Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Mim lowin’ it

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SUNNY

The Tribune ~€

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009



HIGH
LOW

Volume: 105 No.185

PRICE — 75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)







nen HF

InSsIG

the stories Ls



Body of murdered
woman discoveret

Police investigate
whether victim was
sexually molested

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigating
whether the murdered woman
found wrapped in a sheet off
Eastern Road may have been
sexually molested before her
death.

The Caucasian woman
whose badly decomposed body
was found dumped in a bushy
area near Fox Hill Creek on
Saturday evening is thought to
have died over a week ago and
been dropped at the roadside
on Friday night or Saturday
morning.

Police have not yet con-
firmed her identity, the cause of
her death or circumstances sur-
rounding her murder.

But Superintendent in charge
of the Central Detective Unit
Elsworth Moss said detectives
are close to identifying the
woman as she has a distinctive
tattoo across her lower back.

He did not speculate about
her age, whether she was
Bahamian, a foreign resident

*except red tagged & net items

or a tourist, but said she has
been linked to missing person
reports and he expects to speak
to her family and confirm her
identity tomorrow.

The woman was fully dressed
in blue jeans and a green top,
and wrapped from head to toe
in a sheet, when she was dis-
covered by walkers exercising
in the area just after 6pm on
Saturday.

Mr Moss said she had been
dead for at least seven days
before she was dumped in
overgrowth near the waterfront
at the bottom of Fox Hill on
Eastern Road, New Provi-
dence.

Mr Moss said: “We certainly
believe the body was dumped
there because persons walked
in the same area on Friday
night and there was nothing.

“Someone saw it on Satur-
day morning and didn’t pay
attention to it and on Saturday
afternoon the police were
called.

“We have an idea of who it

SEE page eight

Great selection ="
of independence
items: hats, flags,
bags & umbrellas ~s





Turks constitution suspension

CARICOM Heads of
Government continued to
lend their support against
the suspension of the con-
stitution of the Turks and
Caicos Islands during
their summit meeting in
Guyana over the week-
end.

Representing the

Bahamas at this summit in
Georgetown, Guyana, was
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-

ham who flew to George-
town on Thursday
evening.

While these heads of
government focused their
attention primarily on
immigration matters, a
joint statement was
released on Turks and
Caicos as follows:

“The Member States of the

SEE page eight

Bahamasair flight grounded
after warning light on takeoff

A BAHAMASAIR flight bound for Fort Lauderdale was ground-
ed in Nassau last night after a warning light came on midway down the

runway on takeoff.

Passengers had earlier been forced to vacate the plane, scheduled to
leave at 6.30pm, due to “mechanical difficulties” but were soon told

they could get back on board.

Several passengers then described a small puff of smoke coming from
underneath the wing before the plane moved. Minutes later the plane
was forced to return from the runway with the pilot saying he wasn’t
comfortable flying after the warning light came on just before takeoff.

Many of the passengers were said to be upset with several saying they

would never fly Bahamasair again.

Passengers who didn’t want to stay the night were told another

plane would be available at 10.30pm.







SS SS



Police officer
in hospital
after attack

by thugs

Confrontation

at gas station

Alastair Grant/AP

MARK KNOWLES and Germany's
Anna-Lena Groenefeld pose with
their trophies after winning their
mixed doubles final against Lean-
der Paes of India and Cara Black
of Zimbabwe, on the Centre Court
at Wimbledon.













By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER falling short in
both singles and men’s dou-
bles over a span of more
than two decades, Mark
Knowles’ name is finally
inked on a title at the presti-
gious Wimbledon Tennis
Tournament.

On the final day of com-
petition at the 2009 Grand
Slam in London, England,
Knowles and Anna-Lena
Groenefeld of Germany
came up with the perfect
combination to win the
mixed doubles.

Before a crowd of
Bahamian supporters wav-
ing their Bahamian flags, the
number nine seeds prevailed
with a 7-5, 6-3 win over top
seeds Leander Paes of India
and Cara Black from Zim-
babwe.

“I always envisioned
myself being a Wimbledon
champion,” said Knowles in

SEE page 10





























By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A POLICE officer is
recovering in hospital fol-
lowing a confrontation
with a group of violent
thugs at the Texaco gas
station in Mackey Street
on Saturday night.

Southern Detective
Unit officer Ricardo Fer-
guson 447 was with two
reserve police officers
when he came across a
group of men vandalising
the pumps and damaging
cars.

The off-duty officers
approached the group
only to be set upon by the
hooligans.

Mr Ferguson received
head injuries and reserve
officers Ferguson 708 and
Pratt 782 attended to him
while they alerted police.

But the men got away
in the car they were trav-
elling in together, and the
driver has not yet been

SEE page eight

Officer may be
questioned in
connection with
armed robbery

of jewellery store

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A POLICE officer may be
questioned in connection with
the second Sunday afternoon
armed robbery of a downtown
jewellery store yesterday.

According to reports the
police officer may have acted
as a lookout in the robbery of
the Breitling Boutique on Bay
Street at around 12.30pm yes-
terday, but this has not yet been
confirmed by police.

Staff at the store, located
between Parliament and Char-
lotte Streets, were forced to
hand over hundreds of dollars
worth of designer watches when
a robber threatened them at
gunpoint.

It was the second armed rob-
bery of a Bay Street store with-

SEE page eight

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

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LOCAL NEWS

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THE TRIBUNE



0 In brief

Man ilies after
falling from tree

A 53-YEAR-OLD man
died when he fell from a
Breadfruit tree in The Bluff,
Eleuthera, at around 9.45am
yesterday. Police are investi-
gating the incident.

Error in BEC
billing process

BEC customers received
two bills for the month of May
owing to a technical error in

the corporation’s billing
process.

An accounting adjustment
was then made resulting in a
second bill being generated.

Customers who have

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the bill dated June 3.

The Bahamas Electricity
Corporation apologises for
any inconvenience caused.

If you have any queries or
concerns contact the customer
service department on 302-
1680 or 302-1170.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Minister
Pecommencds
a Catholic

Charities Fund

A CATHOLIC
Charities Fund
was recom-
mended by
Labour Minister
Dion Foulkes at
the Fourth
Degree Toast &
and reception of Dion Foulkes
the Knights of Columbus on
Friday.

Mr Foulkes made the sug-
gestion to Archbishop Patrick
Pinder and the Roman
Catholic community during
his speech at the Hermitage,
the Archbishop’s residence
on the Eastern Road. Mr.
Foulkes was representing
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, who is attending the
Caricom conference in
Guyana.

While the minister praised
the contribution of the
Catholic Church and the
good work of the Knights of
Columbus, he asked the
Church to consider establish-
ing a Catholic Charities fund
similar to the Archbishop’s
Annual Appeal.

However, the Catholic
Charities fund would also
draw on resources from non-
Catholics to serve the needs
of all regardless of religious
affiliation.

He said: “It is my sincere
belief that a Catholic Chari-
ties agency and fund would
be an innovative vehicle to
expand your social outreach,
while providing you and the
nation with additional
resources to help meet some
of the social assistance and
development needs of our
people.

“As minister of social
development I would be hap-
py to discuss this matter with
Archbishop Pinder whose
commitment in this area con-
tinues a fine tradition of
social witness by the Roman
Catholic community.

“Yours is a powerful moral
voice both as the leader of
your community and in your
own right.

“The nation and the Gov-
ernment of the day needs to
hear more voices of faith and
reason and justice and mercy
championing the defence of
human dignity, whether the
matter is one of social, eco-
nomic or restorative justice.”

Mr Foulkes said he is guid-
ed by the tenets of the
Church’s social tradition,
including the principles of
human equality, solidarity,
care for the poor and the vul-
nerable.

Government initiatives
such as the contributory
unemployment benefit
scheme directing around $7
million in relief to those who
have qualified for the benefit,
and social services embody
these tenets, he said.

A programme to retrain
1,000 recently displaced
workers also will be launched
by government in conjunction
with the youth programme,
Self Starters, which trains and
microfinances young entre-
preneurs seeking to start their
own businesses.

He said: “I am proud that
even in the midst of severe
economic and social disloca-
tion and pain, as a country
we are still making great
strides in social development
and social assistance.

“This is indeed something
to toast and celebrate, ever
mindful of the work still to
be done.”

Mr Foulkes asked the
Catholic Church to become
more involved in current
affairs such as budget negoti-
ations as government makes a
number of moral decisions.

He said: “The national
budget is not simply a docu-
ment filled with numbers, it is
essentially a moral document
which details national priori-
ties and how the government
of the day, guided by certain
values and obligations, nur-
tures and defends human dig-
nity, however haltingly,
imperfectly and faultingly.”



Crash victim tries to steal
car of Good Samaritan

A GOOD Samaritan who
stopped to help a man injured
in a serious car accident had
to then fight off the injured
man as he tried to steal his
car.

Pedro Ermilis and his girl-
friend pulled over when they
saw a grey Honda Saber hit
a garbage can, a guard rail
and flip over narrowly missing
a nearby home at around
12.30am on Sunday in Faith
Avenue.

As Mr Ermilis got out of
his car to check on the driver,
the latter climbed out of his
wrecked vehicle, which was
sandwiched between the
guard rail and a row of ficus
trees.

He then ran over to Mr
Ermilis’s 2000 Chevy Impala
where his girlfriend was wait-
ing and forced himself in as
she jumped out of the car.

Mr Ermilis then got in to
prevent the man from stealing
it and the two men struggled
for control of the car as it
sped off over the hill and hit a
utility pole around 500 yards
away.

Witnesses said the driver of








ABOVE: Mr Ermilis’s 2000 Chevy Impala which hit a utility pole.

the Honda Saber, registration
21853, had hit a car in the
Texaco gas station at the junc-
tion of Faith Avenue and Sir
Milo Butler Highway and had
sped away as the other driver
gave chase.

The car chase ended when
the vehicle following lost con-
trol, witnesses said.

Police have launched an
investigation. Anyone with

any information which may
assist should call Crime Stop-
pers on 328-TIPS (8477).

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TOP RIGHT: The Honda Saber was sandwiched between the guard
rail and a row of ficus trees.




























































































MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News P28) Sey eee) 0, 1 le

ECFA ESTIORS ie eet een en sneer er terete a eu
Fle ees

BUSINESS SECTION
Business
INSIGHT SECTION

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES
REAL ESTATE GUIDE 24 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

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380-FLIX



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 5





LOCAL NEWS

Spirit Airlines buys Air Jamaica

Flag raising commemorates
Bahamas Independence



PARLIAMENTARIANS
assembled in Rawson
Square to participate in the
national flag raising ceremo-
ny. Seen (I-r) are National
Security Minister Tommy
Turnquest, Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux,
Health Minister Dr Hubert
Minnis, State Minister for
Culture Charles Maynard
and Senate President Lynn
Holowesko.

GOVERNOR GENERAL
Arthur Hanna and Deputy
Prime Minister and Minister
of Foreign Affairs Brent
Symonette at the national
flag raising ceremony.



A FLAG raising ceremony
in Rawson Square commem-
orated the Bahamas 36th
anniversary of Independence
on Friday.

Members of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force paraded the national
colours before crowds of
Bahamians from all walks of
life. Also present for the cere-
mony were Governor Gener-
al Arthur Hanna, Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette, Members of Parliament
and local dignitaries.

Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette delivered
the Independence 2009 mes-
sage from Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham.

STROM

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Le



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DISCOUNT carrier Spirit Airlines has
reportedly acquired Air Jamaica in a gov-
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money-losing national airline, according to
Associated Press.

The Jamaica Gleaner newspaper says a
deal was reached after a committee charged
with the airline's privatization submitted its

report. The newspaper cites unnamed gov-
ernment sources.

Spirit spokeswoman Misty Pinson was con-
tacted by The Associated Press on Saturday
and refuses to comment.

Prime Minister Bruce Golding has said
Air Jamaica was losing $141 million a year.

Spirit is privately owned and flies to 36
cities in the U.S., Latin America and the
Caribbean.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

. Mingle f With She ingles

‘Saturday July 18th
8:00 pon until

Whyndam Nassau Resorts

NASSAU SINGLES

SPEED DATING

Call: 341-8596 for Tickets

Looking for a few good man!

Kingsway Academy High School Invites
qualified applicants for the following
teaching positions for September, 2009.

e Spanish

e French

e Art and Design

e Music

Successful applicants must:
Be born again Christians, with
minimum qualifications of a
Bachelor’s Degree in the
appropriate subject areas
Have a valid Teachers Certificate
Be willing to participate in
Extra Curricular activities, etc

Application Forms can be collected from
the Human Resources section at the
Business Office, Bernard Road,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Tel. 242-324-6269 / 324-6887

Deadline for Applications:
Friday, July 17, 2009

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Princess Margaret Hospital

ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC
NOTICE!

IN AN EFFORT TO IMPROVE OUR PATIENT
SERVICES AT THE PRINCESS MARGARET
HOSPITAL. WE WILL UNDERGO
RENOVATIONS TO THE ENTRANCE AND
TRIAGE AREA OF THE ACCIDENT &
EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT.v

WE ASK THAT PERSONS VISITING THE
DEPARTMENT ENTER THROUGH ~ THE
PHARMACY DEPARTMENT ENTRANCE AND
CONTINUE ONWARD - THROUGH THE
ENTRANCE OF THE ORTHOPEDIC CLINIC.

MANAGEMENT APOLOGIZES FOR’ ANY
INCONVENIENCE CAUSED AND ASK THAT
THE PUBLIC COOPERATE WITH US DURING
THIS TIME.

SIGNED: MANAGEMENT





THE TRIBUNE





Strengthening Canada-Caricom relations

insight

By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a consultant and
former Caribbean Diplomat)

SEEING Jamaican guest workers
on a farm in Canada recently
reminded me of the close relation-
ship that has always existed between
Canada and the Caribbean.

Canada’s guest-worker pro-
gramme for farms is as important to
Canadian farmers, who need the
labour, as payment for the work is to
the many Caribbean workers.

There is little hassle over this pro-
gramme. It has clear rules and guide-
lines which are strictly observed for
the most part about the treatment
and living conditions of workers, and
it is clearly understood that, at the
end of the period, the workers return
to their homelands.

In the result, Canada’s agricul-
tural produce is harvested and not
wasted, and Caribbean workers earn
money that helps them and their
dependants to survive when they
return home. The relationship could
not be more mutually beneficial.

It is this sort of mutually benefi-
cial relationship that Caribbean
countries and Canada should be
striving to establish in many other
areas. But, it is a relationship that
might have to stop short of a Free
Trade Agreement (FTA) or Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) which is now under contem-
plation by the two sides.

This is sad because had the
Caribbean negotiated an EPA with
Canada before it did so with the
European Union (EV) last year, the
terms of the agreement may have
been more generous to the
Caribbean countries and they could
have been used as the basis for the
negotiation with the EU.

In this connection, the Caribbean
might have ended-up with two EPAs
that benefited them instead of the
full EPA with the EU in which they
will be at a considerable disadvan-
tage as its terms evolve. It should be
recalled that the terms include even-
tual free access the Caribbean mar-
kets for EU companies that will be
required to be given “national treat-
ment”. In addition, EU companies
will be able to bid for contracts,
including government ones, on an
equal footing with domestic compa-
nies.

And, of course, over time tariffs
have to be removed from EU goods
entering the Caribbean markets and
this will remove whatever little
advantage is enjoyed by domestic
producers.

Earlier this year, writing about
Canada’s trade relationship with the
Caribbean Community and Com-
mon Market (Caricom) countries, I
recalled that under the existing
CARIBCAN arrangement
Caribbean countries enjoy duty-free
access to the Canadian market for
83.2 per cent of their exports, but
even so trade in goods with Canada
is relatively small for the Caribbean.

For Canada, trade in goods with
Caricom countries constitute a mere
0.02 per cent of its total trade. There-
fore, whether or not Canada con-
cludes an FTA with CARICOM
countries is neither here nor there for
Canada economically.

Canada would like to conclude an
FTA or EPA with Caricom coun-
tries because it has a strong free
trade position globally, and an FTA



WORLD VIEW

with Caricom would be symbolical-
ly important.

But, as Professor Norman Gir-
van has pointed out, any EPA with
Canada would have to use the EPA
with the EU as a baseline. Canada
cannot now accept any lesser terms
than has been accorded to the EU.
For their part, Caricom countries
cannot afford a further EPA of the
kind signed with the EU, and espe-
cially not in the midst of a global
financial crisis which is hurting their
economies.

In the context, even though Cari-
com countries have reportedly
agreed a mandate for their joint
negotiations with Canada, now may
not be the most prudent time to pur-
sue it.

Nonetheless, the relationship with
Canada is too valuable to leave it
unattended in a meaningful way.
Canadian banks dominate the Cari-
com domestic financial sector, and
they constitute the majority of the
offshore banks in Barbados. Fur-
ther, Canadian firms are heavily
involved in tourism, oil exploration
and gold mining in the region.

Against this background, and
until an EPA with Canada could be
considered meaningfully, there are
still many areas of cooperation that
Canada and Caricom could mean-
ingfully pursue.

Amongst these could be: Invest-
ment promotion and protection
agreements with CARICOM coun-
tries; Tax Information Exchange
Agreements with CARICOM coun-





tries; Double Taxation Agreements
with CARICOM countries; Coop-
eration agreements with CARICOM
countries in relation to drug traf-
ficking; Agreements with CARI-
COM countries for the provision of
temporary labour in certain skilled
or unskilled areas.

Such agreements could help both
sides since Canadian investment into
Caricom countries would be pro-
moted and, once there, be protected;
double taxation agreements would
also encourage investment from
Canadian firms that would not fear
being taxed twice; cooperation
agreements on drug trafficking could
provide Caricom countries with
training and equipment that they
need to fight drug traffickers and
this would help to retard escalating
crime in the region while curtailing
drug trafficking into Canada.

And if there were agreements on
the provision of skilled and unskilled
labour, the practice of poaching
Caribbean doctors, nurses and teach-
ers could be regulated with Canada
making a financial contribution to
tertiary education in the region. In
this way, Canada could have a reli-
able source of qualified people, but
the institutions could train enough
people to ensure that Caricom coun-
tries still have a pool to cater for its
own needs.

Separately, Canada could contin-
ue its aid programme to the
Caribbean which, in a statement in
February this year, it listed as a pri-
ority. And that aid programme

SIR RONALD SANDERS



should have both regional and
national components directed at
deepening the regional integration
process and tackling areas of social
need from which international finan-
cial institutions shy away.

As a matter of urgency, Canada
could provide Caricom with techni-
cal assistance and financial help in
establishing a pan-Caricom financial
services regulator. Recent global and
Caribbean experiences have shown
that Caricom needs such regulation
and Canada, whose banks survived
the toxic assets of the US and
Europe, were effectively regulated.

There should also be a real effort
to make Canada-CARICOM con-
sultations meaningful and produc-
tive at the level of foreign ministers
and prime ministers. Maybe there
should be a structured format of
biennial meetings of Prime Minis-
ters and a meeting of Foreign Min-
isters in the in-between years as is
now the case between Caricom
countries and Britain.

Deferring a Free Trade Agree-
ment should not delay strengthening
the Canada-Caricom relationship.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

in a week as Little Switzerland
staff had been confronted by a
gunman who made the same
demands of them at around
the same time last Sunday.

But this week quick-footed
police of the detective unit of
Central Police Station, in East
Street, were fast to respond
and ran after a suspect to
apprehend him moments after
the robbery.

Two Breitling watches were
recovered as well as an imita-
tion firearm. A man was
arrested in connection with the
incident.

And police are investigating
suspicions that a police officer
may have been acting as a
lookout in at least the latest
robbery.

Police suspect the two rob-
beries — Little Switzerland last
Sunday and Breitling this Sun-
day — to be connected.

Superintendent in charge of
the Central Detective Unit
Elsworth Moss said: “We are
dealing with one person right
now and we are trying to gath-

Officer may be questioned in connection
With armed robbery of jewellery store

er information to confirm
whether this is so, but we are
not sure yet whether the police
officer was involved.

“We have good reason to
believe the robbery this week
and the robbery last week are
linked.

“It would have been totally
unusual and brazen if the same
person who went there last
week returned again almost
the same time this week, if that
is the case.

“But we are going to get
more information to find out if
we can link the two robberies.”

Mr Moss said he is not con-
cerned about crime escalating
in downtown Nassau as he
believes the two robberies
were isolated incidents.

He added: “We have
increased our visibility in Bay
Street, and we are hoping this
arrest will deter others from
attempting to commit crimes

COMMONWEALTH BANK

2009 SCHOLARSHIP

in the area.”

Mr Moss said the number of
armed robberies in New Prov-
idence has decreased in recent
weeks, barring various street
robberies over the last two
weekends.

A number of street rob-
beries were committed across
New Providence this weekend.
In most cases thieves threat-
ened their victims with knives,
Mr Moss said.

A 15 year old was robbed in
Flamingo Gardens, Nassau,
when he was accosted by two
men with a knife who intimi-
dated him into handing over
his Oakley sunglasses.

Police are appealing to the
public for information to assist
investigations and anyone who
may have any information is
asked to call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477) or call police on 911 or
919.

Commonwealth Bank is offering Scholarship Awards to Bahamian
students to attend The College of The Bahamas.

Caricom chiefs stand
against suspension of
Turks constitution

FROM page one

Caribbean Community reiterate their view that
respect for the rule of law, representative democ-
racy and integrity in public life are fundamental
elements of good governance to which they all
strongly adhere. Accordingly, they were deeply
disturbed by the adverse findings of Turks and
Caicos Commission of Inquiry into possible cor-
ruption or other dishonesty in relation to past
and present elected members of the Legislature.

“The Caribbean Community continues to hold
fast to the view it expressed in its statement on the
situation in the TCI on March 24, 2009 that sus-
pending the Constitution of TCI and its democ-
ratic institutions and resorting to direct rule by the
colonial power are not the most effective tools to
bolster good governance and effective adminis-
tration in the territory.

“The Community therefore regrets that the
intervening period was not used more profitably
to find solutions that would avert the threatened
constitutional and democratic dislocation. In this

Police officer in hospital
alter attack by thugs

regard, the rejection by the governor of the pro-
posal of the new Premier to allow the people of
TCI to elect anew government which could have
adopted and implemented the measures required
to improve the administration of the territory
and strengthen integrity in public life was, regret-
tably, a lost opportunity. The people of the Turks
and Caicos Islands and their ability to govern
themselves in the long run will benefit far more
from strengthening their administrative and good
governance processes through their own efforts
than by the administrations through the governor
under direct rule.”

Following the now infamous commission of
inquiry into the neighbouring islands Queen Eliz-
abeth II has signed the necessary consents that
will dissolve the parliament of the Turks and
Caicos islands and leave power with the crown
colony’s British governor for up to two years.

The country’s former premier Michael Misick
has already been dismissed from office and is
expected to face criminal charges with four other
former ministers over allegations of corruption
following the commissioner’s report.

Body of murdered
_ Woman discovered

Applications are available at any Commonwealth Bank Branch or at FROM page one

The College of The Bahamas, Financial Aid & Housing Department, FROM page one

2nd Floor, Portia Smith Building. is, but we need to contact a
located. family member so they can

APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED TO:

Mr Ferguson was rushed to Doctor’s Hospital where he is cur-
rently detained, Superintendent Elsworth Moss said.

give us some information.”
Assistant Superintendent

in charge of the Homicide
Division Leon Bethel said:
“We are trying to find out
who she is, how she got
there, and what was the
cause of her death. We are

One man has been arrested in connection with the incident.

Police are appealing to the public for information which may lead
to the apprehension of all those involved in the attack.

If you have any information which may assist investigations call
Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477) or call police on
911 or 919.

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR
FINANCIAL AID & HOUSING

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
P. 0. BOX N-4912

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

(Students from the Family Islands are invited to apply).

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The public are advised to
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call police on 911 or 919.

share
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news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS



Police hand hold
Beat Retreat

THE ROYAL Bahamas Police Force
Band stage their annual Beat
Retreat in Rawson Square yester-
day.



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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

RBC

RBC

Royal Bank
_of Canada

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

(201) Leds #17 & #18 Crown Aller-
ments, Love Hill Settlement. An-
dros, Containing a two-storey 1s
Apgeraised value: 5004000

(00) Lois #1 & #2. Block 4 with
a parcel situated between Lot #1,
Block 3, containing a 4 bedroan
condominium —Sunset View Villas,
West Bay Street. Appraised valor:
Sy oO (Hl

(434) Lot #27 of Village Albetiment
#14 in the Eastern District, contain
ing resikbence situated on Denver
Street off Parkgate Rox in the Ancts
Ta Constibuency, New Providence.

Property size 2500 sqt) Building size
44h oy ft. Appraised valuc |

400) Property situated in Calabash
Bay on the Eland of Andros, 75" x
180" and containing thereon a small
prcery store 480 sql. and an in-
complete 3 bed 2 bath house 408)
sgl. Aungenaised value: 865,000

(301) Lot #2 in Ieheck 4, Steward
Road, Coral Heights East Subdivi-
dion situated i Western District a
New Providence, approx, sioc 1,80K)
sq). fi. with a split level containing
hee bed, two bath, living, dining
& family roma, Kitchen are anil-
ity room —apprax, siee of building

2,658 sqtl Appraised value: S422 752

(702) Lot #20 with residential prng-
erty located Skyline Heights.
Appraised value $280,000

(02) Lot of land 45 S43 150% 150
on Ciperns t lighway ust south of
Palmetto Point with a two storey
stone building containing t two apart

ments. Each unit ha 3 bedi? 1/2
bath, kitchen, living roe and 4 liner
closets. Appraised value; S267 208

(00) Lit #14 sipuated in the setie-
mene of Love Hill on the bland of
Aniros totalling 20.4KK) sqft Property
COMMAS & Divo Sleey 5 bedinoarni,
4 bathroom residence. Appraised
value S105 A000

(105) Lot containing 2 stoney' bldg.
with thee beck evo and a halfbath

(702) Undeveloped lots # 4A, 16,
17, 18 and 19 located Chapman
Estates, West Bay Appraised sale:
$348,000

POL) Undeveloped lot #144, Sea-
fan Lane, Lacayan Beach Subdivi-
alon. Grand Bahaina, 1ATS0 eget
Agpraised value: TRA

665) Vacantlotes located Eleu-
eo Island Shores, Seaside Drive
Section B Bkeck #15, Elewthera,
Bahamas. 9,691 sqft, Appraised
value: 327,621

402) Lot 49, Aleck 7 Aberdeen
Drive, Bahamia West Replat Sub
division, Freeport, Grand Bahama,
consisting of 12,100 sqit.
Agpralied value: $51,000

AON Vacant property located
Bahamia South. Bheck 16 lot QA,
F recport, « Amn Bahama consist-
ing of 24.829,20 soft. Appraised
Value: $52,000

65) Vacant Lot #9 (1) 40605 sqit)
altuated in Mango Lane Secthon
"EB Block #15, Eleuthera Island
Shores, Eleuthera,

Agpralied value: $5,109

904) Vacant residential Lote 63
(S00 sqft} Crown Allotments
lacated Murphy Town, Abaca,
Agpraised value: $18,000

(08) Vacant Single Family Lot 45

COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE

Tel; 242-5 6- AR
(BOW) Mrs, Monique Crawlard
(B00) Mr. Jeneme Finder
(P02) Mr. Brian Kineewles
(BO) Min, Warde Pratt
(B05) Mrs. Tiffany Simms O'brien
(BG) Mrs. Lois Hollis
(BOT) Mr. Lester Cox
(BON) Mrs, DaShann Clare-Paul
(210) Miss Lalaige Gardiner
(B11) Ms, Ladia Gardiner
PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel; 242-322-4426/9 or
242-502-300

(201) Ms, Nicola Walker

(202) Mr, Robert Paniry

(205) Mirs, Anya Major

residence, are 30 x Ab situated Bai-
ley Town, North Bimini
Appraised value $235,000

(OL) Let# 18 in Sandilands Allat-
ment on the western side of Cross-
wind Thoad benween Seabees Lane
and Pineyvard Aoad in the Basterr
Distro of The bland of New Proy-
idence-The Bahamas, containing
single stancy private residence com-
posing the following: covered eniry
porch, living ream, dining room,
Wiichen, laundry noon, family nam,
siding area. 4 beclpooons. 2 bathe
and patio. The total area of banal is
approximately 7G) square feet.
Appraised value: $205 426

(0.10 Tae parcels of land containing,
21, UA sq.ft. situated on the seuth-
ern side of East Shiney Street ane
100 feet weet of its junction with
“Shirk” in Lhe Eastern District, New
Providence, Situated thereon isa
Cras Station and Ave Tepair Sheng.
Appraised value: $799,497

(BOL) Lot 2b? locabed Village Allat-
mer with fourex,
Appraised value: S500 (0

TL) Lot of land having the wumber
16 in Block mumber bi in Section
Three of the Subdivision called
and knew 2s Sea Breese Belated
siuated in the Raster District
Mew Prvidence. Property comtains
a luree bed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: S277 000

CAL) Lot of und being bot number
Lin Bleck number Mhon a plan of
dlotents laid ous by Village Estates
Limited and Ged in the dept of Land
& Surveys a8 auunber 142 6B ariel
siuabed in the Eastern District al
New Providence, Property conbaine
Thinee sed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: $165,110}

6S) Lot # O18 in Golden Gates
Estates #2 Subdivision situate in
the South Western District of the
bland of New Providenor Contain ng
asliegle shorey privabe pesicenmce 3
bedroom 2 bath, Prager y approx.
size 6,000 sqft Building approx size

Block #5 Unit #1 Devenshine
Appraised valive $20,000

B12) Vacant Geminercial Lot Nor
2A, Block 60 Bahamia Subdivision
Vl containing 3 acres located Free-
port, Grand Bahama,

Appraised value: $750,000

LOB) Vacant Single Family Loe 45
Block F Bahama South Subelivi-
dion. Appraised value $45,700

569) Vacant property located in
Subdivision called “Gulmerville"
being a portion of Let #47 and a
Portion of Lbete57, Appraised value;
§24,01M)

54) All that piece papcel or lor
of land simate in the secdemvenc
of lames Clatenn on the lelanal af
Elewhera one of the Islands of the
Commanwealth of the Bahamas
measuring appre 10,000 sq. Ft
Appraised value TBA

S68) Allthat piece parcel of lot of
land being Lot No, Lo? in the Sub-
division known as "EXUMA HAR-
BOUR" to the bland of Great Exuma
measuring 10,0005, Ft. Appraised
vale $20, 000000.

202) Vacant ket ofland contain-
ing 41.164 soft, Lote, Lowe Estate,
Phase 1. 2,200 £L south of West Bay
Sireet, Western District, New Provi-
dence, Appraised value $165,000

NASSAU AAD BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-8700

TOW) Mr. James Strachan [rea
(702) Mir. Antonia Eyma
(S01) Ms. Thyra fehnson
S04) Mrs. Alicia Thompson
MACKEY STREET BRANCH

Ted: 242-393-3007

(G00) Ms. Cherelle Martinborougl
JON EB KENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH

Tel: 242-325-4711

400) Wirs, Renea Walkine
(402) Nirs. (handra CGillbem
PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE

Tel: 242-393-7506 /8
(S01) Mr. Jason Sawyer
(500) Mr. Dwight King

(506) Ms, Patricia Russell
CABLE BEACH BRANCH

Tel: 242-327-017?

(466) Mirs. Winifred Roberts
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel: 242-502-5170 502-5 1,00

RBC > HELPING YOU SUCCEED

a meroyalbank. lu Lipa

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eee

2400 sq 0 Appraised value: $173,176
(20S) Lot B - 60 fic 115.7% fit situ-
ated onthe north side of Shell Fish
Tho ad. being (he thin bol west of Fire
Trail Road and east of Hamsier Fool
with a ane ball duplex resicderuial
prenuises. Appraised value: THA

SL) Lot #32 containing 4 bedroom
Zbath coment: structure located
Triana Shores Harbour bland, E leal-
thera, Property siee Ox 1:

120 leet Appraised value: $332, 3

(M01-N) Single | Farnily Teesi-
dence-810 sqft, 2 bed, bath Let
#9 Block #1 Eastville Subslivisian
Eastern District, New Providence,
Appraised value: 565,000

S10) Lott? Madeira Park, a small
subdivision on the outskirts of Treas-
ure Cay, Abaco having an area ol
Sb square feet residence comtain-

ing a concrete hock structure wilh
aqeiall shingle rool comprises of
lure bexbrooins, tw hahaa,
family reom. living room, dining
rene, atl kitchen. Appraised value:
$147,000

(S69) Property situated on Wil-
lias Lane al Keenp Road, Mew
Providence, Bahamas containing
a fwo-sterey house and an ageart-
men building consisting of 1H
Sql Appraised value £104,000

(569) All that paece of land being Par-
orl #3 and Parcel #4 situated on ihe
South side-of Prince Charles Drive,
hiew Providenoe, Bahamas comiain-
ing a commercial building housing
ho slap Space on the proaind Elosnir
and Thpee shop 3 paboe inn Che cece
loot with alange aorege area in ihe
rear, Total ance P-e00 sq f
Appraised value: 535,650

(S65) All that pieoe, parcel or land
having an appHrocimabe area of 2 MM)
aQit situated on the Western she of
Blue Hill Road about 70 fit North of
Peter Street and about 15 ft south
al Laid Street in the Southern Dis-
trict at Mew Providenoe, Bahamas
congining a commercial building

VACANT PROPERTIES

(202) Vacanthot of band containing
L786 acre, situated eastol Know-
les Dove. apprexdimately 1420
it. exuthward of Harald Read in
the western district of New Prov-
idence, Bahamas. Appraised value:
§ 170M)

(S03) Vacant property consisting
af Lot #84 siniated inthe Freep-
ort Ridge Subdivision, section #1,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Baha-
has Appraded vale: TRA

(S05) Ten (10) acces of land situ-
ated on Wieds Cary, knran as Little
‘hace, between Coopers Town and
‘Cedar Harbourin hace, Bahamas,
The property 6 undeveloped with
a view of the sea from both the
North and Souch side. Appraised
Value: $1,078,750

(S69) All that plece parcel ov lot
Wand Lot? 977, Pinewood Gear-
dens Subdivision, Southem Dis-
Trict, New Providence. Appraised

value: TRA

(one) All that plece parcel of lot
and land on the Island of Great
Exuma sttuabed about lO 1¢2 miles
Northwestwardly of George Town
which said place parcel or bot of
land is #10750 Bahama Sound
CLA.E 10,900 sqft.

Appraised value: 265000

(008) All that piece parcel of lot of

OFFICERS

ea i,
(T1T}

[i24)}

(T25}

(565)

ey

Mrs. [nenid Sineon

Mrs, Nancy Swaby

Ms. Deidre King

Mrs. Faye Higgs

Me Marguerite fahmscr
Mrs, Catherine Davis
(564) Airs. Vanessa Senet
NASSAU INT'L AIRPORT

Tel: 242-577-7179

(433) Mis. Suosette Hall-Moss
LYFORD CAY BRANCH

Tel: 242-362-4540 of 242-362-4007
(1LO1-N) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson
GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR, ELEWVTHERA
Tel: 242-352-2858

(02) Ms, Nicole Evans
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel:242-3553-2200

(01) Mis. Velkderine Laroda
ANDROS TOWN BRANCH

Tel: 242-360-207 |

Mrs. Rose Bethel
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO

heusine a two bedore bath util
on the top floorand astore on the
first floor. Appraised value: $154, (Mi)

(S69) All Chat piece, parcel or het
if land situated on Cowpen Road
(L000 feast of dhe Faith Avenue fire
lian) in the Seuthern District ol Mew
Providence, Bahamas containing
ads ipihe: PATO COMprising of
two ~ 2-berdineoms L- “Hatha apart
ments. Appraised value; $150.00

(400) All that pancel of het of Varied
being Lots #10 ame UL in Block 29
at Coconut Grove Subdivision, com-
laining ashapping plas. The boo is
Lrapeziun in share, 6,585 square
feet Appraised value SSC), Ooh

(560) Lot of land #2 Sea View Sub-
division, Russell Island, Spanish
Wells, Property size 11,323 sigit,
budlding size. 36 sq Mt containing
S bedrooms, 2 bath, living room, ani
eal-in kitchen, dining ronan, laun-
bry nonin, comened pooch, a cae car
parage, and a covered water tank.
Appraised value 5254.00

S01) Lod? S$? block # Triana Shores
containing 3 bed 2 bath front oom,
dining room, & kitchen. Concrete
amichine, 2640 aq ff wooden
deck 42 16sg fi. property S600 sqft
Appraised value: 5448645

(901) Lor“ Barrack Street, Harlsour
Idand comtainitg a2 storey concrete
Iruilding with 4 bed 4 bath, dining
room & kitchen -Building 2534.56
Saft rape rty bevhat sig

Appraisind values 5478228

S10) Property comtaining Consbo
‘Millenium 0". Linit A- 101, building
57, Phase 1, 2 bedroanss, 3 bath-
ren living penn, dining room,
ulility chisel & patio Sibwabed in
Le area bnew as Bieini Bay Be-
sort, Bimini, Balharnis

Appraised value - 465,000

(OU) Singhe Story tri-plex buikding,
one 2 bedrooms and two | bed-
non jocabed on a multi-family Lot
Nod, block 4, Shirkey Lane, sectien
1, Bahama Reef Yacht & Country

land designated as Lot Number 563
on a plan of a Subdivision called
or known as Bahama Highlands
04. 11,22341 sqft Appralaed value
$87,000

(201) Single Family residential Lot
No. 11703 Kahana Sound Subd
Number 11 West, Great Exuma
hase: appre 1] OAWOT sey Et

Appraised value $15,000

(201) Mult family Lor Ne. 1o -
Southeast Conver of Mandarin
Drive, Super Apple Road. Sans
Souci Sudy. Size: 14,368 sq ft
Appraised value $163 40000

(201) Single family resadential Lot
No. 11698 Bahama Sound Subd.
Number 11 West, Great Exurma.
Size: approx, 10.4263q ft Appraised
Value: 515,008)

(569) Allihat pice) parcel or ket of
land being Lot #1 lecated in Block
3 in the Subdivision known 3 East-
crn Estates situate inthe Eastem
Districtaf the island of Mew Provi-
dence. Property agyprox. Bd) sg.
* Appraied value THA

(564) AU that piece parcel or bet
of land located on Marigold Hoadd
in the Subdivision known as Real

Actes. Lot is approx.$455 sq, ft,
Appraised vilue $93,010.

(569) Allihat piece parcel orketaf
land being Lot #152 located in the



lub Subdivision, Freepcrt Grand
Bahama. Property siee is approx
12 1 sq. ft.

Appriised value 3348,000

(08 Low 42 Crown Albotowenis
located Murphy Tina, Alsace with
die being 10,200 sq. Containing
Aone siency house with 4 bed!
bath - Concrete Block Structure -
Appriised value. $200 000)

(S68) All that piece parcel or lotaf

land being Lot #39 in Use residen-
ilk’ zoned areaol Highbaur Park
Subdivision in Uhe Eastern District
tf New Prvidence, Balarnas Ap-
prax. land size & CK sy It. Proxpesty
contains a 3-bedronm/2-bathroam
aes soe being bid sq. ft.
Appraised Valwe 3.14 1,000.00

(08) Lott 23 becabted in the Sub-
division of Spring City, Abaco with
Siac bring BYES fel] hi, COMtELnINng a
ine storey Wwoiden stricture house
with 3 bed! 1 bath of TORS Say ML
Apprised value. 360,000

(S04) Simele storey triplex, situabedl
on Lot 615, Mermaid Boulevard,
Golden Gates #2 in the Western
District, New Provideror, Tero - two
boon, one bacon units and
one - ne bedroom, one bathroan
unit. The property is sored as Multi
Family Tesicential, oeasurinmg 9,092
aq. fee with the living area mes-
uring 2,792 34 11.

Appraised value $374,192

(201) Duplex Lot #25 situated am
Faith Ave. North (Claridge Estates)
- sit being 7,.d>4¢ sq feet. with du-
ples thereon

Appraised value - TRA

(200) Lot of land situated om Fire
Trail Rod being a partition of Chad
don Alot 4 New Provinlenoe, Ba-
lamas conmlaining bowrilause apart-
INET Wnt anid twa proposed wits
(ommpleted as ist

Appraised value $237,714

(201) Lot containing residence situ-
abed in Carey's Subdivision - Lot B,
Block B Appraised Value $100,000,

Subdivision krawn 2a West Ridge-
land Park situated in the Sauth-
en District of the island of New
Providence. Property appro 4000
sgh Appraised value $55.00

(008) An undeveloped watertront
lot lanal beling Lot Sumber 12032
with a sie of 10,600 sq.ft, in the
Bahama Sound of Bauma Subdi-
Vielon Nurnber 11 West situated in
the Leland of Great Exuma one of
the Islands af the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas.

Appraised value $224,000

(M8) Partially developed parcel
of land being 10,0000 sq.ft. situate
abut the eastern portion of The
Forest Estate inthe viciniry of the
setdementsed Southside and The
Fereest being Lot Nunmibor 4603 tn
Bahama Smid of Exumna 6, Exum
The Bahamas.

Appraised waluc 323,000

(724) Vacant land at Lowe Beach,
Western Distict of New Providence
composing a portion of “LoveEs-
tale containing | acre.
Appraised value $225,000.00,

(HO) Lord 2 vacant kine 30,000 say
ft located Chapman Estates Sub-
division on West Bay Street with
open zoning. Appmised value
S600,000.



Tel: 242-267-2420

(908) Mrs. Joyce Riviere

(08) Mrs, Sylvia Poitier

(9.10) Miss Cyprianna Williams
RIMINI BRANCH
Tel:242-347-B091

(105| Miss. Ganiatu Tinubu
GRAS, LONG ISLAND

Tel: 242-397-0101

(100) Mrs, Lucy Wells
EXUMA BRANCH

Tel: 242-356-3251

(O08) Ms. Jocyelyn Mackey
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-352-664 1/2

(101-F) Ms, Garnell Frith
(102) Ms, Elaine Collie

(103) Mrs, Damita Newbold-Cartwright

(108) Ms. Sylvie Carey
SPANISH WELLS

Tel: 242-393-4159 1 or

242-435-4145
(560) Mir. Walter Caney

REC Royal
SEM mee tT ifs]



THE TRIBUNE

Title joy
for Mark
Knowles

FROM page one



an interview with The Tribune
yesterday after their victory. “I
really didn’t expect it to come
first in mixed doubles, but I will
celebrate it just as if it was in
the men’s doubles.”

Having played Wimbledon
since 1990, Knowles reached the
second round in singles in 1992,
1994, 1995 and 1996 and had his
best showing in doubles in 2002
when he and his former part-
ner Daniel Nestor got to men’s
doubles final in 2002.

Knowles, who turns 38 on
September 4, has won the Aus-
tralian Open in 1994, the French
Open a year later and the US
Open in 1997 with Nestor, who
repeated as the doubles cham-
pion with new partner Nenad
Zimonjic on Saturday.

But Wimbledon has been the
one missing piece of the puzzle
in Knowles’ storied career that
has eluded him since he began
playing on the international cir-
cuit in 1992.

Knowles and his Indian part-
ner Mahesh Bhupathi got elim-
inated in the men’s doubles in
the quarter-final.

e See the Sports Page for
more details.

Bahamas real
estate today

Or iwiiatMiiE KK een



TIME TO MAKE
LEMONADE

HOME values at the high-
er end have declined, and
buyers are seeing the best
deals in many years. While
unpleasant for some sellers,
price declines increase
affordability for buyers, so if
you've been renting, now is a
fantastic time to turn that
monthly payment into equi-
ty.

Interest rates have inched
up, but more affordable
housing yield a formula that
should put you in a home
that you own for payments
not too much higher than the
amount you are now paying
for rent. Not to mention that
at a lower purchase price,
you should enjoy some good
appreciation over the com-
ing years.

Take matters into your
own hands and buy yourself
some peace of mind.

Cayman
residents
struggle to
recover from
‘08 storm

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

THE CAYMAN
ISLANDS has raised about
half the money it says it
needs to rebuild homes
destroyed by a Category 4
hurricane last year, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The government says it
has built 50 homes in Cay-
man Brac and plans to
build nearly 100 more for
impoverished owners who
lacked insurance. The
director of the islands’
national recovery fund says
the government has raised
about $1.2 million of the $3
million needed. Mark
Laskin said Friday that he
has approved 140 of the
212 applications received.

Hurricane Paloma caused
an estimated $15 million in
damages when it hit in
November.

The hurricane season
began June 1 and runs
through November.



THE TRIBUNE



LC
An economic model

for the Bahamas

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

"Les week marks the
beginning of a new fiscal
year, with world economies facing
an ever encompassing economic
drought and the Bahamian gov-
ernment having to initiate a stim-
ulus package to stand in the gap
because global credit markets
remain in a state of near paralysis
and the country faces a revenue
shortfall while hardly being able
to boast of having any indigenous
capital.

In this seemingly deep and
long recession, governments
across the globe have been pass-
ing stimulus packages to soften
the impact of the crisis and create
new jobs, save existing ones and
maintain, as is the case of the
Bahamas, an expensive bureau-
cracy. In the US, for example, the
stimulus package is more than
$800 billion. Although the pur-
veyors of socialist doom and
gloom are quick to denounce of
government’s stimulus initiatives,
how else do they propose to with-
stand a global financial meltdown,
especially in an economy such as
ours that appears to have been
built on sand?

According to the Central Bank
“the outlook for the Bahamian
economy remains weak through-
out 2009, with developments
expected to be heavily influenced
by the responsiveness of the glob-
al economy—particularly the
US—to the stimulus measures
implemented by monetary and
fiscal authorities.

Frankly, with reduced con-
sumer spending by tourists and
some locals, and investments by
foreigners and Bahamian busi-
nesses currently in the doldrums,
the only area left to stimulate
gross domestic product (GDP) is
government spending. In the
short term, while the stimulus
programme will increase the fiscal
deficit and the national debt, it
will provide for the implementa-
tion of a government social safe-
ty net, improvements in public
sector infrastructure, create
numerous construction projects
and employment, spawn business
opportunities and initiate eco-
nomic activity.

As the economic storm surges
and continues to corrode the
Bahamas’ badly prepared, waning

YOUNG MAN’S VIEW

tourism and financial services
industries, Bahamians must raise
their standards of service and
improve their work ethic and our
government, along with social
leaders and the private sector,
must seek to draft a national plan
and an updated and revised eco-
nomic model for the country in
order to ensure our long-term
sustainability. The contracting
local job market and the closure
of businesses has caused the
unemployment rate to raise to a
troubling 12 per cent. Recent
unemployment figures reveal that
more than 15,000 Bahamians
have either been job hunting
without success or have been dis-
couraged from finding a job dur-
ing the last four years and, as of
May/June, there are thousands of
new job seekers having just grad-
uated from high school/colleges.
In order to contain the bal-
looning deficit and strengthen the
economy, the government must
continue to streamline expendi-
tures and even more, invest in
teaching citizens new skills and
encourage entrepreneurship. Two
of the main factors of production
are human capital and entrepre-
neurship, with the former refer-
ring to heightening of the knowl-
edge and skills of workers
through education and experi-
ence and thereby widen employ-
ment opportunities and, as is the
case with the latter, to develop
new ideas, take financial risks to
develop their ideas and coordi-
nate the production and sale of
goods and services. Consecutive
governments seemingly have
failed to notice the value of
Japan’s re-emergence after being
obliterated by a US-dropped
nuclear bomb during the Second
World War. Japan exemplifies
the importance of developing
human capital in order to build a
sound, flourishing economy. Why
doesn’t the Bahamas, like Bar-
bados, allow for deserving stu-
dents to study at the College of
the Bahamas free of charge?
Furthermore, the deficit can
only be curtailed if the Bahamian
government takes serious steps
to implement an efficient system
to collect hundreds of millions of
outstanding tax dollars. More-



over, a heightened revenue col-
lection drive must be taken by
government-run companies such
as BTC, BEC and Water and
Sewerage, and the government
must seek to severely penalize
those persons engaging in tax
fraud or who have evaded cus-
toms and other tax collection
agencies. The Customs depart-
ment, the country’s chief revenue
earner, is thought to have lost
millions per annum due to duty
avoidance, corruption and erro-
neous practices. The government
must immediately move legisla-
tion to close tax loopholes and
revenue leakages, particularly to
mitigate against those unscrupu-
lous Bahamian companies that
use phony invoices and practice
under-invoicing and/or set-up
wholly-owned US “shell compa-
nies”, to cheat the government
and honest taxpayers of millions
of dollars per year.

The antiquated Customs Man-
agement Act must be amended
to protect the revenue base in
Freeport, loopholes in the Busi-
ness License Act must be closed
and casino and local/foreign-
owned real property taxes must
be collected. According to a 2007
Auditor General report, there
was nearly $400 million in out-
standing real property taxes owed
to the government. This amount
has no doubt increased and, if the
reigns of revenue collection are
tightened, the country could
unquestionably achieve a budget
surplus.

According to an International
Monetary Fund (IMF) report, it
was also suggested that the
Bahamas’ government “strength-
en administration of existing
property and trade taxes, review
FDI (Foreign Direct Investment)
incentives and shift the tax base to
domestic consumption—endors-
ing the adoption of a broad-based
VAT.” In widening our tax rev-
enue base, a value added tax
should be implemented locally.
This form of taxation has been
adopted by 140 countries around
the world and would represent a
prime candidate for the Bahamas.
Frankly, this form of taxation—

SEE page 12

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 11

The Corporation wishes to advise the public that
as a result of a technical error in our billing
process, some customers may have received two
bills for the May 2009 billing period. As a result of

this error an accounting adjustment was made
resulting in a second bill being generated.
Customers are notified that the lower of the two,
dated June 3 2009, is the correct bill for payment.

Should you have any queries or concems please

contact our Customer Service Department at
302-1680 or 302-1170.

The Corporation apologizes for any inconvenience
caused.



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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Butler’s Funeral Homes
& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Harriet Ophelia Cartwright, 78

of Hawthorne Road and
formerly of Cartwright’s,
Long Island will be held
on Wednesday July 08,
2009 at 400p.m. at St.
Matthewis Anglican
Church, Shirley and
Church Streets.
Officiating will be
Venerable Keith N.
Cartwright; assisted by
Revid Dr. James B.
Moultrie and Rev’d Don
Haynes. Cremation will
follow.

She is survived by one adopted son; Terrance, three
grand children; Roxanna of Fort Worth, Texas, T. Kirk
and Gavin Cartwright, her brothers; Lacton, Michael,
Calvin “Gus” and Thalburg “T.C” Cartwright, sisters:
Lucy Cartwright and Katherine Treco, brothers-in-law;
Thomas Treco, Mitchell and Emery Cartwright, sisters-
in-law: Beryl, Verona, Eva, Ellerith and Ovina
Cartwright, Lillian “Lilla” Knowles and Thelma “Tally”
Burrows; fourty nephews, fourty- seven nieces, one
hundred and thirty grand nephews, one hundred and
twenty grand nieces , numerous great-grand nephews
and nieces and many other relatives and friends
including: Father Earnest Pratt, Patricia “Pat” Knowles
and Deborah Cartwright. Care givers: Mrs. Francis
Ledee, Mrs. Shirley Miller and the Staff of The Persis
Rodgers Home for the Aged, Members of St. John’s,
Buckley’s, Long Island and the People of Cartwright’s,
Long Island.

The family would like for those planning on attending
the service of Mrs. Cartwright to wear only bright
summer colours, no black ,white, navy blue or dark
colours.

In lieu of flowers the family has requested that donations
be made to the Persis Rodgers Home for The Aged on
Hawthorne Road P. O. Box N 7350, Nassau, Bahamas.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’ Funeral
Homes and Crematorium at Ernest and York Streets on
Tuesday July 07, 2009 from 10: 00 a.m. until 5:00pm
and at the church on Wednesday July 08, 2009 at 3:00p.m.
until service time.



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KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

MR. LESLIE
ANDRE PYFROM,
51

of Oxford Road, Stapledon
Gardens, Nassau, The Bahamas,
will be held at Christ Church
Cathedral, George Street, Nassau,
on Wednesday, 8th July, 2009 at
11:00a.m.

The Very Reverend Patrick L.
Adderley, Dean of Nassau and
Reverend Father Michael Gittens,
Priest Vicar, will officiate and
interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road, Nassau.

Mr. Pyfrom is survived by his wife Jennifer, daughters, Janay Pyfrom
and Yamel and husband Vasco Marshall; granddaughter, Eliana
Marshall; mother, Thelma Pyfrom; aunt, Rosamund Thrower; sister,
Suzette and her husband Richard Uriasz, and sister, Emily Pyfrom;
nieces, Nicole and Ashleigh Uriasz; father-in-law, Robert Thompson,
mother-in-law, Delores Thompson; brothers-in-law, Ricardo Thompson
and Donovan Neymour; sisters-in law, Beth Carey, Clarie Neymour,
Daniella Thompson; uncle, Oswald Pyfrom; aunts, Ernestine Jones,
Evelyn Klapp, Helen Degoumois, Thelma Brice, Shelia Brice, Conchita
Pyfrom and Eunice Green; his nephews, Bryant Carey, Damien and
Dylan Neymour; other nieces, Darryn and Drew Neymour, Jaiden,
Janayah and Jalani Thompson; grandniece Zion Carey; cousins,
Patricia Smith, Mary and Susan Culmer, Chuck Simms, Wilfred and
Cecile Knowles, Carl and Gladys Brice, Joan Nixon, Aaron and
Carol, Mizpah, Israel, Pauline, Paul, Gilbert Brice, Douglas, Valerie,
Deborah, Ruth, Ernestine, Carol, Freddie, Rudolph Pyfrom, Ken and
Brian Albury, Tyrone, Craig, Tracey Pyfrom, Ronald Jones, Dianne
Havey, Brian, Tiffany Thompson, Rosine Moutardier Ann Mosotti,
Karen and Pamela Klapp, Stephen Conliffe, Joann Heggan, Michelle
and Madeline Degoumois, Bernadette Davis, Ricardo, Enrique Pyfrom,
Mario, Michael, Marina Edsel, Carmie, Anthony Simms, The Archer’s,
The Swaby’s and The Cheney’s, Imperial Park Family: Jacqueline,
Enoch Pedro and Anna Maria Roberts, John, Eric, Andrew, Pamela
and John Jr. Godget, Gregory and Sandra Brennan, Dr. Clive, Joseph
Gaskin, Henderson Burrows and Family, The Thrower Family (U.K.)
and Ramon Kelly, godchildren Nyjo and Shandia Brennen; friends:
Chris Justilien & Members of Colors Entertainment and Junkanoo
Organization Family, Alfred & Vernique Stubbs, Lynette Barry,
Omar & Gerona Bernard, Stephanie Knowles &The John Bull Family,
U.S. Embassy Family, the CB family, Chauntez Wilson, Lydia
Lochan, Kweku Symonette, Melissa Lightbourne, Rachel Peters,
Ruvania Deveaux, Desmin Bullard, Kristi Bullard, Jackie and Deyar
Knowles, Craig, Paula, Naomi and Blanche, Anthony Bellot, Queen’s
College class of 1974 and The residents of Oxford Road; Stapledon
Gardens, other Family and Friends too numerous to mention.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to help defray the cost of
Janay Pyfrom (Leslie’s daughter) education to Mrs. Jennifer Pyfrom,
P.O. Box S.S. 5061, Nassau in memory of Mr. Leslie A. Pyfrom.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Kemp’s Funeral Home
Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale, Nassau, on Tuesday, 7th
July, 2009 from 10:00 to 6:00p.m.

THERE WILL BE NO VIEWING AT THE CATHEDRAL.

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FROM page 11

once effectively administered—
would be comprehensive and dif-
ficult for persons to circumvent
since it must be tacked on to all
purchases. As the IMF report
suggests, “sustainable revenue-
enhancing measures, including
VAT, would reduce the national
debt by 30 per cent GDP over
the medium term.”

A corporate tax and taxes on
profits, revenues and/or assets
under management of interna-
tional clients/companies must also
be levied.

Over the years, consecutive
governments have paid lip ser-
vice to development, entrepre-
neurship and empowering citi-
zens. Although legislation such
as the Industries Encouragement
Act, the Tariff Act, the Export
Manufacturing Industries Encour-
agement Act, the Agricultural
Manufacturing Act and the Spir-
its and Beer Act are in place,
there has seemingly been a lack of
support for industries. While
Bahamians are capable of self-
sustenance and engaging in viable
crop production, there also
appears to be a lack of support
in the commercial sector for
Bahamian foodstuffs, in part due
to an inferiority complex that
many Bahamians have seemingly
adopted when dealing with native
produce and successive govern-
ments failing to increase the
import tariffs particularly in sup-
port of items made or grown
locally.

The government must pro-
mote national youth development
programmes and keep young
people focused on making their
contribution to nation-building.
In Jamaica, the government has
demonstrated its faith in that
country’s youth by budgeting for
$3 million to be directed to a
Youth Empowerment Pro-
gramme, with set goals to assist
new graduates with becoming
employed, setting up training
seminars to help them manage
businesses and providing for
youngsters to submit ideas of the
kind of enterprise they wish to
start. Furthermore, the micro-
lending approach adopted by the
Jamaicans for the start up of small
to medium-sized businesses, and
additional monies being set aside
to help create and sustain these
businesses, should be further
adopted by the Bahamas—
although the government took a
similar approach to lending mon-
ey in 2007.

The National Training and
Retraining Programme was a
great initiative undertaken in the
2009/2010 Budget, which also pro-

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poses to provide opportunities
for persons to expand their skill-
sets in areas such as masonry,
wielding, carpentry, tile laying,
day care, customer service, data
processing, computer skills, land-
scaping, electrical works, lan-
guage skills landscaping, electrical
works, language skills and house-
keeping.

As a nation we must move
from an economic model that
seems stuck in a time-warp, which
focuses on year-round tourism
and financial services, to a com-
petitive diversified model that
expands public revenue and lib-
eralizes our economy.

The allocation of venture cap-
ital for entrepreneurs can assist
in the diversification of our econ-
omy and the establishment of
new industries such as food pro-
cessing, consulting and advisory
services, information technology,
fisheries processing, off-shore and
local research and development
setups, canning, pre-packaged
native tea/meals/spices/sauces,
marine farms and exports, cattle
rearing and so on. Whatever hap-
pened to the Domestic Invest-
ment Board? What role is the
Bahamas Development Bank
playing during these floundering
economic times?

In a country of scarce
resources and rampant con-
sumerism, it is high-time that
those Bahamians living beyond
their means and in constant pur-
suit of material possessions most
likely bought on credit— be pru-
dent spenders and heed PM
Hubert Ingraham’s admonition
not to “hang (their) hats higher
than (they) could reach.”

Thus far, it appears that gov-
ernment is demonstrating fiscal
prudence in the management of
the Bahamian people’s money,
so as not to endanger our nation-
al economic welfare and pass on
an unsustainable debt burden to
future generations.

The recent budget exercise
revealed much about some mem-
bers of the Opposition who
resorted to partisan histrionics
instead of proposing constructive
and considered alternatives to
positions put forward by the gov-
ernment.

With the IMF suggesting that
there will be a “difficult transi-
tion period” to economic recov-
ery as it is expected to be much
weaker and slower than in previ-
ous recessions, it is high-time that
certain of our elected represen-
tatives understand that their elec-
tion does not certify them to talk
foolishness for five years.

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THE TRIBUNE



1

MONDAY,





TUL Yeacor 22 00-8

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life



Port accuses
the St George
estate of
‘improper
abuse’

* Responds to claims
over Babak work
permit renewal

* Claims St George

estate owes
companies ‘millions
of dollars’ for
former receivership

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE late Edward St
George’s estate has been
accused of committing “an
improper abuse” by continuing
to “threaten” the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) and Port Group Ltd
over issues such as the renewal
of the chairman’s work permit,

SEE page 4B

6



Draconian’ 10,000% fee rises

may ‘kill’ private airline firms

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

rivate Bahamian air-

lines and charter

operators fear “dra-

conian” increases of
as much as 10,000 per cent in
their fee structure could “kill”
the industry, Tribune Business
can reveal, with the Civil Avia-
tion Department (CAD) plan-
ning to implement the changes
from August 1, 2009.

Industry sources, speaking to
Tribune Business on condition
of anonymity because they were
not authorised to speak pub-
licly, said that under the CAD’s
proposed “across the board” fee
increases, the operator of a five-
seater aircraft flying 50 hours
per month could expect to see a
$13,000 per annum fee rise.

This newspaper was told that
the fee increases include a
tripling or 200 per cent rise in
landing fees at Family Island
airports, the rates jumping from
a current $18.56 per landing to
$56 per landing for a 19-seat
aircraft.

Other fee increases divulged

Credit demand drops 30-40%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CREDIT demand = by
Bahamian consumers has “fall-
en very sharply” by between 30-
AO per cent, a senior banking
executive has told Tribune Busi-
ness, with consumer loans hav-
ing contracted by some $29.49
million year-over-year during
the first five months of 2009.

With Bahamian commercial
banks having collectively writ-
ten off a net $39.8 million in
bad loans during the year to
end-May, and provisions being
made for a further $70.4 mil-
lion worth, Anwer Sunderji,
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) chief
executive, said the industry’s
asset quality would continue to
deteriorate for as long as the
recession lasted.

“Credit demand has fallen
very sharply, by between 30-40
per cent, as Bahamian con-
sumers deleverage and banks
tighten up on credit criteria.
This process is expected to con-
tinue as long as the economy
remains in a downward spiral,”
Mr Sunderji told Tribune Busi-
ness.

Statistics published by the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
last week showed that consumer
loans had actually declined
year-over-year by $29.49 mil-
lion for the first five years of
2009, compared to growth of
$45.82 million in the compara-
tive period.

As for mortgages, growth in

Consumer loans contract
almost $30m year-over-
year, with almost $40m

in loans written-off

this lending category had
declined by almost 50 per cent
during the first five months of
2009, falling to $46.74 million
compared to $92.19 million in
2008. Overall, Bahamian dollar
credit contracted by $16.61 mil-
lion for the first five months of
2009, compared to $154.34 mil-
lion worth of growth in 2008.

For May 2009, consumer
loans contracted by $230,000
compared to a $10.1 million
expansion in May 2008, while
the total amount of mortgage
loans expanded by $7.94 mil-
lion — less than half the $16.84
million expansion in May 2008.

“We expect it to continue to
deteriorate,” Mr Sunderji said
of the commercial banking sec-
tor’s asset quality position. “The
Central Bank is forecasting an
expected improvement in the
Bahamian economy in the latter
half of 2010, and they expect
unemployment to increase fur-
ther.

“With that as the backdrop,
we can only expect asset quali-
ty to deteriorate. So it’s not at
all surprising that the loan
arrears rate is up to just under
14 per cent (13.98 per cent) and

SEE page 7B

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* Bahamian operators say recession ‘wrong time’ for Civil Aviation to implement ‘across the board’ fee rises
* Family Island landing fees triple, with fleet charges increasing by four-digit percentages

* Competition already unfair, with Bahamasair and foreign carriers exempt
* New fees a potential ‘double whammy’, given planned NAD increases

—— ey ~~
Jafar



COMPETITION is already unfair with Bahamasair and foreign carriers

exempt...

to Tribune Business are as fol-
lows:

e Monitoring charge: From a
current $0 to $1,000, a 1,000 per
cent increase

e Fleet charge: For a five

seater Aztec aircraft, this will
go from $0 to $7,000 — a 7,000
per cent increase. For a Beech
19 seater aircraft, the fee will
rise from $0 to $10,000, a 10,000
per cent increase

e Charge to lease a foreign
aircraft: Current: $0. Proposed:
$4,000, a 4,000 per cent increase

e Charter permit renewal:
Current: $500 per annum. Pro-
posed: $1,200, a 240 per cent
increase

¢ Renewal of scheduled per-
mits: Current: $500 per annum.
Proposed: $1,200, a 240 per cent
increase. Both large foreign air-
lines and Bahamian operators,
including small charter compa-
nies, will pay the same rate

¢ Pilot licences: From $0 to
$250 for a six-month Air Trans-
port US licence. From $0 to
$200 for a one-year US com-
mercial pilots licence.

¢ Fuel suppliers to Bahamian
airlines in the Family Islands
will have to pay a tax equivalent
to $0.07 per gallon to the Civil
Aviation Department, on top
of existing government taxes

City Markets retains 25 of 27 staff from closed store

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CITY Markets has retained
25 of the 27 staff displaced by
closure of its Independence Dri-
ve store elsewhere within the
company’s operations, its chief
executive has confirmed to Tri-
bune Business, although seven
workers at its “overstaffed”
warehouse have been let go.

Sunil Chatrani said the 11-
store grocery chain had decided
to downsize its warehouse
because it was overstaffed based
on the volume of goods it han-
dled, the majority of those
affected being part-time per-
sonnel.

The City Markets chief exec-
utive said it was agreed with the

* Releases seven workers from ‘overstaffed’ warehouse
* Resuming direct imports ‘last piece of

puzzle’ to completing turnaround
* Grocery chain ‘still losing money but not to extent

we were’, with all major cost savings realised

union that represents the com-
pany’s line staff that the redun-
dancies would be on a “last in,
first out basis”.

He explained: “We had to cut
our numbers down. There’s only
seven affected. We were over-
staffed based on the through-
put at the warehouse. We had
too many employees at the
warehouse, and the ones we had
to let go are mostly part-timers.
But there are no other staff cuts

to be made.”

Elsewhere, Mr Chatrani said
“only two people out of 27 were
displaced” when City Markets,
as previously revealed by Tri-
bune Business, closed its store at
the Independence
Drive/Tonique Williams-Dar-
ling Highway on June 24, coin-
ciding with the end of the com-
pany’s financial year.

SEE page 5B

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A source close to the
Bahamas Association of Air
Transport Operators, the indus-
try group that represents more
than 20 charter companies and
private islands, questioned why
the Government and CAD
were looking to introduce these
fee increases in such a
depressed economic environ-
ment, especially given that they
had decided against doing so in
2005.

The fees are included in the
Landing, Parking, Tie Down
and Air Navigation Regulations
2005, part of The Civil Aviation
Act. “These things [fee increas-
es] were in fact proposed some
time ago back in 2005,” the
industry source said. “They did
not come into being then

SEE page 6B

—_





























The Embassy of the United States of America
is saddened by the loss of our

Leslie Pyfrom

The Embassy Family mourns his passing
and offers condolences to his family, friends and loved ones.

Thank you for your
trust OF step port
as we Messe’ to b previsle

Results with Integrity.

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Fouts, of

PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



susie
SR

@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

LAST week, investors trad-
ed in eight out of the 24 listed
securities, of which three
declined and five remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 9,879 shares
changed hands, representing a
decrease of 11,382 shares or 54
per cent, compared to the pre-
vious week's trading volume of
21,261 shares.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
was the volume leader for a sec-
ond consecutive week with
5,338 shares trading hands, its
stock ending the week
unchanged at $5.64.

J. S. Johnson (JSJ) was the
lead decliner, falling by $0.10
to end the week at a new 52-
week low of $10.40 on a volume
of 1,000 shares. Finance Corpo-
ration of the Bahamas (FIN)
traded 1,000 shares, its stock
declining by $0.07 to also end
at a 52-week low of $10.90.

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
traded 2,000 shares, its share
price dropping by $0.05 to end
the week at $5.04.

BOND MARKET

Investors traded the follow-
ing bonds this week:

* $10,000 (par value), Fideli-
ty Bank (Bahamas) Series A
Notes Due 2017 (FBB17)

* $10,000 (par value) Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) Series C Notes
Due 2013 (FBB13)

Pieces of Luggage



The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 788.56 (-5.54%) YTD

BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $1.39 $- 0 -18.71%
BBL $0.63 $- 0 -4.55%
BOB $6.94 $- 0 -9.16%
BPF $11.00 $- 0 -6.78%
BSL $7.92 $- 0 -22.28%
BWL $3.15 $- 0 0.00%
CAB $11.39 $- 0 -18.82%
CBL $5.64 $- 5,338 -19.43%
CHL $2.74 $- 541 -3.18%
CIB $10.38 $- 0 -0.67%
CWCB $3.11 $-0.22 0 38.22%
DHS $1.77 $- 0 -30.59%
FAM $7.76 $- 0 -0.51%
FBB $2.37 $- 0 0.00%
FCC $0.30 $- 0 0.00%
ee $5.04 $-0.05 2,000 -2.51%
FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%
FIN $10.90 $-0.07 1,000 -8.17%
ICD $5.50 $- 0 -10.28%
JSJ $10.40 $-0.10 1,000 -6.31%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%

* $50,000 (par value) Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) Series D
Notes Due 2015 (FBB15).

COMPANY NEWS
Earnings Releases:
Bahamas Waste (BWL) - For
the quarter ending March 31,
2009, BWL posted net income
of $208,000, representing a
decrease of $21,000 or 9 per
cent compared to $228,000 for
the same period last year.
Sales and services revenues

fell by $81,000 to total $1.9 mil-
lion, while cost of sales
decreased by $68,000 to total
$1.2 million. Total operating
expenses stood at $490,000 com-
pared to $483,000 in the 2008
first quarter. Earnings per share
remained unchanged at $0.05.
Total assets and liabilities as
at March 31, 2009, stood at $9.8
million and $1.1 million respec-
tively, compared to $9.6 million

SEE page 8B

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 3B



Major Water Corp work in downtown y——————=a

EXTENSIVE work has to be done on
the Water and Sewerage Corporation’s
infrastructure in the downtown area,
according to the minister responsible for
the utility, with the Ministry of Works
forced to postpone its paving exercises as a
result.

Phenton Neymour, minister of state for
the environment, told Tribune Business
that he could not say what exactly needs
to be done in the downtown area, though it
has been said that the problems stem from
dilapidated sewer lines.

Minister of Works Neko Grant assured
Tribune Business two weeks ago that Bay
Street would be paved in its entirety.

Sources close to the Ministry of Works
subsequently suggested that the depart-
ment considered paving only the street itself

and leaving the area
several feet away
from the sidewalk
unpaved - the area i
typically excavated by ||
public utilities. i

But Mr Grant said
last week: “It would
make no sense to
pave the main Bay
Street when there is
considerable work to
be done by Water and
Sewerage.”

Now, the down-
town area, in much
need of paving after
crews from several government utilities,
including Water & Sewerage, tore into it

Phenton Neymour



recently, will be the only part of a strip
extending from Caves Village to the bridge
to Paradise Island without fresh asphalt.

The major paving programme was under-
taken as part of an initiative to beautify the
main northern corridor before the Miss
Universe beauty pageant in August.

However, Mr Grant said it would not be
a sensible decision to pave the downtown
area for the pageant when the road would
have to be torn up again when the pageant
is over to repair and replace the damaged
infrastructure.

“We wanted to provide a sensible ride
for Miss Universe, but Miss Universe will
come and go and we need to provide prop-
er infrastructure for people who will tra-
verse these roads on an annual basis,” he
said.

Customs cuts
10-day bond to
just five days

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

along so that people will not

clearing motor cars, furniture
and heaven knows what else on

to bring the loopholes to a stop.

JAMAICA AND COMMONWEALTH CARIBBEAN
RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS
2010

Applications are invied from auiably qualified candidates for
two (2) RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS to be dwarded as

follows:

fal The Jamaica Rhodes Scholarship available ta
candidates from Jamaica only; and

iB) The Commonweal Caribbean Rhodes Scholarship,
available to all Caribbean candidates, excluding
Jamaicans

Candidates must have undertaken academic training
aufficiently advanced to assure the completion of a
Bechelors degree by Tet October, 2070.

Married candidates can mow apply
The criteria for selection by the Committees are as followe:-

Proven os infaiectual and Academic
Achievement of a high standard is fhe first
quality required of applicants, Out fhey will
also be required to show integrity of character,
sympatny for and protection af foe weak, fhe
abiiy fo Mad and ine eneygy fo vse ther
fale fo the full

The closing date for Jamaian and Commanvealth
Canbbean Rhodes Scholarships 2070 application is
September 30, 2009 by which date all completed eaniry forms
must be received by the Secretary

The Memorandum whieh contains Delaile of the
Scholarships as well as the Application Form may be
obtained from:-

THE SECRETARY
RHODES SCHOLARSHIP SELECTION COMMITTEE
2? East Street
Kingston, Jamaica
Te: 876-922-5500
or fram

www. modes-caribbean.com

Tribune Business Editor

IMPORTERS of perishable
goods and currency have only
five days from when they take
delivery to submit due entries
and Customs/Excise duties, the
Comptroller of Customs has
told Tribune Business, as his
department moves to turn
around most shipments in 24
hours.

Glenn Gomez told this news-
paper that the formerly 10-day
bond under the C19 entry dec-
laration had been amended and
reduced to five days as of July 1,
2009, seemingly an effort by
Customs and the Government

have to hang around Customs.
We’re making improvements
every day. One of the things I
want to do is implement an
automated system; it’s not what
it should be. That’s some
months down the line, but we’ll
be able to show people that
Customs has really improved.”

On the C19 situation, Mr
Gomez had told Tribune Busi-
ness previously: “The C19 is
now being utilized in the man-
ner for which it was designed
by law, for perishables, gold,

bullion and coins.

“They’ve been abusing that
form, and now that abuse has
been stopped. They have been

that form. Why should I allow
you to abuse that form, take
delivery of goods and not pay?”

Mr Gomez said the vast
majority of items outstanding
before Customs, many of which
dated back several years, relat-
ed to C19 form declarations.
“You can’t have your cake and
eat it too,” he added.

“Everyone wants to get a
freebie, and the Government
has to bear the costs of having
those goods come in and people
do not come back to pay,” Mr
Gomez said.

“There’s just too many loop-
holes in Customs, and it’s time

Whether internally or external-
ly, we have to address these
issues.”

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to enhance cash flow and bol-
ster revenue collection. Previ-
ously, importers of perish-
ables/currency had 10 days in
which to submit entries and due
duties to Customs, but that time
has been slashed by 50 per cent.

Responding further to con-
cerns about the Customs
Department’s move to enforce
“the letter of the law” on the
C19 and prevent it from being
used as a ‘catch all’ to take
delivery of imports without pri-
or payment, Mr Gomez told
Tribune Business: “There is also
in effect a stipulation in the law
where importers, if they desire,
can pay duties prior to the
arrival of their vessel and their
goods.”

With prior payment and sub-
mission of entries, their goods

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And Mr Gomez added: “If = :
they don’t have a bond, or don’t
have perishable goods, there is
still a way that merchants can
have imported goods cleared
quickly to get them in-store.
They can put up a deposit, then
come back with their entries
and reconcile them to the
deposit.”

As for complaints about Cus-
toms’ changed policy and
adherence to the law in relation
to the C19, Mr Gomez said sim-
ply: “If I bring in goods, it is
known I have to pay duty, and I
should not expect to get goods
without paying duty.”

Addressing the concerns of
importers and brokers regard-
ing the efficiency of clearing
incoming shipments, the Comp-
troller told Tribune Business:
“We’ve been turning around
entries in 24 hours, other than
entries with multiple lines and
several pages. That will take a
little longer.”

Companies could leave their
entries and have shipments
turned around within a day, Mr
Gomez said, while persons com-
ing in off the street to collect
imports were being dealt with in
one to two hours, once duties
were paid and the correct doc-
uments submitted.

“There really shouldn’t have
to be any concerns by the aver-
age importer in getting goods
from Customs in a timely fash-
ion,” Mr Gomez told Tribune
Business.

“Tf they pay for their goods at
Thompson Boulevard [Customs
HQ] with the cashier, and then
go to the dock, even that
process has been speeded up.
We’re getting the documents
through the same day in time
for the person’s arrival, instead
of a day or two.

“There’s still things to do, but
the idea is to move the process

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

Bratish Lskomal Falter: Hebel
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Tel: 242-323-1865

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(aN
NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS MORTGAGE CORPORATION
TENDER FOR GROUP HAZARD INSURANCE



The Bahamas Mortgage Corporation is inviting proposals
from insurance companies for the provision of hazard
insurance coverage to contractors and homeowners of
properties mortgaged to the Corporation.

The proposal should be for a three year period 1st
September, 2009 to 31st August, 2012.

Companies interested in submitting a proposal may collect
an information package from The Bahamas Mortgage
Corporation’s Head Office, Russell Road, Oakes Field,
Nassau, Bahamas.

The deadline for collection of the information package is
Friday, July 09, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.



FROM page 1B

Tribune Business can reveal.

A June 4, 2009, letter from
the companies’ external coun-
sel, Thomas Evans, QC, to Fred
Smith, the attorney for the
estate, responded to the latter’s
letters objecting to the renewal
of Hannes Babak’s work per-
mit by alleging that Mr Smith’s
clients had “no proper (or actu-
al) legal role in the GBPA or
Port Group Ltd.”

This position appeared to be
based on the fact that the
Supreme Court threw out the
St George estate’s “oppression”
action against Mr Babak and
the Hayward Family Trust,
although that verdict is under
appeal.

Writing that “the action was
struck out as hopeless and
bound to fail”, Mr Evans wrote
to Mr Smith: “Your clients are
presently indebted to Port
Group Ltd and the GBPA for
several million dollars, as a
result of their wrongful impo-
sition of a receivership on those
companies.

“Whilst yours and your
clients’ personal dedication to
a fundamentally misconceived
cause has been noted, you must
be aware it cannot be otherwise
than an improper abuse for
your clients to continue to
threaten these organisations
with which they have no proper
(or actual) legal role.”

And he added: “We wish to
point out that the estate of
Edward St George is not a
shareholder, director or officer
of Port Group Ltd or GBPA,
and therefore has absolutely no
standing on which to complain
about the internal affairs and
operations of our clients.”

Mr Smith and the St George
estate had objected to the
renewal of Mr Babak’s work
permit due to the fact that arbi-
tration proceedings he had com-
menced previously against
Intercontinental Diversified
Corporation (IDC), the Cay-
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the GBPA and Port Group Ltd,
were still live and could poten-
tially expose the two companies
to a multi-million dollar liabili-
ty.

They had also claimed that
his continued role as chairman,
while arbitration proceedings
were still ongoing, could place
the companies and their Boards
in a potential conflict of interest.

However, Mr Evans coun-
tered that the London-based
arbitration proceedings were
between Mr Babak and IDC
solely. He added that Lady
Henrietta St George, who does
sit on the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd Boards, could “raise
the prospect” of joining the two
companies to the proceedings,
“however misconceived such an
application may be.”

And Mr Evans wrote: “In
relation to your expressed con-
cern for the executors of the
estate of Edward St George not
to be taken to have ‘acquiesced,
waived or consented’ to Mr
Babak’s ‘resumption of activi-
ties’, the point belabours that
which our clients considered the
Supreme Court to have made
plain. The estate has no role in
relation to Port Group Ltd and
GBPA...

“Your clients are obviously
unhappy with the outcome of
the election for chairmanship
of Port Group Ltd or GBPA,
but that does not justify your
clients’ attempts to interfere
with the internal affairs of our
clients.”

Mr Evans also addressed, via
a June 8, 2009 letter, the issue
Mr Smith had raised over Mr
Babak’s work permit renewal
in a document sent to the Prime
Minister’s Office and the Cabi-
net, plus the Department of
Immigration.

In his letter, sent to director
of immigration Jack Thompson,
the Immigration Board and
Fausteen Major-Smith, the
deputy immigration director in
charge of Grand Bahama, Mr
Evans rebutted the St George
estate’s allegation that Mr

THE TRIBUNE





Port accuses the St
George estate of
improper abuse’

Babak submitted incorrect
information on his original 2006
work permit application.

Mr Evans said Mr Babak’s
original appointment was “on
the understanding that his
remuneration would be perfor-
mance-based. Therefore there
was not (nor could there be
any) salary stipulated on the
application as a set remunera-
tion for his work as chairman.

“Tt was never stated that Mr
Babak would not be remuner-
ated for work done. It was upon
this uncertainty that the Immi-
gration Department assessed
the highest rate possible (at this
time) for the permit, $10,000
per annum.”

Mr Babak’s appointment as
chairman was ratified when a
majority of directors voted in
his favour. “It is noteworthy
that Mr Babak was supported
by all members of the respective
Boards of GBPA and Port
Group Ltd (save Lady Henri-
etta St George),” Mr Evans
said.

“Therefore, Lady St George
cannot seek to accomplish by
letter that which she could not
by the laws which Port Group
Ltd and GBPA govern their
internal operations.”

Mr Evans added that Lady
Henrietta was part of the
Board’s chairman’s remunera-
tion sub-committee, which
determined details of Mr
Babak’s compensation.

“Indeed, Lady Henrietta St
George appeared by her proxy
and actively participated in dis-
cussion in relation to the same,”
he wrote. “In addition, Lady
Henrietta St George by her
proxy has since Mr Babak’s
election aggressively participat-
ed in subsequent Board meet-
ings chaired by Mr Babak.

“Therefore, one would
assume that if Lady St George’s
convictions were as passionate-
ly felt as stated in Mr Smith’s
letter, then she would not have
taken a part of the sub-com-
mittee or subsequent meetings
of the Board of Directors.”

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 5B



City Markets retains 25 of
27 staff from closed store

FROM page 1B

Of those not staying with City
Markets, whose parent firm is
Bahamas Supermarkets, one
was pregnant and the other had
decided he “wanted to part
company”. City Markets now
has around 686 staff, and Mr
Chatrani said: “We’re very con-
scious of the employees. At the
end of the day, they’ve been
loyal to us and we want to pro-
vide the level of employment
we provided in the past.”

Meanwhile, City Markets
remains in a holding pattern as
it waits for the multi-million dol-
lar equity capital injection from
its majority shareholder con-
sortium to come through, Mr
Chatrani describing this and the
re-starting of the “direct import’
programme as “the last piece
of the puzzle” in the company’s
turnaround.

He said that while he and the
management team had extract-
ed more than the previously
announced $5.3 million in annu-
alised cost savings from City
Markets’ business operations,
there were no more major cuts
to be made.

On the status of the new
equity financing from investors
in BSL Holdings, the consor-
tium that owns a majority 78
per cent stake in Bahamas
Supermarkets, Mr Chatrani
said: “It’s pretty much the same
as before. It’s all bureaucracy,
the paperwork, and I’m hoping
it comes in sooner rather than
later.”

It is still unclear precisely
what percentage of the new
equity capital will make its way
to Bahamas Supermarkets at
the operating company level,
and what will be retained by
BSL Holdings to meet its own
financial obligations. The major-
ity shareholder has some $24
million in bank debt owed to
the Royal Bank of Canada to
service.

While City Markets’ sales
were “still flat in this economy”,
Mr Chatrani said the business
was holding its ground and had
been “restructured in terms of

expenses”.

He told Tribune Business:
“There’s no more major cuts to
be done now. We’ve made all
the cuts we can. Our issue now
is to get back into the direct
import programme, which will
improve margins and gross
profitability.

Puzzle

“The last piece of the puzzle
is to import on the scale that
we used to. That’s the last piece
of the puzzle to turning this
company around. We’ve
reduced our losses. We’re still
losing money, but nowhere near
the extent we were in the past.
The turnaround will come when
we get into our import pro-
gramme.”

Mr Chatrani previously told
Tribune Business that City Mar-
kets current sources “less than
10 per cent of its product inven-
tory from abroad, a figure that
will increase to 20 per cent once
the direct import programme
restarts. With direct imports,
some 2,900 SKUs (stock keep-

ing units) — chiefly high-end,
high-margin products - will
return to the chain’s shelves on
a more consistent basis, thus
enhancing consumer selection
and price points.

Gross profit margins, mean-
while, which had fallen as low as
17.8 per cent during City Mar-
kets’ 2008 financial year, had
recovered to 25.4 per cent with-
in the last quarter, with the gro-
cery chain looking to get back
to historical margins of 28 per
cent as rapidly as possible.

Mr Chatrani also previously
told Tribune Business that the
financial year 2008 audit’s com-
pletion would “follow very
shortly after” the new funding
was received, as “everything
revolves around the financing”.
Bahamas Supermarkets is pro-
jected, through management
accounts, to have incurred a
$13.429 million loss for the year.

He cautioned, though, that
the audit completion would not
be immediate, as external audi-
tors KMPG would need to test
various assumptions to verify
their conclusions.

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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





‘Draconian’ 10,000% fee rises
may ‘kill’ private airline firms

FROM page 1B

because of the potential down-
side to the implementation of
these taxes at the time.

“Now, it’s even worse. They
can’t be contemplated.”

Among the airlines likely to
be impacted are Western Air,
Southern Air, Sky Bahamas,
Pineapple Air, Flamingo Air,
Cat Island Air, and First Choice
Airlines. The source said the
Civil Aviation Department let-
ter informing them all of the fee
increases was received around
Wednesday last week, effec-
tively giving them a month’s
notice, with the implementation
deadline set for August 1, 2009.

Although no reason for why
the increase was being imple-
mented now was given, the pri-
vate airlines believe it reflects
the Government — and Public
Treasury’s — increasing desper-
ation to get their hands on any
available revenue, given the
expanding fiscal deficit and a
national debt-to-gross domes-
tic product ratio that now stands
above 50 per cent.

But the industry source



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

warned that the fee increase
would impact the bottom line
at private Bahamian airlines
during a period when many
were struggling, and could even
affect the ability of some to sur-
vive.

Given that the industry
employs several hundred per-
sons and is a key transportation
avenue linking New Providence
and Grand Bahama with the
Family Islands, not only com-
munities in the latter but
tourism, too, could suffer if pri-
vate airline services are dis-
rupted. At least part of the fee
increase will likely have to be
passed on to passengers in
terms of increased ticket and
airlift costs, thus impacting the
cost and accessibility of a
Bahamian vacation. That is
exactly what Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace, minister of
tourism and aviation, has said
he wants to avoid at all costs.

“You’re looking at a time
when the Bahamian airline
operators have made substan-
tial investments in the expan-
sion of their fleets and acquisi-
tion of new equipment, so many
are spread thin,” the industry

2008

CLE/genNo.00842

Common Law and Equity Division

Between

source told Tribune Business.

“Margins in the airline indus-
try are very thin, so these things
[the fee increases] go straight
to the bottom line. Most of the
operators are very small, five
and seven-seater aircraft with
two planes.

“You’re going to impact
things like crazy. A guy with a
five-seater plane and two pilots,
it’s going to kill him, because
he does not have the margins
to absorb this. It’s going to have
a huge effect, and as you go up
the chain it’s going to get
worse.”

And the source added: “For a
very long time, the Government
feels we’ve been making money
and they want to relieve us of
some of these monies...... We
all live in the real world, but
this is not the time for this.

“This is not the operating
environment to look at increas-
ing fees, and certainly not with
such draconian increases. This
cannot happen in this environ-
ment. The economy is too frag-
ile.

“Tt’s across the board. It’s cor-
porate fees, and it has gone to
every aspect of the operation. It
has gone to the engineer, the
mechanic, the pilots, and
includes the $0.07 per gallon.
It’s just bad news all around.
Obviously, like anything else,

something will have to give, and
we will see a ripple effect down
through the system.”

While Bahamian private air-
lines and charter operators
understood the Government’s
need to maximise its revenue
collections, they suggested that
instead of increasing fees and
taxes upon their industry, it first
should seek to collect the “sev-
eral hundred million dollars” in
unpaid taxes — especially real
property tax — that it was
already owed.

The fee increases on the
Bahamian aviation industry
were unlikely to offset the Gov-
ernment’s fiscal deficit by them-
selves, and the sector source
pointed out that companies
were already competing on an
uneven “playing field’ by virtue
of Bahamasair being exempt
from the very same rises they
were facing. Foreign airlines,
too, are largely exempt.

The source questioned why
Bahamian-owned private air-
lines were being seen as a tax
revenue source at a time when
the Government was handing
out all manner of investment
incentives and concessions to
the likes of the cruise lines via
the Cruise Overnight Incentive
Act amendments.

He also cited the fact that
Bahamasair and all the foreign

NOTICE

NOTICE

LAUDERDALE, FL 33068

is hereby given. that
of 5401 SW 12 STREET APT.,

ROSELYNE DORTELY
108 NORTH, FORT
is applying to the Minister

airlines were allowed to bring
in replacement parts duty free,
whereas his industry was not,
and the 2009-2010 Budget
reforms that allow foreign boat
operators to import replace-
ment parts duty-free into the
Bahamas.

Implementing the CAD fee
increases, the industry source
said, would act as a “deterrent”
to the Association’s efforts to
have private plane owners, who
currently provide unregulated
charter services, to become
“certified and regulated”.

On the industry’s current
financial performance, he told
Tribune Business: “We’re down
across the board and they’re
[the companies] just holding
their own and hoping that
whenever the economy turns
around, they will turn a profit.
Many operations are holding
on.

“Tt’s just an unfortunate time,
and the general consensus is
that we’re hoping the Govern-
ment will reconsider it.”

The source added that the
Bahamian private airline oper-
ators were also faced with a
“double whammy”, given the
Nassau Airport Development
Company’s (NAD) plans for a
23.6 per cent increase in landing
fees, and a 6.1 per cent in park-
ing and other related aircraft



fees, at Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport (LPIA) with
effect from January 1, 2010.

On the CAD fee increases, it
is quite possible the Govern-
ment will argue that the current
fees levied are undervalued and
have not been increased for
some time. Any revenues raised
may also be used to enhance
Family Island airports.

Yet the fact major fee
increases of this nature are
being contemplated is again
likely to raise concern in some
quarters of ‘stealth taxes’, fol-
lowing a Budget in which the
Prime Minister again pledged
that there would be no tax or
fee increases apart from one
case impacting the latter.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



MICHAEL ROKER
Plaintiff
AND
MIGUEL DEAL

Defendant

NOTICE

TO: MIGUEL DEAL
Princess Charles Drive
Nassau, Bahamas

Take Notice that by Order of the Deputy
Registrar, Meeres sitting in Chambers, dated the
23rd day of February, A.D., 2009, it was ordered
that service of the amended Writ of Summons in
this action on you be effected by advertisement

LOCKHART & MUNROE
Attorneys for the Plaintiff

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6th
day of July 6th, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

YES YOU CAN

God got with his instrument and produced the book
“Yes You Can - A Bahamian Plan”.

The world seems to be waiting; every nation it has
touched is positively affected.

Did two leaders missed it, missed it to our
detriment!

We are still here to serve your accounting needs.
For a copy of “Yes You Can” and other services

Contact us at:- M.E. LOCKHART ACCOUNTING
Tel: 242-394-3565
Cell: 242-425-0650
P.O.Box N522

Email: elshagg @coralwave.com

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 3 JULY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,576.90 | CHG -0.39 | %CHG -0.06 | YTD -135.46 | YTD % -7.91
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.04 | YTD -5.49% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHON E:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Security
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.39
10.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00
6.94 Bank of Bahamas 6.94
0.63 Benchmark 0.63
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37
10.18 Cable Bahamas 11.39
2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74
5.50 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.64
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.44
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 1.77
7.50 Famguard 7.76
10.00. Finco 10.90
10.35 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.38
4.95 Focol (8) 5.09
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 9.30
5.50 ISD Utilities 5.50
10.40 J. S Johnson 10.40
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

EPS $
0.127
0.992
0.244
0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240 7.4
0.420 18.5
0.322 33.9
0.794 13.1
0.332
0.000
0.035 B86

Change Div $ P/E
1.39 0.00
11.00 0.00
6.94 0.00
0.63 0.00
3.15 0.00
2.37 0.00
11.39 0.00
2.74 0.00
5.64 0.00
3.11 0.00
1.77 0.00
7.76 0.00
10.90 0.00
10.38 0.00
5.04 -0.05
1.00 0.00
0.30 0.00
5.50 0.00
10.40 0.00
10.00 0.00

Daily Vol.

0.407 13.5
0.952 10.9
0.180 55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

5S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Serles A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FEE17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Change Daily Vol. Interest
700.00 0.00 7%
100.00 90.00 Prime + 1.75%
100.00 9.00 7%

100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%

Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELTON JOSEPH of FOSTER
STRRET, CHIPPINGHAM, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6'* day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Kelly's Team
Security Officers

Kelly’s is seeking mature, reliable, honest
and hardworking individuals to fill the
position of Security Officer.

Prospective candidates must be available to

work evening shifts. Past security experience

would be an asset. This position is ideal for
retired police or prison officers.

We offer excellent pay, benefits
and working conditions.

Interested persons may collect an application
form from the Customer Service counter at
Kelly's House & Home, Mall at Marathon.

No phone calls please

Houseg MonFri - 8:00am - 8:00pm
OME Sat-8:00am - 9:00pm

‘Ss

‘Mucronet

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

Computer Technician

Micronet Ltd, a leading business technology supplier
requires a computer technician to join our Service Team.

* Experience in hardware, networking, Windows based
operating systems amd software.
Professional certifications an advantage (A+, MCSE}
Must have good communication skills
Must be a team player; willing to work with others
Must have cen transportation and cell phone
Great career opportunity, training will be provided.
Salary commensurate with qualifications é& experience

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

52wk-Low Symbol Bid $
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets ¢.92

6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00

0.20 RND Holdings 0.35

Ask $

Last Price
8.42 14.60
6.25 6.00
0.40 0.35

Weekly Vol.

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

29.00 ABDAB 30.13
0.40 RND Holdings 0.45

31.59

29.00
0.55 0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

S2wk-Low
1.3124
2.8952
1.3948

NAV
1.3787
2.8952
1.4750

Eund Name

CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
3.1821
12.9209
100.5448
93.1992
1.0000
9.2511
1.0578
1.0271
1.0554

3.1821 Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
12.2702 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund

93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FSG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

YTD%

Last 12 Months
4.83
-3.18
5.74
-13.90
5.793
0.54
-6.76
0.00

1.72 4.12

2.13 5.78

Div S

-0.57 2.71

1.74 5.54

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

eighted price for daily volume
hted price for daily volume
|g price from day to day
.- Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 3/3/2007
(S41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Weekt -
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meanin oful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of C jelity

ice —

nter price
prior week

EPS $

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

0.000
0.000

Yield %
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
26-Jun-09
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | F@ CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

No telephone calls. Please reply in writing via email (subject

line: Computer Tech.) or fax to

Computer Tech.

clo Service Manager
Micromet Ltd.

PuO). Box SS-62 7)
Nassau, Bahamas

Cy



Email:
Fax:

obsfaimicronct.bs

328-3043

CERTEM

PARTNER



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 7B



Credit demand drops
30-40 per cent

FROM page 1B

non-performing loans up to 7.7
per cent of total loans.

“Banks have had to add to
their loan loss provisions, and
we fully expect we will continue
to have to do so until the econ-
omy starts to recover. Our
expectations of recovery are
consistent with the Central
Bank’s perspective.”

Mr Sunderji said the banking
sector’s ability to recover the
full value of loans provided for
depended heavily on whether
the loan in question was
secured. He added that home
loans secured by a mortgage on
the real estate involved pre-
sented “a very good chance of
recovery. Banks have histori-
cally not made a loss on mort-
gages”.

One bright spot for monetary
policymakers and the commer-
cial banking sector has been the
expansion in sector liquidity,
the amount of surplus assets
available for onward lending
purposes. This stood at a

healthy $538.65 million at end-
May 2009, as compared to
$319.03 million a year ago, after
a $276.7 million increase year-
to-date and $132.74 million
growth in May.

The expansion in commercial
banking sector liquidity is as a
direct result of reduced credit
demand and tighter lending
conditions, which have made it
more difficult for Bahamian
borrowers to qualify for loans.

As for other consequences of
the liquidity expansion, Mr Sun-
derji told Tribune Business:
“You can expect a softening in
deposit rates, which will likely
take place in the next few
months.” While this will do no
favours to savers, Mr Sunderji
said it would be impossible to
“lay-off” the surplus liquidity
build-up in the system without
any impact on spreads.

And foreign exchange
reserves had also “stayed buoy-
ant”, having risen to $758.63
million at end-May 2009, com-
pared to $698.34 million a year
before, after enjoying a $119.97

million expansion in May.
Foreign

The Bahamas’ foreign cur-
rency reserves had been bol-
stered by the foreign currency
borrowings of the Bahamian
government, plus the reduction
in global oil prices and demand
for credit, the latter of which
had reduced import demand
and foreign currency outflows.

The Central Bank reported
last week that almost one in five
(20 per cent) of loans to
Bahamian businesses by com-
mercial banks were in default
at end-May 2009, with total
non-performing loans rising to
7.77 per cent or $468.2 million
of total loans issued.

The total number of loans in
arrears by at least one month
increased by $6.1 million or 0.7
per cent in May, reaching a total
of $847.3 million. Total loans in
arrears increased to 13.98 per
cent as a percentage of total
loans, although the proportion
of delinquent loans - those

between 31 to 90 days past due
- declined by $12 million or 3.73
per cent to $373.3 million.

The Central Bank said: “The
increase in the arrears rate was
attributed to a worsening in the
consumer loans and residential
mortgages portfolios, by 58
basis points and 2 basis points,
to 12.45 per cent and 13 per
cent, respectively.

“In contrast, the commercial
arrears rate receded to 19.83
per cent in May, from 20.61 per
cent in April. In response to
these developments, banks aug-
mented loan loss provisions by
$3 million, boosting the ratio of
provisions to total arrears by 18
basis points to 23.44 per cent.

“This corresponded to new
loan provisions of $10 million,
partly offset by a $6.9 million
net write-off against loans pro-
visioned for earlier. However,
as the growth in non-perform-
ing loans outpaced the increase
in provisions, the ratio of total
provisions to non-performing
loans fell by five basis points to
42.43 per cent.”

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IM THE SUPREME COURT

Cammean Law and Equity Side

200V EOC 1430

IM THE MATTER. of all that poece parcel or Int of
land situated on the Eastern side of Labour Street
approximately | 0) fest South of Hay Street in the
Con stitwency of Grants Town bounded an the North

bry an adjacent het running. thereon (105.00) feet on
the West by Labour Street and running thereon
(22.00) feet on the South by an adjacent lot running.
therean (72.00) feet. The property has an

ANT
iM THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959.
AND

[§ THE MATTER of the Petition of Wilfred James
Thompson

NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that Wilfred James Thompson of Labour Street in
the Island of Mew Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas claims to be the owner of the
unencumbered tee simple estate of ALL THAT pisces parcel or lot
of land srtuated on the Eeater side of Labour Street aporonimately
100 feet South of Hay Street in the Constituency of Grants Town
vounded on the North by an adjacent lot running (105,00) fest on
the West by Labour Street and running tharsan (32.080) feet on the
South by ar a cht kot running thereon (32.00) feet. The property
hae an appa imané ares of (9,360) sqiere feet.
Wilfred James Thomason clalene to be the qaamer on fies sar ple of
the said land free fron encumbrances and has made an application
to ike Supreme Court in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Secrion 3 of the Quicting Tithes Act 1999 co have its tithe to the said
land itstigeted and the nature and extend thereof determined and
declared in a Genificate of Tithe to be granted by the Court in
accordande with the provisions of the said Act
4, plan of thee aid land may be inspected during normal office

hours. if the Tolkewing places

a, The Regietry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JUDITH FLEUREMY
of TREASURE CAY, ABACO, is applying to the

Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why

registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





Legal Notice

NOTICE
DALI INTERNATIONAL
HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VENTNOR VILLAS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BLUE RANGE
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JESSIKA LOUIS of SAPPHIRE
RIDGE DRIVE, PRINCE CHARLES, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6" day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.










INGRAHAM’s




TUNE UP AUTO ELECTRICAL
SPECIAL SUPPLIES CO. LTD.
Other Services Includes:
* Auto Body Repairs
SERVICE: *Diagnostics Test
= *Mechanical Repairs
Dil *Brakes, CGV Joints Replacement
-Oil Filter *Head Jobs
-Air Filter *Engine Overhaul
Fuel Filter *Electrical Repairs
Spark Plug s *Repair & Rebuild Starters
*Rebuild & Repair Wire Harness
(parts not included) *Repair & Install Window Motors

: *Repair Lights & Switch
We also import parts for any Peete a ieee

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Tel: 3235835/3235436 an 2025

GIN- Bet

CABINET
OFFICE

RE: THE OPENING OF SHOPS ON
PUBLIC HOLIDAYS

In accordance with Section 3 of the Public
Holidays Act, (Chapter 36), the following day will
be observed as a Public Holiday:-

Friday, 10th July, 2009 - Independence Day

On the said day, all public offices, banks and
shops throughout The Bahamas must be kept
closed, except that shops may open:-

for the sale of food, cooked or prepared for
consumption on the premises;

for the sale of drugs, medicines or surgical
appliances:

for the sale of ice;

for the sale of bread, fresh and frozen fish,
fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, butcher's meat
and fresh dairy products, until the hour of ten
o'clock in the morning;

for the sale of any article required for the burial
of a dead body, or in the case of illness of any
person or animal, or in any other emergency;
for the sale of petroleum products

for the sale of fresh water;

for the sale of newspapers and periodicals.

c.0. 1883

The Chambers of Johnson-Hasean & Co., Surte No
Grasvendr Suites, Grosvenor Chase off Shirkey Street,
Nassau, M.P_, The Bahamas Attiomeys for the Pettioner.

4OTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right of
dower of an Adverse clains of claim not reeegnized im the Petition
shall on cr before che Sth day of August, A.D ‘ 2009 file in
the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
Statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file
and serve.a statement of his claim oo oc before the said Sth day
of August, AD., 2009 will operate aé a bar to seh a elaim

MOHNSON-HASSAN & CO)
Suite Wo? Grosvenor Close
Of Shirkey Steer

Nassau, M_P., The Bahamas
Atomeys for the Petitioner
















Ministry Of Public
Works & Transport

NORTH ACKLINS ROAD
REHABILITATION










Tender Publication No.: FIR/207/15/1 (GOB)

EUROPEAID/128742/M/WKS/BS (EU)

The Government of The Bahamas intends to award a works
contract for the rehabilitation of the Queen’s Highway on Acklins.
The works contract consists in the rehabilitation and provision
of periodic maintenance (pavement patching and sealing) for
about 32.3 miles (approx. 52 km) of a two-lane single carriageway
road (Queen’s Highway. About 290,000 square yards of the road
pavement will require patching and sealing maintenance, and
about 100,000 square yards of the road pavement will require the
replacement of the base course layer and the placement of a new
surface seal.

The works are co-financed by the Government of The Bahamas
and the 9th European Development Fund.

The Tender dossier is available for inspection and purchase at
the following address:

Department of Public Works

of the Ministry of Works and Transport,
John F. Kennedy Drive,

1st Floor, East Wing

Nassau, (N.P.), The Bahamas

Tel.: +242-322-4830

Fax: +242-326-7344

Sealed Tender Submissions are to be deposited in the Tender Box
located at:

Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

3rd Floor

Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tender submissions will be received no later than 4:00pm, Monday,
24th August, 2009. Any tender received after this deadline will
not be considered.

Tenders are invited to attend the Tender opening at 10am Tuesday,
25th August, 2009 at the Tenders Board.

Possible additional information or clarifications/questions shall
be published on the EuropeAid website:
http://ec .ouropa.eu/europeaid/work/funding/index_en.htm
(Select Contracts link) and will be communicated in writing to
all tenderers.

Signed,
PERMANENT SECRETARY

CC SM 7
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 502-2371 today!



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas’ cruise product 300% more
costly than other Caribbean destinations

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE terms reached between
the Government and two major
cruise lines will ensure that 90
per cent of arriving ships visit
approved Bahamian ports, the
deputy director-general at the
Ministry of Tourism has told
Tribune Business, as this coun-












































* Ministry official says new agreement will ensure 90% of ships call at ‘approved ports’
* Says reduced overnight stay, private islands not major concerns

try seeks to enhance its com-
petitiveness despite having a
product 300 per cent more cost-
ly than other Caribbean desti-
nations.

David Johnson said the
Bahamas entered negotiations

a oi

eg oe

a]

=

‘|
eee

A World of
Choices



with Carnival Cruise Lines and
Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines
to secure this country’s share of
the cruise market.

With a rebate-style passenger
departure tax incentive pack-
age, the Government hopes to

have Carnival alone deliver 1.4
million visitors per year. For
each passenger over 800,000, the
cruise line will receive a rebate
of $8.50 per passenger on the
$15 per head tax, and a $10 per
passenger rebate when those vis-

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GET THERE. TOGETHER.

itor numbers exceed one mil-
lion. At least 350,000 of those
visitors must overnight in Nas-
sau, and 175,000 in Freeport, for
the cruise lines to access these
incentives, with all passengers
below 800,000 visitors attract-
ing a $15 per head tax.

These incentives, part of the
Government’s amendment to
the Cruise Ship

Overnighting Incentives Act,
come as cruise lines have slashed
their prices to fill ships in the
midst of the global economic cri-
sis. And the cruise sector has
been the only one in a declining
Bahamian tourism industry to
have seen year-over-year
arrivals growth this year, as a
result of the cruise industry’s
staying power.

Bay Street merchants, though,
have questioned how effective
the amendments will be in
increasing business in the down-
town area, and some have
argued that the move to
decrease the overnight mini-
mum stay of 13 hours until mid-
night, with a minimum of nine
daylight hours in port, could
hurt some businesses.

Some night club owners said
the amendment could strip them
of their cruise passenger busi-
ness should ships decide to leave
port at midnight.

However, Mr Johnson said 13
hours is merely the minimum
amount of time under the agree-
ment, and contended that ships
often remain in port much
longer.

According to him, Bay Street
merchants have no cause for
concern. He suggested they
bring their product to the atten-
tion of cruise industry in order
to secure the business.

“Tf there are night options,

midnight sailing doesn’t negate a
night option,” said Mr Johnson.
“Some ships stay longer than
the 13 or 18 hours. If there are
options, their (cruise lines) cus-
tomers are willing to buy or pro-
mote. I have no doubt that they
would want to take advantage
of those tours and sail a bit lat-
ere

Merchants and Tour Opera-
tors were also concerned about
competition from the cruise
lines’ own private islands in this
country, as well as their on-ship
retail, restaurant, bar and gam-
ing facilities.

Passengers

Though passengers taken to
only private islands or “desig-
nated ports” are counted in the
total number of visitors brought
to the Bahamas as a part of the
incentive scheme, Mr Johnson
suggested the number of ships
that visit only their private
islands is minimal.

“The vast majority do stop in
two ports,” he said.

The number of ports that
cruise ships can dock at and
remain eligible for the benefits
of the Act is being increased
from two to seven.

Once enacted, Nassau,
Freeport, Rock Sound, Cast-
away Cay, Coco Cay and Half
Moon Cay will all be
“approved” ports under the Act.

Ships visiting approved ports,
according to Mr Johnson, will
not be allowed to open

their casinos or stores until
after 7pm and after acquiring a
business licence to do so.

He said New Providence casi-
nos agreed to that provision
“because they saw a significant
benefit to themselves.”

International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold

Weekly % Change
0.8621
1.6329
1.3978

-0.62
-1.28
-0.69

Weekly

$65.63
$931.00

% Change

-5.46
-0.97

International Stock Market Indexes:

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and $1.2 million at the end of fiscal 2008.

Dividend Notes:

¢ J. S. Johnson (JSJ) has declared a dividend of $0.16 per share,
payable on July 15, 2009, to all shareholders of record date July 8,

2009

¢ Consolidated Water (CWCO) has declared a dividend of
$0.013 per share, payable on August 6, 2009, to all shareholders of

record date July 1, 2009.

Annual General Meeting (AGM) Notes:

¢ Abaco Markets (AML) announced that it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at 6pm at
The Wyndam Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino, West Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of June 19,
2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting.

¢ Benchmark (Bahamas) (BBL) announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on Thursday, July 23, 2009, at 6.30pm at
British Colonial Hilton, Governor's Ballroom, Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of June 23, 2009, will be qual-
ified to vote at the Annual Meeting.

SpeLOT MT tees

— SNACK WRAP’-—



MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009





i Cc], 1

The stories behind the news

THE ills plaguing our society can be likened to a
beast with one great belly and many starving
mouths. Each mouth represents an endemic hunger
in our land. One mouth, the hunger for justice,
another, the hunger for an adequate education and
the third, the hunger for security...





Worshippers of
material things

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net



‘Prosperity pastors’ are helping
to destroy the Bahamas

he ills plaguing our society can be
likened to a beast with one great
belly and many starving mouths.
Each mouth represents an endem-
ic hunger in our land. One mouth,
the hunger for justice, another, the hunger for an

adequate education and the third, the hunger
for security.

But one mouth, one gaping maw that lies at
the centre of this beast, represents the deepest
hunger, the most neglected need of our people,
the need to be fed spiritually.

Much of the crime we experience in the
Bahamas comes from a wound that leads us to

want to possess, an obsession for the material,
whether that be money or people, which leads to
violence manifesting itself in murder, abuse,
armed robbery or even stealing from our jobs.
We do not value the worthwhile aspects of
our existence, the beauty of human potential,
the richness to be found in knowledge, the sat-
isfaction of a truly loving relationship with fam-

ily and friends. These are the things that can
save us from this hunger, that can make us into
a better people, better humans.

Having these virtues installed in a person is a
job left up to the individual or family. No other
institution in our society purports to or is able to
help with this task.

I take that back, there is one. Well, one that’s

supposed to.

The church claims to be our saving grace, the
place where our people can go for this food.
Nearly every corner of this island has one and
they exist in every community. But if it’s spiritual
food you want, you'll find their pantries inex-

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 3C



INSIGHT



From Haiti, a surprise:
‘sood news’ about AIDS

Bf By JONATHAN M KATZ
Associated Press Writer

BLANCHARD, Haiti (AP)
— When Micheline Leon was
diagnosed with HIV, her par-
ents told her they would fit her
for a coffin.

Fifteen years later, she walks
around her two-room concrete
house on Haiti's central plateau,
watching her four children play
under the plantain trees. She
looks healthy, her belly amply
filling a gray, secondhand T-
shirt. Her three sons and one
daughter were born after she
was diagnosed. None has the
virus.

"T'm not sick," she explained
patiently on a recent afternoon.
"People call me sick but I'm
not. I'm infected."

In many ways the 35-year-old
mother's story is Haiti's too. In
the early 1980s, when the
strange and terrifying disease
showed up in the US among
migrants who had escaped
Haiti's dictatorship, experts
thought it could wipe out a third
of the country's population.

Instead, Haiti's HIV infection
rate stayed in the single digits,
then plummeted.

In a wide range of interviews
with doctors, patients, public
health experts and others, The
Associated Press found that
Haiti's success in the face of
chronic political and social tur-
moil came because organisa-
tions cooperated and tailored
programmes to the country's
specific challenges.

Much of the credit went to
two pioneering nonprofit
groups, Boston-based Partners
in Health and Port-au-Prince's
GHESKIO, widely considered
to be the world’s oldest AIDS
clinic.

"The Haitian AIDS commu-
nity feels like they're out in
front of everyone else on this,
and pretty much they are,” said
Judith Timyan, senior



IN THIS May 7, 2009, photo, Micheline Leon, a woman living with HIV/AIDS, poses for a photo with her children
in Cange, in central Haiti. Haitian infection rates dropped from 6.2 per cent to 3.1 per cent among expectant moth-
ers in the last 15 years. Researchers recently switched to a new methodology that tests all adults, which puts
Haiti’s official rate at 2.2 per cent, according to UNAIDS.

HIV/AIDS adviser for the US
Agency for International Devel-
opment in Haiti. "They really
do some of the best work in the
world."

Researchers say the number
of suffers was initially lessened
by closing private blood banks,
and statistically by high mortal-
ity rates — an untreated AIDS
sufferer in Haiti lives eight few-
er years than an untreated
American.

Well-coordinated use of
AIDS drugs, education and
behavioural changes such as
increased condom use have
kept the disease from surging
back, at least for now.

Statistics are notoriously
unreliable in this country of
poverty and lack of infrastruc-
ture. The most telling data
would be the number of new

infections in a given year, but
researchers say such a precise
count is impossible.

Next best is to estimate the
infected as a percentage of the
population. From 1993 to 2003,
only pregnant women were test-
ed, and their rate of infection
dropped from 6.2 per cent to
3.1 per cent, according to
GHESKIO and national health
surveys.

Test

Researchers now test men
and women aged 15 to 49, and
the official rate is 2.2 per cent,
according to UNAIDS.

That's still far higher than in
the developed world, but it's
lower than the Bahamas,
Guyana and Suriname, and
much lower than sub-Saharan

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(AP Photo: Ramon Espinosa)

Africa, where the rate averages
about five per cent but spikes to
24 per cent in Botswana and 33
per cent in Swaziland.

But the crisis is far from over.
In the Artibonite Valley, where
Boston-based Partners in
Health is just now setting up
two clinics, the estimated infec-
tion rate is 4.5 per cent.

Some in these remote regions
still look for care from Voodoo
priests, who ask for large sums
of money or goods and use
treatments doctors say can be
poisonous.

Thanks in large part to
UNAIDS, which awarded Haiti
its first grant in 2002, and $420
million from the US President's
Emergency Plan for AIDS
Relief, or PEPFAR, an esti-
mated 18,000 people are on
AIDS drugs, most of them

administered free through
GHESKIO and PIH.

That population represents
40 per cent of those whose
white blood cell count is low
enough for them to need the
drugs. It is a high percentage
for the developing world, but
still fails to help many too
remote to reach medical care
or those at for-pay public clinics.

Still, Haiti has been suffi-
ciently ahead in prevention,
diagnosis and treatment for
some of its programmes to serve
as models for PEPFAR, the
programme launched by Presi-
dent George W Bush in 2003
and praised for its work in
Africa.

GHESKIO co-founder Dr
Jean W Pape was awarded the
French Legion of Honour for
his work, and PIH's Paul
Farmer was recently named
chairman of Harvard Medical
School's global health depart-
ment. In May, Haiti was hon-
oured as the host of the opening
ceremony of the 2009 Interna-
tional AIDS Candlelight
Memorial.

In a country suffering from
political upheaval and natural
disasters, where three-quarters
of the people can neither afford
nor access private clinics or fee-
based public hospitals, few

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PAGE 4C, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



From Haiti, a surprise: ‘good news’ about AIDS

FROM page 3C

could have imagined at the
dawn of the AIDS crisis how
far Haiti would come.

When some of the first con-
firmed cases of the strange new
immune deficiency disease were
found in Haitian migrants, the
country was hastily and unsci-
entifically pegged as the main
breeding ground, or maybe
even cause, of AIDS. Experts
predicted a third or more of its
population would be wiped out.

The US Centers for Disease
Control deeply offended the
country by listing Haitian
nationality alongside hemo-
philia, homosexuality and hero-
in use as primary risk factors —
nicknamed "the four H's."
There was speculation that slum
squalor or Voodoo ceremonies
were responsible for the
scourge.

By the mid-1980s the CDC's
risk-factor list was amended,
but the damage was done to
Haiti's dignity and to tourism,

The Tribune

then its second-largest industry,
which collapsed and never
recovered.

Yet the stigma may be what
motivated Haiti to fight the dis-
ease harder, uniting squabbling
officials and divided donors in a
common cause, said Pape, the
Haitian-born, Cornell-educat-
ed physician who helped found
GHESKIO in May 1982.

GHESKIO was founded two
months before the disease even
had a name, hence its unwieldy
French acronym for "Haitian
Group for the Study of Kaposi's
Sarcoma and Opportunistic
Infections."

Speaking in an office filled
with health studies and signed
photos from US presidents,
Pape said efforts to close unreg-
ulated blood banks, treat the
sick and reducing mother-to-
child transmissions helped curb
the epidemic.

Partners in Health was found-
ed in 1983, by two Haitians and
two Americans including
Farmer, as a small clinic treating

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A Ministry of Marsh Harbour desapel Chapel
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infected people in the desper-
ately poor hillside community
of Cange.

Its "accompagnateur" pro-
gramme, in which local work-
ers including HIV patients are
paid to help the newly diag-
nosed adhere to physically tax-
ing medication regimens and
prevention measures, has been
duplicated in Africa. So has
GHESKIO's work, such as dis-
tributing phone cards to
patients to keep in closer touch
with their doctors.

Obner Saint-Valain is an
accompagnateur who looks
over seven patients including
Marie-Lourdes Pierre, a blind
55-year-old Blanchard woman
who has lived with the virus
since 1999. For that work he is
paid $54 a month.

"If you're giving medication
to a patient, you can't be scared
of them. If the patient becomes
worse, it’s me that picks them
up and puts them in a car to the
hospital,” he said.

While many of Haiti's more
than nine million people can-
not afford care in hospitals that
require them to provide every-
thing from medicine to latex
gloves for their doctors, HIV
patients get cutting-edge treat-
ments for free.

Meanwhile, education cam-
paigns spread the word on pre-
vention measures. More than
51 million free condoms have
been shipped to the country of
since 2004 and are advertised
everywhere on street murals
and corner store signs.

"More Haitians know about
modes of transmission than high
school students in the US,"
Pape said.

Tt was in 1994 that Micheline
Leon made the 30-kilometer
(20-mile) trek from her home
in Blanchard over crumbling
roads to the stone-walled cam-
pus of Zanmi Lasante, the Cre-
ole name and flagship opera-
tion of Partners in Health.

Something felt wrong with
her pregnancy — the baby was
too low in her belly, she said.
The baby was fine, but Leon
tested positive in the HIV test
given to all expectant mothers.

"My family lost hope. They
thought I was already gone,”
she said.

Through care, counselling
and a lot of social assistance —

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IN THIS May 7, 2009, photo, a doctor attends to a patient with HIV/AIDS at the Partners in Health hospital in Cange,

Haiti’s central plateau.

Partners in Health also helped
build her tin-roofed, concrete
house — Leon survived. She is
also a paid PIH accompagna-
teur, working mostly with tuber-
culosis patients.

‘Treatments, which in her lat-
er pregnancies included AIDS
drugs, prevented the virus from

passing to her children, and she
was discouraged from breast-
feeding. PIH stands by the prac-
tice though some AIDS doctors
say that's unwise in countries
like Haiti where food is scarce.

Pape envisions a Haiti where
the prevalence rate will dip
below one per cent. Timyan of

(AP Photo: Ramon Espinosa)

USAID believes the rate has
essentially stabilized but will not
rise again.

Leon's parents never did buy
that coffin. For her, fear and
shame have been replaced with
pride and confidence.

"I'm not scared anymore,"
she said.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 5C



‘Prosperity pastors’ helping to destroy Bahamas

FROM page 1C

cusably bare. Instead they stand
like little temples to Mammon.

Nothing can illustrate this
point better than an article
appearing in The Nassau
Guardian this past Friday enti-
tled “Pastor calls $1/4 million
vehicle a Blessing.”

The story was of how Bish-
op Kirkwood Murphy who, with
the help of his congregation,
bought a 2005 Bentley Arnage
ordinarily worth $250,000 for
$68,000.

On face value it sounds like
the good Bishop just got an
awesome deal on a really
expensive car. Some may find it
unseemly for a man of the cloth
to be parading around town in
such an expensive vehicle, but if
he and his congregation decide
that their collection funds were
best invested in this car, far be it
from anyone outside of that
organisation to criticise them.

However, as he tried to justi-
fy the purchase there were sev-
eral statements he made that
showed how materialism is rot-
ting the core out of the beauty
of Christianity.

“IT wanted to make a state-
ment, I wanted to bring hope
to the Body of Christ. I wanted
people to know that not only
drug dealers and cabinet minis-
ters and prime ministers could
drive this kind of car, but that a
man of God could too.”

A Bentley bring hope to the
Body of Christ? A Bentley? I
had no idea pastors had become
so cynical! I’m only 27 but I
remember a time when Jesus’
resurrection was supposed to
“bring hope to the Body of
Christ”. I guess things have
changed and the reanimation
of a human body after death
isn’t enough to impress people
anymore. But hope has
returned! Bishop Murphy has
himself raised up a car from an
auction in New York and
brought it to the Bahamas. The
church can sing again!

He went on to say: “I wanted
to take the level and the minds
of Christians up.”

Watch out Saint Augustine,
Thomas Aquinas, Martin
Luther and Thomas 4 Kempis!
Two thousand years of church
teachings, the voluminous

works of the fathers of the
church are not enough. It’s a
lucky thing this car hit Nassau.
We are certainly living in a
blessed time. But I digress. The
Bishop continued: “We always
think of Christians as poor , but
the Bible says that the Earth is
the Lord’s and the fullness
thereof, and so I wanted to
make a statement too as a pas-
tor and a man of God.”

He is right, God doesn’t
demand material poverty, he
demands spiritual poverty. God
doesn’t care if you are poor nor
is he concerned about your
wealth. If Bishop Murphy was
doing what he was supposed to,
he should “take the level and
minds of Christians up” by set-
ting an example that would
encourage people to be con-
cerned about what God is truly
interested in, the state of the
human soul, not a bank account.

I find prosperity preaching
abhorrent, dishonest and sinful.
The idea that a person is blessed
because of the material God
allows him or her to have is
faith destroying.

There are millions of people
around the world, many of them
faithful Christians, who suffer
from poverty, disease and vio-
lence. They live painful, sad,
short, joyless lives. Is their God
absent? Are we favoured above
these people? If the answer is
yes then is the God you wor-
ship really all loving and merci-
ful?

Prosperity theology is cor-
rupting, it is a perversion of
what the faith should be. It is
nothing more than a hustle from
snake-oil salesmen who try to
justify their enrichment by prey-
ing on the faith of those they
pretend to lead or care about.

This “name it and claim it”
philosophy makes spoilt chil-
dren of the faithful. It is funda-
mentally pagan and it cheapens
the concept of God’s grace.
Grace by definition means
unmerited favour. There is no
human prayer sincere enough,
nor human faith deep enough
to deserve anything from God.

It encourages laziness and
materialism. It defaces Chris-
tianity and makes vandals of
those pastors who preach it.

In the darkness of this teach-
ing, Christianity becomes a faith

in which the creation is to be
served by the creator. It
becomes a religion where the
gifts bestowed to humankind by
the Holy Spirit aren’t wisdom,
understanding, counsel, forti-
tude, knowledge, piety and fear
of the Lord, but rather Bent-
ley, Versace, Rolex, Armani
and having no fear you'll max
out your platinum Visa card.

It becomes a system of belief
in which Christ is indistinguish-
able from Santa Claus and God,
a genie whose lamp you rub
with a little prayer.

Name it and claim it indeed!
Where is the religion that taught
that the cross and salvation
were the only things that were
ours to name and claim and
where love of neighbour was
the highest value and service
and sacrifice were worthy
ideals?

Concepts

I suppose those concepts are
not in vogue anymore. The
human sprit dies everyday in
our country through the abuse
of drugs, alcohol, children and
spouses. It suffers the curse of
never being able to reach its full
potential because of an anorex-
ic school system and a people
who do not value knowledge
for its own sake. But like the
good pastor said “God is good.”
You can still get a Bentley in
the country for less than
$400,000.

Bishop Murphy’s Bentley is
bringing more soldiers into the
army of Christ, however. In fact
he said that a young man saw
him and asked him what he did
for a living that would have
caused him to have such a nice
car.

“T said that ’'m a pastor. He
said ‘Oh I want to be a pastor. I
wanted to be a doctor, but I
changed my mind’. Then he said
‘can I take a picture of your
Bentley? Where is your church?
I want to come there.””

For the sake of our spiritual
and physical health I hope the
young man is driven into a pro-
fession he enjoys, not the one
he just feels will bring in the
most cash.

It’s no wonder that increas-
ingly our people are becoming
disgusted with religion and

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Christianity in particular. The
church that is the beautiful
bride of Christ is being hidden
by this mess, this noise, this wor-
ship of mammon that is indis-
tinguishable from secular ideals.

They see pastors wallowing
in self-righteous indignation
over the private lives of people
while ignoring more pressing
matters in our society, living lav-
ish lives while their parishioners
struggle to place 10 per cent of
their earnings in the collection
plate. They see Christians pray-
ing for husbands, wives, cars,
promotions, more money, a
nicer house, and the destruc-
tion of “evil” co-workers and
bosses.

It is possible that I’m being
unfair. The reason why some
pastors encourage this orgy of
avarice in their churches may
come down to a question of
capacity. If spiritual enlighten-
ment were easy everyone would
have it. The truth is many pas-
tors in the Bahamas are not
capable of leading their "flock"
toward deeper spiritual enlight-
enment because they are not
enlightened themselves and
equally as shallow as the most
heathen socialite.

Unable to measure their own
spiritual growth, much less any-
one else’s, they turn to chattel
as a determining factor in how
close they or a person is to God.

We have upstart pastors and
preachers who, in a desperate
push for legitimacy, appoint
themselves prophet, prophet-
ess, apostle, psalmist and Bish-
op.

Whatever happened to just
being called a servant of God.
Honestly that would be OK.
Think about it. What would be
the shame in a person directing
the service saying : "Coming to
speak to us now is another ser-
vant of God Timothy Jones."

But that would be ridiculous.
Where would the "wow factor"
be in that? Surely this man of
God deserves a better intro-
duction.

“And coming to bless us now
with a word from the Lord is
Bishop, the honourable prophet
and general overseer of the first
temple of the most holy chapel
on the bank of Montagu beach
and part time psalmist Timothy
Jones.”

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That's better. That's more
suited to a person who serves
the Lord.

In my favourite scene from
one my favourite movies
"Angela's Ashes” the main
character, Frank, a young Irish
Catholic boy, looks up at a
naked statue of a child hanging
up on the wall of the only bed-
room of the rundown house his
two parents and three siblings






move into.

His mother exclaims:
“Look! That’s the baby Jesus. If
you ever need anything you
should pray to him.”

Frank’s younger brother
Malachy leans and whispers to
him: “Will you tell baby Jesus
that we’re hungry?"

Nice car Bishop Murphy. But
will you please tell baby Jesus
that we’re hungry?

Pca S Ks




















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THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPO

ae

5-Day FORECAST







e~

ih, ai ORLANDO SS :
High:91°F23°C = ; Sunny. A moonlit sky. Times of clouds and Mostly sunny. Intervals of clouds Sunshine.
6 L 9 73° F °C J sunshine. and sunshine.
ow: 73° F/ all ° ° ° °
@ High: 91 High: 92 High: 92 High: 90
r 5 Fr High: 92° Low: 81° Low: 81° Low: 80° Low: 80° Low: 81°
TAMPA he ae UE
High: 88° F/31°C t 113° F | 113°-92°F 117°-93° F 113°-91° F 107°-89° F
Low: 77° F/25°C ry r. The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
a @ - : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

-

FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 89°F/32°C

Low: 77° F/25°C

@ WEST PALM BEACH
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 76° F/24° C

<

FREEPORT
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 79° F/26° C

@

MIAMI
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 78° F/26° C

ABACO
High: 92° F/33° C

—— Low: 82° F/28°C
e”,
im

NASSAU
High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 81°F/27°C

KEY WEST . eX 2
High: 90° F/32°C
Low: 80° F/27°C —

a,



Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's

highs and tonights's lows.

Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today
High Low W High Low Ww High Low W High Low W High Low W

Fic FC Fic FC Fic FC Fic FC FIC OFC
Albuquerque 93/33 68/20 pc 94/34 68/20 pc Indianapolis 84/28 64/17 $s 83/28 65/18 s Philadelphia 86/30 66/18 s
Anchorage 78/25 58/14 $s 78/25 59/15 s Jacksonville 90/32 73/22 t 91/32 73/22 t Phoenix 110/43 86/30 s
Atlanta 82/27 68/20 t 88/31 68/20 s Kansas City 86/30 66/18 s 90/32 70/21 s Pittsburgh 81/27 55/12 $s
Atlantic City 84/28 61/16 s 86/30 59/15 pc Las Vegas 107/41 77/25 s 105/40 81/27 s Portland, OR 72/22 56/13 pc
Baltimore 85/29 62/16 s 85/29 62/16 pc Little Rock 89/31 66/18 pce 93/83 67/19 s Raleigh-Durham 85/29 66/18 t
Boston 77/25 61/6 t 78/25 59/15 t Los Angeles 83/28 62/16 pc 83/28 62/16 pc St. Louis 88/31 68/20 s
Buffalo 76/24 56/13 t 68/20 54/12 t Louisville 85/29 67/19 s 88/31 65/18 s Salt Lake City 95/85 63/17 $s
Charleston,SC 89/31 72/22 t 89/31 70/21 t Memphis 87/30 70/21 pce 93/83 72/22 s San Antonio 98/36 76/24 pc
Chicago 83/28 60/15 pce 77/25 60/15 t Miami 89/31 78/25 t 92/33 78/25 pc San Diego 75/23 64/17 pc
Cleveland 77/25 56/13 pe 75/23 55/12 pce Minneapolis 84/28 62/16 t 73/22 58/14 t San Francisco 70/21 55/12 pc
Dallas 92/33 72/22 t 96/35 76/24 pc Nashville 86/30 62/16 pce 90/82 64/17 s Seattle 70/21 55/12 pe
Denver 91/32 60/15 t 94/34 58/14 pc New Orleans 90/32 78/25 t 90/32 76/24 t Tallahassee 87/30 73/22 t
Detroit 82/27 58/14 pe 77/25 58/14 pc New York 84/28 65/18 pce 83/28 66/18 t Tampa 88/31 77/25 t
Honolulu 88/31 75/23 pce 88/31 75/23 pc Oklahoma City 90/82 67/19 s 94/34 69/20 pc Tucson 100/37 79/26 s
Houston 93/33 76/24 t 94/34 74/23 t Orlando 91/382 73/22 t 92/33 73/22 t Washington, DC 85/29 67/19 s

ANDROS
High: 97° F/36° C
Low: 80° F/27°C

ELEUTHERA

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature



IGN sesssasedvsseesslccettonaetectiecianed isaecbanes 91° F/33° C
LOW Normal high .... 88° F/31° C
Normal low 75° F/24° C
Last year's Nigh oo... ceceeteeeeeeteees 90° F/32° C
Last year's LOW o..ccceeseseteteseeceeees 76° F/24° C

Precipitation

As of 2 p.m. yesterday .......ccccccccccnseeceneee 0.10"
Year to date a
Normal year to date

AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009



High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 79° F/26° C

GREAT EXUMA

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 78° F/26° C

oO

Tuesday
Low

F/C
64/17
85/29
53/11
55/12
65/18
72/22
63/17
76/24
65/18
53/11
54/12
73/22
77/25
81/27
64/17

High

F/C
86/30
108/42
76/24
68/20
89/31
91/32
95/35
100/37
73/22
70/21
65/18
89/31
89/31
101/38
85/29

Ww

on eo

CATISLAND
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 74° F/23°C

O



aslo elshohe
V. HIGH EXT.

MODERATE | HIGH



o|1|2

LOW







The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Pe

High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht. (ft.

Tod 753am. 23 1:55am. 0.2
ev 8t9pm. 28 1:46pm. 02
Tuesd 833am. 23 2:35am. 0.2
meseey gs7pm. 28 22pm. 02
Wednesday2.12a.m. 24 3:12am. 0.2

senesOVo34pm. 28 3:08pm. 02
Thursd 950am. 24 3:48am. 0.1

mse 10-09 p.m. 27 3:48pm. 02
ST MLCT
Sunrise...... 6:26 a.m. Moonrise .... 7:47 p.m.
Sunset....... 8:04 p.m. Moonset..... 5:36 a.m.

Last New

Full First

Jul. 7

Jul. 15 Jul. 21 Jul. 28

SAN SALVADOR

MONDAY, JULY 6 2009, PAGE 7C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

Bea Sie

= (fl (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

[CL aS













High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 76° F/24° C

QO

LONGISLAND
High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

2

MAYAGUANA
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 77° F/25° C

CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS

RAGGED ISLAND
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 73° F/23° C

Low: 77° F/25°C

High: 94° F/34° C

GREAT INAGUA .

High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 79° F/26° C

iF

Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.

High = Low W High Low W WASSAU ‘Today. Sat5-10Knots O-2Feet 10-20Miles 82°F
F/C F/C F/C F/C Tuesday: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F

Acapulco 88/31 78/25 pe 89/31 79/26 S FREEPORT Today: S at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F

Amsterdam 70/21 56/13 sh 65/18 57/13 s Tuesday: _§ at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F

Ankara, Turkey 85/29 58/14 s 86/30 58/14 ¢ = ABACO Today: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F

Athens 88/31 76/24 t 91/32 75/23 s Tuesday: __§ at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F

Auckland 57/13 50/10 c 5613 48/8 pc

Bangkok 88/31 79/26 t 89/31 78/25 t 1 5 7 B F

Barbados 87/30 76/24 s 86/30 77/25 pc

Barcelona 82/27 68/20 t 75/23 65/18 pc hati binatcindd

Beijing 95/35 72/22 pc 97/36 73/22 pc

Beirut 79/26 76/24 s 80/26 76/24 s

Belgrade 90/32 68/20 t 87/30 66/18 t

Berlin 78/25 59/15 sh 75/23 58/14 sh

Bermuda 82/27 75/23 pc 80/26 71/21 pc

Bogota 66/18 46/7 c 6417 47/8 t

Brussels 72/22 50/10 sh 6417 56/13 4

Budapest 87/30 63/17 t 90/32 64/17 t

Buenos Aires 63/17 50/10 pc 66/18 44/6 sh

Cairo 99/37 76/24 s 100/37 75/23 s

Calcutta 90/32 79/26 t 94/34 84/28 +

Calgary 60/15 50/10 t 6417 46/7 t

Cancun 91/32 73/22 pc 90/32 76/24 sh

Caracas g0/26 71/21 t 81/27 71/21 t oa

Casablanca 78/25 64/17 s 77/25 63/7 s

Copenhagen 68/20 56/13 c 69/20 58/14 sh

Dublin 6417 54/12 6 66/18 52/11 sh

Frankfurt 77/25 58/14 t 72/22 58/14 sh

Geneva 79/26 58/14 pc 70/21 54/12 sh

Halifax 66/18 52/11 sh 66/18 52/11 pc

Havana 90/32 75/23 s gos2 742at) pes

Helsinki 66/18 48/8 pc 68/20 50/10 c = Rain

Hong Kong 86/30 77/25 t 86/30 77/25 t L*, 4 Flurries -

Islamabad 109/42 81/27 s 112/44 82/27 s BE Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and

Istanbul 92/33 73/22 s 90/32 73/22 s ive] ~ eval Temperature bands are highs for the day. :

Jerusalem 89/27 62/16 s 85/29 62/16 s orecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mange.

Johannesburg 56/12 38/3 pe 59/15 40/4 s : 4 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s /i00sl/110s)

Kingston 88/31 79/26 r 89/31 78/25 r 10s [iis oe 10s 20s [30s") 40s

Lima 70/21 58/14 s 71/21 58/14 s

London 70/21 54/12 t 68/20 55/12 r

Madrid 90/32 61/16 pc 93/33 63/17 pc

Manila 88/31 78/25 t 86/30 77/25 sh a es i im IC AN = IN st u RAN ‘é =

Mexico City 77/25 53/11 t 77/25 54/12 s ; 1

Monterrey 106/41 76/24 pc 110/43 76/24 s

Montreal 75/23 61/16 sh 66/18 61/16 t

Moscow 5713 44h 6 68/20 50/10 pc

Munich 76/24 53/11 t 71/21 50/10 t

Nairobi 78/25 55/12 pc 76/24 55/12 pc

New Delhi 102/38 88/31 pc 102/38 90/32 pc Y ou 4 B e B lo

Oslo 62/16 57/13 sh 63N7 55/12 6 nN wn

Paris 74/23 55/12 sh 73/22 54/12 sh

Prague 75/23 57/13 sh 76/24 54/12 pe Away y A | | UITIC “ane

Rio de Janeiro 76/24 65/18 pc 76/24 68/20 s

Riyadh 102/38 77/25 s 102/38 79/26 s

sie 85/29 65/18 3 «85/20 63/17 s Or you can rest easy knowing

St. Thomas 91/32 82/27 sh 91/32 79/26 s that yo have excellent insurance

San Juan 71/21 = 36/2 s 66/18 32/0 s “4

San Salvador 86/30 74/23 t 85/29 74/23 t coy aah no mar which

Santiago 61/16 39/3 pc 62/16 39/3 s .

Santo Domingo 85/29 75/23 sh 87/30 73/22 pc way e win OWS.

Sao Paulo 72/22 58/14 t 73/22 58/14 s i

Seoul 88/31 68/20 s 77/25 64/17 + a tT

Stockholm 68/20 52/11 pc 68/20 54/12 sh Nobody does it better.

Sydney 59/15 50/10 s 59/15 50/10 pc

Taipei 95/35 79/26 t 94/34 77/25 pc

Tokyo 81/27 72/22 82/27 72/22 pc

Toronto 71/21 55/12 t 68/20 54/12 t

Trinidad 90/32 70/21 r 82/27 68/20 t :

Vancouver 67/19 58/14 sh 65/18 56/13 sh (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Vienna 78/25 65/18 pc 75/23 60/15 sh oe — oon

Warsaw 74/23 61/16 s 80/26 59/15 t

Winnipeg 73/22 51/10 pe 68/20 51/10 t Tet (242) 357-4204 Tete (242) 22-2662 wea 20

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace





Full Text
{)

Mim lowin’ it

92F
81F

SUNNY

The Tribune ~€

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009



HIGH
LOW

Volume: 105 No.185

PRICE — 75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)







nen HF

InSsIG

the stories Ls



Body of murdered
woman discoveret

Police investigate
whether victim was
sexually molested

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigating
whether the murdered woman
found wrapped in a sheet off
Eastern Road may have been
sexually molested before her
death.

The Caucasian woman
whose badly decomposed body
was found dumped in a bushy
area near Fox Hill Creek on
Saturday evening is thought to
have died over a week ago and
been dropped at the roadside
on Friday night or Saturday
morning.

Police have not yet con-
firmed her identity, the cause of
her death or circumstances sur-
rounding her murder.

But Superintendent in charge
of the Central Detective Unit
Elsworth Moss said detectives
are close to identifying the
woman as she has a distinctive
tattoo across her lower back.

He did not speculate about
her age, whether she was
Bahamian, a foreign resident

*except red tagged & net items

or a tourist, but said she has
been linked to missing person
reports and he expects to speak
to her family and confirm her
identity tomorrow.

The woman was fully dressed
in blue jeans and a green top,
and wrapped from head to toe
in a sheet, when she was dis-
covered by walkers exercising
in the area just after 6pm on
Saturday.

Mr Moss said she had been
dead for at least seven days
before she was dumped in
overgrowth near the waterfront
at the bottom of Fox Hill on
Eastern Road, New Provi-
dence.

Mr Moss said: “We certainly
believe the body was dumped
there because persons walked
in the same area on Friday
night and there was nothing.

“Someone saw it on Satur-
day morning and didn’t pay
attention to it and on Saturday
afternoon the police were
called.

“We have an idea of who it

SEE page eight

Great selection ="
of independence
items: hats, flags,
bags & umbrellas ~s





Turks constitution suspension

CARICOM Heads of
Government continued to
lend their support against
the suspension of the con-
stitution of the Turks and
Caicos Islands during
their summit meeting in
Guyana over the week-
end.

Representing the

Bahamas at this summit in
Georgetown, Guyana, was
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-

ham who flew to George-
town on Thursday
evening.

While these heads of
government focused their
attention primarily on
immigration matters, a
joint statement was
released on Turks and
Caicos as follows:

“The Member States of the

SEE page eight

Bahamasair flight grounded
after warning light on takeoff

A BAHAMASAIR flight bound for Fort Lauderdale was ground-
ed in Nassau last night after a warning light came on midway down the

runway on takeoff.

Passengers had earlier been forced to vacate the plane, scheduled to
leave at 6.30pm, due to “mechanical difficulties” but were soon told

they could get back on board.

Several passengers then described a small puff of smoke coming from
underneath the wing before the plane moved. Minutes later the plane
was forced to return from the runway with the pilot saying he wasn’t
comfortable flying after the warning light came on just before takeoff.

Many of the passengers were said to be upset with several saying they

would never fly Bahamasair again.

Passengers who didn’t want to stay the night were told another

plane would be available at 10.30pm.







SS SS



Police officer
in hospital
after attack

by thugs

Confrontation

at gas station

Alastair Grant/AP

MARK KNOWLES and Germany's
Anna-Lena Groenefeld pose with
their trophies after winning their
mixed doubles final against Lean-
der Paes of India and Cara Black
of Zimbabwe, on the Centre Court
at Wimbledon.













By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER falling short in
both singles and men’s dou-
bles over a span of more
than two decades, Mark
Knowles’ name is finally
inked on a title at the presti-
gious Wimbledon Tennis
Tournament.

On the final day of com-
petition at the 2009 Grand
Slam in London, England,
Knowles and Anna-Lena
Groenefeld of Germany
came up with the perfect
combination to win the
mixed doubles.

Before a crowd of
Bahamian supporters wav-
ing their Bahamian flags, the
number nine seeds prevailed
with a 7-5, 6-3 win over top
seeds Leander Paes of India
and Cara Black from Zim-
babwe.

“I always envisioned
myself being a Wimbledon
champion,” said Knowles in

SEE page 10





























By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A POLICE officer is
recovering in hospital fol-
lowing a confrontation
with a group of violent
thugs at the Texaco gas
station in Mackey Street
on Saturday night.

Southern Detective
Unit officer Ricardo Fer-
guson 447 was with two
reserve police officers
when he came across a
group of men vandalising
the pumps and damaging
cars.

The off-duty officers
approached the group
only to be set upon by the
hooligans.

Mr Ferguson received
head injuries and reserve
officers Ferguson 708 and
Pratt 782 attended to him
while they alerted police.

But the men got away
in the car they were trav-
elling in together, and the
driver has not yet been

SEE page eight

Officer may be
questioned in
connection with
armed robbery

of jewellery store

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A POLICE officer may be
questioned in connection with
the second Sunday afternoon
armed robbery of a downtown
jewellery store yesterday.

According to reports the
police officer may have acted
as a lookout in the robbery of
the Breitling Boutique on Bay
Street at around 12.30pm yes-
terday, but this has not yet been
confirmed by police.

Staff at the store, located
between Parliament and Char-
lotte Streets, were forced to
hand over hundreds of dollars
worth of designer watches when
a robber threatened them at
gunpoint.

It was the second armed rob-
bery of a Bay Street store with-

SEE page eight

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

Mini Famous Bowl « Roll = tte Drink

LOCAL NEWS

a add
HAIR aa TE

4" Block Was $1.58
NOW $1.50
6" Block Was $1.72
Now $1.60
8" Block Was $1.86

THE TRIBUNE



0 In brief

Man ilies after
falling from tree

A 53-YEAR-OLD man
died when he fell from a
Breadfruit tree in The Bluff,
Eleuthera, at around 9.45am
yesterday. Police are investi-
gating the incident.

Error in BEC
billing process

BEC customers received
two bills for the month of May
owing to a technical error in

the corporation’s billing
process.

An accounting adjustment
was then made resulting in a
second bill being generated.

Customers who have

Ir. Twister Combo

Now $1.69

Delivery
JBR and take
advantage of Charges On

these summer Block
savings! was 15¢

NOW 10¢

Jk Teeter * Requiar Prive + toe Drink received two bills for May
2009 are advised to only pay
the bill dated June 3.

The Bahamas Electricity
Corporation apologises for
any inconvenience caused.

If you have any queries or
concerns contact the customer
service department on 302-
1680 or 302-1170.

I Snacker Combo

snack = Requir frie * Thor Drink

Chicken Deal ia ee

Ut)
ie teh
PHONE: 322-2157

7 Supplies

IPO Chicken « Rall = Requar Fries = dar Drink

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SPOT TALL - THA
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REGULAR

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a . - + -
Se . aad
WEATEALL WARIMARA gs oe = a
OVEN ROASTED CHICIOEN BREAST | re « ore
ITALIAN BUT + THRMED BREAST / 7 = . ee , ae ee 5

HLAGE FOREST Hill

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!
AT PARTICIPATING STORES

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Ask your
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Minister
Pecommencds
a Catholic

Charities Fund

A CATHOLIC
Charities Fund
was recom-
mended by
Labour Minister
Dion Foulkes at
the Fourth
Degree Toast &
and reception of Dion Foulkes
the Knights of Columbus on
Friday.

Mr Foulkes made the sug-
gestion to Archbishop Patrick
Pinder and the Roman
Catholic community during
his speech at the Hermitage,
the Archbishop’s residence
on the Eastern Road. Mr.
Foulkes was representing
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, who is attending the
Caricom conference in
Guyana.

While the minister praised
the contribution of the
Catholic Church and the
good work of the Knights of
Columbus, he asked the
Church to consider establish-
ing a Catholic Charities fund
similar to the Archbishop’s
Annual Appeal.

However, the Catholic
Charities fund would also
draw on resources from non-
Catholics to serve the needs
of all regardless of religious
affiliation.

He said: “It is my sincere
belief that a Catholic Chari-
ties agency and fund would
be an innovative vehicle to
expand your social outreach,
while providing you and the
nation with additional
resources to help meet some
of the social assistance and
development needs of our
people.

“As minister of social
development I would be hap-
py to discuss this matter with
Archbishop Pinder whose
commitment in this area con-
tinues a fine tradition of
social witness by the Roman
Catholic community.

“Yours is a powerful moral
voice both as the leader of
your community and in your
own right.

“The nation and the Gov-
ernment of the day needs to
hear more voices of faith and
reason and justice and mercy
championing the defence of
human dignity, whether the
matter is one of social, eco-
nomic or restorative justice.”

Mr Foulkes said he is guid-
ed by the tenets of the
Church’s social tradition,
including the principles of
human equality, solidarity,
care for the poor and the vul-
nerable.

Government initiatives
such as the contributory
unemployment benefit
scheme directing around $7
million in relief to those who
have qualified for the benefit,
and social services embody
these tenets, he said.

A programme to retrain
1,000 recently displaced
workers also will be launched
by government in conjunction
with the youth programme,
Self Starters, which trains and
microfinances young entre-
preneurs seeking to start their
own businesses.

He said: “I am proud that
even in the midst of severe
economic and social disloca-
tion and pain, as a country
we are still making great
strides in social development
and social assistance.

“This is indeed something
to toast and celebrate, ever
mindful of the work still to
be done.”

Mr Foulkes asked the
Catholic Church to become
more involved in current
affairs such as budget negoti-
ations as government makes a
number of moral decisions.

He said: “The national
budget is not simply a docu-
ment filled with numbers, it is
essentially a moral document
which details national priori-
ties and how the government
of the day, guided by certain
values and obligations, nur-
tures and defends human dig-
nity, however haltingly,
imperfectly and faultingly.”



Crash victim tries to steal
car of Good Samaritan

A GOOD Samaritan who
stopped to help a man injured
in a serious car accident had
to then fight off the injured
man as he tried to steal his
car.

Pedro Ermilis and his girl-
friend pulled over when they
saw a grey Honda Saber hit
a garbage can, a guard rail
and flip over narrowly missing
a nearby home at around
12.30am on Sunday in Faith
Avenue.

As Mr Ermilis got out of
his car to check on the driver,
the latter climbed out of his
wrecked vehicle, which was
sandwiched between the
guard rail and a row of ficus
trees.

He then ran over to Mr
Ermilis’s 2000 Chevy Impala
where his girlfriend was wait-
ing and forced himself in as
she jumped out of the car.

Mr Ermilis then got in to
prevent the man from stealing
it and the two men struggled
for control of the car as it
sped off over the hill and hit a
utility pole around 500 yards
away.

Witnesses said the driver of








ABOVE: Mr Ermilis’s 2000 Chevy Impala which hit a utility pole.

the Honda Saber, registration
21853, had hit a car in the
Texaco gas station at the junc-
tion of Faith Avenue and Sir
Milo Butler Highway and had
sped away as the other driver
gave chase.

The car chase ended when
the vehicle following lost con-
trol, witnesses said.

Police have launched an
investigation. Anyone with

any information which may
assist should call Crime Stop-
pers on 328-TIPS (8477).

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380-FLIX
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 5





LOCAL NEWS

Spirit Airlines buys Air Jamaica

Flag raising commemorates
Bahamas Independence



PARLIAMENTARIANS
assembled in Rawson
Square to participate in the
national flag raising ceremo-
ny. Seen (I-r) are National
Security Minister Tommy
Turnquest, Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux,
Health Minister Dr Hubert
Minnis, State Minister for
Culture Charles Maynard
and Senate President Lynn
Holowesko.

GOVERNOR GENERAL
Arthur Hanna and Deputy
Prime Minister and Minister
of Foreign Affairs Brent
Symonette at the national
flag raising ceremony.



A FLAG raising ceremony
in Rawson Square commem-
orated the Bahamas 36th
anniversary of Independence
on Friday.

Members of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force paraded the national
colours before crowds of
Bahamians from all walks of
life. Also present for the cere-
mony were Governor Gener-
al Arthur Hanna, Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette, Members of Parliament
and local dignitaries.

Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette delivered
the Independence 2009 mes-
sage from Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham.

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Spirit spokeswoman Misty Pinson was con-
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Prime Minister Bruce Golding has said
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Spirit is privately owned and flies to 36
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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

. Mingle f With She ingles

‘Saturday July 18th
8:00 pon until

Whyndam Nassau Resorts

NASSAU SINGLES

SPEED DATING

Call: 341-8596 for Tickets

Looking for a few good man!

Kingsway Academy High School Invites
qualified applicants for the following
teaching positions for September, 2009.

e Spanish

e French

e Art and Design

e Music

Successful applicants must:
Be born again Christians, with
minimum qualifications of a
Bachelor’s Degree in the
appropriate subject areas
Have a valid Teachers Certificate
Be willing to participate in
Extra Curricular activities, etc

Application Forms can be collected from
the Human Resources section at the
Business Office, Bernard Road,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Tel. 242-324-6269 / 324-6887

Deadline for Applications:
Friday, July 17, 2009

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PUBLIC
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IN AN EFFORT TO IMPROVE OUR PATIENT
SERVICES AT THE PRINCESS MARGARET
HOSPITAL. WE WILL UNDERGO
RENOVATIONS TO THE ENTRANCE AND
TRIAGE AREA OF THE ACCIDENT &
EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT.v

WE ASK THAT PERSONS VISITING THE
DEPARTMENT ENTER THROUGH ~ THE
PHARMACY DEPARTMENT ENTRANCE AND
CONTINUE ONWARD - THROUGH THE
ENTRANCE OF THE ORTHOPEDIC CLINIC.

MANAGEMENT APOLOGIZES FOR’ ANY
INCONVENIENCE CAUSED AND ASK THAT
THE PUBLIC COOPERATE WITH US DURING
THIS TIME.

SIGNED: MANAGEMENT


THE TRIBUNE





Strengthening Canada-Caricom relations

insight

By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a consultant and
former Caribbean Diplomat)

SEEING Jamaican guest workers
on a farm in Canada recently
reminded me of the close relation-
ship that has always existed between
Canada and the Caribbean.

Canada’s guest-worker pro-
gramme for farms is as important to
Canadian farmers, who need the
labour, as payment for the work is to
the many Caribbean workers.

There is little hassle over this pro-
gramme. It has clear rules and guide-
lines which are strictly observed for
the most part about the treatment
and living conditions of workers, and
it is clearly understood that, at the
end of the period, the workers return
to their homelands.

In the result, Canada’s agricul-
tural produce is harvested and not
wasted, and Caribbean workers earn
money that helps them and their
dependants to survive when they
return home. The relationship could
not be more mutually beneficial.

It is this sort of mutually benefi-
cial relationship that Caribbean
countries and Canada should be
striving to establish in many other
areas. But, it is a relationship that
might have to stop short of a Free
Trade Agreement (FTA) or Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) which is now under contem-
plation by the two sides.

This is sad because had the
Caribbean negotiated an EPA with
Canada before it did so with the
European Union (EV) last year, the
terms of the agreement may have
been more generous to the
Caribbean countries and they could
have been used as the basis for the
negotiation with the EU.

In this connection, the Caribbean
might have ended-up with two EPAs
that benefited them instead of the
full EPA with the EU in which they
will be at a considerable disadvan-
tage as its terms evolve. It should be
recalled that the terms include even-
tual free access the Caribbean mar-
kets for EU companies that will be
required to be given “national treat-
ment”. In addition, EU companies
will be able to bid for contracts,
including government ones, on an
equal footing with domestic compa-
nies.

And, of course, over time tariffs
have to be removed from EU goods
entering the Caribbean markets and
this will remove whatever little
advantage is enjoyed by domestic
producers.

Earlier this year, writing about
Canada’s trade relationship with the
Caribbean Community and Com-
mon Market (Caricom) countries, I
recalled that under the existing
CARIBCAN arrangement
Caribbean countries enjoy duty-free
access to the Canadian market for
83.2 per cent of their exports, but
even so trade in goods with Canada
is relatively small for the Caribbean.

For Canada, trade in goods with
Caricom countries constitute a mere
0.02 per cent of its total trade. There-
fore, whether or not Canada con-
cludes an FTA with CARICOM
countries is neither here nor there for
Canada economically.

Canada would like to conclude an
FTA or EPA with Caricom coun-
tries because it has a strong free
trade position globally, and an FTA



WORLD VIEW

with Caricom would be symbolical-
ly important.

But, as Professor Norman Gir-
van has pointed out, any EPA with
Canada would have to use the EPA
with the EU as a baseline. Canada
cannot now accept any lesser terms
than has been accorded to the EU.
For their part, Caricom countries
cannot afford a further EPA of the
kind signed with the EU, and espe-
cially not in the midst of a global
financial crisis which is hurting their
economies.

In the context, even though Cari-
com countries have reportedly
agreed a mandate for their joint
negotiations with Canada, now may
not be the most prudent time to pur-
sue it.

Nonetheless, the relationship with
Canada is too valuable to leave it
unattended in a meaningful way.
Canadian banks dominate the Cari-
com domestic financial sector, and
they constitute the majority of the
offshore banks in Barbados. Fur-
ther, Canadian firms are heavily
involved in tourism, oil exploration
and gold mining in the region.

Against this background, and
until an EPA with Canada could be
considered meaningfully, there are
still many areas of cooperation that
Canada and Caricom could mean-
ingfully pursue.

Amongst these could be: Invest-
ment promotion and protection
agreements with CARICOM coun-
tries; Tax Information Exchange
Agreements with CARICOM coun-





tries; Double Taxation Agreements
with CARICOM countries; Coop-
eration agreements with CARICOM
countries in relation to drug traf-
ficking; Agreements with CARI-
COM countries for the provision of
temporary labour in certain skilled
or unskilled areas.

Such agreements could help both
sides since Canadian investment into
Caricom countries would be pro-
moted and, once there, be protected;
double taxation agreements would
also encourage investment from
Canadian firms that would not fear
being taxed twice; cooperation
agreements on drug trafficking could
provide Caricom countries with
training and equipment that they
need to fight drug traffickers and
this would help to retard escalating
crime in the region while curtailing
drug trafficking into Canada.

And if there were agreements on
the provision of skilled and unskilled
labour, the practice of poaching
Caribbean doctors, nurses and teach-
ers could be regulated with Canada
making a financial contribution to
tertiary education in the region. In
this way, Canada could have a reli-
able source of qualified people, but
the institutions could train enough
people to ensure that Caricom coun-
tries still have a pool to cater for its
own needs.

Separately, Canada could contin-
ue its aid programme to the
Caribbean which, in a statement in
February this year, it listed as a pri-
ority. And that aid programme

SIR RONALD SANDERS



should have both regional and
national components directed at
deepening the regional integration
process and tackling areas of social
need from which international finan-
cial institutions shy away.

As a matter of urgency, Canada
could provide Caricom with techni-
cal assistance and financial help in
establishing a pan-Caricom financial
services regulator. Recent global and
Caribbean experiences have shown
that Caricom needs such regulation
and Canada, whose banks survived
the toxic assets of the US and
Europe, were effectively regulated.

There should also be a real effort
to make Canada-CARICOM con-
sultations meaningful and produc-
tive at the level of foreign ministers
and prime ministers. Maybe there
should be a structured format of
biennial meetings of Prime Minis-
ters and a meeting of Foreign Min-
isters in the in-between years as is
now the case between Caricom
countries and Britain.

Deferring a Free Trade Agree-
ment should not delay strengthening
the Canada-Caricom relationship.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

in a week as Little Switzerland
staff had been confronted by a
gunman who made the same
demands of them at around
the same time last Sunday.

But this week quick-footed
police of the detective unit of
Central Police Station, in East
Street, were fast to respond
and ran after a suspect to
apprehend him moments after
the robbery.

Two Breitling watches were
recovered as well as an imita-
tion firearm. A man was
arrested in connection with the
incident.

And police are investigating
suspicions that a police officer
may have been acting as a
lookout in at least the latest
robbery.

Police suspect the two rob-
beries — Little Switzerland last
Sunday and Breitling this Sun-
day — to be connected.

Superintendent in charge of
the Central Detective Unit
Elsworth Moss said: “We are
dealing with one person right
now and we are trying to gath-

Officer may be questioned in connection
With armed robbery of jewellery store

er information to confirm
whether this is so, but we are
not sure yet whether the police
officer was involved.

“We have good reason to
believe the robbery this week
and the robbery last week are
linked.

“It would have been totally
unusual and brazen if the same
person who went there last
week returned again almost
the same time this week, if that
is the case.

“But we are going to get
more information to find out if
we can link the two robberies.”

Mr Moss said he is not con-
cerned about crime escalating
in downtown Nassau as he
believes the two robberies
were isolated incidents.

He added: “We have
increased our visibility in Bay
Street, and we are hoping this
arrest will deter others from
attempting to commit crimes

COMMONWEALTH BANK

2009 SCHOLARSHIP

in the area.”

Mr Moss said the number of
armed robberies in New Prov-
idence has decreased in recent
weeks, barring various street
robberies over the last two
weekends.

A number of street rob-
beries were committed across
New Providence this weekend.
In most cases thieves threat-
ened their victims with knives,
Mr Moss said.

A 15 year old was robbed in
Flamingo Gardens, Nassau,
when he was accosted by two
men with a knife who intimi-
dated him into handing over
his Oakley sunglasses.

Police are appealing to the
public for information to assist
investigations and anyone who
may have any information is
asked to call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477) or call police on 911 or
919.

Commonwealth Bank is offering Scholarship Awards to Bahamian
students to attend The College of The Bahamas.

Caricom chiefs stand
against suspension of
Turks constitution

FROM page one

Caribbean Community reiterate their view that
respect for the rule of law, representative democ-
racy and integrity in public life are fundamental
elements of good governance to which they all
strongly adhere. Accordingly, they were deeply
disturbed by the adverse findings of Turks and
Caicos Commission of Inquiry into possible cor-
ruption or other dishonesty in relation to past
and present elected members of the Legislature.

“The Caribbean Community continues to hold
fast to the view it expressed in its statement on the
situation in the TCI on March 24, 2009 that sus-
pending the Constitution of TCI and its democ-
ratic institutions and resorting to direct rule by the
colonial power are not the most effective tools to
bolster good governance and effective adminis-
tration in the territory.

“The Community therefore regrets that the
intervening period was not used more profitably
to find solutions that would avert the threatened
constitutional and democratic dislocation. In this

Police officer in hospital
alter attack by thugs

regard, the rejection by the governor of the pro-
posal of the new Premier to allow the people of
TCI to elect anew government which could have
adopted and implemented the measures required
to improve the administration of the territory
and strengthen integrity in public life was, regret-
tably, a lost opportunity. The people of the Turks
and Caicos Islands and their ability to govern
themselves in the long run will benefit far more
from strengthening their administrative and good
governance processes through their own efforts
than by the administrations through the governor
under direct rule.”

Following the now infamous commission of
inquiry into the neighbouring islands Queen Eliz-
abeth II has signed the necessary consents that
will dissolve the parliament of the Turks and
Caicos islands and leave power with the crown
colony’s British governor for up to two years.

The country’s former premier Michael Misick
has already been dismissed from office and is
expected to face criminal charges with four other
former ministers over allegations of corruption
following the commissioner’s report.

Body of murdered
_ Woman discovered

Applications are available at any Commonwealth Bank Branch or at FROM page one

The College of The Bahamas, Financial Aid & Housing Department, FROM page one

2nd Floor, Portia Smith Building. is, but we need to contact a
located. family member so they can

APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED TO:

Mr Ferguson was rushed to Doctor’s Hospital where he is cur-
rently detained, Superintendent Elsworth Moss said.

give us some information.”
Assistant Superintendent

in charge of the Homicide
Division Leon Bethel said:
“We are trying to find out
who she is, how she got
there, and what was the
cause of her death. We are

One man has been arrested in connection with the incident.

Police are appealing to the public for information which may lead
to the apprehension of all those involved in the attack.

If you have any information which may assist investigations call
Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477) or call police on
911 or 919.

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR
FINANCIAL AID & HOUSING

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
P. 0. BOX N-4912

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

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share
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Plugs * Champion Spark Plugs and
many more.

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Dowdeswell Street * Tel: 322-2434, 322-2082
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS



Police hand hold
Beat Retreat

THE ROYAL Bahamas Police Force
Band stage their annual Beat
Retreat in Rawson Square yester-
day.



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where life is Ses ant people stall care






Telephone 322-8493

ODESSA GARDEN'S FIRST SALEIN
WE ARE CELEBRATING INDEPENDENCE!!!
Antique and Vintage Books, Silver Items, Vintage
Tablecloths, Hats, some in Independence colours.
Crochet Blouses and Skirts, Dolls, Vintage and
Collectible. CD's, Books for Children,
Antique and Vintage. Old Quilts, Chenille

Bedspreads,

Murphyville, 2nd Right from Sears Road. |

Beatrix Potter, LLadro, Cheese

Dishes. Many other items we can't list them alll!!!

a

Come and See. BO
25% to 50% off

Starts today until Independence Day

Top of the Line
Performance Vehicles.

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be ee ee er a Ie J/ ae

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yreflex Star Motors is the Exclusive
Authorized Dealer for Mercedes-Benz,
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> New & Used Cars & Trucks

> Sales, Parts & Service

Call us today at 325.4961

Visit our showroom on Wulff Rd!

Fax: 323.4667 / Open Mon-Fri, 8am-Spm
Wulff Road, P. 0. Box W 9123, Nassau

KIDZ Cry

INDEPENDENCE

ai 7Sale Starts |
nday, July) 6th - Saturday, July 1 1th.

Montrose Avenue and Oxford Street
(2 doors North of Multi-Discount)
P.O. Box N-1552
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 323-3460
Monday - Friday - 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Saturday - 9AM - 5PM

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or email: jobs@theplusgrp.com

We thank all applicants, however only thase

selected For an interview will be contacted,


PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

RBC

RBC

Royal Bank
_of Canada

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

(201) Leds #17 & #18 Crown Aller-
ments, Love Hill Settlement. An-
dros, Containing a two-storey 1s
Apgeraised value: 5004000

(00) Lois #1 & #2. Block 4 with
a parcel situated between Lot #1,
Block 3, containing a 4 bedroan
condominium —Sunset View Villas,
West Bay Street. Appraised valor:
Sy oO (Hl

(434) Lot #27 of Village Albetiment
#14 in the Eastern District, contain
ing resikbence situated on Denver
Street off Parkgate Rox in the Ancts
Ta Constibuency, New Providence.

Property size 2500 sqt) Building size
44h oy ft. Appraised valuc |

400) Property situated in Calabash
Bay on the Eland of Andros, 75" x
180" and containing thereon a small
prcery store 480 sql. and an in-
complete 3 bed 2 bath house 408)
sgl. Aungenaised value: 865,000

(301) Lot #2 in Ieheck 4, Steward
Road, Coral Heights East Subdivi-
dion situated i Western District a
New Providence, approx, sioc 1,80K)
sq). fi. with a split level containing
hee bed, two bath, living, dining
& family roma, Kitchen are anil-
ity room —apprax, siee of building

2,658 sqtl Appraised value: S422 752

(702) Lot #20 with residential prng-
erty located Skyline Heights.
Appraised value $280,000

(02) Lot of land 45 S43 150% 150
on Ciperns t lighway ust south of
Palmetto Point with a two storey
stone building containing t two apart

ments. Each unit ha 3 bedi? 1/2
bath, kitchen, living roe and 4 liner
closets. Appraised value; S267 208

(00) Lit #14 sipuated in the setie-
mene of Love Hill on the bland of
Aniros totalling 20.4KK) sqft Property
COMMAS & Divo Sleey 5 bedinoarni,
4 bathroom residence. Appraised
value S105 A000

(105) Lot containing 2 stoney' bldg.
with thee beck evo and a halfbath

(702) Undeveloped lots # 4A, 16,
17, 18 and 19 located Chapman
Estates, West Bay Appraised sale:
$348,000

POL) Undeveloped lot #144, Sea-
fan Lane, Lacayan Beach Subdivi-
alon. Grand Bahaina, 1ATS0 eget
Agpraised value: TRA

665) Vacantlotes located Eleu-
eo Island Shores, Seaside Drive
Section B Bkeck #15, Elewthera,
Bahamas. 9,691 sqft, Appraised
value: 327,621

402) Lot 49, Aleck 7 Aberdeen
Drive, Bahamia West Replat Sub
division, Freeport, Grand Bahama,
consisting of 12,100 sqit.
Agpralied value: $51,000

AON Vacant property located
Bahamia South. Bheck 16 lot QA,
F recport, « Amn Bahama consist-
ing of 24.829,20 soft. Appraised
Value: $52,000

65) Vacant Lot #9 (1) 40605 sqit)
altuated in Mango Lane Secthon
"EB Block #15, Eleuthera Island
Shores, Eleuthera,

Agpralied value: $5,109

904) Vacant residential Lote 63
(S00 sqft} Crown Allotments
lacated Murphy Town, Abaca,
Agpraised value: $18,000

(08) Vacant Single Family Lot 45

COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE

Tel; 242-5 6- AR
(BOW) Mrs, Monique Crawlard
(B00) Mr. Jeneme Finder
(P02) Mr. Brian Kineewles
(BO) Min, Warde Pratt
(B05) Mrs. Tiffany Simms O'brien
(BG) Mrs. Lois Hollis
(BOT) Mr. Lester Cox
(BON) Mrs, DaShann Clare-Paul
(210) Miss Lalaige Gardiner
(B11) Ms, Ladia Gardiner
PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel; 242-322-4426/9 or
242-502-300

(201) Ms, Nicola Walker

(202) Mr, Robert Paniry

(205) Mirs, Anya Major

residence, are 30 x Ab situated Bai-
ley Town, North Bimini
Appraised value $235,000

(OL) Let# 18 in Sandilands Allat-
ment on the western side of Cross-
wind Thoad benween Seabees Lane
and Pineyvard Aoad in the Basterr
Distro of The bland of New Proy-
idence-The Bahamas, containing
single stancy private residence com-
posing the following: covered eniry
porch, living ream, dining room,
Wiichen, laundry noon, family nam,
siding area. 4 beclpooons. 2 bathe
and patio. The total area of banal is
approximately 7G) square feet.
Appraised value: $205 426

(0.10 Tae parcels of land containing,
21, UA sq.ft. situated on the seuth-
ern side of East Shiney Street ane
100 feet weet of its junction with
“Shirk” in Lhe Eastern District, New
Providence, Situated thereon isa
Cras Station and Ave Tepair Sheng.
Appraised value: $799,497

(BOL) Lot 2b? locabed Village Allat-
mer with fourex,
Appraised value: S500 (0

TL) Lot of land having the wumber
16 in Block mumber bi in Section
Three of the Subdivision called
and knew 2s Sea Breese Belated
siuated in the Raster District
Mew Prvidence. Property comtains
a luree bed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: S277 000

CAL) Lot of und being bot number
Lin Bleck number Mhon a plan of
dlotents laid ous by Village Estates
Limited and Ged in the dept of Land
& Surveys a8 auunber 142 6B ariel
siuabed in the Eastern District al
New Providence, Property conbaine
Thinee sed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: $165,110}

6S) Lot # O18 in Golden Gates
Estates #2 Subdivision situate in
the South Western District of the
bland of New Providenor Contain ng
asliegle shorey privabe pesicenmce 3
bedroom 2 bath, Prager y approx.
size 6,000 sqft Building approx size

Block #5 Unit #1 Devenshine
Appraised valive $20,000

B12) Vacant Geminercial Lot Nor
2A, Block 60 Bahamia Subdivision
Vl containing 3 acres located Free-
port, Grand Bahama,

Appraised value: $750,000

LOB) Vacant Single Family Loe 45
Block F Bahama South Subelivi-
dion. Appraised value $45,700

569) Vacant property located in
Subdivision called “Gulmerville"
being a portion of Let #47 and a
Portion of Lbete57, Appraised value;
§24,01M)

54) All that piece papcel or lor
of land simate in the secdemvenc
of lames Clatenn on the lelanal af
Elewhera one of the Islands of the
Commanwealth of the Bahamas
measuring appre 10,000 sq. Ft
Appraised value TBA

S68) Allthat piece parcel of lot of
land being Lot No, Lo? in the Sub-
division known as "EXUMA HAR-
BOUR" to the bland of Great Exuma
measuring 10,0005, Ft. Appraised
vale $20, 000000.

202) Vacant ket ofland contain-
ing 41.164 soft, Lote, Lowe Estate,
Phase 1. 2,200 £L south of West Bay
Sireet, Western District, New Provi-
dence, Appraised value $165,000

NASSAU AAD BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-8700

TOW) Mr. James Strachan [rea
(702) Mir. Antonia Eyma
(S01) Ms. Thyra fehnson
S04) Mrs. Alicia Thompson
MACKEY STREET BRANCH

Ted: 242-393-3007

(G00) Ms. Cherelle Martinborougl
JON EB KENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH

Tel: 242-325-4711

400) Wirs, Renea Walkine
(402) Nirs. (handra CGillbem
PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE

Tel: 242-393-7506 /8
(S01) Mr. Jason Sawyer
(500) Mr. Dwight King

(506) Ms, Patricia Russell
CABLE BEACH BRANCH

Tel: 242-327-017?

(466) Mirs. Winifred Roberts
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel: 242-502-5170 502-5 1,00

RBC > HELPING YOU SUCCEED

a meroyalbank. lu Lipa

et TET]

eee

2400 sq 0 Appraised value: $173,176
(20S) Lot B - 60 fic 115.7% fit situ-
ated onthe north side of Shell Fish
Tho ad. being (he thin bol west of Fire
Trail Road and east of Hamsier Fool
with a ane ball duplex resicderuial
prenuises. Appraised value: THA

SL) Lot #32 containing 4 bedroom
Zbath coment: structure located
Triana Shores Harbour bland, E leal-
thera, Property siee Ox 1:

120 leet Appraised value: $332, 3

(M01-N) Single | Farnily Teesi-
dence-810 sqft, 2 bed, bath Let
#9 Block #1 Eastville Subslivisian
Eastern District, New Providence,
Appraised value: 565,000

S10) Lott? Madeira Park, a small
subdivision on the outskirts of Treas-
ure Cay, Abaco having an area ol
Sb square feet residence comtain-

ing a concrete hock structure wilh
aqeiall shingle rool comprises of
lure bexbrooins, tw hahaa,
family reom. living room, dining
rene, atl kitchen. Appraised value:
$147,000

(S69) Property situated on Wil-
lias Lane al Keenp Road, Mew
Providence, Bahamas containing
a fwo-sterey house and an ageart-
men building consisting of 1H
Sql Appraised value £104,000

(569) All that paece of land being Par-
orl #3 and Parcel #4 situated on ihe
South side-of Prince Charles Drive,
hiew Providenoe, Bahamas comiain-
ing a commercial building housing
ho slap Space on the proaind Elosnir
and Thpee shop 3 paboe inn Che cece
loot with alange aorege area in ihe
rear, Total ance P-e00 sq f
Appraised value: 535,650

(S65) All that pieoe, parcel or land
having an appHrocimabe area of 2 MM)
aQit situated on the Western she of
Blue Hill Road about 70 fit North of
Peter Street and about 15 ft south
al Laid Street in the Southern Dis-
trict at Mew Providenoe, Bahamas
congining a commercial building

VACANT PROPERTIES

(202) Vacanthot of band containing
L786 acre, situated eastol Know-
les Dove. apprexdimately 1420
it. exuthward of Harald Read in
the western district of New Prov-
idence, Bahamas. Appraised value:
§ 170M)

(S03) Vacant property consisting
af Lot #84 siniated inthe Freep-
ort Ridge Subdivision, section #1,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Baha-
has Appraded vale: TRA

(S05) Ten (10) acces of land situ-
ated on Wieds Cary, knran as Little
‘hace, between Coopers Town and
‘Cedar Harbourin hace, Bahamas,
The property 6 undeveloped with
a view of the sea from both the
North and Souch side. Appraised
Value: $1,078,750

(S69) All that plece parcel ov lot
Wand Lot? 977, Pinewood Gear-
dens Subdivision, Southem Dis-
Trict, New Providence. Appraised

value: TRA

(one) All that plece parcel of lot
and land on the Island of Great
Exuma sttuabed about lO 1¢2 miles
Northwestwardly of George Town
which said place parcel or bot of
land is #10750 Bahama Sound
CLA.E 10,900 sqft.

Appraised value: 265000

(008) All that piece parcel of lot of

OFFICERS

ea i,
(T1T}

[i24)}

(T25}

(565)

ey

Mrs. [nenid Sineon

Mrs, Nancy Swaby

Ms. Deidre King

Mrs. Faye Higgs

Me Marguerite fahmscr
Mrs, Catherine Davis
(564) Airs. Vanessa Senet
NASSAU INT'L AIRPORT

Tel: 242-577-7179

(433) Mis. Suosette Hall-Moss
LYFORD CAY BRANCH

Tel: 242-362-4540 of 242-362-4007
(1LO1-N) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson
GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR, ELEWVTHERA
Tel: 242-352-2858

(02) Ms, Nicole Evans
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel:242-3553-2200

(01) Mis. Velkderine Laroda
ANDROS TOWN BRANCH

Tel: 242-360-207 |

Mrs. Rose Bethel
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO

heusine a two bedore bath util
on the top floorand astore on the
first floor. Appraised value: $154, (Mi)

(S69) All Chat piece, parcel or het
if land situated on Cowpen Road
(L000 feast of dhe Faith Avenue fire
lian) in the Seuthern District ol Mew
Providence, Bahamas containing
ads ipihe: PATO COMprising of
two ~ 2-berdineoms L- “Hatha apart
ments. Appraised value; $150.00

(400) All that pancel of het of Varied
being Lots #10 ame UL in Block 29
at Coconut Grove Subdivision, com-
laining ashapping plas. The boo is
Lrapeziun in share, 6,585 square
feet Appraised value SSC), Ooh

(560) Lot of land #2 Sea View Sub-
division, Russell Island, Spanish
Wells, Property size 11,323 sigit,
budlding size. 36 sq Mt containing
S bedrooms, 2 bath, living room, ani
eal-in kitchen, dining ronan, laun-
bry nonin, comened pooch, a cae car
parage, and a covered water tank.
Appraised value 5254.00

S01) Lod? S$? block # Triana Shores
containing 3 bed 2 bath front oom,
dining room, & kitchen. Concrete
amichine, 2640 aq ff wooden
deck 42 16sg fi. property S600 sqft
Appraised value: 5448645

(901) Lor“ Barrack Street, Harlsour
Idand comtainitg a2 storey concrete
Iruilding with 4 bed 4 bath, dining
room & kitchen -Building 2534.56
Saft rape rty bevhat sig

Appraisind values 5478228

S10) Property comtaining Consbo
‘Millenium 0". Linit A- 101, building
57, Phase 1, 2 bedroanss, 3 bath-
ren living penn, dining room,
ulility chisel & patio Sibwabed in
Le area bnew as Bieini Bay Be-
sort, Bimini, Balharnis

Appraised value - 465,000

(OU) Singhe Story tri-plex buikding,
one 2 bedrooms and two | bed-
non jocabed on a multi-family Lot
Nod, block 4, Shirkey Lane, sectien
1, Bahama Reef Yacht & Country

land designated as Lot Number 563
on a plan of a Subdivision called
or known as Bahama Highlands
04. 11,22341 sqft Appralaed value
$87,000

(201) Single Family residential Lot
No. 11703 Kahana Sound Subd
Number 11 West, Great Exuma
hase: appre 1] OAWOT sey Et

Appraised value $15,000

(201) Mult family Lor Ne. 1o -
Southeast Conver of Mandarin
Drive, Super Apple Road. Sans
Souci Sudy. Size: 14,368 sq ft
Appraised value $163 40000

(201) Single family resadential Lot
No. 11698 Bahama Sound Subd.
Number 11 West, Great Exurma.
Size: approx, 10.4263q ft Appraised
Value: 515,008)

(569) Allihat pice) parcel or ket of
land being Lot #1 lecated in Block
3 in the Subdivision known 3 East-
crn Estates situate inthe Eastem
Districtaf the island of Mew Provi-
dence. Property agyprox. Bd) sg.
* Appraied value THA

(564) AU that piece parcel or bet
of land located on Marigold Hoadd
in the Subdivision known as Real

Actes. Lot is approx.$455 sq, ft,
Appraised vilue $93,010.

(569) Allihat piece parcel orketaf
land being Lot #152 located in the



lub Subdivision, Freepcrt Grand
Bahama. Property siee is approx
12 1 sq. ft.

Appriised value 3348,000

(08 Low 42 Crown Albotowenis
located Murphy Tina, Alsace with
die being 10,200 sq. Containing
Aone siency house with 4 bed!
bath - Concrete Block Structure -
Appriised value. $200 000)

(S68) All that piece parcel or lotaf

land being Lot #39 in Use residen-
ilk’ zoned areaol Highbaur Park
Subdivision in Uhe Eastern District
tf New Prvidence, Balarnas Ap-
prax. land size & CK sy It. Proxpesty
contains a 3-bedronm/2-bathroam
aes soe being bid sq. ft.
Appraised Valwe 3.14 1,000.00

(08) Lott 23 becabted in the Sub-
division of Spring City, Abaco with
Siac bring BYES fel] hi, COMtELnINng a
ine storey Wwoiden stricture house
with 3 bed! 1 bath of TORS Say ML
Apprised value. 360,000

(S04) Simele storey triplex, situabedl
on Lot 615, Mermaid Boulevard,
Golden Gates #2 in the Western
District, New Provideror, Tero - two
boon, one bacon units and
one - ne bedroom, one bathroan
unit. The property is sored as Multi
Family Tesicential, oeasurinmg 9,092
aq. fee with the living area mes-
uring 2,792 34 11.

Appraised value $374,192

(201) Duplex Lot #25 situated am
Faith Ave. North (Claridge Estates)
- sit being 7,.d>4¢ sq feet. with du-
ples thereon

Appraised value - TRA

(200) Lot of land situated om Fire
Trail Rod being a partition of Chad
don Alot 4 New Provinlenoe, Ba-
lamas conmlaining bowrilause apart-
INET Wnt anid twa proposed wits
(ommpleted as ist

Appraised value $237,714

(201) Lot containing residence situ-
abed in Carey's Subdivision - Lot B,
Block B Appraised Value $100,000,

Subdivision krawn 2a West Ridge-
land Park situated in the Sauth-
en District of the island of New
Providence. Property appro 4000
sgh Appraised value $55.00

(008) An undeveloped watertront
lot lanal beling Lot Sumber 12032
with a sie of 10,600 sq.ft, in the
Bahama Sound of Bauma Subdi-
Vielon Nurnber 11 West situated in
the Leland of Great Exuma one of
the Islands af the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas.

Appraised value $224,000

(M8) Partially developed parcel
of land being 10,0000 sq.ft. situate
abut the eastern portion of The
Forest Estate inthe viciniry of the
setdementsed Southside and The
Fereest being Lot Nunmibor 4603 tn
Bahama Smid of Exumna 6, Exum
The Bahamas.

Appraised waluc 323,000

(724) Vacant land at Lowe Beach,
Western Distict of New Providence
composing a portion of “LoveEs-
tale containing | acre.
Appraised value $225,000.00,

(HO) Lord 2 vacant kine 30,000 say
ft located Chapman Estates Sub-
division on West Bay Street with
open zoning. Appmised value
S600,000.



Tel: 242-267-2420

(908) Mrs. Joyce Riviere

(08) Mrs, Sylvia Poitier

(9.10) Miss Cyprianna Williams
RIMINI BRANCH
Tel:242-347-B091

(105| Miss. Ganiatu Tinubu
GRAS, LONG ISLAND

Tel: 242-397-0101

(100) Mrs, Lucy Wells
EXUMA BRANCH

Tel: 242-356-3251

(O08) Ms. Jocyelyn Mackey
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-352-664 1/2

(101-F) Ms, Garnell Frith
(102) Ms, Elaine Collie

(103) Mrs, Damita Newbold-Cartwright

(108) Ms. Sylvie Carey
SPANISH WELLS

Tel: 242-393-4159 1 or

242-435-4145
(560) Mir. Walter Caney

REC Royal
SEM mee tT ifs]



THE TRIBUNE

Title joy
for Mark
Knowles

FROM page one



an interview with The Tribune
yesterday after their victory. “I
really didn’t expect it to come
first in mixed doubles, but I will
celebrate it just as if it was in
the men’s doubles.”

Having played Wimbledon
since 1990, Knowles reached the
second round in singles in 1992,
1994, 1995 and 1996 and had his
best showing in doubles in 2002
when he and his former part-
ner Daniel Nestor got to men’s
doubles final in 2002.

Knowles, who turns 38 on
September 4, has won the Aus-
tralian Open in 1994, the French
Open a year later and the US
Open in 1997 with Nestor, who
repeated as the doubles cham-
pion with new partner Nenad
Zimonjic on Saturday.

But Wimbledon has been the
one missing piece of the puzzle
in Knowles’ storied career that
has eluded him since he began
playing on the international cir-
cuit in 1992.

Knowles and his Indian part-
ner Mahesh Bhupathi got elim-
inated in the men’s doubles in
the quarter-final.

e See the Sports Page for
more details.

Bahamas real
estate today

Or iwiiatMiiE KK een



TIME TO MAKE
LEMONADE

HOME values at the high-
er end have declined, and
buyers are seeing the best
deals in many years. While
unpleasant for some sellers,
price declines increase
affordability for buyers, so if
you've been renting, now is a
fantastic time to turn that
monthly payment into equi-
ty.

Interest rates have inched
up, but more affordable
housing yield a formula that
should put you in a home
that you own for payments
not too much higher than the
amount you are now paying
for rent. Not to mention that
at a lower purchase price,
you should enjoy some good
appreciation over the com-
ing years.

Take matters into your
own hands and buy yourself
some peace of mind.

Cayman
residents
struggle to
recover from
‘08 storm

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

THE CAYMAN
ISLANDS has raised about
half the money it says it
needs to rebuild homes
destroyed by a Category 4
hurricane last year, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The government says it
has built 50 homes in Cay-
man Brac and plans to
build nearly 100 more for
impoverished owners who
lacked insurance. The
director of the islands’
national recovery fund says
the government has raised
about $1.2 million of the $3
million needed. Mark
Laskin said Friday that he
has approved 140 of the
212 applications received.

Hurricane Paloma caused
an estimated $15 million in
damages when it hit in
November.

The hurricane season
began June 1 and runs
through November.
THE TRIBUNE



LC
An economic model

for the Bahamas

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

"Les week marks the
beginning of a new fiscal
year, with world economies facing
an ever encompassing economic
drought and the Bahamian gov-
ernment having to initiate a stim-
ulus package to stand in the gap
because global credit markets
remain in a state of near paralysis
and the country faces a revenue
shortfall while hardly being able
to boast of having any indigenous
capital.

In this seemingly deep and
long recession, governments
across the globe have been pass-
ing stimulus packages to soften
the impact of the crisis and create
new jobs, save existing ones and
maintain, as is the case of the
Bahamas, an expensive bureau-
cracy. In the US, for example, the
stimulus package is more than
$800 billion. Although the pur-
veyors of socialist doom and
gloom are quick to denounce of
government’s stimulus initiatives,
how else do they propose to with-
stand a global financial meltdown,
especially in an economy such as
ours that appears to have been
built on sand?

According to the Central Bank
“the outlook for the Bahamian
economy remains weak through-
out 2009, with developments
expected to be heavily influenced
by the responsiveness of the glob-
al economy—particularly the
US—to the stimulus measures
implemented by monetary and
fiscal authorities.

Frankly, with reduced con-
sumer spending by tourists and
some locals, and investments by
foreigners and Bahamian busi-
nesses currently in the doldrums,
the only area left to stimulate
gross domestic product (GDP) is
government spending. In the
short term, while the stimulus
programme will increase the fiscal
deficit and the national debt, it
will provide for the implementa-
tion of a government social safe-
ty net, improvements in public
sector infrastructure, create
numerous construction projects
and employment, spawn business
opportunities and initiate eco-
nomic activity.

As the economic storm surges
and continues to corrode the
Bahamas’ badly prepared, waning

YOUNG MAN’S VIEW

tourism and financial services
industries, Bahamians must raise
their standards of service and
improve their work ethic and our
government, along with social
leaders and the private sector,
must seek to draft a national plan
and an updated and revised eco-
nomic model for the country in
order to ensure our long-term
sustainability. The contracting
local job market and the closure
of businesses has caused the
unemployment rate to raise to a
troubling 12 per cent. Recent
unemployment figures reveal that
more than 15,000 Bahamians
have either been job hunting
without success or have been dis-
couraged from finding a job dur-
ing the last four years and, as of
May/June, there are thousands of
new job seekers having just grad-
uated from high school/colleges.
In order to contain the bal-
looning deficit and strengthen the
economy, the government must
continue to streamline expendi-
tures and even more, invest in
teaching citizens new skills and
encourage entrepreneurship. Two
of the main factors of production
are human capital and entrepre-
neurship, with the former refer-
ring to heightening of the knowl-
edge and skills of workers
through education and experi-
ence and thereby widen employ-
ment opportunities and, as is the
case with the latter, to develop
new ideas, take financial risks to
develop their ideas and coordi-
nate the production and sale of
goods and services. Consecutive
governments seemingly have
failed to notice the value of
Japan’s re-emergence after being
obliterated by a US-dropped
nuclear bomb during the Second
World War. Japan exemplifies
the importance of developing
human capital in order to build a
sound, flourishing economy. Why
doesn’t the Bahamas, like Bar-
bados, allow for deserving stu-
dents to study at the College of
the Bahamas free of charge?
Furthermore, the deficit can
only be curtailed if the Bahamian
government takes serious steps
to implement an efficient system
to collect hundreds of millions of
outstanding tax dollars. More-



over, a heightened revenue col-
lection drive must be taken by
government-run companies such
as BTC, BEC and Water and
Sewerage, and the government
must seek to severely penalize
those persons engaging in tax
fraud or who have evaded cus-
toms and other tax collection
agencies. The Customs depart-
ment, the country’s chief revenue
earner, is thought to have lost
millions per annum due to duty
avoidance, corruption and erro-
neous practices. The government
must immediately move legisla-
tion to close tax loopholes and
revenue leakages, particularly to
mitigate against those unscrupu-
lous Bahamian companies that
use phony invoices and practice
under-invoicing and/or set-up
wholly-owned US “shell compa-
nies”, to cheat the government
and honest taxpayers of millions
of dollars per year.

The antiquated Customs Man-
agement Act must be amended
to protect the revenue base in
Freeport, loopholes in the Busi-
ness License Act must be closed
and casino and local/foreign-
owned real property taxes must
be collected. According to a 2007
Auditor General report, there
was nearly $400 million in out-
standing real property taxes owed
to the government. This amount
has no doubt increased and, if the
reigns of revenue collection are
tightened, the country could
unquestionably achieve a budget
surplus.

According to an International
Monetary Fund (IMF) report, it
was also suggested that the
Bahamas’ government “strength-
en administration of existing
property and trade taxes, review
FDI (Foreign Direct Investment)
incentives and shift the tax base to
domestic consumption—endors-
ing the adoption of a broad-based
VAT.” In widening our tax rev-
enue base, a value added tax
should be implemented locally.
This form of taxation has been
adopted by 140 countries around
the world and would represent a
prime candidate for the Bahamas.
Frankly, this form of taxation—

SEE page 12

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 11

The Corporation wishes to advise the public that
as a result of a technical error in our billing
process, some customers may have received two
bills for the May 2009 billing period. As a result of

this error an accounting adjustment was made
resulting in a second bill being generated.
Customers are notified that the lower of the two,
dated June 3 2009, is the correct bill for payment.

Should you have any queries or concems please

contact our Customer Service Department at
302-1680 or 302-1170.

The Corporation apologizes for any inconvenience
caused.



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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Butler’s Funeral Homes
& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Harriet Ophelia Cartwright, 78

of Hawthorne Road and
formerly of Cartwright’s,
Long Island will be held
on Wednesday July 08,
2009 at 400p.m. at St.
Matthewis Anglican
Church, Shirley and
Church Streets.
Officiating will be
Venerable Keith N.
Cartwright; assisted by
Revid Dr. James B.
Moultrie and Rev’d Don
Haynes. Cremation will
follow.

She is survived by one adopted son; Terrance, three
grand children; Roxanna of Fort Worth, Texas, T. Kirk
and Gavin Cartwright, her brothers; Lacton, Michael,
Calvin “Gus” and Thalburg “T.C” Cartwright, sisters:
Lucy Cartwright and Katherine Treco, brothers-in-law;
Thomas Treco, Mitchell and Emery Cartwright, sisters-
in-law: Beryl, Verona, Eva, Ellerith and Ovina
Cartwright, Lillian “Lilla” Knowles and Thelma “Tally”
Burrows; fourty nephews, fourty- seven nieces, one
hundred and thirty grand nephews, one hundred and
twenty grand nieces , numerous great-grand nephews
and nieces and many other relatives and friends
including: Father Earnest Pratt, Patricia “Pat” Knowles
and Deborah Cartwright. Care givers: Mrs. Francis
Ledee, Mrs. Shirley Miller and the Staff of The Persis
Rodgers Home for the Aged, Members of St. John’s,
Buckley’s, Long Island and the People of Cartwright’s,
Long Island.

The family would like for those planning on attending
the service of Mrs. Cartwright to wear only bright
summer colours, no black ,white, navy blue or dark
colours.

In lieu of flowers the family has requested that donations
be made to the Persis Rodgers Home for The Aged on
Hawthorne Road P. O. Box N 7350, Nassau, Bahamas.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’ Funeral
Homes and Crematorium at Ernest and York Streets on
Tuesday July 07, 2009 from 10: 00 a.m. until 5:00pm
and at the church on Wednesday July 08, 2009 at 3:00p.m.
until service time.



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KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

MR. LESLIE
ANDRE PYFROM,
51

of Oxford Road, Stapledon
Gardens, Nassau, The Bahamas,
will be held at Christ Church
Cathedral, George Street, Nassau,
on Wednesday, 8th July, 2009 at
11:00a.m.

The Very Reverend Patrick L.
Adderley, Dean of Nassau and
Reverend Father Michael Gittens,
Priest Vicar, will officiate and
interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road, Nassau.

Mr. Pyfrom is survived by his wife Jennifer, daughters, Janay Pyfrom
and Yamel and husband Vasco Marshall; granddaughter, Eliana
Marshall; mother, Thelma Pyfrom; aunt, Rosamund Thrower; sister,
Suzette and her husband Richard Uriasz, and sister, Emily Pyfrom;
nieces, Nicole and Ashleigh Uriasz; father-in-law, Robert Thompson,
mother-in-law, Delores Thompson; brothers-in-law, Ricardo Thompson
and Donovan Neymour; sisters-in law, Beth Carey, Clarie Neymour,
Daniella Thompson; uncle, Oswald Pyfrom; aunts, Ernestine Jones,
Evelyn Klapp, Helen Degoumois, Thelma Brice, Shelia Brice, Conchita
Pyfrom and Eunice Green; his nephews, Bryant Carey, Damien and
Dylan Neymour; other nieces, Darryn and Drew Neymour, Jaiden,
Janayah and Jalani Thompson; grandniece Zion Carey; cousins,
Patricia Smith, Mary and Susan Culmer, Chuck Simms, Wilfred and
Cecile Knowles, Carl and Gladys Brice, Joan Nixon, Aaron and
Carol, Mizpah, Israel, Pauline, Paul, Gilbert Brice, Douglas, Valerie,
Deborah, Ruth, Ernestine, Carol, Freddie, Rudolph Pyfrom, Ken and
Brian Albury, Tyrone, Craig, Tracey Pyfrom, Ronald Jones, Dianne
Havey, Brian, Tiffany Thompson, Rosine Moutardier Ann Mosotti,
Karen and Pamela Klapp, Stephen Conliffe, Joann Heggan, Michelle
and Madeline Degoumois, Bernadette Davis, Ricardo, Enrique Pyfrom,
Mario, Michael, Marina Edsel, Carmie, Anthony Simms, The Archer’s,
The Swaby’s and The Cheney’s, Imperial Park Family: Jacqueline,
Enoch Pedro and Anna Maria Roberts, John, Eric, Andrew, Pamela
and John Jr. Godget, Gregory and Sandra Brennan, Dr. Clive, Joseph
Gaskin, Henderson Burrows and Family, The Thrower Family (U.K.)
and Ramon Kelly, godchildren Nyjo and Shandia Brennen; friends:
Chris Justilien & Members of Colors Entertainment and Junkanoo
Organization Family, Alfred & Vernique Stubbs, Lynette Barry,
Omar & Gerona Bernard, Stephanie Knowles &The John Bull Family,
U.S. Embassy Family, the CB family, Chauntez Wilson, Lydia
Lochan, Kweku Symonette, Melissa Lightbourne, Rachel Peters,
Ruvania Deveaux, Desmin Bullard, Kristi Bullard, Jackie and Deyar
Knowles, Craig, Paula, Naomi and Blanche, Anthony Bellot, Queen’s
College class of 1974 and The residents of Oxford Road; Stapledon
Gardens, other Family and Friends too numerous to mention.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to help defray the cost of
Janay Pyfrom (Leslie’s daughter) education to Mrs. Jennifer Pyfrom,
P.O. Box S.S. 5061, Nassau in memory of Mr. Leslie A. Pyfrom.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Kemp’s Funeral Home
Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale, Nassau, on Tuesday, 7th
July, 2009 from 10:00 to 6:00p.m.

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FROM page 11

once effectively administered—
would be comprehensive and dif-
ficult for persons to circumvent
since it must be tacked on to all
purchases. As the IMF report
suggests, “sustainable revenue-
enhancing measures, including
VAT, would reduce the national
debt by 30 per cent GDP over
the medium term.”

A corporate tax and taxes on
profits, revenues and/or assets
under management of interna-
tional clients/companies must also
be levied.

Over the years, consecutive
governments have paid lip ser-
vice to development, entrepre-
neurship and empowering citi-
zens. Although legislation such
as the Industries Encouragement
Act, the Tariff Act, the Export
Manufacturing Industries Encour-
agement Act, the Agricultural
Manufacturing Act and the Spir-
its and Beer Act are in place,
there has seemingly been a lack of
support for industries. While
Bahamians are capable of self-
sustenance and engaging in viable
crop production, there also
appears to be a lack of support
in the commercial sector for
Bahamian foodstuffs, in part due
to an inferiority complex that
many Bahamians have seemingly
adopted when dealing with native
produce and successive govern-
ments failing to increase the
import tariffs particularly in sup-
port of items made or grown
locally.

The government must pro-
mote national youth development
programmes and keep young
people focused on making their
contribution to nation-building.
In Jamaica, the government has
demonstrated its faith in that
country’s youth by budgeting for
$3 million to be directed to a
Youth Empowerment Pro-
gramme, with set goals to assist
new graduates with becoming
employed, setting up training
seminars to help them manage
businesses and providing for
youngsters to submit ideas of the
kind of enterprise they wish to
start. Furthermore, the micro-
lending approach adopted by the
Jamaicans for the start up of small
to medium-sized businesses, and
additional monies being set aside
to help create and sustain these
businesses, should be further
adopted by the Bahamas—
although the government took a
similar approach to lending mon-
ey in 2007.

The National Training and
Retraining Programme was a
great initiative undertaken in the
2009/2010 Budget, which also pro-

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poses to provide opportunities
for persons to expand their skill-
sets in areas such as masonry,
wielding, carpentry, tile laying,
day care, customer service, data
processing, computer skills, land-
scaping, electrical works, lan-
guage skills landscaping, electrical
works, language skills and house-
keeping.

As a nation we must move
from an economic model that
seems stuck in a time-warp, which
focuses on year-round tourism
and financial services, to a com-
petitive diversified model that
expands public revenue and lib-
eralizes our economy.

The allocation of venture cap-
ital for entrepreneurs can assist
in the diversification of our econ-
omy and the establishment of
new industries such as food pro-
cessing, consulting and advisory
services, information technology,
fisheries processing, off-shore and
local research and development
setups, canning, pre-packaged
native tea/meals/spices/sauces,
marine farms and exports, cattle
rearing and so on. Whatever hap-
pened to the Domestic Invest-
ment Board? What role is the
Bahamas Development Bank
playing during these floundering
economic times?

In a country of scarce
resources and rampant con-
sumerism, it is high-time that
those Bahamians living beyond
their means and in constant pur-
suit of material possessions most
likely bought on credit— be pru-
dent spenders and heed PM
Hubert Ingraham’s admonition
not to “hang (their) hats higher
than (they) could reach.”

Thus far, it appears that gov-
ernment is demonstrating fiscal
prudence in the management of
the Bahamian people’s money,
so as not to endanger our nation-
al economic welfare and pass on
an unsustainable debt burden to
future generations.

The recent budget exercise
revealed much about some mem-
bers of the Opposition who
resorted to partisan histrionics
instead of proposing constructive
and considered alternatives to
positions put forward by the gov-
ernment.

With the IMF suggesting that
there will be a “difficult transi-
tion period” to economic recov-
ery as it is expected to be much
weaker and slower than in previ-
ous recessions, it is high-time that
certain of our elected represen-
tatives understand that their elec-
tion does not certify them to talk
foolishness for five years.

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THE TRIBUNE



1

MONDAY,





TUL Yeacor 22 00-8

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life



Port accuses
the St George
estate of
‘improper
abuse’

* Responds to claims
over Babak work
permit renewal

* Claims St George

estate owes
companies ‘millions
of dollars’ for
former receivership

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE late Edward St
George’s estate has been
accused of committing “an
improper abuse” by continuing
to “threaten” the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) and Port Group Ltd
over issues such as the renewal
of the chairman’s work permit,

SEE page 4B

6



Draconian’ 10,000% fee rises

may ‘kill’ private airline firms

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

rivate Bahamian air-

lines and charter

operators fear “dra-

conian” increases of
as much as 10,000 per cent in
their fee structure could “kill”
the industry, Tribune Business
can reveal, with the Civil Avia-
tion Department (CAD) plan-
ning to implement the changes
from August 1, 2009.

Industry sources, speaking to
Tribune Business on condition
of anonymity because they were
not authorised to speak pub-
licly, said that under the CAD’s
proposed “across the board” fee
increases, the operator of a five-
seater aircraft flying 50 hours
per month could expect to see a
$13,000 per annum fee rise.

This newspaper was told that
the fee increases include a
tripling or 200 per cent rise in
landing fees at Family Island
airports, the rates jumping from
a current $18.56 per landing to
$56 per landing for a 19-seat
aircraft.

Other fee increases divulged

Credit demand drops 30-40%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CREDIT demand = by
Bahamian consumers has “fall-
en very sharply” by between 30-
AO per cent, a senior banking
executive has told Tribune Busi-
ness, with consumer loans hav-
ing contracted by some $29.49
million year-over-year during
the first five months of 2009.

With Bahamian commercial
banks having collectively writ-
ten off a net $39.8 million in
bad loans during the year to
end-May, and provisions being
made for a further $70.4 mil-
lion worth, Anwer Sunderji,
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) chief
executive, said the industry’s
asset quality would continue to
deteriorate for as long as the
recession lasted.

“Credit demand has fallen
very sharply, by between 30-40
per cent, as Bahamian con-
sumers deleverage and banks
tighten up on credit criteria.
This process is expected to con-
tinue as long as the economy
remains in a downward spiral,”
Mr Sunderji told Tribune Busi-
ness.

Statistics published by the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
last week showed that consumer
loans had actually declined
year-over-year by $29.49 mil-
lion for the first five years of
2009, compared to growth of
$45.82 million in the compara-
tive period.

As for mortgages, growth in

Consumer loans contract
almost $30m year-over-
year, with almost $40m

in loans written-off

this lending category had
declined by almost 50 per cent
during the first five months of
2009, falling to $46.74 million
compared to $92.19 million in
2008. Overall, Bahamian dollar
credit contracted by $16.61 mil-
lion for the first five months of
2009, compared to $154.34 mil-
lion worth of growth in 2008.

For May 2009, consumer
loans contracted by $230,000
compared to a $10.1 million
expansion in May 2008, while
the total amount of mortgage
loans expanded by $7.94 mil-
lion — less than half the $16.84
million expansion in May 2008.

“We expect it to continue to
deteriorate,” Mr Sunderji said
of the commercial banking sec-
tor’s asset quality position. “The
Central Bank is forecasting an
expected improvement in the
Bahamian economy in the latter
half of 2010, and they expect
unemployment to increase fur-
ther.

“With that as the backdrop,
we can only expect asset quali-
ty to deteriorate. So it’s not at
all surprising that the loan
arrears rate is up to just under
14 per cent (13.98 per cent) and

SEE page 7B

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* Bahamian operators say recession ‘wrong time’ for Civil Aviation to implement ‘across the board’ fee rises
* Family Island landing fees triple, with fleet charges increasing by four-digit percentages

* Competition already unfair, with Bahamasair and foreign carriers exempt
* New fees a potential ‘double whammy’, given planned NAD increases

—— ey ~~
Jafar



COMPETITION is already unfair with Bahamasair and foreign carriers

exempt...

to Tribune Business are as fol-
lows:

e Monitoring charge: From a
current $0 to $1,000, a 1,000 per
cent increase

e Fleet charge: For a five

seater Aztec aircraft, this will
go from $0 to $7,000 — a 7,000
per cent increase. For a Beech
19 seater aircraft, the fee will
rise from $0 to $10,000, a 10,000
per cent increase

e Charge to lease a foreign
aircraft: Current: $0. Proposed:
$4,000, a 4,000 per cent increase

e Charter permit renewal:
Current: $500 per annum. Pro-
posed: $1,200, a 240 per cent
increase

¢ Renewal of scheduled per-
mits: Current: $500 per annum.
Proposed: $1,200, a 240 per cent
increase. Both large foreign air-
lines and Bahamian operators,
including small charter compa-
nies, will pay the same rate

¢ Pilot licences: From $0 to
$250 for a six-month Air Trans-
port US licence. From $0 to
$200 for a one-year US com-
mercial pilots licence.

¢ Fuel suppliers to Bahamian
airlines in the Family Islands
will have to pay a tax equivalent
to $0.07 per gallon to the Civil
Aviation Department, on top
of existing government taxes

City Markets retains 25 of 27 staff from closed store

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CITY Markets has retained
25 of the 27 staff displaced by
closure of its Independence Dri-
ve store elsewhere within the
company’s operations, its chief
executive has confirmed to Tri-
bune Business, although seven
workers at its “overstaffed”
warehouse have been let go.

Sunil Chatrani said the 11-
store grocery chain had decided
to downsize its warehouse
because it was overstaffed based
on the volume of goods it han-
dled, the majority of those
affected being part-time per-
sonnel.

The City Markets chief exec-
utive said it was agreed with the

* Releases seven workers from ‘overstaffed’ warehouse
* Resuming direct imports ‘last piece of

puzzle’ to completing turnaround
* Grocery chain ‘still losing money but not to extent

we were’, with all major cost savings realised

union that represents the com-
pany’s line staff that the redun-
dancies would be on a “last in,
first out basis”.

He explained: “We had to cut
our numbers down. There’s only
seven affected. We were over-
staffed based on the through-
put at the warehouse. We had
too many employees at the
warehouse, and the ones we had
to let go are mostly part-timers.
But there are no other staff cuts

to be made.”

Elsewhere, Mr Chatrani said
“only two people out of 27 were
displaced” when City Markets,
as previously revealed by Tri-
bune Business, closed its store at
the Independence
Drive/Tonique Williams-Dar-
ling Highway on June 24, coin-
ciding with the end of the com-
pany’s financial year.

SEE page 5B

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A source close to the
Bahamas Association of Air
Transport Operators, the indus-
try group that represents more
than 20 charter companies and
private islands, questioned why
the Government and CAD
were looking to introduce these
fee increases in such a
depressed economic environ-
ment, especially given that they
had decided against doing so in
2005.

The fees are included in the
Landing, Parking, Tie Down
and Air Navigation Regulations
2005, part of The Civil Aviation
Act. “These things [fee increas-
es] were in fact proposed some
time ago back in 2005,” the
industry source said. “They did
not come into being then

SEE page 6B

—_


























The Embassy of the United States of America
is saddened by the loss of our

Leslie Pyfrom

The Embassy Family mourns his passing
and offers condolences to his family, friends and loved ones.

Thank you for your
trust OF step port
as we Messe’ to b previsle

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edd DOWN pedestal 1

Cavicw

Fouts, of

PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



susie
SR

@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

LAST week, investors trad-
ed in eight out of the 24 listed
securities, of which three
declined and five remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 9,879 shares
changed hands, representing a
decrease of 11,382 shares or 54
per cent, compared to the pre-
vious week's trading volume of
21,261 shares.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
was the volume leader for a sec-
ond consecutive week with
5,338 shares trading hands, its
stock ending the week
unchanged at $5.64.

J. S. Johnson (JSJ) was the
lead decliner, falling by $0.10
to end the week at a new 52-
week low of $10.40 on a volume
of 1,000 shares. Finance Corpo-
ration of the Bahamas (FIN)
traded 1,000 shares, its stock
declining by $0.07 to also end
at a 52-week low of $10.90.

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
traded 2,000 shares, its share
price dropping by $0.05 to end
the week at $5.04.

BOND MARKET

Investors traded the follow-
ing bonds this week:

* $10,000 (par value), Fideli-
ty Bank (Bahamas) Series A
Notes Due 2017 (FBB17)

* $10,000 (par value) Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) Series C Notes
Due 2013 (FBB13)

Pieces of Luggage



The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 788.56 (-5.54%) YTD

BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $1.39 $- 0 -18.71%
BBL $0.63 $- 0 -4.55%
BOB $6.94 $- 0 -9.16%
BPF $11.00 $- 0 -6.78%
BSL $7.92 $- 0 -22.28%
BWL $3.15 $- 0 0.00%
CAB $11.39 $- 0 -18.82%
CBL $5.64 $- 5,338 -19.43%
CHL $2.74 $- 541 -3.18%
CIB $10.38 $- 0 -0.67%
CWCB $3.11 $-0.22 0 38.22%
DHS $1.77 $- 0 -30.59%
FAM $7.76 $- 0 -0.51%
FBB $2.37 $- 0 0.00%
FCC $0.30 $- 0 0.00%
ee $5.04 $-0.05 2,000 -2.51%
FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%
FIN $10.90 $-0.07 1,000 -8.17%
ICD $5.50 $- 0 -10.28%
JSJ $10.40 $-0.10 1,000 -6.31%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%

* $50,000 (par value) Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) Series D
Notes Due 2015 (FBB15).

COMPANY NEWS
Earnings Releases:
Bahamas Waste (BWL) - For
the quarter ending March 31,
2009, BWL posted net income
of $208,000, representing a
decrease of $21,000 or 9 per
cent compared to $228,000 for
the same period last year.
Sales and services revenues

fell by $81,000 to total $1.9 mil-
lion, while cost of sales
decreased by $68,000 to total
$1.2 million. Total operating
expenses stood at $490,000 com-
pared to $483,000 in the 2008
first quarter. Earnings per share
remained unchanged at $0.05.
Total assets and liabilities as
at March 31, 2009, stood at $9.8
million and $1.1 million respec-
tively, compared to $9.6 million

SEE page 8B

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 3B



Major Water Corp work in downtown y——————=a

EXTENSIVE work has to be done on
the Water and Sewerage Corporation’s
infrastructure in the downtown area,
according to the minister responsible for
the utility, with the Ministry of Works
forced to postpone its paving exercises as a
result.

Phenton Neymour, minister of state for
the environment, told Tribune Business
that he could not say what exactly needs
to be done in the downtown area, though it
has been said that the problems stem from
dilapidated sewer lines.

Minister of Works Neko Grant assured
Tribune Business two weeks ago that Bay
Street would be paved in its entirety.

Sources close to the Ministry of Works
subsequently suggested that the depart-
ment considered paving only the street itself

and leaving the area
several feet away
from the sidewalk
unpaved - the area i
typically excavated by ||
public utilities. i

But Mr Grant said
last week: “It would
make no sense to
pave the main Bay
Street when there is
considerable work to
be done by Water and
Sewerage.”

Now, the down-
town area, in much
need of paving after
crews from several government utilities,
including Water & Sewerage, tore into it

Phenton Neymour



recently, will be the only part of a strip
extending from Caves Village to the bridge
to Paradise Island without fresh asphalt.

The major paving programme was under-
taken as part of an initiative to beautify the
main northern corridor before the Miss
Universe beauty pageant in August.

However, Mr Grant said it would not be
a sensible decision to pave the downtown
area for the pageant when the road would
have to be torn up again when the pageant
is over to repair and replace the damaged
infrastructure.

“We wanted to provide a sensible ride
for Miss Universe, but Miss Universe will
come and go and we need to provide prop-
er infrastructure for people who will tra-
verse these roads on an annual basis,” he
said.

Customs cuts
10-day bond to
just five days

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

along so that people will not

clearing motor cars, furniture
and heaven knows what else on

to bring the loopholes to a stop.

JAMAICA AND COMMONWEALTH CARIBBEAN
RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS
2010

Applications are invied from auiably qualified candidates for
two (2) RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS to be dwarded as

follows:

fal The Jamaica Rhodes Scholarship available ta
candidates from Jamaica only; and

iB) The Commonweal Caribbean Rhodes Scholarship,
available to all Caribbean candidates, excluding
Jamaicans

Candidates must have undertaken academic training
aufficiently advanced to assure the completion of a
Bechelors degree by Tet October, 2070.

Married candidates can mow apply
The criteria for selection by the Committees are as followe:-

Proven os infaiectual and Academic
Achievement of a high standard is fhe first
quality required of applicants, Out fhey will
also be required to show integrity of character,
sympatny for and protection af foe weak, fhe
abiiy fo Mad and ine eneygy fo vse ther
fale fo the full

The closing date for Jamaian and Commanvealth
Canbbean Rhodes Scholarships 2070 application is
September 30, 2009 by which date all completed eaniry forms
must be received by the Secretary

The Memorandum whieh contains Delaile of the
Scholarships as well as the Application Form may be
obtained from:-

THE SECRETARY
RHODES SCHOLARSHIP SELECTION COMMITTEE
2? East Street
Kingston, Jamaica
Te: 876-922-5500
or fram

www. modes-caribbean.com

Tribune Business Editor

IMPORTERS of perishable
goods and currency have only
five days from when they take
delivery to submit due entries
and Customs/Excise duties, the
Comptroller of Customs has
told Tribune Business, as his
department moves to turn
around most shipments in 24
hours.

Glenn Gomez told this news-
paper that the formerly 10-day
bond under the C19 entry dec-
laration had been amended and
reduced to five days as of July 1,
2009, seemingly an effort by
Customs and the Government

have to hang around Customs.
We’re making improvements
every day. One of the things I
want to do is implement an
automated system; it’s not what
it should be. That’s some
months down the line, but we’ll
be able to show people that
Customs has really improved.”

On the C19 situation, Mr
Gomez had told Tribune Busi-
ness previously: “The C19 is
now being utilized in the man-
ner for which it was designed
by law, for perishables, gold,

bullion and coins.

“They’ve been abusing that
form, and now that abuse has
been stopped. They have been

that form. Why should I allow
you to abuse that form, take
delivery of goods and not pay?”

Mr Gomez said the vast
majority of items outstanding
before Customs, many of which
dated back several years, relat-
ed to C19 form declarations.
“You can’t have your cake and
eat it too,” he added.

“Everyone wants to get a
freebie, and the Government
has to bear the costs of having
those goods come in and people
do not come back to pay,” Mr
Gomez said.

“There’s just too many loop-
holes in Customs, and it’s time

Whether internally or external-
ly, we have to address these
issues.”

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to enhance cash flow and bol-
ster revenue collection. Previ-
ously, importers of perish-
ables/currency had 10 days in
which to submit entries and due
duties to Customs, but that time
has been slashed by 50 per cent.

Responding further to con-
cerns about the Customs
Department’s move to enforce
“the letter of the law” on the
C19 and prevent it from being
used as a ‘catch all’ to take
delivery of imports without pri-
or payment, Mr Gomez told
Tribune Business: “There is also
in effect a stipulation in the law
where importers, if they desire,
can pay duties prior to the
arrival of their vessel and their
goods.”

With prior payment and sub-
mission of entries, their goods

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And Mr Gomez added: “If = :
they don’t have a bond, or don’t
have perishable goods, there is
still a way that merchants can
have imported goods cleared
quickly to get them in-store.
They can put up a deposit, then
come back with their entries
and reconcile them to the
deposit.”

As for complaints about Cus-
toms’ changed policy and
adherence to the law in relation
to the C19, Mr Gomez said sim-
ply: “If I bring in goods, it is
known I have to pay duty, and I
should not expect to get goods
without paying duty.”

Addressing the concerns of
importers and brokers regard-
ing the efficiency of clearing
incoming shipments, the Comp-
troller told Tribune Business:
“We’ve been turning around
entries in 24 hours, other than
entries with multiple lines and
several pages. That will take a
little longer.”

Companies could leave their
entries and have shipments
turned around within a day, Mr
Gomez said, while persons com-
ing in off the street to collect
imports were being dealt with in
one to two hours, once duties
were paid and the correct doc-
uments submitted.

“There really shouldn’t have
to be any concerns by the aver-
age importer in getting goods
from Customs in a timely fash-
ion,” Mr Gomez told Tribune
Business.

“Tf they pay for their goods at
Thompson Boulevard [Customs
HQ] with the cashier, and then
go to the dock, even that
process has been speeded up.
We’re getting the documents
through the same day in time
for the person’s arrival, instead
of a day or two.

“There’s still things to do, but
the idea is to move the process

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

Bratish Lskomal Falter: Hebel
Marlborough St.. Shop a]

Clearance

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Until the end of July
P.O.Box EE-15827
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Tel: 242-323-1865

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(aN
NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS MORTGAGE CORPORATION
TENDER FOR GROUP HAZARD INSURANCE



The Bahamas Mortgage Corporation is inviting proposals
from insurance companies for the provision of hazard
insurance coverage to contractors and homeowners of
properties mortgaged to the Corporation.

The proposal should be for a three year period 1st
September, 2009 to 31st August, 2012.

Companies interested in submitting a proposal may collect
an information package from The Bahamas Mortgage
Corporation’s Head Office, Russell Road, Oakes Field,
Nassau, Bahamas.

The deadline for collection of the information package is
Friday, July 09, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.



FROM page 1B

Tribune Business can reveal.

A June 4, 2009, letter from
the companies’ external coun-
sel, Thomas Evans, QC, to Fred
Smith, the attorney for the
estate, responded to the latter’s
letters objecting to the renewal
of Hannes Babak’s work per-
mit by alleging that Mr Smith’s
clients had “no proper (or actu-
al) legal role in the GBPA or
Port Group Ltd.”

This position appeared to be
based on the fact that the
Supreme Court threw out the
St George estate’s “oppression”
action against Mr Babak and
the Hayward Family Trust,
although that verdict is under
appeal.

Writing that “the action was
struck out as hopeless and
bound to fail”, Mr Evans wrote
to Mr Smith: “Your clients are
presently indebted to Port
Group Ltd and the GBPA for
several million dollars, as a
result of their wrongful impo-
sition of a receivership on those
companies.

“Whilst yours and your
clients’ personal dedication to
a fundamentally misconceived
cause has been noted, you must
be aware it cannot be otherwise
than an improper abuse for
your clients to continue to
threaten these organisations
with which they have no proper
(or actual) legal role.”

And he added: “We wish to
point out that the estate of
Edward St George is not a
shareholder, director or officer
of Port Group Ltd or GBPA,
and therefore has absolutely no
standing on which to complain
about the internal affairs and
operations of our clients.”

Mr Smith and the St George
estate had objected to the
renewal of Mr Babak’s work
permit due to the fact that arbi-
tration proceedings he had com-
menced previously against
Intercontinental Diversified
Corporation (IDC), the Cay-
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the GBPA and Port Group Ltd,
were still live and could poten-
tially expose the two companies
to a multi-million dollar liabili-
ty.

They had also claimed that
his continued role as chairman,
while arbitration proceedings
were still ongoing, could place
the companies and their Boards
in a potential conflict of interest.

However, Mr Evans coun-
tered that the London-based
arbitration proceedings were
between Mr Babak and IDC
solely. He added that Lady
Henrietta St George, who does
sit on the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd Boards, could “raise
the prospect” of joining the two
companies to the proceedings,
“however misconceived such an
application may be.”

And Mr Evans wrote: “In
relation to your expressed con-
cern for the executors of the
estate of Edward St George not
to be taken to have ‘acquiesced,
waived or consented’ to Mr
Babak’s ‘resumption of activi-
ties’, the point belabours that
which our clients considered the
Supreme Court to have made
plain. The estate has no role in
relation to Port Group Ltd and
GBPA...

“Your clients are obviously
unhappy with the outcome of
the election for chairmanship
of Port Group Ltd or GBPA,
but that does not justify your
clients’ attempts to interfere
with the internal affairs of our
clients.”

Mr Evans also addressed, via
a June 8, 2009 letter, the issue
Mr Smith had raised over Mr
Babak’s work permit renewal
in a document sent to the Prime
Minister’s Office and the Cabi-
net, plus the Department of
Immigration.

In his letter, sent to director
of immigration Jack Thompson,
the Immigration Board and
Fausteen Major-Smith, the
deputy immigration director in
charge of Grand Bahama, Mr
Evans rebutted the St George
estate’s allegation that Mr

THE TRIBUNE





Port accuses the St
George estate of
improper abuse’

Babak submitted incorrect
information on his original 2006
work permit application.

Mr Evans said Mr Babak’s
original appointment was “on
the understanding that his
remuneration would be perfor-
mance-based. Therefore there
was not (nor could there be
any) salary stipulated on the
application as a set remunera-
tion for his work as chairman.

“Tt was never stated that Mr
Babak would not be remuner-
ated for work done. It was upon
this uncertainty that the Immi-
gration Department assessed
the highest rate possible (at this
time) for the permit, $10,000
per annum.”

Mr Babak’s appointment as
chairman was ratified when a
majority of directors voted in
his favour. “It is noteworthy
that Mr Babak was supported
by all members of the respective
Boards of GBPA and Port
Group Ltd (save Lady Henri-
etta St George),” Mr Evans
said.

“Therefore, Lady St George
cannot seek to accomplish by
letter that which she could not
by the laws which Port Group
Ltd and GBPA govern their
internal operations.”

Mr Evans added that Lady
Henrietta was part of the
Board’s chairman’s remunera-
tion sub-committee, which
determined details of Mr
Babak’s compensation.

“Indeed, Lady Henrietta St
George appeared by her proxy
and actively participated in dis-
cussion in relation to the same,”
he wrote. “In addition, Lady
Henrietta St George by her
proxy has since Mr Babak’s
election aggressively participat-
ed in subsequent Board meet-
ings chaired by Mr Babak.

“Therefore, one would
assume that if Lady St George’s
convictions were as passionate-
ly felt as stated in Mr Smith’s
letter, then she would not have
taken a part of the sub-com-
mittee or subsequent meetings
of the Board of Directors.”

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 5B



City Markets retains 25 of
27 staff from closed store

FROM page 1B

Of those not staying with City
Markets, whose parent firm is
Bahamas Supermarkets, one
was pregnant and the other had
decided he “wanted to part
company”. City Markets now
has around 686 staff, and Mr
Chatrani said: “We’re very con-
scious of the employees. At the
end of the day, they’ve been
loyal to us and we want to pro-
vide the level of employment
we provided in the past.”

Meanwhile, City Markets
remains in a holding pattern as
it waits for the multi-million dol-
lar equity capital injection from
its majority shareholder con-
sortium to come through, Mr
Chatrani describing this and the
re-starting of the “direct import’
programme as “the last piece
of the puzzle” in the company’s
turnaround.

He said that while he and the
management team had extract-
ed more than the previously
announced $5.3 million in annu-
alised cost savings from City
Markets’ business operations,
there were no more major cuts
to be made.

On the status of the new
equity financing from investors
in BSL Holdings, the consor-
tium that owns a majority 78
per cent stake in Bahamas
Supermarkets, Mr Chatrani
said: “It’s pretty much the same
as before. It’s all bureaucracy,
the paperwork, and I’m hoping
it comes in sooner rather than
later.”

It is still unclear precisely
what percentage of the new
equity capital will make its way
to Bahamas Supermarkets at
the operating company level,
and what will be retained by
BSL Holdings to meet its own
financial obligations. The major-
ity shareholder has some $24
million in bank debt owed to
the Royal Bank of Canada to
service.

While City Markets’ sales
were “still flat in this economy”,
Mr Chatrani said the business
was holding its ground and had
been “restructured in terms of

expenses”.

He told Tribune Business:
“There’s no more major cuts to
be done now. We’ve made all
the cuts we can. Our issue now
is to get back into the direct
import programme, which will
improve margins and gross
profitability.

Puzzle

“The last piece of the puzzle
is to import on the scale that
we used to. That’s the last piece
of the puzzle to turning this
company around. We’ve
reduced our losses. We’re still
losing money, but nowhere near
the extent we were in the past.
The turnaround will come when
we get into our import pro-
gramme.”

Mr Chatrani previously told
Tribune Business that City Mar-
kets current sources “less than
10 per cent of its product inven-
tory from abroad, a figure that
will increase to 20 per cent once
the direct import programme
restarts. With direct imports,
some 2,900 SKUs (stock keep-

ing units) — chiefly high-end,
high-margin products - will
return to the chain’s shelves on
a more consistent basis, thus
enhancing consumer selection
and price points.

Gross profit margins, mean-
while, which had fallen as low as
17.8 per cent during City Mar-
kets’ 2008 financial year, had
recovered to 25.4 per cent with-
in the last quarter, with the gro-
cery chain looking to get back
to historical margins of 28 per
cent as rapidly as possible.

Mr Chatrani also previously
told Tribune Business that the
financial year 2008 audit’s com-
pletion would “follow very
shortly after” the new funding
was received, as “everything
revolves around the financing”.
Bahamas Supermarkets is pro-
jected, through management
accounts, to have incurred a
$13.429 million loss for the year.

He cautioned, though, that
the audit completion would not
be immediate, as external audi-
tors KMPG would need to test
various assumptions to verify
their conclusions.

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BSI TRUST CORPORATION (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

is presently accepting applications for

TRUST OFFICER

The successful candidate for the position of Trust Officer must have extensive
experience with all aspects of trust administration.

Personal qualities:

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Positive attitude and outlook

Problem-solving skills

Commitment to quality and service excellence
Ability to partner with tam members.

Advise and support the business on trust related matters

Administer a group of Trusts, Foundations & Companies pursuant to respective
goveming documents, regulations and internal policies

Oversee a group of complex chent relationships
Review all governing documents of Trusts, Foundations & Companies for legal
compliance and adherence to internal policies
Liaise with Relationshio Managers, Financial Planners and Clients
Report directly to the Head of Trust

Qualifications:

The candidate must have thorough knowledge of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as intemational practices as they relate to the Trust

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Candidate should possess the TEP designation; bachelors degree:

Minimum of 3-5 years working experience in the trust field. Preference will be
given to professionals who have experienced working in a Swiss Bank or Trust:
Knowledge of the system Viewpoint will be considered as a plus.

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/cumculum vitae

ta:

Human Resources Manager

BSI Trust Corporation (Bahamas) Limited

Bayside Executive Park
P. 0. Box CB-10976
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) §02 2310 or email: ruby. kem@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted,

































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CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Batch Operator

We are looking for a Batch Operator to perform computer operations in an AS/400 &
Windows data centre setting. The position runs batch jobs that support systems
involving day-end processing; monitors performance of all servers, networks,
communications devices, etc; and initiates corrective action as needed.

Qualifications/Experience/Skills:

e 2+ years AS/400 operations experience a plus

e Hands-on experience in batch job processing, monitoring, back-ups

e Experience handling Windows technical issues

e Ability to work well independently as well as in a team environment

e Capacity to handle stressful situations, prioritize workload and perform multiple
tasks concurrently

e Excellent problem solving and troubleshooting skills

e Excellent oral and written communication skills

e Attention to detail

e Ability to learn different technologies between various software packages for the
distribution of data

e Strong work ethic

e Flexible work schedule (2:00pm-10:00pm)

Responsibilities:

e Perform operating and maintenance functions for mid range systems;

e Monitor overnight batch processing and perform print processing as scheduled in
accordance with current service levels;
Provide all aspects of media handling (backup media loading/unloading, dispatch/
receipt of offsite media, etc);
Process in an accurate and timely manner, information in and through the computer
systems including system utilities, production and testing batch runs and quality
control;
Maintain current knowledge of operating procedures and standards;
Safeguard security of data centre equipment, media and data files;
Keep records of hardware down time;
Follow procedures to run job requests from programmer and requester;
Run system and application backups per written run log;
Manage tape retention log;
Test, document and promote software changes in accordance with industry best
practices and standards; and
Participate in, and possibly direct, problem definition and resolution activities

Apply by 6 July 2009:

Send electronic résumé via email to careers@colinaimperial.com
Subject: Batch Operator

or

Send résumé to:

Human Resources Manager
308 East Bay Street

P.O. Box N-4728

Nassau, Bahamas
PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





‘Draconian’ 10,000% fee rises
may ‘kill’ private airline firms

FROM page 1B

because of the potential down-
side to the implementation of
these taxes at the time.

“Now, it’s even worse. They
can’t be contemplated.”

Among the airlines likely to
be impacted are Western Air,
Southern Air, Sky Bahamas,
Pineapple Air, Flamingo Air,
Cat Island Air, and First Choice
Airlines. The source said the
Civil Aviation Department let-
ter informing them all of the fee
increases was received around
Wednesday last week, effec-
tively giving them a month’s
notice, with the implementation
deadline set for August 1, 2009.

Although no reason for why
the increase was being imple-
mented now was given, the pri-
vate airlines believe it reflects
the Government — and Public
Treasury’s — increasing desper-
ation to get their hands on any
available revenue, given the
expanding fiscal deficit and a
national debt-to-gross domes-
tic product ratio that now stands
above 50 per cent.

But the industry source



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

warned that the fee increase
would impact the bottom line
at private Bahamian airlines
during a period when many
were struggling, and could even
affect the ability of some to sur-
vive.

Given that the industry
employs several hundred per-
sons and is a key transportation
avenue linking New Providence
and Grand Bahama with the
Family Islands, not only com-
munities in the latter but
tourism, too, could suffer if pri-
vate airline services are dis-
rupted. At least part of the fee
increase will likely have to be
passed on to passengers in
terms of increased ticket and
airlift costs, thus impacting the
cost and accessibility of a
Bahamian vacation. That is
exactly what Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace, minister of
tourism and aviation, has said
he wants to avoid at all costs.

“You’re looking at a time
when the Bahamian airline
operators have made substan-
tial investments in the expan-
sion of their fleets and acquisi-
tion of new equipment, so many
are spread thin,” the industry

2008

CLE/genNo.00842

Common Law and Equity Division

Between

source told Tribune Business.

“Margins in the airline indus-
try are very thin, so these things
[the fee increases] go straight
to the bottom line. Most of the
operators are very small, five
and seven-seater aircraft with
two planes.

“You’re going to impact
things like crazy. A guy with a
five-seater plane and two pilots,
it’s going to kill him, because
he does not have the margins
to absorb this. It’s going to have
a huge effect, and as you go up
the chain it’s going to get
worse.”

And the source added: “For a
very long time, the Government
feels we’ve been making money
and they want to relieve us of
some of these monies...... We
all live in the real world, but
this is not the time for this.

“This is not the operating
environment to look at increas-
ing fees, and certainly not with
such draconian increases. This
cannot happen in this environ-
ment. The economy is too frag-
ile.

“Tt’s across the board. It’s cor-
porate fees, and it has gone to
every aspect of the operation. It
has gone to the engineer, the
mechanic, the pilots, and
includes the $0.07 per gallon.
It’s just bad news all around.
Obviously, like anything else,

something will have to give, and
we will see a ripple effect down
through the system.”

While Bahamian private air-
lines and charter operators
understood the Government’s
need to maximise its revenue
collections, they suggested that
instead of increasing fees and
taxes upon their industry, it first
should seek to collect the “sev-
eral hundred million dollars” in
unpaid taxes — especially real
property tax — that it was
already owed.

The fee increases on the
Bahamian aviation industry
were unlikely to offset the Gov-
ernment’s fiscal deficit by them-
selves, and the sector source
pointed out that companies
were already competing on an
uneven “playing field’ by virtue
of Bahamasair being exempt
from the very same rises they
were facing. Foreign airlines,
too, are largely exempt.

The source questioned why
Bahamian-owned private air-
lines were being seen as a tax
revenue source at a time when
the Government was handing
out all manner of investment
incentives and concessions to
the likes of the cruise lines via
the Cruise Overnight Incentive
Act amendments.

He also cited the fact that
Bahamasair and all the foreign

NOTICE

NOTICE

LAUDERDALE, FL 33068

is hereby given. that
of 5401 SW 12 STREET APT.,

ROSELYNE DORTELY
108 NORTH, FORT
is applying to the Minister

airlines were allowed to bring
in replacement parts duty free,
whereas his industry was not,
and the 2009-2010 Budget
reforms that allow foreign boat
operators to import replace-
ment parts duty-free into the
Bahamas.

Implementing the CAD fee
increases, the industry source
said, would act as a “deterrent”
to the Association’s efforts to
have private plane owners, who
currently provide unregulated
charter services, to become
“certified and regulated”.

On the industry’s current
financial performance, he told
Tribune Business: “We’re down
across the board and they’re
[the companies] just holding
their own and hoping that
whenever the economy turns
around, they will turn a profit.
Many operations are holding
on.

“Tt’s just an unfortunate time,
and the general consensus is
that we’re hoping the Govern-
ment will reconsider it.”

The source added that the
Bahamian private airline oper-
ators were also faced with a
“double whammy”, given the
Nassau Airport Development
Company’s (NAD) plans for a
23.6 per cent increase in landing
fees, and a 6.1 per cent in park-
ing and other related aircraft



fees, at Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport (LPIA) with
effect from January 1, 2010.

On the CAD fee increases, it
is quite possible the Govern-
ment will argue that the current
fees levied are undervalued and
have not been increased for
some time. Any revenues raised
may also be used to enhance
Family Island airports.

Yet the fact major fee
increases of this nature are
being contemplated is again
likely to raise concern in some
quarters of ‘stealth taxes’, fol-
lowing a Budget in which the
Prime Minister again pledged
that there would be no tax or
fee increases apart from one
case impacting the latter.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



MICHAEL ROKER
Plaintiff
AND
MIGUEL DEAL

Defendant

NOTICE

TO: MIGUEL DEAL
Princess Charles Drive
Nassau, Bahamas

Take Notice that by Order of the Deputy
Registrar, Meeres sitting in Chambers, dated the
23rd day of February, A.D., 2009, it was ordered
that service of the amended Writ of Summons in
this action on you be effected by advertisement

LOCKHART & MUNROE
Attorneys for the Plaintiff

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6th
day of July 6th, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

YES YOU CAN

God got with his instrument and produced the book
“Yes You Can - A Bahamian Plan”.

The world seems to be waiting; every nation it has
touched is positively affected.

Did two leaders missed it, missed it to our
detriment!

We are still here to serve your accounting needs.
For a copy of “Yes You Can” and other services

Contact us at:- M.E. LOCKHART ACCOUNTING
Tel: 242-394-3565
Cell: 242-425-0650
P.O.Box N522

Email: elshagg @coralwave.com

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 3 JULY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,576.90 | CHG -0.39 | %CHG -0.06 | YTD -135.46 | YTD % -7.91
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.04 | YTD -5.49% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHON E:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Security
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.39
10.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00
6.94 Bank of Bahamas 6.94
0.63 Benchmark 0.63
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37
10.18 Cable Bahamas 11.39
2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74
5.50 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.64
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.44
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 1.77
7.50 Famguard 7.76
10.00. Finco 10.90
10.35 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.38
4.95 Focol (8) 5.09
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 9.30
5.50 ISD Utilities 5.50
10.40 J. S Johnson 10.40
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

EPS $
0.127
0.992
0.244
0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240 7.4
0.420 18.5
0.322 33.9
0.794 13.1
0.332
0.000
0.035 B86

Change Div $ P/E
1.39 0.00
11.00 0.00
6.94 0.00
0.63 0.00
3.15 0.00
2.37 0.00
11.39 0.00
2.74 0.00
5.64 0.00
3.11 0.00
1.77 0.00
7.76 0.00
10.90 0.00
10.38 0.00
5.04 -0.05
1.00 0.00
0.30 0.00
5.50 0.00
10.40 0.00
10.00 0.00

Daily Vol.

0.407 13.5
0.952 10.9
0.180 55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

5S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Serles A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FEE17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Change Daily Vol. Interest
700.00 0.00 7%
100.00 90.00 Prime + 1.75%
100.00 9.00 7%

100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%

Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELTON JOSEPH of FOSTER
STRRET, CHIPPINGHAM, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6'* day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Kelly's Team
Security Officers

Kelly’s is seeking mature, reliable, honest
and hardworking individuals to fill the
position of Security Officer.

Prospective candidates must be available to

work evening shifts. Past security experience

would be an asset. This position is ideal for
retired police or prison officers.

We offer excellent pay, benefits
and working conditions.

Interested persons may collect an application
form from the Customer Service counter at
Kelly's House & Home, Mall at Marathon.

No phone calls please

Houseg MonFri - 8:00am - 8:00pm
OME Sat-8:00am - 9:00pm

‘Ss

‘Mucronet

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

Computer Technician

Micronet Ltd, a leading business technology supplier
requires a computer technician to join our Service Team.

* Experience in hardware, networking, Windows based
operating systems amd software.
Professional certifications an advantage (A+, MCSE}
Must have good communication skills
Must be a team player; willing to work with others
Must have cen transportation and cell phone
Great career opportunity, training will be provided.
Salary commensurate with qualifications é& experience

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

52wk-Low Symbol Bid $
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets ¢.92

6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00

0.20 RND Holdings 0.35

Ask $

Last Price
8.42 14.60
6.25 6.00
0.40 0.35

Weekly Vol.

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

29.00 ABDAB 30.13
0.40 RND Holdings 0.45

31.59

29.00
0.55 0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

S2wk-Low
1.3124
2.8952
1.3948

NAV
1.3787
2.8952
1.4750

Eund Name

CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
3.1821
12.9209
100.5448
93.1992
1.0000
9.2511
1.0578
1.0271
1.0554

3.1821 Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
12.2702 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund

93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FSG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

YTD%

Last 12 Months
4.83
-3.18
5.74
-13.90
5.793
0.54
-6.76
0.00

1.72 4.12

2.13 5.78

Div S

-0.57 2.71

1.74 5.54

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

eighted price for daily volume
hted price for daily volume
|g price from day to day
.- Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 3/3/2007
(S41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Weekt -
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meanin oful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of C jelity

ice —

nter price
prior week

EPS $

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

0.000
0.000

Yield %
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
26-Jun-09
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | F@ CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

No telephone calls. Please reply in writing via email (subject

line: Computer Tech.) or fax to

Computer Tech.

clo Service Manager
Micromet Ltd.

PuO). Box SS-62 7)
Nassau, Bahamas

Cy



Email:
Fax:

obsfaimicronct.bs

328-3043

CERTEM

PARTNER
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 7B



Credit demand drops
30-40 per cent

FROM page 1B

non-performing loans up to 7.7
per cent of total loans.

“Banks have had to add to
their loan loss provisions, and
we fully expect we will continue
to have to do so until the econ-
omy starts to recover. Our
expectations of recovery are
consistent with the Central
Bank’s perspective.”

Mr Sunderji said the banking
sector’s ability to recover the
full value of loans provided for
depended heavily on whether
the loan in question was
secured. He added that home
loans secured by a mortgage on
the real estate involved pre-
sented “a very good chance of
recovery. Banks have histori-
cally not made a loss on mort-
gages”.

One bright spot for monetary
policymakers and the commer-
cial banking sector has been the
expansion in sector liquidity,
the amount of surplus assets
available for onward lending
purposes. This stood at a

healthy $538.65 million at end-
May 2009, as compared to
$319.03 million a year ago, after
a $276.7 million increase year-
to-date and $132.74 million
growth in May.

The expansion in commercial
banking sector liquidity is as a
direct result of reduced credit
demand and tighter lending
conditions, which have made it
more difficult for Bahamian
borrowers to qualify for loans.

As for other consequences of
the liquidity expansion, Mr Sun-
derji told Tribune Business:
“You can expect a softening in
deposit rates, which will likely
take place in the next few
months.” While this will do no
favours to savers, Mr Sunderji
said it would be impossible to
“lay-off” the surplus liquidity
build-up in the system without
any impact on spreads.

And foreign exchange
reserves had also “stayed buoy-
ant”, having risen to $758.63
million at end-May 2009, com-
pared to $698.34 million a year
before, after enjoying a $119.97

million expansion in May.
Foreign

The Bahamas’ foreign cur-
rency reserves had been bol-
stered by the foreign currency
borrowings of the Bahamian
government, plus the reduction
in global oil prices and demand
for credit, the latter of which
had reduced import demand
and foreign currency outflows.

The Central Bank reported
last week that almost one in five
(20 per cent) of loans to
Bahamian businesses by com-
mercial banks were in default
at end-May 2009, with total
non-performing loans rising to
7.77 per cent or $468.2 million
of total loans issued.

The total number of loans in
arrears by at least one month
increased by $6.1 million or 0.7
per cent in May, reaching a total
of $847.3 million. Total loans in
arrears increased to 13.98 per
cent as a percentage of total
loans, although the proportion
of delinquent loans - those

between 31 to 90 days past due
- declined by $12 million or 3.73
per cent to $373.3 million.

The Central Bank said: “The
increase in the arrears rate was
attributed to a worsening in the
consumer loans and residential
mortgages portfolios, by 58
basis points and 2 basis points,
to 12.45 per cent and 13 per
cent, respectively.

“In contrast, the commercial
arrears rate receded to 19.83
per cent in May, from 20.61 per
cent in April. In response to
these developments, banks aug-
mented loan loss provisions by
$3 million, boosting the ratio of
provisions to total arrears by 18
basis points to 23.44 per cent.

“This corresponded to new
loan provisions of $10 million,
partly offset by a $6.9 million
net write-off against loans pro-
visioned for earlier. However,
as the growth in non-perform-
ing loans outpaced the increase
in provisions, the ratio of total
provisions to non-performing
loans fell by five basis points to
42.43 per cent.”

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IM THE SUPREME COURT

Cammean Law and Equity Side

200V EOC 1430

IM THE MATTER. of all that poece parcel or Int of
land situated on the Eastern side of Labour Street
approximately | 0) fest South of Hay Street in the
Con stitwency of Grants Town bounded an the North

bry an adjacent het running. thereon (105.00) feet on
the West by Labour Street and running thereon
(22.00) feet on the South by an adjacent lot running.
therean (72.00) feet. The property has an

ANT
iM THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959.
AND

[§ THE MATTER of the Petition of Wilfred James
Thompson

NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that Wilfred James Thompson of Labour Street in
the Island of Mew Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas claims to be the owner of the
unencumbered tee simple estate of ALL THAT pisces parcel or lot
of land srtuated on the Eeater side of Labour Street aporonimately
100 feet South of Hay Street in the Constituency of Grants Town
vounded on the North by an adjacent lot running (105,00) fest on
the West by Labour Street and running tharsan (32.080) feet on the
South by ar a cht kot running thereon (32.00) feet. The property
hae an appa imané ares of (9,360) sqiere feet.
Wilfred James Thomason clalene to be the qaamer on fies sar ple of
the said land free fron encumbrances and has made an application
to ike Supreme Court in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Secrion 3 of the Quicting Tithes Act 1999 co have its tithe to the said
land itstigeted and the nature and extend thereof determined and
declared in a Genificate of Tithe to be granted by the Court in
accordande with the provisions of the said Act
4, plan of thee aid land may be inspected during normal office

hours. if the Tolkewing places

a, The Regietry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JUDITH FLEUREMY
of TREASURE CAY, ABACO, is applying to the

Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why

registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6 day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





Legal Notice

NOTICE
DALI INTERNATIONAL
HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VENTNOR VILLAS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BLUE RANGE
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of July 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JESSIKA LOUIS of SAPPHIRE
RIDGE DRIVE, PRINCE CHARLES, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6" day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.










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RE: THE OPENING OF SHOPS ON
PUBLIC HOLIDAYS

In accordance with Section 3 of the Public
Holidays Act, (Chapter 36), the following day will
be observed as a Public Holiday:-

Friday, 10th July, 2009 - Independence Day

On the said day, all public offices, banks and
shops throughout The Bahamas must be kept
closed, except that shops may open:-

for the sale of food, cooked or prepared for
consumption on the premises;

for the sale of drugs, medicines or surgical
appliances:

for the sale of ice;

for the sale of bread, fresh and frozen fish,
fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, butcher's meat
and fresh dairy products, until the hour of ten
o'clock in the morning;

for the sale of any article required for the burial
of a dead body, or in the case of illness of any
person or animal, or in any other emergency;
for the sale of petroleum products

for the sale of fresh water;

for the sale of newspapers and periodicals.

c.0. 1883

The Chambers of Johnson-Hasean & Co., Surte No
Grasvendr Suites, Grosvenor Chase off Shirkey Street,
Nassau, M.P_, The Bahamas Attiomeys for the Pettioner.

4OTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right of
dower of an Adverse clains of claim not reeegnized im the Petition
shall on cr before che Sth day of August, A.D ‘ 2009 file in
the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
Statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file
and serve.a statement of his claim oo oc before the said Sth day
of August, AD., 2009 will operate aé a bar to seh a elaim

MOHNSON-HASSAN & CO)
Suite Wo? Grosvenor Close
Of Shirkey Steer

Nassau, M_P., The Bahamas
Atomeys for the Petitioner
















Ministry Of Public
Works & Transport

NORTH ACKLINS ROAD
REHABILITATION










Tender Publication No.: FIR/207/15/1 (GOB)

EUROPEAID/128742/M/WKS/BS (EU)

The Government of The Bahamas intends to award a works
contract for the rehabilitation of the Queen’s Highway on Acklins.
The works contract consists in the rehabilitation and provision
of periodic maintenance (pavement patching and sealing) for
about 32.3 miles (approx. 52 km) of a two-lane single carriageway
road (Queen’s Highway. About 290,000 square yards of the road
pavement will require patching and sealing maintenance, and
about 100,000 square yards of the road pavement will require the
replacement of the base course layer and the placement of a new
surface seal.

The works are co-financed by the Government of The Bahamas
and the 9th European Development Fund.

The Tender dossier is available for inspection and purchase at
the following address:

Department of Public Works

of the Ministry of Works and Transport,
John F. Kennedy Drive,

1st Floor, East Wing

Nassau, (N.P.), The Bahamas

Tel.: +242-322-4830

Fax: +242-326-7344

Sealed Tender Submissions are to be deposited in the Tender Box
located at:

Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

3rd Floor

Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tender submissions will be received no later than 4:00pm, Monday,
24th August, 2009. Any tender received after this deadline will
not be considered.

Tenders are invited to attend the Tender opening at 10am Tuesday,
25th August, 2009 at the Tenders Board.

Possible additional information or clarifications/questions shall
be published on the EuropeAid website:
http://ec .ouropa.eu/europeaid/work/funding/index_en.htm
(Select Contracts link) and will be communicated in writing to
all tenderers.

Signed,
PERMANENT SECRETARY

CC SM 7
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 502-2371 today!
PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas’ cruise product 300% more
costly than other Caribbean destinations

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE terms reached between
the Government and two major
cruise lines will ensure that 90
per cent of arriving ships visit
approved Bahamian ports, the
deputy director-general at the
Ministry of Tourism has told
Tribune Business, as this coun-












































* Ministry official says new agreement will ensure 90% of ships call at ‘approved ports’
* Says reduced overnight stay, private islands not major concerns

try seeks to enhance its com-
petitiveness despite having a
product 300 per cent more cost-
ly than other Caribbean desti-
nations.

David Johnson said the
Bahamas entered negotiations

a oi

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a]

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A World of
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with Carnival Cruise Lines and
Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines
to secure this country’s share of
the cruise market.

With a rebate-style passenger
departure tax incentive pack-
age, the Government hopes to

have Carnival alone deliver 1.4
million visitors per year. For
each passenger over 800,000, the
cruise line will receive a rebate
of $8.50 per passenger on the
$15 per head tax, and a $10 per
passenger rebate when those vis-

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itor numbers exceed one mil-
lion. At least 350,000 of those
visitors must overnight in Nas-
sau, and 175,000 in Freeport, for
the cruise lines to access these
incentives, with all passengers
below 800,000 visitors attract-
ing a $15 per head tax.

These incentives, part of the
Government’s amendment to
the Cruise Ship

Overnighting Incentives Act,
come as cruise lines have slashed
their prices to fill ships in the
midst of the global economic cri-
sis. And the cruise sector has
been the only one in a declining
Bahamian tourism industry to
have seen year-over-year
arrivals growth this year, as a
result of the cruise industry’s
staying power.

Bay Street merchants, though,
have questioned how effective
the amendments will be in
increasing business in the down-
town area, and some have
argued that the move to
decrease the overnight mini-
mum stay of 13 hours until mid-
night, with a minimum of nine
daylight hours in port, could
hurt some businesses.

Some night club owners said
the amendment could strip them
of their cruise passenger busi-
ness should ships decide to leave
port at midnight.

However, Mr Johnson said 13
hours is merely the minimum
amount of time under the agree-
ment, and contended that ships
often remain in port much
longer.

According to him, Bay Street
merchants have no cause for
concern. He suggested they
bring their product to the atten-
tion of cruise industry in order
to secure the business.

“Tf there are night options,

midnight sailing doesn’t negate a
night option,” said Mr Johnson.
“Some ships stay longer than
the 13 or 18 hours. If there are
options, their (cruise lines) cus-
tomers are willing to buy or pro-
mote. I have no doubt that they
would want to take advantage
of those tours and sail a bit lat-
ere

Merchants and Tour Opera-
tors were also concerned about
competition from the cruise
lines’ own private islands in this
country, as well as their on-ship
retail, restaurant, bar and gam-
ing facilities.

Passengers

Though passengers taken to
only private islands or “desig-
nated ports” are counted in the
total number of visitors brought
to the Bahamas as a part of the
incentive scheme, Mr Johnson
suggested the number of ships
that visit only their private
islands is minimal.

“The vast majority do stop in
two ports,” he said.

The number of ports that
cruise ships can dock at and
remain eligible for the benefits
of the Act is being increased
from two to seven.

Once enacted, Nassau,
Freeport, Rock Sound, Cast-
away Cay, Coco Cay and Half
Moon Cay will all be
“approved” ports under the Act.

Ships visiting approved ports,
according to Mr Johnson, will
not be allowed to open

their casinos or stores until
after 7pm and after acquiring a
business licence to do so.

He said New Providence casi-
nos agreed to that provision
“because they saw a significant
benefit to themselves.”

International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold

Weekly % Change
0.8621
1.6329
1.3978

-0.62
-1.28
-0.69

Weekly

$65.63
$931.00

% Change

-5.46
-0.97

International Stock Market Indexes:

DITA

S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei

FROM page 2B

Weekly

% Change

8,280.74
896.42

1,796.52
9,816.07

-1.87
-2.45
-2.27
-0.62



and $1.2 million at the end of fiscal 2008.

Dividend Notes:

¢ J. S. Johnson (JSJ) has declared a dividend of $0.16 per share,
payable on July 15, 2009, to all shareholders of record date July 8,

2009

¢ Consolidated Water (CWCO) has declared a dividend of
$0.013 per share, payable on August 6, 2009, to all shareholders of

record date July 1, 2009.

Annual General Meeting (AGM) Notes:

¢ Abaco Markets (AML) announced that it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at 6pm at
The Wyndam Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino, West Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of June 19,
2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting.

¢ Benchmark (Bahamas) (BBL) announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on Thursday, July 23, 2009, at 6.30pm at
British Colonial Hilton, Governor's Ballroom, Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of June 23, 2009, will be qual-
ified to vote at the Annual Meeting.

SpeLOT MT tees

— SNACK WRAP’-—
MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009





i Cc], 1

The stories behind the news

THE ills plaguing our society can be likened to a
beast with one great belly and many starving
mouths. Each mouth represents an endemic hunger
in our land. One mouth, the hunger for justice,
another, the hunger for an adequate education and
the third, the hunger for security...





Worshippers of
material things

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net



‘Prosperity pastors’ are helping
to destroy the Bahamas

he ills plaguing our society can be
likened to a beast with one great
belly and many starving mouths.
Each mouth represents an endem-
ic hunger in our land. One mouth,
the hunger for justice, another, the hunger for an

adequate education and the third, the hunger
for security.

But one mouth, one gaping maw that lies at
the centre of this beast, represents the deepest
hunger, the most neglected need of our people,
the need to be fed spiritually.

Much of the crime we experience in the
Bahamas comes from a wound that leads us to

want to possess, an obsession for the material,
whether that be money or people, which leads to
violence manifesting itself in murder, abuse,
armed robbery or even stealing from our jobs.
We do not value the worthwhile aspects of
our existence, the beauty of human potential,
the richness to be found in knowledge, the sat-
isfaction of a truly loving relationship with fam-

ily and friends. These are the things that can
save us from this hunger, that can make us into
a better people, better humans.

Having these virtues installed in a person is a
job left up to the individual or family. No other
institution in our society purports to or is able to
help with this task.

I take that back, there is one. Well, one that’s

supposed to.

The church claims to be our saving grace, the
place where our people can go for this food.
Nearly every corner of this island has one and
they exist in every community. But if it’s spiritual
food you want, you'll find their pantries inex-

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 3C



INSIGHT



From Haiti, a surprise:
‘sood news’ about AIDS

Bf By JONATHAN M KATZ
Associated Press Writer

BLANCHARD, Haiti (AP)
— When Micheline Leon was
diagnosed with HIV, her par-
ents told her they would fit her
for a coffin.

Fifteen years later, she walks
around her two-room concrete
house on Haiti's central plateau,
watching her four children play
under the plantain trees. She
looks healthy, her belly amply
filling a gray, secondhand T-
shirt. Her three sons and one
daughter were born after she
was diagnosed. None has the
virus.

"T'm not sick," she explained
patiently on a recent afternoon.
"People call me sick but I'm
not. I'm infected."

In many ways the 35-year-old
mother's story is Haiti's too. In
the early 1980s, when the
strange and terrifying disease
showed up in the US among
migrants who had escaped
Haiti's dictatorship, experts
thought it could wipe out a third
of the country's population.

Instead, Haiti's HIV infection
rate stayed in the single digits,
then plummeted.

In a wide range of interviews
with doctors, patients, public
health experts and others, The
Associated Press found that
Haiti's success in the face of
chronic political and social tur-
moil came because organisa-
tions cooperated and tailored
programmes to the country's
specific challenges.

Much of the credit went to
two pioneering nonprofit
groups, Boston-based Partners
in Health and Port-au-Prince's
GHESKIO, widely considered
to be the world’s oldest AIDS
clinic.

"The Haitian AIDS commu-
nity feels like they're out in
front of everyone else on this,
and pretty much they are,” said
Judith Timyan, senior



IN THIS May 7, 2009, photo, Micheline Leon, a woman living with HIV/AIDS, poses for a photo with her children
in Cange, in central Haiti. Haitian infection rates dropped from 6.2 per cent to 3.1 per cent among expectant moth-
ers in the last 15 years. Researchers recently switched to a new methodology that tests all adults, which puts
Haiti’s official rate at 2.2 per cent, according to UNAIDS.

HIV/AIDS adviser for the US
Agency for International Devel-
opment in Haiti. "They really
do some of the best work in the
world."

Researchers say the number
of suffers was initially lessened
by closing private blood banks,
and statistically by high mortal-
ity rates — an untreated AIDS
sufferer in Haiti lives eight few-
er years than an untreated
American.

Well-coordinated use of
AIDS drugs, education and
behavioural changes such as
increased condom use have
kept the disease from surging
back, at least for now.

Statistics are notoriously
unreliable in this country of
poverty and lack of infrastruc-
ture. The most telling data
would be the number of new

infections in a given year, but
researchers say such a precise
count is impossible.

Next best is to estimate the
infected as a percentage of the
population. From 1993 to 2003,
only pregnant women were test-
ed, and their rate of infection
dropped from 6.2 per cent to
3.1 per cent, according to
GHESKIO and national health
surveys.

Test

Researchers now test men
and women aged 15 to 49, and
the official rate is 2.2 per cent,
according to UNAIDS.

That's still far higher than in
the developed world, but it's
lower than the Bahamas,
Guyana and Suriname, and
much lower than sub-Saharan

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Africa, where the rate averages
about five per cent but spikes to
24 per cent in Botswana and 33
per cent in Swaziland.

But the crisis is far from over.
In the Artibonite Valley, where
Boston-based Partners in
Health is just now setting up
two clinics, the estimated infec-
tion rate is 4.5 per cent.

Some in these remote regions
still look for care from Voodoo
priests, who ask for large sums
of money or goods and use
treatments doctors say can be
poisonous.

Thanks in large part to
UNAIDS, which awarded Haiti
its first grant in 2002, and $420
million from the US President's
Emergency Plan for AIDS
Relief, or PEPFAR, an esti-
mated 18,000 people are on
AIDS drugs, most of them

administered free through
GHESKIO and PIH.

That population represents
40 per cent of those whose
white blood cell count is low
enough for them to need the
drugs. It is a high percentage
for the developing world, but
still fails to help many too
remote to reach medical care
or those at for-pay public clinics.

Still, Haiti has been suffi-
ciently ahead in prevention,
diagnosis and treatment for
some of its programmes to serve
as models for PEPFAR, the
programme launched by Presi-
dent George W Bush in 2003
and praised for its work in
Africa.

GHESKIO co-founder Dr
Jean W Pape was awarded the
French Legion of Honour for
his work, and PIH's Paul
Farmer was recently named
chairman of Harvard Medical
School's global health depart-
ment. In May, Haiti was hon-
oured as the host of the opening
ceremony of the 2009 Interna-
tional AIDS Candlelight
Memorial.

In a country suffering from
political upheaval and natural
disasters, where three-quarters
of the people can neither afford
nor access private clinics or fee-
based public hospitals, few

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PAGE 4C, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



From Haiti, a surprise: ‘good news’ about AIDS

FROM page 3C

could have imagined at the
dawn of the AIDS crisis how
far Haiti would come.

When some of the first con-
firmed cases of the strange new
immune deficiency disease were
found in Haitian migrants, the
country was hastily and unsci-
entifically pegged as the main
breeding ground, or maybe
even cause, of AIDS. Experts
predicted a third or more of its
population would be wiped out.

The US Centers for Disease
Control deeply offended the
country by listing Haitian
nationality alongside hemo-
philia, homosexuality and hero-
in use as primary risk factors —
nicknamed "the four H's."
There was speculation that slum
squalor or Voodoo ceremonies
were responsible for the
scourge.

By the mid-1980s the CDC's
risk-factor list was amended,
but the damage was done to
Haiti's dignity and to tourism,

The Tribune

then its second-largest industry,
which collapsed and never
recovered.

Yet the stigma may be what
motivated Haiti to fight the dis-
ease harder, uniting squabbling
officials and divided donors in a
common cause, said Pape, the
Haitian-born, Cornell-educat-
ed physician who helped found
GHESKIO in May 1982.

GHESKIO was founded two
months before the disease even
had a name, hence its unwieldy
French acronym for "Haitian
Group for the Study of Kaposi's
Sarcoma and Opportunistic
Infections."

Speaking in an office filled
with health studies and signed
photos from US presidents,
Pape said efforts to close unreg-
ulated blood banks, treat the
sick and reducing mother-to-
child transmissions helped curb
the epidemic.

Partners in Health was found-
ed in 1983, by two Haitians and
two Americans including
Farmer, as a small clinic treating

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infected people in the desper-
ately poor hillside community
of Cange.

Its "accompagnateur" pro-
gramme, in which local work-
ers including HIV patients are
paid to help the newly diag-
nosed adhere to physically tax-
ing medication regimens and
prevention measures, has been
duplicated in Africa. So has
GHESKIO's work, such as dis-
tributing phone cards to
patients to keep in closer touch
with their doctors.

Obner Saint-Valain is an
accompagnateur who looks
over seven patients including
Marie-Lourdes Pierre, a blind
55-year-old Blanchard woman
who has lived with the virus
since 1999. For that work he is
paid $54 a month.

"If you're giving medication
to a patient, you can't be scared
of them. If the patient becomes
worse, it’s me that picks them
up and puts them in a car to the
hospital,” he said.

While many of Haiti's more
than nine million people can-
not afford care in hospitals that
require them to provide every-
thing from medicine to latex
gloves for their doctors, HIV
patients get cutting-edge treat-
ments for free.

Meanwhile, education cam-
paigns spread the word on pre-
vention measures. More than
51 million free condoms have
been shipped to the country of
since 2004 and are advertised
everywhere on street murals
and corner store signs.

"More Haitians know about
modes of transmission than high
school students in the US,"
Pape said.

Tt was in 1994 that Micheline
Leon made the 30-kilometer
(20-mile) trek from her home
in Blanchard over crumbling
roads to the stone-walled cam-
pus of Zanmi Lasante, the Cre-
ole name and flagship opera-
tion of Partners in Health.

Something felt wrong with
her pregnancy — the baby was
too low in her belly, she said.
The baby was fine, but Leon
tested positive in the HIV test
given to all expectant mothers.

"My family lost hope. They
thought I was already gone,”
she said.

Through care, counselling
and a lot of social assistance —

cau Pe ey

Arie Set

Ur ele
icy

ATC LMPLC Mn atl) ut School

Ue a eee eg

Se Me er Roly

mrs

Se me ea ie ar a
For the school year beginning SEPTEMBER 2004

Applicants mast be Born Again Christians and adhere 1» toe Staterent of Faith of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel
Teachers must aso have af least a Pachelors Dearee in Education or a Teacher's Certificate
and must be a Bahamian or a permanent resident of the Bahamas with work status,

Qualtying persons are aaked to contact Hoe office at

Telephone (242) 307-4771 830 AM. ~ 345 PM, ov fax (242) 31-6101
oc vesil oor website ~ wiewagapeschool com ~ for jab or student! applications

20 ee Pe ee eee

ereararsarcs

Agape Christian School uses the A Beka Pook Curriculum
which emphasizes Christian values a6 well as a very high standard of education
and is approved by the Pahamas Ministry of Education,

We seek to train the mind, quide the person, and love the personality,
Study to Yow thrall approved unto. God... 2 “Timothy 215



IN THIS May 7, 2009, photo, a doctor attends to a patient with HIV/AIDS at the Partners in Health hospital in Cange,

Haiti’s central plateau.

Partners in Health also helped
build her tin-roofed, concrete
house — Leon survived. She is
also a paid PIH accompagna-
teur, working mostly with tuber-
culosis patients.

‘Treatments, which in her lat-
er pregnancies included AIDS
drugs, prevented the virus from

passing to her children, and she
was discouraged from breast-
feeding. PIH stands by the prac-
tice though some AIDS doctors
say that's unwise in countries
like Haiti where food is scarce.

Pape envisions a Haiti where
the prevalence rate will dip
below one per cent. Timyan of

(AP Photo: Ramon Espinosa)

USAID believes the rate has
essentially stabilized but will not
rise again.

Leon's parents never did buy
that coffin. For her, fear and
shame have been replaced with
pride and confidence.

"I'm not scared anymore,"
she said.

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On the Occasion of

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 5C



‘Prosperity pastors’ helping to destroy Bahamas

FROM page 1C

cusably bare. Instead they stand
like little temples to Mammon.

Nothing can illustrate this
point better than an article
appearing in The Nassau
Guardian this past Friday enti-
tled “Pastor calls $1/4 million
vehicle a Blessing.”

The story was of how Bish-
op Kirkwood Murphy who, with
the help of his congregation,
bought a 2005 Bentley Arnage
ordinarily worth $250,000 for
$68,000.

On face value it sounds like
the good Bishop just got an
awesome deal on a really
expensive car. Some may find it
unseemly for a man of the cloth
to be parading around town in
such an expensive vehicle, but if
he and his congregation decide
that their collection funds were
best invested in this car, far be it
from anyone outside of that
organisation to criticise them.

However, as he tried to justi-
fy the purchase there were sev-
eral statements he made that
showed how materialism is rot-
ting the core out of the beauty
of Christianity.

“IT wanted to make a state-
ment, I wanted to bring hope
to the Body of Christ. I wanted
people to know that not only
drug dealers and cabinet minis-
ters and prime ministers could
drive this kind of car, but that a
man of God could too.”

A Bentley bring hope to the
Body of Christ? A Bentley? I
had no idea pastors had become
so cynical! I’m only 27 but I
remember a time when Jesus’
resurrection was supposed to
“bring hope to the Body of
Christ”. I guess things have
changed and the reanimation
of a human body after death
isn’t enough to impress people
anymore. But hope has
returned! Bishop Murphy has
himself raised up a car from an
auction in New York and
brought it to the Bahamas. The
church can sing again!

He went on to say: “I wanted
to take the level and the minds
of Christians up.”

Watch out Saint Augustine,
Thomas Aquinas, Martin
Luther and Thomas 4 Kempis!
Two thousand years of church
teachings, the voluminous

works of the fathers of the
church are not enough. It’s a
lucky thing this car hit Nassau.
We are certainly living in a
blessed time. But I digress. The
Bishop continued: “We always
think of Christians as poor , but
the Bible says that the Earth is
the Lord’s and the fullness
thereof, and so I wanted to
make a statement too as a pas-
tor and a man of God.”

He is right, God doesn’t
demand material poverty, he
demands spiritual poverty. God
doesn’t care if you are poor nor
is he concerned about your
wealth. If Bishop Murphy was
doing what he was supposed to,
he should “take the level and
minds of Christians up” by set-
ting an example that would
encourage people to be con-
cerned about what God is truly
interested in, the state of the
human soul, not a bank account.

I find prosperity preaching
abhorrent, dishonest and sinful.
The idea that a person is blessed
because of the material God
allows him or her to have is
faith destroying.

There are millions of people
around the world, many of them
faithful Christians, who suffer
from poverty, disease and vio-
lence. They live painful, sad,
short, joyless lives. Is their God
absent? Are we favoured above
these people? If the answer is
yes then is the God you wor-
ship really all loving and merci-
ful?

Prosperity theology is cor-
rupting, it is a perversion of
what the faith should be. It is
nothing more than a hustle from
snake-oil salesmen who try to
justify their enrichment by prey-
ing on the faith of those they
pretend to lead or care about.

This “name it and claim it”
philosophy makes spoilt chil-
dren of the faithful. It is funda-
mentally pagan and it cheapens
the concept of God’s grace.
Grace by definition means
unmerited favour. There is no
human prayer sincere enough,
nor human faith deep enough
to deserve anything from God.

It encourages laziness and
materialism. It defaces Chris-
tianity and makes vandals of
those pastors who preach it.

In the darkness of this teach-
ing, Christianity becomes a faith

in which the creation is to be
served by the creator. It
becomes a religion where the
gifts bestowed to humankind by
the Holy Spirit aren’t wisdom,
understanding, counsel, forti-
tude, knowledge, piety and fear
of the Lord, but rather Bent-
ley, Versace, Rolex, Armani
and having no fear you'll max
out your platinum Visa card.

It becomes a system of belief
in which Christ is indistinguish-
able from Santa Claus and God,
a genie whose lamp you rub
with a little prayer.

Name it and claim it indeed!
Where is the religion that taught
that the cross and salvation
were the only things that were
ours to name and claim and
where love of neighbour was
the highest value and service
and sacrifice were worthy
ideals?

Concepts

I suppose those concepts are
not in vogue anymore. The
human sprit dies everyday in
our country through the abuse
of drugs, alcohol, children and
spouses. It suffers the curse of
never being able to reach its full
potential because of an anorex-
ic school system and a people
who do not value knowledge
for its own sake. But like the
good pastor said “God is good.”
You can still get a Bentley in
the country for less than
$400,000.

Bishop Murphy’s Bentley is
bringing more soldiers into the
army of Christ, however. In fact
he said that a young man saw
him and asked him what he did
for a living that would have
caused him to have such a nice
car.

“T said that ’'m a pastor. He
said ‘Oh I want to be a pastor. I
wanted to be a doctor, but I
changed my mind’. Then he said
‘can I take a picture of your
Bentley? Where is your church?
I want to come there.””

For the sake of our spiritual
and physical health I hope the
young man is driven into a pro-
fession he enjoys, not the one
he just feels will bring in the
most cash.

It’s no wonder that increas-
ingly our people are becoming
disgusted with religion and

‘THE GARDENS

NURSERY

Est. 1994

"From Our Garpven To Yours"

INDEPENDENCE Day SPECIALS

Orchids starting at $20

ew COUN E Malta aD Le
Outdoor Bromeliads sarting at $30
PES ome e uel ear lane
Red and Gold Mulch $7
Potting and Top Soils $8.50

Landscaping Rocks $5

HEINER CNET AKON

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2 St. Albans Drive, Nassau
(Osea a colom yin



Christianity in particular. The
church that is the beautiful
bride of Christ is being hidden
by this mess, this noise, this wor-
ship of mammon that is indis-
tinguishable from secular ideals.

They see pastors wallowing
in self-righteous indignation
over the private lives of people
while ignoring more pressing
matters in our society, living lav-
ish lives while their parishioners
struggle to place 10 per cent of
their earnings in the collection
plate. They see Christians pray-
ing for husbands, wives, cars,
promotions, more money, a
nicer house, and the destruc-
tion of “evil” co-workers and
bosses.

It is possible that I’m being
unfair. The reason why some
pastors encourage this orgy of
avarice in their churches may
come down to a question of
capacity. If spiritual enlighten-
ment were easy everyone would
have it. The truth is many pas-
tors in the Bahamas are not
capable of leading their "flock"
toward deeper spiritual enlight-
enment because they are not
enlightened themselves and
equally as shallow as the most
heathen socialite.

Unable to measure their own
spiritual growth, much less any-
one else’s, they turn to chattel
as a determining factor in how
close they or a person is to God.

We have upstart pastors and
preachers who, in a desperate
push for legitimacy, appoint
themselves prophet, prophet-
ess, apostle, psalmist and Bish-
op.

Whatever happened to just
being called a servant of God.
Honestly that would be OK.
Think about it. What would be
the shame in a person directing
the service saying : "Coming to
speak to us now is another ser-
vant of God Timothy Jones."

But that would be ridiculous.
Where would the "wow factor"
be in that? Surely this man of
God deserves a better intro-
duction.

“And coming to bless us now
with a word from the Lord is
Bishop, the honourable prophet
and general overseer of the first
temple of the most holy chapel
on the bank of Montagu beach
and part time psalmist Timothy
Jones.”

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That's better. That's more
suited to a person who serves
the Lord.

In my favourite scene from
one my favourite movies
"Angela's Ashes” the main
character, Frank, a young Irish
Catholic boy, looks up at a
naked statue of a child hanging
up on the wall of the only bed-
room of the rundown house his
two parents and three siblings






move into.

His mother exclaims:
“Look! That’s the baby Jesus. If
you ever need anything you
should pray to him.”

Frank’s younger brother
Malachy leans and whispers to
him: “Will you tell baby Jesus
that we’re hungry?"

Nice car Bishop Murphy. But
will you please tell baby Jesus
that we’re hungry?

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THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPO

ae

5-Day FORECAST







e~

ih, ai ORLANDO SS :
High:91°F23°C = ; Sunny. A moonlit sky. Times of clouds and Mostly sunny. Intervals of clouds Sunshine.
6 L 9 73° F °C J sunshine. and sunshine.
ow: 73° F/ all ° ° ° °
@ High: 91 High: 92 High: 92 High: 90
r 5 Fr High: 92° Low: 81° Low: 81° Low: 80° Low: 80° Low: 81°
TAMPA he ae UE
High: 88° F/31°C t 113° F | 113°-92°F 117°-93° F 113°-91° F 107°-89° F
Low: 77° F/25°C ry r. The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
a @ - : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

-

FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 89°F/32°C

Low: 77° F/25°C

@ WEST PALM BEACH
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 76° F/24° C

<

FREEPORT
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 79° F/26° C

@

MIAMI
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 78° F/26° C

ABACO
High: 92° F/33° C

—— Low: 82° F/28°C
e”,
im

NASSAU
High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 81°F/27°C

KEY WEST . eX 2
High: 90° F/32°C
Low: 80° F/27°C —

a,



Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's

highs and tonights's lows.

Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today
High Low W High Low Ww High Low W High Low W High Low W

Fic FC Fic FC Fic FC Fic FC FIC OFC
Albuquerque 93/33 68/20 pc 94/34 68/20 pc Indianapolis 84/28 64/17 $s 83/28 65/18 s Philadelphia 86/30 66/18 s
Anchorage 78/25 58/14 $s 78/25 59/15 s Jacksonville 90/32 73/22 t 91/32 73/22 t Phoenix 110/43 86/30 s
Atlanta 82/27 68/20 t 88/31 68/20 s Kansas City 86/30 66/18 s 90/32 70/21 s Pittsburgh 81/27 55/12 $s
Atlantic City 84/28 61/16 s 86/30 59/15 pc Las Vegas 107/41 77/25 s 105/40 81/27 s Portland, OR 72/22 56/13 pc
Baltimore 85/29 62/16 s 85/29 62/16 pc Little Rock 89/31 66/18 pce 93/83 67/19 s Raleigh-Durham 85/29 66/18 t
Boston 77/25 61/6 t 78/25 59/15 t Los Angeles 83/28 62/16 pc 83/28 62/16 pc St. Louis 88/31 68/20 s
Buffalo 76/24 56/13 t 68/20 54/12 t Louisville 85/29 67/19 s 88/31 65/18 s Salt Lake City 95/85 63/17 $s
Charleston,SC 89/31 72/22 t 89/31 70/21 t Memphis 87/30 70/21 pce 93/83 72/22 s San Antonio 98/36 76/24 pc
Chicago 83/28 60/15 pce 77/25 60/15 t Miami 89/31 78/25 t 92/33 78/25 pc San Diego 75/23 64/17 pc
Cleveland 77/25 56/13 pe 75/23 55/12 pce Minneapolis 84/28 62/16 t 73/22 58/14 t San Francisco 70/21 55/12 pc
Dallas 92/33 72/22 t 96/35 76/24 pc Nashville 86/30 62/16 pce 90/82 64/17 s Seattle 70/21 55/12 pe
Denver 91/32 60/15 t 94/34 58/14 pc New Orleans 90/32 78/25 t 90/32 76/24 t Tallahassee 87/30 73/22 t
Detroit 82/27 58/14 pe 77/25 58/14 pc New York 84/28 65/18 pce 83/28 66/18 t Tampa 88/31 77/25 t
Honolulu 88/31 75/23 pce 88/31 75/23 pc Oklahoma City 90/82 67/19 s 94/34 69/20 pc Tucson 100/37 79/26 s
Houston 93/33 76/24 t 94/34 74/23 t Orlando 91/382 73/22 t 92/33 73/22 t Washington, DC 85/29 67/19 s

ANDROS
High: 97° F/36° C
Low: 80° F/27°C

ELEUTHERA

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature



IGN sesssasedvsseesslccettonaetectiecianed isaecbanes 91° F/33° C
LOW Normal high .... 88° F/31° C
Normal low 75° F/24° C
Last year's Nigh oo... ceceeteeeeeeteees 90° F/32° C
Last year's LOW o..ccceeseseteteseeceeees 76° F/24° C

Precipitation

As of 2 p.m. yesterday .......ccccccccccnseeceneee 0.10"
Year to date a
Normal year to date

AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009



High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 79° F/26° C

GREAT EXUMA

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 78° F/26° C

oO

Tuesday
Low

F/C
64/17
85/29
53/11
55/12
65/18
72/22
63/17
76/24
65/18
53/11
54/12
73/22
77/25
81/27
64/17

High

F/C
86/30
108/42
76/24
68/20
89/31
91/32
95/35
100/37
73/22
70/21
65/18
89/31
89/31
101/38
85/29

Ww

on eo

CATISLAND
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 74° F/23°C

O



aslo elshohe
V. HIGH EXT.

MODERATE | HIGH



o|1|2

LOW







The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Pe

High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht. (ft.

Tod 753am. 23 1:55am. 0.2
ev 8t9pm. 28 1:46pm. 02
Tuesd 833am. 23 2:35am. 0.2
meseey gs7pm. 28 22pm. 02
Wednesday2.12a.m. 24 3:12am. 0.2

senesOVo34pm. 28 3:08pm. 02
Thursd 950am. 24 3:48am. 0.1

mse 10-09 p.m. 27 3:48pm. 02
ST MLCT
Sunrise...... 6:26 a.m. Moonrise .... 7:47 p.m.
Sunset....... 8:04 p.m. Moonset..... 5:36 a.m.

Last New

Full First

Jul. 7

Jul. 15 Jul. 21 Jul. 28

SAN SALVADOR

MONDAY, JULY 6 2009, PAGE 7C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

Bea Sie

= (fl (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

[CL aS













High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 76° F/24° C

QO

LONGISLAND
High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

2

MAYAGUANA
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 77° F/25° C

CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS

RAGGED ISLAND
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 73° F/23° C

Low: 77° F/25°C

High: 94° F/34° C

GREAT INAGUA .

High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 79° F/26° C

iF

Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.

High = Low W High Low W WASSAU ‘Today. Sat5-10Knots O-2Feet 10-20Miles 82°F
F/C F/C F/C F/C Tuesday: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 82° F

Acapulco 88/31 78/25 pe 89/31 79/26 S FREEPORT Today: S at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F

Amsterdam 70/21 56/13 sh 65/18 57/13 s Tuesday: _§ at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F

Ankara, Turkey 85/29 58/14 s 86/30 58/14 ¢ = ABACO Today: § at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F

Athens 88/31 76/24 t 91/32 75/23 s Tuesday: __§ at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 81°F

Auckland 57/13 50/10 c 5613 48/8 pc

Bangkok 88/31 79/26 t 89/31 78/25 t 1 5 7 B F

Barbados 87/30 76/24 s 86/30 77/25 pc

Barcelona 82/27 68/20 t 75/23 65/18 pc hati binatcindd

Beijing 95/35 72/22 pc 97/36 73/22 pc

Beirut 79/26 76/24 s 80/26 76/24 s

Belgrade 90/32 68/20 t 87/30 66/18 t

Berlin 78/25 59/15 sh 75/23 58/14 sh

Bermuda 82/27 75/23 pc 80/26 71/21 pc

Bogota 66/18 46/7 c 6417 47/8 t

Brussels 72/22 50/10 sh 6417 56/13 4

Budapest 87/30 63/17 t 90/32 64/17 t

Buenos Aires 63/17 50/10 pc 66/18 44/6 sh

Cairo 99/37 76/24 s 100/37 75/23 s

Calcutta 90/32 79/26 t 94/34 84/28 +

Calgary 60/15 50/10 t 6417 46/7 t

Cancun 91/32 73/22 pc 90/32 76/24 sh

Caracas g0/26 71/21 t 81/27 71/21 t oa

Casablanca 78/25 64/17 s 77/25 63/7 s

Copenhagen 68/20 56/13 c 69/20 58/14 sh

Dublin 6417 54/12 6 66/18 52/11 sh

Frankfurt 77/25 58/14 t 72/22 58/14 sh

Geneva 79/26 58/14 pc 70/21 54/12 sh

Halifax 66/18 52/11 sh 66/18 52/11 pc

Havana 90/32 75/23 s gos2 742at) pes

Helsinki 66/18 48/8 pc 68/20 50/10 c = Rain

Hong Kong 86/30 77/25 t 86/30 77/25 t L*, 4 Flurries -

Islamabad 109/42 81/27 s 112/44 82/27 s BE Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and

Istanbul 92/33 73/22 s 90/32 73/22 s ive] ~ eval Temperature bands are highs for the day. :

Jerusalem 89/27 62/16 s 85/29 62/16 s orecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mange.

Johannesburg 56/12 38/3 pe 59/15 40/4 s : 4 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s /i00sl/110s)

Kingston 88/31 79/26 r 89/31 78/25 r 10s [iis oe 10s 20s [30s") 40s

Lima 70/21 58/14 s 71/21 58/14 s

London 70/21 54/12 t 68/20 55/12 r

Madrid 90/32 61/16 pc 93/33 63/17 pc

Manila 88/31 78/25 t 86/30 77/25 sh a es i im IC AN = IN st u RAN ‘é =

Mexico City 77/25 53/11 t 77/25 54/12 s ; 1

Monterrey 106/41 76/24 pc 110/43 76/24 s

Montreal 75/23 61/16 sh 66/18 61/16 t

Moscow 5713 44h 6 68/20 50/10 pc

Munich 76/24 53/11 t 71/21 50/10 t

Nairobi 78/25 55/12 pc 76/24 55/12 pc

New Delhi 102/38 88/31 pc 102/38 90/32 pc Y ou 4 B e B lo

Oslo 62/16 57/13 sh 63N7 55/12 6 nN wn

Paris 74/23 55/12 sh 73/22 54/12 sh

Prague 75/23 57/13 sh 76/24 54/12 pe Away y A | | UITIC “ane

Rio de Janeiro 76/24 65/18 pc 76/24 68/20 s

Riyadh 102/38 77/25 s 102/38 79/26 s

sie 85/29 65/18 3 «85/20 63/17 s Or you can rest easy knowing

St. Thomas 91/32 82/27 sh 91/32 79/26 s that yo have excellent insurance

San Juan 71/21 = 36/2 s 66/18 32/0 s “4

San Salvador 86/30 74/23 t 85/29 74/23 t coy aah no mar which

Santiago 61/16 39/3 pc 62/16 39/3 s .

Santo Domingo 85/29 75/23 sh 87/30 73/22 pc way e win OWS.

Sao Paulo 72/22 58/14 t 73/22 58/14 s i

Seoul 88/31 68/20 s 77/25 64/17 + a tT

Stockholm 68/20 52/11 pc 68/20 54/12 sh Nobody does it better.

Sydney 59/15 50/10 s 59/15 50/10 pc

Taipei 95/35 79/26 t 94/34 77/25 pc

Tokyo 81/27 72/22 82/27 72/22 pc

Toronto 71/21 55/12 t 68/20 54/12 t

Trinidad 90/32 70/21 r 82/27 68/20 t :

Vancouver 67/19 58/14 sh 65/18 56/13 sh (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Vienna 78/25 65/18 pc 75/23 60/15 sh oe — oon

Warsaw 74/23 61/16 s 80/26 59/15 t

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Body of murdered woman discovered N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.185MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY HIGH 92F LOW 81F SEEINSIGHTFRONT S P O R T S SEEPAGETHIRTEEN Wimbledon champion By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net POLICE are investigating whether the murdered woman found wrapped in a sheet off E astern Road may have been sexually molested before her death. T he Caucasian woman w hose badly decomposed body w as found dumped in a bushy area near Fox Hill Creek on Saturday evening is thought to have died over a week ago and been dropped at the roadside on Friday night or Saturday morning. Police have not yet confirmed her identity, the cause of her death or circumstances surrounding her murder. But Superintendent in charge of the Central Detective Unit Elsworth Moss said detectives are close to identifying the woman as she has a distinctive tattoo across her lower back. He did not speculate about her age, whether she was Bahamian, a foreign resident or a tourist, but said she has b een linked to missing person reports and he expects to speak to her family and confirm her identity tomorrow. T he woman was fully dressed i n blue jeans and a green top, and wrapped from head to toe in a sheet, when she was dis c overed by walkers exercising in the area just after 6pm on Saturday. Mr Moss said she had been dead for at least seven days before she was dumped in overgrowth near the waterfront at the bottom of Fox Hill on Eastern Road, New Providence. Mr Moss said: “We certainly believe the body was dumped there because persons walked in the same area on Friday night and there was nothing. “Someone saw it on Satur day morning and didn’t pay attention to it and on Saturday afternoon the police were called. “We have an idea of who it Police investigate whether victim was sexually molested The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com I N S I G H T C M Y K C M Y K T h e T r i b u n e I N S I G H T M O N D A Y , J U L Y 6 , 2 0 0 9T h e s t o r i e s b e h i n d t h e n e w s n B y R U P E R T M I S S I C K J r C h i e f R e p o r t e r r m i s s i c k @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e tTh e i l l s p l a g u i n g o u r s o c i e t y c a n b e l i k e n e d t o a b e a s t w i t h o n e g r e a t b e l l y a n d m a n y s t a r v i n g m o u t h s . E a c h m o u t h r e p r e s e n t s a n e n d e m i c h u n g e r i n o u r l a n d . O n e m o u t h , t h e h u n g e r f o r j u s t i c e , a n o t h e r , t h e h u n g e r f o r a n a d e q u a t e e d u c a t i o n a n d t h e t h i r d , t h e h u n g e r f o r s e c u r i t y . B u t o n e m o u t h , o n e g a p i n g m a w t h a t l i e s a t t h e c e n t r e o f t h i s b e a s t , r e p r e s e n t s t h e d e e p e s t h u n g e r , t h e m o s t n e g l e c t e d n e e d o f o u r p e o p l e , t h e n e e d t o b e f e d s p i r i t u a l l y . M u c h o f t h e c r i m e w e e x p e r i e n c e i n t h e B a h a m a s c o m e s f r o m a w o u n d t h a t l e a d s u s t o w a n t t o p o s s e s s , a n o b s e s s i o n f o r t h e m a t e r i a l , w h e t h e r t h a t b e m o n e y o r p e o p l e , w h i c h l e a d s t o v i o l e n c e m a n i f e s t i n g i t s e l f i n m u r d e r , a b u s e , a r m e d r o b b e r y o r e v e n s t e a l i n g f r o m o u r j o b s . W e d o n o t v a l u e t h e w o r t h w h i l e a s p e c t s o f o u r e x i s t e n c e , t h e b e a u t y o f h u m a n p o t e n t i a l , t h e r i c h n e s s t o b e f o u n d i n k n o w l e d g e , t h e s a t i s f a c t i o n o f a t r u l y l o v i n g r e l a t i o n s h i p w i t h f a m i l y a n d f r i e n d s . T h e s e a r e t h e t h i n g s t h a t c a n s a v e u s f r o m t h i s h u n g e r , t h a t c a n m a k e u s i n t o a b e t t e r p e o p l e , b e t t e r h u m a n s . H a v i n g t h e s e v i r t u e s i n s t a l l e d i n a p e r s o n i s a j o b l e f t u p t o t h e i n d i v i d u a l o r f a m i l y . N o o t h e r i n s t i t u t i o n i n o u r s o c i e t y p u r p o r t s t o o r i s a b l e t o h e l p w i t h t h i s t a s k . I t a k e t h a t b a c k , t h e r e i s o n e . W e l l , o n e t h a t s s u p p o s e d t o . T h e c h u r c h c l a i m s t o b e o u r s a v i n g g r a c e , t h e p l a c e w h e r e o u r p e o p l e c a n g o f o r t h i s f o o d . N e a r l y e v e r y c o r n e r o f t h i s i s l a n d h a s o n e a n d t h e y e x i s t i n e v e r y c o m m u n i t y . B u t i f i t s s p i r i t u a l f o o d y o u w a n t , y o u l l f i n d t h e i r p a n t r i e s i n e x -W o r s h i p p e r s o f m a t e r i a l t h i n g s P r o s p e r i t y p a s t o r s a r e h e l p i n g t o d e s t r o y t h e B a h a m a sS E E p a g e 5 CT H E i l l s p l a g u i n g o u r s o c i e t y c a n b e l i k e n e d t o a b e a s t w i t h o n e g r e a t b e l l y a n d m a n y s t a r v i n g m o u t h s . E a c h m o u t h r e p r e s e n t s a n e n d e m i c h u n g e r i n o u r l a n d . O n e m o u t h , t h e h u n g e r f o r j u s t i c e , a n o t h e r , t h e h u n g e r f o r a n a d e q u a t e e d u c a t i o n a n d t h e t h i r d , t h e h u n g e r f o r s e c u r i t y . . . I N S I G H T ‘Prosperity pastors’ I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate SEE page eight By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net A POLICE officer is recovering in hospital foll owing a confrontation with a group of violent thugs at the Texaco gass tation in Mackey Street o n Saturday night. Southern Detective Unit officer Ricardo Fer g uson 447 was with two reserve police officers when he came across a g roup of men vandalising the pumps and damaging cars. The off-duty officers a pproached the group only to be set upon by the hooligans. M r Ferguson received head injuries and reserve officers Ferguson 708 andP ratt 782 attended to him while they alerted police. But the men got away i n the car they were travelling in together, and the driver has not yet been Police officer in hospital after attack by thugs Confrontation at gas station TITLE JO YFORKNOWLES By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net AFTER falling short in both singles and men’s dou bles over a span of more than two decades, Mark Knowles’ name is finally inked on a title at the prestigious Wimbledon Tennis Tournament. On the final day of competition at the 2009 Grand Slam in London, England, Knowles and Anna-Lena Groenefeld of Germany came up with the perfect combination to win the mixed doubles. Before a crowd of Bahamian supporters waving their Bahamian flags, the number nine seeds prevailed with a 7-5, 6-3 win over top seeds Leander Paes of India and Cara Black from Zim babwe. “I always envisioned myself being a Wimbledon champion,” said Knowles in MARK KNOWLES and Germany's Anna-Lena Groenefeld pose with their trophies after winning their mixed doubles final against Leander Paes of India and Cara Black of Zimbabwe, on the Centre Court at Wimbledon. A l a s t a i r G r a n t / A P SEE page 10 By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A POLICE officer may be questioned in connection with the second Sunday afternoon armed robbery of a downtown jewellery store yesterday. According to reports the police officer may have acted as a lookout in the robbery of the Breitling Boutique on Bay Street at around 12.30pm yesterday, but this has not yet been confirmed by police. Staff at the store, located between Parliament and Charlotte Streets, were forced to hand over hundreds of dollars worth of designer watches when a robber threatened them at gunpoint. It was the second armed rob bery of a Bay Street store withOfficer may be questioned in connection with armed robbery of jewellery store SEE page eight SEE page eight CARICOM Heads of Government continued to lend their support against the suspension of the constitution of the Turks and Caicos Islands during their summit meeting in Guyana over the week end. Representingthe Bahamas at this summit in Georgetown, Guyana, was Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham who flew to George townonThursday evening. While these heads of government focused their attention primarily on immigration matters, a joint statement was released on Turks and Caicos as follows: “The Member States of the A BAHAMASAIR flight bound for Fort Lauderdale was ground ed in Nassau last night after a warning light came on midway down the runway on takeoff. Passengers had earlier been forced to vacate the plane, scheduled to leave at 6.30pm, due to “mechanical difficulties” but were soon told they could get back on board. Several passengers then described a small puff of smoke coming from underneath the wing before the plane moved. Minutes later the plane was forced to return from the runway with the pilot saying he wasn’t comfortable flying after the warning light came on just before takeoff. Many of the passengers were said to be upset with several saying they would never fly Bahamasair again. Passengers who didn’t want to stay the night were told another plane would be available at 10.30pm. Bahamasair flight grounded after w ar ning light on tak eoff SEE page eight Hubert Ingraham Caricom chiefs stand against T urks constitution suspension

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Error in BEC billing process In brief BEC customers received two bills for the month of May o wing to a technical error in the corporation’s billing p rocess. An accounting adjustment was then made resulting in a second bill being generated. Customers who have received two bills for May 2009 are advised to only pay t he bill dated June 3. T he Bahamas Electricity C orporation apologises for a ny inconvenience caused. I f you have any queries or c oncerns contact the customer service department on 3021 680 or 302-1170. A 53-YEAR-OLD man died when he fell from a Breadfruit tree in The Bluff, Eleuthera, at around 9.45am y esterday. Police are investig ating the incident. Man dies after falling from tree

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A GOOD Samaritan who stopped to help a man injured in a serious car accident had to then fight off the injured man as he tried to steal his car. Pedro Ermilis and his girlf riend pulled over when they saw a grey Honda Saber hit a garbage can, a guard rail and flip over narrowly missinga nearby home at around 1 2.30am on Sunday in Faith Avenue. As Mr Ermilis got out of h is car to check on the driver, t he latter climbed out of his wrecked vehicle, which was s andwiched between the g uard rail and a row of ficus t rees. He then ran over to Mr Ermilis’s 2000 Chevy Impala w here his girlfriend was wait ing and forced himself in ass he jumped out of the car. Mr Ermilis then got in to p revent the man from stealing it and the two men struggled f or control of the car as it s ped off over the hill and hit a utility pole around 500 yards away. Witnesses said the driver of the Honda Saber, registration 21853, had hit a car in the Texaco gas station at the junction of Faith Avenue and Sir Milo Butler Highway and hads ped away as the other driver gave chase. T he car chase ended when the vehicle following lost con t rol, witnesses said. Police have launched an i nvestigation. Anyone with any information which may a ssist should call Crime Stoppers on 328-TIPS (8477 C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Post Bed 3 pc Queen Post Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Q ueen 8 Pc Q ueen 8 Pc $ 3,950 $ 3,950 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,150 $4,150Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through C ommonwealth Bank I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e INDEX M AIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News.............P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 S ports........................................P13,14,15,16 Advt ....................................................P17,18 BUSINESS SECTION B usiness................................P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 INSIGHT SECTION I nsight................................................P1,3,4,5 A dvts........................................................P2,8 Comics........................................................P6 W eather.......................................................P7 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES REAL ESTATE GUIDE 24 PAGES U SA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES A BOVE: M r Ermilis’s 2000 Chevy Impala which hit a utility pole. T OPRIGHT: T he Honda Saber was sandwiched between the guard r ail and a row of ficus trees. Minister recommends a Catholic Charities Fund A CATHOLIC Charities Fund was recommended by L abour Minister Dion Foulkes at the Fourth Degree Toast and reception of the Knights of Columbus on Friday. Mr Foulkes made the suggestion to Archbishop Patrick Pinder and the Roman Catholic community during his speech at the Hermitage, the Archbishop’s residence on the Eastern Road. Mr. Foulkes was representing Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, who is attending the Caricom conference in Guyana. While the minister praised the contribution of the Catholic Church and the good work of the Knights of Columbus, he asked the Church to consider establishing a Catholic Charities fund similar to the Archbishop’s Annual Appeal. However, the Catholic Charities fund would also draw on resources from nonCatholics to serve the needs of all regardless of religious affiliation. He said: “It is my sincere belief that a Catholic Chari ties agency and fund would be an innovative vehicle to expand your social outreach, while providing you and the nation with additional resources to help meet some of the social assistance and development needs of our people. “As minister of social development I would be happy to discuss this matter with Archbishop Pinder whosec ommitment in this area con tinues a fine tradition of social witness by the Roman Catholic community. “Yours is a powerful moral voice both as the leader of your community and in your own right. “The nation and the Gove rnment of the day needs to hear more voices of faith and reason and justice and mercy championing the defence of human dignity, whether the matter is one of social, eco nomic or restorative justice.” Mr Foulkes said he is guided by the tenets of theC hurch’s social tradition, including the principles of human equality, solidarity, care for the poor and the vulnerable. Government initiatives such as the contributory unemployment benefit scheme directing around $7 million in relief to those who have qualified for the benefit, and social services embody these tenets, he said. A programme to retrain 1,000 recently displaced workers also will be launched by government in conjunction with the youth programme, Self Starters, which trains and microfinances young entre preneurs seeking to start their own businesses. He said: “I am proud that even in the midst of severe economic and social disloca tion and pain, as a country we are still making great strides in social development and social assistance. “This is indeed something to toast and celebrate, ever mindful of the work still to be done.” Mr Foulkes asked the Catholic Church to become more involved in current affairs such as budget negotiations as government makes a number of moral decisions. He said: “The national budget is not simply a document filled with numbers, it is essentially a moral document which details national priori ties and how the government of the day, guided by certain values and obligations, nur tures and defends human dignity, however haltingly, imperfectly and faultingly.” Dion Foulkes Crash victim tries to steal car of Good Samaritan

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 A FLAG raising ceremony in Rawson Square commemorated the Bahamas 36th anniversary of Independence o n Friday. M embers of the Royal B ahamas Police Force and R oyal Bahamas Defence Force paraded the national colours before crowds of Bahamians from all walks of life. Also present for the ceremony were Governor General Arthur Hanna, Deputy P rime Minister Brent Symonette, Members of Parliament and local dignitaries. D eputy Prime Minister and M inister of Foreign Affairs B rent Symonette delivered the Independence 2009 mes-s age from Prime Minister H ubert Ingraham. Flag raising commemorates Bahamas Independence P ARLIAMENTARIANS assembled in Rawson Square to participate in the national flag raising ceremony. Seen (l-r Security Minister Tommy Turnquest, Environment M inister Earl Deveaux, Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis, State Minister for C ulture Charles Maynard a nd Senate President Lynn Holowesko. GOVERNOR GENERAL A rthur Hanna and Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs BrentS ymonette at the national flag raising ceremony. S AN JUAN, Puerto Rico DISCOUNTcarrier Spirit Airlines has reportedly acquired Air Jamaica in a government-led effort to privatize the island's money-losing national airline, according to Associated Press. The Jamaica Gleaner newspaper says a d eal was reached after a committee charged w ith the airline's privatization submitted its r eport. The newspaper cites unnamed gove rnment sources. Spirit spokeswoman Misty Pinson was contacted by The Associated Press on Saturday and refuses to comment. Prime Minister Bruce Golding has said Air Jamaica was losing $141 million a year. Spirit is privately owned and flies to 36 c ities in the U.S., Latin America and the C aribbean. Spirit Airlines buys Air Jamaica

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 38%/,& 12 JUNKANOOSUMMERFESTIVALGETSUNDERWAY THEMINISTRYOFTOURISM’S Junkanoo Summer Festival got under way at the weekend at Long Wharf with tourists and residents being thoroughly entertained. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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By SIR RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a consultant and former Caribbean Diplomat) SEEING Jamaican guest workers on a farm in Canada recently reminded me of the close relationship that has always existed between Canada and the Caribbean. Canada’s guest-worker programme for farms is as important to Canadian farmers, who need the labour, as payment for the work is to the many Caribbean workers. There is little hassle over this programme. It has clear rules and guidelines which are strictly observed for the most part about the treatment and living conditions of workers, and it is clearly understood that, at the end of the period, the workers return to their homelands. In the result, Canada’s agricultural produce is harvested and not wasted, and Caribbean workers earn money that helps them and their dependants to survive when they return home. The relationship could not be more mutually beneficial. It is this sort of mutually beneficial relationship that Caribbean countries and Canada should be striving to establish in many other areas. But, it is a relationship that might have to stop short of a Free Trade Agreement (FTA nomic Partnership Agreement (EPA plation by the two sides. This is sad because had the Caribbean negotiated an EPA with Canada before it did so with the European Union (EU terms of the agreement may have been more generous to the Caribbean countries and they could have been used as the basis for the negotiation with the EU. In this connection, the Caribbean might have ended-up with two EPAs that benefited them instead of the full EPA with the EU in which they will be at a considerable disadvantage as its terms evolve. It should be recalled that the terms include eventual free access the Caribbean mar kets for EU companies that will be required to be given “national treatment”. In addition, EU companies will be able to bid for contracts, including government ones, on an equal footing with domestic compa nies. And, of course, over time tariffs have to be removed from EU goods entering the Caribbean markets and this will remove whatever little advantage is enjoyed by domestic producers. Earlier this year, writing about Canada’s trade relationship with the Caribbean Community and Com mon Market (Caricom recalled that under the existing CARIBCAN arrangement Caribbean countries enjoy duty-free access to the Canadian market for 83.2 per cent of their exports, but even so trade in goods with Canadais relatively small for the Caribbean. For Canada, trade in goods with Caricom countries constitute a mere 0.02 per cent of its total trade. There fore, whether or not Canada concludes an FTA with CARICOM countries is neither here nor there for Canada economically. Canada would like to conclude an FTA or EPA with Caricom countries because it has a strong free trade position globally, and an FTA with Caricom would be symbolically important. But, as Professor Norman Girvan has pointed out, any EPA with Canada would have to use the EPA with the EU as a baseline. Canada cannot now accept any lesser terms than has been accorded to the EU. For their part, Caricom countries cannot afford a further EPA of the kind signed with the EU, and especially not in the midst of a global financial crisis which is hurting their economies. In the context, even though Caricom countries have reportedly agreed a mandate for their joint negotiations with Canada, now may not be the most prudent time to pursue it. Nonetheless, the relationship with Canada is too valuable to leave it unattended in a meaningful way. Canadian banks dominate the Caricom domestic financial sector, and they constitute the majority of the offshore banks in Barbados. Further, Canadian firms are heavily involved in tourism, oil exploration and gold mining in the region. Against this background, and until an EPA with Canada could be considered meaningfully, there are still many areas of cooperation that Canada and Caricom could meaningfully pursue. Amongst these could be: Invest ment promotion and protection agreements with CARICOM countries; Tax Information Exchange Agreements with CARICOM coun tries; Double Taxation Agreements with CARICOM countries; Cooperation agreements with CARICOM countries in relation to drug trafficking; Agreements with CARICOM countries for the provision of temporary labour in certain skilled or unskilled areas. Such agreements could help both sides since Canadian investment into Caricom countries would be promoted and, once there, be protected; double taxation agreements would also encourage investment from Canadian firms that would not fear being taxed twice; cooperation agreements on drug trafficking could provide Caricom countries with training and equipment that they need to fight drug traffickers and this would help to retard escalating crime in the region while curtailing drug trafficking into Canada. And if there were agreements on the provision of skilled and unskilled labour, the practice of poaching Caribbean doctors, nurses and teachers could be regulated with Canada making a financial contribution to tertiary education in the region. In this way, Canada could have a reliable source of qualified people, but the institutions could train enough people to ensure that Caricom countries still have a pool to cater for its own needs. Separately, Canada could contin ue its aid programme to the Caribbean which, in a statement in February this year, it listed as a priority. And that aid programme should have both regional and national components directed at deepening the regional integration p rocess and tackling areas of social need from which international financial institutions shy away. As a matter of urgency, Canada could provide Caricom with technical assistance and financial help in establishing a pan-Caricom financial services regulator. Recent global and Caribbean experiences have shown t hat Caricom needs such regulation and Canada, whose banks survived the toxic assets of the US and Europe, were effectively regulated. There should also be a real effort to make Canada-CARICOM consultations meaningful and productive at the level of foreign ministers and prime ministers. Maybe there should be a structured format of biennial meetings of Prime Ministers and a meeting of Foreign Ministers in the in-between years as is now the case between Caricom countries and Britain. Deferring a Free Trade Agreement should not delay strengthening the Canada-Caricom relationship. Responses to: ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 7 Strengthening Canada-Caricom relations WORLDVIEW S IRRONALD SANDERS

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in a week as Little Switzerland staff had been confronted by a gunman who made the same demands of them at around the same time last Sunday. But this week quick-footed p olice of the detective unit of C entral Police Station, in East Street, were fast to respond and ran after a suspect to apprehend him moments after the robbery. Two Breitling watches were r ecovered as well as an imitat ion firearm. A man was arrested in connection with the incident. And police are investigating suspicions that a police officerm ay have been acting as a l ookout in at least the latest r obbery. Police suspect the two robberies Little Switzerland last Sunday and Breitling this Sunday to be connected. S uperintendent in charge of the Central Detective Unit Elsworth Moss said: “We are dealing with one person right now and we are trying to gather information to confirm whether this is so, but we arenot sure yet whether the police o fficer was involved. We have good reason to b elieve the robbery this week and the robbery last week are linked. “It would have been totally unusual and brazen if the samep erson who went there last w eek returned again almost the same time this week, if that is the case. “But we are going to get more information to find out if we can link the two robberies.” M r Moss said he is not conc erned about crime escalating in downtown Nassau as he believes the two robberies were isolated incidents. He added: “We have increased our visibility in Bay S treet, and we are hoping this a rrest will deter others from a ttempting to commit crimes in the area.” Mr Moss said the number of armed robberies in New Prov-i dence has decreased in recent w eeks, barring various street r obberies over the last two weekends. A number of street robberies were committed across New Providence this weekend.I n most cases thieves threate ned their victims with knives, Mr Moss said. A 15 year old was robbed in Flamingo Gardens, Nassau, when he was accosted by two men with a knife who intimi-d ated him into handing over h is Oakley sunglasses. Police are appealing to the public for information to assist investigations and anyone who may have any information is asked to call Crime Stoppers a nonymously on 328-TIPS ( 8477) or call police on 911 or 9 19. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ApplicationsareavailableatanyCommonwealthBankBranchorat TheCollegeofTheBahamas,FinancialAid&HousingDepartment, 2ndFloor,PortiaSmithBuilding. APPLICATIONSMUSTBESUBMITTEDTO: OFFICEOFTHEDIRECTOR FINANCIALAID&HOUSING THECOLLEGEOFTHEBAHAMAS P .O.BOXN-4912 NASSAU,BAHAMASDEADLINEFORAPPLICATIONSISJULY17,2009 “LeaderinPersonalBankingServices”www.combankltd.com 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t2 009SCHOLARSHIP AWARDPROGRAM Commonwealth Bank is offering Scholarship Awards to Bahamian s tudents to attend The College of The Bahamas.(StudentsfromtheFamilyIslandsareinvitedtoapply). is, but we need to contact a f amily member so they can give us some information.” Assistant Superintendent i n charge of the Homicide Division Leon Bethel said: We are trying to find out who she is, how she got there, and what was the c ause of her death. We are asking members of the pub lic to assist us.” T he public are advised to come forward with informa tion in connection to the incident by calling Crime Stop-p ers on 328-TIPS (8477 call police on 911 or 919. Caribbean Community reiterate their view that respect for the rule of law, representative democ-r acy and integrity in public life are fundamental e lements of good governance to which they all strongly adhere. Accordingly, they were deeply disturbed by the adverse findings of Turks and Caicos Commission of Inquiry into possible corruption or other dishonesty in relation to past a nd present elected members of the Legislature. The Caribbean Community continues to hold f ast to the view it expressed in its statement on the s ituation in the TCI on March 24, 2009 that suspending the Constitution of TCI and its democratic institutions and resorting to direct rule by thec olonial power are not the most effective tools to bolster good governance and effective administration in the territory. The Community therefore regrets that the i ntervening period was not used more profitably t o find solutions that would avert the threatened constitutional and democratic dislocation. In this r egard, the rejection by the governor of the prop osal of the new Premier to allow the people of T CI to elect a new government which could have adopted and implemented the measures required to improve the administration of the territory and strengthen integrity in public life was, regrettably, a lost opportunity. The people of the Turksa nd Caicos Islands and their ability to govern t hemselves in the long run will benefit far more from strengthening their administrative and good governance processes through their own efforts than by the administrations through the governor under direct rule.” Following the now infamous commission of inquiry into the neighbouring islands Queen Elizabeth II has signed the necessary consents thatw ill dissolve the parliament of the Turks and C aicos islands and leave power with the crown colony’s British governor for up to two years. The country’s former premier Michael Misick h as already been dismissed from office and is expected to face criminal charges with four other former ministers over allegations of corruptionf ollowing the commissioner’s report. l ocated. Mr Ferguson was rushed to Doctor’s Hospital where he is currently detained, Superintendent Elsworth Moss said. One man has been arrested in connection with the incident. P olice are appealing to the public for information which may lead to the apprehension of all those involved in the attack. If you have any information which may assist investigations call C rime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 911 or 919. Caricom chiefs stand against suspension of Turks constitution FROM page one Body of murdered woman discovered Police officer in hospital after attack by thugs F ROM page one F ROM page one Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear f r om people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story. FROM page one O fficer may be questioned in connection with armed robbery of jewellery store

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 9 KIDZ CITY M ontrose Avenue and Oxford Street (2 doors North of Multi-Discount P.O. Box N-1552 Nassau, Bahamas Phone: 323-3460 Monday Friday 9:30 AM 5:30 PM Saturday 9AM 5PM INDEPENDENCE SALE 15% OFF STOREWIDE Sale Starts Monday July 6th Saturday July 11th Police band hold Beat Retreat THEROYAL Bahamas Police Force B and stage their annual Beat Retreat in Rawson Square yesterday. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE an interview with The Tribune yesterday after their victory. “I really didn’t expect it to come first in mixed doubles, but I will c elebrate it just as if it was in t he men’s doubles.” Having played Wimbledon since 1990, Knowles reached the second round in singles in 1992, 1994, 1995 and 1996 and had his best showing in doubles in 2002w hen he and his former partn er Daniel Nestor got to men’s doubles final in 2002. Knowles, who turns 38 on September 4, has won the Australian Open in 1994, the French Open a year later and the USO pen in 1997 with Nestor, who r epeated as the doubles champ ion with new partner Nenad Z imonjic on Saturday. B ut Wimbledon has been the o ne missing piece of the puzzle i n Knowles’ storied career that has eluded him since he began p laying on the international cir c uit in 1992. Knowles and his Indian partn er Mahesh Bhupathi got eliminated in the men’s doubles in the quarter-final. See the Sports Page for more details. Title joy for Mark Knowles F ROM page one HOME values at the high er end have declined, andb uyers are seeing the best deals in many years. While unpleasant for some sellers, price declines increase affordability for buyers, so if you’ve been renting, now is a fantastic time to turn that monthly payment into equity. Interest rates have inched up, but more affordable housing yield a formula that should put you in a home that you own for payments not too much higher than the amount you are now paying for rent. Not to mention that at a lower purchase price, you should enjoy some good appreciation over the coming years. Take matters into your own hands and buy yourself some peace of mind. Bahamas real estate today Car men Massoni TIME TO MAKE LEMONADE SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico THE CAYMAN ISLANDShas raised about half the money it says it needs to rebuild homes destroyed by a Category 4 hurricane last year, accord ing to Associated Press. The government says it has built 50 homes in Cayman Brac and plans to build nearly 100 more for impoverished owners who lacked insurance. The director of the islands' national recovery fund says the government has raised about $1.2 million of the $3 million needed. Mark Laskin said Friday that he has approved 140 of the 212 applications received. Hurricane Paloma caused an estimated $15 million in damages when it hit in November. The hurricane season began June 1 and runs through November. Cayman r esidents struggle to r ecover from '08 stor m

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By ADRIAN GIBSON ajbahama@hotmail.com T HIS week marks the beginning of a new fiscal year, with world economies facing an ever encompassing economic drought and the Bahamian government having to initiate a stimulus package to stand in the gap because global credit markets remain in a state of near paralysis and the country faces a revenue shortfall while hardly being able to boast of having any indigenous capital. In this seemingly deep and long recession, governments across the globe have been passing stimulus packages to soften the impact of the crisis and create new jobs, save existing ones and maintain, as is the case of the Bahamas, an expensive bureaucracy. In the US, for example, the stimulus package is more than $800 billion. Although the purveyors of socialist doom and gloom are quick to denounce of government’s stimulus initiatives,h ow else do they propose to withstand a global financial meltdown, especially in an economy such as ours that appears to have been built on sand? According to the Central Bank “the outlook for the Bahamian economy remains weak through-out 2009, with developments e xpected to be heavily influenced by the responsiveness of the glob al economyparticularly the USto the stimulus measures implemented by monetary and fiscal authorities. Frankly, with reduced consumer spending by tourists and some locals, and investments byf oreigners and Bahamian businesses currently in the doldrums, the only area left to stimulate gross domestic product (GDP government spending. In the short term, while the stimulus programme will increase the fiscal deficit and the national debt, it will provide for the implementa tion of a government social safe ty net, improvements in public sector infrastructure, create numerous construction projectsand employment, spawn business opportunities and initiate eco nomic activity. As the economic storm surges and continues to corrode the Bahamas’ badly prepared, waning tourism and financial services industries, Bahamians must raise their standards of service and improve their work ethic and our government, along with social leaders and the private sector, must seek to draft a national plan and an updated and revised economic model for the country in order to ensure our long-term sustainability. The contracting local job market and the closure of businesses has caused the unemployment rate to raise to a troubling 12 per cent. Recent unemployment figures reveal that more than 15,000 Bahamians have either been job hunting without success or have been discouraged from finding a job during the last four years and, as of May/June, there are thousands of new job seekers having just graduated from high school/colleges. In order to contain the ballooning deficit and strengthen the economy, the government must continue to streamline expendi tures and even more, invest in teaching citizens new skills and encourage entrepreneurship. Two of the main factors of productiona re human capital and entrepreneurship, with the former referr ing to heightening of the knowledge and skills of workers through education and experience and thereby widen employment opportunities and, as is the case with the latter, to develop new ideas, take financial risks tod evelop their ideas and coordinate the production and sale of g oods and services. Consecutive governments seemingly have failed to notice the value of Japan’s re-emergence after being obliterated by a US-dropped nuclear bomb during the Second World War. Japan exemplifies the importance of developing human capital in order to build as ound, flourishing economy. Why doesn’t the Bahamas, like Barbados, allow for deserving stu dents to study at the College of the Bahamas free of charge? Furthermore, the deficit can only be curtailed if the Bahamian government takes serious steps to implement an efficient systemt o collect hundreds of millions of outstanding tax dollars. More over, a heightened revenue collection drive must be taken by government-run companies such as BTC, BEC and Water and Sewerage, and the government must seek to severely penalize those persons engaging in tax fraud or who have evaded customs and other tax collection agencies. The Customs department, the country’s chief revenue earner, is thought to have lost millions per annum due to duty avoidance, corruption and erroneous practices. The government must immediately move legislation to close tax loopholes and revenue leakages, particularly to mitigate against those unscrupulous Bahamian companies that use phony invoices and practice under-invoicing and/or set-up wholly-owned US “shell companies”, to cheat the government and honest taxpayers of millions of dollars per year. The antiquated Customs Management Act must be amended to protect the revenue base in Freeport, loopholes in the Business License Act must be closed and casino and local/foreign-o wned real property taxes must be collected. According to a 2007 A uditor General report, there was nearly $400 million in outstanding real property taxes owed to the government. This amount has no doubt increased and, if the reigns of revenue collection are tightened, the country couldu nquestionably achieve a budget surplus. A ccording to an International Monetary Fund (IMF was also suggested that the Bahamas’ government “strengthen administration of existing property and trade taxes, review FDI (Foreign Direct Investment incentives and shift the tax base to domestic consumptionendors i ng the adoption of a broad-based VAT.” In widening our tax revenue base, a value added tax should be implemented locally. This form of taxation has been adopted by 140 countries around the world and would represent a prime candidate for the Bahamas. Frankly, this form of taxation C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 11 An economic model for the Bahamas Y OUNG M AN S V IEW SEE page 12

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE once effectively administered would be comprehensive and difficult for persons to circumvent since it must be tacked on to all purchases. As the IMF report suggests, “sustainable revenueenhancing measures, including VAT, would reduce the national debt by 30 per cent GDP over the medium term.” A corporate tax and taxes on profits, revenues and/or assets under management of international clients/companies must also be levied. Over the years, consecutive governments have paid lip service to development, entrepreneurship and empowering citizens. Although legislation such as the Industries Encouragement Act, the Tariff Act, the Export Manufacturing Industries Encouragement Act, the Agricultural Manufacturing Act and the Spirits and Beer Act are in place, there has seemingly been a lack of support for industries. While Bahamians are capable of selfsustenance and engaging in viable crop production, there also appears to be a lack of support in the commercial sector for Bahamian foodstuffs, in part due to an inferiority complex that many Bahamians have seemingly adopted when dealing with native produce and successive governments failing to increase the import tariffs particularly in support of items made or grown locally. The government must promote national youth development programmes and keep young people focused on making their contribution to nation-building. In Jamaica, the government has demonstrated its faith in that country’s youth by budgeting for $3 million to be directed to a Youth Empowerment Programme, with set goals to assist new graduates with becoming employed, setting up training seminars to help them manage businesses and providing for youngsters to submit ideas of the kind of enterprise they wish to start. Furthermore, the microlending approach adopted by the Jamaicans for the start up of small to medium-sized businesses, and additional monies being set aside to help create and sustain these businesses, should be furthera dopted by the Bahamas although the government took a similar approach to lending mon ey in 2007. The National Training and Retraining Programme was a great initiative undertaken in the 2009/2010 Budget, which also pro poses to provide opportunities for persons to expand their skillsets in areas such as masonry, wielding, carpentry, tile laying, day care, customer service, data processing, computer skills, landscaping, electrical works, language skills landscaping, electrical works, language skills and housekeeping. As a nation we must move from an economic model that seems stuck in a time-warp, which focuses on year-round tourism and financial services, to a competitive diversified model that expands public revenue and liberalizes our economy. The allocation of venture capital for entrepreneurs can assist in the diversification of our economy and the establishment of new industries such as food processing, consulting and advisory services, information technology, fisheries processing, off-shore and local research and development setups, canning, pre-packaged native tea/meals/spices/sauces, marine farms and exports, cattle rearing and so on. Whatever happened to the Domestic Investment Board? What role is the Bahamas Development Bank playing during these floundering economic times? In a country of scarce resources and rampant consumerism, it is high-time that those Bahamians living beyond their means and in constant pursuit of material possessions most likely bought on credit be prudent spenders and heed PM Hubert Ingraham’s admonition not to “hang (their than (they Thus far, it appears that government is demonstrating fiscal prudence in the management of the Bahamian people’s money, so as not to endanger our national economic welfare and pass on an unsustainable debt burden to future generations. The recent budget exercise revealed much about some members of the Opposition who resorted to partisan histrionics instead of proposing constructive and considered alternatives to positions put forward by the government. With the IMF suggesting that t here will be a “difficult transition period” to economic recov ery as it is expected to be much weaker and slower than in previ ous recessions, it is high-time that certain of our elected representatives understand that their elec tion does not certify them to talk foolishness for five years. FROM page 11 Economic model

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4.68$4.51$4.69T he information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.21 $4.30 $4.25 t t n n r r t t !!! bn $)&$%'+!,(**'#&! %$( !&*'(%*$'%#'.'%%#%) !((*$$!$nn (!-"%%'&$) %*()%& !) !)(!.""!&'#!*# #'$')(.!$)'!%''%%#) !(%+&$ %*$)!%$(&'!+(*%#&",!) ''%! "*-*'."!+!$ !( brt n B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor P rivate Bahamian airlines and charter o perators fear “drac onian” increases of as much as 10,000 per cent in their fee structure could “kill”t he industry, Tribune Business can reveal, with the Civil Avia-t ion Department (CAD n ing to implement the changes f rom August 1, 2009. Industry sources, speaking to Tribune Business on condition o f anonymity because they were not authorised to speak publicly, said that under the CAD’sp roposed “across the board” fee i ncreases, the operator of a fiveseater aircraft flying 50 hours per month could expect to see a $13,000 per annum fee rise. This newspaper was told that the fee increases include at ripling or 200 per cent rise in landing fees at Family Island airports, the rates jumping from a current $18.56 per landing to $56 per landing for a 19-seat aircraft. Other fee increases divulged to Tribune Business are as follows: Monitoring charge: From a c urrent $0 to $1,000, a 1,000 per cent increase Fleet charge: For a five seater Aztec aircraft, this will go from $0 to $7,000 – a 7,000 per cent increase. For a Beech 1 9 seater aircraft, the fee will rise from $0 to $10,000, a 10,000 per cent increase Charge to lease a foreign aircraft: Current: $0. Proposed: $ 4,000, a 4,000 per cent increase Charter permit renewal: C urrent: $500 per annum. Proposed: $1,200, a 240 per cent i ncrease Renewal of scheduled perm its: Current: $500 per annum. P roposed: $1,200, a 240 per cent i ncrease. Both large foreign airl ines and Bahamian operators, including small charter companies, will pay the same rate Pilot licences: From $0 to $250 for a six-month Air Trans p ort US licence. From $0 to $200 for a one-year US commercial pilots licence. Fuel suppliers to Bahamian airlines in the Family Islands will have to pay a tax equivalent to $0.07 per gallon to the Civil A viation Department, on top of existing government taxes A source close to the B ahamas Association of Air T ransport Operators, the indust ry group that represents more than 20 charter companies and p rivate islands, questioned why the Government and CAD w ere looking to introduce these f ee increases in such a d epressed economic environm ent, especially given that they had decided against doing so in 2005. The fees are included in the Landing, Parking, Tie Downa nd Air Navigation Regulations 2005, part of The Civil Aviation Act. “These things [fee increases] were in fact proposed some time ago back in 2005,” the industry source said. “They did not come into being then ‘Draconian’ 10,000% fee rises may ‘kill’ private airline firms * Bahamian operators say recession ‘wrong time’for Civil Aviation to implement ‘across the board’ fee rises * Family Island landing fees triple, with fleet charges increasing by four-digit percentages * Competition already unfair, with Bahamasair and foreign carriers exempt * New fees a potential ‘double whammy’, given planned NAD increases S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B COMPETITION is already unfair with Bahamasair and foreign carriers e xempt... n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor C ITY Markets has retained 25 of the 27 staff displaced by closure of its Independence Dri ve store elsewhere within the company’s operations, its chief executive has confirmed to Tribune Business, although seven w orkers at its “overstaffed” warehouse have been let go. Sunil Chatrani said the 11store grocery chain had decided to downsize its warehouse because it was overstaffed based on the volume of goods it handled, the majority of those affected being part-time per s onnel. The City Markets chief exec u tive said it was agreed with the u nion that represents the company’s line staff that the redun dancies would be on a “last in, f irst out basis”. He explained: “We had to cut our numbers down. There’s only seven affected. We were overs taffed based on the through put at the warehouse. We had too many employees at thew arehouse, and the ones we had to let go are mostly part-timers. But there are no other staff cuts t o be made.” Elsewhere, Mr Chatrani said “only two people out of 27 wered isplaced” when City Markets, as previously revealed by Tri bune Business, closed its store at the Independence D rive/Tonique Williams-Dar ling Highway on June 24, coinciding with the end of the com-p any’s financial year. City Markets retains 25 of 27 staff from closed store n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CREDIT demand by B ahamian consumers has “fallen very sharply” by between 3040 per cent, a senior banking e xecutive has told Tribune Busi ness, with consumer loans having contracted by some $29.49m illion year-over-year during t he first five months of 2009. With Bahamian commercial banks having collectively writ t en off a net $39.8 million in bad loans during the year to end-May, and provisions being made for a further $70.4 mill ion worth, Anwer Sunderji, Fidelity Bank (Bahamas executive, said the industry’sa sset quality would continue to d eteriorate for as long as the recession lasted. “Credit demand has fallen very sharply, by between 30-40 per cent, as Bahamian consumers deleverage and banks tighten up on credit criteria. This process is expected to continue as long as the economy remains in a downward spiral,” Mr Sunderji told Tribune Busi ness. Statistics published by the Central Bank of the Bahamas last week showed that consumer loans had actually declined year-over-year by $29.49 million for the first five years of 2009, compared to growth of $45.82 million in the comparative period. As for mortgages, growth in this lending category had declined by almost 50 per cent d uring the first five months of 2009, falling to $46.74 million compared to $92.19 million in 2008. Overall, Bahamian dollar c redit contracted by $16.61 million for the first five months of 2009, compared to $154.34 million worth of growth in 2008. For May 2009, consumer loans contracted by $230,000 compared to a $10.1 million e xpansion in May 2008, while the total amount of mortgage loans expanded by $7.94 million – less than half the $16.84 million expansion in May 2008. “We expect it to continue to deteriorate,” Mr Sunderji said of the commercial banking sec tor’s asset quality position. “The Central Bank is forecasting an expected improvement in the Bahamian economy in the latter half of 2010, and they expect unemployment to increase further. “With that as the backdrop, we can only expect asset quality to deteriorate. So it’s not at all surprising that the loan arrears rate is up to just under 14 per cent (13.98 per cent Credit demand drops 30-40% * Responds to claims over Babak work p ermit renewal * Claims St George estate owes companies ‘millions of dollars’ for former receivership n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor THE late Edward St G eorge’s estate has been accused of committing “an improper abuse” by continuing t o “threaten” the Grand B ahama Port Authority (GBPA over issues such as the renewalo f the chairman’s work permit, Port accuses the St George estate of 'improper abuse' S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 7 7 B B * Releases seven workers from ‘overstaffed’ warehouse * Resuming direct imports ‘last piece of puzzle’ to completing turnaround * Grocery chain ‘still losing money but not to extent we were’, with all major cost savings realised Consumer loans contract almost $30m year-overyear, with almost $40m in loans written-off S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By RoyalFidelity Capital Market s LAST week, investors trade d in eight out of the 24 listed securities, of which three declined and five remained unchanged. E E Q Q U U I I T T Y Y M M A A R R K K E E T T A total of 9,879 shares c hanged hands, representing a decrease of 11,382 shares or 54 per cent, compared to the previous week's trading volume of 21,261 shares. Commonwealth Bank (CBL w as the volume leader for a seco nd consecutive week with 5 ,338 shares trading hands, its stock ending the week unchanged at $5.64. J. S. Johnson (JSJ lead decliner, falling by $0.10t o end the week at a new 52week low of $10.40 on a volume of 1,000 shares. Finance Corpor ation of the Bahamas (FIN traded 1,000 shares, its stock declining by $0.07 to also enda t a 52-week low of $10.90. FOCOL Holdings (FCL t raded 2,000 shares, its share p rice dropping by $0.05 to end t he week at $5.04. B B O O N N D D M M A A R R K K E E T T Investors traded the following bonds this week: * $10,000 (par value t y Bank (Bahamas Notes Due 2017 (FBB17 * $10,000 (par value Bank (Bahamas Due 2013 (FBB13 * $50,000 (par value B ank (Bahamas Notes Due 2015 (FBB15 C C O O M M P P A A N N Y Y N N E E W W S S E E a a r r n n i i n n g g s s R R e e l l e e a a s s e e s s : : Bahamas Waste (BWL the quarter ending March 31, 2 009, BWL posted net income of $208,000, representing a decrease of $21,000 or 9 perc ent compared to $228,000 for t he same period last year. Sales and services revenues fell by $81,000 to total $1.9 mill ion, while cost of sales decreased by $68,000 to total $1.2 million. Total operating e xpenses stood at $490,000 comp ared to $483,000 in the 2008 first quarter. Earnings per share remained unchanged at $0.05. T otal assets and liabilities as at March 31, 2009, stood at $9.8 million and $1.1 million respec-t ively, compared to $9.6 million ROYAL FIDELITY MARKETWRAP The Bahamian Stock Market F F I I N N D D E E X X 7 7 8 8 8 8 . . 5 5 6 6 ( ( 5 5 . . 5 5 4 4 % % ) ) Y Y T T D D B B I I S S X X C C L L O O S S I I N N G G C C H H A A N N G G E E V V O O L L U U M M E E Y Y T T D D P P R R I I C C E E S S Y Y M M B B O O L L P P R R I I C C E E C C H H A A N N G G E E AML$1.39 $-0-18.71% BBL$0.63 $-0-4.55%B OB$6.94 $-0-9.16% BPF$11.00 $-0-6.78% BSL$7.92 $-0-22.28% BWL$3.15 $-00.00% CAB$11.39$-0-18.82% CBL$5.64 $5,338-19.43% C HL$2.74 $-541-3.18% C IB$10.38 $-0-0.67% CWCB$3.11 $-0.22038.22% DHS$1.77 $-0-30.59% FAM$7.76 $-0-0.51% FBB$2.37 $-00.00% FCC$0.30 $-00.00%F CL$5.04 $-0.052,000-2.51% F CLB$1.00 $-00.00% FIN$10.90$-0.071,000-8.17% ICD$5.50 $-0-10.28% JSJ$10.40 $-0.101,000-6.31%P RE$10.00 $-00.00% S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B

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EXTENSIVE work has to be done on the Water and Sewerage Corporation’s infrastructure in the downtown area, according to the minister responsible for the utility, with the Ministry of Works forced to postpone its paving exercises as a result. Phenton Neymour, minister of state for the environment, told Tribune Business that he could not say what exactly needs to be done in the downtown area, though it has been said that the problems stem from dilapidated sewer lines. Minister of Works Neko Grant assured Tribune Business two weeks ago that Bay Street would be paved in its entirety. Sources close to the Ministry of Works subsequently suggested that the department considered paving only the street itself and leaving the area several feet away from the sidewalk unpaved the area typically excavated by public utilities. But Mr Grant said last week: “It would make no sense to pave the main Bay Street when there is considerable work to be done by Water and Sewerage.” Now, the downtown area, in much need of paving after crews from several government utilities, including Water & Sewerage, tore into it recently, will be the only part of a strip extending from Caves Village to the bridge to Paradise Island without fresh asphalt. The major paving programme was undertaken as part of an initiative to beautify the main northern corridor before the Miss Universe beauty pageant in August. However, Mr Grant said it would not be a sensible decision to pave the downtown area for the pageant when the road would have to be torn up again when the pageant is over to repair and replace the damaged infrastructure. “We wanted to provide a sensible ride for Miss Universe, but Miss Universe will come and go and we need to provide proper infrastructure for people who will traverse these roads on an annual basis,” he said. n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor IMPORTERS of perishable goods and currency have only five days from when they take delivery to submit due entries and Customs/Excise duties, the Comptroller of Customs has told Tribune Business, as his department moves to turn around most shipments in 24 hours. Glenn Gomez told this news paper that the formerly 10-day bond under the C19 entry declaration had been amended and reduced to five days as of July 1, 2009, seemingly an effort by Customs and the Governmentto enhance cash flow and bolster revenue collection. Previously, importers of perish ables/currency had 10 days in which to submit entries and due duties to Customs, but that time has been slashed by 50 per cent. Responding further to concerns about the Customs Department’s move to enforce “the letter of the law” on the C19 and prevent it from being used as a ‘catch all’ to take delivery of imports without prior payment, Mr Gomez told Tribune Business: “There is alsoin effect a stipulation in the law where importers, if they desire, can pay duties prior to the arrival of their vessel and their goods.” With prior payment and sub mission of entries, their goods only needed to be examined on the dock before delivery could be taken. And Mr Gomez added: “If they don’t have a bond, or don’t have perishable goods, there is still a way that merchants can have imported goods cleared quickly to get them in-store. They can put up a deposit, then come back with their entries and reconcile them to the deposit.” As for complaints about Cus toms’ changed policy and adherence to the law in relationto the C19, Mr Gomez said sim ply: “If I bring in goods, it is known I have to pay duty, and I should not expect to get goods without paying duty.” Addressing the concerns of importers and brokers regard ing the efficiency of clearing incoming shipments, the Comp troller told Tribune Business:“We’ve been turning around entries in 24 hours, other than entries with multiple lines and several pages. That will take a little longer.” Companies could leave their entries and have shipments turned around within a day, Mr Gomez said, while persons com ing in off the street to collect imports were being dealt with in one to two hours, once duties were paid and the correct documents submitted. “There really shouldn’t have to be any concerns by the average importer in getting goods from Customs in a timely fash ion,” Mr Gomez told Tribune Business. “If they pay for their goods at Thompson Boulevard [Customs HQ] with the cashier, and thengo to the dock, even that process has been speeded up. We’re getting the documents through the same day in time for the person’s arrival, instead of a day or two. “There’s still things to do, but the idea is to move the process along so that people will not have to hang around Customs. We’re making improvements every day. One of the things I want to do is implement an automated system; it’s not what it should be. That’s some months down the line, but we’ll be able to show people that Customs has really improved.” O n the C19 situation, Mr G omez had told Tribune Busi ness previously: “The C19 is now being utilized in the manner for which it was designed by law, for perishables, gold, bullion and coins. “They’ve been abusing that f orm, and now that abuse has been stopped. They have been clearing motor cars, furniture and heaven knows what else on that form. Why should I allow you to abuse that form, take delivery of goods and not pay?” Mr Gomez said the vast majority of items outstanding before Customs, many of which dated back several years, related to C19 form declarations. You can’t have your cake and e at it too,” he added. “Everyone wants to get a freebie, and the Government has to bear the costs of having those goods come in and people do not come back to pay,” Mr Gomez said. There’s just too many loopholes in Customs, and it’s time to bring the loopholes to a stop. Whether internally or externally, we have to address these issues.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 3B Major Water Corp work in downtown Customs cuts 10-day bond to just five days Phenton Neymour

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Tribune Business can reveal. A June 4, 2009, letter from the companies’ external counsel, Thomas Evans, QC, to Fred Smith, the attorney for the estate, responded to the latter’s l etters objecting to the renewal of Hannes Babak’s work permit by alleging that Mr Smith’s clients had “no proper (or actual) legal role in the GBPA or Port Group Ltd.” This position appeared to be based on the fact that the Supreme Court threw out the St George estate’s “oppression” action against Mr Babak and the Hayward Family Trust, although that verdict is under appeal. Writing that “the action was struck out as hopeless and bound to fail”, Mr Evans wrote to Mr Smith: “Your clients are presently indebted to Port Group Ltd and the GBPA for several million dollars, as a result of their wrongful imposition of a receivership on those companies. “Whilst yours and your clients’ personal dedication toa fundamentally misconceived cause has been noted, you must be aware it cannot be otherwise than an improper abuse for your clients to continue to threaten these organisations with which they have no proper (or actual And he added: “We wish to point out that the estate of Edward St George is not a shareholder, director or officer of Port Group Ltd or GBPA, and therefore has absolutely no standing on which to complain about the internal affairs and operations of our clients.” Mr Smith and the St George estate had objected to the renewal of Mr Babak’s work permit due to the fact that arbitration proceedings he had com menced previously against Intercontinental Diversified Corporation (IDC man-based holding company for the GBPA and Port Group Ltd, were still live and could potentially expose the two companies to a multi-million dollar liability. They had also claimed that his continued role as chairman, while arbitration proceedings were still ongoing, could place the companies and their Boards in a potential conflict of interest. However, Mr Evans coun tered that the London-based arbitration proceedings were between Mr Babak and IDC solely. He added that Lady Henrietta St George, who does sit on the GBPA and Port Group Ltd Boards, could “raise the prospect” of joining the two companies to the proceedings, “however misconceived such an application may be.” And Mr Evans wrote: “In relation to your expressed concern for the executors of the estate of Edward St George not to be taken to have ‘acquiesced, waived or consented’ to Mr Babak’s ‘resumption of activities’, the point belabours that which our clients considered the Supreme Court to have made plain. The estate has no role in relation to Port Group Ltd and GBPA “Your clients are obviously u nhappy with the outcome of the election for chairmanship of Port Group Ltd or GBPA, but that does not justify your clients’ attempts to interfere with the internal affairs of our clients.” M r Evans also addressed, via a June 8, 2009 letter, the issue Mr Smith had raised over Mr Babak’s work permit renewal in a document sent to the Prime Minister’s Office and the Cabi net, plus the Department of Immigration. I n his letter, sent to director of immigration Jack Thompson, the Immigration Board and Fausteen Major-Smith, the deputy immigration director in charge of Grand Bahama, Mr Evans rebutted the St George estate’s allegation that Mr Babak submitted incorrect information on his original 2006 work permit application. Mr Evans said Mr Babak’s original appointment was “on the understanding that his remuneration would be performance-based. Therefore there was not (nor could there be any) salary stipulated on the application as a set remuneration for his work as chairman. “It was never stated that Mr Babak would not be remunerated for work done. It was upon this uncertainty that the Immigration Department assessed the highest rate possible (at this time) for the permit, $10,000 per annum.” Mr Babak’s appointment as chairman was ratified when a majority of directors voted in his favour. “It is noteworthy that Mr Babak was supported by all members of the respective Boards of GBPA and Port Group Ltd (save Lady Henrietta St George),” Mr Evans said. “Therefore, Lady St George cannot seek to accomplish by letter that which she could not by the laws which Port Group Ltd and GBPA govern their internal operations.” Mr Evans added that Lady H enrietta was part of the Board’s chairman’s remuneration sub-committee, which determined details of Mr Babak’s compensation. “Indeed, Lady Henrietta St George appeared by her proxya nd actively participated in disc ussion in relation to the same,” he wrote. “In addition, Lady Henrietta St George by her proxy has since Mr Babak’s election aggressively participat ed in subsequent Board meetings chaired by Mr Babak. Therefore, one would assume that if Lady St George’s convictions were as passionately felt as stated in Mr Smith’s letter, then she would not have taken a part of the sub-com mittee or subsequent meetings of the Board of Directors.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs Port accuses the St George estate of ‘improper abuse’ Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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Of those not staying with City Markets, whose parent firm is Bahamas Supermarkets, one was pregnant and the other had decided he “wanted to part company”. City Markets now has around 686 staff, and Mr Chatrani said: “We’re very conscious of the employees. At the end of the day, they’ve been loyal to us and we want to provide the level of employment we provided in the past.” Meanwhile, City Markets remains in a holding pattern asit waits for the multi-million dollar equity capital injection from its majority shareholder consortium to come through, Mr Chatrani describing this and the re-starting of the ‘direct import’ programme as “the last piece of the puzzle” in the company’s turnaround. He said that while he and the management team had extracted more than the previously a nnounced $5.3 million in annualised cost savings from City Markets’ business operations, there were no more major cuts to be made. On the status of the new equity financing from investors in BSL Holdings, the consortium that owns a majority 78 per cent stake in Bahamas Supermarkets, Mr Chatrani said: “It’s pretty much the sameas before. It’s all bureaucracy, t he paperwork, and I’m hoping i t comes in sooner rather than l ater.” It is still unclear precisely what percentage of the new equity capital will make its wayto Bahamas Supermarkets at the operating company level, and what will be retained by BSL Holdings to meet its own financial obligations. The majority shareholder has some $24 million in bank debt owed to the Royal Bank of Canada to service. While City Markets’ sales were “still flat in this economy”,Mr Chatrani said the business was holding its ground and had been “restructured in terms of expenses”. He told Tribune Business: “There’s no more major cuts to be done now. We’ve made all the cuts we can. Our issue now is to get back into the direct import programme, which will improve margins and gross profitability. Puzzle “The last piece of the puzzle is to import on the scale thatwe used to. That’s the last piece of the puzzle to turning this company around. We’ve reduced our losses. We’re still losing money, but nowhere near the extent we were in the past. The turnaround will come when we get into our import programme.” Mr Chatrani previously told T ribune Business that City Mark ets current sources “less than 1 0 per cent of its product inventory from abroad, a figure that will increase to 20 per cent once the direct import programme restarts. With direct imports, some 2,900 SKUs (stock keeping units) – chiefly high-end, high-margin products will return to the chain’s shelves on a more consistent basis, thus enhancing consumer selection and price points. Gross profit margins, meanwhile, which had fallen as low as 17.8 per cent during City Markets’ 2008 financial year, had recovered to 25.4 per cent within the last quarter, with the grocery chain looking to get back to historical margins of 28 per cent as rapidly as possible. Mr Chatrani also previously told Tribune Business that the financial year 2008 audit’s completion would “follow very shortly after” the new funding was received, as “everything revolves around the financing”. Bahamas Supermarkets is projected, through management a ccounts, to have incurred a $ 13.429 million loss for the year. H e cautioned, though, that the audit completion would not be immediate, as external auditors KMPG would need to test various assumptions to verify their conclusions. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 5B THE COLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs CAREER OPPORTUNITY Batch OperatorWe are looking for a Batch Operator to perform computer operations in an AS/400 & Windows data centre setting. The position runsbatch jobsthat support systems involving day-end processing; monitors performance of allservers, networks, communications devices, etc; and initiates corrective action as needed. Qualifications/Experience/Skills: x 2+ years AS/400 operations experience a plus x Hands-on experience in batch job processing, monitoring, back-ups x Experience handling Windows technical issues x Ability to work well independently as well as in a team environment x Capacity to handle stressful situations, prioritize workload and perform multiple tasks concurrently x Excellent problem solving and troubleshooting skills x Excellent oral and written communication skills x Attention to detail x Ability to learn different technologies between various software packages for the distribution of data x Strong work ethic x Flexible work schedule (2:00pm-10:00pm) Responsibilities: x Perform operating and maintenance functions for mid range systems; x Monitor overnight batch processing and perform print processing as scheduled in accordance with current service levels; x Provide all aspects of media handling (backup media loading/unloading, dispatch/ receipt of offsite media, etc); x Process in an accurate and timely manner, information in and through the computer systems including system utilities, production and testing batch runs and quality control; x Maintain current knowledge of operating procedures and standards; x Safeguard security of data centre equipment, media and data files; x Keep records of hardware down time; x Follow procedures to run job requests from programmer and requester; x Run system and application backups per written run log; x Manage tape retention log; x Test, document and promote software changes in accordance with industry best practices and standards; and x Participate in, and possibly direct, problem definition and resolution activities Apply by 6 July 2009: Send electronic rsum via email to careers@colinaimperial.com Subject: Batch Operator or Send rsum to: Human Resources Manager 308 East Bay Street P.O. Box N-4728 Nassau, Bahamas City Markets retains 25 of 27 staff from closed store F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 502-2371 today!

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because of the potential downside to the implementation of these taxes at the time. “Now, it’s even worse. They can’t be contemplated.” Among the airlines likely to be impacted are Western Air, Southern Air, Sky Bahamas, Pineapple Air, Flamingo Air, Cat Island Air, and First Choice Airlines. The source said the Civil Aviation Department let-ter informing them all of the fee increases was received around Wednesday last week, effectively giving them a month’s notice, with the implementation deadline set for August 1, 2009. Although no reason for why the increase was being implemented now was given, the private airlines believe it reflects the Government – and Public Treasury’s – increasing desperation to get their hands on any available revenue, given the expanding fiscal deficit and a national debt-to-gross domes-tic product ratio that now stands above 50 per cent. But the industry source warned that the fee increase would impact the bottom line at private Bahamian airlines during a period when many were struggling, and could even affect the ability of some to survive. Given that the industry employs several hundred persons and is a key transportation avenue linking New Providence and Grand Bahama with the Family Islands, not only communities in the latter but tourism, too, could suffer if private airline services are disrupted. At least part of the fee increase will likely have to be passed on to passengers in terms of increased ticket and airlift costs, thus impacting the cost and accessibility of a Bahamian vacation. That is exactly what Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, has said he wants to avoid at all costs. “You’re looking at a time when the Bahamian airline operators have made substantial investments in the expansion of their fleets and acquisition of new equipment, so many are spread thin,” the industry source told Tribune Business. “Margins in the airline industry are very thin, so these things [the fee increases] go straight to the bottom line. Most of the operators are very small, five and seven-seater aircraft with two planes. “You’re going to impact things like crazy. A guy with a five-seater plane and two pilots, it’s going to kill him, because he does not have the margins to absorb this. It’s going to have a huge effect, and as you go up the chain it’s going to get worse.” And the source added: “For a very long time, the Government feels we’ve been making money and they want to relieve us of some of these monies We all live in the real world, but this is not the time for this. “This is not the operating environment to look at increasing fees, and certainly not with such draconian increases. This cannot happen in this environment. The economy is too fragile. “It’s across the board. It’s corporate fees, and it has gone to every aspect of the operation. It has gone to the engineer, the mechanic, the pilots, and includes the $0.07 per gallon. It’s just bad news all around. Obviously, like anything else, something will have to give, and we will see a ripple effect down through the system.” While Bahamian private airlines and charter operators understood the Government’s need to maximise its revenue collections, they suggested that instead of increasing fees and taxes upon their industry, it first should seek to collect the “several hundred million dollars” in unpaid taxes – especially real property tax – that it was already owed. The fee increases on the Bahamian aviation industry were unlikely to offset the Government’s fiscal deficit by themselves, and the sector source pointed out that companies were already competing on an uneven ‘playing field’ by virtue of Bahamasair being exempt from the very same rises they were facing. Foreign airlines, too, are largely exempt. The source questioned why Bahamian-owned private airlines were being seen as a tax revenue source at a time when the Government was handing out all manner of investment incentives and concessions to the likes of the cruise lines via the Cruise Overnight Incentive Act amendments. He also cited the fact that Bahamasair and all the foreign airlines were allowed to bring in replacement parts duty free, whereas his industry was not, and the 2009-2010 Budget reforms that allow foreign boat operators to import replacement parts duty-free into the Bahamas. Implementing the CAD fee increases, the industry source said, would act as a “deterrent” to the Association’s efforts to have private plane owners, who currently provide unregulated charter services, to become “certified and regulated”. On the industry’s current financial performance, he told Tribune Business: “We’re down across the board and they’re [the companies] just holding their own and hoping that whenever the economy turns around, they will turn a profit. Many operations are holding on. “It’s just an unfortunate time, and the general consensus is that we’re hoping the Government will reconsider it.” The source added that the Bahamian private airline operators were also faced with a “double whammy”, given the Nassau Airport Development Company’s (NAD 23.6 per cent increase in landing fees, and a 6.1 per cent in parking and other related aircraft fees, at Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA effect from January 1, 2010. On the CAD fee increases, it is quite possible the Government will argue that the current fees levied are undervalued and have not been increased for some time. Any revenues raised may also be used to enhance Family Island airports. Yet the fact major fee increases of this nature are being contemplated is again likely to raise concern in some quarters of ‘stealth taxes’, following a Budget in which the Prime Minister again pledged that there would be no tax or fee increases apart from one case impacting the latter. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE <(6<28&$1 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW (/721-26(3+RI)267(5 6755(7&+,33,1*+$01$66$8%$+$0$6 LV D SSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG &LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH % DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\ UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOG VHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQ W ZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH WK G D\ R XO\ W WKH 0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 127,&( ‘Draconian’ 10,000% fee rises may ‘kill’ private airline firms I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 7B /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-XO\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $ UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV Aug ust , Aug ust , 5th 5th INGRAHAMs A UTO ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES CO. LTD. Other Services Includes: *Auto Body Repairs *Diagnostics Test *Mechanical Repairs *Brakes, C&V Joints Replacement *Head Jobs *Engine Overhaul *Electrical Repairs *Repair & Rebuild Starters *Rebuild & RepairWireHarness *Repair & InstallWindow Motors *Repair Lights & Switches C C o o l l l l e e g g e e A A v v e e n n u u e e , , O O a a k k e e s s F F i i e e l l d d Monday—Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am 1pm TUNE UP SPECIAL S S E E R R V V I I C C E E : : O O i i l l O O i i l l F F i i l l t t e e r r A A i i r r F F i i l l t t e e r r F F u u e e l l F F i i l l t t e e r r S S p p a a r r k k P P l l u u g g s s ( ( p p a a r r t t s s n n o o t t i i n n c c l l u u d d e e d d ) ) T T e e l l : : 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 5 8 8 3 3 5 5 / / 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 5 4 4 3 3 6 6 We also import parts for any make and model vehicle with an Impressive turn-around. Come in and see us today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redit demand drops 30-40 per cent non-performing loans up to 7.7 per cent of total loans. “Banks have had to add to their loan loss provisions, and we fully expect we will continue to have to do so until the economy starts to recover. Our expectations of recovery are consistent with the Central Bank’s perspective.” Mr Sunderji said the banking sector’s ability to recover the full value of loans provided for depended heavily on whether the loan in question was secured. He added that home loans secured by a mortgage on the real estate involved presented “a very good chance of recovery. Banks have historic ally not made a loss on mortg ages”. O ne bright spot for monetary policymakers and the commercial banking sector has been the expansion in sector liquidity, the amount of surplus assets available for onward lending purposes. This stood at a healthy $538.65 million at endMay 2009, as compared to $319.03 million a year ago, after a $276.7 million increase yearto-date and $132.74 million growth in May. The expansion in commercial banking sector liquidity is as a direct result of reduced credit demand and tighter lending conditions, which have made it more difficult for Bahamian borrowers to qualify for loans. As for other consequences of the liquidity expansion, Mr Sunderji told Tribune Business: “You can expect a softening in deposit rates, which will likely take place in the next few months.” While this will do no favours to savers, Mr Sunderji s aid it would be impossible to “lay-off” the surplus liquidity build-up in the system without any impact on spreads. And foreign exchange reserves had also “stayed buoyant”, having risen to $758.63 million at end-May 2009, compared to $698.34 million a year before, after enjoying a $119.97 million expansion in May. Foreign The Bahamas’ foreign currency reserves had been bolstered by the foreign currency borrowings of the Bahamian government, plus the reduction in global oil prices and demand for credit, the latter of which had reduced import demand and foreign currency outflows. The Central Bank reported last week that almost one in five (20 per cent Bahamian businesses by commercial banks were in default at end-May 2009, with total non-performing loans rising to 7.77 per cent or $468.2 million o f total loans issued. The total number of loans in arrears by at least one month increased by $6.1 million or 0.7 per cent in May, reaching a total of $847.3 million. Total loans in arrears increased to 13.98 per cent as a percentage of total loans, although the proportion of delinquent loans those between 31 to 90 days past due declined by $12 million or 3.73 per cent to $373.3 million. The Central Bank said: “The increase in the arrears rate was attributed to a worsening in the consumer loans and residential mortgages portfolios, by 58 basispoints and 2 basis points, to 12.45 per cent and 13 per cent, respectively. “In contrast, the commercial arrears rate receded to 19.83 per cent in May, from 20.61 per cent in April.In response to these developments, banks augmented loan loss provisions by $3 million, boosting the ratio of provisions to total arrears by 18 basis points to 23.44 per cent. “This corresponded to new l oan provisions of $10 million, partly offset by a $6.9 million net write-off against loans provisioned for earlier. However, as the growth in non-performing loans outpaced the increase in provisions, the ratio of total provisions to non-performing loans fell by five basis points to 42.43 per cent.” To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today! F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE terms reached between the Government and two major cruise lines will ensure that 90 p er cent of arriving ships visit a pproved Bahamian ports, the deputy director-general at the Ministry of Tourism has told Tribune Business, as this country seeks to enhance its comp etitiveness despite having a product 300 per cent more costly than other Caribbean destinations. David Johnson said the B ahamas entered negotiations with Carnival Cruise Lines and R oyal Caribbean Cruise Lines to secure this country’s share of the cruise market. With a rebate-style passenger departure tax incentive pack-a ge, the Government hopes to have Carnival alone deliver 1.4 m illion visitors per year. For each passenger over 800,000, the cruise line will receive a rebate of $8.50 per passenger on the $15 per head tax, and a $10 perp assenger rebate when those visitor numbers exceed one mill ion. At least 350,000 of those visitors must overnight in Nassau, and 175,000 in Freeport, for the cruise lines to access these incentives, with all passengersb elow 800,000 visitors attracting a $15 per head tax. T hese incentives, part of the Government’s amendment to the Cruise Ship Overnighting Incentives Act, come as cruise lines have slashedt heir prices to fill ships in the midst of the global economic cris is. And the cruise sector has been the only one in a declining Bahamian tourism industry to h ave seen year-over-year a rrivals growth this year, as a result of the cruise industry’s staying power. Bay Street merchants, though, have questioned how effective the amendments will be ini ncreasing business in the downtown area, and some have a rgued that the move to decrease the overnight minimum stay of 13 hours until midnight, with a minimum of nine d aylight hours in port, could h urt some businesses. Some night club owners said the amendment could strip themo f their cruise passenger business should ships decide to leave port at midnight. H owever, Mr Johnson said 13 h ours is merely the minimum a mount of time under the agreement, and contended that ships o ften remain in port much longer. According to him, Bay Street m erchants have no cause for concern. He suggested they bring their product to the atten t ion of cruise industry in order t o secure the business. “If there are night options, midnight sailing doesn’t negate a n ight option,” said Mr Johnson. “Some ships stay longer than the 13 or 18 hours. If there are options, their (cruise lines tomers are willing to buy or pro-m ote. I have no doubt that they would want to take advantageo f those tours and sail a bit later.” Merchants and Tour Operators were also concerned about competition from the cruisel ines’ own private islands in this country, as well as their on-ship r etail, restaurant, bar and gaming facilities. Passengers Though passengers taken to only private islands or “designated ports” are counted in the total number of visitors brought to the Bahamas as a part of thei ncentive scheme, Mr Johnson suggested the number of ships t hat visit only their private islands is minimal. “The vast majority do stop in two ports,” he said. T he number of ports that c ruise ships can dock at and remain eligible for the benefits of the Act is being increasedf rom two to seven. Once enacted, Nassau, Freeport, Rock Sound, Casta way Cay, Coco Cay and Half M oon Cay will all be approved” ports under the Act. Ships visiting approved ports, a ccording to Mr Johnson, will not be allowed to open their casinos or stores until a fter 7pm and after acquiring a business licence to do so. He said New Providence casi n os agreed to that provision because they saw a significant benefit to themselves.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE and $1.2 million at the end of fiscal 2008. D D i i v v i i d d e e n n d d N N o o t t e e s s : : J. S. Johnson (JSJ payable on July 15, 2009, to all shareholders of record date July 8, 2009. Consolidated Water (CWCO $0.013 per share, payable on August 6, 2009, to all shareholders of record date July 1, 2009. A A n n n n u u a a l l G G e e n n e e r r a a l l M M e e e e t t i i n n g g ( ( A A G G M M ) ) N N o o t t e e s s : : Abaco Markets (AML Annual General Meeting on Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at 6pm at The Wyndam Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino, West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of June 19, 2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting. Benchmark (BahamasBBL Annual General Meeting on Thursday, July 23, 2009, at 6.30pm at British Colonial Hilton, Governor's Ballroom, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Shareholders of record as of June 23, 2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting. Inter national Markets F F O O R R E E X X R R a a t t e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C A A D D $ $ 0.8621 -0.62 G G B B P P 1.6329 1.28 E E U U R R 1.3978-0.69 C C o o m m m m o o d d i i t t i i e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C r r u u d d e e O O i i l l $65.63 5.46 G G o o l l d d $931.00-0.97 I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l S S t t o o c c k k M M a a r r k k e e t t I I n n d d e e x x e e s s : : W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e D D J J I I A A 8,280.74 -1.87 S S & & P P 5 5 0 0 0 0 896.42-2.45 N N A A S S D D A A Q Q 1,796.52-2.27 N N i i k k k k e e i i 9,816.07-0.62 F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B Bahamas’ cruise product 300% more costly than other Caribbean destinations * Ministry official says new agreement will ensure 90% of ships call at ‘approved ports’ * Says reduced overnight stay, private islands not major concerns

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INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT M ONDAY, JULY 6, 2009 The stories behind the news n By RUPERT MISSICK Jr Chief Reporter rmissick@tribunemedia.net T he ills plaguing our society can be likened to a beast with one great belly and many starving mouths. Each mouth represents an endem ic hunger in our land. One mouth, the hunger for justice, another, the hunger for an adequate education and the third, the hunger for security. But one mouth, one gaping maw that lies at the centre of this beast, represents the deepest hunger, the most neglected need of our people, the need to be fed spiritually. Much of the crime we experience in the Bahamas comes from a wound that leads us to want to possess, an obsession for the material, whether that be money or people, which leads to violence manifesting itself in murder, abuse, armed robbery or even stealing from our jobs. We do not value the worthwhile aspects of our existence, the beauty of human potential, the richness to be found in knowledge, the sat isfaction of a truly loving relationship with family and friends. These are the things that can save us from this hunger, that can make us into a better people, better humans. Having these virtues installed in a person is a job left up to the individual or family. No other institution in our society purports to or is able to help with this task. I take that back, there is one. Well, one that’s supposed to. The church claims to be our saving grace, the place where our people can go for this food. Nearly every corner of this island has one and they exist in every community. But if it’s spiritual food you want, you’ll find their pantries inexWorshippers of material things ‘Pr osper ity pastors’ are helping to destroy the Bahamas S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 C C THE ills plaguing our society can be likened to a beast with one great belly and many starving mouths. Each mouth represents an endemic hunger in our land. One mouth, the hunger for justice, another, the hunger for an adequate education and the third, the hunger for security...

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n By JONATHAN M KATZ Associated Press Writer BLANCHARD, Haiti (AP When Micheline Leon was diagnosed with HIV, her parents told her they would fit her for a coffin. Fifteen years later, she walks around her two-room concrete h ouse on Haiti's central plateau, w atching her four children play u nder the plantain trees. She looks healthy, her belly amply filling a gray, secondhand Tshirt. Her three sons and one daughter were born after she was diagnosed. None has the virus. "I'm not sick," she explained patiently on a recent afternoon. "People call me sick but I'm not. I'm infected." In many ways the 35-year-old mother's story is Haiti's too. In the early 1980s, when the strange and terrifying disease showed up in the US among migrants who had escaped Haiti's dictatorship, experts thought it could wipe out a third of the country's population. Instead, Haiti's HIV infection rate stayed in the single digits, then plummeted. In a wide range of interviews with doctors, patients, public health experts and others, The Associated Press found that Haiti's success in the face of chronic political and social turmoil came because organisations cooperated and tailored programmes to the country'ss pecific challenges. Much of the credit went to two pioneering nonprofit groups, Boston-based Partners in Health and Port-au-Prince's GHESKIO, widely considered to be the world's oldest AIDSc linic. " The Haitian AIDS commu nity feels like they're out in front of everyone else on this, and pretty much they are," said Judith Timyan, senior HIV/AIDS adviser for the US Agency for International Devel opment in Haiti. "They really do some of the best work in the world." Researchers say the number of suffers was initially lessened by closing private blood banks, and statistically by high mortality rates an untreated AIDS sufferer in Haiti lives eight few er years than an untreated American. Well-coordinated use of AIDS drugs, education and behavioural changes such as increased condom use havek ept the disease from surging back, at least for now. Statistics are notoriously unreliable in this country of poverty and lack of infrastructure. The most telling data would be the number of new infections in a given year, but researchers say such a precise count is impossible. Next best is to estimate the infected as a percentage of the population. From 1993 to 2003, only pregnant women were tested, and their rate of infection dropped from 6.2 per cent to 3.1 per cent, according to GHESKIO and national health surveys. Test Researchers now test men and women aged 15 to 49, andt he official rate is 2.2 per cent, according to UNAIDS. That's still far higher than in the developed world, but it's lower than the Bahamas, Guyana and Suriname, and much lower than sub-Saharan Africa, where the rate averages about five per cent but spikes to 24 per cent in Botswana and 33 per cent in Swaziland. But the crisis is far from over. In the Artibonite Valley, where Boston-based Partners in Health is just now setting up two clinics, the estimated infection rate is 4.5 per cent. Some in these remote regions still look for care from Voodoo priests, who ask for large sums of money or goods and use treatments doctors say can be poisonous. Thanks in large part to U NAIDS, which awarded Haiti its first grant in 2002, and $420 million from the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, or PEPFAR, an estimated 18,000 people are on AIDS drugs, most of them administered free through GHESKIO and PIH. That population represents 40 per cent of those whose white blood cell count is low enough for them to need the drugs. It is a high percentage for the developing world, but still fails to help many too remote to reach medical care or those at for-pay public clinics. Still, Haiti has been sufficiently ahead in prevention, diagnosis and treatment for some of its programmes to serve as models for PEPFAR, the programme launched by President George W Bush in 2003 a nd praised for its work in Africa. GHESKIO co-founder Dr Jean W Pape was awarded the French Legion of Honour for his work, and PIH's Paul Farmer was recently named chairman of Harvard Medical School's global health department. In May, Haiti was honoured as the host of the opening ceremony of the 2009 International AIDS Candlelight Memorial. In a country suffering from political upheaval and natural disasters, where three-quarters of the people can neither afford nor access private clinics or feebased public hospitals, few C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 3C -t-($ 0(*$ , QGHSHQGHQFH From Haiti, a surprise: ‘good news’ about AIDS S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e IN THIS May 7, 2009, photo, Micheline Leon, a woman living with HIV/AIDS, poses for a photo with her children in Cange, in central Haiti. Haitian infection rates dropped from 6.2 per cent to 3.1 per cent among expectant mothers in the last 15 years. Researchers recently switched to a new methodology that tests all adults, which puts Haiti’s official rate at 2.2 per cent, according to UNAIDS. (AP Photo: Ramon Espinosa

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INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 4C, MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE could have imagined at the dawn of the AIDS crisis how far Haiti would come. When some of the first confirmed cases of the strange new immune deficiency disease were found in Haitian migrants, the country was hastily and unscientifically pegged as the main breeding ground, or maybe even cause, of AIDS. Experts predicted a third or more of its population would be wiped out. The US Centers for Disease Control deeply offended the country by listing Haitian nationality alongside hemophilia, homosexuality and heroin use as primary risk factors nicknamed "the four H's." There was speculation that slum squalor or Voodoo ceremonies were responsible for the scourge. By the mid-1980s the CDC's risk-factor list was amended, but the damage was done to Haiti's dignity and to tourism, then its second-largest industry, which collapsed and never recovered. Yet the stigma may be what motivated Haiti to fight the disease harder, uniting squabbling officials and divided donors in a common cause, said Pape, the Haitian-born, Cornell-educated physician who helped found GHESKIO in May 1982. GHESKIO was founded two months before the disease even had a name, hence its unwieldy French acronym for "Haitian Group for the Study of Kaposi's Sarcoma and Opportunistic Infections." Speaking in an office filled with health studies and signed photos from US presidents, Pape said efforts to close unregulated blood banks, treat the sick and reducing mother-tochild transmissions helped curb the epidemic. Partners in Health was founded in 1983, by two Haitians and two Americans including Farmer, as a small clinic treating infected people in the desperately poor hillside community of Cange. Its "accompagnateur" programme, in which local workers including HIV patients are paid to help the newly diagnosed adhere to physically taxing medication regimens and prevention measures, has been duplicated in Africa. So has GHESKIO's work, such as distributing phone cards to patients to keep in closer touch with their doctors. Obner Saint-Valain is an accompagnateur who looks over seven patients including Marie-Lourdes Pierre, a blind 55-year-old Blanchard woman who has lived with the virus since 1999. For that work he is paid $54 a month. "If you're giving medication to a patient, you can't be scared of them. If the patient becomes worse, it's me that picks them up and puts them in a car to the hospital," he said. While many of Haiti's more than nine million people cannot afford care in hospitals that require them to provide everything from medicine to latex gloves for their doctors, HIV patients get cutting-edge treatments for free. Meanwhile, education campaigns spread the word on prevention measures. More than 51 million free condoms have been shipped to the country of since 2004 and are advertised everywhere on street murals and corner store signs. "More Haitians know about modes of transmission than high school students in the US," Pape said. It was in 1994 that Micheline Leon made the 30-kilometer (20-mile in Blanchard over crumbling roads to the stone-walled campus of Zanmi Lasante, the Creole name and flagship opera tion of Partners in Health. Something felt wrong with h er pregnancy the baby was too low in her belly, she said. The baby was fine, but Leon tested positive in the HIV test given to all expectant mothers. "My family lost hope. They thought I was already gone,"s he said. Through care, counselling and a lot of social assistance Partners in Health also helped build her tin-roofed, concrete house Leon survived. She is also a paid PIH accompagnateur, working mostly with tuberculosis patients. Treatments, which in her later pregnancies included AIDS drugs, prevented the virus from passing to her children, and she was discouraged from breastfeeding. PIH stands by the practice though some AIDS doctors say that's unwise in countries like Haiti where food is scarce. Pape envisions a Haiti where the prevalence rate will dip below one per cent. Timyan of USAID believes the rate has essentially stabilized but will not rise again. Leon's parents never did buy that coffin. For her, fear and shame have been replaced with pride and confidence. "I'm not scared anymore," she said. From Haiti, a surprise: ‘good news’ about AIDS F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 3 3 C C I N THIS M ay 7, 2009, photo, a doctor attends to a patient with HIV/AIDS at the Partners in Health hospital in Cange, Haiti’s central plateau. (AP Photo: Ramon Espinosa

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cusably bare. Instead they stand like little temples to Mammon. Nothing can illustrate this point better than an article appearing in The Nassau Guardian this past Friday entitled “Pastor calls $1/4 million vehicle a Blessing.” The story was of how Bisho p Kirkwood Murphy who, with t he help of his congregation, b ought a 2005 Bentley Arnage ordinarily worth $250,000 for $68,000. On face value it sounds like the good Bishop just got an awesome deal on a really expensive car. Some may find it unseemly for a man of the cloth to be parading around town in such an expensive vehicle, but if he and his congregation decide that their collection funds were best invested in this car, far be it from anyone outside of that organisation to criticise them. However, as he tried to justify the purchase there were several statements he made thatshowed how materialism is rotting the core out of the beauty of Christianity. “I wanted to make a statement, I wanted to bring hope to the Body of Christ. I wanted people to know that not only drug dealers and cabinet ministers and prime ministers coulddrive this kind of car, but that a man of God could too.” A Bentley bring hope to the Body of Christ? A Bentley? I h ad no idea pastors had become s o cynical! I’m only 27 but I r emember a time when Jesus’ resurrection was supposed to “bring hope to the Body of Christ”. I guess things have changed and the reanimationof a human body after death i sn’t enough to impress people a nymore. But hope has returned! Bishop Murphy has himself raised up a car from an auction in New York andbrought it to the Bahamas. The church can sing again! He went on to say: “I wanted to take the level and the minds of Christians up.” Watch out Saint Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther and Thomas Kempis! Two thousand years of church teachings, the voluminous works of the fathers of the church are not enough. It’s a lucky thing this car hit Nassau.We are certainly living in a blessed time. But I digress. The Bishop continued: “We always think of Christians as poor , but the Bible says that the Earth is the Lord’s and the fullness thereof, and so I wanted to make a statement too as a pastor and a man of God.” He is right, God doesn’t demand material poverty, he demands spiritual poverty. God doesn’t care if you are poor nor is he concerned about your wealth. If Bishop Murphy was doing what he was supposed to, he should “take the level and minds of Christians up” by setting an example that would encourage people to be concerned about what God is truly interested in, the state of the human soul, not a bank account. I find prosperity preaching abhorrent, dishonest and sinful. The idea that a person is blessed because of the material God allows him or her to have is faith destroying. There are millions of people around the world, many of them faithful Christians, who suffer from poverty, disease and violence. They live painful, sad, short, joyless lives. Is their God absent? Are we favoured above these people? If the answer is yes then is the God you worship really all loving and merciful? Prosperity theology is corrupting, it is a perversion of what the faith should be. It is nothing more than a hustle from snake-oil salesmen who try to justify their enrichment by preying on the faith of those they pretend to lead or care about. This “name it and claim it” philosophy makes spoilt chil dren of the faithful. It is fundamentally pagan and it cheapens the concept of God’s grace. Grace by definition means unmerited favour. There is no human prayer sincere enough, nor human faith deep enough to deserve anything from God. It encourages laziness and materialism. It defaces Christianity and makes vandals of those pastors who preach it. In the darkness of this teaching, Christianity becomes a faith in which the creation is to be served by the creator. It becomes a religion where the gifts bestowed to humankind by the Holy Spirit aren’t wisdom, understanding, counsel, fortitude, knowledge, piety and fear of the Lord, but rather Bentley, Versace, Rolex, Armani and having no fear you'll max out your platinum Visa card. It becomes a system of belief in which Christ is indistinguishable from Santa Claus and God, a genie whose lamp you rub with a little prayer. Name it and claim it indeed! Where is the religion that taught that the cross and salvation were the only things that were ours to name and claim and where love of neighbour was the highest value and service and sacrifice were worthy ideals? Concepts I suppose those concepts are not in vogue anymore. The human sprit dies everyday in our country through the abuse of drugs, alcohol, children and spouses. It suffers the curse of never being able to reach its full potential because of an anorexic school system and a people who do not value knowledge for its own sake. But like the good pastor said “God is good.” You can still get a Bentley in the country for less than $400,000. Bishop Murphy’s Bentley is bringing more soldiers into the army of Christ, however. In fact he said that a young man saw him and asked him what he did for a living that would have caused him to have such a nice car. “I said that I’m a pastor. He said ‘Oh I want to be a pastor. I wanted to be a doctor, but I changed my mind’. Then he said ‘can I take a picture of your Bentley? Where is your church?I want to come there.’” For the sake of our spiritual and physical health I hope the young man is driven into a pro fession he enjoys, not the one he just feels will bring in the most cash. It’s no wonder that increasingly our people are becoming disgusted with religion and Christianity in particular. The church that is the beautiful bride of Christ is being hidden by this mess, this noise, this worship of mammon that is indistinguishable from secular ideals. They see pastors wallowing in self-righteous indignation over the private lives of people while ignoring more pressing matters in our society, living lavish lives while their parishioners struggle to place 10 per cent of their earnings in the collection plate. They see Christians praying for husbands, wives, cars, promotions, more money, a nicer house, and the destruction of “evil” co-workers and bosses. It is possible that I’m being unfair. The reason why some pastors encourage this orgy of avarice in their churches may come down to a question of capacity. If spiritual enlightenment were easy everyone would have it. The truth is many pastors in the Bahamas are not capable of leading their "flock" toward deeper spiritual enlightenment because they are not enlightened themselves and equally as shallow as the most heathen socialite. Unable to measure their own spiritual growth, much less anyone else’s, they turn to chattel as a determining factor in how close they or a person is to God. We have upstart pastors and preachers who, in a desperate push for legitimacy, appoint themselves prophet, prophetess, apostle, psalmist and Bishop. Whatever happened to just being called a servant of God. Honestly that would be OK. Think about it. What would be the shame in a person directing the service saying : "Coming to speak to us now is another ser vant of God Timothy Jones." But that would be ridiculous. Where would the "wow factor" be in that? Surely this man of God deserves a better intro duction. “And coming to bless us now with a word from the Lord is Bishop, the honourable prophet and general overseer of the first temple of the most holy chapel on the bank of Montagu beach and part time psalmist Timothy Jones.” That's better. That's more suited to a person who serves the Lord. In my favourite scene from one my favourite movies "Angela's Ashes" the main character, Frank, a young Irish Catholic boy, looks up at a naked statue of a child hanging up on the wall of the only bedroom of the rundown house his two parents and three siblings move into. His mother exclaims: “Look! That’s the baby Jesus. If you ever need anything you should pray to him.” Frank’s younger brother Malachy leans and whispers to him: “Will you tell baby Jesus that we’re hungry?" Nice car Bishop Murphy. But will you please tell baby Jesus that we’re hungry? C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 6, 2009, PAGE 5C Bright +Effective 322-2188/9 Y ou’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. Long life Spirallamps 2 0 0 8 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t ‘Prosperity pastors’ helping to destroy Bahamas F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 C C To advertise in The Tribune #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today!

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 73F/23C Low: 77F/25C Low: 76F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 81 F/27 C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 91F/33C High: 88F/31C High: 91 F/33 C High: 89 F/32 C High: 89F/32C High: 90 F/32C High: 92F/33C Low: 82F/28C High: 92F/33C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 93F/34C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 73F/23C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 78F/26C High: 90 F/32 Low: 74F/23C High: 89F/32C Low: 76 F/24C High: 91F/33C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 94F/34C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 92F/33C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 91F/33C Low: 79F/26C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 80F/27C High: 97F/36C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 6 2009, PAGE 7C THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Sunny. A moonlit sky.Times of clouds and sunshine. Mostly sunny. Intervals of clouds and sunshine. High: 92 Low: 81 High: 91 High: 92 High: 92 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Sunshine. High: 90 Low: 81 Low: 80 Low: 80 AccuWeather RealFeel 113F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 89F 113-92F 117-93F 113-91F 107-89F Low: 81 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................79F/26C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 90 F/32C Last year's low .................................. 76 F/24C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.10" Year to date ................................................17.82" Normal year to date ....................................19.44" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Full Last New First Jul. 7 Jul. 15Jul. 21Jul. 28 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:26 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:04 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 7:47 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 5:36 a.m. Today Tuesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 7:53 a.m.2.31:55 a.m.0.2 8:19 p.m.2.81:46 p.m.0.2 8:33 a.m.2.32:35 a.m.0.2 8:57 p.m.2.82:28 p.m.0.2 9:12 a.m.2.43:12 a.m.0.2 9:34 p.m.2.83:08 p.m.0.2 9:50 a.m.2.43:48 a.m.0.1 10:09 p.m.2.73:48 p.m.0.2 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco88/3178/25pc89/3179/26s Amsterdam70/2156/13sh65/1857/13sh Ankara, Turkey85/2958/14s86/3058/14c Athens88/3176/24t91/3275/23s Auckland57/1350/10c56/1348/8pc Bangkok88/3179/26t89/3178/25t Barbados87/3076/24s86/3077/25pc Barcelona82/2768/20t75/2365/18pc Beijing95/3572/22pc97/3673/22pc Beirut79/2676/24s80/2676/24s Belgrade90/3268/20t87/3066/18t Berlin78/2559/15sh75/2358/14sh Bermuda82/2775/23pc80/2671/21pc Bogota66/1846/7c64/1747/8t Brussels72/2250/10sh64/1756/13r Budapest87/3063/17t90/3264/17t Buenos Aires63/1750/10pc66/1844/6sh Cairo99/3776/24s100/3775/23s Calcutta90/3279/26t94/3484/28r Calgary60/1550/10t64/1746/7t Cancun91/3273/22pc90/3276/24sh Caracas80/2671/21t81/2771/21t Casablanca78/2564/17s77/2563/17s Copenhagen68/2056/13c69/2058/14sh Dublin64/1754/12r66/1852/11sh Frankfurt77/2558/14t72/2258/14sh Geneva 79/26 58/14 pc 70/2154/12sh Halifax 66/18 52/11 sh 66/18 52/11 pc Havana 90/32 75/23 s 90/32 74/23 t Helsinki 66/18 48/8pc68/2050/10c Hong Kong 86/30 77/25 t 86/30 77/25t Islamabad 109/42 81/27 s 112/44 82/27 s Istanbul92/3373/22s90/3273/22s Jerusalem 82/27 62/16s85/2962/16s Johannesburg 55/1238/3pc59/1540/4s Kingston 88/3179/26r89/3178/25r Lima70/2158/14s71/2158/14s London70/2154/12t68/2055/12r Madrid90/3261/16pc93/3363/17pc Manila88/3178/25t86/3077/25sh Mexico City77/2553/11t77/2554/12s Monterrey106/4176/24pc110/4376/24s Montreal75/2361/16sh66/1861/16t Moscow57/1341/5r68/2050/10pc Munich76/2453/11t71/2150/10t Nairobi78/2555/12pc76/2455/12pc New Delhi 102/3888/31pc102/3890/32pc Oslo62/1657/13sh63/1755/12r Paris74/2355/12sh73/2254/12sh Prague 75/23 57/13 sh 76/24 54/12 pc Rio de Janeiro76/2465/18pc76/2468/20s Riyadh102/3877/25s102/3879/26s Rome 85/29 65/18 s 85/29 63/17 s St. Thomas91/3282/27sh91/3279/26s San Juan71/2136/2s66/1832/0s San Salvador 86/30 74/23 t 85/29 74/23 t Santiago 61/1639/3pc62/1639/3s Santo Domingo85/2975/23sh87/3073/22pc Sao Paulo 72/22 58/14 t 73/22 58/14s Seoul88/3168/20s77/2564/17r Stockholm 68/20 52/11 pc 68/20 54/12 sh Sydney 59/15 50/10 s59/1550/10pc Taipei95/3579/26t94/3477/25pc T okyo 81/27 72/22 r 82/27 72/22 pc T oronto 71/2155/12t68/2054/12t Trinidad90/3270/21r82/2768/20t V ancouver 67/19 58/14 sh 65/1856/13sh Vienna 78/2565/18pc75/2360/15sh W arsaw 74/23 61/16 s 80/26 59/15 t Winnipeg 73/22 51/10 pc 68/2051/10t H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Tuesday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles82F Today:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Tuesday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Today:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F Tuesday:S at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque93/3368/20pc94/3468/20pc Anchorage78/2558/14s78/2559/15s Atlanta82/2768/20t88/3168/20s Atlantic City84/2861/16s86/3059/15pc Baltimore85/2962/16s85/2962/16pc Boston77/2561/16t78/2559/15t Buffalo76/2456/13t68/2054/12t Charleston, SC89/3172/22t89/3170/21t Chicago83/2860/15pc77/2560/15t Cleveland77/2556/13pc75/2355/12pc Dallas92/3372/22t96/3576/24pc Denver91/3260/15t94/3458/14pc Detroit82/2758/14pc77/2558/14pc Honolulu88/3175/23pc88/3175/23pc Houston93/3376/24t94/3474/23t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday TodayTuesdayTodayTuesday Indianapolis84/2864/17s83/2865/18s Jacksonville90/3273/22t91/3273/22t Kansas City86/3066/18s90/3270/21s Las Vegas107/4177/25s105/4081/27s Little Rock89/3166/18pc93/3367/19s Los Angeles83/2862/16pc83/2862/16pc Louisville85/2967/19s88/3165/18s Memphis87/3070/21pc93/3372/22s Miami89/3178/25t92/3378/25pc Minneapolis84/2862/16t73/2258/14t Nashville86/3062/16pc90/3264/17s New Orleans90/3278/25t90/3276/24t New York84/2865/18pc83/2866/18t Oklahoma City90/3267/19s94/3469/20pc Orlando91/3273/22t92/3373/22t Philadelphia86/3066/18s86/3064/17pc Phoenix 110/43 86/30 s 108/4285/29s Pittsburgh81/2755/12s76/2453/11pc Portland, OR 72/2256/13pc68/2055/12c Raleigh-Durham 85/29 66/18 t 89/31 65/18 s St. Louis88/3168/20s91/3272/22s Salt Lake City 95/35 63/17 s 95/3563/17s San Antonio 98/36 76/24 pc 100/37 76/24 pc San Diego75/2364/17pc73/2265/18pc San Francisco 70/21 55/12 pc 70/2153/11pc Seattle70/2155/12pc65/1854/12c T allahassee 87/3073/22t89/3173/22t T ampa 88/31 77/25 t 89/31 77/25t Tucson100/3779/26s101/3881/27s W ashington, DC 85/29 67/19s85/2964/17s UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com