Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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mother

Woman taken from
her house to ATM

A WOMAN who lives in the
eastern area of New Providence
was kidnapped and forced to
withdraw monies from a local
ATM as her captor sat in her
car threatening to kill her two
young children if she dared to
disobey him.

Early on Sunday morning
sometime before 5am, this
woman, whose identity is being
withheld, was wakened by an
unknown man who was stand-
ing over her bed and had placed
his hand over her mouth.

Ordering her not to scream,
he escorted her and her chil-
dren to the floor and demanded
to know where the safe and the
money was located in her home.

Exclaiming that there was no
safe in her house, the woman
attempted to appease the bur-
glar by handing over two Mova-
do watches, which were esti-
mated to be valued together at
about $3,000.

Reportedly unsatisfied with
this gesture, the burglar is said
to then have got on top of the
woman. Fearing that she was
about to be raped, the woman is
said to have offered the intrud-
er the option of going to the
bank where she said she could

get him “some money.”

Agreeing to this idea, the
man forced the woman into her
own car and made her kneel on
the floor on the front passen-
ger side. Although he was wear-
ing a mask, the man ordered
her not to look at his face and
they began to drive away from
her home. However, shortly
after leaving, the burglar
stopped and turned the car
around and went back to home
for the two young children who
had been left behind.

Setting off for the Palmdale
area, the man forced the woman
out of the car at the Scotiabank
ATM, reminding her of what
he would do to her children if
she did not return with the
promised funds.

Withdrawing $1,000 the
woman is said to have handed
over the cash and then demand-
ed that the man, who was at this
point holding her children
hostage to “get lost”, as he had
now got what he had come for.

However, the criminal
refused.

He placed the woman back
into the car and drove the vehi-

SEE page eight

The Taste
on
lruesdays!!

Valid only on Tvesdays!



m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

SS
a

OG MS ES

BAHAMAS BIGGEST

laren

Knife found next to body of
Har! Taylor exhibited in court

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

THE broken knife found
next to the lifeless body of
internationally recognised
handbag designer Harl Taylor
was exhibited in Supreme
Court yesterday as witness tes-
timony in the murder trial con-
tinued.

Troyniko McNeil, the son
of Taylor’s former business partner Troy McNeil,
is charged with intentionally causing the death of
Harl Taylor between Saturday, November 17,
and Sunday, November 18, 2007, while being
concerned together with another.

Taylor, 37, who was found dead at Mountbat-

SEE page eight

Harl Taylor



‘33-year-old’
believed to have

lived in Bahamas for

three years before
disappearance

‘Felipé Major/Tribune staff

PEDESTRIANS pick their way
through-the puddles yesterday
after heavy rain resulted in
flooding on the sidewalks of
Downtown Nassau:

e SEE PAGE FIVE



Psychologist warns
over teacher-student
boundary infractions

LOCAL psychologist Dr David Allen
encouraged Bahamian teachers to better
observe and understand the growing dynamics
of teacher-student boundaries as the trends of
old are no longer acceptable in today’s society.

Speaking at the opening of the Ministry of
Education’s forum at the Wyndham Crystal
Palace yesterday, Dr Allen explained that sex-
ual abuse of a child often comes after years of
boundary infractions.

These infractions, he said, come in the guise
of the exchange of notes or e-mails, the giving
of gifts or money, giving children rides home,
acting as confidants, meetings outside of school
on a social level, and finally the sexual abuse

SEE page eight



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Missing US
woman could be
murder victim
found in sheet

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AN AMERICAN
woman who disappeared
earlier this year is one
among several “missing”
individuals who police
think could be the murder
victim found wrapped in a
sheet over the weekend.

Police yesterday con-
firmed that they are
exploring the possibility
that it was the body of
Anna Michelle Garrison
of West Palm Beach,
Florida, which was discov-
ered by walkers in a bushy
area off Fox Hill Road
south on Saturday.

According to uncon-
firmed reports, Garrison
is 33-years-old and went
by seven different aliases,
including Anne Pugh and
Anne Marie Jenkins. She
is believed to have been
living in the Bahamas for
about three years prior to
her disappearance.

Family members are
expected to be contacted
today to come in and view
the body, said Superinten-
dent Elsworth Moss.

Officer in charge of the
Criminal Investigation
Department, Supt Moss
said that like the badly
decomposed corpse of the
Caucasian woman found
on Saturday, both Garri-
son and another missing
woman are known to have
tattoos.

The dead body, detected
near the Blue Water Cay
development just after
6pm on Saturday, had a

SEE page eight

Ministry reports
‘two swine flu cases’

THE Ministry of Health
last night reported what they
believe to be two cases of
swine flu that were contract-
ed by persons who were
returning to New Providence
from a stay in Orlando.

With four confirmed cases
in the Bahamas thus far,
these two latest cases could
push the official number up
to seven if they are con-
firmed by Ministry officials.





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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LOCAL NEWS

Michele Rassin makes Rotary history

Fast Nassau Club’s first female president elected

AFTER braving considerable
opposition to become a member
of the largest Rotary Club in the
Bahamas, Michele Rassin has
been elected its first female pres-
ident. She has been involved in
Rotary since childhood, attend-
ing and volunteering for events
through her father Barry Rassin, a
past president, district governor
and now one of 17 directors of
Rotary International around the
world. As the first woman to join
the Rotary Club of East Nassau
seven years ago, Ms Rassin says
she felt constantly compelled to
prove her worth to both support-
ers and sceptics.

She therefore committed her
time and energy to as many of the
club’s community projects as pos-
sible — a task that was also a plea-
sure, as it was the idea of being
useful that first drew her to the
club. Ms Rassin said that despite
the controversy sparked by her
decision to join — no less than
three members formally objected
and others threatened to quit — it
was not an attempt to rock the
boat, but rather an expression of
her desire to help the less fortu-
nate as effectively as possible. She
pointed out that while numerous
charity groups were already
accepting women at the time,
Rotary was the only one she knew
of that dedicated every cent it
raised to charity, using none for
administrative or other purposes.

"T really wanted to dedicate my
time and my resources to give
back 100 per cent, where I know
where it was going to be used for
the best," she said.

Still, Ms Rassin was aware of
the entrenched attitudes that pro-

ONE of the oldest buildings
in Nassau, Garrison House on
gated Queen Street, has been put
up for sale.

The well-maintained, Colonial
two-storey building comprises
1,774 square feet, plus 936 square
feet of covered porches.

“This is a fantastic location,”
said Mike Lightbourn, president

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MICHELE RASSIN receiving the Rotary Club of East Nassau Gold Citation Award from the Past District Governor Rupert

Ross.

voked the hostile reaction of some
members, and was determined to
take them on.

"I don't think people should be
judged based on their race, sex or
religion; your work performance
should stand for itself, and I have
a passion for doing work within
the community, and I didn't think
politics should be the deciding fac-
tor on somebody who wants to
help make things better for some-
body else, to make a difference,”
she told The Tribune.

About 20 years ago, American
branches of what was until then
the archetypal boys club began
taking female members — after a
US Supreme Court ruling com-
pelled them to — and eventually
clubs around the world followed
suit, including some in the
Bahamas. There have been other
female presidents of local club
branches in the past, but not East
Nassau — where many were keen

of Coldwell Banker Lightbourn
Realty and the exclusive listing
agent for the commercial prop-
erty. It is in the heart of Nassau’s
business district with the United
States Embassy three doors away,
providing special security for per-
sons entering from Bay Street.

The British Colonial Hilton
hotel stands a stone’s throw away
at the juncture of Bay and Queen
Streets, and shops, restaurants,
law firms and banks are all with-
in walking distance.

Another drawing point is the
enclosed grounds of approxi-
mately 7,000 plus square feet,
which provide potential parking
for eight to 10 cars at the rear.

Mr Lightbourn said the prop-
erty is priced at $650,000.

“This is a rare opportunity for
someone to own a unique piece of
real estate in a highly desirable
location,” he said.

This property is one of the old-
est buildings in Nassau and has a
considerable historical past and

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to preserve what they saw as an
important tradition.

But things have indeed
changed, if the overwhelming sup-
port for Ms Rassin expressed at
the handing-over dinner on Sat-
urday, June 27, was any indica-
tion. The new has president said
she will not let her supporters
down, and has ambitious plans for
her one year term. These include
the donation of hearing aids and
eye glasses to children of eco-
nomically challenged families, the
provision of wheelchairs to those
who cannot afford them, the pur-
chase of ventilators and incuba-
tors for the Princess Margaret
Hospital, and the launch of the
Bahamas’ first "blood mobile."

This last project, which she has
been working on for a year, will
see the commissioning of a van
fully equipped to conduct blood
drives at businesses or other loca-
tions, in an effort to improve

blood reserves. "We make it eas-
ier, by bringing the blood drive
to you,” she said.

Perhaps the most significant
aspect of the project, she
explained, is that by taking advan-
tage of the mail boat system, the
vehicle can conduct the first blood
drives on Family Islands.

All Rotary projects depend on
charity, and no one would be sur-
prised if businessmen have
become more reluctant to give of
late. But Ms Rassin said she is
determined not to let the world’s
economic troubles get in the way
of her plans. If anything, she said,
Rotary members must try even
harder, as the ranks of the needy
will inevitably grow, and other
non-profit aid organisations will
begin to struggle.

© See today’s Tribune Woman tor

more on our talk with Michele
Rassin

ed a MALTY
E pars Bi

UP FOR SALE: onl rT ae ence ent

character. It started life as Garri-
son House and accommodated
the officers serving at Fort Nas-
sau, which was built in 1697 and is
now the Hilton hotel.

The fort was destroyed around
1703-04 in a surprise attack by a
combined Spanish and French
force. It is said they found the
Deputy Governor feasting, the
fort neglected and without a gar-
rison. The town was sacked and
burned, the fort destroyed and its
guns spiked, and the inhabitants
expelled. The fort was later
rebuilt. Many of the original fea-
tures of Garrison House have



been preserved and restored to
offer an outstanding residence or
office, with all of the charm and
grace of yesteryear. Garrison
House was the Bishop of New
York’s winter residence during
the early 19th century.

The well-known Tamberly
School started here before mov-
ing to the west of New Provi-
dence. And, to add a twist of
intrigue, the grounds of the house
are said to harbour a major
Bahamian historical secret. The
seller says that the secret, in time
honoured tradition, will be
revealed to the successful buyer.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief |

Policeman
quizzed over
Bay Street
shop robbery

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

A POLICE officer has
been questioned in connec-
tion with the robbery of a
high-end Bay Street shop,
the Central Detective Unit
confirmed.

Superintendent Elsworth
Moss, in charge of the CDU,
said the officer was ques-
tioned yesterday, but added
that it is not known if he will
be formally charged at this
stage.

Several other individuals
have also been questioned in
the wake of the robbery of
the downtown Breitling bou-
tique on Sunday.

Staff at the store were
forced to hand over thou-
sands of dollars worth of
designer watches when a
robber threatened them at
gunpoint.

It was alleged that a police
officer may have acted as a
lookout while the crime was
being committed.

It was the second armed
robbery of a Bay Street store
in just seven days.

Staff at a Little Switzer-
land shop were confronted
by a gunman who made simi-
lar demands last Sunday.

This time around, officers
from the Central Police Sta-
tion caught up with an
armed suspect, who was then
taken into custody.

Yesterday, Supt Moss con-
firmed that police believe
the suspect may be responsi-
ble for both robberies.

Wanted Grand
Bahama fugitive
arrested after
police chase

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - One of
Grand Bahama’s most want-
ed fugitives was apprehend-
ed on Monday afternoon fol-
lowing a police chase on
Queen’s Highway.

Asst Supt Welbourne Boo-
tle reported that Garin Gib-
son and a female were taken
into police custody sometime
after 3.30pm when the chase
ended in a three-car collision
near Colony Motors.

Mr Bootle said police were
in pursuit of a vehicle, driven
by Gibson, which crashed
into two other vehicles.

He fled from the vehicle
and ran into the surrounding
area to escape capture.

A female passenger in the
vehicle was immediately tak-
en into custody, while police
cordoned off the area to
search for Gibson.

Standstill

Police had cordoned off an
area on Queen’s Highway
near Dolly Madison, bring-
ing traffic to a standstill on
the busy commercial cause-
way.

A large crowd of onlook-
ers had gathered in the area.

The K-9 Unit was also
called to the scene to assist
in the search for Gibson,
who was later found hiding
in the back trunk of a vehicle
at Colony Motors.

Mr Bootle said that two
persons were seriously
injured in the collision and
taken to hospital.

Gibson is wanted for ques-
tioning in connection with
several serious offences. He
had managed to elude police
for a long time.

In March, the police had
classified Gibson as their
“number one” wanted sus-
pect and had appealed to the
public for assistance in his
capture.

INSIGHT

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net



REDUCING violence in
schools, attracting and retain-
ing quality teachers and adopt-
ing a more relevant national
curriculum are among the 22
goals laid out in the Ministry of
Education’s Ten Year Educa-
tion Plan.

Hundreds of education dele-
gates from across the Bahamas
yesterday scrutinised the min-
istry’s plan for the future of edu-
cation during the first day of
the 2009 National Education
Summit.

The two-day conference at
the Wyndham Nassau Resort is
encouraging discussion between
delegates and educators from
every island, as well as public
and private stakeholders so that
their thoughts and recommen-
dations may be considered
before the plan is passed in par-
liament and implemented for
all government schools in the
next school year.

Minister of Education Carl
Bethel said the specific goals
set out in the plan are all the
more sustainable as they have
been developed by educators
for educators and will outlast
any political changes.

Three advisory committees
for pre- and primary schools,
secondary schools, and post-sec-

TEN-YEAR EDUCATION PLAN

Ministry sets sights on
reducing school violence

Other goals include attracting quality teachers and making curriculum more relevant

CARL BETHEL

ondary/tertiary education, also
will be established at the sum-
mit to ensure continued discus-
sions and developments.

Positive

Mr Bethel said: “We must do
more to effect positive and sub-
stantial improvements in the
quality of education. Excellence
must become the standard, the
only standard that is acceptable
in public education.”

The minister said it will no
longer be acceptable for a child
to leave primary school with-
out having reached the grade
level in literacy and numeracy,
or to maintain the C- BJC aver-
age in junior high school, or for





“Excellence
must become
the standard,
the only
standard that
is acceptable
in public
education.”



so many students to struggle to
meet a 2.0 grade point average
in senior high school.

“Well enough is no longer
good enough. We want to
ensure the education system is
holistic in providing an effec-
tive environment, programmes
and opportunities to enable stu-
dents to develop their capacity
to make positive choices as lit-
erate citizens.

“Our ability to adequately
meet the needs of all facets of
society are all predicated on our
ability to prepare our students
to be leaders who are analytical,
independent thinkers with the
problem-solving capacity to
make a positive difference.”

Educational needs are chang-

Nurses union sticks to rejection
of government’s insurance offer

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE president of the Bahamas
Nurses Union is sticking to her
guns — the union has no plans to
reconsider its rejection of gov-
ernment’s insurance offer, she
says.

BNU president Cleola Hamil-
ton told The Tribune yesterday
that as far as she is aware there
are no further meetings sched-
uled with government represen-
tatives. She said she would “pre-
fer not to comment” any further
at this time as to what the union’s
next step may be in the continu-
ing dispute between the two par-
ties.

Ms Hamilton reiterated that in
the union’s view government’s
last proposal relating to insurance
coverage for the nurses is “no
offer at all.”

Hundreds of nurses called in
sick for over two weeks in June,
crippling the healthcare system,
after Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham announced in May that
the government “cannot afford”
to pay for (the nurses’) expected
$10.5 million health insurance this

HUBERT MINNIS

budget year.”

After sitting down to talk with
the union two weeks later, the
government said it could cover
the nurses for all “work-related”
sicknesses and injuries, provide
some private rooms for them to
be treated in at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital, and bring in their
insurance coverage by July 1,
2010, or before, if feasible.

Proposal

But Ms Hamilton said nurses
rejected that offer on the same
day it was made, and yesterday





dismissed Health Minister Hubert
Minnis’ call for the union to
reconsider the proposal before it
expires on Thursday.

She maintains that the aspect of
the proposal that commits the
government to cover the expense
of any work-related injuries goes
no further than what is already
available to workers under the
National Insurance Board.

This comes after Dr Minnis
said last week that he hopes the
nurses could “look at the situation
globally” in terms of the eco-
nomic challenges facing countries
the world over and review their
opposition to government’s offer.

Commenting on where the
BNU goes from here, Ms Hamil-
ton said, “we will have to see.”

She said she “will have to see
some stuff” before she can say
whether she feels that there is
anything else that can be done by
the union to cause government
to put another offer on the table.

The BNU’s counter-proposal
demands that government imple-
ment its insurance coverage this
year. The union said the cover-
age is critical given the risks that
nurses are exposed to in the
course of their daily duties.

Man, 28, charged with Bimini murder

A 28-year-old man charged
in connection with a murder on
Bimini last week was arraigned
in Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Police have charged Chrisco
Knowles of Seven Hills, with
the July 1 murder of Vernon
Rolle.

According to reports, Rolle
was stabbed to death during an
altercation with another man
around 5.35 pm on Wednesday.
Rolle was reportedly stabbed in
the stomach outside Sue and
Joy's Variety Store in Alice
Town, Bimini.

He was taken by private vehi-
cle to hospital for treatment
where he later died becoming
the country’s 38th murder victim

for the year. Knowles, who
appeared before Chief Magis-
trate Roger Gomez yesterday
with his left arm in a cast and
sling, was not required to enter
a plea to the murder charge.

He was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison.

The case was transferred to
Court 5, Bank Lane and
adjourned to July 14 for men-
tion.

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ing in a modern world and stu-
dents’ individual needs and abil-
ities must be catered to, Mr
Bethel said. He emphasised the
importance of vocational train-
ing required for some students
to excel, and the academic train-
ing other students require.

“TI believe the days of an
unscientific, ideology-driven,
‘one size fits all’ approach to
high school education must end,
and must end now,” Mr Bethel
said. “A child’s high school
should not be randomly decided
by which primary school he or
she attended, but rather should
reflect and cater to the child’s
educational inclination and indi-
vidual learning needs.”

Educators yesterday dis-
cussed the plan in groups and
will report on their recommen-
dations this morning.

They will then participate in
the election of officers and the
appointment of the three new
sub-committees. Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham will speak
at the closing of the summit this
afternoon.

TIZQYICN

Lia-Alexis Ritchie
represented
Bahamas at

‘leaders’ sumunit

LIA-ALEXIS Ritchie,
a St Andrews High
School student, was elect-
ed to represent the
Bahamas at the People-
to-People Leadership
Summit at Harvard Uni-
versity in Boston, which
was held last week Sun-
day, June 28, to Saturday,
July 4.

Ms Ritchie joined stu-
dents from around the
world to discuss issues
such as leadership, team
building, community ser-
vice, college admissions,
and professional aspira-
tions.

The Summit also
allowed students to work
on an action plan to make
a difference in their com-
munities and develop
skills that will help them
in becoming leaders in
tomorrow's world.

People-to-People was
founded by former presi-
dent Dwight D Eisenhow-
er during his presidency
in 1956. Its People-to-
People Ambassador pro-
grammes were set up to
fulfil President Eisenhow-
er's vision for fostering
world citizenship.





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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Bay Street needs to be revamped

THE PROBLEMS of Bay Street seem to
spin in a vicious circle. Merchants need business,
government has entered into a contract with
Carnival Cruise lines to guarantee 1.4 million
visitors a year to satisfy their needs — but it is
now up to merchants to lure these visitors off
their ships and on to shabby Bay Street.

Planning is underway for the redesign of
Bay Street, but in the meantime most Bay Street
shops need a good cleanup that can only be
done with a couple of coats of paint.

We can understand the reluctance of mer-
chants to expend such funds on their buildings
knowing that by the end of a week they will
again take on that grubby look from the exhaust
of the vehicular traffic — especially the large
buses — that daily choke the narrow street.

Before anything can be done to give Bay
Street a face-lift — if it’s only to wash the store
fronts — traffic has to be removed from what
used to be Nassau’s main shopping thorough-
fare. The removal of the unwieldy, exhaust-
puffing buses would be a good place to start.

Government has an agreement from Carni-
val to overnight in port. But how many cruise
passengers will leave their ships for an empty,
dismal Bay Street when entertainment is pro-
vided on board? This is something that mer-
chants will have to think about and plan for.
Special patrols will also have to be provided to
guarantee round-the-clock safety.

Government has brought visitors to mer-
chants’ doorsteps, it is now up to the merchants
to get them into their stores — but without
shopping, dining or clubs to liven up an after 5
o’clock Bay Street, there will be no evening
trade.

Whatever management committee is
appointed for Bay Street its members’ first
order of business should be to decide what stan-
dard and look they want for Bay Street. Colours
and shop designs that would detract from the
atmosphere that the majority are trying to
achieve should be discouraged. We recall when
many years ago there were regulations to main-
tain an attractive looking island with homes
and businesses painted in pastel shades — the
flamingo pink being the favourite. Today any-
thing goes with some of the most garish looking
colours imaginable.

The Bahamian flag fluttering from the top of
a flagstaff has its place, but the combination of
its colours when formed into decorative bunting
or streamers around buildings are an unfortu-
nate blend — rather than creating a joyful
mood, they look too funereal.

But that probably is a matter of personal
taste. However, if this is going to be the deco-

ration on state occasions, then professionals
should be consulted as to the colour buildings
should be painted so that when this bunting
goes up the effect will be dramatic rather than
drab.

However, there are points to commend as
government tries to create green spaces along
Bay Street.

The little park at Armstrong and East Bay
Streets has been greatly improved and with the
daily rains is blooming in beauty as is the Bay
and Mackey Street park, the Eastern Parade
and the disused Eastern Cemetery.

Atlantis has greatly improved the strip lead-
ing over the bridge to Paradise, but the chains
connecting the small posts constructed to keep
cars from running onto the greens have since
been smashed by an indifferent public.

A small team of workers will have to be
assigned to these parks for daily care if only to
protect them from the abuses of uncaring,
garbage-littering citizens. Motorists should also
be more careful about driving on the road pro-
vided for them and not run up onto curbs dam-
aging them and cracking the sidewalks.

It is ashame that an historic landmark oppo-
site the Eastern Parade is being allowed to
crumble for lack of care. Early in the last cen-
tury it was at this landing ramp that Pan Amer-
ican Airways with its seaplanes introduced the
Bahamas to the age of aviation and from which
many an international celebrity stepped ashore.
This is where the late Eugene Dupuch, QC, for
whom the Eugene Dupuch Law Library is
named, as a young teenager conducted his first
interview for The Tribune. Himself an accom-
plished pianist, young Eugene was delighted to
quiz Irving Berlin.

In the early days this building was painted
white with black trim. In later years it was
repainted in PanAm’s colours — white with
blue trim. Most people preferred the original
colours of black and white.

In later years the building was taken over by
the Traffic Department and rapidly started to
decline for lack of maintenance. Today it has
been totally abandoned.

It is in such a bad state that it should either be
restored as a small museum with the early his-
tory of PanAm and the delivery of mail and
the first airline-borne tourists, or it should be
torn down.

But to be allowed to stand in its present state
detracts from the present beauty of the Eastern
Parade on the opposite side of the road.

If we are to have an attractive island all
Bahamians from every walk of life will have to
participate in its upkeep.



Growing the
economic
pie will help
the poor

LETTERS

RE: Avid Reader and "the
middle road between the
extremes of capitalism and
socialism"

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thanks to Avid Reader for
having written again to suggest
there are benefits to "the middle
road between the extremes of
capitalism and socialism" telling
us that he or she seeks that "elu-
sive Utopia where capitalism
with a human face resides".

One would say both major
political parties here are some-
where between capitalists and
socialists, using the mixed econ-
omy economic model, and the
country does not appear to
function very well in numerous
areas as Avid Reader pointed
out a couple weeks back.

But neither capitalism or
socialism has a "human face".
As Ludwig von Mises tells us, in
economics there is "Human
Action".

Put another way, Adam
Smith, the "father of econom-
ics," said that: "Jt is not from
the benevolence of the butcher,
the brewer, or the baker, that we
expect our dinner, but from their
regard to their own interest. We
address ourselves, not to their
humanity but to their self-love,
and never talk to them of our
necessities but of their advan-
tages" (The Wealth of Nations,
Book I Chapter IT).

And this Human Action, as
described by Smith, is the cen-
tral point of The Nassau Insti-
tute’s position.

Avid Reader then suggests
that the state should take care
of us in times of need.

Many of us, (including Avid
Reader), complain about gov-
ernment and the grief it causes,
albeit unintentionally. Yet he

letters@tribunemedia net



or she calls on them to fix the
things they already control by
doing more. What makes us
believe that they will succeed
in "helping" us this time with
further government initiatives
like unemployment insurance?
Particularly when it is in essence
another Ponzi Scheme that will
leave future generations worse
off.

Recognise that unemploy-
ment premiums paid by both
employers and employees is a
tax on labour. The premium
deduction for employers is a
cost that must be passed on to
consumers. For the employed
person it is a reduction of
income. Also harmful, it creates
dependency over time, and a
disincentive to find employ-
ment. The cost of a new gov-
ernment bureaucracy with its
attendant inefficiencies and pos-
sible corruption has to be paid
for. Tax increases inevitably fol-
low.

Any right thinking person is
concerned about helping the
less fortunate, but history shows
us that this is more easily
accomplished by growing the
economic pie with sensible eco-
nomic policy than with policies
that destroy wealth. Policies
such as those offered by wel-
fare states, or those that pre-
vent people opening a business
or high taxes, etc, that discour-
age the entrepreneur and
reduce economic growth.

Witness the many private
trusts in the United States that
are established by wealthy peo-
ple to assist others because of
their ability to grow the eco-

nomic pie. Locally we can refer
to many Bahamians who have
been able to succeed and there-
by grow the economic pie and
in the process give to local char-
ities and individuals in need.

The letter writer also seems
to suggest that our policy rec-
ommendations are limited to
Dr. Milton Friedman.

Having read various books
and articles by economists like
John Maynard Keynes, Milton
Friedman, Friedrich Hayek,
Ludwig von Mises, Thomas
Sowell, Lawrence Reed, Arthur
Seldon and numerous others,
we have come to the conclusion
that with economic policy it is
not whether a public (govern-
ment) policy comes from the
left or right that should matter.
What is of paramount impor-
tance is if the prescribed policy
is right or wrong, or works or
does not work. A quick read we
would highly recommend for
Avid Reader is Henry Hazlit-
t's Economics in One Lesson.

Is the Free Market or Capi-
talism perfect? Of course not.
But, it has brought more people
out of poverty than any other
economic system.

Finally, Avid Reader sug-
gests once more that we are
resistant to change and want to
preserve the status quo.

Please be assured Avid
Reader, The Nassau Institute
and our membership are all
about changing the status quo
and our web site

(http://www. nassauinstitute.org

> ) is a growing testament to

the changes we advocate in
favour of the Free Market.

RICK LOWE

Vice President,

The Nassau Institute,
June 27, 2009.

Looking at cruise ship business decline

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Tam concerned.

We are paying how much to
dredge the Harbour to allow
cruise ships to be here for short-
er periods of time with restau-
rants and shops open on board?

The primary reason for ships
to come to the Bahamas is
because dumping garbage here
is cheaper than doing it in the
USA, and to visit their own pri-



vate Cays where they sell their
own Made in China souvenirs
and staff the island with non
Bahamians. We allow ships to
dump their garbage here when
we cannot adequately dispose
of garbage generated by our
population.

There is still no Straw Market
(which I can assure you is not
“World Famous” for the rea-
sons we would like), and it
seems that every morning I dri-
ve through Bay Street it looks
shabbier and shops are getting
fewer. Tour operators will be
an endangered species once
ships stop in Nassau so briefly
that there is no time to do

excursions except on the Cay
owned by who...the cruise ship
company!

Currently the Government
owes the cruise ship association
millions of dollars in rebates for
bringing people here, even if
those people have never left the
boat in Nassau, or even if the
boat does not dock at all!

So I ask, how much does it
actually cost all of us who live
here for others to have a vaca-
tion on a cruise ship in the
Bahamas?

S APPLETON
Nassau,
July, 2009.

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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALBERT SAINTRE
of MINI STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 30° day of June, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

=e
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

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Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in
Customer Service.”

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The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

Public Advisory

The public is advised that due to the
LPIA Expansion Project, the
entrance road laading to the US
Departures tenminal will be recdhuoed
to one lane of vehicular traffic
commencing an Thursday, July
2, 2009 until further notice. Please
observe any traffic directions and
signage while driving along the
entrance road.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

HAPPY INDEPENDENCE BAHAMAS

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
(OPER EXPERES JULY 12". Joc}

Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.

We apologize for any inconvenience
caused,





THE TRIBUNE

president keeping tight-lipped

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Bahamas Bar
Association president Wayne
Munroe is remaining tight-
lipped about the reasons
behind his decision not to run
for re-election and reports
that his law partnership with
Elliott Lockhart is to be dis-
solved.

Asked yesterday to com-
ment on why he did not run
for the position of Bar Presi-
dent for a fourth time in the
June 26 elections, Mr Munroe
said that his decision was in
part down to the fact that he
had already served on the bar
council for around a decade.

Served

“IT was president for six
years, vice president for four.
I may have even been on the
council before but I definitely
served on the bar council for
at least 10 years,” said the
lawyer.

However, he noted that also
playing a part in the his deter-
mination not to stand again
was “something” which he has
to “pay close attention to in
the next 12 to 18 months”.

“T thought it was appropri-
ate to pay close attention to
that,” said Mr Munroe,

adding that the matter is not
something he “can openly dis-
cuss”.

He added that the presi-
dency of the BBA — now held
by Ruth Bowe-Darville — is
an unpaid position which
nonetheless “takes a lot of
time, dedication and devo-
tion.”

Post

Upon winning the presi-
dency, former vice president
of the BBA Mrs Bowe-
Darville revealed that Mr
Munroe had initially indicated
his intention to run again for
the top post.

However, she said he
withdrew from the running
several days prior to the elec-
tion.

Over the past few weeks,
reports have surfaced which
suggest that Mr Munroe’s 12
year law partnership with
Elliott Lockhart, who recent-
ly returned to the firm after a
stint as a judge, is to be dis-
solved.

Mr Munroe started work-
ing for Mr Lockhart in 1990
and partnered with him to
form the well-known and suc-
cessful firm in 1997.

When asked about the
claims, Mr Lockhart did not
confirm or deny them. He
declined to comment on the

Govt soliciting bids
to repair Acklins’
Queen’s Highway

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net

AFTER years of com-
plaints from Acklins resi-
dents, government has start-
ed soliciting bids to repair
the island’s Queen’s High-
way.

MP for the
island Alfred
Gray yester-
day said the
news that the
“almost
impassable”
thoroughfare
will be
addressed “is
a step in the
right direc-
tion.”

But he
urged that the
work must be done “with
urgency.”

Residents have described
the road as being in a
“deplorable” state — a blight
on the island’s attractiveness
as a tourist destination and a
burden on the pockets of
islanders who regularly send
off to Nassau for parts to
repair their rattled cars.

The people of Acklins
have had to endure their
hopes of an improvement to
the road being dashed on
more than one occasion.

A $3.4 million contract
signed in September 2006 to
pave the route — which res-
idents say was “scraped” in
1996 but never repaved —
was cancelled by the govern-
ment after the May 2007
election.

Former FNM Works Min-
ister Earl Deveaux told par-
liament the contract was
awarded without competitive
bidding and that prior to its
cancellation there was con-
cern over whether it would
be completed.

Yesterday, Mr Gray wel-
comed the government’s
decision to put out to tender
the contract to finally repair
Queen’s Highway and pro-
vide periodical maintenance
of the 32.3 mile, two-lane
road.

Contractors are being
invited to bid up until
August 14, 2009 to carry out
the patching and sealing
maintenance of around
290,000 square yards of the
road, the replacement of the
base course layer and the
placement of a new surface
seal on about 100,000 square
yards of the road.

Alfred Gray



The work is to be funded
by the Bahamas government
and the Ninth European
Development Fund.

matter when contacted a
week ago.

When questioned about the
reports yesterday, Mr Munroe





also refused to confirm or
deny them, stating that he
cannot respond “at this
point”.

a SESSA









































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TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 , PAGE 5

Former Bahamas Bar Association Benicio del foro pays visit

to Puerto Rico prison

| BAYAMON, Puerto Rico

ACTOR BENICIO DEL

: TORO met with convicts
i inside a Puerto Rican
? prison Monday, offering
: encouragement to a jail-
: house theater group and a
i few tips from his own
? Oscar-winning
i according to Associated
i Press.

career,

The Puerto Rico-born

? actor interrupted his vaca-
: tion in the U.S. Caribbean
i territory for the talk at
? Bayamon Regional Prison
? outside the capital, San
: Juan.

"I believe everyone needs

a second chance," del Toro
: told about 30 inmates who
; take part in the theater

there is life, you can still
help society in some way,
you can improve yourself."

He encouraged the
inmates to read as part of
their rehabilitation, saying
reading has been crucial to
his own growth as an actor.

The inmates performed a
sketch for the actor and
thanked him for coming.

"It's a great thing to be
able to share with an artist
who is famous, who has
been making movies in
Hollywood," said Carlos
Baez Figueroa, 39, who is
in prison for murder.

Del Toro won a support-
ing actor Oscar for his role
in the movie "Traffic" and
starred in last year's "Che,"
a film biography of Latin

i group. "I am here to help
: reaffirm that as long as

Butler's Funeral Homes

Che Guevara.

& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sits.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR

Patrick James Jacobs, 52

of Mt. Pleasant will be
held on Thursday July
09, 2009 at 10:00a.m. at
St. Cecilia’s Catholic
Church, Third and
Fourth Streets, Coconut
Grove. Officiating will
be Fr. Simeon Roberts.

He is survived by his

mother, Patricia

Campbell; two

daughters, Jacqueline

Jacobs, of New York and

Chantal Jacobs of London, England; three

grandsons, Joshua and Isaac of London and Camron

of New York; two sisters, Ann Bease and Amber

Jacobs; two brothers, Jack and Mark Isaacs; one

brother-in-law, Bob Bease; seven aunts, Thelma

Ford , Virginia Campbell, Madeline Campbell, Corine

I Phil, Marsha Bowe, Maria Campbell, Peggy

Campbell Bethel; six uncles, Eugene , Edward,

George and Anthony Campbell, Eugene Iphill and

Clinton Bowe; three nieces, Angelica , Anna and

Mari; four nephews, Jamie, John Pierre, Yarrow and

Abel and a host of cousins and other relatives and
friends too numerous to mention.




In lieu of flowers the family has requested that
donations be made to St. Cecilia’s Catholic
Church, Third and Fourth Streets, Coconut
Grove, P. O. Box N 8187, Nassau, Bahamas in his
memory.

Funeral arrangements are being handled by
Butlers’ Funeral Homes and Crematorium, Ernest
and York Streets.

Funeral Service for
Harriet Ophelia Cartwright, 78

of Hawthorne Road and
formerly of Cartwright’s
, Long Island will be
held on Wednesday July
08, 2009 at 400p.m. at
St. Matthew’s Anglican
Church, Shirley and
Church Streets.
Officiating will be
Venerable Keith N.
Cartwright; assisted by
Rev’d Dr. James B.
Moultrie and Rev’d Don
Haynes. Cremation will follow.

She is survived by one adopted son; Terrance, three
grand children; Roxanna of Fort Worth, Texas, T.
Kirk and Gavin Cartwright, her brothers; Lacton,
Michael, Calvin “Gus” and Thalburg “T.C”
Cartwright; sisters, Lucy Cartwright and Katherine
Treco; brothers-in-law, Thomas Treco, Mitchell
and Emery Cartwright; sisters-in-law, Beryl, Verona,
Eva, Ellerith and Ovina Cartwright, Lillian “Lilla”
Knowles and Thelma “Tally” Burrows; fourty-three
nephews, fourty- eight nieces, one hundred and
fourty-nine grand nephews, one hundred and
thirty-one grand nieces, numerous great-grand
nephews and nieces and many other relatives and
friends including, Father Earnest Pratt, Patricia
“Pat” Knowles and Deborah Cartwright; Care givers,
Mrs. Francis Ledee, Mrs. Shirley Miller and the staff
of The Persis Rodgers Home for the Aged, Members
of St. John’s, Buckley’s, Long Island and the People
of Cartwright’s, Long Island.

The family would like for those planning on attending
the service of Mrs. Cartwright to wear only bright
summer colours, no black white, navy blue or dark
colours.

In lieu of flowers the family has requested that
donations be made to the Persis Rodgers Home
for The Aged on Hawthorne Road P.O. Box N
7350, Nassau, Bahamas.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’
Funeral Homes and Crematorium

at Ernest and York Streets on Wednesday July
08, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. until 2:30p.m. There
will be no viewing at the church.

American revolutionary



PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Bill Clinton
making first
Haiti visit as
UN envoy

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti

BILL CLINTON aims to refo-
cus international attention on this i

Caribbean country's deep eco-
nomic problems and environ-

mental decay during his first visit i
as the United Nations’ special }

envoy to Haiti, according to Asso-
ciated Press.
The former U.S. president,

who is expected to meet with :
Haitian President Rene Preval }

and visit hurricane-battered areas,

is lending his prestige to the plight :
of the poorest nation inthe West- }

ern Hemisphere as world atten-

tion has shifted to the global i
financial crisis and other trouble }

spots.

United Nations said.
The three-day visit will be Clin-

ton's second to Haiti this year. :
He toured Port-au-Prince with

UN. Secretary-General Ban Ki-

moon, recording artist Wyclef :
Jean and others in March, before :

Ban named him to the newly cre-
ated post in May.

Clinton spoke at a Haiti donors i

conference at the Inter-Ameri-
can Development Bank in Wash-

ington in April that generated

$324 million in aid pledges.

As U.N. envoy, his aims i

include investment and job cre-

ation, particularly by expanding

garment factories that export to

the United States, and repairing

Haiti's severe deforestation.

Those priorities were laid out :
in a 19-page report to Ban by :
Oxford University professor Paul}
Collier in January that was }

praised by Preval and other lead-
ers.
But the report has been criti-

cized by lawmakers and other

Haitians who see the garment fac-

tories as havens for exploitative i
labor. Workers in the factories }
make a minimum salary of $1.72a

day, though some are paid more.
A bill passed by Haiti's parlia-

ment to raise the daily minimum }
wage to $5.14 was rejected by }
Preval, contributing to frustra- i
tions that have fueled street
protests and kept most voters
away from the polls during last :

month's Senate elections.

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He was scheduled to arrive late
Monday, but no public events }
were planned until Tuesday, the i

Encouragement for
_CC Sweeting graduates

GRADUATES of CC Sweeting Senior
High School have been encouraged to
attend the Bahamas Technical and Voca-
tional Institute where they will soon be

able to obtain associate degrees.

Ministry of Education Permanent Sec-
retary Elma Garraway congratulated the
Class of 2009 during the graduation cere-
mony at the Holy Trinity activity centre
on June 17. She told them that they are

mas.

the only graduating class in the public

school system where most of the gradu-
ates have skills they can take into the work-
place or use to open their own businesses.
She told the graduates to dream big and
work their way from “rags to riches.”
Head girl Nadia McQuay was presented
the Valedictorian Award and Jermaine
Tucker was given the Salutorian Award
and named Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity’s

2009 Valedictorian.

YOUNG writers in the Fam-
ily Islands were awarded lap-
top computers when announced
winners of the annual Temple-
ton Foundation “Laws of Life’
essay competition.

Bernique Pinder, a grade 11
pupil at Crooked Island High
School, and Justin Jack, a grade
eight student at South Andros
High School, were selected
from more than 80 entrants who
wrote on the subjects, “If you
don’t use it, you'll lose it” and
“Crime doesn’t pay.”

Bernique wrote on the first
subject, citing a Biblical story
in the Gospel of St Luke, and
the tale of American bridge
builder John Roebling who was
left brain damaged in a con-
struction accident and yet con-
tinued to build the bridge from
New York City to Long Island,
completing it 13 years after
starting it.

Justin perceptively tackled
the difficult subject of murder
and showed how it affects the
families of both the victim and
the perpetrator as children who
lose a parent to murder also
lose hope and financial security,
while those whose parents
have committed murder are
scarred with the stigma of the
crime.

Education Minister Carl

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Bethel praised the Family
Island students for their work,
and said it was a sign of an
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More than 100 students at the ceremony
received awards in addition to their diplo-

The humanities award went to Nicholas
Rose for the selfless support he showed
his friend Deniro LaFrenier, by helping
him to class during his three years at CC
Sweeting. Deniro is unable to walk.

Deniro was presented with a motorised
wheelchair by the graduating class.

MRS. ELMA GARRAWAY, Permanent Sec-
retary in the Ministry of Education told the
graduating class of C. C. Sweeting Senior
High that they have the distinction of being
the only graduating class in the entire pub-
lic school system where most of its gradu-
ates have the skills that will enable to go
into the workplace or to open their own

businesses.

young men working towards a
brighter future.

Speaking in a prize-giving
ceremony at the Sheraton Nas-
sau Beach Resort he said finan-
cial cutbacks made by the edu-
cation department this year do
not mean children will fall
behind, as long as parents are
supportive and encourage their
studies.

John Templeton Jr said his
father would have been proud
of the students’ work.

The late Sir John Templeton
founded the “Laws of Life”

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BAHAMAS Asgricultural
and Industrial Corporation’s
domestic investment officer
Alphonso Smith was honoured
by the All-Andros and Berry
Islands Regatta Committee for
“dedicated services to the com-
munity.”

BAIC executive chairman
Edison Key hailed him as “a
North Androsian extraordi-
naire,” one who has given dis-
tinguished and unblemished
service to all the Bahamas.

“As our domestic invest-
ment officer for North Andros,
Mr Smith is forever coming up
with ideas and suggestions to
improve the quality of life for
North Androsians,” he said
during a banquet last weekend.

Mr Smith held positions with
the Water and Sewerage Cor-

Oe eb





















PICTURED L-R (FRONT ROW) ARE: Mrs. Mena Griffith, Templeton Foun-
dation; Mrs. Leanora Archer, Deputy Director of Education; Pastor Allan
Lee, Calvary Bible Church; Mrs. Elma Garraway, Permanent Secretary, Min-
istry of Education, Dr. John Templeton Jr. and Mrs. John Templeton.

BACK ROW: Edward Moss, Bishop Michael Eldon High School; Myr-
keeva Johnson, Doris Johnson High School; Toi Johnson, Queen’s College;
Admad Pratt, Queen’s College; Justin Jack, Junior Winner, South Andros
High School; Bernique Pinder, Crooked High School, Senior Winner;
Morgan Adderley, Queen’s College and Tanisha Adderley, L. W. Young

Junior High School.

essay competition in the 1990's,
and although it was inactive for
a time it has now been
relaunched in cooperation with

the Ministry of Education.
Runners-up were awarded

digital cameras, I-pod music

players and cash prizes.






ALPHONSO SMITH (left), honoured for his community service, is

presented with an award of appreciation from the North Andros and
Berry Islands Regatta Committee. Also pictured from right are Don-
na Pickstock and Darnell Evans.

poration and Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation, served on
the town planning committee,
and was one of the organisers
of the Bahamas Games.

In 1988, the now retired
senior administrator Everette

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Hart formed the first North
Andros Sailing Club and it was
through Mr Smith that organ-
ised sailing became established
on the island.

From three boats in Conch
Sound to an entire fleet of
native sloops in Morgan’s Bluff,
the North Andros and Berry
Islands Regatta has become an
important fixture on the regat-
ta calendar.

From regatta commodore
and chairman, Mr Smith was
elected as member of local gov-
ernment and served as chief
councillor for three consecu-
tive terms.

He is founder of the North
Andros Sea Food Splash and
the Red Bays Snapper Tour-
nament and Cultural Festival.

Said senior deputy adminis-
trator Dr Huntley Christie:
“There’s no other person at this
time who deserves this recog-
nition for his hard work, com-
mitment and sense of duty.”

A priest warden at St Mar-
garet’s and St Mary Mag-
dalene’s in North Andros, Mr
Smith is married to Andrea
Smith. He is the father of eight
children.

He is also an avid backyard
farmer.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009, PAGE 7



The Church and ‘playing numbers’

By REV DR EMMETTE WEIR

I: APPEARS as if there is
a widespread impression
that the Church is strongly
opposed to the idea of legaliza-
tion of the informal Bahamian
national lottery, commonly
known as “playing numbers” or
simply “numbers”!

Yes, according to this under-
standing of the contemporary sit-
uation, there are many in this
nation in all walks of life who
would like to see “the playing of
numbers” become legal, but they
are reluctant to take steps to
bring about this change because
the Church is so strongly opposed
to it. Yet, when the situation is
carefully examined, it can be stat-
ed that “nothing can be farther
from the truth!”

As a matter of fact, there are at
least four responses to the legal-
izing of “numbers” within the
Christian community in the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas. It is
therefore, appropriate to discuss
them with a view to coming up
with a more balanced and fair
assessment of the Church's teach-
ing with regard to legalizing
“numbers.” But first, a brief com-
ment on the Biblical and theo-
logical issues in the case of the
Christian teaching on gambling,
for, as will be demonstrated, it
informs the teaching and prac-
tice of the various denominations
of the church with regard to
legalizing “numbers.”

Here it is germane to note that
there are, indeed, certain moral
precepts which are clearly and
unequivocally decreed in the
major moral codes of the Bible
— the Ten Commandments
(Exodus 20) and the Sermon on
the Mount (Matthew 5-7). These
include the total rejection of idol-
atry, commanding respect for
parents, respect for life, respect
for the property of others, the
sanctity of the vows of matrimo-
ny, the condemnation of lying
and the condemnation of cov-
etousness. All Christians recog-
nize the authority and validity of
these moral precepts, and,
indeed, they are observed by
adherents of all the world's pre-
dominant religions, for there is
an amazing unity amongst people
of all the major religions of
humankind when it comes to
these fundamental ethical prin-
ciples. There are, however, other
moral issues on which the teach-
ing of the Bible is not so clear.
One of these certainly is “gam-
bling.” Or, to put it another way,
whereas the major ethical prohi-
bitions are prefaced by the cate-
gorical “Thou Shalt Not” — for
example “thou shalt not steal,”
“thou shalt not kill (murder),”
“thou shalt not commit adultery,”
etc, nowhere is it decreed: “Thou
shalt not gamble!”

Thus the Rev. Alfred T.
Thompson, who incidentally, sup-
ports the idea of the national lot-
tery, in the “Guest Commentary”
published in The Freeport News
on Monday, June 22, correctly
sums up the Biblical position:

“As a Biblical student, I have
researched the scriptures from
Genesis to Revelation and have
not found anything against gam-
bling. However, references are
made about gambling, such as I
Timothy 6:10 and Ecclesiastics
5:10 which include scriptures on
the love and greed of money,
respectively. Therefore, the Bible
does not indicate any wrong with
gambling as long as it is done in
moderation.

Now, since the teaching of the
Bible on gambling is not clear-
cut, then it follows logically that
the attitude and teaching of a
particular Christian denomina-
tion must be based on theological
grounds. Concisely, the Biblical
scholars and theologians of a
Christian body have to come to a
moral position on gambling on
the basis of principles gleaned
from the interpretation of rele-
vant texts from the Bible, its the-
ological propositions and history.

For instance, the Methodist
Church has been consistent in
taking a strong stand against
gambling, as a matter of historical
fact and took the lead in oppos-
ing the introduction of casinos
by the late Sir Stafford Sands as a
means of boosting tourism. As
such, raffles are prohibited in its
fund raising programmes. This is
precisely because the Methodist
Church, on the basis of “the Law
of love” in the teaching of Jesus
(Mark 12:28-32) and John Wes-
ley's seminal sermon on the use
of money, hold tenaciously to the
teaching that gambling is moral-
ly wrong. It is held that gambling,
or as some prefer “gaming” is
wrong because in any such game,
in order for a person to gain
something, then his or her neigh-
bour must lose.

On the other hand, the moral
theologians of the Roman
Catholic Church, interpreting the
texts of Holy Scripture from the
perspective of the concept of
Natural Law, as expounded in
the works of its leading theolo-
gian, St. Thomas Aquinas, hold
to a much more “liberal” posi-
tion on gambling. Hence in the
case of Catholicism, the holding
of raffles and bingo games are
practised as important, legitimate
methods of raising money for the

mission of the Church. It is clear,
then, that there is no consensus
amongst Christians when it
comes to the matter of gambling.
This, then inevitably impacts
upon the respective attitudes of
Christian bodies and clergyper-
sons when the matter at stake
here is considered — “the pros
and cons” of legalizing the infor-
mal Bahamian lottery numbers.

Now, it has been asserted that
there are at least four responses
to this burning moral issue with-
in the vast Christian community
in the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. With the caveat
already discussed, it is now
appropriate to discuss them,
albeit rather briefly and in a cur-
sory, rather than detailed man-
ner.

First and foremost. There are
those Christian bodies and cler-
gypersons who are uncompro-
mising in their opposition to
legalizing numbers. Indeed, sev-
eral leading clergypersons of this
grouping have spoken out loud
and clear in stating their strong
opposition to any attempt to
legalize “the playing of num-
bers.”

Most outspoken in their oppo-
sition in this regard are that
young dynamic duo, Pastor Lyall
Bethel of Grace Community
Church, and Pastor Cedric Moss
of Kingdom Life Church. Like-
wise, Pastor Leonard Johnson,
President of the Bahamas Con-
ference of the Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, the Rev. Dr.
William Thompson, outgoing
President of the huge Bahamas
Baptist Missionary & Educa-
tional Convention, Bishop John
Humes of the Church of God,
The Rev. William “Bill” Higgs,
President of the Bahamas Con-
ference of the Methodist Church,
Bishop Elgarnet Rahming, Pres-
ident of the Church of God of
Prophecy, and Bishop the Rev.
Dr. Raymond Neilly, President
of the Bahamas Turks and Caicos
Islands Conference of the
Methodist Church in the
Caribbean and the Americas,
have all come out in opposing
the legalizing of numbers. By the
same token, Pastor Anthony

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Bahama, has also declared strong
opposition to it. Likewise the
Rev. Patrick Paul, President of
the influential Bahamas Christian
Council, after making a_state-
ment that was interpreted by
some as being not-too-veiled sup-
port of the concept of legalizing
numbers, quickly clarified his
position in joining with his min-
isterial colleagues in condemn-
ing the idea of moving in that
direction.

Evidently then, there is a large
and influential body of Christian
denominations and leading cler-
gypersons who are strongly
opposed to legalizing numbers
and any move in that direction
would, inevitably come up
against the challenge of this pow-
erful and influential segment of
the Church.

Secondly, there are those who
have come to the conclusion that
the way ahead

is to hold a referendum. They
are plainly aware of the fact that
the present situation, in which
the playing of numbers is illegal,
yet is practised openly by
Bahamians from all walks of life,
is clearly untenable, unbearable,
and, indeed unethical.

As declared in another arti-
cle in the media, this writer is at
one with those who believe that
the people should be given an
opportunity to express their opin-
ion. Concisely, that there should
be a period of open discussion in
every forum from the House of
Assembly, to discussions in the
barber shops, in which the pros
and cons are debated. Then, the
matter should be put to the vote.
It is submitted that such an
approach would be in keeping
with the concept of democracy,
which is one of the three princi-
ples enshrined in our Constitu-
tion, the others being Christiani-
ty and the rule of Law. Indeed, it
can be argued with a fair degree
of cogency, that the holding of a
referendum is in line with all
three principles upon which this
nation was established.

This writer is by no means
alone. A number of clergyper-
sons are in favour of it. the Rev.

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Henry Francis, for instance, an
executive officer of Bahamas
Faith Ministries, has long held
that a referendum would be the
best way of dealing with this mat-
ter. Interestingly enough, Rev.
Francis is strongly of the convic-
tion that should such a referen-
dum be held, those opposed to
legalizing numbers would pre-
vail.

Who dares suggest that he is
under a delusion? If anything,
events in recent years in our
region have demonstrated that

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Thirdly, there are those with-
in the Christian fold who appear
to give tacit support to the idea of
legalizing numbers. They cer-
tainly have not been forthright
in apposing such an idea. Nor
have they clearly stated that they
are in favour of such a develop-
ment. While not reading too
much into their silence on this
now highly controversial and
essentially complex burning issue,
it may be inferred that they see

nothing morally wrong with legal-
izing numbers. The adage is rel-
evant here, “silence gives con-
sent”!

Finally, there are those cler-
gypersons who are very strong in
supporting the idea of legalizing
numbers. While this writer has
had occasion to speak to cler-
gypersons who are in favour of
legalizing numbers, he can state
without fear of contradiction that
the most outspoken, and indeed,

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Kidnap ordeal of |
mother, children i

FROM page one

cle back towards her home in |

the Eastern Road area.
What happens next, haga

ever, breaks the trend of what }

is normally seen from crimi-
nals in these circumstances. }
The kidnapper at this point }
allegedly stopped the vehicle :
when he got within a relative- }
ly near distance of the home :

and fled the scene on foot,

leaving the mother and her i

two children inside.

However, police who are }
investigating this matter :
believe that the man may }
have had a “get away” car i

waiting nearby.

Investigations into this mat-

ter continue.

UN Council condemns:
North Korea missiles

UNITED NATIONS

THE UN. Security Council on
Monday condemned North Kore- }
a’s recent firing of seven ballistic ;
missiles on U.S. Independence }
Day, the reclusive country’s biggest
display of firepower in three years, }

according to Associated Press.

Uganda U.N. Ambassador :
Ruhakana Rugunda, who holds }
the 15-member council’s rotating
presidency, said the council mem- }
bers “condemned and expressed :
grave concern” at the missile
launches, which violated UN. res- }
olutions and “pose a threat to i
regional and international securi- }

ty.”

said.

olutions.

Security Council members
agreed that Pyongyang “must com- }
ply fully with its obligations” under }

the resolutions, Rugunda said.

The North’s missile tests aggra- i
vated tensions that were already :
high after its May 25 underground :

nuclear test blast.

The council punished the North }
after its May nuclear test with a
resolution and tough sanctions }
clamping down on alleged trading }
of banned arms and weapons-relat- :
ed material, including authorizing ;

searches of suspect ships.




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Knife found next to body of
Har! Taylor exhibited in court

FROM page one

ten House on West Hill Street, had sus-
tained some 42 to 50 injuries, according
to the prosecution.

Detective Constable Jermaine Stubbs,
a crime scene investigator, told the court
that around 9.50 am on Sunday, Novem-
ber 18, 2007, while on duty at the Crim-
inal Records Office, he received infor-
mation from Detective Inspector Bona-
by. As a result went with several other
officers to Mountbatten House on West
Hill Street. He told the court that after
receiving further information from
Detective Inspector Bonaby at the
scene, he entered the building. Consta-
ble Stubbs told the court that he

observed in the eastern portion of the
living room, a large pool of blood and
blood dripping from the ceiling above
the area. He told the court that he then
went upstairs and saw bloodstains on
the railing of the staircase.

Constable Stubbs testified that in
the upstairs hallway, which ran east to
west, he observed bloody foot and shoe
sole prints. He also told the court that in
the upstairs bedroom, he observed the
lifeless body of a male lying face up in
the bed in a pool of blood, with wounds
to the upper chest. He told the court
that the male was clad in a pair of white
underwear and that a broken, silver
blade knife was also on the bed near

court that he observed blood stains
throughout the room and noted that the
displacement of furniture in the room
suggested that there had been a struggle.

Constable Stubbs also told the court
that the bloody shoe and footprints also
led to the bathroom, where he observed
blood on a soap dish and blood on a tile
next to the face bowl. Stubbs also told
the court that he collected 47 items from
the scene, including several swabs of
blood that he handed over to the police
forensic laboratory on November 24,
2007. The broken knife blade and han-
dle were exhibited in court yesterday
and submitted in evidence.

During cross-examination by defence
attorney Murrio Ducille, Constable

Stubbs told the court that the items that
he had retrieved from the scene were
kept in a locker at the Criminal Records
Office until he handed them over to the
police forensic laboratory. He also
admitted that he had made no mention
of the bloody shoe and footprints lead-
ing to the bathroom in his notes.

Detective Inspector Rochelle Dele-
veaux told the court yesterday that on
November 30, 2007, she received from
Detective Corporal 2313 Francis, blood
swabs and other items that she inspect-
ed and prepared to be forwarded to a
lab for DNA analysis.

The trial, which is being heard before
Senior Justice Anita Allen, continues

The council will continue to }
closely monitor the situation and is }
committed to a “peaceful, diplo- :
matic and political solution,” he

On Saturday, North Korea fired :
missiles into the ocean off its east :
coast in violation of three U.N. res- :

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Missing US woman

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victim found in sheet



FROM page one

“distinctive” tattoo across the lower back area, police reported.
Clothed in blue jeans and a green top, the victim is thought to

have been dead for at least a week but to have only been placed in

the location where her body was found on Friday night or Saturday

morning.

Yesterday Supt Moss said the cause of death in the case has yet
to be confirmed, but investigators expect to move a step closer to
determining this when a doctor examines the body today.

Police are exploring the possibility that the victim may have

suffered a sexual attack.

Despite linking the death with the missing person reports, he
added that no one had yet been called into formally identify the
woman’s body as police are still completing their preliminary

investigations.

“We’re trying to identify a couple of things before we call anyone.

Hopefully we will make contact (today),”

said Moss.

the body. Constable Stubbs told the

THE body of the victim was found in this area.

today.



Psychologist warns over teacher-student boundary infractions

FROM page one

happens.

“You see them standing
outside your office. They
will try to hold your hand.
They will stay there and
almost beg you for some

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connection because they feel
a hole in their soul,” Dr
Allen said.

The eminent psychiatrist
went further to explain that
teachers of today cannot
continue in the actions that
were acceptable in the past,

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such as offering rides to
their students, or even acting
as a concerned ear when
these students are facing
challenges at home or in
their personal life.
“Teachers are responsible
for their colleagues and no
longer can they sit by and
watch what unfolds and say I
can’t get involved. In fact if
you see something and don’t
report it you can get blamed
as well. And think of your
own child and remember
that this incubation period
is about four to five years

and people see things.

“In all the cases I’ve dealt
with around the world,
somebody knows. The kids
know, the teachers know,
some parents know, but the
twine would never come
together to talk. The cult of
silence produces a silent
scream as people’s lives are
destroyed. Instead of the
place being an edifice for
development it is a cauldron
of destruction,” he said.

Dr Allen also cited the
work of Dorothy Lewis at
Yale who studied 14 men

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who committed multiple
murders. In her findings, it
was discovered that all of
the men were sexually
abused, some of them hav-
ing plungers inserted into
their rectum.

“They were abused by
their uncles, neighbours,
what have you. There is a
powerful connection
between sexual abuse and
teenage murder and the
murder situation in our
country. That is why we
must get at it. This is noth-
ing to play with,” he said.

The Church
and ‘playing
numbers’
FROM page seven

bold of this group is the Rev.
Alfred T. Thompson. In the arti-
cle written by this Minister of the
Gospel, he puts forward a num-
ber of arguments in favour of
such a proposal. Omitting, or
rather, ignoring the serious moral
objections raised by clergymen
of the first group, he takes the
line that the legalizing of num-
bers would provide money for
education and social pro-
grammes. And, as pointed out
above, he makes much of the fact
that the teaching of the Bible on
gambling is not as clear-cut as it is
on other moral issues.

What, then can we say about
the Church's position on legaliz-
ing numbers?

It is not easy to sum up four
different responses, which though
closely related, are to be sharply
distinguished. It can be declared
that while the vast majority of
the clergypersons who have been
vocal are opposed to such a pro-
posal, there are many who have
not spoken out against it, some
who have called for a referen-
dum, and those who have stated
support for it.

There is one thing that is cer-
tain — the present hypocritical
situation cannot continue indefi-
nitely. We cannot continue for-
ever in this situation in which the
“the playing of numbers” is offi-
cially illegal, but a large percent-
age of Bahamians engage in it.
The hour of decision must come
when we either enforce the law
by clamping down on this situa-
tion, closing all the numbers
houses and arresting all who
engage in it, or legalizing num-
bers so that those who would like
to engage in playing numbers can
do so and those who are opposed
to the same on moral grounds
need not engage in the same.

Joshua, challenging the
Israelites with the necessity of
making a decision, declared,
“choose ye this day whom ye will
serve” (Joshua 24:15). Or, as Dr.
Robert Schuller challenges us:

“A decision must be made;

A price must be paid.”



THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009, PAGE 9



Armstrong jumps from 10th
to 3rd at Tour de France

@ By JAMEY KEATEN
Associated Press Writer

LA GRANDE-MOTTE,
France (AP) — Lance Arm-
strong jumped from 10th to
third place at the Tour de
France on Monday, positioning
himself for a shot at the yellow
jersey after evading trouble on a
windy ride along the Mediter-
ranean.

Britain’s Mark Cavendish
won his second straight stage.
He and Armstrong and overall
leader Fabian Cancellara of
Switzerland kept up with a
breakaway group that bolted
from the pack with 18 miles left
in the 122-mile third stage.

Armstrong, a seven-time
champion coming out of retire-
ment, is 40 seconds behind. He
was able to make his big jump
because riders in front of him at
the start of the day got trapped
in the main pack.

The race is set for a shake-
out featuring Cancellara, Arm-
strong and Germany’s Tony
Martin in Tuesday’s team time
trial. Each team is strong in the
24-mile event, which starts and
finishes in Montpellier. If
Astana wins, Armstrong could
take the yellow jersey. The race
ends July 26 in Paris.

The Tour said Armstrong will
be fined the equivalent of $92
for failing to sign in before the
stage. His Astana team said the
Texan was delayed because of
autographs and interviews.

This was the sixth time
Cavendish won a Tour stage.
He finished in 5 hours, 1
minute, 24 seconds on the hot
and breezy ride from Marseille
to La Grande-Motte.

Armstrong, Cancellara and
22 other cyclists had the same
time. Cancellara, who rides for
Saxo Bank, extended his lead
and is ahead of Martin by 33
seconds.

Cavendish mimed talking on
a cell phone — in recognition of
one of the Columbia team spon-
sors — as he led a sprint finish
ahead of Norway’s Thor
Hushovd and France’s Cyril
Lemoine.

“Tt was brilliant,” Cavendish
said. “We were the only sprint
team that wanted to ride
today.”

The pack, including expect-
ed contenders like Armstrong’s
Astana teammate Alberto Con-
tador of Spain, the 2007 Tour
champion, and two-time run-
ner-up Cadel Evans of Aus-
tralia, finished 41 seconds
behind.

Columbia took control with
about 18 miles left. Its riders
led a 29-man breakaway that

AMERICAN seven-time Tour de France
winner Lance Armstrong strains as he
passes Monaco’s casino during the first
stage of the Tour de France cycling race,
an individual time trial of 15.5 kilome-
ters (9.63 miles) with start and finish in

Monaco on Saturday...

included several Astana cyclists,
among them Armstrong and
Cancellara.

They used the gusty condi-
tions to their advantage in a tac-
tic known as “bordure,” which
can help breakaway groups gain
time on the main pack. Conta-

dor and other favorites were
caught off-guard.

Wind

“We knew the wind was
going to be a factor,” said Arm-
strong, noting Columbia’s

Citing hip, Roddick
pulls out of Davis Cup

m By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Tennis Writer

WIMBLEDON, England
(AP) — Wimbledon runner-up
Andy Roddick withdrew Mon-
day from the US Davis Cup
team’s quarterfinal at Croatia,
citing a right hip flexor injury.

The US Tennis Association

announced that Roddick would-
n’t participate in this week’s
Davis Cup matches because he
was hurt during his loss a day
earlier to Roger Federer at the
All England Club — a match
that finished 16-14 in the longest
fifth set in Grand Slam final his-
tory.
Roddick slipped and tumbled
to the grass in the eighth game
of the fourth set Sunday. He
stayed down for a few moments,
then rose, grimacing, and tow-
eled off.

The 26-year-old American
would go on to play for more
than another 1 1/2 hours, final-
ly succumbing when Federer
broke him for the first time all
match in the 77th and last game.

After the match, Roddick
was asked whether he hurt him-
self in that fall, and he replied,
“No. It was OK.”

He is being replaced on the
US Davis Cup team by Mardy
Fish, who reached the third
round at Wimbledon. Roddick
is ranked No. 6, while Fish is
No. 23.

When he was asked to play
Davis Cup, Fish pulled out of
this week’s Hall of Fame Tennis
Championships in Newport,
R.I., where he was the tourna-
ment’s top-seeded player.

Roddick had played in 18



ANDY RODDICK plays a return to Roger Federer during their final match
on the Centre Court at Wimbledon on Sunday...
(AP Photo: Anja Niedringhaus)

consecutive Davis Cup matches
for the United States, helping
the country with the 2007 title.

“Andy has been a stalwart for
this team the past nine years,
and his dedication to Davis Cup
and his teammates is unques-
tioned,” US captain Patrick
McEnroe said.

Croatia hosts the US on clay
at Porec, Croatia, starting Fri-
day.

“Mardy is a Davis Cup veter-
an and we appreciate his will-
ingness to join the team on
short notice. He has been play-
ing well and we are glad to have
him back in the singles lineup,”
McEnroe said. “Andy had a
great run at Wimbledon. He
battled for more than four
hours yesterday and fought
hard to reach the final. Under-

standably, his body is not up for
the rigors of Davis Cup in such
a short turnaround.”

Fish will be joined in singles
action for the US by James
Blake, while twins Bob and
Mike Bryan will play doubles.

Wimbledon quarterfinalist
Ivo Karlovic and Marin Cilic
will lead Croatia, which won the
Davis Cup in 2005.

“Tt’s worse for us,” Goran
Prpic, Croatia’s Davis Cup cap-
tain, said in Porec. “Instead of
an injured Roddick, who after
such a final at Wimbledon
would have had to play match-
es on clay, we'll have to face a
motivated Fish.”

¢ Associated Press Writer
Snjezana Vukic in Zagreb,
Croatia, contributed to this
report

move. “When you see a team
at the front like that, you have
to pay attention.”

Armstrong said it was “not
my objective” to gain ground
on Contador, insisting he was
“just trying to stay up front and
out of trouble. ... I turned

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=
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=
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around and was surprised there
was a split.”

Contador dropped to fourth
from second and is 59 seconds
back from Cancellara. Fellow
Astana rider Levi Leipheimer
slipped to 10th, from sixth, and
is 1:11 behind.

dason Kidd
Staying with
the Mavs

Bg By JAIME ARON
AP Sports Writer

DALLAS (AP) — Jason
Kidd isn’t going anywhere.

The free agent point guard
has agreed to sign a three-year
contract for more than $25
million to remain with Dirk
Nowitzki and the rest of the
Mavericks. The New York
Knicks were among Kidd’s
suitors.

“We are excited that JKidd
and the Mavs have reached
an agreement to have Jason
return to the Mavs,” Maver-
icks owner Mark Cuban said
via e-mail Monday. “We look
forward to him continuing to
take a major role with the
team.”

With the contract, the 37-
year-old Kidd could end his
career in Dallas, which is
where he started in 1994. The
Oakland, Calif., native was the
No. 2 overall pick out of Cali-
fornia, and he has also played
for Phoenix and New Jersey.

Kidd’s return helps the
Mavericks as they pursue a
supporting cast around Now-
itzki, from not having to find a
replacement to recruiting
players. Kidd, who is third on
the career assist list, also will
continue to mentor J.J. Barea,
who emerged as a solid back-
up last season, and raw rook-
ie Rodrigue Beaubois, who is
coming over from France.

The deal — which can’t be
signed until Wednesday —
was first reported by
ESPN.com.

The Mavericks also plan to
send an offer sheet Wednes-
day to Marcin Gortat, a 25-
year-old center who backed
up Dwight Howard in Orlan-
do last season, according to a
person with knowledge of
negotiations. The person
spoke on condition of
anonymity because of NBA
rules against commenting on
deals before the signing period
opens.

Gortat is expected to
receive the full midlevel
exception of about $5.6 mil-
lion, which means any more
big moves Dallas makes this
offseason will come through
trades.

The Mavs can dangle the
expiring contract of Erick
Dampier and the trade-friend-
ly contract of Jerry Stack-
house in front of other teams.
Pretty much everyone but
Nowitzki could be dealt, too,
as the Mavericks explore ways
to keep up with the changes
made by top rivals in the
Western Conference, espe-
cially the defending champi-
on Lakers and division foe
San Antonio.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009,

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL/INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Steve McNair

Fisher:

a ‘great
will be

m By TERESA M WALKER
AP Sports Writer

NASHVILLE, Tennessee
(AP) — An emotional Jeff
Fisher says his former quar-
terback Steve McNair was a
"great person" who put the
Tennessee Titans franchise on
the NFL map.

The Titans coach Monday
called the slain quarterback
one of the "greatest competi-
tors of all time on the field.”
Fisher said McNair would
want him to tell people
McNair was sorry and wasn't

AP Photos

Sahel Kazemi

McNair
person,’
missed

perfect.

Fisher was the only coach
McNair had for the first 11
years of his NFL career.

McNair was found shot to
death Saturday, alongside 20-
year-old Sahel Kazemi in
Nashville. Police have said
McNair, a married father of
four, had been dating Kaze-
mi.

The Titans coach had been
in Iraq as part of an NFL trip
last week to visit the military.
Eddie George told Fisher of
McNair's death during a stop
in Kuwait.



Mikhail McLean secures
athletic scholarship
offer from Rutgers

YET another
member of the
Frank Rutherford
Elite Development
Camp has left an
indelible mark on
the prep basketball
community in
Houston, Texas,
earning himself a
series of scholarship
offers to NCAA
Division One Uni-
versities.

Mikhail McLean,
a 6°7” 215 pound
forward, has
received interest from numerous institu-
tions and recently secured an athletic schol-
arship offer from Rutgers University for
the 2009-10 academic year.

McLean seeks to join other members of
the programme who have progressed from
the Bahamas to collegiate and professional
success including Devard Darling (Balti-
more Ravens), Jeremy Barr (University of
Southern California, University of Nebras-
ka, San Jacincto JuCo) Ian Symonette (Uni-
versity of Miami), Dwight Miller (Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh), Probese Leo (Bucknell
University), Waltia Rolle (University of
North Carolina) and a number of others.




Mikhail McLean (top left) in action...

Mikhail Mclean left the Bahamas in 2005
for the programme in Houston, Texas, with
the intent of furthering his athletic devel-
opment and ultimately achieving a schol-
arship for an education at a top flight uni-
versity.

He attended Second Baptist High School
for the last three years he has been the
model student who has made the honour
role every year, and has become a heavily
sought after recruit on the court as well.

McLean and other prep stars around the
United States are looking to improve their
recruiting stock during the summer months,
gaining exposure on the AAU circuit and at
various camps nationwide.

McLean, a long athletic forward with a
good shooting touch from mid-range, is also
a tenacious perimeter and post defender.

He also has interest or scholarship offers
from Penn State University, Tulane Uni-
versity, and Rice University.

He will attend the Reebok University
camp in July where the top 100 players in
America will assemble in Philadelphia
under the scrutiny of 400 NCAA Division I
college basketball coaches.

Based on his similar build and style of
play to Dwight Miller, who won the MVP at
the Reebok camp in 2007, Mikhail is pro-
jected to have a similar outing at the camp
and recruitment this summer.

80,000 fans finally welcome Ronaldo to Real Madrid

m By PAUL LOGOTHETIS
AP Sports Writer

MADRID (AP) — After a three-
year wait, 80,000 Real Madrid fans
gave Cristiano Ronaldo a rapturous
welcome on Monday following his
record transfer from Manchester Unit-
ed.

A beaming Ronaldo came out to the
capacity Santiago Bernabeu crowd
wearing the same No. 9 jersey as
Madrid great Alfredo di Stefano wore.

"I'm very happy to be here. I've
achieved one of my dreams," Ronaldo,
who agreed to a six-year deal, said

before leading the crowd into a cry of
"Viva Madrid!"

Fans had queued outside the Bern-
abeu from the early morning to catch a
glimpse of the 24-year-old, who com-
pleted a lap of honor to salute fans
after performing a few juggling tricks.

Ronaldo was eventually chased from
the field as security failed to contain
the crowd, with many teenage fans
jumping the barrier in search of an
autograph. One fan managed to evade
security to reach the stage and hug
Ronaldo, who signed the young man's
Madrid shirt.

Only Diego Maradona's presenta-

tion at Napoli 25 years ago has rivaled
Ronaldo's in terms of the crowds it
attracted. Last week, 50,000 greeted
Kaka at the Bernabeu.

Madrid had been chasing the cur-
rent world player of the year since
2006, with president Florentino Perez
finally securing his signature in an 80
million pound (94 million; $131 mil -
lion) deal.

Portugal great Eusebio was among
those who joined the party, the Portu-
gal great joining Ronaldo onstage with
Di Stefano, Perez and Madrid's record
nine European Cups.

"Today, we present the greatest sym-

bolism of Real Madrid," Perez said by
way of introduction.

Ronaldo scored 120 goals from 313
appearances in all competitions at Man
United, where he arrived in 2003 from
Portuguese club Sporting. Ronaldo left
Old Trafford having won the Champi-
ons League, three Premier League
titles, the FA Cup and the Club World
Cup in six seasons.

Perez has vowed to return the
"galactico" era to Madrid after initiat-
ing the original one from 2000-06 with
the blockbuster signings of Zinedine
Zidane, David Beckham, Luis Figo
and Ronaldo, who was the last impact

player to wear the No. 9 jersey.

Perez has splashed out 214 million
($300 million) on new players this sum-
mer in a bid to turn the page on a sea-
son that was marred by former presi-
dent Ramon Calderon's resignation
over a vote-rigging scandal and in
which Madrid was eclipsed by arch
rival Barcelona.

Madrid failed to get past the first
knockout stage of Europe's top-tier
competition for the fifth straight season
and lost the league to Barcelona, which
also won the Champions League and
Copa del Rey to become the first Span-
ish club to win the treble.

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THE



JUSTIN ROBERTS

Justin
Roberts
moves into
semis at the
St Maarten
Junior Open

BAHAMIAN Justin Roberts
moved into his second consecu-
tive boys U-14 singles semifi-
nals at the St Maarten Junior
Open by defeating Edward
Buckley (ANT) 6-0, 6-0.

Roberts now awaits the win-
ner of the match between
Castellanos/de Silva. His semi-
finals match will be competi-
tive, however Roberts is confi-
dent that he can win having
defeated de Silva in the round
robin and Castallanos is not a
big hitter.

Roberts appears to be on a
“collision course” to meet his
training and traveling partner
in the boys U-14 singles final.

Gian Issa defeated Yannick
James in his quarterfinal match
6-0, 6-1 and faces Juan Bisono,
who won 6-1, 6-3 over Timothy
Blok of Antigua in the other
semifinals on Tuesday.

Issa defeated Justin in Aruba
last week Tuesday in the boys
U14 semifinal 75, 61.

The dueling doubles pair are
seeded number one in the boys
U-14 doubles and have a bye in
the quarterfinals and will play
their semi-finals doubles match
tomorrow.

Bahamas’ national
junior golf team to
tee off in Jamaica

THE Bahamas’ Junior Golf
National Team are in Montego
Bay, Jamaica, to compete in the
Caribbean Amateur Junior
Golf Championships this week.

For the past eight weeks, the
14-member golf team — eight
hailing from the Bahamas Golf
Federation’s northern division
in Grand Bahama and six from
its central division in New Prov-
idence — has been preparing for
this competition.

The youngsters earned their
spot on the team during a
National Team Qualifying
Tournament held April 15-17,
2009, at the Reef Course in
Freeport.

The championships, which is
scheduled to take place at the
Cinnamon Hills Golf Club, will
be contested by 10 neighbour-
ing countries.

It is a 54-hole stroke play
event with players earning
points for their team based on
their play. The country with the
most points at the end of three
days will be deemed the win-
ner.

Individual trophies can also
be won at the championships.

The juniors will compete in

TRIBUNE

re =
|
|
F



PAGE 1

§



ahamas native Devard
Darling is continuing the
dream of him and his
brother to bring football
to the Bahamas through
the Devard and Devaughn Darling Foot-
ball Camps, presented by his non-profit
organisation, the As One Foundation.

Fellow NFL Players Derrick Martin
and Tre Stallings of the Baltimore
Ravens, and Larry Johnson, Bob
Engram and Dwayne Bowe of the
Kansas City Chiefs, and Darrius Hay-
ward Bey of the Oakland Raiders, will
assist young athletes with skill develop-
ment, technique, and the fundamentals of
American football.

A similar two-day camp will close out
today in Grand Bahama at the Freeport
Rugby Football Club on Settlers Way.
The Nassau camp will run from July 10-
12 at Tom “The Bird” Grant Sports and
Recreation Complex.

The purpose of the camp is to encour-
age young Bahamian athletes to pursue
their education and dreams of playing
American football.

Campers will have the opportunity to
interact with prominent sports figures
who will act as coaches, leaders and men-
tors throughout the duration of the
camps.

Their presence will offer campers a
once-in-a-lifetime chance to meet and
train under the tutelage of professional
athletes.

The ‘As One Foundation’ was created
in 2007 by Devard Darling in loving
memory of his identical brother
Devaughn Darling who passed in 2001
during spring training.

Its goal is to provide underprivileged
youth both nationally and internation-
ally with educational and developmental
opportunities through athletic endeav-
ors, educational programming and spir-
itual enrichment.

Specifically, the “Devard &
Deveaughn Darling Football Camps”
strive to encourage young Bahamians
ages 11 to 16 to further their athletic
skills and education at a private school in
the United States.

The cap of available camper slots is
120, and attendance will be allotted to
elite athletes with the potential of pur-
suing a collegiate or professional career
in football.

While gaining invaluable skills and
training in the game of American foot-

ts

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

ball, camp attendees will also receive
free gifts, equipment and a chance to
earn the title of Camp MVP.

The Camp MVP will be judged by par-
ticipation in all activities and the chosen
honouree and one parent will win a ful-
ly paid trip to Kansas City, Missouri,
during the 2009 NFL season to spend a
weekend with Devard Darling and his
family.

“We are thrilled with the number of
quality professional athletes confirmed to
attend, coach and mentor campers at
both of the 2009 football camps,” Darling
said.

“The foundation would not be able to
put on successful football camps with-
out the help and support from the ath-
letic community and we are truly grate-
ful for their time and generosity.”

For more information about Devard
Darling, his vision for Bahamian youth
and the “Devard & Devaughn Darling
Football Camps”, go to www.asone-
foundation.org.

About Devard Darling

Devard Darling, the founder and
visionary of the As One Foundation, is
pursuing his goals on the professional
football field while bringing to life the
dream envisioned between him and his
late twin brother, Devaughn.

Hr hopes to bring the game of Amer-
ican football to their native country of
the Bahamas and to honour his brother



DEVARD DARLING (left) and
his older brother Dennis...

by opening the Devaughn Darling Sports
Complex. Devard currently plays pro-
fessional football for the Kansas City
Chiefs, where he is wide receiver.

Prior to joining the Chiefs, Devard
played four years with the Baltimore
Ravens where he was selected as 82nd
overall in the 3rd round of the 2004 NFL
Draft.

In the final two months of the 2007
season, Devard recorded 18 receptions
for 326 yards and three touchdowns in
just eight games.

Devard began his athletic career at
Florida State University as one of the
top high school prospects out of Stephen
F Austin High School in Houston, Texas.

However, after the unfortunate passing
of his identical twin brother Devaughn
Darling on the football field during
spring practices in 2001, Florida State
University would not reinstate Devard
for his remaining eligibility.

After being connected with Mike
Price, former head coach of the Wash-
ington State University Cougars, Devard
was cleared to play and became one of
the best wide receivers in Washington
State history, recording 16 touchdowns
and over 1500 yards in just two years.

Devard currently resides in Kansas
City, MI with his Wife, Cicely Darling
and Son, Devard Jr. In his free time he
enjoys charity work, attending church
and giving back to his community
through athletics.



Armstrong
jumps from
10th to 3rd at

Tour de France...
See page 9

Top NEL
players to
visit Nassau
for football
camp

A NUMBER of top NFL
players are heading to Nas-
sau this weekend to partici-
pate in a free football camp
and a weekend of fun called
‘Players Paradise Weekend.”

Samari Rolle and ‘The
Rolle With Me Foundation’
is slated to host the 3rd annu-
al Players Paradise All-Star
Weekend, designed to give
back to children through fun,
sports and entertainment.

Two hundred children will
have the opportunity to sign
up for a free football camp
hosted by 11-year Baltimore
Ravens player Samari Rolle
and feature superstar athletes
Fred Taylor, Duane Starks,
Jevon Kearse, Mike McKen-
zie, Corey Ivy, Vernon
Carey, Stockar McDougle,
Lito Sheppard, Ed Reed,
Devard Darling, Antwan
Barnes, Willis Mcgahee,
Jamal Lewis and others.

Station

All you have to do is stop
by the 100 Jamz radio station
located on Shirley &
Deveaux Street and pick up a
The Samari Rolle Football
Camp registration (200 chil-
dren limit).

Participants will learn valu-
able football techniques with
some of the NFL’s finest.
Dominos Pizza will be pro-
viding a complimentary lunch
for all participating guests.

Players Paradise 2009 All-
Star Weekend schedule:

¢ Friday, July 10 - Wel-
come Reception & Dinner
(7pm - midnight)

¢ Saturday, July 11 - 100
Jamz Radio & Samari Rolle’s
Free Football Camp at the
Thomas Robinson Track and
Field Stadium 10am to 2pm

Beach Bar-B-Q Pool Party
& Comedy Show (invitation
only)

¢ Sunday, July 12 - Brunch
(11am - 3pm)

wEW CHEESY
PV ee ay

the following categories: Boys
16-17, 14-15 and 13 and under;
and Girls 16-17, 14-15, and 13
and under.

National coaches Anthony
“Biggie” Robinson of New
Providence and Duwayne Hep-
burn of Grand Bahama, with
the assistance of others, have
been working extremely hard
with the junior golfers at various
local courses in hopes of bring-
ing home a trophy for this year’s
event. According to the coach-
es, the kids are ready.

They just have to go out, stay
focused and execute their game
plans.

Team manager Walter
Robinson is looking forward to
a good showing from the
golfers.

In the past few years the team
has fallen short of bringing
home a trophy. However, he
feels that this year there is a
really good chance of changing
that and bringing home not only
a team trophy, but also at least
one individual trophy.

A number of followers, con-
sisting mostly of parents and
other family members, will also
be traveling in support of the

team. It is encouraging to know
that there is a support team urg-
ing you on in these types of
events.

Scores will be posted daily
online at www.cga.com and the
team members are asking the
Bahamian public for their sup-
port.

Team members are: Kyle
King, Charlie Butler and
Rashad Ferguson (Boys 16-17);
Benjamin Davis Jr., Rasheed
Robinson and Osborne Cooper
III (Boys 14-15); Asif Robin-
son and Harrison Collins (Boys
13 & Under); Eugenie Adder-
ley and Ileah Knowles (Girls
16-17); Taneka Sandiford and
Bijan Lockhart (Girls 14-15);
Asiyah Robinson and Denier
Weech (Girls 13 & Under).

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



(oleh i tie)
INCLUDES
Pe ha. 3 +e
Reg. Hash Brown
& Reg. Coffee or Tea







U



THE TRIBUNE



TUES DAY

SECTION B ¢ business @tribunemedia.net

Raised airline fees
to boost ‘quality of
air transportation’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Ministry of Tourism is
“working feverishly” to expand
business opportunities for
Bahamian airlines and charter
operators, Tribune Business was
told yesterday, with the
increased fees set to be levied
on the industry needed to main-
tain Family Island airports and
“improve the quality of air
transportation in the Bahamas”.

Defending the proposed Civ-
il Aviation Department (CAD)
fee increases, some as high as
10,000 per cent and which are
now scheduled to take effect
from September 10, 2009, Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace, min-
ister of tourism and aviation,
said the new charges would still
be below many rival jurisdic-
tions and not impact the
Bahamas’ competitiveness.

Pointing out that the increas-
es had been approved from
2005, but never implemented,
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
the result of this had been that
the Department always under-
performed on fee revenue in
comparison to the estimates
contained in the Government’s
annual Budget.

While the Government and
Civil Aviation Department

“understood
the economic
circum -
stances”
today were a
lot less
favourable
for private
Bahamian-
owned air-
lines, and
their ability to
absorb. the
fee increases,
Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said revenues
were needed to develop and
improve Family Island airports.

“There are certain costs for
providing all of the Govern-
ment’s services,” he explained.
“These fee increases were
approved in 2005 but never
implemented, and there’s noth-
ing we can see to suggest that
this was nothing more than an
oversight.

“These fees were factored
into the Budget since then, but
have not been put in place and
we fell short for several years.
When we discovered the fees
had been approved, but not put
in place, we followed the
process of putting in the new
fee structure for Civil Aviation.

SEE page 3B

ei cle

Cable’s $80m Columbus
deal gets the ‘go ahead’

B@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas has
received the final government
approvals needed to complete
the $80 million buy-out of con-
trolling shareholder Columbus
Communications, and yester-
day formally launched the deal’s
financing with its $40 million
preference share issue.

The Bahamian investment
community, chiefly those insti-
tutional investors, such as
banks, pension funds and insur-
ance companies, high-net worth
individuals and their financial
advisers, confirmed to Tribune
Business that they had received
prospectuses/offering memo-
randums on Cable Bahamas’
$40 million offering over the
weekend.

The issue, which formally
launched yesterday, is sched-
uled to close in three-and-a-half
weeks time on July 31, 2009, as
Cable Bahamas moves to raise
the financing necessary to allow
it to purchase Columbus Com-
munications’ 30.2 per cent stake
for a price pegged at $13.43 per
share.

That price represented a 17.9
per cent premium to Cable

$40m preference
share issue launched

Bahamas’ closing share price of
$11.39 on the Bahamas Inter-
national Securities Exchange
(BISX), but is below the $14.2
52-week high. The transaction
price was ratified by a ‘fairness
opinion’ sought by Cable
Bahamas’ two non-executive
directors, Frank Watson and
Sandra Knowles.

A source close to Cable
Bahamas confirmed last night:
“The company got Central
Bank [exchange control]
approval last week. It received
approval to sell the preference
share issue and purchase
Columbus Communications’
stake.”

The $40 million preference
share issue includes a $20 mil-
lion US dollar component, and
a $20 million Bahamian dollar
one. Investors will have the
option to convert those prefer-
ence shares into ordinary Cable
Bahamas shares after two years,
with the preference shares pay-
ing an interest rate of 8 per cent.

The preference share issue is

SEE page 2B

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2009

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

‘Dry cleaning goes
green’ despite 20 per
cent business fall

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ew Oriental

Cleaners is rein-

vesting in the

environment

with a switch to
biodegradable plastic clothing
bags, the company’s director
said yesterday, despite suffer-
ing a 20 per cent drop in busi-
ness with the economic down-
turn.

Lana Lee-Brogdon said the
new environmentally friendly
bags will cost the company 10
per cent more than the conven-
tional plastic ones, but will hold
twice as many clothes.

With the introduction of the
new eco-friendly bags will come
a witty new slogan such as: “Go
green when you dry clean.”

Plastics have been a burden
on the environment since the
beginning of their development
because they never decompose
when discarded. Mrs Lee-Brog-
don said New Oriental’s new

* New biodegradable clothing bags to cost New
Oriental 10% more, but hold more clothes
* Wire hanger credit deal and three-in-one bags likely to
see company gain green investment return in one year
* Firm holds on to all 125 staff by shaving

working day by 30 minutes

bags will break down in a mat-
ter of days.

The award-winning dry clean-
ing company has been an advo-
cate for the environment since
its early days, and has spon-
sored myriad clean-up cam-
paigns throughout New Provi-
dence.

“For decades we have had
signs up about keeping the
Bahamas clean,” said Mrs Lee-
Brogdon. She said she brought
the ideal of recycling back with
her from the US, where she
studied computer science.

“We recycled everything,”
she added. New Oriental Clean-
ers even recycles their wire
hangers and offers a credit for

customers who bring in 50 hang-
ers.

According to Mrs Lee-Brog-
don, when customers bring in
50 hangers they can receive
$1.50 back - about three cents
per hanger. Shortly after the
introduction of the biodegrad-
able polybags, the company will
roll out a reusable polypropy-
lene garment bag that will be
for sale at New Oriental loca-
tions.

The company has invested
$5,000 in the three-in-one bags,
which can currently be pre-
ordered. The bags are being
imported from China.

SEE page 2B

Transparency woes undermine
project ‘buy-in’ by public

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIANS would more
readily “buy into” mega resort
and other major development
projects if the Government
removed the lack of trans-
parency and obsessive secrecy
surrounding the Environmen-
tal Impact Assessment (EIA)
process, an attorney warning
yesterday that the current situ-
ation undermined both investor
and public confidence.

Romauld Ferreira, who is
also an environmental consul-
tant and partner in Ferreira &
Company, told Tribune Busi-

Environmental consultant and attorney argues that better
EIA disclosure would stimulate business and investment

ness that the absence of public
disclosure before development-
related EIAs were approved
effectively meant the Bahamas
was violating one of the 13 prin-
ciples set by the United Nations
Environmental Programme
(UNEP) on how EIAs were to
be conducted.

He explained that principle
seven of the 13 stated: “Before
a decision is made on an activi-
ty, government agencies, mem-
bers of the public, experts in
relevant disciplines and inter-

ROYAL FIDELITY

amid

RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

ested groups should be allowed
appropriate opportunity to
comment on the EJA.”

Yet with many major resort-
related investment projects,
such as Albany and Baker’s
Bay, Mr Ferreira said the devel-
opments and their EIAs had
been approved by the Govern-
ment and its agencies - such as
the BEST Commission - prior
to the Bahamian communities
living in the impacted areas

SEE page 6B



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Cruise line
incentives
‘weaken’

Bahamians

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE industry grouping rep-
resenting Bahamian tour oper-
ators and excursion providers
yesterday said the amendments
to the Cruise Ship Overnight
Incentive Act had “further
weakened” the sector, chal-
lenging the Government to
explain what benefits the agree-
ment with Carnival Cruise Line
would bring to it and other
cruise-reliant businesses.

Describing the process by
which the Government had
negotiated the new incentive
agreement with Carnival, and
possibly Royal Caribbean, as
“regrettable”, a spokesman for
the Bahamas Association of
Shore Excursionists (BASE)
said the sector had effectively
been cut out of the talks, and
had received assurances from
government officials that no
agreement was in the offing.

And BASE alleged that sev-
eral of its members had been

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission.
from the daily report.



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Money at Work





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Po BUSINESS
Cruise line incentives ‘weaken’ Bahamians

FROM page 1B

warned by both the cruise lines
and Bahamian government offi-
cials to ‘back down’ from press-
ing its concerns and issues in
public, as there would be “a
heavy price to pay” in terms of
loss of business and support.
A BASE spokesman yester-
day told Tribune Business that
while the Bahamian tour and
excursion provider industry had
“certainly weakened” as a result
of the global economic reces-
sion, “but from a future stand-
point it has weakened even fur-
ther because we do not feel
we’ve got a leg to stand on to
access this piece of the pie gov-

ernment keeps on talking
about”.

Arguing that the cruise lines
appeared to have “got what
they wanted” from the new
Cruise Overnight Incentive Act,
the BASE spokesman said
some of its 13-14 members, who
employ collectively 350-400 per-
sons, had already begun to
make staff lay-offs and cut
backs - not just because of the
current environment, but due
to the adversarial environment
they were likely to face in
future.

Referring to the agreement
passed by both houses of Par-
liament, the BASE spokesman
said: “It’s very vague and broad-

based, which suggests the cruise
lines got everything they asked
for. But it’s very difficult for the
Bahamian to figure out: What’s
in the deal for me?

“Now the cruise lines get to
do what they wish with local
vendors. They can do what they
want to do, whenever they want
to do it, and with whoever they
want to do it with.”

The BASE spokesman said
the issue affected not just excur-
sion providers and tour opera-
tors, but all businesses that
relied on the multi-million dol-
lar cruise ship industry - retailer,
taxi drivers, straw vendors and
hair braiders.

The new Overnight Incentive

Act includes a rebate-style pas-
senger departure tax incentive
package. For each passenger
over 800,000, the cruise line will
receive a rebate of $8.50 per
passenger on the $15 per head
tax, and a $10 per passenger
rebate when those visitor num-
bers exceed one million. At
least 350,000 of those visitors
must overnight in Nassau, and
175,000 in Freeport, for the
cruise lines to access these
incentives, with all passengers
below 800,000 visitors attract-
ing a $15 per head tax.

Yet the new Act also desig-
nates the cruise line-owned pri-
vate islands, such as Coco Cay,
Great Stirrup Cay, Castaaway

























YOUR CONWNECTIO

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PUBLIC NOTICE






TENDER FOR PREMIUM





SPOT ADVERTISEMENTS





The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite ten-




ders from the general public who wish to advertise In our premium spots in




the 2010 Telephone Directories.





Interested companies may collect a specification document from BIC's




Head Office located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, or



BIC's Head Office located in The Government Complex, Mall Drive, Free-




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Friday.

Bids should be received by 4:00 pm on Monday July 13, 2009. Bids are to be



marked, “Tender for PREMIUM SPOT ADVERTISEMENT" to the attention of:





Mr. | Kirk Griffin

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or

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Company Limited

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P.O, Bow W-30448, Mcassau NLP., Bohomas

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Edge
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THE BAHAMAS.
THERE Deb - wie ee

Cay and Half Moon Cay, as
‘designated ports’, with passen-
gers landed there counting to
the departure tax rebates. On
these islands, the cruise lines
control everything and capture
all revenues and profits earned,
determining the mark-ups
earned by all businesses oper-
ating there.

They do much the same in
Nassau and Freeport, receiving
wholesale pricing from Bahami-
an tour and excursion providers,
and then selling these tickets on
to passengers. Yet the BASE
spokesman pointed out that
cruise ships sold stingray tours
on their private islands at $27
per head, undercutting the $35-
$42 prices that they sold tick-
ets to Bahamian-owned tours
at.

In a statement, BASE said it
was “convinced that more could
have been done to address the
concerns of the small business-
es directly involved in this sec-
tor, and to qualify the overall
economic benefit to the
Bahamas.

“Successive administrations
have done well to continue to
ignore the plight and concerns
of businesses in this sector in
general, and in particular those
that deal directly with cruise
lines. They all agree that we
have some legitimate concerns,
but none of the last two admin-
istrations can say that they have
delivered on their promise to
even attempt to understand
these concerns by establishing
reasonable dialogue. Instead,
they have gone ahead and
rushed to the end line, only to
find out that they forgot the
very people they have promised
to represent.”

And BASE added: “By no
means does the business com-
munity in general, and those
businesses directly linked to the
cruise industry in particular,
expect that all of our needs,
issues and concerns will be met
all at once, but it was hoped
that the business needs of the
Bahamas are addressed with
our international industry part-
ners like the cruise lines, and as
things evolve, more of those
concerns can be accommodated
and resolved. And yes, there
are some issues that may never
get addressed, but at least we
would know that going in.

“We do need the cruise lines,
but remember, this is a part-
nership and that relationship,
no matter how good, should not
be at our expense.

In fact, when the question of
the progress of the amendments
to the Overnight/Cruise Incen-
tive Act was put to a senior gov-
ernment official directly
involved in the process, his
reply was: “The government of
the Bahamas is not in the habit
of discussing current negotia-
tions.’ We were then told that
the amendments were on the
‘slow tract”, so ‘nothing much
was happening on that front’.

However, as strange as it is,
after the Government got done
debating the National Budget,
what was the first piece of leg-
islation that was rushed through
both houses? The Incentive Act
Amendments.”

Accusing the Government of
continuing to play the ‘cruise
passenger numbers game’ and
ignore the fact that per capita
spending was declining rapidly,
BASE challenged the assertion
that the Bahamas was uncom-
petitive based on passenger
departure tax fees.

“Cruise lines would not be in
the Bahamas if they did not see
this destination as a gold mine
for themselves,” BASE argued.

“The fact that our ‘fees’ are
higher than those of our com-
petitors is a fact that must be
taken into proper context.
When you look at it as a whole,
those other competitors don’t
offer what we can either: they
are further away, they don’t
have private islands and the
Bahamas as a single destination
ranks pretty high among cruise
passengers. So net, net the only
thing these other countries can
compete on is lower port,
departure and other fees.

“Tt is certainly clear what the
cruise lines are getting. Millions
in revenues and up to $10 rebat-
ed to them over a period of
time, but what are we, the Pub-
lic Treasury and the business
community getting in real dol-
lars and sense?

“Or are we to continue to
believe that we are only good
enough to get the crumbs, while
we continue watch more and
more of our hard dollars gener-
ated here in the Bahamas sail
away to foreign bank accounts.”

Cable’s $80m Columbus deal gets ‘go ahead’

a private placement targeted at
invited investors only, so mem-
bers of the Bahamian public
should not apply to become
involved.

Cable Bahamas is also financ-
ing the transaction with a $90
million syndicated loan put
together by Royal Bank of
Canada, FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas) and
Scotiabank, a portion of which
will be used to refinance the
company’s existing debt and
credit facilities, plus pay trans-
action costs and fund working
capital.

The preference share offer-
ing memorandum was yester-
day still being digested by the
investment community, but one
source told Tribune Business
they were concerned about

Cable Bahamas’ continued
access to cutting-edge technol-
ogy in the absence of Colum-
bus Communications’ involve-
ment.

“That’s a real competitive
threat to Cable Bahamas,” the
source said.

Tribune Business under-
stands that Columbus Commu-
nications is exiting because it
has been unable to achieve the
desired rate of return on its
investment in the Bahamas,
having been hemmed in by the
Government’s desire to protect
the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company (BTC).

The deal is designed to pur-
chase Cable Bahamas for future
opportunities in a liberalised
Bahamian telecommunications
and communications market.

‘Dry cleaning goes green’ despite 20% business fall

FROM page 1B

“Customers can bring their
clothes in it, and it coverts toa
duffle bag,” said Mrs Lee-Brog-
don. “It’s reusable and can hold
10 to 12 garments each and, in
the end, not use any plastic.”
She said she expects the com-
pany to see a return on the bags
within one year.

With the onset of the eco-
nomic downturn, New Orien-
tal, like many dry cleaning com-
panies worldwide, saw a decline
in business.

However, unlike many dry
cleaning businesses in the US,
New Oriental’s business has not
foundered and the company has
managed to hold on to all of its

125 employees, though they
have had to slash working
hours.

Mrs Lee-Brogdon said 30
minutes was shaved off each
employee’s work day in order to
lower company expenses and
ensure no lay-offs.

The company recently won
the Dry Cleaning and Laundry
Institute’s coveted Award of
Excellence, and is the only dry
cleaning company in the region
to have acquired it.

Mrs Lee-Brogdon was recent-
ly quoted in Fabricare Maga-
zine as saying: “The Award of
Excellence says that we are a
business that is willing to test
ourselves and strive to meet or
exceed the industry standard.”



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 , PAGE 3B



SINE SCC
Firm sees major rise in t-shirt sales

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

‘242 PEOPLE’ have sold shirts as
far away as Afghanistan and Africa,
and with independence just around the
corner yesterday said it has seen a sig-
nificant rise in sales through T-shirts
depicting Bahamian themes and
colours. Covering every possible mar-
ket - even sidewalk sales - 242 People
has in a short time become one of the
leading all Bahamian t-shirt compa-

Raised airline fees to boost

nies in this nation.

President of the company, Jason
Hepburn, told Tribune Business that
he and his partners wanted the shirts to
express what everyone in the Bahamas
feels. And, according to him, requests
have been pouring in for their innova-
tive t-shirts.

242 People’s shirts have been picked
up by several major retailers, including
the Sports Centre and Urban Nation.
Their shirts can also be purchased
online at shopbvm.com and can be
requested on the company’s Facebook

page, which has almost 3,000 fans.
Capitalising on the independence
holiday, Mr Hepburn opened a side-
walk shop in the front of Scotiabank’s
main branch on Bay Street, selling the
same gear that can be found in stores.

Holiday

Explaining that he wanted to take
advantage of the holiday business, he
asserted that the t-shirts were not sim-
ply independence t-shirts,but a devel-
oping fad, available in store year-

round. “After Independence Day, dis-
tributors will still be selling them,” he
said.

The company initially released six
t-shirt themes: The Slangs, Marine Life,
The Wild Life, The Uprising of the
Country and two 242 People designs.

According to Mr Hepburn, his com-
pany chose to shy away from the typi-
cal tourist t-shirt. “It’s not like the nor-
mal t-shirt that has to have the word
Bahamas plastered on it,” he said.
“When Bahamians see it they can

relate to it, whether it’s a

flag or the flamingo.”

One shirt’s image features a flamin-
go with a Bahamian flag across its face,
while a shirt from the “Slang” line fea-
tures the popular phrase “Don’t watch
nuttin” with a blindfolded male figure.

Mr Heburn said Bahamians have
been happy to see something differ-
ent, and those of all ages have sup-
ported their endeavour. “We have seen
a lot of people between the ages of 20
and 40 buying the shirts,” he said.
“And people from other countries like
them.”

The Tribune

‘quality of air transportation’

FROM page 1B

We need to improve the quality
of aviation, and need to have
the revenues to make that hap-
pen.”

Tribune Business revealed
yesterday how private Bahami-
an airlines and charter opera-
tors fear “draconian” increases
of as much as 10,000 per cent
in their fee structure could
“kill” the industry.

Under the CAD’s proposed
“across the board” fee increas-
es, the operator of a five-seater
aircraft flying 50 hours per
month could expect to see a
$13,000 per annum fee rise.

This newspaper was told that
the fee increases include a
tripling or 200 per cent rise in
landing fees at Family Island
airports, the rates jumping from
a current $18.56 per landing to
$56 per landing for a 19-seat
aircraft.

However, Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace defended the fee
increases, saying there were
“very few places” where com-
parable fees were lower than

the proposed Civil Aviation
ones. He implied that the new
fees would be more in line with
costs incurred by the Govern-
ment.

Conceding that no one liked
to see an increase in the fees
impacting their business, Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace told Tri-
bune Business: “When you
compare the fees with else-
where, they compare very
favourably. In fact, they’re
below what is charged in other
places, even though we have a
much more expensive set of
requirements.”

The minister said that unlike
other Caribbean nations, which
only had one or two airports,
the Bahamas had 17 airports as
ports of entry and many more
airstrips in the Family Islands.

Therefore, airport mainte-
nance costs were much higher in
the Bahamas, but Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said it was “very
difficult to continue to agitate
for improvements in the civil
aviation regime” and to Family
Island airports if revenue tar-
gets were not being met and

fees had not been raised for
many years.

The minister said the failure
to improve the Bahamas’ civil
aviation regime had been “the
primary reason for the lack of
growth in the Family Islands”
when it came to tourism, and
to achieve this revenues were
needed to airport navigation
systems and runway lighting to
permit night flying.

“There’s a whole range of
things that need to be done to
improve the quality of air trans-
portation in the Bahamas, and
we need the resources to do it,”
Mr Vanderpoool-Wallace said.
“We need to have the staff and
equipment to keep the airports
in working order, and need to
have the revenues to do it.”

He added, though, that the
Government was not “callously





increasing fees without grow-
ing opportunities” for the
Bahamian private airlines. The
Ministry of Tourism was “work-
ing feverishly” with them to get
the airlines on-line, so that the
public and travel agents could
book reservations directly with
them.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CUVENTUS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)








WANTED:

ASSISTANT HEAD SWIM COACH

Swim Club seeks level 2 ASCA Certified
swim coach, Previous experience and good
administrative skills required. Involves
working with young children. Competitive

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Real Estate

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Legal Notice

NOTICE
LIMESTONE POINTE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SHINEEY CANAL LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOCHE AZUL INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AUTREMENT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Micromet Ltd.

Pu). Box S4-6270)
Nassau, Bahamas Fax:

Email: jobsie! micronet.bs
328-3043

aN
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dovelopmomt Company

PRICE INQUIRY

PL-140 Aircraft Docking System

Nassau Airpor Development Company (MAD) i pleased io
announce the release of Pl-140 Aircrat Docking System for
the Lynden Pindling lnlemabanal Alport Expansion Project
The purchase inquiry includes

* Design, supoly and instalahon, jesing and
commissioning of the new aulamated aircraft docking
eysiem for sin gates, three in Stage 1 and three in
Srage 2: and

* Coordination wath 0-230 Apron Onve Badge Supplier,
0-230 General Contractor and 0-120 Airsida Chal
Contractor

The Plid0 Document will be available for pick up after
1:00pm, Tuesday June 23rd, 2008. Pease
confact Traci Brisby to register atthe MAD Project office

Goniact Titec Bisby

Ph: (242) FOR 0006 | Fm: (282) 377-2017
PO) Boo AP SO) Messe Bahamas
Email traci breshyiirers bs





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a > =;\;
Transparency woes undermine project ‘buy-in’ by public

FROM page 1B

being consulted.

Mr Ferreira said it was
through this lack of transparen-
cy and disclosure that the Gov-
ernment was effectively ‘creat-
ing a rod for its back’ and that
of the developers, as the lack
of consultation, public input and
information was convincing
many Bahamians that there was
something to hide in relation to
these investments.

“T think the lack of trans-
parency from the Government’s












NT
NAD

Nassau Airport
Developmoant Company

point of view assumes the
Bahamian people are resistant
to development, or they make
the assumption that people will
say ‘no’ to development and use
the information against them,”
Mr Ferreira told Tribune Busi-
ness. ““That’s the wrong assump-
tion to take.”

While acknowledging that
there were some environmen-
talists and others who would
always oppose development
projects regardless, Mr Ferreira
said that as an environmental
consultant he would lose credi-
bility if he said something he

PRICE INQUIRY









P-110 Generators

Nassau Arpon Develooment Company (MAD) i pleased to
annaunoe the release of Pl-110 Generalors for fhe Lynden
Findling lnlemational Aijpor Exparaion Project

The purchase inguin includes









* Supply of two (2) 100 KW ROO0 RA, 277 HED VAG new
factory assembled motor generator sets completa with
NEMA 32 endesure and day tank

+ Commesioning and Site Acceptance Tests following

rataliehon by MAD's Gantractor; and

* § yaar or 1500 operating hours warranhy












The Pl-110 Decument wil be available for pick up afier
1:00pm, Tuesday June 23rd, 2009. Please contact
Traci Grisby to register et the MAD Project office.


















Ph: (242) TOP-0086 | Faun: (247) ST7-PHT
PO Bon AP S602), Messe, Bahamas

Email traci breshyiitrers bs

could not prove or demonstrate.

“T think they’re afraid of pub-
lic consultation,” Mr Ferreira
said of the Government.
“They’re not used to consulta-
tive engagement; they’re more
used to talking to you.

“T think they are afraid, in
some instances, of the public
response or think it will delay
the process. It’s some sort of
fear. It’s actually in the Gov-
ernment’s interest to disclose
the information, so it’s not ver-
ified just by us, but by the
world. Two heads are better
than one. Why not put then
together in a collective effort to
try and resolve these problems?
They have implications for
future generations that every-
one has to live with.”

Mr Ferreira said the EIA
document itself represented a
commitment to the process
enshrined in the 13 UNEP prin-
ciples, the first of which stated
that the “authorities should not
authorise such activities with-
out prior consultation at an ear-
ly stage of their environmental
efforts”. Then there was the
principle on making the public
part of the EJA consultation
process.

What had happened to the
Albany and Baker’s Bay EIA,
and the opposition spawned -
particularly to the latter - by the
lack of transparency and public
consultation prior to EIA and
project approval could be hap-
pening again with the proposed
Arawak Cay port project, Mr
Ferreira feared.

Linking again to the UNEP
principle seven, he explained:
“In order to fulfil this obliga-
tion, a measure of transparency
is required from the Govern-
ment. The intent is that the pub-
lic should be consulted prior to
the commencement of activities
so their concerns can be taken
into account before the EIA is
finalised.

“Authorities must, in a sense,
come clean with full public dis-
closure of the EIA. What’s

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

Cultural Show, Inspection,
Prayers, Flag Raising
Ceremony, Fireworks

Followed By....

The People’s Rush

ee

: a awe oi as r Vr | rill
arin ye en at Cre es
_.

1:00 a.m.

% \

more, comment should not be
invited after an EIA is finalised
and approved, as in the Albany
project. Or, as in the case of
Arawak Cay where no EIA
information has been disclosed
to the public at all.

“This is part and parcel of the
concept of freedom of informa-
tion and government trans-
parency. The public ought not
to be viewed as an inconve-
nience to be sidestepped wher-
ever possible but partners in
development.”

And Mr Ferreira added: “The
reality is that successive gov-
ernments prefer to hold their
cards close to their chest. Thus,
in the absence of envrionmental
legislation and transparency,
environmental transgressions
and excesses can, in some cases,
become another negotiating
tool. And, with this mode of
operation, the welfare of future
generations is jeopardised.”

In the absence of proper envi-
ronmental and EIA-related
information, the Bahamian pub-
lic were unable to make an
informed decision on issues
such as whether Arawak Cay is
the best location for the con-
tainer shipping facilities that will
be removed from downtown
Bay Street.

The former PLP government
was arguing that the EDAW
study had shown Arawak Cay
was the second least desirable of
seven locations for a new ship-
ping port, and Mr Ferreira said
it was impossible for the
Bahamian people to determine
who was right - and whether the
addition of 40 acres to Arawak
Cay would increase erosion at
Saunders Beach - without an
EIA being made available.

“We need full transparency
and proper public disclosure,”
Mr Ferreira said. “Realistically,
this should have happened
before the [Nassau Harbour]
dredging operations com-
menced, particularly as the
dredge spolis will no doubt be
used to create the new man
made cay. Let’s be reminded
that this was the case with the
creation of Arawak Cay.”

Arguing the case for sustain-
able development, Mr Ferreira
told Tribune Business that the
absence of a clear EIA process
“was one of many facets in our
society where there’s lack of
clarity and transparency. That’s

the real issue we’re plagued
with. It makes people think
you've got something to hide.

“Power concedes nothing.
You have to take power. People
have to demand it from the
Government. The PLP did it
with Baker’s Bay, and the FNM
are doing it now with Arawak
Cay.”

Mr Ferreira added that by
including the Bahamian pub-
lic’s comments and concerns in
the EIA process, and before it a
project was approved, would
help “the public buy into the
development. Instead of getting
it thrown on them, they would
buy into it”.

And he said: “It ll make our
country more attractive to for-
eign investment, because one
of the questions we’re always

asked is : What is the process? It
will simulate business. This is
the time to do it, for when the
economy picks up.

“These things affect business.
What we’re talking about is
making our country more com-
petitive for the 21st century. We
like to call ourselves leaders in
the region, but environmentally
we’re certainly not. We’re fol-
lowers.”

Without adopting the process
of environmental transparency,
and enacting the draft environ-
mental laws and regulations that
have been on the drawing board
since 2005, Mr Ferreira
expressed doubts as to whether
the Bahamas could ever partic-
ipate in activities such as car-
bon trading or reduce its car-
bon footprint.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ADELINE LOUIS of BURIAL
GROUND CORNER, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 7‘ day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

TO: Ms. Carla Johnson

No. 528 Churchill Road

South Bahamia

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Kindly remove your personal property from the above-
mentioned address, failure to do so within seven (7)
days from the date of this notice will result in the
removal of your personal property from the above-
mentioned address, without further notice to you. The
owners shall not be liable for any loss andor damage
occasioned to your personal property after the expiry

of this notice,

DATED the 30th day of June, 2009,

THE OWNERS
No. 32, Churchill Road
South Bahamia
Freeport, Grand Bahama

A Ministry of Marsh Harbour denepel Chapel
PO. Fre AR2OTL0, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Pahantas

Now accepting applications for

1A SN)

Junior and Senior Hi
UR mee)

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&

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speed cam lob pers oe
Smee eM eR ete a
For the school year beginning SEPTEMBER 2004

Applicants mast be Born Again Cheistians and adhere to toe Statement of Faith of Mareh Harbour Gospel Chapel
Teachers must aso have al Ieast 2 Bachelors Degree in Education or a Teacher's Certificate
and must be a Bahamian or a permanent resident of the Bahamas with work stahus,

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Agape Christian School uses the A Beka Pook Curriculum
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udly To Shou hye approved who Got.



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‘i ae “Timothy, AD
a



PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







The Tribune

B O Di



ea







Setting
a new

By ALEX MISSICK



Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

ITH the entire world scur-

rying to save the planet
and become environmentally. -
friendly, a healthy water supply —
gio, ecome a priority.



safe and cost effective means
of providing quality water to
“residential, commercial and
institutional properties.
“We condition the water but
= without the use of salt which is
a new technology that has been
on the market for about three
to four years now and its just
reaching the Bahamas, ” Mr
Rahming said.
Mr Rahmin.

y Bahamians ques-
their water supply

sta

“incl

said. -

g said the way
jitioner works, is by
asan sot and



esp via

The Sterling Water system/conditioner can
provide a healthy, safe and cost effective
means of providing quality water to residential,
commercial and institutional properties.

Separation Anxiety
A form of mental
illness in dogs

Do you ever wonder what your dog
does when you are not at home? Perhaps
he is taking a nap on your bed (and drib-
bling on your pillow), chewing on your
favourite pair of shoes, or just terrorising
your loved kitty cat. But people whose
dog suffers from Separation Anxiety are
lucky if their house is still standing when
they return home.

Separation Anxiety is a form of men-
tal illness affecting dogs. The second
their owners leave they become extreme-
ly upset and anxious. Then they become
frantic. At this point, this dog is not in
control of his behaviour.

Separation Anxiety can be defined
as increased fearfulness of this dog after
the departure of the owner. For example:
after their owners leave for work, anx-
ious dogs might bark or howl, have bow-
el or bladder accidents, or destroy things.
Dogs that form intense attachments with
their owners such as Labradors are more
likely candidates for Separation Anxi-
ety.

Typically, the dog follows the owner
about the house, can’t bear to have the
owner out of sight, and becomes increas-
ingly distraught as the owner prepares to
leave. To make up for this, owners may
tend to overdo good byes. But in fact,
this can accentuate your dog’s feeling of
abandonment once you leave the house.

Instead, ignore the dog for ten min-
utes or so immediately before prior to
departure. And get him use to your leav-
ing. Stage your absences; first only a
minute or two, then five minutes, ten
and so on. Offer your dog a treat, like a

Y
AM DR BASIL
#4 SANDS



Nylabone, before you go to keep him
pleasantly distracted while you're gone.

Separation Anxiety is a panic disorder
likely caused by over stimulation of the
parts of the brain that regulates fear and
stress, but this term is often misapplied.
Like Attention Deficit Disorder in chil-
dren, separation anxiety has become a
trendy diagnosis. Not every dog that mis-
behaves when owners are away has sep-
aration anxiety.

Dogs are pack animals and are hap-
piest around their pack. They are
extremely social critters that form strong
bonds with their owners. Most dogs do
not like it when people leave and will
exhibit mild forms of behaviour associ-
ated with Separation Anxiety. A typi-
cal dog left alone may chew shoes out of
boredom, but dogs with separation anx-
iety will chew the refrigerator. The three
main signs of Separation

Anxiety are destruction, vocalisation
and elimination. These dogs will bark
and howl the entire time the owner is
gone. The destruction these dogs do is
astounding.

There are several hallmarks of sepa-
ration anxiety. The first is the mass











destruction when the dog is left alone.
The dogs literally destroy the house,
chewing though walls, doors and even
into the refrigerator. Exit points to the
house are targets, perhaps because dogs
think they can get outside to find their
owners. Another distinction is that this
extreme destruction occurs within the
first 15 minutes after the owner leaves.

Separation Anxiety is not a problem
commonly seen in puppies. It is seen in
dogs that have been through trauma.
Pound dogs that have had the worst
things happen to them; their owners did
leave and never came back. Now they
are afraid it will happen again. Another
example of a scary situation that may
trigger anxiety is if the dog is present
during a burglary. Separation Anxiety
is generally the result of a traumatic
experience.

Unfortunately separation anxiety is
self-perpetuating. The dogs keep getting
more and more upset each time the own-
er leaves. However another pet does not
help these dogs and it is not boredom
that is causing the behaviour. These
dogs are extremely attached to their —
owners and are very people-ori-
ented.

There is no quick fix for
this problem. Anti-
depressant and
anxiety
drugs
are

“Maintaining this system is very mini-
mum. The only thing we ask persons to
do is every month or so to check their fil-
ters to make sure they are clean. The sys"
tem itself is required to be serviced eve
five to six months because the water in
our ground is very hard and you are going +
to get a lot of build up,” Mr Rahming ,

dard

Cah



_As for energy efficiency, Mr Rahming F Li:
said although the Sterling Water condi-
tioner works with electricity, the amount — ih
it uses is the equivalent to et at of a 25
watt a bulb. :

ety. Medication needs to be used in addi-
tion to desensitisation therapy. As men-

involves having this dog sit and stay as

tually the owner will step out of the room
as the dog stays and believes that the
owner will return.

The goal is to take the “scary” factor
out of the owner’s departure. This is
time consuming work and takes dedica-
tion. Many veterinarians may refer own-
ers to a dog trainer.

Crate training these dogs is helpful. It 2. Foot Pain and injury:
at least provides these dogs a safer place }

where they can’t destroy things or harm : further injury, consider custom

? orthotics or inserts with proper arch
? support for your foot type. Such

Ge peau are concerned i items can be purchased at specialty

Bi ear anxieties, con- i footwear stores or Pedorthic facili-

: ties. If you want to continue running,
? walking or remain active for many

? more years, you need to ensure that

? there is enough support between

? your foot and the flat and hard sur-

? faces. Depending on the activity to

? which you are doing, you need to

} seek the appropriate footwear and

? support for that purpose. Avoid

? injury and pain by seeking profes-

: sional help to assist you with the cor-
? rect footwear and support (orthotic)
? to not only support your body and

} foot type but to adequately off load

: the pressure presented by the under-
? lying terrain.

themselves.
For more information about Separa-

tact your local veterinarian.



uy
aN Dal
GIBSON



Summer
heat and
your feet!

IT is quite a challenge to keep your

? feet cool when walking around in
? extremely hot weather. Therefore, your
? feet need some special care and atten-
? tion during the summer months. Heat
? and humidity will aid in the growth of
: bacteria, so taking measures to reduce
? these will help enormously.

During the summer foot injuries are

? also more prevalent - the increased
? level of outdoor athletic activities dur-
_ | ing the summer also increases the
? chance of muscle pain, heel pain, shin
: splints, plantar fasciitis, Morton's neu-
? roma, achilles tendinitis, hip pain/bur-
| £ sitis, runner's knee, illiotibial band syn-
: drome (ITB) and the list goes on.......

How do we deal with summer heat
? and our feet?

Moisture Management:

The most important is to manage

? moisture in order to decrease the

risk of athlete's foot and pro-

? nounced foot odor. Excessive perspi-
: ration has been seen as a significant
? contributor to these conditions. In

technical terms, this excessive perspi-
ration is known as hyperridrosis. A

? rapid production of sweat that can-
|} not be evaporated as fast as it is pro-
/ } duced. When this happens, the

? shoe's material or part becomes satu-
? rated with moisture. In the perspira-
? tion there is also bacterial waste.

: You may ask what is this bacterial

? waste? Perspiration is body “waste”
? and has an abundance of bacteria. In
? addition, it is believed that approxi-
? mately 98 per cent of this perspira-

? tion is moisture and 2 per cent is
solids - mostly acids and salts. These
? bacteria thrive on moisture, warmth
? and darkness - just like bacteria that
? causes toe fungus.

Solutions:

In terms of cleanliness and hygiene

: habits, wash your feet daily and dry

? thoroughly before putting on

? footwear. Always, use a clean pair of
: socks, preferably, specially-designed
? cotton or synthetic perspiration

? wicking fabric to get rid of foot odor.
? For example, "Thorlos' and 'Balgia'

? brand of cushioned socks are espe-

? cially designed to provide insulation

? and air flow and wicks away mois-

? ture and keep your foot from getting
? too hot. Refrain from wearing yes-

? terday's gym socks just because they
? smell clean. One wear is enough to

. _ ¢ leave behind sufficient foot perspira-
not enough to conquer separation anxi- }

tion for odor-causing bacteria to

: thrive on. It will be enough to leave

k 1 eras ? feet stinky and dirty. Footwear is
tioned earlier, desensitisation therapy :

another important factor. When

: selecting shoes it is important to
the owner gradually steps away. Even- :

avoid shoes or boots with non-

? breathable upper materials, especial-
? ly closed-type shoes or simply tight-

: fitting shoes. For example, leather

? with its unique internal structure of

: fibers and inter-fiber air spaces, plus
: its surface pores, has excellent

: breathing capacity.

To alleviate such pain and or avoid

? ¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified
: Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot

: Solutions, a health and wellness fran-

i chise that focuses on foot care and

: proper shoe fit, located in the Sandyport
i Plaza, Nassau.

: "The views expressed are those of the author

: and does not necessarily represent those of Foot
: Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary

? and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any

: guestions or comments to nassau@footsolu-

i tions.com or 327-FEET (3338).





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009, PAGE 9B





Do you have
Osteoporosis?

By Dr KATHRYN
DE SOUZA
Western Medical Plaza

OSTEOPOROSIS is the med-
ical term for thinning bones. It is
often confused with osteoarthri-
tis, which is degeneration of the
joints through wear and tear.
There is no cure for osteoarthri-
tis, but we are now able to treat,
and cure, osteoporosis.

The body is constantly mak-
ing new bone and resorbing old
bone. Osteoporosis occurs when
there is more bone being
resorbed than made. The ground
work for good bone structure is



laid down in childhood to young
adult years. The body uses calci-
um, Vitamin D and phosphate
to form bone. The bones are a
storage space for calcium in the
body. The heart, brain and oth-
er organs need calcium to work
properly. To keep the body func-
tioning normally, the body uses
the calcium in the bones when it
is needed, and replaces it with
the calcium obtained from the
diet. If a person does not eat
enough calcium, such as dairy
products, fortified orange juice
and salmon (to name a few),
bone production may suffer,
resulting in brittle bones over

time.

The leading cause of Osteo-
porosis is lack of estrogen in
women. During and after
menopause, estrogen levels drop.
Older men, or men who are
undergoing prostate cancer treat-
ment, may also have low hor-
mone levels. These hormones
are called androgens, which can
result in Osteoporosis. People
who have taken a large amount
of steroids over time, such as
those with Asthma and Rheuma-
toid Arthritis, are at risk for
osteoporosis as well. Epileptic
patients, who are being treated
with anti-epileptics, should also

The garden of July

be monitored for osteoporosis.
Thyroid and chronic renal dis-
ease also increase your risk for
osteoporosis. Women with the
following attributes are at the
highest risk for osteoporosis:

1. Over 50, post menopausal

2. Caucasian or Asian

3. Thin or small bone struc-
ture

4. Smokers and alcoholics

5. Strong family history

However, if you do not have
any of these attributes, you can
still develop osteoporosis. Osteo-
porosis is usually a silent disease
until the fracture (broken bone)
occurs. More often than not, peo-
ple do not know they have osteo-
porosis. They may have a dull
ache in their back or neck, or
they may develop a hunchback
posture. Severe pain can develop
if a compression fracture occurs
suddenly, leaving the vertebrae
(spinal bone) shorter than it was
normally. Sudden hip fractures
can also occur which are
extremely painful. Anyone over
50 with a hip, wrist or spine frac-

ture from a seemingly mild
injury, needs to be checked for
osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is diagnosed by a
test called a bone density test,
which measures the density, or
strength, of the bones. This test
can detect osteoporosis before a
fracture occurs.

There are several things you
can do to minimise your risk for
developing osteoporosis. Young
adults should be encouraged to
get 1000mg of calcium in their
diet from milk and other dairy
products, salmon, sardines and
other bony fish, and fortified
orange juice. Weight bearing
exercise such as running, walk-
ing, aerobics, weight lifting and
even cycling decrease your risk
as does maintaining a normal,
healthy body weight. Studies
have shown that women who
walk a mile a day have four to
seven more years of bone
reserve than women who do

not.
It is also important to get
enough Vitamin D. Usually we

get enough Vitamin D through
sun exposure as it is absorbed
through our skin, but with the
threat of skin cancer, many peo-
ple are dramatically limiting
their sun exposure and wearing
high intensity sun block which
does not allow the Vitamin D
to penetrate the skin. You
should have 5-10 minutes of
unprotected sun exposure daily
to obtain enough Vitamin D. If
a supplement is preferred, a cal-
cium supplement with 600mg of
Calcium and Vitamin D should
be taken twice daily, as we are
unable to absorb more than
600mg of calcium at any given
time.

Treatment for osteoporosis
aims to slow down or stop bone
loss, increasing bone density,
preventing fractures and pain
control. 40 per cent of women
will experience a fracture due
to osteoporosis in their lifetime.
Talk to your doctor to deter-
mine which medication is right
for you, as well as diet and exer-
cise advice.

TWO trees catch our attention dur-
ing July. One is the royal poinciana
that dominates the urban landscape
and the other is mango. The royal
poinciana is for beauty; the mango is
for eating.

Few tropical fruits are loved as much
as mango. Their exquisite sweetness
makes all the care and attention that
goes into the trees worth while. Messy
to eat they may be but few fruits are as
rewarding when it comes to taste.

While we have plenty of mangoes
around we should think about pre-
serving some for future use. Mango
jam is easily made and mango chut-
ney is a fine relish with lots of applica-
tions. Make mango salsa to enjoy with
white fish and meats, particularly pork
and chicken.

That care and attention can be con-
tinued even while the mango trees are
bearing. Some people omit the sea-
sonal fertilisation of mangoes in sum-
mer and fertilise them in autumn. For
most citrus and fruit

trees a summer application of fer-
tiliser is part of the three times a year
treatment of iron, granular fertiliser
and minor nutrients.

The iron is applied as a drench to
the bole of the tree and should be

Sequestrene 138 or similar. This type of
chelated iron was developed for the
Florida citrus industry when it was
found that normal chelated irons
became bound up in the highly alkaline
soil. It is very expensive but virtually a
necessity for successful citrus.

If possible, use specific fertilisers for
your fruit trees: citrus fertiliser for cit-
rus, fruit for fruit, and palm for palm. I
tend to buy the right sized bag so once
Ihave finished fertilising I have no

irritating half bags to store.

Minor nutrients are applied as a
spray, using a sticker/spreader to help
the liquid adhere to the leaves.

In the vegetable garden it is the sea-
son of okra and corn. Okra is not my
favourite veggie but I do like them
pickled. Pickled okra is fine served
with a cheese platter.

The corn I grow each year is Peach-
es and Cream, a bi-coloured sugar-
enhanced variety that produces large,
plump ears. The stalks grow to six feet
and must be grown in blocks rather
than rows. Once the plants have tas-
seled they should be sprayed regularly
with Sevin or a similar product. If you
want to be organic you can use Dipel
dust that is effective against caterpil-
lars.

July is a good time to plant seeds
for calabaza, or Cuban pumpkin. The
seasonal rains will nurture the young
vines and you can expect mature fruits
in late fall.

I have cubanelle sweet peppers for
my summer crop. I am growing them
under papaya trees to provide midday
shade to prevent sunscald on the fruits.
Most people like to eat the cubanelles
at the yellow stage

but I prefer them when they are red
and really sweet.

It is at this time of year many gar-
deners have a plethora of hot peppers.
The best way to preserve hot peppers is
by freezing them. Spread a layer on a
metal cookie sheet and put in the freez-
er for an

hour. Then pack them in freezer
bags and dip into them whenever you
need a pepper hit.

There is a great misconception about
roses. Many people associate roses with
English gardens and think they are
sun-shy. Not so. Roses demand full
sun, even in summer. To maintain their
vigour they should be dressed every
season with compost and kept well
watered during droughts. Regular
dead-heading and the occasional prun-
ing will keep your plants healthy.



ROSES need special care during the summer months to avoid diseases caused by

damp conditions and high heat.

During the summer months the
humidity will encourage black spot on
rose bush leaves. This is treated with
Orthene, a systemic that kills sucking
insects. Orthene can be used on other
ornamental shrubs to give them pro-
tection but is best not used on hibiscus.

July is the first full month of summer
and jobs like fertilising, judicial pruning
and composting will ensure dividends
later on in the season.

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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Circumvention: A recognizable convention

YOU have a suggestion to make and
you know if you make it to your boss
she will say something like, we tried
that before or find a reason why it
wouldn't work. You have at least two
options: take a chance and give your
boss your idea or circumvent your boss
and take it to someone further up in
the hierarchy who can act on it.

In the book, “The 48 Laws of Pow-
er” by Robert Greene, his very first
law is “Don't outshine the master.”
He defines this law saying an effort to
display your talent does not always
impress others, it can inadvertently
inspire fear and insecurity.

Here are some reasons why you may
decide to circumvent a boss, friend,
family member, a peer or a member of
your support staff.

No Voice

Many times I witness supervisors
and managers who have no voice in
an organisation because of a past mis-
take or current performance issues. If
a supervisor has no voice, they can't be
the voice of their direct reports so their
direct reports have to choose between
circumventing the hierarchy if they
want to be heard and keeping quiet to
protect their supervisor.

By YVETTE
BETHEL



Negative attitude

No-one likes to be around a person
with a negative attitude unless this is
their comfort zone. Know-it-alls, con-
descending people, gossips, bullies,
blamers are all examples of types of
people who are avoided. While some
of you have no problem facing bearers
of negativity, others of you prefer to
reduce your ‘face time’ with them. If
you obviously circumvent someone
who is negative, brace yourself for his
or her negativism to be directed at you
but keep in mind that sometimes it is
worth the risk...

Insecurity

People are insecure for any number
of reasons. None of those reasons
probably have anything to do with you.
They could be insecure about your idea

being better than theirs or they could
be uncomfortable with you dressed up
all the time.

Awareness is part of the battle.
Many of us refuse to see the truth
because it is uncomfortable so we opt
to stay in a comfortable, unaware
space. If you choose to see the truth
and act, circumvention is one of your
options.

Procrastination

Procrastination is the enemy of many
well laid plans. If there is a procrasti-
nator on your team, your productivity
is impacted because you are reliant on
the procrastinator for their part of the
plan. Procrastinators are not easy to
circumvent so you can either decide
to let them sink or you can help them.
If you have the authority you can reas-
sign the work.

A Complaint

It takes emotional discipline and the
ability to articulate your complaint in a
constructive way to complain to the
person you are complaining about.
Even with effective communication
skills, this kind of conversation can go
off track so persons with complaints
tend to circumvent the perceived per-

petrator.

Fear

In some work environments there
are employees or bosses whose sole
purpose seems to be to keep you in a
state of suspended terror. They are
bullies and they often know no other
way to be. They either bully you into
submission and you lose your voice or
you circumvent them and brace your-
self for the fallout.

Dependence

Some people believe their power
resides in keeping others dependent
on them. If you don't want to get
caught in this trap you will need to
learn what you are not being shown
by circumventing the system of depen-
dence.

Circumvention guidelines:
Here are a few tips to help you
decide if you will circumvent:

e Decide on your objectives and your
priority values given the situation
and circumvent if it aligns with your
objectives. In other words, choose
your battles.

¢ Remember one of the Laws of

Power, if you outshine the Master be
prepared for the possible conse-
quences.

e Think ahead and consider the pos-
sible positive and negative conse-
quences of your actions. Then deter-
mine the worst-case scenario and
whether or not you can live with it.

If you decide to circumvent, you can
do it in a few different ways.

e You can provide information to the
appropriate person understanding
that one possible outcome of this is
that you will not be trusted. To get
around this I have seen people “acci-
dentally” tip off a person in authori-
t

y.
e There are others of you who will
circumvent a dysfunctional system
with no regard for the possible fall-
out.

e You can give information to some-
one “off the record” but remember
that it is sometimes their job to put it
on the record.

e Set up someone to represent you.
In all of this, remember that circum-
vention in and of itself is neither right
nor wrong. It all depends on how
you play the circumvention game.



First lady of Rotary

PICTURED from left to right: Rotarian, District 7020; Past District Governor Rupert Ross; wife of District Governor Leonie Alberga; District Governor Errol Alberga; Michele Rassin,
President Rotary Club of East Nassau; Barry Rassin, Past Rotary International Director; Philip Cumming, Secretary, Rotary Club of East Nassau; Felix Stubbs, Assistant District
Governor.

La

PICTURED Left to right: Michele Rassin, President, Rotary Club of East Nassau accepting flowers on behalf of the hearing aid recipients; Ralph Foreskin, Past President Rotary Club

*
=

of East Nassau; Kim Scriven, Audiologist; Hearing Aid Recipient.

JS

SLI. EI

Po

5 -
Wr

=.
i





Pe a



FROM page 12

to shelter me from the politics that
went on behind the scenes so I have
to say that I had a lot of support
from the Rotarians who were in it
for the right reasons, and I really
would not have pursued it, if it were
not for those supportive members
not to mention that my dad was a
Rotarian so it was harder for them to
say no to Barry Rassin’s daughter
then it would be for them to say no
to someone else.”

The club’s president at the time
Everett Peart also took up slack for
her.

“I do not think that anyone should
be judged based on their sex race or
gender I think your work perfor-
mance should stand by itself. I have
a passion for community service and
I don’t that politics should be a
deciding factor.”

Despite this, Ms Rassin said when
her application was presented to the
members for a vote , “three persons
actually quit the club, many threat-
ened to quit and many held on just
to make trouble. They were the min-
imal amount however and the
majority of the members were
extremely supportive.”

Her application took about two
months to process, while most appli-
cations took about six weeks.

“After I became a member it was
a bit of a hazing process I think I
was on every committee and every
community service function but I
loved it, I really got my hands
involved and that has been the best
part - I have been able to get a real-
ly good grasp of what Rotary does.”

Today, there are nine members
in East Nassau and women in all the
Rotary groups except the West Nas-
sau Club. To date there have been
seven female presidents although
none of them have had quite the
drama to gain admittance.

“One of the nicest things that hap-
pened, was that Sir Durward
Knowles stood up at a meeting and
said that he was one of the mem-
bers who had objected to my mem-
bership, but that he had to admit
that he was wrong. That meant a lot
to me.”

As the first female president, she
said she knows she has a lot to prove,
but says that she has a passion for
community service and is ready to
meet what she knows will be high
expectations.

Amoung the projects Rotary will
be working on this year: the launch
of a blood mobile which can travel
around the country, projects that
will fit children with hearing aids
and eye glasses, and another that
will provide much needed ventila-
tors and incubators to Princess Mar-
garet Hospital. The club will do all of
these things in addition to the regu-
lar outreach programmes and sup-
port they have provided over the
years.

Of course funding is a major com-
ponent in just how much they will be
able to do, but Ms Rassin said
despite the current economic climate
now is not the time to scale back on
fundraising because a lot of the char-
ity organisations will be faced with
short falls and have a harder time
raising funds to carry on their day to
day projects and will thus be relying
more on the assistance Rotary can
provide.

“We’ve been very lucky, this year
for example our fishing tournament
raised more money than it did last
year so people are just working a lit-
tle harder and a little longer to get
the amounts that we need. So maybe
this year your $1000 donor can only
give $500 so you need more $500
donors. It will make it more diffi-
cult but we realise the importance
of it.

“The theme for this year is “The
Future of Rotary is in Your Hands”
and so we will be undertaking an
aggressive membership drive as well
as bridging the gap between what
we do and people knowing what we
do,” she added.



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST



TUESDAY, JULY 7 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

Nha la

mil (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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LAID the groundwork for the new
playground for the Bahamas Association
for the Physically Disabled.



THE TRIBUNE

2009



TUESDAY, JULY 7,





Peis eel ese eer ean | ed Cg |
eter (the) A ee et sc |

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

MICHELE Rassin is a lady of

firsts. Not only did she break
the all male barrier of the
Rotary Cub of East Nassau, to
become its first female mem-
ber, now she is its first female
president.

The Doctors Hospital execu-
tive sat down with Tribune

Woman recently to discuss ~
ie

the role Rotary has played i
her life and to discuss the ©
aggressive agenda the club”
will undertake this year.


















“TI grew up attending Rotary events with my father ( Dr
Barry Rassin) and so I have been surrounded by Rotary all of
my life.”

And while she knew that entering the traditionally all boys
club would be difficult, it was really
the organisation’s track record that
inspired her to push for membership.
Ms Rassin explained that she was
attracted to Rotary because 100 per
cent of the funds that the organisation
raises goes into their community out-
reach programmes.

“T didn’t want to give my money or
my time to an organisation that used
some of the funds for administration
purposes. Even in the church, you don’t
see a lot of the money going back into
the community as you do in Rotary so
I wanted to give my time and resources
where I knew it would be used the best
and they are a global organsation, so we
are not just helping the Bahamas, we
are helping people all over the world.”

However, her request for member-
ship seven years ago did not come with-

out controversy- “Tt was a stressful time, she says looking back.
_ ~I was very nervous, I am not one that wants or likes to cause
problems so it was very difficult for me, a lot of the members tned

SEE page 10

One of the nicest thin
that happened, was fae
Sir Durward Knowles
stood up at a meeting
and said that he was one
of the members who had
objected to my member
ship, but that he had fo
admit that he was wrong.
That meant a lot fo me.

5





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SEE ‘WOMAN’ SECTION

mother

Woman taken from
her house to ATM

A WOMAN who lives in the
eastern area of New Providence
was kidnapped and forced to
withdraw monies from a local
ATM as her captor sat in her
car threatening to kill her two
young children if she dared to
disobey him.

Early on Sunday morning
sometime before 5am, this
woman, whose identity is being
withheld, was wakened by an
unknown man who was stand-
ing over her bed and had placed
his hand over her mouth.

Ordering her not to scream,
he escorted her and her chil-
dren to the floor and demanded
to know where the safe and the
money was located in her home.

Exclaiming that there was no
safe in her house, the woman
attempted to appease the bur-
glar by handing over two Mova-
do watches, which were esti-
mated to be valued together at
about $3,000.

Reportedly unsatisfied with
this gesture, the burglar is said
to then have got on top of the
woman. Fearing that she was
about to be raped, the woman is
said to have offered the intrud-
er the option of going to the
bank where she said she could

get him “some money.”

Agreeing to this idea, the
man forced the woman into her
own car and made her kneel on
the floor on the front passen-
ger side. Although he was wear-
ing a mask, the man ordered
her not to look at his face and
they began to drive away from
her home. However, shortly
after leaving, the burglar
stopped and turned the car
around and went back to home
for the two young children who
had been left behind.

Setting off for the Palmdale
area, the man forced the woman
out of the car at the Scotiabank
ATM, reminding her of what
he would do to her children if
she did not return with the
promised funds.

Withdrawing $1,000 the
woman is said to have handed
over the cash and then demand-
ed that the man, who was at this
point holding her children
hostage to “get lost”, as he had
now got what he had come for.

However, the criminal
refused.

He placed the woman back
into the car and drove the vehi-

SEE page eight

The Taste
on
lruesdays!!

Valid only on Tvesdays!



m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

SS
a

OG MS ES

BAHAMAS BIGGEST

laren

Knife found next to body of
Har! Taylor exhibited in court

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

THE broken knife found
next to the lifeless body of
internationally recognised
handbag designer Harl Taylor
was exhibited in Supreme
Court yesterday as witness tes-
timony in the murder trial con-
tinued.

Troyniko McNeil, the son
of Taylor’s former business partner Troy McNeil,
is charged with intentionally causing the death of
Harl Taylor between Saturday, November 17,
and Sunday, November 18, 2007, while being
concerned together with another.

Taylor, 37, who was found dead at Mountbat-

SEE page eight

Harl Taylor



‘33-year-old’
believed to have

lived in Bahamas for

three years before
disappearance

‘Felipé Major/Tribune staff

PEDESTRIANS pick their way
through-the puddles yesterday
after heavy rain resulted in
flooding on the sidewalks of
Downtown Nassau:

e SEE PAGE FIVE



Psychologist warns
over teacher-student
boundary infractions

LOCAL psychologist Dr David Allen
encouraged Bahamian teachers to better
observe and understand the growing dynamics
of teacher-student boundaries as the trends of
old are no longer acceptable in today’s society.

Speaking at the opening of the Ministry of
Education’s forum at the Wyndham Crystal
Palace yesterday, Dr Allen explained that sex-
ual abuse of a child often comes after years of
boundary infractions.

These infractions, he said, come in the guise
of the exchange of notes or e-mails, the giving
of gifts or money, giving children rides home,
acting as confidants, meetings outside of school
on a social level, and finally the sexual abuse

SEE page eight



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Missing US
woman could be
murder victim
found in sheet

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AN AMERICAN
woman who disappeared
earlier this year is one
among several “missing”
individuals who police
think could be the murder
victim found wrapped in a
sheet over the weekend.

Police yesterday con-
firmed that they are
exploring the possibility
that it was the body of
Anna Michelle Garrison
of West Palm Beach,
Florida, which was discov-
ered by walkers in a bushy
area off Fox Hill Road
south on Saturday.

According to uncon-
firmed reports, Garrison
is 33-years-old and went
by seven different aliases,
including Anne Pugh and
Anne Marie Jenkins. She
is believed to have been
living in the Bahamas for
about three years prior to
her disappearance.

Family members are
expected to be contacted
today to come in and view
the body, said Superinten-
dent Elsworth Moss.

Officer in charge of the
Criminal Investigation
Department, Supt Moss
said that like the badly
decomposed corpse of the
Caucasian woman found
on Saturday, both Garri-
son and another missing
woman are known to have
tattoos.

The dead body, detected
near the Blue Water Cay
development just after
6pm on Saturday, had a

SEE page eight

Ministry reports
‘two swine flu cases’

THE Ministry of Health
last night reported what they
believe to be two cases of
swine flu that were contract-
ed by persons who were
returning to New Providence
from a stay in Orlando.

With four confirmed cases
in the Bahamas thus far,
these two latest cases could
push the official number up
to seven if they are con-
firmed by Ministry officials.


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





| ‘Show Your Colors!

Ae uN

ass *

*

Exclusively at

JOHN’S

SHOES Go AIGGESSO)
lead ome tomele

noseeen ie mechs
Garmichael Kd) so1-bsby7b



LOCAL NEWS

Michele Rassin makes Rotary history

Fast Nassau Club’s first female president elected

AFTER braving considerable
opposition to become a member
of the largest Rotary Club in the
Bahamas, Michele Rassin has
been elected its first female pres-
ident. She has been involved in
Rotary since childhood, attend-
ing and volunteering for events
through her father Barry Rassin, a
past president, district governor
and now one of 17 directors of
Rotary International around the
world. As the first woman to join
the Rotary Club of East Nassau
seven years ago, Ms Rassin says
she felt constantly compelled to
prove her worth to both support-
ers and sceptics.

She therefore committed her
time and energy to as many of the
club’s community projects as pos-
sible — a task that was also a plea-
sure, as it was the idea of being
useful that first drew her to the
club. Ms Rassin said that despite
the controversy sparked by her
decision to join — no less than
three members formally objected
and others threatened to quit — it
was not an attempt to rock the
boat, but rather an expression of
her desire to help the less fortu-
nate as effectively as possible. She
pointed out that while numerous
charity groups were already
accepting women at the time,
Rotary was the only one she knew
of that dedicated every cent it
raised to charity, using none for
administrative or other purposes.

"T really wanted to dedicate my
time and my resources to give
back 100 per cent, where I know
where it was going to be used for
the best," she said.

Still, Ms Rassin was aware of
the entrenched attitudes that pro-

ONE of the oldest buildings
in Nassau, Garrison House on
gated Queen Street, has been put
up for sale.

The well-maintained, Colonial
two-storey building comprises
1,774 square feet, plus 936 square
feet of covered porches.

“This is a fantastic location,”
said Mike Lightbourn, president

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MICHELE RASSIN receiving the Rotary Club of East Nassau Gold Citation Award from the Past District Governor Rupert

Ross.

voked the hostile reaction of some
members, and was determined to
take them on.

"I don't think people should be
judged based on their race, sex or
religion; your work performance
should stand for itself, and I have
a passion for doing work within
the community, and I didn't think
politics should be the deciding fac-
tor on somebody who wants to
help make things better for some-
body else, to make a difference,”
she told The Tribune.

About 20 years ago, American
branches of what was until then
the archetypal boys club began
taking female members — after a
US Supreme Court ruling com-
pelled them to — and eventually
clubs around the world followed
suit, including some in the
Bahamas. There have been other
female presidents of local club
branches in the past, but not East
Nassau — where many were keen

of Coldwell Banker Lightbourn
Realty and the exclusive listing
agent for the commercial prop-
erty. It is in the heart of Nassau’s
business district with the United
States Embassy three doors away,
providing special security for per-
sons entering from Bay Street.

The British Colonial Hilton
hotel stands a stone’s throw away
at the juncture of Bay and Queen
Streets, and shops, restaurants,
law firms and banks are all with-
in walking distance.

Another drawing point is the
enclosed grounds of approxi-
mately 7,000 plus square feet,
which provide potential parking
for eight to 10 cars at the rear.

Mr Lightbourn said the prop-
erty is priced at $650,000.

“This is a rare opportunity for
someone to own a unique piece of
real estate in a highly desirable
location,” he said.

This property is one of the old-
est buildings in Nassau and has a
considerable historical past and

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PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 322-2157



to preserve what they saw as an
important tradition.

But things have indeed
changed, if the overwhelming sup-
port for Ms Rassin expressed at
the handing-over dinner on Sat-
urday, June 27, was any indica-
tion. The new has president said
she will not let her supporters
down, and has ambitious plans for
her one year term. These include
the donation of hearing aids and
eye glasses to children of eco-
nomically challenged families, the
provision of wheelchairs to those
who cannot afford them, the pur-
chase of ventilators and incuba-
tors for the Princess Margaret
Hospital, and the launch of the
Bahamas’ first "blood mobile."

This last project, which she has
been working on for a year, will
see the commissioning of a van
fully equipped to conduct blood
drives at businesses or other loca-
tions, in an effort to improve

blood reserves. "We make it eas-
ier, by bringing the blood drive
to you,” she said.

Perhaps the most significant
aspect of the project, she
explained, is that by taking advan-
tage of the mail boat system, the
vehicle can conduct the first blood
drives on Family Islands.

All Rotary projects depend on
charity, and no one would be sur-
prised if businessmen have
become more reluctant to give of
late. But Ms Rassin said she is
determined not to let the world’s
economic troubles get in the way
of her plans. If anything, she said,
Rotary members must try even
harder, as the ranks of the needy
will inevitably grow, and other
non-profit aid organisations will
begin to struggle.

© See today’s Tribune Woman tor

more on our talk with Michele
Rassin

ed a MALTY
E pars Bi

UP FOR SALE: onl rT ae ence ent

character. It started life as Garri-
son House and accommodated
the officers serving at Fort Nas-
sau, which was built in 1697 and is
now the Hilton hotel.

The fort was destroyed around
1703-04 in a surprise attack by a
combined Spanish and French
force. It is said they found the
Deputy Governor feasting, the
fort neglected and without a gar-
rison. The town was sacked and
burned, the fort destroyed and its
guns spiked, and the inhabitants
expelled. The fort was later
rebuilt. Many of the original fea-
tures of Garrison House have



been preserved and restored to
offer an outstanding residence or
office, with all of the charm and
grace of yesteryear. Garrison
House was the Bishop of New
York’s winter residence during
the early 19th century.

The well-known Tamberly
School started here before mov-
ing to the west of New Provi-
dence. And, to add a twist of
intrigue, the grounds of the house
are said to harbour a major
Bahamian historical secret. The
seller says that the secret, in time
honoured tradition, will be
revealed to the successful buyer.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief |

Policeman
quizzed over
Bay Street
shop robbery

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

A POLICE officer has
been questioned in connec-
tion with the robbery of a
high-end Bay Street shop,
the Central Detective Unit
confirmed.

Superintendent Elsworth
Moss, in charge of the CDU,
said the officer was ques-
tioned yesterday, but added
that it is not known if he will
be formally charged at this
stage.

Several other individuals
have also been questioned in
the wake of the robbery of
the downtown Breitling bou-
tique on Sunday.

Staff at the store were
forced to hand over thou-
sands of dollars worth of
designer watches when a
robber threatened them at
gunpoint.

It was alleged that a police
officer may have acted as a
lookout while the crime was
being committed.

It was the second armed
robbery of a Bay Street store
in just seven days.

Staff at a Little Switzer-
land shop were confronted
by a gunman who made simi-
lar demands last Sunday.

This time around, officers
from the Central Police Sta-
tion caught up with an
armed suspect, who was then
taken into custody.

Yesterday, Supt Moss con-
firmed that police believe
the suspect may be responsi-
ble for both robberies.

Wanted Grand
Bahama fugitive
arrested after
police chase

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - One of
Grand Bahama’s most want-
ed fugitives was apprehend-
ed on Monday afternoon fol-
lowing a police chase on
Queen’s Highway.

Asst Supt Welbourne Boo-
tle reported that Garin Gib-
son and a female were taken
into police custody sometime
after 3.30pm when the chase
ended in a three-car collision
near Colony Motors.

Mr Bootle said police were
in pursuit of a vehicle, driven
by Gibson, which crashed
into two other vehicles.

He fled from the vehicle
and ran into the surrounding
area to escape capture.

A female passenger in the
vehicle was immediately tak-
en into custody, while police
cordoned off the area to
search for Gibson.

Standstill

Police had cordoned off an
area on Queen’s Highway
near Dolly Madison, bring-
ing traffic to a standstill on
the busy commercial cause-
way.

A large crowd of onlook-
ers had gathered in the area.

The K-9 Unit was also
called to the scene to assist
in the search for Gibson,
who was later found hiding
in the back trunk of a vehicle
at Colony Motors.

Mr Bootle said that two
persons were seriously
injured in the collision and
taken to hospital.

Gibson is wanted for ques-
tioning in connection with
several serious offences. He
had managed to elude police
for a long time.

In March, the police had
classified Gibson as their
“number one” wanted sus-
pect and had appealed to the
public for assistance in his
capture.

INSIGHT

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net



REDUCING violence in
schools, attracting and retain-
ing quality teachers and adopt-
ing a more relevant national
curriculum are among the 22
goals laid out in the Ministry of
Education’s Ten Year Educa-
tion Plan.

Hundreds of education dele-
gates from across the Bahamas
yesterday scrutinised the min-
istry’s plan for the future of edu-
cation during the first day of
the 2009 National Education
Summit.

The two-day conference at
the Wyndham Nassau Resort is
encouraging discussion between
delegates and educators from
every island, as well as public
and private stakeholders so that
their thoughts and recommen-
dations may be considered
before the plan is passed in par-
liament and implemented for
all government schools in the
next school year.

Minister of Education Carl
Bethel said the specific goals
set out in the plan are all the
more sustainable as they have
been developed by educators
for educators and will outlast
any political changes.

Three advisory committees
for pre- and primary schools,
secondary schools, and post-sec-

TEN-YEAR EDUCATION PLAN

Ministry sets sights on
reducing school violence

Other goals include attracting quality teachers and making curriculum more relevant

CARL BETHEL

ondary/tertiary education, also
will be established at the sum-
mit to ensure continued discus-
sions and developments.

Positive

Mr Bethel said: “We must do
more to effect positive and sub-
stantial improvements in the
quality of education. Excellence
must become the standard, the
only standard that is acceptable
in public education.”

The minister said it will no
longer be acceptable for a child
to leave primary school with-
out having reached the grade
level in literacy and numeracy,
or to maintain the C- BJC aver-
age in junior high school, or for





“Excellence
must become
the standard,
the only
standard that
is acceptable
in public
education.”



so many students to struggle to
meet a 2.0 grade point average
in senior high school.

“Well enough is no longer
good enough. We want to
ensure the education system is
holistic in providing an effec-
tive environment, programmes
and opportunities to enable stu-
dents to develop their capacity
to make positive choices as lit-
erate citizens.

“Our ability to adequately
meet the needs of all facets of
society are all predicated on our
ability to prepare our students
to be leaders who are analytical,
independent thinkers with the
problem-solving capacity to
make a positive difference.”

Educational needs are chang-

Nurses union sticks to rejection
of government’s insurance offer

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE president of the Bahamas
Nurses Union is sticking to her
guns — the union has no plans to
reconsider its rejection of gov-
ernment’s insurance offer, she
says.

BNU president Cleola Hamil-
ton told The Tribune yesterday
that as far as she is aware there
are no further meetings sched-
uled with government represen-
tatives. She said she would “pre-
fer not to comment” any further
at this time as to what the union’s
next step may be in the continu-
ing dispute between the two par-
ties.

Ms Hamilton reiterated that in
the union’s view government’s
last proposal relating to insurance
coverage for the nurses is “no
offer at all.”

Hundreds of nurses called in
sick for over two weeks in June,
crippling the healthcare system,
after Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham announced in May that
the government “cannot afford”
to pay for (the nurses’) expected
$10.5 million health insurance this

HUBERT MINNIS

budget year.”

After sitting down to talk with
the union two weeks later, the
government said it could cover
the nurses for all “work-related”
sicknesses and injuries, provide
some private rooms for them to
be treated in at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital, and bring in their
insurance coverage by July 1,
2010, or before, if feasible.

Proposal

But Ms Hamilton said nurses
rejected that offer on the same
day it was made, and yesterday





dismissed Health Minister Hubert
Minnis’ call for the union to
reconsider the proposal before it
expires on Thursday.

She maintains that the aspect of
the proposal that commits the
government to cover the expense
of any work-related injuries goes
no further than what is already
available to workers under the
National Insurance Board.

This comes after Dr Minnis
said last week that he hopes the
nurses could “look at the situation
globally” in terms of the eco-
nomic challenges facing countries
the world over and review their
opposition to government’s offer.

Commenting on where the
BNU goes from here, Ms Hamil-
ton said, “we will have to see.”

She said she “will have to see
some stuff” before she can say
whether she feels that there is
anything else that can be done by
the union to cause government
to put another offer on the table.

The BNU’s counter-proposal
demands that government imple-
ment its insurance coverage this
year. The union said the cover-
age is critical given the risks that
nurses are exposed to in the
course of their daily duties.

Man, 28, charged with Bimini murder

A 28-year-old man charged
in connection with a murder on
Bimini last week was arraigned
in Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Police have charged Chrisco
Knowles of Seven Hills, with
the July 1 murder of Vernon
Rolle.

According to reports, Rolle
was stabbed to death during an
altercation with another man
around 5.35 pm on Wednesday.
Rolle was reportedly stabbed in
the stomach outside Sue and
Joy's Variety Store in Alice
Town, Bimini.

He was taken by private vehi-
cle to hospital for treatment
where he later died becoming
the country’s 38th murder victim

for the year. Knowles, who
appeared before Chief Magis-
trate Roger Gomez yesterday
with his left arm in a cast and
sling, was not required to enter
a plea to the murder charge.

He was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison.

The case was transferred to
Court 5, Bank Lane and
adjourned to July 14 for men-
tion.

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ing in a modern world and stu-
dents’ individual needs and abil-
ities must be catered to, Mr
Bethel said. He emphasised the
importance of vocational train-
ing required for some students
to excel, and the academic train-
ing other students require.

“TI believe the days of an
unscientific, ideology-driven,
‘one size fits all’ approach to
high school education must end,
and must end now,” Mr Bethel
said. “A child’s high school
should not be randomly decided
by which primary school he or
she attended, but rather should
reflect and cater to the child’s
educational inclination and indi-
vidual learning needs.”

Educators yesterday dis-
cussed the plan in groups and
will report on their recommen-
dations this morning.

They will then participate in
the election of officers and the
appointment of the three new
sub-committees. Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham will speak
at the closing of the summit this
afternoon.

TIZQYICN

Lia-Alexis Ritchie
represented
Bahamas at

‘leaders’ sumunit

LIA-ALEXIS Ritchie,
a St Andrews High
School student, was elect-
ed to represent the
Bahamas at the People-
to-People Leadership
Summit at Harvard Uni-
versity in Boston, which
was held last week Sun-
day, June 28, to Saturday,
July 4.

Ms Ritchie joined stu-
dents from around the
world to discuss issues
such as leadership, team
building, community ser-
vice, college admissions,
and professional aspira-
tions.

The Summit also
allowed students to work
on an action plan to make
a difference in their com-
munities and develop
skills that will help them
in becoming leaders in
tomorrow's world.

People-to-People was
founded by former presi-
dent Dwight D Eisenhow-
er during his presidency
in 1956. Its People-to-
People Ambassador pro-
grammes were set up to
fulfil President Eisenhow-
er's vision for fostering
world citizenship.





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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Bay Street needs to be revamped

THE PROBLEMS of Bay Street seem to
spin in a vicious circle. Merchants need business,
government has entered into a contract with
Carnival Cruise lines to guarantee 1.4 million
visitors a year to satisfy their needs — but it is
now up to merchants to lure these visitors off
their ships and on to shabby Bay Street.

Planning is underway for the redesign of
Bay Street, but in the meantime most Bay Street
shops need a good cleanup that can only be
done with a couple of coats of paint.

We can understand the reluctance of mer-
chants to expend such funds on their buildings
knowing that by the end of a week they will
again take on that grubby look from the exhaust
of the vehicular traffic — especially the large
buses — that daily choke the narrow street.

Before anything can be done to give Bay
Street a face-lift — if it’s only to wash the store
fronts — traffic has to be removed from what
used to be Nassau’s main shopping thorough-
fare. The removal of the unwieldy, exhaust-
puffing buses would be a good place to start.

Government has an agreement from Carni-
val to overnight in port. But how many cruise
passengers will leave their ships for an empty,
dismal Bay Street when entertainment is pro-
vided on board? This is something that mer-
chants will have to think about and plan for.
Special patrols will also have to be provided to
guarantee round-the-clock safety.

Government has brought visitors to mer-
chants’ doorsteps, it is now up to the merchants
to get them into their stores — but without
shopping, dining or clubs to liven up an after 5
o’clock Bay Street, there will be no evening
trade.

Whatever management committee is
appointed for Bay Street its members’ first
order of business should be to decide what stan-
dard and look they want for Bay Street. Colours
and shop designs that would detract from the
atmosphere that the majority are trying to
achieve should be discouraged. We recall when
many years ago there were regulations to main-
tain an attractive looking island with homes
and businesses painted in pastel shades — the
flamingo pink being the favourite. Today any-
thing goes with some of the most garish looking
colours imaginable.

The Bahamian flag fluttering from the top of
a flagstaff has its place, but the combination of
its colours when formed into decorative bunting
or streamers around buildings are an unfortu-
nate blend — rather than creating a joyful
mood, they look too funereal.

But that probably is a matter of personal
taste. However, if this is going to be the deco-

ration on state occasions, then professionals
should be consulted as to the colour buildings
should be painted so that when this bunting
goes up the effect will be dramatic rather than
drab.

However, there are points to commend as
government tries to create green spaces along
Bay Street.

The little park at Armstrong and East Bay
Streets has been greatly improved and with the
daily rains is blooming in beauty as is the Bay
and Mackey Street park, the Eastern Parade
and the disused Eastern Cemetery.

Atlantis has greatly improved the strip lead-
ing over the bridge to Paradise, but the chains
connecting the small posts constructed to keep
cars from running onto the greens have since
been smashed by an indifferent public.

A small team of workers will have to be
assigned to these parks for daily care if only to
protect them from the abuses of uncaring,
garbage-littering citizens. Motorists should also
be more careful about driving on the road pro-
vided for them and not run up onto curbs dam-
aging them and cracking the sidewalks.

It is ashame that an historic landmark oppo-
site the Eastern Parade is being allowed to
crumble for lack of care. Early in the last cen-
tury it was at this landing ramp that Pan Amer-
ican Airways with its seaplanes introduced the
Bahamas to the age of aviation and from which
many an international celebrity stepped ashore.
This is where the late Eugene Dupuch, QC, for
whom the Eugene Dupuch Law Library is
named, as a young teenager conducted his first
interview for The Tribune. Himself an accom-
plished pianist, young Eugene was delighted to
quiz Irving Berlin.

In the early days this building was painted
white with black trim. In later years it was
repainted in PanAm’s colours — white with
blue trim. Most people preferred the original
colours of black and white.

In later years the building was taken over by
the Traffic Department and rapidly started to
decline for lack of maintenance. Today it has
been totally abandoned.

It is in such a bad state that it should either be
restored as a small museum with the early his-
tory of PanAm and the delivery of mail and
the first airline-borne tourists, or it should be
torn down.

But to be allowed to stand in its present state
detracts from the present beauty of the Eastern
Parade on the opposite side of the road.

If we are to have an attractive island all
Bahamians from every walk of life will have to
participate in its upkeep.



Growing the
economic
pie will help
the poor

LETTERS

RE: Avid Reader and "the
middle road between the
extremes of capitalism and
socialism"

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thanks to Avid Reader for
having written again to suggest
there are benefits to "the middle
road between the extremes of
capitalism and socialism" telling
us that he or she seeks that "elu-
sive Utopia where capitalism
with a human face resides".

One would say both major
political parties here are some-
where between capitalists and
socialists, using the mixed econ-
omy economic model, and the
country does not appear to
function very well in numerous
areas as Avid Reader pointed
out a couple weeks back.

But neither capitalism or
socialism has a "human face".
As Ludwig von Mises tells us, in
economics there is "Human
Action".

Put another way, Adam
Smith, the "father of econom-
ics," said that: "Jt is not from
the benevolence of the butcher,
the brewer, or the baker, that we
expect our dinner, but from their
regard to their own interest. We
address ourselves, not to their
humanity but to their self-love,
and never talk to them of our
necessities but of their advan-
tages" (The Wealth of Nations,
Book I Chapter IT).

And this Human Action, as
described by Smith, is the cen-
tral point of The Nassau Insti-
tute’s position.

Avid Reader then suggests
that the state should take care
of us in times of need.

Many of us, (including Avid
Reader), complain about gov-
ernment and the grief it causes,
albeit unintentionally. Yet he

letters@tribunemedia net



or she calls on them to fix the
things they already control by
doing more. What makes us
believe that they will succeed
in "helping" us this time with
further government initiatives
like unemployment insurance?
Particularly when it is in essence
another Ponzi Scheme that will
leave future generations worse
off.

Recognise that unemploy-
ment premiums paid by both
employers and employees is a
tax on labour. The premium
deduction for employers is a
cost that must be passed on to
consumers. For the employed
person it is a reduction of
income. Also harmful, it creates
dependency over time, and a
disincentive to find employ-
ment. The cost of a new gov-
ernment bureaucracy with its
attendant inefficiencies and pos-
sible corruption has to be paid
for. Tax increases inevitably fol-
low.

Any right thinking person is
concerned about helping the
less fortunate, but history shows
us that this is more easily
accomplished by growing the
economic pie with sensible eco-
nomic policy than with policies
that destroy wealth. Policies
such as those offered by wel-
fare states, or those that pre-
vent people opening a business
or high taxes, etc, that discour-
age the entrepreneur and
reduce economic growth.

Witness the many private
trusts in the United States that
are established by wealthy peo-
ple to assist others because of
their ability to grow the eco-

nomic pie. Locally we can refer
to many Bahamians who have
been able to succeed and there-
by grow the economic pie and
in the process give to local char-
ities and individuals in need.

The letter writer also seems
to suggest that our policy rec-
ommendations are limited to
Dr. Milton Friedman.

Having read various books
and articles by economists like
John Maynard Keynes, Milton
Friedman, Friedrich Hayek,
Ludwig von Mises, Thomas
Sowell, Lawrence Reed, Arthur
Seldon and numerous others,
we have come to the conclusion
that with economic policy it is
not whether a public (govern-
ment) policy comes from the
left or right that should matter.
What is of paramount impor-
tance is if the prescribed policy
is right or wrong, or works or
does not work. A quick read we
would highly recommend for
Avid Reader is Henry Hazlit-
t's Economics in One Lesson.

Is the Free Market or Capi-
talism perfect? Of course not.
But, it has brought more people
out of poverty than any other
economic system.

Finally, Avid Reader sug-
gests once more that we are
resistant to change and want to
preserve the status quo.

Please be assured Avid
Reader, The Nassau Institute
and our membership are all
about changing the status quo
and our web site

(http://www. nassauinstitute.org

> ) is a growing testament to

the changes we advocate in
favour of the Free Market.

RICK LOWE

Vice President,

The Nassau Institute,
June 27, 2009.

Looking at cruise ship business decline

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Tam concerned.

We are paying how much to
dredge the Harbour to allow
cruise ships to be here for short-
er periods of time with restau-
rants and shops open on board?

The primary reason for ships
to come to the Bahamas is
because dumping garbage here
is cheaper than doing it in the
USA, and to visit their own pri-



vate Cays where they sell their
own Made in China souvenirs
and staff the island with non
Bahamians. We allow ships to
dump their garbage here when
we cannot adequately dispose
of garbage generated by our
population.

There is still no Straw Market
(which I can assure you is not
“World Famous” for the rea-
sons we would like), and it
seems that every morning I dri-
ve through Bay Street it looks
shabbier and shops are getting
fewer. Tour operators will be
an endangered species once
ships stop in Nassau so briefly
that there is no time to do

excursions except on the Cay
owned by who...the cruise ship
company!

Currently the Government
owes the cruise ship association
millions of dollars in rebates for
bringing people here, even if
those people have never left the
boat in Nassau, or even if the
boat does not dock at all!

So I ask, how much does it
actually cost all of us who live
here for others to have a vaca-
tion on a cruise ship in the
Bahamas?

S APPLETON
Nassau,
July, 2009.

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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALBERT SAINTRE
of MINI STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 30° day of June, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

=e
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

ESSAY COMPETITION

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Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

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High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
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The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
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Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

Public Advisory

The public is advised that due to the
LPIA Expansion Project, the
entrance road laading to the US
Departures tenminal will be recdhuoed
to one lane of vehicular traffic
commencing an Thursday, July
2, 2009 until further notice. Please
observe any traffic directions and
signage while driving along the
entrance road.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

HAPPY INDEPENDENCE BAHAMAS

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
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Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.

We apologize for any inconvenience
caused,


THE TRIBUNE

president keeping tight-lipped

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Bahamas Bar
Association president Wayne
Munroe is remaining tight-
lipped about the reasons
behind his decision not to run
for re-election and reports
that his law partnership with
Elliott Lockhart is to be dis-
solved.

Asked yesterday to com-
ment on why he did not run
for the position of Bar Presi-
dent for a fourth time in the
June 26 elections, Mr Munroe
said that his decision was in
part down to the fact that he
had already served on the bar
council for around a decade.

Served

“IT was president for six
years, vice president for four.
I may have even been on the
council before but I definitely
served on the bar council for
at least 10 years,” said the
lawyer.

However, he noted that also
playing a part in the his deter-
mination not to stand again
was “something” which he has
to “pay close attention to in
the next 12 to 18 months”.

“T thought it was appropri-
ate to pay close attention to
that,” said Mr Munroe,

adding that the matter is not
something he “can openly dis-
cuss”.

He added that the presi-
dency of the BBA — now held
by Ruth Bowe-Darville — is
an unpaid position which
nonetheless “takes a lot of
time, dedication and devo-
tion.”

Post

Upon winning the presi-
dency, former vice president
of the BBA Mrs Bowe-
Darville revealed that Mr
Munroe had initially indicated
his intention to run again for
the top post.

However, she said he
withdrew from the running
several days prior to the elec-
tion.

Over the past few weeks,
reports have surfaced which
suggest that Mr Munroe’s 12
year law partnership with
Elliott Lockhart, who recent-
ly returned to the firm after a
stint as a judge, is to be dis-
solved.

Mr Munroe started work-
ing for Mr Lockhart in 1990
and partnered with him to
form the well-known and suc-
cessful firm in 1997.

When asked about the
claims, Mr Lockhart did not
confirm or deny them. He
declined to comment on the

Govt soliciting bids
to repair Acklins’
Queen’s Highway

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net

AFTER years of com-
plaints from Acklins resi-
dents, government has start-
ed soliciting bids to repair
the island’s Queen’s High-
way.

MP for the
island Alfred
Gray yester-
day said the
news that the
“almost
impassable”
thoroughfare
will be
addressed “is
a step in the
right direc-
tion.”

But he
urged that the
work must be done “with
urgency.”

Residents have described
the road as being in a
“deplorable” state — a blight
on the island’s attractiveness
as a tourist destination and a
burden on the pockets of
islanders who regularly send
off to Nassau for parts to
repair their rattled cars.

The people of Acklins
have had to endure their
hopes of an improvement to
the road being dashed on
more than one occasion.

A $3.4 million contract
signed in September 2006 to
pave the route — which res-
idents say was “scraped” in
1996 but never repaved —
was cancelled by the govern-
ment after the May 2007
election.

Former FNM Works Min-
ister Earl Deveaux told par-
liament the contract was
awarded without competitive
bidding and that prior to its
cancellation there was con-
cern over whether it would
be completed.

Yesterday, Mr Gray wel-
comed the government’s
decision to put out to tender
the contract to finally repair
Queen’s Highway and pro-
vide periodical maintenance
of the 32.3 mile, two-lane
road.

Contractors are being
invited to bid up until
August 14, 2009 to carry out
the patching and sealing
maintenance of around
290,000 square yards of the
road, the replacement of the
base course layer and the
placement of a new surface
seal on about 100,000 square
yards of the road.

Alfred Gray



The work is to be funded
by the Bahamas government
and the Ninth European
Development Fund.

matter when contacted a
week ago.

When questioned about the
reports yesterday, Mr Munroe





also refused to confirm or
deny them, stating that he
cannot respond “at this
point”.

a SESSA









































7 or ‘
— gi : = a en,

FLOODING IN THE STREETS of Downtown Nassau posed a

challenge for these pedestrians yesterday following heavy rain in the

afternoon.

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TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 , PAGE 5

Former Bahamas Bar Association Benicio del foro pays visit

to Puerto Rico prison

| BAYAMON, Puerto Rico

ACTOR BENICIO DEL

: TORO met with convicts
i inside a Puerto Rican
? prison Monday, offering
: encouragement to a jail-
: house theater group and a
i few tips from his own
? Oscar-winning
i according to Associated
i Press.

career,

The Puerto Rico-born

? actor interrupted his vaca-
: tion in the U.S. Caribbean
i territory for the talk at
? Bayamon Regional Prison
? outside the capital, San
: Juan.

"I believe everyone needs

a second chance," del Toro
: told about 30 inmates who
; take part in the theater

there is life, you can still
help society in some way,
you can improve yourself."

He encouraged the
inmates to read as part of
their rehabilitation, saying
reading has been crucial to
his own growth as an actor.

The inmates performed a
sketch for the actor and
thanked him for coming.

"It's a great thing to be
able to share with an artist
who is famous, who has
been making movies in
Hollywood," said Carlos
Baez Figueroa, 39, who is
in prison for murder.

Del Toro won a support-
ing actor Oscar for his role
in the movie "Traffic" and
starred in last year's "Che,"
a film biography of Latin

i group. "I am here to help
: reaffirm that as long as

Butler's Funeral Homes

Che Guevara.

& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sits.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR

Patrick James Jacobs, 52

of Mt. Pleasant will be
held on Thursday July
09, 2009 at 10:00a.m. at
St. Cecilia’s Catholic
Church, Third and
Fourth Streets, Coconut
Grove. Officiating will
be Fr. Simeon Roberts.

He is survived by his

mother, Patricia

Campbell; two

daughters, Jacqueline

Jacobs, of New York and

Chantal Jacobs of London, England; three

grandsons, Joshua and Isaac of London and Camron

of New York; two sisters, Ann Bease and Amber

Jacobs; two brothers, Jack and Mark Isaacs; one

brother-in-law, Bob Bease; seven aunts, Thelma

Ford , Virginia Campbell, Madeline Campbell, Corine

I Phil, Marsha Bowe, Maria Campbell, Peggy

Campbell Bethel; six uncles, Eugene , Edward,

George and Anthony Campbell, Eugene Iphill and

Clinton Bowe; three nieces, Angelica , Anna and

Mari; four nephews, Jamie, John Pierre, Yarrow and

Abel and a host of cousins and other relatives and
friends too numerous to mention.




In lieu of flowers the family has requested that
donations be made to St. Cecilia’s Catholic
Church, Third and Fourth Streets, Coconut
Grove, P. O. Box N 8187, Nassau, Bahamas in his
memory.

Funeral arrangements are being handled by
Butlers’ Funeral Homes and Crematorium, Ernest
and York Streets.

Funeral Service for
Harriet Ophelia Cartwright, 78

of Hawthorne Road and
formerly of Cartwright’s
, Long Island will be
held on Wednesday July
08, 2009 at 400p.m. at
St. Matthew’s Anglican
Church, Shirley and
Church Streets.
Officiating will be
Venerable Keith N.
Cartwright; assisted by
Rev’d Dr. James B.
Moultrie and Rev’d Don
Haynes. Cremation will follow.

She is survived by one adopted son; Terrance, three
grand children; Roxanna of Fort Worth, Texas, T.
Kirk and Gavin Cartwright, her brothers; Lacton,
Michael, Calvin “Gus” and Thalburg “T.C”
Cartwright; sisters, Lucy Cartwright and Katherine
Treco; brothers-in-law, Thomas Treco, Mitchell
and Emery Cartwright; sisters-in-law, Beryl, Verona,
Eva, Ellerith and Ovina Cartwright, Lillian “Lilla”
Knowles and Thelma “Tally” Burrows; fourty-three
nephews, fourty- eight nieces, one hundred and
fourty-nine grand nephews, one hundred and
thirty-one grand nieces, numerous great-grand
nephews and nieces and many other relatives and
friends including, Father Earnest Pratt, Patricia
“Pat” Knowles and Deborah Cartwright; Care givers,
Mrs. Francis Ledee, Mrs. Shirley Miller and the staff
of The Persis Rodgers Home for the Aged, Members
of St. John’s, Buckley’s, Long Island and the People
of Cartwright’s, Long Island.

The family would like for those planning on attending
the service of Mrs. Cartwright to wear only bright
summer colours, no black white, navy blue or dark
colours.

In lieu of flowers the family has requested that
donations be made to the Persis Rodgers Home
for The Aged on Hawthorne Road P.O. Box N
7350, Nassau, Bahamas.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’
Funeral Homes and Crematorium

at Ernest and York Streets on Wednesday July
08, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. until 2:30p.m. There
will be no viewing at the church.

American revolutionary
PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Bill Clinton
making first
Haiti visit as
UN envoy

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti

BILL CLINTON aims to refo-
cus international attention on this i

Caribbean country's deep eco-
nomic problems and environ-

mental decay during his first visit i
as the United Nations’ special }

envoy to Haiti, according to Asso-
ciated Press.
The former U.S. president,

who is expected to meet with :
Haitian President Rene Preval }

and visit hurricane-battered areas,

is lending his prestige to the plight :
of the poorest nation inthe West- }

ern Hemisphere as world atten-

tion has shifted to the global i
financial crisis and other trouble }

spots.

United Nations said.
The three-day visit will be Clin-

ton's second to Haiti this year. :
He toured Port-au-Prince with

UN. Secretary-General Ban Ki-

moon, recording artist Wyclef :
Jean and others in March, before :

Ban named him to the newly cre-
ated post in May.

Clinton spoke at a Haiti donors i

conference at the Inter-Ameri-
can Development Bank in Wash-

ington in April that generated

$324 million in aid pledges.

As U.N. envoy, his aims i

include investment and job cre-

ation, particularly by expanding

garment factories that export to

the United States, and repairing

Haiti's severe deforestation.

Those priorities were laid out :
in a 19-page report to Ban by :
Oxford University professor Paul}
Collier in January that was }

praised by Preval and other lead-
ers.
But the report has been criti-

cized by lawmakers and other

Haitians who see the garment fac-

tories as havens for exploitative i
labor. Workers in the factories }
make a minimum salary of $1.72a

day, though some are paid more.
A bill passed by Haiti's parlia-

ment to raise the daily minimum }
wage to $5.14 was rejected by }
Preval, contributing to frustra- i
tions that have fueled street
protests and kept most voters
away from the polls during last :

month's Senate elections.

Fai Super
' Specia

Year-e
Only while supple

He was scheduled to arrive late
Monday, but no public events }
were planned until Tuesday, the i

Encouragement for
_CC Sweeting graduates

GRADUATES of CC Sweeting Senior
High School have been encouraged to
attend the Bahamas Technical and Voca-
tional Institute where they will soon be

able to obtain associate degrees.

Ministry of Education Permanent Sec-
retary Elma Garraway congratulated the
Class of 2009 during the graduation cere-
mony at the Holy Trinity activity centre
on June 17. She told them that they are

mas.

the only graduating class in the public

school system where most of the gradu-
ates have skills they can take into the work-
place or use to open their own businesses.
She told the graduates to dream big and
work their way from “rags to riches.”
Head girl Nadia McQuay was presented
the Valedictorian Award and Jermaine
Tucker was given the Salutorian Award
and named Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity’s

2009 Valedictorian.

YOUNG writers in the Fam-
ily Islands were awarded lap-
top computers when announced
winners of the annual Temple-
ton Foundation “Laws of Life’
essay competition.

Bernique Pinder, a grade 11
pupil at Crooked Island High
School, and Justin Jack, a grade
eight student at South Andros
High School, were selected
from more than 80 entrants who
wrote on the subjects, “If you
don’t use it, you'll lose it” and
“Crime doesn’t pay.”

Bernique wrote on the first
subject, citing a Biblical story
in the Gospel of St Luke, and
the tale of American bridge
builder John Roebling who was
left brain damaged in a con-
struction accident and yet con-
tinued to build the bridge from
New York City to Long Island,
completing it 13 years after
starting it.

Justin perceptively tackled
the difficult subject of murder
and showed how it affects the
families of both the victim and
the perpetrator as children who
lose a parent to murder also
lose hope and financial security,
while those whose parents
have committed murder are
scarred with the stigma of the
crime.

Education Minister Carl

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Bethel praised the Family
Island students for their work,
and said it was a sign of an
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More than 100 students at the ceremony
received awards in addition to their diplo-

The humanities award went to Nicholas
Rose for the selfless support he showed
his friend Deniro LaFrenier, by helping
him to class during his three years at CC
Sweeting. Deniro is unable to walk.

Deniro was presented with a motorised
wheelchair by the graduating class.

MRS. ELMA GARRAWAY, Permanent Sec-
retary in the Ministry of Education told the
graduating class of C. C. Sweeting Senior
High that they have the distinction of being
the only graduating class in the entire pub-
lic school system where most of its gradu-
ates have the skills that will enable to go
into the workplace or to open their own

businesses.

young men working towards a
brighter future.

Speaking in a prize-giving
ceremony at the Sheraton Nas-
sau Beach Resort he said finan-
cial cutbacks made by the edu-
cation department this year do
not mean children will fall
behind, as long as parents are
supportive and encourage their
studies.

John Templeton Jr said his
father would have been proud
of the students’ work.

The late Sir John Templeton
founded the “Laws of Life”

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ae

BAHAMAS Asgricultural
and Industrial Corporation’s
domestic investment officer
Alphonso Smith was honoured
by the All-Andros and Berry
Islands Regatta Committee for
“dedicated services to the com-
munity.”

BAIC executive chairman
Edison Key hailed him as “a
North Androsian extraordi-
naire,” one who has given dis-
tinguished and unblemished
service to all the Bahamas.

“As our domestic invest-
ment officer for North Andros,
Mr Smith is forever coming up
with ideas and suggestions to
improve the quality of life for
North Androsians,” he said
during a banquet last weekend.

Mr Smith held positions with
the Water and Sewerage Cor-

Oe eb





















PICTURED L-R (FRONT ROW) ARE: Mrs. Mena Griffith, Templeton Foun-
dation; Mrs. Leanora Archer, Deputy Director of Education; Pastor Allan
Lee, Calvary Bible Church; Mrs. Elma Garraway, Permanent Secretary, Min-
istry of Education, Dr. John Templeton Jr. and Mrs. John Templeton.

BACK ROW: Edward Moss, Bishop Michael Eldon High School; Myr-
keeva Johnson, Doris Johnson High School; Toi Johnson, Queen’s College;
Admad Pratt, Queen’s College; Justin Jack, Junior Winner, South Andros
High School; Bernique Pinder, Crooked High School, Senior Winner;
Morgan Adderley, Queen’s College and Tanisha Adderley, L. W. Young

Junior High School.

essay competition in the 1990's,
and although it was inactive for
a time it has now been
relaunched in cooperation with

the Ministry of Education.
Runners-up were awarded

digital cameras, I-pod music

players and cash prizes.






ALPHONSO SMITH (left), honoured for his community service, is

presented with an award of appreciation from the North Andros and
Berry Islands Regatta Committee. Also pictured from right are Don-
na Pickstock and Darnell Evans.

poration and Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation, served on
the town planning committee,
and was one of the organisers
of the Bahamas Games.

In 1988, the now retired
senior administrator Everette

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Hart formed the first North
Andros Sailing Club and it was
through Mr Smith that organ-
ised sailing became established
on the island.

From three boats in Conch
Sound to an entire fleet of
native sloops in Morgan’s Bluff,
the North Andros and Berry
Islands Regatta has become an
important fixture on the regat-
ta calendar.

From regatta commodore
and chairman, Mr Smith was
elected as member of local gov-
ernment and served as chief
councillor for three consecu-
tive terms.

He is founder of the North
Andros Sea Food Splash and
the Red Bays Snapper Tour-
nament and Cultural Festival.

Said senior deputy adminis-
trator Dr Huntley Christie:
“There’s no other person at this
time who deserves this recog-
nition for his hard work, com-
mitment and sense of duty.”

A priest warden at St Mar-
garet’s and St Mary Mag-
dalene’s in North Andros, Mr
Smith is married to Andrea
Smith. He is the father of eight
children.

He is also an avid backyard
farmer.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009, PAGE 7



The Church and ‘playing numbers’

By REV DR EMMETTE WEIR

I: APPEARS as if there is
a widespread impression
that the Church is strongly
opposed to the idea of legaliza-
tion of the informal Bahamian
national lottery, commonly
known as “playing numbers” or
simply “numbers”!

Yes, according to this under-
standing of the contemporary sit-
uation, there are many in this
nation in all walks of life who
would like to see “the playing of
numbers” become legal, but they
are reluctant to take steps to
bring about this change because
the Church is so strongly opposed
to it. Yet, when the situation is
carefully examined, it can be stat-
ed that “nothing can be farther
from the truth!”

As a matter of fact, there are at
least four responses to the legal-
izing of “numbers” within the
Christian community in the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas. It is
therefore, appropriate to discuss
them with a view to coming up
with a more balanced and fair
assessment of the Church's teach-
ing with regard to legalizing
“numbers.” But first, a brief com-
ment on the Biblical and theo-
logical issues in the case of the
Christian teaching on gambling,
for, as will be demonstrated, it
informs the teaching and prac-
tice of the various denominations
of the church with regard to
legalizing “numbers.”

Here it is germane to note that
there are, indeed, certain moral
precepts which are clearly and
unequivocally decreed in the
major moral codes of the Bible
— the Ten Commandments
(Exodus 20) and the Sermon on
the Mount (Matthew 5-7). These
include the total rejection of idol-
atry, commanding respect for
parents, respect for life, respect
for the property of others, the
sanctity of the vows of matrimo-
ny, the condemnation of lying
and the condemnation of cov-
etousness. All Christians recog-
nize the authority and validity of
these moral precepts, and,
indeed, they are observed by
adherents of all the world's pre-
dominant religions, for there is
an amazing unity amongst people
of all the major religions of
humankind when it comes to
these fundamental ethical prin-
ciples. There are, however, other
moral issues on which the teach-
ing of the Bible is not so clear.
One of these certainly is “gam-
bling.” Or, to put it another way,
whereas the major ethical prohi-
bitions are prefaced by the cate-
gorical “Thou Shalt Not” — for
example “thou shalt not steal,”
“thou shalt not kill (murder),”
“thou shalt not commit adultery,”
etc, nowhere is it decreed: “Thou
shalt not gamble!”

Thus the Rev. Alfred T.
Thompson, who incidentally, sup-
ports the idea of the national lot-
tery, in the “Guest Commentary”
published in The Freeport News
on Monday, June 22, correctly
sums up the Biblical position:

“As a Biblical student, I have
researched the scriptures from
Genesis to Revelation and have
not found anything against gam-
bling. However, references are
made about gambling, such as I
Timothy 6:10 and Ecclesiastics
5:10 which include scriptures on
the love and greed of money,
respectively. Therefore, the Bible
does not indicate any wrong with
gambling as long as it is done in
moderation.

Now, since the teaching of the
Bible on gambling is not clear-
cut, then it follows logically that
the attitude and teaching of a
particular Christian denomina-
tion must be based on theological
grounds. Concisely, the Biblical
scholars and theologians of a
Christian body have to come to a
moral position on gambling on
the basis of principles gleaned
from the interpretation of rele-
vant texts from the Bible, its the-
ological propositions and history.

For instance, the Methodist
Church has been consistent in
taking a strong stand against
gambling, as a matter of historical
fact and took the lead in oppos-
ing the introduction of casinos
by the late Sir Stafford Sands as a
means of boosting tourism. As
such, raffles are prohibited in its
fund raising programmes. This is
precisely because the Methodist
Church, on the basis of “the Law
of love” in the teaching of Jesus
(Mark 12:28-32) and John Wes-
ley's seminal sermon on the use
of money, hold tenaciously to the
teaching that gambling is moral-
ly wrong. It is held that gambling,
or as some prefer “gaming” is
wrong because in any such game,
in order for a person to gain
something, then his or her neigh-
bour must lose.

On the other hand, the moral
theologians of the Roman
Catholic Church, interpreting the
texts of Holy Scripture from the
perspective of the concept of
Natural Law, as expounded in
the works of its leading theolo-
gian, St. Thomas Aquinas, hold
to a much more “liberal” posi-
tion on gambling. Hence in the
case of Catholicism, the holding
of raffles and bingo games are
practised as important, legitimate
methods of raising money for the

mission of the Church. It is clear,
then, that there is no consensus
amongst Christians when it
comes to the matter of gambling.
This, then inevitably impacts
upon the respective attitudes of
Christian bodies and clergyper-
sons when the matter at stake
here is considered — “the pros
and cons” of legalizing the infor-
mal Bahamian lottery numbers.

Now, it has been asserted that
there are at least four responses
to this burning moral issue with-
in the vast Christian community
in the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. With the caveat
already discussed, it is now
appropriate to discuss them,
albeit rather briefly and in a cur-
sory, rather than detailed man-
ner.

First and foremost. There are
those Christian bodies and cler-
gypersons who are uncompro-
mising in their opposition to
legalizing numbers. Indeed, sev-
eral leading clergypersons of this
grouping have spoken out loud
and clear in stating their strong
opposition to any attempt to
legalize “the playing of num-
bers.”

Most outspoken in their oppo-
sition in this regard are that
young dynamic duo, Pastor Lyall
Bethel of Grace Community
Church, and Pastor Cedric Moss
of Kingdom Life Church. Like-
wise, Pastor Leonard Johnson,
President of the Bahamas Con-
ference of the Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, the Rev. Dr.
William Thompson, outgoing
President of the huge Bahamas
Baptist Missionary & Educa-
tional Convention, Bishop John
Humes of the Church of God,
The Rev. William “Bill” Higgs,
President of the Bahamas Con-
ference of the Methodist Church,
Bishop Elgarnet Rahming, Pres-
ident of the Church of God of
Prophecy, and Bishop the Rev.
Dr. Raymond Neilly, President
of the Bahamas Turks and Caicos
Islands Conference of the
Methodist Church in the
Caribbean and the Americas,
have all come out in opposing
the legalizing of numbers. By the
same token, Pastor Anthony

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Grant of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, has also declared strong
opposition to it. Likewise the
Rev. Patrick Paul, President of
the influential Bahamas Christian
Council, after making a_state-
ment that was interpreted by
some as being not-too-veiled sup-
port of the concept of legalizing
numbers, quickly clarified his
position in joining with his min-
isterial colleagues in condemn-
ing the idea of moving in that
direction.

Evidently then, there is a large
and influential body of Christian
denominations and leading cler-
gypersons who are strongly
opposed to legalizing numbers
and any move in that direction
would, inevitably come up
against the challenge of this pow-
erful and influential segment of
the Church.

Secondly, there are those who
have come to the conclusion that
the way ahead

is to hold a referendum. They
are plainly aware of the fact that
the present situation, in which
the playing of numbers is illegal,
yet is practised openly by
Bahamians from all walks of life,
is clearly untenable, unbearable,
and, indeed unethical.

As declared in another arti-
cle in the media, this writer is at
one with those who believe that
the people should be given an
opportunity to express their opin-
ion. Concisely, that there should
be a period of open discussion in
every forum from the House of
Assembly, to discussions in the
barber shops, in which the pros
and cons are debated. Then, the
matter should be put to the vote.
It is submitted that such an
approach would be in keeping
with the concept of democracy,
which is one of the three princi-
ples enshrined in our Constitu-
tion, the others being Christiani-
ty and the rule of Law. Indeed, it
can be argued with a fair degree
of cogency, that the holding of a
referendum is in line with all
three principles upon which this
nation was established.

This writer is by no means
alone. A number of clergyper-
sons are in favour of it. the Rev.

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Henry Francis, for instance, an
executive officer of Bahamas
Faith Ministries, has long held
that a referendum would be the
best way of dealing with this mat-
ter. Interestingly enough, Rev.
Francis is strongly of the convic-
tion that should such a referen-
dum be held, those opposed to
legalizing numbers would pre-
vail.

Who dares suggest that he is
under a delusion? If anything,
events in recent years in our
region have demonstrated that

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Thirdly, there are those with-
in the Christian fold who appear
to give tacit support to the idea of
legalizing numbers. They cer-
tainly have not been forthright
in apposing such an idea. Nor
have they clearly stated that they
are in favour of such a develop-
ment. While not reading too
much into their silence on this
now highly controversial and
essentially complex burning issue,
it may be inferred that they see

nothing morally wrong with legal-
izing numbers. The adage is rel-
evant here, “silence gives con-
sent”!

Finally, there are those cler-
gypersons who are very strong in
supporting the idea of legalizing
numbers. While this writer has
had occasion to speak to cler-
gypersons who are in favour of
legalizing numbers, he can state
without fear of contradiction that
the most outspoken, and indeed,

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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mother, children i

FROM page one

cle back towards her home in |

the Eastern Road area.
What happens next, haga

ever, breaks the trend of what }

is normally seen from crimi-
nals in these circumstances. }
The kidnapper at this point }
allegedly stopped the vehicle :
when he got within a relative- }
ly near distance of the home :

and fled the scene on foot,

leaving the mother and her i

two children inside.

However, police who are }
investigating this matter :
believe that the man may }
have had a “get away” car i

waiting nearby.

Investigations into this mat-

ter continue.

UN Council condemns:
North Korea missiles

UNITED NATIONS

THE UN. Security Council on
Monday condemned North Kore- }
a’s recent firing of seven ballistic ;
missiles on U.S. Independence }
Day, the reclusive country’s biggest
display of firepower in three years, }

according to Associated Press.

Uganda U.N. Ambassador :
Ruhakana Rugunda, who holds }
the 15-member council’s rotating
presidency, said the council mem- }
bers “condemned and expressed :
grave concern” at the missile
launches, which violated UN. res- }
olutions and “pose a threat to i
regional and international securi- }

ty.”

said.

olutions.

Security Council members
agreed that Pyongyang “must com- }
ply fully with its obligations” under }

the resolutions, Rugunda said.

The North’s missile tests aggra- i
vated tensions that were already :
high after its May 25 underground :

nuclear test blast.

The council punished the North }
after its May nuclear test with a
resolution and tough sanctions }
clamping down on alleged trading }
of banned arms and weapons-relat- :
ed material, including authorizing ;

searches of suspect ships.




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Knife found next to body of
Har! Taylor exhibited in court

FROM page one

ten House on West Hill Street, had sus-
tained some 42 to 50 injuries, according
to the prosecution.

Detective Constable Jermaine Stubbs,
a crime scene investigator, told the court
that around 9.50 am on Sunday, Novem-
ber 18, 2007, while on duty at the Crim-
inal Records Office, he received infor-
mation from Detective Inspector Bona-
by. As a result went with several other
officers to Mountbatten House on West
Hill Street. He told the court that after
receiving further information from
Detective Inspector Bonaby at the
scene, he entered the building. Consta-
ble Stubbs told the court that he

observed in the eastern portion of the
living room, a large pool of blood and
blood dripping from the ceiling above
the area. He told the court that he then
went upstairs and saw bloodstains on
the railing of the staircase.

Constable Stubbs testified that in
the upstairs hallway, which ran east to
west, he observed bloody foot and shoe
sole prints. He also told the court that in
the upstairs bedroom, he observed the
lifeless body of a male lying face up in
the bed in a pool of blood, with wounds
to the upper chest. He told the court
that the male was clad in a pair of white
underwear and that a broken, silver
blade knife was also on the bed near

court that he observed blood stains
throughout the room and noted that the
displacement of furniture in the room
suggested that there had been a struggle.

Constable Stubbs also told the court
that the bloody shoe and footprints also
led to the bathroom, where he observed
blood on a soap dish and blood on a tile
next to the face bowl. Stubbs also told
the court that he collected 47 items from
the scene, including several swabs of
blood that he handed over to the police
forensic laboratory on November 24,
2007. The broken knife blade and han-
dle were exhibited in court yesterday
and submitted in evidence.

During cross-examination by defence
attorney Murrio Ducille, Constable

Stubbs told the court that the items that
he had retrieved from the scene were
kept in a locker at the Criminal Records
Office until he handed them over to the
police forensic laboratory. He also
admitted that he had made no mention
of the bloody shoe and footprints lead-
ing to the bathroom in his notes.

Detective Inspector Rochelle Dele-
veaux told the court yesterday that on
November 30, 2007, she received from
Detective Corporal 2313 Francis, blood
swabs and other items that she inspect-
ed and prepared to be forwarded to a
lab for DNA analysis.

The trial, which is being heard before
Senior Justice Anita Allen, continues

The council will continue to }
closely monitor the situation and is }
committed to a “peaceful, diplo- :
matic and political solution,” he

On Saturday, North Korea fired :
missiles into the ocean off its east :
coast in violation of three U.N. res- :

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Missing US woman

could be murder
victim found in sheet



FROM page one

“distinctive” tattoo across the lower back area, police reported.
Clothed in blue jeans and a green top, the victim is thought to

have been dead for at least a week but to have only been placed in

the location where her body was found on Friday night or Saturday

morning.

Yesterday Supt Moss said the cause of death in the case has yet
to be confirmed, but investigators expect to move a step closer to
determining this when a doctor examines the body today.

Police are exploring the possibility that the victim may have

suffered a sexual attack.

Despite linking the death with the missing person reports, he
added that no one had yet been called into formally identify the
woman’s body as police are still completing their preliminary

investigations.

“We’re trying to identify a couple of things before we call anyone.

Hopefully we will make contact (today),”

said Moss.

the body. Constable Stubbs told the

THE body of the victim was found in this area.

today.



Psychologist warns over teacher-student boundary infractions

FROM page one

happens.

“You see them standing
outside your office. They
will try to hold your hand.
They will stay there and
almost beg you for some

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connection because they feel
a hole in their soul,” Dr
Allen said.

The eminent psychiatrist
went further to explain that
teachers of today cannot
continue in the actions that
were acceptable in the past,

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such as offering rides to
their students, or even acting
as a concerned ear when
these students are facing
challenges at home or in
their personal life.
“Teachers are responsible
for their colleagues and no
longer can they sit by and
watch what unfolds and say I
can’t get involved. In fact if
you see something and don’t
report it you can get blamed
as well. And think of your
own child and remember
that this incubation period
is about four to five years

and people see things.

“In all the cases I’ve dealt
with around the world,
somebody knows. The kids
know, the teachers know,
some parents know, but the
twine would never come
together to talk. The cult of
silence produces a silent
scream as people’s lives are
destroyed. Instead of the
place being an edifice for
development it is a cauldron
of destruction,” he said.

Dr Allen also cited the
work of Dorothy Lewis at
Yale who studied 14 men

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who committed multiple
murders. In her findings, it
was discovered that all of
the men were sexually
abused, some of them hav-
ing plungers inserted into
their rectum.

“They were abused by
their uncles, neighbours,
what have you. There is a
powerful connection
between sexual abuse and
teenage murder and the
murder situation in our
country. That is why we
must get at it. This is noth-
ing to play with,” he said.

The Church
and ‘playing
numbers’
FROM page seven

bold of this group is the Rev.
Alfred T. Thompson. In the arti-
cle written by this Minister of the
Gospel, he puts forward a num-
ber of arguments in favour of
such a proposal. Omitting, or
rather, ignoring the serious moral
objections raised by clergymen
of the first group, he takes the
line that the legalizing of num-
bers would provide money for
education and social pro-
grammes. And, as pointed out
above, he makes much of the fact
that the teaching of the Bible on
gambling is not as clear-cut as it is
on other moral issues.

What, then can we say about
the Church's position on legaliz-
ing numbers?

It is not easy to sum up four
different responses, which though
closely related, are to be sharply
distinguished. It can be declared
that while the vast majority of
the clergypersons who have been
vocal are opposed to such a pro-
posal, there are many who have
not spoken out against it, some
who have called for a referen-
dum, and those who have stated
support for it.

There is one thing that is cer-
tain — the present hypocritical
situation cannot continue indefi-
nitely. We cannot continue for-
ever in this situation in which the
“the playing of numbers” is offi-
cially illegal, but a large percent-
age of Bahamians engage in it.
The hour of decision must come
when we either enforce the law
by clamping down on this situa-
tion, closing all the numbers
houses and arresting all who
engage in it, or legalizing num-
bers so that those who would like
to engage in playing numbers can
do so and those who are opposed
to the same on moral grounds
need not engage in the same.

Joshua, challenging the
Israelites with the necessity of
making a decision, declared,
“choose ye this day whom ye will
serve” (Joshua 24:15). Or, as Dr.
Robert Schuller challenges us:

“A decision must be made;

A price must be paid.”
THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009, PAGE 9



Armstrong jumps from 10th
to 3rd at Tour de France

@ By JAMEY KEATEN
Associated Press Writer

LA GRANDE-MOTTE,
France (AP) — Lance Arm-
strong jumped from 10th to
third place at the Tour de
France on Monday, positioning
himself for a shot at the yellow
jersey after evading trouble on a
windy ride along the Mediter-
ranean.

Britain’s Mark Cavendish
won his second straight stage.
He and Armstrong and overall
leader Fabian Cancellara of
Switzerland kept up with a
breakaway group that bolted
from the pack with 18 miles left
in the 122-mile third stage.

Armstrong, a seven-time
champion coming out of retire-
ment, is 40 seconds behind. He
was able to make his big jump
because riders in front of him at
the start of the day got trapped
in the main pack.

The race is set for a shake-
out featuring Cancellara, Arm-
strong and Germany’s Tony
Martin in Tuesday’s team time
trial. Each team is strong in the
24-mile event, which starts and
finishes in Montpellier. If
Astana wins, Armstrong could
take the yellow jersey. The race
ends July 26 in Paris.

The Tour said Armstrong will
be fined the equivalent of $92
for failing to sign in before the
stage. His Astana team said the
Texan was delayed because of
autographs and interviews.

This was the sixth time
Cavendish won a Tour stage.
He finished in 5 hours, 1
minute, 24 seconds on the hot
and breezy ride from Marseille
to La Grande-Motte.

Armstrong, Cancellara and
22 other cyclists had the same
time. Cancellara, who rides for
Saxo Bank, extended his lead
and is ahead of Martin by 33
seconds.

Cavendish mimed talking on
a cell phone — in recognition of
one of the Columbia team spon-
sors — as he led a sprint finish
ahead of Norway’s Thor
Hushovd and France’s Cyril
Lemoine.

“Tt was brilliant,” Cavendish
said. “We were the only sprint
team that wanted to ride
today.”

The pack, including expect-
ed contenders like Armstrong’s
Astana teammate Alberto Con-
tador of Spain, the 2007 Tour
champion, and two-time run-
ner-up Cadel Evans of Aus-
tralia, finished 41 seconds
behind.

Columbia took control with
about 18 miles left. Its riders
led a 29-man breakaway that

AMERICAN seven-time Tour de France
winner Lance Armstrong strains as he
passes Monaco’s casino during the first
stage of the Tour de France cycling race,
an individual time trial of 15.5 kilome-
ters (9.63 miles) with start and finish in

Monaco on Saturday...

included several Astana cyclists,
among them Armstrong and
Cancellara.

They used the gusty condi-
tions to their advantage in a tac-
tic known as “bordure,” which
can help breakaway groups gain
time on the main pack. Conta-

dor and other favorites were
caught off-guard.

Wind

“We knew the wind was
going to be a factor,” said Arm-
strong, noting Columbia’s

Citing hip, Roddick
pulls out of Davis Cup

m By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Tennis Writer

WIMBLEDON, England
(AP) — Wimbledon runner-up
Andy Roddick withdrew Mon-
day from the US Davis Cup
team’s quarterfinal at Croatia,
citing a right hip flexor injury.

The US Tennis Association

announced that Roddick would-
n’t participate in this week’s
Davis Cup matches because he
was hurt during his loss a day
earlier to Roger Federer at the
All England Club — a match
that finished 16-14 in the longest
fifth set in Grand Slam final his-
tory.
Roddick slipped and tumbled
to the grass in the eighth game
of the fourth set Sunday. He
stayed down for a few moments,
then rose, grimacing, and tow-
eled off.

The 26-year-old American
would go on to play for more
than another 1 1/2 hours, final-
ly succumbing when Federer
broke him for the first time all
match in the 77th and last game.

After the match, Roddick
was asked whether he hurt him-
self in that fall, and he replied,
“No. It was OK.”

He is being replaced on the
US Davis Cup team by Mardy
Fish, who reached the third
round at Wimbledon. Roddick
is ranked No. 6, while Fish is
No. 23.

When he was asked to play
Davis Cup, Fish pulled out of
this week’s Hall of Fame Tennis
Championships in Newport,
R.I., where he was the tourna-
ment’s top-seeded player.

Roddick had played in 18



ANDY RODDICK plays a return to Roger Federer during their final match
on the Centre Court at Wimbledon on Sunday...
(AP Photo: Anja Niedringhaus)

consecutive Davis Cup matches
for the United States, helping
the country with the 2007 title.

“Andy has been a stalwart for
this team the past nine years,
and his dedication to Davis Cup
and his teammates is unques-
tioned,” US captain Patrick
McEnroe said.

Croatia hosts the US on clay
at Porec, Croatia, starting Fri-
day.

“Mardy is a Davis Cup veter-
an and we appreciate his will-
ingness to join the team on
short notice. He has been play-
ing well and we are glad to have
him back in the singles lineup,”
McEnroe said. “Andy had a
great run at Wimbledon. He
battled for more than four
hours yesterday and fought
hard to reach the final. Under-

standably, his body is not up for
the rigors of Davis Cup in such
a short turnaround.”

Fish will be joined in singles
action for the US by James
Blake, while twins Bob and
Mike Bryan will play doubles.

Wimbledon quarterfinalist
Ivo Karlovic and Marin Cilic
will lead Croatia, which won the
Davis Cup in 2005.

“Tt’s worse for us,” Goran
Prpic, Croatia’s Davis Cup cap-
tain, said in Porec. “Instead of
an injured Roddick, who after
such a final at Wimbledon
would have had to play match-
es on clay, we'll have to face a
motivated Fish.”

¢ Associated Press Writer
Snjezana Vukic in Zagreb,
Croatia, contributed to this
report

move. “When you see a team
at the front like that, you have
to pay attention.”

Armstrong said it was “not
my objective” to gain ground
on Contador, insisting he was
“just trying to stay up front and
out of trouble. ... I turned

a.
=
oS
S
wi
@
=
=
°
=
2
—
=
o



around and was surprised there
was a split.”

Contador dropped to fourth
from second and is 59 seconds
back from Cancellara. Fellow
Astana rider Levi Leipheimer
slipped to 10th, from sixth, and
is 1:11 behind.

dason Kidd
Staying with
the Mavs

Bg By JAIME ARON
AP Sports Writer

DALLAS (AP) — Jason
Kidd isn’t going anywhere.

The free agent point guard
has agreed to sign a three-year
contract for more than $25
million to remain with Dirk
Nowitzki and the rest of the
Mavericks. The New York
Knicks were among Kidd’s
suitors.

“We are excited that JKidd
and the Mavs have reached
an agreement to have Jason
return to the Mavs,” Maver-
icks owner Mark Cuban said
via e-mail Monday. “We look
forward to him continuing to
take a major role with the
team.”

With the contract, the 37-
year-old Kidd could end his
career in Dallas, which is
where he started in 1994. The
Oakland, Calif., native was the
No. 2 overall pick out of Cali-
fornia, and he has also played
for Phoenix and New Jersey.

Kidd’s return helps the
Mavericks as they pursue a
supporting cast around Now-
itzki, from not having to find a
replacement to recruiting
players. Kidd, who is third on
the career assist list, also will
continue to mentor J.J. Barea,
who emerged as a solid back-
up last season, and raw rook-
ie Rodrigue Beaubois, who is
coming over from France.

The deal — which can’t be
signed until Wednesday —
was first reported by
ESPN.com.

The Mavericks also plan to
send an offer sheet Wednes-
day to Marcin Gortat, a 25-
year-old center who backed
up Dwight Howard in Orlan-
do last season, according to a
person with knowledge of
negotiations. The person
spoke on condition of
anonymity because of NBA
rules against commenting on
deals before the signing period
opens.

Gortat is expected to
receive the full midlevel
exception of about $5.6 mil-
lion, which means any more
big moves Dallas makes this
offseason will come through
trades.

The Mavs can dangle the
expiring contract of Erick
Dampier and the trade-friend-
ly contract of Jerry Stack-
house in front of other teams.
Pretty much everyone but
Nowitzki could be dealt, too,
as the Mavericks explore ways
to keep up with the changes
made by top rivals in the
Western Conference, espe-
cially the defending champi-
on Lakers and division foe
San Antonio.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009,

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL/INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Steve McNair

Fisher:

a ‘great
will be

m By TERESA M WALKER
AP Sports Writer

NASHVILLE, Tennessee
(AP) — An emotional Jeff
Fisher says his former quar-
terback Steve McNair was a
"great person" who put the
Tennessee Titans franchise on
the NFL map.

The Titans coach Monday
called the slain quarterback
one of the "greatest competi-
tors of all time on the field.”
Fisher said McNair would
want him to tell people
McNair was sorry and wasn't

AP Photos

Sahel Kazemi

McNair
person,’
missed

perfect.

Fisher was the only coach
McNair had for the first 11
years of his NFL career.

McNair was found shot to
death Saturday, alongside 20-
year-old Sahel Kazemi in
Nashville. Police have said
McNair, a married father of
four, had been dating Kaze-
mi.

The Titans coach had been
in Iraq as part of an NFL trip
last week to visit the military.
Eddie George told Fisher of
McNair's death during a stop
in Kuwait.



Mikhail McLean secures
athletic scholarship
offer from Rutgers

YET another
member of the
Frank Rutherford
Elite Development
Camp has left an
indelible mark on
the prep basketball
community in
Houston, Texas,
earning himself a
series of scholarship
offers to NCAA
Division One Uni-
versities.

Mikhail McLean,
a 6°7” 215 pound
forward, has
received interest from numerous institu-
tions and recently secured an athletic schol-
arship offer from Rutgers University for
the 2009-10 academic year.

McLean seeks to join other members of
the programme who have progressed from
the Bahamas to collegiate and professional
success including Devard Darling (Balti-
more Ravens), Jeremy Barr (University of
Southern California, University of Nebras-
ka, San Jacincto JuCo) Ian Symonette (Uni-
versity of Miami), Dwight Miller (Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh), Probese Leo (Bucknell
University), Waltia Rolle (University of
North Carolina) and a number of others.




Mikhail McLean (top left) in action...

Mikhail Mclean left the Bahamas in 2005
for the programme in Houston, Texas, with
the intent of furthering his athletic devel-
opment and ultimately achieving a schol-
arship for an education at a top flight uni-
versity.

He attended Second Baptist High School
for the last three years he has been the
model student who has made the honour
role every year, and has become a heavily
sought after recruit on the court as well.

McLean and other prep stars around the
United States are looking to improve their
recruiting stock during the summer months,
gaining exposure on the AAU circuit and at
various camps nationwide.

McLean, a long athletic forward with a
good shooting touch from mid-range, is also
a tenacious perimeter and post defender.

He also has interest or scholarship offers
from Penn State University, Tulane Uni-
versity, and Rice University.

He will attend the Reebok University
camp in July where the top 100 players in
America will assemble in Philadelphia
under the scrutiny of 400 NCAA Division I
college basketball coaches.

Based on his similar build and style of
play to Dwight Miller, who won the MVP at
the Reebok camp in 2007, Mikhail is pro-
jected to have a similar outing at the camp
and recruitment this summer.

80,000 fans finally welcome Ronaldo to Real Madrid

m By PAUL LOGOTHETIS
AP Sports Writer

MADRID (AP) — After a three-
year wait, 80,000 Real Madrid fans
gave Cristiano Ronaldo a rapturous
welcome on Monday following his
record transfer from Manchester Unit-
ed.

A beaming Ronaldo came out to the
capacity Santiago Bernabeu crowd
wearing the same No. 9 jersey as
Madrid great Alfredo di Stefano wore.

"I'm very happy to be here. I've
achieved one of my dreams," Ronaldo,
who agreed to a six-year deal, said

before leading the crowd into a cry of
"Viva Madrid!"

Fans had queued outside the Bern-
abeu from the early morning to catch a
glimpse of the 24-year-old, who com-
pleted a lap of honor to salute fans
after performing a few juggling tricks.

Ronaldo was eventually chased from
the field as security failed to contain
the crowd, with many teenage fans
jumping the barrier in search of an
autograph. One fan managed to evade
security to reach the stage and hug
Ronaldo, who signed the young man's
Madrid shirt.

Only Diego Maradona's presenta-

tion at Napoli 25 years ago has rivaled
Ronaldo's in terms of the crowds it
attracted. Last week, 50,000 greeted
Kaka at the Bernabeu.

Madrid had been chasing the cur-
rent world player of the year since
2006, with president Florentino Perez
finally securing his signature in an 80
million pound (94 million; $131 mil -
lion) deal.

Portugal great Eusebio was among
those who joined the party, the Portu-
gal great joining Ronaldo onstage with
Di Stefano, Perez and Madrid's record
nine European Cups.

"Today, we present the greatest sym-

bolism of Real Madrid," Perez said by
way of introduction.

Ronaldo scored 120 goals from 313
appearances in all competitions at Man
United, where he arrived in 2003 from
Portuguese club Sporting. Ronaldo left
Old Trafford having won the Champi-
ons League, three Premier League
titles, the FA Cup and the Club World
Cup in six seasons.

Perez has vowed to return the
"galactico" era to Madrid after initiat-
ing the original one from 2000-06 with
the blockbuster signings of Zinedine
Zidane, David Beckham, Luis Figo
and Ronaldo, who was the last impact

player to wear the No. 9 jersey.

Perez has splashed out 214 million
($300 million) on new players this sum-
mer in a bid to turn the page on a sea-
son that was marred by former presi-
dent Ramon Calderon's resignation
over a vote-rigging scandal and in
which Madrid was eclipsed by arch
rival Barcelona.

Madrid failed to get past the first
knockout stage of Europe's top-tier
competition for the fifth straight season
and lost the league to Barcelona, which
also won the Champions League and
Copa del Rey to become the first Span-
ish club to win the treble.

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JUSTIN ROBERTS

Justin
Roberts
moves into
semis at the
St Maarten
Junior Open

BAHAMIAN Justin Roberts
moved into his second consecu-
tive boys U-14 singles semifi-
nals at the St Maarten Junior
Open by defeating Edward
Buckley (ANT) 6-0, 6-0.

Roberts now awaits the win-
ner of the match between
Castellanos/de Silva. His semi-
finals match will be competi-
tive, however Roberts is confi-
dent that he can win having
defeated de Silva in the round
robin and Castallanos is not a
big hitter.

Roberts appears to be on a
“collision course” to meet his
training and traveling partner
in the boys U-14 singles final.

Gian Issa defeated Yannick
James in his quarterfinal match
6-0, 6-1 and faces Juan Bisono,
who won 6-1, 6-3 over Timothy
Blok of Antigua in the other
semifinals on Tuesday.

Issa defeated Justin in Aruba
last week Tuesday in the boys
U14 semifinal 75, 61.

The dueling doubles pair are
seeded number one in the boys
U-14 doubles and have a bye in
the quarterfinals and will play
their semi-finals doubles match
tomorrow.

Bahamas’ national
junior golf team to
tee off in Jamaica

THE Bahamas’ Junior Golf
National Team are in Montego
Bay, Jamaica, to compete in the
Caribbean Amateur Junior
Golf Championships this week.

For the past eight weeks, the
14-member golf team — eight
hailing from the Bahamas Golf
Federation’s northern division
in Grand Bahama and six from
its central division in New Prov-
idence — has been preparing for
this competition.

The youngsters earned their
spot on the team during a
National Team Qualifying
Tournament held April 15-17,
2009, at the Reef Course in
Freeport.

The championships, which is
scheduled to take place at the
Cinnamon Hills Golf Club, will
be contested by 10 neighbour-
ing countries.

It is a 54-hole stroke play
event with players earning
points for their team based on
their play. The country with the
most points at the end of three
days will be deemed the win-
ner.

Individual trophies can also
be won at the championships.

The juniors will compete in

TRIBUNE

re =
|
|
F



PAGE 1

§



ahamas native Devard
Darling is continuing the
dream of him and his
brother to bring football
to the Bahamas through
the Devard and Devaughn Darling Foot-
ball Camps, presented by his non-profit
organisation, the As One Foundation.

Fellow NFL Players Derrick Martin
and Tre Stallings of the Baltimore
Ravens, and Larry Johnson, Bob
Engram and Dwayne Bowe of the
Kansas City Chiefs, and Darrius Hay-
ward Bey of the Oakland Raiders, will
assist young athletes with skill develop-
ment, technique, and the fundamentals of
American football.

A similar two-day camp will close out
today in Grand Bahama at the Freeport
Rugby Football Club on Settlers Way.
The Nassau camp will run from July 10-
12 at Tom “The Bird” Grant Sports and
Recreation Complex.

The purpose of the camp is to encour-
age young Bahamian athletes to pursue
their education and dreams of playing
American football.

Campers will have the opportunity to
interact with prominent sports figures
who will act as coaches, leaders and men-
tors throughout the duration of the
camps.

Their presence will offer campers a
once-in-a-lifetime chance to meet and
train under the tutelage of professional
athletes.

The ‘As One Foundation’ was created
in 2007 by Devard Darling in loving
memory of his identical brother
Devaughn Darling who passed in 2001
during spring training.

Its goal is to provide underprivileged
youth both nationally and internation-
ally with educational and developmental
opportunities through athletic endeav-
ors, educational programming and spir-
itual enrichment.

Specifically, the “Devard &
Deveaughn Darling Football Camps”
strive to encourage young Bahamians
ages 11 to 16 to further their athletic
skills and education at a private school in
the United States.

The cap of available camper slots is
120, and attendance will be allotted to
elite athletes with the potential of pur-
suing a collegiate or professional career
in football.

While gaining invaluable skills and
training in the game of American foot-

ts

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

ball, camp attendees will also receive
free gifts, equipment and a chance to
earn the title of Camp MVP.

The Camp MVP will be judged by par-
ticipation in all activities and the chosen
honouree and one parent will win a ful-
ly paid trip to Kansas City, Missouri,
during the 2009 NFL season to spend a
weekend with Devard Darling and his
family.

“We are thrilled with the number of
quality professional athletes confirmed to
attend, coach and mentor campers at
both of the 2009 football camps,” Darling
said.

“The foundation would not be able to
put on successful football camps with-
out the help and support from the ath-
letic community and we are truly grate-
ful for their time and generosity.”

For more information about Devard
Darling, his vision for Bahamian youth
and the “Devard & Devaughn Darling
Football Camps”, go to www.asone-
foundation.org.

About Devard Darling

Devard Darling, the founder and
visionary of the As One Foundation, is
pursuing his goals on the professional
football field while bringing to life the
dream envisioned between him and his
late twin brother, Devaughn.

Hr hopes to bring the game of Amer-
ican football to their native country of
the Bahamas and to honour his brother



DEVARD DARLING (left) and
his older brother Dennis...

by opening the Devaughn Darling Sports
Complex. Devard currently plays pro-
fessional football for the Kansas City
Chiefs, where he is wide receiver.

Prior to joining the Chiefs, Devard
played four years with the Baltimore
Ravens where he was selected as 82nd
overall in the 3rd round of the 2004 NFL
Draft.

In the final two months of the 2007
season, Devard recorded 18 receptions
for 326 yards and three touchdowns in
just eight games.

Devard began his athletic career at
Florida State University as one of the
top high school prospects out of Stephen
F Austin High School in Houston, Texas.

However, after the unfortunate passing
of his identical twin brother Devaughn
Darling on the football field during
spring practices in 2001, Florida State
University would not reinstate Devard
for his remaining eligibility.

After being connected with Mike
Price, former head coach of the Wash-
ington State University Cougars, Devard
was cleared to play and became one of
the best wide receivers in Washington
State history, recording 16 touchdowns
and over 1500 yards in just two years.

Devard currently resides in Kansas
City, MI with his Wife, Cicely Darling
and Son, Devard Jr. In his free time he
enjoys charity work, attending church
and giving back to his community
through athletics.



Armstrong
jumps from
10th to 3rd at

Tour de France...
See page 9

Top NEL
players to
visit Nassau
for football
camp

A NUMBER of top NFL
players are heading to Nas-
sau this weekend to partici-
pate in a free football camp
and a weekend of fun called
‘Players Paradise Weekend.”

Samari Rolle and ‘The
Rolle With Me Foundation’
is slated to host the 3rd annu-
al Players Paradise All-Star
Weekend, designed to give
back to children through fun,
sports and entertainment.

Two hundred children will
have the opportunity to sign
up for a free football camp
hosted by 11-year Baltimore
Ravens player Samari Rolle
and feature superstar athletes
Fred Taylor, Duane Starks,
Jevon Kearse, Mike McKen-
zie, Corey Ivy, Vernon
Carey, Stockar McDougle,
Lito Sheppard, Ed Reed,
Devard Darling, Antwan
Barnes, Willis Mcgahee,
Jamal Lewis and others.

Station

All you have to do is stop
by the 100 Jamz radio station
located on Shirley &
Deveaux Street and pick up a
The Samari Rolle Football
Camp registration (200 chil-
dren limit).

Participants will learn valu-
able football techniques with
some of the NFL’s finest.
Dominos Pizza will be pro-
viding a complimentary lunch
for all participating guests.

Players Paradise 2009 All-
Star Weekend schedule:

¢ Friday, July 10 - Wel-
come Reception & Dinner
(7pm - midnight)

¢ Saturday, July 11 - 100
Jamz Radio & Samari Rolle’s
Free Football Camp at the
Thomas Robinson Track and
Field Stadium 10am to 2pm

Beach Bar-B-Q Pool Party
& Comedy Show (invitation
only)

¢ Sunday, July 12 - Brunch
(11am - 3pm)

wEW CHEESY
PV ee ay

the following categories: Boys
16-17, 14-15 and 13 and under;
and Girls 16-17, 14-15, and 13
and under.

National coaches Anthony
“Biggie” Robinson of New
Providence and Duwayne Hep-
burn of Grand Bahama, with
the assistance of others, have
been working extremely hard
with the junior golfers at various
local courses in hopes of bring-
ing home a trophy for this year’s
event. According to the coach-
es, the kids are ready.

They just have to go out, stay
focused and execute their game
plans.

Team manager Walter
Robinson is looking forward to
a good showing from the
golfers.

In the past few years the team
has fallen short of bringing
home a trophy. However, he
feels that this year there is a
really good chance of changing
that and bringing home not only
a team trophy, but also at least
one individual trophy.

A number of followers, con-
sisting mostly of parents and
other family members, will also
be traveling in support of the

team. It is encouraging to know
that there is a support team urg-
ing you on in these types of
events.

Scores will be posted daily
online at www.cga.com and the
team members are asking the
Bahamian public for their sup-
port.

Team members are: Kyle
King, Charlie Butler and
Rashad Ferguson (Boys 16-17);
Benjamin Davis Jr., Rasheed
Robinson and Osborne Cooper
III (Boys 14-15); Asif Robin-
son and Harrison Collins (Boys
13 & Under); Eugenie Adder-
ley and Ileah Knowles (Girls
16-17); Taneka Sandiford and
Bijan Lockhart (Girls 14-15);
Asiyah Robinson and Denier
Weech (Girls 13 & Under).

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



(oleh i tie)
INCLUDES
Pe ha. 3 +e
Reg. Hash Brown
& Reg. Coffee or Tea




U



THE TRIBUNE



TUES DAY

SECTION B ¢ business @tribunemedia.net

Raised airline fees
to boost ‘quality of
air transportation’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Ministry of Tourism is
“working feverishly” to expand
business opportunities for
Bahamian airlines and charter
operators, Tribune Business was
told yesterday, with the
increased fees set to be levied
on the industry needed to main-
tain Family Island airports and
“improve the quality of air
transportation in the Bahamas”.

Defending the proposed Civ-
il Aviation Department (CAD)
fee increases, some as high as
10,000 per cent and which are
now scheduled to take effect
from September 10, 2009, Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace, min-
ister of tourism and aviation,
said the new charges would still
be below many rival jurisdic-
tions and not impact the
Bahamas’ competitiveness.

Pointing out that the increas-
es had been approved from
2005, but never implemented,
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
the result of this had been that
the Department always under-
performed on fee revenue in
comparison to the estimates
contained in the Government’s
annual Budget.

While the Government and
Civil Aviation Department

“understood
the economic
circum -
stances”
today were a
lot less
favourable
for private
Bahamian-
owned air-
lines, and
their ability to
absorb. the
fee increases,
Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said revenues
were needed to develop and
improve Family Island airports.

“There are certain costs for
providing all of the Govern-
ment’s services,” he explained.
“These fee increases were
approved in 2005 but never
implemented, and there’s noth-
ing we can see to suggest that
this was nothing more than an
oversight.

“These fees were factored
into the Budget since then, but
have not been put in place and
we fell short for several years.
When we discovered the fees
had been approved, but not put
in place, we followed the
process of putting in the new
fee structure for Civil Aviation.

SEE page 3B

ei cle

Cable’s $80m Columbus
deal gets the ‘go ahead’

B@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas has
received the final government
approvals needed to complete
the $80 million buy-out of con-
trolling shareholder Columbus
Communications, and yester-
day formally launched the deal’s
financing with its $40 million
preference share issue.

The Bahamian investment
community, chiefly those insti-
tutional investors, such as
banks, pension funds and insur-
ance companies, high-net worth
individuals and their financial
advisers, confirmed to Tribune
Business that they had received
prospectuses/offering memo-
randums on Cable Bahamas’
$40 million offering over the
weekend.

The issue, which formally
launched yesterday, is sched-
uled to close in three-and-a-half
weeks time on July 31, 2009, as
Cable Bahamas moves to raise
the financing necessary to allow
it to purchase Columbus Com-
munications’ 30.2 per cent stake
for a price pegged at $13.43 per
share.

That price represented a 17.9
per cent premium to Cable

$40m preference
share issue launched

Bahamas’ closing share price of
$11.39 on the Bahamas Inter-
national Securities Exchange
(BISX), but is below the $14.2
52-week high. The transaction
price was ratified by a ‘fairness
opinion’ sought by Cable
Bahamas’ two non-executive
directors, Frank Watson and
Sandra Knowles.

A source close to Cable
Bahamas confirmed last night:
“The company got Central
Bank [exchange control]
approval last week. It received
approval to sell the preference
share issue and purchase
Columbus Communications’
stake.”

The $40 million preference
share issue includes a $20 mil-
lion US dollar component, and
a $20 million Bahamian dollar
one. Investors will have the
option to convert those prefer-
ence shares into ordinary Cable
Bahamas shares after two years,
with the preference shares pay-
ing an interest rate of 8 per cent.

The preference share issue is

SEE page 2B

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RUSE Bees



2009

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

‘Dry cleaning goes
green’ despite 20 per
cent business fall

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ew Oriental

Cleaners is rein-

vesting in the

environment

with a switch to
biodegradable plastic clothing
bags, the company’s director
said yesterday, despite suffer-
ing a 20 per cent drop in busi-
ness with the economic down-
turn.

Lana Lee-Brogdon said the
new environmentally friendly
bags will cost the company 10
per cent more than the conven-
tional plastic ones, but will hold
twice as many clothes.

With the introduction of the
new eco-friendly bags will come
a witty new slogan such as: “Go
green when you dry clean.”

Plastics have been a burden
on the environment since the
beginning of their development
because they never decompose
when discarded. Mrs Lee-Brog-
don said New Oriental’s new

* New biodegradable clothing bags to cost New
Oriental 10% more, but hold more clothes
* Wire hanger credit deal and three-in-one bags likely to
see company gain green investment return in one year
* Firm holds on to all 125 staff by shaving

working day by 30 minutes

bags will break down in a mat-
ter of days.

The award-winning dry clean-
ing company has been an advo-
cate for the environment since
its early days, and has spon-
sored myriad clean-up cam-
paigns throughout New Provi-
dence.

“For decades we have had
signs up about keeping the
Bahamas clean,” said Mrs Lee-
Brogdon. She said she brought
the ideal of recycling back with
her from the US, where she
studied computer science.

“We recycled everything,”
she added. New Oriental Clean-
ers even recycles their wire
hangers and offers a credit for

customers who bring in 50 hang-
ers.

According to Mrs Lee-Brog-
don, when customers bring in
50 hangers they can receive
$1.50 back - about three cents
per hanger. Shortly after the
introduction of the biodegrad-
able polybags, the company will
roll out a reusable polypropy-
lene garment bag that will be
for sale at New Oriental loca-
tions.

The company has invested
$5,000 in the three-in-one bags,
which can currently be pre-
ordered. The bags are being
imported from China.

SEE page 2B

Transparency woes undermine
project ‘buy-in’ by public

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIANS would more
readily “buy into” mega resort
and other major development
projects if the Government
removed the lack of trans-
parency and obsessive secrecy
surrounding the Environmen-
tal Impact Assessment (EIA)
process, an attorney warning
yesterday that the current situ-
ation undermined both investor
and public confidence.

Romauld Ferreira, who is
also an environmental consul-
tant and partner in Ferreira &
Company, told Tribune Busi-

Environmental consultant and attorney argues that better
EIA disclosure would stimulate business and investment

ness that the absence of public
disclosure before development-
related EIAs were approved
effectively meant the Bahamas
was violating one of the 13 prin-
ciples set by the United Nations
Environmental Programme
(UNEP) on how EIAs were to
be conducted.

He explained that principle
seven of the 13 stated: “Before
a decision is made on an activi-
ty, government agencies, mem-
bers of the public, experts in
relevant disciplines and inter-

ROYAL FIDELITY

amid

RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

ested groups should be allowed
appropriate opportunity to
comment on the EJA.”

Yet with many major resort-
related investment projects,
such as Albany and Baker’s
Bay, Mr Ferreira said the devel-
opments and their EIAs had
been approved by the Govern-
ment and its agencies - such as
the BEST Commission - prior
to the Bahamian communities
living in the impacted areas

SEE page 6B



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Cruise line
incentives
‘weaken’

Bahamians

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE industry grouping rep-
resenting Bahamian tour oper-
ators and excursion providers
yesterday said the amendments
to the Cruise Ship Overnight
Incentive Act had “further
weakened” the sector, chal-
lenging the Government to
explain what benefits the agree-
ment with Carnival Cruise Line
would bring to it and other
cruise-reliant businesses.

Describing the process by
which the Government had
negotiated the new incentive
agreement with Carnival, and
possibly Royal Caribbean, as
“regrettable”, a spokesman for
the Bahamas Association of
Shore Excursionists (BASE)
said the sector had effectively
been cut out of the talks, and
had received assurances from
government officials that no
agreement was in the offing.

And BASE alleged that sev-
eral of its members had been

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission.
from the daily report.



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ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Money at Work


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Po BUSINESS
Cruise line incentives ‘weaken’ Bahamians

FROM page 1B

warned by both the cruise lines
and Bahamian government offi-
cials to ‘back down’ from press-
ing its concerns and issues in
public, as there would be “a
heavy price to pay” in terms of
loss of business and support.
A BASE spokesman yester-
day told Tribune Business that
while the Bahamian tour and
excursion provider industry had
“certainly weakened” as a result
of the global economic reces-
sion, “but from a future stand-
point it has weakened even fur-
ther because we do not feel
we’ve got a leg to stand on to
access this piece of the pie gov-

ernment keeps on talking
about”.

Arguing that the cruise lines
appeared to have “got what
they wanted” from the new
Cruise Overnight Incentive Act,
the BASE spokesman said
some of its 13-14 members, who
employ collectively 350-400 per-
sons, had already begun to
make staff lay-offs and cut
backs - not just because of the
current environment, but due
to the adversarial environment
they were likely to face in
future.

Referring to the agreement
passed by both houses of Par-
liament, the BASE spokesman
said: “It’s very vague and broad-

based, which suggests the cruise
lines got everything they asked
for. But it’s very difficult for the
Bahamian to figure out: What’s
in the deal for me?

“Now the cruise lines get to
do what they wish with local
vendors. They can do what they
want to do, whenever they want
to do it, and with whoever they
want to do it with.”

The BASE spokesman said
the issue affected not just excur-
sion providers and tour opera-
tors, but all businesses that
relied on the multi-million dol-
lar cruise ship industry - retailer,
taxi drivers, straw vendors and
hair braiders.

The new Overnight Incentive

Act includes a rebate-style pas-
senger departure tax incentive
package. For each passenger
over 800,000, the cruise line will
receive a rebate of $8.50 per
passenger on the $15 per head
tax, and a $10 per passenger
rebate when those visitor num-
bers exceed one million. At
least 350,000 of those visitors
must overnight in Nassau, and
175,000 in Freeport, for the
cruise lines to access these
incentives, with all passengers
below 800,000 visitors attract-
ing a $15 per head tax.

Yet the new Act also desig-
nates the cruise line-owned pri-
vate islands, such as Coco Cay,
Great Stirrup Cay, Castaaway

























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the 2010 Telephone Directories.





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Bids should be received by 4:00 pm on Monday July 13, 2009. Bids are to be



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= ——_














Edge
=
Printing

THE BAHAMAS.
THERE Deb - wie ee

Cay and Half Moon Cay, as
‘designated ports’, with passen-
gers landed there counting to
the departure tax rebates. On
these islands, the cruise lines
control everything and capture
all revenues and profits earned,
determining the mark-ups
earned by all businesses oper-
ating there.

They do much the same in
Nassau and Freeport, receiving
wholesale pricing from Bahami-
an tour and excursion providers,
and then selling these tickets on
to passengers. Yet the BASE
spokesman pointed out that
cruise ships sold stingray tours
on their private islands at $27
per head, undercutting the $35-
$42 prices that they sold tick-
ets to Bahamian-owned tours
at.

In a statement, BASE said it
was “convinced that more could
have been done to address the
concerns of the small business-
es directly involved in this sec-
tor, and to qualify the overall
economic benefit to the
Bahamas.

“Successive administrations
have done well to continue to
ignore the plight and concerns
of businesses in this sector in
general, and in particular those
that deal directly with cruise
lines. They all agree that we
have some legitimate concerns,
but none of the last two admin-
istrations can say that they have
delivered on their promise to
even attempt to understand
these concerns by establishing
reasonable dialogue. Instead,
they have gone ahead and
rushed to the end line, only to
find out that they forgot the
very people they have promised
to represent.”

And BASE added: “By no
means does the business com-
munity in general, and those
businesses directly linked to the
cruise industry in particular,
expect that all of our needs,
issues and concerns will be met
all at once, but it was hoped
that the business needs of the
Bahamas are addressed with
our international industry part-
ners like the cruise lines, and as
things evolve, more of those
concerns can be accommodated
and resolved. And yes, there
are some issues that may never
get addressed, but at least we
would know that going in.

“We do need the cruise lines,
but remember, this is a part-
nership and that relationship,
no matter how good, should not
be at our expense.

In fact, when the question of
the progress of the amendments
to the Overnight/Cruise Incen-
tive Act was put to a senior gov-
ernment official directly
involved in the process, his
reply was: “The government of
the Bahamas is not in the habit
of discussing current negotia-
tions.’ We were then told that
the amendments were on the
‘slow tract”, so ‘nothing much
was happening on that front’.

However, as strange as it is,
after the Government got done
debating the National Budget,
what was the first piece of leg-
islation that was rushed through
both houses? The Incentive Act
Amendments.”

Accusing the Government of
continuing to play the ‘cruise
passenger numbers game’ and
ignore the fact that per capita
spending was declining rapidly,
BASE challenged the assertion
that the Bahamas was uncom-
petitive based on passenger
departure tax fees.

“Cruise lines would not be in
the Bahamas if they did not see
this destination as a gold mine
for themselves,” BASE argued.

“The fact that our ‘fees’ are
higher than those of our com-
petitors is a fact that must be
taken into proper context.
When you look at it as a whole,
those other competitors don’t
offer what we can either: they
are further away, they don’t
have private islands and the
Bahamas as a single destination
ranks pretty high among cruise
passengers. So net, net the only
thing these other countries can
compete on is lower port,
departure and other fees.

“Tt is certainly clear what the
cruise lines are getting. Millions
in revenues and up to $10 rebat-
ed to them over a period of
time, but what are we, the Pub-
lic Treasury and the business
community getting in real dol-
lars and sense?

“Or are we to continue to
believe that we are only good
enough to get the crumbs, while
we continue watch more and
more of our hard dollars gener-
ated here in the Bahamas sail
away to foreign bank accounts.”

Cable’s $80m Columbus deal gets ‘go ahead’

a private placement targeted at
invited investors only, so mem-
bers of the Bahamian public
should not apply to become
involved.

Cable Bahamas is also financ-
ing the transaction with a $90
million syndicated loan put
together by Royal Bank of
Canada, FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas) and
Scotiabank, a portion of which
will be used to refinance the
company’s existing debt and
credit facilities, plus pay trans-
action costs and fund working
capital.

The preference share offer-
ing memorandum was yester-
day still being digested by the
investment community, but one
source told Tribune Business
they were concerned about

Cable Bahamas’ continued
access to cutting-edge technol-
ogy in the absence of Colum-
bus Communications’ involve-
ment.

“That’s a real competitive
threat to Cable Bahamas,” the
source said.

Tribune Business under-
stands that Columbus Commu-
nications is exiting because it
has been unable to achieve the
desired rate of return on its
investment in the Bahamas,
having been hemmed in by the
Government’s desire to protect
the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company (BTC).

The deal is designed to pur-
chase Cable Bahamas for future
opportunities in a liberalised
Bahamian telecommunications
and communications market.

‘Dry cleaning goes green’ despite 20% business fall

FROM page 1B

“Customers can bring their
clothes in it, and it coverts toa
duffle bag,” said Mrs Lee-Brog-
don. “It’s reusable and can hold
10 to 12 garments each and, in
the end, not use any plastic.”
She said she expects the com-
pany to see a return on the bags
within one year.

With the onset of the eco-
nomic downturn, New Orien-
tal, like many dry cleaning com-
panies worldwide, saw a decline
in business.

However, unlike many dry
cleaning businesses in the US,
New Oriental’s business has not
foundered and the company has
managed to hold on to all of its

125 employees, though they
have had to slash working
hours.

Mrs Lee-Brogdon said 30
minutes was shaved off each
employee’s work day in order to
lower company expenses and
ensure no lay-offs.

The company recently won
the Dry Cleaning and Laundry
Institute’s coveted Award of
Excellence, and is the only dry
cleaning company in the region
to have acquired it.

Mrs Lee-Brogdon was recent-
ly quoted in Fabricare Maga-
zine as saying: “The Award of
Excellence says that we are a
business that is willing to test
ourselves and strive to meet or
exceed the industry standard.”
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 , PAGE 3B



SINE SCC
Firm sees major rise in t-shirt sales

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

‘242 PEOPLE’ have sold shirts as
far away as Afghanistan and Africa,
and with independence just around the
corner yesterday said it has seen a sig-
nificant rise in sales through T-shirts
depicting Bahamian themes and
colours. Covering every possible mar-
ket - even sidewalk sales - 242 People
has in a short time become one of the
leading all Bahamian t-shirt compa-

Raised airline fees to boost

nies in this nation.

President of the company, Jason
Hepburn, told Tribune Business that
he and his partners wanted the shirts to
express what everyone in the Bahamas
feels. And, according to him, requests
have been pouring in for their innova-
tive t-shirts.

242 People’s shirts have been picked
up by several major retailers, including
the Sports Centre and Urban Nation.
Their shirts can also be purchased
online at shopbvm.com and can be
requested on the company’s Facebook

page, which has almost 3,000 fans.
Capitalising on the independence
holiday, Mr Hepburn opened a side-
walk shop in the front of Scotiabank’s
main branch on Bay Street, selling the
same gear that can be found in stores.

Holiday

Explaining that he wanted to take
advantage of the holiday business, he
asserted that the t-shirts were not sim-
ply independence t-shirts,but a devel-
oping fad, available in store year-

round. “After Independence Day, dis-
tributors will still be selling them,” he
said.

The company initially released six
t-shirt themes: The Slangs, Marine Life,
The Wild Life, The Uprising of the
Country and two 242 People designs.

According to Mr Hepburn, his com-
pany chose to shy away from the typi-
cal tourist t-shirt. “It’s not like the nor-
mal t-shirt that has to have the word
Bahamas plastered on it,” he said.
“When Bahamians see it they can

relate to it, whether it’s a

flag or the flamingo.”

One shirt’s image features a flamin-
go with a Bahamian flag across its face,
while a shirt from the “Slang” line fea-
tures the popular phrase “Don’t watch
nuttin” with a blindfolded male figure.

Mr Heburn said Bahamians have
been happy to see something differ-
ent, and those of all ages have sup-
ported their endeavour. “We have seen
a lot of people between the ages of 20
and 40 buying the shirts,” he said.
“And people from other countries like
them.”

The Tribune

‘quality of air transportation’

FROM page 1B

We need to improve the quality
of aviation, and need to have
the revenues to make that hap-
pen.”

Tribune Business revealed
yesterday how private Bahami-
an airlines and charter opera-
tors fear “draconian” increases
of as much as 10,000 per cent
in their fee structure could
“kill” the industry.

Under the CAD’s proposed
“across the board” fee increas-
es, the operator of a five-seater
aircraft flying 50 hours per
month could expect to see a
$13,000 per annum fee rise.

This newspaper was told that
the fee increases include a
tripling or 200 per cent rise in
landing fees at Family Island
airports, the rates jumping from
a current $18.56 per landing to
$56 per landing for a 19-seat
aircraft.

However, Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace defended the fee
increases, saying there were
“very few places” where com-
parable fees were lower than

the proposed Civil Aviation
ones. He implied that the new
fees would be more in line with
costs incurred by the Govern-
ment.

Conceding that no one liked
to see an increase in the fees
impacting their business, Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace told Tri-
bune Business: “When you
compare the fees with else-
where, they compare very
favourably. In fact, they’re
below what is charged in other
places, even though we have a
much more expensive set of
requirements.”

The minister said that unlike
other Caribbean nations, which
only had one or two airports,
the Bahamas had 17 airports as
ports of entry and many more
airstrips in the Family Islands.

Therefore, airport mainte-
nance costs were much higher in
the Bahamas, but Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said it was “very
difficult to continue to agitate
for improvements in the civil
aviation regime” and to Family
Island airports if revenue tar-
gets were not being met and

fees had not been raised for
many years.

The minister said the failure
to improve the Bahamas’ civil
aviation regime had been “the
primary reason for the lack of
growth in the Family Islands”
when it came to tourism, and
to achieve this revenues were
needed to airport navigation
systems and runway lighting to
permit night flying.

“There’s a whole range of
things that need to be done to
improve the quality of air trans-
portation in the Bahamas, and
we need the resources to do it,”
Mr Vanderpoool-Wallace said.
“We need to have the staff and
equipment to keep the airports
in working order, and need to
have the revenues to do it.”

He added, though, that the
Government was not “callously





increasing fees without grow-
ing opportunities” for the
Bahamian private airlines. The
Ministry of Tourism was “work-
ing feverishly” with them to get
the airlines on-line, so that the
public and travel agents could
book reservations directly with
them.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CUVENTUS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)








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Swim Club seeks level 2 ASCA Certified
swim coach, Previous experience and good
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Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

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Legal Notice

NOTICE
LIMESTONE POINTE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SHINEEY CANAL LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOCHE AZUL INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AUTREMENT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Micromet Ltd.

Pu). Box S4-6270)
Nassau, Bahamas Fax:

Email: jobsie! micronet.bs
328-3043

aN
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dovelopmomt Company

PRICE INQUIRY

PL-140 Aircraft Docking System

Nassau Airpor Development Company (MAD) i pleased io
announce the release of Pl-140 Aircrat Docking System for
the Lynden Pindling lnlemabanal Alport Expansion Project
The purchase inquiry includes

* Design, supoly and instalahon, jesing and
commissioning of the new aulamated aircraft docking
eysiem for sin gates, three in Stage 1 and three in
Srage 2: and

* Coordination wath 0-230 Apron Onve Badge Supplier,
0-230 General Contractor and 0-120 Airsida Chal
Contractor

The Plid0 Document will be available for pick up after
1:00pm, Tuesday June 23rd, 2008. Pease
confact Traci Brisby to register atthe MAD Project office

Goniact Titec Bisby

Ph: (242) FOR 0006 | Fm: (282) 377-2017
PO) Boo AP SO) Messe Bahamas
Email traci breshyiirers bs


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a > =;\;
Transparency woes undermine project ‘buy-in’ by public

FROM page 1B

being consulted.

Mr Ferreira said it was
through this lack of transparen-
cy and disclosure that the Gov-
ernment was effectively ‘creat-
ing a rod for its back’ and that
of the developers, as the lack
of consultation, public input and
information was convincing
many Bahamians that there was
something to hide in relation to
these investments.

“T think the lack of trans-
parency from the Government’s












NT
NAD

Nassau Airport
Developmoant Company

point of view assumes the
Bahamian people are resistant
to development, or they make
the assumption that people will
say ‘no’ to development and use
the information against them,”
Mr Ferreira told Tribune Busi-
ness. ““That’s the wrong assump-
tion to take.”

While acknowledging that
there were some environmen-
talists and others who would
always oppose development
projects regardless, Mr Ferreira
said that as an environmental
consultant he would lose credi-
bility if he said something he

PRICE INQUIRY









P-110 Generators

Nassau Arpon Develooment Company (MAD) i pleased to
annaunoe the release of Pl-110 Generalors for fhe Lynden
Findling lnlemational Aijpor Exparaion Project

The purchase inguin includes









* Supply of two (2) 100 KW ROO0 RA, 277 HED VAG new
factory assembled motor generator sets completa with
NEMA 32 endesure and day tank

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rataliehon by MAD's Gantractor; and

* § yaar or 1500 operating hours warranhy












The Pl-110 Decument wil be available for pick up afier
1:00pm, Tuesday June 23rd, 2009. Please contact
Traci Grisby to register et the MAD Project office.


















Ph: (242) TOP-0086 | Faun: (247) ST7-PHT
PO Bon AP S602), Messe, Bahamas

Email traci breshyiitrers bs

could not prove or demonstrate.

“T think they’re afraid of pub-
lic consultation,” Mr Ferreira
said of the Government.
“They’re not used to consulta-
tive engagement; they’re more
used to talking to you.

“T think they are afraid, in
some instances, of the public
response or think it will delay
the process. It’s some sort of
fear. It’s actually in the Gov-
ernment’s interest to disclose
the information, so it’s not ver-
ified just by us, but by the
world. Two heads are better
than one. Why not put then
together in a collective effort to
try and resolve these problems?
They have implications for
future generations that every-
one has to live with.”

Mr Ferreira said the EIA
document itself represented a
commitment to the process
enshrined in the 13 UNEP prin-
ciples, the first of which stated
that the “authorities should not
authorise such activities with-
out prior consultation at an ear-
ly stage of their environmental
efforts”. Then there was the
principle on making the public
part of the EJA consultation
process.

What had happened to the
Albany and Baker’s Bay EIA,
and the opposition spawned -
particularly to the latter - by the
lack of transparency and public
consultation prior to EIA and
project approval could be hap-
pening again with the proposed
Arawak Cay port project, Mr
Ferreira feared.

Linking again to the UNEP
principle seven, he explained:
“In order to fulfil this obliga-
tion, a measure of transparency
is required from the Govern-
ment. The intent is that the pub-
lic should be consulted prior to
the commencement of activities
so their concerns can be taken
into account before the EIA is
finalised.

“Authorities must, in a sense,
come clean with full public dis-
closure of the EIA. What’s

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

Cultural Show, Inspection,
Prayers, Flag Raising
Ceremony, Fireworks

Followed By....

The People’s Rush

ee

: a awe oi as r Vr | rill
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1:00 a.m.

% \

more, comment should not be
invited after an EIA is finalised
and approved, as in the Albany
project. Or, as in the case of
Arawak Cay where no EIA
information has been disclosed
to the public at all.

“This is part and parcel of the
concept of freedom of informa-
tion and government trans-
parency. The public ought not
to be viewed as an inconve-
nience to be sidestepped wher-
ever possible but partners in
development.”

And Mr Ferreira added: “The
reality is that successive gov-
ernments prefer to hold their
cards close to their chest. Thus,
in the absence of envrionmental
legislation and transparency,
environmental transgressions
and excesses can, in some cases,
become another negotiating
tool. And, with this mode of
operation, the welfare of future
generations is jeopardised.”

In the absence of proper envi-
ronmental and EIA-related
information, the Bahamian pub-
lic were unable to make an
informed decision on issues
such as whether Arawak Cay is
the best location for the con-
tainer shipping facilities that will
be removed from downtown
Bay Street.

The former PLP government
was arguing that the EDAW
study had shown Arawak Cay
was the second least desirable of
seven locations for a new ship-
ping port, and Mr Ferreira said
it was impossible for the
Bahamian people to determine
who was right - and whether the
addition of 40 acres to Arawak
Cay would increase erosion at
Saunders Beach - without an
EIA being made available.

“We need full transparency
and proper public disclosure,”
Mr Ferreira said. “Realistically,
this should have happened
before the [Nassau Harbour]
dredging operations com-
menced, particularly as the
dredge spolis will no doubt be
used to create the new man
made cay. Let’s be reminded
that this was the case with the
creation of Arawak Cay.”

Arguing the case for sustain-
able development, Mr Ferreira
told Tribune Business that the
absence of a clear EIA process
“was one of many facets in our
society where there’s lack of
clarity and transparency. That’s

the real issue we’re plagued
with. It makes people think
you've got something to hide.

“Power concedes nothing.
You have to take power. People
have to demand it from the
Government. The PLP did it
with Baker’s Bay, and the FNM
are doing it now with Arawak
Cay.”

Mr Ferreira added that by
including the Bahamian pub-
lic’s comments and concerns in
the EIA process, and before it a
project was approved, would
help “the public buy into the
development. Instead of getting
it thrown on them, they would
buy into it”.

And he said: “It ll make our
country more attractive to for-
eign investment, because one
of the questions we’re always

asked is : What is the process? It
will simulate business. This is
the time to do it, for when the
economy picks up.

“These things affect business.
What we’re talking about is
making our country more com-
petitive for the 21st century. We
like to call ourselves leaders in
the region, but environmentally
we’re certainly not. We’re fol-
lowers.”

Without adopting the process
of environmental transparency,
and enacting the draft environ-
mental laws and regulations that
have been on the drawing board
since 2005, Mr Ferreira
expressed doubts as to whether
the Bahamas could ever partic-
ipate in activities such as car-
bon trading or reduce its car-
bon footprint.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ADELINE LOUIS of BURIAL
GROUND CORNER, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 7‘ day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

TO: Ms. Carla Johnson

No. 528 Churchill Road

South Bahamia

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Kindly remove your personal property from the above-
mentioned address, failure to do so within seven (7)
days from the date of this notice will result in the
removal of your personal property from the above-
mentioned address, without further notice to you. The
owners shall not be liable for any loss andor damage
occasioned to your personal property after the expiry

of this notice,

DATED the 30th day of June, 2009,

THE OWNERS
No. 32, Churchill Road
South Bahamia
Freeport, Grand Bahama

A Ministry of Marsh Harbour denepel Chapel
PO. Fre AR2OTL0, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Pahantas

Now accepting applications for

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a
PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







The Tribune

B O Di



ea







Setting
a new

By ALEX MISSICK



Tribune Features Reporter

amissick@tribunemedia.net

ITH the entire world scur-

rying to save the planet
and become environmentally. -
friendly, a healthy water supply —
gio, ecome a priority.



safe and cost effective means
of providing quality water to
“residential, commercial and
institutional properties.
“We condition the water but
= without the use of salt which is
a new technology that has been
on the market for about three
to four years now and its just
reaching the Bahamas, ” Mr
Rahming said.
Mr Rahmin.

y Bahamians ques-
their water supply

sta

“incl

said. -

g said the way
jitioner works, is by
asan sot and



esp via

The Sterling Water system/conditioner can
provide a healthy, safe and cost effective
means of providing quality water to residential,
commercial and institutional properties.

Separation Anxiety
A form of mental
illness in dogs

Do you ever wonder what your dog
does when you are not at home? Perhaps
he is taking a nap on your bed (and drib-
bling on your pillow), chewing on your
favourite pair of shoes, or just terrorising
your loved kitty cat. But people whose
dog suffers from Separation Anxiety are
lucky if their house is still standing when
they return home.

Separation Anxiety is a form of men-
tal illness affecting dogs. The second
their owners leave they become extreme-
ly upset and anxious. Then they become
frantic. At this point, this dog is not in
control of his behaviour.

Separation Anxiety can be defined
as increased fearfulness of this dog after
the departure of the owner. For example:
after their owners leave for work, anx-
ious dogs might bark or howl, have bow-
el or bladder accidents, or destroy things.
Dogs that form intense attachments with
their owners such as Labradors are more
likely candidates for Separation Anxi-
ety.

Typically, the dog follows the owner
about the house, can’t bear to have the
owner out of sight, and becomes increas-
ingly distraught as the owner prepares to
leave. To make up for this, owners may
tend to overdo good byes. But in fact,
this can accentuate your dog’s feeling of
abandonment once you leave the house.

Instead, ignore the dog for ten min-
utes or so immediately before prior to
departure. And get him use to your leav-
ing. Stage your absences; first only a
minute or two, then five minutes, ten
and so on. Offer your dog a treat, like a

Y
AM DR BASIL
#4 SANDS



Nylabone, before you go to keep him
pleasantly distracted while you're gone.

Separation Anxiety is a panic disorder
likely caused by over stimulation of the
parts of the brain that regulates fear and
stress, but this term is often misapplied.
Like Attention Deficit Disorder in chil-
dren, separation anxiety has become a
trendy diagnosis. Not every dog that mis-
behaves when owners are away has sep-
aration anxiety.

Dogs are pack animals and are hap-
piest around their pack. They are
extremely social critters that form strong
bonds with their owners. Most dogs do
not like it when people leave and will
exhibit mild forms of behaviour associ-
ated with Separation Anxiety. A typi-
cal dog left alone may chew shoes out of
boredom, but dogs with separation anx-
iety will chew the refrigerator. The three
main signs of Separation

Anxiety are destruction, vocalisation
and elimination. These dogs will bark
and howl the entire time the owner is
gone. The destruction these dogs do is
astounding.

There are several hallmarks of sepa-
ration anxiety. The first is the mass











destruction when the dog is left alone.
The dogs literally destroy the house,
chewing though walls, doors and even
into the refrigerator. Exit points to the
house are targets, perhaps because dogs
think they can get outside to find their
owners. Another distinction is that this
extreme destruction occurs within the
first 15 minutes after the owner leaves.

Separation Anxiety is not a problem
commonly seen in puppies. It is seen in
dogs that have been through trauma.
Pound dogs that have had the worst
things happen to them; their owners did
leave and never came back. Now they
are afraid it will happen again. Another
example of a scary situation that may
trigger anxiety is if the dog is present
during a burglary. Separation Anxiety
is generally the result of a traumatic
experience.

Unfortunately separation anxiety is
self-perpetuating. The dogs keep getting
more and more upset each time the own-
er leaves. However another pet does not
help these dogs and it is not boredom
that is causing the behaviour. These
dogs are extremely attached to their —
owners and are very people-ori-
ented.

There is no quick fix for
this problem. Anti-
depressant and
anxiety
drugs
are

“Maintaining this system is very mini-
mum. The only thing we ask persons to
do is every month or so to check their fil-
ters to make sure they are clean. The sys"
tem itself is required to be serviced eve
five to six months because the water in
our ground is very hard and you are going +
to get a lot of build up,” Mr Rahming ,

dard

Cah



_As for energy efficiency, Mr Rahming F Li:
said although the Sterling Water condi-
tioner works with electricity, the amount — ih
it uses is the equivalent to et at of a 25
watt a bulb. :

ety. Medication needs to be used in addi-
tion to desensitisation therapy. As men-

involves having this dog sit and stay as

tually the owner will step out of the room
as the dog stays and believes that the
owner will return.

The goal is to take the “scary” factor
out of the owner’s departure. This is
time consuming work and takes dedica-
tion. Many veterinarians may refer own-
ers to a dog trainer.

Crate training these dogs is helpful. It 2. Foot Pain and injury:
at least provides these dogs a safer place }

where they can’t destroy things or harm : further injury, consider custom

? orthotics or inserts with proper arch
? support for your foot type. Such

Ge peau are concerned i items can be purchased at specialty

Bi ear anxieties, con- i footwear stores or Pedorthic facili-

: ties. If you want to continue running,
? walking or remain active for many

? more years, you need to ensure that

? there is enough support between

? your foot and the flat and hard sur-

? faces. Depending on the activity to

? which you are doing, you need to

} seek the appropriate footwear and

? support for that purpose. Avoid

? injury and pain by seeking profes-

: sional help to assist you with the cor-
? rect footwear and support (orthotic)
? to not only support your body and

} foot type but to adequately off load

: the pressure presented by the under-
? lying terrain.

themselves.
For more information about Separa-

tact your local veterinarian.



uy
aN Dal
GIBSON



Summer
heat and
your feet!

IT is quite a challenge to keep your

? feet cool when walking around in
? extremely hot weather. Therefore, your
? feet need some special care and atten-
? tion during the summer months. Heat
? and humidity will aid in the growth of
: bacteria, so taking measures to reduce
? these will help enormously.

During the summer foot injuries are

? also more prevalent - the increased
? level of outdoor athletic activities dur-
_ | ing the summer also increases the
? chance of muscle pain, heel pain, shin
: splints, plantar fasciitis, Morton's neu-
? roma, achilles tendinitis, hip pain/bur-
| £ sitis, runner's knee, illiotibial band syn-
: drome (ITB) and the list goes on.......

How do we deal with summer heat
? and our feet?

Moisture Management:

The most important is to manage

? moisture in order to decrease the

risk of athlete's foot and pro-

? nounced foot odor. Excessive perspi-
: ration has been seen as a significant
? contributor to these conditions. In

technical terms, this excessive perspi-
ration is known as hyperridrosis. A

? rapid production of sweat that can-
|} not be evaporated as fast as it is pro-
/ } duced. When this happens, the

? shoe's material or part becomes satu-
? rated with moisture. In the perspira-
? tion there is also bacterial waste.

: You may ask what is this bacterial

? waste? Perspiration is body “waste”
? and has an abundance of bacteria. In
? addition, it is believed that approxi-
? mately 98 per cent of this perspira-

? tion is moisture and 2 per cent is
solids - mostly acids and salts. These
? bacteria thrive on moisture, warmth
? and darkness - just like bacteria that
? causes toe fungus.

Solutions:

In terms of cleanliness and hygiene

: habits, wash your feet daily and dry

? thoroughly before putting on

? footwear. Always, use a clean pair of
: socks, preferably, specially-designed
? cotton or synthetic perspiration

? wicking fabric to get rid of foot odor.
? For example, "Thorlos' and 'Balgia'

? brand of cushioned socks are espe-

? cially designed to provide insulation

? and air flow and wicks away mois-

? ture and keep your foot from getting
? too hot. Refrain from wearing yes-

? terday's gym socks just because they
? smell clean. One wear is enough to

. _ ¢ leave behind sufficient foot perspira-
not enough to conquer separation anxi- }

tion for odor-causing bacteria to

: thrive on. It will be enough to leave

k 1 eras ? feet stinky and dirty. Footwear is
tioned earlier, desensitisation therapy :

another important factor. When

: selecting shoes it is important to
the owner gradually steps away. Even- :

avoid shoes or boots with non-

? breathable upper materials, especial-
? ly closed-type shoes or simply tight-

: fitting shoes. For example, leather

? with its unique internal structure of

: fibers and inter-fiber air spaces, plus
: its surface pores, has excellent

: breathing capacity.

To alleviate such pain and or avoid

? ¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified
: Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot

: Solutions, a health and wellness fran-

i chise that focuses on foot care and

: proper shoe fit, located in the Sandyport
i Plaza, Nassau.

: "The views expressed are those of the author

: and does not necessarily represent those of Foot
: Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary

? and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any

: guestions or comments to nassau@footsolu-

i tions.com or 327-FEET (3338).


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009, PAGE 9B





Do you have
Osteoporosis?

By Dr KATHRYN
DE SOUZA
Western Medical Plaza

OSTEOPOROSIS is the med-
ical term for thinning bones. It is
often confused with osteoarthri-
tis, which is degeneration of the
joints through wear and tear.
There is no cure for osteoarthri-
tis, but we are now able to treat,
and cure, osteoporosis.

The body is constantly mak-
ing new bone and resorbing old
bone. Osteoporosis occurs when
there is more bone being
resorbed than made. The ground
work for good bone structure is



laid down in childhood to young
adult years. The body uses calci-
um, Vitamin D and phosphate
to form bone. The bones are a
storage space for calcium in the
body. The heart, brain and oth-
er organs need calcium to work
properly. To keep the body func-
tioning normally, the body uses
the calcium in the bones when it
is needed, and replaces it with
the calcium obtained from the
diet. If a person does not eat
enough calcium, such as dairy
products, fortified orange juice
and salmon (to name a few),
bone production may suffer,
resulting in brittle bones over

time.

The leading cause of Osteo-
porosis is lack of estrogen in
women. During and after
menopause, estrogen levels drop.
Older men, or men who are
undergoing prostate cancer treat-
ment, may also have low hor-
mone levels. These hormones
are called androgens, which can
result in Osteoporosis. People
who have taken a large amount
of steroids over time, such as
those with Asthma and Rheuma-
toid Arthritis, are at risk for
osteoporosis as well. Epileptic
patients, who are being treated
with anti-epileptics, should also

The garden of July

be monitored for osteoporosis.
Thyroid and chronic renal dis-
ease also increase your risk for
osteoporosis. Women with the
following attributes are at the
highest risk for osteoporosis:

1. Over 50, post menopausal

2. Caucasian or Asian

3. Thin or small bone struc-
ture

4. Smokers and alcoholics

5. Strong family history

However, if you do not have
any of these attributes, you can
still develop osteoporosis. Osteo-
porosis is usually a silent disease
until the fracture (broken bone)
occurs. More often than not, peo-
ple do not know they have osteo-
porosis. They may have a dull
ache in their back or neck, or
they may develop a hunchback
posture. Severe pain can develop
if a compression fracture occurs
suddenly, leaving the vertebrae
(spinal bone) shorter than it was
normally. Sudden hip fractures
can also occur which are
extremely painful. Anyone over
50 with a hip, wrist or spine frac-

ture from a seemingly mild
injury, needs to be checked for
osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is diagnosed by a
test called a bone density test,
which measures the density, or
strength, of the bones. This test
can detect osteoporosis before a
fracture occurs.

There are several things you
can do to minimise your risk for
developing osteoporosis. Young
adults should be encouraged to
get 1000mg of calcium in their
diet from milk and other dairy
products, salmon, sardines and
other bony fish, and fortified
orange juice. Weight bearing
exercise such as running, walk-
ing, aerobics, weight lifting and
even cycling decrease your risk
as does maintaining a normal,
healthy body weight. Studies
have shown that women who
walk a mile a day have four to
seven more years of bone
reserve than women who do

not.
It is also important to get
enough Vitamin D. Usually we

get enough Vitamin D through
sun exposure as it is absorbed
through our skin, but with the
threat of skin cancer, many peo-
ple are dramatically limiting
their sun exposure and wearing
high intensity sun block which
does not allow the Vitamin D
to penetrate the skin. You
should have 5-10 minutes of
unprotected sun exposure daily
to obtain enough Vitamin D. If
a supplement is preferred, a cal-
cium supplement with 600mg of
Calcium and Vitamin D should
be taken twice daily, as we are
unable to absorb more than
600mg of calcium at any given
time.

Treatment for osteoporosis
aims to slow down or stop bone
loss, increasing bone density,
preventing fractures and pain
control. 40 per cent of women
will experience a fracture due
to osteoporosis in their lifetime.
Talk to your doctor to deter-
mine which medication is right
for you, as well as diet and exer-
cise advice.

TWO trees catch our attention dur-
ing July. One is the royal poinciana
that dominates the urban landscape
and the other is mango. The royal
poinciana is for beauty; the mango is
for eating.

Few tropical fruits are loved as much
as mango. Their exquisite sweetness
makes all the care and attention that
goes into the trees worth while. Messy
to eat they may be but few fruits are as
rewarding when it comes to taste.

While we have plenty of mangoes
around we should think about pre-
serving some for future use. Mango
jam is easily made and mango chut-
ney is a fine relish with lots of applica-
tions. Make mango salsa to enjoy with
white fish and meats, particularly pork
and chicken.

That care and attention can be con-
tinued even while the mango trees are
bearing. Some people omit the sea-
sonal fertilisation of mangoes in sum-
mer and fertilise them in autumn. For
most citrus and fruit

trees a summer application of fer-
tiliser is part of the three times a year
treatment of iron, granular fertiliser
and minor nutrients.

The iron is applied as a drench to
the bole of the tree and should be

Sequestrene 138 or similar. This type of
chelated iron was developed for the
Florida citrus industry when it was
found that normal chelated irons
became bound up in the highly alkaline
soil. It is very expensive but virtually a
necessity for successful citrus.

If possible, use specific fertilisers for
your fruit trees: citrus fertiliser for cit-
rus, fruit for fruit, and palm for palm. I
tend to buy the right sized bag so once
Ihave finished fertilising I have no

irritating half bags to store.

Minor nutrients are applied as a
spray, using a sticker/spreader to help
the liquid adhere to the leaves.

In the vegetable garden it is the sea-
son of okra and corn. Okra is not my
favourite veggie but I do like them
pickled. Pickled okra is fine served
with a cheese platter.

The corn I grow each year is Peach-
es and Cream, a bi-coloured sugar-
enhanced variety that produces large,
plump ears. The stalks grow to six feet
and must be grown in blocks rather
than rows. Once the plants have tas-
seled they should be sprayed regularly
with Sevin or a similar product. If you
want to be organic you can use Dipel
dust that is effective against caterpil-
lars.

July is a good time to plant seeds
for calabaza, or Cuban pumpkin. The
seasonal rains will nurture the young
vines and you can expect mature fruits
in late fall.

I have cubanelle sweet peppers for
my summer crop. I am growing them
under papaya trees to provide midday
shade to prevent sunscald on the fruits.
Most people like to eat the cubanelles
at the yellow stage

but I prefer them when they are red
and really sweet.

It is at this time of year many gar-
deners have a plethora of hot peppers.
The best way to preserve hot peppers is
by freezing them. Spread a layer on a
metal cookie sheet and put in the freez-
er for an

hour. Then pack them in freezer
bags and dip into them whenever you
need a pepper hit.

There is a great misconception about
roses. Many people associate roses with
English gardens and think they are
sun-shy. Not so. Roses demand full
sun, even in summer. To maintain their
vigour they should be dressed every
season with compost and kept well
watered during droughts. Regular
dead-heading and the occasional prun-
ing will keep your plants healthy.



ROSES need special care during the summer months to avoid diseases caused by

damp conditions and high heat.

During the summer months the
humidity will encourage black spot on
rose bush leaves. This is treated with
Orthene, a systemic that kills sucking
insects. Orthene can be used on other
ornamental shrubs to give them pro-
tection but is best not used on hibiscus.

July is the first full month of summer
and jobs like fertilising, judicial pruning
and composting will ensure dividends
later on in the season.

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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Circumvention: A recognizable convention

YOU have a suggestion to make and
you know if you make it to your boss
she will say something like, we tried
that before or find a reason why it
wouldn't work. You have at least two
options: take a chance and give your
boss your idea or circumvent your boss
and take it to someone further up in
the hierarchy who can act on it.

In the book, “The 48 Laws of Pow-
er” by Robert Greene, his very first
law is “Don't outshine the master.”
He defines this law saying an effort to
display your talent does not always
impress others, it can inadvertently
inspire fear and insecurity.

Here are some reasons why you may
decide to circumvent a boss, friend,
family member, a peer or a member of
your support staff.

No Voice

Many times I witness supervisors
and managers who have no voice in
an organisation because of a past mis-
take or current performance issues. If
a supervisor has no voice, they can't be
the voice of their direct reports so their
direct reports have to choose between
circumventing the hierarchy if they
want to be heard and keeping quiet to
protect their supervisor.

By YVETTE
BETHEL



Negative attitude

No-one likes to be around a person
with a negative attitude unless this is
their comfort zone. Know-it-alls, con-
descending people, gossips, bullies,
blamers are all examples of types of
people who are avoided. While some
of you have no problem facing bearers
of negativity, others of you prefer to
reduce your ‘face time’ with them. If
you obviously circumvent someone
who is negative, brace yourself for his
or her negativism to be directed at you
but keep in mind that sometimes it is
worth the risk...

Insecurity

People are insecure for any number
of reasons. None of those reasons
probably have anything to do with you.
They could be insecure about your idea

being better than theirs or they could
be uncomfortable with you dressed up
all the time.

Awareness is part of the battle.
Many of us refuse to see the truth
because it is uncomfortable so we opt
to stay in a comfortable, unaware
space. If you choose to see the truth
and act, circumvention is one of your
options.

Procrastination

Procrastination is the enemy of many
well laid plans. If there is a procrasti-
nator on your team, your productivity
is impacted because you are reliant on
the procrastinator for their part of the
plan. Procrastinators are not easy to
circumvent so you can either decide
to let them sink or you can help them.
If you have the authority you can reas-
sign the work.

A Complaint

It takes emotional discipline and the
ability to articulate your complaint in a
constructive way to complain to the
person you are complaining about.
Even with effective communication
skills, this kind of conversation can go
off track so persons with complaints
tend to circumvent the perceived per-

petrator.

Fear

In some work environments there
are employees or bosses whose sole
purpose seems to be to keep you in a
state of suspended terror. They are
bullies and they often know no other
way to be. They either bully you into
submission and you lose your voice or
you circumvent them and brace your-
self for the fallout.

Dependence

Some people believe their power
resides in keeping others dependent
on them. If you don't want to get
caught in this trap you will need to
learn what you are not being shown
by circumventing the system of depen-
dence.

Circumvention guidelines:
Here are a few tips to help you
decide if you will circumvent:

e Decide on your objectives and your
priority values given the situation
and circumvent if it aligns with your
objectives. In other words, choose
your battles.

¢ Remember one of the Laws of

Power, if you outshine the Master be
prepared for the possible conse-
quences.

e Think ahead and consider the pos-
sible positive and negative conse-
quences of your actions. Then deter-
mine the worst-case scenario and
whether or not you can live with it.

If you decide to circumvent, you can
do it in a few different ways.

e You can provide information to the
appropriate person understanding
that one possible outcome of this is
that you will not be trusted. To get
around this I have seen people “acci-
dentally” tip off a person in authori-
t

y.
e There are others of you who will
circumvent a dysfunctional system
with no regard for the possible fall-
out.

e You can give information to some-
one “off the record” but remember
that it is sometimes their job to put it
on the record.

e Set up someone to represent you.
In all of this, remember that circum-
vention in and of itself is neither right
nor wrong. It all depends on how
you play the circumvention game.



First lady of Rotary

PICTURED from left to right: Rotarian, District 7020; Past District Governor Rupert Ross; wife of District Governor Leonie Alberga; District Governor Errol Alberga; Michele Rassin,
President Rotary Club of East Nassau; Barry Rassin, Past Rotary International Director; Philip Cumming, Secretary, Rotary Club of East Nassau; Felix Stubbs, Assistant District
Governor.

La

PICTURED Left to right: Michele Rassin, President, Rotary Club of East Nassau accepting flowers on behalf of the hearing aid recipients; Ralph Foreskin, Past President Rotary Club

*
=

of East Nassau; Kim Scriven, Audiologist; Hearing Aid Recipient.

JS

SLI. EI

Po

5 -
Wr

=.
i





Pe a



FROM page 12

to shelter me from the politics that
went on behind the scenes so I have
to say that I had a lot of support
from the Rotarians who were in it
for the right reasons, and I really
would not have pursued it, if it were
not for those supportive members
not to mention that my dad was a
Rotarian so it was harder for them to
say no to Barry Rassin’s daughter
then it would be for them to say no
to someone else.”

The club’s president at the time
Everett Peart also took up slack for
her.

“I do not think that anyone should
be judged based on their sex race or
gender I think your work perfor-
mance should stand by itself. I have
a passion for community service and
I don’t that politics should be a
deciding factor.”

Despite this, Ms Rassin said when
her application was presented to the
members for a vote , “three persons
actually quit the club, many threat-
ened to quit and many held on just
to make trouble. They were the min-
imal amount however and the
majority of the members were
extremely supportive.”

Her application took about two
months to process, while most appli-
cations took about six weeks.

“After I became a member it was
a bit of a hazing process I think I
was on every committee and every
community service function but I
loved it, I really got my hands
involved and that has been the best
part - I have been able to get a real-
ly good grasp of what Rotary does.”

Today, there are nine members
in East Nassau and women in all the
Rotary groups except the West Nas-
sau Club. To date there have been
seven female presidents although
none of them have had quite the
drama to gain admittance.

“One of the nicest things that hap-
pened, was that Sir Durward
Knowles stood up at a meeting and
said that he was one of the mem-
bers who had objected to my mem-
bership, but that he had to admit
that he was wrong. That meant a lot
to me.”

As the first female president, she
said she knows she has a lot to prove,
but says that she has a passion for
community service and is ready to
meet what she knows will be high
expectations.

Amoung the projects Rotary will
be working on this year: the launch
of a blood mobile which can travel
around the country, projects that
will fit children with hearing aids
and eye glasses, and another that
will provide much needed ventila-
tors and incubators to Princess Mar-
garet Hospital. The club will do all of
these things in addition to the regu-
lar outreach programmes and sup-
port they have provided over the
years.

Of course funding is a major com-
ponent in just how much they will be
able to do, but Ms Rassin said
despite the current economic climate
now is not the time to scale back on
fundraising because a lot of the char-
ity organisations will be faced with
short falls and have a harder time
raising funds to carry on their day to
day projects and will thus be relying
more on the assistance Rotary can
provide.

“We’ve been very lucky, this year
for example our fishing tournament
raised more money than it did last
year so people are just working a lit-
tle harder and a little longer to get
the amounts that we need. So maybe
this year your $1000 donor can only
give $500 so you need more $500
donors. It will make it more diffi-
cult but we realise the importance
of it.

“The theme for this year is “The
Future of Rotary is in Your Hands”
and so we will be undertaking an
aggressive membership drive as well
as bridging the gap between what
we do and people knowing what we
do,” she added.
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST



TUESDAY, JULY 7 2009, PAGE 11B

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+ Wednesday@ 12 am. 24 3:12am. 02 Bermuda 80/26 71/21 ¢ 80/26 72/22 sh Billings
4 Nom CO 9:34pm. 28 3:08pm. 0.2 Bogota 66/18 47/8 r 62/16 46/7 sh ca ae
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ABACO Temperature 10:09pm. 27 3:48pm. 02 Budapest 86/30 59/15 t 81/27 54/12 pc sy
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; os F,.: @ WEST PALMBEACH i Last year's High or nertnctnette 91° F/33° C ST eB UCITH Cancun 90/32 73/22 t 96/30 76/24 t
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Anchorage 78/25 59/15 s 79/26 5915 s Jacksonville 88/31 71/21 t 90/32 72/22 t Phoenix 108/42 87/30 s 108/42 85/29 s i er P Santo Domingo ong eke pe ey lee sh
Atlanta 88/31 68/20 s 87/30 70/21 pc Kansas City 90/32 68/20 s 93/38 72/22 pc Pittsburgh 76/24 56/13 po 78/25 54/12 pc RAGGEDISLAND — Uiigt:95°F/35° a0 Paulo pe s A
Atlantic City 83/28 59/15 pc 84/28 60/15 pc Las Vegas 105/40 77/25 s 104/40 81/27 s Portland, OR 70/21 55/12 c 74/21 5412 eee Low: 78° F/26°C ear Ean Se eri Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 85/29 62/16 pc 82/27 64/17 pc _ Little Rock 94/34 6719 s 98/33 68/20 pc Raleigh-Durham 90/32 65/18 s 91/32 64/17 pc Low: 74° F/23°C sen _ Dae tae , ae oe EF
Boston 73/22 5915 t 73/22 5915 t LosAngeles 83/28 62/16 pc 83/28 62/46 pc St. Louis 87/30 70/21 pc 93/33 72/22 pe . om ae ETS Pe aT a
Buffalo 68/20 54/12 t 69/20 57413 pc Louisville 88/31 65/18 s 89/31 67419 pc SaltLake City 92/33 6347 s 86/30 60/15 s GREATINAGUA Tuva cae ae nage ae
Charleston, SC 89/31 70/21 t 89/31 70/21 t Memphis 92/33 70/21 s 93/33 73/22 pc SanAntonio 97/36 76/24 t 100/37 78/25 s High: 94° F/34°C aaa aes en 70/21 58/12 pe
Chicago 76/24 58/14 t 82/27 6618 t Miami 92/33 78/25 po 92/33 79/26 t San Diego 73/22 66/18 po 73/22 64/17 pc aw a
Cleveland 78/25 55/12 pc 73/22 59/415 pc Minneapolis 82/27 6d/17 t 77/25 66/18 t SanFrancisco 67/19 55/12 pc 70/21 54/12 pc Low: 79° F/26° ¢ ea et oe ts ore oO : (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 96/35 74/23 po 98/36 77/25 pc Nashville 88/31 64/17 s 92/33 66/18 pc Seattle 65/18 54/12 c 68/20 53/11 c Gianna 76/24 63/17 t 70/21 56/13. sh
Denver 92/33 58/14 po 95/35 6015 s New Orleans 90/32 76/24 t 90/32 74/23 t Tallahassee «86/30 71/21 t 88/31 73/22 t WS 77/28 57/13 sh 73/22 5A/12 ao — |
Detroit 77/25 5512 pc 76/24 60/15 pc New York 82/27 6417 t 81/27 65/18 pc Tampa 89/31 77/25 t 89/31 77/25 t i Winnipeg 77/95 54/42 1 re. Seat Test (242) S67-42004 J Tek (242) 332-2662 wep 2
Honolulu 88/31 75/23 po 88/31 76/24 s Oklahoma City 90/32 68/20 pc 96/35 72/22 pc — Tucson 99/37 81/27 s 99/37 78/25 pc ;
Houston 94/34 76/24 t 96/35 74/23 t Orlando 89/31 73/22 t 92/33 73/22 t Washington, DC 86/30 66/18 s 86/30 64/17 pc eh ee i ee


LAID the groundwork for the new
playground for the Bahamas Association
for the Physically Disabled.



THE TRIBUNE

2009



TUESDAY, JULY 7,





Peis eel ese eer ean | ed Cg |
eter (the) A ee et sc |

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

MICHELE Rassin is a lady of

firsts. Not only did she break
the all male barrier of the
Rotary Cub of East Nassau, to
become its first female mem-
ber, now she is its first female
president.

The Doctors Hospital execu-
tive sat down with Tribune

Woman recently to discuss ~
ie

the role Rotary has played i
her life and to discuss the ©
aggressive agenda the club”
will undertake this year.


















“TI grew up attending Rotary events with my father ( Dr
Barry Rassin) and so I have been surrounded by Rotary all of
my life.”

And while she knew that entering the traditionally all boys
club would be difficult, it was really
the organisation’s track record that
inspired her to push for membership.
Ms Rassin explained that she was
attracted to Rotary because 100 per
cent of the funds that the organisation
raises goes into their community out-
reach programmes.

“T didn’t want to give my money or
my time to an organisation that used
some of the funds for administration
purposes. Even in the church, you don’t
see a lot of the money going back into
the community as you do in Rotary so
I wanted to give my time and resources
where I knew it would be used the best
and they are a global organsation, so we
are not just helping the Bahamas, we
are helping people all over the world.”

However, her request for member-
ship seven years ago did not come with-

out controversy- “Tt was a stressful time, she says looking back.
_ ~I was very nervous, I am not one that wants or likes to cause
problems so it was very difficult for me, a lot of the members tned

SEE page 10

One of the nicest thin
that happened, was fae
Sir Durward Knowles
stood up at a meeting
and said that he was one
of the members who had
objected to my member
ship, but that he had fo
admit that he was wrong.
That meant a lot fo me.

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PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Kidnap ordeal of mother , children C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.186TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY AND HUMID HIGH 93F LOW 81F F E A T U R E S SEE‘WOMAN’ SECTION S P O R T S First lady of Rotary SEEPAGEELEVEN Bringing ‘football dream’ to reality W oman taken from her house to ATM The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com Switch to Fidelity products they have built-in savings plans:It’s not too late to build yours...Weather the storm with Fidelity. B AHAMAS BIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E A WOMAN who lives in the e astern area of New Providence was kidnapped and forced to withdraw monies from a local ATM as her captor sat in her car threatening to kill her two young children if she dared to disobey him. E arly on Sunday morning sometime before 5am, this woman, whose identity is beingw ithheld, was wakened by an unknown man who was standing over her bed and had placedh is hand over her mouth. O rdering her not to scream, he escorted her and her chil dren to the floor and demanded to know where the safe and the money was located in her home. Exclaiming that there was no safe in her house, the woman attempted to appease the burglar by handing over two Movado watches, which were esti mated to be valued together at about $3,000. Reportedly unsatisfied with this gesture, the burglar is said to then have got on top of the woman. Fearing that she was about to be raped, the woman is said to have offered the intruder the option of going to the bank where she said she could get him “some money.” A greeing to this idea, the man forced the woman into her own car and made her kneel on the floor on the front passen ger side. Although he was wear ing a mask, the man ordered her not to look at his face andt hey began to drive away from her home. However, shortly after leaving, the burglars topped and turned the car around and went back to home for the two young children whoh ad been left behind. S etting off for the Palmdale area, the man forced the woman out of the car at the Scotiabank ATM, reminding her of what he would do to her children if she did not return with the promised funds. Withdrawing $1,000 the woman is said to have handed over the cash and then demand ed that the man, who was at this point holding her children hostage to “get lost”, as he had now got what he had come for. However, the criminal refused. He placed the woman back into the car and drove the vehiSEE page eight DOWNTOWNFLOODING PEDESTRIANS pick their way through the puddles yesterday after heavy rain resulted in flooding on the sidewalks of Downtown Nassau. SEEPAGEFIVE F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Missing US woman could be murder victim found in sheet By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net AN A MERICAN woman who disappearede arlier this year is one a mong several “missing” individuals who police think could be the murder victim found wrapped in a sheet over the weekend. Police yesterday con f irmed that they are exploring the possibility that it was the body of Anna Michelle Garrison o f West Palm Beach, Florida, which was discovered by walkers in a bushy area off Fox Hill Road south on Saturday. According to unconf irmed reports, Garrison is 33-years-old and went by seven different aliases,i ncluding Anne Pugh and A nne Marie Jenkins. She is believed to have been living in the Bahamas fora bout three years prior to her disappearance. Family members are expected to be contacted today to come in and view the body, said Superinten dent Elsworth Moss. Officer in charge of the Criminal Investigation Department, Supt Moss said that like the badly decomposed corpse of the Caucasian woman found on Saturday, both Garri son and another missing woman are known to have tattoos. The dead body, detected near the Blue Water Cay development just after 6pm on Saturday, had a -year-old’ believed to have lived in Bahamas for three years before disappearance SEE page eight THE Ministry of Health last night reported what they believe to be two cases of swine flu that were contract ed by persons who were returning to New Providence from a stay in Orlando. With four confirmed cases in the Bahamas thus far, these two latest cases could push the official number up to seven if they are confirmed by Ministry officials. Ministry reports ‘two swine flu cases’ By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net THE broken knife found next to the lifeless body of internationally recognised handbag designer Harl Taylor was exhibited in Supreme Court yesterday as witness testimony in the murder trial con tinued. Troyniko McNeil, the son of Taylor’s former business partner Troy McNeil, is charged with intentionally causing the death of Harl Taylor between Saturday, November 17, and Sunday, November 18, 2007, while being concerned together with another. Taylor, 37, who was found dead at Mountbat Knife found next to body of Harl T aylor exhibited in court LOCAL psychologist Dr David Allen encouraged Bahamian teachers to better observe and understand the growing dynamics of teacher-student boundaries as the trends of old are no longer acceptable in today’s society. Speaking at the opening of the Ministry of Education’s forum at the Wyndham Crystal Palace yesterday, Dr Allen explained that sexual abuse of a child often comes after years of boundary infractions. These infractions, he said, come in the guise of the exchange of notes or e-mails, the giving of gifts or money, giving children rides home, acting as confidants, meetings outside of school on a social level, and finally the sexual abuse Psychologist warns over teacher-student boundary infractions SEE page eight SEE page eight Harl Taylor

PAGE 2

O NE of the oldest buildings in Nassau, Garrison House on g ated Queen Street, has been put up for sale. T he well-maintained, Colonial two-storey building comprises 1,774 square feet, plus 936 square feet of covered porches. “This is a fantastic location,” said Mike Lightbourn, president o f Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty and the exclusive listing a gent for the commercial prop erty. It is in the heart of Nassau’s b usiness district with the United States Embassy three doors away, providing special security for persons entering from Bay Street. The British Colonial Hilton hotel stands a stone’s throw away at the juncture of Bay and QueenS treets, and shops, restaurants, law firms and banks are all withi n walking distance. Another drawing point is the enclosed grounds of approximately 7,000 plus square feet, which provide potential parking for eight to 10 cars at the rear. Mr Lightbourn said the property is priced at $650,000. “This is a rare opportunity for s omeone to own a unique piece of real estate in a highly desirable location,” he said. This property is one of the old est buildings in Nassau and has a considerable historical past and character. It started life as Garris on House and accommodated the officers serving at Fort Nassau, which was built in 1697 and is now the Hilton hotel. The fort was destroyed around 1703-04 in a surprise attack by a combined Spanish and Frenchf orce. It is said they found the Deputy Governor feasting, the f ort neglected and without a garrison. The town was sacked and b urned, the fort destroyed and its guns spiked, and the inhabitants expelled. The fort was later rebuilt. Many of the original features of Garrison House have been preserved and restored to o ffer an outstanding residence or office, with all of the charm and grace of yesteryear. Garrison House was the Bishop of New York’s winter residence during the early 19th century. The well-known Tamberly S chool started here before mov ing to the west of New Provi-d ence. And, to add a twist of intrigue, the grounds of the house a re said to harbour a major Bahamian historical secret. The seller says that the secret, in time honoured tradition, will be revealed to the successful buyer. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE A FTER braving considerable o pposition to become a member o f the largest Rotary Club in the Bahamas, Michele Rassin has been elected its first female president. She has been involved in Rotary since childhood, attending and volunteering for events through her father Barry Rassin, a past president, district governor and now one of 17 directors of Rotary International around the world. As the first woman to join the Rotary Club of East Nassau seven years ago, Ms Rassin says she felt constantly compelled to prove her worth to both supporters and sceptics. She therefore committed her time and energy to as many of the club’s community projects as possible – a task that was also a pleasure, as it was the idea of being u seful that first drew her to the c lub. Ms Rassin said that despite the controversy sparked by her d ecision to join – no less than t hree members formally objected and others threatened to quit – it was not an attempt to rock the b oat, but rather an expression of h er desire to help the less fortu n ate as effectively as possible. She p ointed out that while numerous c harity groups were already a ccepting women at the time, R otary was the only one she knew of that dedicated every cent it raised to charity, using none for administrative or other purposes. "I really wanted to dedicate my time and my resources to give back 100 per cent, where I know where it was going to be used for t he best," she said. S till, Ms Rassin was aware of the entrenched attitudes that provoked the hostile reaction of some m embers, and was determined to take them on. "I don't think people should be judged based on their race, sex or religion; your work performances hould stand for itself, and I have a passion for doing work within the community, and I didn't thinkp olitics should be the deciding fac tor on somebody who wants to h elp make things better for somebody else, to make a difference,” she told The Tribune . About 20 years ago, American branches of what was until thent he archetypal boys club began taking female members – after aU S Supreme Court ruling com pelled them to – and eventually c lubs around the world followed suit, including some in the Bahamas. There have been other female presidents of local club branches in the past, but not East Nassau – where many were keen to preserve what they saw as an i mportant tradition. But things have indeed changed, if the overwhelming support for Ms Rassin expressed at the handing-over dinner on Sat-u rday, June 27, was any indicat ion. The new has president said she will not let her supportersd own, and has ambitious plans for her one year term. These include t he donation of hearing aids and eye glasses to children of economically challenged families, the provision of wheelchairs to those who cannot afford them, the pur-c hase of ventilators and incubators for the Princess MargaretH ospital, and the launch of the Bahamas' first "blood mobile." T his last project, which she has been working on for a year, will see the commissioning of a van fully equipped to conduct blood drives at businesses or other locations, in an effort to improve blood reserves. "We make it easi er, by bringing the blood drive to you," she said. Perhaps the most significant aspect of the project, she explained, is that by taking advan-t age of the mail boat system, the v ehicle can conduct the first blood drives on Family Islands. A ll Rotary projects depend on charity, and no one would be surp rised if businessmen have become more reluctant to give of late. But Ms Rassin said she is determined not to let the world’s economic troubles get in the wayo f her plans. If anything, she said, Rotary members must try evenh arder, as the ranks of the needy will inevitably grow, and other n on-profit aid organisations will begin to struggle. See today’s Tribune Woman for more on our talk with Michele Rassin Michele Rassin makes Rotary history History on the market UP FOR SALE: Garrison House on gated Queen Street. East Nassau Club’s first female president elected MICHELE RASSIN receiving the Rotary Club of East Nassau Gold Citation Award from the Past District Governor Rupert Ross.

PAGE 3

By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net REDUCING violence in schools, attracting and retaining quality teachers and adopting a more relevant national curriculum are among the 22 goals laid out in the Ministry of Education’s Ten Year Education Plan. Hundreds of education delegates from across the Bahamas yesterday scrutinised the ministry’s plan for the future of education during the first day of t he 2009 National Education Summit. The two-day conference at the Wyndham Nassau Resort is encouraging discussion between delegates and educators from every island, as well as public and private stakeholders so that their thoughts and recommendations may be considered before the plan is passed in par l iament and implemented for all government schools in the next school year. Minister of Education Carl Bethel said the specific goals set out in the plan are all the more sustainable as they have been developed by educators for educators and will outlast any political changes. Three advisory committees f or preand primary schools, secondary schools, and post-sec ondary/tertiary education, also will be established at the summit to ensure continued discussions and developments. Positive Mr Bethel said: “We must do more to effect positive and substantial improvements in the quality of education. Excellence must become the standard, the only standard that is acceptable in public education.” The minister said it will no longer be acceptable for a child to leave primary school without having reached the grade level in literacy and numeracy, or to maintain the CBJC aver age in junior high school, or for so many students to struggle to meet a 2.0 grade point average in senior high school. “Well enough is no longer good enough. We want to ensure the education system is holistic in providing an effec tive environment, programmes and opportunities to enable students to develop their capacity to make positive choices as literate citizens. “Our ability to adequately meet the needs of all facets of society are all predicated on our ability to prepare our studentsto be leaders who are analytical, independent thinkers with the problem-solving capacity to make a positive difference.” Educational needs are changi ng in a modern world and students’ individual needs and abilities must be catered to, Mr Bethel said. He emphasised the importance of vocational training required for some students to excel, and the academic training other students require. “I believe the days of an u nscientific, ideology-driven, ‘one size fits all’ approach to high school education must end, and must end now,” Mr Bethel said. “A child’s high school should not be randomly decided by which primary school he or she attended, but rather should reflect and cater to the child’s educational inclination and individual learning needs.” E ducators yesterday dis cussed the plan in groups and will report on their recommendations this morning. They will then participate in the election of officers and the appointment of the three new sub-committees. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham will speak at the closing of the summit this afternoon. A 28-year-old man charged in connection with a murder on Bimini last week was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Police have charged Chrisco Knowles of Seven Hills, with the July 1 murder of Vernon Rolle. According to reports, Rolle was stabbed to death during an altercation with another man around 5.35 pm on Wednesday. Rolle was reportedly stabbed in the stomach outside Sue and Joy's Variety Store in Alice Town, Bimini. He was taken by private vehicle to hospital for treatment where he later died becoming the country’s 38th murder victim for the year. Knowles, who appeared before Chief Magis trate Roger Gomez yesterday with his left arm in a cast and sling, was not required to enter a plea to the murder charge. He was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case was transferred to Court 5, Bank Lane and adjourned to July 14 for men tion. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009, PAGE 3 Policeman quizzed overB ay Street shop robbery W anted Grand Bahama fugitive ar r ested after police chase In brief B y ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A POLICE officer has been questioned in connec-t ion with the robbery of a high-end Bay Street shop, the Central Detective Unit confirmed. Superintendent Elsworth Moss, in charge of the CDU,s aid the officer was questioned yesterday, but added that it is not known if he willb e formally charged at this stage. S everal other individuals have also been questioned in the wake of the robbery oft he downtown Breitling boutique on Sunday. S taff at the store were forced to hand over thousands of dollars worth ofd esigner watches when a robber threatened them at gunpoint. It was alleged that a police officer may have acted as al ookout while the crime was being committed. It was the second armed r obbery of a Bay Street store in just seven days. S taff at a Little Switzerland shop were confronted by a gunman who made simil ar demands last Sunday. This time around, officers f rom the Central Police Station caught up with an a rmed suspect, who was then taken into custody. Yesterday, Supt Moss con f irmed that police believe the suspect may be responsible for both robberies. By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE president of the Bahamas Nurses Union is sticking to her guns the union has no plans to reconsider its rejection of gov e rnment’s insurance offer, she says. B NU president Cleola Hamilton told The Tribune yesterday t hat as far as she is aware there are no further meetings sched uled with government representatives. She said she would “pre fer not to comment” any furthera t this time as to what the union’s next step may be in the continu i ng dispute between the two parties. M s Hamilton reiterated that in the union’s view government’s last proposal relating to insurance coverage for the nurses is “no offer at all.” H undreds of nurses called in sick for over two weeks in June, c rippling the healthcare system, after Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham announced in May that the government “cannot afford” to pay for (the nurses’ $10.5 million health insurance this budget year.” After sitting down to talk with the union two weeks later, the government said it could cover the nurses for all “work-related” sicknesses and injuries, provide some private rooms for them to be treated in at the Princess Margaret Hospital, and bring in their insurance coverage by July 1, 2010, or before, if feasible. Proposal But Ms Hamilton said nurses rejected that offer on the same day it was made, and yesterday dismissed Health Minister Hubert M innis’ call for the union to reconsider the proposal before it e xpires on Thursday. She maintains that the aspect of the proposal that commits the government to cover the expense of any work-related injuries goes n o further than what is already available to workers under the N ational Insurance Board. This comes after Dr Minnis s aid last week that he hopes the nurses could “look at the situation globally” in terms of the economic challenges facing countries the world over and review their o pposition to government’s offer. Commenting on where the B NU goes from here, Ms Hamilton said, “we will have to see.” S he said she “will have to see some stuff” before she can say whether she feels that there isa nything else that can be done by the union to cause government t o put another offer on the table. The BNU’s counter-proposal demands that government implement its insurance coverage this year. The union said the coverage is critical given the risks that nurses are exposed to in the course of their daily duties. L IA-ALEXIS Ritchie, a St Andrews High School student, was elected to represent the Bahamas at the People-t o-People Leadership Summit at Harvard University in Boston, which was held last week Sunday, June 28, to Saturday,J uly 4. M s Ritchie joined students from around the world to discuss issues such as leadership, team building, community service, college admissions,a nd professional aspirations. T he Summit also allowed students to work on an action plan to makea difference in their communities and develop skills that will help themi n becoming leaders in tomorrow's world. P eople-to-People was founded by former president Dwight D Eisenhow-e r during his presidency in 1956. Its People-toP eople Ambassador programmes were set up to fulfil President Eisenhow-e r's vision for fostering world citizenship. B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – One of G rand Bahama’s most wanted fugitives was apprehended on Monday afternoon foll owing a police chase on Queen’s Highway. Asst Supt Welbourne Boo tle reported that Garin Gib son and a female were taken i nto police custody sometime after 3.30pm when the chase ended in a three-car collision near Colony Motors. Mr Bootle said police were in pursuit of a vehicle, driven by Gibson, which crashed into two other vehicles. He fled from the vehicle and ran into the surrounding area to escape capture. A female passenger in the vehicle was immediately tak en into custody, while police cordoned off the area to search for Gibson. Standstill Police had cordoned off an area on Queen’s Highway near Dolly Madison, bringing traffic to a standstill on the busy commercial causeway. A large crowd of onlookers had gathered in the area. The K-9 Unit was also called to the scene to assistin the search for Gibson, who was later found hiding in the back trunk of a vehicle at Colony Motors. Mr Bootle said that two persons were seriously injured in the collision and taken to hospital. Gibson is wanted for questioning in connection with several serious offences. He had managed to elude police for a long time. In March, the police had classified Gibson as their “number one” wanted suspect and had appealed to the public for assistance in his capture. Ministry sets sights on reducing school violence Nurses union sticks to rejection of government’s insurance offer TEN-YEAREDUCATION PLAN Other goals include attracting quality teachers and making curriculum more relevant Lia-Alexis Ritchie represented Bahamas at ‘leaders’ summit CARL BETHEL Man, 28, char ged with Bimini murder H UBERT MINNIS I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s “Excellence must become the standard, t he only standard that i s acceptable in public e ducation.”

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I am concerned. We are paying how much to dredge the Harbour to allow cruise ships to be here for shorter periods of time with restaurants and shops open on board? The primary reason for ships to come to the Bahamas is because dumping garbage here is cheaper than doing it in the USA, and to visit their own private Cays where they sell their own Made in China souvenirs and staff the island with non Bahamians. We allow ships to dump their garbage here when we cannot adequately dispose of garbage generated by our population. There is still no Straw Market (which I can assure you is not “World Famous” for the reasons we would like), and it seems that every morning I drive through Bay Street it looks shabbier and shops are getting fewer. Tour operators will be an endangered species once ships stop in Nassau so briefly that there is no time to do excursions except on the Cay owned by whothe cruise ship company! Currently the Government owes the cruise ship association millions of dollars in rebates for bringing people here, even if those people have never left the boat in Nassau, or even if the boat does not dock at all! So I ask, how much does it actually cost all of us who live here for others to have a vacation on a cruise ship in the Bahamas? S APPLETON Nassau, July, 2009. RE: Avid Reader and "the middle road between the extremes of capitalism and socialism" EDITOR, The Tribune. Thanks to Avid Reader for having written again to suggest there are benefits to "the middle road between the extremes of capitalism and socialism" telling us that he or she seeks that "elusive Utopia where capitalism with a human face resides" . One would say both major political parties here are some where between capitalists and socialists, using the mixed economy economic model, and the country does not appear to function very well in numerous areas as Avid Reader pointed out a couple weeks back. But neither capitalism or socialism has a "human face". As Ludwig von Mises tells us, in economics there is "Human Action". Put another way, Adam Smith, the "father of econom ics," said that: "It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker, that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own interest. We address ourselves, not to their humanity but to their self-love, and never talk to them of our necessities but of their advan tages" (The Wealth of Nations, Book I Chapter II). And this Human Action, as described by Smith, is the cen tral point of The Nassau Institute's position. Avid Reader then suggests that the state should take care of us in times of need. Many of us, (including Avid Reader), complain about government and the grief it causes, albeit unintentionally. Yet he or she calls on them to fix the things they already control by doing more. What makes us believe that they will succeed in "helping" us this time with further government initiatives like unemployment insurance? Particularly when it is in essence another Ponzi Scheme that will leave future generations worse off. Recognise that unemployment premiums paid by both employers and employees is a tax on labour. The premium deduction for employers is a cost that must be passed on to consumers. For the employed person it is a reduction of income. Also harmful, it creates dependency over time, and a disincentive to find employment. The cost of a new gov ernment bureaucracy with its attendant inefficiencies and possible corruption has to be paid for. Tax increases inevitably follow. Any right thinking person is concerned about helping the less fortunate, but history shows us that this is more easily accomplished by growing the economic pie with sensible economic policy than with policies that destroy wealth. Policies such as those offered by welfare states, or those that prevent people opening a business or high taxes, etc, that discour age the entrepreneur and reduce economic growth. Witness the many private trusts in the United States that are established by wealthy peo ple to assist others because of their ability to grow the economic pie. Locally we can refer to many Bahamians who have been able to succeed and thereby grow the economic pie and in the process give to local charities and individuals in need. The letter writer also seems to suggest that our policy recommendations are limited to Dr. Milton Friedman. Having read various books and articles by economists like John Maynard Keynes, Milton Friedman, Friedrich Hayek, Ludwig von Mises, Thomas Sowell, Lawrence Reed, Arthur Seldon and numerous others, we have come to the conclusion that with economic policy it is not whether a public (government) policy comes from the left or right that should matter. What is of paramount importance is if the prescribed policy is right or wrong, or works or does not work. A quick read we would highly recommend for Avid Reader is Henry Hazlitt's Economics in One Lesson. Is the Free Market or Capitalism perfect? Of course not. But, it has brought more people out of poverty than any other economic system. Finally, Avid Reader sug gests once more that we are resistant to change and want to preserve the status quo. Please be assured Avid Reader, The Nassau Institute and our membership are all about changing the status quo and our web site( http://www.nassauinstitute.org ) is a growing testament to the changes we advocate in favour of the Free Market. RICK LOWE Vice President, The Nassau Institute, June 27, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm THE PROBLEMS of Bay Street seem to spin in a vicious circle. Merchants need business, government has entered into a contract with C arnival Cruise lines to guarantee 1.4 million visitors a year to satisfy their needs but it is now up to merchants to lure these visitors off their ships and on to shabby Bay Street. P lanning is underway for the redesign of B ay Street, but in the meantime most Bay Street shops need a good cleanup that can only be done with a couple of coats of paint. We can understand the reluctance of merc hants to expend such funds on their buildings knowing that by the end of a week they will a gain take on that grubby look from the exhaust of the vehicular traffic especially the large b uses that daily choke the narrow street. Before anything can be done to give Bay Street a face-lift if it’s only to wash the store fronts traffic has to be removed from what used to be Nassau’s main shopping thoroughf are. The removal of the unwieldy, exhaustpuffing buses would be a good place to start. G overnment has an agreement from Carni val to overnight in port. But how many cruisep assengers will leave their ships for an empty, dismal Bay Street when entertainment is provided on board? This is something that merchants will have to think about and plan for. Special patrols will also have to be provided to g uarantee round-the-clock safety. Government has brought visitors to merc hants’ doorsteps, it is now up to the merchants to get them into their stores but without s hopping, dining or clubs to liven up an after 5 o’clock Bay Street, there will be no evening trade. Whatever management committee is appointed for Bay Street its members’ first o rder of business should be to decide what standard and look they want for Bay Street. Colours a nd shop designs that would detract from the atmosphere that the majority are trying to a chieve should be discouraged. We recall when many years ago there were regulations to maintain an attractive looking island with homesa nd businesses painted in pastel shades the flamingo pink being the favourite. Today anyt hing goes with some of the most garish looking colours imaginable. The Bahamian flag fluttering from the top of a flagstaff has its place, but the combination of its colours when formed into decorative bunting or streamers around buildings are an unfortunate blend rather than creating a joyful mood, they look too funereal. But that probably is a matter of personal taste. However, if this is going to be the decoration on state occasions, then professionals should be consulted as to the colour buildings should be painted so that when this bunting g oes up the effect will be dramatic rather than drab. However, there are points to commend as government tries to create green spaces alongB ay Street. T he little park at Armstrong and East Bay Streets has been greatly improved and with the daily rains is blooming in beauty as is the Bay and Mackey Street park, the Eastern Parade a nd the disused Eastern Cemetery. Atlantis has greatly improved the strip lead i ng over the bridge to Paradise, but the chains connecting the small posts constructed to keep c ars from running onto the greens have since been smashed by an indifferent public. A small team of workers will have to be assigned to these parks for daily care if only to protect them from the abuses of uncaring, g arbage-littering citizens. Motorists should also be more careful about driving on the road pro v ided for them and not run up onto curbs dam aging them and cracking the sidewalks. I t is a shame that an historic landmark opposite the Eastern Parade is being allowed to crumble for lack of care. Early in the last century it was at this landing ramp that Pan Amer ican Airways with its seaplanes introduced the B ahamas to the age of aviation and from which many an international celebrity stepped ashore. T his is where the late Eugene Dupuch, QC, for whom the Eugene Dupuch Law Library is n amed, as a young teenager conducted his first interview for The Tribune. Himself an accom plished pianist, young Eugene was delighted to quiz Irving Berlin. In the early days this building was painted w hite with black trim. In later years it was repainted in PanAm’s colours white with b lue trim. Most people preferred the original colours of black and white. I n later years the building was taken over by the Traffic Department and rapidly started to decline for lack of maintenance. Today it hasb een totally abandoned. It is in such a bad state that it should either be r estored as a small museum with the early history of PanAm and the delivery of mail and the first airline-borne tourists, or it should be torn down. But to be allowed to stand in its present state detracts from the present beauty of the Eastern Parade on the opposite side of the road. If we are to have an attractive island all Bahamians from every walk of life will have to participate in its upkeep. Growing the economic pie will help the poor LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Bay Street needs to be revamped NOTICE is hereby given that ALBERT SAINTRE of MINI STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 30th day of June, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE Looking at cr uise ship business decline

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By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A FTER years of com plaints from Acklins resi dents, government has start ed soliciting bids to repair t he island’s Queen’s Highw ay. MP for the island AlfredG ray yesterd ay said the news that the “almost impassable” thoroughfare willbe addressed “isa step in the right direction.” But he urged that the work must be done “with urgency.” Residents have described the road as being in a “deplorable” state a blight on the island’s attractiveness as a tourist destination and a burden on the pockets of islanders who regularly send off to Nassau for parts to repair their rattled cars. The people of Acklins have had to endure their hopes of an improvement to the road being dashed on more than one occasion. A $3.4 million contract signed in September 2006 to pave the route which residents say was “scraped” in 1996 but never repaved was cancelled by the government after the May 2007 election. Former FNM Works Minister Earl Deveaux told par liament the contract was awarded without competitive bidding and that prior to its cancellation there was concern over whether it would be completed. Yesterday, Mr Gray welcomed the government’s decision to put out to tender the contract to finally repair Queen’s Highway and provide periodical maintenanceof the 32.3 mile, two-lane road. Contractors are being invited to bid up until August 14, 2009 to carry out the patching and sealing maintenance of around 290,000 square yards of the road, the replacement of thebase course layer and the placement of a new surface seal on about 100,000 square yards of the road. The work is to be funded by the Bahamas government and the Ninth EuropeanD evelopment Fund. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 , PAGE 5 B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net FORMER Bahamas Bar Association president Wayne Munroe is remaining tightlipped about the reasons b ehind his decision not to run f or re-election and reports that his law partnership with Elliott Lockhart is to be dissolved. Asked yesterday to comm ent on why he did not run for the position of Bar President for a fourth time in the J une 26 elections, Mr Munroe s aid that his decision was in p art down to the fact that he h ad already served on the bar c ouncil for around a decade. Served “I was president for six y ears, vice president for four. I may have even been on the council before but I definitelys erved on the bar council for at least 10 years,” said the l awyer. However, he noted that also p laying a part in the his determ ination not to stand again was “something” which he has t o “pay close attention to in the next 12 to 18 months”. I thought it was appropriate to pay close attention to that,” said Mr Munroe, adding that the matter is not something he “can openly discuss”. He added that the presid ency of the BBA – now held b y Ruth Bowe-Darville – is a n unpaid position which nonetheless “takes a lot of time, dedication and devotion.” Post U pon winning the presidency, former vice president of the BBA Mrs BoweDarville revealed that Mr Munroe had initially indicated his intention to run again for the top post. H owever, she said he w ithdrew from the running several days prior to the elect ion. O ver the past few weeks, r eports have surfaced which suggest that Mr Munroe’s 12 year law partnership withE lliott Lockhart, who recently returned to the firm after a stint as a judge, is to be dissolved. Mr Munroe started working for Mr Lockhart in 1990 and partnered with him to f orm the well-known and succ essful firm in 1997. W hen asked about the claims, Mr Lockhart did notc onfirm or deny them. He d eclined to comment on the matter when contacted a week ago. When questioned about the reports yesterday, Mr Munroe also refused to confirm or deny them, stating that he cannot respond “at this point”. Former Bahamas Bar Association president keeping tight-lipped Govt soliciting bids to repair Acklins’ Queen’ s Highway FLOODING I NTHESTREETS of Downtown Nassau posed a challenge for these pedestrians yesterday following heavy rain in the afternoon. FLOODINGWOESINNASSAU Alfred Gray BAYAMON, Puerto Rico ACTOR BENICIO DEL T OROmet with convicts i nside a Puerto Rican p rison Monday, offering encouragement to a jailhouse theater group and a few tips from his own Oscar-winning career, according to Associated P ress. The Puerto Rico-born actor interrupted his vacation in the U.S. Caribbean territory for the talk at Bayamon Regional Prisono utside the capital, San Juan. "I believe everyone needs a second chance," del Toro told about 30 inmates who take part in the theater group. "I am here to help r eaffirm that as long as there is life, you can still help society in some way, you can improve yourself." H e encouraged the i nmates to read as part of t heir rehabilitation, saying reading has been crucial to his own growth as an actor. The inmates performed a sketch for the actor and thanked him for coming. " It's a great thing to be able to share with an artist who is famous, who has been making movies in Hollywood," said Carlos Baez Figueroa, 39, who isi n prison for murder. Del Toro won a supporting actor Oscar for his role in the movie "Traffic" and starred in last year's "Che," a film biography of Latin American revolutionary C he Guevara. Benicio del Toro pays visit to Puerto Rico prison

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BAHAMAS Agricultural and Industrial Corporation’s domestic investment officer Alphonso Smith was honoured by the All-Andros and Berry Islands Regatta Committee for “dedicated services to the community.” BAIC executive chairman Edison Key hailed him as “a North Androsian extraordinaire,” one who has given dis tinguished and unblemished service to all the Bahamas. “As our domestic invest ment officer for North Andros, Mr Smith is forever coming up with ideas and suggestions to improve the quality of life for North Androsians,” he said during a banquet last weekend. Mr Smith held positions with the Water and Sewerage Corporation and Bahamas Elec tricity Corporation, served on the town planning committee, and was one of the organisers of the Bahamas Games. In 1988, the now retired senior administrator Everette Hart formed the first North Andros Sailing Club and it was through Mr Smith that organised sailing became established on the island. From three boats in Conch Sound to an entire fleet of native sloops in Morgan’s Bluff, the North Andros and Berry Islands Regatta has become an important fixture on the regatta calendar. From regatta commodore and chairman, Mr Smith was elected as member of local government and served as chief councillor for three consecutive terms. He is founder of the North Andros Sea Food Splash and the Red Bays Snapper Tour nament and Cultural Festival. Said senior deputy administrator Dr Huntley Christie: “There’s no other person at this time who deserves this recognition for his hard work, com mitment and sense of duty.” A priest warden at St Margaret’s and St Mary Magdalene’s in North Andros, Mr Smith is married to Andrea Smith. He is the father of eight children. He is also an avid backyard farmer. YOUNG writers in the Family Islands were awarded laptop computers when announced w inners of the annual Templeton Foundation “Laws of Life’ e ssay competition. Bernique Pinder, a grade 11 pupil at Crooked Island High School, and Justin Jack, a grade eight student at South AndrosH igh School, were selected from more than 80 entrants who wrote on the subjects, “If youd on’t use it, you’ll lose it” and “Crime doesn’t pay.” Bernique wrote on the first s ubject, citing a Biblical story i n the Gospel of St Luke, and the tale of American bridge builder John Roebling who wasl eft brain damaged in a con struction accident and yet continued to build the bridge fromN ew York City to Long Island, c ompleting it 13 years after starting it. J ustin perceptively tackled t he difficult subject of murder and showed how it affects the families of both the victim andt he perpetrator as children who lose a parent to murder also lose hope and financial security,w hile those whose parents have committed murder are scarred with the stigma of the crime. E ducation Minister Carl Bethel praised the Family Island students for their work, and said it was a sign of an e qual quality of education across the Bahamas and of young men working towards a brighter future. Speaking in a prize-giving c eremony at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort he said financial cutbacks made by the edu c ation department this year do not mean children will fall behind, as long as parents ares upportive and encourage their s tudies. John Templeton Jr said his father would have been proudo f the students’ work. The late Sir John Templeton founded the “Laws of Life” e ssay competition in the 1990’s, and although it was inactive fora time it has now been relaunched in cooperation with t he Ministry of Education. Runners-up were awarded digital cameras, I-pod music players and cash prizes. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE GRADUATES of CC Sweeting Senior High School have been encouraged to attend the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute where they will soon be able to obtain associate degrees. Ministry of Education Permanent Secretary Elma Garraway congratulated the Class of 2009 during the graduation ceremony at the Holy Trinity activity centre on June 17. She told them that they are the only graduating class in the public school system where most of the graduates have skills they can take into the workplace or use to open their own businesses. She told the graduates to dream big and work their way from “rags to riches.” Head girl Nadia McQuay was presented the Valedictorian Award and Jermaine Tucker was given the Salutorian Award and named Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity’s 2009 Valedictorian. More than 100 students at the ceremony received awards in addition to their diplomas. The humanities award went to Nicholas Rose for the selfless support he showed his friend Deniro LaFrenier, by helping him to class during his three years at CC Sweeting. Deniro is unable to walk. Deniro was presented with a motorised wheelchair by the graduating class. Encouragement for CC Sweeting graduates MRS. ELMA GARRAWAY , Permanent Secr etary in the Ministry of Education told the g raduating class of C. C. Sweeting Senior H igh that they have the distinction of being the only graduating class in the entire public school system where most of its graduates have the skills that will enable to go into the workplace or to open their own b usinesses. Family Island competition winners have the write stuff P ICTURED L-R (FRONT ROW M rs. Mena Griffith, Templeton Found ation; Mrs. Leanora Archer, Deputy Director of Education; Pastor Allan Lee, Calvary Bible Church; Mrs. Elma Garraway, Permanent Secretary, Min i stry of Education, Dr. John Templeton Jr. and Mrs. John Templeton. BACK ROW: Edward Moss, Bishop Michael Eldon High School; Myr keeva Johnson, Doris Johnson High School; Toi Johnson, Queen’s College; A dmad Pratt, Queen’s College; Justin Jack, Junior Winner, South Andros High School; Bernique Pinder, Crooked High School, Senior Winner; Morgan Adderley, Queen’s College and Tanisha Adderley, L. W. Young Junior High School. ALPHONSO SMITH (left presented with an award of appreciation from the North Andros and Berry Islands Regatta Committee. Also pictured from right are Don na Pickstock and Darnell Evans. BAIC domestic investment officer honoured for community service PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti BILL CLINTON aims to refocus international attention on this Caribbean country's deep economic problems and environmental decay during his first visit as the United Nations' special envoy to Haiti, according to Associated Press. The former U.S. president, who is expected to meet with Haitian President Rene Preval and visit hurricane-battered areas, is lending his prestige to the plightof the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere as world attention has shifted to the global financial crisis and other trouble spots. He was scheduled to arrive late Monday, but no public events were planned until Tuesday, the United Nations said. The three-day visit will be Clinton's second to Haiti this year. He toured Port-au-Prince with U.N. Secretary-General Ban Kimoon, recording artist Wyclef Jean and others in March, before Ban named him to the newly cre ated post in May. Clinton spoke at a Haiti donors conference at the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington in April that generated $324 million in aid pledges. As U.N. envoy, his aims include investment and job creation, particularly by expanding garment factories that export to the United States, and repairing Haiti's severe deforestation. Those priorities were laid out in a 19-page report to Ban by Oxford University professor Paul Collier in January that was praised by Preval and other leaders. But the report has been criticized by lawmakers and other Haitians who see the garment fac tories as havens for exploitative l abor. Workers in the factories make a minimum salary of $1.72 a day, though some are paid more. A bill passed by Haiti's parlia ment to raise the daily minimum wage to $5.14 was rejected by Preval, contributing to frustrations that have fueled street protests and kept most votersa way from the polls during last month's Senate elections. Bill Clinton making first Haiti visit asUN envoy

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By REV DR EMMETTE WEIR I T APPEARS as if there is a widespread impression that the Church is strongly opposed to the idea of legalization of the informal Bahamian national lottery, commonly known as “playing numbers” or simply “numbers”! Yes, according to this unders tanding of the contemporary situation, there are many in this nation in all walks of life who would like to see “the playing of numbers” become legal, but they are reluctant to take steps to bring about this change because the Church is so strongly opposed to it. Yet, when the situation is c arefully examined, it can be stated that “nothing can be farther from the truth!” As a matter of fact, there are at least four responses to the legalizing of “numbers” within the Christian community in the Com monwealth of the Bahamas. It is therefore, appropriate to discusst hem with a view to coming up with a more balanced and fair assessment of the Church's teaching with regard to legalizing “numbers.” But first, a brief comment on the Biblical and theological issues in the case of the Christian teaching on gambling, f or, as will be demonstrated, it informs the teaching and pract ice of the various denominations of the church with regard to legalizing “numbers.” Here it is germane to note that there are, indeed, certain moral precepts which are clearly and unequivocally decreed in the m ajor moral codes of the Bible the Ten Commandments ( Exodus 20) and the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7 include the total rejection of idolatry, commanding respect for parents, respect for life, respect for the property of others, the sanctity of the vows of matrimon y, the condemnation of lying and the condemnation of covetousness. All Christians recognize the authority and validity of these moral precepts, and, indeed, they are observed by adherents of all the world's predominant religions, for there is an amazing unity amongst people of all the major religions of humankind when it comes to these fundamental ethical prin ciples. There are, however, other moral issues on which the teaching of the Bible is not so clear. One of these certainly is “gam bling.” Or, to put it another way, whereas the major ethical prohi bitions are prefaced by the cate gorical “Thou Shalt Not” for example “thou shalt not steal,” “thou shalt not kill (murder “thou shalt not commit adultery,” etc, nowhere is it decreed: “Thou shalt not gamble!” Thus the Rev. Alfred T. Thompson, who incidentally, supports the idea of the national lottery, in the “Guest Commentary” published in The Freeport News on Monday, June 22, correctly sums up the Biblical position: “As a Biblical student, I have researched the scriptures from Genesis to Revelation and have not found anything against gambling. However, references are made about gambling, such as I Timothy 6:10 and Ecclesiastics 5:10 which include scriptures on the love and greed of money, respectively. Therefore, the Bible does not indicate any wrong with gambling as long as it is done in moderation. Now, since the teaching of the Bible on gambling is not clearcut, then it follows logically that the attitude and teaching of a particular Christian denomination must be based on theological grounds. Concisely, the Biblical scholars and theologians of a Christian body have to come to a moral position on gambling on the basis of principles gleaned from the interpretation of rele vant texts from the Bible, its theological propositions and history. For instance, the Methodist Church has been consistent in taking a strong stand against gambling, as a matter of historical fact and took the lead in opposing the introduction of casinosby the late Sir Stafford Sands as a means of boosting tourism. As such, raffles are prohibited in its fund raising programmes. This is precisely because the Methodist Church, on the basis of “the Law of love” in the teaching of Jesus (Mark 12:28-32 ley's seminal sermon on the use of money, hold tenaciously to the teaching that gambling is moral ly wrong. It is held that gambling, or as some prefer “gaming” is wrong because in any such game, in order for a person to gain something, then his or her neigh bour must lose. On the other hand, the moral theologians of the Roman Catholic Church, interpreting the texts of Holy Scripture from the perspective of the concept of Natural Law, as expounded in the works of its leading theologian, St. Thomas Aquinas, hold to a much more “liberal” position on gambling. Hence in the case of Catholicism, the holding of raffles and bingo games are practised as important, legitimate methods of raising money for the mission of the Church. It is clear, then, that there is no consensus amongst Christians when it comes to the matter of gambling. This, then inevitably impacts upon the respective attitudes of Christian bodies and clergypersons when the matter at stake h ere is considered “the pros and cons” of legalizing the informal Bahamian lottery numbers. Now, it has been asserted that there are at least four responses to this burning moral issue within the vast Christian community in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. With the caveat a lready discussed, it is now appropriate to discuss them, albeit rather briefly and in a cursory, rather than detailed manner. First and foremost. There are those Christian bodies and clergypersons who are uncompromising in their opposition to l egalizing numbers. Indeed, sev eral leading clergypersons of this grouping have spoken out loud and clear in stating their strong opposition to any attempt to legalize “the playing of numbers.” Most outspoken in their oppos ition in this regard are that young dynamic duo, Pastor Lyall Bethel of Grace Community Church, and Pastor Cedric Moss of Kingdom Life Church. Likewise, Pastor Leonard Johnson, President of the Bahamas Conference of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church, the Rev. Dr. W illiam Thompson, outgoing President of the huge Bahamas Baptist Missionary & Educational Convention, Bishop John Humes of the Church of God, The Rev. William “Bill” Higgs, President of the Bahamas Conference of the Methodist Church, Bishop Elgarnet Rahming, Presi dent of the Church of God of Prophecy, and Bishop the Rev. Dr. Raymond Neilly, President of the Bahamas Turks and Caicos Islands Conference of the Methodist Church in the Caribbean and the Americas, have all come out in opposing the legalizing of numbers. By thes ame token, Pastor Anthony Grant of Freeport, Grand Bahama, has also declared strong opposition to it. Likewise the Rev. Patrick Paul, President of the influential Bahamas Christian Council, after making a statement that was interpreted by some as being not-too-veiled supp ort of the concept of legalizing numbers, quickly clarified his position in joining with his ministerial colleagues in condemning the idea of moving in that direction. Evidently then, there is a large and influential body of Christian denominations and leading clerg ypersons who are strongly opposed to legalizing numbers and any move in that direction would, inevitably come up against the challenge of this powerful and influential segment of the Church. Secondly, there are those who have come to the conclusion that t he way ahead is to hold a referendum. They are plainly aware of the fact that the present situation, in which the playing of numbers is illegal, yet is practised openly by Bahamians from all walks of life, is clearly untenable, unbearable, a nd, indeed unethical. As declared in another article in the media, this writer is at one with those who believe that the people should be given an opportunity to express their opin ion. Concisely, that there should be a period of open discussion in every forum from the House of A ssembly, to discussions in the barber shops, in which the pros and cons are debated. Then, the matter should be put to the vote. It is submitted that such an approach would be in keeping with the concept of democracy, which is one of the three principles enshrined in our Constitut ion, the others being Christianity and the rule of Law. Indeed, it can be argued with a fair degree of cogency, that the holding of a referendum is in line with all three principles upon which this nation was established. This writer is by no means alone. A number of clergyper s ons are in favour of it. the Rev. Henry Francis, for instance, an executive officer of Bahamas Faith Ministries, has long held that a referendum would be the best way of dealing with this matter. Interestingly enough, Rev. Francis is strongly of the convict ion that should such a referendum be held, those opposed to legalizing numbers would prevail. Who dares suggest that he is under a delusion? If anything, events in recent years in our region have demonstrated that referenda are amazingly unpredictable. Thirdly, there are those within the Christian fold who appear to give tacit support to the idea of legalizing numbers. They certainly have not been forthright i n apposing such an idea. Nor have they clearly stated that they are in favour of such a development. While not reading too much into their silence on this now highly controversial and essentially complex burning issue, it may be inferred that they see nothing morally wrong with legalizing numbers. The adage is relevant here, “silence gives consent”! Finally, there are those clergypersons who are very strong in supporting the idea of legalizing n umbers. While this writer has had occasion to speak to clergypersons who are in favour of legalizing numbers, he can state without fear of contradiction that the most outspoken, and indeed, C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009, PAGE 7 The Church and ‘playing numbers’ Y OUR S AY SEE page eight

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happens. You see them standing outside your office. They will try to hold your hand. T hey will stay there and almost beg you for some connection because they feel a hole in their soul,” Dr Allen said. The eminent psychiatrist went further to explain that t eachers of today cannot continue in the actions that were acceptable in the past, such as offering rides to t heir students, or even acting as a concerned ear when these students are facing challenges at home or in t heir personal life. “Teachers are responsible for their colleagues and no l onger can they sit by and watch what unfolds and say I can’t get involved. In fact ify ou see something and don’t report it you can get blamed as well. And think of your own child and remembert hat this incubation period is about four to five years and people see things. In all the cases I’ve dealt with around the world, somebody knows. The kids know, the teachers know, s ome parents know, but the twine would never come together to talk. The cult of s ilence produces a silent scream as people’s lives are destroyed. Instead of thep lace being an edifice for development it is a cauldron of destruction,” he said. Dr Allen also cited the w ork of Dorothy Lewis at Yale who studied 14 men who committed multiple m urders. In her findings, it was discovered that all of the men were sexually abused, some of them hav i ng plungers inserted into their rectum. “They were abused by t heir uncles, neighbours, what have you. There is a powerful connectionb etween sexual abuse and teenage murder and the murder situation in our country. That is why wem ust get at it. This is noth ing to play with,” he said. bold of this group is the Rev. Alfred T. Thompson. In the article written by this Minister of the Gospel, he puts forward a num ber of arguments in favour of such a proposal. Omitting, or rather, ignoring the serious moral objections raised by clergymen of the first group, he takes the line that the legalizing of numbers would provide money for education and social programmes. And, as pointed out above, he makes much of the fact that the teaching of the Bible on gambling is not as clear-cut as it is on other moral issues. What, then can we say about the Church's position on legalizing numbers? It is not easy to sum up four different responses, which though closely related, are to be sharply distinguished. It can be declared that while the vast majority of the clergypersons who have been vocal are opposed to such a pro posal, there are many who have not spoken out against it, some who have called for a referen dum, and those who have stated support for it. There is one thing that is certain the present hypocritical situation cannot continue indefinitely. We cannot continue forever in this situation in which the “the playing of numbers” is offi cially illegal, but a large percent age of Bahamians engage in it. The hour of decision must come when we either enforce the law by clamping down on this situa tion, closing all the numbers houses and arresting all who engage in it, or legalizing numbers so that those who would like to engage in playing numbers can do so and those who are opposed to the same on moral grounds need not engage in the same. Joshua, challenging the Israelites with the necessity of making a decision, declared, “choose ye this day whom ye will serve” (Joshua 24:15 Robert Schuller challenges us: “A decision must be made; A price must be paid.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE -t-($ 0(*$ , QGHSHQGHQFH The Church and ‘playing numbers’ FROM page seven cle back towards her home in the Eastern Road area. W hat happens next, however, breaks the trend of what is normally seen from criminals in these circumstances. The kidnapper at this point allegedly stopped the vehiclew hen he got within a relativel y near distance of the home and fled the scene on foot, leaving the mother and hertwo children inside. However, police who are investigating this matterb elieve that the man may h ave had a “get away” car waiting nearby. Investigations into this matter continue. ten House on West Hill Street, had sustained some 42 to 50 injuries, according to the prosecution. Detective Constable Jermaine Stubbs, a crime scene investigator, told the court that around 9.50 am on Sunday, November 18, 2007, while on duty at the Criminal Records Office, he received information from Detective Inspector Bonaby. As a result went with several other o fficers to Mountbatten House on West H ill Street. He told the court that after receiving further information from Detective Inspector Bonaby at the scene, he entered the building. Constable Stubbs told the court that he observed in the eastern portion of the living room, a large pool of blood and b lood dripping from the ceiling above t he area. He told the court that he then went upstairs and saw bloodstains on the railing of the staircase. Constable Stubbs testified that in the upstairs hallway, which ran east to west, he observed bloody foot and shoe s ole prints. He also told the court that in t he upstairs bedroom, he observed the lifeless body of a male lying face up in the bed in a pool of blood, with wounds to the upper chest. He told the court that the male was clad in a pair of white underwear and that a broken, silver blade knife was also on the bed near t he body. Constable Stubbs told the court that he observed blood stains throughout the room and noted that the d isplacement of furniture in the room s uggested that there had been a struggle. Constable Stubbs also told the court that the bloody shoe and footprints also led to the bathroom, where he observed blood on a soap dish and blood on a tile next to the face bowl. Stubbs also told t he court that he collected 47 items from t he scene, including several swabs of blood that he handed over to the police forensic laboratory on November 24, 2007. The broken knife blade and handle were exhibited in court yesterday and submitted in evidence. During cross-examination by defence a ttorney Murrio Ducille, Constable Stubbs told the court that the items that he had retrieved from the scene were k ept in a locker at the Criminal Records O ffice until he handed them over to the police forensic laboratory. He also admitted that he had made no mention of the bloody shoe and footprints leading to the bathroom in his notes. Detective Inspector Rochelle Delev eaux told the court yesterday that on N ovember 30, 2007, she received from Detective Corporal 2313 Francis, blood swabs and other items that she inspected and prepared to be forwarded to a lab for DNA analysis. The trial, which is being heard before Senior Justice Anita Allen, continues t oday. “distinctive” tattoo across the lower back area, police reported. Clothed in blue jeans and a green top, the victim is thought to h ave been dead for at least a week but to have only been placed in the location where her body was found on Friday night or Saturday morning. Y esterday Supt Moss said the cause of death in the case has yet t o be confirmed, but investigators expect to move a step closer to determining this when a doctor examines the body today. Police are exploring the possibility that the victim may have suffered a sexual attack. Despite linking the death with the missing person reports, he added that no one had yet been called into formally identify thew oman’s body as police are still completing their preliminary investigations. “We’re trying to identify a couple of things before we call anyone. Hopefully we will make contact (today Kidnap ordeal of mother, children F ROM page one FROM page one Psychologist warns over teacher -student boundary infractions Knife found next to body of Harl Taylor exhibited in court FROM page one FROM page one Missing US woman could be murder victim found in sheet T HE b ody of the victim was found in this area. UNITED NATIONS THEU.N. Security Council on Monday condemned North Korea’s recent firing of seven ballistic missiles on U.S. Independence Day, the reclusive country’s biggest display of firepower in three years, according to Associated Press. Uganda U.N. Ambassador Ruhakana Rugunda, who holdsthe 15-member council’s rotating presidency, said the council members “condemned and expressed grave concern” at the missile launches, which violated U.N. resolutions and “pose a threat to regional and international security.” The council will continue to closely monitor the situation and is committed to a “peaceful, diplomatic and political solution,” he said. On Saturday, North Korea fired missiles into the ocean off its east coast in violation of three U.N. resolutions. Security Council members agreed that Pyongyang “must comply fully with its obligations” underthe resolutions, Rugunda said. The North’s missile tests aggra vated tensions that were already high after its May 25 underground nuclear test blast. The council punished the North after its May nuclear test with a resolution and tough sanctions clamping down on alleged tradingof banned arms and weapons-related material, including authorizing searches of suspect ships. UN Council condemns North Korea missiles F elip Major / Tribune staff

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n By JAMEY KEATEN Associated Press Writer LA GRANDE-MOTTE, France (AP strong jumped from 10th to third place at the Tour de France on Monday, positioning himself for a shot at the yellow jersey after evading trouble on a windy ride along the Mediterranean. Britain’s Mark Cavendish won his second straight stage. He and Armstrong and overall leader Fabian Cancellara of Switzerland kept up with a breakaway group that bolted from the pack with 18 miles left in the 122-mile third stage. Armstrong, a seven-time champion coming out of retirement, is 40 seconds behind. He was able to make his big jump because riders in front of him at the start of the day got trapped in the main pack. The race is set for a shakeout featuring Cancellara, Armstrong and Germany’s Tony Martin in Tuesday’s team time trial. Each team is strong in the 24-mile event, which starts and finishes in Montpellier. If Astana wins, Armstrong could take the yellow jersey. The race ends July 26 in Paris. The Tour said Armstrong will be fined the equivalent of $92 for failing to sign in before the stage. His Astana team said the Texan was delayed because of autographs and interviews. This was the sixth time Cavendish won a Tour stage. He finished in 5 hours, 1 minute, 24 seconds on the hota nd breezy ride from Marseille t o La Grande-Motte. Armstrong, Cancellara and 22 other cyclists had the same time. Cancellara, who rides for Saxo Bank, extended his lead and is ahead of Martin by 33 seconds. C avendish mimed talking on a cell phone in recognition of one of the Columbia team spon-sors as he led a sprint finish ahead of Norway’s Thor Hushovd and France’s Cyril Lemoine. “It was brilliant,” Cavendish said. “We were the only sprint team that wanted to ride today.” The pack, including expect ed contenders like Armstrong’s Astana teammate Alberto Con tador of Spain, the 2007 Tour champion, and two-time run ner-up Cadel Evans of Aus tralia, finished 41 seconds behind. Columbia took control with about 18 miles left. Its riders led a 29-man breakaway that included several Astana cyclists, among them Armstrong and Cancellara. They used the gusty conditions to their advantage in a tactic known as “bordure,” which can help breakaway groups gain time on the main pack. Contador and other favorites were caught off-guard. Wind “We knew the wind was going to be a factor,” said Armstrong, noting Columbia’s move. “When you see a team at the front like that, you have to pay attention.” Armstrong said it was “not my objective” to gain ground on Contador, insisting he was “just trying to stay up front and out of trouble. ... I turned around and was surprised there was a split.” Contador dropped to fourth from second and is 59 seconds back from Cancellara. Fellow Astana rider Levi Leipheimer slipped to 10th, from sixth, and is 1:11 behind. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009, PAGE 9 P u b l i c E d u c a t i o n M e e t i n gThe Bahamas National TrustPast, Present and Future Thoughts from the 1958 Exuma Expedition Leader Special Presentation:G. Carleton Ray, PhD. Research Professor Department of Environmental Sciences University ofVirginia DATE: Wednesday, July 15 TIME: 7:00 pm SHARP! PLACE: Nassau Yacht Club, East Bay Street BNT and NYC members FREE General Public $2For more information call: 393-1317 Armstrong jumps from 10th to 3rd at Tour de France n By JAIME ARON AP Sports Writer DALLAS (AP Kidd isn’t going anywhere. The free agent point guard has agreed to sign a three-year contract for more than $25 million to remain with Dirk Nowitzki and the rest of the Mavericks. The New York Knicks were among Kidd’s suitors. “We are excited that JKidd and the Mavs have reached an agreement to have Jason return to the Mavs,” Mavericks owner Mark Cuban said v ia e-mail Monday. “We look f orward to him continuing to t ake a major role with the team.” With the contract, the 37year-old Kidd could end his career in Dallas, which is where he started in 1994. The Oakland, Calif., native was the No. 2 overall pick out of California, and he has also played for Phoenix and New Jersey. Kidd’s return helps the Mavericks as they pursue a supporting cast around Nowitzki, from not having to find a replacement to recruiting players. Kidd, who is third on the career assist list, also will continue to mentor J.J. Barea, who emerged as a solid backup last season, and raw rookie Rodrigue Beaubois, who is coming over from France. The deal which can’t be signed until Wednesday was first reported by ESPN.com. The Mavericks also plan to send an offer sheet Wednesday to Marcin Gortat, a 25year-old center who backed up Dwight Howard in Orlando last season, according to a person with knowledge of negotiations. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because of NBA rules against commenting on deals before the signing period opens. G ortat is expected to r eceive the full midlevel exception of about $5.6 million, which means any more big moves Dallas makes this offseason will come through trades. The Mavs can dangle the e xpiring contract of Erick Dampier and the trade-friendly contract of Jerry Stackhouse in front of other teams. Pretty much everyone but Nowitzki could be dealt, too, as the Mavericks explore ways to keep up with the changes made by top rivals in the Western Conference, especially the defending champion Lakers and division foe San Antonio. Jason Kidd staying with the Mavs n By HOWARD FENDRICH AP Tennis Writer WIMBLEDON, England (AP Andy Roddick withdrew Mon day from the US Davis Cup team’s quarterfinal at Croatia, citing a right hip flexor injury. The US Tennis Association announced that Roddick wouldn’t participate in this week’s Davis Cup matches because he was hurt during his loss a day earlier to Roger Federer at the All England Club a match that finished 16-14 in the longest fifth set in Grand Slam final his tory. Roddick slipped and tumbled to the grass in the eighth game of the fourth set Sunday. He stayed down for a few moments, then rose, grimacing, and tow eled off. The 26-year-old American would go on to play for more than another 1 1/2 hours, finally succumbing when Federer broke him for the first time all match in the 77th and last game. After the match, Roddick was asked whether he hurt him self in that fall, and he replied, “No. It was OK.” He is being replaced on the US Davis Cup team by Mardy Fish, who reached the third round at Wimbledon. Roddick is ranked No. 6, while Fish is No. 23. When he was asked to play Davis Cup, Fish pulled out of this week’s Hall of Fame Tennis Championships in Newport, R.I., where he was the tournament’s top-seeded player. Roddick had played in 18 consecutive Davis Cup matches for the United States, helping the country with the 2007 title. “Andy has been a stalwart for this team the past nine years, and his dedication to Davis Cup and his teammates is unquestioned,” US captain Patrick McEnroe said. Croatia hosts the US on clay at Porec, Croatia, starting Fri day. “Mardy is a Davis Cup veteran and we appreciate his willingness to join the team on short notice. He has been playing well and we are glad to have him back in the singles lineup,” McEnroe said. “Andy had a great run at Wimbledon. He battled for more than four hours yesterday and fought hard to reach the final. Understandably, his body is not up for the rigors of Davis Cup in such a short turnaround.” Fish will be joined in singles action for the US by James Blake, while twins Bob and Mike Bryan will play doubles. Wimbledon quarterfinalist Ivo Karlovic and Marin Cilic will lead Croatia, which won the Davis Cup in 2005. “It’s worse for us,” Goran Prpic, Croatia’s Davis Cup captain, said in Porec. “Instead of an injured Roddick, who after such a final at Wimbledon would have had to play match es on clay, we’ll have to face a motivated Fish.” Associated Press Writer Snjezana Vukic in Zagreb, Croatia, contributed to this report Citing hip, Roddick pulls out of Davis Cup ANDY RODDICK plays a return to Roger Federer during their final match on the Centre Court at Wimbledon on Sunday... (AP Photo: Anja Niedringhaus AMERICAN seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong strains as he passes Monaco’s casino during the firsts tage of the Tour de France cycling race, an individual time trial of 15.5 kilome ters (9.63 miles Monaco on Saturday... C h r i s t o p h e E n a / A P

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n B y TERESA M WALKER A P Sports Writer NASHVILLE, Tennessee (AP Fisher says his former quarterback Steve McNair was a "great person" who put the Tennessee Titans franchise on the NFL map. The Titans coach Monday called the slain quarterback one of the "greatest competitors of all time on the field." Fisher said McNair would w ant him to tell people McNair was sorry and wasn't perfect. Fisher was the only coach McNair had for the first 11 years of his NFL career. McNair was found shot to death Saturday, alongside 20year-old Sahel Kazemi in Nashville. Police have said McNair, a married father of four, had been dating Kazemi. The Titans coach had been in Iraq as part of an NFL trip last week to visit the military. Eddie George told Fisher of McNair's death during a stop in Kuwait. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL/INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009, THE TRIBUNE n By PAUL LOGOTHETIS AP Sports Writer MADRID (AP year wait, 80,000 Real Madrid fans gave Cristiano Ronaldo a rapturous welcome on Monday following his record transfer from Manchester Unit ed. A beaming Ronaldo came out to the capacity Santiago Bernabeu crowd wearing the same No. 9 jersey as Madrid great Alfredo di Stefano wore. "I'm very happy to be here. I've achieved one of my dreams," Ronaldo, who agreed to a six-year deal, said before leading the crowd into a cry of "Viva Madrid!" Fans had queued outside the Bernabeu from the early morning to catch a glimpse of the 24-year-old, who completed a lap of honor to salute fansa fter performing a few juggling tricks. Ronaldo was eventually chased from the field as security failed to contain the crowd, with many teenage fans jumping the barrier in search of an autograph. One fan managed to evade security to reach the stage and hugR onaldo, who signed the young man's M adrid shirt. Only Diego Maradona's presentation at Napoli 25 years ago has rivaled Ronaldo's in terms of the crowds it attracted. Last week, 50,000 greeted Kaka at the Bernabeu. Madrid had been chasing the current world player of the year since2 006, with president Florentino Perez finally securing his signature in an 80 million pound ( million; $131 mil lion) deal. Portugal great Eusebio was among those who joined the party, the Portugal great joining Ronaldo onstage withD i Stefano, Perez and Madrid's record n ine European Cups. "Today, we present the greatest symbolism of Real Madrid," Perez said by way of introduction. Ronaldo scored 120 goals from 313 appearances in all competitions at Man United, where he arrived in 2003 from Portuguese club Sporting. Ronaldo leftO ld Trafford having won the Champions League, three Premier League titles, the FA Cup and the Club World Cup in six seasons. Perez has vowed to return the "galactico" era to Madrid after initiating the original one from 2000-06 witht he blockbuster signings of Zinedine Z idane, David Beckham, Luis Figo and Ronaldo, who was the last impact player to wear the No. 9 jersey. Perez has splashed out million ($300 million mer in a bid to turn the page on a season that was marred by former president Ramon Calderon's resignationo ver a vote-rigging scandal and in which Madrid was eclipsed by arch rival Barcelona. Madrid failed to get past the first knockout stage of Europe's top-tier competition for the fifth straight season and lost the league to Barcelona, whicha lso won the Champions League and C opa del Rey to become the first Span ish club to win the treble. 80,000 fans finally welcome Ronaldo to Real Madrid Fisher: McNair a ‘great person,’ will be missed A P P h o t o s YET another member of the Frank Rutherford Elite Development Camp has left an indelible mark on the prep basketball community in Houston, Texas, earning himself a series of scholarship offers to NCAA D ivision One Univ ersities. Mikhail McLean, a 6” 215 pound forward, has received interest from numerous institutions and recently secured an athletic scholarship offer from Rutgers University for the 2009-10 academic year. McLean seeks to join other members of the programme who have progressed from the Bahamas to collegiate and professional success including Devard Darling (Baltimore Ravens), Jeremy Barr (University of Southern California, University of Nebraska, San Jacincto JuCo) Ian Symonette (University of Miami), Dwight Miller (University of Pittsburgh), Probese Leo (Bucknell University), Waltia Rolle (University of N orth Carolina) and a number of others. Mikhail Mclean left the Bahamas in 2005 for the programme in Houston, Texas, with the intent of furthering his athletic development and ultimately achieving a scholarship for an education at a top flight university. He attended Second Baptist High School for the last three years he has been the model student who has made the honour role every year, and has become a heavily sought after recruit on the court as well. McLean and other prep stars around the U nited States are looking to improve their r ecruiting stock during the summer months, gaining exposure on the AAU circuit and at various camps nationwide. McLean, a long athletic forward with a good shooting touch from mid-range, is also a tenacious perimeter and post defender. He also has interest or scholarship offers from Penn State University, Tulane University, and Rice University. He will attend the Reebok University camp in July where the top 100 players in America will assemble in Philadelphia under the scrutiny of 400 NCAA Division I college basketball coaches. Based on his similar build and style of play to Dwight Miller, who won the MVP at the Reebok camp in 2007, Mikhail is projected to have a similar outing at the camp a nd recruitment this summer. Mikhail McLean secures athletic scholarship offer from Rutgers Mikhail McLean (top left

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BAHAMIAN Justin Roberts moved into his second consecutive boys U-14 singles semifinals at the St Maarten Junior Open by defeating Edward Buckley (ANT Roberts now awaits the winner of the match between Castellanos/de Silva. His semi finals match will be competi tive, however Roberts is confident that he can win having defeated de Silva in the round robin and Castallanos is not abig hitter. Roberts appears to be on a “collision course” to meet his training and traveling partner in the boys U-14 singles final. Gian Issa defeated Yannick James in his quarterfinal match 6-0, 6-1 and faces Juan Bisono, who won 6-1, 6-3 over Timothy Blok of Antigua in the other semifinals on Tuesday. Issa defeated Justin in Aruba last week Tuesday in the boysU14 semifinal 75, 61. The dueling doubles pair are seeded number one in the boys U-14 doubles and have a bye in the quarterfinals and will play their semi-finals doubles match tomorrow. C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE11 P AGE 9 International sports news... A rmstrong j umps from 10th to 3rd at Tour de France... See page 9 Justin Roberts moves into semis at the St Maarten Junior Open THE Bahamas’ Junior Golf National Team are in Montego Bay, Jamaica, to compete in the Caribbean Amateur Junior Golf Championships this week. For the past eight weeks, the 14-member golf team – eight hailing from the Bahamas Golf Federation’s northern division in Grand Bahama and six from its central division in New Prov idence – has been preparing for this competition. The youngsters earned their spot on the team during a National Team Qualifying Tournament held April 15-17, 2009, at the Reef Course in Freeport. The championships, which is scheduled to take place at the Cinnamon Hills Golf Club, will be contested by 10 neighbour ing countries. It is a 54-hole stroke play event with players earning points for their team based on their play. The country with the most points at the end of three days will be deemed the winner. Individual trophies can also be won at the championships. The juniors will compete in the following categories: Boys 16-17, 14-15 and 13 and under; and Girls 16-17, 14-15, and 13 and under. National coaches Anthony “Biggie” Robinson of New Providence and Duwayne Hep burn of Grand Bahama, with the assistance of others, have been working extremely hard with the junior golfers at various local courses in hopes of bringing home a trophy for this year’s event. According to the coach es, the kids are ready. They just have to go out, stay focused and execute their game plans. Team manager Walter Robinson is looking forward to a good showing from the golfers. In the past few years the team has fallen short of bringing home a trophy. However, he feels that this year there is a really good chance of changing that and bringing home not onlya team trophy, but also at least one individual trophy. A number of followers, consisting mostly of parents and other family members, will also be traveling in support of the team. It is encouraging to know that there is a support team urg ing you on in these types of events. Scores will be posted daily online at www.cga.com and the team members are asking the Bahamian public for their support. Team members are: Kyle King, Charlie Butler and Rashad Ferguson (Boys 16-17 Benjamin Davis Jr., Rasheed Robinson and Osborne Cooper III (Boys 14-15 son and Harrison Collins (Boys 13 & Under); Eugenie Adderley and Ileah Knowles (Girls 16-17); Taneka Sandiford and Bijan Lockhart (Girls 14-15 Asiyah Robinson and Denier Weech (Girls 13 & Under Bahamas’ national junior golf team to tee off in Jamaica JUSTIN ROBERTS A NUMBER of top NFL p layers are heading to Nass au this weekend to particip ate in a free football camp a nd a weekend of fun called Players Paradise Weekend.” S amari Rolle and ‘The R olle With Me Foundation’ i s slated to host the 3rd annu a l Players Paradise All-Star Weekend, designed to give back to children through fun, sports and entertainment. T wo hundred children will have the opportunity to sign u p for a free football camp hosted by 11-year Baltimore R avens player Samari Rolle a nd feature superstar athletes Fred Taylor, Duane Starks, J evon Kearse, Mike McKenzie, Corey Ivy, Vernon Carey, Stockar McDougle,L ito Sheppard, Ed Reed, Devard Darling, Antwan Barnes, Willis Mcgahee,J amal Lewis and others. Station All you have to do is stop by the 100 Jamz radio stationl ocated on Shirley & Deveaux Street and pick up a The Samari Rolle FootballC amp registration (200 child ren limit). Participants will learn valua ble football techniques with some of the NFL’s finest. Dominos Pizza will be pro viding a complimentary lunch for all participating guests. P P l l a a y y e e r r s s P P a a r r a a d d i i s s e e 2 2 0 0 0 0 9 9 A A l l l l S S t t a a r r W W e e e e k k e e n n d d s s c c h h e e d d u u l l e e : : Friday, July 10 – Wel come Reception & Dinner (7pm midnight Saturday, July 11 – 100 Jamz Radio & Samari Rolle’s F ree Football Camp at the Thomas Robinson Track and F ield Stadium 10am to 2pm Beach Bar-B-Q Pool Party & Comedy Show (invitation only) Sunday, July 12 – Brunch (11am 3pm Top NFL players to visit Nassau for football camp Bringing a ‘football dream’ to reality B ahamas native Devard Darling is continuing the dream of him and his brother to bring football to the Bahamas through the Devard and Devaughn Darling Football Camps, presented by his non-profit organisation, the As One Foundation . Fellow NFL Players Derrick Martin and Tre Stallings of the Baltimore Ravens, and Larry Johnson, Bob Engram and Dwayne Bowe of the Kansas City Chiefs, and Darrius Hayward Bey of the Oakland Raiders, will assist young athletes with skill development, technique, and the fundamentals of American football. A similar two-day camp will close out today in Grand Bahama at the Freeport Rugby Football Club on Settlers Way. The Nassau camp will run from July 1012 at Tom “The Bird” Grant Sports and Recreation Complex. The purpose of the camp is to encourage young Bahamian athletes to pursue their education and dreams of playing American football. Campers will have the opportunity to interact with prominent sports figures who will act as coaches, leaders and mentors throughout the duration of thec amps. Their presence will offer campers a once-in-a-lifetime chance to meet and train under the tutelage of professional athletes. The ‘As One Foundation’ was created in 2007 by Devard Darling in lovingm emory of his identical brother D evaughn Darling who passed in 2001 during spring training. Its goal is to provide underprivileged youth both nationally and internation ally with educational and developmental opportunities through athletic endeavors, educational programming and spir itual enrichment. Specifically, the “Devard & Deveaughn Darling Football Camps” strive to encourage young Bahamians ages 11 to 16 to further their athletic skills and education at a private school in the United States. The cap of available camper slots is 120, and attendance will be allotted to elite athletes with the potential of pur suing a collegiate or professional career in football. While gaining invaluable skills and training in the game of American football, camp attendees will also receive free gifts, equipment and a chance to earn the title of Camp MVP. The Camp MVP will be judged by par ticipation in all activities and the chosen honouree and one parent will win a fully paid trip to Kansas City, Missouri, during the 2009 NFL season to spend a weekend with Devard Darling and his family. “We are thrilled with the number of quality professional athletes confirmed to attend, coach and mentor campers at both of the 2009 football camps,” Darling said. “The foundation would not be able to put on successful football camps without the help and support from the ath letic community and we are truly grateful for their time and generosity.” For more information about Devard Darling, his vision for Bahamian youth and the “Devard & Devaughn Darling Football Camps”, go to www.asonefoundation.org. A A b b o o u u t t D D e e v v a a r r d d D D a a r r l l i i n n g g Devard Darling, the founder and visionary of the As One Foundation , is pursuing his goals on the professional football field while bringing to life the dream envisioned between him and his late twin brother, Devaughn. Hr hopes to bring the game of American football to their native country of the Bahamas and to honour his brother by opening the Devaughn Darling Sports Complex. Devard currently plays professional football for the Kansas City Chiefs, where he is wide receiver. Prior to joining the Chiefs, Devard played four years with the Baltimore Ravens where he was selected as 82nd overall in the 3rd round of the 2004 NFL Draft. In the final two months of the 2007 season, Devard recorded 18 receptions for 326 yards and three touchdowns in just eight games. Devard began his athletic career at Florida State University as one of the top high school prospects out of Stephen F Austin High School in Houston, Texas. However, after the unfortunate passing of his identical twin brother Devaughn Darling on the football field during spring practices in 2001, Florida State University would not reinstate Devard for his remaining eligibility. After being connected with Mike Price, former head coach of the Washington State University Cougars, Devard was cleared to play and became one of the best wide receivers in Washington State history, recording 16 touchdowns and over 1500 yards in just two years. Devard currently resides in Kansas City, MI with his Wife, Cicely Darling and Son, Devard Jr. In his free time he enjoys charity work, attending church and giving back to his community through athletics. DEVARD DARLING (left his older brother Dennis... F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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‘Dry cleaning goes green’ despite 20 per cent business fall n By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net N ew Oriental Cleaners is reinvesting in the environment with a switch to biodegradable plastic clothing bags, the company’s director said yesterday, despite suffering a 20 per cent drop in business with the economic downturn. Lana Lee-Brogdon said the n ew environmentally friendly bags will cost the company 10 per cent more than the conventional plastic ones, but will hold twice as many clothes. With the introduction of the new eco-friendly bags will come a witty new slogan such as: “Go green when you dry clean.” Plastics have been a burden on the environment since the beginning of their development because they never decompose when discarded. Mrs Lee-Brogdon said New Oriental’s new bags will break down in a mat ter of days. The award-winning dry cleaning company has been an advocate for the environment since its early days, and has sponsored myriad clean-up cam paigns throughout New Providence. “For decades we have had signs up about keeping the Bahamas clean,” said Mrs LeeBrogdon. She said she brought the ideal of recycling back with her from the US, where she studied computer science. “We recycled everything,” she added. New Oriental Clean ers even recycles their wire hangers and offers a credit for customers who bring in 50 hang ers. According to Mrs Lee-Brogdon, when customers bring in 50 hangers they can receive $1.50 back about three cents per hanger. Shortly after the introduction of the biodegradable polybags, the company will roll out a reusable polypropy lene garment bag that will be for sale at New Oriental locations. The company has invested $5,000 in the three-in-one bags, which can currently be preordered. The bags are being imported from China. n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CABLE Bahamas has received the final government approvals needed to complete the $80 million buy-out of con trolling shareholder Columbus Communications, and yesterday formally launched the deal’s financing with its $40 million preference share issue. The Bahamian investment community, chiefly those institutional investors, such as banks, pension funds and insurance companies, high-net worth individuals and their financial advisers, confirmed to Tribune Business that they had received prospectuses/offering memorandums on Cable Bahamas’ $40 million offering over the weekend. The issue, which formally launched yesterday, is sched uled to close in three-and-a-half weeks time on July 31, 2009, as Cable Bahamas moves to raise the financing necessary to allow it to purchase Columbus Communications’ 30.2 per cent stake for a price pegged at $13.43 per share. That price represented a 17.9 per cent premium to Cable Bahamas’ closing share price of $11.39 on the Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX 52-week high. The transaction price was ratified by a ‘fairness opinion’ sought by Cable Bahamas’ two non-executive directors, Frank Watson and Sandra Knowles. A source close to Cable Bahamas confirmed last night: “The company got Central Bank [exchange control] approval last week. It received approval to sell the preference share issue and purchase Columbus Communications’ stake.” The $40 million preference share issue includes a $20 million US dollar component, and a $20 million Bahamian dollar one. Investors will have the option to convert those preference shares into ordinary Cable Bahamas shares after two years, with the preference shares paying an interest rate of 8 per cent. The preference share issue is n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HE industry grouping repr esenting Bahamian tour operators and excursion providers yesterday said the amendments to the Cruise Ship Overnight Incentive Act had “further weakened” the sector, challenging the Government to explain what benefits the agreement with Carnival Cruise Line would bring to it and other cruise-reliant businesses. Describing the process by which the Government had n egotiated the new incentive agreement with Carnival, and possibly Royal Caribbean, as “regrettable”, a spokesman for the Bahamas Association of Shore Excursionists (BASE said the sector had effectively been cut out of the talks, and had received assurances from government officials that no agreement was in the offing. And BASE alleged that several of its members had been C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29T he information c ontained is from a third party and The T ribune can not be h eld responsible for errors and/or omission from thed aily report. $4.21 $4.30 $4.25 n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIANS would more readily “buy into” mega resort and other major development projects if the Government removed the lack of transparency and obsessive secrecy surrounding the Environmen tal Impact Assessment (EIA process, an attorney warning yesterday that the current situation undermined both investor and public confidence. Romauld Ferreira, who is also an environmental consul tant and partner in Ferreira & Company, told Tribune Busi ness that the absence of public disclosure before developmentrelated EIAs were approved effectively meant the Bahamas was violating one of the 13 principles set by the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP be conducted. He explained that principle seven of the 13 stated: “Before a decision is made on an activit y, government agencies, memb ers of the public, experts in r elevant disciplines and inter ested groups should be allowed appropriate opportunity to comment on the EIA.” Yet with many major resortrelated investment projects, such as Albany and Baker’s Bay, Mr Ferreira said the developments and their EIAs had been approved by the Govern ment and its agencies such as the BEST Commission prior to the Bahamian communities l iving in the impacted areas T ransparency woes undermine project ‘buy-in’ by public n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Ministry of Tourism is “working feverishly” to expand business opportunities for Bahamian airlines and charter operators, Tribune Business was told yesterday, with the increased fees set to be levied on the industry needed to maintain Family Island airports and “improve the quality of air transportation in the Bahamas”. Defending the proposed Civil Aviation Department (CAD fee increases, some as high as 10,000 per cent and which are now scheduled to take effect from September 10, 2009, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, said the new charges would still be below many rival jurisdictions and not impact the Bahamas’ competitiveness. Pointing out that the increas es had been approved from 2005, but never implemented, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said the result of this had been thatt he Department always under p erformed on fee revenue in comparison to the estimates contained in the Government’s annual Budget. While the Government and Civil Aviation Department “understood the economic circumstances” today were a lot less favourable for private Bahamianowned airlines, and their ability to absorb the fee increases, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said revenues were needed to develop and improve Family Island airports. “There are certain costs for providing all of the Government’s services,” he explained. “These fee increases were approved in 2005 but never implemented, and there’s nothing we can see to suggest that this was nothing more than an oversight. “These fees were factored into the Budget since then, but have not been put in place and we fell short for several years. When we discovered the fees had been approved, but not put in place, we followed the process of putting in the new fee structure for Civil Aviation. Raised airline fees to boost ‘quality of air transportation’ Cruise line incentives ‘weaken’ Bahamians Environmental consultant and attorney argues that better EIA disclosure would stimulate business and investment S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B Ca b le’ s $80m Columbus deal g ets the ‘g o ahead’ * New biodegradable clothing bags to cost New O riental 10% more, but hold more clothes * Wire hanger credit deal and three-in-one bags likely to see company gain green investment return in one year * Firm holds on to all 125 staff by shaving w orking day by 30 minutes V-Wallace $40m preference shar e issue launc hed

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warned by both the cruise lines and Bahamian government officials to ‘back down’ from pressing its concerns and issues in public, as there would be “a heavy price to pay” in terms of loss of business and support. A BASE spokesman yesterday told Tribune Business that while the Bahamian tour and excursion provider industry had “certainly weakened” as a result of the global economic recession, “but from a future standpoint it has weakened even further because we do not feel we’ve got a leg to stand on to access this piece of the pie government keeps on talking about”. Arguing that the cruise lines appeared to have “got what they wanted” from the new Cruise Overnight Incentive Act, the BASE spokesman said some of its 13-14 members, who employ collectively 350-400 persons, had already begun to make staff lay-offs and cut backs not just because of the current environment, but due to the adversarial environment they were likely to face in future. Referring to the agreement passed by both houses of Parliament, the BASE spokesman said: “It’s very vague and broadbased, which suggests the cruise lines got everything they asked for. But it’s very difficult for the Bahamian to figure out: What’s in the deal for me? “Now the cruise lines get to do what they wish with local vendors. They can do what they want to do, whenever they want to do it, and with whoever they want to do it with.” The BASE spokesman said the issue affected not just excursion providers and tour operators, but all businesses that relied on the multi-million dollar cruise ship industry retailer, taxi drivers, straw vendors and hair braiders. The new Overnight Incentive Act includes a rebate-style passenger departure tax incentive package. For each passenger over 800,000, the cruise line will receive a rebate of $8.50 per passenger on the $15 per head tax, and a $10 per passenger rebate when those visitor numbers exceed one million. At least 350,000 of those visitors must overnight in Nassau, and 175,000 in Freeport, for the cruise lines to access these incentives, with all passengers below 800,000 visitors attracting a $15 per head tax. Yet the new Act also designates the cruise line-owned private islands, such as Coco Cay, Great Stirrup Cay, Castaaway Cay and Half Moon Cay, as ‘designated ports’, with passengers landed there counting to the departure tax rebates. On these islands, the cruise lines control everything and capture all revenues and profits earned, determining the mark-ups earned by all businesses operating there. They do much the same in Nassau and Freeport, receiving wholesale pricing from Bahamian tour and excursion providers, and then selling these tickets on to passengers. Yet the BASE spokesman pointed out that cruise ships sold stingray tours on their private islands at $27 per head, undercutting the $35$42 prices that they sold tickets to Bahamian-owned tours at. In a statement, BASE said it was “convinced that more could have been done to address the concerns of the small businesses directly involved in this sector, and to qualify the overall economic benefit to the Bahamas. “Successive administrations have done well to continue to ignore the plight and concerns of businesses in this sector in general, and in particular those that deal directly with cruise lines. They all agree that we have some legitimate concerns, but none of the last two administrations can say that they have delivered on their promise to even attempt to understand these concerns by establishing reasonable dialogue. Instead, they have gone ahead and rushed to the end line, only to find out that they forgot the very people they have promised to represent.” And BASE added: “By no means does the business com munity in general, and those businesses directly linked to the cruise industry in particular, expect that all of our needs, issues and concerns will be met all at once, but it was hoped that the business needs of the Bahamas are addressed with our international industry part ners like the cruise lines, and as things evolve, more of those concerns can be accommodated and resolved. And yes, there are some issues that may neverget addressed, but at least we would know that going in. “We do need the cruise lines, but remember, this is a partnership and that relationship, no matter how good, should not be at our expense. In fact, when the question of the progress of the amendments to the Overnight/Cruise Incentive Act was put to a senior government official directly involved in the process, his reply was: ‘The government of the Bahamas is not in the habit of discussing current negotiations.’ We were then told that the amendments were on the ‘slow tract”, so ‘nothing much was happening on that front’. However, as strange as it is, after the Government got done debating the National Budget, what was the first piece of legislation that was rushed through both houses? The Incentive Act Amendments.” Accusing the Government of continuing to play the ‘cruise passenger numbers game’ and ignore the fact that per capita spending was declining rapidly, BASE challenged the assertion that the Bahamas was uncompetitive based on passenger departure tax fees. “Cruise lines would not be in the Bahamas if they did not see this destination as a gold mine for themselves,” BASE argued. “The fact that our ‘fees’ are higher than those of our competitors is a fact that must be taken into proper context. When you look at it as a whole, those other competitors don’t offer what we can either: they are further away, they don’t have private islands and the Bahamas as a single destination ranks pretty high among cruise passengers. So net, net the only thing these other countries can compete on is lower port, departure and other fees. “It is certainly clear what the cruise lines are getting. Millions in revenues and up to $10 rebat ed to them over a period of time, but what are we, the Public Treasury and the business community getting in real dollars and sense? “Or are we to continue to believe that we are only good enough to get the crumbs, while we continue watch more and more of our hard dollars generated here in the Bahamas sail away to foreign bank accounts.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Cruise line incentives ‘weaken’ Bahamians F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Cable’s $80m Columbus deal gets ‘go ahead’ a private placement targeted at invited investors only, so members of the Bahamian public should not apply to become involved. Cable Bahamas is also financing the transaction with a $90 million syndicated loan put together by Royal Bank of Canada, FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas Scotiabank, a portion of which will be used to refinance the company’s existing debt and credit facilities, plus pay transaction costs and fund working capital. The preference share offering memorandum was yester day still being digested by the investment community, but one source told Tribune Business they were concerned about Cable Bahamas’ continued access to cutting-edge technology in the absence of Columbus Communications’ involve ment. “That’s a real competitive threat to Cable Bahamas,” the source said. Tribune Business understands that Columbus Communications is exiting because it has been unable to achieve the desired rate of return on its investment in the Bahamas, having been hemmed in by the Government’s desire to protect the Bahamas Telecommunica tions Company (BTC The deal is designed to pur chase Cable Bahamas for future opportunities in a liberalised Bahamian telecommunications and communications market. ‘Dry cleaning goes green’ despite 20% business fall “Customers can bring their clothes in it, and it coverts to a duffle bag,” said Mrs Lee-Brogdon. “It’s reusable and can hold 10 to 12 garments each and, in the end, not use any plastic.” She said she expects the company to see a return on the bags within one year. With the onset of the economic downturn, New Oriental, like many dry cleaning companies worldwide, saw a decline in business. However, unlike many dry cleaning businesses in the US, New Oriental’s business has not foundered and the company has managed to hold on to all of its 125 employees, though they have had to slash working hours. Mrs Lee-Brogdon said 30 minutes was shaved off each employee’s work day in order to lower company expenses and ensure no lay-offs. The company recently won the Dry Cleaning and Laundry Institute’s coveted Award of Excellence, and is the only dry cleaning company in the region to have acquired it. Mrs Lee-Brogdon was recently quoted in Fabricare Maga zine as saying: “The Award of Excellence says that we are a business that is willing to test ourselves and strive to meet or exceed the industry standard.” F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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We need to improve the quality of aviation, and need to have the revenues to make that happen.” Tribune Business revealed yesterday how private Bahamian airlines and charter operators fear “draconian” increasesof as much as 10,000 per cent in their fee structure could “kill” the industry. Under the CAD’s proposed “across the board” fee increases, the operator of a five-seater aircraft flying 50 hours per month could expect to see a $13,000 per annum fee rise. This newspaper was told that the fee increases include a tripling or 200 per cent rise in landing fees at Family Island airports, the rates jumping froma current $18.56 per landing to $56 per landing for a 19-seat aircraft. However, Mr VanderpoolWallace defended the fee increases, saying there were “very few places” where comparable fees were lower than the proposed Civil Aviation ones. He implied that the new fees would be more in line with costs incurred by the Government. Conceding that no one liked to see an increase in the fees impacting their business, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace told Trib une Business: “When you c ompare the fees with elsew here, they compare very favourably. In fact, they’re below what is charged in other places, even though we have a much more expensive set of requirements.” The minister said that unlike other Caribbean nations, which only had one or two airports, the Bahamas had 17 airports as ports of entry and many more airstrips in the Family Islands. Therefore, airport mainte nance costs were much higher in the Bahamas, but Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said it was “very difficult to continue to agitate for improvements in the civil aviation regime” and to Family Island airports if revenue targets were not being met and fees had not been raised for many years. The minister said the failure to improve the Bahamas’ civil aviation regime had been “the primary reason for the lack of growth in the Family Islands” when it came to tourism, and to achieve this revenues were n eeded to airport navigation s ystems and runway lighting to p ermit night flying. “There’s a whole range of things that need to be done to improve the quality of air transportation in the Bahamas, and we need the resources to do it,” Mr Vanderpoool-Wallace said. “We need to have the staff and equipment to keep the airports in working order, and need to have the revenues to do it.” He added, though, that the Government was not “callously increasing fees without growing opportunities” for the Bahamian private airlines. The Ministry of Tourism was “working feverishly” with them to get the airlines on-line, so that the public and travel agents could book reservations directly with them. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 , PAGE 3B /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net PEOPLE’ have sold shirts as far away as Afghanistan and Africa, and with independence just around the corner yesterday said it has seen a significant rise in sales through T-shirts depicting Bahamian themes and colours. Covering every possible market even sidewalk sales 242 People has in a short time become one of the leading all Bahamian t-shirt companies in this nation. President of the company, Jason Hepburn, told Tribune Business that he and his partners wanted the shirts to express what everyone in the Bahamas feels. And, according to him, requests h ave been pouring in for their innovat ive t-shirts. 2 42 People’s shirts have been picked up by several major retailers, including the Sports Centre and Urban Nation. Their shirts can also be purchased online at shopbvm.com and can be requested on the company’s Facebook page, which has almost 3,000 fans. Capitalising on the independence holiday, Mr Hepburn opened a sidewalk shop in the front of Scotiabank’s main branch on Bay Street, selling the same gear that can be found in stores. Holiday Explaining that he wanted to take advantage of the holiday business, he asserted that the t-shirts were not simply independence t-shirts,but a developing fad, available in store yearround. “After Independence Day, distributors will still be selling them,” he said. The company initially released six t-shirt themes: The Slangs, Marine Life, The Wild Life, The Uprising of the C ountry and two 242 People designs. A ccording to Mr Hepburn, his comp any chose to shy away from the typical tourist t-shirt. “It’s not like the normal t-shirt that has to have the word Bahamas plastered on it,” he said. “When Bahamians see it they can relate to it, whether it’s a flag or the flamingo.” One shirt’s image features a flamingo with a Bahamian flag across its face, while a shirt from the “Slang” line features the popular phrase “Don’t watch nuttin” with a blindfolded male figure. M r Heburn said Bahamians have b een happy to see something differe nt, and those of all ages have supported their endeavour. “We have seena lot of people between the ages of 20 and 40 buying the shirts,” he said. “And people from other countries like them.” Firm sees major rise in t-shirt sales Raised airline fees to boost ‘quality of air transportation’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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being consulted. Mr Ferreira said it was through this lack of transparency and disclosure that the Government was effectively ‘creating a rod for its back’ and that of the developers, as the lack of consultation, public input and information was convincing many Bahamians that there was something to hide in relation to these investments. think the lack of transparency from the Government’s point of view assumes the Bahamian people are resistant to development, or they make the assumption that people will say ‘no’ to development and use the information against them,” Mr Ferreira told Tribune Business. “That’s the wrong assumption to take.” While acknowledging that there were some environmentalists and others who would always oppose development projects regardless, Mr Ferreira said that as an environmental consultant he would lose credibility if he said something he could not prove or demonstrate. “I think they’re afraid of public consultation,” Mr Ferreira said of the Government. “They’re not used to consultative engagement; they’re more used to talking to you. “I think they are afraid, in some instances, of the public response or think it will delay the process. It’s some sort of fear. It’s actually in the Government’s interest to disclose the information, so it’s not verified just by us, but by the world. Two heads are better than one. Why not put then together in a collective effort to try and resolve these problems?T hey have implications for future generations that everyone has to live with.” Mr Ferreira said the EIA document itself represented a commitment to the process enshrined in the 13 UNEP principles, the first of which stated that the “authorities should not authorise such activities without prior consultation at an early stage of their environmental efforts”. Then there was the principle on making the public part of the EIA consultation process. What had happened to the Albany and Baker’s Bay EIA, and the opposition spawned particularly to the latter by the lack of transparency and public consultation prior to EIA and project approval could be happening again with the proposed Arawak Cay port project, Mr Ferreira feared. Linking again to the UNEP principle seven, he explained: “In order to fulfil this obligation, a measure of transparency is required from the Government. The intent is that the public should be consulted prior to the commencement of activities so their concerns can be taken into account before the EIA is finalised. “Authorities must, in a sense, come clean with full public disclosure of the EIA. What’s more, comment should not be invited after an EIA is finalised and approved, as in the Albany project. Or, as in the case of Arawak Cay where no EIA information has been disclosed to the public at all. “This is part and parcel of the concept of freedom of information and government transparency. The public ought not to be viewed as an inconvenience to be sidestepped wherever possible but partners in development.” And Mr Ferreira added: “The reality is that successive governments prefer to hold their cards close to their chest. Thus,i n the absence of envrionmental legislation and transparency, environmental transgressions and excesses can, in some cases, become another negotiating tool. And, with this mode of operation, the welfare of future generations is jeopardised.” In the absence of proper environmental and EIA-related information, the Bahamian public were unable to make an informed decision on issues such as whether Arawak Cay is the best location for the con tainer shipping facilities that will be removed from downtown Bay Street. The former PLP government was arguing that the EDAW study had shown Arawak Cay was the second least desirable of seven locations for a new shipping port, and Mr Ferreira said it was impossible for the Bahamian people to determine who was right and whether the addition of 40 acres to Arawak Cay would increase erosion at Saunders Beach without an EIA being made available. “We need full transparency and proper public disclosure,” Mr Ferreira said. “Realistically, this should have happened before the [Nassau Harbour] dredging operations commenced, particularly as the dredge spolis will no doubt be used to create the new manm ade cay. Let’s be reminded that this was the case with the creation of Arawak Cay.” Arguing the case for sustain able development, Mr Ferreira told Tribune Business that the absence of a clear EIA process was one of many facets in our s ociety where there’s lack of clarity and transparency. That’s the real issue we’re plagued with. It makes people think you’ve got something to hide. “Power concedes nothing. You have to take power. People have to demand it from the Government. The PLP did it with Baker’s Bay, and the FNM are doing it now with Arawak Cay.” Mr Ferreira added that by including the Bahamian public’s comments and concerns in the EIA process, and before it a project was approved, would help “the public buy into the development. Instead of getting it thrown on them, they would buy into it”. A nd he said: “It’ll make our country more attractive to foreign investment, because one of the questions we’re always asked is : What is the process? It will simulate business. This is the time to do it, for when the economy picks up. “These things affect business. What we’re talking about is making our country more competitive for the 21st century. We like to call ourselves leaders in the region, but environmentally we’re certainly not. We’re followers.” Without adopting the process of environmental transparency, and enacting the draft environmental laws and regulations that have been on the drawing board since 2005, Mr Ferreira expressed doubts as to whethert he Bahamas could ever participate in activities such as carbon trading or reduce its carbon footprint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ransparency woes undermine project ‘buy-in’ by public F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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Last month, many Bahamians ques tioned the safety of their water supply when several impostor bottles bearing the Aquapure label were confiscated from an independent depot because they had “mind blowing” levels of diseasecausing and potentially-deadly bacteria. Paul Rahming, Proprietor of Renovation Innovation, said he can provide the tools needed to produce clean drinking water for all Bahamians -not from a bot tling company, but from their own homes. “My partner and I, Ricardo Albury, have always been health conscious when it comes to water. With the amount of pollution that is around now such as septic tanks, we just happened to stumble on this system going to a trade show a few years back. It really caught our eyes and as we got additional information, it is here today,” Mr Rahming said. Mr Rahming said the Sterling Water system/conditioner can provide a healthy, safe and cost effective means of providing quality water to residential, commercial and institutional properties. “We condition the water but without the use of salt which isa new technology that has been o n the market for about three to four years now and its just reaching the Bahamas,” Mr Rahming said. Mr Rahming said the way the Sterling water conditioner works, is by two electrodes, one acts as an anode and the other is the cathode. H ow it works “What it does is it neutralises the particles in the water without touching the water. The way we install our systems is directly where water enters the house or the establishment thus giving you proper use of the water. Also, another part of our installation comes with a filtration sys tem. We install a filter before the water goes through our sterling water condi tioner. Out of our sterling water conditioner into another two part filtration system even before it goes into the estab l ishment,” Mr Rahming said. Mr Rahming said this type of system installed with a two year warranty, will cost around $1,475 and there is no space needed for installation because it is attached to the wall. “Maintaining this system is very minimum. The only thing we ask persons to do is every month or so to check their filters to make sure they are clean. The system itself is required to be serviced every five to six months because the water in our ground is very hard and you are goingt o get a lot of build up,” Mr Rahming said. As for energy efficiency, Mr Rahming said although the Sterling Water conditioner works with electricity, the amount it uses is the equivalent to that of a 25 watt light bulb. “The good thing about this is it is equipped with a very sensitive flow switch and it only kicks in as water flows. If you are not using any water in the house, it shuts down,” Mr Rahming said. Mr Rahming advises persons unable to afford a system like the Sterling water conditioner, to purchase a filtration sys tem. “A filtration system would cost around $300 to $400 and all it would take is you maintaining the filters inside it about every month. However, for those per sons who had filtration systems and the Sterling water conditioner, their filters were crys tal clear except for the hard water build up,” Mr Rahming said. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 8B,TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE health BODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter a missick@tribunemedia.net W ITH the entire world scurrying to save the planet and become environmentally fr iendly, a healthy water supply has become a pr ior ity. IT is quite a challenge to keep your feet cool when walking around in extremely hot weather. Therefore, your feet need some special care and atten tion during the summer months. Heat and humidity will aid in the growth of bacteria, so taking measures to reduce these will help enormously. During the summer foot injuries are also more prevalent the increased level of outdoor athletic activities during the summer also increases the chance of muscle pain, heel pain, shin splints, plantar fasciitis, Morton's neuroma, achilles tendinitis, hip pain/bursitis, runner's knee, illiotibial band syndrome (ITB How do we deal with summer heat and our feet? Moisture Management: The most important is to manage moisture in order to decrease the risk of athlete's foot and pronounced foot odor. Excessive perspiration has been seen as a significant contributor to these conditions. In technical terms, this excessive perspi ration is known as hyperridrosis. A rapid production of sweat that cannot be evaporated as fast as it is pro duced. When this happens, the shoe's material or part becomes saturated with moisture. In the perspiration there is also bacterial waste. You may ask what is this bacterial waste? Perspiration is body “waste”a nd has an abundance of bacteria. In addition, it is believed that approximately 98 per cent of this perspira tion is moisture and 2 per cent is solids mostly acids and salts. These bacteria thrive on moisture, warmth and darkness just like bacteria thatc auses toe fungus. Solutions: In terms of cleanliness and hygiene habits, wash your feet daily and dry thoroughly before putting on footwear. Always, use a clean pair of socks, preferably, specially-designed cotton or synthetic perspiration wicking fabric to get rid of foot odor. For example, 'Thorlos' and 'Balgia' brand of cushioned socks are espe cially designed to provide insulation and air flow and wicks away moisture and keep your foot from getting too hot. Refrain from wearing yesterday's gym socks just because they smell clean. One wear is enough to leave behind sufficient foot perspiration for odor-causing bacteria to thrive on. It will be enough to leave feet stinky and dirty. Footwear is another important factor. When selecting shoes it is important to avoid shoes or boots with nonbreathable upper materials, especially closed-type shoes or simply tightfitting shoes. For example, leather with its unique internal structure of fibers and inter-fiber air spaces, plus its surface pores, has excellent breathing capacity. 2. Foot Pain and injury: To alleviate such pain and or avoid further injury, consider custom orthotics or inserts with proper arch support for your foot type. Such items can be purchased at specialty footwear stores or Pedorthic facilities. If you want to continue running, walking or remain active for many more years, you need to ensure that there is enough support between your foot and the flat and hard sur faces. Depending on the activity to which you are doing, you need to seek the appropriate footwear and support for that purpose. Avoid injury and pain by seeking professional help to assist you with the cor rect footwear and support (orthotic to not only support your body and foot type but to adequately off load the pressure presented by the underlying terrain. Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a health and wellness franchise that focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit, located in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau. "The views expressed are those of the author and does not necessarily represent those of Foot Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any questions or comments to nassau@footsolu tions.com or 327-FEET (3338 Summer heat and your feet! By BERNADETTE G IBSON Setting a new in standard clean water The Sterling Water system/conditioner can provide a healthy, safe and cost effective means of providing quality water to residential, commercial and institutional properties. Do you ever wonder what your dog does when you are not at home? Perhaps he is taking a nap on your bed (and dribbling on your pillow), chewing on your favourite pair of shoes, or just terrorising your loved kitty cat. But people whose dog suffers from Separation Anxiety are lucky if their house is still standing when they return home. Separation Anxiety is a form of men tal illness affecting dogs. The second their owners leave they become extremely upset and anxious. Then they become frantic. At this point, this dog is not in control of his behaviour. Separation Anxiety can be defined as increased fearfulness of this dog after the departure of the owner. For example: after their owners leave for work, anxious dogs might bark or howl, have bowel or bladder accidents, or destroy things. Dogs that form intense attachments with their owners such as Labradors are more likely candidates for Separation Anxiety. Typically, the dog follows the owner about the house, can’t bear to have the owner out of sight, and becomes increasingly distraught as the owner prepares to leave. To make up for this, owners may tend to overdo good byes. But in fact, this can accentuate your dog’s feeling of abandonment once you leave the house. Instead, ignore the dog for ten minutes or so immediately before prior to departure. And get him use to your leaving. Stage your absences; first only a minute or two, then five minutes, ten and so on. Offer your dog a treat, like a Nylabone, before you go to keep him pleasantly distracted while you’re gone. Separation Anxiety is a panic disorder likely caused by over stimulation of the parts of the brain that regulates fear and stress, but this term is often misapplied. Like Attention Deficit Disorder in children, separation anxiety has become a trendy diagnosis. Not every dog that mis behaves when owners are away has sep aration anxiety. Dogs are pack animals and are happiest around their pack. They are extremely social critters that form strong bonds with their owners. Most dogs do not like it when people leave and will exhibit mild forms of behaviour associated with Separation Anxiety. A typical dog left alone may chew shoes out of boredom, but dogs with separation anx iety will chew the refrigerator. The three main signs of Separation Anxiety are destruction, vocalisation and elimination. These dogs will bark and howl the entire time the owner is gone. The destruction these dogs do is astounding. There are several hallmarks of separation anxiety. The first is the mass destruction when the dog is left alone. The dogs literally destroy the house, chewing though walls, doors and even into the refrigerator. Exit points to the house are targets, perhaps because dogs think they can get outside to find their owners. Another distinction is that this extreme destruction occurs within the first 15 minutes after the owner leaves. Separation Anxiety is not a problem commonly seen in puppies. It is seen in dogs that have been through trauma. Pound dogs that have had the worst things happen to them; their owners did leave and never came back. Now they are afraid it will happen again. Another example of a scary situation that may trigger anxiety is if the dog is present during a burglary. Separation Anxiety is generally the result of a traumatic experience. Unfortunately separation anxiety is self-perpetuating. The dogs keep getting more and more upset each time the owner leaves. However another pet does not help these dogs and it is not boredom that is causing the behaviour. These dogs are extremely attached to their owners and are very people-oriented. There is no quick fix for this problem. Antidepressant and anxiety drugs are not enough to conquer separation anxi ety. Medication needs to be used in addi tion to desensitisation therapy. As mentioned earlier, desensitisation therapy involves having this dog sit and stay as the owner gradually steps away. Even tually the owner will step out of the room as the dog stays and believes that the owner will return. The goal is to take the “scary” factor out of the owner’s departure. This is time consuming work and takes dedica tion. Many veterinarians may refer owners to a dog trainer. Crate training these dogs is helpful. It at least provides these dogs a safer place where they can’t destroy things or harm themselves. For more information about Separation Anxiety, or if you are concerned your dog has separation anxieties, contact your local veterinarian. Separation Anxiety A form of mental illness in dogs By DR BASIL SANDS

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GREEN SCENE BY JACK HARDY C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009, PAGE 9B Recruiting Now for the July 2009 intake www.rdicaribbean.com • 27499 Riverview Center Boulevard, Suite 111, Bonita Springs, Florida 34134, USA • Tel 1 239 444 1730 • email info@rdicaribbean.com your goalsSpecialised MBAs offered by the University of Wales: Project Management, Management Consultancy, HR Management, Service Excellence and General MBA Higher National Diploma (HND months BA/BSc 12 months Higher National Diploma (entry to top up Degrees through 2-year HND) in Business and Management, Information Technology, Travel and Tourism, Marketing, Finance FEATURED PROGRAMME: UNIVERSITY OF WALES MBA US$8,500 COMPLETE IN MINIMUM OF ONE YEAR! • Develop your career while studying • No attendance requirement • Tutor and student MASTERSMBA University of Bradford, University of Sunderland, University of Wales MSc in Public Administration & Development University of Birmingham MSc Marketing & Management University of Bradford MSc Finance, Accounting & Management University of Bradford MA Education University of Derby LLM Commercial Law University of Derby MSc Information Technology University of Teesside MSc International Hospitality ManagementMSc Telecommunications Birmingham City University Diploma in Management University of Wales (pre-MBA for non-degree holders)BACHELOR DEGREE COURSES University of Wales BA (Honstop up specialisms in Marketing, Finance, Banking University of Sunderland BA (Hons& Management (top upHons Management (top up University of Derby BSc (Hons University of Teesside LLB, BSc (Hons (top up BSc (Hons Hospitality & Tourism (top up By Dr KATHRYN DE SOUZA Western Medical Plaza OSTEOPOROSISis the medical term for thinning bones. It is o ften confused with osteoarthrit is, which is degeneration of the j oints through wear and tear. There is no cure for osteoarthritis, but we are now able to treat, and cure, osteoporosis. The body is constantly making new bone and resorbing old bone. Osteoporosis occurs when there is more bone being resorbed than made. The ground work for good bone structure is laid down in childhood to young adult years. The body uses calciu m, Vitamin D and phosphate t o form bone. The bones are a s torage space for calcium in the body. The heart, brain and other organs need calcium to work properly. To keep the body functioning normally, the body uses the calcium in the bones when it is needed, and replaces it with the calcium obtained from the diet. If a person does not eat enough calcium, such as dairy products, fortified orange juice and salmon (to name a few bone production may suffer, r esulting in brittle bones over time. The leading cause of Osteop orosis is lack of estrogen in w omen. During and after m enopause, estrogen levels drop. Older men, or men who are undergoing prostate cancer treatment, may also have low hormone levels. These hormones are called androgens, which can result in Osteoporosis. People who have taken a large amount of steroids over time, such as those with Asthma and Rheumatoid Arthritis, are at risk for osteoporosis as well. Epileptic patients, who are being treated w ith anti-epileptics, should also be monitored for osteoporosis. Thyroid and chronic renal disease also increase your risk for osteoporosis. Women with the following attributes are at the highest risk for osteoporosis: 1. Over 50, post menopausal 2. Caucasian or Asian 3. Thin or small bone structure 4. Smokers and alcoholics 5. Strong family history However, if you do not have any of these attributes, you can still develop osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is usually a silent disease until the fracture (broken bone occurs. More often than not, people do not know they have osteoporosis. They may have a dull ache in their back or neck, or they may develop a hunchback posture. Severe pain can develop if a compression fracture occurs suddenly, leaving the vertebrae (spinal bone normally. Sudden hip fractures can also occur which are extremely painful. Anyone over 50 with a hip, wrist or spine fracture from a seemingly mild injury, needs to be checked for osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is diagnosed by a test called a bone density test, which measures the density, or strength, of the bones. This test can detect osteoporosis before a fracture occurs. There are several things you can do to minimise your risk for developing osteoporosis. Young adults should be encouraged to get 1000mg of calcium in their diet from milk and other dairy products, salmon, sardines and other bony fish, and fortified orange juice. Weight bearing exercise such as running, walking, aerobics, weight lifting and even cycling decrease your risk as does maintaining a normal, healthy body weight. Studies have shown that women who walk a mile a day have four to seven more years of bone reserve than women who do not. It is also important to get enough Vitamin D. Usually we get enough Vitamin D through sun exposure as it is absorbed through our skin, but with the threat of skin cancer, many people are dramatically limiting their sun exposure and wearing high intensity sun block which does not allow the Vitamin D to penetrate the skin. You should have 5-10 minutes of unprotected sun exposure daily to obtain enough Vitamin D. If a supplement is preferred, a calcium supplement with 600mg of Calcium and Vitamin D should be taken twice daily, as we are unable to absorb more than 600mg of calcium at any given time. Treatment for osteoporosis aims to slow down or stop bone loss, increasing bone density, preventing fractures and pain control. 40 per cent of women will experience a fracture due to osteoporosis in their lifetime. Talk to your doctor to determine which medication is right for you, as well as diet and exercise advice. Do you have Osteoporosis? TWOtrees catch our attention during July. One is the royal poinciana that dominates the urban landscape and the other is mango. The royal p oinciana is for beauty; the mango is for eating. Few tropical fruits are loved as much as mango. Their exquisite sweetness makes all the care and attention that goes into the trees worth while. Messy to eat they may be but few fruits are as rewarding when it comes to taste. While we have plenty of mangoes around we should think about preserving some for future use. Mango jam is easily made and mango chut ney is a fine relish with lots of applica t ions. Make mango salsa to enjoy with w hite fish and meats, particularly pork and chicken. That care and attention can be continued even while the mango trees are bearing. Some people omit the sea sonal fertilisation of mangoes in summer and fertilise them in autumn. For most citrus and fruit trees a summer application of fertiliser is part of the three times a year treatment of iron, granular fertiliser and minor nutrients. The iron is applied as a drench to the bole of the tree and should be Sequestrene 138 or similar. This type of chelated iron was developed for the Florida citrus industry when it was found that normal chelated irons b ecame bound up in the highly alkaline soil. It is very expensive but virtually a necessity for successful citrus. If possible, use specific fertilisers for your fruit trees: citrus fertiliser for citrus, fruit for fruit, and palm for palm. I tend to buy the right sized bag so once I have finished fertilising I have no irritating half bags to store. Minor nutrients are applied as a spray, using a sticker/spreader to help the liquid adhere to the leaves. In the vegetable garden it is the sea s on of okra and corn. Okra is not my f avourite veggie but I do like them pickled. Pickled okra is fine served with a cheese platter. The corn I grow each year is Peach es and Cream, a bi-coloured sugarenhanced variety that produces large, plump ears. The stalks grow to six feet and must be grown in blocks rather than rows. Once the plants have tasseled they should be sprayed regularly with Sevin or a similar product. If you want to be organic you can use Dipel dust that is effective against caterpil lars. July is a good time to plant seeds for calabaza, or Cuban pumpkin. The seasonal rains will nurture the young vines and you can expect mature fruits i n late fall. I have cubanelle sweet peppers for my summer crop. I am growing them under papaya trees to provide midday shade to prevent sunscald on the fruits. Most people like to eat the cubanelles at the yellow stage but I prefer them when they are red and really sweet. It is at this time of year many gardeners have a plethora of hot peppers. The best way to preserve hot peppers is by freezing them. Spread a layer on am etal cookie sheet and put in the freeze r for an hour. Then pack them in freezer bags and dip into them whenever you need a pepper hit. There is a great misconception about roses. Many people associate roses with English gardens and think they are sun-shy. Not so. Roses demand full sun, even in summer. To maintain their vigour they should be dressed every season with compost and kept well watered during droughts. Regular dead-heading and the occasional prun ing will keep your plants healthy. During the summer months the h umidity will encourage black spot on r ose bush leaves. This is treated with Orthene, a systemic that kills sucking insects. Orthene can be used on other ornamental shrubs to give them protection but is best not used on hibiscus. July is the first full month of summer a nd jobs like fertilising, judicial pruning a nd composting will ensure dividends later on in the season. j.hardy@coralwave.com The garden of July R OSES n eed special care during the summer months to avoid diseases caused by damp conditions and high heat.

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C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE YOUhave a suggestion to make and you know if you make it to your boss she will say something like, we tried that before or find a reason why it wouldn't work. You have at least two options: take a chance and give your boss your idea or circumvent your boss a nd take it to someone further up in t he hierarchy who can act on it. I n the book, “The 48 Laws of Power” by Robert Greene, his very first law is “Don't outshine the master.” He defines this law saying an effort to display your talent does not always impress others, it can inadvertently inspire fear and insecurity. Here are some reasons why you may decide to circumvent a boss, friend, family member, a peer or a member of your support staff. No Voice M any times I witness supervisors and managers who have no voice in an organisation because of a past mistake or current performance issues. If a supervisor has no voice, they can't be the voice of their direct reports so their direct reports have to choose between circumventing the hierarchy if they want to be heard and keeping quiet to protect their supervisor. Negative attitude No-one likes to be around a person with a negative attitude unless this is their comfort zone. Know-it-alls, condescending people, gossips, bullies, blamers are all examples of types of people who are avoided. While some of you have no problem facing bearers of negativity, others of you prefer to reduce your 'face time' with them. If you obviously circumvent someone who is negative, brace yourself for his or her negativism to be directed at you but keep in mind that sometimes it is worth the risk Insecurity People are insecure for any number of reasons. None of those reasons probably have anything to do with you. They could be insecure about your idea being better than theirs or they could be uncomfortable with you dressed up all the time. Awareness is part of the battle. Many of us refuse to see the truth because it is uncomfortable so we opt to stay in a comfortable, unaware s pace. If you choose to see the truth a nd act, circumvention is one of your o ptions. Procrastination Procrastination is the enemy of many well laid plans.If there is a procrastinator on your team, your productivity is impacted because you are reliant on the procrastinator for their part of the plan. Procrastinators are not easy to circumvent so you can either decide to let them sink or you can help them. If you have the authority you can reassign the work. A Complaint It takes emotional discipline and the ability to articulate your complaint in a constructive way to complain to the person you are complaining about. Even with effective communication skills, this kind of conversation can go off track so persons with complaints tend to circumvent the perceived perpetrator. Fear In some work environments there are employees or bosses whose sole purpose seems to be to keep you in a state of suspended terror. They are b ullies and they often know no other w ay to be. They either bully you into s ubmission and you lose your voice or you circumvent them and brace yourself for the fallout. Dependence Some people believe their power resides in keeping others dependent on them. If you don't want to get caught in this trap you will need to learn what you are not being shown by circumventing the system of dependence. C ircumvention guidelines: Here are a few tips to help you decide if you will circumvent: Decide on your objectives and your priority values given the situation and circumvent if it aligns with your objectives. In other words, choose your battles. Remember one of the Laws of Power, if you outshine the Master be prepared for the possible consequences. Think ahead and consider the possible positive and negative consequences of your actions. Then determine the worst-case scenario and w hether or not you can live with it. I f you decide to circumvent, you can do it in a few different ways. You can provide information to the appropriate person understanding that one possible outcome of this is that you will not be trusted. To get around this I have seen people “accidentally” tip off a person in authority. There are others of you who will circumvent a dysfunctional system with no regard for the possible fallo ut. You can give information to someone “off the record” but remember that it is sometimes their job to put it on the record. Set up someone to represent you. In all of this, remember that circumvention in and of itself is neither right nor wrong. It all depends on how you play the circumvention game. Circumvention: A recognizable convention By YVETTE BETHEL to shelter me from the politics that went on behind the scenes so I have to say that I had a lot of support from the Rotarians who were in it for the right reasons, and I really would not have pursued it, if it were not for those supportive members not to mention that my dad was a Rotarian so it was harder for them to say no to Barry Rassin’s daughter then it would be for them to say no to someone else.” The club’s president at the time Everett Peart also took up slack for her. “I do not think that anyone should be judged based on their sex race or gender I think your work perfor mance should stand by itself. I have a passion for community service and I don’t that politics should be a deciding factor.” Despite this, Ms Rassin said when her application was presented to the members for a vote , “three persons actually quit the club, many threatened to quit and many held on just to make trouble. They were the min imal amount however and the majority of the members were extremely supportive.” Her application took about two months to process, while most applications took about six weeks. “After I became a member it was a bit of a hazing process I think I was on every committee and every community service function but I loved it, I really got my handsi nvolved and that has been the best part I have been able to get a really good grasp of what Rotary does.” Today, there are nine members in East Nassau and women in all the Rotary groups except the West Nassau Club. To date there have been seven female presidents although none of them have had quite the drama to gain admittance. “One of the nicest things that happened, was that Sir Durward Knowles stood up at a meeting and said that he was one of the members who had objected to my mem bership, but that he had to admit that he was wrong. That meant a lot to me.” As the first female president, she said she knows she has a lot to prove, but says that she has a passion for community service and is ready to meet what she knows will be high expectations. Amoung the projects Rotary will be working on this year: the launch of a blood mobile which can travel around the country, projects that will fit children with hearing aids and eye glasses, and another that will provide much needed ventila tors and incubators to Princess Margaret Hospital. The club will do all of these things in addition to the regu lar outreach programmes and support they have provided over the years. Of course funding is a major component in just how much they will be able to do, but Ms Rassin said despite the current economic climate now is not the time to scale back on fundraising because a lot of the char ity organisations will be faced with short falls and have a harder time raising funds to carry on their day to day projects and will thus be relying more on the assistance Rotary can provide. “We’ve been very lucky, this year for example our fishing tournament raised more money than it did last year so people are just working a little harder and a little longer to get the amounts that we need. So maybe this year your $1000 donor can only give $500 so you need more $500 donors. It will make it more diffi cult but we realise the importance of it. “The theme for this year is “The Future of Rotary is in Your Hands” and so we will be undertaking an aggressive membership drive as well as bridging the gap between what we do and people knowing what we do,” she added. F ROM page 12 First lady of Rotary PICTURED Left to right: Michele Rassin, President, Rotary Club of East Nassau accepting flowers on behalf of the hearing aid recipients; Ralph Foreskin, Past President Rotary Club of East Nassau; Kim Scriven, Audiologist; Hearing Aid Recipient. PICTURED from left to right: Rotarian, District 7020; Past District Governor Rupert Ross; wife of District Governor Leonie Alberga; District Governor Errol Alberga; Michele Rassin, President Rotary Club of East Nassau; Barry Rassin, Past Rotary International Director; Philip Cumming, Secretary, Rotary Club of East Nassau; Felix Stubbs, Assistant District Governor.

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 73F/23C Low: 77F/25C Low: 76F/24C Low: 78F/26C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 81 F/27 C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 89F/32C High: 89F/32C High: 91 F/33 C High: 91 F/33 C High: 92F/33C High: 89 F/32C High: 93F/34C Low: 82F/28C High: 93F/34C Low: 81 F/27 C High: 94F/34C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 79F/26C High: 91 F/33 Low: 75F/24C High: 89F/32C Low: 78 F/26C High: 92F/33C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 95F/35C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 93F/34C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 93F/34C Low: 79F/26C High: 94 F/34 C Low: 82F/28C High: 97F/36C High: 92 F/33 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JULY 7 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Sunny and humid. Partly cloudy.Intervals of clouds and sunshine. Intervals of clouds and sunshine. Bright and sunny. High: 93 Low: 81 High: 92 High: 92 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Clouds and sun with a shower. High: 89 Low: 82 Low: 80 Low: 81 AccuWeather RealFeel 120F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 92F 118-94F 114-90F 107-88F 102-87F Low: 80 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................82F/28C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 76 F/24C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.49" Year to date ................................................18.31" Normal year to date ....................................19.65" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Full Last New First Jul. 7 Jul. 15Jul. 21Jul. 28 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:26 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:04 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 8:29 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 6:30 a.m. Today Wednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 8:33 a.m.2.32:35 a.m.0.2 8:57 p.m.2.82:28 p.m.0.2 9:12 a.m.2.43:12 a.m.0.2 9:34 p.m.2.83:08 p.m.0.2 9:50 a.m.2.43:48 a.m.0.1 10:09 p.m.2.73:48 p.m.0.2 10:26 a.m.2.44:23 a.m.0.1 10:43 p.m.2.64:27 p.m.0.3 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3279/26pc91/3279/26s Amsterdam66/1854/12sh64/1752/11c Ankara, Turkey84/2855/12pc88/3157/13c Athens88/3172/22s93/3376/24s Auckland56/1348/8sh54/1239/3sh Bangkok89/3178/25r89/3177/25r Barbados88/3177/25s85/2977/25s Barcelona81/2765/18pc71/2166/18sh Beijing97/3675/23s92/3371/21c Beirut84/2875/23s80/2677/25s Belgrade89/3166/18t90/3267/19pc Berlin74/2357/13sh68/2054/12r Bermuda80/2671/21c80/2672/22sh Bogota66/1847/8r62/1646/7sh Brussels66/1852/11sh64/1752/11r Budapest86/3059/15t81/2754/12pc Buenos Aires61/1641/5pc52/1137/2pc Cairo95/3575/23s99/3773/22s Calcutta91/3284/28sh94/3484/28sh Calgary64/1746/7t64/1746/7t Cancun90/3273/22t86/3076/24t Caracas81/2771/21t82/2771/21t Casablanca75/2363/17s81/2766/18s Copenhagen65/1857/13sh69/2059/15sh Dublin64/1752/11sh63/1750/10pc Frankfurt72/2254/12sh66/1852/11r Geneva 73/22 54/12 t 69/2052/11t Halifax 65/18 52/11 pc 66/18 52/11 sh Havana 93/33 73/22 t 90/32 75/23 sh Helsinki 70/21 50/10pc72/2254/12sh Hong Kong 90/32 81/27 t 90/32 81/27s Islamabad 112/44 82/27 s 112/44 83/28 s Istanbul90/3273/22s91/3275/23s Jerusalem 82/27 62/16s83/2861/16s Johannesburg 59/1540/4s60/1540/4s Kingston 88/3175/23t91/3279/26s Lima71/2158/14pc72/2258/14s London66/1854/12r70/2155/12sh Madrid90/3261/16pc93/3361/16pc Manila88/3177/25t86/3077/25sh Mexico City77/2554/12t77/2552/11t Monterrey104/4075/23s106/4175/23s Montreal69/2061/16t72/2261/16sh Moscow68/2046/7pc73/2254/12pc Munich72/2250/10t70/2152/11t Nairobi76/2455/12c76/2454/12c New Delhi 108/4288/31s104/4088/31s Oslo65/1855/12r64/1752/11sh Paris68/2054/12t70/2150/10pc Prague 74/23 54/12 t 73/22 54/12 pc Rio de Janeiro78/2568/20s80/2669/20s Riyadh108/4284/28s109/4284/28s Rome 85/29 66/18 s 83/28 63/17 s St. Thomas91/3279/26s89/3179/26r San Juan66/1831/0s57/1331/0pc San Salvador 88/31 70/21 t 85/29 74/23 t Santiago 59/1537/2pc59/1534/1pc Santo Domingo91/3275/23pc86/3074/23sh Sao Paulo 75/23 58/14 pc 76/24 57/13s Seoul86/3068/20pc86/3071/21pc Stockholm 68/20 54/12 r 73/22 55/12 sh Sydney 61/16 47/8 pc61/1648/8sh Taipei92/3377/25t93/3377/25pc T okyo 86/30 74/23 pc 82/27 73/22 r T oronto 66/1855/12t70/2155/12pc Trinidad86/3072/22t85/2968/20c V ancouver 65/18 56/13 sh 66/1855/12c Vienna 76/2463/17t70/2156/13sh W arsaw 77/25 57/13 sh 73/22 54/12 r Winnipeg 77/25 54/12 t 73/2256/13t H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Wednesday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Today:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Wednesday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Today:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Wednesday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque94/3468/20s94/3468/20pc Anchorage78/2559/15s79/2659/15s Atlanta88/3168/20s87/3070/21pc Atlantic City83/2859/15pc84/2860/15pc Baltimore85/2962/16pc82/2764/17pc Boston73/2259/15t73/2259/15t Buffalo68/2054/12t69/2057/13pc Charleston, SC89/3170/21t89/3170/21t Chicago76/2458/14t82/2766/18t Cleveland78/2555/12pc73/2259/15pc Dallas96/3574/23pc98/3677/25pc Denver92/3358/14pc95/3560/15s Detroit77/2555/12pc76/2460/15pc Honolulu88/3175/23pc88/3176/24s Houston94/3476/24t96/3574/23t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday TodayWednesdayTodayWednesday Indianapolis84/2863/17pc85/2967/19t Jacksonville88/3171/21t90/3272/22t Kansas City90/3268/20s93/3372/22pc Las Vegas105/4077/25s104/4081/27s Little Rock94/3467/19s93/3368/20pc Los Angeles83/2862/16pc83/2862/16pc Louisville88/3165/18s89/3167/19pc Memphis92/3370/21s93/3373/22pc Miami92/3378/25pc92/3379/26t Minneapolis82/2764/17t77/2566/18t Nashville88/3164/17s92/3366/18pc New Orleans90/3276/24t90/3274/23t New York82/2764/17t81/2765/18pc Oklahoma City90/3268/20pc96/3572/22pc Orlando89/3173/22t92/3373/22t Philadelphia84/2864/17pc81/2763/17pc Phoenix 108/42 87/30 s 108/4285/29s Pittsburgh76/2456/13pc78/2554/12pc Portland, OR 70/2155/12c71/2154/12c Raleigh-Durham 90/32 65/18 s 91/32 64/17 pc St. Louis87/3070/21pc93/3372/22pc Salt Lake City 92/33 63/17 s 86/3060/15s San Antonio 97/36 76/24 t 100/37 78/25 s San Diego73/2266/18pc73/2264/17pc San Francisco 67/19 55/12 pc 70/2154/12pc Seattle65/1854/12c68/2053/11c T allahassee 86/3071/21t88/3173/22t T ampa 89/31 77/25 t 89/31 77/25t Tucson99/3781/27s99/3778/25pc W ashington, DC 86/30 66/18s86/3064/17pc UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, JULY 7, 2009 “I grew up attending Rotary events with my father ( Dr Barry Rassin) and so I have been surrounded by Rotary all of my life.” And while she knew that entering the traditionally all boys club would be difficult, it was really the organisation’s track record that inspired her to push for membership. Ms Rassin explained that she was attracted to Rotary because 100 per cent of the funds that the organisation raises goes into their community outreach programmes. “I didn’t want to give my money or my time to an organisation that used some of the funds for administration purposes. Even in the church, you don’t see a lot of the money going back into the community as you do in Rotary soI wanted to give my time and resources where I knew it would be used the best and they are a global organsation, so we are not just helping the Bahamas, we are helping people all over the world.” However, her request for member ship seven years ago did not come without controversy- “It was a stressful time, she says looking back. “I was very nervous, I am not one that wants or likes to cause problems so it was very difficult for me, a lot of the members tried SEE page 10 m By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL Tribune Features Editor MICHELERassin is a lady of firsts. Not only did she break the all male barrier of the Rotary Cub of East Nassau, to become its first female member, now she is its first female president. The Doctors Hospital executive sat down with Tribune Woman recently to discuss the role Rotary has played in her life and to discuss the aggressive agenda the club will undertake this year. One of the nicest things that happened, was that Sir Durward Knowles stood up at a meeting and said that he was one of the members who had objected to my membership, but that he had to admit that he was wrong. That meant a lot to me. ROTARIANS and volunteers in action painting Project Read. LAID the groundwork for the new playground for the Bahamas Association for the Physically Disabled.