTS LIMITED
NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

EXXONMOBIL TERMINAL INVESTMENTS LIMITED
in dissolution under the provisions of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said Company commenced on
the 2nd day of July,2009 when its Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is Carol G. Gray
of 16945 Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060.

Dated the 7th day of July, 2009.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT
co. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (NORTH)
LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against
the above-named Company are required to send
particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O. Box
N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 28th day of July,
A.D., 2009.|In default thereof they will be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, TEXAS 77060



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 7





Good news and bad.
news about sharks

“Tam the shark among the fish-
es, and the Ganges among the
rivers.”

— Bhagavad Gita

W ELL folks, when it
comes to sharks —

we have some good news and
some bad news.

The bad news is that sharks
— like most other big fish in the
ocean — are not long for this
world if we continue overfishing
on an industrial-scale.

The good news is that because
driftnet and longline fishing are
banned in the Bahamas, our
shark populations are relatively
stable. In fact, National Geo-
graphic described Bahamian
waters as a relative "Eden" for
sharks compared to the rest of
the world.

Unfortunately, sharks have
always suffered from an image
problem. People tend to regard
them as serial killers and fishing
competitors. But to Aleksandra
Maljkovic’, a doctoral student in
marine ecology at Canada's
Simon Fraser University, they
are a fascinating research sub-
ject.

"T have been obsessed with
sharks since childhood," she
wrote during a recent internship
at the Bimini Biological Field
Station. "My main aim here is to
learn as much as possible about
handling sharks without losing
body parts so I can pursue my
shark-related PhD.”

The Bimini training must have
been successful, because
Maljkovic’ appeared perfectly
normal at a meeting hosted by
the Bahamas National Trust last
week where she reported on new
shark research at Southwest
Point. Maljkovic’ is studying the
impacts of marine resource
depletion on the ecology and
behaviour of Caribbean reef
sharks.

The Bahamas has a reputa-
tion for such research because of
its relatively intact shark popula-
tions. The Cape Eleuthera Insti-
tute launched a shark research

Synergy Bahamas

programme a year ago. And the
Bimini Field Station, operated
by venerable University of Miami
professor Dr Sammy Gruber, has
been studying sharks since 1990.

Gruber took over this mantle
from the defunct Lerner Marine
Lab, which was set up on Bimini
by renowned big game fisherman
Michael Lerner in 1948. Lerner
used to pal around with Ernest
Hemingway and founded the
International Game Fishing
Association, but he was also a
trustee of the American Muse-
um of Natural History and had a
passion for marine biology.

The 1930s and 40s were the
days when grinning sportfisher-
men were ritually photographed
on piers next to the 500-pound
tunas and marlins they had just
caught. However, scientists have
determined that big ocean fish
like these have declined by 90
per cent over the past 50 years.

And the bad news is getting
worse. For example, we know
that if we keep overfishing at cur-
rent rates most of the world's
commercial fisheries will collapse
by mid-century. To understand
what that means we have only to
consider the once bountiful
Canadian cod fishery, which was
closed in the early 1990s, with
the loss of over 40,000 jobs, and
has been unable to recover.

In recent years the overfishing
of sharks has become a big prob-
lem too. More than 100 million
are taken annually by commer-
cial fishermen and another five
million by recreational fishermen.
According to Maljkovic’, "the
trends indicate precipitous pop-
ulation declines in all large-bod-
ied sharks. They are the most
threatened species on the plan-
et.”

One of the chief reasons for



this is the Chinese demand for
shark fin soup. Fins can fetch
hundreds of dollars, whereas
shark meat is worth less than
most fish. As a result, fins are cut
off millions of living sharks and
the mutilated animals thrown
back into the sea to die — a prac-
tice that was banned by the US in
2000.

Sharks are like the lions and
tigers of the sea, and scientists
like Maljkovic’ are trying des-
perately to understand the
ecosystem changes that will occur
due to their decline. As top
predators, sharks help keep the
oceans in balance by controlling
other species. To explain this,
Maljkovic’ cited research showing
that intense fishing pressure on
sharks has produced a cascade of
unexpected consequences.

With fewer large predators in
the sea, the number of rays,
skates and small shark species
has exploded, and these are dec-
imating the populations of other
vital marine species. North Car-
olina, for example, had to close
its century-old scallop fishery in
2004 because of over-predation
by rays, while shark fishing in
Tasmania caused a boom in their
main prey — octopus — which
crashed the spiny lobster fishery
there.

Scientists like Gruber and
Maljkovic’ often complain about
the popular fear of sharks, which
leads many to think it is a good
thing to kill them. But the fact is
that overfishing benefits no one,
least of all the fishermen. And
sharks are especially vulnerable
because they take so long to
reach sexual maturity and only
reproduce every couple of years.

But despite our propensity to
kill sharks whenever we have the
opportunity, the Bahamas gen-

erally maintains a good reputa-
tion in terms of marine conser-
vation. In a 2007 article National
Geographic pointed out that
most of our archipelago remains
free of industrial development:
"Locals still make a living off
Bahamian lobster, snapper, and
conch; sportsmen still take bone-
fish from the sand flats, and mar-
lin and sailfish from the cold
6,000-foot-deep chasm called the
Tongue of the Ocean.

"More than 40 shark species
cruise Bahamian waters," the
article continued, "including
tigers, lemons, great hammer-
heads, bulls, blacktips, makos,
silkies, nurses; even migrating
blues and massive whale sharks
pass through. Others live here
year-round, giving birth in the
same quiet lagoons where they
were born.”

According to Mike Braynan,
director of the Department of
Marine Resources, there is no
significant commercial shark fish-
ery in The Bahamas: "We have
had a line item for sharks in our
landing statistics off and on over
the years, but usually the amount
is zero."

By contrast, shark dive
tourism is a multi-million-dollar
industry that attracts thousands
of visitors and generates tons of
priceless publicity every year. It
contributes much more to our

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economy than a dead shark ona
fishing boat ever could. In fact,
according to Gruber, a single live
shark in healthy habitat like the
Bahamas is worth as much as
$200,000 in tourism revenue over
its lifetime.

That's why shark feeding has
become such a big part of the
local dive industry. And although
feeding wild animals is generally
frowned upon, Gruber has long
been in favour of it where sharks
are concerned: "The reasons are
manifold, not the least being the
economic value of sharks to the
dive industry of the Bahamas.
Considering the unremitting
commercial slaughter and the
bad press that sharks inevitably
get these days, any development
of a positive image by making
divers into ambassadors for shark
conservation can only help.”

Maljkovic’ seems to agree
with this analysis. She told BNT
members last week that her
recent research at Southwest
Point looked into the impacts of
feeding on reef shark ecology.
With the help of Stuart Cove's
dive operation at South Ocean
she observed and tagged num-
bers of sharks, and concluded
that dive tourism has negligible
impacts on their behaviour.

She also concluded that reef
shark conservation efforts would
likely have a positive impact on

populations of other marine
species, and called for an ecosys-
tem-based approach to marine
conservation. This is something
that the BNT and other environ-
mental groups have also been
pushing for years through the
national park system.

Back in the 1980s an assess-
ment of popular dive sites off the
southwest coast of New Provi-
dence led to the first proposals
for a marine park in that area.
The idea was revived in the early
2000s during the fight to preserve
Clifton as a national heritage
park, and the BNT is now work-
ing on a formal proposal for the
government to consider.

That proposal will be based
on information to be collected
during a rapid ecological survey
now being planned, as well as
from a series of consultations
with stakeholders — the people
who live near and use the areas
that may be included in the pro-
posed reserve.

The objective is to protect our
natural resources while provid-
ing non-destructive economic
opportunities (like shark dive
tourism), as well as recreational
and educational opportunities for
Bahamians and visitors. A multi-
use marine reserve in this area
has the potential to become a
cornerstone of the country's
national park system, the BNT
says.

Some argue that the entire
Bahamas is already a no-take
zone for sharks. But this over-
looks the fact that — like turtles
— sharks don't respect national
boundaries. And ongoing coastal
development at places like Bimi-
ni is destroying critical nursery
habitat for these endangered ani-
mals.

As National Geographic put
it, "If the sharks go, so too goes a
bountiful ecosystem that feeds
local people and keeps outsiders
coming back to the islands."

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



LAUNCH OF RBPF SUMMER YOUTH PROGRAMME
Children on the

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOBLE OVERSEAS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
YASHIMA ALPS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GOLDEN CREST INVESTMENT
HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AURUBIN HOLDINGS S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



PHOTOS By Felipé Major
Tribune Staff

Howes of children took part in Monday’s
march to mark the launch of this year’s Royal
Bahamas Police Force Summer Youth programme.

Organised under the banners of their respective dis-
tricts, participants marched from St John’s Native Bap-
tist Church on East Street to Police Headquarters.

The RBDF’s Summer Youth Programme brings
together students from all over New Providence for six to
eight weeks of educational and recreational activities.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SUNWATER LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 9



Prime Minister backs
plan for education

FROM page one

especially Bahamian parents and citi-
zens. It is necessary, therefore, that the
process you have begun at this summit
be continued and expanded,” he said.

Mr Ingraham extended a special invi-
tation to his “friends in the Opposition”
to participate fully in this enterprise.

Noting the fact that education cur-
rently receives more than 16 per cent of
the annual national budget Mr Ingra-
ham said that it is with considerable
satisfaction that the Bahamas was able
to report to the United Nations that it
has achieved the vast majority of the
millennium goals for education even as
these were just being articulated in
international circles.

“It is to the credit of successive
Bahamian governments since 1967 that
every child in the Bahamas has access to
education as a right and that we in the
public sector guarantee that there is
school space for every child in the
Bahamas from kindergarten to Grade
12.”

The Prime Minister also noted that
there has been significant criticism of

the performance of pub-
lic schools which has
been focused primarily
on the average grades
produced each year.
However, Mr Ingraham
added that it must also
be recognised that these
same schools produce
graduates who are well
above average and some
who are even considered
“brilliant by any inter-
national yardstick.”
“Each year, the top
echelon of our student
body leaves school as
accomplished scholars,
able to pursue tertiary
level education at the
best universities and
technical colleges in the
world, where many of
them perform exceptionally well.
“Top class professionals — teachers,
nurses, doctors, lawyers, accountants,
bankers — have come out of our
schools, both public and private, having
been given the tools to pursue higher

HUBERT INGRAHAM



education in our schools.
We have helped in the
development of talented
artists, musicians and
crafts persons, acclaimed
chefs and tourism prac-
titioners, and successful
entrepreneurs and busi-
ness managers.

“Regrettably, our suc-
cess in getting every
child into a classroom
has not translated into
every child having
achieved his full poten-
tial. When, in the first
half of the 20th century,
most children complet-
ing primary school could
read and write, today
too many students leave
our secondary schools
only semi-literate and
semi-numerate.

“Tn earlier times, academically weak
students dropped out of school, learned
a trade or became one of a large
unskilled and semi-literate work force.
They never had the opportunity to

;
7
]
*
J
'
*
'
.
i

attend secondary schools. Today, many
young persons are kept in school until :
age 18, but still leave school as unpre- i
pared to earn a living as would have
their early counterparts who never pro- }

gressed beyond primary school.”

This mismatch between money spent }
and the unsatisfactory performance of }
pupils has served as a principal cause for }
this latest summit. Mr Ingraham said
that while the Bahamas must face the
fact that only a minority — “some saya i
talented tenth” — of any population will :
excel academically, the Bahamas nev- }
ertheless has a responsibility to prepare }
the great majority of its populace to }
make a living and to function as bal- :

anced and productive citizens.

“You have spent the past two days }
reviewing and discussing a draft ten- :
year education plan. It is my hope that :
your sessions will have produced some }
practical, sensible, and focused recom- }
mendations on how we might invigo- }
rate our education system, stimulate }
young persons not only to want to learn, i

but to excel,” he said.

¢ SEE PAGE THREE

BNT chief, Lands and Surveys staff accused
of ‘conspiring’ to dispossess farmer of land

FROM page one

tated” to receive a letter in May
2008 which gave him three
months to vacate land he had
leased from the Crown for 40
years to farm with his family.

The Statement claims that he
later discovered that at around
the same time he had received
the letter the Department had
already granted the land — on
which Mr Gibson had made a
livelihood farming pigs, sheep,
cattle and chickens — to the
BNT without his knowledge.

The environmental charity
wanted the right to land in the
area to create the protected
Harrold and Wilson Ponds park
and to relocate their headquar-
ters from Village Road, it is
claimed.

The location had come to the
organisation’s attention after it
became a major draw for
birdlife as a result of Mr Gib-
son’s farming activities, with
birds eating the feed he gave to
his animals, the statement
claims.

It is alleged that in 2007, the
same year that the organisation
was granted 250 acres in the
area, Mr Carey, on behalf of
the BNT, first started to “make
enquiries” of the Department
concerning the possibility of
acquiring rights to the farm land
Gibson leased.

Mr Carey consequently went
on to propose to the farmer that
if the BNT could take posses-
sion of half of the land in ques-
tion — four acres — the organ-
isation would assist Mr Gibson
in getting a lease for 50 acres

Clinton draws crowds
as UN envoy to Haiti

GONAIVES, Haiti

BILL CLINTON on Tuesday took his Haiti relief effort to this
battered seaside city that was nearly destroyed last year by a series
of tropical storms, finding a mud-caked maze of partially rebuilt
homes and shops, according to Associated Press.

Clinton, the new special U.N. envoy to Haiti, viewed river con-
trol projects and visited a hospital that served as an emergency shel-
ter during the two storms that ravaged the town. Four storms hit
Haiti in all, killing nearly 800 people nationwide and causing $1 bil-
lion in damage to irrigation, bridges and roads.

The former president praised reconstruction efforts but said
much more work needed to be done. He said Haiti needs more
money and better coordination among aid groups and the gov-
ernment to rebuild and spur development.

“[’m just trying to organize this process and drive it faster,”
Clinton said during a break in the tour, standing in the blazing mid-
day sun alongside a smiling President Rene Preval.

Aid has poured into the Gonaives region but many homes and
shops remain damaged and the area remains vulnerable to flood-
ing because the surrounding hills have been stripped of trees to cre-
ate farm fields and make charcoal for cooking.

It was Clinton’s first trip to Gonaives, but he was greeted like a
returning hero. Shrieking girls clamored to have their photo taken
with the former president and men pushed their elderly mothers
through the crowd for a chance to shake his hand.

People stood on piles of rubble to catch a glimpse of Clinton’s
motorcade as it wove through the rocky streets of Gonaives, one of
the poorest cities in a chronically troubled country considered the
poorest in the Western Hemisphere.

Clinton said the Haitian government and its international back-
ers hope to create 150,000 to 200,000 jobs nationwide over the
next two years. Many of those jobs will come from projects to
rebuild roads and shore up erosion-prone hillsides.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORCHID OAKS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is

Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

of farm land in Andros where
he could grow feed for his
chickens.

However, the statement
claims that Mr Carey, on behalf
of the BNT, wanted all of the
land.

Furthermore, it alleges he
“never made an approach” to
the Ministry of Agriculture on
behalf of Mr Gibson and “nev-
er intended to”, instead “secret-
ly” approaching the Depart-
ment of Lands and Surveys with
a view to having the entire
leased farm taken away from
the plaintiff and given to the
BNT with nothing in return.

The deal proposed by the
BNT with Mr Gibson was
therefore “bogus and not bona
fide and constituted uncon-
scionable conduct against a
poor and simple farmer and his
family,” it is alleged.

Meanwhile, despite previ-
ously meeting with Mr Turn-
quest and Mr Russell of the
Department of Lands and Sur-
veys and making enquiries
about the status of his lease, Mr
Gibson claims he only learnt
that his lease on the land had
come to an end in the letter of



May 2008, which asked him to
vacate the premises.

The Department, from which
Mr Turnquest resigned amid
controversy over his alleged
role in grants of Crown land
made to family members and
friends, had never “produced
evidence of grants of lease or
renewals of lease to the plaintiff
nor produced demands for rent
nor accepted rent in respect of
his leased farm...so the plaintiff
could never be certain that his
status as a tenant was in good
standing,” the statement of
claim alleges.

Mr Carey was aware of this, it
is alleged, and “despite the fact
that the department, with the
knowledge of the BNT, had giv-
en Mr Gibson the expectation
that his renewable lease would
be renewed...conspired with the
officers of the Department that
the eight acres of Crown
land...that the plaintiff had
farmed with his family for over
40 years would be taken away
from them and donated to the
(BNT).”

The statement claims that Mr
Gibson became subject to an
“ever increasing battery of

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AVENARIUS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)











Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

















Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)






Legal Notice

NOTICE
LIMEHOUSE INCORPORATED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

threats from senior civil servants i
asking him to vacate” the land :

from May 2008 onwards.

Mr Gibson, who is described
as having been born in 1947 into ;
a “poor farming family”, began }
farming the land behind Fire :
Trail Road in the vicinity of

Wilson Pond at age 21.

In his statement of claim he is }
asking the court to rule that he :
has “exclusive possession and }
occupation” of the eight acres of }
land he had farmed prior to }

May 2008.

He is also seeking an injunc- }
tion restraining the BNT from
entering that area of land and :
another 36,500 square feet of ;
land he owns there without his :
permission and from “interfer- }
ing with the exclusive posses- }
sion occupation and enjoyment }
of the relevant land for farm- :

ing purposes.”

Also demanded is $120,000
that the statement alleges Mr }
Carey is alleged to have :

promised Mr Gibson in return

for him agreeing to remove two }
poultry houses that were locat- :
ed near the boardwalk con- }
structed by the BNT over the }

ponds.

Har! Taylor

FROM page one

that after receiving informa-
i tion regarding McNeil from
i Inspector Cash, he told McNeil
i to take off his clothes and gave
i him clothes to put on. This he
i said was done in the presence
i of Inspector Cash and ASP
i Fernander. He told the court
i that he collected a gray T-shirt,
a white T-shirt, a pair of short
blue jeans, white boxer shorts
and a pair of white socks from
McNeil. He told the court that
he packaged the items in
? brown paper bags, which he
sealed. He said the items were
delivered to the police forensic
lab the following day. Corporal
Evans also told the court that
while at CDU, he also spoke
? to ASP Leon Bethel regard-
ing McNeil and as a result
took a hair sample from him.
The hair sample was also deliv-
ered to the police forensic lab
on November 15, he said.

During cross-examination,
McNeil’s attorney Murrio
Ducille suggested that Corpo-
ral Evans had asked his client
for his clothing because he had
told him that he wanted to
examine his body to see if he
had any injuries. Corporal
Evans denied the suggestion
? admitting that he gave McNeil
? no reason for requesting his
clothing. He also noted that
? McNeil was a suspect during
i that time. Mr Ducille also
i pointed out that he had taken
i a hair sample from McNeil
i without his consent. Corporal
i Evans replied that McNeil,
? who did have a lawyer present
i did not object to the sample
i being taken. He admitted,
: however, that the accused had
? not consented to the sample
being taken.

Detective Inspector
? Rochelle Deleveaux-Rolle told
the court yesterday that on
August 15, 2008, she received a
: number of items from Corpo-
? ral 2313 Francis. She said she
? found biological stains on each
? shoulder of McNeil’s shirt and
took a cutting from them. She
i also told the court that she
: took a cutting from the heels
? of McNeil’s socks and for-
warded them for DNA analy-
i sis.
The case, which is being
i heard before Senior Justice
Anita Allen, continues today.
i Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner, Neil
i Brathwaite and Darnell
: Dorsette represent the Crown.
Troyniko McNeil, 22, the
? son of Taylor’s former busi-
? ness partner, Troy McNeil, is
charged with intentionally
? causing the death of Harl Tay-
lor between Saturday,
: November 17, and Sunday,
? November 18, 2007, while
? being concerned together with
another. Taylor, 37, was found
dead at his home, Mountbat-

i ten House, on West Hill
: Street.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TALIPAN VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
COURCELLES GREENS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

CUED © A SOMBRE FAREWELL TO MICHAEL JACKSON e
around the world

mourn their idol

LONDON

FANS IN Asia stayed up into the
wee hours, bars across Europe held
Michael Jackson theme nights and
television stations from Sydney to
Paris cleared their schedules Tues-
day to broadcast the King of Pop’s
star-studded memorial service live
from Los Angeles, according to
Associated Press.

Fans mourned — and celebrated
— the singer’s life along with the
thousands attending the U.S.
event, where entertainers including
Stevie Wonder, Mariah Carey,
Usher, Lionel Richie paid tribute
to the star, who died June 25. The
12-year-old Welsh schoolboy Sha-
heen Jafargholi, who wowed TV
audiences earlier this year with the
Jackson 5 song “Who’s Loving
You” on “Britain’s Got Talent”
got a standing ovation after he
sang the same song to the stadium.

In London, dozens of fans shel-
tered under umbrellas against the
rain as they watched the event on a
big screen outside the 02 Arena,
where Jackson was to have per-
formed 50 comeback shows start-
ing next week. Many more stayed
dry at home after the BBC
announced it would cancel sched-
uled programming and show the
ceremony live.

“His whole life was a global
broadcast in a way, so I suppose
it’s fitting that his death also is,”
said barista Robert Anderson, 26,
in London.

Crowds gathered outside
Harlem’s Apollo Theater in New
York — where the Jackson 5 won
“Amateur Night” in 1967 — and in
Detroit, where his career was
launched with Motown Records.

“T think he was somebody who
really did change the style of
music,” said Jonathan Contreras, a
23-year-old college student from
Westland, Michigan. “They call
him the King of Pop. I call him the
King of Music.”

Fans gathered at Berlin’s O2
World arena and at a bar just off
Paris’ Champs-Elysees, where
about 20 people, many dressed in
black, Jackson-style hats or white
gloves, watched the ceremony.

“T didn’t want to experience this
moment alone,” said Marie-Anne
Le Saux, 25, an insurance company
employee who helped organize the
ceremony.

In Santiago, Chile, national
police band played “We are the
world” during the traditional guard
change at the presidential palace
La Moneda, as hundreds looked
on.

About 50 fans lit candles and
laid flowers in the main square in
Stockholm, as Jackson hits “Billie
Jean” and “Earth Song” poured
out of a small stereo.

Hannah Ralme, 14, from Stock-
holm, said she had been heartbro-
ken by Jackson’s death. “It’s like a
piece of me died,” she said. “The
music, the way he danced, the way
he expressed it showed me how to
live my life — to be childlike and
think about other people.”

Ata Pan-African culture festival
in Algiers, Algeria, hundreds of
singers and dancers from across
the continent performed The Jack-
son 5’s “Blame it on the Boogie”
as a tribute.

Several hundred Jackson fans
gathered at a Hong Kong mall late
Tuesday to remember their idol
and watch the memorial on a big
screen, surrounded by shuttered
store fronts. Holding white can-
dles, Hong Kong singer William
Chan and Taiwanese pop star Judy
Chou led the audience in observing
a 30-second silence. Many fans
clutched red roses and wore black;
some donned Jackson’s trademark
fedora hats.

In Japan, home to some of Jack-
son’s most passionate fans, about
100 people gathered at a Tower
Records store in downtown Tokyo
to watch his videos on a big screen
hours before the Los Angeles
memorial. The store, which Jack-
son visited twice, displayed his
hand print in a cement block and
large posters celebrating his per-
formances. Several shelves dedicat-
ed to the pop star were stacked
with his CDs and DVDs.

“T love him,” said Namiko
Hayakawa, a 31-year-old house-
wife, one of the first to grab a seat.
“He is one of the greatest and most
original solo performers. He also
has a message about peace. He is
such a big star, but he has a mes-
sage for every little person.”

In the Philippines, noontime
television variety show “Eat Bula-
ga” said it would hold a Jackson
dance contest Wednesday in honor
of the pop icon.

For some, the relentless media
coverage of Jackson since his death
was too much.

“In Ireland we like a good funer-
al, so we’ll be tuning in. There’s no
good sports match on tonight any-
way,” said barman Peadar O i #
Docherty, 24, in the Stag’s Head i j lial
pub in central Dublin. i }

But, he added, “alot of the adu- Pee

lation is completely over the top.” THE JACKSON FAMILY, from left, Janet Jackson, Paris Jackson, LaToya Jackson, Jermaine Jackson and Prince Michael are shown on stage at the memorial service.

Wally Skalij, Pool/AP

Mark J. Terrill, Pool/AP

Kevork Djansezian, pool/AP





THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 11



era JACKSON (AP FILE)
LOS ANGELES

IT WAS not spectacular, extrav-
agant or bizarre. There were songs
and tears but little dancing. Instead,
Michael Jackson’s memorial was a
somber, spiritual ceremony that
reached back for the essence of the
man, according to Associated Press.

Singer, dancer, superstar,
humanitarian: That was how the
some 20,000 people gathered inside
the Staples Center arena on Tues-
day, and untold millions watching
around the world, remembered
Jackson, whose immense talents
almost drowned beneath the spec-
tacle of his life and fame.

If there was a shocking moment,
it came in the form of Jackson’s
daughter, Paris-Michael, who made
the first public statement of her 11
years.

“Ever since I was born, Daddy
has been the best father you could
ever imagine,” she said, dissolving
into tears and turning to lean on
her aunt Janet. “And I just wanted
to say I love him — so much.”

Outside the arena, the celebrity-
industrial complex that Jackson
helped create ground on. More
than 3,000 police officers massed
downtown to keep the ticketless
at bay. Helicopters followed the
golden casket as it was driven over
blocked-off freeways from Forest
Lawn cemetery to Staples Center.
A bazaar of T-shirts, buttons, pho-
tos and other memorabilia sprout-
ed in the blocks around the memo-
rial. Movie theaters played the ser-
vice live and people paused around
the world to watch.

Inside, however, the atmosphere
was churchlike, assisted by the
enormous video image of a stained
glass window, with red-gold clouds
blowing past, that was projected
behind the stage.

The ceremony began with
Smokey Robinson reading state-
ments from Jackson’s close friend
Diana Ross — “Michael was part
of the fabric of my life” — and then
Nelson Mandela — “Be strong.”

A lengthy silence of several min-
utes followed, punctuated only by
a steady twinkle of camera flashes.
The thousands of mourners spoke
softly to those in neighboring seats
or contemplated their private
thoughts.

Celebrities made their way to
their seats in front of the stage:
Kobe Bryant, Spike Lee, Wesley
Snipes, Lou Ferrigno, Don King,
the Kardashian sisters, Magic John-
son, Brooke Shields, Larry King.
While Jackson was among the most
famous faces in the world, today’s
megastars were largely absent.
Those present mostly reflected
some connection to Jackson’s life
or work.

Among those conspicuously not
in attendance were Elizabeth Tay-
lor, Ross and Debbie Rowe, Jack-
son’s ex-wife and the mother of
Jackson’s two oldest children.

Many vehicles left Staples in a
long motorcade that ended up in a
Beverly Hills hotel. Record pro-
ducer Jimmy Jam told AP Televi-
sion that he was headed for a gath-
ering for friends and family, but he
won't give details.

The fans, clutching tickets that
1.6 million people had sought, were
a visual representation of Jackson’s
life: white, black and everything in
between; from Mexico, Japan, Italy
or America; wearing fedoras,

A final farewell to

July 7, 2009 in Los Angeles.

African headdresses, sequins or
surgical masks. Actor Corey Feld-
man showed up fully costumed as
Michael Jackson.

“Words can’t express how I
feel,” said Dani Harris, a 35-year-
old stay-at-home mom from Los
Angeles.

“You think about one person,
larger than presidents and kings
and queens,” Harris said. “People
in countries you can’t even see on
the map know his face, his music.”

The pre-ceremony stillness was
broken by the organ strains of an
African-American spiritual. “Hal-
lelujah, hallelujah, going to see the
King,” a choir sang. The crowd
cheered and rose to its feet.

The Rev. Lucious W. Smith of
the Friendship Baptist Church in
Pasadena gave the greeting, stand-
ing on the same stage where Jack-
son had been rehearsing for a
comeback concert before his death
on June 25 at age 50. Then Mariah
Carey sang the opening perfor-

LIONEL RICHIE performs at the Michael Jackson public memorial service held at Staples Center on Tuesday,

mance with a sweet rendition of
the Jackson 5 ballad “PL Be
There,” a duet with Trey Lorenz.
Queen Latifah read a special
poem composed by Maya
Angelou. Lionel Richie sang
gospel, “Jesus Is Love.” Berry
Gordy remembered the prodigy
of young Michael, drawing a stand-
ing ovation when he said the title
King of Pop would no longer suf-
fice: “He is simply the greatest
entertainer who ever lived.”
Emotions peaked when the Rev.
Al Sharpton delivered a fiery eulo-
gy highlighting all the barriers
Jackson broke and the troubles he
faced. “Every time he got knocked
down, he got back up,” Sharpton
said, and the applauding crowd
again jumped to its feet.
Sharpton rode the moment,
building to a crescendo. “There
wasn’t nothing strange about your
daddy,” he said later, addressing
Jackson’s three children in the
front row. “It was strange what

LCM a ESPEN

your daddy had to deal with!”

Jubilation erupted, with the
longest standing ovation of the
day. It seemed as if Sharpton
broke through some sort of wall,
freeing shouts from the crowd of
“We love you Michael!” After he
left the stage, chants of “Mi-chael!
Mi-chael!” filled the arena.

The parade of famous names
continued: Jennifer Hudson, Stevie
Wonder, Usher, Martin Luther
King III and his sister Bernice,
US. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee and
Kobe Bryant.

For a performer who smashed
the race barrier on MTV and did
as much as anyone to make black
music mainstream — not to men-
tion was accused of trying to turn
himself white through skin treat-
ments and plastic surgery — the
ceremony had a remarkably black
cast. John Mayer and Brooke
Sheields were the only white celebs
with major roles.

Another unexpected aspect was





Monica Almeida, Pool/AP

Cd

Gabriel Bouys, pool/AP

MICHAEL JACKSON’S daughter Paris Michael Katherine is comforted
by her aunts Janet Jackson, right, and LaToya Jackson at a memorial
service for music legend Michael Jackson.

the logistics. The mayhem and traf-
fic snarls that had been feared by
city officials never materialized.
The thousands of ticketholders
began filing in early and encoun-
tered few problems, and traffic was
actually considered by police to be
lighter than normal. An estimate
of up to 700,000 gawkers turned
out to be about 1,000.

The city of Los Angeles set up a
Web site to allow fans to con-
tribute money to help the city pay
for the memorial, which was esti-
mated to cost $1.5 million to $4
million. AEG, the event promoter
behind the memorial, has not
addressed whether it will give
money for the effort, but did con-
tribute $1 million to the city after it
staged a victory parade for the Los
Angeles Lakers last month.

It was not clear what will hap-

pen to Jackson’s body. The For-
est Lawn Memorial Park Holly-
wood Hills cemetery, where a pri-
vate service was held, is the final
resting place for such stars as Bette
Davis, Andy Gibb, Freddie Prinze,
Liberace and recently deceased
David Carradine and Ed McMa-
hon.

But Jackson’s brother Jermaine
has expressed a desire to have him
buried someday at Neverland, his
estate in Southern California.

The ceremony ended with Jack-
son’s family on stage, amid a choir,
singing “Heal the World.”

“All around us are people of
different cultures, different reli-
gions, different nationalities,” Rev.
Smith said as he closed the ser-
vice. “And yet the music of
Michael Jackson brings us togeth-

”

er.



THE TRIBUNE

Spor

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8,



for the
‘Golden
Girls’

‘GOLDEN Girl’ Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie proved
that her victory over Chandra
Sturrup at the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Athletic Associa-
tions (BAAA) National Track
and Field Championships was
no fluke.

Competing yesterday at the
Athletissima Track and Field
Meet in Lausanne, Switzer-
land, the double sprint cham-
pion clocked 11.12 seconds to
finish third in the women’s
100m.

Sturrup, who lost in the cen-
tury at home for the first time
in about five years, had to set-
tle for fourth in 11.25.

Winning the race was
Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser
in 11.03, followed by Ameri-
can Carmelita Jeter in 11.06.

It was the first race for both
Ferguson-McKenzie and Stur-
rup since they clashed at the
BAAA Nationals last month.

In that meeting, Ferguson-
McKenzie won in an identi-
cal time of 11.12 with Sturrup
trailing in 11.22.

Ferguson-McKenzie and
Sturrup were the only two
Bahamians to compete in
Switzerland.

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

OSBOURNE Moxey cap-
tured one of the four medals
won by the Bahamas at the
Central American and
Caribbean Championships in
Havana, Cuba, over the week-
end.

Now he’s hoping that as the
area champion, he will be added
to the Bahamas team going to
the IAAF World Champi-
onships in Athletics in Berlin,
Germany.

His winning leap of 26-feet,
11/2-inches in the men’s long
jump on Saturday was just
under the B qualifying mark of
26-41/2. The A standard is 26-8
3/4.

But Moxey will now have to
wait on the Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Associations as
to whether or not they will book
a ticket for him for the August
15-23 meet.

“Tt was okay. Our first goal
was to win a medal for the
Bahamas, which we did. Then it
was to qualify for the champi-

PAGE 12



Alessandro Valle/AP

SHELLY-ANN FRASER of Jamaica (right) runs to win the 100m race ahead of Carmelita Jeter (left) of the US,
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie (centre) of the Bahamas, Sheri-Ann Brooks of Jamaica (top left) and Torri Edwards
of the US (top right) at the Athletissima athletics meeting in the Stade Olympique in Lausanne, Switzerland, on

ts

2009

Moxey’s winning
leap at CAC not
enough for Berlin

onships outright in terms of dis-
tance,” said Moxey, who fell
short on the latter.

In pulling off the victory,
Moxey beat out Carlos Morgan
of the Cayman Islands, who
posted a leap of 25-9 3/4.
Bahamian Rudon Bastian, a
training partner of Moxey, got
the bronze with 24-10.

The other medals came from
veteran Lavern Eve in the
women’s javelin with a toss of
182-2 1/2. Cuban Yainelis
Ribeaux won with 195-9 1/2
with world record holder Oslei-
dys Menendez third with 192-6
1/2.

And the men’s 4 x 100 relay
team of Rodney Green, Adrian
Griffith, Karlton Rolle and Der-
rick Atkins clocked 39.45 for
the bronze behind Trinidad &
Tobago with the gold in 38.73
and Jamaica with the silver in
39.31.

But the relay team fell short
of the qualifying time of 39.10
for Berlin.

Moxey, who felt he put his
best foot forward, said had he
gotten a challenge from the
Cubans, he was convinced that

he would have been able to
earn a World Championship
qualifying mark.

If he gets to make the trip,
Moxey said he will definitely
have to work on his “approach
to the board and my landing has
to improve.”

I think if the Cubans were at
their best, I would have been
able to put out a little more,” he
said.

His local coach Peter Pratt
said he was satisfied with Mox-
ey’s performance, but he knew
that with the training he put in,
he should have performed
much better.

“The CAC was just his third
track meet for the year, so ’m
happy with his performance,”
Pratt said.

“Now we just have to wait
and see what the ruling the
BAAA will take, so we can
adjust our training.”

Moxey, employed at the
National Insurance Board, has
made the adjustment to training
at home and according to Pratt,
he’s doing all of the necessary
things to perform at a high lev-
el, if he gets to travel to Berlin.

§



ee more photos on page 14







Win
rele

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

eam captain John

Farrington knows

how important it is

for Team Bahamas to
play their best this weekend in
the second round of the Ameri-
can Zone II Davis Cup tie.

The Bahamas will remain in
zone II for 2010 if they defeat
Guatemala. If they lose, the
Bahamas will be dropped back
to Zone III where the team last
played in 2007.

“This is a relegation tie, so we
really don’t want to go back
down there,” Farrington said.
“We’re looking good. The guys
have been working hard and
they are all feeling fine. I think
they came home prepared to
play.”

During a practice session yes-
terday at the National Tennis
Center where the tie will take
place over the Independence
holiday weekend, Farrington
said the players are eager to
treat this tie just like any other.

“Texpect us to come out with
the win by Sunday,” he said, not
taking the younger Guatemalan
team for granted, despite hav-
ing won 3-0 in their last meet-
ing in 2007 in Guatemala.

“T’m confident in my players.
We have control of our destiny,
so to speak,” he insisted. “So we
just have to do the things that
we have to do to take care of
business.”

If they play through to form,
Olympian Devin Mullings will
play as the top seed, followed
by former Orange Bowl cham-
pion Timothy Neilly. They
should be in action on Friday in
the opening singles.

Then on Saturday, expect for
veteran Bjorn Munroe and Mar-
vin Rolle to once again team up
for doubles. The alternate on
the team is Rodney Carey Jr.

All of the players are excited
about competing in the tie this
weekend.

“T think everybody is playing
with confidence and so we
should do very well,” said
Munroe, the 23-year-old Grand
Bahamian, who has played on
the team since 2002.

As long as they put up a

or ile
ated!

Armstrong
moves into
contention at

Tour de France...
See page 16



“fight,” Mullings said the
Bahamas should have no prob-
lems coming out on top, espe-
cially with the tie being at home.

Neilly, another Grand
Bahamian, said he has been
doing a lot of physical training
and that has certainly helped his
game.

“You can expect to see a lot
better tennis than you’ve seen
in the past,” said Neilly, the 21-
year-old playing in just his fourth
tie. “I’m looking forward to play-
ing some very good matches.”

As for the team, Neilly said
they are all looking very good, so
they should be able to prevail.

Munroe, the oldest member
of them at age 31, said both
Mullings and Neilly seem to be
prepared for their singles match-
es and he’s going to be ready
when he’s called upon to play
doubles.

“T’ve been playing both sin-
gles and doubles, but doubles is
my specialty,” said the Grand
Bahama native, who has played
in six ties, but his first at home in
five years. “So I’m definitely
going to be ready.”

And Rolle, his partner, said
he’s ready.

“We just have to go out there
and give it our best and fight,”
said Rolle, the 25-year-old who
has played in 15 previous ties.
“If we give 100 per cent, I don’t
see why we should not come out
on top. We are ready.”

Carey Jr, the 17-year-old who
is making his debut on the team,
said he’s really pleased to be giv-
ena chance to hang out with the
more experienced players.

“T’ve been having some good
workouts, so I’m really pleased
with that,” he said. “I won’t be
playing, but I will be cheering
from the sidelines and I hope
that I can help them come up
with the win.”

Not concerned about the fact
that they are playing over the
holiday weekend, Munroe said it
just means that more people will
have something special to do, so
the stadium should be filled.

With this being a holiday
weekend, Farrington is calling
on the general public to come
out Friday to Sunday to support
the team because they need to
capitalize on their home court
advantage.



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TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS

Guatemala, Bahamas Davis Cup teams
looking for big second round win



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH they know
their backs are against the wall
competing away from home, the
Guatemalan Davis Cup team is
confident that they can take
care of business this weekend.

The youthful visiting team,
captained by Manuel Chavez,
will have their hands full against
the Bahamian team in the sec-
ond round of the American
Zone IJ tie that will be impor-
tant for both teams.

The winner of the tie, sched-
uled for this weekend at the
National Tennis Center, will
remain in Zone II for next year,
while the loser will be relegated
to Zone ITI.

Sebastian Vidal, the 19-year-
old member of the team, said
they are here to win.

“We feel pretty strong about
our chances of getting the vic-
tory,” he said following a team
practice yesterday at the NTC.
“We feel we can win the whole
thing.”

Having played and lost to the
Bahamas 3-0 in Guatemala in
the Group 3 Round Robin play
in 2007, Vidal said they know
how strong the Bahamian team
is.

“Their four players are pretty
strong, so we know it’s going to
be a pretty tough match,” Vidal
said. “But we are a pretty young
team and we’re experienced
enough to win on the big stage.

“We have a lot of talent, so
we hope to come out with the
W (win).”

Joining Vidal on the
Guatemalan team are Christio-
pher Diaz-Figueroa, a 19-year-
old who is expected to be the
top seed, Cristian Paiz, the old-
est player at 28 and the No.2
seed and Julen Uriguen, the
youngest member, who turns 19
on July 22.

Guatemela, who first started
playing Davis Cup in 1990, had
their best showing in 1995, 2000
and 2001 when they played in
the Americans Zone II.

However, they have played
in Zone 3 for a number of years
and even were as low as Zone 4
in 2004. They last played in
Zone 3 last year where they got
promoted to Zone II.

But the team is coming off a
5-0 loss to the Dominican
Republic in March and know
that if they fail to win this week-
end, they will drop back to
Zone IIT.

“T think it’s very important. I
know the Bahamas won the
Group III two years ago and
we managed to win it last year,”
Vidal said. “So I think both
teams know how hard it is to
get to Zone IL.

“No one wants to go back
down to Zone 3, so it’s an
important match for both of our
teams to win and not go back to
Zone 3.”

Loser will be relegated to American Zone III



THE YOUTHFUL Guatemalan Davis Cup team, captained by Manuel Chavez (far left), is confident that they can take care of business this weekend. Shown (I-r) are Chavez, Christopher Diaz,
Cristian Diaz, Sebastian Vidal, Andres Bucaro and Julen Uriguen...



THE BAHAMAS’ Davis Cup team - shown (I-r) are Timothy Neilly, Devin Mullings, Marvin Rolle, team captain John Farrington, Bjorn Munroe and Rodney Carey Jr

National 15-16
baseball team

to face Puerto
Rico today

THE Bahamas Baseball Fed-
eration’s national 15-16 team
departed town on Monday and
have arrived safely in San Juan,
Puerto Rico.

The team, managed by
Patrick Knowles Sr of Grand
Bahama, had a light workout
yesterday and are scheduled to
play their first game against
Puerto Rico at 3pm today.

The starting pitcher is Mar-
cus Holbert, a flame thrower
from Grand Bahama who has
recorded his speed ball at 87
miles per hour.

The rest of the line-up is
expected to include the follow-

ing:
Catcher - Theodore Sweet-
ing Jr of New Providence

1st Base - Jeffrey Woodside
of New Providence

2nd Base - Ashton Allens of
New Providence

Shortstop - Alex Tapia of
New Providence

3rd Base - Marvin McQueen
of Grand Bahama

Left Field - Andre Turnquest
of Grand Bahama

Center Field - Jervis Stuart
Jr of Grand Bahama

Right Field - David Sweeting
of New Providence

Designated player - Jeffrey
Woodside of New Providence

To advertise in The Tritune -



ea MSNA UT
MIR) rere ya BTL

STANDING (I-r) are Patrick Knowles Sr, manager - LBL/Marcian Curry, coach - GBABA/David Sweeting - JBLN/ Benniko Benneby - GBABA/ Marcus
Holbert - GBABA/ Jervis Stuart Jr - LBL / Ashton Allens - JBLN/ Crachad Laing - JBLN/ Chad Burrows - JBLN/ Jeffrey Woodside - JBLN. Kneeling (I-
r) are Loren Kemp, Coach - JBLN/ Theodore Sweeting Jr - JBLN/ Remon Grant - GBABA/ Cameron Richardson - GBABA/ Alex Tapia - JBLN/ Andre Turn-
quest - LBL/ Marvin McQueen - GBABA/D'Andre Rigby - JBLN/ Byron Ferguson - JBLN.





PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS

PUM mC TTT CM CT Dir ed cr dt





AP Photos

ABOVE AND ON TOP — Carmelita Jeter (far left) of the US, Shelly-Ann Fraser (centre) of Jamaica and ‘Gold-
en Girl Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of the Bahamas run during the 100m race at the Athletissima meeting in
the Stade Olympique in Lausanne, Switzerland on Tuesday. Shelly-Ann Fraser won ahead of Carmelita Jeter

and Ferguson-McKenzie.

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SHELLY-ANN FRASER and Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie run during the 100m race...

Cancer-free Eric Shanteau
back to swimming fast

@ By BETH HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) —
Eric Shanteau is swimming
faster than he ever has, diving
into the water every day know-
ing that he’s cancer-free.

That’s gratifying news to the
25-year-old breaststroker who
was diagnosed with testicular
cancer just weeks before last
year’s US Olympic trials.

He kept the stunning infor-
mation to himself while com-
peting for a spot on his first
Olympic team. Shanteau earned
a spot in the 200-meter breast-
stroke, finishing 10th in Beijing
with a personal-best time.

Then he returned home to
Atlanta for surgery. After a
recovery period, Shanteau
resumed training in Austin,
Texas, with a goal of making
the world championships.

He’s four laps away from a
trip to Rome later this month.

Shanteau became the second
American to swim under a
minute in the 100 breaststroke,
clocking 59.89 seconds to make
him the leading qualifier going
into Tuesday night’s final at the

US national championships.

“Tt gives me a lot of confi-
dence,” he said before adding,
“It doesn’t matter what hap-
pens this morning if I don’t do it
tonight.”

The top two finishers qualify
for the world meet.

Since March, Shanteau has
posted personal bests in his sig-
nature events, the 100 and 200
breaststrokes. His 100 time in
the morning preliminaries low-
ered his previous best of 1:00.09.

He wore the X Glide suit by
Arena for the first time Tues-
day. It’s one of the suits
approved by swimming’s world
governing body for competition
this year.

“Obviously the suits are going
to help out, but regardless of
what suit I wore, I knew I was
going to be under a minute this
week,” he said.

With Brendan Hansen tak-
ing time off, Shanteau is poised
to move into the role of domi-
nant American breaststroker
that Hansen has owned for the
last several years.

Shanteau wants more than
just to compete in the individual
breaststroke events in Rome.

He is aiming to succeed Hansen
on the medley relay team, and
likely needs to win the 100 to
ensure he would swim in the
final in Rome rather than just in
the prelims.

Just before traveling to Indi-
anapolis, Shanteau went for a
final round of blood tests that
confirmed he is cancer-free, the
10th month he can celebrate
such welcome news.

But memories of his recent
past are never far away.

“There’s still that thought in
the back of your mind, ‘What
if there’s a recurrence?”’ he
said.

“It’s been a difficult past eight
or nine months. I have to live
with it the rest of my life.”

The disease had already hit
home for Shanteau, whose
father Rick battled lung cancer
at the same time his son was
diagnosed. The elder Shanteau
is in Indianapolis this week to
cheer on his son, and now needs
only occasional chemotherapy
treatments.

“He’s doing really well,” the
younger Shanteau said smiling.

Happily, Shanteau can say
the same about himself.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 15



SPORTS



Mathis’ 3-run homer leads Angels over Rangers A217)

BASEBALL
ANAHEIM, Calif.
Associated Press

BEFORE hitting a pair of
RBI singles and robbing Hank
Blalock of an extra-base hit with
yet another defensive gem in
center field, Torii Hunter nearly
saw his errorless streak slip away.

The eight-time Gold Glove
winner relayed the ball toward
third base after an RBI single by
Blalock in the first inning of the
Angels’ 9-4 victory over Texas
on Monday night. Shortstop
Maicer Izturis was supposed to
cut off the throw, but it went past
him, and skipped by third base-
man Chone Figgins as another
run scored.

The error was charged to Fig-
gins, and Hunter was able to
extend his errorless streak to 235
consecutive games — the longest
active streak among outfielders.

“T was sweating a little bit, to
be honest,” said Hunter, whose
last error was on Aug. 31, 2007.
“T thought they would give me
the error because I made the
throw. But I wasn’t trying to
throw him out. I was actually just
trying to hit the cutoff man, but
he let it go. It was a mistake on
his part. I was very upset. But
the streak lives.”

Jeff Mathis hit a go-ahead
three-run homer in the second
ining, helping the Angels snap a
first-place tie with the Rangers in
the AL West. Juan Rivera also
had a pair of RBI singles and
Jered Weaver (9-3) struck out
nine over seven innings for the
victory.

Weaver allowed four runs and
seven hits, including a two-run
homer in the seventh by Ian
Kinsler that snapped a career-
worst 0-for-24 drought by the
Rangers’ second baseman.

“Tt’s hard to take Kins out for
the teams we’ve been playing,”
manager Ron Washington said.
“IT mean, how can you tell Kins:
Tm going to sit you against Ana-
heim?’ or "Pm going to sit you
against Tampa Bay?’ I wasn’t
going to do that. He’s got seven
days left, and he’s going to learn
how to grind. It’s going to help
him to understand how to play
when you’re a little fatigued —
because he is fatigued. At this



point, everybody is fatigued.”

Josh Hamilton, who was acti-
vated from the disabled list
before the game, was 2 for 4 with
a double and two strikeouts.

“T would have stayed down
longer if I didn’t feel like I was
ready,” said Hamilton, who will
play in his second straight All-
Star game next week. “It’s good
to be back up here and be
around the guys again and actu-
ally feel like part of the team,
instead of just a guy hanging
out.”

The Rangers had a 4 1/2 game
lead on the Angels when Hamil-
ton went on the DL on June 2,
and led them by 5 1/2 games on
May 30.

Both teams reached the mid-
way point of their respective
schedules. The Angels (46-35)
were 48-33 at this stage last sea-

son and the Rangers (45-36)
were 41-40.

“You have to play well against
whatever team shows up on the
schedule,” Angels manager Mike
Scioscia said. “If we were playing
any other team but Texas, it
doesn’t mean we don’t have to
bring the focus and intensity. It’s
still July, there’s still a lot of base-
ball left, and we’re still trying to
evolve as a team.”

Kevin Millwood (8-6) gave up
nine runs and nine hits over five
innings in the shortest of his 18
starts this season. He has given
up 13 runs and 17 hits over 11 1-
3 innings in his past two starts
— both against the Angels —
after giving up just seven runs in
40 2-3 innings over his previous
six outings.

“T didn’t hit my spots. When I
tried to go away, it would drift

PHILADELPHIA
Phillies’ Jayson
Werth, left,
runs the bases
after hitting a
grand slam
against the
Cincinnati
Reds’ in the
ninth inning of
a baseball
game Monday,
July 6, 2009, in
Philadelphia.

H. Rumph Jr./AP Photo

Big first inning leads
Phillies over Reds 22-1

BASEBALL
PHILADELPHIA
Associated Press

BLOOPERS dropped in,
grounders found holes and sev-
eral balls flew out of the park.

Once the Philadelphia Phillies
put their bats down, the Cincin-
nati Reds had suffered the
worst loss in team history.

Chase Utley hit a three-run
homer and Shane Victorino and
Greg Dobbs each had two-run
shots during a 10-run first, lead-
ing the Phillies to a 22-1 victory
over the Reds on Monday night.

It was the most lopsided
defeat for baseball’s first pro-
fessional franchise. The Red
Stockings and Redlegs never
got beat this badly, and the Big
Red Machine used to do all the
hitting.

“We got slaughtered as they
used to say,” Reds manager
Dusty Baker said.

The previous worst defeat for
the Reds was 26-6 on July 26,
1892. That also was against the
Phillies.

Cole Hamels (5-5) was the
beneficiary of the offensive out-
burst. The struggling ace
allowed one run and three hits
in seven innings to earn his first
win since shutting out the Los
Angeles Dodgers on June 4.

“T was just jumping for joy,”

Hamels said about the run sup-
port. “When you put that many
runs up, it makes it uncomfort-
able for the other team.”

The Phillies tied a club record
for most runs in the first inning.
They scored 10 three other
times, most recently on June 2,
2002, against the Montreal
Expos.

It was the most runs by
Philadelphia since a 26-7 win
over the New York Mets at the
old Veterans Stadium on June
11, 1985. The 22 runs were the
most in the six-year history of
Citizens Bank Park.

Reds starter Johnny Cueto
(8-5) retired just two batters,
allowing nine runs and five hits.
It was the shortest outing in the
right-hander’s two-year career.
Cueto had never allowed more
than six earned runs in a game,
and his ERA rose from 2.69 to
3.45.

Jayson Werth connected off
infielder Paul Janish in the
eighth. Victorino, a candidate
for the final spot on the NL’s
All-Star roster, helped his case
with four hits, four RBIs and a
career-high five runs. Dobbs
had four hits, Utley drove in
four and every starter had a hit.

“It was one of those nights
where everything we hit was
falling and we hit some hard,”
manager Charlie Manuel said.

The NL East-leading Phillies
have won four straight games
after losing 14 of 18. They had-
n’t scored more than 15 runs
since a 20-2 victory at St. Louis
last June 13. After that game,
the Phillies went 3-11 and
scored a total of 38 runs. Rock-
ies 1, Nationals 0

At Denver, Jason Marquis
pitched eight innings for his
major league-leading 11th win
and Todd Helton had an RBI
double in the first for Colorado.

Fresh off making his first All-
Star team, Marquis pitched out
of bases-loaded jams in the sev-
enth and eighth innings. Mar-
quis (11-5), who allowed seven
hits and struck out three, was
coming off a two-hit shutout at
Los Angeles on June 30.

Huston Street threw a per-
fect ninth for his 20th save in
21 chances.

Rookie Craig Stammen (1-4)
went a season-high seven
innings, giving up five hits and
the one run.

Diamondbacks 6, Padres 5

In Phoenix, Mark Reynolds
singled home Justin Upton with
two outs in the bottom of the
ninth to give Arizona the win.

Upton drew a two-out walk
from Cla Meredith (4-2) and
stole second before Reynolds
lined a single into the left-field
corner.



over the middle of the plate. And
when I didn’t hit my spots, they
hit those mistakes,” Millwood
said. “I think pitching up is part
of my game, one of my strengths.
But thigh high isn’t. Thigh high is
a bad place to throw the ball,
and that’s where I was missing
tonight.”

MARINERS 5, ORIOLES 0

¢ At Seattle, Jarrod Washburn
tossed a one-hitter for his ninth
career complete game. It was the
first one-hitter by a Mariners
pitcher at Safeco Field, and 10th in
franchise history.

Nick Markakis had the only hit
off Washburn (4-5), a two-out sin-
gle in the fourth. Washburn faced
just one batter over the minimum,
issuing no walks and striking out
three in his 110-pitch effort.

TEXAS Rangers
catcher Jarrod
Saltalamacchia,
left, tags out Los
Angeles Angels’
Kendry Morales
at home during
the eighth inning
of a baseball
game, Monday,
July 6, 2009, in
Anaheim, Calif.
The Angels won
9-4,

Jeff Lewis/AP Photo

ROYALS 4, TIGERS 3

¢ At Detroit, Mike Jacobs hit a
go-ahead solo homer in the
ninth and closer Joakim Soria
held on for Kansas City’s third
straight win.

Willie Bloomquist drove in
three runs for the Royals, con-
necting on a home run in the
sixth and a two-run triple in the
eighth. Roman Colon (1-0)
earned his first win since 2006,
when he was pitching for
Detroit.

BLUE JAYS 7, YANKEES 6

¢ At New York, Ricky Romero
(7-3) extended his scoreless
streak to 24 innings before Eric
Hinske homered in his Yankees
debut, and Toronto avoided get-
ting swept in a four-game
series.



INBRIEF

Yahoo, NFL
players union
Setile lawsuit

NFL
MINNEAPOLIS
Associated Press

YAHOO Inc. and the
NFL Players Association
have reached a settlement
over use of players’ statis-
tics, photos and other data
in Yahoo’s popular online
fantasy football game, but
details were not immediate-
ly available Tuesday.

Santa Clara, Calif.-based
Yahoo sued the NFLPA last
month in U.S. District Court
in Minnesota, claiming
Yahoo shouldn’t have to
pay royalties to use the data
because the information is
already publicly available.

Yahoo dropped the law-
suit Monday. Officials from
both parties said a settle-
ment was reached.

Yahoo Sports spokes-
woman Nicol Addison said
Yahoo doesn’t discuss liti-
gation and she wouldn’t dis-
close details.

Andrew Feffer, the
union’s chief operating offi-
cer and executive vice pres-
ident, had no comment
beyond saying there was a
settlement.

The last of Yahoo’s
licensing agreements with
NFL Players Inc. expired
March 1. But Yahoo
claimed it didn’t need
authorization, due to a court
decision in April in a similar
dispute between NFL Play-
ers Inc. and CBS Interac-
tive Inc.

Fantasy sports league par-
ticipants create teams com-
prised of real players. As the
season progresses, partici-
pants’ track their players’
statistics to judge how well
their team is performing.

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PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS



; | | i



Laurent Rebours/AP Photos



TONY Martin of Germany, wearing the best young rider's white jersey, right, leads his Team Columbia-HTC riders with Mark Cavendish of Britain, wearing the best sprint-
er's green jersey, seen far left, during the fourth stage of the Tour de France cycling race, a team time-trial over 39 kilometers (24.2 miles) with start and finish in Montpelli-
er, southern France, Tuesday July 7, 2009. Martin now ranks 8th overall, second right is American George Hincapie, left is Mark Cavendish of Britain, wearing the best
Sprinter's green jersey.

Bas Czerwinski/AP Photo

CADEL Evans of Australia, left, and Johan van Summeren of Bel-
gium, behind, ride with their Silence-Lotto to take a 13th place dur-
ing the fourth stage of the Tour de France cycling race, a team time-
trial over 39 kilometers (24.2 miles) with start and finish.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
COURCELLES GREENS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Tour de France

CYCLING

LA GRANDE-MOTTE,
France

Associated Press

LANCE Armstrong showed
that experience still counts at
the Tour de France.

The 37-year old American
rider surged to the front to take
the right breakaway during
Monday’s third stage while
Alberto Contador and the other
favorites were trapped in the
peloton.

Armstrong’s astute move
earned him valuable time and
moved to third place overall
while Contador dropped to
fourth, 19 seconds behind the
Texan. Contador is the 2007
Tour winner and a favorite this
year.

Armstrong could take the yel-
low leader’s jersey from Fabian
Cancellara on Tuesday when a
24.23-mile team time trial is
scheduled in Montpellier.

“Never say never,” Arm-
strong said when asked about

the possibility of putting on the
coveted jersey for the 84th time
in his career, four years after his
record seventh Tour victory.

Overall, he trails Cancellara
by 40 seconds — a tough deficit
to erase in the team time trial.
The Swiss rider’s Saxo Bank
team is one of the best in the
discipline, along with Arm-
strong’s Astana, Garmin and
Columbia.

Among other Tour favorites,
two-time runner up Cadel Evans
slipped to eighth place overall, 1
minute, 4 seconds behind Can-
cellara. Andy Schleck is 24th at
1:41, and defending champion
Carlos Sastre of Spain is 26th,
1:47 back.

Armstrong has got time to
move up now that he leads Con-
tador, who had a 22 second-
cushion over Armstrong before
Monday’s stage won by Mark
Cavendish. Armstrong has
already said the third week, fea-
turing a long time trial, three
mountain stages, and a finish up
the daunting Mont Ventoux, will
be very hard.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LIMEHOUSE INCORPORATED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Cavendish earned his second
consecutive Tour stage victory
and his sixth overall, ahead of
Norway’s Thor Hushovd and
Cyril Lemoine of France after
completing the 122.1-mile trek
between Marseille and La
Grande-Motte in 5 hours, 1
minute, 24 seconds.

Only 29 riders including Arm-
strong, Cancellara and two oth-
er Astana teammates —
Yaroslav Popovych and Haimar
Zubeldia — handled the tricky
conditions.

“Whenever you see a team
lined up at the front like that,
you have to pay attention,”
Armstrong said. “You know
what the wind’s doing, and you
see that a turn’s coming up, so it
doesn’t take a rocket scientist
to know that you have to go to
the front.”

Contador was at the wrong
place at the wrong time when
the breakaway happened. “I was
climbing with a teammate and
we ended up in no man’s land,”
he said.

Asked about his reaction
when he saw that Contador was
not with him in front, Arm-
strong said that he didn’t try to
gain time over the Spaniard.

“That’s not my objective but I
turned around and was sur-
prised that there was a split,”
he said. “On days like this —
for good or bad — you can
make a difference.”

After realizing that Arm-
strong was the only title con-
tender in the breakaway, Astana
riders in it decided to collabo-
rate with the Columbia riders.

“Apart from Lance, there was
nobody from all the other
favorites,” Astana manager
Johan Bruyneel said. “At first,
we let the Columbia riders do
the work. At a moment, I was
convinced the peloton was going
to come back. But the gap came
up again and at that moment,
about 15 kilometers from the
finish, we decided that
Popovych and Zubeldia will
help in the front.”

ai

INBRIEF

French tennis
player Mathieu
Montcourt
dies at 24

: TENNIS

PARIS

Associated Press

FRENCH tennis player

Mathieu Montcourt has died.
i He was 24.

The French tennis federa-

? tion said on Tuesday that
? Montcourt had
? overnight but that “the caus-
? es of his death are not yet
i known.”

died

“It is with great sadness

that the French tennis feder-

ation has learned of the sud-
den death of Mathieu Mont-

? court,” the French tennis fed-
? eration said. “Mathieu was an
? enthusiastic young man, pas-
? sionate, very endearing, and
? extremely appreciated for his

Armstrong moves |
into contention at

kindness and politeness.”

French media earlier
reported that Montcourt,
ranked 119, was found dead
by his girlfriend in the stair-
well of his Paris apartment.

In May, Montcourt was
handed a five-week ban and
fined $12,000 for betting on
other matches. That ban took
effect Monday.

Montcourt complained
during the French Open that

the punishment was too
? harsh, saying that he never
; bet more than $3 at any time,

and never on his own match-

i es — a fact confirmed by the
? ATP which oversees the
i men’s Tour.

The Court of Arbitration

? for Sport said Montcourt had
? wagered a total of $192 on 36
? tennis events in 2005. It
: reduced his suspension on

appeal from eight weeks to

i five.

The issue of betting in ten-

? nis drew increased attention
? from the sport’s governing
? bodies after an online book-
: maker voided all wagers on

a 2007 match involving Niko-

lay Davydenko.



a

Lack of motive
slows ruling
on McNair
girlfriend

FOOTBALL
NASHVILLE, Tenn.

Associated Press

TENNESSEB’S state med-

: ical examiner says investiga-
? tors have been hesitant to con-
? clude that Steve McNair’s girl-
? friend killed the NFL star and
i herself because she didn’t

appear to have a motive.
Bruce Levy said Tuesday

i that murder-suicide is the
? most likely scenario and it’s
? unlikely the crime scene was
? staged by a third party.

But investigators have been

i cautious about exploring
? every possibility. In murder-
? suicides, friends and family
? usually have seen problems.
? But 20-year-old Sahel
? Kazemi’s family has said she
i was very happy.

A ruling is expected in the

next few days.

Police quickly labeled

McNair’s death a homicide.

Investigators say that Kazemi

bought the handgun found
? under her body less than two

days before the shooting.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TALIPAN VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORCHID OAKS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AVENARIUS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. (Liquidator)

(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 17
eS







The Tribune

=









CUPCAK





eLight B’s
Gourmet

Nikoya Lightbourne gourmet food shop is a dream come true



By ALEX MISSICK “My parents are
Tribune Features Reporter Aryett and Beryl
amissick@tribunemedia.net Lightbourne. You

could say that I con-
: sider Nassau and
FOR most young people in the A Adhex botlras
Bahamas, growing up ona fami- ‘home’. can catch
ly island forces you to dream my own crabs, so I do

bigger and accomplish greater — Consider myself an

: . be ‘Andros Gal’ too. I 7
things in life to make those you can remember beg-
leave behind proud. Nikoya ging my Muay to

. . stir the crab ‘n’ rice
Lightbourne, a native of Andros but Lcouldn’t reach
and owner of De Light B’s the stove. I remember
Gourmet, formerly De’ Light- helping my ae

. motner, ary Jonn-

bourne's LLC, located in Trenton con kneading bread
Farmer’s Market in Lawrence on her kitchen i

New Jersey; ten minutes south of counter, but Iwas
Princeton, followed her dreams = “27ding on a milk
’ crate so I could reach
and made them come true. the counter. I remem-
ber the dining room
table in her house on
Thompson Blvd cov-
ered in hot cross buns for Easter, dripping with icing and
my cousins and I hiding under the table and making off
with a few. Bahamians are a lucky people because so much
of our culture and what makes our nation great revolves
around family and great food,” Ms Lightbourne said.

Ms Lightbourne ended up in New Jersey where she
attended Rutgers University graduating with a Bachelor of
Science degree in Environmental Business and Economics.

“After I graduated, I worked for Rutgers University
doing research for an E.P.A program called IR-4. I liked
my work, I was very good at it, but being stuck behind a
desk crunching the numbers on pesticide and herbicide
data was not my passion. I had been doing research and
looking into starting my company and soon I had to make
a choice, stay in a secure job, or take a leap of faith and
follow my passion. I had a wonderful friend that was will-
ing to be my business partner and it all grew from there,”
Ms Lightbourne said.

As with most things we are passionate about, Ms Light-
bourne said De’Light B’s Gourmet got started by helping
to raise money for the American Cancer Society.

“Thad lost my Mom, Beryl Munnings-Lightbourne to
breast cancer in 1998; it’s a cause close to my heart and I
wanted or rather needed somewhere to channel those

F




SHORT BREAD _
DAISIES





-

emotions and feel like I was making a difference. To raise
money for our ‘Relay for Life’ team, I started using my
mom’s banana bread recipe and baking breads to sell on
campus. By senior year I was baking all year round
because people were not satisfied that they could only get
them during spring before the Relay. In April of 2006, we
did our first official event as a bakery; and six months later
in September we signed a lease on our current kitchen
space. We now had an entire professional kitchen space to
work with and decided to create a catering menu as well
and it has flourished,” Ms Lightbourne said.

As for the business, Ms Lightbourne said De’Light B’s
Gourmet carries a line of rum cakes, Bahamian style fruit
cakes, pineapple tarts, coconut tarts and Bahamian style
macaroni as only Bahamians can make it.

“Pastry wise I would say that our best sellers right now
are our pies and especially the key lime pies. We also have
a variety of cakes; coconut cake, and carrot cake are at the
top of that list. Then there is our cheesecake line which is
our latest record breaker; we are currently in the process
of getting that product line into our local higher end gro-
cery stores such as Whole Foods and Wegman’'s. By far,
the rum cakes and the fruit cakes are the biggest hit, and
we can’t forget about the jerk chicken,” Ms Lightbourne
said.

NIKOYA
LIGHTBOURNE







SEE page 19



PAGE 18, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune












BAHAMIANS grab your flags
and come celebrate the 36th
anniversary of this beautiful place
we call home. With less than two
days remaining before the annual
independence celebrations,
already there’s the echoes of
Junkanoo, the aroma of the peas
and rice, and the spirit of one-
ness spreading across the coun-
try, and Tribune Features is right
there giving you the full scoop.

This special edition of Things 2
Do, has the five day rundown of
happenings and events sure to
remind you why it’s so great to
be a Bahamian.

Wednesday -The Hub Art Cen-
tre is the official jump-off for this
five day independence weekend
as it will feature several budding
local entertainers and a special
guest performance. Starting at
7.30pm, this week’s featured
artist is no stranger to the local
music scene- regionally
acclaimed gospel recording artist
Manifest. The event offers true
musical variety, but is also a
great place just to mix and min-
gle, so come out and become a
part of the Express Yourself
experience.

Thursday - Clifford Park is
expected to be transformed into a
Bahamian cultural mecca.
Organisers for the annual inde-
pendence celebration have
arranged an array of activities
including an all out cultural show
featuring authentic Bahamian
music and dance. There will also
be a Police and Defence Force
inspection, a national prayer, the
traditional flag raising ceremony,
and fireworks This event begins
at 8pm.

Friday - It’s Independence Day,
and if there’s one thing that
defines the Bahamas, its
Junkanoo. Wake up to the
sounds of “The People’s Rush-
out” as thousands flock to the
center of town celebrating the
independence of a beautiful
nation. Starting from 1am, the
Junkanoo rush-out begins at
Rawson Square to Arawak Cay,
so come and enjoy the music.

The Bahamas Hot Rod Associ-
ation is hosting a special Inde-
pendence Street Legal Racing
night at 7.30pm at its motorsport
park located at the rear of the
Queen Elizabeth Sporting Com-
plex. Specialty cars of all makes
and models will be showcased,
and the event is only $5,

Saturday - The Junkanoo Sum-
mer Festival continues its month
long stint showcasing traditional
Goombay music, live bands, and
lots of local food and fun in Raw-
son Square. The day long event
also features local crafts,
Bahamian literature, and a
pineapple eating and onion peel-
ing competition. So come out this
Saturday between noon and 10
pm to experience traditional life
in the islands.

The Sixth Annual South
Eleuthera Mission Heritage & Cul-
tural Fair and Raffle takes place in
Rock Sound today from noon
until. An intended fundraiser for
the community, the event will fea-
ture the Bahamas Defense Force
Pop Band, a bouncing castle,
punch board, sail boat exhibition,
best independence hair style,
coconut barking, pineapple eating

li



and crab catching competitions. The Police and Defence
Sunday - Available for its final

showing at the Dundas Center is Force Bands held an

the much talked about Treemon- Independence Beat

isha, an opera written by famous .

American playwright Scott Joplin, Retreat in Rawson

and directed by famed Bahamian

drama connoisseur Dr Cleveland Square on Saturaday.

Williams. Performed by an all Hundreds of Bahami-

Bahamian cast, it tells a story of
an African American community
recently freed from slavery. The
play is centered around the main
character Treemonisha, who
helps to express the importance
of religion, family, culture, and
education. Also a good reminder
of the importance of indepen-
dence, the play has been dubbed
a tribute to the Bahamianism.
Proceeds from this final night are
intended to assist the Bahamas
National Dance company on their
upcoming trip to the Aberdeen
International Youth Festival in the
UK. Tickets are $20, and Show-
time is 8pm.

Several simultaneous morning
walks will be held on Saturday
and Sunday to recognise the

ans and visitors enjoyed ¥
the spectacular display. be -



importance of the nation’s inde- 5 el - — ="
pendence. The walks will all start a
at 6am from Windsor Park, Gold- — ai Bs = 4

en Gates, Montagu Beach, and
Goodman’s Bay and will all end at
Clifford Park.



THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 19

PINEAPPLE UPSIDE

DeLight B’s

Gourmet

FROM page 17

Ms Lightbourne said she is very
proud of what she does and the New
Jersey locals love the food mostly
because it’s different.

“We use a style called ‘Caribbean
Fusion’; for example, we’d take our
home made jerk sauce and use it to
season wild caught Alaska Salmon and
then grill them on cedar planks. Its still
salmon, but it’s salmon like you’ve nev-
er had it before. It’s a whole lot of
blood, sweat and tearful phone calls
home to Andros to my dad because
I’m stressed out beyond words. It’s
missed birthdays, graduations, and
Christmases with my friends and fami-
ly at home. However, at the end of the

become such a driving force at home
and are changing the way that things
are done by being innovative, thinking
outside the box and not being afraid
to take chances. My cousin, Scharad
Lightbourne, a graphic designer and
photographer and artist Sammy Star
(who went to the same high school I
did) are examples of those at home
who are pushing the envelope, not
afraid of being different and are having
great successes in their chosen careers.
They are examples of “home grown”
being better than options or influences
from outside the country,” Ms Light-
bourne said.

Ms Lightbourne said her advice to
any young entrepreneur is to do their
research.

“You need to know your customer

“Ve use a style called ‘Caribbean
Fusion’; for example, we'd take our
home made jerk sauce and use it to season
wild caught Alaska Salmon and then grill
them on cedar planks. Its still salmon, but
it's salmon like you've never had it before.”

day, it is my name on the door. It took
me forever to get used to the fact that I
was (when it all started) 25 years old
running my own business with employ-
ees and taxes to pay. Three years later,
I appreciate the responsibility and Iam
forever grateful to everyone in my life
from my family and friends to my teach-
ers from my earliest years that gave me
the confidence and the knowledge that
T could and would do anything that I set
out to achieve. Iam even more grateful
to those who said I couldn’t do it, or
that I wouldn’t succeed, they are the
ultimate motivators,” Ms Lightbourne
said.

In the end, many Bahamians can not
neglect the force that is pulling them to
return home and Ms Lightbourne said
she is very motivated to do so.

“The homesickness only gets worse
every year. I’m currently looking into a
few options though nothing is concrete.
I love the fact that my generation has

base and what products your target
audience will be more than willing to
not only buy but to tell others to buy as
well. We started as a Caribbean bakery,
and learned that it was not a large cus-
tomer base, we switched to a more
American variety that still has some
Caribbean influence and now I’ve been
given the nickname “The Pie Lady” by
the Trentonian, our local paper. Com-
munication is key; use every free mode
of communication available to you,
word of mouth, and internet hubs like
Facebook or Twitter. Remember that
there will always be setbacks, but it’s
those discouraging moments that make
our successes that much sweeter.”

¢ To learn more about De’Light B’s
Gourmet, visit the website at
www.delightbournes.com or if you visit
New Jersey in your travels, visit them at
960 Spruce Street, Lawrence NJ 08648
or give them a call at 609-989-7577.

Are You Prep

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Police and
Defence
Force Beat

Retreat
ys Seepage 18



WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009







NEEDLE bkxous

Art form reminds us of native tongue



DeLight B's Gourmet

see page 17

By LLOYD ALLEN

Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net



AOGH “HAPS

AS the sweet breeze of independence rolls
around on this 36 anniversary of the coun-
try, the age old question of what is unique
about the Bahamas arises.

This year it seems the
answer to that question is a
reemerging form of Bahami-
an art known as Relief Carv-
ings.

According to Heino
Scmidt, Central Bank art
curator and seasoned artist,
Relief Carvings is an art form
that most likely branched off
from the common kitchen
prayer paintings and towels
that have adorned Bahamian
homes for years.

Bridging art, culture, and
décor, this art form helps to
remind older Bahamians of
the native tongue, and intro-
duces young people to ele-
ments of our dialect that are
scarcely used.

Although it has not gained
significant popularity on New
Providence, many out islands
like Eleuthera, Cat Island,
and Andros, showcase this
work in practically all areas
of society including restau-
rants, schools, homes, and
sometimes even churches.

‘Hard head bird don’ cook
good soup,’ ‘Don’ gimme no
lip,’ ‘Eye winker older dan’
beard,’ ‘Tief, tief from tief
and God laugh, Ha!,’ ‘Pick
until ya pick needle wit’out
eye,’ and ‘Loose goat don’
Know how tie goat feel.’

These are some of the say-
ings that many of our par-
ents and grandparents would
have heard while growing up,
and believe it or not they
probably understand what
each of them mean.

However for the rest of us,
local playwright and dialec-
tologist James Catalyn lends
his expertise in the art of
translating Bahamianise.

Eye Winker Older dan’
Beard

“When you look at it,
when we are born there is
the eye winkers, and you
don’t grow a beard until you
turn maybe 17 or 18-years-
old. So really this saying is

telling us that the older peo-
ple in our communities are
the wiser.”

Tief, Tief From Tief And
God Laugh, Ha!

“Tf somebody has stolen
something from one person,
and another person steals
from him or her, then that
proves that what goes around
comes around, and in the end
God gets the last laugh.”

Pick Until Ya Pick Nee-
dle Wit’out Eye

“Often you hear about
women who end up becom-
ing an old maid (someone
who never marries and is too
old and unable to have chil-
dren) sometimes because
they have the mentality that
there is no man good enough
for them. They keep looking,
picking, and choosing until
they end up with nothing,
and that is what this saying
conveys.”

Mr Catalyn said while
there are dozens of indige-
nous idiosyncrasies through-
out the country, their exis-
tence is not unusual.

With others countries hav-
ing their share of quirks which
also have some historical con-
nections, many of the saying
that we assume as uniquely
Bahamian do in fact originate
from other places.

“Like the term *bungy,’ is
also used in the Gullah
Islands in the Carolinas.
Those islands were originally
inhabited by slaves and their
native tongue is a language
known as Gullah,” he said.

Mr Catalyn said these com-
monalties in language cement
the fact that all humans are
in some way related, particu-
larly the African Diaspora.

However he said the emer-
gence of Relief Carvings in
Bahamian society is an exam-
ple of how important it is to
continue to share the lan-
guage that made the Bahamas
what it is.







Bahamas oil
imports cost
$1.1bn in ‘08

Some 27,300
consumer loans,
worth a collective
$160m, in default

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas spent more
than $1.1 billion on oil and fuel-
related imports in 2008 as glob-
al prices soared to a $147 per
barrel all-time high, Central
Bank of the Bahamas data has
revealed, an amount equivalent
to 15.3 per cent of this nation’s
Gross Domestic Product
(GDP).

The Central Bank’s quarterly
statistical digest for May 2009
showed that the total value of
oil imported into the Bahamas
increased by 37.5 per cent year-
over-year, rising from $802.067
million in 2007 to $1.103 billion
last year - a more than $300 mil-
lion increase.

The $1.103 billion figure is
more than double the $523.952
million figure that the Bahamas
paid for its oil and fuel-related
imports as recently as 2005.

The 2008 third quarter was
the most expensive three-month
period in this nation’s oil
importing history, with the peak
in global oil prices forcing this
nation to spend $333.76 million
- a 59.6 per cent increase upon
the comparative period in 2007.

This nation’s heavy oil depen-
dency, both for electrical power
generation and to fuel is gaz-
guzzling car economy, imposes
a heavy burden on the foreign
exchange reserves and current
outflows, especially when glob-
al oil prices are at their peak.

The Central Bank’s data
again makes a compelling eco-
nomic case for the Bahamas to
tap new forms of electrical ener-
gy generation, especially renew-
able sources, to reduce the pres-
sure on foreign exchange
reserves to finance oil imports.

The Bahamas has been lucky
to date that global oil prices fell
back to around $50 per barrel,
but they are on the rise again.
The oil price decline has helped
to insulate the Bahamian for-
eign exchange reserves against
the pressures from a decline in
foreign currency inflows as a
result of the drop in tourism
and foreign direct investment.
But if oil prices rise again, the
foreign reserves would likely
come under extreme pressure
because they are not being
restocked.

Elsewhere, the Central

SEE page 4B


























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Sale Ends
July 11th

THE TRIBUNE

usiness

2009

WEDNESDAY,

TEL eS.

Airline fearing six
figure fee increase

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bahamian private airline

ROYAL FIDELITY

Sky Bahamas chief: ‘You're talking about more money

operator yesterday said it

would have to pay “in
excess of $150,000 per
year” in fees on its aircraft
fleet alone, compared to the current $1,000,
if the proposed Civil Aviation Department
fee increases were introduced, creating an
“undue burden” on travellers and “dis-

rupting” business models.

Captain Randy Butler, chief executive
of Sky Bahamas, said the privately-owned
Bahamian airline was still calculating the
precise impact the proposed fee rises would

have on its business.

increases.

However, he warned that companies in
the sector would have no choice but to take
measures like increasing passenger fares or
cutting staff numbers to absorb the tax

Sky Bahamas employed 74 persons, and
the industry an estimated 400 in total, and
Mr Butler warned that companies might
have no choice but to downsize to absorb
the fee rises. He also expressed concern
about the impact on Family Island com-

in fees and taxes than the actual cost of the ticket’

munities that relied on private airline oper-

ators, saying of the increases: “Your busi-
ness model is disrupted.”

“It’s direct taxation of the people,
because we’re going to go from paying

$1,000 a year to the Civil Aviation Depart-

ness.

ment for the company to paying $30,000
per plane. We have four, so that would be
$120,000,” Mr Butler told Tribune Busi-

SEE page 3B

Minister: Bahamas not been ‘effective’
on grant financed project execution

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas
will not become
more aggressive
in seeking grant
funding for infra-
structure projects
despite its tight
fiscal predica-
ment, a govern-
ment minister
said yesterday, as
he admitted that this nation had
not been “effective in execut-
ing” European Union-financed



Worries over
‘extraordinary
number of
casualties’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president yester-
day told Tribune Business his
“biggest concern” was that the
business community did not suf-
fer “an extraordinary number
of casualties” as a result of the
current recession, with the
banking sector already seeing
20 per cent of their commercial
loans fall into arrears.

Khaalis Rolle called for a
“unified effort” to help stabilise
the private sector, and urged
Bahamian companies falling
into financial difficulties to
immediately communicate with
their bankers/debt financiers to
try and work out an interim
solution. He also urged the
banks to “provide a lifeline” to
floundering clients deserving of
such treatment.

Commenting on the Central
Bank of the Bahamas’ report
on monthly economic and
financial developments for May,
which found that commercial
loans more than 30 days past
due accounted for 19.83 per
cent of the banking sector’s
total portfolio, Mr Rolle told
Tribune Business: “We were
very concerned.

“Everybody is feeling the
pinch, and we’re going to con-
tinue to see this until the econ-
omy turns around. My biggest
concern is that we don’t have
an extraordinary number of
casualties resulting from this.

SEE page 2B

* Says Ministry of Works workload and EU conditions key factors in
implementation woes on multi-million dollar infrastructure projects
* Bahamas will not ‘be more aggressive’ in seeking grant financing,

despite fiscal deficit and infrastructure woes

developments.

Responding to the EU’s
2008-2013 Country Strategy
Paper for the Bahamas, which
revealed that Europe had con-
sidered slashing the only form
of grant funding available to
this nation because it was “a
very low performer” in imple-
menting projects Brussels was

financing, Zhivargo Laing said:
“That is a fair statement.”
The minister of state for
finance then told Tribune Busi-
ness: “We have not been as
effective in executing these pro-
jects for years and years and
years. That’s the reality.”
When asked about the rea-
sons for this ineffectiveness, Mr

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Laing suggested they often
became lost amid the many pro-
jects the Ministry of Works had
to deal with, and did not figure
as highly on that ministry’s -
and the Government’s - priori-
ty list.

In addition, the EU also

SEE page 4B

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(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Year-end target
for first phase
finance regulator
consolidation

* Once Securities
Commission, Registrar of
Insurance and Compliance
Commission a Bahamas
Financial Services
Authority, Central Bank
will follow in second phase

* Minister says timeline
‘absolutely achievable’

* Bahamas needs to ‘get it
right’, as ‘not a lot
of room for error’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government is hoping
to complete the consolidation
of three regulators into a
Bahamas Financial Services
Authority by year-end, Tribune
Business was told yesterday,
with the second and final phase
eventually involving the merg-
ing of the Central Bank’s Bank
Supervision Department into
this entity to create a solitary
‘super regulator’.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, explained that
the Government was taking a
staged approach to financial ser-
vices regulatory consolidation
to ensure “everything was
working on all cylinders” after
the first phase was completed,
as the Bahamas did “not have a
lot of room for error”.

The first phase involves the
consolidation of the Securities

SEE page 4B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Setting goals you can score

SCORING a goal in soccer
is like getting a hole in one on
the golf course. Soccer players
run countless miles before they
score a goal, and often games
end with neither side scoring a
goal. Soccer players train dai-
ly, perform countless drills, and
experience numerous injuries.
However, they never quit or
give up. Why? Because scoring
a goal is one of the greatest feel-
ings.

Achieving a goal you have
been working for so long is one
of the most rewarding, satisfying
feelings. So why is it that so
many of us do not set goals and
wonder why we don’t score
them? I believe it is because
most of us think goal setting is
too much work and we don’t
have the time.

Here are a few tips to score
goals. Short, sweet and to the

point. Who wants to sit down
for hours and map out a plan
for the next five or 10 years?

Short-Term Goals

Not all goals have to be work-
related. Mix personal goals and
work goals together. The payoff
is almost instant. However, they
are life changing. Short-term
goals give you momentum, and
when you achieve one it is
rewarding. So hopefully you
want more.

Get A Calendar

Pick a short-term goal. Start
with tomorrow or next week.
This will get you in the mix right
away, and short-term goals are
easier to visualise. Because of
their short-term nature they
encourage you to set realistic,
easy-to-accomplish goals. Of
course, you can look a month,

Promotional
Marketing

mooie er arirey TT



three or six months out if you
wish. But the further you look,
the farther away these goals are.
We like low hanging fruit, right?

Start Small

Try not to write a 10-page list.
Start with two or three small
goals, such as: “This week, I will
lose two pounds and visit at
least two prospects.’ Instead,
most of us start with: ‘I need to
lose 20 pounds and visit 20
prospects.’ Instantly, you can
tell the difference, right? Short
and tangible is the way to go.
Otherwise, you become and feel

overwhelmed.

Extend If Necessary

Go easy on yourself. If you
don’t achieve the goal in the ini-
tial time set out, extend it
another week or month, and
just keep it close to you. Estab-
lishing a pattern is what is
important...

Use Pen and Paper

Write down your goals and
review them daily. Take five
minutes a day and read over
your goals. Add notes if neces-
sary. You will be surprised how
other goals will pop into your
mind.

Once a week, rewrite your
list. Change the order of your
goals if you wish. Delete some if
you want, but the important
objective is to develop a pat-
tern and stay consistent. Once

you score a goal, you will feel
like scoring another. Momen-
tum will keep you focused and
that good feeling will keep you
motivated.

Action

Finally. next to each goal
write down one or two actions
that will help you score your
goal...

Start today and do this
tomorrow and the next day, and
before you realise it you’re run-
ning around your office pealing
your shirt off, like the soccer
players do on the field after
scoring a goal. (Please don’t tell
your boss I recommended that
you do that.)

Simply put, it works if you
work it. No change, no
change!!!

All of these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your

business on top during these
challenging economic times.
Have a productive and prof-
itable week! Remember,
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT.”

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products. Established
over 27 years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted
Bahamian businesses in various
industries, ranging from tourism
and banking to telecommuni-
cations, in marketing them-
selves.

Readers can contact Mr Far-
rington at SunTee EmbroidMe
on East Shirley Street, by e-mail
at HYPERLINK scott@sun-
tee.com or by telephone at 242-
393-3104.

Bahamian accountants sign up to monitoring

A Ministry af Marsh Harbour desepel Chapel
PO. Bie ABLOTLO, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Pahartas



cou eR

TEACHER POSITIONS

avr a ele
fs

Tunior and Senior High School

UR Ree Teme Teg
emo)

Nr mE ues

De me MR earl a
For the school year beginning SEPTEMBER 2004

Papolicants mast be Born Again Christians and adhere to fhe Statement| of Fafth ef Marsh Harbour Laospel Chapel
Teachers must also have af least a Bachelors Dearee in Education or a Teachers Certificate
and must be a Pahanian or a permanent resident of the Bahamas with work staus,
Qualtying persons are aaked {0 contact Yor office at
Telephone (242) 37-4771 8:30 AM. ~ 345 PM, or fas (242) 341-§TT1
oc vesil oor website ~ wiewagapeschool come ~ for jab or student! applications

Agape Christian School uses the A Beka Pook Curriculum
which emphasizes Christian values a6 well a a very high standard ef education
and is approved by the Pahamas Ministry of Education,

We seek to train the mind, quide the person, and love the personality

Study to ow thysell approved unto Gt... 2 “Timothy 2:15





SHOWN (I-r) are Guyanese Prime Minister Samuel Hinds; president of The Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accoun-
tants, Daniel Ferguson; Sha Ali Khan, director of practice monitoring professional standards at ACCA; Institute
of Chartered Accountants of the Caribbean (ICAC) president, Angela Lee Loy; Brendan Murtagh, president, ACCA;
and Frank Myers, president of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of the Eastern Caribbean.

THE Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants (BICA)
has formally signed up to a
regional accounting practice
monitoring programme, some-
thing it believes “will signifi-
cantly improve auditing proce-
dures and quality assurance
review systems in the
Bahamas”.

The contract to implement
the programme in the Bahamas
was signed by BICA’s presi-
dent, Daniel Ferguson, on June
26 during the official opening
ceremony of the 27th Annual
Caribbean Conference of
Accountants in Guyana.

The Bahamas and the East-
ern Caribbean will now join
Guyana, Barbados and Trinidad

and Tobago in implementing a
monitoring review process for
accounting practitioners and
audit firms within their respec-
tive territories.

“The implementation of the
regional practice monitoring
programme will not only signif-
icantly improve quality assur-
ance in the auditing procedure
in the Bahamas, but it will also
elevate the standard of the
Bahamian accounting profes-
sionals to be on par with global
standards. This will significant-
ly enhance the accountancy pro-
fession in the Bahamas," said
Mr Ferguson.

The practice monitoring pro-
gramme is designed to place the
Bahamas and the Caribbean on

the same level as accountants
in the UK, US and Canada,
who have already implement-
ed such initiatives.

Under the Caribbean region-
al monitoring programme, prac-
titioners and firms within the
Bahamas and other participat-
ing territories will be monitored
to ensure audit reports and
audit procedures are in compli-
ance with international stan-
dards and other internationally
recognised rules.

The monitoring visits will be
carried out by the Association
of Chartered Certified Accoun-
tants (ACCA), which has over
15 years experience and exper-
tise in the monitoring of its
members worldwide.

Worries over ‘extraordinary
number of casualties’

FROM page 1B

We will begin to see some of
that.”

Mr Rolle added that the
recession’s impact was begin-
ning to show itself in the Cham-
ber’s own membership
renewals, although the organi-
sation had yet to determine
which non-renewals were linked
to the recession, and others that
were simply late.

“There are some companies
that have gone out of business,
there are some companies that
cannot sustain any fees not
related to their core operating
expenses,” the Chamber presi-
dent explained. “People are try-
ing to manage cash flow and are
treading water.”

Adding that the current eco-
nomic circumstances “reinforce
the need for businesses to plan
what they do”, Mr Rolle said:
“Businesses have an obligation
to communicate with their
bankers. If you’re in trouble,
and see early signs of trouble -
and there are early warning
alarms - the first entity you talk
to should be the person funding

ou.”

On the other side of the coin,
Mr Rolle said it was in the
banks’ best interests to provide
struggling commercial and cor-
porate clients with “a lifeline”
where they could, as a low per-
forming loan was better than a

non-performing one.

He also urged the banking
sector to avoid putting any
undue pressure on their busi-
ness clients, and instead work
with them to allow “people to
get back on their feet and do
business without pressure from
the bank”.

However, Mr Rolle added
that he was “not surprised at
all” by the almost 20 per cent
commercial loan arrears rate
identified by the Central Bank.

This was chiefly because
“small businesses operate on
very tight financial constraints
anyway. Many of them operate
on a very tight overdraft, espe-
cially new businesses. They
operate on very stringent terms
in that regard, and as soon as
pressure builds they’re among
the first to become casualties.

“The best we can do is find a
universal solution to this prob-
lem. Commercial bankers need
to develop a framework, an
environment for communica-
tion, and all stakeholders need
to be involved in that process.
Everyone has to be involved.”

In its report, the Central
Bank found that total non-per-
forming loans rose to 7.7 per
cent or $468.2 million of the
commercial banking sector’s
total outstanding portfolio. This
figure increased by 4 per cent or
$18.2 million in May.

The total number of loans in
arrears by at least one month
increased by $6.1 million or 0.7
per cent in May, reaching a total
of $847.3 million. Total loans in
arrears increased to 13.98 per
cent as a percentage of total
loans, although the proportion
of delinquent loans - those
between 31 to 90 days past due
- declined by $12 million or 3.73
per cent to $373.3 million.

The Central Bank said: “The
increase in the arrears rate was
attributed to a worsening in the
consumer loans and residential
mortgages portfolios, by 58
basis points and 2 basis points,
to 12.45 per cent and 13 per
cent, respectively.

“In contrast, the commercial
arrears rate receded to 19.83
per cent in May, from 20.61 per
cent in April. In response to
these developments, banks aug-
mented loan loss provisions by
$3 million, boosting the ratio of
provisions to total arrears by 18
basis points to 23.44 per cent.

“This corresponded to new
loan provisions of $10 million,
partly offset by a $6.9 million
net write-off against loans pro-
visioned for earlier. However,
as the growth in non-perform-
ing loans outpaced the increase
in provisions, the ratio of total
provisions to non-performing
loans fell by 5 basis points to
42.43 per cent.”



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 3B





Cruise line joins Grand
Bahama all-inclusive deal

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

DISCOVERY Cruise Lines, the sin-
gle largest contributor to hotel room
nights on Grand Bahama, is positioned
to maintain that title with its introduc-
tion of an island-inclusive package
linked to the Ministry of Tourism’s
‘Club Grand Bahama’ promotion.

The cruise line sails out of Port Ever-
glades en route to Grand Bahama six
times per week. Deputy director of the
Ministry of Tourism and Aviation,
David Johnson, said Discovery brought

Bahamian
accounts chief
is now regional
body’s secretary

THE Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants (BICA) pres-
ident has been elected as secretary for the Institute of Chartered
Accountants of the Caribbean (ICAC) for 2009-2010.

Mr Ferguson, managing partner of Daniel H. Ferguson & Asso-
ciates Chartered Accountants, was first appointed to the ICAC

Board in June 2006.

Harryram Parmesar was elected president, with Jon Braith-
waite becoming vice-president. Prunella Vassell was elected as

treasurer.

e Pictured on the right is the newly-elected president of ICAC,
Harryram Parmesar (second from left) with other executive officers.
From L to R are Prunella Vassell, treasurer; Joan Brathwaite,

170,000 visitors to Grand Bahama last
year and acts as a ferry service for
Grand Bahamians.

The Club Grand Bahama promo-
tion was designed to make the entire
island of Grand Bahama an all-inclu-
sive package.

What Discovery Cruise Line is able
to offer its guests through the Club
Grand Bahama promotion is a two to
seven-night stay on Grand Bahama,
with the purchaser’s choice of hotels,
activities, attractions and restaurants,
depending on which tier - Silver, Gold
or Platinum - is chosen. The packages
start at $269.99 and include trans-

portation to the island.

According to Discovery’s website,
guests who purchase the Club Grand
Bahama packages will be “greeted with
round-trip harbour transfers to the
hotel or resort of your choice”.

Guests are then able to choose from
more than 50 sports and recreational
activities, including golf, scuba diving,
fishing and adventure activities.

With the silver package, visitors can
choose from five breakfast locations,
four dinner locations and four attrac-
tions.

At the Gold level, visitors have sev-
en breakfast options, 11 dinner

vice-president; and Daniel Ferguson, secretary

Airline fearing six figure fee increase

FROM page 1B

Given that Sky Bahamas
operated 33-seater aircraft,
which weighed more than
28,000 pounds, Mr Butler said
the company’s planes would be
in the highest fee category. It
had been looking at adding oth-
er planes to its fleet, and Mr
Butler said: “We’re looking
right now at in excess of
$150,000 [in fees] on the fleet.”

While acknowledging that
there needed to be an increase
in Civil Aviation fees, Mr Butler
said the Department and the
Government needed to take a
“graduated” approach and raise
them over time, not in one go -
and especially at a time when
the industry was being impacted
by a global recession.

Questioning the timing of the
move to implement the fee
increases that were approved,
but never implemented, in 2005,
Mr Butler said Sky Bahamas
and others in the industry “need
to sit down and talk” with Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace, min-
ister of tourism and aviation.

“There needs to be a fee
increase, but it should be a grad-
uated increase and shouldn’t
happen without the input of the
industry,” Mr Butler told Tri-
bune Business. “We’re trying
to find out what is the objec-
tive, the goal of doing it at this
time. It’s been four years since
they were approved.

“We don’t understand what
the Government is doing right
here. All these taxes, all these
fee increases, you have to pass it
on to the passenger. You’re
talking about more money in
fees and taxes than the actual
cost of the ticket. The Govern-
ment now is going to put a
large, undue burden on every-
one to travel. Maybe they’re

HOME AWAY

FROM HOME
Sake and Coaerieetihhe



telling everyone to travel by
boat.”

He added that some Bahami-
an private airline and charter
operators were wondering if the
Civil Aviation fee increases was
simply a move to protect
Bahamasair by reducing their
competitiveness, and even
“putting some of us out of busi-
ness”.

Aviation

The increased Civil Aviation
fees contrasted sharply with the
incentives and tax breaks giv-
en to foreign companies, such as
the cruise line and foreign air
carriers. Instead, the tax bur-
den appeared to be falling
squarely on Bahamian private
operators and charter firms.

The increased fees also con-
trast with Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace’s stated determination to
get the cost of access to the
Bahamian tourism product,
namely air fare and airlift costs,
down. The fee rises are likely
to achieve the opposite when it
comes to Family Island air

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transportation.

Mr Butler added that while
the Government had said it was
going to use the revenues from
the fee increases to improve air
transportation, it had yet to
state what specific aspects
would be improved.

He said Bahamian private
airlines currently paid “for ser-
vices you don’t get”, namely
security and sterile areas - free
from the travelling public and
their guests - at Family Island
airports.

Questions were also asked
about whether the fee rises
were necessary given the pro-
posed $50 million Inter-Ameri-
can Development Bank (IDB)
financed project to reform civil
aviation in the Bahamas.

Mr Butler said most Bahami-
an private airlines were suffer-
ing from reduced passenger
loads, but had been able to sur-
vive as a result of the weekend
boosts they received from
Bahamians flying home for
homecomings and regattas. He
lamented the absence of a
strategic plan for the sector.



BARAM AS

| Short Term Apartment

RENTALS

Cheaper than a Hotel
week 2weeks month

HOME AWAY FROM HOME

cal: 328-2325

eedal; Guharas homeeayfromomaetagralcom

options, and over 25 attractions to
choose from. Platinum package holders
have slightly more dinner options.

Hotel options include the Flamingo
Bay Resort, Reef Our Lucaya Resort,
Pelican Bay Resort and Radisson Our
Lucaya.

“To suit your budget, Club Grand
Bahama packages have been divided
into Silver, Gold or Platinum levels,
with the number of activities and din-
ing options increasing exponentially
with each level.

“You receive a Club Grand Bahama
Card that will be activated at check-in
and swiped for meals and activities

Zi eee ee
Ora Rie

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5

throughout the vacation,” said the
company’s website.

The Ministry of Tourism has moved
to get more suppliers like Discovery
to offer the Club Grand Bahama Pack-
age, a programme the Ministry had
pledged since the beginning of the year
to roll out. And the Grand Bahama
economy, with its steady decline, was in
much need of a dynamic plan for a
turn around.

Mr Johnson said Discovery Cruise
Lines has been a tremendous contrib-
utor to the Grand Bahama economy
and continues to be the leader visitor
access route to the island.



TREEMONISHA

olny

Qn the Occasion of

A Ann ersary a f Independence

f a Leelee SORA es

TT ma AL te eee at A

iT . 5
tm Clie mes

The Dundas Centre For The Performing Arts
tt ere wea
a ee es ee TP:





PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a > =; ;
A global look at economic developments

@ By The Associated Press



A LOOK at economic developments
and stock market activity around the
world Tuesday:

German industrial orders increase

by 4.4% in May over previous month

BERLIN — German industrial orders
increased by a healthy 4.4 per cent in
May over the previous month, with
demand from outside Europe rising the
most strongly, government figures
showed.

The strong performance followed a
minimal 0.1 per cent increase in April
and adds to other indications that the
outlook for Germany’s export-depen-
dent economy — Europe’s biggest — is
becoming rosier. Recent surveys have
shown rising business and consumer con-
fidence.

In European markets, the FTSE 100
index of leading British shares closed
down 0.2 per cent at 4,187 while Ger-
many’s DAX fell 53.63 points, or 1.2 per
cent, to 4,598.19. The CAC-40 in France
was 33.59 points lower, or 1.1 per cent, at
3,048.57.

EU nations want to publish

confidential stress tests

BRUSSELS — Some European
Union nations want to publish confi-
dential stress tests that assess how well
European banks could cope with a worse
economic climate, the top EU economy
official said.

Separately, European Union nations
partly blamed the financial crisis on the
way bankers and traders are paid and
called for new rules to link performance
to pay. Finance ministers said in a joint
statement that “inappropriate incentives,
short-termism and inadequate capture
of risk” had allowed banks to take on
massive risks that have forced them to

put aside billions of euros in the past
year to cover potential losses.

Meanwhile, the EU gave Poland, Hun-
gary, Romania, Latvia and Lithuania
two- and three-year deadlines to curb
their budget deficits, which have been
swollen by the world financial crisis and
its fallout in Eastern Europe.

China’s economy improving

BEIJING — China’s economy is
improving and growth might have
topped 7.5 per cent for the quarter that
ended in June, a central bank researcher
said in an official journal.

Growth is benefiting from Beijing’s
stimulus spending and rising investment
and consumption, said Zhang Jianhua,
chief of the bank’s research bureau, in an
article in the July issue of the bank’s
magazine, China Finance.

The government is due to report quar-
terly economic data next week. The
economy expanded by 6.1 per cent in
the January-to-March quarter from a
year earlier.

In Asian markets, Japan’s Nikkei 225
stock average fell for the fifth straight
day, closing down 0.3 per cent at
9,647.79. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng shed
0.7 per cent to 17,862.27, while South
Korea’s Kospi rose 0.4 per cent to
1,434.20. China’s Shanghai fell 1.1 per
cent. Australia’s market retreated 0.4
per cent but Singapore ended almost
flat.

Business group says worst

of Britain’s recession over

LONDON — A business group said
the worst of Britain’s recession is over,
but the Bank of England should still
print more money because recovery is
not assured.

A separate report showed that manu-
facturing output fell 1.2 per cent in
March through May from the previous

three months, however, casting doubt
over the sector’s recovery. Output is 12.3
per cent lower than a year earlier.

Indian business leaders praise

government’s new budget

NEW DELHI — Despite initial
investor disappointment, Indian busi-
ness leaders praised the government’s
new budget as spurring growth by spend-
ing money on developing roads and oth-
er infrastructure, especially in poor rur-
al areas.

The budget, presented Monday by
Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee, will
boost total spending 36 per cent to 10.3
trillion rupees ($213 billion) between
now and March 2010.

Singapore’s finance minister warns

Asia to expect lower economic

growth for years to come

SINGAPORE — Singapore’s finance
minister warned Asia to expect lower
economic growth for years to come as a
weakened US consumer buys less of the
region’s exports.

Gross domestic product expansion in
Asia will likely fall to an average 6.5 per
cent over the next few years from nine
per cent during the 2002 to 2007 period,
Finance Minister Tharman Shanmu-
garatnam said.

Singapore, along with other export-
dependent countries such as South
Korea, Taiwan and Hong Kong, has
been especially hard hit by the global
recession and collapse in consumer
demand from the US and Europe.

Australia’s central bank leaves key

interest rate unchanged

or third month at 3%

SYDNEY — Australia’s central bank
left its key interest rate unchanged for
the third month at three per cent, citing

a stabilizing global situation and
stronger-than-expected domestic econ-
omy.

The Reserve Bank of Australia has
kept rates at the current level — their
lowest in 49 years — since April but said
in a statement there is room for further
cuts this year if necessary.

Conditions in global financial markets
are improving and action to strengthen
balance sheets of key financial institu-
tions is under way, RBA chief Glenn
Stevens said in the statement.

The Philippines’ inflation drops

to lowest rate in 22 years

MANILA, Philippines — The Philip-
pines’ inflation rate dropped to 1.5 per
cent in June — the lowest in 22 years
— as prices of commodities, particularly
fuel and utilities, continued to fall, the
government said.

Last month’s rate, down from 3.3 per
cent in May, was the lowest since April
1987. A year ago, the country posted an
11.4 per cent inflation rate.

Pope calls for new

world financial order

VATICAN CITY — Pope Benedict
XVI called for a new world financial
order guided by ethics, dignity and the
search for the common good in the third
encyclical of his pontificate.

In “Charity in Truth,” Benedict
denounced the profit-at-all-cost mental-
ity of the globalized economy and
lamented that greed had brought about
the worst economic downturn since the
Great Depression.

The document, in the works for two
years and repeatedly delayed to incor-
porate the fallout from the crisis, was
released one day before leaders of the
Group of Eight industrialized nations
meet to coordinate efforts to deal with
the global meltdown.



Minister: Bahamas not been ‘effective’ on grant financed project execution

FROM page 1B

imposed stringent requirements
relating to areas such as the bid-
ding and tendering processes
for such projects, something
that Mr Laing said created chal-
lenges because the Bahamas’
stipulations in the same area
were different.

“In particular, the projects
that have had the difficulties
have been projects that have
been required to be executed
through the Ministry of Works,”
Mr Laing told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“That Ministry is challenged
as it is in terms of the multitude
of the projects it has to execute.
Very little projects, and these
[EU financed] ones could be
very small projects, get caught
up in the rush. They are not as
driven as they need to be.

“The effort of late to get by
that by using private entities to
do initial estimates for these
projects has not been as effec-
tive either.”

Mr Laing added that the
EU’s “stringent requirements”
were another reason for the
delays in implementing grant-
funded projects, adding that
they were often not in line with

the stipulations of the Bahamas
and other Caribbean countries.

“T’ve attended a number of
meetings at which discussions
have been held over the execu-
tion of EU projects, and we’ve
considered many complaints
from countries about the
demands, conditions and stipu-
lations [of the EU] creating a
slower processing efficiency,”
Mr Laing said.

The talks had then focused
on “reforming the process to
create more efficiency” through
the Bahamas and Caribbean
states taking on ‘ownership’ of
the projects, with the responsi-
bility to get them executed.

The EU's 2008-2013 Country
Strategy Paper for the
Bahamas, a copy of which has
been obtained by Tribune Busi-
ness despite it never being made
public, found that 6.83 million
Euros made available to the
Bahamas in the last funding
round - known as the ninth
European Development Fund
(EDF) - failed to achieve their
goal to ‘build capacity’ in the
Family Islands.

Finding that the Bahamas
had been "very slow" in com-
mitting these funds to agreed
projects, with a "protracted

Zhivargo Laing



process" in setting up technical
help, the Strategy Paper said:
"Unfortunately, implementa-
tion of the ninth EDF has expe-
rienced significant delays...

"This is at least in part due
to lack of communication on
project implementation issues.
The intervention framework
had not been updated by the
end of 2004, and no output or
outcome sector-wide indicators
were made available.

"The Mid-Term Review con-
cluded that the Bahamas was a
very low performer in terms of

implementation of EU assis-
tance, and that a reduction of
the overall allocation could be
contemplated at the End-of-
Term Review if things did not
improve."

Tribune Business previously
reported that risking a cut in
EDF financing would be sheer
folly for the Bahamas, given
that it is the only grant funding
this nation can access. This is
largely due to it being viewed by
many as a relatively developed
nation with high living stan-
dards.

Grant funding is financing
without any repayment or inter-
est rates attached, making it
especially valuable to the
Bahamas given the expanding
fiscal deficits and national debt
due to weakness in the public
finances.

However, Mr Laing told Tri-
bune Business yesterday that
the EU “is not the only grant
funding that is out there”.

He added: “The Bahamas has
not been aggressive in seeking
to take advantage of grant fund-
ing, because we have sought to
carry our weight for the most
part. Other countries, where the
need is greater, have been more
aggressive in seeking grant

funding.”

While the Bahamas had
sought to finance its infrastruc-
ture and capital works needs
through its “own internal
resources”, Mr Laing said this
did not mean the Government
would refuse grant funding if it
provided access to items such
as essential technical expertise.

He added, though, that the
Bahamas would not be “more
aggressive” in seeking grant
funding as a result of the reces-
sion and its impact on the pub-
lic finances.

“In the Bahamas, we want to
manage our affairs sensibly. To
the extent funds are available,
we will be as efficient as we can
in utilizing those funds,” Mr
Laing said.

“T don’t think we’ve come to
a phase where circumstances
dictate that we have to rush out
with great aggression for every
funding available.”

The minister added that the
projects to be included in the
EU’s 10th EDF still had not
been decided. He added that
while the Bahamas had to pro-
vide counterpart financing of its
own for these projects, it was
often for as little as 25 per cent
of what the EU provided.

Year-end target for first phase finance regulator consolidation

FROM page 1B

Commission, Compliance Com-
mission and Registrar of Insur-
ance’s Office - which are
already occupying the same
building, Charlotte House on
Shirley Street - into the sole
Bahamas Financial Services
Authority, via a Bahamas
Financial Services Act. The new
Authority will have a chief exec-
utive, who will replace the



NN tare tiie

Ory Estate |

heads of the three existing reg-
ulators, merging their roles into
his own.

“We had hoped that we
would have this process com-
pleted by year-end,” Mr Laing
told Tribune Business, “which is
the first phase of the consolida-
tion which we propose to do.”

He described this goal as
“absolutely achievable”, given
that the three regulators

involved were already in the
same building. “The hard work
has been done,” Mr Laing said.

With new legislation in the
form of the Domestic and
External Insurance Acts; the
reformed Securities Industry
Act and its regulations; and
responsibility for the Financial
and Corporate Services
Providers Act being handed to
the Securities Commission all

s Source For Homes, Apartment Commanities tr Rentals *

Everywhere Lr Buyers Are!



either having been passed, in
the process of being imple-
mented, under consultation or
in effect. The minister said all
that remained to be done was to
consolidate their provisions
under the sole Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Act.

Mr Laing added: “In the first
phase, we will consolidate
everyone bar the Central Bank.
Then we will move to the sec-
ond phase, and the goal of the
single regulator. We’re taking
on step at a time.”

This will mean that, tem-
porarily at least, the Bahamas
will have a ‘twin peaks’ regula-
tory model, with the Central
Bank’s Bank Supervision
Department as a standalone
regulator for the banking and
trust company sector, and the
Financial Services Authority
responsible for everything else.

Mr Laing, though, said con-
solidation of the Banking
Supervision Department into
the Bahamas Financial Services
Authority would be the second
and final phase of the Govern-
ment’s strategy to create a
‘super regulator’.

He explained that the over-
laps between regulators, partic-
ularly the Central Bank and
Securities Commission in the
areas of banking and securities,
needed to be examined first.

“We want to make sure
everything is working on all
cylinders on that side before we
take it to the next level,” Mr
Laing said of first phase con-
solidation.

“Ultimately, we want to pro-
duce a level of efficiency and
effectiveness that makes it eas-
ier for clients to have a more

productive time in doing busi-
ness in our jurisdiction. We
want to get it right. The envi-
ronment in which we are oper-
ating does not have a lot of
room for error.”

The minister unveiled, via
some broad brush strokes, the
Government’s strategy for
financial services regulation and
growing the industry’s private
sector at a closed-door
Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB) meeting with
senior sector representatives on
Monday. He is understood to
be meeting with a BFSB steer-
ing committee today to put
more flesh, or meat, on the
bones of the Government’s
plans.

The Government is looking
to build on the Bahamas’ pri-
vate wealth management - pri-
vate banking, trusts and estate
planning - base to expand the
industry, hoping to encourage
high net worth and ultra high-
net worth clients to follow their
assets to the Bahamas by
becoming residents here.

That would lead into private
trust companies, family offices
and those individuals possibly
bringing their businesses to the
Bahamas and investing in its
economy. This trend would also
tie into yacht and aircraft reg-
istries, something the Bahamas
is trying to develop, and boost
the real estate and construction
industries.

Other aspects of the Govern-
ment’s strategy also aim to
establish the Bahamas as a cen-
tre through which investment
could be channelled into Latin
America and other emerging
economies in the region.

Crude prices
fall helow $63
in extented
sell-off

lm By ERNEST SCHEYDER
AP Energy Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil
prices fell for the fifth straight
day Tuesday, with a barrel cost-
ing $10 less than it did just one
week ago when crude hit anew
high for the year.

Benchmark crude for August
delivery fell $1.27 to $62.78 a
barrel on the New York Mer-
cantile Exchange.

Oil prices had already begun
to slide after peaking last Tues-
day, and dismal jobs numbers
last week from both the US and
Europe only exacerbated the
fall.

The unemployment data
dampened optimism about a
quick economic recovery, rais-
ing new doubts about the glob-
al appetite for energy.

“This is a market that is look-
ing for a reason to go back up
and it just isn’t getting it, so it
continues to fade away,” Alaron
Trading Corp. analyst Phil Fly-
nn said.

For months a weak dollar has
brought more investment mon-
ey into the market even though
storage levels for energy prod-
ucts like crude and gasoline are
very high.

Stockpiles of gasoline have
increased steadily for the past
four weeks even though the
country is in the midst of the
heavy driving season, which
includes the July Fourth holi-
day weekend.

Data coming from the
Department of Energy on
Wednesday is expected to show
that trend only continuing.

The department said Tues-
day it expects consumption of
liquid petroleum products to
contract by about 3.3 per cent
this year.

Crude prices will likely aver-
age about $70 per barrel for the
rest of the year, and the average
retail gasoline price likely will
float around $2.36 per gallon,
the department said.

Oil prices have doubled since
the beginning of the year and
on Tuesday, federal regulators
said they would examine
whether the government should
impose limits on the number of
futures contracts in oil and oth-
er energy commodities held by
speculative traders.

In other Nymex trading, gaso-
line for August delivery fell 1.76
cents to $1.7228 a gallon and
heating oil dropped 2.9 cents to
$1.5978. Natural gas for August
delivery rose less than a penny
to $3.488 per 1,000 cubic feet.

In London, Brent prices shed
95 cents to $63.10 a barrel on
the ICE Futures exchange.

¢ Associated Press writers
Alex Kennedy and George Jahn
in Vienna contributed to this
report from Singapore

Bahamas oil
imports cost
$1.1bn in ‘08

Bank’s quarterly statistical
digest showed that as at end-
March 2009, some 27,300 con-
sumer loans - worth a collective
$160.245 million - were past
due, meaning they were either
in arrears or non-performing.

However, only 9.6 per cent
of total consumer loans of
283,615 were in default. And,
measured by worth, only 7.2 per
cent of total consumer loans
worth $2.212 billion were in that
status.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 5B





World markets fall ahead.
of US earnings season

@ By PAN PYLAS
AP Business Writer

LONDON (AP) — World
stock markets fell Tuesday —
with Japan’s Nikkei index drop-
ping for the fifth day running
— amid mounting concerns that
the upcoming US second-quar-
ter earnings will disappoint.

In Europe, the FTSE 100
index of leading British shares
closed down 7.91 points, or 0.2
per cent, at 4,187 while Ger-
many’s DAX fell 53.63 points,
or 1.2 per cent, to 4,598.19. The
CAC-40 in France was 33.59
points, or 1.1 per cent, lower at
3,048.57.

On Wall Street, the Dow
Jones industrial average was
down 86.30 points, or one per
cent, at 8,238.57 around midday
New York time while the
broader Standard & Poor’s 500
index fell 8.42 points, or 0.9 per
cent, to 890.30.

will provide clues about
whether companies have
already seen the worst of the
recession or whether they are
still struggling in the first syn-
chronized global economic
downturn since the Second
World War.

“The worry is that the quar-
terly results are going to demon-
strate that stock markets have
got ahead of the economic
recovery and may well lead
some investors to feel that
shares do not represent value
at current levels,” said Philip
Gillet, a sales trader at IG
Index.

“This all starts in earnest on
Wednesday, when Dow com-
ponent Alcoa reveals its figures,
and market reaction could well
set the tone for the next few
weeks,” he added.

Equities rose from the middle
of March until the start of June
on hopes that the US economy

pated. The S&P 500 index in
the US rose around 15 per cent
during the second quarter, its
best performance since 1998,
amid hopes of a global recovery
despite worries about the bank-
ing system, public finances and
the length and depth of the
recession.

But disappointing economic
news over the last few weeks,
culminating in last Thursday’s
worse than expected US jobs
report for June, has altered the
general mood prevailing among




investors that a significant
rebound in the US was a dis-
tinct possibility. Since its peak in
early June, the S&P has
dropped around six per cent.

“Given the strong perfor-
mance of stocks relative to
March lows, a reality check
from earnings could be detri-
mental to risk appetite,” said
Gareth Berry, an analyst at
UBS.

Oil prices continued to fall
amid the global economic
uncertainty, with benchmark

NOTICE








INTERNATIONAL PETROLEUM
INVESTMENT CORPORATION





crude for August delivery down
$1.03 at $63.02 a barrel. On
Monday, the benchmark con-
tract slid $2.68 to settle at
$64.05.

Earlier, Asian stocks were
weighed down by waning
investor optimism about the
global economic recovery ahead
of this week’s meeting of the
Group of Eight leaders in Italy.
Japan’s Nikkei 225 stock aver-
age fell for the fifth straight day,
closing down 33.08 points, or
0.3 per cent, at 9,647.79.

Hong Kong’s Hang Seng
shed 117.14, or 0.7 per cent, to
17,862.27, while South Korea’s
Kospi rose 0.4 per cent to
1,434.20. China’s Shanghai fell
1.1 per cent. Australia’s market
retreated 0.4 per cent but Sin-
gapore trimmed gains to be
almost flat.

The dollar was down 0.1 per
cent at 95.11 yen while the euro
was steady at $1.3975.

¢ AP Business Writer Stephen
Wright in Bangkok contributed
to this report

Legal Notice
NOTICE

LACED INTERNATIONAL INC.
In Voluntary Liquidation

The start of the second-quar-
ter earnings reporting season

in particular will recover from
recession sooner than antici-

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RATIONAL INVESTMENTS LTD.

—_— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of RATIONAL INVESTMENTS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EL’ VIRA MANOR INC.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of EV VIRA MANOR INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
THINK ASSETS LTD.

— *,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of THINK ASSETS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

To advertise in The
Tribune - the #1 newspaper
in circulation, just call
Naar a BDL

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 6th day of July , 2009 Credit
Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre,
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, P.O.Box N-3023, Nassau, The
Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the
Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SATINROSE PARK LTD.

—_— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SATINROSE PARK LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SECOND GENESIS LID.

— *,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SECOND GENESIS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HAWKINSHILL ACRE LTD.

—f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of HAWKINSHILL ACRE LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,

2000, LACED INTERNATIONAL INC. is in
dissolution as of JULY 2, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated as 35A
Regent Street, PO. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DAWN INT’L LTD.

ps —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of DAWN INT’L LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SIALIS INTERNATIONAL INC.

—*f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SIALIS INTERNATIONAL INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GARTENPLATZ INC.

—*,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of GARTENPLATZ INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



PEER, WERE ER GREE UWE

5-Day FORECAST
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ORLANDO . .
Partly sunny with a
shower possible.






















Partly sunny with a
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Partly cloudy. Partly sunny. Partly sunny. Partly sunny, a

ah: ON? oa’ - ———e
High:90°F/32°C t-storm possible.

~~ Low:73°F/28°C i

























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The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
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LOW

3|4|5

MODERATE









. @. Te High: 92° High: 90° High: 89° High: 90°
r es High: 92° Low: 82° Low: 80° Low: 81° Low: 80° Low: 79° see EOE
TAMPA ae ; Ca
High: 89° F/32° C Li High __Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft.
Low: 77° F/25°C ed: - The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 9:12am. 24 3:12am. 02
cae @ F . elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 9:34pm. 28 3:08pm. 0.2
a 9:50am. 24 3:48am. 0.1
a i. a CT Thursday cog pm. 27 348pm. 02
J RR a Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Friday 26am. 24 423am. 01
\ | er ABACO Femperatre ______ 10:43pm. 26 4:27pm. 03
r by , 4 High: 88° F/31°C NQUN: « .ctinstetscetésiassetuecetszers crcteogtesoulieees 3 3 Saturday 17:03 a.m. 95 457am. 02
¥ , the Low: 83° F/28°C Te ee oo 11:19pm. 26 5:08 p.m. 0.3
— F Normal low 75° F/24° C
a hee @ WEST PALM BEACH a Last year's high oo... 91° F/33° C SUN AND ify
4 ell High: 91° F/33° C - Last year's lOW eects 80° F/26° C
q Low: 76° F/24°C ; Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:26 a.m. Moonrise .... 9:07 p.m.
es As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....ccccccscsssssescssessseeen 0.19" Sunset....... 8:03 p.m. Moonset ..... 7:24 a.m.
at FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date 18. Last New First
. am High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 90° F/32° C Normal year to date .......c.ccsecscsscsssseeeeeseeee 19.86" a %
Low: 78° F/26°C Low: 80° F/27°C te a
AccuWeather.com = Lao
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i MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul.15 = Jul. 21 Jul. 28
tok 0 Fa ELEUTHERA
Low: 79° F/26° C NASSAU Bee Fas
cr = Low: 82° F/28° C
P “a @ a
KEY WEST — << _ GATISLAND
High: 88° F/31°C High: 89° F/32°C
Low: 80° F/27°C =e , Low: 76° F/24°C
i m4 =
ZX
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
High: 91 F/33 C High: 93° F/34° C
; ANDROS Low: 80° F/27° C Low: 77° F/25° Cc
Shown is ee ete eel are today's High: 96° F/36°C —
ighs and toni i ; : “ a ae
g ane awe Low: 82° F/28° C aad ¢ i
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“a m
LONGISLAND
Low: 77° F/25°C —
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday é - : MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ‘aul High: 93° F/34° C
FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FC FC FIC FC 70% Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 94/34 68/20 s 93/33 68/20 pc Indianapolis 82/27 62/16 t 85/29 68/20 pc Philadelphia 81/27 63/17 pce 82/27 64/17 pc j
Anchorage 77/25 59/15 s 77/25 5713 pe Jacksonville 88/31 72/22 t 86/30 71/21 t Phoenix 106/41 87/30 pc 105/40 85/29 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 90/32 70/21 t 88/31 68/20 t Kansas City 90/32 72/22 pc 93/33 74/23 s Pittsburgh 76/24 54/12 po 80/26 60/15 pc RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:96°F/36"c
Atlantic City 80/26 60/15 pc 80/26 6246 pc LasVegas 102/38 78/25 s 102/38 82/27 s Portland,OR 70/21 5442 c 77/25 57/13 pc High: 93° F/34° C Low: 78° F/26°C
Baltimore 84/28 58/14 pce 82/27 63/17 pc Little Rock 96/35 68/20 pce 94/84 72/22 s Raleigh-Durham 93/383 64/117 pc 91/82 66/18 pc Low: 74°F/23°C i
Boston 73/22 59/15 t 69/20 58/14 c Los Angeles 82/27 62/16 pc 82/27 62/16 pc St. Louis 90/32 72/22 pe 93/33 73/22 s
Buffalo 68/20 57/13 pe 75/23 60/15 pc Louisville 89/31 67/19 pe 88/31 71/21 5s Salt Lake City 86/30 60/15 s 89/31 63/17 5s GREAT INAGUA
Charleston, SC 88/31 70/21 t 90/32 72/22 t Memphis 94/34 73/22 pce 95/35 75/23 s San Antonio 102/38 78/25 s 102/38 78/25 s High: 95° F/35° C
Chicago 74/23 60/15 t 85/29 69/20 pc Miami 90/32 79/26 t 91/32 79/26 t San Diego 75/23 66/18 pe 77/25 67/19 pc Low. 77°F/25°C
Cleveland 73/22 55/12 pe 82/27 62/16 pc Minneapolis 78/25 66/18 t 85/29 66/18 t San Francisco 71/21 54/2 pe 69/20 54/12 pc 7
Dallas 98/36 77/25 pce 102/38 78/25 s Nashville 92/33 66/18 pc 92/33 68/20 s Seattle 68/20 53/11 c 74/23 53/11 pe
Denver 96/35 58/14 5s 92/33 61/16 pc New Orleans 90/32 74/23 t 90/32 76/24 t Tallahassee 88/31 71/21 t 87/30 72/22 t
Detroit 76/24 58/14 pe 81/27 65/18 pc New York 81/27 65/18 pce 78/25 67/19 pc Tampa 89/31 77/25 t 88/31 77/25 t ;
Honolulu 88/31 76/24 pc 88/31 75/23 pc Oklahoma City 98/36 72/22 pc 100/87 72/22 s Tucson 97/36 78/25 s 100/87 77/25 pc
Houston 98/36 76/24 pc 98/36 76/24 5s Orlando 90/32 73/22 t 89/31 72/22 t Washington, DC 87/30 64/17 pc 84/28 67/19 pc

» ULL

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
66/18
86/30
93/33
56/13
89/31
85/29
71/21
90/32
80/26
89/31
68/20
80/26
64/17
64/17
79/26
54/12
99/37
94/34
60/15
88/31
82/27
78/25
69/20
63/17
66/18
69/20
62/16
88/31
72/22
91/32
112/44
91/32
83/28
58/14
91/32
72/22
68/20
90/32
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79/26
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61/16
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74/23
86/30
72/22
61/16
93/33
82/27
73/22
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67/19
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70/21
76/24

Today

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53/11
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44/6
79/26
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64/17
72/22
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59/15
57/13
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88/31
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54/12
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69/20
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68/20
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73/22
59/15
70/21
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43/6
78/25
72/22
58/14
68/20
55/12
56/13
55/12
57/13

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High
F/C
89/31
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Thursday
Low
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76/24
54/12
57/13
73/22
42/5
79/26
77/25
65/18
71/21
77/25
59/15
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88/31
58/14
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51/10
69/20
80/26
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32/0
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36/2
73/22
mile
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72/22
61/16
69/20
56/13
57/13
52/11
58/14

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precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SSE at 8-16 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
Thursday: SE at 8-26 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 8-16 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Thursday: SE at 8-16 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
ABACO Today: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Thursday: _$ at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F



Miami
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Full Text



PAGE 1

Harl Taylor ‘had 45 to 50 wounds’ N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.188WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH T-STORM HIGH 92F LOW 82F By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@ tribunemedia.net FORENSIC pathologist Dr Govinda Raju testified yesterday thati nternationally recognisedhandbag designer Harl Taylor suffered 45 to 50 wounds, including abrasions, deep cut wounds, incised wounds and bruises. Dr Raju told the court yes terday that around 2pm on November 18, 2007, he went to Mountbatten House for a scene examination. There, he told the court, he observed the lifeless body of an adult male, later identified as Harl Taylor, lying in a pool of blood on the wooden floor of the bedroom. He told the court that there was stiff rigidity of Taylor's upper and lower extremities. Dr Raju told the court that from his observa tion, he concluded that there was some violent activity going on at the time of Taylor’s death. He also concluded that Taylor had died some 10 to 12 hours prior to his examination. According to Dr Raju, the victim had lost a couple liters of blood. Dr Raju also told the court that he conducted an autopsy on Taylor's body, on November 21, 2007, at the morgue of the Princess Margaret Hospital. Dr Raju described the numer ous wounds he observed, including multiple cut penetrating wounds to Taylor's face, head, neck, chest, abdomen and shoulders. He also described deep penetrating wounds to Taylor’s lower abdomen, mid left shoulder, right upper abdomen and front of left shoulder. Dr Raju said that he also noted that Taylor had defensive wounds on his body. Detective Corporal Basil Evans told the court yesterday that around 5.50pm while at the Central Detective Unit, he saw detective Inspector Solomon Cash who pointed out a black male he later identified as mur der accused Troyniko McNeil. Corporal Evans told the court Forensic pathologist testifies in court The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com /77 57:616/ )Va WVM' By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham yesterday lent his support to the Ministry of Education’s 10-year plan for education, noting that he hoped their initiative would develop further into a flexible entity that can respond to the changing needs and demands of the country’s economy. Delivering the keynote address at the closing ceremony at the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Mr Ingraham said that it is hoped that through such dia logue that has been started at this summit, the Ministry can develop a plan for education that will not be a PLP, or FNM plan, but a “nation al plan for education in the Bahamas.” “It must be a plan to which future governments and ministers of education of whatever political stripe can subscribe and vigorously pursue. It must be a plan that is understood by and has the sup port of all sectors of our society: the Government of the day, the Opposi tion, the private sector, trade unions, the churches, academia and most SEE page nine PM backs 10-year plan for education By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE executive director of the Bahamas National Trust and senior employees of the Department of Lands and Surveys have been accused of “conspiring” together to dispossess a poor farmer and his family of land he had worked for decades. In a Statement of Claim filed in the Supreme Court on June 26, 2009, between farmer Charles Christopher Gibson and the Bahamas National Trust, the environmental organisation through its director Eric Carey, former Department of Lands and Surveys director Tex Turnquest and Christopher Russell are alleged to have acted “unconscionably” and even “corruptly” towards Mr Gibson. It is alleged the BNT and the Department breached their “fiduciary duty” towards the farmer, with both agencies allegedly concealing certain information from him as the BNT moved to add the land he had farmed to the “enormous acreage” in the area for which it had already been granted a lease. The farmer, who is represented by lawyer Lionel Levine, took the BNT to court last month after he was “devas BNT CHIEF , L ANDS AND SUR VEYS STAFF ACCUSED OF ‘CONSPIRING’ TO DISPOSSESS FARMER OF LAND SEE page nine ITISCLAIMED the charity wanted the right to land in the area to create the Harrold and Wilson Ponds park (above and to relocate their headquarters from Village Road. MURDER ACCUSED Troyniko McNeil SEE page nine JENNIFER HUDSON performs at the memorial service for Michael Jackson at the Staples CentreinLos Angeles yesterday. The 20,000 peo ple gathered inside the arena and millions watching around the world said a final farewell to the ‘King of Pop’. TWOPAGE SPECIAL ON PAGES 10 and 11 Gabriel Bouys , Pool/AP SAYINGFAREWELLTOMICHAELJACKSON INSIDE BAHAMIANS GIVE THEIR OPINIONSON NATIONALLOTTERY ANDEDUCATION PAGETWO PLEA FOR MORE TIME TO STUDY 10-YEAR EDUCATION STRATEGY PAGETHREE Ingraham hopes initiative will develop into ‘flexible entity’ YOURIN-DEPTH GUIDE FORTHIS YEAR’SCELEBRATION INSIDETODAY

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T ALK S TREET NATIONAL LOTTERY EDUCATION and Bahamians voice their opinions on I think that if they established a lottery that it will generate some funds for education and for sports, but that education thing with D being considered a good thing makes no sense to me, when I was a young man you had to get an A or a B or something – not a D. D never was good for any-b ody. D means you are a dunce. I am for the lottery . I think that it will be a good thing.” SHELTONGRAY A t the National Education Summit on Monday, a 10-year education development plan was unveiled. It called for, among other things, the creation of a national lottery to be established with the proceeds being used to improve the struggling public education system and raising the national grade average from a D+. The controversial question of whether gambling should be legal for Bahamians has many proponents on both sides of the argument. Yesterday, The Tribune hit the streets to see what the public had to say. INTERVIEWSBYSTEFFONFYNES RICARDOKEMP RYANDAVIS I think a national lottery is good for some, and it is bad for some. If we are playing the lottery it’s good if we are doing it to sponsor education, but if we are not doing it for education and we are playing it all the time, families may not be able to eat because people would spend money on lottery instead of food. We call our Bahamas a Christian nation; it depends what kind of Christian nation we are. I am for the lottery.” BRIAN THOMPSON What I find is that most of the young people don’t be into nothing. (The lottery) should help provide, but it all depends on the individual cause. You know, most of the people come from a poor area and they don’t be into nothing. The national lot tery is a good idea, and it should benefit the education system if they use the money wisely.” WADESTUBBS Right now at the present moment in time, gambling shops are illegal, and police aren’t doing anything about it. But if there was a drug shop on Bay Street or Shirley Street, the police would raid it. Why should (gambling) be OK when both of them are illegal. To use funds from gam bling to pay for education is equal to stealing money to pay my child’s school fee.” In terms of legalising the lottery, it would mean legalising gambling across the board. I don’t necessarily see a problem with that. It is going to open up more revenue as well as for the Bahamian casino. The revenue from the lottery can be used towards education. “More accountability as to where the funding goes and is allocated and how it is used is needed. We need to revamp everything – the curriculum, teachers, classroom settings and facilities. That is one of our problems. The education system is failing even on the primary level. The lottery, as it factors into the big picture, is probably small scale, because it probably won’t change the situation com pletely but it will help. “The adverse effect of legalising gambling is another social issue that will have to be dealt with separately. Since there are pri vate entities that are benefitting from the lottery as it is now, we should be giving some of those funds to the public. More than just a lottery is needed to fix education though.” GEORGEMINNS Bahamians are gambling anyhow all over the place. The people are taking the money off the top and it isn’t getting put into education. The government is going to have to take it over and take the money and put it toward sports and education. That’s where the money should go.” CALVINJOHNSON I think it’s a good idea. National lottery funds being used for education happens in a lot of different countries. Go ahead with the lottery and let it finance educa tion.”

PAGE 3

B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net STUDENTS across the B ahamas claim teachers curse at them, call them names and throwo bjects at them in the classroom, according to preliminary data g athered by the College of the Bahamas. Junior high school students in grade eight and senior high school students in grade 11 claimed in a series of focus groups that teach ers need to find better ways tor elate to students and must change their “bad attitudes.” T he preliminary findings of the Ministry of Education and College of the Bahamas’ (COB vey shows that 47 per cent of 11th grade students think teachers need to change their attitudes, and 19 per cent of eighth grade s tudents agree. Murmurs rippled through the c rowd of around 300 education delegates, school administrators, p rincipals and teachers, as the data was presented on the sec ond day of the 2009 National Education Summit at the Wyndh am Nassau Resort in Cable Beach yesterday. T he COB representative pre senting the data said: “The stu dents said ‘some of the teachers need to find a better way to relate to students’, and ‘tell teachers about changing their bad attitudes’. They said teachers curse att hem and not many of us believed that, but we began to question it a s it was consistent across the board. It was not just one school. “They said teachers threw objects at them, teachers did not treat them fairly, teachers called them names, and we are not going to go into the names here, but this is what the students said.” Almost 50 per cent of grade e ight students said their teachers teach by reading notes for them, and 30 per cent of eleventh graders agreed. Around 30 per cent of eleventh graders said their teachers also give lectures, as did 16 per cent of eighth graders. Only 16 per cent of eighth graders said teachers use games as a teaching method, and 14 per cent said that would be their preferred mode of learning. The majority of students in both age groups said using computers is their favourite way to learn, followed closely by the use of examples from daily life in teaching. The students also feel parental support is vital to their studies, as are adequate resources and technology, as 29 per cent of eleventh graders said parental support is important, while 19 per c ent of eighth graders agreed. Adequate resources and technolo gy is considered to be of high importance by 18 per cent of eleventh graders, and 11 per cent of eighth graders. “This is all preliminary data, and it corroborates the need to gather more data from the par-e nts,” the COB representative added. “We need to have their v iews as stakeholders in educa tion in this country. And we need to have focus groups about problems in the home and make a national effort to get parents involved. I am pleased to see that we are beginning this education al summit to express some of the needs in this country. This summit i s a wonderful beginning to making evidence based decisions in relation to our education system and education in general, creating a national vision for education and nation building.” Additional data from schools, organised according to areas of New Providence, shows that a number of students in grades eight and eleven do not know their own Grade Point Average (GPA division of New Providence at the top of this list. However, when asked if they are expected to do their best in school, more students from the southeast answered “yes” than was the case for any other division – and yet many of them said teachers do not care about their learning. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 , PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $4,210 $4,210 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,410 $4,410Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n Health officials expect moreswine flu Police find large quantityof drugs In brief WITH many families and g roups travelling abroad during the summer months, the M inistry of Health said it expects to see the sporadic emergence of new cases of theI nfluenza A(H1N1 Yesterday, the ministry r eported that the Bahamas resident who became the country’s seventh confirmedc ase of swine flu a few weeks ago has fully recovered. The patient was in South Florida from June 22 to 24. On Monday, Minister of H ealth Dr Hubert Minnis confirmed that there are two new cases of swine flu in theB ahamas. It is believed that these patients contracted the v irus when they travelled to Orlando. The first case of swine flu in the Bahamas wasa visitor to the country from New York in June. So far n one of the swine flu patients has spread the infection, the Ministry of Health says. H ealth officials are calling on the public to observe good respiratory hygiene practicesin an effort to prevent the spread of A(H1N1 POLICE discovered a large quantity of illegal drugson Monday in the Dover S ound area of Grand Bahama. Two men, aged 31 and 33, are being questioned in con nection with the discovery. A sst Supt Welbourne Boo tle reported that sometime around 1.45pm, DEU offi-c ers went to Dover Sound where they discovered 50 buckets of marijuana. They also found three large crocus bags, each containing four bales of marijuana. Investigations continue. Plea for more time to study 10-year education strategy eachers curse, call us names and throw objects’ H UBERT MINNIS 2 009 NATIONAL EDUCATION SUMMIT By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net EDUCATION delegates have asked for another semester to study the 10year education plan reviewed at the 2009 National Education Summit yesterday. School principals, administrators, teachers, education officers and parents discussed the 22-goal plan in groups on Monday. As they presented their find-i ngs and suggestions to the Ministry of Education, some said the 50 minutes allocated for them to review the plan on Monday was not sufficient. But after 14 months of preparation 13 months longer than was originally anticipated – Minister of Education Carl Bethel is keen for the proposal to be brought to parliament so it can be implemented in schools. A leader of one of the groups said: “Give administrators and teachers one more look-see at the 10 year plan before m oving forward. We suggest strongly that district superintendents are given the go ahead to organise discussions in their districts during the first semester to provide feedback.” Points were raised and amendments suggested in connection with a number of proposed initiatives, including those aiming to ensure parents are more involved in their children’s education, and those aiming to increase transparency in funding. Group Two looked at ways of funding education including a plan for the allocation of at least 17 per cent of the national budget to education, seeking funding from external organisations, and introducing a national lottery in order to use the proceeds to fund education. The only issue raised by group leader Prince Dean concerned the proposed efforts to ensure schools take greater responsibility for income-generation and expenditure. School funds, he said, need to be backed up by a system of monitoring and enforcement. A ccountable Mr Dean said: “The income generated must be monitored to ensure local government is held accountable for the educational funding included in the budget and to ensure there is a policy in place to provide for the recovery of funds, and imprisonment, when funds are misappropriated.” Delegates also suggested schools declare their materials to ensure new supplies are distributed in a fair way throughout the government school system. Another top priority for educators is involving parents in their children’s education and the leader of the group looking at ways of encouraging parents said: “The group thought it was necessary for our ministry to seek to ensure the law assists with the legal obligations of parents. Far too many parents for far too long have been grossly negligent of their duties and it’s time to move beyond just encouraging them. “We thought we could create incentives for parents to become more involved in their children’s education.” G roup members also suggested involving parents and guardians in community service programmes, and making schools more hospitable to parents. They spoke out against the suggestion that the school day should be extended as a way of improving student achievement and school performance, and again c alled on parents to encourage children after school. Educators also feel there is a need to establish a national curriculum for home schools, as well as a training college specifically focused on improving the calibre of teachers. Preliminary data shows students think staff need to change attitudes Teachers and administrators ask for another semester to look at plan C ARL BETHEL

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. Please afford me the opportunity to comment on two news articles that appeared in your paper of last week. I refer to “Public Service Act set to be Introduced” in the In Brief section of The Tribune of Tuesday, June 9th, and “Government prepares for Freedom of Information Act” by Tribune Staff Reporter Taneka Thomp son, as appeared in The Tribune of Wednesday, June 10th. As one who has criticised our PM in the past, I would like to publicly congratulate Prime Minister Ingraham at this time, on these two bold and revolutionary initiatives. The legacy of the Rt Hon Hubert Alexander Ingraham is already secured for posterity’s sake. I will always remember PM Ingraham as the leader who rid us of tyranny in 1992 and incompetence in 2007. Be that as it may Prime Minister Ingraham, you are not the best person to lead this country post 2012. Joshua will lead where Moses cannot. The same holds for former PM Christie, who we all know is not capable of defeating you in a general election. However, do not make the same mistake as your mentor did, in staying on simply because you are capable of winning elections for your party, or allow yourself to be unduly persuaded by those who do not have your, nor the country’s best interests at heart, but whose primary motivation is winning a general election. It would be in the best inter est of the country were you to step down as leader of your party during this term in office; but please do not do it the way you did it the last time and leave your party in shambles. Towards this end then, I have a few suggestions. Introduce legislation to limit the service of a sitting prime minister to two consecutive terms. This will ensure the promotion of new and visionary lead ers to lead our country in the future; instead of being stuck with a prime minister who refuses to step down simply because he is capable of winning another general election, as is now the case. I trust that in finally abolish ing the infamous General Orders of the civil service, greater accountability and transparency will be introduced with a view to stamping out corruption wherever and whenever it raises its ugly head. The people have long suffered the extra financial burden of having to pay twice for prompt and efficient government services, and cry out to you sir, especially now, for relief. Along with a Freedom of Information Act though, please reconsider establishing an office of Ombudsman. Why would a government of transparency and openness, a government of trust, have an aversion to an office of Ombudsman, especially when the establishment of this office remains an unfulfilled campaign promise? With regard to your government’s economic stimulus plan, the missing link is land reform. The Government of The Bahamas needs to pay Bahami ans for all land that has been compulsorily acquired by gov ernment over the years, and for which payment remains outstanding. Additionally I would respect fully suggest introducing legislation to regularise the claims of thousands of Bahamian fam ilies to land throughout the length and breadth of this arch ipelago, known traditionally as “generation property.” Please unleash this vast economic reservoir on behalf of the Bahamian people. Finally, please do not call another general election without first implementing much needed campaign and electoral reforms. And whereas I agree with you that incompetence was a factor in the deficiencies of the last electoral process, I do not agree with you that nothing is wrong with the system. Again, please reconsider your decision to ignore the findings and recommendations of the recent Election Court rulings, especially with regard to the Pinewood case. If an incompetent prime min ister is able to wreak so much havoc on our electoral process, then you owe it to the nation as prime minister, during this term, to implement the necessary changes that would safeguard the people from such a recurrence in future. LAVADE M DARLING Nassau, June 14, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. I feel sure all of us involved in the Commercial Airline and Charter Service in this country are aghast with a notification from Flight Standards about CAD’s increase in fees for aircraft operators in this country scheduled for effect on September 10, 2009. Then this m orning in your Business Section comes the article about increase proposals of up to 10,000 per cent for some firms! The question that many of us may be asking today is “have any of the individuals who came up with this idea ever even owned an aircraft, yet alone owned a Charter Operation?” Have they no earthly concept of cost involved? We are but a one man band, one of the little guys who dared to “do it right” and cross every ‘t’ and dot every ‘I’ to run a valuable and appreciated service for the last 18 years here. We are overjoyed a t bringing home about 20 cents on each dollar! (God only know what our larger brothers are able to take home after what must be astronomical expenses?) With this vast fortune in the pocket we now have to pay BEC, BTC, insurance, fuel (near $6 a gallon and $8.50 per quart of oil) and that long forgotten item called ‘Maintenance’. After this we then really try to pay the bank a mortgage and then if we are more than lucky we get to go to Super Value or City Meat! Our Government needs to take a step backward here and check out the numbers, for very soon if we all come to a grinding halt one day there will be no air transportation within this country other than our national carrier? No tourism, no emergency flights, no Out-Island funeral services, no weddings and no local travellers for family visits and local hotel clientele transport available and so it goes on! Then NAD announces that they too are going to increase our fees at LOP International Airport adding fuel to the fire. While with this organisation we note that still we are having our main windward runways closed for ‘maintenance’ or ‘grass cutting’ during peakoperating hours backing up traffic on one runway. Has no one taken notice what other International Aerodromes do with what isc alled “displaced thresholds” where aircraft can still actually use part of the runway instead of closing all three miles of it to change a light bulb or cut a section of grass down at one end? Aviation management in this country appears, in a lot of areas, is headed back to the b irds! CAPT P HARDING Nassau, July 6, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WE GATHER from spot surveys done over several years that Bahamians are gradually coming to the conclusion that there should be a national lottery and all gambling outlets now in operation should be brought under control. If those now operating are allowed to continue they, like the casinos, should pay a yearly tax. At one time large church groups, particularly the Baptists and Methodists, were staunchly against gambling. However, in recent years a gradual softening can be detected in the church pews and among the clerics. Even we are now of the view particularly as gambling establishments are openly operating in defiance of the law that public opinion has already swept the anti-gambling law off the statute books. Therefore, it is now time for government to step in with legislation to regulate the operations. The only way to do this is to establish a national lottery that is tightly policed, closely audited and managed as fairly and honestly as corrupt human nature will allow. Whatever revenue is raised should be specifically earmarked for education, sports and the building of a new hospital. On page 2 of today’s Tribune several Bahamians have expressed their opinions ona national lottery and education. One of them condemned the police for doing nothing about the daily gambling. It is true that over the years certain police officers and their numbers have not been small have been among the citizens standing in line to take their chance with the “numbers.” Naturally, as a result, there has been much foot dragging in bringing the law to bear on these side street establishments, which in turn has emboldened some to become big time operators and dare government to do something about it. Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson, who has taken up the challenge, has vowedt hat as long as gambling is listed as illegal in the Penal Code his men will be out there confiscating the equipment and proceeds of gambling and arresting those caught in the gaming houses when police arrive. That is as far as the police can go. The rest is up to the courts. This is where the officials seem to get the hiccups and start the foot dragging they can’t even bring themselves to imitate Michael Jackson’s exquisite “moon walk.” No wonder one of the island’s biggest operators, after being raided by the police in April, could assure the public that his operations would remain open and that his employees had nothing to fear. Since that announcement, the police have made a second raid. But it seems that business goes on as usual. The owner, in an interview with The Tribune after the first raid, said that he is of the opinion obviously acting on legal advice that he was breaking no laws and that he was working in tandem with local authorities to determine the way forward. The Police Commissioner is probably also acting on legal advice. Meanwhile the law is being held up to public ridicule and contempt. It is now up to government to do something about it. Only government can break the impasse. If gam bling is no longer illegal, then remove it from the books, and allow the Commissioner and his men to concentrate on other criminal activity. What is now of great concern is that too many people in this country seem to believe that they are above the law. When that happens then the country is well on the road to anarchy. We have the example of the House of Assembly when Opposition members the very ones who wrote the rules denounced the Speaker for enforcing them against one of their number who had defied his ruling. Then there were the striking nurses members of an essential service who should not even consider a strike vote. The Supreme Court ordered them back to work, only to be told by many of them that they had no intention of returning until they got an insurance plan that government cannot afford to pay at this time. The next move by the court should have been to cite for con-t empt those who refused to obey. The court did nothing. It is of great concern that we have come to such a pass in the affairs of state that our laws are no longer respected. If we have laws that the courts are reluctant to enforce, then don’t call them into service. Aghast at rise in fees for aircraft operators LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Time to enforce gambling laws Your legacy is secured Mr Ingraham – but you should not lead the country post 2012 EDITOR, The Tribune. Sitting around dinner tables with old timers teaches us a lot. Recently a comment was made that Cable Beach was so much broader and nicer before Arawak Cay was constructed. This makes me ask: Has an Environmental Impact study by an independent company been done for this expansion? Are we sacri ficing our beauty and tourist attractions for commerce? How will the Harbour dredging affect the movement of sand from one end of the island to the other? Food for thought. S APPLETON Nassau, July, 2009. Will Arawak Cay expansion af fect our W ester n beaches?

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By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA for the first time held an open bidding with licensed contractors for the construction of the Grand Bahama Arts and Craft Centre i n Freeport. A total of 12 contractors participated and entered bids ranging from a low of $635,109 to a high of $1,296,000. The new craft centre will be located on two acres of land on E ast Sunrise Highway, next to the Jasmine Corporate Centre. It will c onsist of an office area, two areas each comprising 1,000 sq ft, and a t hird area comprising 2,500 sq ft. The project is being undertaken by the Grand Bahama Port Authority in conjunction with the Bahamas Agricultural and Indus-t rial Corporation (BAIC Edison Key, executive chairman of BAIC, and deputy chairman Winston Pinnock were present at the bidding on Friday in the Port Authority boardroom. This is the first time in its history that the GBPA has hosted an open bid process meeting where contractors make personal submission of their bids. Arthur Jones, vice-president of Building and Development, said the open bidding process is one that contractors can expect with other GBPA projects. “This would probably become a common occurrence here because GBPA would like to take the approach where most of our licensees who are qualified to engage in particular works would have the opportunity to do so on all appropriate projects,” he said. Mr Jones explained that the lowest bidder is in no way entitled to the award of the contract. He said they will analyse the bids and get back to the contractors in about a week to announce who will be chosen. The bids were as follows: Albacore Construction bid $889,218.75; Allied Builders $832,627; DBS Builders $952,924.79; Glenerick International Ltd $769,315; Island Pro jects $1,296,000; Keystone Development $898,447; Oral Jones Construction $636,630.80; Pyra mid Construction $635,109; Quality Construction $735,000; Reef Construction $998,927.18; San Jose Construction $856,869; and West Bay Construction $965,000. Contractors commended the Port Authority for taking the approach of holding an open bidding process. “I have been a contractor for more than 10 years and this is the first time I have been invited by the Port Authority to participate, and I commend the Port for taking this approach,” said a repre sentative of Albacore Construction. Ian Rolle, GBPA president, said the process is significant. “Today is a very important day in the history of GBPA, this is first time that we have done an exercise of this nature and it is in line with our making it happeni nitiative. “Mr Hannes Babak, our chair m an, was very instrumental in implementing this process and we thank him very much,” he said. Mr Key said that an arts and crafts centre has been long overdue in Freeport. He was very pleased that the process has started. “We have been talking about a c raft centre for quite a long time here in Freeport, and I under s tand that it has been on the drawing board for years. “Grand Bahama needs a shot in the arm and we really apprecia te the Port Authority giving BAIC some two acres of land for the project. There are other projects in the area of agriculture (that we want to bring on stream and (the Port acres sitting idle, and we are pre pared to work with them to boost Freeport because we have some o ther large projects in store for Grand Bahama very soon,” he said. Mr Key believes that the gov ernment is making “big strides” in crafts at BAIC. He said training has been provided to hundreds of Bahamians. He noted that over 500 young Bahamians have already gradu ated from the training programme, and more than 200 are currently enrolled this year. “We are trying to develop a network of people so we can compete with the foreign imported items and come up with an authentic Bahamian craft centre here in Freeport as well as other areas of the Bahamas,” he said. DIGITAL mammography h as been determined as the best m ethod for detecting breast cancer in African-American and African-Caribbean women, according to a new study. T he case for digital versus traditional mammography in certain groups of women has been confirmed by a study r eported in the New England J ournal of Medicine. Dean of the University of Buckingham School of Medicine Dr Karol Sikora, who seesp atients in the Bahamas in his capacity as director of Medical Oncology at the Cancer Centre Bahamas, said the availa bility of digital mammography is especially critical for Bahamian women who are excellent candidates for the new technology because of their denseb reast tissue. This form of testing is also of particular interest to Bahamian women as emerging e vidence suggests that they could be genetically predisposed towards getting an aggressive variety of breast can-cer at an earlier age. Battle The Imaging Centre in con junction with the Cancer Centre Bahamas at Centreville Medical Pavilion on CollinsA venue has invested in one of the country’s first digital mam-m ogram machines, an incomparable tool in the continuing b attle against breast cancer. A study that tracked mammograms on nearly 50,000 women in the United States and Canada to resolve the d ebate over whether there was a difference between tradition a l mammography and newer and more expensive digital m ammography showed a sig nificant difference in certain categories – among them women under 50 and those with dense breasts. The results of this study, which was funded by the N ational Cancer Institute, coord inated by the American College of Radiology Imaging Net work and reported in the New E ngland Journal of Medicine, clearly indicate a significant difference in detection in certain categories of women, includingt hose with dense breast tissue which makes screening using t raditional film methods more difficult,” said Dr Sikora. Fewer than one-tenth of one per cent of all medical facili t ies in the US offer digital mammography, partially because of the initial invest ment cost for the equipment and because, until this study showed the difference, the debate continued about whether or not the more expensive technology and testing was worthwhile. A digital mammogram, a llowing a technician or doctor to zoom in on a suspicious area, to computer-enhance it for better definition, to store it electronically for comparison purposes without concern for deterioration and to see throught hick, dark tissue costs about $50 to $100 more per exam. I t is, doctors say, a small price for what can save someone’s life. “The study was important not only because of its size andt he methods it employed, but because the results it achievedw ere so specific,” said Dr Sikora, author of “The Treatment o f Cancer”the most widelyused textbook on cancer at the graduate level in medical schools in the United Kingdom. Difference “For the first time we are able to show that there is a significant difference in three key categories between the more widely available film mammogr aphy and digital mammograp hy, although in other cases, t he difference is negligible.” T he study was conducted by administering both forms of breast examinations – traditional film and digital – to everyp articipating woman with two v iews taken by each screening method. Differences showed up in three categories age, race and menopausal status. For post-menopausal women over 50 who did not have dense breast tissue, there was no significant difference between trad itional film and digital. Howe ver, there was a measurable d ifference in tumour or suspicious area detection in premenopausal women under 50 with dense breast tissue and in those cases, digital was able to spot what traditional film missed. “To put it simply, if you or someone you love is AfricanCaribbean or African-Americ an and under 50, and you want t o make sure that you or your d aughter, sister, mother or friend is getting the most accurate picture of what is going on in her breasts knowing that early detection is the best cure for breast cancer, you should request, even demand, digitalm ammography,” explained Dr S ikora. If, on the other hand, you are over 50, have been through menopause and are Caucasian, chances are you will receive just as accurate a report of your breast condition using traditional film mammography.” W ith one in every eight women in the US expected to hear the words “you have breast cancer” at some time in her life, determining the best method for early detection is crucial -detected early enough, breast cancer has a better than 90 per cent cure rate. In addition to being one the first in the region to offer digital mammography, the Cancer C entre Bahamas which opened in expanded headquarters in January, is one of only two m edical facilities in the world outside the US to be certified b y the American College of R adiation Oncology (ACRO The other facility is located near Vatican City, Rome. And only a small percentage of cancer treatment facilities in the US are ACRO-certified. The Imaging Centre and the Cancer Centre Bahamas ared ivisions of Centreville Medical Pavilion which also houses the Bahamas Heart Centre. W ith anecdotal information suggesting that there is a high incidence of breast cancer in young Bahamian women, the disease has become an issue of c ritical local importance. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 5 Employment Opportunity Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t C ommonwealthBankisthepremierBahamianBankwith brancheslocatedinNewProvidence,AbacoandGrandBahama. Wearecommittedtodeliveringsuperiorqualityservice,tot raininganddevelopingouremployees,tocreatingvalueforour shareholdersandtopromotingeconomicgrowthandstabilityin thecommunity. Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for A ssistant Branch Manager, Abaco. CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE: AssistingtheBranchManagerinmanagingthesalesactivitiesof theBranchtoenhanceprofitability.E ffectivelyleading,supportingandcoachingpersonnelto achievecorporateobjectives.Effectivelymanagingaportfolioofconsumer,mortgageand commercialloans.Adjudicatingcreditlineswithindelegatedauthority.M anagingtheBranch’scollectionactivitiesandtheprotectionof collateral.Following-upwithclientandsupportfunctionstoensuretimely completionofproductrequestsandtransactionsandresolutionof inquiriesandissues.E nsuringCreditriskratingsandcreditscoringpracticesare adheredtoatalltimestominimizetheriskofloanlosses.Ensuringspecificobjectivesaredevelopedthroughan appropriatestrategicplantogrowtheBranch’sloananddeposit portfoliosandotherofferings.Addingvaluetothecustomers’portfoliooffinancialservices byactivelypromoting,marketing,buildingandcrosssellingall deposit/investmentandconsumercreditbusiness.Ensuring selfanddirectreportsconsistentlyprovidehighlycourteous customerserviceinaninformedandthoroughmanner.Assisting theManagerinattainingthetargetsincorporatedintheBranch’s financialplan.QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE: Bachelor’sdegreeorhigherinBusinessAdministration,Banking &FinanceorarelateddisciplinefromanaccreditedUniversity.Minimumofeightyearscommercialbankingexperiencewitha minimumof3yearssupervisory/managerialexperience.Experienceinmanagingadiverseloanportfolioandassessing loanquality.DetailedknowledgeofRetail/Commercial/Mortgagelending practicesandcreditanalysistoensureportfolioquality.Substantialworkexperienceinloansandriskmanagementwith afullunderstandingoffinancialstatementsandtheabilityto analyzetheinformation.Excellentleadershipandcoachingskills.Excellentcommunication,analyticalandreasoningskills.Excellentorganizationalandtimemanagementskills.ProficientintheuseoftheMicrosoftrangeofapplications.REMUNERATION PACKAGE: CommonwealthBankisaGreatplacetowork!Weofferan excitingworkenvironmentwiththeopportunityforgrowthand development.Wealsoofferacompetitivecompensationpackage, reflectingthesuccessfulapplicant’sexperienceandqualifications, includingaperformancebasedincentiveplan,health,vision, dentalandlifeinsurancesandapensionplan. Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before July 24, 2009to: Human Resources Department Re: Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco P.O. Box SS-6263 Nassau, Bahamas Telefax: (242393-8073 E-mail address:hr@combankltd.com Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those under consideration will be contacted.” THE Fox Hill Festival will be celebrated this year from July 31 to August 11. I t will be named in honour of Charles Johnson who served a s the festival’s chairman for the past five years and who died in May of this year. The festival will be officially opened on Friday, July 31 on the Fox Hill Parade beginning at 8pm. O ther highlights of the festival include the junkanoo rush o n Emancipation Day beginning at 1am. This will be followed by an Ecumenical service on the Parade at 11am and a luncheon for the elderly in the Community Centre right after. The usual climbing of the greasy pole, p laiting of the Maypole, live music, and games will take place. Dates set for the Fox Hill Festival Study:digital mammography offers better detection for Bahamian women under 50 GBPA holds open bidding for arts and crafts centre GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITY officials held an open bidding process w ith contractors for construction of the Grand Bahama Arts and Crafts Cen tre in Freeport. Seated from left are Arthur Jones, vice-president of building a nd development; Ian Rolle, GBPA president; Edison Key, executive chairman of BAIC, and Winston Pinnock, deputy-chairman of BAIC. V a n d y k e H e p b u r n T T h h e e s s t t u u d d y y w w a a s s i i m m p p o o r r t t a a n n t t n n o o t t o o n n l l y y b b e e c c a a u u s s e e o o f f i i t t s s s s i i z z e e a a n n d d t t h h e e m m e e t t h h o o d d s s i i t t e e m m p p l l o o y y e e d d , , b b u u t t b b e e c c a a u u s s e e t t h h e e r r e e s s u u l l t t s s i i t t a a c c h h i i e e v v e e d d w w e e r r e e s s o o s s p p e e c c i i f f i i c c . . D r Karol Sikora, D ean of the U niversity of Buckingham School of Medicine

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 1 2 7 , & ( (;;2102%,/(50,1$/,19(670(176 /,0,7(' &UHGLWRUVKDYLQJGHEWVRUFODLPVDJDLQVWWKHDERYH QDPHG&RPSDQ\DUHUHTXLUHGWRVHQGSDUWLFXODUV WKHUHRIWRWKHXQGHUVLJQHG3%R[ 1DVVDX%DKDPDVRQRUEHIRUHGD\RI-XO\ ,QGHIDXOWWKHUHRIWKH\ZLOOEHH[FOXGHGIURP WKHEHQHRIDQ\GLVWULEXWLRQPDGHWKH/LTXLGDWRU 'DWHGWKHWKGD\RI-XO\ &DURO**UD\ /LTXLGDWRU RUWKFKDVH'ULYH 1 2 7 , & ( (;;2102%,/,7('$5$%(0,5$7(6+f/,0,7(' 1 2 7 , & ( ,6+(5(%<*,9(1DVIROORZV (;;2102%,/ 81,7(' $5$%(0,5$7(6+f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the goal of introd ucing children to the country’s ecosystems, theB ahamas National Trust (BNTi ts Summer Safari Camp. A group of 50 young peop le between the ages of eight and 14 joined theB NT for special field trips to Harrold and Wilson’sP onds National Park, Stuart Cove’s Dive Bahamas a nd the Bahamas Youth Camp. The trips allowed the children to learn about wetlands, coral reefs and the fish that frequent them a nd of course the unique pine forest. “We also wanted to pro vide them with some up c lose and personal experi ences with some of our endangered species and marine mammals, and we a ppreciate the support of D olphin Encounters and Ardastra Gardens for assisting us in coordinating v isits to these attractions,” s aid Shelley Cant, BNT education officer. Each camper kept a journ al and each afternoon there was an arts and craftsa ctivity complimenting the daily learning experience. T hese journals assisted the young people in creat-i ng presentations for par ents and friends on the lastd ay of the camp. There were presentations o n dolphins and endangered species, but the need t o provide further protection for endangered sea turtles was by the most popular topic for the presentations. Safari Camp culminated i n a group camp-out at the Retreat on Village Road on June 27 where the young campers cooked din n er over an open fire and shared Bahamian stories. Summer Safari Camp is an education THE Bahamas National Trust (BNT working with Caroline Stahala, PhD student at Florida State University, to monitor the 2009 Bahama Parrot nesting season in the Abaco National Park. Ms Stahala is also assisting with determining the effectiveness of the predator control programme being implemented by the Trust to control invasive feral cats which are the major threat to Bahama Parrots during the nesting season which begins in late May, early June. Forty nests have been located and four volunteers, Uli Nowlan, Barbara Foreman, D r Sue Faircloth and Susie Lill, are assisting i n the watching of the nests. Parrot chicks w ere banded during June and July to assist in future individual identification. With the support of the Rare Species Conservation Foundation, 25 nest boxes have been placed in various locations in the park to see if the birds will choose to nest above the ground. This is being done to determine the effectiveness of providing additional nesting sites which are less susceptible to predators than the ground cavities. The Bahama Amazon Parrot is found in the Abaco pine and broadleaf forest of the southern part of Great Abaco. The Abaco population of the Bahama Parrot is the only new world parrot that nests in subterrain rock cavities. It is believed that this adaptation to ground nesting is due to the few holes found in Abaco’s trees. A clutch of two to four eggs are laid in late May or early June. Eggs hatch asynchronously 26-28 days after the female begins incubation. There is about a 46 per cent failure hatch rate. The eggs and the chicks are sometimes eaten by large land crabs, snakes, feral cats and feral raccoons or the nests are flooded due to heavy summer rains. While the female sits on the eggs, the male visits the nest four to six times a day to feed the female. Should the male die or abandon the female, she would be unable to raise the chicks alone and would probably desert the nest. Parents will return to the nest five to seven times a day to feed the youngsters, spending considerable time in the area of the nest to watch and protect it. The Trust with the assistance of Ms Stahala, Dr Frank Riviera of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Birdlife International, Friends of the Environment and other relevant agencies is in the process of completing the final draft of the Bahama Parrot Management Plan for review and distribution. The Abaco National Park is the largest of five national parks and protected areas in the Abacos managed by the BNT. BNT monitors Bahama Parrot nesting season THE Department of Fisheries has recommended that fishe rmen “cash in on harvesting” lionfish as a means of counteracting that voracious predator’s alarming growth rate. T he meat of the lionfish is edible and “is in fact being used as a food source” in the Bahamas, Agriculture and Marine Resources Minister Larry Cartwright said. T he Department of Marine Resources is hoping that fish ermen can derive some economic benefit from the harvest and s ale of lionfish, he recently told parliament. Fishermen advised to ‘cash in’ on lionfish MAKING A SPLASH with Stuart Cove’s Dive Bahamas. TWO TO four eggs are laid in late May or early June. ABAHAMAPARROT pictured in Abaco. Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in theirn eighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigningf or improvements in the a rea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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C M Y K C M Y K THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 7 “I am the shark among the fishes, and the Ganges among the rivers.” Bhagavad Gita W ELLfolks, when it comes to sharks we have some good news and some bad news. The bad news is that sharks like most other big fish in the ocean are not long for this world if we continue overfishing o n an industrial-scale. The good news is that because driftnet and longline fishing are banned in the Bahamas, our shark populations are relatively stable. In fact, National Geographic described Bahamian waters as a relative "Eden" for sharks compared to the rest of t he world. U nfortunately, sharks have always suffered from an image problem. People tend to regard them as serial killers and fishing competitors. But to AleksandraM aljkovic, a doctoral student in marine ecology at Canada'sS imon Fraser University, they are a fascinating research subj ect. "I have been obsessed with sharks since childhood," she wrote during a recent internship at the Bimini Biological FieldS tation. "My main aim here is to learn as much as possible about handling sharks without losing body parts so I can pursue my s hark-related PhD." The Bimini training must have been successful, because Maljkovic appeared perfectly normal at a meeting hosted by the Bahamas National Trust last week where she reported on news hark research at Southwest Point. Maljkovic is studying the i mpacts of marine resource depletion on the ecology and behaviour of Caribbean reef sharks. The Bahamas has a reputa tion for such research because of its relatively intact shark populations. The Cape Eleuthera Insti tute launched a shark research programme a year ago. And the Bimini Field Station, operated by venerable University of Miamip rofessor Dr Sammy Gruber, has been studying sharks since 1990. Gruber took over this mantle from the defunct Lerner Marine L ab, which was set up on Bimini by renowned big game fisherman Michael Lerner in 1948. Lerner used to pal around with Ernest Hemingway and founded theI nternational Game Fishing Association, but he was also a trustee of the American Muse u m of Natural History and had a passion for marine biology. The 1930s and 40s were the d ays when grinning sportfishermen were ritually photographedo n piers next to the 500-pound tunas and marlins they had just c aught. However, scientists have determined that big ocean fish l ike these have declined by 90 per cent over the past 50 years. And the bad news is getting w orse. For example, we know that if we keep overfishing at cur-r ent rates most of the world's commercial fisheries will collapse b y mid-century. To understand what that means we have only to c onsider the once bountiful Canadian cod fishery, which was closed in the early 1990s, with the loss of over 40,000 jobs, and has been unable to recover. In recent years the overfishing of sharks has become a big prob-l em too. More than 100 million are taken annually by commerc ial fishermen and another five million by recreational fishermen. According to Maljkovic, "the trends indicate precipitous pop ulation declines in all large-bod ied sharks. They are the most threatened species on the planet." One of the chief reasons for this is the Chinese demand for shark fin soup. Fins can fetch hundreds of dollars, whereass hark meat is worth less than most fish. As a result, fins are cut off millions of living sharks and the mutilated animals thrown b ack into the sea to die a practice that was banned by the US in 2000. Sharks are like the lions and tigers of the sea, and scientistsl ike Maljkovic are trying desperately to understand the ecosystem changes that will occurd ue to their decline. As top predators, sharks help keep the oceans in balance by controllingo ther species. To explain this, Maljkovic cited research showingt hat intense fishing pressure on sharks has produced a cascade of u nexpected consequences. With fewer large predators in t he sea, the number of rays, skates and small shark species has exploded, and these are dec-i mating the populations of other vital marine species. North Car-o lina, for example, had to close its century-old scallop fishery in 2 004 because of over-predation by rays, while shark fishing in T asmania caused a boom in their main prey octopus which crashed the spiny lobster fishery there. Scientists like Gruber and Maljkovic often complain about the popular fear of sharks, whichl eads many to think it is a good thing to kill them. But the fact is t hat overfishing benefits no one, least of all the fishermen. And sharks are especially vulnerable because they take so long to reach sexual maturity and only reproduce every couple of years. But despite our propensity to kill sharks whenever we have the opportunity, the Bahamas generally maintains a good reputation in terms of marine conserv ation. In a 2007 article National G eographic pointed out that m ost of our archipelago remains f ree of industrial development: " Locals still make a living off Bahamian lobster, snapper, and c onch; sportsmen still take bonefish from the sand flats, and mar l in and sailfish from the cold 6,000-foot-deep chasm called theT ongue of the Ocean. "More than 40 shark species c ruise Bahamian waters," the article continued, "including tigers, lemons, great hammerheads, bulls, blacktips, makos, silkies, nurses; even migratingb lues and massive whale sharks pass through. Others live here y ear-round, giving birth in the same quiet lagoons where they were born." According to Mike Braynan, director of the Department of M arine Resources, there is no significant commercial shark fish e ry in The Bahamas: "We have had a line item for sharks in our l anding statistics off and on over the years, but usually the amount is zero." By contrast, shark dive tourism is a multi-million-dollar i ndustry that attracts thousands of visitors and generates tons of p riceless publicity every year. It contributes much more to our economy than a dead shark on a fishing boat ever could. In fact, a ccording to Gruber, a single live s hark in healthy habitat like the B ahamas is worth as much as $ 200,000 in tourism revenue over i ts lifetime. That's why shark feeding has b ecome such a big part of the local dive industry. And although f eeding wild animals is generally frowned upon, Gruber has longb een in favour of it where sharks are concerned: "The reasons are m anifold, not the least being the economic value of sharks to the dive industry of the Bahamas. Considering the unremitting commercial slaughter and theb ad press that sharks inevitably get these days, any development o f a positive image by making divers into ambassadors for shark conservation can only help." Maljkovic seems to agree with this analysis. She told BNT m embers last week that her recent research at SouthwestP oint looked into the impacts of feeding on reef shark ecology. W ith the help of Stuart Cove's dive operation at South Ocean she observed and tagged numbers of sharks, and concluded that dive tourism has negligible i mpacts on their behaviour. She also concluded that reef s hark conservation efforts would likely have a positive impact on populations of other marine species, and called for an ecosystem-based approach to marine conservation. This is something that the BNT and other environm ental groups have also been pushing for years through the national park system. Back in the 1980s an assessment of popular dive sites off the southwest coast of New Providence led to the first proposals for a marine park in that area. The idea was revived in the early 2 000s during the fight to preserve Clifton as a national heritage park, and the BNT is now working on a formal proposal for the government to consider. That proposal will be based on information to be collected during a rapid ecological survey now being planned, as well as f rom a series of consultations w ith stakeholders the people who live near and use the areas that may be included in the proposed reserve. The objective is to protect our n atural resources while providing non-destructive economico pportunities (like shark dive tourism), as well as recreational a nd educational opportunities for Bahamians and visitors. A multiuse marine reserve in this area has the potential to become a cornerstone of the country'sn ational park system, the BNT says. Some argue that the entire Bahamas is already a no-take z one for sharks. But this overlooks the fact that like turtles – sharks don't respect national boundaries. And ongoing coastal development at places like Bimi ni is destroying critical nursery habitat for these endangered ani-m als. As National Geographic put i t, "If the sharks go, so too goes a bountiful ecosystem that feeds local people and keeps outsiders coming back to the islands." What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com Good news and bad news about sharks

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV H U NDREDS of children took part in Monday’s march to mark the launch of this year’s Royal Bahamas Police Force Summer Youth programme. Organised under the banners of their respective districts, participants marched from St John’s Native Bap-t ist Church on East Street to Police Headquarters. The RBDF’s Summer Youth Programme brings together students from all over New Providence for six to eight weeks of educational and recreational activities. March Children on the LAUNCHOFRBPFSUMMERYOUTH PROGRAMME PHOTOSBy Felip Major T ribune Staff

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 9 /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV that after receiving information regarding McNeil from Inspector Cash, he told McNeil to take off his clothes and gave him clothes to put on. This he said was done in the presence of Inspector Cash and ASP Fernander. He told the court that he collected a gray T-shirt, a white T-shirt, a pair of short blue jeans, white boxer shorts and a pair of white socks from McNeil. He told the court that he packaged the items in brown paper bags, which he sealed. He said the items were delivered to the police forensic lab the following day. Corporal Evans also told the court that while at CDU, he also spoke to ASP Leon Bethel regarding McNeil and as a result took a hair sample from him. The hair sample was also delivered to the police forensic lab on November 15, he said. D uring cross-examination, M cNeil’s attorney Murrio D ucille suggested that Corporal Evans had asked his client for his clothing because he had told him that he wanted to examine his body to see if he had any injuries. Corporal Evans denied the suggestion admitting that he gave McNeil no reason for requesting his clothing. He also noted that McNeil was a suspect during that time. Mr Ducille also pointed out that he had taken a hair sample from McNeil without his consent. Corporal Evans replied that McNeil, who did have a lawyer present did not object to the sample being taken. He admitted, however, that the accused had not consented to the sample being taken. Detective Inspector Rochelle Deleveaux-Rolle told the court yesterday that on August 15, 2008, she received a number of items from Corporal 2313 Francis. She said she found biological stains on each shoulder of McNeil’s shirt and took a cutting from them. She also told the court that she took a cutting from the heels of McNeil’s socks and forwarded them for DNA analysis. The case, which is being heard before Senior Justice Anita Allen, continues today. Director of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner, Neil Brathwaite and Darnell Dorsette represent the Crown. Troyniko McNeil, 22, the son of Taylor’s former business partner, Troy McNeil, is charged with intentionally causing the death of Harl Taylor between Saturday, November 17, and Sunday, November 18, 2007, while being concerned together with another. Taylor, 37, was foundd ead at his home, Mountbatten House, on West Hill Street. tated” to receive a letter in May 2008 which gave him three months to vacate land he had leased from the Crown for 40 years to farm with his family. T he Statement claims that he later discovered that at around the same time he had received the letter the Department had already granted the land on which Mr Gibson had made a livelihood farming pigs, sheep,c attle and chickens to the B NT without his knowledge. The environmental charity wanted the right to land in the area to create the protected Harrold and Wilson Ponds park and to relocate their headquarters from Village Road, it is claimed. The location had come to the organisation’s attention after it became a major draw for birdlife as a result of Mr Gibson’s farming activities, withb irds eating the feed he gave to his animals, the statement claims. It is alleged that in 2007, the same year that the organisation was granted 250 acres in the area, Mr Carey, on behalf oft he BNT, first started to “make e nquiries” of the Department concerning the possibility of acquiring rights to the farm land Gibson leased. Mr Carey consequently went on to propose to the farmer thatif the BNT could take possession of half of the land in question four acres the organ isation would assist Mr Gibson in getting a lease for 50 acres of farm land in Andros where he could grow feed for his chickens. However, the statement claims that Mr Carey, on behalfo f the BNT, wanted all of the land. Furthermore, it alleges he “never made an approach” to the Ministry of Agriculture on behalf of Mr Gibson and “never intended to”, instead “secret-l y” approaching the Departm ent of Lands and Surveys with a view to having the entire leased farm taken away from the plaintiff and given to the BNT with nothing in return. The deal proposed by the BNT with Mr Gibson was therefore “bogus and not bona fide and constituted uncon scionable conduct against a poor and simple farmer and his family,” it is alleged. Meanwhile, despite previ ously meeting with Mr Turn quest and Mr Russell of the Department of Lands and Sur veys and making enquiries about the status of his lease, Mr Gibson claims he only learnt that his lease on the land had come to an end in the letter of May 2008, which asked him to vacate the premises. The Department, from which Mr Turnquest resigned amid controversy over his allegedr ole in grants of Crown land made to family members and friends, had never “produced evidence of grants of lease or renewals of lease to the plaintiff nor produced demands for rent nor accepted rent in respect ofh is leased farm...so the plaintiff c ould never be certain that his status as a tenant was in good standing,” the statement of claim alleges. Mr Carey was aware of this, it is alleged, and “despite the fact that the department, with the knowledge of the BNT, had given Mr Gibson the expectation that his renewable lease would be renewed...conspired with the officers of the Department that the eight acres of Crown land...that the plaintiff had farmed with his family for over 40 years would be taken away from them and donated to the (BNT The statement claims that Mr Gibson became subject to an “ever increasing battery of threats from senior civil servants asking him to vacate” the land from May 2008 onwards. Mr Gibson, who is described as having been born in 1947 intoa “poor farming family”, began farming the land behind Fire Trail Road in the vicinity of Wilson Pond at age 21. In his statement of claim he is asking the court to rule that he has “exclusive possession ando ccupation” of the eight acres of l and he had farmed prior to May 2008. He is also seeking an injunction restraining the BNT from entering that area of land and another 36,500 square feet of land he owns there without his permission and from “interfering with the exclusive posses sion occupation and enjoyment of the relevant land for farming purposes.” Also demanded is $120,000 that the statement alleges Mr Carey is alleged to have promised Mr Gibson in return for him agreeing to remove two poultry houses that were locat ed near the boardwalk constructed by the BNT over the ponds. especially Bahamian parents and citizens. It is necessary, therefore, that the process you have begun at this summit be continued and expanded,” he said. Mr Ingraham extended a special invitation to his “friends in the Opposition” to participate fully in this enterprise. Noting the fact that education currently receives more than 16 per cent of the annual national budget Mr Ingra-ham said that it is with considerable satisfaction that the Bahamas was able to report to the United Nations that ith as achieved the vast majority of the millennium goals for education even as these were just being articulated in international circles. “It is to the credit of successive Bahamian governments since 1967 that every child in the Bahamas has access to education as a right and that we in the public sector guarantee that there is school space for every child in the Bahamas from kindergarten to Grade 12.” The Prime Minister also noted that there has been significant criticism of the performance of public schools which has been focused primarily on the average grades produced each year. However, Mr Ingraham added that it must also be recognised that these same schools produce graduates who are well above average and some who are even considered “brilliant by any international yardstick.” “Each year, the top echelon of our student body leaves school as accomplished scholars, able to pursue tertiary level education at the best universities and technical colleges in the world, where many of them perform exceptionally well. “Top class professionals – teachers, nurses, doctors, lawyers, accountants, bankers have come out of our schools, both public and private, having been given the tools to pursue higher education in our schools. We have helped in the development of talented artists, musicians and crafts persons, acclaimed chefs and tourism practitioners, and successful entrepreneurs and business managers. “Regrettably, our success in getting every child into a classroom has not translated into every child having achieved his full potential. When, in the first half of the 20th century, most children completing primary school could read and write, today too many students leave our secondary schools only semi-literate and semi-numerate. “In earlier times, academically weak students dropped out of school, learneda trade or became one of a large unskilled and semi-literate work force. They never had the opportunity to attend secondary schools. Today, many young persons are kept in school until age 18, but still leave school as unprepared to earn a living as would have their early counterparts who never progressed beyond primary school.” This mismatch between money spent and the unsatisfactory performance of pupils has served as a principal cause for this latest summit. Mr Ingraham said that while the Bahamas must face the fact that only a minority – “some say a talented tenth” – of any population will excel academically, the Bahamas nevertheless has a responsibility to prepare the great majority of its populace to make a living and to function as balanced and productive citizens. “You have spent the past two days reviewing and discussing a draft tenyear education plan. It is my hope that your sessions will have produced some practical, sensible, and focused recommendations on how we might invigorate our education system, stimulate young persons not only to want to learn, but to excel,” he said. SEEPAGETHREE Prime Minister backs plan for education F ROM page one HUBERT INGRAHAM Harl Taylor F ROM page one BNTchief, Lands and Surveys staff accused of ‘conspiring’ to dispossess farmer of land F ROM page one GONAIVES, Haiti BILL CLINTONon Tuesday took his Haiti relief effort to this battered seaside city that was nearly destroyed last year by a series of tropical storms, finding a mud-caked maze of partially rebuilt homes and shops, according to Associated Press. Clinton, the new special U.N. envoy to Haiti, viewed river con trol projects and visited a hospital that served as an emergency shelter during the two storms that ravaged the town. Four storms hit Haiti in all, killing nearly 800 people nationwide and causing $1 billion in damage to irrigation, bridges and roads. The former president praised reconstruction efforts but said much more work needed to be done. He said Haiti needs more money and better coordination among aid groups and the government to rebuild and spur development. “I’m just trying to organize this process and drive it faster,” Clinton said during a break in the tour, standing in the blazing mid day sun alongside a smiling President Rene Preval. Aid has poured into the Gonaives region but many homes and shops remain damaged and the area remains vulnerable to flooding because the surrounding hills have been stripped of trees to create farm fields and make charcoal for cooking. It was Clinton’s first trip to Gonaives, but he was greeted like a returning hero. Shrieking girls clamored to have their photo taken with the former president and men pushed their elderly mothers through the crowd for a chance to shake his hand. People stood on piles of rubble to catch a glimpse of Clinton’s motorcade as it wove through the rocky streets of Gonaives, one of the poorest cities in a chronically troubled country considered the poorest in the Western Hemisphere. Clinton said the Haitian government and its international back ers hope to create 150,000 to 200,000 jobs nationwide over the next two years. Many of those jobs will come from projects to rebuild roads and shore up erosion-prone hillsides. Clinton dr a ws cr o wds as UN envoy to Haiti

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE LONDON FANS INAsia stayed up into the wee hours, bars across Europe held Michael Jackson theme nights and television stations from Sydney to Paris cleared their schedules Tuesday to broadcast the King of Pop’s star-studded memorial service live from Los Angeles, according to Associated Press. Fans mourned and celebrated the singer’s life along with the thousands attending the U.S. event, where entertainers including Stevie Wonder, Mariah Carey, Usher, Lionel Richie paid tributeto the star, who died June 25. The 12-year-old Welsh schoolboy Shaheen Jafargholi, who wowed TV audiences earlier this year with the Jackson 5 song “Who’s Loving You” on “Britain’s Got Talent” got a standing ovation after he sang the same song to the stadium. In London, dozens of fans sheltered under umbrellas against the rain as they watched the event on a big screen outside the 02 Arena, where Jackson was to have performed 50 comeback shows starting next week. Many more stayed dry at home after the BBC announced it would cancel scheduled programming and show the ceremony live. “His whole life was a global broadcast in a way, so I suppose it’s fitting that his death also is,” said barista Robert Anderson, 26, in London. Crowds gathered outside Harlem’s Apollo Theater in New York where the Jackson 5 won “Amateur Night” in 1967 and in Detroit, where his career was launched with Motown Records. “I think he was somebody who really did change the style of music,” said Jonathan Contreras, a 23-year-old college student from Westland, Michigan. “They call him the King of Pop. I call him theKing of Music.” Fans gathered at Berlin’s O2 World arena and at a bar just off Paris’ Champs-Elysees, where about 20 people, many dressed in black, Jackson-style hats or white gloves, watched the ceremony. “I didn’t want to experience this moment alone,” said Marie-Anne Le Saux, 25, an insurance company employee who helped organize the ceremony. In Santiago, Chile, national police band played “We are the world” during the traditional guard change at the presidential palace La Moneda, as hundreds looked on. About 50 fans lit candles and l aid flowers in the main square in S tockholm, as Jackson hits “Billie Jean” and “Earth Song” poured out of a small stereo. Hannah Ralme, 14, from Stockholm, said she had been heartbro-ken by Jackson’s death. “It’s like a p iece of me died,” she said. “The m usic, the way he danced, the way h e expressed it showed me how to live my life to be childlike and think about other people.” At a Pan-African culture festival in Algiers, Algeria, hundreds of singers and dancers from across the continent performed The Jackson 5’s “Blame it on the Boogie” as a tribute. Several hundred Jackson fans gathered at a Hong Kong mall late Tuesday to remember their idol and watch the memorial on a big screen, surrounded by shuttered store fronts. Holding white candles, Hong Kong singer William Chan and Taiwanese pop star Judy Chou led the audience in observing a 30-second silence. Many fans clutched red roses and wore black; some donned Jackson’s trademark fedora hats. In Japan, home to some of Jackson’s most passionate fans, about 100 people gathered at a Tower Records store in downtown Tokyo to watch his videos on a big screen hours before the Los Angeles memorial. The store, which Jack son visited twice, displayed his hand print in a cement block and large posters celebrating his performances. Several shelves dedicat ed to the pop star were stacked with his CDs and DVDs. “I love him,” said Namiko Hayakawa, a 31-year-old housewife, one of the first to grab a seat.“He is one of the greatest and most original solo performers. He also has a message about peace. He is such a big star, but he has a mes sage for every little person.” In the Philippines, noontime television variety show “Eat Bula ga” said it would hold a Jackson dance contest Wednesday in honor of the pop icon. For some, the relentless media coverage of Jackson since his deathwas too much. “In Ireland we like a good funeral, so we’ll be tuning in. There’s no good sports match on tonight any way,” said barman Peadar O Docherty, 24, in the Stag’s Head pub in central Dublin. But, he added, “a lot of the adulation is completely over the top.” Jackson’s fans around the world mourn their idol ASOMBREFAREWELLTOMICHAELJACKSON T HE ROSE c overed coffin holding the remains of Michael Jackson rests in the front of stage during Jackson’s memorial service at the Staples Center, Tuesday, July 7, 2 009 in Los Angeles. W a l l y S k a l i j , P o o l / A P MARIAH CAREY performs at the Michael Jackson public memorial service. K e v o r k D j a n s e z i a n , p o o l / A P SINGER JERMAINE JACKSON throws a rose on Michael Jackson’s casket after performing ‘Smile’ during the memorial service. M a r k J . T e r r i l l , P o o l / A P THE JACKSON FAMILY , from left, Janet Jackson, Paris Jackson, LaToya Jackson, Jermaine Jackson and Prince Michael are shown on stage at the memorial service.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 11 L OS ANGELES I T WAS n ot spectacular, extravagant or bizarre. There were songs and tears but little dancing. Instead, Michael Jackson’s memorial was a somber, spiritual ceremony that r eached back for the essence of the man, according to Associated Press. S inger, dancer, superstar, humanitarian: That was how the s ome 20,000 people gathered inside the Staples Center arena on Tues day, and untold millions watching around the world, remembered Jackson, whose immense talents a lmost drowned beneath the spectacle of his life and fame. I f there was a shocking moment, it came in the form of Jackson’s d aughter, Paris-Michael, who made the first public statement of her 11 years. “Ever since I was born, Daddy has been the best father you could e ver imagine,” she said, dissolving into tears and turning to lean onh er aunt Janet. “And I just wanted to say I love him so much.” O utside the arena, the celebrityindustrial complex that Jackson h elped create ground on. More than 3,000 police officers massed d owntown to keep the ticketless at bay. Helicopters followed the g olden casket as it was driven over blocked-off freeways from Forest Lawn cemetery to Staples Center. A bazaar of T-shirts, buttons, pho tos and other memorabilia sprouted in the blocks around the memorial. Movie theaters played the ser vice live and people paused around the world to watch. Inside, however, the atmosphere was churchlike, assisted by the enormous video image of a stained glass window, with red-gold clouds blowing past, that was projected behind the stage. The ceremony began with Smokey Robinson reading statements from Jackson’s close friend Diana Ross “Michael was part of the fabric of my life” and then Nelson Mandela “Be strong.” A lengthy silence of several minutes followed, punctuated only bya steady twinkle of camera flashes. The thousands of mourners spoke softly to those in neighboring seats or contemplated their private thoughts. Celebrities made their way to their seats in front of the stage: Kobe Bryant, Spike Lee, Wesley Snipes, Lou Ferrigno, Don King, the Kardashian sisters, Magic Johnson, Brooke Shields, Larry King. While Jackson was among the most famous faces in the world, today’s megastars were largely absent. Those present mostly reflected some connection to Jackson’s life or work. Among those conspicuously not in attendance were Elizabeth Taylor, Ross and Debbie Rowe, Jack son’s ex-wife and the mother of Jackson’s two oldest children. Many vehicles left Staples in a long motorcade that ended up in a Beverly Hills hotel. Record producer Jimmy Jam told AP Television that he was headed for a gath ering for friends and family, but he won’t give details. The fans, clutching tickets that 1.6 million people had sought, were a visual representation of Jackson’s life: white, black and everything in between; from Mexico, Japan, Italy or America; wearing fedoras, African headdresses, sequins or surgical masks. Actor Corey Feld man showed up fully costumed as Michael Jackson. “Words can’t express how I feel,” said Dani Harris, a 35-yearold stay-at-home mom from Los Angeles. “You think about one person, larger than presidents and kings and queens,” Harris said. “People in countries you can’t even see on the map know his face, his music.” The pre-ceremony stillness was broken by the organ strains of an African-American spiritual. “Hallelujah, hallelujah, going to see the King,” a choir sang. The crowd cheered and rose to its feet. The Rev. Lucious W. Smith of the Friendship Baptist Church in Pasadena gave the greeting, standing on the same stage where Jackson had been rehearsing for a comeback concert before his death on June 25 at age 50. Then Mariah Carey sang the opening performance with a sweet rendition of the Jackson 5 ballad “I’ll Be There,” a duet with Trey Lorenz. Queen Latifah read a special poem composed by Maya Angelou. Lionel Richie sang gospel, “Jesus Is Love.” Berry Gordy remembered the prodigy of young Michael, drawing a standing ovation when he said the title King of Pop would no longer suf fice: “He is simply the greatest entertainer who ever lived.” Emotions peaked when the Rev. Al Sharpton delivered a fiery eulo gy highlighting all the barriers Jackson broke and the troubles he faced. “Every time he got knocked down, he got back up,” Sharpton said, and the applauding crowd again jumped to its feet. Sharpton rode the moment, building to a crescendo. “There wasn’t nothing strange about your daddy,” he said later, addressing Jackson’s three children in the front row. “It was strange what your daddy had to deal with!” Jubilation erupted, with the longest standing ovation of the day. It seemed as if Sharpton broke through some sort of wall, freeing shouts from the crowd of “We love you Michael!” After he left the stage, chants of “Mi-chael! Mi-chael!” filled the arena. The parade of famous names continued: Jennifer Hudson, Stevie Wonder, Usher, Martin Luther King III and his sister Bernice, U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee and Kobe Bryant. For a performer who smashed the race barrier on MTV and did as much as anyone to make black music mainstream not to men tion was accused of trying to turn himself white through skin treatments and plastic surgery the ceremony had a remarkably black cast. John Mayer and Brooke Sheields were the only white celebs with major roles. Another unexpected aspect was the logistics. The mayhem and traf fic snarls that had been feared by city officials never materialized. The thousands of ticketholders began filing in early and encountered few problems, and traffic was actually considered by police to be lighter than normal. An estimate of up to 700,000 gawkers turned out to be about 1,000. The city of Los Angeles set up a Web site to allow fans to contribute money to help the city pay for the memorial, which was estimated to cost $1.5 million to $4 million. AEG, the event promoter behind the memorial, has not addressed whether it will give money for the effort, but did contribute $1 million to the city after it staged a victory parade for the Los Angeles Lakers last month. It was not clear what will happen to Jackson’s body. The For est Lawn Memorial Park Hollywood Hills cemetery, where a private service was held, is the final resting place for such stars as Bette Davis, Andy Gibb, Freddie Prinze, Liberace and recently deceased David Carradine and Ed McMahon. But Jackson’s brother Jermaine has expressed a desire to have him buried someday at Neverland, his estate in Southern California. The ceremony ended with Jackson’s family on stage, amid a choir, singing “Heal the World.” “All around us are people of different cultures, different reli gions, different nationalities,” Rev. Smith said as he closed the service. “And yet the music of Michael Jackson brings us togeth er.” A final farewell to a sombre celebration FRIENDS AND FAMILY members sing ‘We are the World’ at the end of the memorial service for Michael Jackson at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, Tuesday, July 7, 2009. M o n i c a A l m e i d a , P o o l / A P MICHAEL JACKSON’S daughter Paris Michael Katherine is comforted by her aunts Janet Jackson, right, and LaToya Jackson at a memorial service for music legend Michael Jackson. G a b r i e l B o u y s , p o o l / A P LIONEL RICHIE performs at the Michael Jackson public memorial service held at Staples Center on Tuesday, July 7, 2009 in Los Angeles. K e v o r k D j a n s e z i a n , p o o l / A P MICHAELJACKSON (APFILE)

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C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 12 P AGES 15 & 16 International sports news SHELLY-ANN FRASER of Jamaica (rightleft Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie (centretop left of the US (top right Tuesday. Bahamian Chandra Sturrup (top left See more photos on page 14 A l e s s a n d r o V a l l e / A P ‘GOLDEN Girl’ Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie proved that her victory over Chandra Sturrup at the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA and Field Championships wasno fluke. Competing yesterday at the Athletissima Track and Field Meet in Lausanne, Switzer land, the double sprint champion clocked 11.12 seconds to finish third in the women’s 100m. Sturrup, who lost in the century at home for the first time in about five years, had to settle for fourth in 11.25. Winning the race was Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser in 11.03, followed by American Carmelita Jeter in 11.06. It was the first race for both Ferguson-McKenzie and Sturrup since they clashed at the BAAA Nationals last month. In that meeting, FergusonMcKenzie won in an identical time of 11.12 with Sturrup trailing in 11.22. Ferguson-McKenzie and Sturrup were the only two Bahamians to compete in Switzerland. T T h h i i r r d d , , f f o o u u r r t t h h f f o o r r t t h h e e G G o o l l d d e e n n G G i i r r l l s s Win or be relegated! n B y BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net T eam captain John Farrington knows how important it isf or Team Bahamas to play their best this weekend in the second round of the Americ an Zone II Davis Cup tie. The Bahamas will remain in zone II for 2010 if they defeat Guatemala. If they lose, the B ahamas will be dropped back to Zone III where the team last played in 2007. “This is a relegation tie, so we really don’t want to go back down there,” Farrington said. “We’re looking good. The guys have been working hard and they are all feeling fine. I think they came home prepared to play.” D uring a practice session yesterday at the National Tennis Center where the tie will take place over the Independence holiday weekend, Farrington said the players are eager to treat this tie just like any other. “I expect us to come out with t he win by Sunday,” he said, not taking the younger Guatemalan t eam for granted, despite having won 3-0 in their last meet ing in 2007 in Guatemala. “I’m confident in my players. We have control of our destiny, so to speak,” he insisted. “So we just have to do the things that we have to do to take care of business.” If they play through to form, Olympian Devin Mullings willp lay as the top seed, followed by former Orange Bowl cham p ion Timothy Neilly. They should be in action on Friday int he opening singles. Then on Saturday, expect for veteran Bjorn Munroe and Mar vin Rolle to once again team upf or doubles. The alternate on the team is Rodney Carey Jr. All of the players are excited a bout competing in the tie this weekend. “I think everybody is playing with confidence and so wes hould do very well,” said Munroe, the 23-year-old Grand Bahamian, who has played on the team since 2002. As long as they put up a “fight,” Mullings said the Bahamas should have no problems coming out on top, especially with the tie being at home. Neilly, another Grand Bahamian, said he has been doing a lot of physical training a nd that has certainly helped his game. “You can expect to see a lot better tennis than you’ve seen in the past,” said Neilly, the 21year-old playing in just his fourth tie. “I’m looking forward to play ing some very good matches.” A s for the team, Neilly said they are all looking very good, so they should be able to prevail. Munroe, the oldest member of them at age 31, said both Mullings and Neilly seem to be prepared for their singles matches and he’s going to be ready when he’s called upon to play doubles. “I’ve been playing both singles and doubles, but doubles is my specialty,” said the Grand Bahama native, who has played in six ties, but his first at home in five years. “So I’m definitely going to be ready.” A nd Rolle, his partner, said he’s ready. “We just have to go out there and give it our best and fight,” said Rolle, the 25-year-old who has played in 15 previous ties. “If we give 100 per cent, I don’t see why we should not come out on top. We are ready.” Carey Jr, the 17-year-old who is making his debut on the team, s aid he’s really pleased to be given a chance to hang out with the more experienced players. “I’ve been having some good workouts, so I’m really pleased with that,” he said. “I won’t be playing, but I will be cheering from the sidelines and I hopet hat I can help them come up with the win.” Not concerned about the fact that they are playing over the h oliday weekend, Munroe said it just means that more people will have something special to do, so the stadium should be filled. With this being a holiday weekend, Farrington is calling on the general public to come out Friday to Sunday to support the team because they need to capitalize on their home court advantage. A rmstrong m oves into c ontention at Tour de France... See page 16 n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net OSBOURNE Moxey cap tured one of the four medals won by the Bahamas at the Central American and Caribbean Championships in Havana, Cuba, over the weekend. Now he’s hoping that as the area champion, he will be added to the Bahamas team going to the IAAF World Champi onships in Athletics in Berlin, Germany. His winning leap of 26-feet, 11/2-inches in the men’s long jump on Saturday was just under the B qualifying mark of 26-41/2. The A standard is 26-8 3/4. But Moxey will now have to wait on the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations as to whether or not they will book a ticket for him for the August 15-23 meet. “It was okay. Our first goal was to win a medal for the Bahamas, which we did. Then it was to qualify for the championships outright in terms of dis tance,” said Moxey, who fell short on the latter. In pulling off the victory, Moxey beat out Carlos Morgan of the Cayman Islands, who posted a leap of 25-9 3/4. Bahamian Rudon Bastian, a training partner of Moxey, got the bronze with 24-10. The other medals came from veteran Lavern Eve in the women’s javelin with a toss of 182-2 1/2. Cuban Yainelis Ribeaux won with 195-9 1/2 with world record holder Oslei dys Menendez third with 192-6 1/2. And the men’s 4 x 100 relay team of Rodney Green, Adrian Griffith, Karlton Rolle and Derrick Atkins clocked 39.45 for the bronze behind Trinidad & Tobago with the gold in 38.73 and Jamaica with the silver in 39.31. But the relay team fell short of the qualifying time of 39.10 for Berlin. Moxey, who felt he put his best foot forward, said had he gotten a challenge from the Cubans, he was convinced that he would have been able to earn a World Championship qualifying mark. If he gets to make the trip, Moxey said he will definitely have to work on his “approach to the board and my landing has to improve.” I think if the Cubans were at their best, I would have been able to put out a little more,” he said. His local coach Peter Pratt said he was satisfied with Moxey’s performance, but he knew that with the training he put in, he should have performed much better. “The CAC was just his third track meet for the year, so I’m happy with his performance,” Pratt said. “Now we just have to wait and see what the ruling the BAAA will take, so we can adjust our training.” Moxey, employed at the National Insurance Board, has made the adjustment to training at home and according to Pratt, he’s doing all of the necessary things to perform at a high level, if he gets to travel to Berlin. Moxes winning leap at CAC not enough f or Berlin

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n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net ALTHOUGH they know their backs are against the wall competing away from home, the Guatemalan Davis Cup team is confident that they can take care of business this weekend. The youthful visiting team, captained by Manuel Chavez, will have their hands full against the Bahamian team in the second round of the American Zone II tie that will be important for both teams. The winner of the tie, scheduled for this weekend at the National Tennis Center, will remain in Zone II for next year, while the loser will be relegated to Zone III. Sebastian Vidal, the 19-yearold member of the team, said they are here to win. “We feel pretty strong about our chances of getting the victory,” he said following a team practice yesterday at the NTC. “We feel we can win the whole thing.” Having played and lost to the Bahamas 3-0 in Guatemala in the Group 3 Round Robin play in 2007, Vidal said they know how strong the Bahamian team is. “Their four players are pretty s trong, so we know it’s going to be a pretty tough match,” Vidal said. “But we are a pretty young team and we’re experienced enough to win on the big stage. “We have a lot of talent, so w e hope to come out with the W (win Joining Vidal on the Guatemalan team are Christio-pher Diaz-Figueroa, a 19-yearold who is expected to be the top seed, Cristian Paiz, the oldest player at 28 and the No.2s eed and Julen Uriguen, the youngest member, who turns 19 on July 22. Guatemela, who first started playing Davis Cup in 1990, had their best showing in 1995, 2000and 2001 when they played in the Americans Zone II. However, they have played in Zone 3 for a number of years and even were as low as Zone 4in 2004. They last played in Zone 3 last year where they got promoted to Zone II. But the team is coming off a 5-0 loss to the Dominican Republic in March and know that if they fail to win this weekend, they will drop back to Zone III. “I think it’s very important. I know the Bahamas won the Group III two years ago and we managed to win it last year,” Vidal said. “So I think both teams know how hard it is to get to Zone II. “No one wants to go back down to Zone 3, so it’s an important match for both of ourteams to win and not go back to Zone 3.” C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 13 STANDING (l-r Holbert GBABA/ Jervis Stuart Jr LBL / Ashton Allens JBLN/ Crachad Laing JBLN/ Chad Burrows JBLN/ Jeffrey Woodside JBLN. Kneeling (lr) are Loren Kemp, Coach JBLN/ Theodore Sweeting Jr JBLN/ Remon Grant GBABA/ Cameron Richardson GBABA/ Alex Tapia JBLN/ Andre Turnquest LBL/ Marvin McQueen GBABA/D'Andre Rigby JBLN/ Byron Ferguson JBLN. THE Bahamas Baseball Federation’s national 15-16 team departed town on Monday and have arrived safely in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The team, managed by Patrick Knowles Sr of Grand Bahama, had a light workout yesterday and are scheduled to play their first game against Puerto Rico at 3pm today. The starting pitcher is Marcus Holbert, a flame thrower from Grand Bahama who has recorded his speed ball at 87 miles per hour. The rest of the line-up is expected to include the following: Catcher Theodore Sweeting Jr of New Providence 1st Base Jeffrey Woodside of New Providence 2nd Base Ashton Allens of New Providence Shortstop Alex Tapia of New Providence 3rd Base Marvin McQueen of Grand Bahama Left Field Andre Turnquest of Grand Bahama Center Field Jervis Stuart Jr of Grand Bahama Right Field David Sweeting of New Providence Designated player Jeffrey Woodside of New Providence National 15-16 baseball team to face Puerto Rico today Guatemala, Bahamas Davis Cup teams looking for big second round win Loser will be relegated to American Zone III T o advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 502-2371 today! THE YOUTHFUL Guatemalan Davis Cup team, captained by Manuel Chavez (far leftl-r Cristian Diaz, Sebastian Vidal, Andres Bucaro and Julen Uriguen... THE BAHAMAS’ Davis Cup team shown (l-r

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE SHELLY-ANN FRASER and Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie run during the 100m race... A P P h o t o s ABOVE AND ON TOP Carmelita Jeter (far leftcentre en Girl’ Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of the Bahamas run during the 100m race at the Athletissima meeting in the Stade Olympique in Lausanne, Switzerland on Tuesday. Shelly-Ann Fraser won ahead of Carmelita Jeter and Ferguson-McKenzie. n By BETH HARRIS AP Sports Writer INDIANAPOLIS (AP Eric Shanteau is swimming faster than he ever has, diving into the water every day knowing that he’s cancer-free. That’s gratifying news to the 25-year-old breaststroker who was diagnosed with testicular cancer just weeks before last year’s US Olympic trials. He kept the stunning infor mation to himself while competing for a spot on his first Olympic team. Shanteau earneda spot in the 200-meter breaststroke, finishing 10th in Beijing with a personal-best time. Then he returned home to Atlanta for surgery. After a recovery period, Shanteau resumed training in Austin, Texas, with a goal of making the world championships. He’s four laps away from a trip to Rome later this month. Shanteau became the second American to swim under a minute in the 100 breaststroke, clocking 59.89 seconds to make him the leading qualifier going into Tuesday night’s final at the US national championships. “It gives me a lot of confidence,” he said before adding, “It doesn’t matter what happens this morning if I don’t do it tonight.” The top two finishers qualify for the world meet. Since March, Shanteau has posted personal bests in his sig nature events, the 100 and 200 breaststrokes. His 100 time in the morning preliminaries lowered his previous best of 1:00.09. He wore the X Glide suit by Arena for the first time Tues day. It’s one of the suits approved by swimming’s world governing body for competition this year. “Obviously the suits are going to help out, but regardless of what suit I wore, I knew I was going to be under a minute this week,” he said. With Brendan Hansen tak ing time off, Shanteau is poised to move into the role of domi nant American breaststroker that Hansen has owned for the last several years. Shanteau wants more than just to compete in the individual breaststroke events in Rome. He is aiming to succeed Hansen on the medley relay team, and likely needs to win the 100 to ensure he would swim in the final in Rome rather than just in the prelims. Just before traveling to Indi anapolis, Shanteau went for a final round of blood tests that confirmed he is cancer-free, the 10th month he can celebrate such welcome news. But memories of his recent past are never far away. “There’s still that thought in the back of your mind, ‘What if there’s a recurrence?”’ he said. “It’s been a difficult past eight or nine months. I have to live with it the rest of my life.” The disease had already hit home for Shanteau, whose father Rick battled lung cancer at the same time his son was diagnosed. The elder Shanteau is in Indianapolis this week to cheer on his son, and now needs only occasional chemotherapy treatments. “He’s doing really well,” the younger Shanteau said smiling. Happily, Shanteau can say the same about himself. Cancer-free Eric Shanteau back to swimming fast A third and fourth for ‘Golden Girls’ Debbie and Chandra at track meet in Switzerland...

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B ASEBALL ANAHEIM, Calif. Associated Press BEFOREhitting a pair of RBI singles and robbing Hank Blalock of an extra-base hit with yet another defensive gem in center field, Torii Hunter nearly saw his errorless streak slip away. The eight-time Gold Glove winner relayed the ball toward third base after an RBI single by Blalock in the first inning of the Angels’ 9-4 victory over Texas on Monday night. Shortstop Maicer Izturis was supposed to cut off the throw, but it went past him, and skipped by third baseman Chone Figgins as another run scored. The error was charged to Figgins, and Hunter was able to extend his errorless streak to 235 consecutive games the longest active streak among outfielders. “I was sweating a little bit, to be honest,” said Hunter, whose last error was on Aug. 31, 2007. thought they would give me the error because I made the throw. But I wasn’t trying to throw him out. I was actually just trying to hit the cutoff man, buthe let it go. It was a mistake on h is part. I was very upset. But t he streak lives.” J eff Mathis hit a go-ahead three-run homer in the second inning, helping the Angels snap a first-place tie with the Rangers in the AL West. Juan Rivera also had a pair of RBI singles and Jered Weaver (9-3 nine over seven innings for the victory. Weaver allowed four runs and seven hits, including a two-run homer in the seventh by Ian Kinsler that snapped a careerworst 0-for-24 drought by the Rangers’ second baseman. “It’s hard to take Kins out for the teams we’ve been playing,” manager Ron Washington said. mean, how can you tell Kins: ’I’m going to sit you against Ana heim?’ or ’I’m going to sit you against Tampa Bay?’ I wasn’t going to do that. He’s got seven days left, and he’s going to learn how to grind. It’s going to help him to understand how to play when you’re a little fatigued because he is fatigued. At this point, everybody is fatigued.” Josh Hamilton, who was activated from the disabled list before the game, was 2 for 4 with a double and two strikeouts. “I would have stayed down longer if I didn’t feel like I was ready,” said Hamilton, who will play in his second straight AllStar game next week. “It’s good to be back up here and be around the guys again and actually feel like part of the team, instead of just a guy hanging out.” The Rangers had a 4 1/2 game lead on the Angels when Hamilton went on the DL on June 2, and led them by 5 1/2 games on May 30. Both teams reached the midway point of their respective schedules. The Angels (46-35 were 48-33 at this stage last season and the Rangers (45-36 were 41-40. “You have to play well against whatever team shows up on the schedule,” Angels manager Mike Scioscia said. “If we were playing any other team but Texas, it doesn’t mean we don’t have to bring the focus and intensity. It’s still July, there’s still a lot of base ball left, and we’re still trying to evolve as a team.” Kevin Millwood (8-6 nine runs and nine hits over five innings in the shortest of his 18 starts this season. He has given up 13 runs and 17 hits over 11 1-3 innings in his past two starts both against the Angels after giving up just seven runs in 40 2-3 innings over his previous six outings. “I didn’t hit my spots. When I tried to go away, it would drift over the middle of the plate. And when I didn’t hit my spots, they hit those mistakes,” Millwood said. “I think pitching up is part of my game, one of my strengths. But thigh high isn’t. Thigh high is a bad place to throw the ball, and that’s where I was missing tonight.” MARINERS 5, ORIOLES 0 At Seattle, Jarrod Washburn tossed a one-hitter for his ninth career complete game. It was the first one-hitter by a Mariners pitcher at Safeco Field, and 10th in franchise history. Nick Markakis had the only hit off Washburn (4-5 gle in the fourth. Washburn faced just one batter over the minimum, issuing no walks and striking out three in his 110-pitch effort. ROYALS 4, TIGERS 3 At Detroit, Mike Jacobs hit a go-ahead solo homer in the ninth and closer Joakim Soria held on for Kansas City’s third straight win. Willie Bloomquist drove in three runs for the Royals, connecting on a home run in the sixth and a two-run triple in the eighth. Roman Colon (1-0 earned his first win since 2006, when he was pitching for Detroit. B L UE J AYS 7, YANKEES 6 At New York, Ricky Romero (7-3 streak to 24 innings before Eric Hinske homered in his Yankees debut, and Toronto avoided getting swept in a four-game series. Mathis’ 3-run homer leads Angels over Rangers C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 15 * All prices are net. EAGLE ELECTRICAL &LIGHTINGTel (242Fax (242 Email: eaglebahamas@gmail.com Eagle Air features an efcient cooling system, designed for optimum air circulation. NOW CARRYING 9000 BTU UNITS! Our new stock of air conditioning units are now in. All prices are net. Special ends Monday, July 13, 2009! BEAT THE SUMMER’S HEAT WITH ! Ductless Units EAGLE AIR DUCTLESS AIR CONDITIONERS TONNAGE SIZE PRICE 9000 BTU $399.00 1 TON 12000 BTU $449.00 1.5 TON 18000 BTU $665.00 2 TON 24000 BTU $869.00 N e w ! We ship to the Family Islands! TEXAS Rangers catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia,l eft, tags out Los Angeles Angels' Kendry Morales at home during the eighth inningo f a baseball game, Monday, July 6, 2009, in Anaheim, Calif. The Angels won9 -4. J e f f L e w i s / A P P h o t o BASEBALL PHILADELPHIA Associated Press BLOOPERS dropped in, grounders found holes and several balls flew out of the park. Once the Philadelphia Phillies put their bats down, the Cincinnati Reds had suffered the worst loss in team history. Chase Utley hit a three-run homer and Shane Victorino and Greg Dobbs each had two-run shots during a 10-run first, leading the Phillies to a 22-1 victory over the Reds on Monday night. It was the most lopsided defeat for baseball’s first pro fessional franchise. The Red Stockings and Redlegs never got beat this badly, and the Big Red Machine used to do all the hitting. “We got slaughtered as they used to say,” Reds manager Dusty Baker said. The previous worst defeat for the Reds was 26-6 on July 26, 1892. That also was against the Phillies. Cole Hamels (5-5 beneficiary of the offensive outburst. The struggling ace allowed one run and three hits in seven innings to earn his first win since shutting out the Los Angeles Dodgers on June 4. “I was just jumping for joy,” Hamels said about the run support. “When you put that many runs up, it makes it uncomfort able for the other team.” The Phillies tied a club record for most runs in the first inning. They scored 10 three other times, most recently on June 2, 2002, against the Montreal Expos. It was the most runs by Philadelphia since a 26-7 win over the New York Mets at the old Veterans Stadium on June 11, 1985. The 22 runs were the most in the six-year history of Citizens Bank Park. Reds starter Johnny Cueto (8-5 allowing nine runs and five hits. It was the shortest outing in the right-hander’s two-year career. Cueto had never allowed more than six earned runs in a game, and his ERA rose from 2.69 to 3.45. Jayson Werth connected off infielder Paul Janish in the eighth. Victorino, a candidate for the final spot on the NL’s All-Star roster, helped his case with four hits, four RBIs and a career-high five runs. Dobbs had four hits, Utley drove in four and every starter had a hit. “It was one of those nights where everything we hit was falling and we hit some hard,” manager Charlie Manuel said. The NL East-leading Phillies have won four straight games after losing 14 of 18. They had n’t scored more than 15 runs since a 20-2 victory at St. Louis last June 13. After that game, the Phillies went 3-11 and scored a total of 38 runs. Rock ies 1, Nationals 0 At Denver, Jason Marquis pitched eight innings for his major league-leading 11th win and Todd Helton had an RBI double in the first for Colorado. Fresh off making his first AllStar team, Marquis pitched out of bases-loaded jams in the sev enth and eighth innings. Marquis (11-5 hits and struck out three, was coming off a two-hit shutout at Los Angeles on June 30. Huston Street threw a perfect ninth for his 20th save in 21 chances. Rookie Craig Stammen (1-4 went a season-high seven innings, giving up five hits and the one run. Diamondbacks 6, Padres 5 In Phoenix, Mark Reynolds singled home Justin Upton with two outs in the bottom of the ninth to give Arizona the win. Upton drew a two-out walk from Cla Meredith (4-2 stole second before Reynolds lined a single into the left-field corner. Big first inning leads Phillies over Reds 22-1 PHILADELPHIA Phillies' Jayson Werth, left, runs the basesa fter hitting a grand slam against the Cincinnati Reds' in then inth inning of a baseball game Monday, July 6, 2009, in Philadelphia. H . R u m p h J r . / A P P h o t o SPORTS IN BRIEF NFL MINNEAPOLISA ssociated Press YAHOOInc. and the NFL Players Association have reached a settlement over use of players’ statistics, photos and other data in Yahoo’s popular online fantasy football game, but details were not immediately available Tuesday. Santa Clara, Calif.-based Yahoo sued the NFLPA last month in U.S. District Court in Minnesota, claiming Yahoo shouldn’t have to pay royalties to use the data because the information isa lready publicly available. Yahoo dropped the lawsuit Monday. Officials from both parties said a settlement was reached. Yahoo Sports spokeswoman Nicol Addison said Yahoo doesn’t discuss litigation and she wouldn’t disclose details. Andrew Feffer, the union’s chief operating officer and executive vice presi dent, had no comment b eyond saying there was a s ettlement. The last of Yahoo’s licensing agreements with NFL Players Inc. expired March 1. But Yahoo claimed it didn’t need authorization, due to a court decision in April in a similar dispute between NFL Players Inc. and CBS Interactive Inc. Fantasy sports league participants create teams com prised of real players. As the season progresses, participants’ track their players’ statistics to judge how well their team is performing. Yahoo, NFL players union settle lawsuit

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C YCLING LA GRANDE-MOTTE, FranceA ssociated Press LANCEArmstrong showed that experience still counts att he Tour de France. The 37-year old American rider surged to the front to take the right breakaway during Monday’s third stage while Alberto Contador and the other favorites were trapped in the peloton. Armstrong’s astute move earned him valuable time and moved to third place overall while Contador dropped to fourth, 19 seconds behind the Texan. Contador is the 2007 Tour winner and a favorite this year. Armstrong could take the yel low leader’s jersey from Fabian Cancellara on Tuesday when a 24.23-mile team time trial is scheduled in Montpellier. “Never say never,” Armstrong said when asked about the possibility of putting on the coveted jersey for the 84th time in his career, four years after his record seventh Tour victory. Overall, he trails Cancellara by 40 seconds a tough deficit to erase in the team time trial. The Swiss rider’s Saxo Bank team is one of the best in the discipline, along with Armstrong’s Astana, Garmin and Columbia. Among other Tour favorites, two-time runner up Cadel Evans slipped to eighth place overall, 1 minute, 4 seconds behind Can cellara. Andy Schleck is 24th at 1:41, and defending champion Carlos Sastre of Spain is 26th, 1:47 back. Armstrong has got time to move up now that he leads Contador, who had a 22 secondcushion over Armstrong before Monday’s stage won by Mark Cavendish. Armstrong has already said the third week, featuring a long time trial, three mountain stages, and a finish up the daunting Mont Ventoux, will be very hard. Cavendish earned his second consecutive Tour stage victory and his sixth overall, ahead of Norway’s Thor Hushovd and Cyril Lemoine of France after completing the 122.1-mile trek between Marseille and La Grande-Motte in 5 hours, 1 minute, 24 seconds. Only 29 riders including Armstrong, Cancellara and two other Astana teammates Yaroslav Popovych and Haimar Zubeldia handled the tricky conditions. “Whenever you see a team lined up at the front like that, you have to pay attention,” Armstrong said. “You know what the wind’s doing, and you see that a turn’s coming up, so it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to know that you have to go to the front.” Contador was at the wrong place at the wrong time when the breakaway happened. “I was climbing with a teammate and we ended up in no man’s land,” he said. Asked about his reaction when he saw that Contador was not with him in front, Armstrong said that he didn’t try to gain time over the Spaniard. “That’s not my objective but I turned around and was surprised that there was a split,” he said. “On days like this for good or bad you can make a difference.” After realizing that Armstrong was the only title contender in the breakaway, Astana riders in it decided to collaborate with the Columbia riders. “Apart from Lance, there was nobody from all the other favorites,” Astana manager Johan Bruyneel said. “At first, we let the Columbia riders do the work. At a moment, I was convinced the peloton was going to come back. But the gap came up again and at that moment, about 15 kilometers from the finish, we decided that Popovych and Zubeldia will help in the front.” C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-XO\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV SPORTS IN BRIEF T ENNIS PARIS Associated Press FRENCHtennis player Mathieu Montcourt has died. He was 24. The French tennis federation said on Tuesday that Montcourt had died overnight but that “the causes of his death are not yet known.” “It is with great sadness that the French tennis federation has learned of the sudden death of Mathieu Montcourt,” the French tennis federation said. “Mathieu was an enthusiastic young man, passionate, very endearing, and extremely appreciated for his kindness and politeness.” French media earlier reported that Montcourt, ranked 119, was found dead by his girlfriend in the stairwell of his Paris apartment. In May, Montcourt was handed a five-week ban and fined $12,000 for betting on other matches. That ban took effect Monday. Montcourt complained during the French Open that the punishment was too harsh, saying that he neverb et more than $3 at any time, a nd never on his own match es a fact confirmed by the ATP which oversees the men’s Tour. The Court of Arbitration for Sport said Montcourt had wagered a total of $192 on 36t ennis events in 2005. It reduced his suspension on appeal from eight weeks to five. The issue of betting in tennis drew increased attention from the sport’s governing bodies after an online bookmaker voided all wagers on a 2007 match involving Nikolay Davydenko. French tennis player MathieuM ontcourt dies at 24 FOOTBALL NASHVILLE, Tenn. Associated Press TENNESSEE’S state medical examiner says investigators have been hesitant to conclude that Steve McNair’s girlfriend killed the NFL star and herself because she didn’t appear to have a motive. Bruce Levy said Tuesday that murder-suicide is the most likely scenario and it’s unlikely the crime scene was staged by a third party. But investigators have been cautious about exploring every possibility. In murdersuicides, friends and family usually have seen problems. But 20-year-old Sahel Kazemi’s family has said she was very happy. A ruling is expected in the next few days. Police quickly labeled McNair’s death a homicide. Investigators say that Kazemi bought the handgun found under her body less than two days before the shooting. Lack of motive slows ruling on McNair girlfriend Armstrong moves into contention at Tour de France TONY Martin of Germany, wearing the best young rider's white jersey, right, leads his Team Columbia-HTC riders with Mark Cavendish of Britain, wearing the best sprinte r's green jersey, seen far left, during the fourth stage of the Tour de France cycling race, a team time-trial over 39 kilometers (24.2 miles er, southern France, Tuesday July 7, 2009. Martin now ranks 8th overall, second right is American George Hincapie, left is Mark Cavendish of Britain, wearing the best s printer's green jersey. L a u r e n t R e b o u r s / A P P h o t o s CADEL Evans of Australia, left, and Johan van Summeren of Belgium, behind, ride with their Silence-Lotto to take a 13th place dur ing the fourth stage of the Tour de France cycling race, a team timet rial over 39 kilometers (24.2 miles Bas Czerwinski /AP Photo

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“My parents are Aryett and BerylL ightbourne. You could say that I consider Nassau and Andros both as ‘home’. I can catch my own crabs, so I do consider myself an Andros Gal’ too. I c an remember begging my Mummy to stir the crab ‘n’ ricebut I couldn’t reach the stove. I remember helping my grandmother, Mary Johnson, kneading bread on her kitchen counter, but I was standing on a milk crate so I could reach the counter. I remember the dining room table in her house on Thompson Blvd covered in hot cross buns for Easter, dripping with icing and my cousins and I hiding under the table and making off with a few. Bahamians are a lucky people because so much of our culture and what makes our nation great revolves around family and great food,” Ms Lightbourne said. Ms Lightbourne ended up in New Jersey where she attended Rutgers University graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Business and Economics. “After I graduated, I worked for Rutgers University doing research for an E.P.A program called IR-4. I liked my work, I was very good at it, but being stuck behind a desk crunching the numbers on pesticide and herbicide data was not my passion. I had been doing research and looking into starting my company and soon I had to make a choice, stay in a secure job, or take a leap of faith and follow my passion. I had a wonderful friend that was will ing to be my business partner and it all grew from there,” Ms Lightbourne said. As with most things we are passionate about, Ms Light bourne said De’Light B’s Gourmet got started by helping to raise money for the American Cancer Society. “I had lost my Mom, Beryl Munnings-Lightbourne to breast cancer in 1998; it’s a cause close to my heart and I wanted or rather needed somewhere to channel those C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 17 T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net F OR most young people in the Bahamas, growing up on a family island forces you to dream bigger and accomplish greater things in life to make those you leave behind proud. Nikoya Lightbour ne, a native of Andros and o wner of De’Light B’s Gourmet, formerly De’Lightbourne’s LLC, located in Trenton Farmer’s Market in Lawrence N e w Jersey; ten minutes south of Princeton, followed her dreams and made them come true. Gourmet DeLight B’s Nikoya Lightbourne gourmet food shop is a dream come true emotions and feel like I was making a difference. To raise money for our ‘Relay for Life’ team, I started using my mom’s banana bread recipe and baking breads to sell on campus. By senior year I was baking all year round because people were not satisfied that they could only get them during spring before the Relay. In April of 2006, we did our first official event as a bakery; and six months later in September we signed a lease on our current kitchen space. We now had an entire professional kitchen space to work with and decided to create a catering menu as well and it has flourished,” Ms Lightbourne said. As for the business, Ms Lightbourne said De’Light B’s Gourmet carries a line of rum cakes, Bahamian style fruit cakes, pineapple tarts, coconut tarts and Bahamian style macaroni as only Bahamians can make it. “Pastry wise I would say that our best sellers right now are our pies and especially the key lime pies. We also have a variety of cakes; coconut cake, and carrot cake are at the top of that list. Then there is our cheesecake line which is our latest record breaker; we are currently in the process of getting that product line into our local higher end gro cery stores such as Whole Foods and Wegman's. By far, the rum cakes and the fruit cakes are the biggest hit, and we can’t forget about the jerk chicken,” Ms Lightbourne said. SEE page 19 PETITE CUPCAKES SHORT BREAD DAISIES CUPCAKES NIKOYA LIGHTBOURNE

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 18, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e things 2 DO BAHAMIANS grab your flags and come celebrate the 36th anniversary of this beautiful place we call home. With less than two days remaining before the annual independence celebrations, already there’s the echoes of Junkanoo, the aroma of the peas and rice, and the spirit of oneness spreading across the country, and Tribune Features is right there giving you the full scoop. This special edition of Things 2 Do, has the five day rundown of happenings and events sure to remind you why it’s so great to be a Bahamian. Wednesday -The Hub Art Centre is the official jump-off for this five day independence weekend as it will feature several budding local entertainers and a special guest performance. Starting at 7.30pm, this week’s featured artist is no stranger to the local music sceneregionally acclaimed gospel recording artist Manifest . The event offers true musical variety, but is also a g reat place just to mix and ming le, so come out and become a p art of the Express Yourself experience. Thursday Clifford Park is expected to be transformed into a Bahamian cultural mecca. Organisers for the annual inde pendence celebration have a rranged an array of activities including an all out cultural show featuring authentic Bahamian music and dance. There will also be a Police and Defence Force inspection, a national prayer, the traditional flag raising ceremony, and fireworks This event begins at 8pm. Friday It’s Independence Day, and if there’s one thing that defines the Bahamas, its Junkanoo. Wake up to the sounds of “The People’s Rushout” as thousands flock to the center of town celebrating the independence of a beautiful nation. Starting from 1am, the Junkanoo rush-out begins at Rawson Square to Arawak Cay, so come and enjoy the music. The Bahamas Hot Rod Association is hosting a special Inde pendence Street Legal Racing night at 7.30pm at its motorsport park located at the rear of the Queen Elizabeth Sporting Com plex. Specialty cars of all makes and models will be showcased, and the event is only $5, Saturday The Junkanoo Sum mer Festival continues its month long stint showcasing traditional Goombay music, live bands, and lots of local food and fun in Rawson Square. The day long event also features local crafts, Bahamian literature, and a pineapple eating and onion peeling competition. So come out this Saturday between noon and 10 pm to experience traditional life in the islands. The Sixth Annual South Eleuthera Mission Heritage & Cultural Fair and Raffle takes place in Rock Sound today from noon until. An intended fundraiser for the community, the event will fea ture the Bahamas Defense Force Pop Band, a bouncing castle, punch board, sail boat exhibition, best independence hair style, coconut barking, pineapple eating and crab catching competitions. Sunday Available for its final showing at the Dundas Center is the much talked about Treemon isha, an opera written by famous American playwright Scott Joplin, and directed by famed Bahamian drama connoisseur Dr Cleveland Williams. Performed by an all Bahamian cast, it tells a story of an African American community recently freed from slavery. The play is centered around the main character Treemonisha, who helps to express the importance of religion, family, culture, and education. Also a good reminder of the importance of independence, the play has been dubbed a tribute to the Bahamianism. Proceeds from this final night are intended to assist the Bahamas National Dance company on their upcoming trip to the Aberdeen International Youth Festival in the UK. Tickets are $20, and Showtime is 8pm. Several simultaneous morning walks will be held on Saturday and Sunday to recognise the importance of the nation’s inde pendence. The walks will all start at 6am from Windsor Park, Gold en Gates, Montagu Beach, and Goodman’s Bay and will all end at Clifford Park. Beat Retreat Police and Defense Force The Police and Defence Force Bands held an Independence Beat Retreat in Rawson Square on Saturaday. Hundreds of Bahamians and visitors enjoyed the spectacular display.

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C M Y K C M Y K ARTS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 19 Ms Lightbourne said she is very p roud of what she does and the New J ersey locals love the food mostly b ecause it’s different. “We use a style called ‘Caribbean Fusion’; for example, we’d take our home made jerk sauce and use it to season wild caught Alaska Salmon and then grill them on cedar planks. Its still salmon, but it’s salmon like you’ve never had it before. It’s a whole lot of blood, sweat and tearful phone calls home to Andros to my dad because I’m stressed out beyond words. It’s missed birthdays, graduations, and Christmases with my friends and famil y at home. However, at the end of the d ay, it is my name on the door. It took m e forever to get used to the fact that I was (when it all started running my own business with employees and taxes to pay. Three years later, I appreciate the responsibility and I am forever grateful to everyone in my life from my family and friends to my teach-e rs from my earliest years that gave me the confidence and the knowledge thatI could and would do anything that I set out to achieve. I am even more grateful to those who said I couldn’t do it, or that I wouldn’t succeed, they are the ultimate motivators,” Ms Lightbourne said. In the end, many Bahamians can not neglect the force that is pulling them to return home and Ms Lightbourne said she is very motivated to do so. “The homesickness only gets worse every year. I’m currently looking into a few options though nothing is concrete.I love the fact that my generation has become such a driving force at home and are changing the way that things are done by being innovative, thinking outside the box and not being afraid t o take chances. My cousin, Scharad L ightbourne, a graphic designer and p hotographer and artist Sammy Star (who went to the same high school I did) are examples of those at home who are pushing the envelope, not afraid of being different and are having great successes in their chosen careers. They are examples of “home grown” being better than options or influences from outside the country,” Ms Lightbourne said. Ms Lightbourne said her advice to any young entrepreneur is to do their research. You need to know your customer b ase and what products your target a udience will be more than willing to not only buy but to tell others to buy as well. We started as a Caribbean bakery, and learned that it was not a large customer base, we switched to a more American variety that still has some Caribbean influence and now I’ve beeng iven the nickname “The Pie Lady” by the Trentonian, our local paper. Communication is key; use every free mode of communication available to you, word of mouth, and internet hubs like Facebook or Twitter. Remember that there will always be setbacks, but it’s those discouraging moments that make our successes that much sweeter.” To learn more about De’Light B’s Gourmet, visit the website at www.delightbournes.com or if you visit New Jersey in your travels, visit them at 960 Spruce Street, Lawrence NJ 08648 or give them a call at 609-989-7577. F ROM page 17 DeLight B’s Gourmet We use a style called ‘Caribbean Fusion’; for example, we’d take our home made jerk sauce and use it to season wild caught Alaska Salmon and then grill them on cedar planks. Its still salmon, but it’s salmon like you’ve never had it before. PINEAPPLE UPSIDE D OWN CAKE EXPRESSO CHEESECAKE

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C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONA I N S I D E Police and Defence Force Beat Retreat See page 18 W EDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 DeLight B’s Gourmet See page 17 DA WAY WE IS SPEAK Art form reminds us of native tongue WITH other countries having their share of quirks, many of the saying that we assume as uniquely Bahamian do in fact originate from other places said local playwright and dialectologist James Catalyn. By LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net AS the sweet breeze of independence rolls around on this 36 anniversary of the country, the age old question of what is unique about the Bahamas arises. This year it seems the answer to that question is a reemerging form of Bahami an art known as Relief Carvings. According to Heino Scmidt, Central Bank art curator and seasoned artist, Relief Carvings is an art form that most likely branched off from the common kitchen prayer paintings and towels that have adorned Bahamian homes for years. Bridging art, culture, and dcor, this art form helps to remind older Bahamians of the native tongue, and intro duces young people to elements of our dialect that are scarcely used. Although it has not gained significant popularity on New Providence, many out islands like Eleuthera, Cat Island, and Andros, showcase this work in practically all areas of society including restaurants, schools, homes, and sometimes even churches. ‘Hard head bird don’ cook good soup,’ ‘Don’ gimme no lip,’ ‘Eye winker older dan’ beard,’ ‘Tief, tief from tief and God laugh, Ha!,’ ‘Pick until ya pick needle wit’out eye,’ and ‘Loose goat don’ know how tie goat feel.’ These are some of the sayings that many of our parents and grandparents would have heard while growing up, and believe it or not they probably understand what each of them mean. However for the rest of us, local playwright and dialec tologist James Catalyn lends his expertise in the art of translating Bahamianise. E E y y e e W W i i n n k k e e r r O O l l d d e e r r d d a a n n B B e e a a r r d d “When you look at it, when we are born there is the eye winkers, and you don’t grow a beard until you turn maybe 17 or 18-yearsold. So really this saying is telling us that the older peo ple in our communities are the wiser.” T T i i e e f f , , T T i i e e f f F F r r o o m m T T i i e e f f A A n n d d G G o o d d L L a a u u g g h h , , H H a a ! ! “If somebody has stolen something from one person, and another person steals from him or her, then that proves that what goes around comes around, and in the end God gets the last laugh.” P P i i c c k k U U n n t t i i l l Y Y a a P P i i c c k k N N e e e e d d l l e e W W i i t t o o u u t t E E y y e e “Often you hear about women who end up becoming an old maid (someone who never marries and is too old and unable to have children) sometimes because they have the mentality that there is no man good enough for them. They keep looking, picking, and choosing until they end up with nothing, and that is what this saying conveys.” Mr Catalyn said while there are dozens of indige nous idiosyncrasies throughout the country, their exis tence is not unusual. With others countries hav ing their share of quirks which also have some historical connections, many of the saying that we assume as uniquely Bahamian do in fact originate from other places. “Like the term ’bungy,’ is also used in the Gullah Islands in the Carolinas. Those islands were originally inhabited by slaves and their native tongue is a language known as Gullah,” he said. Mr Catalyn said these com monalties in language cement the fact that all humans are in some way related, particularly the African Diaspora. However he said the emergence of Relief Carvings in Bahamian society is an exam ple of how important it is to continue to share the lan guage that made the Bahamas what it is.

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A Bahamian private airline operator yesterday said it would have to pay “in excess of $150,000 per year” in fees on its aircraft fleet alone, compared to the current $1,000, if the proposed Civil Aviation Department fee increases were introduced, creating an “undue burden” on travellers and “disrupting” business models. C aptain Randy Butler, chief executive o f Sky Bahamas, said the privately-owned B ahamian airline was still calculating the precise impact the proposed fee rises would have on its business. However, he warned that companies in the sector would have no choice but to take measures like increasing passenger fares or cutting staff numbers to absorb the tax increases. Sky Bahamas employed 74 persons, and the industry an estimated 400 in total, and Mr Butler warned that companies might have no choice but to downsize to absorb the fee rises. He also expressed concern about the impact on Family Island communities that relied on private airline operators, saying of the increases: “Your business model is disrupted.” “It’s direct taxation of the people, because we’re going to go from paying $1,000 a year to the Civil Aviation Department for the company to paying $30,000 per plane. We have four, so that would be $120,000,” Mr Butler told Tribune Business. n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas will not become more aggressive in seeking grant funding for infra structure projects despite its tight fiscal predicament, a government minister said yesterday, as he admitted that this nation had not been “effective in executing” European Union-financed developments. Responding to the EU’s 2 008-2013 Country Strategy Paper for the Bahamas, which revealed that Europe had con sidered slashing the only form of grant funding available to this nation because it was "a very low performer" in imple m enting projects Brussels was financing, Zhivargo Laing said: “That is a fair statement.” T he minister of state for finance then told Tribune Business: “We have not been as effective in executing these pro jects for years and years and years. That’s the reality.” When asked about the rea s ons for this ineffectiveness, Mr Laing suggested they often became lost amid the many pro j ects the Ministry of Works had to deal with, and did not figure as highly on that ministry’s and the Government’s priori ty list. In addition, the EU also C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $4.21 $4.30 $4.25 Minister: Bahamas not been ‘effective’ on grant financed project execution * Says Ministry of Works workload and EU conditions key factors in implementation woes on multi-million dollar infrastructure projects * Bahamas will not ‘be more aggressive’ in seeking grant financing, despite f i scal def icit and infr a str ucture woes S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B Laing n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s president yester day told Tribune Business his “biggest concern” was that the business community did not suffer “an extraordinary number of casualties” as a result of the current recession, with the banking sector already seeing 20 per cent of their commercial loans fall into arrears. Khaalis Rolle called for a “unified effort” to help stabilise the private sector, and urged Bahamian companies falling into financial difficulties to immediately communicate with their bankers/debt financiers to try and work out an interim solution. He also urged the banks to “provide a lifeline” to floundering clients deserving of such treatment. Commenting on the Central Bank of the Bahamas’ report on monthly economic and financial developments for May, which found that commercial loans more than 30 days past due accounted for 19.83 per cent of the banking sector’s total portfolio, Mr Rolle told Tribune Business: “We were very concerned. “Everybody is feeling the pinch, and we’re going to continue to see this until the econ omy turns around. My biggest concern is that we don’t have an extraordinary number of casualties resulting from this. Worries over ‘extraordinary number of casualties’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas spent more than $1.1 billion on oil and fuelrelated imports in 2008 as global prices soared to a $147 per barrel all-time high, Central Bank of the Bahamas data has revealed, an amount equivalent to 15.3 per cent of this nation’s Gross Domestic Product ( GDP). The Central Bank’s quarterly statistical digest for May 2009 showed that the total value of oil imported into the Bahamas increased by 37.5 per cent yearover-year, rising from $802.067 million in 2007 to $1.103 billion last year a more than $300 million increase. The $1.103 billion figure is more than double the $523.952 million figure that the Bahamas paid for its oil and fuel-related imports as recently as 2005. The 2008 third quarter was the most expensive three-month period in this nation’s oil importing history, with the peak in global oil prices forcing this nation to spend $333.76 million a 59.6 per cent increase upon the comparative period in 2007. This nation’s heavy oil depen dency, both for electrical power generation and to fuel is gazguzzling car economy, imposes a heavy burden on the foreign exchange reserves and current outflows, especially when global oil prices are at their peak. The Central Bank’s data again makes a compelling eco nomic case for the Bahamas to tap new forms of electrical energy generation, especially renewable sources, to reduce the pressure on foreign exchange reserves to finance oil imports. The Bahamas has been lucky to date that global oil prices fell back to around $50 per barrel, but they are on the rise again. The oil price decline has helped to insulate the Bahamian foreign exchange reserves against the pressures from a decline in foreign currency inflows as a result of the drop in tourism and foreign direct investment. But if oil prices rise again, the foreign reserves would likely come under extreme pressure because they are not being restocked. Elsewhere, the Central Bahamas oil imports cost $1.1bn in Some 27,300 consumer loans, worth a collective $160m, in default S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B * Once Securities Commission, Registrar of I nsurance and Compliance Commission a Bahamas Financial Services A uthority, Central Bank will follow in second phase * Minister says timeline absolutely achievable’ * Bahamas needs to ‘get it right’, as ‘not a lot o f room for error’ n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Government is hoping to complete the consolidation of three regulators into a Bahamas Financial Services Authority by year-end, Tribune Business was told yesterday, with the second and final phase eventually involving the merging of the Central Bank’s Bank Supervision Department into this entity to create a solitary ‘super regulator’. Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, explained that the Government was taking a staged approach to financial services regulatory consolidation to ensure “everything was working on all cylinders” after the first phase was completed, as the Bahamas did “not have a lot of room for error”. The first phase involves the consolidation of the Securities Year-end target for first phase finance regulator consolidation S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B Airline fearing six figure fee increase Sky Bahamas chief: ‘You’re talking about more money in fees and taxes than the actual cost of the ticket’

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THE Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants (BICA has formally signed up to a regional accounting practice monitoring programme, some thing it believes “will signifi cantly improve auditing proce d ures and quality assurance r eview systems in the Bahamas”. The contract to implement the programme in the Bahamas was signed by BICA’s president, Daniel Ferguson, on June 26 during the official opening ceremony of the 27th Annual Caribbean Conference of Accountants in Guyana. The Bahamas and the Eastern Caribbean will now join Guyana, Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago in implementing a monitoring review process for accounting practitioners and audit firms within their respective territories. “The implementation of the regional practice monitoringp rogramme will not only signifi cantly improve quality assurance in the auditing procedure in the Bahamas, but it will also elevate the standard of the Bahamian accounting professionals to be on par with global standards. This will significant ly enhance the accountancy profession in the Bahamas," said Mr Ferguson. The practice monitoring programme is designed to place the Bahamas and the Caribbean on the same level as accountants in the UK, US and Canada, who have already implement-ed such initiatives. Under the Caribbean region al monitoring programme, prac titioners and firms within the B ahamas and other participati ng territories will be monitored to ensure audit reports and audit procedures are in compliance with international stan dards and other internationally recognised rules. The monitoring visits will be carried out by the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA 15 years experience and expertise in the monitoring of its members worldwide. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE SCORING a goal in soccer is like getting a hole in one on the golf course. Soccer players run countless miles before they score a goal, and often games end with neither side scoring a goal. Soccer players train daily, perform countless drills, and experience numerous injuries. However, they never quit or give up. Why? Because scoringa goal is one of the greatest feelings. Achieving a goal you have been working for so long is one of the most rewarding, satisfying feelings. So why is it that so many of us do not set goals and wonder why we don’t score them? I believe it is because most of us think goal setting is too much work and we don’t have the time. Here are a few tips to score goals. Short, sweet and to the point. Who wants to sit down for hours and map out a plan for the next five or 10 years? S S h h o o r r t t T T e e r r m m G G o o a a l l s s Not all goals have to be workrelated. Mix personal goals and work goals together. The payoff is almost instant. However, they are life changing. Short-term goals give you momentum, and when you achieve one it is rewarding. So hopefully you want more. G G e e t t A A C C a a l l e e n n d d a a r r Pick a short-term goal. Start with tomorrow or next week. This will get you in the mix right away, and short-term goals are easier to visualise. Because of their short-term nature they encourage you to set realistic, easy-to-accomplish goals. Of course, you can look a month, three or six months out if you wish. But the further you look, the farther away these goals are. We like low hanging fruit, right? S S t t a a r r t t S S m m a a l l l l Try not to write a 10-page list. Start with two or three small goals, such as: ‘This week, I will lose two pounds and visit at least two prospects.’ Instead, most of us start with: ‘I need to lose 20 pounds and visit 20 prospects.’ Instantly, you can tell the difference, right? Short and tangible is the way to go. Otherwise, you become and feel overwhelmed. E E x x t t e e n n d d I I f f N N e e c c e e s s s s a a r r y y Go easy on yourself. If you don’t achieve the goal in the initial time set out, extend it another week or month, and just keep it close to you. Establishing a pattern is what is important... U U s s e e P P e e n n a a n n d d P P a a p p e e r r Write down your goals and review them daily. Take five minutes a day and read over your goals. Add notes if necessary. You will be surprised how other goals will pop into your mind. Once a week, rewrite your list. Change the order of your goals if you wish. Delete some if you want, but the important objective is to develop a pattern and stay consistent. Once you score a goal, you will feel like scoring another. Momentum will keep you focused and that good feeling will keep you motivated. A A c c t t i i o o n n Finally. next to each goal write down one or two actions that will help you score your goal... Start today and do this tomorrow and the next day, and before you realise it you’re running around your office pealing your shirt off, like the soccer players do on the field after scoring a goal. (Please don’t tell your boss I recommended that you do that.) Simply put, it works if you work it. No change, no change!!!! All of these marketing strategies are certain to keep your business on top during these challenging economic times. Have a productive and profitable week! Remember, “THOSE WHO MARKET WILL MAKE IT.” N N B B : : S S c c o o t t t t F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n i i s s p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t o o f f S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e , , a a p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l a a n n d d m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g c c o o m m p p a a n n y y s s p p e e c c i i a a l l i i s s i i n n g g i i n n p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l p p r r o o d d u u c c t t s s . . E E s s t t a a b b l l i i s s h h e e d d o o v v e e r r 2 2 7 7 y y e e a a r r s s a a g g o o , , S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e h h a a s s a a s s s s i i s s t t e e d d B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s e e s s i i n n v v a a r r i i o o u u s s i i n n d d u u s s t t r r i i e e s s , , r r a a n n g g i i n n g g f f r r o o m m t t o o u u r r i i s s m m a a n n d d b b a a n n k k i i n n g g t t o o t t e e l l e e c c o o m m m m u u n n i i c c a a t t i i o o n n s s , , i i n n m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g t t h h e e m m s s e e l l v v e e s s . . R R e e a a d d e e r r s s c c a a n n c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M r r F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n a a t t S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e o o n n E E a a s s t t S S h h i i r r l l e e y y S S t t r r e e e e t t , , b b y y e e m m a a i i l l a a t t H H Y Y P P E E R R L L I I N N K K s s c c o o t t t t @ @ s s u u n n t t e e e e . . c c o o m m o o r r b b y y t t e e l l e e p p h h o o n n e e a a t t 2 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 3 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 4 4 . . Setting goals you can score Promotional M arketing by Scott Farrington Worries over ‘extraordinary number of casualties’ We will begin to see some of that.” Mr Rolle added that the recession’s impact was begin ning to show itself in the Chamber’s own membership renewals, although the organisation had yet to determine which non-renewals were linked to the recession, and others that were simply late. “There are some companies that have gone out of business, there are some companies that cannot sustain any fees not related to their core operating expenses,” the Chamber president explained. “People are trying to manage cash flow and are treading water.” Adding that the current economic circumstances “reinforce the need for businesses to plan what they do”, Mr Rolle said: “Businesses have an obligation to communicate with their bankers. If you’re in trouble, and see early signs of trouble and there are early warning alarms the first entity you talk to should be the person funding you.” On the other side of the coin, Mr Rolle said it was in the banks’ best interests to provide struggling commercial and cor porate clients with “a lifeline” where they could, as a low per forming loan was better than a non-performing one. He also urged the banking sector to avoid putting any undue pressure on their business clients, and instead work with them to allow “people to get back on their feet and do business without pressure from the bank”. However, Mr Rolle added that he was “not surprised at all” by the almost 20 per cent commercial loan arrears rate identified by the Central Bank. This was chiefly because “small businesses operate on very tight financial constraints anyway. Many of them operate on a very tight overdraft, especially new businesses. They operate on very stringent terms in that regard, and as soon as pressure builds they’re among the first to become casualties. “The best we can do is find a universal solution to this problem. Commercial bankers need to develop a framework, an environment for communication, and all stakeholders need to be involved in that process. Everyone has to be involved.” In its report, the Central Bank found that total non-per forming loans rose to 7.7 per cent or $468.2 million of the commercial banking sector’s total outstanding portfolio. This figure increased by 4 per cent or $18.2 million in May. The total number of loans in arrears by at least one month increased by $6.1 million or 0.7 per cent in May, reaching a total of $847.3 million. Total loans in arrears increased to 13.98 per cent as a percentage of total loans, although the proportion of delinquent loans those between 31 to 90 days past due declined by $12 million or 3.73 per cent to $373.3 million. The Central Bank said: “The increase in the arrears rate was attributed to a worsening in the consumer loans and residential mortgages portfolios, by 58 basis points and 2 basis points, to 12.45 per cent and 13 per cent, respectively. “In contrast, the commercial arrears rate receded to 19.83 per cent in May, from 20.61 per cent in April. In response to these developments, banks aug mented loan loss provisions by $3 million, boosting the ratio of provisions to total arrears by 18 basis points to 23.44 per cent. “This corresponded to new loan provisions of $10 million, partly offset by a $6.9 million net write-off against loans provisioned for earlier. However, as the growth in non-performing loans outpaced the increase in provisions, the ratio of total provisions to non-performing loans fell by 5 basis points to 42.43 per cent.” F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Bahamian accountants sign up to monitoring SHOWN (l-r tants, Daniel Ferguson; Sha Ali Khan, director of practice monitoring professional standards at ACCA; Institute of Chartered Accountants of the Caribbean (ICAC and Frank Myers, president of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of the Eastern Caribbean.

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net DISCOVERY Cruise Lines, the single largest contributor to hotel room nights on Grand Bahama, is positioned to maintain that title with its introduction of an island-inclusive package linked to the Ministry of Tourism’s ‘Club Grand Bahama’ promotion. The cruise line sails out of Port Everglades en route to Grand Bahama six times per week. Deputy director of the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, David Johnson, said Discovery brought 170,000 visitors to Grand Bahama last year and acts as a ferry service for Grand Bahamians. The Club Grand Bahama promotion was designed to make the entire island of Grand Bahama an all-inclusive package. What Discovery Cruise Line is able to offer its guests through the Club Grand Bahama promotion is a two to seven-night stay on Grand Bahama, with the purchaser’s choice of hotels, activities, attractions and restaurants, depending on which tier Silver, Gold or Platinum is chosen. The packages start at $269.99 and include transportation to the island. According to Discovery’s website, guests who purchase the Club Grand Bahama packages will be “greeted with round-trip harbour transfers to the hotel or resort of your choice”. Guests are then able to choose from more than 50 sports and recreational activities, including golf, scuba diving, fishing and adventure activities. With the silver package, visitors can choose from five breakfast locations, four dinner locations and four attractions. At the Gold level, visitors have seven breakfast options, 11 dinner options, and over 25 attractions to choose from. Platinum package holders have slightly more dinner options. Hotel options include the Flamingo Bay Resort, Reef Our Lucaya Resort, Pelican Bay Resort and Radisson Our Lucaya. “To suit your budget, Club Grand Bahama packages have been divided into Silver, Gold or Platinum levels, with the number of activities and dining options increasing exponentially with each level. “You receive a Club Grand Bahama Card that will be activated at check-in and swiped for meals and activities throughout the vacation,” said the company’s website. The Ministry of Tourism has moved to get more suppliers like Discovery to offer the Club Grand Bahama Package, a programme the Ministry had pledged since the beginning of the year to roll out. And the Grand Bahama economy, with its steady decline, was in much need of a dynamic plan for a turn around. Mr Johnson said Discovery Cruise Lines has been a tremendous contributor to the Grand Bahama economy and continues to be the leader visitor access route to the island. G iven that Sky Bahamas o perated 33-seater aircraft, which weighed more than 28,000 pounds, Mr Butler said the company’s planes would bein the highest fee category. It had been looking at adding oth er planes to its fleet, and Mr Butler said: “We’re looking right now at in excess of $150,000 [in fees] on the fleet.” While acknowledging that there needed to be an increase in Civil Aviation fees, Mr Butlersaid the Department and the Government needed to take a “graduated” approach and raise them over time, not in one go and especially at a time when the industry was being impactedby a global recession. Questioning the timing of the move to implement the fee increases that were approved, but never implemented, in 2005, Mr Butler said Sky Bahamas and others in the industry “need to sit down and talk” with Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation. “There needs to be a fee increase, but it should be a grad uated increase and shouldn’t happen without the input of the industry,” Mr Butler told Tribune Business. “We’re trying to find out what is the objective, the goal of doing it at this time. It’s been four years since they were approved. “We don’t understand what the Government is doing right here. All these taxes, all these fee increases, you have to pass iton to the passenger. You’re talking about more money in fees and taxes than the actual cost of the ticket. The Govern ment now is going to put a large, undue burden on everyone to travel. Maybe they’re telling everyone to travel by boat.” He added that some Bahamian private airline and charter operators were wondering if the Civil Aviation fee increases was simply a move to protect Bahamasair by reducing their competitiveness, and even “putting some of us out of business”. Aviation The increased Civil Aviation fees contrasted sharply with the incentives and tax breaks giv en to foreign companies, such as the cruise line and foreign air carriers. Instead, the tax burden appeared to be falling squarely on Bahamian private operators and charter firms. The increased fees also contrast with Mr Vanderpool-Wal lace’s stated determination to get the cost of access to the Bahamian tourism product, namely air fare and airlift costs, down. The fee rises are likely to achieve the opposite when it comes to Family Island air transportation. Mr Butler added that while the Government had said it was going to use the revenues from the fee increases to improve air transportation, it had yet to state what specific aspects would be improved. He said Bahamian private airlines currently paid “for services you don’t get”, namely security and sterile areas free from the travelling public and their guests at Family Island airports. Questions were also asked about whether the fee rises were necessary given the proposed $50 million Inter-American Development Bank (IDB financed project to reform civil aviation in the Bahamas. Mr Butler said most Bahami an private airlines were suffering from reduced passenger loads, but had been able to survive as a result of the weekend boosts they received from Bahamians flying home for homecomings and regattas. He lamented the absence of a strategic plan for the sector. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 3B THE Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants (BICA ident has been elected as secretary for the Institute of Chartered Accountants of the Caribbean (ICAC Mr Ferguson, managing partner of Daniel H. Ferguson & Asso ciates Chartered Accountants, was first appointed to the ICAC Board in June 2006. Harryram Parmesar was elected president, with Jon Braithwaite becoming vice-president. Prunella Vassell was elected as treasurer. Pictured on the right is the newly-elected president of ICAC, Harryram Parmesar (second from left From L to R are Prunella Vassell, treasurer; Joan Brathwaite, vice-president; and Daniel Ferguson, secretary Bahamian accounts chief is now regional body’s secretary Cruise line joins Grand Bahama all-inclusive deal Airline fearing six figure fee increase F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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imposed stringent requirements relating to areas such as the bid ding and tendering processes for such projects, something that Mr Laing said created challenges because the Bahamas’ stipulations in the same area were different. “In particular, the projects that have had the difficulties have been projects that have been required to be executedt hrough the Ministry of Works,” M r Laing told Tribune Busi ness. “That Ministry is challenged as it is in terms of the multitude of the projects it has to execute. Very little projects, and these [EU financed] ones could bev ery small projects, get caught up in the rush. They are not as driven as they need to be. “The effort of late to get by that by using private entities to do initial estimates for these projects has not been as effective either.” Mr Laing added that the EU’s “stringent requirements” were another reason for the delays in implementing grantfunded projects, adding that they were often not in line with the stipulations of the Bahamas and other Caribbean countries. “I’ve attended a number of meetings at which discussions have been held over the execution of EU projects, and we’vec onsidered many complaints from countries about the demands, conditions and stipu lations [of the EU] creating a slower processing efficiency,” Mr Laing said. The talks had then focused on “reforming the process to create more efficiency” through the Bahamas and Caribbean states taking on ‘ownership’ of the projects, with the responsi bility to get them executed. The EU's 2008-2013 Country Strategy Paper for the Bahamas, a copy of which has been obtained by Tribune Business despite it never being made public, found that 6.83 million Euros made available to the Bahamas in the last funding round known as the ninth European Development Fund (EDF goal to 'build capacity' in the Family Islands. Finding that the Bahamas had been "very slow" in com mitting these funds to agreed projects, with a "protracted process" in setting up technical help, the Strategy Paper said: "Unfortunately, implementa tion of the ninth EDF has expe rienced significant delays... "This is at least in part due to lack of communication on project implementation issues. The intervention framework had not been updated by the e nd of 2004, and no output or o utcome sector-wide indicators were made available. "The Mid-Term Review concluded that the Bahamas was a very low performer in terms of implementation of EU assis tance, and that a reduction of the overall allocation could be contemplated at the End-ofTerm Review if things did not improve." T ribune Business previously reported that risking a cut in EDF financing would be sheer folly for the Bahamas, given that it is the only grant funding this nation can access. This is largely due to it being viewed by many as a relatively developed nation with high living stan dards. Grant funding is financing without any repayment or inter est rates attached, making it especially valuable to the Bahamas given the expanding fiscal deficits and national debt due to weakness in the public finances. However, Mr Laing told Tri bune Business yesterday that the EU “is not the only grant funding that is out there”. He added: “The Bahamas has not been aggressive in seeking to take advantage of grant fund ing, because we have sought to carry our weight for the most part. Other countries, where the need is greater, have been more aggressive in seeking grant funding.” While the Bahamas had sought to finance its infrastructure and capital works needs through its “own internal resources”, Mr Laing said thisd id not mean the Government would refuse grant funding if it provided access to items such as essential technical expertise. He added, though, that the Bahamas would not be “more aggressive” in seeking grant funding as a result of the recession and its impact on the pub lic finances. “In the Bahamas, we want to manage our affairs sensibly. To the extent funds are available, we will be as efficient as we can in utilizing those funds,” Mr Laing said. “I don’t think we’ve come to a phase where circumstances dictate that we have to rush out with great aggression for every funding available.” The minister added that the projects to be included in the EU’s 10th EDF still had not been decided. He added that while the Bahamas had to provide counterpart financing of its own for these projects, it was often for as little as 25 per cent of what the EU provided. A global look at economic developments C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By ERNEST SCHEYDER AP Energy Writer NEW YORK (AP prices fell for the fifth straight day Tuesday, with a barrel costing $10 less than it did just one week ago when crude hit a new high for the year. Benchmark crude for August delivery fell $1.27 to $62.78 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Oil prices had already begun to slide after peaking last Tuesday, and dismal jobs numbers last week from both the US and Europe only exacerbated the fall. The unemployment data dampened optimism about a quick economic recovery, raising new doubts about the global appetite for energy. “This is a market that is looking for a reason to go back up a nd it just isn’t getting it, so it c ontinues to fade away,” Alaron T rading Corp. analyst Phil Flynn said. For months a weak dollar has brought more investment money into the market even though storage levels for energy products like crude and gasoline are very high. Stockpiles of gasoline have increased steadily for the past four weeks even though the country is in the midst of the heavy driving season, which includes the July Fourth holiday weekend. Data coming from the Department of Energy on Wednesday is expected to show that trend only continuing. The department said Tues day it expects consumption of liquid petroleum products to contract by about 3.3 per cent this year. Crude prices will likely average about $70 per barrel for the rest of the year, and the average retail gasoline price likely will float around $2.36 per gallon, the department said. Oil prices have doubled since the beginning of the year and on Tuesday, federal regulators said they would examine whether the government should impose limits on the number of futures contracts in oil and other energy commodities held by speculative traders. In other Nymex trading, gaso line for August delivery fell 1.76 cents to $1.7228 a gallon and heating oil dropped 2.9 cents to $1.5978. Natural gas for August delivery rose less than a penny to $3.488 per 1,000 cubic feet. In London, Brent prices shed 95 cents to $63.10 a barrel on the ICE Futures exchange. Associated Press writers Alex Kennedy and George Jahn in Vienna contributed to this report from Singapore Crude prices fall below $63 in extended sell-off n B y The Associated Press A LOOK at economic developments and stock market activity around the world Tuesday: G G e e r r m m a a n n i i n n d d u u s s t t r r i i a a l l o o r r d d e e r r s s i i n n c c r r e e a a s s e e b b y y 4 4 . . 4 4 % % i i n n M M a a y y o o v v e e r r p p r r e e v v i i o o u u s s m m o o n n t t h h BERLIN German industrial orders increased by a healthy 4.4 per cent in May over the previous month, with demand from outside Europe rising the most strongly, government figures showed. The strong performance followed a minimal 0.1 per cent increase in April and adds to other indications that the outlook for Germany’s export-dependent economy Europe’s biggest is becoming rosier. Recent surveys have shown rising business and consumer confidence. In European markets, the FTSE 100 index of leading British shares closed down 0.2 per cent at 4,187 while Germany’s DAX fell 53.63 points, or 1.2 per cent, to 4,598.19. The CAC-40 in France was 33.59 points lower, or 1.1 per cent, at 3,048.57. E E U U n n a a t t i i o o n n s s w w a a n n t t t t o o p p u u b b l l i i s s h h c c o o n n f f i i d d e e n n t t i i a a l l s s t t r r e e s s s s t t e e s s t t s s B RUSSELS Some European U nion nations want to publish confidential stress tests that assess how well European banks could cope with a worse economic climate, the top EU economy official said. Separately, European Union nations partly blamed the financial crisis on the way bankers and traders are paid and called for new rules to link performance to pay. Finance ministers said in a joint statement that “inappropriate incentives, short-termism and inadequate capture of risk” had allowed banks to take on massive risks that have forced them to p ut aside billions of euros in the past year to cover potential losses. Meanwhile, the EU gave Poland, Hungary, Romania, Latvia and Lithuania twoand three-year deadlines to curb their budget deficits, which have been swollen by the world financial crisis and its fallout in Eastern Europe. C C h h i i n n a a s s e e c c o o n n o o m m y y i i m m p p r r o o v v i i n n g g BEIJING China’s economy is improving and growth might have topped 7.5 per cent for the quarter that ended in June, a central bank researcher said in an official journal. Growth is benefiting from Beijing’s stimulus spending and rising investment and consumption, said Zhang Jianhua, chief of the bank’s research bureau, in an article in the July issue of the bank’s magazine, China Finance. The government is due to report quarterly economic data next week. The economy expanded by 6.1 per cent in the January-to-March quarter from a year earlier. In Asian markets, Japan’s Nikkei 225 stock average fell for the fifth straight day, closing down 0.3 per cent at 9,647.79. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng shed 0.7 per cent to 17,862.27, while South K orea’s Kospi rose 0.4 per cent to 1 ,434.20. China’s Shanghai fell 1.1 per c ent. Australia’s market retreated 0.4 per cent but Singapore ended almost flat. B B u u s s i i n n e e s s s s g g r r o o u u p p s s a a y y s s w w o o r r s s t t o o f f B B r r i i t t a a i i n n s s r r e e c c e e s s s s i i o o n n o o v v e e r r LONDON A business group said the worst of Britain’s recession is over, but the Bank of England should still print more money because recovery is not assured. A separate report showed that manufacturing output fell 1.2 per cent in March through May from the previous t hree months, however, casting doubt over the sector’s recovery. Output is 12.3 per cent lower than a year earlier. I I n n d d i i a a n n b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s l l e e a a d d e e r r s s p p r r a a i i s s e e g g o o v v e e r r n n m m e e n n t t s s n n e e w w b b u u d d g g e e t t NEW DELHI Despite initial investor disappointment, Indian business leaders praised the government’s new budget as spurring growth by spending money on developing roads and other infrastructure, especially in poor rural areas. The budget, presented Monday by Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee, will boost total spending 36 per cent to 10.3 trillion rupees ($213 billion now and March 2010. S S i i n n g g a a p p o o r r e e s s f f i i n n a a n n c c e e m m i i n n i i s s t t e e r r w w a a r r n n s s A A s s i i a a t t o o e e x x p p e e c c t t l l o o w w e e r r e e c c o o n n o o m m i i c c g g r r o o w w t t h h f f o o r r y y e e a a r r s s t t o o c c o o m m e e SINGAPORE Singapore’s finance minister warned Asia to expect lower economic growth for years to come as a weakened US consumer buys less of the region’s exports. Gross domestic product expansion in Asia will likely fall to an average 6.5 per cent over the next few years from nine p er cent during the 2002 to 2007 period, F inance Minister Tharman Shanmu g aratnam said. Singapore, along with other exportdependent countries such as South Korea, Taiwan and Hong Kong, has been especially hard hit by the global recession and collapse in consumer demand from the US and Europe. A A u u s s t t r r a a l l i i a a s s c c e e n n t t r r a a l l b b a a n n k k l l e e a a v v e e s s k k e e y y i i n n t t e e r r e e s s t t r r a a t t e e u u n n c c h h a a n n g g e e d d o o r r t t h h i i r r d d m m o o n n t t h h a a t t 3 3 % % SYDNEY Australia’s central bank left its key interest rate unchanged for the third month at three per cent, citing a stabilizing global situation and stronger-than-expected domestic economy. The Reserve Bank of Australia has kept rates at the current level their lowest in 49 years since April but said in a statement there is room for further cuts this year if necessary. Conditions in global financial markets are improving and action to strengthen balance sheets of key financial institutions is under way, RBA chief Glenn Stevens said in the statement. T T h h e e P P h h i i l l i i p p p p i i n n e e s s i i n n f f l l a a t t i i o o n n d d r r o o p p s s t t o o l l o o w w e e s s t t r r a a t t e e i i n n 2 2 2 2 y y e e a a r r s s MANILA, Philippines The Philippines’ inflation rate dropped to 1.5 per cent in June the lowest in 22 years as prices of commodities, particularly fuel and utilities, continued to fall, the government said. Last month’s rate, down from 3.3 per cent in May, was the lowest since April 1987. A year ago, the country posted an 11.4 per cent inflation rate. P P o o p p e e c c a a l l l l s s f f o o r r n n e e w w w w o o r r l l d d f f i i n n a a n n c c i i a a l l o o r r d d e e r r VATICAN CITY Pope Benedict XVI called for a new world financial o rder guided by ethics, dignity and the s earch for the common good in the third e ncyclical of his pontificate. In “Charity in Truth,” Benedict denounced the profit-at-all-cost mentality of the globalized economy and lamented that greed had brought about the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. The document, in the works for two years and repeatedly delayed to incorporate the fallout from the crisis, was released one day before leaders of the Group of Eight industrialized nations meet to coordinate efforts to deal with the global meltdown. Minister: Bahamas not been ‘effective’ on grant financed project execution F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Bank’s quarterly statistical digest showed that as at endMarch 2009, some 27,300 con sumer loans worth a collective $160.245 million were past due, meaning they were either in arrears or non-performing. However, only 9.6 per cent of total consumer loans of 283,615 were in default. And, measured by worth, only 7.2 per cent of total consumer loans worth $2.212 billion were in that status. Bahamas oil imports cost $1.1bn in Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. Year-end target for first phase finance regulator consolidation Commission, Compliance Commission and Registrar of Insur ance’s Office which are already occupying the same building, Charlotte House on Shirley Street into the sole Bahamas Financial Services Authority, via a Bahamas Financial Services Act. The new Authority will have a chief executive, who will replace the heads of the three existing reg ulators, merging their roles into his own. “We had hoped that we would have this process completed by year-end,” Mr Laing told Tribune Business, “which is the first phase of the consolida tion which we propose to do.” He described this goal as “absolutely achievable”, given that the three regulators involved were already in the same building. “The hard work has been done,” Mr Laing said. With new legislation in the form of the Domestic and External Insurance Acts; the reformed Securities Industry Act and its regulations; and responsibility for the Financial and Corporate Services Providers Act being handed to the Securities Commission all either having been passed, in the process of being implemented, under consultation or in effect. The minister said all that remained to be done was to consolidate their provisions under the sole Bahamas Financial Services Act. Mr Laing added: “In the first phase, we will consolidate everyone bar the Central Bank. Then we will move to the sec ond phase, and the goal of the single regulator. We’re taking on step at a time.” This will mean that, temporarily at least, the Bahamas will have a ‘twin peaks’ regula tory model, with the Central Bank’s Bank Supervision Department as a standalone regulator for the banking and trust company sector, and the Financial Services Authority responsible for everything else. Mr Laing, though, said con solidation of the Banking Supervision Department into the Bahamas Financial Services Authority would be the second and final phase of the Government’s strategy to create a ‘super regulator’. He explained that the overlaps between regulators, partic ularly the Central Bank and Securities Commission in the areas of banking and securities, needed to be examined first. “We want to make sure everything is working on all cylinders on that side before we take it to the next level,” Mr Laing said of first phase con solidation. “Ultimately, we want to produce a level of efficiency and effectiveness that makes it eas ier for clients to have a more productive time in doing busi ness in our jurisdiction. We want to get it right. The environment in which we are operating does not have a lot of room for error.” The minister unveiled, via some broad brush strokes, the Government’s strategy for financial services regulation and growing the industry’s private sector at a closed-door Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB senior sector representatives on Monday. He is understood to be meeting with a BFSB steer ing committee today to put more flesh, or meat, on the bones of the Government’s plans. The Government is looking to build on the Bahamas’ private wealth management pri vate banking, trusts and estate planning base to expand the industry, hoping to encourage high net worth and ultra highnet worth clients to follow their assets to the Bahamas by becoming residents here. That would lead into private trust companies, family offices and those individuals possibly bringing their businesses to the Bahamas and investing in its economy. This trend would also tie into yacht and aircraft registries, something the Bahamas is trying to develop, and boost the real estate and construction industries. Other aspects of the Government’s strategy also aim to establish the Bahamas as a centre through which investment could be channelled into Latin America and other emerging economies in the region. Zhivargo Laing F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 25

n By PAN PYLAS AP Business Writer LONDON (AP stock markets fell Tuesday with Japan’s Nikkei index dropping for the fifth day running amid mounting concerns that the upcoming US second-quarter earnings will disappoint. In Europe, the FTSE 100 index of leading British shares closed down 7.91 points, or 0.2 per cent, at 4,187 while Germany’s DAX fell 53.63 points, or 1.2 per cent, to 4,598.19. The CAC-40 in France was 33.59 points, or 1.1 per cent, lower at 3,048.57. On Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrial average was down 86.30 points, or one per cent, at 8,238.57 around midday New York time while the broader Standard & Poor’s 500 i ndex fell 8.42 points, or 0.9 per c ent, to 890.30. T he start of the second-quarter earnings reporting season will provide clues about whether companies have already seen the worst of the recession or whether they are s till struggling in the first sync hronized global economic downturn since the Second World War. “The worry is that the quarterly results are going to demonstrate that stock markets have got ahead of the economic recovery and may well lead some investors to feel that shares do not represent value at current levels,” said Philip Gillet, a sales trader at IG Index. “This all starts in earnest on Wednesday, when Dow component Alcoa reveals its figures, and market reaction could well set the tone for the next few weeks,” he added. Equities rose from the middle of March until the start of June on hopes that the US economy in particular will recover from recession sooner than anticipated. The S&P 500 index in the US rose around 15 per cent during the second quarter, its best performance since 1998, a mid hopes of a global recovery d espite worries about the banking system, public finances and the length and depth of the recession. But disappointing economic news over the last few weeks, culminating in last Thursday’s worse than expected US jobs report for June, has altered the general mood prevailing among investors that a significant rebound in the US was a distinct possibility. Since its peak in early June, the S&P has d ropped around six per cent. Given the strong performance of stocks relative to March lows, a reality check from earnings could be detrimental to risk appetite,” said Gareth Berry, an analyst at UBS. Oil prices continued to fall amid the global economic uncertainty, with benchmark crude for August delivery down $1.03 at $63.02 a barrel. On Monday, the benchmark contract slid $2.68 to settle at $ 64.05. E arlier, Asian stocks were weighed down by waning investor optimism about the global economic recovery ahead of this week’s meeting of the Group of Eight leaders in Italy. Japan’s Nikkei 225 stock average fell for the fifth straight day, closing down 33.08 points, or 0.3 per cent, at 9,647.79. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng shed 117.14, or 0.7 per cent, to 17,862.27, while South Korea’s Kospi rose 0.4 per cent to 1 ,434.20. China’s Shanghai fell 1 .1 per cent. Australia’s market retreated 0.4 per cent but Singapore trimmed gains to be almost flat. The dollar was down 0.1 per cent at 95.11 yen while the euro was steady at $1.3975. AP Business Writer Stephen Wright in Bangkok contributed to this report C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 5B World markets fall ahead of US earnings season To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 502-2371 today!

PAGE 26

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 73F/23C Low: 77F/25C Low: 76 F/24C Low: 78 F/26 Low: 79 F/26C Low: 80 F/27C Low: 82F/28C Low: 80 F/27 High: 90F/32C High: 89F/32C High: 91F/33C High: 90F/32C High: 90F/32C High: 88F/31C High: 92F/33C Low: 83F/28C High: 88F/31C Low: 81 F/27C High: 95F/35C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74 F/23C High: 93F/34C Low: 80F/27C High: 91 F/33C Low: 76F/24C High: 89F/32C Low: 77 F/25 High: 93F/34C Low: 78 F/26C High: 96F/36C Low: 77 F/25C High: 94 F/34C Low: 75F/24C High: 93F/34C Low: 77 F/25 High: 95F/35C Low: 82F/28C High: 96 F/36C High: 90 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 8 2009, PAGE 7B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny with a stray t-storm. P artly cloudy.Partly sunny.Partly sunny. Partly sunny with a shower possible. High: 92 Low: 82 High: 92 High: 90 High: 89 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 80 Low: 81 Low: 80 AccuWeather RealFeel 1 18F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 95F 117-88F 101-89F 103-83F 9 6-83F Low: 79 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................82F/28C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high ..................................91F/33C Last year's low ..................................80F/26C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.19" Year to date ................................................18.50" Normal year to date ....................................19.86" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UNAND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full Jul. 15 Jul. 21Jul. 28Aug. 5 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:26 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:03 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 9:07 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 7:24 a.m. Today Thursday Friday S aturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 9:12 a.m.2.43:12 a.m.0.2 9:34 p.m.2.83:08 p.m.0.2 9 :50 a.m.2.43:48 a.m.0.1 1 0:09 p.m.2.73:48 p.m.0.2 10:26 a.m.2.44:23 a.m.0.1 10:43 p.m.2.64:27 p.m.0.3 11:03 a.m.2.54:57 a.m.0.2 11:19 p.m.2.65:08 p.m.0.3 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3277/25pc89/3176/24pc Amsterdam66/1853/11r63/1754/12shA nkara, Turkey86/3057/13pc91/3257/13s Athens93/3376/24s95/3573/22s Auckland56/1344/6sh55/1242/5s Bangkok89/3179/26r90/3279/26shB arbados85/2977/25pc86/3077/25sh Barcelona71/2164/17pc71/2165/18sh Beijing90/3272/22c91/3271/21c Beirut80/2677/25s81/2777/25s Belgrade 8 9/3162/16r79/2659/15pc B erlin 6 8/2056/13r67/1952/11r Bermuda80/2675/23sh82/2773/22pc Bogota64/1746/7sh64/1742/5sh Brussels64/1748/8r69/2046/7shB udapest79/2657/13sh81/2757/13s Buenos Aires54/1237/2pc55/1243/6s Cairo99/3773/22s100/3774/23s Calcutta94/3484/28sh94/3484/28t Calgary60/1544/6t54/1242/5t Cancun88/3173/22t88/3176/24t Caracas82/2771/21t80/2671/21t Casablanca78/2563/17s81/2764/17s Copenhagen 69/2059/15sh71/2155/12sh Dublin63/1746/7pc61/1648/8c Frankfurt 66/18 52/11 r67/1950/10r Geneva 69/20 54/12 r70/2152/11c Halifax62/1648/8sh68/2054/12c Havana88/3173/22t92/3375/23t Helsinki72/2263/17c68/2057/13r Hong Kong 91/3281/27pc90/3281/27pc Islamabad112/4483/28s110/4384/28pc Istanbul91/3275/23s95/3577/25s Jerusalem 83/28 61/16s84/2863/17s Johannesburg58/1440/4s61/1641/5s Kingston91/3279/26s89/3179/26sh Lima72/2260/15s72/2259/15pc London68/2052/11pc68/2050/10pc Madrid90/3261/16pc90/3261/16pc Manila 88/31 77/25 t85/2977/25r Mexico City 79/26 55/12t76/2457/13t Monterrey 104/4077/25s106/4177/25s Montreal68/2059/15sh77/2563/17pc Moscow75/2357/13pc69/2064/17r Munich 67/19 52/11 c65/1846/7sh Nairobi 74/23 54/12c76/2453/11c New Delhi104/4088/31s102/3888/31s Oslo68/2057/13sh63/1758/14r Paris 72/2254/12sh73/2256/13pc Prague71/2154/12sh72/2251/10sh Rio de Janeiro 80/2669/20s82/2769/20pc Riyadh101/3878/25s102/3880/26s Rome 82/27 59/15 s82/2759/15s St. Thomas89/3179/26sh89/3179/26sh San Juan57/1328/-2pc64/1732/0s San Salvador86/3068/20t85/2974/23t Santiago61/1634/1pc59/1536/2pc Santo Domingo 90/32 73/22 pc86/3073/22sh Sao Paulo 74/2359/15pc70/2157/13c Seoul86/3070/21pc88/3170/21r Stockholm72/2259/15sh68/2059/15r Sydney61/1643/6pc61/1648/8shT aipei 93/33 78/25pc93/3379/26pc T okyo82/2772/22pc81/2772/22sh Toronto73/2258/14pc78/2561/16pc T rinidad 86/3068/20t85/2969/20t Vancouver67/1955/12c70/2156/13pc Vienna72/2256/13sh75/2357/13s Warsaw70/2155/12r68/2052/11sh Winnipeg 76/24 57/13 pc72/2258/14t HighLowWHighLowW F /CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday W eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow , i -ice, Pr cp-precipitation, T r -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO T oday:SSE at 8-16 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F T hursday:SE at 8-26 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Today:SE at 8-16 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Thursday:SE at 8-16 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Today:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Thursday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque 94/34 68/20s93/3368/20pc Anchorage77/2559/15s77/2557/13pc Atlanta 90/3270/21t88/3168/20t Atlantic City80/2660/15pc80/2662/16pc Baltimore 84/28 58/14 pc 82/2763/17pc Boston 73/2259/15t69/2058/14c Buffalo68/2057/13pc75/2360/15pc Charleston, SC88/3170/21t90/3272/22t Chicago74/2360/15t85/2969/20pc Cleveland73/2255/12pc82/2762/16pc Dallas 98/36 77/25 pc102/3878/25s Denver96/3558/14s92/3361/16pc Detroit 76/2458/14pc81/2765/18pc Honolulu88/3176/24pc88/3175/23pc Houston98/3676/24pc98/3676/24s HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/C F/CF/C High LowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C High LowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayThursday T odayThursday T odayThursday Indianapolis 82/27 62/16t85/2968/20pc Jacksonville88/3172/22t86/3071/21t Kansas City 90/3272/22pc93/3374/23s Las Vegas102/3878/25s102/3882/27s Little Rock 96/35 68/20 pc 94/3472/22s Los Angeles 82/2762/16pc82/2762/16pc Louisville89/3167/19pc88/3171/21s Memphis94/3473/22pc95/3575/23s Miami90/3279/26t91/3279/26t Minneapolis78/2566/18t85/2966/18t Nashville 92/33 66/18 pc92/3368/20s New Orleans90/3274/23t90/3276/24t New Y ork81/2765/18pc78/2567/19pc Oklahoma City98/3672/22pc100/3772/22s Orlando90/3273/22t89/3172/22t Philadelphia81/2763/17pc82/2764/17pc Phoenix106/4187/30pc105/4085/29pc Pittsburgh76/2454/12pc80/2660/15pc Portland, OR 70/2154/12c77/2557/13pc Raleigh-Durham 93/33 64/17pc91/3266/18pc St. Louis90/3272/22pc93/3373/22s Salt Lake City 86/30 60/15 s 89/31 63/17 s San Antonio102/3878/25s102/3878/25s San Diego 75/23 66/18pc77/2567/19pc San Francisco 71/21 54/12 pc 69/2054/12pc Seattle 68/2053/11c74/2353/11pc Tallahassee88/3171/21t87/3072/22t Tampa89/3177/25t88/3177/25tT ucson97/3678/25s100/3777/25pc W ashington, DC 87/30 64/17pc84/2867/19pc UV I NDEX T ODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV Index TM number, the g reater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com


{T\

Mim blowin’ it

HIGH 92F
LOW 82F

SUNNY WITH
>< FSTORM

Volume: 105 No.188

The Tribune e

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

YOUR IN-DEPTH
GUIDE FOR THIS

YEAR'S CELEBRATION
INSIDE TODAY

PM backs

Tal
nar’ Taylor 0 10-year plan
r for education
0 WOU ¢ Ingraham hopes [a

develop into tribunemedia.net
¢ , ae
flexible entity





PRIME Minister
Hubert Ingraham yester-
day lent his support to the
Ministry of Education’s
10-year plan for educa-
tion, noting that he hoped
their initiative would
develop further into a
flexible entity that can
respond to the changing

Forensic pathologist
testifies in court

By NATARIO prior to his examina-

McKENZIE tion. According to Dr ae eae of the
a eee cee Dee the i aot
eee ae en reaelee address at the closing cer-

emony at the Wyndham
Nassau Resort, Mr Ingra-
ham said that it is hoped
that through such dia-
logue that has been start-
ed at this summit, the
Ministry can develop a
plan for education that
will not be a PLP, or
FNM plan, but a “nation-
al plan for education in
the Bahamas.”

“It must be a plan to

tribunemedia.net Dr Raju also told
the court that he con-
ducted an autopsy on
Taylor's body, on
November 21, 2007, at
the morgue of the
Princess Margaret
Hospital. Dr Raju
described the numer-

eG ® 10 20 MURDER ACCUSED OS wounds he
wounds, including Troyniko McNeil observed, including
abrasions, deep cut

FORENSIC
pathologist Dr
Govinda Raju testi-
fied yesterday that
internationally recog-
nised handbag
designer Harl Taylor
suffered 45 to 50



multiple cut penetrat-
wounds, incised wounds and ing wounds to Taylor's face,
head, neck, chest, abdomen and
shoulders. He also described
deep penetrating wounds to
Taylor’s lower abdomen, mid
left shoulder, right upper
abdomen and front of left shoul-
der. Dr Raju said that he also
noted that Taylor had defensive
wounds on his body.
Detective Corporal Basil
Evans told the court yesterday
that around 5.50pm while at the
Central Detective Unit, he saw
detective Inspector Solomon
Cash who pointed out a black
male he later identified as mur-
der accused Troyniko McNeil.
Corporal Evans told the court

SEE page nine

bruises.

Dr Raju told the court yes-
terday that around 2pm on
November 18, 2007, he went to
Mountbatten House for a scene
examination. There, he told the
court, he observed the lifeless
body of an adult male, later
identified as Harl Taylor, lying
in a pool of blood on the wood-
en floor of the bedroom. He told
the court that there was stiff
rigidity of Taylor's upper and
lower extremities. Dr Raju told
the court that from his observa-
tion, he concluded that there
was some violent activity going
on at the time of Taylor’s death.
He also concluded that Taylor
had died some 10 to 12 hours

HURRICANE INSURANCE









IT IS CLAIMED the charity wanted the
right to land in the area to create the

Harrold and Wilson Ponds park (above)
and to relocate their headquarters from
Village Road.


















By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



THE executive director of the
Bahamas National Trust and senior
employees of the Department of Lands
and Surveys have been accused of “con-
spiring” together to dispossess a poor
farmer and his family of land he had
worked for decades.

In a Statement of Claim filed in the
Supreme Court on June 26, 2009,
between farmer Charles Christopher
Gibson and the Bahamas National
Trust, the environmental organisation
through its director Eric Carey, former
Department of Lands and Surveys
director Tex Turnquest and Christo-



RNa ee UR Gy Ven Qt

S.

which future governments
and ministers of educa-
tion of whatever political
stripe can subscribe and
vigorously pursue. It must
be a plan that is under-
stood by and has the sup-
port of all sectors of our
society: the Government
of the day, the Opposi-
tion, the private sector,
trade unions, the church-
es, academia and most

SEE page nine





BAHAMIANS GIVE

pher Russell are alleged to have acted
“unconscionably” and even “corrupt-
ly” towards Mr Gibson.

It is alleged the BNT and the Depart-
ment breached their “fiduciary duty”
towards the farmer, with both agencies
allegedly concealing certain informa-
tion from him as the BNT moved to
add the land he had farmed to the
“enormous acreage” in the area for
which it had already been granted a
lease.

The farmer, who is represented by
lawyer Lionel Levine, took the BNT to
court last month after he was “devas-

SEE page nine


















JENNIFER HUDSON
performs at the
memorial service
for Michael Jack-
son at the Staples
Centre in Los Ange-
les yesterday.

The 20,000 peo-
ple gathered inside
the arena and mil-
lions watching
around the world
said a final farewell
to the ‘King of Pop’.

¢ TWO PAGE

SPECIAL ON
PAGES 10 and 11

THEIR OPINIONS ON
NATIONAL LOTTERY
AND EDUCATION

















PLEA FOR MORE TIME
TO STUDY 10-YEAR
EDUCATION STRATEGY

You Can Be Blown
Away Be A Hurricane

Or you can rest easy knowing
that you have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

ee

Gabriel Bouys, Pool/AP




Tater Tela
MUTUAL FUNDS
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ANNUITIES

(BAN AMAS) UMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS a

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



STREET

At the National Education Summit on Monday, a 10-year education development plan was unveiled. It called for, among other things, the cre-
ation of a national lottery to be established with the proceeds being used to improve the struggling public education system and raising the
national grade average from a D+. The controversial question of whether gambling should be legal for Bahamians has many proponents on
both sides of the argument. Yesterday, The Tribune hit the streets to see what the public had to say.

INTERVIEWS BY STEFFON FYNES



am



66! think that if they established a lottery
that it will generate some funds for edu-
cation and for sports, but that educa-

tion thing with D being considered a good
thing makes no sense to me, when I was a
young man you had to get an A or a B or some-
thing — not a D. D never was good for any-
body. D means you are a dunce. Iam for the
lottery . I think that it will be a good thing.”



What I

most of
the young peo-
ple don’t be into
nothing. (The
lottery) should
help provide,
but it all
depends on the

You know, most
of the people
come from a
poor area and
they don’t be
into nothing.
The national lot-
tery is a good
idea, and it

ele oe benefit
the education
US Tc cout

a hah
PHONE: 322-2157

use the money
wisely.”



»EIAIPPY
~ Wes

t
_——_~

(Conch; (Snap,



find is that

individual cause.

ss” Roberts (Fathe r)

Ty

Bahamians voice their opinions on

NATIONAL LOTTERY

and



I think a national lottery is good

for some, and it is bad for some. If

we are playing the lottery it’s good
if we are doing it to sponsor education,
but if we are not doing it for education
and we are playing it all the time, families
may not be able to eat because people
would spend money on lottery instead of
food. We call our Bahamas a Christian
nation; it depends what kind of Christian
nation we are. I am for the lottery.”

RU NO)!






6! think it’s
* a good.
— idea.
= National lottery
_ funds being

_ used for educa-
_ tion happens in
a lot of different
_ countries. Go
_ ahead with the
lottery and let it
finance educa-
tion.”

6¢ In terms of legalising the lottery, it

would mean legalising gambling across

the board. I don’t necessarily see a

problem with that. It is going to open up

more revenue as well as for the Bahamian

casino. The revenue from the lottery can be
used towards education.

“More accountability as to where the fund-
ing goes and is allocated and how it is used is
needed. We need to revamp everything — the
curriculum, teachers, classroom settings and
facilities. That is one of our problems. The
education system is failing even on the pri-
mary level. The lottery, as it factors into the
big picture, is probably small scale, because
it probably won’t change the situation com-
pletely but it will help.

“The adverse effect of legalising gambling
is another social issue that will have to be
dealt with separately. Since there are pri-
vate entities that are benefitting from the
lottery as it is now, we should be giving
some of those funds to the public. More than
just a lottery is needed to fix education
though.”

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EW YUL



6G Right now at the present
moment in time, gambling
shops are illegal, and police
aren't doing anything about it. But
if there was a drug shop on Bay
Street or Shirley Street, the police
would raid it. Why should (gam-
bling) be OK when both of them
are illegal. To use funds from gam-
bling to pay for education is equal
to stealing money to pay my child’s
school fee.”

ETT

ea oat Ea Se sage
- ~) <



Bahamians are gambling any-

how all over the place. The

people are taking the money
off the top and it isn’t getting put
into education. The government is
going to have to take it over and
take the money and put it toward
sports and education. That’s where
the money should go.”

ULY 10th
Y Athy

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 , PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS





Health officials
expect more
swine flu

HUBERT MINNIS



WITH many families and
groups travelling abroad dur-
ing the summer months, the
Ministry of Health said it
expects to see the sporadic
emergence of new cases of the
Influenza A(H1N1) virus.

Yesterday, the ministry
reported that the Bahamas
resident who became the
country’s seventh confirmed
case of swine flu a few weeks
ago has fully recovered.

The patient was in South
Florida from June 22 to 24.

On Monday, Minister of
Health Dr Hubert Minnis con-
firmed that there are two new
cases of swine flu in the
Bahamas. It is believed that
these patients contracted the
virus when they travelled to
Orlando. The first case of
swine flu in the Bahamas was
a visitor to the country from
New York in June. So far
none of the swine flu patients
has spread the infection, the
Ministry of Health says.

Health officials are calling
on the public to observe good
respiratory hygiene practices
in an effort to prevent the
spread of A(HIN1).

Police find
large quantity
of drugs

POLICE discovered a
large quantity of illegal drugs
on Monday in the Dover
Sound area of Grand
Bahama.

Two men, aged 31 and 33,
are being questioned in con-
nection with the discovery.

Asst Supt Welbourne Boo-
tle reported that sometime
around 1.45pm, DEU offi-
cers went to Dover Sound
where they discovered 50
buckets of marijuana. They
also found three large crocus
bags, each containing four
bales of marijuana.

Investigations continue.

2009 NATIONAL EDUCATION SUMMIT

Plea for more time to study
0-year education strategy

Teachers and administrators ask for another semester to look at plan

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

EDUCATION delegates have asked
for another semester to study the 10-
year education plan reviewed at the 2009
National Education Summit yesterday.

School principals, administrators,
teachers, education officers and parents
discussed the 22-goal plan in groups on
Monday. As they presented their find-
ings and suggestions to the Ministry of
Education, some said the 50 minutes
allocated for them to review the plan on
Monday was not sufficient.

But after 14 months of preparation
— 13 months longer than was originally
anticipated — Minister of Education Carl
Bethel is keen for the proposal to be
brought to parliament so it can be imple-
mented in schools.

A leader of one of the groups said:
“Give administrators and teachers one
more look-see at the 10 year plan before
moving forward. We suggest strongly
that district superintendents are given
the go ahead to organise discussions in
their districts during the first semester to



CARL BETHEL

provide feedback.”

Points were raised and amendments
suggested in connection with a number
of proposed initiatives, including those
aiming to ensure parents are more
involved in their children’s education,
and those aiming to increase trans-
parency in funding.

Group Two looked at ways of funding

education including a plan for the allo-
cation of at least 17 per cent of the
national budget to education, seeking
funding from external organisations, and
introducing a national lottery in order
to use the proceeds to fund education.

The only issue raised by group leader
Prince Dean concerned the proposed
efforts to ensure schools take greater
responsibility for income-generation and
expenditure. School funds, he said, need
to be backed up by a system of monitor-
ing and enforcement.

Accountable

Mr Dean said: “The income generated
must be monitored to ensure local gov-
ernment is held accountable for the edu-
cational funding included in the budget
and to ensure there is a policy in place to
provide for the recovery of funds, and
imprisonment, when funds are misap-
propriated.”

Delegates also suggested schools
declare their materials to ensure new
supplies are distributed in a fair way
throughout the government school sys-
tem.

Another top priority for educators is
involving parents in their children’s edu-
cation and the leader of the group look-
ing at ways of encouraging parents said:
“The group thought it was necessary for
our ministry to seek to ensure the law
assists with the legal obligations of par-
ents. Far too many parents for far too
long have been grossly negligent of their
duties and it’s time to move beyond just
encouraging them.

“We thought we could create incen-
tives for parents to become more
involved in their children’s education.”

Group members also suggested involv-
ing parents and guardians in community
service programmes, and making schools
more hospitable to parents.

They spoke out against the suggestion
that the school day should be extended
as a way of improving student achieve-
ment and school performance, and again
called on parents to encourage children
after school.

Educators also feel there is a need to
establish a national curriculum for home
schools, as well as a training college
specifically focused on improving the
calibre of teachers.

‘Teachers curse, call us
names and throw objects’





By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

STUDENTS across the
Bahamas claim teachers curse at
them, call them names and throw
objects at them in the classroom,
according to preliminary data
gathered by the College of the
Bahamas.

Junior high school students in
grade eight and senior high school
students in grade 11 claimed in a
series of focus groups that teach-
ers need to find better ways to
relate to students and must
change their “bad attitudes.”

The preliminary findings of the
Ministry of Education and Col-
lege of the Bahamas’ (COB) sur-
vey shows that 47 per cent of 11th
grade students think teachers
need to change their attitudes,
and 19 per cent of eighth grade
students agree.

Murmurs rippled through the
crowd of around 300 education
delegates, school administrators,
principals and teachers, as the
data was presented on the sec-
ond day of the 2009 National




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Preliminary data shows students



think staff need to change attitudes

Education Summit at the Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort in Cable
Beach yesterday.

The COB representative pre-
senting the data said: “The stu-
dents said ‘some of the teachers
need to find a better way to relate
to students’, and ‘tell teachers
about changing their bad atti-
tudes’. They said teachers curse at
them and not many of us believed
that, but we began to question it
as it was consistent across the
board. It was not just one school.

“They said teachers threw
objects at them, teachers did not
treat them fairly, teachers called
them names, and we are not
going to go into the names here,
but this is what the students said.”

Almost 50 per cent of grade
eight students said their teachers
teach by reading notes for them,
and 30 per cent of eleventh
graders agreed. Around 30 per
cent of eleventh graders said their
teachers also give lectures, as did
16 per cent of eighth graders.
Only 16 per cent of eighth graders
said teachers use games as a
teaching method, and 14 per cent
said that would be their preferred
mode of learning. The majority
of students in both age groups
said using computers is their
favourite way to learn, followed
closely by the use of examples
from daily life in teaching.

The students also feel parental
support is vital to their studies,
as are adequate resources and
technology, as 29 per cent of
eleventh graders said parental

support is important, while 19 per
cent of eighth graders agreed.
Adequate resources and technol-
ogy is considered to be of high
importance by 18 per cent of
eleventh graders, and 11 per cent
of eighth graders.

“This is all preliminary data,
and it corroborates the need to
gather more data from the par-
ents,” the COB representative
added. “We need to have their
views as stakeholders in educa-
tion in this country. And we need
to have focus groups about prob-
lems in the home and make a
national effort to get parents
involved. I am pleased to see that
we are beginning this education-
al summit to express some of the
needs in this country. This summit
is a wonderful beginning to mak-
ing evidence based decisions in
relation to our education system
and education in general, creating
a national vision for education
and nation building.”

Additional data from schools,
organised according to areas of
New Providence, shows that a
number of students in grades
eight and eleven do not know
their own Grade Point Average
(GPA), with the southeastern
division of New Providence at the
top of this list. However, when
asked if they are expected to do
their best in school, more students
from the southeast answered
“yes” than was the case for any
other division — and yet many of
them said teachers do not care
about their learning.



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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Time to enforce gambling laws

WE GATHER from spot surveys done
over several years that Bahamians are grad-
ually coming to the conclusion that there
should be a national lottery and all gambling
outlets now in operation should be brought
under control. If those now operating are
allowed to continue they, like the casinos,
should pay a yearly tax.

At one time large church groups, particu-
larly the Baptists and Methodists, were
staunchly against gambling. However, in
recent years a gradual softening can be
detected in the church pews and among the
clerics.

Even we are now of the view — particu-
larly as gambling establishments are openly
operating in defiance of the law — that pub-
lic opinion has already swept the anti-gam-
bling law off the statute books.

Therefore, it is now time for government to
step in with legislation to regulate the oper-
ations.

The only way to do this is to establish a
national lottery that is tightly policed, close-
ly audited and managed as fairly and honestly
as corrupt human nature will allow. Whatev-
er revenue is raised should be specifically
earmarked for education, sports and the
building of a new hospital.

On page 2 of today’s Tribune several
Bahamians have expressed their opinions on
a national lottery and education. One of them
condemned the police for doing nothing
about the daily gambling.

It is true that over the years certain police
officers — and their numbers have not been
small — have been among the citizens stand-
ing in line to take their chance with the “num-
bers.” Naturally, as a result, there has been
much foot dragging in bringing the law to
bear on these side street establishments,
which in turn has emboldened some to
become big time operators and dare govern-
ment to do something about it.

Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson,
who has taken up the challenge, has vowed
that as long as gambling is listed as illegal in
the Penal Code his men will be out there
confiscating the equipment and proceeds of
gambling and arresting those caught in the
gaming houses when police arrive. That is as
far as the police can go. The rest is up to the
courts. This is where the officials seem to get

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the hiccups and start the foot dragging —
they can’t even bring themselves to imitate
Michael Jackson’s exquisite “moon walk.”

No wonder one of the island’s biggest
operators, after being raided by the police
in April, could assure the public that his oper-
ations would remain open and that his
employees had nothing to fear. Since that
announcement, the police have made a sec-
ond raid. But it seems that business goes on as
usual.

The owner, in an interview with The Tri-
bune after the first raid, said that he is of the
opinion — obviously acting on legal advice —
that he was breaking no laws and that he was
working in tandem with local authorities to
determine the way forward.

The Police Commissioner is probably also
acting on legal advice.

Meanwhile the law is being held up to
public ridicule and contempt. It is now up to
government to do something about it. Only
government can break the impasse. If gam-
bling is no longer illegal, then remove it from
the books, and allow the Commissioner and
his men to concentrate on other criminal
activity.

What is now of great concern is that too
many people in this country seem to believe
that they are above the law. When that hap-
pens then the country is well on the road to
anarchy.

We have the example of the House of
Assembly when Opposition members — the
very ones who wrote the rules — denounced
the Speaker for enforcing them against one of
their number who had defied his ruling.

Then there were the striking nurses —
members of an essential service who should
not even consider a strike vote.

The Supreme Court ordered them back to
work, only to be told by many of them that
they had no intention of returning until they
got an insurance plan that government cannot
afford to pay at this time. The next move by
the court should have been to cite for con-
tempt those who refused to obey. The court
did nothing.

It is of great concern that we have come to
such a pass in the affairs of state that our
laws are no longer respected.

If we have laws that the courts are reluctant
to enforce, then don’t call them into service.



Aghast at rise in
fees for aircraft

operators

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I feel sure all of us involved in
the Commercial Airline and
Charter Service in this country
are aghast with a notification
from Flight Standards about
CAD’s increase in fees for air-
craft operators in this country
scheduled for effect on Sep-
tember 10, 2009. Then this
morning in your Business Sec-
tion comes the article about
increase proposals of up to
10,000 per cent for some firms!

The question that many of us
may be asking today is “have
any of the individuals who came
up with this idea ever even
owned an aircraft, yet alone
owned a Charter Operation?”

Have they no earthly concept
of cost involved? We are but a
one man band, one of the little
guys who dared to “do it right”
and cross every ‘t’ and dot every
‘T to run a valuable and appre-
ciated service for the last 18
years here. We are overjoyed
at bringing home about 20 cents
on each dollar! (God only know
what our larger brothers are

letters@tribunemedia net



able to take home after what
must be astronomical expens-
es?)

With this vast fortune in the
pocket we now have to pay
BEC, BTC, insurance, fuel
(near $6 a gallon and $8.50 per
quart of oil) and that long for-
gotten item called ‘Mainte-
nance’. After this we then real-
ly try to pay the bank a mort-
gage and then if we are more
than lucky we get to go to Super
Value or City Meat!

Our Government needs to
take a step backward here and
check out the numbers, for very
soon if we all come to a grinding
halt one day there will be no
air transportation within this
country other than our national
carrier? No tourism, no emer-
gency flights, no Out-Island
funeral services, no weddings
and no local travellers for fam-

ily visits and local hotel clientele
transport available and so it
goes on!

Then NAD announces that
they too are going to increase
our fees at LOP International
Airport adding fuel to the fire.
While with this organisation we
note that still we are having our
main windward runways closed
for ‘maintenance’ or ‘grass cut-
ting’ during peak operating
hours backing up traffic on one
runway. Has no one taken
notice what other International
Aerodromes do with what is
called “displaced thresholds”
where aircraft can still actually
use part of the runway instead
of closing all three miles of it
to change a light bulb or cut a
section of grass down at one
end?

Aviation management in this
country appears, in a lot of
areas, is headed back to the
birds!

CAPT P HARDING
Nassau,
July 6, 2009.

Your legacy is secured Mr Ingraham - but
you should not lead the country post 2012

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please afford me the oppor-
tunity to comment on two news
articles that appeared in your
paper of last week.

I refer to “Public Service Act
set to be Introduced” in the In
Brief section of The Tribune of
Tuesday, June 9th, and “Gov-
ernment prepares for Freedom
of Information Act” by Tribune
Staff Reporter Taneka Thomp-
son, as appeared in The Tribune
of Wednesday, June 10th.

As one who has criticised our
PM in the past, I would like to
publicly congratulate Prime
Minister Ingraham at this time,
on these two bold and revolu-
tionary initiatives.

The legacy of the Rt Hon
Hubert Alexander Ingraham is
already secured for posterity’s
sake. I will always remember
PM Ingraham as the leader who
rid us of tyranny in 1992 and
incompetence in 2007.

Be that as it may Prime Min-
ister Ingraham, you are not the
best person to lead this coun-
try post 2012. Joshua will lead
where Moses cannot. The same
holds for former PM Christie,
who we all know is not capable
of defeating you in a general
election. However, do not make
the same mistake as your men-
tor did, in staying on simply
because you are capable of win-














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ning elections for your party, or
allow yourself to be unduly per-
suaded by those who do not
have your, nor the country’s
best interests at heart, but
whose primary motivation is
winning a general election.

It would be in the best inter-
est of the country were you to
step down as leader of your par-
ty during this term in office; but
please do not do it the way you
did it the last time and leave
your party in shambles.

‘Towards this end then, I have
a few suggestions.

Introduce legislation to limit
the service of a sitting prime
minister to two consecutive
terms.

This will ensure the promo-
tion of new and visionary lead-
ers to lead our country in the
future; instead of being stuck
with a prime minister who
refuses to step down simply
because he is capable of win-
ning another general election,
as is now the case.

I trust that in finally abolish-
ing the infamous General
Orders of the civil service,
greater accountability and trans-
parency will be introduced with
a view to stamping out corrup-
tion wherever and whenever it
raises its ugly head. The people
have long suffered the extra
financial burden of having to
pay twice for prompt and effi-
cient government services, and
cry out to you sir, especially
now, for relief.

Along with a Freedom of
Information Act though, please
reconsider establishing an office
of Ombudsman.

Why would a government of
transparency and openness, a
government of trust, have an
aversion to an office of
Ombudsman, especially when
the establishment of this office

remains an unfulfilled campaign
promise?

With regard to your govern-
ment’s economic stimulus plan,
the missing link is land reform.
The Government of The
Bahamas needs to pay Bahami-
ans for all land that has been
compulsorily acquired by gov-
ernment over the years, and for
which payment remains out-
standing.

Additionally I would respect-
fully suggest introducing legis-
lation to regularise the claims
of thousands of Bahamian fam-
ilies to land throughout the
length and breadth of this arch-
ipelago, known traditionally as
“generation property.” Please
unleash this vast economic
reservoir on behalf of the
Bahamian people.

Finally, please do not call
another general election with-
out first implementing much
needed campaign and electoral
reforms.

And whereas I agree with
you that incompetence was a
factor in the deficiencies of the
last electoral process, I do not
agree with you that nothing is
wrong with the system.

Again, please reconsider your
decision to ignore the findings
and recommendations of the
recent Election Court rulings,
especially with regard to the
Pinewood case.

If an incompetent prime min-
ister is able to wreak so much
havoc on our electoral process,
then you owe it to the nation
as prime minister, during this
term, to implement the neces-
sary changes that would safe-
guard the people from such a
recurrence in future.

LAVADE M DARLING
Nassau,
June 14, 2009.

Will Arawak Cay expansion

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EDITOR, The Tribune.

















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Study: digital mammography offers better Dates set for the

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 5

detection for Bahamian women under 50 — _ Fox Hill Festival

DIGITAL mammography
has been determined as the best
method for detecting breast
cancer in African-American
and African-Caribbean women,
according to a new study.

The case for digital versus
traditional mammography in
certain groups of women has
been confirmed by a study
reported in the New England
Journal of Medicine.

Dean of the University of
Buckingham School of Medi-
cine Dr Karol Sikora, who sees
patients in the Bahamas in his
capacity as director of Medical
Oncology at the Cancer Cen-
tre Bahamas, said the avail-
ability of digital mammography
is especially critical for Bahami-
an women who are excellent
candidates for the new tech-
nology because of their dense
breast tissue.

This form of testing is also
of particular interest to
Bahamian women as emerging
evidence suggests that they
could be genetically predis-
posed towards getting an
aggressive variety of breast can-
cer at an earlier age.

Battle

The Imaging Centre in con-
junction with the Cancer Cen-
tre Bahamas at Centreville
Medical Pavilion on Collins
Avenue has invested in one of
the country’s first digital mam-
mogram machines, an incom-
parable tool in the continuing
battle against breast cancer.

A study that tracked mam-
mograms on nearly 50,000
women in the United States
and Canada to resolve the
debate over whether there was
a difference between tradition-
al mammography and newer
and more expensive digital
mammography showed a sig-
nificant difference in certain
categories — among them
women under 50 and those with
dense breasts.

GBPA holds



By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama Port Authority (GBPA)
for the first time held an open
bidding with licensed contractors
for the construction of the Grand
Bahama Arts and Craft Centre
in Freeport.

A total of 12 contractors par-
ticipated and entered bids ranging
from a low of $635,109 to a high
of $1,296,000.

The new craft centre will be
located on two acres of land on
East Sunrise Highway, next to the
Jasmine Corporate Centre. It will
consist of an office area, two areas
each comprising 1,000 sq ft, and a
third area comprising 2,500 sq ft.

The project is being undertak-
en by the Grand Bahama Port
Authority in conjunction with the
Bahamas Agricultural and Indus-
trial Corporation (BAIC).

Edison Key, executive chair-
man of BAIC, and deputy chair-
man Winston Pinnock were pre-
sent at the bidding on Friday in
the Port Authority boardroom.

This is the first time in its his-
tory that the GBPA has hosted
an open bid process meeting
where contractors make personal
submission of their bids.

Arthur Jones, vice-president of
Building and Development, said
the open bidding process is one
that contractors can expect with
other GBPA projects.

“This would probably become
a common occurrence here
because GBPA would like to take
the approach where most of our
licensees who are qualified to
engage in particular works would
have the opportunity to do so on
all appropriate projects,” he said.

Mr Jones explained that the
lowest bidder is in no way entitled
to the award of the contract. He
said they will analyse the bids and
get back to the contractors in
about a week to announce who
will be chosen.

The bids were as follows: Alba-
core Construction bid
$889,218.75; Allied Builders
$832,627; DBS Builders
$952,924.79; Glenerick Interna-
tional Ltd $769,315; Island Pro-
jects $1,296,000; Keystone Devel-
opment $898,447; Oral Jones
Construction $636,630.80; Pyra-
mid Construction $635,109; Qual-
ity Construction $735,000; Reef
Construction $998,927.18; San
Jose Construction $856,869; and
West Bay Construction $965,000.

Contractors commended the
Port Authority for taking the
approach of holding an open bid-
ding process.

“T have been a contractor for
more than 10 years and this is the
first time I have been invited by
the Port Authority to participate,
and I commend the Port for tak-
ing this approach,” said a repre-
sentative of Albacore Construc-
tion.

Ian Rolle, GBPA president,



“The study
was important
not only
because of its
size and the
methods it
employed, but
because the
results it
achieved were
so specific.”



Dr Karol Sikora,
Dean of the
University of
Buckingham School
of Medicine

“The results of this study,
which was funded by the
National Cancer Institute, coor-
dinated by the American Col-
lege of Radiology Imaging Net-
work and reported in the New
England Journal of Medicine,
clearly indicate a significant dif-
ference in detection in certain
categories of women, including
those with dense breast tissue
which makes screening using
traditional film methods more
difficult,” said Dr Sikora.

Fewer than one-tenth of one
per cent of all medical facili-
ties in the US offer digital
mammography, partially
because of the initial invest-
ment cost for the equipment
and because, until this study
showed the difference, the
debate continued about
whether or not the more expen-

sive technology and testing was
worthwhile.

A digital mammogram,
allowing a technician or doctor
to zoom in on a suspicious area,
to computer-enhance it for bet-
ter definition, to store it elec-
tronically for comparison pur-
poses without concern for dete-
rioration and to see through
thick, dark tissue costs about
$50 to $100 more per exam.

It is, doctors say, a small
price for what can save some-
one’s life.

“The study was important
not only because of its size and
the methods it employed, but
because the results it achieved
were so specific,” said Dr Siko-
ra, author of “The Treatment
of Cancer”- the most widely-
used textbook on cancer at the
graduate level in medical
schools in the United Kingdom.

Difference

“For the first time we are
able to show that there is a sig-
nificant difference in three key
categories between the more
widely available film mammog-
raphy and digital mammogra-
phy, although in other cases,
the difference is negligible.”

The study was conducted by
administering both forms of
breast examinations — tradi-
tional film and digital — to every
participating woman with two
views taken by each screening
method. Differences showed up
in three categories - age, race
and menopausal status.

For post-menopausal women
over 50 who did not have dense
breast tissue, there was no sig-
nificant difference between tra-
ditional film and digital. How-
ever, there was a measurable
difference in tumour or suspi-
cious area detection in pre-
menopausal women under 50
with dense breast tissue and in
those cases, digital was able to
spot what traditional film
missed.

yon ee for arts and



Vandyke Hepburn

GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITY officials held an open bidding process
with contractors for construction of the Grand Bahama Arts and Crafts Cen-
tre in Freeport. Seated from left are Arthur Jones, vice-president of building
and development; lan Rolle, GBPA president; Edison Key, executive chairman
of BAIC, and Winston Pinnock, deputy-chairman of BAIC.

said the process is significant.

“Today is a very important day
in the history of GBPA, this is
first time that we have done an
exercise of this nature and it is in
line with our making it happen
initiative.

“Mr Hannes Babak, our chair-
man, was very instrumental in
implementing this process and we
thank him very much,” he said.

Mr Key said that an arts and
crafts centre has been long over-
due in Freeport. He was very
pleased that the process has start-
ed.

“We have been talking about a
craft centre for quite a long time
here in Freeport, and I under-
stand that it has been on the
drawing board for years.

“Grand Bahama needs a shot

“To put it simply, if you or
someone you love is African-
Caribbean or African-Ameri-
can and under 50, and you want
to make sure that you or your
daughter, sister, mother or
friend is getting the most accu-
rate picture of what is going on
in her breasts knowing that ear-
ly detection is the best cure for
breast cancer, you should
request, even demand, digital
mammography,” explained Dr
Sikora.

“Tf, on the other hand, you
are over 50, have been through
menopause and are Caucasian,
chances are you will receive just
as accurate a report of your

breast condition using
traditional film mammogra-
phy.”

With one in every eight
women in the US expected to
hear the words “you have
breast cancer” at some time in
her life, determining the best
method for early detection is
crucial -- detected early
enough, breast cancer has a
better than 90 per cent cure
rate.

In addition to being one the
first in the region to offer digi-
tal mammography, the Cancer
Centre Bahamas which opened
in expanded headquarters in
January, is one of only two
medical facilities in the world
outside the US to be certified
by the American College of
Radiation Oncology (ACRO).
The other facility is located
near Vatican City, Rome.

And only a small percentage
of cancer treatment facilities in
the US are ACRO-certified.
The Imaging Centre and the
Cancer Centre Bahamas are
divisions of Centreville
Medical Pavilion which also
houses the Bahamas Heart
Centre.

With anecdotal information
suggesting that there is a high
incidence of breast cancer in
young Bahamian women, the
disease has become an issue of
critical local importance.

crafts centre

in the arm and we really appreci-
ate the Port Authority giving
BAIC some two acres of land for
the project. There are other pro-
jects in the area of agriculture
(that we want to bring on stream)
and (the Port) has some 500 plus
acres sitting idle, and we are pre-
pared to work with them to boost
Freeport because we have some
other large projects in store for
Grand Bahama very soon,” he
said.

Mr Key believes that the gov-
ernment is making “big strides” in
crafts at BAIC. He said training
has been provided to hundreds
of Bahamians.

He noted that over 500 young
Bahamians have already gradu-
ated from the training pro-
gramme, and more than 200 are
currently enrolled this year.

“We are trying to develop a
network of people so we can com-
pete with the foreign imported
items and come up with an
authentic Bahamian craft centre
here in Freeport as well as other
areas of the Bahamas,” he said.

Between the evening of Tuesday June 22nd and the morning of
Wednesday June 23rd, a 1993 Ford Taurus vehicle was broken
into, while parked in a residential area off Mermaid Blvd, off
Carmichael Road. The police have been contacted regarding this
matter, but we need your help, in assisting further, in locating two
very valuable items that were stolen at this time. Description
of the items are as follows:

Two (2)

sets of AUTOMOTIVE SCAN TOOLS.

They will

individually be housed in large black cases, please see

pictures below:

Both of these items are of no use to the average person and to

this end we are offering a

disclosed at the recovery of said items.

reward which will be

Anyone having ANY information may contact the following

numbers.

328-7941,

341/4675, 557-1744 or

436-2621

All calls will be treated with the utmost confidentiality.



THE Fox Hill Festival will be celebrated this year from

July 31 to August 11.

It will be named in honour of Charles Johnson who served
as the festival’s chairman for the past five years and who died

in May of this year.

The festival will be officially opened on Friday, July 31 on

the Fox Hill Parade beginning at 8pm.

Other highlights of the festival include the junkanoo rush

on Emancipation Day beginning at lam.

This will be followed by an Ecumenical service on the
Parade at 11am and a luncheon for the elderly in the Com-

munity Centre right after.
The usual climbing of the

place.

G Ke: SSAC
CLF den

where fife is still we and people still care
Murphyville, 2nd Right from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

MINIATURE HEREND FIGURINES
33% OFFI!!!

DRESSY PRE-TEEN DRESSES,
WHITE, CREME, AND TURQUOISE
AND WHITE ORGANZA,

$80.00 and UP, 25 TO 33% OFF!!!

ROYAL READERS 25% OFFI!!!

Cc

COMMONWEALTH BANK

Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed to delivering superior quality service, to
training and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in
the community.

Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for
Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco.

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
Assisting the Branch Manager in managing the sales activities of
the Branch to enhance profitability.
Effectively leading, supporting and coaching personnel to
achieve corporate objectives.
Effectively managing a portfolio of consumer, mortgage and
commercial loans.

e Adjudicating credit lines within delegated authority.

¢ Managing the Branch’s collection activities and the protection of
collateral.
Following-up with client and support functions to ensure timely
completion of product requests and transactions and resolution of
inquiries and issues.
Ensuring Credit risk ratings and credit scoring practices are
adhered to at all times to mimmize the risk of loan losses.
Ensuring specific objectives are developed through an
appropriate strategic plan to grow the Branch’s loan and deposit
portfolios and other offerings.
Adding value to the customers’ portfolio of financial services
by actively promoting, marketing, building and cross selling all
deposit / investment and consumer credit business. Ensuring
self and direct reports consistently provide highly courteous
customer service in an informed and thorough manner. Assisting
the Manager in attaining the targets incorporated in the Branch’s
financial plan.

QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE:
Bachelor’s degree or higher in Business Administration, Banking
& Finance or a related discipline from an accredited University.
Minimum of eight years commercial banking experience with a
minimum of 3 years supervisory / managerial experience.
Experience in managing a diverse loan portfolio and assessing
loan quality.

Detailed knowledge of Retail / Commercial / Mortgage lending
practices and credit analysis to ensure portfolio quality.
Substantial work experience in loans and risk management with
a full understanding of financial statements and the ability to
anal yze the information.

Excellent leadership and coaching skills

Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills
Excellent organizational and time management skills

Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications.

REMUNERATION PACKAGE:

Commonwealth Bank is a Great place to work! We offer an
exciting work environment with the opportunity for growth and
development. We also offer a competitive compensation package,
reflecting the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications,
including a performance based incentive plan, health, vision,
dental and life insurances and a pension plan.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before

July 24, 2009 to:

Human Resources Department
Re: Assistant Branch Manager, Abaco
P.O. Box SS-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Telefax: (242) 393-8073
E-mail address: hr@ combankltd.com

“Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their
interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those
under consideration will be contacted.”

greasy pole,
plaiting of the Maypole, live music, and games will take

©2009 CreativeRelations.net


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS
| J a 1



Fishermen advised t
r4 e 9 oO
cash in’ on lionfish

THE Department of Fisheries has recommended that fish-
ermen “cash in on harvesting” lionfish as a means of coun-
teracting that voracious predator’s alarming growth rate.

The meat of the lionfish is edible and “is in fact being used
as a food source” in the Bahamas, Agriculture and Marine
Resources Minister Larry Cartwright said.

The Department of Marine Resources is hoping that fish-
ermen can derive some economic benefit from the harvest and
sale of lionfish, he recently told parliament.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.




















































NOTICE

NIFEST INCORPORATION LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to
Section 239 (2) of the Companies Act, 1992, that a
general meeting of the members of the above-named
company will be held at Dupuch & Turquest & Co., #308
East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas on 7" day of August,
A. D. 2009 at 10: 00 in the forenoon, for the purpose of
having an account laid before the company showing the
manner in which the winding up has been conducted and
the property of the company disposed of, and of hearing
any explanation that may be given by the liquidators, and
for the purpose of passing an extraordinary resolution
disposing of the books accounts and documents of the
company and the liquidators.

Dated the 7* day of July, A.D. 2009

ANTHONY A. M. MOREE
Liquidator

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION QATAR
LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
QATAR LIMITED in dissolution under the provisions
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said Company commenced on
the 2nd day of July,2009 when its Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is Carol G. Gray
of 16945 Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060.

Dated the 7th day of July, 2009.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT
co. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL TERMINAL INVESTMENTS
LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-
named Company are required to send particulars
thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624,
Nassau, Bahamas on or before 28th day of July, A.D.,
2009. In default thereof they will be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, TEXAS 77060

THE Bahamas National Trust (BNT) is
working with Caroline Stahala, PhD stu-
dent at Florida State University, to monitor
the 2009 Bahama Parrot nesting season in
the Abaco National Park.

Ms Stahala is also assisting with deter-
mining the effectiveness of the predator
control programme being implemented by
the Trust to control invasive feral cats which
are the major threat to Bahama Parrots
during the nesting season which begins in
late May, early June.

Forty nests have been located and four
volunteers, Uli Nowlan, Barbara Foreman,
Dr Sue Faircloth and Susie Lill, are assisting
in the watching of the nests. Parrot chicks
were banded during June and July to assist
in future individual identification.

With the support of the Rare Species
Conservation Foundation, 25 nest boxes
have been placed in various locations in
the park to see if the birds will choose to
nest above the ground.

This is being done to determine the effec-
tiveness of providing additional nesting sites
which are less susceptible to predators than
the ground cavities.

The Bahama Amazon Parrot is found in
the Abaco pine and broadleaf forest of the
southern part of Great Abaco. The Abaco
population of the Bahama Parrot is the
only new world parrot that nests in sub-
terrain rock cavities. It is believed that this
adaptation to ground nesting is due to the
few holes found in Abaco’s trees.

A clutch of two to four eggs are laid in
late May or early June. Eggs hatch asyn-
chronously 26-28 days after the female
begins incubation. There is about a 46 per
cent failure hatch rate. The eggs and the
chicks are sometimes eaten by large land



TWO TO four eggs are laid in late May or
early June.

crabs, snakes, feral cats and feral raccoons
or the nests are flooded due to heavy sum-
mer rains.

While the female sits on the eggs, the
male visits the nest four to six times a day to
feed the female. Should the male die or
abandon the female, she would be unable to
raise the chicks alone and would probably
desert the nest. Parents will return to the
nest five to seven times a day to feed the
youngsters, spending considerable time in
the area of the nest to watch and protect it.

The Trust with the assistance of Ms Sta-
hala, Dr Frank Riviera of the United States
Fish and Wildlife Service, Birdlife Interna-
tional, Friends of the Environment and oth-

BNT monitors Bahama
Parrot nesting season

, - . % i,
a | bee

A BAHAMA PARROT pictured in Abaco.



er relevant agencies is in the process of
completing the final draft of the Bahama
Parrot Management Plan for review and
distribution.

The Abaco National Park is the largest of
five national parks and protected areas in
the Abacos managed by the BNT.

Summer Safari Camp is an education

WITH the goal of intro-
ducing children to the
country’s ecosystems, the
Bahamas National Trust
(BNT) once again put on
its Summer Safari Camp.

A group of 50 young peo-
ple between the ages of
eight and 14 joined the
BNT for special field trips
to Harrold and Wilson’s
Ponds National Park, Stu-
art Cove’s Dive Bahamas
and the Bahamas Youth
Camp.

The trips allowed the
children to learn about
wetlands, coral reefs and
the fish that frequent them
and of course the unique
pine forest.

“We also wanted to pro-



Each camper kept a jour-
nal and each afternoon
there was an arts and crafts
activity complimenting the
daily learning experience.

These journals assisted
the young people in creat-
ing presentations for par-
ents and friends on the last
day of the camp.

There were presentations
on dolphins and endan-
gered species, but the need
to provide further protec-
tion for endangered sea
turtles was by the most
popular topic for the pre-
sentations.

Safari Camp culminated
in a group camp-out at the
Retreat on Village Road
on June 27 where the

vide them with some up
close and personal experi-

marine mammals, and we
appreciate the support of

assisting us in coordinating
visits to these attractions,”

young campers cooked din-
ner over an open fire

ences with some of our
endangered species and

Dolphin Encounters and
Ardastra Gardens for

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
ATAR LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the
above-named Company are required to send particulars
thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau,
Bahamas on or before 28th day of July, A.D., 2009. In
default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, TEXAS 77060

EXXONMOBIL UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (NORTH) LIMITED
NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

EXXONMOBIL UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (NORTH)
LIMITED in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said Company commenced on
the 2nd day of July, 2009 when its Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is Carol G. Gray
of 16945 Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060.

Dated the 7th day of July, 2009.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT
co. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

and shared Bahamian sto-
ries.

said Shelley Cant, BNT
education officer.

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL TERMINAL INVESTMENTS LIMITED
NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

EXXONMOBIL TERMINAL INVESTMENTS LIMITED
in dissolution under the provisions of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said Company commenced on
the 2nd day of July,2009 when its Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is Carol G. Gray
of 16945 Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060.

Dated the 7th day of July, 2009.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT
co. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (NORTH)
LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against
the above-named Company are required to send
particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O. Box
N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 28th day of July,
A.D., 2009.|In default thereof they will be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 7th day of July, A.D., 2009.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, TEXAS 77060
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 7





Good news and bad.
news about sharks

“Tam the shark among the fish-
es, and the Ganges among the
rivers.”

— Bhagavad Gita

W ELL folks, when it
comes to sharks —

we have some good news and
some bad news.

The bad news is that sharks
— like most other big fish in the
ocean — are not long for this
world if we continue overfishing
on an industrial-scale.

The good news is that because
driftnet and longline fishing are
banned in the Bahamas, our
shark populations are relatively
stable. In fact, National Geo-
graphic described Bahamian
waters as a relative "Eden" for
sharks compared to the rest of
the world.

Unfortunately, sharks have
always suffered from an image
problem. People tend to regard
them as serial killers and fishing
competitors. But to Aleksandra
Maljkovic’, a doctoral student in
marine ecology at Canada's
Simon Fraser University, they
are a fascinating research sub-
ject.

"T have been obsessed with
sharks since childhood," she
wrote during a recent internship
at the Bimini Biological Field
Station. "My main aim here is to
learn as much as possible about
handling sharks without losing
body parts so I can pursue my
shark-related PhD.”

The Bimini training must have
been successful, because
Maljkovic’ appeared perfectly
normal at a meeting hosted by
the Bahamas National Trust last
week where she reported on new
shark research at Southwest
Point. Maljkovic’ is studying the
impacts of marine resource
depletion on the ecology and
behaviour of Caribbean reef
sharks.

The Bahamas has a reputa-
tion for such research because of
its relatively intact shark popula-
tions. The Cape Eleuthera Insti-
tute launched a shark research

Synergy Bahamas

programme a year ago. And the
Bimini Field Station, operated
by venerable University of Miami
professor Dr Sammy Gruber, has
been studying sharks since 1990.

Gruber took over this mantle
from the defunct Lerner Marine
Lab, which was set up on Bimini
by renowned big game fisherman
Michael Lerner in 1948. Lerner
used to pal around with Ernest
Hemingway and founded the
International Game Fishing
Association, but he was also a
trustee of the American Muse-
um of Natural History and had a
passion for marine biology.

The 1930s and 40s were the
days when grinning sportfisher-
men were ritually photographed
on piers next to the 500-pound
tunas and marlins they had just
caught. However, scientists have
determined that big ocean fish
like these have declined by 90
per cent over the past 50 years.

And the bad news is getting
worse. For example, we know
that if we keep overfishing at cur-
rent rates most of the world's
commercial fisheries will collapse
by mid-century. To understand
what that means we have only to
consider the once bountiful
Canadian cod fishery, which was
closed in the early 1990s, with
the loss of over 40,000 jobs, and
has been unable to recover.

In recent years the overfishing
of sharks has become a big prob-
lem too. More than 100 million
are taken annually by commer-
cial fishermen and another five
million by recreational fishermen.
According to Maljkovic’, "the
trends indicate precipitous pop-
ulation declines in all large-bod-
ied sharks. They are the most
threatened species on the plan-
et.”

One of the chief reasons for



this is the Chinese demand for
shark fin soup. Fins can fetch
hundreds of dollars, whereas
shark meat is worth less than
most fish. As a result, fins are cut
off millions of living sharks and
the mutilated animals thrown
back into the sea to die — a prac-
tice that was banned by the US in
2000.

Sharks are like the lions and
tigers of the sea, and scientists
like Maljkovic’ are trying des-
perately to understand the
ecosystem changes that will occur
due to their decline. As top
predators, sharks help keep the
oceans in balance by controlling
other species. To explain this,
Maljkovic’ cited research showing
that intense fishing pressure on
sharks has produced a cascade of
unexpected consequences.

With fewer large predators in
the sea, the number of rays,
skates and small shark species
has exploded, and these are dec-
imating the populations of other
vital marine species. North Car-
olina, for example, had to close
its century-old scallop fishery in
2004 because of over-predation
by rays, while shark fishing in
Tasmania caused a boom in their
main prey — octopus — which
crashed the spiny lobster fishery
there.

Scientists like Gruber and
Maljkovic’ often complain about
the popular fear of sharks, which
leads many to think it is a good
thing to kill them. But the fact is
that overfishing benefits no one,
least of all the fishermen. And
sharks are especially vulnerable
because they take so long to
reach sexual maturity and only
reproduce every couple of years.

But despite our propensity to
kill sharks whenever we have the
opportunity, the Bahamas gen-

erally maintains a good reputa-
tion in terms of marine conser-
vation. In a 2007 article National
Geographic pointed out that
most of our archipelago remains
free of industrial development:
"Locals still make a living off
Bahamian lobster, snapper, and
conch; sportsmen still take bone-
fish from the sand flats, and mar-
lin and sailfish from the cold
6,000-foot-deep chasm called the
Tongue of the Ocean.

"More than 40 shark species
cruise Bahamian waters," the
article continued, "including
tigers, lemons, great hammer-
heads, bulls, blacktips, makos,
silkies, nurses; even migrating
blues and massive whale sharks
pass through. Others live here
year-round, giving birth in the
same quiet lagoons where they
were born.”

According to Mike Braynan,
director of the Department of
Marine Resources, there is no
significant commercial shark fish-
ery in The Bahamas: "We have
had a line item for sharks in our
landing statistics off and on over
the years, but usually the amount
is zero."

By contrast, shark dive
tourism is a multi-million-dollar
industry that attracts thousands
of visitors and generates tons of
priceless publicity every year. It
contributes much more to our

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economy than a dead shark ona
fishing boat ever could. In fact,
according to Gruber, a single live
shark in healthy habitat like the
Bahamas is worth as much as
$200,000 in tourism revenue over
its lifetime.

That's why shark feeding has
become such a big part of the
local dive industry. And although
feeding wild animals is generally
frowned upon, Gruber has long
been in favour of it where sharks
are concerned: "The reasons are
manifold, not the least being the
economic value of sharks to the
dive industry of the Bahamas.
Considering the unremitting
commercial slaughter and the
bad press that sharks inevitably
get these days, any development
of a positive image by making
divers into ambassadors for shark
conservation can only help.”

Maljkovic’ seems to agree
with this analysis. She told BNT
members last week that her
recent research at Southwest
Point looked into the impacts of
feeding on reef shark ecology.
With the help of Stuart Cove's
dive operation at South Ocean
she observed and tagged num-
bers of sharks, and concluded
that dive tourism has negligible
impacts on their behaviour.

She also concluded that reef
shark conservation efforts would
likely have a positive impact on

populations of other marine
species, and called for an ecosys-
tem-based approach to marine
conservation. This is something
that the BNT and other environ-
mental groups have also been
pushing for years through the
national park system.

Back in the 1980s an assess-
ment of popular dive sites off the
southwest coast of New Provi-
dence led to the first proposals
for a marine park in that area.
The idea was revived in the early
2000s during the fight to preserve
Clifton as a national heritage
park, and the BNT is now work-
ing on a formal proposal for the
government to consider.

That proposal will be based
on information to be collected
during a rapid ecological survey
now being planned, as well as
from a series of consultations
with stakeholders — the people
who live near and use the areas
that may be included in the pro-
posed reserve.

The objective is to protect our
natural resources while provid-
ing non-destructive economic
opportunities (like shark dive
tourism), as well as recreational
and educational opportunities for
Bahamians and visitors. A multi-
use marine reserve in this area
has the potential to become a
cornerstone of the country's
national park system, the BNT
says.

Some argue that the entire
Bahamas is already a no-take
zone for sharks. But this over-
looks the fact that — like turtles
— sharks don't respect national
boundaries. And ongoing coastal
development at places like Bimi-
ni is destroying critical nursery
habitat for these endangered ani-
mals.

As National Geographic put
it, "If the sharks go, so too goes a
bountiful ecosystem that feeds
local people and keeps outsiders
coming back to the islands."

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



LAUNCH OF RBPF SUMMER YOUTH PROGRAMME
Children on the

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOBLE OVERSEAS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
YASHIMA ALPS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GOLDEN CREST INVESTMENT
HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AURUBIN HOLDINGS S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



PHOTOS By Felipé Major
Tribune Staff

Howes of children took part in Monday’s
march to mark the launch of this year’s Royal
Bahamas Police Force Summer Youth programme.

Organised under the banners of their respective dis-
tricts, participants marched from St John’s Native Bap-
tist Church on East Street to Police Headquarters.

The RBDF’s Summer Youth Programme brings
together students from all over New Providence for six to
eight weeks of educational and recreational activities.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SUNWATER LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 9



Prime Minister backs
plan for education

FROM page one

especially Bahamian parents and citi-
zens. It is necessary, therefore, that the
process you have begun at this summit
be continued and expanded,” he said.

Mr Ingraham extended a special invi-
tation to his “friends in the Opposition”
to participate fully in this enterprise.

Noting the fact that education cur-
rently receives more than 16 per cent of
the annual national budget Mr Ingra-
ham said that it is with considerable
satisfaction that the Bahamas was able
to report to the United Nations that it
has achieved the vast majority of the
millennium goals for education even as
these were just being articulated in
international circles.

“It is to the credit of successive
Bahamian governments since 1967 that
every child in the Bahamas has access to
education as a right and that we in the
public sector guarantee that there is
school space for every child in the
Bahamas from kindergarten to Grade
12.”

The Prime Minister also noted that
there has been significant criticism of

the performance of pub-
lic schools which has
been focused primarily
on the average grades
produced each year.
However, Mr Ingraham
added that it must also
be recognised that these
same schools produce
graduates who are well
above average and some
who are even considered
“brilliant by any inter-
national yardstick.”
“Each year, the top
echelon of our student
body leaves school as
accomplished scholars,
able to pursue tertiary
level education at the
best universities and
technical colleges in the
world, where many of
them perform exceptionally well.
“Top class professionals — teachers,
nurses, doctors, lawyers, accountants,
bankers — have come out of our
schools, both public and private, having
been given the tools to pursue higher

HUBERT INGRAHAM



education in our schools.
We have helped in the
development of talented
artists, musicians and
crafts persons, acclaimed
chefs and tourism prac-
titioners, and successful
entrepreneurs and busi-
ness managers.

“Regrettably, our suc-
cess in getting every
child into a classroom
has not translated into
every child having
achieved his full poten-
tial. When, in the first
half of the 20th century,
most children complet-
ing primary school could
read and write, today
too many students leave
our secondary schools
only semi-literate and
semi-numerate.

“Tn earlier times, academically weak
students dropped out of school, learned
a trade or became one of a large
unskilled and semi-literate work force.
They never had the opportunity to

;
7
]
*
J
'
*
'
.
i

attend secondary schools. Today, many
young persons are kept in school until :
age 18, but still leave school as unpre- i
pared to earn a living as would have
their early counterparts who never pro- }

gressed beyond primary school.”

This mismatch between money spent }
and the unsatisfactory performance of }
pupils has served as a principal cause for }
this latest summit. Mr Ingraham said
that while the Bahamas must face the
fact that only a minority — “some saya i
talented tenth” — of any population will :
excel academically, the Bahamas nev- }
ertheless has a responsibility to prepare }
the great majority of its populace to }
make a living and to function as bal- :

anced and productive citizens.

“You have spent the past two days }
reviewing and discussing a draft ten- :
year education plan. It is my hope that :
your sessions will have produced some }
practical, sensible, and focused recom- }
mendations on how we might invigo- }
rate our education system, stimulate }
young persons not only to want to learn, i

but to excel,” he said.

¢ SEE PAGE THREE

BNT chief, Lands and Surveys staff accused
of ‘conspiring’ to dispossess farmer of land

FROM page one

tated” to receive a letter in May
2008 which gave him three
months to vacate land he had
leased from the Crown for 40
years to farm with his family.

The Statement claims that he
later discovered that at around
the same time he had received
the letter the Department had
already granted the land — on
which Mr Gibson had made a
livelihood farming pigs, sheep,
cattle and chickens — to the
BNT without his knowledge.

The environmental charity
wanted the right to land in the
area to create the protected
Harrold and Wilson Ponds park
and to relocate their headquar-
ters from Village Road, it is
claimed.

The location had come to the
organisation’s attention after it
became a major draw for
birdlife as a result of Mr Gib-
son’s farming activities, with
birds eating the feed he gave to
his animals, the statement
claims.

It is alleged that in 2007, the
same year that the organisation
was granted 250 acres in the
area, Mr Carey, on behalf of
the BNT, first started to “make
enquiries” of the Department
concerning the possibility of
acquiring rights to the farm land
Gibson leased.

Mr Carey consequently went
on to propose to the farmer that
if the BNT could take posses-
sion of half of the land in ques-
tion — four acres — the organ-
isation would assist Mr Gibson
in getting a lease for 50 acres

Clinton draws crowds
as UN envoy to Haiti

GONAIVES, Haiti

BILL CLINTON on Tuesday took his Haiti relief effort to this
battered seaside city that was nearly destroyed last year by a series
of tropical storms, finding a mud-caked maze of partially rebuilt
homes and shops, according to Associated Press.

Clinton, the new special U.N. envoy to Haiti, viewed river con-
trol projects and visited a hospital that served as an emergency shel-
ter during the two storms that ravaged the town. Four storms hit
Haiti in all, killing nearly 800 people nationwide and causing $1 bil-
lion in damage to irrigation, bridges and roads.

The former president praised reconstruction efforts but said
much more work needed to be done. He said Haiti needs more
money and better coordination among aid groups and the gov-
ernment to rebuild and spur development.

“[’m just trying to organize this process and drive it faster,”
Clinton said during a break in the tour, standing in the blazing mid-
day sun alongside a smiling President Rene Preval.

Aid has poured into the Gonaives region but many homes and
shops remain damaged and the area remains vulnerable to flood-
ing because the surrounding hills have been stripped of trees to cre-
ate farm fields and make charcoal for cooking.

It was Clinton’s first trip to Gonaives, but he was greeted like a
returning hero. Shrieking girls clamored to have their photo taken
with the former president and men pushed their elderly mothers
through the crowd for a chance to shake his hand.

People stood on piles of rubble to catch a glimpse of Clinton’s
motorcade as it wove through the rocky streets of Gonaives, one of
the poorest cities in a chronically troubled country considered the
poorest in the Western Hemisphere.

Clinton said the Haitian government and its international back-
ers hope to create 150,000 to 200,000 jobs nationwide over the
next two years. Many of those jobs will come from projects to
rebuild roads and shore up erosion-prone hillsides.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORCHID OAKS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is

Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

of farm land in Andros where
he could grow feed for his
chickens.

However, the statement
claims that Mr Carey, on behalf
of the BNT, wanted all of the
land.

Furthermore, it alleges he
“never made an approach” to
the Ministry of Agriculture on
behalf of Mr Gibson and “nev-
er intended to”, instead “secret-
ly” approaching the Depart-
ment of Lands and Surveys with
a view to having the entire
leased farm taken away from
the plaintiff and given to the
BNT with nothing in return.

The deal proposed by the
BNT with Mr Gibson was
therefore “bogus and not bona
fide and constituted uncon-
scionable conduct against a
poor and simple farmer and his
family,” it is alleged.

Meanwhile, despite previ-
ously meeting with Mr Turn-
quest and Mr Russell of the
Department of Lands and Sur-
veys and making enquiries
about the status of his lease, Mr
Gibson claims he only learnt
that his lease on the land had
come to an end in the letter of



May 2008, which asked him to
vacate the premises.

The Department, from which
Mr Turnquest resigned amid
controversy over his alleged
role in grants of Crown land
made to family members and
friends, had never “produced
evidence of grants of lease or
renewals of lease to the plaintiff
nor produced demands for rent
nor accepted rent in respect of
his leased farm...so the plaintiff
could never be certain that his
status as a tenant was in good
standing,” the statement of
claim alleges.

Mr Carey was aware of this, it
is alleged, and “despite the fact
that the department, with the
knowledge of the BNT, had giv-
en Mr Gibson the expectation
that his renewable lease would
be renewed...conspired with the
officers of the Department that
the eight acres of Crown
land...that the plaintiff had
farmed with his family for over
40 years would be taken away
from them and donated to the
(BNT).”

The statement claims that Mr
Gibson became subject to an
“ever increasing battery of

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AVENARIUS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)











Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

















Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)






Legal Notice

NOTICE
LIMEHOUSE INCORPORATED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

threats from senior civil servants i
asking him to vacate” the land :

from May 2008 onwards.

Mr Gibson, who is described
as having been born in 1947 into ;
a “poor farming family”, began }
farming the land behind Fire :
Trail Road in the vicinity of

Wilson Pond at age 21.

In his statement of claim he is }
asking the court to rule that he :
has “exclusive possession and }
occupation” of the eight acres of }
land he had farmed prior to }

May 2008.

He is also seeking an injunc- }
tion restraining the BNT from
entering that area of land and :
another 36,500 square feet of ;
land he owns there without his :
permission and from “interfer- }
ing with the exclusive posses- }
sion occupation and enjoyment }
of the relevant land for farm- :

ing purposes.”

Also demanded is $120,000
that the statement alleges Mr }
Carey is alleged to have :

promised Mr Gibson in return

for him agreeing to remove two }
poultry houses that were locat- :
ed near the boardwalk con- }
structed by the BNT over the }

ponds.

Har! Taylor

FROM page one

that after receiving informa-
i tion regarding McNeil from
i Inspector Cash, he told McNeil
i to take off his clothes and gave
i him clothes to put on. This he
i said was done in the presence
i of Inspector Cash and ASP
i Fernander. He told the court
i that he collected a gray T-shirt,
a white T-shirt, a pair of short
blue jeans, white boxer shorts
and a pair of white socks from
McNeil. He told the court that
he packaged the items in
? brown paper bags, which he
sealed. He said the items were
delivered to the police forensic
lab the following day. Corporal
Evans also told the court that
while at CDU, he also spoke
? to ASP Leon Bethel regard-
ing McNeil and as a result
took a hair sample from him.
The hair sample was also deliv-
ered to the police forensic lab
on November 15, he said.

During cross-examination,
McNeil’s attorney Murrio
Ducille suggested that Corpo-
ral Evans had asked his client
for his clothing because he had
told him that he wanted to
examine his body to see if he
had any injuries. Corporal
Evans denied the suggestion
? admitting that he gave McNeil
? no reason for requesting his
clothing. He also noted that
? McNeil was a suspect during
i that time. Mr Ducille also
i pointed out that he had taken
i a hair sample from McNeil
i without his consent. Corporal
i Evans replied that McNeil,
? who did have a lawyer present
i did not object to the sample
i being taken. He admitted,
: however, that the accused had
? not consented to the sample
being taken.

Detective Inspector
? Rochelle Deleveaux-Rolle told
the court yesterday that on
August 15, 2008, she received a
: number of items from Corpo-
? ral 2313 Francis. She said she
? found biological stains on each
? shoulder of McNeil’s shirt and
took a cutting from them. She
i also told the court that she
: took a cutting from the heels
? of McNeil’s socks and for-
warded them for DNA analy-
i sis.
The case, which is being
i heard before Senior Justice
Anita Allen, continues today.
i Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner, Neil
i Brathwaite and Darnell
: Dorsette represent the Crown.
Troyniko McNeil, 22, the
? son of Taylor’s former busi-
? ness partner, Troy McNeil, is
charged with intentionally
? causing the death of Harl Tay-
lor between Saturday,
: November 17, and Sunday,
? November 18, 2007, while
? being concerned together with
another. Taylor, 37, was found
dead at his home, Mountbat-

i ten House, on West Hill
: Street.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TALIPAN VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
COURCELLES GREENS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

CUED © A SOMBRE FAREWELL TO MICHAEL JACKSON e
around the world

mourn their idol

LONDON

FANS IN Asia stayed up into the
wee hours, bars across Europe held
Michael Jackson theme nights and
television stations from Sydney to
Paris cleared their schedules Tues-
day to broadcast the King of Pop’s
star-studded memorial service live
from Los Angeles, according to
Associated Press.

Fans mourned — and celebrated
— the singer’s life along with the
thousands attending the U.S.
event, where entertainers including
Stevie Wonder, Mariah Carey,
Usher, Lionel Richie paid tribute
to the star, who died June 25. The
12-year-old Welsh schoolboy Sha-
heen Jafargholi, who wowed TV
audiences earlier this year with the
Jackson 5 song “Who’s Loving
You” on “Britain’s Got Talent”
got a standing ovation after he
sang the same song to the stadium.

In London, dozens of fans shel-
tered under umbrellas against the
rain as they watched the event on a
big screen outside the 02 Arena,
where Jackson was to have per-
formed 50 comeback shows start-
ing next week. Many more stayed
dry at home after the BBC
announced it would cancel sched-
uled programming and show the
ceremony live.

“His whole life was a global
broadcast in a way, so I suppose
it’s fitting that his death also is,”
said barista Robert Anderson, 26,
in London.

Crowds gathered outside
Harlem’s Apollo Theater in New
York — where the Jackson 5 won
“Amateur Night” in 1967 — and in
Detroit, where his career was
launched with Motown Records.

“T think he was somebody who
really did change the style of
music,” said Jonathan Contreras, a
23-year-old college student from
Westland, Michigan. “They call
him the King of Pop. I call him the
King of Music.”

Fans gathered at Berlin’s O2
World arena and at a bar just off
Paris’ Champs-Elysees, where
about 20 people, many dressed in
black, Jackson-style hats or white
gloves, watched the ceremony.

“T didn’t want to experience this
moment alone,” said Marie-Anne
Le Saux, 25, an insurance company
employee who helped organize the
ceremony.

In Santiago, Chile, national
police band played “We are the
world” during the traditional guard
change at the presidential palace
La Moneda, as hundreds looked
on.

About 50 fans lit candles and
laid flowers in the main square in
Stockholm, as Jackson hits “Billie
Jean” and “Earth Song” poured
out of a small stereo.

Hannah Ralme, 14, from Stock-
holm, said she had been heartbro-
ken by Jackson’s death. “It’s like a
piece of me died,” she said. “The
music, the way he danced, the way
he expressed it showed me how to
live my life — to be childlike and
think about other people.”

Ata Pan-African culture festival
in Algiers, Algeria, hundreds of
singers and dancers from across
the continent performed The Jack-
son 5’s “Blame it on the Boogie”
as a tribute.

Several hundred Jackson fans
gathered at a Hong Kong mall late
Tuesday to remember their idol
and watch the memorial on a big
screen, surrounded by shuttered
store fronts. Holding white can-
dles, Hong Kong singer William
Chan and Taiwanese pop star Judy
Chou led the audience in observing
a 30-second silence. Many fans
clutched red roses and wore black;
some donned Jackson’s trademark
fedora hats.

In Japan, home to some of Jack-
son’s most passionate fans, about
100 people gathered at a Tower
Records store in downtown Tokyo
to watch his videos on a big screen
hours before the Los Angeles
memorial. The store, which Jack-
son visited twice, displayed his
hand print in a cement block and
large posters celebrating his per-
formances. Several shelves dedicat-
ed to the pop star were stacked
with his CDs and DVDs.

“T love him,” said Namiko
Hayakawa, a 31-year-old house-
wife, one of the first to grab a seat.
“He is one of the greatest and most
original solo performers. He also
has a message about peace. He is
such a big star, but he has a mes-
sage for every little person.”

In the Philippines, noontime
television variety show “Eat Bula-
ga” said it would hold a Jackson
dance contest Wednesday in honor
of the pop icon.

For some, the relentless media
coverage of Jackson since his death
was too much.

“In Ireland we like a good funer-
al, so we’ll be tuning in. There’s no
good sports match on tonight any-
way,” said barman Peadar O i #
Docherty, 24, in the Stag’s Head i j lial
pub in central Dublin. i }

But, he added, “alot of the adu- Pee

lation is completely over the top.” THE JACKSON FAMILY, from left, Janet Jackson, Paris Jackson, LaToya Jackson, Jermaine Jackson and Prince Michael are shown on stage at the memorial service.

Wally Skalij, Pool/AP

Mark J. Terrill, Pool/AP

Kevork Djansezian, pool/AP


THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 11



era JACKSON (AP FILE)
LOS ANGELES

IT WAS not spectacular, extrav-
agant or bizarre. There were songs
and tears but little dancing. Instead,
Michael Jackson’s memorial was a
somber, spiritual ceremony that
reached back for the essence of the
man, according to Associated Press.

Singer, dancer, superstar,
humanitarian: That was how the
some 20,000 people gathered inside
the Staples Center arena on Tues-
day, and untold millions watching
around the world, remembered
Jackson, whose immense talents
almost drowned beneath the spec-
tacle of his life and fame.

If there was a shocking moment,
it came in the form of Jackson’s
daughter, Paris-Michael, who made
the first public statement of her 11
years.

“Ever since I was born, Daddy
has been the best father you could
ever imagine,” she said, dissolving
into tears and turning to lean on
her aunt Janet. “And I just wanted
to say I love him — so much.”

Outside the arena, the celebrity-
industrial complex that Jackson
helped create ground on. More
than 3,000 police officers massed
downtown to keep the ticketless
at bay. Helicopters followed the
golden casket as it was driven over
blocked-off freeways from Forest
Lawn cemetery to Staples Center.
A bazaar of T-shirts, buttons, pho-
tos and other memorabilia sprout-
ed in the blocks around the memo-
rial. Movie theaters played the ser-
vice live and people paused around
the world to watch.

Inside, however, the atmosphere
was churchlike, assisted by the
enormous video image of a stained
glass window, with red-gold clouds
blowing past, that was projected
behind the stage.

The ceremony began with
Smokey Robinson reading state-
ments from Jackson’s close friend
Diana Ross — “Michael was part
of the fabric of my life” — and then
Nelson Mandela — “Be strong.”

A lengthy silence of several min-
utes followed, punctuated only by
a steady twinkle of camera flashes.
The thousands of mourners spoke
softly to those in neighboring seats
or contemplated their private
thoughts.

Celebrities made their way to
their seats in front of the stage:
Kobe Bryant, Spike Lee, Wesley
Snipes, Lou Ferrigno, Don King,
the Kardashian sisters, Magic John-
son, Brooke Shields, Larry King.
While Jackson was among the most
famous faces in the world, today’s
megastars were largely absent.
Those present mostly reflected
some connection to Jackson’s life
or work.

Among those conspicuously not
in attendance were Elizabeth Tay-
lor, Ross and Debbie Rowe, Jack-
son’s ex-wife and the mother of
Jackson’s two oldest children.

Many vehicles left Staples in a
long motorcade that ended up in a
Beverly Hills hotel. Record pro-
ducer Jimmy Jam told AP Televi-
sion that he was headed for a gath-
ering for friends and family, but he
won't give details.

The fans, clutching tickets that
1.6 million people had sought, were
a visual representation of Jackson’s
life: white, black and everything in
between; from Mexico, Japan, Italy
or America; wearing fedoras,

A final farewell to

July 7, 2009 in Los Angeles.

African headdresses, sequins or
surgical masks. Actor Corey Feld-
man showed up fully costumed as
Michael Jackson.

“Words can’t express how I
feel,” said Dani Harris, a 35-year-
old stay-at-home mom from Los
Angeles.

“You think about one person,
larger than presidents and kings
and queens,” Harris said. “People
in countries you can’t even see on
the map know his face, his music.”

The pre-ceremony stillness was
broken by the organ strains of an
African-American spiritual. “Hal-
lelujah, hallelujah, going to see the
King,” a choir sang. The crowd
cheered and rose to its feet.

The Rev. Lucious W. Smith of
the Friendship Baptist Church in
Pasadena gave the greeting, stand-
ing on the same stage where Jack-
son had been rehearsing for a
comeback concert before his death
on June 25 at age 50. Then Mariah
Carey sang the opening perfor-

LIONEL RICHIE performs at the Michael Jackson public memorial service held at Staples Center on Tuesday,

mance with a sweet rendition of
the Jackson 5 ballad “PL Be
There,” a duet with Trey Lorenz.
Queen Latifah read a special
poem composed by Maya
Angelou. Lionel Richie sang
gospel, “Jesus Is Love.” Berry
Gordy remembered the prodigy
of young Michael, drawing a stand-
ing ovation when he said the title
King of Pop would no longer suf-
fice: “He is simply the greatest
entertainer who ever lived.”
Emotions peaked when the Rev.
Al Sharpton delivered a fiery eulo-
gy highlighting all the barriers
Jackson broke and the troubles he
faced. “Every time he got knocked
down, he got back up,” Sharpton
said, and the applauding crowd
again jumped to its feet.
Sharpton rode the moment,
building to a crescendo. “There
wasn’t nothing strange about your
daddy,” he said later, addressing
Jackson’s three children in the
front row. “It was strange what

LCM a ESPEN

your daddy had to deal with!”

Jubilation erupted, with the
longest standing ovation of the
day. It seemed as if Sharpton
broke through some sort of wall,
freeing shouts from the crowd of
“We love you Michael!” After he
left the stage, chants of “Mi-chael!
Mi-chael!” filled the arena.

The parade of famous names
continued: Jennifer Hudson, Stevie
Wonder, Usher, Martin Luther
King III and his sister Bernice,
US. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee and
Kobe Bryant.

For a performer who smashed
the race barrier on MTV and did
as much as anyone to make black
music mainstream — not to men-
tion was accused of trying to turn
himself white through skin treat-
ments and plastic surgery — the
ceremony had a remarkably black
cast. John Mayer and Brooke
Sheields were the only white celebs
with major roles.

Another unexpected aspect was





Monica Almeida, Pool/AP

Cd

Gabriel Bouys, pool/AP

MICHAEL JACKSON’S daughter Paris Michael Katherine is comforted
by her aunts Janet Jackson, right, and LaToya Jackson at a memorial
service for music legend Michael Jackson.

the logistics. The mayhem and traf-
fic snarls that had been feared by
city officials never materialized.
The thousands of ticketholders
began filing in early and encoun-
tered few problems, and traffic was
actually considered by police to be
lighter than normal. An estimate
of up to 700,000 gawkers turned
out to be about 1,000.

The city of Los Angeles set up a
Web site to allow fans to con-
tribute money to help the city pay
for the memorial, which was esti-
mated to cost $1.5 million to $4
million. AEG, the event promoter
behind the memorial, has not
addressed whether it will give
money for the effort, but did con-
tribute $1 million to the city after it
staged a victory parade for the Los
Angeles Lakers last month.

It was not clear what will hap-

pen to Jackson’s body. The For-
est Lawn Memorial Park Holly-
wood Hills cemetery, where a pri-
vate service was held, is the final
resting place for such stars as Bette
Davis, Andy Gibb, Freddie Prinze,
Liberace and recently deceased
David Carradine and Ed McMa-
hon.

But Jackson’s brother Jermaine
has expressed a desire to have him
buried someday at Neverland, his
estate in Southern California.

The ceremony ended with Jack-
son’s family on stage, amid a choir,
singing “Heal the World.”

“All around us are people of
different cultures, different reli-
gions, different nationalities,” Rev.
Smith said as he closed the ser-
vice. “And yet the music of
Michael Jackson brings us togeth-

”

er.
THE TRIBUNE

Spor

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8,



for the
‘Golden
Girls’

‘GOLDEN Girl’ Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie proved
that her victory over Chandra
Sturrup at the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Athletic Associa-
tions (BAAA) National Track
and Field Championships was
no fluke.

Competing yesterday at the
Athletissima Track and Field
Meet in Lausanne, Switzer-
land, the double sprint cham-
pion clocked 11.12 seconds to
finish third in the women’s
100m.

Sturrup, who lost in the cen-
tury at home for the first time
in about five years, had to set-
tle for fourth in 11.25.

Winning the race was
Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser
in 11.03, followed by Ameri-
can Carmelita Jeter in 11.06.

It was the first race for both
Ferguson-McKenzie and Stur-
rup since they clashed at the
BAAA Nationals last month.

In that meeting, Ferguson-
McKenzie won in an identi-
cal time of 11.12 with Sturrup
trailing in 11.22.

Ferguson-McKenzie and
Sturrup were the only two
Bahamians to compete in
Switzerland.

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

OSBOURNE Moxey cap-
tured one of the four medals
won by the Bahamas at the
Central American and
Caribbean Championships in
Havana, Cuba, over the week-
end.

Now he’s hoping that as the
area champion, he will be added
to the Bahamas team going to
the IAAF World Champi-
onships in Athletics in Berlin,
Germany.

His winning leap of 26-feet,
11/2-inches in the men’s long
jump on Saturday was just
under the B qualifying mark of
26-41/2. The A standard is 26-8
3/4.

But Moxey will now have to
wait on the Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Associations as
to whether or not they will book
a ticket for him for the August
15-23 meet.

“Tt was okay. Our first goal
was to win a medal for the
Bahamas, which we did. Then it
was to qualify for the champi-

PAGE 12



Alessandro Valle/AP

SHELLY-ANN FRASER of Jamaica (right) runs to win the 100m race ahead of Carmelita Jeter (left) of the US,
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie (centre) of the Bahamas, Sheri-Ann Brooks of Jamaica (top left) and Torri Edwards
of the US (top right) at the Athletissima athletics meeting in the Stade Olympique in Lausanne, Switzerland, on

ts

2009

Moxey’s winning
leap at CAC not
enough for Berlin

onships outright in terms of dis-
tance,” said Moxey, who fell
short on the latter.

In pulling off the victory,
Moxey beat out Carlos Morgan
of the Cayman Islands, who
posted a leap of 25-9 3/4.
Bahamian Rudon Bastian, a
training partner of Moxey, got
the bronze with 24-10.

The other medals came from
veteran Lavern Eve in the
women’s javelin with a toss of
182-2 1/2. Cuban Yainelis
Ribeaux won with 195-9 1/2
with world record holder Oslei-
dys Menendez third with 192-6
1/2.

And the men’s 4 x 100 relay
team of Rodney Green, Adrian
Griffith, Karlton Rolle and Der-
rick Atkins clocked 39.45 for
the bronze behind Trinidad &
Tobago with the gold in 38.73
and Jamaica with the silver in
39.31.

But the relay team fell short
of the qualifying time of 39.10
for Berlin.

Moxey, who felt he put his
best foot forward, said had he
gotten a challenge from the
Cubans, he was convinced that

he would have been able to
earn a World Championship
qualifying mark.

If he gets to make the trip,
Moxey said he will definitely
have to work on his “approach
to the board and my landing has
to improve.”

I think if the Cubans were at
their best, I would have been
able to put out a little more,” he
said.

His local coach Peter Pratt
said he was satisfied with Mox-
ey’s performance, but he knew
that with the training he put in,
he should have performed
much better.

“The CAC was just his third
track meet for the year, so ’m
happy with his performance,”
Pratt said.

“Now we just have to wait
and see what the ruling the
BAAA will take, so we can
adjust our training.”

Moxey, employed at the
National Insurance Board, has
made the adjustment to training
at home and according to Pratt,
he’s doing all of the necessary
things to perform at a high lev-
el, if he gets to travel to Berlin.

§



ee more photos on page 14







Win
rele

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

eam captain John

Farrington knows

how important it is

for Team Bahamas to
play their best this weekend in
the second round of the Ameri-
can Zone II Davis Cup tie.

The Bahamas will remain in
zone II for 2010 if they defeat
Guatemala. If they lose, the
Bahamas will be dropped back
to Zone III where the team last
played in 2007.

“This is a relegation tie, so we
really don’t want to go back
down there,” Farrington said.
“We’re looking good. The guys
have been working hard and
they are all feeling fine. I think
they came home prepared to
play.”

During a practice session yes-
terday at the National Tennis
Center where the tie will take
place over the Independence
holiday weekend, Farrington
said the players are eager to
treat this tie just like any other.

“Texpect us to come out with
the win by Sunday,” he said, not
taking the younger Guatemalan
team for granted, despite hav-
ing won 3-0 in their last meet-
ing in 2007 in Guatemala.

“T’m confident in my players.
We have control of our destiny,
so to speak,” he insisted. “So we
just have to do the things that
we have to do to take care of
business.”

If they play through to form,
Olympian Devin Mullings will
play as the top seed, followed
by former Orange Bowl cham-
pion Timothy Neilly. They
should be in action on Friday in
the opening singles.

Then on Saturday, expect for
veteran Bjorn Munroe and Mar-
vin Rolle to once again team up
for doubles. The alternate on
the team is Rodney Carey Jr.

All of the players are excited
about competing in the tie this
weekend.

“T think everybody is playing
with confidence and so we
should do very well,” said
Munroe, the 23-year-old Grand
Bahamian, who has played on
the team since 2002.

As long as they put up a

or ile
ated!

Armstrong
moves into
contention at

Tour de France...
See page 16



“fight,” Mullings said the
Bahamas should have no prob-
lems coming out on top, espe-
cially with the tie being at home.

Neilly, another Grand
Bahamian, said he has been
doing a lot of physical training
and that has certainly helped his
game.

“You can expect to see a lot
better tennis than you’ve seen
in the past,” said Neilly, the 21-
year-old playing in just his fourth
tie. “I’m looking forward to play-
ing some very good matches.”

As for the team, Neilly said
they are all looking very good, so
they should be able to prevail.

Munroe, the oldest member
of them at age 31, said both
Mullings and Neilly seem to be
prepared for their singles match-
es and he’s going to be ready
when he’s called upon to play
doubles.

“T’ve been playing both sin-
gles and doubles, but doubles is
my specialty,” said the Grand
Bahama native, who has played
in six ties, but his first at home in
five years. “So I’m definitely
going to be ready.”

And Rolle, his partner, said
he’s ready.

“We just have to go out there
and give it our best and fight,”
said Rolle, the 25-year-old who
has played in 15 previous ties.
“If we give 100 per cent, I don’t
see why we should not come out
on top. We are ready.”

Carey Jr, the 17-year-old who
is making his debut on the team,
said he’s really pleased to be giv-
ena chance to hang out with the
more experienced players.

“T’ve been having some good
workouts, so I’m really pleased
with that,” he said. “I won’t be
playing, but I will be cheering
from the sidelines and I hope
that I can help them come up
with the win.”

Not concerned about the fact
that they are playing over the
holiday weekend, Munroe said it
just means that more people will
have something special to do, so
the stadium should be filled.

With this being a holiday
weekend, Farrington is calling
on the general public to come
out Friday to Sunday to support
the team because they need to
capitalize on their home court
advantage.



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TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS

Guatemala, Bahamas Davis Cup teams
looking for big second round win



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH they know
their backs are against the wall
competing away from home, the
Guatemalan Davis Cup team is
confident that they can take
care of business this weekend.

The youthful visiting team,
captained by Manuel Chavez,
will have their hands full against
the Bahamian team in the sec-
ond round of the American
Zone IJ tie that will be impor-
tant for both teams.

The winner of the tie, sched-
uled for this weekend at the
National Tennis Center, will
remain in Zone II for next year,
while the loser will be relegated
to Zone ITI.

Sebastian Vidal, the 19-year-
old member of the team, said
they are here to win.

“We feel pretty strong about
our chances of getting the vic-
tory,” he said following a team
practice yesterday at the NTC.
“We feel we can win the whole
thing.”

Having played and lost to the
Bahamas 3-0 in Guatemala in
the Group 3 Round Robin play
in 2007, Vidal said they know
how strong the Bahamian team
is.

“Their four players are pretty
strong, so we know it’s going to
be a pretty tough match,” Vidal
said. “But we are a pretty young
team and we’re experienced
enough to win on the big stage.

“We have a lot of talent, so
we hope to come out with the
W (win).”

Joining Vidal on the
Guatemalan team are Christio-
pher Diaz-Figueroa, a 19-year-
old who is expected to be the
top seed, Cristian Paiz, the old-
est player at 28 and the No.2
seed and Julen Uriguen, the
youngest member, who turns 19
on July 22.

Guatemela, who first started
playing Davis Cup in 1990, had
their best showing in 1995, 2000
and 2001 when they played in
the Americans Zone II.

However, they have played
in Zone 3 for a number of years
and even were as low as Zone 4
in 2004. They last played in
Zone 3 last year where they got
promoted to Zone II.

But the team is coming off a
5-0 loss to the Dominican
Republic in March and know
that if they fail to win this week-
end, they will drop back to
Zone IIT.

“T think it’s very important. I
know the Bahamas won the
Group III two years ago and
we managed to win it last year,”
Vidal said. “So I think both
teams know how hard it is to
get to Zone IL.

“No one wants to go back
down to Zone 3, so it’s an
important match for both of our
teams to win and not go back to
Zone 3.”

Loser will be relegated to American Zone III



THE YOUTHFUL Guatemalan Davis Cup team, captained by Manuel Chavez (far left), is confident that they can take care of business this weekend. Shown (I-r) are Chavez, Christopher Diaz,
Cristian Diaz, Sebastian Vidal, Andres Bucaro and Julen Uriguen...



THE BAHAMAS’ Davis Cup team - shown (I-r) are Timothy Neilly, Devin Mullings, Marvin Rolle, team captain John Farrington, Bjorn Munroe and Rodney Carey Jr

National 15-16
baseball team

to face Puerto
Rico today

THE Bahamas Baseball Fed-
eration’s national 15-16 team
departed town on Monday and
have arrived safely in San Juan,
Puerto Rico.

The team, managed by
Patrick Knowles Sr of Grand
Bahama, had a light workout
yesterday and are scheduled to
play their first game against
Puerto Rico at 3pm today.

The starting pitcher is Mar-
cus Holbert, a flame thrower
from Grand Bahama who has
recorded his speed ball at 87
miles per hour.

The rest of the line-up is
expected to include the follow-

ing:
Catcher - Theodore Sweet-
ing Jr of New Providence

1st Base - Jeffrey Woodside
of New Providence

2nd Base - Ashton Allens of
New Providence

Shortstop - Alex Tapia of
New Providence

3rd Base - Marvin McQueen
of Grand Bahama

Left Field - Andre Turnquest
of Grand Bahama

Center Field - Jervis Stuart
Jr of Grand Bahama

Right Field - David Sweeting
of New Providence

Designated player - Jeffrey
Woodside of New Providence

To advertise in The Tritune -



ea MSNA UT
MIR) rere ya BTL

STANDING (I-r) are Patrick Knowles Sr, manager - LBL/Marcian Curry, coach - GBABA/David Sweeting - JBLN/ Benniko Benneby - GBABA/ Marcus
Holbert - GBABA/ Jervis Stuart Jr - LBL / Ashton Allens - JBLN/ Crachad Laing - JBLN/ Chad Burrows - JBLN/ Jeffrey Woodside - JBLN. Kneeling (I-
r) are Loren Kemp, Coach - JBLN/ Theodore Sweeting Jr - JBLN/ Remon Grant - GBABA/ Cameron Richardson - GBABA/ Alex Tapia - JBLN/ Andre Turn-
quest - LBL/ Marvin McQueen - GBABA/D'Andre Rigby - JBLN/ Byron Ferguson - JBLN.


PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS

PUM mC TTT CM CT Dir ed cr dt





AP Photos

ABOVE AND ON TOP — Carmelita Jeter (far left) of the US, Shelly-Ann Fraser (centre) of Jamaica and ‘Gold-
en Girl Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of the Bahamas run during the 100m race at the Athletissima meeting in
the Stade Olympique in Lausanne, Switzerland on Tuesday. Shelly-Ann Fraser won ahead of Carmelita Jeter

and Ferguson-McKenzie.

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SHELLY-ANN FRASER and Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie run during the 100m race...

Cancer-free Eric Shanteau
back to swimming fast

@ By BETH HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) —
Eric Shanteau is swimming
faster than he ever has, diving
into the water every day know-
ing that he’s cancer-free.

That’s gratifying news to the
25-year-old breaststroker who
was diagnosed with testicular
cancer just weeks before last
year’s US Olympic trials.

He kept the stunning infor-
mation to himself while com-
peting for a spot on his first
Olympic team. Shanteau earned
a spot in the 200-meter breast-
stroke, finishing 10th in Beijing
with a personal-best time.

Then he returned home to
Atlanta for surgery. After a
recovery period, Shanteau
resumed training in Austin,
Texas, with a goal of making
the world championships.

He’s four laps away from a
trip to Rome later this month.

Shanteau became the second
American to swim under a
minute in the 100 breaststroke,
clocking 59.89 seconds to make
him the leading qualifier going
into Tuesday night’s final at the

US national championships.

“Tt gives me a lot of confi-
dence,” he said before adding,
“It doesn’t matter what hap-
pens this morning if I don’t do it
tonight.”

The top two finishers qualify
for the world meet.

Since March, Shanteau has
posted personal bests in his sig-
nature events, the 100 and 200
breaststrokes. His 100 time in
the morning preliminaries low-
ered his previous best of 1:00.09.

He wore the X Glide suit by
Arena for the first time Tues-
day. It’s one of the suits
approved by swimming’s world
governing body for competition
this year.

“Obviously the suits are going
to help out, but regardless of
what suit I wore, I knew I was
going to be under a minute this
week,” he said.

With Brendan Hansen tak-
ing time off, Shanteau is poised
to move into the role of domi-
nant American breaststroker
that Hansen has owned for the
last several years.

Shanteau wants more than
just to compete in the individual
breaststroke events in Rome.

He is aiming to succeed Hansen
on the medley relay team, and
likely needs to win the 100 to
ensure he would swim in the
final in Rome rather than just in
the prelims.

Just before traveling to Indi-
anapolis, Shanteau went for a
final round of blood tests that
confirmed he is cancer-free, the
10th month he can celebrate
such welcome news.

But memories of his recent
past are never far away.

“There’s still that thought in
the back of your mind, ‘What
if there’s a recurrence?”’ he
said.

“It’s been a difficult past eight
or nine months. I have to live
with it the rest of my life.”

The disease had already hit
home for Shanteau, whose
father Rick battled lung cancer
at the same time his son was
diagnosed. The elder Shanteau
is in Indianapolis this week to
cheer on his son, and now needs
only occasional chemotherapy
treatments.

“He’s doing really well,” the
younger Shanteau said smiling.

Happily, Shanteau can say
the same about himself.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 15



SPORTS



Mathis’ 3-run homer leads Angels over Rangers A217)

BASEBALL
ANAHEIM, Calif.
Associated Press

BEFORE hitting a pair of
RBI singles and robbing Hank
Blalock of an extra-base hit with
yet another defensive gem in
center field, Torii Hunter nearly
saw his errorless streak slip away.

The eight-time Gold Glove
winner relayed the ball toward
third base after an RBI single by
Blalock in the first inning of the
Angels’ 9-4 victory over Texas
on Monday night. Shortstop
Maicer Izturis was supposed to
cut off the throw, but it went past
him, and skipped by third base-
man Chone Figgins as another
run scored.

The error was charged to Fig-
gins, and Hunter was able to
extend his errorless streak to 235
consecutive games — the longest
active streak among outfielders.

“T was sweating a little bit, to
be honest,” said Hunter, whose
last error was on Aug. 31, 2007.
“T thought they would give me
the error because I made the
throw. But I wasn’t trying to
throw him out. I was actually just
trying to hit the cutoff man, but
he let it go. It was a mistake on
his part. I was very upset. But
the streak lives.”

Jeff Mathis hit a go-ahead
three-run homer in the second
ining, helping the Angels snap a
first-place tie with the Rangers in
the AL West. Juan Rivera also
had a pair of RBI singles and
Jered Weaver (9-3) struck out
nine over seven innings for the
victory.

Weaver allowed four runs and
seven hits, including a two-run
homer in the seventh by Ian
Kinsler that snapped a career-
worst 0-for-24 drought by the
Rangers’ second baseman.

“Tt’s hard to take Kins out for
the teams we’ve been playing,”
manager Ron Washington said.
“IT mean, how can you tell Kins:
Tm going to sit you against Ana-
heim?’ or "Pm going to sit you
against Tampa Bay?’ I wasn’t
going to do that. He’s got seven
days left, and he’s going to learn
how to grind. It’s going to help
him to understand how to play
when you’re a little fatigued —
because he is fatigued. At this



point, everybody is fatigued.”

Josh Hamilton, who was acti-
vated from the disabled list
before the game, was 2 for 4 with
a double and two strikeouts.

“T would have stayed down
longer if I didn’t feel like I was
ready,” said Hamilton, who will
play in his second straight All-
Star game next week. “It’s good
to be back up here and be
around the guys again and actu-
ally feel like part of the team,
instead of just a guy hanging
out.”

The Rangers had a 4 1/2 game
lead on the Angels when Hamil-
ton went on the DL on June 2,
and led them by 5 1/2 games on
May 30.

Both teams reached the mid-
way point of their respective
schedules. The Angels (46-35)
were 48-33 at this stage last sea-

son and the Rangers (45-36)
were 41-40.

“You have to play well against
whatever team shows up on the
schedule,” Angels manager Mike
Scioscia said. “If we were playing
any other team but Texas, it
doesn’t mean we don’t have to
bring the focus and intensity. It’s
still July, there’s still a lot of base-
ball left, and we’re still trying to
evolve as a team.”

Kevin Millwood (8-6) gave up
nine runs and nine hits over five
innings in the shortest of his 18
starts this season. He has given
up 13 runs and 17 hits over 11 1-
3 innings in his past two starts
— both against the Angels —
after giving up just seven runs in
40 2-3 innings over his previous
six outings.

“T didn’t hit my spots. When I
tried to go away, it would drift

PHILADELPHIA
Phillies’ Jayson
Werth, left,
runs the bases
after hitting a
grand slam
against the
Cincinnati
Reds’ in the
ninth inning of
a baseball
game Monday,
July 6, 2009, in
Philadelphia.

H. Rumph Jr./AP Photo

Big first inning leads
Phillies over Reds 22-1

BASEBALL
PHILADELPHIA
Associated Press

BLOOPERS dropped in,
grounders found holes and sev-
eral balls flew out of the park.

Once the Philadelphia Phillies
put their bats down, the Cincin-
nati Reds had suffered the
worst loss in team history.

Chase Utley hit a three-run
homer and Shane Victorino and
Greg Dobbs each had two-run
shots during a 10-run first, lead-
ing the Phillies to a 22-1 victory
over the Reds on Monday night.

It was the most lopsided
defeat for baseball’s first pro-
fessional franchise. The Red
Stockings and Redlegs never
got beat this badly, and the Big
Red Machine used to do all the
hitting.

“We got slaughtered as they
used to say,” Reds manager
Dusty Baker said.

The previous worst defeat for
the Reds was 26-6 on July 26,
1892. That also was against the
Phillies.

Cole Hamels (5-5) was the
beneficiary of the offensive out-
burst. The struggling ace
allowed one run and three hits
in seven innings to earn his first
win since shutting out the Los
Angeles Dodgers on June 4.

“T was just jumping for joy,”

Hamels said about the run sup-
port. “When you put that many
runs up, it makes it uncomfort-
able for the other team.”

The Phillies tied a club record
for most runs in the first inning.
They scored 10 three other
times, most recently on June 2,
2002, against the Montreal
Expos.

It was the most runs by
Philadelphia since a 26-7 win
over the New York Mets at the
old Veterans Stadium on June
11, 1985. The 22 runs were the
most in the six-year history of
Citizens Bank Park.

Reds starter Johnny Cueto
(8-5) retired just two batters,
allowing nine runs and five hits.
It was the shortest outing in the
right-hander’s two-year career.
Cueto had never allowed more
than six earned runs in a game,
and his ERA rose from 2.69 to
3.45.

Jayson Werth connected off
infielder Paul Janish in the
eighth. Victorino, a candidate
for the final spot on the NL’s
All-Star roster, helped his case
with four hits, four RBIs and a
career-high five runs. Dobbs
had four hits, Utley drove in
four and every starter had a hit.

“It was one of those nights
where everything we hit was
falling and we hit some hard,”
manager Charlie Manuel said.

The NL East-leading Phillies
have won four straight games
after losing 14 of 18. They had-
n’t scored more than 15 runs
since a 20-2 victory at St. Louis
last June 13. After that game,
the Phillies went 3-11 and
scored a total of 38 runs. Rock-
ies 1, Nationals 0

At Denver, Jason Marquis
pitched eight innings for his
major league-leading 11th win
and Todd Helton had an RBI
double in the first for Colorado.

Fresh off making his first All-
Star team, Marquis pitched out
of bases-loaded jams in the sev-
enth and eighth innings. Mar-
quis (11-5), who allowed seven
hits and struck out three, was
coming off a two-hit shutout at
Los Angeles on June 30.

Huston Street threw a per-
fect ninth for his 20th save in
21 chances.

Rookie Craig Stammen (1-4)
went a season-high seven
innings, giving up five hits and
the one run.

Diamondbacks 6, Padres 5

In Phoenix, Mark Reynolds
singled home Justin Upton with
two outs in the bottom of the
ninth to give Arizona the win.

Upton drew a two-out walk
from Cla Meredith (4-2) and
stole second before Reynolds
lined a single into the left-field
corner.



over the middle of the plate. And
when I didn’t hit my spots, they
hit those mistakes,” Millwood
said. “I think pitching up is part
of my game, one of my strengths.
But thigh high isn’t. Thigh high is
a bad place to throw the ball,
and that’s where I was missing
tonight.”

MARINERS 5, ORIOLES 0

¢ At Seattle, Jarrod Washburn
tossed a one-hitter for his ninth
career complete game. It was the
first one-hitter by a Mariners
pitcher at Safeco Field, and 10th in
franchise history.

Nick Markakis had the only hit
off Washburn (4-5), a two-out sin-
gle in the fourth. Washburn faced
just one batter over the minimum,
issuing no walks and striking out
three in his 110-pitch effort.

TEXAS Rangers
catcher Jarrod
Saltalamacchia,
left, tags out Los
Angeles Angels’
Kendry Morales
at home during
the eighth inning
of a baseball
game, Monday,
July 6, 2009, in
Anaheim, Calif.
The Angels won
9-4,

Jeff Lewis/AP Photo

ROYALS 4, TIGERS 3

¢ At Detroit, Mike Jacobs hit a
go-ahead solo homer in the
ninth and closer Joakim Soria
held on for Kansas City’s third
straight win.

Willie Bloomquist drove in
three runs for the Royals, con-
necting on a home run in the
sixth and a two-run triple in the
eighth. Roman Colon (1-0)
earned his first win since 2006,
when he was pitching for
Detroit.

BLUE JAYS 7, YANKEES 6

¢ At New York, Ricky Romero
(7-3) extended his scoreless
streak to 24 innings before Eric
Hinske homered in his Yankees
debut, and Toronto avoided get-
ting swept in a four-game
series.



INBRIEF

Yahoo, NFL
players union
Setile lawsuit

NFL
MINNEAPOLIS
Associated Press

YAHOO Inc. and the
NFL Players Association
have reached a settlement
over use of players’ statis-
tics, photos and other data
in Yahoo’s popular online
fantasy football game, but
details were not immediate-
ly available Tuesday.

Santa Clara, Calif.-based
Yahoo sued the NFLPA last
month in U.S. District Court
in Minnesota, claiming
Yahoo shouldn’t have to
pay royalties to use the data
because the information is
already publicly available.

Yahoo dropped the law-
suit Monday. Officials from
both parties said a settle-
ment was reached.

Yahoo Sports spokes-
woman Nicol Addison said
Yahoo doesn’t discuss liti-
gation and she wouldn’t dis-
close details.

Andrew Feffer, the
union’s chief operating offi-
cer and executive vice pres-
ident, had no comment
beyond saying there was a
settlement.

The last of Yahoo’s
licensing agreements with
NFL Players Inc. expired
March 1. But Yahoo
claimed it didn’t need
authorization, due to a court
decision in April in a similar
dispute between NFL Play-
ers Inc. and CBS Interac-
tive Inc.

Fantasy sports league par-
ticipants create teams com-
prised of real players. As the
season progresses, partici-
pants’ track their players’
statistics to judge how well
their team is performing.

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PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS



; | | i



Laurent Rebours/AP Photos



TONY Martin of Germany, wearing the best young rider's white jersey, right, leads his Team Columbia-HTC riders with Mark Cavendish of Britain, wearing the best sprint-
er's green jersey, seen far left, during the fourth stage of the Tour de France cycling race, a team time-trial over 39 kilometers (24.2 miles) with start and finish in Montpelli-
er, southern France, Tuesday July 7, 2009. Martin now ranks 8th overall, second right is American George Hincapie, left is Mark Cavendish of Britain, wearing the best
Sprinter's green jersey.

Bas Czerwinski/AP Photo

CADEL Evans of Australia, left, and Johan van Summeren of Bel-
gium, behind, ride with their Silence-Lotto to take a 13th place dur-
ing the fourth stage of the Tour de France cycling race, a team time-
trial over 39 kilometers (24.2 miles) with start and finish.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
COURCELLES GREENS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Tour de France

CYCLING

LA GRANDE-MOTTE,
France

Associated Press

LANCE Armstrong showed
that experience still counts at
the Tour de France.

The 37-year old American
rider surged to the front to take
the right breakaway during
Monday’s third stage while
Alberto Contador and the other
favorites were trapped in the
peloton.

Armstrong’s astute move
earned him valuable time and
moved to third place overall
while Contador dropped to
fourth, 19 seconds behind the
Texan. Contador is the 2007
Tour winner and a favorite this
year.

Armstrong could take the yel-
low leader’s jersey from Fabian
Cancellara on Tuesday when a
24.23-mile team time trial is
scheduled in Montpellier.

“Never say never,” Arm-
strong said when asked about

the possibility of putting on the
coveted jersey for the 84th time
in his career, four years after his
record seventh Tour victory.

Overall, he trails Cancellara
by 40 seconds — a tough deficit
to erase in the team time trial.
The Swiss rider’s Saxo Bank
team is one of the best in the
discipline, along with Arm-
strong’s Astana, Garmin and
Columbia.

Among other Tour favorites,
two-time runner up Cadel Evans
slipped to eighth place overall, 1
minute, 4 seconds behind Can-
cellara. Andy Schleck is 24th at
1:41, and defending champion
Carlos Sastre of Spain is 26th,
1:47 back.

Armstrong has got time to
move up now that he leads Con-
tador, who had a 22 second-
cushion over Armstrong before
Monday’s stage won by Mark
Cavendish. Armstrong has
already said the third week, fea-
turing a long time trial, three
mountain stages, and a finish up
the daunting Mont Ventoux, will
be very hard.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LIMEHOUSE INCORPORATED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Cavendish earned his second
consecutive Tour stage victory
and his sixth overall, ahead of
Norway’s Thor Hushovd and
Cyril Lemoine of France after
completing the 122.1-mile trek
between Marseille and La
Grande-Motte in 5 hours, 1
minute, 24 seconds.

Only 29 riders including Arm-
strong, Cancellara and two oth-
er Astana teammates —
Yaroslav Popovych and Haimar
Zubeldia — handled the tricky
conditions.

“Whenever you see a team
lined up at the front like that,
you have to pay attention,”
Armstrong said. “You know
what the wind’s doing, and you
see that a turn’s coming up, so it
doesn’t take a rocket scientist
to know that you have to go to
the front.”

Contador was at the wrong
place at the wrong time when
the breakaway happened. “I was
climbing with a teammate and
we ended up in no man’s land,”
he said.

Asked about his reaction
when he saw that Contador was
not with him in front, Arm-
strong said that he didn’t try to
gain time over the Spaniard.

“That’s not my objective but I
turned around and was sur-
prised that there was a split,”
he said. “On days like this —
for good or bad — you can
make a difference.”

After realizing that Arm-
strong was the only title con-
tender in the breakaway, Astana
riders in it decided to collabo-
rate with the Columbia riders.

“Apart from Lance, there was
nobody from all the other
favorites,” Astana manager
Johan Bruyneel said. “At first,
we let the Columbia riders do
the work. At a moment, I was
convinced the peloton was going
to come back. But the gap came
up again and at that moment,
about 15 kilometers from the
finish, we decided that
Popovych and Zubeldia will
help in the front.”

ai

INBRIEF

French tennis
player Mathieu
Montcourt
dies at 24

: TENNIS

PARIS

Associated Press

FRENCH tennis player

Mathieu Montcourt has died.
i He was 24.

The French tennis federa-

? tion said on Tuesday that
? Montcourt had
? overnight but that “the caus-
? es of his death are not yet
i known.”

died

“It is with great sadness

that the French tennis feder-

ation has learned of the sud-
den death of Mathieu Mont-

? court,” the French tennis fed-
? eration said. “Mathieu was an
? enthusiastic young man, pas-
? sionate, very endearing, and
? extremely appreciated for his

Armstrong moves |
into contention at

kindness and politeness.”

French media earlier
reported that Montcourt,
ranked 119, was found dead
by his girlfriend in the stair-
well of his Paris apartment.

In May, Montcourt was
handed a five-week ban and
fined $12,000 for betting on
other matches. That ban took
effect Monday.

Montcourt complained
during the French Open that

the punishment was too
? harsh, saying that he never
; bet more than $3 at any time,

and never on his own match-

i es — a fact confirmed by the
? ATP which oversees the
i men’s Tour.

The Court of Arbitration

? for Sport said Montcourt had
? wagered a total of $192 on 36
? tennis events in 2005. It
: reduced his suspension on

appeal from eight weeks to

i five.

The issue of betting in ten-

? nis drew increased attention
? from the sport’s governing
? bodies after an online book-
: maker voided all wagers on

a 2007 match involving Niko-

lay Davydenko.



a

Lack of motive
slows ruling
on McNair
girlfriend

FOOTBALL
NASHVILLE, Tenn.

Associated Press

TENNESSEB’S state med-

: ical examiner says investiga-
? tors have been hesitant to con-
? clude that Steve McNair’s girl-
? friend killed the NFL star and
i herself because she didn’t

appear to have a motive.
Bruce Levy said Tuesday

i that murder-suicide is the
? most likely scenario and it’s
? unlikely the crime scene was
? staged by a third party.

But investigators have been

i cautious about exploring
? every possibility. In murder-
? suicides, friends and family
? usually have seen problems.
? But 20-year-old Sahel
? Kazemi’s family has said she
i was very happy.

A ruling is expected in the

next few days.

Police quickly labeled

McNair’s death a homicide.

Investigators say that Kazemi

bought the handgun found
? under her body less than two

days before the shooting.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TALIPAN VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORCHID OAKS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AVENARIUS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. (Liquidator)

(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 17
eS







The Tribune

=









CUPCAK





eLight B’s
Gourmet

Nikoya Lightbourne gourmet food shop is a dream come true



By ALEX MISSICK “My parents are
Tribune Features Reporter Aryett and Beryl
amissick@tribunemedia.net Lightbourne. You

could say that I con-
: sider Nassau and
FOR most young people in the A Adhex botlras
Bahamas, growing up ona fami- ‘home’. can catch
ly island forces you to dream my own crabs, so I do

bigger and accomplish greater — Consider myself an

: . be ‘Andros Gal’ too. I 7
things in life to make those you can remember beg-
leave behind proud. Nikoya ging my Muay to

. . stir the crab ‘n’ rice
Lightbourne, a native of Andros but Lcouldn’t reach
and owner of De Light B’s the stove. I remember
Gourmet, formerly De’ Light- helping my ae

. motner, ary Jonn-

bourne's LLC, located in Trenton con kneading bread
Farmer’s Market in Lawrence on her kitchen i

New Jersey; ten minutes south of counter, but Iwas
Princeton, followed her dreams = “27ding on a milk
’ crate so I could reach
and made them come true. the counter. I remem-
ber the dining room
table in her house on
Thompson Blvd cov-
ered in hot cross buns for Easter, dripping with icing and
my cousins and I hiding under the table and making off
with a few. Bahamians are a lucky people because so much
of our culture and what makes our nation great revolves
around family and great food,” Ms Lightbourne said.

Ms Lightbourne ended up in New Jersey where she
attended Rutgers University graduating with a Bachelor of
Science degree in Environmental Business and Economics.

“After I graduated, I worked for Rutgers University
doing research for an E.P.A program called IR-4. I liked
my work, I was very good at it, but being stuck behind a
desk crunching the numbers on pesticide and herbicide
data was not my passion. I had been doing research and
looking into starting my company and soon I had to make
a choice, stay in a secure job, or take a leap of faith and
follow my passion. I had a wonderful friend that was will-
ing to be my business partner and it all grew from there,”
Ms Lightbourne said.

As with most things we are passionate about, Ms Light-
bourne said De’Light B’s Gourmet got started by helping
to raise money for the American Cancer Society.

“Thad lost my Mom, Beryl Munnings-Lightbourne to
breast cancer in 1998; it’s a cause close to my heart and I
wanted or rather needed somewhere to channel those

F




SHORT BREAD _
DAISIES





-

emotions and feel like I was making a difference. To raise
money for our ‘Relay for Life’ team, I started using my
mom’s banana bread recipe and baking breads to sell on
campus. By senior year I was baking all year round
because people were not satisfied that they could only get
them during spring before the Relay. In April of 2006, we
did our first official event as a bakery; and six months later
in September we signed a lease on our current kitchen
space. We now had an entire professional kitchen space to
work with and decided to create a catering menu as well
and it has flourished,” Ms Lightbourne said.

As for the business, Ms Lightbourne said De’Light B’s
Gourmet carries a line of rum cakes, Bahamian style fruit
cakes, pineapple tarts, coconut tarts and Bahamian style
macaroni as only Bahamians can make it.

“Pastry wise I would say that our best sellers right now
are our pies and especially the key lime pies. We also have
a variety of cakes; coconut cake, and carrot cake are at the
top of that list. Then there is our cheesecake line which is
our latest record breaker; we are currently in the process
of getting that product line into our local higher end gro-
cery stores such as Whole Foods and Wegman’'s. By far,
the rum cakes and the fruit cakes are the biggest hit, and
we can’t forget about the jerk chicken,” Ms Lightbourne
said.

NIKOYA
LIGHTBOURNE







SEE page 19
PAGE 18, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune












BAHAMIANS grab your flags
and come celebrate the 36th
anniversary of this beautiful place
we call home. With less than two
days remaining before the annual
independence celebrations,
already there’s the echoes of
Junkanoo, the aroma of the peas
and rice, and the spirit of one-
ness spreading across the coun-
try, and Tribune Features is right
there giving you the full scoop.

This special edition of Things 2
Do, has the five day rundown of
happenings and events sure to
remind you why it’s so great to
be a Bahamian.

Wednesday -The Hub Art Cen-
tre is the official jump-off for this
five day independence weekend
as it will feature several budding
local entertainers and a special
guest performance. Starting at
7.30pm, this week’s featured
artist is no stranger to the local
music scene- regionally
acclaimed gospel recording artist
Manifest. The event offers true
musical variety, but is also a
great place just to mix and min-
gle, so come out and become a
part of the Express Yourself
experience.

Thursday - Clifford Park is
expected to be transformed into a
Bahamian cultural mecca.
Organisers for the annual inde-
pendence celebration have
arranged an array of activities
including an all out cultural show
featuring authentic Bahamian
music and dance. There will also
be a Police and Defence Force
inspection, a national prayer, the
traditional flag raising ceremony,
and fireworks This event begins
at 8pm.

Friday - It’s Independence Day,
and if there’s one thing that
defines the Bahamas, its
Junkanoo. Wake up to the
sounds of “The People’s Rush-
out” as thousands flock to the
center of town celebrating the
independence of a beautiful
nation. Starting from 1am, the
Junkanoo rush-out begins at
Rawson Square to Arawak Cay,
so come and enjoy the music.

The Bahamas Hot Rod Associ-
ation is hosting a special Inde-
pendence Street Legal Racing
night at 7.30pm at its motorsport
park located at the rear of the
Queen Elizabeth Sporting Com-
plex. Specialty cars of all makes
and models will be showcased,
and the event is only $5,

Saturday - The Junkanoo Sum-
mer Festival continues its month
long stint showcasing traditional
Goombay music, live bands, and
lots of local food and fun in Raw-
son Square. The day long event
also features local crafts,
Bahamian literature, and a
pineapple eating and onion peel-
ing competition. So come out this
Saturday between noon and 10
pm to experience traditional life
in the islands.

The Sixth Annual South
Eleuthera Mission Heritage & Cul-
tural Fair and Raffle takes place in
Rock Sound today from noon
until. An intended fundraiser for
the community, the event will fea-
ture the Bahamas Defense Force
Pop Band, a bouncing castle,
punch board, sail boat exhibition,
best independence hair style,
coconut barking, pineapple eating

li



and crab catching competitions. The Police and Defence
Sunday - Available for its final

showing at the Dundas Center is Force Bands held an

the much talked about Treemon- Independence Beat

isha, an opera written by famous .

American playwright Scott Joplin, Retreat in Rawson

and directed by famed Bahamian

drama connoisseur Dr Cleveland Square on Saturaday.

Williams. Performed by an all Hundreds of Bahami-

Bahamian cast, it tells a story of
an African American community
recently freed from slavery. The
play is centered around the main
character Treemonisha, who
helps to express the importance
of religion, family, culture, and
education. Also a good reminder
of the importance of indepen-
dence, the play has been dubbed
a tribute to the Bahamianism.
Proceeds from this final night are
intended to assist the Bahamas
National Dance company on their
upcoming trip to the Aberdeen
International Youth Festival in the
UK. Tickets are $20, and Show-
time is 8pm.

Several simultaneous morning
walks will be held on Saturday
and Sunday to recognise the

ans and visitors enjoyed ¥
the spectacular display. be -



importance of the nation’s inde- 5 el - — ="
pendence. The walks will all start a
at 6am from Windsor Park, Gold- — ai Bs = 4

en Gates, Montagu Beach, and
Goodman’s Bay and will all end at
Clifford Park.
THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 19

PINEAPPLE UPSIDE

DeLight B’s

Gourmet

FROM page 17

Ms Lightbourne said she is very
proud of what she does and the New
Jersey locals love the food mostly
because it’s different.

“We use a style called ‘Caribbean
Fusion’; for example, we’d take our
home made jerk sauce and use it to
season wild caught Alaska Salmon and
then grill them on cedar planks. Its still
salmon, but it’s salmon like you’ve nev-
er had it before. It’s a whole lot of
blood, sweat and tearful phone calls
home to Andros to my dad because
I’m stressed out beyond words. It’s
missed birthdays, graduations, and
Christmases with my friends and fami-
ly at home. However, at the end of the

become such a driving force at home
and are changing the way that things
are done by being innovative, thinking
outside the box and not being afraid
to take chances. My cousin, Scharad
Lightbourne, a graphic designer and
photographer and artist Sammy Star
(who went to the same high school I
did) are examples of those at home
who are pushing the envelope, not
afraid of being different and are having
great successes in their chosen careers.
They are examples of “home grown”
being better than options or influences
from outside the country,” Ms Light-
bourne said.

Ms Lightbourne said her advice to
any young entrepreneur is to do their
research.

“You need to know your customer

“Ve use a style called ‘Caribbean
Fusion’; for example, we'd take our
home made jerk sauce and use it to season
wild caught Alaska Salmon and then grill
them on cedar planks. Its still salmon, but
it's salmon like you've never had it before.”

day, it is my name on the door. It took
me forever to get used to the fact that I
was (when it all started) 25 years old
running my own business with employ-
ees and taxes to pay. Three years later,
I appreciate the responsibility and Iam
forever grateful to everyone in my life
from my family and friends to my teach-
ers from my earliest years that gave me
the confidence and the knowledge that
T could and would do anything that I set
out to achieve. Iam even more grateful
to those who said I couldn’t do it, or
that I wouldn’t succeed, they are the
ultimate motivators,” Ms Lightbourne
said.

In the end, many Bahamians can not
neglect the force that is pulling them to
return home and Ms Lightbourne said
she is very motivated to do so.

“The homesickness only gets worse
every year. I’m currently looking into a
few options though nothing is concrete.
I love the fact that my generation has

base and what products your target
audience will be more than willing to
not only buy but to tell others to buy as
well. We started as a Caribbean bakery,
and learned that it was not a large cus-
tomer base, we switched to a more
American variety that still has some
Caribbean influence and now I’ve been
given the nickname “The Pie Lady” by
the Trentonian, our local paper. Com-
munication is key; use every free mode
of communication available to you,
word of mouth, and internet hubs like
Facebook or Twitter. Remember that
there will always be setbacks, but it’s
those discouraging moments that make
our successes that much sweeter.”

¢ To learn more about De’Light B’s
Gourmet, visit the website at
www.delightbournes.com or if you visit
New Jersey in your travels, visit them at
960 Spruce Street, Lawrence NJ 08648
or give them a call at 609-989-7577.

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Police and
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Force Beat

Retreat
ys Seepage 18



WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009







NEEDLE bkxous

Art form reminds us of native tongue



DeLight B's Gourmet

see page 17

By LLOYD ALLEN

Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net



AOGH “HAPS

AS the sweet breeze of independence rolls
around on this 36 anniversary of the coun-
try, the age old question of what is unique
about the Bahamas arises.

This year it seems the
answer to that question is a
reemerging form of Bahami-
an art known as Relief Carv-
ings.

According to Heino
Scmidt, Central Bank art
curator and seasoned artist,
Relief Carvings is an art form
that most likely branched off
from the common kitchen
prayer paintings and towels
that have adorned Bahamian
homes for years.

Bridging art, culture, and
décor, this art form helps to
remind older Bahamians of
the native tongue, and intro-
duces young people to ele-
ments of our dialect that are
scarcely used.

Although it has not gained
significant popularity on New
Providence, many out islands
like Eleuthera, Cat Island,
and Andros, showcase this
work in practically all areas
of society including restau-
rants, schools, homes, and
sometimes even churches.

‘Hard head bird don’ cook
good soup,’ ‘Don’ gimme no
lip,’ ‘Eye winker older dan’
beard,’ ‘Tief, tief from tief
and God laugh, Ha!,’ ‘Pick
until ya pick needle wit’out
eye,’ and ‘Loose goat don’
Know how tie goat feel.’

These are some of the say-
ings that many of our par-
ents and grandparents would
have heard while growing up,
and believe it or not they
probably understand what
each of them mean.

However for the rest of us,
local playwright and dialec-
tologist James Catalyn lends
his expertise in the art of
translating Bahamianise.

Eye Winker Older dan’
Beard

“When you look at it,
when we are born there is
the eye winkers, and you
don’t grow a beard until you
turn maybe 17 or 18-years-
old. So really this saying is

telling us that the older peo-
ple in our communities are
the wiser.”

Tief, Tief From Tief And
God Laugh, Ha!

“Tf somebody has stolen
something from one person,
and another person steals
from him or her, then that
proves that what goes around
comes around, and in the end
God gets the last laugh.”

Pick Until Ya Pick Nee-
dle Wit’out Eye

“Often you hear about
women who end up becom-
ing an old maid (someone
who never marries and is too
old and unable to have chil-
dren) sometimes because
they have the mentality that
there is no man good enough
for them. They keep looking,
picking, and choosing until
they end up with nothing,
and that is what this saying
conveys.”

Mr Catalyn said while
there are dozens of indige-
nous idiosyncrasies through-
out the country, their exis-
tence is not unusual.

With others countries hav-
ing their share of quirks which
also have some historical con-
nections, many of the saying
that we assume as uniquely
Bahamian do in fact originate
from other places.

“Like the term *bungy,’ is
also used in the Gullah
Islands in the Carolinas.
Those islands were originally
inhabited by slaves and their
native tongue is a language
known as Gullah,” he said.

Mr Catalyn said these com-
monalties in language cement
the fact that all humans are
in some way related, particu-
larly the African Diaspora.

However he said the emer-
gence of Relief Carvings in
Bahamian society is an exam-
ple of how important it is to
continue to share the lan-
guage that made the Bahamas
what it is.




Bahamas oil
imports cost
$1.1bn in ‘08

Some 27,300
consumer loans,
worth a collective
$160m, in default

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas spent more
than $1.1 billion on oil and fuel-
related imports in 2008 as glob-
al prices soared to a $147 per
barrel all-time high, Central
Bank of the Bahamas data has
revealed, an amount equivalent
to 15.3 per cent of this nation’s
Gross Domestic Product
(GDP).

The Central Bank’s quarterly
statistical digest for May 2009
showed that the total value of
oil imported into the Bahamas
increased by 37.5 per cent year-
over-year, rising from $802.067
million in 2007 to $1.103 billion
last year - a more than $300 mil-
lion increase.

The $1.103 billion figure is
more than double the $523.952
million figure that the Bahamas
paid for its oil and fuel-related
imports as recently as 2005.

The 2008 third quarter was
the most expensive three-month
period in this nation’s oil
importing history, with the peak
in global oil prices forcing this
nation to spend $333.76 million
- a 59.6 per cent increase upon
the comparative period in 2007.

This nation’s heavy oil depen-
dency, both for electrical power
generation and to fuel is gaz-
guzzling car economy, imposes
a heavy burden on the foreign
exchange reserves and current
outflows, especially when glob-
al oil prices are at their peak.

The Central Bank’s data
again makes a compelling eco-
nomic case for the Bahamas to
tap new forms of electrical ener-
gy generation, especially renew-
able sources, to reduce the pres-
sure on foreign exchange
reserves to finance oil imports.

The Bahamas has been lucky
to date that global oil prices fell
back to around $50 per barrel,
but they are on the rise again.
The oil price decline has helped
to insulate the Bahamian for-
eign exchange reserves against
the pressures from a decline in
foreign currency inflows as a
result of the drop in tourism
and foreign direct investment.
But if oil prices rise again, the
foreign reserves would likely
come under extreme pressure
because they are not being
restocked.

Elsewhere, the Central

SEE page 4B


























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Sale Ends
July 11th

THE TRIBUNE

usiness

2009

WEDNESDAY,

TEL eS.

Airline fearing six
figure fee increase

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bahamian private airline

ROYAL FIDELITY

Sky Bahamas chief: ‘You're talking about more money

operator yesterday said it

would have to pay “in
excess of $150,000 per
year” in fees on its aircraft
fleet alone, compared to the current $1,000,
if the proposed Civil Aviation Department
fee increases were introduced, creating an
“undue burden” on travellers and “dis-

rupting” business models.

Captain Randy Butler, chief executive
of Sky Bahamas, said the privately-owned
Bahamian airline was still calculating the
precise impact the proposed fee rises would

have on its business.

increases.

However, he warned that companies in
the sector would have no choice but to take
measures like increasing passenger fares or
cutting staff numbers to absorb the tax

Sky Bahamas employed 74 persons, and
the industry an estimated 400 in total, and
Mr Butler warned that companies might
have no choice but to downsize to absorb
the fee rises. He also expressed concern
about the impact on Family Island com-

in fees and taxes than the actual cost of the ticket’

munities that relied on private airline oper-

ators, saying of the increases: “Your busi-
ness model is disrupted.”

“It’s direct taxation of the people,
because we’re going to go from paying

$1,000 a year to the Civil Aviation Depart-

ness.

ment for the company to paying $30,000
per plane. We have four, so that would be
$120,000,” Mr Butler told Tribune Busi-

SEE page 3B

Minister: Bahamas not been ‘effective’
on grant financed project execution

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas
will not become
more aggressive
in seeking grant
funding for infra-
structure projects
despite its tight
fiscal predica-
ment, a govern-
ment minister
said yesterday, as
he admitted that this nation had
not been “effective in execut-
ing” European Union-financed



Worries over
‘extraordinary
number of
casualties’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president yester-
day told Tribune Business his
“biggest concern” was that the
business community did not suf-
fer “an extraordinary number
of casualties” as a result of the
current recession, with the
banking sector already seeing
20 per cent of their commercial
loans fall into arrears.

Khaalis Rolle called for a
“unified effort” to help stabilise
the private sector, and urged
Bahamian companies falling
into financial difficulties to
immediately communicate with
their bankers/debt financiers to
try and work out an interim
solution. He also urged the
banks to “provide a lifeline” to
floundering clients deserving of
such treatment.

Commenting on the Central
Bank of the Bahamas’ report
on monthly economic and
financial developments for May,
which found that commercial
loans more than 30 days past
due accounted for 19.83 per
cent of the banking sector’s
total portfolio, Mr Rolle told
Tribune Business: “We were
very concerned.

“Everybody is feeling the
pinch, and we’re going to con-
tinue to see this until the econ-
omy turns around. My biggest
concern is that we don’t have
an extraordinary number of
casualties resulting from this.

SEE page 2B

* Says Ministry of Works workload and EU conditions key factors in
implementation woes on multi-million dollar infrastructure projects
* Bahamas will not ‘be more aggressive’ in seeking grant financing,

despite fiscal deficit and infrastructure woes

developments.

Responding to the EU’s
2008-2013 Country Strategy
Paper for the Bahamas, which
revealed that Europe had con-
sidered slashing the only form
of grant funding available to
this nation because it was “a
very low performer” in imple-
menting projects Brussels was

financing, Zhivargo Laing said:
“That is a fair statement.”
The minister of state for
finance then told Tribune Busi-
ness: “We have not been as
effective in executing these pro-
jects for years and years and
years. That’s the reality.”
When asked about the rea-
sons for this ineffectiveness, Mr

ROYAL FIDELITY

ea ela 4

OMe Mom oe Ge lil

Laing suggested they often
became lost amid the many pro-
jects the Ministry of Works had
to deal with, and did not figure
as highly on that ministry’s -
and the Government’s - priori-
ty list.

In addition, the EU also

SEE page 4B

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St. Michael: 246.435.1955

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NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Year-end target
for first phase
finance regulator
consolidation

* Once Securities
Commission, Registrar of
Insurance and Compliance
Commission a Bahamas
Financial Services
Authority, Central Bank
will follow in second phase

* Minister says timeline
‘absolutely achievable’

* Bahamas needs to ‘get it
right’, as ‘not a lot
of room for error’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government is hoping
to complete the consolidation
of three regulators into a
Bahamas Financial Services
Authority by year-end, Tribune
Business was told yesterday,
with the second and final phase
eventually involving the merg-
ing of the Central Bank’s Bank
Supervision Department into
this entity to create a solitary
‘super regulator’.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, explained that
the Government was taking a
staged approach to financial ser-
vices regulatory consolidation
to ensure “everything was
working on all cylinders” after
the first phase was completed,
as the Bahamas did “not have a
lot of room for error”.

The first phase involves the
consolidation of the Securities

SEE page 4B

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1 www.bossbahamas.com
PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Setting goals you can score

SCORING a goal in soccer
is like getting a hole in one on
the golf course. Soccer players
run countless miles before they
score a goal, and often games
end with neither side scoring a
goal. Soccer players train dai-
ly, perform countless drills, and
experience numerous injuries.
However, they never quit or
give up. Why? Because scoring
a goal is one of the greatest feel-
ings.

Achieving a goal you have
been working for so long is one
of the most rewarding, satisfying
feelings. So why is it that so
many of us do not set goals and
wonder why we don’t score
them? I believe it is because
most of us think goal setting is
too much work and we don’t
have the time.

Here are a few tips to score
goals. Short, sweet and to the

point. Who wants to sit down
for hours and map out a plan
for the next five or 10 years?

Short-Term Goals

Not all goals have to be work-
related. Mix personal goals and
work goals together. The payoff
is almost instant. However, they
are life changing. Short-term
goals give you momentum, and
when you achieve one it is
rewarding. So hopefully you
want more.

Get A Calendar

Pick a short-term goal. Start
with tomorrow or next week.
This will get you in the mix right
away, and short-term goals are
easier to visualise. Because of
their short-term nature they
encourage you to set realistic,
easy-to-accomplish goals. Of
course, you can look a month,

Promotional
Marketing

mooie er arirey TT



three or six months out if you
wish. But the further you look,
the farther away these goals are.
We like low hanging fruit, right?

Start Small

Try not to write a 10-page list.
Start with two or three small
goals, such as: “This week, I will
lose two pounds and visit at
least two prospects.’ Instead,
most of us start with: ‘I need to
lose 20 pounds and visit 20
prospects.’ Instantly, you can
tell the difference, right? Short
and tangible is the way to go.
Otherwise, you become and feel

overwhelmed.

Extend If Necessary

Go easy on yourself. If you
don’t achieve the goal in the ini-
tial time set out, extend it
another week or month, and
just keep it close to you. Estab-
lishing a pattern is what is
important...

Use Pen and Paper

Write down your goals and
review them daily. Take five
minutes a day and read over
your goals. Add notes if neces-
sary. You will be surprised how
other goals will pop into your
mind.

Once a week, rewrite your
list. Change the order of your
goals if you wish. Delete some if
you want, but the important
objective is to develop a pat-
tern and stay consistent. Once

you score a goal, you will feel
like scoring another. Momen-
tum will keep you focused and
that good feeling will keep you
motivated.

Action

Finally. next to each goal
write down one or two actions
that will help you score your
goal...

Start today and do this
tomorrow and the next day, and
before you realise it you’re run-
ning around your office pealing
your shirt off, like the soccer
players do on the field after
scoring a goal. (Please don’t tell
your boss I recommended that
you do that.)

Simply put, it works if you
work it. No change, no
change!!!

All of these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your

business on top during these
challenging economic times.
Have a productive and prof-
itable week! Remember,
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT.”

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products. Established
over 27 years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted
Bahamian businesses in various
industries, ranging from tourism
and banking to telecommuni-
cations, in marketing them-
selves.

Readers can contact Mr Far-
rington at SunTee EmbroidMe
on East Shirley Street, by e-mail
at HYPERLINK scott@sun-
tee.com or by telephone at 242-
393-3104.

Bahamian accountants sign up to monitoring

A Ministry af Marsh Harbour desepel Chapel
PO. Bie ABLOTLO, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Pahartas



cou eR

TEACHER POSITIONS

avr a ele
fs

Tunior and Senior High School

UR Ree Teme Teg
emo)

Nr mE ues

De me MR earl a
For the school year beginning SEPTEMBER 2004

Papolicants mast be Born Again Christians and adhere to fhe Statement| of Fafth ef Marsh Harbour Laospel Chapel
Teachers must also have af least a Bachelors Dearee in Education or a Teachers Certificate
and must be a Pahanian or a permanent resident of the Bahamas with work staus,
Qualtying persons are aaked {0 contact Yor office at
Telephone (242) 37-4771 8:30 AM. ~ 345 PM, or fas (242) 341-§TT1
oc vesil oor website ~ wiewagapeschool come ~ for jab or student! applications

Agape Christian School uses the A Beka Pook Curriculum
which emphasizes Christian values a6 well a a very high standard ef education
and is approved by the Pahamas Ministry of Education,

We seek to train the mind, quide the person, and love the personality

Study to ow thysell approved unto Gt... 2 “Timothy 2:15





SHOWN (I-r) are Guyanese Prime Minister Samuel Hinds; president of The Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accoun-
tants, Daniel Ferguson; Sha Ali Khan, director of practice monitoring professional standards at ACCA; Institute
of Chartered Accountants of the Caribbean (ICAC) president, Angela Lee Loy; Brendan Murtagh, president, ACCA;
and Frank Myers, president of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of the Eastern Caribbean.

THE Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants (BICA)
has formally signed up to a
regional accounting practice
monitoring programme, some-
thing it believes “will signifi-
cantly improve auditing proce-
dures and quality assurance
review systems in the
Bahamas”.

The contract to implement
the programme in the Bahamas
was signed by BICA’s presi-
dent, Daniel Ferguson, on June
26 during the official opening
ceremony of the 27th Annual
Caribbean Conference of
Accountants in Guyana.

The Bahamas and the East-
ern Caribbean will now join
Guyana, Barbados and Trinidad

and Tobago in implementing a
monitoring review process for
accounting practitioners and
audit firms within their respec-
tive territories.

“The implementation of the
regional practice monitoring
programme will not only signif-
icantly improve quality assur-
ance in the auditing procedure
in the Bahamas, but it will also
elevate the standard of the
Bahamian accounting profes-
sionals to be on par with global
standards. This will significant-
ly enhance the accountancy pro-
fession in the Bahamas," said
Mr Ferguson.

The practice monitoring pro-
gramme is designed to place the
Bahamas and the Caribbean on

the same level as accountants
in the UK, US and Canada,
who have already implement-
ed such initiatives.

Under the Caribbean region-
al monitoring programme, prac-
titioners and firms within the
Bahamas and other participat-
ing territories will be monitored
to ensure audit reports and
audit procedures are in compli-
ance with international stan-
dards and other internationally
recognised rules.

The monitoring visits will be
carried out by the Association
of Chartered Certified Accoun-
tants (ACCA), which has over
15 years experience and exper-
tise in the monitoring of its
members worldwide.

Worries over ‘extraordinary
number of casualties’

FROM page 1B

We will begin to see some of
that.”

Mr Rolle added that the
recession’s impact was begin-
ning to show itself in the Cham-
ber’s own membership
renewals, although the organi-
sation had yet to determine
which non-renewals were linked
to the recession, and others that
were simply late.

“There are some companies
that have gone out of business,
there are some companies that
cannot sustain any fees not
related to their core operating
expenses,” the Chamber presi-
dent explained. “People are try-
ing to manage cash flow and are
treading water.”

Adding that the current eco-
nomic circumstances “reinforce
the need for businesses to plan
what they do”, Mr Rolle said:
“Businesses have an obligation
to communicate with their
bankers. If you’re in trouble,
and see early signs of trouble -
and there are early warning
alarms - the first entity you talk
to should be the person funding

ou.”

On the other side of the coin,
Mr Rolle said it was in the
banks’ best interests to provide
struggling commercial and cor-
porate clients with “a lifeline”
where they could, as a low per-
forming loan was better than a

non-performing one.

He also urged the banking
sector to avoid putting any
undue pressure on their busi-
ness clients, and instead work
with them to allow “people to
get back on their feet and do
business without pressure from
the bank”.

However, Mr Rolle added
that he was “not surprised at
all” by the almost 20 per cent
commercial loan arrears rate
identified by the Central Bank.

This was chiefly because
“small businesses operate on
very tight financial constraints
anyway. Many of them operate
on a very tight overdraft, espe-
cially new businesses. They
operate on very stringent terms
in that regard, and as soon as
pressure builds they’re among
the first to become casualties.

“The best we can do is find a
universal solution to this prob-
lem. Commercial bankers need
to develop a framework, an
environment for communica-
tion, and all stakeholders need
to be involved in that process.
Everyone has to be involved.”

In its report, the Central
Bank found that total non-per-
forming loans rose to 7.7 per
cent or $468.2 million of the
commercial banking sector’s
total outstanding portfolio. This
figure increased by 4 per cent or
$18.2 million in May.

The total number of loans in
arrears by at least one month
increased by $6.1 million or 0.7
per cent in May, reaching a total
of $847.3 million. Total loans in
arrears increased to 13.98 per
cent as a percentage of total
loans, although the proportion
of delinquent loans - those
between 31 to 90 days past due
- declined by $12 million or 3.73
per cent to $373.3 million.

The Central Bank said: “The
increase in the arrears rate was
attributed to a worsening in the
consumer loans and residential
mortgages portfolios, by 58
basis points and 2 basis points,
to 12.45 per cent and 13 per
cent, respectively.

“In contrast, the commercial
arrears rate receded to 19.83
per cent in May, from 20.61 per
cent in April. In response to
these developments, banks aug-
mented loan loss provisions by
$3 million, boosting the ratio of
provisions to total arrears by 18
basis points to 23.44 per cent.

“This corresponded to new
loan provisions of $10 million,
partly offset by a $6.9 million
net write-off against loans pro-
visioned for earlier. However,
as the growth in non-perform-
ing loans outpaced the increase
in provisions, the ratio of total
provisions to non-performing
loans fell by 5 basis points to
42.43 per cent.”
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 3B





Cruise line joins Grand
Bahama all-inclusive deal

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

DISCOVERY Cruise Lines, the sin-
gle largest contributor to hotel room
nights on Grand Bahama, is positioned
to maintain that title with its introduc-
tion of an island-inclusive package
linked to the Ministry of Tourism’s
‘Club Grand Bahama’ promotion.

The cruise line sails out of Port Ever-
glades en route to Grand Bahama six
times per week. Deputy director of the
Ministry of Tourism and Aviation,
David Johnson, said Discovery brought

Bahamian
accounts chief
is now regional
body’s secretary

THE Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants (BICA) pres-
ident has been elected as secretary for the Institute of Chartered
Accountants of the Caribbean (ICAC) for 2009-2010.

Mr Ferguson, managing partner of Daniel H. Ferguson & Asso-
ciates Chartered Accountants, was first appointed to the ICAC

Board in June 2006.

Harryram Parmesar was elected president, with Jon Braith-
waite becoming vice-president. Prunella Vassell was elected as

treasurer.

e Pictured on the right is the newly-elected president of ICAC,
Harryram Parmesar (second from left) with other executive officers.
From L to R are Prunella Vassell, treasurer; Joan Brathwaite,

170,000 visitors to Grand Bahama last
year and acts as a ferry service for
Grand Bahamians.

The Club Grand Bahama promo-
tion was designed to make the entire
island of Grand Bahama an all-inclu-
sive package.

What Discovery Cruise Line is able
to offer its guests through the Club
Grand Bahama promotion is a two to
seven-night stay on Grand Bahama,
with the purchaser’s choice of hotels,
activities, attractions and restaurants,
depending on which tier - Silver, Gold
or Platinum - is chosen. The packages
start at $269.99 and include trans-

portation to the island.

According to Discovery’s website,
guests who purchase the Club Grand
Bahama packages will be “greeted with
round-trip harbour transfers to the
hotel or resort of your choice”.

Guests are then able to choose from
more than 50 sports and recreational
activities, including golf, scuba diving,
fishing and adventure activities.

With the silver package, visitors can
choose from five breakfast locations,
four dinner locations and four attrac-
tions.

At the Gold level, visitors have sev-
en breakfast options, 11 dinner

vice-president; and Daniel Ferguson, secretary

Airline fearing six figure fee increase

FROM page 1B

Given that Sky Bahamas
operated 33-seater aircraft,
which weighed more than
28,000 pounds, Mr Butler said
the company’s planes would be
in the highest fee category. It
had been looking at adding oth-
er planes to its fleet, and Mr
Butler said: “We’re looking
right now at in excess of
$150,000 [in fees] on the fleet.”

While acknowledging that
there needed to be an increase
in Civil Aviation fees, Mr Butler
said the Department and the
Government needed to take a
“graduated” approach and raise
them over time, not in one go -
and especially at a time when
the industry was being impacted
by a global recession.

Questioning the timing of the
move to implement the fee
increases that were approved,
but never implemented, in 2005,
Mr Butler said Sky Bahamas
and others in the industry “need
to sit down and talk” with Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace, min-
ister of tourism and aviation.

“There needs to be a fee
increase, but it should be a grad-
uated increase and shouldn’t
happen without the input of the
industry,” Mr Butler told Tri-
bune Business. “We’re trying
to find out what is the objec-
tive, the goal of doing it at this
time. It’s been four years since
they were approved.

“We don’t understand what
the Government is doing right
here. All these taxes, all these
fee increases, you have to pass it
on to the passenger. You’re
talking about more money in
fees and taxes than the actual
cost of the ticket. The Govern-
ment now is going to put a
large, undue burden on every-
one to travel. Maybe they’re

HOME AWAY

FROM HOME
Sake and Coaerieetihhe



telling everyone to travel by
boat.”

He added that some Bahami-
an private airline and charter
operators were wondering if the
Civil Aviation fee increases was
simply a move to protect
Bahamasair by reducing their
competitiveness, and even
“putting some of us out of busi-
ness”.

Aviation

The increased Civil Aviation
fees contrasted sharply with the
incentives and tax breaks giv-
en to foreign companies, such as
the cruise line and foreign air
carriers. Instead, the tax bur-
den appeared to be falling
squarely on Bahamian private
operators and charter firms.

The increased fees also con-
trast with Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace’s stated determination to
get the cost of access to the
Bahamian tourism product,
namely air fare and airlift costs,
down. The fee rises are likely
to achieve the opposite when it
comes to Family Island air

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transportation.

Mr Butler added that while
the Government had said it was
going to use the revenues from
the fee increases to improve air
transportation, it had yet to
state what specific aspects
would be improved.

He said Bahamian private
airlines currently paid “for ser-
vices you don’t get”, namely
security and sterile areas - free
from the travelling public and
their guests - at Family Island
airports.

Questions were also asked
about whether the fee rises
were necessary given the pro-
posed $50 million Inter-Ameri-
can Development Bank (IDB)
financed project to reform civil
aviation in the Bahamas.

Mr Butler said most Bahami-
an private airlines were suffer-
ing from reduced passenger
loads, but had been able to sur-
vive as a result of the weekend
boosts they received from
Bahamians flying home for
homecomings and regattas. He
lamented the absence of a
strategic plan for the sector.



BARAM AS

| Short Term Apartment

RENTALS

Cheaper than a Hotel
week 2weeks month

HOME AWAY FROM HOME

cal: 328-2325

eedal; Guharas homeeayfromomaetagralcom

options, and over 25 attractions to
choose from. Platinum package holders
have slightly more dinner options.

Hotel options include the Flamingo
Bay Resort, Reef Our Lucaya Resort,
Pelican Bay Resort and Radisson Our
Lucaya.

“To suit your budget, Club Grand
Bahama packages have been divided
into Silver, Gold or Platinum levels,
with the number of activities and din-
ing options increasing exponentially
with each level.

“You receive a Club Grand Bahama
Card that will be activated at check-in
and swiped for meals and activities

Zi eee ee
Ora Rie

no a a
ae te
DY Or [ee

Ne
a gran e

5

throughout the vacation,” said the
company’s website.

The Ministry of Tourism has moved
to get more suppliers like Discovery
to offer the Club Grand Bahama Pack-
age, a programme the Ministry had
pledged since the beginning of the year
to roll out. And the Grand Bahama
economy, with its steady decline, was in
much need of a dynamic plan for a
turn around.

Mr Johnson said Discovery Cruise
Lines has been a tremendous contrib-
utor to the Grand Bahama economy
and continues to be the leader visitor
access route to the island.



TREEMONISHA

olny

Qn the Occasion of

A Ann ersary a f Independence

f a Leelee SORA es

TT ma AL te eee at A

iT . 5
tm Clie mes

The Dundas Centre For The Performing Arts
tt ere wea
a ee es ee TP:


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a > =; ;
A global look at economic developments

@ By The Associated Press



A LOOK at economic developments
and stock market activity around the
world Tuesday:

German industrial orders increase

by 4.4% in May over previous month

BERLIN — German industrial orders
increased by a healthy 4.4 per cent in
May over the previous month, with
demand from outside Europe rising the
most strongly, government figures
showed.

The strong performance followed a
minimal 0.1 per cent increase in April
and adds to other indications that the
outlook for Germany’s export-depen-
dent economy — Europe’s biggest — is
becoming rosier. Recent surveys have
shown rising business and consumer con-
fidence.

In European markets, the FTSE 100
index of leading British shares closed
down 0.2 per cent at 4,187 while Ger-
many’s DAX fell 53.63 points, or 1.2 per
cent, to 4,598.19. The CAC-40 in France
was 33.59 points lower, or 1.1 per cent, at
3,048.57.

EU nations want to publish

confidential stress tests

BRUSSELS — Some European
Union nations want to publish confi-
dential stress tests that assess how well
European banks could cope with a worse
economic climate, the top EU economy
official said.

Separately, European Union nations
partly blamed the financial crisis on the
way bankers and traders are paid and
called for new rules to link performance
to pay. Finance ministers said in a joint
statement that “inappropriate incentives,
short-termism and inadequate capture
of risk” had allowed banks to take on
massive risks that have forced them to

put aside billions of euros in the past
year to cover potential losses.

Meanwhile, the EU gave Poland, Hun-
gary, Romania, Latvia and Lithuania
two- and three-year deadlines to curb
their budget deficits, which have been
swollen by the world financial crisis and
its fallout in Eastern Europe.

China’s economy improving

BEIJING — China’s economy is
improving and growth might have
topped 7.5 per cent for the quarter that
ended in June, a central bank researcher
said in an official journal.

Growth is benefiting from Beijing’s
stimulus spending and rising investment
and consumption, said Zhang Jianhua,
chief of the bank’s research bureau, in an
article in the July issue of the bank’s
magazine, China Finance.

The government is due to report quar-
terly economic data next week. The
economy expanded by 6.1 per cent in
the January-to-March quarter from a
year earlier.

In Asian markets, Japan’s Nikkei 225
stock average fell for the fifth straight
day, closing down 0.3 per cent at
9,647.79. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng shed
0.7 per cent to 17,862.27, while South
Korea’s Kospi rose 0.4 per cent to
1,434.20. China’s Shanghai fell 1.1 per
cent. Australia’s market retreated 0.4
per cent but Singapore ended almost
flat.

Business group says worst

of Britain’s recession over

LONDON — A business group said
the worst of Britain’s recession is over,
but the Bank of England should still
print more money because recovery is
not assured.

A separate report showed that manu-
facturing output fell 1.2 per cent in
March through May from the previous

three months, however, casting doubt
over the sector’s recovery. Output is 12.3
per cent lower than a year earlier.

Indian business leaders praise

government’s new budget

NEW DELHI — Despite initial
investor disappointment, Indian busi-
ness leaders praised the government’s
new budget as spurring growth by spend-
ing money on developing roads and oth-
er infrastructure, especially in poor rur-
al areas.

The budget, presented Monday by
Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee, will
boost total spending 36 per cent to 10.3
trillion rupees ($213 billion) between
now and March 2010.

Singapore’s finance minister warns

Asia to expect lower economic

growth for years to come

SINGAPORE — Singapore’s finance
minister warned Asia to expect lower
economic growth for years to come as a
weakened US consumer buys less of the
region’s exports.

Gross domestic product expansion in
Asia will likely fall to an average 6.5 per
cent over the next few years from nine
per cent during the 2002 to 2007 period,
Finance Minister Tharman Shanmu-
garatnam said.

Singapore, along with other export-
dependent countries such as South
Korea, Taiwan and Hong Kong, has
been especially hard hit by the global
recession and collapse in consumer
demand from the US and Europe.

Australia’s central bank leaves key

interest rate unchanged

or third month at 3%

SYDNEY — Australia’s central bank
left its key interest rate unchanged for
the third month at three per cent, citing

a stabilizing global situation and
stronger-than-expected domestic econ-
omy.

The Reserve Bank of Australia has
kept rates at the current level — their
lowest in 49 years — since April but said
in a statement there is room for further
cuts this year if necessary.

Conditions in global financial markets
are improving and action to strengthen
balance sheets of key financial institu-
tions is under way, RBA chief Glenn
Stevens said in the statement.

The Philippines’ inflation drops

to lowest rate in 22 years

MANILA, Philippines — The Philip-
pines’ inflation rate dropped to 1.5 per
cent in June — the lowest in 22 years
— as prices of commodities, particularly
fuel and utilities, continued to fall, the
government said.

Last month’s rate, down from 3.3 per
cent in May, was the lowest since April
1987. A year ago, the country posted an
11.4 per cent inflation rate.

Pope calls for new

world financial order

VATICAN CITY — Pope Benedict
XVI called for a new world financial
order guided by ethics, dignity and the
search for the common good in the third
encyclical of his pontificate.

In “Charity in Truth,” Benedict
denounced the profit-at-all-cost mental-
ity of the globalized economy and
lamented that greed had brought about
the worst economic downturn since the
Great Depression.

The document, in the works for two
years and repeatedly delayed to incor-
porate the fallout from the crisis, was
released one day before leaders of the
Group of Eight industrialized nations
meet to coordinate efforts to deal with
the global meltdown.



Minister: Bahamas not been ‘effective’ on grant financed project execution

FROM page 1B

imposed stringent requirements
relating to areas such as the bid-
ding and tendering processes
for such projects, something
that Mr Laing said created chal-
lenges because the Bahamas’
stipulations in the same area
were different.

“In particular, the projects
that have had the difficulties
have been projects that have
been required to be executed
through the Ministry of Works,”
Mr Laing told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“That Ministry is challenged
as it is in terms of the multitude
of the projects it has to execute.
Very little projects, and these
[EU financed] ones could be
very small projects, get caught
up in the rush. They are not as
driven as they need to be.

“The effort of late to get by
that by using private entities to
do initial estimates for these
projects has not been as effec-
tive either.”

Mr Laing added that the
EU’s “stringent requirements”
were another reason for the
delays in implementing grant-
funded projects, adding that
they were often not in line with

the stipulations of the Bahamas
and other Caribbean countries.

“T’ve attended a number of
meetings at which discussions
have been held over the execu-
tion of EU projects, and we’ve
considered many complaints
from countries about the
demands, conditions and stipu-
lations [of the EU] creating a
slower processing efficiency,”
Mr Laing said.

The talks had then focused
on “reforming the process to
create more efficiency” through
the Bahamas and Caribbean
states taking on ‘ownership’ of
the projects, with the responsi-
bility to get them executed.

The EU's 2008-2013 Country
Strategy Paper for the
Bahamas, a copy of which has
been obtained by Tribune Busi-
ness despite it never being made
public, found that 6.83 million
Euros made available to the
Bahamas in the last funding
round - known as the ninth
European Development Fund
(EDF) - failed to achieve their
goal to ‘build capacity’ in the
Family Islands.

Finding that the Bahamas
had been "very slow" in com-
mitting these funds to agreed
projects, with a "protracted

Zhivargo Laing



process" in setting up technical
help, the Strategy Paper said:
"Unfortunately, implementa-
tion of the ninth EDF has expe-
rienced significant delays...

"This is at least in part due
to lack of communication on
project implementation issues.
The intervention framework
had not been updated by the
end of 2004, and no output or
outcome sector-wide indicators
were made available.

"The Mid-Term Review con-
cluded that the Bahamas was a
very low performer in terms of

implementation of EU assis-
tance, and that a reduction of
the overall allocation could be
contemplated at the End-of-
Term Review if things did not
improve."

Tribune Business previously
reported that risking a cut in
EDF financing would be sheer
folly for the Bahamas, given
that it is the only grant funding
this nation can access. This is
largely due to it being viewed by
many as a relatively developed
nation with high living stan-
dards.

Grant funding is financing
without any repayment or inter-
est rates attached, making it
especially valuable to the
Bahamas given the expanding
fiscal deficits and national debt
due to weakness in the public
finances.

However, Mr Laing told Tri-
bune Business yesterday that
the EU “is not the only grant
funding that is out there”.

He added: “The Bahamas has
not been aggressive in seeking
to take advantage of grant fund-
ing, because we have sought to
carry our weight for the most
part. Other countries, where the
need is greater, have been more
aggressive in seeking grant

funding.”

While the Bahamas had
sought to finance its infrastruc-
ture and capital works needs
through its “own internal
resources”, Mr Laing said this
did not mean the Government
would refuse grant funding if it
provided access to items such
as essential technical expertise.

He added, though, that the
Bahamas would not be “more
aggressive” in seeking grant
funding as a result of the reces-
sion and its impact on the pub-
lic finances.

“In the Bahamas, we want to
manage our affairs sensibly. To
the extent funds are available,
we will be as efficient as we can
in utilizing those funds,” Mr
Laing said.

“T don’t think we’ve come to
a phase where circumstances
dictate that we have to rush out
with great aggression for every
funding available.”

The minister added that the
projects to be included in the
EU’s 10th EDF still had not
been decided. He added that
while the Bahamas had to pro-
vide counterpart financing of its
own for these projects, it was
often for as little as 25 per cent
of what the EU provided.

Year-end target for first phase finance regulator consolidation

FROM page 1B

Commission, Compliance Com-
mission and Registrar of Insur-
ance’s Office - which are
already occupying the same
building, Charlotte House on
Shirley Street - into the sole
Bahamas Financial Services
Authority, via a Bahamas
Financial Services Act. The new
Authority will have a chief exec-
utive, who will replace the



NN tare tiie

Ory Estate |

heads of the three existing reg-
ulators, merging their roles into
his own.

“We had hoped that we
would have this process com-
pleted by year-end,” Mr Laing
told Tribune Business, “which is
the first phase of the consolida-
tion which we propose to do.”

He described this goal as
“absolutely achievable”, given
that the three regulators

involved were already in the
same building. “The hard work
has been done,” Mr Laing said.

With new legislation in the
form of the Domestic and
External Insurance Acts; the
reformed Securities Industry
Act and its regulations; and
responsibility for the Financial
and Corporate Services
Providers Act being handed to
the Securities Commission all

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either having been passed, in
the process of being imple-
mented, under consultation or
in effect. The minister said all
that remained to be done was to
consolidate their provisions
under the sole Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Act.

Mr Laing added: “In the first
phase, we will consolidate
everyone bar the Central Bank.
Then we will move to the sec-
ond phase, and the goal of the
single regulator. We’re taking
on step at a time.”

This will mean that, tem-
porarily at least, the Bahamas
will have a ‘twin peaks’ regula-
tory model, with the Central
Bank’s Bank Supervision
Department as a standalone
regulator for the banking and
trust company sector, and the
Financial Services Authority
responsible for everything else.

Mr Laing, though, said con-
solidation of the Banking
Supervision Department into
the Bahamas Financial Services
Authority would be the second
and final phase of the Govern-
ment’s strategy to create a
‘super regulator’.

He explained that the over-
laps between regulators, partic-
ularly the Central Bank and
Securities Commission in the
areas of banking and securities,
needed to be examined first.

“We want to make sure
everything is working on all
cylinders on that side before we
take it to the next level,” Mr
Laing said of first phase con-
solidation.

“Ultimately, we want to pro-
duce a level of efficiency and
effectiveness that makes it eas-
ier for clients to have a more

productive time in doing busi-
ness in our jurisdiction. We
want to get it right. The envi-
ronment in which we are oper-
ating does not have a lot of
room for error.”

The minister unveiled, via
some broad brush strokes, the
Government’s strategy for
financial services regulation and
growing the industry’s private
sector at a closed-door
Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB) meeting with
senior sector representatives on
Monday. He is understood to
be meeting with a BFSB steer-
ing committee today to put
more flesh, or meat, on the
bones of the Government’s
plans.

The Government is looking
to build on the Bahamas’ pri-
vate wealth management - pri-
vate banking, trusts and estate
planning - base to expand the
industry, hoping to encourage
high net worth and ultra high-
net worth clients to follow their
assets to the Bahamas by
becoming residents here.

That would lead into private
trust companies, family offices
and those individuals possibly
bringing their businesses to the
Bahamas and investing in its
economy. This trend would also
tie into yacht and aircraft reg-
istries, something the Bahamas
is trying to develop, and boost
the real estate and construction
industries.

Other aspects of the Govern-
ment’s strategy also aim to
establish the Bahamas as a cen-
tre through which investment
could be channelled into Latin
America and other emerging
economies in the region.

Crude prices
fall helow $63
in extented
sell-off

lm By ERNEST SCHEYDER
AP Energy Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil
prices fell for the fifth straight
day Tuesday, with a barrel cost-
ing $10 less than it did just one
week ago when crude hit anew
high for the year.

Benchmark crude for August
delivery fell $1.27 to $62.78 a
barrel on the New York Mer-
cantile Exchange.

Oil prices had already begun
to slide after peaking last Tues-
day, and dismal jobs numbers
last week from both the US and
Europe only exacerbated the
fall.

The unemployment data
dampened optimism about a
quick economic recovery, rais-
ing new doubts about the glob-
al appetite for energy.

“This is a market that is look-
ing for a reason to go back up
and it just isn’t getting it, so it
continues to fade away,” Alaron
Trading Corp. analyst Phil Fly-
nn said.

For months a weak dollar has
brought more investment mon-
ey into the market even though
storage levels for energy prod-
ucts like crude and gasoline are
very high.

Stockpiles of gasoline have
increased steadily for the past
four weeks even though the
country is in the midst of the
heavy driving season, which
includes the July Fourth holi-
day weekend.

Data coming from the
Department of Energy on
Wednesday is expected to show
that trend only continuing.

The department said Tues-
day it expects consumption of
liquid petroleum products to
contract by about 3.3 per cent
this year.

Crude prices will likely aver-
age about $70 per barrel for the
rest of the year, and the average
retail gasoline price likely will
float around $2.36 per gallon,
the department said.

Oil prices have doubled since
the beginning of the year and
on Tuesday, federal regulators
said they would examine
whether the government should
impose limits on the number of
futures contracts in oil and oth-
er energy commodities held by
speculative traders.

In other Nymex trading, gaso-
line for August delivery fell 1.76
cents to $1.7228 a gallon and
heating oil dropped 2.9 cents to
$1.5978. Natural gas for August
delivery rose less than a penny
to $3.488 per 1,000 cubic feet.

In London, Brent prices shed
95 cents to $63.10 a barrel on
the ICE Futures exchange.

¢ Associated Press writers
Alex Kennedy and George Jahn
in Vienna contributed to this
report from Singapore

Bahamas oil
imports cost
$1.1bn in ‘08

Bank’s quarterly statistical
digest showed that as at end-
March 2009, some 27,300 con-
sumer loans - worth a collective
$160.245 million - were past
due, meaning they were either
in arrears or non-performing.

However, only 9.6 per cent
of total consumer loans of
283,615 were in default. And,
measured by worth, only 7.2 per
cent of total consumer loans
worth $2.212 billion were in that
status.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 2009, PAGE 5B





World markets fall ahead.
of US earnings season

@ By PAN PYLAS
AP Business Writer

LONDON (AP) — World
stock markets fell Tuesday —
with Japan’s Nikkei index drop-
ping for the fifth day running
— amid mounting concerns that
the upcoming US second-quar-
ter earnings will disappoint.

In Europe, the FTSE 100
index of leading British shares
closed down 7.91 points, or 0.2
per cent, at 4,187 while Ger-
many’s DAX fell 53.63 points,
or 1.2 per cent, to 4,598.19. The
CAC-40 in France was 33.59
points, or 1.1 per cent, lower at
3,048.57.

On Wall Street, the Dow
Jones industrial average was
down 86.30 points, or one per
cent, at 8,238.57 around midday
New York time while the
broader Standard & Poor’s 500
index fell 8.42 points, or 0.9 per
cent, to 890.30.

will provide clues about
whether companies have
already seen the worst of the
recession or whether they are
still struggling in the first syn-
chronized global economic
downturn since the Second
World War.

“The worry is that the quar-
terly results are going to demon-
strate that stock markets have
got ahead of the economic
recovery and may well lead
some investors to feel that
shares do not represent value
at current levels,” said Philip
Gillet, a sales trader at IG
Index.

“This all starts in earnest on
Wednesday, when Dow com-
ponent Alcoa reveals its figures,
and market reaction could well
set the tone for the next few
weeks,” he added.

Equities rose from the middle
of March until the start of June
on hopes that the US economy

pated. The S&P 500 index in
the US rose around 15 per cent
during the second quarter, its
best performance since 1998,
amid hopes of a global recovery
despite worries about the bank-
ing system, public finances and
the length and depth of the
recession.

But disappointing economic
news over the last few weeks,
culminating in last Thursday’s
worse than expected US jobs
report for June, has altered the
general mood prevailing among




investors that a significant
rebound in the US was a dis-
tinct possibility. Since its peak in
early June, the S&P has
dropped around six per cent.

“Given the strong perfor-
mance of stocks relative to
March lows, a reality check
from earnings could be detri-
mental to risk appetite,” said
Gareth Berry, an analyst at
UBS.

Oil prices continued to fall
amid the global economic
uncertainty, with benchmark

NOTICE








INTERNATIONAL PETROLEUM
INVESTMENT CORPORATION





crude for August delivery down
$1.03 at $63.02 a barrel. On
Monday, the benchmark con-
tract slid $2.68 to settle at
$64.05.

Earlier, Asian stocks were
weighed down by waning
investor optimism about the
global economic recovery ahead
of this week’s meeting of the
Group of Eight leaders in Italy.
Japan’s Nikkei 225 stock aver-
age fell for the fifth straight day,
closing down 33.08 points, or
0.3 per cent, at 9,647.79.

Hong Kong’s Hang Seng
shed 117.14, or 0.7 per cent, to
17,862.27, while South Korea’s
Kospi rose 0.4 per cent to
1,434.20. China’s Shanghai fell
1.1 per cent. Australia’s market
retreated 0.4 per cent but Sin-
gapore trimmed gains to be
almost flat.

The dollar was down 0.1 per
cent at 95.11 yen while the euro
was steady at $1.3975.

¢ AP Business Writer Stephen
Wright in Bangkok contributed
to this report

Legal Notice
NOTICE

LACED INTERNATIONAL INC.
In Voluntary Liquidation

The start of the second-quar-
ter earnings reporting season

in particular will recover from
recession sooner than antici-

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RATIONAL INVESTMENTS LTD.

—_— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of RATIONAL INVESTMENTS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EL’ VIRA MANOR INC.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of EV VIRA MANOR INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
THINK ASSETS LTD.

— *,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of THINK ASSETS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

To advertise in The
Tribune - the #1 newspaper
in circulation, just call
Naar a BDL

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 6th day of July , 2009 Credit
Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre,
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, P.O.Box N-3023, Nassau, The
Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the
Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SATINROSE PARK LTD.

—_— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SATINROSE PARK LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SECOND GENESIS LID.

— *,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SECOND GENESIS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HAWKINSHILL ACRE LTD.

—f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of HAWKINSHILL ACRE LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,

2000, LACED INTERNATIONAL INC. is in
dissolution as of JULY 2, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated as 35A
Regent Street, PO. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DAWN INT’L LTD.

ps —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of DAWN INT’L LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SIALIS INTERNATIONAL INC.

—*f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SIALIS INTERNATIONAL INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GARTENPLATZ INC.

—*,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of GARTENPLATZ INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
PEER, WERE ER GREE UWE

5-Day FORECAST
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ORLANDO . .
Partly sunny with a
shower possible.






















Partly sunny with a
stray t-storm.

Partly cloudy. Partly sunny. Partly sunny. Partly sunny, a

ah: ON? oa’ - ———e
High:90°F/32°C t-storm possible.

~~ Low:73°F/28°C i

























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Y. HIGH EXT.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.



HIGH

fF
|

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LOW

3|4|5

MODERATE









. @. Te High: 92° High: 90° High: 89° High: 90°
r es High: 92° Low: 82° Low: 80° Low: 81° Low: 80° Low: 79° see EOE
TAMPA ae ; Ca
High: 89° F/32° C Li High __Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft.
Low: 77° F/25°C ed: - The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 9:12am. 24 3:12am. 02
cae @ F . elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 9:34pm. 28 3:08pm. 0.2
a 9:50am. 24 3:48am. 0.1
a i. a CT Thursday cog pm. 27 348pm. 02
J RR a Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Friday 26am. 24 423am. 01
\ | er ABACO Femperatre ______ 10:43pm. 26 4:27pm. 03
r by , 4 High: 88° F/31°C NQUN: « .ctinstetscetésiassetuecetszers crcteogtesoulieees 3 3 Saturday 17:03 a.m. 95 457am. 02
¥ , the Low: 83° F/28°C Te ee oo 11:19pm. 26 5:08 p.m. 0.3
— F Normal low 75° F/24° C
a hee @ WEST PALM BEACH a Last year's high oo... 91° F/33° C SUN AND ify
4 ell High: 91° F/33° C - Last year's lOW eects 80° F/26° C
q Low: 76° F/24°C ; Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:26 a.m. Moonrise .... 9:07 p.m.
es As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....ccccccscsssssescssessseeen 0.19" Sunset....... 8:03 p.m. Moonset ..... 7:24 a.m.
at FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date 18. Last New First
. am High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 90° F/32° C Normal year to date .......c.ccsecscsscsssseeeeeseeee 19.86" a %
Low: 78° F/26°C Low: 80° F/27°C te a
AccuWeather.com = Lao
a @ Forecasts and graphics provided by ay ;
i MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul.15 = Jul. 21 Jul. 28
tok 0 Fa ELEUTHERA
Low: 79° F/26° C NASSAU Bee Fas
cr = Low: 82° F/28° C
P “a @ a
KEY WEST — << _ GATISLAND
High: 88° F/31°C High: 89° F/32°C
Low: 80° F/27°C =e , Low: 76° F/24°C
i m4 =
ZX
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
High: 91 F/33 C High: 93° F/34° C
; ANDROS Low: 80° F/27° C Low: 77° F/25° Cc
Shown is ee ete eel are today's High: 96° F/36°C —
ighs and toni i ; : “ a ae
g ane awe Low: 82° F/28° C aad ¢ i
a all )
“a m
LONGISLAND
Low: 77° F/25°C —
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday é - : MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ‘aul High: 93° F/34° C
FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FC FC FIC FC 70% Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 94/34 68/20 s 93/33 68/20 pc Indianapolis 82/27 62/16 t 85/29 68/20 pc Philadelphia 81/27 63/17 pce 82/27 64/17 pc j
Anchorage 77/25 59/15 s 77/25 5713 pe Jacksonville 88/31 72/22 t 86/30 71/21 t Phoenix 106/41 87/30 pc 105/40 85/29 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 90/32 70/21 t 88/31 68/20 t Kansas City 90/32 72/22 pc 93/33 74/23 s Pittsburgh 76/24 54/12 po 80/26 60/15 pc RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:96°F/36"c
Atlantic City 80/26 60/15 pc 80/26 6246 pc LasVegas 102/38 78/25 s 102/38 82/27 s Portland,OR 70/21 5442 c 77/25 57/13 pc High: 93° F/34° C Low: 78° F/26°C
Baltimore 84/28 58/14 pce 82/27 63/17 pc Little Rock 96/35 68/20 pce 94/84 72/22 s Raleigh-Durham 93/383 64/117 pc 91/82 66/18 pc Low: 74°F/23°C i
Boston 73/22 59/15 t 69/20 58/14 c Los Angeles 82/27 62/16 pc 82/27 62/16 pc St. Louis 90/32 72/22 pe 93/33 73/22 s
Buffalo 68/20 57/13 pe 75/23 60/15 pc Louisville 89/31 67/19 pe 88/31 71/21 5s Salt Lake City 86/30 60/15 s 89/31 63/17 5s GREAT INAGUA
Charleston, SC 88/31 70/21 t 90/32 72/22 t Memphis 94/34 73/22 pce 95/35 75/23 s San Antonio 102/38 78/25 s 102/38 78/25 s High: 95° F/35° C
Chicago 74/23 60/15 t 85/29 69/20 pc Miami 90/32 79/26 t 91/32 79/26 t San Diego 75/23 66/18 pe 77/25 67/19 pc Low. 77°F/25°C
Cleveland 73/22 55/12 pe 82/27 62/16 pc Minneapolis 78/25 66/18 t 85/29 66/18 t San Francisco 71/21 54/2 pe 69/20 54/12 pc 7
Dallas 98/36 77/25 pce 102/38 78/25 s Nashville 92/33 66/18 pc 92/33 68/20 s Seattle 68/20 53/11 c 74/23 53/11 pe
Denver 96/35 58/14 5s 92/33 61/16 pc New Orleans 90/32 74/23 t 90/32 76/24 t Tallahassee 88/31 71/21 t 87/30 72/22 t
Detroit 76/24 58/14 pe 81/27 65/18 pc New York 81/27 65/18 pce 78/25 67/19 pc Tampa 89/31 77/25 t 88/31 77/25 t ;
Honolulu 88/31 76/24 pc 88/31 75/23 pc Oklahoma City 98/36 72/22 pc 100/87 72/22 s Tucson 97/36 78/25 s 100/87 77/25 pc
Houston 98/36 76/24 pc 98/36 76/24 5s Orlando 90/32 73/22 t 89/31 72/22 t Washington, DC 87/30 64/17 pc 84/28 67/19 pc

» ULL

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
66/18
86/30
93/33
56/13
89/31
85/29
71/21
90/32
80/26
89/31
68/20
80/26
64/17
64/17
79/26
54/12
99/37
94/34
60/15
88/31
82/27
78/25
69/20
63/17
66/18
69/20
62/16
88/31
72/22
91/32
112/44
91/32
83/28
58/14
91/32
72/22
68/20
90/32
88/31
79/26
104/40
68/20
75/23
67/19
74/23
104/40
68/20
72/22
71/21
80/26
101/38
82/27
89/31
57/13
86/30
61/16
90/32
74/23
86/30
72/22
61/16
93/33
82/27
73/22
86/30
67/19
72/22
70/21
76/24

Today

Low
F/C
77/25
53/11
57/13
76/24
44/6
79/26
77/25
64/17
72/22
77/25
62/16
56/13
75/23
46/7
43/8
57/13
37/2
73/22
84/28
44/6
73/22
71/21
63/17
59/15
46/7
52/11
54/12
48/8
73/22
63/17
81/27
83/28
75/23
61/16
40/4
79/26
60/15
52/11
61/16
77/25
55/12
77/25
59/15
57/13
52/11
54/12
88/31
57/13
54/12
54/12
69/20
78/25
59/15
79/26
28/-2
68/20
34/1
73/22
59/15
70/21
59/15
43/6
78/25
72/22
58/14
68/20
55/12
56/13
55/12
57/13

TNIV APU VL VIP NPWLIVILIEN I



(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Woruo Ginies Marine Forecast

Ww

pc
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pc
S
sh
r
pc
pc
c
s
r
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sh
sh
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pc
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sh
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S$
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= MO FT TTT V4 TTUTTTUT THT BHAA NMH AH A
— Cac co SO Geo & oa >a =>

pc

High
F/C
89/31
63/17
91/32
95/35
55/12
90/32
86/30
71/21
91/32
81/27
79/26
67/19
82/27
64/17
69/20
81/27
55/12
100/37
94/34
54/12
88/31
80/26
81/27
71/21
61/16
67/19
70/21
68/20
92/33
68/20
90/32
110/43
95/35
84/28
61/16
89/31
72/22
68/20
90/32
85/29
76/24
106/41
77/25
69/20
65/18
76/24
102/38
63/17
73/22
72/22
82/27
102/38
82/27
89/31
64/17
85/29
59/15
86/30
70/21
88/31
68/20
61/16
93/33
81/27
78/25
85/29
70/21
75/23
68/20
72/22

Thursday
Low
F/C
76/24
54/12
57/13
73/22
42/5
79/26
77/25
65/18
71/21
77/25
59/15
52/11
73/22
42/5
46/7
57/13
43/6
74/23
84/28
42/5
76/24
71/21
64/17
55/12
48/8
50/10
52/11
54/12
75/23
57/13
81/27
84/28
77/25
63/17
41/5
79/26
59/15
50/10
61/16
77/25
57/13
77/25
63/17
64/17
46/7
53/11
88/31
58/14
56/13
51/10
69/20
80/26
59/15
79/26
32/0
74/23
36/2
73/22
mile
70/21
59/15
48/8
79/26
72/22
61/16
69/20
56/13
57/13
52/11
58/14

Ww

pe

—

pc
sh
pc
t
pc
S$
sh
t

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

0) Va ES gah Gy

Showers
EX &j T-storms
Rain

* *| Flurries
| Snow
[ve] Ice

-10s









Minnéapolis

ZBI6G

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SSE at 8-16 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
Thursday: SE at 8-26 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 8-16 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Thursday: SE at 8-16 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
ABACO Today: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F
Thursday: _$ at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F



Miami
90/79

Fronts

Cold
War Milind

Stationary Mcngenli-

Os (0s 10s 20s [B0s/) 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s [S0s(//iO0ST/AiiE]

HURRICANE INSURANCE

“Yo
Away

Or you can rest easy knowing
that You have excellent insurance

co

way

Gan Be

rage no matter which
he wind

blows.

Nobody does it better.

Blown
urricane

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

i‘. eed easel ik on i204





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