Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

nar! faylor Killer
‘tid not act alone

Prosecution claim as
murder trial begins

By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
nmckenzie@
tribunemedia.net

THERE is evidence
to suggest that more
than one person was
involved in the death of
handbag designer Harl
Taylor, Director of
Public Prosecutions
Bernard Turner told a
court yesterday.

Mr Turner, who is the lead pros-
ecutor in the trial of 22-year-old
Troyniko McNeil, said in his open-
ing address that the Crown has
evidence against McNeil and
intends to prove he is responsible
for Mr Taylor’s death.

McNeil, the son of Mr Taylor’s
former business partner Troy
McNeil, is charged with inten-
tionally and unlawfully causing Mr
Taylor’s death between Saturday,
November 17, and Sunday
November 18, 2007, while being

Harl Taylor



concerned together
with another.

Mr Taylor, 37, was
found dead at Mount-
batten House, on West
Hill Street. He had sus-
tained between 42 to 50
injuries, Mr Turner told
the jury yesterday.

Mr Taylor’s mother,
Beverly Taylor, broke
into tears on the wit-
ness stand yesterday
when shown a photo of
her son’s body.

Mrs Taylor told the court she
knew Troyniko McNeil and his
father Troy who once resided at
Mountbatten House.

She recalled that on the morn-
ing of November 18, 2007, while
driving in the area of Government
House, she noticed that police had
cordoned off the entrance to West
Hill Street with yellow tape.

Mrs Taylor said she asked a
young man on the street what had
happened, and as a result of what

SEE page eight

BEC ‘is owed substantial amounts of money’

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

CHAIRMAN of the Bahamas Electricity Corporation Fred Gottlieb con-
firmed the Government-owned and run utility is owed “substantial”
amounts of money by various business people throughout the country,

including other government agencies.

And he pledged that the corporation is doing all it can to recoup the funds.

SEE page eight

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US INDEPENDENCE



=i
ABRAHAM LINCOLN re-enactor Larry Elliot speaks from the podium yesterday at th



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SEE PAGE ELEVEN

Immigration
chief calls for
information on
alleged abuse
of detainees

Officers ‘should
not fear reprisal’



US Embassy’s

Independence celebrations. The event, held at Liberty Overlook, also commemorated the life and legacy

of President Lincoln.

Doctors Hospital
officials slam BEC

over power outage

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

CHIEFS at Doctors Hospital
have slammed the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation for a lengthy
and “totally unacceptable” power
outage.

The hospital’s Vice President of
Operations, Michele Rassin said
BEC must act to “prevent a reoc-
currence” of Tuesday’s events -
which saw power cut off to numer-
ous buildings along a section of
Shirley Street, including Doctor’s
Hospital and The Tribune.

101 outpatients and 36 inpatients
were at the hospital at the time.

Yesterday, General Manager of
BEC Kevin Basden said the situa-
tion was “unavoidable” and
involved a faulty underground pow-
er cable in the Shirley Street area.

He said that once BEC was
informed by a customer it imme-
diately responded, and having
replaced a section of the cable had
power restored “within the hour.”

SEE page eight

PU eee melee Cred
Sorry No Debit cards accepted

Concerns
atm) ob
ATU IUTIUTI Cat

of two judges

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE appointment of two
Supreme Court judges has raised
concerns in the legal community
about their possible bias towards
the executive as both have served
the Attorney General.

A senior attorney has criti-
cised the “antiquated, non-trans-
parent” process which led to the
appointment of Bernard Turn-
er, director of public prosecu-
tions at the Attorney General’s
office, and attorney Rhonda
Bain, former director of legal
affairs for the Attorney General,
as Justices of the Supreme Court.

Lawyers only learned of the
appointment yesterday when it
was announced Mr Turner and
Ms Bain had been chosen by the
Judicial and Legal Service Com-

SEE page eight



GB businessman
Rick Hayward
back in business

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

GRAND Bahama businessman
Rick Hayward is back in business
and his 76 employees expected to
return to their jobs after the locks
were removed at his three busi-
nesses in the Port Lucaya market-
place.

Mr Hayward, the son of Sir Jack
Hayward, was locked out by Port
Group Limited for non-payment of
rent at his three restaurants — La
Dolce Vita, The Pub at Port
Lucaya, and East last Thursday.

He has not paid his rent for eight
months and owes $230,000.

Mr Hayward and his lawyer
Senator David Thompson met
Thursday with Grand Bahama
Port Authority president Ian Rolle,
who was able to persuade PGL
officials to rescind the lock-out and
enter into mediation with Mr Hay-
ward to resolve the matter.

“Twas so thrilled that President
Tan Rolle has persuaded his people

SEE page eight

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IMMIGRATION officers
with information relating to
alleged abuse or mistreat-
ment of detainees at the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre should come forward
so the claims can be investi-
gated, urged Immigration
Director Jack Thompson.

Mr Thompson said he has
an “open door policy"
adding that immigration offi-
cers should not fear reprisal
for coming forward.

He also said once any
claim of abuse or inhumane
treatment is made to his
department it will be investi-
gated and officers involved
may be placed on adminis-
trative leave pending the
results of the probe, sus-
pended, or charged before
the courts if necessary.

"We under no circum-
stances are prepared to con-
done wrongdoing, corrup-
tion. We made it very clear
to the staff that wherever we
find any trace of it we are
prepared to have it thor-
oughly investigated and if
evidence supports that you
are indeed guilty we'll deal
with you.

"We've made it clear - it's
not as if we've compromised
on it, we're not timid about
it, we're not sweeping it
under the carpet - we'll deal
with it but we need to have
the complaint. I need to have
the evidence, I need some-
thing to work with. .. and
we'll develop it and we'll
turn it over to the police,”
said Mr Thompson at a press
conference at the depart-
ment yesterday.

On Monday, The Tribune

SEE page eight

PLEASE NOTE:

DUE TO THE US
INDEPENDENCE
HOLIDAY, THERE
WILL BE NO

USA TODAY IN
TODAY'S TRIBUNE.





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NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER





PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Nurses Union given extended

Harhour Island
convenience

Store project ‘in
contravention of law’

A SENIOR government offi-
cial said she was “surprised” to
learn that the construction of a
convenience store on Harbour

Island was moving forward — as :

she had already made it clear
that the project is “tn contra-
vention of the law”.

Rena Glinton, undersecre-
tary in the Department of
Lands and Surveys, explained
that the building covenants for
the area, known as Triana

Shores, states that Block Three,

where the store is being con-
structed, is a strictly residential
area.

“You cannot put business
places in that area,” she said.

According to sources on the
island, permission for the store
was granted by the local coun-
cil, but Ms Glinton told The
Tribune that after she learned
of the project, she contacted

the council to inform them that :

their decision was not legal.

She questioned how the pro- :

ject could have been granted a
building permit under the cir-
cumstances.

The Tribune was unable to

contact members of the council }

or the island administrator
before press time last night.





























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DESPITE having formally
rejected the government’s last
health insurance offer, the
Bahamas Nurses Union has
been given an extended peri-
od to “reconsider” it, accord-
ing to health minister Hubert
Minnis.

Dr Minnis said he would
like “individuals to sit down
and look at the situation
that’s happening not only in
the Bahamas but globally” in
terms of the economy.

Stalemate

This after Wednesday’s
meeting between BNU rep-
resentatives and officials from
the Department of Labour
and the Public Hospitals
Authority resulted in another
stalemate between the par-
ties, with no resolution and
no new offers placed on the
table.

The meeting was the sec-
ond between the government
and the BNU about health

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insurance coverage for nurses
since the government’s pro-
posal was rejected more than
three weeks ago. It was
scheduled after BNU Presi-
dent Cleola Hamilton said
she would have to take the
government’s offer to her
membership.

Yesterday Dr Minnis said:
“They would still have the
time to consider our offer and
we have extended the time
frame for that after which
you’d have to start over
again.

“Hopefully they will accept
the offer. It’s only a tempo-
rary thing, a stop-gap until
one can come in with the
insurance plan on July 1, 2010
or hopefully before.”

Nurses say they desperate-
ly need health insurance
because their line of work
puts their health at risk.

However, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham told parlia-
ment during the 2009/2010
budget communication that

Ars
JS

$7

the government “simply can-
not afford” to pay for the
$10.5 million coverage this
year in light of a massive rev-
enue fall off precipitated by
the global economic crisis.

Action

Nurses took action, calling
in sick for almost two weeks
to protest the move.

Last week the government
offered to introduce their
health coverage on July 1,
2010 or earlier if possible,
provide three private rooms

at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital for them to be treated
in, and pay for treatment of
any work-related illnesses or
injuries.

BNU President Mrs Hamil-
ton said this “did not sit well”
with nurses and the union
officially rejected the pro-
posal, calling again for full
coverage — but the govern-
ment said it would not budge.

The union leader then left
the country to travel to South
Africa. Like Dr Minnis and
labour minister Dion Foulkes,
she did not attend Wednes-
day’s meeting.

period to ‘reconsider’ govt offer



Dr Hubert Minnis

CEREMONIAL DIVISIONS CEREMONY FOR DEFENCE FORCE 2009 RETIREES
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THREE OF THE FOUR MARINES receiving their final salute at a ceremonial colours and march pass by the officers

and marines of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force.

AFTER serving their coun-
try for the past 25 years, four
marines of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force bid
farewell to their colleagues
and co-workers, as they begin
a new life outside the naval
establishment. Family mem-
bers and friends of Leading
Mechanics Hensel Rolle and
Anthony Francis, Leading
Seamen Stephen Bastian and
Gregory Farrington gathered
at the Coral Harbour Base for
aretirement ceremony. These
men were the recipients of a
ceremonial divisions by the
officers and marines of the
Defence Force.

This occasion was the cul-
mination of a series of events,
during which the four marines
were recognised for their valu-
able achievements.

This is the second such cer-
emony in which marines retir-
ing from the Defence Force

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LIEUTENANT COMMANDER Franklyn Clarke (left) receiving a token of
appreciation from Lieutenant Commander Michael Simmons, Comman-
do Squadron Officer, RBDF.

are hosted to an official ‘bon
voyage.’

They were presented with
gifts and were treated to a cer-
emonial colours and march
pass by the officers and
marines.

Bringing remarks for the
occasion was Clyde Sawyer,
captain of the Coral Harbour
Base. He thanked the men
and their families for dedicat-
ing more than half of their
lives to the Defence Force and
wished them all the best in
their future plans.

The men all joined the

Defence Force as recruits on
July 2, 1984 as members of
New Entry 15. Within the
Defence Force, their career
paths led them to serve within
numerous departments.

At the end of their tenures,
Mr Francis was a serving
member of the base mainte-
nance team, Mr Rolle was
employed in the electrical sec-
tion of the engineering depart-
ment, Mr Farrington was
attached to the supply depart-
ment and Mr Bastian was a
member of the Commando
Squadron Department.



LEADING MECHANIC ANTHONY FRANCIS as he receives a gift as a
token of appreciation from Captain Clyde Sawyer.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News
Editorial/Letters. ..........
Sports

BUSINESS SECTION
Business

Bilbao Oree

Boece ten eeaec atte ence tetera P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS





0 In brief

questioned in
connection with
Bimini homicide

POLICE in Bimini are
questioning a Nassau resi-
dent in connection with
Wednesday’s homicide on
that island.

Superintendent
Elsworth Moss said police
on Bimini are questioning
a 28-year-old man from
New Providence regarding
the murder of 27-year-old
Vermon Rolle.

Mr Moss said it is possi-
ble that the suspect could
be arraigned on related

charges as early as Mon-
day.

Rolle was stabbed to death
during an altercation with
another man around
5.35pm on Wednesday.

The victim was stabbed
in the stomach outside of
Sue and Joy's Variety
Store in Alice Town, Bimi-
ni. He was taken to hospi-
tal by private vehicle,
where he later died,
becoming the country’s
38th murder victim for the
year.

Police said the suspect
was taken into custody a
short time after the fatal
stabbing.

council plans
community
outreach

THE National Council
of Older Persons is plan-
ning a series of community
outreach programmes and
fundraising events.

By facilitating the needs
and well-being of older
persons, the council wants
to reverse the perception
of aging as an image of
dependence, vulnerability
and inactivity, to one of
celebration of knowledge
and wisdom, council advo-
cate Charles Sawyer said.

The council seeks to give
older persons a voice, he
said, as "many of them
who are retired are moved
into government care facil-
ities, and are neglected by
their families.”

“They are in urgent
need of supplies, medica-
tion, counselling, and the
Council’s protection,” he
said.

The council follows
guidelines developed by
the International Plan of
Action on Aging,
endorsed by the United
Nations General Assembly
in 1982, and adopted by
the World Assembly on
Aging in Vienna, Austria.

UN statistics show that
by the year 2025, one in
eight persons in develop-
ing nations will have
reached the age 60 years.

Aging impacts national
development policies from
family planning to eco-
nomic growth.

Mr Sawyer underscored
the ability of older persons
to contribute economically
and socially to the success
of a nation.

“They could earn a liv-
ing and remain indepen-
dent for as long as possi-
ble, which affects the per-
sonal growth of the entire
population,” he said.

Fidelity Bank ATMs
accepting all local
and international
visa caris

THE Bahamas has joined
the existing nationwide VISA
and VISA PLUS ATM net-
work, and both residents and
tourists now have an even
wider selection of ATMs to
withdraw their funds from.

Locally and internationally
issued VISA and VISA
PLUS cards are now accept-
ed at all Fidelity Bank ATMs
located in Nassau, Freeport
and Abaco.

Pictured is Rotara Lewis
using her VISA card in one
of Fidelity Bank’s automat-
ed, voice enabled ATMs.

Nassau resident

According to reports, Mr

Older persons:

BEC considers increasing
its rates to offset costs

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

MEMBERS of the public
may face heftier electricity
bills in the near future as
the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation is considering
increasing its rates to offset
the cost of producing and

supplying electricity to the
country.

Noting that BEC is
unable to break even with
the current electricity rate,
chairman Fred Gottlieb said
the problem stems back to
2003 when the PLP decid-
ed to lower rates, causing
the corporation — which at
that time was profitable —

to fall into the red, where it
has been ever since.

Profitable

“Consultants who were
employed by BEC approxi-
mately two years ago rec-
ommended a new tariff rate
structure which would allow

Le ea HU IN as vii a MI

r

Felipé Major/Tribune staff:

st

aw
es

A HEARSE at the scene near to where the body was discovered.

TWO Department of Environmental
Health workers made a gruesome
discovery yesterday in the bushes off Skyline

Drive.

They were reportedly cleaning a street
around 10am when they noticed a foul smell,
which them to a badly decomposed body in

the bushes.

Up to press time, police could not say how
long the man's body had been in the bushes, or
what his age or name might be.

But based on the advanced stage of decom-
position, it is suspected the body may have

been there for a few days.



was found.

It is believed that the man was homeless and
lived in the makeshift shelter where his body

A mattress and a blanket were also found

in the area.

Police yesterday said they did not suspect
foul play and are treating the incident as a case

of sudden death.

"We don't know who he is. .
anything at this stage to suggest foul play,"

. we don't have

said Central Detective Unit Superintendent

tion.

Elsworth Moss, who added that the case was
being handled by the Cable Beach police sta-

Disagreement over status of
vessel collision investigation

THE Port Department and
the part owner of a local mail-
boat involved in an early morn-
ing collision are at odds over
the status of the agency’s inves-
tigation into the June incident.

Deputy Commander at the
department, Collimae Fergu-
son, yesterday said no one was
injured in the incident, which
involved the vessels ‘Grand-
master’ and ‘Captain C’, but
that inquiries continue.

She declined to offer further
comment on the matter, stating
that when the investigation is
completed, the findings will be
forwarded to the minister of
national security, who can
choose whether or not to
release the information.

However, Lenneth Brozozog,





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a principal shareholder in the
Grandmaster Shipping Compa-
ny, which owns the Grandmas-
ter mailboat, claimed that the
department’s investigation is
“over and done with”.

“They’ve come to their own
conclusion,” he stated, describ-
ing the incident as “not news-
worthy.”

It is understood that neither
vessel suffered major damage
during the collision, which took
place some time after midnight
on June 18.

The late night collision was
not the first of its kind in
Bahamian maritime history.

In 2000, the Grandmaster
helped to rescue about 80 Hait-
ian migrants after it hit and
overturned a sloop in the east

Gélebrate 56 years of

ndependence

central Bahamas.

Meanwhile, in 2008 the gov-
ernment made an ex gratia pay-
ment of $1 million to the sur-
vivors and relatives of those
killed in the tragic 2003 colli-
sion between the United Star
and Seahauler mailboats.

Twenty five people were
injured and four people died in
the incident which occurred
when the Sea Hauler struck the
United Star while en route to
the Cat Island regatta.

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BEC to function on a prof-
itable basis. But in these
present economic times,
obviously the government
has to look closely at what is
in the best interest of not
only BEC, but what is in the
best interest of the Bahamas
as a whole in terms of the
economy and the effect any
increase in rates would have
on the populace,” Mr Got-
tlieb said.

While the government
wrestles with this delicate
balancing act, Mr Gottlieb
said that from the perspec-
tive of BEC the proposed
rate increases are advisable.

He added that in the
meantime, the corporation
will do everything it can to
generate power as efficient-
ly as possible.

Opting to not disclose the
size of the proposed rate
increases, Mr Gottlieb
added that persons at the
lower end of the electricity
usage scale would not nec-
essarily be affected.

Onles bE

“Because it is a percent-
age it is relatively a low
increase percentage wise.
But of course that has the
effect of translating into
quite a lot of additional rev-
enue.

Consumer

“T know that sounds a lit-
tle inconsistent, but for the
individual consumer the
increase rate would not be
that great. But of course one
has to bear in mind, that for
somebody at the very lower
end of the economic scale,
any increase can have a dev-
aStating effect.

“But I might add to that,
that within the suggested or
recommended rate increase,
provision is made for no rate
increase for a certain mini-
mum level of consumption.
In other words there would
be no rate increase up to a
certain amount of kilowatt
hours consumed by an indi-
vidual customer,” he said.

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reamoae | WA] WA] WA | 600 | 025 | voa8
exncorreinwics [wo [340 [wa | 10] WA | NA
ruowerur 0 | 15 | a00-| wa | 608 | ean | T000
THE MANGOVER | 440 | 335 | ga | G00 | 35 | 10:40

380-FLIX





PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Diamonds are keeping Mugabe in power

WASHINGTON — Diamonds are not a
country’s best friend. Certainly not if yours
is a semi-lawless country in Africa, like
Zimbabwe.

In Zimbabwe the discovery of diamonds
in the beautiful part of the country around
Marange, southeast of the capital of
Harare, has probably extended the life of
the Robert Mugabe regime by two years.

Their discovery by a British company,
Africa Consolidated Resources, in Sep-
tember 2006, provided Mugabe with anoth-
er source of plunder; plunder he could use
to keep his brutal security forces loyal.

Fact is that such economic governance as
remains in Zimbabwe is directed to finding
cash to pay the army and the police, who
keep the Mugabe regime afloat. Even so,
Mugabe had fallen behind; and last Decem-
ber soldiers and police demonstrated in
Harare, demanding to be paid. Basically,
Mugabe’s response was to cede the dia-
mond operations to the security forces.

In a new report, Human Rights Watch
says the security forces killed 200 miners
while tightening their grip on the mines
and introducing forced labor.

The Kimberley Process, a humanitarian
alliance set up to stop the flow of so-called
blood diamonds, sent a six-person team to
investigate the Zimbabwe mines and found
such human rights abuses that it classified
the gems as blood diamonds to be sanc-
tioned.

But diamonds are hard to trace and label;
they are fungible and portable, and they
can be mined with a pick and shovel in
many places, as they are today in Zimbab-
we and Congo.

They also can be smuggled in many of
the ways drugs are, except there is no odor
to aid border guards with dogs.

Through the years diamonds have been
ingested, concealed in body cavities and
even hidden in wounds.

Desperate people do desperate things
— and never more so when there is the
prospect of riches in places of utter pover-
ty. A diamond rush, as has happened in
Zimbabwe, is a dangerous, lawless, violent
and wretched occurrence.

As Mugabe has rejected international
mining partners, who might actually know
something about the safe and orderly min-
ing of diamonds, the Zimbabwe mines are
dangerous, inefficient and environmental-
ly disastrous.



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Sumptuous Breakfast Buffet Offer!

The Zimbabweans are not even getting
fair value for their gems. These are being
marketed through back channels estab-
lished by the government, and untold num-
bers of gems are stolen at production and
sold to middle men and unscrupulous cut-
ters around the world.

The link between the security forces and
the mines has another bad effect: It adds to
the political impotence of Morgan Tsvan-
girai, prime minister in a power-sharing
arrangement with Mugabe and his ZANU-
PF party. In that arrangement Mugabe
retains control of the the security forces,
thus robbing Tsvangirai of any authority —
not that he would use it well if he got it.

Zimbabweans are wondering what has
happened to Tsvangirai, who seems to have
lost the ability to stand up to Mugabe. For
nearly a decade, Tsvangirai endured false
arrests, allegations of treason, beatings
while in custody and had the last election
stolen from him and his Movement for
Democratic Change.

Now Zimbabweans are asking whether
the trappings of power have corrupted their
hero or whether, in accepting the South
Africa-brokered power-sharing deal,
Tsvangirai boxed himself in.

Anyway, he looks as though he has
become Mugabe’s bagman, touring the
world seeking “investment.”

Tsvangirai has been promised some very
limited humanitarian aid, including $8 mil-
lion of conditional aid from the British and
a promise of a little over $73 million of
even more restricted and conditional aid
from President Obama.

When Tvangirai got back to Harare,
Mugabe supporters ridiculed his efforts
and his own supporters accused him of sell-
ing out to Mugabe.

As if to show up his old rival, Mugabe
then announced a Chinese loan of just
under $1 billion; much of this money has to
be spent on Chinese imports.

It is ironic that Mugabe should be kept in
power by diamonds. It was diamonds that
formed the basis of the fortune that
enabled the adventurer, Cecil John
Rhodes, to colonize Zimbabwe for Britain
in the 1890s. Maybe all diamonds are con-
flict diamonds. Bloody stones.

(This article is by LLEWELLYN KING
C.2009 Hearst Newspapers)



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Wake up, Bahamas!
you must wake up!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It is now time once again to rid
this country of political interfer-
ence. I say now both Free Nation-
al Movement, and the Progres-
sive Liberal Party need to step
down to bring in a new breed of
young people to chart the course
for the 21st century in this actual
perilous time. Sir Lynden left a
legacy starting with Prime Minis-
ter and current Prime Ministers
Hubert Ingraham and Perry
Christie and the Hon Bernard
Nottage the champions of the
20th century. Both Prime Minis-
ters have served their duly course
in the halls of parliament, and run
out of ideas, and need to leave
the political scene before the next
general election, to pave the way
for Dr Bernard Nottage to
become the next Prime Minister
of the Bahamas.

The National General Council
needs to change its course, bring
a new setting for the betterment
of this country, and the Bahamian
people.

Bahamian people must rise up!
And rise up! Now to bring a con-
clusion to this vexing matter.
President Reagan took office
when he was 68 or 69 as Presi-
dent of the United States so we
cannot discriminate against age.
We must get out of our minds
about this abstract thinking and
call a spade a spade, and think
out of the box. First of all the
Prime Minister has too much
power and it needs to be reduced
so that there is no political inter-
ference.

Secondly, the senators need to
be appointed by the people, and
should have more say in the
affairs of the government of the
day.

We should hold our represen-
tatives feet to the fire until the
five years are finished, so that
they can remain honest in their
dealing of the affairs of our coun-
try.
Day in and day out, the pre-
sent Prime Minister and Mr
Christie are making no sense,
because neither of them believe
in capital punishment, and nei-
ther of them is willing to change
the constitution of the Bahamas
laws it deals within the present
time. The Privy Council must go,
and must go now. We cannot say
we are an independent country,

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



and the Privy Council is telling
us what to do in our own country.
Bahamian people rise up! And
rise up! Now before its too late
and end this era and bring in a
new change for our country. The
other day the opposition wanted
to speak on the crime of the 15
year old boy, and it led to a stink
in the halls of parliament, because
the Speaker did not use his dis-
cretion, which led to the suspen-
sion of Glenys Hanna-Martin
unfairly. The Prime Minister
should not appoint the Commis-
sioner of Police to office, this
should be done by an indepen-
dent body and in fact all matters
belonging to the police force of
the Bahamas.

If the government of the day
is going to deal with hanging, then
the constitution must be changed
immediately with regards to the
nation’s crimes, white collar, blue
collar, and other crimes like
incest, child molestation, sexual
abuse small children, male and
female. Speaking on Agriculture
both parties have fallen down
with farming, and none of them
has reached anywhere near self
sufficient. We cannot rely on
tourism alone, but must have a
backdrop to sustain us.

There must be a mixture of
people in the House so that the
country can be diversified with
not only lawyers, but many pro-
fessions coming together for the
betterment of our country.
Bahamians everywhere under the
sound of my voice!

Rise up, and rise up now from
north to south to east, and the
west and take your place and be
counted to chart the course of our
beloved country. Rise up!

Courts: Too many people on
death row, and people out on bail,
this must stop, and it must stop
now. To bring an end to this, Mr
Prime Minister, find the number
of places that you need, and pay
the Bahamian people adequate
salaries to the magistrate or judge.
All members of parliament need
to cut their salaries, and do it
immediately to become role mod-
els to set the pace and tone for
the people of the Bahamas.

All other crimes must be dealt
with in short order. Immigration:
We must rid ourselves of the var-
ious illegal immigrants not just
Haitian, and bring them only
when we need their help in the
farming. This will help us, and
will also help the Haitian govern-
ment.

Just how we deal with foreign
investment, we need to work out
our economy with agriculture and
give a mandate to the hotel own-
ers to buy our product to put in
the various hotels.

If we don’t have enough then
give the farmers the help to pro-
duce more, we can use the Fami-
ly Islands to produce anything we
want. We cannot just look to the
United States for help, we must
help ourselves, and feed families.

We must do all that we can in
light industry to help our situa-
tion in the Bahamas. By now
these should have been factories
in various islands to meet this eco-
nomic time.

The country needs to be diver-
sified to even bring out Bahamian
brothers and sisters from the var-
ious places in the United States to
help enhance our skills in vari-
ous fields. I call upon the Hon
Hubert Ingraham, and the Hon
Perry Christie, along with the
National General Council, to
rethink their strategy and the oth-
er parties to unite and throw their
full support to Dr Bernard Not-
tage to be the next Prime Minister
of the Bahamas.

He deserves it more than any-
one else in the two parties, and
bring a closure to the political
madness in this country. This
must start immediately, so he can
start working and fielding new
candidates who are neither PLP
or FNM to usher in a new cleans-
ing for Bahamians everywhere.

This is our time to shine, and
bring a halt to what is happening
in our beloved country. Bahami-
ans, we put the people in parlia-
ment, and we have to tell them
what to do, not them tell us what
to say. Rise up! Bahamians and
shine! Wake up, Bahamians, and
take your places and be counted
in our beloved country. We only
have one and we must take care
of our piece of the rock.

FRANKLIN THOMPSON
Nassau,
June, 2009.

Imperative that we become frugal in spending habits

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Due to the tough and eco-
nomic times that we are facing
in the Bahamas and the world
at large, it is imperative that we
become frugal in our spending
habits. The cost of living is at
an all time high; a simple trip
to the grocery store can be very
depressing with the escalating
cost of food. I can recall leaving
the grocery store after spend-
ing just over $100 with just a
few bags; in time past, $100
would have completed my gro-
cery list with change left over.
Today, electricity bills seem to
be the amount of a mortgage
payment. In lieu of all of this,
we must explore new ways to
help us live on a budget and
avoid overspending.

Starting with food: let’s say
you buy breakfast from a Fast
Food enterprise which is about
$4 to $6. Now multiply that by
five Gif you do this every day of

the week) and see how much
money you will be spending in
one week! My suggestion is to
wake up earlier and prepare
breakfast — it is cost effective
and you know what is in your
food. Because in the end, all
those artificial ingredients may
only send you to the doctor to
spend more money!

Lunch is a real killer if you
buy it everyday. Approximate-
ly $7 is normally for lunch; now
multiply that by five and you
are spending $35 a week on
lunch. So instead of buying
lunch every day, how about you
bring a sandwich from home or
eat some of the peas ’n rice and
fish your sister cooked for Sun-
day dinner? When it all boils
down, that’s $149 a month you
could be saving or doing some-
thing more constructive with.
Apart from food, we as
Bahamians want to look good;
every banquet and wedding we
must buy something new. An




















British Colonial Hilton

Pe ea

Travel should take you places

outfit or a new dress or simply
cosmetics, for the ladies, and a
pair of new name-brand tennis
— all of these apparatus is sim-
ply not necessary. Nine times
out of ten there is something
right in the closet to wear, but
many of us want something new
just to say it is “new.” We are
trying to keep up with the Jone-
ses when in fact the Joneses are
probably in debt up to their eye-
balls! We must learn to appre-
ciate what we have and be more
conservative in order to save
our money and make it through
this financial crisis. When on a
budget we must be cognisant of
the fact that cell phones are a
real expense, if you set aside
$20 a month it is normally best
to stick to that. Phone cards can
be very expensive; to preserve
airtime, call when it’s necessary
and don’t answer land phones
especially if you’re close to one.
Use the phone only in emer-
gencies and I’m sure you'll stick
to your budget.

If you think that these items
are so important that you can-
not live without them, make up
an expense log and see how
much money you are spending
on a regular basis.

Add up every single expense
no matter how small and go
through things you really need
and you will turn your financial
situation around. Money is not
for selective individuals. The
way you treat your money is the
way your money will treat you.
If you hang around the food
store on any given day you can
hit the jackpot with the amount
of pennies that lay dormant on
the ground. Don’t throw those
pennies away, they go a long
way. In the Bahamas to make it
during this tough time we must
curve our spending habits and
get what’s necessary. Do not let
our needs be overshadowed by
our wants.

Realistically, the difference
between the rich and the poor is
not the amount of money they
make but the way in which they
spend it. To be effective in
managing your money you must
start now, we make so many
excuses on how we are going to
start tomorrow. If $10 is all you
have, save it. Let’s continue to
strive for financial freedom as
we live on a budget.

JASON E SPRINGER
Nassau,
June, 2009.



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Family fear
for safety of
missing man

THE family of a missing
67-year-old man are fear-
ing for his safety as he dis-
appeared from his Wulff
Road home without his
seizure medication.

David McKinney was
last seen at his home last
week Friday.

Since then, he has been
seen in Romer Street in
the Fox Hill area, but has
not made contact with his
family.

Although Mr McKinney
often went for walks, his
niece Annamae saidthat i
never before had he disap- }
peared for longer than a ;
day and that he did not
tend to frequent Fox Hill.

“He’s on medication for
seizures. If he doesn’t
have it, he’ll fall out all
the time,” she said.
“Every time I go to Fox
Hill I can’t find him.”

“T just want to be able
to pick him up and take
him back to his place.

“With the seizures he
may not know where he
is,” she added.

Annamae has asked
anyone who sees Mr McK-
inney to call her on 364-
2228, 322-3754 or 434-
0643. If no one answers,
callers are advised to
leave a message.

The Tribune will publish
a photo of Mr McKinney
tomorrow.

Graduates urged
to he of service
to others

PUBLIC Works and
Transport Minister Neko
Grant admonished gradu-
ates of St George’s
Senior High School to
“be of service to others”
as they “climb the ladder
of success.”

“Many people (are on)
their quest for success,
only focused on ‘having’
or ‘getting’ from a per-
sonal perspective,” he
said. “Their lives never
include sharing their
gifts, talents or experi-
ences with others.

“Therefore, seek to be
of some service or help to
others. Please always
remember to give back to
your country and to your
community.”

Mr Grant was a fea-
tured speaker at the June
2009 graduation ceremo-
ny of St George’s Sec-
ondary School, Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

“You must pursue and
accept the opportunities
for further education,
training or work,” he told
the graduates.

“You must also seek to
excel when you are
required to complete a
particular task. You must
embrace your destiny and
you must put your desire
to excel into action.”

The graduates were
told that they will not
know or perfect every-
thing, “however, every
day we should strive
toward continuous
improvement in all
aspects of our lives,” Mr
Grant said.

Immigration officers on leave on

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

TWO Immigration officers are cur-
rently on administrative leave on sus-
picion of having committed various
infractions, Immigration Director Jack
Thompson revealed.

The officers were placed on leave by
the former director of immigration
before Mr Thompson assumed office
last November, he said, but he could
not say what the infractions were.

"There are two officers who are on
administrative leave, they were on leave
prior to my coming to office. I am
reviewing the files, I don't have the full

particulars before me now. . . I'm not
sure what they were on administrative
leave for," he said.

Allegations

The Department of Immigration has
come under heavy fire in recent months,
with rampant allegations of abuse and
mistreatment at the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre, as well as claims of
bribery.

Earlier this year, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham admonished corrupt
Immigration officers and said his gov-
ernment will not "look the other way"
where evidence supports allegations of
corruption in the public service.

He addressed allegations of immi-
gration officials accepting bribes at
ports of entry or in exchange for falsi-
fying documents or speeding up work
permit and residence application
processes.

Mr Ingraham also noted allegations
that some immigration officers use
excessive force during apprehension
and detention exercises and stressed
that his government does not tolerate
the abuse of detainees or suspected ille-
gal immigrants.

“T want to be clear: abuse of detained
persons whether in their homes, at a
work site, on an immigration bus or at
the Carmichael Road Detention Centre
is contrary to the law. Everyone must be

suspicion of committing infractions

treated with respect and with dignity
at all times; that is the law and that is
the policy of the government which I
head,” said Mr Ingraham earlier in the
year.

Meeting

Mr Thompson said since the prime
minister's warning, the department has
held a meeting with supervisors and
advised them to be vigilant for instances
of impropriety.

He stressed that despite some
bad apples, there are a lot of outstand-
ing and dedicated officers who routine-
ly go beyond the required level of ser-

Poles for $12m transmission
facilities set for installation

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Power Company will
soon begin pole installation for
the construction of the new $12
million transmission facilities
for Ginn sur Mer at West End.

The new poles have been
placed strategically along
Queens Highway and will be
erected along a 21-mile route
into West End.

Derick King, director trans-
mission and distribution, said
the new composite poles are
about 65ft to 70ft tall and capa-
ble of withstanding maximum
sustained winds of 150 mph.

Executives of Grand Bahama
Power Company and Ginn sur
Mer held a town meeting on
Tuesday evening at the Eight
Mile Rock High School gym-
nasium for residents of West
Grand Bahama.

Concerns were raised during
the meeting about the strength
of the poles in a vehicle collision
and the dangers a falling 70ft
pole could pose to nearby
homes and other buildings in
Eight Mile Rock.

Mr King assured residents
that 4000 psi of concrete will be
pumped into the pole base to
add strength.

He also noted that the poles
are made of composite material
that comes with a life-time guar-
antee, compared to the existing
35ft wooden poles that have a
life span of 35 years.

Construction of the new 69kv
pole line started in the first
quarter of 2009.

The GBPC and Ginn are
contributing $6 million each
toward the cost of the project,
which is expected to be com-
pleted in December 2009.

Mr King said that a feasibili-
ty study and a series of related
engineering studies have been
conducted in order to quantify
the ultimate requirements in the
West End and surrounding area
and develop a plan for the elec-
trical infrastructure to support
it.

Meanwhile, the proposed $4.9
bilion Ginn sur Mer/Old
Bahama Bay development at
West End is progressing. It will
be comprised of a 20-storey
tower resort, condo units, sin-
gle-family residential home lots,
marinas, a private airport, two
golf courses and other state-of-
the-art amenities.

Mr King said that the devel-
opment’s ultimate forecasted

power demand of 54 megawatts
far exceeds the capacity of the
existing power system in the
west of Grand Bahama.

He noted that the power sup-
plied to Ginn will far exceed
the power demand at Paradise
Island in New Providence.

Mr King said the new trans-
mission line will improve ser-
vices to residents of West
Grand Bahama, from Eight
Mile Rock to West End.

“We will install arresters on
the poles to help protect the
pole line equipment from
flashover due to lightning
strikes, significantly increasing
the reliability of the new line,”
he said.

He said the new system will
provide increased feeder capac-
ity for load growth and decrease
interruption frequency and
duration.

The proposed 69,000-volt
pole line will be built from the
generating plant located on
Queen’s Highway. The pole line
will be built on the existing
easements.

Mr King said that employ-
ment opportunities will be cre-
ated for Bahamians. In addition
to GBPC crews, he noted that
external Bahamian contractors
and labourers will be employed,
as well as US based advisors
who will train power company
staff on high voltage techniques.

The project will also provide
an economic boost for busi-
nesses in the western part of
Grand Bahama.

“We will be required to feed
our crews and we will be sup-

Committee formed to assist in the
eradication of illegal immigrant ‘slums’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT has a newly formed com-
mittee to assist the Department of Immigration
in fulfilling its pledge to eradicate illegal immi-

grant "slums".

Immigration Director Jack Thompson said a
number of government representatives — from
Public Works, Building Control, the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health, the Depart-
ment of Lands and Surveys, the Department of
Housing, the RBPF, and the Attorney Gener-
al's office — convened for a meeting on Wednes-
day where a committee was formed to address
the “vexing” problem of slum communities on
New Providence and the Family Islands.

Mr Thompson said the group has already
identified a number of communities that they
will address and plan to meet again next week.

"This is of major concern to us because, one,
you have a number of persons who are illegal in

the Bahamas who are residing in these places.
Two, this is a health issue, three there's the
water table that's affected by it because these
persons build these places without building

codes up to standard,” he said.
While Mr Thompson said his department
would aggressively deal with the slum commu-

nities, he stressed that the process would be

yesterday.

forum.

handled humanely.

"This time we're going to do something about
it, but we're going to do it right, we're not
going to move into a community with a bull-
dozer and start bulldozing houses down — that
is not our style.

"We're going to do it within the law, but we
are going to move in that direction and address
this problem," said Mr Thompson, at a press
conference at the Department of Immigration

The issue was raised by State Immigration
Minister Branville McCartney last week at the
Chamber of Commerce's ‘Meet the Minister’



porting local food vendors in
the area to provide our crews
with breakfast and lunch,” Mr
King said.

Fun
a
iy)

Tired of thé Same
Old Boring Summer
School?

DERICK KING, GBPC director of
transmissions and distribution,
and Derek Gape, Ginn sur Mer
project manager, were both on
hand to answer questions from
residents at the informational
night about the West End trans-
mission line upgrade. They are
pictured in front of topographic
maps showing the route of the
new line, which follows the
existing power line, but will
upgrade residents from 5mhw
to 69mhw.

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Bahamas Agricultural & Industrial Corporation (BAIC)

Presents Its

HANDICRAFT ‘STRAW’ TRAINING PROGRAM
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Date: July 6-17, 2009

Venue: C. H. Reeves Junior School

Agerange: under 15

Employment Status:

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The port at Arawak Cay—all things considered

Recexny I
reviewed plans to

move the container port to
Arawak Cay in the context of
revitalising the city of Nassau.

But there has been an unfor-
tunate failure to communicate
on this project, and some of the
parameters discussed earlier
have changed.

So I met with the board of
directors of the Arawak Cay
Port Development Company
(APD) last week for an author-
itative update.

The latest draft of the agree-
ment between the Government
and the developers (which could
be the final version) is now at
the Office of the Prime Minis-
ter. Expectations are that it will
be signed within days, after
which contractors would be
mobilised to begin work.

If this happens, the deal will
have taken one year to con-
clude, at a cost to APD's share-
holders of about a million dol-
lars so far. Those shareholders
include the entire Bahamian
shipping industry - 19 partners
in all. They range from domes-
tic and international shippers to
stevedoring firms, dry bulk
importers, and ferry operators.

The working group spear-
heading the negotiations
includes Bahamas Marine Con-
stuction's Jimmy Mosko,
Arawak Stevedoring's Chris
Lightbourn, the Mailboat Com-
pany's Donelle Taylor, Jack
Sands of Betty K Agencies and
Mike Maura of Tropical Ship-
ping. But they are not the prime
movers.

"The government is driving
this," Lightbourn told me. "And
we have been trying to imple-
ment whatever solution the
Government wants. The previ-
ous Government told us we
were going to Southwest Point
and the current Government
told us we are going to Arawak
Cay. In both cases the mandate
was to minimise impact to the
cost of living and make way for
the redevelopment of down-
town Nassau."

In fact, the same coalition of
shipping interests helped fund
the 2006 Southwest Point engi-
neering study by the Dutch con-
sultants, Ecorys; just as it has
more recently funded develop-
ment studies for the Arawak

Cay location. The current con-
sulting team includes London-
based Halcrow Group, KPMG
Bahamas, and the law firm of
Higgs & Johnson.

"It will take three months for
us to mobilise," Mosko told me.
"The work will include con-
struction of a sea wall, mainte-
nance dredging of less than
200,000 cubic yards of material
from the existing channel, the
addition of two lift cranes, some
20 acres of pavement, plus secu-
rity fencing. It's little more than



“There is one
major point that
still needs
clarification,
and that is how
the new port
will connect
to the New
Providence
road network.”



a glorified car park and certain-
ly not rocket science - we can be
up and running within a year."
The total land area for phase
one of the container terminal -
which will be located on the
existing 70-acre cay - is about
40 acres. An additional five
acres on the eastern end of the
cay will be used for a terminal
that will handle inter-island fer-
ries, the Mailboat Company and
tour boats, while most domestic
shipping will remain at Potter's
Cay. The ferry terminal is a sep-
arate project, Mosko said.
Meanwhile, the Dutch infra-
structure firm, Royal Boskalis
Westminster, is already mobil-
ising to dredge Nassau harbour
to expand the cruise port. This



separate Government project
(which will finish in November)
will excavate 2.1 million cubic
yards of material from the har-
bour, most of which will be used
to add about 40 new acres to
the western end of Arawak Cay.
The remainder will be used to
expand Woodes Rogers Wharf
east of Rawson Square to pro-
vide space for more waterfront
activities.

Some concerns have been
expressed about the impact the
Arawak Cay extension may
have on the Saunders Beach
area. But according to Neil
Sealey, a local expert on the
coastal environment, "there is
no reason to suspect that the
extension will change anything
from the present situation,
although it should be moni-
tored."

Sealey pointed out that the
New Providence shoreline in
this area is already masked by
Silver Cay and water circula-
tion is being blocked by the
existing causeway at the east-
ern end of Arawak Cay right
now, adding that it wouldn’t
hurt to open up the causeway
to allow more water flow along
the southern side of the cay.

Costs for the Arawak Cay
port are pegged at $55 million -
including basic civil works at
the proposed Gladstone Road
warehouse depot. This com-
pares to the more than $235 mil-
lion that was estimated for the
Southwest Point port, which
had a seven-year buildout. The
equity split outlined in the latest
draft agreement calls for the
government and the shipping
coalition to each hold 40 per
cent of the shares, with 20 per
cent reserved for a public offer-
ing.

This price tag will be partly
financed by a $15 million pref-
erence share offering, with the
shareholders having to come up
with the remaining $40 million.

"The investment has to make
sense for all parties,” Light-
bourn said. "And Arawak Cay

* Bahamian Food * Folklore * Artisans
' Dance * Music * Bands + Prison Pop Band

* Fashion show * Best yards competition etc...

Followed By....
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Arts Festival Cultural Show

CD pmeQipma
Rawson Square



is amuch more eco-
nomical project,
especially in today's
climate. For exam-
ple, the Ecorys
study projected a six
per cent annual
growth in container
cargo, but what we
have actually seen
over the past nine
months is a drop of
about 20 per cent."

And it is not
widely known that
40 per cent of all
cargo already
arrives at Arawak
Cay. This includes
containers handled
by Tropical Ship-
ping and MSC, as
well as dry bulk
imports like sand,
cement, steel and
aggregates. Potable
water is also shipped
from Andros to reservoirs on
the cay, and these may be shift-
ed to other locations nearby to
facilitate the berthing of con-
tainer ships on the northern side
of the cay.

There is one major point that
still needs clarification, and that
is how the new port will con-
nect to the New Providence
road network. Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux told me
recently that a bridge would be
built from the newly-reclaimed
western end of the cay to con-
nect to West Bay Street at the
extreme eastern end of Saun-
ders Beach, which is now a
rocky shoreline.

In this scenario, containers
would be trucked over the
bridge and on to the Bethel
Avenue road extension, which
will connect to West Bay at a
roundabout to be built imme-
diately west of the Shell station.
From here trucks will travel
across Thompson Boulevard
and the Tonique Darling High-
way to a 15-acre warehouse
depot that will be built on Gov-
ernment land off Gladstone
Road. Goods will be unloaded
at the depot and sent on to their
final destinations.

However, the shipping coali-
tion says a bridge is not part of
their plans. At this point they
anticipate moving containers to
Gladstone Road via the existing
access route from Arawak Cay.
Trucks will run during off-peak
traffic times, with an estimated
1,000 movements a week in and
out of the terminal. Official
sources say the new bridge may
be part of what the Government
brings to the table in the port
deal, but no firm project exists
and the appropriate EIAs
would have to be done prior to
any commitments.

The Bethel Avenue road
extension (from West Bay
Street to the Tonique Darling
Highway) is part of the IDB-
financed New Providence road
improvement project being
undertaken by the Argentinian
contractor, Jose Cartellone.

In a related development, the
Government recently signed an
agreement with the Chinese
export-import bank for a multi-
million-dollar loan, part of
which will be used to convert
JFK Drive and Thompson
Boulevard (from the airport to
the College of The Bahamas)
into a four-lane highway.
Preparatory work for this pro-
ject is already under way,
according to officials.

"But we have to balance the
traffic issues because no matter
where cargo arrives on the
island it has to get to its final
destinations, which are usually
in high traffic areas," Light-
bourn told me. "In terms of



fee Li 3
ENVIRONMENT MINIS-
TER Earl Deveaux told
me recently that a bridge
would be built from the
newly-reclaimed western
end of the cay to connect
to West Bay Street at the
extreme eastern end of
Saunders Beach.

Arawak Cay we are
dealing with a prop-
erty that we don't
control, so we have
gone as far as we can
go until the Govern-
ment decides what it
wants to do."

In addition to the
traffic concerns, crit-
ics have complained
about using Arawak
Cay for industrial
rather than touristic
purposes - as was
originally proposed
back in the 1960s
when the island was
created from the
spoil of earlier har-
bour dredging.

Here's one exam-
ple of this view tak-
en from a recent
Facebook conversa-
tion:

"Won't it look just
gorgeous to our visiting cruise
ship passengers? Instead of
putting some wonderful facility
out there (think Sydney Opera
House), we put a container port.
What does that say about how
we feel about Bahamian cul-
ture? Why not be bold and cre-
ate a wonderful space where
everyone can access the sea and
recreation?"

But the plain fact is that
Arawak Cay has been an indus-
trial site for the past 40 years,
and many cruise ships leave
from industrial ports or arrive at
multi-use ports in the
Caribbean. Arawak Cay could
hardly be any worse as it is, and
a modern container port is not
necessarily an eyesore. It does-
nm’t seem to detract from Mia-
mi, for instance.

It is also worth noting that
any location on New Provi-
dence for a new port has
impacts and tradeoffs. A port
at Clifton would likely destroy
the dive tourism industry, for
example, whereas one at
Arawak Cay would have virtu-
ally no impact on the marine
environment as it uses the exist-
ing dredged harbour entrance.
A Clifton port would also cost
hundreds of millions more,
while taking much longer to put
together.

The bottom line is that freight
traffic is disrupting the capital
and the container terminals
occupy valuable waterfront
space. This restricts options for
Nassau's redevelopment while
making life unpleasant for
everyone. It's time to bring this
long-running saga to an end.

THE PORT, SAUNDERS
BEACH AND THE
CASUARINAS

As a sidebar to this story, an
angry email was circulated over
the weekend complaining about
the imminent removal of the
casuarina colonnade along
Saunders Beach. This was rem-
iniscent of the misguided out-
cry that occurred the last time
the Government undertook a
casuarina removal programme,
17 years ago, at Cable Beach.

The email used this little
rhyme to make its point:

If you go down to the beach
today,

Youw’re in for a big surprise,

For every tree that used to be
there,

Is threatened with pending
demise.

Casuarinas are native to the
western Pacific but were intro-
duced to Florida and the
Caribbean in the late 1800s for
use as firewood and wind-
breaks. After a series of major
hurricanes in the 1920s uproot-
ed many landmark trees on
New Providence, fast-growing

casuarinas were planted around
the capital by well-meaning gar-
den clubs.

These trees grow well in dis-
turbed areas and are highly salt-
tolerant.

But dense thickets of casuar-
inas quickly displace native
dune and beach vegetation,
including mangroves. And once
established they outcompete
native plants and destroy habi-
tat for native insects and other
wildlife. The ground below the
tree is poisoned and becomes
ecologically sterile.

Both the Government and
the Bahamas National Trust
have removal policies and pro-
grammes for invasive species
like the casuarina that shut out
native plants. In populated
areas there is also a danger from
falling limbs as the trees can
grow to more than 100 feet and
decay with age. But their impact
on beaches is less widely known.

In 2003 coastal expert Neil
Sealey produced a research
paper on casuarina-induced
beach erosion at Small Hope
Bay on Andros. He showed that
erosion was caused by the sup-
pression of native vegetation
beneath the trees. This led to
sand blown onshore not being
trapped to form dunes, so that
during storms there was nothing
to stop massive sand loss.

An update to this research
was produced for the recent nat-
ural history conference on San
Salvador, pointing out that no
vegetated shorelines have been
found with chronic erosion
except those with casuarinas.
And Sealey was able to confirm
that specific areas cleared of
casuarinas - including Small
Hope Bay - have been rapidly
repopulated by native species
that build up the natural dune.

Orange Hill on West Bay
Street is the best example of a
successful beach restoration on
New Providence. The casuari-
nas were replaced a few years
ago with native vegetation, and
the dune has since stabilised.

According to the Bahamas
Reef Environment Education
Foundation "One only needs to
drive past Saunders Beach to
see how it has been eroded by
the casuarinas that line it. If this
beach were planted with native
coastal species such as seagrape,
cocoplum and sea oats, the
beach would be stabilized and
sand would not be constantly
blown into the road."

Well, that is exactly what is
about to happen. The tree
removal is part of a larger re-
organisation of the Saunders
Beach area, which is a compo-
nent of the aforementioned
IDB-funded road improvement
project.

The road immediately west
of the Shell station will be
diverted south to create a park-
ing area for some 150 vehicles.
This will improve public access
to the beach, while the casuari-
nas will be replaced with native
vegetation to allow the beach
to regenerate over time.

Environmentalists say that
West Bay Street should never
have been built so close to the
shoreline. In fact, coastal roads
are chiefly responsibly for our
disappearing beaches, as can be
seen at Montagu, where the
road was built on the dune and
the beach is now almost gone.

The end result is that we have
to fork out money every few
years to repair the seawall. The
same thing is in store for Saun-
ders Beach if nothing is done.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY "J/7>

The Airport Authority invites applications from suitably qualified Bahamians for the

following vacant post.

Maintenance Officer Il

Applicants must possess a BTV! Diploma or equivalent in Diesel and heavy equipment me-
chanics with a minimum of five years practical experience troubleshooting and performing
maintenance work on mechanical, hydraulic, diesel and electrical systems with minimum

supervision.

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and the appropriate salary scales of the
Airport Authority. Interested persons should submit their Resumes, together with refer-
ences and copies of qualifications by July 13, 2009 to:

Manager Human Resources

The Airport Authority

Lynden Pindling International Airport
P.O. Box AP-59222

Nassau, Bahamas





THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

The infrastructure ‘must be in good
condition’ when economy rebounds

THE current economic crunch will
not last forever and the Bahamas’
infrastructure “must be in good con-
dition” when the economy rebounds,
Public Works and Transport Minis-
ter Neko Grant said yesterday.

Mr Grant was responding to com-
ments by Senator Allyson Maynard-
Gibson during her contribution to the
debate in the Senate on a Bill for an
Act to Amend the Cruise Ship’s
Overnighting Incentives Act on



Queen's College
Foundation and
alumni create
lapel pin

IN RECOGNITION of ;
the contributions of its alum- }
ni to the community, the ;
Queen’s College Founda- ;
tion, in co-operation with the }
Queen’s College alumni ;
steering committee, has cre-
ated an alumni pin.

The lapel pin is in the ;
shape of the famous Queen’s }
College crest and willimme-

which are not connected to the shore
and are used for mooring) at Prince
George Wharf, and extension by 1,000
feet of the western end of Arawak
Cay with the dredged material.

At the contract signing for the Nas-
sau Harbour Port Improvement Pro-
ject, Minister Grant said: “It is antic-
ipated that the dredging would be
completed in time to accommodate
the arrival of one of the first of Roy-
al Caribbean International’s mega

tinue with the Nassau Har-
bour dredging despite the
global economic downturn.

Mr Grant said 70 per cent
of the visitors to the
Bahamas arrive by cruise
ship and the introduction of
mega cruise ships that call
on the port of Nassau will
require more water depth
than presently exists.

“It was decided that it was

ships and for the Bahamas to
be able to compete with oth-
er Caribbean countries,” said
Mr Grant.

On April 2, the govern-
ment signed a $44 million
contract with BoskKalis, a
Netherlands-based interna-
tional dredging and maritime
infrastructure contractor.

The contract includes
dredging of 1.9 million cubic

Neko Grant



diately identify its wearer as
a distinguished alumnus of
the school.

As a part of the gradua-
tion ceremony this year,

graduating grade 12 students

were pinned by members of
the alumni steering commit-
tee to symbolise their transi-
tion to alumni status.

“Tt is more than simply a
pin,” said Yolanda Darville,
director of development for
the Queen’s college founda-
tion.

“The alumni pin symbolis- i
es that the wearer recognises }

that they have received one
of the best educational
experiences available in the
country. It also symbolises
that although the alumnus
has graduated, they still love
and support their alma
mater.”

The alumni pins are avail-
able for $10 and are perfect

to wear at class reunions and :
other Queen’s College alum- }

ni events

The Queen’s College
Foundation is a charitable
organisation that provides
support to the school for
scholarships, special pro-
grammes, technology and
the improvement of facili-
ties.

Recent achievements by
the foundation on behalf of
Queen’s College include the
building of the new Early
Learning Centre, the reno-
vation of the Geoffrey
Brown Auditorium and the
creation of the Q Café.

Established in 1890,

Queen’s College is the oldest

private school in the
Bahamas and has educated

numerous Bahamian leaders. }

Wednesday.

She criticised the government for,
among other things, its plans to con-

necessary to increase the capacity of
Nassau Harbour, making it accessi-
ble to this new generation of cruise

yards of material from Nassau Har-
bour, construction of three mooring
dolphins (fixed man-made structures

cruise ships, ‘Oasis of the Seas’, on
its maiden voyage in December,
2009.”

Students to gain experience at public hospitals

FREEPORT - With the
objective of providing students
with clinical exposure while
studying in the Bahamas, Ross
University has partnered with
the Public Hospitals Authori-
ty in a vlinical yraining sgree-
ment.

On May 12 Ross first and
second year medical students
began their training at both
the Rand Hospital and the
Bight Mile Rock clinic.

This agreement will provide
a scope for the further devel-
opment and training of per-
sonnel throughout the Grand
Bahama health services.

An important aspect of the
agreement provides PHA
health professionals with
access to Ross University’s
simulation labs and medical
library which will enhance
PHA’s ability to train and
strengthen the capacity of
local health professionals.

This arrangement will allow
for Bahamian professionals to
participate in the training of
students from various parts of
the wider international com-
munity.

Medical students at each
location are under the careful
supervision of two doctors for
a few hours twice weekly.
During a typical half day, the
student is introduced to the
patient by the doctor and is
allowed to interview, examine

and obtain history of present
illness; they examine the
patient ‘(applying only those
skills they have been taught);
present the patient to the
attending physician; write up
the history and physical and
later obtain feedback on the
presentation and the write-up
from the attending physician.

The doctors are then
required to provide evalua-
tions of the students to the
university.

The Clinical Education
Partnership was introduced to
the Grand Bahama health
community back in December
2008, and will provide a rich
educational experience to
Ross students, and also
enhance the professional
growth of Bahamian physi-
cians, thus improving the over-
all health and medical care
system within the Bahamas.
Statistics have shown that
when hospitals become more
teaching oriented and offer
themselves as educational
facilities, the level of patient
care tends to go up.

“This is a significant
moment in the history of
Grand Bahama. We look for-
ward to a long and fruitful
working relationship between
the university and the medical
community on Grand
Bahama. How we work
together will impact both pre-

FOCOL

HOLDINGS LTD.

PREFERRED
DIVIDEND PAYMENT

FOCOL Is pleased to announce a

dividend payment to all holders of
CLASS ‘A’ preference shares
as of June 30, 2009

payable within ten business days

of the record date
through CFAL Ltd.

“Fuelling Growth For People”

Dave Mackey

ROSS STUDENTS with doctors

of the Rand Hospital in Grand
Bahama. (I-r) Joshua Lynn,
Rachel Lacy, Dr Ohueyi, Dr
Bartlett, Dr Klasson, Neeti Patel,
and Olawole Ogunsulire.

clinical and tertiary medical
education on this island, and
possibly the educational devel-
opment of the next generation
of health care professionals in
the Bahamas,” said Dr
Desiree Cox, director of clin-
ical education at Ross Uni-
versity.

“The Clinical Training
Agreement is just the begin-
ning of a long relationship
between Ross and the Grand
Bahama medical community.
We are open to more ways in
engaging with doctors who
work in private practice
and other health care profes-
sionals in the medical com-
munity.”






































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_ Murphyville, 2nd Right from Sears Road.
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ODESSA GARDENS FIRST SALE
WE ARE CELEBRATING INDEPENDENCE!!!
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Applicants mast be Born Again Cheistians and adhere to toe Statement of Faith of Marvh Harbour Gospel Chapel
Teachers must aso have al Ieast 2 Bachelors Degree in Education or a Teacher's Certificate
and must be a Bahamian or a permanent resident of the Eahaonzs with work stahus,
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Study to ow thy wll approved untor Godin 2 Timothy 2:15





Rurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020 Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 « 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

LAST RITES FOR

Deacon Emmanuel “Mannie” Rolle, 87

of Farmer’s Hill,

Exuma will be held on

Saturday at 10:00am at

Ebenezer Union Baptist

Church, Farmer’s Hill.

Officiating will be Rev.

Dr. Irvin Clarke-First

Assistant

Superintendent-At-

Large, President

Emeritus, The Exuma

District Convention,

Pastor Ebenezer Union

Baptist Church, Rev.

Dr. C. W. Saunders-

Superintendent The

Bahamas Baptist

Union, Pastor Salem

Union Baptist Church assisted by Rev. Cedric Smith-President

The Exuma District Convention, Minister Stephen Smith,

Rev. Adam Brown, Fourth Assistant Superintendent, Rev.

Louis Rolle-Assistant Union Evangelist and Rev. Leslie

Curtis-Third Assistant Superintendent, Vice President , The

Exuma District. Interment in The Public Cemetery, Old
Place Exuma.

Memories will linger in the hearts of his 5 Sons: Cyril,
Deacon Anthony, Kendall and Elton Rolle and Wilfred Curry;

5 Daughters: Minister. Anniemae Kemp, Evangelist
Clementina Mills, Lorraine Thompson , Minister Angela
Rahming and Karen Winters; 2 Adopted Daughters: Dorothy
Rolle and Rosetta Watkins; 43 Grandchildren: Yvonne,
Antwan, Shonell, Alverez, Trell, Tarell, Natasha, Tanya,
Tamara, Tamika Rolle, Deangelo, Brittney, Latoya, Dorelle,
Steven, Ashleigh, Clinton, Cheryl, Delenor, Shakliah,
Leandra, Leroy Jr., Elton Jr., Daltric and Osumiria Mills,
Jason, Travis, Gabrielle, Mekell, Gregory, Bradley, Deborah,
Dion, Patrick, Colette, Paul, Jermey, Daquiri, Derick, Omar,
Oneil, Owen, Osworth and O’Brian Rolle; 22 Great
Grandchildren: 4 Sons-in-law: Patricl Mills, Leroy
Thompson, James Rahming and Ernest Winters; 3 Daughters-
in-law: Christine Rolle, Lillian Rolle and Daisymae Curry;
2 Sisters-in-law: Estine Rolle and Evelyn Knowles; 2
Brothers-in-law: Rolston and Elkin Flowers; 5 Nieces:
Laverne, Ezerene, Shantel, Marie and Rochelle; 9 Nephews:
Junior, Raymon, Uriah, Tyrone, Jamal, Naham, Walter,
Solomon and Thomas; Host of other relatives and friends
including Maria Barr, Yvette and Patrice Rolle, Stephen
Jones, Glen Gray, Wayne Knowles, Mr. & Mrs.
Shutettleworth, Gladstone Rolle and Family, Stephen Smith
and Family, Ellismae Smith and Family, Mr. L. G. Ferguson
and Family, Rev. Louis Rolle and Family, Rev. Dr. Irvin
Clarke and Family, The Family of the late Samuel and Ellen
Rolle, Mrs. Zelma Nixon and Family, Mr. & Mrs. George
Fox of Long Island, Cynthia Stuart and Family, Carol Young,
Pastor Mildred Ferguson and Family, Rosemary Moss and
Family, The Oliver Family, Mr. & Mrs. Kettel, The Family
of the late Vernal and Lovely Rolle, The Family of Marie
Flowers, The Family of the late Gerald Flowers, Mr. Newman,
Mr. Ponder, Mr. Jimmy Barr and Family, Hardley Smith and
Family, Nurse Marilyn Munroe, The Family of the Late
Dorothy and Florine, John(London, England), Bob(Sarasta),
Anglican Family, The Ebenezer Union Baptist Church Family,
Glad Tiding Church Family, Trinity Full Gospel Church
Family, Rokers Point, Church of God Family, The Forest,
Old Place and Farmeris Hill Communities.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Ramsey
Exuma on Friday from 12:00 Noon until 6:00 P.M. and at
the church on Saturday from 9:00 A.M. until service time.

Seletha Ferguson, 88

of Colonel Hill,
Crooked Island was
held on Thursday, at
12:00 Noon at Trinity
Full Gospel Baptist
Church, Marshall
Road. Officiated was
Rev. Deanza
Cunningham assisted
by other Ministers.
Interment was held at
Lakeview Memorial
Gardens, J.F.K. Drive
and Gladstone Road.

She is survived by
her step-daughter:
Deaconess Reatha
Ferguson and Reverend Linkwood Ferguson (step-son-in-
law), three adopted sons: Andrew Johnson and Denise
Johnson (daughter-in-law), Omar and Hansel Moss; Two
step-grandsons: Alphege and Nelson Ferguson; Nieces and
Nephews: Mr. and Mrs. Vondell Deleveaux of Hallandale
Fla. Mr. and Mrs. Othman and Marian Brown, Mr. and Mrs.
Edsel and Beulah Scavella, Mr. and Mrs. Clarrington
Deleveaux, Mr. Theophilus Anderson, Mrs. Olga Meadows,
Mr. and Mrs. James Anderson, Mrs. Joyce Gray, Ms. Thelma
Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Anderson, Mr. Lionel
Anderson ,Mr. and Mrs. Hudley Anderson, Rev Garth. and
Mrs. Eloise Mr. Kevan and Dr. Anita Brown-Dean and Mr.
and Mrs. Ian and Erica Atkins; Numerous grand nieces and
nephews and a host of other relatives and friends including
Mrs. Gerlene Gibson, Mrs. Victoria Beneby, Valderine Moss,
Mr. and Mrs. John E. Deleveaux, Rev. Catherine Chisholm,
Mrs. Olga Richards, Mrs. Lenora "Queen" Darling, Rev.
Theodore Darling, Mrs. Pearlene Knowles, Mrs. Laura
Rolle, Reverend Dr. Errol and Mabel Farquaharson, Ednol
Farquharson, Anthony Ferguson Pastor Juliemae
Farquharson, Deaconess Tirzah Williams and the entire
membership of St. John's Baptist Church, Crooked Island,
Mrs. Muriel Deleveaux, Mrs. Jenniamae Moss, Mrs. Iris
Daxon, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Ferguson -of Crooked Island,
Pastor Dorcas Thompson, Deaconess Edith Bain, Mrs.
Vernice Scavella and Family, Mrs. Luceille Scavella and
Family, Mrs. Elizabeth Ferguson, Eunice Deleveaux, Doreen
Darling, Senator Johnley Ferguson and Family, Staff at the
Geriatrics Hospital, and the entire community of Crooked
Island.

The body was repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary,
Robinson Road and Fifth Street on Wednesday from 12:00
Noon until 6:00 P.M., and at the church on Thursday from
11:00 a.m., until service time.



PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

mission, chaired by Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall,
to be formally appointed by Governor General
Arthur Hanna on October 1 and August 14
respectively.

A senior lawyer, who did not want to be named,
criticised the commission’s failure to consult
lawyers, judges, members of the public, non-gov-
ernmental organisations and watchdogs about the
potential appointments before drawing conclu-
sions.

Without an open discussion there is potential for
appointments to be skewed, the attorney warned.

He said: “We have to be sure to appoint people
because of their track record, as opposed to them
progressing through the civil service.

“For people who are answerable to the execu-
tive, and who continue to be answerable to the
executive, the State can do no wrong; and that
could be the case if your entire experience as an
attorney has been working in the office of the
Attorney General for five, 15 or 20 years.”

The appointment of Supreme Court and
Appeal Court judges is extremely sensitive as
Justices make and interpret laws to guide progress
in the country.

The senior counsel added: “We can have judges

Immigration chief calls for information
on alleged abuse of detainees =

Concerns raised

who are either lazy, or who will worship every
utterance of the executive, or who are complete-
ly left-wing, or completely right-wing, so there
should be a process which allows for the consid-
eration of the prospective appointment before
it’s confirmed, or simply announced.

“We have an antiquated, non-transparent
accountability process for Supreme Court and
Court of Appeal appointments and I think it’s
way past time to reform these kind of appoint-
ments.”

The Justices-to-be will fill the roles left vacant by
Justice Rubie Nottage and Senior Justice John
Lyons.

Justice Nottage left the bench last year, when
she reached the mandatory retirement age of 65
just two years after her appointment. And Justice
Lyons took early retirement on May 7.

Another attorney, who did not want to be
named, is concerned the appointed judges will
not be able to fill the shoes of Justice Lyons, a
senior commercial judge who heard a number of
complex cases.

She said: “We need to have someone who can
meet that image and substance if we want to have

FROM page one

detailed allegations made by an
officer who alleged to have wit-
nessed numerous beatings, sex-
ual assaults, and even one mur-
der at the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre - all of which
the officer claimed went unpun-
ished.

The identity and rank of the
officer was withheld to protect
his identity.

Yesterday, Mr Thompson said
his department was "not aware"
of the claims outlined in the arti-
cle.

"I'm saying that I have no
information before me, at all, (to
support) that it happened. .
.We're not aware of it. If any
such action or behaviour or mis-
conduct is brought to our atten-
tion we will investigate it and
we'll deal with it," he said,
flanked by the department's
senior deputy director, the
deputy director and the assistant
director of immigration.

An investigation into these
claims has not been launched,
said Mr Thompson.

There are no surveillance cam-

eras at the holding facility - to }
document the treatment of the }
detainees - but provisions have }
been made for their purchase in }
the department's 2009/2010 bud- :
get, said the director. i
He also stressed that his team }
maintains vigilance over the }
operations of the site with rou- }
tine visits and staff meetings with
Immigration officials. i
The Detention Centre has }
been plagued with claims of }
abuse and mistreatment for }
months with several detainees }
alleging that the facility was like ;
a "concentration camp”. H
The allegations prompted the
department to launch a fact-find- }
ing mission with prominent }
members of the community ear- ;
lier in the year. While that report }
was never made public, several }
aesthetic upgrades were made to }
the centre following the visit. :
The Immigration Department }

is responsible for the adminis- }
tration of the holding facility ;
while the RBDF mans the secu- }
rity of the centre. i
The Department of Social Ser- }
vices is responsible for the prepa- }
ration and distribution of meals. :
¢ SEE PAGE FIVE

a credible reputation as a financial centre and a
legitimate judiciary.

“While I’m not saying there’s anything wrong
with the appointments, we need to ask if we are
filling the gap.”

While Ms Bain has some commercial experi-
ence as former director of legal affairs for the
Attorney General, Mr Turner’s experience is in
criminal law.

He has worked at the Attorney General’s office
since 1988 and was appointed director of public
prosecutions in April 2000 to be responsible for
organising all criminal prosecutions through the
Attorney General’s office since.

The Bar Association reportedly expressed dis-
pleasure over Ms Bain’s Supreme Court appoint-
ment, but this has not been confirmed by Bar
Association President Ruth Bowe-Darville or for-
mer president Wayne Munroe.

The concerned attorney said: “The rules in the
Supreme Court are complex and they’re extreme-
ly deep. Unless you work with them in process and
know them intimately it’s very difficult to sit up on
the bench and hear some of these cases because of
the technicalities and rules involved, and that’s
what’s lacking in a number of these appoint-
ments.”

Harl Taylor killer ‘did not act alone’
FROM page one

she was told, tried to get to Mountbatten House but was unable to.

She told the court she subsequently went home and there received a
phone call prompting her to go back to West Hill Street.

Mts Taylor told how she identified her son’s body at the morgue the
following day.

During cross-examination by McNeil’s lead attorney, Murrio Ducille,
Mrs Taylor told the court that over the years she saw Troyniko at
Mountbatten House.

Detective Corporal Keith Turnquest, a crime scene investigator, said
yesterday that on the morning of November 18, 2007, he went to Mount-
batten House where he met other police officers.

Cpl Turnquest said that in the eastern side of the lobby area he saw
what appeared to be an accumulation of blood droplets on the floor and
blood dripping from the ceiling.

He told the court he went upstairs and saw blood stains on the white
railing that lead to a long hallway. There, he told the court, he found
bloody shoe prints and footprints. He testified that the hallway led to the
master bedroom and bathroom where he found blood in a face basin,
blood on the wall above it and a small white towel on face basin.

Cpl Turnquest said that in the master bedroom, he saw spattered
blood on the western, northern and southern wall as well as the lifeless
body of a dark male lying face up on the left side of the bed in a pool of
blood. Corporal Turnquest said he then photographed the scene.

While describing one of the photographs, Cpl Turnquest noted that a
brown handle broken knife was on the bed just above Taylor’s right hand.

Detective Sergeant James Colebrooke testified that he photographed
Taylor’s body at the morgue and observed numerous injuries to his
abdomen, back, shoulders, the back of his head and face.

A male alternate juror was discharged yesterday after he told the court
his mother was a close friend of Harl Taylor’s mother Beverly.

The trial resumes today before Senior Justice Anita Allen.

BEC ‘is owedl substantial amounts of money’
FROM page one

panies that owe BEC money and
who are at the point of legitimately

aN
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Compory

Public Advisory

The public ie advised that due to the
LPIA Expansion Project, the
entrance road leading to thea US
Departures terminal will be reduced
to one lane of wehiqular tratic
commencing on Thursday, Julby
=, 2009 until further notice. Please
observe any traffic directions and
signage while driving along the
entrance road,

We apologize for any inconvenience
caused.

However, Mr Gottlieb said he
was unwilling to disclose the amount
owed - which sources estimate to
be more than $80million.

In a bid to recoup the cash, the
chairman said BEC essentially has
three options open to it - the threat
of disconnection, disconnection, and
finally legal action.

In terms of people who owe the
corporation, Mr Gottlieb said this
demographic ranges from everyday
citizens, to businesses, to even oth-
er Government agencies and cor-
porations.

“That’s not unusual. There is usu-
ally an offset process there that
sometimes lags in time. There are
private companies that owe BEC
money and there are private indi-
viduals who also owe BEC money.
So it’s across the spectrum,” he said.

When asked if there was a diffi-
culty in the corporation actually col-
lecting its funds from certain high
profile persons in society, Mr Got-
theb said that this is a common mis-
perception.

“The present board does not pur-
sue a policy of being selective with
regard to those individuals or com-

having their electricity supply dis-
connected.

“But the facts that were stated
in the recent Punch article were not
correct as regards that particular
individual and business (Wendall
Jones, Jones Communication).”

Mr Gottlieb said he could not
disclose how much the struggling
media empire owed but it is not the
significant sums quoted in the
tabloid piece.

Doctors Hospital
FROM page one

Ms Rassin said: “At Doctors
Hospital, our first priority is quali-
ty care and patient safety. We have
a disaster plan as well as protocols
in place for such emergencies
including redundancy with two
backup generators.

“However, management at
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
must understand that a hospital is
an essential service to the country,
and patients’ lives could be in jeop-
ardy during a power outage. Long
term power outages could put



eo

fies an

Public Notice

Ministry of Public Works and Transport
Construction of New Market, Downtown Nassau

Pre-Qualification of Contractors

The Government of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas through the Ministry of
Public Works and Transport is inviting qualified General Contractors to participate
for the Tender for the construction of a new Market to be built on a restricted site in

Downtown Nassau.

The structure will be approximately 38,724 sq.ft. with associated external works and

SeIVICes.

The General Contractors will be required to provide a detailed indication of their

competence, both technically and financially, to carry out the intended scope of work
within a reasonable time.

Interested parties may collect the pre-qualification documents as of Thursday, 2 July,

2009 between the hours of 9:00am - 5:00pm from:

The Office of the Director of Public Works
Ministry of Public Works and Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive

Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 322-4830

Fax:

The completed pre-qualification document should be deposited in the Tender Box at
the Ministry of Finance, 3rd Floor, Cecil Wallace-Whitfied Building, West Bay Street,
P.O.Box, N-3017, Nassau, Bahamas no later than 5:00pm on Monday, 13 July, 2009

The Government of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has the right to reject any or all

pre-qualification contractors.

(242) 302-9770

Signed

Colin Higgs

Permanent Secretary



patients at risk if they are on a ven-
tilator or having surgery. Medica-
tion, treatment and services might
be delayed for patients further ham-
pering patient care.”

She said physicians and nursing
staff “responded professionally” to
the situation which saw the elec-
tricity supply to the hospital cut off
for “just under two hours”.

The length of this period was
“totally unacceptable,” she added.

“Tn a crisis that involves power or
water outages, the utility compa-
nies must ensure consistent and reli-
able service to hospitals as patient
lives could be at stake; actions need
to take place to prevent a reoccur-
rence.”

Ms Rassin added that Doctors
Hospital “is committed to our
employees, patients, and commu-
nity and top priority remains to
ensure their safety.”

Acknowledging that some mem-
bers of the public may not think to
contact BEC when their power
goes out, Mr Basden said this can
happen for a number of reasons
and in some cases “depending on
the nature of it, BEC may not be
aware.”

He said people can contact BEC
on 323 5661 to report outages.

GB businessman
FROM page one

in the ‘Pink Building’ that really
this is the way to go,” he said.

“Tam elated. I could not see the
point of putting 76 people out of
work for rent. I want to pay it, but
I did not see what was wrong in
finding out what was a fair rent.”

Following his meeting with Mr
Rolle, Mr Hayward met with his
staff at Port Lucaya around 3pm to
share the news and update them
on the current situation.

Mr Hayward has paid more than
$34,000, emptying his businesses’
bank accounts. He is required
come up with an additional $15,000
by the end of next week, bringing
his total payment to $50,000.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



ai

Roddick faces
Murray at
Wimbledon

TENNIS
WIMBLEDON, England
Associated Press



THE current edition of
Wimbledon is the 23rd
Grand Slam tournament
since Andy Roddick won his
lone major championship at
the 2003 U.S. Open.

He badly wants to win a
second.

It’s why he changed coach-
es for this season. Slimmed
down. Put in as much work
as ever in practice, striving
to improve his returns, his
backhands, his volleys.

Add it all up, and the
sixth-seeded American is
back in the Wimbledon
semifinals for the first time
since 2005, facing No. 3-
seeded Andy Murray of
Britain on Friday. Roger
Federer — seeking a sixth
Wimbledon championship
and record 15th Grand Slam
title — faces No. 24 Tommy
Haas of Germany in the oth-
er semifinal.

“Andymonium” has hit
the All England Club, but
don’t think Roddick is happy
merely to be a part of it.

“By no means is he satis-
fied, because the whole gig
when he hired me is we’ve
got to win a Slam,” Rod-
dick’s coach, Larry Stefan-
ki, said. “I said, "That’s what
I’m here for.’ Winning a
Slam is what it’s all about.
Coming in second is like
kissing your sister. And he
knows that he’s already won
one. Nothing is going to suf-
fice. Even if you get to the
final, 1t won’t do.”

Roddick’s major title, not
quite six years ago, was also
the last at any Grand Slam
event for an American man,
the country’s longest drought
in the Open era, which
began in 1968.

That wait must seem
rather quaint to the folks
around here.

Murray is trying to
become the first British man
to win Wimbledon since
Fred Perry in 1936. No
British man has won any
Grand Slam championship
since Perry at the U.S. Open
later that year.

So the buzz builds with
each victory by Murray. The
22-year-old from Scotland
wrote on Twitter about the
good-luck note he received
from Queen Elizabeth II —
everyone in Britain wants to
know whether she’ll show up
in the Royal Box if Murray
reaches Sunday’s final —
and the phone call he got
from actor Sean Connery.

“Tt doesn’t make any dif-
ference the way you per-
form, the hype. If you ...
spend a lot of time reading
the papers, watching every-
thing on the TV, all the
things that are getting said
on the radio, then you get
caught up in it,” said Mur-
ray, the runner-up to Feder-
er at last year’s U.S. Open.
“If you ignore it, you don’t
realize it’s happening.”

Murray is 6-2 against Rod-
dick, including a lopsided
victory in their most recent
meeting, in the final of a
hard-court tournament at
Doha, Qatar, in January.

That was Stefanki’s first
tournament with Roddick
and expects Friday’s
encounter to look different.

“Tt wast pretty. That tac-
tic won’t be used again. It
was a very aggressive, offen-
sive, bring-out-the-bugle-
and-charge,” Stefanki said.
“And this guy is like (Mats)
Wilander or (Bjorn) Borg —
you give him a target and
he’s going to pass you, lob
you, dink you, because he’s a
great mover off the ball.”



nacre

Stefan Wermuth/AP Photo

TENNIS
WIMBLEDON, England
Associated Press

urday in a Fourth of July final.

“A fourth final — it’s so exciting. It
was so hard before my match to watch
all that drama,” Venus said, referring to



for, and this is what we want. Like I wanted
her to win today and she wanted me to win
today. It’s all come down to this.”

Venus said she was rooting for Serena to
win Thursday, but will now do all she can to
stop her sister and win her eighth major
title.

“T’m happy for her to be in the final, but
I have to face her and defeat her,” Venus
said. “I don’t necessarily want her to lose,
but for sure I want me to win. I don’t want
to see myself disappointed. I need to get
my titles, too. I’m still the big sister, but ’m
still going to play great tennis.”

The difference in the two semifinals
couldn’t have been more striking.

The Serena-Dementieva match was the
longest women’s Wimbledon semifinal by
time since 1969; records are incomplete
before then. Venus’ win was the most one-
sided women’s semifinal since Billie Jean
King beat Rosie Casals by the same score in
1969. The last time a semifinal ended 6-0, 6-
0 was in 1925.

After Serena’s tense, drama-filled escape
against Dementieva, Venus barely broke a
sweat against Safina. The Russian is ranked
and seeded No. 1 despite never having won
a Grand Slam tournament. Safina won only
20 points and was completely outclassed by
the third-seeded Venus, who has been play-
ing some of her best grass-court tennis at this
tournament.

THE purple “W” logo at Wimbledon
might as well stand for the siblings who
have made the women’s championship
their own playground. Yes, the Williams
sisters are back in the Wimbledon final.

Venus and Serena Williams won in con-
trasting fashion Thursday to set up their
fourth all-sister Wimbledon final and
eighth meeting in a Grand Slam title
match.

Two-time champion Serena saved a
match point and overcame Elena Demen-
tieva 6-7 (4), 7-5, 8-6 in 2 hours, 49 minutes
— the longest women’s semifinal at Wim-
bledon in at least 40 years. Five-time win-
ner Venus, meanwhile, needed only 51
minutes to demolish Dinara Safina 6-1,
6-0 and reach her eighth Wimbledon final.

“Oh, my God, this is my eighth final,
and it’s a dream come to true to be here
again and have the opportunity to hold
the plate up,” Venus said.

The sisters — with 17 Grand Slam titles
between them — will face each other Sat-

Serena’s semifinal. “It was so difficult.
But the hardest part is next to come, to
play Serena Williams.”

One Williams or the other has won sev-
en of the past nine championships at the
All England Club. Serena beat Venus in
the 2002 and ’03 finals, and Venus came
out on top against her younger sister last
year.

“All I know is a Williams is going to
win,” said the sisters’ father, Richard.

Venus is bidding to become the first
woman since Steffi Graf in 1991-93 to win
Wimbledon three years in a row.

There have been seven previous all-
Williams championship matches at majors,
with Serena holding a 5-2 lead. Overall,
the sisters are 10-10.

“The more we play, the better it gets,”
Serena said. “Wen we play our match on
Saturday, you know, it’s for everything.
This is what we dreamed of when we were
growing up in Compton (Calif.) 20-some-
thing years ago. This is what we worked



Anja Niedringhaus/AP Photo

Donovan: Beckham has become a bad teammate

SOCCER
NEW YORK
Associated Press

DAVID Beckham has
become a bad teammate on the
Los Angeles Galaxy, accord-
ing to Landon Donovan.

“All that we care about at a
minimum is that he committed
himself to us,” Donovan was
quoted as saying in an excerpt
of Grant Wahl’s “The Beck-
ham Experiment,” scheduled
for publication July 14. “As
time has gone on, that has not
proven to be the case in many
ways — on the field, off the
field.

“Does the fact that he earns
that much money come into it?
Yeah. If someone’s paying you
more than anybody in the
league, more than double any-
body in the league, the least
we expect is that you show up

to every game, whether you’re
suspended or not. Show up and
train hard. Show up and play
hard.”

Beckham joined the Galaxy
in July 2007 from Real Madrid
and has a $6.5 million average
annual income from the team,
twice the $2.94 million
Cuauhtemoc Blanco earns
from the Chicago Fire. Dono-
van was fifth at $900,000 at the
start of the season.

Beckham was loaned to AC
Milan last winter and the 34-
year-old midfielder is to rejoin
Los Angeles for its July 16
match at the New York Red
Bulls.

Donovan was angry that
when Beckham was suspend-
ed for a game at Houston last
year, he didn’t attend the
match.

“Tcan’t think of another guy
where I'd say he wasn’t a good
teammate, he didn’t give every-

thing through all this, he didn’t
still care,” Donovan said. “But
with (Beckham) I’d say no, he
wasn’t committed.”

An excerpt of the book was
published in this week’s Sports
Illustrated. It portrays Beck-
ham as stingy, saying he would-
n’t pick up meal checks for
teammates who earn as little
as $12,900 annually. It states
Terry Byrne, Beckham’s best
friend and personal manager,
pressed for the Galaxy to strip
Donovan of the captain’s arm-
band and give it to Beckham.
Donovan went along with the
move.

It says that at a dinner at
Morton’s steak house in
Arlington, Va., Beckham ini-
tially wasn’t served wine
because he didn’t have ID, and
needed the intervention of the
maitre d’.

Byrne, according to the
excerpt, was hired as a Galaxy

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consultant and conducted the
search that led to the hiring of
Ruud Gullit to replace Frank
Yallop as coach — even though
general manager Alexi Lalas
advised against hiring the 1987
European player of the year.
“My sense is that David’s
clearly frustrated, that he’s f[
unhappy and, honestly, that he a
thinks it’s a joke,”
said last August.

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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Bahamas 1-2 at FIBA championships

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

AFTER three days of com-
petition in the the FIBA Amer-
icas Caribbean Basketball
Championships for Men in Tor-
tola, British Virgin Islands, the
Bahamas stands at 1-2 and faces
an uphill climb towards medal
contention.

MSEC
CNY

For the third consecutive con-
test, the Bahamas squandered a
fourth quarter lead to an oppo-
nent to lose a crucial game in its
waning moments.

The Bahamas took a 67-59
lead into the fourth, but failed
to hang on, outscored by
Trinidad 27-17 in the quarter.

Trinidad opened on a 12-4 run
to tie the game at 71 with 5:50
left to play on a basket by Steven
Lewis.

They took the lead of the
game since the first quarter,
nearly a minute later on an

by Julius Ashby with 4:34 left.

Alonzo Hinds again tied the
score at 73 from the free throw
line and the Bahamas regained
the lead on a free throw by Jef-
frey Henfield.

Trinidad pulled ahead 77-74
before the Bahamas brought
about another tie when Hinds
made a three pointer from the
right wing.

Ian Curtis regained the lead
for good for the Trinidadians
with his pair of free throws with
1:46 remaining.

His free throws sparked a 7-0
run which put the team up 85-77.

Brian Bain finally broke the
run for the Bahamas with a three
point field goal, but with just sev-
en seconds remaining and trail-
ing by two possessions, little
hope was left for a comeback.

Tied after the opening quarter
at 22, however the Bahamas
widened the margin opening an
advantage that grew to as much
as 11 on a basket by Jeremy
Hutchinson just before the half
to make the score 46-35.

The downward spiral began
for the Bahamas in the third

outscored by five and with the
fourth quarter breakdown, were
outscored by 15 for the game.

Quentin Hall led the Bahamas
in scoring with 24 points and sev-
en assists, including 5-12 shoot-
ing from beyond the arc.

Hinds came off the bench and
finished with 21 points six
rebounds and four assists while
Doyle Hudson also chipped in
with 11 points and four rebounds
in a reserve role.

Henfield finished with nine
points while Scott Forbes added
four points and 10 rebounds.

Curtis led Trinidad and Toba-
go with 23 points, while Julius
Ashby and Wilfred Benjamin
chipped in with 17 points apiece.

The Bahamas’ three games
have been decided by an average
margin of 3.3 points per game

Dera
BAHAMAS - 73

After again blowing a late
fourth quarter lead, the
Bahamas was unable to hold off
their oppenents and fell to 1-1 in
the CBC Championships.



opening quarter, however with a
major run in the second when
they outscored Jamaica 30-18,
the Bahamas took a 44-37 lead.

The lead was trimmed to just
four, 60-56 heading into the
fourth quarter. The Bahamas
faltered in the fourth quarter,
outscored 21-13. Louisville Uni-
versity’'s Samardo Samuels
scored eight of his 11 points in
the fourth quarter to lead
Jamaica.

Kimani Friend and Orit-
seweyinmi Efejuku each hipped
in with 18 points apeice. Hinds
again led the Bahamas with a
game high 27 points including a
nearly perfect 12-13 from the
free throw line. Torrington Cox
and Quentin Hall each finished
with 11 points apeice while Bri-
an Bain and Jeremy Hutchin-
son both finished with nine.

The Bahamas shot just 41 per-
cent from the field and gave up
10 turnovers.

BAHAMAS - 75

PU UL]



The Bahamas Men’s Senior

offensive rebound and putback

quarter

when they were

Barry captures

third Ironman title



AFTER failing to defend his
crown in 2008, Lieutenant Ricardo
Barry returned this year determined
to be considered the best all around
athlete in the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force. Barry captured the
prestigious Ironman title for the
third time in the event's ten-year
history. A newcomer to the scene,
Woman Marine Aniska Bonaby
captured the crown in the open
female category.

The annual competition features
the fittest male and female officers
and marines the force has to offer,
and gives its winners coveted brag-
ging rights for one full year. Male
participants must complete a 500-
metre swim, cycle eight miles and

run a three-mile road race. Their
female counterparts are required to
complete a shortened circuit com-
prising the mentioned events.

Due to job obligations, the men's
defending champion, Leading Sea-
man Marvin Darville was not avail-
able to defend his crown, as Barry
won with a time of 1:00.20secs. For
a second consecutive year, both Sub
Lieutenant Derrick Ferguson and
Able Seaman Edney had to settle
for second and third respectively,
with improved times of 1:06.54secs
and 1:10.55secs. “I was quite pre-
pared for the competition this time
around”, said Barry, who had previ-
ously won the competition in 2006
and 2007. “Although Darville had

Jamaica led 19-14 after the

job obligations, I felt I would have
gotten a better push”.

Woman Marine Bonaby complet-
ed a shortened female's version of
the gruelling circuit in 1:06.14secs.
Akeyra Saunders was a close second
with a time of 1:07.50seconds and
Malissa Richardson placed third in
1:35.10secs. Bonaby, who joined the
Defence Force in February of this
year, felt like the competition could
have been better. “I've never com-
peted in a competition like the Iron-
man, but I just went out there and
gave it my best shot. I felt good,
and hopefully, I will get better at it.”

In the team segment of the com-
petition, the male team of Craig
Frazier, Marcellus Rolle and
Delvonne Duncombe prevailed in a
time of 54:57secs, and the female
team of Gaye Bykowski, Dorece
Henfield and Michelle Colebrooke
completed the course in 1:09.21secs.
Defence Force organizers of the
event were pleased with the compe-
tition, but according to Petty Officer
Ramone Storr, there is still room for
improvemant.







EVEN IF IT DOESN'T MOVE

today.

one touchdown.

league.

National team opened the

After Knowles and his men’s doubles
partner Mahesh Bhupathi got eliminated
in the semis on Wednesday, he and Anna-
Lena Groenefeld are playing for a spot
in the mixed doubles final.

Seeded number nine, Knowles and

FROM page 11

“Tm ready now to take that next step in my
career,” he said. “I’m just not happy with being
in the NFL. I’m ready to take the next step to
becoming a real productive receiver in this

“T feel I have the talent to do it and ’'m going
to do it. It ain’t just about being happy there in
the league. I want to be a starter and a star on the
team. I want to be a real contributor.”

With two more years left on his contract, Dar-
ling said he’s looking forward to making the best
of his opportunity with the Chiefs.

“We have a new coaching staff coming in with
a new attitude and everyone is buying into it,”

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FROM page 11

their goals in life.”

This year, the second-year
Kansas City Chiefs’ wide
receiver will be bringing about
five of his colleagues from the
National Football League,
including team-mates, wide
receiver Dwayne Bowe and
running back Larry Johnson.

Also expected in is Darius
Haywood, Kansas City’s No.7
pick overall in the recent NFL
draft, along with Bobby Ingra-
ham, a wide receiver who was
just acquired from the Seattle
Seahawks.

“It’s going to be a good
showing,” Darling said. “Hope-
fully the kids will come out and
participate and learn some life
skills and some football at the
same time.”

With the two camps being
held on the two islands, Dar-

region’s top tournament by
holding off a late fourth quar-
ter charge in the feature game
of opening night.

The team opened with a 75-
73 win over Barbados in the
opening game of the FIBA
Americas Caribbean Basket-
ball Championships for Men in
Tortola, British Virgin Islands.

The Bahamas withheld a late
run by the Barbadian squad in
the third game of the night.

They led after the opening
quarter 27-23 propelled by C.J
Hinds who had 8 points in the
quarter and Quentin Hall who
opened with 7 points.

The Bahamas also outscored
theie opponents 16-14 in the
second quarter to lead at the
half 43-37.

The Bahamas opened with a
9-2 run in the third to take a
61-50 lead early into the quar-
ter. After again outscoring
Barbados 22-15, and took a 65-
52 lead heading into the fourth
quarter.

After begining each quarter
trailing, Barbados began with
an 8-2 run to trim the defecit to
single digits, 67-60.



They reduced the lead 74-71
with a 7-0 run after a basket
by David Jeremy Gill with 4:29
left to play.

With an opportunity to draw
even, Barbados failed to tie the
game missing key baskets
down the stretch.

The Bahamas placed four
players in double figures, led
by Jeremy Hutchinson's dou-
ble double with 11 points and
10 rebounds.

Hinds led the team with 15
points and four assists, finish-
ing with 3-5 shots from beyond
the arch Brian Bain finished
with 12 points while Hall
added 11.

Jeffrey Henfield finished
with eight points while Scott
Forbes added eight points and
five rebounds.

Kelvin Patterson led Barba-
dos with 15 points.

Both teams were virtually
even statistically, however in
a closely contested game, the
Bahamas’ advantage in field
goal percentage (60-48) and
three point field goals made
(7-5), both in favour of the
Bahamas.

LIEUTENANT
Ricardo Barry
completing the
three mile run
segment of the
Defence Force
Ironman
triathlon compe-
tition at the Coral
Harbour Base.
Barry was SuUC-
cessful in cap-
turing the overall
male crown.

Able Seaman Al Rahming/Photo

Knowles, Groenefeld play
for mixed doubles finals

AFTER losing in an historic semifinal,
Mark Knowles will get a chance to make
up for his men’s doubles exit when he
plays in another semifinal at Wimbledon

Groenefeld will play the team of Great
Britain’s Jamie Murray and American
Liezel Huber to secure their spot in the
mixed doubles final.

Their semi-final match is scheduled for

today with the final set for Sunday.

If they win, they will play either No.1
seeds Leander Paes from India and Cara
Black from Zimbabwe or the No.12 team

of Stephen Huss of Australia and Virginia

Ruano Pascual from Spain.

Devard excited about upcoming NFL season

Darling said. “I’m just looking forward to going

into training camp and having a good year.”
Training camp will get under way on July 30 in

River Falls, Wisconsin. However, the season

ling said he’s pretty pleased
about what they have been
able to achieve and he only
expected the camp to contin-
ue to get bigger and better.

His older brother, Dennis, a
former track quarter-miler
turned collegiate coach, said
he was thrilled to be working
with Devard and his crew in
putting on the two camps.

“Every year we try to get
better and help the youngsters
to learn the game of football,”
Dennis said. “We will also have
some spiritual devotions and
life devotions.

“We are looking forward to
over 100 kids coming out and
participating in the two
camps.”

With the camp in Grand
Bahama getting under way on
Monday, Dennis said they have
seen the growth and develop-
ment in the campers who have

won’t get underway until Saturday, August 15
when Kansas City will host the Houston Oilers.

Their first game on the road will take place on
Friday, August 21 at Minnesota.

“T just can’t wait for the season to get under
way,” Darling said. “I’m really looking forward to
a great season. I’ve been working extremely hard
and my expectations are high.”

But in the meantime Darling said he just want-
ed to go to Grand Bahama on Sunday to get the
first leg of his camp under way on Monday.

Once that’s done, Darling said he will be back
in town to complete the second half at the Tom
‘the Bird’ Grant Complex next weekend.

Darling Football Camp set to kick off

been participating from the
inception there four years ago.

“They are still coming out to
the camp, so we look forward
to going over there and having
a good time,” he said. “The
kids over there (Grand
Bahama) look forward to it.
We hope that we can eventu-
ally expand to other Family
Islands in the future.”

Here in New Providence, the
venue has been changed from
the Winton Rugby Pitch where
the numbers were not as
impressive last year, to the
Tom ‘the Bird’ Grant Complex
where they hope to increase
the number of participants.

“We decided to move it from
the east end of the island to a
more central location where a
lot more of the kids can come
out,” Darling said. “So we
expect to have a lot more kids
this year.”



THE TRIBUNE

S|

FRIDAY, JULY 3,



INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays





PAGE 1



2009

‘tS

ah



Devard excited abou
upcoming NFL season

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER playing in his first year with
the Kansas City Chiefs, Devard Darling
feels that his current stint in the Nation-
al Football League will only get better.

The 27-year-old wide receiver just
completed his sixth year in the National
Football League, his second with the
Chiefs after being traded by the Wash-
ington Redskins, whom he began his
career with.

“T can’t complain. The Lord has been
good,” said Darling, who is in town to get
ready for the promotion of his football
camp in Grand Bahama and here next
week.

“We got a good coach and GM. The
Lord has played his favour on me, so
I’m looking for a great season this year.
We have a new quarter-back, a couple
new pieces with the team, so I’m looking
forward to having a great season this
year.”

At 6-feet, one-inch and 215 pounds,
Darling said the Chiefs are expecting
him to step in this year as the starting
wide receiver and so he’s anticipating
that he will make the best of the oppor-
tunity.

“Last year, I didn’t really get too many
balls thrown my way, but this year, ’'m
looking for the ball to come more, espe-
cially with a new quarter-back.

“Tjust have to go out there and make
some plays.”

Last year, Darling played in 16 games
where he caught a total of 17 receptions
for 247 yards, an average of 14.5 per
game, his longest posted at 68 yards.

He also had eight first downs with just

SEE page 10



KANSAS City Chiefs’ wide receiver Devard Darling (left) shares a moment with his old-
er brother, Dennis Darling (during) during a visit to The Tribune Newspaper yesterday.

Darling
Football

Gr Tenhemrels
KO e(@l aya



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ONCE again, Devard Darling will be
sharing his professional football expertise
with potential Bahamian high school
players who wish to follow in his foot-
steps.

The dual Devard and Devaughn Dar-
ling’s Football Camp will be hosted at
the Freeport Rugby Club in Grand
Bahama from July 6-7 and at the Tom
‘the Bird’ Grant Sports Complex from
July 9-10.

Just in town to promote the camp that
he’s holding in memory of his deceased
twin brother, Devaughn, Devard said he
only expected camp to get better and
better with each year.

“T expect every year for the kids to
come out and learn, not just about the
game of football, but a lot about life
because that’s the most important part,”
Devard Darling said.

“We hope to get them to open their
minds so that they can hope and reach for

SEE page 10









suffers

cable
break

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company’s (BTC)
international telecoms and
Internet/data traffic was tem-
porarily interrupted earlier
this week when its Bahamas IT
fibre optic cable was acciden-
tally cut, Tribune Business
confirmed yesterday, with
repairs likely to be made
before month’s end.

Marlon Johnson, BTC”s
vice-president of sales and
marketing, told this newspa-
per that the state-owned carri-
er’s services were “affected for
a few hours” after the under-
sea cable was cut somewhere
between Eight Mile Rock in
Grand Bahama and Vero
Beach, Florida, where it lands
to connect the Bahamas to the
international telecoms and
Internet network.

“We did have a cut in the
Bahamas IT Cable. The service
was affected for a few hours,”
Mr Johnson said. However, he
emphasised that cuts to under-
sea telecommunications were
not unusual, being caused by
bad weather such as hurri-
canes, or ships inadvertently
dropping anchor on them.

The BTC executive added
that when the Bahamas II
Cable was cut, BTC diverted
the voice telecommunications
and data traffic it carried on to
the ARCOS network, the self-
healing circular fibre optic
ring that connects the
Bahamas and other Caribbean
countries to North, South and
Central America.

Disruption

“We just moved the traffic
from one network to the oth-
er,” Mr Johnson told Tribune
Business. “There was a few
hours disruption when the cut
came.

“We want to emphasise that
this happens, and what tele-
coms operators do is build
topography that is self-healing
or have alternative routes with
alternative providers.”

And he added: “They’ve
scheduled repairs. There’s a
company that we engage that
has a vessel to do this stuff,
and it depends where we fall
in the queue. We are sched-
uled for repairs, I suspect
some time this month.”

Tribune Business was yes-
terday told that the Bahamas
II cable had suffered two cuts,
one at the Vero Beach end
close to Florida and the other
nearer to Eight Mile Rock in
Grand Bahama.

However, Mr Johnson dis-
puted this, telling Tribune
Business that BTC had “no
information to indicate that”.
Its initial assessment was that
there was only one cable
break, but it would only know
for sure when repairs com-
menced.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission.
from the daily report.



THE TRIBUNE

u





ne

FRIDAY,

TUBE Cees



2009

| SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net



$43m in airport
work for locals

WB Airport Authority chair denies Bahamian contractors being squeezed out, as ‘the
majority’ of $43m in work to be let in next three months for them

Wi Winning general contractor to partner with Nassau-based Wooslee Dominion

Wl ‘Great surprise’ that only three bids received on time for US departures terminal
i Pledge that no more ‘incentive fees’ in concessions contracts

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

“The majority” of $43 million
worth of contracts that the Nas-
sau Airport Development Com-
pany (NAD) has yet to issue
for construction work on the
new US departures terminal
will be awarded to Bahamian
contractors, the Airport
Authority’s chairman said yes-
terday, describing as “factually
incorrect” claims that locals
were being squeezed out.

Frank Watson told Tribune
Business those contracts, large-
ly for interior work such as
electrics, plumbing and engi-
neering, would be issued
between now and September
2009, with the groundbreaking
ceremony for the US departures

A LeU e) |

terminal - the first stage in the
$409.5 million Lynden Pindling
International Airport (LPIA)



Firm’s assets under
administration up
140% to $405-$410m

KENWOOD KERR



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Bahamas-based investment
advisory firm has increased its
assets under administration by
141 per cent to around $405-
$10 million during its first three
years in existence, Tribune Busi-
ness was told yesterday, having
“exceeded expectations” as it
moves to enhance clients’ real
time access to their financial
information.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive, said
the company was hoping by
September to provide individual
members of pension plans it
managed/administered with on-
line access to their personal
financial information via the use
of pin numbers and encrypted
passwords/codes.

Speaking to Tribune Business
as the company prepares to cel-
ebrate its third birthday follow-
ing its buy out from S$ G Ham-
bros Bank & Trust (Bahamas),
Mr Kerr said Providence Advi-
sors had already invested “a few
hundred thousand dollars” in
replacing the legacy IT system it
inherited upon its creation.

The company already pro-
vided clients, at the human
resources and management lev-
el, with real time, on-line access
to their financial plans and
investments, so they could
gauge their performance and
obtain the relevant information.

And Mr Kerr told Tribune
Business that the company was
also looking at broadening its
investments product offering
through ‘family of funds’ prod-
ucts targeted at specific mar-
kets.

“We’ve exceeded expecta-

SEE page 2B

* Providence Advisors
looking to provide real
time, on-line access to
clients’ financial data by
September

* Eyeing ‘family of
funds’ product, as firm
‘excceeds expectations’

redevelopment - set to take
place this coming Thursday.

Stating that he was “very sur-
prised” that NAD only received
three bids for the US departures
terminal’s general contractor
tender, Mr Watson described
as “not factually correct” claims
by Stephen Wrinkle, the
Bahamian Contractors Associ-
ation’s (BCA) president, that
Bahamian construction compa-
nies were being “left out in the
cold” when it came to getting
work on the airport redevelop-
ment.

Referring to the general con-
tractor bid, which was ulti-
mately won by Vancouver-
based Ledcor Construction, Mr
Watson told Tribune Business:

SEE page 4B




PHOTO: Christopher Hartley



ENVIRONMENTAL protection controls off Arawak Cay

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



$3m overtime
Savings ‘negate’
airport fee rise

* Hotel executive says work on other initiatives to
reduce airline costs at LPIA will counteract impact
of fee rises

* Concern remains on ground handling charges

* ‘No one likes to see an increase, but we want to
have an airport that is modern, efficient and that
showcases the country in the best possible light’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The $3 million in annual savings that airlines flying into
Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA) will enjoy
from the elimination of Customs/Immigration overtime
charges should “more than negate” the impact of a 23.6 per
cent increase in landing fees, the Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion’s (BHA) executive vice-president said yesterday.

Pointing out that the elimination of Customs/Immigra-
tion overtime charges would coincide with the date when the
Nassau Airport Development Company’s (NAD) proposed
fee increases would be implemented, Frank Comito told
Tribune Business a balance had to be struck between mak-
ing LPIA cost competitive for airlines and the need to

SEE page 5B

BEST warns
OSM M CENA

control at
Arawak Cay

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



THE COMPANY responsi-
ble for extending the western
end of Arawak Cay has been
warned by the Bahamas Envi-
ronment, Science and Technol-
ogy (BEST) Commission to
properly install water turbidity
control measures, the minister
of the environment said yester-

SEE page 2B

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





BEST warns on turbidity
control at Arawak Cay

FROM page 1B

day, as the developers await sheet piles
that will form the bulkhead for the
extension and secure fill dredged from
Nassau harbour.

Earl Deveaux said the BEST Com-
mission found that fill being pushed
into the sea was escaping beneath the
floating turbidity control barriers used
to prevent such a spread.

Director of the BEST Commission,
Philip Weech, said the floats were not
designed to prevent the occurrence of
murky water as fill is spread and
packed along the sea bed, but they
are designed to greatly reduce its
spread.

“The turbidity barriers are intended
to reduce and control the amount of
influence over as large an area as pos-
sible,” he said.

Mr Weech said that when the dredg-
ing of Nassau Harbour begins, similar
measures will be put in place, but he
argued that areas of white milky water
will occur around the site.

The extension of Arawak Cay is a
part of the Government’s plan for the
new container port. Now, as work
begins, questions are being asked
about the project’s environmental
impact.

According to Mr Deveaux, the fine
silt stirred up on the ocean floor dur-
ing dredging can be dangerous to reefs
and fish if it is suspended in that envi-

ronment for long periods of time.

Mr Weech argued that the installa-
tion of the bulkhead will greatly
reduce the amount of large material
escaping the site, but conceded that
it will not prevent the fine silt, which
will again be held at bay by floating
turbidity control measures.

Christopher Hartley, describing
himself as an environmental steward,
told Tribune Business yesterday that
he had explored the reefs around Bal-
moral Island which could be affected
by the dredged silt.

“These reefs are beautiful. Iam so
pleased to see something living around
here,” he said.

Discourage

Diving and photographing the area
of Arawak Cay under construction,
Mr Hartley said workers attempted
to discourage him from investigating
whether the turbidity control mea-
sures were doing their job.

According to Mr Hartley, the skirts
attached to the floats did not connect
with the sea bed, and thus would not
prevent silt escaping underneath.

Mr Hartley said he was a leading
figure agitating against Atlantis’ pro-
posed development of a golf course
on Athol Island.

He operated a tour called Hartley’s
Undersea Walk, which took guests on
a stroll along the seafloor just off the

southeastern coast of the island, which
was in danger of being destroyed by
the development.

Mr Hartley said rare, thriving reefs
off the coast of New Providence could
be affected if ocean currents pull silt
toward that area.

“We took observation pictures
along the barrier reef of Cable Beach,
and I was pleased to see amazing life.
In fact, a kind of coral which is endan-
gered as well as sensitive to destruc-
tion. I have not seen such coral in
abundance since I was a child,” said
Mr Hartley.

Mr Deveaux said his ministry and
the BEST Commission are working
closely with Boskalis, the company
extending Arawak Cay, to mitigate
the environmental impact.

Questions were also raised about
numbers spray painted on the casau-
rina trees lining Saunders Beach, pos-
sibly indicating their inevitable
removal.

Mr Weech said some of the trees
will be removed when the Govern-
ment redevelops that area as part of
its road improvement programme.
However, he said they should have
never been spray painted.

“Some trees will be removed as a
part of the redevelopment of the
beach area by the Ministry of Works,
where the corridors would connect
into West Bay Street,” Mr Weech said.
“But there is no intention to take the
trees.”

TREEMONISHA

Oram ee

‘ey \ i uty

On the Occasion of

The 36 Anniversary of Independence

site ber

j
Wihherit
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GL Ab ard

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Directed by: Dr, Lieweland AL William
Settee tn

The Dundas Centre For The Performing Arts
July 6, 7, 8, 11, 2009 at 8:00 PM

394~7179 | 393~3728

T; 242.328,7115 theough 9

Firm’s assets under
administration up

140% to $405-$410m

FROM page 1B



tions,” Mr Kerr told Tribune Business. “We’ve had a very positive response from
the business community. That is evidenced by the fact some people have joined us
from the get go, and we still have those clients. It has been pretty good. We’ve
acquired business on top of what we had with SG.”

Providence Advisors was now hoping the implementation of its new IT platform,
which had almost entirely replaced its legacy systems, would enhance operating effi-
ciencies. The company aimed to “be able to deliver on these changes in the next
quarter”.

Mr Kerr said the new IT system provided Providence Advisors with integrated
client accounting, portfolio accounting and portfolio management, enhancing the
company’s “ability to capture data and send it on”.

And he added: “We’re also looking on the investment side to create diversity and
options in terms of what we offer on the funds menu through a family of funds.”

Mr Kerr said Providence Advisors’ business had grown from $170 million when
it split from SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) three years ago to about
$405-$410 million currently. By having an established book of business, largely
through the hotel industry pension funds, the company’s development was “much
further on than if we had started from scratch”.

Mr Kerr said Providence Advisors, which employs 14 full-time staff, had seen the
effects of the economic slowdown in terms of new business flows, but felt it would
benefit in the future from the Government’s planned reforms to pensions in the
Bahamas. That effort is being overseen by the Government-appointed Private Pen-
sions Task Force.

While the company would eventually look to expand through specialist services
to institutional clients, Mr Kerr said it was “not effective to do that” at the
moment.

“Our core business remains pension administration and asset management,” Mr
Kerr said, “and select corporate advisory. We are not going out to be everything
to everyone.”

Brand building, and increasing awareness of Providence Advisors and the ser-
vices it provided, was a key goal for the company in its fourth year, said Mr Kerr.

“Tdeally Pd like to see us be further ahead,” he added, acknowledging that the
company had already accomplished much.

“We have a lot of work to do,” Mr Kerr told Tribune Business. “We’re not rest-
ing on our laurels. We have to add value, not only to our clients but for our
shareholders. We’re going to be very methodical and deliberate.”

Thank you for your
trust & support -
as we continue to provide

Results with Integrity.

PROVIDENCE
ADVISORS

Results with Integrity.

PENSIONS = INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT = CORPORATE SERVICES

Geedman's Bay Corporate Contre | Weal Bay Street | Maiseu, The Bahamas
Integiprovidenceadvisers.net | wee, providenceadvisors net





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 3B



LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



Three-month delay to
owntown Bay’s paving

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribune media.net

TRIBUNE BUSINESS has
learned that the Ministry of
Works been forced to delay the
paving of downtown Bay Street
for three months, after it was
found that major work needs to
be done by the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation (WSC).

Only last week, Minister of
Works, Neko Grant, assured
this paper that Bay Street would
be paved.

But he said yesterday: “It



Neko Grant

is consid-
erable
work to be
done by
Water and
|Sewer-
| age.”
Minister
of state for
the envi-
ronment,
who has
responsi-
bility for
Water and
Sewerage,
Phenton

put off because of the Corpora-
tion’s maintenance.
According to Mr Grant,
Water and Sewerage also needs
to do major repair work to its
infrastructure on Shirley Street
before paving can commence.

Paving

When asked when it was dis-
covered that Water and Sewer-
age’s infrastructure mainte-
nance would delay the paving,
Mr Grant said it was of no con-
sequence.

initiatuve to beautify the main
northern corridor before the
Miss Universe beauty pageant
in August.

Now, the downtown area, in
much need of paving after crews
from several government utili-
ties tore into it recently, will be
the only part of a strip extend-
ing from Caves village to the
bridge to Paradise Island with-
out fresh asphalt.

“We wanted to provide a sen-
sible ride for Miss Universe, but
Miss Universe will come and go
and we need to provide proper
infrastructure for people who

would make no sense to pave
the main Bay Street when there

Neymour, said he was not
aware that the paving was to be

will traverse these roads on an

The major paving programme \ \
annual basis,” said Mr Grant.

was undertaken as part of an

Almost 20% of commercial loans in default

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Almost one in five (20 per cent) of loans to
Bahamian businesses by commercial banks
were in default at end-May 2009, a Central
Bank of the Bahamas report released yester-
day finding that total non-performing loans
rose to 76.7 per cent or $468.2 million. This fig-
ure increased by 4 per cent or $18.2 million in
May.

The Central Bank’s report on monthly eco-
nomic developments for May not unexpect-
edly revealed a continued deterioration in
asset and loan portfolio quality in the Bahami-
an commercial banking sector, with this
nation’s economic recovery “delayed until the
latter half of 2010”.

The total number of loans in arrears by at
least one month increased by $6.1 million or
0.7 per cent in May, reaching a total of $847.3
million. Total loans in arrears increased to
13.98 per cent as a percentage of total loans,
although the proportion of delinquent loans -
those between 31 to 90 days past due -
declined by $12 million or 3.73 per cent to
$373.3 million.

The Central Bank said: “The increase in
the arrears rate was attributed to a worsening
in the consumer loans and residential mort-
gages portfolios, by 58 basis points and 2
basis points, to 12.45 per cent and 13 per cent,
respectively.

“In contrast, the commercial arrears rate
receded to 19.83 per cent in May, from 20.61
per cent in April. In response to these devel-
opments, banks augmented loan loss provi-

BSI TRUST CORPORATION (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

sions by $3 million, boosting the ratio of pro-
visions to total arrears by 18 basis points to
23.44 per cent.

“This corresponded to new loan provisions
of $10 million, partly offset by a $6.9 million
net write-off against loans provisioned for
earlier. However, as the growth in non-per-
forming loans outpaced the increase in provi-
sions, the ratio of total provisions to non-per-
forming loans fell by 5 basis points to 42.43 per
cent.”

And looking at the prospects for the
Bahamian economy as a whole, the Central
Bank added: “The Bahamian economy is
expected to remain weak over the remainder
of the year, with the prospects of a recovery
delayed until the latter half of 2010, lagging the
anticipated turnaround in the US economy.

“In the short-term, the downturn in
stopover arrivals, coupled with discounted
hotel room pricing, should pose ongoing con-
straints on tourism output. Lingering tight-
ness in global credit markets should further
constrain foreign investments and conse-
quently construction activity, notwithstand-
ing steadied support from equity financed
projects and a continued, but moderated, pace
of domestic investments. Under these condi-
tions, a further rise in the unemployment rate
is likely before any stabilisation is secured.”

The Central Bank said that while increases
in global oil prices could pressure the
Bahamas’ current account, the reduction in
import demand and the Government’s for-
eign currency borrowings were expected to
maintain foreign exchange reserves at healthy
levels. Banking sector liquidity, too, was

is presently accepting applications for

TRUST OFFICER

The successful candidate for the position of Trust Officer must have extensive

experience with all aspects of trust administration.

Personal qualities:

Excellent organizational, communicabon and computer skills

Positive attitude and outlook
Problem-sotving skills

Commitment to quality and service excellence

Ability to partner with team members.

Responsibilities:

Advise and support the business on trust related matters

Administer a group of Trusts, Foundations & Companies pursuant to respective

governing documents, regulations and internal policies
Oversee a group of complex chent relationships

Review all governing documents of Trusts, Foundations & Companies for legal

compliance and adherence to internal policies
Liaise with Relationshio Managers, Financial Planners and Clients
Report directly to tha Head of Trust

expected to be good as a result of the slow-
down in credit demand, the main issues being
asset quality and the difficulties Bahamians
were having in meeting debt servicing costs.

There was some good news on inflation,
which slowed to a 1.8 per cent rate for the 12
months to May 2009, compared to 4.9 per
cent for the same period last year.

“The Government’s budgetary operations
for the first 10 months of fiscal year 2009-
2009 resulted in a widening in the estimated
deficit to $219.7 million from $77.7 million in
2007-2008,” the Central Bank said.

“An 11 per cent decrease in tax collections
led to a 5.8 per cent reduction in total receipts,
while total expenditure firmed by 5.8 per cent.
Disaggregated data showed a 7 per cent
advance in current spending, mainly reflecting
increased outlays on consumption, as gains
were recorded for purchases of goods and
services (11.5 per cent), personal emoluments
(4.6 per cent) and other contractual services
(23.3 per cent).

“Although capital expenditures were
reduced by 6.8 per cent, investments in infra-
structural works rose by 9.4 per cent. The
slump in tax receipts was led by a 12.5 per
cent reduction in taxes on international trade
and transactions, which comprised over 50
per cent of the total.

“Significant declines were also noted for
taxes on financial and other transactions (24.3
per cent), departure taxes (15.4 per cent), and
‘other’ uncategorised taxes (32.9 per cent).
In contrast, non-tax receipts rose by 52.7 per
cent, mainly owing to a hike in dividend
receipts from public corporations.”

Ao ecmerin me ntk

stocks reeling

NEW YORK



The stock market found little to celebrate heading into the long
holiday weekend, according to Associated Press.

Major stock indexes fell more than 2.6 percent Thursday, push-
ing the Dow Jones industrials to their lowest level in six weeks, after
the government said the unemployment rate hit a 26-year high
and employers cut far more jobs than expected.

The data was especially disappointing since it broke a trend of
four straight months of improvement in job losses. The report —
one of the most closely watched gauges of the economy's health —
delivered the latest blow to the market's already waning confi-
dence.

Investor optimism has been shaken in recent weeks amid a bar-
rage of mixed economic reports, making for an erratic market.

This past week was no exception. Stocks rose Monday, then
erased nearly all their gains the following day after a report show-
ing an unexpected drop in consumer confidence.

On Wednesday the market bounced back after getting some
reassuring data on manufacturing and housing, only to tumble
again on Thursday on the disappointing jobs report.

"There's not a lot of conviction on either side," said Jill Evans, co-
portfolio manager of the Alpine Dynamic Dividend Fund.

The Dow Jones industrials lost 223.32, or 2.6 percent, to 8,280.74,
the lowest close since May 22. It was the average's worst day since
April 20.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index fell 26.91, or 2.9 percent, to
896.42 and the Nasdaq composite index fell 49.20, or 2.7 percent, to
1,796.52.

Trading on the New York Stock Exchange was extended until
4:15 p.m. Eastern time in order to execute customer orders impact-
ed by system irregularities, an NYSE spokeswoman said.

The stock market rallied furiously this spring off of 12-year lows
beginning in early March on hopes for a recovery, but the upward
momentum has stalled since mid-June as doubts grow about
whether the economy had really found a bottom.

Since hitting multi-month highs on June 12, the Dow has fallen
a total of 5.9 percent, while the S&P 500 index has lost 5.3 percent.

"There's more and more evidence mounting against this rally con-
tinuing,” said Doug De Groote, a managing director at United
Wealth Management. Consumers are likely to lead the nation out
of the ongoing recession, but that won't happen if more people are
losing their jobs, he said.

Stocks started the day down and stayed there after the Labor
Department reported that employers slashed 467,000 jobs in June,
far worse than the 363,000 that economists expected and a grim sig-
nal that the path to recovery will be bumpy. The unemployment
rate rose to 9.5 percent from 9.4 percent the month before.

Overseas markets also fell Thursday after a report showed unem-
ployment in Europe rose to a 10-year high in May.

As stock prices fell across the board, other signs of investor
unease emerged. Treasury prices rose, driving the yield on the 10-
year note down to 3.50 percent from 3.54 percent late Wednesday.

Meanwhile a gauge of volatility in the stock market, the Chica-
go Board Options Exchange Volatility Index, or VIX, jumped
1.73, or 6.6 percent, to 27.95 Thursday afternoon.

Declining issues outnumbered advancers by about 5 to 1 on the
New York Stock Exchange.

Consolidated volume came to a relatively low 3.56 billion shares
ahead of the holiday weekend, compared with 4 billion shares
traded a day earlier. Light volume can lead to more volatile swings
in trading.

Markets will be closed Friday in observance of the Indepen-
dence Day holiday.

For the week, the Dow finished down 1.9 percent; the S&P 500
lost 2.5 percent; and the Nasdaq fell 2.3 percent.

INdIGO

TW OR K §S

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Nortel PBK and Key System Technician

IndiGO Networks is a growing telecommunications company based in Nassau,

Bahamas. Systems Resource Group (SRG), IndiGO’s parent company, has a 20-
year history in offering innovative technology and telecommunications solutions
to consumers in The Bahamas.

IndiGO Networks is seeking to fill a senior position in its Technical Services
department for an experienced Telecommunications and Networking engineer

Responsibilities

¢ The individual will be responsible for the installation, maintenance and support
of Nortel key and PBX systems located primarily in New Providence with
travel to the Family Islands as necessary
Nortel and/or Mitel PBX Certification would be an advantage

Ability to meet with Customers in a Sales Capacity

an advantage

Experience with VoIP PBX systems, Cisco switching and routing would be

Ensure service standards for quality and responsiveness are met

practices

Maintain confidentiality relative to customer accounts and organizational

¢ Ability to work with minimum supervision

Qualifications

¢ Ability to perform analysis, recommendations, and Implementation to Customer’s
Voice and Data Networks.
In depth Design, Pro: ing, Implementation, Maintenance of Nortel Norstar,
BCM, Meridian Option 11C and 81C systems. Knowledge of ESN is essential
Programming and Installation of T1’s and PRI’s
Knowledge of PBX Inter-Networking and VOIP Integration
Routing, Trunking, QOS, and VLAN experience as it relates to the Integration
of Voice and Data Networks
Excellent customer service skills
Excellent oral and written communications skills
Ability to work in a fast-paced environment
Strong problem-solving and decision-making skills

The candidate must have thorough knowledge of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as intamational practices as they relate to the Trust
Industry:

Candidate should possess the TEP designation; bachelors degree:

Minimum of 3-5 years working experience in the trust field, Preference will be
given to professionals who have expenenced working in a Swiss Bank or Trust;
Knowledge of the system Viewpoint will be considered a a plus

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/cumculum vitae A competitive salary commensurate with experience is offered along with product
to: training, medical, pension and car allowance after a qualifying period.

Human Resources Manager

BSI Trust Corporation (Bahamas) Limited
Bayside Executive Park

P. 0. Box CB-10976

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) §02 2310 or email: ruby. kerni@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.

Interested candidates should submit their résumés in writing to:

Attn.: Technical Services Manager,
IndiGO Networks,
P.O. Box N-3920,
Nassau, Bahamas
Or
Fax: 242-677-1050
E-mail: hr @indigonetworks.com





PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE

OF
EMERY MANAGEMENT LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 22nd day of May, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial Cen-
tre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas
has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

UNUSUAL INVESTMENTS LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) UNUSUAL INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 02â„¢
July 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Serene Lim of 1 Raffles
Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 02" day of July A. D. 2009



Ms. Serene Lim
Liquidator

=
KS

Pd

Colinalmperial

To Our Valued Clients

Please note that all offices of
Colinalmperial will be CLOSED on
Friday 3 July 2009
for the company’s
Annual Employee Fun Day.

Our Pay Station at 21 Collins Avenue will
offer extended weekend hours on
Saturday 4 July from 8:30am to 4pm
for your convenience.

Thank you.

aN
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dewolopmgint Comgany

PRICE INQUIRY

PL-110 Generators

Nassau Airport Develooment Company (MAD) pleased to
aingunce the release of Pl-110 Generalars for fhe Lynden
Findling inemational Airport Expansion Project

The purchase inquiry incdudes

Supply of two (2) 1600 KMWEOO0 KYA, 2780 VAG new
factory assembled molor generator sets complete with
NEMA SR endesure and day tank
Commisioning and Site Acceptance Tests tollawing
rétaliaton by NAD's Contractor, and

* § year or 1500 operating hours warranby

The Pl-110 Document wil be available for pick up after
1:00pm, Tuesday June 23rd, 2009. Please contact
Traci Grisby to regisler at the MAD Project office.

Contact Titec Grabs

(Contract & Procurement Manager

LFLA Eepaacenn Project

Poh: (242) TOE-O0G6 | Fem: (242) STP
PO Bon AP SiG29, Massa Bahamas
Emal tac brehyiires bs



$43m in airport
work for locals

FROM page 1B

“T was very surprised that we
only got three bids submitted
on it. I thought we would get
six or seven bids, but only three
came in on time for this multi-
million dollar contract

“One bid came in late, and
was rejected because of it. Per-
sonally, I didn’t think any of the
local contractors would take on
the job themselves, but assumed
that they would want to be in
the mix together with someone
from overseas in a joint ven-
ture.”

Venturing

Mr Watson said Ledcor was
itself joint venturing with a
Bahamas-based construction
company on the US departures
terminal contract, and con-
firmed reports reaching Tribune
Business that the firm con-
cerned is Wooslee Dominion.

That company, headed by
Ashley Glinton, made the head-
lines in recent years because it
was selected under the former

PLP administration to construct
its planned $23 million Bay
Street Straw Market, a contract
subsequently cancelled by the
Ingraham administration.

When asked about concerns
that a large number of LPIA
contracts were going to Cana-
dian companies, especially ones
based in Vancouver, the home
city for NAD’s operating part-
ner, Vancouver Airport Ser-
vices (YVRAS), Mr Watson
indicated it was natural for the
company to go with contractors
it was “comfortable” with and
“knows well”.

Ledcor has also performed a
$100 million renovation to
YVRAS’s home airport in Van-
couver, much of NAD’s envi-
ronmental-related work is fun-
nelled through another Van-
couver-based firm, Patrick
Environmental.

“In the case of the contract
for Ledcor, they won it hands
down. There was no one close
to them,” Mr Watson told 7ri-
bune Business, indicating it was
the cheapest bid by far.

“We took the best bid, val-
ued it ourselves. All the com-

NOTICE

NAROO LID.

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the Ist day of July, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial Cen-
tre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas
has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator



NOTICE

OF

CHERRY PIE HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 25th day of May, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial Cen-
tre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas
has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

GROWING MULTI-MEDIA & TRANSPORTATION
COMPANY REQUIRES

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

Rapidly growing company is inviting applications for the
position of “Financial Controller’. Applicants should have
a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting and a CPA, ACCA, CA
qualification or any other qualification recognized by the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Successful candidate should:



have at least 4 years experience in an established

accounting firm

be able to work as a part of a team
be able to prepare budgets and financial reports

liaise with banking officers

be able to communicate effectively with all levels

of management

be proficient in meeting and keeping all deadlines
have proficient knowledge of QuickBooks

For a confidential interview please mail resume to:
c/o Financial Controller,
P O Box N 4271, Nassau, N. P., The Bahamas
or email financialcontrollerposition@yahoo.com

panies that bid were competent
to do the job, so in the final
analysis it came down to price.”

Pledging that NAD and the
Airport Authority would
release a full list of Bahamian
companies who had performed
work at LPIA since NAD took
over on April 1, 2007, the Air-
port Authority chairman said
he “really doesn’t understand”
Mr Wrinkle’s concerns.

He added that NAD still had
$43 million worth of construc-
tion contracts related to the US
departures terminal “to be let.
The majority of them are going
to Bahamians. That’s the whole
idea.

“We don’t give the general
contractor the whole package
turnkey and say that’s it.
There’s lots of work to be let
that’s not part of the general
contractor package.” Those
contracts are scheduled to be
released between now and Sep-
tember 2009.

Responsible

While the general contractor
would be responsible for the
overall building and project,
constructing the foundation and
exterior shell itself and super-
vising the work of sub-contrac-
tors, Mr Watson said included
in the $43 million worth of con-
tracts still to be issued was the
interior work, such as electrics
and plumbing.

Elsewhere, Mr Watson
pledged that NAD had aban-
doned the use of ‘incentive fees’
- one-time payments that
prospective retail tenants could
offer it to induce the airport
operator to accept its bid to run
a concession at LPIA at the
expense of rivals.

The fee’s use and inclusion
in previous concession tenders
had sparked consternation
among Bahamian small busi-
nesses and entrepreneurs, who
saw it as favouring their larger
counterparts.

But Mr Watson said yester-
day: “My understanding from
YVRAS in Canada is that this is
an option which most airports

use, but we have determined
the of fees raised from that
source doesn’t justify the per-
ception it creates - that it’s
favouring those with money.

“They’re not going to do that.
There’ll be no incentive fee in
the package.” Mr Watson
understood that incentive fees
had come into play in “only a
couple of cases”, namely the
“lucrative” coffee shop contract
won by Dunkin Donuts, the
franchise operated by George
Myers’ group, and the gas sta-
tion contract that went to
FOCOL/SShell.

On NAD’s proposed landing
fee increases and other raised
charges, Mr Watson said that
as part of the consultative
process it had to “make the
case” to the airlines that the
increases were necessary. Then,
once the airlines were satisfied,
the final say would rest with the
Airport Authority, with a deci-
sion likely to be taken in Octo-
ber/November 2009.

“Those rates were very low
to start with, and they would-
n’t have a dramatic impact on
the cost of airline operations,”
Mr Watson said of the proposed
increases. “It’s part of the finan-
cial package agreed with the
consortium of banks, and will
only be implemented if NAD
satisfies the airlines.

“One has to satisfy the banks
that we’re doing all the things
we say we planned to do. We
have to finance the airport, but
not at the cost of putting the
airlines out of business. We
have to strike a balance.”

Mr Watson said the financial
projections for NAD and the
Airport Authority, including
achieving the goal of making
LPIA profitable within five
years of YVRAS’s takeover,
depended on tourist and pas-
senger arrivals recovering by
end-2009 or early 2010.

If that did not happen, he
warned it was “going to be a
struggle” to keep in line with
financial projections.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

ANGLO-BAHAMIAN BANK LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that the winding up and dissolution

of Anglo-Bahamian Bank Limited has been completed in

accordance with the Ariicles of Dissolution and the
Company fas been removed from the Register of

Companies on the 5” Day of June, 2009.

Paul F, Clarke
Liquictator

I Ca evel

Security Officers

Kelly's is seeking mature, reliable, honest
and hardworking individuals to fill the
position of Security Officer.

Prospective candidates must be available to

work evening shifts. Past security experience

would be an asset. This position is ideal for
retired police or prison officers.

We offer excellent pay, benefits
and working conditions.

Interested persons may collect an application
form from the Customer Service counter at
Kelly's House & Home, Mall at Marathon.

No phone calls please

's Houses — monFri-8:00am- 8:00pm
Home set-8:00am- 9:00pm





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 5B



3m overtime savings ‘negate’ airport fee rise

FROM page 1B

finance its transformation into a
world-class facility.

With January 1, 2010, sched-
uled to be the date when the
overtime fee elimination took
effect, Mr Comito told Tribune
Business: “The same time this
kicks in, for a number of air-
lines this will more than negate
the landing fee increase.”

He added: “While any fee
increase at the airport is not
something we’d [the hotel
industry] like to see, we under-
stand the necessity, and have
been working on several fronts
to reduce the costs of operation
for the airlines.

“Specifically, in the Budget
that’s just been passed, the Gov-
ernment did something we’ve
been advocating for a number
of years, which is to eliminate
the Customs and Immigration
overtime charges that get
charged back to the airlines.
That will be $3 million in annu-
al savings.”

Mr Comito said “most air-
lines” had been impacted in

past years by having to pay Cus-
toms/Immigration overtime
charges, which in turn were
passed on to passengers through
increased ticket prices. This
increased the cost of air travel
to the Bahamas (the access cost
for visitors), negatively impact-
ing airlift and the tourism indus-
try. Elsewhere, the BHA vice-
president acknowledged that
there were “concerns about the
high cost of ground handling
fees which some airlines face”.
He said this was “not just Nas-
sau Flight Services”, as some
airlines had their own ground
handling services, adding that
“efforts are being made to
reduce” a whole variety of costs
faced by airlines that operate
at LPIA.

NAD is proposing to increase
landing fees for all airlines at
LPIA by 23.6 per cent from
January 1, 2010, onwards, with a
6.1 per cent increase in terminal
fees, aircraft loading bridge fees
and aircraft parking fees.

For one Bahamas-owned air-
line, this translates into an
added $13 on the $51 landing

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that We, MICHAEL MOSS and
KEVA TARZA DAMES-MOSS of the Island of New Providence,
intend to change our daughter's name from K’7DYNCE JULIA
HOLBERT to K’DYNCE JULIA MOSS. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CLAUDE VASQUEZ of
TWYNAM AVENUE, P.O. Box N-7504, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 26 day of June, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

fee for their 19-seater aircraft.
But NAD argued that the fees
are necessary to maintain its
“financial covenants”, but said
LPIA’s rates after the increases
remain competitive and less
than the Caribbean average.

The airport operating com-
pany had conducted a bench-
marking exercise to show this,
based on a Boeing 737 700 with
a passenger load factor of 75
per cent (102 passengers) and
90-minute turnaround time that
included use of a jet bridge for
fuel loading.

“Excluding government tax-
es, LPIA’s costs are currently
$29.58, and with the recom-
mended increase become $30.03
per passenger, an increase of
1.5 per cent. The average cost of
the Caribbean airports present-
ed in the graph, excluding
LPIA, is $35.39 per passenger.
LPIA’s recommended rates are
very competitive at $5.36 or 15
per cent less than the Caribbean
average,” NAD said.

Mr Comito said the landing
fee increase translated into just
a $0.50 per passenger increase,
and added: “This is only the sec-
ond increase in landing fees
since 1993. The reality is there
are costs associated with build-
ing and operating a new airport,
and the fact is that the new fees
are lower than most airports in

south Florida and _ the
Caribbean.

“No one likes to see an
increase, but we want to have
an airport that is modern, effi-
cient and that showcases the
country in the best possible
light. While a 23 per cent
increase on the surface does not
look good, it’s only 50 cents per
passenger.”

When asked whether the fee
increases might impact LPIA’s
attractiveness as a destination
to both existing and potential
new airline services, Mr Comito
replied: “As long as we show
we’re working, in good faith to
reduce costs and improve the
experience of passengers as well
as the airlines, with more effi-
cient airport operations and a
better environment, then we’re
in safe territory.

“There’s efforts underway to
help reduce costs. The Ministry
of Tourism and the Promotions
Boards have targeted efforts
underway with some of the air-
lines to help increase their
yields.”

If the fee increases, which
combine the 2010 and deferred
2009 rises, do not take place,
NAD said it risked breaching
its banking covenants for the
$265 million redevelopment
financing.

“In accordance with its

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TYREE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that on 4th day of June
2009,the above-named Company has rescinded
its intention to wind-up and dissolve.

Date the 1st day of July, 2009

financing obligations ,the Nas-
sau Airport Development Com-
pany must maintain a debt ser-
vice coverage ratio (DSCR) of
not less than 1.3 to 1. The aver-
age DSCR ratio for the 10 year
period of 2011 to 2020 is cur-
rently projected at 1.48 to 1,”
NAD said.

“The financial model includes
the proposed fees and charges
increases, in addition to increas-
es planned for 2011, 2012 and
2013, followed by annual con-
sumer price index [inflation]
type increases.

*The proposed fees and
charges increases include the
deferred 2009 rate increases
adjusted by the planned 2010
rate increase. More specifically,
the deferred increases planned
for 2009, which were to be 20
per cent for landing fees and 3
per cent for the other fees, must

be applied prior to the 2010 rate
increase of 3 per cent. Thus in
determining the proposed rate
increase, the 2009 rate increase
is multiplied by the 2010 rate
increase and the result is added
to the 2010 rate increase.”

Asked earlier this week about
the overtime charges’ negative
impact on airlift into New Prov-
idence and other Bahamian des-
tinations, Robert Sands, the
Bahamas Hotel Association’s
(BHA) president, said: “When
you see an air fare costing ‘x’
dollars, and taxes and levies are
double that amount or a signif-
icant part of it, it makes the cost
of air travel to the Bahamas
extremely expensive.

“And when you have com-
peting destinations that can be
accessed at lower air fare costs,
it puts us in a very negative
competitive position.”

NOTICE
PISTON INVESTMENT
MANAGEMENT INC.

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, PISTON INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT
INC., has been dissolved and struck off the Register
according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued
by the Registrar General on the 22"! of June, A.D.,
2009.

Dated the 29" day of June A.D., 2009

A.J.K. Corporate Services (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator



HALSBURY

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

TUNE UP

SPECIAL



SERVICE:

Oil

-Oil Filter
Air Filter
-Fuel Filter
~Spark Plug s

(parts not included)

We also import parts for any
make and model vehicle with an
Impressive turn-around.
Come in and see Us today!

College Avenue,
Oakes Field

Tel; 3235835/3235436

PA
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dewolopmgmt Company



INGRAHAM’s
AUTO ELECTRICAL
SUPPLIES CO. LTD.

Other Services Includes:
* Auto Body Repairs
*Diagnostics Test
*Mechanical Repairs
*Brakes, CGV Joints Replacement
*Head Jobs
*Engine Overhaul
*Electrical Repairs
*Repair & Rebuild Starters
*Rebuild & Repair Wire Harness
*Repair & Install Window Motors
*Repair Lights & Switches

Monday—Friday 8am-5pm
Saturday 8am- 1pm



Tender

C118 Medium Voltage Sedteh House and Duct Bank

Museau Aiport Developmer! Company (MAD i pleased Io

anmounoe the manne of

Tender S118 Medium Voltage Seatch

House and Duel Back for Sege 1 of the Lyeden Finding
nkematonal Apart Expansion

The scope of work incdude

5
=

* Construction of a new modem voltage (71k swiich house tor

HEG and MAL santeh 3

nat: Building 8 apprcamalely MH) SF,

8 inch block walls, alemmnem haedrads, and o standing seam

Metal roa

Corl works including ap
behing. duct iestalatc
backfill, compaction, cu
vole duct bank

oramately 1500 LP of eecemaion:
On, Supply and anslallabion of manholes
fing and patching for a new medium

= Purchase and installation of NAD Switchgear

nlerested Bidders muel be licensed and aporoved by fhe Bahamas

Biecine Comporalion in par

The € 118 Tender Roque

form maecium woltage (1 Tew] work

ents wil be awaiatte tor pick up alter

1900 pm, Tuesday June 16th, 2009 Abate meen wl
be held at 10°00 am, Thursday Jume 28th, 2008 Please

Gonlael Traci Breby ta regeter af the MAD! Project office

Contact: TRAC! BRISRY

Contracts and Procurement Manager
LPIA Expamcenn Prnqent

Ph: (242) FOE-O0GE | Fam: (242) STP
PO. Boo AP Soe, Messau, Bahamas
Email traci brshyiiires bs

UBS TRUSTEES (BAHAMAS) LTD.

CHAMBERS

Counsel and Attarnevs-at-Law
Notaries Public



















Registered Agent
for the above-named Company



Will be closed
Legal Notice

Oye (OD .

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT Friday, 3rd July, 2009
(No.45 of 2000)

RYECROFT LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 of the International Business Companies
Act No. 45 of 2000, RYECROFT LIMITED, has been
dissolved and struck off the Register according to
the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 10th day of June, 2009. =

Monday, 6th July, 2009

due to the observance of the Firm's

BVUe ee eek

The office will re-open

Cl Accountancy Limited,
of Boatside Business Centre,
Warden, Northumberland, NE46 4SH
Liquidator

We regret any inconvenience caused.



FG CAPITAL MARKET.
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERYIC-ES

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money ot Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 2 JULY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,577.79 | CHG 1.92 | %CHG 0.12 | YTD -134.57 | YTD % -7.86
FINDEX: CLOSE 788.02 | YTD -5.61% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW_.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

1.28 Abaco Markets 1.39 1.39 0.00 0.127

10.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992

6.94 Bank of Bahamas 6.94 6.94 0.00 0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00
10.18 Cable Bahamas 11.39 11.39 0.00
2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00
5.50 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 5.60 5.64 0.04
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.21 3.11 -0.10
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 1.77 1.77 0.00
7.50 Famguard 7.76 7.76 0.00
10.00 Finco 10.90 10.90 0.00
10.35 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.38 10.38 0.00
4.95 Focol (S) 5.09 5.09 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.00
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00
10.40 J. S. Johnson 10.40 10.40 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Last Sale Daily Vol.
100.00 0.00 7%
100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
100.00 0.00 T%
Prime + 1.75%

S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Securi
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series ©) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.60
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3787 1.87 4.83
2.8988 -1.40 -3.35
1.4750 2.88 5.74
3.1821 6.01 -13.90
12.9209 2.40 5.79
100.5448 -0.02 0.54
93.1992 -3.33 -6.76
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2511 1.72 4.12
1.0578 2.13 5.78
1.0271 -0.57 2.71
1.0554 1.74 5.54
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
ASK §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany‘s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

52wk-Low Weekly Vol. EPS $

-0.041

Div $ P/E
0.300

0.000

0.001

0.480
0.000

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
1.3948 CFAL Money Market Fund
3.1821 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
12.2702 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3124

2.8988

31-May-09
31-May-09
26-Jun-09
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396—4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525



Full Text


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FILES


WEATHER
TRY OUR

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Mim blowin’ it

90F
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BBQ CHIPOTLE
SNACK WRAP

HIGH
LOW

The Tribune

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1





_intraducing Two Delightfully
peer ee CCM ULL



SISSY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

nar! faylor Killer
‘tid not act alone

Prosecution claim as
murder trial begins

By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
nmckenzie@
tribunemedia.net

THERE is evidence
to suggest that more
than one person was
involved in the death of
handbag designer Harl
Taylor, Director of
Public Prosecutions
Bernard Turner told a
court yesterday.

Mr Turner, who is the lead pros-
ecutor in the trial of 22-year-old
Troyniko McNeil, said in his open-
ing address that the Crown has
evidence against McNeil and
intends to prove he is responsible
for Mr Taylor’s death.

McNeil, the son of Mr Taylor’s
former business partner Troy
McNeil, is charged with inten-
tionally and unlawfully causing Mr
Taylor’s death between Saturday,
November 17, and Sunday
November 18, 2007, while being

Harl Taylor



concerned together
with another.

Mr Taylor, 37, was
found dead at Mount-
batten House, on West
Hill Street. He had sus-
tained between 42 to 50
injuries, Mr Turner told
the jury yesterday.

Mr Taylor’s mother,
Beverly Taylor, broke
into tears on the wit-
ness stand yesterday
when shown a photo of
her son’s body.

Mrs Taylor told the court she
knew Troyniko McNeil and his
father Troy who once resided at
Mountbatten House.

She recalled that on the morn-
ing of November 18, 2007, while
driving in the area of Government
House, she noticed that police had
cordoned off the entrance to West
Hill Street with yellow tape.

Mrs Taylor said she asked a
young man on the street what had
happened, and as a result of what

SEE page eight

BEC ‘is owed substantial amounts of money’

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

CHAIRMAN of the Bahamas Electricity Corporation Fred Gottlieb con-
firmed the Government-owned and run utility is owed “substantial”
amounts of money by various business people throughout the country,

including other government agencies.

And he pledged that the corporation is doing all it can to recoup the funds.

SEE page eight

ee ke
ee ee





US INDEPENDENCE



=i
ABRAHAM LINCOLN re-enactor Larry Elliot speaks from the podium yesterday at th



4



= AVEO

a
= = =
a

‘|

CGT

SEE PAGE ELEVEN

Immigration
chief calls for
information on
alleged abuse
of detainees

Officers ‘should
not fear reprisal’



US Embassy’s

Independence celebrations. The event, held at Liberty Overlook, also commemorated the life and legacy

of President Lincoln.

Doctors Hospital
officials slam BEC

over power outage

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

CHIEFS at Doctors Hospital
have slammed the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation for a lengthy
and “totally unacceptable” power
outage.

The hospital’s Vice President of
Operations, Michele Rassin said
BEC must act to “prevent a reoc-
currence” of Tuesday’s events -
which saw power cut off to numer-
ous buildings along a section of
Shirley Street, including Doctor’s
Hospital and The Tribune.

101 outpatients and 36 inpatients
were at the hospital at the time.

Yesterday, General Manager of
BEC Kevin Basden said the situa-
tion was “unavoidable” and
involved a faulty underground pow-
er cable in the Shirley Street area.

He said that once BEC was
informed by a customer it imme-
diately responded, and having
replaced a section of the cable had
power restored “within the hour.”

SEE page eight

PU eee melee Cred
Sorry No Debit cards accepted

Concerns
atm) ob
ATU IUTIUTI Cat

of two judges

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE appointment of two
Supreme Court judges has raised
concerns in the legal community
about their possible bias towards
the executive as both have served
the Attorney General.

A senior attorney has criti-
cised the “antiquated, non-trans-
parent” process which led to the
appointment of Bernard Turn-
er, director of public prosecu-
tions at the Attorney General’s
office, and attorney Rhonda
Bain, former director of legal
affairs for the Attorney General,
as Justices of the Supreme Court.

Lawyers only learned of the
appointment yesterday when it
was announced Mr Turner and
Ms Bain had been chosen by the
Judicial and Legal Service Com-

SEE page eight



GB businessman
Rick Hayward
back in business

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

GRAND Bahama businessman
Rick Hayward is back in business
and his 76 employees expected to
return to their jobs after the locks
were removed at his three busi-
nesses in the Port Lucaya market-
place.

Mr Hayward, the son of Sir Jack
Hayward, was locked out by Port
Group Limited for non-payment of
rent at his three restaurants — La
Dolce Vita, The Pub at Port
Lucaya, and East last Thursday.

He has not paid his rent for eight
months and owes $230,000.

Mr Hayward and his lawyer
Senator David Thompson met
Thursday with Grand Bahama
Port Authority president Ian Rolle,
who was able to persuade PGL
officials to rescind the lock-out and
enter into mediation with Mr Hay-
ward to resolve the matter.

“Twas so thrilled that President
Tan Rolle has persuaded his people

SEE page eight

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IMMIGRATION officers
with information relating to
alleged abuse or mistreat-
ment of detainees at the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre should come forward
so the claims can be investi-
gated, urged Immigration
Director Jack Thompson.

Mr Thompson said he has
an “open door policy"
adding that immigration offi-
cers should not fear reprisal
for coming forward.

He also said once any
claim of abuse or inhumane
treatment is made to his
department it will be investi-
gated and officers involved
may be placed on adminis-
trative leave pending the
results of the probe, sus-
pended, or charged before
the courts if necessary.

"We under no circum-
stances are prepared to con-
done wrongdoing, corrup-
tion. We made it very clear
to the staff that wherever we
find any trace of it we are
prepared to have it thor-
oughly investigated and if
evidence supports that you
are indeed guilty we'll deal
with you.

"We've made it clear - it's
not as if we've compromised
on it, we're not timid about
it, we're not sweeping it
under the carpet - we'll deal
with it but we need to have
the complaint. I need to have
the evidence, I need some-
thing to work with. .. and
we'll develop it and we'll
turn it over to the police,”
said Mr Thompson at a press
conference at the depart-
ment yesterday.

On Monday, The Tribune

SEE page eight

PLEASE NOTE:

DUE TO THE US
INDEPENDENCE
HOLIDAY, THERE
WILL BE NO

USA TODAY IN
TODAY'S TRIBUNE.





a Si

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Nurses Union given extended

Harhour Island
convenience

Store project ‘in
contravention of law’

A SENIOR government offi-
cial said she was “surprised” to
learn that the construction of a
convenience store on Harbour

Island was moving forward — as :

she had already made it clear
that the project is “tn contra-
vention of the law”.

Rena Glinton, undersecre-
tary in the Department of
Lands and Surveys, explained
that the building covenants for
the area, known as Triana

Shores, states that Block Three,

where the store is being con-
structed, is a strictly residential
area.

“You cannot put business
places in that area,” she said.

According to sources on the
island, permission for the store
was granted by the local coun-
cil, but Ms Glinton told The
Tribune that after she learned
of the project, she contacted

the council to inform them that :

their decision was not legal.

She questioned how the pro- :

ject could have been granted a
building permit under the cir-
cumstances.

The Tribune was unable to

contact members of the council }

or the island administrator
before press time last night.





























tatty Pan Squash

Sugar Snap Peas

DESPITE having formally
rejected the government’s last
health insurance offer, the
Bahamas Nurses Union has
been given an extended peri-
od to “reconsider” it, accord-
ing to health minister Hubert
Minnis.

Dr Minnis said he would
like “individuals to sit down
and look at the situation
that’s happening not only in
the Bahamas but globally” in
terms of the economy.

Stalemate

This after Wednesday’s
meeting between BNU rep-
resentatives and officials from
the Department of Labour
and the Public Hospitals
Authority resulted in another
stalemate between the par-
ties, with no resolution and
no new offers placed on the
table.

The meeting was the sec-
ond between the government
and the BNU about health

be $Butfalo Boz Patties

: 2 pack)

French Beans

sé.

$6
Snow Peas

Baby Zucchini

cQ-
$785

Sunburst Squash

insurance coverage for nurses
since the government’s pro-
posal was rejected more than
three weeks ago. It was
scheduled after BNU Presi-
dent Cleola Hamilton said
she would have to take the
government’s offer to her
membership.

Yesterday Dr Minnis said:
“They would still have the
time to consider our offer and
we have extended the time
frame for that after which
you’d have to start over
again.

“Hopefully they will accept
the offer. It’s only a tempo-
rary thing, a stop-gap until
one can come in with the
insurance plan on July 1, 2010
or hopefully before.”

Nurses say they desperate-
ly need health insurance
because their line of work
puts their health at risk.

However, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham told parlia-
ment during the 2009/2010
budget communication that

Ars
JS

$7

the government “simply can-
not afford” to pay for the
$10.5 million coverage this
year in light of a massive rev-
enue fall off precipitated by
the global economic crisis.

Action

Nurses took action, calling
in sick for almost two weeks
to protest the move.

Last week the government
offered to introduce their
health coverage on July 1,
2010 or earlier if possible,
provide three private rooms

at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital for them to be treated
in, and pay for treatment of
any work-related illnesses or
injuries.

BNU President Mrs Hamil-
ton said this “did not sit well”
with nurses and the union
officially rejected the pro-
posal, calling again for full
coverage — but the govern-
ment said it would not budge.

The union leader then left
the country to travel to South
Africa. Like Dr Minnis and
labour minister Dion Foulkes,
she did not attend Wednes-
day’s meeting.

period to ‘reconsider’ govt offer



Dr Hubert Minnis

CEREMONIAL DIVISIONS CEREMONY FOR DEFENCE FORCE 2009 RETIREES
i lima Ha BB |
2 ills

Bs 7
i a] |



THREE OF THE FOUR MARINES receiving their final salute at a ceremonial colours and march pass by the officers

and marines of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force.

AFTER serving their coun-
try for the past 25 years, four
marines of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force bid
farewell to their colleagues
and co-workers, as they begin
a new life outside the naval
establishment. Family mem-
bers and friends of Leading
Mechanics Hensel Rolle and
Anthony Francis, Leading
Seamen Stephen Bastian and
Gregory Farrington gathered
at the Coral Harbour Base for
aretirement ceremony. These
men were the recipients of a
ceremonial divisions by the
officers and marines of the
Defence Force.

This occasion was the cul-
mination of a series of events,
during which the four marines
were recognised for their valu-
able achievements.

This is the second such cer-
emony in which marines retir-
ing from the Defence Force

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CSS C ESET EERE SE CESS SEES SEER SEER REECE EEE EEE REECE SE OEE ES





RBDF PublictRelati



LIEUTENANT COMMANDER Franklyn Clarke (left) receiving a token of
appreciation from Lieutenant Commander Michael Simmons, Comman-
do Squadron Officer, RBDF.

are hosted to an official ‘bon
voyage.’

They were presented with
gifts and were treated to a cer-
emonial colours and march
pass by the officers and
marines.

Bringing remarks for the
occasion was Clyde Sawyer,
captain of the Coral Harbour
Base. He thanked the men
and their families for dedicat-
ing more than half of their
lives to the Defence Force and
wished them all the best in
their future plans.

The men all joined the

Defence Force as recruits on
July 2, 1984 as members of
New Entry 15. Within the
Defence Force, their career
paths led them to serve within
numerous departments.

At the end of their tenures,
Mr Francis was a serving
member of the base mainte-
nance team, Mr Rolle was
employed in the electrical sec-
tion of the engineering depart-
ment, Mr Farrington was
attached to the supply depart-
ment and Mr Bastian was a
member of the Commando
Squadron Department.



LEADING MECHANIC ANTHONY FRANCIS as he receives a gift as a
token of appreciation from Captain Clyde Sawyer.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News
Editorial/Letters. ..........
Sports

BUSINESS SECTION
Business

Bilbao Oree

Boece ten eeaec atte ence tetera P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS





0 In brief

questioned in
connection with
Bimini homicide

POLICE in Bimini are
questioning a Nassau resi-
dent in connection with
Wednesday’s homicide on
that island.

Superintendent
Elsworth Moss said police
on Bimini are questioning
a 28-year-old man from
New Providence regarding
the murder of 27-year-old
Vermon Rolle.

Mr Moss said it is possi-
ble that the suspect could
be arraigned on related

charges as early as Mon-
day.

Rolle was stabbed to death
during an altercation with
another man around
5.35pm on Wednesday.

The victim was stabbed
in the stomach outside of
Sue and Joy's Variety
Store in Alice Town, Bimi-
ni. He was taken to hospi-
tal by private vehicle,
where he later died,
becoming the country’s
38th murder victim for the
year.

Police said the suspect
was taken into custody a
short time after the fatal
stabbing.

council plans
community
outreach

THE National Council
of Older Persons is plan-
ning a series of community
outreach programmes and
fundraising events.

By facilitating the needs
and well-being of older
persons, the council wants
to reverse the perception
of aging as an image of
dependence, vulnerability
and inactivity, to one of
celebration of knowledge
and wisdom, council advo-
cate Charles Sawyer said.

The council seeks to give
older persons a voice, he
said, as "many of them
who are retired are moved
into government care facil-
ities, and are neglected by
their families.”

“They are in urgent
need of supplies, medica-
tion, counselling, and the
Council’s protection,” he
said.

The council follows
guidelines developed by
the International Plan of
Action on Aging,
endorsed by the United
Nations General Assembly
in 1982, and adopted by
the World Assembly on
Aging in Vienna, Austria.

UN statistics show that
by the year 2025, one in
eight persons in develop-
ing nations will have
reached the age 60 years.

Aging impacts national
development policies from
family planning to eco-
nomic growth.

Mr Sawyer underscored
the ability of older persons
to contribute economically
and socially to the success
of a nation.

“They could earn a liv-
ing and remain indepen-
dent for as long as possi-
ble, which affects the per-
sonal growth of the entire
population,” he said.

Fidelity Bank ATMs
accepting all local
and international
visa caris

THE Bahamas has joined
the existing nationwide VISA
and VISA PLUS ATM net-
work, and both residents and
tourists now have an even
wider selection of ATMs to
withdraw their funds from.

Locally and internationally
issued VISA and VISA
PLUS cards are now accept-
ed at all Fidelity Bank ATMs
located in Nassau, Freeport
and Abaco.

Pictured is Rotara Lewis
using her VISA card in one
of Fidelity Bank’s automat-
ed, voice enabled ATMs.

Nassau resident

According to reports, Mr

Older persons:

BEC considers increasing
its rates to offset costs

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

MEMBERS of the public
may face heftier electricity
bills in the near future as
the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation is considering
increasing its rates to offset
the cost of producing and

supplying electricity to the
country.

Noting that BEC is
unable to break even with
the current electricity rate,
chairman Fred Gottlieb said
the problem stems back to
2003 when the PLP decid-
ed to lower rates, causing
the corporation — which at
that time was profitable —

to fall into the red, where it
has been ever since.

Profitable

“Consultants who were
employed by BEC approxi-
mately two years ago rec-
ommended a new tariff rate
structure which would allow

Le ea HU IN as vii a MI

r

Felipé Major/Tribune staff:

st

aw
es

A HEARSE at the scene near to where the body was discovered.

TWO Department of Environmental
Health workers made a gruesome
discovery yesterday in the bushes off Skyline

Drive.

They were reportedly cleaning a street
around 10am when they noticed a foul smell,
which them to a badly decomposed body in

the bushes.

Up to press time, police could not say how
long the man's body had been in the bushes, or
what his age or name might be.

But based on the advanced stage of decom-
position, it is suspected the body may have

been there for a few days.



was found.

It is believed that the man was homeless and
lived in the makeshift shelter where his body

A mattress and a blanket were also found

in the area.

Police yesterday said they did not suspect
foul play and are treating the incident as a case

of sudden death.

"We don't know who he is. .
anything at this stage to suggest foul play,"

. we don't have

said Central Detective Unit Superintendent

tion.

Elsworth Moss, who added that the case was
being handled by the Cable Beach police sta-

Disagreement over status of
vessel collision investigation

THE Port Department and
the part owner of a local mail-
boat involved in an early morn-
ing collision are at odds over
the status of the agency’s inves-
tigation into the June incident.

Deputy Commander at the
department, Collimae Fergu-
son, yesterday said no one was
injured in the incident, which
involved the vessels ‘Grand-
master’ and ‘Captain C’, but
that inquiries continue.

She declined to offer further
comment on the matter, stating
that when the investigation is
completed, the findings will be
forwarded to the minister of
national security, who can
choose whether or not to
release the information.

However, Lenneth Brozozog,





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a principal shareholder in the
Grandmaster Shipping Compa-
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department’s investigation is
“over and done with”.

“They’ve come to their own
conclusion,” he stated, describ-
ing the incident as “not news-
worthy.”

It is understood that neither
vessel suffered major damage
during the collision, which took
place some time after midnight
on June 18.

The late night collision was
not the first of its kind in
Bahamian maritime history.

In 2000, the Grandmaster
helped to rescue about 80 Hait-
ian migrants after it hit and
overturned a sloop in the east

Gélebrate 56 years of

ndependence

central Bahamas.

Meanwhile, in 2008 the gov-
ernment made an ex gratia pay-
ment of $1 million to the sur-
vivors and relatives of those
killed in the tragic 2003 colli-
sion between the United Star
and Seahauler mailboats.

Twenty five people were
injured and four people died in
the incident which occurred
when the Sea Hauler struck the
United Star while en route to
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BEC to function on a prof-
itable basis. But in these
present economic times,
obviously the government
has to look closely at what is
in the best interest of not
only BEC, but what is in the
best interest of the Bahamas
as a whole in terms of the
economy and the effect any
increase in rates would have
on the populace,” Mr Got-
tlieb said.

While the government
wrestles with this delicate
balancing act, Mr Gottlieb
said that from the perspec-
tive of BEC the proposed
rate increases are advisable.

He added that in the
meantime, the corporation
will do everything it can to
generate power as efficient-
ly as possible.

Opting to not disclose the
size of the proposed rate
increases, Mr Gottlieb
added that persons at the
lower end of the electricity
usage scale would not nec-
essarily be affected.

Onles bE

“Because it is a percent-
age it is relatively a low
increase percentage wise.
But of course that has the
effect of translating into
quite a lot of additional rev-
enue.

Consumer

“T know that sounds a lit-
tle inconsistent, but for the
individual consumer the
increase rate would not be
that great. But of course one
has to bear in mind, that for
somebody at the very lower
end of the economic scale,
any increase can have a dev-
aStating effect.

“But I might add to that,
that within the suggested or
recommended rate increase,
provision is made for no rate
increase for a certain mini-
mum level of consumption.
In other words there would
be no rate increase up to a
certain amount of kilowatt
hours consumed by an indi-
vidual customer,” he said.

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Diamonds are keeping Mugabe in power

WASHINGTON — Diamonds are not a
country’s best friend. Certainly not if yours
is a semi-lawless country in Africa, like
Zimbabwe.

In Zimbabwe the discovery of diamonds
in the beautiful part of the country around
Marange, southeast of the capital of
Harare, has probably extended the life of
the Robert Mugabe regime by two years.

Their discovery by a British company,
Africa Consolidated Resources, in Sep-
tember 2006, provided Mugabe with anoth-
er source of plunder; plunder he could use
to keep his brutal security forces loyal.

Fact is that such economic governance as
remains in Zimbabwe is directed to finding
cash to pay the army and the police, who
keep the Mugabe regime afloat. Even so,
Mugabe had fallen behind; and last Decem-
ber soldiers and police demonstrated in
Harare, demanding to be paid. Basically,
Mugabe’s response was to cede the dia-
mond operations to the security forces.

In a new report, Human Rights Watch
says the security forces killed 200 miners
while tightening their grip on the mines
and introducing forced labor.

The Kimberley Process, a humanitarian
alliance set up to stop the flow of so-called
blood diamonds, sent a six-person team to
investigate the Zimbabwe mines and found
such human rights abuses that it classified
the gems as blood diamonds to be sanc-
tioned.

But diamonds are hard to trace and label;
they are fungible and portable, and they
can be mined with a pick and shovel in
many places, as they are today in Zimbab-
we and Congo.

They also can be smuggled in many of
the ways drugs are, except there is no odor
to aid border guards with dogs.

Through the years diamonds have been
ingested, concealed in body cavities and
even hidden in wounds.

Desperate people do desperate things
— and never more so when there is the
prospect of riches in places of utter pover-
ty. A diamond rush, as has happened in
Zimbabwe, is a dangerous, lawless, violent
and wretched occurrence.

As Mugabe has rejected international
mining partners, who might actually know
something about the safe and orderly min-
ing of diamonds, the Zimbabwe mines are
dangerous, inefficient and environmental-
ly disastrous.



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The Zimbabweans are not even getting
fair value for their gems. These are being
marketed through back channels estab-
lished by the government, and untold num-
bers of gems are stolen at production and
sold to middle men and unscrupulous cut-
ters around the world.

The link between the security forces and
the mines has another bad effect: It adds to
the political impotence of Morgan Tsvan-
girai, prime minister in a power-sharing
arrangement with Mugabe and his ZANU-
PF party. In that arrangement Mugabe
retains control of the the security forces,
thus robbing Tsvangirai of any authority —
not that he would use it well if he got it.

Zimbabweans are wondering what has
happened to Tsvangirai, who seems to have
lost the ability to stand up to Mugabe. For
nearly a decade, Tsvangirai endured false
arrests, allegations of treason, beatings
while in custody and had the last election
stolen from him and his Movement for
Democratic Change.

Now Zimbabweans are asking whether
the trappings of power have corrupted their
hero or whether, in accepting the South
Africa-brokered power-sharing deal,
Tsvangirai boxed himself in.

Anyway, he looks as though he has
become Mugabe’s bagman, touring the
world seeking “investment.”

Tsvangirai has been promised some very
limited humanitarian aid, including $8 mil-
lion of conditional aid from the British and
a promise of a little over $73 million of
even more restricted and conditional aid
from President Obama.

When Tvangirai got back to Harare,
Mugabe supporters ridiculed his efforts
and his own supporters accused him of sell-
ing out to Mugabe.

As if to show up his old rival, Mugabe
then announced a Chinese loan of just
under $1 billion; much of this money has to
be spent on Chinese imports.

It is ironic that Mugabe should be kept in
power by diamonds. It was diamonds that
formed the basis of the fortune that
enabled the adventurer, Cecil John
Rhodes, to colonize Zimbabwe for Britain
in the 1890s. Maybe all diamonds are con-
flict diamonds. Bloody stones.

(This article is by LLEWELLYN KING
C.2009 Hearst Newspapers)



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Wake up, Bahamas!
you must wake up!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It is now time once again to rid
this country of political interfer-
ence. I say now both Free Nation-
al Movement, and the Progres-
sive Liberal Party need to step
down to bring in a new breed of
young people to chart the course
for the 21st century in this actual
perilous time. Sir Lynden left a
legacy starting with Prime Minis-
ter and current Prime Ministers
Hubert Ingraham and Perry
Christie and the Hon Bernard
Nottage the champions of the
20th century. Both Prime Minis-
ters have served their duly course
in the halls of parliament, and run
out of ideas, and need to leave
the political scene before the next
general election, to pave the way
for Dr Bernard Nottage to
become the next Prime Minister
of the Bahamas.

The National General Council
needs to change its course, bring
a new setting for the betterment
of this country, and the Bahamian
people.

Bahamian people must rise up!
And rise up! Now to bring a con-
clusion to this vexing matter.
President Reagan took office
when he was 68 or 69 as Presi-
dent of the United States so we
cannot discriminate against age.
We must get out of our minds
about this abstract thinking and
call a spade a spade, and think
out of the box. First of all the
Prime Minister has too much
power and it needs to be reduced
so that there is no political inter-
ference.

Secondly, the senators need to
be appointed by the people, and
should have more say in the
affairs of the government of the
day.

We should hold our represen-
tatives feet to the fire until the
five years are finished, so that
they can remain honest in their
dealing of the affairs of our coun-
try.
Day in and day out, the pre-
sent Prime Minister and Mr
Christie are making no sense,
because neither of them believe
in capital punishment, and nei-
ther of them is willing to change
the constitution of the Bahamas
laws it deals within the present
time. The Privy Council must go,
and must go now. We cannot say
we are an independent country,

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



and the Privy Council is telling
us what to do in our own country.
Bahamian people rise up! And
rise up! Now before its too late
and end this era and bring in a
new change for our country. The
other day the opposition wanted
to speak on the crime of the 15
year old boy, and it led to a stink
in the halls of parliament, because
the Speaker did not use his dis-
cretion, which led to the suspen-
sion of Glenys Hanna-Martin
unfairly. The Prime Minister
should not appoint the Commis-
sioner of Police to office, this
should be done by an indepen-
dent body and in fact all matters
belonging to the police force of
the Bahamas.

If the government of the day
is going to deal with hanging, then
the constitution must be changed
immediately with regards to the
nation’s crimes, white collar, blue
collar, and other crimes like
incest, child molestation, sexual
abuse small children, male and
female. Speaking on Agriculture
both parties have fallen down
with farming, and none of them
has reached anywhere near self
sufficient. We cannot rely on
tourism alone, but must have a
backdrop to sustain us.

There must be a mixture of
people in the House so that the
country can be diversified with
not only lawyers, but many pro-
fessions coming together for the
betterment of our country.
Bahamians everywhere under the
sound of my voice!

Rise up, and rise up now from
north to south to east, and the
west and take your place and be
counted to chart the course of our
beloved country. Rise up!

Courts: Too many people on
death row, and people out on bail,
this must stop, and it must stop
now. To bring an end to this, Mr
Prime Minister, find the number
of places that you need, and pay
the Bahamian people adequate
salaries to the magistrate or judge.
All members of parliament need
to cut their salaries, and do it
immediately to become role mod-
els to set the pace and tone for
the people of the Bahamas.

All other crimes must be dealt
with in short order. Immigration:
We must rid ourselves of the var-
ious illegal immigrants not just
Haitian, and bring them only
when we need their help in the
farming. This will help us, and
will also help the Haitian govern-
ment.

Just how we deal with foreign
investment, we need to work out
our economy with agriculture and
give a mandate to the hotel own-
ers to buy our product to put in
the various hotels.

If we don’t have enough then
give the farmers the help to pro-
duce more, we can use the Fami-
ly Islands to produce anything we
want. We cannot just look to the
United States for help, we must
help ourselves, and feed families.

We must do all that we can in
light industry to help our situa-
tion in the Bahamas. By now
these should have been factories
in various islands to meet this eco-
nomic time.

The country needs to be diver-
sified to even bring out Bahamian
brothers and sisters from the var-
ious places in the United States to
help enhance our skills in vari-
ous fields. I call upon the Hon
Hubert Ingraham, and the Hon
Perry Christie, along with the
National General Council, to
rethink their strategy and the oth-
er parties to unite and throw their
full support to Dr Bernard Not-
tage to be the next Prime Minister
of the Bahamas.

He deserves it more than any-
one else in the two parties, and
bring a closure to the political
madness in this country. This
must start immediately, so he can
start working and fielding new
candidates who are neither PLP
or FNM to usher in a new cleans-
ing for Bahamians everywhere.

This is our time to shine, and
bring a halt to what is happening
in our beloved country. Bahami-
ans, we put the people in parlia-
ment, and we have to tell them
what to do, not them tell us what
to say. Rise up! Bahamians and
shine! Wake up, Bahamians, and
take your places and be counted
in our beloved country. We only
have one and we must take care
of our piece of the rock.

FRANKLIN THOMPSON
Nassau,
June, 2009.

Imperative that we become frugal in spending habits

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Due to the tough and eco-
nomic times that we are facing
in the Bahamas and the world
at large, it is imperative that we
become frugal in our spending
habits. The cost of living is at
an all time high; a simple trip
to the grocery store can be very
depressing with the escalating
cost of food. I can recall leaving
the grocery store after spend-
ing just over $100 with just a
few bags; in time past, $100
would have completed my gro-
cery list with change left over.
Today, electricity bills seem to
be the amount of a mortgage
payment. In lieu of all of this,
we must explore new ways to
help us live on a budget and
avoid overspending.

Starting with food: let’s say
you buy breakfast from a Fast
Food enterprise which is about
$4 to $6. Now multiply that by
five Gif you do this every day of

the week) and see how much
money you will be spending in
one week! My suggestion is to
wake up earlier and prepare
breakfast — it is cost effective
and you know what is in your
food. Because in the end, all
those artificial ingredients may
only send you to the doctor to
spend more money!

Lunch is a real killer if you
buy it everyday. Approximate-
ly $7 is normally for lunch; now
multiply that by five and you
are spending $35 a week on
lunch. So instead of buying
lunch every day, how about you
bring a sandwich from home or
eat some of the peas ’n rice and
fish your sister cooked for Sun-
day dinner? When it all boils
down, that’s $149 a month you
could be saving or doing some-
thing more constructive with.
Apart from food, we as
Bahamians want to look good;
every banquet and wedding we
must buy something new. An




















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outfit or a new dress or simply
cosmetics, for the ladies, and a
pair of new name-brand tennis
— all of these apparatus is sim-
ply not necessary. Nine times
out of ten there is something
right in the closet to wear, but
many of us want something new
just to say it is “new.” We are
trying to keep up with the Jone-
ses when in fact the Joneses are
probably in debt up to their eye-
balls! We must learn to appre-
ciate what we have and be more
conservative in order to save
our money and make it through
this financial crisis. When on a
budget we must be cognisant of
the fact that cell phones are a
real expense, if you set aside
$20 a month it is normally best
to stick to that. Phone cards can
be very expensive; to preserve
airtime, call when it’s necessary
and don’t answer land phones
especially if you’re close to one.
Use the phone only in emer-
gencies and I’m sure you'll stick
to your budget.

If you think that these items
are so important that you can-
not live without them, make up
an expense log and see how
much money you are spending
on a regular basis.

Add up every single expense
no matter how small and go
through things you really need
and you will turn your financial
situation around. Money is not
for selective individuals. The
way you treat your money is the
way your money will treat you.
If you hang around the food
store on any given day you can
hit the jackpot with the amount
of pennies that lay dormant on
the ground. Don’t throw those
pennies away, they go a long
way. In the Bahamas to make it
during this tough time we must
curve our spending habits and
get what’s necessary. Do not let
our needs be overshadowed by
our wants.

Realistically, the difference
between the rich and the poor is
not the amount of money they
make but the way in which they
spend it. To be effective in
managing your money you must
start now, we make so many
excuses on how we are going to
start tomorrow. If $10 is all you
have, save it. Let’s continue to
strive for financial freedom as
we live on a budget.

JASON E SPRINGER
Nassau,
June, 2009.
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Family fear
for safety of
missing man

THE family of a missing
67-year-old man are fear-
ing for his safety as he dis-
appeared from his Wulff
Road home without his
seizure medication.

David McKinney was
last seen at his home last
week Friday.

Since then, he has been
seen in Romer Street in
the Fox Hill area, but has
not made contact with his
family.

Although Mr McKinney
often went for walks, his
niece Annamae saidthat i
never before had he disap- }
peared for longer than a ;
day and that he did not
tend to frequent Fox Hill.

“He’s on medication for
seizures. If he doesn’t
have it, he’ll fall out all
the time,” she said.
“Every time I go to Fox
Hill I can’t find him.”

“T just want to be able
to pick him up and take
him back to his place.

“With the seizures he
may not know where he
is,” she added.

Annamae has asked
anyone who sees Mr McK-
inney to call her on 364-
2228, 322-3754 or 434-
0643. If no one answers,
callers are advised to
leave a message.

The Tribune will publish
a photo of Mr McKinney
tomorrow.

Graduates urged
to he of service
to others

PUBLIC Works and
Transport Minister Neko
Grant admonished gradu-
ates of St George’s
Senior High School to
“be of service to others”
as they “climb the ladder
of success.”

“Many people (are on)
their quest for success,
only focused on ‘having’
or ‘getting’ from a per-
sonal perspective,” he
said. “Their lives never
include sharing their
gifts, talents or experi-
ences with others.

“Therefore, seek to be
of some service or help to
others. Please always
remember to give back to
your country and to your
community.”

Mr Grant was a fea-
tured speaker at the June
2009 graduation ceremo-
ny of St George’s Sec-
ondary School, Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

“You must pursue and
accept the opportunities
for further education,
training or work,” he told
the graduates.

“You must also seek to
excel when you are
required to complete a
particular task. You must
embrace your destiny and
you must put your desire
to excel into action.”

The graduates were
told that they will not
know or perfect every-
thing, “however, every
day we should strive
toward continuous
improvement in all
aspects of our lives,” Mr
Grant said.

Immigration officers on leave on

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

TWO Immigration officers are cur-
rently on administrative leave on sus-
picion of having committed various
infractions, Immigration Director Jack
Thompson revealed.

The officers were placed on leave by
the former director of immigration
before Mr Thompson assumed office
last November, he said, but he could
not say what the infractions were.

"There are two officers who are on
administrative leave, they were on leave
prior to my coming to office. I am
reviewing the files, I don't have the full

particulars before me now. . . I'm not
sure what they were on administrative
leave for," he said.

Allegations

The Department of Immigration has
come under heavy fire in recent months,
with rampant allegations of abuse and
mistreatment at the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre, as well as claims of
bribery.

Earlier this year, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham admonished corrupt
Immigration officers and said his gov-
ernment will not "look the other way"
where evidence supports allegations of
corruption in the public service.

He addressed allegations of immi-
gration officials accepting bribes at
ports of entry or in exchange for falsi-
fying documents or speeding up work
permit and residence application
processes.

Mr Ingraham also noted allegations
that some immigration officers use
excessive force during apprehension
and detention exercises and stressed
that his government does not tolerate
the abuse of detainees or suspected ille-
gal immigrants.

“T want to be clear: abuse of detained
persons whether in their homes, at a
work site, on an immigration bus or at
the Carmichael Road Detention Centre
is contrary to the law. Everyone must be

suspicion of committing infractions

treated with respect and with dignity
at all times; that is the law and that is
the policy of the government which I
head,” said Mr Ingraham earlier in the
year.

Meeting

Mr Thompson said since the prime
minister's warning, the department has
held a meeting with supervisors and
advised them to be vigilant for instances
of impropriety.

He stressed that despite some
bad apples, there are a lot of outstand-
ing and dedicated officers who routine-
ly go beyond the required level of ser-

Poles for $12m transmission
facilities set for installation

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Power Company will
soon begin pole installation for
the construction of the new $12
million transmission facilities
for Ginn sur Mer at West End.

The new poles have been
placed strategically along
Queens Highway and will be
erected along a 21-mile route
into West End.

Derick King, director trans-
mission and distribution, said
the new composite poles are
about 65ft to 70ft tall and capa-
ble of withstanding maximum
sustained winds of 150 mph.

Executives of Grand Bahama
Power Company and Ginn sur
Mer held a town meeting on
Tuesday evening at the Eight
Mile Rock High School gym-
nasium for residents of West
Grand Bahama.

Concerns were raised during
the meeting about the strength
of the poles in a vehicle collision
and the dangers a falling 70ft
pole could pose to nearby
homes and other buildings in
Eight Mile Rock.

Mr King assured residents
that 4000 psi of concrete will be
pumped into the pole base to
add strength.

He also noted that the poles
are made of composite material
that comes with a life-time guar-
antee, compared to the existing
35ft wooden poles that have a
life span of 35 years.

Construction of the new 69kv
pole line started in the first
quarter of 2009.

The GBPC and Ginn are
contributing $6 million each
toward the cost of the project,
which is expected to be com-
pleted in December 2009.

Mr King said that a feasibili-
ty study and a series of related
engineering studies have been
conducted in order to quantify
the ultimate requirements in the
West End and surrounding area
and develop a plan for the elec-
trical infrastructure to support
it.

Meanwhile, the proposed $4.9
bilion Ginn sur Mer/Old
Bahama Bay development at
West End is progressing. It will
be comprised of a 20-storey
tower resort, condo units, sin-
gle-family residential home lots,
marinas, a private airport, two
golf courses and other state-of-
the-art amenities.

Mr King said that the devel-
opment’s ultimate forecasted

power demand of 54 megawatts
far exceeds the capacity of the
existing power system in the
west of Grand Bahama.

He noted that the power sup-
plied to Ginn will far exceed
the power demand at Paradise
Island in New Providence.

Mr King said the new trans-
mission line will improve ser-
vices to residents of West
Grand Bahama, from Eight
Mile Rock to West End.

“We will install arresters on
the poles to help protect the
pole line equipment from
flashover due to lightning
strikes, significantly increasing
the reliability of the new line,”
he said.

He said the new system will
provide increased feeder capac-
ity for load growth and decrease
interruption frequency and
duration.

The proposed 69,000-volt
pole line will be built from the
generating plant located on
Queen’s Highway. The pole line
will be built on the existing
easements.

Mr King said that employ-
ment opportunities will be cre-
ated for Bahamians. In addition
to GBPC crews, he noted that
external Bahamian contractors
and labourers will be employed,
as well as US based advisors
who will train power company
staff on high voltage techniques.

The project will also provide
an economic boost for busi-
nesses in the western part of
Grand Bahama.

“We will be required to feed
our crews and we will be sup-

Committee formed to assist in the
eradication of illegal immigrant ‘slums’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT has a newly formed com-
mittee to assist the Department of Immigration
in fulfilling its pledge to eradicate illegal immi-

grant "slums".

Immigration Director Jack Thompson said a
number of government representatives — from
Public Works, Building Control, the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health, the Depart-
ment of Lands and Surveys, the Department of
Housing, the RBPF, and the Attorney Gener-
al's office — convened for a meeting on Wednes-
day where a committee was formed to address
the “vexing” problem of slum communities on
New Providence and the Family Islands.

Mr Thompson said the group has already
identified a number of communities that they
will address and plan to meet again next week.

"This is of major concern to us because, one,
you have a number of persons who are illegal in

the Bahamas who are residing in these places.
Two, this is a health issue, three there's the
water table that's affected by it because these
persons build these places without building

codes up to standard,” he said.
While Mr Thompson said his department
would aggressively deal with the slum commu-

nities, he stressed that the process would be

yesterday.

forum.

handled humanely.

"This time we're going to do something about
it, but we're going to do it right, we're not
going to move into a community with a bull-
dozer and start bulldozing houses down — that
is not our style.

"We're going to do it within the law, but we
are going to move in that direction and address
this problem," said Mr Thompson, at a press
conference at the Department of Immigration

The issue was raised by State Immigration
Minister Branville McCartney last week at the
Chamber of Commerce's ‘Meet the Minister’



porting local food vendors in
the area to provide our crews
with breakfast and lunch,” Mr
King said.

Fun
a
iy)

Tired of thé Same
Old Boring Summer
School?

DERICK KING, GBPC director of
transmissions and distribution,
and Derek Gape, Ginn sur Mer
project manager, were both on
hand to answer questions from
residents at the informational
night about the West End trans-
mission line upgrade. They are
pictured in front of topographic
maps showing the route of the
new line, which follows the
existing power line, but will
upgrade residents from 5mhw
to 69mhw.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The port at Arawak Cay—all things considered

Recexny I
reviewed plans to

move the container port to
Arawak Cay in the context of
revitalising the city of Nassau.

But there has been an unfor-
tunate failure to communicate
on this project, and some of the
parameters discussed earlier
have changed.

So I met with the board of
directors of the Arawak Cay
Port Development Company
(APD) last week for an author-
itative update.

The latest draft of the agree-
ment between the Government
and the developers (which could
be the final version) is now at
the Office of the Prime Minis-
ter. Expectations are that it will
be signed within days, after
which contractors would be
mobilised to begin work.

If this happens, the deal will
have taken one year to con-
clude, at a cost to APD's share-
holders of about a million dol-
lars so far. Those shareholders
include the entire Bahamian
shipping industry - 19 partners
in all. They range from domes-
tic and international shippers to
stevedoring firms, dry bulk
importers, and ferry operators.

The working group spear-
heading the negotiations
includes Bahamas Marine Con-
stuction's Jimmy Mosko,
Arawak Stevedoring's Chris
Lightbourn, the Mailboat Com-
pany's Donelle Taylor, Jack
Sands of Betty K Agencies and
Mike Maura of Tropical Ship-
ping. But they are not the prime
movers.

"The government is driving
this," Lightbourn told me. "And
we have been trying to imple-
ment whatever solution the
Government wants. The previ-
ous Government told us we
were going to Southwest Point
and the current Government
told us we are going to Arawak
Cay. In both cases the mandate
was to minimise impact to the
cost of living and make way for
the redevelopment of down-
town Nassau."

In fact, the same coalition of
shipping interests helped fund
the 2006 Southwest Point engi-
neering study by the Dutch con-
sultants, Ecorys; just as it has
more recently funded develop-
ment studies for the Arawak

Cay location. The current con-
sulting team includes London-
based Halcrow Group, KPMG
Bahamas, and the law firm of
Higgs & Johnson.

"It will take three months for
us to mobilise," Mosko told me.
"The work will include con-
struction of a sea wall, mainte-
nance dredging of less than
200,000 cubic yards of material
from the existing channel, the
addition of two lift cranes, some
20 acres of pavement, plus secu-
rity fencing. It's little more than



“There is one
major point that
still needs
clarification,
and that is how
the new port
will connect
to the New
Providence
road network.”



a glorified car park and certain-
ly not rocket science - we can be
up and running within a year."
The total land area for phase
one of the container terminal -
which will be located on the
existing 70-acre cay - is about
40 acres. An additional five
acres on the eastern end of the
cay will be used for a terminal
that will handle inter-island fer-
ries, the Mailboat Company and
tour boats, while most domestic
shipping will remain at Potter's
Cay. The ferry terminal is a sep-
arate project, Mosko said.
Meanwhile, the Dutch infra-
structure firm, Royal Boskalis
Westminster, is already mobil-
ising to dredge Nassau harbour
to expand the cruise port. This



separate Government project
(which will finish in November)
will excavate 2.1 million cubic
yards of material from the har-
bour, most of which will be used
to add about 40 new acres to
the western end of Arawak Cay.
The remainder will be used to
expand Woodes Rogers Wharf
east of Rawson Square to pro-
vide space for more waterfront
activities.

Some concerns have been
expressed about the impact the
Arawak Cay extension may
have on the Saunders Beach
area. But according to Neil
Sealey, a local expert on the
coastal environment, "there is
no reason to suspect that the
extension will change anything
from the present situation,
although it should be moni-
tored."

Sealey pointed out that the
New Providence shoreline in
this area is already masked by
Silver Cay and water circula-
tion is being blocked by the
existing causeway at the east-
ern end of Arawak Cay right
now, adding that it wouldn’t
hurt to open up the causeway
to allow more water flow along
the southern side of the cay.

Costs for the Arawak Cay
port are pegged at $55 million -
including basic civil works at
the proposed Gladstone Road
warehouse depot. This com-
pares to the more than $235 mil-
lion that was estimated for the
Southwest Point port, which
had a seven-year buildout. The
equity split outlined in the latest
draft agreement calls for the
government and the shipping
coalition to each hold 40 per
cent of the shares, with 20 per
cent reserved for a public offer-
ing.

This price tag will be partly
financed by a $15 million pref-
erence share offering, with the
shareholders having to come up
with the remaining $40 million.

"The investment has to make
sense for all parties,” Light-
bourn said. "And Arawak Cay

* Bahamian Food * Folklore * Artisans
' Dance * Music * Bands + Prison Pop Band

* Fashion show * Best yards competition etc...

Followed By....
E. Clement Bethel National
Arts Festival Cultural Show

CD pmeQipma
Rawson Square



is amuch more eco-
nomical project,
especially in today's
climate. For exam-
ple, the Ecorys
study projected a six
per cent annual
growth in container
cargo, but what we
have actually seen
over the past nine
months is a drop of
about 20 per cent."

And it is not
widely known that
40 per cent of all
cargo already
arrives at Arawak
Cay. This includes
containers handled
by Tropical Ship-
ping and MSC, as
well as dry bulk
imports like sand,
cement, steel and
aggregates. Potable
water is also shipped
from Andros to reservoirs on
the cay, and these may be shift-
ed to other locations nearby to
facilitate the berthing of con-
tainer ships on the northern side
of the cay.

There is one major point that
still needs clarification, and that
is how the new port will con-
nect to the New Providence
road network. Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux told me
recently that a bridge would be
built from the newly-reclaimed
western end of the cay to con-
nect to West Bay Street at the
extreme eastern end of Saun-
ders Beach, which is now a
rocky shoreline.

In this scenario, containers
would be trucked over the
bridge and on to the Bethel
Avenue road extension, which
will connect to West Bay at a
roundabout to be built imme-
diately west of the Shell station.
From here trucks will travel
across Thompson Boulevard
and the Tonique Darling High-
way to a 15-acre warehouse
depot that will be built on Gov-
ernment land off Gladstone
Road. Goods will be unloaded
at the depot and sent on to their
final destinations.

However, the shipping coali-
tion says a bridge is not part of
their plans. At this point they
anticipate moving containers to
Gladstone Road via the existing
access route from Arawak Cay.
Trucks will run during off-peak
traffic times, with an estimated
1,000 movements a week in and
out of the terminal. Official
sources say the new bridge may
be part of what the Government
brings to the table in the port
deal, but no firm project exists
and the appropriate EIAs
would have to be done prior to
any commitments.

The Bethel Avenue road
extension (from West Bay
Street to the Tonique Darling
Highway) is part of the IDB-
financed New Providence road
improvement project being
undertaken by the Argentinian
contractor, Jose Cartellone.

In a related development, the
Government recently signed an
agreement with the Chinese
export-import bank for a multi-
million-dollar loan, part of
which will be used to convert
JFK Drive and Thompson
Boulevard (from the airport to
the College of The Bahamas)
into a four-lane highway.
Preparatory work for this pro-
ject is already under way,
according to officials.

"But we have to balance the
traffic issues because no matter
where cargo arrives on the
island it has to get to its final
destinations, which are usually
in high traffic areas," Light-
bourn told me. "In terms of



fee Li 3
ENVIRONMENT MINIS-
TER Earl Deveaux told
me recently that a bridge
would be built from the
newly-reclaimed western
end of the cay to connect
to West Bay Street at the
extreme eastern end of
Saunders Beach.

Arawak Cay we are
dealing with a prop-
erty that we don't
control, so we have
gone as far as we can
go until the Govern-
ment decides what it
wants to do."

In addition to the
traffic concerns, crit-
ics have complained
about using Arawak
Cay for industrial
rather than touristic
purposes - as was
originally proposed
back in the 1960s
when the island was
created from the
spoil of earlier har-
bour dredging.

Here's one exam-
ple of this view tak-
en from a recent
Facebook conversa-
tion:

"Won't it look just
gorgeous to our visiting cruise
ship passengers? Instead of
putting some wonderful facility
out there (think Sydney Opera
House), we put a container port.
What does that say about how
we feel about Bahamian cul-
ture? Why not be bold and cre-
ate a wonderful space where
everyone can access the sea and
recreation?"

But the plain fact is that
Arawak Cay has been an indus-
trial site for the past 40 years,
and many cruise ships leave
from industrial ports or arrive at
multi-use ports in the
Caribbean. Arawak Cay could
hardly be any worse as it is, and
a modern container port is not
necessarily an eyesore. It does-
nm’t seem to detract from Mia-
mi, for instance.

It is also worth noting that
any location on New Provi-
dence for a new port has
impacts and tradeoffs. A port
at Clifton would likely destroy
the dive tourism industry, for
example, whereas one at
Arawak Cay would have virtu-
ally no impact on the marine
environment as it uses the exist-
ing dredged harbour entrance.
A Clifton port would also cost
hundreds of millions more,
while taking much longer to put
together.

The bottom line is that freight
traffic is disrupting the capital
and the container terminals
occupy valuable waterfront
space. This restricts options for
Nassau's redevelopment while
making life unpleasant for
everyone. It's time to bring this
long-running saga to an end.

THE PORT, SAUNDERS
BEACH AND THE
CASUARINAS

As a sidebar to this story, an
angry email was circulated over
the weekend complaining about
the imminent removal of the
casuarina colonnade along
Saunders Beach. This was rem-
iniscent of the misguided out-
cry that occurred the last time
the Government undertook a
casuarina removal programme,
17 years ago, at Cable Beach.

The email used this little
rhyme to make its point:

If you go down to the beach
today,

Youw’re in for a big surprise,

For every tree that used to be
there,

Is threatened with pending
demise.

Casuarinas are native to the
western Pacific but were intro-
duced to Florida and the
Caribbean in the late 1800s for
use as firewood and wind-
breaks. After a series of major
hurricanes in the 1920s uproot-
ed many landmark trees on
New Providence, fast-growing

casuarinas were planted around
the capital by well-meaning gar-
den clubs.

These trees grow well in dis-
turbed areas and are highly salt-
tolerant.

But dense thickets of casuar-
inas quickly displace native
dune and beach vegetation,
including mangroves. And once
established they outcompete
native plants and destroy habi-
tat for native insects and other
wildlife. The ground below the
tree is poisoned and becomes
ecologically sterile.

Both the Government and
the Bahamas National Trust
have removal policies and pro-
grammes for invasive species
like the casuarina that shut out
native plants. In populated
areas there is also a danger from
falling limbs as the trees can
grow to more than 100 feet and
decay with age. But their impact
on beaches is less widely known.

In 2003 coastal expert Neil
Sealey produced a research
paper on casuarina-induced
beach erosion at Small Hope
Bay on Andros. He showed that
erosion was caused by the sup-
pression of native vegetation
beneath the trees. This led to
sand blown onshore not being
trapped to form dunes, so that
during storms there was nothing
to stop massive sand loss.

An update to this research
was produced for the recent nat-
ural history conference on San
Salvador, pointing out that no
vegetated shorelines have been
found with chronic erosion
except those with casuarinas.
And Sealey was able to confirm
that specific areas cleared of
casuarinas - including Small
Hope Bay - have been rapidly
repopulated by native species
that build up the natural dune.

Orange Hill on West Bay
Street is the best example of a
successful beach restoration on
New Providence. The casuari-
nas were replaced a few years
ago with native vegetation, and
the dune has since stabilised.

According to the Bahamas
Reef Environment Education
Foundation "One only needs to
drive past Saunders Beach to
see how it has been eroded by
the casuarinas that line it. If this
beach were planted with native
coastal species such as seagrape,
cocoplum and sea oats, the
beach would be stabilized and
sand would not be constantly
blown into the road."

Well, that is exactly what is
about to happen. The tree
removal is part of a larger re-
organisation of the Saunders
Beach area, which is a compo-
nent of the aforementioned
IDB-funded road improvement
project.

The road immediately west
of the Shell station will be
diverted south to create a park-
ing area for some 150 vehicles.
This will improve public access
to the beach, while the casuari-
nas will be replaced with native
vegetation to allow the beach
to regenerate over time.

Environmentalists say that
West Bay Street should never
have been built so close to the
shoreline. In fact, coastal roads
are chiefly responsibly for our
disappearing beaches, as can be
seen at Montagu, where the
road was built on the dune and
the beach is now almost gone.

The end result is that we have
to fork out money every few
years to repair the seawall. The
same thing is in store for Saun-
ders Beach if nothing is done.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY "J/7>

The Airport Authority invites applications from suitably qualified Bahamians for the

following vacant post.

Maintenance Officer Il

Applicants must possess a BTV! Diploma or equivalent in Diesel and heavy equipment me-
chanics with a minimum of five years practical experience troubleshooting and performing
maintenance work on mechanical, hydraulic, diesel and electrical systems with minimum

supervision.

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and the appropriate salary scales of the
Airport Authority. Interested persons should submit their Resumes, together with refer-
ences and copies of qualifications by July 13, 2009 to:

Manager Human Resources

The Airport Authority

Lynden Pindling International Airport
P.O. Box AP-59222

Nassau, Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

The infrastructure ‘must be in good
condition’ when economy rebounds

THE current economic crunch will
not last forever and the Bahamas’
infrastructure “must be in good con-
dition” when the economy rebounds,
Public Works and Transport Minis-
ter Neko Grant said yesterday.

Mr Grant was responding to com-
ments by Senator Allyson Maynard-
Gibson during her contribution to the
debate in the Senate on a Bill for an
Act to Amend the Cruise Ship’s
Overnighting Incentives Act on



Queen's College
Foundation and
alumni create
lapel pin

IN RECOGNITION of ;
the contributions of its alum- }
ni to the community, the ;
Queen’s College Founda- ;
tion, in co-operation with the }
Queen’s College alumni ;
steering committee, has cre-
ated an alumni pin.

The lapel pin is in the ;
shape of the famous Queen’s }
College crest and willimme-

which are not connected to the shore
and are used for mooring) at Prince
George Wharf, and extension by 1,000
feet of the western end of Arawak
Cay with the dredged material.

At the contract signing for the Nas-
sau Harbour Port Improvement Pro-
ject, Minister Grant said: “It is antic-
ipated that the dredging would be
completed in time to accommodate
the arrival of one of the first of Roy-
al Caribbean International’s mega

tinue with the Nassau Har-
bour dredging despite the
global economic downturn.

Mr Grant said 70 per cent
of the visitors to the
Bahamas arrive by cruise
ship and the introduction of
mega cruise ships that call
on the port of Nassau will
require more water depth
than presently exists.

“It was decided that it was

ships and for the Bahamas to
be able to compete with oth-
er Caribbean countries,” said
Mr Grant.

On April 2, the govern-
ment signed a $44 million
contract with BoskKalis, a
Netherlands-based interna-
tional dredging and maritime
infrastructure contractor.

The contract includes
dredging of 1.9 million cubic

Neko Grant



diately identify its wearer as
a distinguished alumnus of
the school.

As a part of the gradua-
tion ceremony this year,

graduating grade 12 students

were pinned by members of
the alumni steering commit-
tee to symbolise their transi-
tion to alumni status.

“Tt is more than simply a
pin,” said Yolanda Darville,
director of development for
the Queen’s college founda-
tion.

“The alumni pin symbolis- i
es that the wearer recognises }

that they have received one
of the best educational
experiences available in the
country. It also symbolises
that although the alumnus
has graduated, they still love
and support their alma
mater.”

The alumni pins are avail-
able for $10 and are perfect

to wear at class reunions and :
other Queen’s College alum- }

ni events

The Queen’s College
Foundation is a charitable
organisation that provides
support to the school for
scholarships, special pro-
grammes, technology and
the improvement of facili-
ties.

Recent achievements by
the foundation on behalf of
Queen’s College include the
building of the new Early
Learning Centre, the reno-
vation of the Geoffrey
Brown Auditorium and the
creation of the Q Café.

Established in 1890,

Queen’s College is the oldest

private school in the
Bahamas and has educated

numerous Bahamian leaders. }

Wednesday.

She criticised the government for,
among other things, its plans to con-

necessary to increase the capacity of
Nassau Harbour, making it accessi-
ble to this new generation of cruise

yards of material from Nassau Har-
bour, construction of three mooring
dolphins (fixed man-made structures

cruise ships, ‘Oasis of the Seas’, on
its maiden voyage in December,
2009.”

Students to gain experience at public hospitals

FREEPORT - With the
objective of providing students
with clinical exposure while
studying in the Bahamas, Ross
University has partnered with
the Public Hospitals Authori-
ty in a vlinical yraining sgree-
ment.

On May 12 Ross first and
second year medical students
began their training at both
the Rand Hospital and the
Bight Mile Rock clinic.

This agreement will provide
a scope for the further devel-
opment and training of per-
sonnel throughout the Grand
Bahama health services.

An important aspect of the
agreement provides PHA
health professionals with
access to Ross University’s
simulation labs and medical
library which will enhance
PHA’s ability to train and
strengthen the capacity of
local health professionals.

This arrangement will allow
for Bahamian professionals to
participate in the training of
students from various parts of
the wider international com-
munity.

Medical students at each
location are under the careful
supervision of two doctors for
a few hours twice weekly.
During a typical half day, the
student is introduced to the
patient by the doctor and is
allowed to interview, examine

and obtain history of present
illness; they examine the
patient ‘(applying only those
skills they have been taught);
present the patient to the
attending physician; write up
the history and physical and
later obtain feedback on the
presentation and the write-up
from the attending physician.

The doctors are then
required to provide evalua-
tions of the students to the
university.

The Clinical Education
Partnership was introduced to
the Grand Bahama health
community back in December
2008, and will provide a rich
educational experience to
Ross students, and also
enhance the professional
growth of Bahamian physi-
cians, thus improving the over-
all health and medical care
system within the Bahamas.
Statistics have shown that
when hospitals become more
teaching oriented and offer
themselves as educational
facilities, the level of patient
care tends to go up.

“This is a significant
moment in the history of
Grand Bahama. We look for-
ward to a long and fruitful
working relationship between
the university and the medical
community on Grand
Bahama. How we work
together will impact both pre-

FOCOL

HOLDINGS LTD.

PREFERRED
DIVIDEND PAYMENT

FOCOL Is pleased to announce a

dividend payment to all holders of
CLASS ‘A’ preference shares
as of June 30, 2009

payable within ten business days

of the record date
through CFAL Ltd.

“Fuelling Growth For People”

Dave Mackey

ROSS STUDENTS with doctors

of the Rand Hospital in Grand
Bahama. (I-r) Joshua Lynn,
Rachel Lacy, Dr Ohueyi, Dr
Bartlett, Dr Klasson, Neeti Patel,
and Olawole Ogunsulire.

clinical and tertiary medical
education on this island, and
possibly the educational devel-
opment of the next generation
of health care professionals in
the Bahamas,” said Dr
Desiree Cox, director of clin-
ical education at Ross Uni-
versity.

“The Clinical Training
Agreement is just the begin-
ning of a long relationship
between Ross and the Grand
Bahama medical community.
We are open to more ways in
engaging with doctors who
work in private practice
and other health care profes-
sionals in the medical com-
munity.”






































Odes a GS Va ee

where fife is still simple and people stil care
_ Murphyville, 2nd Right from Sears Road.
N Telephone 322-8493

ODESSA GARDENS FIRST SALE
WE ARE CELEBRATING INDEPENDENCE!!!
Antique and Vintage Books, Silver Items, Vintage
Tablecloths, Hats, some in Independence colours.
Crochet Blouses and Skirts, Dolls, Vintage and
Collectible. CD's, Books for Children,
Antique and Vintage. Old Quilts, Chenille
Bedspreads, Beatrix Potter, LLadro, Cheese
Dishes. Many other items we can't list them all!!!

_ Come and See.
25% to 50% off

Starts today until Independence Day

A Ministry of Marsh Harbour denepel Chapel
FO. Bae ARGO, Marsh Harbour, Abaca, Bahamas

eau We eR

1A SN)

Junior and Senior Hi
UR ee ame eg
Ce Meee mule Ly

Primary Grades

ia
el School

Dee ETL es

De eS ee
For the school year beginning SEPTEMBER 2004

Applicants mast be Born Again Cheistians and adhere to toe Statement of Faith of Marvh Harbour Gospel Chapel
Teachers must aso have al Ieast 2 Bachelors Degree in Education or a Teacher's Certificate
and must be a Bahamian or a permanent resident of the Eahaonzs with work stahus,
Qualtying persons are aiked to contact Yor office a
Telephone (242) S1-4TTT 830 AM. ~ 345 PM, or fax (242!) 307-9771
be vesil oor website ~ wiewagapeschool com ~ for jab or student! applications

Un ee ee ee ne

PRION OPTION PEELE CODE L ES

Agape Christian School use the A Beka Pook Curriculum
which emphasizes Christian values a6 well as a very high standard of education
and is approved by the Bahamas Minisiry of Education.

We seek to train the mind, quide the person, and love the personality,

"Stide te how Hlasall anorsced uate (Bod...” 2 Tinotla 215
Study to ow thy wll approved untor Godin 2 Timothy 2:15


Rurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020 Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 « 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

LAST RITES FOR

Deacon Emmanuel “Mannie” Rolle, 87

of Farmer’s Hill,

Exuma will be held on

Saturday at 10:00am at

Ebenezer Union Baptist

Church, Farmer’s Hill.

Officiating will be Rev.

Dr. Irvin Clarke-First

Assistant

Superintendent-At-

Large, President

Emeritus, The Exuma

District Convention,

Pastor Ebenezer Union

Baptist Church, Rev.

Dr. C. W. Saunders-

Superintendent The

Bahamas Baptist

Union, Pastor Salem

Union Baptist Church assisted by Rev. Cedric Smith-President

The Exuma District Convention, Minister Stephen Smith,

Rev. Adam Brown, Fourth Assistant Superintendent, Rev.

Louis Rolle-Assistant Union Evangelist and Rev. Leslie

Curtis-Third Assistant Superintendent, Vice President , The

Exuma District. Interment in The Public Cemetery, Old
Place Exuma.

Memories will linger in the hearts of his 5 Sons: Cyril,
Deacon Anthony, Kendall and Elton Rolle and Wilfred Curry;

5 Daughters: Minister. Anniemae Kemp, Evangelist
Clementina Mills, Lorraine Thompson , Minister Angela
Rahming and Karen Winters; 2 Adopted Daughters: Dorothy
Rolle and Rosetta Watkins; 43 Grandchildren: Yvonne,
Antwan, Shonell, Alverez, Trell, Tarell, Natasha, Tanya,
Tamara, Tamika Rolle, Deangelo, Brittney, Latoya, Dorelle,
Steven, Ashleigh, Clinton, Cheryl, Delenor, Shakliah,
Leandra, Leroy Jr., Elton Jr., Daltric and Osumiria Mills,
Jason, Travis, Gabrielle, Mekell, Gregory, Bradley, Deborah,
Dion, Patrick, Colette, Paul, Jermey, Daquiri, Derick, Omar,
Oneil, Owen, Osworth and O’Brian Rolle; 22 Great
Grandchildren: 4 Sons-in-law: Patricl Mills, Leroy
Thompson, James Rahming and Ernest Winters; 3 Daughters-
in-law: Christine Rolle, Lillian Rolle and Daisymae Curry;
2 Sisters-in-law: Estine Rolle and Evelyn Knowles; 2
Brothers-in-law: Rolston and Elkin Flowers; 5 Nieces:
Laverne, Ezerene, Shantel, Marie and Rochelle; 9 Nephews:
Junior, Raymon, Uriah, Tyrone, Jamal, Naham, Walter,
Solomon and Thomas; Host of other relatives and friends
including Maria Barr, Yvette and Patrice Rolle, Stephen
Jones, Glen Gray, Wayne Knowles, Mr. & Mrs.
Shutettleworth, Gladstone Rolle and Family, Stephen Smith
and Family, Ellismae Smith and Family, Mr. L. G. Ferguson
and Family, Rev. Louis Rolle and Family, Rev. Dr. Irvin
Clarke and Family, The Family of the late Samuel and Ellen
Rolle, Mrs. Zelma Nixon and Family, Mr. & Mrs. George
Fox of Long Island, Cynthia Stuart and Family, Carol Young,
Pastor Mildred Ferguson and Family, Rosemary Moss and
Family, The Oliver Family, Mr. & Mrs. Kettel, The Family
of the late Vernal and Lovely Rolle, The Family of Marie
Flowers, The Family of the late Gerald Flowers, Mr. Newman,
Mr. Ponder, Mr. Jimmy Barr and Family, Hardley Smith and
Family, Nurse Marilyn Munroe, The Family of the Late
Dorothy and Florine, John(London, England), Bob(Sarasta),
Anglican Family, The Ebenezer Union Baptist Church Family,
Glad Tiding Church Family, Trinity Full Gospel Church
Family, Rokers Point, Church of God Family, The Forest,
Old Place and Farmeris Hill Communities.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Ramsey
Exuma on Friday from 12:00 Noon until 6:00 P.M. and at
the church on Saturday from 9:00 A.M. until service time.

Seletha Ferguson, 88

of Colonel Hill,
Crooked Island was
held on Thursday, at
12:00 Noon at Trinity
Full Gospel Baptist
Church, Marshall
Road. Officiated was
Rev. Deanza
Cunningham assisted
by other Ministers.
Interment was held at
Lakeview Memorial
Gardens, J.F.K. Drive
and Gladstone Road.

She is survived by
her step-daughter:
Deaconess Reatha
Ferguson and Reverend Linkwood Ferguson (step-son-in-
law), three adopted sons: Andrew Johnson and Denise
Johnson (daughter-in-law), Omar and Hansel Moss; Two
step-grandsons: Alphege and Nelson Ferguson; Nieces and
Nephews: Mr. and Mrs. Vondell Deleveaux of Hallandale
Fla. Mr. and Mrs. Othman and Marian Brown, Mr. and Mrs.
Edsel and Beulah Scavella, Mr. and Mrs. Clarrington
Deleveaux, Mr. Theophilus Anderson, Mrs. Olga Meadows,
Mr. and Mrs. James Anderson, Mrs. Joyce Gray, Ms. Thelma
Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Anderson, Mr. Lionel
Anderson ,Mr. and Mrs. Hudley Anderson, Rev Garth. and
Mrs. Eloise Mr. Kevan and Dr. Anita Brown-Dean and Mr.
and Mrs. Ian and Erica Atkins; Numerous grand nieces and
nephews and a host of other relatives and friends including
Mrs. Gerlene Gibson, Mrs. Victoria Beneby, Valderine Moss,
Mr. and Mrs. John E. Deleveaux, Rev. Catherine Chisholm,
Mrs. Olga Richards, Mrs. Lenora "Queen" Darling, Rev.
Theodore Darling, Mrs. Pearlene Knowles, Mrs. Laura
Rolle, Reverend Dr. Errol and Mabel Farquaharson, Ednol
Farquharson, Anthony Ferguson Pastor Juliemae
Farquharson, Deaconess Tirzah Williams and the entire
membership of St. John's Baptist Church, Crooked Island,
Mrs. Muriel Deleveaux, Mrs. Jenniamae Moss, Mrs. Iris
Daxon, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Ferguson -of Crooked Island,
Pastor Dorcas Thompson, Deaconess Edith Bain, Mrs.
Vernice Scavella and Family, Mrs. Luceille Scavella and
Family, Mrs. Elizabeth Ferguson, Eunice Deleveaux, Doreen
Darling, Senator Johnley Ferguson and Family, Staff at the
Geriatrics Hospital, and the entire community of Crooked
Island.

The body was repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary,
Robinson Road and Fifth Street on Wednesday from 12:00
Noon until 6:00 P.M., and at the church on Thursday from
11:00 a.m., until service time.



PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

mission, chaired by Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall,
to be formally appointed by Governor General
Arthur Hanna on October 1 and August 14
respectively.

A senior lawyer, who did not want to be named,
criticised the commission’s failure to consult
lawyers, judges, members of the public, non-gov-
ernmental organisations and watchdogs about the
potential appointments before drawing conclu-
sions.

Without an open discussion there is potential for
appointments to be skewed, the attorney warned.

He said: “We have to be sure to appoint people
because of their track record, as opposed to them
progressing through the civil service.

“For people who are answerable to the execu-
tive, and who continue to be answerable to the
executive, the State can do no wrong; and that
could be the case if your entire experience as an
attorney has been working in the office of the
Attorney General for five, 15 or 20 years.”

The appointment of Supreme Court and
Appeal Court judges is extremely sensitive as
Justices make and interpret laws to guide progress
in the country.

The senior counsel added: “We can have judges

Immigration chief calls for information
on alleged abuse of detainees =

Concerns raised

who are either lazy, or who will worship every
utterance of the executive, or who are complete-
ly left-wing, or completely right-wing, so there
should be a process which allows for the consid-
eration of the prospective appointment before
it’s confirmed, or simply announced.

“We have an antiquated, non-transparent
accountability process for Supreme Court and
Court of Appeal appointments and I think it’s
way past time to reform these kind of appoint-
ments.”

The Justices-to-be will fill the roles left vacant by
Justice Rubie Nottage and Senior Justice John
Lyons.

Justice Nottage left the bench last year, when
she reached the mandatory retirement age of 65
just two years after her appointment. And Justice
Lyons took early retirement on May 7.

Another attorney, who did not want to be
named, is concerned the appointed judges will
not be able to fill the shoes of Justice Lyons, a
senior commercial judge who heard a number of
complex cases.

She said: “We need to have someone who can
meet that image and substance if we want to have

FROM page one

detailed allegations made by an
officer who alleged to have wit-
nessed numerous beatings, sex-
ual assaults, and even one mur-
der at the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre - all of which
the officer claimed went unpun-
ished.

The identity and rank of the
officer was withheld to protect
his identity.

Yesterday, Mr Thompson said
his department was "not aware"
of the claims outlined in the arti-
cle.

"I'm saying that I have no
information before me, at all, (to
support) that it happened. .
.We're not aware of it. If any
such action or behaviour or mis-
conduct is brought to our atten-
tion we will investigate it and
we'll deal with it," he said,
flanked by the department's
senior deputy director, the
deputy director and the assistant
director of immigration.

An investigation into these
claims has not been launched,
said Mr Thompson.

There are no surveillance cam-

eras at the holding facility - to }
document the treatment of the }
detainees - but provisions have }
been made for their purchase in }
the department's 2009/2010 bud- :
get, said the director. i
He also stressed that his team }
maintains vigilance over the }
operations of the site with rou- }
tine visits and staff meetings with
Immigration officials. i
The Detention Centre has }
been plagued with claims of }
abuse and mistreatment for }
months with several detainees }
alleging that the facility was like ;
a "concentration camp”. H
The allegations prompted the
department to launch a fact-find- }
ing mission with prominent }
members of the community ear- ;
lier in the year. While that report }
was never made public, several }
aesthetic upgrades were made to }
the centre following the visit. :
The Immigration Department }

is responsible for the adminis- }
tration of the holding facility ;
while the RBDF mans the secu- }
rity of the centre. i
The Department of Social Ser- }
vices is responsible for the prepa- }
ration and distribution of meals. :
¢ SEE PAGE FIVE

a credible reputation as a financial centre and a
legitimate judiciary.

“While I’m not saying there’s anything wrong
with the appointments, we need to ask if we are
filling the gap.”

While Ms Bain has some commercial experi-
ence as former director of legal affairs for the
Attorney General, Mr Turner’s experience is in
criminal law.

He has worked at the Attorney General’s office
since 1988 and was appointed director of public
prosecutions in April 2000 to be responsible for
organising all criminal prosecutions through the
Attorney General’s office since.

The Bar Association reportedly expressed dis-
pleasure over Ms Bain’s Supreme Court appoint-
ment, but this has not been confirmed by Bar
Association President Ruth Bowe-Darville or for-
mer president Wayne Munroe.

The concerned attorney said: “The rules in the
Supreme Court are complex and they’re extreme-
ly deep. Unless you work with them in process and
know them intimately it’s very difficult to sit up on
the bench and hear some of these cases because of
the technicalities and rules involved, and that’s
what’s lacking in a number of these appoint-
ments.”

Harl Taylor killer ‘did not act alone’
FROM page one

she was told, tried to get to Mountbatten House but was unable to.

She told the court she subsequently went home and there received a
phone call prompting her to go back to West Hill Street.

Mts Taylor told how she identified her son’s body at the morgue the
following day.

During cross-examination by McNeil’s lead attorney, Murrio Ducille,
Mrs Taylor told the court that over the years she saw Troyniko at
Mountbatten House.

Detective Corporal Keith Turnquest, a crime scene investigator, said
yesterday that on the morning of November 18, 2007, he went to Mount-
batten House where he met other police officers.

Cpl Turnquest said that in the eastern side of the lobby area he saw
what appeared to be an accumulation of blood droplets on the floor and
blood dripping from the ceiling.

He told the court he went upstairs and saw blood stains on the white
railing that lead to a long hallway. There, he told the court, he found
bloody shoe prints and footprints. He testified that the hallway led to the
master bedroom and bathroom where he found blood in a face basin,
blood on the wall above it and a small white towel on face basin.

Cpl Turnquest said that in the master bedroom, he saw spattered
blood on the western, northern and southern wall as well as the lifeless
body of a dark male lying face up on the left side of the bed in a pool of
blood. Corporal Turnquest said he then photographed the scene.

While describing one of the photographs, Cpl Turnquest noted that a
brown handle broken knife was on the bed just above Taylor’s right hand.

Detective Sergeant James Colebrooke testified that he photographed
Taylor’s body at the morgue and observed numerous injuries to his
abdomen, back, shoulders, the back of his head and face.

A male alternate juror was discharged yesterday after he told the court
his mother was a close friend of Harl Taylor’s mother Beverly.

The trial resumes today before Senior Justice Anita Allen.

BEC ‘is owedl substantial amounts of money’
FROM page one

panies that owe BEC money and
who are at the point of legitimately

aN
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Compory

Public Advisory

The public ie advised that due to the
LPIA Expansion Project, the
entrance road leading to thea US
Departures terminal will be reduced
to one lane of wehiqular tratic
commencing on Thursday, Julby
=, 2009 until further notice. Please
observe any traffic directions and
signage while driving along the
entrance road,

We apologize for any inconvenience
caused.

However, Mr Gottlieb said he
was unwilling to disclose the amount
owed - which sources estimate to
be more than $80million.

In a bid to recoup the cash, the
chairman said BEC essentially has
three options open to it - the threat
of disconnection, disconnection, and
finally legal action.

In terms of people who owe the
corporation, Mr Gottlieb said this
demographic ranges from everyday
citizens, to businesses, to even oth-
er Government agencies and cor-
porations.

“That’s not unusual. There is usu-
ally an offset process there that
sometimes lags in time. There are
private companies that owe BEC
money and there are private indi-
viduals who also owe BEC money.
So it’s across the spectrum,” he said.

When asked if there was a diffi-
culty in the corporation actually col-
lecting its funds from certain high
profile persons in society, Mr Got-
theb said that this is a common mis-
perception.

“The present board does not pur-
sue a policy of being selective with
regard to those individuals or com-

having their electricity supply dis-
connected.

“But the facts that were stated
in the recent Punch article were not
correct as regards that particular
individual and business (Wendall
Jones, Jones Communication).”

Mr Gottlieb said he could not
disclose how much the struggling
media empire owed but it is not the
significant sums quoted in the
tabloid piece.

Doctors Hospital
FROM page one

Ms Rassin said: “At Doctors
Hospital, our first priority is quali-
ty care and patient safety. We have
a disaster plan as well as protocols
in place for such emergencies
including redundancy with two
backup generators.

“However, management at
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
must understand that a hospital is
an essential service to the country,
and patients’ lives could be in jeop-
ardy during a power outage. Long
term power outages could put



eo

fies an

Public Notice

Ministry of Public Works and Transport
Construction of New Market, Downtown Nassau

Pre-Qualification of Contractors

The Government of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas through the Ministry of
Public Works and Transport is inviting qualified General Contractors to participate
for the Tender for the construction of a new Market to be built on a restricted site in

Downtown Nassau.

The structure will be approximately 38,724 sq.ft. with associated external works and

SeIVICes.

The General Contractors will be required to provide a detailed indication of their

competence, both technically and financially, to carry out the intended scope of work
within a reasonable time.

Interested parties may collect the pre-qualification documents as of Thursday, 2 July,

2009 between the hours of 9:00am - 5:00pm from:

The Office of the Director of Public Works
Ministry of Public Works and Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive

Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 322-4830

Fax:

The completed pre-qualification document should be deposited in the Tender Box at
the Ministry of Finance, 3rd Floor, Cecil Wallace-Whitfied Building, West Bay Street,
P.O.Box, N-3017, Nassau, Bahamas no later than 5:00pm on Monday, 13 July, 2009

The Government of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has the right to reject any or all

pre-qualification contractors.

(242) 302-9770

Signed

Colin Higgs

Permanent Secretary



patients at risk if they are on a ven-
tilator or having surgery. Medica-
tion, treatment and services might
be delayed for patients further ham-
pering patient care.”

She said physicians and nursing
staff “responded professionally” to
the situation which saw the elec-
tricity supply to the hospital cut off
for “just under two hours”.

The length of this period was
“totally unacceptable,” she added.

“Tn a crisis that involves power or
water outages, the utility compa-
nies must ensure consistent and reli-
able service to hospitals as patient
lives could be at stake; actions need
to take place to prevent a reoccur-
rence.”

Ms Rassin added that Doctors
Hospital “is committed to our
employees, patients, and commu-
nity and top priority remains to
ensure their safety.”

Acknowledging that some mem-
bers of the public may not think to
contact BEC when their power
goes out, Mr Basden said this can
happen for a number of reasons
and in some cases “depending on
the nature of it, BEC may not be
aware.”

He said people can contact BEC
on 323 5661 to report outages.

GB businessman
FROM page one

in the ‘Pink Building’ that really
this is the way to go,” he said.

“Tam elated. I could not see the
point of putting 76 people out of
work for rent. I want to pay it, but
I did not see what was wrong in
finding out what was a fair rent.”

Following his meeting with Mr
Rolle, Mr Hayward met with his
staff at Port Lucaya around 3pm to
share the news and update them
on the current situation.

Mr Hayward has paid more than
$34,000, emptying his businesses’
bank accounts. He is required
come up with an additional $15,000
by the end of next week, bringing
his total payment to $50,000.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



ai

Roddick faces
Murray at
Wimbledon

TENNIS
WIMBLEDON, England
Associated Press



THE current edition of
Wimbledon is the 23rd
Grand Slam tournament
since Andy Roddick won his
lone major championship at
the 2003 U.S. Open.

He badly wants to win a
second.

It’s why he changed coach-
es for this season. Slimmed
down. Put in as much work
as ever in practice, striving
to improve his returns, his
backhands, his volleys.

Add it all up, and the
sixth-seeded American is
back in the Wimbledon
semifinals for the first time
since 2005, facing No. 3-
seeded Andy Murray of
Britain on Friday. Roger
Federer — seeking a sixth
Wimbledon championship
and record 15th Grand Slam
title — faces No. 24 Tommy
Haas of Germany in the oth-
er semifinal.

“Andymonium” has hit
the All England Club, but
don’t think Roddick is happy
merely to be a part of it.

“By no means is he satis-
fied, because the whole gig
when he hired me is we’ve
got to win a Slam,” Rod-
dick’s coach, Larry Stefan-
ki, said. “I said, "That’s what
I’m here for.’ Winning a
Slam is what it’s all about.
Coming in second is like
kissing your sister. And he
knows that he’s already won
one. Nothing is going to suf-
fice. Even if you get to the
final, 1t won’t do.”

Roddick’s major title, not
quite six years ago, was also
the last at any Grand Slam
event for an American man,
the country’s longest drought
in the Open era, which
began in 1968.

That wait must seem
rather quaint to the folks
around here.

Murray is trying to
become the first British man
to win Wimbledon since
Fred Perry in 1936. No
British man has won any
Grand Slam championship
since Perry at the U.S. Open
later that year.

So the buzz builds with
each victory by Murray. The
22-year-old from Scotland
wrote on Twitter about the
good-luck note he received
from Queen Elizabeth II —
everyone in Britain wants to
know whether she’ll show up
in the Royal Box if Murray
reaches Sunday’s final —
and the phone call he got
from actor Sean Connery.

“Tt doesn’t make any dif-
ference the way you per-
form, the hype. If you ...
spend a lot of time reading
the papers, watching every-
thing on the TV, all the
things that are getting said
on the radio, then you get
caught up in it,” said Mur-
ray, the runner-up to Feder-
er at last year’s U.S. Open.
“If you ignore it, you don’t
realize it’s happening.”

Murray is 6-2 against Rod-
dick, including a lopsided
victory in their most recent
meeting, in the final of a
hard-court tournament at
Doha, Qatar, in January.

That was Stefanki’s first
tournament with Roddick
and expects Friday’s
encounter to look different.

“Tt wast pretty. That tac-
tic won’t be used again. It
was a very aggressive, offen-
sive, bring-out-the-bugle-
and-charge,” Stefanki said.
“And this guy is like (Mats)
Wilander or (Bjorn) Borg —
you give him a target and
he’s going to pass you, lob
you, dink you, because he’s a
great mover off the ball.”



nacre

Stefan Wermuth/AP Photo

TENNIS
WIMBLEDON, England
Associated Press

urday in a Fourth of July final.

“A fourth final — it’s so exciting. It
was so hard before my match to watch
all that drama,” Venus said, referring to



for, and this is what we want. Like I wanted
her to win today and she wanted me to win
today. It’s all come down to this.”

Venus said she was rooting for Serena to
win Thursday, but will now do all she can to
stop her sister and win her eighth major
title.

“T’m happy for her to be in the final, but
I have to face her and defeat her,” Venus
said. “I don’t necessarily want her to lose,
but for sure I want me to win. I don’t want
to see myself disappointed. I need to get
my titles, too. I’m still the big sister, but ’m
still going to play great tennis.”

The difference in the two semifinals
couldn’t have been more striking.

The Serena-Dementieva match was the
longest women’s Wimbledon semifinal by
time since 1969; records are incomplete
before then. Venus’ win was the most one-
sided women’s semifinal since Billie Jean
King beat Rosie Casals by the same score in
1969. The last time a semifinal ended 6-0, 6-
0 was in 1925.

After Serena’s tense, drama-filled escape
against Dementieva, Venus barely broke a
sweat against Safina. The Russian is ranked
and seeded No. 1 despite never having won
a Grand Slam tournament. Safina won only
20 points and was completely outclassed by
the third-seeded Venus, who has been play-
ing some of her best grass-court tennis at this
tournament.

THE purple “W” logo at Wimbledon
might as well stand for the siblings who
have made the women’s championship
their own playground. Yes, the Williams
sisters are back in the Wimbledon final.

Venus and Serena Williams won in con-
trasting fashion Thursday to set up their
fourth all-sister Wimbledon final and
eighth meeting in a Grand Slam title
match.

Two-time champion Serena saved a
match point and overcame Elena Demen-
tieva 6-7 (4), 7-5, 8-6 in 2 hours, 49 minutes
— the longest women’s semifinal at Wim-
bledon in at least 40 years. Five-time win-
ner Venus, meanwhile, needed only 51
minutes to demolish Dinara Safina 6-1,
6-0 and reach her eighth Wimbledon final.

“Oh, my God, this is my eighth final,
and it’s a dream come to true to be here
again and have the opportunity to hold
the plate up,” Venus said.

The sisters — with 17 Grand Slam titles
between them — will face each other Sat-

Serena’s semifinal. “It was so difficult.
But the hardest part is next to come, to
play Serena Williams.”

One Williams or the other has won sev-
en of the past nine championships at the
All England Club. Serena beat Venus in
the 2002 and ’03 finals, and Venus came
out on top against her younger sister last
year.

“All I know is a Williams is going to
win,” said the sisters’ father, Richard.

Venus is bidding to become the first
woman since Steffi Graf in 1991-93 to win
Wimbledon three years in a row.

There have been seven previous all-
Williams championship matches at majors,
with Serena holding a 5-2 lead. Overall,
the sisters are 10-10.

“The more we play, the better it gets,”
Serena said. “Wen we play our match on
Saturday, you know, it’s for everything.
This is what we dreamed of when we were
growing up in Compton (Calif.) 20-some-
thing years ago. This is what we worked



Anja Niedringhaus/AP Photo

Donovan: Beckham has become a bad teammate

SOCCER
NEW YORK
Associated Press

DAVID Beckham has
become a bad teammate on the
Los Angeles Galaxy, accord-
ing to Landon Donovan.

“All that we care about at a
minimum is that he committed
himself to us,” Donovan was
quoted as saying in an excerpt
of Grant Wahl’s “The Beck-
ham Experiment,” scheduled
for publication July 14. “As
time has gone on, that has not
proven to be the case in many
ways — on the field, off the
field.

“Does the fact that he earns
that much money come into it?
Yeah. If someone’s paying you
more than anybody in the
league, more than double any-
body in the league, the least
we expect is that you show up

to every game, whether you’re
suspended or not. Show up and
train hard. Show up and play
hard.”

Beckham joined the Galaxy
in July 2007 from Real Madrid
and has a $6.5 million average
annual income from the team,
twice the $2.94 million
Cuauhtemoc Blanco earns
from the Chicago Fire. Dono-
van was fifth at $900,000 at the
start of the season.

Beckham was loaned to AC
Milan last winter and the 34-
year-old midfielder is to rejoin
Los Angeles for its July 16
match at the New York Red
Bulls.

Donovan was angry that
when Beckham was suspend-
ed for a game at Houston last
year, he didn’t attend the
match.

“Tcan’t think of another guy
where I'd say he wasn’t a good
teammate, he didn’t give every-

thing through all this, he didn’t
still care,” Donovan said. “But
with (Beckham) I’d say no, he
wasn’t committed.”

An excerpt of the book was
published in this week’s Sports
Illustrated. It portrays Beck-
ham as stingy, saying he would-
n’t pick up meal checks for
teammates who earn as little
as $12,900 annually. It states
Terry Byrne, Beckham’s best
friend and personal manager,
pressed for the Galaxy to strip
Donovan of the captain’s arm-
band and give it to Beckham.
Donovan went along with the
move.

It says that at a dinner at
Morton’s steak house in
Arlington, Va., Beckham ini-
tially wasn’t served wine
because he didn’t have ID, and
needed the intervention of the
maitre d’.

Byrne, according to the
excerpt, was hired as a Galaxy

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consultant and conducted the
search that led to the hiring of
Ruud Gullit to replace Frank
Yallop as coach — even though
general manager Alexi Lalas
advised against hiring the 1987
European player of the year.
“My sense is that David’s
clearly frustrated, that he’s f[
unhappy and, honestly, that he a
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APRIL 30, 2009
PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Bahamas 1-2 at FIBA championships

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

AFTER three days of com-
petition in the the FIBA Amer-
icas Caribbean Basketball
Championships for Men in Tor-
tola, British Virgin Islands, the
Bahamas stands at 1-2 and faces
an uphill climb towards medal
contention.

MSEC
CNY

For the third consecutive con-
test, the Bahamas squandered a
fourth quarter lead to an oppo-
nent to lose a crucial game in its
waning moments.

The Bahamas took a 67-59
lead into the fourth, but failed
to hang on, outscored by
Trinidad 27-17 in the quarter.

Trinidad opened on a 12-4 run
to tie the game at 71 with 5:50
left to play on a basket by Steven
Lewis.

They took the lead of the
game since the first quarter,
nearly a minute later on an

by Julius Ashby with 4:34 left.

Alonzo Hinds again tied the
score at 73 from the free throw
line and the Bahamas regained
the lead on a free throw by Jef-
frey Henfield.

Trinidad pulled ahead 77-74
before the Bahamas brought
about another tie when Hinds
made a three pointer from the
right wing.

Ian Curtis regained the lead
for good for the Trinidadians
with his pair of free throws with
1:46 remaining.

His free throws sparked a 7-0
run which put the team up 85-77.

Brian Bain finally broke the
run for the Bahamas with a three
point field goal, but with just sev-
en seconds remaining and trail-
ing by two possessions, little
hope was left for a comeback.

Tied after the opening quarter
at 22, however the Bahamas
widened the margin opening an
advantage that grew to as much
as 11 on a basket by Jeremy
Hutchinson just before the half
to make the score 46-35.

The downward spiral began
for the Bahamas in the third

outscored by five and with the
fourth quarter breakdown, were
outscored by 15 for the game.

Quentin Hall led the Bahamas
in scoring with 24 points and sev-
en assists, including 5-12 shoot-
ing from beyond the arc.

Hinds came off the bench and
finished with 21 points six
rebounds and four assists while
Doyle Hudson also chipped in
with 11 points and four rebounds
in a reserve role.

Henfield finished with nine
points while Scott Forbes added
four points and 10 rebounds.

Curtis led Trinidad and Toba-
go with 23 points, while Julius
Ashby and Wilfred Benjamin
chipped in with 17 points apiece.

The Bahamas’ three games
have been decided by an average
margin of 3.3 points per game

Dera
BAHAMAS - 73

After again blowing a late
fourth quarter lead, the
Bahamas was unable to hold off
their oppenents and fell to 1-1 in
the CBC Championships.



opening quarter, however with a
major run in the second when
they outscored Jamaica 30-18,
the Bahamas took a 44-37 lead.

The lead was trimmed to just
four, 60-56 heading into the
fourth quarter. The Bahamas
faltered in the fourth quarter,
outscored 21-13. Louisville Uni-
versity’'s Samardo Samuels
scored eight of his 11 points in
the fourth quarter to lead
Jamaica.

Kimani Friend and Orit-
seweyinmi Efejuku each hipped
in with 18 points apeice. Hinds
again led the Bahamas with a
game high 27 points including a
nearly perfect 12-13 from the
free throw line. Torrington Cox
and Quentin Hall each finished
with 11 points apeice while Bri-
an Bain and Jeremy Hutchin-
son both finished with nine.

The Bahamas shot just 41 per-
cent from the field and gave up
10 turnovers.

BAHAMAS - 75

PU UL]



The Bahamas Men’s Senior

offensive rebound and putback

quarter

when they were

Barry captures

third Ironman title



AFTER failing to defend his
crown in 2008, Lieutenant Ricardo
Barry returned this year determined
to be considered the best all around
athlete in the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force. Barry captured the
prestigious Ironman title for the
third time in the event's ten-year
history. A newcomer to the scene,
Woman Marine Aniska Bonaby
captured the crown in the open
female category.

The annual competition features
the fittest male and female officers
and marines the force has to offer,
and gives its winners coveted brag-
ging rights for one full year. Male
participants must complete a 500-
metre swim, cycle eight miles and

run a three-mile road race. Their
female counterparts are required to
complete a shortened circuit com-
prising the mentioned events.

Due to job obligations, the men's
defending champion, Leading Sea-
man Marvin Darville was not avail-
able to defend his crown, as Barry
won with a time of 1:00.20secs. For
a second consecutive year, both Sub
Lieutenant Derrick Ferguson and
Able Seaman Edney had to settle
for second and third respectively,
with improved times of 1:06.54secs
and 1:10.55secs. “I was quite pre-
pared for the competition this time
around”, said Barry, who had previ-
ously won the competition in 2006
and 2007. “Although Darville had

Jamaica led 19-14 after the

job obligations, I felt I would have
gotten a better push”.

Woman Marine Bonaby complet-
ed a shortened female's version of
the gruelling circuit in 1:06.14secs.
Akeyra Saunders was a close second
with a time of 1:07.50seconds and
Malissa Richardson placed third in
1:35.10secs. Bonaby, who joined the
Defence Force in February of this
year, felt like the competition could
have been better. “I've never com-
peted in a competition like the Iron-
man, but I just went out there and
gave it my best shot. I felt good,
and hopefully, I will get better at it.”

In the team segment of the com-
petition, the male team of Craig
Frazier, Marcellus Rolle and
Delvonne Duncombe prevailed in a
time of 54:57secs, and the female
team of Gaye Bykowski, Dorece
Henfield and Michelle Colebrooke
completed the course in 1:09.21secs.
Defence Force organizers of the
event were pleased with the compe-
tition, but according to Petty Officer
Ramone Storr, there is still room for
improvemant.







EVEN IF IT DOESN'T MOVE

today.

one touchdown.

league.

National team opened the

After Knowles and his men’s doubles
partner Mahesh Bhupathi got eliminated
in the semis on Wednesday, he and Anna-
Lena Groenefeld are playing for a spot
in the mixed doubles final.

Seeded number nine, Knowles and

FROM page 11

“Tm ready now to take that next step in my
career,” he said. “I’m just not happy with being
in the NFL. I’m ready to take the next step to
becoming a real productive receiver in this

“T feel I have the talent to do it and ’'m going
to do it. It ain’t just about being happy there in
the league. I want to be a starter and a star on the
team. I want to be a real contributor.”

With two more years left on his contract, Dar-
ling said he’s looking forward to making the best
of his opportunity with the Chiefs.

“We have a new coaching staff coming in with
a new attitude and everyone is buying into it,”

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FROM page 11

their goals in life.”

This year, the second-year
Kansas City Chiefs’ wide
receiver will be bringing about
five of his colleagues from the
National Football League,
including team-mates, wide
receiver Dwayne Bowe and
running back Larry Johnson.

Also expected in is Darius
Haywood, Kansas City’s No.7
pick overall in the recent NFL
draft, along with Bobby Ingra-
ham, a wide receiver who was
just acquired from the Seattle
Seahawks.

“It’s going to be a good
showing,” Darling said. “Hope-
fully the kids will come out and
participate and learn some life
skills and some football at the
same time.”

With the two camps being
held on the two islands, Dar-

region’s top tournament by
holding off a late fourth quar-
ter charge in the feature game
of opening night.

The team opened with a 75-
73 win over Barbados in the
opening game of the FIBA
Americas Caribbean Basket-
ball Championships for Men in
Tortola, British Virgin Islands.

The Bahamas withheld a late
run by the Barbadian squad in
the third game of the night.

They led after the opening
quarter 27-23 propelled by C.J
Hinds who had 8 points in the
quarter and Quentin Hall who
opened with 7 points.

The Bahamas also outscored
theie opponents 16-14 in the
second quarter to lead at the
half 43-37.

The Bahamas opened with a
9-2 run in the third to take a
61-50 lead early into the quar-
ter. After again outscoring
Barbados 22-15, and took a 65-
52 lead heading into the fourth
quarter.

After begining each quarter
trailing, Barbados began with
an 8-2 run to trim the defecit to
single digits, 67-60.



They reduced the lead 74-71
with a 7-0 run after a basket
by David Jeremy Gill with 4:29
left to play.

With an opportunity to draw
even, Barbados failed to tie the
game missing key baskets
down the stretch.

The Bahamas placed four
players in double figures, led
by Jeremy Hutchinson's dou-
ble double with 11 points and
10 rebounds.

Hinds led the team with 15
points and four assists, finish-
ing with 3-5 shots from beyond
the arch Brian Bain finished
with 12 points while Hall
added 11.

Jeffrey Henfield finished
with eight points while Scott
Forbes added eight points and
five rebounds.

Kelvin Patterson led Barba-
dos with 15 points.

Both teams were virtually
even statistically, however in
a closely contested game, the
Bahamas’ advantage in field
goal percentage (60-48) and
three point field goals made
(7-5), both in favour of the
Bahamas.

LIEUTENANT
Ricardo Barry
completing the
three mile run
segment of the
Defence Force
Ironman
triathlon compe-
tition at the Coral
Harbour Base.
Barry was SuUC-
cessful in cap-
turing the overall
male crown.

Able Seaman Al Rahming/Photo

Knowles, Groenefeld play
for mixed doubles finals

AFTER losing in an historic semifinal,
Mark Knowles will get a chance to make
up for his men’s doubles exit when he
plays in another semifinal at Wimbledon

Groenefeld will play the team of Great
Britain’s Jamie Murray and American
Liezel Huber to secure their spot in the
mixed doubles final.

Their semi-final match is scheduled for

today with the final set for Sunday.

If they win, they will play either No.1
seeds Leander Paes from India and Cara
Black from Zimbabwe or the No.12 team

of Stephen Huss of Australia and Virginia

Ruano Pascual from Spain.

Devard excited about upcoming NFL season

Darling said. “I’m just looking forward to going

into training camp and having a good year.”
Training camp will get under way on July 30 in

River Falls, Wisconsin. However, the season

ling said he’s pretty pleased
about what they have been
able to achieve and he only
expected the camp to contin-
ue to get bigger and better.

His older brother, Dennis, a
former track quarter-miler
turned collegiate coach, said
he was thrilled to be working
with Devard and his crew in
putting on the two camps.

“Every year we try to get
better and help the youngsters
to learn the game of football,”
Dennis said. “We will also have
some spiritual devotions and
life devotions.

“We are looking forward to
over 100 kids coming out and
participating in the two
camps.”

With the camp in Grand
Bahama getting under way on
Monday, Dennis said they have
seen the growth and develop-
ment in the campers who have

won’t get underway until Saturday, August 15
when Kansas City will host the Houston Oilers.

Their first game on the road will take place on
Friday, August 21 at Minnesota.

“T just can’t wait for the season to get under
way,” Darling said. “I’m really looking forward to
a great season. I’ve been working extremely hard
and my expectations are high.”

But in the meantime Darling said he just want-
ed to go to Grand Bahama on Sunday to get the
first leg of his camp under way on Monday.

Once that’s done, Darling said he will be back
in town to complete the second half at the Tom
‘the Bird’ Grant Complex next weekend.

Darling Football Camp set to kick off

been participating from the
inception there four years ago.

“They are still coming out to
the camp, so we look forward
to going over there and having
a good time,” he said. “The
kids over there (Grand
Bahama) look forward to it.
We hope that we can eventu-
ally expand to other Family
Islands in the future.”

Here in New Providence, the
venue has been changed from
the Winton Rugby Pitch where
the numbers were not as
impressive last year, to the
Tom ‘the Bird’ Grant Complex
where they hope to increase
the number of participants.

“We decided to move it from
the east end of the island to a
more central location where a
lot more of the kids can come
out,” Darling said. “So we
expect to have a lot more kids
this year.”
THE TRIBUNE

S|

FRIDAY, JULY 3,



INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays





PAGE 1



2009

‘tS

ah



Devard excited abou
upcoming NFL season

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER playing in his first year with
the Kansas City Chiefs, Devard Darling
feels that his current stint in the Nation-
al Football League will only get better.

The 27-year-old wide receiver just
completed his sixth year in the National
Football League, his second with the
Chiefs after being traded by the Wash-
ington Redskins, whom he began his
career with.

“T can’t complain. The Lord has been
good,” said Darling, who is in town to get
ready for the promotion of his football
camp in Grand Bahama and here next
week.

“We got a good coach and GM. The
Lord has played his favour on me, so
I’m looking for a great season this year.
We have a new quarter-back, a couple
new pieces with the team, so I’m looking
forward to having a great season this
year.”

At 6-feet, one-inch and 215 pounds,
Darling said the Chiefs are expecting
him to step in this year as the starting
wide receiver and so he’s anticipating
that he will make the best of the oppor-
tunity.

“Last year, I didn’t really get too many
balls thrown my way, but this year, ’'m
looking for the ball to come more, espe-
cially with a new quarter-back.

“Tjust have to go out there and make
some plays.”

Last year, Darling played in 16 games
where he caught a total of 17 receptions
for 247 yards, an average of 14.5 per
game, his longest posted at 68 yards.

He also had eight first downs with just

SEE page 10



KANSAS City Chiefs’ wide receiver Devard Darling (left) shares a moment with his old-
er brother, Dennis Darling (during) during a visit to The Tribune Newspaper yesterday.

Darling
Football

Gr Tenhemrels
KO e(@l aya



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ONCE again, Devard Darling will be
sharing his professional football expertise
with potential Bahamian high school
players who wish to follow in his foot-
steps.

The dual Devard and Devaughn Dar-
ling’s Football Camp will be hosted at
the Freeport Rugby Club in Grand
Bahama from July 6-7 and at the Tom
‘the Bird’ Grant Sports Complex from
July 9-10.

Just in town to promote the camp that
he’s holding in memory of his deceased
twin brother, Devaughn, Devard said he
only expected camp to get better and
better with each year.

“T expect every year for the kids to
come out and learn, not just about the
game of football, but a lot about life
because that’s the most important part,”
Devard Darling said.

“We hope to get them to open their
minds so that they can hope and reach for

SEE page 10






suffers

cable
break

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company’s (BTC)
international telecoms and
Internet/data traffic was tem-
porarily interrupted earlier
this week when its Bahamas IT
fibre optic cable was acciden-
tally cut, Tribune Business
confirmed yesterday, with
repairs likely to be made
before month’s end.

Marlon Johnson, BTC”s
vice-president of sales and
marketing, told this newspa-
per that the state-owned carri-
er’s services were “affected for
a few hours” after the under-
sea cable was cut somewhere
between Eight Mile Rock in
Grand Bahama and Vero
Beach, Florida, where it lands
to connect the Bahamas to the
international telecoms and
Internet network.

“We did have a cut in the
Bahamas IT Cable. The service
was affected for a few hours,”
Mr Johnson said. However, he
emphasised that cuts to under-
sea telecommunications were
not unusual, being caused by
bad weather such as hurri-
canes, or ships inadvertently
dropping anchor on them.

The BTC executive added
that when the Bahamas II
Cable was cut, BTC diverted
the voice telecommunications
and data traffic it carried on to
the ARCOS network, the self-
healing circular fibre optic
ring that connects the
Bahamas and other Caribbean
countries to North, South and
Central America.

Disruption

“We just moved the traffic
from one network to the oth-
er,” Mr Johnson told Tribune
Business. “There was a few
hours disruption when the cut
came.

“We want to emphasise that
this happens, and what tele-
coms operators do is build
topography that is self-healing
or have alternative routes with
alternative providers.”

And he added: “They’ve
scheduled repairs. There’s a
company that we engage that
has a vessel to do this stuff,
and it depends where we fall
in the queue. We are sched-
uled for repairs, I suspect
some time this month.”

Tribune Business was yes-
terday told that the Bahamas
II cable had suffered two cuts,
one at the Vero Beach end
close to Florida and the other
nearer to Eight Mile Rock in
Grand Bahama.

However, Mr Johnson dis-
puted this, telling Tribune
Business that BTC had “no
information to indicate that”.
Its initial assessment was that
there was only one cable
break, but it would only know
for sure when repairs com-
menced.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission.
from the daily report.



THE TRIBUNE

u





ne

FRIDAY,

TUBE Cees



2009

| SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net



$43m in airport
work for locals

WB Airport Authority chair denies Bahamian contractors being squeezed out, as ‘the
majority’ of $43m in work to be let in next three months for them

Wi Winning general contractor to partner with Nassau-based Wooslee Dominion

Wl ‘Great surprise’ that only three bids received on time for US departures terminal
i Pledge that no more ‘incentive fees’ in concessions contracts

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

“The majority” of $43 million
worth of contracts that the Nas-
sau Airport Development Com-
pany (NAD) has yet to issue
for construction work on the
new US departures terminal
will be awarded to Bahamian
contractors, the Airport
Authority’s chairman said yes-
terday, describing as “factually
incorrect” claims that locals
were being squeezed out.

Frank Watson told Tribune
Business those contracts, large-
ly for interior work such as
electrics, plumbing and engi-
neering, would be issued
between now and September
2009, with the groundbreaking
ceremony for the US departures

A LeU e) |

terminal - the first stage in the
$409.5 million Lynden Pindling
International Airport (LPIA)



Firm’s assets under
administration up
140% to $405-$410m

KENWOOD KERR



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Bahamas-based investment
advisory firm has increased its
assets under administration by
141 per cent to around $405-
$10 million during its first three
years in existence, Tribune Busi-
ness was told yesterday, having
“exceeded expectations” as it
moves to enhance clients’ real
time access to their financial
information.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive, said
the company was hoping by
September to provide individual
members of pension plans it
managed/administered with on-
line access to their personal
financial information via the use
of pin numbers and encrypted
passwords/codes.

Speaking to Tribune Business
as the company prepares to cel-
ebrate its third birthday follow-
ing its buy out from S$ G Ham-
bros Bank & Trust (Bahamas),
Mr Kerr said Providence Advi-
sors had already invested “a few
hundred thousand dollars” in
replacing the legacy IT system it
inherited upon its creation.

The company already pro-
vided clients, at the human
resources and management lev-
el, with real time, on-line access
to their financial plans and
investments, so they could
gauge their performance and
obtain the relevant information.

And Mr Kerr told Tribune
Business that the company was
also looking at broadening its
investments product offering
through ‘family of funds’ prod-
ucts targeted at specific mar-
kets.

“We’ve exceeded expecta-

SEE page 2B

* Providence Advisors
looking to provide real
time, on-line access to
clients’ financial data by
September

* Eyeing ‘family of
funds’ product, as firm
‘excceeds expectations’

redevelopment - set to take
place this coming Thursday.

Stating that he was “very sur-
prised” that NAD only received
three bids for the US departures
terminal’s general contractor
tender, Mr Watson described
as “not factually correct” claims
by Stephen Wrinkle, the
Bahamian Contractors Associ-
ation’s (BCA) president, that
Bahamian construction compa-
nies were being “left out in the
cold” when it came to getting
work on the airport redevelop-
ment.

Referring to the general con-
tractor bid, which was ulti-
mately won by Vancouver-
based Ledcor Construction, Mr
Watson told Tribune Business:

SEE page 4B




PHOTO: Christopher Hartley



ENVIRONMENTAL protection controls off Arawak Cay

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



$3m overtime
Savings ‘negate’
airport fee rise

* Hotel executive says work on other initiatives to
reduce airline costs at LPIA will counteract impact
of fee rises

* Concern remains on ground handling charges

* ‘No one likes to see an increase, but we want to
have an airport that is modern, efficient and that
showcases the country in the best possible light’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The $3 million in annual savings that airlines flying into
Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA) will enjoy
from the elimination of Customs/Immigration overtime
charges should “more than negate” the impact of a 23.6 per
cent increase in landing fees, the Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion’s (BHA) executive vice-president said yesterday.

Pointing out that the elimination of Customs/Immigra-
tion overtime charges would coincide with the date when the
Nassau Airport Development Company’s (NAD) proposed
fee increases would be implemented, Frank Comito told
Tribune Business a balance had to be struck between mak-
ing LPIA cost competitive for airlines and the need to

SEE page 5B

BEST warns
OSM M CENA

control at
Arawak Cay

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



THE COMPANY responsi-
ble for extending the western
end of Arawak Cay has been
warned by the Bahamas Envi-
ronment, Science and Technol-
ogy (BEST) Commission to
properly install water turbidity
control measures, the minister
of the environment said yester-

SEE page 2B

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

nvestinent

call us today at 396-4000

FAMILY GUARDIAN CORPORATE CENTRE: AT THE JUNCTION OF VILLAGE ROAD, SHIRLEY STREET & EAST BAY STREET | www.famguardbahamas.com



[= expert investment advice
[1 multiple fund options
[7 potentially higher returns

all of the above

A SUBSIDIARY OF

FAMGUARD
CORPORATION LIMITED
PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





BEST warns on turbidity
control at Arawak Cay

FROM page 1B

day, as the developers await sheet piles
that will form the bulkhead for the
extension and secure fill dredged from
Nassau harbour.

Earl Deveaux said the BEST Com-
mission found that fill being pushed
into the sea was escaping beneath the
floating turbidity control barriers used
to prevent such a spread.

Director of the BEST Commission,
Philip Weech, said the floats were not
designed to prevent the occurrence of
murky water as fill is spread and
packed along the sea bed, but they
are designed to greatly reduce its
spread.

“The turbidity barriers are intended
to reduce and control the amount of
influence over as large an area as pos-
sible,” he said.

Mr Weech said that when the dredg-
ing of Nassau Harbour begins, similar
measures will be put in place, but he
argued that areas of white milky water
will occur around the site.

The extension of Arawak Cay is a
part of the Government’s plan for the
new container port. Now, as work
begins, questions are being asked
about the project’s environmental
impact.

According to Mr Deveaux, the fine
silt stirred up on the ocean floor dur-
ing dredging can be dangerous to reefs
and fish if it is suspended in that envi-

ronment for long periods of time.

Mr Weech argued that the installa-
tion of the bulkhead will greatly
reduce the amount of large material
escaping the site, but conceded that
it will not prevent the fine silt, which
will again be held at bay by floating
turbidity control measures.

Christopher Hartley, describing
himself as an environmental steward,
told Tribune Business yesterday that
he had explored the reefs around Bal-
moral Island which could be affected
by the dredged silt.

“These reefs are beautiful. Iam so
pleased to see something living around
here,” he said.

Discourage

Diving and photographing the area
of Arawak Cay under construction,
Mr Hartley said workers attempted
to discourage him from investigating
whether the turbidity control mea-
sures were doing their job.

According to Mr Hartley, the skirts
attached to the floats did not connect
with the sea bed, and thus would not
prevent silt escaping underneath.

Mr Hartley said he was a leading
figure agitating against Atlantis’ pro-
posed development of a golf course
on Athol Island.

He operated a tour called Hartley’s
Undersea Walk, which took guests on
a stroll along the seafloor just off the

southeastern coast of the island, which
was in danger of being destroyed by
the development.

Mr Hartley said rare, thriving reefs
off the coast of New Providence could
be affected if ocean currents pull silt
toward that area.

“We took observation pictures
along the barrier reef of Cable Beach,
and I was pleased to see amazing life.
In fact, a kind of coral which is endan-
gered as well as sensitive to destruc-
tion. I have not seen such coral in
abundance since I was a child,” said
Mr Hartley.

Mr Deveaux said his ministry and
the BEST Commission are working
closely with Boskalis, the company
extending Arawak Cay, to mitigate
the environmental impact.

Questions were also raised about
numbers spray painted on the casau-
rina trees lining Saunders Beach, pos-
sibly indicating their inevitable
removal.

Mr Weech said some of the trees
will be removed when the Govern-
ment redevelops that area as part of
its road improvement programme.
However, he said they should have
never been spray painted.

“Some trees will be removed as a
part of the redevelopment of the
beach area by the Ministry of Works,
where the corridors would connect
into West Bay Street,” Mr Weech said.
“But there is no intention to take the
trees.”

TREEMONISHA

Oram ee

‘ey \ i uty

On the Occasion of

The 36 Anniversary of Independence

site ber

j
Wihherit
re oo
GL Ab ard

an
Zs
iors

id Lae ale tae
" I

1

Pe

Set
ov

oe eh ea

Directed by: Dr, Lieweland AL William
Settee tn

The Dundas Centre For The Performing Arts
July 6, 7, 8, 11, 2009 at 8:00 PM

394~7179 | 393~3728

T; 242.328,7115 theough 9

Firm’s assets under
administration up

140% to $405-$410m

FROM page 1B



tions,” Mr Kerr told Tribune Business. “We’ve had a very positive response from
the business community. That is evidenced by the fact some people have joined us
from the get go, and we still have those clients. It has been pretty good. We’ve
acquired business on top of what we had with SG.”

Providence Advisors was now hoping the implementation of its new IT platform,
which had almost entirely replaced its legacy systems, would enhance operating effi-
ciencies. The company aimed to “be able to deliver on these changes in the next
quarter”.

Mr Kerr said the new IT system provided Providence Advisors with integrated
client accounting, portfolio accounting and portfolio management, enhancing the
company’s “ability to capture data and send it on”.

And he added: “We’re also looking on the investment side to create diversity and
options in terms of what we offer on the funds menu through a family of funds.”

Mr Kerr said Providence Advisors’ business had grown from $170 million when
it split from SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) three years ago to about
$405-$410 million currently. By having an established book of business, largely
through the hotel industry pension funds, the company’s development was “much
further on than if we had started from scratch”.

Mr Kerr said Providence Advisors, which employs 14 full-time staff, had seen the
effects of the economic slowdown in terms of new business flows, but felt it would
benefit in the future from the Government’s planned reforms to pensions in the
Bahamas. That effort is being overseen by the Government-appointed Private Pen-
sions Task Force.

While the company would eventually look to expand through specialist services
to institutional clients, Mr Kerr said it was “not effective to do that” at the
moment.

“Our core business remains pension administration and asset management,” Mr
Kerr said, “and select corporate advisory. We are not going out to be everything
to everyone.”

Brand building, and increasing awareness of Providence Advisors and the ser-
vices it provided, was a key goal for the company in its fourth year, said Mr Kerr.

“Tdeally Pd like to see us be further ahead,” he added, acknowledging that the
company had already accomplished much.

“We have a lot of work to do,” Mr Kerr told Tribune Business. “We’re not rest-
ing on our laurels. We have to add value, not only to our clients but for our
shareholders. We’re going to be very methodical and deliberate.”

Thank you for your
trust & support -
as we continue to provide

Results with Integrity.

PROVIDENCE
ADVISORS

Results with Integrity.

PENSIONS = INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT = CORPORATE SERVICES

Geedman's Bay Corporate Contre | Weal Bay Street | Maiseu, The Bahamas
Integiprovidenceadvisers.net | wee, providenceadvisors net


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 3B



LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



Three-month delay to
owntown Bay’s paving

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribune media.net

TRIBUNE BUSINESS has
learned that the Ministry of
Works been forced to delay the
paving of downtown Bay Street
for three months, after it was
found that major work needs to
be done by the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation (WSC).

Only last week, Minister of
Works, Neko Grant, assured
this paper that Bay Street would
be paved.

But he said yesterday: “It



Neko Grant

is consid-
erable
work to be
done by
Water and
|Sewer-
| age.”
Minister
of state for
the envi-
ronment,
who has
responsi-
bility for
Water and
Sewerage,
Phenton

put off because of the Corpora-
tion’s maintenance.
According to Mr Grant,
Water and Sewerage also needs
to do major repair work to its
infrastructure on Shirley Street
before paving can commence.

Paving

When asked when it was dis-
covered that Water and Sewer-
age’s infrastructure mainte-
nance would delay the paving,
Mr Grant said it was of no con-
sequence.

initiatuve to beautify the main
northern corridor before the
Miss Universe beauty pageant
in August.

Now, the downtown area, in
much need of paving after crews
from several government utili-
ties tore into it recently, will be
the only part of a strip extend-
ing from Caves village to the
bridge to Paradise Island with-
out fresh asphalt.

“We wanted to provide a sen-
sible ride for Miss Universe, but
Miss Universe will come and go
and we need to provide proper
infrastructure for people who

would make no sense to pave
the main Bay Street when there

Neymour, said he was not
aware that the paving was to be

will traverse these roads on an

The major paving programme \ \
annual basis,” said Mr Grant.

was undertaken as part of an

Almost 20% of commercial loans in default

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Almost one in five (20 per cent) of loans to
Bahamian businesses by commercial banks
were in default at end-May 2009, a Central
Bank of the Bahamas report released yester-
day finding that total non-performing loans
rose to 76.7 per cent or $468.2 million. This fig-
ure increased by 4 per cent or $18.2 million in
May.

The Central Bank’s report on monthly eco-
nomic developments for May not unexpect-
edly revealed a continued deterioration in
asset and loan portfolio quality in the Bahami-
an commercial banking sector, with this
nation’s economic recovery “delayed until the
latter half of 2010”.

The total number of loans in arrears by at
least one month increased by $6.1 million or
0.7 per cent in May, reaching a total of $847.3
million. Total loans in arrears increased to
13.98 per cent as a percentage of total loans,
although the proportion of delinquent loans -
those between 31 to 90 days past due -
declined by $12 million or 3.73 per cent to
$373.3 million.

The Central Bank said: “The increase in
the arrears rate was attributed to a worsening
in the consumer loans and residential mort-
gages portfolios, by 58 basis points and 2
basis points, to 12.45 per cent and 13 per cent,
respectively.

“In contrast, the commercial arrears rate
receded to 19.83 per cent in May, from 20.61
per cent in April. In response to these devel-
opments, banks augmented loan loss provi-

BSI TRUST CORPORATION (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

sions by $3 million, boosting the ratio of pro-
visions to total arrears by 18 basis points to
23.44 per cent.

“This corresponded to new loan provisions
of $10 million, partly offset by a $6.9 million
net write-off against loans provisioned for
earlier. However, as the growth in non-per-
forming loans outpaced the increase in provi-
sions, the ratio of total provisions to non-per-
forming loans fell by 5 basis points to 42.43 per
cent.”

And looking at the prospects for the
Bahamian economy as a whole, the Central
Bank added: “The Bahamian economy is
expected to remain weak over the remainder
of the year, with the prospects of a recovery
delayed until the latter half of 2010, lagging the
anticipated turnaround in the US economy.

“In the short-term, the downturn in
stopover arrivals, coupled with discounted
hotel room pricing, should pose ongoing con-
straints on tourism output. Lingering tight-
ness in global credit markets should further
constrain foreign investments and conse-
quently construction activity, notwithstand-
ing steadied support from equity financed
projects and a continued, but moderated, pace
of domestic investments. Under these condi-
tions, a further rise in the unemployment rate
is likely before any stabilisation is secured.”

The Central Bank said that while increases
in global oil prices could pressure the
Bahamas’ current account, the reduction in
import demand and the Government’s for-
eign currency borrowings were expected to
maintain foreign exchange reserves at healthy
levels. Banking sector liquidity, too, was

is presently accepting applications for

TRUST OFFICER

The successful candidate for the position of Trust Officer must have extensive

experience with all aspects of trust administration.

Personal qualities:

Excellent organizational, communicabon and computer skills

Positive attitude and outlook
Problem-sotving skills

Commitment to quality and service excellence

Ability to partner with team members.

Responsibilities:

Advise and support the business on trust related matters

Administer a group of Trusts, Foundations & Companies pursuant to respective

governing documents, regulations and internal policies
Oversee a group of complex chent relationships

Review all governing documents of Trusts, Foundations & Companies for legal

compliance and adherence to internal policies
Liaise with Relationshio Managers, Financial Planners and Clients
Report directly to tha Head of Trust

expected to be good as a result of the slow-
down in credit demand, the main issues being
asset quality and the difficulties Bahamians
were having in meeting debt servicing costs.

There was some good news on inflation,
which slowed to a 1.8 per cent rate for the 12
months to May 2009, compared to 4.9 per
cent for the same period last year.

“The Government’s budgetary operations
for the first 10 months of fiscal year 2009-
2009 resulted in a widening in the estimated
deficit to $219.7 million from $77.7 million in
2007-2008,” the Central Bank said.

“An 11 per cent decrease in tax collections
led to a 5.8 per cent reduction in total receipts,
while total expenditure firmed by 5.8 per cent.
Disaggregated data showed a 7 per cent
advance in current spending, mainly reflecting
increased outlays on consumption, as gains
were recorded for purchases of goods and
services (11.5 per cent), personal emoluments
(4.6 per cent) and other contractual services
(23.3 per cent).

“Although capital expenditures were
reduced by 6.8 per cent, investments in infra-
structural works rose by 9.4 per cent. The
slump in tax receipts was led by a 12.5 per
cent reduction in taxes on international trade
and transactions, which comprised over 50
per cent of the total.

“Significant declines were also noted for
taxes on financial and other transactions (24.3
per cent), departure taxes (15.4 per cent), and
‘other’ uncategorised taxes (32.9 per cent).
In contrast, non-tax receipts rose by 52.7 per
cent, mainly owing to a hike in dividend
receipts from public corporations.”

Ao ecmerin me ntk

stocks reeling

NEW YORK



The stock market found little to celebrate heading into the long
holiday weekend, according to Associated Press.

Major stock indexes fell more than 2.6 percent Thursday, push-
ing the Dow Jones industrials to their lowest level in six weeks, after
the government said the unemployment rate hit a 26-year high
and employers cut far more jobs than expected.

The data was especially disappointing since it broke a trend of
four straight months of improvement in job losses. The report —
one of the most closely watched gauges of the economy's health —
delivered the latest blow to the market's already waning confi-
dence.

Investor optimism has been shaken in recent weeks amid a bar-
rage of mixed economic reports, making for an erratic market.

This past week was no exception. Stocks rose Monday, then
erased nearly all their gains the following day after a report show-
ing an unexpected drop in consumer confidence.

On Wednesday the market bounced back after getting some
reassuring data on manufacturing and housing, only to tumble
again on Thursday on the disappointing jobs report.

"There's not a lot of conviction on either side," said Jill Evans, co-
portfolio manager of the Alpine Dynamic Dividend Fund.

The Dow Jones industrials lost 223.32, or 2.6 percent, to 8,280.74,
the lowest close since May 22. It was the average's worst day since
April 20.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index fell 26.91, or 2.9 percent, to
896.42 and the Nasdaq composite index fell 49.20, or 2.7 percent, to
1,796.52.

Trading on the New York Stock Exchange was extended until
4:15 p.m. Eastern time in order to execute customer orders impact-
ed by system irregularities, an NYSE spokeswoman said.

The stock market rallied furiously this spring off of 12-year lows
beginning in early March on hopes for a recovery, but the upward
momentum has stalled since mid-June as doubts grow about
whether the economy had really found a bottom.

Since hitting multi-month highs on June 12, the Dow has fallen
a total of 5.9 percent, while the S&P 500 index has lost 5.3 percent.

"There's more and more evidence mounting against this rally con-
tinuing,” said Doug De Groote, a managing director at United
Wealth Management. Consumers are likely to lead the nation out
of the ongoing recession, but that won't happen if more people are
losing their jobs, he said.

Stocks started the day down and stayed there after the Labor
Department reported that employers slashed 467,000 jobs in June,
far worse than the 363,000 that economists expected and a grim sig-
nal that the path to recovery will be bumpy. The unemployment
rate rose to 9.5 percent from 9.4 percent the month before.

Overseas markets also fell Thursday after a report showed unem-
ployment in Europe rose to a 10-year high in May.

As stock prices fell across the board, other signs of investor
unease emerged. Treasury prices rose, driving the yield on the 10-
year note down to 3.50 percent from 3.54 percent late Wednesday.

Meanwhile a gauge of volatility in the stock market, the Chica-
go Board Options Exchange Volatility Index, or VIX, jumped
1.73, or 6.6 percent, to 27.95 Thursday afternoon.

Declining issues outnumbered advancers by about 5 to 1 on the
New York Stock Exchange.

Consolidated volume came to a relatively low 3.56 billion shares
ahead of the holiday weekend, compared with 4 billion shares
traded a day earlier. Light volume can lead to more volatile swings
in trading.

Markets will be closed Friday in observance of the Indepen-
dence Day holiday.

For the week, the Dow finished down 1.9 percent; the S&P 500
lost 2.5 percent; and the Nasdaq fell 2.3 percent.

INdIGO

TW OR K §S

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Nortel PBK and Key System Technician

IndiGO Networks is a growing telecommunications company based in Nassau,

Bahamas. Systems Resource Group (SRG), IndiGO’s parent company, has a 20-
year history in offering innovative technology and telecommunications solutions
to consumers in The Bahamas.

IndiGO Networks is seeking to fill a senior position in its Technical Services
department for an experienced Telecommunications and Networking engineer

Responsibilities

¢ The individual will be responsible for the installation, maintenance and support
of Nortel key and PBX systems located primarily in New Providence with
travel to the Family Islands as necessary
Nortel and/or Mitel PBX Certification would be an advantage

Ability to meet with Customers in a Sales Capacity

an advantage

Experience with VoIP PBX systems, Cisco switching and routing would be

Ensure service standards for quality and responsiveness are met

practices

Maintain confidentiality relative to customer accounts and organizational

¢ Ability to work with minimum supervision

Qualifications

¢ Ability to perform analysis, recommendations, and Implementation to Customer’s
Voice and Data Networks.
In depth Design, Pro: ing, Implementation, Maintenance of Nortel Norstar,
BCM, Meridian Option 11C and 81C systems. Knowledge of ESN is essential
Programming and Installation of T1’s and PRI’s
Knowledge of PBX Inter-Networking and VOIP Integration
Routing, Trunking, QOS, and VLAN experience as it relates to the Integration
of Voice and Data Networks
Excellent customer service skills
Excellent oral and written communications skills
Ability to work in a fast-paced environment
Strong problem-solving and decision-making skills

The candidate must have thorough knowledge of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as intamational practices as they relate to the Trust
Industry:

Candidate should possess the TEP designation; bachelors degree:

Minimum of 3-5 years working experience in the trust field, Preference will be
given to professionals who have expenenced working in a Swiss Bank or Trust;
Knowledge of the system Viewpoint will be considered a a plus

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/cumculum vitae A competitive salary commensurate with experience is offered along with product
to: training, medical, pension and car allowance after a qualifying period.

Human Resources Manager

BSI Trust Corporation (Bahamas) Limited
Bayside Executive Park

P. 0. Box CB-10976

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) §02 2310 or email: ruby. kerni@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.

Interested candidates should submit their résumés in writing to:

Attn.: Technical Services Manager,
IndiGO Networks,
P.O. Box N-3920,
Nassau, Bahamas
Or
Fax: 242-677-1050
E-mail: hr @indigonetworks.com


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE

OF
EMERY MANAGEMENT LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 22nd day of May, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial Cen-
tre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas
has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

UNUSUAL INVESTMENTS LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) UNUSUAL INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 02â„¢
July 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Serene Lim of 1 Raffles
Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 02" day of July A. D. 2009



Ms. Serene Lim
Liquidator

=
KS

Pd

Colinalmperial

To Our Valued Clients

Please note that all offices of
Colinalmperial will be CLOSED on
Friday 3 July 2009
for the company’s
Annual Employee Fun Day.

Our Pay Station at 21 Collins Avenue will
offer extended weekend hours on
Saturday 4 July from 8:30am to 4pm
for your convenience.

Thank you.

aN
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dewolopmgint Comgany

PRICE INQUIRY

PL-110 Generators

Nassau Airport Develooment Company (MAD) pleased to
aingunce the release of Pl-110 Generalars for fhe Lynden
Findling inemational Airport Expansion Project

The purchase inquiry incdudes

Supply of two (2) 1600 KMWEOO0 KYA, 2780 VAG new
factory assembled molor generator sets complete with
NEMA SR endesure and day tank
Commisioning and Site Acceptance Tests tollawing
rétaliaton by NAD's Contractor, and

* § year or 1500 operating hours warranby

The Pl-110 Document wil be available for pick up after
1:00pm, Tuesday June 23rd, 2009. Please contact
Traci Grisby to regisler at the MAD Project office.

Contact Titec Grabs

(Contract & Procurement Manager

LFLA Eepaacenn Project

Poh: (242) TOE-O0G6 | Fem: (242) STP
PO Bon AP SiG29, Massa Bahamas
Emal tac brehyiires bs



$43m in airport
work for locals

FROM page 1B

“T was very surprised that we
only got three bids submitted
on it. I thought we would get
six or seven bids, but only three
came in on time for this multi-
million dollar contract

“One bid came in late, and
was rejected because of it. Per-
sonally, I didn’t think any of the
local contractors would take on
the job themselves, but assumed
that they would want to be in
the mix together with someone
from overseas in a joint ven-
ture.”

Venturing

Mr Watson said Ledcor was
itself joint venturing with a
Bahamas-based construction
company on the US departures
terminal contract, and con-
firmed reports reaching Tribune
Business that the firm con-
cerned is Wooslee Dominion.

That company, headed by
Ashley Glinton, made the head-
lines in recent years because it
was selected under the former

PLP administration to construct
its planned $23 million Bay
Street Straw Market, a contract
subsequently cancelled by the
Ingraham administration.

When asked about concerns
that a large number of LPIA
contracts were going to Cana-
dian companies, especially ones
based in Vancouver, the home
city for NAD’s operating part-
ner, Vancouver Airport Ser-
vices (YVRAS), Mr Watson
indicated it was natural for the
company to go with contractors
it was “comfortable” with and
“knows well”.

Ledcor has also performed a
$100 million renovation to
YVRAS’s home airport in Van-
couver, much of NAD’s envi-
ronmental-related work is fun-
nelled through another Van-
couver-based firm, Patrick
Environmental.

“In the case of the contract
for Ledcor, they won it hands
down. There was no one close
to them,” Mr Watson told 7ri-
bune Business, indicating it was
the cheapest bid by far.

“We took the best bid, val-
ued it ourselves. All the com-

NOTICE

NAROO LID.

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the Ist day of July, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial Cen-
tre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas
has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator



NOTICE

OF

CHERRY PIE HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 25th day of May, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finacial Cen-
tre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas
has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

GROWING MULTI-MEDIA & TRANSPORTATION
COMPANY REQUIRES

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

Rapidly growing company is inviting applications for the
position of “Financial Controller’. Applicants should have
a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting and a CPA, ACCA, CA
qualification or any other qualification recognized by the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Successful candidate should:



have at least 4 years experience in an established

accounting firm

be able to work as a part of a team
be able to prepare budgets and financial reports

liaise with banking officers

be able to communicate effectively with all levels

of management

be proficient in meeting and keeping all deadlines
have proficient knowledge of QuickBooks

For a confidential interview please mail resume to:
c/o Financial Controller,
P O Box N 4271, Nassau, N. P., The Bahamas
or email financialcontrollerposition@yahoo.com

panies that bid were competent
to do the job, so in the final
analysis it came down to price.”

Pledging that NAD and the
Airport Authority would
release a full list of Bahamian
companies who had performed
work at LPIA since NAD took
over on April 1, 2007, the Air-
port Authority chairman said
he “really doesn’t understand”
Mr Wrinkle’s concerns.

He added that NAD still had
$43 million worth of construc-
tion contracts related to the US
departures terminal “to be let.
The majority of them are going
to Bahamians. That’s the whole
idea.

“We don’t give the general
contractor the whole package
turnkey and say that’s it.
There’s lots of work to be let
that’s not part of the general
contractor package.” Those
contracts are scheduled to be
released between now and Sep-
tember 2009.

Responsible

While the general contractor
would be responsible for the
overall building and project,
constructing the foundation and
exterior shell itself and super-
vising the work of sub-contrac-
tors, Mr Watson said included
in the $43 million worth of con-
tracts still to be issued was the
interior work, such as electrics
and plumbing.

Elsewhere, Mr Watson
pledged that NAD had aban-
doned the use of ‘incentive fees’
- one-time payments that
prospective retail tenants could
offer it to induce the airport
operator to accept its bid to run
a concession at LPIA at the
expense of rivals.

The fee’s use and inclusion
in previous concession tenders
had sparked consternation
among Bahamian small busi-
nesses and entrepreneurs, who
saw it as favouring their larger
counterparts.

But Mr Watson said yester-
day: “My understanding from
YVRAS in Canada is that this is
an option which most airports

use, but we have determined
the of fees raised from that
source doesn’t justify the per-
ception it creates - that it’s
favouring those with money.

“They’re not going to do that.
There’ll be no incentive fee in
the package.” Mr Watson
understood that incentive fees
had come into play in “only a
couple of cases”, namely the
“lucrative” coffee shop contract
won by Dunkin Donuts, the
franchise operated by George
Myers’ group, and the gas sta-
tion contract that went to
FOCOL/SShell.

On NAD’s proposed landing
fee increases and other raised
charges, Mr Watson said that
as part of the consultative
process it had to “make the
case” to the airlines that the
increases were necessary. Then,
once the airlines were satisfied,
the final say would rest with the
Airport Authority, with a deci-
sion likely to be taken in Octo-
ber/November 2009.

“Those rates were very low
to start with, and they would-
n’t have a dramatic impact on
the cost of airline operations,”
Mr Watson said of the proposed
increases. “It’s part of the finan-
cial package agreed with the
consortium of banks, and will
only be implemented if NAD
satisfies the airlines.

“One has to satisfy the banks
that we’re doing all the things
we say we planned to do. We
have to finance the airport, but
not at the cost of putting the
airlines out of business. We
have to strike a balance.”

Mr Watson said the financial
projections for NAD and the
Airport Authority, including
achieving the goal of making
LPIA profitable within five
years of YVRAS’s takeover,
depended on tourist and pas-
senger arrivals recovering by
end-2009 or early 2010.

If that did not happen, he
warned it was “going to be a
struggle” to keep in line with
financial projections.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

ANGLO-BAHAMIAN BANK LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that the winding up and dissolution

of Anglo-Bahamian Bank Limited has been completed in

accordance with the Ariicles of Dissolution and the
Company fas been removed from the Register of

Companies on the 5” Day of June, 2009.

Paul F, Clarke
Liquictator

I Ca evel

Security Officers

Kelly's is seeking mature, reliable, honest
and hardworking individuals to fill the
position of Security Officer.

Prospective candidates must be available to

work evening shifts. Past security experience

would be an asset. This position is ideal for
retired police or prison officers.

We offer excellent pay, benefits
and working conditions.

Interested persons may collect an application
form from the Customer Service counter at
Kelly's House & Home, Mall at Marathon.

No phone calls please

's Houses — monFri-8:00am- 8:00pm
Home set-8:00am- 9:00pm


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 5B



3m overtime savings ‘negate’ airport fee rise

FROM page 1B

finance its transformation into a
world-class facility.

With January 1, 2010, sched-
uled to be the date when the
overtime fee elimination took
effect, Mr Comito told Tribune
Business: “The same time this
kicks in, for a number of air-
lines this will more than negate
the landing fee increase.”

He added: “While any fee
increase at the airport is not
something we’d [the hotel
industry] like to see, we under-
stand the necessity, and have
been working on several fronts
to reduce the costs of operation
for the airlines.

“Specifically, in the Budget
that’s just been passed, the Gov-
ernment did something we’ve
been advocating for a number
of years, which is to eliminate
the Customs and Immigration
overtime charges that get
charged back to the airlines.
That will be $3 million in annu-
al savings.”

Mr Comito said “most air-
lines” had been impacted in

past years by having to pay Cus-
toms/Immigration overtime
charges, which in turn were
passed on to passengers through
increased ticket prices. This
increased the cost of air travel
to the Bahamas (the access cost
for visitors), negatively impact-
ing airlift and the tourism indus-
try. Elsewhere, the BHA vice-
president acknowledged that
there were “concerns about the
high cost of ground handling
fees which some airlines face”.
He said this was “not just Nas-
sau Flight Services”, as some
airlines had their own ground
handling services, adding that
“efforts are being made to
reduce” a whole variety of costs
faced by airlines that operate
at LPIA.

NAD is proposing to increase
landing fees for all airlines at
LPIA by 23.6 per cent from
January 1, 2010, onwards, with a
6.1 per cent increase in terminal
fees, aircraft loading bridge fees
and aircraft parking fees.

For one Bahamas-owned air-
line, this translates into an
added $13 on the $51 landing

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that We, MICHAEL MOSS and
KEVA TARZA DAMES-MOSS of the Island of New Providence,
intend to change our daughter's name from K’7DYNCE JULIA
HOLBERT to K’DYNCE JULIA MOSS. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CLAUDE VASQUEZ of
TWYNAM AVENUE, P.O. Box N-7504, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 26 day of June, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

fee for their 19-seater aircraft.
But NAD argued that the fees
are necessary to maintain its
“financial covenants”, but said
LPIA’s rates after the increases
remain competitive and less
than the Caribbean average.

The airport operating com-
pany had conducted a bench-
marking exercise to show this,
based on a Boeing 737 700 with
a passenger load factor of 75
per cent (102 passengers) and
90-minute turnaround time that
included use of a jet bridge for
fuel loading.

“Excluding government tax-
es, LPIA’s costs are currently
$29.58, and with the recom-
mended increase become $30.03
per passenger, an increase of
1.5 per cent. The average cost of
the Caribbean airports present-
ed in the graph, excluding
LPIA, is $35.39 per passenger.
LPIA’s recommended rates are
very competitive at $5.36 or 15
per cent less than the Caribbean
average,” NAD said.

Mr Comito said the landing
fee increase translated into just
a $0.50 per passenger increase,
and added: “This is only the sec-
ond increase in landing fees
since 1993. The reality is there
are costs associated with build-
ing and operating a new airport,
and the fact is that the new fees
are lower than most airports in

south Florida and _ the
Caribbean.

“No one likes to see an
increase, but we want to have
an airport that is modern, effi-
cient and that showcases the
country in the best possible
light. While a 23 per cent
increase on the surface does not
look good, it’s only 50 cents per
passenger.”

When asked whether the fee
increases might impact LPIA’s
attractiveness as a destination
to both existing and potential
new airline services, Mr Comito
replied: “As long as we show
we’re working, in good faith to
reduce costs and improve the
experience of passengers as well
as the airlines, with more effi-
cient airport operations and a
better environment, then we’re
in safe territory.

“There’s efforts underway to
help reduce costs. The Ministry
of Tourism and the Promotions
Boards have targeted efforts
underway with some of the air-
lines to help increase their
yields.”

If the fee increases, which
combine the 2010 and deferred
2009 rises, do not take place,
NAD said it risked breaching
its banking covenants for the
$265 million redevelopment
financing.

“In accordance with its

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TYREE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that on 4th day of June
2009,the above-named Company has rescinded
its intention to wind-up and dissolve.

Date the 1st day of July, 2009

financing obligations ,the Nas-
sau Airport Development Com-
pany must maintain a debt ser-
vice coverage ratio (DSCR) of
not less than 1.3 to 1. The aver-
age DSCR ratio for the 10 year
period of 2011 to 2020 is cur-
rently projected at 1.48 to 1,”
NAD said.

“The financial model includes
the proposed fees and charges
increases, in addition to increas-
es planned for 2011, 2012 and
2013, followed by annual con-
sumer price index [inflation]
type increases.

*The proposed fees and
charges increases include the
deferred 2009 rate increases
adjusted by the planned 2010
rate increase. More specifically,
the deferred increases planned
for 2009, which were to be 20
per cent for landing fees and 3
per cent for the other fees, must

be applied prior to the 2010 rate
increase of 3 per cent. Thus in
determining the proposed rate
increase, the 2009 rate increase
is multiplied by the 2010 rate
increase and the result is added
to the 2010 rate increase.”

Asked earlier this week about
the overtime charges’ negative
impact on airlift into New Prov-
idence and other Bahamian des-
tinations, Robert Sands, the
Bahamas Hotel Association’s
(BHA) president, said: “When
you see an air fare costing ‘x’
dollars, and taxes and levies are
double that amount or a signif-
icant part of it, it makes the cost
of air travel to the Bahamas
extremely expensive.

“And when you have com-
peting destinations that can be
accessed at lower air fare costs,
it puts us in a very negative
competitive position.”

NOTICE
PISTON INVESTMENT
MANAGEMENT INC.

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, PISTON INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT
INC., has been dissolved and struck off the Register
according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued
by the Registrar General on the 22"! of June, A.D.,
2009.

Dated the 29" day of June A.D., 2009

A.J.K. Corporate Services (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator



HALSBURY

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

TUNE UP

SPECIAL



SERVICE:

Oil

-Oil Filter
Air Filter
-Fuel Filter
~Spark Plug s

(parts not included)

We also import parts for any
make and model vehicle with an
Impressive turn-around.
Come in and see Us today!

College Avenue,
Oakes Field

Tel; 3235835/3235436

PA
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dewolopmgmt Company



INGRAHAM’s
AUTO ELECTRICAL
SUPPLIES CO. LTD.

Other Services Includes:
* Auto Body Repairs
*Diagnostics Test
*Mechanical Repairs
*Brakes, CGV Joints Replacement
*Head Jobs
*Engine Overhaul
*Electrical Repairs
*Repair & Rebuild Starters
*Rebuild & Repair Wire Harness
*Repair & Install Window Motors
*Repair Lights & Switches

Monday—Friday 8am-5pm
Saturday 8am- 1pm



Tender

C118 Medium Voltage Sedteh House and Duct Bank

Museau Aiport Developmer! Company (MAD i pleased Io

anmounoe the manne of

Tender S118 Medium Voltage Seatch

House and Duel Back for Sege 1 of the Lyeden Finding
nkematonal Apart Expansion

The scope of work incdude

5
=

* Construction of a new modem voltage (71k swiich house tor

HEG and MAL santeh 3

nat: Building 8 apprcamalely MH) SF,

8 inch block walls, alemmnem haedrads, and o standing seam

Metal roa

Corl works including ap
behing. duct iestalatc
backfill, compaction, cu
vole duct bank

oramately 1500 LP of eecemaion:
On, Supply and anslallabion of manholes
fing and patching for a new medium

= Purchase and installation of NAD Switchgear

nlerested Bidders muel be licensed and aporoved by fhe Bahamas

Biecine Comporalion in par

The € 118 Tender Roque

form maecium woltage (1 Tew] work

ents wil be awaiatte tor pick up alter

1900 pm, Tuesday June 16th, 2009 Abate meen wl
be held at 10°00 am, Thursday Jume 28th, 2008 Please

Gonlael Traci Breby ta regeter af the MAD! Project office

Contact: TRAC! BRISRY

Contracts and Procurement Manager
LPIA Expamcenn Prnqent

Ph: (242) FOE-O0GE | Fam: (242) STP
PO. Boo AP Soe, Messau, Bahamas
Email traci brshyiiires bs

UBS TRUSTEES (BAHAMAS) LTD.

CHAMBERS

Counsel and Attarnevs-at-Law
Notaries Public



















Registered Agent
for the above-named Company



Will be closed
Legal Notice

Oye (OD .

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT Friday, 3rd July, 2009
(No.45 of 2000)

RYECROFT LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 of the International Business Companies
Act No. 45 of 2000, RYECROFT LIMITED, has been
dissolved and struck off the Register according to
the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 10th day of June, 2009. =

Monday, 6th July, 2009

due to the observance of the Firm's

BVUe ee eek

The office will re-open

Cl Accountancy Limited,
of Boatside Business Centre,
Warden, Northumberland, NE46 4SH
Liquidator

We regret any inconvenience caused.



FG CAPITAL MARKET.
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERYIC-ES

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money ot Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 2 JULY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,577.79 | CHG 1.92 | %CHG 0.12 | YTD -134.57 | YTD % -7.86
FINDEX: CLOSE 788.02 | YTD -5.61% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW_.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

1.28 Abaco Markets 1.39 1.39 0.00 0.127

10.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992

6.94 Bank of Bahamas 6.94 6.94 0.00 0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00
10.18 Cable Bahamas 11.39 11.39 0.00
2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00
5.50 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 5.60 5.64 0.04
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.21 3.11 -0.10
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 1.77 1.77 0.00
7.50 Famguard 7.76 7.76 0.00
10.00 Finco 10.90 10.90 0.00
10.35 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.38 10.38 0.00
4.95 Focol (S) 5.09 5.09 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.00
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00
10.40 J. S. Johnson 10.40 10.40 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Last Sale Daily Vol.
100.00 0.00 7%
100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
100.00 0.00 T%
Prime + 1.75%

S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Securi
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series ©) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.60
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4.00 6.25 6.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3787 1.87 4.83
2.8988 -1.40 -3.35
1.4750 2.88 5.74
3.1821 6.01 -13.90
12.9209 2.40 5.79
100.5448 -0.02 0.54
93.1992 -3.33 -6.76
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2511 1.72 4.12
1.0578 2.13 5.78
1.0271 -0.57 2.71
1.0554 1.74 5.54
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
ASK §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany‘s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

52wk-Low Weekly Vol. EPS $

-0.041

Div $ P/E
0.300

0.000

0.001

0.480
0.000

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
1.3948 CFAL Money Market Fund
3.1821 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
12.2702 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3124

2.8988

31-May-09
31-May-09
26-Jun-09
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-Mar-09
31-Mar-09
31-Dec-07
30-Apr-09
31-May-09
31-May-09
31-May-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396—4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525




PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY HIGH 90F LOW 80F S EEBUSINESSFRONT S P O R T S $43m in airport work for locals SEEPAGE ELEVEN Devard Darling looks ahead By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@ tribunemedia.net THERE is evidence to suggest that more than one person was involved in the death of handbag designer Harl Taylor, Director of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner told a court yesterday. Mr Turner, who is the lead prosecutor in the trial of 22-year-old Troyniko McNeil, said in his opening address that the Crown has evidence against McNeil and intends to prove he is responsible for Mr Taylor’s death. McNeil, the son of Mr Taylor’s former business partner Troy McNeil, is charged with intentionally and unlawfully causing Mr Taylor’sdeath between Saturday, November 17, and Sunday November 18, 2007, while being concerned together with another. Mr Taylor, 37, was found dead at Mount batten House, on WestH ill Street. He had sus tained between 42 to 50 injuries, Mr Turner told the jury yesterday. Mr Taylor’s mother, Beverly Taylor, broke into tears on the wit ness stand yesterday when shown a photo ofh er son’s body. Mrs Taylor told the court she knew Troyniko McNeil and his father Troy who once resided at Mountbatten House. She recalled that on the morning of November 18, 2007, while driving in the area of Government House, she noticed that police had c ordoned off the entrance to West Hill Street with yellow tape. Mrs Taylor said she asked a young man on the street what had happened, and as a result of what The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Harl Taylor killer ‘did not act alone’ SEE page eight By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net CHAIRMAN of the Bahamas Electricity Corporation Fred Gottlieb confirmed the Government-owned and run utility is owed “substantial” amounts of money by various business people throughout the country, including other government agencies. And he pledged that the corporation is doing all it can to recoup the funds. BEC‘is owed substantial amounts of money’ SEE page eight By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net CHIEFS at Doctors Hospital have slammed the Bahamas Electricity Corporation for a lengthy and “totally unacceptable” power outage. The hospital’s Vice President of Operations, Michele Rassin said BEC must act to “prevent a reoc currence” of Tuesday’s events which saw power cut off to numer ous buildings along a section of Shirley Street, including Doctor’s Hospital and The Tribune . 101 outpatients and 36 inpatients were at the hospital at the time. Yesterday, General Manager of BEC Kevin Basden said the situa tion was “unavoidable” and involved a faulty underground pow er cable in the Shirley Street area. He said that once BEC was informed by a customer it imme diately responded, and having replaced a section of the cable had power restored “within the hour.” Doctors Hospital officials slam BEC over power outage SEE page eight By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE appointment of two Supreme Court judges has raised concerns in the legal community about their possible bias towards the executive as both have served the Attorney General. A senior attorney has criticised the “antiquated, non-trans parent” process which led to the appointment of Bernard Turner, director of public prosecutions at the Attorney General’s office, and attorney Rhonda Bain, former director of legal affairs for the Attorney General, as Justices of the Supreme Court. Lawyers only learned of the appointment yesterday when it was announced Mr Turner and Ms Bain had been chosen by the Judicial and Legal Service ComConcerns raised over appointment of two judges SEE page eight By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net GRAND Bahama businessman Rick Hayward is back in business and his 76 employees expected to return to their jobs after the locks were removed at his three businesses in the Port Lucaya market place. Mr Hayward, the son of Sir Jack Hayward, was locked out by Port Group Limited for non-payment of rent at his three restaurants – La Dolce Vita, The Pub at Port Lucaya, and East last Thursday. He has not paid his rent for eight months and owes $230,000. Mr Hayward and his lawyer Senator David Thompson met Thursday with Grand Bahama Port Authority president Ian Rolle, who was able to persuade PGL officials to rescind the lock-out and enter into mediation with Mr Hay ward to resolve the matter. “I was so thrilled that President Ian Rolle has persuaded his people GB businessman Rick Hayward back in business SEE page eight PLEASENOTE: DUETOTHEUS INDEPENDEN CE HOLID AY, THERE WILLBENO USATODAY IN TODAYTRIBUNE. H arl Taylor USINDEPENDENCE Prosecution claim as m ur der trial begins Immigration chief calls for information on alleged abuse of detainees By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net IMMIGRATION officers with information relating to alleged abuse or mistreat ment of detainees at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre should come forward so the claims can be investigated, urged Immigration D irector Jack Thompson. Mr Thompson said he has an "open door policy" adding that immigration offi cers should not fear reprisal for coming forward. He also said once any claim of abuse or inhumane treatment is made to his department it will be investi gated and officers involved may be placed on administrative leave pending the results of the probe, sus pended, or charged before the courts if necessary. "We under no circumstances are prepared to condone wrongdoing, corruption. We made it very clear to the staff that wherever we find any trace of it we are prepared to have it thor oughly investigated and if evidence supports that you are indeed guilty we'll deal with you. "We've made it clear it's not as if we've compromised on it, we're not timid about it, we're not sweeping it under the carpet we'll deal with it but we need to have the complaint. I need to have the evidence, I need something to work with. . . and we'll develop it and we'll turn it over to the police," said Mr Thompson at a press conference at the department yesterday. On Monday, The Tribune Officers ‘should not fear reprisal’ SEE page eight ABRAHAMLINCOLN re-enactor Larry Elliot speaks from the podium yesterday at the US Embassy’s Independence celebrations. The event, held at Liberty Overlook, also commemorated the life and legacy of President Lincoln. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f C M Y K C M Y K S E C T I O N B b u s i n e s s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t F R I D A Y , J U L Y 3 , 2 0 0 9 T H E T R I B U N E $ 4 . 2 1 $ 4 . 3 0 $ 4 . 2 5 $ 3 m o v e r t i m e s a v i n g s n e g a t e a i r p o r t f e e r i s e B T C s u f f e r s c a b l e b r e a k * H o t e l e x e c u t i v e s a y s w o r k o n o t h e r i n i t i a t i v e s t o r e d u c e a i r l i n e c o s t s a t L P I A w i l l c o u n t e r a c t i m p a c t o f f e e r i s e s * C o n c e r n r e m a i n s o n g r o u n d h a n d l i n g c h a r g e s * N o o n e l i k e s t o s e e a n i n c r e a s e , b u t w e w a n t t o h a v e a n a i r p o r t t h a t i s m o d e r n , e f f i c i e n t a n d t h a t s h o w c a s e s t h e c o u n t r y i n t h e b e s t p o s s i b l e l i g h t B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e $ 3 m i l l i o n i n a n n u a l s a v i n g s t h a t a i r l i n e s f l y i n g i n t o L y n d e n P i n d l i n g I n t e r n a t i o n a l A i r p o r t ( L P I A ) w i l l e n j o y f r o m t h e e l i m i n a t i o n o f C u s t o m s / I m m i g r a t i o n o v e r t i m e c h a r g e s s h o u l d m o r e t h a n n e g a t e t h e i m p a c t o f a 2 3 . 6 p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e i n l a n d i n g f e e s , t h e B a h a m a s H o t e l A s s o c i a t i o n s ( B H A ) e x e c u t i v e v i c e p r e s i d e n t s a i d y e s t e r d a y . P o i n t i n g o u t t h a t t h e e l i m i n a t i o n o f C u s t o m s / I m m i g r a t i o n o v e r t i m e c h a r g e s w o u l d c o i n c i d e w i t h t h e d a t e w h e n t h e N a s s a u A i r p o r t D e v e l o p m e n t C o m p a n y s ( N A D ) p r o p o s e d f e e i n c r e a s e s w o u l d b e i m p l e m e n t e d , F r a n k C o m i t o t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s a b a l a n c e h a d t o b e s t r u c k b e t w e e n m a k i n g L P I A c o s t c o m p e t i t i v e f o r a i r l i n e s a n d t h e n e e d t o S E E p a g e 5 B B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e m a j o r i t y o f $ 4 3 m i l l i o n w o r t h o f c o n t r a c t s t h a t t h e N a s s a u A i r p o r t D e v e l o p m e n t C o m p a n y ( N A D ) h a s y e t t o i s s u e f o r c o n s t r u c t i o n w o r k o n t h e n e w U S d e p a r t u r e s t e r m i n a l w i l l b e a w a r d e d t o B a h a m i a n c o n t r a c t o r s , t h e A i r p o r t A u t h o r i t y s c h a i r m a n s a i d y e s t e r d a y , d e s c r i b i n g a s f a c t u a l l y i n c o r r e c t c l a i m s t h a t l o c a l s w e r e b e i n g s q u e e z e d o u t . F r a n k W a t s o n t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h o s e c o n t r a c t s , l a r g e l y f o r i n t e r i o r w o r k s u c h a s e l e c t r i c s , p l u m b i n g a n d e n g i n e e r i n g , w o u l d b e i s s u e d b e t w e e n n o w a n d S e p t e m b e r 2 0 0 9 , w i t h t h e g r o u n d b r e a k i n g c e r e m o n y f o r t h e U S d e p a r t u r e s t e r m i n a l t h e f i r s t s t a g e i n t h e $ 4 0 9 . 5 m i l l i o n L y n d e n P i n d l i n g I n t e r n a t i o n a l A i r p o r t ( L P I A ) r e d e v e l o p m e n t s e t t o t a k e p l a c e t h i s c o m i n g T h u r s d a y . S t a t i n g t h a t h e w a s v e r y s u r p r i s e d t h a t N A D o n l y r e c e i v e d t h r e e b i d s f o r t h e U S d e p a r t u r e s t e r m i n a l s g e n e r a l c o n t r a c t o r t e n d e r , M r W a t s o n d e s c r i b e d a s n o t f a c t u a l l y c o r r e c t c l a i m s b y S t e p h e n W r i n k l e , t h e B a h a m i a n C o n t r a c t o r s A s s o c i a t i o n s ( B C A ) p r e s i d e n t , t h a t B a h a m i a n c o n s t r u c t i o n c o m p a n i e s w e r e b e i n g l e f t o u t i n t h e c o l d w h e n i t c a m e t o g e t t i n g w o r k o n t h e a i r p o r t r e d e v e l o p m e n t . R e f e r r i n g t o t h e g e n e r a l c o n t r a c t o r b i d , w h i c h w a s u l t i m a t e l y w o n b y V a n c o u v e r b a s e d L e d c o r C o n s t r u c t i o n , M r W a t s o n t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s : $ 4 3 m i n a i r p o r t w o r k f o r l o c a l s A i r p o r t A u t h o r i t y c h a i r d e n i e s B a h a m i a n c o n t r a c t o r s b e i n g s q u e e z e d o u t , a s t h e m a j o r i t y o f $ 4 3 m i n w o r k t o b e l e t i n n e x t t h r e e m o n t h s f o r t h e m W i n n i n g g e n e r a l c o n t r a c t o r t o p a r t n e r w i t h N a s s a u b a s e d W o o s l e e D o m i n i o n G r e a t s u r p r i s e t h a t o n l y t h r e e b i d s r e c e i v e d o n t i m e f o r U S d e p a r t u r e s t e r m i n a l P l e d g e t h a t n o m o r e i n c e n t i v e f e e s i n c o n c e s s i o n s c o n t r a c t s S E E p a g e 4 B B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e B a h a m a s T e l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s C o m p a n y s ( B T C ) i n t e r n a t i o n a l t e l e c o m s a n d I n t e r n e t / d a t a t r a f f i c w a s t e m p o r a r i l y i n t e r r u p t e d e a r l i e r t h i s w e e k w h e n i t s B a h a m a s I I f i b r e o p t i c c a b l e w a s a c c i d e n t a l l y c u t , T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s c o n f i r m e d y e s t e r d a y , w i t h r e p a i r s l i k e l y t o b e m a d e b e f o r e m o n t h s e n d . M a r l o n J o h n s o n , B T C s v i c e p r e s i d e n t o f s a l e s a n d m a r k e t i n g , t o l d t h i s n e w s p a p e r t h a t t h e s t a t e o w n e d c a r r i e r s s e r v i c e s w e r e a f f e c t e d f o r a f e w h o u r s a f t e r t h e u n d e r s e a c a b l e w a s c u t s o m e w h e r e b e t w e e n E i g h t M i l e R o c k i n G r a n d B a h a m a a n d V e r o B e a c h , F l o r i d a , w h e r e i t l a n d s t o c o n n e c t t h e B a h a m a s t o t h e i n t e r n a t i o n a l t e l e c o m s a n d I n t e r n e t n e t w o r k . W e d i d h a v e a c u t i n t h e B a h a m a s I I C a b l e . T h e s e r v i c e w a s a f f e c t e d f o r a f e w h o u r s , M r J o h n s o n s a i d . H o w e v e r , h e e m p h a s i s e d t h a t c u t s t o u n d e r s e a t e l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s w e r e n o t u n u s u a l , b e i n g c a u s e d b y b a d w e a t h e r s u c h a s h u r r i c a n e s , o r s h i p s i n a d v e r t e n t l y d r o p p i n g a n c h o r o n t h e m . T h e B T C e x e c u t i v e a d d e d t h a t w h e n t h e B a h a m a s I I C a b l e w a s c u t , B T C d i v e r t e d t h e v o i c e t e l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s a n d d a t a t r a f f i c i t c a r r i e d o n t o t h e A R C O S n e t w o r k , t h e s e l f h e a l i n g c i r c u l a r f i b r e o p t i c r i n g t h a t c o n n e c t s t h e B a h a m a s a n d o t h e r C a r i b b e a n c o u n t r i e s t o N o r t h , S o u t h a n d C e n t r a l A m e r i c a .D i s r u p t i o n W e j u s t m o v e d t h e t r a f f i c f r o m o n e n e t w o r k t o t h e o t h e r , M r J o h n s o n t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s . T h e r e w a s a f e w h o u r s d i s r u p t i o n w h e n t h e c u t c a m e . W e w a n t t o e m p h a s i s e t h a t t h i s h a p p e n s , a n d w h a t t e l e c o m s o p e r a t o r s d o i s b u i l d t o p o g r a p h y t h a t i s s e l f h e a l i n g o r h a v e a l t e r n a t i v e r o u t e s w i t h a l t e r n a t i v e p r o v i d e r s . A n d h e a d d e d : T h e y v e s c h e d u l e d r e p a i r s . T h e r e s a c o m p a n y t h a t w e e n g a g e t h a t h a s a v e s s e l t o d o t h i s s t u f f , a n d i t d e p e n d s w h e r e w e f a l l i n t h e q u e u e . W e a r e s c h e d u l e d f o r r e p a i r s , I s u s p e c t s o m e t i m e t h i s m o n t h . T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s w a s y e s t e r d a y t o l d t h a t t h e B a h a m a s I I c a b l e h a d s u f f e r e d t w o c u t s , o n e a t t h e V e r o B e a c h e n d c l o s e t o F l o r i d a a n d t h e o t h e r n e a r e r t o E i g h t M i l e R o c k i n G r a n d B a h a m a . H o w e v e r , M r J o h n s o n d i s p u t e d t h i s , t e l l i n g T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t B T C h a d n o i n f o r m a t i o n t o i n d i c a t e t h a t . I t s i n i t i a l a s s e s s m e n t w a s t h a t t h e r e w a s o n l y o n e c a b l e b r e a k , b u t i t w o u l d o n l y k n o w f o r s u r e w h e n r e p a i r s c o m m e n c e d . B y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r c r o b a r d s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t T H E C O M P A N Y r e s p o n s i b l e f o r e x t e n d i n g t h e w e s t e r n e n d o f A r a w a k C a y h a s b e e n w a r n e d b y t h e B a h a m a s E n v i r o n m e n t , S c i e n c e a n d T e c h n o l o g y ( B E S T ) C o m m i s s i o n t o p r o p e r l y i n s t a l l w a t e r t u r b i d i t y c o n t r o l m e a s u r e s , t h e m i n i s t e r o f t h e e n v i r o n m e n t s a i d y e s t e r B E S T w a r n s o n t u r b i d i t y c o n t r o l a t A r a w a k C a y S E E p a g e 2 BP H O T O : C h r i s t o p h e r H a r t l e yE N V I R O N M E N T A L p r o t e c t i o n c o n t r o l s o f f A r a w a k C a y F R A N K W A T S O NB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r A B a h a m a s b a s e d i n v e s t m e n t a d v i s o r y f i r m h a s i n c r e a s e d i t s a s s e t s u n d e r a d m i n i s t r a t i o n b y 1 4 1 p e r c e n t t o a r o u n d $ 4 0 5 $ 1 0 m i l l i o n d u r i n g i t s f i r s t t h r e e y e a r s i n e x i s t e n c e , T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s w a s t o l d y e s t e r d a y , h a v i n g e x c e e d e d e x p e c t a t i o n s a s i t m o v e s t o e n h a n c e c l i e n t s r e a l t i m e a c c e s s t o t h e i r f i n a n c i a l i n f o r m a t i o n . K e n w o o d K e r r , P r o v i d e n c e A d v i s o r s c h i e f e x e c u t i v e , s a i d t h e c o m p a n y w a s h o p i n g b y S e p t e m b e r t o p r o v i d e i n d i v i d u a l m e m b e r s o f p e n s i o n p l a n s i t m a n a g e d / a d m i n i s t e r e d w i t h o n l i n e a c c e s s t o t h e i r p e r s o n a l f i n a n c i a l i n f o r m a t i o n v i a t h e u s e o f p i n n u m b e r s a n d e n c r y p t e d p a s s w o r d s / c o d e s . S p e a k i n g t o T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s a s t h e c o m p a n y p r e p a r e s t o c e l e b r a t e i t s t h i r d b i r t h d a y f o l l o w i n g i t s b u y o u t f r o m S G H a m b r o s B a n k & T r u s t ( B a h a m a s ) , M r K e r r s a i d P r o v i d e n c e A d v i s o r s h a d a l r e a d y i n v e s t e d a f e w h u n d r e d t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s i n r e p l a c i n g t h e l e g a c y I T s y s t e m i t i n h e r i t e d u p o n i t s c r e a t i o n . T h e c o m p a n y a l r e a d y p r o v i d e d c l i e n t s , a t t h e h u m a n r e s o u r c e s a n d m a n a g e m e n t l e v e l , w i t h r e a l t i m e , o n l i n e a c c e s s t o t h e i r f i n a n c i a l p l a n s a n d i n v e s t m e n t s , s o t h e y c o u l d g a u g e t h e i r p e r f o r m a n c e a n d o b t a i n t h e r e l e v a n t i n f o r m a t i o n . A n d M r K e r r t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t t h e c o m p a n y w a s a l s o l o o k i n g a t b r o a d e n i n g i t s i n v e s t m e n t s p r o d u c t o f f e r i n g t h r o u g h f a m i l y o f f u n d s p r o d u c t s t a r g e t e d a t s p e c i f i c m a r k e t s . W e v e e x c e e d e d e x p e c t a F i r m s a s s e t s u n d e r a d m i n i s t r a t i o n u p 1 4 0 % t o $ 4 0 5 $ 4 1 0 m * P r o v i d e n c e A d v i s o r s l o o k i n g t o p r o v i d e r e a l t i m e , o n l i n e a c c e s s t o c l i e n t s f i n a n c i a l d a t a b y S e p t e m b e r * E y e i n g f a m i l y o f f u n d s p r o d u c t , a s f i r m e x c c e e d s e x p e c t a t i o n s K E N W O O D K E R RS E E p a g e 2 B B U S I N E S S V olume: 105 No.183FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25

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A FTER serving their country for the past 25 years, four marines of the RoyalB ahamas Defence Force bid farewell to their colleagues a nd co-workers, as they begin a new life outside the naval establishment. Family members and friends of LeadingM echanics Hensel Rolle and Anthony Francis, Leading Seamen Stephen Bastian and Gregory Farrington gathereda t the Coral Harbour Base for a retirement ceremony. These men were the recipients of a ceremonial divisions by theo fficers and marines of the Defence Force. This occasion was the cul m ination of a series of events, d uring which the four marines were recognised for their valuable achievements. This is the second such ceremony in which marines retiring from the Defence Force are hosted to an official ‘bon v oyage.’ T hey were presented with g ifts and were treated to a cer emonial colours and march pass by the officers and marines. Bringing remarks for the occasion was Clyde Sawyer, captain of the Coral Harbour Base. He thanked the men and their families for dedicating more than half of their lives to the Defence Force and wished them all the best in their future plans. The men all joined the Defence Force as recruits on J uly 2, 1984 as members of N ew Entry 15. Within the D efence Force, their career paths led them to serve within numerous departments. At the end of their tenures, Mr Francis was a serving member of the base maintenance team, Mr Rolle was employed in the electrical section of the engineering department, Mr Farrington was attached to the supply department and Mr Bastian was a member of the Commando Squadron Department. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News...............................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8 Editorial/Letters. ......................................... P4 Sports...............................................P9,10,11 Advt .........................................................P12 BUSINESS SECTION Business.........................................P1,2,3,4,5 Advts ................................................... P6,7,10 Comics ........................................................ P8 W eather.......................................................P9 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 P AGES DESPITEhaving formally rejected the government’s last health insurance offer, the Bahamas Nurses Union has been given an extended period to “reconsider” it, accordi ng to health minister Hubert M innis. Dr Minnis said he would like “individuals to sit down and look at the situation that’s happening not only in the Bahamas but globally” in t erms of the economy. Stalemate T his after Wednesday’s m eeting between BNU rep resentatives and officials from the Department of Labour and the Public HospitalsA uthority resulted in another stalemate between the part ies, with no resolution and no new offers placed on the t able. T he meeting was the seco nd between the government a nd the BNU about health insurance coverage for nurses since the government’s proposal was rejected more than three weeks ago. It was scheduled after BNU President Cleola Hamilton said s he would have to take the g overnment’s offer to her membership. Yesterday Dr Minnis said: “They would still have the time to consider our offer and we have extended the time f rame for that after which you’d have to start over a gain. Hopefully they will accept t he offer. It’s only a tempor ary thing, a stop-gap until o ne can come in with the i nsurance plan on July 1, 2010 or hopefully before.” Nurses say they desperately need health insurance because their line of work puts their health at risk. However, Prime Minister H ubert Ingraham told parliament during the 2009/2010 budget communication that the government “simply cannot afford” to pay for the $10.5 million coverage this year in light of a massive revenue fall off precipitated by the global economic crisis. A ction N urses took action, calling in sick for almost two weeks to protest the move. Last week the government o ffered to introduce their h ealth coverage on July 1, 2 010 or earlier if possible, p rovide three private rooms at the Princess Margaret Hospital for them to be treated in, and pay for treatment of any work-related illnesses or injuries. BNU President Mrs Hamilt on said this “did not sit well” w ith nurses and the union officially rejected the proposal, calling again for full coverage – but the government said it would not budge. The union leader then left t he country to travel to South Africa. Like Dr Minnis and l abour minister Dion Foulkes, s he did not attend Wednesd ay’s meeting. Nurses Union given extended period to ‘reconsider’ govt offer A SENIOR government official said she was “surprised” to learn that the construction of a convenience store on Harbour Island was moving forward – as she had already made it clear that the project is “in contravention of the law”. Rena Glinton, undersecretary in the Department of Lands and Surveys, explained that the building covenants for the area, known as Triana Shores, states that Block Three, where the store is being constructed, is a strictly residential area. “You cannot put business places in that area,” she said. According to sources on the island, permission for the store was granted by the local council, but Ms Glinton told The Tribune that after she learned of the project, she contacted the council to inform them that their decision was not legal. She questioned how the project could have been granted a building permit under the circumstances. The Tribune was unable to contact members of the council or the island administrator before press time last night. Harbour Island convenience s tore project ‘in contravention of law’ THREE OF THE FOUR MARINES receiving their final salute at a ceremonial colours and march pass by the officers and marines of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. CEREMONIAL DIVISIONS CEREMONY FOR DEFENCE FORCE 2009 RETIREES LIEUTENANT COMMANDER Franklyn Clarke (left a ppreciation from Lieutenant Commander Michael Simmons, Commando Squadron Officer, RBDF. LEADING MECHANIC ANTHONY FRANCIS as he receives a gift as a token of appreciation from Captain Clyde Sawyer.R B D F P u b l i c R e l a t i o n s D e p t Dr Hubert Minnis

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THE Port Department and t he part owner of a local mailboat involved in an early morn ing collision are at odds over t he status of the agency’s inves tigation into the June incident. Deputy Commander at the department, Collimae Fergus on, yesterday said no one was injured in the incident, which involved the vessels ‘Grandmaster’ and ‘Captain C’, but that inquiries continue. She declined to offer further comment on the matter, stating that when the investigation is completed, the findings will be forwarded to the minister of national security, who can choose whether or not to release the information. However, Lenneth Brozozog, a principal shareholder in the G randmaster Shipping Company, which owns the Grandmas ter mailboat, claimed that the d epartment’s investigation is “over and done with”. “They’ve come to their own conclusion,” he stated, describi ng the incident as “not newsworthy.” It is understood that neither vessel suffered major damage during the collision, which took place some time after midnight on June 18. The late night collision was not the first of its kind in Bahamian maritime history. In 2000, the Grandmaster helped to rescue about 80 Hait ian migrants after it hit and overturned a sloop in the east central Bahamas. M eanwhile, in 2008 the government made an ex gratia pay ment of $1 million to the surv ivors and relatives of those killed in the tragic 2003 collision between the United Star and Seahauler mailboats. T wenty five people were injured and four people died in the incident which occurred when the Sea Hauler struck the United Star while en route to the Cat Island regatta. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 3 THEBahamas has joined the existing nationwide VISA and VISA PLUS ATM net work, and both residents and tourists now have an even wider selection of ATMs to withdraw their funds from. Locally and internationally issued VISA and VISAPLUS cards are now accepted at all Fidelity Bank ATMs located in Nassau, Freeport and Abaco. Pictured is Rotara Lewis using her VISA card in oneof Fidelity Bank’s automated, voice enabled ATMs. Fidelity Bank A TMs accepting all local and international visa car ds T HE National Council of Older Persons is plan-n ing a series of community o utreach programmes and fundraising events. By facilitating the needs and well-being of olderp ersons, the council wants to reverse the perception of aging as an image ofd ependence, vulnerability and inactivity, to one of celebration of knowledge and wisdom, council advo-c ate Charles Sawyer said. T he council seeks to give older persons a voice, he said, as "many of themwho are retired are moved i nto government care facil ities, and are neglected by their families.” “They are in urgent need of supplies, medication, counselling, and the Council’s protection,” he said. The council follows guidelines developed by the International Plan of Action on Aging, endorsed by the United Nations General Assembly in 1982, and adopted by the World Assembly on Aging in Vienna, Austria. UN statistics show that by the year 2025, one in eight persons in develop ing nations will have reached the age 60 years. Aging impacts national development policies from family planning to eco nomic growth. Mr Sawyer underscored the ability of older persons to contribute economically and socially to the success of a nation. “They could earn a liv ing and remain indepen dent for as long as possible, which affects the per sonal growth of the entire population,” he said. Older persons council plans community outreach Disagreement over status of vessel collision investigation By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net MEMBERS of the public m ay face heftier electricity b ills in the near future as t he Bahamas Electricity Corporation is considering increasing its rates to offset the cost of producing and supplying electricity to the country. N oting that BEC is u nable to break even with t he current electricity rate, chairman Fred Gottlieb said the problem stems back to 2003 when the PLP decided to lower rates, causing the corporation – which at that time was profitable – to fall into the red, where it has been ever since. Profitable Consultants who were e mployed by BEC approximately two years ago recommended a new tariff rate structure which would allow BEC to function on a profitable basis. But in these p resent economic times, o bviously the government h as to look closely at what is in the best interest of not only BEC, but what is in the best interest of the Bahamas as a whole in terms of the economy and the effect any increase in rates would have on the populace,” Mr Gott lieb said. W hile the government wrestles with this delicate balancing act, Mr Gottlieb said that from the perspect ive of BEC the proposed rate increases are advisable. He added that in the m eantime, the corporation w ill do everything it can to g enerate power as efficientl y as possible. O pting to not disclose the s ize of the proposed rate increases, Mr Gottlieb added that persons at the lower end of the electricity usage scale would not necessarily be affected. “Because it is a percentage it is relatively a low i ncrease percentage wise. B ut of course that has the e ffect of translating into quite a lot of additional revenue. Consumer I know that sounds a litt le inconsistent, but for the i ndividual consumer the increase rate would not be that great. But of course one has to bear in mind, that for somebody at the very lower end of the economic scale, any increase can have a deva stating effect. But I might add to that, that within the suggested or r ecommended rate increase, provision is made for no rate i ncrease for a certain minimum level of consumption. In other words there would b e no rate increase up to a certain amount of kilowatt h ours consumed by an individual customer,” he said. BECconsiders increasing its rates to offset costs POLICE in Bimini are q uestioning a Nassau resident in connection with Wednesday’s homicide on that island. Superintendent Elsworth Moss said police on Bimini are questioning a 28-year-old man from N ew Providence regarding t he murder of 27-year-old V ermon Rolle. Mr Moss said it is possible that the suspect could b e arraigned on related c harges as early as Mond ay. A ccording to reports, Mr R olle was stabbed to death d uring an altercation with another man around 5 .35pm on Wednesday. The victim was stabbed in the stomach outside of S ue and Joy's Variety Store in Alice Town, Bimini. He was taken to hospital by private vehicle, where he later died, becoming the country’s 38th murder victim for the y ear. P olice said the suspect w as taken into custody a s hort time after the fatal s tabbing. Nassau resident questioned in connection with Bimini homicide In brief TWO Department of Environmental Health workers m ade a gruesome d iscovery yesterday in the bushes off Skyline Drive. They were reportedly cleaning a street around 10am when they noticed a foul smell,w hich them to a badly decomposed body in the bushes. Up to press time, police could not say how l ong the man's body had been in the bushes, or w hat his age or name might be. But based on the advanced stage of decomposition, it is suspected the body may have been there for a few days. It is believed that the man was homeless and lived in the makeshift shelter where his bodyw as found. A mattress and a blanket were also found in the area. Police yesterday said they did not suspect f oul play and are treating the incident as a case of sudden death. "We don't know who he is. . . we don't have a nything at this stage to suggest foul play," s aid Central Detective Unit Superintendent Elsworth Moss, who added that the case was being handled by the Cable Beach police station. WORKERSDISCOVERBODYINBUSHESOFFSKYLINEDRIVE A HEARSE a t the scene near to where the body was discovered. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Due to the tough and economic times that we are facing in the Bahamas and the world at large, it is imperative that we become frugal in our spending habits. The cost of living is at an all time high; a simple trip to the grocery store can be very depressing with the escalating cost of food. I can recall leaving the grocery store after spending just over $100 with just a few bags; in time past, $100 would have completed my grocery list with change left over. Today, electricity bills seem to be the amount of a mortgage payment. In lieu of all of this, we must explore new ways to help us live on a budget and avoid overspending. Starting with food: let’s say you buy breakfast from a Fast Food enterprise which is about $4 to $6. Now multiply that by five (if you do this every day of the week) and see how much money you will be spending in one week! My suggestion is to wake up earlier and prepare breakfast it is cost effective and you know what is in your food. Because in the end, all those artificial ingredients may only send you to the doctor to spend more money! Lunch is a real killer if you buy it everyday. Approximately $7 is normally for lunch; now multiply that by five and you are spending $35 a week on lunch. So instead of buying lunch every day, how about you bring a sandwich from home or eat some of the peas ’n rice and fish your sister cooked for Sun day dinner? When it all boils down, that’s $149 a month you could be saving or doing something more constructive with. Apart from food, we as Bahamians want to look good; every banquet and wedding we must buy something new. An outfit or a new dress or simply cosmetics, for the ladies, and a pair of new name-brand tennis all of these apparatus is simply not necessary. Nine times out of ten there is something right in the closet to wear, but many of us want something new just to say it is “new.” We are trying to keep up with the Joneses when in fact the Joneses are probably in debt up to their eyeballs! We must learn to appreciate what we have and be more conservative in order to save our money and make it through this financial crisis. When on a budget we must be cognisant of the fact that cell phones are a real expense, if you set aside $20 a month it is normally best to stick to that. Phone cards can be very expensive; to preserve airtime, call when it’s necessary and don’t answer land phones especially if you’re close to one. Use the phone only in emergencies and I’m sure you’ll stick to your budget. If you think that these items are so important that you cannot live without them, make up an expense log and see how much money you are spending on a regular basis. Add up every single expense no matter how small and go through things you really need and you will turn your financial situation around. Money is not for selective individuals. The way you treat your money is the way your money will treat you. If you hang around the food store on any given day you can hit the jackpot with the amount of pennies that lay dormant on the ground. Don’t throw those pennies away, they go a long way. In the Bahamas to make it during this tough time we must curve our spending habits and get what’s necessary. Do not let our needs be overshadowed by our wants. Realistically, the difference between the rich and the poor is not the amount of money they make but the way in which they spend it. To be effective in managing your money you must start now, we make so many excuses on how we are going to start tomorrow. If $10 is all you have, save it. Let’s continue to strive for financial freedom as we live on a budget. JASON E SPRINGER Nassau, June, 2009. E DITOR, The Tribune. It is now time once again to rid this country of political interfere nce. I say now both Free National Movement, and the Progressive Liberal Party need to step down to bring in a new breed of young people to chart the course for the 21st century in this actual perilous time. Sir Lynden left a legacy starting with Prime Minister and current Prime Ministers H ubert Ingraham and Perry Christie and the Hon Bernard Nottage the champions of the 20th century. Both Prime Ministers have served their duly course in the halls of parliament, and run out of ideas, and need to leave the political scene before the next general election, to pave the way f or Dr Bernard Nottage to become the next Prime Minister of the Bahamas. The National General Council needs to change its course, bring a new setting for the betterment of this country, and the Bahamian people. B ahamian people must rise up! And rise up! Now to bring a con c lusion to this vexing matter. President Reagan took officew hen he was 68 or 69 as Presi d ent of the United States so we cannot discriminate against age.W e must get out of our minds about this abstract thinking and c all a spade a spade, and think out of the box. First of all the P rime Minister has too much power and it needs to be reduceds o that there is no political inter f erence. Secondly, the senators need to b e appointed by the people, and should have more say in the a ffairs of the government of the day. W e should hold our represen tatives feet to the fire until the f ive years are finished, so that they can remain honest in their dealing of the affairs of our country. Day in and day out, the pre s ent Prime Minister and Mr Christie are making no sense, b ecause neither of them believe in capital punishment, and nei t her of them is willing to change the constitution of the Bahamas laws it deals within the present time. The Privy Council must go, and must go now. We cannot say w e are an independent country, a nd the Privy Council is telling us what to do in our own country. Bahamian people rise up! And rise up! Now before its too late a nd end this era and bring in a new change for our country. The other day the opposition wanted to speak on the crime of the 15 year old boy, and it led to a stink i n the halls of parliament, because the Speaker did not use his discretion, which led to the suspension of Glenys Hanna-Martin u nfairly. The Prime Minister should not appoint the Commissioner of Police to office, this should be done by an independent body and in fact all matters belonging to the police force of the Bahamas. If the government of the day is going to deal with hanging, then t he constitution must be changed immediately with regards to the nation’s crimes, white collar, blue collar, and other crimes likei ncest, child molestation, sexual abuse small children, male andf emale. Speaking on Agriculture both parties have fallen down w ith farming, and none of them has reached anywhere near self sufficient. We cannot rely on tourism alone, but must have a backdrop to sustain us. T here must be a mixture of people in the House so that thec ountry can be diversified with not only lawyers, but many prof essions coming together for the betterment of our country. B ahamians everywhere under the sound of my voice! Rise up, and rise up now from north to south to east, and the west and take your place and be c ounted to chart the course of our beloved country. Rise up! C ourts: Too many people on death row, and people out on bail, t his must stop, and it must stop now. To bring an end to this, Mr Prime Minister, find the number of places that you need, and pay the Bahamian people adequate s alaries to the magistrate or judge. All members of parliament need t o cut their salaries, and do it immediately to become role mode ls to set the pace and tone for the people of the Bahamas. A ll other crimes must be dealt with in short order. Immigration: We must rid ourselves of the various illegal immigrants not just H aitian, and bring them only when we need their help in the farming. This will help us, and will also help the Haitian government. Just how we deal with foreign investment, we need to work out our economy with agriculture and give a mandate to the hotel owne rs to buy our product to put in the various hotels. If we don’t have enough then give the farmers the help to produce more, we can use the Family Islands to produce anything we want. We cannot just look to the United States for help, we must help ourselves, and feed families. W e must do all that we can in light industry to help our situation in the Bahamas. By now these should have been factories in various islands to meet this economic time. The country needs to be diversified to even bring out Bahamian b rothers and sisters from the various places in the United States to h elp enhance our skills in various fields. I call upon the HonH ubert Ingraham, and the Hon P erry Christie, along with the National General Council, tor ethink their strategy and the other parties to unite and throw their f ull support to Dr Bernard Nottage to be the next Prime Minister o f the Bahamas. He deserves it more than anyo ne else in the two parties, and b ring a closure to the political madness in this country. Thism ust start immediately, so he can start working and fielding new c andidates who are neither PLP or FNM to usher in a new cleans i ng for Bahamians everywhere. This is our time to shine, and b ring a halt to what is happening in our beloved country. Bahamians, we put the people in parliament, and we have to tell them what to do, not them tell us what t o say. Rise up! Bahamians and shine! Wake up, Bahamians, and t ake your places and be counted in our beloved country. We only h ave one and we must take care of our piece of the rock. FRANKLIN THOMPSON Nassau, J une, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON Diamonds are not a country’s best friend. Certainly not if yoursis a semi-lawless country in Africa, like Zimbabwe. I n Zimbabwe the discovery of diamonds in the beautiful part of the country around Marange, southeast of the capital ofH arare, has probably extended the life of the Robert Mugabe regime by two years. T heir discovery by a British company, Africa Consolidated Resources, in September 2006, provided Mugabe with anoth-e r source of plunder; plunder he could use to keep his brutal security forces loyal. F act is that such economic governance as remains in Zimbabwe is directed to finding cash to pay the army and the police, whok eep the Mugabe regime afloat. Even so, Mugabe had fallen behind; and last Decem ber soldiers and police demonstrated in H arare, demanding to be paid. Basically, Mugabe’s response was to cede the diamond operations to the security forces. In a new report, Human Rights Watch says the security forces killed 200 minersw hile tightening their grip on the mines and introducing forced labor. The Kimberley Process, a humanitarian a lliance set up to stop the flow of so-called blood diamonds, sent a six-person team to investigate the Zimbabwe mines and found such human rights abuses that it classified the gems as blood diamonds to be sanc t ioned. But diamonds are hard to trace and label; they are fungible and portable, and they can be mined with a pick and shovel inmany places, as they are today in Zimbab w e and Congo. They also can be smuggled in many of t he ways drugs are, except there is no odor to aid border guards with dogs. Through the years diamonds have been ingested, concealed in body cavities and even hidden in wounds. Desperate people do desperate things and never more so when there is the prospect of riches in places of utter poverty. A diamond rush, as has happened in Zimbabwe, is a dangerous, lawless, violent and wretched occurrence. As Mugabe has rejected international mining partners, who might actually know something about the safe and orderly mining of diamonds, the Zimbabwe mines are dangerous, inefficient and environmentally disastrous. The Zimbabweans are not even getting fair value for their gems. These are being marketed through back channels established by the government, and untold num-b ers of gems are stolen at production and sold to middle men and unscrupulous cutters around the world. T he link between the security forces and the mines has another bad effect: It adds to t he political impotence of Morgan Tsvangirai, prime minister in a power-sharing arrangement with Mugabe and his ZANU-P F party. In that arrangement Mugabe retains control of the the security forces, t hus robbing Tsvangirai of any authority not that he would use it well if he got it. Zimbabweans are wondering what has h appened to Tsvangirai, who seems to have lost the ability to stand up to Mugabe. For nearly a decade, Tsvangirai endured false a rrests, allegations of treason, beatings while in custody and had the last election stolen from him and his Movement for Democratic Change. Now Zimbabweans are asking whether t he trappings of power have corrupted their hero or whether, in accepting the South Africa-brokered power-sharing deal,T svangirai boxed himself in. Anyway, he looks as though he has become Mugabe’s bagman, touring the world seeking “investment.” Tsvangirai has been promised some very l imited humanitarian aid, including $8 mil lion of conditional aid from the British and a promise of a little over $73 million of even more restricted and conditional aid from President Obama. W hen Tvangirai got back to Harare, Mugabe supporters ridiculed his efforts a nd his own supporters accused him of selling out to Mugabe. As if to show up his old rival, Mugabe then announced a Chinese loan of just under $1 billion; much of this money has to be spent on Chinese imports. It is ironic that Mugabe should be kept in power by diamonds. It was diamonds that formed the basis of the fortune that enabled the adventurer, Cecil John Rhodes, to colonize Zimbabwe for Britain in the 1890s. Maybe all diamonds are conflict diamonds. Bloody stones. (This article is by LLEWELLYN KING C.2009 Hearst Newspapers) Wake up, Bahamas! you must wake up! LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Imperative that we become frugal in spending habits Diamonds are keeping Mugabe in power

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By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORTGrand B ahama Power Company will s oon begin pole installation for the construction of the new $12 million transmission facilities for Ginn sur Mer at West End. The new poles have been p laced strategically along Queens Highway and will be e rected along a 21-mile route into West End. Derick King, director transmission and distribution, said the new composite poles are a bout 65ft to 70ft tall and capable of withstanding maximum sustained winds of 150 mph. E xecutives of Grand Bahama Power Company and Ginn sur Mer held a town meeting on T uesday evening at the Eight Mile Rock High School gymnasium for residents of WestG rand Bahama. C oncerns were raised during the meeting about the strength of the poles in a vehicle collisiona nd the dangers a falling 70ft pole could pose to nearby homes and other buildings inE ight Mile Rock. Mr King assured residents that 4000 psi of concrete will be pumped into the pole base toa dd strength. He also noted that the poles are made of composite materialt hat comes with a life-time guarantee, compared to the existing 35ft wooden poles that have a life span of 35 years. C onstruction of the new 69kv pole line started in the first quarter of 2009. T he GBPC and Ginn are contributing $6 million each toward the cost of the project, which is expected to be completed in December 2009. Mr King said that a feasibility study and a series of related engineering studies have been conducted in order to quantify the ultimate requirements in the West End and surrounding area and develop a plan for the electrical infrastructure to support it. Meanwhile, the proposed $4.9 billion Ginn sur Mer/Old Bahama Bay development at West End is progressing. It will be comprised of a 20-storey tower resort, condo units, single-family residential home lots, marinas, a private airport, two golf courses and other state-ofthe-art amenities. Mr King said that the development’s ultimate forecasted power demand of 54 megawatts f ar exceeds the capacity of the existing power system in the west of Grand Bahama. He noted that the power sup plied to Ginn will far exceed the power demand at ParadiseI sland in New Providence. M r King said the new trans mission line will improve ser vices to residents of West G rand Bahama, from Eight Mile Rock to West End. “We will install arresters on t he poles to help protect the p ole line equipment from flashover due to lightning strikes, significantly increasingt he reliability of the new line,” he said. He said the new system will provide increased feeder capac-i ty for load growth and decrease interruption frequency and duration. The proposed 69,000-volt pole line will be built from the generating plant located on Queen’s Highway. The pole line will be built on the existing easements. Mr King said that employment opportunities will be created for Bahamians. In addition to GBPC crews, he noted that external Bahamian contractors and labourers will be employed, as well as US based advisors who will train power company staff on high voltage techniques. The project will also provide an economic boost for busi nesses in the western part of Grand Bahama. “We will be required to feed our crews and we will be sup porting local food vendors in t he area to provide our crews with breakfast and lunch,” Mr King said. By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net TWO Immigration officers are currently on administrative leave on susp icion of having committed various i nfractions, Immigration Director Jack Thompson revealed. The officers were placed on leave by the former director of immigration before Mr Thompson assumed office last November, he said, but he could not say what the infractions were. "There are two officers who are on administrative leave, they were on leave prior to my coming to office. I am reviewing the files, I don't have the full particulars before me now. . . I'm not sure what they were on administrative l eave for," he said. Allegations T he Department of Immigration has come under heavy fire in recent months, w ith rampant allegations of abuse and mistreatment at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre, as well as claims of b ribery. Earlier this year, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham admonished corrupt Immigration officers and said his gov-e rnment will not "look the other way" w here evidence supports allegations of corruption in the public service. He addressed allegations of immigration officials accepting bribes atp orts of entry or in exchange for falsifying documents or speeding up work permit and residence application processes. M r Ingraham also noted allegations that some immigration officers use excessive force during apprehension and detention exercises and stressed that his government does not tolerate the abuse of detainees or suspected illegal immigrants. “I want to be clear: abuse of detained persons whether in their homes, at a work site, on an immigration bus or at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre is contrary to the law. Everyone must be treated with respect and with dignity at all times; that is the law and that is t he policy of the government which I head,” said Mr Ingraham earlier in the year. Meeting M r Thompson said since the prime minister's warning, the department has held a meeting with supervisors and a dvised them to be vigilant for instances of impropriety. He stressed that despite some bad apples, there are a lot of outstand-i ng and dedicated officers who routinel y go beyond the required level of service. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 5 'VO 4VNNFS $BNQ7 LUHGRIWKHDPH 2 OG%RULQJXPPHU 6FKRRO" 7 U\RPHWKLQJ 1HZt&UHDWLY$FWLYLWLHV,QFOXGH $ UWVt&UDIWV'UDZLQJtDLQWLQJ0XVLFt'UDPD /HVVRQV 6ZLPPLQJDQG 6SRUWV &$//:$1' 5(6(59(<285 %()25(,7/$7( RU( PDLOZHVWPRRU#KRWPDLOFRP Bahamas Agricultural & Industrial Corporation (BAIC PresentsIts HANDICRAFT ‘STRAW’TRAINING PROGRAM Date: July 6-17, 2009 Venue: C. H. Reeves Junior School Time: 6:00 – 10:00 p.m. (Daily Location:Robinson RoadApplication Form Name: _________________________ Address:_______________________ Tel: ___________________________ P. O. Box: ______________________ Email: _________________________ Fax: ___________________________ Age range: under 15162526 – 40 41 – 6061–70 71and overEmployment Status:EmployedGovernment PrivateSelf-employed Unemployed Have you completed other BAIS Training Programs Yes No List Them ________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ADMINISTRATIVE FEE: $100.00 [excluding materials]**************** Contact:Sharae Collie/ Pam Deveaux (BAIC) TEL:322-3740-1 Fax: 328-6542 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 Immigration officers on leave on suspicion of committing infractions T HEfamily of a missing 6 7-year-old man are fearing for his safety as he disappeared from his Wulff Road home without his seizure medication. D avid McKinney was last seen at his home lastw eek Friday. Since then, he has been seen in Romer Street in the Fox Hill area, but has not made contact with hisf amily. Although Mr McKinney often went for walks, his niece Annamae said that never before had he disappeared for longer than a day and that he did not tend to frequent Fox Hill. “He’s on medication for s eizures. If he doesn’t have it, he’ll fall out all the time,” she said. Every time I go to Fox H ill I can’t find him.” “I just want to be able to pick him up and take h im back to his place. “With the seizures he may not know where he i s,” she added. A nnamae has asked anyone who sees Mr McKinney to call her on 3642 228, 322-3754 or 4340643. If no one answers, callers are advised tol eave a message. T he Tribune w ill publish a photo of Mr McKinney tomorrow. By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net GOVERNMENT has a newly formed committee to assist the Department of Immigration in fulfilling its pledge to eradicate illegal immi grant "slums". Immigration Director Jack Thompson said a number of government representatives – from Public Works, Building Control, the Depart ment of Environmental Health, the Depart ment of Lands and Surveys, the Department of Housing, the RBPF, and the Attorney General's office – convened for a meeting on Wednesday where a committee was formed to address the "vexing" problem of slum communities on New Providence and the Family Islands. Mr Thompson said the group has already identified a number of communities that they will address and plan to meet again next week. "This is of major concern to us because, one, you have a number of persons who are illegal in the Bahamas who are residing in these places. Two, this is a health issue, three there's the water table that's affected by it because these persons build these places without building codes up to standard," he said. While Mr Thompson said his department would aggressively deal with the slum communities, he stressed that the process would be handled humanely. "This time we're going to do something about it, but we're going to do it right, we're not going to move into a community with a bull dozer and start bulldozing houses down – that is not our style. "We're going to do it within the law, but we are going to move in that direction and address this problem," said Mr Thompson, at a press conference at the Department of Immigration yesterday. The issue was raised by State Immigration Minister Branville McCartney last week at the Chamber of Commerce's 'Meet the Minister' forum. Committee formed to assist in the eradication of illegal immigrant ‘slums’ Poles for $12m transmission facilities set for installation D ERICK KING , GBPC director of transmissions and distribution, and Derek Gape, Ginn sur Mer p roject manager, were both on hand to answer questions from r esidents at the informational night about the West End transmission line upgrade. They arep ictured in front of topographic maps showing the route of the n ew line, which follows the existing power line, but will upgrade residents from 5mhw t o 69mhw. K een i Media Ltd PUBLIC Works and T ransport Minister Neko Grant admonished gradu ates of St George’s S enior High School to “be of service to others” as they “climb the ladder o f success.” “Many people (are on their quest for success, only focused on ‘having’o r ‘getting’ from a personal perspective,” he said. “Their lives never include sharing their gifts, talents or experiences with others. Therefore, seek to be of some service or help to others. Please always remember to give back to your country and to your community.” Mr Grant was a featured speaker at the June 2009 graduation ceremo ny of St George’s Secondary School, Freeport, Grand Bahama. “You must pursue and accept the opportunitiesfor further education, training or work,” he told the graduates. “You must also seek to excel when you are required to complete a particular task. You must embrace your destiny and you must put your desire to excel into action.” The graduates were told that they will not know or perfect everything, “however, every day we should strive toward continuous improvement in all aspects of our lives,” Mr Grant said. Graduates urged to be of ser vice to others Family fear for safety of missing man In brief

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R E CENTLY I reviewed plans to move the container port to Arawak Cay in the context of revitalising the city of Nassau. But there has been an unfortunate failure to communicate o n this project, and some of the parameters discussed earlier have changed. So I met with the board of directors of the Arawak Cay Port Development Company (APD itative update. T he latest draft of the agreement between the Government and the developers (which couldbe the final version) is now at the Office of the Prime Minist er. Expectations are that it will be signed within days, after w hich contractors would be mobilised to begin work. If this happens, the deal will have taken one year to con-c lude, at a cost to APD's shareholders of about a million doll ars so far. Those shareholders include the entire Bahamian shipping industry 19 partners in all. They range from domest ic and international shippers to s tevedoring firms, dry bulk importers, and ferry operators. The working group spearh eading the negotiations includes Bahamas Marine Constuction's Jimmy Mosko, A rawak Stevedoring's Chris L ightbourn, the Mailboat Comp any's Donelle Taylor, Jack Sands of Betty K Agencies and M ike Maura of Tropical Shipping. But they are not the prime movers. " The government is driving t his," Lightbourn told me. "And we have been trying to implement whatever solution the Government wants. The previous Government told us we were going to Southwest Pointa nd the current Government told us we are going to Arawak Cay. In both cases the mandate w as to minimise impact to the cost of living and make way for the redevelopment of downt own Nassau." I n fact, the same coalition of shipping interests helped fund the 2006 Southwest Point engi-n eering study by the Dutch cons ultants, Ecorys; just as it has more recently funded develop m ent studies for the Arawak C ay location. The current consulting team includes Londonb ased Halcrow Group, KPMG Bahamas, and the law firm of Higgs & Johnson. "It will take three months for us to mobilise," Mosko told me. "The work will include con-s truction of a sea wall, maintenance dredging of less than 200,000 cubic yards of material from the existing channel, the addition of two lift cranes, some 20 acres of pavement, plus security fencing. It's little more than a glorified car park and certain ly not rocket science we can be up and running within a year." T he total land area for phase one of the container terminal w hich will be located on the existing 70-acre cay is about 40 acres. An additional five acres on the eastern end of the cay will be used for a terminalt hat will handle inter-island ferries, the Mailboat Company and tour boats, while most domestics hipping will remain at Potter's Cay. The ferry terminal is a separate project, Mosko said. M eanwhile, the Dutch infrastructure firm, Royal Boskalis Westminster, is already mobil ising to dredge Nassau harbour t o expand the cruise port. This s eparate Government project (which will finish in November w ill excavate 2.1 million cubic yards of material from the harbour, most of which will be used to add about 40 new acres to the western end of Arawak Cay. The remainder will be used toe xpand Woodes Rogers Wharf east of Rawson Square to provide space for more waterfront activities. Some concerns have been expressed about the impact the Arawak Cay extension mayh ave on the Saunders Beach area. But according to Neil Sealey, a local expert on the coastal environment, "there is no reason to suspect that the extension will change anything f rom the present situation, although it should be monit ored." S ealey pointed out that the New Providence shoreline in this area is already masked by Silver Cay and water circulat ion is being blocked by the existing causeway at the east e rn end of Arawak Cay right n ow, adding that it wouldn’t hurt to open up the causeway t o allow more water flow along t he southern side of the cay. C osts for the Arawak Cay p ort are pegged at $55 million including basic civil works at t he proposed Gladstone Road warehouse depot. This compares to the more than $235 mil l ion that was estimated for the Southwest Point port, which h ad a seven-year buildout. The equity split outlined in the latest draft agreement calls for the government and the shipping coalition to each hold 40 perc ent of the shares, with 20 per cent reserved for a public offer ing. T his price tag will be partly financed by a $15 million preference share offering, with thes hareholders having to come up with the remaining $40 million. "The investment has to make sense for all parties," Light b ourn said. "And Arawak Cay i s a much more economical project, especially in today's climate. For example, the Ecorys study projected a sixp er cent annual g rowth in container cargo, but what we have actually seen over the past nine months is a drop of about 20 per cent." A nd it is not w idely known that 40 per cent of all cargo already arrives at Arawak Cay. This includesc ontainers handled b y Tropical Shipp ing and MSC, as well as dry bulk imports like sand, cement, steel and aggregates. Potablew ater is also shipped from Andros to reservoirs on t he cay, and these may be shifte d to other locations nearby to facilitate the berthing of container ships on the northern side o f the cay. There is one major point that still needs clarification, and thati s how the new port will connect to the New Providence road network. Environment Minister Earl Deveaux told me recently that a bridge would be built from the newly-reclaimed w estern end of the cay to conn ect to West Bay Street at the extreme eastern end of Saunders Beach, which is now ar ocky shoreline. In this scenario, containers would be trucked over the b ridge and on to the Bethel A venue road extension, which will connect to West Bay at a roundabout to be built immed iately west of the Shell station. From here trucks will travel across Thompson Boulevarda nd the Tonique Darling Highw ay to a 15-acre warehouse depot that will be built on Gov ernment land off Gladstone R oad. Goods will be unloaded at the depot and sent on to their final destinations. H owever, the shipping coali tion says a bridge is not part of their plans. At this point they anticipate moving containers to G ladstone Road via the existing access route from Arawak Cay. Trucks will run during off-peak t raffic times, with an estimated 1,000 movements a week in and out of the terminal. Officials ources say the new bridge may b e part of what the Government brings to the table in the port deal, but no firm project exists a nd the appropriate EIAs would have to be done prior to any commitments. T he Bethel Avenue road extension (from West Bay Street to the Tonique DarlingH ighway) is part of the IDBfinanced New Providence road improvement project being undertaken by the Argentinian contractor, Jose Cartellone. In a related development, the Government recently signed an agreement with the Chinese export-import bank for a multimillion-dollar loan, part of which will be used to convert JFK Drive and Thompson Boulevard (from the airport to the College of The Bahamas) into a four-lane highway. Preparatory work for this pro ject is already under way, according to officials. "But we have to balance the traffic issues because no matter where cargo arrives on the island it has to get to its final destinations, which are usually in high traffic areas," Lightbourn told me. "In terms of A rawak Cay we are dealing with a property that we don't control, so we have gone as far as we can go until the Govern-m ent decides what it w ants to do." In addition to the traffic concerns, critics have complained about using Arawak Cay for industrialr ather than touristic p urposes as was originally proposed back in the 1960s when the island was created from thes poil of earlier harb our dredging. H ere's one example of this view taken from a recent Facebook conversation: " Won't it look just gorgeous to our visiting cruise s hip passengers? Instead of p utting some wonderful facility out there (think Sydney Opera House), we put a container port. W hat does that say about how we feel about Bahamian culture? Why not be bold and cre a te a wonderful space where everyone can access the sea and recreation?" But the plain fact is that Arawak Cay has been an industrial site for the past 40 years, a nd many cruise ships leave f rom industrial ports or arrive at multi-use ports in the Caribbean. Arawak Cay couldh ardly be any worse as it is, and a modern container port is not necessarily an eyesore. It doesn ’t seem to detract from Miam i, for instance. It is also worth noting that any location on New Provid ence for a new port has impacts and tradeoffs. A port at Clifton would likely destroyt he dive tourism industry, for e xample, whereas one at Arawak Cay would have virtu ally no impact on the marine e nvironment as it uses the existing dredged harbour entrance. A Clifton port would also cost h undreds of millions more, while taking much longer to put together. The bottom line is that freight t raffic is disrupting the capital and the container terminals occupy valuable waterfront s pace. This restricts options for Nassau's redevelopment while making life unpleasant fore veryone. It's time to bring this l ong-running saga to an end. THE PORT, SAUNDERS B EACH AND THE CASUARINAS As a sidebar to this story, an a ngry email was circulated over the weekend complaining about the imminent removal of thec asuarina colonnade along Saunders Beach. This was reminiscent of the misguided outcry that occurred the last time the Government undertook a casuarina removal programme, 17 years ago, at Cable Beach. The email used this little rhyme to make its point: If you go down to the beach today, You’re in for a big surprise, For every tree that used to be there, Is threatened with pending demise. Casuarinas are native to the western Pacific but were introduced to Florida and the Caribbean in the late 1800s for use as firewood and windbreaks. After a series of major hurricanes in the 1920s uprooted many landmark trees on New Providence, fast-growing c asuarinas were planted around the capital by well-meaning garden clubs. These trees grow well in disturbed areas and are highly salttolerant. B ut dense thickets of casuari nas quickly displace native dune and beach vegetation, including mangroves. And once established they outcompete native plants and destroy habitat for native insects and otherw ildlife. The ground below the t ree is poisoned and becomes ecologically sterile. Both the Government and the Bahamas National Trust have removal policies and pro-g rammes for invasive species l ike the casuarina that shut out n ative plants. In populated areas there is also a danger from falling limbs as the trees can grow to more than 100 feet and decay with age. But their impacto n beaches is less widely known. In 2003 coastal expert Neil S ealey produced a research p aper on casuarina-induced beach erosion at Small Hope Bay on Andros. He showed that e rosion was caused by the sup pression of native vegetation beneath the trees. This led tos and blown onshore not being trapped to form dunes, so that during storms there was nothing to stop massive sand loss. An update to this research was produced for the recent natu ral history conference on San S alvador, pointing out that no vegetated shorelines have been found with chronic erosione xcept those with casuarinas. And Sealey was able to confirm that specific areas cleared of c asuarinas including Small H ope Bay have been rapidly repopulated by native species that build up the natural dune. O range Hill on West Bay Street is the best example of a successful beach restoration onN ew Providence. The casuarin as were replaced a few years ago with native vegetation, and the dune has since stabilised. A ccording to the Bahamas Reef Environment Education Foundation "One only needs tod rive past Saunders Beach to see how it has been eroded by the casuarinas that line it. If this beach were planted with native c oastal species such as seagrape, cocoplum and sea oats, the beach would be stabilized and s and would not be constantly blown into the road." Well, that is exactly what is a bout to happen. The tree r emoval is part of a larger reorganisation of the Saunders Beach area, which is a compo n ent of the aforementioned IDB-funded road improvement project. T he road immediately west of the Shell station will be diverted south to create a park-i ng area for some 150 vehicles. This will improve public access to the beach, while the casuarinas will be replaced with native vegetation to allow the beach to regenerate over time. Environmentalists say that West Bay Street should never have been built so close to the shoreline. In fact, coastal roads are chiefly responsibly for our disappearing beaches, as can be seen at Montagu, where the road was built on the dune and the beach is now almost gone. The end result is that we have to fork out money every few years to repair the seawall. The same thing is in store for Saunders Beach if nothing is done. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The port at Arawak Cayall things considered ENVIRONMENT MINISTER Earl Deveaux told me recently that a bridge would be built from the newly-reclaimed western end of the cay to connect to West Bay Street at the extreme eastern end of Saunders Beach. T T h h e e r r e e i i s s o o n n e e m m a a j j o o r r p p o o i i n n t t t t h h a a t t s s t t i i l l l l n n e e e e d d s s c c l l a a r r i i f f i i c c a a t t i i o o n n , , a a n n d d t t h h a a t t i i s s h h o o w w t t h h e e n n e e w w p p o o r r t t w w i i l l l l c c o o n n n n e e c c t t t t o o t t h h e e N N e e w w P P r r o o v v i i d d e e n n c c e e r r o o a a d d n n e e t t w w o o r r k k . .

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FREEPORT With the objective of providing students with clinical exposure while studying in the Bahamas, Ross U niversity has partnered with t he Public Hospitals Authori ty in a vlinical yraining sgree-m ent. O n May 12 Ross first and s econd year medical students began their training at both the Rand Hospital and theE ight Mile Rock clinic. This agreement will provide a scope for the further development and training of personnel throughout the Grand Bahama health services. An important aspect of the a greement provides PHA h ealth professionals with a ccess to Ross University’s simulation labs and medicall ibrary which will enhance P HA’s ability to train and strengthen the capacity of local health professionals. This arrangement will allow for Bahamian professionals to participate in the training of students from various parts oft he wider international community. Medical students at each location are under the carefuls upervision of two doctors for a few hours twice weekly. During a typical half day, the student is introduced to the patient by the doctor and is allowed to interview, examine and obtain history of present illness; they examine the patient (applying only those skills they have been taught); p resent the patient to the a ttending physician; write up the history and physical and l ater obtain feedback on the p resentation and the write-up f rom the attending physician. The doctors are then required to provide evalua-t ions of the students to the university. The Clinical Education Partnership was introduced to the Grand Bahama health community back in December 2008, and will provide a rich e ducational experience to R oss students, and also e nhance the professional growth of Bahamian physi-c ians, thus improving the overa ll health and medical care system within the Bahamas. Statistics have shown that when hospitals become more teaching oriented and offer themselves as educational facilities, the level of patientc are tends to go up. “This is a significant moment in the history of Grand Bahama. We look for-w ard to a long and fruitful w orking relationship between the university and the medical community on Grand Bahama. How we work together will impact both prec linical and tertiary medical education on this island, andp ossibly the educational develo pment of the next generation of health care professionals in the Bahamas,” said Dr Desiree Cox, director of clinical education at Ross University. “The Clinical Training Agreement is just the begin n ing of a long relationship between Ross and the Grand Bahama medical community.W e are open to more ways in e ngaging with doctors who work in private practice and other health care professionals in the medical com m unity.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 7 IN RECOGNITIONof the contributions of its alumni to the community, the Q ueen’s College Foundat ion, in co-operation with the Queen’s College alumni steering committee, has created an alumni pin. The lapel pin is in the shape of the famous Queen’s C ollege crest and will immed iately identify its wearer as a distinguished alumnus of the school. As a part of the graduation ceremony this year, graduating grade 12 students were pinned by members of t he alumni steering committee to symbolise their transition to alumni status. “It is more than simply a p in,” said Yolanda Darville, director of development for the Queen’s college foundation. “The alumni pin symbolises that the wearer recognises t hat they have received one o f the best educational e xperiences available in the country. It also symbolises t hat although the alumnus has graduated, they still love and support their almam ater.” T he alumni pins are availa ble for $10 and are perfect to wear at class reunions and o ther Queen’s College alum ni events The Queen’s College F oundation is a charitable organisation that provides support to the school for scholarships, special programmes, technology and the improvement of facilities. R ecent achievements by the foundation on behalf of Queen’s College include theb uilding of the new Early Learning Centre, the reno vation of the Geoffrey B rown Auditorium and the creation of the Q Caf. Established in 1890, Queen’s College is the oldestp rivate school in the Bahamas and has educated numerous Bahamian leaders. Queen’s College Foundation and alumni create lapel pin Students to gain experience at public hospitals ROSS STUDENTS with doctors of the Rand Hospital in Grand Bahama. (l-r Rachel Lacy, Dr Ohueyi, Dr Bartlett, Dr Klasson, Neeti Patel, and Olawole Ogunsulire. THE current economic crunch will n ot last forever and the Bahamas’ infrastructure “must be in good condition” when the economy rebounds, Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant said yesterday. Mr Grant was responding to comments by Senator Allyson Maynard-G ibson during her contribution to the debate in the Senate on a Bill for an Act to Amend the Cruise Ship’s Overnighting Incentives Act on Wednesday. She criticised the government for, among other things, its plans to continue with the Nassau Harb our dredging despite the global economic downturn. Mr Grant said 70 per cent of the visitors to the Bahamas arrive by cruise ship and the introduction of mega cruise ships that callo n the port of Nassau will require more water depth than presently exists. “It was decided that it was necessary to increase the capacity of Nassau Harbour, making it accessible to this new generation of cruise ships and for the Bahamas to b e able to compete with other Caribbean countries,” said Mr Grant. On April 2, the government signed a $44 million contract with Boskalis, a Netherlands-based interna-t ional dredging and maritime infrastructure contractor. The contract includes dredging of 1.9 million cubic yards of material from Nassau Harbour, construction of three mooring dolphins (fixed man-made structures which are not connected to the shore a nd are used for mooring) at Prince George Wharf, and extension by 1,000 feet of the western end of Arawak Cay with the dredged material. At the contract signing for the Nassau Harbour Port Improvement Project, Minister Grant said: “It is antic-i pated that the dredging would be completed in time to accommodate the arrival of one of the first of Royal Caribbean International’s mega cruise ships, ‘Oasis of the Seas’, on its maiden voyage in December, 2009.” The infrastructure ‘must be in good condition’ when economy rebounds D a v e M a c k e y Neko Grant

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she was told, tried to get to Mountbatten House but was unable to. She told the court she subsequently went home and there received a phone call prompting her to go back to West Hill Street. Mrs Taylor told how she identified her son’s body at the morgue the following day. During cross-examination by McNeil’s lead attorney, Murrio Ducille, Mrs Taylor told the court that over the years she saw Troyniko at Mountbatten House. Detective Corporal Keith Turnquest, a crime scene investigator, said yesterday that on the morning of November 18, 2007, he went to Mountbatten House where he met other police officers. Cpl Turnquest said that in the eastern side of the lobby area he saw what appeared to be an accumulation of blood droplets on the floor and blood dripping from the ceiling. He told the court he went upstairs and saw blood stains on the white railing that lead to a long hallway. There, he told the court, he found b loody shoe prints and footprints. He testified that the hallway led to the master bedroom and bathroom where he found blood in a face basin, blood on the wall above it and a small white towel on face basin. Cpl Turnquest said that in the master bedroom, he saw spattered blood on the western, northern and southern wall as well as the lifeless body of a dark male lying face up on the left side of the bed in a pool of blood. Corporal Turnquest said he then photographed the scene. While describing one of the photographs, Cpl Turnquest noted that a brown handle broken knife was on the bed just above Taylor’s right hand. D etective Sergeant James Colebrooke testified that he photographed Taylor’s body at the morgue and observed numerous injuries to his abdomen, back, shoulders, the back of his head and face. A male alternate juror was discharged yesterday after he told the court his mother was a close friend of Harl Taylor’s mother Beverly. The trial resumes today before Senior Justice Anita Allen. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE However, Mr Gottlieb said he was unwilling to disclose the amount owed which sources estimate tob e more than $80million. In a bid to recoup the cash, the chairman said BEC essentially has three options open to it the threat of disconnection, disconnection, and finally legal action. In terms of people who owe the corporation, Mr Gottlieb said this demographic ranges from everydayc itizens, to businesses, to even other Government agencies and corporations. “That’s not unusual. There is usu ally an offset process there that sometimes lags in time. There are private companies that owe BEC money and there are private individuals who also owe BEC money. So it’s across the spectrum,” he said. When asked if there was a diffi culty in the corporation actually collecting its funds from certain high profile persons in society, Mr Got tlieb said that this is a common mis perception. “The present board does not pursue a policy of being selective with regard to those individuals or companies that owe BEC money and who are at the point of legitimately having their electricity supply disconnected. “But the facts that were stated in the recent Punch article were not correct as regards that particular individual and business (Wendall Jones, Jones Communication).” Mr Gottlieb said he could not disclose how much the struggling media empire owed but it is not the significant sums quoted in the tabloid piece. Ms Rassin said: “At Doctors Hospital, our first priority is quali ty care and patient safety. We have a disaster plan as well as protocols in place for such emergencies including redundancy with two b ackup generators. “However, management at Bahamas Electricity Corporation must understand that a hospital is an essential service to the country, and patients’ lives could be in jeop ardy during a power outage. Long term power outages could put patients at risk if they are on a vent ilator or having surgery. Medica tion, treatment and services might be delayed for patients further hampering patient care.” She said physicians and nursing staff “responded professionally” to the situation which saw the elec tricity supply to the hospital cut off for “just under two hours”. The length of this period was “totally unacceptable,” she added. “In a crisis that involves power or water outages, the utility companies must ensure consistent and reliable service to hospitals as patient lives could be at stake; actions need to take place to prevent a reoccurrence.” Ms Rassin added that Doctors Hospital “is committed to our employees, patients, and commu nity and top priority remains to ensure their safety.” Acknowledging that some mem bers of the public may not think to contact BEC when their power goes out, Mr Basden said this can happen for a number of reasons and in some cases “depending on the nature of it, BEC may not be aware.” He said people can contact BEC on 323 5661 to report outages. mission, chaired by Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, to be formally appointed by Governor General Arthur Hanna on October 1 and August 14 respectively. A senior lawyer, who did not want to be named, criticised the commission’s failure to consult lawyers, judges, members of the public, non-governmental organisations and watchdogs about the potential appointments before drawing conclusions. Without an open discussion there is potential for appointments to be skewed, the attorney warned. He said: “We have to be sure to appoint people because of their track record, as opposed to them progressing through the civil service. “For people who are answerable to the executive, and who continue to be answerable to the executive, the State can do no wrong; and that could be the case if your entire experience as an attorney has been working in the office of the Attorney General for five, 15 or 20 years.” The appointment of Supreme Court and Appeal Court judges is extremely sensitive as Justices make and interpret laws to guide progress in the country. The senior counsel added: “We can have judges who are either lazy, or who will worship every utterance of the executive, or who are completely left-wing, or completely right-wing, so there should be a process which allows for the consideration of the prospective appointment before it’s confirmed, or simply announced. “We have an antiquated, non-transparent accountability process for Supreme Court and Court of Appeal appointments and I think it’s way past time to reform these kind of appointments.” The Justices-to-be will fill the roles left vacant by Justice Rubie Nottage and Senior Justice John Lyons. Justice Nottage left the bench last year, when she reached the mandatory retirement age of 65 just two years after her appointment. And Justice Lyons took early retirement on May 7. Another attorney, who did not want to be named, is concerned the appointed judges will not be able to fill the shoes of Justice Lyons, a senior commercial judge who heard a number of complex cases. She said: “We need to have someone who can meet that image and substance if we want to have a credible reputation as a financial centre and a legitimate judiciary. “While I’m not saying there’s anything wrong w ith the appointments, we need to ask if we are filling the gap.” While Ms Bain has some commercial experience as former director of legal affairs for the Attorney General, Mr Turner’s experience is in criminal law. He has worked at the Attorney General’s office since 1988 and was appointed director of public prosecutions in April 2000 to be responsible for o rganising all criminal prosecutions through the Attorney General’s office since. The Bar Association reportedly expressed displeasure over Ms Bain’s Supreme Court appointment, but this has not been confirmed by Bar Association President Ruth Bowe-Darville or former president Wayne Munroe. The concerned attorney said: “The rules in the Supreme Court are complex and they’re extremel y deep. Unless you work with them in process and know them intimately it’s very difficult to sit up on the bench and hear some of these cases because of the technicalities and rules involved, and that’s what’s lacking in a number of these appointments.” in the ‘Pink Building’ that really this is the way to go,” he said. “I am elated. I could not see the point of putting 76 people out of work for rent. I want to pay it, but I did not see what was wrong in finding out what was a fair rent.” Following his meeting with Mr Rolle, Mr Hayward met with his staff at Port Lucaya around 3pm to share the news and update them on the current situation. Mr Hayward has paid more than $34,000, emptying his businesses’ bank accounts. He is required come up with an additional $15,000 by the end of next week, bringing his total payment to $50,000. detailed allegations made by an officer who alleged to have wit nessed numerous beatings, sexual assaults, and even one murder at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre all of which the officer claimed went unpunished. The identity and rank of the officer was withheld to protect his identity. Yesterday, Mr Thompson said his department was "not aware" of the claims outlined in the article. "I'm saying that I have no information before me, at all, (to support) that it happened. . .We're not aware of it. If any such action or behaviour or mis conduct is brought to our attention we will investigate it and we'll deal with it," he said, flanked by the department's senior deputy director, the deputy director and the assistant director of immigration. An investigation into these claims has not been launched, said Mr Thompson. There are no surveillance cam eras at the holding facility to document the treatment of the detainees but provisions have been made for their purchase in the department's 2009/2010 budget, said the director. He also stressed that his team maintains vigilance over the operations of the site with routine visits and staff meetings with Immigration officials. The Detention Centre has been plagued with claims of abuse and mistreatment for months with several detainees alleging that the facility was likea "concentration camp". The allegations prompted the department to launch a fact-finding mission with prominent members of the community earlier in the year. While that report was never made public, several aesthetic upgrades were made to the centre following the visit. The Immigration Department is responsible for the administration of the holding facility while the RBDF mans the security of the centre. T he Department of Social Ser vices is responsible for the prepa ration and distribution of meals. SEEPAGEFIVE FROM page one Concerns raised FROM page one GBbusinessman FROM page one Doctors Hospital FROM page one Immigration chief calls for information on alleged abuse of detainees F ROM page one Harl Taylor killer ‘did not act alone’ FROM page one BEC ‘is owed substantial amounts of money’

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SOCCER NEW YORK Associated Press DAVID Beckham has become a bad teammate on the Los Angeles Galaxy, according to Landon Donovan. “All that we care about at a minimum is that he committed himself to us,” Donovan was quoted as saying in an excerpt of Grant Wahl’s “The Beck ham Experiment,” scheduled for publication July 14. “As time has gone on, that has not proven to be the case in many ways on the field, off the field. “Does the fact that he earns that much money come into it? Yeah. If someone’s paying you more than anybody in the league, more than double anybody in the league, the least we expect is that you show up to every game, whether you’re suspended or not. Show up and train hard. Show up and play hard.” Beckham joined the Galaxy in July 2007 from Real Madrid a nd has a $6.5 million average annual income from the team, twice the $2.94 million Cuauhtemoc Blanco earns from the Chicago Fire. Dono van was fifth at $900,000 at the start of the season. Beckham was loaned to AC Milan last winter and the 34year-old midfielder is to rejoin Los Angeles for its July 16 match at the New York Red Bulls. Donovan was angry that when Beckham was suspend ed for a game at Houston last year, he didn’t attend the match. “I can’t think of another guy where I’d say he wasn’t a good teammate, he didn’t give every thing through all this, he didn’t still care,” Donovan said. “But with (Beckham wasn’t committed.” An excerpt of the book was published in this week’s Sports I llustrated. It portrays Beckham as stingy, saying he wouldn’t pick up meal checks for teammates who earn as little as $12,900 annually. It states Terry Byrne, Beckham’s best friend and personal manager, pressed for the Galaxy to strip Donovan of the captain’s armband and give it to Beckham. Donovan went along with the move. It says that at a dinner at Morton’s steak house in Arlington, Va., Beckham ini tially wasn’t served wine because he didn’t have ID, and needed the intervention of the maitre d’. Byrne, according to the excerpt, was hired as a Galaxy consultant and conducted the search that led to the hiring of Ruud Gullit to replace Frank Yallop as coach even though general manager Alexi Lalas advised against hiring the 1987 E uropean player of the year. “My sense is that David’s clearly frustrated, that he’s unhappy and, honestly, that he thinks it’s a joke,” Donovan said last August. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 9 SPORTS IN BRIEF TENNIS W IMBLEDON, England Associated Press THEcurrent edition of Wimbledon is the 23rd Grand Slam tournament since Andy Roddick won his lone major championship at the 2003 U.S. Open. He badly wants to win a second. It’s why he changed coaches for this season. Slimmed down. Put in as much work as ever in practice, striving to improve his returns, his backhands, his volleys. Add it all up, and the sixth-seeded American is b ack in the Wimbledon s emifinals for the first time s ince 2005, facing No. 3seeded Andy Murray of Britain on Friday. Roger Federer seeking a sixth Wimbledon championship and record 15th Grand Slam title faces No. 24 Tommy Haas of Germany in the other semifinal. “Andymonium” has hit the All England Club, but don’t think Roddick is happy merely to be a part of it. “By no means is he satisfied, because the whole gig when he hired me is we’ve got to win a Slam,” Rod dick’s coach, Larry Stefanki, said. “I said, ’That’s what I’m here for.’ Winning a Slam is what it’s all about. Coming in second is like kissing your sister. And he knows that he’s already won one. Nothing is going to suf fice. Even if you get to the final, it won’t do.” Roddick’s major title, not quite six years ago, was also the last at any Grand Slam event for an American man, the country’s longest drought in the Open era, which began in 1968. That wait must seem rather quaint to the folks around here. Murray is trying to become the first British man to win Wimbledon since Fred Perry in 1936. No British man has won any Grand Slam championship since Perry at the U.S. Open later that year. So the buzz builds with each victory by Murray. The 22-year-old from Scotland wrote on Twitter about the good-luck note he received from Queen Elizabeth II everyone in Britain wants to know whether she’ll show up in the Royal Box if Murray reaches Sunday’s final and the phone call he got from actor Sean Connery. “It doesn’t make any difference the way you perform, the hype. If you ... spend a lot of time reading the papers, watching everything on the TV, all the things that are getting said on the radio, then you get caught up in it,” said Mur ray, the runner-up to Federer at last year’s U.S. Open. “If you ignore it, you don’t realize it’s happening.” Murray is 6-2 against Roddick, including a lopsided victory in their most recent meeting, in the final of a hard-court tournament at Doha, Qatar, in January. That was Stefanki’s first tournament with Roddick and expects Friday’s encounter to look different. “It wasn’t pretty. That tac tic won’t be used again. It was a very aggressive, offen sive, bring-out-the-bugleand-charge,” Stefanki said. “And this guy is like (Mats Wilander or (Bjorn you give him a target and he’s going to pass you, lob you, dink you, because he’s a great mover off the ball.” Dono van: Beckham has become a bad teammate Landon Donovan Andy Roddick T ENNIS WIMBLEDON, England A ssociated Press THEpurple “W” logo at Wimbledon might as well stand for the siblings who have made the women’s championship their own playground. Yes, the Williams sisters are back in the Wimbledon final. Venus and Serena Williams won in contrasting fashion Thursday to set up their fourth all-sister Wimbledon final and eighth meeting in a Grand Slam title match. Two-time champion Serena saved a match point and overcame Elena Demen tieva 6-7 (4 the longest women’s semifinal at Wimbledon in at least 40 years. Five-time winner Venus, meanwhile, needed only 51 minutes to demolish Dinara Safina 6-1, 6-0 and reach her eighth Wimbledon final. “Oh, my God, this is my eighth final, and it’s a dream come to true to be here again and have the opportunity to hold the plate up,” Venus said. The sisters with 17 Grand Slam titles between them will face each other Saturday in a Fourth of July final. “A fourth final it’s so exciting. It was so hard before my match to watch all that drama,” Venus said, referring to Serena’s semifinal. “It was so difficult. But the hardest part is next to come, to play Serena Williams.” One Williams or the other has won seven of the past nine championships at the All England Club. Serena beat Venus in the 2002 and finals, and Venus came out on top against her younger sister last year. “All I know is a Williams is going to win,” said the sisters’ father, Richard. Venus is bidding to become the first woman since Steffi Graf in 1991-93 to win Wimbledon three years in a row. There have been seven previous allWilliams championship matches at majors, with Serena holding a 5-2 lead. Overall, the sisters are 10-10. “The more we play, the better it gets,” Serena said. “Wen we play our match on Saturday, you know, it’s for everything. This is what we dreamed of when we were growing up in Compton (Calif. thing years ago. This is what we worked A n j a N i e d r i n g h a u s / A P P h o t o Stefan Wermuth /AP Photo for, and this is what we want. Like I wanted her to win today and she wanted me to win today. It’s all come down to this.” Venus said she was rooting for Serena to win Thursday, but will now do all she can to stop her sister and win her eighth major title. “I’m happy for her to be in the final, but I have to face her and defeat her,” Venus said. “I don’t necessarily want her to lose, but for sure I want me to win. I don’t want to see myself disappointed. I need to get my titles, too. I’m still the big sister, but I’m still going to play great tennis.” The difference in the two semifinals couldn’t have been more striking. The Serena-Dementieva match was the longest women’s Wimbledon semifinal by time since 1969; records are incomplete before then. Venus’ win was the most onesided women’s semifinal since Billie Jean King beat Rosie Casals by the same score in 1969. The last time a semifinal ended 6-0, 60 was in 1925. After Serena’s tense, drama-filled escape against Dementieva, Venus barely broke a sweat against Safina. The Russian is ranked and seeded No. 1 despite never having won a Grand Slam tournament. Safina won only 20 points and was completely outclassed by the third-seeded Venus, who has been playing some of her best grass-court tennis at this tournament. SERENA Williams of U.S. plays a return to Elena Dementieva of Russia during their semifinal singles match on centre court at Wimbledon, Thursday, July 2, 2009. VENUS Williams of U.S. a return to Dinara Safina of Russia plays during their semifinal match on centre court at Wimbledon, Thursday, July 2, 2009. SERENA, VENUS REACH WIMBLEDON FINAL AGAIN Roddick faces Murray at Wimbledon

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS AFTER losing in an historic semifinal, Mark Knowles will get a chance to make up for his men’s doubles exit when he plays in another semifinal at Wimbledon today. After Knowles and his men’s doubles partner Mahesh Bhupathi got eliminated in the semis on Wednesday, he and AnnaLena Groenefeld are playing for a spot in the mixed doubles final. Seeded number nine, Knowles and Groenefeld will play the team of Great Britain’s Jamie Murray and American Liezel Huber to secure their spot in the mixed doubles final. Their semi-final match is scheduled for today with the final set for Sunday. If they win, they will play either No.1 seeds Leander Paes from India and Cara Black from Zimbabwe or the No.12 team of Stephen Huss of Australia and Virginia Ruano Pascual from Spain. Knowles, Groenefeld play for mixed doubles finals AFTER failing to defend his crown in 2008, Lieutenant Ricardo B arry returned this year determined to be considered the best all around athlete in the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. Barry captured the prestigious Ironman title for thet hird time in the event's ten-year history. A newcomer to the scene, Woman Marine Aniska Bonabyc aptured the crown in the open female category. T he annual competition features the fittest male and female officers and marines the force has to offer,a nd gives its winners coveted bragging rights for one full year. Male p articipants must complete a 500metre swim, cycle eight miles and run a three-mile road race. Their female counterparts are required toc omplete a shortened circuit com prising the mentioned events. Due to job obligations, the men's defending champion, Leading Sea man Marvin Darville was not avail a ble to defend his crown, as Barry won with a time of 1:00.20secs. For a second consecutive year, both SubL ieutenant Derrick Ferguson and Able Seaman Edney had to settle f or second and third respectively, with improved times of 1:06.54secs and 1:10.55secs. “I was quite pre p ared for the competition this time around”, said Barry, who had previo usly won the competition in 2006 and 2007. “Although Darville had j ob obligations, I felt I would have gotten a better push”. W oman Marine Bonaby completed a shortened female's version of the gruelling circuit in 1:06.14secs.A keyra Saunders was a close second with a time of 1:07.50seconds and Malissa Richardson placed third in 1:35.10secs. Bonaby, who joined the Defence Force in February of thisy ear, felt like the competition could have been better. “I've never com-p eted in a competition like the Ironman, but I just went out there and gave it my best shot. I felt good,a nd hopefully, I will get better at it.” In the team segment of the com p etition, the male team of Craig Frazier, Marcellus Rolle and Delvonne Duncombe prevailed in at ime of 54:57secs, and the female team of Gaye Bykowski, Dorece H enfield and Michelle Colebrooke completed the course in 1:09.21secs. Defence Force organizers of thee vent were pleased with the compe tition, but according to Petty Officer Ramone Storr, there is still room for improvemant. Barry captures third Ironman title LIEUTENANT Ricardo Barry c ompleting the three mile run s egment of the Defence Force Ironmant riathlon competition at the Coral Harbour Base. B arry was suc cessful in cap turing the overall male crown. By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net AFTERthree days of competition in the the FIBA Americas Caribbean Basketball Championships for Men in Tortola, British Virgin Islands, the Bahamas stands at 1-2 and faces an uphill climb towards medal contention. TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO – 86 BAHAMAS – 82 For the third consecutive contest, the Bahamas squandered a fourth quarter lead to an opponent to lose a crucial game in its waning moments. The Bahamas took a 67-59 lead into the fourth, but failed to hang on, outscored by Trinidad 27-17 in the quarter. Trinidad opened on a 12-4 run to tie the game at 71 with 5:50 left to play on a basket by Steven Lewis. They took the lead of the game since the first quarter, nearly a minute later on an offensive rebound and putback by Julius Ashby with 4:34 left. Alonzo Hinds again tied the score at 73 from the free throw line and the Bahamas regained the lead on a free throw by Jeffrey Henfield. Trinidad pulled ahead 77-74 before the Bahamas brought about another tie when Hinds made a three pointer from the right wing. Ian Curtis regained the lead for good for the Trinidadians with his pair of free throws with 1:46 remaining. His free throws sparked a 7-0 run which put the team up 85-77. Brian Bain finally broke the run for the Bahamas with a three point field goal, but with just seven seconds remaining and trailing by two possessions, little hope was left for a comeback. Tied after the opening quarter at 22, however the Bahamas widened the margin opening an advantage that grew to as much as 11 on a basket by Jeremy Hutchinson just before the half to make the score 46-35. The downward spiral began for the Bahamas in the third quarter when they were outscored by five and with the fourth quarter breakdown, were outscored by 15 for the game. Quentin Hall led the Bahamas in scoring with 24 points and seven assists, including 5-12 shooting from beyond the arc. Hinds came off the bench and finished with 21 points six rebounds and four assists while Doyle Hudson also chipped in with 11 points and four rebounds in a reserve role. Henfield finished with nine points while Scott Forbes added four points and 10 rebounds. Curtis led Trinidad and Tobago with 23 points, while Julius Ashby and Wilfred Benjamin chipped in with 17 points apiece. The Bahamas' three games have been decided by an average margin of 3.3 points per game J AMAICA – 77 B AHAMAS – 73 After again blowing a late fourth quarter lead, the Bahamas was unable to hold off their oppenents and fell to 1-1 in the CBC Championships. Jamaica led 19-14 after the opening quarter, however with a major run in the second when they outscored Jamaica 30-18, the Bahamas took a 44-37 lead. The lead was trimmed to just four, 60-56 heading into the fourth quarter. The Bahamas faltered in the fourth quarter, outscored 21-13. Louisville University's Samardo Samuels scored eight of his 11 points in the fourth quarter to lead Jamaica. Kimani Friend and Oritseweyinmi Efejuku each hipped in with 18 points apeice. Hinds again led the Bahamas with a game high 27 points including a nearly perfect 12-13 from the free throw line. Torrington Cox and Quentin Hall each finished with 11 points apeice while Brian Bain and Jeremy Hutchinson both finished with nine. The Bahamas shot just 41 percent from the field and gave up 10 turnovers. B AHAMAS – 75 BARBADOS – 73 The Bahamas Men’s Senior National team opened the region’s top tournament by holding off a late fourth quarter charge in the feature game of opening night. The team opened with a 7573 win over Barbados in the opening game of the FIBA Americas Caribbean Basketball Championships for Men in Tortola, British Virgin Islands. The Bahamas withheld a late run by the Barbadian squad in the third game of the night. They led after the opening quarter 27-23 propelled by C.J Hinds who had 8 points in the quarter and Quentin Hall who opened with 7 points. The Bahamas also outscored theie opponents 16-14 in the second quarter to lead at the half 43-37. The Bahamas opened with a 9-2 run in the third to take a 61-50 lead early into the quarter. After again outscoring Barbados 22-15, and took a 6552 lead heading into the fourth quarter. After begining each quarter trailing, Barbados began with an 8-2 run to trim the defecit to single digits, 67-60. They reduced the lead 74-71 with a 7-0 run after a basket by David Jeremy Gill with 4:29 left to play. With an opportunity to draw even, Barbados failed to tie the game missing key baskets down the stretch. The Bahamas placed four players in double figures, led by Jeremy Hutchinson's double double with 11 points and 10 rebounds. Hinds led the team with 15 points and four assists, finishing with 3-5 shots from beyond the arch Brian Bain finished with 12 points while Hall added 11. Jeffrey Henfield finished with eight points while Scott Forbes added eight points and five rebounds. Kelvin Patterson led Barbados with 15 points. Both teams were virtually even statistically, however in a closely contested game, the Bahamas' advantage in field goal percentage (60-48 three point field goals made (7-5 Bahamas. Bahamas 1-2 at FIBA championships their goals in life.” This year, the second-year Kansas City Chiefs’ wide receiver will be bringing about five of his colleagues from the National Football League, including team-mates, wide receiver Dwayne Bowe and running back Larry Johnson. Also expected in is Darius Haywood, Kansas City’s No.7 pick overall in the recent NFL draft, along with Bobby Ingraham, a wide receiver who was just acquired from the Seattle Seahawks. “It’s going to be a good showing,” Darling said. “Hopefully the kids will come out and participate and learn some life skills and some football at the same time.” With the two camps being held on the two islands, Darling said he’s pretty pleased about what they have been able to achieve and he only expected the camp to continue to get bigger and better. His older brother, Dennis, a former track quarter-miler turned collegiate coach, said he was thrilled to be working with Devard and his crew in putting on the two camps. “Every year we try to get better and help the youngsters to learn the game of football,” Dennis said. “We will also have some spiritual devotions and life devotions. “We are looking forward to over 100 kids coming out and participating in the two camps.” With the camp in Grand Bahama getting under way on Monday, Dennis said they have seen the growth and development in the campers who have been participating from the inception there four years ago. “They are still coming out to the camp, so we look forward to going over there and having a good time,” he said. “The kids over there (Grand Bahama) look forward to it. We hope that we can eventually expand to other Family Islands in the future.” Here in New Providence, the venue has been changed from the Winton Rugby Pitch where the numbers were not as impressive last year, to the Tom ‘the Bird’ Grant Complex where they hope to increase the number of participants. “We decided to move it from the east end of the island to a more central location where a lot more of the kids can come out,” Darling said. “So we expect to have a lot more kids this year.” FROM page 11 Darling Football Camp set to kick off Devard excited about upcoming NFL season one touchdown. “I’m ready now to take that next step in my career,” he said. “I’m just not happy with being in the NFL. I’m ready to take the next step to becoming a real productive receiver in this league. “I feel I have the talent to do it and I’m going to do it. It ain’t just about being happy there in the league. I want to be a starter and a star on the team. I want to be a real contributor.” With two more years left on his contract, Darling said he’s looking forward to making the best of his opportunity with the Chiefs. “We have a new coaching staff coming in with a new attitude and everyone is buying into it,” Darling said. “I’m just looking forward to going into training camp and having a good year.” Training camp will get under way on July 30 in River Falls, Wisconsin. However, the season won’t get underway until Saturday, August 15 when Kansas City will host the Houston Oilers. Their first game on the road will take place on Friday, August 21 at Minnesota. “I just can’t wait for the season to get under way,” Darling said. “I’m really looking forward to a great season. I’ve been working extremely hard and my expectations are high.” But in the meantime Darling said he just want ed to go to Grand Bahama on Sunday to get the first leg of his camp under way on Monday. Once that’s done, Darling said he will be back in town to complete the second half at the Tom ‘the Bird’ Grant Complex next weekend. FROM page 11 Able Seaman Al Rahming /Photo

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C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE International sports news CCCAN SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS RESULTS By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net AFTER playing in his first year with the Kansas City Chiefs, Devard Darling feels that his current stint in the National Football League will only get better. The 27-year-old wide receiver just completed his sixth year in the National Football League, his second with the Chiefs after being traded by the Washington Redskins, whom he began his career with. “I can’t complain. The Lord has been good,” said Darling, who is in town to get ready for the promotion of his football camp in Grand Bahama and here next week. “We got a good coach and GM. The Lord has played his favour on me, so I’m looking for a great season this year. We have a new quarter-back, a couple new pieces with the team, so I’m looking forward to having a great season this year.” At 6-feet, one-inch and 215 pounds, Darling said the Chiefs are expecting him to step in this year as the starting wide receiver and so he’s anticipating that he will make the best of the opportunity. “Last year, I didn’t really get too many balls thrown my way, but this year, I’m looking for the ball to come more, espe cially with a new quarter-back. “I just have to go out there and make some plays.” Last year, Darling played in 16 games where he caught a total of 17 receptions for 247 yards, an average of 14.5 per game, his longest posted at 68 yards. He also had eight first downs with just KANSAS City Chiefs’ wide receiver Devard Darling (left er brother, Dennis Darling (during SEE page 10 By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net ONCE again, Devard Darling will be sharing his professional football expertise with potential Bahamian high school players who wish to follow in his footsteps. The dual Devard and Devaughn Darling’s Football Camp will be hosted at the Freeport Rugby Club in Grand Bahama from July 6-7 and at the Tom ‘the Bird’ Grant Sports Complex from July 9-10. Just in town to promote the camp that he’s holding in memory of his deceased twin brother, Devaughn, Devard said he only expected camp to get better and better with each year. “I expect every year for the kids to come out and learn, not just about the game of football, but a lot about lifeb ecause that’s the most important part,” Devard Darling said. “We hope to get them to open their minds so that they can hope and reach for SEE page 10 Devard excited about upcoming NFL season Darling Football Camp set to kick off A T the first day of c ompetition at the CCCAN Swimming Championships in Venezuela, the Bahamas t urned in the following performances in the finals: 50 Fly G old Taryn Smith – 30.44 ( 11-12 girls). 7 th – Evante Gibson – 27.47 (13-14 boys 5 th – Ashley Butler – 30.47 ( 15-17 girls). 8 th – Armando Moss – 27.20 (15-17 boys 200 IM 8 th – Laura Morley – 2.46.26 (11-12 girls Bronze – Dustin Tynes – 2.30.18 (11-12 boys 4th – Brian Deveaux – 2.33.39 Out-touched for 3rd. 6th – Evante Gibson – 2 .21.82. 200 Backstroke 8th – Dionisio Carey – 2.38.06. I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.21 $4.30 $4.25 MUTUAL FUND investment expert investment advice multiple fund options potentially higher returnsall of the aboveFAMILY GUARDIAN CORPORATE CENTRE: AT THE JUNCTION OF VILLAGE ROAD, SHIRLEY STREET & EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.comcall us today at 396-4000 A SUBSIDIARY OF $3m overtime savings ‘negate’ airport fee rise BTC suffers cable break * Hotel executive says work on other initiatives to reduce airline costs at LPIA will counteract impact of fee rises * Concern remains on ground handling charges * ‘No one likes to see an increase, but we want to have an airport that is modern, efficient and that showcases the country in the best possible light’ By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The $3 million in annual savings that airlines flying into Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA from the elimination of Customs/Immigration overtime charges should “more than negate” the impact of a 23.6 per cent increase in landing fees, the Bahamas Hotel Association’s (BHA Pointing out that the elimination of Customs/Immigration overtime charges would coincide with the date when the Nassau Airport Development Company’s (NAD fee increases would be implemented, Frank Comito told Tribune Business a balance had to be struck between mak ing LPIA cost competitive for airlines and the need to S EE page 5B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor “The majority” of $43 million worth of contracts that the Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD for construction work on the new US departures terminal will be awarded to Bahamian contractors, the Airport Authority’s chairman said yesterday, describing as “factually incorrect” claims that locals were being squeezed out. Frank Watson told Tribune Business those contracts, large l y for interior work such as e lectrics, plumbing and engi neering, would be issued between now and September 2009, with the groundbreaking ceremony for the US departures terminal the first stage in the $409.5 million Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA redevelopment set to take place this coming Thursday. Stating that he was “very surprised” that NAD only received three bids for the US departures terminal’s general contractor tender, Mr Watson described as “not factually correct” claims by Stephen Wrinkle, the Bahamian Contractors Association’s (BCA Bahamian construction companies were being “left out in the cold” when it came to getting work on the airport redevelopment. Referring to the general con tractor bid, which was ultimately won by Vancouverbased Ledcor Construction, Mr Watson told Tribune Business : $43m in airport work for locals Airport Authority chair denies Bahamian contractors being squeezed out, as ‘the m ajority’ of $43m in work to be let in next three months for them W inning general contractor to partner with Nassau-based Wooslee Dominion ‘Great surprise’ that only three bids received on time for US departures terminal Pledge that no more ‘incentive fees’ in concessions contracts S EE page 4B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas Telecommunications Company’s (BTC international telecoms and Internet/data traffic was temp orarily interrupted earlier this week when its Bahamas II fibre optic cable was accidentally cut, Tribune Business confirmed yesterday, with repairs likely to be made before month’s end. Marlon Johnson, BTC”s vice-president of sales and marketing, told this newspaper that the state-owned carrier’s services were “affected for a few hours” after the undersea cable was cut somewhere between Eight Mile Rock in Grand Bahama and Vero Beach, Florida, where it lands to connect the Bahamas to the international telecoms and Internet network. “We did have a cut in the Bahamas II Cable. The service was affected for a few hours,” Mr Johnson said. However, he emphasised that cuts to under sea telecommunications were not unusual, being caused by bad weather such as hurricanes, or ships inadvertently dropping anchor on them. The BTC executive added that when the Bahamas II Cable was cut, BTC diverted the voice telecommunications and data traffic it carried on to the ARCOS network, the selfhealing circular fibre optic ring that connects the Bahamas and other Caribbean countries to North, South and Central America. Disruption “We just moved the traffic from one network to the other,” Mr Johnson told Tribune Business. “There was a few hours disruption when the cut came. “We want to emphasise that this happens, and what telecoms operators do is build topography that is self-healing or have alternative routes with alternative providers.” And he added: “They’ve scheduled repairs. There’s a company that we engage that has a vessel to do this stuff, and it depends where we fall in the queue. We are sched uled for repairs, I suspect some time this month.” Tribune Business was yesterday told that the Bahamas II cable had suffered two cuts, one at the Vero Beach end close to Florida and the other nearer to Eight Mile Rock in Grand Bahama. However, Mr Johnson disputed this, telling Tribune Business that BTC had “no information to indicate that”. Its initial assessment was that there was only one cable break, but it would only know for sure when repairs commenced. By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE COMPANY responsi ble for extending the western end of Arawak Cay has been warned by the Bahamas Envi ronment, Science and Technol ogy (BEST properly install water turbidity control measures, the minister of the environment said yesterBEST warns on turbidity contr ol at Arawak Cay SEE page 2B P H O T O : C h r i s t o p h e r H a r t l e y ENVIRONMENTAL protection controls off Arawak Cay FRANK WATSON By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A Bahamas-based investment advisory firm has increased its assets under administration by 141 per cent to around $405$10 million during its first three years in existence, Tribune Business was told yesterday, having “exceeded expectations” as it moves to enhance clients’ real time access to their financial information. Kenwood Kerr, Providence Advisors’ chief executive, said the company was hoping by September to provide individual members of pension plans it managed/administered with online access to their personal financial information via the use of pin numbers and encrypted passwords/codes. Speaking to Tribune Business as the company prepares to celebrate its third birthday following its buy out from S G Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas Mr Kerr said Providence Advi sors had already invested “a few hundred thousand dollars” in replacing the legacy IT system it inherited upon its creation. The company already provided clients, at the human resources and management level, with real time, on-line access to their financial plans and investments, so they could gauge their performance and obtain the relevant information. And Mr Kerr told Tribune Business that the company was also looking at broadening its investments product offering through ‘family of funds’ products targeted at specific mar kets. “We’ve exceeded expecta Firm’s assets under administration up 140% to $405-$410m * Providence Advisors looking to provide real time, on-line access to clients’ financial data by September * Eyeing ‘family of funds’ product, as firm ‘excceeds expectations’ KENWOOD KERR SEE page 2B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE day, as the developers await sheet piles t hat will form the bulkhead for the e xtension and secure fill dredged from Nassau harbour. Earl Deveaux said the BEST Commission found that fill being pushed into the sea was escaping beneath the floating turbidity control barriers usedto prevent such a spread. Director of the BEST Commission, Philip Weech, said the floats were not designed to prevent the occurrence of murky water as fill is spread and packed along the sea bed, but they are designed to greatly reduce its s pread. The turbidity barriers are intended to reduce and control the amount of influence over as large an area as possible,” he said. Mr Weech said that when the dredging of Nassau Harbour begins, similar measures will be put in place, but he argued that areas of white milky water will occur around the site. The extension of Arawak Cay is a part of the Government’s plan for the new container port. Now, as work begins, questions are being asked about the project’s environmental impact. According to Mr Deveaux, the fine silt stirred up on the ocean floor during dredging can be dangerous to reefs and fish if it is suspended in that envi ronment for long periods of time. Mr Weech argued that the installation of the bulkhead will greatly reduce the amount of large material escaping the site, but conceded that it will not prevent the fine silt, which will again be held at bay by floating turbidity control measures. Christopher Hartley, describing himself as an environmental steward, told Tribune Business yesterday that he had explored the reefs around Balmoral Island which could be affected by the dredged silt. “These reefs are beautiful. I am so pleased to see something living around here,” he said. Discourage Diving and photographing the area of Arawak Cay under construction, Mr Hartley said workers attempted to discourage him from investigating whether the turbidity control measures were doing their job. According to Mr Hartley, the skirts attached to the floats did not connect with the sea bed, and thus would not prevent silt escaping underneath. Mr Hartley said he was a leading figure agitating against Atlantis’ proposed development of a golf course on Athol Island. He operated a tour called Hartley’s Undersea Walk, which took guests ona stroll along the seafloor just off the southeastern coast of the island, which was in danger of being destroyed by the development. Mr Hartley said rare, thriving reefs off the coast of New Providence could be affected if ocean currents pull silt toward that area. “We took observation pictures along the barrier reef of Cable Beach, and I was pleased to see amazing life. In fact, a kind of coral which is endangered as well as sensitive to destruction.I have not seen such coral in abundance since I was a child,” said Mr Hartley. Mr Deveaux said his ministry and the BEST Commission are working closely with Boskalis, the company extending Arawak Cay, to mitigate the environmental impact. Questions were also raised about numbers spray painted on the casaurina trees lining Saunders Beach, possibly indicating their inevitable removal. Mr Weech said some of the trees will be removed when the Government redevelops that area as part of its road improvement programme. However, he said they should have never been spray painted. “Some trees will be removed as a part of the redevelopment of the beach area by the Ministry of Works, where the corridors would connect into West Bay Street,” Mr Weech said. “But there is no intention to take the trees.” tions,” Mr Kerr told Tribune Business. “We’ve had a very positive response from the business community. That is evidenced by the fact some people have joined us from the get go, and we still have those clients. It has been pretty good. We’ve a cquired business on top of what we had with SG.” P rovidence Advisors was now hoping the implementation of its new IT platform, which had almost entirely replaced its legacy systems, would enhance operating efficiencies. The company aimed to “be able to deliver on these changes in the next quarter”. Mr Kerr said the new IT system provided Providence Advisors with integrated client accounting, portfolio accounting and portfolio management, enhancing the company’s “ability to capture data and send it on”. And he added: “We’re also looking on the investment side to create diversity and options in terms of what we offer on the funds menu through a family of funds.” Mr Kerr said Providence Advisors’ business had grown from $170 million when it split from SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas $405-$410 million currently. By having an established book of business, largely through the hotel industry pension funds, the company’s development was “much f urther on than if we had started from scratch”. Mr Kerr said Providence Advisors, which employs 14 full-time staff, had seen the effects of the economic slowdown in terms of new business flows, but felt it would benefit in the future from the Government’s planned reforms to pensions in the Bahamas. That effort is being overseen by the Government-appointed Private Pensions Task Force. While the company would eventually look to expand through specialist services to institutional clients, Mr Kerr said it was “not effective to do that” at the moment. “Our core business remains pension administration and asset management,” Mr Kerr said, “and select corporate advisory. We are not going out to be everything to everyone.” Brand building, and increasing awareness of Providence Advisors and the services it provided, was a key goal for the company in its fourth year, said Mr Kerr. “Ideally I’d like to see us be further ahead,” he added, acknowledging that the company had already accomplished much. “We have a lot of work to do,” Mr Kerr told Tribune Business . “We’re not resting on our laurels. We have to add value, not only to our clients but for our shareholders. We’re going to be very methodical and deliberate.” F ROM page 1B F ROM page 1B BEST warns on turbidity control at Arawak Cay Firm’s assets under administration up 140% to $405-$410m

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCALANDINTERNATIONAL BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 3B By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribune media.net TRIBUNE BUSINESS has learned that the Ministry of Works been forced to delay the paving of downtown Bay Street for three months, after it was found that major work needs to be done by the Water and Sewerage Corporation (WSC Only last week, Minister of Works, Neko Grant, assured this paper that Bay Street would be paved. But he said yesterday: “It would make no sense to pave the main Bay Street when there is considerable work to be done by Water and Sewerage.” Minister of state for the environment, who has responsibility for Water and S ewerage, P henton N eymour, said he was not aware that the paving was to be put off because of the Corporation’s maintenance. According to Mr Grant, W ater and Sewerage also needs to do major repair work to its infrastructure on Shirley Street before paving can commence. Paving When asked when it was discovered that Water and Sewerage’s infrastructure maintenance would delay the paving, Mr Grant said it was of no consequence. The major paving programme was undertaken as part of an initiatuve to beautify the main northern corridor before the Miss Universe beauty pageant in August. Now, the downtown area, in much need of paving after crews from several government utilities tore into it recently, will be the only part of a strip extending from Caves village to the bridge to Paradise Island without fresh asphalt. “We wanted to provide a sensible ride for Miss Universe, but Miss Universe will come and go a nd we need to provide proper i nfrastructure for people who w ill traverse these roads on an annual basis,” said Mr Grant. Three-month delay to downtown Bay’s paving Neko Grant NEW YORK The stock market found little to celebrate heading into the long holiday weekend, according to Associated Press . Major stock indexes fell more than 2.6 percent Thursday, pushing the Dow Jones industrials to their lowest level in six weeks, after the government said the unemployment rate hit a 26-year high and employers cut far more jobs than expected. The data was especially disappointing since it broke a trend of four straight months of improvement in job losses. The report one of the most closely watched gauges of the economy's health delivered the latest blow to the market's already waning confidence. Investor optimism has been shaken in recent weeks amid a barrage of mixed economic reports, making for an erratic market. This past week was no exception. Stocks rose Monday, then erased nearly all their gains the following day after a report showing an unexpected drop in consumer confidence. On Wednesday the market bounced back after getting some reassuring data on manufacturing and housing, only to tumble again on Thursday on the disappointing jobs report. "There's not a lot of conviction on either side," said Jill Evans, coportfolio manager of the Alpine Dynamic Dividend Fund. The Dow Jones industrials lost 223.32, or 2.6 percent, to 8,280.74, the lowest close since May 22. It was the average's worst day since April 20. The Standard & Poor's 500 index fell 26.91, or 2.9 percent, to 896.42 and the Nasdaq composite index fell 49.20, or 2.7 percent, to 1,796.52. Trading on the New York Stock Exchange was extended until 4:15 p.m. Eastern time in order to execute customer orders impacte d by system irregularities, an NYSE spokeswoman said. T he stock market rallied furiously this spring off of 12-year lows beginning in early March on hopes for a recovery, but the upward momentum has stalled since mid-June as doubts grow about whether the economy had really found a bottom. Since hitting multi-month highs on June 12, the Dow has fallen a total of 5.9 percent, while the S&P 500 index has lost 5.3 percent. "There's more and more evidence mounting against this rally con tinuing," said Doug De Groote, a managing director at United Wealth Management. Consumers are likely to lead the nation out of the ongoing recession, but that won't happen if more people are losing their jobs, he said. Stocks started the day down and stayed there after the Labor Department reported that employers slashed 467,000 jobs in June, far worse than the 363,000 that economists expected and a grim signal that the path to recovery will be bumpy. The unemployment rate rose to 9.5 percent from 9.4 percent the month before. Overseas markets also fell Thursday after a report showed unem ployment in Europe rose to a 10-year high in May. As stock prices fell across the board, other signs of investor unease emerged. Treasury prices rose, driving the yield on the 10year note down to 3.50 percent from 3.54 percent late Wednesday. Meanwhile a gauge of volatility in the stock market, the Chica go Board Options Exchange Volatility Index, or VIX, jumped 1.73, or 6.6 percent, to 27.95 Thursday afternoon. Declining issues outnumbered advancers by about 5 to 1 on the New York Stock Exchange. Consolidated volume came to a relatively low 3.56 billion shares ahead of the holiday weekend, compared with 4 billion shares traded a day earlier. Light volume can lead to more volatile swings in trading. Markets will be closed Friday in observance of the Independence Day holiday. For the week, the Dow finished down 1.9 percent; the S&P 500 lost 2.5 percent; and the Nasdaq fell 2.3 percent. Jobless data sends stocks reeling By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Almost one in five (20 per cent B ahamian businesses by commercial banks were in default at end-May 2009, a CentralB ank of the Bahamas report released yesterday finding that total non-performing loans r ose to 76.7 per cent or $468.2 million. This figure increased by 4 per cent or $18.2 million in May. The Central Bank’s report on monthly economic developments for May not unexpect-e dly revealed a continued deterioration in asset and loan portfolio quality in the Bahami-a n commercial banking sector, with this nation’s economic recovery “delayed until the l atter half of 2010”. The total number of loans in arrears by at least one month increased by $6.1 million or 0.7 per cent in May, reaching a total of $847.3 million. Total loans in arrears increased to 1 3.98 per cent as a percentage of total loans, although the proportion of delinquent loans -t hose between 31 to 90 days past due declined by $12 million or 3.73 per cent to $ 373.3 million. The Central Bank said: “The increase in the arrears rate was attributed to a worsening in the consumer loans and residential mort gages portfolios, by 58 basis points and 2 b asis points, to 12.45 per cent and 13 per cent, respectively. In contrast, the commercial arrears rate receded to 19.83 per cent in May, from 20.61 p er cent in April. In response to these developments, banks augmented loan loss provisions by $3 million, boosting the ratio of provisions to total arrears by 18 basis points to2 3.44 per cent. “This corresponded to new loan provisions o f $10 million, partly offset by a $6.9 million net write-off against loans provisioned for e arlier. However, as the growth in non-performing loans outpaced the increase in provisions, the ratio of total provisions to non-performing loans fell by 5 basis points to 42.43 per cent.” A nd looking at the prospects for the Bahamian economy as a whole, the CentralB ank added: “The Bahamian economy is expected to remain weak over the remainder o f the year, with the prospects of a recovery delayed until the latter half of 2010, lagging the anticipated turnaround in the US economy. “In the short-term, the downturn in stopover arrivals, coupled with discounted hotel room pricing, should pose ongoing con straints on tourism output. Lingering tightn ess in global credit markets should further constrain foreign investments and conse-q uently construction activity, notwithstanding steadied support from equity financed p rojects and a continued, but moderated, pace of domestic investments. Under these conditions, a further rise in the unemployment rate is likely before any stabilisation is secured.” The Central Bank said that while increases i n global oil prices could pressure the Bahamas’ current account, the reduction ini mport demand and the Government’s foreign currency borrowings were expected to m aintain foreign exchange reserves at healthy levels. Banking sector liquidity, too, was expected to be good as a result of the slowdown in credit demand, the main issues beinga sset quality and the difficulties Bahamians were having in meeting debt servicing costs. T here was some good news on inflation, which slowed to a 1.8 per cent rate for the 12 m onths to May 2009, compared to 4.9 per cent for the same period last year. “The Government’s budgetary operations for the first 10 months of fiscal year 20092009 resulted in a widening in the estimatedd eficit to $219.7 million from $77.7 million in 2007-2008,” the Central Bank said. An 11 per cent decrease in tax collections led to a 5.8 per cent reduction in total receipts, w hile total expenditure firmed by 5.8 per cent. Disaggregated data showed a 7 per cent advance in current spending, mainly reflecting increased outlays on consumption, as gains were recorded for purchases of goods and services (11.5 per cent (4.6 per cent ( 23.3 per cent). “Although capital expenditures were r educed by 6.8 per cent, investments in infrastructural works rose by 9.4 per cent. The s lump in tax receipts was led by a 12.5 per cent reduction in taxes on international trade and transactions, which comprised over 50 per cent of the total. “Significant declines were also noted for t axes on financial and other transactions (24.3 per cent), departure taxes (15.4 per cent), and other’ uncategorised taxes (32.9 per cent In contrast, non-tax receipts rose by 52.7 per c ent, mainly owing to a hike in dividend receipts from public corporations.” Almost 20% of commercial loans in default

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“I was very surprised that we only got three bids submittedo n it. I thought we would get six or seven bids, but only three came in on time for this multimillion dollar contract “One bid came in late, and was rejected because of it. Personally, I didn’t think any of the local contractors would take on the job themselves, but assumed that they would want to be in the mix together with someone from overseas in a joint venture.” Venturing Mr Watson said Ledcor was itself joint venturing with a Bahamas-based construction company on the US departures terminal contract, and con firmed reports reaching Tribune Business that the firm con cerned is Wooslee Dominion. That company, headed by Ashley Glinton, made the headlines in recent years because it was selected under the former PLP administration to construct its planned $23 million Bay Street Straw Market, a contract subsequently cancelled by the Ingraham administration. When asked about concerns that a large number of LPIA contracts were going to Canadian companies, especially ones based in Vancouver, the home city for NAD’s operating partner, Vancouver Airport Services (YVRAS indicated it was natural for the company to go with contractors it was “comfortable” with and “knows well”. Ledcor has also performed a $100 million renovation to YVRAS’s home airport in Vancouver, much of NAD’s environmental-related work is funnelled through another Vancouver-based firm, Patrick Environmental. “In the case of the contract for Ledcor, they won it hands down. There was no one close to them,” Mr Watson told Tribune Business , indicating it was the cheapest bid by far. “We took the best bid, valu ed it ourselves. All the companies that bid were competent to do the job, so in the final analysis it came down to price.” Pledging that NAD and the Airport Authority would release a full list of Bahamian companies who had performed work at LPIA since NAD took over on April 1, 2007, the Airport Authority chairman said he “really doesn’t understand” Mr Wrinkle’s concerns. He added that NAD still had $43 million worth of construction contracts related to the US departures terminal “to be let. The majority of them are going to Bahamians. That’s the whole idea. “We don’t give the general contractor the whole package turnkey and say that’s it. There’s lots of work to be let that’s not part of the general contractor package.” Those contracts are scheduled to be released between now and September 2009. Responsible While the general contractor would be responsible for the overall building and project, constructing the foundation and exterior shell itself and super vising the work of sub-contrac tors, Mr Watson said included in the $43 million worth of contracts still to be issued was the interior work, such as electrics and plumbing. Elsewhere, Mr Watson pledged that NAD had aban doned the use of ‘incentive fees’one-time payments that prospective retail tenants could offer it to induce the airport o perator to accept its bid to run a concession at LPIA at the expense of rivals. The fee’s use and inclusion in previous concession tenders had sparked consternation among Bahamian small busi nesses and entrepreneurs, who saw it as favouring their larger counterparts. But Mr Watson said yesterday: “My understanding from YVRAS in Canada is that this is an option which most airports use, but we have determined the of fees raised from that source doesn’t justify the perception it creates that it’s favouring those with money. “They’re not going to do that. There’ll be no incentive fee in the package.” Mr Watson understood that incentive fees had come into play in “only a couple of cases”, namely the “lucrative” coffee shop contract won by Dunkin Donuts, the franchise operated by George Myers’ group, and the gas station contract that went to FOCOL/Shell. On NAD’s proposed landing fee increases and other raised charges, Mr Watson said that as part of the consultative process it had to “make the case” to the airlines that the increases were necessary. Then, once the airlines were satisfied, the final say would rest with the Airport Authority, with a decision likely to be taken in October/November 2009. “Those rates were very low to start with, and they wouldn’t have a dramatic impact on the cost of airline operations,” Mr Watson said of the proposed increases. “It’s part of the finan-c ial package agreed with the consortium of banks, and will only be implemented if NAD satisfies the airlines. “One has to satisfy the banks that we’re doing all the things we say we planned to do. We have to finance the airport, but not at the cost of putting the airlines out of business. We have to strike a balance.” Mr Watson said the financial projections for NAD and the Airport Authority, includinga chieving the goal of making LPIA profitable within fivey ears of YVRAS’s takeover, depended on tourist and passenger arrivals recovering by end-2009 or early 2010. If that did not happen, he warned it was “going to be a struggle” to keep in line with financial projections. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Please note that all offices of ColinaImperial will be CLOSED on Friday 3 July 2009 for the company’s Annual Employee Fun Day. Our Pay Station at 21 Collins Avenue will offer extended weekend hours on Saturday 4 July from 8:30am to 4pm for your convenience. Thank you. To Our Valued Clients $43m in airport work for locals FROM page 1B

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finance its transformation into a world-class facility. With January 1, 2010, scheduled to be the date when the overtime fee elimination took effect, Mr Comito told Tribune Business: “The same time this kicks in, for a number of airlines this will more than negate the landing fee increase.” He added: “While any fee increase at the airport is not something we’d [the hotel industry] like to see, we understand the necessity, and have been working on several fronts to reduce the costs of operation for the airlines. “Specifically, in the Budget that’s just been passed, the Government did something we’ve been advocating for a number of years, which is to eliminate the Customs and Immigration overtime charges that get charged back to the airlines. That will be $3 million in annual savings.” Mr Comito said “most airlines” had been impacted in past years by having to pay Customs/Immigration overtime charges, which in turn were passed on to passengers through increased ticket prices. This increased the cost of air travel to the Bahamas (the access cost for visitors), negatively impacting airlift and the tourism industry. Elsewhere, the BHA vicepresident acknowledged that there were “concerns about the high cost of ground handling fees which some airlines face”. He said this was “not just Nassau Flight Services”, as some airlines had their own ground handling services, adding that “efforts are being made to reduce” a whole variety of costs faced by airlines that operate at LPIA. NAD is proposing to increase landing fees for all airlines at LPIA by 23.6 per cent from January 1, 2010, onwards, with a 6 .1 per cent increase in terminal f ees, aircraft loading bridge fees and aircraft parking fees. For one Bahamas-owned airline, this translates into an added $13 on the $51 landing fee for their 19-seater aircraft. But NAD argued that the fees are necessary to maintain its “financial covenants”, but said LPIA’s rates after the increases remain competitive and less than the Caribbean average. The airport operating company had conducted a benchmarking exercise to show this, based on a Boeing 737 700 with a passenger load factor of 75 per cent (102 passengers 90-minute turnaround time that included use of a jet bridge for fuel loading. “Excluding government taxes, LPIA’s costs are currently $29.58, and with the recommended increase become $30.03 per passenger, an increase of 1.5 per cent. The average cost of the Caribbean airports presented in the graph, excluding LPIA, is $35.39 per passenger. LPIA’s recommended rates are v ery competitive at $5.36 or 15 p er cent less than the Caribbean average,” NAD said. Mr Comito said the landing fee increase translated into just a $0.50 per passenger increase, and added: “This is only the second increase in landing fees since 1993. The reality is there are costs associated with building and operating a new airport, and the fact is that the new fees are lower than most airports in south Florida and the Caribbean. “No one likes to see an increase, but we want to have an airport that is modern, efficient and that showcases the country in the best possible light. While a 23 per cent increase on the surface does not look good, it’s only 50 cents per passenger.” When asked whether the fee increases might impact LPIA’s attractiveness as a destination to both existing and potential new airline services, Mr Comito replied: “As long as we show we’re working, in good faith to reduce costs and improve the experience of passengers as well as the airlines, with more efficient airport operations and a better environment, then we’re in safe territory. “There’s efforts underway to help reduce costs. The Ministry o f Tourism and the Promotions B oards have targeted efforts underway with some of the airlines to help increase their yields.” If the fee increases, which combine the 2010 and deferred 2009 rises, do not take place, NAD said it risked breaching its banking covenants for the $265 million redevelopment financing. “In accordance with its financing obligations ,the Nassau Airport Development Company must maintain a debt service coverage ratio (DSCR not less than 1.3 to 1. The average DSCR ratio for the 10 year period of 2011 to 2020 is currently projected at 1.48 to 1,” NAD said. “The financial model includes the proposed fees and charges increases, in addition to increases planned for 2011, 2012 and 2013, followed by annual consumer price index [inflation] type increases. ”The proposed fees and charges increases include the deferred 2009 rate increases adjusted by the planned 2010 rate increase. More specifically, the deferred increases planned for 2009, which were to be 20 per cent for landing fees and 3 per cent for the other fees, must be applied prior to the 2010 rate increase of 3 per cent. Thus in determining the proposed rate increase, the 2009 rate increase is multiplied by the 2010 rate increase and the result is added to the 2010 rate increase.” Asked earlier this week about the overtime charges’ negative impact on airlift into New Providence and other Bahamian destinations, Robert Sands, the Bahamas Hotel Association’s (BHA you see an air fare costing ‘x’ dollars, and taxes and levies are double that amount or a significant part of it, it makes the cost of air travel to the Bahamas extremely expensive. “And when you have competing destinations that can be accessed at lower air fare costs, it puts us in a very negative competitive position.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2009, PAGE 5B 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.841.28Abaco Markets1.391.390.000.1270.00010.90.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.436.94Bank of Bahamas6.946.940.000.2440.26028.43.75%0 .890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.603.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3911.390.001.4060.2508.12.19% 2.902.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S15.605.640.043,9380.4190.36013.56.38% 4 .781.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.213.11-0.100.1110.05228.01.67% 2.951.32Doctor's Hospital1.771.770.000.2400.0807.44.52% 8.207.50Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5010.00Finco10.9010.900.000.3220.52033.94.77% 11.7110.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.3810.380.000.7940.35013.13.37% 5.554.95Focol (S5.095.090.000.3320.15015.32.95%1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.60013.510.91% 12.0010.40J. S. Johnson10.4010.400.000.9520.64010.96.15% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.37871.3124CFAL Bond Fund1.37871.874.83 3.03512.8988CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.47501.3948CFAL Money Market Fund1.47502.885.74 3.60903.1821Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.18216.01-13.90 12.920912.2702Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.92092.405.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.5448-0.020.54 100.000093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund93.1992-3.33-6.76 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.56119.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.25111.724.12 1.05781.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.05782.135.78 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0271-0.572.71 1.05541.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05541.745.54 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 2 JULY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,577.79 | CHG 1.92 | %CHG 0.12 | YTD -134.57 | YTD % -7.86BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesInterest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%30 May 2013 29 May 2015T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L LI I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 50 0 2 2 7 7 0 0 1 1 0 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 24 42 2 -3 3 5 56 6 -7 77 7 6 64 4 | | F F G G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K KE E T T S S 2 2 4 42 2 -3 3 9 9 6 6 -4 4 0 00 00 0 | | C C O O L L O O N N I I A A L L 2 24 4 2 25 5 0 0 2 2 7 7 5 5 2 25 5FINDEX: CLOSE 788.02 | YTD -5.61% | 2008 -12.31%31-May-09 31-Mar-09 31-Dec-07 30-Apr-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 31-May-09 31-May-09 W W W WW W. .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO O N NE E : :2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 32 2 3 3 3 3 0 0 | | F FA A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 42 2 3 3 2 23 3 -2 23 3 2 20 0NAV Date 31-May-09 26-Jun-09 30-Apr-09 31-May-09 31-Mar-09 31-May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s AUTO ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES CO. LTD. O ther Services Includes: *Auto Body Repairs *Diagnostics Test *Mechanical Repairs *Brakes, C&V Joints Replacement *Head Jobs *Engine Overhaul *Electrical Repairs *Repair & Rebuild Starters *Rebuild & RepairWireHarness *Repair & InstallWindow Motors *Repair Lights & Switches C C o o l l l l e e g g e e A A v v e e n n u u e e , , O O a a k k e e s s F F i i e e l l d d Monday—Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am 1pm TUNE UP SPECIAL S S E E R R V V I I C C E E : : O O i i l l O O i i l l F F i i l l t t e e r r A A i i r r F F i i l l t t e e r r F F u u e e l l F F i i l l t t e e r r S S p p a a r r k k P P l l u u g g s s ( ( p p a a r r t t s s n n o o t t i i n n c c l l u u d d e e d d ) ) T T e e l l : : 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 5 8 8 3 3 5 5 / / 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 5 4 4 3 3 6 6 We also import parts for any make and model vehicle with an Impressive turn-around. Come in and see us today! 127,&( 3,6721,19(670(17 0$1$*(0(17 127,&(',662/87,21 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ RIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV 3,6721,19(670(170$1$*(0(17 ,1& KDVEHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHU DFFRUGLQJWRWKH&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHG WKH5HJLVWUDU*HQHUDORQWKH QG RI-XQH ' WK G D\RI-XQH $ $ -.&RUSRUDWHHUYLFHV%DKDPDVf/LPLWHG / LTXLGDWRU /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWRQGD\RI-XQH DERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\KDVUHVFLQGHG L WVLQWHQWLRQWRZLQGXSDQGGLVVROYH $3m overtime savings ‘negate’ airport fee rise FROM page 1B