Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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LOW

Volume: 105 No.184

SOF
79F

SUNNY AND
CLOUDY

Bank workers feel

‘Overlooked’

Meee SS







BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009



m Lhe Tribu

er om icc re

Accuset’s rite
found at scene

Police testify
in handbag
designer’s
murder trial

@ By NATARIO MCKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tripunemedia.net

A fingerprint examiner testi-
fied yesterday that prints found
on the front door of Mountbat-
ten House matched those of
murder accused Troyniko
McNeil.

The trial into the murder of
internationally recognised hand-
bag designer Harl Taylor con-
tinued in the Supreme Court
yesterday with five more wit-

Sir Jack’s
son happy
for lockout
support

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia. net

FREEPORT business-
man Rick Hayward was
grateful for the outpouring
of support and offers of
assistance from persons who
express concern over the
lockout at his three restau-
rants at Port Lucaya Mar-
ketplace.

Among those expressing
concern was Lady Henrietta
St George, who was dis-
mayed by the recent news-
paper reports about the
lockout of Mr Hayward, the
son of Sir Jack Hayward.

“TI got a call from Lady
Henrietta saying that she
was very upset (about what
happened to me) and it was
very encouraging,” he said.

The Port Group Limited
(PGL) changed the locks on
Mr Hayward’s three restau-
rants — La Dolce Vita, The
Pub at Port Lucaya and
Fast, last Thursday after he
had not paid his rent for
eight months. He owes
$230,000 in back rent.

SEE page 7



nesses being called to testify.
Troyniko McNeil, the son of
Taylor’s former business part-
ner Troy McNeil, is charged
with intentionally causing Tay-
lor’s death between Saturday,
November 17, and Sunday,
November 18, 2007 while being
concerned together with anoth-
er. Taylor, 37, was found dead
at Mountbatten House on West
Hill Street and sustained some
42 to 50 injuries, according to
the prosecution.

ASP Clifford Ferguson, offi-
cer in charge of the Criminal
Records Office of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, told the
court yesterday that on Novem-
ber 20, 2007, he received from
Corporal 402 Rolle, an enve-
lope labelled Harl Taylor that
contained photographs and neg-
atives of fingerprints. ASP Fer-
guson told the court that on
August 14, 2008, he received
from Corporal 1406 Davis, a set
of fingerprint impressions
recorded on a Royal Bahamas
Police Force fingerprint form
bearing the name Troyniko
McNeil. ASP Ferguson told the
court that he compared the fin-
gerprints in photographs
labelled Harl Taylor A to F and
found that the prints in the pho-
tographs labelled A and C were
identical to the left forefinger
and right thumb impressions on
the fingerprint form. ASP Fer-
guson said he found no match
for the other prints labelled, B,
D, E and F.

During cross-examination by
McNeil’s attorney, Murrio
Ducille, ASP Ferguson said that
prints could last on an object a
year or two. He also told the
court that if a print was lifted
from one object to another he
would be able to tell because it
would have something from the
surface from which it was lifted.
ASP Ferguson noted, however,
that this would be difficult to
determine if the prints had been
photographed.

Corporal Gardell Rolle, who
is attached to the Carmichael
Road Detective Unit, told the
court that around 10 am on
Sunday November 18, 2007, he
travelled to Mountbatten House
after receiving certain informa-
tion. Corporal Rolle told the

SEE page 7



a
Treat yourself

Open 24hours,
teres Met LUL net Wac}

Iced Coffee.
Now in 4 Flavors.

Knowles will not play on team

Man charged
with gambling
came murder

27 year-old
is arraigned

Rawson Square was overflowing rin Bahamian culture, craft, food and song in celebration of
National Pride Day, as the country gears up to celebrate ie independence anniversary. See more

pictures on page 2

Teen tattoo
controversy

= By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER who said her
15-year-old son was tattooed at
a local parlour without her per-
mnission is calling for legislation
that would prevent minors from
getting tattoos without parental
consent.

Administrator Linda Nixon
wants the parlour to pay $3,089
to get the imprint removed by a
laser.

But the tattoo parlour in
question — the Tattoo King —
claims the boy had a signed con-
sent form with him which they
thought was legitimate permis-
sion from his mother.

The frustrated mother
thought her teenage son was
attending a youth group on the
afternoon of June, 16 and was
shocked when he came home
with a tattoo of a cross on the
back of his left hand.

Her son's friend reportedly
gave the tattoo artist a cell
phone in exchange for several
tattoos.

She said he did not have her
consent and made a complaint
at the Central Police Station the
next day. She was told by the
investigating officer that the
parlour had agreed to remove
the design but when she went to



THE tattoo at the centre of the
controversy

the Bay Street location the next
Saturday she claimed the par-
lour reneged on the deal and
offered instead to cover the
mark with skin-toned ink.

"T said I want it taken off, but
(they) said all we can do is cov-
er it up and match his skin
tone," she said.

Fuming, she visited a plastic
surgeon who told her the
removal would take 14 sessions
at over $3000 — a price she
thinks the Tattoo King should
pay.

Part-owner Byron Austin
told The Tribune he offered to
cover the tattoo with flesh-
toned ink at a reduced price of
$10 a session instead of $400 a
pop — which Ms Nixon refused.
He argued that his establish-

SEE page 7



CARICOM
to focus on

economic
problems



THE issue of the recent polit-
ical coup in Honduras, a reso-
lution to have Cuba instated in
the Organisation of American
States and the regional eco-
nomic crisis will likely be issues
raised at the ongoing meeting
of CARICOM heads of Gov-
ernment in Guyana, said For-
eign Affairs Minister Brent
Symonette.

"The issue of Honduras will
be discussed. . .the question of
Cuba at the Organisation of
American States will come up
along with the financial situa-
tion in the Caribbean will come
up,” he told The Tribune during
a brief interview yesterday.

On June 28, Honduran Pres-
ident Manuel Zelaya was
expelled from the country for
multiple constitutional viola-
tions, according to internation-
al reports. Roberto Micheletti
assumed control of the country.
The United States, CARTCOM
and the United Nations have
condemned the coup.

Mr Symonette offered little
comment on the issue other
than to say it was "still unravel-
ling” and he hoped it would be
resolved diplomatically.

On June 3 the Cuban gov-

SEE page 7



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

A 27-YEAR-OLD man
accused of killing another man
during a gambling game was
arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday afternoon.

Theophilus Darling, of
Coconut Grove Avenue,
appeared before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in Court
One, Bank Lane, charged with
the murder of Dewitt Butler,
36.

Mr Butler was reportedly
shot in the head and body
around 8pm on Monday dur-
ing a dispute in a gambling
game on East Street, just
north of Coconut Grove
Avenue. He died a short time
later in hospital.

Darling, who was repre-
sented by attorney Krysta
Smith, was not required to
enter a plea to the murder
charge and was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison. The
case has been adjourned to
July 13 and transferred to
Court 6, Parliament Street.

Mr Butler's death brought
the murder count to 37 for the
year.

PLP’s
hopefuls
Start to
campaign

POLITICAL candidates are
being shopped around to vari-
ous constituencies throughout
New Providence as the PLP
attempts to revitalise its base
and lead into its convention in
October with a massive show
of force, The Tribune has
learned.

According to sources within
the party, candidates are begin-
ning to emerge and campaign
in Mount Moriah, Holy Cross,
South Beach, Kennedy, and
even Elizabeth, which is cur-
rently held by PLP MP Mal-
colm Adderley.

The other seats throughout
New Providence have also been
put on alert and branch meet-
ings have been held on a
monthly basis to keep the par-
ty’s base informed of what the
PLP is doing and the party’s
message going forward.

In the recent past PLP
Leader Perry Christie
announced his decision to
remain as leader of the party,
carrying the PLP into the next
general election in 2012.

Political pundits have argued
that this push of candidates in
the various constituencies could
prove as an effective distraction
from a possible challenge to Mr

SEE page 7

USA Today

Due to the July 4 Inde-
pendence Day celebrations

in the US, the USA Today
MIKOMIE LHe RCAC a TMI:
be published in today’s Tri-
bune. It will return on Mon-
day, July 6





PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Garbage pile-up
causes big stink

oT Ti

A garbage truck picks up trash on Bay Street yesterday

=m By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

STINKING garbage is piling
up outside some homes in the
Eastern Road and Camper-
down areas as waste collection
has been stalled for weeks, res-
idents claim.

An Eastern Road resident
who lives near the junction with
Dodge Road said outdoor
dumpsters are overflowing in

his area since the regular Thurs-
day night garbage collections
stopped four weeks ago.

He said: “The smell and the
flies are really nasty, and
although I haven’t seen any rats
yet, Iam sure they will follow.

“T noticed them collect it
around four weeks ago, because
they have always come at
around midnight on Thursdays
and they have been as regular
as clockwork, but all of a sud-
den they just stopped.”

Camperdown residents have

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Comics

leaeo. a Onn

se eee ede este aveneeeecemecers P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 12 PAGES



A Ministry of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel
?.0. Box AB207Â¥0, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



also complained about waste
piling up in their bins.

But Senior Superintendent
Elvis McPhee in charge of col-
lections and disposal was
shocked to learn of such a long
suspension of service.

He said: “In the last two
weeks we experienced some
rain which has put the sched-
ule off, because when the
weather is bad there is nothing
we can do. But four weeks is
not a fact, I say that unequivo-
cally.

“We have never had any-
where in New Providence go
four weeks without garbage col-
lection.”

The senior superintendent
added: “For 22 months we have
had excellent service and no
complaints.

It could be an isolated case
where something may have
been an oversight, but I will
speak to the supervisors and
move to rectify it immediately.

“If anyone has any com-
plaints they can call me, I am
here almost all day dealing with
matters and I am more than
happy to apologise and tell
them we endeavour to provide
an excellent service.”

If you have had problems
with your garbage collection call
Mr McPhee on 341-1968/9.

Nea Pe ORC

TEACHER POSITIONS

VU M AIC
cs

Tr LoL mA

with BIC, and BGCSE experience in Language Arts, Literature, Mathematics,

eco ee ar

NUE Nec eA ee
STM aera Za oe ca

Applicants must be Born Again Christians and adhere to the Statement of Faith of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel.
Teachers must also have at least a Bachelors Degree in Education or a Teacher's Certificate
and must be a Bahamian or a permanent resident of the Bahamas with work status,
Qualifying persons are asked to contact the office af
Telephone (242) 201-4771 8:30 AM, - 3:45 P.M. or fax (242) 367-577
or visit our website ~ www.agape-school.com ~ for job or student applications

LEE LE NE EE LE NE EL EE dL EE ED da de a I et a

Agape Christian School uses the A Beka Book Curriculum
which emphasizes Christian values as well as a very high standard of education
and is approved by the Bahamas Ministry of Education.

We seek to train the mind, guide the person, and love the personality,

‘Study to shou thysell approved wntor God...’ 2 “Timothy 2:15







































Taking

pew eCom te
being
Bahamian

Hundreds of Bahamians and tourists
turned out in Rawson Sqaure yesterday
to celebrate National Pride Day, part of
the Bahamas’ 36th independence
anniversary activities.

National Pride Day featured
Bahamian culture at its best, including
food, folklore, artisans, dance, music,
the Prison pop band, fashion shows,
and the best yards competition.

The day is intended to encourage
Bahamians to celebrate and be proud
of what is Bahamian

(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune
Staff)



The Embassy of the United States of America

is saddened by the loss of our

dear friend and colleague
Leslie Pyfrom
ak.a Diplomat DJ.

The Embassy Family mourns his passing
and offers condolences to his family, friends and loved ones.







THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Staff at Scotiabank ‘being

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN Scotiabank
staff claim they are being over-
looked in favour of foreign
employees who are chosen over
them for high positions and given
preferential treatment.

Employees of Scotiabank
spoke out after The Tribune
reported how the Labour Board
launched an investigation into
the RBC Trust management
when staff claimed expatriates
were being hired unfairly and
given lavish compensation pack-
ages while Bahamians were let
go or forced to take unpaid leave.

Scotiabank staff say local staff
are hindered from advancing into
management level because for-
eign workers are hired to fill the
top posts, often because of their
foreign language skills when lan-
guages are not part of the official
requirements.

Other foreigners are brought
in for training programmes and
then stay to fill permanent posi-
tions, staff claim.

Christians upset over pastor's purchase of $68k Bentley

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

CHRISTIANS have
expressed their disappointment
at one pastor’s flaunting of a
$68,000 Bentley paid for with
the help of his 400 parishioners.

Bishop Kirkwood Murphy,
head pastor at Temple Fellow-
ship Ministries in Davis Street,
Oakes Field, showed off the
2005 navy blue Bentley Arnage
—similar to the one used by the
Queen of England —- in the
press yesterday.

The car has a retail price of
around $240,000 in the United
States and around $400,000 in
the Bahamas, but the pastor
was quoted as saying he pur-
chased it in a New York auc-
tion around two months ago,
following an agreement by nine
of the church’s 10 pastors.

Bishop Murphy told the press

Meanwhile the allegedly friv-
olous foreign hiring is a financial
drain on the company, the staff
said.

One employee who did not
want to be named said: “They
will pay for their housing, trans-
portation, school fees, will allow
them to travel home, and there’s
a fund for the permits and that
could be very high, usually over
$10,000.

“Sometimes they pay right
down to the water that they
drink, and it’s all at the expense
of the bank.

“It’s a waste of money if we
have the talent.”

Staff claim Bahamians in high
positions have been forced into
retirement, by either being reas-
signed to an unsuitable position,
or being forced to resign with-
out reason, while at least one
position was created for a for-
eigner.

that the car for which he saved
for three years to buy was a gift
and a blessing from God.

He said he wanted to make a
statement as a man of God, raise
the profile of the church and
attract believers to his parish.

But Christians have criticised
the pastor for making such an
extravagant purchase when
thousands of Bahamians are
out of work in the global eco-
nomic recession.

A senior pastor who did not
want to be named said: “Pas-
tors should be comfortable
because we do social service,
but there’s something called
excess and that’s excessive.
Totally excessive.

“He didn’t rob a bank to buy
it, the people gave — people
like their leaders to be a little
ahead of them, we see it all the
time with our politicians.

“But at this time we should
set better examples.”

The pastor stressed how the

About five expatriates are
thought to be currently
employed at Scotiabank, and
staff believe there are more to
come.

Assistant Director of Immi-
gration Dwight Beneby said
there is no limit on the number
of foreign workers a bank can
employ, and work permits for
bank managers are approved by
the Central Bank of the
Bahamas before applications are
sent to the Immigration Depart-
ment. If no objection is noted by
Central Bank, work permits will
usually be approved by the
department as they presume the
Central Bank would know the
needs of the banking sector, par-
ticularly at management level.

Mr Beneby said: “We get this
complaint from time to time, but
one of the things is that our laws
tend to work against us.

“The bank may ask for some-

10,000 ministers in the coun-
try’s 3,500 churches are not all
blessed with such extrava-
gances, as the majority of Chris-
tian preachers must do part-
time work on the side, and
some need more than one job
to earn a living.

Devout Christian Jewel
Major, a member of Grace
Community Church off
Marathon Road, said she
believes parishioners should
give one tenth of their earnings
to the church to pay for upkeep,
costs, and community work, but
should not give over and above
their earnings rendering them
unable to pay their bills.

She said: “I don’t believe the
church or pastors ought to
accept their parishioners’ mon-
ey when people in the parish
are not doing well.

“If he got a $68,000 car then
I don’t think this is the time to
flaunt it, and if he’s flaunting
it to show how good God is to

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one who speaks a language when
the language of business is Eng-
lish, and that affects most people.
“Government needs to revise
the labour laws and advertising
laws in order for it to change.”

overlooked’

employees’ professional devel-
opment plans.

“Many Scotiabank Bahamas
employees take full advantage
of these opportunities and work
in other countries which provide

a greater opportunity to advance
their careers.

“Tt is Scotiabank’s policy not to
discuss individual employees’
personnel files for privacy rea-
sons.”

A spokeswoman for Scotia-
bank said: “Scotiabank is firmly
committed to the advancement
and well-being of its Bahamian
employees.

“Being a global employer of
choice enables Scotiabank to
attract and retain high-perform-
ing employees, while positioning
the bank as a place where tal-
ented people not only want to
work, but also have the oppor-
tunity to thrive in their careers.

“With our base in Canada and
significant operations around the
world, Scotiabank understands
that embracing and fostering an
inclusive work culture and har-
nessing the skills of local talent
will generate more innovative
thinking, better decision making
and stronger business results.

“Because we are an interna-
tional company, many employees
are frequently offered opportu-
nities to work abroad. These
opportunities are elements of our

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him, then he better have a lot of
good stuff in store for when
people come to him.

“They’re going to expect God
to do the same thing for them as
He has done for him and that’s
not the way it works.”

Bishop Murphy was quoted
as saying his ministry gives
$60,000 to $70,000 back to its
members each year, and will
give or loan thousands of dol-
lars to people in his parish who
are in need.

The Tribune was unable to
contact Bishop Murphy before
the paper went to press last
night.



280-FLIX

INdIGO

Ww O R

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Nortel PBX and Key System Technician

IndiGO Networks is a growing telecommunications company based in Nassau,
Bahamas. Systems Resource Group (SRG), IndiGO’s parent company, has a 20-
year history in offering innovative technology and telecommunications solutions
to consumers in The Bahamas.



IndiGO Networks is seeking to fill a senior position in its Technical Services
department for an experienced Telecommunications and Networking engineer

Responsibilities

¢ The individual will be responsible for the installation, maintenance and support
of Nortel key and PBX systems located primarily in New Providence with
travel to the Family Islands as necessary
Nortel and/or Mitel PBX Certification would be an advantage
Ability to meet with Customers in a Sales Capacity
Experience with VoIP PBX systems, Cisco switching and routing would be
an advantage
Ensure service standards for quality and responsiveness are met
Maintain confidentiality relative to customer accounts and organizational
practices

¢ Ability to work with minimum supervision

Qualifications

¢ Ability to perform analysis, recommendations, and Implementation to Customer’s
Voice and Data Networks.
In depth Design, Programming, Implementation, Maintenance of Nortel Norstar,
BCM, Meridian Option 11C and 81C systems. Knowledge of ESN is essential
Programming and Installation of T1’s and PRI’s
Knowledge of PBX Inter-Networking and VOIP Integration
Routing, Trunking, QOS, and VLAN experience as it relates to the Integration
of Voice and Data Networks
Excellent customer service skills
Excellent oral and written communications skills
Ability to work in a fast-paced environment
Strong problem-solving and decision-making skills

A competitive salary commensurate with experience is offered along with product
training, medical, pension and car allowance after a qualifying period.

Interested candidates should submit their résumés in writing to:

Attn.: Technical Services Manager,
IndiGO Networks,
P.O. Box N-3920,
Nassau, Bahamas

r
Fax: 242-677-1050
E-mail: hr@indigonetworks.com



PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009



THE TRIBUNE
EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited | ‘Broke’. but
we’re in
total denial



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Russia plays a cheque book diplomacy

MOSCOW — Russia is using its energy
wealth to shore up influence abroad, pouring
billions of dollars in loans and grants into former
Soviet states and long-standing allies — even as
it faces its own severe economic downturn.

Faced with its own economic crisis, the
Kremlin could have downplayed its drive to
reclaim its former status as a "great power"
and fight fires at home.

Instead, armed with cash hoarded during
years of high oil prices, Russia has gone on a
cash offensive — pledging loans and aid to
Belarus, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova and Armenia.
It has tied in its neighbours to crucial energy
deals, and has talked about lending billions of
dollars to Ukraine and Serbia.

Russia has sought to hold sway over what it
calls its "near abroad,” a region that includes
most of Moscow's former imperial possessions.
It has railed against its neighbours’ efforts to
move closer to Europe, and resisted Western
influence on what it sees as its home turf.

But Russia will have to step up its game if it
is to build sustainable influence in the former
Soviet Union. Presented with choices, its neigh-
bours are starting to resist Russia's dominant
position, playing Moscow off against other pow-
ers to secure their own long-term interests.

Turkmenistan, the reclusive Central Asian
state with enormous gas reserves, was until
recently in Moscow's thrall. The Russians swept
in last year, buying up Turkmen gas in lucrative
long-term contracts. With that gas bound for
Europe, Russia's Gazprom stood to lock in
profits and strengthen its hold over European
gas supply.

But the global crisis has hit demand for gas,
and Gazprom attempted to renege on its con-
tracts — much to Ashgabat's irritation. Turk-
menistan accused Gazprom of blowing up the
gas pipeline between the two countries — a
charge that Gazprom denied — prompting an
outage in exports and a deepening rift in rela-
tions. With Russia's relationship with Turk-
menistan looking fragile, neighbouring China
swooped in last month with a $4 billion credit,
and agreed to purchase production expected
from a new gas field. With Russian President
Dmitry Medvedev invited to visit Turkmenistan
in September, the Turkmens seem ready to
talk. But as China and the West actively court
the gas-rich country, Russia may find it is
already too late.

"Russia is increasingly facing up to China in
the areas it regards as its near abroad,” said
Chris Weafer, chief strategist at Uralsib. "Rus-
sia has been accused of falling short on promis-
es, while China is very diligent in its delivery."

"Russia needs to step up its response."

Belarus, too, has attempted to play Russia off
other powers — in this case Europe. Talks
with Minsk to extend the final $500 million
tranche of a $2 billion loan collapsed in acri-
mony recently.

Belarus' authoritarian leader, Alexander
Lukashenko, accused Moscow publicly of insist-
ing on dubious political preconditions — name-
ly recognizing the independence claims of Geor-
gia's breakaway regions, South Ossetia and
Abkhazia. Only Russia and Nicaragua recognise
those claims.

In response to Lukashenko's charge, Russia's
normally cool Finance Minister Alexei Kudrin
accused Belarus of having a "parasitic" atti-
tude toward Moscow. Lukashenko shot back
that he would not "bow down, whine and cry" to
Russia.

Lukashenko may feel he has little choice
but to mend relations with an annoyed Kremlin.
Belarus, despite recently joining the European
Union's six-nation Eastern Partnership, still has
limited ties with the West. Instead, it remains
heavily dependent on Russia for cheap loans,
inexpensive energy and vital trade ties.

Nevertheless, the Kremlin has good reason to
whip out its cheque book elsewhere. The gov-
ernment of Uzbekistan, normally highly critical
of US. policy, surprised observers by praising
USS. President Barack Obama's recent address
to the Islamic world in Cairo. A Foreign Min-
istry statement described Obama's approach
to key issues as "sober and realistic."

Kyrgyzstan recently backpedaled on a deci-
sion to kick the Americans out entirely from a
vital military base, a staging post for sending
supplies to Afghanistan. The move drew anger
in Moscow, which had loaned the impoverished
country some $2 billion — seemingly on the
condition that it give the Americans notice.

"Russia always makes the same mistake,"
said Alexander Konovalov, president of the
Institute of Strategic Assessment. "It presents its
neighbours with a choice: you're either with
the West or with us.”

Some neighbours have achieved a balance.
Kazakhstan has successfully played off Russia,
China and the West — to little detriment to its
relationships. And so may Kyrgyzstan. In the
wake of Bishkek's overtures to the U'S. in June,
Medvedev sought to assure the world that Rus-
sia had no objection.

"In this multipolar world, countries that are
not great powers have choices," said Sam
Greene, deputy director at the Carnegie
Moscow Centre. "They are going to diversify
their relationships. I think Russia realises that.”

But the Kremlin's actions so far, he said,
have been more "about maintaining some rem-
nants of the past rather than building some-
thing for the future."

Analysts warn it is a short-sighted strategy
that could yet backfire. "Once you start building
relationships based on financial aid, you have to
keep that flow of aid coming,” said Weafer. "If
some day you can't afford to write the cheque,
somebody else will.”

(This article was written by Catrina Stewart
of the Associated Press).



St. Andrew's School Foundation

Development Officer

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IMT NILSEN

GATT BA

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I must admit I did endure
watching quite a lot of the so-
called Budget debate but found
its content totally ridiculous and
worrisome as crucial issues that
we are faced with were talked
about but nothing done to cor-
rect.

Probably the most significant
utterance did not come from
the halls of parliament but came
as part of The Councillor’s dis-
cussion at Choices Restaurant
when in a single sentence Dr
Duane Sands totally described
the troubles facing us and the
initial cure.

For those who missed Dr
Sands’ comment this is a para-
phrase of it: We are a State suf-
fering from total denial and dis-
illusionment and are “broke”
but we describe ourselves as a
“first world nation.”

Although there is a massive
deficit for Budget 2010 Gov-
ernment did not introduce or
name any measures to reduce
Government’s costs — incredi-
bly the Prime Minister made a
comment on civil service “over-
time” but did not have the
courage to, for at least the short
term till we get out of this mess,
that all “overtime” is banned
and may not occur for any rea-
son.

Why at this crucial economic
time didn’t the government see
fit to reduce the what has to be
enormous outflow of hard
earned US dollars through the
returning duty free exemption?
Surely this was an appropriate
time to cut it by 50 per cent and
save? We really need to retain
as many dollars as we can that
will further retain employment.

What is the cost of this Trav-
el exemption anyway? Does
anyone know? Conservatively
over $90 million must flow out
through this really unnecessary
exemption or more as we all
know few give truthful declara-
tions.

LETTERS

letters@tripbunemedia net

The PLP is still living in
denial as to why their anchor
projects stopped — it was no
one else but the Lehmann Bros
bankruptcy, or we would have
three to four of these projects
coming out of the ground.

I cannot understand why this
government refuses to imple-
ment Catastrophic Health
Insurance — if the annual bill is
$80 million with 188,000 work-
ing that's only a shared premi-
um of $83.33 per person for the
year — incredibly cheap I sug-
gest.

The Prime Minister’s com-
ment as to the number of vehi-
cles licensed to the government
— well who purchased them,
Mr Prime Minister, and who has
allowed the known misuse to
continue for years. Drive
behind the Oakes Field Police
compound and see just how
many of the police cars pur-
chased in 2007 are now broken
right up.

Credit Card debt — absolute-
ly nothing spoken on this issue
but it is very important for the
financial safety of Joe Public
that policy from the Central
Bank requires a tightening,
especially when issuing new
cards. A debt of $269 million
from 116,000 cards is excep-
tionally high.

Educational Scholarships
scheme — surely these grants
should be ‘*PAYE’ deductions
at source and surely the schol-
arships should be insured?

I am quite sure a skilled
financial operations person
would cut the daily operational
costs of running our over-sized
civil service by as much as 20
per cent, but, of course, we
wouldn’t dare to consider that
so I conclude is this government
serious as past governments
have been serious?



Lottery: am honestly sick of
hearing the continual misrep-
resentation, including that of
the current chair of the Gaming
Board — no government is
going to approve a lottery or
legalise the current illegal oper-
ations of the numbers as this
activity is too valuable politi-
cally to the parties and is a per-
ceived major source of corrup-
tion and protection so the side
earnings involve too many so
nothing is ever going to be
done. Bahamians gambling on
Paradise Island or in any casino
is a fad few will continue after
the newness wears off.

There is no doubt we have
to, we are bound to invest at
least $15-20 million in our so-
called Justice system unless we
wish to be described as a nation
without a free and open justice
process and I suggest this is not
very far off.

If I were prime minister I
would have effectively cut cab-
inet to size at least for the next
year unless he is really telling
us that some of the full time
ministers simply can’t operate
without a Minister of State or a
Parliamentary Secretary?

We should invest in massive
across the board government
reform of procedures — our
government needs to within
two-years no more go totally
into e-government also a sub-
stantial part of education - cus-
toms and immigration.

We have to leave the postur-
ing of politics behind us and be
willing to take the obvious steps
to reduce government in size
and costs. I am suspicious that
this budget has done something
very sinister as how can you
approve an establishment larg-
er than what the funds are to
pay them on scale? This is what
has been approved, Editor.

ABRAHAM MOSS
Nassau,
June 20, 2009.

Other institutions also
now D-grade achievers

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

age ATA, EXTRA,

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: 1. Accusations made
against the RBPF.

2. Police: No prosecution over
alleged (RBDF) beating of
reporter.

We permit our schools to
churn out grade D students, yet
many of us seem amazed that
we now appear to have a D-
grade RBPF and RBDF (along
with other national institutions).

KEN W KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,
June 13, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS







‘I is vex that everyone just }
seem to be throwing good }
money to redevelop Bay }
Street without realising that it :
is one dirty, overbuilt, unat- }
horse manure }
smelling, congested flea mar- }
ket. I am upset that after
throwing all those millions of }
money to fix downtown, I can- }
not find parking and the only }
ones who seem to benefit are }
the store owners who are dri- }
ving fancy cars and living in }

tractive,

multi-million dollar homes.

“Let’s throw our money to }
develop Carmichael Road }
instead and give all those mer- }
chants all along that 10 mile }
strip tax free duty on their }
imports where the benefits }
can go to many instead of just ;
a few along a half mile road!” :

- Financial Analyst, Nassau.

“T must commend the gov- }
ernment for addressing the :
matter of the CLICO policy }
holders and bailing them out ;

to acertain extent. However,

I don’t hear anything about :
the CLICO staff and how }
their situation is being }
addressed by the government.
Something needs to be done }
for the employees. The PLP }
and FNM governments }
allowed CLICO to financially :
fleece our country and left }
hard working Bahamians :

holding the bag.”

- Anonymous, Nassau.

“T vex that these doggonit }
pot-holes still breaking up my }
good car and government }
moving too slow to fix it. I
tired of driving on these bite }
up roads and jostling all over }
the place and what makes it
worse is people driving }
behind me is be so close like }
they want me to speed when }
open ditches all over the }

place.

ridiculous.”

- Mad Motorist, Nassau.

“I vex at how lavish and }
rich some of these so-called }
‘men of God? live when peo- }
ple in our country hungry }
with no clothes on their back
or shoes on their feet. can ;
understand that even Chris- }
tians want nice things, but }
splurging on unnecessary lux- :
ury items is a slap in the face. :
Why not use that money to }
set up a scholarship fund ora :
meals-on-wheels type of :
thing, something that can ben-

efit the whole community?
“And what makes it worse,

these people ga’ get up in :
front of their congregation on :
Sunday morning and start }
heaving like they get asthma
and tell them they soon get :
their blessings and then go }
ride off in the sunset while }

their church catching bus.”

- Cathy S, Nassau.
¢ Are you vex? Send your

complaints to whyyouvex@tri- }
bunemedia.net or fax them to }

328-2398.

Freeport man charged
with robbing John Bull

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A 25-YEAR-OLD man has been
charged with the armed robbery of
the John Bull store in Lucaya.

Leonard Barnett appeared in Court
Two at Freeport Magistrates Court
before Magistrate Andrew Forbes.

In addition to the armed robbery
charge, Barnett, along with his moth-
er and two sisters, were charged with
possession of an unlicensed firearm
and ammunition.

It is alleged that on June 21, Barnett,
while armed with a firearm robbed
the John Bull Store of four Rolex
watches. He was not required to enter
a plea to the armed robbery charge.

It is also alleged that on June 30 the
accused was found in possession of a
firearm and ammunition at a residence
in Freeport. He pleaded not guilty to
the charges.

The prosecution objected to bail and
Barnett was remanded to Fox Hill
Prison until October 19.

His mother, Yvonne Saunders, 54,
and sisters, Cleopatra Barnett, 32, and

Tabitha Joffer, 34, were also charged
with possession of a firearm and
ammunition.

It is alleged the women were found
in possession of an unlicensed firearm
and ammunition while at a residence
in Freeport.

They pleaded not guilty to the
charges and were each granted $5,000
bail with two sureties.

During the arraignment, Barnett’s
brother, Claude Barnett, was cited for
contempt of court because of his angry
outburst in the courtroom during the
proceedings.















Leonard Barnett

“I ready to go get one four- }
wheeler because these streets i
is like driving off road - it’s }

Shotgun fired in
service station raid

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

GRAND Bahama police are
investigating two armed rob-
beries which occurred in
Freeport — one at a service sta-
tion and the other at a land-
fill.

Police believe the two inci-
dents are connected.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle
reported that some time
around 11.30pm on Wednes-
day, July 1, an armed robbery
occurred at the Boulevard Ser-
vice Station on East Sunrise
Highway.

According to reports, a pas-
senger in truck, armed with a
shotgun, fired several shots at
the glass door of the service
station.

The gunman had a grey shirt
tied around his mouth and
nose and was wearing blue
jeans and a dark shirt.

After robbing the establish-
ment of an undetermined
amount of money, the suspect
got back into the truck that
was driven away by another
man.

Police believe that the truck
used in the armed robbery was
stolen earlier from the Piner-
idge landfill.

ASP Bootle said that around
11.45pm police received a call
from a security officer on duty
at the landfill on Grand
Bahama Highway.

The man reported that while
on duty some time around
10.45pm he was robbed by two
black men armed with shot-
guns in a white truck, the prop-
erty of the Sanitation Services.

He was also robbed of two
cellular phones, valued at $330.
He said the suspects were
wearing masks and dark cloth-
ing.

Police are investigating the
incidents.

ABA Learning Centre hosts

special summer camp

THE Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Learning
Centre is putting on a special summer camp for chil-
dren with autism, ADHD, speech and language
delays, gross motor delays, behaviour problems and
other developmental disorders.

The camp began on June 29 and will be held until







August 21 at



26 Sears Hill Road.

The camp is geared towards increasing gross
motor skills, communication skills, receptive and
expressive language, social skills, sensory, acade-
mics, attention and concentration, play skills and

cognitive skills.

Activities include play skill building games; social
skills activities; fun academic learning activities; lan-
guage building videos, among others.

Scholarships are available.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
rela fel ater V3



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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



OAS Secretary
General to travel

to Honduras



Comoros crash
Survivor welcomed
hack home in Paris

LE BOURGET, France its with a joke, according to the
Associated Press.

A SEVERELY bruised Bahia Bakari, 14, returned to

THE Secretary General of
the Organisation of American
States (OAS) José Miguel
Insulza yesterday flew to Hon-
duras to continue carrying on
the mandate of the OAS Spe-
cial General Assembly that
instructed him to undertake
diplomatic initiatives aimed at
restoring democracy and the
rule of law and the reinstate-
ment of President Jose
Manuel Zelaya Rosales as
Head of State.

During his less than 24-hour
stay, Secretary General Insulza
will notify the Honduran
stakeholders of the terms of
the resolution adopted by the
OAS Special General Assem-
bly on Tuesday, June 30.

The OAS Secretary Gener-
al has since Wednesday under-
taken intense conversations
with these sectors, as well as
Ministers of Foreign Relations
of OAS member states, aimed
at the normalisation of the sit-
uation within Honduras,
altered since the coup d état
that ousted constitutional
President José Manuel Zelaya.

Representatives from all
member states instructed Sec-
retary General Insulza to con-
duct “diplomatic initiatives
aimed at restoring democracy
and the rule of law and the
reinstatement of President
José Manuel Zelaya Rosales,
pursuant to Article 20 of the
Inter-American Democratic

Charter and report to the Spe-
cial General Assembly on the
results of the initiatives.”

“Should these (initiatives)
prove unsuccessful within 72
hours,” the resolution says,
“the Special General Assem-
bly shall forthwith invoke
Article 21 of the Inter-Ameri-
can Democratic Charter to
suspend Honduras’ member-
ship.”

Mr Insulza will go to Hon-
duras from Guyana, where he
attended the Summit of Heads
of Government of the
Caribbean Community
(CARICOM) on Thursday.

The OAS Secretary Gener-
al will use a plane provided by
the Brazilian government.

O In brief

Mexico
Wins praise
for swine
flu response

CANCUN, Mexico

AS swine flu runs rampant
in the Southern Hemisphere
winter, world health experts

young girl believed to be the
only survivor of an Indian
Ocean plane crash flew back
Thursday to Paris, where she
was embraced gently by her
father, who tried to lift her spir-

France from the Comoros
Islands on a French govern-
ment plane. The Falcon-900 jet
with medical facilities left the
archipelago nation, a former
French colony, and arrived at

are concerned that some
hard-hit countries have been
reluctant to take forceful
measures to protect public
health, according to the Asso-

om LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

4 = Grounded In The Past &
Se... Geared To The Future

Worship time: Ilam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira
Shopping Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

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REPOSITIONING FOR MIRACLES WITH FRESH EXPRESSIONS



Faustine Vincent/AP Photo

IN THIS picture made from video broadcast, Thursday, July 2, 2009 by France 2/20 Minutes, Bahia
Bakari, aged 14, believed to be the only survivor of the Yemenia Airbus 310 crash is brought back to
France on a French Government plane. Bahia was a passenger on a Yemenia Airbus 310 jet which
crashed flying the last leg of a journey taking passengers from Paris and Marseille to the remote
Indian Ocean island nation of Comoros via Yemen when it crashed into the Indian Ocean.

Le Bourget airport just north
of Paris.

Yemenia Flight 626 crashed
Tuesday morning off Comoros
amid heavy winds. Bahia,
described by her father as a
fragile girl who could barely
swim, spent over 13 hours in
the water clinging to wreckage

before she was rescued. She
was found suffering from
hypothermia, a fractured col-
larbone and widespread bruises
to her face, her elbow and her
foot.

The other 152 people on the
plane, including her mother and
others from France's large

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Comoran community, are pre-
sumed dead.

Anger over the crash ran
high Thursday in France's
Comoran community. In Mar-
seille, hundreds of shouting
demonstrators tried to block
passengers from boarding a
Yemenia airlines flight to
Moroni, the Comoros capital.
Police broke up the protest but
there were no injuries.

"We don't want any more
Yemenia flights as long as jus-
tice has not been done," said
Farid Solihi, president of "SOS
Trips to the Comoros," a group
seeking to draw attention to
what they call poor conditions
on Yemenia flights.

In the Comoros, French and
U.S. ships and officials directed
the search for survivors. Alain
Baulin, a commander with the
French Foreign Legion, said
military planes spotted what
appear to be life jackets floating
in the sea Thursday and divers
were sent to the scene.

ciated Press.

Only Friday did Argenti-
na's new health minister, Juan
Manzur, raise the country's
official death toll to 44. He
now estimates that as many
as 320,000 people have been
stricken with influenza,
including about 100,000 with
swine flu — a huge jump in
what the government
acknowledged previously, and
an indication that Argentina's
hospitals will remain over-
whelmed for months.

Britain, for its part, had
refused to do widespread test-
ing for swine flu, slowing the
World Health Organization's
efforts to declare that the viral
spread had become a pan-
demic. Britain's Health Min-
ister Andy Burnham belated-
ly acknowledged Thursday
that Britain needs to revamp
its response and could see up
to 100,000 new swine flu cas-
es a day by the end of August.

The government was reluc-
tant to implement unpopular
measures leading up to last
Sunday's midterm elections
in Argentina. Now that
they're over, it ramped up its
response this week — dou-
bling the winter vacation to a
month for schools nationwide,
sending pregnant women and
other vulnerable workers
home for 15 days and urging
people to avoid crowds when-
ever possible.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

FUNDAMENTAL || _
EVANGELISTIC

ENERGIZING THE CONFERENCE NOWW (Nurture Outreach Witness Worship)
IMMENSE VARIETY- IMMENSE CREATIVITY- IMMENSE HOPE
“Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist witness for Christ in The Bahamas”
FIFTH LORD'S DAY AFTER PENTECOST, JULY 5, 2009

COLLECT: Almighty and everlasting God, by whose Spirt the whole body of the Church is governed and
sanclfied: hear our prayer which we offer for al your faithful people, that in their vocation and ministry they may
serve you in holiness and truth to the glory of Your Name, through our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

Survey Schism
Praachirg iam & 7 d0pr
Radia Bi ole Hour:

Sundey Bor - 2hS2

Weel Prayer & Praise ¢oatpin

Pascoe H. fills

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
9:00 am. Reverend Dr Kenneth A. Huggins, President Emeritus

(Celebration of the Holy Eucharist
6:30 pm. Circuit Missions Service
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108 Montrose Ave, near Wulff Rd)
7-00 am, Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly (Celebration of the Holy Eucharist)
10:00 am, Pastor Colin Newton (Bible Stu
11-00. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly: Shut-ln Service

(Celebration of the Holy Eucharist)
6:30 pm, Circuit Missions Service
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street, Fox Hill)
11:00am, Reverend Evans Lazarre (Celebration ofthe Holy Eucharist)
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m, Reverend Leonard G. Roberts, J.
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field
7:00am, Reverend Evans Lazarre (Celebration of the Holy Eucharist
9:00am. Lay Preacher, Sis, Vivienne Huggins
METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD (Fire Trail Rd)
‘00am, Conducted by the Youth
NASTERY PARK FELLOWSHIP
xt Worship Service: Lord’s Day, July 12 at 5:15 pn.
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
Camp EDGE: Experiencing and Discovering God Everywhere Vacation Bible School:
ly 13-17, 2009, 9 a.m.-1:00 pm, (Ages 3-18)
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thritt Shop and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St., Oakes Field) Reception to Grade 7
MID WEEK SERVICES:
Midweek Eucharistic Service - Rhodes Memorial Methodist Church - Wednesday, August 5, 6:30
am-7:15 am, (Breakfast Served)
Mid-Day Devotions - Providence Methodist Church - Wednesday, July 15 at 12:15-12:45 p.m,
RADIO PROGRAMS
“Vision” - On the Lord’s Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; “Great Hymns of Inspiration” - On the Lord’s Day, Radio
§10 at 5:30 p.m; “Family Vibes” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:20 p.m.; “To God be the Glory” ZNS 1, Tuesday,
745 p.m.
CONGRATULATIONS: Sisters Ruth Pratt, Kelli Jolly, Annette Poitier and Katie Carter on thetr
approval as Fully Accredited Lay Preachers of the Methodist Church and Sis, Kelli Jolly on her
acceptance fo candidate for the Ministry of the Word and Sacraments, the Presbyterate.

“Preaching the Bible as 1s, to men as Gey ane”
) Pastor H. MDS @ Prem: SSd40593 ® aon h-Shsd

PROM DONDAGES

ree igetias gcd roseirese Eel pease, Keka
amd Viziorp le ihe preemece- et Gad.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, JULY 5TH, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer / Sis. Alice Woodside
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer / Boys Brigade
7:00 p.m. Bro, Ernest Miller/ Board of General Education
Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”



elt eae Le Bad
oD oe ae

SMES SERVICES

enc Lar



Grace and etry Wesleyan Church
A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
North America

WEDMESOMS oF 7.20 bmi

oe ee







WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED
Worship Time: Lla.m.



I “Les Fl Prayer Time: 10:15a.m.

ele I Ni ar Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Wel thar Soa Sow Tee FR eee el ee 9

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE



Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O. Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

ee eet ee ee pe | |
ee tee te et Bo

Pl IN pe ee ee eR eg is ae oat COME TO WORSHIP. LEAVE TO SERVE





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009, PAGE 7



PLPs start campaigning

Summit to (eiteeketerke ry,

have Europe
trade focus

FROM page one

ernment was invited to make
an application to rejoin the
OAS after a 47-year absence.

According to international
reports, this invitation was
declined by Cuba.

But the resolution passed out
of that June, 3 meeting will like-
ly be raised, said Mr Symon-
ette.

Regional leaders are also
expected to discuss the eco-
nomic partnership agreement
(EPA) with the European
Union along with a plan to cre-
ate an equivalent agreement
between the region and Cana-

da.

"The implementation of the
EPA will probably come up and
also questions of where we go
with regard to negotiating a sim-
ilar agreement with Canada will
be discussed as well," said Mr
Symonette.

According to a statement
released by CARICOM last
month, the region’s chief med-
ical officers (CMOs) were devis-
ing a Port Health protocol for
the Influenza A H1N1 virus
which was slated to be present-
ed at the meeting in Guyana.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham left the country on Thurs-
day to attend the meeting,
which end July 5, in Guyana.

Rick Hayward’s
eateries re-open

FROM page one

In addition to the lock-out,
PGL had also commenced liti-
gation against Mr Hayward. On
Thursday, Grand Bahama Port
Authority president Ian Rolle
persuaded PGL officials to
rescind the lock-out and enter
into mediation with Mr Hay-
ward.

The three restaurants opened
on Friday and the 76 workers
returned to their jobs after a
week out of work.

Lady Henrietta St George, a
director and honorary chairman
of the Grand Bahama Port
Authority Ltd and Port Group
of Companies, felt that the mat-
ter should have been handled
differently.

She noted that she was not
consulted on the draconian
measures and neither was there
a board meeting on the matter.

In a statement issued through
her lawyer Frederick Smith of
Callenders Counsel & Attorney
law firm, she said:

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“Any action...which affects
the closure of three very long
term businesses in Port Lucaya,
which affects the livelihood of
over 75 employees, which
affects the tourist product and
local restaurant amenities;
which affects the income of the
companies, and which affects
one of the children of share-
holders of the Port Group of
Companies, should have been
handled privately, sensitively,
and a lot more delicately with
prior consultation and at mini-
mum through the board levels.”

Mr Hayward said that he also
received support from his fam-
ily. His father, Sir Jack, is also a
50 per cent owner of PGL.

“I love my dad very much
and there might be a few dis-
agreements as there always is
in families,” he said.

Mr Hayward thanked local
residents, politicians, labour
board officials, and business-
men for their tremendous sup-
port for him and his businesses
and his staff.

FROM page one

ment has no obligation to get
consent from a parent before
inking a minor and said they
only ask "as a courtesy."

"IT have never seen a law that
says a child cannot go into a
store and make a purchase.
There is nothing on the books
that says you cannot give a
teenager a tattoo, but we have a
civil and social obligation to ask
for (parental) permission," said
Mr Austin. "She (Ms Nixon)
should have taken responsibili-
ty instead of throwing the blame
on us. . .I[f her son came home
with a tattoo you have to blame
your child not the tattoo par-
lour because there is no law on
the books."

He claimed the boy told the
artist he had permission to get
the body art “and even has
another tattoo on his shoulder.”

At the end of her rope, Ms
Nixon is in talks with her son's
school to see if they will allow
him entry in September but is
worried he will be viewed as a



delinquent because of the mark.

She now plans to push for a
law that will make tattooing a
minor without parental consent
a crime.

"I'm in a bind — my hands
are tied — legally because if I
take him to court I possibly
wouldn't win. And I don't have
the funds to remove that any-
way.

"T also want to look what can
be done as far as enforcing it as
a law. It's against the law in the
United States, it's against the
law in Great Britain," she said.

She added that her son is
"sorry" he got the tattoo.

Inspector Bernard K Bonamy
of Central Police Station, who
took Ms Nixon's complaint, said
the tattoo parlour should have
turned the boy away and asked
him to return with a parent.

"Once you go to any tattoo
person and have some tattoo
on the child the mother should
accompany him. The parent
should have gone there and
spoke to the person or (the
artist) should have called the
mother," he told The Tribune.

FROM page one

Christie’s leadership as his MPs
would be more concerned with
shoring up their base — rather
than a challenge to his post.

Seeking to maintain this posi-
tion may prove to be a difficult
fight at the party’s upcoming
convention, however, as would-
be challengers maintain that
despite Mr Christie’s procla-
mations, they will mount a chal-
lenge — “whether it be futile
or not.”

“Tf history teaches us any-
thing then the answer to that
question is obvious. Perry
Christie did not win the 2002
elections. The people were sim-
ply tired of the FNM and decid-
ed to vote them out. But the
2007 election proved that Mr
Ingraham was capable of
defeating an incumbent Prime
Minister who at that time was in
his post for only one term. That
is the issue. And with Ingraham
motioning as if he will stay on
we need a leader who is capable
of defeating him and returning
the PLP to government,” the

source said.

With both leaders suggesting
that they very well could still
be around in their present
capacities as leaders of their
respective parties in 2012, Prime
Minister Ingraham will be 64
years old at that time, with Mr
Christie coming in as his senior
by three years at 67 years.

However, as many senior
PLP’s suggest, their leader’s age
does not come across primarily
as a concern for them. Of more
importance is the party’s mes-
sage to the youth and the mid-
dle class that needs to be han-
dled and tailored in such a way
that new voters are encouraged
to get behind the party and revi-
talise their diminishing base.

With the list of would-be con-
tenders, including Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald, PLP MP’s
Fred Mitchell, Philip Davis,
Obie Wilchcombe, Dr Bernard
Nottage, former party chairman
Raynard Rigby and attorney
Paul Moss, it is unknown at this
time if any of them would actu-
ally continue in their efforts to
become the new face of the
PLP.

Police reveal print ‘evidence’

FROM page one

court that at the scene, he spoke
with Detective Sergeant Cole-
brooke who also gave him cer-
tain information. Corporal
Colebrooke said that he dust-
ed for latent prints and labelled
the six prints he discovered
between A to F. He told the
court that he found prints inside
the front entrance door near the
lock and prints on the inside of
the door frame near the lock.
Detective Corporal Philip
Davis told the court yesterday
that around noon on August 14,
2008, while at Central Detec-
tive Unit he saw Troyniko
McNeil and recorded his fin-
gerprints. Corporal Davis dur-
ing cross-examination by
MecNeil’s attorney Murrio
Ducille said that the accused
did not have a lawyer at the
time his prints were taken. Cor-
poral Davis said that he did not
know if McNeil was charged at
the time and had only been car-
rying out the instructions that
were given to him. Detective

Corporal Marvin Cargill, a
crime scene technician told the
court that sometime after 10 am
on Sunday November 18, 2007,
he and several other officers
responded to the report of a
homicide at Mountbatten
House, West Hill Street.
Cargill told the court that
after receiving instructions from
Detective Inspector Bonaby, he
and the officers entered the
building through the southern
entrance. Corporal Cargill
recalled that there was blood
dripping from the ceiling, and
blood stains on the stairs. He

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also told the court that he
observed shoe and foot prints
in the upstairs hallway. He told
the court that in the upstairs
bedroom, he observed the life-
less body of a male lying on the
bed.

Corporal Cargill told the
court that he also observed a
broken handle knife on the bed.
Corporal Cargill told the court
that he removed six tiles from
the eastern bedroom entrance
which had footprints on them.

Hector Gonzales, a United
States Immigration and Cus-
toms agent testified yesterday

that on August 14, 2008, he was
assigned to bring Troyniko
McNeil back to the Bahamas.
Gonzales said that he and fel-
low agent Alex Gonzales
brought McNeil to New Provi-
dence on an American Eagle
flight from Florida. Gonzales
said they were met at the air-
port by Bahamian police and
taken to Police Headquarters
where McNeil was officially
handed over to local authori-
ties.

The trial is to resume on
Monday at 9.15am before
Senior Justice Anita Allen.

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SATURDAY, JULY 4,

2009

PAGE 10 °e Mark Knowles on mixed doubles crown...



won't play on
avis Cup team

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH the Bahamas set to host
Guatemala in the second round of the
American Zone Two Davis Cup tie |
next weekend, touring pro Mark
Knowles has announced that he will
not be coming home after all to com-

pete on the team.

Knowles, who is gearing up for the
final of the mixed doubles at Wimble-
don, said yesterday that he has opted

day of competition as the Capitals host-
ed their first match last night against

the Washington Kastles, which features

Serena Williams and Leander Paes,

who will both be absent as Williams is
playing in the women's final and Paes is
in the mixed doubles.
the way the schedule is to get away for
two days and play the doubles, but as it
turns out, I can't,” Knowles said. “The

“T was hoping

rules indicate that I must be present

Knowles (AP)

for at least two days and so I won't be
able to get there for that.”
Knowles will end up missing the

to go to the United States where he will play in
the Advanta World Team Tennis.

He is a member of the Sacramento Capitals,
coached by Wayne Bryan. Included on the
team are Michael Chang, Angela Haynes, Coco
Vanderweghe, Sam Warburg and Brian
MacPhine.

Legendary Billy Jean and Larry King started
the Advanta WTT 34 years ago. It’s a unique
gender-equity team concept that runs from July
2-26 with the 10 teams divided into two divi-
sions. Each team is comprised of two men, two
women and a coach. Team matches consist of
five sets, with one set each of men's singles,
women's singles, men's doubles, women's dou-
bles and mixed doubles.

The first team to reach five games wins each
set. One point is awarded for each game won,
and a nine-point tiebreaker is played if a set
reaches four all. If necessary, overtime and a
“super tiebreaker” are played to determine the
outright winner of the match.

“We tried to make it work, but unfortunate-
ly [had made a commitment to Team Tennis at
the start of the year,” Knowles said. “I didn't
know that it would have clashed with the Davis
Cup draw. When I found out that it did, I tried
to work it out where I could come down to
Davis Cup, but I won't be able to leave here in
time to be beneficial to the team. So I hope
the guys can do it and beat Guatemala.”

Playing in the final of mixed doubles also
means that Knowles will have to skip the first

Capitals’ second match against the Newport
Beach Breakers on Sunday that has Maria
Sharapova in their line-up. But he's hoping to
be available when they host the Boston Lob-
sters on Tuesday that is headlined by Martina
Navratilova. While he won't be available for the
tie, Knowles sent his best wishes to the team.

The Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association is
scheduled to play at the National Tennis Cen-
ter over the Independence holiday weekend
with the quartet of Devin Mullings, Timothy
Neilly, Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle who
will all be back with captain John Farrington.

However, the BLTA did announce that it
has added youthful Rodney Carey Jr of Grand
Bahama as a member of the team. He will serve
as an alternate, whom the association hopes to
groom as a future potential team member.
Carey Jr recently played in the Security & Gen-
eral International Tennis Tournament at the
NTC where he lost in the final to his touring
doubles teammate Darian King of Barbados.
The duo also won the doubles title.

Guatemala is slated to come to town with
the team of Christopher Diaz-Figueroa, Chris-
tian Paiz, Julen Uriguen and Sebastian Vidal.
Eduardo Herrera is the team captain.

The Bahamas is coming off a 4-1 loss to
Paraguay in March, the same weekend that
Guatemala was blanked 5-0 by the Dominican
Republic. The winner between the Bahamas
and Guatemala will remain in Zone IT for 2010,
while the loser will be relegated to Zone III.

Sturrup turns
in season hest
performance

AFTER being
dethroned as the
women’s nation-
al 100m champi-
on at the
Bahamas Associ-
ation of Athletic
Associations
National Cham-
pionships last
weekend, veter-
an sprinter Chandra Sturrup
turned in her season best per-
formance yesterday at the
ExxonMobil Bislett Games.

As the lone competitor from
the Bahamas in the IAAF
Golden League meet in Oslo,
Norway, Sturrup clocked 11.15
seconds for a third place finish.

The meet was dominated by
the Caribbean with Kerron
Stewart, runner-up in the
Jamaican Nationals last week-
end as well, winning in 10.99.

Trinidad & Tobago's Kelly-
Ann Baptiste was second in
11.14, while Jamaican Sheri-
Ann Brooks was third in 11.27.

The majority of our elite ath-
letes are competing this week-
end at the Central American
and Caribbean Championships
in Havana, Cuba.

Some others are competing
at the 28th Meeting dev
Atletismo Madrid 2009 in
Madrid, Spain, today.

SVUTMAU Te

aC MUU Ty
playoffs on Sunday

THE Bahamas Flag Foot-
ball is scheduled to host its
semifinal playoffs on Sun-

day at the Winton Rugby
Pitch with the following
match-ups on tap:

e 3:30pm - Goodman’s
Bay Spartans vs RBC Lions,
4:30pm - The Rugby Team
vs The Warriors







Powell edges Bailey in
100m at Bislett Games

@ By STEPHAN

NASSTROM
AP Sports Writer
OSLO (AP) — Asafa Pow-

ell overcame a poor start to win
the 100 meters in a photo finish
at the Bislett Games on Friday,
but fell short of clocking his
50th time under 10 seconds.

The former world record-
holder from Jamaica finished
strongly to win in 10.07 seconds,
with runner-up Daniel Bailey
of Antigua given the same time.

“T didn’t feel as strong as I
normally do,” Powell said. “I
didn’t get a great start. I was
way behind. I got to the front
somehow, but I didn’t finish as
strong as normal. But a win is
always a win.”

It was Powell’s second race
after returning from an ankle
injury.

“It’s not 100 percent,” he
said. “I’m still a bit cautious. I
have two more races next week.
Hopefully I can do better and
better in both.”

Powell had hoped to join
Maurice Greene of the United
States as the only sprinter with
50 sub-10 second races. Greene
tops the list with 53.

Powell, who set four world
records between 2005-07, has
the second fastest time in histo-
ry (9.72). His countryman Usain
Bolt holds the world record at
9.69.

Yelena Isinbayeva of Russia,
who has set 14 world outdoor
records, won the women’s pole
vault at a disappointing 15 feet,
5 1/2 inches. The competition
was stopped for about an hour
because of a thunderstorm.

“Three hours ... it was my
longest competition,” Isinbaye-
va said. “It was also one of the
most difficult competitions of
my career and one of the
wettest.”

Sanya Richards of the United
States won the women’s 400
meters in 49.23 seconds for the
fastest time of the year.

Richards, who has not lost a



ASAFA POWELL (AP)

400 in the Golden League since
Zurich 2004, also tied the Bislett
Stadium record that Czech Tat-
jana Kocembova set in 1983.

“It was a pity that I only
equaled the meet record,”
Richards said. “I didn’t expect
to have the world’s best time of
the year after the storm. We
were worried during warm-up
what would happen when we
would be running.”

Shericka Williams, the
Olympic silver medalist from
Jamaica, finished second in
49.98.

Reigning Olympic and world
champion Christine Ohuruogu
of Britain was sixth in 51.19 in
her first major race of the sea-
son.

The Bislett meet is the sec-
ond of six in the Golden League
series.

The men compete in the 100
meters, 400, 3,000, 5,000, 110
hurdles and javelin, while the
women contest the 100, 400, 100
hurdles, high jump and pole
vault.

Any athlete who wins those
events at each of the six Golden
League meetings will claim at
least part of a $1 million jack-
pot.

If no one wins all six of their
events, athletes with five victo-
ries will share $500,000.



\

Federer beats
Haas to reach
his 7th final at
Wimbledon...

See page 10



etiel turns
up the heat

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net_

he Heavy Lift

Dorsey Park Boyz

moved a half game

in front on the men’s
standings of the New Provi-
dence Softball Association on
another superb pitching perfor-
mance from ace Edney “The
Heat” Bethel.

The premier pitcher in the
country fired a one-hitter with
12 strike outs in four and-a-
quarter innings of relief work
as the Dorsey Park Boyz came
from behind to pound the
youthful New Breed 9-4 in the
opening game on Thursday at
the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.

In the ladies’ feature contest,
the Pineapple Air Wildcats
blasted the defending champi-
ons Sigma Brackettes 6-3 as
Mary “Cruise” Sweeting out-
shined veteran Ernestine But-
ler-Stubbs on the mound.

Talking about the mound, the
45-year-old Bethel came in
from right field to replace
starter Randy Gibson on the
mound with New Breed threat-
ening to put their fifth run on
the scoreboard in the top of the
third with two out in the men’s
opener.

Solomon Bastian, who got on
base on an error, was standing
on third when Bethel got to the
mound and he went on to add
to his total of 105 he had
already posted through the first
six games of the season.

Bethel’s first victim Thursday
night was Kyle Rolle as the
inning came to an end.

In the bottom half of the
frame, Bastian got back at
Bethel when he snagged down a
high fly ball to rob the Dorsey
Park Boyz of what could have
been their second run of the
game (their first came on a lead-
off solo in-the-park home run
from Steven Culmer).

“Like I tell everybody, as
long as I'm here in Nassau, I
practice more because I play in
three or four different leagues,”
said the Eleuthera native, who
has played on just about every
island affiliated with the
Bahamas Softball Federation.

“It has made me a whole lot
more stronger and in better
shape.”

Bethel proved just how dom-
inant a pitcher he is as he would
go on to strike out the first two
batters in the fourth, only to
watch as Eugene Pratt broke
up the streak with a grounder
up the middle. But Bethel
forced Thomas Davis to pop up
to the end the inning.

Then over the next three

Dorsey Park Boyz
pound New Breed
9-4 in opener

a amas ee ane



innings, Bethel went on to retire
the side in order on strike-outs,
pushing his grand total to 117 in
seven games.

“The key to striking out
everybody is that I don't throw
hard. I throw a lot of rise balls,
curve ball and I have an excel-
lent drop ball,” he said. “I don't
have a good change up, but I
can get you with it.

“T have a blazing curve ball
and a riser. My riser is my best
pitch and I'm a littler quicker
getting off the mound, so it
doesn't give the batters that
much of a chance to get a good
look at the pitch.”

The Dorsey Park Boyz
improved their front running
record to 7-1 just a half game of
the defending champions Com-
mando Truckers, who are 6-1.
The Truckers handed the
Dorsey Park Boyz their first loss
on Saturday night with a 3-2 win
as Bethel struck out 16 in the
loss.

With the loss Thursday night,
New Breed remained in fifth at
2-5.

Bethel, still reflecting on the
heartbreaking loss, said the

NPSA Team Standings

Here’s a look at the team standings going

into Saturday's double-header:

Teams W L Pct. GB

MEN’S DIVISION
Dorcy Park Boyz
Commando Truckers
Stingrays

Robin Hood Hitmen
New Breed

Mighty Mits

T H Equipment
Buccaneers

CGRPNMWUAA~

WOMEN’S DIVISION
Wildcats

Brackettes

Lady Sharks

Mystical Gems
Swingers

CrPNwNhmw

Saturday’s schedule:

1 875 -
1 857 -
1 833 1
3 500 31/2
5 285 41/2
6 250 5
5 166 51/2
5 O00 31/2
0 1.000 -
2 .666 3
4 B33) 5
8 250 5
7 O00 712

7pm - Brackettes vs Proper Care (L)
8:30pm - Stingrays vs Robin Hood (M)

Truckers got the first blow, but
they will definitely meet them
again and he assured the public
that it will be a totally different
ball game.

It was a totally different ball
game for New Breed, who did-
n't stand a chance against
Bethel. And while he held them
at bay, his teammates managed
to finally come around and get
their offense clicking.

It started in the fourth when
Lorenzo Carter got safely on
second base on a shot to left-
center field and he rode home
on a two-run homer over the
right-center field fence that cut
their deficit to 4-3.

Pinch hitter Darren Bowleg
led off the fifth with a triple and
scored on an error to tie the
score at 4-4.

But in the sixth, the Dorsey
Park Boyz put the game out of
reach when they connected just
two hits, a consecutive two-out
RBI single from Chavey
Thompson and a two-run dou-
ble from Bethel.

New Breed would start
Thomas Davis and he lasted
until the fifth when ace Eugene
Pratt came in to try and close
the door after starting behind
the plate and moving to play
third. But it was a little too late.

Dorsey Park would march 10
batters to the plate as they bat-
ted around the clock in the fatal
fifth.

Wildcats 6, Brackettes 3: Nor-
mally Pineapple Air would
struggle during the regular sea-
son and turn up the heat in the
postseason. This year, they are
off to one of their best starts
ever, improving to 8-0 in a bat-
tle of the top two ladies’ teams.

Sigma Brackettes dropped to
4-2 with the loss.

Dornette Edwards went 2-
for-3, scoring a pair of runs and
Vernie Curry went 2-for-4 with
a run scored to lead Pineapple
Air to victory.

On the mound, Edgecome-
Sweeting tossed a two-hitter,
striking out three for the win.
In the loss, Butler-Stubbs gave
up eight hits, but struck out five.

For the Brackettes, Sharvette
Taylor was 1-for-2 with a RBI
and run scored.



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



LOCAL/INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Knowles has eyes set on mixed doubles crown

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ark Knowles

would have pre-

ferred to be play-

ing for the men’s
doubles title at Wimbledon, but
he will have to settle for a shot
at the mixed doubles crown.

Knowles and Anna-Lena
Groenefeld of Germany are the
No.9 seeds and they will go up
against the top seeded team of
Leander Paes of India and Cara
Black of Zimbabwe on Sunday
in London, England.

“T definitely preferred the
other one,” said Knowles of the
men's doubles draw of which
he and his Indian partner
Mahesh Bhupathi got eliminat-
ed in the quarterfinal.

“We played really well. We
just needed a bit of luck here
and there, but it didn't go our

way. We came up short, so I
will take this one.”

Having never won a mixed
doubles crown — he played in
the final of the French Open
before — Knowles feels that this
could definitely be the year that
he gets over the hump and wins
his first Wimbledon crown of
any sort.

“We beat a lot of great
teams,” said Knowles of their
third round two-set victory over
Canadian Daniel Nestor and
Russian Elkena Vesnina and
their second round win over
defending champions American
Bob Bryan and Australian
Samantha Stosur in three sets
in the quarterfinal.

Yesterday they knocked off
Great Britain’s Jamie Murray
(a former mixed doubles cham-
pion) and his partner Liezel
Huber of the United States in
straight sets of 6-2, 7-5 to get
into the final.

“..But my goal has always
been to win that doubles title
and I thought this was the year
that we would have won it

because we played so well,
even though I thought we
had a tough draw.”

— Tennis ace Mark Knowles

“We beat a lot of great teams
and we're playing very well,”
Knowles said. “We meet the top
seeds in Paes and Black, who
are playing very well as well. So



it will be a very tough final, a
very tough match, but there's
no reason why we can't beat
them.”

The majority of the focus in

tennis has been placed on the
men’s and women’s singles. But
Knowles noted that in recent
years both the men’s and wom-
en’s doubles and now the mixed
doubles have been getting just
as much recognition because of
the amount of top singles play-
ers who are now playing in the
draws.

Their final will follow imme-
diately after the completion of
the men's singles final on Sun-
day between No.6 seed Andy
Roddick of the United States
and No.2 Roger Federer of
Switzerland.

Hopefully with the match
being carried live on Tennis TV,
Knowles said he would like
nothing better than be able to
emerge as the champion with
Groenefeld.

“With Wimbledon being such
a prestigious event, whether it's
singles or doubles or mixed
doubles, it doesn't matter which

Federer, Roddick to face
off in 3rd Wimbledon final

@ By STEPHEN WILSON
AP Sports Writer

WIMBLEDON, England
(AP) — Five-time champion
Roger Federer reached his sev-
enth straight Wimbledon final
Friday and will face Andy Rod-
dick for a chance at a record
15th Grand Slam title.

Federer delivered a master-
ful grass-court performance to
beat Tommy Haas 7-6 (3), 7-5,
6-3, extending his winning run
to 18 consecutive matches and
closing in on the mark he shares
with Pete Sampras of 14 major
titles.

Federer will meet Roddick in
the final for the third time in
six years after the American
defeated Andy Murray 6-4, 4-6,
7-6 (7), 7-6 (5). The Swiss star
beat Roddick in the 2004 and
°05 finals and leads 18-2 overall.

The third-seeded Murray had
been seeking to become the first
British man to reach the final
in 71 years and first to take the
title since 1936, but Roddick
outplayed him on the big points
to silence the home fans.

“To be honest, the last couple
of years I didn’t know if ’'d ever
get a chance to play for another
Grand Slam title,” said Rod-
dick, who won the U.S. Open
in 2003. “Now I get to. It’s just a
dream.”

Roddick saved a break point
with Murray leading 4-3 in the
fourth set with a forehand win-
ner, then came through with big
serves in the tiebreaker. When
Murray slapped a backhand
into the net on the second
match point, Roddick fell to his
knees on the grass and leaned
forward covering his head.

“Thad to play my best tennis
out there to win today,” Rod-
dick said. “I can’t say enough
good things about Andy’s game,
but I can play some tennis
sometimes, and not many peo-
ple were giving me much of a
chance at all, and I knew if I
could stay the course that I had
a shot and that’s all you can ask
for.”

Murray dominated the statis-
tics, but still couldn’t overcome
Roddick’s clutch play. Murray
had 25 aces, 76 winners and 20
errors, compared with 21, 64
and 24 for the American.

“Throughout my career I’ve
had a lot of shortcomings, but
trying hard hasn’t been one of
them,” Roddick said. “To be
fair, he had all the pressure on
him and I could come out and
kind of swing and that probably
helped me today.”

Federer finished his match
with a flourish, leaping high for
a smash reminiscent of Sampras
in his Wimbledon heyday. He is
the first man to make it to seven
consecutive Wimbledon finals
in the history of a tournament
that began in 1877.

Federer never faced a break
point as he beat Haas for the
ninth straight time to reach his
record 20th Grand Slam final.
He and Ivan Lendl had been
tied at 19 apiece.

“T’m very happy with my per-
formance and it’s unbelievable
to back into another Wimble-
don final,” Federer said. “I’ve
had a lot of pressure over all
the years, so this is just another
great match, great opportunity
for me to get into the history
books.”

If Federer wins Sunday, he
will be the third player to win

=
—_ a

Andy Roddick (AP)

six or more Wimbledon titles.
William Renshaw and Sampras
both won seven.

“Tm very proud of all the
records I’ve achieved because
I never thought I would be that
successful as a kid,” Federer
said. “I would have been happy
winning a couple tournaments
and maybe collecting Wimble-
don. It’s quite staggering now
having reached ... my sixth
straight Grand Slam final. Hav-
ing so many things going for me
now again, opportunity again
on Sunday, it’s fantastic.”

Federer said he is feeling less
pressure this year than in 2007
when he equaled Bjorn Borg’s
record of five straight Wimble-
don titles. Borg was among
those watching Friday from the
Royal Box.

“For some reason that meant
the world to me,” Federer said.
“T was like in a bubble for two
weeks, just trying to achieve it.
So this time around I think I’m
much more relaxed.”

Federer, who completed a
career Grand Slam by winning
the French Open last month,
said he would be happy if Sam-
pras came to Wimbledon to
watch him try to break his
record. Sampras is home in Cal-
ifornia looking after his two
young sons.

“He might come around, he
might not,” Federer said. “It’s
his choice. P’d love to see him
because he’s a good friend of
mine. Very honored of course
that I share the record of 14
with him.”

The women’s final is Satur-
day, with a Williams assured the
trophy for the eighth time in 10
years. The Williams sisters are
back in the final again — Venus
for the eighth time, Serena the
fifth. It’s the fourth Williams-
vs.-Williams final at the All
England Club and eighth in a
Grand Slam title match. Fit-
tingly, the show will take place
on the Fourth of July.

The sisters reached their sec-
ond straight Wimbledon dou-
bles final Friday, beating top-
seeded Cara Black of Zimbab-
we and Liezel Huber of the U.S.
6-1, 6-2. They will face Saman-
tha Stosur and Rennae Stubbs
of Australia for the title.













fi el at



Hugo Philpott/AP

ROGER FEDERER (rear) returns to Tommy Haas during their singles semifinal at Wimbledon yesterday



VENUS WILLIAMS plays a return to Dinara Safina of Russia during their semifinal singles match at Wimbledon
on Thursday

(AP Photo: Sean Dempsey)

one you win, people can't take
that away from you being the
champion,” he said. “So it's
extremely important.

“But my goal has always been
to win that doubles title and I
thought this was the year that
we would have won it because
we played so well, even though
I thought we had a tough draw.

“Now I find myself playing
in a mixed doubles final, so any-
time you are on center court in
a final, these are special
moments. So it's going to be a
big moment and I'm going to
try to enjoy it, but I also want to
win that title.”

Knowles said if he and
Groenefeld can win, it won't
take away the disappointment
he has in not getting to the
men's doubles final. But he said
it sure would help him to get
away with some consolation
from the biggest tournament in
the world.

New league
will consider
signing Vick

lm By BARRY WILNER
AP Football Writer

N E WwW
YORK (AP)
— When the
United Foot-
ball League
debuts in
October,
Michael Vick
could be one
of its players.

Michael
Huyghue, the
commissioner
of the new
four-team
league, says the UFL is willing
to give Vick a place to play —
provided there are no pending
legal issues. His rights belong
to the Orlando franchise.

Vick already has served an
18-month sentence in federal
prison for his involvement in a
dogfighting ring. He is under
home confinement until July 20,
after which the NFL is expected
to announce whether the for-
mer Atlanta Falcons quarter-
back will be suspended.

Vick, the No. 1 overall pick in
the 2001 draft, has not played
football since the 2006 season.

Report:
Celtics offer
Wallace a
contract

BOSTON (AP) — The
Boston Celtics have offered for-
ward Rasheed Wallace a con-
tract as part of a major push to
land the coveted forward,
according to a published report
on Friday.

The Boston Globe reports
the Celtics offered Wallace a
deal during a three-hour meet-
ing in Detroit on Thursday.
Celtics stars Kevin Garnett, Ray
Allen and Paul Pierce joined
general manager Danny Ainge
and managing partner Wyc
Grousbeck at the meeting.

Wallace’s agent, Bill Strick-
land, told the Globe in a text
message that it was a “very
good meeting; some contractu-
al terms discussed, nothing
agreed to.”

He also said Wallace will be
meeting with other teams next
week. Charlotte, Cleveland,
Orlando and San Antonio are
said to be possible suitors.

The 35-year-old Wallace can
play the low post and also has
exceptional shooting range. He
averaged 12 points per game for
Detroit last year, before falling
to 6.5 points per game in the
first round of the playoffs as
Detroit was swept in four games
by Cleveland.

Wallace earned $13.68 mil-
lion last season as he finished
up a five-year contract with
Detroit. Teams pursuing Wal-
lace now would be offering the
midlevel exception, worth
between $5.6 million and $5.8
million.

Wallace, a starter most of his
career, would likely play a com-
plementary role in Boston. The
Celtics are hoping they can lure
him by offering a shot at a title.
Wallace is also close to Garnett.



Vick (AP)



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPO

e~

5-Day FORECAST

Pr i ry : ol
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a ir 1 |

ame © —_
a ORLANDO











AY rn NY




3l4|5\c

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| HIGH

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LOW









iah-O4°F RAR US Clouds and sun, Patchy clouds with a Mostly sunny, a Sunny to partly Times of clouds and Intervals of clouds The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
a High: 94° F/34° Ca afternoon t-storm. thunderstorm. t-storm in the p.m. cloudy. sun. and sunshine. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
Low: 75° F/24°C st -_, : 3 : 5 ; 5 ; =
; @ 7 High: 91 High: 92 High: 91 High: 90
c ie f High: 89° Low: 79° Low: 80° Low: 81° Low: 81° Low: 80° see EE
TAMPA {if ah aE UE
High: 91° F/33° C , = 108°-89° F 111°-86° F 105°-91° F 107°-94° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft.
Low: 77° F/25°C otk r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 6:23am. 2.2 12:27am. 03
a @ “ 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 654p.m. 28 12:14pm. 0.2
i 738 p.m. 28 1:01pm. 0.2
) “i cae are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Monday (ooam. 23 15am. 02
: r ——— emperature 819pm. 28 1:46pm. 0.2
i : ae Hi ee QM, es satetnee seseree an tcc 91° F/33° C qe 333am. 23 235am. 02
ps * "Yall t ted “8 °F/97°C LOW eee 82° F/28° C uesday 857 p.m. 28 2:28pm. 02
al — ow: 81° F/27 Normal high .... ea a
- ; wy Normal low 75° F/24° C
) es @ WEST PALMBEACH a Last year's high... or Fs3°C | ONT MTIMT(IIN
4 ell High: 90° F/32° C oe Last year's lOW oes 79° F/26° C oan fee aon bas
oor Low: 77° F/25°C i ~ Precipitation = ===S———~—S—S——CSS riser... 25 a.m. Moonrise .... 6:09 p.m.
ra . a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccccsssecsscsseeesseseeeee 0.00" Sunset....... 8:04 p.m. Moonset... 3:53 a.m.
a FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT << oie a a Cia SCG
High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 86° F/30° C Normal year to date .......c.ccsesscssessscececseeee 19.02" ag a s
Low: 78° F/26°C —— Low: 77° F/25°C ie le #
GF AccuWeather.com {0 = a
n @ a mm Forecasts and graphics provided by oe a F
ene —— ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul.7 Jul. 150 Jul.21 Jul. 28
in = ales 4° 0
oo Low: 78° F/26° C NASSAU ot Fae C
Low: 79° F/26° C
KEY WEST Re » CATISLAND
High: 89° F/32° C High: 87° F/31° C
Low: 80° F/27°C — Low: 73° F/23°C
ams: D
‘a GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
oe eae 4 High: 90° F/32° C
3 ow: 78°F /26° Low: 75° F/24° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 94° F/34°C ;
Low: 80° F/27°C
a
LONG ISLAND
Low: 76° F/24°C
Today Sunday Today Sunday Today Sunday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 91° F/33°C
F/C FIC Fic FC Fic FIC FC FIC FC FC Fic FC rue Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 90/32 68/20 c 89/31 67/19 t Indianapolis 76/24 60/15 4+ 79/26 62/16 pc Philadelphia 83/28 64/17 s 83/28 66/18 pc
Anchorage 73/22 56/13 s 78/25 57/13 $s Jacksonville 96/35 73/22 t 96/35 75/23 t Phoenix 106/41 87/30 pc 107/41 86/380 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 92/33 71/21 po 88/31 71/21 t Kansas City 82/27 64/17 t 87/30 65/18 pc Pittsburgh 74/23 56/13 po 76/24 56/13 pc RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:92°F/83°c
Atlantic City 79/26 60/15 s 80/26 63/17 pc Las Vegas 105/40 80/26 s 107/41 84/28 s Portland, OR 94/34 60/15 s 89/31 60/15 pc High: 90° F/32° C Low: 77° F/25°C
Baltimore 84/28 64/17 s 80/26 62/16 pc Little Rock 98/36 75/23 pce 87/30 69/20 t Raleigh-Durham 90/32 67/19 s 86/30 67/19 t Low: 74°F/23°C
Boston 79/26 61/6 t 81/27 60/15 pc Los Angeles 82/27 64/417 pce 84/28 63/17 pc St. Louis 83/28 67/19 t 84/28 66/18 pc .
Buffalo 72/22 5613 pe 75/23 58/14 pc Louisville 82/27 68/20 t 83/28 66/18 t Salt Lake City 90/32 64/17 pc 92/383 66/18 s GREAT INAGUA
Charleston, SC 92/83 73/22 pc 94/34 75/23 t Memphis 96/35 77/25 pce 88/31 71/21 t San Antonio 100/37 78/25 s 99/37 76/24 ¢$ High: 93° F/34° C
Chicago 72/22 54412 4+ 83/28 59/15 pc Miami 90/32 78/25 t 89/31 78/25 t San Diego 75/23 67/49 pe 75/23 66/18 pc Low. 77°F25°C
Cleveland 73/22 56/13 pe 79/26 59/15 pc Minneapolis 78/25 62/16 pc 84/28 65/18 pc San Francisco 78/25 58/14 pce 73/22 55/12 pc .
Dallas 100/37 77/25 s GSAS 2cmat Nashville 89/31 70/21 pc 86/30 68/20 t Seattle 83/28 56/13 s 84/28 57/13 pc
Denver 80/26 57/13 t 85/29 57/13 t New Orleans 97/36 80/26 t 95/35 77/25 t Tallahassee 96/35 74/23 t 97/36 75/23 t
Detroit 74/23 59/15 s 83/28 60/15 pc New York 81/27 66/18 s 82/27 65/18 pc Tampa 91/32 77/25 t 91/32 77/25 t
Honolulu 88/31 75/23 s 89/31 75/23 $s Oklahoma City 94/84 70/21 s 88/31 69/20 t Tucson 98/36 78/25 pce 100/37 77/25 t
Houston 98/36 79/26 pc 98/86 78/25 ¢ Orlando 94/34 75/23 t 94/34 75/23 t Washington, DC 84/28 67/19 s 79/26 67/19 c

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
79/26
86/30
88/31
59/15
89/31
86/30
82/27
97/36
78/25
87/30
84/28
82/27
64/17
81/27
92/33
66/18
98/36
93/33
72/22
93/33
81/27
86/30
75/23
66/18
82/27
80/26
64/17
91/32
64/17
86/30
90/32
89/31
79/26
59/15
89/31
71/21
77/25
93/33
88/31
71/21
106/41
72/22
59/15
78/25
77/25
100/37
77/25
82/27
86/30
74/23
105/40
86/30
90/32
69/20
89/31
55/12
86/30
66/18
82/27
72/22
63/17
87/30
79/26
68/20
83/28
76/24
82/27
81/27
73/22

ii

Today

Low
F/C
78/25
58/14
55/12
74/23
50/10
79/26
77/25
70/21
77/25
76/24
66/18
67/19
M128
46/7
58/14
63/17
43/8
75/23
85/29
48/8
74/23
71/21
71/21
66/18
52/11
61/16
61/16

SATURDAY, JULY 41H 2009, PAGE 11

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Ca CS

53/11 ¢

74/23

45/7
81/27
71/21
72/22
61/16

40/4
78/25
58/14
59/15
61/16
77/25
54/12
76/24
57/13

415
61/16
54/12
81/27
57/13
61/16
62/16
66/18
80/26
68/20
81/27

35/1
74/23

43/6
73/22
58/14
68/20
52/11

48/8
77/25
70/21
54/12
65/18
58/14
66/18
59/15
53/11

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mei” a has ke

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High
F/C
90/32
77/25
88/31
90/32
56/13
89/31
86/30
81/27
91/32
78/25
91/32
79/26
82/27
67/19
79/26
88/31
65/18
98/36
94/34
72/22
91/32
80/26
86/30
81/27
64/17
85/29
80/26
72/22
89/31
63/17
86/30
104/40
91/32
80/26
55/12
89/31
70/21
76/24
91/32
87/30
73/22
110/43
70/21
55/12
78/25
79/26
100/37
72/22
79/26
78/25
72/22
104/40
86/30
90/32
71/21
87/30
Soals)
85/29
66/18
84/28
70/21
61/16
86/30
82/27
72/22
86/30
76/24
82/27
17/25
77/25

Sunday

Low
F/C
79/26
58/14
52/11
73/22
50/10
78/25
77/25
69/20
73/22
74/23
68/20
61/16
USES
45/7
54/12
64/17
50/10
75/23
85/29
49/9
74/23
71/21
73/22
65/18
54/12
61/16
62/16
54/12
5/28
46/7
82/27
77/25
73/22
63/17
40/4
79/26
58/14
57/13
63/17
77/25
53/11
75/23
63/17
43/6
57/13
53/11
81/27
57/13
54/12
62/16
66/18
77/25
65/18
81/27
36/2
73/22
39/3
73/22
57/13
68/20
54/12
46/7
75/23
72/22
54/12
66/18
62/16
66/18
58/14
56/13

Ww

pe

pe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
Sunday: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-3 Feet 5-15 Miles 81°F
Sunday: SE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
ABACO Today: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
Sunday: SE at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

9 3GI60e

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Denver, Kansas City,

82/64

'osJAngeles)
“82/64!

Showers
T-storms
Rain

[*_ | Flurries

Be =*] Snow Warr -fienflenli
7_9! Ice Stationary Manguniit-

“10s Os {/0s)) 10s 20s /308)) 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s [90s fills!) 1i0s)

HURRICANE INSURANCE

90/78

Fronts
Cold
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.









| Blown
Away By ulricane

_ Or you can rest easy knowing
that youyhave excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

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Full Text

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Accused’s prints ‘found at scene’ C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.184SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY AND CLOUDY HIGH 89F LOW 79F N E W S S TAFF CLAIM FOREIGNERS GET BETTER TREATMENT S P O R T S Bank workers feel Knowles will not play on team ‘Overlooked’ Davis Cup No Show N E W S Upset over uncollected refuse Garbage Stink A fingerprint examiner testified yesterday that prints found on the front door of Mountbatt en House matched those of murder accused Troyniko McNeil. T he trial into the murder of internationally recognised handbag designer Harl Taylor continued in the Supreme Court yesterday with five more witnesses being called to testify. Troyniko McNeil, the son ofT aylor’s former business partner Troy McNeil, is charged with intentionally causing Taylor’s death between Saturday, November 17, and Sunday, November 18, 2007 while being concerned together with another. Taylor, 37, was found dead at Mountbatten House on West Hill Street and sustained some4 2 to 50 injuries, according to the prosecution. ASP Clifford Ferguson, offi cer in charge of the Criminal Records Office of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, told the court yesterday that on November 20, 2007, he received from Corporal 402 Rolle, an envelope labelled Harl Taylor that contained photographs and negatives of fingerprints. ASP Fer guson told the court that on August 14, 2008, he received from Corporal 1406 Davis, a set of fingerprint impressions recorded on a Royal Bahamas Police Force fingerprint form bearing the name Troyniko McNeil. ASP Ferguson told the court that he compared the fin gerprints in photographs labelled Harl Taylor A to F and found that the prints in the pho tographs labelled A and C were identical to the left forefinger and right thumb impressions on the fingerprint form. ASP Ferguson said he found no match for the other prints labelled, B, D, E and F. During cross-examination by McNeil’s attorney, Murrio Ducille, ASP Ferguson said that prints could last on an object a year or two. He also told the court that if a print was lifted from one object to another he would be able to tell because it would have something from the surface from which it was lifted. ASP Ferguson noted, however, that this would be difficult to determine if the prints had been photographed. Corporal Gardell Rolle, who is attached to the Carmichael Road Detective Unit, told the court that around 10 am on Sunday November 18, 2007, he travelled to Mountbatten House after receiving certain information. Corporal Rolle told the Police testify in handbag designer’s murder trial The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com Man charged with gambling game murder A 27-YEAR-OLD man accused of killing another man during a gambling game was arraigned in Magistrate’sC ourt yesterday afternoon. Theophilus Darling, of Coconut Grove Avenue, appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court O ne, Bank Lane, charged with the murder of Dewitt Butler, 3 6. Mr Butler was reportedly shot in the head and bodya round 8pm on Monday dur ing a dispute in a gambling game on East Street, just north of Coconut GroveA venue. He died a short time later in hospital. Darling, who was repres ented by attorney Krysta Smith, was not required to enter a plea to the murderc harge and was remanded to H er Majesty’s Prison. The case has been adjourned to July 13 and transferred toC ourt 6, Parliament Street. Mr Butler's death brought the murder count to 37 for the year. n By NATARIO MCKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter n mckenzie@tribunemedia.net SEE page 7 27 y ear-old is arraigned Proud to be a Bahamian Rawson Square was overflowing with Bahamian culture, craft, food and song in celebration of National Pride Day, as the country gears up to celebrate its 36th independence anniversary. See more pictures on page 2 POLITICAL candidates are being shopped around to various constituencies throughout New Providence as the PLP attempts to revitalise its base and lead into its convention in October with a massive show of force, The Tribune has learned. According to sources within the party, candidates are begin ning to emerge and campaign in Mount Moriah, Holy Cross, South Beach, Kennedy, and even Elizabeth, which is currently held by PLP MP Mal colm Adderley. The other seats throughout New Providence have also been put on alert and branch meetings have been held on a monthly basis to keep the party’s base informed of what the PLP is doing and the party’s message going forward. In the recent past PLP Leader Perry Christie announced his decision to remain as leader of the party, carrying the PLP into the next general election in 2012. Political pundits have argued that this push of candidates in the various constituencies could prove as an effective distraction from a possible challenge to Mr PLP’s hopefuls start to campaign SEE page 7 F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Due to the July 4 Independence Day celebrations in the US, the USA Today international edition will not be published in today’s Tribune. It will return on Mon day, July 6 USAToday FREEPORT businessman Rick Hayward was grateful for the outpouring of support and offers of assistance from persons who express concern over the lockout at his three restaurants at Port Lucaya Marketplace. Among those expressing concern was Lady Henrietta St George, who was dismayed by the recent news paper reports about the lockout of Mr Hayward, the son of Sir Jack Hayward. “I got a call from Lady Henrietta saying that she was very upset (about what happened to me) and it was very encouraging,” he said. The Port Group Limited (PGL Mr Hayward’s three restau rants – La Dolce Vita, The Pub at Port Lucaya and East, last Thursday after he had not paid his rent for eight months. He owes $230,000 in back rent. Sir Jack’s son happy for lockout support n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net SEE page 7 T een tattoo controversy A MOTHER who said her 15-year-old son was tattooed at a local parlour without her permission is calling for legislation that would prevent minors from getting tattoos without parental consent. Administrator Linda Nixon wants the parlour to pay $3,089 to get the imprint removed by a laser. But the tattoo parlour in question the Tattoo King claims the boy had a signed consent form with him which they thought was legitimate permis sion from his mother. The frustrated mother thought her teenage son was attending a youth group on the afternoon of June, 16 and was shocked when he came home with a tattoo of a cross on the back of his left hand. Her son's friend reportedly gave the tattoo artist a cell phone in exchange for several tattoos. She said he did not have her consent and made a complaint at the Central Police Station the next day. She was told by the investigating officer that the parlour had agreed to remove the design but when she went to the Bay Street location the next Saturday she claimed the parlour reneged on the deal and offered instead to cover the mark with skin-toned ink. "I said I want it taken off, but (they er it up and match his skin tone," she said. Fuming, she visited a plastic surgeon who told her the removal would take 14 sessions at over $3000 a price she thinks the Tattoo King should pay. Part-owner Byron Austin told The Tribune he offered to cover the tattoo with fleshtoned ink at a reduced price of $10 a session instead of $400 a pop which Ms Nixon refused. He argued that his establish n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net SEE page 7 THE issue of the recent political coup in Honduras, a resolution to have Cuba instated in the Organisation of American States and the regional economic crisis will likely be issues raised at the ongoing meeting of CARICOM heads of Government in Guyana, said For eign Affairs Minister Brent Symonette. "The issue of Honduras will be discussed. . .the question of Cuba at the Organisation of American States will come up along with the financial situation in the Caribbean will come up," he told The Tribune during a brief interview yesterday. On June 28, Honduran President Manuel Zelaya was expelled from the country for multiple constitutional viola tions, according to internation al reports. Roberto Micheletti assumed control of the country. The United States, CARICOM and the United Nations have condemned the coup. Mr Symonette offered little comment on the issue other than to say it was "still unravel ling" and he hoped it would be resolved diplomatically. On June 3 the Cuban gov SEE page 7 THE tattoo at the centre of the controversy CARICOM to focus on economic problems

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S TINKING garbage is piling up outside some homes in the Eastern Road and Camper-d own areas as waste collection has been stalled for weeks, residents claim. An Eastern Road resident who lives near the junction with Dodge Road said outdoor dumpsters are overflowing in h is area since the regular Thursd ay night garbage collections s topped four weeks ago. He said: “The smell and the f lies are really nasty, and although I haven’t seen any rats yet, I am sure they will follow. I noticed them collect it a round four weeks ago, because they have always come at around midnight on Thursdays and they have been as regular as clockwork, but all of a sudden they just stopped.” C amperdown residents have a lso complained about waste p iling up in their bins. B ut Senior Superintendent Elvis McPhee in charge of coll ections and disposal was shocked to learn of such a long suspension of service. H e said: “In the last two w eeks we experienced some rain which has put the schedule off, because when the weather is bad there is nothing we can do. But four weeks is not a fact, I say that unequivo-c ally. “We have never had anywhere in New Providence go four weeks without garbage collection.” The senior superintendent a dded: “For 22 months we have h ad excellent service and no complaints. It could be an isolated case w here something may have b een an oversight, but I will speak to the supervisors and m ove to rectify it immediately. “If anyone has any complaints they can call me, I am here almost all day dealing with m atters and I am more than happy to apologise and tell them we endeavour to provide an excellent service.” If you have had problems with your garbage collection callM r McPhee on 341-1968/9. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPOR T S SECTION L ocal News..................................P1,2,3,5,6,7 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Comics........................................................P8 Sports....................................................P9,10W eather . ....................................................P11 Advt .........................................................P12 C LASSIFIED SECTION 36 P AGES USA TODAY WEEKENDER 12 PAGES Garbage pile-up causes big stink n B y MEGAN R EYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A garbage truck picks up trash on Bay Street yesterday F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f H undreds of Bahamians and tourists t urned out in Rawson Sqaure yesterday t o celebrate National Pride Day, part of t he Bahamas’ 36th independence anniversary activities. National Pride Day featured Bahamian culture at its best, including food, folklore, artisans, dance, music,t he Prison pop band, fashion shows, and the best yards competition. T he day is intended to encourage Bahamians to celebrate and be proud of what is Bahamian (Photos: Felip Major/Tribune S taff) Taking pride in being Bahamian

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By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net C HRISTIANS have expressed their disappointment at one pastor’s flaunting of a $68,000 Bentley paid for with the help of his 400 parishioners. B ishop Kirkwood Murphy, head pastor at Temple Fellow ship Ministries in Davis Street, O akes Field, showed off the 2005 navy blue Bentley Arnage similar to the one used by the Q ueen of England – in the press yesterday. The car has a retail price of around $240,000 in the UnitedS tates and around $400,000 in the Bahamas, but the pastor was quoted as saying he purc hased it in a New York auction around two months ago, following an agreement by nineo f the church’s 10 pastors. B ishop Murphy told the press t hat the car for which he saved for three years to buy was a gift and a blessing from God. He said he wanted to make a statement as a man of God, raise the profile of the church and attract believers to his parish. B ut Christians have criticised the pastor for making such an extravagant purchase when thousands of Bahamians are out of work in the global economic recession. A senior pastor who did not w ant to be named said: “Pastors should be comfortable because we do social service,b ut there’s something called excess and that’s excessive. Totally excessive. “He didn’t rob a bank to buy i t, the people gave people like their leaders to be a little ahead of them, we see it all the t ime with our politicians. “But at this time we should set better examples.” T he pastor stressed how the 1 0,000 ministers in the country’s 3,500 churches are not all blessed with such extravagances, as the majority of Christian preachers must do parttime work on the side, and some need more than one jobt o earn a living. Devout Christian Jewel Major, a member of Grace Community Church off Marathon Road, said she believes parishioners should g ive one tenth of their earnings t o the church to pay for upkeep, costs, and community work, but should not give over and abovet heir earnings rendering them unable to pay their bills. She said: “I don’t believe the church or pastors ought toa ccept their parishioners’ money when people in the parish are not doing well. If he got a $68,000 car then I don’t think this is the time to flaunt it, and if he’s flauntingi t to show how good God is to h im, then he better have a lot of good stuff in store for when people come to him. “They’re going to expect God to do the same thing for them as He has done for him and that’s not the way it works.” B ishop Murphy was quoted as saying his ministry gives $60,000 to $70,000 back to its members each year, and will give or loan thousands of dollars to people in his parish who a re in need. T he Tribune w as unable to contact Bishop Murphy before the paper went to press lastn ight. By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net BAHAMIAN Scotiabank s taff claim they are being overlooked in favour of foreign employees who are chosen over them for high positions and given preferential treatment. Employees of Scotiabank spoke out after The Tribune r eported how the Labour Board launched an investigation into the RBC Trust management when staff claimed expatriates were being hired unfairly and given lavish compensation packa ges while Bahamians were let g o or forced to take unpaid leave. Scotiabank staff say local staff are hindered from advancing into management level because foreign workers are hired to fill the top posts, often because of their foreign language skills when languages are not part of the official r equirements. O ther foreigners are brought in for training programmes and t hen stay to fill permanent posit ions, staff claim. M eanwhile the allegedly frivo lous foreign hiring is a financial drain on the company, the staff said. One employee who did not want to be named said: “Theyw ill pay for their housing, transp ortation, school fees, will allow t hem to travel home, and there’s a fund for the permits and that could be very high, usually over $10,000. “Sometimes they pay right d own to the water that they d rink, and it’s all at the expense of the bank. “It’s a waste of money if we have the talent.” S taff claim Bahamians in high p ositions have been forced into retirement, by either being reassigned to an unsuitable position,o r being forced to resign without reason, while at least onep osition was created for a fore igner. A bout five expatriates are t hought to be currently employed at Scotiabank, and staff believe there are more to come. Assistant Director of Immig ration Dwight Beneby said t here is no limit on the number o f foreign workers a bank can employ, and work permits for bank managers are approved by the Central Bank of the Bahamas before applications ares ent to the Immigration Departm ent. If no objection is noted by Central Bank, work permits will usually be approved by the department as they presume the C entral Bank would know the n eeds of the banking sector, particularly at management level. Mr Beneby said: “We get this c omplaint from time to time, but one of the things is that our lawst end to work against us. The bank may ask for someo ne who speaks a language when t he language of business is English, and that affects most people. “Government needs to revise the labour laws and advertising laws in order for it to change.” A spokeswoman for Scotiab ank said: “Scotiabank is firmly c ommitted to the advancement and well-being of its Bahamian employees. “Being a global employer of choice enables Scotiabank toa ttract and retain high-performi ng employees, while positioning t he bank as a place where talented people not only want to work, but also have the opportunity to thrive in their careers. “With our base in Canada and s ignificant operations around the w orld, Scotiabank understands that embracing and fostering an inclusive work culture and harnessing the skills of local talent w ill generate more innovative t hinking, better decision making and stronger business results. “Because we are an internat ional company, many employees are frequently offered opportu-n ities to work abroad. These o pportunities are elements of our e mployees' professional develo pment plans. “Many Scotiabank Bahamas employees take full advantage of these opportunities and work in other countries which provide a greater opportunity to advance t heir careers. “It is Scotiabank's policy not to discuss individual employees' personnel files for privacy reasons.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009, PAGE 3 Staff at Scotiabank ‘being overlooked’ Workers claim foreigners get preferential treatment Christians upset over pastor’s purchase of $68k Bentley

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E DITOR, The Tribune. Re: 1. Accusations made against the RBPF. 2. Police: No prosecution over alleged (RBDF reporter. We permit our schools to churn out grade D students, yet many of us seem amazed that we now appear to have a Dgrade RBPF and RBDF (along with other national institutions). KEN W KNOWLES, MD Nassau, June 13, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. I must admit I did endure w atching quite a lot of the soc alled Budget debate but found i ts content totally ridiculous and worrisome as crucial issues that we are faced with were talked about but nothing done to correct. Probably the most significant utterance did not come fromt he halls of parliament but came as part of The Councillor’s dis-c ussion at Choices Restaurant w hen in a single sentence Dr D uane Sands totally described the troubles facing us and the initial cure. F or those who missed Dr Sands’ comment this is a paraphrase of it: We are a State suf f ering from total denial and disillusionment and are “broke” but we describe ourselves as a “first world nation.” Although there is a massive deficit for Budget 2010 Government did not introduce orn ame any measures to reduce Government’s costs incredibly the Prime Minister made a comment on civil service “overtime” but did not have the courage to, for at least the short t erm till we get out of this mess, t hat all “overtime” is banned and may not occur for any rea son. W hy at this crucial economic time didn’t the government see fit to reduce the what has to be enormous outflow of harde arned US dollars through the returning duty free exemption? Surely this was an appropriate t ime to cut it by 50 per cent and save? We really need to retain as many dollars as we can thatw ill further retain employment. W hat is the cost of this Trav el exemption anyway? Does anyone know? Conservativelyo ver $90 million must flow out through this really unnecessary exemption or more as we allk now few give truthful declara tions. The PLP is still living in denial as to why their anchor projects stopped it was no one else but the Lehmann Bros bankruptcy, or we would have t hree to four of these projects c oming out of the ground. I cannot understand why this g overnment refuses to implem ent Catastrophic Health Insurance if the annual bill is $ 80 million with 188,000 working that's only a shared premiu m of $83.33 per person for the year incredibly cheap I suggest. T he Prime Minister’s comm ent as to the number of vehic les licensed to the government well who purchased them, Mr Prime Minister, and who has allowed the known misuse to continue for years. Driveb ehind the Oakes Field Police compound and see just how many of the police cars purchased in 2007 are now broken right up. Credit Card debt absolutel y nothing spoken on this issue b ut it is very important for the financial safety of Joe Public that policy from the CentralB ank requires a tightening, especially when issuing new cards. A debt of $269 million f rom 116,000 cards is exceptionally high. Educational Scholarships scheme surely these grants s hould be ‘PAYE’ deductions at source and surely the scholarships should be insured? I am quite sure a skilled financial operations person would cut the daily operationalc osts of running our over-sized civil service by as much as 20 per cent, but, of course, we wouldn’t dare to consider thats o I conclude is this government serious as past governments have been serious? Lottery: I am honestly sick of hearing the continual misrepresentation, including that oft he current chair of the Gaming B oard no government is g oing to approve a lottery or legalise the current illegal operations of the numbers as this activity is too valuable politically to the parties and is a perceived major source of corruption and protection so the sidee arnings involve too many so nothing is ever going to bed one. Bahamians gambling on P aradise Island or in any casino i s a fad few will continue after the newness wears off. There is no doubt we have t o, we are bound to invest at least $15-20 million in our socalled Justice system unless wew ish to be described as a nation without a free and open justice process and I suggest this is not very far off. If I were prime minister I would have effectively cut cabinet to size at least for the nexty ear unless he is really telling us that some of the full time ministers simply can’t operate without a Minister of State or a Parliamentary Secretary? We should invest in massive a cross the board government r eform of procedures our government needs to within two-years no more go totallyi nto e-government also a substantial part of education customs and immigration. We have to leave the postur i ng of politics behind us and be willing to take the obvious steps to reduce government in size a nd costs. I am suspicious that this budget has done something very sinister as how can youa pprove an establishment large r than what the funds are to pay them on scale? This is what has been approved, Editor. ABRAHAM MOSS N assau, June 20, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K E DITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt . P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 Freeport fax: (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm MOSCOW Russia is using its energy wealth to shore up influence abroad, pouring billions of dollars in loans and grants into former Soviet states and long-standing allies even as it faces its own severe economic downturn. Faced with its own economic crisis, the Kremlin could have downplayed its drive to reclaim its former status as a "great power" and fight fires at home. Instead, armed with cash hoarded during years of high oil prices, Russia has gone on a cash offensive pledging loans and aid to Belarus, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova and Armenia. It has tied in its neighbours to crucial energy deals, and has talked about lending billions of dollars to Ukraine and Serbia. Russia has sought to hold sway over what it calls its "near abroad," a region that includes most of Moscow's former imperial possessions. It has railed against its neighbours' efforts to move closer to Europe, and resisted Western influence on what it sees as its home turf. But Russia will have to step up its game if it is to build sustainable influence in the former Soviet Union. Presented with choices, its neighbours are starting to resist Russia's dominant position, playing Moscow off against other powers to secure their own long-term interests. Turkmenistan, the reclusive Central Asian state with enormous gas reserves, was until recently in Moscow's thrall. The Russians swept in last year, buying up Turkmen gas in lucrative long-term contracts. With that gas bound for Europe, Russia's Gazprom stood to lock in profits and strengthen its hold over European gas supply. But the global crisis has hit demand for gas, and Gazprom attempted to renege on its con tracts much to Ashgabat's irritation. Turkmenistan accused Gazprom of blowing up the gas pipeline between the two countries a charge that Gazprom denied prompting an outage in exports and a deepening rift in rela tions. With Russia's relationship with Turk menistan looking fragile, neighbouring China swooped in last month with a $4 billion credit, and agreed to purchase production expected from a new gas field. With Russian President Dmitry Medvedev invited to visit Turkmenistan in September, the Turkmens seem ready to talk. But as China and the West actively court the gas-rich country, Russia may find it is already too late. "Russia is increasingly facing up to China in the areas it regards as its near abroad," said Chris Weafer, chief strategist at Uralsib. "Russia has been accused of falling short on promis es, while China is very diligent in its delivery." "Russia needs to step up its response." Belarus, too, has attempted to play Russia off other powers in this case Europe. Talks with Minsk to extend the final $500 million tranche of a $2 billion loan collapsed in acrimony recently. Belarus' authoritarian leader, Alexander Lukashenko, accused Moscow publicly of insisting on dubious political preconditions namely recognizing the independence claims of Georgia's breakaway regions, South Ossetia and Abkhazia. Only Russia and Nicaragua recognise those claims. In response to Lukashenko's charge, Russia's normally cool Finance Minister Alexei Kudrin accused Belarus of having a "parasitic" attitude toward Moscow. Lukashenko shot back that he would not "bow down, whine and cry" to Russia. Lukashenko may feel he has little choice but to mend relations with an annoyed Kremlin. Belarus, despite recently joining the European Union's six-nation Eastern Partnership, still has limited ties with the West. Instead, it remains heavily dependent on Russia for cheap loans, inexpensive energy and vital trade ties. Nevertheless, the Kremlin has good reason to whip out its cheque book elsewhere. The gov ernment of Uzbekistan, normally highly critical of U.S. policy, surprised observers by praising U.S. President Barack Obama's recent address to the Islamic world in Cairo. A Foreign Ministry statement described Obama's approach to key issues as "sober and realistic." Kyrgyzstan recently backpedaled on a deci sion to kick the Americans out entirely from a vital military base, a staging post for sending supplies to Afghanistan. The move drew anger in Moscow, which had loaned the impoverished country some $2 billion seemingly on the condition that it give the Americans notice. "Russia always makes the same mistake," said Alexander Konovalov, president of the Institute of Strategic Assessment. "It presents its neighbours with a choice: you're either with the West or with us." Some neighbours have achieved a balance. Kazakhstan has successfully played off Russia, China and the West to little detriment to its relationships. And so may Kyrgyzstan. In the wake of Bishkek's overtures to the U.S. in June, Medvedev sought to assure the world that Russia had no objection. "In this multipolar world, countries that are not great powers have choices," said Sam Greene, deputy director at the Carnegie Moscow Centre. "They are going to diversify their relationships. I think Russia realises that." But the Kremlin's actions so far, he said, have been more "about maintaining some rem nants of the past rather than building some thing for the future." Analysts warn it is a short-sighted strategy that could yet backfire. "Once you start building relationships based on financial aid, you have to keep that flow of aid coming," said Weafer. "If some day you can't afford to write the cheque, somebody else will." (This article was written by Catrina Stewart of the Associated Press). ‘Broke’, but we’re in total denial LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Russia plays a cheque book diplomacy Other institutions also now D-grade achievers

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net A 25-YEAR-OLDman has been charged with the armed robbery of the John Bull store in Lucaya. Leonard Barnett appeared in Court Two at Freeport Magistrates Court before Magistrate Andrew Forbes. In addition to the armed robbery charge, Barnett, along with his moth-e r and two sisters, were charged with possession of an unlicensed firearm and ammunition. It is alleged that on June 21, Barnett, while armed with a firearm robbed the John Bull Store of four Rolex watches. He was not required to enter a plea to the armed robbery charge. It is also alleged that on June 30 the accused was found in possession of af irearm and ammunition at a residence i n Freeport. He pleaded not guilty to the charges. The prosecution objected to bail and Barnett was remanded to Fox Hill Prison until October 19. H is mother, Yvonne Saunders, 54, a nd sisters, Cleopatra Barnett, 32, and Tabitha Joffer, 34, were also charged with possession of a firearm and ammunition. It is alleged the women were found in possession of an unlicensed firearm and ammunition while at a residence in Freeport. T hey pleaded not guilty to the c harges and were each granted $5,000 bail with two sureties. During the arraignment, Barnett’s brother, Claude Barnett, was cited for contempt of court because of his angryo utburst in the courtroom during the p roceedings. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009, PAGE 5 Freeport man charged with robbing John Bull Why you VEX? I is vex that everyone just s eem to be throwing good money to redevelop Bay Street without realising that it is one dirty, overbuilt, unattractive, horse manure smelling, congested flea mark et. I am upset that after t hrowing all those millions of money to fix downtown, I cannot find parking and the only ones who seem to benefit aret he store owners who are driving fancy cars and living in multi-million dollar homes. “Let’s throw our money to develop Carmichael Road instead and give all those merchants all along that 10 miles trip tax free duty on their imports where the benefits can go to many instead of justa few along a half mile road!” Financial Analyst, Nassau. “I must commend the gove rnment for addressing the matter of the CLICO policy h olders and bailing them out t o a certain extent. However, I don’t hear anything about t he CLICO staff and how their situation is being addressed by the government. Something needs to be done for the employees. The PLPa nd FNM governments allowed CLICO to financially f leece our country and left hard working Bahamians holding the bag.” Anonymous, Nassau. I vex that these doggonit pot-holes still breaking up my good car and governmentm oving too slow to fix it. I tired of driving on these bite up roads and jostling all over the place and what makes it w orse is people driving behind me is be so close likethey want me to speed when open ditches all over the place. “I ready to go get one fourw heeler because these streets i s like driving off road it’s ridiculous.” Mad Motorist, Nassau. I vex at how lavish and rich some of these so-called men of God’ live when people in our country hungry with no clothes on their backor shoes on their feet. I can understand that even Chris tians want nice things, but splurging on unnecessary lux ury items is a slap in the face. Why not use that money to set up a scholarship fund or a meals-on-wheels type of thing, something that can ben efit the whole community? “And what makes it worse, these people ga’ get up in front of their congregation on Sunday morning and start heaving like they get asthma and tell them they soon get their blessings and then go ride off in the sunset while their church catching bus.” Cathy S, Nassau. Are you vex? Send your complaints to whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net or fax them to 328-2398. BY DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net GRAND Bahama police are i nvestigating two armed robb eries which occurred in F reeport – one at a service station and the other at a landf ill. Police believe the two incidents are connected. A sst Supt Welbourne Bootle r eported that some time around 11.30pm on Wednesday, July 1, an armed robbery o ccurred at the Boulevard Ser vice Station on East Sunrise Highway. A ccording to reports, a pas senger in truck, armed with a shotgun, fired several shots at t he glass door of the service station. The gunman had a grey shirt tied around his mouth and n ose and was wearing blue jeans and a dark shirt. A fter robbing the establishment of an undetermineda mount of money, the suspect g ot back into the truck that w as driven away by another man. Police believe that the truck u sed in the armed robbery was stolen earlier from the Piner-i dge landfill. A SP Bootle said that around 1 1.45pm police received a call from a security officer on duty at the landfill on Grand B ahama Highway. The man reported that while on duty some time around1 0.45pm he was robbed by two b lack men armed with shot guns in a white truck, the prop erty of the Sanitation Services. H e was also robbed of two cellular phones, valued at $330. He said the suspects were w earing masks and dark cloth ing. Police are investigating the incidents. Shotgun fired in service station raid THE Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA Centre is putting on a special summer camp for chil d ren with autism, ADHD, speech and language d elays, gross motor delays, behaviour problems and other developmental disorders. The camp began on June 29 and will be held until A ugust 21 at #26 Sears Hill Road. T he camp is geared towards increasing gross motor skills, communication skills, receptive and expressive language, social skills, sensory, academics, attention and concentration, play skills and cognitive skills. Activities include play skill building games; social skills activities; fun academic learning activities; language building videos, among others. Scholarships are available. ABA Learning Centre hosts special summer camp I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s GB crime BRIEF Leonard Barnett

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L E BOURGET, France A SEVERELYbruised young girl believed to be the only survivor of an Indian Ocean plane crash flew back Thursday to Paris, where shew as embraced gently by her father, who tried to lift her spirits with a joke, according to the A ssociated Press . Bahia Bakari, 14, returned to France from the ComorosI slands on a French government plane. The Falcon-900 jet with medical facilities left thea rchipelago nation, a former F rench colony, and arrived at Le Bourget airport just north of Paris. Y emenia Flight 626 crashed Tuesday morning off Comoros amid heavy winds. Bahia, described by her father as a f ragile girl who could barely swim, spent over 13 hours in the water clinging to wreckage before she was rescued. She was found suffering from h ypothermia, a fractured collarbone and widespread bruises to her face, her elbow and her foot. T he other 152 people on the plane, including her mother and others from France's large Comoran community, are presumed dead. A nger over the crash ran high Thursday in France's Comoran community. In Marseille, hundreds of shouting d emonstrators tried to block passengers from boarding a Yemenia airlines flight toM oroni, the Comoros capital. P olice broke up the protest but there were no injuries. "We don't want any more Yemenia flights as long as justice has not been done," said Farid Solihi, president of "SOST rips to the Comoros," a group seeking to draw attention to what they call poor conditions on Yemenia flights. I n the Comoros, French and U.S. ships and officials directed the search for survivors. Alain B aulin, a commander with the French Foreign Legion, said military planes spotted whata ppear to be life jackets floating in the sea Thursday and divers were sent to the scene. THE Secretary General of the Organisation of American States (OASI nsulza yesterday flew to Hond uras to continue carrying on t he mandate of the OAS Special General Assembly that instructed him to undertake diplomatic initiatives aimed at restoring democracy and ther ule of law and the reinstatem ent of President Jose Manuel Zelaya Rosales as Head of State. During his less than 24-hour stay, Secretary General Insulza will notify the Honduran stakeholders of the terms oft he resolution adopted by the OAS Special General Assembly on Tuesday, June 30. The OAS Secretary General has since Wednesday undertaken intense conversationsw ith these sectors, as well as M inisters of Foreign Relations o f OAS member states, aimed at the normalisation of the situation within Honduras, altered since the coup d’tat that ousted constitutional P resident Jos Manuel Zelaya. R epresentatives from all member states instructed Secretary General Insulza to conduct “diplomatic initiatives aimed at restoring democracy and the rule of law and the reinstatement of PresidentJ os Manuel Zelaya Rosales, pursuant to Article 20 of the Inter-American Democratic Charter and report to the Special General Assembly on the results of the initiatives.” Should these (initiatives p rove unsuccessful within 72 h ours,” the resolution says, “the Special General Assembly shall forthwith invoke Article 21 of the Inter-American Democratic Charter tos uspend Honduras’ members hip.” Mr Insulza will go to Honduras from Guyana, where he attended the Summit of Heads of Government of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM T he OAS Secretary General will use a plane provided by the Brazilian government. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE O O A A S S S S e e c c r r e e t t a a r r y y G G e e n n e e r r a a l l t t o o t t r r a a v v e e l l t t o o H H o o n n d d u u r r a a s s Comoros crash survivor welcomed back home in Paris Mexico wins praise for swine flu response In brief IN THIS picture made from video broadcast, Thursday, July 2, 2009 by France 2/20 Minutes, Bahia B akari, aged 14, believed to be the only survivor of the Yemenia Airbus 310 crash is brought back to France on a French Government plane. Bahia was a passenger on a Yemenia Airbus 310 jet which crashed flying the last leg of a journey taking passengers from Paris and Marseille to the remote I ndian Ocean island nation of Comoros via Yemen when it crashed into the Indian Ocean. F a u s t i n e V i n c e n t / A P P h o t o CANCUN, Mexico A Sswine flu runs rampant in the Southern Hemisphere winter, world health experts are concerned that some hard-hit countries have been reluctant to take forceful measures to protect publich ealth, a ccording to the Associated Press . Only Friday did Argentina's new health minister, Juan Manzur, raise the country's official death toll to 44. He n ow estimates that as many a s 320,000 people have been stricken with influenza, including about 100,000 withs wine flu a huge jump in what the government acknowledged previously, and a n indication that Argentina's h ospitals will remain overwhelmed for months. Britain, for its part, had r efused to do widespread test ing for swine flu, slowing the World Health Organization'se fforts to declare that the viral s pread had become a pan demic. Britain's Health Min ister Andy Burnham belatedl y acknowledged Thursday that Britain needs to revamp its response and could see up t o 100,000 new swine flu cas es a day by the end of August. The government was reluctant to implement unpopular m easures leading up to last Sunday's midterm elections in Argentina. Now that t hey're over, it ramped up its response this week doubling the winter vacation to am onth for schools nationwide, sending pregnant women and other vulnerable workersh ome for 15 days and urging people to avoid crowds when ever possible.

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court that at the scene, he spoke with Detective Sergeant Cole-b rooke who also gave him cert ain information. Corporal Colebrooke said that he dusted for latent prints and labelled the six prints he discovered between A to F. He told the court that he found prints insidet he front entrance door near the lock and prints on the inside of the door frame near the lock. Detective Corporal Philip Davis told the court yesterday t hat around noon on August 14, 2008, while at Central Detec t ive Unit he saw Troyniko McNeil and recorded his fin gerprints. Corporal Davis duri ng cross-examination by McNeil’s attorney Murrio Ducille said that the accused did not have a lawyer at thet ime his prints were taken. Cor poral Davis said that he did not know if McNeil was charged at t he time and had only been car rying out the instructions that were given to him. Detective C orporal Marvin Cargill, a crime scene technician told the court that sometime after 10 amo n Sunday November 18, 2007, he and several other officers responded to the report of a homicide at Mountbatten House, West Hill Street. Cargill told the court that after receiving instructions fromD etective Inspector Bonaby, he and the officers entered the building through the southern entrance. Corporal Cargill recalled that there was blood dripping from the ceiling, and b lood stains on the stairs. He a lso told the court that he observed shoe and foot prints in the upstairs hallway. He toldt he court that in the upstairs bedroom, he observed the lifeless body of a male lying on the bed. Corporal Cargill told the court that he also observed a broken handle knife on the bed.C orporal Cargill told the court that he removed six tiles from the eastern bedroom entrance which had footprints on them. Hector Gonzales, a United States Immigration and Cust oms agent testified yesterday t hat on August 14, 2008, he was assigned to bring Troyniko McNeil back to the Bahamas.G onzales said that he and fellow agent Alex Gonzales brought McNeil to New Providence on an American Eagle flight from Florida. Gonzales said they were met at the airport by Bahamian police andt aken to Police Headquarters where McNeil was officially handed over to local authorities. The trial is to resume on Monday at 9.15am before S enior Justice Anita Allen. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009, PAGE 7 I n addition to the lock-out, PGL had also commenced litigation against Mr Hayward. On Thursday, Grand Bahama Port Authority president Ian Rolle persuaded PGL officials to r escind the lock-out and enter i nto mediation with Mr Hayward. The three restaurants opened o n Friday and the 76 workers returned to their jobs after aw eek out of work. L ady Henrietta St George, a d irector and honorary chairman of the Grand Bahama Port Authority Ltd and Port Groupo f Companies, felt that the mat ter should have been handled differently. She noted that she was not c onsulted on the draconian measures and neither was there a board meeting on the matter. I n a statement issued through her lawyer Frederick Smith of Callenders Counsel & Attorneyl aw firm, she said: “Any actionwhich affects the closure of three very long t erm businesses in Port Lucaya, w hich affects the livelihood of over 75 employees, which a ffects the tourist product and local restaurant amenities; which affects the income of the companies, and which affects one of the children of shareh olders of the Port Group of Companies, should have been h andled privately, sensitively, a nd a lot more delicately with prior consultation and at minimum through the board levels.” Mr Hayward said that he also received support from his fam ily. His father, Sir Jack, is also a 5 0 per cent owner of PGL. I love my dad very much and there might be a few dis agreements as there always is in families,” he said. Mr Hayward thanked local residents, politicians, labourb oard officials, and business men for their tremendous support for him and his businesses and his staff. ment has no obligation to get consent from a parent before inking a minor and said they only ask "as a courtesy." "I have never seen a law that s ays a child cannot go into a store and make a purchase. There is nothing on the books that says you cannot give a teenager a tattoo, but we have ac ivil and social obligation to ask f or (parental M r Austin. "She (Ms Nixon should have taken responsibility instead of throwing the blame on us. . .If her son came home with a tattoo you have to blame your child not the tattoo par-l our because there is no law on the books." He claimed the boy told the artist he had permission to get the body art “and even has another tattoo on his shoulder.” At the end of her rope, Ms Nixon is in talks with her son'ss chool to see if they will allow h im entry in September but is w orried he will be viewed as a delinquent because of the mark. She now plans to push for a law that will make tattooing a minor without parental consenta crime. " I'm in a bind my hands are tied legally because if I take him to court I possibly wouldn't win. And I don't have the funds to remove that anyway. " I also want to look what can b e done as far as enforcing it as a law. It's against the law in the United States, it's against the law in Great Britain," she said. She added that her son is " sorry" he got the tattoo. I nspector Bernard K Bonamy o f Central Police Station, who took Ms Nixon's complaint, said the tattoo parlour should have turned the boy away and asked him to return with a parent. " Once you go to any tattoo p erson and have some tattoo on the child the mother should accompany him. The parent should have gone there and spoke to the person or (thea rtist) should have called the mother," he told The Tribune. Christie’s leadership as his MPs would be more concerned with shoring up their base rather than a challenge to his post. S eeking to maintain this position may prove to be a difficult fight at the party’s upcoming convention, however, as wouldbe challengers maintain that despite Mr Christie’s proclamations, they will mount a chall enge “whether it be futile or not.” “If history teaches us anything then the answer to that question is obvious. Perry Christie did not win the 2002e lections. The people were simply tired of the FNM and decid-e d to vote them out. But the 2007 election proved that Mr Ingraham was capable of defeating an incumbent Prime Minister who at that time was inh is post for only one term. That is the issue. And with Ingraham m otioning as if he will stay on we need a leader who is capable of defeating him and returning t he PLP to government,” the s ource said. With both leaders suggesting that they very well could still be around in their present capacities as leaders of their respective parties in 2012, PrimeM inister Ingraham will be 64 years old at that time, with MrC hristie coming in as his senior by three years at 67 years. However, as many senior PLP’s suggest, their leader’s age does not come across primarilya s a concern for them. Of more importance is the party’s mes-s age to the youth and the middle class that needs to be handled and tailored in such a way that new voters are encouraged to get behind the party and revi-t alise their diminishing base. With the list of would-be contenders, including Senator Jerome Fitzgerald, PLP MP’s Fred Mitchell, Philip Davis, Obie Wilchcombe, Dr Bernard Nottage, former party chairman R aynard Rigby and attorney Paul Moss, it is unknown at this t ime if any of them would actually continue in their efforts to become the new face of the P LP. ernment was invited to make an application to rejoin the OAS after a 47-year absence. A ccording to international r eports, this invitation was declined by Cuba. But the resolution passed out of that June, 3 meeting will likely be raised, said Mr Symonette. R egional leaders are also e xpected to discuss the economic partnership agreement (EPA Union along with a plan to cre-a te an equivalent agreement b etween the region and Canada. "The implementation of the EPA will probably come up and also questions of where we go with regard to negotiating a sim-i lar agreement with Canada will b e discussed as well," said Mr Symonette. According to a statement released by CARICOM last month, the region’s chief medical officers (CMOsi ng a Port Health protocol for the Influenza A H1N1 virus which was slated to be presented at the meeting in Guyana. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham left the country on Thursd ay to attend the meeting, which end July 5, in Guyana. FROM page one Rick Hayward’s eateries re-open F ROM page one Summit to have Europe trade focus FROM page one Police reveal print ‘evidence’ Tattoo controversy F ROM page one PLPs start campaigning FROM page one

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AFTER being dethroned as the women’s nation al 100m champi on at the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations National Championships last weekend, veteran sprinter Chandra Sturrup turned in her season best performance yesterday at the ExxonMobil Bislett Games. As the lone competitor from the Bahamas in the IAAF Golden League meet in Oslo, Norway, Sturrup clocked 11.15 seconds for a third place finish. The meet was dominated by the Caribbean with Kerron Stewart, runner-up in the Jamaican Nationals last weekend as well, winning in 10.99. Trinidad & Tobago's KellyAnn Baptiste was second in 11.14, while Jamaican SheriAnn Brooks was third in 11.27. The majority of our elite ath letes are competing this weekend at the Central American and Caribbean Championships in Havana, Cuba. Some others are competing at the 28th Meeting dev Atletismo Madrid 2009 in Madrid, Spain, today. n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T h e Heavy Lift D orsey Park Boyz m oved a half game in front on the men’s standings of the New Providence Softball Association on another superb pitching performance from ace Edney “The Heat” Bethel. The premier pitcher in the country fired a one-hitter with 12 strike outs in four and-aquarter innings of relief work as the Dorsey Park Boyz came from behind to pound the youthful New Breed 9-4 in theo pening game on Thursday at the Baillou Hills Sporting Com plex. In the ladies’ feature contest, the Pineapple Air Wildcats blasted the defending champions Sigma Brackettes 6-3 as Mary “Cruise” Sweeting outshined veteran Ernestine Butler-Stubbs on the mound. Talking about the mound, the 45-year-old Bethel came in from right field to replace starter Randy Gibson on the mound with New Breed threatening to put their fifth run on the scoreboard in the top of the third with two out in the men’s opener. Solomon Bastian, who got on base on an error, was standing on third when Bethel got to the mound and he went on to add to his total of 105 he had already posted through the first six games of the season. Bethel’s first victim Thursday night was Kyle Rolle as the inning came to an end. In the bottom half of the frame, Bastian got back at Bethel when he snagged down a high fly ball to rob the Dorsey Park Boyz of what could have been their second run of the game (their first came on a leadoff solo in-the-park home run from Steven Culmer). “Like I tell everybody, as long as I'm here in Nassau, I practice more because I play in three or four different leagues,” said the Eleuthera native, who has played on just about every island affiliated with the Bahamas Softball Federation. “It has made me a whole lot more stronger and in better shape.” Bethel proved just how dominant a pitcher he is as he would go on to strike out the first two batters in the fourth, only to watch as Eugene Pratt broke up the streak with a grounder up the middle. But Bethel forced Thomas Davis to pop up to the end the inning. Then over the next three innings, Bethel went on to retire the side in order on strike-outs, pushing his grand total to 117 in seven games. “The key to striking out everybody is that I don't throw hard. I throw a lot of rise balls, curve ball and I have an excellent drop ball,” he said. “I don't have a good change up, but I can get you with it. “I have a blazing curve ball and a riser. My riser is my best pitch and I'm a littler quicker getting off the mound, so it doesn't give the batters that much of a chance to get a good look at the pitch.” The Dorsey Park Boyz improved their front running record to 7-1 just a half game of the defending champions Com mando Truckers, who are 6-1. The Truckers handed the Dorsey Park Boyz their first loss on Saturday night with a 3-2 win as Bethel struck out 16 in the loss. With the loss Thursday night, New Breed remained in fifth at 2-5. Bethel, still reflecting on the heartbreaking loss, said the Truckers got the first blow, but they will definitely meet them again and he assured the public that it will be a totally different ball game. It was a totally different ball game for New Breed, who didn't stand a chance against Bethel. And while he held them at bay, his teammates managed to finally come around and get their offense clicking. It started in the fourth when Lorenzo Carter got safely on second base on a shot to leftcenter field and he rode home on a two-run homer over the right-center field fence that cut their deficit to 4-3. Pinch hitter Darren Bowleg led off the fifth with a triple and scored on an error to tie the score at 4-4. But in the sixth, the Dorsey Park Boyz put the game out of reach when they connected just two hits, a consecutive two-out RBI single from Chavey Thompson and a two-run dou ble from Bethel. New Breed would start Thomas Davis and he lasted until the fifth when ace Eugene Pratt came in to try and close the door after starting behind the plate and moving to play third. But it was a little too late. Dorsey Park would march 10 batters to the plate as they batted around the clock in the fatal fifth. W W i i l l d d c c a a t t s s 6 6 , , B B r r a a c c k k e e t t t t e e s s 3 3 : : Normally Pineapple Air would struggle during the regular season and turn up the heat in the postseason. This year, they are off to one of their best starts ever, improving to 8-0 in a battle of the top two ladies' teams. Sigma Brackettes dropped to 4-2 with the loss. Dornette Edwards went 2for-3, scoring a pair of runs and Vernie Curry went 2-for-4 with a run scored to lead Pineapple Air to victory. On the mound, EdgecomeSweeting tossed a two-hitter, striking out three for the win. In the loss, Butler-Stubbs gave up eight hits, but struck out five. For the Brackettes, Sharvette Taylor was 1-for-2 with a RBI and run scored. C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 9 P AGE 10 Mark Knowles on mixed doubles crown... Federer beats Haas to reachh is 7th final at Wimbledon... See page 10 Bethel turns up ‘the heat’ Here’s a look at the team standings going into Saturday's double-header: Teams W L Pct. GB M M E E N N S S D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N Dorcy Park Boyz 7 1 .875 Commando Truckers 6 1 .857 Stingrays5 1 .833 1 Robin Hood Hitmen 3 3 .500 31/2 New Breed2 5 .285 41/2 Mighty Mits 2 6 .250 5 T H Equipment 1 5 .166 51/2 Buccaneers0 5 .000 51/2 W W O O M M E E N N S S D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N Wildcats8 0 1.000Brackettes4 2 .666 3 Lady Sharks 2 4 .333 5 Mystical Gems1 3 .250 5 Swingers 0 7 .000 71/2 S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y s s s s c c h h e e d d u u l l e e : : 7pm Brackettes vs Proper Care (L 8:30pm Stingrays vs Robin Hood (M NPSA Team Standings Dorsey Park Boyz pound New Breed 9-4 in opener EDNEY “THE HEAT” BETHEL n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net WITH the Bahamas set to host Guatemala in the second round of the American Zone Two Davis Cup tie next weekend, touring pro Mark Knowles has announced that he will not be coming home after all to compete on the team. Knowles, who is gearing up for the final of the mixed doubles at Wimbledon, said yesterday that he has optedt o go to the United States where he will play in the Advanta World Team Tennis. He is a member of the Sacramento Capitals, coached by Wayne Bryan. Included on the team are Michael Chang, Angela Haynes, Coco Vanderweghe, Sam Warburg and Brian MacPhine. Legendary Billy Jean and Larry King started the Advanta WTT 34 years ago. It's a unique gender-equity team concept that runs from July 2-26 with the 10 teams divided into two divisions. Each team is comprised of two men, two women and a coach. Team matches consist of five sets, with one set each of men's singles, women's singles, men's doubles, women's doubles and mixed doubles. The first team to reach five games wins each s et. One point is awarded for each game won, and a nine-point tiebreaker is played if a set reaches four all. If necessary, overtime and a “super tiebreaker” are played to determine theo utright winner of the match. “We tried to make it work, but unfortunately I had made a commitment to Team Tennis at the start of the year,” Knowles said. “I didn't know that it would have clashed with the Davis Cup draw. When I found out that it did, I tried to work it out where I could come down toD avis Cup, but I won't be able to leave here in time to be beneficial to the team. So I hope the guys can do it and beat Guatemala.” Playing in the final of mixed doubles also m eans that Knowles will have to skip the first day of competition as the Capitals hosted their first match last night against the Washington Kastles, which features Serena Williams and Leander Paes, who will both be absent as Williams is playing in the women's final and Paes is in the mixed doubles. “I was hoping the way the schedule is to get away for two days and play the doubles, but as itt urns out, I can't,” Knowles said. “The rules indicate that I must be present for at least two days and so I won't be able to get there for that.” Knowles will end up missing the C apitals' second match against the Newport Beach Breakers on Sunday that has Maria Sharapova in their line-up. But he's hoping tob e available when they host the Boston Lobsters on Tuesday that is headlined by Martina Navratilova. While he won't be available for the tie, Knowles sent his best wishes to the team. The Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association is scheduled to play at the National Tennis Center over the Independence holiday weekend with the quartet of Devin Mullings, Timothy Neilly, Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle whow ill all be back with captain John Farrington. However, the BLTA did announce that it h as added youthful Rodney Carey Jr of Grand Bahama as a member of the team. He will servea s an alternate, whom the association hopes to groom as a future potential team member.C arey Jr recently played in the Security & General International Tennis Tournament at the NTC where he lost in the final to his touring doubles teammate Darian King of Barbados. The duo also won the doubles title. Guatemala is slated to come to town with the team of Christopher Diaz-Figueroa, Christian Paiz, Julen Uriguen and Sebastian Vidal. Eduardo Herrera is the team captain. T he Bahamas is coming off a 4-1 loss to Paraguay in March, the same weekend that G uatemala was blanked 5-0 by the Dominican Republic. The winner between the Bahamas and Guatemala will remain in Zone II for 2010, while the loser will be relegated to Zone III. Mark Knowles won’t play on Davis Cup team K nowles ( AP) T T H H E E B B a a h h a a m m a a s s F F l l a a g g F F o o o o t t b b a a l l l l i i s s s s c c h h e e d d u u l l e e d d t t o o h h o o s s t t i i t t s s s s e e m m i i f f i i n n a a l l p p l l a a y y o o f f f f s s o o n n S S u u n n d d a a y y a a t t t t h h e e W W i i n n t t o o n n R R u u g g b b y y P P i i t t c c h h w w i i t t h h t t h h e e f f o o l l l l o o w w i i n n g g m m a a t t c c h h u u p p s s o o n n t t a a p p : : 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m G G o o o o d d m m a a n n s s B B a a y y S S p p a a r r t t a a n n s s v v s s R R B B C C L L i i o o n n s s , , 4 4 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m T T h h e e R R u u g g b b y y T T e e a a m m v v s s T T h h e e W W a a r r r r i i o o r r s s Flag Football semis playoffs on Sunday Stur rup turns in season best per for mance Sturrup n By STEPHAN NASSTROM AP Sports Writer OSLO (AP ell overcame a poor start to win the 100 meters in a photo finish at the Bislett Games on Friday, but fell short of clocking his 50th time under 10 seconds. The former world recordholder from Jamaica finished strongly to win in 10.07 seconds, with runner-up Daniel Bailey of Antigua given the same time. “I didn’t feel as strong as I normally do,” Powell said. “I didn’t get a great start. I was way behind. I got to the front somehow, but I didn’t finish as strong as normal. But a win is always a win.” It was Powell’s second race after returning from an ankle injury. “It’s not 100 percent,” he said. “I’m still a bit cautious. I have two more races next week. Hopefully I can do better and better in both.” Powell had hoped to join Maurice Greene of the United States as the only sprinter with 50 sub-10 second races. Greene tops the list with 53. Powell, who set four world records between 2005-07, has the second fastest time in history (9.72 Bolt holds the world record at 9.69. Yelena Isinbayeva of Russia, who has set 14 world outdoor records, won the women’s pole vault at a disappointing 15 feet, 5 1/2 inches. The competition was stopped for about an hour because of a thunderstorm. “Three hours ... it was my longest competition,” Isinbaye va said. “It was also one of the most difficult competitions of my career and one of the wettest.” Sanya Richards of the United States won the women’s 400 meters in 49.23 seconds for the fastest time of the year. Richards, who has not lost a 400 in the Golden League since Zurich 2004, also tied the Bislett Stadium record that Czech Tatjana Kocembova set in 1983. “It was a pity that I only equaled the meet record,” Richards said. “I didn’t expect to have the world’s best time of the year after the storm. We were worried during warm-up what would happen when we would be running.” Shericka Williams, the Olympic silver medalist from Jamaica, finished second in 49.98. Reigning Olympic and world champion Christine Ohuruogu of Britain was sixth in 51.19 in her first major race of the season. The Bislett meet is the sec ond of six in the Golden League series. The men compete in the 100 meters, 400, 3,000, 5,000, 110 hurdles and javelin, while the women contest the 100, 400, 100 hurdles, high jump and pole vault. Any athlete who wins those events at each of the six Golden League meetings will claim at least part of a $1 million jack pot. If no one wins all six of their events, athletes with five victories will share $500,000. Powell edges Bailey in 100m at Bislett Games ASAFA POWELL (AP

PAGE 9

BOSTON (AP Boston Celtics have offered for ward Rasheed Wallace a contract as part of a major push to land the coveted forward, according to a published report on Friday. The Boston Globe reports the Celtics offered Wallace a deal during a three-hour meet ing in Detroit on Thursday. Celtics stars Kevin Garnett, Ray Allen and Paul Pierce joined general manager Danny Ainge and managing partner Wyc Grousbeck at the meeting. Wallace’s agent, Bill Strick land, told the Globe in a text message that it was a “very good meeting; some contractual terms discussed, nothing agreed to.” He also said Wallace will be meeting with other teams next week. Charlotte, Cleveland, Orlando and San Antonio are said to be possible suitors. The 35-year-old Wallace can play the low post and also has exceptional shooting range. He averaged 12 points per game for Detroit last year, before falling to 6.5 points per game in the first round of the playoffs as Detroit was swept in four games by Cleveland. Wallace earned $13.68 million last season as he finished up a five-year contract with Detroit. Teams pursuing Wallace now would be offering the midlevel exception, worth between $5.6 million and $5.8 million. Wallace, a starter most of his career, would likely play a complementary role in Boston. The Celtics are hoping they can lure him by offering a shot at a title. Wallace is also close to Garnett. n By BARRY WILNER AP Football Writer NEW YORK (AP When the United Foot ball League debuts in October, Michael Vick could be one of its players. Michael Huyghue, the commissioner of the new four-team league, says the UFL is willing to give Vick a place to play provided there are no pending legal issues. His rights belong to the Orlando franchise. Vick already has served an 18-month sentence in federal prison for his involvement in a dogfighting ring. He is under home confinement until July 20, after which the NFL is expected to announce whether the former Atlanta Falcons quarterback will be suspended. Vick, the No. 1 overall pick in the 2001 draft, has not played football since the 2006 season. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL/INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Report: Celtics of fer W allace a contract n B y STEPHEN WILSON AP Sports Writer WIMBLEDON, England (AP Roger Federer reached his sev e nth straight Wimbledon final Friday and will face Andy Roddick for a chance at a record 15th Grand Slam title. Federer delivered a masterful grass-court performance to beat Tommy Haas 7-6 (3 6-3, extending his winning run to 18 consecutive matches and closing in on the mark he shares with Pete Sampras of 14 major titles. Federer will meet Roddick in the final for the third time in six years after the American defeated Andy Murray 6-4, 4-6, 7-6 (75 beat Roddick in the 2004 and finals and leads 18-2 overall. The third-seeded Murray had been seeking to become the first British man to reach the final in 71 years and first to take the title since 1936, but Roddick outplayed him on the big points to silence the home fans. “To be honest, the last couple of years I didn’t know if I’d ever get a chance to play for another Grand Slam title,” said Roddick, who won the U.S. Open in 2003. “Now I get to. It’s just a dream.” Roddick saved a break point with Murray leading 4-3 in the fourth set with a forehand winner, then came through with big serves in the tiebreaker. When Murray slapped a backhand into the net on the second match point, Roddick fell to his knees on the grass and leaned forward covering his head. “I had to play my best tennis out there to win today,” Roddick said. “I can’t say enough good things about Andy’s game, but I can play some tennis sometimes, and not many people were giving me much of a chance at all, and I knew if I could stay the course that I had a shot and that’s all you can ask for.” Murray dominated the statistics, but still couldn’t overcome Roddick’s clutch play. Murray had 25 aces, 76 winners and 20 errors, compared with 21, 64 and 24 for the American. “Throughout my career I’ve had a lot of shortcomings, but trying hard hasn’t been one of them,” Roddick said. “To be fair, he had all the pressure on him and I could come out and kind of swing and that probably helped me today.” Federer finished his match with a flourish, leaping high for a smash reminiscent of Sampras in his Wimbledon heyday. He is the first man to make it to seven consecutive Wimbledon finals in the history of a tournament that began in 1877. Federer never faced a break point as he beat Haas for the ninth straight time to reach his record 20th Grand Slam final. He and Ivan Lendl had been tied at 19 apiece. “I’m very happy with my performance and it’s unbelievable to back into another Wimbledon final,” Federer said. “I’ve had a lot of pressure over all the years, so this is just another great match, great opportunity for me to get into the history books.” If Federer wins Sunday, he will be the third player to win six or more Wimbledon titles. William Renshaw and Sampras both won seven. “I’m very proud of all the records I’ve achieved because I never thought I would be that successful as a kid,” Federer said. “I would have been happy winning a couple tournaments and maybe collecting Wimble don. It’s quite staggering now having reached ... my sixth straight Grand Slam final. Hav ing so many things going for me now again, opportunity again on Sunday, it’s fantastic.” Federer said he is feeling less pressure this year than in 2007 when he equaled Bjorn Borg’s record of five straight Wimbledon titles. Borg was among those watching Friday from the Royal Box. “For some reason that meant the world to me,” Federer said. “I was like in a bubble for two weeks, just trying to achieve it. So this time around I think I’m much more relaxed.” Federer, who completed a career Grand Slam by winning the French Open last month, said he would be happy if Sampras came to Wimbledon to watch him try to break his record. Sampras is home in California looking after his two young sons. “He might come around, he might not,” Federer said. “It’s his choice. I’d love to see him because he’s a good friend of mine. Very honored of course that I share the record of 14 with him.” The women’s final is Satur day, with a Williams assured the trophy for the eighth time in 10 years. The Williams sisters are back in the final again Venus for the eighth time, Serena the fifth. It’s the fourth Williamsvs.-Williams final at the All England Club and eighth in a Grand Slam title match. Fit tingly, the show will take place on the Fourth of July. The sisters reached their sec ond straight Wimbledon doubles final Friday, beating topseeded Cara Black of Zimbabwe and Liezel Huber of the U.S. 6-1, 6-2. They will face Samantha Stosur and Rennae Stubbs of Australia for the title. Federer, Roddick to face off in 3rd Wimbledon final New league will consider signing V ick Vick (AP ROGER FEDERER (rear VENUS WILLIAMS plays a return to Dinara Safina of Russia during their semifinal singles match at Wimbledon on Thursday (AP Photo: Sean Dempsey Andy Roddick (AP H u g o P h i l p o t t / A P n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net M ark Knowles would have preferred to be playing for the men’s doubles title at Wimbledon, but he will have to settle for a shot at the mixed doubles crown. Knowles and Anna-Lena Groenefeld of Germany are the No.9 seeds and they will go up against the top seeded team of Leander Paes of India and Cara Black of Zimbabwe on Sunday in London, England. “I definitely preferred the other one,” said Knowles of the men's doubles draw of which he and his Indian partner Mahesh Bhupathi got eliminated in the quarterfinal. “We played really well. We just needed a bit of luck here and there, but it didn't go our way. We came up short, so I will take this one.” Having never won a mixed doubles crown – he played in the final of the French Open before – Knowles feels that this could definitely be the year that he gets over the hump and wins his first Wimbledon crown of any sort. “We beat a lot of great teams,” said Knowles of their third round two-set victory over Canadian Daniel Nestor and Russian Elkena Vesnina and their second round win over defending champions American Bob Bryan and Australian Samantha Stosur in three sets in the quarterfinal. Yesterday they knocked off Great Britain’s Jamie Murray (a former mixed doubles champion) and his partner Liezel Huber of the United States in straight sets of 6-2, 7-5 to get into the final. “We beat a lot of great teams and we're playing very well,” Knowles said. “We meet the top seeds in Paes and Black, who are playing very well as well. So it will be a very tough final, a very tough match, but there's no reason why we can't beat them.” The majority of the focus in tennis has been placed on the men’s and women’s singles. But Knowles noted that in recent years both the men’s and women’s doubles and now the mixed doubles have been getting just as much recognition because of the amount of top singles players who are now playing in the draws. Their final will follow immediately after the completion of the men's singles final on Sunday between No.6 seed Andy Roddick of the United States and No.2 Roger Federer of Switzerland. Hopefully with the match being carried live on Tennis TV, Knowles said he would like nothing better than be able to emerge as the champion with Groenefeld. “With Wimbledon being such a prestigious event, whether it's singles or doubles or mixed doubles, it doesn't matter which one you win, people can't take that away from you being the champion,” he said. “So it's extremely important. “But my goal has always been to win that doubles title and I thought this was the year that we would have won it because we played so well, even though I thought we had a tough draw. “Now I find myself playing in a mixed doubles final, so anytime you are on center court in a final, these are special moments. So it's going to be a big moment and I'm going to try to enjoy it, but I also want to win that title.” Knowles said if he and Groenefeld can win, it won't take away the disappointment he has in not getting to the men's doubles final. But he said it sure would help him to get away with some consolation from the biggest tournament in the world. Knowles has eyes set on mixed doubles crown “...But my goal has always been to win that doubles title and I thought this was the year that we would have won it because we played so well, even though I thought we had a tough draw Tennis ace Mark Knowles

PAGE 10

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 75F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 77F/25C Low: 78F/26C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 94F/34C High: 91F/33C High: 90 F/32 C High: 90 F/32 C High: 90F/32C High: 89 F/32C High: 89F/32C Low: 81F/27C High: 88F/31C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 78F/26C High: 89 F/32 Low: 73F/23C High: 87F/31C Low: 75 F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 92F/33C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 77F/25C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 80F/27C High: 94F/34C High: 86 F/30 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, JULY 4 TH 2009, PAGE 11 THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Clouds and sun, afternoon t-storm. Patchy clouds with a thunderstorm. Mostly sunny, a t-storm in the p.m. Sunny to partly cloudy. Times of clouds and sun. High: 89 Low: 79 High: 91 High: 92 High: 91 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Intervals of clouds and sunshine. High: 90 Low: 80 Low: 81 Low: 81 AccuWeather RealFeel 97F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 89F 108-89F 111-86F 105-91F 107-94F Low: 80 TODAYTONIGHTSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................82F/28C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 79 F/26C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................17.70" Normal year to date ....................................19.02" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Full Last New First Jul. 7 Jul. 15Jul. 21Jul. 28 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:25 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 8:04 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 6:09 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 3:53 a.m. Today Sunday Monday Tuesday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 6:23 a.m.2.212:27 a.m.0.3 6:54 p.m.2.812:14 p.m.0.2 7:10 a.m.2.21:13 a.m.0.3 7:38 p.m.2.81:01 p.m.0.2 7:53 a.m.2.31:55 a.m.0.2 8:19 p.m.2.81:46 p.m.0.2 8:33 a.m.2.32:35 a.m.0.2 8:57 p.m.2.82:28 p.m.0.2 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco88/3178/25t90/3279/26pc Amsterdam79/2658/14pc77/2558/14s Ankara, Turkey86/3055/12pc88/3152/11pc Athens88/3174/23c90/3273/22s Auckland59/1550/10r56/1350/10c Bangkok89/3179/26t89/3178/25sh Barbados86/3077/25pc86/3077/25r Barcelona82/2770/21s81/2769/20s Beijing97/3677/25s91/3273/22pc Beirut78/2576/24pc78/2574/23s Belgrade87/3066/18t91/3268/20s Berlin84/2867/19t79/2661/16r Bermuda82/2775/23t82/2775/23t Bogota64/1746/7t67/1945/7sh Brussels81/2758/14pc79/2654/12sh Budapest92/3363/17t88/3164/17pc Buenos Aires66/1848/8s65/1850/10pc Cairo98/3675/23s98/3675/23s Calcutta93/3385/29sh94/3485/29t Calgary72/2248/8pc72/2249/9pc Cancun93/3374/23sh91/3274/23c Caracas81/2771/21t80/2671/21t Casablanca86/3071/21s86/3073/22s Copenhagen75/2366/18sh81/2765/18pc Dublin66/1852/11r64/1754/12r Frankfurt82/2761/16pc85/2961/16pc Geneva 80/26 61/16 t 80/2662/16t Halifax 64/17 53/11 c 72/22 54/12 pc Havana 91/32 74/23 t 89/31 75/23 sh Helsinki 64/17 45/7pc63/1746/7pc Hong Kong 86/30 81/27 t 86/30 82/27r Islamabad 90/32 71/21 sh 104/40 77/25 s Istanbul89/3172/22s91/3273/22s Jerusalem 79/26 61/16pc80/2663/17s Johannesburg 59/1540/4s55/1240/4s Kingston 89/3178/25sh89/3179/26sh Lima71/2158/14s70/2158/14s London77/2559/15pc76/2457/13pc Madrid93/3361/16s91/3263/17pc Manila88/3177/25r87/3077/25sh Mexico City71/2154/12t73/2253/11t Monterrey106/4176/24s110/4375/23s Montreal72/2257/13t70/2163/17pc Moscow59/1541/5pc55/1243/6pc Munich78/2561/16t78/2557/13t Nairobi77/2554/12c79/2653/11pc New Delhi 100/3781/27pc100/3781/27s Oslo77/2557/13sh72/2257/13t Paris82/2761/16pc79/2654/12pc Prague 86/30 62/16 pc 78/25 62/16 c Rio de Janeiro74/2366/18pc72/2266/18sh Riyadh105/4080/26s104/4077/25s Rome 86/30 68/20 pc 86/30 65/18 t St. Thomas90/3281/27s90/3281/27r San Juan69/2035/1pc71/2136/2pc San Salvador 89/31 74/23 pc 87/30 73/22 pc Santiago 55/1243/6r59/1539/3pc Santo Domingo86/3073/22sh85/2973/22r Sao Paulo 66/18 58/14 r 66/18 57/13t Seoul82/2768/20sh84/2868/20sh Stockholm 72/22 52/11 pc 70/21 54/12 pc Sydney 63/17 48/8 s61/1646/7pc Taipei87/3077/25c86/3075/23c T okyo 79/26 70/21 c 82/27 72/22 r T oronto 68/2054/12s72/2254/12pc Trinidad83/2865/18pc86/3066/18sh V ancouver 76/24 58/14 pc 76/2462/16pc Vienna 82/2766/18t82/2766/18t W arsaw 81/27 59/15 pc 77/25 58/14 s Winnipeg 73/22 53/11 pc 77/2556/13pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySunday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet5-15 Miles82F Sunday:SE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet5-15 Miles82F Today:SE at 10-15 Knots2-3 Feet5-15 Miles81F Sunday:SE at 8-16 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F Today:SE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F Sunday:SE at 7-14 Knots2-4 Feet5-10 Miles81F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque90/3268/20c89/3167/19t Anchorage73/2256/13s78/2557/13s Atlanta92/3371/21pc88/3171/21t Atlantic City79/2660/15s80/2663/17pc Baltimore84/2864/17s80/2662/16pc Boston79/2661/16t81/2760/15pc Buffalo72/2256/13pc75/2358/14pc Charleston, SC92/3373/22pc94/3475/23t Chicago72/2254/12r83/2859/15pc Cleveland73/2256/13pc79/2659/15pc Dallas100/3777/25s91/3275/23t Denver80/2657/13t85/2957/13t Detroit74/2359/15s83/2860/15pc Honolulu88/3175/23s89/3175/23s Houston98/3679/26pc98/3678/25s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySunday TodaySundayTodaySunday Indianapolis76/2460/15r79/2662/16pc Jacksonville96/3573/22t96/3575/23t Kansas City82/2764/17t87/3065/18pc Las Vegas105/4080/26s107/4184/28s Little Rock98/3675/23pc87/3069/20t Los Angeles82/2764/17pc84/2863/17pc Louisville82/2768/20t83/2866/18t Memphis96/3577/25pc88/3171/21t Miami90/3278/25t89/3178/25t Minneapolis78/2562/16pc84/2865/18pc Nashville89/3170/21pc86/3068/20t New Orleans97/3680/26t95/3577/25t New York81/2766/18s82/2765/18pc Oklahoma City94/3470/21s88/3169/20t Orlando94/3475/23t94/3475/23t Philadelphia83/2864/17s83/2866/18pc Phoenix 106/41 87/30 pc 107/4186/30s Pittsburgh74/2356/13pc76/2456/13pc Portland, OR 94/3460/15s89/3160/15pc Raleigh-Durham 90/32 67/19 s 86/30 67/19 t St. Louis83/2867/19t84/2866/18pc Salt Lake City 90/32 64/17 pc 92/3366/18s San Antonio 100/37 78/25 s 99/37 76/24 s San Diego75/2367/19pc75/2366/18pc San Francisco 78/25 58/14 pc 73/2255/12pc Seattle83/2856/13s84/2857/13pc T allahassee 96/3574/23t97/3675/23t T ampa 91/32 77/25 t 91/32 77/25t Tucson98/3678/25pc100/3777/25t W ashington, DC 84/28 67/19s79/2667/19c UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com




Prt boevinr if

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 105 No.184

SOF
79F

SUNNY AND
CLOUDY

Bank workers feel

‘Overlooked’

Meee SS







BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009



m Lhe Tribu

er om icc re

Accuset’s rite
found at scene

Police testify
in handbag
designer’s
murder trial

@ By NATARIO MCKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tripunemedia.net

A fingerprint examiner testi-
fied yesterday that prints found
on the front door of Mountbat-
ten House matched those of
murder accused Troyniko
McNeil.

The trial into the murder of
internationally recognised hand-
bag designer Harl Taylor con-
tinued in the Supreme Court
yesterday with five more wit-

Sir Jack’s
son happy
for lockout
support

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia. net

FREEPORT business-
man Rick Hayward was
grateful for the outpouring
of support and offers of
assistance from persons who
express concern over the
lockout at his three restau-
rants at Port Lucaya Mar-
ketplace.

Among those expressing
concern was Lady Henrietta
St George, who was dis-
mayed by the recent news-
paper reports about the
lockout of Mr Hayward, the
son of Sir Jack Hayward.

“TI got a call from Lady
Henrietta saying that she
was very upset (about what
happened to me) and it was
very encouraging,” he said.

The Port Group Limited
(PGL) changed the locks on
Mr Hayward’s three restau-
rants — La Dolce Vita, The
Pub at Port Lucaya and
Fast, last Thursday after he
had not paid his rent for
eight months. He owes
$230,000 in back rent.

SEE page 7



nesses being called to testify.
Troyniko McNeil, the son of
Taylor’s former business part-
ner Troy McNeil, is charged
with intentionally causing Tay-
lor’s death between Saturday,
November 17, and Sunday,
November 18, 2007 while being
concerned together with anoth-
er. Taylor, 37, was found dead
at Mountbatten House on West
Hill Street and sustained some
42 to 50 injuries, according to
the prosecution.

ASP Clifford Ferguson, offi-
cer in charge of the Criminal
Records Office of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, told the
court yesterday that on Novem-
ber 20, 2007, he received from
Corporal 402 Rolle, an enve-
lope labelled Harl Taylor that
contained photographs and neg-
atives of fingerprints. ASP Fer-
guson told the court that on
August 14, 2008, he received
from Corporal 1406 Davis, a set
of fingerprint impressions
recorded on a Royal Bahamas
Police Force fingerprint form
bearing the name Troyniko
McNeil. ASP Ferguson told the
court that he compared the fin-
gerprints in photographs
labelled Harl Taylor A to F and
found that the prints in the pho-
tographs labelled A and C were
identical to the left forefinger
and right thumb impressions on
the fingerprint form. ASP Fer-
guson said he found no match
for the other prints labelled, B,
D, E and F.

During cross-examination by
McNeil’s attorney, Murrio
Ducille, ASP Ferguson said that
prints could last on an object a
year or two. He also told the
court that if a print was lifted
from one object to another he
would be able to tell because it
would have something from the
surface from which it was lifted.
ASP Ferguson noted, however,
that this would be difficult to
determine if the prints had been
photographed.

Corporal Gardell Rolle, who
is attached to the Carmichael
Road Detective Unit, told the
court that around 10 am on
Sunday November 18, 2007, he
travelled to Mountbatten House
after receiving certain informa-
tion. Corporal Rolle told the

SEE page 7



a
Treat yourself

Open 24hours,
teres Met LUL net Wac}

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Knowles will not play on team

Man charged
with gambling
came murder

27 year-old
is arraigned

Rawson Square was overflowing rin Bahamian culture, craft, food and song in celebration of
National Pride Day, as the country gears up to celebrate ie independence anniversary. See more

pictures on page 2

Teen tattoo
controversy

= By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER who said her
15-year-old son was tattooed at
a local parlour without her per-
mnission is calling for legislation
that would prevent minors from
getting tattoos without parental
consent.

Administrator Linda Nixon
wants the parlour to pay $3,089
to get the imprint removed by a
laser.

But the tattoo parlour in
question — the Tattoo King —
claims the boy had a signed con-
sent form with him which they
thought was legitimate permis-
sion from his mother.

The frustrated mother
thought her teenage son was
attending a youth group on the
afternoon of June, 16 and was
shocked when he came home
with a tattoo of a cross on the
back of his left hand.

Her son's friend reportedly
gave the tattoo artist a cell
phone in exchange for several
tattoos.

She said he did not have her
consent and made a complaint
at the Central Police Station the
next day. She was told by the
investigating officer that the
parlour had agreed to remove
the design but when she went to



THE tattoo at the centre of the
controversy

the Bay Street location the next
Saturday she claimed the par-
lour reneged on the deal and
offered instead to cover the
mark with skin-toned ink.

"T said I want it taken off, but
(they) said all we can do is cov-
er it up and match his skin
tone," she said.

Fuming, she visited a plastic
surgeon who told her the
removal would take 14 sessions
at over $3000 — a price she
thinks the Tattoo King should
pay.

Part-owner Byron Austin
told The Tribune he offered to
cover the tattoo with flesh-
toned ink at a reduced price of
$10 a session instead of $400 a
pop — which Ms Nixon refused.
He argued that his establish-

SEE page 7



CARICOM
to focus on

economic
problems



THE issue of the recent polit-
ical coup in Honduras, a reso-
lution to have Cuba instated in
the Organisation of American
States and the regional eco-
nomic crisis will likely be issues
raised at the ongoing meeting
of CARICOM heads of Gov-
ernment in Guyana, said For-
eign Affairs Minister Brent
Symonette.

"The issue of Honduras will
be discussed. . .the question of
Cuba at the Organisation of
American States will come up
along with the financial situa-
tion in the Caribbean will come
up,” he told The Tribune during
a brief interview yesterday.

On June 28, Honduran Pres-
ident Manuel Zelaya was
expelled from the country for
multiple constitutional viola-
tions, according to internation-
al reports. Roberto Micheletti
assumed control of the country.
The United States, CARTCOM
and the United Nations have
condemned the coup.

Mr Symonette offered little
comment on the issue other
than to say it was "still unravel-
ling” and he hoped it would be
resolved diplomatically.

On June 3 the Cuban gov-

SEE page 7



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

A 27-YEAR-OLD man
accused of killing another man
during a gambling game was
arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday afternoon.

Theophilus Darling, of
Coconut Grove Avenue,
appeared before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in Court
One, Bank Lane, charged with
the murder of Dewitt Butler,
36.

Mr Butler was reportedly
shot in the head and body
around 8pm on Monday dur-
ing a dispute in a gambling
game on East Street, just
north of Coconut Grove
Avenue. He died a short time
later in hospital.

Darling, who was repre-
sented by attorney Krysta
Smith, was not required to
enter a plea to the murder
charge and was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison. The
case has been adjourned to
July 13 and transferred to
Court 6, Parliament Street.

Mr Butler's death brought
the murder count to 37 for the
year.

PLP’s
hopefuls
Start to
campaign

POLITICAL candidates are
being shopped around to vari-
ous constituencies throughout
New Providence as the PLP
attempts to revitalise its base
and lead into its convention in
October with a massive show
of force, The Tribune has
learned.

According to sources within
the party, candidates are begin-
ning to emerge and campaign
in Mount Moriah, Holy Cross,
South Beach, Kennedy, and
even Elizabeth, which is cur-
rently held by PLP MP Mal-
colm Adderley.

The other seats throughout
New Providence have also been
put on alert and branch meet-
ings have been held on a
monthly basis to keep the par-
ty’s base informed of what the
PLP is doing and the party’s
message going forward.

In the recent past PLP
Leader Perry Christie
announced his decision to
remain as leader of the party,
carrying the PLP into the next
general election in 2012.

Political pundits have argued
that this push of candidates in
the various constituencies could
prove as an effective distraction
from a possible challenge to Mr

SEE page 7

USA Today

Due to the July 4 Inde-
pendence Day celebrations

in the US, the USA Today
MIKOMIE LHe RCAC a TMI:
be published in today’s Tri-
bune. It will return on Mon-
day, July 6


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Garbage pile-up
causes big stink

oT Ti

A garbage truck picks up trash on Bay Street yesterday

=m By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

STINKING garbage is piling
up outside some homes in the
Eastern Road and Camper-
down areas as waste collection
has been stalled for weeks, res-
idents claim.

An Eastern Road resident
who lives near the junction with
Dodge Road said outdoor
dumpsters are overflowing in

his area since the regular Thurs-
day night garbage collections
stopped four weeks ago.

He said: “The smell and the
flies are really nasty, and
although I haven’t seen any rats
yet, Iam sure they will follow.

“T noticed them collect it
around four weeks ago, because
they have always come at
around midnight on Thursdays
and they have been as regular
as clockwork, but all of a sud-
den they just stopped.”

Camperdown residents have

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Comics

leaeo. a Onn

se eee ede este aveneeeecemecers P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 12 PAGES



A Ministry of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel
?.0. Box AB207Â¥0, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



also complained about waste
piling up in their bins.

But Senior Superintendent
Elvis McPhee in charge of col-
lections and disposal was
shocked to learn of such a long
suspension of service.

He said: “In the last two
weeks we experienced some
rain which has put the sched-
ule off, because when the
weather is bad there is nothing
we can do. But four weeks is
not a fact, I say that unequivo-
cally.

“We have never had any-
where in New Providence go
four weeks without garbage col-
lection.”

The senior superintendent
added: “For 22 months we have
had excellent service and no
complaints.

It could be an isolated case
where something may have
been an oversight, but I will
speak to the supervisors and
move to rectify it immediately.

“If anyone has any com-
plaints they can call me, I am
here almost all day dealing with
matters and I am more than
happy to apologise and tell
them we endeavour to provide
an excellent service.”

If you have had problems
with your garbage collection call
Mr McPhee on 341-1968/9.

Nea Pe ORC

TEACHER POSITIONS

VU M AIC
cs

Tr LoL mA

with BIC, and BGCSE experience in Language Arts, Literature, Mathematics,

eco ee ar

NUE Nec eA ee
STM aera Za oe ca

Applicants must be Born Again Christians and adhere to the Statement of Faith of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel.
Teachers must also have at least a Bachelors Degree in Education or a Teacher's Certificate
and must be a Bahamian or a permanent resident of the Bahamas with work status,
Qualifying persons are asked to contact the office af
Telephone (242) 201-4771 8:30 AM, - 3:45 P.M. or fax (242) 367-577
or visit our website ~ www.agape-school.com ~ for job or student applications

LEE LE NE EE LE NE EL EE dL EE ED da de a I et a

Agape Christian School uses the A Beka Book Curriculum
which emphasizes Christian values as well as a very high standard of education
and is approved by the Bahamas Ministry of Education.

We seek to train the mind, guide the person, and love the personality,

‘Study to shou thysell approved wntor God...’ 2 “Timothy 2:15







































Taking

pew eCom te
being
Bahamian

Hundreds of Bahamians and tourists
turned out in Rawson Sqaure yesterday
to celebrate National Pride Day, part of
the Bahamas’ 36th independence
anniversary activities.

National Pride Day featured
Bahamian culture at its best, including
food, folklore, artisans, dance, music,
the Prison pop band, fashion shows,
and the best yards competition.

The day is intended to encourage
Bahamians to celebrate and be proud
of what is Bahamian

(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune
Staff)



The Embassy of the United States of America

is saddened by the loss of our

dear friend and colleague
Leslie Pyfrom
ak.a Diplomat DJ.

The Embassy Family mourns his passing
and offers condolences to his family, friends and loved ones.




THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Staff at Scotiabank ‘being

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN Scotiabank
staff claim they are being over-
looked in favour of foreign
employees who are chosen over
them for high positions and given
preferential treatment.

Employees of Scotiabank
spoke out after The Tribune
reported how the Labour Board
launched an investigation into
the RBC Trust management
when staff claimed expatriates
were being hired unfairly and
given lavish compensation pack-
ages while Bahamians were let
go or forced to take unpaid leave.

Scotiabank staff say local staff
are hindered from advancing into
management level because for-
eign workers are hired to fill the
top posts, often because of their
foreign language skills when lan-
guages are not part of the official
requirements.

Other foreigners are brought
in for training programmes and
then stay to fill permanent posi-
tions, staff claim.

Christians upset over pastor's purchase of $68k Bentley

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

CHRISTIANS have
expressed their disappointment
at one pastor’s flaunting of a
$68,000 Bentley paid for with
the help of his 400 parishioners.

Bishop Kirkwood Murphy,
head pastor at Temple Fellow-
ship Ministries in Davis Street,
Oakes Field, showed off the
2005 navy blue Bentley Arnage
—similar to the one used by the
Queen of England —- in the
press yesterday.

The car has a retail price of
around $240,000 in the United
States and around $400,000 in
the Bahamas, but the pastor
was quoted as saying he pur-
chased it in a New York auc-
tion around two months ago,
following an agreement by nine
of the church’s 10 pastors.

Bishop Murphy told the press

Meanwhile the allegedly friv-
olous foreign hiring is a financial
drain on the company, the staff
said.

One employee who did not
want to be named said: “They
will pay for their housing, trans-
portation, school fees, will allow
them to travel home, and there’s
a fund for the permits and that
could be very high, usually over
$10,000.

“Sometimes they pay right
down to the water that they
drink, and it’s all at the expense
of the bank.

“It’s a waste of money if we
have the talent.”

Staff claim Bahamians in high
positions have been forced into
retirement, by either being reas-
signed to an unsuitable position,
or being forced to resign with-
out reason, while at least one
position was created for a for-
eigner.

that the car for which he saved
for three years to buy was a gift
and a blessing from God.

He said he wanted to make a
statement as a man of God, raise
the profile of the church and
attract believers to his parish.

But Christians have criticised
the pastor for making such an
extravagant purchase when
thousands of Bahamians are
out of work in the global eco-
nomic recession.

A senior pastor who did not
want to be named said: “Pas-
tors should be comfortable
because we do social service,
but there’s something called
excess and that’s excessive.
Totally excessive.

“He didn’t rob a bank to buy
it, the people gave — people
like their leaders to be a little
ahead of them, we see it all the
time with our politicians.

“But at this time we should
set better examples.”

The pastor stressed how the

About five expatriates are
thought to be currently
employed at Scotiabank, and
staff believe there are more to
come.

Assistant Director of Immi-
gration Dwight Beneby said
there is no limit on the number
of foreign workers a bank can
employ, and work permits for
bank managers are approved by
the Central Bank of the
Bahamas before applications are
sent to the Immigration Depart-
ment. If no objection is noted by
Central Bank, work permits will
usually be approved by the
department as they presume the
Central Bank would know the
needs of the banking sector, par-
ticularly at management level.

Mr Beneby said: “We get this
complaint from time to time, but
one of the things is that our laws
tend to work against us.

“The bank may ask for some-

10,000 ministers in the coun-
try’s 3,500 churches are not all
blessed with such extrava-
gances, as the majority of Chris-
tian preachers must do part-
time work on the side, and
some need more than one job
to earn a living.

Devout Christian Jewel
Major, a member of Grace
Community Church off
Marathon Road, said she
believes parishioners should
give one tenth of their earnings
to the church to pay for upkeep,
costs, and community work, but
should not give over and above
their earnings rendering them
unable to pay their bills.

She said: “I don’t believe the
church or pastors ought to
accept their parishioners’ mon-
ey when people in the parish
are not doing well.

“If he got a $68,000 car then
I don’t think this is the time to
flaunt it, and if he’s flaunting
it to show how good God is to

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one who speaks a language when
the language of business is Eng-
lish, and that affects most people.
“Government needs to revise
the labour laws and advertising
laws in order for it to change.”

overlooked’

employees’ professional devel-
opment plans.

“Many Scotiabank Bahamas
employees take full advantage
of these opportunities and work
in other countries which provide

a greater opportunity to advance
their careers.

“Tt is Scotiabank’s policy not to
discuss individual employees’
personnel files for privacy rea-
sons.”

A spokeswoman for Scotia-
bank said: “Scotiabank is firmly
committed to the advancement
and well-being of its Bahamian
employees.

“Being a global employer of
choice enables Scotiabank to
attract and retain high-perform-
ing employees, while positioning
the bank as a place where tal-
ented people not only want to
work, but also have the oppor-
tunity to thrive in their careers.

“With our base in Canada and
significant operations around the
world, Scotiabank understands
that embracing and fostering an
inclusive work culture and har-
nessing the skills of local talent
will generate more innovative
thinking, better decision making
and stronger business results.

“Because we are an interna-
tional company, many employees
are frequently offered opportu-
nities to work abroad. These
opportunities are elements of our

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him, then he better have a lot of
good stuff in store for when
people come to him.

“They’re going to expect God
to do the same thing for them as
He has done for him and that’s
not the way it works.”

Bishop Murphy was quoted
as saying his ministry gives
$60,000 to $70,000 back to its
members each year, and will
give or loan thousands of dol-
lars to people in his parish who
are in need.

The Tribune was unable to
contact Bishop Murphy before
the paper went to press last
night.



280-FLIX

INdIGO

Ww O R

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Nortel PBX and Key System Technician

IndiGO Networks is a growing telecommunications company based in Nassau,
Bahamas. Systems Resource Group (SRG), IndiGO’s parent company, has a 20-
year history in offering innovative technology and telecommunications solutions
to consumers in The Bahamas.



IndiGO Networks is seeking to fill a senior position in its Technical Services
department for an experienced Telecommunications and Networking engineer

Responsibilities

¢ The individual will be responsible for the installation, maintenance and support
of Nortel key and PBX systems located primarily in New Providence with
travel to the Family Islands as necessary
Nortel and/or Mitel PBX Certification would be an advantage
Ability to meet with Customers in a Sales Capacity
Experience with VoIP PBX systems, Cisco switching and routing would be
an advantage
Ensure service standards for quality and responsiveness are met
Maintain confidentiality relative to customer accounts and organizational
practices

¢ Ability to work with minimum supervision

Qualifications

¢ Ability to perform analysis, recommendations, and Implementation to Customer’s
Voice and Data Networks.
In depth Design, Programming, Implementation, Maintenance of Nortel Norstar,
BCM, Meridian Option 11C and 81C systems. Knowledge of ESN is essential
Programming and Installation of T1’s and PRI’s
Knowledge of PBX Inter-Networking and VOIP Integration
Routing, Trunking, QOS, and VLAN experience as it relates to the Integration
of Voice and Data Networks
Excellent customer service skills
Excellent oral and written communications skills
Ability to work in a fast-paced environment
Strong problem-solving and decision-making skills

A competitive salary commensurate with experience is offered along with product
training, medical, pension and car allowance after a qualifying period.

Interested candidates should submit their résumés in writing to:

Attn.: Technical Services Manager,
IndiGO Networks,
P.O. Box N-3920,
Nassau, Bahamas

r
Fax: 242-677-1050
E-mail: hr@indigonetworks.com
PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009



THE TRIBUNE
EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited | ‘Broke’. but
we’re in
total denial



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Russia plays a cheque book diplomacy

MOSCOW — Russia is using its energy
wealth to shore up influence abroad, pouring
billions of dollars in loans and grants into former
Soviet states and long-standing allies — even as
it faces its own severe economic downturn.

Faced with its own economic crisis, the
Kremlin could have downplayed its drive to
reclaim its former status as a "great power"
and fight fires at home.

Instead, armed with cash hoarded during
years of high oil prices, Russia has gone on a
cash offensive — pledging loans and aid to
Belarus, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova and Armenia.
It has tied in its neighbours to crucial energy
deals, and has talked about lending billions of
dollars to Ukraine and Serbia.

Russia has sought to hold sway over what it
calls its "near abroad,” a region that includes
most of Moscow's former imperial possessions.
It has railed against its neighbours’ efforts to
move closer to Europe, and resisted Western
influence on what it sees as its home turf.

But Russia will have to step up its game if it
is to build sustainable influence in the former
Soviet Union. Presented with choices, its neigh-
bours are starting to resist Russia's dominant
position, playing Moscow off against other pow-
ers to secure their own long-term interests.

Turkmenistan, the reclusive Central Asian
state with enormous gas reserves, was until
recently in Moscow's thrall. The Russians swept
in last year, buying up Turkmen gas in lucrative
long-term contracts. With that gas bound for
Europe, Russia's Gazprom stood to lock in
profits and strengthen its hold over European
gas supply.

But the global crisis has hit demand for gas,
and Gazprom attempted to renege on its con-
tracts — much to Ashgabat's irritation. Turk-
menistan accused Gazprom of blowing up the
gas pipeline between the two countries — a
charge that Gazprom denied — prompting an
outage in exports and a deepening rift in rela-
tions. With Russia's relationship with Turk-
menistan looking fragile, neighbouring China
swooped in last month with a $4 billion credit,
and agreed to purchase production expected
from a new gas field. With Russian President
Dmitry Medvedev invited to visit Turkmenistan
in September, the Turkmens seem ready to
talk. But as China and the West actively court
the gas-rich country, Russia may find it is
already too late.

"Russia is increasingly facing up to China in
the areas it regards as its near abroad,” said
Chris Weafer, chief strategist at Uralsib. "Rus-
sia has been accused of falling short on promis-
es, while China is very diligent in its delivery."

"Russia needs to step up its response."

Belarus, too, has attempted to play Russia off
other powers — in this case Europe. Talks
with Minsk to extend the final $500 million
tranche of a $2 billion loan collapsed in acri-
mony recently.

Belarus' authoritarian leader, Alexander
Lukashenko, accused Moscow publicly of insist-
ing on dubious political preconditions — name-
ly recognizing the independence claims of Geor-
gia's breakaway regions, South Ossetia and
Abkhazia. Only Russia and Nicaragua recognise
those claims.

In response to Lukashenko's charge, Russia's
normally cool Finance Minister Alexei Kudrin
accused Belarus of having a "parasitic" atti-
tude toward Moscow. Lukashenko shot back
that he would not "bow down, whine and cry" to
Russia.

Lukashenko may feel he has little choice
but to mend relations with an annoyed Kremlin.
Belarus, despite recently joining the European
Union's six-nation Eastern Partnership, still has
limited ties with the West. Instead, it remains
heavily dependent on Russia for cheap loans,
inexpensive energy and vital trade ties.

Nevertheless, the Kremlin has good reason to
whip out its cheque book elsewhere. The gov-
ernment of Uzbekistan, normally highly critical
of US. policy, surprised observers by praising
USS. President Barack Obama's recent address
to the Islamic world in Cairo. A Foreign Min-
istry statement described Obama's approach
to key issues as "sober and realistic."

Kyrgyzstan recently backpedaled on a deci-
sion to kick the Americans out entirely from a
vital military base, a staging post for sending
supplies to Afghanistan. The move drew anger
in Moscow, which had loaned the impoverished
country some $2 billion — seemingly on the
condition that it give the Americans notice.

"Russia always makes the same mistake,"
said Alexander Konovalov, president of the
Institute of Strategic Assessment. "It presents its
neighbours with a choice: you're either with
the West or with us.”

Some neighbours have achieved a balance.
Kazakhstan has successfully played off Russia,
China and the West — to little detriment to its
relationships. And so may Kyrgyzstan. In the
wake of Bishkek's overtures to the U'S. in June,
Medvedev sought to assure the world that Rus-
sia had no objection.

"In this multipolar world, countries that are
not great powers have choices," said Sam
Greene, deputy director at the Carnegie
Moscow Centre. "They are going to diversify
their relationships. I think Russia realises that.”

But the Kremlin's actions so far, he said,
have been more "about maintaining some rem-
nants of the past rather than building some-
thing for the future."

Analysts warn it is a short-sighted strategy
that could yet backfire. "Once you start building
relationships based on financial aid, you have to
keep that flow of aid coming,” said Weafer. "If
some day you can't afford to write the cheque,
somebody else will.”

(This article was written by Catrina Stewart
of the Associated Press).



St. Andrew's School Foundation

Development Officer

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GATT BA

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I must admit I did endure
watching quite a lot of the so-
called Budget debate but found
its content totally ridiculous and
worrisome as crucial issues that
we are faced with were talked
about but nothing done to cor-
rect.

Probably the most significant
utterance did not come from
the halls of parliament but came
as part of The Councillor’s dis-
cussion at Choices Restaurant
when in a single sentence Dr
Duane Sands totally described
the troubles facing us and the
initial cure.

For those who missed Dr
Sands’ comment this is a para-
phrase of it: We are a State suf-
fering from total denial and dis-
illusionment and are “broke”
but we describe ourselves as a
“first world nation.”

Although there is a massive
deficit for Budget 2010 Gov-
ernment did not introduce or
name any measures to reduce
Government’s costs — incredi-
bly the Prime Minister made a
comment on civil service “over-
time” but did not have the
courage to, for at least the short
term till we get out of this mess,
that all “overtime” is banned
and may not occur for any rea-
son.

Why at this crucial economic
time didn’t the government see
fit to reduce the what has to be
enormous outflow of hard
earned US dollars through the
returning duty free exemption?
Surely this was an appropriate
time to cut it by 50 per cent and
save? We really need to retain
as many dollars as we can that
will further retain employment.

What is the cost of this Trav-
el exemption anyway? Does
anyone know? Conservatively
over $90 million must flow out
through this really unnecessary
exemption or more as we all
know few give truthful declara-
tions.

LETTERS

letters@tripbunemedia net

The PLP is still living in
denial as to why their anchor
projects stopped — it was no
one else but the Lehmann Bros
bankruptcy, or we would have
three to four of these projects
coming out of the ground.

I cannot understand why this
government refuses to imple-
ment Catastrophic Health
Insurance — if the annual bill is
$80 million with 188,000 work-
ing that's only a shared premi-
um of $83.33 per person for the
year — incredibly cheap I sug-
gest.

The Prime Minister’s com-
ment as to the number of vehi-
cles licensed to the government
— well who purchased them,
Mr Prime Minister, and who has
allowed the known misuse to
continue for years. Drive
behind the Oakes Field Police
compound and see just how
many of the police cars pur-
chased in 2007 are now broken
right up.

Credit Card debt — absolute-
ly nothing spoken on this issue
but it is very important for the
financial safety of Joe Public
that policy from the Central
Bank requires a tightening,
especially when issuing new
cards. A debt of $269 million
from 116,000 cards is excep-
tionally high.

Educational Scholarships
scheme — surely these grants
should be ‘*PAYE’ deductions
at source and surely the schol-
arships should be insured?

I am quite sure a skilled
financial operations person
would cut the daily operational
costs of running our over-sized
civil service by as much as 20
per cent, but, of course, we
wouldn’t dare to consider that
so I conclude is this government
serious as past governments
have been serious?



Lottery: am honestly sick of
hearing the continual misrep-
resentation, including that of
the current chair of the Gaming
Board — no government is
going to approve a lottery or
legalise the current illegal oper-
ations of the numbers as this
activity is too valuable politi-
cally to the parties and is a per-
ceived major source of corrup-
tion and protection so the side
earnings involve too many so
nothing is ever going to be
done. Bahamians gambling on
Paradise Island or in any casino
is a fad few will continue after
the newness wears off.

There is no doubt we have
to, we are bound to invest at
least $15-20 million in our so-
called Justice system unless we
wish to be described as a nation
without a free and open justice
process and I suggest this is not
very far off.

If I were prime minister I
would have effectively cut cab-
inet to size at least for the next
year unless he is really telling
us that some of the full time
ministers simply can’t operate
without a Minister of State or a
Parliamentary Secretary?

We should invest in massive
across the board government
reform of procedures — our
government needs to within
two-years no more go totally
into e-government also a sub-
stantial part of education - cus-
toms and immigration.

We have to leave the postur-
ing of politics behind us and be
willing to take the obvious steps
to reduce government in size
and costs. I am suspicious that
this budget has done something
very sinister as how can you
approve an establishment larg-
er than what the funds are to
pay them on scale? This is what
has been approved, Editor.

ABRAHAM MOSS
Nassau,
June 20, 2009.

Other institutions also
now D-grade achievers

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

age ATA, EXTRA,

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: 1. Accusations made
against the RBPF.

2. Police: No prosecution over
alleged (RBDF) beating of
reporter.

We permit our schools to
churn out grade D students, yet
many of us seem amazed that
we now appear to have a D-
grade RBPF and RBDF (along
with other national institutions).

KEN W KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,
June 13, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS







‘I is vex that everyone just }
seem to be throwing good }
money to redevelop Bay }
Street without realising that it :
is one dirty, overbuilt, unat- }
horse manure }
smelling, congested flea mar- }
ket. I am upset that after
throwing all those millions of }
money to fix downtown, I can- }
not find parking and the only }
ones who seem to benefit are }
the store owners who are dri- }
ving fancy cars and living in }

tractive,

multi-million dollar homes.

“Let’s throw our money to }
develop Carmichael Road }
instead and give all those mer- }
chants all along that 10 mile }
strip tax free duty on their }
imports where the benefits }
can go to many instead of just ;
a few along a half mile road!” :

- Financial Analyst, Nassau.

“T must commend the gov- }
ernment for addressing the :
matter of the CLICO policy }
holders and bailing them out ;

to acertain extent. However,

I don’t hear anything about :
the CLICO staff and how }
their situation is being }
addressed by the government.
Something needs to be done }
for the employees. The PLP }
and FNM governments }
allowed CLICO to financially :
fleece our country and left }
hard working Bahamians :

holding the bag.”

- Anonymous, Nassau.

“T vex that these doggonit }
pot-holes still breaking up my }
good car and government }
moving too slow to fix it. I
tired of driving on these bite }
up roads and jostling all over }
the place and what makes it
worse is people driving }
behind me is be so close like }
they want me to speed when }
open ditches all over the }

place.

ridiculous.”

- Mad Motorist, Nassau.

“I vex at how lavish and }
rich some of these so-called }
‘men of God? live when peo- }
ple in our country hungry }
with no clothes on their back
or shoes on their feet. can ;
understand that even Chris- }
tians want nice things, but }
splurging on unnecessary lux- :
ury items is a slap in the face. :
Why not use that money to }
set up a scholarship fund ora :
meals-on-wheels type of :
thing, something that can ben-

efit the whole community?
“And what makes it worse,

these people ga’ get up in :
front of their congregation on :
Sunday morning and start }
heaving like they get asthma
and tell them they soon get :
their blessings and then go }
ride off in the sunset while }

their church catching bus.”

- Cathy S, Nassau.
¢ Are you vex? Send your

complaints to whyyouvex@tri- }
bunemedia.net or fax them to }

328-2398.

Freeport man charged
with robbing John Bull

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A 25-YEAR-OLD man has been
charged with the armed robbery of
the John Bull store in Lucaya.

Leonard Barnett appeared in Court
Two at Freeport Magistrates Court
before Magistrate Andrew Forbes.

In addition to the armed robbery
charge, Barnett, along with his moth-
er and two sisters, were charged with
possession of an unlicensed firearm
and ammunition.

It is alleged that on June 21, Barnett,
while armed with a firearm robbed
the John Bull Store of four Rolex
watches. He was not required to enter
a plea to the armed robbery charge.

It is also alleged that on June 30 the
accused was found in possession of a
firearm and ammunition at a residence
in Freeport. He pleaded not guilty to
the charges.

The prosecution objected to bail and
Barnett was remanded to Fox Hill
Prison until October 19.

His mother, Yvonne Saunders, 54,
and sisters, Cleopatra Barnett, 32, and

Tabitha Joffer, 34, were also charged
with possession of a firearm and
ammunition.

It is alleged the women were found
in possession of an unlicensed firearm
and ammunition while at a residence
in Freeport.

They pleaded not guilty to the
charges and were each granted $5,000
bail with two sureties.

During the arraignment, Barnett’s
brother, Claude Barnett, was cited for
contempt of court because of his angry
outburst in the courtroom during the
proceedings.















Leonard Barnett

“I ready to go get one four- }
wheeler because these streets i
is like driving off road - it’s }

Shotgun fired in
service station raid

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

GRAND Bahama police are
investigating two armed rob-
beries which occurred in
Freeport — one at a service sta-
tion and the other at a land-
fill.

Police believe the two inci-
dents are connected.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle
reported that some time
around 11.30pm on Wednes-
day, July 1, an armed robbery
occurred at the Boulevard Ser-
vice Station on East Sunrise
Highway.

According to reports, a pas-
senger in truck, armed with a
shotgun, fired several shots at
the glass door of the service
station.

The gunman had a grey shirt
tied around his mouth and
nose and was wearing blue
jeans and a dark shirt.

After robbing the establish-
ment of an undetermined
amount of money, the suspect
got back into the truck that
was driven away by another
man.

Police believe that the truck
used in the armed robbery was
stolen earlier from the Piner-
idge landfill.

ASP Bootle said that around
11.45pm police received a call
from a security officer on duty
at the landfill on Grand
Bahama Highway.

The man reported that while
on duty some time around
10.45pm he was robbed by two
black men armed with shot-
guns in a white truck, the prop-
erty of the Sanitation Services.

He was also robbed of two
cellular phones, valued at $330.
He said the suspects were
wearing masks and dark cloth-
ing.

Police are investigating the
incidents.

ABA Learning Centre hosts

special summer camp

THE Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Learning
Centre is putting on a special summer camp for chil-
dren with autism, ADHD, speech and language
delays, gross motor delays, behaviour problems and
other developmental disorders.

The camp began on June 29 and will be held until







August 21 at



26 Sears Hill Road.

The camp is geared towards increasing gross
motor skills, communication skills, receptive and
expressive language, social skills, sensory, acade-
mics, attention and concentration, play skills and

cognitive skills.

Activities include play skill building games; social
skills activities; fun academic learning activities; lan-
guage building videos, among others.

Scholarships are available.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
rela fel ater V3



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position of “Financial Controller’. Applicants should have
a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting and a CPA, ACCA, CA
qualification or any other qualification recognized by the
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Successful candidate should:



have at least 4 years experience in an established

accounting firm

be able to work as a part of a team
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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



OAS Secretary
General to travel

to Honduras



Comoros crash
Survivor welcomed
hack home in Paris

LE BOURGET, France its with a joke, according to the
Associated Press.

A SEVERELY bruised Bahia Bakari, 14, returned to

THE Secretary General of
the Organisation of American
States (OAS) José Miguel
Insulza yesterday flew to Hon-
duras to continue carrying on
the mandate of the OAS Spe-
cial General Assembly that
instructed him to undertake
diplomatic initiatives aimed at
restoring democracy and the
rule of law and the reinstate-
ment of President Jose
Manuel Zelaya Rosales as
Head of State.

During his less than 24-hour
stay, Secretary General Insulza
will notify the Honduran
stakeholders of the terms of
the resolution adopted by the
OAS Special General Assem-
bly on Tuesday, June 30.

The OAS Secretary Gener-
al has since Wednesday under-
taken intense conversations
with these sectors, as well as
Ministers of Foreign Relations
of OAS member states, aimed
at the normalisation of the sit-
uation within Honduras,
altered since the coup d état
that ousted constitutional
President José Manuel Zelaya.

Representatives from all
member states instructed Sec-
retary General Insulza to con-
duct “diplomatic initiatives
aimed at restoring democracy
and the rule of law and the
reinstatement of President
José Manuel Zelaya Rosales,
pursuant to Article 20 of the
Inter-American Democratic

Charter and report to the Spe-
cial General Assembly on the
results of the initiatives.”

“Should these (initiatives)
prove unsuccessful within 72
hours,” the resolution says,
“the Special General Assem-
bly shall forthwith invoke
Article 21 of the Inter-Ameri-
can Democratic Charter to
suspend Honduras’ member-
ship.”

Mr Insulza will go to Hon-
duras from Guyana, where he
attended the Summit of Heads
of Government of the
Caribbean Community
(CARICOM) on Thursday.

The OAS Secretary Gener-
al will use a plane provided by
the Brazilian government.

O In brief

Mexico
Wins praise
for swine
flu response

CANCUN, Mexico

AS swine flu runs rampant
in the Southern Hemisphere
winter, world health experts

young girl believed to be the
only survivor of an Indian
Ocean plane crash flew back
Thursday to Paris, where she
was embraced gently by her
father, who tried to lift her spir-

France from the Comoros
Islands on a French govern-
ment plane. The Falcon-900 jet
with medical facilities left the
archipelago nation, a former
French colony, and arrived at

are concerned that some
hard-hit countries have been
reluctant to take forceful
measures to protect public
health, according to the Asso-

om LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

4 = Grounded In The Past &
Se... Geared To The Future

Worship time: Ilam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira
Shopping Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS CONFERENCE i

OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS x (

LYEGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE ET LES AMERIQUES
NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES

108 Montrose Avenue
P.O, Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax: 328-2784;
methodistconference(@msn.com
REPOSITIONING FOR MIRACLES WITH FRESH EXPRESSIONS



Faustine Vincent/AP Photo

IN THIS picture made from video broadcast, Thursday, July 2, 2009 by France 2/20 Minutes, Bahia
Bakari, aged 14, believed to be the only survivor of the Yemenia Airbus 310 crash is brought back to
France on a French Government plane. Bahia was a passenger on a Yemenia Airbus 310 jet which
crashed flying the last leg of a journey taking passengers from Paris and Marseille to the remote
Indian Ocean island nation of Comoros via Yemen when it crashed into the Indian Ocean.

Le Bourget airport just north
of Paris.

Yemenia Flight 626 crashed
Tuesday morning off Comoros
amid heavy winds. Bahia,
described by her father as a
fragile girl who could barely
swim, spent over 13 hours in
the water clinging to wreckage

before she was rescued. She
was found suffering from
hypothermia, a fractured col-
larbone and widespread bruises
to her face, her elbow and her
foot.

The other 152 people on the
plane, including her mother and
others from France's large

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, JULY 5, 2009

11:30 A.M. Speaker

PASTOR PATRICK RUTHERFORD
Theme: * Enriching Marriage And Family Life”

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

Comoran community, are pre-
sumed dead.

Anger over the crash ran
high Thursday in France's
Comoran community. In Mar-
seille, hundreds of shouting
demonstrators tried to block
passengers from boarding a
Yemenia airlines flight to
Moroni, the Comoros capital.
Police broke up the protest but
there were no injuries.

"We don't want any more
Yemenia flights as long as jus-
tice has not been done," said
Farid Solihi, president of "SOS
Trips to the Comoros," a group
seeking to draw attention to
what they call poor conditions
on Yemenia flights.

In the Comoros, French and
U.S. ships and officials directed
the search for survivors. Alain
Baulin, a commander with the
French Foreign Legion, said
military planes spotted what
appear to be life jackets floating
in the sea Thursday and divers
were sent to the scene.

ciated Press.

Only Friday did Argenti-
na's new health minister, Juan
Manzur, raise the country's
official death toll to 44. He
now estimates that as many
as 320,000 people have been
stricken with influenza,
including about 100,000 with
swine flu — a huge jump in
what the government
acknowledged previously, and
an indication that Argentina's
hospitals will remain over-
whelmed for months.

Britain, for its part, had
refused to do widespread test-
ing for swine flu, slowing the
World Health Organization's
efforts to declare that the viral
spread had become a pan-
demic. Britain's Health Min-
ister Andy Burnham belated-
ly acknowledged Thursday
that Britain needs to revamp
its response and could see up
to 100,000 new swine flu cas-
es a day by the end of August.

The government was reluc-
tant to implement unpopular
measures leading up to last
Sunday's midterm elections
in Argentina. Now that
they're over, it ramped up its
response this week — dou-
bling the winter vacation to a
month for schools nationwide,
sending pregnant women and
other vulnerable workers
home for 15 days and urging
people to avoid crowds when-
ever possible.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

FUNDAMENTAL || _
EVANGELISTIC

ENERGIZING THE CONFERENCE NOWW (Nurture Outreach Witness Worship)
IMMENSE VARIETY- IMMENSE CREATIVITY- IMMENSE HOPE
“Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist witness for Christ in The Bahamas”
FIFTH LORD'S DAY AFTER PENTECOST, JULY 5, 2009

COLLECT: Almighty and everlasting God, by whose Spirt the whole body of the Church is governed and
sanclfied: hear our prayer which we offer for al your faithful people, that in their vocation and ministry they may
serve you in holiness and truth to the glory of Your Name, through our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

Survey Schism
Praachirg iam & 7 d0pr
Radia Bi ole Hour:

Sundey Bor - 2hS2

Weel Prayer & Praise ¢oatpin

Pascoe H. fills

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
9:00 am. Reverend Dr Kenneth A. Huggins, President Emeritus

(Celebration of the Holy Eucharist
6:30 pm. Circuit Missions Service
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108 Montrose Ave, near Wulff Rd)
7-00 am, Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly (Celebration of the Holy Eucharist)
10:00 am, Pastor Colin Newton (Bible Stu
11-00. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly: Shut-ln Service

(Celebration of the Holy Eucharist)
6:30 pm, Circuit Missions Service
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street, Fox Hill)
11:00am, Reverend Evans Lazarre (Celebration ofthe Holy Eucharist)
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m, Reverend Leonard G. Roberts, J.
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field
7:00am, Reverend Evans Lazarre (Celebration of the Holy Eucharist
9:00am. Lay Preacher, Sis, Vivienne Huggins
METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD (Fire Trail Rd)
‘00am, Conducted by the Youth
NASTERY PARK FELLOWSHIP
xt Worship Service: Lord’s Day, July 12 at 5:15 pn.
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
Camp EDGE: Experiencing and Discovering God Everywhere Vacation Bible School:
ly 13-17, 2009, 9 a.m.-1:00 pm, (Ages 3-18)
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thritt Shop and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St., Oakes Field) Reception to Grade 7
MID WEEK SERVICES:
Midweek Eucharistic Service - Rhodes Memorial Methodist Church - Wednesday, August 5, 6:30
am-7:15 am, (Breakfast Served)
Mid-Day Devotions - Providence Methodist Church - Wednesday, July 15 at 12:15-12:45 p.m,
RADIO PROGRAMS
“Vision” - On the Lord’s Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; “Great Hymns of Inspiration” - On the Lord’s Day, Radio
§10 at 5:30 p.m; “Family Vibes” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:20 p.m.; “To God be the Glory” ZNS 1, Tuesday,
745 p.m.
CONGRATULATIONS: Sisters Ruth Pratt, Kelli Jolly, Annette Poitier and Katie Carter on thetr
approval as Fully Accredited Lay Preachers of the Methodist Church and Sis, Kelli Jolly on her
acceptance fo candidate for the Ministry of the Word and Sacraments, the Presbyterate.

“Preaching the Bible as 1s, to men as Gey ane”
) Pastor H. MDS @ Prem: SSd40593 ® aon h-Shsd

PROM DONDAGES

ree igetias gcd roseirese Eel pease, Keka
amd Viziorp le ihe preemece- et Gad.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, JULY 5TH, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer / Sis. Alice Woodside
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer / Boys Brigade
7:00 p.m. Bro, Ernest Miller/ Board of General Education
Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”



elt eae Le Bad
oD oe ae

SMES SERVICES

enc Lar



Grace and etry Wesleyan Church
A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
North America

WEDMESOMS oF 7.20 bmi

oe ee







WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED
Worship Time: Lla.m.



I “Les Fl Prayer Time: 10:15a.m.

ele I Ni ar Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Wel thar Soa Sow Tee FR eee el ee 9

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE



Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O. Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

ee eet ee ee pe | |
ee tee te et Bo

Pl IN pe ee ee eR eg is ae oat COME TO WORSHIP. LEAVE TO SERVE


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009, PAGE 7



PLPs start campaigning

Summit to (eiteeketerke ry,

have Europe
trade focus

FROM page one

ernment was invited to make
an application to rejoin the
OAS after a 47-year absence.

According to international
reports, this invitation was
declined by Cuba.

But the resolution passed out
of that June, 3 meeting will like-
ly be raised, said Mr Symon-
ette.

Regional leaders are also
expected to discuss the eco-
nomic partnership agreement
(EPA) with the European
Union along with a plan to cre-
ate an equivalent agreement
between the region and Cana-

da.

"The implementation of the
EPA will probably come up and
also questions of where we go
with regard to negotiating a sim-
ilar agreement with Canada will
be discussed as well," said Mr
Symonette.

According to a statement
released by CARICOM last
month, the region’s chief med-
ical officers (CMOs) were devis-
ing a Port Health protocol for
the Influenza A H1N1 virus
which was slated to be present-
ed at the meeting in Guyana.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham left the country on Thurs-
day to attend the meeting,
which end July 5, in Guyana.

Rick Hayward’s
eateries re-open

FROM page one

In addition to the lock-out,
PGL had also commenced liti-
gation against Mr Hayward. On
Thursday, Grand Bahama Port
Authority president Ian Rolle
persuaded PGL officials to
rescind the lock-out and enter
into mediation with Mr Hay-
ward.

The three restaurants opened
on Friday and the 76 workers
returned to their jobs after a
week out of work.

Lady Henrietta St George, a
director and honorary chairman
of the Grand Bahama Port
Authority Ltd and Port Group
of Companies, felt that the mat-
ter should have been handled
differently.

She noted that she was not
consulted on the draconian
measures and neither was there
a board meeting on the matter.

In a statement issued through
her lawyer Frederick Smith of
Callenders Counsel & Attorney
law firm, she said:

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“Any action...which affects
the closure of three very long
term businesses in Port Lucaya,
which affects the livelihood of
over 75 employees, which
affects the tourist product and
local restaurant amenities;
which affects the income of the
companies, and which affects
one of the children of share-
holders of the Port Group of
Companies, should have been
handled privately, sensitively,
and a lot more delicately with
prior consultation and at mini-
mum through the board levels.”

Mr Hayward said that he also
received support from his fam-
ily. His father, Sir Jack, is also a
50 per cent owner of PGL.

“I love my dad very much
and there might be a few dis-
agreements as there always is
in families,” he said.

Mr Hayward thanked local
residents, politicians, labour
board officials, and business-
men for their tremendous sup-
port for him and his businesses
and his staff.

FROM page one

ment has no obligation to get
consent from a parent before
inking a minor and said they
only ask "as a courtesy."

"IT have never seen a law that
says a child cannot go into a
store and make a purchase.
There is nothing on the books
that says you cannot give a
teenager a tattoo, but we have a
civil and social obligation to ask
for (parental) permission," said
Mr Austin. "She (Ms Nixon)
should have taken responsibili-
ty instead of throwing the blame
on us. . .I[f her son came home
with a tattoo you have to blame
your child not the tattoo par-
lour because there is no law on
the books."

He claimed the boy told the
artist he had permission to get
the body art “and even has
another tattoo on his shoulder.”

At the end of her rope, Ms
Nixon is in talks with her son's
school to see if they will allow
him entry in September but is
worried he will be viewed as a



delinquent because of the mark.

She now plans to push for a
law that will make tattooing a
minor without parental consent
a crime.

"I'm in a bind — my hands
are tied — legally because if I
take him to court I possibly
wouldn't win. And I don't have
the funds to remove that any-
way.

"T also want to look what can
be done as far as enforcing it as
a law. It's against the law in the
United States, it's against the
law in Great Britain," she said.

She added that her son is
"sorry" he got the tattoo.

Inspector Bernard K Bonamy
of Central Police Station, who
took Ms Nixon's complaint, said
the tattoo parlour should have
turned the boy away and asked
him to return with a parent.

"Once you go to any tattoo
person and have some tattoo
on the child the mother should
accompany him. The parent
should have gone there and
spoke to the person or (the
artist) should have called the
mother," he told The Tribune.

FROM page one

Christie’s leadership as his MPs
would be more concerned with
shoring up their base — rather
than a challenge to his post.

Seeking to maintain this posi-
tion may prove to be a difficult
fight at the party’s upcoming
convention, however, as would-
be challengers maintain that
despite Mr Christie’s procla-
mations, they will mount a chal-
lenge — “whether it be futile
or not.”

“Tf history teaches us any-
thing then the answer to that
question is obvious. Perry
Christie did not win the 2002
elections. The people were sim-
ply tired of the FNM and decid-
ed to vote them out. But the
2007 election proved that Mr
Ingraham was capable of
defeating an incumbent Prime
Minister who at that time was in
his post for only one term. That
is the issue. And with Ingraham
motioning as if he will stay on
we need a leader who is capable
of defeating him and returning
the PLP to government,” the

source said.

With both leaders suggesting
that they very well could still
be around in their present
capacities as leaders of their
respective parties in 2012, Prime
Minister Ingraham will be 64
years old at that time, with Mr
Christie coming in as his senior
by three years at 67 years.

However, as many senior
PLP’s suggest, their leader’s age
does not come across primarily
as a concern for them. Of more
importance is the party’s mes-
sage to the youth and the mid-
dle class that needs to be han-
dled and tailored in such a way
that new voters are encouraged
to get behind the party and revi-
talise their diminishing base.

With the list of would-be con-
tenders, including Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald, PLP MP’s
Fred Mitchell, Philip Davis,
Obie Wilchcombe, Dr Bernard
Nottage, former party chairman
Raynard Rigby and attorney
Paul Moss, it is unknown at this
time if any of them would actu-
ally continue in their efforts to
become the new face of the
PLP.

Police reveal print ‘evidence’

FROM page one

court that at the scene, he spoke
with Detective Sergeant Cole-
brooke who also gave him cer-
tain information. Corporal
Colebrooke said that he dust-
ed for latent prints and labelled
the six prints he discovered
between A to F. He told the
court that he found prints inside
the front entrance door near the
lock and prints on the inside of
the door frame near the lock.
Detective Corporal Philip
Davis told the court yesterday
that around noon on August 14,
2008, while at Central Detec-
tive Unit he saw Troyniko
McNeil and recorded his fin-
gerprints. Corporal Davis dur-
ing cross-examination by
MecNeil’s attorney Murrio
Ducille said that the accused
did not have a lawyer at the
time his prints were taken. Cor-
poral Davis said that he did not
know if McNeil was charged at
the time and had only been car-
rying out the instructions that
were given to him. Detective

Corporal Marvin Cargill, a
crime scene technician told the
court that sometime after 10 am
on Sunday November 18, 2007,
he and several other officers
responded to the report of a
homicide at Mountbatten
House, West Hill Street.
Cargill told the court that
after receiving instructions from
Detective Inspector Bonaby, he
and the officers entered the
building through the southern
entrance. Corporal Cargill
recalled that there was blood
dripping from the ceiling, and
blood stains on the stairs. He

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also told the court that he
observed shoe and foot prints
in the upstairs hallway. He told
the court that in the upstairs
bedroom, he observed the life-
less body of a male lying on the
bed.

Corporal Cargill told the
court that he also observed a
broken handle knife on the bed.
Corporal Cargill told the court
that he removed six tiles from
the eastern bedroom entrance
which had footprints on them.

Hector Gonzales, a United
States Immigration and Cus-
toms agent testified yesterday

that on August 14, 2008, he was
assigned to bring Troyniko
McNeil back to the Bahamas.
Gonzales said that he and fel-
low agent Alex Gonzales
brought McNeil to New Provi-
dence on an American Eagle
flight from Florida. Gonzales
said they were met at the air-
port by Bahamian police and
taken to Police Headquarters
where McNeil was officially
handed over to local authori-
ties.

The trial is to resume on
Monday at 9.15am before
Senior Justice Anita Allen.

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SATURDAY, JULY 4,

2009

PAGE 10 °e Mark Knowles on mixed doubles crown...



won't play on
avis Cup team

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH the Bahamas set to host
Guatemala in the second round of the
American Zone Two Davis Cup tie |
next weekend, touring pro Mark
Knowles has announced that he will
not be coming home after all to com-

pete on the team.

Knowles, who is gearing up for the
final of the mixed doubles at Wimble-
don, said yesterday that he has opted

day of competition as the Capitals host-
ed their first match last night against

the Washington Kastles, which features

Serena Williams and Leander Paes,

who will both be absent as Williams is
playing in the women's final and Paes is
in the mixed doubles.
the way the schedule is to get away for
two days and play the doubles, but as it
turns out, I can't,” Knowles said. “The

“T was hoping

rules indicate that I must be present

Knowles (AP)

for at least two days and so I won't be
able to get there for that.”
Knowles will end up missing the

to go to the United States where he will play in
the Advanta World Team Tennis.

He is a member of the Sacramento Capitals,
coached by Wayne Bryan. Included on the
team are Michael Chang, Angela Haynes, Coco
Vanderweghe, Sam Warburg and Brian
MacPhine.

Legendary Billy Jean and Larry King started
the Advanta WTT 34 years ago. It’s a unique
gender-equity team concept that runs from July
2-26 with the 10 teams divided into two divi-
sions. Each team is comprised of two men, two
women and a coach. Team matches consist of
five sets, with one set each of men's singles,
women's singles, men's doubles, women's dou-
bles and mixed doubles.

The first team to reach five games wins each
set. One point is awarded for each game won,
and a nine-point tiebreaker is played if a set
reaches four all. If necessary, overtime and a
“super tiebreaker” are played to determine the
outright winner of the match.

“We tried to make it work, but unfortunate-
ly [had made a commitment to Team Tennis at
the start of the year,” Knowles said. “I didn't
know that it would have clashed with the Davis
Cup draw. When I found out that it did, I tried
to work it out where I could come down to
Davis Cup, but I won't be able to leave here in
time to be beneficial to the team. So I hope
the guys can do it and beat Guatemala.”

Playing in the final of mixed doubles also
means that Knowles will have to skip the first

Capitals’ second match against the Newport
Beach Breakers on Sunday that has Maria
Sharapova in their line-up. But he's hoping to
be available when they host the Boston Lob-
sters on Tuesday that is headlined by Martina
Navratilova. While he won't be available for the
tie, Knowles sent his best wishes to the team.

The Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association is
scheduled to play at the National Tennis Cen-
ter over the Independence holiday weekend
with the quartet of Devin Mullings, Timothy
Neilly, Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle who
will all be back with captain John Farrington.

However, the BLTA did announce that it
has added youthful Rodney Carey Jr of Grand
Bahama as a member of the team. He will serve
as an alternate, whom the association hopes to
groom as a future potential team member.
Carey Jr recently played in the Security & Gen-
eral International Tennis Tournament at the
NTC where he lost in the final to his touring
doubles teammate Darian King of Barbados.
The duo also won the doubles title.

Guatemala is slated to come to town with
the team of Christopher Diaz-Figueroa, Chris-
tian Paiz, Julen Uriguen and Sebastian Vidal.
Eduardo Herrera is the team captain.

The Bahamas is coming off a 4-1 loss to
Paraguay in March, the same weekend that
Guatemala was blanked 5-0 by the Dominican
Republic. The winner between the Bahamas
and Guatemala will remain in Zone IT for 2010,
while the loser will be relegated to Zone III.

Sturrup turns
in season hest
performance

AFTER being
dethroned as the
women’s nation-
al 100m champi-
on at the
Bahamas Associ-
ation of Athletic
Associations
National Cham-
pionships last
weekend, veter-
an sprinter Chandra Sturrup
turned in her season best per-
formance yesterday at the
ExxonMobil Bislett Games.

As the lone competitor from
the Bahamas in the IAAF
Golden League meet in Oslo,
Norway, Sturrup clocked 11.15
seconds for a third place finish.

The meet was dominated by
the Caribbean with Kerron
Stewart, runner-up in the
Jamaican Nationals last week-
end as well, winning in 10.99.

Trinidad & Tobago's Kelly-
Ann Baptiste was second in
11.14, while Jamaican Sheri-
Ann Brooks was third in 11.27.

The majority of our elite ath-
letes are competing this week-
end at the Central American
and Caribbean Championships
in Havana, Cuba.

Some others are competing
at the 28th Meeting dev
Atletismo Madrid 2009 in
Madrid, Spain, today.

SVUTMAU Te

aC MUU Ty
playoffs on Sunday

THE Bahamas Flag Foot-
ball is scheduled to host its
semifinal playoffs on Sun-

day at the Winton Rugby
Pitch with the following
match-ups on tap:

e 3:30pm - Goodman’s
Bay Spartans vs RBC Lions,
4:30pm - The Rugby Team
vs The Warriors







Powell edges Bailey in
100m at Bislett Games

@ By STEPHAN

NASSTROM
AP Sports Writer
OSLO (AP) — Asafa Pow-

ell overcame a poor start to win
the 100 meters in a photo finish
at the Bislett Games on Friday,
but fell short of clocking his
50th time under 10 seconds.

The former world record-
holder from Jamaica finished
strongly to win in 10.07 seconds,
with runner-up Daniel Bailey
of Antigua given the same time.

“T didn’t feel as strong as I
normally do,” Powell said. “I
didn’t get a great start. I was
way behind. I got to the front
somehow, but I didn’t finish as
strong as normal. But a win is
always a win.”

It was Powell’s second race
after returning from an ankle
injury.

“It’s not 100 percent,” he
said. “I’m still a bit cautious. I
have two more races next week.
Hopefully I can do better and
better in both.”

Powell had hoped to join
Maurice Greene of the United
States as the only sprinter with
50 sub-10 second races. Greene
tops the list with 53.

Powell, who set four world
records between 2005-07, has
the second fastest time in histo-
ry (9.72). His countryman Usain
Bolt holds the world record at
9.69.

Yelena Isinbayeva of Russia,
who has set 14 world outdoor
records, won the women’s pole
vault at a disappointing 15 feet,
5 1/2 inches. The competition
was stopped for about an hour
because of a thunderstorm.

“Three hours ... it was my
longest competition,” Isinbaye-
va said. “It was also one of the
most difficult competitions of
my career and one of the
wettest.”

Sanya Richards of the United
States won the women’s 400
meters in 49.23 seconds for the
fastest time of the year.

Richards, who has not lost a



ASAFA POWELL (AP)

400 in the Golden League since
Zurich 2004, also tied the Bislett
Stadium record that Czech Tat-
jana Kocembova set in 1983.

“It was a pity that I only
equaled the meet record,”
Richards said. “I didn’t expect
to have the world’s best time of
the year after the storm. We
were worried during warm-up
what would happen when we
would be running.”

Shericka Williams, the
Olympic silver medalist from
Jamaica, finished second in
49.98.

Reigning Olympic and world
champion Christine Ohuruogu
of Britain was sixth in 51.19 in
her first major race of the sea-
son.

The Bislett meet is the sec-
ond of six in the Golden League
series.

The men compete in the 100
meters, 400, 3,000, 5,000, 110
hurdles and javelin, while the
women contest the 100, 400, 100
hurdles, high jump and pole
vault.

Any athlete who wins those
events at each of the six Golden
League meetings will claim at
least part of a $1 million jack-
pot.

If no one wins all six of their
events, athletes with five victo-
ries will share $500,000.



\

Federer beats
Haas to reach
his 7th final at
Wimbledon...

See page 10



etiel turns
up the heat

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net_

he Heavy Lift

Dorsey Park Boyz

moved a half game

in front on the men’s
standings of the New Provi-
dence Softball Association on
another superb pitching perfor-
mance from ace Edney “The
Heat” Bethel.

The premier pitcher in the
country fired a one-hitter with
12 strike outs in four and-a-
quarter innings of relief work
as the Dorsey Park Boyz came
from behind to pound the
youthful New Breed 9-4 in the
opening game on Thursday at
the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.

In the ladies’ feature contest,
the Pineapple Air Wildcats
blasted the defending champi-
ons Sigma Brackettes 6-3 as
Mary “Cruise” Sweeting out-
shined veteran Ernestine But-
ler-Stubbs on the mound.

Talking about the mound, the
45-year-old Bethel came in
from right field to replace
starter Randy Gibson on the
mound with New Breed threat-
ening to put their fifth run on
the scoreboard in the top of the
third with two out in the men’s
opener.

Solomon Bastian, who got on
base on an error, was standing
on third when Bethel got to the
mound and he went on to add
to his total of 105 he had
already posted through the first
six games of the season.

Bethel’s first victim Thursday
night was Kyle Rolle as the
inning came to an end.

In the bottom half of the
frame, Bastian got back at
Bethel when he snagged down a
high fly ball to rob the Dorsey
Park Boyz of what could have
been their second run of the
game (their first came on a lead-
off solo in-the-park home run
from Steven Culmer).

“Like I tell everybody, as
long as I'm here in Nassau, I
practice more because I play in
three or four different leagues,”
said the Eleuthera native, who
has played on just about every
island affiliated with the
Bahamas Softball Federation.

“It has made me a whole lot
more stronger and in better
shape.”

Bethel proved just how dom-
inant a pitcher he is as he would
go on to strike out the first two
batters in the fourth, only to
watch as Eugene Pratt broke
up the streak with a grounder
up the middle. But Bethel
forced Thomas Davis to pop up
to the end the inning.

Then over the next three

Dorsey Park Boyz
pound New Breed
9-4 in opener

a amas ee ane



innings, Bethel went on to retire
the side in order on strike-outs,
pushing his grand total to 117 in
seven games.

“The key to striking out
everybody is that I don't throw
hard. I throw a lot of rise balls,
curve ball and I have an excel-
lent drop ball,” he said. “I don't
have a good change up, but I
can get you with it.

“T have a blazing curve ball
and a riser. My riser is my best
pitch and I'm a littler quicker
getting off the mound, so it
doesn't give the batters that
much of a chance to get a good
look at the pitch.”

The Dorsey Park Boyz
improved their front running
record to 7-1 just a half game of
the defending champions Com-
mando Truckers, who are 6-1.
The Truckers handed the
Dorsey Park Boyz their first loss
on Saturday night with a 3-2 win
as Bethel struck out 16 in the
loss.

With the loss Thursday night,
New Breed remained in fifth at
2-5.

Bethel, still reflecting on the
heartbreaking loss, said the

NPSA Team Standings

Here’s a look at the team standings going

into Saturday's double-header:

Teams W L Pct. GB

MEN’S DIVISION
Dorcy Park Boyz
Commando Truckers
Stingrays

Robin Hood Hitmen
New Breed

Mighty Mits

T H Equipment
Buccaneers

CGRPNMWUAA~

WOMEN’S DIVISION
Wildcats

Brackettes

Lady Sharks

Mystical Gems
Swingers

CrPNwNhmw

Saturday’s schedule:

1 875 -
1 857 -
1 833 1
3 500 31/2
5 285 41/2
6 250 5
5 166 51/2
5 O00 31/2
0 1.000 -
2 .666 3
4 B33) 5
8 250 5
7 O00 712

7pm - Brackettes vs Proper Care (L)
8:30pm - Stingrays vs Robin Hood (M)

Truckers got the first blow, but
they will definitely meet them
again and he assured the public
that it will be a totally different
ball game.

It was a totally different ball
game for New Breed, who did-
n't stand a chance against
Bethel. And while he held them
at bay, his teammates managed
to finally come around and get
their offense clicking.

It started in the fourth when
Lorenzo Carter got safely on
second base on a shot to left-
center field and he rode home
on a two-run homer over the
right-center field fence that cut
their deficit to 4-3.

Pinch hitter Darren Bowleg
led off the fifth with a triple and
scored on an error to tie the
score at 4-4.

But in the sixth, the Dorsey
Park Boyz put the game out of
reach when they connected just
two hits, a consecutive two-out
RBI single from Chavey
Thompson and a two-run dou-
ble from Bethel.

New Breed would start
Thomas Davis and he lasted
until the fifth when ace Eugene
Pratt came in to try and close
the door after starting behind
the plate and moving to play
third. But it was a little too late.

Dorsey Park would march 10
batters to the plate as they bat-
ted around the clock in the fatal
fifth.

Wildcats 6, Brackettes 3: Nor-
mally Pineapple Air would
struggle during the regular sea-
son and turn up the heat in the
postseason. This year, they are
off to one of their best starts
ever, improving to 8-0 in a bat-
tle of the top two ladies’ teams.

Sigma Brackettes dropped to
4-2 with the loss.

Dornette Edwards went 2-
for-3, scoring a pair of runs and
Vernie Curry went 2-for-4 with
a run scored to lead Pineapple
Air to victory.

On the mound, Edgecome-
Sweeting tossed a two-hitter,
striking out three for the win.
In the loss, Butler-Stubbs gave
up eight hits, but struck out five.

For the Brackettes, Sharvette
Taylor was 1-for-2 with a RBI
and run scored.
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JULY 4, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



LOCAL/INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Knowles has eyes set on mixed doubles crown

Bm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ark Knowles

would have pre-

ferred to be play-

ing for the men’s
doubles title at Wimbledon, but
he will have to settle for a shot
at the mixed doubles crown.

Knowles and Anna-Lena
Groenefeld of Germany are the
No.9 seeds and they will go up
against the top seeded team of
Leander Paes of India and Cara
Black of Zimbabwe on Sunday
in London, England.

“T definitely preferred the
other one,” said Knowles of the
men's doubles draw of which
he and his Indian partner
Mahesh Bhupathi got eliminat-
ed in the quarterfinal.

“We played really well. We
just needed a bit of luck here
and there, but it didn't go our

way. We came up short, so I
will take this one.”

Having never won a mixed
doubles crown — he played in
the final of the French Open
before — Knowles feels that this
could definitely be the year that
he gets over the hump and wins
his first Wimbledon crown of
any sort.

“We beat a lot of great
teams,” said Knowles of their
third round two-set victory over
Canadian Daniel Nestor and
Russian Elkena Vesnina and
their second round win over
defending champions American
Bob Bryan and Australian
Samantha Stosur in three sets
in the quarterfinal.

Yesterday they knocked off
Great Britain’s Jamie Murray
(a former mixed doubles cham-
pion) and his partner Liezel
Huber of the United States in
straight sets of 6-2, 7-5 to get
into the final.

“..But my goal has always
been to win that doubles title
and I thought this was the year
that we would have won it

because we played so well,
even though I thought we
had a tough draw.”

— Tennis ace Mark Knowles

“We beat a lot of great teams
and we're playing very well,”
Knowles said. “We meet the top
seeds in Paes and Black, who
are playing very well as well. So



it will be a very tough final, a
very tough match, but there's
no reason why we can't beat
them.”

The majority of the focus in

tennis has been placed on the
men’s and women’s singles. But
Knowles noted that in recent
years both the men’s and wom-
en’s doubles and now the mixed
doubles have been getting just
as much recognition because of
the amount of top singles play-
ers who are now playing in the
draws.

Their final will follow imme-
diately after the completion of
the men's singles final on Sun-
day between No.6 seed Andy
Roddick of the United States
and No.2 Roger Federer of
Switzerland.

Hopefully with the match
being carried live on Tennis TV,
Knowles said he would like
nothing better than be able to
emerge as the champion with
Groenefeld.

“With Wimbledon being such
a prestigious event, whether it's
singles or doubles or mixed
doubles, it doesn't matter which

Federer, Roddick to face
off in 3rd Wimbledon final

@ By STEPHEN WILSON
AP Sports Writer

WIMBLEDON, England
(AP) — Five-time champion
Roger Federer reached his sev-
enth straight Wimbledon final
Friday and will face Andy Rod-
dick for a chance at a record
15th Grand Slam title.

Federer delivered a master-
ful grass-court performance to
beat Tommy Haas 7-6 (3), 7-5,
6-3, extending his winning run
to 18 consecutive matches and
closing in on the mark he shares
with Pete Sampras of 14 major
titles.

Federer will meet Roddick in
the final for the third time in
six years after the American
defeated Andy Murray 6-4, 4-6,
7-6 (7), 7-6 (5). The Swiss star
beat Roddick in the 2004 and
°05 finals and leads 18-2 overall.

The third-seeded Murray had
been seeking to become the first
British man to reach the final
in 71 years and first to take the
title since 1936, but Roddick
outplayed him on the big points
to silence the home fans.

“To be honest, the last couple
of years I didn’t know if ’'d ever
get a chance to play for another
Grand Slam title,” said Rod-
dick, who won the U.S. Open
in 2003. “Now I get to. It’s just a
dream.”

Roddick saved a break point
with Murray leading 4-3 in the
fourth set with a forehand win-
ner, then came through with big
serves in the tiebreaker. When
Murray slapped a backhand
into the net on the second
match point, Roddick fell to his
knees on the grass and leaned
forward covering his head.

“Thad to play my best tennis
out there to win today,” Rod-
dick said. “I can’t say enough
good things about Andy’s game,
but I can play some tennis
sometimes, and not many peo-
ple were giving me much of a
chance at all, and I knew if I
could stay the course that I had
a shot and that’s all you can ask
for.”

Murray dominated the statis-
tics, but still couldn’t overcome
Roddick’s clutch play. Murray
had 25 aces, 76 winners and 20
errors, compared with 21, 64
and 24 for the American.

“Throughout my career I’ve
had a lot of shortcomings, but
trying hard hasn’t been one of
them,” Roddick said. “To be
fair, he had all the pressure on
him and I could come out and
kind of swing and that probably
helped me today.”

Federer finished his match
with a flourish, leaping high for
a smash reminiscent of Sampras
in his Wimbledon heyday. He is
the first man to make it to seven
consecutive Wimbledon finals
in the history of a tournament
that began in 1877.

Federer never faced a break
point as he beat Haas for the
ninth straight time to reach his
record 20th Grand Slam final.
He and Ivan Lendl had been
tied at 19 apiece.

“T’m very happy with my per-
formance and it’s unbelievable
to back into another Wimble-
don final,” Federer said. “I’ve
had a lot of pressure over all
the years, so this is just another
great match, great opportunity
for me to get into the history
books.”

If Federer wins Sunday, he
will be the third player to win

=
—_ a

Andy Roddick (AP)

six or more Wimbledon titles.
William Renshaw and Sampras
both won seven.

“Tm very proud of all the
records I’ve achieved because
I never thought I would be that
successful as a kid,” Federer
said. “I would have been happy
winning a couple tournaments
and maybe collecting Wimble-
don. It’s quite staggering now
having reached ... my sixth
straight Grand Slam final. Hav-
ing so many things going for me
now again, opportunity again
on Sunday, it’s fantastic.”

Federer said he is feeling less
pressure this year than in 2007
when he equaled Bjorn Borg’s
record of five straight Wimble-
don titles. Borg was among
those watching Friday from the
Royal Box.

“For some reason that meant
the world to me,” Federer said.
“T was like in a bubble for two
weeks, just trying to achieve it.
So this time around I think I’m
much more relaxed.”

Federer, who completed a
career Grand Slam by winning
the French Open last month,
said he would be happy if Sam-
pras came to Wimbledon to
watch him try to break his
record. Sampras is home in Cal-
ifornia looking after his two
young sons.

“He might come around, he
might not,” Federer said. “It’s
his choice. P’d love to see him
because he’s a good friend of
mine. Very honored of course
that I share the record of 14
with him.”

The women’s final is Satur-
day, with a Williams assured the
trophy for the eighth time in 10
years. The Williams sisters are
back in the final again — Venus
for the eighth time, Serena the
fifth. It’s the fourth Williams-
vs.-Williams final at the All
England Club and eighth in a
Grand Slam title match. Fit-
tingly, the show will take place
on the Fourth of July.

The sisters reached their sec-
ond straight Wimbledon dou-
bles final Friday, beating top-
seeded Cara Black of Zimbab-
we and Liezel Huber of the U.S.
6-1, 6-2. They will face Saman-
tha Stosur and Rennae Stubbs
of Australia for the title.













fi el at



Hugo Philpott/AP

ROGER FEDERER (rear) returns to Tommy Haas during their singles semifinal at Wimbledon yesterday



VENUS WILLIAMS plays a return to Dinara Safina of Russia during their semifinal singles match at Wimbledon
on Thursday

(AP Photo: Sean Dempsey)

one you win, people can't take
that away from you being the
champion,” he said. “So it's
extremely important.

“But my goal has always been
to win that doubles title and I
thought this was the year that
we would have won it because
we played so well, even though
I thought we had a tough draw.

“Now I find myself playing
in a mixed doubles final, so any-
time you are on center court in
a final, these are special
moments. So it's going to be a
big moment and I'm going to
try to enjoy it, but I also want to
win that title.”

Knowles said if he and
Groenefeld can win, it won't
take away the disappointment
he has in not getting to the
men's doubles final. But he said
it sure would help him to get
away with some consolation
from the biggest tournament in
the world.

New league
will consider
signing Vick

lm By BARRY WILNER
AP Football Writer

N E WwW
YORK (AP)
— When the
United Foot-
ball League
debuts in
October,
Michael Vick
could be one
of its players.

Michael
Huyghue, the
commissioner
of the new
four-team
league, says the UFL is willing
to give Vick a place to play —
provided there are no pending
legal issues. His rights belong
to the Orlando franchise.

Vick already has served an
18-month sentence in federal
prison for his involvement in a
dogfighting ring. He is under
home confinement until July 20,
after which the NFL is expected
to announce whether the for-
mer Atlanta Falcons quarter-
back will be suspended.

Vick, the No. 1 overall pick in
the 2001 draft, has not played
football since the 2006 season.

Report:
Celtics offer
Wallace a
contract

BOSTON (AP) — The
Boston Celtics have offered for-
ward Rasheed Wallace a con-
tract as part of a major push to
land the coveted forward,
according to a published report
on Friday.

The Boston Globe reports
the Celtics offered Wallace a
deal during a three-hour meet-
ing in Detroit on Thursday.
Celtics stars Kevin Garnett, Ray
Allen and Paul Pierce joined
general manager Danny Ainge
and managing partner Wyc
Grousbeck at the meeting.

Wallace’s agent, Bill Strick-
land, told the Globe in a text
message that it was a “very
good meeting; some contractu-
al terms discussed, nothing
agreed to.”

He also said Wallace will be
meeting with other teams next
week. Charlotte, Cleveland,
Orlando and San Antonio are
said to be possible suitors.

The 35-year-old Wallace can
play the low post and also has
exceptional shooting range. He
averaged 12 points per game for
Detroit last year, before falling
to 6.5 points per game in the
first round of the playoffs as
Detroit was swept in four games
by Cleveland.

Wallace earned $13.68 mil-
lion last season as he finished
up a five-year contract with
Detroit. Teams pursuing Wal-
lace now would be offering the
midlevel exception, worth
between $5.6 million and $5.8
million.

Wallace, a starter most of his
career, would likely play a com-
plementary role in Boston. The
Celtics are hoping they can lure
him by offering a shot at a title.
Wallace is also close to Garnett.



Vick (AP)
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPO

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5-Day FORECAST

Pr i ry : ol
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a ir 1 |

ame © —_
a ORLANDO











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| HIGH

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LOW









iah-O4°F RAR US Clouds and sun, Patchy clouds with a Mostly sunny, a Sunny to partly Times of clouds and Intervals of clouds The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
a High: 94° F/34° Ca afternoon t-storm. thunderstorm. t-storm in the p.m. cloudy. sun. and sunshine. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
Low: 75° F/24°C st -_, : 3 : 5 ; 5 ; =
; @ 7 High: 91 High: 92 High: 91 High: 90
c ie f High: 89° Low: 79° Low: 80° Low: 81° Low: 81° Low: 80° see EE
TAMPA {if ah aE UE
High: 91° F/33° C , = 108°-89° F 111°-86° F 105°-91° F 107°-94° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft.
Low: 77° F/25°C otk r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 6:23am. 2.2 12:27am. 03
a @ “ 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 654p.m. 28 12:14pm. 0.2
i 738 p.m. 28 1:01pm. 0.2
) “i cae are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Monday (ooam. 23 15am. 02
: r ——— emperature 819pm. 28 1:46pm. 0.2
i : ae Hi ee QM, es satetnee seseree an tcc 91° F/33° C qe 333am. 23 235am. 02
ps * "Yall t ted “8 °F/97°C LOW eee 82° F/28° C uesday 857 p.m. 28 2:28pm. 02
al — ow: 81° F/27 Normal high .... ea a
- ; wy Normal low 75° F/24° C
) es @ WEST PALMBEACH a Last year's high... or Fs3°C | ONT MTIMT(IIN
4 ell High: 90° F/32° C oe Last year's lOW oes 79° F/26° C oan fee aon bas
oor Low: 77° F/25°C i ~ Precipitation = ===S———~—S—S——CSS riser... 25 a.m. Moonrise .... 6:09 p.m.
ra . a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccccsssecsscsseeesseseeeee 0.00" Sunset....... 8:04 p.m. Moonset... 3:53 a.m.
a FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT << oie a a Cia SCG
High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 86° F/30° C Normal year to date .......c.ccsesscssessscececseeee 19.02" ag a s
Low: 78° F/26°C —— Low: 77° F/25°C ie le #
GF AccuWeather.com {0 = a
n @ a mm Forecasts and graphics provided by oe a F
ene —— ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jul.7 Jul. 150 Jul.21 Jul. 28
in = ales 4° 0
oo Low: 78° F/26° C NASSAU ot Fae C
Low: 79° F/26° C
KEY WEST Re » CATISLAND
High: 89° F/32° C High: 87° F/31° C
Low: 80° F/27°C — Low: 73° F/23°C
ams: D
‘a GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
oe eae 4 High: 90° F/32° C
3 ow: 78°F /26° Low: 75° F/24° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 94° F/34°C ;
Low: 80° F/27°C
a
LONG ISLAND
Low: 76° F/24°C
Today Sunday Today Sunday Today Sunday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 91° F/33°C
F/C FIC Fic FC Fic FIC FC FIC FC FC Fic FC rue Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 90/32 68/20 c 89/31 67/19 t Indianapolis 76/24 60/15 4+ 79/26 62/16 pc Philadelphia 83/28 64/17 s 83/28 66/18 pc
Anchorage 73/22 56/13 s 78/25 57/13 $s Jacksonville 96/35 73/22 t 96/35 75/23 t Phoenix 106/41 87/30 pc 107/41 86/380 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 92/33 71/21 po 88/31 71/21 t Kansas City 82/27 64/17 t 87/30 65/18 pc Pittsburgh 74/23 56/13 po 76/24 56/13 pc RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:92°F/83°c
Atlantic City 79/26 60/15 s 80/26 63/17 pc Las Vegas 105/40 80/26 s 107/41 84/28 s Portland, OR 94/34 60/15 s 89/31 60/15 pc High: 90° F/32° C Low: 77° F/25°C
Baltimore 84/28 64/17 s 80/26 62/16 pc Little Rock 98/36 75/23 pce 87/30 69/20 t Raleigh-Durham 90/32 67/19 s 86/30 67/19 t Low: 74°F/23°C
Boston 79/26 61/6 t 81/27 60/15 pc Los Angeles 82/27 64/417 pce 84/28 63/17 pc St. Louis 83/28 67/19 t 84/28 66/18 pc .
Buffalo 72/22 5613 pe 75/23 58/14 pc Louisville 82/27 68/20 t 83/28 66/18 t Salt Lake City 90/32 64/17 pc 92/383 66/18 s GREAT INAGUA
Charleston, SC 92/83 73/22 pc 94/34 75/23 t Memphis 96/35 77/25 pce 88/31 71/21 t San Antonio 100/37 78/25 s 99/37 76/24 ¢$ High: 93° F/34° C
Chicago 72/22 54412 4+ 83/28 59/15 pc Miami 90/32 78/25 t 89/31 78/25 t San Diego 75/23 67/49 pe 75/23 66/18 pc Low. 77°F25°C
Cleveland 73/22 56/13 pe 79/26 59/15 pc Minneapolis 78/25 62/16 pc 84/28 65/18 pc San Francisco 78/25 58/14 pce 73/22 55/12 pc .
Dallas 100/37 77/25 s GSAS 2cmat Nashville 89/31 70/21 pc 86/30 68/20 t Seattle 83/28 56/13 s 84/28 57/13 pc
Denver 80/26 57/13 t 85/29 57/13 t New Orleans 97/36 80/26 t 95/35 77/25 t Tallahassee 96/35 74/23 t 97/36 75/23 t
Detroit 74/23 59/15 s 83/28 60/15 pc New York 81/27 66/18 s 82/27 65/18 pc Tampa 91/32 77/25 t 91/32 77/25 t
Honolulu 88/31 75/23 s 89/31 75/23 $s Oklahoma City 94/84 70/21 s 88/31 69/20 t Tucson 98/36 78/25 pce 100/37 77/25 t
Houston 98/36 79/26 pc 98/86 78/25 ¢ Orlando 94/34 75/23 t 94/34 75/23 t Washington, DC 84/28 67/19 s 79/26 67/19 c

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
79/26
86/30
88/31
59/15
89/31
86/30
82/27
97/36
78/25
87/30
84/28
82/27
64/17
81/27
92/33
66/18
98/36
93/33
72/22
93/33
81/27
86/30
75/23
66/18
82/27
80/26
64/17
91/32
64/17
86/30
90/32
89/31
79/26
59/15
89/31
71/21
77/25
93/33
88/31
71/21
106/41
72/22
59/15
78/25
77/25
100/37
77/25
82/27
86/30
74/23
105/40
86/30
90/32
69/20
89/31
55/12
86/30
66/18
82/27
72/22
63/17
87/30
79/26
68/20
83/28
76/24
82/27
81/27
73/22

ii

Today

Low
F/C
78/25
58/14
55/12
74/23
50/10
79/26
77/25
70/21
77/25
76/24
66/18
67/19
M128
46/7
58/14
63/17
43/8
75/23
85/29
48/8
74/23
71/21
71/21
66/18
52/11
61/16
61/16

SATURDAY, JULY 41H 2009, PAGE 11

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Ca CS

53/11 ¢

74/23

45/7
81/27
71/21
72/22
61/16

40/4
78/25
58/14
59/15
61/16
77/25
54/12
76/24
57/13

415
61/16
54/12
81/27
57/13
61/16
62/16
66/18
80/26
68/20
81/27

35/1
74/23

43/6
73/22
58/14
68/20
52/11

48/8
77/25
70/21
54/12
65/18
58/14
66/18
59/15
53/11

nAnNnD MN
— oO

oO

mei” a has ke

OO Be Bo Te wee Bo mee mao
— = a oO Oooo Fo

nD
Loa

c
C
s
pe
pe
t
pe
pc

High
F/C
90/32
77/25
88/31
90/32
56/13
89/31
86/30
81/27
91/32
78/25
91/32
79/26
82/27
67/19
79/26
88/31
65/18
98/36
94/34
72/22
91/32
80/26
86/30
81/27
64/17
85/29
80/26
72/22
89/31
63/17
86/30
104/40
91/32
80/26
55/12
89/31
70/21
76/24
91/32
87/30
73/22
110/43
70/21
55/12
78/25
79/26
100/37
72/22
79/26
78/25
72/22
104/40
86/30
90/32
71/21
87/30
Soals)
85/29
66/18
84/28
70/21
61/16
86/30
82/27
72/22
86/30
76/24
82/27
17/25
77/25

Sunday

Low
F/C
79/26
58/14
52/11
73/22
50/10
78/25
77/25
69/20
73/22
74/23
68/20
61/16
USES
45/7
54/12
64/17
50/10
75/23
85/29
49/9
74/23
71/21
73/22
65/18
54/12
61/16
62/16
54/12
5/28
46/7
82/27
77/25
73/22
63/17
40/4
79/26
58/14
57/13
63/17
77/25
53/11
75/23
63/17
43/6
57/13
53/11
81/27
57/13
54/12
62/16
66/18
77/25
65/18
81/27
36/2
73/22
39/3
73/22
57/13
68/20
54/12
46/7
75/23
72/22
54/12
66/18
62/16
66/18
58/14
56/13

Ww

pe

pe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
Sunday: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-3 Feet 5-15 Miles 81°F
Sunday: SE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
ABACO Today: SE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F
Sunday: SE at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-10 Miles 81°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

9 3GI60e

U

Denver, Kansas City,

82/64

'osJAngeles)
“82/64!

Showers
T-storms
Rain

[*_ | Flurries

Be =*] Snow Warr -fienflenli
7_9! Ice Stationary Manguniit-

“10s Os {/0s)) 10s 20s /308)) 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s [90s fills!) 1i0s)

HURRICANE INSURANCE

90/78

Fronts
Cold
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.









| Blown
Away By ulricane

_ Or you can rest easy knowing
that youyhave excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

“You Can Be

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